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Sample records for high redshifts characterizing

  1. Galaxies at High Redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Fournon, I.; Balcells, M.; Moreno-Insertis, F.; Sánchez, F.

    2010-08-01

    Participants; Group photograph; Preface; Acknowledgements; 1. Galaxy formation and evolution: recent progress R. Ellis; 2. Galaxies at high redshift M. Dickinson; 3. High-redshift galaxies: the far-infrared and sub-millimeter view A. Franceschini; 4. Quasar absorption lines J. Bechtold; 5. Stellar population synthesis models at low and high redshift G. Bruzual A.; 6. Elliptical galaxies K. C. Freeman; 7. Disk galaxies K. C. Freeman; 8. Dark matter in disk galaxies K. C. Freeman.

  2. High Redshift Quasars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elvis, Martin S.

    1996-01-01

    The report for this period includes three papers: 'Associated Absorption at Low and High Redshift'; 'Strong X-ray Absorption in a Broad Absorption Line Quasar: PHL5200'; and 'ASCA and ROSAT X-ray Spectra of High-Redshift Radio-Loud Quasars'. The first gives examples from both low and high redshift for combining information on absorbing material in active galactic nuclei from both x-ray and the UV. The second presents ASCA observations of the z = 1.98 prototype broad absorption line quasar (BALQSO): PHL 5200, detected with both the solid-state imaging spectrometers and the gas imaging spectometers. The third paper presents results on the x-ray properties of 9 high-redshift radio-loud quasars observed by ASCA and ROSAT, including ASCA observations of S5 0014+81 (z = 3.38) and S5 0836+71 (z = 2.17) and ROSAT observations of PKS 2126-158.

  3. High Redshift GRBs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, Neil; Cannizzo, John K.

    2012-01-01

    The Swift mission has opened a new, high redshift window on the universe. In this review we provide an overview of gamma-ray burst (GRB) science, describe the Swift mission, discuss high-z GRBs and tools for high-z studies, and look forward at future capabilities. A new mission concept - Lobster - is described that would monitor the X-ray sky at order of magnitude higher sensitivity than current missions.

  4. High redshift GRBs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehrels, Neil; Cannizzo, John K.

    2012-09-01

    The Swift mission has opened a new, high redshift window on the universe. In this review we provide an overview of gamma-ray burst (GRB) science, describe the Swift mission, discuss high-z GRBs and tools for high-z studies, and look forward at future capabilities. A new mission concept - Lobster - is described that would monitor the X-ray sky at order of magnitude higher sensitivity than current missions.

  5. High-redshift cosmography

    SciTech Connect

    Vitagliano, Vincenzo; Xia, Jun-Qing; Liberati, Stefano; Viel, Matteo E-mail: xia@sissa.it E-mail: viel@oats.inaf.it

    2010-03-01

    We constrain the parameters describing the kinematical state of the universe using a cosmographic approach, which is fundamental in that it requires a very minimal set of assumptions (namely to specify a metric) and does not rely on the dynamical equations for gravity. On the data side, we consider the most recent compilations of Supernovae and Gamma Ray Bursts catalogues. This allows to further extend the cosmographic fit up to z = 6.6, i.e. up to redshift for which one could start to resolve the low z degeneracy among competing cosmological models. In order to reliably control the cosmographic approach at high redshifts, we adopt the expansion in the improved parameter y = z/(1+z). This series has the great advantage to hold also for z > 1 and hence it is the appropriate tool for handling data including non-nearby distance indicators. We find that Gamma Ray Bursts, probing higher redshifts than Supernovae, have constraining power and do require (and statistically allow) a cosmographic expansion at higher order than Supernovae alone. Exploiting the set of data from Union and GRBs catalogues, we show (for the first time in a purely cosmographic approach parametrized by deceleration q{sub 0}, jerk j{sub 0}, snap s{sub 0}) a definitively negative deceleration parameter q{sub 0} up to the 3σ confidence level. We present also forecasts for realistic data sets that are likely to be obtained in the next few years.

  6. High redshift radio galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccarthy, Patrick J.

    1993-01-01

    High redshift galaxies that host powerful radio sources are examined. An overview is presented of the content of radio surveys: 3CR and 3CRR, 4C and 4C/USS, B2/1 Jy, MG, MRC/1Jy, Parkes/PSR, B3, and ESO Key-Project. Narrow-line radio galaxies in the visible and UV, the source of ionization and excitation of the emission lines, emission-line luminosities, morphology of the line-emitting gas, physical properties and energetics, kinematics of the line-emitting gas, and implications from the emission lines are discussed. The morphologies and environments of the host galaxies, the alignment effect, and spectral energy distributions and ages are also examined.

  7. Galaxies at High Redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, F. E.

    2014-10-01

    Recent years have seen tremendous progress in finding and charactering star-forming galaxies at high redshifts across the electromagnetic spectrum, giving us a more complete picture of how galaxies evolve, both in terms of their stellar and gas content, as well as the growth of their central supermassive black holes. A wealth of studies now demonstrate that star formation peaked at roughly half the age of the Universe and drops precariously as we look back to very early times, and that their central monsters apparently growth with them. At the highest-redshifts, we are pushing the boundaries via deep surveys at optical, X-ray, radio wavelengths, and more recently using gamma-ray bursts. I will review some of our accomplishments and failures. Telescope have enabled Lyman break galaxies to be robustly identified, but the UV luminosity function and star formation rate density of this population at z = 6 - 8 seems to be much lower than at z = 2 - 4. High escape fractions and a large contribution from faint galaxies below our current detection limits would be required for star-forming galaxies to reionize the Universe. We have also found that these galaxies have blue rest-frame UV colours, which might indicate lower dust extinction at z > 5. There has been some spectroscopic confirmation of these Lyman break galaxies through Lyman-α emission, but the fraction of galaxies where we see this line drops at z > 7, perhaps due to the onset of the Gunn-Peterson effect (where the IGM is opaque to Lyman-α).

  8. Metals at high redshifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petitjean, Patrick

    The amount of metals present in the Universe and its cosmological evolution is a key issue for our understanding of how star formation proceeds from the collapse of the first objects to the formation of present day galaxies. We discuss here recent results at the two extremes of the density scale. 1. Part of the tenuous intergalactic medium (IGM) revealed by neutral hydrogen absorptions in the spectra of remote quasars (the so-called Lyman-α forest) contains metals. This is not surprising as there is a close interplay between the formation of galaxies and the evolution of the IGM. The IGM acts as the baryonic reservoir from which galaxies form, while star formation in the forming galaxies strongly influences the IGM by enrichment with metals and the emission of ionizing radiation. The spatial distribution of metals in the IGM is largely unknown however. The possibility remains that metals are associated with the filaments and sheets of the dark matter spatial distribution where stars are expected to form, whereas the space delineated by these features remains unpolluted. 2. Damped Lyman-α (DLA) systems observed in the spectra of high-redshift quasars are considered as the progenitors of present-day galaxies. Indeed, the large neutral hydrogen column densities observed and the presence of metals imply that the gas is somehow closely associated with regions of star formation. The nature of the absorbing objects is unclear however. It is probable that very different objects contribute to this population of absorption systems. Here we concentrate on summarizing the properties of the gas: presence of dust in small amount; nucleosynthesis signature and lack of H_2 molecules. The presence of H_2 molecules has been investigated in the course of a mini-survey with UVES at the VLT. The upper limits on the molecular fraction, f = 2N(H_2)/(2N(H_2)+N(HI)), derived in eight systems are in the range 1.2 ×10^-7 - 1.6 × 10^-5. There is no evidence in this sample for any

  9. Obscured AGN at High Redshift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the obscured sources of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) in the universe at high redshift. The cosmic X-ray background, unified models of AGN and clues to galaxy formation/evolution is the motivation for this study.

  10. Dusty Quasars at High Redshifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weedman, Daniel; Sargsyan, Lusine

    2016-09-01

    A population of quasars at z ˜ 2 is determined based on dust luminosities νL ν (7.8 μm) that includes unobscured, partially obscured, and obscured quasars. Quasars are classified by the ratio νL ν (0.25 μm)/νL ν (7.8 μm) = UV/IR, assumed to measure obscuration of UV luminosity by the dust that produces IR luminosity. Quasar counts at rest-frame 7.8 μm are determined for quasars in the Boötes field of the NOAO Deep Wide Field Survey using 24 μm sources with optical redshifts from the AGN and Galaxy Evolution Survey (AGES) or infrared redshifts from the Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph. Spectral energy distributions are extended to far-infrared wavelengths using observations from the Herschel Space Observatory Spectral and Photometric Imaging Receiver (SPIRE), and new SPIRE photometry is presented for 77 high-redshift quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. It is found that unobscured and obscured quasars have similar space densities at rest-frame 7.8 μm, but the ratio L ν (100 μm)/L ν (7.8 μm) is about three times higher for obscured quasars than for unobscured, so that far-infrared or submillimeter quasar detections are dominated by obscured quasars. We find that only ˜5% of high-redshift submillimeter sources are quasars and that existing 850 μm surveys or 2 mm surveys should already have detected sources at z ˜ 10 if quasar and starburst luminosity functions remain the same from z = 2 until z = 10.

  11. High Redshift Gamma Ray Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, Neil

    2012-01-01

    The Swift Observatory has been detecting 100 gamma-ray bursts per year for 7 years and has greatly stimulated the field with new findings. Observations are made of the X-ray and optical afterglow from 1 minute after the burst, continuing for days. GRBs are providing a new tool to study the high redshift universe. Swift has detected several events at z>5 and one at z=9.4 giving information on metallicity, star formation rate and reionization. The talk will present the latest results.

  12. IONIZED NITROGEN AT HIGH REDSHIFT

    SciTech Connect

    Decarli, R.; Walter, F.; Neri, R.; Cox, P.; Bertoldi, F.; Carilli, C.; Kneib, J. P.; Lestrade, J. F.; Maiolino, R.; Omont, A.; Richard, J.; Riechers, D.; Thanjavur, K.; Weiss, A.

    2012-06-10

    We present secure [N II]{sub 205{mu}m} detections in two millimeter-bright, strongly lensed objects at high redshift, APM 08279+5255 (z = 3.911) and MM 18423+5938 (z = 3.930), using the IRAM Plateau de Bure Interferometer. Due to its ionization energy [N II]{sub 205{mu}m} is a good tracer of the ionized gas phase in the interstellar medium. The measured fluxes are S([N II]{sub 205{mu}m}) = (4.8 {+-} 0.8) Jy km s{sup -1} and (7.4 {+-} 0.5) Jy km s{sup -1}, respectively, yielding line luminosities of L([N II]{sub 205{mu}m}) = (1.8 {+-} 0.3) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} {mu}{sup -1} L{sub Sun} for APM 08279+5255 and L([N II]{sub 205{mu}m}) = (2.8 {+-} 0.2) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} {mu}{sup -1} L{sub Sun} for MM 18423+5938. Our high-resolution map of the [N II]{sub 205{mu}m} and 1 mm continuum emission in MM 18423+5938 clearly resolves an Einstein ring in this source and reveals a velocity gradient in the dynamics of the ionized gas. A comparison of these maps with high-resolution EVLA CO observations enables us to perform the first spatially resolved study of the dust continuum-to-molecular gas surface brightness ({Sigma}{sub FIR}{proportional_to}{Sigma}{sup N}{sub CO}, which can be interpreted as the star formation law) in a high-redshift object. We find a steep relation (N = 1.4 {+-} 0.2), consistent with a starbursting environment. We measure a [N II]{sub 205{mu}m}/FIR luminosity ratio in APM 08279+5255 and MM 18423+5938 of 9.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6} and 5.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6}, respectively. This is in agreement with the decrease of the [N II]{sub 205{mu}m}/FIR ratio at high FIR luminosities observed in local galaxies.

  13. Imaging of Three Possible Low-redshift Analogs to High-redshift Compact Red Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, Hsin-Yi; Stockton, Alan

    2011-05-01

    As part of a larger program to identify and characterize possible low-redshift analogs to massive compact red galaxies found at high redshift, we have examined the morphologies of three low-redshift compact galaxies drawn from the sample of Trujillo et al. Using deeper and higher resolution images, we have found faint and relatively extensive outer structures in addition to the compact cores identified in the earlier measurements. One object appears to have a small companion that may be involved in an ongoing minor merger of the sort that could be responsible for building up the outer parts of these galaxies. The ages of the dominant stellar populations in these objects are found to be around 2-4 Gyr, in good agreement with the previous estimates. The presence of diffuse outer structures in these galaxies indicates that truly compact and massive red galaxies are exceedingly rare at low redshift. The relatively young stellar populations suggest that the accretion of the extensive outer material must occur essentially universally on relatively short timescales of a few billion years or less. These results confirm and extend previous suggestions that the driving mechanism behind the size evolution of high-redshift compact galaxies cannot be highly stochastic processes such as major mergers, which would inevitably leave a non-negligible fraction of survivors at low redshift.

  14. Moderate resolution spectrophotometry of high redshift quasars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Donald P.; Schmidt, Maarten; Gunn, James E.

    1991-01-01

    A uniform set of photometry and high signal-to-noise moderate resolution spectroscopy of 33 quasars with redshifts larger than 3.1 is presented. The sample consists of 17 newly discovered quasars (two with redshifts in excess of 4.4) and 16 sources drawn from the literature. The objects in this sample have r magnitudes between 17.4 and 21.4; their luminosities range from -28.8 to -24.9. Three of the 33 objects are broad absorption line quasars. A number of possible high redshift damped Ly-alpha systems were found.

  15. Astronomical redshifts of highly ionized regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Peter M.

    2014-07-01

    Astronomical or cosmological redshifts are an observable property of extragalactic objects and have historically been wholly attributed to the recessional velocity of that object. The question of other, or intrinsic, components of the redshift has been highly controversial since it was first proposed. This paper investigates one theoretical source of intrinsic redshift that has been identified. The highly ionized regions of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) and Quasi-Stellar Objects (QSO) are, by definition, plasmas. All plasmas have electromagnetic scattering characteristics that could contribute to the observed redshift. To investigate this possibility, one region of a generalized AGN was selected, the so called Broad Line Region (BLR). Even though unresolvable with current instrumentation, physical estimates of this region have been published for years in the astronomical literature. These data, selected and then averaged, are used to construct an overall model that is consistent with the published data to within an order of magnitude. The model is then subjected to a theoretical scattering investigation. The results suggest that intrinsic redshifts, derivable from the characteristics of the ambient plasma, may indeed contribute to the overall observed redshift of these objects.

  16. Simulation of High-Redshift Galactic Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Robert J.; Scannapieco, E.; Windhorst, R. A.; Thacker, R.

    2009-12-01

    We construct an observational model of galaxies at high redshifts (z 3 - 13) from numerical N-body and SPH simulations of galaxy formation using the computing cluster "Saguaro” at Arizona State University. The model uses a concordance Lambda-CDM model including baryonic components with gas heating and cooling and star formation using Gadget-2 simulations. Snapshots at various redshifts yield star "particles” (populations) with a modeled metallicity and age of formation. The Bruzual-Charlot '03 stellar population models are used to compute a red-shifted flux for various filters for each simulated star population. The flux and spatial coordinates are then used to create a pixel image in a fits file format. The different redshift "slices” are shifted randomly in the simulation periodic box, and resized according to the comoving distance to correct for the angular pixel mapping. The various redshift corrected fits images are then combined into a single image for each filter to produce simulated observational images. This is to enable the use of observational imaging tools to detect galaxies and to aid observational proposals at high redshifts including the new WFC3 camera to be installed on the HST. This method also permits estimates of the luminosity function at z >6 directly from the simulated stellar populations rather than just the size of the Dark Matter haloes. With runs of higher resolution, this will permit exploration of the faint end of the luminosity function. The computing time was supplied by the ASU Fulton HPC center.

  17. Flaring γ-Ray Emission from High Redshift Blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orienti, Monica; D'Ammando, Filippo; Giroletti, Marcello; Finke, Justin; Dallacasa, Daniele

    2016-09-01

    High redshift blazars are among the most powerful objects in the Universe. Although they represent a significant fraction of the extragalactic hard X-ray sky, they are not commonly detected in gamma-rays. High redshift (z>2) objects represent <10 per cent of the AGN population observed by Fermi so far, and gamma-ray flaring activity from these sources is even more uncommon. The characterization of the radio-to-gamma-ray properties of high redshift blazars represent a powerful tool for the study of both the energetics of such extreme objects and the Extragalactic Background Light. We present results of a multi-band campaign on TXS 0536+145, which is the highest redshift flaring gamma-ray blazar detected so far. At the peak of the flare the source reached an apparent isotropic gamma-ray luminosity of 6.6x10^49 erg/s, which is comparable with the luminosity observed from the most powerful blazars. The physical properties derived from the multi-wavelength observations are then compared with those shown by the high redshift population. In addition preliminary results from the high redshift flaring blazar PKS 2149-306 will be discussed.

  18. High redshift quasars and high metallicities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferland, Gary J.

    1997-01-01

    A large-scale code called Cloudy was designed to simulate non-equilibrium plasmas and predict their spectra. The goal was to apply it to studies of galactic and extragalactic emission line objects in order to reliably deduce abundances and luminosities. Quasars are of particular interest because they are the most luminous objects in the universe and the highest redshift objects that can be observed spectroscopically, and their emission lines can reveal the composition of the interstellar medium (ISM) of the universe when it was well under a billion years old. The lines are produced by warm (approximately 10(sup 4)K) gas with moderate to low density (n less than or equal to 10(sup 12) cm(sup -3)). Cloudy has been extended to include approximately 10(sup 4) resonance lines from the 495 possible stages of ionization of the lightest 30 elements, an extension that required several steps. The charge transfer database was expanded to complete the needed reactions between hydrogen and the first four ions and fit all reactions with a common approximation. Radiative recombination rate coefficients were derived for recombination from all closed shells, where this process should dominate. Analytical fits to Opacity Project (OP) and other recent photoionization cross sections were produced. Finally, rescaled OP oscillator strengths were used to compile a complete set of data for 5971 resonance lines. The major discovery has been that high redshift quasars have very high metallicities and there is strong evidence that the quasar phenomenon is associated with the birth of massive elliptical galaxies.

  19. SCUBA Observations of High Redshift Radio Galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Reuland, M; Rottgering, H; van Breugel, W

    2003-03-11

    High redshift radio galaxies (HzRGs) are key targets for studies of the formation and evolution of massive galaxies.The role of dust in these processes is uncertain. We have therefore observed the dust continuum emission from a sample of z > 3 radio galaxies with the SCUBA bolometer array. We confirm and strengthen the result found by Archibald et al. (1), that HzRGs are massive starforming systems and that submillimeter detection rate appears to be primarily a strong function of redshift. We also observed HzRG-candidates that have so far eluded spectroscopic redshift determination. Four of these have been detected, and provide evidence that they may be extremely obscured radio galaxies, possibly in an early stage of their evolution.

  20. Stars and gas in high redshift galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettini, Max

    Recent advances in instrumentation and observing techniques have made it possible to begin to study in detail the stellar populations and the interstellar media of galaxies at redshift z=3, when the universe was still in its "teen years". In keeping with the theme of this conference, I show how our knowledge of local star-forming regions can be applied directly to these distant galaxies to deduce their ages, metallicities, initial mass function, and masses. I also discuss areas where current limitations in stellar astrophysics have a direct bearing on the interpretation of the data being gathered, at an ever increasing rate, on the high redshift universe.

  1. Redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huchra, J.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    The redshift (or blueshift) of an object is the displacement of its spectral features to longer (or shorter) wavelengths due to a combination of the gravitational redshift, Doppler motions and the general expansion of the Universe. More properly, the term RADIAL VELOCITY is used primarily for the Doppler motions, which are usually the result of gravitational interactions, while redshift is reserv...

  2. High Energy Continuum of High Redshift Quasars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elvis, Martin

    2000-01-01

    Discussion with the RXTE team at GSFC showed that a sufficiently accurate background subtraction procedure had now, been derived for sources at the flux level of PKS 2126-158. However this solution does not apply to observations carried out before April 1997, including our observation. The prospect of an improved solution becoming available soon is slim. As a result the RXTE team agreed to re-observe PKS2126-158. The new observation was carried out in April 1999. Quasi-simultaneous optical observations were obtained, as Service observing., at the 4-meter Anglo-Australian Telescope, and ftp-ed from the AAT on 22April. The RXTE data was processed in late June, arriving at SAO in early July. Coincidentally, our collaborative Beppo-SAX observation of PKS2126-158 was made later in 1999, and a GTO Chandra observation (with which we are involved) was made on November 16. Since this gives us a unique monitoring data for a high redshift quasar over a broad pass-band we are now combining all three observations into a single comprehensive study Final publication of the RXTE data will thus take place under another grant.

  3. Finding high-redshift voids using Lyman α forest tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stark, Casey W.; Font-Ribera, Andreu; White, Martin; Lee, Khee-Gan

    2015-11-01

    We present a new method of finding cosmic voids using tomographic maps of Lyα forest flux. We identify cosmological voids with radii of 2-12 h-1 Mpc in a large N-body simulation at z = 2.5, and characterize the signal of the high-redshift voids in density and Lyα forest flux. The void properties are similar to what has been found at lower redshifts, but they are smaller and have steeper radial density profiles. Similarly to what has been found for low-redshift voids, the radial velocity profiles have little scatter and agree very well with the linear theory prediction. We run the same void finder on an ideal Lyα flux field and tomographic reconstructions at various spatial samplings. We compare the tomographic map void catalogues to the density void catalogue and find good agreement even with modest-sized voids (r > 6 h-1 Mpc). Using our simple void-finding method, the configuration of the ongoing COSMOS Lyman Alpha Mapping And Tomography Observations (CLAMATO) survey covering 1 deg2 would provide a sample of about 100 high-redshift voids. We also provide void-finding forecasts for larger area surveys, and discuss how these void samples can be used to test modified gravity models, study high-redshift void galaxies, and to make an Alcock-Paczynski measurement. To aid future work in this area, we provide public access to our simulation products, catalogues, and sample tomographic flux maps.

  4. Morphologies at High Redshift from Galaxy Zoo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masters, Karen; Melvin, Tom; Simmons, Brooke; Willett, Kyle; Lintott, Chris

    2015-08-01

    I will present results from Galaxy Zoo classification of galaxies observed in public observed frame optical HST surveys (e.g. COSMOS, GOODS) as well as in observed frame NIR with (ie. CANDELS). Early science results from these classifications have investigated the changing bar fraction in disc galaxies as a function of redshift (to z~1 in Melvin et al. 2014; and at z>1 in Simmons et al. 2015), as well as how the morphologies of galaxies on the red sequence have been changing since z~1 (Melvin et al. in prep.). These unique dataset of quantitative visual classifications for high redshift galaxies will be made public in forthcoming publications (planned as Willett et al. for Galaxy Zoo Hubble, and Simmons et al. for Galaxy Zoo CANDELS).

  5. Searches for high redshift radio galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    De Breuck, C.; Van Breugel, W.; Rottgering, H.; Miley, G.

    1997-05-05

    We have started a search for High Redshift Radio Galaxies (HZRGS) in an area covering 7 sr by selecting a sample of Ultra Steep Spectrum (USS) sources with a low flux density cut-off S1400 > 10 mJy and a steep spectral index cut-off of a < -1.3 (S of about nu-alpha) from the WENSS, NVSS and TEXAS surveys. Our first results for 27 sources show that we are almost twice as effective in finding HZRGs than than surveys of relatively bright radio sources with a spectral index cut-off of a < - 1.0. The redshift distribution is consistent with an extension of the z - a relation to a < -1.3, but a large fraction of our sample (40%) consists of objects which are too faint to observe with 3-4 m class telescopes. Our search is aimed at increasing the number of very high redshift radio galaxies for further detailed studies of the formation and evolution of massive galaxies and their environment.

  6. Dust Emission from High-Redshift QSOs.

    PubMed

    Carilli; Bertoldi; Menten; Rupen; Kreysa; Fan; Strauss; Schneider; Bertarini; Yun; Zylka

    2000-04-10

    We present detections of emission at 250 GHz (1.2 mm) from two high-redshift QSOs from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey sample using the bolometer array at the IRAM 30 m telescope. The sources are SDSSp 015048.83+004126.2 at z=3.7 and SDSSp J033829.31+002156.3 at z=5.0; the latter is the third highest redshift QSO known and the highest redshift millimeter-emitting source yet identified. We also present deep radio continuum imaging of these two sources at 1.4 GHz using the Very Large Array. The combination of centimeter and millimeter observations indicate that the 250 GHz emission is most likely thermal dust emission, with implied dust masses approximately 108 M middle dot in circle. We consider possible dust heating mechanisms, including UV emission from the active galactic nucleus (AGN) and a massive starburst concurrent with the AGN, with implied star formation rates greater than 103 M middle dot in circle yr-1. PMID:10727380

  7. Jets in AGN at extremely high redshifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurvits, Leonid I.; Frey, Sándor; Paragi, Zsolt

    2015-03-01

    The jet phenomenon is a trademark of active galactic nuclei (AGN). In most general terms, the current understanding of this phenomenon explains the jet appearance by effects of relativistic plasma physics. The fundamental source of energy that feeds the plasma flow is believed to be the gravitational field of a central supermassive black hole. While the mechanism of energy transfer and a multitude of effects controlling the plasma flow are yet to be understood, major properties of jets are strikingly similar in a broad range of scales from stellar to galactic. They are supposed to be controlled by a limited number of physical parameters, such as the mass of a central black hole and its spin, magnetic field induction and accretion rate. In a very simplified sense, these parameters define the formation of a typical core-jet structure observed at radio wavelengths in the region of the innermost central tens of parsecs in AGN. These core-jet structures are studied in the radio domain by Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) with milli- and sub-milliarcsecond angular resolution. Such structures are detectable at a broad range of redshifts. If observed at a fixed wavelength, a typical core-jet AGN morphology would appear as having a steep-spectrum jet fading away with the increasing redshift while a flat-spectrum core becoming more dominant. If core-jet AGN constitute the same population of objects throughout the redshift space, the apparent ``prominence'' of jets at higher redshifts must decrease (Gurvits 1999): well pronounced jets at high z must appear less frequent than at low z.

  8. Highly ionised absorbers at high redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergeron, Jacqueline; Herbert-Fort, Stéphane

    2005-03-01

    We build a sample of O VI absorption systems in the redshift range 2.0 ≲ z ≲ 2.6 using high spectral resolution data of ten quasars from the VLT-UVES large programme. We investigate the existence of a metal-rich O VI population and define observational criteria for this class of absorbers under the assumption of photoionisation. The low temperatures of nearly half of all O VI absorbers, implied by their line widths, are too low for collisional ionisation to be a dominant process. We estimate the oxygen abundance under the assumption of photoionisation; a striking result is the bimodal distribution of [o/h] with median values close to 0.01 and 0.5 solar for the metal-poor and metal-rich populations, respectively. Using the line widths to fix the temperature or assuming a constant, low gas density does not drastically change the metallicities of the metal-rich population. We present the first estimate of the O VI column density distribution. Assuming a single power-law distribution, f(n) ∝ n-α, yields α ˜ 1.7 and a normalisation of f(n) =2.3× 10-13 at log n(O VI) ˜ 13.5, both with a ˜30% uncertainty. The value of α is similar to that found for C IV surveys, whereas the normalisation factor is about ten times higher. We use f(n) to derive the number density per unit z and cosmic density ωb(O VI), selecting a limited column density range not strongly affected by incompleteness or sample variance. Comparing our results with those obtained at z˜0.1 for a similar range of column densities implies some decline of dn/dz with z. The cosmic O VI density derived from f(n), ωb(O VI)≈ (3.5± 3.20.9) × 10-7, is 2.3 times higher than the value estimated using the observed O VI sample (of which the metal-rich population contributes ˜35%), easing the problem of missing metals at high z (˜ 1/4 of the produced metals) but not solving it. We find that the majori ty of the metal-rich absorbers are located within ˜ 450 km s-1 of strong Ly-α lines and show that

  9. Spectra of High-Redshift Type Ia Supernovae and a Comparison withtheir Low-Redshift Counterparts

    SciTech Connect

    Hook, I.M.; Howell, D.A.; Aldering, G.; Amanullah, R.; Burns,M.S.; Conley, A.; Deustua, S.E.; Ellis, R.; Fabbro, S.; Fadeyev, V.; Folatelli, G.; Garavini, G.; Gibbons, R.; Goldhaber, G.; Goobar, A.; Groom, D.E.; Kim, A.G.; Knop, R.A.; Kowalski, M.; Lidman, C.; Nobili, S.; Nugent, P.E.; Pain, R.; Pennypacker, C.R.; Perlmutter, S.; Ruiz-Lapuente,P.; Sainton, G.; Schaefer, B.E.; Smith, E.; Spadafora, A.L.; Stanishev,V.; Thomas, R.C.; Walton, N.A.; Wang, L.; Wood-Vasey, W.M.

    2005-07-20

    We present spectra for 14 high-redshift (0.17 < z < 0.83) supernovae, which were discovered by the Supernova Cosmology Project as part of a campaign to measure cosmological parameters. The spectra are used to determine the redshift and classify the supernova type, essential information if the supernovae are to be used for cosmological studies. Redshifts were derived either from the spectrum of the host galaxy or from the spectrum of the supernova itself. We present evidence that these supernovae are of Type Ia by matching to spectra of nearby supernovae. We find that the dates of the spectra relative to maximum light determined from this fitting process are consistent with the dates determined from the photometric light curves, and moreover the spectral time-sequence for SNe Type Ia at low and high redshift is indistinguishable. We also show that the expansion velocities measured from blueshifted Ca H&K are consistent with those measured for low-redshift Type Ia supernovae. From these first-level quantitative comparisons we find no evidence for evolution in SNIa properties between these low- and high-redshift samples. Thus even though our samples may not be complete, we conclude that there is a population of SNe Ia at high redshift whose spectral properties match those at low redshift.

  10. The Intergalactic Medium at High Redshifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furlanetto, Steven R.

    The intergalactic medium (IGM) contains >95% of the mass in the Universe at high redshifts, and its properties control the earliest phases of structure formation and the reionization process. Although its evolution may seem straightforward, a number of feedback mechanisms can dramatically affect it. Radiative feedback, through a Lyman-Werner background, an X-ray background, and photoionization, affect halo collapse and the clumping of the IGM. We describe how the redshifted 21 cm background can be used to study these effects. Chemical feedback, primarily through supernova winds, changes the modes of star formation and halo cooling; it can be studied through metal absorption lines with the JWST, as well as metal lines in the cosmic microwave background, direct observations of cooling radiation, and fossil evidence in the nearby Universe. Finally, we describe how uncertainties in our modeling of the IGM structure affect reionization models and observations. Detailed studies of helium reionization, which occurs at the much more accessible z˜3, will significantly improve these models over the next few years.

  11. Studying the high redshift Universe with Athena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, P. T.

    2016-04-01

    Athena is the second large mission selected in the ESA Cosmic Vision plan. With its large collecting area, high spectral-energy resolution (X-IFU instrument) and impressive grasp (WFI instrument), Athena will truly revolutionise X-ray astronomy. The most prodigious sources of high-energy photons are often transitory in nature. Athena will provide the sensitivity and spectral resolution coupled with rapid response to enable the study of the dynamic sky. Potential sources include: distant Gamma-Ray Bursts to probe the reionisation epoch and find ‘missing’ baryons in the cosmic web; tidal disruption events to reveal dormant supermassive and intermediate-mass black holes; and supernova explosions to understand progenitors and their environments.Using detailed simulations, we illustrate Athena’s extraordinary capabilities for transients out to the highest redshifts and show how it will be able to constrain the nature of explosive transients including gas metallicity and dynamics, constraining environments and progenitors.

  12. Broadband Observations of High Redshift Blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paliya, Vaidehi S.; Parker, M. L.; Fabian, A. C.; Stalin, C. S.

    2016-07-01

    We present a multi-wavelength study of four high redshift blazars, S5 0014+81 (z = 3.37), CGRaBS J0225+1846 (z = 2.69), BZQ J1430+4205 (z = 4.72), and 3FGL J1656.2-3303 (z = 2.40) using quasi-simultaneous data from the Swift, Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) and the Fermi-Large Area Telescope (LAT) and also archival XMM-Newton observations. Other than 3FGL J1656.2-3303, none of the sources were known as γ-ray emitters, and our analysis of ˜7.5 yr of LAT data reveals the first time detection of statistically significant γ-ray emission from CGRaBS J0225+1846. We generate the broadband spectral energy distributions (SED) of all the objects, centering at the epoch of NuSTAR observations and reproduce them using a one-zone leptonic emission model. The optical-UV emission in all the objects can be explained by radiation from the accretion disk, whereas the X-ray to γ-ray windows of the SEDs are found to be dominated by inverse Compton scattering off the broad line region photons. All of them host black holes that are billions of solar masses. Comparing the accretion disk luminosity and the jet power of these sources with a large sample of blazars, we find them to occupy a high disk luminosity-jet power regime. We also investigate the X-ray spectral properties of the sources in detail with a major focus on studying the causes of soft X-ray deficit, a feature generally seen in high redshift radio-loud quasars. We summarize that this feature could be explained based on the intrinsic curvature in the jet emission rather than being due to the external effects predicted in earlier studies, such as host galaxy and/or warm absorption.

  13. A new method to search for high-redshift clusters using photometric redshifts

    SciTech Connect

    Castignani, G.; Celotti, A.; Chiaberge, M.; Norman, C.

    2014-09-10

    We describe a new method (Poisson probability method, PPM) to search for high-redshift galaxy clusters and groups by using photometric redshift information and galaxy number counts. The method relies on Poisson statistics and is primarily introduced to search for megaparsec-scale environments around a specific beacon. The PPM is tailored to both the properties of the FR I radio galaxies in the Chiaberge et al. sample, which are selected within the COSMOS survey, and to the specific data set used. We test the efficiency of our method of searching for cluster candidates against simulations. Two different approaches are adopted. (1) We use two z ∼ 1 X-ray detected cluster candidates found in the COSMOS survey and we shift them to higher redshift up to z = 2. We find that the PPM detects the cluster candidates up to z = 1.5, and it correctly estimates both the redshift and size of the two clusters. (2) We simulate spherically symmetric clusters of different size and richness, and we locate them at different redshifts (i.e., z = 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0) in the COSMOS field. We find that the PPM detects the simulated clusters within the considered redshift range with a statistical 1σ redshift accuracy of ∼0.05. The PPM is an efficient alternative method for high-redshift cluster searches that may also be applied to both present and future wide field surveys such as SDSS Stripe 82, LSST, and Euclid. Accurate photometric redshifts and a survey depth similar or better than that of COSMOS (e.g., I < 25) are required.

  14. Individual QSOs, Groups, & Clusters of High Redshift QSOs Associated with Low Redshift Spiral Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burbidge, Geoffrey; Napier, W.

    2009-01-01

    Starting more than forty years ago it was found by Arp and others that many high redshift QSOs lie very close to comparatively nearby spiral galaxies. As time has gone on the implication of these results have been ignored. Implicitly they have been assumed to be accidental configurations. By now there are so many data, sometimes involving clusters of high z QSOs, that the data requires re-examination. We have done this using conservative statistical methods. We have concluded that the physical associations are real and thus it appears that QSOs are being ejected from spiral galaxies which often show other aspects of activity. Some examples of these phenomena will be described. Thus despite the fact that most investigators continue to use QSOs for cosmological investigations, the results are doomed to failure. Even more important the nature of the high redshifts of QSOs (but not the redshifts of normal galaxies) remains a puzzle yet to be solved.

  15. Properties of High Redshift Galaxies in the ELTs Era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greggio, Laura; Gullieuszik, Marco; Falomo, Renato; Fantinel, Daniela; Uslenghi, Michela

    2015-08-01

    The extraordinary sensitivity and spatial resolution of the future Extremely Large Telescopes will allow us to characterize the photometric and structural properties of high redshift galaxies, in spite of their small size. In this contribution we present a quantitative analysis of these capabilities thorugh the generation of a large set of simulated images, and their subsequent analysis with GALFIT. In particular, we assess the accuracy with which it will be possible to measure the basic galaxy parameters: Sersic index, half light radius and total magnitude. The simulations adopt the expected performances of the near-IR imagers MICADO at the E-ELT for galaxies at z ~ 2 and z ~ 3, spanning a mass range from 10^9 to 10^11 solar masses, and whose sizes, magnitudes and colors are obtained from presently available scaling relations for high redshift objects. It turns out that with such future facility it will be possible to derive both accurate photometry and detailed morphology for very distant galaxies, that are mandatory to probe fundamental problems on the processes of galaxy formation and evolution. These results are also compared with the expected capabilities of NIRcam at JWST.

  16. Stellar Population Maps of High-Redshift Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fetherolf, Tara; Reddy, Naveen; MOSDEF

    2016-06-01

    A comprehensive study of resolved galaxy structure can shed light on the formation and evolution of galactic properties, such as the distribution of stars and interstellar dust that obscures starlight. This requires high-resolution, multi-waveband photometry and spectroscopy to completely characterize the galaxies. Previous studies lacked key spectroscopic information, were comprised of small samples, or focused on the local universe. We use HST ACS/WFC3 high-resolution, multi-waveband imaging from the CANDELS project in parallel with moderate-resolution Keck I MOSFIRE spectra from the MOSFIRE Deep Evolution Field (MOSDEF) survey to produce resolved stellar population and dust maps of ~500 galaxies at redshifts 1.4 < z < 2.6—covering the key epoch when galaxies accreted most of their mass. For data preparation and analysis we develop an automated Python program to process our large, comprehensive dataset. From the multi-waveband imaging and spectroscopic redshifts, we model the spectral energy distribution for every resolution element within each galaxy and compare these results to the spectroscopically measured global properties. From our stellar population and dust maps we identify resolved structures within these galaxies. We also investigate if spectroscopically measured galaxy properties are biased when compared with that of localized sub-galactic structures.

  17. Photometric Properties of the Most Massive High-Redshift Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Brant; Li, Yuexing; Cox, Thomas J.; Hernquist, Lars; Hopkins, Philip F.

    2007-09-01

    We calculate the observable properties of the most massive high-redshift galaxies in the hierarchical formation scenario where stellar spheroid and supermassive black hole growth are fueled by gas-rich mergers. Combining high-resolution hydrodynamical simulations of the hierarchical formation of a z~6 quasar, stellar population synthesis models, template active galactic nucleus (AGN) spectra, prescriptions for interstellar and intergalactic absorption, and the response of modern telescopes, the photometric evolution of galaxies destined to host z~6 quasars is modeled at redshifts z~4-14. These massive galaxies, with enormous stellar masses of M*~1011.5-1012 Msolar and star formation rates of SFR~103-104 Msolar yr-1 at z>~7, satisfy a variety of photometric selection criteria based on Lyman break techniques, including V-band dropouts at z>~5, i-band dropouts at z>~6, and z-band dropouts at z>~7. The observability of the most massive high-redshift galaxies is assessed and compared with a wide range of existing and proposed photometric surveys, including the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey (GOODS)/Hubble Ultra Deep Field (HUDF), National Optical Astronomy Observatory Deep Wide-Field Survey (NDWFS), UKIRT Infared Deep Sky Survey (UKIDSS), Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) Shallow Survey, Ultradeep Visible and Infrared Survey Telescope for Astronomy (VISTA), Dark Universe Explorer (DUNE), Panoramic Survey Telescope and Rapid Response System (Pan-STARRS), Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST), and Supernova/Acceleration Probe (SNAP). Massive stellar spheroids descended from z~6 quasars will likely be detected at z~4 by existing surveys, but owing to their low number densities the discovery of quasar progenitor galaxies at z>7 will likely require future surveys of large portions of the sky (>~0.5%) at wavelengths λ>~1 μm. The detection of rare, starbursting, massive galaxies at redshifts z>~6 would provide support for the

  18. Infrared/optical energy distributions of high redshifted quasars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soifer, B. T.; Neugebauer, G.; Oke, J. B.; Matthews, K.; Lacy, J. H.

    1982-01-01

    Measurements at 1.2, 1.6 and 2.2 microns were combined with visual spectrophotometry of 21 quasars having redshifts z or = 2.66. The primary result is that the rest frame visual/ultraviolet continua of the high redshift quasars are well described by a sum of a power law continuum with slope of approximately -0.4 and a 3000 A bump. The rest frame visual/ultraviolet continua of these quasars are quite similar to that of 3C273, the archetype of low redshift quasars. There does not appear to be any visual/ultraviolet properties distinguishing high redshift quasars selected via visual or radio techniques.

  19. Early Star Formation and High-Redshift Quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietrich, Matthias; Peterson, B. M.

    2007-12-01

    We are investigating for a sample of about 30 high-redshift quasars, with redshifts up to z=6, the gas chemical metallicity based on emission line ratios and employing the FeII UV/MgII line ratio, we probe the differential metal enrichment timescale between iron and alpha-elements at these early epochs. The quasars show enhanced solar metallicities ( 5 times solar) in their broad emission-line region and no indication of a metallicity evolution up to redshifts z=6. The measured FeII UV/MgII ratios range from 3 to 5, typical for high redshift quasars, with a weighted mean of about 4. However, there is a weak tendency for a lower mean ratio at z>4.7. For the first time, we will compare the gas metallicity and the FeII UV/MgII ratio for high redshift quasars. In concert, the gas metallicity, the FeII UV/MgII ratio, and model-based estimated time scales for enriching the gas and building up the super-massive black holes suggest that a violent episode of star formation and the main growth of the black hole occur roughly contemporaneously beginning at redshifts z = 8 to 13. Support for this work was provided by NASA through grant HST-GO-10792 from the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555.

  20. Lyman Break Analogs: Constraints on the Formation of Extreme Starbursts at Low and High Redshift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goncalves, Thiago S.; Overzier, Roderik; Basu-Zych, Antara; Martin, D. Christopher

    2011-01-01

    Lyman Break Analogs (LBAs), characterized by high far-UV luminosities and surface brightnesses as detected by GALEX, are intensely star-forming galaxies in the low-redshift universe (z approximately equal to 0.2), with star formation rates reaching up to 50 times that of the Milky Way. These objects present metallicities, morphologies and other physical properties similar to higher redshift Lyman Break Galaxies (LBGs), motivating the detailed study of LBAs as local laboratories of this high-redshift galaxy population. We present results from our recent integral-field spectroscopy survey of LBAs with Keck/OSIRIS, which shows that these galaxies have the same nebular gas kinematic properties as high-redshift LBGs. We argue that such kinematic studies alone are not an appropriate diagnostic to rule out merger events as the trigger for the observed starburst. Comparison between the kinematic analysis and morphological indices from HST imaging illustrates the difficulties of properly identifying (minor or major) merger events, with no clear correlation between the results using either of the two methods. Artificial redshifting of our data indicates that this problem becomes even worse at high redshift due to surface brightness dimming and resolution loss. Whether mergers could generate the observed kinematic properties is strongly dependent on gas fractions in these galaxies. We present preliminary results of a CARMA survey for LBAs and discuss the implications of the inferred molecular gas masses for formation models.

  1. High redshift QSOs and the x ray background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Impey, Chris

    1993-01-01

    ROSAT pointed observations were made of 9 QSO's from the Large Bright Quasar Survey (LBQS). The LBQS is based on machine measurement of objective prism plates taken with the UK Schmidt Telescope. Software has been used to select QSO's by both color and by the presence of spectral features and continuum breaks. The probability of detection can be calculated as a function of magnitude, redshift and spectral features, and the completeness of the survey can be accurately estimated. Nine out of 1040 QSO's in the LBQS have z greater than 3. The observations will provide an important data point in the X-ray luminosity function of QSO's at high redshift. The QSO's with z greater than 3 span less than a magnitude in M(sub B), so can be combined as a homogeneous sample. This analysis is only possible with a sample drawn from a large and complete catalog such as the LBQS. Four of the 9 QSO's that were observed with the ROSAT PSPC for this proposal were detected, including one of the most luminous X-ray sources ever observed. The April 1992 version of the PROS DETECT package was used to reduce the data. The results have been used to search for evolution of the X-ray properties of QSO's in redshift. The 9 QSO's lie in the range -28.7 less than M(sub B) less than -27.8. When combined with data for 16 QSO's in a similar luminosity range at lower redshift correlations with luminosity and redshift can be separated out. The LBQS sample also yields a new constraint on the contribution of high redshift QSO's to the X-ray background. An initial requirement is knowledge of the X-ray properties (alpha(sub OX)) as a function of redshift. Integration over the evolving luminosity function of the LBQS then gives the QSO contribution to the source counts.

  2. Gravitational microlensing of high-redshift supernovae by compact objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rauch, Kevin P.

    1991-01-01

    An analysis of the effect of microlensing by a cosmologically dominant density of compact objects is performed, using high-redshift Type Ia supernovae (SN Ia's) as probes. The compact objects are modeled as a three-dimensional distribution of point masses, and Monte Carlo simulations are done to calculate the resulting amplification probability distributions for several column densities and cosmologies. By combining these distributions with the intrinsic SN Ia luminosity function and comparing with the results for a perfectly smooth universe, estimates are made of the number of supernovae that would need to be observed to confirm or rule out this lensing scenario. It is found that about 1000 SN Ia's with redshifts of z = 1 would be needed to perform this test, which is beyond what current searches can hope to accomplish. Observations of many fewer high-redshift supernovae, used merely as standard candles, appears a promising way of distinguishing between different cosmological models.

  3. Detectability of Gravitational Waves from High-Redshift Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosado, Pablo A.; Lasky, Paul D.; Thrane, Eric; Zhu, Xingjiang; Mandel, Ilya; Sesana, Alberto

    2016-03-01

    Recent nondetection of gravitational-wave backgrounds from pulsar timing arrays casts further uncertainty on the evolution of supermassive black hole binaries. We study the capabilities of current gravitational-wave observatories to detect individual binaries and demonstrate that, contrary to conventional wisdom, some are, in principle, detectable throughout the Universe. In particular, a binary with rest-frame mass ≳1010M⊙ can be detected by current timing arrays at arbitrarily high redshifts. The same claim will apply for less massive binaries with more sensitive future arrays. As a consequence, future searches for nanohertz gravitational waves could be expanded to target evolving high-redshift binaries. We calculate the maximum distance at which binaries can be observed with pulsar timing arrays and other detectors, properly accounting for redshift and using realistic binary waveforms.

  4. Detectability of Gravitational Waves from High-Redshift Binaries.

    PubMed

    Rosado, Pablo A; Lasky, Paul D; Thrane, Eric; Zhu, Xingjiang; Mandel, Ilya; Sesana, Alberto

    2016-03-11

    Recent nondetection of gravitational-wave backgrounds from pulsar timing arrays casts further uncertainty on the evolution of supermassive black hole binaries. We study the capabilities of current gravitational-wave observatories to detect individual binaries and demonstrate that, contrary to conventional wisdom, some are, in principle, detectable throughout the Universe. In particular, a binary with rest-frame mass ≳10^{10}M_{⊙} can be detected by current timing arrays at arbitrarily high redshifts. The same claim will apply for less massive binaries with more sensitive future arrays. As a consequence, future searches for nanohertz gravitational waves could be expanded to target evolving high-redshift binaries. We calculate the maximum distance at which binaries can be observed with pulsar timing arrays and other detectors, properly accounting for redshift and using realistic binary waveforms. PMID:27015470

  5. A Catalog of Candidate High-redshift Blazars for GLAST

    SciTech Connect

    Arias, Tersi M.; /SLAC /San Francisco State U.

    2006-09-27

    High-redshift blazars are promising candidates for detection by the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST). GLAST, expected to be launched in the Fall of 2007, is a high-energy gamma-ray observatory designed for making observations of celestial gamma-ray sources in the energy band extending from 10 MeV to more than 200 GeV. It is estimated that GLAST will find several thousand blazars. The motivations for measuring the gamma-ray emission from distant blazars include the study of the high-energy emission processes occurring in these sources and an indirect measurement of the extragalactic background light. In anticipation of the launch of GLAST we have compiled a catalog of candidate high-redshift blazars. The criteria for sources chosen for the catalog were: high radio emission, high redshift, and a flat radio spectrum. A preliminary list of 307 radio sources brighter than 70mJy with a redshift z {ge} 2.5 was acquired using data from the NASA Extragalactic Database. Flux measurements of each source were obtained at two or more radio frequencies from surveys and catalogs to calculate their radio spectral indices {alpha}. The sources with a flat-radio spectrum ({alpha} {le} 0.5) were selected for the catalog, and the final catalog includes about 200 sources.

  6. The Host Galaxies of Type Ia Supernovae at High Redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quimby, R.; Aldering, G.; Nugent, P.; Amanullah, R.; Astier, P.; Blanc, G.; Burns, M. S.; Conley, A.; Deustua, S.; Doi, M.; Ellis, R.; Fabbro, S.; Folatelli, G.; Fruchter, A.; Garavini, G.; Gibbons, R.; Goldhaber, G.; Goobar, A.; Groom, D. E.; Hardin, D.; Hook, I. M.; Howell, D. A.; Irwin, M.; Kim, A.; Knop, R. A.; Lidman, C.; McMahon, R.; Mendez, J.; Nobili, S.; Pain, R.; Panagia, N.; Pennypacker, C. R.; Perlmutter, S.; Raux, J.; Regnault, N.; Ruiz-Lapuente, P.; Schaefer, B.; Schahmaneche, K.; Spadafora, A. L.; Walton, N.; Wang, L.; Wood-Vasey, W. M.; Yasuda, N.; Supernova Cosmology Project Collaboration

    2002-12-01

    We use the luminosities and B-V colors from the host galaxies of 74 high-redshift (0.17 < z < 0.86) Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) discovered by the Supernova Cosmology Project (SCP) to search for environmental effects on supernovae peak luminosities. Using the galaxy luminosity-metallicity relation and the radial metallicity gradient of galaxies as indicators of the progenitor metallicity, we find no significant correlation between peak SNe Ia luminosity and host galaxy metallicity. The projected radial distribution of supernovae tracks the galaxy light and shows no deficit of SNe Ia near the galaxy cores (Shaw effect). The host galaxy luminosity function is calculated, and shown to be consistent with the subset of the Caltech Faint Galaxy Redshift Survey (Cohen et al. 2000) in the same redshift range, as well as the luminosity function of nearby galaxies measured by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (Blanton et al. 2001).

  7. Radio-loud high-redshift protogalaxy canidates in Bootes

    SciTech Connect

    Croft, S; van Breugel, W; Brown, M J; de Vries, W; Dey, A; Eisenhardt, P; Jannuzi, B; Rottgering, H; Stanford, S A; Stern, D; Willner, S P

    2007-07-20

    We used the Near Infrared Camera (NIRC) on Keck I to obtain K{sub s}-band images of four candidate high-redshift radio galaxies selected using optical and radio data in the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey in Bootes. Our targets have 1.4 GHz radio flux densities greater than 1 mJy, but are undetected in the optical. Spectral energy distribution fitting suggests that three of these objects are at z > 3, with radio luminosities near the FR-I/FR-II break. The other has photometric redshift z{sub phot} = 1.2, but may in fact be at higher redshift. Two of the four objects exhibit diffuse morphologies in K{sub s}-band, suggesting that they are still in the process of forming.

  8. A high deuterium abundance at redshift z = 0.7.

    PubMed

    Webb, J K; Carswell, R F; Lanzetta, K M; Ferlet, R; Lemoine, M; Vidal-Madjar, A; Bowen, D V

    1997-07-17

    Of the light elements, the primordial abundance of deuterium relative to hydrogen, (D/H)p, provides the most sensitive diagnostic for the cosmological mass density parameter, omegaB. Recent high-redshift D/H measurements are highly discrepant, although this may reflect observational uncertainties. The larger primordial D/H values imply a low omegaB (requiring the Universe to be dominated by non-baryonic matter), and cause problems for galactic chemical evolution models, which have difficulty in reproducing the steep decline in D/H to the present-day values. Conversely, the lower D/H values measured at high redshift imply an omegaB greater than that derived from 7Li and 4He abundance measurements, and may require a deuterium-abundance evolution that is too low to easily explain. Here we report the first measurement of D/H at intermediate redshift (z = 0.7010), in a gas cloud selected to minimize observational uncertainties. Our analysis yields a value of D/H ((2.0 +/- 0.5) x 10[-4]) which is at the upper end of the range of values measured at high redshifts. This finding, together with other independent observations, suggests that there may be inhomogeneity in (D/H)p of at least a factor of ten.

  9. A high deuterium abundance at redshift z = 0.7.

    PubMed

    Webb, J K; Carswell, R F; Lanzetta, K M; Ferlet, R; Lemoine, M; Vidal-Madjar, A; Bowen, D V

    1997-07-17

    Of the light elements, the primordial abundance of deuterium relative to hydrogen, (D/H)p, provides the most sensitive diagnostic for the cosmological mass density parameter, omegaB. Recent high-redshift D/H measurements are highly discrepant, although this may reflect observational uncertainties. The larger primordial D/H values imply a low omegaB (requiring the Universe to be dominated by non-baryonic matter), and cause problems for galactic chemical evolution models, which have difficulty in reproducing the steep decline in D/H to the present-day values. Conversely, the lower D/H values measured at high redshift imply an omegaB greater than that derived from 7Li and 4He abundance measurements, and may require a deuterium-abundance evolution that is too low to easily explain. Here we report the first measurement of D/H at intermediate redshift (z = 0.7010), in a gas cloud selected to minimize observational uncertainties. Our analysis yields a value of D/H ((2.0 +/- 0.5) x 10[-4]) which is at the upper end of the range of values measured at high redshifts. This finding, together with other independent observations, suggests that there may be inhomogeneity in (D/H)p of at least a factor of ten. PMID:9230433

  10. Optical signatures of high-redshift galaxy clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evrard, August E.; Charlot, Stephane

    1994-01-01

    We combine an N-body and gasdynamic simulation of structure formation with an updated population synthesis code to explore the expected optical characteristics of a high-redshift cluster of galaxies. We examine a poor (2 keV) cluster formed in a biased, cold dark matter cosmology and employ simple, but plausible, threshold criteria to convert gas into stars. At z = 2, the forming cluster appears as a linear chain of very blue (g-r approximately equals 0) galaxies, with 15 objects brighter than r = 25 within a 1 square arcmin field of view. After 2 Gyr of evolution, the cluster viewed at z = 1 displays both freshly infalling blue galaxies and red galaxies robbed of recent accretion by interaction with the hot intracluster medium. The range in G-R colors is approximately 3 mag at z = 1, with the reddest objects lying at sites of highest galaxy density. We suggest that red, high-redshift galaxies lie in the cores of forming clusters and that their existence indicates the presence of a hot intracluster medium at redshifts z approximately equals 2. The simulated cluster viewed at z = 2 has several characteristics similar to the collection of faint, blue objects identified by Dressler et al. in a deep Hubble Space Telescope observation. The similarities provide some support for the interpretation of this collection as a high-redshift cluster of galaxies.

  11. Bimodal star formation - Constraints from galaxy colors at high redshift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wyse, Rosemary F. G.; Silk, Joseph

    1987-01-01

    The possibility that at early epochs the light from elliptical galaxies is dominated by stars with an initial mass function (IMF) which is deficient in low-mass stars, relative to the solar neighborhood is investigated. V-R colors for the optical counterparts of 3CR radio sources offer the most severe constraints on the models. Reasonable fits are obtained to both the blue, high-redshift colors and the redder, low-redshift colors with a model galaxy which forms with initially equal star formation rates in each of two IMF modes: one lacking low-mass stars, and one with stars of all masses. The net effect is that the time-integrated IMF has twice as many high-mass stars as the solar neighborhood IMF, relative to low mass stars. A conventional solar neighborhood IMF does not simultaneously account for both the range in colors at high redshift and the redness of nearby ellipticals, with any single star formation epoch. Models with a standard IMF require half the stellar population to be formed in a burst at low redshift z of about 1.

  12. Identifying high-redshift gamma-ray bursts with RATIR

    SciTech Connect

    Littlejohns, O. M.; Butler, N. R.; Cucchiara, A.; Watson, A. M.; Lee, W. H.; Richer, M. G.; De Diego, J. A.; Georgiev, L.; González, J.; Román-Zúñiga, C. G.; Kutyrev, A. S.; Troja, E.; Gehrels, N.; Moseley, H.; Klein, C. R.; Fox, O. D.; Bloom, J. S.; Prochaska, J. X.; Ramirez-Ruiz, E.

    2014-07-01

    We present a template-fitting algorithm for determining photometric redshifts, z {sub phot}, of candidate high-redshift gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Using afterglow photometry, obtained by the Reionization and Transients InfraRed (RATIR) camera, this algorithm accounts for the intrinsic GRB afterglow spectral energy distribution, host dust extinction, and the effect of neutral hydrogen (local and cosmological) along the line of sight. We present the results obtained by this algorithm and the RATIR photometry of GRB 130606A, finding a range of best-fit solutions, 5.6 < z {sub phot} < 6.0, for models of several host dust extinction laws (none, the Milky Way, Large Magellanic Clouds, and Small Magellanic Clouds), consistent with spectroscopic measurements of the redshift of this GRB. Using simulated RATIR photometry, we find that our algorithm provides precise measures of z {sub phot} in the ranges of 4 < z {sub phot} ≲ 8 and 9 < z {sub phot} < 10 and can robustly determine when z {sub phot} > 4. Further testing highlights the required caution in cases of highly dust-extincted host galaxies. These tests also show that our algorithm does not erroneously find z {sub phot} < 4 when z {sub sim} > 4, thereby minimizing false negatives and allowing us to rapidly identify all potential high-redshift events.

  13. CMB quenching of high-redshift radio-loud AGNs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghisellini, G.; Haardt, F.; Ciardi, B.; Sbarrato, T.; Gallo, E.; Tavecchio, F.; Celotti, A.

    2015-10-01

    The very existence of more than a dozen of high-redshift (z ≳ 4) blazars indicates that a much larger population of misaligned powerful jetted active galactic nucleus (AGN) was already in place when the Universe was ≲1.5 Gyr old. Such parent population proved to be very elusive, and escaped direct detection in radio surveys so far. High-redshift blazars themselves seem to be failing in producing extended radio lobes, raising questions about the connection between such class and the vaster population of radio galaxies. We show that the interaction of the jet electrons with the intense cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation explains the lack of extended radio emission in high-redshift blazars and in their parent population, helping to explain the apparently missing misaligned counterparts of high-redshift blazars. On the other hand, the emission from the more compact and more magnetized hotspots are less affected by the enhanced CMB energy density. By modelling the spectral energy distribution of blazar lobes and hotspots, we find that most of them should be detectable by low-frequency deep radio observations, e.g. by LOw-Frequency ARray for radio astronomy and by relatively deep X-ray observations with good angular resolution, e.g. by the Chandra satellite. At high redshifts, the emission of a misaligned relativistic jet, being debeamed, is missed by current large sky area surveys. The isotropic flux produced in the hotspots can be below ˜1 mJy and the isotropic lobe radio emission is quenched by the CMB cooling. Consequently, even sources with very powerful jets can go undetected in current radio surveys, and misclassified as radio-quiet AGNs.

  14. On the Evolution of High-redshift Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Jirong; Kim, Minsun

    2016-09-01

    We build a simple physical model to study the high-redshift active galactic nucleus (AGN) evolution within the co-evolution framework of central black holes (BHs) and their host galaxies. The correlation between the circular velocity of a dark halo V c and the velocity dispersion of a galaxy σ is used to link the dark matter halo mass and BH mass. The dark matter halo mass function is converted to the BH mass function for any given redshift. The high-redshift optical AGN luminosity functions (LFs) are constructed. At z∼ 4, the flattening feature is not shown at the faint end of the optical AGN LF. This is consistent with observational results. If the optical AGN LF at z∼ 6 can be reproduced in the case in which central BHs have the Eddington-limited accretion, it is possible for the AGN lifetime to have a small value of 2× {10}5 {{years}}. The X-ray AGN LFs and X-ray AGN number counts are also calculated at 2.0\\lt z\\lt 5.0 and z\\gt 3, respectively, using the same parameters adopted in the calculation for the optical AGN LF at z∼ 4. It is estimated that about 30 AGNs per {{{\\deg }}}2 at z\\gt 6 can be detected with a flux limit of 3× {10}-17 {erg} {{cm}}-2 {{{s}}}-1 in the 0.5–2 keV band. Additionally, the cosmic reionization is also investigated. The ultraviolet photons emitted from the high-redshift AGNs mainly contribute to the cosmic reionization, and the central BHs of the high-redshift AGNs have a mass range of {10}6{--}{10}8{M}ȯ . We also discuss some uncertainties in both the AGN LFs and AGN number counts originating from the {M}{{BH}}{--}σ relation, Eddington ratio, AGN lifetime, and X-ray attenuation in our model.

  15. DUST ATTENUATION IN HIGH REDSHIFT GALAXIES: 'DIAMONDS IN THE SKY'

    SciTech Connect

    Scoville, Nick; Capak, Peter; Steinhardt, Charles; Faisst, Andreas; Kakazu, Yuko; Li, Gongjie

    2015-02-20

    We use observed optical to near-infrared spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of 266 galaxies in the COSMOS survey to derive the wavelength dependence of the dust attenuation at high redshift. All of the galaxies have spectroscopic redshifts in the range z = 2-6.5. The presence of the C IV absorption feature, indicating that the rest-frame UV-optical SED is dominated by OB stars, is used to select objects for which the intrinsic, unattenuated spectrum has a well-established shape. Comparison of this intrinsic spectrum with the observed broadband photometric SED then permits derivation of the wavelength dependence of the dust attenuation. The derived dust attenuation curve is similar in overall shape to the Calzetti curve for local starburst galaxies. We also see the 2175 Å bump feature which is present in the Milky Way and Large Magellanic Cloud extinction curves but not seen in the Calzetti curve. The bump feature is commonly attributed to graphite or polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. No significant dependence is seen with redshift between sub-samples at z = 2-4 and z = 4-6.5. The 'extinction' curve obtained here provides a firm basis for color and extinction corrections of high redshift galaxy photometry.

  16. Local Analogs for High-redshift Galaxies: Resembling the Physical Conditions of the Interstellar Medium in High-redshift Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Fuyan; Kewley, Lisa J.; Dopita, Michael A.; Juneau, Stephanie

    2016-05-01

    We present a sample of local analogs for high-redshift galaxies selected in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The physical conditions of the interstellar medium (ISM) in these local analogs resemble those in high-redshift galaxies. These galaxies are selected based on their positions in the [O iii]/Hβ versus [N ii]/Hα nebular emission-line diagnostic diagram. We show that these local analogs share similar physical properties with high-redshift galaxies, including high specific star formation rates (sSFRs), flat UV continuums, and compact galaxy sizes. In particular, the ionization parameters and electron densities in these analogs are comparable to those in z ≃ 2–3 galaxies, but higher than those in normal SDSS galaxies by ≃0.6 dex and ≃0.9 dex, respectively. The mass–metallicity relation (MZR) in these local analogs shows ‑0.2 dex offset from that in SDSS star-forming galaxies at the low-mass end, which is consistent with the MZR of the z˜ 2{--}3 galaxies. We compare the local analogs in this study with those in other studies, including Lyman break analogs (LBA) and green pea (GP) galaxies. The analogs in this study share a similar star formation surface density with LBAs, but the ionization parameters and electron density in our analogs are higher than those in LBAs by factors of 1.5 and 3, respectively. The analogs in this study have comparable ionization parameters and electron densities to the GP galaxies, but our method can select galaxies in a wider redshift range. We find the high sSFR and SFR surface density can increase the electron density and ionization parameters, but still cannot fully explain the difference in ISM condition between nearby galaxies and the local analogs/high-redshift galaxies.

  17. Local Analogs for High-redshift Galaxies: Resembling the Physical Conditions of the Interstellar Medium in High-redshift Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Fuyan; Kewley, Lisa J.; Dopita, Michael A.; Juneau, Stephanie

    2016-05-01

    We present a sample of local analogs for high-redshift galaxies selected in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The physical conditions of the interstellar medium (ISM) in these local analogs resemble those in high-redshift galaxies. These galaxies are selected based on their positions in the [O iii]/Hβ versus [N ii]/Hα nebular emission-line diagnostic diagram. We show that these local analogs share similar physical properties with high-redshift galaxies, including high specific star formation rates (sSFRs), flat UV continuums, and compact galaxy sizes. In particular, the ionization parameters and electron densities in these analogs are comparable to those in z ≃ 2-3 galaxies, but higher than those in normal SDSS galaxies by ≃0.6 dex and ≃0.9 dex, respectively. The mass-metallicity relation (MZR) in these local analogs shows -0.2 dex offset from that in SDSS star-forming galaxies at the low-mass end, which is consistent with the MZR of the z˜ 2{--}3 galaxies. We compare the local analogs in this study with those in other studies, including Lyman break analogs (LBA) and green pea (GP) galaxies. The analogs in this study share a similar star formation surface density with LBAs, but the ionization parameters and electron density in our analogs are higher than those in LBAs by factors of 1.5 and 3, respectively. The analogs in this study have comparable ionization parameters and electron densities to the GP galaxies, but our method can select galaxies in a wider redshift range. We find the high sSFR and SFR surface density can increase the electron density and ionization parameters, but still cannot fully explain the difference in ISM condition between nearby galaxies and the local analogs/high-redshift galaxies.

  18. Close companions to two high-redshift quasars

    SciTech Connect

    McGreer, Ian D.; Fan, Xiaohui; Bian, Fuyan; Strauss, Michael A.; Haiman, Zoltàn; Richards, Gordon T.; Jiang, Linhua; Schneider, Donald P.

    2014-10-01

    We report the serendipitous discoveries of companion galaxies to two high-redshift quasars. SDSS J025617.7+001904 is a z = 4.79 quasar included in our recent survey of faint quasars in the SDSS Stripe 82 region. The initial MMT slit spectroscopy shows excess Lyα emission extending well beyond the quasar's light profile. Further imaging and spectroscopy with LBT/MODS1 confirms the presence of a bright galaxy (i {sub AB} = 23.6) located 2'' (12 kpc projected) from the quasar with strong Lyα emission (EW{sub 0} ≈ 100 Å) at the redshift of the quasar, as well as faint continuum. The second quasar, CFHQS J005006.6+344522 (z = 6.25), is included in our recent HST SNAP survey of z ∼ 6 quasars searching for evidence of gravitational lensing. Deep imaging with ACS and WFC3 confirms an optical dropout ∼4.5 mag fainter than the quasar (Y {sub AB} = 25) at a separation of 0.''9. The red i {sub 775} – Y {sub 105} color of the galaxy and its proximity to the quasar (5 kpc projected if at the quasar redshift) strongly favor an association with the quasar. Although it is much fainter than the quasar, it is remarkably bright when compared to field galaxies at this redshift, while showing no evidence for lensing. Both systems may represent late-stage mergers of two massive galaxies, with the observed light for one dominated by powerful ongoing star formation and for the other by rapid black hole growth. Observations of close companions are rare; if major mergers are primarily responsible for high-redshift quasar fueling then the phase when progenitor galaxies can be observed as bright companions is relatively short.

  19. Formation of elongated galaxies with low masses at high redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceverino, Daniel; Primack, Joel; Dekel, Avishai

    2015-10-01

    We report the identification of elongated (triaxial or prolate) galaxies in cosmological simulations at z ≃ 2. These are preferentially low-mass galaxies (M* ≤ 109.5 M⊙), residing in dark matter (DM) haloes with strongly elongated inner parts, a common feature of high-redshift DM haloes in the Λ cold dark matter cosmology. Feedback slows formation of stars at the centres of these haloes, so that a dominant and prolate DM distribution gives rise to galaxies elongated along the DM major axis. As galaxies grow in stellar mass, stars dominate the total mass within the galaxy half-mass radius, making stars and DM rounder and more oblate. A large population of elongated galaxies produces a very asymmetric distribution of projected axis ratios, as observed in high-z galaxy surveys. This indicates that the majority of the galaxies at high redshifts are not discs or spheroids but rather galaxies with elongated morphologies.

  20. X-RAY ABSORPTION OF HIGH-REDSHIFT QUASARS

    SciTech Connect

    Eitan, Assaf; Behar, Ehud E-mail: behar@physics.technion.ac.il

    2013-09-01

    The soft X-ray photoelectric absorption of high-z quasars has been known for two decades, but has no unambiguous astrophysical context. We construct the largest sample to date of 58 high-redshift quasars (z > 0.45) selected from the XMM-Newton archive based on a high photon count criterion (>1800). We measure the optical depth {tau} at 0.5 keV and find that 43% of the quasars show significant absorption. We aim to find which physical parameters of the quasars, e.g., redshift, radio luminosity, radio loudness, or X-ray luminosity, drive their observed absorption. We compare the absorption behavior with redshift with the pattern expected if the diffuse intergalactic medium (IGM) is responsible for the observed absorption. We also compare the absorption with a comparison sample of gamma-ray burst (GRB) X-ray afterglows. Although the z > 2 quasar opacity is consistent with diffuse IGM absorption, many intermediate-z (0.45 < z < 2) quasars are not sufficiently absorbed for this scenario, and are appreciably less absorbed than GRBs. Only 10/37 quasars at z < 2 are absorbed, and only 5/30 radio-quiet quasars are absorbed. We find a weak correlation between {tau} and z, and an even weaker correlation between {tau} and radio luminosity. These findings lead to the conclusion that although a diffuse IGM origin for the quasar absorption is unlikely, the optical depth does seem to increase with redshift, roughly as (1 + z){sup 2.2{+-}0.6}, tending to {tau} Almost-Equal-To 0.4 at high redshifts, similar to the high-z GRBs. This result can be explained by an ionized and clumpy IGM at z < 2, and a cold, diffuse IGM at higher redshift. If, conversely, the absorption occurs at the quasar, and owing to the steep L{sub x} {proportional_to}(1 + z){sup 7.1{+-}0.5} correlation in the present sample, the host column density scales as N{sub H}{proportional_to}L{sub x}{sup 0.7{+-}0.1}.

  1. Bulge Growth Through Disc Instabilities in High-Redshift Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bournaud, Frédéric

    The role of disc instabilities, such as bars and spiral arms, and the associated resonances, in growing bulges in the inner regions of disc galaxies have long been studied in the low-redshift nearby Universe. There it has long been probed observationally, in particular through peanut-shaped bulges (Chap. 14 10.1007/978-3-319-19378-6_14"). This secular growth of bulges in modern disc galaxies is driven by weak, non-axisymmetric instabilities: it mostly produces pseudobulges at slow rates and with long star-formation timescales. Disc instabilities at high redshift (z > 1) in moderate-mass to massive galaxies (1010 to a few 1011 M⊙ of stars) are very different from those found in modern spiral galaxies. High-redshift discs are globally unstable and fragment into giant clumps containing 108-9 M⊙ of gas and stars each, which results in highly irregular galaxy morphologies. The clumps and other features associated to the violent instability drive disc evolution and bulge growth through various mechanisms on short timescales. The giant clumps can migrate inward and coalesce into the bulge in a few 108 years. The instability in the very turbulent media drives intense gas inflows toward the bulge and nuclear region. Thick discs and supermassive black holes can grow concurrently as a result of the violent instability. This chapter reviews the properties of high-redshift disc instabilities, the evolution of giant clumps and other features associated to the instability, and the resulting growth of bulges and associated sub-galactic components.

  2. ALMA and SINFONI high redshift observations to test AGN feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakkad, D.; Mainieri, V.; Padovani, P.; Cresci, G.; Husemann, B.; Carniani, S.; Brusa, M.; Lamastra, A.; Lanzuisi, G.; Feruglio, C.; Piconcelli, E.; Schramm, M.

    2016-08-01

    The epoch between redshift of 1-3 has become the prime focus of many galaxy evolutionary studies as the accretion rates of super massive black holes at the galactic center and the star formation rates of their hosts peaked around this period, pointing to their co-evolution throughout cosmic history. We will present two different approaches to study the impact of high redshift AGN (z~1.5) on the host galaxy: a) CO(2-1) observations from ALMA in a sample of "main sequence" AGNs to compare the star formation efficiency and gas fractions in active and inactive galaxies. b) SINFONI-IFU observations of a representative sample of high redshift quasars for which we observe intermediate to high velocity outflows using [OIII]5007 line diagnostics. These outflows are extended up-to kiloparsec scales and have an asymmetric geometry. With these approaches, one is able to test the effect of AGN feedback on the molecular as well as the ionized gas content.

  3. Far-Infrared Line Emission from High Redshift Quasars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benford, D. J.; Cox, P.; Hunter, T. R.; Malhotra, S.; Phillips, T. G.; Yun, M. S.

    2002-01-01

    Recent millimeter and submillimeter detections of line emission in high redshift objects have yielded new information and constraints on star formation at early epochs. Only CO transitions and atomic carbon transitions have been detected from these objects, yet bright far-infrared lines such as C+ at 158 microns and N+ at 205 microns should be fairly readily detectable when redshifted into a submillimeter atmospheric window. We have obtained upper limits for C+ emission &om two high redshift quasars, BR1202-0725 at z=4.69 and BRI1335-0415 at z=4.41. These limits show that the ratio of the C+ line luminosity to the total far-infrared luminosity is less than 0.0l%, ten times smaller than has been observed locally. Additionally, we have searched for emission in the N+ 205 micron line from the Cloverleaf quasar, H1413+117, and detected emission in CO J=7-6. The N+ emission is found to be below the amount predicted based on comparison to the only previous detection of this line, in the starburst galaxy M82.

  4. High redshift galaxies in the ALHAMBRA survey . I. Selection method and number counts based on redshift PDFs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viironen, K.; Marín-Franch, A.; López-Sanjuan, C.; Varela, J.; Chaves-Montero, J.; Cristóbal-Hornillos, D.; Molino, A.; Fernández-Soto, A.; Vilella-Rojo, G.; Ascaso, B.; Cenarro, A. J.; Cerviño, M.; Cepa, J.; Ederoclite, A.; Márquez, I.; Masegosa, J.; Moles, M.; Oteo, I.; Pović, M.; Aguerri, J. A. L.; Alfaro, E.; Aparicio-Villegas, T.; Benítez, N.; Broadhurst, T.; Cabrera-Caño, J.; Castander, J. F.; Del Olmo, A.; González Delgado, R. M.; Husillos, C.; Infante, L.; Martínez, V. J.; Perea, J.; Prada, F.; Quintana, J. M.

    2015-04-01

    Context. Most observational results on the high redshift restframe UV-bright galaxies are based on samples pinpointed using the so-called dropout technique or Ly-α selection. However, the availability of multifilter data now allows the dropout selections to be replaced by direct methods based on photometric redshifts. In this paper we present the methodology to select and study the population of high redshift galaxies in the ALHAMBRA survey data. Aims: Our aim is to develop a less biased methodology than the traditional dropout technique to study the high redshift galaxies in ALHAMBRA and other multifilter data. Thanks to the wide area ALHAMBRA covers, we especially aim at contributing to the study of the brightest, least frequent, high redshift galaxies. Methods: The methodology is based on redshift probability distribution functions (zPDFs). It is shown how a clean galaxy sample can be obtained by selecting the galaxies with high integrated probability of being within a given redshift interval. However, reaching both a complete and clean sample with this method is challenging. Hence, a method to derive statistical properties by summing the zPDFs of all the galaxies in the redshift bin of interest is introduced. Results: Using this methodology we derive the galaxy rest frame UV number counts in five redshift bins centred at z = 2.5,3.0,3.5,4.0, and 4.5, being complete up to the limiting magnitude at mUV(AB) = 24, where mUV refers to the first ALHAMBRA filter redwards of the Ly-α line. With the wide field ALHAMBRA data we especially contribute to the study of the brightest ends of these counts, accurately sampling the surface densities down to mUV(AB) = 21-22. Conclusions: We show that using the zPDFs it is easy to select a very clean sample of high redshift galaxies. We also show that it is better to do statistical analysis of the properties of galaxies using a probabilistic approach, which takes into account both the incompleteness and contamination issues in a

  5. The growth efficiency of high-redshift black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacucci, Fabio; Volonteri, Marta; Ferrara, Andrea

    2015-09-01

    The observational evidence that Super-Massive Black Holes (M• ˜ 109-10 M⊙) are already in place less than 1 Gyr after the big bang poses stringent time constraints on the growth efficiency of their seeds. Among proposed possibilities, the formation of massive (˜103-6 M⊙) seeds and/or the occurrence of super-Eddington (dot{M}>dot{M}_{Edd}) accretion episodes may contribute to the solution of this problem. In this work, using a set of astrophysically motivated initial conditions, we analytically and numerically investigate the accretion flow on to high-redshift (z ˜ 10) black holes to understand the physical requirements favouring rapid and efficient growth. Our model identifies a `feeding-dominated' accretion regime and a `feedback-limited' one, the latter being characterized by intermittent (duty cycles D ≲ 0.5) and inefficient growth, with recurring outflow episodes. We find that low-mass seeds (≲103-4 M⊙) evolve in the feedback-limited regime, while more massive seeds (≳105-6 M⊙) grow very rapidly as they are found in the feeding-dominated regime. In addition to the standard accretion model with a fixed matter-energy conversion factor (ɛ = 0.1), we have also explored slim disc models, appropriate for super-Eddington accretion, where radiation is trapped in the disc and the radiative efficiency is reduced (ɛ ≲ 0.04), which may ensure a continuous growth with dot{M} ≫ dot{M}_{Edd} (up to {˜ } 300 dot{M}_{Edd} in our simulations). Under these conditions, outflows play a negligible role and a black hole can accrete 80-100 per cent of the gas mass of the host halo (˜107 M⊙) in ˜10 Myr, while in feedback-limited systems we predict that black holes can accrete only up to ˜15 per cent of the available mass.

  6. On the Evolution of High-redshift Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Jirong; Kim, Minsun

    2016-09-01

    We build a simple physical model to study the high-redshift active galactic nucleus (AGN) evolution within the co-evolution framework of central black holes (BHs) and their host galaxies. The correlation between the circular velocity of a dark halo V c and the velocity dispersion of a galaxy σ is used to link the dark matter halo mass and BH mass. The dark matter halo mass function is converted to the BH mass function for any given redshift. The high-redshift optical AGN luminosity functions (LFs) are constructed. At z˜ 4, the flattening feature is not shown at the faint end of the optical AGN LF. This is consistent with observational results. If the optical AGN LF at z˜ 6 can be reproduced in the case in which central BHs have the Eddington-limited accretion, it is possible for the AGN lifetime to have a small value of 2× {10}5 {{years}}. The X-ray AGN LFs and X-ray AGN number counts are also calculated at 2.0\\lt z\\lt 5.0 and z\\gt 3, respectively, using the same parameters adopted in the calculation for the optical AGN LF at z˜ 4. It is estimated that about 30 AGNs per {{{\\deg }}}2 at z\\gt 6 can be detected with a flux limit of 3× {10}-17 {erg} {{cm}}-2 {{{s}}}-1 in the 0.5-2 keV band. Additionally, the cosmic reionization is also investigated. The ultraviolet photons emitted from the high-redshift AGNs mainly contribute to the cosmic reionization, and the central BHs of the high-redshift AGNs have a mass range of {10}6{--}{10}8{M}⊙ . We also discuss some uncertainties in both the AGN LFs and AGN number counts originating from the {M}{{BH}}{--}σ relation, Eddington ratio, AGN lifetime, and X-ray attenuation in our model.

  7. Radio Selected Clusters of Galaxies at High Redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wing, Joshua; Blanton, Elizabeth

    2010-08-01

    Previous studies have shown that three-component radio sources exhibiting some degree of bending between components are likely to be found in galaxy clusters. Often this radio emission is associated with a cD type galaxy at the center of a cluster. We have cross-correlated the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) with samples selected from the Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty Centimeters (FIRST) catalog and measured the richness of the cluster environments surrounding three- component sources exhibiting both bent and straight lobes. This has lead to the discovery and classification of a large number of galaxy clusters out to a redshift of z ~ 0.5. For both bent- and straight- lobed sources without an optical counterpart it is likely that the radio emission is associated with a galaxy fainter than m_r=22 (the limiting magnitude of the SDSS) and at a redshift higher than z~0.8. We propose to observe a small sub-sample of these sources with the FLAMINGOS instrument on the Mayall 4-m telescope in an attempt to discover if these sources are located in high redshift (z≳0.8) galaxy clusters. In our visually-selected bent radio source sample, 78% of sources with counterparts in the SDSS are associated with clusters.

  8. Accessing the population of high-redshift Gamma Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghirlanda, G.; Salvaterra, R.; Ghisellini, G.; Mereghetti, S.; Tagliaferri, G.; Campana, S.; Osborne, J. P.; O'Brien, P.; Tanvir, N.; Willingale, D.; Amati, L.; Basa, S.; Bernardini, M. G.; Burlon, D.; Covino, S.; D'Avanzo, P.; Frontera, F.; Götz, D.; Melandri, A.; Nava, L.; Piro, L.; Vergani, S. D.

    2015-04-01

    Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) are a powerful probe of the high-redshift Universe. We present a tool to estimate the detection rate of high-z GRBs by a generic detector with defined energy band and sensitivity. We base this on a population model that reproduces the observed properties of GRBs detected by Swift, Fermi and CGRO in the hard X-ray and γ-ray bands. We provide the expected cumulative distributions of the flux and fluence of simulated GRBs in different energy bands. We show that scintillator detectors, operating at relatively high energies (e.g. tens of keV to the MeV), can detect only the most luminous GRBs at high redshifts due to the link between the peak spectral energy and the luminosity (Epeak-Liso) of GRBs. We show that the best strategy for catching the largest number of high-z bursts is to go softer (e.g. in the soft X-ray band) but with a very high sensitivity. For instance, an imaging soft X-ray detector operating in the 0.2-5 keV energy band reaching a sensitivity, corresponding to a fluence, of ˜10-8 erg cm-2 is expected to detect ≈40 GRBs yr-1 sr-1 at z ≥ 5 (≈3 GRBs yr-1 sr-1 at z ≥ 10). Once high-z GRBs are detected the principal issue is to secure their redshift. To this aim we estimate their NIR afterglow flux at relatively early times and evaluate the effectiveness of following them up and construct usable samples of events with any forthcoming GRB mission dedicated to explore the high-z Universe.

  9. The rest-frame submillimeter spectrum of high-redshift, dusty, star-forming galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Spilker, J. S.; Marrone, D. P.; Aguirre, J. E.; Aravena, M.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Béthermin, M.; Bothwell, M. S.; Brodwin, M.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Crawford, T. M.; Chapman, S. C.; De Breuck, C.; Gullberg, B.; Fassnacht, C. D.; Gonzalez, A. H.; Greve, T. R.; Hezaveh, Y.; Holzapfel, W. L.; and others

    2014-04-20

    We present the average rest-frame spectrum of high-redshift dusty, star-forming galaxies from 250 to 770 GHz. This spectrum was constructed by stacking Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) 3 mm spectra of 22 such sources discovered by the South Pole Telescope and spanning z = 2.0-5.7. In addition to multiple bright spectral features of {sup 12}CO, [C I], and H{sub 2}O, we also detect several faint transitions of {sup 13}CO, HCN, HNC, HCO{sup +}, and CN, and use the observed line strengths to characterize the typical properties of the interstellar medium of these high-redshift starburst galaxies. We find that the {sup 13}CO brightness in these objects is comparable to that of the only other z > 2 star-forming galaxy in which {sup 13}CO has been observed. We show that the emission from the high-critical density molecules HCN, HNC, HCO{sup +}, and CN is consistent with a warm, dense medium with T {sub kin} ∼ 55 K and n{sub H{sub 2}}≳10{sup 5.5} cm{sup –3}. High molecular hydrogen densities are required to reproduce the observed line ratios, and we demonstrate that alternatives to purely collisional excitation are unlikely to be significant for the bulk of these systems. We quantify the average emission from several species with no individually detected transitions, and find emission from the hydride CH and the linear molecule CCH for the first time at high redshift, indicating that these molecules may be powerful probes of interstellar chemistry in high-redshift systems. These observations represent the first constraints on many molecular species with rest-frame transitions from 0.4 to 1.2 mm in star-forming systems at high redshift, and will be invaluable in making effective use of ALMA in full science operations.

  10. The Rest-frame Submillimeter Spectrum of High-redshift, Dusty, Star-forming Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spilker, J. S.; Marrone, D. P.; Aguirre, J. E.; Aravena, M.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Béthermin, M.; Bradford, C. M.; Bothwell, M. S.; Brodwin, M.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Chapman, S. C.; Crawford, T. M.; de Breuck, C.; Fassnacht, C. D.; Gonzalez, A. H.; Greve, T. R.; Gullberg, B.; Hezaveh, Y.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Husband, K.; Ma, J.; Malkan, M.; Murphy, E. J.; Reichardt, C. L.; Rotermund, K. M.; Stalder, B.; Stark, A. A.; Strandet, M.; Vieira, J. D.; Weiß, A.; Welikala, N.

    2014-04-01

    We present the average rest-frame spectrum of high-redshift dusty, star-forming galaxies from 250 to 770 GHz. This spectrum was constructed by stacking Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) 3 mm spectra of 22 such sources discovered by the South Pole Telescope and spanning z = 2.0-5.7. In addition to multiple bright spectral features of 12CO, [C I], and H2O, we also detect several faint transitions of 13CO, HCN, HNC, HCO+, and CN, and use the observed line strengths to characterize the typical properties of the interstellar medium of these high-redshift starburst galaxies. We find that the 13CO brightness in these objects is comparable to that of the only other z > 2 star-forming galaxy in which 13CO has been observed. We show that the emission from the high-critical density molecules HCN, HNC, HCO+, and CN is consistent with a warm, dense medium with T kin ~ 55 K and n_{H_2} \\gtrsim 10^{5.5} cm-3. High molecular hydrogen densities are required to reproduce the observed line ratios, and we demonstrate that alternatives to purely collisional excitation are unlikely to be significant for the bulk of these systems. We quantify the average emission from several species with no individually detected transitions, and find emission from the hydride CH and the linear molecule CCH for the first time at high redshift, indicating that these molecules may be powerful probes of interstellar chemistry in high-redshift systems. These observations represent the first constraints on many molecular species with rest-frame transitions from 0.4 to 1.2 mm in star-forming systems at high redshift, and will be invaluable in making effective use of ALMA in full science operations.

  11. High-redshift supermassive black holes: accretion through cold flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Yu; Di Matteo, Tiziana; Croft, Rupert; Khandai, Nishikanta

    2014-05-01

    We use zoom-in techniques to re-simulate three high-redshift (z ≥ 5.5) haloes which host 109 M⊙ black holes from the ˜Gpc volume, MassiveBlack cosmological hydrodynamic simulation. We examine a number of factors potentially affecting supermassive black hole growth at high redshift in cosmological simulations. We find insignificant differences in the black hole accretion history by (i) varying the region over which feedback energy is deposited directly, (ii) changing mass resolution by factors of up to 64, (iii) changing the black hole seed mass by a factor of 100. Switching from the density-entropy formulation to the pressure-entropy formulation of smoothed particle hydrodynamics slightly increases the accretion rate. In general numerical details/model parameters appear to have small effects on the main fuelling mechanism for black holes at these high redshifts. The insensitivity to simulation technique seems to be a hallmark of the cold flow feeding picture of these high-z supermassive black holes. We show that the gas that participates in critical accretion phases in these massive objects at z > 6-7 is in all cases colder, denser and forms more coherent streams than the average gas in the halo. This is also mostly the case when the black hole accretion is feedback regulated (z < 6), however, the distinction is less prominent. For our resimulated haloes, cold flows appear to be a viable mechanism for forming the most massive black holes in the early universe, occurring naturally in Λ cold dark matter models of structure formation, without requiring fine-tuning of numerical parameters.

  12. ASSOCIATIONS OF HIGH-REDSHIFT QUASI-STELLAR OBJECTS WITH ACTIVE, LOW-REDSHIFT SPIRAL GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Burbidge, G.; Napier, W. M. E-mail: smawmn@cardiff.ac.u

    2009-11-20

    Following the discovery in the 1960s of radio and optical QSOs it was found that some of them lie very close to low-redshift (z <= 0.01) spiral galaxies with separations of approx<2 arcmin. These were discovered both serendipitously by many observers, and systematically by Arp. They are some of the brightest QSOs in radio and optical wavelengths and are very rare. We have carried out a new statistical analysis of most of those galaxy-QSO pairs and find that the configurations have high statistical significance. We show that gravitational microlensing due to stars or other dark objects in the halos of the galaxies apparently cannot account for the excess. Sampling or identification bias likewise seems unable to explain it. Following this up we selected all approx4000 QSOs with g <= 18 from a catalog of confirmed QSOs in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, and compared them with various subsets of galaxies from the RC 3 galaxy catalog. In contrast to the earlier results, no significant excess of such QSOs was found around these galaxies. Possible reasons for the discrepancy are discussed.

  13. POPULATION III STARS AND REMNANTS IN HIGH-REDSHIFT GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Hao; Norman, Michael L.; Wise, John H. E-mail: mlnorman@ucsd.edu

    2013-08-20

    Recent simulations of Population III star formation have suggested that some fraction form in binary systems, in addition to having a characteristic mass of tens of solar masses. The deaths of metal-free stars result in the initial chemical enrichment of the universe and the production of the first stellar-mass black holes. Here we present a cosmological adaptive mesh refinement simulation of an overdense region that forms a few 10{sup 9} M{sub Sun} dark matter halos and over 13,000 Population III stars by redshift 15. We find that most halos do not form Population III stars until they reach M{sub vir} {approx} 10{sup 7} M{sub Sun} because this biased region is quickly enriched from both Population III and galaxies, which also produce high levels of ultraviolet radiation that suppress H{sub 2} formation. Nevertheless, Population III stars continue to form, albeit in more massive halos, at a rate of {approx}10{sup -4} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} Mpc{sup -3} at redshift 15. The most massive starless halo has a mass of 7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7} M{sub Sun }, which could host massive black hole formation through the direct gaseous collapse scenario. We show that the multiplicity of the Population III remnants grows with halo mass above 10{sup 8} M{sub Sun }, culminating in 50 remnants located in 10{sup 9} M{sub Sun} halos on average. This has implications that high-mass X-ray binaries and intermediate-mass black holes that originate from metal-free stars may be abundant in high-redshift galaxies.

  14. Cosmic Lighthouses : Unveiling the nature of high-redshift galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dayal, Pratika

    2011-01-01

    We are in the golden age for the search for high-redshift galaxies, made possible by a combination of new instruments and innovative search techniques. One of the major aims of such searches is to constrain the epoch of reionization (EoR), which marks the second major change in the ionization state of the Universe. Understanding the EoR is difficult since whilst it is galaxy evolution which drives reionization, reionization itself influences galaxy evolution through feedback effects. Unraveling the interplay of reionization and galaxy evolution is further complicated by of a lack of understanding of the metal enrichment and dust distribution in high redshift galaxies. To this end, a class of galaxies called Lyman Alpha Emitters (LAEs) have been gaining enormous popularity as probes of all these three processes. In this thesis, we couple state of the art cosmological SPH simulations (GADGET-2) with a physically motivated, self-consistent model for LAEs, so as to be able to understand the importance of the intergalactic medium (IGM) ionization state, dust and peculiar velocities in shaping their observed properties. By doing so, the aim is to gain insight on the nature of LAEs, put precious constraints on their elusive physical properties and make predictions for future instruments such as the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA). Using our LAE model in conjunction with a code that builds the MW merger tree (GAMETE), we build a bridge between the high-redshift and the local Universe. We also use SPH simulations (GADGET-2) to study the nature of the earliest galaxies that have been detected as of yet, place constraints on their contribution to reionization, and predict their detectability using the next generation of instruments, such as the James Web Space Telescope (JWST).

  15. THE FIRST HIGH-REDSHIFT QUASAR FROM Pan-STARRS

    SciTech Connect

    Morganson, Eric; De Rosa, Gisella; Decarli, Roberto; Walter, Fabian; Rix, Hans-Walter; Chambers, Ken; Burgett, William; Flewelling, Heather; Hodapp, Klaus; Kaiser, Nick; Magnier, Eugene; Sweeney, Bill; Waters, Christopher; McGreer, Ian; Fan, Xiaohui; Greiner, Jochen; Price, Paul

    2012-06-15

    We present the discovery of the first high-redshift (z > 5.7) quasar from the Panoramic Survey Telescope and Rapid Response System 1 (Pan-STARRS1 or PS1). This quasar was initially detected as an i{sub P1} dropout in PS1, confirmed photometrically with the SAO Wide-field InfraRed Camera at Arizona's Multiple Mirror Telescope (MMT) and the Gamma-Ray Burst Optical/Near-Infrared Detector at the MPG 2.2 m telescope in La Silla. The quasar was verified spectroscopically with the MMT Spectrograph, Red Channel and the Cassegrain Twin Spectrograph at the Calar Alto 3.5 m telescope. Its near-infrared spectrum was taken at the Large Binocular Telescope Observatory (LBT) with the LBT Near-Infrared Spectroscopic Utility with Camera and Integral Field Unit for Extragalactic Research. It has a redshift of 5.73, an AB z{sub P1} magnitude of 19.4, a luminosity of 3.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 47} erg s{sup -1}, and a black hole mass of 6.9 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} M{sub Sun }. It is a broad absorption line quasar with a prominent Ly{beta} peak and a very blue continuum spectrum. This quasar is the first result from the PS1 high-redshift quasar search that is projected to discover more than 100 i{sub P1} dropout quasars and could potentially find more than 10 z{sub P1} dropout (z > 6.8) quasars.

  16. Photometric Selection of High-Redshift Type Ia Supernova Candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, M.; Howell, D. A.; Perrett, K.; Nugent, P. E.; Astier, P.; Aubourg, E.; Balam, D.; Basa, S.; Carlberg, R. G.; Conley, A.; Fabbro, S.; Fouchez, D.; Guy, J.; Hook, I.; Lafoux, H.; Neill, J. D.; Pain, R.; Palanque-Delabrouille, N.; Pritchet, C. J.; Regnault, N.; Rich, J.; Taillet, R.; Aldering, G.; Baumont, S.; Bronder, J.; Filiol, M.; Knop, R. A.; Perlmutter, S.; Tao, C.

    2006-02-01

    We present a method for selecting high-redshift Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) located via rolling SN searches. The technique, using both color and magnitude information of events from only two to three epochs of multiband real-time photometry, is able to discriminate between SNe Ia and core-collapse SNe. Furthermore, for SNe Ia the method accurately predicts the redshift, phase, and light-curve parameterization of these events based only on pre-maximum-light data. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the technique on a simulated survey of SNe Ia and core-collapse SNe, where the selection method effectively rejects most core-collapse SNe while retaining SNe Ia. We also apply the selection code to real-time data acquired as part of the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Supernova Legacy Survey (SNLS). During the period 2004 May to 2005 January in the SNLS, 440 SN candidates were discovered, of which 70 were confirmed spectroscopically as SNe Ia and 15 as core-collapse events. For this test data set, the selection technique correctly identifies 100% of the identified SNe II as non-SNe Ia with only a 1%-2% false rejection rate. The predicted parameterization of the SNe Ia has a precision of Δz/(1+zspec)<0.09 in redshift and +/-2-3 rest-frame days in phase, providing invaluable information for planning spectroscopic follow-up observations. We also investigate any bias introduced by this selection method on the ability of surveys such as SNLS to measure cosmological parameters (e.g., w and ΩM) and find any effect to be negligible.

  17. First broadband characterization and redshift determination of the VHE blazar MAGIC J2001+439

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleksić, J.; Ansoldi, S.; Antonelli, L. A.; Antoranz, P.; Babic, A.; Bangale, P.; Barres de Almeida, U.; Barrio, J. A.; Becerra González, J.; Bednarek, W.; Bernardini, E.; Biland, A.; Blanch, O.; Bonnefoy, S.; Bonnoli, G.; Borracci, F.; Bretz, T.; Carmona, E.; Carosi, A.; Carreto Fidalgo, D.; Colin, P.; Colombo, E.; Contreras, J. L.; Cortina, J.; Covino, S.; da Vela, P.; Dazzi, F.; de Angelis, A.; de Caneva, G.; de Lotto, B.; Delgado Mendez, C.; Doert, M.; Domínguez, A.; Dominis Prester, D.; Dorner, D.; Doro, M.; Einecke, S.; Eisenacher, D.; Elsaesser, D.; Farina, E.; Ferenc, D.; Fonseca, M. V.; Font, L.; Frantzen, K.; Fruck, C.; García López, R. J.; Garczarczyk, M.; Garrido Terrats, D.; Gaug, M.; Godinović, N.; González Muñoz, A.; Gozzini, S. R.; Hadasch, D.; Hayashida, M.; Herrera, J.; Herrero, A.; Hildebrand, D.; Hose, J.; Hrupec, D.; Idec, W.; Kadenius, V.; Kellermann, H.; Kodani, K.; Konno, Y.; Krause, J.; Kubo, H.; Kushida, J.; La Barbera, A.; Lelas, D.; Lewandowska, N.; Lindfors, E.; Lombardi, S.; López, M.; López-Coto, R.; López-Oramas, A.; Lorenz, E.; Lozano, I.; Makariev, M.; Mallot, K.; Maneva, G.; Mankuzhiyil, N.; Mannheim, K.; Maraschi, L.; Marcote, B.; Mariotti, M.; Martínez, M.; Mazin, D.; Menzel, U.; Meucci, M.; Miranda, J. M.; Mirzoyan, R.; Moralejo, A.; Munar-Adrover, P.; Nakajima, D.; Niedzwiecki, A.; Nilsson, K.; Nishijima, K.; Noda, K.; Nowak, N.; Orito, R.; Overkemping, A.; Paiano, S.; Palatiello, M.; Paneque, D.; Paoletti, R.; Paredes, J. M.; Paredes-Fortuny, X.; Partini, S.; Persic, M.; Prada, F.; Prada Moroni, P. G.; Prandini, E.; Preziuso, S.; Puljak, I.; Reinthal, R.; Rhode, W.; Ribó, M.; Rico, J.; Rodriguez Garcia, J.; Rügamer, S.; Saggion, A.; Saito, T.; Saito, K.; Satalecka, K.; Scalzotto, V.; Scapin, V.; Schultz, C.; Schweizer, T.; Shore, S. N.; Sillanpää, A.; Sitarek, J.; Snidaric, I.; Sobczynska, D.; Spanier, F.; Stamatescu, V.; Stamerra, A.; Steinbring, T.; Storz, J.; Strzys, M.; Sun, S.; Surić, T.; Takalo, L.; Takami, H.; Tavecchio, F.; Temnikov, P.; Terzić, T.; Tescaro, D.; Teshima, M.; Thaele, J.; Tibolla, O.; Torres, D. F.; Toyama, T.; Treves, A.; Uellenbeck, M.; Vogler, P.; Wagner, R. M.; Zandanel, F.; Zanin, R.; MAGIC Collaboration

    2014-12-01

    Aims: We aim to characterize the broadband emission from 2FGL J2001.1+4352, which has been associated with the unknown-redshift blazar MG4 J200112+4352. Based on its gamma-ray spectral properties, it was identified as a potential very high energy (VHE; E> 100 GeV) gamma-ray emitter. We investigate whether this object is aVHE emitter, characterize its gamma-ray spectrum, and study the broadband emission within the one-zone synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) scenario, which is commonly used to describe the emission in blazars. Moreover, we also intend to determine the redshift of this object, which is a crucial parameter for its scientific interpretation. Methods: The source was observed with MAGIC first in 2009 and later in 2010 within a multi-instrument observation campaign. The MAGIC observations yielded 14.8 h of good quality stereoscopic data. Besides MAGIC, the campaign involved, observations with Fermi-LAT, Swift-XRT/UVOT, the optical telescopes KVA, Goddard Robotic Telescope, Galaxy View observatory, Crimean Astrophysical observatory, St. Petersburg observatory, and the Owens Valley Radio Observatory. The object was monitored at radio, optical and gamma-ray energies during the years 2010 and 2011. We characterize the radio to VHE spectral energy distribution and quantify the multiband variability and correlations over short (few days) and long (many months) timescales. We also organized deep imaging optical observations with the Nordic Optical Telescope in 2013 to determine the source redshift. Results: The source, named MAGIC J2001+439, is detected for the first time at VHE with MAGIC at a statistical significance of 6.3σ (E > 70 GeV) during a 1.3 h long observation on 2010 July 16. The multi-instrument observations show variability in all energy bands with the highest amplitude of variability in the X-ray and VHE bands. Besides the variability on few-day timescales, the long-term monitoring of MAGIC J2001+439 shows that, the gamma-ray, optical, and radio

  18. Tracing high redshift cosmic web with quasar systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Einasto, Maret

    2016-10-01

    We study the cosmic web at redshifts 1.0 <= <= 1.8 using quasar systems based on quasar data from the SDSS DR7 QSO catalogue. Quasar systems were determined with a friend-of-friend (FoF) algorithm at a series of linking lengths. At the linking lengths l <= 30 h -1 Mpc the diameters of quasar systems are smaller than the diameters of random systems, and are comparable to the sizes of galaxy superclusters in the local Universe. The mean space density of quasar systems is close to the mean space density of local rich superclusters. At larger linking lengths the diameters of quasar systems are comparable with the sizes of supercluster complexes in our cosmic neighbourhood. The richest quasar systems have diameters exceeding 500h Mpc. Very rich systems can be found also in random distribution but the percolating system which penetrate the whole sample volume appears in quasar sample at smaller linking length than in random samples showing that the large-scale distribution of quasar systems differs from random distribution. Quasar system catalogues at our web pages (http://www.aai.ee/maret/QSOsystems.html) serve as a database to search for superclusters of galaxies and to trace the cosmic web at high redshifts.

  19. UV Spectral Templates for High-Redshift Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heap, Sara; Lindler, Don; Lanz, Thierry

    2003-01-01

    New instrumentation such as DEIMOS on Keck-II now enable deep spectral surveys, and thereby samples of galaxies at younger ages. At a redshift, z = 1, all galaxies are less than 6 Gyr old and hence, have not yet formed horizontal-branch stars. Also, at z = 1, the restframe-UV comes into view, and with it, a new set of spectral diagnostics. UV spectral features are especially important because most of the UV flux comes from stars at the main-sequence turnoff (MSTO). Hence, UV spectral diagnostics enable the ages of z = 1 galaxies to be estimated directly from MSTO stars. In preparation for these high-redshift spectral surveys, we are developing UV spectral templates for stellar populations younger than 6 Gyr using UV-optical spectra of stars observed by HST/STIS. We are also planning to supplement these observations with theoretical spectral grids of stars of various metallicities. In this paper, we present a progress report on the observation-based spectral templates and spectral diagnostics.

  20. Star formation and mass assembly in high redshift galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santini, P.; Fontana, A.; Grazian, A.; Salimbeni, S.; Fiore, F.; Fontanot, F.; Boutsia, K.; Castellano, M.; Cristiani, S.; de Santis, C.; Gallozzi, S.; Giallongo, E.; Menci, N.; Nonino, M.; Paris, D.; Pentericci, L.; Vanzella, E.

    2009-09-01

    Aims: The goal of this work is to infer the star formation properties and the mass assembly process of high redshift (0.3 ≤ z < 2.5) galaxies from their IR emission using the 24 μm band of MIPS-Spitzer. Methods: We used an updated version of the GOODS-MUSIC catalog, which has multiwavelength coverage from 0.3 to 24 μm and either spectroscopic or accurate photometric redshifts. We describe how the catalog has been extended by the addition of mid-IR fluxes derived from the MIPS 24 μm image. We compared two different estimators of the star formation rate (SFR hereafter). One is the total infrared emission derived from 24 μm, estimated using both synthetic and empirical IR templates. The other one is a multiwavelength fit to the full galaxy SED, which automatically accounts for dust reddening and age-star formation activity degeneracies. For both estimates, we computed the SFR density and the specific SFR. Results: We show that the two SFR indicators are roughly consistent, once the uncertainties involved are taken into account. However, they show a systematic trend, IR-based estimates exceeding the fit-based ones as the star formation rate increases. With this new catalog, we show that: a) at z>0.3, the star formation rate is correlated well with stellar mass, and this relationship seems to steepen with redshift if one relies on IR-based estimates of the SFR; b) the contribution to the global SFRD by massive galaxies increases with redshift up to ≃ 2.5, more rapidly than for galaxies of lower mass, but appears to flatten at higher z; c) despite this increase, the most important contributors to the SFRD at any z are galaxies of about, or immediately lower than, the characteristic stellar mass; d) at z≃ 2, massive galaxies are actively star-forming, with a median {SFR} ≃ 300 M_⊙ yr-1. During this epoch, our targeted galaxies assemble a substantial part of their final stellar mass; e) the specific SFR (SSFR) shows a clear bimodal distribution. Conclusions

  1. OPTIMAL MASS CONFIGURATIONS FOR LENSING HIGH-REDSHIFT GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Kenneth C.; Zabludoff, Ann I.; Ammons, S. Mark; Keeton, Charles R.

    2012-06-20

    We investigate the gravitational lensing properties of lines of sight containing multiple cluster-scale halos, motivated by their ability to lens very high redshift (z {approx} 10) sources into detectability. We control for the total mass along the line of sight, isolating the effects of distributing the mass among multiple halos and of varying the physical properties of the halos. Our results show that multiple-halo lines of sight can increase the magnified source-plane region compared to the single cluster lenses typically targeted for lensing studies and thus are generally better fields for detecting very high redshift sources. The configurations that result in optimal lensing cross sections benefit from interactions between the lens potentials of the halos when they overlap somewhat on the sky, creating regions of high magnification in the source plane not present when the halos are considered individually. The effect of these interactions on the lensing cross section can even be comparable to changing the total mass of the lens from 10{sup 15} M{sub Sun} to 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 15} M{sub Sun }. The gain in lensing cross section increases as the mass is split into more halos, provided that the lens potentials are projected close enough to interact with each other. A nonzero projected halo angular separation, equal halo mass ratio, and high projected halo concentration are the best mass configurations, whereas projected halo ellipticity, halo triaxiality, and the relative orientations of the halos are less important. Such high-mass, multiple-halo lines of sight exist in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey.

  2. Tracing a high redshift cosmic web with quasar systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Einasto, Maret; Tago, Erik; Lietzen, Heidi; Park, Changbom; Heinämäki, Pekka; Saar, Enn; Song, Hyunmi; Liivamägi, Lauri Juhan; Einasto, Jaan

    2014-08-01

    Context. To understand the formation, evolution, and present-day properties of the cosmic web we need to study it at low and high redshifts. Aims: We trace the cosmic web at redshifts that range from 1.0 ≤ z ≤ 1.8 by using the quasar (QSO) data from the SDSS DR7 QSO catalogue. Methods: We apply a friend-of-friend algorithm to the quasar and random catalogues to determine systems at a series of linking length and analyse richness and sizes of these systems. Results: At the linking lengths l ≤ 30 h-1 Mpc, the number of quasar systems is larger than the number of systems detected in random catalogues, and the systems themselves have smaller diameters than random systems. The diameters of quasar systems are comparable to the sizes of poor galaxy superclusters in the local Universe. The richest quasar systems have four members. The mean space density of quasar systems, ≈ 10-7 (h-1 Mpc)-3, is close to the mean space density of local rich superclusters. At intermediate linking lengths (40 ≤ l ≤ 70 h-1 Mpc), the richness and length of quasar systems are similar to those derived from random catalogues. Quasar system diameters are similar to the sizes of rich superclusters and supercluster chains in the local Universe. The percolating system, which penetrate the whole sample volume appears in a quasar sample at a smaller linking length than in random samples (85 h-1 Mpc). At the linking length 70 h-1 Mpc, the richest systems of quasars have diameters exceeding 500 h-1 Mpc. Quasar luminosities in systems are not correlated with the system richness. Conclusions: Quasar system catalogues in our web pages and at the Strasbourg Astronomical Data Center (CDS) serve as a database for searching superclusters of galaxies and for tracing the cosmic web at high redshifts. Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.orgThe catalogues are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc

  3. The dust budget crisis in high-redshift submillimetre galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowlands, K.; Gomez, H.; Dunne, L.; Aragon-Salamanca, A.; Dye, S.; Maddox, S.; da Cunha, E.; van der Werf, P.

    We apply a chemical evolution model to investigate the sources and evolution of dust in a sample of 26 high-redshift (z > 1) submillimetre galaxies (SMGs) with complete photometry from the UV-submillimetre. Models with dust produced only by low-intermediate mass stars fall a factor 240 short of the observed dust masses of SMGs, the well-known ‘dust-budget crisis’. Adding an extra source of dust from supernovae can account for the dust mass in 19% of the sample. After accounting for dust produced by supernovae the remaining deficit in the dust mass provides support for higher supernova yields or substantial grain growth in the interstellar medium. Efficient destruction of dust by supernova shocks increases the tension between the model and observed dust masses. Models which best reproduce the physical properties of SMGs have a rapid build-up of dust from both stellar and interstellar sources and minimal dust destruction.

  4. Relativistic jet feedback in high-redshift galaxies - I. Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Dipanjan; Bicknell, Geoffrey V.; Sutherland, Ralph; Wagner, Alex

    2016-09-01

    We present the results of 3D relativistic hydrodynamic simulations of interaction of active galactic nucleus jets with a dense turbulent two-phase interstellar medium, which would be typical of high-redshift galaxies. We describe the effect of the jet on the evolution of the density of the turbulent interstellar medium (ISM). The jet-driven energy bubble affects the gas to distances up to several kiloparsecs from the injection region. The shocks resulting from such interactions create a multiphase ISM and radial outflows. One of the striking result of this work is that low-power jets (Pjet ≲ 1043 ergs-1), although less efficient in accelerating clouds, are trapped in the ISM for a longer time and hence affect the ISM over a larger volume. Jets of higher power drill through with relative ease. Although the relativistic jets launch strong outflows, there is little net mass ejection to very large distances, supporting a galactic fountain scenario for local feedback.

  5. The circumgalactic medium of high-redshift galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pallottini, A.; Gallerani, S.; Ferrara, A.

    2014-10-01

    We study the properties of the circumgalactic medium (CGM) of high-z galaxies in the metal enrichment simulations presented in Pallottini et al. At z = 4, we find that the simulated CGM gas density profiles are self-similar, once scaled with the virial radius of the parent dark matter halo. We also find a simple analytical expression relating the neutral hydrogen equivalent width (EWH I) of CGM absorbers as a function of the line-of-sight impact parameter (b). We test our predictions against mock spectra extracted from the simulations and show that the model reproduces the EWH I(b) profile extracted from the synthetic spectra analysis. When compared with available data, our CGM model nicely predicts the observed EWH I(b) in z ≲ 2 galaxies, and supports the idea that the CGM profile does not evolve with redshift.

  6. Non-steller light from high-redshift radiogalaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rawlings, Steve; Eales, Stephen A.

    1990-01-01

    With the aid of a new IRCAM image of 3C356, researchers question the common assumption that radiosource-stimulated starbursts are responsible for the extended optical emission aligned with radio structures in high-redshift radiogalaxies. They propose an alternative model in which the radiation from a hidden luminous quasar is beamed along the radio axis and illuminates dense clumps of cool gas to produce both extended narrow emission line regions and, by Thomson scattering, extended optical continua. Simple observational tests of this model are possible and necessary if we are to continue to accept that the color, magnitude and shape evolution of radiogalaxies are controlled by the active evolution of stellar populations.

  7. XMM-Newton spectroscopy of high-redshift quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Page, K. L.; Reeves, J. N.; O'Brien, P. T.; Turner, M. J. L.

    2005-11-01

    XMM-Newton observations of 29 high-redshift (z > 2) quasars, including seven radio-quiet, 16 radio-loud and six broad absorption line (BAL) objects, are presented; due to the high redshifts, the rest-frame energy bands extend up to ~30-70 keV. Over 2-10 keV, the quasars can be well fitted in each case by a simple power law, with no strong evidence for iron emission lines. The lack of iron lines is in agreement both with dilution by the radio jet emission (for the radio-loud quasars) and the X-ray Baldwin effect. No Compton reflection humps at higher energies (i.e. above 10 keV in the rest frame) are detected either. Over the broad-band (0.3-10 keV), approximately half (nine out of 16) of the radio-loud quasars are intrinsically absorbed, with the values of NH generally being 1 × 1022 to 2 × 1022cm-2 in the rest frames of the objects. None of the seven radio-quiet objects shows excess absorption, while four of the six BAL quasars are absorbed. The radio-loud quasars have flatter continuum slopes than their radio-quiet counterparts (ΓRL~ 1.55; ΓRQ~ 1.98 over 2-10 keV), while, after modelling the absorption, the underlying photon index for the six BAL quasars is formally consistent with the non-BAL radio-quiet objects.

  8. High-redshift clumpy discs and bulges in cosmological simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceverino, Daniel; Dekel, Avishai; Bournaud, Frederic

    2010-06-01

    We analyse the first cosmological simulations that recover the fragmentation of high-redshift galactic discs driven by cold streams. The fragmentation is recovered owing to an AMR resolution better than 70pc with cooling below 104K. We study three typical star-forming galaxies in haloes of ~5 × 1011Msolar at z ~= 2.3 when they were not undergoing a major merger. The steady gas supply by cold streams leads to gravitationally unstable, turbulent discs, which fragment into giant clumps and transient features on a dynamical time-scale. The disc clumps are not associated with dark-matter haloes. The clumpy discs are self-regulated by gravity in a marginally unstable state. Clump migration and angular-momentum transfer on an orbital time-scale help the growth of a central bulge with a mass comparable to the disc. The continuous gas input keeps the system of clumpy disc and bulge in a near steady state for several Gyr. The average star formation rate, much of which occurs in the clumps, follows the gas accretion rate of ~45Msolaryr-1. The simulated galaxies resemble in many ways the observed star-forming galaxies at high redshift. Their properties are consistent with the simple theoretical framework presented in Dekel, Sari & Ceverino. In particular, a two-component analysis reveals that the simulated discs are indeed marginally unstable, and the time evolution confirms the robustness of the clumpy configuration in a cosmological steady state. By z ~ 1, the simulated systems are stabilized by a dominant stellar spheroid, demonstrating the process of `morphological quenching' of star formation. We demonstrate that the disc fragmentation is not a numerical artefact once the Jeans length is kept larger than nearly seven resolution elements, i.e. beyond the standard Truelove criterion.

  9. An empirical SFR estimator for high redshift galaxies:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnouts, Stephane

    2015-08-01

    At high redshift, most of the SFR indicators are limited to the most massive galaxies (Far-IR, radio) and out of reach of optical spectroscopy (Halpha). The UV continuum is the only one available at all redshifts and for galaxies within a large range of mass. The main question is then to properly account for dust absorption. The SED fitting are always limited in the choice of popular attenuation laws (if not only one, starburst) which relies on the slope of the UV continuum. The alternative is to measure the net budget between the absorbed vs un-absorbed UV light i.e. the infrared excess (IRX= Lir/Luv).By using the deep 24 micron in the COSMOS field, we have observed a remarkable behaviour of IRX stripes within the (NUV-r)o vs (r-K)o color diagram which can be used to derive robust SFR estimates just with the Luv, Lr and Lk luminosities (Arnouts et al, 2013). We have shown that we can explain the correlation if we consider a two component models for the birth clouds and the ISM and also a complete model for galaxy inclination to explain the extrem IRX values. We are now extended the method with Herschel data at higher redshift (z~2) and lower masses (M~10^8Mo) by using stacking techniques and find that the IRX-NUVrK correlation persists (Le Floc’h , in prep). This method allows us to derive an accurate SFR for each individual galaxy based on its location in the NUVrK diagram and with no assumption on dust attenuation law, a main caveat for SED fitting technique.We investigated the behavior of the scatter of the SFR-Mass in GOODS and COSMOS fields and find that both SFR (Lir+Luv) or SFR(NUVrK) estimatesare consistent (Ilbert et al., 2015). Finally will investigate the dust-free UV luminosity functions in between 0

  10. FRONTIER FIELDS: HIGH-REDSHIFT PREDICTIONS AND EARLY RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Coe, Dan; Bradley, Larry; Zitrin, Adi

    2015-02-20

    The Frontier Fields program is obtaining deep Hubble and Spitzer Space Telescope images of new ''blank'' fields and nearby fields gravitationally lensed by massive galaxy clusters. The Hubble images of the lensed fields are revealing nJy sources (AB mag > 31), the faintest galaxies yet observed. The full program will transform our understanding of galaxy evolution in the first 600 million years (z > 9). Previous programs have yielded a dozen or so z > 9 candidates, including perhaps fewer than expected in the Ultra Deep Field and more than expected in shallower Hubble images. In this paper, we present high-redshift (z > 6) number count predictions for the Frontier Fields and candidates in three of the first Hubble images. We show the full Frontier Fields program may yield up to ∼70 z > 9 candidates (∼6 per field). We base this estimate on an extrapolation of luminosity functions observed between 4 < z < 8 and gravitational lensing models submitted by the community. However, in the first two deep infrared Hubble images obtained to date, we find z ∼ 8 candidates but no strong candidates at z > 9. We defer quantitative analysis of the z > 9 deficit (including detection completeness estimates) to future work including additional data. At these redshifts, cosmic variance (field-to-field variation) is expected to be significant (greater than ±50%) and include clustering of early galaxies formed in overdensities. The full Frontier Fields program will significantly mitigate this uncertainty by observing six independent sightlines each with a lensing cluster and nearby blank field.

  11. X-Ray Absorption of High- Redshift Quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behar, Ehud; Eitan, Assaf

    2012-09-01

    Soft X-ray absorption of high-z quasars has been known for more than a decade, but its astrophysical context remains a mystery. In order to better understand this absorption, we have constructed the largest to date high-S/N sample of high-z quasars (z > 0.5) from the XMM-Newton archive. We find that generally, z<2 and radio quiet objects provide only upper limits for the 0.5 keV optical depth (tau). Thus, we use censored statistics methods to seek correlations between tau and other quasar parameters. We find a dramatic increase of tau with z [(1+z)^{2.5}], although the correlation is rather weak. The correlation of tau with radio luminosity (or loudness) is even weaker. We also compare the absorption behavior with redshift with a large sample of GRBs, and with the pattern expected if the diffuse intergalactic medium (IGM) is responsible for the observed absorption. We find that although the z > 2 quasar opacity is consistent with a diffuse IGM effect and with the high-z GRB opacities, absorption of intermediate z (0.5 < z < 2) quasars is too low for this scenario, which leads to the conclusion that a simple IGM origin for this absorption is unlikely.

  12. Sources and Evolution of Dust in the High Redshift Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwek, Eli

    2015-08-01

    Understanding the sources and evolution of dust in the very high redshift universe (z > 8-9) poses unique challenges to observers and theorists alike.The peak of the infrared emission from the dust falls in the ~ 80-120 micron region in the rest frame of the galaxy, or about 850 micron to 2 mm in the observers' frame. Sensitivity and background confusion are the main obstacles for the detection of these high-z galaxies and their association with optical and near-IR counterparts. Observations with instruments such as the SCUBA-2, AzTEC, Mambo, Laboca, and GISMO2 offer the best hope for detecting such sources.On the theoretical side, the sources of dust in these galaxies are confined to massive stars with main sequence lifetimes that are shorter than the age of the universe. This leaves core collapse supernovae (CCSNe) as the main source of thermally-condensed dust in these objects. Dust is not only produced by CCSNe, but also destroyed by them in the remnant phase of their evolution. Accounting for the mass of dust inferred from the far-IR/millimeter observations requires therefore an understanding of the various physical processes affecting the evolution of dust in the very high-z universe, and a carefull evaluation of the balance between their different dust formation and destruction mechanisms.

  13. Detection of high Lyman continuum leakage from four low-redshift compact star-forming galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izotov, Y. I.; Schaerer, D.; Thuan, T. X.; Worseck, G.; Guseva, N. G.; Orlitová, I.; Verhamme, A.

    2016-10-01

    Following our first detection reported in Izotov et al., we present the detection of Lyman continuum (LyC) radiation of four other compact star-forming galaxies observed with the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) onboard the Hubble Space Telescope. These galaxies, at redshifts of z ˜ 0.3, are characterized by high emission-line flux ratios [O III] λ5007/[O II] λ3727 ≳ 5. The escape fractions of the LyC radiation fesc(LyC) in these galaxies are in the range of ˜6-13 per cent, the highest values found so far in low-redshift star-forming galaxies. Narrow double-peaked Ly α emission lines are detected in the spectra of all four galaxies, compatible with predictions for LyC leakers. We find escape fractions of Ly α, fesc(Ly α) ˜ 20-40 per cent, among the highest known for Ly α emitting galaxies. Surface brightness profiles produced from the COS acquisition images reveal bright star-forming regions in the centre and exponential discs in the outskirts with disc scalelengths α in the range ˜0.6-1.4 kpc. Our galaxies are characterized by low metallicity, ˜1/8-1/5 solar, low stellar mass ˜(0.2-4) × 109 M⊙, high star formation rates, SFR ˜ 14-36 M⊙ yr-1, and high SFR densities, Σ ˜ 2-35 M⊙ yr-1 kpc-2. These properties are comparable to those of high-redshift star-forming galaxies. Finally, our observations, combined with our first detection reported in Izotov et al., reveal that a selection for compact star-forming galaxies showing high [O III] λ5007/[O II] λ3727 ratios appears to pick up very efficiently sources with escaping LyC radiation: all five of our selected galaxies are LyC leakers.

  14. Stellar Populations. A User Guide from Low to High Redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greggio, Laura; Renzini, Alvio

    2011-09-01

    This textbook is meant to illustrate the specific role played by stellar population diagnostics in our attempt to understand galaxy formation and evolution. The book starts with a rather unconventional summary of the results of stellar evolution theory (Chapter 1), as they provide the basis for the construction of synthetic stellar populations. Current limitations of stellar models are highlighted, which arise from the necessity to parametrize all those physical processes that involve bulk mass motions, such as convection, mixing, mass loss, etc. Chapter 2 deals with the foundations of the theory of synthetic stellar populations, and illustrates their energetics and metabolic functions, providing basic tools that will be used in subsequent chapters. Chapters 3 and 4 deal with resolved stellar populations, first addressing some general problems encountered in photometric studies of stellar fields. Then some highlights are presented illustrating our current capacity of measuring stellar ages in Galactic globular clusters, in the Galactic bulge and in nearby galaxies. Chapter 5 is dedicated to the exemplification of synthetic spectra of simple as well as composite stellar populations, drawing attention to those spectral features that may depend on less secure results of stellar evolution models. Chapter 6 illustrates how synthetic stellar populations are used to derive basic galaxy properties, such as star formation rates, stellar masses, ages and metallicities, and does so for galaxies at low as well as at high redshifts. Chapter 7 is dedicated to supernovae, distinguishing them in core collapse and thermonuclear cases, describing the evolution of their rates for various star formation histories, and estimating the supernova productivity of stellar populations and their chemical yields. In Chapter 8 the stellar initial mass function (IMF) is discussed, first showing how even apparently small IMF variations may have large effects on the demo! graphy of stellar

  15. EUV spectroscopy of high-redshift x-ray objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalski, M. P.; Wolff, M. T.; Wood, K. S.; Barbee, T. W., Jr.; Barstow, M. A.

    2010-07-01

    As astronomical observations are pushed to cosmological distances (z>3) the spectral energy distributions of X-ray objects, AGN for example, will be redshifted into the EUV waveband. Consequently, a wealth of critical spectral diagnostics, provided by, for example, the Fe L-shell complex and the O VII/VIII lines, will be lost to future planned X-ray missions (e.g., IXO, Gen-X) if operated at traditional X-ray energies. This opens up a critical gap in performance located at short EUV wavelengths, where critical X-ray spectral transitions occur in high-z objects. However, normal-incidence multilayer-grating technology, which performs best precisely at such wavelengths, together with advanced nanolaminate replication techniques have been developed and are now mature to the point where advanced EUV instrument designs with performance complementary to IXO and Gen-X are practical. Such EUV instruments could be flown either independently or as secondary instruments on these X-ray missions. We present here a critical examination of the limits placed on extragalactic EUV measurements by ISM absorption, the range where high-z measurements are practical, and the requirements this imposes on next-generation instrument designs. We conclude with a discussion of a breakthrough technology, nanolaminate replication, which enables such instruments.

  16. High-redshift gamma-ray bursts: observational signatures of superconducting cosmic strings?

    PubMed

    Cheng, K S; Yu, Yun-Wei; Harko, T

    2010-06-18

    The high-redshift gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), GRBs 080913 and 090423, challenge the conventional GRB progenitor models by their short durations, typical for short GRBs, and their high energy releases, typical for long GRBs. Meanwhile, the GRB rate inferred from high-redshift GRBs also remarkably exceeds the prediction of the collapsar model, with an ordinary star formation history. We show that all these contradictions could be eliminated naturally, if we ascribe some high-redshift GRBs to electromagnetic bursts of superconducting cosmic strings. High-redshift GRBs could become a reasonable way to test the superconducting cosmic string model because the event rate of cosmic string bursts increases rapidly with increasing redshifts, whereas the collapsar rate decreases. PMID:20867291

  17. The dust budget crisis in high-redshift submillimetre galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowlands, K.; Gomez, H. L.; Dunne, L.; Aragón-Salamanca, A.; Dye, S.; Maddox, S.; da Cunha, E.; van der Werf, P.

    2014-06-01

    We apply a chemical evolution model to investigate the sources and evolution of dust in a sample of 26 high-redshift (z > 1) submillimetre galaxies (SMGs) from the literature, with complete photometry from ultraviolet to the submillimetre. We show that dust produced only by low-intermediate-mass stars falls a factor 240 short of the observed dust masses of SMGs, the well-known `dust-budget crisis'. Adding an extra source of dust from supernovae can account for the dust mass in 19 per cent of the SMG sample. Even after accounting for dust produced by supernovae the remaining deficit in the dust mass budget provides support for higher supernova yields, substantial grain growth in the interstellar medium or a top-heavy IMF. Including efficient destruction of dust by supernova shocks increases the tension between our model and observed SMG dust masses. The models which best reproduce the physical properties of SMGs have a rapid build-up of dust from both stellar and interstellar sources and minimal dust destruction. Alternatively, invoking a top-heavy IMF or significant changes in the dust grain properties can solve the dust budget crisis only if dust is produced by both low-mass stars and supernovae and is not efficiently destroyed by supernova shocks.

  18. The fate of high-redshift massive compact galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Rosa, Ignacio G.; La Barbera, Francesco; Ferreras, Ignacio; Sánchez Almeida, Jorge; Dalla Vecchia, Claudio; Martínez-Valpuesta, Inma; Stringer, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Massive high-redshift quiescent compact galaxies (nicknamed red nuggets) have been traditionally connected to present-day elliptical galaxies, often overlooking the relationships that they may have with other galaxy types. We use large bulge-disc decomposition catalogues based on the Sloan Digital Sky Survey to check the hypothesis that red nuggets have survived as compact cores embedded inside the haloes or discs of present-day massive galaxies. In this study, we designate a compact core as the bulge component that satisfies a prescribed compactness criterion. Photometric and dynamic mass-size and mass-density relations are used to show that, in the inner regions of galaxies at z ˜ 0.1, there are abundant compact cores matching the peculiar properties of the red nuggets, an abundance comparable to that of red nuggets at z ˜ 1.5. Furthermore, the morphology distribution of the present-day galaxies hosting compact cores is used to demonstrate that, in addition to the standard channel connecting red nuggets with elliptical galaxies, a comparable fraction of red nuggets might have ended up embedded in discs. This result generalizes the inside-out formation scenario; present-day massive galaxies can begin as dense spheroidal cores (red nuggets), around which either a spheroidal halo or a disc is formed later.

  19. Is deuterium in high-redshift Lyman limit systems primordial?

    SciTech Connect

    Jedamzik, K.; Fuller, G.M.

    1997-07-01

    Detections of deuterium in high-redshift Lyman limit absorption systems along the line of sight to QSOs promise to reveal the primordial deuterium abundance. At present, the deuterium abundances (D/H) derived from the very few systems observed are significantly discordant. Assuming the validity of all the data, if this discordance does not reflect intrinsic primordial inhomogeneity, then it must arise from processes operating after the primordial nucleosynthesis epoch. We consider processes that might lead to significant deuterium production or destruction and yet allow the cloud to mimic a chemically unevolved system. These processes include, for example, anomalous/stochastic chemical evolution and D/{sup 4}He photodestruction. In general, we find it unlikely that these processes could have significantly altered D/H in Lyman limit clouds. We argue that chemical evolution scenarios, unless very finely tuned, cannot account for significant local deuterium depletion since they tend to overproduce {sup 12}C, even when allowance is made for possible outflow. Similarly, D/{sup 4}He photodestruction schemes engineered to locally produce or destroy deuterium founder on the necessity of requiring an improbably large {gamma}-ray source density. Future observations of D/H in Lyman limit systems may provide important insight into the initial conditions for the primordial nucleosynthesis process, early chemical evolution, and the galaxy formation process. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Astronomical Society}

  20. Selection and Physical Properties of High-redshift Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, G. W.

    2014-09-01

    that the fraction of OGs and DGs in our sample (COSMOS) is similar, about 52% of them are DGs, and the other 48% are OGs. For 24 EROs in the UDF, 16 fall into DGs, while 8 are OGs. To reduce the redundancy of these three different classification methods, we perform a principal component analysis on the measurements of EROs, and find that the nonparametric measures and SEDs are efficient in segregating DGs and OGs. We investigate the dependence of the fraction of EROs on their observational properties, and the results suggest that DGs become increasingly important toward fainter magnitudes, redder colors, and higher redshifts. Moreover, we find that the clustering of EROs is much stronger than that of full K-limited samples of galaxies; and the clustering amplitude of OGs is a factor of ˜2 larger than DGs. In Chapter 3, we pick out 1609 star-forming galaxies (sgzKs: gzK=(z-K)_{AB}-1.4(g-z)_{AB}≥ 0.2) and 422 passively evolving galaxies (pgzKs: gzK<0.2 and (z-K)_{AB}>2.7) at z˜2 in the AEGIS field (K_{AB} < 22.0). The number counts of pgzKs in our sample turn over at K_{AB} ˜ 21.0, and both the number of faint and bright objects (including sgzKs and pgzKs) exceed the predictions of a recent semi-analytic model of galaxy formation. A more successful model is needed to explain this diversity. It is also found that the star formation rate (SFR) and specific SFR (sSFR) of sgzKs increase with redshift at all masses, implying that star-forming galaxies were much more active on average in the past. Moreover, the sSFR of massive galaxies is lower at all redshifts, suggesting that the mass growth of low-mass galaxies is more attributed to the star formation while comparing with high-mass galaxies. From the HST WFC3/F160W imaging data, we find that gzKs not only have diffuse structures, but also have single-object morphologies, implying that there are morphological variety and different formation processes for these galaxies at z˜2. In addition, we also find ˜ 10% of 828 gz

  1. High-Redshift Supernovae in the Hubble Deep Field

    SciTech Connect

    Gilliland, R.L.; Nugent, P.E.; Phillips, M.M.

    1999-08-01

    Two supernovae detected in the Hubble Deep Field (HDF) using the original 1995 December epoch and data from a shorter (63,000 s in F814W) 1997 December visit with {ital HST} are discussed. The supernovae (SNe) are both associated with distinct galaxies at redshifts of 0.95 (spectroscopic) from Cohen et al. and 1.32 (photometric) from the work of Fern{acute a}ndez-Soto, Lanzetta, & Yahil. These redshifts are near, in the case of 0.95, and well beyond, for 1.32, the greatest distance reported previously for SNe. We show that our observations are sensitive to supernovae to z{approx_lt}1.8 in either epoch for an event near peak brightness. Detailed simulations are discussed that quantify the level at which false events from our search phase would start to arise and the completeness of our search as a function of both SN brightness and host galaxy redshift. The number of Type Ia and Type II SNe expected as a function of redshift in the two HDF epochs are discussed in relation to several published predictions and our own detailed calculations. A mean detection frequency of one SN per epoch for the small HDF area is consistent with expectations from current theory. {copyright} {ital {copyright} 1999.} {ital The American Astronomical Society}

  2. Intergalactic Helium Absorption toward High-Redshift Quasars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giroux, Mark L.; Fardal, Mark A.; Shull, J. Michael

    1995-01-01

    The recent Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations of the z(q) = 3.286 quasar Q0302-003 (Jakobsen et at. 1994) and the z(q) = 3.185 quasar Q1935-67 by Tytler (1995) show absorption edges at the redshifted wavelength of He II 304 A. A key goal is to distinguish between contributions from discrete Ly-alpha forest clouds and a smoothly distributed intergalactic medium (IGM). We model the contributions from each of these sources of He II absorption, including the distribution of line Doppler widths and column densities, the 'He II proximity effect' from the quasar, and a self-consistent derivation of the He II opacity of the universe as a function of the spectrum of ionizing sources, with the assumption that both the clouds and the IGM are photoionized. The He II edge can be fully accounted for by He II line blanketing for reasonable distributions of line widths and column densities in the Ly-alpha forest, provided that the ionizing sources have spectral index alpha(s) greater than 1.5, and any He II proximity effect is neglected. Even with some contribution from a diffuse IGM, it is difficult to account for the edge observed by Jakobsen et al. (1994) with a 'hard' source spectrum (alpha(s) less than 1.3). The proximity effect modifies the relative contributions of the clouds and IGM to tau(He II) near the quasar (z approx. less than z(q)) and markedly increases the amount of He II absorption required. This implies, for example, that to account for the He II edge with line blanketing alone, the minimum spectral index alpha(s) must be increased from 1.5 to 1.9. We demonstrate the need for higher resolution observations that characterize the change in transmission as z approaches z(q) and resolve line-free gaps in the continuum. We set limits on the density of the diffuse IGM and suggest that the IGM and Ly-alpha clouds are likely to be a significant repository for dark baryons.

  3. A search for moderate-redshift survivors from the population of luminous compact passive galaxies at high redshift

    SciTech Connect

    Stockton, Alan; Shih, Hsin-Yi; Larson, Kirsten; Mann, Andrew W. E-mail: hsshih@ifa.hawaii.edu E-mail: amann@ifa.hawaii.edu

    2014-01-10

    From a search of a ∼2400 deg{sup 2} region covered by both the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey databases, we have attempted to identify galaxies at z ∼ 0.5 that are consistent with their being essentially unmodified examples of the luminous passive compact galaxies found at z ∼ 2.5. After isolating good candidates via deeper imaging, we further refine the sample with Keck moderate-resolution spectroscopy and laser guide star adaptive-optics imaging. For four of the five galaxies that so far remain after passing through this sieve, we analyze plausible star-formation histories based on our spectra in order to identify galaxies that may have survived with little modification from the population formed at high redshift. We find two galaxies that are consistent with having formed ≳ 95% of their mass at z > 5. We attempt to estimate masses both from our stellar population determinations and from velocity dispersions. Given the high frequency of small axial ratios, both in our small sample and among samples found at high redshifts, we tentatively suggest that some of the more extreme examples of passive compact galaxies may have prolate morphologies.

  4. EUV Spectroscopy of High-redshift X-ray Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalski, Michael Paul; Wolff, M. T.; Wood, K. S.; Barbee, T. W., Jr.

    2010-03-01

    As astronomical observations are pushed to cosmological distances (z>3) the spectral energy distributions of X-ray objects, AGNs for example, will have their maxima redshifted into the EUV waveband ( 90-912 Å/0.1-0.01 keV). Consequently, a wealth of spectral diagnostics, provided by, for example, the Fe L-shell complex ( 60-6 Å/0.2-2.0 keV) and the O VII/VIII lines ( 20 Å/0.5 keV), will be lost to X-ray instruments operating at traditional ( 0.5-10 keV) and higher X-ray energies. There are precedents in other wavebands. For example, HST evolutionary studies will become largely the province of JWST. Despite the successes of EUVE, the ROSAT WFC, and the Chandra LETG, the EUV continues to be unappreciated and under-utilized, partly because of a preconception that absorption by neutral galactic Hydrogen in the ISM prevents any useful extragalactic measurements at all EUV wavelengths and, until recently, by a lack of a suitable enabling technology. Thus, if future planned X-ray missions (e.g., IXO, Gen-X) are optimized again for traditional X-ray energies, their performance (effective area, resolving power) will be cut off at ultrasoft X-ray energies or at best be radically reduced in the EUV. This opens up a critical gap in performance located right at short EUV wavelengths, where the critical X-ray spectral transitions occur in high-z objects. However, normal-incidence multilayer-grating technology, which performs best precisely at such wavelengths, together with advanced nano-laminate fabrication techniques have been developed and are now mature to the point where advanced EUV instrument designs with performance complementary to IXO and Gen-X are practical. Such EUV instruments could be flown either independently or as secondary instruments on these X-ray missions. We present here a critical examination of the limits placed on extragalactic EUV measurements by ISM absorption, the range where high-z measurements are practical, and the requirements this imposes on

  5. GALAXY CLUSTERS AT HIGH REDSHIFT AND EVOLUTION OF BRIGHTEST CLUSTER GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, Z. L.; Han, J. L.

    2011-06-10

    Identification of high-redshift clusters is important for studies of cosmology and cluster evolution. Using photometric redshifts of galaxies, we identify 631 clusters from the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) wide field, 202 clusters from the CFHT deep field, 187 clusters from the Cosmic Evolution Survey (COSMOS) field, and 737 clusters from the Spitzer Wide-area InfraRed Extragalactic Survey (SWIRE) field. The redshifts of these clusters are in the range 0.1 {approx}< z {approx}< 1.6. Merging these cluster samples gives 1644 clusters in the four survey fields, of which 1088 are newly identified and more than half are from the large SWIRE field. Among 228 clusters of z {>=} 1, 191 clusters are newly identified, and most of them from the SWIRE field. With this large sample of high-redshift clusters, we study the color evolution of the brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs). The r' - z' and r{sup +} - m{sub 3.6{mu}m} colors of the BCGs are consistent with a stellar population synthesis model in which the BCGs are formed at redshift z{sub f} {>=} 2 and evolved passively. The g' - z' and B - m{sub 3.6{mu}m} colors of the BCGs at redshifts z > 0.8 are systematically bluer than the passive evolution model for galaxies formed at z{sub f} {approx} 2, indicating star formation in high-redshift BCGs.

  6. THE SPITZER HIGH-REDSHIFT RADIO GALAXY SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    De Breuck, Carlos; Galametz, Audrey; Vernet, Joel; Seymour, Nick; Stern, Daniel; Eisenhardt, P. R. M.; Willner, S. P.; Fazio, G. G.; Lacy, Mark; Rettura, Alessandro; Rocca-Volmerange, Brigitte

    2010-12-10

    We present results from a comprehensive imaging survey of 70 radio galaxies at redshifts 1 < z < 5.2 using all three cameras on board the Spitzer Space Telescope. The resulting spectral energy distributions unambiguously show a stellar population in 46 sources and hot dust emission associated with the active nucleus in 59. Using a new rest-frame S{sub 3{sub {mu}m}}/S{sub 1.6{sub {mu}m}} versus S{sub 5{sub {mu}m}}/S{sub 3{sub {mu}m}} criterion, we identify 42 sources where the rest-frame 1.6 {mu}m emission from the stellar population can be measured. For these radio galaxies, the median stellar mass is high, 2 x 10{sup 11} M{sub sun}, and remarkably constant within the range 1 < z < 3. At z>3, there is tentative evidence for a factor of two decrease in stellar mass. This suggests that radio galaxies have assembled the bulk of their stellar mass by z {approx} 3, but confirmation by more detailed decomposition of stellar and active galactic nucleus (AGN) emission is needed. The rest-frame 500 MHz radio luminosities are only marginally correlated with stellar mass but are strongly correlated with the rest-frame 5 {mu}m hot dust luminosity. This suggests that the radio galaxies have a large range of Eddington ratios. We also present new Very Large Array 4.86 and 8.46 GHz imaging of 14 radio galaxies and find that radio core dominance-an indicator of jet orientation-is strongly correlated with hot dust luminosity. While all of our targets were selected as narrow-lined, type 2 AGNs, this result can be understood in the context of orientation-dependent models if there is a continuous distribution of orientations from obscured type 2 to unobscured type 1 AGNs rather than a clear dichotomy. Finally, four radio galaxies have nearby (<6'') companions whose mid-IR colors are suggestive of their being AGNs. This may indicate an association between radio galaxy activity and major mergers.

  7. WISH: Wide-field Imaging Durvayor for High-redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Toru

    2015-08-01

    We introduce the concept and current status of WISH project and discuss the science cases. WISH is a proposed space science mission for JAXA, which is dedicated for the deep and wide-field near-infrared imaging surveys. The mission contains the 1.5m cooled telescope as well as the imager with the FoV of ~850 square arcmin. The main goal of WISH is to detect and study galaxies at z=8-15 in the earliest history of structure formation in the universe. The key feature is to conduct WISH Ultra Deep Survey, which images in total of 100 square degrees in 6 broad-band filters at 0.9-4.5 micron down to 28AB magnitude. While more than 10^5 galaxies at z=8-9, 10^4 galaxies at z=11-12 will be detected, WISH-UDS is designed to constrain UV luminosity function at z=15. Depending on the models of the earliest evolution history, 1-1000 galaxies at z~15 (~100 galaxies for the moderate cases) will be detected. The UV spectral properties as well as the clustering properties of galaxies at z=8-15 can be studied as well; UV slope can be measured up to z=15, and the stellar and dark-matter-halo masses can be obtained up to z=9. WISH UDS can provide excellent opportunities for studying SNe at high redshift. Up to ~7000 type Ia SNe at z>1 can be detected and the distance modulus can be constrained with the precision of 0.9-1.5% at z>1.5. More than 100 Super Luminous SNe at z>6, and 10 SLSN at z>10 can also be detected, which allow us to study the earliest history of massive star formation in the universe. WISH imaging surveys as well as WISHSpec, which is an optional parallel-operation simple IFU spectrograph, also provide unique opportunities in various astronomical fields. WISH mission proposal was submitted to JAXA in February 2015 for the first down selection of JAXA Large Strategic Science Mission targeting the launch date in 2020-22. International collaborations including SAO (G.Fazio et al.), LAM (D. Burgarella et al.) and Canada (M.Sawicki et al.) are also actively coordinated.

  8. Quantitative comparison between type Ia supernova spectra at low and high redshifts: a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garavini, G.; Folatelli, G.; Nobili, S.; Aldering, G.; Amanullah, R.; Antilogus, P.; Astier, P.; Blanc, G.; Bronder, T.; Burns, M. S.; Conley, A.; Deustua, S. E.; Doi, M.; Fabbro, S.; Fadeyev, V.; Gibbons, R.; Goldhaber, G.; Goobar, A.; Groom, D. E.; Hook, I.; Howell, D. A.; Kashikawa, N.; Kim, A. G.; Kowalski, M.; Kuznetsova, N.; Lee, B. C.; Lidman, C.; Mendez, J.; Morokuma, T.; Motohara, K.; Nugent, P. E.; Pain, R.; Perlmutter, S.; Quimby, R.; Raux, J.; Regnault, N.; Ruiz-Lapuente, P.; Sainton, G.; Schahmaneche, K.; Smith, E.; Spadafora, A. L.; Stanishev, V.; Thomas, R. C.; Walton, N. A.; Wang, L.; Wood-Vasey, W. M.; Yasuda, N.

    2007-08-01

    We develop a method to measure the strength of the absorption features in type Ia supernova (SN Ia) spectra and use it to make a quantitative comparisons between the spectra of type Ia supernovae at low and high redshifts. In this case study, we apply the method to 12 high-redshift (0.212 ≤ z ≤ 0.912) SNe Ia observed by the Supernova Cosmology Project. Through measurements of the strengths of these features and of the blueshift of the absorption minimum in Ca ii H&K, we show that the spectra of the high-redshift SNe Ia are quantitatively similar to spectra of nearby SNe Ia (z < 0.15). One supernova in our high redshift sample, SN 2002fd at z = 0.279, is found to have spectral characteristics that are associated with peculiar SN 1991T/SN 1999aa-like supernovae.

  9. Quantitative comparison between Type Ia supernova spectra at low and high redshifts: A case study

    SciTech Connect

    Supernova Cosmology Project; Nugent, Peter E; Garavini, G.; Folatelli, G.; Nobili, S.; Aldering, G.; Amanullah, R.; Antilogus, P.; Astier, P.; Blanc, G.; Bronder, J.; Burns, M.S.; Conley, A.; Deustua, S. E.; Doi, M.; Fabbro, S.; Fadeyev, V.; Gibbons, R.; Goldhaber, G.; Goobar, A.; Groom, D. E.; Hook, I.; Howell, D. A.; Kashikawa, N.; Kim, A. G.; Kowalski, M.; Kuznetsova, N.; Lee, B. C.; Lidman, C.; Mendez, J.; Morokuma, T.; Motohara, K.; Nugent, P. E.; Pain, R.; Perlmutter, S.; Quimby, R.; Raux, J.; Regnault, N.; Ruiz-Lapuente, P.; Sainton, G.; Schahmaneche, K.; Smith, E.; Spadafora, A. L.; Stanishev, V.; Thomas, R. C.; Walton, N. A.; Wang, L.; Wood-Vasey, W. M.; Yasuda, N.

    2008-03-24

    We develop a method to measure the strength of the absorption features in type Ia supernova (SN Ia) spectra and use it to make a quantitative comparisons between the spectra of type Ia supernovae at low and high redshifts. In this case study, we apply the method to 12 high-redshift (0.212 = z = 0.912) SNe Ia observed by the Supernova Cosmology Project. Through measurements of the strengths of these features and of the blueshift of theabsorption minimum in Ca ii H&K, we show that the spectra of the high-redshift SNe Ia are quantitatively similar to spectra of nearby SNe Ia (z< 0.15). One supernova in our high redshift sample, SN 2002fd at z = 0.279, is found to have spectral characteristics that are associated with peculiar SN 1991T/SN 1999aa-like supernovae.

  10. Where stars form and live at high redshift: clues from the infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Béthermin, M.; Doré, O.; Lagache, G.

    2012-01-01

    The relation between dark matter halos and the loci of star formation at high redshift is a pressing question in contemporary cosmology. Matching the abundance of halos to the abundance of infrared (IR) galaxies, we explore the link between dark matter halo mass (Mh), stellar mass (M⋆) and star-formation rate (SFR) up to a redshift of 2. Our findings are five-fold. First, we find a strong evolution of the relation between M⋆ and SFR as a function of redshift with an increase of sSFR = SFR/M⋆ by a factor ~30 between z = 0 and z = 2.3. Second, we observe a decrease of sSFR with stellar mass. These results reproduce observed trends at redshift z > 0.3. Third, we find that the star formation is most efficient in dark matter halos with Mh ≃ 5 × 1011 M⊙, with hints of an increase of this mass with redshift. Fourth, we find that SFR/Mh increases by a factor ~15 between z = 0 and z = 2.3. Finally we find that the SFR density is dominated by halo masses close to ~7 × 1011 M⊙ at all redshift, with a rapid decrease at lower and higher halo masses. Despite its simplicity, our novel use of IR observations unveils some characteristic mass-scales governing star formation at high redshift.

  11. ON THE SHAPES AND STRUCTURES OF HIGH-REDSHIFT COMPACT GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Chevance, Melanie; Damjanov, Ivana; Abraham, Roberto G.; Weijmans, Anne-Marie; Simard, Luc; Van den Bergh, Sidney; Caris, Evelyn; Glazebrook, Karl

    2012-08-01

    Recent deep Hubble Space Telescope WFC3 imaging suggests that a majority of compact quiescent massive galaxies at z {approx} 2 may contain disks. To investigate this claim, we have compared the ellipticity distribution of 31 carefully selected high-redshift massive quiescent compact galaxies to a set of mass-selected ellipticity and Sersic index distributions obtained from two-dimensional structural fits to {approx}40, 000 nearby galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. A Kolmogorov-Smirnov test shows that the distribution of ellipticities for the high-redshift galaxies is consistent with the ellipticity distribution of a similarly chosen sample of massive early-type galaxies. However, the distribution of Sersic indices for the high-redshift sample is inconsistent with that of local early-type galaxies, and instead resembles that of local disk-dominated populations. The mismatch between the properties of high-redshift compact galaxies and those of both local early-type and disk-dominated systems leads us to conclude that the basic structures of high-redshift compact galaxies probably do not closely resemble those of any single local galaxy population. Any galaxy population analog to the high-redshift compact galaxies that exists at the current epoch is either a mix of different types of galaxies, or possibly a unique class of objects on their own.

  12. Characterizing the redshifts and luminosities of WISE selected obscured AGN using SALT optical spectra.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hviding, Raphael E.; Hickox, Ryan C.; Hainline, Kevin N.; Carroll, Christopher M.; DiPompeo, Mike A.; Jones, Mackenzie L.

    2016-08-01

    We present the results of several optical spectroscopic surveys covering over 100 candidate luminous obscured active galactic nuclei (AGN) identified by their mid-infrared emission detected with the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). These galaxies were selected based on red WISE colors and galaxy-like optical emission, and were studied using long-slit optical spectroscopy with the Robert Stobie Spectrograph (RSS) on the Southern African Large Telescope (SALT). Our spectra were analyzed to obtain redshifts and emission line flux ratios for each galaxy. These results verify that WISE is an effective section method for luminous obscured AGN, allow for the characterization of redshifts and luminosities of the WISE color selected obscured AGN population, and could potentially contribute to large statistical studies of obscured AGN distributions in the future.

  13. ON THE EFFECT OF THE COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND IN HIGH-REDSHIFT (SUB-)MILLIMETER OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Da Cunha, Elisabete; Groves, Brent; Walter, Fabian; Decarli, Roberto; Rix, Hans-Walter; Weiss, Axel; Bertoldi, Frank; Carilli, Chris; Daddi, Emanuele; Sargent, Mark; Maiolino, Roberto; Riechers, Dominik; Smail, Ian

    2013-03-20

    Modern (sub-)millimeter interferometers enable the measurement of the cool gas and dust emission of high-redshift galaxies (z > 5). However, at these redshifts the cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature is higher, approaching, and even exceeding, the temperature of cold dust and molecular gas observed in the local universe. In this paper, we discuss the impact of the warmer CMB on (sub-)millimeter observations of high-redshift galaxies. The CMB affects the observed (sub-)millimeter dust continuum and the line emission (e.g., carbon monoxide, CO) in two ways: (1) it provides an additional source of (both dust and gas) heating and (2) it is a non-negligible background against which the line and continuum emission are measured. We show that these two competing processes affect the way we interpret the dust and gas properties of high-redshift galaxies using spectral energy distribution models. We quantify these effects and provide correction factors to compute what fraction of the intrinsic dust (and line) emission can be detected against the CMB as a function of frequency, redshift, and temperature. We discuss implications on the derived properties of high-redshift galaxies from (sub-)millimeter data. Specifically, the inferred dust and molecular gas masses can be severely underestimated for cold systems if the impact of the CMB is not properly taken into account.

  14. The importance of stellar feedback for high-redshift galaxy populations in hierarchical formation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirschmann, Michaela; De Lucia, Gabriella

    2015-08-01

    One major deficiency of most state-of-the-art galaxy formation models consists in their inability of capturing the observed galaxy downsizing trend as they significantly over-estimate the number density of low-mass galaxies at high redshifts. This points towards fundamental modifications in modeling the interplay between star formation and stellar feedback. Employing an enhanced galaxy formation model with a full chemical enrichment scheme, we present an improved model for stellar feedback (based on parametrizations extracted from cosmological zoom simulations), in which strong gas outflows happen due to bursty star formation at high redshift, while star formation is mainly "quiescent" not causing any significant outflows anymore at low redshift. Due to the stronger gas outflows at high z, early star formation is strongly delayed towards later times in good agreement with abundance matching predictions. As a consequence, also metal enrichment gets significantly delayed, resulting in a much more realistic redshift evolution of the gaseous metallicity. Overall, with our new stellar feedback model, we can successfully reproduce many observational constraints, such as the redshift evolution of the stellar mass function and of the SFR function, the gaseous and stellar metallicity content, the cold gas fractions and the fraction of quiescent/red galaxies at both low and high redshifts. The resulting new-generation galaxy catalogues based on that model are expected to significantly contribute to the interpretation of current and up-coming large-scale surveys (HST, JWST, Euclid) which in turn may also help to further constrain feedback models.

  15. BINARY QUASARS AT HIGH REDSHIFT. I. 24 NEW QUASAR PAIRS AT z {approx} 3-4

    SciTech Connect

    Hennawi, Joseph F.; Myers, Adam D.; Shen, Yue; Strauss, Michael A.; Djorgovski, S. G.; Glikman, Eilat; Mahabal, Ashish; Fan Xiaohui; Martin, Crystal L.; Richards, Gordon T.; Schneider, Donald P.; Shankar, Francesco

    2010-08-20

    The clustering of quasars on small scales yields fundamental constraints on models of quasar evolution and the buildup of supermassive black holes. This paper describes the first systematic survey to discover high-redshift binary quasars. Using color-selection and photometric redshift techniques, we searched 8142 deg{sup 2} of Sloan Digital Sky Survey imaging data for binary quasar candidates, and confirmed them with follow-up spectroscopy. Our sample of 27 high-redshift binaries (24 of them new discoveries) at redshifts 2.9 < z < 4.3 with proper transverse separations 10 kpc < R{sub perpendicular} < 650 kpc increases the number of such objects known by an order of magnitude. Eight members of this sample are very close pairs with R{sub perpendicular} < 100 kpc, and of these close systems four are at z>3.5. The completeness and efficiency of our well-defined selection algorithm are quantified using simulated photometry and we find that our sample is {approx}50% complete. Our companion paper uses this knowledge to make the first measurement of the small-scale clustering (R < 1 h {sup -1} Mpc comoving) of high-redshift quasars. High-redshift binaries constitute exponentially rare coincidences of two extreme (M {approx}> 10{sup 9} M {sub sun}) supermassive black holes. At z {approx} 4, there is about one close binary per 10 Gpc{sup 3}, thus these could be the highest sigma peaks, the analogs of superclusters, in the early universe.

  16. Was Star Formation Suppressed in High-Redshift Minihalos?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haiman, Zoltán; Bryan, Greg L.

    2006-10-01

    The primordial gas in the earliest dark matter halos, collapsing at redshifts z~20, with masses Mhalo~106 Msolar and virial temperatures Tvir<104 K, relied on the presence of molecules for cooling. Several theoretical studies have suggested that gas contraction and star formation in these minihalos was suppressed by radiative, chemical, thermal, and dynamical feedback processes. The recent measurement by the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) of the optical depth to electron scattering, τ~0.09+/-0.03, provides the first empirical evidence for this suppression. The new WMAP result is consistent with vanilla models of reionization, in which ionizing sources populate cold dark matter halos down to a virial temperature of Tvir=104 K. On the other hand, we show that in order to avoid overproducing the optical depth, the efficiency for the production of ionizing photons in minihalos must have been about an order of magnitude lower than expected from massive metal-free stars and lower than the efficiency in large halos that can cool via atomic hydrogen (Tvir>104 K). This conclusion is insensitive to assumptions about the efficiency of ionizing photon production in the large halos, as long as reionization ends by z=6, as required by the spectra of bright quasars at z<~6. Our conclusion is strengthened if the clumping of the ionized gas evolves with redshift, as suggested by semianalytical predictions and three-dimensional numerical simulations.

  17. Are starbursts really mergers at high redshift? A kinematic investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickinson, Mark; Kartaltepe, Jeyhan; Weiner, Ben; Kassin, Susan; Bournaud, Frederic; Eisenhardt, Peter; Inami, Hanae; Pforr, Janine

    2014-02-01

    Star-forming galaxies obey a remarkable ``main sequence'' correlation between their star formation rates (SFR) and stellar masses (M^ast), whose normalization (the specific star formation rate, SSFR) evolves with redshift. A minority of starbursts, with much higher SSFR, are found at all redshifts, and may be an important evolutionary stage, fueling AGN activity and building bulges and spheroids. Locally, starbursting ultraluminous infrared galaxies are the product of galaxy mergers, but this is not so clear at z > 1, where ULIRGs are hundreds of times more common, but where HST images reveal only loose correlations between irregular/disturbed morphology and starburst activity. We propose to use MOSFIRE spectroscopy to measure kinematics for 80 Herschel far-IR-selected galaxies at z 1.5, distributed over the SFR-M^ast plane. We will look for kinematic differences (larger σ_V or σ/V_rot at fixed M^ast; increased line asymmetry, and a new kinematic irregularity index optimized from numerical simulations) between main sequence and starburst galaxies that would indicate a prevalence of merger activity at higher SSFR. This program was allocated 1 night in 2013B, but was scheduled so that it will be impossible to observe our fields in 3 position angles as required. We request additional time in 2014A to complete the observations as planned.

  18. Are starbursts really mergers at high redshift? A kinematic investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickinson, Mark; Kartaltepe, Jeyhan; Weiner, Ben; Kassin, Susan; Bournaud, Frederic; Eisenhardt, Peter; Inami, Hanae; Pforr, Janine

    2013-08-01

    Star-forming galaxies obey a remarkable ``main sequence'' correlation between their star formation rates (SFR) and stellar masses (M^ast), whose normalization (the specific star formation rate or SSFR) evolves with redshift. A minority population of starbursts with much higher SSFR are found at all redshifts, and may represent an important stage in the transformation and evolution of galaxies, fueling AGN activity and building bulges and spheroids. Locally, starbursting ultraluminous infrared galaxies are clearly the product of galaxy mergers, but this is much less clear at z > 1, where ULIRGs are hundreds of times more common than today, but where HST observations reveal only loose correlations between irregular/disturbed morphology and starburst activity. We propose to use MOSFIRE spectroscopy to measure kinematics for >80 Herschel far-IR-selected galaxies at z 1.5, distributed over the SFR-M^ast plane. We will look for kinematic differences (larger σ_V or σ/V_rot at fixed M^ast; increased line asymmetry, and a new kinematic irregularity index optimized from numerical simulations) between main sequence and starburst galaxies that would indicate a prevalence of merger activity at higher SSFR.

  19. Lyman alpha emitting galaxies at high redshift: Direct detection of young galaxies in a young universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, Steven Arthur

    An early result of galaxy formation theory was the prediction that the copious ionizing radiation produced in nascent galaxies undergoing their first starbursts should in turn produce a strong Lya emission line. We report on our efforts to detect and characterize primeval galaxies by searching for this expected Lya signature with two observational techniques: serendipitous slit spectroscopy, and narrowband imaging selection. In Part I, we describe our serendipitous slit spectroscopy survey of the Hubble Deep Field and its environs, which resulted in a catalog of 74 spectroscopic redshifts spanning 0.10 < z < 5.77, including a galaxy cluster at z = 0.85 and five galaxies at z > 5. Follow-up observations at higher resolution resulted in the additional serendipitous detection of a strong Lya-emitting galaxy at z = 5.190 (ES1). At the time of its discovery, ES1 was one of only nine known galaxies at z > 5, and was the sixth most distant known galaxy. The unprecedented spectral purity of the observation offers evidence for a galaxy-scale outflow with a. velocity of v > 300 km s -1 , consistent with wind speeds observed in powerful local starbursts (typically 10 2 to 10 3 km s -1 ), and with simulations of the late- stage evolution of Lya emission in star-forming systems. Our final serendipitous detection is the remarkable source CXOHDFN J123635.6+621424, which is both the highest redshift known spiral galaxy, and a rare example of a high redshift, hard X-ray-emitting Type II AGN. Significantly, all of these results were acquired with no direct allocation of telescope time. In Part II, we report on our implementation of narrowband imaging selection, with which we traded redshift coverage for survey volume, focusing on the systematic study of galaxies at a particular epoch in favor of chasing that rare, most-distant object. This effort resulted in a catalog of 76 z [approximate] 4.5 Lya-emitting galaxies spectroscopically-confirmed in campaigns of Keck/LRIS and Keck

  20. Probing Pre-galactic Metal Enrichment with High-redshift Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, F. Y.; Bromm, Volker; Greif, Thomas H.; Stacy, Athena; Dai, Z. G.; Loeb, Abraham; Cheng, K. S.

    2012-11-01

    We explore high-redshift gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) as promising tools to probe pre-galactic metal enrichment. We utilize the bright afterglow of a Population III (Pop III) GRB exploding in a primordial dwarf galaxy as a luminous background source, and calculate the strength of metal absorption lines that are imprinted by the first heavy elements in the intergalactic medium (IGM). To derive the GRB absorption line diagnostics, we use an existing highly resolved simulation of the formation of a first galaxy which is characterized by the onset of atomic hydrogen cooling in a halo with virial temperature >~ 104 K. We explore the unusual circumburst environment inside the systems that hosted Pop III stars, modeling the density evolution with the self-similar solution for a champagne flow. For minihalos close to the cooling threshold, the circumburst density is roughly proportional to (1 + z) with values of about a few cm-3. In more massive halos, corresponding to the first galaxies, the density may be larger, n >~ 100 cm-3. The resulting afterglow fluxes are weakly dependent on redshift at a fixed observed time, and may be detectable with the James Webb Space Telescope and Very Large Array in the near-IR and radio wavebands, respectively, out to redshift z >~ 20. We predict that the maximum of the afterglow emission shifts from near-IR to millimeter bands with peak fluxes from mJy to Jy at different observed times. The metal absorption line signature is expected to be detectable in the near future. GRBs are ideal tools for probing the metal enrichment in the early IGM, due to their high luminosities and featureless power-law spectra. The metals in the first galaxies produced by the first supernova (SN) explosions are likely to reside in low-ionization stages (C II, O I, Si II and Fe II). We show that, if the afterglow can be observed sufficiently early, analysis of the metal lines may distinguish whether the first heavy elements were produced in a pair

  1. Probing Pre-Galactic Metal Enrichment with High-Redshift Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, F. Y.; Bromm, Volker; Greif, Thomas H.; Stacy, Athena; Dai, Z. G.; Loeb, Abraham; Cheng, K. S.

    2012-01-01

    We explore high-redshift gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) as promising tools to probe pre-galactic metal enrichment. We utilize the bright afterglow of a Population III (Pop III) GRB exploding in a primordial dwarf galaxy as a luminous background source, and calculate the strength of metal absorption lines that are imprinted by the first heavy elements in the intergalactic medium (IGM). To derive the GRB absorption line diagnostics, we use an existing highly resolved simulation of the formation of a first galaxy which is characterized by the onset of atomic hydrogen cooling in a halo with virial temperature approximately greater than10(exp 4) K.We explore the unusual circumburst environment inside the systems that hosted Pop III stars, modeling the density evolution with the self-similar solution for a champagne flow. For minihalos close to the cooling threshold, the circumburst density is roughly proportional to (1 + z) with values of about a few cm(exp -3). In more massive halos, corresponding to the first galaxies, the density may be larger, n approximately greater than100 cm(exp -3). The resulting afterglow fluxes are weakly dependent on redshift at a fixed observed time, and may be detectable with the James Webb Space Telescope and Very Large Array in the near-IR and radio wavebands, respectively, out to redshift z approximately greater than 20. We predict that the maximum of the afterglow emission shifts from near-IR to millimeter bands with peak fluxes from mJy to Jy at different observed times. The metal absorption line signature is expected to be detectable in the near future. GRBs are ideal tools for probing the metal enrichment in the early IGM, due to their high luminosities and featureless power-law spectra. The metals in the first galaxies produced by the first supernova (SN) explosions are likely to reside in low-ionization stages (C II, O I, Si II and Fe II). We show that, if the afterglow can be observed sufficiently early, analysis of the metal lines may

  2. RUNAWAY STARS AND THE ESCAPE OF IONIZING RADIATION FROM HIGH-REDSHIFT GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Conroy, Charlie; Kratter, Kaitlin M.

    2012-08-20

    Approximately 30% of all massive stars in the Galaxy are runaways with velocities exceeding 30 km s{sup -1}. Their high speeds allow them to travel {approx}0.1-1 kpc away from their birthplace before they explode at the end of their several Myr lifetimes. At high redshift, when galaxies were much smaller than in the local universe, runaways could venture far from the dense inner regions of their host galaxies. From these large radii, and therefore low column densities, much of their ionizing radiation is able to escape into the intergalactic medium. Runaways may therefore significantly enhance the overall escape fraction of ionizing radiation, f{sub esc}, from small galaxies at high redshift. We present simple models of the high-redshift runaway population and its impact on f{sub esc} as a function of halo mass, size, and redshift. We find that the inclusion of runaways enhances f{sub esc} by factors of Almost-Equal-To 1.1-8, depending on halo mass, galaxy geometry, and the mechanism of runaway production, implying that runaways may contribute 50%-90% of the total ionizing radiation escaping from high-redshift galaxies. Runaways may therefore play an important role in reionizing the universe.

  3. Exploring The Gas Cycle In High-redshift Galaxies: A Joint Effort Of Theory And Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fumagalli, Michele

    2012-01-01

    The evolution of high-redshift galaxies is regulated by the balance between the inflow of fresh fuel for star formation and the outflow of metal-polluted material from star forming regions. Hydrodynamic cosmological simulations indicate that galaxies at high redshifts are fed by extended streams of cold gas in a smooth component and in merging satellites, but direct evidence of this mode of accretion is lacking. To investigate the signatures of these "cold streams" in observations, we have studied the Lyman-α emission and hydrogen absorption properties in galaxies simulated at high-resolution, using state-of-the-art radiative transfer codes. I will present these model predictions and I will compare and contrast results of simulations with observations of high-redshift Lyman break galaxies. I will also discuss the prospects of mapping the circumgalactic medium with absorption line systems and present preliminary results from ongoing observations.

  4. Soft X-Ray Absorption by High-Redshift Intergalactic Helium.

    PubMed

    Miralda-Escudé

    2000-01-01

    The Lyalpha absorption from intergalactic, once-ionized helium (He ii) has been measured with the Hubble Space Telescope in four quasars over the last few years in the redshift range 2.4redshifts is, however, model-dependent and difficult to determine from these observations, since the intergalactic medium (IGM) can be completely optically thick to Lyalpha photons when only a small fraction of the helium remains as He ii. In addition, finding quasars in which the He ii Lyalpha absorption can be observed becomes increasingly difficult at higher redshift owing to the large abundance of hydrogen Lyman limit systems. It is pointed out here that He ii in the IGM should also cause detectable continuum absorption in the soft X-rays. The spectrum of a high-redshift source seen behind the IGM when most of the helium was He ii should recover from the He ii Lyman continuum absorption at an observed energy of approximately 0.1 keV. Galactic absorption will generally be stronger, but not by a large factor; the intergalactic He ii absorption can be detected as an excess over the expected Galactic absorption from the 21 cm H i column density. In principle, this method allows a direct determination of the fraction of helium that was singly ionized as a function of redshift if the measurement is done on a large sample of high-redshift sources over a range of redshifts. PMID:10587481

  5. Neutral hydrogen at the present epoch: A constraint on the evolution of high redshift systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, Sandhya; Briggs, Frank H.

    1993-01-01

    Damped Lyman-alpha and metal absorption lines in the spectra of quasars indicate the presence of intervening gas-rich systems at high redshift (z greater than 2). These systems have characteristic size scales, velocity dispersions, and neutral hydrogen column densities (N(H1)) similar to present day spirals and are thus thought to be their progenitors. Constraints on galaxy evolution can be derived by comparing the H1 properties of high redshift systems to the present galaxy population. Good observational statistics on high redshift absorbers specify the number of these systems along the line of sight as a function of N(H1), the column density of neutral hydrogen per absorber. Similar statistics for nearby (z = 0) galaxies of which spirals are the only gas-rich systems that provide a significant cross-section for the interception of light from quasars is derived.

  6. Pressure-driven fragmentation of multiphase clouds at high redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhanoa, H.; Mackey, J.; Yates, J.

    2014-11-01

    The discovery of a hyper metal-poor star with total metallicity of ≤10-5 Z⊙ has motivated new investigations of how such objects can form from primordial gas polluted by a single supernova. In this paper, we present a shock-cloud model which simulates a supernova remnant interacting with a cloud in a metal-free environment at redshift z = 10. Pre-supernova conditions are considered, which include a multiphase neutral medium and H II region. A small dense clump (n = 100 cm-3), located 40 pc from a 40 M⊙ metal-free star, embedded in an n = 10 cm-3 ambient cloud. The evolution of the supernova remnant and its subsequent interaction with the dense clump is examined. We include a comprehensive treatment of the non-equilibrium hydrogen and helium chemistry and associated radiative cooling that is occurring at all stages of the shock-cloud model, covering the temperature range 10-109 K. Deuterium chemistry and its associated cooling are not included because the UV radiation field produced by the relic H II region and supernova remnant is expected to suppress deuterium chemistry and cooling. We find a 103 times density enhancement of the clump (maximum density ≈78 000 cm-3) within this metal-free model. This is consistent with Galactic shock-cloud models considering solar metallicity gas with equilibrium cooling functions. Despite this strong compression, the cloud does not become gravitationally unstable. We find that the small cloud modelled here is destroyed for shock velocities ≳50 km s-1, and not significantly affected by shocks with velocity ≲30 km s-1. Rather specific conditions are required to make such a cloud collapse, and substantial further compression would be required to reduce the local Jeans mass to sub-solar values.

  7. A study of massive and evolved galaxies at high redshift

    SciTech Connect

    Nayyeri, H.; Mobasher, B.; Hemmati, S.; De Barros, S.; Ferguson, H. C.; Wiklind, T.; Dahlen, T.; Kassin, S.; Koekemoer, A.; Dickinson, M.; Giavalisco, M.; Fontana, A.; Paris, D.; Ashby, M.; Willner, S.; Barro, G.; Guo, Y.; Hathi, N. P.; Dunlop, J. S.; Targett, T. A.

    2014-10-10

    We use data taken as part of Hubble Space Telescope (HST)/Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) observations of the Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey (CANDELS) to identify massive and evolved galaxies at 3 < z < 4.5. This is performed using the strength of the Balmer break feature at rest-frame 3648 Å, which is a diagnostic of the age of the stellar population in galaxies. Using the WFC3 H-band-selected catalog for the CANDELS GOODS-S field and deep multi-waveband photometry from optical (HST) to mid-infrared (Spitzer) wavelengths, we identify a population of old and evolved post-starburst galaxies based on the strength of their Balmer breaks (Balmer break galaxies, BBGs). The galaxies are also selected to be bright in rest-frame near-IR wavelengths and hence massive. We identify a total of 16 BBGs. Fitting the spectral energy distribution of the BBGs shows that the candidate galaxies have average estimated ages of ∼800 Myr and average stellar masses of ∼5 × 10{sup 10} M {sub ☉}, consistent with being old and massive systems. Two of our BBG candidates are also identified by the criteria that are sensitive to star-forming galaxies (Lyman break galaxy selection). We find a number density of ∼3.2 × 10{sup –5} Mpc{sup –3} for the BBGs, corresponding to a mass density of ∼2.0 × 10{sup 6} M {sub ☉} Mpc{sup –3} in the redshift range covering the survey. Given the old age and the passive evolution, it is argued that some of these objects formed the bulk of their mass only a few hundred million years after the big bang.

  8. Five New High-Redshift Quasar Lenses from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Inada, Naohisa; Oguri, Masamune; Shin, Min-Su; Kayo, Issha; Strauss, Michael A.; Morokuma, Tomoki; Schneider, Donald P.; Becker, Robert H.; Bahcall, Neta A.; York, Donald G.

    2008-09-08

    We report the discovery of five gravitationally lensed quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). All five systems are selected as two-image lensed quasar candidates from a sample of high-redshift (z > 2.2) SDSS quasars. We confirmed their lensing nature with additional imaging and spectroscopic observations. The new systems are SDSS J0819+5356 (source redshift z{sub s} = 2.237, lens redshift z{sub l} = 0.294, and image separation {theta} = 4.04 inch), SDSS J1254+2235 (z{sub s} = 3.626, {theta} = 1.56 inch), SDSS J1258+1657 (z{sub s} = 2.702, {theta} = 1.28 inch), SDSS J1339+1310 (z{sub s} = 2.243, {theta} = 1.69 cin), and SDSS J1400+3134 (z{sub s} = 3.317, {theta} = 1.74 inch). We estimate the lens redshifts of the latter four systems to be z{sub l} = 0.4-0.6 from the colors and magnitudes of the lensing galaxies. We find that the image configurations of all systems are well reproduced by standard mass models. Although these lenses will not be included in our statistical sample of z{sub s} < 2.2 lenses, they expand the number of lensed quasars which can be used for high-redshift galaxy and quasar studies.

  9. The Lyman-continuum photon production efficiency in the high-redshift Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkins, Stephen M.; Feng, Yu; Di-Matteo, Tiziana; Croft, Rupert; Stanway, Elizabeth R.; Bouwens, Rychard J.; Thomas, Peter

    2016-05-01

    The Lyman-continuum photon production efficiency (ξion) is a critical ingredient for inferring the number of photons available to reionize the intergalactic medium. To estimate the theoretical production efficiency in the high-redshift Universe we couple the BlueTides cosmological hydrodynamical simulation with a range of stellar population synthesis models. We find Lyman-continuum photon production efficiencies of log10(ξion/erg-1 Hz) ≈ 25.1-25.5 depending on the choice of stellar population synthesis model. These results are broadly consistent with recent observational constraints at high-redshift though favour a model incorporating the effects of binary evolution.

  10. Local Counterparts to High-Redshift Turbulent Galaxies: What are the Stellar Kinematics?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassett, Robert; Glazebrook, Karl; Fisher, David; Abraham, Roberto; Damjanov, Ivana

    2014-02-01

    We aim to measure the stellar kinematics of 4 low redshift turbulent, clumpy disks with the GMOS IFU. Recent observations of high redshift galaxies show that gaseous disks in high redshift (z 2) galaxies are turbulent. The source of this turbulence remains an open question. A possible scenario is that turbulent disks are fed by streams of cold gas, flowing along cosmic filaments, which drive the large H-alpha velocity dispersions and clumpy star formation observed (for example by the SINS survey). However, the recent discovery of low redshift disk galaxies with clumpy-high velocity dispersion disks shows that galaxies with similar properties to high-z clumpy disks can exists in absence of cold flows, therefore an alternate driver for turbulence seems likely to explain, at least these nearby galaxies. A contrasting scenario is that the turbulence is driven by feedback from extreme star formation originating from a thin stellar disk. These nearby star forming disks are very rare, yet they provide an oppurtunity to study clumpy disks with techniques which are impossible at high redshift (due to both resolution and surface brightness dimming). Here we propose one such study, to measure the stellar kinematics from Balmer absorption lines. If the stars and gas have similar velocity dispersion, this would favor externally driven turbulence by gas accretion (a rare thing in the low redshift Universe); conversely if the gas and stars have different dynamics then this would suggest that internally driven turbelence from feedback is a plausible scenario. We currently have GMOS IFU observations of two disk systems, and we propose here to extend our sample. To identify galaxies as disks we use lower resolution IFU emission line kinematics from AAO, surface photometry from UKIDSS and SDSS, and Halpha maps from Hubble Space Telescope.

  11. Non-linear violent disc instability with high Toomre's Q in high-redshift clumpy disc galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Shigeki; Dekel, Avishai; Mandelker, Nir; Ceverino, Daniel; Bournaud, Frédéric; Primack, Joel

    2016-02-01

    We utilize zoom-in cosmological simulations to study the nature of violent disc instability in clumpy galaxies at high redshift, z = 1-5. Our simulated galaxies are not in the ideal state assumed in Toomre instability, of linear fluctuations in an isolated, uniform, rotating disc. There, instability is characterized by a Q parameter below unity, and lower when the disc is thick. Instead, the high-redshift discs are highly perturbed. Over long periods they consist of non-linear perturbations, compact massive clumps and extended structures, with new clumps forming in interclump regions. This is while the galaxy is subject to frequent external perturbances. We compute the local, two-component Q parameter for gas and stars, smoothed on a ˜1 kpc scale to capture clumps of 108-9 M⊙. The Q < 1 regions are confined to collapsed clumps due to the high surface density there, while the interclump regions show Q significantly higher than unity. Tracing the clumps back to their relatively smooth Lagrangian patches, we find that Q prior to clump formation typically ranges from unity to a few. This is unlike the expectations from standard Toomre instability. We discuss possible mechanisms for high-Q clump formation, e.g. rapid turbulence decay leading to small clumps that grow by mergers, non-axisymmetric instability, or clump formation induced by non-linear perturbations in the disc. Alternatively, the high-Q non-linear VDI may be stimulated by the external perturbations such as mergers and counter-rotating streams. The high Q may represent excessive compressive modes of turbulence, possibly induced by tidal interactions.

  12. The fate of high redshift massive compact galaxies in dense environments

    SciTech Connect

    Kaufmann, Tobias; Mayer, Lucio; Carollo, Marcella; Feldmann, Robert; /Fermilab /Chicago U., KICP

    2012-01-01

    Massive compact galaxies seem to be more common at high redshift than in the local universe, especially in denser environments. To investigate the fate of such massive galaxies identified at z {approx} 2 we analyse the evolution of their properties in three cosmological hydrodynamical simulations that form virialized galaxy groups of mass {approx} 10{sup 13} M{sub {circle_dot}} hosting a central massive elliptical/S0 galaxy by redshift zero. We find that at redshift {approx} 2 the population of galaxies with M{sub *} > 2 x 10{sup 10} M{sub {circle_dot}} is diverse in terms of mass, velocity dispersion, star formation and effective radius, containing both very compact and relatively extended objects. In each simulation all the compact satellite galaxies have merged into the central galaxy by redshift 0 (with the exception of one simulation where one of such satellite galaxy survives). Satellites of similar mass at z = 0 are all less compact than their high redshift counterparts. They form later than the galaxies in the z = 2 sample and enter the group potential at z < 1, when dynamical friction times are longer than the Hubble time. Also, by z = 0 the central galaxies have increased substantially their characteristic radius via a combination of in situ star formation and mergers. Hence in a group environment descendants of compact galaxies either evolve towards larger sizes or they disappear before the present time as a result of the environment in which they evolve. Since the group-sized halos that we consider are representative of dense environments in the {Lambda}CDM cosmology, we conclude that the majority of high redshift compact massive galaxies do not survive until today as a result of the environment.

  13. Chemical abundances in high-redshift galaxies: a powerful new emission line diagnostic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dopita, Michael A.; Kewley, Lisa J.; Sutherland, Ralph S.; Nicholls, David C.

    2016-02-01

    This Letter presents a new, remarkably simple diagnostic specifically designed to derive chemical abundances for high redshift galaxies. It uses only the Hα, [N ii] and [S ii] emission lines, which can usually be observed in a single grating setting, and is almost linear up to an abundance of 12+log (O/H) = 9.05. It can be used over the full abundance range encountered in high redshift galaxies. By its use of emission lines located close together in wavelength, it is also independent of reddening. Our diagnostic depends critically on the calibration of the N/O ratio. However, by using realistic stellar atmospheres combined with the N/O vs. O/H abundance calibration derived locally from stars and H ii regions, and allowing for the fact that high-redshift H ii regions have both high ionisation parameters and high gas pressures, we find that the observations of high-redshift galaxies can be simply explained by the models without having to invoke arbitrary changes in N/O ratio, or the presence of unusual quantities of Wolf-Rayet stars in these galaxies.

  14. Observational Signatures of High-Redshift Quasars and Local Relics of Black Hole Seeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reines, Amy E.; Comastri, Andrea

    2016-10-01

    Observational constraints on the birth and early evolution of massive black holes come from two extreme regimes. At high redshift, quasars signal the rapid growth of billion-solar-mass black holes and indicate that these objects began remarkably heavy and/or accreted mass at rates above the Eddington limit. At low redshift, the smallest nuclear black holes known are found in dwarf galaxies and provide the most concrete limits on the mass of black hole seeds. Here, we review current observational work in these fields that together are critical for our understanding of the origin of massive black holes in the Universe.

  15. WEAK LINE QUASARS AT HIGH REDSHIFT: EXTREMELY HIGH ACCRETION RATES OR ANEMIC BROAD-LINE REGIONS?

    SciTech Connect

    Shemmer, Ohad; Trakhtenbrot, Benny; Netzer, Hagai; Anderson, Scott F.; Brandt, W. N.; Schneider, Donald P.; Diamond-Stanic, Aleksandar M.; Fan Xiaohui; Lira, Paulina; Plotkin, Richard M.; Richards, Gordon T.; Strauss, Michael A.

    2010-10-20

    We present Gemini-North K-band spectra of two representative members of the class of high-redshift quasars with exceptionally weak rest-frame ultraviolet emission lines (WLQs), SDSS J114153.34+021924.3 at z = 3.55 and SDSS J123743.08+630144.9 at z = 3.49. In both sources, we detect an unusually weak broad H{beta} line and place tight upper limits on the strengths of their [O III] lines. Virial, H{beta}-based black hole mass determinations indicate normalized accretion rates of L/L {sub Edd}=0.4 for these sources, which is well within the range observed for typical quasars with similar luminosities and redshifts. We also present high-quality XMM-Newton imaging spectroscopy of SDSS J114153.34+021924.3 and find a hard-X-ray photon index of {Gamma} = 1.91{sup +0.24} {sub -0.22}, which supports the virial L/L {sub Edd} determination in this source. Our results suggest that the weakness of the broad emission lines in WLQs is not a consequence of an extreme continuum-emission source but instead due to abnormal broad emission line region properties.

  16. Weak Line Quasars at High Redshift: Extremely High Accretion Rates or Anemic Broad-line Regions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shemmer, Ohad; Trakhtenbrot, Benny; Anderson, Scott F.; Brandt, W. N.; Diamond-Stanic, Aleksandar M.; Fan, Xiaohui; Lira, Paulina; Netzer, Hagai; Plotkin, Richard M.; Richards, Gordon T.; Schneider, Donald P.; Strauss, Michael A.

    2010-10-01

    We present Gemini-North K-band spectra of two representative members of the class of high-redshift quasars with exceptionally weak rest-frame ultraviolet emission lines (WLQs), SDSS J114153.34+021924.3 at z = 3.55 and SDSS J123743.08+630144.9 at z = 3.49. In both sources, we detect an unusually weak broad Hβ line and place tight upper limits on the strengths of their [O III] lines. Virial, Hβ-based black hole mass determinations indicate normalized accretion rates of L/L Edd=0.4 for these sources, which is well within the range observed for typical quasars with similar luminosities and redshifts. We also present high-quality XMM-Newton imaging spectroscopy of SDSS J114153.34+021924.3 and find a hard-X-ray photon index of Γ = 1.91+0.24 -0.22, which supports the virial L/L Edd determination in this source. Our results suggest that the weakness of the broad emission lines in WLQs is not a consequence of an extreme continuum-emission source but instead due to abnormal broad emission line region properties.

  17. In Pursuit of the Thermal State of the IGM at Redshift 20: Radio Foreground Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenhill, Lincoln J.; LEDA Collaboration

    2014-01-01

    One of the great challenges of cosmology today is tracing the thermal history of the Universe from global reionization back to recombination. The Large Aperture Experiment to Detect the Dark Age (LEDA) will set direct constraints on sky-averaged spectral-line absorption of the Cosmic Microwave Background by neutral Hydrogen in the intergalactic medium at redshift ~ 20. Line intensity, breadth, and center frequency enable hypothesis testing for models of heating during the preceding Dark Age and the epoch at which sustained star formation began. LEDA has begun science observations at the Long Wavelength Array in Owens Valley. I will report initial characterizations of the foreground sky, effectiveness of subtraction, and assessment of how difficult or easy it may be to take the next step: measurement of the angular power spectrum of HI fluctuations just after the end of the Dark Age.

  18. The high-redshift galaxy population in hierarchical galaxy formation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitzbichler, M. G.; White, S. D. M.

    2007-03-01

    We compare observations of the high-redshift galaxy population to the predictions of the galaxy formation model of Croton et al. and De Lucia & Blaizot. This model, implemented on the Millennium Simulation of the concordance Lambda cold dark matter cosmogony, introduces `radio mode' feedback from the central galaxies of groups and clusters in order to obtain quantitative agreement with the luminosity, colour, morphology and clustering properties of the present-day galaxy population. Here we construct deep light cone surveys in order to compare model predictions to the observed counts and redshift distributions of distant galaxies, as well as to their inferred luminosity and mass functions out to redshift 5. With the exception of the mass functions, all these properties are sensitive to modelling of dust obscuration. A simple but plausible treatment agrees moderately well with most of the data. The predicted abundance of relatively massive (~M*) galaxies appears systematically high at high redshift, suggesting that such galaxies assemble earlier in this model than in the real Universe. An independent galaxy formation model implemented on the same simulation matches the observed mass functions slightly better, so the discrepancy probably reflects incomplete or inaccurate galaxy formation physics rather than problems with the underlying cosmogony.

  19. Dust Formation, Evolution, and Obscuration Effects in the Very High-Redshift Universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwek, Eli; Staguhn, Johannes; Arendt, Richard G.; Kovacs, Attila; Su, Ting; Benford, Dominic J.

    2014-01-01

    The evolution of dust at redshifts z > or approx. 9, and consequently the dust properties, differs greatly from that in the local universe. In contrast to the local universe, core collapse supernovae (CCSNe) are the only source of thermally-condensed dust. Because of the low initial dust-to-gas mass ratio, grain destruction rates are low, so that CCSNe are net producers of interstellar dust. Galaxies with large initial gas mass or high mass infall rate will therefore have a more rapid net rate of dust production comported to galaxies with lower gas mass, even at the same star formation rate. The dust composition is dominated by silicates, which exhibit a strong rise in the UV opacity near the Lyman break. This "silicate-UV break" may be confused with the Lyman break, resulting in a misidentification of a galaxies' photometric redshift. In this paper we demonstrate these effects by analyzing the spectral energy distribution (SED) of MACS1149-JD, a lensed galaxy at z = 9.6. A potential 2mm counterpart of MACS1149-JD has been identified with GISMO. While additional observations are required to corroborate this identification, we use this possible association to illustrate the physical processes and the observational effects of dust in the very high redshift universe. Subject headings: galaxies: high-redshift - galaxies: evolution - galaxies: individual (MACS1149- JD) - Interstellar medium (ISM), nebulae: dust, extinction - physical data and processes: nuclear reactions, nucleosynthesis, abundances.

  20. Hard Ionizing Photons at High Redshift --- A New Method for Measuring the QSO Continuum Shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldwin, Jack

    2006-07-01

    We wish to test and calibrate a new method for measuring the far-UV continuum shapes of AGN. Knowledge of this continuum shape bears on several key questions about the high-redshift universe: What is the shape and intensity of the ionizing background radiation for the IGM, as a function of lookback time? How and at what rate do massive black holes grow at the centers of galaxy halos? How do the chemical abundances in the central regions of massive proto-galaxies evolve with lookback time at redshifts z > 6? A well-established way to measure the far- to near-UV continuum shape of AGN is to compare the intensities of high- and low-ionization emission lines from the gas that is photoionized by that radiation. The highest ionization gas is expected to be in a hard-to-observe hot phase, emitted by gas at nearly a million degrees. There are to date only a few detections of this gas, using x-ray telescopes to measure the L-alpha equivalent emission line from ions such as O VII, Ne IX and Mg XI. Such measurements are only possible for the brightest nearby AGN. We show here that these same ions are expected to also emit other lines in the rest-UV with about the same strength. For high-redshift QSOs, these will be redshifted into the optical region, where they can be studied using the large collecting area of ground-based telescopes. The strengths of these lines will then tie down the far-UV continuum shape of high-redshift AGN. But the method needs to be tested and calibrated by searching for these lines in the observed-UV spectra of the same nearby AGN for which the L-alpha equivalent lines have been detected at x-ray wavelengths. This is only possible using archival HST spectra, as we propose to do here.

  1. Imaging and Demography of the Host Galaxies of High-Redshift Type Ia Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Benjamin F.; Hogan, Craig J.; Barris, Brian; Candia, Pablo; Challis, Peter; Clocchiatti, Alejandro; Coil, Alison L.; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Garnavich, Peter; Kirshner, Robert P.; Holland, Stephen T.; Jha, Saurabh; Krisciunas, Kevin; Leibundgut, Bruno; Li, Weidong; Matheson, Thomas; Maza, Jose; Phillips, Mark M.; Riess, Adam G.; Schmidt, Brian P.; Schommer, Robert A.; Smith, R. Chris; Sollerman, Jesper; Spyromilio, Jason; Stubbs, Christopher; Suntzeff, Nicholas B.; Tonry, John L.

    2003-12-01

    We present the results of a study of the host galaxies of high-redshift Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). We provide a catalog of 18 hosts of SNe Ia observed with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) by the High-z Supernova Search Team, including images, scale lengths, measurements of integrated (Hubble-equivalent) BVRIZ photometry in bands where the galaxies are brighter than m~25 mag, and galactocentric distances of the supernovae. We compare the residuals of SN Ia distance measurements from cosmological fits with measurable properties of the supernova host galaxies that might be expected to correlate with variable properties of the progenitor population, such as host-galaxy color and position of the supernova. We find mostly null results; the current data are generally consistent with no correlations of the distance residuals with host-galaxy properties in the redshift range 0.42redshift and high redshift. These similarities support the current practice of extrapolating properties of the nearby population to high redshifts, pending more robust detections of any correlations between distance residuals from cosmological fits and host properties. Based on observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy (AURA), Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555.

  2. A supernova origin for dust in a high-redshift quasar.

    PubMed

    Maiolino, R; Schneider, R; Oliva, E; Bianchi, S; Ferrara, A; Mannucci, F; Pedani, M; Sogorb, M Roca

    2004-09-30

    Interstellar dust plays a crucial role in the evolution of the Universe by assisting the formation of molecules, by triggering the formation of the first low-mass stars, and by absorbing stellar ultraviolet-optical light and subsequently re-emitting it at infrared/millimetre wavelengths. Dust is thought to be produced predominantly in the envelopes of evolved (age >1 Gyr), low-mass stars. This picture has, however, recently been brought into question by the discovery of large masses of dust in the host galaxies of quasars at redshift z > 6, when the age of the Universe was less than 1 Gyr. Theoretical studies, corroborated by observations of nearby supernova remnants, have suggested that supernovae provide a fast and efficient dust formation environment in the early Universe. Here we report infrared observations of a quasar at redshift 6.2, which are used to obtain directly its dust extinction curve. We then show that such a curve is in excellent agreement with supernova dust models. This result demonstrates a supernova origin for dust in this high-redshift quasar, from which we infer that most of the dust at high redshifts probably has the same origin.

  3. Understanding the Physical Conditions in Local Analogs of High-Redshift Starburst Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiewak, Renée; Erb, Dawn; Tremonti, Christina A.; Berg, Danielle

    2016-01-01

    Observations of strong nebular emission lines in high-redshift galaxies (z~2) can be illuminated through the use of analogous local galaxies (z<0.4), for which many more emission lines can be measured. The observed offset in the "BPT" ([N II]λ6584/Hα vs. [O III]λ5007/Hβ) nebular diagnostic diagram between the locus of high redshift galaxies and that of typical local galaxies indicates a change in the physical conditions of the galaxies with redshift; the cause of this offset is unknown, but it may be associated with the ionization parameter, the hardness of the ionizing spectrum, or the N/O abundance ratio. To study the offset, we have selected a sample of local galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey Data Release 12 (SDSS-III/BOSS DR12), which occupies the same space in the [N II]λ6584/Hα vs. [O III]λ5007/Hβ diagnostic diagram as the z~2 sample. Using a suite of >50 different emission lines, most of which are unavailable in analyses of higher redshift galaxies, and a novel method of improving the spectrophotometric calibration of BOSS data, we investigate the metallicity, ionization state, and abundance ratios of this offset sample in order to shed light on the physical conditions in galaxies in the early universe.

  4. High Redshift Dust Obscured Galaxies, A Morphology-SED Connection Revealed by Keck Adaptive Optics Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melbourne, Jason

    2009-01-01

    Keck Adaptive Optics (AO) K'-band images reveal the morphologies of 15 high redshift (z 2) dust obscured galaxies (DOGs). DOGs are defined by an optical to mid-IR color of fν(24) / fν(R) > 1000, redder than Arp 220 at any redshift. With ultra-luminous infrared luminosities, DOGs are thought to be powered by a combination of AGN and star formation. We use high spatial resolution (0.5 - 1 kpc at these redshifts) AO images to help disentangle the dominant energy source in each DOG and to look for triggers, such as evidence of ongoing mergers. We find evidence for ongoing merging in 10-20% of the sample. We also find a statistically significant correlation between galaxy compactness and 24 micron flux (luminosity), with the brightest DOGs exhibiting more compact morphologies than fainter DOGs. The most diffuse systems tend to show a 1.6 micron stellar bump in their spectral energy distributions redshifted to the Spitzer IRAC bands (4.5 - 8.0 microns). The imaging results lend further support to the idea that the highest luminosity DOGs are AGN dominated (resulting in compact morphology), while the lower luminosity, diffuse, DOGs tend to be star formation dominated.

  5. Strong magnetic fields in normal galaxies at high redshift.

    PubMed

    Bernet, Martin L; Miniati, Francesco; Lilly, Simon J; Kronberg, Philipp P; Dessauges-Zavadsky, Miroslava

    2008-07-17

    The origin and growth of magnetic fields in galaxies is still something of an enigma. It is generally assumed that seed fields are amplified over time through the dynamo effect, but there are few constraints on the timescale. It was recently demonstrated that field strengths as traced by rotation measures of distant (and hence ancient) quasars are comparable to those seen today, but it was unclear whether the high fields were in the unusual environments of the quasars themselves or distributed along the lines of sight. Here we report high-resolution spectra that demonstrate that the quasars with strong Mg II absorption lines are unambiguously associated with larger rotation measures. Because Mg ii absorption occurs in the haloes of normal galaxies along the sightlines to the quasars, this association requires that organized fields of surprisingly high strengths are associated with normal galaxies when the Universe was only about one-third of its present age.

  6. THE POPULATION OF HIGH-REDSHIFT ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI IN THE CHANDRA-COSMOS SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Civano, F.; Elvis, M.; Hao, H.; Brusa, M.; Comastri, A.; Zamorani, G.; Gilli, R.; Mignoli, M.; Salvato, M.; Capak, P.; Kakazu, Y.; Masters, D.; Fiore, F.; Ikeda, H.; Kartaltepe, J. S.; Miyaji, T.; Puccetti, S.; Shankar, F.; Silverman, J.; Vignali, C.

    2011-11-10

    We present the high-redshift (3 redshifts plus 20 sources with a formal z{sub phot} < 3 but with a broad photometric redshift probability distribution, such that z{sub phot} + 1{sigma} > 3. Eighty-one sources are selected in the 0.5-2 keV band, fourteen are selected in the 2-10 keV and six in the 0.5-10 keV bands. We sample the high-luminosity (log L{sub (2-10keV)} > 44.15 erg s{sup -1}) space density up to z {approx} 5 and a fainter luminosity range (43.5 erg s{sup -1} < log L{sub (2-10keV)} < 44.15 erg s{sup -1}) than previous studies, up to z = 3.5. We weighted the contribution to the number counts and the space density of the sources with photometric redshift by using their probability of being at z > 3. We find that the space density of high-luminosity AGNs declines exponentially at all the redshifts, confirming the trend observed for optically selected quasars. At lower luminosity, the measured space density is not conclusive, and a larger sample of faint sources is needed. Comparisons with optical luminosity functions and black hole formation models are presented together with prospects for future surveys.

  7. High-Redshift Galaxies with the James Webb Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, Jonathan P.

    2015-08-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope is the scientific successor to the Hubble and Spitzer Space Telescopes and will continue their rich legacy of high-z galaxy studies with a combination of deep, high-resolution infrared photometry and multi-object or integral field spectroscopy. As a large (6.6m) cold (50K) space telescope, JWST is well optimized for studying high-z galaxies and the science goals include the formation of the first stars and galaxies in the early universe and the chemical, morphological and dynamical buildup of galaxies. Webb has four instruments: The Near-Infrared Camera, the Near-Infrared multi-object Spectrograph, and the Near-Infrared Imager and Slitless Spectrograph will cover the wavelength range 0.6 to 5 microns, while the Mid-Infrared Instrument will do both imaging and spectroscopy from 5 to 28.5 microns. The observatory is confirmed for launch into orbit around the second Earth-Sun Lagrange point in 2018; the design is complete and it is in its construction and test phase. It is a partnership of NASA with the European and Canadian Space Agencies. Recent progress includes the completion of the mirrors and scientific instruments and the start of high-level assembly and cryogenic testing. Proposals for the first cycle of scientific observations will be due in February 2018; the community should begin planning their proposals now.

  8. "Observing and Analyzing" Images from a Simulated High-Redshift Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Robert J.; Windhorst, Rogier A.; Scannapieco, Evan; Thacker, Robert J.

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the high-redshift evolution of the rest-frame UV-luminosity function (LF) of galaxies via hydrodynamical cosmological simulations, coupled with an emulated observational astronomy pipeline that provides a direct comparison with observations. We do this by creating mock images and synthetic galaxy catalogs of ≈100 arcmin-2 fields from the numerical model at redshifts ≈4.5 to 10.4. We include the effects of dust extinction and the point-spread function (PSF) for the Hubble WFC3 camera for comparison with space observations. We also include the expected zodiacal background to predict its effect on space observations, including future missions such as the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). When our model catalogs are fitted to Schechter function parameters, we predict that the faint-end slope (α) of the LF evolves as α = -1.16-0.12z over the redshift range z ≈ 4.5-7.7, in excellent agreement with observations from, e.g., Hathi and coworkers. However, for redshifts z ≈ 6-10.4, α(z) appears to display a shallower evolution, α = -1.79-0.03z. Augmenting the simulations with more detailed physics—specifically stellar winds and supernovae (SN)—produces similar results. The model shows an overproduction of galaxies, especially at faint magnitudes, compared with the observations, although the discrepancy is reduced when dust extinction is taken into account.

  9. The high-redshift star formation history from carbon-monoxide intensity maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breysse, Patrick C.; Kovetz, Ely D.; Kamionkowski, Marc

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrate how cosmic star formation history can be measured with one-point statistics of carbon-monoxide intensity maps. Using a P(D) analysis, the luminosity function of CO-emitting sources can be inferred from the measured one-point intensity PDF. The star formation rate density (SFRD) can then be obtained, at several redshifts, from the CO luminosity density. We study the effects of instrumental noise, line foregrounds, and target redshift, and obtain constraints on the CO luminosity density of the order of 10 per cent. We show that the SFRD uncertainty is dominated by that of the model connecting CO luminosity and star formation. For pessimistic estimates of this model uncertainty, we obtain an error of the order of 50 per cent on SFRD for surveys targeting redshifts between two and seven with reasonable noise and foregrounds included. However, comparisons between intensity maps and galaxies could substantially reduce this model uncertainty. In this case, our constraints on SFRD at these redshifts improve to roughly 5 - 10 per cent, which is highly competitive with current measurements.

  10. Galactic Synchrotron Emission and the Far-infrared-Radio Correlation at High Redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schober, J.; Schleicher, D. R. G.; Klessen, R. S.

    2016-08-01

    Theoretical scenarios, including the turbulent small-scale dynamo, predict that strong magnetic fields already exist in young galaxies. Based on the assumption of energy equipartition between magnetic fields and turbulence, we determine the galactic synchrotron flux as a function of redshift z. Galaxies in the early universe are different from local galaxies, in particular, the former have more intense star formation. To cover a large range of conditions, we consider two different systems: one model galaxy comparable to the Milky Way and one typical high-z starburst galaxy. We include a model of the steady-state cosmic ray spectrum and find that synchrotron emission can be detected up to cosmological redshifts with current and future radio telescopes. The turbulent dynamo theory is in agreement with the origin of the observed correlation between the far-infrared (FIR) luminosity L FIR and the radio luminosity L radio. Our model reproduces this correlation well at z = 0. We extrapolate the FIR-radio correlation to higher redshifts and predict a time evolution with a significant deviation from its present-day appearance already at z≈ 2 for a gas density that increases strongly with z. In particular, we predict a decrease of the radio luminosity with redshift which is caused by the increase of cosmic ray energy losses at high z. The result is an increase of the ratio between L FIR and L radio. Simultaneously, we predict that the slope of the FIR-radio correlation becomes shallower with redshift. This behavior of the correlation could be observed in the near future with ultra-deep radio surveys.

  11. Galactic Synchrotron Emission and the Far-infrared–Radio Correlation at High Redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schober, J.; Schleicher, D. R. G.; Klessen, R. S.

    2016-08-01

    Theoretical scenarios, including the turbulent small-scale dynamo, predict that strong magnetic fields already exist in young galaxies. Based on the assumption of energy equipartition between magnetic fields and turbulence, we determine the galactic synchrotron flux as a function of redshift z. Galaxies in the early universe are different from local galaxies, in particular, the former have more intense star formation. To cover a large range of conditions, we consider two different systems: one model galaxy comparable to the Milky Way and one typical high-z starburst galaxy. We include a model of the steady-state cosmic ray spectrum and find that synchrotron emission can be detected up to cosmological redshifts with current and future radio telescopes. The turbulent dynamo theory is in agreement with the origin of the observed correlation between the far-infrared (FIR) luminosity L FIR and the radio luminosity L radio. Our model reproduces this correlation well at z = 0. We extrapolate the FIR–radio correlation to higher redshifts and predict a time evolution with a significant deviation from its present-day appearance already at z≈ 2 for a gas density that increases strongly with z. In particular, we predict a decrease of the radio luminosity with redshift which is caused by the increase of cosmic ray energy losses at high z. The result is an increase of the ratio between L FIR and L radio. Simultaneously, we predict that the slope of the FIR–radio correlation becomes shallower with redshift. This behavior of the correlation could be observed in the near future with ultra-deep radio surveys.

  12. High-Redshift Type Ia Supernova Rates in Galaxy Cluster and Field Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbary, Kyle Harris

    This thesis presents Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) rates from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Cluster Supernova Survey, a program designed to efficiently detect and observe high-redshift supernovae by targeting massive galaxy clusters at redshifts 0.9 < z < 1.46. Among other uses, measurements of the rate at which SNe Ia occur can be used to help constrain the SN Ia "progenitor scenario." The progenitor scenario, the process that leads to a SN~Ia, is a particularly poorly understood aspect of these events. Fortunately, the progenitor is directly linked to the delay time between star formation and supernova explosion. Supernova rates can be used to measure the distribution of these delay times and thus yield information about the elusive progenitors. Galaxy clusters, with their simpler star formation histories, offer an ideal environment for measuring the delay time distribution. In this thesis the SN Ia rate in clusters is calculated based on 8 +/- 1 cluster SNe Ia discovered in the HST Cluster Supernova Survey. This is the first cluster SN Ia rate measurement with detected z > 0.9 SNe. The SN Ia rate is found to be 0.50+0.23-0.19 (stat) +0.10-0.09 (sys) h 702 SNuB (SNuB = 10-12 SNe Lsun,B-1 yr-1), or in units of stellar mass, 0.36+0.16-0.13 (stat) +0.07-0.06 (sys) h 702 SNuM (SNuM = 10-12 SNe M sun-1 yr-1). This represents a factor of approximately 5 +/- 2 increase over measurements of the cluster rate at z < 0.2 and is the first significant detection of a changing cluster SN Ia rate with redshift. Parameterizing the late-time SN Ia delay time distribution with a power law in time with index s, this measurement in combination with lower-redshift cluster SN Ia rates constrains s = -1.41+0.47 -0.40, under the approximation of a single-burst cluster formation redshift of zf = 3. This is generally consistent with expectations for the "double degenerate" progenitor scenario and inconsistent with some models for the "single degenerate" progenitor scenario predicting a

  13. The premature formation of high-redshift galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Melia, Fulvio

    2014-05-01

    Observations with WFC3/IR on the Hubble Space Telescope and the use of gravitational lensing techniques have facilitated the discovery of galaxies as far back as z ∼ 10-12, a truly remarkable achievement. However, this rapid emergence of high-z galaxies, barely ∼200 Myr after the transition from Population III star formation to Population II, appears to be in conflict with the standard view of how the early universe evolved. This problem has much in common with the better known (and probably related) premature appearance of supermassive black holes at z ≳ 6. It is difficult to understand how ∼10{sup 9} M {sub ☉} black holes could have appeared so quickly after the big bang without invoking non-standard accretion physics and the formation of massive seeds, neither of which is seen in the local universe. In earlier work, we showed that the appearance of high-z quasars could instead be understood more reasonably in the context of the R {sub h} = ct universe, which does not suffer from the same time compression issues as ΛCDM does at early epochs. Here, we build on that work by demonstrating that the evolutionary growth of primordial galaxies was consistent with the current view of how the first stars formed, but only with the timeline afforded by the R {sub h} = ct cosmology. We also show that the growth of high-z quasars was mutually consistent with that of the earliest galaxies, though it is not yet clear whether the former grew from 5-20 M {sub ☉} seeds created in Population III or Population II supernova explosions.

  14. On the [CII]-SFR Relation in High Redshift Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallini, L.; Gallerani, S.; Ferrara, A.; Pallottini, A.; Yue, B.

    2015-11-01

    After two Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) observing cycles, only a handful of [C ii] 158 μm emission line searches in z > 6 galaxies have reported a positive detection, questioning the applicability of the local [C ii]-star formation rate (SFR) relation to high-z systems. To investigate this issue we use the Vallini et al. (V13) model,based on high-resolution, radiative transfer cosmological simulations to predict the [C ii] emission from the interstellar medium of a z ≈ 7 (halo mass Mh = 1.17 × 1011 M⊙) galaxy. We improve the V13 model by including (a) a physically motivated metallicity (Z) distribution of the gas, (b) the contribution of photodissociation regions (PDRs), and (c) the effects of cosmic microwave background (CMB) on the [C ii] line luminosity. We study the relative contribution of diffuse neutral gas to the total [C ii] emission (Fdiff/Ftot) for different SFR and Z values. We find that the [C ii] emission arises predominantly from PDRs: regardless of the galaxy properties, Fdiff/Ftot ≤ 10%, since at these early epochs the CMB temperature approaches the spin temperature of the [C ii] transition in the cold neutral medium (TCMB ˜ {T}s{{CNM}} ˜ 20 K). Our model predicts a high-z [C ii]-SFR relation, consistent with observations of local dwarf galaxies (0.02 < Z/Z⊙ < 0.5). The [C ii] deficit suggested by actual data (LCii < 2.0 × 107 L⊙ in BDF3299 at z ≈ 7.1) if confirmed by deeper ALMA observations, can be ascribed to negative stellar feedback disrupting molecular clouds around star formation sites. The deviation from the local [C ii]-SFR would then imply a modified Kennicutt-Schmidt relation in z > 6 galaxies. Alternatively/in addition, the deficit might be explained by low gas metallicities (Z < 0.1 Z⊙).

  15. X-ray absorption and high redshift quasars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elvis, Martin

    1996-01-01

    The low energy cut-offs toward radio-loud quasars with z greater than 2, red quasars, and broad absorption line quasars are discussed. The X-ray absorption seems to be common among different types of red shift quasar. The Rosat position sensitive proportional counter (PSPC) spectra of z = 3 quasars and of a red quasar are presented. Broad absorption lines show outflow velocities of up to 0.1 c to 0.2 c. The advantages and the disadvantages of high red shift observations are underlined.

  16. PROBING THE PHYSICAL CONDITIONS OF ATOMIC GAS AT HIGH REDSHIFT

    SciTech Connect

    Neeleman, Marcel; Wolfe, Arthur M.; Prochaska, J. Xavier

    2015-02-10

    A new method is used to measure the physical conditions of the gas in damped Lyα systems (DLAs). Using high-resolution absorption spectra of a sample of 80 DLAs, we are able to measure the ratio of the upper and lower fine-structure levels of the ground state of C{sup +} and Si{sup +}. These ratios are determined solely by the physical conditions of the gas. We explore the allowed physical parameter space using a Monte Carlo Markov chain method to constrain simultaneously the temperature, neutral hydrogen density, and electron density of each DLA. The results indicate that at least 5% of all DLAs have the bulk of their gas in a dense, cold phase with typical densities of ∼100 cm{sup –3} and temperatures below 500 K. We further find that the typical pressure of DLAs in our sample is log (P/k{sub B} ) = 3.4 (K cm{sup –3}), which is comparable to the pressure of the local interstellar medium (ISM), and that the components containing the bulk of the neutral gas can be quite small with absorption sizes as small as a few parsecs. We show that the majority of the systems are consistent with having densities significantly higher than expected for a purely canonical warm neutral medium, indicating that significant quantities of dense gas (i.e., n {sub H} > 0.1 cm{sup –3}) are required to match observations. Finally, we identify eight systems with positive detections of Si II*. These systems have pressures (P/k{sub B} ) in excess of 20,000 K cm{sup –3}, which suggest that these systems tag a highly turbulent ISM in young, star-forming galaxies.

  17. A high-redshift quasar absorber without C IV. A galactic outflow caught in the act?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, Anne; Richter, Philipp

    2016-04-01

    We present a detailed analysis of a very unusual sub-damped Lyman α (sub-DLA) system at redshift z = 2.304 towards the quasar Q 0453-423, based on high signal-to-noise (S/N), high-resolution spectral data obtained with VLT/UVES. With a neutral hydrogen column density of log N(H i) = 19.23 and a metallicity of -1.61 as indicated by [O i/H i] the sub-DLA mimics the properties of many other optically thick absorbers at this redshift. A very unusual feature of this system is, however, the lack of any C iv absorption at the redshift of the neutral hydrogen absorption, although the relevant spectral region is free of line blends and has very high S/N. Instead, we find high-ion absorption from C iv and O vi in another metal absorber at a velocity more than 220 km s-1 redwards of the neutral gas component. We explore the physical conditions in the two different absorption systems using Cloudy photoionisation models. We find that the weakly ionised absorber is dense and metal-poor while the highly ionised system is thin and more metal-rich. The absorber pair towards Q 0453-423 mimics the expected features of a galactic outflow with highly ionised material that moves away with high radial velocities from a (proto)galactic gas disk in which star-formation takes place. We discuss our findings in the context of C iv absorption line statistics at high redshift and compare our results to recent galactic-wind and outflow models.

  18. Scale-Free Processes in Galaxy Formation at High Redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekel, Avishai

    2015-08-01

    Key processes of galaxy formation in the Einstein-de Sitter cosmological phase are scale free. For example, 1. The specific accretion rate into dark-matter halos, and that of baryons into the central galaxies, is mass independent and scales as a generic power-law (1+z)^{5/2}. 2. The main-sequence of star-forming galaxies is evolving self-similarly accordingly. Its confinement is determined by generic evolution of galaxies through a sequence of compaction and quenching events. 3. The evolution of the overall gas and stellar content of galaxies can be addressed via a very simple and useful bathtub toy model, which converges to a self-similar quasi-steady-state solution. 4. The spin parameter of the halos, and of the baryons in the galaxy, as built up by streams from the cosmic web, is independent of mass and cosmic time. 5. Counter-rotating streams, self-similar on all scales, may play a major role in generating compaction events and stimulating disk instability. 6. The violent disk instability in the gas-rich high-z galaxies is manifested in a scale-free mass function of clumps. 7. This instability is nonlinear, stimulated by the intense gas inflow into the galaxies, and it may involve scale-free compressive modes of turbulence. These processes are studied using toy models and cosmological simulations.

  19. Contemporaneous Broadband Observations of Three High-redshift BL LAC Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; An, H.; Baldini, L.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bellazzini, R.; Bissaldi, E.; Blandford, R. D.; Bonino, R.; Bregeon, J.; Britto, R. J.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caragiulo, M.; Caraveo, P. A.; Cavazzuti, E.; Cecchi, C.; Charles, E.; Chekhtman, A.; Chiaro, G.; Ciprini, S.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Costanza, F.; Cutini, S.; D'Ammando, F.; de Angelis, A.; de Palma, F.; Desiante, R.; Di Mauro, M.; Di Venere, L.; Domínguez, A.; Drell, P. S.; Favuzzi, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Ferrara, E. C.; Finke, J.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Giglietto, N.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Green, D.; Grenier, I. A.; Guiriec, S.; Horan, D.; Jóhannesson, G.; Katsuragawa, M.; Kuss, M.; Larsson, S.; Latronico, L.; Li, J.; Li, L.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Magill, J.; Maldera, S.; Manfreda, A.; Mayer, M.; Mazziotta, M. N.; Michelson, P. F.; Mirabal, N.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Mizuno, T.; Monzani, M. E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Negro, M.; Nuss, E.; Ohsugi, T.; Okada, C.; Orlando, E.; Paneque, D.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Piron, F.; Pivato, G.; Porter, T. A.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Reimer, O.; Rau, A.; Romani, R. W.; Schady, P.; Sgrò, C.; Simone, D.; Siskind, E. J.; Spada, F.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Stern, D.; Takahashi, H.; Thayer, J. B.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Troja, E.; Vianello, G.; Wood, K. S.; Wood, M.

    2016-03-01

    We have collected broadband spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of three BL Lac objects 3FGL J0022.1-1855 (z = 0.689), 3FGL J0630.9-2406 (z\\quad ≳ 1.239), and 3FGL J0811.2-7529 (z = 0.774), detected by Fermi with relatively flat gigaelectronvolt spectra. By observing simultaneously in the near-infrared to hard X-ray band, we can well characterize the high end of the synchrotron component of the SED. Thus, fitting the SEDs to synchro-Compton models of the dominant emission from the relativistic jet, we can constrain the underlying particle properties and predict the shape of the gigaelectronvolt Compton component. Standard extragalactic background light (EBL) models explain the high-energy absorption well, with poorer fits for high-ultraviolet models. The fits show clear evidence for EBL absorption in the Fermi spectrum of our highest-redshift source 3FGL J0630.9-2406. While synchrotron self-Compton models adequately describe the SEDs, the situation may be complicated by possible external Compton components. For 3FGL J0811.2-7529, we also discover a nearby serendipitous source in the X-ray data, which is almost certainly another lower synchrotron peak frequency ({ν }{{pk}}{{sy}}) BL Lac, that may contribute flux in the Fermi band. Since our sources are unusual high-luminosity, moderate {ν }{{pk}}{{sy}} BL Lacs, we compare these quantities and the Compton dominance, the ratio of peak inverse Compton to peak synchrotron luminosities ({L}{{pk}}{{IC}}/{L}{{pk}}{{sy}}), with those of the full Fermi BL Lac population.

  20. OUTFLOW AND HOT DUST EMISSION IN HIGH-REDSHIFT QUASARS

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Huiyuan; Xing, Feijun; Wang, Tinggui; Zhou, Hongyan; Zhang, Kai; Zhang, Shaohua

    2013-10-10

    Correlations of hot dust emission with outflow properties are investigated, based on a large z ∼ 2 non-broad absorption line quasar sample built from the Wide-field Infrared Survey and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey data releases. We use the near-infrared slope and the infrared to UV luminosity ratio to indicate the hot dust emission relative to the emission from the accretion disk. In our luminous quasars, these hot dust emission indicators are almost independent of the fundamental parameters, such as luminosity, Eddington ratio and black hole mass, but moderately dependent on the blueshift and asymmetry index (BAI) and FWHM of C IV lines. Interestingly, the latter two correlations dramatically strengthen with increasing Eddington ratio. We suggest that, in high Eddington ratio quasars, C IV regions are dominated by outflows so the BAI and FWHM (C IV) can reliably reflect the general properties and velocity of outflows, respectively. In low Eddington ratio quasars, on the other hand, C IV lines are primarily emitted by virialized gas so the BAI and FWHM (C IV) become less sensitive to outflows. Therefore, the correlations for the highest Eddington ratio quasars are more likely to represent the true dependence of hot dust emission on outflows and the correlations for the entire sample are significantly diluted by the low Eddington ratio quasars. Our results show that an outflow with a large BAI or velocity can double the hot dust emission on average. We suggest that outflows either contain hot dust in themselves or interact with the dusty interstellar medium or torus.

  1. RED-SEQUENCE GALAXIES AT HIGH REDSHIFT BY THE COMBO-17+4 SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Nicol, Marie-Helene; Meisenheimer, Klaus; Wolf, Christian; Tapken, Christian E-mail: meise@mpia.de E-mail: ctapken@aip.de

    2011-01-20

    We investigate the evolution of the galaxy population since redshift 2 with a focus on the color bimodality and mass density of the red sequence. We obtain precise and reliable photometric redshifts up to z = 2 by supplementing the optical survey COMBO-17 with observations in four near-infrared bands on 0.2 deg{sup 2} of the COMBO-17 A901-field. Our results are based on an H-band-selected catalog of 10,692 galaxies complete to H = 21fm7. We measure the rest-frame color (U{sub 280}-V) of each galaxy, which across the redshift range of our interest requires no extrapolation and is robust against moderate redshift errors by staying clear of the 4000 A break. We measure the color-magnitude relation of the red sequence as a function of look-back time from the peak in a color-error-weighted histogram, and thus trace the galaxy bimodality out to z {approx_equal} 1.65. The (U{sub 280}-V) of the red sequence is found to evolve almost linearly with look-back time. At high redshift, we find massive galaxies in both the red and the blue population. Red-sequence galaxies with log M{sub *}/M{sub sun}>11 increase in mass density by a factor of {approx}4 from z {approx} 2 to 1 and remain nearly constant at z < 1. However, some galaxies as massive as log M{sub *}/M{sub sun} = 11.5 are already in place at z {approx} 2.

  2. Astrophysical dynamos and the growth of magnetic fields in high-redshift galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieder, Michael; Teyssier, Romain

    2015-08-01

    The origin and evolution of magnetic fields in the Universe is still an open question. Observations of galaxies at high-redshift give evidence for strong galactic magnetic fields even in the early Universe which are consistently measured at later times up to the present age. However, primordial magnetic fields and seed field generation by battery processes cannot explain such high field strengths, suggesting the presence of a rapid growth mechanism in those high-redshift galaxies and subsequent maintenance against decay. Astrophysical dynamo theory provides efficient means of field amplification where even weak initial fields can grow exponentially on sufficiently fast timescales, driving the conversion of kinetic energy into magnetic energy. We investigate the role which feedback mechanisms play in the creation of the turbulence necessary for dynamos to operate. Performing magnetohydrodynamic simulations of cooling halos of dwarf and Milky Way-like high-redshift progenitors, we compare the magnetic field evolution of weak seed fields with various topologies and stellar feedback mechanisms. We find that strong feedback can drive galactic gas turbulence which gives rise to velocity fields with fast exponential magnetic field growth. The simulations display a high gas fraction and a clumpy morphology with kinematics resembling Kolmogorov turbulence and magnetic energy spectra as predicted by Kazantsev dynamo theory. Magnetic fields reach equipartition with $\\mu$G field strength. In a final quiescent phase where feedback is turned off, gas turbulence is reduced and a quadrupole symmetry is observed in the magnetic field. These findings support the theory of rapid magnetic field amplification inside high-redshift galaxies, when the Universe was still young.

  3. Stellar Populations, Outflows, and Morphologies of High-Redshift Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornei, Katherine Anne

    the centroids of FeII interstellar absorption lines, are found to span the interval -217, +155 km s-1. We find that ˜ 40% (10%) of the sample exhibits blueshifted FeII lines at the 1sigma (3sigma) level. We also measure maximal outflow velocities using the profiles of the FeII and MgII lines; we find that MgII frequently traces higher velocity gas than FeII. Using quantitative morphological parameters derived from the HST imaging, we find that mergers are not a prerequisite for driving outflows. More face-on galaxies also show stronger winds than highly inclined systems, consistent with the canonical picture of winds emanating perpendicular to galactic disks. Galactic winds are further explored in the third study of this thesis, where we present a study at z ˜ 1 of the prevalence and kinematics of ultraviolet emission lines from fine-structure FeII* transitions and resonance MgII transitions. Utilizing a multiwavelength dataset of 212 star-forming galaxies, we investigate how the strength and kinematics of FeII* and MgII emission lines vary as a function of galaxy properties. We find that FeII* emission is prevalent in the sample; composite spectra assembled on the basis of a variety of galaxy properties all show FeII* emission, particularly in the stronger 2396 and 2626 A lines. This prevalence of emission is in contrast to observations of local galaxies; the lack of FeII* emission in the small star-forming regions targeted by spectroscopic observations at z ˜ 0 may imply that FeII* emission arises in more extended galaxy halos. The strength of FeII* emission is most strongly modulated by star-formation rate, dust attenuation, and [OII] equivalent width, such that systems with lower star-formation rates, lower dust levels, and larger [OII] equivalent widths show stronger FeII* emission. MgII emission, while not observed in a spectral stack of all the data in our sample, is seen in ˜ 30% of individual objects. We find that objects showing MgII emission have

  4. The long lives of giant clumps and the birth of outflows in gas-rich galaxies at high redshift

    SciTech Connect

    Bournaud, Frédéric; Renaud, Florent; Daddi, Emanuele; Duc, Pierre-Alain; Elbaz, David; Gabor, Jared M.; Juneau, Stéphanie; Kraljic, Katarina; Le Floch', Emeric; Dekel, Avishai; Elmegreen, Bruce G.; Elmegreen, Debra M.; Teyssier, Romain

    2014-01-01

    Star-forming disk galaxies at high redshift are often subject to violent disk instability, characterized by giant clumps whose fate is yet to be understood. The main question is whether the clumps disrupt within their dynamical timescale (≤50 Myr), like the molecular clouds in today's galaxies, or whether they survive stellar feedback for more than a disk orbital time (≈300 Myr) in which case they can migrate inward and help building the central bulge. We present 3.5-7 pc resolution adaptive mesh refinement simulations of high-redshift disks including photoionization, radiation pressure, and supernovae feedback. Our modeling of radiation pressure determines the mass loading and initial velocity of winds from basic physical principles. We find that the giant clumps produce steady outflow rates comparable to and sometimes somewhat larger than their star formation rate, with velocities largely sufficient to escape the galaxy. The clumps also lose mass, especially old stars, by tidal stripping, and the stellar populations contained in the clumps hence remain relatively young (≤200 Myr), as observed. The clumps survive gaseous outflows and stellar loss, because they are wandering in gas-rich turbulent disks from which they can reaccrete gas at high rates compensating for outflows and tidal stripping, overall keeping realistic and self-regulated gaseous and stellar masses. The outflow and accretion rates have specific timescales of a few 10{sup 8} yr, as opposed to rapid and repeated dispersion and reformation of clumps. Our simulations produce gaseous outflows with velocities, densities, and mass loading consistent with observations, and at the same time suggest that the giant clumps survive for hundreds of Myr and complete their migration to the center of high-redshift galaxies. These long-lived clumps are gas-dominated and contain a moderate mass fraction of stars; they drive inside-out disk evolution, thickening, spheroid growth, and fueling of the central

  5. Hard X-Ray Detection of the High Redshift Quasar 4C 71.07

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malizia, A.; Bassani, L.; Dean, A. J.; McCollough, M. L.; Stephen, J. B.; Zhang, S. N.

    1999-01-01

    BATSE/OSSE observations of the high redshift quasar 4C 71.07 indicate that this is the brightest and furthest AGN so far detected 20 keV. BATSE Earth occultation data have been used to search for emission from 4C 71.07 from nearly 3 years of observation. The mean source flux over the- whole period in the BATSE energy range 20-100 keV is (13.2 +/- 1.06) x 10(exp -11) erg/square cm/s corresponding to a luminosity of 2 x 10(exp 48 erg/s. The BATSE light curve over the 3 years of observations shows several flare-like events, one of which (in January 1996) is associated with an optical flare (R=16.1) but with a delay of 55 days. The OSSE/BATSE spectral analysis indicates that the source is characterized by a flat power spectrum (Gamma is approximately 1.1- 1.3) when in a low state: this spectral form is consistent within errors with the ASCA and ROSAT spectra. This means that the power law observed from 0.1 to 10 keV extends up to at least 1 MeV but steepens soon after to meet EGRET high energy data. BATSE data taken around the January 1996 flare suggests that the spectrum could be steeper when the source is in a bright state. The upsilon-F-upsilon representation of the source is typical of a low frequency peaked/ gamma- ray dominated blazar, with the synchrotron peak in the mm-FIR band and the Compton peak in the MeV band. The BATSE and OSSE spectral data seem to favour a model in which the high energy - flux is due to the sum of the synchrotron self-Compton and the external Compton contributions: this is also supported by the- variability behaviour of the source.

  6. Seeding high-redshift QSOs by collisional runaway in primordial star clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, Harley; Sijacki, Debora; Haehnelt, Martin G.

    2015-08-01

    We study how runaway stellar collisions in high-redshift, metal-poor star clusters form very massive stars (VMSs) that can directly collapse to intermediate-mass black holes (IMBHs). We follow the evolution of a pair of neighbouring high-redshift mini-haloes with high-resolution, cosmological hydrodynamical zoom-in simulations using the adaptive mesh refinement code RAMSES combined with the non-equilibrium chemistry package KROME. The first collapsing mini-halo is assumed to enrich the central nuclear star cluster (NSC) of the other to a critical metallicity, sufficient for Population II (Pop. II) star formation at redshift z ≈ 27. Using the spatial configuration of the flattened, asymmetrical gas cloud forming in the core of the metal-enriched halo, we set the initial conditions for simulations of an initially non-spherical star cluster with the direct summation code NBODY6 which are compared to about 2000 NBODY6 simulations of spherical star clusters for a wide range of star cluster parameters. The final mass of the VMS that forms depends strongly on the initial mass and initial central density of the NSC. For the initial central densities suggested by our RAMSES simulations, VMSs with mass >400 M⊙ can form in clusters with stellar masses of ≈104 M⊙, and this can increase to well over 1000 M⊙ for more massive and denser clusters. The high probability we find for forming a VMS in these mini-haloes at such an early cosmic time makes collisional runaway of Pop. II star clusters a promising channel for producing large numbers of high-redshift IMBHs that may act as the seeds of supermassive black holes.

  7. Clustering of High Redshift (z>2.9) Quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Yue; Strauss, Michael A.; Oguri, Masamune; Hennawi, Joseph F.; Fan, Xiaohui; Richards, Gordon T.; Hall, Patrick B.; Schneider, Donald P.; Szalay, Alexander S.; Thakar, Anirudda R.; Berk, Daniel E.Vanden; Anderson, Scott F.; Bahcall, Neta A.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2006-11-30

    We study the two-point correlation function of a uniformly selected sample of 4,428 optically selected luminous quasars with redshift 2.9 {le} z {le} 5.4 selected over 4041 deg{sup 2} from the Fifth Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We fit a power-law to the projected correlation function w{sub p}(r{sub p}) to marginalize over redshift space distortions and redshift errors. For a real-space correlation function of the form {zeta}(r) = (r/r{sub 0}){sup -{gamma}}, the fitted parameters in comoving coordinates are r{sub 0} = 15.2 {+-} 2.7 h{sup -1} Mpc and {gamma} = 2.0 {+-} 0.3, over a scale range 4 {le} r{sub p} {le} 150 h{sup -1} Mpc. Thus high-redshift quasars are appreciably more strongly clustered than their z {approx} 1.5 counterparts, which have a comoving clustering length r{sub 0} {approx} 6.5 h{sup -1} Mpc. Dividing our sample into two redshift bins: 2.9 {le} z {le} 3.5 and z {ge} 3.5, and assuming a power-law index {gamma} = 2.0, we find a correlation length of r{sub 0} = 16.9 {+-} 1.7 h{sup -1} Mpc for the former, and r{sub 0} = 24.3 {+-} 2.4 h{sup -1} Mpc for the latter. Strong clustering at high redshift indicates that quasars are found in very massive, and therefore highly biased, halos. Following Martini & Weinberg, we relate the clustering strength and quasar number density to the quasar lifetimes and duty cycle. Using the Sheth & Tormen halo mass function, the quasar lifetime is estimated to lie in the range 4 {approx} 50 Myr for quasars with 2.9 {le} z {le} 3.5; and 30 {approx} 600 Myr for quasars with z {ge} 3.5. The corresponding duty cycles are 0.004 {approx} 0.05 for the lower redshift bin and 0.03 {approx} 0.6 for the higher redshift bin. The minimum mass of halos in which these quasars reside is 2-3 x 10{sup 12} h{sup -1} M{sub {circle_dot}} for quasars with 2.9 {le} z {le} 3.5 and 4-6 x 10{sup 12} h{sup -1} M{sub {circle_dot}} for quasars with z {ge} 3.5; the effective bias factor b{sub eff} increases with redshift, e.g., b

  8. WQ 2059-247: An unusual high redshift X-ray cluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, R. A.; Sarazin, C. L.; Quintana, H.; Jaffe, W. J.

    1980-01-01

    X-ray, optical, and radio observations of a high redshift, Bautz-Morgan type I cluster of galaxies are reported. The cD galaxy contains a powerful, flat spectrum radio source coincident with the possibly stellar nucleus. The cluster is an extremely luminous X-ray source; however, unlike nearby luminous X-ray clusters the X-ray spectrum appears to be rather soft. Two possible interpretations of the soruces are suggested: either the intracluster gas is much cooler in high redshift clusters because they are less relaxed, or the X-ray and radio emissions from WQ 2059-247 are the result of a non thermal QSO/BL Lac type object in the nucleus of the cD.

  9. Damped Ly alpha absorbers at high redshift: Large disks or galactic building blocks?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haehnelt, Martin G.; Steinmetz, Matthias; Rauch, Michael

    1997-01-01

    The nature of the physical structures giving rise to damped Lyman alpha absorption systems (DLAS) at high redshifts is investigated. The proposal that rapidly rotating large disks are the only viable explanation for the observed asymmetric profiles of low ionization absorption lines is examined. Using hydrodynamic simulations of galaxy formation, it is demonstated that irregular protogalactic clumps can reproduce the observed velocity width distribution and asymmetries of the absorption profiles equally well. The velocity broadening in the simulated clumps is due to a mixture of rotation, random motions, infall and merging. The observed velocity width correlates with the virial velocity for the dark matter halo of the forming protogalactic clump. The typical virial velocity of the halos required to lead to the DLAS population is approximately 100 km/s. It is concluded that the evidence that DLAS at high redshift are related to large, rapidly rotating disks, is not compelling.

  10. Exploring the stellar populations of nearby and high redshift galaxies with ELTs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gullieuszik, M.; Falomo, R.; Greggio, L.; Uslenghi, M.; Fantinel, D.

    The high sensitivity and spatial resolution of future ELTs facilities will offer the unique opportunity to probe directly the stellar populations of the very inner regions of galaxies in the local Universe and to derive morphological and photometric information for high redshift galaxies. We present our project aimed at assessing the expected capabilities of ELTs in the study of nearby and high-redshift stellar populations. To this end, we simulated imaging observations of different stellar populations in the local Universe and in high-redhshift galaxies with the MICADO camera at the E-ELT. Detailed photometric analyses of these images were used to probe the feasibility of science cases dealing with photometry of resolved stars in crowded fields, and with surface photometry of distant galaxies. We find that the future facilities will allow us to greatly improve our knowledge of the stellar populations in galaxies, especially in the innermost and most crowded regions. Accurate photometry of turn-off stars in nuclear star clusters of intermediate age will be possible up to distances of ˜ 3 Mpc. The exquisite spacial resolution will also drive great progress in unresolved stellar populations studies, enabling the detailed measurement of structural parameters, colour profiles, and the detection of signature of star formation sub-structures in galaxies at redshifts up to z=3.

  11. The distribution of neutral hydrogen around high-redshift galaxies and quasars in the EAGLE simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmati, Alireza; Schaye, Joop; Bower, Richard G.; Crain, Robert A.; Furlong, Michelle; Schaller, Matthieu; Theuns, Tom

    2015-09-01

    The observed high covering fractions of neutral hydrogen (H I) with column densities above ˜1017 cm-2 around Lyman-Break Galaxies (LBGs) and bright quasars at redshifts z ˜ 2-3 has been identified as a challenge for simulations of galaxy formation. We use the Evolution and Assembly of Galaxies and their Environment (EAGLE) cosmological, hydrodynamical simulation, which has been shown to reproduce a wide range of galaxy properties and for which the subgrid feedback was calibrated without considering gas properties, to study the distribution of H I around high-redshift galaxies. We predict the covering fractions of strong H I absorbers (N_{H I}≳ 10^{17} cm^{-2}) inside haloes to increase rapidly with redshift but to depend only weakly on halo mass. For massive (M200 ≳ 1012M⊙) haloes, the covering fraction profiles are nearly scale-invariant and we provide fitting functions that reproduce the simulation results. While efficient feedback is required to increase the H I covering fractions to the high observed values, the distribution of strong absorbers in and around haloes of a fixed mass is insensitive to factor of 2 variations in the strength of the stellar feedback. In contrast, at fixed stellar mass the predicted H I distribution is highly sensitive to the feedback efficiency. The fiducial EAGLE simulation reproduces both the observed global column density distribution function of H I and the observed radial covering fraction profiles of strong H I absorbers around LBGs and bright quasars.

  12. High resolution frequency analysis techniques with application to the redshift experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decher, R.; Teuber, D.

    1975-01-01

    High resolution frequency analysis methods, with application to the gravitational probe redshift experiment, are discussed. For this experiment a resolution of .00001 Hz is required to measure a slowly varying, low frequency signal of approximately 1 Hz. Major building blocks include fast Fourier transform, discrete Fourier transform, Lagrange interpolation, golden section search, and adaptive matched filter technique. Accuracy, resolution, and computer effort of these methods are investigated, including test runs on an IBM 360/65 computer.

  13. NIR Brightening of the high redshift Blazar 4C+38.41

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrasco, L.; Porras, A.; Recillas, E.; Chavushyan, V.; Mayya, D. Y.

    2016-09-01

    We report on the recent NIR brightening of the high redshift Blazar 4C+38.41 (z=1.814), associated with the Gamma-ray source 2FGLJ1635.2+3810 and the optical source [HB89]1633+382 On September 21st,2016 (MJD 2457652.6733), we found the source with NIR fluxes corresponding to: H = 14.627 +/- 0.04 . On MJD 2457578.8.

  14. The X-ray properties of high redshift, optically selected QSOs. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, S. F.

    1985-01-01

    In order to study the X-ray properties of high redshift QSOs, grism/grens plates covering 17 deg. of sky previously imaged to very sensitive X-ray flux levels with the Einstein Observatory were taken. Following optical selection of the QSO, the archived X-ray image is examined to extract an X-ray flux detection or a sensitive upper limit.

  15. THE AzTEC/SMA INTERFEROMETRIC IMAGING SURVEY OF SUBMILLIMETER-SELECTED HIGH-REDSHIFT GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Younger, Joshua D.; Fazio, Giovanni G.; Huang Jiasheng; Ashby, Matthew L. N.; Gurwell, Mark A.; Petitpas, Glen R.; Wilner, David J.; Yun, Min S.; Wilson, Grant W.; Scott, Kimberly S.; Austermann, Jason; Perera, Thushara; Peck, Alison B.; Hughes, David H.; Aretxaga, Itziar; Kim, Sungeun; Lowenthal, James D.

    2009-10-10

    We present results from a continuing interferometric survey of high-redshift submillimeter galaxies (SMGs) with the Submillimeter Array, including high-resolution (beam size approx2 arcsec) imaging of eight additional AzTEC 1.1 mm selected sources in the COSMOS field, for which we obtain six reliable (peak signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) >5 or peak S/N >4 with multiwavelength counterparts within the beam) and two moderate significance (peak S/N >4) detections. When combined with previous detections, this yields an unbiased sample of millimeter-selected SMGs with complete interferometric follow up. With this sample in hand, we (1) empirically confirm the radio-submillimeter association, (2) examine the submillimeter morphology-including the nature of SMGs with multiple radio counterparts and constraints on the physical scale of the far infrared-of the sample, and (3) find additional evidence for a population of extremely luminous, radio-dim SMGs that peaks at higher redshift than previous, radio-selected samples. In particular, the presence of such a population of high-redshift sources has important consequences for models of galaxy formation-which struggle to account for such objects even under liberal assumptions-and dust production models given the limited time since the big bang.

  16. MORPHOLOGY AND SIZE DIFFERENCES BETWEEN LOCAL AND HIGH-REDSHIFT LUMINOUS INFRARED GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Rujopakarn, Wiphu; Rieke, George H.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Juneau, Stephanie

    2011-01-10

    We show that the star-forming regions in high-redshift luminous and ultraluminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs and ULIRGs) and submillimeter galaxies (SMGs) have similar physical scales to those in local normal star-forming galaxies. To first order, their higher infrared (IR) luminosities result from higher luminosity surface density. We also find a good correlation between the IR luminosity and IR luminosity surface density in starburst galaxies across over five orders of magnitude of IR luminosity from local normal galaxies to z {approx} 2 SMGs. The intensely star-forming regions of local ULIRGs are significantly smaller than those in their high-redshift counterparts and hence diverge significantly from this correlation, indicating that the ULIRGs found locally are a different population from the high-redshift ULIRGs and SMGs. Based on this relationship, we suggest that luminosity surface density should serve as a more accurate indicator for the IR emitting environment, and hence the observable properties, of star-forming galaxies than their IR luminosity. We demonstrate this approach by showing that ULIRGs at z {approx} 1 and a lensed galaxy at z {approx} 2.5 exhibit aromatic features agreeing with local LIRGs that are an order of magnitude less luminous, but have similar IR luminosity surface density. A consequence of this relationship is that the aromatic emission strength in star-forming galaxies will appear to increase at z>1 for a given IR luminosity compared to their local counterparts.

  17. Herschel-ATLAS: The Angular Correlation Function of Submillimetre Galaxies at High and Low Redshift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maddox, S. J.; Dunne, L.; Rigby, E.; Eales, S.; Cooray, A.; Scott, D.; Peacock, J. A.; Negrello, M.; Smith, D. J. B.; Benford, D.; Amblard, A.; Auld, R.; Baes, M.; Bonfield, D.; Burgarella, D.; Buttiglione, S.; Cava, A.; Clements, D.; Dariush, A.; deZotti, G.; Dye, S.; Frayer, D.; Fritz, J.; Gonzalez-Nuevo, J.; Herranz, D.

    2010-01-01

    We present measurements of the angular correlation function of galaxies selected from the first field of the H-ATLAS survey. Careful removal of the background from galactic cirrus is essential, and currently dominates the uncertainty in our measurements. For our 250 micrometer-selected sample we detect no significant clustering, consistent with the expectation that the 250 pm-selected sources are mostly normal galaxies at z < or equal to 1. For our 350 micrometer and 500 micrometer-selected samples we detect relatively strong clustering with correlation amplitudes A of 0.2 and 1.2 at 1', but with relatively large uncertainties. For samples which preferentially select high redshift galaxies at z approx. 2-3 we detect significant strong clustering, leading to an estimate of r(0) approx. 7-11/h Mpc. The slope of our clustering measurements is very steep. delta approx. 2. The measurements are consistent with the idea that sub-mm sources consist of a low redshift population of normal galaxies and a high redshift population of highly clustered star-bursting galaxies.

  18. The High Energy Telescope on EXIST: Hunting High Red-shift GRBs and Other Exotic Transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, JaeSub; Grindlay, J.; Allen, B.; Skinner, G. K.; Finger, M. H.; Jernigan, J. G.; EXIST Team

    2009-01-01

    The current baseline design of the High Energy Telescope (HET) on EXIST will localize high red-shift Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) and other exotic transients fast (<10 sec) and accurately (<17") in order to allow the rapid (<1-2 min) follow-up onboard optical/IR imaging and spectroscopy. HET employs coded-aperture imaging with 5.5m2 CZT detector and a large hybrid tungsten mask (See also Skinner et al. in this meeting). The wide energy band coverage (5-600 keV) is optimal for capturing these transients and highly obscured AGNs. The continuous scan with the wide field of view ( 45 deg radius at 25% coding fraction) increases the chance of capturing rare elusive events such as soft Gamma-ray repeaters and tidal disruption events of stars by dormant supermassive black holes. Sweeping nearly the entire sky every two orbits (3 hour) will also establish a finely-sampled long-term history of the X-ray variability of many X-ray sources, opening up a new time domain of the variability study. In light of the new EXIST design concept, we review the observing strategy to maximize the science return and report the latest development of the CZT detectors for HET.

  19. High redshift signatures in the 21 cm forest due to cosmic string wakes

    SciTech Connect

    Tashiro, Hiroyuki; Sekiguchi, Toyokazu; Silk, Joseph E-mail: toyokazu.sekiguchi@nagoya-u.jp

    2014-01-01

    Cosmic strings induce minihalo formation in the early universe. The resultant minihalos cluster in string wakes and create a ''21 cm forest'' against the cosmic microwave background (CMB) spectrum. Such a 21 cm forest can contribute to angular fluctuations of redshifted 21 cm signals integrated along the line of sight. We calculate the root-mean-square amplitude of the 21 cm fluctuations due to strings and show that these fluctuations can dominate signals from minihalos due to primordial density fluctuations at high redshift (z∼>10), even if the string tension is below the current upper bound, Gμ < 1.5 × 10{sup −7}. Our results also predict that the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) can potentially detect the 21 cm fluctuations due to strings with Gμ ≈ 7.5 × 10{sup −8} for the single frequency band case and 4.0 × 10{sup −8} for the multi-frequency band case.

  20. High redshift signatures in the 21 cm forest due to cosmic string wakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tashiro, Hiroyuki; Sekiguchi, Toyokazu; Silk, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Cosmic strings induce minihalo formation in the early universe. The resultant minihalos cluster in string wakes and create a ``21 cm forest'' against the cosmic microwave background (CMB) spectrum. Such a 21 cm forest can contribute to angular fluctuations of redshifted 21 cm signals integrated along the line of sight. We calculate the root-mean-square amplitude of the 21 cm fluctuations due to strings and show that these fluctuations can dominate signals from minihalos due to primordial density fluctuations at high redshift (zgtrsim10), even if the string tension is below the current upper bound, Gμ < 1.5 × 10-7. Our results also predict that the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) can potentially detect the 21 cm fluctuations due to strings with Gμ ≈ 7.5 × 10-8 for the single frequency band case and 4.0 × 10-8 for the multi-frequency band case.

  1. High-Redshift Clusters form NVSS: The TexOx Cluster (TOC) Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Croft, S; Rawlings, S; Hill, G J

    2003-02-11

    The TexOx Cluster (TOC) Survey uses overdensities of radiosources in the NVSS to trace clusters of galaxies. The links between radiosources and rich environments make this a powerful way to find clusters which may potentially be overlooked by other selection techniques. By including constraints from optical surveys, TOC is an extremely efficient way to find clusters at high redshift. One such field, TOC J0233.3+3021, contains at least one galaxy cluster (at z {approx} 1.4) and has been detected using the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect. Even in targeted deep optical observations, however, distinguishing the cluster galaxies from the background is difficult, especially given the tendency of TOC to select fields containing multiple structures at different redshifts.

  2. Massive Elliptical Galaxies at High Redshift: NICMOS Imaging of z~1 Radio Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zirm, Andrew W.; Dickinson, Mark; Dey, Arjun

    2003-03-01

    We present deep, ~1.6 μm, continuum images of 11 high-redshift (0.811high-redshift radio galaxies to lower redshift counterparts. We find that their sizes are similar to those of local FRII radio source hosts and are in general larger than other local galaxies. The derived host galaxy luminosities are very high and lie at the bright end of luminosity functions constructed at similar redshifts. This indicates that the high-redshift radio galaxies are likely rare, massive sources. The galaxies in our sample are also brighter than the rest-frame size-surface-brightness locus defined by the low-redshift sources. Passive evolution roughly aligns the z~1 galaxies with the low-redshift samples with a slope equal to 4.7. This value is intermediate between the canonical Kormendy relation (~3.5) and a constant luminosity line (=5). The optical host is sometimes centered on a local minimum in the rest-frame UV

  3. Low/High Redshift Classification of Emission Line Galaxies in the HETDEX survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acquaviva, Viviana; Gawiser, Eric; Leung, Andrew S.; Martin, Mario R.

    2014-05-01

    We discuss different methods to separate high- from low-redshift galaxies based on a combination of spectroscopic and photometric observations. Our baseline scenario is the Hobby-Eberly Telescope Dark Energy eXperiment (HETDEX) survey, which will observe several hundred thousand Lyman Alpha Emitting (LAE) galaxies at 1.9 < z < 3.5, and for which the main source of contamination is [OII]-emitting galaxies at z < 0.5. Additional information useful for the separation comes from empirical knowledge of LAE and [OII] luminosity functions and equivalent width distributions as a function of redshift. We consider three separation techniques: a simple cut in equivalent width, a Bayesian separation method, and machine learning algorithms, including support vector machines. These methods can be easily applied to other surveys and used on simulated data in the framework of survey planning.

  4. The Evolution of Metals and Dust in the High-Redshift Universe (z greater than 6)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwek, Eliahu

    2007-01-01

    Dusty hyperluminous galaxies in the early universe provide unique environments for studying the role of massive stars in the formation and destruction of dust. At redshifts above approx. 6, when the universe was less than approx. 1 Gyr old, dust could have only condensed in the explosive ejecta of Type-II supernovae (SNe), since most of the progenitors of the AGB stars, the major alternative source of interstellar dust, did not have time to evolve off the main sequence. I will present analytical models for the evolution of the gas, dust, and metals in high redshift galaxies, with a special application to SDSS J1148+5251, a hyperluminous quasar at $z = 6.4$. I will also discuss possible star formation scenarios consistent with observational constraints on the dust and gas content of this object.

  5. Crossing the Lyman valley: how many UV-bright high redshift quasars are there?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picard, Alain; Jakobsen, Peter

    1993-09-01

    We present predictions for the appearance of the high redshift quasar population at far-UV (λ <~ 1500A) wavelengths, with an emphasis on assessing the feasibility of carrying out the HeII λ304A equivalent of the Gunn-Peterson test with HST and FUSE. We assume that the shape of the intrinsic extreme-UV spectra of luminous quasars can be described by a simple power law, and combine the quasar evolution models of Schmidt & Green (1983) and Boyle et al. (1988) with the intervening Lyman continuum absorption model of Moller & Jakobsen (1990) in order to calculate the distribution of quasars in apparent far- UV flux and redshift. We present curves giving the predicted total number of observable quasars on the sky as a function of limiting far-UV sensitivity at received HeII λ304A for the redshift range z > 3 accessible with HST and the range 2 < z <3 accessible with FUSE. The steepness of the quasar luminosity function is enhanced by the effects of intervening Lyman continuum absorption, and leads to the number of observable quasars being strongly dependent on the limiting sensitivity and assumed quasar spectrum. Nonetheless, our analysis suggests that a limiting far-UV spectroscopic sensitivity of Flambda_ ~ 1 x 10^16^ ergs s^-1^ cm^2^ A^-1^ is required in order to be able to observe HeII λ304A absorption in the ~10^2^ brightest quasars at redshifts z > 3. This sensitivity cannot currently be reached with the aberrated HST observatory but may be achievable in the future with the COSTAR and STIS instruments. In the lower redshift range 2 < Z < 3, where redshifted HeII λ304A line is accessible with FUSE, the corresponding sensitivity required to reach the ~10^2^ brightest quasars is Flambda_ ~ 1 x 10^-15^ ergs s^-1^ cm^-2^ A^-1^. This sensitivity is below that expected for the prime spectrographic mode of FUSE, but could be achieved in a low resolution mode

  6. Probabilistic Selection of High-redshift Quasars with Subaru/Hyper Suprime-Cam Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onoue, Masafusa

    High-redshift quasars are an important probe of the distant Universe. They enable observational studies of the early growth of supermassive blackholes, cosmic reionization, chemical enrichment of host galaxies, and so on. Through pioneering optical and near-infrared wide-area surveys such as the SDSS and the VIKING Survey, about one hundred quasars have been found at z > 6 (e.g., Fan et al. (2006b), Venemans et al. (2013)). However, its current small sample size and the fact that most of them are the most luminous (M 1450 <~ -24) population in this epoch prevents one from constraining statistics on high-redshift quasars, namely quasar luminosity function (QLF), and redshift evolution of IGM neutral fraction. Thus, discovery of large number of z > 6 quasars, especially low-luminous or z > 7 quasars, is highly desired for further understanding of the early universe. We are now starting a new ground-breaking survey of high-redshift (z > 6) quasars using the exquisite imaging data provided by the Hyper Suprime-Cam (HSC) Subaru Strategic Program (SSP) Survey. Thanks to its extremely wide coverage and its high sensitivity thorough five optical bands (1,400 deg2 to the depth of r ~ 26 in HSC-Wide layer), it is one of the most powerful contemporary surveys that makes it possible for us to increase the number of z > 6 quasars by almost an order of magnitude, i.e., 300 at z ~ 6 and 50 at z ~ 7, based on the current estimate of the QLF at z > 6 by Willott et al. (2010b). One of the biggest challenges in z > 6 quasar candidate selection is contamination of Galactic brown dwarfs, which have the same point-like appearance as and similarly red colors to the quasars. To overcome this issue and maximize the selection efficiency, we apply a double-layered approach to the HSC survey products, namely combination of two probabilistic selections: SED-fitting and Bayesian selection. In particular, we have developed a template SED fitting method optimized to high-redshift quasars

  7. Distance Estimates for High Redshift Clusters SZ and X-Ray Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joy, Marshall K.

    1999-01-01

    I present interferometric images of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect for the high redshift (z $ greater than $ 0.5) galaxy clusters in the \\emph(Einstein) Medium Sensitivity Survey: MS0451.5-0305 (z = 0.54), MS0015.9+1609 (z = 0.55), MS2053.7-0449 (z = 0.58), MS1 137.5+6625 (z = 0.78), and MS 1054.5-0321 (z = 0.83). Isothermal $\\beta$ models are applied to the data to determine the magnitude of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (S-Z) decrement in each cluster. Complementary ROSAT PSPC and HRI x-ray data are also analyzed, and are combined with the S-Z data to generate an independent estimate of the cluster distance. Since the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect is invariant with redshift, sensitive S-Z imaging can provide an independent determination of the size, shape, density, and distance of high redshift galaxy clusters; we will discuss current systematic uncertainties with this approach, as well as future observations which will yield stronger constraints.

  8. A critical analysis of high-redshift, massive, galaxy clusters. Part I

    SciTech Connect

    Hoyle, Ben; Jimenez, Raul; Verde, Licia; Hotchkiss, Shaun E-mail: licia.verde@icc.ub.edu E-mail: shaun.hotchkiss@helsinki.fi

    2012-02-01

    We critically investigate current statistical tests applied to high redshift clusters of galaxies in order to test the standard cosmological model and describe their range of validity. We carefully compare a sample of high-redshift, massive, galaxy clusters with realistic Poisson sample simulations of the theoretical mass function, which include the effect of Eddington bias. We compare the observations and simulations using the following statistical tests: the distributions of ensemble and individual existence probabilities (in the > M, > z sense), the redshift distributions, and the 2d Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. Using seemingly rare clusters from Hoyle et al. (2011), and Jee et al. (2011) and assuming the same survey geometry as in Jee et al. (2011, which is less conservative than Hoyle et al. 2011), we find that the ( > M, > z) existence probabilities of all clusters are fully consistent with ΛCDM. However assuming the same survey geometry, we use the 2d K-S test probability to show that the observed clusters are not consistent with being the least probable clusters from simulations at > 95% confidence, and are also not consistent with being a random selection of clusters, which may be caused by the non-trivial selection function and survey geometry. Tension can be removed if we examine only a X-ray selected sub sample, with simulations performed assuming a modified survey geometry.

  9. DUST FORMATION, EVOLUTION, AND OBSCURATION EFFECTS IN THE VERY HIGH-REDSHIFT UNIVERSE

    SciTech Connect

    Dwek, Eli; Benford, Dominic J.; Staguhn, Johannes; Su, Ting; Arendt, Richard G.; Kovacks, Attila

    2014-06-20

    The evolution of dust at redshifts z ≳ 9, and consequently the dust properties, differs greatly from that in the local universe. In contrast to the local universe, core collapse supernovae (CCSNe) are the only source of thermally condensed dust. Because of the low initial dust-to-gas mass ratio, grain destruction rates are low, so that CCSNe are net producers of interstellar dust. Galaxies with large initial gas mass or high mass infall rate will therefore have a more rapid net rate of dust production compared to galaxies with lower gas mass, even at the same star formation rate. The dust composition is dominated by silicates, which exhibit a strong rise in the UV opacity near the Lyman break. This ''silicate-UV break'' may be confused with the Lyman break, resulting in a misidentification of a galaxy's photometric redshift. In this Letter we demonstrate these effects by analyzing the spectral energy distribution of MACS1149-JD, a lensed galaxy at z = 9.6. A potential 2 mm counterpart of MACS1149-JD has been identified with GISMO. While additional observations are required to corroborate this identification, we use this possible association to illustrate the physical processes and the observational effects of dust in the very high-redshift universe.

  10. Dust Formation, Evolution, and Obscuration Effects in the Very High-Redshift Universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwek, Eli; Staguhn, Johannes; Arendt, Richard G.; Kovacks, Attila; Su, Ting; Benford, Dominic J.

    2014-01-01

    The evolution of dust at redshifts z > or approx. 9, and consequently the dust properties, differs greatly from that in the local universe. In contrast to the local universe, core collapse supernovae (CCSNe) are the only source of thermally-condensed dust. Because of the low initial dust-togas mass ratio, grain destruction rates are low, so that CCSNe are net producers of interstellar dust. Galaxies with large initial gas mass or high mass infall rate will therefore have a more rapid net rate of dust production comported to galaxies with lower gas mass, even at the same star formation rate. The dust composition is dominated by silicates, which exhibit a strong rise in the UV opacity near the Lyman break. This "silicate-UV break" may be confused with the Lyman break, resulting in a misidentification of a galaxies' photometric redshift. In this paper we demonstrate these effects by analyzing the spectral energy distribution (SED) of MACS1149-JD, a lensed galaxy at z = 9.6. A potential 2mm counterpart of MACS1149-JD has been identified with GISMO. While additional observations are required to corroborate this identification, we use this possible association to illustrate the physical processes and the observational effects of dust in the very high redshift universe.

  11. GISMO, a 2 mm Bolometer Camera Optimized for the Study of High Redshift Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Staguhn, J.

    2007-01-01

    The 2mm spectral range provides a unique terrestrial window enabling ground based observations of the earliest active dusty galaxies in the universe and thereby allowing a better constraint on the star formation rate in these objects. We present a progress report for our bolometer camera GISMO (the Goddard-IRAM Superconducting 2-Millimeter Observer), which will obtain large and sensitive sky maps at this wavelength. The instrument will be used at the IRAM 30 m telescope and we expect to install it at the telescope in 2007. The camera uses an 8 x 16 planar array of multiplexed TES bolometers, which incorporates our recently designed Backshort Under Grid (BUG) architecture. GISMO will be very efficient at detecting sources serendipitously in large sky surveys. With the background limited performance of the detectors, the camera provides significantly greater imaging sensitivity and mapping speed at this wavelength than has previously been possible. The major scientific driver for the instrument is to provide the IRAM 30 m telescope with the capability to rapidly observe galactic and extragalactic dust emission, in particular from high-zeta ULI RGs and quasar s, even in the summer season. The instrument will fill in the SEDs of high redshift galaxies at the Rayleigh-Jeans part of the dust emission spectrum, even at the highest redshifts. Our source count models predict that GISMO will serendipitously detect one galaxy every four hours on the blank sky, and that one quarter of these galaxies will be at a redshift of zeta 6.5.

  12. An Increasing Stellar Baryon Fraction in Bright Galaxies at High Redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finkelstein, Steven L.; Song, Mimi; Behroozi, Peter; Somerville, Rachel S.; Papovich, Casey; Milosavljević, Miloš; Dekel, Avishai; Narayanan, Desika; Ashby, Matthew L. N.; Cooray, Asantha; Fazio, Giovanni G.; Ferguson, Henry C.; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Salmon, Brett; Willner, S. P.

    2015-12-01

    Recent observations have shown that the characteristic luminosity of the rest-frame ultraviolet (UV) luminosity function does not significantly evolve at 4 < z < 7 and is approximately {M}{UV}*˜ -21. We investigate this apparent non-evolution by examining a sample of 173 bright, MUV < -21 galaxies at z = 4-7, analyzing their stellar populations and host halo masses. Including deep Spitzer/IRAC imaging to constrain the rest-frame optical light, we find that {M}{UV}* galaxies at z = 4-7 have similar stellar masses of log(M/M⊙) = 9.6-9.9 and are thus relatively massive for these high redshifts. However, bright galaxies at z = 4-7 are less massive and have younger inferred ages than similarly bright galaxies at z = 2-3, even though the two populations have similar star formation rates and levels of dust attenuation for a fixed dust-attenuation curve. Matching the abundances of these bright z = 4-7 galaxies to halo mass functions from the Bolshoi ΛCDM simulation implies that the typical halo masses in ˜ {M}{{UV}}* galaxies decrease from log(Mh/M⊙) = 11.9 at z = 4 to log(Mh/M⊙) = 11.4 at z = 7. Thus, although we are studying galaxies at a similar stellar mass across multiple redshifts, these galaxies live in lower mass halos at higher redshift. The stellar baryon fraction in ˜ {M}{{UV}}* galaxies in units of the cosmic mean Ωb/Ωm rises from 5.1% at z = 4 to 11.7% at z = 7; this evolution is significant at the ˜3σ level. This rise does not agree with simple expectations of how galaxies grow, and implies that some effect, perhaps a diminishing efficiency of feedback, is allowing a higher fraction of available baryons to be converted into stars at high redshifts.

  13. The Swift gamma-ray burst redshift distribution: selection biases and optical brightness evolution at high z?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coward, D. M.; Howell, E. J.; Branchesi, M.; Stratta, G.; Guetta, D.; Gendre, B.; Macpherson, D.

    2013-07-01

    We employ realistic constraints on astrophysical and instrumental selection effects to model the gamma-ray burst (GRB) redshift distribution using Swift triggered redshift samples acquired from optical afterglows and The Optically Unbiased GRB Host survey. Models for the Malmquist bias, redshift desert, and the fraction of afterglows missing because of host galaxy dust extinction are used to show how the `true' GRB redshift distribution is distorted to its presently observed biased distribution. We also investigate another selection effect arising from a correlation between Eiso and Lopt. The analysis, which accounts for the missing fraction of redshifts in the two data subsets, shows that a combination of selection effects (both instrumental and astrophysical) can describe the observed GRB redshift distribution. Furthermore, the observed distribution is compatible with a GRB rate evolution that tracks the global star formation rate, although the rate at high z cannot be constrained with confidence. Taking optical selection effects into account, it may not be necessary to invoke high-energy GRB luminosity evolution with redshift to explain the observed GRB rate at high z.

  14. Dark bubbles around high-redshift radio-loud active galactic nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghisellini, G.; Sbarrato, T.

    2016-09-01

    At redshift larger than 3 there is a disagreement between the number of blazars (whose jet is pointing at us) and the number of expected parents (whose jet is pointing elsewhere). Now we strengthen this claim because (i) the number of blazars identified within the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS)+Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-cm (FIRST) survey footprint increased, demanding a more numerous parent population, and (ii) the detected blazars have a radio flux large enough to be above the FIRST flux limit even if the jet is slightly misaligned. The foreseen number of these slightly misaligned jets, in principle detectable, is much larger than the radio-detected sources in the FIRST+SDSS survey (at redshift larger than 4). This argument is independent of the presence of an isotropic radio component, such as the hotspot or the radio lobe, and does not depend on the bulk Lorentz factor Γ. We propose a scenario that ascribes the lack of slightly misaligned sources to an overobscuration of the nucleus by a `bubble' of dust, possibly typical of the first high-redshift quasars.

  15. How absorption selected galaxies trace the general high-redshift galaxy population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, Lise

    2015-08-01

    Strong absorption lines seen in quasar spectra arise when the lines of sight to the quasars intersect intervening galaxies. The associated metal absorption lines from the strongest absorption lines, the damped Lyman alpha absorbers (DLAs), allow us to trace the metallicity of galaxies back to redshifts z>5. Typical metallicities range from 0.1-100% solar metallicities with a huge scatter at any given redshift. Understanding the nature of galaxies that host DLAs is one strategy to probe the early phase and origin of stars in the outskirts of present-day galaxy disks.The search for emission from the elusive high-redshift DLA galaxies has reached a mature state now that we have determined how to best identify the absorbing galaxies. From a growing number of emission-line detections from DLA galaxies at redshifts ranging between 0.1 and 3, we can analyse galaxies in both absorption and emission, and probe the gas-phase metallicities in the outskirts and halos of the galaxies.By combining information for galaxies seen in emission and absorption, I will show that there is a relation between DLA metallicities and the host galaxy luminosities similar to the well-known the mass-metallicity relation for luminosity selected galaxies. This implies that DLA galaxies are drawn from the general population of low- to intermediate mass galaxies. We can determine a metallicity gradient in the extended halo of the galaxies out to ~40 kpc, and this allows us to reproduce observed galaxy correlation functions derived from conventional samples of luminosity selected galaxies.

  16. Can Life Survive Gamma-Ray Bursts in the High-redshift Universe?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ye; Zhang, Bing

    2015-09-01

    Nearby gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) have been proposed as a possible cause of mass extinctions on Earth. Due to the higher event rate of GRBs at higher redshifts, it has been speculated that life as we know it may not survive above a certain redshift (e.g., z\\gt 0.5). We examine the duty cycle of lethal (life-threatening) GRBs in the solar neighborhood, in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) galaxies, and GRB host galaxies, with the dependence of the long GRB rate on star formation and metallicity properly taken into account. We find that the number of lethal GRBs attacking Earth within the past 500 Myr (˜epoch of the Ordovician mass extinction) is 0.93. The number of lethal GRBs hitting a certain planet increases with redshift, as a result of the increasing star formation rate (SFR) and decreasing metallicity in high-z galaxies. Taking 1 per 500 Myr as a conservative duty cycle for life to survive, as evidenced by our existence, we find that there is still a good fraction of SDSS galaxies beyond z=0.5 where the GRB rate at half-mass radius is lower than this value. We derive the fraction of such benign galaxies as a function of redshift through Monte Carlo simulations, and we find that the fraction is ˜ 50% at z˜ 1.5 and ˜ 10% even at z˜ 3. The mass distribution of benign galaxies is dominated by Milky Way-like ones, due to their commonness, relatively large mass, and low SFR. GRB host galaxies are among the most dangerous ones.

  17. A physical model for the redshift evolution of high-z Lyman-break galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jose, Charles; Srianand, Raghunathan; Subramanian, Kandaswamy

    2014-10-01

    We present a galaxy formation model to understand the evolution of stellar mass (M*)-UV luminosity relations, stellar mass functions and specific star formation rate (sSFR) of Lyman-break galaxies (LBGs) along with their UV luminosity functions (LFs) in the redshift range 3 ≤ z ≤ 8. Our models assume a physically motivated form for star formation in galaxies and model parameters are calibrated by fitting the observed UV LFs of LBGs. We find the fraction of baryons that gets converted into stars remains nearly constant for z ≥ 4 but shows an increase for z < 4. However, the rate of converting baryons into stars does not evolve significantly in the redshift range 3 ≤ z ≤ 8. Our model further successfully explains the M*-UV luminosity (MAB) correlations of LBGs. While our model predictions of stellar mass functions compare well with the inferred data from observations at the low-mass end, we need to invoke the Eddington bias to fit the high-mass end. At any given redshift, we find the sSFR to be constant over the stellar mass range 5 × 108-5 × 109 M⊙ and the redshift evolution of sSFR is well approximated by a form (1 + z)2.4 for 3 ≤ z ≤ 8 which is consistent with observations. Thus, we find that dark matter halo buildup in the ΛCDM model is sufficient to explain the evolution of UV LFs of LBGs along with their M*-MAB relations, the stellar mass functions and the sSFR for 3 ≤ z ≤ 8.

  18. On the road to precision cosmology with high-redshift H II galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terlevich, R.; Terlevich, E.; Melnick, J.; Chávez, R.; Plionis, M.; Bresolin, F.; Basilakos, S.

    2015-08-01

    We report the first results of a programme aimed at studying the properties of high-redshift galaxies with ongoing massive and dominant episodes of star formation (H II galaxies). We use the L(Hβ)-σ distance estimator based on the correlation between the ionized gas velocity dispersions and Balmer emission line luminosities of H II galaxies and Giant H II regions to trace the expansion of the Universe up to z ˜ 2.33. This approach provides an independent constraint on the equation of state of dark energy and its possible evolution with look-back time. Here we present high-dispersion (8000 to 10 000 resolution) spectroscopy of H II galaxies at redshifts between 0.6 and 2.33, obtained at the Very Large Telescope (VLT) using XShooter. Using six of these H II galaxies we obtain broad constraints on the plane Ωm-w0. The addition of 19 high-z H II galaxies from the literature improves the constraints and highlights the need for high-quality emission line profiles, fluxes and reddening corrections. The 25 high-z H II galaxies plus our local compilation of 107 H II galaxies up to z = 0.16 were used to impose further constraints. Our results are consistent with recent studies, although weaker due to the as yet small sample and low quality of the literature data of high-z H II galaxies. We show that much better and competitive constraints can be obtained using a larger sample of high-redshift H II galaxies with high quality data that can be easily obtained with present facilities like K-band Multi Object Spactrograph (KMOS) at the VLT.

  19. Low Masses and High Redshifts: The Evolution of the Mass-Metallicity Relation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, Alaina; Scarlata, Claudia; Dominguez, Alberto; Malkan, Matthew; Martin, Crystal L.; Siana, Brian; Atek, Hakim; Bedregal, Alejandro G.; Colbert, James W.; Rafelski, Marc; Ross, Nathaniel; Teplitz, Harry; Bunker, Andrew J.; Dressler, Alan; Hathi, Nimish; Masters, Daniel; McCarthy, Patrick; Straughn, Amber

    2013-01-01

    We present the first robust measurement of the high redshift mass-metallicity (MZ) relation at 10(exp 8) < M/Stellar Mass < or approx. 10(exp 10), obtained by stacking spectra of 83 emission-line galaxies with secure redshifts between 1.3 < or approx. z < or approx. 2.3. For these redshifts, infrared grism spectroscopy with the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 is sensitive to the R23 metallicity diagnostic: ([O II] (lambda)(lambda)3726, 3729 + [OIII] (lambda)(lambda)4959, 5007)/H(beta). Using spectra stacked in four mass quartiles, we find a MZ relation that declines significantly with decreasing mass, extending from 12+log(O/H) = 8.8 at M = 10(exp 9.8) Stellar Mass to 12+log(O/H)= 8.2 at M = 10(exp 8.2) Stellar Mass. After correcting for systematic offsets between metallicity indicators, we compare our MZ relation to measurements from the stacked spectra of galaxies with M > or approx. 10(exp 9.5) Stellar Mass and z approx. 2.3. Within the statistical uncertainties, our MZ relation agrees with the z approx. 2.3 result, particularly since our somewhat higher metallicities (by around 0.1 dex) are qualitatively consistent with the lower mean redshift (z = 1.76) of our sample. For the masses probed by our data, the MZ relation shows a steep slope which is suggestive of feedback from energy-driven winds, and a cosmological downsizing evolution where high mass galaxies reach the local MZ relation at earlier times. In addition, we show that our sample falls on an extrapolation of the star-forming main sequence (the SFR-M* relation) at this redshift. This result indicates that grism emission-line selected samples do not have preferentially high star formation rates (SFRs). Finally, we report no evidence for evolution of the mass-metallicity-SFR plane; our stack-averaged measurements show excellent agreement with the local relation.

  20. Low Masses and High Redshifts: The Evolution of the Mass-Metallicity Relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, Alaina; Scarlata, Claudia; Domínguez, Alberto; Malkan, Matthew; Martin, Crystal L.; Siana, Brian; Atek, Hakim; Bedregal, Alejandro G.; Colbert, James W.; Rafelski, Marc; Ross, Nathaniel; Teplitz, Harry; Bunker, Andrew J.; Dressler, Alan; Hathi, Nimish; Masters, Daniel; McCarthy, Patrick; Straughn, Amber

    2013-10-01

    We present the first robust measurement of the high redshift mass-metallicity (MZ) relation at 108 <~ M/M ⊙ <~ 1010, obtained by stacking spectra of 83 emission-line galaxies with secure redshifts between 1.3 <~ z <~ 2.3. For these redshifts, infrared grism spectroscopy with the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 is sensitive to the R 23 metallicity diagnostic: ([O II] λλ3726, 3729 + [O III] λλ4959, 5007)/Hβ. Using spectra stacked in four mass quartiles, we find a MZ relation that declines significantly with decreasing mass, extending from 12+log(O/H) = 8.8 at M = 109.8 M ⊙, to 12+log(O/H) = 8.2 at M = 108.2 M ⊙. After correcting for systematic offsets between metallicity indicators, we compare our MZ relation to measurements from the stacked spectra of galaxies with M >~ 109.5 M ⊙ and z ~ 2.3. Within the statistical uncertainties, our MZ relation agrees with the z ~ 2.3 result, particularly since our somewhat higher metallicities (by around 0.1 dex) are qualitatively consistent with the lower mean redshift (z = 1.76) of our sample. For the masses probed by our data, the MZ relation shows a steep slope which is suggestive of feedback from energy-driven winds, and a cosmological downsizing evolution where high mass galaxies reach the local MZ relation at earlier times. In addition, we show that our sample falls on an extrapolation of the star-forming main sequence (the SFR-M * relation) at this redshift. This result indicates that grism emission-line selected samples do not have preferentially high star formation rates (SFRs). Finally, we report no evidence for evolution of the mass-metallicity-SFR plane; our stack-averaged measurements show excellent agreement with the local relation. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555.

  1. LOW MASSES AND HIGH REDSHIFTS: THE EVOLUTION OF THE MASS-METALLICITY RELATION

    SciTech Connect

    Henry, Alaina; Straughn, Amber; Scarlata, Claudia; Bedregal, Alejandro G.; Domínguez, Alberto; Siana, Brian; Masters, Daniel; Malkan, Matthew; Ross, Nathaniel; Martin, Crystal L.; Atek, Hakim; Colbert, James W.; Rafelski, Marc; Teplitz, Harry; Bunker, Andrew J.; Dressler, Alan; Hathi, Nimish; McCarthy, Patrick

    2013-10-20

    We present the first robust measurement of the high redshift mass-metallicity (MZ) relation at 10{sup 8} ∼< M/M {sub ☉} ∼< 10{sup 10}, obtained by stacking spectra of 83 emission-line galaxies with secure redshifts between 1.3 ∼< z ∼< 2.3. For these redshifts, infrared grism spectroscopy with the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 is sensitive to the R {sub 23} metallicity diagnostic: ([O II] λλ3726, 3729 + [O III] λλ4959, 5007)/Hβ. Using spectra stacked in four mass quartiles, we find a MZ relation that declines significantly with decreasing mass, extending from 12+log(O/H) = 8.8 at M = 10{sup 9.8} M {sub ☉}, to 12+log(O/H) = 8.2 at M = 10{sup 8.2} M {sub ☉}. After correcting for systematic offsets between metallicity indicators, we compare our MZ relation to measurements from the stacked spectra of galaxies with M ∼> 10{sup 9.5} M {sub ☉} and z ∼ 2.3. Within the statistical uncertainties, our MZ relation agrees with the z ∼ 2.3 result, particularly since our somewhat higher metallicities (by around 0.1 dex) are qualitatively consistent with the lower mean redshift (z = 1.76) of our sample. For the masses probed by our data, the MZ relation shows a steep slope which is suggestive of feedback from energy-driven winds, and a cosmological downsizing evolution where high mass galaxies reach the local MZ relation at earlier times. In addition, we show that our sample falls on an extrapolation of the star-forming main sequence (the SFR-M {sub *} relation) at this redshift. This result indicates that grism emission-line selected samples do not have preferentially high star formation rates (SFRs). Finally, we report no evidence for evolution of the mass-metallicity-SFR plane; our stack-averaged measurements show excellent agreement with the local relation.

  2. Scheduled discoveries of 7+ high-Redshift supernovae: First cosmology results and bounds on q{sub 0}

    SciTech Connect

    Perlmutter, S., FNAL

    1998-09-01

    Our search for high-redshift Type Ia supernovae discovered, in its first years, a sample of seven supernovae. Using a ``batch`` search strategy, almost all were discovered before maximum light and were observed over the peak of their light curves. The spectra and light curves indicate that almost all were Type Ia supernovae at redshifts z = 0.35 - 0.5. These high-redshift supernovae can provide a distance indicator and ``standard clock`` to study the cosmological parameters q{sub 0} , {Lambda}, {Omega}{sub 0} , and H{sub 0}. This presentation and the following presentations of Kim et al. (1996), Goldhaber et al. (1996), and Pain et al. (1996) will discuss observation strategies and rates, analysis and calibration issues, the sources of measurement uncertainty, and the cosmological implications, including bounds on q{sub 0} , of these first high-redshift supernovae from our ongoing search.

  3. A robust sample of submillimetre galaxies: constraints on the prevalence of dusty, high-redshift starbursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivison, R. J.; Smail, Ian; Dunlop, J. S.; Greve, T. R.; Swinbank, A. M.; Stevens, J. A.; Mortier, A. M. J.; Serjeant, S.; Targett, T. A.; Bertoldi, F.; Blain, A. W.; Chapman, S. C.

    2005-12-01

    The modest significance of most sources detected in current (sub)millimetre [(sub)mm] surveys can potentially compromise some analyses due to the inclusion of spurious sources in catalogues typically selected at >=3.0-3.5σ. Here, we develop and apply a dual-survey extraction technique to Submillimetre Common-User Bolometer Array (SCUBA) and Max-Planck Millimetre Bolometer (MAMBO) images of the Lockman Hole. Cut above 5σ, our catalogue of submillimetre galaxies (SMGs) is more robust than previous samples, with a reduced likelihood of real, but faint SMGs (beneath and around the confusion limit) entering via superposition with noise. Our selection technique yields 19 SMGs in an effective area of 165arcmin2, of which we expect at most two to be due to chance superposition of SCUBA and MAMBO noise peaks. The effective flux limit of the survey (~4mJy at ~1mm) is well matched to our deep 1.4-GHz image (σ= 4.6μJybeam-1). The former is sensitive to luminous, dusty galaxies at extreme redshifts whilst the latter probes the z<~ 3 regime. A high fraction of our robust SMGs (~80 per cent) have radio counterparts which, given the ~10per cent contamination by spurious sources, suggests that very distant SMGs (z>> 3) are unlikely to make up more than ~10 per cent of the bright SMG population. This implies that almost all of the S1mm>~ 4mJy SMG population is amenable to study via the deepest current radio imaging. We use these radio counterparts to provide an empirical calibration of the positional uncertainty in SMG catalogues. We then go on to outline the acquisition of redshifts for radio-identified SMGs, from sample selection in the submm, to counterpart selection in the radio and optical/infrared, to slit placement on spectrograph masks. We determine a median of z= 2.05 +/- 0.41 from a sample of six secure redshifts for unambiguous radio-identified submm sources and z= 2.14 +/- 0.27 when we include submm sources with multiple radio counterparts and/or less reliable

  4. Four Quasars above Redshift 6 Discovered by the Canada-France High-z Quasar Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willott, Chris J.; Delorme, Philippe; Omont, Alain; Bergeron, Jacqueline; Delfosse, Xavier; Forveille, Thierry; Albert, Loic; Reylé, Céline; Hill, Gary J.; Gully-Santiago, Michael; Vinten, Phillip; Crampton, David; Hutchings, John B.; Schade, David; Simard, Luc; Sawicki, Marcin; Beelen, Alexandre; Cox, Pierre

    2007-12-01

    The Canada-France High-z Quasar Survey (CFHQS) is an optical survey designed to locate quasars during the epoch of reionization. In this paper we present the discovery of the first four CFHQS quasars at redshifts greater than 6, including the most distant known quasar, CFHQS J2329-0301 at z = 6.43. We describe the observational method used to identify the quasars and present optical, infrared, and millimeter photometry and optical and near-infrared spectroscopy. We investigate the dust properties of these quasars, finding an unusual dust extinction curve for one quasar and a high far-infrared luminosity due to dust emission for another. The mean millimeter continuum flux for CFHQS quasars is substantially lower than that for SDSS quasars at the same redshift, likely due to a correlation with quasar UV luminosity. For two quasars with sufficiently high signal-to-noise ratio optical spectra, we use the spectra to investigate the ionization state of hydrogen at z > 5. For CFHQS J1509-1749 at z = 6.12 we find significant evolution (beyond a simple extrapolation of lower redshift data) in the Gunn-Peterson optical depth at z > 5.4. The line of sight to this quasar has one of the highest known optical depths at z approx 5.8. An analysis of the sizes of the highly ionized near-zones in the spectra of two quasars at z = 6.12 and 6.43 suggest that the intergalactic medium surrounding these quasars was substantially ionized before these quasars turned on. Together, these observations point toward an extended reionization process, but we caution that cosmic variance is still a major limitation in z > 6 quasar observations.

  5. High redshift in greatness scale caused by Interstellar and Intergalactic Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shao-Guang

    gravitational wave of dipole radiation will be produced from the change in masses of A and B caused by the nonlinearity of Einstein's equation or by mass renormalization of QFT. The change in period of energy loss of pulsar binary PSR1913+16 calculated with Eq. (4) is consistent with the observation value of Taylar et al. The change in mass of photons on the way calculated from F Q or F G is the redshift ratio: Red=(E-Ei)/Ei= F G ds / Ei = - 4 GM / c 2 D (5) Where E is actual energy, Ei is in inertial system energy, which is just the metrical definition of redshift. The redshift ratio of Eq. (5) is numerically equal to the deflection ratio of GR, which is consistent with relativistic combination of energy and momentum. When light sweep the sun once maximal redshift ratio is 4GM / c2 R =-8×10-6 . When photons pass through greatness scale interstellar and intergalactic media high gravitational redshift will arises, e.g., if universal luminosity mass density ( about 10-31 g cm -3 )is entirely constituted by stars with M in homogeneous distribution, the distance of two stars is about 800 PC, maximal redshift constant is 3000 km s-1 / MPC, average value is 62.5 km s-1 / MPC ( near the observational Hubble's constant ), which will influence astronomical distance estimated by redshift and many astrophysical parameter.

  6. THE GEOMETRY EFFECTS OF AN EXPANDING UNIVERSE ON THE DETECTION OF COOL NEUTRAL GAS AT HIGH REDSHIFT

    SciTech Connect

    Curran, S. J.

    2012-03-20

    Recent high-redshift surveys for 21 cm absorption in damped Ly{alpha} absorption systems (DLAs) take the number of published searches at z{sub abs} > 2 to 25, the same number as at z{sub abs} < 2, although the detection rate at high redshift remains significantly lower (20% compared to 60%). Using the known properties of the DLAs to estimate the unknown profile widths of the 21 cm non-detections and including the limits via a survival analysis, we show that the mean spin temperature/covering factor degeneracy at high redshift is, on average, double that of the low-redshift sample. This value is significantly lower than the previous factor of eight for the spin temperatures and is about the same factor as in the angular diameter distance ratios between the low- and high-redshift samples. That is, without the need for the several pivotal assumptions, which lead to an evolution in the spin temperature, we show that the observed distribution of 21 cm detections in DLAs can be accounted for by the geometry effects of an expanding universe. That is, as yet there is no evidence of the spin temperature of gas-rich galaxies evolving with redshift.

  7. Long-Term Multiwavelength Studies of High-Redshift Blazar 0836+710

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, D. J.; Akyuz, A.; Donato, D.; Perkins, J. S.; Larsson, S.; Sokolovsky, K.; Fuhrmann, L.; Kurtanidze, O.

    2012-01-01

    Following gamma-ray flaring activity of high-redshift (z=2.218) blazar 0836+710 in 2011, we have assembled a long-term multiwavelength study of this object. Although this source is monitored regularly by radio telescopes and the Fermi Large Area Telescope, its coverage at other wavelengths is limited. The optical flux appears generally correlated with the gamma-ray flux, while little variability has been seen at X-ray energies. The gamma-ray/radio correlation is complex compared to some other blazars. As for many blazars, the largest variability is seen at gamma-ray wavelengths.

  8. Updates to the High-Redshift Supernovae in the SCP Union Compilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubin, David; Aldering, G. S.; Amanullah, R.; Barbary, K. H.; Bruce, A.; Dawson, K. S.; Doi, M.; Fakhouri, H.; Fruchter, A. S.; Goobar, A.; Huang, X.; Ihara, Y.; Kim, A. G.; Kowalski, M.; Krechmer, E.; Lidman, C.; Linder, E.; Meyers, J.; Morokuma, T.; Nordin, J.; Perlmutter, S.; Rykoff, E. S.; Saunders, C.; Spadafora, A. L.; Suzuki, N.; Takanashi, N.; Yasuda, N.; Cosmology Project, Supernova

    2013-01-01

    Building on the work presented in Amanullah et al. (ApJ, 2010) and Suzuki et al. (ApJ, 2012), adding new z > 1 supernovae discovered in ground-based work and a new analysis of existing HST SNe, we present an updated high-redshift dataset. We update the SCP Union compilation with this and other recent datasets and present updated cosmological fits. This work has been supported by the Office of Science, U.S. Department of Energy (through contract DE-AC02-05CH11231), and in part by NASA through grants associated with HST-GO-10496.

  9. The Connection Between Reddening, Gas Covering Fraction, and the Escape of Ionizing Radiation at High Redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, Naveen A.; Steidel, Charles C.; Pettini, Max; Bogosavljević, Milan; Shapley, Alice E.

    2016-09-01

    Using a large sample of spectroscopically confirmed z∼ 3 galaxies, we establish an empirical relationship between reddening (E(B-V)), neutral gas covering fraction ({f}{{cov}}({{H}} {{I}})), and the escape of ionizing (Lyman continuum, LyC) photons. Our sample includes 933 galaxies at z∼ 3,121 of which have deep spectroscopic observations (≳ 7 hr) at 850≲ {λ }{{rest}}≲ 1300 Å with the Low Resolution Imaging Spectrograph on Keck. The high covering fraction of outflowing optically thick {{H}} {{I}} indicated by the composite spectra of these galaxies implies that photoelectric absorption, rather than dust attenuation, dominates the depletion of LyC photons. By modeling the composite spectra as the combination of an unattenuated stellar spectrum including nebular continuum emission with one that is absorbed by {{H}} {{I}} and reddened by a line-of-sight extinction, we derive an empirical relationship between E(B-V) and {f}{{cov}}({{H}} {{I}}). Galaxies with redder UV continua have larger covering fractions of {{H}} {{I}} characterized by higher line-of-sight extinctions. We develop a model which connects the ionizing escape fraction with E(B-V), and which may be used to estimate the ionizing escape fraction for an ensemble of galaxies. Alternatively, direct measurements of the escape fraction for our sample allow us to constrain the intrinsic LyC-to-UV flux density ratio to be < S(900 \\mathring{{A}} )/S(1500 \\mathring{{A}} ){> }{{int}}≳ 0.20, a value that favors stellar population models that include weaker stellar winds, a flatter initial mass function, and/or binary evolution. Last, we demonstrate how the framework discussed here may be used to assess the pathways by which ionizing radiation escapes from high-redshift galaxies. Based on data obtained at the W.M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and NASA, and was made possible by the generous

  10. Reionisation and High-Redshift Galaxies: The View from Quasar Absorption Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, George D.; Bolton, James S.; Lidz, Adam

    2015-12-01

    Determining when and how the first galaxies reionised the intergalactic medium promises to shed light on both the nature of the first objects and the cosmic history of baryons. Towards this goal, quasar absorption lines play a unique role by probing the properties of diffuse gas on galactic and intergalactic scales. In this review, we examine the multiple ways in which absorption lines trace the connection between galaxies and the intergalactic medium near the reionisation epoch. We first describe how the Ly α forest is used to determine the intensity of the ionising ultraviolet background and the global ionising emissivity budget. Critically, these measurements reflect the escaping ionising radiation from all galaxies, including those too faint to detect directly. We then discuss insights from metal absorption lines into reionisation-era galaxies and their surroundings. Current observations suggest a buildup of metals in the circumgalactic environments of galaxies over z ~ 6 to 5, although changes in ionisation will also affect the evolution of metal line properties. A substantial fraction of metal absorbers at these redshifts may trace relatively low-mass galaxies. Finally, we review constraints from the Ly α forest and quasar near zones on the timing of reionisation. Along with other probes of the high-redshift Universe, absorption line data are consistent with a relatively late end to reionisation (5.5 ≲ z ≲ 7); however, the constraints are still fairly week. Significant progress is expected to come through improved analysis techniques, increases in the number of known high-redshift quasars from optical and infrared sky surveys, large gains in sensitivity from next-generation observing facilities, and synergies with other probes of the reionisation era.

  11. GRB hosts and the search for missing star formation at high redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanvir, Nial

    2014-10-01

    Measuring the star formation rate (SFR) at high redshift is crucial for understanding cosmic reionization and the formation of galaxies at early times. Two common, complementary approaches are Lyman-Break-Galaxy (LBG) surveys, providing large samples, and Gamma-Ray-Bursts (GRBs) which can sign-post star formation even in the smallest galaxies. Recent results of both methods have found evidence for a dominant population of very faint star-forming galaxies at z>5, representing a continuation of the steepening of the galaxy luminosity function with redshift. However, LBG surveys are affected by possible incompleteness and contamination, while the magnitude limit means very large correction factors must be applied to account for these unseen galaxies. On the other hand GRBs suffer small number statistics and have their own selection biases. We propose to construct a new sample of six 6redshifts of the targets means that this can be achieved relatively economically, since we can accept a lower level of significance and single filter. This method depends only on GRBs and SF tracing UV light (both likely at high-z), and in turn will constrain the completeness correction to be applied to LBG surveys in order to derive the ionizing photon budget.

  12. THE GENTLE GROWTH OF GALAXIES AT HIGH REDSHIFTS IN OVERDENSE ENVIRONMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Romano-Díaz, Emilio; Shlosman, Isaac; Choi, Jun-Hwan; Sadoun, Raphael

    2014-08-01

    We have explored prevailing modes of galaxy growth for redshifts z ∼ 6-14, comparing substantially overdense and normal regions of the universe, using high-resolution zoom-in cosmological simulations. Such rare overdense regions have been projected to host high-z quasars. We demonstrate that galaxies in such environments grow predominantly by a smooth accretion from cosmological filaments which dominates the mass input from major, intermediate, and minor mergers. We find that by z ∼ 6, the accumulated galaxy mass fraction from mergers falls short by a factor of 10 of the cumulative accretion mass for galaxies in the overdense regions, and by a factor of 5 in the normal environments. Moreover, the rate of the stellar mass input from mergers also lies below that of an in situ star formation (SF) rate. The fraction of stellar masses in galaxies contributed by mergers in overdense regions is ∼12%, and ∼33% in the normal regions, at these redshifts. Our median SF rates for ∼few × 10{sup 9} M {sub ☉} galaxies agrees well with the recently estimated rates for z ∼ 7 galaxies from Spitzer's SURF-UP survey. Finally, we find that the main difference between the normal and overdense regions lies in the amplified growth of massive galaxies in massive dark matter halos. This leads to the formation of ≳ 10{sup 10} M {sub ☉} galaxies due to the ∼100 fold increase in mass during the above time period. Such galaxies are basically absent in the normal regions at these redshifts.

  13. Gravitational wave source counts at high redshift and in models with extra dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Bellido, Juan; Nesseris, Savvas; Trashorras, Manuel

    2016-07-01

    Gravitational wave (GW) source counts have been recently shown to be able to test how gravitational radiation propagates with the distance from the source. Here, we extend this formalism to cosmological scales, i.e. the high redshift regime, and we discuss the complications of applying this methodology to high redshift sources. We also allow for models with compactified extra dimensions like in the Kaluza-Klein model. Furthermore, we also consider the case of intermediate redshifts, i.e. 0 < z lesssim 1, where we show it is possible to find an analytical approximation for the source counts dN/d(S/N). This can be done in terms of cosmological parameters, such as the matter density Ωm,0 of the cosmological constant model or the cosmographic parameters for a general dark energy model. Our analysis is as general as possible, but it depends on two important factors: a source model for the black hole binary mergers and the GW source to galaxy bias. This methodology also allows us to obtain the higher order corrections of the source counts in terms of the signal-to-noise S/N. We then forecast the sensitivity of future observations in constraining GW physics but also the underlying cosmology by simulating sources distributed over a finite range of signal-to-noise with a number of sources ranging from 10 to 500 sources as expected from future detectors. We find that with 500 events it will be possible to provide constraints on the matter density parameter at present Ωm,0 on the order of a few percent and with the precision growing fast with the number of events. In the case of extra dimensions we find that depending on the degeneracies of the model, with 500 events it may be possible to provide stringent limits on the existence of the extra dimensions if the aforementioned degeneracies can be broken.

  14. The Quest for Dusty Star-forming Galaxies at High Redshift z ≳ 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancuso, C.; Lapi, A.; Shi, J.; Gonzalez-Nuevo, J.; Aversa, R.; Danese, L.

    2016-06-01

    We exploit the continuity equation approach and “main-sequence” star formation timescales to show that the observed high abundance of galaxies with stellar masses ≳ a few 1010 M ⊙ at redshift z ≳ 4 implies the existence of a galaxy population featuring large star formation rates (SFRs) ψ ≳ 102 M ⊙ yr-1 in heavily dust-obscured conditions. These galaxies constitute the high-redshift counterparts of the dusty star-forming population already surveyed for z ≲ 3 in the far-IR band by the Herschel Space Observatory. We work out specific predictions for the evolution of the corresponding stellar mass and SFR functions out to z ˜ 10, determining that the number density at z ≲ 8 for SFRs ψ ≳ 30 M ⊙ yr-1 cannot be estimated relying on the UV luminosity function alone, even when standard corrections for dust extinction based on the UV slope are applied. We compute the number counts and redshift distributions (including galaxy-scale gravitational lensing) of this galaxy population, and show that current data from the AzTEC-LABOCA, SCUBA-2, and ALMA-SPT surveys are already addressing it. We demonstrate how an observational strategy based on color preselection in the far-IR or (sub-)millimeter band with Herschel and SCUBA-2, supplemented by photometric data from on-source observations with ALMA, can allow us to reconstruct the bright end of the SFR functions out to z ≲ 8. In parallel, such a challenging task can be managed by exploiting current UV surveys in combination with (sub-)millimeter observations by ALMA and NIKA2 and/or radio observations by SKA and its precursors.

  15. AN OBSERVED LINK BETWEEN ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI AND VIOLENT DISK INSTABILITIES IN HIGH-REDSHIFT GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Bournaud, Frederic; Juneau, Stephanie; Le Floc'h, Emeric; Mullaney, James; Daddi, Emanuele; Duc, Pierre-Alain; Elbaz, David; Salmi, Fadia; Dekel, Avishai; Dickinson, Mark

    2012-09-20

    We provide evidence for a correlation between the presence of giant clumps and the occurrence of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in disk galaxies. Giant clumps of 10{sup 8}-10{sup 9} M{sub Sun} arise from violent gravitational instability in gas-rich galaxies, and it has been proposed that this instability could feed supermassive black holes (BHs). We use emission line diagnostics to compare a sample of 14 clumpy (unstable) disks and a sample of 13 smoother (stable) disks at redshift z {approx} 0.7. The majority of clumpy disks in our sample have a high probability of containing AGNs. Their [O III] {lambda}5007 emission line is strongly excited, inconsistent with low-metallicity star formation (SF) alone. [Ne III] {lambda}3869 excitation is also higher. Stable disks rarely have such properties. Stacking ultra sensitive Chandra observations (4 Ms) reveals an X-ray excess in clumpy galaxies, which confirms the presence of AGNs. The clumpy galaxies in our intermediate-redshift sample have properties typical of gas-rich disk galaxies rather than mergers, being in particular on the main sequence of SF. This suggests that our findings apply to the physically similar and numerous gas-rich unstable disks at z > 1. Using the observed [O III] and X-ray luminosities, we conservatively estimate that AGNs hosted by clumpy disks have typical bolometric luminosities of the order of a few 10{sup 43} erg s{sup -1}, BH growth rates m-dot{sub BH}{approx}10{sup -2} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}, and that these AGNs are substantially obscured in X-rays. This moderate-luminosity mode could provide a large fraction of today's BH mass with a high duty cycle (>10%), accretion bursts with higher luminosities being possible over shorter phases. Violent instabilities at high redshift (giant clumps) are a much more efficient driver of BH growth than the weak instabilities in nearby spirals (bars), and the evolution of disk instabilities with mass and redshift could explain the simultaneous downsizing of

  16. An Observed Link between Active Galactic Nuclei and Violent Disk Instabilities in High-redshift Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bournaud, Frédéric; Juneau, Stéphanie; Le Floc'h, Emeric; Mullaney, James; Daddi, Emanuele; Dekel, Avishai; Duc, Pierre-Alain; Elbaz, David; Salmi, Fadia; Dickinson, Mark

    2012-09-01

    We provide evidence for a correlation between the presence of giant clumps and the occurrence of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in disk galaxies. Giant clumps of 108-109 M ⊙ arise from violent gravitational instability in gas-rich galaxies, and it has been proposed that this instability could feed supermassive black holes (BHs). We use emission line diagnostics to compare a sample of 14 clumpy (unstable) disks and a sample of 13 smoother (stable) disks at redshift z ~ 0.7. The majority of clumpy disks in our sample have a high probability of containing AGNs. Their [O III] λ5007 emission line is strongly excited, inconsistent with low-metallicity star formation (SF) alone. [Ne III] λ3869 excitation is also higher. Stable disks rarely have such properties. Stacking ultra sensitive Chandra observations (4 Ms) reveals an X-ray excess in clumpy galaxies, which confirms the presence of AGNs. The clumpy galaxies in our intermediate-redshift sample have properties typical of gas-rich disk galaxies rather than mergers, being in particular on the main sequence of SF. This suggests that our findings apply to the physically similar and numerous gas-rich unstable disks at z > 1. Using the observed [O III] and X-ray luminosities, we conservatively estimate that AGNs hosted by clumpy disks have typical bolometric luminosities of the order of a few 1043 erg s-1, BH growth rates \\dot{m}_BH \\sim 10^{-2}\\,M_\\odot yr-1, and that these AGNs are substantially obscured in X-rays. This moderate-luminosity mode could provide a large fraction of today's BH mass with a high duty cycle (>10%), accretion bursts with higher luminosities being possible over shorter phases. Violent instabilities at high redshift (giant clumps) are a much more efficient driver of BH growth than the weak instabilities in nearby spirals (bars), and the evolution of disk instabilities with mass and redshift could explain the simultaneous downsizing of SF and of BH growth.

  17. Nearby Clumpy, Gas Rich, Star-forming Galaxies: Local Analogs of High-redshift Clumpy Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garland, C. A.; Pisano, D. J.; Mac Low, M.-M.; Kreckel, K.; Rabidoux, K.; Guzmán, R.

    2015-07-01

    Luminous compact blue galaxies (LCBGs) have enhanced star formation rates (SFRs) and compact morphologies. We combine Sloan Digital Sky Survey data with H i data of 29 LCBGs at redshift z ∼ 0 to understand their nature. We find that local LCBGs have high atomic gas fractions (∼50%) and SFRs per stellar mass consistent with some high-redshift star-forming galaxies (SFGs). Many local LCBGs also have clumpy morphologies, with clumps distributed across their disks. Although rare, these galaxies appear to be similar to the clumpy SFGs commonly observed at z ∼ 1–3. Local LCBGs separate into three groups: (1) interacting galaxies (∼20%) (2) clumpy spirals (∼40%) and (3) non-clumpy, non-spirals with regular shapes and smaller effective radii and stellar masses (∼40%). It seems that the method of building up a high gas fraction, which then triggers star formation, is not the same for all local LCBGs. This may lead to a dichotomy in galaxy characteristics. We consider possible gas delivery scenarios and suggest that clumpy spirals, preferentially located in clusters and with companions, are smoothly accreting gas from tidally disrupted companions and/or intracluster gas enriched by stripped satellites. Conversely, as non-clumpy galaxies are preferentially located in the field and tend to be isolated, we suggest clumpy, cold streams, which destroy galaxy disks and prevent clump formation, as a likely gas delivery mechanism for these systems. Other possibilities include smooth cold streams, a series of minor mergers, or major interactions.

  18. NEARBY CLUMPY, GAS RICH, STAR-FORMING GALAXIES: LOCAL ANALOGS OF HIGH-REDSHIFT CLUMPY GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Garland, C. A.; Pisano, D. J.; Rabidoux, K.; Low, M.-M. Mac; Kreckel, K.; Guzmán, R. E-mail: djpisano@mail.wvu.edu E-mail: mordecai@amnh.org E-mail: guzman@astro.ufl.edu

    2015-07-10

    Luminous compact blue galaxies (LCBGs) have enhanced star formation rates (SFRs) and compact morphologies. We combine Sloan Digital Sky Survey data with H i data of 29 LCBGs at redshift z ∼ 0 to understand their nature. We find that local LCBGs have high atomic gas fractions (∼50%) and SFRs per stellar mass consistent with some high-redshift star-forming galaxies (SFGs). Many local LCBGs also have clumpy morphologies, with clumps distributed across their disks. Although rare, these galaxies appear to be similar to the clumpy SFGs commonly observed at z ∼ 1–3. Local LCBGs separate into three groups: (1) interacting galaxies (∼20%); (2) clumpy spirals (∼40%); and (3) non-clumpy, non-spirals with regular shapes and smaller effective radii and stellar masses (∼40%). It seems that the method of building up a high gas fraction, which then triggers star formation, is not the same for all local LCBGs. This may lead to a dichotomy in galaxy characteristics. We consider possible gas delivery scenarios and suggest that clumpy spirals, preferentially located in clusters and with companions, are smoothly accreting gas from tidally disrupted companions and/or intracluster gas enriched by stripped satellites. Conversely, as non-clumpy galaxies are preferentially located in the field and tend to be isolated, we suggest clumpy, cold streams, which destroy galaxy disks and prevent clump formation, as a likely gas delivery mechanism for these systems. Other possibilities include smooth cold streams, a series of minor mergers, or major interactions.

  19. The environments of high-redshift radio galaxies and quasars: probes of protoclusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orsi, Álvaro A.; Fanidakis, Nikos; Lacey, Cedric G.; Baugh, Carlton M.

    2016-03-01

    We use the GALFORM semi-analytical model to study high-density regions traced by radio galaxies and quasars at high redshifts. We explore the impact that baryonic physics has upon the properties of galaxies in these environments. Star-forming emission-line galaxies (Ly α and H α emitters) are used to probe the environments at high redshifts. Radio galaxies are predicted to be hosted by more massive haloes than quasars, and this is imprinted on the amplitude of galaxy overdensities and cross-correlation functions. We find that Ly α radiative transfer and active galactic nucleus feedback indirectly affect the clustering on small scales and also the stellar masses, star formation rates and gas metallicities of galaxies in dense environments. We also investigate the relation between protoclusters associated with radio galaxies and quasars, and their present-day cluster descendants. The progenitors of massive clusters associated with radio galaxies and quasars allow us to determine an average protocluster size in a simple way. Overdensities within the protoclusters are found to correlate with the halo descendant masses. We present scaling relations that can be applied to observational data. By computing projection effects due to the wavelength resolution of modern spectrographs and narrow-band filters, we show that the former have enough spectral resolution to map the structure of protoclusters, whereas the latter can be used to measure the clustering around radio galaxies and quasars over larger scales to determine the mass of dark matter haloes hosting them.

  20. The Cosmic Evolution of Galaxies: The Hunt for Hot Gas (and Winds!) at High Redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hornschemeier, Ann; Kilbourne, Caroline; Lehmer, Bret; Yukita, Mihoko; Smith, Randall; Basu-Zych, Antara; Ptak, Andrew; Tatum, Malachi

    Deep surveys with current missions have revealed a population of high-redshift normal galaxies whose X-ray emission is dominated not by accretion onto supermassive black holes, but by the hot interstellar medium and accreting neutron star and black hole binary populations. Enormous progress has been made on the evolution of galaxies in the X-ray band, however there are some glaring holes in our understanding. For one, it is very difficult to measure the properties of the hot phase of the interstellar medium at high redshift, which in many galaxies is tremendously important component. Also, we know from optical, IR and UV studies that outflows from starburst galaxies appear to be relatively ubiquitous; such outflows are thought to be superwinds from the combination of many supernova explosions and stellar winds. Only with high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy will we have the capability of catching the hot phase of these outflows. The outflows remove fuel for subsequent generations of star formation and pollute the Intergalactic Medium with metals. Prospects for observations by next-generation X-ray spectroscopic instruments will be discussed.

  1. Detectability of cold streams into high-redshift galaxies by absorption lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goerdt, Tobias; Dekel, Avishai; Sternberg, Amiel; Gnat, Orly; Ceverino, Daniel

    2012-08-01

    Cold gas streaming along the dark matter filaments of the cosmic web is predicted to be the major source of fuel for disc buildup, violent disc instability and star formation in massive galaxies at high redshift. We investigate to what extent such cold gas is detectable in the extended circumgalactic environment of galaxies via Lyα absorption and selected low-ionization metal absorption lines. We model the expected absorption signatures using high-resolution zoom-in adaptive mesh refinement cosmological simulations. In the post-processing, we distinguish between self-shielded gas and unshielded gas. In the self-shielded gas, which is optically thick to Lyman continuum radiation, we assume pure collisional ionization for species with an ionization potential greater than 13.6 eV. In the optically-thin, unshielded gas, these species are also photoionized by the metagalactic radiation. In addition to absorption of radiation from background quasars, we compute the absorption line profiles of radiation emitted by the galaxy at the centre of the same halo. We predict the strength of the absorption signal for individual galaxies without stacking. We find that the Lyα absorption profiles produced by the streams are consistent with observations of absorption and emission Lyα profiles in high-redshift galaxies. Due to the low metallicities in the streams, and their low covering factors, the metal absorption features are weak and difficult to detect.

  2. Awakening of The High-Redshift Blazar CGRaBS J0809+5341

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paliya, Vaidehi S.; Parker, M. L.; Stalin, C. S.; Fabian, A. C.; Ramya, S.; Covino, S.; Tagliaferri, G.; Sahayanathan, S.; Ravikumar, C. D.

    2015-04-01

    CGRaBS J0809+5341, a high-redshift blazar at z = 2.144, underwent a giant optical outburst on 2014 April 19 when it brightened by ˜5 mag and reached an unfiltered apparent magnitude of 15.7 mag. This implies an absolute magnitude of -30.5 mag, making it one of the brightest quasars in the universe. This optical flaring triggered us to carry out observations during the decaying part of the flare covering a wide energy range using the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array, Swift, and ground-based optical facilities. For the first time, the source is detected in γ-rays by the Large Area Telescope on board the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope. A high optical polarization of ˜10% is also observed. Using the Sloan Digital Sky Survey spectrum, the accretion disk luminosity and black hole mass are estimated as 1.5 × 1045 erg s-1 and 108.4 M⊙, respectively. Using a single zone leptonic emission model, we reproduce the spectral energy distribution of the source during the flaring activity. This analysis suggests that the emission region is probably located outside the broad-line region, and the jet becomes radiatively efficient. We also show that the overall properties of CGRaBS J0809+5341 seem to not be in agreement with the general properties observed in high-redshift blazars up to now.

  3. AWAKENING OF THE HIGH-REDSHIFT BLAZAR CGRaBS J0809+5341

    SciTech Connect

    Paliya, Vaidehi S.; Stalin, C. S.; Parker, M. L.; Fabian, A. C.; Ramya, S.; Covino, S.; Tagliaferri, G.; Sahayanathan, S.; Ravikumar, C. D.

    2015-04-20

    CGRaBS J0809+5341, a high-redshift blazar at z = 2.144, underwent a giant optical outburst on 2014 April 19 when it brightened by ∼5 mag and reached an unfiltered apparent magnitude of 15.7 mag. This implies an absolute magnitude of −30.5 mag, making it one of the brightest quasars in the universe. This optical flaring triggered us to carry out observations during the decaying part of the flare covering a wide energy range using the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array, Swift, and ground-based optical facilities. For the first time, the source is detected in γ-rays by the Large Area Telescope on board the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope. A high optical polarization of ∼10% is also observed. Using the Sloan Digital Sky Survey spectrum, the accretion disk luminosity and black hole mass are estimated as 1.5 × 10{sup 45} erg s{sup −1} and 10{sup 8.4} M{sub ⊙}, respectively. Using a single zone leptonic emission model, we reproduce the spectral energy distribution of the source during the flaring activity. This analysis suggests that the emission region is probably located outside the broad-line region, and the jet becomes radiatively efficient. We also show that the overall properties of CGRaBS J0809+5341 seem to not be in agreement with the general properties observed in high-redshift blazars up to now.

  4. Atomic and molecular far-infrared lines from high redshift galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallini, L.

    2015-03-01

    The advent of Atacama Large Millimeter-submillimeter Array (ALMA), with its unprecedented sensitivity, makes it possible the detection of far-infrared (FIR) metal cooling and molecular lines from the first galaxies that formed after the Big Bang. These lines represent a powerful tool to shed light on the physical properties of the interstellar medium (ISM) in high-redshift sources. In what follows we show the potential of a physically motivated theoretical approach that we developed to predict the ISM properties of high redshift galaxies. The model allows to infer, as a function of the metallicity, the luminosities of various FIR lines observable with ALMA. It is based on high resolution cosmological simulations of star-forming galaxies at the end of the Epoch of Reionization (z˜eq6) , further implemented with sub-grid physics describing the cooling and the heating processes that take place in the neutral diffuse ISM. Finally we show how a different approach based on semi-analytical calculations can allow to predict the CO flux function at z>6.

  5. LOW-REDSHIFT Lyalpha SELECTED GALAXIES FROM GALEX SPECTROSCOPY: A COMPARISON WITH BOTH UV-CONTINUUM SELECTED GALAXIES AND HIGH-REDSHIFT Lyalpha EMITTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Cowie, Lennox L.; Barger, Amy J.; Hu, Esther M. E-mail: barger@astro.wisc.ed

    2010-03-10

    We construct a sample of low-redshift Lyalpha emission-line selected sources from Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) grism spectroscopy of nine deep fields to study the role of Lyalpha emission in galaxy populations with cosmic time. Our final sample consists of 119 (141) sources selected in the redshift interval z = 0.195-0.44 (z = 0.65-1.25) from the FUV (NUV) channel. We classify the Lyalpha sources as active galactic nuclei (AGNs) if high-ionization emission lines are present in their UV spectra and as possible star-forming galaxies otherwise. We classify additional sources as AGNs using line widths for our Lyalpha emitter (LAE) analysis. These classifications are broadly supported by comparisons with X-ray and optical spectroscopic observations, though the optical spectroscopy identifies a small number of additional AGNs. Defining the GALEX LAE sample in the same way as high-redshift LAE samples, we show that LAEs constitute only about 5% of NUV-continuum selected galaxies at z {approx} 0.3. We also show that they are less common at z {approx} 0.3 than they are at z {approx} 3. We find that the z {approx} 0.3 optically confirmed Lyalpha galaxies lie below the metallicity-luminosity relation of the z {approx} 0.3 NUV-continuum selected galaxies but have similar Halpha velocity widths at similar luminosities, suggesting that they also lie below the metallicity-mass relation of the NUV-continuum selected galaxies. We show that, on average, the Lyalpha galaxies have bluer colors, lower extinctions as measured from the Balmer line ratios, and more compact morphologies than the NUV-continuum selected galaxies. Finally, we confirm that the z {approx} 2 Lyman break galaxies have relatively low metallicities for their luminosities, and we find that they lie in the same metallicity range as the z {approx} 0.3 Lyalpha galaxies.

  6. The Abundance of Low-Luminosity Lyα Emitters at High Redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Michael R.; Ellis, Richard S.; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Richard, Johan; Kuijken, Konrad

    2004-05-01

    We derive the luminosity function of high-redshift Lyα-emitting sources from a deep, blind, spectroscopic survey that utilized strong-lensing magnification by intermediate-redshift clusters of galaxies. We observed carefully selected regions near nine clusters, consistent with magnification factors generally greater than 10 for the redshift range 4.5L)~L-1 over 1041-1042.5 ergs s-1. When combined with the results of other surveys, limited at higher luminosities, our results suggest evidence for the suppression of star formation in low-mass halos, as predicted in popular models of galaxy formation. Data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation.

  7. MID-INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY OF HIGH-REDSHIFT 3CRR SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    Leipski, C.; Antonucci, R.; Haas, M.; Chini, R.; Heymann, F.; Willner, S. P.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Wilkes, B. J.; Fazio, G. G.; Barthel, P.; Siebenmorgen, R.; Ogle, P.

    2010-07-10

    Using the Spitzer Space Telescope, we have obtained rest-frame 9-16 {mu}m spectra of 11 quasars and 9 radio galaxies from the 3CRR catalog at redshifts 1.0 < z < 1.4. This complete flux-limited 178 MHz selected sample is unbiased with respect to orientation and therefore suited to studying orientation-dependent effects in the most powerful active galactic nuclei (AGNs). The mean radio-galaxy spectrum shows a clear silicate absorption feature ({tau}{sub 9.7{mu}m} = 1.1) whereas the mean quasar spectrum shows silicates in emission. The mean radio-galaxy spectrum matches a dust-absorbed mean quasar spectrum in both shape and overall flux level. The data for individual objects conform to these results. The trend of the silicate depth to increase with decreasing core fraction of the radio source further supports that for this sample orientation is the main driver for the difference between radio galaxies and quasars, as predicted by AGN unification. However, comparing our high-z sample with lower redshift 3CRR objects reveals that the absorption of the high-z radio galaxy MIR continuum is lower than expected from a scaled-up version of lower luminosity sources, and we discuss some effects that may explain these trends.

  8. Millimeter Detection of Spitzer-selected High Redshift Hyperluminus Starburst Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lonsdale, Carol J.; Omont, A.; del Carmen Polletta, M.; Zylka, R.; Shupe, D.; Smith, H. E., Jr.; Berta, S.; Bavouzet, N.; Lagache, G.; Farrah, D.; Bertoldi, F.; Cox, P.; de Breuck, C.; Dole, H.; Lutz, D.; Tacconi, L.; Perez-Fournon, I.; Aussel, H.; McCracken, H.; Clements, D.; Rowan-Robinson, M.; Franceschini, A.; Frayer, D.; Surace, J.; Siana, B.

    2006-12-01

    We have used the Mambo instrument on the IRAM 30m telescope to observe at 1.2mm 63 Spitzer-selected z>1 hyperluminous infrared galaxy candidates (HLIRGs) with starburst-dominated mid-infrared (MIR) spectral energy distributions from the SWIRE Legacy survey. The primary selection criteria are a peak in the IRAC 5.8μm band due to the rest frame near-infrared spectrum of evolved stars, a bright detection at 24μm, and very faint optical counterparts. The detection rate with Mambo is very high at 45%, and both the detection rate and the average 1.2mm/24μm flux ratio are much higher than found for previous Spitzer MIR-selected samples, due to the fact that earlier samples favored systems with AGN-dominated MIR emission. Our sample, on the other hand, shows systematically lower 1.2mm/24μm ratios than a sample of Spitzer-detected submillimeter-selected galaxies (SMGs) in a similar redshift range. Thus Spitzer MIR selection complements submillimeter selection of high redshift starburst-dominated HLIRGs, finding a population with substantially different SED shapes. The large MIR/submillimeter flux ratios probably indicate exceptionally luminous 7.7μm PAH emission, based on Spitzer IRS spectra for a subset of these objects (Weedman et al. 2007).

  9. THE MID-INFRARED ENVIRONMENTS OF HIGH-REDSHIFT RADIO GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Galametz, Audrey; Stern, Daniel; De Breuck, Carlos; Vernet, Joeel; Hatch, Nina; Mayo, Jack; Miley, George; Rettura, Alessandro; Seymour, Nick; Adam Stanford, S.

    2012-04-20

    Taking advantage of the impressive sensitivity of Spitzer to detect massive galaxies at high redshift, we study the mid-infrared environments of powerful, high-redshift radio galaxies at 1.2 < z < 3. Galaxy cluster member candidates were isolated using a single Spitzer/IRAC mid-infrared color criterion, [3.6]-[4.5] > -0.1 (AB), in the fields of 48 radio galaxies at 1.2 < z < 3. Using a counts-in-cell analysis, we identify a field as overdense when 15 or more red IRAC sources are found within 1' (i.e., 0.5 Mpc at 1.2 < z < 3) of the radio galaxy to the 5{sigma} flux density limits of our IRAC data (f{sub 4.5} = 13.4 {mu}Jy). We find that radio galaxies lie preferentially in medium to dense regions, with 73% of the targeted fields denser than average. Our (shallow) 120 s data permit the rediscovery of previously known clusters and protoclusters associated with radio galaxies as well as the discovery of new promising galaxy cluster candidates at z > 1.2.

  10. Testing primordial non-Gaussianities on galactic scales at high redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habouzit, Mélanie; Nishimichi, Takahiro; Peirani, Sébastien; Mamon, Gary A.; Silk, Joseph; Chevallard, Jacopo

    2014-11-01

    Primordial non-Gaussianities provide an important test of inflationary models. Although the Planck cosmic microwave background experiment has produced strong limits on non-Gaussianity on scales of clusters, there is still room for considerable non-Gaussianity on galactic scales. We have tested the effect of local non-Gaussianity on the high-redshift galaxy population by running five cosmological N-body simulations down to z = 6.5. For these simulations, we adopt the same initial phases, and either Gaussian or scale-dependent non-Gaussian primordial fluctuations, all consistent with the constraints set by Planck on cluster scales. We then assign stellar masses to each halo using the halo-stellar mass empirical relation of Behroozi et al. Our simulations with non-Gaussian initial conditions produce halo mass functions that show clear departures from those obtained from the analogous simulations with Gaussian initial conditions at z ≳ 10. We observe a >0.3 dex enhancement of the low end of the halo mass function, which leads to a similar effect on the galaxy stellar mass function, which should be testable with future galaxy surveys at z > 10. As cosmic reionization is thought to be driven by dwarf galaxies at high redshift, our findings may have implications for the reionization history of the Universe.

  11. VLP - High-Redshift AGNs and the X-SERVS Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, W.

    2016-06-01

    In the first part of this talk, I will review how X-ray observations of high-redshift AGNs at z = 4-7 have played a critical role in understanding their basic demographics as well as their physical processes; e.g., accretion rates, jet emission, X-ray absorption by nuclear material and winds. Since 2000, XMM-Newton and Chandra have provided new X-ray detections for more than 120 such objects, and well-defined samples of z > 4 AGNs now allow reliable basic X-ray population studies. I will point out key remaining areas of uncertainty, highlighting where further XMM-Newton and Chandra observations can advance understanding. I will then describe the X-SERVS project which aims to go ``beyond COSMOS'' via a 12 deg^2 survey of three prime sky regions: W-CDF-S, XMM-LSS, and ELAIS-S1. The X-SERVS survey will allow outstanding studies of the detected AGNs and groups/clusters by powerfully leveraging multiple intensive radio-to-UV surveys: ATLAS/HerMES/SERVS/VIDEO/DES/HSC/PS1MD/VOICE/CSI/PRIMUS. We aim to dramatically advance studies of SMBH growth across the full range of cosmic environments, links between SMBH accretion and star formation, exceptional AGNs at high redshifts, protoclusters, etc. The targeted X-SERVS fields will have extraordinary legacy value as MOONS massive spectroscopy fields, prime ALMA fields, and DES/LSST deep-drilling fields.

  12. Colour gradients of high-redshift early-type galaxies from hydrodynamical monolithic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tortora, C.; Pipino, A.; D'Ercole, A.; Napolitano, N. R.; Matteucci, F.

    2013-10-01

    We analyse the evolution of colour gradients predicted by the hydrodynamical models of early-type galaxies (ETGs) in Pipino et al., which reproduce fairly well the chemical abundance pattern and the metallicity gradients of local ETGs. We convert the star formation (SF) and metal content into colours by means of stellar population synthetic model and investigate the role of different physical ingredients, as the initial gas distribution and content, and ɛSF, i.e. the normalization of SF rate. From the comparison with high-redshift data, a full agreement with optical rest-frame observations at z ≲ 1 is found, for models with low ɛSF, whereas some discrepancies emerge at 1 < z < 2, despite our models reproduce quite well the data scatter at these redshifts. To reconcile the prediction of these high ɛSF systems with the shallower colour gradients observed at lower z we suggest intervention of one to two dry mergers. We suggest that future studies should explore the impact of wet galaxy merging, interactions with environment, dust content and a variation of the initial mass function from the galactic centres to the peripheries.

  13. Superluminous Supernovae as Standardizable Candles and High-redshift Distance Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inserra, C.; Smartt, S. J.

    2014-12-01

    We investigate the use of type Ic superluminous supernovae (SLSN Ic) as standardizable candles and distance indicators. Their appeal as cosmological probes stems from their remarkable peak luminosities, hot blackbody temperatures, and bright rest-frame ultraviolet emission. We present a sample of 16 published SLSN, from redshifts 0.1 to 1.2, and calculate accurate K corrections to determine uniform magnitudes in 2 synthetic rest-frame filter bandpasses with central wavelengths at 400 nm and 520 nm. At 400 nm, we find an encouragingly low scatter in their uncorrected, raw mean magnitudes with M(400) = -21.86 ± 0.35 mag for the full sample of 16 objects. We investigate the correlation between their decline rates and peak magnitude and find that the brighter events appear to decline more slowly. In a manner similar to the Phillips relation for type Ia SNe (SNe Ia), we define a ΔM 20 decline relation. This correlates peak magnitude and decline over 20 days and can reduce the scatter in standardized peak magnitudes to ±0.22 mag. We further show that M(400) appears to have a strong color dependence. Redder objects are fainter and also become redder faster. Using this peak magnitudecolor evolution relation, a surprisingly low scatter of between ±0.08 mag and ±0.13 mag can be found in peak magnitudes, depending on sample selection. However, we caution that only 8 to 10 objects currently have enough data to test this peak magnitudecolor evolution relation. We conclude that SLSN Ic are promising distance indicators in the high-redshift universe in regimes beyond those possible with SNe Ia. Although the empirical relationships are encouraging, the unknown progenitor systems, how they may evolve with redshift, and the uncertain explosion physics are of some concern. The two major measurement uncertainties are the limited numbers of low-redshift, well-studied objects available to test these relationships and internal dust extinction in the host galaxies.

  14. Superluminous supernovae as standardizable candles and high-redshift distance probes

    SciTech Connect

    Inserra, C.; Smartt, S. J.

    2014-12-01

    We investigate the use of type Ic superluminous supernovae (SLSN Ic) as standardizable candles and distance indicators. Their appeal as cosmological probes stems from their remarkable peak luminosities, hot blackbody temperatures, and bright rest-frame ultraviolet emission. We present a sample of 16 published SLSN, from redshifts 0.1 to 1.2, and calculate accurate K corrections to determine uniform magnitudes in 2 synthetic rest-frame filter bandpasses with central wavelengths at 400 nm and 520 nm. At 400 nm, we find an encouragingly low scatter in their uncorrected, raw mean magnitudes with M(400) = –21.86 ± 0.35 mag for the full sample of 16 objects. We investigate the correlation between their decline rates and peak magnitude and find that the brighter events appear to decline more slowly. In a manner similar to the Phillips relation for type Ia SNe (SNe Ia), we define a ΔM {sub 20} decline relation. This correlates peak magnitude and decline over 20 days and can reduce the scatter in standardized peak magnitudes to ±0.22 mag. We further show that M(400) appears to have a strong color dependence. Redder objects are fainter and also become redder faster. Using this peak magnitudecolor evolution relation, a surprisingly low scatter of between ±0.08 mag and ±0.13 mag can be found in peak magnitudes, depending on sample selection. However, we caution that only 8 to 10 objects currently have enough data to test this peak magnitudecolor evolution relation. We conclude that SLSN Ic are promising distance indicators in the high-redshift universe in regimes beyond those possible with SNe Ia. Although the empirical relationships are encouraging, the unknown progenitor systems, how they may evolve with redshift, and the uncertain explosion physics are of some concern. The two major measurement uncertainties are the limited numbers of low-redshift, well-studied objects available to test these relationships and internal dust extinction in the host galaxies.

  15. An Deficiency of High Redshift, High Luminosity X-ray Clusters: Evidence for a High Value for Omega.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichol, R. C.; Reichart, D.; Romer, A. Kathy; Collins, C. A.; Burke, D. J.; Holden, B. P.; Ulmer, M. P.

    1997-12-01

    There have been several recent analyses of clusters taken from the EMSS sample (Henry et al 1997) that have yielded yield low values (Omega_0<0.3) for the cosmic density (Donahue et al 1997, Carlberg et al 1997). By contrast, the results from a new analysis - which takes full account of the evolution in the luminosity temperature relationship - supports values of Omega_0 close to unity. We present our method and its application to two flux limited samples of high redshift clusters; the revised EMSS sample from Nichol et al (1997) and the SHARC South sample of Burke et al (1997). We go on to discuss possible systematic errors in our method and in the two cluster samples that might be mimicing a high value of Omega.

  16. FEEDBACK FROM HIGH-MASS X-RAY BINARIES ON THE HIGH-REDSHIFT INTERGALACTIC MEDIUM: MODEL SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Power, Chris; James, Gillian; Wynn, Graham; Combet, Celine

    2013-02-10

    Massive stars at redshifts z {approx}> 6 are predicted to have played a pivotal role in cosmological reionization as luminous sources of ultraviolet (UV) photons. However, the remnants of these massive stars could be equally important as X-ray-luminous (L{sub X} {approx} 10{sup 38} erg s{sup -1}) high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs). Because the absorption cross section of neutral hydrogen decreases sharply with photon energy ({sigma}{proportional_to}E {sup -3}), X-rays can escape more freely than UV photons from the star-forming regions in which they are produced, allowing HMXBs to make a potentially significant contribution to the ionizing X-ray background during reionization. In this paper, we explore the ionizing power of HMXBs at redshifts z {approx}> 6 using a Monte Carlo model for a coeval stellar population of main-sequence stars and HMXBs. Using the archetypal Galactic HMXB Cygnus X-1 as our template, we propose a composite HMXB spectral energy distribution consisting of blackbody and power-law components, whose contributions depend on the accretion state of the system. We determine the time-dependent ionizing power of a combined population of UV-luminous stars and X-ray-luminous HMXBs and deduce fitting formulae for the boost in the population's ionizing power arising from HMXBs; these fits allow for simple implementation of HMXB feedback in numerical simulations. Based on this analysis, we estimate the contribution of high-redshift HMXBs to the present-day soft X-ray background, and we show that it is a factor of {approx}100-1000 smaller than the observed limit. Finally, we discuss the implications of our results for the role of HMXBs in reionization and in high-redshift galaxy formation.

  17. Human high intelligence is involved in spectral redshift of biophotonic activities in the brain

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Niting; Li, Zehua; Xiao, Fangyan; Dai, Jiapei

    2016-01-01

    Human beings hold higher intelligence than other animals on Earth; however, it is still unclear which brain properties might explain the underlying mechanisms. The brain is a major energy-consuming organ compared with other organs. Neural signal communications and information processing in neural circuits play an important role in the realization of various neural functions, whereas improvement in cognitive function is driven by the need for more effective communication that requires less energy. Combining the ultraweak biophoton imaging system (UBIS) with the biophoton spectral analysis device (BSAD), we found that glutamate-induced biophotonic activities and transmission in the brain, which has recently been demonstrated as a novel neural signal communication mechanism, present a spectral redshift from animals (in order of bullfrog, mouse, chicken, pig, and monkey) to humans, even up to a near-infrared wavelength (∼865 nm) in the human brain. This brain property may be a key biophysical basis for explaining high intelligence in humans because biophoton spectral redshift could be a more economical and effective measure of biophotonic signal communications and information processing in the human brain. PMID:27432962

  18. Inflow velocities of cold flows streaming into massive galaxies at high redshifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goerdt, Tobias; Ceverino, Daniel

    2015-07-01

    We study the velocities of the accretion along streams from the cosmic web into massive galaxies at high redshift with the help of three different suites of AMR hydrodynamical cosmological simulations. The results are compared to free-fall velocities and to the sound speeds of the hot ambient medium. The sound speed of the hot ambient medium is calculated using two different methods to determine the medium's temperature. We find that the simulated cold stream velocities are in violent disagreement with the corresponding free-fall profiles. The sound speed is a better albeit not always correct description of the cold flows' velocity. Using these calculations as a first order approximation for the gas inflow velocities vinflow = 0.9 vvir is given. We conclude from the hydrodynamical simulations as our main result that the velocity profiles for the cold streams are constant with radius. These constant inflow velocities seem to have a `parabola-like' dependency on the host halo mass in units of the virial velocity that peaks at Mvir = 1012 M⊙ and we also propose that the best-fitting functional form for the dependency of the inflow velocity on the redshift is a square root power-law relation: v_inflow ∝ √{z + 1} v_vir.

  19. Constraining high-redshift X-ray sources with next generation 21-cm power spectrum measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewall-Wice, Aaron; Hewitt, Jacqueline; Mesinger, Andrei; Dillon, Joshua S.; Liu, Adrian; Pober, Jonathan

    2016-05-01

    We use the Fisher matrix formalism and seminumerical simulations to derive quantitative predictions of the constraints that power spectrum measurements on next-generation interferometers, such as the Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array (HERA) and the Square Kilometre Array (SKA), will place on the characteristics of the X-ray sources that heated the high-redshift intergalactic medium. Incorporating observations between z = 5 and 25, we find that the proposed 331 element HERA and SKA phase 1 will be capable of placing ≲ 10 per cent constraints on the spectral properties of these first X-ray sources, even if one is unable to perform measurements within the foreground contaminated `wedge' or the FM band. When accounting for the enhancement in power spectrum amplitude from spin temperature fluctuations, we find that the observable signatures of reionization extend well beyond the peak in the power spectrum usually associated with it. We also find that lower redshift degeneracies between the signatures of heating and reionization physics lead to errors on reionization parameters that are significantly greater than previously predicted. Observations over the heating epoch are able to break these degeneracies and improve our constraints considerably. For these two reasons, 21-cm observations during the heating epoch significantly enhance our understanding of reionization as well.

  20. H-ATLAS: a candidate high redshift cluster/protocluster of star-forming galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clements, D. L.; Braglia, F.; Petitpas, G.; Greenslade, J.; Cooray, A.; Valiante, E.; De Zotti, G.; O'Halloran, B.; Holdship, J.; Morris, B.; Pérez-Fournon, I.; Herranz, D.; Riechers, D.; Baes, M.; Bremer, M.; Bourne, N.; Dannerbauer, H.; Dariush, A.; Dunne, L.; Eales, S.; Fritz, J.; Gonzalez-Nuevo, J.; Hopwood, R.; Ibar, E.; Ivison, R. J.; Leeuw, L. L.; Maddox, S.; Michałowski, M. J.; Negrello, M.; Omont, A.; Oteo, I.; Serjeant, S.; Valtchanov, I.; Vieira, J. D.; Wardlow, J.; van der Werf, P.

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the region around the Planck-detected z = 3.26 gravitationally lensed galaxy HATLAS J114637.9-001132 (hereinafter HATLAS12-00) using both archival Herschel data from the H-ATLAS survey and using submm data obtained with both LABOCA and SCUBA2. The lensed source is found to be surrounded by a strong overdensity of both Herschel-SPIRE sources and submm sources. We detect 17 bright (S870 > ˜7 mJy) sources at >4σ closer than 5 arcmin to the lensed object at 850/870 μm. 10 of these sources have good cross-identifications with objects detected by Herschel-SPIRE which have redder colours than other sources in the field, with 350 μm flux >250 μm flux, suggesting that they lie at high redshift. Submillimeter Array (SMA) observations localise one of these companions to ˜1 arcsec, allowing unambiguous cross identification with a 3.6 and 4.5 μm Spitzer source. The optical/near-IR spectral energy distribution of this source is measured by further observations and found to be consistent with z > 2, but incompatible with lower redshifts. We conclude that this system may be a galaxy cluster/protocluster or larger scale structure that contains a number of galaxies undergoing starbursts at the same time.

  1. The discovery of high-redshift supernovae and their cosmological implications

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, A G

    1997-09-01

    In this thesis the author discusses the methodology for doing photometry: from procedure of extracting supernova counts from images that contain combined supernova plus galaxy flux, to standard star calibration, to additional instrumental corrections that arise due to the multiple telescopes used for observations. He discusses the different sources of photometric error and their correlations, and the construction of the covariance matrix for all the points in the light curve. He then describes the K corrections which account for the redshifting of spectra that are necessary to compare the photometry of the high-redshift data with those from nearby (z < 0.1) supernovae. Finally, he uses the first seven of the supernovae to test the hypothesis that they live in an under-dense bubble where the locally measured Hubble constant differs significantly from the true Hubble constant. He also uses the data to place limits on the value of the Hubble constant. Discussions of several other important aspects of the data analysis are or will be included in other papers. These topics include a description of how the covariance matrix is used to generate light-curve fits, a discussion of non-photometric systematic errors that also effect the measurements, and a discussion of the application of the supernovae to address other scientific/cosmological problems.

  2. Human high intelligence is involved in spectral redshift of biophotonic activities in the brain.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhuo; Wang, Niting; Li, Zehua; Xiao, Fangyan; Dai, Jiapei

    2016-08-01

    Human beings hold higher intelligence than other animals on Earth; however, it is still unclear which brain properties might explain the underlying mechanisms. The brain is a major energy-consuming organ compared with other organs. Neural signal communications and information processing in neural circuits play an important role in the realization of various neural functions, whereas improvement in cognitive function is driven by the need for more effective communication that requires less energy. Combining the ultraweak biophoton imaging system (UBIS) with the biophoton spectral analysis device (BSAD), we found that glutamate-induced biophotonic activities and transmission in the brain, which has recently been demonstrated as a novel neural signal communication mechanism, present a spectral redshift from animals (in order of bullfrog, mouse, chicken, pig, and monkey) to humans, even up to a near-infrared wavelength (∼865 nm) in the human brain. This brain property may be a key biophysical basis for explaining high intelligence in humans because biophoton spectral redshift could be a more economical and effective measure of biophotonic signal communications and information processing in the human brain. PMID:27432962

  3. A PARAMETRIC STUDY OF POSSIBLE SOLUTIONS TO THE HIGH-REDSHIFT OVERPRODUCTION OF STARS IN MODELED DWARF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    White, Catherine E.; Somerville, Rachel S.; Ferguson, Henry C.

    2015-02-01

    Both numerical hydrodynamic and semi-analytic cosmological models of galaxy formation struggle to match observed star formation histories of galaxies in low-mass halos (M {sub H} ≲ 10{sup 11} M {sub ☉}), predicting more star formation at high redshift and less star formation at low redshift than observed. The fundamental problem is that galaxies' gas accretion and star formation rates are too closely coupled in the models: the accretion rate largely drives the star formation rate. Observations point to gas accretion rates that outpace star formation at high redshift, resulting in a buildup of gas and a delay in star formation until lower redshifts. We present three empirical adjustments of standard recipes in a semi-analytic model motivated by three physical scenarios that could cause this decoupling: (1) the mass-loading factors of outflows driven by stellar feedback may have a steeper dependence on halo mass at earlier times, (2) the efficiency of star formation may be lower in low-mass halos at high redshift, and (3) gas may not be able to accrete efficiently onto the disk in low-mass halos at high redshift. These new recipes, once tuned, better reproduce the evolution of f {sub *}≡ M {sub *}/M {sub H} as a function of halo mass as derived from abundance matching over redshifts z = 0 to 3, though they have different effects on cold gas fractions, star formation rates, and metallicities. Changes to gas accretion and stellar-driven winds are promising, while direct modification of the star formation timescale requires drastic measures that are not physically well motivated.

  4. Serendipitous Discovery of an Extended X-Ray Jet without a Radio Counterpart in a High-redshift Quasar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simionescu, A.; Stawarz, Ł.; Ichinohe, Y.; Cheung, C. C.; Jamrozy, M.; Siemiginowska, A.; Hagino, K.; Gandhi, P.; Werner, N.

    2016-01-01

    A recent Chandra observation of the nearby galaxy cluster Abell 585 has led to the discovery of an extended X-ray jet associated with the high-redshift background quasar B3 0727+409, a luminous radio source at redshift z = 2.5. This is one of only few examples of high-redshift X-ray jets known to date. It has a clear extension of about 12″, corresponding to a projected length of ∼100 kpc, with a possible hot spot located 35″ from the quasar. The archival high resolution Very Large Array maps surprisingly reveal no extended jet emission, except for one knot about 1.″4 from the quasar. The high X-ray to radio luminosity ratio for this source appears consistent with the \\propto {(1+z)}4 amplification expected from the inverse Compton radiative model. This serendipitous discovery may signal the existence of an entire population of similar systems with bright X-ray and faint radio jets at high redshift, a selection bias that must be accounted for when drawing any conclusions about the redshift evolution of jet properties and indeed about the cosmological evolution of supermassive black holes and active galactic nuclei in general.

  5. Investigating the Local and High Redshift Universe With Deep Survey Data and Ground-Based Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masters, Daniel Charles

    Large multiwavelength surveys are now driving the frontiers of astronomical research. I describe results from my work using data from two large astronomical surveys: the Cosmic Evolution Survey (COSMOS), which has obtained deep photometric and spectroscopic data on two square degrees of the sky using many of the most powerful telescopes in the world, and the WFC3 Infrared Spectroscopic Parallels (WISP) Survey, which uses the highly sensitive slitless spectroscopic capability of the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 to detect star-forming galaxies over most of the universe's history. First I describe my work on the evolution of the high-redshift quasar luminosity function, an important observational quantity constraining the growth of the supermassive black holes in the early universe. I show that the number density of faint quasars declines rapidly above z ˜ 3. This result is discussed in the context of cosmic reionization and the coevolution of galaxies and their central black holes. Next I present results of a multi-year campaign of near-infrared spectroscopy with FIRE, a world-class near-infrared spectrometer on the Magellan Baade 6.5 meter telescope in Chile, targeting emission-line galaxies at z ˜ 2 discovered with the Hubble Space Telescope. Our results showed that the typical emission-line galaxy at this redshift has low-metallicity, low dust obscuration, high ionization parameter, and little evidence for significant active galactic nucleus (AGN) contribution to the emission lines. We also find evidence that high redshift star-forming galaxies have enhanced nitrogen abundances. This result has interesting implications for the nature of the star formation in such galaxies -- in particular, it could mean that a large fraction of such galaxies harbor substantial populations of Wolf-Rayet stars, which are massive, evolved stars ejecting large amounts of enriched matter into the interstellar medium. Finally, I will discuss the discovery of three

  6. High-Redshift Quasars Found in Sloan Digital Sky Survey Commissioning Data. II. The Spring Equatorial Stripe

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Xiaohui; Strauss, Michael A.; Schneider, Donald P.; Gunn, James E.; Lupton, Robert H.; Anderson, Scott F.; Voges, Wolfgang; Margon, Bruce; Annis, James; Bahcall, Neta A.

    2000-01-01

    This is the second paper in a series aimed at finding high-redshift quasars from five-color (u{sup '} g{sup '} r{sup '} i{sup '} z{sup '}) imaging data taken along the Celestial Equator by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) during its commissioning phase. In this paper, we present 22 high-redshift quasars (z>3.6) discovered from {approx}250 deg2 of data in the spring Equatorial Stripe, plus photometry for two previously known high-redshift quasars in the same region of the sky. Our success rate in identifying high-redshift quasars is 68%. Five of the newly discovered quasars have redshifts higher than 4.6 (z=4.62, 4.69, 4.70, 4.92, and 5.03). All the quasars have i{sup *} <20.2 with absolute magnitude - 28.8

  7. Delayed star formation in high-redshift stream-fed galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabor, J. M.; Bournaud, Frédéric

    2014-01-01

    We propose that star formation (SF) is delayed relative to the inflow rate in rapidly accreting galaxies at very high redshift (z > 2) because of the energy conveyed by the accreting gas. Accreting gas streams provide fuel for SF, but they stir the disc and increase turbulence above the usual levels compatible with gravitational instability, reducing the SF efficiency in the available gas. After the specific inflow rate has sufficiently decreased - typically at z < 3 - galaxies settle in a self-regulated regime with efficient SF. An analytic model shows that this interaction between infalling gas and young galaxies can significantly delay SF and maintain high gas fractions (>40 per cent) down to z ≈ 2, in contrast to other galaxy formation models. Idealized hydrodynamic simulations of infalling gas streams on to primordial galaxies confirm the efficient energetic coupling at z > 2 and suggest that this effect is largely under-resolved in existing cosmological simulations.

  8. A high-redshift IRAS galaxy with huge luminosity - Hidden quasar or protogalaxy?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowan-Robinson, M.; Broadhurst, T.; Oliver, S. J.; Taylor, A. N.; Lawrence, A.; Mcmahon, R. G.; Lonsdale, C. J.; Hacking, P. B.; Conrow, T.

    1991-01-01

    An emission line galaxy with the enormous far-IR luminosity of 3 x 10 to the 14th solar has been found at z = 2.286. The spectrum is very unusual, showing lines of high excitation but with very weak Lyman-alpha emission. A self-absorbed synchrotron model for the IR energy distribution cannot be ruled out, but a thermal origin seems more plausible. A radio-quiet quasar embedded in a very dusty galaxy could account for the IR emission, as might a starburst embedded in 1-10 billion solar masses of dust. The latter case demands so much dust that the object would probably be a massive galaxy in the process of formation. The presence of a large amount of dust in an object of such high redshift implies the generation of heavy elements at an early cosmological epoch.

  9. XMM-Newton spectroscopy of high-redshift Dust Obscured Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanzuisi, Giorgio

    2010-10-01

    A population of Dust Obscured Galaxies (DOGs; (F(24um)/F(R)>1000 and F(24um)> 1 mJy) at z>1, likely associated with an obscured phase in the quasar lifetime, has recently been revealed. Redshift distribution, broad-band photometry and bolometric luminosities of DOGs indicate that these systems may represent an early dust-embedded phase of powerful AGN activity. Due to low space density, DOGs are rarely detected even in the deepest X-ray surveys. However, low-quality X-ray spectroscopy has revealed the common presence of highly obscured AGN in their nuclei. XMM-Newton is the ideal telescope to study their largely unexplored X-ray properties. We propose here to obtain a high signal-to-noise X-ray spectrum for two unique, optically-identified DOGs from the Bootes survey.

  10. XMM-Newton spectroscopy of high-redshift Dust Obscured Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanzuisi, Giorgio

    2011-10-01

    A population of Dust Obscured Galaxies (DOGs; (F(24um)/F(R)>1000 and F(24um)> 1 mJy) at z>1, associated with an obscured phase in the quasar lifetime, has recently been revealed. Redshift distribution, broad-band photometry and bolometric luminosities indicate that these systems may represent an early dust-embedded phase of AGN activity. Due to low space density, DOGs are rarely detected even in the deepest X-ray surveys. However, low-quality X-ray spectroscopy has revealed the common presence of highly obscured AGN in their nuclei. XMM-Newton is the ideal telescope to study their largely unexplored X-ray properties. We propose here to obtain a high signal-to-noise X-ray spectrum for two unique, optically-identified DOGs from the Bootes survey.

  11. Characterization of red-shifted phycobilisomes isolated from the chlorophyll f-containing cyanobacterium Halomicronema hongdechloris.

    PubMed

    Li, Yaqiong; Lin, Yuankui; Garvey, Christopher J; Birch, Debra; Corkery, Robert W; Loughlin, Patrick C; Scheer, Hugo; Willows, Robert D; Chen, Min

    2016-01-01

    Phycobilisomes are the main light-harvesting protein complexes in cyanobacteria and some algae. It is commonly accepted that these complexes only absorb green and orange light, complementing chlorophyll absorbance. Here, we present a new phycobilisome derived complex that consists only of allophycocyanin core subunits, having red-shifted absorption peaks of 653 and 712 nm. These red-shifted phycobiliprotein complexes were isolated from the chlorophyll f-containing cyanobacterium, Halomicronema hongdechloris, grown under monochromatic 730 nm-wavelength (far-red) light. The 3D model obtained from single particle analysis reveals a double disk assembly of 120-145 Å with two α/β allophycocyanin trimers fitting into the two separated disks. They are significantly smaller than typical phycobilisomes formed from allophycocyanin subunits and core-membrane linker proteins, which fit well with a reduced distance between thylakoid membranes observed from cells grown under far-red light. Spectral analysis of the dissociated and denatured phycobiliprotein complexes grown under both these light conditions shows that the same bilin chromophore, phycocyanobilin, is exclusively used. Our findings show that red-shifted phycobilisomes are required for assisting efficient far-red light harvesting. Their discovery provides new insights into the molecular mechanisms of light harvesting under extreme conditions for photosynthesis, as well as the strategies involved in flexible chromatic acclimation to diverse light conditions. PMID:26514405

  12. Characterization of red-shifted phycobilisomes isolated from the chlorophyll f-containing cyanobacterium Halomicronema hongdechloris.

    PubMed

    Li, Yaqiong; Lin, Yuankui; Garvey, Christopher J; Birch, Debra; Corkery, Robert W; Loughlin, Patrick C; Scheer, Hugo; Willows, Robert D; Chen, Min

    2016-01-01

    Phycobilisomes are the main light-harvesting protein complexes in cyanobacteria and some algae. It is commonly accepted that these complexes only absorb green and orange light, complementing chlorophyll absorbance. Here, we present a new phycobilisome derived complex that consists only of allophycocyanin core subunits, having red-shifted absorption peaks of 653 and 712 nm. These red-shifted phycobiliprotein complexes were isolated from the chlorophyll f-containing cyanobacterium, Halomicronema hongdechloris, grown under monochromatic 730 nm-wavelength (far-red) light. The 3D model obtained from single particle analysis reveals a double disk assembly of 120-145 Å with two α/β allophycocyanin trimers fitting into the two separated disks. They are significantly smaller than typical phycobilisomes formed from allophycocyanin subunits and core-membrane linker proteins, which fit well with a reduced distance between thylakoid membranes observed from cells grown under far-red light. Spectral analysis of the dissociated and denatured phycobiliprotein complexes grown under both these light conditions shows that the same bilin chromophore, phycocyanobilin, is exclusively used. Our findings show that red-shifted phycobilisomes are required for assisting efficient far-red light harvesting. Their discovery provides new insights into the molecular mechanisms of light harvesting under extreme conditions for photosynthesis, as well as the strategies involved in flexible chromatic acclimation to diverse light conditions.

  13. On the Radiative Efficiencies, Eddington Ratios, and Duty Cycles of Luminous High-redshift Quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shankar, Francesco; Crocce, Martin; Miralda-Escudé, Jordi; Fosalba, Pablo; Weinberg, David H.

    2010-07-01

    We investigate the characteristic radiative efficiency epsilon, Eddington ratio λ, and duty cycle P 0 of high-redshift active galactic nuclei (AGNs), drawing on measurements of the AGN luminosity function at z = 3-6 and, especially, on recent measurements of quasar clustering at z = 3-4.5 from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. The free parameters of our models are epsilon, λ, and the normalization, scatter, and redshift evolution of the relation between black hole (BH) mass M BH and halo virial velocity V vir. We compute the luminosity function from the implied growth of the BH mass function and the quasar correlation length from the bias of the host halos. We test our adopted formulae for the halo mass function and halo bias against measurements from the large N-body simulation developed by the MICE collaboration. The strong clustering of AGNs observed at z = 3 and, especially, at z = 4 implies that massive BHs reside in rare, massive dark matter halos. Reproducing the observed luminosity function then requires high efficiency epsilon and/or low Eddington ratio λ, with a lower limit (based on 2σ agreement with the measured z = 4 correlation length) epsilon >~ 0.7λ/(1 + 0.7λ), implying epsilon >~ 0.17 for λ>0.25. Successful models predict high duty cycles, P 0 ~ 0.2, 0.5, and 0.9 at z = 3.1, 4.5, and 6, respectively, and they require that the fraction of halo baryons locked in the central BH is much larger than the locally observed value. The rapid drop in the abundance of the massive and rare host halos at z > 7 implies a proportionally rapid decline in the number density of luminous quasars, much stronger than simple extrapolations of the z = 3-6 luminosity function would predict. For example, our most successful model predicts that the highest redshift quasar in the sky with true bolometric luminosity L > 1047.5 erg s-1 should be at z ~ 7.5, and that all quasars with higher apparent luminosities would have to be magnified by lensing.

  14. A Very Hot, High Redshift Cluster of Galaxies: More Trouble for Omega(0) = 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donahue, Megan; Voit, G. Mark; Gioia, Isabella; Luppino, Gerry; Hughes, John P.; Stocke, John T.

    1998-01-01

    We have observed the most distant (= 0.829) cluster of galaxies in the Einstein Extended Medium Sensitivity Survey (EMSS), with the ASCA and ROSAT satellites. We find an X-ray temperature of 12.3 (sup +3.1) (sub -2.2)keV for this cluster, and the ROSAT map reveals significant substructure. The high temperature of MS1054-0321 is consistent with both its approximate velocity dispersion, based on the redshifts of 12 cluster members we have obtained at the Keck and the Canada-France-Hawaii telescopes, and with its weak lensing signature. The X-ray temperature of this cluster implies a virial mass approx. 7.4 x 10 (sup 14) h (sup -1) M (circle dot), if the mean matter density in the universe equals the critical value (OMEGA (sub 0) = 1), or larger if OMEGA (sub 0) is less than 1. Finding such a hot, massive cluster in the EMSS is extremely improbable if clusters grew from Gaussian perturbations in an OMEGA (sub 0) = 1 universe. Combining the assumptions that OMEGA (sub 0) = 1 and that the initial perturbations were Gaussian with the observed X-ray temperature function at low redshift, we show that this probability of this cluster occurring in the volume sampled by the EMSS is less than a few times 10 (sup -5). Nor is MS1054-0321 the only hot cluster at high redshift; the only two other z greater than 0.5 EMSS clusters already observed with ASCA also have temperatures exceeding 8 keV. Assuming again that the initial perturbations were Gaussian and OMEGA (sub 0) = 1, we find that each one is improbable at the less than 10 (sup -2) level. These observations, along with the fact that these luminosities and temperatures of the high-z clusters all agree with the low-z L (sub X) - T (sub X) relation, argue strongly that OMEGA (sub 0) less than 1. Otherwise, the initial perturbations must be non-Gaussian, if these clusters' temperatures do indeed reflect their gravitational potentials.

  15. Lyalpha RADIATIVE TRANSFER WITH DUST: ESCAPE FRACTIONS FROM SIMULATED HIGH-REDSHIFT GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Laursen, Peter; Sommer-Larsen, Jesper; Andersen, Anja C. E-mail: jslarsen@astro.ku.d

    2009-10-20

    The Lyalpha emission line is an essential diagnostic tool for probing galaxy formation and evolution. Not only is it commonly the strongest observable line from high-redshift galaxies, but from its shape detailed information about its host galaxy can be revealed. However, due to the scattering nature of Lyalpha photons increasing their path length in a nontrivial way, if dust is present in the galaxy, the line may be severely suppressed and its shape altered. In order to interpret observations correctly, it is thus of crucial significance to know how much of the emitted light actually escapes the galaxy. In the present work, using a combination of high-resolution cosmological hydrosimulations and an adaptively refinable Monte Carlo Lyalpha radiative transfer code including an environment dependent model of dust, the escape fractions f {sub esc} of Lyalpha radiation from high-redshift (z = 3.6) galaxies are calculated. In addition to the average escape fraction, the variation of f {sub esc} in different directions and from different parts of the galaxies is investigated, as well as the effect on the emergent spectrum. Escape fractions from a sample of simulated galaxies of representative physical properties are found to decrease for increasing galaxy virial mass M {sub vir}, from f {sub esc} approaching unity for M {sub vir} approx 10{sup 9} M {sub sun} to f {sub esc} less than 10% for M {sub vir} approx 10{sup 12} M {sub sun}. In spite of dust being almost gray, it is found that the emergent spectrum is affected nonuniformly, with the escape fraction of photons close to the line center being much higher than of those in the wings, thus effectively narrowing the Lyalpha line.

  16. COSMIC RAYS CAN DRIVE STRONG OUTFLOWS FROM GAS-RICH HIGH-REDSHIFT DISK GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Hanasz, M.; Kowalik, K.; Wóltański, D.; Lesch, H.; Naab, T.; Gawryszczak, A.

    2013-11-10

    We present simulations of the magnetized interstellar medium (ISM) in models of massive star-forming (40 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}) disk galaxies with high gas surface densities (Σ{sub gas} ∼ 100 M {sub ☉} pc{sup –2}) similar to observed star-forming high-redshift disks. We assume that type II supernovae deposit 10% of their energy into the ISM as cosmic rays (CRs) and neglect the additional deposition of thermal energy or momentum. With a typical Galactic diffusion coefficient for CRs (3 × 10{sup 28} cm{sup 2} s{sup –1}), we demonstrate that this process alone can trigger the local formation of a strong low-density galactic wind maintaining vertically open field lines. Driven by the additional pressure gradient of the relativistic fluid, the wind speed can exceed 10{sup 3} km s{sup –1}, much higher than the escape velocity of the galaxy. The global mass loading, i.e., the ratio of the gas mass leaving the galactic disk in a wind to the star formation rate, becomes of order unity once the system has settled into an equilibrium. We conclude that relativistic particles accelerated in supernova remnants alone provide a natural and efficient mechanism to trigger winds similar to observed mass-loaded galactic winds in high-redshift galaxies. These winds also help in explaining the low efficiencies for the conversion of gas into stars in galaxies, as well as the early enrichment of the intergalactic medium with metals. This mechanism may be at least of similar importance to the traditionally considered momentum feedback from massive stars and thermal and kinetic feedback from supernova explosions.

  17. Imaging of High Redshift Starburst galaxies in the light of Lyman alpha

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckwith, Steven

    1997-07-01

    The PI is the designated director for STScI but has no experience with HST. The purpose of this proposal is to gain experience with the facility by carrying out a modest observational program that is unique and will not conflict with any community programs. The proposed science is divided into priority 1 and priority 2, for 6 + 4 orbits. This division will allow allocation in parts, if the pressure on DDT is large and the total of 10 orbits unusually difficult to schedule. The priority 1 science is rather predictable and, hence, conservative, consisting of the brightest of the objects under study. The priority 2 science is somewhat riskier, because it is more difficult to estimate object brightnesses in the filters to be used on HST. Both priority 1 and priority 2 observations allow for a large degree of serendipity, because the fields are likely to have more starburst galaxies at the observed redshifts that may show up in Lyman alpha. Exploration of the high redshift u niverse and discovery of the most distant objects is still in its infancy. Only recently have the tools been available to detect normal galaxies at redshifts larger than one when the first galaxies were created {Pescarelle et al. 1996; Hu & McMahon 1996; Cowie & Hu 1998; Steidel et al. 1996}. It seems likely that young galaxies will have a variety of different signatures {Franceschini et al. 1998; Guideroni et al. 1997}, so that it will be necessary to use several diverse techniques to uncover all of them: searches at optical, infrared, x-ray, and radio wavelengths, for example. It is already known that many of the optically selected galaxies using the "dropout" technique are reddened by dust {Pettini et al. 1997}. We carried out two surveys for infrared emission-line galaxies by imaging through narrow {Resolving power 100} and broad band filters between 1 and 2.5 microns and identifying objects that appeared brighter in the narrow filters. Our first survey was designed to uncover emission lines at

  18. Studying high redshift galaxy groups with the Athena Wide-Field-Imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacaud, Florian; Reiprich, Thomas; Ramos Ceja, Miriam Elizabeth; Lovisari, Lorenzo

    2016-07-01

    In this contribution, we will discuss the potential of Athena to study high redshift galaxy groups (1

  19. Observational Studies of Type Ia Supernovae at High and Intermediate redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doi, M.; Suzuki, N.; Supernova Cosmology Project

    2012-08-01

    It was the observations of distant type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) that revealed the expansion of the universe is now accelerating. The Nobel Prize in Physics 2011 was awarded for this discovery which implied the existence of a mysterious form of energy, dark energy. We briefly review our SNIa observations with Subaru telescope in collaboration with Supernova Cosmology Project (SCP) since 2001 and report the latest results (Suzuki et al. 2012) which doubled the number of SNIa beyond redshift z = 1. We found no obvious deviation from a flat ΛCDM model in the era when the expansion of the universe turned from deceleration to acceleration. We discuss the future prospects of high-z SNIa cosmology with Hyper Suprime-Cam.

  20. A Detailed Study of Two Optically-Selected, High-Redshift Clusters of Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lubin, Lori M.

    2002-01-01

    We are obtaining detailed X-ray spectral and structural data for two distant, optically-selected clusters of galaxies which are known X-ray emitters, CL1324+3011 at z=0.76 and CL1604+4304 at z=0.90. These observations will allow us to place accurate constraints on the temperature, surface-brightness profile, and mass fraction of the intracluster medium in rich, optically-selected clusters at very high redshift. The two target clusters are the most well-studied systems at z greater than 0.7 in the optical and infrared regimes; therefore, with the addition of the XMM data, we plan to study the specifics of the relationship between the X-ray and optical properties and their implications for galaxy and cluster evolution.

  1. A Detailed Study of Two Optically Selected, High-Redshift Clusters of Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lubin, Lori M.

    2000-01-01

    We are obtaining detailed X-ray spectral and structural data for two distant, optically-selected clusters of galaxies which are known X-ray emitters, CL1324+3011 at z = 0.76 and CL,1604+4304 at z = 0.90. These observations will allow us to place accurate constraints on the temperature, surface-brightness profile, and mass fraction of the intracluster medium in rich, optically-selected clusters at very high redshift. The two target clusters are the most well-studied systems at z greater than 0.7 in the optical and infrared regimes; therefore, with the addition of the XMM data, we plan to study the specifies of the relationship between the X-ray and optical properties and their implications for galaxy and cluster evolution.

  2. VizieR Online Data Catalog: KMOS AGN Survey at High redshift (KASHz) (Harrison+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, C. M.; Alexander, D. M.; Mullaney, J. R.; Stott, J. P.; Swinbank, A. M.; Arumugam, V.; Bauer, F. E.; Bower, R. G.; Bunker, A. J.; Sharples, R. M.

    2016-08-01

    KASHz is designed to ultimately obtain spatially resolved emission-line kinematics of ~(100-200) high-redshift (z~0.6-3.6) AGN. For our target selection we make use of deep X-ray surveys performed in extragalactic fields (COSMOS, see Scoville et al., 2007, Cat. J/ApJS/171/1; CDF-S, see Giacconi et al. 2001ApJ...551..624G and Xue et al., 2011, Cat. J/ApJS/195/10 (CDFS); UDS, SXDS: see Furusawa et al. 2008, Cat. J/ApJS/176/1 (UDS) and SSA22, see Steidel et al. 1998ApJ...492..428S). (1 data file).

  3. THE PRESENCE OF WEAK ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI IN HIGH REDSHIFT STAR-FORMING GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, Shelley A.; Graham, James R.; Ma, C-P; Larkin, James E.

    2010-03-10

    We present [O III 5007 A] observations of the star-forming galaxy (SFG) HDF-BMZ1299 (z = 1.598) using Keck Observatory's adaptive optics system with the near-infrared {integral} field spectrograph OSIRIS. Using previous Halpha and [N II] measurements of the same source, we are able for the first time to use spatially resolved observations to place a high-redshift galaxy's substructure on a traditional H II diagnostic diagram. We find that HDF-BMZ1299's spatially concentrated nebular ratios in the central {approx}1.5 kpc (0.''2) are best explained by the presence of an active galactic nucleus (AGN): log ([N II]/Halpha) = -0.22 +- 0.05 and 2sigma limit of log ([O III]/Hbeta) {approx}>0.26. The dominant energy source of this galaxy is star formation, and integrating a single aperture across the galaxy yields nebular ratios that are composite spectra from both AGN and H II regions. The presence of an embedded AGN in HDF-BMZ1299 may suggest a potential contamination in a fraction of other high-redshift SFGs, and we suggest that this may be a source of the 'elevated' nebular ratios previously seen in seeing-limited metallicity studies. HDF-BMZ1299's estimated AGN luminosity is L{sub Halpha} = (3.7 +- 0.5) x 10{sup 41} erg s{sup -1} and L{sub [O{sub III}]} = (5.8 +- 1.9) x 10{sup 41} erg s{sup -1}, making it one of the lowest luminosity AGNs discovered at this early epoch.

  4. The Coevolution of Supermassive Black Holes and Massive Galaxies at High Redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapi, A.; Raimundo, S.; Aversa, R.; Cai, Z.-Y.; Negrello, M.; Celotti, A.; De Zotti, G.; Danese, L.

    2014-02-01

    We exploit the recent, wide samples of far-infrared (FIR) selected galaxies followed up in X-rays and of X-ray/optically selected active galactic nuclei (AGNs) followed up in the FIR band, along with the classic data on AGNs and stellar luminosity functions at high redshift z >~ 1.5, to probe different stages in the coevolution of supermassive black holes (BHs) and host galaxies. The results of our analysis indicate the following scenario: (1) the star formation in the host galaxy proceeds within a heavily dust-enshrouded medium at an almost constant rate over a timescale <~ 0.5-1 Gyr and then abruptly declines due to quasar feedback, over the same timescale; (2) part of the interstellar medium loses angular momentum, reaches the circum-nuclear regions at a rate proportional to the star formation, and is temporarily stored in a massive reservoir/proto-torus wherefrom it can be promptly accreted; (3) the BH grows by accretion in a self-regulated regime with radiative power that can slightly exceed the Eddington limit L/L Edd <~ 4, particularly at the highest redshifts; (4) for massive BHs, the ensuing energy feedback at its maximum exceeds the stellar one and removes the interstellar gas, thus stopping the star formation and the fueling of the reservoir; (5) afterward, if the latter has retained enough gas, a phase of supply-limited accretion follows, exponentially declining with a timescale of about two e-folding times. We also discuss how the detailed properties and the specific evolution of the reservoir can be investigated via coordinated, high-resolution observations of star-forming, strongly lensed galaxies in the (sub-)mm band with ALMA and in the X-ray band with Chandra and the next-generation X-ray instruments.

  5. The coevolution of supermassive black holes and massive galaxies at high redshift

    SciTech Connect

    Lapi, A.; Raimundo, S.; Aversa, R.; Cai, Z.-Y.; Celotti, A.; De Zotti, G.; Danese, L.; Negrello, M.

    2014-02-20

    We exploit the recent, wide samples of far-infrared (FIR) selected galaxies followed up in X-rays and of X-ray/optically selected active galactic nuclei (AGNs) followed up in the FIR band, along with the classic data on AGNs and stellar luminosity functions at high redshift z ≳ 1.5, to probe different stages in the coevolution of supermassive black holes (BHs) and host galaxies. The results of our analysis indicate the following scenario: (1) the star formation in the host galaxy proceeds within a heavily dust-enshrouded medium at an almost constant rate over a timescale ≲ 0.5-1 Gyr and then abruptly declines due to quasar feedback, over the same timescale; (2) part of the interstellar medium loses angular momentum, reaches the circum-nuclear regions at a rate proportional to the star formation, and is temporarily stored in a massive reservoir/proto-torus wherefrom it can be promptly accreted; (3) the BH grows by accretion in a self-regulated regime with radiative power that can slightly exceed the Eddington limit L/L {sub Edd} ≲ 4, particularly at the highest redshifts; (4) for massive BHs, the ensuing energy feedback at its maximum exceeds the stellar one and removes the interstellar gas, thus stopping the star formation and the fueling of the reservoir; (5) afterward, if the latter has retained enough gas, a phase of supply-limited accretion follows, exponentially declining with a timescale of about two e-folding times. We also discuss how the detailed properties and the specific evolution of the reservoir can be investigated via coordinated, high-resolution observations of star-forming, strongly lensed galaxies in the (sub-)mm band with ALMA and in the X-ray band with Chandra and the next-generation X-ray instruments.

  6. Radiative transfer in a clumpy universe: The colors of high-redshift galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madau, Piero

    1995-01-01

    We assess the effects of the stochastic attenuation produced by intervening QSO absorption systems on the broadband colors of galaxies at cosmological distances. We compute the H I opacity of a clumpy universe as a function of redshift, including scattering in resonant lines, such as Lyman alpha, Lyman beta, Lyman gamma, and higher order members, and Lyman-continuum absorption. Both the numerous, optically thin Lyman-alpha forest clouds and the rarer, optically thick Lyman limit systems are found to contribute to the obscuration of background sources. We study the mean properties of primeval galaxies at high redshift in four broad optical passbands, U(sub n), B, G, and R. Even if young galaxies radiated a significant amount of ionizing photons, the attenuation due to the accumulated photoelectric opacity along the path is so severe that sources beyond z approximately 3 will drop out of the U(sub n) image together. We also show that the observed B-R color of distant galaxies can be much redder than expected from a stellar population. At z approximately 3.5, the blanketing by discrete absorption lines in the Lyman series is so effective that background galaxies appear, on average, 1 mag fainter in B. By z approximately 4, the observed B magnitude increment due to intergalactic absorption exceeds 2 mag. By modeling the intrinsic UV spectral energy distribution of star-forming galaxies with a stellar population synthesis code, we show that the (B-R)(sub AB) approximately 0 criterion for identifying 'flat-spectrum,' metal-producing galaxies is biased against objects at z greater than 3. The continuum blanketing from the Lyman series produces a characteristic staircase profile in the transmitted power. We suggest that this cosmic Lyman decrement might be used as a tool to identify high-z galaxies.

  7. The deepest X-ray view of high-redshift galaxies: constraints on low-rate black-hole accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vito, F.; Gilli, R.; Vignali, C.; Brandt, W. N.; Comastri, A.; Yang, G.; Lehmer, B. D.; Luo, B.; Basu-Zych, A.; Bauer, F. E.; Cappelluti, N.; Koekemoer, A.; Mainieri, V.; Paolillo, M.; Ranalli, P.; Shemmer, O.; Trump, J.; Wang, J. X.; Xue, Y. Q.

    2016-08-01

    We exploit the 7 Ms Chandra observations in the Chandra Deep Field-South (CDF-S), the deepest X-ray survey to date, coupled with CANDELS/GOODS-S data, to measure the total X-ray emission arising from 2076 galaxies at 3.5 ≤ z < 6.5. This aim is achieved by stacking the Chandra data at the positions of optically selected galaxies, reaching effective exposure times of ≥109s. We detect significant (>3.7σ) X-ray emission from massive galaxies at z ≈ 4. We also report the detection of massive galaxies at z ≈ 5 at a 99.7% confidence level (2.7σ), the highest significance ever obtained for X-ray emission from galaxies at such high redshifts. No significant signal is detected from galaxies at even higher redshifts. The stacking results place constraints on the BHAD associated with the known high-redshift galaxy samples, as well as on the SFRD at high redshift, assuming a range of prescriptions for X-ray emission due to X- ray binaries. We find that the X-ray emission from our sample is likely dominated by processes related to star formation. Our results show that low-rate mass accretion onto SMBHs in individually X-ray-undetected galaxies is negligible, compared with the BHAD measured for samples of X-ray detected AGN, for cosmic SMBH mass assembly at high redshift. We also place, for the first time, constraints on the faint-end of the AGN X-ray luminosity function (logLX ˜ 42) at z > 4, with evidence for fairly flat slopes. The implications of all of these findings are discussed in the context of the evolution of the AGN population at high redshift.

  8. The deepest X-ray view of high-redshift galaxies: constraints on low-rate black hole accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vito, F.; Gilli, R.; Vignali, C.; Brandt, W. N.; Comastri, A.; Yang, G.; Lehmer, B. D.; Luo, B.; Basu-Zych, A.; Bauer, F. E.; Cappelluti, N.; Koekemoer, A.; Mainieri, V.; Paolillo, M.; Ranalli, P.; Shemmer, O.; Trump, J.; Wang, J. X.; Xue, Y. Q.

    2016-11-01

    We exploit the 7 Ms Chandra observations in the Chandra Deep Field-South (CDF-S), the deepest X-ray survey to date, coupled with CANDELS/GOODS-S data, to measure the total X-ray emission arising from 2076 galaxies at 3.5 ≤ z < 6.5. This aim is achieved by stacking the Chandra data at the positions of optically selected galaxies, reaching effective exposure times of ≥109s. We detect significant (>3.7σ) X-ray emission from massive galaxies at z ≈ 4. We also report the detection of massive galaxies at z ≈ 5 at a 99.7 per cent confidence level (2.7σ), the highest significance ever obtained for X-ray emission from galaxies at such high redshifts. No significant signal is detected from galaxies at even higher redshifts. The stacking results place constraints on the BHAD associated with the known high-redshift galaxy samples, as well as on the SFRD at high redshift, assuming a range of prescriptions for X-ray emission due to X- ray binaries. We find that the X-ray emission from our sample is likely dominated by processes related to star formation. Our results show that low-rate mass accretion on to SMBHs in individually X-ray-undetected galaxies is negligible, compared with the BHAD measured for samples of X-ray detected AGN, for cosmic SMBH mass assembly at high redshift. We also place, for the first time, constraints on the faint-end of the AGN X-ray luminosity function (logLX ˜ 42) at z > 4, with evidence for fairly flat slopes. The implications of all of these findings are discussed in the context of the evolution of the AGN population at high redshift.

  9. Exploratory X-ray monitoring of luminous radio-quiet quasars at high redshift: Initial results

    SciTech Connect

    Shemmer, Ohad; Stein, Matthew S.; Brandt, W. N.; Schneider, Donald P.; Paolillo, Maurizio; Kaspi, Shai; Vignali, Cristian; Lira, Paulina; Gibson, Robert R.

    2014-03-10

    We present initial results from an exploratory X-ray monitoring project of two groups of comparably luminous radio-quiet quasars (RQQs). The first consists of four sources at 4.10 ≤ z ≤ 4.35, monitored by Chandra, and the second is a comparison sample of three sources at 1.33 ≤ z ≤ 2.74, monitored by Swift. Together with archival X-ray data, the total rest-frame temporal baseline spans ∼2-4 yr and ∼5-13 yr for the first and second group, respectively. Six of these sources show significant X-ray variability over rest-frame timescales of ∼10{sup 2}-10{sup 3} days; three of these also show significant X-ray variability on rest-frame timescales of ∼1-10 days. The X-ray variability properties of our variable sources are similar to those exhibited by nearby and far less luminous active galactic nuclei (AGNs). While we do not directly detect a trend of increasing X-ray variability with redshift, we do confirm previous reports of luminous AGNs exhibiting X-ray variability above that expected from their luminosities, based on simplistic extrapolation from lower luminosity sources. This result may be attributed to luminous sources at the highest redshifts having relatively high accretion rates. Complementary UV-optical monitoring of our sources shows that variations in their optical-X-ray spectral energy distribution are dominated by the X-ray variations. We confirm previous reports of X-ray spectral variations in one of our sources, HS 1700+6416, but do not detect such variations in any of our other sources in spite of X-ray flux variations of up to a factor of ∼4. This project is designed to provide a basic assessment of the X-ray variability properties of RQQs at the highest accessible redshifts that will serve as a benchmark for more systematic monitoring of such sources with future X-ray missions.

  10. High-redshift blazar identification for Swift J1656.3-3302

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masetti, N.; Mason, E.; Landi, R.; Giommi, P.; Bassani, L.; Malizia, A.; Bird, A. J.; Bazzano, A.; Dean, A. J.; Gehrels, N.; Palazzi, E.; Ubertini, P.

    2008-03-01

    We report on the high-redshift blazar identification of a new gamma-ray source, Swift J1656.3-3302, detected with the BAT imager onboard the Swift satellite and the IBIS instrument on the INTEGRAL satellite. Follow-up optical spectroscopy has allowed us to identify the counterpart as an R˜ 19 mag source that shows broad Lyman-α, Si iv, He ii, C iv, and C iii] emission lines at redshift z = 2.40 ± 0.01. Spectral evolution is observed in X-rays when the INTEGRAL/IBIS data are compared to the Swift/BAT results, with the spectrum steepening when the source gets fainter. The 0.7-200 keV X-ray continuum, observed with Swift/XRT and INTEGRAL/IBIS, shows the power law shape typical of radio loud (broad emission line) active galactic nuclei (with a photon index Γ ˜ 1.6) and a hint of spectral curvature below ~2 keV, possibly due to intrinsic absorption (NH ˜ 7× 10 22 cm-2) local to the source. Alternatively, a slope change (Δ Γ ˜ 1) around 2.7 keV can describe the X-ray spectrum equally well. At this redshift, the observed 20-100 keV luminosity of the source is ~1048 erg s-1 (assuming isotropic emission), making Swift J1656.3-3302 one of the most X-ray luminous blazars. This source is yet another example of a distant gamma-ray loud quasar discovered above 20 keV. It is also the farthest object, among the previously unidentified INTEGRAL sources, whose nature has been determined a posteriori through optical spectroscopy. Partly based on X-ray observations with INTEGRAL, an ESA project with instruments and science data centre funded by ESA member states (especially the PI countries: Denmark, France, Germany, Italy, Switzerland, Spain), Czech Republic and Poland, and with the participation of Russia and the USA, and on optical observations collected at ESO (La Silla, Chile) under programme 079.A-0171(A).

  11. High-Redshift QSOs in the SWIRE Survey and the z~3 QSO Luminosity Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siana, Brian; Polletta, Maria del Carmen; Smith, Harding E.; Lonsdale, Carol J.; Gonzalez-Solares, Eduardo; Farrah, Duncan; Babbedge, Tom S. R.; Rowan-Robinson, Michael; Surace, Jason; Shupe, David; Fang, Fan; Franceschini, Alberto; Oliver, Seb

    2008-03-01

    We use a simple optical/infrared (IR) photometric selection of high-redshift QSOs that identifies a Lyman break in the optical photometry and requires a red IR color to distinguish QSOs from common interlopers. The search yields 100 z ~ 3 (U-dropout) QSO candidates with 19 < r' < 22 over 11.7 deg2 in the ELAIS-N1 (EN1) and ELAIS-N2 (EN2) fields of the Spitzer Wide-area Infrared Extragalactic (SWIRE) Legacy Survey. The z ~ 3 selection is reliable, with spectroscopic follow-up of 10 candidates confirming that they are all QSOs at 2.83 < z < 3.44. We find that our z ~ 4 (g'-dropout) sample suffers from both unreliability and incompleteness but present seven previously unidentified QSOs at 3.50 < z < 3.89. Detailed simulations show our z ~ 3 completeness to be ~80%-90% from 3.0 < z < 3.5, significantly better than the ~30%-80% completeness of the SDSS at these redshifts. The resulting luminosity function extends 2 mag fainter than SDSS and has a faint-end slope of β = - 1.42 +/- 0.15, consistent with values measured at lower redshift. Therefore, we see no evidence for evolution of the faint-end slope of the QSO luminosity function. Including the SDSS QSO sample, we have now directly measured the space density of QSOs responsible for ~70% of the QSO UV luminosity density at z ~ 3. We derive a maximum rate of H I photoionization from QSOs at z ~ 3.2, Γ = 4.8 × 10-13 s-1, about half of the total rate inferred through studies of the Lyα forest. Therefore, star-forming galaxies and QSOs must contribute comparably to the photoionization of H I in the intergalactic medium at z ~ 3. Some of the data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation.

  12. Gravitational lensing of extended high-redshift sources by dark matter haloes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrotta, F.; Baccigalupi, C.; Bartelmann, M.; De Zotti, G.; Granato, G. L.

    2002-01-01

    High-redshift galaxies and quasi-stellar objects (QSOs) are most likely to be strongly lensed by intervening haloes between the source and the observer. In addition, a large fraction of lensed sources is expected to be seen in the submillimetre region, as a result of the enhanced magnification bias on the steep intrinsic number counts. We extend in three directions Blain's earlier study of this effect. First, we use a modification of the Press-Schechter mass function and detailed lens models to compute the magnification probability distribution. We compare the magnification cross-sections of populations of singular isothermal spheres and Navarro, Frenk & White (NFW) haloes and find that they are very similar, in contrast to the image-splitting statistics which were recently investigated in other studies. The distinction between the two types of density profile is therefore irrelevant for our purposes. Secondly, we discuss quantitatively the maximum magnification, μmax, that can be achieved for extended sources (galaxies) with realistic luminosity profiles, taking into account the possible ellipticity of the lensing potential. We find that μmax plausibly falls into the range 10-30 for sources of 1-10h-1kpc effective radius at redshifts within 1-4. Thirdly, we apply our model for the lensing magnification to a class of sources following the luminosity evolution typical for a unified scheme of QSO formation. As a result of the peculiar steepness of their intrinsic number counts, we find that the lensed source counts at a fiducial wave length of 850μm can exceed the unlensed counts by several orders of magnitude at flux densities >~100mJy, even with a conservative choice of the maximum magnification.

  13. The distribution of Extremely High Accretion Rates and Metallicities of QSO's as a Function of Redshift over Cosmic Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu Seif, Nasser; Kazanas, Demosthenes

    2016-07-01

    The investigation of how QSOs' extremity of accretion rates vary with redshift has remained a major focus of our study in the last five years. How does the evolution of QSOs trace the accretion history of early SMBH? What does accretion at super-Eddington rates look like? Does the correlation between SMBHs and metallicity of QSOs emission line evolve differently at high redshift? Is it a surprise that metallicity is high at high redshift, or is this expected? Here, we establish a new database for the width of an emission line (e.g., Hβ, Mg II and C IV) to obtain a large statistical sample of QSOs at different redshifts. We calculated L/LEdd that determined mass from previous studies (Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS)). We investigated the significant evolution of L/ LEdd for any value of MBH as a function of redshift. Also, we investigated the evolution and distribution of the accretion rate (L/LEdd) over cosmic time with a concentration on the extremely high accretion rate sources at high redshift. The current study investigated the accretion rate (L/LEdd) correlation to other QSO properties and investigated how the accretion of Black Holes L/LEdd and MBH occurs within heavily obscured environments. Our research found that some QSOs are radiating near the Eddington limit with L/ Ledd ~ 1 and those QSOs have extreme accretion. We also found that the lowest M BH has the highest accretion rate, a result that was already noted by McClure & Dunlop (2004). The distribution of Eddington ratio displayed by QSOs clearly shows that all luminous QSOs accreted at their Eddington limit have a poor approximation. This result is important because it is often assumed that optically luminous QSOs are accreting at their Eddington limit within the models of QSOs evolution. We determined the peak of the L/LEdd versus redshift and we found the largest of those peaks to be at the interval of redshift (1< Z < 2). We noted that the highest peak of the distribution of L/LEdd at all

  14. Clustering analysis of high-redshift luminous red galaxies in Stripe 82

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikoloudakis, N.; Shanks, T.; Sawangwit, U.

    2013-03-01

    We present a clustering analysis of luminous red galaxies (LRGs) in Stripe 82 from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). We study the angular two-point autocorrelation function, w(θ), of a selected sample of over 130 000 LRG candidates via colour-cut selections in izK with the K-band coverage coming from UKIRT (United Kingdom Infrared Telescope) Infrared Deep Sky Survey (UKIDSS) Large Area Survey (LAS). We have used the cross-correlation technique of Newman to establish the redshift distribution of the LRGs. Cross-correlating them with SDSS quasi-stellar objects (QSOs), MegaZ-LRGs and DEEP Extragalactic Evolutionary Probe 2 (DEEP2) galaxies, implies an average redshift of the LRGs to be z ≈ 1 with space density, ng ≈ 3.20 ± 0.16 × 10-4 h3 Mpc-3. For θ ≤ 10 arcmin (corresponding to ≈10 h-1 Mpc), the LRG w(θ) significantly deviates from a conventional single power law as noted by previous clustering studies of highly biased and luminous galaxies. A double power law with a break at rb ≈ 2.4 h-1 Mpc fits the data better, with best-fitting scale length, r0, 1 = 7.63 ± 0.27 h-1 Mpc and slope γ1 = 2.01 ± 0.02 at small scales and r0, 2 = 9.92 ± 0.40 h-1 Mpc and γ2 = 1.64 ± 0.04 at large scales. Due to the flat slope at large scales, we find that a standard Λ cold dark matter (Λ CDM) linear model is accepted only at 2-3σ, with the best-fitting bias factor, b = 2.74 ± 0.07. We also fitted the halo occupation distribution (HOD) models to compare our measurements with the predictions of the dark matter clustering. The effective halo mass of Stripe 82 LRGs is estimated as Meff = 3.3 ± 0.6 × 1013 h-1 M⊙. But at large scales, the current HOD models did not help explain the power excess in the clustering signal. We then compare the w(θ) results to the results of Sawangwit et al. from three samples of photometrically selected LRGs at lower redshifts to measure clustering evolution. We find that a long-lived model may be a poorer fit than at lower

  15. The Star Formation History of Local Starbursts as Benchmark for High Redshifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Henrique R.; Calzetti, Daniela; Armus, Lee

    2001-08-01

    We propose to use the WIYN telescope and MIMO to obtain broad band B and R, and narrow band H(alpha) and H(beta) images for a sample of 13 local starburst galaxies detected by ISO at 170-200(micron) and for which we are obtaining ultraviolet (1600Å) images with an approved HST/STIS program. With these observations we will complete the ground based portion of this project. This sample spans a wide range in the luminosity, star formation rate, metallicity and morphology parameters, and will be used as a low-redshift benchmark to explore the relationship between the Lyman-break and the SCUBA galaxies at z~3. The broad- band ground-based and HST images will be used to characterize the stellar populations and determine the ages of the star forming regions of these galaxies, while the H(alpha)/H(beta) ratio will be used to determine the reddening and gas morphology of these regions. We will study the conditions for the escape of UV light from a dusty galaxy, as a function of the sample parameters. The H(alpha) and UV HST images will be combined to derive a relative empirical calibration between these two star formation indicators. We will measure the fraction of nuclear and disk emission, the fraction of star formation in massive clusters and the properties of those star clusters, the structural properties of star forming bars, rings, and tidally-driven star formation in IR-bright galaxies.

  16. The Star Formation History of Local Starbursts as Benchmark for High Redshifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Henrique R.; Calzetti, Daniela; Armus, Lee

    2001-02-01

    We propose to use the WIYN telescope and MIMO to obtain broad band B and R, and narrow band H(alpha) and H(beta) images for a sample of 22 local starburst galaxies detected by ISO at 170-200(micron) and for which we are obtaining ultraviolet (1600Å) images with an approved HST/STIS program. This sample spans a wide range in the luminosity, star formation rate, metallicity and morphology parameters, and will be used as a low-redshift benchmark to explore the relationship between the Lyman-break and the SCUBA galaxies at z~3. The broad-band ground- based and HST images will be used to characterize the stellar populations and determine the ages of the star forming regions of these galaxies, while the H(alpha)/H(beta) ratio will be used to determine the reddening and gas morphology of these regions. We will study the conditions for the escape of UV light from a dusty galaxy, as a function of the sample parameters. The H(alpha) and UV HST images will be combined to derive a relative empirical calibration between these two star formation indicators. We will measure the fraction of nuclear and disk emission, the fraction of star formation in massive clusters and the properties of those star clusters, the structural properties of star forming bars, rings, and tidally-driven star formation in IR-bright galaxies.

  17. Characterizing the Properties of Clusters of Galaxies As a Function of Luminosity and Redshift

    SciTech Connect

    Andersson, K.; Peterson, J.R.; Madejski, G.; Goobar, A.; /Stockholm U. /Stockholm U., OKC

    2009-02-24

    We report the application of the new Monte Carlo method, Smoothed Particle Inference (SPI, described in a pair of companion papers), towards analysis and interpretation of X-ray observations of clusters of galaxies with the XMM-Newton satellite. Our sample consists of publicly available well-exposed observations of clusters at redshifts z > 0.069, totaling 101 objects. We determine the luminosity and temperature structure of the X-ray emitting gas, with the goal to quantify the scatter and the evolution of the L{sub X} - T relation, as well as to investigate the dependence on cluster substructure with redshift. This work is important for the establishment of the potential robustness of mass estimates from X-ray data which in turn is essential towards the use of clusters for measurements of cosmological parameters. We use the luminosity and temperature maps derived via the SPI technique to determine the presence of cooling cores, via measurements of luminosity and temperature contrast. The L{sub X}-T relation is investigated, and we confirm that L{sub X} {proportional_to} T{sup 3}. We find a weak redshift dependence ({proportional_to} (1 + z){sup {beta}{sub LT}}, {beta}{sub LT} = 0.50 {+-} 0.34), in contrast to some Chandra results. The level of dynamical activity is established using the 'power ratios' method, and we compare our results to previous application of this method to Chandra data for clusters. We find signs of evolution in the P{sub 3}/P{sub 0} power ratio. A new method, the 'temperature two-point correlation function', is proposed. This method is used to determine the 'power spectrum' of temperature fluctuations in the X-ray emitting gas as a function of spatial scale. We show how this method can be fruitfully used to identify cooling core clusters as well as those with disturbed structures, presumably due to on-going or recent merger activity.

  18. Reconciling the Stellar and Nebular Spectra of High-redshift Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steidel, Charles C.; Strom, Allison L.; Pettini, Max; Rudie, Gwen C.; Reddy, Naveen A.; Trainor, Ryan F.

    2016-08-01

    We present a combined analysis of rest-frame far-UV (FUV; 1000–2000 Å) and rest-frame optical (3600–7000 Å) composite spectra formed from very deep Keck/LRIS and Keck/MOSFIRE observations of a sample of 30 star-forming galaxies with z=2.40+/- 0.11, selected to be broadly representative of the full KBSS-MOSFIRE spectroscopic survey. Since the same massive stars are responsible for the observed FUV continuum and for the excitation of the observed nebular emission, a self-consistent stellar population synthesis model should simultaneously match the details of the FUV stellar+nebular continuum and—when inserted as the excitation source in photoionization models—predict all observed nebular emission line ratios. We find that only models including massive star binaries, having low stellar metallicity ({Z}* /{Z}ȯ ≃ 0.1) but relatively high nebular (ionized gas-phase) abundances ({Z}{{neb}}/{Z}ȯ ≃ 0.5), can successfully match all of the observational constraints. We show that this apparent discrepancy is naturally explained by highly super-solar O/Fe (≃ 4{--}5 {({{O}}/{Fe})}ȯ ), expected for a gas whose enrichment is dominated by the products of core-collapse supernovae. While O dominates the physics of the ionized gas (and thus the nebular emission lines), Fe dominates the extreme-UV (EUV) and FUV opacity and controls the mass-loss rate from massive stars, resulting in particularly dramatic effects for massive stars in binary systems. This high nebular excitation—caused by the hard EUV spectra of Fe-poor massive stars—is much more common at high redshift (z≳ 2) than low redshift due to systematic differences in the star formation history of typical galaxies. Based on data obtained at the W.M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and NASA, and was made possible by the generous financial support of the W.M. Keck Foundation.

  19. Reconciling the Stellar and Nebular Spectra of High-redshift Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steidel, Charles C.; Strom, Allison L.; Pettini, Max; Rudie, Gwen C.; Reddy, Naveen A.; Trainor, Ryan F.

    2016-08-01

    We present a combined analysis of rest-frame far-UV (FUV; 1000-2000 Å) and rest-frame optical (3600-7000 Å) composite spectra formed from very deep Keck/LRIS and Keck/MOSFIRE observations of a sample of 30 star-forming galaxies with z=2.40+/- 0.11, selected to be broadly representative of the full KBSS-MOSFIRE spectroscopic survey. Since the same massive stars are responsible for the observed FUV continuum and for the excitation of the observed nebular emission, a self-consistent stellar population synthesis model should simultaneously match the details of the FUV stellar+nebular continuum and—when inserted as the excitation source in photoionization models—predict all observed nebular emission line ratios. We find that only models including massive star binaries, having low stellar metallicity ({Z}* /{Z}⊙ ≃ 0.1) but relatively high nebular (ionized gas-phase) abundances ({Z}{{neb}}/{Z}⊙ ≃ 0.5), can successfully match all of the observational constraints. We show that this apparent discrepancy is naturally explained by highly super-solar O/Fe (≃ 4{--}5 {({{O}}/{Fe})}⊙ ), expected for a gas whose enrichment is dominated by the products of core-collapse supernovae. While O dominates the physics of the ionized gas (and thus the nebular emission lines), Fe dominates the extreme-UV (EUV) and FUV opacity and controls the mass-loss rate from massive stars, resulting in particularly dramatic effects for massive stars in binary systems. This high nebular excitation—caused by the hard EUV spectra of Fe-poor massive stars—is much more common at high redshift (z≳ 2) than low redshift due to systematic differences in the star formation history of typical galaxies. Based on data obtained at the W.M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and NASA, and was made possible by the generous financial support of the W.M. Keck Foundation.

  20. Physical Conditions in a Young, Unreddened, Low-metallicity Galaxy at High Redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erb, Dawn K.; Pettini, Max; Shapley, Alice E.; Steidel, Charles C.; Law, David R.; Reddy, Naveen A.

    2010-08-01

    Increasingly large samples of galaxies are now being discovered at redshifts z ~ 5-6 and higher. Many of these objects are inferred to be young, low in mass, and relatively unreddened, but detailed analysis of their high quality spectra will not be possible until the advent of future facilities. In this paper, we shed light on the physical conditions in a plausibly similar low-mass galaxy by presenting the analysis of the rest-frame optical and UV spectra of Q2343-BX418, an L* galaxy at z = 2.3 with a very low mass-to-light ratio and unusual properties: BX418 is young (<100 Myr), low mass (M sstarf ~ 109 M sun), low in metallicity (Z ~ 1/6 Z sun), and unreddened (E(B - V) ~= 0.02, UV continuum slope β = -2.1). We infer a metallicity 12 + log(O/H) = 7.9 ± 0.2 from the rest-frame optical emission lines. We also determine the metallicity via the direct, electron temperature method, using the ratio O III] λλ1661, 1666/[O III] λ5007 to determine the electron temperature and finding 12 + log(O/H) = 7.8 ± 0.1. These measurements place BX418 among the most metal-poor galaxies observed in emission at high redshift. The rest-frame UV spectrum, which represents ~12 hr of integration with the Keck telescope, contains strong emission from Lyα (with rest-frame equivalent width 54 Å), He II λ1640 (both stellar and nebular), C III] λλ1907, 1909 and O III] λλ1661, 1666. The C IV/C III] ratio indicates that the source of ionization is unlikely to be an active galactic nucleus. Analysis of the He II, O III], and C III] line strengths indicates a very high ionization parameter log U ~ -1, while Lyα and the interstellar absorption lines indicate that outflowing gas is highly ionized over a wide range of velocities. It remains to be determined how many of BX418's unique spectral features are due to its global properties, such as low metallicity and dust extinction, and how many are indicative of a short-lived phase in the early evolution of an otherwise normal star

  1. Theoretical predictions for the effect of nebular emission on the broad-band photometry of high-redshift galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkins, Stephen M.; Coulton, William; Caruana, Joseph; Croft, Rupert; Matteo, Tiziana Di; Khandai, Nishikanta; Feng, Yu; Bunker, Andrew; Elbert, Holly

    2013-11-01

    By combining optical and near-IR observations from the Hubble Space Telescope with near-IR photometry from the Spitzer Space Telescope, it is possible to measure the rest-frame UV-optical colours of galaxies at z = 4-8. The UV-optical spectral energy distribution of star formation dominated galaxies is the result of several different factors. These include the joint distribution of stellar masses, ages and metallicities (solely responsible for the pure stellar spectral energy distribution), and the subsequent reprocessing by dust and gas in the interstellar medium. Using a large cosmological hydrodynamical simulation (MassiveBlack-II), we investigate the predicted spectral energy distributions of galaxies at high redshift with a particular emphasis on assessing the potential contribution of nebular emission. We find that the average (median) pure stellar UV-optical colour correlates with both luminosity and redshift such that galaxies at lower redshift and higher luminosity are typically redder. Assuming that the escape fraction of ionizing photons is close to zero, the effect of nebular emission is to redden the UV-optical 1500 - Vw colour by, on average, 0.4 mag at z = 8 declining to 0.25 mag at z = 4. Young and low-metallicity stellar populations, which typically have bluer pure stellar UV-optical colours, produce larger ionizing luminosities and are thus more strongly affected by the reddening effects of nebular emission. This causes the distribution of 1500 - Vw colours to narrow and the trends with luminosity and redshift to weaken. The strong effect of nebular emission leaves observed-frame colours critically sensitive to the redshift of the source. For example, increasing the redshift by 0.1 can result in observed-frame colours changing by up to ˜0.6. These predictions reinforce the need to include nebular emission when modelling the spectral energy distributions of galaxies at high redshift and also highlight the difficultly in interpreting the observed

  2. QUEST FOR COSMOS SUBMILLIMETER GALAXY COUNTERPARTS USING CARMA AND VLA: IDENTIFYING THREE HIGH-REDSHIFT STARBURST GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Smolcic, V.; Navarrete, F.; Bertoldi, F.; Aravena, M.; Sheth, K.; Ilbert, O.; Yun, M. S.; Salvato, M.; Finoguenov, A.; McCracken, H. J.; Diener, C.; Aretxaga, I.; Hughes, D.; Wilson, G.; Riechers, D. A.; Capak, P.; Scoville, N. Z.; Karim, A.; Schinnerer, E.

    2012-05-01

    We report on interferometric observations at 1.3 mm at 2''-3'' resolution using the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy. We identify multi-wavelength counterparts of three submillimeter galaxies (SMGs; F{sub 1m} > 5.5 mJy) in the COSMOS field, initially detected with MAMBO and AzTEC bolometers at low, {approx}10''-30'', resolution. All three sources-AzTEC/C1, Cosbo-3, and Cosbo-8-are identified to coincide with positions of 20 cm radio sources. Cosbo-3, however, is not associated with the most likely radio counterpart, closest to the MAMBO source position, but with that farther away from it. This illustrates the need for intermediate-resolution ({approx}2'') mm-observations to identify the correct counterparts of single-dish-detected SMGs. All of our three sources become prominent only at NIR wavelengths, and their mm-to-radio flux based redshifts suggest that they lie at redshifts z {approx}> 2. As a proof of concept, we show that photometric redshifts can be well determined for SMGs, and we find photometric redshifts of 5.6 {+-} 1.2, 1.9{sup +0.9}{sub -0.5}, and {approx}4 for AzTEC/C1, Cosbo-3, and Cosbo-8, respectively. Using these we infer that these galaxies have radio-based star formation rates of {approx}> 1000 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}and IR luminosities of {approx}10{sup 13} L{sub Sun} consistent with properties of high-redshift SMGs. In summary, our sources reflect a variety of SMG properties in terms of redshift and clustering, consistent with the framework that SMGs are progenitors of z {approx} 2 and today's passive galaxies.

  3. Quest for COSMOS Submillimeter Galaxy Counterparts using CARMA and VLA: Identifying Three High-redshift Starburst Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smolčić, V.; Navarrete, F.; Aravena, M.; Ilbert, O.; Yun, M. S.; Sheth, K.; Salvato, M.; McCracken, H. J.; Diener, C.; Aretxaga, I.; Riechers, D. A.; Finoguenov, A.; Bertoldi, F.; Capak, P.; Hughes, D.; Karim, A.; Schinnerer, E.; Scoville, N. Z.; Wilson, G.

    2012-05-01

    We report on interferometric observations at 1.3 mm at 2''-3'' resolution using the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy. We identify multi-wavelength counterparts of three submillimeter galaxies (SMGs; F 1 mm > 5.5 mJy) in the COSMOS field, initially detected with MAMBO and AzTEC bolometers at low, ~10''-30'', resolution. All three sources—AzTEC/C1, Cosbo-3, and Cosbo-8—are identified to coincide with positions of 20 cm radio sources. Cosbo-3, however, is not associated with the most likely radio counterpart, closest to the MAMBO source position, but with that farther away from it. This illustrates the need for intermediate-resolution (~2'') mm-observations to identify the correct counterparts of single-dish-detected SMGs. All of our three sources become prominent only at NIR wavelengths, and their mm-to-radio flux based redshifts suggest that they lie at redshifts z >~ 2. As a proof of concept, we show that photometric redshifts can be well determined for SMGs, and we find photometric redshifts of 5.6 ± 1.2, 1.9+0.9 - 0.5, and ~4 for AzTEC/C1, Cosbo-3, and Cosbo-8, respectively. Using these we infer that these galaxies have radio-based star formation rates of >~ 1000 M ⊙ yr-1and IR luminosities of ~1013 L ⊙ consistent with properties of high-redshift SMGs. In summary, our sources reflect a variety of SMG properties in terms of redshift and clustering, consistent with the framework that SMGs are progenitors of z ~ 2 and today's passive galaxies.

  4. New observations directly measuring the full continuous sizes of high redshift damped Lya systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooke, Jeff; O'Meara, John

    2016-01-01

    The formation and evolution of galaxies requires large reservoirs of cold, neutral gas. The damped Lyman-α systems (DLAs), seen in absorption towards distant quasars and gamma ray bursts, are predicted to be the dominant reservoirs for this gas. Detailed properties of DLAs have been studied extensively for decades with great success. However, their size, fundamental in understanding their nature, has remained elusive, as quasar and gamma ray burst sightlines only probe comparatively tiny areas of the foreground DLAs. Here, we introduce a new approach to measure the full extent of DLAs in the sightlines to extended background sources. We present the discovery of z ~ 2 DLAs with column densities as high as log N(HI) = 21.1 ±0.4 cm-2 covering 90-100% of the luminous extent of background galaxies. Estimates of the sizes of the background galaxies range from a minimum of a few kpc2, to ˜100 kpc2, and demonstrate that high-column density neutral gas can span continuous areas 108-1010 times larger than previously explored in quasar or gamma ray burst sightlines. The DLAs are from our pilot survey that searches Lyman break and Lyman continuum galaxies at high redshift. The low luminosities, large sizes, and mass contents (~106-109 M⊙) implied by the early data suggest that DLAs contain the necessary fuel for galaxies, with many systems consistent with relatively massive, low-luminosity primeval galaxies.

  5. ACCOUNTING FOR COSMIC VARIANCE IN STUDIES OF GRAVITATIONALLY LENSED HIGH-REDSHIFT GALAXIES IN THE HUBBLE FRONTIER FIELD CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, Brant E.; Stark, Dan P.; Ellis, Richard S.; Dunlop, James S.; McLure, Ross J.; McLeod, Derek

    2014-12-01

    Strong gravitational lensing provides a powerful means for studying faint galaxies in the distant universe. By magnifying the apparent brightness of background sources, massive clusters enable the detection of galaxies fainter than the usual sensitivity limit for blank fields. However, this gain in effective sensitivity comes at the cost of a reduced survey volume and, in this Letter, we demonstrate that there is an associated increase in the cosmic variance uncertainty. As an example, we show that the cosmic variance uncertainty of the high-redshift population viewed through the Hubble Space Telescope Frontier Field cluster Abell 2744 increases from ∼35% at redshift z ∼ 7 to ≳ 65% at z ∼ 10. Previous studies of high-redshift galaxies identified in the Frontier Fields have underestimated the cosmic variance uncertainty that will affect the ultimate constraints on both the faint-end slope of the high-redshift luminosity function and the cosmic star formation rate density, key goals of the Frontier Field program.

  6. Weak-Line Quasars at High Redshift: Extremely High Accretion Rates or Anemic Broad-Line Regions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shemmer, Ohad; Trakhtenbrot, B.; Anderson, S. F.; Brandt, W. N.; Diamond-Stanic, A. M.; Fan, X.; Lira, P.; Netzer, H.; Plotkin, R. M.; Richards, G. T.; Schneider, D. P.; Strauss, M. A.

    2011-01-01

    We present Gemini-North K-band spectra of two representative members of the class of high-redshift quasars with exceptionally weak rest-frame ultraviolet emission lines (WLQs), SDSS J114153.34+021924.3 at z=3.55 and SDSS J123743.08+630144.9 at z=3.49. In both sources we detect an unusually weak broad Hβ line and we place tight upper limits on the strengths of their [O III] lines. Virial, Hβ-based black-hole mass determinations indicate normalized accretion rates of L/LEdd=0.4 for these sources, which is well within the range observed for typical quasars with similar luminosities and redshifts. We also present high-quality XMM-Newton imaging spectroscopy of SDSS J114153.34+021924.3 and find a hard-X-ray photon index of Γ=1.91+0.24-0.22which supports the virial L/LEdd determination in this source. Our results suggest that the weakness of the broad-emission lines in WLQs is not a consequence of an extreme continuum-emission source but instead due to abnormal broad-emission line region properties.

  7. RAPID, MACHINE-LEARNED RESOURCE ALLOCATION: APPLICATION TO HIGH-REDSHIFT GAMMA-RAY BURST FOLLOW-UP

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, A. N.; Richards, Joseph W.; Butler, Nathaniel R.; Bloom, Joshua S.; Long, James; Broderick, Tamara

    2012-02-20

    As the number of observed gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) continues to grow, follow-up resources need to be used more efficiently in order to maximize science output from limited telescope time. As such, it is becoming increasingly important to rapidly identify bursts of interest as soon as possible after the event, before the afterglows fade beyond detectability. Studying the most distant (highest redshift) events, for instance, remains a primary goal for many in the field. Here, we present our Random Forest Automated Triage Estimator for GRB redshifts (RATE GRB-z ) for rapid identification of high-redshift candidates using early-time metrics from the three telescopes onboard Swift. While the basic RATE methodology is generalizable to a number of resource allocation problems, here we demonstrate its utility for telescope-constrained follow-up efforts with the primary goal to identify and study high-z GRBs. For each new GRB, RATE GRB-z provides a recommendation-based on the available telescope time-of whether the event warrants additional follow-up resources. We train RATE GRB-z using a set consisting of 135 Swift bursts with known redshifts, only 18 of which are z > 4. Cross-validated performance metrics on these training data suggest that {approx}56% of high-z bursts can be captured from following up the top 20% of the ranked candidates, and {approx}84% of high-z bursts are identified after following up the top {approx}40% of candidates. We further use the method to rank 200 + Swift bursts with unknown redshifts according to their likelihood of being high-z.

  8. A new method to obtain the broad line region size of high redshift quasars

    SciTech Connect

    Negrete, C. Alenka; Dultzin, Deborah; Marziani, Paola; Sulentic, Jack W. E-mail: deborah@astro.unam.mx E-mail: sulentic@iaa.es

    2014-10-10

    We present high signal-to-noise ratio UV spectra for eight quasars at z ∼ 3 obtained with Very Large Telescope/FORS. The spectra enable us to analyze in detail the strong and weak emission features in the rest frame range 1300-2000 Å of each source (C III] λ1909, Si III] λ1892, Al III λ1860, Si II λ1814, C IV λ1549 and blended Si IV λ1397+O IV] λ1402). The flux ratios Al III λ1860/Si III] λ1892, C IV λ1549/Al III λ1860, Si IV λ1397+O IV] λ1402/Si III] λ1892 and Si IV λ1397+O IV] λ1402/C IV λ1549 strongly constrain ionizing photon flux and metallicity through the use of diagnostic maps built from CLOUDY simulations. The radius of the broad line region is then derived from the ionizing photon flux applying the definition of the ionization parameter. The r {sub BLR} estimate and the width of a virial component isolated in prominent UV lines yields an estimate of black hole mass. We compare our results with previous estimates obtained from the r {sub BLR}-luminosity correlation customarily employed to estimate the black hole masses of high redshift quasars.

  9. Submillimetre observations of WISE-selected high-redshift, luminous AGN and their surrounding overdense environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Suzy F.

    2016-08-01

    We present JCMT SCUBA-2 850 μm submillimetre (submm) observations of 10 mid-infrared (mid-IR) luminous active galactic nuclei (AGNs), detected by the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) all-sky IR survey and 30 that have also been detected by the NVSS/FIRST radio survey. These rare sources are selected by their extremely red mid-IR spectral energy distributions (SEDs). Further investigations show that they are highly obscured, have abundant warm AGN-heated dust and are thought to be experiencing intense AGN feedback. When comparing the number of submm galaxies detected serendipitously in the surrounding 1.5 arcmin to those in blank-field submm surveys, there is a very significant overdensity, of order 3-5, but no sign of radial clustering centred at our primary objects. The WISE-selected AGN thus reside in 10-Mpc-scale overdense environments that could be forming in pre-viralized clusters of galaxies. WISE-selected AGNs appear to be the strongest signposts of high-density regions of active, luminous and dusty galaxies. SCUBA-2 850 μm observations indicate that their submm fluxes are low compared to many popular AGN SED templates, hence the WISE/radio-selected AGNs have either less cold and/or more warm dust emission than normally assumed for typical AGN. Most of the targets have total IR luminosities ≥1013 L⊙, with known redshifts of 20 targets between z ˜ 0.44-4.6.

  10. The Origin and Evolution of Interstellar Dust in the Local and High-redshift Universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwek, Eliahu

    2012-01-01

    In this talk I will begin by reviewing our current state of knowledge regarding the origin and evolution of dust in the local solar neighborhood. using chemical evolution models, I will discuss their many different input parameters and their uncertainties. An important consequence of these models is the delayed injection of dust from AGB stars, compared to supernova-condensed dust, into the interstellar medium. I will show that these stellar evolutionary effects on dust composition are manifested in the infrared spectra of local galaxies. The delayed production of dust in AGB stars has also important consequences for the origin of the large amount of dust detected in high-redshift galaxies, when the universe was less that approx. 1 Gyr old. Supernovae may have been the only viable dust sources in those galaxies. Recent observations of sN1987a show a significant mass of dust in the ejecta of this SN. Is that production rate high enough to account for the observed dust mass in these galaxies? If not, what are the alternative viable sources of dust, and how do they depend on the nature of the galaxy (starburst or AGN) and its star formation history .

  11. The Origin and Evolution of Interstellar Dust in the Local and High-Redshift Universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwek, Eliahu

    2011-01-01

    In this talk I will begin by reviewing our current state of knowledge regarding the origin and evolution of dust in the local solar neighborhood. Using chemical evolution models, I will discuss their many different input parameters and their uncertainties. An important consequence of these models is the delayed injection of dust from AGB stars, compared to supernova-condensed dust, into the interstellar medium. I will show that these stellar evolutionary effects on dust composition are manifested in the infrared spectra of local galaxies. The delayed production of dust in AGB stars has also important consequences for the origin of the large amount of dust detected in high-redshift galaxies, when the universe was less that - 1 Gyr old. Supernovae may have been the only viable dust sources in those galaxies. Recent observations of SN1987a show a significant mass of dust in the ejecta of this SN. Is that production rate high enough to account for the observed dust mass in these galaxies? If not, what are the alternative viable sources of dust, and how do they depend on the nature of the galaxy (starburst or AGN) and its star formation history.

  12. Luminous compact blue galaxies in the local Universe: A key reference for high-redshift studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez Gallego, J.; Guzmán, R.; Castander, F. J.; Garland, C. A.; Pisano, D. J.

    2005-05-01

    Luminous Compact Blue Galaxies (LCBGs) are high surface brightness starburst galaxies, bluer than a typical Sbc and brighter than ˜0.25Lstar. LCBGs have evolved more than any other galaxy class in the last ˜8 Gyr, and are a major contributor to the observed enhancement of the UV luminosity density of the Universe at z≤1. Despite the key role LCBGs may play in galaxy evolution, their statistical properties are still largely unknown. We have selected a complete sample of ˜25 LCBGs within 100 Mpc, after investigating over 106 nearby galaxies from the DR1 of the SDSS database. This sample, although small, provides an excellent reference for comparison with current and future surveys of similar galaxies at high redshift, including the population of Lyman-break galaxies. We present preliminary results of this study using 3D spectroscopic observations obtained over a very wide range in wavelength, using WIYN/DENSEPAK in the optical, FISICA in the infrared, and the VLA at cm wavelengths.

  13. The high-redshift gamma-ray burst GRB 140515A

    SciTech Connect

    Melandri, A.; Bernardini, M. G.; D'Avanzo, P. D.; Sanchez-Ramirez, R.; Nappo, F.; Nava, L.; Japelj, J.; de Ugarte Postigo, A.; Oates, S.; Campana, S.; Covino, S.; D'Elia, V.; Ghirlanda, G.; Gafton, E.; Ghisellini, G.; Gnedin, N.; Goldoni, P.; Gorosabel, J.; Libbrecht, T.; Malesani, D.; Salvaterra, R.; Thone, C. C.; Vergani, S. D.; Xu, D.; Tagliaferri, G.

    2015-09-09

    High-redshift gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) offer several advantages when studying the distant Universe, providing unique information about the structure and properties of the galaxies in which they exploded. Spectroscopic identification with large ground-based telescopes has improved our knowledge of this kind of distant events. We present the multi-wavelength analysis of the high-zSwift GRB GRB 140515A (z = 6.327). The best estimate of the neutral hydrogen fraction of the intergalactic medium towards the burst is xHI ≤ 0.002. The spectral absorption lines detected for this event are the weakest lines ever observed in GRB afterglows, suggesting that GRB 140515A exploded in a very low-density environment. Its circum-burst medium is characterised by an average extinction (AV ~ 0.1) that seems to be typical of z ≥ 6 events. The observed multi-band light curves are explained either with a very hard injected spectrum (p = 1.7) or with a multi-component emission (p = 2.1). In the second case a long-lasting central engine activity is needed in order to explain the late time X-ray emission. Furthermore, the possible origin of GRB 140515A in a Pop III (or in a Pop II star with a local environment enriched by Pop III) massive star is unlikely.

  14. The light up and early evolution of high redshift Supermassive Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comastri, Andrea; Brusa, Marcella; Aird, James; Lanzuisi, Giorgio

    2016-07-01

    The known AGN population at z > 6 is made by luminous optical QSO hosting Supermassive Black Holes (M > 10 ^{9}solar masses), likely to represent the tip of the iceberg of the luminosity and mass function. According to theoretical models for structure formation, Massive Black Holes (M _{BH} 10^{4-7} solar masses) are predicted to be abundant in the early Universe (z > 6). The majority of these lower luminosity objects are expected to be obscured and severely underepresented in current optical near-infrared surveys. The detection of such a population would provide unique constraints on the Massive Black Holes formation mechanism and subsequent growth and is within the capabilities of deep and large area ATHENA surveys. After a summary of the state of the art of present deep XMM and Chandra surveys, at z >3-6 also mentioning the expectations for the forthcoming eROSITA all sky survey; I will present the observational strategy of future multi-cone ATHENA Wide Field Imager (WFI) surveys and the expected breakthroughs in the determination of the luminosity function and its evolution at high (> 4) and very high (>6) redshifts.

  15. The high-redshift gamma-ray burst GRB 140515A

    DOE PAGES

    Melandri, A.; Bernardini, M. G.; D'Avanzo, P. D.; Sanchez-Ramirez, R.; Nappo, F.; Nava, L.; Japelj, J.; de Ugarte Postigo, A.; Oates, S.; Campana, S.; et al

    2015-09-09

    High-redshift gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) offer several advantages when studying the distant Universe, providing unique information about the structure and properties of the galaxies in which they exploded. Spectroscopic identification with large ground-based telescopes has improved our knowledge of this kind of distant events. We present the multi-wavelength analysis of the high-zSwift GRB GRB 140515A (z = 6.327). The best estimate of the neutral hydrogen fraction of the intergalactic medium towards the burst is xHI ≤ 0.002. The spectral absorption lines detected for this event are the weakest lines ever observed in GRB afterglows, suggesting that GRB 140515A exploded in amore » very low-density environment. Its circum-burst medium is characterised by an average extinction (AV ~ 0.1) that seems to be typical of z ≥ 6 events. The observed multi-band light curves are explained either with a very hard injected spectrum (p = 1.7) or with a multi-component emission (p = 2.1). In the second case a long-lasting central engine activity is needed in order to explain the late time X-ray emission. Furthermore, the possible origin of GRB 140515A in a Pop III (or in a Pop II star with a local environment enriched by Pop III) massive star is unlikely.« less

  16. LOW-METALLICITY STAR FORMATION IN HIGH-REDSHIFT GALAXIES AT z {approx} 8

    SciTech Connect

    Taniguchi, Y.; Shioya, Y.; Trump, J. R.

    2010-12-01

    Based on the recent very deep near-infrared imaging of the Hubble Ultra Deep Field with WFC3 on the Hubble Space Telescope, five groups published the most probable samples of galaxies at z {approx} 8, selected by the so-called dropout method or photometric redshift; e.g., Y{sub 105}-dropouts (Y{sub 105} - J{sub 125} > 0.8). These studies are highly useful for investigating both the early star formation history of galaxies and the sources of cosmic re-ionization. In order to better understand these issues, we carefully examine whether there are low-z interlopers in the samples of z {approx} 8 galaxy candidates. We focus on the strong emission-line galaxies at z {approx} 2 in this paper. Such galaxies may be selected as Y{sub 105}-dropouts since the [O III] {lambda}5007 emission line is redshifted into the J{sub 125} band. We have found that the contamination from such low-z interlopers is negligibly small. Therefore, all objects found by the five groups are free from this type of contamination. However, it remains difficult to extract real z {approx} 8 galaxies because all the sources are very faint and the different groups have found different candidates. With this in mind, we construct a robust sample of eight galaxies at z {approx} 8 from the objects found by the five groups: each of these eight objects has been selected by at least two groups. Using this sample, we discuss their UV continuum slope. We also discuss the escape fraction of ionizing photons adopting various metallicities. Our analysis suggests that massive stars forming in low-metallicity gas (Z {approx} 5 x 10{sup -4} Z{sub sun}) can be responsible for the completion of cosmic re-ionization if the escape fraction of the ionizing continuum from galaxies is as large as 0.5, and this is consistent with the observed blue UV continua.

  17. Spatially resolved emission of a high-redshift DLA galaxy with the Keck/OSIRIS IFU

    SciTech Connect

    Jorgenson, Regina A.; Wolfe, Arthur M.

    2014-04-10

    We present the first Keck/OSIRIS infrared IFU observations of a high-redshift damped Lyα (DLA) galaxy detected in the line of sight to a background quasar. By utilizing the Laser Guide Star Adaptive Optics to reduce the quasar point-spread function to FWHM ∼ 0.''15, we were able to search for and map the foreground DLA emission free from the quasar contamination. We present maps of the Hα and [O III] λλ5007, 4959 emission of DLA 2222–0946 at a redshift of z ∼ 2.35. From the composite spectrum over the Hα emission region, we measure a star formation rate of 9.5 ± 1.0 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} and a dynamical mass of M {sub dyn} = 6.1 × 10{sup 9} M {sub ☉}. The average star formation rate surface density is (Σ{sub SFR}) = 0.55 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} kpc{sup –2}, with a central peak of 1.7 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} kpc{sup –2}. Using the standard Kennicutt-Schmidt relation, this corresponds to a gas mass surface density of Σ{sub gas} = 243 M {sub ☉} pc{sup –2}. Integrating over the size of the galaxy, we find a total gas mass of M {sub gas} = 4.2 × 10{sup 9} M {sub ☉}. We estimate the gas fraction of DLA 2222–0946 to be f {sub gas} ∼ 40%. We detect [N II] λ6583 emission at 3σ significance with a flux corresponding to a metallicity of 75% solar. Comparing this metallicity with that derived from the low-ion absorption gas ∼6 kpc away, ∼30% solar, indicates possible evidence for a metallicity gradient or enriched in/outflow of gas. Kinematically, both Hα and [O III] emission show relatively constant velocity fields over the central galactic region. While we detect some red and blueshifted clumps of emission, they do not correspond with rotational signatures that support an edge-on disk interpretation.

  18. Star-forming galactic contrails as a source of metal enrichment and ionizing radiation at high redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauch, Michael; Becker, George D.; Haehnelt, Martin G.; Gauthier, Jean-Rene

    2014-06-01

    A spectroscopically detected Lyman α emitting halo at redshift 3.216 in the GOODS-N field is found to reside at the convergence of several line-emitting filaments. Spatially extended emission apparently by He II 1640 Å and several metal transitions is seen within several arcseconds from the position of the central galaxy. The V = 24.9 galaxy mainly responsible for the continuum emission at the centre of the halo has broad-band colours and spectral features consistent with a z = 3.216 star-forming galaxy. Hubble Space Telescope images show that some of the filaments coincide, in projection, with several, mostly blue galaxies, with pronounced head-tail structures partly aligned with each other. These objects, for which we cannot rule that they are foreground, chance projections in front of the high-redshift halo, are seen over an area with a linear extent of at least 12 arcsec. The broad-band images of some galaxies suggest the presence of ram-pressure stripping, including possible evidence for recent star formation in the stripped contrails. Spatial gradients in the appearance of several galaxies may represent a stream of galaxies passing from a colder to a hotter intergalactic medium. The release of the enriched interstellar medium from galaxies and the occurrence of star formation and stellar feedback in the galactic contrails suggest a mechanism for the metal enrichment of the high-redshift intergalactic medium that does not require long-range galactic winds. If these galaxies are at the same redshift as the Lyα halo, their very blue colours may be a consequence of the stripping of gas. A stripped stellar population and star formation in galactic contrails suggest promising sites for the escape of ionizing radiation from high-redshift galaxies.

  19. High-redshift quasars host galaxies: is there a stellar mass crisis?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valiante, Rosa; Schneider, Raffaella; Salvadori, Stefania; Gallerani, Simona

    2014-11-01

    We investigate the evolutionary properties of a sample of quasars (QSOs) at 5 < z < 6.4 using the semi-analytical hierarchical model GAMETE/QSODUST. We find that the observed properties of these QSOs are well reproduced by a common formation scenario in which stars form according to a standard initial mass function, via quiescent star formation and efficient merger-driven bursts, while the central black hole (BH) grows via gas accretion and BH-BH mergers. Eventually, a strong active galactic nuclei-driven wind starts to clear up the interstellar medium of dust and gas, damping the star formation and un-obscuring the line of sight towards the QSO. In this scenario, all the QSOs hosts have final stellar masses in the range (4-6) × 1011 M⊙, a factor of 3-30 larger than the upper limits allowed by the observations. We discuss alternative scenarios to alleviate this apparent tension: the most likely explanation resides in the large uncertainties that still affect dynamical mass measurements in these high-z galaxies. In addition, during the transition between the starburst-dominated and the active QSO phase, we predict that ˜40 per cent of the progenitor galaxies can be classified as Submillimetre Galaxies, although their number rapidly decreases with redshift.

  20. A stellar feedback origin for neutral hydrogen in high-redshift quasar-mass haloes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faucher-Giguère, Claude-André; Feldmann, Robert; Quataert, Eliot; Kereš, Dušan; Hopkins, Philip F.; Murray, Norman

    2016-09-01

    Observations reveal that quasar host haloes at z ˜ 2 have large covering fractions of cool dense gas (≳60 per cent for Lyman limit systems within a projected virial radius). Most simulations have so far failed to explain these large observed covering fractions. We analyse a new set of 15 simulated massive haloes with explicit stellar feedback from the FIRE project, covering the halo mass range Mh ≈ 2 × 1012 - 1013 M⊙ at z = 2. This extends our previous analysis of the circum-galactic medium of high-redshift galaxies to more massive haloes. Active galactic nuclei (AGN) feedback is not included in these simulations. We find Lyman limit system covering fractions consistent with those observed around quasars. The large H I covering fractions arise from star formation-driven galactic winds, including winds from low-mass satellite galaxies that interact with cosmological filaments. We show that it is necessary to resolve these satellite galaxies and their winds to reproduce the large Lyman limit system covering fractions observed in quasar-mass haloes. Our simulations predict that galaxies occupying dark matter haloes of mass similar to quasars but without a luminous AGN should have Lyman limit system covering fractions comparable to quasars.

  1. Warm molecular Hydrogen at high redshift with the James Webb Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillard, P.; Boulanger, F.; Lehnert, M. D.; Appleton, P. N.; Pineau des Forêts, G.

    2015-12-01

    The build-up of galaxies is regulated by a complex interplay between gravitational collapse, galaxy merging and feedback related to AGN and star formation. The energy released by these processes has to dissipate for gas to cool, condense, and form stars. How gas cools is thus a key to understand galaxy formation. Spitzer Space Telescope infrared spectroscopy revealed a population of galaxies with weak star formation and unusually powerful H_2 line emission. This is a signature of turbulent dissipation, sustained by large-scale mechanical energy injection. The cooling of the multiphase interstellar medium is associated with emission in the H_2 lines. These results have profound consequences on our understanding of regulation of star formation, feedback and energetics of galaxy formation in general. The fact that H_2 lines can be strongly enhanced in high-redshift turbulent galaxies will be of great importance for the James Webb Space Telescope observations which will unveil the role that H_2 plays as a cooling agent in the era of galaxy assembly.

  2. A high stellar velocity dispersion for a compact massive galaxy at redshift z = 2.186.

    PubMed

    van Dokkum, Pieter G; Kriek, Mariska; Franx, Marijn

    2009-08-01

    Recent studies have found that the oldest and most luminous galaxies in the early Universe are surprisingly compact, having stellar masses similar to present-day elliptical galaxies but much smaller sizes. This finding has attracted considerable attention, as it suggests that massive galaxies have grown in size by a factor of about five over the past ten billion years (10 Gyr). A key test of these results is a determination of the stellar kinematics of one of the compact galaxies: if the sizes of these objects are as extreme as has been claimed, their stars are expected to have much higher velocities than those in present-day galaxies of the same mass. Here we report a measurement of the stellar velocity dispersion of a massive compact galaxy at redshift z = 2.186, corresponding to a look-back time of 10.7 Gyr. The velocity dispersion is very high at km s(-1), consistent with the mass and compactness of the galaxy inferred from photometric data. This would indicate significant recent structural and dynamical evolution of massive galaxies over the past 10 Gyr. The uncertainty in the dispersion was determined from simulations that include the effects of noise and template mismatch. However, we cannot exclude the possibility that some subtle systematic effect may have influenced the analysis, given the low signal-to-noise ratio of our spectrum. PMID:19661911

  3. Limits to Seeing High-Redshift Galaxies Due to Planck-Scale-Induced Blurring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinbring, Eric

    2015-08-01

    Carefully accounting for cosmological surface-brightness dimming and K-corrections are two important steps in teasing out the underlying properties of evolving high-z galaxy populations. Another potential effect is worthy of scrutiny simply because of its profound physical implications, if seen. In the last decade or so there has been debate over the possibility that the fuzzy quantum nature of spacetime might decohere wavefronts emanating from very distant sources. Consequences of that could be "blurred" or "faded" images of compact structures in galaxies, primarily at z>1 for their emitted X-rays and gamma-rays, but perhaps even in UV through optical light at higher redshift. So far there are only inconclusive hints of this from z~4 active-galactic nucleii and gamma-ray bursts viewed with Fermi and Hubble Space Telescope. If correct though, that would impose a significant, fundamental resolution limit for galaxies out to z~8 in the era of the James Webb Space Telescope and the next generation of ground-based telescopes using adaptive optics. I consider what to look for (and maybe not see).

  4. The gas distribution in the high-redshift cluster MS 1054-0321

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirakhor, M. S.; Birkinshaw, M.

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the gas mass distribution in the high-redshift cluster MS 1054-0321 using Chandra X-ray and One Centimetre Receiver array Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect data. We use a superposition of offset β-type models to describe the composite structure of MS 1054-0321. We find gas mass fractions f_{gas}^{X {-}ray} = 0.087_{-0.001}^{+0.005} and f_{gas}^SZ=0.094_{-0.001}^{+0.003} for the (main) eastern component of MS 1054-0321 using X-ray or SZ data, but f_{gas}^{X {-}ray}=0.030_{-0.014}^{+0.010} for the western component. The gas mass fraction for the eastern component is in agreement with some results reported in the literature, but inconsistent with the cosmic baryon fraction. The low-gas mass fraction for the western component is likely to be a consequence of gas stripping during the ongoing merger. The gas mass fraction of the integrated system is 0.060_{-0.009}^{+0.004}: we suggest that the missing baryons from the western component are present as hot diffuse gas which is poorly represented in existing X-ray images. The missing gas could appear in sensitive SZ maps.

  5. A high stellar velocity dispersion for a compact massive galaxy at redshift z = 2.186.

    PubMed

    van Dokkum, Pieter G; Kriek, Mariska; Franx, Marijn

    2009-08-01

    Recent studies have found that the oldest and most luminous galaxies in the early Universe are surprisingly compact, having stellar masses similar to present-day elliptical galaxies but much smaller sizes. This finding has attracted considerable attention, as it suggests that massive galaxies have grown in size by a factor of about five over the past ten billion years (10 Gyr). A key test of these results is a determination of the stellar kinematics of one of the compact galaxies: if the sizes of these objects are as extreme as has been claimed, their stars are expected to have much higher velocities than those in present-day galaxies of the same mass. Here we report a measurement of the stellar velocity dispersion of a massive compact galaxy at redshift z = 2.186, corresponding to a look-back time of 10.7 Gyr. The velocity dispersion is very high at km s(-1), consistent with the mass and compactness of the galaxy inferred from photometric data. This would indicate significant recent structural and dynamical evolution of massive galaxies over the past 10 Gyr. The uncertainty in the dispersion was determined from simulations that include the effects of noise and template mismatch. However, we cannot exclude the possibility that some subtle systematic effect may have influenced the analysis, given the low signal-to-noise ratio of our spectrum.

  6. DIFFERENT STAR FORMATION LAWS FOR DISKS VERSUS STARBURSTS AT LOW AND HIGH REDSHIFTS

    SciTech Connect

    Daddi, E.; Elbaz, D.; Bournaud, F.; Salmi, F.; Dannerbauer, H.; Carilli, C.; Dickinson, M.; Monaco, P.; Riechers, D.

    2010-05-01

    We present evidence that bona fide disks and starburst systems occupy distinct regions in the gas mass versus star formation rate (SFR) plane, both for the integrated quantities and for the respective surface densities. This result is based on carbon monoxide (CO) observations of galaxy populations at low and high redshifts, and on the current consensus for the CO luminosity to gas mass conversion factors. The data suggest the existence of two different SF regimes: a long-lasting mode for disks and a more rapid mode for starbursts, the latter probably occurring during major mergers or in dense nuclear SF regions. Both modes are observable over a large range of SFRs. The detection of CO emission from distant near-IR selected galaxies reveals such bimodal behavior for the first time, as they allow us to probe gas in disk galaxies with much higher SFRs than are seen locally. The different regimes can potentially be interpreted as the effect of a top-heavy initial mass function in starbursts. However, we favor a different physical origin related to the fraction of molecular gas in dense clouds. The IR luminosity to gas mass ratio (i.e., the SF efficiency) appears to be inversely proportional to the dynamical (rotation) timescale. Only when accounting for the dynamical timescale, a universal SF law is obtained, suggesting a direct link between global galaxy properties and the local SFR.

  7. The high-ion content and kinematics of low-redshift Lyman limit systems

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, Andrew J.; Tumlinson, Jason; Bordoloi, Rongmon; Lehner, Nicolas; Howk, J. Christopher; Tripp, Todd M.; Katz, Neal; Prochaska, J. Xavier; Werk, Jessica K.; Oppenheimer, Benjamin D.; Davé, Romeel

    2013-12-01

    We study the high-ion content and kinematics of the circumgalactic medium around low-redshift galaxies using a sample of 23 Lyman limit systems (LLSs) at 0.08 < z < 0.93 observed with the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph on board the Hubble Space Telescope. In Lehner et al., we recently showed that low-z LLSs have a bimodal metallicity distribution. Here we extend that analysis to search for differences between the high-ion and kinematic properties of the metal-poor and metal-rich branches. We find that metal-rich LLSs tend to show higher O VI columns and broader O VI profiles than metal-poor LLSs. The total H I line width (Δv {sub 90} statistic) in LLSs is not correlated with metallicity, indicating that the H I kinematics alone cannot be used to distinguish inflow from outflow and gas recycling. Among the 17 LLSs with O VI detections, all but two show evidence of kinematic sub-structure, in the form of O VI-H I centroid offsets, multiple components, or both. Using various scenarios for how the metallicities in the high-ion and low-ion phases of each LLS compare, we constrain the ionized hydrogen column in the O VI phase to lie in the range log N(H II) ∼ 17.6-20. The O VI phase of LLSs is a substantial baryon reservoir, with M(high-ion) ∼ 10{sup 8.5-10.9} (r/150 kpc){sup 2} M {sub ☉}, similar to the mass in the low-ion phase. Accounting for the O VI phase approximately doubles the contribution of low-z LLSs to the cosmic baryon budget.

  8. Globular clusters as the relics of regular star formation in `normal' high-redshift galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruijssen, J. M. Diederik

    2015-12-01

    We present an end-to-end, two-phase model for the origin of globular clusters (GCs). In the model, populations of stellar clusters form in the high-pressure discs of high-redshift (z > 2) galaxies (a rapid-disruption phase due to tidal perturbations from the dense interstellar medium), after which the galaxy mergers associated with hierarchical galaxy formation redistribute the surviving, massive clusters into the galaxy haloes, where they remain until the present day (a slow-disruption phase due to tidal evaporation). The high galaxy merger rates of z > 2 galaxies allow these clusters to be `liberated' into the galaxy haloes before they are disrupted within the high-density discs. This physically motivated toy model is the first to include the rapid-disruption phase, which is shown to be essential for simultaneously reproducing the wide variety of properties of observed GC systems, such as their universal characteristic mass-scale, the dependence of the specific frequency on metallicity and galaxy mass, the GC system mass-halo mass relation, the constant number of GCs per unit supermassive black hole mass, and the colour bimodality of GC systems. The model predicts that most of these observables were already in place at z = 1-2, although under rare circumstances GCs may still form in present-day galaxies. In addition, the model provides important constraints on models for multiple stellar populations in GCs by putting limits on initial GC masses and the amount of pristine gas accretion. The paper is concluded with a discussion of these and several other predictions and implications, as well as the main open questions in the field.

  9. CONTAMINATION OF BROADBAND PHOTOMETRY BY NEBULAR EMISSION IN HIGH-REDSHIFT GALAXIES: INVESTIGATIONS WITH KECK'S MOSFIRE NEAR-INFRARED SPECTROGRAPH

    SciTech Connect

    Schenker, Matthew A; Ellis, Richard S; Konidaris, Nick P; Stark, Daniel P

    2013-11-01

    Earlier work has raised the potential importance of nebular emission in the derivation of the physical characteristics of high-redshift Lyman break galaxies. Within certain redshift ranges, and especially at z ≅ 6-7, such lines may be strong enough to reduce estimates of the stellar masses and ages of galaxies compared with those derived assuming the broadband photometry represents stellar light alone. To test this hypothesis at the highest redshifts where such lines can be probed with ground-based facilities, we examine the near-infrared spectra of a representative sample of 28 3.0 < z < 3.8 Lyman break galaxies using the newly commissioned MOSFIRE near-infrared spectrograph at the Keck I telescope. We use these data to derive the rest-frame equivalent widths (EWs) of [O III] emission and show that these are comparable with estimates derived using the spectral energy distribution (SED) fitting technique introduced for sources of known redshift by Stark et al. Although our current sample is modest, its [O III] EW distribution is consistent with that inferred for Hα based on SED fitting of Stark et al.'s larger sample of 3.8 < z < 5 galaxies. For a subset of survey galaxies, we use the combination of optical and near-infrared spectroscopy to quantify kinematics of outflows in z ≅ 3.5 star-forming galaxies and discuss the implications for reionization measurements. The trends we uncover underline the dangers of relying purely on broadband photometry to estimate the physical properties of high-redshift galaxies and emphasize the important role of diagnostic spectroscopy.

  10. A Population of X-ray Weak Quasars: PHL 1811 Analogs at High Redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jianfeng; Brandt, W. N.; Hall, P. B.; Gibson, R. R.; Richards, G. T.; Schneider, D. P.; Shemmer, O.; Just, D. W.; Schmidt, S. J.

    2011-09-01

    Luminous X-ray emission is considered to be a universal property of efficiently accreting supermassive black holes. However, there are a few notable examples of quasars emitting X-rays much more weakly by a factor of 10-100. We report X-ray observations of a sample of 10 high-redshift (z 2.2) type 1 quasars selected to have unusual UV emission-line properties (weak and blueshifted high-ionization lines; strong UV Fe emission) similar to those of PHL 1811, a confirmed intrinsically X-ray weak quasar. All of the eight radio-quiet PHL 1811 analogs, without exception, are notably X-ray weak by a mean factor of 13. These sources lack broad absorption lines and have blue UV/optical continua, suggesting they are intrinsically X-ray weak. However, their average X-ray spectrum appears to be harder than those of typical quasars, which may indicate the presence of heavy intrinsic X-ray absorption. Our radio-quiet PHL 1811 analogs support a connection between an X-ray weak spectral energy distribution and PHL 1811-like UV emission lines; this connection provides an economical way to identify X-ray weak type 1 quasars. The fraction of radio-quiet PHL 1811 analogs in the radio-quiet quasar population is estimated to be < 1.2%. Correlations between relative X-ray brightness and UV emission-line properties suggest that PHL 1811 analogs may have extreme wind-dominated broad emission-line regions. Observationally, radio-quiet PHL 1811 analogs appear to be a subset ( 30%) of radio-quiet weak-line quasars (WLQs). The existence of a subset of quasars in which high-ionization "shielding gas" covers most of the BELR, but little more than the BELR, could potentially unify the PHL 1811 analogs and WLQs.

  11. FORMATION OF MASSIVE GALAXIES AT HIGH REDSHIFT: COLD STREAMS, CLUMPY DISKS, AND COMPACT SPHEROIDS

    SciTech Connect

    Dekel, Avishai; Sari, Re'em; Ceverino, Daniel E-mail: sari@phys.huji.ac.i

    2009-09-20

    We present a simple theoretical framework for massive galaxies at high redshift, where the main assembly and star formation occurred, and report on the first cosmological simulations that reveal clumpy disks consistent with our analysis. The evolution is governed by the interplay between smooth and clumpy cold streams, disk instability, and bulge formation. Intense, relatively smooth streams maintain an unstable dense gas-rich disk. Instability with high turbulence and giant clumps, each a few percent of the disk mass, is self-regulated by gravitational interactions within the disk. The clumps migrate into a bulge in {approx}<10 dynamical times, or {approx}<0.5 Gyr. The cosmological streams replenish the draining disk and prolong the clumpy phase to several Gigayears in a steady state, with comparable masses in disk, bulge, and dark matter within the disk radius. The clumps form stars in dense subclumps following the overall accretion rate, {approx}100 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}, and each clump converts into stars in {approx}0.5 Gyr. While the clumps coalesce dissipatively to a compact bulge, the star-forming disk is extended because the incoming streams keep the outer disk dense and susceptible to instability and because of angular momentum transport. Passive spheroid-dominated galaxies form when the streams are more clumpy: the external clumps merge into a massive bulge and stir up disk turbulence that stabilize the disk and suppress in situ clump and star formation. We predict a bimodality in galaxy type by z {approx} 3, involving giant-clump star-forming disks and spheroid-dominated galaxies of suppressed star formation. After z {approx} 1, the disks tend to be stabilized by the dominant stellar disks and bulges. Most of the high-z massive disks are likely to end up as today's early-type galaxies.

  12. Bayesian High-redshift Quasar Classification from Optical and Mid-IR Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, Gordon T.; Myers, Adam D.; Peters, Christina M.; Krawczyk, Coleman M.; Chase, Greg; Ross, Nicholas P.; Fan, Xiaohui; Jiang, Linhua; Lacy, Mark; McGreer, Ian D.; Trump, Jonathan R.; Riegel, Ryan N.

    2015-08-01

    We identify 885,503 type 1 quasar candidates to i≲ 22 using the combination of optical and mid-IR photometry. Optical photometry is taken from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-III: Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (SDSS-III/BOSS), while mid-IR photometry comes from a combination of data from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) “AllWISE” data release and several large-area Spitzer Space Telescope fields. Selection is based on a Bayesian kernel density algorithm with a training sample of 157,701 spectroscopically confirmed type 1 quasars with both optical and mid-IR data. Of the quasar candidates, 733,713 lack spectroscopic confirmation (and 305,623 are objects that we have not previously classified as photometric quasar candidates). These candidates include 7874 objects targeted as high-probability potential quasars with 3.5\\lt z\\lt 5 (of which 6779 are new photometric candidates). Our algorithm is more complete to z\\gt 3.5 than the traditional mid-IR selection “wedges” and to 2.2\\lt z\\lt 3.5 quasars than the SDSS-III/BOSS project. Number counts and luminosity function analysis suggest that the resulting catalog is relatively complete to known quasars and is identifying new high-z quasars at z\\gt 3. This catalog paves the way for luminosity-dependent clustering investigations of large numbers of faint, high-redshift quasars and for further machine-learning quasar selection using Spitzer and WISE data combined with other large-area optical imaging surveys.

  13. Probing high-redshift clusters with HST/ACS gravitational weak-lensing and Chandra x-ray observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jee, Myungkook James

    2006-06-01

    Clusters of galaxies, the largest gravitationally bound objects in the Universe, are useful tracers of cosmic evolution, and particularly detailed studies of still-forming clusters at high-redshifts can considerably enhance our understanding of the structure formation. We use two powerful methods that have become recently available for the study of these distant clusters: spaced- based gravitational weak-lensing and high-resolution X-ray observations. Detailed analyses of five high-redshift (0.8 < z < 1.3) clusters are presented based on the deep Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) and Chandra X-ray images. We show that, when the instrumental characteristics are properly understood, the newly installed ACS on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) can detect subtle shape distortions of background galaxies down to the limiting magnitudes of the observations, which enables the mapping of the cluster dark matter in unprecedented high-resolution. The cluster masses derived from this HST /ACS weak-lensing study have been compared with those from the re-analyses of the archival Chandra X-ray data. We find that there are interesting offsets between the cluster galaxy, intracluster medium (ICM), and dark matter centroids, and possible scenarios are discussed. If the offset is confirmed to be uniquitous in other clusters, the explanation may necessitate major refinements in our current understanding of the nature of dark matter, as well as the cluster galaxy dynamics. CL0848+4452, the highest-redshift ( z = 1.27) cluster yet detected in weak-lensing, has a significant discrepancy between the weak- lensing and X-ray masses. If this trend is found to be severe and common also for other X-ray weak clusters at redshifts beyond the unity, the conventional X-ray determination of cluster mass functions, often inferred from their immediate X-ray properties such as the X-ray luminosity and temperature via the so-called mass-luminosity (M-L) and mass-temperature (M-T) relations, will become

  14. The Formation of Dark Matter Halos and High-Redshift Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genel, Shy

    2011-03-01

    In the concordance ΛCDMcosmological model, galaxies form in the centers of dark matter halos and merge with one another following the mergers of their host halos. Thus, we set out to quantify the growth mechanisms of dark matter halos. For this purpose, we analyze several large N-body simulations of the growth of cosmic structure. We devise a novel merger tree construction algorithm that properly takes into account halo fragmentations. We find that the merger rate evolves rapidly with redshift but depends weakly on mass, and that the proportions between mergers of different mass ratios, e.g.major and minor mergers, are universal. We also show that the merger rate per progenitor halo (related to future mergers and to galaxy pair counting) is smaller than that per descendant halo (related to past mergers and galaxy disturbed morphplogies), and that their redshift and mass dependencies are different. We find that only ~60%of the mass accreted onto halos arrives in mergers that are resolved in our simulations. Moreover, the functional form of the merger rate suggests that the merger contribution saturates at that value. Using full particle histories, we confirm that smoothly-accreted particles make a significant fraction of dark matter halos. This has important implications for the smoothness of gas accretion. Disk galaxies at z~2are rapidly star-forming, but show regular rotation, indicating little merger activity. We use a large dark matter simulation to show that even non-merging z~2 halos grow fast enough to explain observed high star-formation rates. We also follow those halos to z=0, finding that many do not undergo major mergers at all. The z~2disks also show high velocity dispersions and irregular clumpy morphologies. We run "zoom-in" cosmological hydrodynamical simulations focusing on the formation of individual z~2 galaxies. We find that the clumpy morphologies are a result of gravitational instability, where the high random motions make the (turbulent

  15. MID-INFRARED DETERMINATION OF TOTAL INFRARED LUMINOSITY AND STAR FORMATION RATES OF LOCAL AND HIGH-REDSHIFT GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Rujopakarn, W.; Rieke, G. H.; Weiner, B. J.; Perez-Gonzalez, P.; Rex, M.; Walth, G. L.; Kartaltepe, J. S.

    2013-04-10

    We demonstrate estimating the total infrared luminosity, L(TIR), and star formation rates (SFRs) of star-forming galaxies at redshift 0 < z < 2.8 from single-band 24 {mu}m observations, using local spectral energy distribution (SED) templates without introducing additional free parameters. Our method is based on characterizing the SEDs of galaxies as a function of their L(TIR) surface density, which is motivated by the indications that the majority of IR luminous star-forming galaxies at 1 < z < 3 have extended star-forming regions, in contrast to the strongly nuclear concentrated, merger-induced starbursts in local luminous and ultraluminous IR galaxies. We validate our procedure for estimating L(TIR) by comparing the resulting L(TIR) with those measured from far-IR observations, such as those from Herschel in the Extended Chandra Deep Field South (ECDFS) and Hubble Deep Field North (HDFN), as well as L(TIR) measured from stacked far-IR observations at redshift 0 < z < 2.8. Active galactic nuclei were excluded using X-ray and 3.6-8.0 {mu}m observations, which are generally available in deep cosmological survey fields. The Gaussian fits to the distribution of the discrepancies between the L(TIR) measurements from single-band 24 {mu}m and Herschel observations in the ECDFS and HDFN samples have {sigma} < 0.1 dex, with {approx}10% of objects disagreeing by more than 0.2 dex. Since the 24 {mu}m estimates are based on SEDs for extended galaxies, this agreement suggests that {approx}90% of IR galaxies at high z are indeed much more physically extended than local counterparts of similar L(TIR), consistent with recent independent studies of the fractions of galaxies forming stars in the main-sequence and starburst modes, respectively. Because we have not introduced empirical corrections to enhance these estimates, in principle, our method should be applicable to lower luminosity galaxies. This will enable use of the 21 {mu}m band of the Mid-Infrared Instrument on board

  16. KECK SPECTROSCOPY OF FAINT 3>z>7 LYMAN BREAK GALAXIES: A HIGH FRACTION OF LINE EMITTERS AT REDSHIFT SIX

    SciTech Connect

    Stark, Daniel P.; Ellis, Richard S.; Ouchi, Masami

    2011-02-10

    As Ly{alpha} photons are scattered by neutral hydrogen, a change with redshift in the Ly{alpha} equivalent width (EW) distribution of distant galaxies offers a promising probe of the degree of ionization in the intergalactic medium and hence when cosmic reionization ended. This simple test is complicated by the fact that Ly{alpha} emission can also be affected by variations in the kinematics and dust content of the host galaxies. In the first paper in this series, we demonstrated both a luminosity- and redshift-dependent trend in the fraction of Ly{alpha} emitters seen within color-selected 'Lyman break' galaxies (LBGs) over the range 3 < z < 6; lower luminosity galaxies and those at higher redshift show an increased likelihood of strong emission. Here, we present the results from 12.5 hr exposures with the Keck DEIMOS spectrograph focused primarily on LBGs at z {approx_equal} 6 which enable us to confirm the redshift dependence of line emission more robustly and to higher redshift than was hitherto possible. We find that 54% {+-} 11% of faint z {approx_equal} 6 LBGs show strong (W{sub Ly{alpha},0}>25 A) emission, an increase of 55% from a sample of similarly luminous z {approx_equal} 4 galaxies. With a total sample of 74 z {approx_equal} 6 LBGs, we determine the luminosity-dependent Ly{alpha} EW distribution. Assuming continuity in these trends to the new population of z {approx_equal} 7 sources located with the Hubble WFC3/IR camera, we predict that unless the neutral fraction rises in the intervening 200 Myr, the success rate for spectroscopic confirmation using Ly{alpha} emission should be high.

  17. The Progenitors of the Compact Early-type Galaxies at High Redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Christina C.; Giavalisco, Mauro; Cassata, Paolo; Tundo, Elena; Wiklind, Tommy; Guo, Yicheng; Lee, Bomee; Barro, Guillermo; Wuyts, Stijn; Bell, Eric F.; Conselice, Christopher J.; Dekel, Avishai; Faber, Sandra M.; Ferguson, Henry C.; Grogin, Norman; Hathi, Nimish; Huang, Kuang-Han; Kocevski, Dale; Koekemoer, Anton; Koo, David C.; Ravindranath, Swara; Salimbeni, Sara

    2014-01-01

    We use GOODS and CANDELS images to identify progenitors of massive (M > 1010 M ⊙) compact early-type galaxies (ETGs) at z ~ 1.6. Because merging and accretion increase the size of the stellar component of galaxies, if the progenitors are among known star-forming galaxies, these must be compact themselves. We select candidate progenitors among compact Lyman-break galaxies at z ~ 3 on the basis of their mass, star-formation rate (SFR), and central stellar density, and we find that these account for a large fraction of, and possibly all, compact ETGs at z ~ 1.6. We find that the average far-UV spectral energy distribution (SED) of the candidates is redder than that of the non-candidates, but the optical and mid-IR SED are the same, implying that the redder UV of the candidates is inconsistent with larger dust obscuration and consistent with more evolved (aging) star formation. This is in line with other evidence suggesting that compactness is a sensitive predictor of passivity among high-redshift massive galaxies. We also find that the light distribution of both the compact ETGs and their candidate progenitors does not show any extended "halos" surrounding the compact "core,"both in individual images and in stacks. We argue that this is generally inconsistent with the morphology of merger remnants, even if gas rich, as predicted by N-body simulations. This suggests that the compact ETGs formed via highly dissipative, mostly gaseous accretion of units whose stellar components are very small and undetected in the Hubble Space Telescope images, with their stellar mass assembling in situ, and that they have not experienced any major merging until the epoch of observations at z ~ 1.6.

  18. Outflows Driven by Quasars in High-Redshift Galaxies with Radiation Hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bieri, Rebekka; Dubois, Yohan; Rosdahl, Joakim; Wagner, Alexander; Silk, Joseph; Mamon, Gary A.

    2016-09-01

    The quasar mode of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) in the high-redshift Universe is routinely observed in gas-rich galaxies together with large-scale AGN-driven winds. It is crucial to understand how photons emitted by the central AGN source couple to the ambient interstellar-medium to trigger large-scale outflows. By means of radiation-hydrodynamical simulations of idealised galactic discs, we study the coupling of photons with the multiphase galactic gas, and how it varies with gas cloud sizes, and the radiation bands included in the simulations, which are ultraviolet (UV), optical, and infrared (IR). We show how a quasar with a luminosity of 146 erg s-1 can drive large-scale winds with velocities of 102 - 103 km s-1 and mass outflow rates around 10^3 M_⊙ yr^{-1} for times of order a few million years. Infrared radiation is necessary to efficiently transfer momentum to the gas via multi-scattering on dust in dense clouds. However, IR multi-scattering, despite being extremely important at early times, quickly declines as the central gas cloud expands and breaks up, allowing the radiation to escape through low gas density channels. The typical number of multi-scattering events for an IR photon is only about a quarter of the mean optical depth from the center of the cloud. Our models account for the observed outflow rates of ˜ 500-1000 M_{⊙} {yr}^{-1} and high velocities of ˜ 10^3 km s^{-1}, favouring winds that are energy-driven via extremely fast nuclear outflows, interpreted here as being IR-radiatively-driven winds.

  19. The progenitors of the compact early-type galaxies at high redshift

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Christina C.; Giavalisco, Mauro; Lee, Bomee; Cassata, Paolo; Tundo, Elena; Conselice, Christopher J.; Wiklind, Tommy; Guo, Yicheng; Barro, Guillermo; Faber, Sandra M.; Koo, David C.; Bell, Eric F.; Dekel, Avishai; Ferguson, Henry C.; Grogin, Norman; Koekemoer, Anton; Hathi, Nimish; Huang, Kuang-Han; Kocevski, Dale; and others

    2014-01-01

    We use GOODS and CANDELS images to identify progenitors of massive (M > 10{sup 10} M {sub ☉}) compact early-type galaxies (ETGs) at z ∼ 1.6. Because merging and accretion increase the size of the stellar component of galaxies, if the progenitors are among known star-forming galaxies, these must be compact themselves. We select candidate progenitors among compact Lyman-break galaxies at z ∼ 3 on the basis of their mass, star-formation rate (SFR), and central stellar density, and we find that these account for a large fraction of, and possibly all, compact ETGs at z ∼ 1.6. We find that the average far-UV spectral energy distribution (SED) of the candidates is redder than that of the non-candidates, but the optical and mid-IR SED are the same, implying that the redder UV of the candidates is inconsistent with larger dust obscuration and consistent with more evolved (aging) star formation. This is in line with other evidence suggesting that compactness is a sensitive predictor of passivity among high-redshift massive galaxies. We also find that the light distribution of both the compact ETGs and their candidate progenitors does not show any extended 'halos' surrounding the compact 'core,' both in individual images and in stacks. We argue that this is generally inconsistent with the morphology of merger remnants, even if gas rich, as predicted by N-body simulations. This suggests that the compact ETGs formed via highly dissipative, mostly gaseous accretion of units whose stellar components are very small and undetected in the Hubble Space Telescope images, with their stellar mass assembling in situ, and that they have not experienced any major merging until the epoch of observations at z ∼ 1.6.

  20. GROWTH OF EARLY SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLES AND THE HIGH-REDSHIFT EDDINGTON RATIO DISTRIBUTION

    SciTech Connect

    DeGraf, C.; Di Matteo, T.; Khandai, N.; Croft, R.

    2012-08-10

    Using a new large-scale ({approx} 0.75 Gpc){sup 3} hydrodynamic cosmological simulation, we investigate the growth rate of supermassive black holes (BHs) in the early universe (z {approx}> 4.75). Remarkably we find a clear peak in the typical Eddington ratio ({lambda}) at BH masses of (4-8) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7} M{sub Sun} (typically in halos of {approx}7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 11} to 1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 12} M{sub Sun }, close to their shock heating scale), independent of redshift and indicative that most BH growth occurs in the cold-flow-dominated regime. BH growth is enhanced at high-z and by and large regulated by the cosmological evolution of gas density, with {lambda} scaling simply as (1 + z){sup 3}. The peak in {lambda} is caused by the competition between increased gas density available in more massive hosts, and a decrease due to active galactic nucleus feedback that becomes effective above the shock heating halo mass scale and at high BH masses. We show that the distribution of {lambda} among both mass-selected and luminosity-selected samples is approximately lognormal. We combine these findings into a single lognormal fitting formula for the distribution of Eddington ratios as a function of (M{sub BH}, z). This formula can be used in analytic and semianalytic models for evolving BH populations, predicting BH masses of observed quasars, and, in conjunction with the observed distribution of Eddington ratios, can be used to constrain the BH mass function.

  1. Quasars as the formation sites of high-redshift ellipticals: a signature in the `associated' absorption-line systems?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franceschini, A.; Gratton, R.

    1997-03-01

    Published data on the average metallicities and abundance ratios for absorption-line systems in high-redshift quasars suggest that a dichotomy may exist between the chemical composition of damped Lyman alpha (Lyalpha) systems (interpreted as intervening galaxies in the QSO line of sight) and the z_abs~=z_em absorption- line systems associated with the quasar. Intervening systems have smaller than solar metallicities, whereas associated absorbers have solar or greater than solar metallicities and small N/C ratios. While these results have to be confirmed by more precise abundance determinations, we argue that they may be explained by an early phase of efficient metal enrichment occurring only in the close environment of high-z QSOs, and characterized by an excess type-II supernova (SNII) activity. This is reminiscent of the SNII phase required to explain the abundance ratios (favouring alpha- over Fe-group elements) observed in the intracluster (IC) medium of local galaxy clusters. We explore the following scenario, to be tested by forthcoming observations of QSO absorption lines using very large optical telescopes. (a) Well-studied damped- Lyalpha, Lyalpha and metal lines in intervening systems trace only part of the history of metal production in the Universe - the one concerning slowly star-forming discs or dwarf irregulars. (b) The complementary class of early-type and bulge-dominated galaxies formed quickly (at z>~4-5) through a huge episode of star formation favouring high-mass stars. (c) The nucleus of the latter is the site of the subsequent formation of a quasar, which partly hides from view the dimmer host galaxy. (d) The products of a galactic wind, following the violent episode of star formation in the host galaxy and metal pollution of the IC medium in the forming cluster, could be directly observable in the z_abs~=z_em associated absorption systems on the QSO line of sight.

  2. On the consequences of a Virial star formation criterion and radiation hydrodynamics in simulations of high redshift galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perret, Valentin; Teyssier, Romain; Devriendt, Julien; Rosdahl, Joakim; Slyz, Adrianne

    2015-08-01

    The last decade has seen a data deluge coming from observational facilities targeting the young universe. These data has revealed that high redshift galaxies are substantially different from their local counterpart that populates the Hubble sequence. High redshift star-forming galaxies often display clumpy morphologies associated to disk-like kinematics with a high level of turbulence. Star formation essentially occurs in these giant massive clumps and is therefore a crucial step in the life of galaxies. Reproducing the fragmentation of high redshift disk galaxies in numerical simulations is mandatory if one wants to get a realistic picture of the Hubble sequence shaping. We present state-of-the-art parsec scale idealised simulations of high redshift analogue galaxies that resolve the supersonic turbulent and clumpy multi-phase interstellar medium. These simulations are performed with the adaptive mesh refinement code RAMSES (Teyssier et al. 2002) using its new radiation hydrodynamics module (Rosdahl et al. 2013). We are therefore able to model the radiative pressure from the young massive stars population settled in the star forming clumps which is suspected to play a subsequent role in the onset of outflowing gas in such galaxies. Furthermore, our model includes a star formation criterion inspired from molecular cloud simulations and which is based on a local analysis of the turbulent support of the gas clouds. The star formation efficiency associated to this approach is two order of magnitudes higher than the one using the standard density threshold and has therefore major implications for the evolution of the galaxy. We will review through a comparative study the consequences of using radiative transfer combined with such a Virial star formation criterion for the star formation history, the gas and stellar morphology of the disk and clumps as well as the properties of the galactic fountain induced by stellar feedback. A first set of simulation presents

  3. SIX MORE QUASARS AT REDSHIFT 6 DISCOVERED BY THE CANADA-FRANCE HIGH-z QUASAR SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Willott, Chris J.; Crampton, David; Hutchings, John B.; Schade, David; Delorme, Philippe; Delfosse, Xavier; Forveille, Thierry; Reyle, Celine; Albert, Loic; Bergeron, Jacqueline; Omont, Alain; McLure, Ross J.

    2009-03-15

    We present imaging and spectroscopic observations for six quasars at z {>=} 5.9 discovered by the Canada-France High-z Quasar Survey (CFHQS). The CFHQS contains subsurveys with a range of flux and area combinations to sample a wide range of quasar luminosities at z {approx} 6. The new quasars have luminosities 10-75 times lower than the most luminous Sloan Digital Sky Survey quasars at this redshift. The least luminous quasar, CFHQS J0216-0455 at z = 6.01, has absolute magnitude M {sub 1450} = -22.21, well below the likely break in the luminosity function. This quasar is not detected in a deep XMM-Newton survey showing that optical selection is still a very efficient tool for finding high-redshift quasars.

  4. Millimeter Observations of a Sample of High-Redshift Obscured Quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Sansigre, Alejo; Karim, Alexander; Schinnerer, Eva; Omont, Alain; Smith, Daniel J. B.; Wu, Jingwen; Hill, Gary J.; Klöckner, Hans-Rainer; Lacy, Mark; Rawlings, Steve; Willott, Chris J.

    2009-11-01

    earlier evolutionary phase than those of unobscured quasars. For one source at z = 2.767, we detect the CO(3-2) transition, with S COΔν = 630 ± 50 mJy km s-1, corresponding to L CO(3-2) = 3.2 ×107 L sun, or a brightness-temperature luminosity of L'CO(3-2) = 2.4 × 1010 K km s-1 pc2. For another source at z = 4.17, the lack of detection of the CO(4-3) line suggests the line to have a brightness-temperature luminosity L'CO(4-3) < 1 × 1010 K km s-1 pc2. Under the assumption that in these objects the high-J transitions are thermalized, we can estimate the molecular gas contents to be M_H_{2}=1.9× 10^{10} M sun and <8 × 109 M sun, respectively. The estimated gas depletion timescales are τg = 4 Myr and <16 Myr, and low gas-to-dust mass ratios of M g/M d = 19 and <20 are inferred. These values are at the low end but consistent with those of other high-redshift galaxies. Based on observations carried out with the IRAM 30 m Telescope and the Plateau de Bure Interferometer. IRAM is supported by INSU/CNRS (France), MPG (Germany), and IGN (Spain).

  5. The Lyman alpha reference sample. IV. Morphology at low and high redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guaita, L.; Melinder, J.; Hayes, M.; Östlin, G.; Gonzalez, J. E.; Micheva, G.; Adamo, A.; Mas-Hesse, J. M.; Sandberg, A.; Otí-Floranes, H.; Schaerer, D.; Verhamme, A.; Freeland, E.; Orlitová, I.; Laursen, P.; Cannon, J. M.; Duval, F.; Rivera-Thorsen, T.; Herenz, E. C.; Kunth, D.; Atek, H.; Puschnig, J.; Gruyters, P.; Pardy, S. A.

    2015-04-01

    Context. The transport of Lyα photons in galaxies is a complex process and the conditions under which Lyα photons manage to escape from certain galaxies is still under investigation. The Lyman alpha reference sample (LARS) is a sample of 14 local star-forming galaxies, designed to study Lyα in detail and relate it to rest-frame UV and optical emission. Aims: With the aim of identifying rest-frame UV and optical properties, which are typical of Lyα emitters (LAEs, galaxies with EW(Lyα) > 20 Å) at both low and high redshift, we investigated the morphological properties of the LARS galaxies, in particular the ones that exhibit intense Lyα radiation. Methods: We measured sizes and morphological parameters in the continuum, Lyα, and Hα images. We studied morphology by using the Gini coefficient vs. M20 and asymmetry vs. concentration diagrams. We then simulated LARS galaxies at z ~ 2 and 5.7, performing the same morphological measurements. We also investigated the detectability of LARS galaxies in current deep field observations. The subsample of LAEs within LARS (LARS-LAEs) was stacked to provide a comparison to stacking studies performed at high redshift. Results: LARS galaxies have continuum size, stellar mass, and rest-frame absolute magnitude typical of Lyman break analogues in the local Universe and also similar to 2 < z < 3 star-forming galaxies and massive LAEs. LARS optical morphology is consistent with the one of merging systems, and irregular or starburst galaxies. For the first time we quantify the morphology in Lyα images: even if a variety of intrinsic conditions of the interstellar medium can favour the escape of Lyα photons, LARS-LAEs appear small in the continuum, and their Lyα is compact. LARS galaxies tend to be more extended in Lyα than in the rest-frame UV. It means that Lyα photons escape by forming haloes around HII regions of LARS galaxies. Conclusions: The stack of LARS-LAE Lyα images is peaked in the centre, indicating that the

  6. Exploring the Chemical Link Between Local Ellipticals and Their High-Redshift Progenitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leja, Joel; Van Dokkum, Pieter G.; Momcheva, Ivelina; Brammer, Gabriel; Skelton, Rosalind E.; Whitaker, Katherine E.; Andrews, Brett H.; Franx, Marijn; Kriek, Mariska; Van Der Wel, Arjen; Bezanson, Rachel; Conroy, Charlie; Schreiber, Natascha Foerster; Nelson, Erica; Patel, Shannon G.

    2013-01-01

    We present Keck/MOSFIRE K-band spectroscopy of the first mass-selected sample of galaxies at z approximately 2.3. Targets are selected from the 3D-Hubble Space Telescope Treasury survey. The six detected galaxies have a mean [N II]lambda6584/H-alpha ratio of 0.27 +/- 0.01, with a small standard deviation of 0.05. This mean value is similar to that of UV-selected galaxies of the same mass. The mean gas-phase oxygen abundance inferred from the [N II]/Halpha ratios depends on the calibration method, and ranges from 12+log(O/H)(sub gas) = 8.57 for the Pettini & Pagel calibration to 12+log(O/H)(sub gas) = 8.87 for the Maiolino et al. calibration. Measurements of the stellar oxygen abundance in nearby quiescent galaxies with the same number density indicate 12+log(O/H)(sub stars) = 8.95, similar to the gas-phase abundances of the z approximately 2.3 galaxies if the Maiolino et al. calibration is used. This suggests that these high-redshift star forming galaxies may be progenitors of today's massive early-type galaxies. The main uncertainties are the absolute calibration of the gas-phase oxygen abundance and the incompleteness of the z approximately 2.3 sample: the galaxies with detected Ha tend to be larger and have higher star formation rates than the galaxies without detected H-alpha, and we may still be missing the most dust-obscured progenitors.

  7. The Local Group as a time machine: studying the high-redshift Universe with nearby galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boylan-Kolchin, Michael; Weisz, Daniel R.; Johnson, Benjamin D.; Bullock, James S.; Conroy, Charlie; Fitts, Alex

    2015-10-01

    We infer the UV luminosities of Local Group galaxies at early cosmic times (z ˜ 2 and z ˜ 7) by combining stellar population synthesis modelling with star formation histories derived from deep colour-magnitude diagrams constructed from Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations. Our analysis provides a basis for understanding high-z galaxies - including those that may be unobservable even with the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) - in the context of familiar, well-studied objects in the very low-z Universe. We find that, at the epoch of reionization, all Local Group dwarfs were less luminous than the faintest galaxies detectable in deep HST observations of blank fields. We predict that JWST will observe z ˜ 7 progenitors of galaxies similar to the Large Magellanic Cloud today; however, the HST Frontier Fields initiative may already be observing such galaxies, highlighting the power of gravitational lensing. Consensus reionization models require an extrapolation of the observed blank-field luminosity function (LF) at z ≈ 7 by at least 2 orders of magnitude in order to maintain reionization. This scenario requires the progenitors of the Fornax and Sagittarius dwarf spheroidal galaxies to be contributors to the ionizing background at z ˜ 7. Combined with numerical simulations, our results argue for a break in the UV LF from a faint-end slope of α ˜ -2 at MUV ≲ -13 to α ˜ -1.2 at lower luminosities. Applied to photometric samples at lower redshifts, our analysis suggests that HST observations in lensing fields at z ˜ 2 are capable of probing galaxies with luminosities comparable to the expected progenitor of Fornax.

  8. Metallicity and far-infrared luminosity of high-redshift quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Leah E.; Hamann, Fred

    2010-09-01

    We present the results of an exploratory study of broad-line region (BLR) metallicity in 34 2.2 <= z <= 4.6 quasars with far-infrared (FIR) luminosities (LFIR) from 1013.4 to <=1012.1 Lsolar. Quasar samples sorted by LFIR might represent an evolutionary sequence if the star formation rates (SFRs) in quasar hosts generally diminish across quasar lifetimes. We use rest-frame ultraviolet spectra from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey to construct three composite spectra sorted by LFIR, corresponding to average SFRs of 4980, 2130 and <=340 Msolar yr-1 after correcting for a nominal quasar FIR contribution. The measured NV λ1240/CIV λ1550 and SiIV λ1397+OIV] λ1402/CIV λ1550 emission line ratios indicate supersolar BLR metallicities in all three composites, with no evidence for a trend with the star formation rate. The formal derived metallicities, Z ~ 5-9Zsolar, are similar to those derived for the BLRs of other quasars at similar redshifts and luminosities. These results suggest that the ongoing star formation in the host is not responsible for the metal enrichment of the BLR gas. Instead, the BLR gas must have been enriched before the visible quasar phase. These results for high quasar metallicities, regardless of LFIR, are consistent with evolution scenarios wherein visibly bright quasars appear after the main episode(s) of star formation and metal enrichment in the host galaxies. Finally, young quasars, those more closely associated with a recent merger or a blowout of gas and dust, may exhibit tracers of these events, such as redder continuum slopes and higher incidence of narrow absorption lines. With the caveat of small sample sizes, we find no relation between LFIR and the reddening or the incidence of absorption lines.

  9. Resolved Gas Kinematics in a Sample of Low-Redshift High Star-Formation Rate Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varidel, Mathew; Pracy, Michael; Croom, Scott; Owers, Matt S.; Sadler, Elaine

    2016-03-01

    We have used integral field spectroscopy of a sample of six nearby (z 0.01-0.04) high star-formation rate (SFR ˜ 10-40 M_⊙ yr^{-1}) galaxies to investigate the relationship between local velocity dispersion and star-formation rate on sub-galactic scales. The low-redshift mitigates, to some extent, the effect of beam smearing which artificially inflates the measured dispersion as it combines regions with different line-of-sight velocities into a single spatial pixel. We compare the parametric maps of the velocity dispersion with the Hα flux (a proxy for local star-formation rate), and the velocity gradient (a proxy for the local effect of beam smearing). We find, even for these very nearby galaxies, the Hα velocity dispersion correlates more strongly with velocity gradient than with Hα flux-implying that beam smearing is still having a significant effect on the velocity dispersion measurements. We obtain a first-order non parametric correction for the unweighted and flux weighted mean velocity dispersion by fitting a 2D linear regression model to the spaxel-by-spaxel data where the velocity gradient and the Hα flux are the independent variables and the velocity dispersion is the dependent variable; and then extrapolating to zero velocity gradient. The corrected velocity dispersions are a factor of 1.3-4.5 and 1.3-2.7 lower than the uncorrected flux-weighted and unweighted mean line-of-sight velocity dispersion values, respectively. These corrections are larger than has been previously cited using disc models of the velocity and velocity dispersion field to correct for beam smearing. The corrected flux-weighted velocity dispersion values are σ m 20-50 km s-1.

  10. EXPLORING THE CHEMICAL LINK BETWEEN LOCAL ELLIPTICALS AND THEIR HIGH-REDSHIFT PROGENITORS

    SciTech Connect

    Leja, Joel; Van Dokkum, Pieter G.; Momcheva, Ivelina; Nelson, Erica; Brammer, Gabriel; Skelton, Rosalind E.; Whitaker, Katherine E.; Andrews, Brett H.; Franx, Marijn; Patel, Shannon G.; Kriek, Mariska; Van der Wel, Arjen; Bezanson, Rachel; Conroy, Charlie; Förster Schreiber, Natascha

    2013-12-01

    We present Keck/MOSFIRE K-band spectroscopy of the first mass-selected sample of galaxies at z ∼ 2.3. Targets are selected from the 3D-Hubble Space Telescope Treasury survey. The six detected galaxies have a mean [N II]λ6584/Hα ratio of 0.27 ± 0.01, with a small standard deviation of 0.05. This mean value is similar to that of UV-selected galaxies of the same mass. The mean gas-phase oxygen abundance inferred from the [N II]/Hα ratios depends on the calibration method, and ranges from 12+log(O/H){sub gas} = 8.57 for the Pettini and Pagel calibration to 12+log(O/H){sub gas} = 8.87 for the Maiolino et al. calibration. Measurements of the stellar oxygen abundance in nearby quiescent galaxies with the same number density indicate 12+log(O/H){sub stars} = 8.95, similar to the gas-phase abundances of the z ∼ 2.3 galaxies if the Maiolino et al. calibration is used. This suggests that these high-redshift star forming galaxies may be progenitors of today's massive early-type galaxies. The main uncertainties are the absolute calibration of the gas-phase oxygen abundance and the incompleteness of the z ∼ 2.3 sample: the galaxies with detected Hα tend to be larger and have higher star formation rates than the galaxies without detected Hα, and we may still be missing the most dust-obscured progenitors.

  11. RED NUGGETS AT HIGH REDSHIFT: STRUCTURAL EVOLUTION OF QUIESCENT GALAXIES OVER 10 Gyr OF COSMIC HISTORY

    SciTech Connect

    Damjanov, Ivana; Abraham, Roberto G.; Carlberg, Raymond G.; Mentuch, Erin; Glazebrook, Karl; Caris, Evelyn; Green, Andrew W.; McCarthy, Patrick J.; Chen, Hsiao-Wen; Crampton, David; Murowinski, Richard; Joergensen, Inger; Roth, Kathy; Juneau, Stephanie; Marzke, Ronald O.; Savaglio, Sandra; Yan Haojing

    2011-10-01

    We present an analysis of the size growth seen in early-type galaxies over 10 Gyr of cosmic time. Our analysis is based on a homogeneous synthesis of published data from 16 spectroscopic surveys observed at similar spatial resolution, augmented by new measurements for galaxies in the Gemini Deep Deep Survey. In total, our sample contains structural data for 465 galaxies (mainly early-type) in the redshift range 0.2 < z < 2.7. The size evolution of passively evolving galaxies over this redshift range is gradual and continuous, with no evidence for an end or change to the process around z {approx} 1, as has been hinted at by some surveys which analyze subsets of the data in isolation. The size growth appears to be independent of stellar mass, with the mass-normalized half-light radius scaling with redshift as R{sub e} {proportional_to}(1 + z){sup -1.62{+-}0.34}. Surprisingly, this power law seems to be in good agreement with the recently reported continuous size evolution of UV-bright galaxies in the redshift range z {approx} 0.5-3.5. It is also in accordance with the predictions from recent theoretical models.

  12. Obscured quasars at high redshift in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strauss, Michael

    2016-08-01

    The SDSS has uncovered a substantial number of luminous quasars with weak continuum, strong narrow lines, and strong evidence for obscuration, at redshifts from 0.4 to 4. I will discuss the selection of such objects and their properties in the optical and infrared. Some of these objects show evidence for significant outflows, with substantial wings in their [OIII] profiles.

  13. The Cycle of Dust in the Milky Ways: Clues from the High-Redshift and the Local Universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwek, Eli

    2008-01-01

    Massive amount of dust has been observed at high-redshifts when the universe was a mere 900 Myr old. The formation and evolution of dust is there dominated by massive stars and interstellar processes. In contrast, in the local universe lower mass stars, predominantly 2-5 Msun AGB stars, play the dominant role in the production of interstellar dust. These two extreme environments offer fascinating clues about the evolution of dust in the Milky Way galaxy

  14. Why Do Compact Active Galactic Nuclei at High Redshift Twinkle Less?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koay, J. Y.; Macquart, J.-P.; Bignall, H. E.; Reynolds, C.; Rickett, B. J.; Jauncey, D. L.; Pursimo, T.; Lovell, J. E. J.; Kedziora-Chudczer, L.; Ojha, R.

    2012-01-01

    The fraction of compact active galactic.nuclei (AGNs) that exhibit interstellar scintillation (ISS) at radio wavelengths, as well as their scintillation amplitudes, have been found to decrease significantly for sources at redshifts z approx greater than 2. This can be attributed to an increase in the angular sizes of the mu-as-scale cores or a decrease in the flux densities of the compact mu-as cores relative to that of the mas-scale components with increasing redshift, possibly arising from (1) the space-time curvature of an expanding Universe, (2) AGN evolution, (3) source selection biases, (4) scatter broadening in the ionized intergalactic medium (IGM), or (5) gravitational lensing. We examine the frequency scaling of this redshift dependence of ISS to determine its origin, using data from a dual-frequency survey of ISS of 128 sources at 0 approx < z approx < 4. We present a novel method of analysis which accounts for selection effects in the source sample. We determine that the redshift dependence of ISS is partially linked to the steepening of source spectral indices (alpha (sup 8.4, sub 4.9)) with redshift, caused either by selection biases or AGN evolution, coupled with weaker ISS in the alpha (sup 8.4, sub 4.9) < -0.4 sources. Selecting only the -0.4 < alpha (sup 8.4, sub 4.9) < 0.4 sources, we find that the redshift dependence of ISS is still significant, but is not significantly steeper than the expected (1 + z)(exp 0.5) scaling of source angular sizes due to cosmological expansion for a brightness temperature and flux-limited sample of sources. We find no significant evidence for scatter broadening in the IGM, ruling it out as the main cause of the redshift dependence of ISS. We obtain an upper limit to IGM scatter broadening of approx. < 110 mu-as at 4.9 GHz with 99% confidence for all lines of sight, and as low as approx. < 8 mu-as for sight-lines to the most compact, approx 10 mu-as sources.

  15. MARZ: Redshifting Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinton, Samuel

    2016-05-01

    MARZ analyzes objects and produces high quality spectroscopic redshift measurements. Spectra not matched correctly by the automatic algorithm can be redshifted manually by cycling automatic results, manual template comparison, or marking spectral features. The software has an intuitive interface and powerful automatic matching capabilities on spectra, and can be run interactively or from the command line, and runs as a Web application. MARZ can be run on a local server; it is also available for use on a public server.

  16. High Resolution Simulations for Hierarchical Formation of Dark Matter Halos Hosting Galaxies and AGNs at High Redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishiyama, Tomoaki

    2015-08-01

    We present the evolution of dark matter halos in six large cosmological N-body simulations, called the ν2GC (New Numerical Galaxy Catalog) simulations on the basis of the LCDM cosmology consistent with observational results obtained by the Planck satellite. The largest simulation consists of 81923 (550 billion) dark matter particles in a box of 1.12h-1Gpc (a mass resolution of 2.20×108 h-1M⊙). Among simulations utilizing boxes larger than 1h-1Gpc, our simulation yields the highest resolution simulation that has ever been achieved. Compared with the Millennium simulation (Springel et al. 2005), our simulation offers the advantages of a mass resolution that is four times better and a spatial volume that is 11 times larger. A ν2GC simulation with the smallest box consists of eight billions particles in a box of 70h-1Mpc (a mass resolution of 3.44×106 -1M⊙). These simulations can follow the evolution of halos over masses of eight orders of magnitude, from small dwarf galaxies to massive clusters. Using the unprecedentedly high resolution and powerful statistics of the ν2GC simulations, we provide statistical results of the halo mass function, mass accretion rate, formation redshift, and merger statistics, and present accurate fitting functions for the Planck cosmology, from redshift 10 to 0. By combining the ν2GC simulations with our new semi-analytic galaxy formation model, we are able to prepare mock catalogs of galaxies and active galactic nuclei, which will be made publicly available in the near future.

  17. A New Population of High-Redshift Short-Duration Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, E.; Fox, D. B.; Price, P. A.; Nakar, E.; Gal-Yam, A.; Holz, D. E.; Schmidt, B. P.; Cucchiara, A.; Cenko, S. B.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Soderberg, A. M.; Frail, D. A.; Penprase, B. E.; Rau, A.; Ofek, E.; Burnell, S. J. Bell; Cameron, P. B.; Cowie, L. L.; Dopita, M. A.; Hook, I.; Peterson, B. A.; Podsiadlowski, P.; Roth, K. C.; Rutledge, R. E.; Sheppard, S. S.; Songaila, A.

    2007-08-01

    The redshift distribution of the short-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) is a crucial, but currently fragmentary, clue to the nature of their progenitors. Here we present optical observations of nine short GRBs obtained with Gemini, Magellan, and the Hubble Space Telescope. We detect the afterglows and host galaxies of two short bursts, and host galaxies for two additional bursts with known optical afterglow positions, and five with X-ray positions (<~6" radius). In eight of the nine cases we find that the most probable host galaxies are faint, R~23-26.5 mag, and are therefore starkly different from the first few short GRB hosts with R~17-22 mag and z<~0.5. Indeed, we measure spectroscopic redshifts of z~0.4-1.1 for the four brightest hosts. A comparison to large field galaxy samples, as well as the hosts of long GRBs and previous short GRBs, indicates that the fainter hosts likely reside at z>~1. Our most conservative limit is that at least half of the five hosts without a known redshift reside at z>0.7 (97% confidence level), suggesting that about 1/3 to 2/3 of all short GRBs originate at higher redshifts than previously determined. This has two important implications: (1) we constrain the acceptable age distributions to a wide lognormal (σ>~1) with τ*~4-8 Gyr, or to a power law, P(τ)~τn, with -1<~n<~0 and (2) the inferred isotropic energies, Eγ,iso~1050-1052 ergs, are significantly larger than ~1048-1049 ergs for the low-redshift, short GRBs, indicating a large spread in energy release or jet opening angles. Finally, we reiterate the importance of short GRBs as potential gravitational-wave sources and find a conservative detection rate with the advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) of ~2-6 yr-1.

  18. A Survey of Luminous High-redshift Quasars with SDSS and WISE. I. Target Selection and Optical Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Feige; Wu, Xue-Bing; Fan, Xiaohui; Yang, Jinyi; Yi, Weimin; Bian, Fuyan; McGreer, Ian D.; Yang, Qian; Ai, Yanli; Dong, Xiaoyi; Zuo, Wenwen; Jiang, Linhua; Green, Richard; Wang, Shu; Cai, Zheng; Wang, Ran; Yue, Minghao

    2016-03-01

    High-redshift quasars are important tracers of structure and evolution in the early universe. However, they are very rare and difficult to find when using color selection because of contamination from late-type dwarfs. High-redshift quasar surveys based on only optical colors suffer from incompleteness and low identification efficiency, especially at z≳ 4.5. We have developed a new method to select 4.7≲ z≲ 5.4 quasars with both high efficiency and completeness by combining optical and mid-IR Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) photometric data, and are conducting a luminous z˜ 5 quasar survey in the whole Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) footprint. We have spectroscopically observed 99 out of 110 candidates with z-band magnitudes brighter than 19.5, and 64 (64.6%) of them are quasars with redshifts of 4.4≲ z≲ 5.5 and absolute magnitudes of -29≲ {M}1450≲ -26.4. In addition, we also observed 14 fainter candidates selected with the same criteria and identified 8 (57.1%) of them as quasars with 4.7\\lt z\\lt 5.4. Among 72 newly identified quasars, 12 of them are at 5.2\\lt z\\lt 5.7, which leads to an increase of ˜36% of the number of known quasars at this redshift range. More importantly, our identifications doubled the number of quasars with {M}1450\\lt -27.5 at z\\gt 4.5, which will set strong constraints on the bright end of the quasar luminosity function. We also expand our method to select quasars at z ≳ 5.7. In this paper we report the discovery of four new luminous z ≳ 5.7 quasars based on SDSS-WISE selection.

  19. THE RELATION BETWEEN EJECTA VELOCITY, INTRINSIC COLOR, AND HOST-GALAXY MASS FOR HIGH-REDSHIFT TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Foley, Ryan J.

    2012-04-01

    Recently, using a large low-redshift sample of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia), we discovered a relation between SN Ia ejecta velocity and intrinsic color that improves the distance precision of SNe Ia and reduces potential systematic biases related to dust reddening. No SN Ia cosmological results have yet made a correction for the 'velocity-color' relation. To test the existence of such a relation and constrain its properties at high redshift, we examine a sample of 75 SNe Ia discovered and observed by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova Survey and Supernova Legacy Survey. From each spectrum, we measure ejecta velocities at maximum brightness for the Ca H and K and Si II {lambda}6355 features, v{sup 0}{sub CaHandK} and v{sup 0}{sub SiII}, respectively. Using SN light curve parameters, we determine the intrinsic B{sub max} - V{sub max} for each SN. Similar to what was found at low redshift, we find that SNe Ia with higher ejecta velocity tend to be intrinsically redder than SNe Ia with lower ejecta velocity. The distributions of ejecta velocities for SNe Ia at low and high redshift are similar, indicating that current cosmological results should have little bias related to the velocity-color relation. Additionally, we find a slight (2.4{sigma} significant) trend between SN Ia ejecta velocity and host-galaxy mass such that SNe Ia in high-mass host galaxies tend to have lower ejecta velocities as probed by v{sup 0}{sub CaHandK}. These results emphasize the importance of spectroscopy for SN Ia cosmology.

  20. A POPULATION OF X-RAY WEAK QUASARS: PHL 1811 ANALOGS AT HIGH REDSHIFT

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Jianfeng; Brandt, W. N.; Schneider, Donald P.; Hall, Patrick B.; Gibson, Robert R.; Schmidt, Sarah J.; Richards, Gordon T.; Shemmer, Ohad; Just, Dennis W.

    2011-07-20

    We report the results from Chandra and XMM-Newton observations of a sample of 10 type 1 quasars selected to have unusual UV emission-line properties (weak and blueshifted high-ionization lines; strong UV Fe emission) similar to those of PHL 1811, a confirmed intrinsically X-ray weak quasar. These quasars were identified by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey at high redshift (z {approx} 2.2); eight are radio quiet while two are radio intermediate. All of the radio-quiet PHL 1811 analogs, without exception, are notably X-ray weak by a mean factor of {approx}13. These sources lack broad absorption lines and have blue UV/optical continua, supporting the hypothesis that they are intrinsically X-ray weak like PHL 1811 itself. However, their average X-ray spectrum appears to be harder than those of typical quasars, which may indicate the presence of heavy intrinsic X-ray absorption. Our sample of radio-quiet PHL 1811 analogs supports a connection between an X-ray weak spectral energy distribution and PHL 1811-like UV emission lines; this connection provides an economical way to identify X-ray weak type 1 quasars. The fraction of radio-quiet PHL 1811 analogs in the radio-quiet quasar population is estimated to be {approx}< 1.2%. We have investigated correlations between relative X-ray brightness and UV emission-line properties (e.g., C IV equivalent width and blueshift) for a sample combining our radio-quiet PHL 1811 analogs, PHL 1811 itself, and typical type 1 quasars. These correlation analyses suggest that PHL 1811 analogs may have extreme wind-dominated broad emission-line regions. Observationally, the radio-quiet PHL 1811 analogs appear to be a subset ({approx}30%) of radio-quiet weak-line quasars (WLQs). The existence of a subset of quasars in which high-ionization 'shielding gas' covers most of the broad emission-line region (BELR), but little more than the BELR, could potentially unify the PHL 1811 analogs and WLQs. The two radio-intermediate PHL 1811 analogs are X

  1. A Population of X-Ray Weak Quasars: PHL 1811 Analogs at High Redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jianfeng; Brandt, W. N.; Hall, Patrick B.; Gibson, Robert R.; Richards, Gordon T.; Schneider, Donald P.; Shemmer, Ohad; Just, Dennis W.; Schmidt, Sarah J.

    2011-07-01

    We report the results from Chandra and XMM-Newton observations of a sample of 10 type 1 quasars selected to have unusual UV emission-line properties (weak and blueshifted high-ionization lines; strong UV Fe emission) similar to those of PHL 1811, a confirmed intrinsically X-ray weak quasar. These quasars were identified by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey at high redshift (z ≈ 2.2); eight are radio quiet while two are radio intermediate. All of the radio-quiet PHL 1811 analogs, without exception, are notably X-ray weak by a mean factor of ≈13. These sources lack broad absorption lines and have blue UV/optical continua, supporting the hypothesis that they are intrinsically X-ray weak like PHL 1811 itself. However, their average X-ray spectrum appears to be harder than those of typical quasars, which may indicate the presence of heavy intrinsic X-ray absorption. Our sample of radio-quiet PHL 1811 analogs supports a connection between an X-ray weak spectral energy distribution and PHL 1811-like UV emission lines; this connection provides an economical way to identify X-ray weak type 1 quasars. The fraction of radio-quiet PHL 1811 analogs in the radio-quiet quasar population is estimated to be <~ 1.2%. We have investigated correlations between relative X-ray brightness and UV emission-line properties (e.g., C IV equivalent width and blueshift) for a sample combining our radio-quiet PHL 1811 analogs, PHL 1811 itself, and typical type 1 quasars. These correlation analyses suggest that PHL 1811 analogs may have extreme wind-dominated broad emission-line regions. Observationally, the radio-quiet PHL 1811 analogs appear to be a subset (≈30%) of radio-quiet weak-line quasars (WLQs). The existence of a subset of quasars in which high-ionization "shielding gas" covers most of the broad emission-line region (BELR), but little more than the BELR, could potentially unify the PHL 1811 analogs and WLQs. The two radio-intermediate PHL 1811 analogs are X-ray bright. X-ray spectral

  2. THE A2667 GIANT ARC AT z = 1.03: EVIDENCE FOR LARGE-SCALE SHOCKS AT HIGH REDSHIFT

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, T.-T.; Kewley, L. J.; Swinbank, A. M.; Richard, J.

    2012-11-01

    We present the spatially resolved emission line ratio properties of a {approx}10{sup 10} M {sub Sun} star-forming galaxy at redshift z = 1.03. This galaxy is gravitationally lensed as a triple-image giant arc behind the massive lensing cluster A2667. The main image of the galaxy has magnification factors of 14 {+-} 2.1 in flux and {approx}2 Multiplication-Sign 7 in area, yielding an intrinsic spatial resolution of 115-405 pc after adaptive optics correction with OSIRIS at KECK II. The Hubble Space Telescope morphology shows a clumpy structure and the H{alpha} kinematics indicates a large velocity dispersion with V {sub max} sin (i)/{sigma} {approx} 0.73, consistent with high-redshift disk galaxies of similar masses. From the [N II]/H{alpha} line ratios, we find that the central 350 pc of the galaxy is dominated by star formation. The [N II]/H{alpha} line ratios are higher in the outer disk than in the central regions. Most noticeably, we find a blueshifted region of strong [N II]/H{alpha} emission in the outer disk. Applying our recent H II region and slow-shock models, we propose that this elevated [N II]/H{alpha} ratio region is contaminated by a significant fraction of shock excitation due to galactic outflows. Our analysis suggests that shocked regions may mimic flat or inverted metallicity gradients at high redshift.

  3. The hard X-ray luminosity function of high-redshift (3 < z ≲ 5) active galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vito, F.; Gilli, R.; Vignali, C.; Comastri, A.; Brusa, M.; Cappelluti, N.; Iwasawa, K.

    2014-12-01

    We present the hard-band (2-10 keV) X-ray luminosity function (HXLF) of 0.5-2 keV band selected active galactic nuclei (AGN) at high redshift. We have assembled a sample of 141 AGN at 3 < z ≲ 5 from X-ray surveys of different size and depth, in order to sample different regions in the LX - z plane. The HXLF is fitted in the range log LX ˜ 43-45 with standard analytical evolutionary models through a maximum likelihood procedure. The evolution of the HXLF is well described by a pure density evolution, with the AGN space density declining by a factor of ˜10 from z = 3 to 5. A luminosity-dependent density evolution model, which, normally, best represents the HXLF evolution at lower redshift, is also consistent with the data, but a larger sample of low-luminosity (log LX < 44), high-redshift AGN is necessary to constrain this model. We also estimated the intrinsic fraction of AGN obscured by a column density log NH ≥ 23 to be 0.54 ± 0.05, with no strong dependence on luminosity. This fraction is higher than the value in the Local Universe, suggesting an evolution of the luminous (LX > 1044 erg s-1) obscured AGN fraction from z = 0 to z > 3.

  4. Discovery of Very High Energy Gamma Rays from PKS 1424+240 and Multiwavelength Constraints on its Redshift

    SciTech Connect

    Acciari, V.A.; Aliu, E.; Arlen, T.; Aune, T.; Bautista, M.; Beilicke, M. Benbow, W.; Bottcher, M.; Boltuch, D.; Bradbury, S.M.; Buckley, J.H.; Bugaev, V.; Byrum, K.; Cannon, A.; Cesarini, A.; Chow, Y.C.; Ciupik, L.; Cogan, P.; Cui, W.; Duke, C.; Falcone, A.; /more authors..

    2012-04-05

    We report the first detection of very-high-energy (VHE) gamma-ray emission above 140GeV from PKS 1424+240, a BL Lac object with an unknown redshift. The photon spectrum above 140GeV measured by VERITAS is well described by a power law with a photon index of 3.8 {+-}0.5{sub stat} {+-} 0.3{sub syst} and a flux normalization at 200 GeV of (5.1 {+-} 0.9{sub stat} {+-} 0.5{sub syst}) x 10{sup -11} TeV{sup -1} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}, where stat and syst denote the statistical and systematical uncertainty, respectively. The VHE flux is steady over the observation period between MJD 54881 and 55003 (2009 February 19 to June 21). Flux variability is also not observed in contemporaneous high energy observations with the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). Contemporaneous X-ray and optical data were also obtained from the Swift XRT and MDM observatory, respectively. The broadband spectral energy distribution (SED) is well described by a one-zone synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) model favoring a redshift of less than 0.1. Using the photon index measured with Fermi in combination with recent extragalactic background light (EBL) absorption models it can be concluded from the VERITAS data that the redshift of PKS 1424+240 is less than 0.66.

  5. DISCOVERY OF VERY HIGH ENERGY GAMMA RAYS FROM PKS 1424+240 AND MULTIWAVELENGTH CONSTRAINTS ON ITS REDSHIFT

    SciTech Connect

    Acciari, V. A.; Benbow, W.; Aliu, E.; Boltuch, D.; Arlen, T.; Chow, Y. C.; Aune, T.; Bautista, M.; Cogan, P.; Beilicke, M.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V.; Boettcher, M.; Bradbury, S. M.; Byrum, K.; Cannon, A.; Cesarini, A.; Ciupik, L.; Cui, W.; Duke, C. E-mail: amy.furniss@gmail.com

    2010-01-10

    We report the first detection of very high energy{sup 83}Gamma-ray emission above 100 GeV. (VHE) gamma-ray emission above 140 GeV from PKS 1424+240, a BL Lac object with an unknown redshift. The photon spectrum above 140 GeV measured by VERITAS is well described by a power law with a photon index of 3.8 {+-} 0.5{sub stat} {+-} 0.3{sub syst} and a flux normalization at 200 GeV of (5.1 {+-} 0.9{sub stat} {+-} 0.5{sub syst}) x 10{sup -11} TeV{sup -1} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}, where stat and syst denote the statistical and systematical uncertainties, respectively. The VHE flux is steady over the observation period between MJD 54881 and 55003 (from 2009 February 19 to June 21). Flux variability is also not observed in contemporaneous high-energy observations with the Fermi Large Area Telescope. Contemporaneous X-ray and optical data were also obtained from the Swift XRT and MDM observatory, respectively. The broadband spectral energy distribution is well described by a one-zone synchrotron self-Compton model favoring a redshift of less than 0.1. Using the photon index measured with Fermi in combination with recent extragalactic background light absorption models it can be concluded from the VERITAS data that the redshift of PKS 1424+240 is less than 0.66.

  6. The relation between mass and concentration in X-ray galaxy clusters at high redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amodeo, S.; Ettori, S.; Capasso, R.; Sereno, M.

    2016-05-01

    Context. Galaxy clusters are the most recent, gravitationally bound products of the hierarchical mass accretion over cosmological scales. How the mass is concentrated is predicted to correlate with the total mass in the halo of the cluster, wherein systems at higher mass are less concentrated at given redshift and, for any given mass, systems with lower concentration are found at higher redshifts. Aims: Through a spatial and spectral X-ray analysis, we reconstruct the total mass profile of 47 galaxy clusters observed with Chandra in the redshift range 0.4 redshift. This sample is the largest investigated so far at z> 0.4, and is well suited to providing the first constraint on the concentration-mass relation at z> 0.7 from X-ray analysis. Methods: Under the assumption that the distribution of the X-ray emitting gas is spherically symmetric and in the hydrostatic equilibrium with the underlined gravitational potential, we combine the deprojected gas density and spectral temperature profiles through the hydrostatic equilibrium equation to recover the parameters that describe a Navarro-Frenk-White total mass distribution. The comparison with results from weak-lensing analysis reveals a very good agreement both for masses and concentrations. The uncertainties are however too large to make any robust conclusion about the hydrostatic bias of these systems. Results: The distribution of concentrations is well approximated by a log-normal function in all the mass and redshift ranges investigated. The relation is well described by the form c ∝ MB(1 + z)C with B = -0.50 ± 0.20, C = 0.12 ± 0.61 (at 68.3% confidence). This relation is slightly steeper than that predicted by numerical simulations (B ~ -0.1) and does not show any evident redshift evolution. We obtain the first constraints on the properties of

  7. GALAXY EVOLUTION IN OVERDENSE ENVIRONMENTS AT HIGH REDSHIFT: PASSIVE EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES IN A CLUSTER AT z {approx} 2

    SciTech Connect

    Strazzullo, V.; Gobat, R.; Daddi, E.; Onodera, M.; Carollo, M.; Dickinson, M.; Renzini, A.; Arimoto, N.; Cimatti, A.; Finoguenov, A.; Chary, R.-R.

    2013-08-01

    We present a study of galaxy populations in the central region of the IRAC-selected, X-ray-detected galaxy cluster Cl J1449+0856 at z = 2. Based on a sample of spectroscopic and photometric cluster members, we investigate stellar populations and the morphological structure of cluster galaxies over an area of {approx}0.7 Mpc{sup 2} around the cluster core. The cluster stands out as a clear overdensity both in redshift space and in the spatial distribution of galaxies close to the center of the extended X-ray emission. The cluster core region (r < 200 kpc) shows a clearly enhanced passive fraction with respect to field levels. However, together with a population of massive, passive galaxies mostly with early-type morphologies, the cluster core also hosts massive, actively star-forming, often highly dust reddened sources. Close to the cluster center, a multi-component system of passive and star-forming galaxies could represent the future brightest cluster galaxy still forming. We observe a clear correlation between passive stellar populations and an early-type morphology, in agreement with field studies at similar redshift. Passive early-type galaxies in this cluster are typically a factor of 2-3 smaller than similarly massive early types at z {approx} 0. On the other hand, these same objects are on average larger by a factor of {approx}2 than field early-types at similar redshift, lending support to recent claims of an accelerated structural evolution in high-redshift dense environments. These results point toward the early formation of a population of massive galaxies, already evolved both in their structure and stellar populations, coexisting with still actively forming massive galaxies in the central regions of young clusters 10 billion years ago.

  8. Tracing quasar narrow-line regions across redshift: a library of high-S/N optical spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tammour, A.; Gallagher, S. C.; Richards, Gordon

    2015-04-01

    In a single optical spectrum, the quasar narrow-line region (NLR) reveals low-density, photoionized gas in the host galaxy interstellar medium (ISM), while the immediate vicinity of the central engine generates the accretion disc continuum and broad emission lines. To isolate these two components, we construct a library of high-S/N optical composite spectra created from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7. We divide the sample into bins of continuum luminosity and Hβ full width at half-maximum that are used to construct median composites at different redshift steps up to 0.75. We measure the luminosities of the narrow-emission lines [Ne V] λ3427, [Ne III] λ3870, [O III] λ5007, and [O II] λ3728 with ionization potentials (IPs) of 97, 40, 35, and 13.6 eV, respectively. The high IP lines' luminosities show no evidence of increase with redshift consistent with no evolution in the AGN spectral energy distribution or the host galaxy ISM illuminated by the continuum. In contrast, we find that the [O II] line becomes stronger at higher redshifts, and we interpret this as a consequence of enhanced star formation contributing to the [O II] emission in host galaxies at higher redshifts. The SFRs estimated from the [O II] luminosities show a flatter increase with z than non-AGN galaxies given our assumed AGN contribution to the [O II] luminosity. Finally, we confirm an inverse correlation between the strength of the Fe II λ4570 complex and both the [O III] equivalent width (though not the luminosity) and the width of the Hβ line as known from the eigenvector 1 correlations.

  9. A lower fragmentation mass scale for clumps in high redshift galaxies: a systematic numerical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamburello, Valentina; Mayer, Lucio; Shen, Sijing; Wadsley, James

    2015-08-01

    We perform a systematic study of the effect of sub-grid physics, resolution and structural parameters on the fragmentation of gas-rich galaxy discs into massive star forming clumps due to gravitational instability. We use the state-of-the-art zoom-in cosmological hydrodynamical simulation ARGO (Fiacconi et al. 2015) to set up the initial conditions of our models, and then carry out 26 high resolution controlled simulations of high-z galaxies using the GASOLINE2 code, which includes a modern, numerically robust SPH implementation.We find that when blast-wave feedback is included, the formation of long-lived, gravitationally bound clumps requires disc gas fractions of at least 50% and massive discs, which should have Vmax > 200 km/s at z ˜ 2, more massive than the typical galaxies expected at those redshifts.Less than 50 Myr after formation, clumps have stellar masses in the range 4 × 106 - 5 × 107 M⊙.Formation of clumps with mass exceeding ˜108 M⊙ is a rare occurrence, since it requires mergers between multiple massive clumps, as we verified by tracing back in time the particles belonging to such clumps. Such mergers happen after a few orbital times (˜200-300 Myr), but normally clumps migrate inward and are tidally disrupted on shorter timescales.Clump sizes are in the range 100-500 pc. We argue that giant clumps identified in observations (˜109 M⊙ and 1 kpc in size) might either have a different origin, such as minor mergers and clumpy gas accretion, or their sizes and masses may be overestimated due to resolution issues.Using an analytical model, already developed to explain the fragmentation scale in gravitationally unstable 3D protoplanetary discs, we can predict fairly accurately the characteristic gaseous masses of clumps soon after fragmentation, when standard Toome analysis becomes invalid.Due to their modest size, clumps have little effect on bulge growth as they migrate to the center. In our unstable discs a small bulge can form irrespective of

  10. Unusual high-redshift radio broad absorption-line quasar 1624+3758

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benn, C. R.; Carballo, R.; Holt, J.; Vigotti, M.; González-Serrano, J. I.; Mack, K.-H.; Perley, R. A.

    2005-07-01

    We present observations of the most radio-luminous broad absorption-line (BAL) quasar known, 1624+3758, at redshift z= 3.377. The quasar has several unusual properties. (1) The FeII UV191 1787-Åemission line is very prominent. (2) The BAL trough (BALnicity index 2990 km s-1) is detached by 21000 km s-1 and extends to velocity v=-29000 km s-1. There are additional intrinsic absorbers at -1900 and -2800 km s-1. (3) The radio rotation measure of the quasar, 18350 rad m-2, is the second highest known. The radio luminosity is P1.4GHz= 4.3 × 1027 W Hz-1 (H0= 50 km s-1 Mpc-1, q0= 0.5) and the radio loudness is R*= 260. The radio source is compact and the radio spectrum is GHz-peaked, consistent with it being relatively young. The width of the CIV emission line, in conjunction with the total optical luminosity, implies a black hole mass MBH~ 109Msolar, L/LEddington~ 2. The high Eddington ratio and the radio-loudness place this quasar in one corner of Boroson's two-component scheme for the classification of active galactic nuclei, implying a very high accretion rate, and this may account for some of the unusual observed properties. The v=-1900km s-1 absorber is a possible Lyman-limit system, with N(HI) = 4 × 1018 cm-2, and a covering factor of 0.7. A complex mini-BAL absorber at v=-2200 to -3400 km s-1 is detected in each of CIV, NV and OVI. The blue and red components of the CIV doublet happen to be unblended, allowing both the covering factor and optical depth to be determined as a function of velocity. Variation of the covering factor with velocity dominates the form of the mini-BAL, with the absorption being saturated (e-τ~ 0) over most of the velocity range. The velocity dependence of the covering factor and the large velocity width imply that the mini-BAL is intrinsic to the quasar. There is some evidence of line-locking between velocity components in the CIV mini-BAL, suggesting that radiation pressure plays a role in accelerating the outflow.

  11. Comparing cosmological hydrodynamic simulations with observations of high- redshift galaxy formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finlator, Kristian Markwart

    We use cosmological hydrodynamic simulations to study the impact of outflows and radiative feedback on high-redshift galaxies. For outflows, we consider simulations that assume (i) no winds, (ii) a "constant-wind" model in which the mass-loading factor and outflow speed are constant, and (iii) "momentum-driven" winds in which both parameters vary smoothly with mass. In order to treat radiative feedback, we develop a moment-based radiative transfer technique that operates in both post-processing and coupled radiative hydrodynamic modes. We first ask how outflows impact the broadband spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of six observed reionization-epoch galaxies. Simulations reproduce five regardless of the outflow prescription, while the sixth suggests an unusually bursty star formation history. We conclude that (i) simulations broadly account for available constraints on reionization-epoch galaxies, (ii) individual SEDs do not constrain outflows, and (iii) SED comparisons efficiently isolate objects that challenge simulations. We next study how outflows impact the galaxy mass metallicity relation (MZR). Momentum-driven outflows uniquely reproduce observations at z = 2. In this scenario, galaxies obey two equilibria: (i) The rate at which a galaxy processes gas into stars and outflows tracks its inflow rate; and (ii) The gas enrichment rate owing to star formation balances the dilution rate owing to inflows. Combining these conditions indicates that the MZR is dominated by the (instantaneous) variation of outflows with mass, with more-massive galaxies driving less gas into outflows per unit stellar mass formed. Turning to radiative feedback, we use post-processing simulations to study the topology of reionization. Reionization begins in overdensities and then "leaks" directly into voids, with filaments reionizing last owing to their high density and low emissivity. This result conflicts with previous findings that voids ionize last. We argue that it owes to the

  12. Ly{alpha} EMISSION FROM HIGH-REDSHIFT SOURCES IN COSMOS

    SciTech Connect

    Mallery, Ryan P.; Mobasher, Bahram; Hemmati, Shoubaneh; Capak, Peter; Kakazu, Yuko; Masters, Dan; Scoville, Nick; Scarlata, Claudia; Salvato, Mara; McCracken, Henry

    2012-12-01

    We investigate spectroscopically measured Ly{alpha} equivalent widths (EWs) and escape fractions of 244 sources of which 95 are Lyman break galaxies (LBGs) and 106 Lyman alpha emitters (LAEs) at z {approx} 4.2, z {approx} 4.8, and z {approx} 5.6 selected from intermediate and narrowband observations. The sources were selected from the Cosmic Evolution Survey and observed with the DEIMOS spectrograph. We find that the distribution of EWs shows no evolution with redshift for both the LBG selected sources and the intermediate/narrowband LAEs. We also find that the Ly{alpha} escape fraction of intermediate/narrowband LAEs is on average higher and has a larger variation than the escape fraction of LBG selected sources. The escape fraction does not show a dependence with redshift. Similar to what has been found for LAEs at low redshifts, the sources with the highest extinctions show the lowest escape fractions. The range of escape fractions increases with decreasing extinction. This is evidence that the dust extinction is the most important factor affecting the escape of Ly{alpha} photons, but at low extinctions other factors, such as the H I covering fraction and gas kinematics, can be just as effective at inhibiting the escape of Ly{alpha} photons.

  13. Escape of about five per cent of Lyman-alpha photons from high-redshift star-forming galaxies.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Matthew; Ostlin, Göran; Schaerer, Daniel; Mas-Hesse, J Miguel; Leitherer, Claus; Atek, Hakim; Kunth, Daniel; Verhamme, Anne; de Barros, Stéphane; Melinder, Jens

    2010-03-25

    The Lyman-alpha (Lyalpha) emission line is the primary observational signature of star-forming galaxies at the highest redshifts, and has enabled the compilation of large samples of galaxies with which to study cosmic evolution. The resonant nature of the line, however, means that Lyalpha photons scatter in the neutral interstellar medium of their host galaxies, and their sensitivity to absorption by interstellar dust may therefore be greatly enhanced. This implies that the Lyalpha luminosity may be significantly reduced, or even completely suppressed. Hitherto, no unbiased empirical test of the escaping fraction (f(esc)) of Lyalpha photons has been performed at high redshifts. Here we report that the average f(esc) from star-forming galaxies at redshift z = 2.2 is just 5 per cent by performing a blind narrowband survey in Lyalpha and Halpha. This implies that numerous conclusions based on Lyalpha-selected samples will require upwards revision by an order of magnitude and we provide a benchmark for this revision. We demonstrate that almost 90 per cent of star-forming galaxies emit insufficient Lyalpha to be detected by standard selection criteria. Both samples show an anti-correlation of f(esc) with dust content, and we show that Lyalpha- and Halpha-selection recovers populations that differ substantially in dust content and f(esc).

  14. Discovery of an Obscured Broad-Line Region in the High-Redshift Radio Galaxy MRC 2025-218.

    PubMed

    Larkin; McLean; Graham; Becklin; Figer; Gilbert; Levenson; Teplitz; Wilcox; Glassman

    2000-04-10

    This Letter presents infrared spectra taken with the newly commissioned near-infrared spectrometer (NIRSPEC) on the Keck II telescope of the high-redshift radio galaxy MRC 2025-218 (z=2.63). These observations represent the deepest infrared spectra of a radio galaxy to date and have allowed for the detection of Hbeta, [O iii] lambdalambda4959, 5007, [O i] lambda6300, Halpha, [N ii] lambdalambda6548, 6583, and [S ii] lambdalambda6716, 6713. The Halpha emission is very broad (FWHM=9300 km s-1) and luminous (2.6x1044 ergs s-1), and it is very comparable to the line widths and strengths of radio-loud quasars at the same redshift. This strongly supports active galactic nucleus unification models linking radio galaxies and quasars, although we discuss some of the outstanding differences. The line [O iii] lambda5007 is extremely strong and has extended emission with large relative velocities toward the nucleus. We also derive that if the extended emission is due to star formation, each knot has a star formation rate comparable to a Lyman-break galaxy at the same redshift.

  15. Extragalactic Backgrounds in the Far UV and Exploring Star Formation at High Redshifts with Gamma-ray Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, Floyd W.

    2006-01-01

    The determination of the intergalactic photon densities from the FIR to the UV which is produced by stellar emission and dust reradiation at various redshifts can provide an independent measure of the star formation history of the universe. Using recent Spitzer and GALEX data in conjunction with other observational inputs, Stecker, Malkan and Scully have calculated the intergalactic photon density as a function of both energy and redshift for 0 < zeta < 6 for photon energies from 0.003 eV to the Lyman limit cutoff at 13.6 eV in a ACDM universe with Omega(sub Lambda) = 0.7 and Omega(sub m) = 0.3. Their results are based on backwards evolution models for galaxies which were developed by Malkan and Stecker previously. The calculated background SEDs at zeta = 0 are in good agreement with the present observational data and limits. The calculated intergalactic photon densities as a function of redshift were used to predict to extend the absorption of high energy 7-rays in intergalactic space from sources such as blazars and quasars, this absorption being produced by interactions the y-rays with the intergalactic FIR-UV photons having the calculated densities. The results are in excellent agreement with absorption features found in the low gamma-ray spectra of Mkn 421, Mkn 501 at, zeta = 0.03 and PKS

  16. FORMATION OF COMPACT STELLAR CLUSTERS BY HIGH-REDSHIFT GALAXY OUTFLOWS. III. OBSERVABILITY AND CONNECTION TO HALO GLOBULAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, William J.; Scannapieco, Evan

    2011-12-01

    The early universe hosted a large population of low-mass virialized 'minihalos', that were not massive enough to form stars on their own. While most minihalos were photoevaporated by ionizing photons from star-forming galaxies, these galaxies also drove large outflows, which in some cases would have reached the minihalos in advance of ionization fronts. In the previous papers in this series, we carried out high-resolution, three-dimensional adaptive mesh refinement simulations of outflow-minihalo interactions that included non-equilibrium chemistry, radiative cooling, and turbulent mixing. We found that, for a fiducial set of parameters, minihalos were transformed into dense, chemically homogenous stellar clusters. Here we conduct a suite of simulations that follow these interactions over a wide range of parameters including minihalo mass, minihalo formation redshift, outflow energy, outflow redshift, distance, concentration, and spin. In almost all cases, the shocked minihalos form molecules through non-equilibrium reactions and then cool rapidly to become compact, chemically homogenous stellar clusters. Furthermore, we show that the unique properties of these clusters make them a prime target for direct study with the next generation of telescopes, and that there are many reasons to suspect that their low-redshift counterparts are the observed population of halo globular clusters.

  17. GRB 120521C at z ∼ 6 and the properties of high-redshift γ-ray bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Laskar, Tanmoy; Berger, Edo; Zauderer, B. Ashley; Margutti, Raffaella; Fong, Wen-fai; Tanvir, Nial; Wiersema, Klaas; Levan, Andrew; Perley, Daniel; Menten, Karl; Hrudkova, Marie

    2014-01-20

    We present optical, near-infrared, and radio observations of the afterglow of GRB 120521C. By modeling the multi-wavelength data set, we derive a photometric redshift of z ≈ 6.0, which we confirm with a low signal-to-noise ratio spectrum of the afterglow. We find that a model with a constant-density environment provides a good fit to the afterglow data, with an inferred density of n ≲ 0.05 cm{sup –3}. The radio observations reveal the presence of a jet break at t {sub jet} ≈ 7 d, corresponding to a jet opening angle of θ{sub jet} ≈ 3°. The beaming-corrected γ-ray and kinetic energies are E {sub γ} ≈ E{sub K} ≈ 3 × 10{sup 50} erg. We quantify the uncertainties in our results using a detailed Markov Chain Monte Carlo analysis, which allows us to uncover degeneracies between the physical parameters of the explosion. To compare GRB 120521C to other high-redshift bursts in a uniform manner we re-fit all available afterglow data for the two other bursts at z ≳ 6 with radio detections (GRBs 050904 and 090423). We find a jet break at t {sub jet} ≈ 15 d for GRB 090423, in contrast to previous work. Based on these three events, we find that γ-ray bursts (GRBs) at z ≳ 6 appear to explode in constant-density environments, and exhibit a wide range of energies and densities that span the range inferred for lower redshift bursts. On the other hand, we find a hint for narrower jets in the z ≳ 6 bursts, potentially indicating a larger true event rate at these redshifts. Overall, our results indicate that long GRBs share a common progenitor population at least to z ∼ 8.

  18. Quasar redshifts: the intrinsic component

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Peter M.

    2016-09-01

    The large observed redshift of quasars has suggested large cosmological distances and a corresponding enormous energy output to explain the brightness or luminosity as seen at earth. Alternative or complementary sources of redshift have not been identified by the astronomical community. This study examines one possible source of additional redshift: an intrinsic component based on the plasma characteristics of high temperature and high electron density which are believed to be present.

  19. QSO Metal Absorption Systems at High Redshift and the Signature of Hierarchical Galaxy Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauch, Michael; Haehnelt, Martin G.; Steinmetz, Matthias

    1997-05-01

    In a hierarchical cosmogony, galaxies build up by continuous merging of smaller structures. At z = 3, the matter content of a typical present-day galaxy is dispersed over several individual clumps embedded in sheetlike structures, often aligned along filaments. We have used hydrodynamical simulations to investigate the spatial distribution and absorption properties of metal-enriched gas in such regions of ongoing galaxy formation. The metal and hydrogen absorption features produced by the collapsing structures closely resemble observed QSO absorption systems over a wide range in H I column density. Strong C II and Si IV absorption occurs for lines of sight passing the densest regions close to the center of the protogalactic clumps, while C IV is a good tracer of the prominent filamentary structures and O VI becomes the strongest absorption feature for lines of sight passing through low-density regions far away from fully collapsed objects. The observed column density ratios of the different ionic species at z = 3 can be well reproduced if a mean metallicity [Z/H] = -2.5, relative abundances as found in metal-poor stars, a UV background with intensity J-22 = 3 at the Lyman limit, and either a power-law spectrum (J ~ ν-1.5) or the spectral shape proposed by Haardt & Madau are assumed. The observed scatter in [C/H] is about a magnitude larger than that in the simulations, which suggests an inhomogeneous metal distribution. Observed and simulated Doppler parameter distributions of H I and C IV absorption lines are in good agreement, which indicates that shock heating due to gravitational collapse is a second important heating agent in addition to photoionization heating. The large velocity spreads seen in some C IV systems may be due to the occasional alignments of the observer's line of sight with expanding large-scale filaments. Both high-ionization multicomponent heavy-element absorbers and damped Lyα systems can arise from groups of moderately sized protogalactic

  20. Gemini Spectroscopy of Supernovae from the Supernova Legacy Survey: Improving High-Redshift Supernova Selection and Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, D. A.; Sullivan, M.; Perrett, K.; Bronder, T. J.; Hook, I. M.; Astier, P.; Aubourg, E.; Balam, D.; Basa, S.; Carlberg, R. G.; Fabbro, S.; Fouchez, D.; Guy, J.; Lafoux, H.; Neill, J. D.; Pain, R.; Palanque-Delabrouille, N.; Pritchet, C. J.; Regnault, N.; Rich, J.; Taillet, R.; Knop, R.; McMahon, R. G.; Perlmutter, S.; Walton, N. A.

    2005-12-01

    We present new techniques for improving the efficiency of supernova (SN) classification at high redshift using 64 candidates observed at Gemini North and South during the first year of the Supernova Legacy Survey (SNLS). The SNLS is an ongoing 5 year project with the goal of measuring the equation of state of dark energy by discovering and following over 700 high-redshift SNe Ia using data from the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey. We achieve an improvement in the SN Ia spectroscopic confirmation rate: at Gemini 71% of candidates are now confirmed as SNe Ia, compared to 54% using the methods of previous surveys. This is despite the comparatively high redshift of this sample, in which the median SN Ia redshift is z=0.81 (0.155<=z<=1.01). These improvements were realized because we use the unprecedented color coverage and light curve sampling of the SNLS to predict whether a candidate is a SN Ia and to estimate its redshift, before obtaining a spectrum, using a new technique called the ``SN photo-z.'' In addition, we have improved techniques for galaxy subtraction and SN template χ2 fitting, allowing us to identify candidates even when they are only 15% as bright as the host galaxy. The largest impediment to SN identification is found to be host galaxy contamination of the spectrum-when the SN was at least as bright as the underlying host galaxy the target was identified more than 90% of the time. However, even SNe in bright host galaxies can be easily identified in good seeing conditions. When the image quality was better than 0.55", the candidate was identified 88% of the time. Over the 5 year course of the survey, using the selection techniques presented here, we will be able to add ~170 more confirmed SNe Ia than would be possible using previous methods. APC, 11 Place Marcelin Berthelot, 75231 Paris Cedex 05, France. DSM/DAPNIA, CEA/Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex, France.

  1. Is there a maximum star formation rate in high-redshift galaxies? , , ,

    SciTech Connect

    Barger, A. J.; Cowie, L. L.; Chen, C.-C.; Casey, C. M.; Lee, N.; Sanders, D. B.; Williams, J. P.; Owen, F. N.; Wang, W.-H.

    2014-03-20

    We use the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope's SCUBA-2 camera to image a 400 arcmin{sup 2} area surrounding the GOODS-N field. The 850 μm rms noise ranges from a value of 0.49 mJy in the central region to 3.5 mJy at the outside edge. From these data, we construct an 850 μm source catalog to 2 mJy containing 49 sources detected above the 4σ level. We use an ultradeep (11.5 μJy at 5σ) 1.4 GHz image obtained with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array together with observations made with the Submillimeter Array to identify counterparts to the submillimeter galaxies. For most cases of multiple radio counterparts, we can identify the correct counterpart from new and existing Submillimeter Array data. We have spectroscopic redshifts for 62% of the radio sources in the 9' radius highest sensitivity region (556/894) and 67% of the radio sources in the GOODS-N region (367/543). We supplement these with a modest number of additional photometric redshifts in the GOODS-N region (30). We measure millimetric redshifts from the radio to submillimeter flux ratios for the unidentified submillimeter sample, assuming an Arp 220 spectral energy distribution. We find a radio-flux-dependent K – z relation for the radio sources, which we use to estimate redshifts for the remaining radio sources. We determine the star formation rates (SFRs) of the submillimeter sources based on their radio powers and their submillimeter fluxes and find that they agree well. The radio data are deep enough to detect star-forming galaxies with SFRs >2000 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} to z ∼ 6. We find galaxies with SFRs up to ∼6000 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} over the redshift range z = 1.5-6, but we see evidence for a turn-down in the SFR distribution function above 2000 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}.

  2. Is There a Maximum Star Formation Rate in High-redshift Galaxies?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barger, A. J.; Cowie, L. L.; Chen, C.-C.; Owen, F. N.; Wang, W.-H.; Casey, C. M.; Lee, N.; Sanders, D. B.; Williams, J. P.

    2014-03-01

    We use the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope's SCUBA-2 camera to image a 400 arcmin2 area surrounding the GOODS-N field. The 850 μm rms noise ranges from a value of 0.49 mJy in the central region to 3.5 mJy at the outside edge. From these data, we construct an 850 μm source catalog to 2 mJy containing 49 sources detected above the 4σ level. We use an ultradeep (11.5 μJy at 5σ) 1.4 GHz image obtained with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array together with observations made with the Submillimeter Array to identify counterparts to the submillimeter galaxies. For most cases of multiple radio counterparts, we can identify the correct counterpart from new and existing Submillimeter Array data. We have spectroscopic redshifts for 62% of the radio sources in the 9' radius highest sensitivity region (556/894) and 67% of the radio sources in the GOODS-N region (367/543). We supplement these with a modest number of additional photometric redshifts in the GOODS-N region (30). We measure millimetric redshifts from the radio to submillimeter flux ratios for the unidentified submillimeter sample, assuming an Arp 220 spectral energy distribution. We find a radio-flux-dependent K - z relation for the radio sources, which we use to estimate redshifts for the remaining radio sources. We determine the star formation rates (SFRs) of the submillimeter sources based on their radio powers and their submillimeter fluxes and find that they agree well. The radio data are deep enough to detect star-forming galaxies with SFRs >2000 M ⊙ yr-1 to z ~ 6. We find galaxies with SFRs up to ~6000 M ⊙ yr-1 over the redshift range z = 1.5-6, but we see evidence for a turn-down in the SFR distribution function above 2000 M ⊙ yr-1. The James Clerk Maxwell Telescope is operated by the Joint Astronomy Centre on behalf of the Science and Technology Facilities Council of the United Kingdom, the National Research Council of Canada, and (until 2013 March 31) the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific

  3. Zoomed high-resolution simulations of Multi-coupled Dark Energy: cored galaxy density profiles at high redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garaldi, Enrico; Baldi, Marco; Moscardini, Lauro

    2016-01-01

    We perform for the first time high-resolution zoom-in re-simulations of individual halos in the context of the Multi-coupled Dark Energy (McDE) scenario, which is characterised by the existence of two distinct Dark Matter particle species with opposite couplings to a Dark Energy scalar field. We compare the structural properties of the simulated halos to the standard ΛCDM results. The zoomed-in initial conditions are set up using a specifically designed code called ZInCo that we publicly release along with the present paper. Our numerical results allow to investigate in detail and with unprecedented resolution the halo segregation process that characterises McDE cosmologies from its very early stages. In particular, we find that in contrast to what could be inferred from previous numerical analysis at lower resolution, the segregation process is already in place at redshifts as high as z ~ 7. Most remarkably, we find that the subsequent evolution of the segregation leads to the formation of cored total matter density profiles with a core size that progressively increases in time. The shape of the cored profiles can be accurately predicted as the superposition of two NFW profiles with an increasing offset, thereby confirming the interpretation of the simulations results in terms of the segregation of the two dark matter components of the halo as a consequence of their different coupling to the Dark Energy field.

  4. MILLIMETER OBSERVATIONS OF A SAMPLE OF HIGH-REDSHIFT OBSCURED QUASARS

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez-Sansigre, Alejo; Karim, Alexander; Schinnerer, Eva E-mail: karim@mpia.d

    2009-11-20

    quasars must have higher cool-dust masses and are therefore often found at an earlier evolutionary phase than those of unobscured quasars. For one source at z = 2.767, we detect the CO(3-2) transition, with S{sub CO}DELTAnu = 630 +- 50 mJy km s{sup -1}, corresponding to L{sub CO(3-2)} = 3.2 x10{sup 7} L{sub sun}, or a brightness-temperature luminosity of L'{sub CO(3-2)} = 2.4 x 10{sup 10} K km s{sup -1} pc{sup 2}. For another source at z = 4.17, the lack of detection of the CO(4-3) line suggests the line to have a brightness-temperature luminosity L'{sub CO(4-3)} < 1 x 10{sup 10} K km s{sup -1} pc{sup 2}. Under the assumption that in these objects the high-J transitions are thermalized, we can estimate the molecular gas contents to be M{sub H{sub 2}}=1.9x10{sup 10} M {sub sun} and <8 x 10{sup 9} M{sub sun}, respectively. The estimated gas depletion timescales are tau{sub g} = 4 Myr and <16 Myr, and low gas-to-dust mass ratios of M{sub g}/M {sub d} = 19 and <20 are inferred. These values are at the low end but consistent with those of other high-redshift galaxies.

  5. High-energy properties of the high-redshift flat spectrum radio quasar PKS 2149-306

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Ammando, F.; Orienti, M.

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the γ-ray and X-ray properties of the flat spectrum radio quasar PKS 2149-306 at redshift z = 2.345. A strong γ-ray flare from this source was detected by the Large Area Telescope on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope satellite in 2013 January, reaching on January 20 a daily peak flux of (301 ± 36) × 10-8 ph cm-2 s-1 in the 0.1-100 GeV energy range. This flux corresponds to an apparent isotropic luminosity of (1.5 ± 0.2) × 1050 erg s-1, comparable to the highest values observed by a blazar so far. During the flare the increase of flux was accompanied by a significant change of the spectral properties. Moreover significant flux variations on a 6-h time-scale were observed, compatible with the light crossing time of the event horizon of the central black hole. The broad-band X-ray spectra of PKS 2149-306 observed by Swift-XRT and NuSTAR are well described by a broken power-law model, with a very hard spectrum (Γ1 ˜ 1) below the break energy, at E break = 2.5-3.0 keV, and Γ2 ˜ 1.4-1.5 above the break energy. The steepening of the spectrum below ˜3 keV may indicate that the soft X-ray emission is produced by the low-energy relativistic electrons. This is in agreement with the small variability amplitude and the lack of spectral changes in that part of the X-ray spectrum observed between the two NuSTAR and Swift joint observations. As for the other high-redshift FSRQ detected by both Fermi-LAT and Swift-BAT, the photon index of PKS 2149-306 in hard X-ray is 1.6 or lower and the average γ-ray luminosity higher than 2 × 1048 erg s-1.

  6. A Highly Doppler Blueshifted Fe-K Emission Line in the High-Redshift QSO PKS 2149-306

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yaqoob, Tahir; George, I. M.; Nandra, K.; Turner, T. J.; Zobair, S.; Selemitsos, P. J.

    1999-01-01

    We report the results from an ASCA observation of the high-luminosity, radioloud quasar PKS 2149-306 (redshift 2.345), covering the approximately 1.7 - 30 keV band in the quasar-frame. We find the source to have a luminosity of approximately 6 x 10(exp 47) ergs/s in the 2 - 10 keV band (quasar frame). We detect an emission line centered at approximately 17 keV in the quasar frame. Line emission at this energy has not been observed in any other active galaxy or quasar to date. We present evidence rejecting the possibility that this line is the result of instrumental artifacts, or a serendipitous source. The most likely explanation is blueshifted Fe-K emission (the equivalent width, is EW approximately 300 +/- 200 eV, quasar frame). Bulk velocities of the order of 0.75c are implied by the data. We show that Fe-K line photons originating in an accretion disk and Compton-scattering off a leptonic jet aligned along the disk axis can account for the emission line. Curiously. if the emission-line feature recently discovered in another quasar (PKS 0637-752, z = 0.654) at 1.6 keV in the quasar frame, is due to blueshifted OVII emission, the Doppler blueshifting factor in both quasars is similar (approximately 2.7 - 2.8).

  7. A Highly Doppler Blueshifted Fe-K Emission Line in the High-Redshift QSO PKS 2149-306.

    PubMed

    Yaqoob; George; Nandra; Turner; Zobair; Serlemitsos

    1999-11-01

    We report the results from an ASCA observation of the high-luminosity, radio-loud quasar PKS 2149-306 (redshift 2.345), covering the approximately 1.7-30 keV band in the quasar frame. We find the source to have a luminosity approximately 6x1047 ergs s-1 in the 2-10 keV band (quasar frame). We detect an emission line centered at approximately 17 keV in the quasar frame. Line emission at this energy has not been observed in any other active galaxy or quasar to date. We present evidence rejecting the possibility that this line is the result of instrumental artifacts or a serendipitous source. The most likely explanation is blueshifted Fe-K emission (the equivalent width is EW approximately 300+/-200 eV, quasar frame). Bulk velocities of the order of 0.75c are implied by the data. We show that Fe-K line photons originating in an accretion disk and Compton scattering off a leptonic jet aligned along the disk axis can account for the emission line. Curiously, if the emission-line feature recently discovered in another quasar (PKS 0637-752, z=0.654) at 1.6 keV in the quasar frame is due to blueshifted O vii emission, the Doppler blueshifting factor in both quasars is similar ( approximately 2.7-2.8).

  8. Deep imaging of high redshift QSO fields below the Lyman limit. II - Number counts and colors of field galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steidel, Charles C.; Hamilton, Donald

    1993-01-01

    We present an analysis of the number counts and colors of faint galaxies to about 26.5 mag in the fields of two high Galactic latitude, very-high-redshift QSOs. We concentrate on the general properties of the field galaxies at faint magnitudes. In particular, we readdress the faint galaxy number counts and colors as a function of apparent magnitude and we reexamine the possible contribution of very-high-redshift galaxies to the faint samples. We find that the number counts to R = 26 are well fitted by the relation log N(m) = 0.31R + C. The G-band counts for the same galaxies are consistent with the same slope fainter than G about 23.5, but exhibit a much steeper slope at brighter magnitudes. At R = 25.5, the differential number counts have reached about 1.2 x 10 exp 5/sq deg; the same surface density of galaxies is reached at G = 26.5. We confirm the existence of a gradual 'blueing' trend of the field galaxies toward fainter apparent magnitude; however, the blueing trend appears to extend only as faint as G about 24, fainter than which both the (G-R) and (U sub n-G) colors appear to level off. The mean colors of faint galaxies are considerably redder than flat spectrum. There are essentially no objects to R = 26 which have spectral energy distributions which are bluer than flat spectrum. The potential contribution of very-high-redshift galaxies may have been underestimated in previous analyses; the current data are consistent with the same population of relatively luminous galaxies at z about 3 as exist at z about 0.7.

  9. An 80-kpc Lyα halo around a high-redshift type-2 quasi-stellar object

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, D. J. B.; Jarvis, M. J.; Simpson, C.; Martínez-Sansigre, A.

    2009-02-01

    We announce the discovery of an extended emission-line region associated with a high-redshift type-2 quasi-stellar object (QSO). The halo, which was discovered in our new wide-field narrow-band survey, resides at z = 2.85 in the Spitzer First Look Survey region and is extended over ~80 kpc. Deep very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) observations imply that approximately 50 per cent of the radio emission is extended on scales >200pc. The inferred active galactic nuclei (AGN) luminosity is sufficient to ionize the extended halo, and the optical emission is consistent with being triggered coevally with the radio source. The Lyα halo is as luminous as those found around high-redshift radio galaxies; however, the active nucleus is several orders of magnitude less luminous at radio wavelengths than those Fanarof-Riley type II (FRIIs) more commonly associated with extended emission-line regions. AMS05 appears to be a high-redshift analogue to the radio-quiet quasar E1821+643 which is core dominated, but which also exhibits extended Fanarof-Riley type I (FRI)-like structure and contains an optically powerful AGN. We also find evidence for more quiescent kinematics in the Lyα emission line in the outer regions of the halo, reminiscent of the haloes around the more powerful FRIIs. The optical to mid-infrared spectral energy distribution is well described by a combination of an obscured QSO (Lbol ~ 3.4 +/- 0.2 × 1013Lsolar) and a 1.4 Gyr old simple stellar population with mass ~3.9 +/- 0.3 × 1011Msolar.

  10. Pressure distribution of the high-redshift cluster of galaxies CL J1226.9+3332 with NIKA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, R.; Comis, B.; Macías-Pérez, J.-F.; Adane, A.; Ade, P.; André, P.; Beelen, A.; Belier, B.; Benoît, A.; Bideaud, A.; Billot, N.; Blanquer, G.; Bourrion, O.; Calvo, M.; Catalano, A.; Coiffard, G.; Cruciani, A.; D'Addabbo, A.; Désert, F.-X.; Doyle, S.; Goupy, J.; Kramer, C.; Leclercq, S.; Martino, J.; Mauskopf, P.; Mayet, F.; Monfardini, A.; Pajot, F.; Pascale, E.; Perotto, L.; Pointecouteau, E.; Ponthieu, N.; Revéret, V.; Ritacco, A.; Rodriguez, L.; Savini, G.; Schuster, K.; Sievers, A.; Tucker, C.; Zylka, R.

    2015-04-01

    The thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (tSZ) effect is expected to provide a low scatter mass proxy for galaxy clusters since it is directly proportional to the cluster thermal energy. The tSZ observations have proven to be a powerful tool for detecting and studying them, but high angular resolution observations are now needed to push their investigation to a higher redshift. In this paper, we report high angular (<20 arcsec) resolution tSZ observations of the high-redshift cluster CL J1226.9+3332 (z = 0.89). It was imaged at 150 and 260 GHz using the NIKA camera at the IRAM 30-m telescope. The 150 GHz map shows that CL J1226.9+3332 is morphologically relaxed on large scales with evidence of a disturbed core, while the 260 GHz channel is used mostly to identify point source contamination. NIKA data are combined with those of Planck and X-ray from Chandra to infer the cluster's radial pressure, density, temperature, and entropy distributions. The total mass profile of the cluster is derived, and we find M500 = 5.96+1.02-0.79 × 1014M⊙ within the radius R500 = 930+50-43 kpc, at a 68% confidence level. (R500 is the radius within which the average density is 500 times the critical density at the cluster's redshift.) NIKA is the prototype camera of NIKA2, a KIDs (kinetic inductance detectors) based instrument to be installed at the end of 2015. This work is, therefore, part of a pilot study aiming at optimizing tSZ NIKA2 large programs. The FITS file of the published maps is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/576/A12

  11. SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLE FORMATION AT HIGH REDSHIFTS VIA DIRECT COLLAPSE: PHYSICAL PROCESSES IN THE EARLY STAGE

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Jun-Hwan; Shlosman, Isaac; Begelman, Mitchell C. E-mail: shlosman@pa.uky.edu

    2013-09-10

    We use numerical simulations to explore whether direct collapse can lead to the formation of supermassive black hole (SMBH) seeds at high redshifts. Using the adaptive mesh refinement code ENZO, we follow the evolution of gas within slowly tumbling dark matter (DM) halos of M{sub vir} {approx} 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 8} M{sub Sun} and R{sub vir} {approx} 1 kpc. For our idealized simulations, we adopt cosmologically motivated DM and baryon density profiles and angular momentum distributions. Our principal goal is to understand how the collapsing flow overcomes the centrifugal barrier and whether it is subject to fragmentation which can potentially lead to star formation, decreasing the seed SMBH mass. We find that the collapse proceeds from inside out and leads either to a central runaway or to off-center fragmentation. A disk-like configuration is formed inside the centrifugal barrier, growing via accretion. For models with a more cuspy DM distribution, the gas collapses more and experiences a bar-like perturbation and a central runaway on scales of {approx}< 1-10 pc. We have followed this inflow down to {approx}10{sup -4} pc ({approx}10 AU), where it is estimated to become optically thick. The flow remains isothermal and the specific angular momentum, j, is efficiently transferred by gravitational torques in a cascade of nested bars. This cascade is triggered by finite perturbations from the large-scale mass distribution and by gas self-gravity, and supports a self-similar, disk-like collapse where the axial ratios remain constant. The mass accretion rate shows a global minimum on scales of {approx}1-10 pc at the time of the central runaway. In the collapsing phase, virial supersonic turbulence develops and fragmentation is damped. Models with progressively larger initial DM cores evolve similarly, but the timescales become longer. In models with more organized initial rotation-when the rotation of spherical shells is constrained to be coplanar-a torus forms

  12. Unveiling the nature of dark matter with high redshift 21 cm line experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Evoli, C.; Mesinger, A.; Ferrara, A. E-mail: andrei.mesinger@sns.it

    2014-11-01

    Observations of the redshifted 21 cm line from neutral hydrogen will open a new window on the early Universe. By influencing the thermal and ionization history of the intergalactic medium (IGM), annihilating dark matter (DM) can leave a detectable imprint in the 21 cm signal. Building on the publicly available 21cmFAST code, we compute the 21 cm signal for a 10 GeV WIMP DM candidate. The most pronounced role of DM annihilations is in heating the IGM earlier and more uniformly than astrophysical sources of X-rays. This leaves several unambiguous, qualitative signatures in the redshift evolution of the large-scale (k ≅ 0.1 Mpc{sup -1}) 21 cm power amplitude: (i) the local maximum (peak) associated with IGM heating can be lower than the other maxima; (ii) the heating peak can occur while the IGM is in emission against the cosmic microwave background (CMB); (iii) there can be a dramatic drop in power (a global minimum) corresponding to the epoch when the IGM temperature is comparable to the CMB temperature. These signatures are robust to astrophysical uncertainties, and will be easily detectable with second generation interferometers. We also briefly show that decaying warm dark matter has a negligible role in heating the IGM.

  13. MAMBO Observations of the COSMOS Field: Probing High Redshift, Dusty Starburst Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carilli, C. L.; Bertoldi, F.; Schinnerer, E.; Voss, H.; Smolcic, V.; Blain, A.; Scoville, N. Z.; Menten, K.; Lutz, D.; Cosmos

    2005-12-01

    The inner 20×20 arcmin2 of the COSMOS field was imaged at 250 GHz (1.2 mm) to an rms noise level of 1 mJy per 11 arcsec beam using the Max-Planck Millimeter Bolometer Array (MAMBO-2) at the IRAM 30-m telescope. We detect 23 sources at significance between 3.5 and 7σ , about half of which are also detected at 1.4 GHz with the VLA with a flux density >3σ = 30 μ Jy. The 250 GHz source areal density in the COSMOS field is comparable to that seen in other deep mm fields. We present the multi-frequency properties of the MAMBO sources, including: (i) HST/ACS i magnitudes (or limits) and morphologies, (ii) ground-based optical and near-IR magnitudes, (iii) XMM X-ray flux densities, and (iv) VLA radio flux densities. We compare radio and optical photometric redshifts, discuss the AGN fraction derived from the X-ray data, and describe the host galaxy properties apparent from the HST and ground based optical imaging. We highlight some relatively bright MAMBO sources that do not show obvious optical counterparts to very faint levels (i'AB > 26.9). These sources could be dusty starburst galaxies at redshifts >3.

  14. Evolution of the Lyα Halos Around High-Redshift Radio Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zirm, Andrew W.; Dey, Arjun; Dickinson, Mark; Norman, Colin J.

    2009-03-01

    We have obtained the first constraints on extended Lyα emission at z ~ 1 in a sample of five radio galaxies. We detect Lyα emission from four of the five galaxies. The Lyα luminosities range from 0.1-4 × 1043 erg s-1 and are much smaller than those observed for halos around higher redshift radio galaxies. If the z ≈ 1 radio galaxies are the descendents of the z lsim 2 radio galaxies, then their Lyα luminosities evolve strongly with redshift as ~(1 + z)5. There do not appear to be strong correlations between other parameters, such as radio power, suggesting that this observed evolution is real and not an observational artifact or secondary correlation. We speculate that this evolution of luminous halos may be due to gas depletion (as gas cools, settles, and forms stars) accompanied by an overall rise in the mean gas temperature and a decrease in specific star formation rate in and around these massive galaxies.

  15. Galaxies at redshifts 5 to 6 with systematically low dust content and high [C II] emission.

    PubMed

    Capak, P L; Carilli, C; Jones, G; Casey, C M; Riechers, D; Sheth, K; Carollo, C M; Ilbert, O; Karim, A; LeFevre, O; Lilly, S; Scoville, N; Smolcic, V; Yan, L

    2015-06-25

    The rest-frame ultraviolet properties of galaxies during the first three billion years of cosmic time (redshift z > 4) indicate a rapid evolution in the dust obscuration of such galaxies. This evolution implies a change in the average properties of the interstellar medium, but the measurements are systematically uncertain owing to untested assumptions and the inability to detect heavily obscured regions of the galaxies. Previous attempts to measure the interstellar medium directly in normal galaxies at these redshifts have failed for a number of reasons, with two notable exceptions. Here we report measurements of the forbidden C ii emission (that is, [C II]) from gas, and the far-infrared emission from dust, in nine typical star-forming galaxies about one billion years after the Big Bang (z ≈ 5-6). We find that these galaxies have thermal emission that is less than 1/12 that of similar systems about two billion years later, and enhanced [C II] emission relative to the far-infrared continuum, confirming a strong evolution in the properties of the interstellar medium in the early Universe. The gas is distributed over scales of one to eight kiloparsecs, and shows diverse dynamics within the sample. These results are consistent with early galaxies having significantly less dust than typical galaxies seen at z < 3 and being comparable in dust content to local low-metallicity systems.

  16. See Change: First Results from the Supernova Cosmology Project High Redshift Cluster Supernova Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayden, Brian; Aldering, Greg Scott; Amanullah, Rahman; Barbary, Kyle H.; Boehringer, Hans; Brodwin, Mark; Cunha, Carlos E.; Deustua, Susana E.; Dixon, Samantha; Eisenhardt, Peter R.; Fagrelius, Parker; Fassbender, Rene; Fruchter, Andrew S.; Gladders, Michael; Gonzalez, Anthony H.; Goobar, Ariel; Hildebrandt, Hendrik; Hilton, Matt; Hoekstra, Henk; Hook, Isobel; Huang, Xiaosheng; Huterer, Dragan; Jee, James; Kim, Alex G.; Kowalski, Marek; Lidman, Chris; Linder, Eric; Luther, Kyle; Meyers, Joshua; Muzzin, Adam; Nordin, Jakob; Pain, Reynald; Perlmutter, Saul; Richard, Johan; Rosati, Piero; Rozo, Eduardo; Rubin, David; Rykoff, Eli S.; Santos, Joana; Saunders, Clare; Sofiatti, Caroline; Spadafora, Anthony L.; Stanford, S. Adam; Stern, Daniel; Suzuki, Nao; Wechsler, Risa H.; Willis, Jon; Wilson, Gillian; Yen, Mike

    2016-01-01

    Using the Hubble Space Telescope, the Supernova Cosmology Project is performing a type Ia supernova search in the highest-redshift, most massive clusters known to date. This large HST program spans Cycles 22-23. It will improve the constraint by a factor of 3 on the Dark Energy equation of state above z ~ 1, allowing an unprecedented probe of Dark Energy time variation. When combined with the improved cluster mass calibration from gravitational lensing provided by the deep WFC3-IR observations of the clusters, the SNe clusters observed also will triple the Dark Energy Task Force Figure of Merit. With Cycle 22 completed, we present preliminary supernova light curves above z=1.1 and discuss the number of supernovae discovered compared to our expectations from different SN rates models. Our HST imaging and extensive ground-based campaign are already producing unique results; we have spectroscopically confirmed several of the highest redshift cluster members to-date, and confirmed one of the most massive clusters at z~1.2 expected over the entire sky.

  17. Galaxies at redshifts 5 to 6 with systematically low dust content and high [C II] emission.

    PubMed

    Capak, P L; Carilli, C; Jones, G; Casey, C M; Riechers, D; Sheth, K; Carollo, C M; Ilbert, O; Karim, A; LeFevre, O; Lilly, S; Scoville, N; Smolcic, V; Yan, L

    2015-06-25

    The rest-frame ultraviolet properties of galaxies during the first three billion years of cosmic time (redshift z > 4) indicate a rapid evolution in the dust obscuration of such galaxies. This evolution implies a change in the average properties of the interstellar medium, but the measurements are systematically uncertain owing to untested assumptions and the inability to detect heavily obscured regions of the galaxies. Previous attempts to measure the interstellar medium directly in normal galaxies at these redshifts have failed for a number of reasons, with two notable exceptions. Here we report measurements of the forbidden C ii emission (that is, [C II]) from gas, and the far-infrared emission from dust, in nine typical star-forming galaxies about one billion years after the Big Bang (z ≈ 5-6). We find that these galaxies have thermal emission that is less than 1/12 that of similar systems about two billion years later, and enhanced [C II] emission relative to the far-infrared continuum, confirming a strong evolution in the properties of the interstellar medium in the early Universe. The gas is distributed over scales of one to eight kiloparsecs, and shows diverse dynamics within the sample. These results are consistent with early galaxies having significantly less dust than typical galaxies seen at z < 3 and being comparable in dust content to local low-metallicity systems. PMID:26108853

  18. BRIGHT lights, BIG city: high redshift radio galaxies, giant Ly-a halos, and proto-clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Breugel, Willem J.; Reuland, Michiel A.; de Vries, Willem H.; Stanford, Adam; Dey, Arjun; Kurk, Jaron; Venemans, Bram; Roettgering, Huub J. A.; Miley, George; De Breuck, Carlos; Dopita, Mike; Sutherland, Ralph; Bland-Hawthorn, Jonathan

    2003-02-01

    High redshift radio galaxies are great cosmological tools for pinpointing the most massive objects in the early Universe: massive forming galaxies, active super-massive black holes and proto-clusters. We report on deep narrow-band imaging and spectroscopic observations of several z > 2 radio galaxy fields to investigate the nature of giant Ly-α nebulae centered on the galaxies and to search for over-dense regions around them. We discuss the possible implications for our understanding of the formation and evolution of massive galaxies and galaxy clusters.

  19. PROBING HIGH-REDSHIFT GALAXY FORMATION AT THE HIGHEST LUMINOSITIES: NEW INSIGHTS FROM DEIMOS SPECTROSCOPY

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Kyoung-Soo; Dey, Arjun; Cooper, Michael C.; Reddy, Naveen; Jannuzi, Buell T.

    2013-07-01

    We present Keck DEIMOS spectroscopic observations of the most UV-luminous star-forming galaxies at redshifts 3.2 < z < 4.6. Our sample, selected in the Booetes field of the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey, contains galaxies with luminosities of L* {approx}< L{sub UV} {approx}< 7 L* and is one of the largest samples to date of the most UV-luminous galaxies at these redshifts. Our spectroscopic data confirm 41 candidates as star-forming galaxies at 3.2 < z < 4.6 and validate the relatively clean selection of the photometric candidates with a contamination rate of 11%-28%. We find that the fraction of Ly{alpha} emitting galaxies increases with decreasing UV luminosity. None of the 12 galaxies with M{sub UV} < -22 (i.e., L{sub UV} > 3 L*) exhibit strong Ly{alpha} emission. We find strong evidence of large-scale outflows, transporting the neutral/ionized gas in the interstellar medium away from the galaxy. Galaxies exhibiting both interstellar absorption and Ly{alpha} emission lines show a significant offset between the two features, with a relative velocity of 200-1150 km s{sup -1}. We find tentative evidence that this measure of the outflow velocity increases with UV luminosity and/or stellar mass. The luminosity- and mass-dependent outflow strengths suggest that the efficiency of feedback and enrichment of the surrounding medium depend on these galaxy parameters. We also stack the individual spectra to construct composite spectra of the absorption-line-only and Ly{alpha}-emitting subsets of the UV luminous galaxies at z {approx_equal} 3.7. The composite spectra are very similar to those of lower-redshift and lower-luminosity Lyman break galaxy (LBG) samples, but with some subtle differences. Analyses of the composite spectra suggest that the UV luminous LBGs at z {approx_equal} 3.7 may have a higher covering fraction of absorbing gas, and may be older (or have had more prolonged star formation histories) than their lower-redshift and lower-luminosity counterparts. In

  20. FORMATION OF COMPACT STELLAR CLUSTERS BY HIGH-REDSHIFT GALAXY OUTFLOWS. I. NON-EQUILIBRIUM COOLANT FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, William J.; Scannapieco, Evan

    2010-07-20

    We use high-resolution three-dimensional adaptive mesh refinement simulations to investigate the interaction of high-redshift galaxy outflows with low-mass virialized clouds of primordial composition. While atomic cooling allows star formation in objects with virial temperatures above 10{sup 4} K, 'minihalos' below this threshold are generally unable to form stars by themselves. However, these objects are highly susceptible to triggered star formation, induced by outflows from neighboring high-redshift starburst galaxies. Here, we conduct a study of these interactions, focusing on cooling through non-equilibrium molecular hydrogen (H{sub 2}) and hydrogen deuteride (HD) formation. Tracking the non-equilibrium chemistry and cooling of 14 species and including the presence of a dissociating background, we show that shock interactions can transform minihalos into extremely compact clusters of coeval stars. Furthermore, these clusters are all less than {approx}10{sup 6} M {sub sun}, and they are ejected from their parent dark matter halos: properties that are remarkably similar to those of the old population of globular clusters.

  1. ALMA Imaging and Gravitational Lens Models of South Pole Telescope—Selected Dusty, Star-Forming Galaxies at High Redshifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spilker, J. S.; Marrone, D. P.; Aravena, M.; Béthermin, M.; Bothwell, M. S.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Chapman, S. C.; Crawford, T. M.; de Breuck, C.; Fassnacht, C. D.; Gonzalez, A. H.; Greve, T. R.; Hezaveh, Y.; Litke, K.; Ma, J.; Malkan, M.; Rotermund, K. M.; Strandet, M.; Vieira, J. D.; Weiss, A.; Welikala, N.

    2016-08-01

    The South Pole Telescope has discovered 100 gravitationally lensed, high-redshift, dusty, star-forming galaxies (DSFGs). We present 0.″5 resolution 870 μ {{m}} Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array imaging of a sample of 47 DSFGs spanning z=1.9{--}5.7, and construct gravitational lens models of these sources. Our visibility-based lens modeling incorporates several sources of residual interferometric calibration uncertainty, allowing us to properly account for noise in the observations. At least 70% of the sources are strongly lensed by foreground galaxies ({μ }870μ {{m}}\\gt 2), with a median magnification of {μ }870μ {{m}}=6.3, extending to {μ }870μ {{m}}\\gt 30. We compare the intrinsic size distribution of the strongly lensed sources to a similar number of unlensed DSFGs and find no significant differences in spite of a bias between the magnification and intrinsic source size. This may indicate that the true size distribution of DSFGs is relatively narrow. We use the source sizes to constrain the wavelength at which the dust optical depth is unity and find this wavelength to be correlated with the dust temperature. This correlation leads to discrepancies in dust mass estimates of a factor of two compared to estimates using a single value for this wavelength. We investigate the relationship between the [C ii] line and the far-infrared luminosity and find that the same correlation between the [C ii]/{L}{{FIR}} ratio and {{{Σ }}}{{FIR}} found for low-redshift star-forming galaxies applies to high-redshift galaxies and extends at least two orders of magnitude higher in {{{Σ }}}{{FIR}}. This lends further credence to the claim that the compactness of the IR-emitting region is the controlling parameter in establishing the “[C ii] deficit.”

  2. Bayesian analysis of X-ray jet features of the high redshift quasar jets observed with Chandra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKeough, Kathryn; Siemiginowska, Aneta; Kashyap, Vinay; Stein, Nathan; Cheung, Chi C.

    2015-01-01

    X-ray emission of powerful quasar jets may be a result of the inverse Compton (IC) process in which the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) photons gain energy by interactions with the jet's relativistic electrons. However, there is no definite evidence that IC/CMB process is responsible for the observed X-ray emission of large scale jets. A step toward understanding the X-ray emission process is to study the Radio and X-ray morphologies of the jet. Results from Chandra X-ray and multi-frequency VLA imaging observations of a sample of 11 high- redshift (z > 2) quasars with kilo-parsec scale radio jets are reported. The sample consists of a set of four z ≥ 3.6 flat-spectrum radio quasars, and seven intermediate redshift (z = 2.1 - 2.9) quasars comprised of four sources with integrated steep radio spectra and three with flat radio spectra.We implement a Bayesian image analysis program, Low-count Image Reconstruction and Analysis (LIRA) , to analyze jet features in the X-ray images of the high redshift quasars. Out of the 36 regions where knots are visible in the radio jets, nine showed detectable X-ray emission. Significant detections are based on the upper bound p-value test based on LIRA simulations. The X-ray and radio properties of this sample combined are examined and compared to lower-redshift samples.This work is supported in part by the National Science Foundation REU and the Department of Defense ASSURE programs under NSF Grant no.1262851 and by the Smithsonian Institution, and by NASA Contract NAS8-39073 to the Chandra X-ray Center (CXC). This research has made use of data obtained from the Chandra Data Archive and Chandra Source Catalog, and software provided by the CXC in the application packages CIAO, ChIPS, and Sherpa. Work is also supported by the Chandra grant GO4-15099X.

  3. Building a better understanding of the massive high-redshift BOSS CMASS galaxies as tools for cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favole, Ginevra; McBride, Cameron K.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Prada, Francisco; Swanson, Molly E.; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Schneider, Donald P.

    2016-10-01

    We explore the massive bluer star-forming population of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) III/BOSS CMASS DR11 galaxies at z > 0.55 to quantify their differences, in terms of redshift-space distortions and large-scale bias, with respect to the luminous red galaxy sample. We perform a qualitative analysis to understand the significance of these differences and whether we can model and reproduce them in mock catalogues. Specifically, we measure galaxy clustering in CMASS on small and intermediate scales (0.1 ≲ r ≲ 50 h-1 Mpc) by computing the two-point correlation function - both projected and redshift-space - of these galaxies, and a new statistic, Σ(π), able to separate the coherent and dispersed redshift-space distortion contributions and the large-scale bias. We interpret our clustering measurements by adopting a Halo Occupation Distribution (HOD) scheme that maps them on to high-resolution N-body cosmological simulations to produce suitable mock galaxy catalogues. The traditional HOD prescription can be applied to the red and the blue samples, independently, but this approach is unphysical since it allows the same mock galaxies to be either red or blue. To overcome this ambiguity, we modify the standard formulation and infer the red and the blue models by splitting the full mock catalogue into two complementary and non-overlapping submocks. This separation is performed by constraining the HOD with the observed CMASS red and blue galaxy fractions and produces reliable and accurate models.

  4. Imaging the Sunyaev-Zeldovich Effect in the High Redshift Galaxy Cluster MS1137+66

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joy, M. K.; Patel, S. K.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Grego, L.; Holder, G. P.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Hughes, J. P.; Reese, E. D.

    2000-01-01

    We present interferometric measurements of the Sunyaev-Zelldovich Effect (SZE) in MS1137+66, a distant galaxy cluster at a redshift of 0.78. The data were obtained in 1997 and 1998 at the Berkeley-Illinois-Maryland millimeter array using sensitive 28.5 GHz receivers optimized for imaging of the SZE, with a total on-source integration time of 87.8 hours. We discuss constraints derived from spherical "beta" model fits to the SZE data, place an upper limit on the strength of any possible radio point sources in the field, and compare the results with the x-ray data published by Donahue et al. in 1999.

  5. Investigating the Physical Cause Behind a Constant Characteristic Magnitude at High Redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finkelstein, Steven L.; Ryan, Russell E.; Papovich, Casey J.; Dickinson, Mark; Song, Mimi; Behroozi, Peter; Somerville, Rachel S.; Closson Ferguson, Henry; Candels Team, S-Candels Team

    2015-01-01

    The combination of deep and wide Hubble Space Telescope surveys have allowed the first robust cosmic census of galaxies in the distant universe. We use a combination of datasets from the CANDELS, Hubble Ultra Deep Field, and Hubble Frontier Field surveys to construct a rest-frame ultraviolet luminosity function at z = 4, 5, 6, 7 and 8, over a large dynamic range in UV luminosity. In contrast to studies from the past few years, we find little evolution in the characteristic magnitude M* with redshift, while the characteristic number density decreases significantly towards earlier times. We examine bright galaxies in our sample, and find that contamination by lower redshift galaxies appears minimal. We use abundance matching to derive the typical halo masses for bright galaxies at z > 4, and finding that M_UV=-21 galaxies live in halos with log (Mhalo/Msol) = 11.3 (11.9) at z=7 (z=4). Combining the halo masses with the measured stellar masses of these galaxies, we find that the stellar-to-halo mass fraction increases significantly (3-sigma) from z=4 to 8, in contrast to expectations from a decreasing halo mass. This could be a signature that decreased feedback is resulting in an increased star-formation efficiency. Finally, we examine the evolution of the cosmic star-formation rate density from our integrated luminosity functions, and find that at z > 4 it is proportional to (1+z)^-4.7, and that this trend is consistent with current results at z=9 and 10 without a need to invoke a steep dropoff.

  6. Cosmic Evolution of Accretion Power and Fusion Power: AGN and Starbursts at High Redshifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold Malkan, Matthew

    2009-05-01

    Extragalactic astronomers have been working for decades on obtaining robust measures of the luminosities galaxies produce from stars, and from active galactic nuclei. Our ultimate goal is deriving the cosmic evolution of all radiation produced by fusion and by black hole accretion. The combined effects of dust reddening and redshift make it impossible to achieve this with optical observations alone. Fortunately, infrared thermal continuum and forbidden line emission--from warm dust grains and ionized gas, respectively--can now be measured with excellent sensitivity. However, when measuring entire galaxies, these dust and gas emissions are powered by both active galactic nuclei and starbursts, which may be hard to separate spatially. We must use the fact that the patterns of IR energy output from AGN and SBs differ, with AGN making more ionized gas and hotter dust grains. Low-resolution spectroscopy, or even narrow-band filters can sort out the line emission from both processes when they are mixed in the same galaxy. The hope is that these spectroscopic determinations of star formation rate, and mass accretion rate in relatively small samples of bright galaxies will allow a calibration of broadband continuum measures. The dust continuum emission will then be measured in enormous samples of galaxies spanning their full range of masses, metallicities, environments and redshifts. Along the way, we should learn the astrophysical basis of black hole/galaxy "co-evolution." I will summarize some of the first specific infrared steps of this ambitious agenda, taken with IRAS and ISO to 2MASS, Akari and Spitzer and other telescopes. Time permitting, some of the exciting upcoming observational prospects will be advertised.

  7. PKS 2123-463: A Confirmed Gamma-ray Blazar at High Redshift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DAmmando, F.; Rau, A.; Schady, P.; Finke, J.; Orienti, M.; Greiner, J.; Kann, D. A.; Ojha, R.; Foley, A. R.; Stevens, J.; Blanchard, J. M.; Edwards, P. G.; Kadler, M.; Lovell, J. E. J.

    2012-01-01

    The flat spectrum radio quasar (FSRQ) PKS 2123-463 was associated in the First Fermi-LAT source catalog with the gamma-ray source 1FGL J2126.1-4603, but when considering the full first two years of Fermi observations, no gamma-ray source at a position consistent with this FSRQ was detected, and thus PKS 2123-463 was not reported in the Second Fermi-LAT source catalog. On 2011 December 14 a gamma-ray source positionally consistent with PKS 2123-463 was detected in flaring activity by Fermi-LAT. This activity triggered radio-to-X-ray observations by the Swift, GROND, ATCA, Ceduna, and KAT-7 observatories. Results of the localization of the gamma-ray source over 41 months of Fermi-LAT operation are reported here in conjunction with the results of the analysis of radio, optical, UV and X-ray data collected soon after the gamma-ray flare. The strict spatial association with the lower energy counterpart together with a simultaneous increase of the activity in optical, UV, X-ray and gamma-ray bands led to a firm identification of the gamma-ray source with PKS 2123-463. A new photometric redshift has been estimated as z = 1.46 +/- 0.05 using GROND and Swift/UVOT observations, in rough agreement with the disputed spectroscopic redshift of z = 1.67. We fit the broadband spectral energy distribution with a synchrotron/external Compton model. We find that a thermal disk component is necessary to explain the optical/UV emis- sion detected by Swift/UVOT. This disk has a luminosity of 1.8x1046 erg s-1, and a fit to the disk emission assuming a Schwarzschild (i.e., nonrotating) black hole gives a mass of 2 x 109 M(solar mass). This is the first black hole mass estimate for this source.

  8. PROSPECTS FOR MEASURING THE MASS OF BLACK HOLES AT HIGH REDSHIFTS WITH RESOLVED KINEMATICS USING GRAVITATIONAL LENSING

    SciTech Connect

    Hezaveh, Yashar D.

    2014-08-20

    Application of the most robust method of measuring black hole masses, spatially resolved kinematics of gas and stars, is presently limited to nearby galaxies. The Atacama Large Millimeter/sub-millimeter Array (ALMA) and 30m class telescopes (the Thirty Meter Telescope, the Giant Magellan Telescope, and the European Extremely Large Telescope) with milli-arcsecond resolution are expected to extend such measurements to larger distances. Here, we study the possibility of exploiting the angular magnification provided by strong gravitational lensing to measure black hole masses at high redshifts (z ∼ 1-6), using resolved gas kinematics with these instruments. We show that in ∼15% and ∼20% of strongly lensed galaxies, the inner 25 and 50 pc could be resolved, allowing the mass of ≳ 10{sup 8} M {sub ☉} black holes to be dynamically measured with ALMA, if moderately bright molecular gas is present at these small radii. Given the large number of strong lenses discovered in current millimeter surveys and future optical surveys, this fraction could constitute a statistically significant population for studying the evolution of the M-σ relation at high redshifts.

  9. Constraints on Photoionization Feedback from Number Counts of Ultra-faint High-redshift Galaxies in the Frontier Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellano, M.; Yue, B.; Ferrara, A.; Merlin, E.; Fontana, A.; Amorín, R.; Grazian, A.; Mármol-Queralto, E.; Michałowski, M. J.; Mortlock, A.; Paris, D.; Parsa, S.; Pilo, S.; Santini, P.

    2016-06-01

    We exploit a sample of ultra-faint high-redshift galaxies (demagnified Hubble Space Telescope, HST, H 160 magnitude > 30) in the Frontier Fields clusters A2744 and M0416 to constrain a theoretical model for the UV luminosity function in the presence of photoionization feedback. The objects have been selected on the basis of accurate photometric redshifts computed from multi-band photometry including seven HST bands and deep K s and IRAC observations. Magnification is computed on an object-by-object basis from all available lensing models of the two clusters. We take into account source detection completeness as a function of luminosity and size, magnification effects, and systematics in the lens modeling of the clusters under investigation. We find that our sample of high-z galaxies constrain the cutoff halo circular velocity below which star formation is suppressed by photoionization feedback to {v}c{{cut}}\\lt 50 km s‑1. This circular velocity corresponds to a halo mass of ≈5.6 × 109 M ⊙ and ≈2.3 × 109 M ⊙ at z = 5 and 10, respectively: higher-mass halos can thus sustain continuous star formation activity without being quenched by external ionizing flux. More stringent constraints are prevented by the uncertainty in the modeling of the cluster lens, as embodied by systematic differences among the lens models available.

  10. The abundance and colours of galaxies in high-redshift clusters in the cold dark matter cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merson, Alexander I.; Baugh, Carlton M.; Gonzalez-Perez, Violeta; Abdalla, Filipe B.; Lagos, Claudia del P.; Mei, Simona

    2016-02-01

    High-redshift galaxy clusters allow us to examine galaxy formation in extreme environments. Here we compile data for 15 z > 1 galaxy clusters to test the predictions from a state-of-the-art semi-analytical model of galaxy formation. The model gives a good match to the slope and zero-point of the cluster red sequence. The model is able to match the cluster galaxy luminosity function at faint and bright magnitudes, but underestimates the number of galaxies around the break in the cluster luminosity function. We find that simply assuming a weaker dust attenuation improves the model predictions for the cluster galaxy luminosity function, but worsens the predictions for the red sequence at bright magnitudes. Examination of the properties of the bright cluster galaxies suggests that the default dust attenuation is large due to these galaxies having large reservoirs of cold gas as well as small radii. We find that matching the luminosity function and colours of high-redshift cluster galaxies, whilst remaining consistent with local observations, poses a challenge for galaxy formation models.

  11. Constraints on cold dark matter theories from observations of massive x-ray-luminous clusters of galaxies at high redshift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luppino, G. A.; Gioia, I. M.

    1995-01-01

    During the course of a gravitational lensing survey of distant, X-ray selected Einstein Observatory Extended Medium Sensitivity Survey (EMSS) clusters of galaxies, we have studied six X-ray-luminous (L(sub x) greater than 5 x 10(exp 44)(h(sub 50)(exp -2))ergs/sec) clusters at redshifts exceeding z = 0.5. All of these clusters are apparently massive. In addition to their high X-ray luminosity, two of the clusters at z approximately 0.6 exhibit gravitationally lensed arcs. Furthermore, the highest redshift cluster in our sample, MS 1054-0321 at z = 0.826, is both extremely X-ray luminous (L(sub 0.3-3.5keV)=9.3 x 10(exp 44)(h(sub 50)(exp -2))ergs/sec) and exceedingly rich with an optical richness comparable to an Abell Richness Class 4 cluster. In this Letter, we discuss the cosmological implications of the very existence of these clusters for hierarchical structure formation theories such as standard Omega = 1 CDM (cold dark matter), hybrid Omega = 1 C + HDM (hot dark matter), and flat, low-density Lambda + CDM models.

  12. Observations of High-Redshift X-Ray Selected Clusters with the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muchovej, Stephen; Carlstrom, John E.; Cartwright, John; Greer, Christopher; Hawkins, David; Hennessey, Ryan; Joy, Marshall; Lamb, James; Leitch, Erik M.; Loh, Michael; Miller, Amber D.; Mroczkowski, Tony; Pryke, Clem; Reddall, Ben; Runyan, Marcus; Sharp, Matthew; Woody, David

    2006-01-01

    We report measurements of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect in three high redshift (0.89 less than or equal to z less than or equal to 1.03), X-ray selected galaxy clusters. The observations were obtained at 30 GHz during the commissioning period of a new, eight-element interferometer - the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Array (SZA) - built for dedicated SZ effect observations. The SZA observations are sensitive to angular scales larger than those subtended by the virial radii of the clusters. Assuming isothermality and hydrostatic equilibrium for the intracluster medium, and gas-mass fractions consistent with those for clusters at moderate redshift, we calculate electron temperatures, gas masses, and total cluster masses from the SZ data. The SZ-derived masses, integrated approximately to the virial radii, are 1.9 (sup +0.5)(sub -0.4) x 10(exp 14) solar mass for Cl J1415.1+3612, 3.4 (sup +0.6)(sub -0.5) x 10(exp 14) solar mass for Cl J1429.0+4241 and 7.2 (sup +1.3)(sub -0.9) x 10(exp 14) solar mass for Cl J1226.9+3332. The SZ-derived quantities are in good agreement with the cluster properties derived from X-ray measurements.

  13. A Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope search for associated H I 21 cm absorption in high-redshift flat-spectrum sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aditya, J. N. H. S.; Kanekar, Nissim; Kurapati, Sushma

    2016-02-01

    We report results from a Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope search for `associated' redshifted H I 21 cm absorption from 24 active galactic nuclei (AGNs), at 1.1 < z < 3.6, selected from the Caltech-Jodrell Bank Flat-spectrum (CJF) sample. 22 out of 23 sources with usable data showed no evidence of absorption, with typical 3σ optical depth detection limits of ≈0.01 at a velocity resolution of ≈30 km s-1. A single tentative absorption detection was obtained at z ≈ 3.530 towards TXS 0604+728. If confirmed, this would be the highest redshift at which H I 21 cm absorption has ever been detected. Including 29 CJF sources with searches for redshifted H I 21 cm absorption in the literature, mostly at z < 1, we construct a sample of 52 uniformly selected flat-spectrum sources. A Peto-Prentice two-sample test for censored data finds (at ≈3σ significance) that the strength of H I 21 cm absorption is weaker in the high-z sample than in the low-z sample; this is the first statistically significant evidence for redshift evolution in the strength of H I 21 cm absorption in a uniformly selected AGN sample. However, the two-sample test also finds that the H I 21 cm absorption strength is higher in AGNs with low ultraviolet or radio luminosities, at ≈3.4σ significance. The fact that the higher luminosity AGNs of the sample typically lie at high redshifts implies that it is currently not possible to break the degeneracy between AGN luminosity and redshift evolution as the primary cause of the low H I 21 cm opacities in high-redshift, high-luminosity AGNs.

  14. A physical model for the evolving ultraviolet luminosity function of high redshift galaxies and their contribution to the cosmic reionization

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Zhen-Yi; Lapi, Andrea; Bressan, Alessandro; De Zotti, Gianfranco; Danese, Luigi; Negrello, Mattia

    2014-04-10

    We present a physical model for the evolution of the ultraviolet (UV) luminosity function of high-redshift galaxies, taking into account in a self-consistent way their chemical evolution and the associated evolution of dust extinction. Dust extinction is found to increase fast with halo mass. A strong correlation between dust attenuation and halo/stellar mass for UV selected high-z galaxies is thus predicted. The model yields good fits of the UV and Lyman-α (Lyα) line luminosity functions at all redshifts at which they have been measured. The weak observed evolution of both luminosity functions between z = 2 and z = 6 is explained as the combined effect of the negative evolution of the halo mass function; of the increase with redshift of the star formation efficiency due to the faster gas cooling; and of dust extinction, differential with halo mass. The slope of the faint end of the UV luminosity function is found to steepen with increasing redshift, implying that low luminosity galaxies increasingly dominate the contribution to the UV background at higher and higher redshifts. The observed range of the UV luminosities at high z implies a minimum halo mass capable of hosting active star formation M {sub crit} ≲ 10{sup 9.8} M {sub ☉}, which is consistent with the constraints from hydrodynamical simulations. From fits of Lyα line luminosity functions, plus data on the luminosity dependence of extinction, and from the measured ratios of non-ionizing UV to Lyman-continuum flux density for samples of z ≅ 3 Lyman break galaxies and Lyα emitters, we derive a simple relationship between the escape fraction of ionizing photons and the star formation rate. It implies that the escape fraction is larger for low-mass galaxies, which are almost dust-free and have lower gas column densities. Galaxies already represented in the UV luminosity function (M {sub UV} ≲ –18) can keep the universe fully ionized up to z ≅ 6. This is consistent with (uncertain) data

  15. PKS 2123-463: A Confirmed Gamma-ray Blazar at High Redshift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    D'Ammando, F.; Rau, A.; Schady, P.; Finke, J.; Orienti, M.; Greiner, J.; Kann, D. A.; Ojha, R.; Foley, A. R.; Stevens, J.; Blanchard, J. M.; Edwards, P. G.; Kadler, M.; Lovell, J. E.

    2013-01-01

    The flat spectrum radio quasar (FSRQ) PKS 2123-463 was associated in the first Fermi- Large Area Telescope (LAT) source catalogue with the gamma-ray source 1FGL J2126.1-4603, but when considering the full first two years of Fermi observations, no gamma-ray source at a position consistent with this FSRQ was detected, and thus PKS 2123-463 was not reported in the second Fermi-LAT source catalogue. On 2011 December 14 a gamma-ray source positionally consistent with PKS 2123-463 was detected in flaring activity by Fermi-LAT. This activity triggered radio-to-X-ray observations by the Swift,Gamma-ray Optical/Near-Infrared Detector (GROND), Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA), Ceduna and Seven Dishes Karoo Array Telescope (KAT-7) observatories. Results of the localization of the gamma-ray source over 41 months of Fermi-LAT operation are reported here in conjunction with the results of the analysis of radio, optical, ultraviolet (UV) and X-ray data collected soon after the gamma-ray flare. The strict spatial association with the lower energy counterpart together with a simultaneous increase of the activity in optical, UV, X-ray and gamma-ray bands led to a firm identification of the gamma-ray source with PKS 2123-463. A new photometric redshift has been estimated as z = 1.46 plus or minus 0.05 using GROND and Swift Ultraviolet/Optical Telescope (UVOT) observations, in rough agreement with the disputed spectroscopic redshift of z = 1.67.We fit the broad-band spectral energy distribution with a synchrotron/external Compton model. We find that a thermal disc component is necessary to explain the optical/UV emission detected by Swift/UVOT. This disc has a luminosity of approximately 1.8 x 10(exp 46) erg s(exp -1), and a fit to the disc emission assuming a Schwarzschild (i.e. non-rotating) black hole gives a mass of approximately 2 x 10(exp 9) solar mass. This is the first black hole mass estimate for this source.

  16. Extended Lyman α haloes around individual high-redshift galaxies revealed by MUSE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wisotzki, L.; Bacon, R.; Blaizot, J.; Brinchmann, J.; Herenz, E. C.; Schaye, J.; Bouché, N.; Cantalupo, S.; Contini, T.; Carollo, C. M.; Caruana, J.; Courbot, J.-B.; Emsellem, E.; Kamann, S.; Kerutt, J.; Leclercq, F.; Lilly, S. J.; Patrício, V.; Sandin, C.; Steinmetz, M.; Straka, L. A.; Urrutia, T.; Verhamme, A.; Weilbacher, P. M.; Wendt, M.

    2016-03-01

    We report the detection of extended Lyα emission around individual star-forming galaxies at redshifts z = 3-6 in an ultradeep exposure of the Hubble Deep Field South obtained with MUSE on the ESO-VLT. The data reach a limiting surface brightness (1σ) of ~1 × 10-19 erg s-1 cm-2 arcsec-2 in azimuthally averaged radial profiles, an order of magnitude improvement over previous narrowband imaging. Our sample consists of 26 spectroscopically confirmed Lyα-emitting, but mostly continuum-faint (mAB ≳ 27) galaxies. In most objects the Lyα emission is considerably more extended than the UV continuum light. While five of the faintest galaxies in the sample show no significantly detected Lyα haloes, the derived upper limits suggest that this is due to insufficient S/N. Lyα haloes therefore appear to be ubiquitous even for low-mass (~ 108-109 M⊙) star-forming galaxies at z > 3. We decompose the Lyα emission of each object into a compact component tracing the UV continuum and an extended halo component, and infer sizes and luminosities of the haloes. The extended Lyα emission approximately follows an exponential surface brightness distribution with a scale length of a few kpc. While these haloes are thus quite modest in terms of their absolute sizes, they are larger by a factor of 5-15 than the corresponding rest-frame UV continuum sources as seen by HST. They are also much more extended, by a factor ~5, than Lyα haloes around low-redshift star-forming galaxies. Between ~40% and ≳90% of the observed Lyα flux comes from the extended halo component, with no obvious correlation of this fraction with either the absolute or the relative size of the Lyα halo. Our observations provide direct insights into the spatial distribution of at least partly neutral gas residing in the circumgalactic medium of low to intermediate mass galaxies at z > 3.

  17. STRUCTURES OF LOCAL GALAXIES COMPARED TO HIGH-REDSHIFT STAR-FORMING GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Petty, Sara M.; De Mello, DuIlia F.; Gallagher, John S.; Gardner, Jonathan P.; Lotz, Jennifer M.; Matt Mountain, C.; Smith, Linda J.

    2009-08-15

    The rest-frame far-ultraviolet morphologies of eight nearby interacting and starburst galaxies (Arp 269, M 82, Mrk 8, NGC 520, NGC 1068, NGC 3079, NGC 3310, and NGC 7673) are compared with 54 galaxies at z {approx} 1.5 and 46 galaxies at z {approx} 4 observed in the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey (GOODS) taken with the Advanced Camera for Surveys onboard the Hubble Space Telescope. The nearby sample is artificially redshifted to z {approx} 1.5 and 4 by applying luminosity and size scaling. We compare the simulated galaxy morphologies to real z {approx} 1.5 and 4 UV-bright galaxy morphologies. We calculate the Gini coefficient (G), the second-order moment of the brightest 20% of the galaxy's flux (M {sub 20}), and the Sersic index (n). We explore the use of nonparametric methods with two-dimensional profile fitting and find the combination of M {sub 20} with n an efficient method to classify galaxies as having merger, exponential disk, or bulge-like morphologies. When classified according to G and M {sub 20} 20/30% of real/simulated galaxies at z {approx} 1.5 and 37/12% at z {approx} 4 have bulge-like morphologies. The rest have merger-like or intermediate distributions. Alternatively, when classified according to the Sersic index, 70% of the z {approx} 1.5 and z {approx} 4 real galaxies are exponential disks or bulge-like with n>0.8, and {approx} 30% of the real galaxies are classified as mergers. The artificially redshifted galaxies have n values with {approx} 35% bulge or exponential at z {approx} 1.5 and 4. Therefore, {approx} 20%-30% of Lyman-break galaxies have structures similar to local starburst mergers, and may be driven by similar processes. We assume merger-like or clumpy star-forming galaxies in the GOODS field have morphological structure with values n < 0.8 and M {sub 20}> - 1.7. We conclude that Mrk 8, NGC 3079, and NGC 7673 have structures similar to those of merger-like and clumpy star-forming galaxies observed at z {approx} 1.5 and 4.

  18. Comparing Local Starbursts to High-Redshift Galaxies: A Search for Lyman-Break Analogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petty, Sara M.; de Mello, Duila F.; Gallagher III, John S.; Gardner, Jonathan; Lotz, Jennifer M.; Mountain, C. Matt; Smith, Linda J.

    2008-01-01

    We compare the restframe far-ultraviolet (FUV) morphologies of 8 nearby interacting and starburst galaxies (Arp 269, M 82, Mrk 08, NGC 0520, NGC 1068, NGC 3079, NGC 3310, NGC 7673) with 54 galaxies at z approx.1.5 and 46 galaxies at z approx.4 in the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey (GOODS) images taken with the Advanced Camera for Surveys onboard the Hubble Space Telescope. We calculate the Gini coefficient (G), the second order moment of 20% of the brightest pixels (M20), and the S ersic index (n). We find that 20% (11/54) of z approx.1.5 and 37% (17/46) of z approx.4 galaxies are bulge-like, using G and M20. We also find approx.70% of the z approx.1.5 and z approx.4 galaxies have exponential disks with n > 0.8. The 2D profile combined with the nonparametric methods provides more detail, concerning the nature of disturbed systems, such as merger and post-merger types. We also provide qualitative descriptions of each galaxy system and at each redshift. We conclude that Mrk 08, NGC 3079, and NGC 7673 have similar morphologies as the starburst FUV restframe galaxies and Lyman-break galaxies at z approx.1.5 and 4, and determine that they are Lyman-break analogs.

  19. Disentangling AGN and Star Formation Activity at High Redshift Using Hubble Space Telescope Grism Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bridge, Joanna S.; Zeimann, Gregory R.; Trump, Jonathan R.; Gronwall, Caryl; Ciardullo, Robin; Fox, Derek; Schneider, Donald P.

    2016-08-01

    Differentiating between active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity and star formation in z ˜ 2 galaxies is difficult because traditional methods, such as line-ratio diagnostics, change with redshift, while multi-wavelength methods (X-ray, radio, IR) are sensitive to only the brightest AGNs. We have developed a new method for spatially resolving emission lines using the Hubble Space Telescope/Wide Field Camera 3 G141 grism spectra and quantifying AGN activity through the spatial gradient of the [O iii]/Hβ line ratio. Through detailed simulations, we show that our novel line-ratio gradient approach identifies ˜40% more low-mass and obscured AGNs than obtained by classical methods. Based on our simulations, we developed a relationship that maps the stellar mass, star formation rate, and measured [O iii]/Hβ gradient to the AGN Eddington ratio. We apply our technique to previously studied stacked samples of galaxies at z ˜ 2 and find that our results are consistent with these studies. This gradient method will also be able to inform other areas of galaxy evolution science, such as inside-out quenching and metallicity gradients, and will be widely applicable to future spatially resolved James Webb Space Telescope data.

  20. How robust are the size measurements of high-redshift compact galaxies?

    SciTech Connect

    Davari, Roozbeh; Ho, Luis C.; Peng, Chien Y.; Huang, Song

    2014-05-20

    Massive quiescent galaxies at z ≈ 2 are apparently much more compact than galaxies of comparable mass today. How robust are these size measurements? We perform comprehensive simulations to determine possible biases and uncertainties in fitting single-component light distributions to real galaxies. In particular, we examine the robustness of the measurements of the luminosity, size, and other structural parameters. We devise simulations with increasing realism to systematically disentangle effects due to the technique (specifically using GALFIT) and the intrinsic structures of the galaxies. By accurately capturing the detailed substructures of nearby elliptical galaxies and then rescaling their sizes and signal-to-noise to mimic galaxies at different redshifts, we confirm that the massive quiescent galaxies at z ≈ 2 are significantly more compact intrinsically than their local counterparts. Their observed compactness is not a result of missing faint outer light due to systematic errors in modeling. In fact, we find that fitting multi-component galaxies with a single Sérsic profile, the procedure most commonly adopted in the literature, biases the inferred sizes higher by up to 10%-20%, which accentuates the amount of size evolution required. If the sky estimation has been done robustly and the model for the point-spread function is fairly accurate, GALFIT can retrieve the properties of single-component galaxies over a wide range of signal-to-noise ratios without introducing any systematic errors.

  1. Limits to Seeing High-Redshift Galaxies Due to Planck-Scale-Induced Blurring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinbring, Eric

    If spacetime is ``foamy'' travel along a lightpath must be subject to continual, random distance fluctuations +/- δ l proportional to Planck length l P ~ 10-35 m (Lieu & Hillman 2003). Although each ``kick'' by itself is tiny, these may accumulate. Accounting for redshifted (bluer) emitted photons, over a cosmological distance L = (1+z)L C for co-moving distance L C, the resultant phase perturbations Δ φ = 2π δ l/λ at observed wavelength λ could grow independently of telescope diameter D to a maximum of Δφmax=(1+z)Δφ0 (Steinbring 2007) where Δφ0=2π a 0 (l P α/λ)L 1 - α follows Ng et al. (2003). Here a 0 ~ 1 and α specifies the quantum-gravity model: 1/2 implies a random walk and 2/3 is consistent with the holographic principle; a vanishingly small ΔφP=Δφmax/[(1 + z) a 0 (L/l P)1 - α]=2π l P/λ is approached when α=1.

  2. Supermassive black hole formation at high redshifts via direct collapse in a cosmological context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jun-Hwan; Shlosman, Isaac; Begelman, Mitchell C.

    2015-07-01

    We study the early stage of the formation of seed supermassive black holes via direct collapse in dark matter (DM) haloes, in the cosmological context. We perform high-resolution zoom-in simulations of such collapse at high z. Using the adaptive mesh refinement code ENZO, we resolve the formation and growth of a DM halo, until its virial temperature reaches ˜104 K, atomic cooling turns on, and collapse ensues. We demonstrate that direct collapse proceeds in two stages, although they are not well separated. The first stage is triggered by the onset of atomic cooling, and leads to rapidly increasing accretion rate with radius, from dot{M}˜ 0.1 M_{⊙} yr^{-1} at the halo virial radius to few M⊙ yr-1, around the scale radius Rs ˜ 30 pc of the NFW DM density profile. The second stage of the collapse commences when the gas density takes precedence over the DM density. This is associated with the gas decoupling from the DM gravitational potential. The ensuing collapse approximates that of an isothermal sphere with dot{M}{(r)}˜ const. We confirm that the gas loses its angular momentum through non-axisymmetric perturbations and gravitational torques, to overcome the centrifugal barrier. During the course of the collapse, this angular momentum transfer process happens on nearly all spatial scales, and the angular momentum vector of the gas varies with position and time. Collapsing gas also exhibits supersonic turbulent motions which suppress gas fragmentation, and are characterized by density PDF consisting of a lognormal part and a high-density power-law tail.

  3. GOODS-HERSCHEL: IMPACT OF ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI AND STAR FORMATION ACTIVITY ON INFRARED SPECTRAL ENERGY DISTRIBUTIONS AT HIGH REDSHIFT

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkpatrick, Allison; Pope, Alexandra; Alexander, David M.; Charmandaris, Vassilis; Daddi, Emmanuele; Elbaz, David; Gabor, Jared; Mullaney, James; Pannella, Maurilio; Aussel, Herve; Bournaud, Frederic; Dasyra, Kalliopi; Hwang, Ho Seong; Ivison, Rob; Scott, Douglas; Altieri, Bruno; Coia, Daniela; Buat, Veronique; Dannerbauer, Helmut; and others

    2012-11-10

    We explore the effects of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and star formation activity on the infrared (0.3-1000 {mu}m) spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of luminous infrared galaxies from z = 0.5 to 4.0. We have compiled a large sample of 151 galaxies selected at 24 {mu}m (S {sub 24} {approx}> 100 {mu}Jy) in the GOODS-N and ECDFS fields for which we have deep Spitzer IRS spectroscopy, allowing us to decompose the mid-IR spectrum into contributions from star formation and AGN activity. A significant portion ({approx}25%) of our sample is dominated by an AGN (>50% of the mid-IR luminosity) in the mid-IR. Based on the mid-IR classification, we divide our full sample into four sub-samples: z {approx} 1 star-forming (SF) sources, z {approx} 2 SF sources, AGNs with clear 9.7 {mu}m silicate absorption, and AGNs with featureless mid-IR spectra. From our large spectroscopic sample and wealth of multi-wavelength data, including deep Herschel imaging at 100, 160, 250, 350, and 500 {mu}m, we use 95 galaxies with complete spectral coverage to create a composite SED for each sub-sample. We then fit a two-temperature component modified blackbody to the SEDs. We find that the IR SEDs have similar cold dust temperatures, regardless of the mid-IR power source, but display a marked difference in the warmer dust temperatures. We calculate the average effective temperature of the dust in each sub-sample and find a significant ({approx}20 K) difference between the SF and AGN systems. We compare our composite SEDs to local templates and find that local templates do not accurately reproduce the mid-IR features and dust temperatures of our high-redshift systems. High-redshift IR luminous galaxies contain significantly more cool dust than their local counterparts. We find that a full suite of photometry spanning the IR peak is necessary to accurately account for the dominant dust temperature components in high-redshift IR luminous galaxies.

  4. THERMAL AND RADIATIVE ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS FEEDBACK HAVE A LIMITED IMPACT ON STAR FORMATION IN HIGH-REDSHIFT GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Roos, Orianne; Juneau, Stéphanie; Bournaud, Frédéric; Gabor, Jared M.

    2015-02-10

    The effects of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) on their host galaxies depend on the coupling between the injected energy and the interstellar medium (ISM). Here, we model and quantify the impact of long-range AGN ionizing radiation—in addition to the often considered small-scale energy deposition—on the physical state of the multi-phase ISM of the host galaxy and on its total star formation rate (SFR). We formulate an AGN spectral energy distribution matched with observations, which we use with the radiative transfer (RT) code Cloudy to compute AGN ionization in a simulated high-redshift disk galaxy. We use a high-resolution (∼6 pc) simulation including standard thermal AGN feedback and calculate RT in post-processing. Surprisingly, while these models produce significant AGN-driven outflows, we find that AGN ionizing radiation and heating reduce the SFR by a few percent at most for a quasar luminosity (L {sub bol} = 10{sup 46.5} erg s{sup –1}). Although the circumgalactic gaseous halo can be kept almost entirely ionized by the AGN, most star-forming clouds (n ≳ 10{sup 2} {sup –} {sup 3} cm{sup –3}) and even the reservoirs of cool atomic gas (n ∼ 0.3-10 cm{sup –3})—which are the sites of future star formation (SF; 100-200 Myr), are generally too dense to be significantly affected. Our analysis ignores any absorption from a putative torus, making our results upper limits on the effects of ionizing radiation. Therefore, while the AGN-driven outflows can remove substantial amounts of gas in the long term, the impact of AGN feedback on the SF efficiency in the interstellar gas in high-redshift galaxies is marginal, even when long-range radiative effects are accounted for.

  5. Tracing the Evolution of High-redshift Galaxies Using Stellar Abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosby, Brian D.; O'Shea, Brian W.; Beers, Timothy C.; Tumlinson, Jason

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents the first results from a model for chemical evolution that can be applied to N-body cosmological simulations and quantitatively compared to measured stellar abundances from large astronomical surveys. This model convolves the chemical yield sets from a range of stellar nucleosynthesis calculations (including asymptotic giant branch stars, Type Ia and II supernovae, and stellar wind models) with a user-specified stellar initial mass function (IMF) and metallicity to calculate the time-dependent chemical evolution model for a “simple stellar population” (SSP) of uniform metallicity and formation time. These SSP models are combined with a semianalytic model for galaxy formation and evolution that uses merger trees from N-body cosmological simulations to track several α- and iron-peak elements for the stellar and multiphase interstellar medium components of several thousand galaxies in the early (z ≥ 6) universe. The simulated galaxy population is then quantitatively compared to two complementary data sets of abundances in the Milky Way stellar halo and is capable of reproducing many of the observed abundance trends. The observed abundance ratio distributions are best reproduced with a Chabrier IMF, a chemically enriched star formation efficiency of 0.2, and a redshift of reionization of 7. Many abundances are qualitatively well matched by our model, but our model consistently overpredicts the carbon-enhanced fraction of stars at low metallicities, likely owing to incomplete coverage of Population III stellar yields and supernova models and the lack of dust as a component of our model.

  6. A Search for Stellar Dust Production in Leo P, a Nearby Analog of High Redshift Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyer, Martha; McDonald, Iain; McQuinn, Kristen; Skillman, Evan; Sonneborn, George; Srinivasan, Sundar; van Loon, Jacco Th.; Zijlstra, Albert; Sloan, Greg

    2016-08-01

    The origin of dust in the early Universe is a matter of debate. One of the main potential dust contributors are Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars, and several studies have been devoted to investigating whether and how AGB dust production changes in metal-poor environments. Of particular interest are the most massive AGB stars (8-10 Msun), which can in principle enter the dust-producing phase <50 Myr after they form. However, these stars cannot produce their own condensable material (unlike carbon AGB stars), so the efficiency of dust production decreases with metallicity. Evidence for dust production in massive AGB stars more metal-poor than the Magellanic Clouds is scarce due both to the rarity of chemically-unevolved, star-forming systems reachable in the infrared and to the short lifetimes of these stars. The recently discovered galaxy Leo P provides an irresistible opportunity to search for these massive AGB stars: Leo P is a gas-rich, star-forming galaxy, it is nearby enough for resolved star photometry with Spitzer, and its interstellar medium is 0.4 dex more metal-poor than any other accessible star-forming galaxy. Models predict ~3 massive AGB stars may be present in Leo P, and optical HST observations reveal 7 candidates. We propose to use Spitzer to determine whether these stars are dusty, providing valuable constraints to the dust contribution from AGB stars up to at least redshift 3.2, or 11.7 Gyr ago, when massive spheroidals and Galactic globular clusters were still forming. This is a gain of 2.8 Gyr compared to other accessible galaxies. We also request 1 orbit of joint HST time to confirm whether the AGB candidates in Leo P are indeed massive AGB stars belonging to the galaxy. These observations will provide information crucial for potential JWST followup spectroscopy.

  7. Applying Observational Methods to Images of a Simulated High-Redshift Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Robert J.; Scannapieco, E.; Thacker, R.; Windhorst, R. A.

    2011-01-01

    Flexible Image Transport (FITS) images produced from numerical cosmological simulations of dark and baryonic matter are analyzed using Source Extractor (SExtractor), a tool frequently used in observational image analysis. The goal is to assist the interpretation of simulation by better understanding how simulation data might appear in the observational domain. The simulation model, based on Gadget-2 (Springel and Hernquist, 2003) includes gas heating, cooling and star formation. The stellar components of the model are processed by the Bruzual-Charlot (BC03) stellar population models to produce SEDs (Spectral Energy Distributions). These are then folded with different infrared filters, including selected filters from WFC3 and the proposed Near Infrared Camera (NIRCam) for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). The simulation data are taken at different redshifts from z 4 to 11, re-sized according to their comoving distances, converted to FITS format files and combined with noise to simulate instrument and background effects. The images are then analyzed with SExtractor to find groupings which are identified as galaxies or galaxy building blocks. Photometry is performed on these objects using SExtractor to extract luminosity functions in the emitted rest frames. Initially, minimal noise levels are used to allow fine details of the model to be "observed.” More realistic sky background levels are then added to estimate the effect of artifacts of observation. We use these models to predict the faint-end Schechter slope evolution alpha(z). We compare these models to the most recent Hathi et al. (2010, ApJ, 720, 1708 ) data, and find good agreement in the faint end slope evolution: predicted alpha (7>z>5) = -1.7 to -1.8, observed alpha (z>5) = -1.75 .

  8. The Luminous Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Emission Features: Applications to High Redshift Galaxies and Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shipley, Heath; Papovich, Casey

    2015-08-01

    We provide a new robust star-formation rate (SFR) calibration using the luminosity from polycyclic aromatic hydrogen (PAH) molecules. The PAH features emit strongly in the mid-infrared (mid-IR; 3-19μm), mitigating dust extinction, and they are very luminous, containing 5-10% of the total IR luminosity in galaxies. We derive the calibration of the PAH luminosity as a SFR indicator using a sample of 105 star-forming galaxies covering a range of total IR luminosity, LIR = L(8-1000μm) = 109 - 1012 L⊙ and redshift 0 < z < 0.6. The PAH luminosity correlates linearly with the SFR as measured by the dust-corrected Hα luminosity (using the sum of the Hα and rest-frame 24μm luminosity from Kennicutt et al. 2009), with tight scatter of ~0.15 dex, comparable to the scatter in the dust-corrected Hα SFRs and Paα SFRs. We show this relation is sensitive to galaxy metallicity, where the PAH luminosity of galaxies with Z < 0.7 Z⊙ departs from the linear SFR relationship but in a behaved manor. We derive for this a correction to galaxies below solar metallicity. As a case study for observations with JWST, we apply the PAH SFR calibration to a sample of lensed galaxies at 1 < z < 3 with Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) data, and we demonstrate the utility of PAHs to derive SFRs as accurate as those available from any other indicator. This new SFR indicator will be useful for probing the peak of the SFR density of the universe (1 < z < 3) and for studying the coevolution of star-formation and supermassive blackhole accretion contemporaneously in a galaxy.

  9. Dark Matter annihilations in halos and high-redshift sources of reionization of the universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulin, Vivian; Serpico, Pasquale D.; Lesgourgues, Julien

    2015-12-01

    It is well known that annihilations in the homogeneous fluid of dark matter (DM) can leave imprints in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy power spectrum. However, the relevance of DM annihilations in halos for cosmological observables is still subject to debate, with previous works reaching different conclusions on this point. Also, all previous studies used a single type of parameterization for the astrophysical reionization, and included no astrophysical source for the heating of the intergalactic medium. In this work, we revisit these problems. When standard approaches are adopted, we find that the ionization fraction does exhibit a very particular (and potentially constraining) pattern, but the currently measurable τreio is left almost unchanged: in agreement with most of the previous literature, for plausible halo models we find that the modification of the signal with respect to the one coming from annihilations in the smooth background is tiny, below cosmic variance within currently allowed parameter space. However, if different and probably more realistic treatments of the astrophysical sources of reionization and heating are adopted, a more pronounced effect of the DM annihilation in halos is possible. We thus conclude that within currently adopted baseline models the impact of the virialised DM structures cannot be uncovered by CMB power spectra measurements, but a larger impact is possible if peculiar models are invoked for the redshift evolution of the DM annihilation signal or different assumptions are made for the astrophysical contributions. A better understanding (both theoretical and observational) of the reionization and temperature history of the universe, notably via the 21 cm signal, seems the most promising way for using halo formation as a tool in DM searches, improving over the sensitivity of current cosmological probes.

  10. Strongly time-variable ultraviolet metal-line emission from the circum-galactic medium of high-redshift galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sravan, Niharika; Faucher-Giguère, Claude-André; van de Voort, Freeke; Kereš, Dušan; Muratov, Alexander L.; Hopkins, Philip F.; Feldmann, Robert; Quataert, Eliot; Murray, Norman

    2016-11-01

    We use cosmological simulations from the Feedback In Realistic Environments project, which implement a comprehensive set of stellar feedback processes, to study ultraviolet (UV) metal-line emission from the circum-galactic medium of high-redshift (z = 2-4) galaxies. Our simulations cover the halo mass range Mh ˜ 2 × 1011-8.5 × 1012 M⊙ at z = 2, representative of Lyman break galaxies. Of the transitions we analyse, the low-ionization C III (977 Å) and Si III (1207 Å) emission lines are the most luminous, with C IV (1548 Å) and Si IV (1394 Å) also showing interesting spatially extended structures. The more massive haloes are on average more UV-luminous. The UV metal-line emission from galactic haloes in our simulations arises primarily from collisionally ionized gas and is strongly time variable, with peak-to-trough variations of up to ˜2 dex. The peaks of UV metal-line luminosity correspond closely to massive and energetic mass outflow events, which follow bursts of star formation and inject sufficient energy into galactic haloes to power the metal-line emission. The strong time variability implies that even some relatively low-mass haloes may be detectable. Conversely, flux-limited samples will be biased towards haloes whose central galaxy has recently experienced a strong burst of star formation. Spatially extended UV metal-line emission around high-redshift galaxies should be detectable by current and upcoming integral field spectrographs such as the Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer on the Very Large Telescope and Keck Cosmic Web Imager.

  11. The Connection between Stellar Populations and the Baryon Cycle and Ionizing Escape Fractions of Galaxies at High Redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, Naveen; Steidel, Charles

    2016-08-01

    We propose Spitzer IRAC 3.6 micron observations to cover the three remaining fields of a large spectroscopic survey of galaxies, AGN, and QSOs in the same cosmic volumes at z~2-3. The IRAC data will be used to probe the stellar populations in these galaxies and to understand how galaxy properties (e.g., stellar masses, ages, reddening, star-formation rates) depend on the flow of baryons into and out of galaxies, as well as identify those properties of galaxies that are conducive to the escape of ionizing radiation at high redshift. The dense spectroscopic sampling of the targeted fields have provided unique insights into metal enrichment as a function of galactocentric radius and the statistical correlation between galaxies and metals in the inter-galactic medium. Our goal is to quantify how the distribution of metals in the circum-galactic and inter-galactic media (CGM/IGM) depend on the stellar masses, ages, and star formation rates of galaxies. Moreover, in an effort to clarify the role of galaxies in reionizing the Universe (and keeping it ionized), we wish to understand the types of stellar populations (e.g., stellar masses, ages) that influence the propensity of galaxies to leak ionizing radiation. Our preliminary observations suggest that bluer galaxies with lower star-formation rates have larger escape fractions, but the results are tentative without the inclusion of the IRAC data proposed here. A modest investment of just 13.1 hours (including overhead), divided among the three fields will cover a total of approximately 200 spectroscopically-confirmed z~2-3 galaxies that span two orders of magnitude in bolometric luminosity and stellar mass. The proposed IRAC imaging will allow us to fully leverage the existing spectroscopic samples that form the backbone of our survey of the baryon cycle and escaping ionizing radiation at high redshift.

  12. Dark-ages reionization and galaxy formation simulation - IV. UV luminosity functions of high-redshift galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chuanwu; Mutch, Simon J.; Angel, P. W.; Duffy, Alan R.; Geil, Paul M.; Poole, Gregory B.; Mesinger, Andrei; Wyithe, J. Stuart B.

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we present calculations of the UV luminosity function (LF) from the Dark-ages Reionization And Galaxy-formation Observables from Numerical Simulations project, which combines N-body, semi-analytic and seminumerical modelling designed to study galaxy formation during the Epoch of Reionization. Using galaxy formation physics including supernova feedback, the model naturally reproduces the UV LFs for high-redshift star-forming galaxies from z ˜ 5 through to z ˜ 10. We investigate the luminosity-star formation rate (SFR) relation, finding that variable SFR histories of galaxies result in a scatter around the median relation of 0.1-0.3 dex depending on UV luminosity. We find close agreement between the model and observationally derived SFR functions. We use our calculated luminosities to investigate the LF below current detection limits, and the ionizing photon budget for reionization. We predict that the slope of the UV LF remains steep below current detection limits and becomes flat at MUV ≳ -14. We find that 48 (17) per cent of the total UV flux at z ˜ 6 (10) has been detected above an observational limit of MUV ˜ -17, and that galaxies fainter than MUV ˜ -17 are the main source of ionizing photons for reionization. We investigate the luminosity-stellar mass relation, and find a correlation for galaxies with MUV < -14 that has the form M_{ast } ∝ 10^{-0.47M_UV}, in good agreement with observations, but which flattens for fainter galaxies. We determine the luminosity-halo mass relation to be M_vir ∝ 10^{-0.35M_UV}, finding that galaxies with MUV = -20 reside in host dark matter haloes of 1011.0±0.1 M⊙ at z ˜ 6, and that this mass decreases towards high redshift.

  13. Properties of z ~ 3-6 Lyman break galaxies. II. Impact of nebular emission at high redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Barros, S.; Schaerer, D.; Stark, D. P.

    2014-03-01

    Context. To gain insight on the mass assembly and place constraints on the star formation history (SFH) of Lyman break galaxies (LBGs), it is important to accurately determine their properties. Aims: We estimate how nebular emission and different SFHs affect parameter estimation of LBGs. Methods: We present a homogeneous, detailed analysis of the spectral energy distribution (SED) of ~1700 LBGs from the GOODS-MUSIC catalogue with deep multi-wavelength photometry from the U band to 8 μm to determine stellar mass, age, dust attenuation, and star formation rate. Using our SED fitting tool, which takes into account nebular emission, we explore a wide parameter space. We also explore a set of different star formation histories. Results: Nebular emission is found to significantly affect the determination of the physical parameters for the majority of z ~ 3-6 LBGs. We identify two populations of galaxies by determining the importance of the contribution of emission lines to broadband fluxes. We find that ~65% of LBGs show detectable signs of emission lines, whereas ~35% show weak or no emission lines. This distribution is found over the entire redshift range. We interpret these groups as actively star-forming and more quiescent LBGs, respectively. We find that it is necessary to considerer SED fits with very young ages (<50 Myr) to reproduce some colours affected by strong emission lines. Other arguments favouring episodic star formation and relatively short star formation timescales are also discussed. Considering nebular emission generally leads to a younger age, lower stellar mass, higher dust attenuation, higher star formation rate, and a large scatter in the SFR-M⋆ relation. Our analysis yields a trend of increasing specific star formation rate with redshift, as predicted by recent galaxy evolution models. Conclusions: The physical parameters of approximately two thirds of high redshift galaxies are significantly modified when we account for nebular emission. The

  14. THE ORIGIN OF [O II] IN POST-STARBURST AND RED-SEQUENCE GALAXIES IN HIGH-REDSHIFT CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Lemaux, B. C.; Lubin, L. M.; Kocevski, D.; Shapley, A.; Gal, R. R.; Squires, G. K.

    2010-06-20

    We present the first results from a near-IR spectroscopic campaign of the Cl1604 supercluster at z {approx} 0.9 and the cluster RX J1821.6+6827 at z {approx} 0.82 to investigate the nature of [O II] {lambda}3727 emission in cluster galaxies at high redshift. Of the 401 members in Cl1604 and RX J1821+6827 confirmed using the Keck II/DEIMOS spectrograph, 131 galaxies have detectable [O II] emission with no other signs of current star formation activity, as well as strong absorption features indicative of a well-established older stellar population. The combination of these features suggests that the primary source of [O II] emission in these galaxies is not a result of star formation processes, but rather due to the presence of a low-ionization nuclear emission-line region (LINER) or Seyfert component. Using the NIRSPEC spectrograph on the Keck II 10 m telescope, 19 such galaxies were targeted, as well as 6 additional [O II]-emitting cluster members that exhibited signs of ongoing star formation activity. Nearly half ({approx}47%) of the 19 [O II]-emitting, absorption-line-dominated galaxies exhibit [O II] to H{alpha} equivalent width (EW) ratios higher than unity, the typical observed value for star-forming galaxies, with an EW distribution similar to that observed for LINERs at low redshift. A majority ({approx}68%) of these 19 galaxies are classified as LINER/Seyfert based primarily on the emission-line ratio of [N II] {lambda}6584 and H{alpha}. The fraction of LINER/Seyferts increases to {approx}85% for red [O II]-emitting, absorption-line-dominated galaxies. The LINER/Seyfert galaxies in our Cl1604 sample exhibit average L([O II])/L(H{alpha}) ratios that are significantly higher than that observed in populations of star-forming galaxies, suggesting that [O II] is a poor indicator of star formation in a significant fraction of high-redshift cluster members. From the prevalence of [O II]-emitting, absorption-line-dominated galaxies in both systems and the fraction

  15. The Luminous Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Emission Features: Applications to High Redshift Galaxies and Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shipley, Heath V.

    2016-01-01

    For decades, significant work has been applied to calibrating emission from the ultra-violet, nebular emission lines, far-infrared, X-ray and radio as tracers of the star-formation rate (SFR) in distant galaxies. Understanding the exact rate of star-formation and how it evolves with time and galaxy mass has deep implications for how galaxies form. The co-evolution of star-formation and supermassive black hole (SMBH) accretion is one of the key problems in galaxy formation theory. But, many of these SFR indicators are influenced by SMBH accretion in galaxies and result in unreliable SFRs. Utilizing the luminous polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emission features, I provide a new robust SFR calibration using the luminosity emitted from the PAHs at 6.2μm, 7.7μm and 11.3μm to solve this. The PAH features emit strongly in the mid-infrared (mid-IR; 5-25μm) mitigating dust extinction, containing on average 5-10% of the total IR luminosity in galaxies. I use a sample of 105 star-forming galaxies covering a range of total IR luminosity, LIR = L(8-1000μm) = 109 - 1012 L⊙ and redshift 0 < z < 0.4, with mid-IR spectroscopy from the Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph (IRS), and data covering other SFR indicators (Hα emission and rest-frame 24μm continuum emission). The PAH luminosity correlates linearly with the SFR as measured by the Hα luminosity (corrected for attenuation using the mono-chromatic rest-frame 24μm emission), with a tight scatter of <0.15 dex. The scatter is comparable to that between SFRs derived from the Paα and dust-corrected Hα emission lines. We present a case study in advance of JWST, which will be capable of measuring SFRs (from 8μm rest-frame photometry, i.e. PAHs) in distant galaxies (z ≤ 2) with JWST/MIRI to SFRs as low as ~10 M⊙yr-1, because the PAH features are so bright. We use Spitzer/IRS observations of PAH features in lensed star-forming galaxies at 1 < z < 3 to demonstrate the utility of the PAHs to derive SFRs that agree with

  16. Megahertz peaked-spectrum sources in the Boötes field I - a route towards finding high-redshift AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppejans, Rocco; Cseh, David; Williams, Wendy L.; van Velzen, Sjoert; Falcke, Heino

    2015-06-01

    We present a 324.5 MHz image of the National Optical Astronomy Observatory Boötes field that was made using Very Large Array P-band observations. The image has a resolution of 5.6 × 5.1 arcsec, a radius of 2.05° and a central noise of ˜0.2 mJy beam-1. Both the resolution and noise of the image are an order of magnitude better than what was previously available at this frequency and will serve as a valuable addition to the already extensive multiwavelength data that are available for this field. The final source catalogue contains 1370 sources and has a median 325-1400 MHz spectral index of -0.72. Using a radio colour-colour diagram of the unresolved sources in our catalogue, we identify 33 megahertz peaked-spectrum (MPS) sources. Based on the turnover frequency linear size relation for the gigahertz peaked-spectrum and compact steep-spectrum sources, we expect that the MPS sources that are compact on scales of tens of milliarcseconds should be young radio loud active galactic nuclei at high (z > 2) redshifts. Of the 33 MPS sources, we were able to determine redshifts for 24, with an average redshift of 1.3. Given that five of the sources are at z > 2, that the four faint sources for which we could not find redshifts are likely at even higher redshifts and that we could only select sources that are compact on a scale of ˜5 arcsec, there is encouraging evidence that the MPS method can be used to search for high-redshift sources.

  17. High temperature materials characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, Gary L.

    1990-01-01

    A lab facility for measuring elastic moduli up to 1700 C was constructed and delivered. It was shown that the ultrasonic method can be used to determine elastic constants of materials from room temperature to their melting points. The ease in coupling high frequency acoustic energy is still a difficult task. Even now, new coupling materials and higher power ultrasonic pulsers are being suggested. The surface was only scratched in terms of showing the full capabilities of either technique used, especially since there is such a large learning curve in developing proper methodologies to take measurements into the high temperature region. The laser acoustic system does not seem to have sufficient precision at this time to replace the normal buffer rod methodology.

  18. The effect of dark matter resolution on the collapse of baryons in high-redshift numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regan, John A.; Johansson, Peter H.; Wise, John H.

    2015-06-01

    We examine the impact of dark matter particle resolution on the formation of a baryonic core in high-resolution adaptive mesh refinement simulations. We test the effect that both particle smoothing and particle splitting have on the hydrodynamic properties of a collapsing halo at high redshift (z > 20). Furthermore, we vary the background field intensity, with energy below the Lyman limit (<13.6 eV), as may be relevant for the case of metal-free star formation and supermassive black hole seed formation. We find that using particle splitting methods greatly increases our particle resolution without introducing any numerical noise and allows us to achieve converged results over a wide range of external background fields. Additionally, we find that for lower values of the background field a lower dark matter particle mass is required. We define the radius of the core as the point at which the enclosed baryonic mass dominates over the enclosed dark matter mass. For our simulations this results in Rcore ˜ 5 pc. We find that in order to produce converged results which are not affected by dark matter particles requires that the relationship Mcore/MDM > 100.0 be satisfied, where Mcore is the enclosed baryon mass within the core and MDM is the minimum dark matter particle mass. This ratio should provide a very useful starting point for conducting convergence tests before any production run simulations. We find that dark matter particle smoothing is a useful adjunct to already highly resolved simulations.

  19. HIGH-REDSHIFT DUST OBSCURED GALAXIES: A MORPHOLOGY-SPECTRAL ENERGY DISTRIBUTION CONNECTION REVEALED BY KECK ADAPTIVE OPTICS

    SciTech Connect

    Melbourne, J.; Matthews, K.; Soifer, B. T. E-mail: bts@submm.caltech.edu

    2009-06-15

    A simple optical to mid-IR color selection, R - [24]>14, i.e., f {sub {nu}}(24 {mu}m)/f {sub {nu}}(R) {approx}> 1000, identifies highly dust obscured galaxies (DOGs) with typical redshifts of z {approx} 2 {+-} 0.5. Extreme mid-IR luminosities (L {sub IR} > 10{sup 12-14}) suggest that DOGs are powered by a combination of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and star formation, possibly driven by mergers. In an effort to compare their photometric properties with their rest-frame optical morphologies, we obtained high-spatial resolution (0.''05-0.''1) Keck Adaptive Optics K'-band images of 15 DOGs. The images reveal a wide range of morphologies, including small exponential disks (eight of 15), small ellipticals (four of 15), and unresolved sources (two of 15). One particularly diffuse source could not be classified because of low signal-to-noise ratio. We find a statistically significant correlation between galaxy concentration and mid-IR luminosity, with the most luminous DOGs exhibiting higher concentration and smaller physical size. DOGs with high concentration also tend to have spectral energy distributions (SEDs) suggestive of AGN activity. Thus, central AGN light may be biasing the morphologies of the more luminous DOGs to higher concentration. Conversely, more diffuse DOGs tend to show an SED shape suggestive of star formation. Two of 15 in the sample show multiple resolved components with separations of {approx}1 kpc, circumstantial evidence for ongoing mergers.

  20. Clues to the nature of high-redshift O vi absorption systems from their lack of small-scale structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, S.; Ellison, S.; D'Odorico, S.; Kim, T.-S.

    2007-07-01

    We present results of the first survey of high-redshift (< z>˜ 2.3) O VI absorption systems along parallel lines of sight toward two lensed QSOs. After a careful and well-defined search, we find ten intervening O VI systems - identified by the presence of the λλ1031, 1037 doublet lines, H I, and in most cases C IV, Si IV, and C III - and eight candidate systems for which we do not detect H I nor other metals. We assess the veracity of these systems by applying a classification scheme. Within the errors, all O VI systems appear at the same redshift and have similar line strengths in front of both QSO images, whereas in most cases C IV or Si IV show more differences across the lines of sight, either in radial velocity or line strength. We conclude that (1) the coherence length of O VI must be much larger than ≈ 1 h70-1 kpc, and (2) an important fraction of the C IV absorbers may not reside in the same volume as O VI. Given the inhomogeneous character of the data - different S/N ratios and degrees of blending - we pay special attention to the observational errors and their impact on the above conclusions. Since Doppler parameters are consistent with photoionization, we propose a model in which V IV occurs in two different photoionized phases, one large, with characteristic sizes of a few hundred kpc and bearing O VI, and another one a factor of ten smaller and containing C III. This model is able to explain the various transverse differences observed in column density and kinematics. We apply the model successfully to 2 kinds of absorbers, with low and high metallicity. In the low-metallicity regime, [C/H]~ -2, we find that [C/O] ≈ -0.7 is required to explain the observations, which hints at late (z⪉ 6) rather than early metal enrichment. In the high-metallicity regime, the observed dissociation between O VI and C IV gas might be produced by galactic outflows. Altogether, the relative abundances, inhomogeneous C IV and featureless O VI are consistent with gas

  1. A UNIVERSAL, LOCAL STAR FORMATION LAW IN GALACTIC CLOUDS, NEARBY GALAXIES, HIGH-REDSHIFT DISKS, AND STARBURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Krumholz, Mark R.; Dekel, Avishai; McKee, Christopher F. E-mail: dekel@phys.huji.ac.il

    2012-01-20

    Star formation laws are rules that relate the rate of star formation in a particular region, either an entire galaxy or some portion of it, to the properties of the gas, or other galactic properties, in that region. While observations of Local Group galaxies show a very simple, local star formation law in which the star formation rate per unit area in each patch of a galaxy scales linearly with the molecular gas surface density in that patch, recent observations of both Milky Way molecular clouds and high-redshift galaxies apparently show a more complicated relationship in which regions of equal molecular gas surface density can form stars at quite different rates. These data have been interpreted as implying either that different star formation laws may apply in different circumstances, that the star formation law is sensitive to large-scale galaxy properties rather than local properties, or that there are high-density thresholds for star formation. Here we collate observations of the relationship between gas and star formation rate from resolved observations of Milky Way molecular clouds, from kpc-scale observations of Local Group galaxies, and from unresolved observations of both disk and starburst galaxies in the local universe and at high redshift. We show that all of these data are in fact consistent with a simple, local, volumetric star formation law. The apparent variations stem from the fact that the observed objects have a wide variety of three-dimensional size scales and degrees of internal clumping, so even at fixed gas column density the regions being observed can have wildly varying volume densities. We provide a simple theoretical framework to remove this projection effect, and we use it to show that all the data, from small solar neighborhood clouds with masses {approx}10{sup 3} M{sub Sun} to submillimeter galaxies with masses {approx}10{sup 11} M{sub Sun }, fall on a single star formation law in which the star formation rate is simply {approx}1% of

  2. HerMES: a search for high-redshift dusty galaxies in the HerMES Large Mode Survey - catalogue, number counts and early results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asboth, V.; Conley, A.; Sayers, J.; Béthermin, M.; Chapman, S. C.; Clements, D. L.; Cooray, A.; Dannerbauer, H.; Farrah, D.; Glenn, J.; Golwala, S. R.; Halpern, M.; Ibar, E.; Ivison, R. J.; Maloney, P. R.; Marques-Chaves, R.; Martinez-Navajas, P. I.; Oliver, S. J.; Pérez-Fournon, I.; Riechers, D. A.; Rowan-Robinson, M.; Scott, Douglas; Siegel, S. R.; Vieira, J. D.; Viero, M.; Wang, L.; Wardlow, J.; Wheeler, J.

    2016-10-01

    Selecting sources with rising flux densities towards longer wavelengths from Herschel/Spectral and Photometric Imaging Receiver (SPIRE) maps is an efficient way to produce a catalogue rich in high-redshift (z > 4) dusty star-forming galaxies. The effectiveness of this approach has already been confirmed by spectroscopic follow-up observations, but the previously available catalogues made this way are limited by small survey areas. Here we apply a map-based search method to 274 deg2 of the Herschel Multi-tiered Extragalactic Survey (HerMES) Large Mode Survey and create a catalogue of 477 objects with SPIRE flux densities S500 > S350 > S250 and a 5σ cut-off S500 > 52 mJy. From this catalogue we determine that the total number of these `red' sources is at least an order of magnitude higher than predicted by galaxy evolution models. These results are in agreement with previous findings in smaller HerMES fields; however, due to our significantly larger sample size we are also able to investigate the shape of the red source counts for the first time. We have obtained spectroscopic redshift measurements for two of our sources using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array. The redshifts z = 5.1 and 3.8 confirm that with our selection method we can indeed find high-redshift dusty star-forming galaxies.

  3. The Second-generation z (Redshift) and Early Universe Spectrometer. I. First-light Observation of a Highly Lensed Local-ulirg Analog at High-z

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferkinhoff, Carl; Brisbin, Drew; Parshley, Stephen; Nikola, Thomas; Stacey, Gordon J.; Schoenwald, Justin; Higdon, James L.; Higdon, Sarah J. U.; Verma, Aprajita; Riechers, Dominik; Hailey-Dunsheath, Steven; Menten, Karl M.; Güsten, Rolf; Weiß, Axel; Irwin, Kent; Cho, Hsiao M.; Niemack, Michael; Halpern, Mark; Amiri, Mandana; Hasselfield, Matthew; Wiebe, D. V.; Ade, Peter A. R.; Tucker, Carol E.

    2014-01-01

    We recently commissioned our new spectrometer, the second-generation z(Redshift) and Early Universe Spectrometer (ZEUS-2) on the Atacama Pathfinder Experiment telescope. ZEUS-2 is a submillimeter grating spectrometer optimized for detecting the faint and broad lines from distant galaxies that are redshifted into the telluric windows from 200 to 850 μm. It uses a focal plane array of transition-edge sensed bolometers, the first use of these arrays for astrophysical spectroscopy. ZEUS-2 promises to be an important tool for studying galaxies in the years to come because of its synergy with Atacama Large Millimeter Array and its capabilities in the short submillimeter windows that are unique in the post-Herschel era. Here, we report on our first detection of the [C II] 158 μm line with ZEUS-2. We detect the line at z ~ 1.8 from H-ATLAS J091043.1-000322 with a line flux of (6.44 ± 0.42) × 10-18 W m-2. Combined with its far-IR luminosity and a new Herschel-PACS detection of the [O I] 63 μm line, we model the line emission as coming from a photo-dissociation region with far-ultraviolet radiation field, G ~ 2 × 104 G 0, gas density, n ~ 1 × 103 cm-3 and size between ~0.4 and 1 kpc. On the basis of this model, we conclude that H-ATLAS J091043.1-000322 is a high-redshift analog of a local ultra-luminous IR galaxy; i.e., it is likely the site of a compact starburst caused by a major merger. Further identification of these merging systems is important for constraining galaxy formation and evolution models.

  4. The second-generation z (redshift) and early universe spectrometer. I. First-light observation of a highly lensed local-ulirg analog at high-z

    SciTech Connect

    Ferkinhoff, Carl; Brisbin, Drew; Parshley, Stephen; Nikola, Thomas; Stacey, Gordon J.; Schoenwald, Justin; Riechers, Dominik; Higdon, James L.; Higdon, Sarah J. U.; Verma, Aprajita; Hailey-Dunsheath, Steven; Menten, Karl M.; Güsten, Rolf; Weiß, Axel; Irwin, Kent; Cho, Hsiao M.; Niemack, Michael; Halpern, Mark; Amiri, Mandana; Hasselfield, Matthew; and others

    2014-01-10

    We recently commissioned our new spectrometer, the second-generation z(Redshift) and Early Universe Spectrometer (ZEUS-2) on the Atacama Pathfinder Experiment telescope. ZEUS-2 is a submillimeter grating spectrometer optimized for detecting the faint and broad lines from distant galaxies that are redshifted into the telluric windows from 200 to 850 μm. It uses a focal plane array of transition-edge sensed bolometers, the first use of these arrays for astrophysical spectroscopy. ZEUS-2 promises to be an important tool for studying galaxies in the years to come because of its synergy with Atacama Large Millimeter Array and its capabilities in the short submillimeter windows that are unique in the post-Herschel era. Here, we report on our first detection of the [C II] 158 μm line with ZEUS-2. We detect the line at z ∼ 1.8 from H-ATLAS J091043.1–000322 with a line flux of (6.44 ± 0.42) × 10{sup –18} W m{sup –2}. Combined with its far-IR luminosity and a new Herschel-PACS detection of the [O I] 63 μm line, we model the line emission as coming from a photo-dissociation region with far-ultraviolet radiation field, G ∼ 2 × 10{sup 4} G {sub 0}, gas density, n ∼ 1 × 10{sup 3} cm{sup –3} and size between ∼0.4 and 1 kpc. On the basis of this model, we conclude that H-ATLAS J091043.1–000322 is a high-redshift analog of a local ultra-luminous IR galaxy; i.e., it is likely the site of a compact starburst caused by a major merger. Further identification of these merging systems is important for constraining galaxy formation and evolution models.

  5. Star formation and obscuration in AGN: A sub-mm study of high-redshift mid-IR selected type-2 QSOs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Violino, Giulio; Stevens, Jason; Coppin, Kristen; Geach, James

    2016-08-01

    The AGN unification model describes unobscured and obscured AGN (AGN1 and AGN2) as identical sources, with their different observed properties explained solely by orientation effects; as a result, it predicts no difference in the host galaxies. As an alternative, a second scenario has been proposed in which type-2 AGN represent an earlier stage in the life of AGN characterized by dust-enshrouded host galaxies which contribute to the obscuration and higher star formation activity, at least at earlier epochs. To test this scenario we employ Herschel data at three different wavelengths (250, 350, 500 um) to study the far-IR-to-submm properties of a sample of mid-IR selected type 2 QSOs at high redshift (1.5

  6. High-Level Incorporation of Silver in Gold Nanoclusters: Fluorescence Redshift upon Interaction with Hydrogen Peroxide and Fluorescence Enhancement with Herbicide.

    PubMed

    Guan, Guijian; Cai, Yongqing; Liu, Shuhua; Yu, Haidong; Bai, Shiqiang; Cheng, Yuan; Tang, Tao; Bharathi, M S; Zhang, Yong-Wei; Han, Ming-Yong

    2016-01-26

    High-level incorporation of Ag in Au nanoclusters (NCs) is conveniently achieved by controlling the concentration of Ag(+) in the synthesis of bovine serum albumin (BSA)-protected Au NCs, and the resulting structure is determined to be bimetallic Ag28 Au10-BSA NCs through a series of characterizations including energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, mass spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, together with density functional theory simulations. Interestingly, the Ag28 Au10 NCs exhibit a significant fluorescence redshift rather than quenching upon interaction with hydrogen peroxide, providing a new approach to the detection of hydrogen peroxide through direct comparison of their fluorescence peaks. Furthermore, the Ag28 Au10 NCs are also used for the sensitive and selective detection of herbicide through fluorescence enhancement. The detection limit for herbicide (0.1 nm) is far below the health value established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency; such sensitive detection was not achieved by using AuAg NCs with low-level incorporation of Ag or by using the individual metal NCs. PMID:26692116

  7. THE THICK DISKS OF SPIRAL GALAXIES AS RELICS FROM GAS-RICH, TURBULENT, CLUMPY DISKS AT HIGH REDSHIFT

    SciTech Connect

    Bournaud, Frederic; Martig, Marie; Elmegreen, Bruce G.

    2009-12-10

    The formation of thick stellar disks in spiral galaxies is studied. Simulations of gas-rich young galaxies show formation of internal clumps by gravitational instabilities, clump coalescence into a bulge, and disk thickening by strong stellar scattering. The bulge and thick disks of modern galaxies may form this way. Simulations of minor mergers make thick disks too, but there is an important difference. Thick disks made by internal processes have a constant scale height with galactocentric radius, but thick disks made by mergers flare. The difference arises because in the first case, perpendicular forcing and disk-gravity resistance are both proportional to the disk column density, so the resulting scale height is independent of this density. In the case of mergers, perpendicular forcing is independent of the column density and the low-density regions get thicker; the resulting flaring is inconsistent with observations. Late-stage gas accretion and thin-disk growth are shown to preserve the constant scale heights of thick disks formed by internal evolution. These results reinforce the idea that disk galaxies accrete most of their mass smoothly and acquire their structure by internal processes, in particular through turbulent and clumpy phases at high redshift.

  8. A cosmic web filament revealed in Lyman-α emission around a luminous high-redshift quasar.

    PubMed

    Cantalupo, Sebastiano; Arrigoni-Battaia, Fabrizio; Prochaska, J Xavier; Hennawi, Joseph F; Madau, Piero

    2014-02-01

    Simulations of structure formation in the Universe predict that galaxies are embedded in a 'cosmic web', where most baryons reside as rarefied and highly ionized gas. This material has been studied for decades in absorption against background sources, but the sparseness of these inherently one-dimensional probes preclude direct constraints on the three-dimensional morphology of the underlying web. Here we report observations of a cosmic web filament in Lyman-α emission, discovered during a survey for cosmic gas fluorescently illuminated by bright quasars at redshift z ≈ 2.3. With a linear projected size of approximately 460 physical kiloparsecs, the Lyman-α emission surrounding the radio-quiet quasar UM 287 extends well beyond the virial radius of any plausible associated dark-matter halo and therefore traces intergalactic gas. The estimated cold gas mass of the filament from the observed emission-about 10(12.0 ± 0.5)/C(1/2) solar masses, where C is the gas clumping factor-is more than ten times larger than what is typically found in cosmological simulations, suggesting that a population of intergalactic gas clumps with subkiloparsec sizes may be missing in current numerical models.

  9. The bispectrum of galaxies from high-redshift galaxy surveys: Primordial non-Gaussianity and non-linear galaxy bias

    SciTech Connect

    Sefusatti, Emiliano; Komatsu, Eiichiro; /Texas U., Astron. Dept.

    2007-05-01

    The greatest challenge in the interpretation of galaxy clustering data from any surveys is galaxy bias. Using a simple Fisher matrix analysis, we show that the bispectrum provides an excellent determination of linear and non-linear bias parameters of intermediate and high-z galaxies, when all measurable triangle configurations down to mildly non-linear scales, where perturbation theory is still valid, are included. The bispectrum is also a powerful probe of primordial non-Gaussianity. The planned galaxy surveys at z {approx}> 2 should yield constraints on non-Gaussian parameters, f{sub NL}{sup loc.} and f{sub NL}{sup eq.}, that are comparable to, or even better than, those from CMB experiments. We study how these constraints improve with volume, redshift range, as well as the number density of galaxies. Finally we show that a halo occupation distribution may be used to improve these constraints further by lifting degeneracies between gravity, bias, and primordial non-Gaussianity.

  10. A cosmic web filament revealed in Lyman-α emission around a luminous high-redshift quasar.

    PubMed

    Cantalupo, Sebastiano; Arrigoni-Battaia, Fabrizio; Prochaska, J Xavier; Hennawi, Joseph F; Madau, Piero

    2014-02-01

    Simulations of structure formation in the Universe predict that galaxies are embedded in a 'cosmic web', where most baryons reside as rarefied and highly ionized gas. This material has been studied for decades in absorption against background sources, but the sparseness of these inherently one-dimensional probes preclude direct constraints on the three-dimensional morphology of the underlying web. Here we report observations of a cosmic web filament in Lyman-α emission, discovered during a survey for cosmic gas fluorescently illuminated by bright quasars at redshift z ≈ 2.3. With a linear projected size of approximately 460 physical kiloparsecs, the Lyman-α emission surrounding the radio-quiet quasar UM 287 extends well beyond the virial radius of any plausible associated dark-matter halo and therefore traces intergalactic gas. The estimated cold gas mass of the filament from the observed emission-about 10(12.0 ± 0.5)/C(1/2) solar masses, where C is the gas clumping factor-is more than ten times larger than what is typically found in cosmological simulations, suggesting that a population of intergalactic gas clumps with subkiloparsec sizes may be missing in current numerical models. PMID:24463517

  11. Chemical Enrichment at High Redshifts: Understanding the Nature of Damped Lyα Systems in Hierarchical Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tissera, Patricia B.; Lambas, Diego G.; Mosconi, Mirta B.; Cora, Sofia

    2001-08-01

    We use cosmological hydrodynamical simulations including star formation and metal enrichment to study the evolution of the chemical properties of galaxy-like objects at high redshift in the range 0.25

  12. Morphologies of High-Redshift Dust-Obscured Galaxies from Keck Laser Guide Star Adaptive Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melbourne, J.; Desai, V.; Armus, Lee; Dey, Arjun; Brand, K.; Thompson, D.; Soifer, B. T.; Matthews, K.; Jannuzi, B. T.; Houck, J. R.

    2008-09-01

    Spitzer MIPS images in the Boötes field of the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey have revealed a class of extremely dust-obscured galaxy (DOG) at z ~ 2. The DOGs are defined by very red optical to mid-infrared (IR; observed-frame) colors, R - [24 μm]>14 mag, i.e. f ν(24 μm)/f ν(R)>1000. They are ultra-luminous infrared galaxies with L 8-1000 μm > 1012-1014 L sun, but typically have very faint optical (rest-frame UV) fluxes. We imaged three DOGs with the Keck laser guide star adaptive optics (LGSAO) system, obtaining ~0.06'' resolution in the K'-band. One system was dominated by a point source, while the other two were clearly resolved. Of the resolved sources, one can be modeled as a exponential disk system. The other is consistent with a de Vaucouleurs profile typical of elliptical galaxies. The nonparametric measures of their concentration and asymmetry show the DOGs to be both compact and smooth. The AO images rule out double nuclei with separations of greater than 0.1'' (<1 kpc at z = 2), making it unlikely that ongoing major mergers (mass ratios of 1/3 and greater) are triggering the high-IR luminosities. By contrast, high-resolution images of z ~ 2 SCUBA sources tend to show multiple components and a higher degree of asymmetry. We compare near-IR morphologies of the DOGs with a set of z = 1 luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs; L IR ~ 1011 L sun) imaged with Keck LGSAO by the Center for Adaptive Optics Treasury Survey. The DOGs in our sample have significantly smaller effective radii, ~1/4 the size of the z = 1 LIRGs, and tend toward higher concentrations. The small sizes and high concentrations may help explain the globally obscured rest-frame blue-to-UV emission of the DOGs.

  13. The compact radio structure of the high-redshift quasar OQ172

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Jiang, D. R.; Gu, M.; Gurvits, L. I.

    2016-02-01

    The GHz-Peaked Spectrum (GPS) quasar OQ172 (J1445+0958) has an extremely high rest-frame rotation measure (RM > 20 000 rad m-2) and an RM gradient in its inner nucleus. Its jet observed with Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) is strongly bent along an arc spanning > 100 pc. Near infrared (NIR) spectra reveal an unusually large [O III] line width which suggests a large mass within the NLR and/or strong interactions between the emerging jet and the dense material therein. We present our VLBI Space Observatory Programme (VSOP) and Multi-frequency Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) observation of the GPS quasar OQ172. The observations will help us to explore the VLBI radio properties and to better understand the circumnuclear environment of OQ172.

  14. Simulated stellar kinematics studies of high-redshift galaxies with the HARMONI Integral Field Spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendrew, S.; Zieleniewski, S.; Houghton, R. C. W.; Thatte, N.; Devriendt, J.; Tecza, M.; Clarke, F.; O'Brien, K.; Häußler, B.

    2016-05-01

    We present a study into the capabilities of integrated and spatially resolved integral field spectroscopy of galaxies at z = 2-4 with the future HARMONI spectrograph for the European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT) using the simulation pipeline, HSIM. We focus particularly on the instrument's capabilities in stellar absorption line integral field spectroscopy, which will allow us to study the stellar kinematics and stellar population characteristics. Such measurements for star-forming and passive galaxies around the peak star formation era will provide a critical insight into the star formation, quenching and mass assembly history of high-z, and thus present-day galaxies. First, we perform a signal-to-noise study for passive galaxies at a range of stellar masses for z = 2-4, assuming different light profiles; for this population, we estimate that integrated stellar absorption line spectroscopy with HARMONI will be limited to galaxies with M* ≳ 1010.7 M⊙. Secondly, we use HSIM to perform a mock observation of a typical star-forming 1010 M⊙ galaxy at z = 3 generated from the high-resolution cosmological simulation NUTFB. We demonstrate that the input stellar kinematics of the simulated galaxy can be accurately recovered from the integrated spectrum in a 15-h observation, using common analysis tools. Whilst spatially resolved spectroscopy is likely to remain out of reach for this particular galaxy, we estimate HARMONI's performance limits in this regime from our findings. This study demonstrates how instrument simulators such as HSIM can be used to quantify instrument performance and study observational biases on kinematics retrieval; and shows the potential of making observational predictions from cosmological simulation output data.

  15. Probing the circumgalactic medium at high-redshift using composite BOSS spectra of strong Lyman α forest absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pieri, Matthew M.; Mortonson, Michael J.; Frank, Stephan; Crighton, Neil; Weinberg, David H.; Lee, Khee-Gan; Noterdaeme, Pasquier; Bailey, Stephen; Busca, Nicolas; Ge, Jian; Kirkby, David; Lundgren, Britt; Mathur, Smita; Pâris, Isabelle; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Petitjean, Patrick; Rich, James; Ross, Nicholas P.; Schneider, Donald P.; York, Donald G.

    2014-06-01

    We present composite spectra constructed from a sample of 242 150 Lyman α (Lyα) forest absorbers at redshifts 2.4 < z < 3.1 identified in quasar spectra from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) as part of Data Release 9 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III. We select forest absorbers by their flux in bins 138 km s-1 wide (approximately the size of the BOSS resolution element). We split these absorbers into five samples spanning the range of flux -0.05 ≤ F < 0.45. Tests on a smaller set of high-resolution spectra show that our three strongest absorption samples would probe circumgalactic regions (projected separation <300 proper kpc and |Δv| < 300 km s-1) in about 60 per cent of cases for very high signal-to-noise ratio. Within this subset, weakening Lyα absorption is associated with decreasing purity of circumgalactic selection once BOSS noise is included. Our weaker two Lyα absorption samples are dominated by the intergalactic medium. We present composite spectra of these samples and a catalogue of measured absorption features from H I and 13 metal ionization species, all of which we make available to the community. We compare measurements of seven Lyman series transitions in our composite spectra to single line models and obtain further constraints from their associated excess Lyman limit opacity. This analysis provides results consistent with column densities over the range 14.4 ≲ log (N_{H I}) ≲ 16.45. We compare our measurements of metal absorption to a variety of simple single-line, single-phase models for a preliminary interpretation. Our results imply clumping on scales down to ˜30 pc and near-solar metallicities in the circumgalactic samples, while high-ionization metal absorption consistent with typical IGM densities and metallicities is visible in all samples.

  16. INTERSTELLAR SILICATE DUST IN THE z = 0.89 ABSORBER TOWARD PKS 1830-211: CRYSTALLINE SILICATES AT HIGH REDSHIFT?

    SciTech Connect

    Aller, Monique C.; Kulkarni, Varsha P.; Som, Debopam; York, Donald G.; Welty, Daniel E.; Vladilo, Giovanni

    2012-03-20

    We present evidence of a >10{sigma} detection of the 10 {mu}m silicate dust absorption feature in the spectrum of the gravitationally lensed quasar PKS 1830-211, produced by a foreground absorption system at redshift 0.886. We have examined more than 100 optical depth templates, derived from both observations of Galactic and extragalactic sources and laboratory measurements, in order to constrain the chemical structure of the silicate dust. We find that the best fit to the observed absorption profile is produced by laboratory crystalline olivine, with a corresponding peak optical depth of {tau}{sub 10} = 0.27 {+-} 0.05. The fit is slightly improved upon by including small contributions from additional materials, such as silica, enstatite, or serpentine, which suggests that the dust composition may consist of a blend of crystalline silicates. Combining templates for amorphous and crystalline silicates, we find that the fraction of crystalline silicates needs to be at least 95%. Given the rarity of extragalactic sources with such a high degree of silicate crystallinity, we also explore the possibility that the observed spectral features are produced by amorphous silicates in combination with other molecular or atomic transitions, or by foreground source contamination. While we cannot rule out these latter possibilities, they lead to much poorer profile fits than for the crystalline olivine templates. If the presence of crystalline interstellar silicates in this distant galaxy is real, it would be highly unusual, given that the Milky Way interstellar matter contains essentially only amorphous silicates. It is possible that the z = 0.886 absorber toward PKS 1830-211, well known for its high molecular content, has a unique star-forming environment that enables crystalline silicates to form and prevail.

  17. Heating the intergalactic medium by X-rays from population III binaries in high-redshift galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Hao; Norman, Michael L.; Ahn, Kyungjin; Wise, John H.; O'Shea, Brian W. E-mail: mlnorman@ucsd.edu E-mail: jwise@gatech.edu

    2014-08-20

    Due to their long mean free path, X-rays are expected to have an important impact on cosmic reionization by heating and ionizing the intergalactic medium (IGM) on large scales, especially after simulations have suggested that Population III (Pop III) stars may form in pairs at redshifts as high as 20-30. We use the Pop III distribution and evolution from a self-consistent cosmological radiation hydrodynamic simulation of the formation of the first galaxies and a simple Pop III X-ray binary model to estimate their X-ray output in a high-density region larger than 100 comoving (Mpc){sup 3}. We then combine three different methods—ray tracing, a one-zone model, and X-ray background modeling—to investigate the X-ray propagation, intensity distribution, and long-term effects on the IGM thermal and ionization state. The efficiency and morphology of photoheating and photoionization are dependent on the photon energies. The sub-kiloelectronvolt X-rays only impact the IGM near the sources, while the kiloelectronvolt photons contribute significantly to the X-ray background and heat and ionize the IGM smoothly. The X-rays just below 1 keV are most efficient in heating and ionizing the IGM. We find that the IGM might be heated to over 100 K by z = 10 and the high-density source region might reach 10{sup 4} K, limited by atomic hydrogen cooling. This may be important for predicting the 21 cm neutral hydrogen signals. On the other hand, the free electrons from X-ray ionizations are not enough to contribute significantly to the optical depth of the cosmic microwave background to the Thomson scattering.

  18. Dust Deficient Palomar-Green Quasars and Their High-redshift Counterparts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyu, Jianwei; Rieke, G. H.; Shi, Y.

    2016-08-01

    The Elvis 1994 AGN template has been phenomenally successful at matching the SEDs of the vast majority of Type-1 quasars from the local Universe to z~6. Nonetheless, a population of hot-dust-poor or hot-dust-free quasars has been found both at intermediate and high-z. Estimates of the numbers of these anomalous quasars vary widely, along with speculations on their place in quasar evolution, e.g., whether they are related to the early growth of the black holes. To answer some of these questions, we have decomposed the optical-IR SEDs of 87 local Palomar-Green (PG) quasars: we find ~20% of them show only weak hot dust emission, indicating the hot dust deficient (HDD) quasars may be relatively common. Moreover, there is an intermediate population of warm dust deficient (WDD) quasars. Based on the comparison between the IR SEDs and classical torus models, the hot-dust-deficient quasars may have relatively little flaring in the dust density distribution in their circumnuclear tori. Our SED decomposition also indicates that the dust deficient quasars are more likely to show lower Eddington ratios and weaker star formation than the majority of quasars. Given these systematic differences, the HDD, WDD, and normal quasars could indicate a sequence of torus evolution around the accreting super-massive black holes.

  19. Cosmic reionization on computers. Ultraviolet continuum slopes and dust opacities in high redshift galaxies

    DOE PAGES

    Khakhaleva-Li, Zimu; Gnedin, Nickolay Y.

    2016-03-30

    In this study, we compare the properties of stellar populations of model galaxies from the Cosmic Reionization On Computers (CROC) project with the exiting UV and IR data. Since CROC simulations do not follow cosmic dust directly, we adopt two variants of the dust-follows-metals ansatz to populate model galaxies with dust. Using the dust radiative transfer code Hyperion, we compute synthetic stellar spectra, UV continuum slopes, and IR fluxes for simulated galaxies. We find that the simulation results generally match observational measurements, but, perhaps, not in full detail. The differences seem to indicate that our adopted dust-follows-metals ansatzes are notmore » fully sufficient. While the discrepancies with the exiting data are marginal, the future JWST data will be of much higher precision, rendering highly significant any tentative difference between theory and observations. It is, therefore, likely, that in order to fully utilize the precision of JWST observations, fully dynamical modeling of dust formation, evolution, and destruction may be required.« less

  20. Redshifts distribution in A262

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, M. S. R.; Abidin, Z. Z.; Ibrahim, U. F. S. U.; Hashim, N.; Lee, D. A. A.

    2016-05-01

    Galaxy clusters are the largest virialized systems in the Universe containing a collection of galaxies of different redshifts. The redshift distribution of galaxies in galaxy clusters is concentrated at a certain redshift range which remarkably tells us that only the galaxies in a certain radial range belong to the galaxy cluster. This leads to a boundary estimation of the cluster. Background and foreground systems are represented by a histogram that determines whether some of the galaxies are too far or too high in redshift to be counted as the member of the cluster. With the recent advances in multifibre spectroscopy, it has become possible to perform detailed analysis of the redshift distribution of several galaxy clusters in the Abell Catalogue. This has given rise to significantly improved estimates of cluster membership, extent and dynamical history. Here we present a spectroscopic analysis of the galaxy cluster A262. We find 55 galaxies fall within z = 0.0143 and 0.0183 with velocity range 4450-5300 km s-1, and are therefore members of the cluster. We derived a new mean redshift of z = 0.016 173 ± 0.000 074 (4852 ± 22 km s-1) for the system of which we compare with our neutral hydrogen (H I) detection which peaks at 4970 ± 0.5 km s-1. It is found that the distribution of H I tends to be located at the edge of the cluster since most of spiral rich galaxies were away from cluster centre.

  1. The Star Formation History of BCGs to z = 1.8 from the SpARCS/SWIRE Survey: Evidence for Significant In Situ Star Formation at High Redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Tracy M. A.; Muzzin, Adam; Noble, Allison; Bonaventura, Nina; Geach, James; Hezevah, Yashar; Lidman, Chris; Wilson, Gillian; Yee, H. K. C.; Surace, Jason; Shupe, David

    2015-12-01

    We present the results of an MIPS-24 μm study of the brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) of 535 high-redshift galaxy clusters. The clusters are drawn from the Spitzer Adaptation of the Red-Sequence Cluster Survey, which effectively provides a sample selected on total stellar mass, over 0.2 < z < 1.8 within the Spitzer Wide-Area Infrared Extragalactic (SWIRE) Survey fields. Twenty percent, or 106 clusters, have spectroscopically confirmed redshifts, and the rest have redshifts estimated from the color of their red sequence. A comparison with the public SWIRE images detects 125 individual BCGs at 24 μm ≳ 100 μJy, or 23%. The luminosity-limited detection rate of BCGs in similar richness clusters (Ngal > 12) increases rapidly with redshift. Above z ∼ 1, an average of ∼20% of the sample have 24 μm inferred infrared luminosities of LIR > 1012 L⊙, while the fraction below z ∼ 1 exhibiting such luminosities is <1%. The Spitzer-IRAC colors indicate the bulk of the 24 μm detected population is predominantly powered by star formation, with only 7/125 galaxies lying within the color region inhabited by active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Simple arguments limit the star formation activity to several hundred million years and this may therefore be indicative of the timescale for AGN feedback to halt the star formation. Below redshift z ∼ 1, there is not enough star formation to significantly contribute to the overall stellar mass of the BCG population, and therefore BCG growth is likely dominated by dry mergers. Above z ∼ 1, however, the inferred star formation would double the stellar mass of the BCGs and is comparable to the mass assembly predicted by simulations through dry mergers. We cannot yet constrain the process driving the star formation for the overall sample, though a single object studied in detail is consistent with a gas-rich merger.

  2. High-redshift supernova rates measured with the gravitational telescope A 1689

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrushevska, T.; Amanullah, R.; Goobar, A.; Fabbro, S.; Johansson, J.; Kjellsson, T.; Lidman, C.; Paech, K.; Richard, J.; Dahle, H.; Ferretti, R.; Kneib, J. P.; Limousin, M.; Nordin, J.; Stanishev, V.

    2016-10-01

    >10-12 SNe L,B-1 yr-1), where the error bars indicate 1σ confidence intervals, statistical and systematic, respectively. The cluster rate normalized by the stellar mass is 0.10+0.13-0.096±0.02 in SNuM h2 (SNuM ≡10-12SNe M-1⊙ yr-1). Furthermore, we explore the optimal future survey for improving the core-collapse supernova rate measurements at z ≳ 2 using gravitational telescopes, and for detections with multiply lensed images, and we find that the planned WFIRST space mission has excellent prospects. Conclusions: Massive clusters can be used as gravitational telescopes to significantly expand the survey range of supernova searches, with important implications for the study of the high-z transient Universe. Based on observations made with European Southern Observatory (ESO) telescopes at the Paranal Observatory under programme ID 082.A-0431; 0.83.A-0398, 091.A-0108 and ID 093.A-0278, PI: A. Goobar.The deep average image (FITS file) is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/594/A54

  3. GOODS-HERSCHEL: SEPARATING HIGH-REDSHIFT ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI AND STAR-FORMING GALAXIES USING INFRARED COLOR DIAGNOSTICS

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkpatrick, Allison; Pope, Alexandra; Charmandaris, Vassilis; Daddi, Emmanuele; Elbaz, David; Pannella, Maurilio; Aussel, Herve; Dasyra, Kalliopi; Leiton, Roger; Scott, Douglas; Magnelli, Benjamin; Popesso, Paola; Altieri, Bruno; Coia, Daniela; Valtchanov, Ivan; Dannerbauer, Helmut; Dickinson, Mark; Kartaltepe, Jeyhan; Magdis, Georgios

    2013-02-15

    We have compiled a large sample of 151 high-redshift (z = 0.5-4) galaxies selected at 24 {mu}m (S {sub 24} > 100 {mu}Jy) in the GOODS-N and ECDFS fields for which we have deep Spitzer IRS spectroscopy, allowing us to decompose the mid-infrared spectrum into contributions from star formation and activity in the galactic nuclei. In addition, we have a wealth of photometric data from Spitzer IRAC/MIPS and Herschel PACS/SPIRE. We explore how effective different infrared color combinations are at separating our mid-IR spectroscopically determined active galactic nuclei from our star-forming galaxies. We look in depth at existing IRAC color diagnostics, and we explore new color-color diagnostics combining mid-IR, far-IR, and near-IR photometry, since these combinations provide the most detail about the shape of a source's IR spectrum. An added benefit of using a color that combines far-IR and mid-IR photometry is that it is indicative of the power source driving the IR luminosity. For our data set, the optimal color selections are S {sub 250}/S {sub 24} versus S {sub 8}/S {sub 3.6} and S {sub 100}/S {sub 24} versus S {sub 8}/S {sub 3.6}; both diagnostics have {approx}10% contamination rate in the regions occupied primarily by star-forming galaxies and active galactic nuclei, respectively. Based on the low contamination rate, these two new IR color-color diagnostics are ideal for estimating both the mid-IR power source of a galaxy when spectroscopy is unavailable and the dominant power source contributing to the IR luminosity. In the absence of far-IR data, we present color diagnostics using the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer mid-IR bands which can efficiently select out high-z (z {approx} 2) star-forming galaxies.

  4. MAMBO observations at 240GHz of optically obscured Spitzer sources: source clumps and radio activity at high redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreani, P.; Magliocchetti, M.; de Zotti, G.

    2010-01-01

    Optically very faint (R > 25.5) sources detected by the Spitzer Space Telescope at 24μm represent a very interesting population at redshift z ~ (1.5-3). They exhibit strong clustering properties, implying that they are hosted by very massive haloes, and their mid-infrared emission could be powered by either dust-enshrouded star formation and/or by an obscured active galactic nucleus (AGN). We report observations carried out with the Max Planck Millimetre Bolometer (MAMBO) array at the IRAM 30-m antenna on Pico Veleta of a candidate protocluster with five optically obscured sources selected from the 24-μm Spitzer sample of the First-Look Survey. Interestingly, these sources appear to lie on a high-density filament aligned with the two radio jets of an AGN. Four out of five of the observed sources were detected. We combine these measurements with optical, infrared and radio observations to probe the nature of the candidate protocluster members. Our preliminary conclusions can be summarized as follows: the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of all sources include both AGN and starburst contributions; the AGN contribution to the bolometric luminosities ranges between 14 and 26 per cent of the total. Such a contribution is enough for the AGN to dominate the emission at 5.8, 8 and 24μm, while the stellar component, inferred from SED fitting, prevails at 1.25mm and at λ < 4.5μm. The present analysis suggests a coherent interplay at high z between extended radio activity and the development of filamentary large-scale structures.

  5. Probing the High Redshift IGM: SPH+P{(3}) MG Simulations of the Lyman-alpha Forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wadsley, J.; Bond, J. R.

    1996-12-01

    Our understanding of the Lyman-alpha forest has received a great boost with the advent of the Keck Telescope and large 3D hydrodynamical simulations. We simulate the high redshift universe using the SPH technique with a P{(3}) MG (Particle-Particle Particle-MultiGrid) non-periodic gravity solver. We employ a high resolution (1 kpc) inner volume, essential for capturing the complex gas physics, larger medium and low resolution volumes surrounding it, essential for correct larger scale tidal fields, and a self-consistently applied, uniform tidal field to model the influence of ultra long waves. Such care is needed because the power per decade in the density fluctuations falls off very slowly in the dwarf galaxy regime of relevance to Lyman alpha clouds. The oft-used periodic boundary condition approach to simulations is ill-suited to proper treatment of the tides. We use constrained field realizations to probe a selection of environments, including voids, quiescent regions, proto-dwarf galaxies and regions experiencing strong tides, such as large galaxy halos and galaxy-galaxy filamentary bridges. We statistically combine our simulations to provide a more comprehensive sample of the universe, including ``rare event'' regions which are difficult to obtain in unrestricted FFT-based approaches. We fit Voigt profiles to the Lyman alpha spectra computed from our simulations direct comparison with the data, e.g., the column density distribution, line widths, temperatures, multiple line-of-sight correlations and the HI (and HeII) flux decrements. We demonstrate the importance of (1) the photoionizing UV flux level and history, (2) tidal environment and (3) differing cosmologies, including CDM and CDM+Lambda. With galaxy-scale rms fluctuations ~ 1 at z=3 and a UV choice motivated by proximity effect observations, the simulations give results in excellent agreement with the data.

  6. Dark-ages Reionization and Galaxy formation simulation - I. The dynamical lives of high-redshift galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poole, Gregory B.; Angel, Paul W.; Mutch, Simon J.; Power, Chris; Duffy, Alan R.; Geil, Paul M.; Mesinger, Andrei; Wyithe, Stuart B.

    2016-07-01

    We present the Dark-ages Reionization and Galaxy formation Observables from Numerical Simulations (DRAGONS) programme and Tiamat, the collisionless N-body simulation programme upon which DRAGONS is built. The primary trait distinguishing Tiamat from other large simulation programme is its density of outputs at high redshift (100 from z = 35 to z = 5; roughly one every 10 Myr) enabling the construction of very accurate merger trees at an epoch when galaxy formation is rapid and mergers extremely frequent. We find that the friends-of-friends halo mass function agrees well with the prediction of Watson et al. at high masses, but deviates at low masses, perhaps due to our use of a different halo finder or perhaps indicating a break from `universal' behaviour. We then analyse the dynamical evolution of galaxies during the Epoch of Reionization finding that only a small fraction (˜20 per cent) of galactic haloes are relaxed. We illustrate this using standard relaxation metrics to establish two dynamical recovery time-scales: (i) haloes need ˜1.5 dynamical times following formation, and (ii) ˜2 dynamical times following a major (3:1) or minor (10:1) merger to be relaxed. This is remarkably consistent across a wide mass range. Lastly, we use a phase-space halo finder to illustrate that major mergers drive long-lived massive phase-space structures which take many dynamical times to dissipate. This can yield significant differences in the inferred mass build-up of galactic haloes and we suggest that care must be taken to ensure a physically meaningful match between the galaxy formation physics of semi-analytic models and the halo finders supplying their input.

  7. Dust Obscuration and Metallicity at High Redshift: New Inferences from UV, Hα, and 8 μm Observations of z ~ 2 Star-forming Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, Naveen A.; Erb, Dawn K.; Pettini, Max; Steidel, Charles C.; Shapley, Alice E.

    2010-04-01

    We use a sample of 90 spectroscopically confirmed Lyman break galaxies with Hα measurements and Spitzer MIPS 24 μm observations to constrain the relationship between rest-frame 8 μm luminosity (L 8) and star formation rate (SFR) for L* galaxies at z ~ 2. We find a tight correlation with 0.24 dex scatter between L 8 and Hα luminosity/SFR for z ~ 2 galaxies with 1010 L sun <~ L IR <~ 1012 L sun. Employing this relationship with a larger sample of 392 galaxies with spectroscopic redshifts, we find that the UV slope β can be used to recover the dust attenuation of the vast majority of moderately luminous L* galaxies at z ~ 2 to within a 0.4 dex scatter using the local correlation. Separately, young galaxies with ages lsim100 Myr appear to be less dusty than their UV slopes would imply based on the local trend and may follow an extinction curve that is steeper than what is typically assumed. Consequently, very young galaxies at high redshift may be significantly less dusty than inferred previously. Our results provide the first direct evidence, independent of the UV slope, for a correlation between UV and bolometric luminosity (L bol) at high redshift, in the sense that UV-faint galaxies are on average less infrared and less bolometrically luminous than their UV-bright counterparts. The L bol-L UV relation indicates that as the SFR increases, L UV turns over (or "saturates") around the value of L* at z ~ 2, implying that dust obscuration may be largely responsible for modulating the bright end of the UV luminosity function. Finally, dust attenuation is found to correlate with oxygen abundance at z ~ 2. Accounting for systematic differences in local and high-redshift metallicity calibrations, we find that L* galaxies at z ~ 2, while at least an order of magnitude more bolometrically luminous, exhibit ratios of metals to dust that are similar to those of local starbursts. This result is expected if high-redshift galaxies are forming their stars in a less metal

  8. Clustering at High Redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Fèvre, O.; Mazure, A.

    1999-12-01

    Conference was held in Marseille, France, from 1999 June 29 to July 7. The Proceedings will be edited by O. Le Fèvre and A. Mazure and published in the ASP Conference Series. We thank H. J. McCracken for his suggestions and language proofing of the manuscript and L. Tresse and M. A. Treyer for useful comments.

  9. THE XMM CLUSTER SURVEY: THE BUILD-UP OF STELLAR MASS IN BRIGHTEST CLUSTER GALAXIES AT HIGH REDSHIFT

    SciTech Connect

    Stott, J. P.; Collins, C. A.; Hilton, M.; Capozzi, D.; Sahlen, M.; Lloyd-Davies, E.; Hosmer, M.; Liddle, A. R.; Mehrtens, N.; Romer, A. K.; Miller, C. J.; Stanford, S. A.; Viana, P. T. P.; Davidson, M.; Hoyle, B.; Kay, S. T.; Nichol, R. C.

    2010-07-20

    We present deep J- and K{sub s} -band photometry of 20 high redshift galaxy clusters between z = 0.8 and1.5, 19 of which are observed with the MOIRCS instrument on the Subaru telescope. By using near-infrared light as a proxy for stellar mass we find the surprising result that the average stellar mass of Brightest Cluster Galaxies (BCGs) has remained constant at {approx}9 x 10{sup 11} M {sub sun} since z {approx} 1.5. We investigate the effect on this result of differing star formation histories generated by three well-known and independent stellar population codes and find it to be robust for reasonable, physically motivated choices of age and metallicity. By performing Monte Carlo simulations we find that the result is unaffected by any correlation between BCG mass and cluster mass in either the observed or model clusters. The large stellar masses imply that the assemblage of these galaxies took place at the same time as the initial burst of star formation. This result leads us to conclude that dry merging has had little effect on the average stellar mass of BCGs over the last 9-10 Gyr in stark contrast to the predictions of semi-analytic models, based on the hierarchical merging of dark matter halos, which predict a more protracted mass build-up over a Hubble time. However, we discuss that there is potential for reconciliation between observation and theory if there is a significant growth of material in the intracluster light over the same period.

  10. A universal, turbulence-regulated star formation law: from Milky Way clouds to high-redshift disk and starburst galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Federrath, Christoph; Salim, Diane; Kewley, Lisa

    2015-08-01

    Whilst the star formation rate (SFR) of molecular clouds and galaxies is key in understanding galaxy evolution, the physical processes which determine the SFR remain unclear. This uncertainty about the underlying physics has resulted in various different star formation laws, all having substantial intrinsic scatter. Extending upon previous works that define the column density of star formation (ΣSFR) by the gas column density (Σgas), we develop a new universal star formation (SF) law based on the multi-freefall prescription of gas. This new SF law relies predominantly on the probability density function (PDF) and on the sonic Mach number of the turbulence in the star-forming clouds. By doing so we derive a relation where the star formation rate (SFR) correlates with the molecular gas mass per multi-freefall time, whereas previous models had used the average, single-freefall time. We define a new quantity called maximum (multi-freefall) gas consumption rate (MGCR) and show that the actual SFR is only about 0.4% of this maximum possible SFR, confirming the observed low efficiency of star formation. We show that placing observations in this new framework (ΣSFR vs. MGCR) yields a significantly improved correlation with 3-4 times reduced scatter compared to previous SF laws and a goodness-of-fit parameter R2 = 0.97. By inverting our new relationship, we provide sonic Mach number predictions for kpc-scale observations of Local Group galaxies as well as unresolved observations of local and high-redshift disk and starburst galaxies that do not have independent, reliable estimates for the turbulent cloud Mach number.

  11. A universal, turbulence-regulated star formation law: from Milky Way clouds to high-redshift disk and starburst galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinda Salim, Diane; Federrath, Christoph; Kewley, Lisa

    2015-08-01

    Whilst the star formation rate (SFR) of molecular clouds and galaxies is key in understanding galaxy evolution, the physical processes that determine the SFR remain unclear, with significant intrinsic scatter arising from previous approaches at describing its functional dependencies. In lieu of this, we extend upon preceding parameterisations which had defined the column density of star formation, ΣSFR by either the gas column density Σgas or the ratio between Σgas and the average, single-freefall time. We develop a new universal star formation (SF) law that relies predominantly on the probability density function (PDF) and the sonic Mach number of the turbulence in star-forming clouds. By doing so we derive a relation where the SFR correlates with the molecular gas mass per multi-freefall time. We define a new quantity called maximum (multi-freefall) gas consumption rate (MGCR) and show that the actual SFR is only about 0.4% of the MGCR, confirming the observed low efficiency of star formation. We show that placing observations in this new framework (ΣSFR vs. MGCR) yields a significantly improved correlation with 3-4 times reduced scatter compared to previous SF laws and a goodness-of-fit parameter R2=0.97, close to a perfect fit of R2=1. By inverting our new relationship, we provide sonic Mach number predictions for kpc-scale observations of Local Group galaxies as well as unresolved observations of local and high-redshift disk and starburst galaxies that do not have independent, reliable estimates for the turbulent cloud Mach number.

  12. A Universal, Turbulence-regulated Star Formation Law: From Milky Way Clouds to High-redshift Disk and Starburst Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salim, Diane M.; Federrath, Christoph; Kewley, Lisa J.

    2015-06-01

    While the star formation rate (SFR) of molecular clouds and galaxies is key in understanding galaxy evolution, the physical processes that determine the SFR remain unclear. This uncertainty about the underlying physics has resulted in various different star formation (SF) laws, all having substantial intrinsic scatter. Extending upon previous works that define the column density of star formation ({{{Σ }}}{SFR}) by the gas column density ({{{Σ }}}{gas}), we develop a new universal SF law based on the multi-freefall prescription of gas. This new SF law relies predominantly on the probability density function and on the sonic Mach number of the turbulence in the star-forming clouds. By doing so we derive a relation where the SFR correlates with the molecular gas mass per multi-freefall time, whereas previous models had used the average, single-freefall time. We define a new quantity called maximum (multi-freefall) gas consumption rate (MGCR) and show that the actual SFR is only about 0.4% of this maximum possible SFR, confirming the observed low efficiency of SF. We show that placing observations in this new framework ({{{Σ }}}{SFR} versus MGCR) yields a significantly improved correlation with 3-4 times reduced scatter compared to previous SF laws and a goodness-of-fit parameter {R}2=0.97. By inverting our new relationship, we provide sonic Mach number predictions for kiloparsec-scale observations of Local Group galaxies as well as unresolved observations of local and high-redshift disk and starburst galaxies that do not have independent, reliable estimates for the turbulent cloud Mach number.

  13. THE MOST METAL-POOR DAMPED Lyα SYSTEMS: AN INSIGHT INTO DWARF GALAXIES AT HIGH-REDSHIFT

    SciTech Connect

    Cooke, Ryan J.; Pettini, Max; Jorgenson, Regina A.

    2015-02-10

    In this paper we analyze the kinematics, chemistry, and physical properties of a sample of the most metal-poor damped Lyα systems (DLAs), to uncover their links to modern-day galaxies. We present evidence that the DLA population as a whole exhibits a ''knee'' in the relative abundances of the α-capture and Fe-peak elements when the metallicity is [Fe/H] ≅ –2.0, assuming that Zn traces the buildup of Fe-peak elements. In this respect, the chemical evolution of DLAs is clearly different from that experienced by Milky Way halo stars, but resembles that of dwarf spheroidal galaxies in the Local Group. We also find a close correspondence between the kinematics of Local Group dwarf galaxies and of high-redshift metal-poor DLAs, which further strengthens this connection. On the basis of such similarities, we propose that the most metal-poor DLAs provide us with a unique opportunity to directly study the dwarf galaxy population more than ten billion years in the past, at a time when many dwarf galaxies were forming the bulk of their stars. To this end, we have measured some of the key physical properties of the DLA gas, including their neutral gas mass, size, kinetic temperature, density, and turbulence. We find that metal-poor DLAs contain a warm neutral medium with T {sub gas} ≅ 9600 K predominantly held up by thermal pressure. Furthermore, all of the DLAs in our sample exhibit a subsonic turbulent Mach number, implying that the gas distribution is largely smooth. These results are among the first empirical descriptions of the environments where the first few generations of stars may have formed in the universe.

  14. Bayesian redshift-space distortions correction from galaxy redshift surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Ata, Metin; Angulo, Raul E.; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio; Monteagudo, Carlos Hernández; Prada, Francisco; Yepes, Gustavo

    2016-03-01

    We present a Bayesian reconstruction method which maps a galaxy distribution from redshift- to real-space inferring the distances of the individual galaxies. The method is based on sampling density fields assuming a lognormal prior with a likelihood modelling non-linear stochastic bias. Coherent redshift-space distortions are corrected in a Gibbs-sampling procedure by moving the galaxies from redshift- to real-space according to the peculiar motions derived from the recovered density field using linear theory. The virialized distortions are corrected by sampling candidate real-space positions along the line of sight, which are compatible with the bulk flow corrected redshift-space position adding a random dispersion term in high-density collapsed regions (defined by the eigenvalues of the Hessian). This approach presents an alternative method to estimate the distances to galaxies using the three-dimensional spatial information, and assuming isotropy. Hence the number of applications is very broad. In this work, we show the potential of this method to constrain the growth rate up to k ˜ 0.3 h Mpc-1. Furthermore it could be useful to correct for photometric redshift errors, and to obtain improved baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) reconstructions.

  15. The high-redshift gamma-ray burst GRB 140515A. A comprehensive X-ray and optical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melandri, A.; Bernardini, M. G.; D'Avanzo, P.; Sánchez-Ramírez, R.; Nappo, F.; Nava, L.; Japelj, J.; de Ugarte Postigo, A.; Oates, S.; Campana, S.; Covino, S.; D'Elia, V.; Ghirlanda, G.; Gafton, E.; Ghisellini, G.; Gnedin, N.; Goldoni, P.; Gorosabel, J.; Libbrecht, T.; Malesani, D.; Salvaterra, R.; Thöne, C. C.; Vergani, S. D.; Xu, D.; Tagliaferri, G.

    2015-09-01

    High-redshift gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) offer several advantages when studying the distant Universe, providing unique information about the structure and properties of the galaxies in which they exploded. Spectroscopic identification with large ground-based telescopes has improved our knowledge of this kind of distant events. We present the multi-wavelength analysis of the high-zSwift GRB GRB 140515A (z = 6.327). The best estimate of the neutral hydrogen fraction of the intergalactic medium towards the burst is xHI ≤ 0.002. The spectral absorption lines detected for this event are the weakest lines ever observed in GRB afterglows, suggesting that GRB 140515A exploded in a very low-density environment. Its circum-burst medium is characterised by an average extinction (AV ~ 0.1) that seems to be typical of z ≥ 6 events. The observed multi-band light curves are explained either with a very hard injected spectrum (p = 1.7) or with a multi-component emission (p = 2.1). In the second case a long-lasting central engine activity is needed in order to explain the late time X-ray emission. The possible origin of GRB 140515A in a Pop III (or in a Pop II star with a local environment enriched by Pop III) massive star is unlikely. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, ESO, the VLT/Kueyen telescope, Paranal, Chile (proposal code: 093.A-0069), on observations made with the Nordic Optical Telescope, operated by the Nordic Optical Telescope Scientific Association at the Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos, La Palma, Spain, of the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (programme 49-008), and on observations made with the Italian 3.6-m Telescopio Nazionale Galileo (TNG), operated by the Fundación Galileo Galilei of the INAF (Instituto Nazionale di Astrofisica) at the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos, La Palma, Spain, of the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (programme A26TAC_63).Appendix A is available in electronic form at

  16. RECONSTRUCTING REDSHIFT DISTRIBUTIONS WITH CROSS-CORRELATIONS: TESTS AND AN OPTIMIZED RECIPE

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, Daniel J.; Newman, Jeffrey A. E-mail: janewman@pitt.ed

    2010-09-20

    Many of the cosmological tests to be performed by planned dark energy experiments will require extremely well-characterized photometric redshift measurements. Current estimates for cosmic shear are that the true mean redshift of the objects in each photo-z bin must be known to better than 0.002(1 + z), and the width of the bin must be known to {approx}0.003(1 + z) if errors in cosmological measurements are not to be degraded significantly. A conventional approach is to calibrate these photometric redshifts with large sets of spectroscopic redshifts. However, at the depths probed by Stage III surveys (such as DES), let alone Stage IV (LSST, JDEM, and Euclid), existing large redshift samples have all been highly (25%-60%) incomplete, with a strong dependence of success rate on both redshift and galaxy properties. A powerful alternative approach is to exploit the clustering of galaxies to perform photometric redshift calibrations. Measuring the two-point angular cross-correlation between objects in some photometric redshift bin and objects with known spectroscopic redshift, as a function of the spectroscopic z, allows the true redshift distribution of a photometric sample to be reconstructed in detail, even if it includes objects too faint for spectroscopy or if spectroscopic samples are highly incomplete. We test this technique using mock DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift survey light cones constructed from the Millennium Simulation semi-analytic galaxy catalogs. From this realistic test, which incorporates the effects of galaxy bias evolution and cosmic variance, we find that the true redshift distribution of a photometric sample can, in fact, be determined accurately with cross-correlation techniques. We also compare the empirical error in the reconstruction of redshift distributions to previous analytic predictions, finding that additional components must be included in error budgets to match the simulation results. This extra error contribution is small for surveys that

  17. Radical C-H arylation of the BODIPY core with aryldiazonium salts: synthesis of highly fluorescent red-shifted dyes.

    PubMed

    Verbelen, Bram; Boodts, Stijn; Hofkens, Johan; Boens, Noël; Dehaen, Wim

    2015-04-01

    We describe herein the first radical C-H arylation of BODIPY dyes. This novel, general, one-step synthetic procedure uses ferrocene to generate aryl radical species from aryldiazonium salts and allows the straightforward synthesis of brightly fluorescent (Φ>0.85) 3,5-diarylated and 3-monoarylated boron dipyrrins in up to 86 % yield for a broad range of aryl substituents. In this way, new and complex dyes with red-shifted spectra can be easily prepared.

  18. VERY STRONG EMISSION-LINE GALAXIES IN THE WFC3 INFRARED SPECTROSCOPIC PARALLEL SURVEY AND IMPLICATIONS FOR HIGH-REDSHIFT GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Atek, H.; Colbert, J.; Shim, H.; Siana, B.; Bridge, C.; Scarlata, C.; Malkan, M.; Ross, N. R.; McCarthy, P.; Dressler, A.; Hathi, N. P.; Teplitz, H.; Henry, A.; Martin, C.; Bunker, A. J.; Fosbury, R. A. E.

    2011-12-20

    The WFC3 Infrared Spectroscopic Parallel Survey uses the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) infrared grism capabilities to obtain slitless spectra of thousands of galaxies over a wide redshift range including the peak of star formation history of the universe. We select a population of very strong emission-line galaxies with rest-frame equivalent widths (EWs) higher than 200 A. A total of 176 objects are found over the redshift range 0.35 < z < 2.3 in the 180 arcmin{sup 2} area that we have analyzed so far. This population consists of young and low-mass starbursts with high specific star formation rates (sSFR). After spectroscopic follow-up of one of these galaxies with Keck/Low Resolution Imaging Spectrometer, we report the detection at z = 0.7 of an extremely metal-poor galaxy with 12 + log(O/H) =7.47 {+-} 0.11. After estimating the active galactic nucleus fraction in the sample, we show that the high-EW galaxies have higher sSFR than normal star-forming galaxies at any redshift. We find that the nebular emission lines can substantially affect the total broadband flux density with a median brightening of 0.3 mag, with some examples of line contamination producing brightening of up to 1 mag. We show that the presence of strong emission lines in low-z galaxies can mimic the color-selection criteria used in the z {approx} 8 dropout surveys. In order to effectively remove low-redshift interlopers, deep optical imaging is needed, at least 1 mag deeper than the bands in which the objects are detected. Without deep optical data, most of the interlopers cannot be ruled out in the wide shallow HST imaging surveys. Finally, we empirically demonstrate that strong nebular lines can lead to an overestimation of the mass and the age of galaxies derived from fitting of their spectral energy distribution (SED). Without removing emission lines, the age and the stellar mass estimates are overestimated by a factor of 2 on average and up to a factor of 10 for the high-EW galaxies

  19. Wide-field mid-infrared and millimetre imaging of the high-redshift radio galaxy, 4C41.17

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greve, T. R.; Stern, D.; Ivison, R. J.; De Breuck, C.; Kovács, A.; Bertoldi, F.

    2007-11-01

    We present deep 350- and 1200-μm imaging of the region around 4C41.17 - one of the most-distant (z = 3.792) and luminous known radio galaxies - obtained with the Submillimeter High Angular Resolution Camera (SHARC-II) and the Max Planck Millimeter Bolometer Array (MAMBO). The radio galaxy is robustly detected at 350 and 1200μm, as are two nearby 850-μm-selected galaxies; a third 850-μm source is detected at 350μm and coincides with a ~2σ feature in the 1200-μm map. Farther away from the radio galaxy additional nine sources are detected at 1200μm, bringing the total number of detec