Science.gov

Sample records for high risk leukemia

  1. High-Risk Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Bhojwani, Deepa; Howard, Scott C.; Pui, Ching-Hon

    2009-01-01

    Although most children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) are cured, certain subsets have a high risk of relapse. Relapse risk can be predicted by early response to therapy, clinical and pharmacogenetic features of the host, and genetic characteristics of leukemic cells. Though early treatment response can be assessed by the peripheral blast cell count after 1 week of single-agent glucocorticoid treatment or percent of bone marrow blasts by morphology after 1 or 2 weeks of multiagent induction treatment, determination of minimal residual disease by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) or flow cytometry after 2 to 6 weeks of induction is the most precise and useful measure. Augmented therapy has improved outcome for the poor responders to initial treatment. Infants with mixed-lineage leukemia (MLL)–rearranged ALL comprise a very poor-risk group wherein further intensification of chemotherapy causes significant toxicity. Hybrid protocols incorporating drugs effective for acute myeloid leukemia could improve survival, a strategy being tested in international trials. Studies on the biology of MLL-induced leukemogenesis have prompted the development of novel targeted agents, currently under evaluation in clinical trials. Short-term outcomes of patients with Philadelphia chromosome (Ph)–positive ALL have improved significantly by adding tyrosine kinase inhibitors to standard chemotherapy regimens. New agents and methods to overcome resistance are under investigation, and allogeneic stem cell transplantation is recommended for certain subsets of patients, for example those with Ph+ and T-cell ALL with poor early response. Genome-wide interrogation of leukemic cell genetic abnormalities and germline genetic variations promise to identify new molecular targets for therapy. PMID:19778845

  2. High-risk acute myelogenous leukemia: treatment today ... and tomorrow.

    PubMed

    Schiller, Gary J

    2013-01-01

    High-risk acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) constitutes a distinct subset of disease based on clinical and biological characteristics and comprises a significant percentage of all cases of adult AML. Biologic features such as distinct clonal cytogenetic and molecular abnormalities identify a subgroup of AML patients characterized by poor response to induction chemotherapy and poor long-term survival after treatment with consolidation chemotherapy. Clinical variables that predict for poor response include AML relapsed after less than 1 year of remission and AML characterized by resistance to conventional agents. We review here our understanding of the defining biologic subtypes of AML and discuss how adequate initial evaluation can be used to inform the choice of treatment. By defining high-risk biologic and clinical variables, a strong case can be made for treating patients with investigational agents, with treatment directed at distinct cytogenetic or molecular abnormalities. Allogeneic transplantation is the only form of therapy available outside of the setting of a clinical trial that may offer a chance for long-term survival for patients with high-risk AML.

  3. Evolving treatment strategies in patients with high-risk acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Schiller, Gary J

    2014-11-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is defined by a set of biologically distinct diseases characterized by maturation arrest and clonal proliferation of myeloid cells. Recommendations for post-remission therapy depend on assessing the leukemia risk characteristics, such as cytogenetics and molecular features present at diagnosis. Patients with high-risk disease include those whose leukemia is characterized by monosomal karyotype or poor-risk cytogenetic or molecular abnormalities, patients with antecedent hematologic disorders or therapy-related AML, and presence of adverse host factors, such as comorbidities, impaired performance status or older age. Older patients are more likely to have these adverse features. High-risk AML responds poorly to available induction treatment and is likely to relapse despite consolidation therapy. Current data support an increasing understanding of prognosis but have not yet resulted in effective therapies for patients with high-risk disease. This review discusses current therapies and evolving treatment strategies for high-risk AML.

  4. Dietary resveratrol does not delay engraftment, sensitize to vincristine, or inhibit growth of high-risk acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells in NOD/SCID mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) with translocation t(4;11) is a high-risk leukemia found in 60-85% of infants with ALL and is often refractory to conventional chemotherapeutics after relapse. Although resveratrol is able to kill high-risk leukemia in vitro, this agent has not been evaluated agai...

  5. High Risk Pediatric Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: To Transplant or Not to Transplant?

    PubMed Central

    Pulsipher, Michael A.; Peters, Christina; Pui, Ching-Hon

    2010-01-01

    Because survival with both chemotherapy and allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) approaches to high risk pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) generally improves through the years, regular comparisons of outcomes with either approach for a given indication are needed to decide when HSCT is indicated. Improvements in risk classification are allowing clinicians to identify patients at high risk for relapse early in their course of therapy. Whether patients defined as high risk by new methods will benefit from HSCT requires careful testing. Standardization and improvement of transplant approaches has led to equivalent survival outcomes with matched sibling and well-matched unrelated donors, however, survival using mismatched and haploidentical donors is generally worse. Trials comparing chemotherapy and HSCT must obtain sufficient data about therapy and stratify the analysis to assess the outcomes of best-chemotherapy with best-HSCT approaches. PMID:21195303

  6. Biomarkers in Bone Marrow Samples From Pediatric Patients With High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-17

    Childhood Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  7. Dasatinib, Cytarabine, and Idarubicin in Treating Patients With High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-08

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  8. Cytogenetic risk stratification in chronic myelomonocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Such, Esperanza; Cervera, José; Costa, Dolors; Solé, Francesc; Vallespí, Teresa; Luño, Elisa; Collado, Rosa; Calasanz, María J.; Hernández-Rivas, Jesús M.; Cigudosa, Juan C.; Nomdedeu, Benet; Mallo, Mar; Carbonell, Felix; Bueno, Javier; Ardanaz, María T.; Ramos, Fernando; Tormo, Mar; Sancho-Tello, Reyes; del Cañizo, Consuelo; Gómez, Valle; Marco, Victor; Xicoy, Blanca; Bonanad, Santiago; Pedro, Carmen; Bernal, Teresa; Sanz, Guillermo F.

    2011-01-01

    Background The prognostic value of cytogenetic findings in chronic myelomonocytic leukemia is unclear. Our purpose was to evaluate the independent prognostic impact of cytogenetic abnormalities in a large series of patients with chronic myelomonocytic leukemia included in the database of the Spanish Registry of Myelodysplastic Syndromes. Design and Methods We studied 414 patients with chronic myelomonocytic leukemia according to WHO criteria and with a successful conventional cytogenetic analysis at diagnosis. Different patient and disease characteristics were examined by univariate and multivariate methods to establish their relationship with overall survival and evolution to acute myeloid leukemia. Results Patients with abnormal karyotype (110 patients, 27%) had poorer overall survival (P=0.001) and higher risk of acute myeloid leukemia evolution (P=0.010). Based on outcome analysis, three cytogenetic risk categories were identified: low risk (normal karyotype or loss of Y chromosome as a single anomaly), high risk (presence of trisomy 8 or abnormalities of chromosome 7, or complex karyotype), and intermediate risk (all other abnormalities). Overall survival at five years for patients in the low, intermediate, and high risk cytogenetic categories was 35%, 26%, and 4%, respectively (P<0.001). Multivariate analysis confirmed that this new CMML-specific cytogenetic risk stratification was an independent prognostic variable for overall survival (P=0.001). Additionally, patients belonging to the high-risk cytogenetic category also had a higher risk of acute myeloid leukemia evolution on univariate (P=0.001) but not multivariate analysis. Conclusions Cytogenetic findings have a strong prognostic impact in patients with chronic myelomonocytic leukemia. PMID:21109693

  9. Bortezomib in Treating Patients With High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-10-30

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  10. Dasatinib in high-risk core binding factor acute myeloid leukemia in first complete remission: a French Acute Myeloid Leukemia Intergroup trial.

    PubMed

    Boissel, Nicolas; Renneville, Aline; Leguay, Thibaut; Lefebvre, Pascale Cornillet; Recher, Christian; Lecerf, Thibaud; Delabesse, Eric; Berthon, Céline; Blanchet, Odile; Prebet, Thomas; Pautas, Cécile; Chevallier, Patrice; Leprêtre, Stéphane; Girault, Stéphane; Bonmati, Caroline; Guièze, Romain; Himberlin, Chantal; Randriamalala, Edouard; Preudhomme, Claude; Jourdan, Eric; Dombret, Hervé; Ifrah, Norbert

    2015-06-01

    Core-binding factor acute myeloid leukemia is a favorable acute myeloid leukemia subset cytogenetically defined by t(8;21) or inv(16)/t(16;16) rearrangements, disrupting RUNX1 (previously CBFA/AML1) or CBFB transcription factor functions. The receptor tyrosine kinase KIT is expressed in the vast majority of these acute myeloid leukemias and frequent activating KIT gene mutations have been associated with a higher risk of relapse. This phase II study aimed to evaluate dasatinib as maintenance therapy in patients with core-binding factor acute myeloid leukemia in first hematologic complete remission, but at higher risk of relapse due to molecular disease persistence or recurrence. A total of 26 patients aged 18-60 years old previously included in the CBF-2006 trial were eligible to receive dasatinib 140 mg daily if they had a poor initial molecular response (n=18) or a molecular recurrence (n=8). The tolerance of dasatinib as maintenance therapy was satisfactory. The 2-year disease-free survival in this high-risk population of patients was 25.7%. All but one patient with molecular recurrence presented subsequent hematologic relapse. Patients with slow initial molecular response had a similar disease-free survival when treated with dasatinib (40.2% at 2 years) or without any maintenance (50.0% at 2 years). The disappearance of KIT gene mutations at relapse suggests that clonal devolution may in part explain the absence of efficacy observed with single-agent dasatinib in these patients (n. EudraCT: 2006-006555-12).

  11. GTI-2040 in Treating Patients With Relapsed, Refractory, or High-Risk Acute Leukemia, High-Grade Myelodysplastic Syndromes, or Refractory or Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-03

    Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  12. Superenhancer reprogramming drives a B-cell-epithelial transition and high-risk leukemia.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yeguang; Zhang, Zhihong; Kashiwagi, Mariko; Yoshida, Toshimi; Joshi, Ila; Jena, Nilamani; Somasundaram, Rajesh; Emmanuel, Akinola Olumide; Sigvardsson, Mikael; Fitamant, Julien; El-Bardeesy, Nabeel; Gounari, Fotini; Van Etten, Richard A; Georgopoulos, Katia

    2016-09-01

    IKAROS is required for the differentiation of highly proliferative pre-B-cell precursors, and loss of IKAROS function indicates poor prognosis in precursor B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL). Here we show that IKAROS regulates this developmental stage by positive and negative regulation of superenhancers with distinct lineage affiliations. IKAROS defines superenhancers at pre-B-cell differentiation genes together with B-cell master regulators such as PAX5, EBF1, and IRF4 but is required for a highly permissive chromatin environment, a function that cannot be compensated for by the other transcription factors. IKAROS is also highly enriched at inactive enhancers of genes normally expressed in stem-epithelial cells. Upon IKAROS loss, expression of pre-B-cell differentiation genes is attenuated, while a group of extralineage transcription factors that are directly repressed by IKAROS and depend on EBF1 relocalization at their enhancers for expression is induced. LHX2, LMO2, and TEAD-YAP1, normally kept separate from native B-cell transcription regulators by IKAROS, now cooperate directly with them in a de novo superenhancer network with its own feed-forward transcriptional reinforcement. Induction of de novo superenhancers antagonizes Polycomb repression and superimposes aberrant stem-epithelial cell properties in a B-cell precursor. This dual mechanism of IKAROS regulation promotes differentiation while safeguarding against a hybrid stem-epithelial-B-cell phenotype that underlies high-risk B-ALL. PMID:27664237

  13. Modern treatment in chronic lymphocytic leukemia: impact on survival and efficacy in high-risk subgroups

    PubMed Central

    Cuneo, Antonio; Cavazzini, Francesco; Ciccone, Maria; Daghia, Giulia; Sofritti, Olga; Saccenti, Elena; Negrini, Massimo; Rigolin, Gian Matteo

    2014-01-01

    Treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) has dramatically changed over the last years, with significant improvement in overall survival (OS) and increased efficacy in genetically defined “high-risk” disease. Besides prospective clinical trials usually enrolling young and fit patients, retrospective studies were performed comparing the outcome of patients belonging to different age groups and showing longer survival in patients diagnosed in the most recent periods. In patients younger than 70 years the 10-year relative survival was 43–53% in the 1980s as compared with 59–63% in the 2000s. Likewise, the 10-year relative survival in patients >70 years was 22–42% in the 1980s and 46–55% in the 2000s. Improved outcome derived in part by the introduction of effective regimens in genetically defined “high-risk” disease (i.e., 17p−, 11q−, TP53, NOTCH1, SF3B1 mutations), especially in the younger and/or fit patients. The unfavorable prognostic significance of 11q− was overcome by chemoimmunotherapy. High-dose steroids with anti-CD52 appeared to improve the response rate in 17p-/TP53 mutated cases and allogeneic transplantation achieved prolonged disease control irrespective of high-risk disease. Further improvement is being generated by the new anti-CD20 obinutuzumab in the elderly and by mechanism-based treatment using kinase-targeting agents or anti-BCL2 molecules yielding high-response rate and impressive progression-free survival in the chemorefractory setting as well as in previously untreated patients. PMID:24648042

  14. Next-generation-sequencing of recurrent childhood high hyperdiploid acute lymphoblastic leukemia reveals mutations typically associated with high risk patients.

    PubMed

    Chen, Cai; Bartenhagen, Christoph; Gombert, Michael; Okpanyi, Vera; Binder, Vera; Röttgers, Silja; Bradtke, Jutta; Teigler-Schlegel, Andrea; Harbott, Jochen; Ginzel, Sebastian; Thiele, Ralf; Husemann, Peter; Krell, Pina F I; Borkhardt, Arndt; Dugas, Martin; Hu, Jianda; Fischer, Ute

    2015-09-01

    20% of children suffering from high hyperdiploid acute lymphoblastic leukemia develop recurrent disease. The molecular mechanisms are largely unknown. Here, we analyzed the genetic landscape of five patients at relapse, who developed recurrent disease without prior high-risk indication using whole-exome- and whole-genome-sequencing. Oncogenic mutations of RAS pathway genes (NRAS, KRAS, FLT3, n=4) and deactivating mutations of major epigenetic regulators (CREBBP, EP300, each n=2 and ARID4B, EZH2, MACROD2, MLL2, each n=1) were prominent in these cases and virtually absent in non-recurrent cases (n=6) or other pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia cases (n=18). In relapse nucleotide variations were detected in cell fate determining transcription factors (GLIS1, AKNA). Structural genomic alterations affected genes regulating B-cell development (IKZF1, PBX1, RUNX1). Eleven novel translocations involved the genes ART4, C12orf60, MACROD2, TBL1XR1, LRRN4, KIAA1467, and ELMO1/MIR1200. Typically, patients harbored only single structural variations, except for one patient who displayed massive rearrangements in the context of a germline tumor suppressor TP53 mutation and a Li-Fraumeni syndrome-like family history. Another patient harbored a germline mutation in the DNA repair factor ATM. In summary, the relapse patients of our cohort were characterized by somatic mutations affecting the RAS pathway, epigenetic and developmental programs and germline mutations in DNA repair pathways. PMID:26189108

  15. Intrinsic and chemo-sensitizing activity of SMAC-mimetics on high-risk childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Schirmer, M; Trentin, L; Queudeville, M; Seyfried, F; Demir, S; Tausch, E; Stilgenbauer, S; Eckhoff, S M; Meyer, L H; Debatin, K-M

    2016-01-01

    SMAC-mimetics represent a targeted therapy approach to overcome apoptosis resistance in many tumors. Here, we investigated the efficacy of the SMAC-mimetic BV6 in B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (BCP-ALL). In ALL cell lines, intrinsic apoptosis sensitivity was associated with rapid cIAP degradation, NF-κB activation, TNF-α secretion and induction of an autocrine TNF-α-dependent cell death loop. This pattern of responsiveness was also observed upon ex vivo analysis of 40 primograft BCP-ALL samples. Treatment with BV6 induced cell death in the majority of ALL primografts including leukemias with high-risk and poor-prognosis features. Inhibition of cell death by the TNF receptor fusion protein etanercept demonstrated that BV6 activity is dependent on TNF-α. In a preclinical NOD/SCID/huALL model of high-risk ALL, marked anti-leukemia effectivity and significantly prolonged survival were observed upon BV6 treatment. Interestingly, also in vivo, intrinsic SMAC-mimetic activity was mediated by TNF-α. Importantly, BV6 increased the effectivity of conventional induction therapy including vincristine, dexamethasone and asparaginase leading to prolonged remission induction. These data suggest SMAC-mimetics as an important addendum to efficient therapy of pediatric BCP-ALL. PMID:26775704

  16. Treosulfan, Fludarabine Phosphate, and Total-Body Irradiation Before Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-10-29

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  17. Blood Spotlight on iAMP21 acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), a high-risk pediatric disease.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Christine J

    2015-02-26

    Intrachromosomal amplification of chromosome 21 (iAMP21) defines a distinct cytogenetic subgroup of childhood B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Breakage-fusion-bridge cycles followed by chromothripsis and other complex structural rearrangements of chromosome 21 underlie the mechanism giving rise to iAMP21. Patients with iAMP21 are older (median age 9 years), with a low white cell count. They have a high relapse rate when treated as standard risk. Recent studies have shown improved outcome on intensive therapy. Molecular targets for therapy are being sought.

  18. 7-Hydroxystaurosporine and Perifosine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia or High Risk Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-27

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasms; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  19. Reduced intensity conditioning followed by peripheral blood stem cell transplantation for adult patients with high-risk acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Anthony S.; Palmer, Joycelynne M.; O'Donnell, Margaret R.; Kogut, Neil M.; Spielberger, Ricardo T.; Slovak, Marilyn L.; Tsai, Ni-Chun; Senitzer, David; Snyder, David S.; Thomas, Sandra H.; J.Forman, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) with high-risk features has a poor prognosis in adults despite aggressive chemotherapy. Reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) is a lower toxicity alternative for high-risk patients requiring hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT), however it has not been widely used for ALL. We conducted a retrospective study of 24 high-risk adult ALL patients who received an RIC regimen of fludarabine/melphalan prior to allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplant between 6/14/02 and 6/15/07 at City of Hope. Indications for the RIC regimen were: 1) age 50 or older (42%), 2) compromised organ function (54%), or 3) recipient of a previous HCT (37.5%). Patients had a median age of 47.5 years and the median follow-up was 28.5 months for living patients. Both overall survival and disease-free survival at two years was 61.5%. Relapse incidence was 21.1% and non-relapse mortality was 21.5% at two years. cGVHD developed in 86% of evaluable patients. In this series, no significant correlations were made between outcomes and patient age, presence of Philadelphia chromosome, relatedness of donor source or prior HCT. These high survival rates for high-risk ALL patients following RIC HCT may offer a promising option for patients not eligible for a standard myeloablative transplant. PMID:19822300

  20. Risk Groups for Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... recovery) and treatment options. Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a type of cancer in which the ... genetic conditions affect the risk of having childhood ALL. Anything that increases your risk of getting a ...

  1. Cyclophosphamide, Alvocidib, and Rituximab in Treating Patients With High Risk B-Cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-11-10

    Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage II Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

  2. Ipilimumab in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndrome or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-16

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome

  3. Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant and Pretargeted Radioimmunotherapy in Treating Patients With High-Risk Advanced Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-01

    Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia and Ringed Sideroblasts; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  4. High-risk childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia in first remission treated with novel intensive chemotherapy and allogeneic transplantation.

    PubMed

    Marshall, G M; Dalla Pozza, L; Sutton, R; Ng, A; de Groot-Kruseman, H A; van der Velden, V H; Venn, N C; van den Berg, H; de Bont, E S J M; Maarten Egeler, R; Hoogerbrugge, P M; Kaspers, G J L; Bierings, M B; van der Schoot, E; van Dongen, J; Law, T; Cross, S; Mueller, H; de Haas, V; Haber, M; Révész, T; Alvaro, F; Suppiah, R; Norris, M D; Pieters, R

    2013-07-01

    Children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and high minimal residual disease (MRD) levels after initial chemotherapy have a poor clinical outcome. In this prospective, single arm, Phase 2 trial, 111 Dutch and Australian children aged 1-18 years with newly diagnosed, t(9;22)-negative ALL, were identified among 1041 consecutively enrolled patients as high risk (HR) based on clinical features or high MRD. The HR cohort received the AIEOP-BFM (Associazione Italiana di Ematologia ed Oncologia Pediatrica (Italy)-Berlin-Frankfurt-Münster ALL Study Group) 2000 ALL Protocol I, then three novel HR chemotherapy blocks, followed by allogeneic transplant or chemotherapy. Of the 111 HR patients, 91 began HR treatment blocks, while 79 completed the protocol. There were 3 remission failures, 12 relapses, 7 toxic deaths in remission and 10 patients who changed protocol due to toxicity or clinician/parent preference. For the 111 HR patients, 5-year event-free survival (EFS) was 66.8% (±5.5) and overall survival (OS) was 75.6% (±4.3). The 30 patients treated as HR solely on the basis of high MRD levels had a 5-year EFS of 63% (±9.4%). All patients experienced grade 3 or 4 toxicities during HR block therapy. Although cure rates were improved compared with previous studies, high treatment toxicity suggested that novel agents are needed to achieve further improvement.

  5. Increased leukemia risk in Chernobyl cleanup workers

    Cancer.gov

    A new study found a significantly elevated risk for chronic lymphocytic leukemia among workers who were engaged in recovery and clean-up activities following the Chernobyl power plant accident in 1986.

  6. Perinatal risk factors for acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Crump, Casey; Sundquist, Jan; Sieh, Weiva; Winkleby, Marilyn A; Sundquist, Kristina

    2015-12-01

    Infectious etiologies have been hypothesized for acute leukemias because of their high incidence in early childhood, but have seldom been examined for acute myeloid leukemia (AML). We conducted the first large cohort study to examine perinatal factors including season of birth, a proxy for perinatal infectious exposures, and risk of AML in childhood through young adulthood. A national cohort of 3,569,333 persons without Down syndrome who were born in Sweden in 1973-2008 were followed up for AML incidence through 2010 (maximum age 38 years). There were 315 AML cases in 69.7 million person-years of follow-up. We found a sinusoidal pattern in AML risk by season of birth (P < 0.001), with peak risk among persons born in winter. Relative to persons born in summer (June-August), incidence rate ratios for AML were 1.72 (95 % CI 1.25-2.38; P = 0.001) for winter (December-February), 1.37 (95 % CI 0.99-1.90; P = 0.06) for spring (March-May), and 1.27 (95 % CI 0.90-1.80; P = 0.17) for fall (September-November). Other risk factors for AML included high fetal growth, high gestational age at birth, and low maternal education level. These findings did not vary by sex or age at diagnosis. Sex, birth order, parental age, and parental country of birth were not associated with AML. In this large cohort study, birth in winter was associated with increased risk of AML in childhood through young adulthood, possibly related to immunologic effects of early infectious exposures compared with summer birth. These findings warrant further investigation of the role of seasonally varying perinatal exposures in the etiology of AML.

  7. Constitutive Function of the Ikaros Transcription Factor in Primary Leukemia Cells from Pediatric Newly Diagnosed High-Risk and Relapsed B-precursor ALL Patients

    PubMed Central

    Uckun, Fatih M.; Ma, Hong; Ishkhanian, Rita; Arellano, Martha; Shahidzadeh, Anoush; Termuhlen, Amanda; Gaynon, Paul S.; Qazi, Sanjive

    2013-01-01

    We examined the constitutive function of the Ikaros (IK) transcription factor in blast cells from pediatric B-precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (BPL) patients using multiple assay platforms and bioinformatics tools. We found no evidence of diminished IK expression or function for primary cells from high-risk BPL patients including a Philadelphia chromosome (Ph)+ subset. Relapse clones as well as very aggressive in vivo clonogenic leukemic B-cell precursors isolated from spleens of xenografted NOD/SCID mice that developed overt leukemia after inoculation with primary leukemic cells of patients with BPL invariably and abundantly expressed intact IK protein. These results demonstrate that a lost or diminished IK function is not a characteristic feature of leukemic cells in Ph+ or Ph- high-risk BPL. PMID:24278314

  8. Role of peripheral blood minimum residual disease at day 8 of induction therapy in high-risk pediatric patients with acute lymphocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Salina, Thais Ditolvo da Costa; Ferreira, Yvelise Antunes; Alves, Eliana Brasil; Ferreira, Cristina Motta; De Paula, Erich Vinícius; Mira, Marcelo Távora; Passos, Leny da Mota

    2016-01-01

    Risk stratification and treatment intensification, based on minimal residual disease (MRD) mensurement, changed the prognosis of pediatric patients with acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL). The main aim of this study was to investigate whether peripheral blood (PB) MRD measurement at day 8 (D8) could predict the risk stratification category determined by bone marrow (BM) MRD at day 15 (D15). The study was performed prospectively, in a cohort of 40 children with B-lineage ALL, adopting the protocol of the Brazilian Cooperative Group of the Treatment Childhood Leukemia (GBTLI-2009). MRD was detected by flow cytometry (FC) using a simplifed panel that can reliably identify MRD at early phases of induction therapy. Upon diagnosis, the proportion of low and high-risk patients, was 24:16 (60%:40%). The main result of our study demonstrated the potential of D8 MRD in anticipating of week the risk stratification of high-risk patients as determined by D15 BM MRD. In these patients D8 MRD level of 1% was able to segregate high risk fast responders from high risk slow responders (p = 0.0097). This result could represent an opportunity for early treatment intensification, as already performed in some protocols. PMID:27526794

  9. Role of peripheral blood minimum residual disease at day 8 of induction therapy in high-risk pediatric patients with acute lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Salina, Thais Ditolvo da Costa; Ferreira, Yvelise Antunes; Alves, Eliana Brasil; Ferreira, Cristina Motta; De Paula, Erich Vinícius; Mira, Marcelo Távora; Passos, Leny da Mota

    2016-08-16

    Risk stratification and treatment intensification, based on minimal residual disease (MRD) mensurement, changed the prognosis of pediatric patients with acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL). The main aim of this study was to investigate whether peripheral blood (PB) MRD measurement at day 8 (D8) could predict the risk stratification category determined by bone marrow (BM) MRD at day 15 (D15). The study was performed prospectively, in a cohort of 40 children with B-lineage ALL, adopting the protocol of the Brazilian Cooperative Group of the Treatment Childhood Leukemia (GBTLI-2009). MRD was detected by flow cytometry (FC) using a simplifed panel that can reliably identify MRD at early phases of induction therapy. Upon diagnosis, the proportion of low and high-risk patients, was 24:16 (60%:40%). The main result of our study demonstrated the potential of D8 MRD in anticipating of week the risk stratification of high-risk patients as determined by D15 BM MRD. In these patients D8 MRD level of 1% was able to segregate high risk fast responders from high risk slow responders (p = 0.0097). This result could represent an opportunity for early treatment intensification, as already performed in some protocols.

  10. Role of peripheral blood minimum residual disease at day 8 of induction therapy in high-risk pediatric patients with acute lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Salina, Thais Ditolvo da Costa; Ferreira, Yvelise Antunes; Alves, Eliana Brasil; Ferreira, Cristina Motta; De Paula, Erich Vinícius; Mira, Marcelo Távora; Passos, Leny da Mota

    2016-01-01

    Risk stratification and treatment intensification, based on minimal residual disease (MRD) mensurement, changed the prognosis of pediatric patients with acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL). The main aim of this study was to investigate whether peripheral blood (PB) MRD measurement at day 8 (D8) could predict the risk stratification category determined by bone marrow (BM) MRD at day 15 (D15). The study was performed prospectively, in a cohort of 40 children with B-lineage ALL, adopting the protocol of the Brazilian Cooperative Group of the Treatment Childhood Leukemia (GBTLI-2009). MRD was detected by flow cytometry (FC) using a simplifed panel that can reliably identify MRD at early phases of induction therapy. Upon diagnosis, the proportion of low and high-risk patients, was 24:16 (60%:40%). The main result of our study demonstrated the potential of D8 MRD in anticipating of week the risk stratification of high-risk patients as determined by D15 BM MRD. In these patients D8 MRD level of 1% was able to segregate high risk fast responders from high risk slow responders (p = 0.0097). This result could represent an opportunity for early treatment intensification, as already performed in some protocols. PMID:27526794

  11. Cediranib Maleate in Treating Patients With Relapsed, Refractory, or Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia or High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-09-18

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  12. Predictions of Leukemia Risks to Astronauts from Solar Particle Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, F. A.; Atwell, W.; Kim, M. Y.; George, K. A.; Ponomarev, A.; Nikjoo, H.; Wilson, J. W.

    2006-01-01

    Leukemias consisting of acute and chronic myeloid leukemia and acute lymphatic lymphomas represent the earliest cancers that appear after radiation exposure, have a high lethality fraction, and make up a significant fraction of the overall fatal cancer risk from radiation for adults. Several considerations impact the recommendation of a preferred model for the estimation of leukemia risks from solar particle events (SPE's): The BEIR VII report recommends several changes to the method of calculation of leukemia risk compared to the methods recommended by the NCRP Report No. 132 including the preference of a mixture model with additive and multiplicative components in BEIR VII compared to the additive transfer model recommended by NCRP Report No. 132. Proton fluences and doses vary considerably across marrow regions because of the characteristic spectra of primary solar protons making the use of an average dose suspect. Previous estimates of bone marrow doses from SPE's have used an average body-shielding distribution for marrow based on the computerized anatomical man model (CAM). We have developed an 82-point body-shielding distribution that faithfully reproduces the mean and variance of SPE doses in the active marrow regions (head and neck, chest, abdomen, pelvis and thighs) allowing for more accurate estimation of linear- and quadratic-dose components of the marrow response. SPE's have differential dose-rates and a pseudo-quadratic dose response term is possible in the peak-flux period of an event. Also, the mechanistic basis for leukemia risk continues to improve allowing for improved strategies in choosing dose-rate modulation factors and radiation quality descriptors. We make comparisons of the various choices of the components in leukemia risk estimates in formulating our preferred model. A major finding is that leukemia could be the dominant risk to astronauts for a major solar particle event.

  13. The role of matched sibling donor allogeneic stem cell transplantation in pediatric high-risk acute myeloid leukemia: results from the AML-BFM 98 study

    PubMed Central

    Klusmann, Jan-Henning; Reinhardt, Dirk; Zimmermann, Martin; Kremens, Bernhard; Vormoor, Josef; Dworzak, Michael; Creutzig, Ursula; Klingebiel, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Background The role of allogeneic stem cell transplantation in post-remission management of children with high-risk acute myeloid leukemia remains controversial. In the multi-center AML-BFM 98 study we prospectively evaluated the impact of allogeneic stem cell transplantation in children with high-risk acute myeloid leukemia in first complete remission. Design and Methods HLA-typed patients with high-risk acute myeloid leukemia, who achieved first complete remission (n=247), were included in this analysis. All patients received double induction and consolidation. Based on the availability of a matched-sibling donor, patients were allocated by genetic chance to allogeneic stem cell transplantation (n=61) or chemotherapy-only (i.e. intensification and maintenance therapy; n=186). The main analysis was done on an intention-to-treat basis according to this allocation. Results Intention-to-treat analysis did not show a significantly different 5-year disease-free survival (49±6% versus 45±4%, Plog rank=0.44) or overall survival (68±6% versus 57±4%, Plog rank=0.17) between the matched-sibling donor and no-matched-sibling donor groups, whereas late adverse effects occurred more frequently after allogeneic stem cell transplantation (72.5% versus 31.8%, PFischer<0.01). These results were confirmed by as-treated analysis corrected for the time until transplantation (5-year overall survival: 72±8% versus 60±4%, PMantel-Byar 0.21). Subgroup analysis demonstrated improved survival rates for patients with 11q23 aberrations allocated to allogeneic stem cell transplantation (5-year overall survival: 94±6% versus 52±7%, Plog-rank=0.01; n=18 versus 49) in contrast to patients without 11q23 aberrations (5-year overall survival: 58±8% versus 55±5%, Plog-rank=0.66). Conclusions Our analyses defined a genetic subgroup of children with high-risk acute myeloid leukemia who benefited from allogeneic stem cell transplantation in the prospective multi-center AML-BFM 98 study. For

  14. What Are the Risk Factors for Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... lymphocytic leukemia? What are the risk factors for acute lymphocytic leukemia? A risk factor is something that affects your ... this is unknown. Having an identical twin with ALL Someone who has an identical twin who develops ...

  15. Distance to high-voltage power lines and risk of childhood leukemia--an analysis of confounding by and interaction with other potential risk factors.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Camilla; Bräuner, Elvira V; Rod, Naja H; Albieri, Vanna; Andersen, Claus E; Ulbak, Kaare; Hertel, Ole; Johansen, Christoffer; Schüz, Joachim; Raaschou-Nielsen, Ole

    2014-01-01

    We investigated whether there is an interaction between distance from residence at birth to nearest power line and domestic radon and traffic-related air pollution, respectively, in relation to childhood leukemia risk. Further, we investigated whether adjusting for potential confounders alters the association between distance to nearest power line and childhood leukemia. We included 1024 cases aged <15, diagnosed with leukemia during 1968-1991, from the Danish Cancer Registry and 2048 controls randomly selected from the Danish childhood population and individually matched by gender and year of birth. We used geographical information systems to determine the distance between residence at birth and the nearest 132-400 kV overhead power line. Concentrations of domestic radon and traffic-related air pollution (NOx at the front door) were estimated using validated models. We found a statistically significant interaction between distance to nearest power line and domestic radon regarding risk of childhood leukemia (p = 0.01) when using the median radon level as cut-off point but not when using the 75th percentile (p = 0.90). We found no evidence of an interaction between distance to nearest power line and traffic-related air pollution (p = 0.73). We found almost no change in the estimated association between distance to power line and risk of childhood leukemia when adjusting for socioeconomic status of the municipality, urbanization, maternal age, birth order, domestic radon and traffic-related air pollution. The statistically significant interaction between distance to nearest power line and domestic radon was based on few exposed cases and controls and sensitive to the choice of exposure categorization and might, therefore, be due to chance. PMID:25259740

  16. CXXC5 (Retinoid-Inducible Nuclear Factor, RINF) is a Potential Therapeutic Target in High-Risk Human Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Astori, Audrey; Fredly, Hanne; Aloysius, Thomas Aquinas; Bullinger, Lars; Mas, Véronique Mansat-De; de la Grange, Pierre; Delhommeau, François; Hagen, Karen Marie; Récher, Christian; Dusanter-Fourt, Isabelle; Knappskog, Stian; Lillehaug, Johan Richard

    2013-01-01

    The retinoid-responsive gene CXXC5 localizes to the 5q31.2 chromosomal region and encodes a retinoid-inducible nuclear factor (RINF) that seems important during normal myelopoiesis. We investigated CXXC5/RINF expression in primary human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells derived from 594 patients, and a wide variation in CXXC5/RINF mRNA levels was observed both in the immature leukemic myeloblasts and in immature acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells. Furthermore, patients with low-risk cytogenetic abnormalities showed significantly lower levels compared to patients with high-risk abnormalities, and high RINF/CXXC5/ mRNA levels were associated with decreased overall survival for patients receiving intensive chemotherapy for newly diagnosed AML. This association with prognosis was seen both when investigating (i) an unselected patient population as well as for patients with (ii) normal cytogenetic and (iii) core-binding factor AML. CXXC5/RINF knockdown in AML cell lines caused increased susceptibility to chemotherapy-induced apoptosis, and regulation of apoptosis also seemed to differ between primary human AML cells with high and low RINF expression. The association with adverse prognosis together with the antiapoptotic effect of CXXC5/RINF suggests that targeting of CXXC5/RINF should be considered as a possible therapeutic strategy, especially in high-risk patients who show increased expression in AML cells compared with normal hematopoietic cells. PMID:23988457

  17. Benzene and leukemia. An epidemiologic risk assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Rinsky, R.A.; Smith, A.B.; Hornung, R.; Filloon, T.G.; Young, R.J.; Okun, A.H.; Landrigan, P.J.

    1987-04-23

    To assess quantitatively the association between benzene exposure and leukemia, we examined the mortality rate of a cohort with occupational exposure to benzene. Cumulative exposure for each cohort member was estimated from historical air-sampling data and, when no sampling data existed, from interpolation on the basis of existing data. The overall standardized mortality ratio (a measure of relative risk multiplied by 100) for leukemia was 337 (95 percent confidence interval, 154 to 641), and that for multiple myeloma was 409 (95 percent confidence interval, 110 to 1047). With stratification according to levels of cumulative exposure, the standardized mortality ratios for leukemia increased from 109 to 322, 1186, and 6637 with increases in cumulative benzene exposure from less than 40 parts per million-years (ppm-years), to 40 to 199, 200 to 399, and 400 or more, respectively. A cumulative benzene exposure of 400 ppm-years is equivalent to a mean annual exposure of 10 ppm over a 40-year working lifetime; 10 ppm is the currently enforceable standard in the United States for occupational exposure to benzene. To examine the shape of the exposure-response relation, we performed a conditional logistic-regression analysis, in which 10 controls were matched to each cohort member with leukemia. From this model, it can be calculated that protection from benzene-induced leukemia would increase exponentially with any reduction in the permissible exposure limit.

  18. Murine B-1 B Cell Progenitors Initiate B-Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia With Features of High Risk Disease1

    PubMed Central

    Montecino-Rodriguez, Encarnacion; Li, Katy; Fice, Michael; Dorshkind, Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    B-1 and B-2 B cells derive from distinct progenitors that emerge in overlapping waves of development. The number of murine B-1 progenitors peaks during fetal development while B-2 B cell production predominates in adult bone marrow. Many genetic mutations that underlie B-acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) occur in the fetus, at which time B-1 progenitor numbers are high. However, whether B-ALL can initiate in B-1 progenitors is unknown. We now report that BCR-ABL transformed murine B-1 progenitors can be B-ALL cells of origin and demonstrate that they initiate disease more rapidly than oncogene expressing B-2 progenitors. We further demonstrate that B-1 progenitors exhibit relative resistance to apoptosis and undergo significant growth following oncogene expression and propose that these properties underlie the accelerated kinetics with which they initiate leukemia. These results provide a developmental perspective on the origin of B-ALL and indicate B cell lineage as a factor influencing disease progression. PMID:24752443

  19. Yttrium Y 90 Anti-CD45 Monoclonal Antibody BC8 Followed by Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-29

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  20. Filgrastim, Cladribine, Cytarabine, and Mitoxantrone Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed or Relapsed/Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-26

    Acute Biphenotypic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  1. Building materials and risk of leukemia.

    PubMed

    Pachocki, K A; Gajewski, A K; Krzyzanowski, M; Rózycki, Z; Majle, T

    1990-01-01

    Using information data obtained from 958 patients with leukemia and the same number of healthy controls matched for sex, age and place of residence the relative risk of leukemia was calculated in relation to the character of the material from which the building was built where the patients and controls were living. The information on the type of the building materials was obtained by inquiry. Three types of buildings were isolated: buildings built from wood, bricks and concrete or prefabricated products. In the analysis the number of years during which the patients and controls were living in these buildings was considered. No statistically significant correlation was noted between the risk of leukaemia development and the character of the building material. No increase was noted in this probability in relation to the time of living in a building built from any of these building materials. Additional analysis demonstrated that in Poland no so called "leukemic houses" are found, that is houses where during 5 years three of more cases of leukemia occurred.

  2. Building materials and risk of leukemia.

    PubMed

    Pachocki, K A; Gajewski, A K; Krzyzanowski, M; Rózycki, Z; Majle, T

    1990-01-01

    Using information data obtained from 958 patients with leukemia and the same number of healthy controls matched for sex, age and place of residence the relative risk of leukemia was calculated in relation to the character of the material from which the building was built where the patients and controls were living. The information on the type of the building materials was obtained by inquiry. Three types of buildings were isolated: buildings built from wood, bricks and concrete or prefabricated products. In the analysis the number of years during which the patients and controls were living in these buildings was considered. No statistically significant correlation was noted between the risk of leukaemia development and the character of the building material. No increase was noted in this probability in relation to the time of living in a building built from any of these building materials. Additional analysis demonstrated that in Poland no so called "leukemic houses" are found, that is houses where during 5 years three of more cases of leukemia occurred. PMID:2244171

  3. Risk-adapted treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia based on all-trans retinoic acid and anthracycline with addition of cytarabine in consolidation therapy for high-risk patients: further improvements in treatment outcome.

    PubMed

    Sanz, Miguel A; Montesinos, Pau; Rayón, Chelo; Holowiecka, Alexandra; de la Serna, Javier; Milone, Gustavo; de Lisa, Elena; Brunet, Salut; Rubio, Vicente; Ribera, José M; Rivas, Concha; Krsnik, Isabel; Bergua, Juan; González, José; Díaz-Mediavilla, Joaquín; Rojas, Rafael; Manso, Félix; Ossenkoppele, Gert; González, José D; Lowenberg, Bob

    2010-06-24

    A risk-adapted strategy based on all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and anthracycline monochemotherapy (PETHEMA LPA99 trial) has demonstrated a high antileukemic efficacy in acute promyelocytic leukemia. We designed a new trial (LPA2005) with the objective of achieving stepwise improvements in outcome. Between July 2005 and April 2009, low- and intermediate-risk patients (leukocytes < 10 x 10(9)/L) received a reduced dose of mitoxantrone for the second consolidation course, whereas high- risk patients younger than 60 years of age received cytarabine combined with ATRA and idarubicin in the first and third consolidation courses. Of 372 patients attaining complete remission after ATRA plus idarubicin (92.5%), 368 proceeded to consolidation therapy. For low- and intermediate-risk patients, duration of neutropenia and thrombocytopenia and hospital stay were significantly reduced without sacrificing antileukemic efficacy, compared with the previous LPA99 trial. For high-risk patients, the 3-year relapse rate was significantly lower in the LPA2005 trial (11%) than in the LPA99 (26%; P = .03). Overall disease-free survival was also better in the LPA2005 trial (P = .04). In conclusion, the lower dose of mitoxantrone resulted in a significant reduction of toxicity and hospital stay while maintaining the antileukemic activity, and the combination of ATRA, idarubicin, and cytarabine for high-risk acute promyelocytic leukemia significantly reduced the relapse rate in this setting. Registered at http://www.clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00408278.

  4. A Pilot Study of Intensified PEG-Asparaginase in High-risk Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: Children's Oncology Group Study AALL08P1.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Vilmarie; Kairalla, John; Salzer, Wanda L; Raetz, Elizabeth A; Loh, Mignon Lc; Carroll, Andrew J; Heerema, Nyla A; Wood, Brent L; Borowitz, Michael J; Burke, Michael J; Asselin, Barbara L; Devidas, Meenakshi; Winick, Naomi J; Carroll, William L; Hunger, Stephen P; Dreyer, ZoAnn E

    2016-08-01

    AALL08P1 was designed to determine whether biweekly intensified pegaspargase (I-PEG) was feasible and safe in pediatric patients with newly diagnosed high-risk B-precursor lymphoblastic leukemia when given with Children's Oncology Group hemiaugmented BFM therapy. High-risk average (HR-Avg) patients received standard pegaspargase dosing (6 doses), whereas high-risk high (HR-High) patients received I-PEG biweekly from the start of Consolidation until day 1 of Maintenance. Feasibility and safety were defined in advance as ≥65% of patients tolerating at least 8 doses of I-PEG and 90% requiring ≤49 weeks from day 1 of Consolidation to the initiation of Maintenance. Targeted toxicities included allergic reactions, anaphylaxis, pancreatitis, thrombosis, bleeding, central nervous system events, and sepsis. AALL08P1 enrolled 104 patients; 54 were classified as HR-Avg and 30 as HR-High after completion of induction therapy. Only 53% (16/30) of the HR-High patients received ≥8 total doses of I-PEG and 50% (15/30) took ≤49 weeks from start of Consolidation to the initiation of Maintenance. I-PEG did not significantly increase grade 2 to 5 targeted toxicities. I-PEG was not feasible or safe as defined in AALL08P1. Complete assessment of this regimen was limited due to removal of patients from I-PEG regimen and early closure of the study. PMID:27299599

  5. Therapeutic benefit of decitabine, a hypomethylating agent, in patients with high-risk primary myelofibrosis and myeloproliferative neoplasm in accelerated or blastic/acute myeloid leukemia phase.

    PubMed

    Badar, Talha; Kantarjian, Hagop M; Ravandi, Farhad; Jabbour, Elias; Borthakur, Gautam; Cortes, Jorge E; Pemmaraju, Naveen; Pierce, Sherry R; Newberry, Kate J; Daver, Naval; Verstovsek, Srdan

    2015-09-01

    Myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN) transformed to acute myeloid leukemia (MPN-AML), MPN in accelerated phase (MPN-AP), and high-risk primary myelofibrosis (PMF) are associated with a poor response to therapy and very short survival. Several reports have suggested clinical activity of hypomethylating agents in these patients. We conducted a retrospective study of 21 patients with MPN-AML, 13 with MPN-AP and 11 with DIPSS-plus high-risk PMF treated with decitabine at our institution over the last 7 years and evaluated their clinical outcomes. Six patients (29%) with MPN-AML responded to decitabine (3 CR, 2 CRi, and 1 PR); median response duration was 7 months. The median overall survival (OS) was significantly higher in those who responded (10.5 vs 4 months). Among patients with MPN-AP, 8 patients (62%) benefited; the median response duration was 6.5 months. The median OS was 11.8 months in responders vs 4.7 months in non-responders. Among patients with DIPSS-plus high-risk PMF, 9 (82%) benefited; the median response duration was 9 months. The median OS was 32 months in responders vs 16.3 months in non-responders. Decitabine is a viable therapeutic option for patients with MPN-AML, MP-AP and high-risk PMF. Prospective clinical studies combining decitabine with other clinically active agents are needed to improve overall outcome.

  6. Therapeutic benefit of decitabine, a hypomethylating agent, in patients with high-risk primary myelofibrosis and myeloproliferative neoplasm in accelerated or blastic/acute myeloid leukemia phase

    PubMed Central

    Badar, Talha; Kantarjian, Hagop M.; Ravandi, Farhad; Jabbour, Elias; Borthakur, Gautam; Cortes, Jorge E.; Pemmaraju, Naveen; Pierce, Sherry R.; Newberry, Kate J.; Daver, Naval; Verstovsek, Srdan

    2015-01-01

    Myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN) transformed to acute myeloid leukemia (MPN-AML), MPN in accelerated phase (MPN-AP), and high-risk primary myelofibrosis (PMF) are associated with a poor response to therapy and very short survival. Several reports have suggested clinical activity of hypomethylating agents in these patients. We conducted a retrospective study of 21 patients with MPN-AML, 13 with MPN-AP and 11 with DIPSS-plus high-risk PMF treated with decitabine at our institution over the last 7 years and evaluated their clinical outcomes. Six patients (29%) with MPN-AML responded to decitabine (3 CR, 2 CRi, and 1 PR); median response duration was 7 months. The median overall survival (OS) was significantly higher in those who responded (10.5 vs 4 months). Among patients with MPN-AP, 8 patients (62%) benefited; median response duration was 6.5 months. The median OS was 11.8 months in responders vs 4.7 months in non-responders. Among patients with DIPSS-plus high-risk PMF, 9 (82%) benefited; median response duration was 9 months. The median OS was 32 months in responders vs 16.3 months in non-responders. Decitabine is a viable therapeutic option for patients with MPN-AML, MP-AP and high-risk PMF. Prospective clinical studies combining decitabine with other clinically active agents are needed to improve overall outcome. PMID:26183878

  7. Therapeutic Autologous Lymphocytes and Aldesleukin in Treating Patients With High-Risk or Recurrent Myeloid Leukemia After Undergoing Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2011-07-12

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  8. Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Young Patients With Newly Diagnosed High-Risk B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia and Ph-Like TKI Sensitive Mutations

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-02

    B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Bone Necrosis; Central Nervous System Leukemia; Cognitive Side Effects of Cancer Therapy; Neurotoxicity Syndrome; Pain; Testicular Leukemia; Therapy-Related Toxicity; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  9. A phase II study of AZD2171 (cediranib) in the treatment of patients with acute myeloid leukemia or high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Mattison, Ryan; Jumonville, Alcee; Flynn, Patrick James; Moreno-Aspitia, Alvaro; Erlichman, Charles; Laplant, Betsy; Juckett, Mark B.

    2015-01-01

    Patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) not fit for intensive treatment need novel therapy options. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor inhibition is one potential mechanism by which AML and MDS could be treated. The receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor AZD2171 (cediranib) has activity against VEGF receptors KDR and FLT-1. This multicenter phase II study was designed to test cediranib's activity in patients with AML or high-risk MDS. The primary endpoint was confirmed disease response defined as a composite of complete remission, partial remission or hematologic improvement. The study enrolled 23 subjects in the AML cohort and 16 subjects in the MDS cohort. There were no confirmed responses in either group. Since the study met the stopping rule after the first stage of enrollment, the trial was closed to further accrual. Common adverse events in both cohorts included thrombocytopenia, neutropenia, anemia, fatigue, dyspnea, diarrhea, nausea and dehydration. PMID:25329007

  10. Laboratory-Treated T Cells in Treating Patients With High-Risk Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia Previously Treated With Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-08

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Therapy-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  11. Non-Radiation Risk Factors for Leukemia: A case-control study among Chornobyl Cleanup Workers in Ukraine

    PubMed Central

    Gudzenko, Nataliya; Hatch, Maureen; Bazyka, Dimitry; Dyagil, Irina; Reiss, Robert F; Brenner, Alina; Chumak, Vadim; Babkina, Natalie; Zablotska, Lydia B; Mabuchi, Kiyohiko

    2015-01-01

    Background Occupational and environmental exposure to chemicals such as benzene has been linked to increased risk of leukemia. Cigarette smoking and alcohol consumption have also been found to affect leukemia risk. Previous analyses in a large cohort of Chornobyl clean-up workers in Ukraine found significant radiation-related increased risk for all leukemia types. We investigated the potential for additional effects of occupational and lifestyle factors on leukemia risk in this radiation-exposed cohort. Methods In a case-control study of chronic lymphocytic and other leukemias among Chornobyl cleanup workers, we collected data on a range of non-radiation exposures. We evaluated these other potential risk factors in analyses adjusting for estimated bone marrow radiation dose. We calculated Odds Ratios and 95% Confidence Intervals in relation to lifestyle factors and occupational hazards. Results After adjusting for radiation, we found no clear association of leukemia risk with smoking or alcohol but identified a two-fold elevated risk for non-CLL leukemia with occupational exposure to petroleum (OR=2.28; 95% Confidence Interval 1.13, 6.79). Risks were particularly high for myeloid leukemias. No associations with risk factors other than radiation were found for chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Conclusions These data – the first from a working population in Ukraine – add to evidence from several previous reports of excess leukemia morbidity in groups exposed environmentally or occupationally to petroleum or its products. PMID:26117815

  12. What Are the Risk Factors for Chronic Myeloid Leukemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... of an atomic bomb blast or nuclear reactor accident) increases the risk of getting CML Age : The ... Myeloid (CML)? Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention Early Detection, Diagnosis, and Staging Treating Leukemia - Chronic Myeloid (CML) ...

  13. Monitoring minimal residual disease in children with high-risk relapses of acute lymphoblastic leukemia: prognostic relevance of early and late assessment.

    PubMed

    Eckert, C; Hagedorn, N; Sramkova, L; Mann, G; Panzer-Grümayer, R; Peters, C; Bourquin, J-P; Klingebiel, T; Borkhardt, A; Cario, G; Alten, J; Escherich, G; Astrahantseff, K; Seeger, K; Henze, G; von Stackelberg, A

    2015-08-01

    The prognosis for children with high-risk relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is poor. Here, we assessed the prognostic importance of response during induction and consolidation treatment prior to hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) aiming to evaluate the best time to assess minimal residual disease (MRD) for intervention strategies and in future trials in high-risk ALL relapse patients. Included patients (n=125) were treated uniformly according to the ALL-REZ BFM (Berlin-Frankfurt-Münster) 2002 relapse trial (median follow-up time=4.8 years). Patients with MRD ⩾10(-3) after induction treatment (76/119, 64%) or immediately preceding HSCT (19/71, 27%) had a significantly worse probability of disease-free survival 10 years after relapse treatment begin, with 26% (±6%) or 23% (±7%), respectively, compared with 58% (±8%) or 48% (±7%) for patients with MRD <10(-3). Conventional intensive consolidation treatment reduced MRD to <10(-3) before HSCT in 63% of patients, whereas MRD remained high or increased in the rest of this patient group. Our data support that MRD after induction treatment can be used to quantify the activity of different induction treatment strategies in phase II trials. MRD persistence at ⩾10(-3) before HSCT reflects a disease highly resistant to conventional intensive chemotherapy and requiring prospective controlled investigation of new treatment strategies and drugs. PMID:25748682

  14. Maternal and perinatal risk factors for childhood leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Zack, M.; Adami, H.O.; Ericson, A. )

    1991-07-15

    This report describes an exploratory population-based study of maternal and perinatal risk factors for childhood leukemia in Sweden. The Swedish National Cancer Registry ascertained 411 cases in successive birth cohorts from 1973 through 1984 recorded in the Swedish Medical Birth Registry. Using the latter, we matched five controls without cancer to each case by sex and month and year of birth. Mothers of children with leukemia were more likely to have been exposed to nitrous oxide anesthesia during delivery than mothers of controls (odds ratio (OR) = 1.3; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.0, 1.6). Children with leukemia were more likely than controls to have Down's syndrome (OR = 32.5; 95% CI = 7.3, 144.0) or cleft lip or cleft palate (OR = 5.0; 95% CI = 1.0, 24.8); to have had a diagnosis associated with difficult labor but unspecified complications (OR = 4.5; 95% CI = 1.1, 18.2) or with other conditions of the fetus or newborn (OR = 1.5; 95% CI = 1.1, 2.1), specifically, uncomplicated physiological jaundice (OR = 1.9; 95% CI = 1.2, 2.9); or to have received supplemental oxygen (OR = 2.6; 95% CI = 1.3, 1.3, 4.9). Because multiple potential risk factors were analyzed in this study, future studies need to check these findings. The authors did not confirm the previously reported higher risks for childhood leukemia associated with being male, having a high birth weight, or being born to a woman of advanced maternal age.

  15. Veliparib and Topotecan With or Without Carboplatin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemia, High-Risk Myelodysplasia, or Aggressive Myeloproliferative Disorders

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-23

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Essential Thrombocythemia; Hematopoietic and Lymphoid Cell Neoplasm; Philadelphia Chromosome Negative, BCR-ABL1 Positive Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Polycythemia Vera; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Disease; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome

  16. Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Leukemia What Is Leukemia? Leukemia is a cancer of the blood cells. ... diagnosed with leukemia are over 50 years old. Leukemia Starts in Bone Marrow Click for more information ...

  17. Neural correlates of risk perception: HIV vs. leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Barth, Alexander; Schmälzle, Ralf; Renner, Britta; Schupp, Harald T.

    2013-01-01

    Field studies on HIV risk perception suggest that people may rely on impressions they have about the safety of their partner. Previous studies show that individuals perceived as “risky” regarding HIV elicit a differential brain response in both earlier (~200–350 ms) and later (~350–700 ms) time windows compared to those perceived as safe. This raises the question whether this event-related brain potential (ERP) response is specific to contagious life-threatening diseases or a general mechanism triggered by life-threatening but non-contagious diseases. In the present study, we recorded dense sensor EEG while participants (N = 36) evaluated photographs of unacquainted individuals for either HIV or leukemia risk. The ERP results replicated previous findings revealing earlier and later differential brain responses towards individuals perceived as high risk for HIV. However, there were no significant ERP differences for high vs. low leukemia risk. Rather than reflecting a generic response to disease, the present findings suggest that intuitive judgments of HIV risk are at least in part specific to sexually transmitted diseases. PMID:24312031

  18. Total Marrow and Lymphoid Irradiation and Chemotherapy Before Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With High-Risk Acute Lymphocytic or Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-07

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  19. Tosedostat in Combination With Cytarabine or Decitabine in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia or High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-06-09

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  20. Improved outcome in high-risk childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia defined by prednisone-poor response treated with double Berlin-Frankfurt-Muenster protocol II.

    PubMed

    Aricò, Maurizio; Valsecchi, Maria Grazia; Conter, Valentino; Rizzari, Carmelo; Pession, Andrea; Messina, Chiara; Barisone, Elena; Poggi, Vincenzo; De Rossi, Giulio; Locatelli, Franco; Micalizzi, Maria Concetta; Basso, Giuseppe; Masera, Giuseppe

    2002-07-15

    One hundred ninety-eight children and adolescents were entered in the Associazione Italiana di Ematologia ed Oncologia Pediatrica (AIEOP)-ALL95 study for high-risk acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Inclusion criteria were poor response to initial prednisone/intrathecal methotrexate (prednisone-poor response [PPR]), resistance to induction therapy, translocation t(9;22), infants with the t(4;11), or CD10(-) ALL. The event-free survival (EFS) rate at 4 years was 56.5% (SE, 3.9%) for the entire group. The overall EFS rate in the current study was significantly better (P =.002) than that obtained in a comparable group of patients treated in the early 1990s in the AIEOP-ALL91 study. In particular, patients with PPR had a 4-year EFS of 61.1% (SE, 4.4%) versus 42.8% (SE, 5.4%) in the ALL 91 study (P =.008). Among PPR patients, those who were PPR-only (60.1%)-that is, they achieved CR and were negative for t(9;22) and t(4;11) translocations-had the best outcomes with this intensive treatment, even when additional adverse features (hyperleukocytosis, T phenotype) were present (4-year EFS, 70.1%; SE, 4.7%). We attribute this improvement to the replacement of 6 alternating blocks of non-cross-resistant drugs with an 8-drug reinduction regimen (Berlin-Frankfurt-Muenster [BFM] protocol II), repeated twice, in the context of a standard BFM-type intensive chemotherapy for high-risk ALL. This modified therapy may lead to high cure rates for patients defined as at high risk for intrinsic resistance to corticosteroids only.

  1. Study finds increases in risk of leukemias related to treatment

    Cancer.gov

    A new study describes the pattern of risk for chemotherapy-related acute myeloid leukemia among adult cancer survivors over the past three decades who have previously been treated with chemotherapy for other cancers. These patterns coincide with major shi

  2. Iodine I 131 Monoclonal Antibody BC8, Fludarabine Phosphate, Cyclophosphamide, Total-Body Irradiation and Donor Bone Marrow Transplant in Treating Patients With Advanced Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-18

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Ring Sideroblasts; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia and Ring Sideroblasts

  3. Flavopiridol administered using a pharmacologically derived schedule is associated with marked clinical efficacy in refractory, genetically high-risk chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Byrd, John C.; Lin, Thomas S.; Dalton, James T.; Wu, Di; Phelps, Mitch A.; Fischer, Beth; Moran, Mollie; Blum, Kristie A.; Rovin, Brad; Brooker-McEldowney, Michelle; Broering, Sarah; Schaaf, Larry J.; Johnson, Amy J.; Lucas, David M.; Heerema, Nyla A.; Lozanski, Gerard; Young, Donn C.; Suarez, Jose-Ramon; Colevas, A. Dimitrios; Grever, Michael R.

    2007-01-01

    Despite promising preclinical studies with the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor flavopiridol in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and other diseases, previous clinical trials with this agent have been disappointing. The discovery of differential protein binding of flavopiridol in human and bovine serum contributed to an effective pharmacokinetic-derived schedule of administration of this agent. On the basis of pharmacokinetic modeling using our in vitro results and data from a previous trial, we initiated a phase 1 study using a 30-minute loading dose followed by 4 hours of infusion administered weekly for 4 of 6 weeks in patients with refractory CLL. A group of 42 patients were enrolled on 3 cohorts (cohort 1, 30 mg/m2 loading dose followed by 30 mg/m2 4-hour infusion; cohort 2, 40 mg/m2 loading dose followed by 40 mg/m2 4-hour infusion; and cohort 3, cohort 1 dose for treatments 1 to 4, then a 30 mg/m2 loading dose followed by a 50 mg/m2 4-hour infusion). The dose-limiting toxicity using this novel schedule was hyperacute tumor lysis syndrome. Aggressive prophylaxis and exclusion of patients with leukocyte counts greater than 200 × 109/L have made this drug safe to administer at the cohort 3 dose. Of the 42 patients treated, 19 (45%) achieved a partial response with a median response duration that exceeds 12 months. Responses were noted in patients with genetically high-risk disease, including 5 (42%) of 12 patients with del(17p13.1) and 13 (72%) of 18 patients with del(11q22.3). Flavopiridol administered using this novel schedule has significant clinical activity in refractory CLL. Patients with bulky disease and high-risk genetic features have achieved durable responses, thereby justifying further study of flavopiridol in CLL and other diseases. PMID:17003373

  4. Dose-enhanced combined priming regimens for refractory acute myeloid leukemia and middle-and-high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome: a single-center, retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xiaorong; Wang, Jin; Xu, Yan; Zhang, Wanggang; Liu, Jie; Cao, Xingmei; He, Aili; Wang, Fangxia; Gu, Liufang; Lei, Bo; Wang, Jianli

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess chemotherapeutic regimens for refractory acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and middle-and-high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Methods Between 2004 and 2014, 44 patients with refractory AML and 36 patients with MDS were treated with new priming regimens (CHAG, CHTG, CHMG, or CTMG), and 77 patients with refractory AML and 52 patients with MDS were treated with conventional priming regimens (CHG or CAG). This was a single-center retrospective analysis of remission, adverse event, mortality, and survival. The capacity of clinical features (including the expression of co-stimulatory molecule B7.1 on tumor cells) to influence survival was assessed by multivariate Cox regression. Results Complete and partial remission rates (RRs) were significantly higher in AML patients treated with new regimens compared to conventional ones (68.2% vs 13.6%, P<0.05). Complete and partial remission were also significantly higher in patients with MDS treated with new regimens (55.6% vs 19.4%, P<0.05). However, although survival advantages were observed in the first year, the new regimens did not significantly improve 3-year overall survival (P>0.05). Patients administered the new regimens experienced more severe and sustained myelosuppression (P<0.05), but no severe adverse events or treatment-related deaths were observed. The rate of non-hematological side effects did not differ significantly between treatment regimens (P>0.05). Both RR and B7.1 expression were significantly higher in patients with AML-M2 and M5 (P<0.05). Conclusion The new priming regimens improved the RR, lowered the recurrence rate, and improved survival in AML and middle-and-high-risk MDS, without significantly increasing adverse events. PMID:27382304

  5. Flavopiridol administered using a pharmacologically derived schedule is associated with marked clinical efficacy in refractory, genetically high-risk chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Byrd, John C; Lin, Thomas S; Dalton, James T; Wu, Di; Phelps, Mitch A; Fischer, Beth; Moran, Mollie; Blum, Kristie A; Rovin, Brad; Brooker-McEldowney, Michelle; Broering, Sarah; Schaaf, Larry J; Johnson, Amy J; Lucas, David M; Heerema, Nyla A; Lozanski, Gerard; Young, Donn C; Suarez, Jose-Ramon; Colevas, A Dimitrios; Grever, Michael R

    2007-01-15

    Despite promising preclinical studies with the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor flavopiridol in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and other diseases, previous clinical trials with this agent have been disappointing. The discovery of differential protein binding of flavopiridol in human and bovine serum contributed to an effective pharmacokinetic-derived schedule of administration of this agent. On the basis of pharmacokinetic modeling using our in vitro results and data from a previous trial, we initiated a phase 1 study using a 30-minute loading dose followed by 4 hours of infusion administered weekly for 4 of 6 weeks in patients with refractory CLL. A group of 42 patients were enrolled on 3 cohorts (cohort 1, 30 mg/m2 loading dose followed by 30 mg/m2 4-hour infusion; cohort 2, 40 mg/m2 loading dose followed by 40 mg/m2 4-hour infusion; and cohort 3, cohort 1 dose for treatments 1 to 4, then a 30 mg/m2 loading dose followed by a 50 mg/m2 4-hour infusion). The dose-limiting toxicity using this novel schedule was hyperacute tumor lysis syndrome. Aggressive prophylaxis and exclusion of patients with leukocyte counts greater than 200x10(9)/L have made this drug safe to administer at the cohort 3 dose. Of the 42 patients treated, 19 (45%) achieved a partial response with a median response duration that exceeds 12 months. Responses were noted in patients with genetically high-risk disease, including 5 (42%) of 12 patients with del(17p13.1) and 13 (72%) of 18 patients with del(11q22.3). Flavopiridol administered using this novel schedule has significant clinical activity in refractory CLL. Patients with bulky disease and high-risk genetic features have achieved durable responses, thereby justifying further study of flavopiridol in CLL and other diseases.

  6. Clofarabine and Cytarabine in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia or High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndromes That Have Relapsed or Not Responded to Treatment

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-08-06

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Isolated Del(5q); Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  7. Radiation-Induced Leukemia at Doses Relevant to Radiation Therapy: Modeling Mechanisms and Estimating Risks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shuryak, Igor; Sachs, Rainer K.; Hlatky, Lynn; Mark P. Little; Hahnfeldt, Philip; Brenner, David J.

    2006-01-01

    Because many cancer patients are diagnosed earlier and live longer than in the past, second cancers induced by radiation therapy have become a clinically significant issue. An earlier biologically based model that was designed to estimate risks of high-dose radiation induced solid cancers included initiation of stem cells to a premalignant state, inactivation of stem cells at high radiation doses, and proliferation of stem cells during cellular repopulation after inactivation. This earlier model predicted the risks of solid tumors induced by radiation therapy but overestimated the corresponding leukemia risks. Methods: To extend the model to radiation-induced leukemias, we analyzed in addition to cellular initiation, inactivation, and proliferation a repopulation mechanism specific to the hematopoietic system: long-range migration through the blood stream of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) from distant locations. Parameters for the model were derived from HSC biologic data in the literature and from leukemia risks among atomic bomb survivors v^ ho were subjected to much lower radiation doses. Results: Proliferating HSCs that migrate from sites distant from the high-dose region include few preleukemic HSCs, thus decreasing the high-dose leukemia risk. The extended model for leukemia provides risk estimates that are consistent with epidemiologic data for leukemia risk associated with radiation therapy over a wide dose range. For example, when applied to an earlier case-control study of 110000 women undergoing radiotherapy for uterine cancer, the model predicted an excess relative risk (ERR) of 1.9 for leukemia among women who received a large inhomogeneous fractionated external beam dose to the bone marrow (mean = 14.9 Gy), consistent with the measured ERR (2.0, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.2 to 6.4; from 3.6 cases expected and 11 cases observed). As a corresponding example for brachytherapy, the predicted ERR of 0.80 among women who received an inhomogeneous low

  8. Herbo-mineral ayurvedic treatment in a high risk acute promyelocytic leukemia patient with second relapse: 12 years follow up

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Balendu; Parikh, Purvish M.; Pal, Sanjoy K.

    2010-01-01

    A 47 year old diabetic male patient was diagnosed and treated for high risk AML-M3 at Tata Memorial Hospital (BJ 17572), Mumbai in September 1995. His bone marrow aspiration cytology indicated 96% promyelocytes with abnormal forms, absence of lymphocytic series and myeloperoxide test 100% positive. Initially treated with ATRA, he achieved hematological remission on day 60, but cytogenetically the disease persisted. The patient received induction and consolidated chemotherapy with Daunorubicin and Cytarabine combination from 12.01.96 to 14.05.96, following which he achieved remission. However, his disease relapsed in February 97. The patient was given two cycles of chemotherapy with Idarubicine and Etoposide, after which he achieved remission. His disease again relapsed in December 97. The patient then refused more chemotherapy and volunteered for a pilot Ayurvedic study conducted by the Central Council for Research in Ayurveda and Siddha, New Delhi. The patient was treated with a proprietary Ayurvedic medicine Navajeevan, Kamadudha Rasa and Keharuba Pisti for one year. For the subsequent 5 years the patient received three months of intermittent Ayurvedic treatment every year. The patient achieved complete disease remission with the alternative treatment without any adverse side effects. The patient has so far completed 13 years of survival after the start of Ayurvedic therapy. PMID:21547051

  9. Herbo-mineral ayurvedic treatment in a high risk acute promyelocytic leukemia patient with second relapse: 12 years follow up.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Balendu; Parikh, Purvish M; Pal, Sanjoy K

    2010-07-01

    A 47 year old diabetic male patient was diagnosed and treated for high risk AML-M3 at Tata Memorial Hospital (BJ 17572), Mumbai in September 1995. His bone marrow aspiration cytology indicated 96% promyelocytes with abnormal forms, absence of lymphocytic series and myeloperoxide test 100% positive. Initially treated with ATRA, he achieved hematological remission on day 60, but cytogenetically the disease persisted. The patient received induction and consolidated chemotherapy with Daunorubicin and Cytarabine combination from 12.01.96 to 14.05.96, following which he achieved remission. However, his disease relapsed in February 97. The patient was given two cycles of chemotherapy with Idarubicine and Etoposide, after which he achieved remission. His disease again relapsed in December 97. The patient then refused more chemotherapy and volunteered for a pilot Ayurvedic study conducted by the Central Council for Research in Ayurveda and Siddha, New Delhi. The patient was treated with a proprietary Ayurvedic medicine Navajeevan, Kamadudha Rasa and Keharuba Pisti for one year. For the subsequent 5 years the patient received three months of intermittent Ayurvedic treatment every year. The patient achieved complete disease remission with the alternative treatment without any adverse side effects. The patient has so far completed 13 years of survival after the start of Ayurvedic therapy. PMID:21547051

  10. Clinical and In Vitro Studies on Impact of High-Dose Etoposide Pharmacokinetics Prior Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation for Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia on the Risk of Post-Transplant Leukemia Relapse.

    PubMed

    Sobiak, Joanna; Kazimierczak, Urszula; Kowalczyk, Dariusz W; Chrzanowska, Maria; Styczyński, Jan; Wysocki, Mariusz; Szpecht, Dawid; Wachowiak, Jacek

    2015-10-01

    The impact of etoposide (VP-16) plasma concentrations on the day of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) on leukemia-free survival in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) was studied. In addition, the in vitro effects of VP-16 on the lymphocytes proliferation, cytotoxic activity and on Th1/Th2 cytokine responses were assessed. In 31 children undergoing allo-HSCT, VP-16 plasma concentrations were determined up to 120 h after the infusion using the HPLC-UV method. For mentioned in vitro studies, VP-16 plasma concentrations observed on allo-HSCT day were used. In 84 % of children, VP-16 plasma concentrations (0.1-1.5 μg/mL) were quantifiable 72 h after the end of the drug infusion, i.e. when allo-HSCT should be performed. In 20 (65 %) children allo-HSCT was performed 4 days after the end of the drug infusion, and VP-16 was still detectable (0.1-0.9 μg/mL) in plasma of 12 (39 %) of them. Post-transplant ALL relapse occurred in four children, in all of them VP-16 was detectable in plasma (0.1-0.8 μg/mL) on allo-HSCT day, while there was no relapse in children with undetectable VP-16. In in vitro studies, VP-16 demonstrated impact on the proliferation activity of stimulated lymphocytes depending on its concentration and exposition time. The presence of VP-16 in plasma on allo-HSCT day may demonstrate an adverse effect on graft-versus-leukemia (GvL) reaction and increase the risk of post-transplant ALL relapse. Therefore, if 72 h after VP-16 administration its plasma concentration is still above 0.1 μg/mL then the postponement of transplantation for next 24 h should be considered to protect GvL effector cells from transplant material.

  11. Sirolimus and Azacitidine in Treating Patients With High Risk Myelodysplastic Syndrome or Acute Myeloid Leukemia That is Recurrent or Not Eligible for Intensive Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-18

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Isolated Del(5q); Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  12. A comprehensive review of occupational and general population cancer risk: 1,3-Butadiene exposure-response modeling for all leukemia, acute myelogenous leukemia, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, chronic myelogenous leukemia, myeloid neoplasm and lymphoid neoplasm.

    PubMed

    Sielken, Robert L; Valdez-Flores, Ciriaco

    2015-11-01

    Excess cancer risks associated with 1,3-butadiene (BD) inhalation exposures are calculated using an extensive data set developed by the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) from an epidemiology study of North American workers in the styrene butadiene rubber (SBR) industry. While the UAB study followed SBR workers, risk calculations can be adapted to estimate both occupational and general population risks. The data from the UAB SBR study offer an opportunity to quantitatively evaluate the association between cumulative exposure to BD and different types of cancer, accounting for the number of tasks involving high-intensity exposures to BD as well as confounding associated with the exposures to the multiple other chemicals in the SBR industry. Quantitative associations of BD exposure and cancer, specifically leukemia, can be further characterized by leukemia type, including potential associations with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), and chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), and the groups of lymphoid and myeloid neoplasms. Collectively, these multiple evaluations lead to a comprehensive analysis that makes use of all of the available information and is consistent with the risk assessment goals of the USEPA and other regulatory agencies, and in line with the recommendations of the USEPA Science Advisory Board. While a range of cancer risk values can result from these multiple factors, a preferred case for occupational and general population risk is highlighted. Cox proportional hazards models are used to fit exposure-response models to the most recent UAB data. The slope of the model with cumulative BD ppm-years as the predictor variable is not statistically significantly greater than zero for CML, AML, or, when any one of eight exposure covariates is added to the model, for all leukemias combined. The slope for CLL is statistically significantly different from zero. The slope for myeloid neoplasms is not statistically

  13. Comparison of allogeneic stem cell transplantation from familial-mismatched/haploidentical donors and from unrelated donors in adults with high-risk acute myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Cho, Byung-Sik; Yoon, Jae-Ho; Shin, Seung-Hwan; Yahng, Seung-Ah; Lee, Sung-Eun; Eom, Ki-Seong; Kim, Yoo-Jin; Lee, Seok; Min, Chang-Ki; Cho, Seok-Goo; Kim, Dong-Wook; Lee, Jong-Wook; Min, Woo-Sung; Park, Chong-Won; Kim, Hee-Je

    2012-10-01

    To weigh the pros and cons of familial-mismatched/haploidentical transplantation (FMT) in patients with high-risk acute myelogenous leukemia, we assessed outcomes of 23 patients who underwent FMT, using reduced-intensity conditioning with total body irradiation 800 cGy/busulfan/fludarabine/antithymocyte globulin without ex vivo T cell depletion, compared to 33 patients who underwent well-matched unrelated donor transplantation (WM-UDT) and 13 who underwent partially matched unrelated donor transplantation (PM-UDT) during the same period. The FMT patients had not only a similar pattern of engraftment and immune reconstitution as the WM-UDT and PM-UDT patients but also comparable incidences and severity of acute and chronic graft-versus-host disease. The FMT patients did not experience any form of engraftment failure. However, the cumulative incidence of cytomegalovirus DNAemia was significantly higher in the FMT group compared with the other groups (P = .036). After a median follow-up of 28 months, overall survival, disease-free survival, relapse, and nonrelapse mortality were 83%, 74%, 20%, and 7%, respectively, for WM-UDT; 51%, 51%, 31%, and 18% for PM-UDT; and 66%, 64%, 26%, and 10% for FMT. This demonstrates a trend for favorable survival outcomes of WM-UDT over FMT and of FMT over PM-UDT. However, we found no significant statistical differences in survival according to donor type. These data need to be interpreted cautiously because of limited power calculations due to the small number of each donor group. This pilot study suggests the feasibility of FMT using our novel regimen with careful evaluation of CMV DNAemia compared with WM-UDT and PM-UDT. Further trials with larger numbers of patients, comparing FMT directly with transplantation with other donor types, are needed.

  14. Risk for childhood leukemia associated with maternal and paternal age.

    PubMed

    Sergentanis, Theodoros N; Thomopoulos, Thomas P; Gialamas, Spyros P; Karalexi, Maria A; Biniaris-Georgallis, Stylianos-Iason; Kontogeorgi, Evangelia; Papathoma, Paraskevi; Tsilimidos, Gerasimos; Skalkidou, Alkistis; Iliadou, Anastasia N; Petridou, Eleni T

    2015-12-01

    The role of reproductive factors, such as parental age, in the pathogenesis of childhood leukemias is being intensively examined; the results of individual studies are controversial. This meta-analysis aims to quantitatively synthesize the published data on the association between parental age and risk of two major distinct childhood leukemia types in the offspring. Eligible studies were identified and pooled relative risk (RR) estimates were calculated using random-effects models, separately for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Subgroup analyses were performed by study design, geographical region, adjustment factors; sensitivity analyses and meta-regression analyses were also undertaken. 77 studies (69 case-control and eight cohort) were deemed eligible. Older maternal and paternal age were associated with increased risk for childhood ALL (pooled RR = 1.05, 95 % CI 1.01-1.10; pooled RR = 1.04, 95 % CI 1.00-1.08, per 5 year increments, respectively). The association between maternal age and risk of childhood AML showed a U-shaped pattern, with symmetrically associated increased risk in the oldest (pooled RR = 1.23, 95 % CI 1.06-1.43) and the youngest (pooled RR = 1.23, 95 % CI 1.07-1.40) extremes. Lastly, only younger fathers were at increased risk of having a child with AML (pooled RR = 1.28, 95 % CI 1.04-1.59). In conclusion, maternal and paternal age represents a meaningful risk factor for childhood leukemia, albeit of different effect size by leukemia subtype. Genetic and socio-economic factors may underlie the observed associations. Well-adjusted studies, scheduled by large consortia, are anticipated to satisfactorily address methodological issues, whereas the potential underlying genetic mechanisms should be elucidated by basic research studies.

  15. NF-kappaB inhibition sensitizes to starvation-induced cell death in high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Fabre, C; Carvalho, G; Tasdemir, E; Braun, T; Adès, L; Grosjean, J; Boehrer, S; Métivier, D; Souquère, S; Pierron, G; Fenaux, P; Kroemer, G

    2007-06-14

    CD34(+) bone marrow blasts from high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) patients as well as MDS patient-derived cell lines (P39 and MOLM13) constitutively activate the nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) pathway and undergo apoptosis when NF-kappaB is inhibited. Here, we show that the combination of conventional chemotherapeutic agents (daunorubicin, mitoxantrone, 5-azacytidine or camptothecin) with the NF-kappaB inhibitor BAY11-7082 did not yield a synergistic cytotoxicity. In contrast, BAY11-7082 (which targets the NF-kappaB-activating I-kappaB kinase (IKK) complex) or knockdown of essential components of the NF-kappaB system (such as the IKK1 and IKK2 subunits of the IKK complex and the p65 subunit of NF-kappaB), by small interfering RNAs sensitized MDS cell lines to starvation-induced apoptosis. The combination of BAY11-7082 and nutrient depletion synergistically killed the acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cell line U937 as well as primary CD34(+) bone marrow blasts from AML and high-risk MDS patients. The synergistic killing by BAY11-7082, combined with nutrient depletion, led to cell death accompanied by all hallmarks of apoptosis, including an early loss of the mitochondrial transmembrane potential, the release of cytochrome c and apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) from mitochondria, activation of caspase-3, phosphatidylserine exposure on the plasma membrane surface and nuclear chromatin condensation. Transmission electron microscopy revealed the presence of numerous autophagic vacuoles in the cytoplasm before cells underwent nuclear apoptosis. Nonetheless, cell death was neither inhibited by the pan-caspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk nor by knockdown of AIF or of essential components of the autophagy pathway (ATG5, ATG6/Beclin-1, ATG10, ATG12). In contrast, external supply of glucose, insulin or insulin-like growth factor-I could retard the cell death induced by BAY11-7082 combined with starvation. These results suggest that in MDS cells, NF-kappaB inhibition can

  16. Formaldehyde and LeukemiA: Epidemiology, Potential Mechanisms and Implications for Risk Assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    Formaldehyde is widely used in the United States and other countries. Occupational and environmental exposures to formaldehyde may be associated with an increased risk of leukemia in exposed individuals. However, risk assessment of formaldehyde and leukemia has been challenging ...

  17. Leukemia risk associated with benzene exposure in the Pliofilm cohort.

    PubMed

    Paxton, M B

    1996-12-01

    A reanalysis of the Pliofilm cohort was conducted incorporating six additional years of follow-up information gathered by the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) and a new set of exposure estimates developed recently. The distribution of individual worker exposures calculated with the Paustenbach exposure estimates was compared to those derived using two earlier sets of job-, plant-, and year-specific exposure estimates. A traditional standardized mortality ratio analysis and the Cox proportional hazards model were used to investigate the impact of these exposure estimates and the NIOSH updated information on evaluation of benzene's leukemogenicity. There were no additional cases of multiple myeloma or any indication of increased incidences of solid tumors. The data added in the update did not greatly modify the estimated relative risk of all leukemias associated with benzene exposure but confirmed previous findings that occupational exposure only to very high concentrations had leukemogenic potential. Leukemia has not been observed in anyone who began employment in Pliofilm production after 1950. Neither the Paustenbach nor the Crump exposures gave dose-response estimates as steep as that resulting from the Rinsky exposures. PMID:9118929

  18. Leukemia risk associated with benzene exposure in the Pliofilm cohort

    SciTech Connect

    Paxton, M.B.

    1996-12-01

    A reanalysis of the Pliofilm cohort was conducted incorporating six additional years of follow-up information gathered by the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) and a new set of exposure estimates developed recently. The distribution of individual worker exposures calculated with the Paustenbach exposure estimates was compared to those derived using two earlier sets of job-, plant-, and year-specific exposure estimates. A traditional standardized mortality ratio analysis and the Cox proportional hazards model were used to investigate the impact of these exposure estimates and the NIOSH updated information on evaluation of benzene`s leukemogenicity. There were no additional cases of multiple myeloma or any indication of increased incidences of solid tumors. The data added in the update did not greatly modify the estimated relative risk of all leukemias associated with benzene exposure but confirmed previous findings that occupational exposure only to very high concentrations had leukemogenic potential. Leukemia has not been observed in anyone who began employment in Pliofilm production after 1950. Neither the Paustenbach nor the Crump exposures gave dose-response estimates as steep as that resulting from the Rinsky exposures. 16 refs., 3 figs., 8 tabs.

  19. Leukemia risk associated with benzene exposure in the Pliofilm cohort.

    PubMed Central

    Paxton, M B

    1996-01-01

    A reanalysis of the Pliofilm cohort was conducted incorporating six additional years of follow-up information gathered by the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) and a new set of exposure estimates developed recently. The distribution of individual worker exposures calculated with the Paustenbach exposure estimates was compared to those derived using two earlier sets of job-, plant-, and year-specific exposure estimates. A traditional standardized mortality ratio analysis and the Cox proportional hazards model were used to investigate the impact of these exposure estimates and the NIOSH updated information on evaluation of benzene's leukemogenicity. There were no additional cases of multiple myeloma or any indication of increased incidences of solid tumors. The data added in the update did not greatly modify the estimated relative risk of all leukemias associated with benzene exposure but confirmed previous findings that occupational exposure only to very high concentrations had leukemogenic potential. Leukemia has not been observed in anyone who began employment in Pliofilm production after 1950. Neither the Paustenbach nor the Crump exposures gave dose-response estimates as steep as that resulting from the Rinsky exposures. PMID:9118929

  20. Absolute monocyte count trichotomizes chronic lymphocytic leukemia into high risk patients with immune dysregulation, disease progression and poor survival.

    PubMed

    Herishanu, Yair; Kay, Sigi; Sarid, Nadav; Kohan, Pedram; Braunstein, Rony; Rotman, Rachel; Deutsch, Varda; Ben-Ezra, Jonathan; Naparstek, Elizabeth; Perry, Chava; Katz, Ben-Zion

    2013-10-01

    Peripheral absolute monocyte count (AMC) has been reported to correlate with clinical outcome in different types of cancers. This association may relate to alteration in circulating monocytic subpopulations and tumor infiltrating macrophages. In this study we evaluated the clinical significance of peripheral AMC in 80 treatment naive patients with CLL. Measurement of AMC was based on direct morphological enumeration, due to our findings that complete blood count data may yield incorrect monocytes enumeration values in CLL. The median AMC in patients with CLL was within normal limits, however the AMC range exceeded the values of healthy individuals. The AMC trichotomized patients into 3 distinct sub-groups with different characteristics and outcomes. High AMC patients were younger and had higher absolute lymphocytes count, while patients with low AMC had prominent immune dysregulation (lower serum IgA levels, susceptibility to infections and a tendency for positive direct anti-globulin test). The low and high AMC patients had a shorter time to treatment compared to the intermediates AMC subgroups, whereas low AMC was associated with increased mortality caused by infectious complications. In conclusion, AMC quantification during the disease course classifies CLL patients into subgroups with unique clinical features and outcomes.

  1. Home pesticide exposures and risk of childhood leukemia: Findings from the childhood leukemia international consortium.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Helen D; Infante-Rivard, Claire; Metayer, Catherine; Clavel, Jacqueline; Lightfoot, Tracy; Kaatsch, Peter; Roman, Eve; Magnani, Corrado; Spector, Logan G; Th Petridou, Eleni; Milne, Elizabeth; Dockerty, John D; Miligi, Lucia; Armstrong, Bruce K; Rudant, Jérémie; Fritschi, Lin; Simpson, Jill; Zhang, Luoping; Rondelli, Roberto; Baka, Margarita; Orsi, Laurent; Moschovi, Maria; Kang, Alice Y; Schüz, Joachim

    2015-12-01

    Some previous studies have suggested that home pesticide exposure before birth and during a child's early years may increase the risk of childhood leukemia. To further investigate this, we pooled individual level data from 12 case-control studies in the Childhood Leukemia International Consortium. Exposure data were harmonized into compatible formats. Pooled analyses were undertaken using multivariable unconditional logistic regression. The odds ratio (ORs) for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) associated with any pesticide exposure shortly before conception, during pregnancy and after birth were 1.39 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.25, 1.55) (using 2,785 cases and 3,635 controls), 1.43 (95% CI: 1.32, 1.54) (5,055 cases and 7,370 controls) and 1.36 (95% CI: 1.23, 1.51) (4,162 cases and 5,179 controls), respectively. Corresponding ORs for risk of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) were 1.49 (95% CI: 1.02, 2.16) (173 cases and 1,789 controls), 1.55 (95% CI: 1.21, 1.99) (344 cases and 4,666 controls) and 1.08 (95% CI: 0.76, 1.53) (198 cases and 2,655 controls), respectively. There was little difference by type of pesticide used. The relative similarity in ORs between leukemia types, time periods and pesticide types may be explained by similar exposure patterns and effects across the time periods in ALL and AML, participants' exposure to multiple pesticides, or recall bias. Although some recall bias is likely, until a better study design can be found to investigate the associations between home pesticide use and childhood leukemia in an equally large sample, it would appear prudent to limit the use of home pesticides before and during pregnancy, and during childhood.

  2. Exposure to residential electric and magnetic fields and risk of childhood leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, J.M.; Thomas, D.C.; Bowman, J.D.; Sobel, E.; London, S.J.; Cheng, T.C. )

    1991-11-01

    This study was conducted on 232 cases of childhood leukemia occurring in children age 10 and under between 1980 and 1987 in Los Angeles County. Two hundred thirty-two controls were selected from the same geographic area and were matched on sex, age and race. The parents of the 464 subjects were interviewed by telephone to elicit information on medical histories of the parents and child, residential histories of the subjects, occupational histories of both parents, environmental chemical histories, personal histories including drug use and smoking habits, and time and space occupancy of subjects, including exposures to electrical appliances. An extensive assessment of exposure to electric and magnetic fields was made by determining wiring configurations of most subjects (90%), by measuring electric and magnetic fields in various areas of the inside and outside of the home, and by measuring magnetic fields for 24 to 72 hours in the child's sleeping area (66%). We conclude that our data offer no support for a relationship between measured electric field exposure and leukemia risk, little support for the relationship between measured magnetic field exposure and leukemia risk, considerable support for a relationship between wiring configuration and leukemia risk, and considerable support for a relationship between children's electrical appliance use and leukemia risk. The reason(s) why wiring configuration correlates with leukemia risk better than measured exposure are not clear. It is also not clear whether short-term, very high exposure of children to magnetic (or electric) fields from electric appliances are responsible for the observed risk or whether associated exposures or recall biases are responsible. These latter two issues deserve continued research. 41 refs., 31 tabs.

  3. Exposure to residential electric and magnetic fields and risk of childhood leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, J.M.; Thomas, D.C.; Bowman, J.D.; Sobel, E.; London, S.J.; Cheng, T.C.

    1991-11-01

    This study was conducted on 232 cases of childhood leukemia occurring in children age 10 and under between 1980 and 1987 in Los Angeles County. Two hundred thirty-two controls were selected from the same geographic area and were matched on sex, age and race. The parents of the 464 subjects were interviewed by telephone to elicit information on medical histories of the parents and child, residential histories of the subjects, occupational histories of both parents, environmental chemical histories, personal histories including drug use and smoking habits, and time and space occupancy of subjects, including exposures to electrical appliances. An extensive assessment of exposure to electric and magnetic fields was made by determining wiring configurations of most subjects (90%), by measuring electric and magnetic fields in various areas of the inside and outside of the home, and by measuring magnetic fields for 24 to 72 hours in the child`s sleeping area (66%). We conclude that our data offer no support for a relationship between measured electric field exposure and leukemia risk, little support for the relationship between measured magnetic field exposure and leukemia risk, considerable support for a relationship between wiring configuration and leukemia risk, and considerable support for a relationship between children`s electrical appliance use and leukemia risk. The reason(s) why wiring configuration correlates with leukemia risk better than measured exposure are not clear. It is also not clear whether short-term, very high exposure of children to magnetic (or electric) fields from electric appliances are responsible for the observed risk or whether associated exposures or recall biases are responsible. These latter two issues deserve continued research. 41 refs., 31 tabs.

  4. Diagnostic x-ray procedures and risk of leukemia, lymphoma, and multiple myeloma

    SciTech Connect

    Boice, J.D. Jr.; Morin, M.M.; Glass, A.G.; Friedman, G.D.; Stovall, M.; Hoover, R.N.; Fraumeni, J.F. Jr. )

    1991-03-13

    Exposure to diagnostic x-rays and the risk of leukemia, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL), and multiple myeloma were studied within two prepaid health plans. Adult patients with leukemia (n = 565), NHL (n = 318), and multiple myeloma (n = 208) were matched to controls (n = 1390), and over 25,000 x-ray procedures were abstracted from medical records. Dose response was evaluated by assigning each x-ray procedure a score based on estimated bone marrow dose. X-ray exposure was not associated with chronic lymphocytic leukemia, one of the few malignant conditions never linked to radiation (relative risk (RR), 0.66). For all other forms of leukemia combined (n = 358), there was a slight elevation in risk (RR, 1.17) but no evidence of a dose-response relationship when x-ray procedures near the time of diagnosis were excluded. Similarly, patients with NHL were exposed to diagnostic x-ray procedures more often than controls (RR, 1.32), but the RR fell to 0.99 when the exposure to diagnostic x-ray procedures within 2 years of diagnosis was ignored. For multiple myeloma, overall risk was not significantly high (RR, 1.14), but there was consistent evidence of increasing risk with increasing numbers of diagnostic x-ray procedures. These data suggest that persons with leukemia and NHL undergo x-ray procedures frequently just prior to diagnosis for conditions related to the development or natural history of their disease. There was little evidence that diagnostic x-ray procedures were causally associated with leukemia or NHL. The risk for multiple myeloma, however, was increased among those patients who were frequently exposed to x-rays.

  5. Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Juliusson, Gunnar; Hough, Rachael

    2016-01-01

    Leukemias are a group of life threatening malignant disorders of the blood and bone marrow. In the adolescent and young adult (AYA) population, the acute leukemias are most prevalent, with chronic myeloid leukemia being infrequently seen. Factors associated with more aggressive disease biology tend to increase in frequency with increasing age, whilst tolerability of treatment strategies decreases. There are also challenges regarding the effective delivery of therapy specific to the AYA group, consequences on the unique psychosocial needs of this age group, including compliance. This chapter reviews the current status of epidemiology, pathophysiology, treatment strategies and outcomes of AYA leukemia, with a focus on acute lymphoblastic leukemia and acute myeloid leukemia. PMID:27595359

  6. Childhood leukemia: electric and magnetic fields as possible risk factors.

    PubMed Central

    Brain, Joseph D; Kavet, Robert; McCormick, David L; Poole, Charles; Silverman, Lewis B; Smith, Thomas J; Valberg, Peter A; Van Etten, R A; Weaver, James C

    2003-01-01

    Numerous epidemiologic studies have reported associations between measures of power-line electric or magnetic fields (EMFs) and childhood leukemia. The basis for such associations remains unexplained. In children, acute lymphoblastic leukemia represents approximately three-quarters of all U.S. leukemia types. Some risk factors for childhood leukemia have been established, and others are suspected. Pathogenesis, as investigated in animal models, is consistent with the multistep model of acute leukemia development. Studies of carcinogenicity in animals, however, are overwhelmingly negative and do not support the hypothesis that EMF exposure is a significant risk factor for hematopoietic neoplasia. We may fail to observe effects from EMFs because, from a mechanistic perspective, the effects of EMFs on biology are very weak. Cells and organs function despite many sources of chemical "noise" (e.g., stochastic, temperature, concentration, mechanical, and electrical noise), which exceed the induced EMF "signal" by a large factor. However, the inability to detect EMF effects in bioassay systems may be caused by the choice made for "EMF exposure." "Contact currents" or "contact voltages" have been proposed as a novel exposure metric, because their magnitude is related to measured power-line magnetic fields. A contact current occurs when a person touches two conductive surfaces at different voltages. Modeled analyses support contact currents as a plausible metric because of correlations with residential magnetic fields and opportunity for exposure. The possible role of contact currents as an explanatory variable in the reported associations between EMFs and childhood leukemia will need to be clarified by further measurements, biophysical analyses, bioassay studies, and epidemiology. PMID:12782499

  7. A review and meta-analysis of outdoor air pollution and risk of childhood leukemia.

    PubMed

    Filippini, Tommaso; Heck, Julia E; Malagoli, Carlotta; Del Giovane, Cinzia; Vinceti, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Leukemia is the most frequent malignant disease affecting children. To date, the etiology of childhood leukemia remains largely unknown. Few risk factors (genetic susceptibility, infections, ionizing radiation, etc.) have been clearly identified, but they appear to explain only a small proportion of cases. Considerably more uncertain is the role of other environmental risk factors, such as indoor and outdoor air pollution. We sought to summarize and quantify the association between traffic-related air pollution and risk of childhood leukemia, and further examined results according to method of exposure assessment, study quality, leukemia subtype, time period, and continent where studies took place. After a literature search yielded 6 ecologic and 20 case-control studies, we scored the studies based on the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale. The studies assessed residential exposure to pollutants from motorized traffic by computing traffic density in the neighboring roads or vicinity to petrol stations, or by using measured or modeled nitrogen dioxide and benzene outdoor air levels. Because heterogeneity across studies was observed, random-effects summary odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were reported. Whenever possible we additionally conducted stratified analyses comparing acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Limiting the analysis to high-quality studies (Newcastle-Ottawa Scale ≥ 7), those using traffic density as the exposure assessment metric showed an increase in childhood leukemia risk in the highest exposure category (OR = 1.07, 95% CI 0.93-1.24). However, we observed evidence of publication bias. Results for NO2 exposure and benzene showed an OR of 1.21 (95% CI 0.97-1.52) and 1.64 (95% CI 0.91-2.95) respectively. When stratifying by leukemia type, the results based upon NO2 were 1.21 (95% CI 1.04-1.41) for ALL and 1.06 (95% CI 0.51-2.21) for AML; based upon benzene were 1.09 (95% CI 0.67-1.77) for ALL and 2.28 (95% CI

  8. A review and meta-analysis of outdoor air pollution and risk of childhood leukemia.

    PubMed

    Filippini, Tommaso; Heck, Julia E; Malagoli, Carlotta; Del Giovane, Cinzia; Vinceti, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Leukemia is the most frequent malignant disease affecting children. To date, the etiology of childhood leukemia remains largely unknown. Few risk factors (genetic susceptibility, infections, ionizing radiation, etc.) have been clearly identified, but they appear to explain only a small proportion of cases. Considerably more uncertain is the role of other environmental risk factors, such as indoor and outdoor air pollution. We sought to summarize and quantify the association between traffic-related air pollution and risk of childhood leukemia, and further examined results according to method of exposure assessment, study quality, leukemia subtype, time period, and continent where studies took place. After a literature search yielded 6 ecologic and 20 case-control studies, we scored the studies based on the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale. The studies assessed residential exposure to pollutants from motorized traffic by computing traffic density in the neighboring roads or vicinity to petrol stations, or by using measured or modeled nitrogen dioxide and benzene outdoor air levels. Because heterogeneity across studies was observed, random-effects summary odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were reported. Whenever possible we additionally conducted stratified analyses comparing acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Limiting the analysis to high-quality studies (Newcastle-Ottawa Scale ≥ 7), those using traffic density as the exposure assessment metric showed an increase in childhood leukemia risk in the highest exposure category (OR = 1.07, 95% CI 0.93-1.24). However, we observed evidence of publication bias. Results for NO2 exposure and benzene showed an OR of 1.21 (95% CI 0.97-1.52) and 1.64 (95% CI 0.91-2.95) respectively. When stratifying by leukemia type, the results based upon NO2 were 1.21 (95% CI 1.04-1.41) for ALL and 1.06 (95% CI 0.51-2.21) for AML; based upon benzene were 1.09 (95% CI 0.67-1.77) for ALL and 2.28 (95% CI

  9. A Review and Meta-Analysis of Outdoor Air Pollution and Risk of Childhood Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Filippini, Tommaso; E. Heck, Julia; Malagoli, Carlotta; Del Giovane, Cinzia; Vinceti, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Leukemia is the most frequent malignant disease affecting children. To date, the etiology of childhood leukemia remains largely unknown. Few risk factors (genetic susceptibility, infections, ionizing radiation, etc.) have been clearly identified, but they appear to explain only a small proportion of cases. Considerably more uncertain is the role of other environmental risk factors, such as indoor and outdoor air pollution. We sought to summarize and quantify the association between traffic-related air pollution and risk of childhood leukemia, and further examined results according to method of exposure assessment, study quality, leukemia subtype, time period and continent where studies took place. After a literature search yielded 6 ecologic and 20 case-control studies, we scored the studies based upon the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale. The studies assessed residential exposure to pollutants from motorized traffic by computing traffic density in the neighboring roads or vicinity to petrol stations, or by using measured or modeled nitrogen dioxide and benzene outdoor air levels. Because heterogeneity across studies was observed, random-effects summary odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were reported. Whenever possible we additionally conducted stratified analyses comparing acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Limiting the analysis to high-quality studies (Newcastle-Ottawa Scale ≥ 7), those using traffic density as the exposure assessment metric showed an increase in childhood leukemia risk in the highest exposure category (OR=1.07, 95% CI 0.93 – 1.24). However, we observed evidence of publication bias. Results for NO2 exposure and benzene showed an OR of 1.21 (95% CI 0.97 – 1.52) and 1.64 (95% CI 0.91 – 2.95) respectively. When stratifying by leukemia type, the results based upon NO2 were 1.21 (95% CI 1.04 – 1.41) for ALL and 1.06 (95% CI 0.51 – 2.21) for AML; based upon benzene were 1.09 (95% CI 0.67 – 1

  10. Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    Leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells. White blood cells help your body fight infection. Your blood cells form in your bone marrow. In leukemia, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood cells. ...

  11. Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Acute leukemia in adults. In: Niederhuber JE, Armitage JO, Doroshow JH, Kastan MB, Tepper JE, eds. Abeloff's ... Pui CH. Childhood leukemia. In: Niederhuber JE, Armitage JO, Doroshow JH, Kastan MB, Tepper JE, eds. Abeloff's ...

  12. Fludarabine Phosphate, Radiation Therapy, and Rituximab in Treating Patients Who Are Undergoing Donor Stem Cell Transplant Followed by Rituximab for High-Risk Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-28

    Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; T-Cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia

  13. [Chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Treatment and genetic risk profile].

    PubMed

    Stilgenbauer, S; Hallek, M

    2013-02-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is characterized by a highly variable clinical course. Among the biological features underlying this heterogeneity, genetic lesions and the mutational status of the immunoglobulin heavy chain variable genes (IGHV) are of importance. Therapeutic options in CLL have been considerably expanded during recent years. The combination of fludarabine, cyclophosphamide and rituximab (FCR) has become gold standard in the first-line treatment of physically fit patients. Bendamustine plus rituximab (BR) is currently being compared to FCR in studies and chlorambucil is still of relevance for elderly patients with comorbidities. Alemtuzumab is an alternative for high-risk patients (refractory CLL, 17p deletion, TP53 mutation). Allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) offers the only chance of cure but not without substantial mortality. Innovative approaches focus on individualized, targeted therapies. A number of novel agents are in clinical trials and show marked efficacy combined with good tolerability. This review provides an overview of the current therapeutic options and of promising novel approaches.

  14. Alpha radiation risk coefficients for liver cancer, bone sarcomas, and leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Hunacek, M.M.; Kathren, R.L.

    1995-01-01

    This study compares published risk coefficients with those determined from dose rates established by postmortem radiochemical analysis of tissues from two whole body donors to the U.S. Transuranium and Uranium Registries, both of whom had been injected with Thorotrast approximately four decades prior to death. The dose data from these cases were used in combination with published latent periods and epidemiologic study results to calculate the following risk coefficients: 0.020 liver cancers Gy{sup -1}, 0.002 bone sarcomas Gy{sup -1}, and 0.032 leukemias Gy{sup -1}. These compare with the ranges of 0.60 to 0.074 liver cancers Gy{sup -1}, 0.0016 to 0.0120 bone sarcomas Gy{sup -1}, and 0.005 to 0.060 leukemias Gy{sup -1} reported in the literature. The results of this study are generally consistent with previously reported values with two exceptions: the values for bone sarcomas fall below the range given by BEIR IV and the values for leukemia are a factor of 6 greater than those reported by BEIR IV. This suggests that the BEIR IV risk coefficient for bone sarcomas may be too high, and that for leukemia may be too low. 46 refs., 5 tabs.

  15. Acute myeloid leukemia risk by industry and occupation

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Rebecca J.; Luckhaupt, Sara E.; Schumacher, Pam; Cress, Rosemary D.; Deapen, Dennis M.; Calvert, Geoffrey M.

    2015-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is the most common type of leukemia found in adults. Identifying jobs that pose a risk for AML may be useful for identifying new risk factors. A matched case–control analysis was conducted using California Cancer Registry data from 1988 to 2007. This study included 8999 cases of AML and 24 822 controls. Industries with a statistically significant increased AML risk were construction (matched odds ratio [mOR] = 1.13); crop production (mOR = 1.41); support activities for agriculture and forestry (mOR = 2.05); and animal slaughtering and processing (mOR = 2.09). Among occupations with a statistically significant increased AML risk were miscellaneous agricultural workers (mOR = 1.76); fishers and related fishing workers (mOR = 2.02); nursing, psychiatric and home health aides (mOR = 1.65); and janitors and building cleaners (mOR = 1.54). Further investigation is needed to confirm study findings and to identify specific exposures responsible for the increased risks. PMID:24547710

  16. Acute myeloid leukemia risk by industry and occupation.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Rebecca J; Luckhaupt, Sara E; Schumacher, Pam; Cress, Rosemary D; Deapen, Dennis M; Calvert, Geoffrey M

    2014-11-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is the most common type of leukemia found in adults. Identifying jobs that pose a risk for AML may be useful for identifying new risk factors. A matched case-control analysis was conducted using California Cancer Registry data from 1988 to 2007. This study included 8999 cases of AML and 24 822 controls. Industries with a statistically significant increased AML risk were construction (matched odds ratio [mOR] = 1.13); crop production (mOR = 1.41); support activities for agriculture and forestry (mOR = 2.05); and animal slaughtering and processing (mOR = 2.09). Among occupations with a statistically significant increased AML risk were miscellaneous agricultural workers (mOR = 1.76); fishers and related fishing workers (mOR = 2.02); nursing, psychiatric and home health aides (mOR = 1.65); and janitors and building cleaners (mOR = 1.54). Further investigation is needed to confirm study findings and to identify specific exposures responsible for the increased risks.

  17. Resveratrol given intraperitoneally does not inhibit growth of high-risk t(4;11) acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells in NOD/SCID mouse model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The efficacy of the phytochemical resveratrol as a preventive agent against the growth of t(4;11) acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) was evaluated in NOD.CB17-Prkdcscid/J mice engrafted with the human t(4;11) ALL line SEM. SEM cells were injected into the tail vein and engraftment was monitored by ...

  18. Pilot Study of Nelarabine in Combination With Intensive Chemotherapy in High-Risk T-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: A Report From the Children's Oncology Group

    PubMed Central

    Dunsmore, Kimberly P.; Devidas, Meenakshi; Linda, Stephen B.; Borowitz, Michael J.; Winick, Naomi; Hunger, Stephen P.; Carroll, William L.; Camitta, Bruce M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Children's Oncology Group study AALL00P2 was designed to assess the feasibility and safety of adding nelarabine to a BFM 86–based chemotherapy regimen in children with newly diagnosed T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL). Patients and Methods In stage one of the study, eight patients with a slow early response (SER) by prednisone poor response (PPR; ≥ 1,000 peripheral blood blasts on day 8 of prednisone prephase) received chemotherapy plus six courses of nelarabine 400 mg/m2 once per day; four patients with SER by high minimal residual disease (MRD; ≥ 1% at day 36 of induction) received chemotherapy plus five courses of nelarabine; 16 patients with a rapid early response (RER) received chemotherapy without nelarabine. In stage two, all patients received six 5-day courses of nelarabine at 650 mg/m2 once per day (10 SER patients [one by MRD, nine by PPR]) or 400 mg/m2 once per day (38 RER patients; 12 SER patients [three by MRD, nine by PPR]). Results The only significant difference in toxicities was decreased neutropenic infections in patients treated with nelarabine (42% with v 81% without nelarabine). Five-year event-free survival (EFS) rates were 73% for 11 stage one SER patients and 67% for 22 stage two SER patients treated with nelarabine versus 69% for 16 stage one RER patients treated without nelarabine and 74% for 38 stage two RER patients treated with nelarabine. Five-year EFS for all patients receiving nelarabine (n = 70) was 73% versus 69% for those treated without nelarabine (n = 16). Conclusion Addition of nelarabine to a BFM 86–based chemotherapy regimen was well tolerated and produced encouraging results in pediatric patients with T-ALL, particularly those with a SER, who have historically fared poorly. PMID:22734022

  19. Busulfan, Fludarabine Phosphate, and Anti-Thymocyte Globulin Followed By Donor Stem Cell Transplant and Azacitidine in Treating Patients With High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndrome and Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-26

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  20. Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation after conditioning with I-131-anti-CD45 antibody plus fludarabine and low-dose total body irradiation for elderly patients with advanced acute myeloid leukemia or high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome.

    SciTech Connect

    Pagel, John M.; Gooley, T. A.; Rajendran, Joseph G.; Fisher, Darrell R.; Wilson, Wendy A.; Sandmaier, B. M.; Matthews, D. C.; Deeg, H. Joachim; Gopal, Ajay K.; Martin, P. J.; Storb, R.; Press, Oliver W.; Appelbaum, Frederick R.

    2009-12-24

    We conducted a study to estimate the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of I-131-anti-CD45 antibody (Ab; BC8) that can be combined with a standard reduced-intensity conditioning regimen before allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation. Fifty-eight patients older than 50 years with advanced acute myeloid leukemia (AML) or high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) were treated with (131)I-BC8 Ab and fludarabine plus 2 Gy total body irradiation. Eighty-six percent of patients had AML or MDS with greater than 5% marrow blasts at the time of transplantation. Treatment produced a complete remission in all patients, and all had 100% donor-derived CD3(+) and CD33(+) cells in the blood by day 28 after the transplantation. The MTD of I-131-BC8 Ab delivered to liver was estimated to be 24 Gy. Seven patients (12%) died of nonrelapse causes by day 100. The estimated probability of recurrent malignancy at 1 year is 40%, and the 1-year survival estimate is 41%. These results show that CD45-targeted radiotherapy can be safely combined with a reduced-intensity conditioning regimen to yield encouraging overall survival for older, high-risk patients with AML or MDS. This study was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00008177.

  1. Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation after conditioning with 131I–anti-CD45 antibody plus fludarabine and low-dose total body irradiation for elderly patients with advanced acute myeloid leukemia or high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gooley, Theodore A.; Rajendran, Joseph; Fisher, Darrell R.; Wilson, Wendy A.; Sandmaier, Brenda M.; Matthews, Dana C.; Deeg, H. Joachim; Gopal, Ajay K.; Martin, Paul J.; Storb, Rainer F.; Press, Oliver W.; Appelbaum, Frederick R.

    2009-01-01

    We conducted a study to estimate the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of 131I–anti-CD45 antibody (Ab; BC8) that can be combined with a standard reduced-intensity conditioning regimen before allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation. Fifty-eight patients older than 50 years with advanced acute myeloid leukemia (AML) or high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) were treated with 131I-BC8 Ab and fludarabine plus 2 Gy total body irradiation. Eighty-six percent of patients had AML or MDS with greater than 5% marrow blasts at the time of transplantation. Treatment produced a complete remission in all patients, and all had 100% donor-derived CD3+ and CD33+ cells in the blood by day 28 after the transplantation. The MTD of 131I-BC8 Ab delivered to liver was estimated to be 24 Gy. Seven patients (12%) died of nonrelapse causes by day 100. The estimated probability of recurrent malignancy at 1 year is 40%, and the 1-year survival estimate is 41%. These results show that CD45-targeted radiotherapy can be safely combined with a reduced-intensity conditioning regimen to yield encouraging overall survival for older, high-risk patients with AML or MDS. This study was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00008177. PMID:19786617

  2. Leukemia risk associated with benzene exposure in the pliofilm cohort: I. Mortality update and exposure distribution.

    PubMed

    Paxton, M B; Chinchilli, V M; Brett, S M; Rodricks, J V

    1994-04-01

    The National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) recently completed a vital status update adding 6 years of observation on the rubber workers known as the Pliofilm cohort. Using traditional standardized mortality ratio (SMR) analysis, we investigate the impact of the additional information gathered in the NIOSH update. We also compare the effect of using three sets of job-, plant-, and year-specific exposure estimates on the evaluation of benzene's leukemogenicity. The lack of any additional cases of multiple myeloma does not support trends toward elevated risks for this endpoint (as had been observed earlier), and there is no indication of increased incidences of solid tumors (as predicted by animal studies). Qualitatively, which exposure estimates are used does not alter the conclusions. The data added in the update did not greatly modify the estimated relative risk of leukemia associated with benzene exposure, but did confirm previous findings that occupational exposure to high concentrations had leukemogenic potential. The fact that leukemia has not been observed in any individual who started employment in Pliofilm production after 1950 suggests that the observed leukemia cases could be a response to very high levels of benzene exposure that occurred during the early years of this manufacturing process. PMID:8008923

  3. Prognostic factors and risk stratification in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Parikh, Sameer A; Shanafelt, Tait D

    2016-04-01

    There is considerable heterogeneity in the clinical outcome of patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). While some patients live for decades without any therapy, others die within years of diagnosis despite multiple treatments. To better counsel newly diagnosed CLL patients about their disease course, the Rai and Binet staging systems were developed four decades ago. A deeper understanding of the biologic and molecular aberrations contributing to the pathogenesis of CLL led to identification of novel prognostic markers such as immunoglobulin heavy-chain variable gene (IGHV) mutation status, leukemia-cell expression of CD38, ZAP-70, and CD49d, and cytogenetic abnormalities detected by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). The advent of next-generation sequencing has provided unprecedented insights into the subclonal architecture of CLL and its impact on disease progression and survival. More recently, integrated prognostic scoring systems that incorporate clinical, biologic and genetic characteristics into a single risk score have been developed and appear to improve the accuracy of prognostication for individual patients. This review summarizes the state-of-the-art prognostic factors and will guide the practicing clinician in their care of patients with CLL. PMID:27040701

  4. A phase II study of decitabine and gemtuzumab ozogamicin in newly diagnosed and relapsed acute myeloid leukemia and high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Daver, N; Kantarjian, H; Ravandi, F; Estey, E; Wang, X; Garcia-Manero, G; Jabbour, E; Konopleva, M; O'Brien, S; Verstovsek, S; Kadia, T; Dinardo, C; Pierce, S; Huang, X; Pemmaraju, N; Diaz-Pines-Mateo, M; Cortes, J; Borthakur, G

    2016-02-01

    Decitabine may open the chromatin structure of leukemia cells making them accessible to the calicheamicin epitope of gemtuzumab ozogamicin (GO). A total of 110 patients (median age 70 years; range 27-89 years) were treated with decitabine and GO in a trial designed on model-based futility to accommodate subject heterogeneity: group 1: relapsed/refractory acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with complete remission duration (CRD) <1 year (N=28, 25%); group 2: relapsed/refractory AML with CRD ⩾1 year (N=5, 5%); group 3: untreated AML unfit for intensive chemotherapy or untreated myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) or untreated myelofibrosis (MF; N=57, 52%); and group 4: AML evolving from MDS or relapsed/refractory MDS or MF (N=20, 18%). Treatment consisted of decitabine 20 mg/m(2) daily for 5 days and GO 3 mg/m(2) on day 5. Post-induction therapy included five cycles of decitabine+GO followed by decitabine alone. Complete remission (CR)/CR with incomplete count recovery was achieved in 39 (35%) patients; group 1= 5/28 (17%), group 2=3/5 (60%), group 3=24/57 (42%) and group 4=7/20 (35%). The 8-week mortality in groups 3 and 4 was 16% and 10%, respectively. Common drug-related adverse events included nausea, mucositis and hemorrhage. Decitabine and GO improved the response rate but not overall survival compared with historical outcomes in untreated AML ⩾60 years.

  5. Inherited genetic variants associated with childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia risk.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Masatoshi; Urayama, Kevin

    2016-07-01

    Numerous efforts have been made to elucidate the roles of individual genetic background factors in the risk of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Most have taken the form of case-control studies focusing on specific candidate gene polymorphisms. Recently, a more rigorous and comprehensive approach referred to as a genome-wide association study (GWAS) has been widely utilized and has achieved success. Case-control studies evaluating candidate gene associations have shown cumulative evidence of a role for folate metabolism and xenobiotic metabolism/transport pathway genetic variants. In addition, single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)s identified by GWAS appear to indicate a strong role for genes encoding transcription factors involved in cellular differentiation. Further studies are needed to clarify the accumulating evidence obtained from both candidate gene and genome-wide investigations. PMID:27498736

  6. At the Bench: Preclinical rationale for exploiting NK cells and γδ T lymphocytes for the treatment of high-risk leukemias.

    PubMed

    Norell, Håkan; Moretta, Alessandro; Silva-Santos, Bruno; Moretta, Lorenzo

    2013-12-01

    NK cells and γδ T lymphocytes display potent cytolytic activity against leukemias and CMV-infected cells and are thus, promising immune effector cells in the context of allo-HSCT. NK cells express HLA class I-specific inhibitory receptors and preferentially kill HLA class I(low) tumors or virus-infected cells. Killing occurs upon engagement of activating NKRs with ligands that are up-regulated on tumors and infected cells. A similar activating receptor/ligand interaction strategy is used by γδ T cells, which in addition, use their TCRs for recognition of phosphorylated antigens and still largely undefined ligands on tumor cells. In the haploidentical allo-HSCT setting, alloreactive NK cells, derived from donor HSCs, can exert potent antileukemia activity and kill residual patient DCs and T cells, thus preventing GvHD and graft rejection. However, generation of KIR(+) alloreactive NK cells from HSCs requires many weeks, during which leukemia relapses, and life-threatening infections may occur. Importantly, mature NK cells and γδ T cells can control certain infectious agents efficiently, in particular, limit CMV reactivation, and infusion of such donor cells at the time of HSCT has been implemented. Development of novel, cell-based immunotherapies, allowing improved trafficking and better targeting, will endow NK cells and γδ T lymphocytes with enhanced anti-tumor activity, also making them key reagents for therapies against solid tumors. The clinical aspects of using NK cells and γδ T lymphocytes against hematological malignancies, including the allo-HSCT context, are reviewed in the related side-by-side paper by Locatelli and colleagues [1].

  7. High Expression of the Very Late Antigen-4 Integrin Independently Predicts Reduced Risk of Relapse and Improved Outcome in Pediatric Acute Myeloid Leukemia: A Report From the Children's Oncology Group

    PubMed Central

    Walter, Roland B.; Alonzo, Todd A.; Gerbing, Robert B.; Ho, Phoenix A.; Smith, Franklin O.; Raimondi, Susana C.; Hirsch, Betsy A.; Gamis, Alan S.; Franklin, Janet L.; Hurwitz, Craig A.; Loken, Michael R.; Meshinchi, Soheil

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the prognostic significance of the integrin cell adhesion molecule very late antigen-4 (VLA-4) in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Patients and Methods We prospectively quantified VLA-4 expression in 216 patients enrolled onto COG-AAML03P1 by flow cytometry and correlated expression levels with disease characteristics and clinical outcome. Results VLA-4 mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) varied 35-fold (range, 30 to 1,110; median, 219.5). High VLA-4 expression (> median MFI), compared with low expression, was associated with younger age (7.1 v 12.1 years, respectively; P < .001), lower FLT3 internal tandem duplication prevalence (4% v 21%, respectively; P < .001), and higher likelihood of extramedullary disease (16% v 5%, respectively; P = .013). In low- and high-expression groups, rates of remission (89% v 80%, respectively; P = .137) and minimal residual disease (29% v 25%, respectively; P = .700) were similar. Patients with low VLA-4 expression, compared with high expression, had a higher relapse rate (RR; 44% ± 10% v 24% ± 9%, respectively; P = .011) and lower disease-free survival (DFS; 48% ± 11% v 67% ± 10%, respectively; P = .023) after 3 years. Multivariate analyses showed that low VLA-4 expression was an independent adverse prognostic factor for DFS (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.98; P = .038) and RR (HR = 2.77; P = .009). Subgroup analyses indicated that the prognostic role of VLA-4 expression was most prominent in patients with standard-risk AML, in whom low VLA-4 expression was associated with inferior DFS (34% ± 16% v 69% ± 14% for high expression; P = .011) and higher RR (61% ± 16% v 26% ± 14% for high expression; P = .009). A similar trend was seen in low-risk but not high-risk patients. Conclusion High VLA-4 expression is associated with better clinical outcome in pediatric AML and is an independent predictor of relapse that may refine our abilities to stratify patients without identifiable cytogenetic or molecular risk factors. PMID

  8. Outcome of patients with high risk Myelodysplastic Syndrome (MDS) and advanced Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia (CMML) treated with decitabine after azacitidine failure.

    PubMed

    Harel, Stéphanie; Cherait, Amina; Berthon, Céline; Willekens, Christophe; Park, Sophie; Rigal, Marthe; Brechignac, Sabine; Thépot, Sylvain; Quesnel, Bruno; Gardin, Claude; Adès, Lionel; Fenaux, Pierre; Braun, Thorsten

    2015-05-01

    Outcome of patients with high risk MDS and CMML who failed treatment with azacitidine remains poor with a median survival of 6 months, without established therapy available except allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The objective of our study was to evaluate efficacy of decitabine after azacitidine failure in a relatively large patient cohort based on conflicting results with 0-28% response rates (RR) in this setting in small patient series. Thirty-six consecutive high risk MDS and CMML patients who received decitabine after azacitidine failure were retrospectively reviewed. Response was based on IWG 2006 criteria for MDS and CMML with WBC<13G/l and also included for proliferative CMML the evolution of WBC, splenomegaly (SMG) and extramedullary disease (EMD). Patients received a median number of 3 (range 1-27) cycles of decitabine and 12 patients received at least 6 cycles. Seven (19.4%) patients were responders including 3 marrow CR (mCR), 2 stable disease (SD) with HI-E, 1 SD with HI-N and HI-P and 1 SD with HI-N. In a CMML patient with SD, specific skin lesions resolved with decitabine. Responses were generally short lived (2-5 months) except 1 responder currently ongoing with +11 months follow up. Two non-responders had prolonged SD (without HI) of 21 and 27 months duration respectively. Median OS from onset of decitabine was 7.3 months, without significant difference between responders and non-responders. Treatment with decitabine after azacitidine failure yielded modest ORR (19.4%) with short response duration and poor OS. Thus, use of decitabine in such patients who failed or progressed after azacitidine cannot be recommended, underscoring the need for novel strategies in this setting.

  9. [Clinical efficacy of decitabine plus improved CAG chemotherapy and haplo-identical donor peripheral lymphocyte infusion regimen on elderly patients with high risk myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia].

    PubMed

    Dou, Li-Ping; Jing, Yu; Wang, Quan-Shun; Mei, Jun-Hui; Yu, Li

    2013-06-01

    This study was aimed to observe the clinical efficacy and adverse effects of decitabine plus improved CAG chemotherapy and haploid-identical donor peripheral lymphocyte infusion regimen on elderly patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Five elderly patients with MDS and AML were treated with decitabine plus improved CAG chemotherapy and donor peripheral lymphocyte infusion regimen. Examinations on liver and renal function, electrocardiogram and bone marrow analysis were performed before and after treatment, and adverse effects were observed. The results indicated that after a course of treatment by decitabine plus improved CAG chemotherapy and haplo-identical donor peripheral lymphocyte infusion regimen, the total effective rate was 100%, and 4 patients (80%) achieved complete remission, 1 patient achieved partial remission. The dominant clinical adverse effect was bone marrow depression, the median time of neutrophil>0.5×10(9)/L and platelet>20×10(9)/L was 15 d and 16 d respectively for patients without previous MDS. It is concluded that decitabine plus improved CAG chemotherapy and haploid-identical donor peripheral lymphocyte infusion regimen may be effective with less adverse effects for elderly primary AML and high risk MDS patients, it is a promising therapeutic methods and worthy to deeply study.

  10. Autologous Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant Followed by Donor Bone Marrow Transplant in Treating Patients With High-Risk Hodgkin Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, Multiple Myeloma, or Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-17

    B-Cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Plasma Cell Leukemia; Progression of Multiple Myeloma or Plasma Cell Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Plasma Cell Myeloma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Plasma Cell Myeloma; Refractory Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; T-Cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  11. Dietary intakes and risk of lymphoid and myeloid leukemia in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC).

    PubMed

    Saberi Hosnijeh, Fatemeh; Peeters, Petra; Romieu, Isabelle; Kelly, Rachel; Riboli, Elio; Olsen, Anja; Tjønneland, Anne; Fagherazzi, Guy; Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise; Dossus, Laure; Nieters, Alexandra; Teucher, Birgit; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Naska, Androniki; Valanou, Elisavet; Mattiello, Amalia; Sieri, Sabina; Parr, Christine L; Engeset, Dagrun; Skeie, Guri; Dorronsoro, Miren; Barricarte, Aurelio; Sánchez, Maria-José; Ericson, Ulrika; Sonestedt, Emily; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas; Ros, Martine M; Travis, Ruth C; Key, Timothy J; Vineis, Paolo; Vermeulen, Roel

    2014-01-01

    The etiology of leukemias cannot entirely be explained by known risk factors, including ionizing radiation, benzene exposure, and infection with human T cell leukemia virus. A number of studies suggested that diet influences the risk of adult leukemias. However, results have been largely inconsistent. We examined the potential association between dietary factors and risk of leukemias among participants of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition study. Among the 477,325 participants with mean follow-up of 11.34 yr (SD = 2.47), 773 leukemias (373 and 342 cases of lymphoid and myeloid leukemia, respectively) were identified. Diet over the previous 12 mo was assessed at baseline using a validated country-specific dietary questionnaire. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to explore the association between dietary factors that have previously been associated with leukemia risk, including red and processed meat, poultry, offal, fish, dairy products, vegetables, fruits, and seeds/nuts, and risk of both lymphoid and myeloid leukemias. No significant associations were observed between dietary measures and total, lymphoid, and myeloid leukemias. Additional subtype analyses showed no dietary association with risk of major subtypes of leukemias. In summary, this study did not support a possible link between selected dietary factors and risk of leukemias.

  12. Dietary intakes and risk of lymphoid and myeloid leukemia in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC).

    PubMed

    Saberi Hosnijeh, Fatemeh; Peeters, Petra; Romieu, Isabelle; Kelly, Rachel; Riboli, Elio; Olsen, Anja; Tjønneland, Anne; Fagherazzi, Guy; Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise; Dossus, Laure; Nieters, Alexandra; Teucher, Birgit; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Naska, Androniki; Valanou, Elisavet; Mattiello, Amalia; Sieri, Sabina; Parr, Christine L; Engeset, Dagrun; Skeie, Guri; Dorronsoro, Miren; Barricarte, Aurelio; Sánchez, Maria-José; Ericson, Ulrika; Sonestedt, Emily; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas; Ros, Martine M; Travis, Ruth C; Key, Timothy J; Vineis, Paolo; Vermeulen, Roel

    2014-01-01

    The etiology of leukemias cannot entirely be explained by known risk factors, including ionizing radiation, benzene exposure, and infection with human T cell leukemia virus. A number of studies suggested that diet influences the risk of adult leukemias. However, results have been largely inconsistent. We examined the potential association between dietary factors and risk of leukemias among participants of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition study. Among the 477,325 participants with mean follow-up of 11.34 yr (SD = 2.47), 773 leukemias (373 and 342 cases of lymphoid and myeloid leukemia, respectively) were identified. Diet over the previous 12 mo was assessed at baseline using a validated country-specific dietary questionnaire. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to explore the association between dietary factors that have previously been associated with leukemia risk, including red and processed meat, poultry, offal, fish, dairy products, vegetables, fruits, and seeds/nuts, and risk of both lymphoid and myeloid leukemias. No significant associations were observed between dietary measures and total, lymphoid, and myeloid leukemias. Additional subtype analyses showed no dietary association with risk of major subtypes of leukemias. In summary, this study did not support a possible link between selected dietary factors and risk of leukemias. PMID:24279598

  13. Improved outcome for high-risk acute myeloid leukemia patients using autologous bone marrow transplantation and monoclonal antibody-purged bone marrow.

    PubMed

    Selvaggi, K J; Wilson, J W; Mills, L E; Cornwell, G G; Hurd, D; Dodge, W; Gingrich, R; Martin, S E; McMillan, R; Miller, W

    1994-03-15

    We have conducted a 9-year multicenter trial of autologous bone marrow transplantation (ABMT) for acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Remission BM was purged in vitro using monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs; PM-81, AML-2-23) and complement targeting myeloid differentiation antigens (CD15, CD14). In 1988, the preparative regimen changed from 60 mg/kg/d cyclophosphamide x 2 and fractionated total body irradiation (TBI) total dose, 1,200 cGy (Cy/fTBI), to 4 mg/kg/d busulfan x 4 and 60 mg/kg/d Cy x 2 (Bu/Cy2). Recent analysis (October 1, 1993) shows that the Bu/Cy2 regimen along with the same MoAb purging method yields an improved outcome. Seven first complete-remission (CR) (CR1), 45 second- or third-CR (CR2/3), and 11 first-relapse (R1) patients were treated with chemotherapy and TBI or chemotherapy alone followed by ABMT with MoAb-purged BM. Median age at ABMT for those patients in CR 2/3 and R1 patients was 36 years. Twenty-nine CR 2/3 and R1 patients were conditioned with Cy/fTBI, and 27 CR2/3 and R1 patients were conditioned with Bu/CY. Using the Kaplan-Meier method, the CY/fTBI, CR2/3, and R1 patients have a 3-year disease-free survival (DFS) of 21%. On the other hand, the Bu/Cy2, CR2/3, and R1 patients have a 3-year DFS of 48%. Nineteen CR2/3 and R1 patients relapsed post-ABMT. On analysis by conditioning regimen, those treated with Cy/fTBI have a 3-year relapse rate (RR) of 58%, whereas the patients conditioned with Bu/Cy2 have a 39% 3-year RR. Long-term DFS can be achieved in about 50% of patients with advanced remissions and relapsed AML using Bu/Cy2 with MoAb-purged BM.

  14. Improved outcome for high-risk acute myeloid leukemia patients using autologous bone marrow transplantation and monoclonal antibody-purged bone marrow.

    PubMed

    Selvaggi, K J; Wilson, J W; Mills, L E; Cornwell, G G; Hurd, D; Dodge, W; Gingrich, R; Martin, S E; McMillan, R; Miller, W

    1994-03-15

    We have conducted a 9-year multicenter trial of autologous bone marrow transplantation (ABMT) for acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Remission BM was purged in vitro using monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs; PM-81, AML-2-23) and complement targeting myeloid differentiation antigens (CD15, CD14). In 1988, the preparative regimen changed from 60 mg/kg/d cyclophosphamide x 2 and fractionated total body irradiation (TBI) total dose, 1,200 cGy (Cy/fTBI), to 4 mg/kg/d busulfan x 4 and 60 mg/kg/d Cy x 2 (Bu/Cy2). Recent analysis (October 1, 1993) shows that the Bu/Cy2 regimen along with the same MoAb purging method yields an improved outcome. Seven first complete-remission (CR) (CR1), 45 second- or third-CR (CR2/3), and 11 first-relapse (R1) patients were treated with chemotherapy and TBI or chemotherapy alone followed by ABMT with MoAb-purged BM. Median age at ABMT for those patients in CR 2/3 and R1 patients was 36 years. Twenty-nine CR 2/3 and R1 patients were conditioned with Cy/fTBI, and 27 CR2/3 and R1 patients were conditioned with Bu/CY. Using the Kaplan-Meier method, the CY/fTBI, CR2/3, and R1 patients have a 3-year disease-free survival (DFS) of 21%. On the other hand, the Bu/Cy2, CR2/3, and R1 patients have a 3-year DFS of 48%. Nineteen CR2/3 and R1 patients relapsed post-ABMT. On analysis by conditioning regimen, those treated with Cy/fTBI have a 3-year relapse rate (RR) of 58%, whereas the patients conditioned with Bu/Cy2 have a 39% 3-year RR. Long-term DFS can be achieved in about 50% of patients with advanced remissions and relapsed AML using Bu/Cy2 with MoAb-purged BM. PMID:8123862

  15. Parental occupational pesticide exposure and the risk of childhood leukemia in the offspring: Findings from the Childhood Leukemia International Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Helen D; Fritschi, Lin; Infante-Rivard, Claire; Glass, Deborah C; Miligi, Lucia; Dockerty, John D; Lightfoot, Tracy; Clavel, Jacqueline; Roman, Eve; Spector, Logan G; Kaatsch, Peter; Metayer, Catherine; Magnani, Corrado; Milne, Elizabeth; Polychronopoulou, Sophia; Simpson, Jill; Rudant, Jérémie; Sidi, Vasiliki; Rondelli, Roberto; Orsi, Laurent; Kang, Alice; Petridou, Eleni; Schüz, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    Maternal occupational pesticide exposure during pregnancy and/or paternal occupational pesticide exposure around conception have been suggested to increase risk of leukemia in the offspring. With a view to providing insight in this area we pooled individual level data from 13 case-control studies participating in the Childhood Leukemia International Consortium (CLIC). Occupational data were harmonized to a compatible format. Pooled individual analyses were undertaken using unconditional logistic regression. Using exposure data from mothers of 8,236 cases, and 14,850 controls, and from fathers of 8,169 cases and 14,201 controls the odds ratio (OR) for maternal exposure during pregnancy and the risk of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) was 1.01 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.78, 1.30) and for paternal exposure around conception 1.20 (95% 1.06, 1.38). For acute myeloid leukemia (AML), the OR for maternal exposure during pregnancy was 1.94 (CI 1.19, 3.18) and for paternal exposure around conception 0.91 (CI 0.66, 1.24.) based on data from 1,329 case and 12,141 control mothers, and 1,231 case and 11,383 control fathers. Our finding of a significantly increased risk of AML in the offspring with maternal exposure to pesticides during pregnancy is consistent with previous reports. We also found a slight increase in risk of ALL with paternal exposure around conception which appeared to be more evident in children diagnosed at the age of five years or more and those with T cell ALL which raises interesting questions on possible mechanisms. PMID:24700406

  16. Leukemia risk associated with benzene exposure in the pliofilm cohort. II. Risk estimates.

    PubMed

    Paxton, M B; Chinchilli, V M; Brett, S M; Rodricks, J V

    1994-04-01

    The detailed work histories of the individual workers composing the Pliofilm cohort represent a unique resource for estimating the dose-response for leukemia that may follow occupational exposure to benzene. In this paper, we report the results of analyzing the updated Pliofilm cohort using the proportional hazards model, a more sophisticated technique that uses more of the available exposure data than the conditional logistic model used by Rinsky et al. The more rigorously defined exposure estimates derived by Paustenbach et al. are consistent with those of Crump and Allen in giving estimates of the slope of the leukemogenic dose-response that are not as steep as the slope resulting from the exposure estimates of Rinsky et al. We consider estimates of 0.3-0.5 additional leukemia deaths per thousand workers with 45 ppm-years of cumulative benzene exposure to be the best estimates currently available of leukemia risk from occupational exposure to benzene. These risks were estimated in the proportional hazards model when the exposure estimates of Crump and Allen or of Paustenbach et al. were used to derive a cumulative concentration-by-time metric. PMID:8008924

  17. Formaldehyde and Leukemia: Epidemiology, Potential Mechanisms and Implications for Risk Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Luoping; Freeman, Laura E. Beane; Nakamura, Jun; Hecht, Stephen S.; Vandenberg, John J.; Smith, Martyn T.; Sonawane, Babasaheb R.

    2009-01-01

    Formaldehyde is widely used in the United States and other countries. Occupational and environmental exposures to formaldehyde may be associated with an increased risk of leukemia in exposed individuals. However, risk assessment of formaldehyde and leukemia has been challenging due to inconsistencies in human and animal studies and the lack of a known mechanism for leukemia induction. Here we provide a summary of the symposium at the Environmental Mutagen Society Meeting in 2008, which focused on the epidemiology of formaldehyde and leukemia, potential mechanisms, and implication for risk assessment, with emphasis on future directions in multidisciplinary formaldehyde research. Updated results of two of the three largest industrial cohort studies of formaldehyde-exposed workers have shown positive associations with leukemia, particularly myeloid leukemia, and a recent meta-analysis of studies to date supports this association. Recent mechanistic studies have shown the formation of formaldehyde-induced DNA adducts and characterized the essential DNA repair pathways that mitigate formaldehyde toxicity. The implications of the updated findings for the design of future studies to more effectively assess the risk of leukemia arising from formaldehyde exposure were discussed and specific recommendations were made. A toxicogenomic approach in experimental models and human exposure studies, together with the measurement of biomarkers of internal exposure, such as formaldehyde-DNA and protein adducts, should prove fruitful. It was recognized that increased communication among scientists who perform epidemiology, toxicology, biology, and risk assessment could enhance the design of future studies, which could ultimately reduce uncertainty in the risk assessment of formaldehyde and leukemia. PMID:19790261

  18. Radiolabeled Monoclonal Antibody Therapy, Fludarabine Phosphate, and Low-Dose Total-Body Irradiation Followed by Donor Stem Cell Transplant and Immunosuppression Therapy in Treating Older Patients With Advanced Acute Myeloid Leukemia or High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-11-16

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Refractory Anemia With Ringed Sideroblasts; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  19. Risk-Based Classification System of Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-24

    Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  20. TCGA researchers identify potential drug targets, markers for leukemia risk

    Cancer.gov

    Investigators for The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Research Network have detailed and broadly classified the genomic alterations that frequently underlie the development of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), a deadly cancer of the blood and bone marrow. Their wo

  1. Tobacco Smoke Exposure and the Risk of Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic and Myeloid Leukemias by Cytogenetic Subtype

    PubMed Central

    Metayer, Catherine; Zhang, Luoping; Wiemels, Joseph L.; Bartley, Karen; Schiffman, Joshua; Ma, Xiaomei; Aldrich, Melinda C.; Chang, Jeffrey S.; Selvin, Steve; Fu, Cecilia H.; Ducore, Jonathan; Smith, Martyn T.; Buffler, Patricia A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Tobacco smoke contains carcinogens known to damage somatic and germ cells. We investigated the effect tobacco smoke on the risk of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and myeloid leukemia (AML), especially subtypes of pre-natal origin like ALL with translocation t(12;21) or high-hyperdiploidy (51–67 chromosomes). Methods We collected information on exposures to tobacco smoking before conception, during pregnancy, and after birth in 767 ALL cases, 135 AML cases, and 1,139 controls (1996–2008). Among cases, chromosome translocations, deletions, or aneuploidy were identified by conventional karyotype and fluorescence in-situ hybridization. Results Multivariable regression analyses for ALL and AML overall showed no definite evidence of associations with self-reported (yes/no) parental prenatal active smoking and child's passive smoking. However, children with history of paternal prenatal smoking combined with postnatal passive smoking had a 1.5-fold increased risk of ALL (95% CI: 1.01–2.23), compared to those without smoking history (ORs for pre- or postnatal smoking only were close to one). This joint effect was seen for B-cell precursor ALL with t(12;21) (OR=2.08; 95% CI: 1.04–4.16), but not high hyperdiploid B-cell ALL. Similarly, child's passive smoking was associated with an elevated risk of AML with chromosome structural changes (OR=2.76; 95% CI: 1.01–7.58), but not aneuploidy. Conclusions our data suggest that exposure to tobacco smoking before were associated with increased risks of childhood ALL and AML; and risks varied by timing of exposure (before and/or after birth) and cytogenetic subtype, based on imprecise estimates. Impact Parents should limit exposures to tobacco smoke before and after the child's birth. PMID:23853208

  2. Characterization of LEF1 High Expression and Novel Mutations in Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Juan; Li, Min; Song, Chunhua; Dovat, Sinisa; Li, Jianyong; Ge, Zheng

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant activation of the Wnt pathway plays a pathogenetic role in tumors and has been associated with adverse outcome in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Lymphoid enhancer binding factor 1 (LEF1), a key mediator of Wnt signaling, has been linked to leukemic transformation, and LEF1 mutations have been identified in T-ALL. Here we found LEF1 is highly expressed in 25.0% adult ALL patients and LEF1 high expression was associated with high-risk leukemia factors (high WBC, Philadelphia chromosome positive, complex karyotype), shorter event-free survival (EFS), and high relapse rates in patients with B-ALL. LEF1 high expression is also associated with high mutation rate of Notch1 and JAK1 in T-ALL. We identified 2 novel LEF1 mutations (K86E and P106L) in 4 of 131 patients with ALL, and those patients with high-risk ALL (high WBC, complex karyotype). These results suggest a role for LEF1 mutations in leukemogenesis. We further explored the effect of the mutations on cell proliferation and found both mutations significantly promoted the proliferation of ALL cells. We also observed the effect of LEF1 and its mutations on the transcription of its targets, c-MYC and Cyclin D1. We found LEF1 increased the promoter activity of its targets c-MYC and Cyclin D1, and LEF1 K86E and P106L mutants further significantly enhanced this effect. We also observed that the c-MYC and Cyclin D1 mRNA levels were significantly increased in patients with LEF1 high expression compared with those with low expression. Taken together, our findings indicate high LEF1 expression and mutation are associated with high-risk leukemia and our results also revealed that LEF1 high expression and/or gain-of-function mutations are involved in leukemogenesis of ALL. PMID:25942645

  3. Alcohol drinking and risk of leukemia-a systematic review and meta-analysis of the dose-risk relation.

    PubMed

    Rota, Matteo; Porta, Lorenzo; Pelucchi, Claudio; Negri, Eva; Bagnardi, Vincenzo; Bellocco, Rino; Corrao, Giovanni; Boffetta, Paolo; La Vecchia, Carlo

    2014-08-01

    The association between alcohol and leukemia risk has been addressed in several studies in the past two decades, but results have been inconsistent. Therefore, we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to quantify the dose-risk relation. Through the literature search up to August 2013, we identified 18 studies, 10 case-control and 8 cohorts, carried out in a total of 7142 leukemia cases. We derived pooled meta-analytic estimates using random-effects models, taking into account the correlation between estimates, and we performed a dose-risk analysis using a class of nonlinear random-effects meta-regression models. Stratified analyses were carried out on leukemia subtypes and groups, in order to identify possible etiologic differences. Compared with nondrinkers, the relative risks (RRs) for all leukemia were 0.94 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.85-1.03], 0.90 (95% CI, 0.80-1.01) and 0.91 (95% CI, 0.81-1.02) for any, light (≤ 1 drink/day) and moderate to heavy (>1 drink/day) alcohol drinking, respectively. The summary RRs for any alcohol drinking were 1.47 (95% CI, 0.47-4.62) for acute lymphoblastic leukemia, 0.94 (95% CI 0.77-1.15) for chronic lymphocytic leukemia, 1.02 (95% CI, 0.86-1.21) for acute myeloid leukemia and 0.93 (95% CI 0.75-1.14) for chronic myeloid leukemia. The subgroup analysis on geographical area for all leukemia combined showed RRs of 0.84 (95% CI, 0.76-0.93), 0.92 (95% CI, 0.83-1.01) and 1.32 (95% CI, 1.02-1.70) for studies conducted in America, Europe and Asia, respectively. We did not find an increased risk of leukemia among alcohol drinkers. If any, a modest favorable effect emerged for light alcohol drinking, with a model-based risk reduction of approximately 10% in regular drinkers.

  4. Dust-metal Loadings and the Risk of Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Whitehead, Todd P.; Ward, Mary H.; Colt, Joanne S.; Dahl, Gary; Ducore, Jonathan; Reinier, Kyndaron; Gunier, Robert B.; Hammond, S. Katharine; Rappaport, Stephen M.; Metayer, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated the relationship between the risk of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and levels of metals in carpet dust. A dust sample was collected from the homes of 142 ALL cases and 187 controls participating in the California Childhood Leukemia Study using a high volume small surface sampler (2001–2006). Samples were analyzed using microwave-assisted acid digestion in combination with inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry for arsenic, cadmium, chromium, copper, lead, nickel, tin, tungsten, and zinc. Eight metals were detected in at least 85% of the case and control homes; tungsten was detected in less than 15% of homes. Relationships between dust-metal loadings (μg metal per m2 carpet) and ALL risk were modeled using multivariable logistic regression, adjusting for the child’s age, sex, and race/ethnicity and confounders, including household annual income. A doubling of dust-metal loadings was not associated with significant changes in ALL risk [odds ratio (95% confidence interval): arsenic: 0.94 (0.83, 1.05), cadmium: 0.91 (0.80, 1.04), chromium: 0.99 (0.87, 1.12), copper: 0.96 (0.90, 1.03), lead: 1.01 (0.93, 1.10), nickel: 0.92 (0.80, 1.07), tin: 0.93 (0.82, 1.05), and zinc: 0.91 (0.81, 1.02)]. Our findings do not support the hypothesis that metals in carpet dust are risk factors for childhood ALL. PMID:25736162

  5. Parental occupational paint exposure and risk of childhood leukemia in the offspring: Findings from the Childhood Leukemia International Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Helen D; Fritschi, Lin; Metayer, Catherine; Infante-Rivard, Claire; Magnani, Corrado; Petridou, Eleni; Roman, Eve; Spector, Logan G; Kaatsch, Peter; Clavel, Jacqueline; Milne, Elizabeth; Dockerty, John D; Glass, Deborah C; Lightfoot, Tracy; Miligi, Lucia; Rudant, Jérémie; Baka, Margarita; Rondelli, Roberto; Amigou, Alicia; Simpson, Jill; Kang, Alice; Moschovi, Maria; Schüz, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    Purpose It has been suggested that parental occupational paint exposure around the time of conception or pregnancy increases the risk of childhood leukemia in the offspring. Methods We obtained individual level data from 13 case-control studies participating in the Childhood Leukemia International Consortium (CLIC). Occupational data were harmonized to a compatible format. Meta-analyses of study-specific odds ratios (ORs) were undertaken, as well as pooled analyses of individual data using unconditional logistic regression. Results Using individual data from fathers of 8,185 cases and 14,210 controls, the pooled OR for paternal exposure around conception and risk of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) was 0.93 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.76, 1.14). Analysis of data from 8,156 ALL case mothers and 14,568 control mothers produced a pooled OR of 0.81 (95% CI 0.39, 1.68) for exposure during pregnancy. For acute myeloid leukaemia (AML), the pooled ORs for paternal and maternal exposure were 0.96 (95% CI 0.65, 1.41) and 1.31 (95% CI 0.38, 4.47) respectively, based on data from 1,231 case and 11,392 control fathers and 1,329 case and 12,141 control mothers. Heterogeneity among the individual studies ranged from low to modest. Conclusions Null findings for paternal exposure for both ALL and AML are consistent with previous reports. Despite the large sample size, results for maternal exposure to paints in pregnancy were based on small numbers of exposed. Overall, we found no evidence that parental occupational exposure to paints increases the risk of leukemia in the offspring, but further data on home exposure are needed. PMID:25088805

  6. Leukemia Risk After Cardiac Fluoroscopic Interventions Stratified by Procedure Number, Exposure Latent Time, and Sex

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Kai-Che; Lin, Hon-Yi; Hung, Shih-Kai; Huang, Yu-Tung; Lee, Moon-Sing; Wang, Wen-Hua; Wu, Chieh-Shan; Su, Yu-Chieh; Shen, Bing-Jie; Tsai, Shiang-Jiun; Tsai, Wei-Ta; Chen, Liang-Cheng; Li, Chung-Yi; Chiou, Wen-Yen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A number of cardiac fluoroscopic interventions have increased rapidly worldwide over the past decade. Percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) and stent implantation have become increasingly popular, and these advancements have allowed patients to receive repetitive treatments for restenosis. However, these advancements also significantly increase radiation exposure that may lead to higher cumulative doses of radiation. In the present study, a nationwide population-based case-controlled study was used to explore the risk of leukemia after cardiac angiographic fluoroscopic intervention. A total of 5026 patients with leukemia and 100,520 control patients matched for age and sex (1:20) by a propensity score method without any cancer history were enrolled using the Registry Data for Catastrophic Illness and the National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD) of Taiwan between 2008 and 2010. All subjects were retrospectively surveyed (from year 2000) to determine receipt of cardiac fluoroscopic interventions. Data were analyzed using conditional logistic regression models, and estimated crude and adjusted odds ratios (95% confidence interval). After adjusting for age, gender, and comorbidities, PTCA was found to be associated with an increased risk of leukemia with an adjusted OR of 1.566 (95% CI, 1.282–1.912), whereas coronary angiography alone without PTCA and cardiac electrophysiologic study were not. Our results also showed that an increased frequency of PTCA and coronary angiography was associated with a higher risk of leukemia (adjusted OR: 1.326 to 1.530 [all P < 0.05]). Gender subgroup analyses demonstrated that men were associated with a higher risk of leukemia compared with women. These results provide additional data in the quantification of the long-term health effects of radiation exposure derived from the cardiac fluoroscopic diagnostic and therapeutic intervention. PTCA alone or PTCA with coronary angiography was associated

  7. Risk of leukemia in relation to exposure to ambient air toxics in pregnancy and early childhood.

    PubMed

    Heck, Julia E; Park, Andrew S; Qiu, Jiaheng; Cockburn, Myles; Ritz, Beate

    2014-07-01

    There are few established causes of leukemia, the most common type of cancer in children. Studies in adults suggest a role for specific environmental agents, but little is known about any effect from exposures in pregnancy to toxics in ambient air. In our case-control study, we ascertained 69 cases of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and 46 cases of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) from California Cancer Registry records of children risk of leukemia associated with one interquartile range increase in air toxic exposure. Risk of ALL was elevated with 3(rd) trimester exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (OR=1.16, 95% CI 1.04, 1.29), arsenic (OR=1.33, 95% CI 1.02, 1.73), benzene (OR=1.50, 95% CI 1.08, 2.09), and three other toxics related to fuel combustion. Risk of AML was increased with 3rd trimester exposure to chloroform (OR=1.30, 95% CI 1.00, 1.69), benzene (1.75, 95% CI 1.04, 2.93), and two other traffic-related toxics. During the child's first year, exposure to butadiene, ortho-xylene, and toluene increased risk for AML and exposure to selenium increased risk for ALL. Benzene is an established cause of leukemia in adults; this study supports that ambient exposures to this and other chemicals in pregnancy and early life may also increase leukemia risk in children.

  8. Risk of leukemia in relation to exposure to ambient air toxics in pregnancy and early childhood

    PubMed Central

    Heck, Julia E; Park, Andrew S; Qiu, Jiaheng; Cockburn, Myles; Ritz, Beate

    2014-01-01

    There are few established causes of leukemia, the most common type of cancer in children. Studies in adults suggest a role for specific environmental agents, but little is known about any effect from exposures in pregnancy to toxics in ambient air. In our case-control study, we ascertained 69 cases of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and 46 cases of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) from California Cancer Registry records of children < age 6, and 19,209 controls from California birth records within 2km (1.3 miles) (ALL) and 6km (3.8 miles) (AML) of an air toxics monitoring station between 1990–2007. Information on air toxics exposures was taken from community air monitors. We used logistic regression to estimate the risk of leukemia associated with one interquartile range increase in air toxic exposure. Risk of ALL was elevated with 3rd trimester exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (OR=1.16, 95%CI 1.04, 1.29), arsenic (OR=1.33, 95%CI 1.02, 1.73), benzene (OR=1.50, 95%CI 1.08, 2.09), and three other toxics related to fuel combustion. Risk of AML was increased with 3rd trimester exposure to chloroform (OR=1.30, 95%CI 1.00, 1.69), benzene (1.75, 95%CI 1.04, 2.93), and two other traffic-related toxics. During the child’s first year, exposure to butadiene, ortho-xylene, and toluene increased risk for AML and exposure to selenium increased risk for ALL. Benzene is an established cause of leukemia in adults; this study supports that ambient exposures to this and other chemicals in pregnancy and early life may also increase leukemia risk in children. PMID:24472648

  9. The risk factors for thrombosis in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Sivaslioglu, Selda; Gursel, Turkiz; Kocak, Ulker; Kaya, Zuhre

    2014-09-01

    We aimed to scrutinize the risk factors for thrombosis in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia treated with the Berlin-Frankfurt-Münster 95 protocol. The study population was 82 children younger than 16 years of age. The children were followed up for 10 years until January 2007. Thrombosis occurred in 10 (12%) of 82 patients during the treatment course, mainly after the M protocol. The most common risk factor was factor V Leiden (FVL; 15.6%). This was followed by methyleneterahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR; 9.3%), elevated lipoprotein (1.5%), and prothrombin (PT) 20210A (1.5%) in descending order. The risk of thrombosis was found to be significantly high in patients with FVL mutation (odds ratio = 7.1, 95% confidence interval = 1.6-30.5). The risk of thrombosis was not significant in patients with MTHFR and PT20210A mutation (P = .2). Age, catheter usage, FVL mutation, and prednisolone treatment are significant risk factors for thromboemboli occurrence.

  10. High frequency of acute promyelocytic leukemia among Latinos with acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Douer, D; Preston-Martin, S; Chang, E; Nichols, P W; Watkins, K J; Levine, A M

    1996-01-01

    A high frequency (24%) of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) was noted among acute myelocytic leukemia (AML) cases at the Los Angeles County-University of Southern California (LAC-USC) Medical Center, in comparison with the expected frequency of 5% to 15%. Because of the high proportion of Latinos in this center, we questioned if APL is more common in this ethnic group. The proportion of APL among the 80 AML patients of Latino origin was significantly higher (30; 37.5%) when compared with the 62 non-Latinos (4; 6.5%) (P = .00001). In an attempt to verify this finding on a larger group of patients, we analyzed 276 pathologically verified cases of AML in patients aged 30 to 69 years from the entire County of Los Angeles, registered on an ongoing population-based epidemiologic study of AML. APL was more frequent among the 47 Latinos (24.3%) than in the 229 non-Latinos (8.3%) (P = .0075). APL is seen in younger patients with AML, but Latino AML patients also had a higher frequency of APL after accounting for their younger age (age-adjusted odds ratio for APL among Latinos in LAC-USC Medical Center, 9.4 [95% confidence interval (CI) 2.9, 30] P = .0002; among Latinos in the population-based study, 3.0 [95% CI 1.3 to 6.9] P = .01). The different ethnic distribution of AML was found to be due to a higher proportion of APL cases per se, and not to a lower proportion of any other French-American-British subtype (P = .0004). These results, from two different populations of AML patients, indicate that Latinos with AML have a higher likelihood of the APL subtype of disease, which may suggest a genetic predisposition to APL and/or exposure to distinct environmental factor(s).

  11. Very late recurrences of leukemia: why does leukemia awake after many years of dormancy?

    PubMed

    Norkin, Maxim; Uberti, Joseph P; Schiffer, Charles A

    2011-02-01

    We report a heterogeneous group of very late recurrences of leukemia occurring more than 10 years after initial treatment including 2 cases of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) which recurred after more than 20 years of remission, 2 cases of donor cell leukemia which developed more than 10 years after allograft for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and high risk myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and 2 cases of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) relapsing 13 and 17 years after allograft. Case descriptions are followed by a discussion regarding possible mechanisms leading to leukemia recurrence and a review of the literature.

  12. Cigarette smoking and the risk of adult leukemia: results from the Three Mile Island cohort study.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaohui; Talbott, Evelyn O; Zborowski, Jeanne V; Rager, Judith R

    2007-01-01

    Smoking is an unconfirmed risk factor for the development of leukemia. The authors examined the potential link using data from the Three Mile Island cohort for the period 1979-1995. Eligible for analysis were 24,539 individuals aged 14 years or older who were followed up over 16 years from the Three Mile Island cohort. The authors identified all incident leukemia cases through the Pennsylvania Department of Health Cancer Registry. They used the Cox proportional hazards model to evaluate the relationships and observed 42 incident leukemia cases, including 15 acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cases, in the cohort. After controlling for other confounding factors, the authors found current smoking to be associated with an increased risk of adult AML (relative risk = 3.47; 95% confidence interval = 1.002-11.99). The authors also observed a marginally significant linear trend of risk of AML associated with the number of years smoked (p = .06). The results from this study suggested that cigarette smoking was associated with an increased risk of adult AML. Further investigation is required to confirm these findings. PMID:18400653

  13. Entinostat and Clofarabine in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed, Relapsed, or Refractory Poor-Risk Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Bilineage/Biphenotypic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-07-16

    Acute Leukemias of Ambiguous Lineage; Philadelphia Chromosome Negative Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  14. Residential Levels of Polybrominated Diphenyl Ethers and Risk of Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in California

    PubMed Central

    Colt, Joanne S.; Deziel, Nicole C.; Whitehead, Todd P.; Reynolds, Peggy; Gunier, Robert B.; Nishioka, Marcia; Dahl, Gary V.; Rappaport, Stephen M.; Buffler, Patricia A.; Metayer, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Background: House dust is a major source of exposure to polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), which are found at high levels in U.S. homes. Methods: We studied 167 acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cases 0–7 years of age and 214 birth certificate controls matched on date of birth, sex, and race/ethnicity from the Northern California Childhood Leukemia Study. In 2001–2007, we sampled carpets in the room where the child spent the most time while awake; we used a high-volume small-surface sampler or we took dust from the home vacuum. We measured concentrations of 14 PBDE congeners including penta (28, 47, 99, 100, 153, 154), octa (183, 196, 197, 203), and decaBDEs (206–209). Odds ratios (ORs) were calculated using logistic regression, adjusting for demographics, income, year of dust collection, and sampling method. Results: BDE-47, BDE-99, and BDE-209 were found at the highest concentrations (medians, 1,173, 1,579, and 938 ng/g, respectively). Comparing the highest to lowest quartile, we found no association with ALL for summed pentaBDEs (OR = 0.7; 95% CI: 0.4, 1.3), octaBDEs (OR = 1.3; 95% CI: 0.7, 2.3), or decaBDEs (OR = 1.0; 95% CI: 0.6, 1.8). Comparing homes in the highest concentration (nanograms per gram) tertile to those with no detections, we observed significantly increased ALL risk for BDE-196 (OR = 2.1; 95% CI: 1.1, 3.8), BDE-203 (OR = 2.0; 95% CI: 1.1, 3.6), BDE-206 (OR = 2.1; 95% CI: 1.1, 3.9), and BDE-207 (OR = 2.0; 95% CI: 1.03, 3.8). Conclusion: We found no association with ALL for common PBDEs, but we observed positive associations for specific octa and nonaBDEs. Additional studies with repeated sampling and biological measures would be informative. Citation: Ward MH, Colt JS, Deziel NC, Whitehead TP, Reynolds P, Gunier RB, Nishioka M, Dahl GV, Rappaport SM, Buffler PA, Metayer C. 2014. Residential levels of polybrominated diphenyl ethers and risk of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia in California. Environ Health Perspect 122:1110–1116

  15. Developmental Outcome of Childhood Leukemia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coniglio, Susan J.; Blackman, James A.

    1995-01-01

    Literature on developmental and psychosocial outcomes of childhood leukemia is reviewed, focusing on preschool-age children. Studies are categorized in terms of outcome measures: intelligence/achievement, neuropsychological, memory/attention, and psychosocial tests. Evidence suggests that preschool children with leukemia are at high risk for…

  16. Applying molecular epidemiology in pediatric leukemia.

    PubMed

    Schiffman, Joshua D

    2016-02-01

    Molecular epidemiology is the study of genetic and environmental risk for disease, with much effort centered on cancer. Childhood leukemia occurs in nearly a third of all patients newly diagnosed with pediatric cancer. only a small percentage of these new cases of childhood leukemia are associated with high penetrant hereditary cancer syndromes. Childhood leukemia, especially acute lymphoblastic leukemia, has been associated with a dysregulated immune system due to delayed infectious exposure at a young age. Identical twins with childhood leukemia suggest that acute lymphoblastic leukemia begins in utero and that the concordant presentation is due to a shared preleukemia subclone via placental transfer. Investigation of single nucleotide polymorphisms within candidate genes find that leukemia risk may be attributed to population-based polymorphisms affecting folate metabolism, xenobiotic metabolism, DNA repair, immunity, and B-cell development. More recently, genome-wide association studies for leukemia risk has led investigators to genes associated with B-cell development. When describing leukemia predisposition due to hereditary cancer syndromes, the following 6 categories become apparent on the basis of biology and clinical presentation: (1) genetic instability/DNA repair syndromes, (2) cell cycle/differentiation syndromes, (3) bone marrow failure syndromes, (4) telomere maintenance syndromes, (5) immunodeficiency syndromes, and (6) transcription factor syndromes and pure familial leukemia. understanding the molecular epidemiology of childhood leukemia can affect the treatment and tumor surveillance strategies for these high risk patients and their family members.

  17. Applying molecular epidemiology in pediatric leukemia.

    PubMed

    Schiffman, Joshua D

    2016-02-01

    Molecular epidemiology is the study of genetic and environmental risk for disease, with much effort centered on cancer. Childhood leukemia occurs in nearly a third of all patients newly diagnosed with pediatric cancer. only a small percentage of these new cases of childhood leukemia are associated with high penetrant hereditary cancer syndromes. Childhood leukemia, especially acute lymphoblastic leukemia, has been associated with a dysregulated immune system due to delayed infectious exposure at a young age. Identical twins with childhood leukemia suggest that acute lymphoblastic leukemia begins in utero and that the concordant presentation is due to a shared preleukemia subclone via placental transfer. Investigation of single nucleotide polymorphisms within candidate genes find that leukemia risk may be attributed to population-based polymorphisms affecting folate metabolism, xenobiotic metabolism, DNA repair, immunity, and B-cell development. More recently, genome-wide association studies for leukemia risk has led investigators to genes associated with B-cell development. When describing leukemia predisposition due to hereditary cancer syndromes, the following 6 categories become apparent on the basis of biology and clinical presentation: (1) genetic instability/DNA repair syndromes, (2) cell cycle/differentiation syndromes, (3) bone marrow failure syndromes, (4) telomere maintenance syndromes, (5) immunodeficiency syndromes, and (6) transcription factor syndromes and pure familial leukemia. understanding the molecular epidemiology of childhood leukemia can affect the treatment and tumor surveillance strategies for these high risk patients and their family members. PMID:25973690

  18. Is Toxoplasma Gondii Infection a Risk Factor for Leukemia? An Evidence-Based Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yi; Huang, Yu; Chang, Aoshuang; Wang, Jishi; Zeng, Xiaoqing; Wu, Jiahong

    2016-01-01

    Background Possible associations of parasite infection with cancer risk have recently attracted much attention. Published studies concerning the association between Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii) infection and leukemia risk have generated inconsistent results. In the present study, we aimed to address this topic by conducting a quantitative meta-analysis. Material/Methods Relevant publications were searched in electronic databases and eligible studies were rigorously screened and selected. Essential information was extracted and the data were pooled. Subgroup analysis on source of controls and detection target was also performed. Results A total of 6 studies that met the inclusion criteria were selected. The overall data show that T. gondii infection might have an association with increased leukemia risk (OR=3.05; 95%CI=1.83–5.08). Similar results were shown in the subgroups regarding source of controls and detection target. Conclusions Our results suggest that T. gondii infection might be a risk factor for leukemia, providing new insight into the etiology of leukemia. Future studies with large sample sizes in different geographic areas are needed to confirm this conclusion. PMID:27155015

  19. Radiation Risks of Leukemia, Lymphoma and Multiple Myeloma Incidence in the Mayak Cohort: 1948–2004

    PubMed Central

    Kuznetsova, Irina S.; Labutina, Elena V.; Hunter, Nezahat

    2016-01-01

    Incidence of all types of lymphatic and hematopoietic cancers, including Hodgkin’s lymphoma, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, multiple myeloma, acute and chronic myeloid leukemia (AML and CML respectively), chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and other forms of leukemia have been studied in a cohort of 22,373 workers employed at the Mayak Production Association (PA) main facilities during 536,126 person-years of follow-up from the start of employment between 1948 and 1982 to the end of 2004. Risk assessment was performed for both external gamma-radiation and internal alpha-exposure of red bone marrow due to incorporated Pu-239 using Mayak Workers Dosimetry System 2008 taking into account non-radiation factors. The incidence of leukemia excluding CLL showed a non-linear dose response relationship for external gamma exposure with exponential effect modifiers based on time since exposure and age at exposure. Among the major subtypes of leukemia, the excess risk of AML was the highest within the first 2–5 years of external exposure (ERR per Gy: 38.40; 90% CI: 13.92–121.4) and decreased substantially thereafter, but the risks remained statistically significant (ERR per Gy: 2.63; 90% CI: 0.07–12.55). In comparison, excess CML first occurred 5 years after exposure and decreased about 10 years after exposure, although the association was not statistically significant (ERR per Gy: 1.39; 90% CI: -0.22–7.32). The study found no evidence of an association between leukemia and occupational exposure to internal plutonium ERR per Gy 2.13; 90% CI: <0–9.45). There was also no indication of any relationship with either external gamma or internal plutonium radiation exposure for either incidence of Hodgkin or non-Hodgkin lymphoma or multiple myeloma. PMID:27631102

  20. Radiation Risks of Leukemia, Lymphoma and Multiple Myeloma Incidence in the Mayak Cohort: 1948-2004.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsova, Irina S; Labutina, Elena V; Hunter, Nezahat

    2016-01-01

    Incidence of all types of lymphatic and hematopoietic cancers, including Hodgkin's lymphoma, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, multiple myeloma, acute and chronic myeloid leukemia (AML and CML respectively), chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and other forms of leukemia have been studied in a cohort of 22,373 workers employed at the Mayak Production Association (PA) main facilities during 536,126 person-years of follow-up from the start of employment between 1948 and 1982 to the end of 2004. Risk assessment was performed for both external gamma-radiation and internal alpha-exposure of red bone marrow due to incorporated Pu-239 using Mayak Workers Dosimetry System 2008 taking into account non-radiation factors. The incidence of leukemia excluding CLL showed a non-linear dose response relationship for external gamma exposure with exponential effect modifiers based on time since exposure and age at exposure. Among the major subtypes of leukemia, the excess risk of AML was the highest within the first 2-5 years of external exposure (ERR per Gy: 38.40; 90% CI: 13.92-121.4) and decreased substantially thereafter, but the risks remained statistically significant (ERR per Gy: 2.63; 90% CI: 0.07-12.55). In comparison, excess CML first occurred 5 years after exposure and decreased about 10 years after exposure, although the association was not statistically significant (ERR per Gy: 1.39; 90% CI: -0.22-7.32). The study found no evidence of an association between leukemia and occupational exposure to internal plutonium ERR per Gy 2.13; 90% CI: <0-9.45). There was also no indication of any relationship with either external gamma or internal plutonium radiation exposure for either incidence of Hodgkin or non-Hodgkin lymphoma or multiple myeloma. PMID:27631102

  1. High concordance of subtypes of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia within families: lessons from sibships with multiple cases of leukemia.

    PubMed

    Schmiegelow, K; Lausten Thomsen, U; Baruchel, A; Pacheco, C E; Pieters, Rob; Pombo-de-Oliveira, M S; Andersen, E W; Rostgaard, K; Hjalgrim, H; Pui, C-H

    2012-04-01

    Polymorphic genes have been linked to the risk of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Surrogate markers for a low burden of early childhood infections are also related to increased risk for developing childhood ALL. It remains uncertain, whether siblings of children with ALL have an increased risk of developing ALL. This international collaboration identified 54 sibships with two (N = 51) or more (N = 3) cases of childhood ALL (ages <18 years). The 5-year event-free survival for 61 patients diagnosed after 1 January 1990 was 0.83 ± 0.05. Ages at diagnosis (Spearman correlation coefficient, r(S) = 0.41, P = 0.002) were significantly correlated, but not WBCs (r(S) = 0.23, P = 0.11). In 18 sibships with successful karyotyping in both cases, six were concordant for high-hyperdiploidy (N = 3), t(12;21) [ETV6/RUNX1] (N = 1), MLL rearrangement (N = 1) or t(1;19)(q23/p13) (N = 1). Eleven sibships were ALL-subtype concordant, being T-cell ALL (T-ALL) (N = 5, of a total of six sibships, where the first-born had T-ALL) or B-lineage ALL belonging to the same cytogenetic subset (N = 6), a finding that differs significantly from the expected chance distribution (κ: 0.58; P < 0.0001). These data indicate strong genetic and/or environmental risk factors for childhood ALL that are restricted to specific ALL subtypes, which must be taken into account, when performing epidemiological studies to reveal etiological factors. PMID:22005784

  2. Increased risk of lung cancer, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, and leukemia following Hodgkin's disease

    SciTech Connect

    van Leeuwen, F.E.; Somers, R.; Taal, B.G.; van Heerde, P.; Coster, B.; Dozeman, T.; Huisman, S.J.; Hart, A.A.

    1989-08-01

    The risk of second cancers (SCs) was assessed in 744 patients with Hodgkin's disease (HD) admitted to The Netherlands Cancer Institute from 1966 to 1983. Sixty-nine SCs were observed one month or more after start of first treatment. These included 14 cases of lung cancer, nine cases of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL), 16 cases of leukemia, and six cases of the myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). The median interval between the diagnosis of HD and that of second lung cancer, NHL, and leukemia was 8.1, 13.3, and 5.7 years, respectively. The overall relative risks (RR) (observed/expected (O/E) ratios) of developing lung cancer, NHL, and leukemia were 4.9 (95% confidence limit (CL), 2.7 to 8.2), 31.0 (95% CL, 14.2 to 58.9) and 45.7 (95% CL, 26.1 to 74.2), respectively. At 15 years the cumulative risk of developing an SC amounted to 20.6% +/- 2.9%. The 15-year estimates of lung cancer, NHL, and leukemia were 6.2% +/- 1.9%, 5.9% +/- 2.1% and 6.3% +/- 1.7%, respectively. Increased lung cancer risk following HD has not frequently been clearly demonstrated before; that we were able to demonstrate such risk may be due to the completeness of follow-up over long periods that could be achieved in this study. Excess lung cancer risk was only noted in treatment regimens with radiotherapy (RT); also, all lung cancers arose in irradiation fields. Excess risk of leukemia was only found in treatment regimens involving chemotherapy (CT). For NHL, combined modality treatment was shown to be the most important risk factor. Risk of lung cancer and NHL increased with time since diagnosis. A time-dependent covariate analysis (Cox model) performed on leukemia and MDS showed an increasing risk with intensity of CT, age (greater than 40 years), and a splenectomy.

  3. Risk factors for relapse after allogeneic transplantation in acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Ossenkoppele, Gert J.; Janssen, Jeroen J.W.M.; van de Loosdrecht, Arjan A.

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia is a clonal neoplasm derived from myeloid progenitor cells with a varying outcome. The initial goal of treatment is the achievement of complete remission, defined for over 40 years by morphology. However, without additional post-remission treatment the majority of patients relapse. In many cases of acute myeloid leukemia, allogeneic stem cell transplantation offers the best prospects of cure. In 2013, 5608 stem cell transplantations in acute myeloid leukemia were performed in Europe (5228 allogeneic and 380 autologous stem cell transplantations). Most stem cell transplantations are performed in first complete remission. However, despite a considerable reduction in the chance of relapse, in most studies, overall survival benefit of allogeneic stem cell transplantation is modest due to substantial non-relapse mortality. Here we discuss the many factors related to the risk of relapse after allogeneic stem cell transplantation. PMID:26721801

  4. TET2 Mutations Improve the New European LeukemiaNet Risk Classification of Acute Myeloid Leukemia: A Cancer and Leukemia Group B Study

    PubMed Central

    Metzeler, Klaus H.; Maharry, Kati; Radmacher, Michael D.; Mrózek, Krzysztof; Margeson, Dean; Becker, Heiko; Curfman, John; Holland, Kelsi B.; Schwind, Sebastian; Whitman, Susan P.; Wu, Yue-Zhong; Blum, William; Powell, Bayard L.; Carter, Thomas H.; Wetzler, Meir; Moore, Joseph O.; Kolitz, Jonathan E.; Baer, Maria R.; Carroll, Andrew J.; Larson, Richard A.; Caligiuri, Michael A.; Marcucci, Guido; Bloomfield, Clara D.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To determine the frequency of TET2 mutations, their associations with clinical and molecular characteristics and outcome, and the associated gene- and microRNA-expression signatures in patients with primary cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia (CN-AML). Patients and Methods Four-hundred twenty-seven patients with CN-AML were analyzed for TET2 mutations by polymerase chain reaction and direct sequencing and for established prognostic gene mutations. Gene- and microRNA-expression profiles were derived using microarrays. Results TET2 mutations, found in 23% of patients, were associated with older age (P < .001) and higher pretreatment WBC (P = .04) compared with wild-type TET2 (TET2-wt). In the European LeukemiaNet (ELN) favorable-risk group (patients with CN-AML who have mutated CEBPA and/or mutated NPM1 without FLT3 internal tandem duplication [FLT3-ITD]), TET2-mutated patients had shorter event-free survival (EFS; P < .001) because of a lower complete remission (CR) rate (P = .007), and shorter disease-free survival (DFS; P = .003), and also had shorter overall survival (P = .001) compared with TET2-wt patients. TET2 mutations were not associated with outcomes in the ELN intermediate-I–risk group (CN-AML with wild-type CEBPA and wild-type NPM1 and/or FLT3-ITD). In multivariable models, TET2 mutations were associated with shorter EFS (P = .004), lower CR rate (P = .03), and shorter DFS (P = .05) only among favorable-risk CN-AML patients. We identified a TET2 mutation-associated gene-expression signature in favorable-risk but not in intermediate-I–risk patients and found distinct mutation-associated microRNA signatures in both ELN groups. Conclusion TET2 mutations improve the ELN molecular-risk classification in primary CN-AML because of their adverse prognostic impact in an otherwise favorable-risk patient subset. Our data suggest that these patients may be candidates for alternative therapies. PMID:21343549

  5. Fetal growth and body size genes and risk of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Chokkalingam, Anand P; Metayer, Catherine; Scelo, Ghislaine; Chang, Jeffrey S; Schiffman, Joshua; Urayama, Kevin Y; Ma, Xiaomei; Hansen, Helen M; Feusner, James H; Barcellos, Lisa F; Wiencke, John K; Wiemels, Joseph L; Buffler, Patricia A

    2012-09-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) may be initiated in utero or early in the postnatal period. High birth weight (or rapid fetal growth) is associated with risk of ALL, but the mechanisms are not understood. In a population-based epidemiologic study of childhood ALL, we utilized a haplotype-based approach to assess the role of eight genes involved in fetal growth and body size regulation in 377 childhood ALL cases and 448 controls. We found significant haplotype associations with risk of childhood ALL for IGF1 among non-Hispanics and Hispanics together (p = 0.002), for IGF2 among Hispanics (p = 0.040), and for IGF2R among Hispanics and non-Hispanics (p = 0.051 and 0.009, respectively). No haplotype associations were observed for IGF1R or the studied genes involved in body size regulation, including LEP, LEPR, GHRL, and NPY. Our study is the first to identify an association between the genes involved in the IGF axis and risk of childhood ALL. These findings for childhood ALL emphasize the importance of fetal growth, when lymphoid progenitor cells are not yet fully differentiated and therefore more susceptible to malignant transformation. Additional studies are needed to confirm these findings and identify specific causal variants.

  6. A novel integrated cytogenetic and genomic classification refines risk stratification in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Moorman, Anthony V; Enshaei, Amir; Schwab, Claire; Wade, Rachel; Chilton, Lucy; Elliott, Alannah; Richardson, Stacey; Hancock, Jeremy; Kinsey, Sally E; Mitchell, Christopher D; Goulden, Nicholas; Vora, Ajay; Harrison, Christine J

    2014-08-28

    Recent genomic studies have provided a refined genetic map of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and increased the number of potential prognostic markers. Therefore, we integrated copy-number alteration data from the 8 most commonly deleted genes, subordinately, with established chromosomal abnormalities to derive a 2-tier genetic classification. The classification was developed using 809 ALL97/99 patients and validated using 742 United Kingdom (UK)ALL2003 patients. Good-risk (GR) genetic features included ETV6-RUNX1, high hyperdiploidy, normal copy-number status for all 8 genes, isolated deletions affecting ETV6/PAX5/BTG1, and ETV6 deletions with a single additional deletion of BTG1/PAX5/CDKN2A/B. All other genetic features were classified as poor risk (PR). Three-quarters of UKALL2003 patients had a GR genetic profile and a significantly improved event-free survival (EFS) (94%) compared with patients with a PR genetic profile (79%). This difference was driven by a lower relapse rate (4% vs 17%), was seen across all patient subgroups, and was independent of other risk factors. Even genetic GR patients with minimal residual disease (>0.01%) at day 29 had an EFS in excess of 90%. In conclusion, the integration of genomic and cytogenetic data defines 2 subgroups with distinct responses to treatment and identifies a large subset of children suitable for treatment deintensification.

  7. Association of Interferon Gamma +874T/A Polymorphism and Leukemia Risk: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhitong; Sun, Yifan; Zhu, Shengbo; Tang, Shifu; Liu, Chunming; Qin, Wenzhou

    2016-03-01

    Interferon gamma (IFN-γ) has antitumor and antiproliferative effects, and previous studies indicated IFN-γ +874T/A (rs2430561) polymorphism were related to the risk of many types of cancer. However, the association between IFN-γ +874T/A polymorphism and leukemia risk remained controversial.We performed a comprehensive meta-analysis based on the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses statement (PRISMA). Electronic database of Embase, Pubmed, and the Cochrane Library were searched for eligible articles published up to December 13, 2015. The association between genetic polymorphisms and leukemia risk was measured by odds ratios (ORs) and its corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs).A total of 8 studies amounting to 420 patients and 767 control subjects were retrieved for this study. Although associations between IFN-γ +874T/A polymorphism and overall leukemia risks were lacking, decreased chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) risk was detected in the allelic model (T vs A, OR=0.660, 95%CI = 0.483-0.902, P = 0.009, I = 0.0% and P = 0.863 for heterogeneity), the codominant model (TT vs AA, OR = 0.472, 95%CI = 0.247-0.902, P = 0.023, I = 0.0% and P = 0.994 for heterogeneity), and dominant model (TT + TA vs AA, OR = 0.457, 95%CI = 0.285-0.734, P = 0.001, I = 40.3% and P = 0.195 for heterogeneity) by using fixed-effect model separately. On the contrary, results indicated T carries have an increased chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) risk in dominant model (TT + TA vs AA, OR = 1.783, 95%CI = 1.236-2.573, P = 0.002, I = 19.0% and P = 0.295 for heterogeneity).This study suggests IFN-γ +874T/A polymorphism are related to CML and CLL risk. In addition, our work also points out IFN-γ +874T/A polymorphism may play dual contrasting role in leukemia risk. PMID:27015189

  8. Association of Interferon Gamma +874T/A Polymorphism and Leukemia Risk: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhitong; Sun, Yifan; Zhu, Shengbo; Tang, Shifu; Liu, Chunming; Qin, Wenzhou

    2016-03-01

    Interferon gamma (IFN-γ) has antitumor and antiproliferative effects, and previous studies indicated IFN-γ +874T/A (rs2430561) polymorphism were related to the risk of many types of cancer. However, the association between IFN-γ +874T/A polymorphism and leukemia risk remained controversial.We performed a comprehensive meta-analysis based on the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses statement (PRISMA). Electronic database of Embase, Pubmed, and the Cochrane Library were searched for eligible articles published up to December 13, 2015. The association between genetic polymorphisms and leukemia risk was measured by odds ratios (ORs) and its corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs).A total of 8 studies amounting to 420 patients and 767 control subjects were retrieved for this study. Although associations between IFN-γ +874T/A polymorphism and overall leukemia risks were lacking, decreased chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) risk was detected in the allelic model (T vs A, OR=0.660, 95%CI = 0.483-0.902, P = 0.009, I = 0.0% and P = 0.863 for heterogeneity), the codominant model (TT vs AA, OR = 0.472, 95%CI = 0.247-0.902, P = 0.023, I = 0.0% and P = 0.994 for heterogeneity), and dominant model (TT + TA vs AA, OR = 0.457, 95%CI = 0.285-0.734, P = 0.001, I = 40.3% and P = 0.195 for heterogeneity) by using fixed-effect model separately. On the contrary, results indicated T carries have an increased chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) risk in dominant model (TT + TA vs AA, OR = 1.783, 95%CI = 1.236-2.573, P = 0.002, I = 19.0% and P = 0.295 for heterogeneity).This study suggests IFN-γ +874T/A polymorphism are related to CML and CLL risk. In addition, our work also points out IFN-γ +874T/A polymorphism may play dual contrasting role in leukemia risk.

  9. A Phase II Study Of The Farnesyltransferase Inhibitor ZANESTRA (R115777, NSC #702818, IND #58,359) In Complete Remission Following Induction And/Or Consolidation Chemotherapy In Adults With Poor-Risk Acute Myelogenous Leukemia (AML) And High-Risk Myelodysplasia (MDS)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-08

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  10. Increased risk of acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) and chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) in a county of Hesse, Germany.

    PubMed

    Kolb, G; Becker, N; Scheller, S; Zugmaier, G; Pralle, H; Wahrendorf, J; Havemann, K

    1993-01-01

    The incidence of acute and chronic myelogenous leukemia has been compared for the two neighbouring regions of Marburg and Giessen in Hesse (Germany). The investigation was based on the incident cases of the years 1983-1989 which have been diagnosed in the hematological departments of the universities of the two regions. The epidemiological evaluation of the data has been carried out in terms of a historical follow-up study, and shows an increased relative risk for the region around Marburg with a particular elevation for one community within this region. Potential determinants are discussed and focus on trinitrotoluene (TNT) and decomposition products which are known to contaminate the soil of this community, in some places severely, due to insufficient removal of remnants of the TNT production in large underground plants during World War II.

  11. Incidence and risk factors of bleeding-related adverse events in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia treated with ibrutinib

    PubMed Central

    Lipsky, Andrew H.; Farooqui, Mohammed Z.H.; Tian, Xin; Martyr, Sabrina; Cullinane, Ann M.; Nghiem, Khanh; Sun, Clare; Valdez, Janet; Niemann, Carsten U.; Herman, Sarah E. M.; Saba, Nakhle; Soto, Susan; Marti, Gerald; Uzel, Gulbu; Holland, Steve M.; Lozier, Jay N.; Wiestner, Adrian

    2015-01-01

    Ibrutinib is associated with bleeding-related adverse events of grade ≤2 in severity, and infrequently with grade ≥3 events. To investigate the mechanisms of bleeding and identify patients at risk, we prospectively assessed platelet function and coagulation factors in our investigator-initiated trial of single-agent ibrutinib for chronic lymphocytic leukemia. At a median follow-up of 24 months we recorded grade ≤2 bleeding-related adverse events in 55% of 85 patients. No grade ≥3 events occurred. Median time to event was 49 days. The cumulative incidence of an event plateaued by 6 months, suggesting that the risk of bleeding decreases with continued therapy. At baseline, von Willebrand factor and factor VIII levels were often high and normalized on treatment. Platelet function measured via the platelet function analyzer (PFA-100™) was impaired in 22 patients at baseline and in an additional 19 patients on ibrutinib (often transiently). Collagen and adenosine diphosphate induced platelet aggregation was tested using whole blood aggregometry. Compared to normal controls, response to both agonists was decreased in all patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia, whether on ibrutinib or not. Compared to untreated chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients, response to collagen showed a mild further decrement on ibrutinib, while response to adenosine diphosphate improved. All parameters associated with a significantly increased risk of bleeding-related events were present at baseline, including prolonged epinephrine closure time (HR 2.74, P=0.012), lower levels of von Willebrand factor activity (HR 2.73, P=0.009) and factor VIII (HR 3.73, P=0.0004). In conclusion, both disease and treatment-related factors influence the risk of bleeding. Patients at greater risk for bleeding of grade ≤2 can be identified by clinical laboratory tests and counseled to avoid aspirin, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and fish oils. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT01500733 PMID

  12. Incidence and risk factors of bleeding-related adverse events in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia treated with ibrutinib.

    PubMed

    Lipsky, Andrew H; Farooqui, Mohammed Z H; Tian, Xin; Martyr, Sabrina; Cullinane, Ann M; Nghiem, Khanh; Sun, Clare; Valdez, Janet; Niemann, Carsten U; Herman, Sarah E M; Saba, Nakhle; Soto, Susan; Marti, Gerald; Uzel, Gulbu; Holland, Steve M; Lozier, Jay N; Wiestner, Adrian

    2015-12-01

    Ibrutinib is associated with bleeding-related adverse events of grade ≤ 2 in severity, and infrequently with grade ≥ 3 events. To investigate the mechanisms of bleeding and identify patients at risk, we prospectively assessed platelet function and coagulation factors in our investigator-initiated trial of single-agent ibrutinib for chronic lymphocytic leukemia. At a median follow-up of 24 months we recorded grade ≤ 2 bleeding-related adverse events in 55% of 85 patients. No grade ≥ 3 events occurred. Median time to event was 49 days. The cumulative incidence of an event plateaued by 6 months, suggesting that the risk of bleeding decreases with continued therapy. At baseline, von Willebrand factor and factor VIII levels were often high and normalized on treatment. Platelet function measured via the platelet function analyzer (PFA-100™) was impaired in 22 patients at baseline and in an additional 19 patients on ibrutinib (often transiently). Collagen and adenosine diphosphate induced platelet aggregation was tested using whole blood aggregometry. Compared to normal controls, response to both agonists was decreased in all patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia, whether on ibrutinib or not. Compared to untreated chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients, response to collagen showed a mild further decrement on ibrutinib, while response to adenosine diphosphate improved. All parameters associated with a significantly increased risk of bleeding-related events were present at baseline, including prolonged epinephrine closure time (HR 2.74, P=0.012), lower levels of von Willebrand factor activity (HR 2.73, P=0.009) and factor VIII (HR 3.73, P=0.0004). In conclusion, both disease and treatment-related factors influence the risk of bleeding. Patients at greater risk for bleeding of grade ≤ 2 can be identified by clinical laboratory tests and counseled to avoid aspirin, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and fish oils. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT01500733.

  13. Biology, Risk Stratification, and Therapy of Pediatric Acute Leukemias: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Pui, Ching-Hon; Carroll, William L.; Meshinchi, Soheil; Arceci, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose We review recent advances in the biologic understanding and treatment of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML), identify therapeutically challenging subgroups, and suggest future directions of research. Methods A review of English literature on childhood acute leukemias from the past 5 years was performed. Results Contemporary treatments have resulted in 5-year event-free survival rates of approximately 80% for childhood ALL and almost 60% for pediatric AML. The advent of high-resolution genome-wide analyses has provided new insights into leukemogenesis and identified many novel subtypes of leukemia. Virtually all ALL and the vast majority of AML cases can be classified according to specific genetic abnormalities. Cooperative mutations involved in cell differentiation, cell cycle regulation, tumor suppression, drug responsiveness, and apoptosis have also been identified in many cases. The development of new formulations of existing drugs, molecularly targeted therapy, and immunotherapies promises to further advance the cure rates and improve quality of life of patients. Conclusion The application of new high-throughput sequencing techniques to define the complete DNA sequence of leukemia and host normal cells and the development of new agents targeted to leukemogenic pathways promise to further improve outcome in the coming decade. PMID:21220611

  14. High Disease-Free Survival with Enhanced Protection against Relapse after Double-Unit Cord Blood Transplantation When Compared with T Cell-Depleted Unrelated Donor Transplantation in Patients with Acute Leukemia and Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Ponce, Doris M; Hilden, Patrick; Devlin, Sean M; Maloy, Molly; Lubin, Marissa; Castro-Malaspina, Hugo; Dahi, Parastoo; Hsu, Katharine; Jakubowski, Ann A; Kernan, Nancy A; Koehne, Guenther; O'Reilly, Richard J; Papadopoulos, Esperanza B; Perales, Miguel-Angel; Sauter, Craig; Scaradavou, Andromachi; Tamari, Roni; van den Brink, Marcel R M; Young, James W; Giralt, Sergio; Barker, Juliet N

    2015-11-01

    Double-unit cord blood (DCB) grafts are a rapidly available stem cell source for adults with high-risk leukemias. However, how disease-free survival (DFS) after DCB transplantation (DCBT) compares to that of unrelated donor transplantation (URDT) is not fully established. We analyzed 166 allograft recipients (66 8/8 HLA-matched URDT, 45 7/8 HLA-matched URDT, and 55 DCBT) ages 16 to 60 years with high-risk acute leukemia or chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). URDT and DCBT recipients were similar except DCBT recipients were more likely to have lower weight and non-European ancestry and to receive intermediate-intensity conditioning. All URDT recipients received a CD34(+) cell-selected (T cell-depleted) graft. Overall, differences between the 3-year transplantation-related mortality were not significant (8/8 URDT, 18%; 7/8 URDT, 39%; and DCBT, 24%; P = .108), whereas the 3-year relapse risk was decreased after DCBT (8/8 URDT, 23%; 7/8 URDT, 20%; and DCBT 9%, P = .037). Three-year DFS was 57% in 8/8 URDT, 41% in 7/8 URDT, and 68% in DCBT recipients (P = .068), and the 3-year DFS in DCBT recipients was higher than that of 7/8 URDT recipients (P = .021). In multivariate analysis in acute leukemia patients, factors adversely associated with DFS were female gender (hazard ratio [HR], 1.68; P = .031), diagnosis of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (HR, 2.09; P = .004), and 7/8 T cell-depleted URDT (HR, 1.91; P = .037). High DFS can be achieved in adults with acute leukemia and CML with low relapse rates after DCBT. Our findings support performing DCBT in adults in preference to HLA-mismatched T cell-depleted URDT and suggest DCBT is a readily available alternative to T cell-depleted 8/8 URDT, especially in patients requiring urgent transplantation.

  15. Feasibility of a study of VHCC wire code as a risk factor for childhood leukemia. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Pearson, R.L.; Wachtel, H.; Langholz, B.; Ebi, K.L.

    1997-12-01

    Several studies have reported an association between living in very high current configuration (VHCC) residences and an elevated risk of childhood cancer, particularly leukemia. The basis for these associations is not well understood. Both the exposure, living in a VHCC residence, and the outcome (childhood cancer) are rare. This results in too few cases and controls in most studies to be able to evaluate the role of potential confounding factors. To better understand this association, an epidemiologic study design was developed that can efficiently locate and study both cases and controls living in VHCC residences. The study is designed to avoid, and perhaps explore, the potential biases in earlier studies.

  16. What Are the Risk Factors for Acute Myeloid Leukemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... more information, see X-rays, Gamma Rays and Cancer Risk . Certain blood disorders People with certain blood disorders seem to be at increased risk for getting AML. These include chronic myeloproliferative disorders such as polycythemia vera, essential thrombocythemia, and ...

  17. Mutational spectrum and risk stratification of intermediate-risk acute myeloid leukemia patients based on next-generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bianhong; Liu, Yangyang; Hou, Guangyuan; Wang, Lili; Lv, Na; Xu, Yuanyuan; Xu, Yihan; Wang, Xiuli; Xuan, Zhaoling; Jing, Yu; Li, Honghua; Jin, Xiangshu; Deng, Ailing; Wang, Li; Gao, Xiaoning; Dou, Liping; Liang, Junbin; Chen, Chongjian; Li, Yonghui; Yu, Li

    2016-05-31

    Intermediate-risk acute myeloid leukemia (IR-AML), which accounts for a substantial number of AML cases, is highly heterogeneous. Although several mutations have been identified, the heterogeneity of AML is uncertain because novel mutations have yet to be discovered. Here we applied next generation sequencing (NGS) platform to screen mutational hotspots in 410 genes relevant to hematological malignancy. IR-AML samples (N=95) were sequenced by Illumina Hiseq and mutations in 101 genes were identified. Only seven genes (CEBPA, NPM1, DNMT3A, FLT3-ITD, NRAS, IDH2 and WT1) were mutated in more than 10% of patients. Genetic interaction analysis identified several cooperative and exclusive patterns of overlapping mutations. Mutational analysis indicated some correlation between genotype and phenotype. FLT3-ITD mutations were identified as independent factors of poor prognosis, while CEBPA mutations were independent favorable factors. Co-occurrence of FLT3-ITD, NPM1 and DNMT3A mutations was identified with associated with specific clinical AML features and poor outcomes. Furthermore, by integrating multiple mutations in the survival analysis, 95 IR-AML patients could be stratified into three distinct risk groups allowing reductions in IR-AML by one-third. Our study offers deep insights into the molecular pathogenesis and biology of AML and indicated that the prognosis of IR-AML could be further stratified by different mutation combinations which may direct future treatment intervention.

  18. GPR56 identifies primary human acute myeloid leukemia cells with high repopulating potential in vivo.

    PubMed

    Pabst, Caroline; Bergeron, Anne; Lavallée, Vincent-Philippe; Yeh, Jonathan; Gendron, Patrick; Norddahl, Gudmundur L; Krosl, Jana; Boivin, Isabel; Deneault, Eric; Simard, Jessica; Imren, Suzan; Boucher, Geneviève; Eppert, Kolja; Herold, Tobias; Bohlander, Stefan K; Humphries, Keith; Lemieux, Sébastien; Hébert, Josée; Sauvageau, Guy; Barabé, Frédéric

    2016-04-21

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a genetically heterogeneous hematologic malignancy, which is initiated and driven by a rare fraction of leukemia stem cells (LSCs). Despite the difficulties of identifying a common LSC phenotype, there is increasing evidence that high expression of stem cell gene signatures is associated with poor clinical outcome. Identification of functionally distinct subpopulations in this disease is therefore crucial to dissecting the molecular machinery underlying LSC self-renewal. Here, we combined next-generation sequencing technology with in vivo assessment of LSC frequencies and identified the adhesion G protein-coupled receptor 56 (GPR56) as a novel and stable marker for human LSCs for the majority of AML samples. High GPR56 expression was significantly associated with high-risk genetic subgroups and poor outcome. Analysis of GPR56 in combination with CD34 expression revealed engraftment potential of GPR56(+)cells in both the CD34(-)and CD34(+)fractions, thus defining a novel LSC compartment independent of the CD34(+)CD38(-)LSC phenotype. PMID:26834243

  19. Pyrethroid pesticide exposure and risk of childhood acute lymphocytic leukemia in Shanghai.

    PubMed

    Ding, Guodong; Shi, Rong; Gao, Yu; Zhang, Yan; Kamijima, Michihiro; Sakai, Kiyoshi; Wang, Guoquan; Feng, Chao; Tian, Ying

    2012-12-18

    Significant amounts of pyrethroid pesticides are used throughout China. Previous studies have suggested that exposure to pesticides may increase the risk of childhood cancer; however, few studies have focused on pyrethroid metabolites. We investigated five nonspecific metabolites of pyrethroid pesticides found in children's urine and examined the correlation with childhood leukemia. We conducted a hospital-based case-control study of childhood acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) in Shanghai between 2010 and 2011. The study included 176 children aged 0-14 years and 180 controls matched for age and sex. Compared with those in the lowest quartiles of total and individual metabolites, the highest quartiles were associated with an approximate 2-fold increased risk of ALL [total metabolites: odds ratio (OR) = 2.75, 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.43-5.29; cis-DCCA: OR = 2.21, 95% CI, 1.16-4.19; trans-DCCA: OR = 2.33, 95% CI, 1.23-4.41; and 3-PBA: OR = 1.84, 95% CI, 1.00-3.38], and most of the positive trends were significant (p < 0.05). Our findings suggest that urinary levels of pyrethroid metabolites may be associated with an elevated risk of childhood ALL and represent a previously unreported quantitative exposure assessment for childhood leukemia.

  20. A Modified Integrated Genetic Model for Risk Prediction in Younger Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Sloan, Caroline E.; Luskin, Marlise R.; Boccuti, Anne M.; Sehgal, Alison R.; Zhao, Jianhua; Daber, Robert D.; Morrissette, Jennifer J. D.; Luger, Selina M.; Bagg, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Background Although cytogenetics-based prognostication systems are well described in acute myeloid leukemia (AML), overall survival (OS) remains highly variable within risk groups. An integrated genetic prognostic (IGP) model using cytogenetics plus mutations in nine genes was recently proposed for patients ≤60 years to improve classification. This model has not been validated in clinical practice. Methods and Findings We retrospectively studied 197 patients with newly diagnosed de novo AML. We compared OS curves among the mutational profiles defined by the IGP model. The IGP model assigned patients with intermediate cytogenetics as having favorable, intermediate or unfavorable mutational profiles. The IGP model reassigned 50 of 137 patients with intermediate cytogenetics to favorable or unfavorable mutational profiles. Median OS was 2.8 years among 14 patients with intermediate cytogenetics and favorable mutational profiles (mutant NPM1 and mutant IDH1 or IDH2) and 1.3 years among patients with intermediate mutational profiles. Among patients with intermediate cytogenetics labeled as having unfavorable mutational profiles, median OS was 0.8 years among 24 patients with FLT3-ITD positive AML and high-risk genetic changes (trisomy 8, TET2 and/or DNMT3A) and 1.7 years among 12 patients with FLT3-ITD negative AML and high-risk mutations (TET2, ASXL1 and/or PHF6). OS for patients with intermediate cytogenetics and favorable mutational profiles was similar to OS for patients with favorable cytogenetics (p = 0.697) and different from patients with intermediate cytogenetics and intermediate mutational profiles (p = 0.028). OS among patients with FLT3-ITD positive AML and high-risk genetic changes was similar to patients with unfavorable cytogenetics (p = 0.793) and different from patients with intermediate IGP profile (p = 0.022). Patients with FLT3-ITD negative AML and high-risk mutations, defined as ‘unfavorable’ in the IGP model, had OS similar to patients with

  1. A Phase 1 study of the safety, pharmacokinetics and anti-leukemic activity of the anti-CD123 monoclonal antibody CSL360 in relapsed, refractory or high-risk acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    He, Simon Z; Busfield, Samantha; Ritchie, David S; Hertzberg, Mark S; Durrant, Simon; Lewis, Ian D; Marlton, Paula; McLachlan, Andrew J; Kerridge, Ian; Bradstock, Kenneth F; Kennedy, Glen; Boyd, Andrew W; Yeadon, Trina M; Lopez, Angel F; Ramshaw, Hayley S; Iland, Harry; Bamford, Simone; Barnden, Megan; DeWitte, Mark; Basser, Russell; Roberts, Andrew W

    2015-05-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) blasts express high levels of interlekin-3 (IL-3) receptor-α (CD123). CSL360 is a recombinant, chimeric immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1), anti-CD123 monoclonal antibody (MoAb) that neutralizes IL-3 and demonstrates anti-leukemic activity in vitro. This phase 1 study assessed safety, pharmacokinetics and bioactivity of weekly intravenous CSL360 for 12 weeks in 40 patients with advanced AML across five dose levels (0.1-10.0 mg/kg). Other than mild infusion reactions, CSL360 was well tolerated. The maximal tolerated dose was not reached. The half-life was 4.9 days, and the area under the curve (AUC) and maximum concentration (Cmax) increased proportionally with dose. Doses ≥ 3.0 mg/kg resulted in complete saturation and down-regulation of CD123 and abolition of ex vivo proliferative responsiveness to IL-3, indicating adequate blockade of IL-3 signaling. Two patients responded, with one remaining in complete remission after 17 doses. CSL360 bound CD123 specifically, but did not induce anti-leukemic activity in most patients. While safe, MoAb blockade of CD123 function is insufficient as a therapeutic strategy. PMID:25248882

  2. How breast cancer chemotherapy increases the risk of leukemia: Thoughts about a case of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and leukemia after breast cancer chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bin; Zhang, Xia; Li, Minghuan; Kong, Li; Deng, Xiaoqin; Yu, Jinming

    2016-01-01

    ABSRTRACT The latest studies suggest that prophylactic chemotherapy or adjuvant chemotherapy for early stage breast cancer may increase the leukemia risk in patients. For patients with a low risk for breast cancer recurrence, physicians who make the choice for adjuvant therapy should consider the risk of its long-term side effects. Is the occurrence of lymphatic system cancer and leukemia after breast cancer treatment associated with chemotherapy? Can these types of leukemia be classified as therapy-related leukaemias? We believe that there may be correlations between any diseases, butwe cannot rush to conclusions or dismiss a correlation because we understand little about the diseases themselves.In this paper, we present a case of secondary diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and leukemia in patients after breast cancer chemotherapy, it is undeniable that this is a special event. For two distinct tumouroccurrences at different times, we cannot give a clear explanation because of thechanges in the genes that might link them together and we hope to attract the attention of other clinicians. PMID:26861804

  3. Risk of chronic myeloid and acute leukemia mortality after exposure to ionizing radiation among workers at four U.S. nuclear weapons facilities and a nuclear naval shipyard.

    PubMed

    Schubauer-Berigan, Mary K; Daniels, Robert D; Fleming, Donald A; Markey, Andrea M; Couch, James R; Ahrenholz, Steven H; Burphy, Jenneh S; Anderson, Jeri L; Tseng, Chih-Yu

    2007-02-01

    A nested case-control study was conducted among workers at five U.S. nuclear facilities to evaluate leukemia mortality risk (excluding chronic lymphocytic) from ionizing radiation using worksite doses and adjusting for potential confounding. Conditional logistic regression was used to estimate the relative risk (RR) of exposed workers and the excess relative risk (ERR) per unit of radiation among 206 cases and 823 age-matched controls. Adjusting for sex and benzene, the RR of leukemia for workers receiving more than 10 mSv was higher compared to those receiving lower or no dose; however, the risk increase was attenuated in the highest dose group. The ERR per 10 mSv was 1.44% (95% CI: < -1.03%, 7.59%) but was higher for workers born after 1921 compared to workers born earlier or when excluding leukemias of uncertain type. Excluding the 7% who were high-dose workers (> 100 mSv), the sex- and benzene-adjusted ERR per 10 mSv was 6.82% (95% CI: -2.87%, 24.1%). The results suggest that risks among these nuclear workers are comparable to those observed in high-dose populations, although no evidence was observed of a positive quadratic dose-response term in this study. This large study is among the first to jointly evaluate benzene and ionizing radiation risk.

  4. Aptamer-Functionalized Fluorescent Silica Nanoparticles for Highly Sensitive Detection of Leukemia Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Juntao; Yang, Nuo; Hu, Zixi; Su, Jing; Zhong, Jianhong; Yang, Yang; Yu, Yating; Zhu, Jianmeng; Xue, Dabin; Huang, Yingying; Lai, Zongqiang; Huang, Yong; Lu, Xiaoling; Zhao, Yongxiang

    2016-06-01

    A simple, highly sensitive method to detect leukemia cells has been developed based on aptamer-modified fluorescent silica nanoparticles (FSNPs). In this strategy, the amine-labeled Sgc8 aptamer was conjugated to carboxyl-modified FSNPs via amide coupling between amino and carboxyl groups. Sensitivity and specificity of Sgc8-FSNPs were assessed using flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy. These results showed that Sgc8-FSNPs detected leukemia cells with high sensitivity and specificity. Aptamer-modified FSNPs hold promise for sensitive and specific detection of leukemia cells. Changing the aptamer may allow the FSNPs to detect other types of cancer cells.

  5. Aptamer-Functionalized Fluorescent Silica Nanoparticles for Highly Sensitive Detection of Leukemia Cells.

    PubMed

    Tan, Juntao; Yang, Nuo; Hu, Zixi; Su, Jing; Zhong, Jianhong; Yang, Yang; Yu, Yating; Zhu, Jianmeng; Xue, Dabin; Huang, Yingying; Lai, Zongqiang; Huang, Yong; Lu, Xiaoling; Zhao, Yongxiang

    2016-12-01

    A simple, highly sensitive method to detect leukemia cells has been developed based on aptamer-modified fluorescent silica nanoparticles (FSNPs). In this strategy, the amine-labeled Sgc8 aptamer was conjugated to carboxyl-modified FSNPs via amide coupling between amino and carboxyl groups. Sensitivity and specificity of Sgc8-FSNPs were assessed using flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy. These results showed that Sgc8-FSNPs detected leukemia cells with high sensitivity and specificity. Aptamer-modified FSNPs hold promise for sensitive and specific detection of leukemia cells. Changing the aptamer may allow the FSNPs to detect other types of cancer cells. PMID:27299653

  6. What Are the Risk Factors for Childhood Leukemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... well as some other types of cancers. Inherited immune system problems Certain inherited conditions cause children to be ... provide more specific information about the possible risks. Immune system suppression Children who are getting intensive treatment to ...

  7. Parental, In Utero, and Early-Life Exposure to Benzene and the Risk of Childhood Leukemia: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Carlos-Wallace, Frolayne M; Zhang, Luoping; Smith, Martyn T; Rader, Gabriella; Steinmaus, Craig

    2016-01-01

    Benzene is an established cause of adult leukemia, but whether it is associated with childhood leukemia remains unclear. We conducted a meta-analysis in which we reviewed the epidemiologic literature on this topic and explored causal inference, bias, and heterogeneity. The exposure metrics that we evaluated included occupational and household use of benzenes and solvents, traffic density, and traffic-related air pollution. For studies of occupational and household product exposure published from 1987 to 2014, the summary relative risk for childhood leukemia was 1.96 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.53, 2.52; n = 20). In these studies, the summary relative risk was higher for acute myeloid leukemia (summary relative risk (sRR) = 2.34, 95% CI: 1.72, 3.18; n = 6) than for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (sRR = 1.57; 95% CI: 1.21, 2.05; n = 14). The summary relative risk was higher for maternal versus paternal exposure, in studies that assessed benzene versus all solvents, and in studies of gestational exposure. In studies of traffic density or traffic-related air pollution published from 1999 to 2014, the summary relative risk was 1.48 (95% CI: 1.10, 1.99; n = 12); it was higher for acute myeloid leukemia (sRR = 2.07; 95% CI: 1.34, 3.20) than for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (sRR = 1.49; 95% CI: 1.07, 2.08) and in studies that involved detailed models of traffic pollution (sRR = 1.70; 95% CI: 1.16, 2.49). Overall, we identified evidence of associations between childhood leukemia and several different potential metrics of benzene exposure.

  8. Hierarchy in Gene Expression is Predictive of Risk, Progression, and Outcome in Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Tripathi, Shubham; Deem, Michael W.

    2015-01-01

    Cancer progresses with a change in the structure of the gene network in normal cells. We define a measure of organizational hierarchy in gene networks of affected cells in adult acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients. With a retrospective cohort analysis based on the gene expression profiles of 116 acute myeloid leukemia patients, we find that the likelihood of future cancer relapse and the level of clinical risk are directly correlated with the level of organization in the cancer related gene network. We also explore the variation of the level of organization in the gene network with cancer progression. We find that this variation is non-monotonic, which implies the fitness landscape in the evolution of AML cancer cells is nontrivial. We further find that the hierarchy in gene expression at the time of diagnosis may be a useful biomarker in AML prognosis. PMID:25685944

  9. Improvement of the Outcome of Relapsed or Refractory Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Children Using a Risk-Based Treatment Strategy.

    PubMed

    Ceppi, Francesco; Duval, Michel; Leclerc, Jean-Marie; Laverdiere, Caroline; Delva, Yves-Line; Cellot, Sonia; Teira, Pierre; Bittencourt, Henrique

    2016-01-01

    Relapsed/refractory acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a leading cause of death by cancer in children. Our institution has switched relapse treatment strategy to improve survival. We reviewed records of first relapse/refractory childhood ALL between 1996 and 2012. Based on length of first remission, relapse site and immunophenotype, patients were classified into two groups: standard-risk relapse (SRR) and high-risk relapse and refractory (HRRR). Before 2007, all patients were uniformly treated with the same induction as at presentation, followed by hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Since 2007, treatment was given according to risk of failure: SRR were mostly treated with chemotherapy; HRRR patients underwent HSCT after intensive chemotherapy, aiming reduction of pre-transplant disease burden. Sixty-four patients were included. Thirty (47%) were SRR and 34 (53%) HRRR, including 11 with refractory ALL. Five-years overall survival (OS) and event-free survival (EFS) were similar for SRR, but were significantly higher with new risk-based strategy for HRRR: 56% versus 17% (P = 0.03) for OS, and 56% vs 11% for EFS (P = 0.008), respectively. In multivariate analysis, treatment strategy was significantly associated with survival. In conclusion, change for a risk-based strategy in our institution increased survival of high-risk patients to levels similar of those of standard-risk patients. PMID:27632202

  10. Improvement of the Outcome of Relapsed or Refractory Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Children Using a Risk-Based Treatment Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Ceppi, Francesco; Duval, Michel; Leclerc, Jean-Marie; Laverdiere, Caroline; Delva, Yves-Line; Cellot, Sonia; Teira, Pierre; Bittencourt, Henrique

    2016-01-01

    Relapsed/refractory acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a leading cause of death by cancer in children. Our institution has switched relapse treatment strategy to improve survival. We reviewed records of first relapse/refractory childhood ALL between 1996 and 2012. Based on length of first remission, relapse site and immunophenotype, patients were classified into two groups: standard-risk relapse (SRR) and high-risk relapse and refractory (HRRR). Before 2007, all patients were uniformly treated with the same induction as at presentation, followed by hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Since 2007, treatment was given according to risk of failure: SRR were mostly treated with chemotherapy; HRRR patients underwent HSCT after intensive chemotherapy, aiming reduction of pre-transplant disease burden. Sixty-four patients were included. Thirty (47%) were SRR and 34 (53%) HRRR, including 11 with refractory ALL. Five-years overall survival (OS) and event-free survival (EFS) were similar for SRR, but were significantly higher with new risk-based strategy for HRRR: 56% versus 17% (P = 0.03) for OS, and 56% vs 11% for EFS (P = 0.008), respectively. In multivariate analysis, treatment strategy was significantly associated with survival. In conclusion, change for a risk-based strategy in our institution increased survival of high-risk patients to levels similar of those of standard-risk patients. PMID:27632202

  11. Oral or parenteral administration of curcumin does not prevent the growth of high-risk t(4;11) acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells engrafted into a NOD/SCID mouse model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The efficacy of orally and parenterally administered curcumin was evaluated in NOD.CB17-Prkdcscid/J mice engrafted with the human t(4;11) acute lymphoblastic leukemia line SEM. SEM cells were injected into the tail vein and engraftment was monitored by flow cytometry. Once engraftment was observed...

  12. High CD3+ and CD34+ peripheral blood stem cell grafts content is associated with increased risk of graft-versus-host disease without beneficial effect on disease control after reduced-intensity conditioning allogeneic transplantation from matched unrelated donors for acute myeloid leukemia — an analysis from the Acute Leukemia Working Party of the European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Czerw, Tomasz; Labopin, Myriam; Schmid, Christoph; Cornelissen, Jan J.; Chevallier, Patrice; Blaise, Didier; Kuball, Jürgen; Vigouroux, Stephane; Garban, Frédéric; Lioure, Bruno; Fegueux, Nathalie; Clement, Laurence; Sandstedt, Anna; Maertens, Johan; Guillerm, Gaëlle; Bordessoule, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    Inconsistent results have been reported regarding the influence of graft composition on the incidence of graft versus host disease (GVHD), disease control and survival after reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (allo-PBSCT). These discrepancies may be at least in part explained by the differences in disease categories, disease status at transplant, donor type and conditioning. The current retrospective EBMT registry study aimed to analyze the impact of CD3+ and CD34+ cells dose on the outcome of RIC allo-PBSCT in patients with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) in first complete remission, allografted from HLA-matched unrelated donors (10 of 10 match). We included 203 adults. In univariate analysis, patients transplanted with the highest CD3+ and CD34+ doses (above the third quartile cut-off point values, >347 × 10^6/kg and >8.25 × 10^6 /kg, respectively) had an increased incidence of grade III-IV acute (a) GVHD (20% vs. 6%, P = .003 and 18% vs. 7%, P = .02, respectively). There was no association between cellular composition of grafts and transplant-related mortality, AML relapse, incidence of chronic GVHD and survival. Neither engraftment itself nor the kinetics of engraftment were affected by the cell dose. In multivariate analysis, CD3+ and CD34+ doses were the only adverse predicting factors for grade III-IV aGVHD (HR = 3.6; 95%CI: 1.45-9.96, P = .006 and 2.65 (1.07-6.57), P = .04, respectively). These results suggest that careful assessing the CD3+ and CD34+ graft content and tailoring the cell dose infused may help in reducing severe acute GVHD risk without negative impact on the other transplantation outcomes. PMID:27036034

  13. Risk of benzene-induced leukemia predicted from the Pliofilm cohort.

    PubMed Central

    Crump, K S

    1996-01-01

    This report updates the risk assessment by Crump and Allen for benzene-induced leukemia that was based on a cohort exposed to benzene in the manufacture of Pliofilm. The present study derives new risk estimates using data from follow-up through 1987 (whereas the earlier assessment only had follow-up available through 1978) and uses new exposure information for this cohort developed by Paustenbach et al. that accounts for a number of factors that were unknown or not fully evaluated in earlier exposure assessments. There was a significant excess of acute myelocytic or acute monocytic leukemia (AMML) (8-10 observed, 1.61 expected) in this cohort, and this end point also exhibited a strong dose-response trend. No other types of lymphatic or hematopoietic cancer were clearly linked to benzene exposure. Quantitative risk estimates were robust with respect to whether AMML or all leukemia was being modeled. They were also robust with respect whether the Paustenbach et al. or Crump and Allen exposure estimates were used (differences in risk estimates of no greater than 2-fold) as long as linear dose-response models were applied. However, whereas the Crump and Allen exposures predicted a linear dose response, the Paustenbach et al. exposures predicted a quadratic dose response. This departure from linearity was borderline significant (p = 0.08). Estimates of additional lifetime from 45 years of occupational exposure (lifetime exposure) to 1 ppm derived using he Paustenbach et al. exposure matrix and best-fitting (quadratic) models ranged from 0.020 to 0.036 per thousand, whereas corresponding estimates based on a linear dose response ranged from 1.6 to 3.1 per thousand. PMID:9118930

  14. Risk of benzene-induced leukemia predicted from the Pliofilm cohort

    SciTech Connect

    Crump, K.S.

    1996-12-01

    This report updates the risk assessment by Crump and Allen for benzene-induced leukemia that was based on a cohort exposed to benzene in the manufacture of Pliofilm. The present study derives new risk estimates using data from follow-up through 1987 (whereas the earlier assessment only had follow-up available through 1978) and uses new exposure information for this cohort developed by Paustenbach et al. that accounts for a number of factors that were unknown or not fully evaluated in earlier exposure assessments. There was a significant excess of acute myelocytic or acute monocytic leukemia (AMML) (8-10 observed, 1.61 expected) in this cohort, and this end point also exhibited a strong dose-response trend. No other types of lymphatic or hematopoietic cancer were clearly linked to benzene exposure. Quantitative risk estimates were robust with respect to whether AMML or all leukemia was being modeled. They were also robust with respect to whether the Paustenbach et al. or Crump and Allen exposure estimates were used (differences in risk estimates of no greater than 2-fold) as long as linear dose-response models were applied. However, whereas the Crump and Allen exposures predicted a linear dose response, the Paustenbach et al. exposures predicted a quadratic dose response. This departure from linearity was borderline significant (p=0.08). Estimates of additional lifetime from 45 years of occupational exposure (lifetime exposure) to 1 ppm derived using the Paustenbach et al. exposure matrix and best-fitting (quadratic) models ranged from 0.020 to 0.036 per thousand, whereas corresponding estimates based on a linear dose response ranged from 1.6 to 3.1 per thousand. 11 refs., 6 figs.

  15. Prognostic value of early response to treatment combined with conventional risk factors in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Akira; Kuriyama, Kikuko; Hibi, Shigeyoshi; Todo, Shinjiro; Yoshihara, Takao; Kuroda, Hiroshi; Imashuku, Shibsaku

    2005-04-01

    To determine useful prognostic factors in treating childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), we correlated conventional risk factors and bone marrow response 14 days after induction chemotherapy. Our study included 116 precursor B-cell (n = 104) and T-cell (n = 12) ALL patients treated with our protocol between 1988 and 1999. The patients were classified into 3 initial risk groups on the basis of conventional risk factors (56 in the low-risk, 33 in the high-risk, and 27 in the very high-risk groups). All patients received similar systemic chemotherapy regimens before the evaluation of their bone marrow on day 14. We evaluated the marrow of 69 patients as M1 (less than 5% blasts), 25 as M2 (5%-25% blasts), and 22 as M3 (more than 25% blasts). Although all patients attained an initial complete remission (CR), relapse was noted in 33 of the 116 patients, and 15 patients died. All of the M1 marrow patients, irrespective of the initial risk group, showed the best event-free survival rate (85.1% +/- 3 4.4%), the lowest relapse rate (14.5%), and the highest attainment of a second CR (100%); they were defined as the new R1 prognostic group. The low-risk patients with M2 or M3 marrow (R2 group) had a relatively high relapse rate, but all of these relapsed patients were treated successfully with subsequent therapy. High- or very high-risk patients with M2 or M3 marrow (R3 group) had the worst prognosis. Our new prognostic definition (R1, R2, R3) incorporating day 14 marrow findings is useful to tailor early-phase treatments for better therapeutic results in childhood ALL.

  16. Maternal Alcohol Consumption during Pregnancy and Early Age Leukemia Risk in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Jeniffer Dantas; Couto, Arnaldo Cézar; Pombo-de-Oliveira, Maria S.; Koifman, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. To investigate the association between the maternal alcohol consumption during pregnancy and early age leukemia (EAL) in offspring. Methods. Datasets were analyzed from a case-control study carried out in Brazil during 1999–2007. Data were obtained by maternal interviews using a standardized questionnaire. The present study included 675 children (193 acute lymphoid leukemia (ALL), 59 acute myeloid leukemia (AML), and 423 controls). Unconditional logistic regression was performed, and adjusted odds ratios (adj. OR) on the association between alcohol consumption and EAL were ascertained. Results. Alcohol consumption was reported by 43% of ALL and 39% of AML case mothers and 35.5% of controls'. Beer consumption before and during pregnancy was associated with ALL in crude analysis (OR = 1.54, 95% CI, 1.08–2.19), although in adjusted analysis no statistical significance was found. For weekly intake of ≤1 glass (adj. OR = 1.30, 95% CI, 0.71–2.36) and ≥1 glass/week (adj. OR = 1.47, 95% CI, 0.88–2.46) a potential dose-response was observed (P trend < 0.03). Conclusion. This study failed to support the hypothesis of an increased risk of EAL associated with maternal alcohol intake during pregnancy, neither with the interaction with tobacco nor with alcohol consumption. PMID:26090439

  17. Epidemiology and environmental risk in hairy cell leukemia.

    PubMed

    Tadmor, Tamar; Polliack, Aaron

    2015-12-01

    Hairy cell leukaemia (HCL) is an orphan subtype of leukaemia which constitutes less than 2% of all leukaemia's, with an incidence of less than 1 per 100,000 persons per annum. Median age at presentation is 55 years and it is 3-4 times more frequent in males. It is also more frequently encountered in whites and less in Asians, Africans and Arabs. The epidemiologic data are multi-factorial and influenced by ethnicity and geographical factors. Other reported associations relate to some environmental exposures and possible occupational factors. Smoking appears to have an inverse correlation with the development of hairy cell leukaemia, while farming and exposure to pesticides, petroleum products, diesel and ionizing radiation have also been reported to be associated with an increased risk. National and international collaborative efforts are needed in order to undertake more extensive studies involving larger patient cohorts, aiming to determine the role of occupational and environmental risk factors in the development of this rare form of chronic leukaemia.

  18. Exposure to electrical contact currents and the risk of childhood leukemia.

    PubMed

    Does, Monique; Scélo, Ghislaine; Metayer, Catherine; Selvin, Steve; Kavet, Robert; Buffler, Patricia

    2011-03-01

    The objectives of this study were to examine the association between contact current exposure and the risk of childhood leukemia and to investigate the relationship between residential contact currents and magnetic fields. Indoor and outdoor contact voltage and magnetic-field measurements were collected for the diagnosis residence of 245 cases and 269 controls recruited in the Northern California Childhood Leukemia Study (2000-2007). Logistic regression techniques produced odds ratios (OR) adjusted for age, sex, Hispanic ethnicity, mother's race and household income. No statistically significant associations were seen between childhood leukemia and indoor contact voltage level [exposure ≥90th percentile (10.5 mV): OR  =  0.83, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.45, 1.54], outdoor contact voltage level [exposure ≥90th percentile (291.2 mV): OR  =  0.89, 95% CI: 0.48, 1.63], or indoor magnetic-field levels (>0.20 µT: OR  =  0.76, 95% CI: 0.30, 1.93). Contact voltage was weakly correlated with magnetic field; correlation coefficients were r  =  0.10 (P  =  0.02) for indoor contact voltage and r  =  0.15 (P  =  0.001) for outdoor contact voltage. In conclusion, in this California population, there was no evidence of an association between childhood leukemia and exposure to contact currents or magnetic fields and a weak correlation between measures of contact current and magnetic fields.

  19. Potential impacts of radon, terrestrial gamma and cosmic rays on childhood leukemia in France: a quantitative risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Laurent, Olivier; Ancelet, Sophie; Richardson, David B; Hémon, Denis; Ielsch, Géraldine; Demoury, Claire; Clavel, Jacqueline; Laurier, Dominique

    2013-05-01

    Previous epidemiological studies and quantitative risk assessments (QRA) have suggested that natural background radiation may be a cause of childhood leukemia. The present work uses a QRA approach to predict the excess risk of childhood leukemia in France related to three components of natural radiation: radon, cosmic rays and terrestrial gamma rays, using excess relative and absolute risk models proposed by the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR). Both models were developed from the Life Span Study (LSS) of Japanese A-bomb survivors. Previous risk assessments were extended by considering uncertainties in radiation-related leukemia risk model parameters as part of this process, within a Bayesian framework. Estimated red bone marrow doses cumulated during childhood by the average French child due to radon, terrestrial gamma and cosmic rays are 4.4, 7.5 and 4.3 mSv, respectively. The excess fractions of cases (expressed as percentages) associated with these sources of natural radiation are 20 % [95 % credible interval (CI) 0-68 %] and 4 % (95 % CI 0-11 %) under the excess relative and excess absolute risk models, respectively. The large CIs, as well as the different point estimates obtained under these two models, highlight the uncertainties in predictions of radiation-related childhood leukemia risks. These results are only valid provided that models developed from the LSS can be transferred to the population of French children and to chronic natural radiation exposures, and must be considered in view of the currently limited knowledge concerning other potential risk factors for childhood leukemia. Last, they emphasize the need for further epidemiological investigations of the effects of natural radiation on childhood leukemia to reduce uncertainties and help refine radiation protection standards.

  20. Cohort study of Air Canada pilots: mortality, cancer incidence, and leukemia risk.

    PubMed

    Band, P R; Le, N D; Fang, R; Deschamps, M; Coldman, A J; Gallagher, R P; Moody, J

    1996-01-15

    Despite the special working environment and exposures of airline pilots, data on risk of death and cancer incidence in this occupational group are limited. The authors investigated a cohort of 2,740 Air Canada pilots who contributed 62,449 person-years of observation. All male pilots employed for at least 1 year on and since January 1, 1950, were studied. The cutoff date for outcome information was December 31, 1992. Standardized mortality ratio (SMR) and standardized incidence ratio (SIR) were used to compare mortality rates and cancer incidence rates of the cohort with the respective Canadian population rates. Ninety percent confidence intervals of the SMR and SIR were calculated. Statistically significant decreased mortality was observed for all causes (SMR = 0.63, 90% confidence interval (CI) 0.56-0.70), for all cancers (SMR = 0.61, 90% CI 0.48-0.76), and for all noncancer diseases (SMR = 0.53, 90% CI 0.45-0.62). Mortality from aircraft accidents was significantly raised (SMR = 26.57, 90% CI 19.3-35.9). Significantly decreased cancer incidence was observed for all cancers (SIR = 0.71, 90% CI 0.61-0.82), rectal cancer (SIR = 0.42, 90% CI 0.14-0.96), lung cancer (SIR = 0.28, 90% CI 0.16-0.46), and bladder cancer (SIR = 0.36, 90% CI 0.12-0.82). Prostate cancer (SIR = 1.87, 90% CI 1.38-2.49) and acute myeloid leukemia (SIR = 4.72, 90% CI 2.05-9.31) were significantly increased. The preferred relative risk model for radiation-induced nonchronic lymphoid leukemia (Beir V report) was applied to the cohort by using published estimates of in-flight radiation exposures. The estimated relative risk ranged from 1.001 to 1.06 and did not differ significantly from the observed SIR (SIR = 1.88, 90% CI 0.80-3.53). However, the incidence rate of acute myeloid leukemia was significantly increased. Monitoring of in-flight radiation exposure and long-term follow-up of civil aviation crew members is needed to further assess cancer incidence and leukemia risk in this special

  1. Herd-level risk factors for infection with bovine leukemia virus in Canadian dairy herds.

    PubMed

    Nekouei, Omid; VanLeeuwen, John; Sanchez, Javier; Kelton, David; Tiwari, Ashwani; Keefe, Greg

    2015-05-01

    Enzootic bovine leukosis (EBL) is an economically important infection of dairy cattle worldwide, which is caused by bovine leukemia virus (BLV). The prevalence of infection in Canadian dairy herds is high and continues to increase; however, there has not been a national program to control BLV. This cross-sectional study was conducted to identify potentially important risk factors for BLV infection on Canadian dairy herds, which is a prerequisite to developing an effective control program. During 1998-2003, based on a stratified two-stage random sampling process, 315 dairy farms from seven provinces of Canada were selected. Within each farm, 9-45 cows were bled and tested with a commercial serum ELISA kit for BLV antibodies. A comprehensive questionnaire, targeting potentially important herd-level management indicators, was successfully administered in 272 herds. A zero-inflated negative binomial (ZINB) regression model was fit to the resulting data to assess the potential associations between BLV seropositivity and a variety of herd-level factors. Seventy-eight percent of the herds were identified as BLV-positive (had one or more test positive animals). In the negative-binomial part of the final ZINB model, herds with clinical cases of leukosis during the 12 months prior to sampling, as well as herds which purchased animals with unknown BLV infection status in the last five years, had a significantly larger proportion of BLV positive animals. Based on a significant interaction between two of the risk factors, changing gloves between cows during pregnancy examination was not statistically associated with lower proportion of infected cows compared with not changing gloves, in the western Canadian provinces. In the logistic part of the model, herds from eastern Canadian provinces and those not purchasing cows in the last five years had increased odds of being free from BLV. The high prevalence of infection across Canada should be addressed through the development and

  2. The role of neighboring infected cattle in bovine leukemia virus transmission risk.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Sota; Tsutsui, Toshiyuki; Yamamoto, Takehisa; Hayama, Yoko; Muroga, Norihiko; Konishi, Misako; Kameyama, Ken-Ichiro; Murakami, Kenji

    2015-07-01

    A cohort study was conducted to evaluate the risk of bovine leukemia virus (BLV) transmission to uninfected cattle by adjacent infected cattle in 6 dairy farms. Animals were initially tested in 2010-2011 using a commercial ELISA kit. Uninfected cattle were repeatedly tested every 4 to 6 months until fall of 2012. The Cox proportional hazard model with frailty showed that uninfected cattle neighboring to infected cattle (n=53) had a significant higher risk of seroconversion than those without any infected neighbors (n=81) (hazard ratio: 12.4, P=0.001), implying that neighboring infected cattle were a significant risk factor for BLV transmission. This finding provides scientific support for animal health authorities and farmers to segregate infected cattle on farms to prevent spread of BLV.

  3. The role of neighboring infected cattle in bovine leukemia virus transmission risk

    PubMed Central

    KOBAYASHI, Sota; TSUTSUI, Toshiyuki; YAMAMOTO, Takehisa; HAYAMA, Yoko; MUROGA, Norihiko; KONISHI, Misako; KAMEYAMA, Ken-ichiro; MURAKAMI, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    A cohort study was conducted to evaluate the risk of bovine leukemia virus (BLV) transmission to uninfected cattle by adjacent infected cattle in 6 dairy farms. Animals were initially tested in 2010–2011 using a commercial ELISA kit. Uninfected cattle were repeatedly tested every 4 to 6 months until fall of 2012. The Cox proportional hazard model with frailty showed that uninfected cattle neighboring to infected cattle (n=53) had a significant higher risk of seroconversion than those without any infected neighbors (n=81) (hazard ratio: 12.4, P=0.001), implying that neighboring infected cattle were a significant risk factor for BLV transmission. This finding provides scientific support for animal health authorities and farmers to segregate infected cattle on farms to prevent spread of BLV. PMID:25754652

  4. In Vivo Imaging Enables High Resolution Preclinical Trials on Patients’ Leukemia Cells Growing in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Terziyska, Nadia; Alves, Catarina Castro; Groiss, Volker; Schneider, Katja; Farkasova, Katarina; Ogris, Manfred; Wagner, Ernst; Ehrhardt, Harald; Brentjens, Renier J.; zur Stadt, Udo; Horstmann, Martin; Quintanilla-Martinez, Leticia; Jeremias, Irmela

    2012-01-01

    Background Xenograft mouse models represent helpful tools for preclinical studies on human tumors. For modeling the complexity of the human disease, primary tumor cells are by far superior to established cell lines. As qualified exemplary model, patients’ acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells reliably engraft in mice inducing orthotopic disseminated leukemia closely resembling the disease in men. Unfortunately, disease monitoring of acute lymphoblastic leukemia in mice is hampered by lack of a suitable readout parameter. Design and Methods Patients’ acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells were lentivirally transduced to express the membrane-bound form of Gaussia luciferase. In vivo imaging was established in individual patients’ leukemias and extensively validated. Results Bioluminescence in vivo imaging enabled reliable and continuous follow-up of individual mice. Light emission strictly correlated to post mortem quantification of leukemic burden and revealed a logarithmic, time and cell number dependent growth pattern. Imaging conveniently quantified frequencies of leukemia initiating cells in limiting dilution transplantation assays. Upon detecting a single leukemia cell within more than 10,000 bone marrow cells, imaging enabled monitoring minimal residual disease, time to tumor re-growth and relapse. Imaging quantified therapy effects precisely and with low variances, discriminating treatment failure from partial and complete responses. Conclusions For the first time, we characterized in detail how in vivo imaging reforms preclinical studies on patient-derived tumors upon increasing monitoring resolution. In the future, in vivo imaging will enable performing precise preclinical studies on a broad range of highly demanding clinical challenges, such as treatment failure, resistance in leukemia initiating cells, minimal residual disease and relapse. PMID:23300782

  5. Monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis and early-stage chronic lymphocytic leukemia: diagnosis, natural history, and risk stratification

    PubMed Central

    Strati, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Monoclonal B lymphocytosis (MBL) is defined as the presence of a clonal B-cell population in the peripheral blood with fewer than 5 × 109/L B-cells and no other signs of a lymphoproliferative disorder. The majority of cases of MBL have the immunophenotype of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). MBL can be categorized as either low count or high count based on whether the B-cell count is above or below 0.5 × 109/L. Low-count MBL can be detected in ∼5% of adults over the age of 40 years when assessed using standard-sensitivity flow cytometry assays. A number of biological and genetic characteristics distinguish low-count from high-count MBL. Whereas low-count MBL rarely progresses to CLL, high-count MBL progresses to CLL requiring therapy at a rate of 1% to 2% per year. High-count MBL is distinguished from Rai 0 CLL based on whether the B-cell count is above or below 5 × 109/L. Although individuals with both high-count MBL and CLL Rai stage 0 are at increased risk of infections and second cancers, the risk of progression requiring treatment and the potential to shorten life expectancy are greater for CLL. This review highlights challenging questions regarding the classification, risk stratification, management, and supportive care of patients with MBL and CLL. PMID:26065657

  6. High Throughput Drug Sensitivity Assay and Genomics- Guided Treatment of Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-19

    Acute Leukemia of Ambiguous Lineage; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Refractory Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  7. Quantitative assessments of indoor air pollution and the risk of childhood acute leukemia in Shanghai.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yu; Zhang, Yan; Kamijima, Michihiro; Sakai, Kiyoshi; Khalequzzaman, Md; Nakajima, Tamie; Shi, Rong; Wang, Xiaojin; Chen, Didi; Ji, Xiaofan; Han, Kaiyi; Tian, Ying

    2014-04-01

    We investigated the association between indoor air pollutants and childhood acute leukemia (AL). A total of 105 newly diagnosed cases and 105 1:1 gender-, age-, and hospital-matched controls were included. Measurements of indoor pollutants (including nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and 17 types of volatile organic compounds (VOCs)) were taken with diffusive samplers for 64 pairs of cases and controls. Higher concentrations of NO2 and almost half of VOCs were observed in the cases than in the controls and were associated with the increased risk of childhood AL. The use of synthetic materials for wall decoration and furniture in bedroom was related to the risk of childhood AL. Renovating the house in the last 5 years, changing furniture in the last 5 years, closing the doors and windows overnight in the winter and/or summer, paternal smoking history and outdoor pollutants affected VOC concentrations. Our results support the association between childhood AL and indoor air pollution.

  8. Exposure to residential electric and magnetic fields and risk of childhood leukemia. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, J.M.; Thomas, D.C.; Bowman, J.D.; Sobel, E.; London, S.J.; Cheng, T.C.

    1995-06-01

    This project employed an improved methodology and provided important insights into the possible association between EMF and childhood leukemia. The project identified wire codes as a risk factor that defies easy explanation. Of note is that improvements in study quality have not led to a concomitant improvement in the clarity of the relationship between magnetic fields and cancer risk. While this study does not point to strong biases or confounding factors, it also fails to identify magnetic fields as the underlying factor for the observed pattern of results. It has, however, identified issues that need to be pursued in future research, such as the importance of wire codes, the potential role of geomagnetic fields, and the selection of an appropriate control group.

  9. Child and maternal household chemical exposure and the risk of acute leukemia in children with Down's syndrome: a report from the Children's Oncology Group.

    PubMed

    Alderton, Lucy E; Spector, Logan G; Blair, Cindy K; Roesler, Michelle; Olshan, Andrew F; Robison, Leslie L; Ross, Julie A

    2006-08-01

    Compared with the general pediatric population, children with Down's syndrome have a much higher risk of acute leukemia. This case-control study was designed to explore potential risk factors for acute lymphoblastic leukemia and acute myeloid leukemia in children with Down's syndrome living in the United States or Canada. Mothers of 158 children with Down's syndrome and acute leukemia (97 acute lymphoblastic leukemia, 61 acute myeloid leukemia) diagnosed between January 1997 and October 2002 and mothers of 173 children with Down's syndrome but without leukemia were interviewed by telephone. Positive associations were found between acute lymphoblastic leukemia and maternal exposure to professional pest exterminations (odds ratio = 2.25, 95% confidence interval: 1.13, 4.49), to any pesticide (odds ratio = 2.18, 95% confidence interval: 1.08, 4.39), and to any chemical (odds ratio = 2.72, 95% confidence interval: 1.17, 6.35). Most of the associations with acute myeloid leukemia were nonsignificant, and odds ratios were generally near or below 1.0. This exploratory study suggests that household chemical exposure may play a role in the development of acute lymphoblastic leukemia in children with Down's syndrome.

  10. Corrigendum: The Associations Between Maternal Factors During Pregnancy and the Risk of Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Yan, Kangkang; Xu, Xuejing; Liu, Xiaodong; Wang, Xikui; Hua, Shucheng; Wang, Chunpeng; Liu, Xin

    2016-05-01

    Because of the erroneous application of multiple publications, the conclusions of our recent paper (Pediatr Blood Cancer 2015;62:1162-70) were not reliable. The corrected results show that coffee drinking during pregnancy was risk factor for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (OR = 1.44, 95% confidence interval = 1.07-1.92). PMID:26999072

  11. Application of systematic coronary risk evaluation chart to identify chronic myeloid leukemia patients at risk of cardiovascular diseases during nilotinib treatment.

    PubMed

    Breccia, Massimo; Molica, Matteo; Zacheo, Irene; Serrao, Alessandra; Alimena, Giuliana

    2015-03-01

    Nilotinib is currently approved for the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) in chronic (CP) and accelerated phase (AP) after failure of imatinib and in newly diagnosed patients. Atherosclerotic events were retrospectively reported in patients with baseline cardiovascular risk factors during nilotinib treatment. We estimated the risk of developing atherosclerotic events in patients treated with second or first-line nilotinib, with a median follow-up of 48 months, by retrospectively applying the SCORE chart proposed by the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) and evaluating risk factors at baseline (diabetes, obesity, smoking, and hypertension). Overall, we enrolled in the study 82 CP patients treated frontline (42 CP patients at the dose of 600 mg BID) or after failure of other tyrosine kinase inhibitors (40 CP patients treated with 400 mg BID). The SCORE chart is based on the stratification of sex (male vs female), age (from 40 to 65 years), smoker vs non-smoker, systolic pressure (from 120 to 180 mm Hg), and cholesterol (measured in mmol/l, from 150 to 300 mg/dl). For statistical purposes, we considered patients subdivided in low, moderate, high (with a score >5), and very high risk. There were 48 males and 34 females, median age 51 years (range 22-84). According to WHO classification, 42 patients were classified as normal weight (BMI <25), 26 patients were overweight (BMI 26 ≤ 30), and 14 were obese (BMI >30). Retrospective classification according to the SCORE chart revealed that 27 patients (33 %) were in the low-risk category, 30 patients (36 %) in the moderate risk category, and 24 patients (29 %) in the high risk. As regards risk factors, we revealed that 17 patients (20.7 %) had a concomitant type II controlled diabetes (without organ damage), 23 patients (28 %) were smokers, 29 patients (35 %) were receiving concomitant drugs for hypertension, and 15 patients (18 %) had concomitant dyslipidemia. Overall, the cumulative incidence of

  12. Application of systematic coronary risk evaluation chart to identify chronic myeloid leukemia patients at risk of cardiovascular diseases during nilotinib treatment.

    PubMed

    Breccia, Massimo; Molica, Matteo; Zacheo, Irene; Serrao, Alessandra; Alimena, Giuliana

    2015-03-01

    Nilotinib is currently approved for the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) in chronic (CP) and accelerated phase (AP) after failure of imatinib and in newly diagnosed patients. Atherosclerotic events were retrospectively reported in patients with baseline cardiovascular risk factors during nilotinib treatment. We estimated the risk of developing atherosclerotic events in patients treated with second or first-line nilotinib, with a median follow-up of 48 months, by retrospectively applying the SCORE chart proposed by the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) and evaluating risk factors at baseline (diabetes, obesity, smoking, and hypertension). Overall, we enrolled in the study 82 CP patients treated frontline (42 CP patients at the dose of 600 mg BID) or after failure of other tyrosine kinase inhibitors (40 CP patients treated with 400 mg BID). The SCORE chart is based on the stratification of sex (male vs female), age (from 40 to 65 years), smoker vs non-smoker, systolic pressure (from 120 to 180 mm Hg), and cholesterol (measured in mmol/l, from 150 to 300 mg/dl). For statistical purposes, we considered patients subdivided in low, moderate, high (with a score >5), and very high risk. There were 48 males and 34 females, median age 51 years (range 22-84). According to WHO classification, 42 patients were classified as normal weight (BMI <25), 26 patients were overweight (BMI 26 ≤ 30), and 14 were obese (BMI >30). Retrospective classification according to the SCORE chart revealed that 27 patients (33 %) were in the low-risk category, 30 patients (36 %) in the moderate risk category, and 24 patients (29 %) in the high risk. As regards risk factors, we revealed that 17 patients (20.7 %) had a concomitant type II controlled diabetes (without organ damage), 23 patients (28 %) were smokers, 29 patients (35 %) were receiving concomitant drugs for hypertension, and 15 patients (18 %) had concomitant dyslipidemia. Overall, the cumulative incidence of

  13. Commentary: does immune suppression increase risk of developing acute myeloid leukemia?

    PubMed

    Gale, R P; Opelz, G

    2012-03-01

    Risk of developing some cancers is markedly increased in settings of immune suppression including after solid organ transplants and in persons with inherited immune-deficiency disorders and those with HIV-1 infection. These cancers include lymphomas, melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancers, kidney and cervical cancers, Kaposi sarcoma and neuroblastoma. There are no reports of an increased acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in settings of immune suppression. This is curious because some data suggest the immune suppression may be important in increasing AML risk in experimental settings, and that immune stimulation may be useful in treating AML. To see whether immune suppression is correlated with an increased risk of developing AML, we analyzed data from 248224 recipients of kidney (N=217219) and heart (N=31005) transplants. Among the kidney transplant recipients, the standardized incidence ratio (SIR) for developing AML was 1.90 (95% confidence interval, 1.4-2.4; P<0.001). Among the heart transplant recipients, the SIR was 5.1 (3.4-7.1; P<0.001). These data suggest immune suppression increases risk of developing AML and that this risk is even higher, following intense prolonged immune suppression. Implications for AML development and therapy are discussed.

  14. Azacitidine With or Without Lenalidomide or Vorinostat in Treating Patients With Higher-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndromes or Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-29

    Adult Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia-1; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia-2; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts

  15. Myeloid leukemia risk assessment and dynamics of the granulocytopoietic system in acutely and continuously irradiated humans: modeling approach.

    PubMed

    Smirnova, O A

    2015-05-01

    A dynamic modeling approach to the risk assessment of radiogenic myeloid leukemia is proposed. A basic tool of this approach is a biologically motivated mathematical model of the granulocytopoietic system, which is capable of predicting the dynamics of blood granulocytes and bone marrow granulocytopoietic cells in acutely and chronically irradiated humans. The performed modeling studies revealed that the dose dependence of the scaled maximal concentration of bone marrow granulocytopoietic cells with radiation-induced changes, which make a cell premalignant, and the dose dependence of the scaled integral of the concentration of these cells over the period of the response of the granulocytopoietic system to acute irradiation conform to the dose dependence of excess relative risk for myeloid leukemia among atomic bomb survivors in a wide range of doses and in a range of comparatively low doses, respectively. Additionally, the dose dependence of the scaled integral of the concentration of these cells over the period of the response of the granulocytopoietic system to continuous irradiation with the dose rate and durations, which were used in brachytherapy, conforms to the dose dependence of excess relative risk for leukemia among the respective groups of exposed patients. These modeling findings demonstrate the potential to use the proposed modeling approach for predicting the excess relative risk for myeloid leukemia among humans exposed to various radiation regimes. Obviously, this is especially important in the assessment of the risks for radiogenic myeloid leukemia among people residing in contaminated areas after an accident or explosion of a radiological device, among astronauts on long-term space missions, as well as among patients treated with radiotherapy. PMID:25811147

  16. Hierarchy in gene expression is predictive of risk, progression, and outcome in adult acute myeloid leukemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, Shubham; Deem, Michael W.

    2015-02-01

    Cancer progresses with a change in the structure of the gene network in normal cells. We define a measure of organizational hierarchy in gene networks of affected cells in adult acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients. With a retrospective cohort analysis based on the gene expression profiles of 116 AML patients, we find that the likelihood of future cancer relapse and the level of clinical risk are directly correlated with the level of organization in the cancer related gene network. We also explore the variation of the level of organization in the gene network with cancer progression. We find that this variation is non-monotonic, which implies the fitness landscape in the evolution of AML cancer cells is non-trivial. We further find that the hierarchy in gene expression at the time of diagnosis may be a useful biomarker in AML prognosis.

  17. Hierarchy in gene expression is predictive of risk, progression, and outcome in adult acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Shubham; Deem, Michael W

    2015-02-01

    Cancer progresses with a change in the structure of the gene network in normal cells. We define a measure of organizational hierarchy in gene networks of affected cells in adult acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients. With a retrospective cohort analysis based on the gene expression profiles of 116 AML patients, we find that the likelihood of future cancer relapse and the level of clinical risk are directly correlated with the level of organization in the cancer related gene network. We also explore the variation of the level of organization in the gene network with cancer progression. We find that this variation is non-monotonic, which implies the fitness landscape in the evolution of AML cancer cells is non-trivial. We further find that the hierarchy in gene expression at the time of diagnosis may be a useful biomarker in AML prognosis. PMID:25685944

  18. Risk Assessment before Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Older Adults with Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Sorror, Mohamed L.; Appelbaum, Frederick R.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) most commonly affects patients older than 60 years. Outcomes of treatment of older AML patients have been poor. The advent of reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) regimens made allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) an available treatment option with curative intent for older AML patients. Because older patients are often excluded from clinical trials, little is known about the stratification of their risks before allogeneic HCT. While recent studies of RIC and allogeneic HCT have shown little impact of age on outcomes, other variables such as the recipient health status and the AML disease status and chromosomal aberrations have proven to be of prognostic significance. Here, we review recent studies of allogeneic HCT for older patients with AML with detailed evaluation of risk factors for relapse as well as non-relapse mortality. We have integrated the currently available information on transplant risks into a five-category risk-benefit system that could aid in the decision-making in this patient population. PMID:24083472

  19. Management of chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Ghia, Paolo; Hallek, Michael

    2014-01-01

    In the last decade, the management of chronic lymphocytic leukemia has undergone profound changes that have been driven by an improved understanding of the biology of the disease and the approval of several new drugs. Moreover, many novel drugs are currently under evaluation for rapid approval or have been approved by regulatory agencies, further broadening the available therapeutic armamentarium for patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia. The use of novel biological and genetic parameters combined with a careful clinical evaluation allows us to dissect some of the heterogeneity of the disease and to distinguish patients with a very mild onset and course, who often will not need any treatment, from those with an intermediate prognosis and a third group with a very aggressive course (high-risk leukemia). On this background, it becomes increasingly challenging to select the right treatment strategy. In this paper, we describe our own approach to the management of different patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia. PMID:24881042

  20. Health and Risk Behaviors in Survivors of Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia: A Report From the Children’s Oncology Group

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, Kris Ann P.; Chen, Lu; Chen, Zhengjia; Zeltzer, Lonnie K.; Nicholson, H. Stacy; Neglia, Joseph P.

    2011-01-01

    Background Survivors of childhood acute myeloid leukemia (AML) face increased risks of chronic disease and secondary malignancies. Substance exposure may compound these risks. Procedures Participants were diagnosed with AML at <21 years of age and survived ≥5 years following diagnosis. All underwent chemotherapy alone or followed by autologous BMT (chemo ± autoBMT) or underwent allogeneic BMT (alloBMT) if an HLA-matched related donor was available. Survivors completed a health questionnaire and a Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS). Results Of eligible survivors, 117 were ≥18 years of age and completed a YRBS. Survivors were a mean age of 10 years at diagnosis and 24 years at interview. Of the substance exposures assessed by YRBS, tobacco, alcohol, and marijuana were most common. Twenty-two percent (22%) had smoked cigarettes in the last 30 days. One-quarter (25%) reported binge drinking in the last month. None of these exposures varied by treatment group. Less than 10% of survivors reported cocaine, heroin, or methamphetamine use. Men were more likely to report high substance exposure (P = 0.004). Sadness/suicidality score was associated with cancer-related anxiety (P = 0.006) and multiple health conditions (P = 0.006). Conclusions This analysis reveals exposure to tobacco, alcohol, and marijuana in young adults with few differences based on treatment received. Survivors with cancer-related anxiety or multiple health conditions were more likely to report sadness/hopelessness. PMID:20232426

  1. Late effect of atomic bomb radiation on myeloid disorders: leukemia and myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Tsushima, Hideki; Iwanaga, Masako; Miyazaki, Yasushi

    2012-03-01

    Leukemia was the first malignancy linked to radiation exposure in atomic bomb survivors. Clear evidence of the dose-dependent excess risk of three major types of leukemia (acute lymphocytic leukemia, acute myeloid leukemia [AML], and chronic myeloid leukemia) was found, especially in people exposed at young ages. Such leukemia risks were at their highest in the late 1950s, and declined gradually thereafter over the past 50 years. Findings from recent risk analyses, however, suggest the persistence of AML risk even after 1990, and evidence of increased risk of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) due to atomic bomb radiation has recently been shown. High-risk MDS and forms involving complex chromosomal aberrations were found to be much more frequent in people exposed to higher radiation doses. These lines of epidemiological evidence suggest that the risk of radiation-induced hematological malignancies has persisted for six decades since the initial exposure.

  2. Late effect of atomic bomb radiation on myeloid disorders: leukemia and myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Tsushima, Hideki; Iwanaga, Masako; Miyazaki, Yasushi

    2012-03-01

    Leukemia was the first malignancy linked to radiation exposure in atomic bomb survivors. Clear evidence of the dose-dependent excess risk of three major types of leukemia (acute lymphocytic leukemia, acute myeloid leukemia [AML], and chronic myeloid leukemia) was found, especially in people exposed at young ages. Such leukemia risks were at their highest in the late 1950s, and declined gradually thereafter over the past 50 years. Findings from recent risk analyses, however, suggest the persistence of AML risk even after 1990, and evidence of increased risk of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) due to atomic bomb radiation has recently been shown. High-risk MDS and forms involving complex chromosomal aberrations were found to be much more frequent in people exposed to higher radiation doses. These lines of epidemiological evidence suggest that the risk of radiation-induced hematological malignancies has persisted for six decades since the initial exposure. PMID:22370711

  3. High hyperdiploid childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia: Chromosomal gains as the main driver event.

    PubMed

    Paulsson, Kajsa

    2016-01-01

    High hyperdiploid childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia is characterized by multiple chromosomal gains. Recent results show that this subtype harbors relatively few genetic abnormalities besides the extra chromosomes, which appear to arise early and are likely the main driver event. Secondary hits primarily target genes in the rat sarcoma (RAS) signaling pathway and histone modifiers. PMID:27308574

  4. Balancing cure and long-term risks in acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Silverman, Lewis B

    2014-12-01

    Cure rates for children and adolescents with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) have improved dramatically over the last few decades. With this success has come increasing recognition of the adverse late effects of treatment. The significant long-term sequelae in the earliest cohort of long-term survivors treated in the 1970s and 1980s are well documented. To reduce the incidence of these late effects, the majority of pediatric patients treated on more contemporary regimens receive less intensive treatment than did those treated 30-40 years ago. However, current therapies are not risk free; children treated with contemporary regimens remain at risk for developing long-term toxicities, including cardiac dysfunction, osteonecrosis, neurocognitive impairment, and second malignant neoplasms. One of the great challenges facing clinical investigators today is to identify interventions that will reduce the frequency and severity of long-term toxicities without adversely affecting cure rates. The use of dexrazoxane as a cardioprotectant (to prevent anthracycline-associated cardiotoxicity) and alternate-week dosing of dexamethasone (to reduce the risk of osteonecrosis) are examples of 2 such successful strategies. This article provides an overview of the long-term toxicities associated with current therapies and reviews results of clinical trials designed to minimize the burden of cure in long-term survivors.

  5. Formaldehyde Exposure and Mortality Risks From Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Lymphohematopoietic Malignancies in the US National Cancer Institute Cohort Study of Workers in Formaldehyde Industries

    PubMed Central

    Dell, Linda D.; Boffetta, Paolo; Gallagher, Alexa E.; Crawford, Lori; Lees, Peter SJ.; Mundt, Kenneth A.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate associations between cumulative and peak formaldehyde exposure and mortality from acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and other lymphohematopoietic malignancies. Methods: Cox proportional hazards analyses. Results: Acute myeloid leukemia was unrelated to cumulative exposure. Hodgkin lymphoma relative risk estimates in the highest exposure categories of cumulative and peak exposures were, respectively, 3.76 (Ptrend = 0.05) and 5.13 (Ptrend = 0.003). There were suggestive associations with peak exposure observed for chronic myeloid leukemia, albeit based on very small numbers. No other lymphohematopoietic malignancy was associated with either chronic or peak exposure. Conclusions: Insofar as there is no prior epidemiologic evidence supporting associations between formaldehyde and either Hodgkin leukemia or chronic myeloid leukemia, any causal interpretations of the observed risk patterns are at most tentative. Findings from this re-analysis do not support the hypothesis that formaldehyde is a cause of AML. PMID:26147546

  6. The risk of human T cell leukemia virus and viral hepatitis infection among US Marines stationed in Okinawa, Japan.

    PubMed

    Brodine, S K; Hyams, K C; Molgaard, C A; Ito, S I; Thomas, R J; Roberts, C R; Golbeck, A L; Oldfield, E C; Blattner, W A

    1995-03-01

    The prevalence and incidence of human T cell leukemia virus type I/II (HTLV-I/II) and hepatitis A, B, and C virus infection were determined among US Marines stationed in Okinawa, Japan. Of 2875 personnel, 2 (0.07%) had antibody to HTLV-I/II. After 1-3 years, no HTLV seroconversions were observed, although 23% reported sexual contact with Okinawans. Of 1010 hepatitis-tested marines, 121 (12%) had antibody to hepatitis A virus (anti-HAV), 26 (2.6%) had antibody to hepatitis B core antigen (anti-HBc), and 2 (0.2%) had antibody to hepatitis C virus (anti-HCV). On follow-up, 1 subject seroconverted to anti-HAV, 8 to anti-HBc, and none to anti-HCV. Most marines with recent hepatitis B infection were young, single, and enlisted and had been on short deployments to other countries in Southeast Asia. Marines stationed in Okinawa are not at high risk for HTLV infection but are at increased risk for hepatitis B infection and should be considered for vaccination. PMID:7876620

  7. Paternal Smoking and Risk of Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ruiling; Zhang, Luoping; McHale, Cliona M.; Hammond, S. Katharine

    2011-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the association between paternal smoking and childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Method. We identified 18 published epidemiologic studies that reported data on both paternal smoking and childhood ALL risk. We performed a meta-analysis and analyzed dose-response relationships on ALL risk for smoking during preconception, during pregnancy, after birth, and ever smoking. Results. The summary odds ratio (OR) of childhood ALL associated with paternal smoking was 1.11 (95% Confidence Interval (CI): 1.05–1.18, I2 = 18%) during any time period, 1.25 (95% CI: 1.08–1.46, I2 = 53%) preconception; 1.24 (95% CI: 1.07–1.43, I2 = 54%) during pregnancy, and 1.24 (95% CI: 0.96–1.60, I2 = 64%) after birth, with a dose-response relationship between childhood ALL and paternal smoking preconception or after birth. Conclusion. The evidence supports a positive association between childhood ALL and paternal ever smoking and at each exposure time period examined. Future epidemiologic studies should assess paternal smoking during well-defined exposure windows and should include biomarkers to assess smoking exposure and toxicological mechanisms. PMID:21765828

  8. Integrating clinical features and genetic lesions in the risk assessment of patients with chronic myelomonocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Elena, Chiara; Gallì, Anna; Such, Esperanza; Meggendorfer, Manja; Germing, Ulrich; Rizzo, Ettore; Cervera, Jose; Molteni, Elisabetta; Fasan, Annette; Schuler, Esther; Ambaglio, Ilaria; Lopez-Pavia, Maria; Zibellini, Silvia; Kuendgen, Andrea; Travaglino, Erica; Sancho-Tello, Reyes; Catricalà, Silvia; Vicente, Ana I.; Haferlach, Torsten; Haferlach, Claudia; Sanz, Guillermo F.; Cazzola, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML) is a myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasm with variable clinical course. To predict the clinical outcome, we previously developed a CMML-specific prognostic scoring system (CPSS) based on clinical parameters and cytogenetics. In this work, we tested the hypothesis that accounting for gene mutations would further improve risk stratification of CMML patients. We therefore sequenced 38 genes to explore the role of somatic mutations in disease phenotype and clinical outcome. Overall, 199 of 214 (93%) CMML patients carried at least 1 somatic mutation. Stepwise linear regression models showed that these mutations accounted for 15% to 24% of variability of clinical phenotype. Based on multivariable Cox regression analyses, cytogenetic abnormalities and mutations in RUNX1, NRAS, SETBP1, and ASXL1 were independently associated with overall survival (OS). Using these parameters, we defined a genetic score that identified 4 categories with significantly different OS and cumulative incidence of leukemic evolution. In multivariable analyses, genetic score, red blood cell transfusion dependency, white blood cell count, and marrow blasts retained independent prognostic value. These parameters were included into a clinical/molecular CPSS (CPSS-Mol) model that identified 4 risk groups with markedly different median OS (from >144 to 18 months, hazard ratio [HR] = 2.69) and cumulative incidence of leukemic evolution (from 0% to 48% at 4 years, HR = 3.84) (P < .001). The CPSS-Mol fully retained its ability to risk stratify in an independent validation cohort of 260 CMML patients. In conclusion, integrating conventional parameters and gene mutations significantly improves risk stratification of CMML patients, providing a robust basis for clinical decision-making and a reliable tool for clinical trials. PMID:27385790

  9. Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia Admitted to Intensive Care Units: Outcome Analysis and Risk Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Braess, Jan; Thudium, Johannes; Schmid, Christoph; Kochanek, Matthias; Kreuzer, Karl-Anton; Lebiedz, Pia; Görlich, Dennis; Gerth, Hans U.; Rohde, Christian; Kessler, Torsten; Müller-Tidow, Carsten; Stelljes, Matthias; Büchner, Thomas; Schlimok, Günter; Hallek, Michael; Waltenberger, Johannes; Hiddemann, Wolfgang; Berdel, Wolfgang E.; Heilmeier, Bernhard; Krug, Utz

    2016-01-01

    Background This retrospective, multicenter study aimed to reveal risk predictors for mortality in the intensive care unit (ICU) as well as survival after ICU discharge in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) requiring treatment in the ICU. Methods and Results Multivariate analysis of data for 187 adults with AML treated in the ICU in one institution revealed the following as independent prognostic factors for death in the ICU: arterial oxygen partial pressure below 72 mmHg, active AML and systemic inflammatory response syndrome upon ICU admission, and need for hemodialysis and mechanical ventilation in the ICU. Based on these variables, we developed an ICU mortality score and validated the score in an independent cohort of 264 patients treated in the ICU in three additional tertiary hospitals. Compared with the Simplified Acute Physiology Score (SAPS) II, the Logistic Organ Dysfunction (LOD) score, and the Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score, our score yielded a better prediction of ICU mortality in the receiver operator characteristics (ROC) analysis (AUC = 0.913 vs. AUC = 0.710 [SAPS II], AUC = 0.708 [LOD], and 0.770 [SOFA] in the training cohort; AUC = 0.841 for the developed score vs. AUC = 0.730 [SAPSII], AUC = 0.773 [LOD], and 0.783 [SOFA] in the validation cohort). Factors predicting decreased survival after ICU discharge were as follows: relapse or refractory disease, previous allogeneic stem cell transplantation, time between hospital admission and ICU admission, time spent in ICU, impaired diuresis, Glasgow Coma Scale <8 and hematocrit of ≥25% at ICU admission. Based on these factors, an ICU survival score was created and used for risk stratification into three risk groups. This stratification discriminated distinct survival rates after ICU discharge. Conclusions Our data emphasize that although individual risks differ widely depending on the patient and disease status, a substantial portion of critically ill patients with AML benefit

  10. Genomics-based Approach and Prognostic Stratification Significance of Gene Mutations in Intermediate-risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bian-Hong; Li, Yong-Hui; Yu, Li

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Intermediate-risk acute myeloid leukemia (IR-AML), which accounts for a substantial number of AML cases, is highly heterogeneous. We systematically summarize the latest research progress on the significance of gene mutations for prognostic stratification of IR-AML. Data Sources: We conducted a systemic search from the PubMed database up to October, 2014 using various search terms and their combinations including IR-AML, gene mutations, mutational analysis, prognosis, risk stratification, next generation sequencing (NGS). Study Selection: Clinical or basic research articles on NGS and the prognosis of gene mutations in IR-AML were included. Results: The advent of the era of whole-genome sequencing has led to the discovery of an increasing number of molecular genetics aberrations that involved in leukemogenesis, and some of them have been used for prognostic risk stratification. Several studies have consistently identified that some gene mutations have prognostic relevance, however, there are still many controversies for some genes because of lacking sufficient evidence. In addition, tumor cells harbor hundreds of mutated genes and multiple mutations often coexist, therefore, single mutational analysis is not sufficient to make accurate prognostic predictions. The comprehensive analysis of multiple mutations based on sophisticated genomic technologies has raised increasing interest in recent years. Conclusions: NGS represents a pioneering and helpful approach to prognostic risk stratification of IR-AML patients. Further large-scale studies for comprehensive molecular analysis are needed to provide guidance and a theoretical basis for IR-AML prognostic stratification and clinical management. PMID:26315090

  11. Risk and impact of tuberculosis in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia: a nationwide population-based study in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chia-Jen; Hong, Ying-Chung; Teng, Chung-Jen; Hung, Man-Hsin; Hu, Yu-Wen; Ku, Fan-Chen; Chen, Yung-Tai; Chien, Sheng-Hsuan; Yeh, Chiu-Mei; Chen, Tzeng-Ji; Chiou, Tzeon-Jye; Gau, Jyh-Pyng; Tzeng, Cheng-Hwai

    2015-04-15

    The relationship between chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) and tuberculosis (TB) has not been determined. We conducted a national survey including 1,082 CML patients identified from the Taiwan National Health Insurance database covering a period between 1998 and 2011; the matched non-exposed cohort included 10,820 subjects without CML that were matched for age, sex and comorbidities. The impact of TB was measured by the overall mortality, and the risk factors were identified by a multivariate Cox proportional hazards model. We found the risk of TB was higher in the CML cohort, with an adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) of 3.76 (p = 0.001) for both pulmonary (aHR 3.23, p < 0.001) and extrapulmonary (aHR 9.77, p = 0.001) TB. Specific risk factors were: aged ≥ 60 (aHR 3.24, p = 0.022), being male (aHR 13.49, p = 0.012), receiving stem cell transplantation (aHR 10.50, p = 0.001) and interferon-α therapy (aHR 3.34, p = 0.011). CML patients with TB had a higher mortality rate than those without (aHR 2.04, p = 0.043). We conclude that the incidence of TB is significantly higher in CML patients of male sex, aged ≥ 60, having received either stem cell transplantation or interferon-α treatment. Careful screening strategies for TB should be considered for CML patients with high risk of the infection.

  12. Role of Radiation Dose in the Risk of Secondary Leukemia After a Solid Tumor in Childhood Treated Between 1980 and 1999

    SciTech Connect

    Allard, Aurore; Haddy, Nadia; Le Deley, Marie-Cecile; Rubino, Carole; Lassalle, Mathilde; Samsaldin, Akthar; Quiniou, Eric; Chompret, Agnes; Lefkopoulos, Dimitri; Diallo, Ibrahima; Vathaire, Florent de

    2010-12-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to estimate the risk of secondary leukemia as a function of radiation dose, taking into account heterogeneous radiation dose distribution. Methods and Materials: We analyzed a case-control study that investigated the risk of secondary leukemia and myelodysplasia after a solid tumor in childhood; it included 61 patients with leukemia matched with 196 controls. Complete clinical, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy histories were recorded for each patient in the study. Average radiation dose to each of seven bone marrow components for each patient was incorporated into the models, and corresponding risks were summed up. Conditional maximum likelihood methods were used to estimate risk parameters. Results: Whatever the model, we failed to evidence a role for the radiation dose to active bone marrow in the risk of later leukemia, myelodysplasia, or myeloproliferative syndrome, when adjusting for epipodophyllotoxin and anthracycline doses. This result was confirmed when fitting models that included total dose of radiation delivered during radiotherapy, when fitting models taking into account dose per fraction, and when restricting the analysis to acute myeloid leukemia. Conclusions: In contrast to results found in similar studies that included children treated before the use of epipodophyllotoxins, this study failed to show a role for radiotherapy in the risk of secondary leukemia after childhood cancer in children treated between 1980 and 1999. This discrepancy was probably due to a competitive mechanism between these two carcinogens.

  13. Perceptions of high risk sports.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, D M

    1997-10-01

    High risk sports were rated as to risk, appeal, and likelihood of participation by 282 men and 162 women. Ascending order of perceived risk was skiing, scuba diving, bungee jumping, rock climbing, motorcycle racing, hang gliding, cliff jumping, and skydiving. Profile analysis showed stated likelihood of participation to be directly related to appeal and inversely related to perceived risk.

  14. Viremia during pregnancy and risk of childhood leukemia and lymphomas in the offspring: Nested case-control study.

    PubMed

    Bzhalava, Davit; Hultin, Emilie; Arroyo Mühr, Laila Sara; Ekström, Johanna; Lehtinen, Matti; de Villiers, Ethel-Michele; Dillner, Joakim

    2016-05-01

    A possible role for infections of the pregnant mother in the development of childhood acute leukemias and lymphomas has been suggested. However, no specific infectious agent has been identified. Offspring of 74,000 mothers who had serum samples taken during pregnancy and stored in a large-scale biobank were followed up to the age of 15 years (750,000 person years) through over-generation linkages between the biobank files, the Swedish national population and cancer registers to identify incident leukemia/lymphoma cases in the offspring. First-trimester sera from mothers of 47 cases and 47 matched controls were retrieved and analyzed using next generation sequencing. Anelloviruses were the most common viruses detected, found in 37/47 cases and in 40/47 controls, respectively (OR: 0.6, 95% CI: 0.2-1.9). None of the detected viruses was associated with leukemia/lymphoma in the offspring. Viremia during pregnancy was common, but no association with leukemia/lymphoma risk in the offspring was found.

  15. The Association of Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase Genotypes with the Risk of Childhood Leukemia in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Wen-Shin; Ji, Hong-Xue; Hsiao, Chieh-Lun; Miao, Chia-En; Hsu, Yuan-Nian; Bau, Da-Tian

    2015-01-01

    Background Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most prevalent type of pediatric cancer, the causes of which are likely to involve an interaction between genetic and environmental factors. To evaluate the effects of the genotypic polymorphisms in methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) on childhood ALL risk in Taiwan, two well-known polymorphic genotypes of MTHFR, C677T (rs1801133) and A1298C (rs1801131), were analyzed to examine the extent of their associations with childhood ALL susceptibility and to discuss the MTHFR genotypic contribution to childhood ALL risk among different populations. Methodology/Principal Findings In total, 266 patients with childhood ALL and an equal number of non-cancer controls recruited were genotyped utilizing PCR-RFLP methodology. The MTHFR C677T genotype, but not the A1298C, was differently distributed between childhood ALL and control groups. The CT and TT of MTHFR C677T genotypes were significantly more frequently found in controls than in childhood ALL patients (odds ratios=0.60 and 0.48, 95% confidence intervals=0.42–0.87 and 0.24–0.97, respectively). As for gender, the boys carrying the MTHFR C677T CT or TT genotype conferred a lower odds ratio of 0.51 (95% confidence interval=0.32–0.81, P=0.0113) for childhood ALL. As for age, those equal to or greater than 3.5 years of age at onset of disease carrying the MTHFR C677T CT or TT genotype were of lower risk (odds ratio= 0.43 and 95% confidence interval=0.26–0.71, P=0.0016). Conclusions Our results indicated that the MTHFR C677T T allele was a protective biomarker for childhood ALL in Taiwan, and the association was more significant in male patients and in patients 3.5 years of age or older at onset of disease. PMID:25793509

  16. Leukemia -- Eosinophilic

    MedlinePlus

    ... Leukemia - Eosinophilic: Overview Request Permissions Print to PDF Leukemia - Eosinophilic: Overview Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial ... Platelets that help the blood to clot About leukemia Types of leukemia are named after the specific ...

  17. Epidemiology of childhood leukemia in the presence and absence of Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mezei, Gabor; Sudan, Madhuri; Izraeli, Shai; Kheifets, Leeka

    2014-10-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is a common congenital anomaly, and children with DS have a substantially higher risk of leukemia. Although understanding of genetic and epigenetic changes of childhood leukemia has improved, the causes of childhood leukemia and the potential role of environmental exposures in leukemogenesis remain largely unknown. Although many epidemiologic studies have examined a variety of environmental exposures, ionizing radiation remains the only generally accepted environmental risk factor for childhood leukemia. Among suspected risk factors, infections, exposure to pesticides, and extremely low frequency magnetic fields are notable. While there are well-defined differences between leukemia in children with and without DS, studies of risk factors for leukemia among DS children are generally consistent with trends seen among non-DS (NDS) children. We provide background on DS epidemiology and review the similarities and differences in biological and epidemiologic features of leukemia in children with and without DS. We propose that both acute lymphoblastic and acute myeloblastic leukemia among DS children can serve as an informative model for development of childhood leukemia. Further, the high rates of leukemia among DS children make it possible to study this disease using a cohort approach, a powerful method that is unfeasible in the general population due to the rarity of childhood leukemia.

  18. High ΔNp73/TAp73 ratio is associated with poor prognosis in acute promyelocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Lucena-Araujo, Antonio R.; Kim, Haesook T.; Thomé, Carolina; Jacomo, Rafael H.; Melo, Raul A.; Bittencourt, Rosane; Pasquini, Ricardo; Pagnano, Katia; Glória, Ana Beatriz F.; Chauffaille, Maria de Lourdes; Athayde, Melina; Chiattone, Carlos S.; Mito, Ingrid; Bendlin, Rodrigo; Souza, Carmino; Bortolheiro, Cristina; Coelho-Silva, Juan L.; Schrier, Stanley L.; Tallman, Martin S.; Grimwade, David; Ganser, Arnold; Berliner, Nancy; Ribeiro, Raul C.; Lo-Coco, Francesco; Löwenberg, Bob; Sanz, Miguel A.

    2015-01-01

    The TP73 gene transcript is alternatively spliced and translated into the transcriptionally active (TAp73) or inactive (ΔNp73) isoforms, with opposite effects on the expression of p53 target genes and on apoptosis induction. The imbalance between ΔNp73 and TAp73 may contribute to tumorigenesis and resistance to chemotherapy in human cancers, including hematologic malignancies. In acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL), both isoforms are expressed, but their relevance in determining response to therapy and contribution to leukemogenesis remains unknown. Here, we provide the first evidence that a higher ΔNp73/TAp73 RNA expression ratio is associated with lower survival, lower disease-free survival, and higher risk of relapse in patients with APL homogeneously treated with all-trans retinoic acid and anthracycline-based chemotherapy, according to the International Consortium on Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (IC-APL) study. Cox proportional hazards modeling showed that a high ΔNp73/TAp73 ratio was independently associated with shorter overall survival (hazard ratio, 4.47; 95% confidence interval, 1.64-12.2; P = .0035). Our data support the hypothesis that the ΔNp73/TAp73 ratio is an important determinant of clinical response in APL and may offer a therapeutic target for enhancing chemosensitivity in blast cells. PMID:26429976

  19. A Multicenter Experience from Lebanon in Childhood and Adolescent Acute Myeloid Leukemia: High rate of Early Death in Childhood Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Farah, Roula A.; Horkos, Jessy G.; Bustros, Youssef D.; Farhat, Hussein Z.; Abla, Oussama

    2015-01-01

    , including faster ATRA administration and, aggressive transfusions, easy access to stem cell transplant for high-risk AML patients and the need for a national homogenous treatment strategy for children with AML. PMID:25574371

  20. Gene Signature of High White Blood Cell Count in B-Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Dombkowski, Alan A.; Caldwell, J. Timothy; Chu, Roland; Xavier, Ana C.; Thummel, Ryan; Neely, Melody; Matherly, Larry H.; Ge, Yubin; Taub, Jeffrey W.

    2016-01-01

    In this study we sought to identify genetic factors associated with the presenting white blood cell (WBC) count in B-precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (BP-ALL). Using ETV6-RUNX1-positive BP-ALL patient samples, a homogeneous subtype, we identified 16 differentially expressed genes based on the presenting WBC count (< 50,000/cumm vs > 50,000). We further confirmed that IL1R1, BCAR3, KCNH2, PIR, and ZDHHC23 were differentially expressed in a larger cohort of ETV6-RUNX1-negative BP-ALL patient samples. Statistical analysis demonstrated that expression levels of these genes could accurately categorize high and low WBC count subjects using two independent patient sets, representing positive and negative ETV6-RUNX1 cases. Further studies in leukemia cell line models will better delineate the role of these genes in regulating the white blood cell count and potentially identify new therapeutic targets. PMID:27536776

  1. Gene Signature of High White Blood Cell Count in B-Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Holly; Rubenstein, Mara; Dombkowski, Alan A; Caldwell, J Timothy; Chu, Roland; Xavier, Ana C; Thummel, Ryan; Neely, Melody; Matherly, Larry H; Ge, Yubin; Taub, Jeffrey W

    2016-01-01

    In this study we sought to identify genetic factors associated with the presenting white blood cell (WBC) count in B-precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (BP-ALL). Using ETV6-RUNX1-positive BP-ALL patient samples, a homogeneous subtype, we identified 16 differentially expressed genes based on the presenting WBC count (< 50,000/cumm vs > 50,000). We further confirmed that IL1R1, BCAR3, KCNH2, PIR, and ZDHHC23 were differentially expressed in a larger cohort of ETV6-RUNX1-negative BP-ALL patient samples. Statistical analysis demonstrated that expression levels of these genes could accurately categorize high and low WBC count subjects using two independent patient sets, representing positive and negative ETV6-RUNX1 cases. Further studies in leukemia cell line models will better delineate the role of these genes in regulating the white blood cell count and potentially identify new therapeutic targets.

  2. Tobacco Smoke and Risk of Childhood Acute Non-Lymphocytic Leukemia: Findings from the SETIL Study

    PubMed Central

    Mattioli, Stefano; Farioli, Andrea; Legittimo, Patrizia; Miligi, Lucia; Benvenuti, Alessandra; Ranucci, Alessandra; Salvan, Alberto; Rondelli, Roberto; Magnani, Corrado

    2014-01-01

    Background Parental smoking and exposure of the mother or the child to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) as risk factors for Acute non-Lymphocytic Leukemia (AnLL) were investigated. Methods Incident cases of childhood AnLL were enrolled in 14 Italian Regions during 1998–2001. We estimated odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) conducting logistic regression models including 82 cases of AnLL and 1,044 controls. Inverse probability weighting was applied adjusting for: age; sex; provenience; birth order; birth weight; breastfeeding; parental educational level age, birth year, and occupational exposure to benzene. Results Paternal smoke in the conception period was associated with AnLL (OR for ≥11 cigarettes/day  = 1.79, 95% CI 1.01–3.15; P trend 0.05). An apparent effect modification by maternal age was identified: only children of mothers aged below 30 presented increased risks. We found weak statistical evidence of an association of AnLL with maternal exposure to ETS (OR for exposure>3 hours/day  = 1.85, 95%CI 0.97–3.52; P trend 0.07). No association was observed between AnLL and either maternal smoking during pregnancy or child exposure to ETS. Conclusions This study is consistent with the hypothesis that paternal smoke is associated with AnLL. We observed statistical evidence of an association between maternal exposure to ETS and AnLL, but believe bias might have inflated our estimates. PMID:25401754

  3. Everyday executive function in standard-risk acute lymphoblastic leukemia survivors.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Karin S; Paltin, Iris; Gioia, Gerard A; Isquith, Peter; Kadan-Lottick, Nina S; Neglia, Joseph P; Brouwers, Pim

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate parent-rated executive function (EF) in pediatric standard risk acute lymphoblastic leukemia (SR-ALL) survivors compared to a healthy comparison (HC) group. We hypothesized that SR-ALL survivors would have greater reported executive dysfunction compared to HC, and that those younger at the time of treatment would demonstrate greater EF difficulties. A sample of 256 SR-ALL survivors evaluated an average nine years after treatment were compared to HC matched for gender, assessment age, and maternal education. Profile analysis was used to compare the groups across EF scales on the BRIEF. The prevalence of clinical elevations in the groups was compared via chi square, and odds ratios were calculated. Regression models were applied to examine the role of age at diagnosis and age at assessment in reported EF. Results indicated that SR-ALL survivors' mean scores of EF are similar to HC, except for flexibility and initiation. Survivors were rated as having clinical impairments with flexibility, initiation, working memory, and emotional control at rates two to three times that of HC. The risk of working memory and self-monitoring deficits was greater in survivors who were older when assessed. There was no relationship between age at diagnosis or treatment regimen on EF. These findings suggest sparing of extensive and severe EF deficits in SR-ALL survivors overall. However, a subset of survivors displays clinically significant executive dysfunction. There appears to be a heightened susceptibility to disrupted metacognitive functions as survivors age. This has implications for how we monitor neurocognitive development and functioning of SR-ALL survivors, and highlights opportunities for cognitive interventions.

  4. Comparative pharmacogenetic analysis of risk polymorphisms in Caucasian and Vietnamese children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia: prediction of therapeutic outcome?

    PubMed Central

    Vu Hoang, Phuong Thu; Ambroise, Jérôme; Dekairelle, Anne-France; Durant, Jean-François; Butoescu, Valentina; Dang Chi, Vu Luan; Huynh, Nghia; Nguyen, Tan Binh; Robert, Annie; Vermylen, Christiane; Gala, Jean-Luc

    2015-01-01

    Aims Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common of all paediatric cancers. Aside from predisposing to ALL, polymorphisms could also be associated with poor outcome. Indeed, genetic variations involved in drug metabolism could, at least partially, be responsible for heterogeneous responses to standardized leukemia treatments, hence requiring more personalized therapy. The aims of this study were to (a) to determine the prevalence of seven common genetic polymorphisms including those that affect the folate and/or thiopurine metabolic pathways, i.e. cyclin D1 (CCND1-G870A), γ-glutamyl hydrolase (GGH-C452T), methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR-C677T and MTHFR-A1298C), thymidylate synthase promoter (TYMS-TSER), thiopurine methyltransferase (TPMT*3A and TPMT*3C) and inosine triphosphate pyrophosphatase (ITPA-C94A), in Caucasian (n = 94, age < 20) and Vietnamese (n = 141, age < 16 years) childhood ALL and (b) to assess the impact of a multilocus genetic risk score (MGRS) on relapse-free survival (RFS) using a Cox proportional-hazards regression model. Results The prevalence of MTHFR-677TT genotype was significantly higher in Caucasians (P = 0.008), in contrast to the prevalence of TYMS-TSER*3R/3R and ITPA-94AA/AC genotypes which were significantly higher in Vietnamese (P < 0.001 and P = 0.02, respectively). Compared with children with a low MGRS (≤3), those with a high MGRS (≥4) were 2.06 (95% CI = 1.01, 4.22; P = 0.04) times more likely to relapse. Adding MGRS into a multivariate Cox regression model with race/ethnicity and four clinical variables improved the predictive accuracy of the model (AUC from 0.682 to 0.709 at 24 months). Conclusion Including MGRS into a clinical model improved the predictive accuracy of short and medium term prognosis, hence confirming the association between well determined pharmacogenotypes and outcome of paediatric ALL. Whether variants on other genes associated with folate metabolism can substantially improve the

  5. Highly sensitive detection of leukemia cells based on aptamer and quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yating; Duan, Siliang; He, Jian; Liang, Wei; Su, Jing; Zhu, Jianmeng; Hu, Nan; Zhao, Yongxiang; Lu, Xiaoling

    2016-08-01

    Detection of leukemia at the early stage with high sensitivity is a significant clinical challenge for clinicians. In the present study, we developed a sensitive detector consisting of the product of oligonucleotides hybridized with semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) to generate a stronger fluorescent signal so that leukemic cells can be captured. In the present study, a biotin-modified Sgc8 aptamer was used to identify CCRF-CEM cells, and then biotin-appended QDs were labeled with the aptamer via streptavidin and biotin amplification interactions. We described the complex as QDs-bsb-apt. CEM and Ramos cells were used to assess the specificity and sensitivity of the novel complex. These results revealed that the complex could be more effective in diagnosing leukemia at the early stage. In conclusion, an innovative structure based on aptamer and QDs for leukemia diagnosis was provided. It has the potential to image tumor cells in vitro or in vivo and to realize the early diagnosis of disease. Furthermore, it may be used to provide guidance for clinicians to implement individualized patient therapy. PMID:27375197

  6. Absolute quantification of the pretreatment PML-RARA transcript defines the relapse risk in acute promyelocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Albano, Francesco; Zagaria, Antonella; Anelli, Luisa; Coccaro, Nicoletta; Tota, Giuseppina; Brunetti, Claudia; Minervini, Crescenzio Francesco; Impera, Luciana; Minervini, Angela; Cellamare, Angelo; Orsini, Paola; Cumbo, Cosimo; Casieri, Paola; Specchia, Giorgina

    2015-05-30

    In this study we performed absolute quantification of the PML-RARA transcript by droplet digital polymerase chain reaction (ddPCR) in 76 newly diagnosed acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) cases to verify the prognostic impact of the PML-RARA initial molecular burden. ddPCR analysis revealed that the amount of PML-RARA transcript at diagnosis in the group of patients who relapsed was higher than in that with continuous complete remission (CCR) (272 vs 89.2 PML-RARA copies/ng, p = 0.0004, respectively). Receiver operating characteristic analysis detected the optimal PML-RARA concentration threshold as 209.6 PML-RARA/ng (AUC 0.78; p < 0.0001) for discriminating between outcomes (CCR versus relapse). Among the 67 APL cases who achieved complete remission after the induction treatment, those with >209.6 PML-RARA/ng had a worse relapse-free survival (p = 0.0006). At 5-year follow-up, patients with >209.6 PML-RARA/ng had a cumulative incidence of relapse of 50.3% whereas 7.5% of the patients with suffered a relapse (p < 0.0001). Multivariate analysis identified the amount of PML-RARA before induction treatment as the sole independent prognostic factor for APL relapse.Our results show that the pretreatment PML-RARA molecular burden could therefore be used to improve risk stratification in order to develop more individualized treatment regimens for high-risk APL cases. PMID:25944686

  7. ARID5B polymorphism confers an increased risk to acquire specific MLL rearrangements in early childhood leukemia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Acute leukemia in early age (EAL) is characterized by acquired genetic alterations such as MLL rearrangements (MLL-r). The aim of this case-controlled study was to investigate whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of IKZF1, ARID5B, and CEBPE could be related to the onset of EAL cases (<24 months-old at diagnosis). Methods The SNPs (IKZF1 rs11978267, ARID5B rs10821936 and rs10994982, CEBPE rs2239633) were genotyped in 265 cases [169 acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and 96 acute myeloid leukaemia (AML)] and 505 controls by Taqman allelic discrimination assay. Logistic regression was used to evaluate the association between SNPs of cases and controls, adjusted on skin color and/or age. The risk was determined by calculating odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence interval (CI). Results Children with the IKZF1 SNP had an increased risk of developing MLL-germline ALL in white children. The heterozygous/mutant genotype in ARID5B rs10994982 significantly increased the risk for MLL-germline leukemia in white and non-white children (OR 2.60, 95% CI: 1.09-6.18 and OR 3.55, 95% CI: 1.57-8.68, respectively). The heterozygous genotype in ARID5B rs10821936 increased the risk for MLL-r leukemia in both white and non-white (OR 2.06, 95% CI: 1.12-3.79 and OR 2.36, 95% CI: 1.09-5.10, respectively). Furthermore, ARID5B rs10821936 conferred increased risk for MLL-MLLT3 positive cases (OR 7.10, 95% CI:1.54-32.68). Our data do not show evidence that CEBPE rs2239633 confers increased genetic susceptibility to EAL. Conclusions IKZF1 and CEBPE variants seem to play a minor role in genetic susceptibility to EAL, while ARID5B rs10821936 increased the risk of MLL-MLLT3. This result shows that genetic susceptibility could be associated with the differences regarding MLL breakpoints and partner genes. PMID:24564228

  8. [Infant acute leukemia].

    PubMed

    Brethon, Benoît; Cavé, Hélène; Fahd, Mony; Baruchel, André

    2016-03-01

    If acute leukemia is the most frequent cancer in childhood (33%), it remains a very rare diagnosis in infants less than one year old, e.g. less than 5% of cases. At this age, the frequency of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) (almost all of B-lineage) is quite similar to the one of myeloblastic forms (AML). Infant leukemia frequently presents with high hyperleucocytosis, major tumoral burden and numerous extra-hematological features, especially in central nervous system and skin. Whatever the lineage, the leukemic cell is often very immature cytologically and immunologically. Rearrangements of the Mixed Lineage Leukemia (MLL) gene, located on band 11q23, are the hallmark of these immature leukemias and confer a particular resistance to conventional approaches, corticosteroids and chemotherapy. The immaturity of infants less than 1-year-old is associated to a decrease of the tolerable dose-intensity of some drugs (anthracyclines, alkylating agents) or asks questions about some procedures like radiotherapy or high dose conditioning regimen, responsible of inacceptable acute and late toxicities. The high level of severe infectious diseases and other high-grade side effects limits also the capacity to cure these infants. The survival of infants less than 1-year-old with AML is only 50% but similar to older children. On the other hand, survival of those with ALL is the same, then quite limited comparing the 80% survival in children over one year. Allogeneic stem cell transplantations are indicated in high-risk subgroups of infant ALL (age below 6 months, high hyperleucocytosis >300.10(9)/L, MLL-rearrangement, initial poor prednisone response). However, morbidity and mortality remain very important and these approaches cannot be extended to all cases. During the neonatal period, the dismal prognosis linked to the high number of primary failures or very early relapses and uncertainties about the late toxicities question physicians about ethics. It is an emergency to

  9. Parameters detected by geriatric and quality of life assessment in 195 older patients with myelodysplastic syndromes and acute myeloid leukemia are highly predictive for outcome.

    PubMed

    Deschler, Barbara; Ihorst, Gabriele; Platzbecker, Uwe; Germing, Ulrich; März, Eva; de Figuerido, Marcelo; Fritzsche, Kurt; Haas, Peter; Salih, Helmut R; Giagounidis, Aristoteles; Selleslag, Dominik; Labar, Boris; de Witte, Theo; Wijermans, Pierre; Lübbert, Michael

    2013-02-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes and acute myeloid leukemia exemplify the complexity of treatment allocation in older patients as options range from best supportive care, non-intensive treatment (e.g. hypomethylating agents) to intensive chemotherapy/hematopoietic cell transplantation. Novel metrics for non-disease variables are urgently needed to help define the best treatment for each older patient. We investigated the feasibility and prognostic value of geriatric/quality of life assessments aside from established disease-specific variables in 195 patients aged 60 years or over with myelodysplastic syndromes/acute myeloid leukemia. These patients were grouped according to treatment intensity and assessed. Assessment consisted of eight instruments evaluating activities of daily living, depression, mental functioning, mobility, comorbidities, Karnofsky Index and quality of life. Patients with a median age of 71 years (range 60-87 years) with myelodysplastic syndromes (n=63) or acute myeloid leukemia (n=132) were treated either with best supportive care (n=47), hypomethylating agents (n=73) or intensive chemotherapy/hematopoietic cell transplantation (n=75). After selection of variables, pathological activities of daily living and quality of life/fatigue remained highly predictive for overall survival in the entire patient group beyond disease-related risk factors adverse cytogenetics and blast count of 20% or over. In 107 patients treated non-intensively activities of daily living of less than 100 (hazard ratio, HR 2.94), Karnofsky Index below 80 (HR 2.34) and quality of life/'fatigue' of 50 or over (HR 1.77) were significant prognosticators. Summation of adverse features revealed a high risk of death (HR 9.36). In-depth evaluation of older patients prior to individual treatment allocation is feasible and provides additional information to standard assessment. Patients aged 60 years or over with newly diagnosed myelodysplastic syndromes/acute myeloid leukemia and

  10. The Relationship Between Risk Factors and Survival in Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Allahyari, Abolghasem; Hashemi, Seyed-Mehdi; Nazemian, Fahimeh; Karimi, Mohammad; Kazemi, Mohammad-Reza; Sadeghi, Masoud

    2016-01-01

    Background Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is aggressive cancer, especially in adults as only 20-40% is cured with current treatment regimens. Objectives The aim of this study is to evaluate prognostic factors and their effects on survival in ALL patients in the Northeast of Iran. Methods In a descriptive and retrospective study from 2009 to 2015, 48 ALL patients referred to hematology-oncology clinic. Age, sex, fever, blood group, type of ALL and consumption of amphotericin B, forms of cytogenetic, survival in the patients, WBC, hemoglobin, and platelet were checked in the first referral for every patient. The mean follow-up was 27.3 months in which 28 patients (59.3%) died. overall survival (OS) was plotted by GraphPad Prism 5 and the Log-rank test was used for analysis of survival with risk factors. Results The mean age for all the ALL patients at diagnosis was 32.3 years (range, 15-71 years), and 81.3% were male. Of all patients, 62.5% had fever and 25% consumed amphotericin B. 1-, 2-, 3-, 4-, 5-year OS rates were 62.2%, 52.7%, 40.6%, 39.1%, 22.2%, respectively. 75%, 29.2% and 39.6% of patients had WBC < 20 × 103/μl, Hb < 7 g/dL and platelet < 30 × 103/μL, respectively. There was a significant difference in survival based on age (P = 0.000). Conclusions Based on the results, age > 35 years is the most prognostic factor in ALL patients. Also, patients who received amphotericin B had lower life expectancy because these patients were suffering from fungal infection or due to lack of response to antibacterial drugs, they have been treated with amphotericin B.

  11. High EVI1 expression predicts poor survival in acute myeloid leukemia: a study of 319 de novo AML patients.

    PubMed

    Barjesteh van Waalwijk van Doorn-Khosrovani, Sahar; Erpelinck, Claudia; van Putten, Wim L J; Valk, Peter J M; van der Poel-van de Luytgaarde, Sonja; Hack, Ronald; Slater, Rosalyn; Smit, Elisabeth M E; Beverloo, H Berna; Verhoef, Gregor; Verdonck, Leo F; Ossenkoppele, Gert J; Sonneveld, Pieter; de Greef, Georgine E; Löwenberg, Bob; Delwel, Ruud

    2003-02-01

    The proto-oncogene EVI1 encodes a DNA binding protein and is located on chromosome 3q26. The gene is aberrantly expressed in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients carrying 3q26 abnormalities. Two mRNAs are transcribed from this locus: EVI1 and a fusion of EVI1 with MDS1 (MDS1-EVI1), a gene located 5' of EVI1. The purpose of this study was to investigate which of the 2 gene products is involved in transformation in human AML. To discriminate between EVI1 and MDS1-EVI1 transcripts, distinct real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays were developed. Patients with 3q26 abnormalities often showed high EVI1 and MDS1-EVI1 expression. In a cohort of 319 AML patients, 4 subgroups could be distinguished: EVI1(+) and MDS1-EVI1(-) (6 patients; group I), EVI1(+) and MDS1-EVI1(+) (26 patients; group II), EVI1(-) and MDS1-EVI1(+) (12 patients; group III), and EVI1(-) and MDS1-EVI1(-) (275 patients; group IV). The only 4 patients with a 3q26 aberration belonged to groups I and II. Interestingly, high EVI1 and not MDS1-EVI1 expression was associated with unfavorable karyotypes (eg, -7/7q-) or complex karyotypes. Moreover, a significant correlation was observed between EVI1 expression and 11q23 aberrations (mixed lineage leukemia [MLL] gene involvement). Patients from groups I and II had significantly shorter overall and event-free survival than patients in groups III and IV. Our data demonstrate that high EVI1 expression is an independent poor prognostic marker within the intermediate- risk karyotypic group.

  12. Effects of Maternal Diet During Pregnancy on the Risk of Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Abiri, Behnaz; Kelishadi, Roya; Sadeghi, Homa; Azizi-Soleiman, Fatemeh

    2016-10-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common type of leukemia in children that can be affected by maternal diet. The aim of this study was to evaluate maternal dietary risk factors of ALL. We searched MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, Springer Link, Wiley Online, Science Direct, Mosby, ISI Web of Science, OVID, ProQuest, and Scopus from database inception until February 2, 2016. Two reviewers scanned titles, abstracts, and keywords of articles after excluding duplicates. We included case-control studies evaluating the relationship between maternal diet during pregnancy and childhood ALL. The search resulted in 2,940 papers, of which 11 full-text articles met the criteria for inclusion in the review and were analyzed. The finding of these studies suggest that maternal diet composed largely of vegetables, fruits, and protein sources before and during pregnancy can reduce the risk of ALL in offspring. Maternal alcohol intake had no effect. Nevertheless, inherent limitations of case-control studies like measurement error, random error, recall bias, and selection bias preclude conclusive evidence. Persuading pregnant women to follow a healthy diet rich in fruits, vegetables, and protein may reduce the risk of childhood ALL. Avoiding alcohol intake seems prudent. PMID:27472187

  13. Effects of Maternal Diet During Pregnancy on the Risk of Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Abiri, Behnaz; Kelishadi, Roya; Sadeghi, Homa; Azizi-Soleiman, Fatemeh

    2016-10-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common type of leukemia in children that can be affected by maternal diet. The aim of this study was to evaluate maternal dietary risk factors of ALL. We searched MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, Springer Link, Wiley Online, Science Direct, Mosby, ISI Web of Science, OVID, ProQuest, and Scopus from database inception until February 2, 2016. Two reviewers scanned titles, abstracts, and keywords of articles after excluding duplicates. We included case-control studies evaluating the relationship between maternal diet during pregnancy and childhood ALL. The search resulted in 2,940 papers, of which 11 full-text articles met the criteria for inclusion in the review and were analyzed. The finding of these studies suggest that maternal diet composed largely of vegetables, fruits, and protein sources before and during pregnancy can reduce the risk of ALL in offspring. Maternal alcohol intake had no effect. Nevertheless, inherent limitations of case-control studies like measurement error, random error, recall bias, and selection bias preclude conclusive evidence. Persuading pregnant women to follow a healthy diet rich in fruits, vegetables, and protein may reduce the risk of childhood ALL. Avoiding alcohol intake seems prudent.

  14. High expression of RUNX1 is associated with poorer outcomes in cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Keman; Hu, Kai; Wang, Jing; Wang, Jijun; Jing, Hongmei; Shi, Jinlong; Ke, Xiaoyan

    2016-01-01

    Depending on its expression level, RUNX1 can act as a tumor promoter or suppressor in hematological malignancies. The clinical impact of RUNX1 expression in cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia (CN-AML) remained unknown, however. We evaluated the prognostic significance of RUNX1 expression using several public microarray datasets. In the testing group (n = 157), high RUNX1 expression (RUNX1high) was associated with poorer overall survival (OS; P = 0.0025) and event-free survival (EFS; P = 0.0025) than low RUNX1 expression (RUNX1low). In addition, the prognostic significance of RUNX1 was confirmed using European Leukemia Net (ELN) genetic categories and multivariable analysis, which was further validated using a second independent CN-AML cohort (n = 162, OS; P = 0.03953). To better understand the mechanisms of RUNX1, we investigated genome-wide gene/microRNAs expression signatures and cell signaling pathways associated with RUNX1 expression status. Several known oncogenes/oncogenic microRNAs and cell signaling pathways were all up-regulated, while some anti-oncogenes and molecules of immune activation were down-regulated in RUNX1high CN-AML patients. These findings suggest RUNX1high is a prognostic biomarker of unfavorable outcome in CN-AML, which is supported by the distinctive gene/microRNA signatures and cell signaling pathways. PMID:26910834

  15. Very Low Dose Fetal Exposure to Chernobyl Contamination Resulted in Increases in Infant Leukemia in Europe and Raises Questions about Current Radiation Risk Models

    PubMed Central

    Busby, Christopher C.

    2009-01-01

    Following contamination from the Chernobyl accident in April 1986 excess infant leukemia (0–1 y) was reported from five different countries, Scotland, Greece, Germany, Belarus and Wales and Scotland combined. The cumulative absorbed doses to the fetus, as conventionally assessed, varied from 0.02 mSv in the UK through 0.06 mSv in Germany, 0.2 mSv in Greece and 2 mSv in Belarus, where it was highest. Nevertheless, the effect was real and given the specificity of the cohort raised questions about the safety of applying the current radiation risk model of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) to these internal exposures, a matter which was discussed in 2000 by Busby and Cato [7,8] and also in the reports of the UK Committee examining Radiation Risk from Internal Emitters. Data on infant leukemia in the United Kingdom, chosen on the basis of the cohorts defined by the study of Greece were supplied by the UK Childhood Cancer Research Group. This has enabled a study of leukemia in the combined infant population of 15,466,845 born in the UK, Greece, and Germany between 1980 and 1990. Results show a statistically significant excess risk RR = 1.43 (95% CI 1.13 < RR < 1.80 (2-tailed); p = 0.0025) in those born during the defined peak exposure period of 01/07/86 to 31/12/87 compared with those born between 01/01/80 and 31/12/85 and 01/01/88 and 31/12/90. The excess risks in individual countries do not increase monotonically with the conventionally calculated doses, the relation being biphasic, increasing sharply at low doses and falling at high doses. This result is discussed in relation to fetal/cell death at higher doses and also to induction of DNA repair. Since the cohort is chosen specifically on the basis of exposure to internal radionuclides, the result can be expressed as evidence for a significant error in the conventional modeling for such internal fetal exposures. PMID:20049249

  16. Asparaginase antibody and asparaginase activity in children with higher-risk acute lymphoblastic leukemia: Children's Cancer Group Study CCG-1961.

    PubMed

    Panosyan, Eduard H; Seibel, Nita L; Martin-Aragon, Sagrario; Gaynon, Paul S; Avramis, Ioannis A; Sather, Harland; Franklin, Janet; Nachman, James; Ettinger, Lawrence J; La, Mei; Steinherz, Peter; Cohen, Lewis J; Siegel, Stuart E; Avramis, Vassilios I

    2004-04-01

    We investigated the anti-asparaginase antibody (Ab) and asparaginase enzymatic activity in the sera of 1,001 patients (CCG-1961) with high-risk acute lymphoblastic leukemia (HR-ALL). Patients received nine doses of native Escherichia coli asparaginase during induction. Half of rapid early responders (RER) were randomly assigned to standard intensity arms and continued to receive native asparaginase. The other RER patients and all slow early responders received 6 or 10 doses of PEG-asparaginase. Serum samples (n = 3,193) were assayed for determination of asparaginase Ab titers and enzymatic activity. Three hundred ninety of 1,001 patients (39%) had no elevation of Ab among multiple evaluations-that is, were Ab-negative (<1.1 over negative control)-and 611 patients (61%) had an elevated Ab titer (>1.1). Among these 611 patients, 447 had no measurable asparaginase activity during therapy. Patients who were Ab-positive but had no clinical allergies continued to receive E. coli asparaginase, the activity of which declined precipitately. No detectable asparaginase activity was found in 81 of 88 Ab-positive patients shortly after asparaginase injections (94% neutralizing Ab). The Ab-positive patients with clinical allergies subsequently were given Erwinase and achieved substantial activity (0.1-0.4 IU/ml). An interim analysis of 280 patients who were followed for 30 months from induction demonstrated that the Ab-positive titers during interim maintenance-1 and in delayed intensification-1 were associated with an increased rate of events. The CCG-1961 treatment schedule was very immunogenic, plausibly due to initially administrated native asparaginase. Anti-asparaginase Ab was associated with undetectable asparaginase activity and may be correlated with adverse outcomes in HR ALL. PMID:15087948

  17. Is there an increased risk of metabolic syndrome among childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia survivors? A developing country experience.

    PubMed

    Mohapatra, Sonali; Bansal, Deepak; Bhalla, A K; Verma Attri, Savita; Sachdeva, Naresh; Trehan, Amita; Marwaha, R K

    2016-03-01

    Data on metabolic syndrome (MS) in survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) from developing countries are lacking. The purpose of this single-center, uncontrolled, observational study was to assess the frequency of MS in our survivors. The survivors of ALL ≤15 years at diagnosis, who had completed therapy ≥2 years earlier, were enrolled. Anthropometric measurements (weight, height, waist circumference), biochemistry (glucose, insulin, triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein [HDL], thyroid function tests, C-reactive protein [CRP], magnesium), measurement of blood pressure, and Tanner staging were performed. MS was defined by International Diabetes Federation (IDF) and the National Cholesterol Education Program Third Adult Treatment Panel guidelines (NCEP ATP III) criteria, modified by Cook et al. (Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2003;157:821-827) and Ford et al. (Diabetes Care. 2005;28:878-881). The median age of 76 survivors was 11.9 years (interquartile range [IQR]: 9.6-13.5). Twenty-four (32%) survivors were obese or overweight. The prevalence of insulin resistance (17%), hypertension (7%), hypertriglyceridemia (20%), and low HDL (37%) was comparable to the prevalence in children/adolescents in historical population-based studies from India. The prevalence of MS ranged from 1.3% to 5.2%, as per different defining criteria. Cranial radiotherapy, age at diagnosis, sex, or socioeconomic status were not risk factors for MS. The prevalence of MS in survivors of childhood ALL, at a median duration of 3 years from completion of chemotherapy, was comparable to the reference population. The prevalence of being obese or overweight was, however, greater than historical controls. PMID:26984439

  18. Cytogenetic and molecular studies of down syndrome individual with leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, J.J.; Hassold, T.J.; Williams, B.J.; Zupursky, A.; Doyle, J.; Sherman, S.L.; Jacobs, P.A.; Shugar, A.L.; Soukup, S.W.

    1995-04-01

    There is an increased risk of leukemia in Down syndrome (DS) patients, with estimates ranging from 14 to 30 times the incidence rate observed for chromosomally normal children. Furthermore, one type of leukemia, called {open_quotes}transient leukemia{close_quotes} (TL), occurs almost exclusively in DS infants. The basis of the association between DS and leukemia is unknown, but we and others have hypothesized that it may be influenced by the mechanism of origin of the extra chromosome. Therefore, we initiated a cytogenetic and molecular study of nondisjunction in leukemic DS individuals. To date, we have obtained blood and/or tissue samples from 55 individuals consisting of 17 cases with TL, 7 cases of acute nonlymphocytic leukemia subtype M7 (ANLL-M7, or acute megakaryoblastic leukemia, postulated to be related to TL), and 31 cases of other forms of leukemia. Analysis of these cases suggests differences between DS children with TL and those with other types of leukemia or DS individuals with no history of leukemia. Specifically, the TL and ANLL-M7 cases have a highly significant increase in the frequency of {open_quotes}atypical{close_quotes} constitutional karyotypes (i.e., mosaic trisomies, rings, and/or isochromosomes) and are almost always male. Additionally, genetic mapping studies suggest an increase in the frequency of disomic homozygosity, especially in proximal 21q, in DS individuals with TL and ANLL-M7. 19 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  19. Ras/Raf/MEK/ERK Pathway Activation in Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia and Its Therapeutic Targeting

    PubMed Central

    Knight, Thomas; Irving, Julie Anne Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Deregulation of the Ras/Raf/MEK/extracellular signal-regulated kinase pathway is a common event in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia and is caused by point mutation, gene deletion, and chromosomal translocation of a vast array of gene types, highlighting its importance in leukemia biology. Pathway activation can be therapeutically exploited and may guide new therapies needed for relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia and other high risk subgroups. PMID:25009801

  20. [Cytosine-arabinoside in high doses in refractory acute granulocytic leukemia. Apropos of 17 cases].

    PubMed

    Jouet, J P; Simon, M; Fenaux, P; Pollet, J P; Bauters, F

    1985-01-01

    A total of 17 patients, 6 female and 11 male (age range 13 to 56 years), received high dose Ara-C for treatment of refractory acute myelogenous leukemia. Ara-C was given at 3 g/m2 twice daily for 6 days as a 1 infusion. 1 patient (with induced acute leukemia) was treated directly, two after failure of a chemotherapy schedule containing the usual dose Ara-C, 12 for first relapse and 2 for subsequent relapse. Maximum follow up is 16 months. Beside hematological toxicity, systemic tolerance was good with no neurological of cutaneous effects. Despite preventive corticoid eyewash, ocular complications occurred in 6 cases, mild and resolvable in 5 of them. The immediate results were as follows: 3 deaths during induction (18%); 6 failures (35%); 8 complete remissions (CR) (47%). After primary chemo-resistance (two cases) failure was always noted. In 3 cases, after less than 12 infusions had been given, 2 failures and 1 very short CR were noted. In 2 patients, when doxorubicin was added to Ara-C, we observed 1 death during induction and 1 failure. Of the patients achieving CR 8 were treated by periodic courses with high dose Ara-C and 4 of them relapsed. The longest failure free duration was 11 months. Median survival duration of the 17 patients is 5 months. PMID:3862072

  1. Prognostic Factors in Childhood Leukemia (ALL or AML)

    MedlinePlus

    ... for childhood leukemias Prognostic factors in childhood leukemia (ALL or AML) Certain factors that can affect a ... myelogenous leukemia (AML). Prognostic factors for children with ALL Children with ALL are often divided into risk ...

  2. Low Cloud Cover-Adjusted Ultraviolet B Irradiance Is Associated with High Incidence Rates of Leukemia: Study of 172 Countries

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    There are 52,380 cases of leukemia and 24,090 deaths from it in the US annually. Its causes are unknown and no preventive strategies have been implemented. We hypothesized that leukemia is due mainly to vitamin D deficiency, which is due mainly to low solar ultraviolet B (UVB) irradiance. To test this hypothesis, we estimated age-standardized cloud-cover-adjusted winter UVB irradiance using cloud cover data from the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project, latitudes of population centroids, and standard astronomical calculations. Incidence rates for 172 countries, available from the International Agency for Cancer Research, were plotted according to cloud-adjusted UVB irradiance. We used multiple regression to account for national differences in elevation and average life expectancy. Leukemia incidence rates were inversely associated with cloud-adjusted UVB irradiance in males (p ≤ 0.01) and females (p ≤ 0.01) in both hemispheres. There were few departures from the trend line, which was parabolic when plotted with the equator at the center of the display, northern hemisphere countries on the right side and southern hemisphere countries on the left. The bivariate association displayed by the polynomial trend line indicated that populations at higher latitudes had at least two times the risk of leukemia compared to equatorial populations. The association persisted in males (p ≤ 0.05) and females (p ≤ 0.01) after controlling for elevation and life expectancy. Incidence rates of leukemia were inversely associated with solar UVB irradiance. It is plausible that the association is due to vitamin D deficiency. This would be consistent with laboratory studies and a previous epidemiological study. Consideration should be given to prudent use of vitamin D for prevention of leukemia. PMID:26637119

  3. Low Cloud Cover-Adjusted Ultraviolet B Irradiance Is Associated with High Incidence Rates of Leukemia: Study of 172 Countries.

    PubMed

    Cuomo, Raphael E; Garland, Cedric F; Gorham, Edward D; Mohr, Sharif B

    2015-01-01

    There are 52,380 cases of leukemia and 24,090 deaths from it in the US annually. Its causes are unknown and no preventive strategies have been implemented. We hypothesized that leukemia is due mainly to vitamin D deficiency, which is due mainly to low solar ultraviolet B (UVB) irradiance. To test this hypothesis, we estimated age-standardized cloud-cover-adjusted winter UVB irradiance using cloud cover data from the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project, latitudes of population centroids, and standard astronomical calculations. Incidence rates for 172 countries, available from the International Agency for Cancer Research, were plotted according to cloud-adjusted UVB irradiance. We used multiple regression to account for national differences in elevation and average life expectancy. Leukemia incidence rates were inversely associated with cloud-adjusted UVB irradiance in males (p ≤ 0.01) and females (p ≤ 0.01) in both hemispheres. There were few departures from the trend line, which was parabolic when plotted with the equator at the center of the display, northern hemisphere countries on the right side and southern hemisphere countries on the left. The bivariate association displayed by the polynomial trend line indicated that populations at higher latitudes had at least two times the risk of leukemia compared to equatorial populations. The association persisted in males (p ≤ 0.05) and females (p ≤ 0.01) after controlling for elevation and life expectancy. Incidence rates of leukemia were inversely associated with solar UVB irradiance. It is plausible that the association is due to vitamin D deficiency. This would be consistent with laboratory studies and a previous epidemiological study. Consideration should be given to prudent use of vitamin D for prevention of leukemia. PMID:26637119

  4. Risk-Adapted Chemotherapy in Treating Younger Patients With Newly Diagnosed Standard-Risk Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Localized B-Lineage Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-23

    Adult B Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Childhood B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia With t(9;22)(q34;q11.2); BCR-ABL1; Childhood B Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Down Syndrome; Stage I B Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage II B Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  5. Thrombosis and acute leukemia.

    PubMed

    Crespo-Solís, Erick

    2012-04-01

    Thrombosis is a common complication in patients with acute leukemia. While the presence of central venous lines, concomitant steroids, the use of Escherichia coli asparaginase and hereditary thrombophilic abnormalities are known risk factors for thrombosis in children, information on the pathogenesis, risk factors, and clinical outcome of thrombosis in adult patients with acute lymphoid leukemia (ALL) or acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is still scarce. Expert consensus and guidelines regarding leukemia-specific risk factors, thrombosis prevention, and treatment strategies, as well as optimal type of central venous catheter in acute leukemia patients are required. It is likely that each subtype of acute leukemia represents a different setting for the development of thrombosis and the risk of bleeding. This is perhaps due to a combination of different disease-specific pathogenic mechanisms of thrombosis, including the type of chemotherapy protocol chosen, the underlying patients health, associated risk factors, as well as the biology of the disease itself. The risk of thrombosis may also vary according to ethnicity and prevalence of hereditary risk factors for thrombosis; thus, it is advisable for Latin American, Asian, and African countries to report on their specific patient population. PMID:22507812

  6. Exposure to ambient air pollution in Canada and the risk of adult leukemia.

    PubMed

    Winters, Nicholas; Goldberg, Mark S; Hystad, Perry; Villeneuve, Paul J; Johnson, Kenneth C

    2015-09-01

    There is a paucity of studies investigating adult leukemia and air pollution. To address this gap, we analyzed data from a Canadian population-based case-control study conducted in 1994-1997. Cases were 1064 adults with incident leukemia and controls were 5039 healthy adults. We used data from satellites and fixed-site monitoring stations to estimate residential concentrations of NO2 and fine particulate matter (PM2.5) for the period prior to diagnosis, starting in 1975 and ending in 1994. We modeled the average annual exposure of each subject. Odds ratios (OR) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated using logistic regression, adjusted for age, gender, province, smoking, education, body mass index, income, and self-reported exposures to ionizing radiation and benzene. We found an 'n-shaped' response function between exposure to NO2 and all forms of leukemia: from the tenth percentile to the median (4.51 to 14.66 ppb), the OR was 1.20; 95% CI: 0.97-1.48 and from the 75th percentile to the 90th (22.75 to 29.7 ppb), the OR was 0.79; 95% CI 0.68-0.93. For PM2.5 we found a response function consistent with a linear model, with an OR per 10 μg/m(3) of 0.97 (95% CI 0.75-1.26). For chronic lymphocytic leukemia we found response functions that were consistent with a simple linear model, with an OR per 5 ppb of NO2 of 0.93 (95% CI 0.86-1.00) and an OR per 10 μg/m(3) of PM2.5 of 0.62 (95% CI 0.42-0.93). In summary, for chronic lymphocytic leukemia we found no evidence of an association with air pollution and with all forms of leukemia we found weak evidence of an association only at low concentrations of NO2. It is possible that these inconsistent results may have arisen because of unaccounted urban/rural differences or possibly from a selection effect, especially among controls.

  7. Exposure to ambient air pollution in Canada and the risk of adult leukemia.

    PubMed

    Winters, Nicholas; Goldberg, Mark S; Hystad, Perry; Villeneuve, Paul J; Johnson, Kenneth C

    2015-09-01

    There is a paucity of studies investigating adult leukemia and air pollution. To address this gap, we analyzed data from a Canadian population-based case-control study conducted in 1994-1997. Cases were 1064 adults with incident leukemia and controls were 5039 healthy adults. We used data from satellites and fixed-site monitoring stations to estimate residential concentrations of NO2 and fine particulate matter (PM2.5) for the period prior to diagnosis, starting in 1975 and ending in 1994. We modeled the average annual exposure of each subject. Odds ratios (OR) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated using logistic regression, adjusted for age, gender, province, smoking, education, body mass index, income, and self-reported exposures to ionizing radiation and benzene. We found an 'n-shaped' response function between exposure to NO2 and all forms of leukemia: from the tenth percentile to the median (4.51 to 14.66 ppb), the OR was 1.20; 95% CI: 0.97-1.48 and from the 75th percentile to the 90th (22.75 to 29.7 ppb), the OR was 0.79; 95% CI 0.68-0.93. For PM2.5 we found a response function consistent with a linear model, with an OR per 10 μg/m(3) of 0.97 (95% CI 0.75-1.26). For chronic lymphocytic leukemia we found response functions that were consistent with a simple linear model, with an OR per 5 ppb of NO2 of 0.93 (95% CI 0.86-1.00) and an OR per 10 μg/m(3) of PM2.5 of 0.62 (95% CI 0.42-0.93). In summary, for chronic lymphocytic leukemia we found no evidence of an association with air pollution and with all forms of leukemia we found weak evidence of an association only at low concentrations of NO2. It is possible that these inconsistent results may have arisen because of unaccounted urban/rural differences or possibly from a selection effect, especially among controls. PMID:25955692

  8. Identification of a high affinity nucleocapsid protein binding element from the bovine leukemia virus genome.

    PubMed

    Yildiz, F Zehra; Babalola, Kathlene; Summers, Michael F

    2013-02-01

    Retroviral genome recognition is mediated by interactions between the nucleocapsid (NC) domain of the virally encoded Gag polyprotein and cognate RNA packaging elements that, for most retroviruses, appear to reside primarily within the 5'-untranslated region (5'-UTR) of the genome. Recent studies suggest that a major packaging determinant of bovine leukemia virus (BLV), a member of the human T-cell leukemia virus (HTLV)/BLV family and a non-primate animal model for HTLV-induced leukemogenesis, resides within the gag open reading frame. We have prepared and purified the recombinant BLV NC protein and conducted electrophoretic mobility shift and isothermal titration calorimetry studies with RNA fragments corresponding to these proposed packaging elements. The gag-derived RNAs did not exhibit significant affinity for NC, suggesting an alternate role in packaging. However, an 83-nucleotide fragment of the 5'-UTR that resides just upstream of the gag start codon binds NC stoichiometrically and with high affinity (K(d)=136±21 nM). These nucleotides were predicted to form tandem hairpin structures, and studies with smaller fragments indicate that the NC binding site resides exclusively within the distal hairpin (residues G369-U399, K(d)=67±8 nM at physiological ionic strength). Unlike all other structurally characterized retroviral NC binding RNAs, this fragment is not expected to contain exposed guanosines, suggesting that RNA binding may be mediated by a previously uncharacterized mechanism.

  9. Radiation exposure as a possible etiologic factor in hairy cell leukemia (leukemic reticuloendotheliosis)

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, D.J.; Keating, M.J.

    1980-10-01

    The frequency of prior occupational, accidental, or therapeutic radiation exposure was significantly higher for hairy cell leukemia patients than for a control group of solid tumor patients. Hairy cell leukemia patients were also more frequently involved in occupations at high risk of radiation exposure such as chemist, engineer, physicist, and health care facility worker. The observation that the incidence of thyroid disorders among hairy cell leukemia patients was also unusually high was interpreted as further indirect evidence of excessive radiation exposure. It appears that radiation exposure may be an important contributing factor in the development of some cases of hairy cell leukemia.

  10. Chromosomal Minimal Critical Regions in Therapy-Related Leukemia Appear Different from Those of De Novo Leukemia by High-Resolution aCGH

    PubMed Central

    Itzhar, Nathalie; Dessen, Philippe; Toujani, Saloua; Auger, Nathalie; Preudhomme, Claude; Richon, Catherine; Lazar, Vladimir; Saada, Véronique; Bennaceur, Anelyse; Bourhis, Jean Henri; de Botton, Stéphane; Bernheim, Alain

    2011-01-01

    Therapy-related acute leukemia (t-AML), is a severe complication of cytotoxic therapy used for primary cancer treatment. The outcome of these patients is poor, compared to people who develop de novo acute leukemia (p-AML). Cytogenetic abnormalities in t-AML are similar to those found in p-AML but present more frequent unfavorable karyotypes depending on the inducting agent. Losses of chromosome 5 or 7 are observed after alkylating agents while balanced translocations are found after topoisomerase II inhibitors. This study compared t-AML to p-AML using high resolution array CGH in order to find copy number abnormalities (CNA) at a higher resolution than conventional cytogenetics. More CNAs were observed in 30 t-AML than in 36 p-AML: 104 CNAs were observed with 63 losses and 41 gains (mean number 3.46 per case) in t-AML, while in p-AML, 69 CNAs were observed with 32 losses and 37 gains (mean number of 1.9 per case). In primary leukemia with a previously “normal” karyotype, 18% exhibited a previously undetected CNA, whereas in the (few) t-AML with a normal karyotype, the rate was 50%. Several minimal critical regions (MCRs) were found in t-AML and p-AML. No common MCRs were found in the two groups. In t-AML a 40kb deleted MCR pointed to RUNX1 on 21q22, a gene coding for a transcription factor implicated in frequent rearrangements in leukemia and in familial thrombocytopenia. In de novo AML, a 1Mb MCR harboring ERG and ETS2 was observed from patients with complex aCGH profiles. High resolution cytogenomics obtained by aCGH and similar techniques already published allowed us to characterize numerous non random chromosome abnormalities. This work supports the hypothesis that they can be classified into several categories: abnormalities common to all AML; those more frequently found in t-AML and those specifically found in p-AML. PMID:21339820

  11. Molecular monitoring of BCR-ABL transcripts in patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia: is high sensitivity of clinical value?

    PubMed

    Norkin, Maxim; Schiffer, Charles A

    2010-04-01

    Monitoring of disease response during treatment with tyrosine kinase inhibitors of patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia dramatically changed after the introduction of real-time PCR, which allows quantification of BCR-ABL transcript levels with high sensitivity and precision. However, its role in patients who have achieved complete cytogenetic response is not entirely clear; incorrect interpretation of results could lead to unnecessary changes from an effective treatment. This review discusses the current evidence regarding the benefits, uncertainties, and potential drawbacks of molecular monitoring in patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia in chronic phase.

  12. Risk of leukemia associated with the first course of cancer treatment: an analysis of the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program experience

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, R.E.; Hankey, B.F.; Myers, M.H.; Young, J.L. Jr.

    1984-03-01

    The risk of leukemia associated with the first course of cancer treatment was evaluated in over 440,000 patients diagnosed during 1973-80 (average follow-up . 1.91 yr) from the National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program. Although the reporting of the first course of therapy probably was incomplete, 34 acute nonlymphocytic leukemias (ANLL) developed compared with 7.6 expected among 70,674 patients known to receive initial chemotherapy (relative risk (RR) . 4.5, 95% confidence interval (Cl) . 3.1-6.3). Significant ANLL excesses were observed following chemotherapy for breast cancer (RR . 8.1), ovarian cancer (RR . 22.2), and multiple myeloma (RR . 9.5). Patients initially treated with radiation (with no record of chemotherapy) also had a significantly increased ANLL risk; 45 leukemias occurred versus 17.9 expected (RR . 2.5, 95% Cl . 1.8-3.4). In this group, excess ANLL were found following irradiation for uterine corpus cancer (RR . 4.0). Kidney and renal pelvis cancer patients had a twofold leukemia risk (all types) that was unrelated to treatment (RR . 2.2).

  13. Survival and risk of relapse of acute lymphoblastic leukemia in a Mexican population is affected by dihydrofolate reductase gene polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    GÓMEZ-GÓMEZ, YAZMÍN; ORGANISTA-NAVA, JORGE; SAAVEDRA-HERRERA, MÓNICA VIRGINIA; RIVERA-RAMÍREZ, ANA BERTHA; TERÁN-PORCAYO, MARCO ANTONIO; DEL CARMEN ALARCÓN-ROMERO, LUZ; ILLADES-AGUIAR, BERENICE; LEYVA-VÁZQUEZ, MARCO ANTONIO

    2012-01-01

    Dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) is the major target of methotrexate, a key component in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) treatment. Polymorphisms in the gene coding for DHFR have been associated with adverse event treatment. This study evaluated the effect of the -A317G and C829T polymorphisms in the DHFR gene on survival and risk of relapse of ALL. Seventy patients with ALL and 100 healthy individuals were genotyped by the polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism method. An association between the polymorphisms and the risk of relapse was found (p<0.05); patients with the -317G/G genotype were found to have an 8.55 (95% CI 1.84–39.70) higher chance of relapse and carriers of the 829T/T genotype had a 14.0 (95% CI 1.13–172.63) higher chance of relapse. Other variables, such as age and leukocyte count, were associated (p<0.05) with the risk of relapse of the disease. Individuals with the G/G and T/T genotype of the -A317G and C829T polymorphisms had poorer survival compared to other genotype groups (log-rank test; p<0.05). Although preliminary, these data seem to suggest a role for the DHFR polymorphisms in the risk of relapse of ALL and the mortality risk in these patients. PMID:22969948

  14. Ionizing radiation exposures in treatments of solid neoplasms are not associated with subsequent increased risks of chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Radivoyevitch, Tomas; Sachs, Rainer K; Gale, Robert Peter; Smith, Mitchell R; Hill, Brian T

    2016-04-01

    Exposure to ionizing radiation is not thought to cause chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Challenging this notion are recent data suggesting CLL incidence may be increased by radiation exposure from the atomic bombs (after many decades), uranium mining and nuclear power facility accidents. To assess the effects of therapeutic ionizing radiation for the treatment of solid neoplasms we studied CLL risks in data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program. Specifically, we compared the risks of developing CLL in persons with a 1(st) non-hematologic cancer treated with or without ionizing radiation. We controlled for early detection effects on CLL risk induced by surveillance after 1(st) cancer diagnoses by forming all-time cumulative CLL relative risks (RR). We estimate such CLL RR to be 1.20 (95% confidence interval, 1.17, 1.23) for persons whose 1(st) cancer was not treated with ionizing radiation and 1.00 (0.96, 1.05) for persons whose 1(st) cancer was treated with ionizing radiations. These results imply that diagnosis of a solid neoplasm is associated with an increased risk of developing CLL only in persons whose 1(st) cancer was not treated with radiation therapy. PMID:26922774

  15. Ionizing radiation exposures in treatments of solid neoplasms are not associated with subsequent increased risks of chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Radivoyevitch, Tomas; Sachs, Rainer K; Gale, Robert Peter; Smith, Mitchell R; Hill, Brian T

    2016-04-01

    Exposure to ionizing radiation is not thought to cause chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Challenging this notion are recent data suggesting CLL incidence may be increased by radiation exposure from the atomic bombs (after many decades), uranium mining and nuclear power facility accidents. To assess the effects of therapeutic ionizing radiation for the treatment of solid neoplasms we studied CLL risks in data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program. Specifically, we compared the risks of developing CLL in persons with a 1(st) non-hematologic cancer treated with or without ionizing radiation. We controlled for early detection effects on CLL risk induced by surveillance after 1(st) cancer diagnoses by forming all-time cumulative CLL relative risks (RR). We estimate such CLL RR to be 1.20 (95% confidence interval, 1.17, 1.23) for persons whose 1(st) cancer was not treated with ionizing radiation and 1.00 (0.96, 1.05) for persons whose 1(st) cancer was treated with ionizing radiations. These results imply that diagnosis of a solid neoplasm is associated with an increased risk of developing CLL only in persons whose 1(st) cancer was not treated with radiation therapy.

  16. Correlation of CD11b and CD56 expression in adult acute myeloid leukemia with cytogenetic risk groups and prognosis.

    PubMed

    Juncà, Jordi; Garcia-Caro, Montse; Granada, Isabel; Rodríguez-Hernández, Inés; Torrent, Anna; Morgades, Mireia; Ribera, Josep-Maria; Millá, Fuensanta; Feliu, Evarist

    2014-09-01

    Among other phenotypic markers, CD11b expression has been considered as an unfavorable prognostic factor, both in terms of overall survival (OS), disease-free survival (DFS), and attainment and duration of complete remissions (CRs) in adult patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Recently, some groups have restricted its prognostic impact to poor prognostic karyotypic risk groups. The aim of this study was to retrospectively analyze the prevalence of CD11b and of CD56 expression in blast cells of 158 AML patients [excluding those with t(15;17)] stratified according to their cytogenetic risk and to correlate these phenotypic characteristics with OS, DFS, and CR. CD11b was more frequently expressed in intermediate and unfavorable cytogenetic prognostic groups (38.9 and 35.5 %, respectively) than in the favorable group (9.5 %). No differences were observed in CD56 expression according to the cytogenetic risk groups. When OS, DFS, and CR were analyzed according to these two markers, no statistical differences were recorded in any cytogenetic risk group. In conclusion, although CD11b was more frequently expressed in blast cells of patients with intermediate and unfavorable cytogenetic risk groups, this feature did not translate into different clinical outcome. Similarly, CD56 positivity did not have any influence on the prognosis of these patients. PMID:24782118

  17. Clinical significance of high c-MYC and low MYCBP2 expression and their association with Ikaros dysfunction in adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Ge, Zheng; Guo, Xing; Li, Jianyong; Hartman, Melanie; Kawasawa, Yuka Imamura; Dovat, Sinisa; Song, Chunhua

    2015-12-01

    Increased expression of c-MYC is observed in both Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) and T-cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (T-ALL). MYC binding protein 2 (MYCBP2) is a probable E3 ubiquitin ligase and its function in leukemia is unknown. IKZF1 deletion is associated with the development and poor outcome of ALL. Here, we observed significant high c-MYC expression and low MYCBP2 expression in adult ALL patients. Patients with high c-MYC expression and/or low MYCBP2 expression had higher WBC counts and a higher percentage of CD34+ or CD33+ cells, as well as splenomegaly, liver infiltration, higher BM blasts, and lower CR rate. Ikaros bound to the regulatory regions of c-MYC and MYCBP2, suppressed c-MYC and increased MYCBP2 expression in ALL cells. Expression of c-MYC mRNA was significantly higher in patients with IKZF1 deletion; conversely MYCBP2 mRNA expression was significantly lower in those patients. A CK2 inhibitor, which acts as an Ikaros activator, also suppressed c-MYC and increased MYCBP2 expression in an Ikaros (IKZF1) dependent manner in the ALL cells. In summary, our data indicated the correlation of high c-MYC expression, low MYCBP2 expression and high c-MYC plus low MYCBP2 expression with high-risk factors and proliferation markers in adult ALL patients. Our data also revealed an oncogenic role for an Ikaros/MYCBP2/c-MYC axis in adult ALL, providing a mechanism of target therapies that activate Ikaros in adult ALL.

  18. An Overview. High Risk Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC.

    This report provides an overview of efforts undertaken by the U.S. General Accounting Office (GAO) in 1990 to review and report on federal program areas its work identified as high risk because of vulnerabilities to waste, fraud, abuse, and mismanagement. It reviews the current status of efforts to address these concerns. The six categories of…

  19. Dynamics of chronic myeloid leukemia response to dasatinib, nilotinib, and high-dose imatinib

    PubMed Central

    Olshen, Adam; Tang, Min; Cortes, Jorge; Gonen, Mithat; Hughes, Timothy; Branford, Susan; Quintás-Cardama, Alfonso; Michor, Franziska

    2014-01-01

    Treatment with the tyrosine kinase inhibitor imatinib is the standard of care for newly diagnosed patients with chronic myeloid leukemia. In recent years, several second-generation inhibitors – such as dasatinib and nilotinib – have become available: these promise to overcome some of the mutations associated with acquired resistance to imatinib. Despite eliciting similar clinical responses, the molecular effects of these agents on different subpopulations of leukemic cells remain incompletely understood. Furthermore, the consequences of using high-dose imatinib therapy have not been investigated in detail. Here we utilized clinical data from patients treated with dasatinib, nilotinib, or high-dose imatinib, together with a statistical data analysis and mathematical modeling approach, to investigate the molecular treatment response of leukemic cells to these agents. We found that these drugs elicit very similar responses if administered front-line. However, patients display significantly different kinetics when treated second-line, both in terms of differences between front-line and second-line treatment for the same drug, and among agents when used as second-line. We then utilized a mathematical framework describing the behavior of four differentiation levels of leukemic cells during therapy to predict the treatment response kinetics for the different cohorts of patients. The dynamics of BCR-ABL1 clearance observed in our study suggest that the use of standard or high-dose imatinib or a second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitor such as nilotinib or dasatinib elicits similar responses when administered as front-line therapy for patients with chronic myeloid leukemia in chronic phase. PMID:25216683

  20. [Management of the cardiovascular disease risk during nilotinib treatment in chronic myeloid leukemia: 2015 recommendations from the France Intergroupe des Leucémies Myéloïdes Chroniques].

    PubMed

    Rea, Delphine; Ame, Shanti; Charbonnier, Aude; Coiteux, Valérie; Cony-Makhoul, Pascale; Escoffre-Barbe, Martine; Etienne, Gabriel; Gardembas, Martine; Guerci-Bresler, Agnès; Legros, Laurence; Nicolini, Franck; Tulliez, Michel; Hermet, Eric; Huguet, Françoise; Johnson-Ansah, Hyacinthe; Lapusan, Simona; Quittet, Philippe; Rousselot, Philippe; Mahon, François-Xavier; Messas, Emmanuel

    2016-02-01

    Tyrosine kinase inhibitors targeting the BCR-ABL oncoprotein represent an outstanding progress in chronic myeloid leukemia and long-term progression-free survival has become a reality for a majority of patients. However, tyrosine kinase inhibitors may at best chronicize rather than cure the disease thus current recommendation is to pursue treatment indefinitely. As a consequence, high quality treatment and care must integrate optimal disease control and treatment tolerability. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors have an overall favorable safety profile in clinical practice since most adverse events are mild to moderate in intensity. However, recent evidence has emerged that new generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors may sometimes damage vital organs and if not adequately managed, morbidity and mortality may increase. The 2nd generation tyrosine kinase inhibitor nilotinib is licensed for the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia with resistance or intolerance to imatinib and newly diagnosed chronic phase-chronic myeloid leukemia. Nilotinib represents an important therapeutic option but it is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events. The purpose of this article by the France Intergroupe des Leucémies Myéloïdes Chroniques is to provide an overview of nilotinib efficacy and cardiovascular safety profile and to propose practical recommendations with the goal to minimize the risk and severity of cardiovascular events in nilotinib-treated patients. PMID:26790711

  1. [Management of the cardiovascular disease risk during nilotinib treatment in chronic myeloid leukemia: 2015 recommendations from the France Intergroupe des Leucémies Myéloïdes Chroniques].

    PubMed

    Rea, Delphine; Ame, Shanti; Charbonnier, Aude; Coiteux, Valérie; Cony-Makhoul, Pascale; Escoffre-Barbe, Martine; Etienne, Gabriel; Gardembas, Martine; Guerci-Bresler, Agnès; Legros, Laurence; Nicolini, Franck; Tulliez, Michel; Hermet, Eric; Huguet, Françoise; Johnson-Ansah, Hyacinthe; Lapusan, Simona; Quittet, Philippe; Rousselot, Philippe; Mahon, François-Xavier; Messas, Emmanuel

    2016-02-01

    Tyrosine kinase inhibitors targeting the BCR-ABL oncoprotein represent an outstanding progress in chronic myeloid leukemia and long-term progression-free survival has become a reality for a majority of patients. However, tyrosine kinase inhibitors may at best chronicize rather than cure the disease thus current recommendation is to pursue treatment indefinitely. As a consequence, high quality treatment and care must integrate optimal disease control and treatment tolerability. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors have an overall favorable safety profile in clinical practice since most adverse events are mild to moderate in intensity. However, recent evidence has emerged that new generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors may sometimes damage vital organs and if not adequately managed, morbidity and mortality may increase. The 2nd generation tyrosine kinase inhibitor nilotinib is licensed for the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia with resistance or intolerance to imatinib and newly diagnosed chronic phase-chronic myeloid leukemia. Nilotinib represents an important therapeutic option but it is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events. The purpose of this article by the France Intergroupe des Leucémies Myéloïdes Chroniques is to provide an overview of nilotinib efficacy and cardiovascular safety profile and to propose practical recommendations with the goal to minimize the risk and severity of cardiovascular events in nilotinib-treated patients.

  2. Targeting of leukemia-initiating cells in acute promyelocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Lo-Coco, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) is a subtype of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with peculiar molecular, phenotypic and clinical features and unique therapeutic response to specific treatments. The disease is characterized by a single, pathognomonic molecular event, consisting of the translocation t(15;17) which gives rise to the PML/retinoic acid receptor α (RARα) hybrid protein. The development of this leukemia is mainly related to the fusion oncoprotein PML/RARα, acting as an altered RAR mediating abnormal signalling and repression of myeloid differentiation, with consequent accumulation of undifferentiated promyelocytes. The prognosis of APL has dramatically been improved with the introduction in therapy of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and arsenic trioxide (ATO). The main effect of these two drugs is linked to the targeting of either RAR moiety of the PML/RARα molecule and induction of cell differentiation (ATRA) or of the PML moiety of the fusion protein and induction of leukemic cell apoptosis, including leukemic progenitors (mostly induced by ATO). These two drugs exhibited excellent synergism and determine a very high rate of durable remissions in low/intermediate-risk APLs, when administered in the absence of any chemotherapeutic drug. The strong synergism and the marked clinical efficacy of these two agents when administered together seem to be related to their capacity to induce PML/RARα degradation and complete eradication of leukemia stem cells. PMID:27358876

  3. Long-term benefits and risks of frontline nilotinib vs imatinib for chronic myeloid leukemia in chronic phase: 5-year update of the randomized ENESTnd trial

    PubMed Central

    Hochhaus, A; Saglio, G; Hughes, T P; Larson, R A; Kim, D-W; Issaragrisil, S; le Coutre, P D; Etienne, G; Dorlhiac-Llacer, P E; Clark, R E; Flinn, I W; Nakamae, H; Donohue, B; Deng, W; Dalal, D; Menssen, H D; Kantarjian, H M

    2016-01-01

    In the phase 3 Evaluating Nilotinib Efficacy and Safety in Clinical Trials–Newly Diagnosed Patients (ENESTnd) study, nilotinib resulted in earlier and higher response rates and a lower risk of progression to accelerated phase/blast crisis (AP/BC) than imatinib in patients with newly diagnosed chronic myeloid leukemia in chronic phase (CML-CP). Here, patients' long-term outcomes in ENESTnd are evaluated after a minimum follow-up of 5 years. By 5 years, more than half of all patients in each nilotinib arm (300 mg twice daily, 54% 400 mg twice daily, 52%) achieved a molecular response 4.5 (MR4.5; BCR-ABL⩽0.0032% on the International Scale) compared with 31% of patients in the imatinib arm. A benefit of nilotinib was observed across all Sokal risk groups. Overall, safety results remained consistent with those from previous reports. Numerically more cardiovascular events (CVEs) occurred in patients receiving nilotinib vs imatinib, and elevations in blood cholesterol and glucose levels were also more frequent with nilotinib. In contrast to the high mortality rate associated with CML progression, few deaths in any arm were associated with CVEs, infections or pulmonary diseases. These long-term results support the positive benefit-risk profile of frontline nilotinib 300 mg twice daily in patients with CML-CP. PMID:26837842

  4. Long-term benefits and risks of frontline nilotinib vs imatinib for chronic myeloid leukemia in chronic phase: 5-year update of the randomized ENESTnd trial.

    PubMed

    Hochhaus, A; Saglio, G; Hughes, T P; Larson, R A; Kim, D-W; Issaragrisil, S; le Coutre, P D; Etienne, G; Dorlhiac-Llacer, P E; Clark, R E; Flinn, I W; Nakamae, H; Donohue, B; Deng, W; Dalal, D; Menssen, H D; Kantarjian, H M

    2016-05-01

    In the phase 3 Evaluating Nilotinib Efficacy and Safety in Clinical Trials-Newly Diagnosed Patients (ENESTnd) study, nilotinib resulted in earlier and higher response rates and a lower risk of progression to accelerated phase/blast crisis (AP/BC) than imatinib in patients with newly diagnosed chronic myeloid leukemia in chronic phase (CML-CP). Here, patients' long-term outcomes in ENESTnd are evaluated after a minimum follow-up of 5 years. By 5 years, more than half of all patients in each nilotinib arm (300 mg twice daily, 54%; 400 mg twice daily, 52%) achieved a molecular response 4.5 (MR(4.5); BCR-ABL⩽0.0032% on the International Scale) compared with 31% of patients in the imatinib arm. A benefit of nilotinib was observed across all Sokal risk groups. Overall, safety results remained consistent with those from previous reports. Numerically more cardiovascular events (CVEs) occurred in patients receiving nilotinib vs imatinib, and elevations in blood cholesterol and glucose levels were also more frequent with nilotinib. In contrast to the high mortality rate associated with CML progression, few deaths in any arm were associated with CVEs, infections or pulmonary diseases. These long-term results support the positive benefit-risk profile of frontline nilotinib 300 mg twice daily in patients with CML-CP.

  5. MicroRNA expression at diagnosis adds relevant prognostic information to molecular categorization in patients with intermediate-risk cytogenetic acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Beyá, M; Brunet, S; Nomdedéu, J; Tejero, R; Díaz, T; Pratcorona, M; Tormo, M; Ribera, J M; Escoda, L; Duarte, R; Gallardo, D; Heras, I; Queipo de Llano, M P; Bargay, J; Monzo, M; Sierra, J; Navarro, A; Esteve, J

    2014-04-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a heterogeneous disease, and optimal treatment varies according to cytogenetic risk factors and molecular markers. Several studies have demonstrated the prognostic importance of microRNAs (miRNAs) in AML. Here we report a potential association between miRNA expression and clinical outcome in 238 intermediate-risk cytogenetic AML (IR-AML) patients from 16 institutions in the CETLAM cooperative group. We first profiled 670 miRNAs in a subset of 85 IR-AML patients from a single institution and identified 10 outcome-related miRNAs. We then validated these 10 miRNAs by individual assays in the total cohort and confirmed the prognostic impact of 4 miRNAs. High levels of miR-196b and miR-644 were independently associated with shorter overall survival, and low levels of miR-135a and miR-409-3p with a higher risk of relapse. Interestingly, miR-135a and miR-409-3p maintained their independent prognostic value within the unfavorable molecular subcategory (wild-type NPM1 and CEBPA and/or FLT3-ITD), and miR-644 retained its value within the favorable molecular subcategory. miR-409-3p, miR-135a, miR-196b and mir-644 arose as prognostic markers for IR-AML, both overall and within specific molecular subgroups. PMID:24072101

  6. Parameters detected by geriatric and quality of life assessment in 195 older patients with myelodysplastic syndromes and acute myeloid leukemia are highly predictive for outcome

    PubMed Central

    Deschler, Barbara; Ihorst, Gabriele; Platzbecker, Uwe; Germing, Ulrich; März, Eva; de Figuerido, Marcelo; Fritzsche, Kurt; Haas, Peter; Salih, Helmut R.; Giagounidis, Aristoteles; Selleslag, Dominik; Labar, Boris; de Witte, Theo; Wijermans, Pierre; Lübbert, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes and acute myeloid leukemia exemplify the complexity of treatment allocation in older patients as options range from best supportive care, non-intensive treatment (e.g. hypomethylating agents) to intensive chemotherapy/hematopoietic cell transplantation. Novel metrics for non-disease variables are urgently needed to help define the best treatment for each older patient. We investigated the feasibility and prognostic value of geriatric/quality of life assessments aside from established disease-specific variables in 195 patients aged 60 years or over with myelodysplastic syndromes/acute myeloid leukemia. These patients were grouped according to treatment intensity and assessed. Assessment consisted of eight instruments evaluating activities of daily living, depression, mental functioning, mobility, comorbidities, Karnofsky Index and quality of life. Patients with a median age of 71 years (range 60-87 years) with myelodysplastic syndromes (n=63) or acute myeloid leukemia (n=132) were treated either with best supportive care (n=47), hypomethylating agents (n=73) or intensive chemotherapy/hematopoietic cell transplantation (n=75). After selection of variables, pathological activities of daily living and quality of life/fatigue remained highly predictive for overall survival in the entire patient group beyond disease-related risk factors adverse cytogenetics and blast count of 20% or over. In 107 patients treated non-intensively activities of daily living of less than 100 (hazard ratio, HR 2.94), Karnofsky Index below 80 (HR 2.34) and quality of life/’fatigue’ of 50 or over (HR 1.77) were significant prognosticators. Summation of adverse features revealed a high risk of death (HR 9.36). In-depth evaluation of older patients prior to individual treatment allocation is feasible and provides additional information to standard assessment. Patients aged 60 years or over with newly diagnosed myelodysplastic syndromes/acute myeloid leukemia and

  7. High levels of the adhesion molecule CD44 on leukemic cells generate acute myeloid leukemia relapse after withdrawal of the initial transforming event.

    PubMed

    Quéré, R; Andradottir, S; Brun, A C M; Zubarev, R A; Karlsson, G; Olsson, K; Magnusson, M; Cammenga, J; Karlsson, S

    2011-03-01

    Multiple genetic hits are detected in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). To investigate this further, we developed a tetracycline-inducible mouse model of AML, in which the initial transforming event, overexpression of HOXA10, can be eliminated. Continuous overexpression of HOXA10 is required to generate AML in primary recipient mice, but is not essential for maintenance of the leukemia. Transplantation of AML to secondary recipients showed that in established leukemias, ∼80% of the leukemia-initiating cells (LICs) in bone marrow stopped proliferating upon withdrawal of HOXA10 overexpression. However, the population of LICs in primary recipients is heterogeneous, as ∼20% of the LICs induce leukemia in secondary recipients despite elimination of HOXA10-induced overexpression. Intrinsic genetic activation of several proto-oncogenes was observed in leukemic cells resistant to inactivation of the initial transformation event. Interestingly, high levels of the adhesion molecule CD44 on leukemic cells are essential to generate leukemia after removal of the primary event. This suggests that extrinsic niche-dependent factors are also involved in the host-dependent outgrowth of leukemias after withdrawal of HOXA10 overexpression event that initiates the leukemia.

  8. Acute myeloid leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... a low number of platelets. A white blood cell count ( WBC ) can be high, low, or normal. Bone ... and overall health How high your white blood cell count was Certain genetic changes in the leukemia cells ...

  9. Genomic profiling of thousands of candidate polymorphisms predicts risk of relapse in 778 Danish and German childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients

    PubMed Central

    Wesołowska-Andersen, A; Borst, L; Dalgaard, M D; Yadav, R; Rasmussen, K K; Wehner, P S; Rasmussen, M; Ørntoft, T F; Nordentoft, I; Koehler, R; Bartram, C R; Schrappe, M; Sicheritz-Ponten, T; Gautier, L; Marquart, H; Madsen, H O; Brunak, S; Stanulla, M; Gupta, R; Schmiegelow, K

    2015-01-01

    Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia survival approaches 90%. New strategies are needed to identify the 10–15% who evade cure. We applied targeted, sequencing-based genotyping of 25 000 to 34 000 preselected potentially clinically relevant single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) to identify host genome profiles associated with relapse risk in 352 patients from the Nordic ALL92/2000 protocols and 426 patients from the German Berlin–Frankfurt–Munster (BFM) ALL2000 protocol. Patients were enrolled between 1992 and 2008 (median follow-up: 7.6 years). Eleven cross-validated SNPs were significantly associated with risk of relapse across protocols. SNP and biologic pathway level analyses associated relapse risk with leukemia aggressiveness, glucocorticosteroid pharmacology/response and drug transport/metabolism pathways. Classification and regression tree analysis identified three distinct risk groups defined by end of induction residual leukemia, white blood cell count and variants in myeloperoxidase (MPO), estrogen receptor 1 (ESR1), lamin B1 (LMNB1) and matrix metalloproteinase-7 (MMP7) genes, ATP-binding cassette transporters and glucocorticosteroid transcription regulation pathways. Relapse rates ranged from 4% (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.6–6.3%) for the best group (72% of patients) to 76% (95% CI: 41–90%) for the worst group (5% of patients, P<0.001). Validation of these findings and similar approaches to identify SNPs associated with toxicities may allow future individualized relapse and toxicity risk-based treatments adaptation. PMID:24990611

  10. Cytogenetic and molecular studies of Down syndrome individuals with transient leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, J.J.; Hassold, T.J.; Zipursky, A.

    1994-09-01

    There is an increased risk of leukemia in Down syndrome (DS) patients with estimates ranging from 14 to 30 times the incidence rate observed for normal children. Furthermore, one subtype of leukemia, called transient myeloproliferative disorder, or transient leukemia (TL), occurs almost exclusively in DS infants. The basis of the association between DS and leukemia is unknown but we and others have hypothesized that it may be attributable to the mechanism of origin of the extra chromosome. Therefore, we have initiated a cytogenetic and molecular study of nondisjunction in leukemic DS individuals. To date, we have obtained blood and/or tissue samples from 54 individuals, consisting of 16 cases with TL and 6 with acute megakaryoblastic leukemia (postulated to be related to TL), and 32 cases of other forms of leukemia (15 ALL, 10 AML, 7 others). Our preliminary data suggest significant differences between DS children with TL and those with other types of leukemia or DS individuals with no history of leukemia. For example, the TL cases have a highly significant increase in the frequency of {open_quotes}atypical{close_quotes} constitutional karyotypes (i.e. mosaic trisomies, rings, isochromosomes) and are almost always male. Initial gene mapping studies of these cases aimed at identifying loci important in the genesis of TL will be presented and compared to similar data from DS individuals with other forms of leukemia and those without leukemia.

  11. Childhood Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... leukemia, having certain genetic disorders and having had radiation or chemotherapy. Treatment often cures childhood leukemia. Treatment options include chemotherapy, other drug therapy and radiation. In some cases bone marrow and blood stem ...

  12. Evidence that high-migration drug-surviving MOLT4 leukemia cells exhibit cancer stem cell-like properties.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiaoxing; Xiong, Meng; Jin, Yujie; Deng, Chaohua; Xu, Hui; An, Changqing; Hao, Ling; Yang, Xiangyong; Deng, Xinzhou; Tu, Zhenbo; Li, Xinran; Xiao, Ruijing; Zhang, Qiuping

    2016-07-01

    Leukemia represents a spectrum of hematological malignancies threatening human health. Resistance to treatments and metastasis of leukemia are the main causes of death in patients. Leukemia stem cells (LSCs) are the initiating cells of leukemia as well as the main source of drug resistance, invasion and metastasis. Consequently, eliminating LSCs is a prerequisite to eradicate leukemia. Preliminary studies in our laboratory have shown that chemokines and their related receptors play an important role in the drug resistance and metastasis of leukemic cells. In this study, we obtained high migration drug-surviving (short term) MOLT4 cells (hMDSCs-MOLT4) with treatment of doxorubicin (DOX) after Transwell assay. Then we detected stem cell-associated molecular markers on hMDSCs-MOLT4 cells and the parental MOLT4 cells by FCM, QPCR, western blotting, H&E staining and immunohisto-chemistry experimental techniques in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, we explored its impact on drug resistance and tumor formation. Then we found that compared with the parental MOLT4 cells, the mRNA expression levels of stem cell-related factors Sox2, Oct4, C-myc, Klf4, Nanog, Bmi-1, CXCR4 are increased in hMDSCs-MOLT4 cells, together with the protein expression levels of Sox2, Oct4, Klf4, Nanog, CXCR4 and CD34. Our results indicated that hMDSCs-MOLT4 cells exhibited strong drug resistance and certain cancer stem cell-like characteristics. It is the first indication that the targeting stemness factors such as Sox2, Oct4, Klf4, Nanog and CXCR4 may represent plausible options for eliminating T-ALL stem-like cells. The present findings shed light on the relationship between drug-tolerant leukemic cells and cancer stem cells.

  13. Risk Factors for High Blood Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... the NHLBI on Twitter. Risk Factors for High Blood Pressure Anyone can develop high blood pressure; however, age, ... can increase your risk for developing high blood pressure. Age Blood pressure tends to rise with age. About 65 ...

  14. Increased risk for lymphoma and glomerulonephritis in a closed population of cats exposed to feline leukemia virus.

    PubMed

    Francis, D P; Essex, M; Jakowski, R M; Cotter, S M; Lerer, T J; Hardy, W D

    1980-03-01

    Feline leukemia virus (FeLV)-associated diseases were observed in a household in eastern Connecticut having 134 cats over a period of five and a half years. FeLV-positive cats had a much higher mortality rate (34.6 deaths per 1000 cat-months of follow-up) than did FeLV-negative cats (8.9 deaths per 1000 cat-months of follow-up). The leading cause of death was glomerulonephritis followed by lymphoma. The relative risk for virus-positive cats as compared to virus-negative cats for the two diseases was 9.9 and 9.6, respectively. The major risk factors for the development of lymphoma were virus positivity and low antibody titer to the feline oncornavirus-associated cell membrane antigen (FOCMA). No significant differences in cancer incidence were seen between the two major breeds (Abyssinian and Burmese) in the household. An older age at arrival in the house decreased death rates for all causes in the household, but it did not significantly affect death rates from lymphoma, although there was a positive trend. PMID:6244730

  15. [Amebic colitis and liver abscess complicated by high serum procalcitonin in acute myeloid leukemia].

    PubMed

    Oku, Eijiro; Nomura, Kei; Nakamura, Takayuki; Morishige, Satoshi; Seki, Ritsuko; Imamura, Rie; Hashiguchi, Michitoshi; Osaki, Kouichi; Mizuno, Shinichi; Nagafuji, Koji; Okamura, Takashi

    2012-11-01

    We present a case of amebic colitis and liver abscess complicated by acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with high serum procalcitonin (PCT). A 61-year-old Japanese man seen at our hospital for severe diarrhea and high fever was found to have multiple ulcers in the transverse and sigmoid colon and rectum by colonoscopy and biopsies were conducted. Immature leukocytes with mild anemia and thrombocytopenia were seen in peripheral blood, necessitating bone marrow aspiration and biopsy that yielded a diagnosis of AML (FAB M4Eo). Serum C-reactive protein and PCT were extremely elevated. Blood cultures for bacteria and fungi were negative. Multiple low-density areas in the liver were found in abdominal computed tomography. Histological colon biopsy findings revealed amebic colitis, strongly suggesting amebic liver abscess. Metronidazole treatment was initiated for amebiasis and subsequent standard chemotherapy for AML was followed after fever was lowered. Hematological and cytogenetic CR was maintained with good clinical condition. Few case reports have been published in Japan to date on amebic colitis and liver abscess complicated by AML and no reports have been made on PCT elevation caused by amebiasis. In conclusion, differential diagnosis of amebiasis is necessary in addition to that of bacterial or fungal infection in serum PCT elevation. PMID:23367854

  16. Multilineage dysplasia is associated with a poorer prognosis in patients with de novo acute myeloid leukemia with intermediate-risk cytogenetics and wild-type NPM1.

    PubMed

    Rozman, María; Navarro, José-Tomás; Arenillas, Leonor; Aventín, Anna; Giménez, Teresa; Alonso, Esther; Perea, Granada; Camós, Mireia; Navarrete, Mayda; Tuset, Esperanza; Florensa, Lourdes; Millá, Fuensanta; Nomdedéu, Josep; de la Banda, Esmeralda; Díaz-Beyá, Marina; Pratcorona, Marta; Garrido, Ana; Navarro, Blanca; Brunet, Salut; Sierra, Jorge; Esteve, Jordi

    2014-10-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with myelodysplasia-related changes is characterized by the presence of multilineage dysplasia (MLD), frequently related to high-risk cytogenetics and poor outcome. However, the presence of MLD does not modify the favorable prognostic impact of NPM1 mutation. The prognosis of patients with AML presenting marked dysplasia lacking high-risk cytogenetics and NPM1 mutation is uncertain. We evaluated the prognostic impact of MLD in 177 patients with intermediate-risk cytogenetics AML (IR-AML) and wild-type NPM1. Patients were categorized as MLD-WHO (WHO myelodysplasia criteria; n = 43, 24 %), MLD-NRW (significant MLD non-reaching WHO criteria; n = 16, 9 %), absent MLD (n = 80, 45 %), or non-evaluable MLD (n = 38, 22 %). No differences concerning the main characteristics were observed between patients with or without MLD. Outcome of patients with MLD-WHO and MLD-NRW was similar, and significantly worse than patients lacking MLD. The presence of MLD (66 vs. 80 %, p = 0.03; HR, 95 % CI = 2.3, 1.08-4.08) and higher leukocyte count at diagnosis was the only variable associated with lower probability of complete remission after frontline therapy. Concerning survival, age and leukocytes showed an independent prognostic value, whereas MLD showed a trend to a negative impact (p = 0.087, HR, 95 % CI = 1.426, 0.95-2.142). Moreover, after excluding patients receiving an allogeneic stem cell transplantation in first CR, MLD was associated with a shorter survival (HR, 95 % CI = 1.599, 1.026-2.492; p = 0.038). In conclusion, MLD identifies a subgroup of patients with poorer outcome among patients with IR-AML and wild-type NPM1.

  17. Multilineage dysplasia is associated with a poorer prognosis in patients with de novo acute myeloid leukemia with intermediate-risk cytogenetics and wild-type NPM1.

    PubMed

    Rozman, María; Navarro, José-Tomás; Arenillas, Leonor; Aventín, Anna; Giménez, Teresa; Alonso, Esther; Perea, Granada; Camós, Mireia; Navarrete, Mayda; Tuset, Esperanza; Florensa, Lourdes; Millá, Fuensanta; Nomdedéu, Josep; de la Banda, Esmeralda; Díaz-Beyá, Marina; Pratcorona, Marta; Garrido, Ana; Navarro, Blanca; Brunet, Salut; Sierra, Jorge; Esteve, Jordi

    2014-10-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with myelodysplasia-related changes is characterized by the presence of multilineage dysplasia (MLD), frequently related to high-risk cytogenetics and poor outcome. However, the presence of MLD does not modify the favorable prognostic impact of NPM1 mutation. The prognosis of patients with AML presenting marked dysplasia lacking high-risk cytogenetics and NPM1 mutation is uncertain. We evaluated the prognostic impact of MLD in 177 patients with intermediate-risk cytogenetics AML (IR-AML) and wild-type NPM1. Patients were categorized as MLD-WHO (WHO myelodysplasia criteria; n = 43, 24 %), MLD-NRW (significant MLD non-reaching WHO criteria; n = 16, 9 %), absent MLD (n = 80, 45 %), or non-evaluable MLD (n = 38, 22 %). No differences concerning the main characteristics were observed between patients with or without MLD. Outcome of patients with MLD-WHO and MLD-NRW was similar, and significantly worse than patients lacking MLD. The presence of MLD (66 vs. 80 %, p = 0.03; HR, 95 % CI = 2.3, 1.08-4.08) and higher leukocyte count at diagnosis was the only variable associated with lower probability of complete remission after frontline therapy. Concerning survival, age and leukocytes showed an independent prognostic value, whereas MLD showed a trend to a negative impact (p = 0.087, HR, 95 % CI = 1.426, 0.95-2.142). Moreover, after excluding patients receiving an allogeneic stem cell transplantation in first CR, MLD was associated with a shorter survival (HR, 95 % CI = 1.599, 1.026-2.492; p = 0.038). In conclusion, MLD identifies a subgroup of patients with poorer outcome among patients with IR-AML and wild-type NPM1. PMID:24824767

  18. High pseudotumor cerebri incidence in tretinoin and arsenic treated acute promyelocytic leukemia and the role of topiramate after acetazolamide failure

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Morgan B.; Griffiths, Elizabeth A.; Thompson, James E.; Wang, Eunice S.; Wetzler, Meir; Freyer, Craig W.

    2014-01-01

    Dual differentiation therapy with arsenic trioxide and tretinoin (all-trans-retinoic acid; ATRA) for the management of low and intermediate risk acute promyelocytic leukemia has recently been recommended by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network. Some less common toxicities of the combination may have yet to be fully realized. Of ten patients we have treated thus far, five (50%) have developed pseudotumor cerebri. In one patient, temporary discontinuation of ATRA and initiation of acetazolamide controlled symptoms. In four patients, topiramate was substituted for acetazolamide to relieve symptoms and allow ATRA dose re-escalation. We conclude that providers should monitor for pseudotumor cerebri and consider topiramate if acetazolamide fails. PMID:25180154

  19. Bimodal high-affinity association of Brd4 with murine leukemia virus integrase and mononucleosomes

    PubMed Central

    Larue, Ross C.; Plumb, Matthew R.; Crowe, Brandon L.; Shkriabai, Nikoloz; Sharma, Amit; DiFiore, Julia; Malani, Nirav; Aiyer, Sriram S.; Roth, Monica J.; Bushman, Frederic D.; Foster, Mark P.; Kvaratskhelia, Mamuka

    2014-01-01

    The importance of understanding the molecular mechanisms of murine leukemia virus (MLV) integration into host chromatin is highlighted by the development of MLV-based vectors for human gene-therapy. We have recently identified BET proteins (Brd2, 3 and 4) as the main cellular binding partners of MLV integrase (IN) and demonstrated their significance for effective MLV integration at transcription start sites. Here we show that recombinant Brd4, a representative of the three BET proteins, establishes complementary high-affinity interactions with MLV IN and mononucleosomes (MNs). Brd4(1–720) but not its N- or C-terminal fragments effectively stimulate MLV IN strand transfer activities in vitro. Mass spectrometry- and NMR-based approaches have enabled us to map key interacting interfaces between the C-terminal domain of BRD4 and the C-terminal tail of MLV IN. Additionally, the N-terminal fragment of Brd4 binds to both DNA and acetylated histone peptides, allowing it to bind tightly to MNs. Comparative analyses of the distributions of various histone marks along chromatin revealed significant positive correlations between H3- and H4-acetylated histones, BET protein-binding sites and MLV-integration sites. Our findings reveal a bimodal mechanism for BET protein-mediated MLV integration into select chromatin locations. PMID:24520112

  20. Bimodal high-affinity association of Brd4 with murine leukemia virus integrase and mononucleosomes.

    PubMed

    Larue, Ross C; Plumb, Matthew R; Crowe, Brandon L; Shkriabai, Nikoloz; Sharma, Amit; DiFiore, Julia; Malani, Nirav; Aiyer, Sriram S; Roth, Monica J; Bushman, Frederic D; Foster, Mark P; Kvaratskhelia, Mamuka

    2014-04-01

    The importance of understanding the molecular mechanisms of murine leukemia virus (MLV) integration into host chromatin is highlighted by the development of MLV-based vectors for human gene-therapy. We have recently identified BET proteins (Brd2, 3 and 4) as the main cellular binding partners of MLV integrase (IN) and demonstrated their significance for effective MLV integration at transcription start sites. Here we show that recombinant Brd4, a representative of the three BET proteins, establishes complementary high-affinity interactions with MLV IN and mononucleosomes (MNs). Brd4(1-720) but not its N- or C-terminal fragments effectively stimulate MLV IN strand transfer activities in vitro. Mass spectrometry- and NMR-based approaches have enabled us to map key interacting interfaces between the C-terminal domain of BRD4 and the C-terminal tail of MLV IN. Additionally, the N-terminal fragment of Brd4 binds to both DNA and acetylated histone peptides, allowing it to bind tightly to MNs. Comparative analyses of the distributions of various histone marks along chromatin revealed significant positive correlations between H3- and H4-acetylated histones, BET protein-binding sites and MLV-integration sites. Our findings reveal a bimodal mechanism for BET protein-mediated MLV integration into select chromatin locations. PMID:24520112

  1. High-throughput sequencing detects minimal residual disease in acute T lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Wu, David; Sherwood, Anna; Fromm, Jonathan R; Winter, Stuart S; Dunsmore, Kimberly P; Loh, Mignon L; Greisman, Harvey A; Sabath, Daniel E; Wood, Brent L; Robins, Harlan

    2012-05-16

    High-throughput sequencing (HTS) of lymphoid receptor genes is an emerging technology that can comprehensively assess the diversity of the immune system. Here, we applied HTS to the diagnosis of T-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia/lymphoma. Using 43 paired patient samples, we then assessed minimal residual disease (MRD) at day 29 after treatment. The variable regions of TCRB and TCRG were sequenced using an Illumina HiSeq platform after performance of multiplexed polymerase chain reaction, which targeted all potential V-J rearrangement combinations. Pretreatment samples were used to define clonal T cell receptor (TCR) complementarity-determining region 3 (CDR3) sequences, and paired posttreatment samples were evaluated for MRD. Abnormal T lymphoblast identification by multiparametric flow cytometry was concurrently performed for comparison. We found that TCRB and TCRG HTS not only identified clonality at diagnosis in most cases (31 of 43 for TCRB and 27 of 43 for TCRG) but also detected subsequent MRD. As expected, HTS of TCRB and TCRG identified MRD that was not detected by flow cytometry in a subset of cases (25 of 35 HTS compared with 13 of 35, respectively), which highlights the potential of this technology to define lower detection thresholds for MRD that could affect clinical treatment decisions. Thus, next-generation sequencing of lymphoid receptor gene repertoire may improve clinical diagnosis and subsequent MRD monitoring of lymphoproliferative disorders.

  2. Genetic risk factors for the development of osteonecrosis in children under age 10 treated for acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Karol, Seth E; Mattano, Leonard A; Yang, Wenjian; Maloney, Kelly W; Smith, Colton; Liu, ChengCheng; Ramsey, Laura B; Fernandez, Christian A; Chang, Tamara Y; Neale, Geoffrey; Cheng, Cheng; Mardis, Elaine; Fulton, Robert; Scheet, Paul; San Lucas, F Anthony; Larsen, Eric C; Loh, Mignon L; Raetz, Elizabeth A; Hunger, Stephen P; Devidas, Meenakshi; Relling, Mary V

    2016-02-01

    Osteonecrosis is a dose-limiting toxicity in the treatment of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Prior studies on the genetics of osteonecrosis have focused on patients ≥10 years of age, leaving the genetic risk factors for the larger group of children <10 years incompletely understood. Here, we perform the first evaluation of genetic risk factors for osteonecrosis in children <10 years. The discovery cohort comprised 82 cases of osteonecrosis and 287 controls treated on Children's Oncology Group (COG) standard-risk ALL protocol AALL0331 (NCT00103285, https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00103285), with results tested for replication in 817 children <10 years treated on COG protocol AALL0232 (NCT00075725, https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00075725). The top replicated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were near bone morphogenic protein 7 [BMP7: rs75161997, P = 5.34 × 10(-8) (odds ratio [OR] 15.0) and P = .0498 (OR 8.44) in the discovery and replication cohorts, respectively] and PROX1-antisense RNA1 (PROX1-AS1: rs1891059, P = 2.28 × 10(-7) [OR 6.48] and P = .0077 [OR 3.78] for the discovery and replication cohorts, respectively). The top replicated nonsynonymous SNP, rs34144324, was in a glutamate receptor gene (GRID2, P = 8.65 × 10(-6) [OR 3.46] and P = .0136 [OR 10.8] in the discovery and replication cohorts, respectively). In a meta-analysis, the BMP7 and PROX1-AS1 variants (rs75161997 and rs1891059, respectively) met the significance threshold of <5 × 10(-8). Top replicated SNPs were enriched in enhancers active in mesenchymal stem cells, and analysis of annotated genes demonstrated enrichment in glutamate receptor and adipogenesis pathways. These data may provide new insights into the pathophysiology of osteonecrosis. PMID:26590194

  3. Genetic risk factors for the development of osteonecrosis in children under age 10 treated for acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Karol, Seth E; Mattano, Leonard A; Yang, Wenjian; Maloney, Kelly W; Smith, Colton; Liu, ChengCheng; Ramsey, Laura B; Fernandez, Christian A; Chang, Tamara Y; Neale, Geoffrey; Cheng, Cheng; Mardis, Elaine; Fulton, Robert; Scheet, Paul; San Lucas, F Anthony; Larsen, Eric C; Loh, Mignon L; Raetz, Elizabeth A; Hunger, Stephen P; Devidas, Meenakshi; Relling, Mary V

    2016-02-01

    Osteonecrosis is a dose-limiting toxicity in the treatment of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Prior studies on the genetics of osteonecrosis have focused on patients ≥10 years of age, leaving the genetic risk factors for the larger group of children <10 years incompletely understood. Here, we perform the first evaluation of genetic risk factors for osteonecrosis in children <10 years. The discovery cohort comprised 82 cases of osteonecrosis and 287 controls treated on Children's Oncology Group (COG) standard-risk ALL protocol AALL0331 (NCT00103285, https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00103285), with results tested for replication in 817 children <10 years treated on COG protocol AALL0232 (NCT00075725, https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00075725). The top replicated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were near bone morphogenic protein 7 [BMP7: rs75161997, P = 5.34 × 10(-8) (odds ratio [OR] 15.0) and P = .0498 (OR 8.44) in the discovery and replication cohorts, respectively] and PROX1-antisense RNA1 (PROX1-AS1: rs1891059, P = 2.28 × 10(-7) [OR 6.48] and P = .0077 [OR 3.78] for the discovery and replication cohorts, respectively). The top replicated nonsynonymous SNP, rs34144324, was in a glutamate receptor gene (GRID2, P = 8.65 × 10(-6) [OR 3.46] and P = .0136 [OR 10.8] in the discovery and replication cohorts, respectively). In a meta-analysis, the BMP7 and PROX1-AS1 variants (rs75161997 and rs1891059, respectively) met the significance threshold of <5 × 10(-8). Top replicated SNPs were enriched in enhancers active in mesenchymal stem cells, and analysis of annotated genes demonstrated enrichment in glutamate receptor and adipogenesis pathways. These data may provide new insights into the pathophysiology of osteonecrosis.

  4. 42 CFR 81.24 - Guidelines for leukemia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Guidelines for leukemia. 81.24 Section 81.24 Public... Causation § 81.24 Guidelines for leukemia. (a) For claims involving leukemia, DOL will calculate one or more probability of causation estimates from up to three of the four alternate leukemia risk models included...

  5. 42 CFR 81.24 - Guidelines for leukemia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Guidelines for leukemia. 81.24 Section 81.24 Public... Causation § 81.24 Guidelines for leukemia. (a) For claims involving leukemia, DOL will calculate one or more probability of causation estimates from up to three of the four alternate leukemia risk models included...

  6. 42 CFR 81.24 - Guidelines for leukemia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Guidelines for leukemia. 81.24 Section 81.24 Public... Causation § 81.24 Guidelines for leukemia. (a) For claims involving leukemia, DOL will calculate one or more probability of causation estimates from up to three of the four alternate leukemia risk models included...

  7. 42 CFR 81.24 - Guidelines for leukemia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Guidelines for leukemia. 81.24 Section 81.24 Public... Causation § 81.24 Guidelines for leukemia. (a) For claims involving leukemia, DOL will calculate one or more probability of causation estimates from up to three of the four alternate leukemia risk models included...

  8. 42 CFR 81.24 - Guidelines for leukemia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Guidelines for leukemia. 81.24 Section 81.24 Public... Causation § 81.24 Guidelines for leukemia. (a) For claims involving leukemia, DOL will calculate one or more probability of causation estimates from up to three of the four alternate leukemia risk models included...

  9. Synchronous gastric and ampullary adenocarcinomas in a hairy cell leukemia patient treated with pentostatin eight years prior.

    PubMed

    Senatore, Frank J; Dasanu, Constantin A

    2016-06-01

    Hairy cell leukemia patients are at increased risk for second malignancies, including both solid and lymphoid neoplasms. Along with other factors, multiple immune defects present in hairy cell leukemia likely contribute to subsequent carcinogenesis. We report herein a case of synchronous high-grade gastric and ampullary adenocarcinomas in a patient with a history of hairy cell leukemia treated eight years prior with pentostatin. We include a review of immune alterations induced by both hairy cell leukemia and its therapies, and link them with the occurrence of second cancers in these patients. PMID:25712625

  10. Effect of high dose cytosine arabinoside on quantitative EEG in patients with acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Maschio, Marta; Marchesi, Francesco; Dispenza, Sabrina; Dinapoli, Loredana; Sperati, Francesca; Petreri, Gianluca; Gumenyuk, Svitlana; Dessanti, Maria Laura; Zarabla, Alessia; Cantelmi, Tonino; Mengarelli, Andrea

    2016-04-01

    Background EEG activity is considered an index of functional state of brain. Chemotherapy (CT), used for non-central nervous system (CNS) cancer, can cross the blood brain barrier and contribute to changes in the functional state of brain that can alter background EEG activity. Quantitative EEG (qEEG) is superior to conventional EEG in the detection of subtle alterations of EEG background activity and for this reason, the use of qEEG might assist the clinician in evaluating the possible effect of CT on the CNS. The nucleoside analog cytosine arabinoside (Ara-C) is one of the milestone chemotherapeutic agents used for treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Our observational study evaluates the possible effect of Ara-C on the qEEG of patients with AML, without CNS involvement. We conducted an observational study on newly diagnosed AML patients without CNS involvement, undergoing treatment with Ara-C to analyze the possible effect of Ara-C high doses on EEG background activity using qEEG analyses. A total of nine AML patients, 5 with Ara-C i.v. high dose (≥3 g/m(2) die), 4 with standard dose (100 mg/m(2) die) underwent qEEG (at rest, during hyperpnoea, mental arithmetic task and blocking reaction). We compared the EEG background activity of the two groups at baseline and after 6 months. Statistical analysis showed no significant differences between the two groups in mean relative power for all frequency bands, at rest and during hyperpnoea, mental arithmetic task and blocking reaction. Our data indicate that high dose Ara-C i.v. did not induce significant changes on EEG background activity in our patients. Future research in this area could include prospective studies that would combine qEEG and neuropsychological testing to assess the impact of CT on brain functions.

  11. Integration of genetic and clinical risk factors improves prognostication in relapsed childhood B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Irving, Julie A. E.; Enshaei, Amir; Parker, Catriona A.; Sutton, Rosemary; Kuiper, Roland P.; Erhorn, Amy; Minto, Lynne; Venn, Nicola C.; Law, Tamara; Yu, Jiangyan; Schwab, Claire; Davies, Rosanna; Matheson, Elizabeth; Davies, Alysia; Sonneveld, Edwin; den Boer, Monique L.; Love, Sharon B.; Harrison, Christine J.; Hoogerbrugge, Peter M.; Revesz, Tamas; Saha, Vaskar

    2016-01-01

    Somatic genetic abnormalities are initiators and drivers of disease and have proven clinical utility at initial diagnosis. However, the genetic landscape and its clinical utility at relapse are less well understood and have not been studied comprehensively. We analyzed cytogenetic data from 427 children with relapsed B-cell precursor ALL treated on the international trial, ALLR3. Also we screened 238 patients with a marrow relapse for selected copy number alterations (CNAs) and mutations. Cytogenetic risk groups were predictive of outcome postrelapse and survival rates at 5 years for patients with good, intermediate-, and high-risk cytogenetics were 68%, 47%, and 26%, respectively (P < .001). TP53 alterations and NR3C1/BTG1 deletions were associated with a higher risk of progression: hazard ratio 2.36 (95% confidence interval, 1.51-3.70, P < .001) and 2.15 (1.32-3.48, P = .002). NRAS mutations were associated with an increased risk of progression among standard-risk patients with high hyperdiploidy: 3.17 (1.15-8.71, P = .026). Patients classified clinically as standard and high risk had distinct genetic profiles. The outcome of clinical standard-risk patients with high-risk cytogenetics was equivalent to clinical high-risk patients. Screening patients at relapse for key genetic abnormalities will enable the integration of genetic and clinical risk factors to improve patient stratification and outcome. This study is registered at www.clinicaltrials.org as #ISCRTN45724312. PMID:27229005

  12. Integration of genetic and clinical risk factors improves prognostication in relapsed childhood B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Irving, Julie A E; Enshaei, Amir; Parker, Catriona A; Sutton, Rosemary; Kuiper, Roland P; Erhorn, Amy; Minto, Lynne; Venn, Nicola C; Law, Tamara; Yu, Jiangyan; Schwab, Claire; Davies, Rosanna; Matheson, Elizabeth; Davies, Alysia; Sonneveld, Edwin; den Boer, Monique L; Love, Sharon B; Harrison, Christine J; Hoogerbrugge, Peter M; Revesz, Tamas; Saha, Vaskar; Moorman, Anthony V

    2016-08-18

    Somatic genetic abnormalities are initiators and drivers of disease and have proven clinical utility at initial diagnosis. However, the genetic landscape and its clinical utility at relapse are less well understood and have not been studied comprehensively. We analyzed cytogenetic data from 427 children with relapsed B-cell precursor ALL treated on the international trial, ALLR3. Also we screened 238 patients with a marrow relapse for selected copy number alterations (CNAs) and mutations. Cytogenetic risk groups were predictive of outcome postrelapse and survival rates at 5 years for patients with good, intermediate-, and high-risk cytogenetics were 68%, 47%, and 26%, respectively (P < .001). TP53 alterations and NR3C1/BTG1 deletions were associated with a higher risk of progression: hazard ratio 2.36 (95% confidence interval, 1.51-3.70, P < .001) and 2.15 (1.32-3.48, P = .002). NRAS mutations were associated with an increased risk of progression among standard-risk patients with high hyperdiploidy: 3.17 (1.15-8.71, P = .026). Patients classified clinically as standard and high risk had distinct genetic profiles. The outcome of clinical standard-risk patients with high-risk cytogenetics was equivalent to clinical high-risk patients. Screening patients at relapse for key genetic abnormalities will enable the integration of genetic and clinical risk factors to improve patient stratification and outcome. This study is registered at www.clinicaltrials.org as #ISCRTN45724312. PMID:27229005

  13. Clinical activity of sequential flavopiridol, cytosine arabinoside, and mitoxantrone for adults with newly diagnosed, poor-risk acute myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Karp, Judith E; Blackford, Amanda; Smith, B Douglas; Alino, Katrina; Seung, Amy Hatfield; Bolaños-Meade, Javier; Greer, Jacqueline M; Carraway, Hetty E; Gore, Steven D; Jones, Richard J; Levis, Mark J; McDevitt, Michael A; Doyle, L Austin; Wright, John J

    2010-07-01

    Flavopiridol, a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, is cytotoxic to leukemic blasts. In a Phase II study, flavopiridol 50 mg/m(2) was given by 1-h infusion daily x 3 beginning day 1 followed by 2 g/m(2)/72 h ara-C beginning day 6 and 40 mg/m(2) mitoxantrone on day 9 (FLAM) to 45 adults with newly diagnosed acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) with multiple poor-risk features. Thirty patients (67%) achieved complete remission (CR) and 4 (9%) died. Twelve (40%) received myeloablative allogeneic bone marrow transplant (BMT) in first CR. Median OS and DFS are not reached (67% alive 12.5-31 months, 58% in CR 11.4-30 months), with median follow-up 22 months. Sixteen received FLAM in CR, with median OS and DFS 9 and 13.1 months, and 36% alive at 21-31 months. Short OS and DFS correlated with adverse cytogenetics, regardless of age or treatment in CR. The addition of allogeneic BMT in CR translates into long OS and DFS in the majority of eligible patients.

  14. Protracted Administration of L-Asparaginase in Maintenance Phase Is the Risk Factor for Hyperglycemia in Older Patients with Pediatric Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Hideki; Imamura, Toshihiko; Saito, Akiko M; Takahashi, Yoshihiro; Suenobu, So-ichi; Hasegawa, Daiichiro; Deguchi, Takao; Hashii, Yoshiko; Kawasaki, Hirohide; Endo, Mikiya; Hori, Hiroki; Suzuki, Nobuhiro; Kosaka, Yoshiyuki; Kato, Koji; Yumura-Yagi, Keiko; Hara, Junichi; Oda, Megumi; Sato, Atsushi; Horibe, Keizo

    2015-01-01

    Although L-asparaginase related hyperglycemia is well known adverse event, it is not studied whether the profile of this adverse event is affected by intensification of L-asparaginase administration. Here, we analyzed the profile of L-asparaginase related hyperglycemia in a 1,176 patients with pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia treated according to the Japan Association of Childhood Leukemia Study ALL-02 protocol using protracted L-asparaginase administration in maintenance phase. We determined that a total of 75 L-asparaginase related hyperglycemia events occurred in 69 patients. Although 17 events (17/1176, 1.4%) developed in induction phase, which was lower incidence than those (10-15%) in previous reports, 45 events developed during the maintenance phase with protracted L-asparaginase administration. Multivariate analysis showed that older age at onset (≥ 10 years) was a sole independent risk factor for L-asparaginase-related hyperglycemia (P<0.01), especially in maintenance phase. Contrary to the previous reports, obesity was not associated with L-asparaginase-related hyperglycemia. These findings suggest that protracted administration of L-asparaginase is the risk factor for hyperglycemia when treating adolescent and young adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients. PMID:26317422

  15. Protracted Administration of L-Asparaginase in Maintenance Phase Is the Risk Factor for Hyperglycemia in Older Patients with Pediatric Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Hideki; Imamura, Toshihiko; Saito, Akiko M; Takahashi, Yoshihiro; Suenobu, So-ichi; Hasegawa, Daiichiro; Deguchi, Takao; Hashii, Yoshiko; Kawasaki, Hirohide; Endo, Mikiya; Hori, Hiroki; Suzuki, Nobuhiro; Kosaka, Yoshiyuki; Kato, Koji; Yumura-Yagi, Keiko; Hara, Junichi; Oda, Megumi; Sato, Atsushi; Horibe, Keizo

    2015-01-01

    Although L-asparaginase related hyperglycemia is well known adverse event, it is not studied whether the profile of this adverse event is affected by intensification of L-asparaginase administration. Here, we analyzed the profile of L-asparaginase related hyperglycemia in a 1,176 patients with pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia treated according to the Japan Association of Childhood Leukemia Study ALL-02 protocol using protracted L-asparaginase administration in maintenance phase. We determined that a total of 75 L-asparaginase related hyperglycemia events occurred in 69 patients. Although 17 events (17/1176, 1.4%) developed in induction phase, which was lower incidence than those (10-15%) in previous reports, 45 events developed during the maintenance phase with protracted L-asparaginase administration. Multivariate analysis showed that older age at onset (≥ 10 years) was a sole independent risk factor for L-asparaginase-related hyperglycemia (P<0.01), especially in maintenance phase. Contrary to the previous reports, obesity was not associated with L-asparaginase-related hyperglycemia. These findings suggest that protracted administration of L-asparaginase is the risk factor for hyperglycemia when treating adolescent and young adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients.

  16. Risk factors associated with increased bovine leukemia virus proviral load in infected cattle in Japan from 2012 to 2014.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Ayumu; Takeshima, Shin-nosuke; Matsumoto, Yuki; Aida, Yoko

    2015-12-01

    Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) is the causative agent of enzootic bovine leukosis, a malignant B cell lymphoma. BLV has spread worldwide and causes serious problems. After infection, the BLV genome is integrated into the host DNA and can be amplified during periods of latency. We previously designed degenerate primers using the Coordination of Common Motifs (CoCoMo) algorithm to establish a new quantitative real-time PCR method (BLV-CoCoMo-qPCR-2) of measuring the proviral load of both known and novel BLV variants. Here, we aimed to examine the correlation between proviral load and risk factors for BLV infection, such as breeding systems, parousity, and colostrum feeding. Blood and serum samples were collected from 83 BLV-positive farms in 22 prefectures of Japan, and the BLV proviral load and anti-BLV antibody levels were measured. BLV was detected in 73.3% (1039/1,417) of cattle by BLV-CoCoMo-qPCR-2 and the provirus was detected in 93 of 1039 antibody-negative samples. The results showed that the proviral load increased with progression of lymphocytosis. Next, the risk factors associated with increasing BLV infection rate were examined along with any association with proviral load. The proviral load was higher in cattle with lymphocytosis than in healthy cattle, and higher in multiparous cows than in nulliparous cows. Finally, proviral loads were higher in contact breeding systems than in non-contact breeding systems. Taken together, these findings may help to formulate a plan for eliminating BLV from contaminated farms. This is the first nationwide study to estimate BLV proviral load in Japanese cattle.

  17. High accuracy mutation detection in leukemia on a selected panel of cancer genes.

    PubMed

    Kalender Atak, Zeynep; De Keersmaecker, Kim; Gianfelici, Valentina; Geerdens, Ellen; Vandepoel, Roel; Pauwels, Daphnie; Porcu, Michaël; Lahortiga, Idoya; Brys, Vanessa; Dirks, Willy G; Quentmeier, Hilmar; Cloos, Jacqueline; Cuppens, Harry; Uyttebroeck, Anne; Vandenberghe, Peter; Cools, Jan; Aerts, Stein

    2012-01-01

    With the advent of whole-genome and whole-exome sequencing, high-quality catalogs of recurrently mutated cancer genes are becoming available for many cancer types. Increasing access to sequencing technology, including bench-top sequencers, provide the opportunity to re-sequence a limited set of cancer genes across a patient cohort with limited processing time. Here, we re-sequenced a set of cancer genes in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) using Nimblegen sequence capture coupled with Roche/454 technology. First, we investigated how a maximal sensitivity and specificity of mutation detection can be achieved through a benchmark study. We tested nine combinations of different mapping and variant-calling methods, varied the variant calling parameters, and compared the predicted mutations with a large independent validation set obtained by capillary re-sequencing. We found that the combination of two mapping algorithms, namely BWA-SW and SSAHA2, coupled with the variant calling algorithm Atlas-SNP2 yields the highest sensitivity (95%) and the highest specificity (93%). Next, we applied this analysis pipeline to identify mutations in a set of 58 cancer genes, in a panel of 18 T-ALL cell lines and 15 T-ALL patient samples. We confirmed mutations in known T-ALL drivers, including PHF6, NF1, FBXW7, NOTCH1, KRAS, NRAS, PIK3CA, and PTEN. Interestingly, we also found mutations in several cancer genes that had not been linked to T-ALL before, including JAK3. Finally, we re-sequenced a small set of 39 candidate genes and identified recurrent mutations in TET1, SPRY3 and SPRY4. In conclusion, we established an optimized analysis pipeline for Roche/454 data that can be applied to accurately detect gene mutations in cancer, which led to the identification of several new candidate T-ALL driver mutations.

  18. Genetic Polymorphisms Associated to Folate Transport as Predictors of Increased Risk for Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Mexican Children.

    PubMed

    Zaruma-Torres, Fausto; Lares-Asseff, Ismael; Lima, Aurea; Reyes-Espinoza, Aarón; Loera-Castañeda, Verónica; Sosa-Macías, Martha; Galaviz-Hernández, Carlos; Arias-Peláez, María C; Reyes-López, Miguel A; Quiñones, Luis A

    2016-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a frequent neoplasia occurring in children. The most commonly used drug for the treatment of ALL is methotrexate (MTX), an anti-folate agent. Previous studies suggest that folate transporters play a role in ALL prognosis and that genetic polymorphism of genes encoding folate transporters may increase the risk of ALL. Therefore, the main goal of this study was to determine the associations among six genetic polymorphisms in four genes related with the folate transporter pathway to determine a relationship with the occurrence of ALL in Mexican children. A case-control study was performed in 73 ALL children and 133 healthy children from Northern and Northwestern Mexico. COL18A1 (rs2274808), SLC19A1 (rs2838956), ABCB1 (rs1045642 and rs1128503), and ABCC5 (rs9838667 and rs3792585). Polymorphisms were assayed through qPCR. Our results showed an increased ALL risk in children carrying CT genotype (OR = 2.55, CI 95% 1.11-5.83, p = 0.0001) and TT genotype (OR = 21.05, CI 95% 5.62-78.87, p < 0.0001) of COL18A1 rs2274808; in SLC19A1 rs2838956 AG carriers (OR = 44.69, CI 95% 10.42-191.63, p = 0.0001); in ABCB1 rs1045642 TT carriers (OR = 13.76, CI 95% 5.94-31.88, p = 0.0001); in ABCC5 rs9838667 AC carriers (OR = 2.61, CI 95% 1.05-6.48, p < 0.05); and in ABCC5 rs3792585 CC carriers (OR = 9.99, CI 95% 3.19-31.28, p = 0.004). Moreover, several combinations of genetic polymorphisms were found to be significantly associated with a risk for ALL. Finally, two combinations of ABCC5 polymorphisms resulted in protection from this neoplasia. In conclusion, certain genetic polymorphisms related to the folate transport pathway, particularly COL18A1 rs2274808, SLC19A1 rs2838956, ABCB1 rs1045642, and ABCC5 rs3792585, were associated with an increased risk for ALL in Mexican children. PMID:27547186

  19. Genetic Polymorphisms Associated to Folate Transport as Predictors of Increased Risk for Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Mexican Children

    PubMed Central

    Zaruma-Torres, Fausto; Lares-Asseff, Ismael; Lima, Aurea; Reyes-Espinoza, Aarón; Loera-Castañeda, Verónica; Sosa-Macías, Martha; Galaviz-Hernández, Carlos; Arias-Peláez, María C.; Reyes-López, Miguel A.; Quiñones, Luis A.

    2016-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a frequent neoplasia occurring in children. The most commonly used drug for the treatment of ALL is methotrexate (MTX), an anti-folate agent. Previous studies suggest that folate transporters play a role in ALL prognosis and that genetic polymorphism of genes encoding folate transporters may increase the risk of ALL. Therefore, the main goal of this study was to determine the associations among six genetic polymorphisms in four genes related with the folate transporter pathway to determine a relationship with the occurrence of ALL in Mexican children. A case-control study was performed in 73 ALL children and 133 healthy children from Northern and Northwestern Mexico. COL18A1 (rs2274808), SLC19A1 (rs2838956), ABCB1 (rs1045642 and rs1128503), and ABCC5 (rs9838667 and rs3792585). Polymorphisms were assayed through qPCR. Our results showed an increased ALL risk in children carrying CT genotype (OR = 2.55, CI 95% 1.11–5.83, p = 0.0001) and TT genotype (OR = 21.05, CI 95% 5.62–78.87, p < 0.0001) of COL18A1 rs2274808; in SLC19A1 rs2838956 AG carriers (OR = 44.69, CI 95% 10.42–191.63, p = 0.0001); in ABCB1 rs1045642 TT carriers (OR = 13.76, CI 95% 5.94–31.88, p = 0.0001); in ABCC5 rs9838667 AC carriers (OR = 2.61, CI 95% 1.05–6.48, p < 0.05); and in ABCC5 rs3792585 CC carriers (OR = 9.99, CI 95% 3.19–31.28, p = 0.004). Moreover, several combinations of genetic polymorphisms were found to be significantly associated with a risk for ALL. Finally, two combinations of ABCC5 polymorphisms resulted in protection from this neoplasia. In conclusion, certain genetic polymorphisms related to the folate transport pathway, particularly COL18A1 rs2274808, SLC19A1 rs2838956, ABCB1 rs1045642, and ABCC5 rs3792585, were associated with an increased risk for ALL in Mexican children. PMID:27547186

  20. Resilience among High Risk Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIntyre, Kevin; And Others

    This report focuses on children who are at risk for abusing alcohol and other drugs. It notes that the concept of risk factors is only one component necessary to understanding the range of youth drug-related behaviors. A second component, protective factors, is identified and defined as those aspects of a person's biology, psychology, and…

  1. Improved efficacy using rituximab and brief duration, high intensity chemotherapy with filgrastim support for Burkitt or aggressive lymphomas: Cancer and Leukemia Group B study 10002

    PubMed Central

    Rizzieri, David A.; Johnson, Jeffrey L.; Byrd, John C.; Lozanski, Gerard; Blum, Kristie A.; Powell, Bayard L.; Shea, Thomas C.; Nattam, Sreenivasa; Hoke, Eva; Cheson, Bruce D.; Larson, Richard A.

    2014-01-01

    Summary To improve long-term outcomes for Burkitt leukaemia/lymphoma (BL) or aggressive lymphomas in adults, we assessed the benefit of adding rituximab and filgrastim support to a dose-dense modified chemotherapy regimen from the Cancer and Leukemia Group B (CALGB) 9251 trial. One hundred and five patients (aged 19–79 years) were enrolled; 27% were >60 years old; 47% had high or high-intermediate risk by International Prognostic Index (IPI) criteria. Common severe toxicities included stomatitis/upper gastrointestinal toxicity (69%), renal insufficiency (10%), neurological events (25%) and pulmonary events (18%). Seven died from treatment-related causes (1 central nervous system bleed, 4 infections, 2 respiratory failure); 5 were > 60 years old. Results in this adult population are encouraging as complete response (CR) was observed in 83% and 4-year event-free (EFS) and overall survivals (OS) were 74% and 78%, respectively. Results compare favourably to our prior chemotherapy alone study (CALGB 9251) but despite this, high-risk patients still had worse outcomes. In conclusion, short duration, intensive chemo-immunotherapy is feasible and should be considered in adults with BL as it results in high remission rates and durable remissions. PMID:24428673

  2. Pre-chemotherapy risk factors for invasive fungal diseases: prospective analysis of 1,192 patients with newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia (SEIFEM 2010-a multicenter study)

    PubMed Central

    Caira, Morena; Candoni, Anna; Verga, Luisa; Busca, Alessandro; Delia, Mario; Nosari, Annamaria; Caramatti, Cecilia; Castagnola, Carlo; Cattaneo, Chiara; Fanci, Rosa; Chierichini, Anna; Melillo, Lorella; Mitra, Maria Enza; Picardi, Marco; Potenza, Leonardo; Salutari, Prassede; Vianelli, Nicola; Facchini, Luca; Cesarini, Monica; De Paolis, Maria Rosaria; Di Blasi, Roberta; Farina, Francesca; Venditti, Adriano; Ferrari, Antonella; Garzia, Mariagrazia; Gasbarrino, Cristina; Invernizzi, Rosangela; Lessi, Federica; Manna, Annunziata; Martino, Bruno; Nadali, Gianpaolo; Offidani, Massimo; Paris, Laura; Pavone, Vincenzo; Rossi, Giuseppe; Spadea, Antonio; Specchia, Giorgina; Trecarichi, Enrico Maria; Vacca, Adriana; Cesaro, Simone; Perriello, Vincenzo; Aversa, Franco; Tumbarello, Mario; Pagano, Livio

    2015-01-01

    Correct definition of the level of risk of invasive fungal infections is the first step in improving the targeting of preventive strategies. We investigated the potential relationship between pre-hospitalization exposure to sources of fungi and the development of invasive fungal infections in adult patients with newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia after their first course of chemotherapy. From January 2010 to April 2012, all consecutive acute myeloid leukemia patients in 33 Italian centers were prospectively registered. Upon first admission, information about possible pre-chemotherapy risk factors and environmental exposure was collected. We recorded data regarding comorbid conditions, employment, hygienic habits, working and living environment, personal habits, hobbies, and pets. All invasive fungal infections occurring within 30 days after the first course of chemotherapy were recorded. Of the 1,192 patients enrolled in this study, 881 received intensive chemotherapy and were included in the present analysis. Of these, 214 developed an invasive fungal infection, including 77 proven/probable cases (8.7%). Of these 77 cases, 54 were proven/probable invasive mold infections (6.1%) and 23 were proven yeast infections (2.6%). Upon univariate analysis, a significant association was found between invasive mold infections and age, performance status, diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, smoking, cocaine use, job, hobbies, and a recent house renovation. Higher body weight resulted in a reduced risk of invasive mold infections. Multivariate analysis confirmed the role of performance status, job, body weight, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and house renovation. In conclusion, several hospital-independent variables could potentially influence the onset of invasive mold infections in patients with acute myeloid leukemia. Investigation of these factors upon first admission may help to define a patient’s risk category and improve targeted prophylactic

  3. Pre-chemotherapy risk factors for invasive fungal diseases: prospective analysis of 1,192 patients with newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia (SEIFEM 2010-a multicenter study).

    PubMed

    Caira, Morena; Candoni, Anna; Verga, Luisa; Busca, Alessandro; Delia, Mario; Nosari, Annamaria; Caramatti, Cecilia; Castagnola, Carlo; Cattaneo, Chiara; Fanci, Rosa; Chierichini, Anna; Melillo, Lorella; Mitra, Maria Enza; Picardi, Marco; Potenza, Leonardo; Salutari, Prassede; Vianelli, Nicola; Facchini, Luca; Cesarini, Monica; De Paolis, Maria Rosaria; Di Blasi, Roberta; Farina, Francesca; Venditti, Adriano; Ferrari, Antonella; Garzia, Mariagrazia; Gasbarrino, Cristina; Invernizzi, Rosangela; Lessi, Federica; Manna, Annunziata; Martino, Bruno; Nadali, Gianpaolo; Offidani, Massimo; Paris, Laura; Pavone, Vincenzo; Rossi, Giuseppe; Spadea, Antonio; Specchia, Giorgina; Trecarichi, Enrico Maria; Vacca, Adriana; Cesaro, Simone; Perriello, Vincenzo; Aversa, Franco; Tumbarello, Mario; Pagano, Livio

    2015-02-01

    Correct definition of the level of risk of invasive fungal infections is the first step in improving the targeting of preventive strategies. We investigated the potential relationship between pre-hospitalization exposure to sources of fungi and the development of invasive fungal infections in adult patients with newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia after their first course of chemotherapy. From January 2010 to April 2012, all consecutive acute myeloid leukemia patients in 33 Italian centers were prospectively registered. Upon first admission, information about possible pre-chemotherapy risk factors and environmental exposure was collected. We recorded data regarding comorbid conditions, employment, hygienic habits, working and living environment, personal habits, hobbies, and pets. All invasive fungal infections occurring within 30 days after the first course of chemotherapy were recorded. Of the 1,192 patients enrolled in this study, 881 received intensive chemotherapy and were included in the present analysis. Of these, 214 developed an invasive fungal infection, including 77 proven/probable cases (8.7%). Of these 77 cases, 54 were proven/probable invasive mold infections (6.1%) and 23 were proven yeast infections (2.6%). Upon univariate analysis, a significant association was found between invasive mold infections and age, performance status, diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, smoking, cocaine use, job, hobbies, and a recent house renovation. Higher body weight resulted in a reduced risk of invasive mold infections. Multivariate analysis confirmed the role of performance status, job, body weight, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and house renovation. In conclusion, several hospital-independent variables could potentially influence the onset of invasive mold infections in patients with acute myeloid leukemia. Investigation of these factors upon first admission may help to define a patient's risk category and improve targeted prophylactic

  4. Beyond CD19: Opportunities for Future Development of Targeted Immunotherapy in Pediatric Relapsed-Refractory Acute Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Shalabi, Haneen; Angiolillo, Anne; Fry, Terry J.

    2015-01-01

    Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell therapy has been used as a targeted approach in cancer therapy. Relapsed and refractory acute leukemia in pediatrics has been difficult to treat with conventional therapy due to dose-limiting toxicities. With the recent success of CD 19 CAR in pediatric patients with B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), this mode of therapy has become a very attractive option for these patients with high-risk disease. In this review, we will discuss current treatment paradigms of pediatric acute leukemia and potential therapeutic targets for additional high-risk populations, including T cell ALL, AML, and infant ALL. PMID:26484338

  5. Risk Factors and Levels of Risk for High School Dropouts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suh, Suhyun; Suh, Jingyo

    2007-01-01

    The study in this article identifies three major risk categories of high school dropouts and evaluates the impact of possible prevention strategies. As students accumulate these risks, they became more likely to drop out and prevention programs become less effective. Additionally, it was found that factors influencing the decision to drop out vary…

  6. Down syndrome preleukemia and leukemia.

    PubMed

    Maloney, Kelly W; Taub, Jeffrey W; Ravindranath, Yaddanapudi; Roberts, Irene; Vyas, Paresh

    2015-02-01

    Children with Down syndrome (DS) and acute leukemias acute have unique biological, cytogenetic, and intrinsic factors that affect their treatment and outcome. Myeloid leukemia of Down syndrome (ML-DS) is associated with high event-free survival (EFS) rates and frequently preceded by a preleukemia condition, the transient abnormal hematopoiesis (TAM) present at birth. For acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), their EFS and overall survival are poorer than non-DS ALL, it is important to enroll them on therapeutic trials, including relapse trials; investigate new agents that could potentially improve their leukemia-free survival; and strive to maximize the supportive care these patients need.

  7. High expression of MAP7 predicts adverse prognosis in young patients with cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Lin; Fu, Huaping; Zhou, Lei; Xu, Keman; Pang, Yifan; Hu, Kai; Wang, Jing; Tian, Lei; Liu, Yuanyuan; Wang, Jijun; Jing, Hongmei; Huang, Wenrong; Ke, Xiaoyan; Shi, Jinlong

    2016-01-01

    Microtubule-associated protein 7 (MAP7) plays an important role in cancer cells. In this study, we identified the prognostic significance of MAP7 expression in cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia (CN-AML) patients (aged <60 years) based on several microarray datasets. In the first group (n = 129), high MAP7 expression (MAP7high) was associated with adverse overall survival (OS; P = 0.0441) and event-free survival (EFS; P = 0.0114) compared with low MAP7 expression (MAP7low). In addition, the prognostic significance of MAP7 was confirmed by European Leukemia Net (ELN) intermediate-I genetic categories and multivariable analysis. In the second independent group of CN-AML patients (aged <60 years), MAP7high was also associated with adverse OS (n = 88, OS; P = 0.00811). To understand the inherent mechanisms of MAP7’s prognosis, we investigated genome-wide gene/microRNA expression signatures associated with MAP7 expression. Several known oncogenic genes/microRNAs and anti-oncogenic genes/microRNAs were disordered in MAP7high CN-AML patients. In conclusion, MAP7high is an adverse prognostic biomarker for CN-AML, which may be attributed to the distinctive genome-wide gene/microRNA expression and related cell signaling pathways. PMID:27686215

  8. Polymorphism of XRCC1, XRCC3, and XPD genes and risk of chronic myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Bănescu, Claudia; Trifa, Adrian P; Demian, Smaranda; Benedek Lazar, Erzsebeth; Dima, Delia; Duicu, Carmen; Dobreanu, Minodora

    2014-01-01

    The genetic polymorphisms of X-ray repair cross complementing group 1 (XRCC1), X-ray repair cross complementing group 3 (XRCC3), and xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group D (XPD) repair genes may lead to genetic instability and leukemogenesis. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the association between XRCC1 Arg399Gln, Arg280His and Arg194Trp, XRCC3 Thr241Met, and XPD Lys751Gln polymorphisms and the risk of developing CML in Romanian patients. A total of 156 patients diagnosed with CML and 180 healthy controls were included in this study. We found no association between CML and XRCC1 or XRCC3 variant genotypes in any of the investigated cases. A significant difference was observed in the variant genotype frequencies of the XPD Lys751Gln polymorphism between the patients with CML and control group (for variant homozygous genotypes, OR = 2.37; 95% CI = 1.20-4.67; P value = 0.016 and for combined heterozygous and variant homozygous genotypes, OR = 1.72; 95% CI = 1.10-2.69; P value = 0.019). This was also observed when analyzing the variant 751Gln allele (OR = 1.54; 95% CI = 1.13-2.11; P value = 0.008). Our results suggest that the XPD Lys751Gln variant genotype increases the risk of CML.

  9. Polymorphism of XRCC1, XRCC3, and XPD Genes and Risk of Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Bănescu, Claudia; Trifa, Adrian P.; Demian, Smaranda; Benedek Lazar, Erzsebeth; Dima, Delia; Duicu, Carmen; Dobreanu, Minodora

    2014-01-01

    The genetic polymorphisms of X-ray repair cross complementing group 1 (XRCC1), X-ray repair cross complementing group 3 (XRCC3), and xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group D (XPD) repair genes may lead to genetic instability and leukemogenesis. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the association between XRCC1 Arg399Gln, Arg280His and Arg194Trp, XRCC3 Thr241Met, and XPD Lys751Gln polymorphisms and the risk of developing CML in Romanian patients. A total of 156 patients diagnosed with CML and 180 healthy controls were included in this study. We found no association between CML and XRCC1 or XRCC3 variant genotypes in any of the investigated cases. A significant difference was observed in the variant genotype frequencies of the XPD Lys751Gln polymorphism between the patients with CML and control group (for variant homozygous genotypes, OR = 2.37; 95% CI = 1.20–4.67; P value = 0.016 and for combined heterozygous and variant homozygous genotypes, OR = 1.72; 95% CI = 1.10–2.69; P value = 0.019). This was also observed when analyzing the variant 751Gln allele (OR = 1.54; 95% CI = 1.13–2.11; P value = 0.008). Our results suggest that the XPD Lys751Gln variant genotype increases the risk of CML. PMID:24955348

  10. Polymorphism of XRCC1, XRCC3, and XPD genes and risk of chronic myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Bănescu, Claudia; Trifa, Adrian P; Demian, Smaranda; Benedek Lazar, Erzsebeth; Dima, Delia; Duicu, Carmen; Dobreanu, Minodora

    2014-01-01

    The genetic polymorphisms of X-ray repair cross complementing group 1 (XRCC1), X-ray repair cross complementing group 3 (XRCC3), and xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group D (XPD) repair genes may lead to genetic instability and leukemogenesis. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the association between XRCC1 Arg399Gln, Arg280His and Arg194Trp, XRCC3 Thr241Met, and XPD Lys751Gln polymorphisms and the risk of developing CML in Romanian patients. A total of 156 patients diagnosed with CML and 180 healthy controls were included in this study. We found no association between CML and XRCC1 or XRCC3 variant genotypes in any of the investigated cases. A significant difference was observed in the variant genotype frequencies of the XPD Lys751Gln polymorphism between the patients with CML and control group (for variant homozygous genotypes, OR = 2.37; 95% CI = 1.20-4.67; P value = 0.016 and for combined heterozygous and variant homozygous genotypes, OR = 1.72; 95% CI = 1.10-2.69; P value = 0.019). This was also observed when analyzing the variant 751Gln allele (OR = 1.54; 95% CI = 1.13-2.11; P value = 0.008). Our results suggest that the XPD Lys751Gln variant genotype increases the risk of CML. PMID:24955348

  11. Multiple sclerosis risk markers in HLA-DRA, HLA-C, and IFNG genes are associated with sex-specific childhood leukemia risk.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Brittany A; Ucisik-Akkaya, Esma; Flores, Hilario; Alaez, Carmen; Gorodezky, Clara; Dorak, M Tevfik

    2010-12-01

    Previous epidemiologic studies showed four times increased risk of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in children of women with multiple sclerosis (MS). MS shows a risk association with Human leukocyte antigens (HLA)-DRA single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs3135388, which is a proxy marker for DRB1*1501. We examined the relevance of rs3135388 in childhood ALL risk along with two other HLA-DRA SNPs in two case-control groups: 114 cases and 388 controls from South Wales (UK) and 100 Mexican Mestizo cases and 253 controls. We first confirmed the correlation between rs3135388 and DRB1*1501 in HLA-typed reference cell lines. We noted a female-specific risk association in childhood ALL (pooled odds ratio (OR) = 2.6, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.5-4.5, Mantel-Haenszel P = 0.0009) similar to the stronger association of DRB1*1501 in females with MS. Examination of an HLA-C 5' flanking region SNP rs9264942, known to correlate with HLA-C expression, showed a protective association in girls (OR = 0.4, 95% CI = 0.2-0.7, Mantel-Haenszel P = 0.0003) similar to the protective HLA-Cw*05 association in MS. In a reference cell line panel, HLA-Cw5 homozygous samples (n = 8) were also homozygous for the minor allele of the SNP. Likewise, the male-specific protective association of interferon-gamma (IFNG) SNP rs2069727 in MS was replicated with the same sex specificity in childhood ALL (OR = 0.6, 95% CI = 0.4-1.0, Mantel-Haenszel P = 0.03). Two other SNPs in superkiller viralicidic activity 2-like and tenascin XB that are markers for systemic lupus erythematosus susceptibility showed female-specific associations but due to linkage disequilibrium with HLA-DRB1*15. Our observations supported the epidemiologic link between MS and childhood ALL and added the sex effect to this connection. It appears that only girls born to mothers with MS may have an increased risk of ALL. Investigating the mechanism of these sex-specific associations may help understand the pathogenesis of MS and ALL.

  12. Clinical Utility of Sequential Minimal Residual Disease Measurements in the Context of Risk-based Therapy in Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: a Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Pui, Ching-Hon; Pei, Deqing; Coustan-Smith, Elaine; Jeha, Sima; Cheng, Cheng; Bowman, W Paul; Sandlund, John T; Ribeiro, Raul C; Rubnitz, Jeffrey E; Inaba, Hiroto; Bhojwani, Deepa; Gruber, Tanja A; Leung, Wing H; Downing, James R; Evans, William E; Relling, Mary V; Campana, Dario

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background The level of minimal residual disease (MRD) during remission induction is the most important prognostic indicator in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). We determined the clinical significance of MRD in the context of a prospective clinical study in which sequential MRD measurements were used to guide treatment decisions. Methods Between 2000 and 2007, 498 evaluable patients with newly diagnosed ALL were enrolled in St. Jude Study XV. Risk of relapse was provisionally classified as low, standard or high according to presenting clinical and laboratory features. Final risk assignment to determine treatment intensity was based mainly on MRD levels measured on days 19 and 46 of remission induction, and on week 7 of continuation treatment. Additional MRD determinations were made on weeks 17, 48 and 120 (end of therapy). Findings Regardless of the provisional risk classification, 10-year event-free survival was significantly inferior for patients with MRD ≥1% on day 19 compared with that of patients having lower MRD levels: 69.2% (95% CI 49.6–82.4, n=36) versus 95.5% (91.7–97.5, n=244) (p<0.001) for the provisional low-risk group and 65.1% (50.7–76.2, n=56) versus 82.9% (75.6–88.2, n=142) (p=0.008) for the provisional standard-risk group. Twelve patients with provisional low-risk ALL and MRD ≥1% on day 19 but negative MRD (<0.01%) on day 46 were treated for standard-risk ALL and had a 10-year event-free survival of 88.9% (43.3–98.4). For the 244 provisional low-risk patients, an MRD level of <1% on day 19 predicted a superior outcome, regardless of the MRD level on day 46. Among provisional standard-risk patients with MRD <1% on day 19, the 15 with persistent MRD on day 46 tended to have an inferior 10-year event-free survival compared with the 126 lacking detectable MRD (72.7% [42.5–88.8] versus 84.0% [76.3–89.4], p=0.06) after receiving the same post-remission treatment for standard-risk ALL. Among patients attaining MRD

  13. Blinatumomab and Nivolumab With or Without Ipilimumab in Treating Patients With Poor-Risk Relapsed or Refractory CD19+ Precursor B-Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-23

    B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia With t(9;22)(q34;q11.2); BCR-ABL1; CD19-Positive Neoplastic Cells Present; Mixed Phenotype Acute Leukemia; Mixed Phenotype Acute Leukemia With t(9;22)(q34;q11.2); BCR-ABL1

  14. Acute non-lymphocytic leukemia following multimodality therapy for retinoblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    White, L.; Ortega, J.A.; Ying, K.L.

    1985-02-01

    The genetic form of retinoblastoma carries a high risk of secondary malignant neoplasm, apparently not related to the use of chemotherapy. A child with unilateral non-genetic retinoblastoma who had received chemotherapy and radiation therapy and developed acute non-lymphocytic leukemia (ANLL) is reported. The occurrence of ANLL and retinoblastoma has not been previously reported.

  15. High affinity and covalent-binding microtubule stabilizing agents show activity in chemotherapy-resistant acute myeloid leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Pera, Benet; Calvo-Vidal, M. Nieves; Ambati, Srikanth; Jordi, Michel; Kahn, Alissa; Díaz, J. Fernando; Fang, Weishuo; Altmann, Karl-Heinz; Cerchietti, Leandro; Moore, Malcolm A.S.

    2016-01-01

    Treatment failure in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is frequently due to the persistence of a cell population resistant to chemotherapy through different mechanisms, in which drug efflux via ATP-binding cassette (ABC) proteins, specifically P-glycoprotein, is one of the most recognized. However, disappointing results from clinical trials employing inhibitors for these transporters have demonstrated the need to adopt different strategies. We hypothesized that microtubule targeting compounds presenting high affinity or covalent binding could overcome the effect of ABC transporters. We therefore evaluated the activity of the high-affinity paclitaxel analog CTX-40 as well as the covalent binder zampanolide (ZMP) in AML cells. Both molecules were active in chemosensitive as well as in chemoresistant cell lines overexpressing P-glycoprotein. Moreover, ZMP or CTX-40 in combination with daunorubicin showed synergistic killing without increased in vitro hematopoietic toxicity. In a primary AML sample, we further demonstrated that ZMP and CTX-40 are active in progenitor and differentiated leukemia cell populations. In sum, our data indicate that high affinity and covalent-binding anti-microtubule agents are active in AML cells otherwise chemotherapy resistant. PMID:26277539

  16. Molecular Characterization of Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Patients with a High Number of Losses in 13q14

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, Ana Eugenia; Hernández, Jose Ángel; Benito, Rocío; Gutiérrez, Norma C.; García, Juan Luis; Hernández-Sánchez, María; Risueño, Alberto; Sarasquete, M. Eugenia; Fermiñán, Encarna; Fisac, Rosa; de Coca, Alfonso García; Martín-Núñez, Guillermo; de las Heras, Natalia; Recio, Isabel; Gutiérrez, Oliver; De Las Rivas, Javier; González, Marcos; Hernández-Rivas, Jesús M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia and 13q deletion as their only FISH abnormality could have a different outcome depending on the number of cells displaying this aberration. Thus, cases with a high number of 13q- cells (13q-H) had both shorter overall survival and time to first therapy. The goal of the study was to analyze the genetic profile of 13q-H patients. Design and Methods: A total of 102 samples were studied, 32 of which served as a validation cohort and five were healthy donors. Results Chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients with higher percentages of 13q- cells (>80%) showed a different level of gene expression as compared to patients with lower percentages (<80%, 13q-L). This deregulation affected genes involved in apoptosis and proliferation (BCR and NFkB signaling), leading to increased proliferation and decreased apoptosis in 13q-H patients. Deregulation of several microRNAs, such as miR-15a, miR-155, miR-29a and miR-223, was also observed in these patients. In addition, our study also suggests that the gene expression pattern of 13q-H cases could be similar to the patients with 11q- or 17p-. Conclusions This study provides new evidence regarding the heterogeneity of 13q deletion in chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients, showing that apoptosis, proliferation as well as miRNA regulation are involved in cases with higher percentages of 13q- cells. PMID:23152777

  17. Low Dose Total Body Irradiation Combined With Recombinant CD19-Ligand × Soluble TRAIL Fusion Protein is Highly Effective Against Radiation-resistant B-precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Mice☆

    PubMed Central

    Uckun, Fatih M.; Myers, Dorothea E.; Ma, Hong; Rose, Rebecca; Qazi, Sanjive

    2015-01-01

    In high-risk remission B-precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (BPL) patients, relapse rates have remained high post-hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) even after the use of very intensive total body irradiation (TBI)-based conditioning regimens, especially in patients with a high “minimal residual disease” (MRD) burden. New agents capable of killing radiation-resistant BPL cells and selectively augmenting their radiation sensitivity are therefore urgently needed. We report preclinical proof-of-principle that the potency of radiation therapy against BPL can be augmented by combining radiation with recombinant human CD19-Ligand × soluble TRAIL (“CD19L–sTRAIL”) fusion protein. CD19L–sTRAIL consistently killed radiation-resistant primary leukemia cells from BPL patients as well as BPL xenograft cells and their leukemia-initiating in vivo clonogenic fraction. Low dose total body irradiation (TBI) combined with CD19L–sTRAIL was highly effective against (1) xenografted CD19+ radiochemotherapy-resistant human BPL in NOD/SCID (NS) mice challenged with an otherwise invariably fatal dose of xenograft cells derived from relapsed BPL patients as well as (2) radiation-resistant advanced stage CD19+ murine BPL with lymphomatous features in CD22ΔE12xBCR-ABL double transgenic mice. We hypothesize that the incorporation of CD19L–sTRAIL into the pre-transplant TBI regimens of patients with very high-risk BPL will improve their survival outcome after HSCT. PMID:26097891

  18. High Blood Pressure May Hike Dementia Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_161398.html High Blood Pressure May Hike Dementia Risk New statement from American ... MONDAY, Oct. 10, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- High blood pressure, particularly in middle age, might open the door ...

  19. For Teens with Leukemia, Pregnancy Tests Often Neglected

    MedlinePlus

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_160916.html For Teens With Leukemia, Pregnancy Tests Often Neglected Risk of ... 2016 MONDAY, Sept. 12, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Many teen girls with leukemia aren't checked for pregnancy ...

  20. What Is Childhood Leukemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... key statistics for childhood leukemia? What is childhood leukemia? Cancer starts when cells start to grow out ... start making antibodies to fight them. Types of leukemia in children Leukemia is often described as being ...

  1. Associations between genetic variants in folate and drug metabolizing pathways and relapse risk in pediatric acute lymphoid leukemia on CCG-1952

    PubMed Central

    Vujkovic, Marijana; Kershenbaum, Aaron; Wray, Lisa; McWilliams, Thomas; Cannon, Shannon; Devidas, Meenakshi; Stork, Linda; Aplenc, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Genetic variation in drug detoxification pathways may influence outcomes in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). We evaluated relapse risk and 24 variants in 17 genes in 714 patients in CCG-1961. Three TPMT and 1 MTR variant were associated with increased risks of relapse (rs4712327, OR 3.3, 95%CI 1.2–8.6; rs2842947, OR 2.7, 95%CI 1.1–6.8; rs2842935, OR 2.5, 95%CI 1.1–5.0; rs10925235, OR 4.9, 95%CI 1.1–25.1). One variant in SLC19A1 showed a protective effect (rs4819128, OR 0.5, 95%CI 0.3–0.9). Our study provides data that relapse risk in pediatric ALL is associated with germline variations in TPMT, MTR and SLC19A1. PMID:26605150

  2. Mixed Phenotype Acute Leukemia with Low Hypodiploidy in a Pediatric Patient

    PubMed Central

    Salazar, Elizabeth G.; Wertheim, Gerald B.; Biegel, Jaclyn A.; Hwang, William; Tasian, Sarah K.; Rheingold, Susan R.

    2015-01-01

    We describe the case of a 16 year-old female with mixed phenotype acute leukemia B/myeloid, NOS (formerly biphenotypic leukemia) with masked hypodiploidy and somatic TP53 and CDKN2A/B deletions. She achieved morphologic remission with lymphoid-directed multi-agent chemotherapy, but experienced an early medullary relapse 11 months from initial diagnosis. Her case details the unusual finding of hypodiploidy in a patient with ambiguous lineage leukemia and highlights the complexity of therapy selection for these high-risk patients. PMID:26525596

  3. Preservation of high glycolytic phenotype by establishing new acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell lines at physiologic oxygen concentration.

    PubMed

    Sheard, Michael A; Ghent, Matthew V; Cabral, Daniel J; Lee, Joanne C; Khankaldyyan, Vazgen; Ji, Lingyun; Wu, Samuel Q; Kang, Min H; Sposto, Richard; Asgharzadeh, Shahab; Reynolds, C Patrick

    2015-05-15

    Cancer cells typically exhibit increased glycolysis and decreased mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, and they continue to exhibit some elevation in glycolysis even under aerobic conditions. However, it is unclear whether cancer cell lines employ a high level of glycolysis comparable to that of the original cancers from which they were derived, even if their culture conditions are changed to physiologically relevant oxygen concentrations. From three childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patients we established three new pairs of cell lines in both atmospheric (20%) and physiologic (bone marrow level, 5%) oxygen concentrations. Cell lines established in 20% oxygen exhibited lower proliferation, survival, expression of glycolysis genes, glucose consumption, and lactate production. Interestingly, the effects of oxygen concentration used during cell line initiation were only partially reversible when established cell cultures were switched from one oxygen concentration to another for eight weeks. These observations indicate that ALL cell lines established at atmospheric oxygen concentration can exhibit relatively low levels of glycolysis and these levels are semi-permanent, suggesting that physiologic oxygen concentrations may be needed from the time of cell line initiation to preserve the high level of glycolysis commonly exhibited by leukemias in vivo.

  4. Preservation of high glycolytic phenotype by establishing new acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell lines at physiologic oxygen concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Sheard, Michael A.; Ghent, Matthew V.; Cabral, Daniel J.; Lee, Joanne C.; Khankaldyyan, Vazgen; Ji, Lingyun; Wu, Samuel Q.; Kang, Min H.; and others

    2015-05-15

    Cancer cells typically exhibit increased glycolysis and decreased mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, and they continue to exhibit some elevation in glycolysis even under aerobic conditions. However, it is unclear whether cancer cell lines employ a high level of glycolysis comparable to that of the original cancers from which they were derived, even if their culture conditions are changed to physiologically relevant oxygen concentrations. From three childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patients we established three new pairs of cell lines in both atmospheric (20%) and physiologic (bone marrow level, 5%) oxygen concentrations. Cell lines established in 20% oxygen exhibited lower proliferation, survival, expression of glycolysis genes, glucose consumption, and lactate production. Interestingly, the effects of oxygen concentration used during cell line initiation were only partially reversible when established cell cultures were switched from one oxygen concentration to another for eight weeks. These observations indicate that ALL cell lines established at atmospheric oxygen concentration can exhibit relatively low levels of glycolysis and these levels are semi-permanent, suggesting that physiologic oxygen concentrations may be needed from the time of cell line initiation to preserve the high level of glycolysis commonly exhibited by leukemias in vivo. - Highlights: • Establishing new ALL cell lines in 5% oxygen resulted in higher glycolytic expression and function. • Establishing new ALL cell lines in 5% oxygen resulted in higher proliferation and lower cell death. • The divergent metabolic phenotypes selected in 5% and 20% oxygen are semi-permanent.

  5. Novel drug candidates for blast phase chronic myeloid leukemia from high-throughput drug sensitivity and resistance testing

    PubMed Central

    Pietarinen, P O; Pemovska, T; Kontro, M; Yadav, B; Mpindi, J P; Andersson, E I; Majumder, M M; Kuusanmäki, H; Koskenvesa, P; Kallioniemi, O; Wennerberg, K; Heckman, C A; Mustjoki, S; Porkka, K

    2015-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia in blast crisis (CML BC) remains a challenging disease to treat despite the introduction and advances in tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) therapy. In this study we set out to identify novel candidate drugs for CML BC by using an unbiased high-throughput drug testing platform. We used three CML cell lines representing different types of CML blast phases (K562, EM-2 and MOLM-1) and primary leukemic cells from three CML BC patients. Profiling of drug responses was performed with a drug sensitivity and resistance testing platform comprising 295 anticancer agents. Overall, drug sensitivity scores and the drug response profiles of cell line and primary cell samples correlated well and were distinct from other types of leukemia samples. The cell lines were highly sensitive to TKIs and the clinically TKI-resistant patient samples were also resistant ex vivo. Comparison of cell line and patient sample data identified new candidate drugs for CML BC, such as vascular endothelial growth factor receptor and nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase inhibitors. Our results indicate that these drugs in particular warrant further evaluation by analyzing a larger set of primary patient samples. The results also pave way for designing rational combination therapies. PMID:25933373

  6. The lincRNA HOTAIRM1, located in the HOXA genomic region, is expressed in acute myeloid leukemia, impacts prognosis in patients in the intermediate-risk cytogenetic category, and is associated with a distinctive microRNA signature

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Beyá, Marina; Brunet, Salut; Nomdedéu, Josep; Pratcorona, Marta; Cordeiro, Anna; Gallardo, David; Escoda, Lourdes; Tormo, Mar; Heras, Inmaculada; Ribera, Josep Maria; Duarte, Rafael; de Llano, María Paz Queipo; Bargay, Joan; Sampol, Antonia; Nomdedeu, Mertixell; Risueño, Ruth M.; Hoyos, Montserrat; Sierra, Jorge; Monzo, Mariano; Navarro, Alfons; Esteve, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are deregulated in several tumors, although their role in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is mostly unknown. We have examined the expression of the lncRNA HOX antisense intergenic RNA myeloid 1 (HOTAIRM1) in 241 AML patients. We have correlated HOTAIRM1 expression with a miRNA expression profile. We have also analyzed the prognostic value of HOTAIRM1 expression in 215 intermediate-risk AML (IR-AML) patients. The lowest expression level was observed in acute promyelocytic leukemia (P < 0.001) and the highest in t(6;9) AML (P = 0.005). In 215 IR-AML patients, high HOTAIRM1 expression was independently associated with shorter overall survival (OR:2.04;P = 0.001), shorter leukemia-free survival (OR:2.56; P < 0.001) and a higher cumulative incidence of relapse (OR:1.67; P = 0.046). Moreover, HOTAIRM1 maintained its independent prognostic value within the favorable molecular subgroup (OR: 3.43; P = 0.009). Interestingly, HOTAIRM1 was overexpressed in NPM1-mutated AML (P < 0.001) and within this group retained its prognostic value (OR: 2.21; P = 0.01). Moreover, HOTAIRM1 expression was associated with a specific 33- microRNA signature that included miR-196b (P < 0.001). miR-196b is located in the HOX genomic region and has previously been reported to have an independent prognostic value in AML. miR-196b and HOTAIRM1 in combination as a prognostic factor can classify patients as high-, intermediate-, or low-risk (5-year OS: 24% vs 42% vs 70%; P = 0.004). Determination of HOTAIRM1 level at diagnosis provided relevant prognostic information in IR-AML and allowed refinement of risk stratification based on common molecular markers. The prognostic information provided by HOTAIRM1 was strengthened when combined with miR-196b expression. Furthermore, HOTAIRM1 correlated with a 33-miRNA signature. PMID:26436590

  7. Genome-wide comparison of the transcriptomes of highly enriched normal and chronic myeloid leukemia stem and progenitor cell populations.

    PubMed

    Gerber, Jonathan M; Gucwa, Jessica L; Esopi, David; Gurel, Meltem; Haffner, Michael C; Vala, Milada; Nelson, William G; Jones, Richard J; Yegnasubramanian, Srinivasan

    2013-05-01

    The persistence leukemia stem cells (LSCs) in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) despite tyrosine kinase inhibition (TKI) may explain relapse after TKI withdrawal. Here we performed genome-wide transcriptome analysis of highly refined CML and normal stem and progenitor cell populations to identify novel targets for the eradication of CML LSCs using exon microarrays. We identified 97 genes that were differentially expressed in CML versus normal stem and progenitor cells. These included cell surface genes significantly upregulated in CML LSCs: DPP4 (CD26), IL2RA (CD25), PTPRD, CACNA1D, IL1RAP, SLC4A4, and KCNK5. Further analyses of the LSCs revealed dysregulation of normal cellular processes, evidenced by alternative splicing of genes in key cancer signaling pathways such as p53 signaling (e.g. PERP, CDKN1A), kinase binding (e.g. DUSP12, MARCKS), and cell proliferation (MYCN, TIMELESS); downregulation of pro-differentiation and TGF-β/BMP signaling pathways; upregulation of oxidative metabolism and DNA repair pathways; and activation of inflammatory cytokines, including CCL2, and multiple oncogenes (e.g., CCND1). These data represent an important resource for understanding the molecular changes in CML LSCs, which may be exploited to develop novel therapies for eradication these cells and achieve cure.

  8. Possible benefit of consolidation therapy with high-dose cytarabine on overall survival of adults with non-promyelocytic acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Azevedo, M.C.; Velloso, E.D.R.P.; Buccheri, V.; Chamone, D.A.F.; Dorlhiac-Llacer, P.E.

    2014-01-01

    In adults with non-promyelocytic acute myeloid leukemia (AML), high-dose cytarabine consolidation therapy has been shown to influence survival in selected patients, although the appropriate doses and schemes have not been defined. We evaluated survival after calculating the actual dose of cytarabine that patients received for consolidation therapy and divided them into 3 groups according to dose. We conducted a single-center, retrospective study involving 311 non-promyelocytic AML patients with a median age of 36 years (16-79 years) who received curative treatment between 1978 and 2007. The 131 patients who received cytarabine consolidation were assigned to study groups by their cytarabine dose protocol. Group 1 (n=69) received <1.5 g/m2 every 12 h on 3 alternate days for up to 4 cycles. The remaining patients received high-dose cytarabine (≥1.5 g/m2 every 12 h on 3 alternate days for up to 4 cycles). The actual dose received during the entire consolidation period in these patients was calculated, allowing us to divide these patients into 2 additional groups. Group 2 (n=27) received an intermediate-high-dose (<27 g/m2), and group 3 (n=35) received a very-high-dose (≥27 g/m2). Among the 311 patients receiving curative treatment, the 5-year survival rate was 20.2% (63 patients). The cytarabine consolidation dose was an independent determinant of survival in multivariate analysis; age, karyotype, induction protocol, French-American-British classification, and de novo leukemia were not. Comparisons showed that the risk of death was higher in the intermediate-high-dose group 2 (hazard ratio [HR]=4.51; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.81-11.21) and the low-dose group 1 (HR=4.43; 95% CI: 1.97-9.96) than in the very-high-dose group 3, with no significant difference between those two groups. Our findings indicated that very-high-dose cytarabine during consolidation in adults with non-promyelocytic AML may improve survival. PMID:25517921

  9. Incidence, risk factors and clinical outcome of leukemia relapses with loss of the mismatched HLA after partially incompatible hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Crucitti, L; Crocchiolo, R; Toffalori, C; Mazzi, B; Greco, R; Signori, A; Sizzano, F; Chiesa, L; Zino, E; Lupo Stanghellini, M T; Assanelli, A; Carrabba, M G; Marktel, S; Marcatti, M; Bordignon, C; Corti, C; Bernardi, M; Peccatori, J; Bonini, C; Fleischhauer, K; Ciceri, F; Vago, L

    2015-05-01

    Genomic loss of the mismatched human leukocyte antigen (HLA) is a recently described mechanism of leukemia immune escape and relapse after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Here we first evaluated its incidence, risk factors and outcome in 233 consecutive transplants from partially HLA-mismatched related and unrelated donors (MMRD and MMUD, respectively). We documented 84 relapses, 23 of which with HLA loss. All the HLA loss relapses occurred after MMRD HSCT, and 20/23 in patients with acute myeloid leukemia. Upon MMRD HSCT, HLA loss variants accounted for 33% of the relapses (23/69), occurring later than their 'classical' counterparts (median: 307 vs 88 days, P<0.0001). Active disease at HSCT increased the risk of HLA loss (hazard ratio (HR): 10.16; confidence interval (CI): 2.65-38.92; P=0.001), whereas older patient ages had a protective role (HR: 0.16; CI: 0.05-0.46; P=0.001). A weaker association with HLA loss was observed for graft T-cell dose and occurrence of chronic graft-versus-host disease. Outcome after 'classical' and HLA loss relapses was similarly poor, and second transplantation from a different donor appeared to provide a slight advantage for survival. In conclusion, HLA loss is a frequent mechanism of evasion from T-cell alloreactivity and relapse in patients with myeloid malignancies transplanted from MMRDs, warranting routine screening in this transplantation setting.

  10. Potent graft-versus-leukemia effect after reduced-intensity allogeneic SCT for intermediate-risk AML with FLT3-ITD or wild-type NPM1 and CEBPA without FLT3-ITD.

    PubMed

    Labouré, Gaëlle; Dulucq, Stéphanie; Labopin, Myriam; Tabrizi, Reza; Guérin, Estelle; Pigneux, Arnaud; Lafarge, Xavier; Leguay, Thibaut; Bouabdallah, Krimo; Dilhuydy, Marie-Sarah; Duclos, Cédric; Lascaux, Axelle; Marit, Gérald; Mahon, François-Xavier; Boiron, Jean-Michel; Milpied, Noël; Vigouroux, Stéphane

    2012-12-01

    To investigate the role of reduced-intensity allogeneic (RIC-allo) stem cell transplant (SCT) as postremission therapy in adult intermediate-risk patients with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) with FLT3-ITD or wild-type NPM1 and CEBPA without FLT3-ITD, we conducted a single-center retrospective study between January 2001 and December 2010. Sixty-six patients were included: 37 treated with RIC-alloSCT and 29 with nonallogeneic SCT therapies. Both groups were comparable concerning age, WBC count at diagnosis, gender, karyotype, genotype, and number of courses of chemotherapy to reach complete remission (CR1). Median follow-up after CR1 was 37 months (range, 11-112 months) and 48 months (range, 9-83 months) in the allo and no-allo groups, respectively. In the allo versus no-allo groups, the 3-year cumulative incidence of relapse (CIR) rates were 25% ± 8% versus 61% ± 9%; P = .005. The 3-year nonrelapse mortality (NRM), overall survival (OS), and relapse-free survival (RFS) were 22% ± 7% versus 4% ± 4% (P = .005), 52% ± 9% versus 44% ± 10% (P = .75), and 53% ± 9% versus 35% ± 9% (P = .28), respectively. Multivariate analysis indicated that CIR was reduced by allo (hazard ratio [HR], 0.32; P = .01). A landmark analysis performed at day 185 after CR1 confirmed a lower CIR after allo. RIC-allo reduces the risk of relapse, suggesting a potent graft-versus-leukemia (GVL) effect in these patients at a high risk of relapse.

  11. Postremission sequential monitoring of minimal residual disease by WT1 Q-PCR and multiparametric flow cytometry assessment predicts relapse and may help to address risk-adapted therapy in acute myeloid leukemia patients.

    PubMed

    Malagola, Michele; Skert, Cristina; Borlenghi, Erika; Chiarini, Marco; Cattaneo, Chiara; Morello, Enrico; Cancelli, Valeria; Cattina, Federica; Cerqui, Elisa; Pagani, Chiara; Passi, Angela; Ribolla, Rossella; Bernardi, Simona; Giustini, Viviana; Lamorgese, Cinzia; Ruggeri, Giuseppina; Imberti, Luisa; Caimi, Luigi; Russo, Domenico; Rossi, Giuseppe

    2016-02-01

    Risk stratification in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients using prognostic parameters at diagnosis is effective, but may be significantly improved by the use of on treatment parameters which better define the actual sensitivity to therapy in the single patient. Minimal residual disease (MRD) monitoring has been demonstrated crucial for the identification of AML patients at high risk of relapse, but the best method and timing of MRD detection are still discussed. Thus, we retrospectively analyzed 104 newly diagnosed AML patients, consecutively treated and monitored by quantitative polymerase chain reactions (Q-PCR) on WT1 and by multiparametric flow cytometry (MFC) on leukemia-associated immunophenotypes (LAIPs) at baseline, after induction, after 1st consolidation and after 1st intensification. By multivariate analysis, the factors independently associated with adverse relapse-free survival (RFS) were: bone marrow (BM)-WT1 ≥ 121/10(4) ABL copies (P = 0.02) and LAIP ≥ 0.2% (P = 0.0001) (after 1st consolidation) (RFS at the median follow up of 12.5 months: 51% vs. 82% [P < 0.0001] and 57% vs. 81%, respectively [P = 0.0003]) and PB-WT1 ≥ 16/10(4) ABL copies (P = 0.0001) (after 1st intensification) (RFS 43% vs. 95% [P < 0.0001]) Our data confirm the benefits of sequential MRD monitoring with both Q-PCR and MFC. If confirmed by further prospective trials, they may significantly improve the possibility of a risk-adapted, postinduction therapy of AML.

  12. Treatment Option Overview (Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia)

    MedlinePlus

    ... recovery) and treatment options. Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a type of cancer in which the ... genetic conditions affect the risk of having childhood ALL. Anything that increases your risk of getting a ...

  13. Stages of Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... recovery) and treatment options. Adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a type of cancer in which the ... to radiation may increase the risk of developing ALL. Anything that increases your risk of getting a ...

  14. Treatment Options for Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... recovery) and treatment options. Adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a type of cancer in which the ... to radiation may increase the risk of developing ALL. Anything that increases your risk of getting a ...

  15. Treatment Options for Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... recovery) and treatment options. Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a type of cancer in which the ... genetic conditions affect the risk of having childhood ALL. Anything that increases your risk of getting a ...

  16. Treatment Option Overview (Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia)

    MedlinePlus

    ... recovery) and treatment options. Adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a type of cancer in which the ... to radiation may increase the risk of developing ALL. Anything that increases your risk of getting a ...

  17. Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sometimes, chemotherapy is used first to reduce the white blood cell count if it is very high at diagnosis. The ... This is because there is a very high count of immature white blood cells (leukemia cells). The only known cure for CML ...

  18. Induction of high-affinity GM-CSF receptors during all-trans retinoic acid treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    de Gentile, A; Toubert, M E; Dubois, C; Krawice, I; Schlageter, M H; Balitrand, N; Castaigne, S; Degos, L; Rain, J D; Najean, Y

    1994-10-01

    Differentiation of normal myeloid cells is accompanied by the increase of high-affinity GM-CSF receptors necessary for progenitor proliferation/differentiation and mature neutrophil function. All-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) induces terminal differentiation of acute promyelocytic leukemia cells (AML3 subtype). We report in this study that AML3 cells, like other AML subtypes, harbor high-affinity GM-CSF R (n = 138.3 +/- 69.3 sites/cell, Kd = 76.9 +/- 68.8 pM). In all cases, incubation with ATRA induces either an increase in the number of affinity of GM-CSF R (n = 212.7 +/- 116.2 sites/cell, Kd = 43.2 +/- 22.5 pM). The data presented show that modulation of GM-CSF receptors cells is correlated to the degree of ATRA-induced granulocytic differentiation but not to increased cell growth.

  19. Association of leukemia with radium groundwater contamination.

    PubMed

    Lyman, G H; Lyman, C G; Johnson, W

    1985-08-01

    Radiation exposure, including the ingestion of radium, has been causally associated with leukemia in man. Groundwater samples from 27 counties on or near Florida phosphate lands were found to exceed 5 pCi/L total radium in 12.4% of measurements. The incidence of leukemia was greater in those counties with high levels of radium contamination (greater than 10% of the samples contaminated) than in those with low levels of contamination. Rank correlation coefficients of .56 and .45 were observed between the radium contamination level and the incidence of total leukemia and acute myeloid leukemia, respectively. The standardized incidence density ratio for those in high-contamination counties was 1.5 for total leukemia and 2.0 for acute myeloid leukemia. Further investigation is necessary, however, before a causal relationship between groundwater radium content and human leukemia can be established.

  20. Familial leukemias.

    PubMed

    Wiernik, Peter H

    2015-02-01

    Familial leukemia has been described for more than 50 years but only recently have modern genetic techniques allowed for the investigation of the genome. Genome-wide association studies have identified a number of genetic sites that appear to relate to susceptibility to leukemia in certain families and occasionally to susceptibility to a specific leukemia in general. Many questions remain, including susceptibility to what? An oncogenic virus? An environmental chemical? Mutation of another gene induced by a heritable mutation-promoting gene?.Clinically important facts have been learned. Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is by far the most common familial leukemia. Patients with CLL have approximately a 10% chance of a first-degree relative developing CLL, and even a greater chance of one developing monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis which may be an asymptomatic forme fruste of the neoplasm. Furthermore, there may be an increased incidence of breast cancer in familial CLL pedigrees which raises the question of a common etiology for neoplasms in general, or at least a previously unrecognized relationship among them.

  1. Jupiter Exploration: High Risk and High Rewards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kite, Edwin S.

    2004-12-01

    Jupiter exploration is big science, and only the United States can afford self-contained missions to the gas giant and its four planet-sized moons. The Galileo spacecraft, which was recently flown into Jupiter to prevent it from contaminating Europa's ocean, cost $1.6 billion. Despite the failure of its High Gain Antenna (HGA), Galileo discovered briny, subsurface oceans on Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto; globally mapped all four Galilean moons; monitored Io's volcanic activity; carried out a 7-year study of the Jovian magnetosphere; and dropped an atmospheric probe into Jupiter's upper cloud layer. Of these achievements, the most significant is the indirect detection of a deep subsurface liquid-water layer on Europa [Pappalardo et al., 1999; Kivelson et al., 2000]. The case for a Europan ecosystem can be made [e.g., Marion et al., 2004], although it is important to remember the energetic and biogeochemical limits on putative Europan life [e.g., Soare et al., 2002]. Europa's low moment of inertia (0.346 +/- 0.005 MR2) suggests a silicate mantle below the ocean, permitting chemical exchanges between ocean and silicates, as occurs on Earth. Europa's surface is geologically young, likely emplaced 20-180 million years ago. Any recycling of surficial icy crust into the ocean could add oxygen, sulfur, and organic compounds, either impact-delivered or generated in situ by UV irradiation and the implantation of ionized particles from Jupiter's radiation belts.

  2. Homoharringtonine, aclarubicin and cytarabine (HAA) regimen as the first course of induction therapy is highly effective for acute myeloid leukemia with t (8;21).

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hong-Hu; Jiang, Hao; Jiang, Qian; Jia, Jin-Song; Qin, Ya-Zhen; Huang, Xiao-Jun

    2016-05-01

    Homoharringtonine combined aclarubicin and cytarabine (HAA) has been demonstrated to achieve a high remission rate and provide a survival advantage in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). To investigate whether HAA is an ideal induction regimen for t(8;21)AML, we retrospectively analyzed the data of 140 patients from the last 8 years in our center. When achieving complete remission (CR), the post-remission treatment was administered as a minimal residual disease-directed risk-stratification treatment protocol. The RUNX1/RUNX1T1 transcript level was assessed by RT-qPCR. The last follow-up was conducted in October 2015. In total, thirty patients received an HAA regimen as the induction treatment. The CR rate after one cycle of the HAA regimen was 93.3% (28/30). One patient achieved partial remission, and one had no response. No patients died during induction treatment. The median fold decrease of the RUNX1/RUNX1T1 transcript level was 200 (1-358000), and 16.7% (5/30) patients achieved >3 log decrease after one cycle of the HAA regimen. The estimated 4-year disease-free survival and overall survival were 89.9% and 90.8%, respectively. We concluded that the HAA regimen is highly effective as the first course of induction therapy for t(8;21) AML, and this needs to be confirmed in a large population in the future. PMID:26994850

  3. High-Dose Vincristine Sulfate Liposome Injection for Advanced, Relapsed, and Refractory Adult Philadelphia Chromosome–Negative Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, Susan; Schiller, Gary; Lister, John; Damon, Lloyd; Goldberg, Stuart; Aulitzky, Walter; Ben-Yehuda, Dina; Stock, Wendy; Coutre, Steven; Douer, Dan; Heffner, Leonard T.; Larson, Melissa; Seiter, Karen; Smith, Scott; Assouline, Sarit; Kuriakose, Philip; Maness, Lori; Nagler, Arnon; Rowe, Jacob; Schaich, Markus; Shpilberg, Ofer; Yee, Karen; Schmieder, Guenter; Silverman, Jeffrey A.; Thomas, Deborah; Deitcher, Steven R.; Kantarjian, Hagop

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Relapsed adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is associated with high reinduction mortality, chemotherapy resistance, and rapid progression leading to death. Vincristine sulfate liposome injection (VSLI), sphingomyelin and cholesterol nanoparticle vincristine (VCR), facilitates VCR dose-intensification and densification plus enhances target tissue delivery. We evaluated high-dose VSLI monotherapy in adults with Philadelphia chromosome (Ph) –negative ALL that was multiply relapsed, relapsed and refractory to reinduction, and/or relapsed after hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). Patients and Methods Sixty-five adults with Ph-negative ALL in second or greater relapse or whose disease had progressed following two or more leukemia therapies were treated in this pivotal phase II, multinational trial. Intravenous VSLI 2.25 mg/m2, without dose capping, was administered once per week until response, progression, toxicity, or pursuit of HCT. The primary end point was achievement of complete response (CR) or CR with incomplete hematologic recovery (CRi). Results The CR/CRi rate was 20% and overall response rate was 35%. VSLI monotherapy was effective as third-, fourth-, and fifth-line therapy and in patients refractory to other single- and multiagent reinduction therapies. Median CR/CRi duration was 23 weeks (range, 5 to 66 weeks); 12 patients bridged to a post-VSLI HCT, and five patients were long-term survivors. VSLI was generally well tolerated and associated with a low 30-day mortality rate (12%). Conclusion High-dose VSLI monotherapy resulted in meaningful clinical outcomes including durable responses and bridging to HCT in advanced ALL settings. The toxicity profile of VSLI was predictable, manageable, and comparable to standard VCR despite the delivery of large, normally unachievable, individual and cumulative doses of VCR. PMID:23169518

  4. Effects of highly purified anthraquinoid compounds from Aloe vera on sensitive and multidrug resistant leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Grimaudo, S; Tolomeo, M; Gancitano, R; Dalessandro, N; Aiello, E

    1997-01-01

    Folk medicine has attributed antitumor properties to preparations from Aloe vera. We have studied the effects of five purified compounds from the plant on human K562 leukemia and on its multidrug resistant (MDR) variant, K562/R. The glycosides aloin A and B, aloesin and aloeresin were devoid of antitumor activity up to 200 mu M concentrations. Only the aglycone aloe emodin produced reproducible antitumor effects, which, interestingly, were more pronounced in the MDR, P-glycoprotein overexpressing, cell line. Its IC50 was in fact 29 mu M in K562 and 10.5 mu M in K562/R. Aloe emodine caused mainly cytostasis and accumulation of the cells in the S and G(2)-M phases of the cell cycle during the first 48 h of treatment. Thereafter, massive cell death ensued. Research on the antitumor activity of compounds extracted from Aloe vera probably deserves continuation.

  5. SY 04-1 CVD RISK PREDICTION IN HIGH-RISK VERSUS LOW-RISK POPULATIONS.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyeon Chang

    2016-09-01

    Disease risk prediction models have been developed to assess the impact of multiple risk factors and to estimate an individual's absolute disease risk. Accurate disease prediction is essential for personalized prevention, because the benefits, risks, and costs of alternative strategies must be weighed to choose the best preventive strategy for individual patients. Cardiovascular disease (CVD) prediction is the earliest example of individual risk predictions. Since the Framingham study reported a CVD risk prediction method in 1976, an increasing number of risk assessment tools have been developed to CVD risk in various settings. The Framingham study results are fundamental evidence for the prediction of CVD risk. However, the clinical utility of a disease prediction model can be population-specific because the baseline disease risk, subtype distribution of the disease, and level of exposure to risk factors differ by region and ethnicity.It has been proved that CVD prediction models which were developed in high-risk populations, such as the Framingham Risk Score, overestimate an individual's disease risk when applied to a low-risk population without re-calibration. Thus countries of relatively low CVD risk are trying to re-calibrate the existing CVD prediction models or to develop a new prediction model analyzing their own population data. However, even the re-calibrated or newly-developed CVD prediction models are often of little clinical value in a low-risk population. A good example is the CVD prediction in the Korean population. Compared to Western populations, the Korean population has much lower incidence of coronary heart disease. Therefore, the vast majority of individuals fall into the low-risk group when their disease risk is assessed with a prediction model. Even a well-validated prediction model may not identify high-risk individuals who merit aggressive preventive treatment.A few alternative approaches have been suggested for CVD risk prediction in a low-risk

  6. Low-Dose or High-Dose Conditioning Followed by Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndrome or Acute Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-10-23

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Acute Myeloid Leukemia/Transient Myeloproliferative Disorder; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Isolated Del(5q); Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  7. High risk of permafrost thaw

    SciTech Connect

    Schuur, E.A.G.; Abbott, B.; Koven, C.D,; Riley, W.J.; Subin, Z.M.; al, et

    2011-11-01

    In the Arctic, temperatures are rising fast, and permafrost is thawing. Carbon released to the atmosphere from permafrost soils could accelerate climate change, but the likely magnitude of this effect is still highly uncertain. A collective estimate made by a group of permafrost experts, including myself, is that carbon could be released more quickly than models currently suggest, and at levels that are cause for serious concern. While our models of carbon emission from permafrost thaw are lacking, experts intimately familiar with these landscapes and processes have accumulated knowledge about what they expect to happen, based on both quantitative data and qualitative understanding of these systems. We (the authors of this piece) attempted to quantify this expertise through a survey developed over several years, starting in 2009. Our survey asked experts what percentage of surface permafrost they thought was likely to thaw, how much carbon would be released, and how much of that would be methane, for three time periods and under four warming scenarios that are part of the new IPCC Fifth Assessment Report.

  8. Not all risks are equal: the risk taking inventory for high-risk sports.

    PubMed

    Woodman, Tim; Barlow, Matt; Bandura, Comille; Hill, Miles; Kupciw, Dominika; Macgregor, Alexandra

    2013-10-01

    Although high-risk sport participants are typically considered a homogenous risk-taking population, attitudes to risk within the high-risk domain can vary considerably. As no validated measure allows researchers to assess risk taking within this domain, we validated the Risk Taking Inventory (RTI) for high-risk sport across four studies. The RTI comprises seven items across two factors: deliberate risk taking and precautionary behaviors. In Study 1 (n = 341), the inventory was refined and tested via a confirmatory factor analysis used in an exploratory fashion. The subsequent three studies confirmed the RTI's good model-data fit via three further separate confirmatory factor analyses. In Study 2 (n = 518) and in Study 3 (n = 290), concurrent validity was also confirmed via associations with other related traits (sensation seeking, behavioral activation, behavioral inhibition, impulsivity, self-esteem, extraversion, and conscientiousness). In Study 4 (n = 365), predictive validity was confirmed via associations with mean accidents and mean close calls in the high-risk domain. Finally, in Study 4, the self-report version of the inventory was significantly associated with an informant version of the inventory. The measure will allow researchers and practitioners to investigate risk taking as a variable that is conceptually distinct from participation in a high-risk sport.

  9. Survival after intestinal mucormycosis in acute myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Parra, R; Arnau, E; Julia, A; Lopez, A; Nadal, A; Allende, E

    1986-12-15

    A young woman with acute myelocytic leukemia developed acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding immediately after a first remission induction of her leukemia. After the site of bleeding was located in the descending colon, a necrotic bleeding ulcer was resected. Histologic examination of the ulcer established the diagnosis of gastrointestinal mucormycosis. Treatment with amphotericin B was administered because of the high risk of dissemination. The patient has been followed for 9 months with no evidence of relapse of infection. Survival after gastrointestinal mucormycosis in acute leukemia has not previously been reported in the English language literature. Success in managing mucormycosis depends on the adherence to the recommended principles of early aggressive diagnostic measures, excisional surgery, amphotericin B therapy, and control of the underlying predisposing condition.

  10. PLASMA CELL LEUKEMIA

    PubMed Central

    de Larrea, Carlos Fernandez; Kyle, Robert A.; Durie, Brian GM; Ludwig, Heinz; Usmani, Saad; Vesole, David H.; Hajek, Roman; Miguel, Jésus San; Sezer, Orhan; Sonneveld, Pieter; Kumar, Shaji K.; Mahindra, Anuj; Comenzo, Ray; Palumbo, Antonio; Mazumber, Amitabha; Anderson, Kenneth C.; Richardson, Paul G.; Badros, Ashraf Z.; Caers, Jo; Cavo, Michele; LeLeu, Xavier; Dimopoulos, Meletios A.; Chim, CS; Schots, Rik; Noeul, Amara; Fantl, Dorotea; Mellqvist, Ulf-Henrik; Landgren, Ola; Chanan-Khan, Asher; Moreau, Philippe; Fonseca, Rafael; Merlini, Giampaolo; Lahuerta, JJ; Bladé, Joan; Orlowski, Robert Z.; Shah, Jatin J.

    2014-01-01

    Plasma cell leukemia (PCL) is a rare and aggressive variant of myeloma characterized by the presence of circulating plasma cells. It is classified as either primary PCL occurring at diagnosis or as secondary PCL in patients with relapsed/refractory myeloma. Primary PCL is a distinct clinic-pathologic entity with different cytogenetic and molecular findings. The clinical course is aggressive with short remissions and survival duration. The diagnosis is based upon the percentage (≥ 20%) and absolute number (≥ 2 × 10 9/L) of plasma cells in the peripheral blood. It is proposed that the thresholds for diagnosis be reexamined and consensus recommendations are made for diagnosis, as well as, response and progression criteria. Induction therapy needs to begin promptly and have high clinical activity leading to rapid disease control in an effort to minimize the risk of early death. Intensive chemotherapy regimens and bortezomib-based regimens are recommended followed by high-dose therapy with autologous stem-cell transplantation (HDT/ASCT) if feasible. Allogeneic transplantation can be considered in younger patients. Prospective multicenter studies are required to provide revised definitions and better understanding of the pathogenesis of PCL. PMID:23288300

  11. Risk assessment of relapse by lineage-specific monitoring of chimerism in children undergoing allogeneic stem cell transplantation for acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Preuner, Sandra; Peters, Christina; Pötschger, Ulrike; Daxberger, Helga; Fritsch, Gerhard; Geyeregger, Rene; Schrauder, André; von Stackelberg, Arend; Schrappe, Martin; Bader, Peter; Ebell, Wolfram; Eckert, Cornelia; Lang, Peter; Sykora, Karl-Walter; Schrum, Johanna; Kremens, Bernhard; Ehlert, Karoline; Albert, Michael H.; Meisel, Roland; Lawitschka, Anita; Mann, Georg; Panzer-Grümayer, Renate; Güngör, Tayfun; Holter, Wolfgang; Strahm, Brigitte; Gruhn, Bernd; Schulz, Ansgar; Woessmann, Wilhelm; Lion, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is required as rescue therapy in about 20% of pediatric patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. However, the relapse rates are considerable, and relapse confers a poor outcome. Early assessment of the risk of relapse is therefore of paramount importance for the development of appropriate measures. We used the EuroChimerism approach to investigate the potential impact of lineage-specific chimerism testing for relapse-risk analysis in 162 pediatric patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia after allogeneic stem cell transplantation in a multicenter study based on standardized transplantation protocols. Within a median observation time of 4.5 years, relapses have occurred in 41/162 patients at a median of 0.6 years after transplantation (range, 0.13–5.7 years). Prospective screening at defined consecutive time points revealed that reappearance of recipient-derived cells within the CD34+ and CD8+ cell subsets display the most significant association with the occurrence of relapses with hazard ratios of 5.2 (P=0.003) and 2.8 (P=0.008), respectively. The appearance of recipient cells after a period of pure donor chimerism in the CD34+ and CD8+ leukocyte subsets revealed dynamics indicative of a significantly elevated risk of relapse or imminent disease recurrence. Assessment of chimerism within these lineages can therefore provide complementary information for further diagnostic and, potentially, therapeutic purposes aiming at the prevention of overt relapse. This study was registered at clinical.trials.gov with the number NC01423747. PMID:26869631

  12. Actual biological diagnosis of acute myeloblastic leukemia in children

    PubMed Central

    Buga Corbu, V; Glűck, A; Arion, C

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Acute myeloblastic leukemia accounts for approximately 20% of acute leukemias in children. The days the microscope represented the main tool in the diagnosis and classification of Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia seem to be very far. This review summarizes the current diagnosis of this malignancy, where the morphological, cytochemical, immunophenotyping, cytogenetic and molecular characterization represents the basement of a risk group related therapy. PMID:25408742

  13. Actual biological diagnosis of acute myeloblastic leukemia in children.

    PubMed

    Buga Corbu, V; Glűck, A; Arion, C

    2014-06-15

    Acute myeloblastic leukemia accounts for approximately 20% of acute leukemias in children. The days the microscope represented the main tool in the diagnosis and classification of Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia seem to be very far. This review summarizes the current diagnosis of this malignancy, where the morphological, cytochemical, immunophenotyping, cytogenetic and molecular characterization represents the basement of a risk group related therapy.

  14. Hypermethylation of the alternative AWT1 promoter in hematological malignancies is a highly specific marker for acute myeloid leukemias despite high expression levels

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Wilms tumor 1 (WT1) is over-expressed in numerous cancers with respect to normal cells, and has either a tumor suppressor or oncogenic role depending on cellular context. This gene is associated with numerous alternatively spliced transcripts, which initiate from two different unique first exons within the WT1 and the alternative (A)WT1 promoter intervals. Within the hematological system, WT1 expression is restricted to CD34+/CD38- cells and is undetectable after differentiation. Detectable expression of this gene is an excellent marker for minimal residual disease in acute myeloid leukemia (AML), but the underlying epigenetic alterations are unknown. Methods To determine the changes in the underlying epigenetic landscape responsible for this expression, we characterized expression, DNA methylation and histone modification profiles in 28 hematological cancer cell lines and confirmed the methylation signature in 356 cytogenetically well-characterized primary hematological malignancies. Results Despite high expression of WT1 and AWT1 transcripts in AML-derived cell lines, we observe robust hypermethylation of the AWT1 promoter and an epigenetic switch from a permissive to repressive chromatin structure between normal cells and AML cell lines. Subsequent methylation analysis in our primary leukemia and lymphoma cohort revealed that the epigenetic signature identified in cell lines is specific to myeloid-lineage malignancies, irrespective of underlying mutational status or translocation. In addition to being a highly specific marker for AML diagnosis (positive predictive value 100%; sensitivity 86.1%; negative predictive value 89.4%), we show that AWT1 hypermethylation also discriminates patients that relapse from those achieving complete remission after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, with similar efficiency to WT1 expression profiling. Conclusions We describe a methylation signature of the AWT1 promoter CpG island that is a promising marker for

  15. Counseling the high-risk adolescent.

    PubMed

    Busen, N H

    1992-01-01

    Interviewing and counseling high-risk adolescents provides a challenge to nurse practitioners. The problems of poverty, substance abuse, mental illness, and low self-esteem overlay other characteristics of risk, making assessment and management of the adolescent's problems complex and difficult. Survey data, obtained in this study on adolescent risk-taking, suggest that violence, aggression, and thrill-seeking behaviors are increasingly common. The finding is supported by current national statistics on adolescents. A case study is used to show the process of gathering information on home and educational settings that can provide insight into family dysfunction and specific problem behaviors.

  16. News Note: New chemotherapy scheduling improves survival for most common form of childhood leukemia

    Cancer.gov

    New NCI-sponsored clinical trial results reported today at the annual American Society of Clinical Oncology meeting in Chicago show that, in a high-risk form of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), a high-dose schedule of a drug raises already high cure rates even higher.

  17. Understanding Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... a second cancer, including melanoma, sarcoma, colorectal cancer, lung cancer, basal cell cancer, squamous cell skin cancer or myeloma. {{ See your primary care doctor to keep up with other healthcare needs. Understanding Leukemia I page 21 {{ Talk with family and friends about how ...

  18. High Incidences of Invasive Fungal Infections in Acute Myeloid Leukemia Patients Receiving Induction Chemotherapy without Systemic Antifungal Prophylaxis: A Prospective Observational Study in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Kung, Hsiang-Chi; Yao, Ming; Wu, Un-In; Hsu, Szu-Chun; Lin, Chien-Ting; Li, Chi-Cheng; Wu, Shang-Ju; Hou, Hsin-An; Chou, Wen-Chien; Huang, Shang-Yi; Tsay, Woei; Chen, Yao-Chang; Chen, Yee-Chun; Chang, Shan-Chwen; Ko, Bor-Sheng; Tien, Hwei-Fang

    2015-01-01

    Invasive fungal infections (IFIs) is an important complication for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients receiving induction chemotherapy. However, the epidemiological information is not clear in Southeastern Asia, an area of potential high incidences of IFIs. To clarify it, we enrolled 298 non-M3 adult AML patients receiving induction chemotherapy without systemic anti-fungal prophylaxis from Jan 2004 to Dec 2009, when we applied a prospective diagnostic and treatment algorithm for IFIs. Their demographic parameters, IFI characters, and treatment outcome were collected for analysis. The median age of these patients was 51 years. Standard induction chemotherapy was used for 246 (82.6%) patients, and 66.8% of patients achieved complete remission (CR) or partial remission. The incidence of all-category IFIs was 34.6% (5.7% proven IFIs, 5.0% probable IFIs and 23.8% possible IFIs). Candida tropicalis was the leading pathogen among yeast, and lower respiratory tract was the most common site for IFIs (75.4%, 80/106). Standard induction chemotherapy and failure to CR were identified as risk factors for IFIs. The presence of IFI in induction independently predicted worse survival (hazard ratio 1.536 (1.100–2.141), p value = 0.012). Even in those who survived from the initial IFI insults after 3 months, the presence of IFIs in induction still predicted a poor long-term survival. This study confirms high incidences of IFIs in Southeastern Asia, and illustrates potential risk factors; poor short-term and long-term outcomes are also demonstrated. This epidemiological information will provide useful perspectives for anti-fungal prophylaxis and treatment for AML patients during induction, so that best chances of cure and survival can be provided. PMID:26061179

  19. The MLL recombinome of acute leukemias in 2013

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, C; Hofmann, J; Burmeister, T; Gröger, D; Park, T S; Emerenciano, M; Pombo de Oliveira, M; Renneville, A; Villarese, P; Macintyre, E; Cavé, H; Clappier, E; Mass-Malo, K; Zuna, J; Trka, J; De Braekeleer, E; De Braekeleer, M; Oh, S H; Tsaur, G; Fechina, L; van der Velden, V H J; van Dongen, J J M; Delabesse, E; Binato, R; Silva, M L M; Kustanovich, A; Aleinikova, O; Harris, M H; Lund-Aho, T; Juvonen, V; Heidenreich, O; Vormoor, J; Choi, W W L; Jarosova, M; Kolenova, A; Bueno, C; Menendez, P; Wehner, S; Eckert, C; Talmant, P; Tondeur, S; Lippert, E; Launay, E; Henry, C; Ballerini, P; Lapillone, H; Callanan, M B; Cayuela, J M; Herbaux, C; Cazzaniga, G; Kakadiya, P M; Bohlander, S; Ahlmann, M; Choi, J R; Gameiro, P; Lee, D S; Krauter, J; Cornillet-Lefebvre, P; Te Kronnie, G; Schäfer, B W; Kubetzko, S; Alonso, C N; zur Stadt, U; Sutton, R; Venn, N C; Izraeli, S; Trakhtenbrot, L; Madsen, H O; Archer, P; Hancock, J; Cerveira, N; Teixeira, M R; Lo Nigro, L; Möricke, A; Stanulla, M; Schrappe, M; Sedék, L; Szczepański, T; Zwaan, C M; Coenen, E A; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, M M; Strehl, S; Dworzak, M; Panzer-Grümayer, R; Dingermann, T; Klingebiel, T; Marschalek, R

    2013-01-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements of the human MLL (mixed lineage leukemia) gene are associated with high-risk infant, pediatric, adult and therapy-induced acute leukemias. We used long-distance inverse-polymerase chain reaction to characterize the chromosomal rearrangement of individual acute leukemia patients. We present data of the molecular characterization of 1590 MLL-rearranged biopsy samples obtained from acute leukemia patients. The precise localization of genomic breakpoints within the MLL gene and the involved translocation partner genes (TPGs) were determined and novel TPGs identified. All patients were classified according to their gender (852 females and 745 males), age at diagnosis (558 infant, 416 pediatric and 616 adult leukemia patients) and other clinical criteria. Combined data of our study and recently published data revealed a total of 121 different MLL rearrangements, of which 79 TPGs are now characterized at the molecular level. However, only seven rearrangements seem to be predominantly associated with illegitimate recombinations of the MLL gene (∼90%): AFF1/AF4, MLLT3/AF9, MLLT1/ENL, MLLT10/AF10, ELL, partial tandem duplications (MLL PTDs) and MLLT4/AF6, respectively. The MLL breakpoint distributions for all clinical relevant subtypes (gender, disease type, age at diagnosis, reciprocal, complex and therapy-induced translocations) are presented. Finally, we present the extending network of reciprocal MLL fusions deriving from complex rearrangements. PMID:23628958

  20. Acute myeloid leukemia in children: Current status and future directions.

    PubMed

    Taga, Takashi; Tomizawa, Daisuke; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Adachi, Souichi

    2016-02-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) accounts for 25% of pediatric leukemia and affects approximately 180 patients annually in Japan. The treatment outcome for pediatric AML has improved through advances in chemotherapy, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), supportive care, and optimal risk stratification. Currently, clinical pediatric AML studies are conducted separately according to the AML subtypes: de novo AML, acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL), and myeloid leukemia with Down syndrome (ML-DS). Children with de novo AML are treated mainly with anthracyclines and cytarabine, in some cases with HSCT, and the overall survival (OS) rate now approaches 70%. Children with APL are treated with an all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA)-combined regimen with an 80-90% OS. Children with ML-DS are treated with a less intensive regimen compared with non-DS patients, and the OS is approximately 80%. HSCT in first remission is restricted to children with high-risk de novo AML only. To further improve outcomes, it will be necessary to combine more accurate risk stratification strategies using molecular genetic analysis with assessment of minimum residual disease, and the introduction of new drugs in international collaborative clinical trials. PMID:26645706

  1. Chronic lymphocytic leukemia: molecular heterogeneity revealed by high-throughput genomics

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) has been consistently at the forefront of genetic research owing to its prevalence and the accessibility of sample material. Recently, genome-wide technologies have been intensively applied to CLL genetics, with remarkable progress. Single nucleotide polymorphism arrays have identified recurring chromosomal aberrations, thereby focusing functional studies on discrete genomic lesions and leading to the first implication of somatic microRNA disruption in cancer. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) has further transformed our understanding of CLL by identifying novel recurrently mutated putative drivers, including the unexpected discovery of somatic mutations affecting spliceosome function. NGS has further enabled in-depth examination of the transcriptional and epigenetic changes in CLL that accompany genetic lesions, and has shed light on how different driver events appear at different stages of disease progression and clonally evolve with relapsed disease. In addition to providing important insights into disease biology, these discoveries have significant translational potential. They enhance prognosis by highlighting specific lesions associated with poor clinical outcomes (for example, driver events such as mutations in the splicing factor subunit gene SF3B1) or with increased clonal heterogeneity (for example, the presence of subclonal driver mutations). Here, we review new genomic discoveries in CLL and discuss their possible implications in the era of precision medicine. PMID:23731665

  2. Transformation of Canine Lymphoma/Leukemia to More Aggressive Diseases: Anecdotes or Reality?

    PubMed Central

    Comazzi, Stefano; Aresu, Luca; Marconato, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Transformation is the evolution of an indolent lymphoma/leukemia to an aggressive lymphoma, typically harboring a very poor prognosis. This phenomenon is well described in humans, but underestimated in dogs although recognized as a possible evolution of indolent lymphomas/leukemias. In canine chronic leukemias, blast crisis (mainly in myeloid) and Richter syndrome (transformation into a high grade lymphoma) (mainly in B-cell lymphocytic leukemia) have been reported. Transformation is a possible event also in canine low grade lymphomas, although rare. The increased knowledge has also generated new questions and posed challenges that need to be addressed to improve outcome, including the recognition of the clinical characteristics at diagnosis associated with a higher risk of transformation in an attempt of anticipating the typical evolution. PMID:26664970

  3. High Frequency of Inherited Variants in the MEFV Gene in Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Sayan, Ozkan; Kilicaslan, Emrah; Celik, Serkan; Tangi, Fatih; Erikci, Alev A; Ipcioglu, Osman; Sanisoglu, Yavuz S; Nalbant, Selim; Oktenli, Cagatay

    2011-09-01

    In the present study, we aimed to determine the frequency of inherited variants in the MEFV (Mediterranean FeVer), the gene responsible for familial Mediterranean fever (FMF), gene in patients with acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL). The eight MEFV gene variants (M694I, M694V, M680I (G/C-A), V726A, R761H, E148Q and P369S) were detected in 36 patients with ALL and 65 healthy controls; none had own and/or family history compatible with FMF. We identified 11 heterozygous inherited variants in the MEFV gene in both ALL patients and controls. The mean overall frequency of inherited variants in the MEFV gene rate was higher in ALL patients than healthy controls (P = 0.040). It is interesting to note that M680I/0 is predominant variant in patients with ALL. In addition, E148Q variant frequency was also significantly higher in the patient group than the controls (P = 0.012). In conclusion, overall frequency of inherited variants in the MEFV gene was found to be higher in patients with ALL. Based on the present data, it is difficult to reach a definitive conclusion regarding the possibility that inherited variants in the MEFV gene could represent a causative role in ALL. However, the data of our study may provide some new insights in understanding of individual genetic differences in susceptibility to these neoplasms. Further investigations are needed to determine the actual role of inherited variants in the MEFV gene in pathogenesis of ALL.

  4. Determination of high-risk cargo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Leo A.; Smith, Douglas E.; Khan, Siraj M.

    1994-10-01

    The approach and methodology used in the determination of the type of cargo containing concealments of commercial quantities of narcotics such as cocaine and heroin is described. This high-risk cargo enters the United States through border crossings at land, seaports and airports. The volume and variety of cargos make it a complex and challenging task for the U.S. Customs Service.

  5. Guaranteed Student Loans: GAO High Risk Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Comptroller General of the U.S., Washington, DC.

    As part of a larger program to identify and analyze federal programs at high risk for waste, fraud, abuse and mismanagement, this publication presents an evaluation of the Federal Family Education Loan Program (FFELP), formerly the Guaranteed Student Loan Program. The analysis argues that the program has not been successful in protecting the…

  6. Micronutrient requirements of high-risk infants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Micronutrient requirements are well-established for healthy full-term infants. However, few such recommendations exist for high-risk infants, including full-term infants with a variety of medical disorders or very preterm infants. Key micronutrients considered in this review are calcium, phosphorus,...

  7. Creating Profiles of High Risk Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higbee, Jeanne L.; Dwinell, Patricia L.

    Measures used at the Division of Developmental Studies at the University of Georgia in constructing a student profile (specifically, of high-risk college freshmen) are discussed. The areas measured concern: goals; learning styles; career exploration; stress and academic anxiety; developmental tasks; and locus of control. The goals checklist…

  8. High risk groups in oil shale workforce

    SciTech Connect

    Gratt, L.B.; Perry, B.W.; Marine, W.M.; Savitz, D.A.

    1984-04-01

    The workforce risks of a hypothetical one million barrels-per-day oil shale industry were estimated. The risks for the different workforce segments were compared and high risk groups were identified. Accidents and injuries were statistically described by rates for fatalities, for accidents with days lost from work, and for accidents with no days lost from work. Workforce diseases analyzed were cancers, silicosia, pneumoconiosis, chronic bronchitis, chronic airway obstruction, and high frequency hearing loss. A comparison of the workforce groups under different risk measures (occurrence, fatality, and life-loss expectancy) was performed. The miners represented the group with the largest fatality and the most serious accident rate, although the estimated rates were below the average industry-wide underground mining experience. Lung disease from inhalation exposure of about the nuisance dust threshold limit value presents a significant risk for future concerns. If future environmental dust exposure is at the 100 ..mu..g/m/sup 3/ alpha-quartz level, safety improvements in the mining sector are of prime importance to reduce the oil shale worker's life-loss expectancy. 11 references, 1 figure, 11 tables.

  9. Incorporating measurable ('minimal') residual disease-directed treatment strategies to optimize outcomes in adults with acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Pettit, Kristen; Stock, Wendy; Walter, Roland B

    2016-07-01

    Curative-intent therapy leads to complete remissions in many adults with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), but relapse remains common. Numerous studies have unequivocally demonstrated that the persistence of measurable ('minimal') residual disease (MRD) at the submicroscopic level during morphologic remission identifies patients at high risk of disease recurrence and short survival. This association has provided the impetus to customize anti-leukemia therapy based on MRD data, a strategy that is now routinely pursued in acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). While it is currently uncertain whether this approach will improve outcomes in AML other than APL, randomized studies have validated MRD-based risk-stratified treatment algorithms in acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Here, we review the available studies examining MRD-directed therapy in AML, appraise their strengths and limitations, and discuss avenues for future investigation.

  10. High prevalence of MAP2K1 mutations in variant and IGHV4-34-expressing hairy-cell leukemias.

    PubMed

    Waterfall, Joshua J; Arons, Evgeny; Walker, Robert L; Pineda, Marbin; Roth, Laura; Killian, J Keith; Abaan, Ogan D; Davis, Sean R; Kreitman, Robert J; Meltzer, Paul S

    2014-01-01

    To understand the genetic mechanisms driving variant and IGHV4-34-expressing hairy-cell leukemias, we performed whole-exome sequencing of leukemia samples from ten affected individuals, including six with matched normal samples. We identified activating mutations in the MAP2K1 gene (encoding MEK1) in 5 of these 10 samples and in 10 of 21 samples in a validation set (overall frequency of 15/31), suggesting potential new strategies for treating individuals with these diseases.

  11. Early Identification of Educationally High Potential and High Risk Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keogh, Barbara K.; Smith, Carol E.

    Early identification of educationally high potential and high risk children was investigated by following the same 49 children from kindergarten entrance through grade five of a regular school program. Kindergarten predictive measures were the Bender Gestalt Test and teachers' evaluations; follow-up measures were yearly standard achievement test…

  12. A case-control study of chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML) in Shanghai, China: evaluation of risk factors for CMML, with special focus on benzene.

    PubMed

    Gross, Sherilyn A; Irons, Richard D; Scott, Paul K; Galbraith, David; Wang, Xiao Qin; Chen, Yan; Paustenbach, Dennis

    2012-01-01

    The authors report the results of a hospital-based case-control study of all patients diagnosed with chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML) (n = 36) from 28 participating hospitals over a 4-year period. Diagnoses were made by a single laboratory using 2001 World Health Organization (WHO) criteria. Subjects were matched to 2 control patients and interviewed concerning previous diseases, work histories, and exposures to potential etiologic agents. Peripheral blood and bone marrow findings revealed clinical features of both myelodysplastic syndromes (MDSs) and myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs), consistent with hematopoietic disease category of MDS/MPN. The frequency of clonal cytogenetic abnormalities in all CMML cases was 31%, with no consistent pattern identified. A select number of risk factors associated with occupational exposure, nonoccupational exposure, and prior medical or family history of disease were extracted from the questionnaire. The results were compared between the case and control subjects. A total of 5 study subjects (2 CMML cases and 3 control subjects) were determined to have had some benzene exposure. In addition, none of the highlighted risk factors associated with nonoccupational exposure to etiologic agents was significantly different among the study subjects. These results do not support an increased risk for developing CMML associated with historical exposures to benzene.

  13. A high proportion of cells carrying trisomy 12 is associated with a worse outcome in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    González-Gascón Y Marín, Isabel; Hernández-Sánchez, María; Rodríguez-Vicente, Ana-Eugenia; Sanzo, Carmen; Aventín, Anna; Puiggros, Anna; Collado, Rosa; Heras, Cecilia; Muñoz, Carolina; Delgado, Julio; Ortega, Margarita; González, María-Teresa; Marugán, Isabel; de la Fuente, Ignacio; Recio, Isabel; Bosch, Francesc; Espinet, Blanca; González, Marcos; Hernández-Rivas, Jesús-María; Hernández, José-Ángel

    2016-06-01

    The prognosis of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) patients displaying trisomy 12 (+12) remains unclear. In this study, we analyzed the influence of the proportion of cells with +12, and other clinical and biologic factors, in time to first therapy (TTFT) and overall survival (OS), in 289 patients diagnosed with CLL carrying +12. Median OS was 129 months. One hundred seventy-four patients (60.2%) presented +12 in <60% of cells. TTFT and OS for this subgroup were longer than for the subgroup with +12 in ≥60% of cells, with a median TTFT of 49 months (CI95%, 39-58) vs 30 months (CI95%, 22-38) (P = 0.001); and a median OS of 159 months (CI95%, 119-182), vs 96 months (CI95%, 58-134) (P = 0.015). Other factors associated with a shorter TTFT were: Binet stage, B symptoms, lymphadenopathy, splenomegaly, high lymphocyte count, 11q-, high β2 microglobulin, and high LDH. In the multivariate analysis, clinical stage, +12 in ≥60% of cells, high lymphocyte count, B symptoms, and 11q- in addition, resulted of significance in predicting shorter TTFT. Significant variables for OS were: Binet stage, lymphadenopathy, splenomegaly, high LDH, high β2 microglobulin, 11q-, and CD38. In the multivariate analysis, only Binet stage, 11q-, and high β2microglobulin significantly predicted shorter OS. CLL with +12 entails a heterogeneous group with intermediate prognosis. However, a high proportion of cells carrying +12 separates a subgroup of patients with poor outcome. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. A high proportion of cells carrying trisomy 12 is associated with a worse outcome in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    González-Gascón Y Marín, Isabel; Hernández-Sánchez, María; Rodríguez-Vicente, Ana-Eugenia; Sanzo, Carmen; Aventín, Anna; Puiggros, Anna; Collado, Rosa; Heras, Cecilia; Muñoz, Carolina; Delgado, Julio; Ortega, Margarita; González, María-Teresa; Marugán, Isabel; de la Fuente, Ignacio; Recio, Isabel; Bosch, Francesc; Espinet, Blanca; González, Marcos; Hernández-Rivas, Jesús-María; Hernández, José-Ángel

    2016-06-01

    The prognosis of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) patients displaying trisomy 12 (+12) remains unclear. In this study, we analyzed the influence of the proportion of cells with +12, and other clinical and biologic factors, in time to first therapy (TTFT) and overall survival (OS), in 289 patients diagnosed with CLL carrying +12. Median OS was 129 months. One hundred seventy-four patients (60.2%) presented +12 in <60% of cells. TTFT and OS for this subgroup were longer than for the subgroup with +12 in ≥60% of cells, with a median TTFT of 49 months (CI95%, 39-58) vs 30 months (CI95%, 22-38) (P = 0.001); and a median OS of 159 months (CI95%, 119-182), vs 96 months (CI95%, 58-134) (P = 0.015). Other factors associated with a shorter TTFT were: Binet stage, B symptoms, lymphadenopathy, splenomegaly, high lymphocyte count, 11q-, high β2 microglobulin, and high LDH. In the multivariate analysis, clinical stage, +12 in ≥60% of cells, high lymphocyte count, B symptoms, and 11q- in addition, resulted of significance in predicting shorter TTFT. Significant variables for OS were: Binet stage, lymphadenopathy, splenomegaly, high LDH, high β2 microglobulin, 11q-, and CD38. In the multivariate analysis, only Binet stage, 11q-, and high β2microglobulin significantly predicted shorter OS. CLL with +12 entails a heterogeneous group with intermediate prognosis. However, a high proportion of cells carrying +12 separates a subgroup of patients with poor outcome. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:25689772

  15. Stabilization of high-risk plaques

    PubMed Central

    Takata, Kohei; Zhang, Bo; Miura, Shin-ichiro; Saku, Keijiro

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases (ASCVDs) is increasing globally and they have become the leading cause of death in most countries. Numerous experimental and clinical studies have been conducted to identify major risk factors and effective control strategies for ASCVDs. The development of imaging modalities with the ability to determine the plaque composition enables us to further identify high-risk plaque and evaluate the effectiveness of different treatment strategies. While intensive lipid-lowering by statins can stabilize or even regress plaque by various mechanisms, such as the reduction of lipid accumulation in a necrotic lipid core, the reduction of inflammation, and improvement of endothelial function, there are still considerable residual risks that need to be understood. We reviewed important findings regarding plaque vulnerability and some encouraging emerging approaches for plaque stabilization. PMID:27500090

  16. High LEF1 expression predicts adverse prognosis in chronic lymphocytic leukemia and may be targeted by ethacrynic acid

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Wei; Zhu, Huayuan; Fu, Yuan; Shen, Wenyi; Miao, Kourong; Hong, Min; Xu, Wei; Fan, Lei; Young, Ken H.; Liu, Peng; Li, Jianyong

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant activation of lymphoid enhancer-binding factor-1 (LEF1) has been identified in several cancers, including chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). As a key transcription factor of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway, LEF1 helps to regulate important genes involved in tumor cell death mechanisms. In this study, we determined LEF1 gene expression levels in CLL (n = 197) and monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis (MBL) (n = 6) patients through real-time RT-PCR. LEF1 was significantly up-regulated in both MBL and CLL patients compared with normal B cells. Treatment-free survival (TFS) time and overall survival (OS) time were much longer in CLL patients with low LEF1 expression than in those with high LEF1 levels. Furthermore, Wnt inhibitor ethacrynic acid (EA) induced both apoptosis and necroptosis in primary CLL cells. EA also enhanced the cytotoxicity of both fludarabine and cyclophosphamide against CLL cells in vitro. Finally, we demonstrated that EA functions by inhibiting the recruitment of LEF1 to DNA promoters and restoring cylindromatosis (CYLD) expression in CLL cells. Our results showed, for the first time, that high LEF1 expression is associated with poor survival for CLL patients. Combined with other chemotherapeutic drugs, EA may be a promising therapeutic agent for CLL. PMID:26950276

  17. Outcomes after Induction Failure in Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Schrappe, Martin; Hunger, Stephen P.; Pui, Ching-Hon; Saha, Vaskar; Gaynon, Paul S.; Baruchel, André; Conter, Valentino; Otten, Jacques; Ohara, Akira; Versluys, Anne Birgitta; Escherich, Gabriele; Heyman, Mats; Silverman, Lewis B.; Horibe, Keizo; Mann, Georg; Camitta, Bruce M.; Harbott, Jochen; Riehm, Hansjörg; Richards, Sue; Devidas, Meenakshi; Zimmermann, Martin

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Failure of remission-induction therapy is a rare but highly adverse event in children and adolescents with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). METHODS We identified induction failure, defined by the persistence of leukemic blasts in blood, bone marrow, or any extramedullary site after 4 to 6 weeks of remission-induction therapy, in 1041 of 44,017 patients (2.4%) 0 to 18 years of age with newly diagnosed ALL who were treated by a total of 14 cooperative study groups between 1985 and 2000. We analyzed the relationships among disease characteristics, treatments administered, and outcomes in these patients. RESULTS Patients with induction failure frequently presented with high-risk features, including older age, high leukocyte count, leukemia with a T-cell phenotype, the Philadelphia chromosome, and 11q23 rearrangement. With a median follow-up period of 8.3 years (range, 1.5 to 22.1), the 10-year survival rate (±SE) was estimated at only 32±1%. An age of 10 years or older, T-cell leukemia, the presence of an 11q23 rearrangement, and 25% or more blasts in the bone marrow at the end of induction therapy were associated with a particularly poor outcome. High hyperdiploidy (a modal chromosome number >50) and an age of 1 to 5 years were associated with a favorable outcome in patients with precursor B-cell leukemia. Allogeneic stem-cell transplantation from matched, related donors was associated with improved outcomes in T-cell leukemia. Children younger than 6 years of age with precursor B-cell leukemia and no adverse genetic features had a 10-year survival rate of 72±5% when treated with chemotherapy only. CONCLUSIONS Pediatric ALL with induction failure is highly heterogeneous. Patients who have T-cell leukemia appear to have a better outcome with allogeneic stem-cell transplantation than with chemotherapy, whereas patients who have precursor B-cell leukemia without other adverse features appear to have a better outcome with chemotherapy. (Funded by Deutsche

  18. Childhood acute leukemias are frequent in Mexico City: descriptive epidemiology

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Worldwide, acute leukemia is the most common type of childhood cancer. It is particularly common in the Hispanic populations residing in the United States, Costa Rica, and Mexico City. The objective of this study was to determine the incidence of acute leukemia in children who were diagnosed and treated in public hospitals in Mexico City. Methods Included in this study were those children, under 15 years of age and residents of Mexico City, who were diagnosed in 2006 and 2007 with leukemia, as determined by using the International Classification of Childhood Cancer. The average annual incidence rates (AAIR), and the standardized average annual incidence rates (SAAIR) per million children were calculated. We calculated crude, age- and sex-specific incidence rates and adjusted for age by the direct method with the world population as standard. We determined if there were a correlation between the incidence of acute leukemias in the various boroughs of Mexico City and either the number of agricultural hectares, the average number of persons per household, or the municipal human development index for Mexico (used as a reference of socio-economic level). Results Although a total of 610 new cases of leukemia were registered during 2006-2007, only 228 fit the criteria for inclusion in this study. The overall SAAIR was 57.6 per million children (95% CI, 46.9-68.3); acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) was the most frequent type of leukemia, constituting 85.1% of the cases (SAAIR: 49.5 per million), followed by acute myeloblastic leukemia at 12.3% (SAAIR: 6.9 per million), and chronic myeloid leukemia at 1.7% (SAAIR: 0.9 per million). The 1-4 years age group had the highest SAAIR for ALL (77.7 per million). For cases of ALL, 73.2% had precursor B-cell immunophenotype (SAAIR: 35.8 per million) and 12.4% had T-cell immunophenotype (SAAIR 6.3 per million). The peak ages for ALL were 2-6 years and 8-10 years. More than half the children (58.8%) were classified as high

  19. Horizontal transmission of feline leukemia virus under natural conditions in a feline leukemia cluster household.

    PubMed

    Essex, M; Cotter, S M; Sliski, A H; Hardy, W D; Stephenson, J R; Aaronson, S A; Jarrett, O

    1977-01-01

    Ten post-weanling 4-month-old cats, designated "tracers", were placed in a feline leukemia cluster household to determine the efficiency of horizontal transmission of feline leukemia virus (FeLV). The tracer cats were confirmed as negative for prior exposure to FeLV. Following the placement in the leukemia cluster environment, the tracer cats were serologically monitored at intervals of 3-6 weeks for a total period of 1 year. The tests employed included the detection of FeLV using fixed-cell immunofluorescence and the detection and titration of antibody to : (1) the feline oncornavirus-associated cell membrane antigen (FOCMA), as detected by membrane immunofluorescence; (2) viable FeLV, using serum neutralization; (3) virion core protein p30, using radioimmunoprecipitation; and (4) virion glycoprotein gp70, using radioimmunoprecipitation. All of the tracers had evidence of horizontal infection by FeLV, by several criteria. Seven of the 10 had virus that could be isolated from plasma. All of these 7 developed a terminal illness within 18 months; 3 developed aplastic anemia, 3 infectious peritonitis, and 1 lymphoma. The remaining 3 were negative for FeLV by both virus isolation and fixed-cell immunofluorescence. These 3 did, however, develop high antibody titers by all four criteria and they remained healthy throughout the examination period. These results clearly indicate that unprotected pros-weanling cats brought into a leukemia exposure household environment have a high risk of becoming infected with FeLV. Furthermore, a large proportion of the cats are at risk for development of persistent viremia and FeLV-related diseases.

  20. Increased BMI correlates with higher risk of disease relapse and differentiation syndrome in patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia treated with the AIDA protocols.

    PubMed

    Breccia, Massimo; Mazzarella, Luca; Bagnardi, Vincenzo; Disalvatore, Davide; Loglisci, Giuseppina; Cimino, Giuseppe; Testi, Anna Maria; Avvisati, Giuseppe; Petti, Maria Concetta; Minotti, Clara; Latagliata, Roberto; Foà, Robin; Pelicci, Pier Giuseppe; Lo-Coco, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    We investigated whether body mass index (BMI) correlates with distinct outcomes in newly diagnosed acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). The study population included 144 patients with newly diagnosed and genetically confirmed APL consecutively treated at a single institution. All patients received All-trans retinoic acid and idarubicin according to the GIMEMA protocols AIDA-0493 and AIDA-2000. Outcome estimates according to the BMI were carried out together with multivariable analysis for the risk of relapse and differentiation syndrome. Fifty-four (37.5%) were under/normal weight (BMI < 25), whereas 90 (62.5%) patients were overweight/obese (BMI ≥ 25). An increased BMI was associated with older age (P < .0001) and male sex (P = .02). BMI was the most powerful predictor of differentiation syndrome in multivariable analysis (odds ratio = 7.24; 95% CI, 1.50-34; P = .014). After a median follow-up of 6 years, the estimated cumulative incidence of relapse at 5 years was 31.6% (95% CI, 22.7%-43.8%) in overweight/obese and 11.2% (95% CI, 5.3%-23.8%) in underweight/normal weight patients (P = .029). Multivariable analysis showed that BMI was an independent predictor of relapse (hazard ratio = 2.45, 95% CI, 1.00-5.99, in overweight/obese vs under/normal weight patients, P = .049). An increased BMI at diagnosis is associated with a higher risk of developing differentiation syndrome and disease relapse in APL patients treated with AIDA protocols.

  1. Maternal drug use and risk of childhood nonlymphoblastic leukemia among offspring. An epidemiologic investigation implicating marijuana (a report from the Childrens Cancer Study Group).

    PubMed

    Robison, L L; Buckley, J D; Daigle, A E; Wells, R; Benjamin, D; Arthur, D C; Hammond, G D

    1989-05-15

    The Childrens Cancer Study Group conducted a case-control study designed to assess in utero and postnatal exposures in children with acute nonlymphoblastic leukemia (ANLL). Analyses were performed for reported maternal use of medications and drugs in the year preceding and during the index pregnancy of the 204 case-control pairs. An 11-fold risk (P = 0.003) was found for maternal use of mind-altering drugs just prior to or during the index pregnancy. Compared with ANLL cases not exposed to marijuana, exposed cases were significantly younger at diagnosis of ANLL (P less than 0.01) and were more often of the myelomonocytic and monocytic subtypes (P less than 0.01). Use of antinausea medication for more than 11 weeks was also associated with a significantly elevated relative risk of 2.81 and a dose-response relationship was noted (P = 0.05 for trend). These results suggest that maternal drug use of marijuana may have an etiologic role in childhood ANLL and may be specific for morphologically defined subgroups.

  2. Risk Factors, Pattern and Clinical Outcome of Acute Graft Versus Host Disease in Acute Leukemia Patients Undergoing Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplant.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Alok; Punatar, Sachin; Gawande, Jayant; Mathew, Libin; Bagal, Bhausaheb; Kannan, Sadhana; Khattry, Navin

    2015-12-01

    We sought to determine risk factors, pattern and outcome of acute graft versus host disease (aGVHD) in seventy-seven acute leukemia patients who underwent allogeneic stem cell transplant at our centre from January 2008 to March 2013. GVHD prophylaxis with cyclosporine-methotrexate or cyclosporine-mycophenolate mofetil was used. Patients were divided in 2 groups, grade II-IV aGVHD (group A) and grade 0-I aGVHD (group B). Incidence of any grade and grade II-IV aGVHD was 44 and 18 %, respectively. The most common site of aGVHD was gastro-intestinal tract (65 %) followed by skin (35 %). Higher total nucleated cell (TNC) dose infused was associated with increased incidence of grade II-IV aGVHD. Incidence of relapse and incidence of slippage of chimerism was 21 and 36 % in group A while 37 and 27 % in group B respectively. Transplant related mortality (TRM) was 21 % in group A and 13 % in group B. Probability of OS and RFS at 4 years was 63 and 34 % in group A compared with 40 and 38 % in group B, respectively. We conclude that higher TNC dose infused is a risk factor for grade II-IV aGVHD with gut being the commonest site. Grade II-IV aGVHD did not have a significant impact on incidence of relapse, TRM and OS.

  3. Concentrations of organochlorines related to titers to Epstein-Barr virus early antigen IgG as risk factors for hairy cell leukemia.

    PubMed Central

    Nordström, M; Hardell, L; Lindström, G; Wingfors, H; Hardell, K; Linde, A

    2000-01-01

    Hairy cell leukemia (HCL) is a rare chronic B-cell malignancy that, according to modern classifications, is a subgroup of non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHLs). A rapid increase in incidence of NHL has been reported in many countries. The reasons for this increase are largely unknown, but exposure to organochlorines has been suggested as a risk factor. Epstein-Barr virus is a human herpesvirus that has been associated with certain subgroups of NHL. In this study, we measured lipid adjusted blood concentrations (in nanogram per gram) of 36 congeners of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), p, p'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (p,p'-DDE), hexachlorobenzene (HCB), and four subgroups of chlordanes (trans-nonachlor, cis-nonachlor, MC6, and oxychlordane) in incident cases of HCL and controls from the general population. We obtained results on organochlorines and antibodies for 54 cases and 54 controls. Titers of antibodies to the Epstein-Barr early antigen and Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen, measured as P107, were correlated to concentrations of organochlorines to evaluate the possibility of an interaction between these factors in the pathogenesis of HCL. We found no significant difference in lipid-adjusted blood concentrations of total PCBs, p,p'-DDE, HCB, or the sum of the chlordanes between cases and controls. Titers of antibodies to Epstein-Barr early antigen IgG [Greater and equal to] 40 were correlated to an increased risk for HCL. This risk was further increased in those with a level above the median value of p,p'-DDE, HCB, or the sum of the chlordanes, suggesting an interaction between Epstein-Barr virus and a higher concentration of these chemicals. We also found increased risk for the sum of immunotoxic PCB group. PMID:10811571

  4. Impact of SNP array karyotyping on the diagnosis and the outcome of chronic myelomonocytic leukemia with low risk cytogenetic features or no metaphases.

    PubMed

    Palomo, Laura; Xicoy, Blanca; Garcia, Olga; Mallo, Mar; Ademà, Vera; Cabezón, Marta; Arnan, Montse; Pomares, Helena; José Larrayoz, María; José Calasanz, María; Maciejewski, Jaroslaw P; Huang, Dayong; Shih, Lee-Yung; Ogawa, Seishi; Cervera, Jose; Such, Esperanza; Coll, Rosa; Grau, Javier; Solé, Francesc; Zamora, Lurdes

    2016-02-01

    Chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML) is a clonal hematopoietic disorder with heterogeneous clinical, morphological and genetic characteristics. Clonal cytogenetic abnormalities are found in 20-30% of patients with CMML. Patients with low risk cytogenetic features (normal karyotype and isolated loss of Y chromosome) account for ∼80% of CMML patients and often fall into the low risk categories of CMML prognostic scores. We hypothesized that single nucleotide polymorphism arrays (SNP-A) karyotyping could detect cryptic chromosomal alterations with prognostic impact in these subgroup of patients. SNP-A were performed at diagnosis in 128 CMML patients with low risk karyotypes or uninformative results for conventional G-banding cytogenetics (CC). Copy number alterations (CNAs) and regions of copy number neutral loss of heterozygosity (CNN-LOH) were detected in 67% of patients. Recurrent CNAs included gains in regions 8p12 and 21q22 as well as losses in 10q21.1 and 12p13.2. Interstitial CNN-LOHs were recurrently detected in the following regions: 4q24-4q35, 7q32.1-7q36.3, and 11q13.3-11q25. Statistical analysis showed that some of the alterations detected by SNP-A associated with the patients' outcome. A shortened overall survival (OS) and progression free survival (PFS) was observed in cases where the affected size of the genome (considering CNAs and CNN-LOHs) was >11 Mb. In addition, presence of interstitial CNN-LOH was predictive of poor OS. Presence of CNAs (≥1) associated with poorer OS and PFS in the patients with myeloproliferative CMML. Overall, SNP-A analysis increased the diagnostic yield in patients with low risk cytogenetic features or uninformative CC and added prognostic value to this subset of patients. PMID:26509444

  5. Screening antiallergic components from Carthamus tinctorius using rat basophilic leukemia 2H3 cell membrane chromatography combined with high-performance liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Han, Shengli; Huang, Jing; Cui, Ronghua; Zhang, Tao

    2015-02-01

    Carthamus tinctorius, used in traditional Chinese medicine, has many pharmacological effects, such as anticoagulant effects, antioxidant effects, antiaging effects, regulation of gene expression, and antitumor effects. However, there is no report on the antiallergic effects of the components in C. tinctorius. In the present study, we investigated the antiallergic components of C. tinctorius and its mechanism of action. A rat basophilic leukemia 2H3/cell membrane chromatography coupled online with high-performance liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry method was developed to screen antiallergic components from C. tinctorius. The screening results showed that Hydroxysafflor yellow A, from C. tinctorius, was the targeted component that retained on the rat basophilic leukemia 2H3/cell membrane chromatography column. We measured the amount of β-hexosaminidase and histamine released in mast cells and the key markers of degranulation. The release assays showed that Hydroxysafflor yellow A could attenuate the immunoglobulin E induced release of allergic cytokines without affecting cell viability from 1.0 to 50.0 μM. In conclusion, the established rat basophilic leukemia 2H3 cell membrane chromatography coupled with online high-performance liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry method successfully screened and identified Hydroxysafflor yellow A from C. tinctorius as a potential antiallergic component. Pharmacological analysis elucidated that Hydroxysafflor yellow A is an effective natural component for inhibiting immunoglobulin E-antigen-mediated degranulation.

  6. Leukemia revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Cronkite, E P

    1980-01-01

    Selected features of the historical development of our knowledge of leukemia are discussed. The use of different methodologies for study of the nature of leukemic cell proliferation are analyzed. The differences between older cell kinetic data using tritiated thymidine and autoradiography and the newer cell culture methods are more apparent than real. It is suggested that tritiated thymidine and extracorporeal irradiation of the blood may be useful for therapeutic agents that have not been given an adequate trial. Radiation leukemogenesis presents an opportunity for study of the nature of leukemogenesis that has not been exploited adequately.

  7. Risk stratification of chromosomal abnormalities in chronic myelogenous leukemia in the era of tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Cortes, Jorge E; Tang, Guilin; Khoury, Joseph D; Wang, Sa; Bueso-Ramos, Carlos E; DiGiuseppe, Joseph A; Chen, Zi; Kantarjian, Hagop M; Medeiros, L Jeffrey; Hu, Shimin

    2016-06-01

    Clonal cytogenetic evolution with additional chromosomal abnormalities (ACAs) in chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) is generally associated with decreased response to tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) therapy and adverse survival. Although ACAs are considered as a sign of disease progression and have been used as one of the criteria for accelerated phase, the differential prognostic impact of individual ACAs in CML is unknown, and a classification system to reflect such prognostic impact is lacking. In this study, we aimed to address these questions using a large cohort of CML patients treated in the era of TKIs. We focused on cases with single chromosomal changes at the time of ACA emergence and stratified the 6 most common ACAs into 2 groups: group 1 with a relatively good prognosis including trisomy 8, -Y, and an extra copy of Philadelphia chromosome; and group 2 with a relatively poor prognosis including i(17)(q10), -7/del7q, and 3q26.2 rearrangements. Patients in group 1 showed much better treatment response and survival than patients in group 2. When compared with cases with no ACAs, ACAs in group 2 conferred a worse survival irrelevant to the emergence phase and time. In contrast, ACAs in group 1 had no adverse impact on survival when they emerged from chronic phase or at the time of CML diagnosis. The concurrent presence of 2 or more ACAs conferred an inferior survival and can be categorized into the poor prognostic group. PMID:27006386

  8. Treatment of high-risk neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Sung, Ki Woong

    2012-04-01

    Although high-dose chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplantation (HDCT/autoSCT) have improved the prognosis for patients with high-risk neuroblastoma (NB), event-free survival rates remain in the range of 30 to 40%, which is unsatisfactory. To further improve outcomes, several clinical trials, including tandem HDCT/autoSCT, high-dose (131)I-metaiodobenzylguanidine treatment, and immunotherapy with NB specific antibody, have been undertaken and pilot studies have reported encouraging results. Nonetheless, about half of high-risk NB patients still experience treatment failure and have no realistic chance for cure with conventional treatment options alone after relapse. Therefore, a new modality of treatment is warranted for these patients. In recent years, several groups of investigators have examined the feasibility and effectiveness of reduced-intensity allogeneic stem cell transplantation (RI alloSCT) for the treatment of relapsed/progressed NB. Although a graft-versus-tumor effect has not yet been convincingly demonstrated in the setting of relapsed NB, the strategy of employing RI alloSCT has provided hope that treatment-related mortality will be reduced and a therapeutic benefit will emerge. However, alloSCT for NB is still investigational and there remain many issues to be elucidated in many areas. At present, alloSCT is reserved for specific clinical trials testing the immunomodulatory effect against NB.

  9. Hyperglycemia during induction therapy is associated with increased infectious complications in childhood acute lymphocytic leukemia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Children with acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) are at high risk for developing hyperglycemia. Hyperglycemic adult ALL patients have shorter remissions, more infections, and increased mortality. No corresponding data are available in children. We hypothesized that children with ALL who become hypergl...

  10. [Esophageal aspergillosis in a patient with acute myelogenous leukemia and febrile neutropenia].

    PubMed

    Besa, Santiago; Kattan, Eduardo; Cid, Ximena; Claro, Juan C

    2014-04-01

    Aspergillosis usually compromises the respiratory system, but can also affect others. We report a 46 yo female with acute myeloid leukemia, developed febrile neutropenia and dysphagia. Endoscopy revealed esophageal cytomegalovirus-like ulcers, but biopsies showed Aspergillus spp. It's important to consider aspergillosis in the differential diagnosis of esophageal lesions in high-risk patients.

  11. High prevalence of MAP2K1 mutations in variant and IGHV4-34-expressing hairy-cell leukemias.

    PubMed

    Waterfall, Joshua J; Arons, Evgeny; Walker, Robert L; Pineda, Marbin; Roth, Laura; Killian, J Keith; Abaan, Ogan D; Davis, Sean R; Kreitman, Robert J; Meltzer, Paul S

    2014-01-01

    To understand the genetic mechanisms driving variant and IGHV4-34-expressing hairy-cell leukemias, we performed whole-exome sequencing of leukemia samples from ten affected individuals, including six with matched normal samples. We identified activating mutations in the MAP2K1 gene (encoding MEK1) in 5 of these 10 samples and in 10 of 21 samples in a validation set (overall frequency of 15/31), suggesting potential new strategies for treating individuals with these diseases. PMID:24241536

  12. Minimal residual disease analysis by eight-color flow cytometry in relapsed childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Karawajew, Leonid; Dworzak, Michael; Ratei, Richard; Rhein, Peter; Gaipa, Giuseppe; Buldini, Barbara; Basso, Giuseppe; Hrusak, Ondrej; Ludwig, Wolf-Dieter; Henze, Günter; Seeger, Karl; von Stackelberg, Arend; Mejstrikova, Ester; Eckert, Cornelia

    2015-07-01

    Multiparametric flow cytometry is an alternative approach to the polymerase chain reaction method for evaluating minimal residual disease in treatment protocols for primary acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Given considerable differences between primary and relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia treatment regimens, flow cytometric assessment of minimal residual disease in relapsed leukemia requires an independent comprehensive investigation. In the present study we addressed evaluation of minimal residual disease by flow cytometry in the clinical trial for childhood relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia using eight-color flow cytometry. The major challenge of the study was to reliably identify low amounts of residual leukemic cells against the complex background of regeneration, characteristic of follow-up samples during relapse treatment. In a prospective study of 263 follow-up bone marrow samples from 122 patients with B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia, we tested various B-cell markers, adapted the antibody panel to the treatment protocol, and evaluated its performance by a blinded parallel comparison with the polymerase chain reaction data. The resulting eight-color single-tube panel showed a consistently high overall concordance (P<0.001) and, under optimal conditions, sensitivity similar to that of the reference polymerase chain reaction method. Overall, evaluation of minimal residual disease by flow cytometry can be successfully integrated into the clinical management of relapsed childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia either as complementary to the polymerase chain reaction or as an independent risk stratification tool. ALL-REZ BFM 2002 clinical trial information: NCT00114348.

  13. Incidence of BCR-ABL transcript variants in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia: Their correlation with presenting features, risk scores and response to treatment with imatinib mesylate

    PubMed Central

    Deb, Pratik; Chakrabarti, Prantar; Chakrabarty, Shila; Aich, Rajarshi; Nath, Uttam; Ray, Siddhartha Sankar; Chaudhuri, Utpal

    2014-01-01

    Context: The exact role of the different transcript variants of BCR-ABL in the pathogenesis of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) and their impact on prognosis is yet to be definitely enumerated. Aims: In this study, we have tried to correlate the presenting features, risk scores and treatment response with the BCR-ABL variants detected in our patients. Settings and Design: A cross-sectional unicentric hospital-based study on 80 patients diagnosed to have CML by bone marrow cytogenetics and confirmed by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Materials and Methods: RT-PCR for BCR-ABL was performed on consecutive patients with CML attending the CML clinic from January 2010 to December 2010. The medical charts of these patients were analyzed after a follow-up of 18 months in a retrospective manner. Statistical Analysis: Box plot and histogram was used to see the distribution of variables. t-test was performed to enumerate the difference between risk scores in two populations of patients carrying two different BCR-ABL transcript variants. Results: Nearly 56.25% of patients had b3a2 (e14a2) while 41.25% of patients showed b2a2 (e13a2) transcripts. The rest 2.5% (two patients) expressed the rare e19b2 variant. Patients with b2a2 presented with higher Sokal, Hasford and European Treatment and Outcomes Study score than their b3a2 counterpart. Different parameters such as the platelet count, leukocyte count, hemoglobin and splenomegaly showed a minor difference between the groups. More patients in the b2a2 group achieved complete hematologic response at 3 months, but it was not significant. Conclusions: Patients with b2a2 variant CML tend to present with higher risk score, but do not behave in a vastly different manner than their b3a2 counterparts. PMID:25006280

  14. Medical History, Lifestyle, and Occupational Risk Factors for Hairy Cell Leukemia: The InterLymph Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Subtypes Project

    PubMed Central

    Slager, Susan L.; Hughes, Ann Maree; Smith, Alex; Glimelius, Bengt; Habermann, Thomas M.; Berndt, Sonja I.; Staines, Anthony; Norman, Aaron D.; Cerhan, James R.; Sampson, Joshua N.; Morton, Lindsay M.; Clavel, Jacqueline

    2014-01-01

    Background Little is known about the etiology of hairy cell leukemia (HCL), a rare B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder with marked male predominance. Our aim was to identify key risk factors for HCL. Methods A pooled analysis of individual-level data for 154 histologically confirmed HCL cases and 8834 controls from five case–control studies, conducted in Europe and Australia, was undertaken. Age-, race and/or ethnicity-, sex-, and study-adjusted odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated using unconditional logistic regression. Results The usual patterns for age and sex in HCL were observed, with a median age of 55 years and sex ratio of 3.7 males to females. Cigarette smoking was inversely associated with HCL (OR = 0.51, 95% CI = 0.37 to 0.71) with dose–response relationships observed for duration, frequency, and lifetime cigarette smoking (P trend < .001). In contrast, occupation as a farmer was positively associated with HCL (OR = 2.34, 95% CI = 1.36 to 4.01), with a dose–response relationship observed for duration (OR = 1.82, 95% CI = 0.85 to 3.88 for ≤10 years vs never; and OR = 2.98, 95% CI = 1.50 to 5.93 for >10 years vs never; P trend = .025). Adult height was also positively associated with HCL (OR = 2.69, 95% CI = 1.39 to 5.29 for upper vs lower quartile of height). The observed associations remained consistent in multivariate analysis. Conclusions Our observations of an increased risk of HCL from farming exposures and decreased risk from smoking exposures, independent of one another, support a multifactorial origin and an etiological specificity of HCL compared with other non-Hodgkin lymphoma subtypes. The positive association with height is a novel finding that needs replication. PMID:25174032

  15. High risk factors of pancreatic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Camara, Soriba Naby; Yin, Tao; Yang, Ming; Li, Xiang; Gong, Qiong; Zhou, Jing; Zhao, Gang; Yang, Zhi-Yong; Aroun, Tajoo; Kuete, Martin; Ramdany, Sonam; Camara, Alpha Kabinet; Diallo, Aissatou Taran; Feng, Zhen; Ning, Xin; Xiong, Jiong-Xin; Tao, Jing; Qin, Qi; Zhou, Wei; Cui, Jing; Huang, Min; Guo, Yao; Gou, Shan-Miao; Wang, Bo; Liu, Tao; Olivier, Ohoya Etsaka Terence; Conde, Tenin; Cisse, Mohamed; Magassouba, Aboubacar Sidiki; Ballah, Sneha; Keita, Naby Laye Moussa; Souare, Ibrahima Sory; Toure, Aboubacar; Traore, Sadamoudou; Balde, Abdoulaye Korse; Keita, Namory; Camara, Naby Daouda; Emmanuel, Dusabe; Wu, He-Shui; Wang, Chun-You

    2016-06-01

    Over the past decades, cancer has become one of the toughest challenges for health professionals. The epidemiologists are increasingly directing their research efforts on various malignant tumor worldwide. Of note, incidence of cancers is on the rise more quickly in developed countries. Indeed, great endeavors have to be made in the control of the life-threatening disease. As we know it, pancreatic cancer (PC) is a malignant disease with the worst prognosis. While little is known about the etiology of the PC and measures to prevent the condition, so far, a number of risk factors have been identified. Genetic factors, pre-malignant lesions, predisposing diseases and exogenous factors have been found to be linked to PC. Genetic susceptibility was observed in 10% of PC cases, including inherited PC syndromes and familial PC. However, in the remaining 90%, their PC might be caused by genetic factors in combination with environmental factors. Nonetheless, the exact mechanism of the two kinds of factors, endogenous and exogenous, working together to cause PC remains poorly understood. The fact that most pancreatic neoplasms are diagnosed at an incurable stage of the disease highlights the need to identify risk factors and to understand their contribution to carcinogenesis. This article reviews the high risk factors contributing to the development of PC, to provide information for clinicians and epidemiologists.

  16. High risk factors of pancreatic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Camara, Soriba Naby; Yin, Tao; Yang, Ming; Li, Xiang; Gong, Qiong; Zhou, Jing; Zhao, Gang; Yang, Zhi-Yong; Aroun, Tajoo; Kuete, Martin; Ramdany, Sonam; Camara, Alpha Kabinet; Diallo, Aissatou Taran; Feng, Zhen; Ning, Xin; Xiong, Jiong-Xin; Tao, Jing; Qin, Qi; Zhou, Wei; Cui, Jing; Huang, Min; Guo, Yao; Gou, Shan-Miao; Wang, Bo; Liu, Tao; Olivier, Ohoya Etsaka Terence; Conde, Tenin; Cisse, Mohamed; Magassouba, Aboubacar Sidiki; Ballah, Sneha; Keita, Naby Laye Moussa; Souare, Ibrahima Sory; Toure, Aboubacar; Traore, Sadamoudou; Balde, Abdoulaye Korse; Keita, Namory; Camara, Naby Daouda; Emmanuel, Dusabe; Wu, He-Shui; Wang, Chun-You

    2016-06-01

    Over the past decades, cancer has become one of the toughest challenges for health professionals. The epidemiologists are increasingly directing their research efforts on various malignant tumor worldwide. Of note, incidence of cancers is on the rise more quickly in developed countries. Indeed, great endeavors have to be made in the control of the life-threatening disease. As we know it, pancreatic cancer (PC) is a malignant disease with the worst prognosis. While little is known about the etiology of the PC and measures to prevent the condition, so far, a number of risk factors have been identified. Genetic factors, pre-malignant lesions, predisposing diseases and exogenous factors have been found to be linked to PC. Genetic susceptibility was observed in 10% of PC cases, including inherited PC syndromes and familial PC. However, in the remaining 90%, their PC might be caused by genetic factors in combination with environmental factors. Nonetheless, the exact mechanism of the two kinds of factors, endogenous and exogenous, working together to cause PC remains poorly understood. The fact that most pancreatic neoplasms are diagnosed at an incurable stage of the disease highlights the need to identify risk factors and to understand their contribution to carcinogenesis. This article reviews the high risk factors contributing to the development of PC, to provide information for clinicians and epidemiologists. PMID:27376795

  17. Association of acute myeloid leukemia’s most immature phenotype with risk groups and outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Gerber, Jonathan M.; Zeidner, Joshua F.; Morse, Sarah; Blackford, Amanda L.; Perkins, Brandy; Yanagisawa, Breann; Zhang, Hao; Morsberger, Laura; Karp, Judith; Ning, Yi; Gocke, Christopher D.; Rosner, Gary L.; Smith, B. Douglas; Jones, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    The precise phenotype and biology of acute myeloid leukemia stem cells remain controversial, in part because the “gold standard” immunodeficient mouse engraftment assay fails in a significant fraction of patients and identifies multiple cell-types in others. We sought to analyze the clinical utility of a novel assay for putative leukemia stem cells in a large prospective cohort. The leukemic clone’s most primitive hematopoietic cellular phenotype was prospectively identified in 109 newly-diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia patients, and analyzed against clinical risk groups and outcomes. Most (80/109) patients harbored CD34+CD38− leukemia cells. The CD34+CD38− leukemia cells in 47 of the 80 patients displayed intermediate aldehyde dehydrogenase expression, while normal CD34+CD38− hematopoietic stem cells expressed high levels of aldehyde dehydrogenase. In the other 33/80 patients, the CD34+CD38− leukemia cells exhibited high aldehyde dehydrogenase activity, and most (28/33, 85%) harbored poor-risk cytogenetics or FMS-like tyrosine kinase 3 internal tandem translocations. No CD34+ leukemia cells could be detected in 28/109 patients, including 14/21 patients with nucleophosmin-1 mutations and 6/7 acute promyelocytic leukemia patients. The patients with CD34+CD38− leukemia cells with high aldehyde dehydrogenase activity manifested a significantly lower complete remission rate, as well as poorer event-free and overall survivals. The leukemic clone’s most immature phenotype was heterogeneous with respect to CD34, CD38, and ALDH expression, but correlated with acute myeloid leukemia risk groups and outcomes. The strong clinical correlations suggest that the most immature phenotype detectable in the leukemia might serve as a biomarker for “clinically-relevant” leukemia stem cells. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01349972. PMID:26819054

  18. What Is Chronic Myeloid Leukemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... leukemia? Next Topic Normal bone marrow and blood What is chronic myeloid leukemia? Cancer starts when cells ... their treatment is the same as for adults. What is leukemia? Leukemia is a cancer that starts ...

  19. What Is Acute Myeloid Leukemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... about acute myeloid leukemia? What is acute myeloid leukemia? Cancer starts when cells in a part of ... the body from doing their jobs. Types of leukemia Not all leukemias are the same. There are ...

  20. Influence of time to complete remission and duration of all-trans retinoic acid therapy on the relapse risk in patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia receiving AIDA protocols.

    PubMed

    Breccia, Massimo; Minotti, Clara; Latagliata, Roberto; Loglisci, Giuseppina; Salaroli, Adriano; Loglisci, Maria Giovanna; Lo-Coco, Francesco

    2013-04-01

    Despite the impressive results obtained with standard chemotherapy, approximately 20% of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) patients undergo disease relapse thereby requiring salvage therapy. Few data is available on long-term prognosis in relation to time to complete remission (CR): we reviewed 142 patients treated with AIDA protocols and we found that 42 out of 142 (29.6%) patients achieved CR after 35 days (median time, 42 days). No significant differences in presenting features, including FAB subtype, type of PML/RARA transcript and relapse risk at presentation between the two patient groups achieving CR > or <35 days were revealed, except for male sex and older age that were significantly associated with delayed CR. Rate of relapse was 31% in patients with delayed CR compared to 17% in the group of patients who achieved CR<35 days (p=0.001), with a 5-year CIR of 29.6% compared to 12% (p=0.03). APL patients with delayed CR should be more closely monitored during follow-up for early identification of relapse and prompt administration of pre-emptive salvage therapy.

  1. Mycobacterium avium Subspecies paratuberculosis and Bovine Leukemia Virus Seroprevalence and Associated Risk Factors in Commercial Dairy and Beef Cattle in Northern and Northeastern China

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Wu-Wen; Lv, Wen-Fa; Cong, Wei; Meng, Qing-Feng; Wang, Chun-Feng; Shan, Xiao-Feng; Qian, Ai-Dong

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) and bovine leukemia virus (BLV) are important pathogens, commonly responsible for economical loss to cattle farms all over the world, yet their epidemiology in commercial dairy and beef cattle in China is still unknown. Thus, from September 2013 to December 2014, a large-scale seroprevalence study was conducted to determine the seroprevalence and identify herd-level risk factors associated with MAP and BLV infection. The source sample was 3674 cattle from 113 herds in northern and northeastern China. Antibodies against MAP and BLV were detected using ELISA tests. At animal-level, the seroprevalence of antibodies against MAP and BLV was 11.79% (433/3674) and 18.29% (672/3674), respectively. At herd-level, the seroprevalence of antibodies against MAP and BLV was 20.35% and 21.24% (24/113), respectively. Herd size was identified to be associated with MAP infection while herd size and presence of cattle introduced from other farms were significantly associated with BLV infection. Further research is needed to confirm these findings and improve the knowledge of the epidemiology of these two pathogens in these regions and elsewhere in China. PMID:26504798

  2. Incidence, risk factors, and treatment outcome of symptomatic osteonecrosis in Taiwanese children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a retrospective cohort study of 245 patients in a single institution.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shih-Hsiang; Chang, Tsung-Yen; Jaing, Tang-Her; Lee, Mel S; Wang, Chao-Jan; Hung, Iou-Jih; Yang, Chao-Ping

    2015-07-01

    Osteonecrosis (ON) is a potentially disabling complication encountered in children who receive chemotherapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Considering the possible effect of ethnic difference on the clinical features of symptomatic ON in pediatric ALL, we retrospectively evaluated 245 children with ALL who were treated at Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Linkou, between 2002 and 2011. Six (2.4 %) patients developed symptomatic ON in a total of 17 sites during the follow-up period. Diagnosis of ON was confirmed by X-ray in seven, magnetic resonance imaging in two, and bone scan in three patients. The estimated cumulative incidence of symptomatic ON in newly diagnosed ALL was 3.4 % at 8 years. Four patients received ON-directed surgical interventions, including total hip replacement in three and arthroplasty in one. The incidence of ON was significantly higher among girls (P = 0.03), patients >10 years old (P = 2.2 × 10(-4)), and patients who had received more intensive chemotherapy regimen (P = 0.02). These results indicate that the incidence and risk factors in our institute were similar to those observed in Western countries. Future studies surveying the impact on the quality of life of childhood ALL survivors in Taiwan are warranted.

  3. Role of Genetic Polymorphisms of Deoxycytidine Kinase and Cytidine Deaminase to Predict Risk of Death in Children with Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Medina-Sanson, Aurora; Ramírez-Pacheco, Arturo; Moreno-Guerrero, Silvia Selene; Dorantes-Acosta, Elisa María; Sánchez-Preza, Metzeri; Reyes-López, Alfonso

    2015-01-01

    Cytarabine is one of the most effective antineoplastic agents among those used for the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia. However, some patients develop resistance and/or severe side effects to the drug, which may interfere with the efficacy of the treatment. The polymorphisms of some Ara-C metabolizing enzymes seem to affect outcome and toxicity in AML patients receiving cytarabine. We conducted this study in a cohort of Mexican pediatric patients with AML to investigate whether the polymorphisms of the deoxycytidine kinase and cytidine deaminase enzymes are implicated in clinical response and toxicity. Bone marrow and/or peripheral blood samples obtained at diagnosis from 27 previously untreated pediatric patients with de novo AML were processed for genotyping and in vitro chemosensitivity assay, and we analyzed the impact of genotypes and in vitro sensitivity on disease outcome and toxicity. In the multivariate Cox regression analysis, we found that age at diagnosis, wild-type genotype of the CDA A79C polymorphism, and wild-type genotype of the dCK C360G polymorphism were the most significant prognostic factors for predicting the risk of death. PMID:26090398

  4. Mycobacterium avium Subspecies paratuberculosis and Bovine Leukemia Virus Seroprevalence and Associated Risk Factors in Commercial Dairy and Beef Cattle in Northern and Northeastern China.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wu-Wen; Lv, Wen-Fa; Cong, Wei; Meng, Qing-Feng; Wang, Chun-Feng; Shan, Xiao-Feng; Qian, Ai-Dong

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) and bovine leukemia virus (BLV) are important pathogens, commonly responsible for economical loss to cattle farms all over the world, yet their epidemiology in commercial dairy and beef cattle in China is still unknown. Thus, from September 2013 to December 2014, a large-scale seroprevalence study was conducted to determine the seroprevalence and identify herd-level risk factors associated with MAP and BLV infection. The source sample was 3674 cattle from 113 herds in northern and northeastern China. Antibodies against MAP and BLV were detected using ELISA tests. At animal-level, the seroprevalence of antibodies against MAP and BLV was 11.79% (433/3674) and 18.29% (672/3674), respectively. At herd-level, the seroprevalence of antibodies against MAP and BLV was 20.35% and 21.24% (24/113), respectively. Herd size was identified to be associated with MAP infection while herd size and presence of cattle introduced from other farms were significantly associated with BLV infection. Further research is needed to confirm these findings and improve the knowledge of the epidemiology of these two pathogens in these regions and elsewhere in China.

  5. Dominance of highly divergent feline leukemia virus A progeny variants in a cat with recurrent viremia and fatal lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In a cat that had ostensibly recovered from feline leukemia virus (FeLV) infection, we observed the reappearance of the virus and the development of fatal lymphoma 8.5 years after the initial experimental exposure to FeLV-A/Glasgow-1. The goals of the present study were to investigate this FeLV reoccurrence and molecularly characterize the progeny viruses. Results The FeLV reoccurrence was detected by the presence of FeLV antigen and RNA in the blood and saliva. The cat was feline immunodeficiency virus positive and showed CD4+ T-cell depletion, severe leukopenia, anemia and a multicentric monoclonal B-cell lymphoma. FeLV-A, but not -B or -C, was detectable. Sequencing of the envelope gene revealed three FeLV variants that were highly divergent from the virus that was originally inoculated (89-91% identity to FeLV-A/Glasgow-1). In the long terminal repeat 31 point mutations, some previously described in cats with lymphomas, were detected. The FeLV variant tissue provirus and viral RNA loads were significantly higher than the FeLV-A/Glasgow-1 loads. Moreover, the variant loads were significantly higher in lymphoma positive compared to lymphoma negative tissues. An increase in the variant provirus blood load was observed at the time of FeLV reoccurrence. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that ostensibly recovered FeLV provirus-positive cats may act as a source of infection following FeLV reactivation. The virus variants that had largely replaced the inoculation strain had unusually heavily mutated envelopes. The mutations may have led to increased viral fitness and/or changed the mutagenic characteristics of the virus. PMID:20167134

  6. Language Deficits in Children at High Risk for Drug Abuse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Najam, Najma; Tarter, Ralph E.; Kirisci, Levent

    1997-01-01

    Compared the language capacities of children at high risk for substance abuse to low-risk children to uncover focal areas of deficit. Results indicate that high-risk subjects' performance was significantly poorer on several measures of language ability. Findings suggest that poor language mediation increases the risk for substance abuse. (RJM)

  7. Nurture versus nature: the microenvironment in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Burger, Jan A

    2011-01-01

    Intrinsic factors such as genetic lesions, anti-apoptotic proteins, and aberrant signaling networks within leukemia cells have long been the main focus of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) research. However, over the past decade, it became increasingly clear that external signals from the leukemia microenvironment make pivotal contributions to disease progression in CLL and other B-cell malignancies. Consequently, increasing emphasis is now placed on exploring and targeting the CLL microenvironment. This review highlights critical cellular and molecular pathways of CLL-microenvironment cross-talk. In vitro and in vivo models for studying the CLL microenvironment are discussed, along with their use in searching for therapeutic targets and in drug testing. Clinically, CXCR4 antagonists and small-molecule antagonists of B cell receptor (BCR)-associated kinases (spleen tyrosine kinase [Syk], Bruton's tyrosine kinase [Btk], and PI3Kδ) are the most advanced drugs for targeting specific interactions between CLL cells and the miocroenvironment. Preclinical and first clinical evidence suggests that high-risk CLL patients can particularly benefit from these alternative agents. These findings indicate that interplay between leukemia-inherent and environmental factors, nature and nurture determines disease progression in CLL. PMID:22160019

  8. High-Dose Busulfan and High-Dose Cyclophosphamide Followed By Donor Bone Marrow Transplant in Treating Patients With Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Multiple Myeloma, or Recurrent Hodgkin or Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2010-08-05

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With T(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With T(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With T(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Childhood Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; De Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent

  9. Integrating Professional and Folk Models of HIV Risk: YMSM's Perceptions of High-Risk Sex

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kubicek, Katrina; Carpineto, Julie; McDavitt, Bryce; Weiss, George; Iverson, Ellen F.; Au, Chi-Wai; Kerrone, Dustin; Martinez, Miguel; Kipke, Michele D.

    2008-01-01

    Risks associated with HIV are well documented in research literature. Although a great deal has been written about high-risk sex, little research has been conducted to examine how young men who have sex with men (YMSM) perceive and define high-risk sexual behavior. In this study, we compare the "professional" and "folk" models of HIV risk based on…

  10. Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance--National Alternative High School Risk Behavior Survey, United States, 1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grunbaum, Jo Anne; Kann, Laura; Kinchen, Steven A.; Ross, James G.; Gowda, Vani R.; Collins, Janet L.; Kolbe, Lloyd J.

    1999-01-01

    The Alternative High School Youth Risk Behavior Survey (ALT-YRBS) is one component of the Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System (YRBSS), which monitors six categories of health risk behaviors among youth and young adults. The 1998 ALT-YRBS measured priority health risk behaviors among students at alternative high schools. It used a three-stage…

  11. Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance National Alternative High School Youth Risk Behavior Survey, United States, 1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grunbaum, Jo Anne; Kann, Laura; Kinchen, Steven A.; Ross, James G.; Gowda, Vani R.; Collins, Janet L.; Kolbe, Lloyd J.

    2000-01-01

    The 1998 National Alternative High School Youth Risk Behavior Survey measured health risk behaviors at alternative high schools. Many alternative students engaged in behaviors that made them high-risk for serious problems (e.g., motor vehicle safety, violence, nutrition, sexuality, exercise, and substance abuse). Their prevalence of high risk…

  12. A discovery study of daunorubicin induced cardiotoxicity in a sample of acute myeloid leukemia patients prioritizes P450 oxidoreductase polymorphisms as a potential risk factor

    PubMed Central

    Lubieniecka, Joanna M.; Graham, Jinko; Heffner, Daniel; Mottus, Randy; Reid, Ronald; Hogge, Donna; Grigliatti, Tom A.; Riggs, Wayne K.

    2013-01-01

    Anthracyclines are very effective chemotherapeutic agents; however, their use is hampered by the treatment-induced cardiotoxicity. Genetic variants that help define patient's sensitivity to anthracyclines will greatly improve the design of optimal chemotherapeutic regimens. However, identification of such variants is hampered by the lack of analytical approaches that address the complex, multi-genic character of anthracycline induced cardiotoxicity (AIC). Here, using a multi-SNP based approach, we examined 60 genes coding for proteins involved in drug metabolism and efflux and identified the P450 oxidoreductase (POR) gene to be most strongly associated with daunorubicin induced cardiotoxicity in a population of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients (FDR adjusted p-value of 0.15). In this sample of cancer patients, variation in the POR gene is estimated to account for some 11.6% of the variability in the drop of left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) after daunorubicin treatment, compared to the estimated 13.2% accounted for by the cumulative dose and ethnicity. In post-hoc analysis, this association was driven by 3 SNPs—the rs2868177, rs13240755, and rs4732513—through their linear interaction with cumulative daunorubicin dose. The unadjusted odds ratios (ORs) and confidence intervals (CIs) for rs2868177 and rs13240755 were estimated to be 1.89 (95% CI: 0.7435–4.819; p = 0.1756) and 3.18 (95% CI: 1.223–8.27; p = 0.01376), respectively. Although the contribution of POR variants is expected to be overestimated due to the multiple testing performed in this small pilot study, given that cumulative anthracycline dose is virtually the only factor used clinically to predict the risk of cardiotoxicity, the contribution that genetic analyses of POR can make to the assessment of this risk is worthy of follow up in future investigations. PMID:24273552

  13. High resolution fire risk mapping in Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiorucci, Paolo; Biondi, Guido; Campo, Lorenzo; D'Andrea, Mirko

    2014-05-01

    The high topographic and vegetation heterogeneity makes Italy vulnerable to forest fires both in the summer and in winter. In particular, northern regions are predominantly characterized by a winter fire regime, mainly due to frequent extremely dry winds from the north, while southern and central regions and the large islands are characterized by a severe summer fire regime, because of the higher temperatures and prolonged lack of precipitation. The threat of wildfires in Italy is not confined to wooded areas as they extend to agricultural areas and urban-forest interface areas. The agricultural and rural areas, in the last century, have been gradually abandoned, especially in areas with complex topography. Many of these areas were subject to reforestation, leading to the spread of pioneer species mainly represented by Mediterranean conifer, which are highly vulnerable to fire. Because of the frequent spread of fire, these areas are limited to the early successional stages, consisting mainly of shrub vegetation; its survival in the competition with the climax species being ensured by the spread of fire itself. Due to the frequency of fire ignition — almost entirely man caused — the time between fires on the same area is at least an order of magnitude less than the time that would allow the establishment of forest climax species far less vulnerable to fire. In view of the limited availability of fire risk management resources, most of which are used in the management of national and regional air services, it is necessary to precisely identify the areas most vulnerable to fire risk. The few resources available can thus be used on a yearly basis to mitigate problems in the areas at highest risk by defining a program of forest management interventions, which is expected to make a significant contribution to the problem in a few years' time. The goal of such detailed planning is to dramatically reduce the costs associated with water bombers fleet management and fire

  14. Biochemical recurrence risk factors in surgically treated high and very high-risk prostate tumors

    PubMed Central

    Bañuelos, Beatriz; Díez, Jesús; Alonso-Dorrego, Jose María; Cisneros, Jesus; Peña, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Introduction High and very high-risk prostate cancers are tumors that display great variation in their progression, making their behaviour and consequent prognosis difficult to predict. We analyse preoperative and postoperative risk factors that could influence biochemical recurrence of these tumors. Material and methods We carried out univariate and multivariate analyses in an attempt to establish statistically significant preoperative (age, rectal examination, PSA, biopsy Gleason score, uni/bilateral tumor, affected cylinder percentage) and postoperative (pT stage, pN lymph node affectation, Gleason score, positive surgical margins, percentage of tumor affectation, perineural infiltration) risk factors, as well as their relationship with biochemical recurrence (PSA >0.2 ng/mL). Results We analysed 276 patients with high and very high-risk prostate cancer that were treated with laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (LRP) between 2003-2007, with a mean follow-up of 84 months. Incidence of biochemical recurrence is 37.3%. Preoperative factors with the greatest impact on recurrence are suspicious rectal exam (OR 2.2) and the bilateralism of the tumor in the biopsy (OR 1.8). Among the postoperative factors, the presence of a LRP positive surgical margins (OR 3.4) showed the greatest impact, followed by the first grade of the Gleason score (OR 3.3). Conclusions The factor with the greatest influence on biochemical recurrence when it comes to surgery and high and very high-risk prostate cancer is the presence of a positive margin, followed by the Gleason score. Preoperative factors (PSA, biopsy Gleason score, rectal examination, number of affected cylinders) offered no guidance concerning the incidence of BCR. PMID:26568870

  15. Minimal Residual Disease-Based Risk Stratification in Chinese Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia by Flow Cytometry and Plasma DNA Quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Suk Hang; Lau, Kin Mang; Li, Chi Kong; Chan, Natalie P. H.; Ip, Rosalina K. L.; Cheng, Chi Keung; Lee, Vincent; Shing, Matthew M. K.; Leung, Alex W. K.; Ha, Shau Yin; Cheuk, Daniel K. L.; Lee, Anselm C. W.; Li, Chak Ho; Luk, Chung Wing; Ling, Siu Cheung; Hrusak, Ondrej; Mejstrikova, Ester; Leung, Yonna; Ng, Margaret H. L.

    2013-01-01

    Minimal residual disease, or MRD, is an important prognostic indicator in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia. In ALL-IC-BFM 2002 study, we employed a standardized method of flow cytometry MRD monitoring for multiple centers internationally using uniformed gating, and determined the relevant MRD-based risk stratification strategies in our local patient cohort. We also evaluated a novel method of PCR MRD quantitation using peripheral blood plasma. For the bone marrow flow MRD study, patients could be stratified into 3 risk groups according to MRD level using a single time-point at day-15 (Model I) (I-A: <0.1%, I-B: 0.1–10%, I-C: >10%), or using two time-points at day-15 and day-33 (Model II) (II-A: day-15<10% and day-33<0.01%, II-B: day-15≥10% or day-33≥0.01% but not both, II-C: day-15≥10% and day-33≥0.01%), which showed significantly superior prediction of relapse (p = .00047 and <0.0001 respectively). Importantly, patients with good outcome (frequency: 56.0%, event-free survival: 90.1%) could be more accurately predicted by Model II. In peripheral blood plasma PCR MRD investigation, patients with day-15-MRD≥10−4 were at a significantly higher risk of relapse (p = 0.0117). By multivariate analysis, MRD results from both methods could independently predict patients’ prognosis, with 20–35-fold increase in risk of relapse for flow MRD I-C and II-C respectively, and 5.8-fold for patients having plasma MRD of ≥10−4. We confirmed that MRD detection by flow cytometry is useful for prognostic evaluation in our Chinese cohort of childhood ALL after treatment. Moreover, peripheral blood plasma DNA MRD can be an alternative where bone marrow specimen is unavailable and as a less invasive method, which allows close monitoring. PMID:23936021

  16. Nonadherence to Oral Mercaptopurine and Risk of Relapse in Hispanic and Non-Hispanic White Children With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: A Report From the Children's Oncology Group

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia, Smita; Landier, Wendy; Shangguan, Muyun; Hageman, Lindsey; Schaible, Alexandra N.; Carter, Andrea R.; Hanby, Cara L.; Leisenring, Wendy; Yasui, Yutaka; Kornegay, Nancy M.; Mascarenhas, Leo; Ritchey, A. Kim; Casillas, Jacqueline N.; Dickens, David S.; Meza, Jane; Carroll, William L.; Relling, Mary V.; Wong, F. Lennie

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Systemic exposure to mercaptopurine (MP) is critical for durable remissions in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Nonadherence to oral MP could increase relapse risk and also contribute to inferior outcome in Hispanics. This study identified determinants of adherence and described impact of adherence on relapse, both overall and by ethnicity. Patients and Methods A total of 327 children with ALL (169 Hispanic; 158 non-Hispanic white) participated. Medication event-monitoring system caps recorded date and time of MP bottle openings. Adherence rate, calculated monthly, was defined as ratio of days of MP bottle opening to days when MP was prescribed. Results After 53,394 person-days of monitoring, adherence declined from 94.7% (month 1) to 90.2% (month 6; P < .001). Mean adherence over 6 months was significantly lower among Hispanics (88.4% v 94.8%; P < .001), patients age ≥ 12 years (85.8% v 93.1%; P < .001), and patients from single-mother households (80.6% v 93.1%; P = .001). A progressive increase in relapse was observed with decreasing adherence (reference: adherence ≥ 95%; 94.9% to 90%: hazard ratio [HR], 4.1; 95% CI,1.2 to 13.5; P = .02; 89.9% to 85%: HR, 4.0; 95% CI, 1.0 to 15.5; P = .04; < 85%: HR. 5.7; 95% CI, 1.9 to 16.8; P = .002). Cumulative incidence of relapse (± standard deviation) was higher among Hispanics (16.5% ± 4.0% v 6.3% ± 2.2%; P = .02). Association between Hispanic ethnicity and relapse (HR, 2.6; 95% CI, 1.1 to 6.1; P = .02) became nonsignificant (HR, 1.8; 95% CI, 0.6 to 5.2; P = .26) after adjusting for adherence and socioeconomic status. At adherence rates ≥ 90%, Hispanics continued to demonstrate higher relapse, whereas at rates < 90%, relapse risk was comparable to that of non-Hispanic whites. Conclusion Lower adherence to oral MP increases relapse risk. Ethnic difference in relapse risk differs by level of adherence—an observation currently under investigation. PMID:22564992

  17. Gene expression profiling reveals differences in microenvironment interaction between patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia expressing high versus low ZAP70 mRNA

    PubMed Central

    Stamatopoulos, Basile; Haibe-Kains, Benjamin; Equeter, Carole; Meuleman, Nathalie; Sorée, Anne; De Bruyn, Cécile; Hanosset, Delphine; Bron, Dominique; Martiat, Philippe; Lagneaux, Laurence

    2009-01-01

    Background Zeta-associated protein 70 (ZAP70) is a widely recognized prognostic factor in chronic lymphocytic leukemia, but mechanisms by which its higher expression leads to a poor outcome must still be fully explained. Design and Methods In an attempt to unveil unfavorable cellular properties linked to high ZAP70 expression, we used gene expression profiling to identify genes associated with disparities in B cells from chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients expressing high versus low ZAP70 mRNA, measured by quantitative real-time PCR. Two groups of 7 patients were compared, selected on the basis of either high or low ZAP70 mRNA expression. Results Twenty-seven genes were differentially expressed with an FDR<10%, and several genes were significant predictors of treatment-free survival (TFS) and/or overall survival; PDE8A and FCRL family genes (down-regulated in ZAP70+ patients) could predict TFS and overall survival; ITGA4 mRNA (up-regulated in ZAP70+ patients) could significantly predict overall survival. Importantly, gene set enrichment analysis revealed overrepresentation of adhesion/migration genes. We therefore investigated in vitro adhesion/migration capacity of chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells into a stromal microenvironment or in response to conditioned medium. We showed that ZAP70+ cells had better adhesion/migration capacities and only ZAP70+ patient cells responded to microenvironment contact by CXCR4 downregulation. Conclusions We concluded that several prognostic factors are the reflection of microenvironment interactions and that the increased adhesion/migratory capacity of ZAP70+ cells in their microenvironment can explain their better survival and thus the aggressiveness of the disease. PMID:19377082

  18. Exposure to armament wastes and leukemia: a case-control study within a cluster of AML and CML in Germany.

    PubMed

    Kilian, P H; Skrzypek, S; Becker, N; Havemann, K

    2001-10-01

    An unusually high incidence of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) concentrated in a specific locality of a region in Germany motivated a descriptive incidence study in that region which showed a near 10-fold increased risk of CML among males but not among females (Kolb G, Becker N, Scheller S, Zugmaier G, Pralle H, Wahrendorf J, Havemann K. Increased risk of acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) and chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) in a County of Hesse, Germany, Soc Prev Med 1993;38:190-195). Since a serious environmental contamination of areas in this locality with armament wastes containing toluene-derivatives has been known for a long time, the hypothesis arose that TNT production and the related severe contamination of soil and water might be responsible for the observed higher risk. We carried out a case-control study within the cluster to test this hypothesis. Overall, the results do not confirm the hypothesis. There is an indication of a relationship of an increased odds ratio with the exposure for a small group of persons who lived at a particular site in one of the two communities involved during the peak phase of TNT production during the 1940s. However, this finding is spurious and cannot explain the large majority of cases which occurred in that area in the 1980s. At the moment, no other explanation can be given for the increased risk of leukemias in that area.

  19. Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    Leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells. White blood cells help your body fight infection. Your blood cells form in your bone marrow. In leukemia, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood cells. ...

  20. Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    Leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells. White blood cells help your body fight infection. Your blood cells form in your bone marrow. In leukemia, however, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood ...

  1. Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    Leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells. White blood cells help your body fight infection. Your blood cells form in your bone marrow. In leukemia, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood cells. ...

  2. Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... hard for blood to do its work. In acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL), also called acute lymphoblastic leukemia, there are too ... of white blood cells called lymphocytes or lymphoblasts. ALL is the most common type of cancer in ...

  3. Drugs Approved for Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Leukemia This page lists cancer drugs approved by the ... not listed here. Drugs Approved for Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) Abitrexate (Methotrexate) Arranon (Nelarabine) Asparaginase Erwinia chrysanthemi ...

  4. Scuba diving: how high the risk?

    PubMed

    Smith, N

    1995-01-01

    The host factors that represent the most risk for scuba-diving safety are poor fitness, overweight, chronic diseases, structural abnormalities of the heart and lungs, and multiple risk factors for CAD. Any of these factors, plus inexperience, a history of irresponsible behavior, or participation in technical diving should alert medical underwriting that a scuba diver has excess risk for fatal accidents.

  5. Modeling HIV Risk in Highly Vulnerable Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huba, G. J.; Panter, A. T.; Melchior, Lisa A.; Trevithick, Lee; Woods, Elizabeth R.; Wright, Eric; Feudo, Rudy; Tierney, Steven; Schneir, Arlene; Tenner, Adam; Remafedi, Gary; Greenberg, Brian; Sturdevant, Marsha; Goodman, Elizabeth; Hodgins, Antigone; Wallace, Michael; Brady, Russell E.; Singer, Barney; Marconi, Katherine

    2003-01-01

    This article examines the structure of several HIV risk behaviors in an ethnically and geographically diverse sample of 8,251 clients from 10 innovative demonstration projects intended for adolescents living with, or at risk for, HIV. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses identified 2 risk factors for men (sexual intercourse with men and a…

  6. Anti-CD45 Pretargeted Radioimmunotherapy using Bismuth-213: High Rates of Complete Remission and Long-Term Survival in a Mouse Myeloid Leukemia Xenograft Model

    SciTech Connect

    Pagel, John M; Kenoyer, Aimee L; Back, Tom; Hamlin, Donald K; Wilbur, D Scott; Fisher, Darrell R; Park, Steven I; Frayo, Shani; Axtman, Amanda; Orgun, Nural; Orozoco, Johnnie; Shenoi, Jaideep; Lin, Yukang; Gopal, Ajay K; Green, Damian J; Appelbaum, Frederick R; Press, Oliver W

    2011-07-21

    Pretargeted radioimmunotherapy (PRIT) using an anti-CD45 antibody (Ab)-streptavidin (SA) conjugate and DOTA-biotin labeled with β-emitting radionuclides has been explored as a strategy to decrease relapse and toxicity. α-emitting radionuclides exhibit high cytotoxicity coupled with a short path-length, potentially increasing the therapeutic index and making them an attractive alternative to β-emitting radionuclides for patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML). Accordingly, we have used 213Bi in mice with human leukemia xenografts. Results demonstrated excellent localization of 213Bi-DOTA-biotin to tumors with minimal uptake into normal organs. After 10 minutes, 4.5 ± 1.1% of the injected dose of 213Bi was delivered per gram of tumor. α imaging demonstrated uniform radionuclide distribution within tumor tissue 45 minutes after 213Bi-DOTA-biotin injection. Radiation absorbed doses were similar to those observed using a β-emitting radionuclide (90Y) in the same model. We conducted therapy experiments in a xenograft model using a single-dose of 213Bi-DOTA-biotin given 24 hours after anti-CD45 Ab-SA conjugate. Among mice treated with anti-CD45 Ab-SA conjugate followed by 800 μCi of 213Bi- or 90Y-DOTA-biotin, 80% and 20%, respectively, survived leukemia-free for >100 days with minimal toxicity. These data suggest that anti-CD45 PRIT using an α-emitting radionuclide may be highly effective and minimally toxic for treatment of AML.

  7. An Immunocompetent Mouse Model for MLL/AF9 Leukemia Reveals the Potential of Spontaneous Cytotoxic T-Cell Response to an Antigen Expressed in Leukemia Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hasegawa, Kana; Tanaka, Satomi; Fujiki, Fumihiro; Morimoto, Soyoko; Nakajima, Hiroko; Tatsumi, Naoya; Nakata, Jun; Takashima, Satoshi; Nishida, Sumiyuki; Tsuboi, Akihiro; Oka, Yoshihiro; Oji, Yusuke; Kumanogoh, Atsushi; Sugiyama, Haruo; Hosen, Naoki

    2015-01-01

    Leukemia differs substantially with respect to stromal milieu from tumors that progress locally as solid masses, and the physiological importance of immunosurveillance in leukemia remains unclear. However, currently available mouse leukemia models have critical limitations in the context of analyzing immunological regulation of leukemia development. In this study, we transferred mouse MLL/AF9 leukemia-initiating cells into immunocompetent recipient mice without any pre-conditioning such as irradiation, and then analyzed the spontaneous T cell response to an immunogenic antigen expressed in leukemia cells. When the minimum numbers of leukemia-initiating cells for engraftment were transferred, leukemia cells were eradicated by the adaptive immune response in most, if not all, wild-type mice, but not in Rag2-/- recipient mice, which lack adaptive immunity. By contrast, mice transplanted with larger numbers of leukemia cells always developed leukemia. In mice with advanced leukemia, antigen-specific CTLs were also expanded, but were unresponsive to antigen stimulation and expressed high levels of PD-1 and LAG-3. These results provide the first clear demonstration that the spontaneous CTL response to a tumor-cell antigen has the potential to eradicate leukemia, whereas antigen-specific CTLs are exhausted in animals with advanced leukemia. This immunocompetent mouse leukemia model provides a useful platform for developing effective immunotherapies against leukemia. PMID:26658107

  8. Leukemia after therapy with alkylating agents for childhood cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Tucker, M.A.; Meadows, A.T.; Boice, J.D. Jr.; Stovall, M.; Oberlin, O.; Stone, B.J.; Birch, J.; Voute, P.A.; Hoover, R.N.; Fraumeni, J.F. Jr.

    1987-03-01

    The risk of leukemia was evaluated in 9,170 2-or-more-year survivors of childhood cancer in the 13 institutions of the Late Effects Study Group. Secondary leukemia occurred in 22 nonreferred individuals compared to 1.52 expected, based on general population rates (relative risk (RR) = 14; 95% confidence interval (CI), 9-22). The influence of therapy for the first cancer on subsequent leukemia risk was determined by a case-control study conducted on 25 cases and 90 matched controls. Treatment with alkylating agents was associated with a significantly elevated risk of leukemia (RR = 4.8; 95% CI, 1.2-18.9). A strong dose-response relationship was also observed between leukemia risk and total dose of alkylating agents, estimated by an alkylator score. The RR of leukemia reached 23 in the highest dose category. Radiation therapy, however, did not increase risk. Although doxorubicin was also identified as a possible risk factor, the excess risk of leukemia following treatment for childhood cancer appears almost entirely due to alkylating agents.

  9. Modeling biotic habitat high risk areas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Despain, D.G.; Beier, P.; Tate, C.; Durtsche, B.M.; Stephens, T.

    2000-01-01

    Fire, especially stand replacing fire, poses a threat to many threatened and endangered species as well as their habitat. On the other hand, fire is important in maintaining a variety of successional stages that can be important for approach risk assessment to assist in prioritizing areas for allocation of fire mitigation funds. One example looks at assessing risk to the species and biotic communities of concern followed by the Colorado Natural Heritage Program. One looks at the risk to Mexican spottled owls. Another looks at the risk to cutthroat trout, and a fourth considers the general effects of fire and elk.

  10. Mismatched Family Member Donor Transplantation for Children and Young Adults With High Risk Hematological Malignancies

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-03

    Leukemia, Acute Lymphocytic (ALL); Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute(AML); Leukemia, Myeloid, Chronic(CML); Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia (JMML); Hemoglobinuria, Paroxysmal Nocturnal (PNH); Hodgkin Lymphoma; Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin (NHL); Myelodysplastic Syndrome (MDS)

  11. [Bleeding complications in acute myeloblastic leukemia (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Sutor, A H

    1979-03-01

    Bleeding is common in acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML). At the time of diagnosis, the danger of bleeding cannot be predicted by laboratory means. However, the following factors represent increased risks: Promyeloblastic leukemia, high blast count, low fibrinogen, low plasminogen. From coagulation studies performed at the time of bleeding complications, the pathomechanism leading to bleeding complications usually cannot be detected. The question whether impairment of production, consumption coagulopathy, or primary fibrinolysis causes the bleeding complications can only be answered by controlling frequently clinical and hemostatic criteria, which include the thrombocytic stystem as well as plasmatic coagulation and fibrinolysis. At the present time, the therapy of bleeding complications in AML is symptomatic. It consists of transfusion with thrombocytes or fresh whole blood, respectively. Coagulation factor concentrates should only be given in combination with Heparin to prevent the deterioration of consumption coagulopathy.

  12. Work-related leukemia: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Leukemia is a complex disease, which only became better understood during the last decades following the development of new laboratory techniques and diagnostic methods. Despite our improved understanding of the physiology of the disease, little is yet known about the causes of leukemia. A variety of potential risk factors have been suggested so far, including personal habits and lifestyle, and a wide range of occupational or environmental exposures. A causal association with leukemia has only been documented to date for ionizing radiation, benzene and treatment with cytostatic drugs, but there is an ongoing scientific debate on the possible association of leukemia with a number of other work-related hazards. In this article, we have reviewed scientific studies, published over the past 5 years, which investigated potential associations between leukemia and exposure to occupational risk factors. The systematic literature review took place via electronic databases, using specific search criteria, and independent reviewers have further filtered the search results to identify the number of articles, presented in our paper. A large number of studies included in the review referred to the effects of ionizing radiation, where new data suggest that the effects of exposure to small doses of ionizing radiation should probably be reevaluated. Some other works appear to substantiate a potential association of the disease with certain pesticides. Further research is also suggested regarding the role of infectious agents or exposure to certain chemicals like formaldehyde or butadiene in the pathogenesis of leukemia. PMID:23697536

  13. [Anesthesiological management of the high-risk surgical patient].

    PubMed

    Bertoldi, G; Avalle, M

    1980-03-01

    Evaluation of the anaesthesiological risk in surgical patients is described and an account is given of results obtained with an association of ketamin and NLA II in 57 high-risk patients subjected to general surgical management.

  14. Risk Management in High Adventure Outdoor Pursuits.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cinnamon, Jerry

    This paper outlines management guidelines for outdoor adventure pursuits based on analysis of accident case studies in the literature. Managing risk, to a large degree, involves managing human errors related to natural environmental hazards. The knowledge needed to manage risk may be gained through personal experience (the most dangerous way),…

  15. Targeted sequencing identifies patients with preclinical MDS at high risk of disease progression.

    PubMed

    Cargo, Catherine A; Rowbotham, Nicola; Evans, Paul A; Barrans, Sharon L; Bowen, David T; Crouch, Simon; Jack, Andrew S

    2015-11-19

    The diagnosis of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) remains problematic due to the subjective nature of morphologic assessment. The reported high frequency of somatic mutations and increased structural variants by array-based cytogenetics have provided potential objective markers of disease; however, this has been complicated by reports of similar abnormalities in the healthy population. We aimed to identify distinguishing features between those with early MDS and reported healthy individuals by characterizing 69 patients who, following a nondiagnostic marrow, developed progressive dysplasia or acute myeloid leukemia. Targeted sequencing and array-based cytogenetics identified a driver mutation and/or structural variant in 91% (63/69) of prediagnostic samples with the mutational spectrum mirroring that in the MDS population. When compared with the reported healthy population, the mutations detected had significantly greater median variant allele fraction (40% vs 9% to 10%), and occurred more commonly with additional mutations (≥2 mutations, 64% vs 8%). Furthermore, mutational analysis identified a high-risk group of patients with a shorter time to disease progression and poorer overall survival. The mutational features in our cohort are distinct from those seen in the healthy population and, even in the absence of definitive disease, can predict outcome. Early detection may allow consideration of intervention in poor-risk patients. PMID:26392596

  16. Improving Access To Novel Agents For Childhood Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Weili; Gaynon, Paul S.; Sposto, Richard; Wayne, Alan S.

    2015-01-01

    Leukemia is the most common pediatric cancer. Despite great progress in the development of curative therapy, leukemia remains a leading cause of death from disease in childhood and survivors are at life-long risk of complications of treatment. New agents are needed to further increase cure rates and decrease treatment-associated toxicities. The complex biology and aggressive nature of childhood leukemia, coupled with the relatively small patient population available for study, pose specific challenges to the development of new therapies. In this review, we discuss strategies and initiatives designed to improve access to new agents in the treatment of pediatric leukemia. PMID:25678105

  17. Outcomes of Children With BCR-ABL1–Like Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Treated With Risk-Directed Therapy Based on the Levels of Minimal Residual Disease

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Kathryn G.; Pei, Deqing; Campana, Dario; Payne-Turner, Debbie; Li, Yongjin; Cheng, Cheng; Sandlund, John T.; Jeha, Sima; Easton, John; Becksfort, Jared; Zhang, Jinghui; Coustan-Smith, Elaine; Raimondi, Susana C.; Leung, Wing H.; Relling, Mary V.; Evans, William E.; Downing, James R.; Mullighan, Charles G.; Pui, Ching-Hon

    2014-01-01

    Purpose BCR-ABL1–like acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a recently identified B-cell ALL (B-ALL) subtype with poor outcome that exhibits a gene expression profile similar to BCR-ABL1-positive ALL but lacks the BCR-ABL1 fusion protein. We examined the outcome of children with BCR-ABL1–like ALL treated with risk-directed therapy based on minimal residual disease (MRD) levels during remission induction. Patients and Methods Among 422 patients with B-ALL enrolled onto the Total Therapy XV study between 2000 and 2007, 344 had adequate samples for gene expression profiling. Next-generation sequencing and/or analysis of genes known to be altered in B-ALL were performed in patients with BCR-ABL1–like ALL who had available material. Outcome was compared between patients with and those without BCR-ABL1–like ALL. Results Forty (11.6%) of the 344 patients had BCR-ABL1–like ALL. They were significantly more likely to be male, have Down syndrome, and have higher MRD levels on day 19 and at the end of induction than did other patients with B-ALL. Among 25 patients comprehensively studied for genetic abnormalities, 11 harbored a genomic rearrangement of CRLF2, six had fusion transcripts responsive to ABL tyrosine kinase inhibitors or JAK inhibitors, and seven had mutations involving the Ras signaling pathway. There were no significant differences in event-free survival (90.0% ± 4.7% [SE] v 88.4% ± 1.9% at 5 years; P = .41) or in overall survival (92.5% ± 4.2% v 95.1% ± 1.3% at 5 years; P = .41) between patients with and without BCR-ABL1–like ALL. Conclusion Patients who have BCR-ABL1–like ALL with poor initial treatment response can be salvaged with MRD-based risk-directed therapy and may benefit from identification of kinase-activating lesions for targeted therapies. PMID:25049327

  18. Evaluation of Risk Management Strategies for a Low-Cost, High-Risk Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shishko, Robert; Jorgensen, Edward J.

    1996-01-01

    This paper summarizes work in progress to define and implement a risk management process tailored to a low-cost, high-risk, NASA mission -the Microrover Flight Experiment (MFEX, commonly called the Mars microrover).

  19. Exemestane Reduces Breast Cancer Risk in High-Risk Postmenopausal Women

    Cancer.gov

    Clinical trial results presented at the 2011 ASCO annual meeting showed that the aromatase inhibitor exemestane—used to treat early and advanced breast cancer—substantially reduced the risk of invasive breast cancer in high-risk postmenopausal women.

  20. Novel in vivo model of inducible multidrug resistance in acute lymphoblastic leukemia with chromosomal translocation t(4;11)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) with translocation t(4;11) is found in 60-85% of infants with ALL and is classified as high-risk due to the generally poor prognosis for survival. Using the SEM cell line established from a patient with t(4;11) ALL, we evaluated the resistance of these cells to the...

  1. Thromboembolism Prophylaxis in Hip Arthroplasty: Routine and High Risk Patients.

    PubMed

    Nam, Denis; Nunley, Ryan M; Johnson, Staci R; Keeney, James A; Clohisy, John C; Barrack, Robert L

    2015-12-01

    This study's purpose was to present the use of a risk stratification protocol in which "routine" risk patients receive a mobile compression device with aspirin and "high" risk patients receive warfarin for thromboprophylaxis after hip arthroplasty. 1859 hip arthroplasty patients were prospectively enrolled (1402 routine risk--75.4%, 457 high risk--24.6%). The cumulative rate of venous thromboembolism events was 0.5% in the routine versus 0.5% in the high-risk cohort within 6weeks postoperatively (P=1.00). Patients in the routine risk cohort had a lower rate of major bleeding (0.5% versus 2.0%, P=0.006) and wound complications (0.2% versus 1.2%, P=0.01). Use of our risk stratification protocol allowed the avoidance of more aggressive anticoagulation in 75% of patients while achieving a low overall incidence of symptomatic VTE. PMID:26182980

  2. Protein signaling and regulation of gene transcription in leukemia: role of the Casein Kinase II-Ikaros axis.

    PubMed

    Gowda, Chandrika S; Song, Chunhua; Ding, Yali; Kapadia, Malika; Dovat, Sinisa

    2016-03-01

    Protein signaling and regulation of gene expression are the two major mechanisms that regulate cellular proliferation in leukemia. Discerning the function of these processes is essential for understanding the pathogenesis of leukemia and for developing the targeted therapies. Here, we provide an overview of one of the mechanisms that regulates gene transcription in leukemia. This mechanism involves the direct interaction between Casein Kinase II (CK2) and the Ikaros transcription factor. Ikaros (IKZF1) functions as a master regulator of hematopoiesis and a tumor suppressor in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Impaired Ikaros function results in the development of high-risk leukemia. Ikaros binds to the upstream regulatory elements of its target genes and regulates their transcription via chromatin remodeling. In vivo, Ikaros is a target for CK2, a pro-oncogenic kinase. CK2 directly phosphorylates Ikaros at multiple amino acids. Functional experiments showed that CK2-mediated phosphorylation of Ikaros, regulates Ikaros' DNA binding affinity, subcellular localization and protein stability. Recent studies revealed that phosphorylation of Ikaros by CK2 regulates Ikaros binding and repression of the terminal deoxytransferase (TdT) gene in normal thymocytes and in T-cell ALL. Available data suggest that the oncogenic activity of CK2 in leukemia involves functional inactivation of Ikaros and provide a rationale for CK2 inhibitors as a potential treatment for ALL. PMID:26912004

  3. [Tumor lysis syndrome in a pregnancy complicated with acute lymphoblastic leukemia].

    PubMed

    Álvarez-Goris, M P; Sánchez-Zamora, R; Torres-Aguilar, A A; Briones Garduño, J C

    2016-04-01

    Acute leukemia is rare during pregnancy, affects about 1 in 75,000 pregnancies, of all leukemias diagnosed only 28% are acute lymphoblastic leukemia, this is a risk factor to develop spontaneous tumor lysis syndrome, it's a oncologic complication potentially deadly if the prophylactic treatment its avoided. Cases of acute lymphoblastic leukemia associated with pregnancy has been poorly documented in the literature the association of these two entities to pregnancy is the first report published worldwide, so the information is limited. PMID:27443101

  4. The Psychosis High-Risk State

    PubMed Central

    Fusar-Poli, Paolo; Borgwardt, Stefan; Bechdolf, Andreas; Addington, Jean; Riecher-Rössler, Anita; Schultze-Lutter, Frauke; Keshavan, Matcheri; Wood, Stephen; Ruhrmann, Stephan; Seidman, Larry J.; Valmaggia, Lucia; Cannon, Tyrone; Velthorst, Eva; De Haan, Lieuwe; Cornblatt, Barbara; Bonoldi, Ilaria; Birchwood, Max; McGlashan, Thomas; Carpenter, William; McGorry, Patrick; Klosterkötter, Joachim; McGuire, Philip; Yung, Alison

    2014-01-01

    Context During the past 2 decades, a major transition in the clinical characterization of psychotic disorders has occurred. The construct of a clinical high-risk (HR) state for psychosis has evolved to capture the prepsychotic phase, describing people presenting with potentially prodromal symptoms. The importance of this HR state has been increasingly recognized to such an extent that a new syndrome is being considered as a diagnostic category in the DSM-5. Objective To reframe the HR state in a comprehensive state-of-the-art review on the progress that has been made while also recognizing the challenges that remain. Data Sources Available HR research of the past 20 years from PubMed, books, meetings, abstracts, and international conferences. Study Selection and Data Extraction Critical review of HR studies addressing historical development, inclusion criteria, epidemiologic research, transition criteria, outcomes, clinical and functional characteristics, neurocognition, neuroimaging, predictors of psychosis development, treatment trials, socioeconomic aspects, nosography, and future challenges in the field. Data Synthesis Relevant articles retrieved in the literature search were discussed by a large group of leading worldwide experts in the field. The core results are presented after consensus and are summarized in illustrative tables and figures. Conclusions The relatively new field of HR research in psychosis is exciting. It has the potential to shed light on the development of major psychotic disorders and to alter their course. It also provides a rationale for service provision to those in need of help who could not previously access it and the possibility of changing trajectories for those with vulnerability to psychotic illnesses. PMID:23165428

  5. High frequency of rare structural chromosome abnormalities at relapse of cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia with FLT3 internal tandem duplication.

    PubMed

    Gourdin, Theodore S; Zou, Ying; Ning, Yi; Emadi, Ashkan; Duong, Vu H; Tidwell, Michael L; Chen, Ching; Rassool, Feyruz V; Baer, Maria R

    2014-01-01

    FLT3 internal tandem duplication (ITD) mutations are present in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in 30% of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), most commonly in those with a normal karyotype, and are associated with short relapse-free survival. Both in vitro and in vivo studies of FLT3-ITD cell lines have demonstrated reactive oxygen species-mediated DNA double-strand breaks and associated error-prone DNA repair as a mechanism of genomic instability, and we hypothesized that genomic instability might be manifested by cytogenetic changes at relapse of FLT3-ITD AML. We retrospectively reviewed charts of patients with cytogenetically normal (CN) FLT3-ITD AML treated at the University of Maryland Greenebaum Cancer Center, with attention to metaphase analysis results at relapse. Cytogenetic data were available from first and, when applicable, subsequent relapses for 15 patients diagnosed with CN FLT3-ITD AML. Among 12 patients with documented FLT3-ITD at first and, when applicable, subsequent relapse, 10 had cytogenetic changes, including nine with rare structural abnormalities. The high frequency of rare structural chromosome abnormalities at relapse in our case series supports a role of genomic instability in the genesis of relapse, and suggests that reactive oxygen species-generating and DNA repair pathways might be therapeutic targets in FLT3-ITD AML. PMID:25441683

  6. Blockade of BCL-2 proteins efficiently induces apoptosis in progenitor cells of high-risk myelodysplastic syndromes patients.

    PubMed

    Jilg, S; Reidel, V; Müller-Thomas, C; König, J; Schauwecker, J; Höckendorf, U; Huberle, C; Gorka, O; Schmidt, B; Burgkart, R; Ruland, J; Kolb, H-J; Peschel, C; Oostendorp, R A J; Götze, K S; Jost, P J

    2016-01-01

    Deregulated apoptosis is an identifying feature of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). Whereas apoptosis is increased in the bone marrow (BM) of low-risk MDS patients, progression to high-risk MDS correlates with an acquired resistance to apoptosis and an aberrant expression of BCL-2 proteins. To overcome the acquired apoptotic resistance in high-risk MDS, we investigated the induction of apoptosis by inhibition of pro-survival BCL-2 proteins using the BCL-2/-XL/-W inhibitor ABT-737 or the BCL-2-selective inhibitor ABT-199. We characterized a cohort of 124 primary human BM samples from MDS/secondary acute myeloid leukemia (sAML) patients and 57 healthy, age-matched controls. Inhibition of anti-apoptotic BCL-2 proteins was specifically toxic for BM cells from high-risk MDS and sAML patients, whereas low-risk MDS or healthy controls remained unaffected. Notably, ABT-737 or ABT-199 treatment was capable of targeting the MDS stem/progenitor compartment in high-risk MDS/sAML samples as shown by the reduction in CD34(+) cells and the decreased colony-forming capacity. Elevated expression of MCL-1 conveyed resistance against both compounds. Protection by stromal cells only partially inhibited induction of apoptosis. Collectively, our data show that the apoptotic resistance observed in high-risk MDS/sAML cells can be overcome by the ABT-737 or ABT-199 treatment and implies that BH3 mimetics might delay disease progression in higher-risk MDS or sAML patients.

  7. Fostering Resilience in At-Risk High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tepovich, Ann

    2012-01-01

    There is a large volume of literature that discusses the at-risk high school student. This literature tends to focus on the factors that create the at-risk student whether those are environmental factors or perhaps the failure of schools in general that create the at-risk problem in the United States. Although the causes are important to…

  8. Discovery of Highly Potent p53-MDM2 Antagonists and Structural Basis for Anti-Acute Myeloid Leukemia Activities

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The inhibition of p53-MDM2 interaction is a promising new approach to non-genotoxic cancer treatment. A potential application for drugs blocking the p53-MDM2 interaction is acute myeloid leukemia (AML) due to the occurrence of wild type p53 (wt p53) in the majority of patients. Although there are very promising preclinical results of several p53-MDM2 antagonists in early development, none of the compounds have yet proven the utility as a next generation anticancer agent. Herein we report the design, synthesis and optimization of YH239-EE (ethyl ester of the free carboxylic acid compound YH239), a potent p53-MDM2 antagonizing and apoptosis-inducing agent characterized by a number of leukemia cell lines as well as patient-derived AML blast samples. The structural basis of the interaction between MDM2 (the p53 receptor) and YH239 is elucidated by a co-crystal structure. YH239-EE acts as a prodrug and is the most potent compound that induces apoptosis in AML cells and patient samples. The observed superior activity compared to reference compounds provides the preclinical basis for further investigation and progression of YH239-EE. PMID:24405416

  9. The carcinogenic risks of low-LET and high-LET ionizing radiations

    SciTech Connect

    Fabrikant, J.I. )

    1989-08-01

    New information is available concerning the carcinogenic effects of radiation and the implications for risk assessment and risk management. This information comes from further follow-up of the epidemiological studies of the Japanese atomic bomb survivors, patients irradiated medically for cancer and allied conditions, and workers exposed in various occupations. In the Japanese atomic bomb survivors the carcinogenic risks are estimated to be somewhat higher than previously, due to the reassessment of the atomic-bomb dosimetry, further follow-up with increase in the number of excess cancer deaths, particularly in survivors irradiated early in life, and changes in the methods of analysis to compute the age-specific risks of cancer. Because of the characteristics of the atomic bomb survivor series as regards sample size, age and sex distribution, duration for follow-up, person-years at risk, and type of dosimetry, the mortality experience of the atomic bomb survivors was selected by the UNSCEAR Committee and the BEIR V Committee as the more appropriate basis for projecting risk estimates for the general population. In the atomic bomb survivors, the dose-effect relationship for overall cancer mortality other than leukemia is consistent with linearity below 3 Gy, while the dose-effect relationship for leukemia, excluding chronic lymphatic leukemia, conforms best to a linear-quadratic function. The shape of the dose-incidence curve at low doses still remains uncertain, and the data do not rule out the possible existence of a threshold for an neoplasm. The excess relative risk of mortality from all cancers combined is estimated to be 1.39 per Gy (shielded kerma), which corresponds to an absolute risk of 10.0 excess cancer deaths per 10,000 PYGy; the relative risks is 1.41 at 1 Gy (organ-absorbed dose), and an absolute risk of 13.07 excess cancer deaths per 10,000 PYGy. 19 refs.

  10. What You Need to Know about Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Publications Reports What You Need To Know About™ Leukemia This booklet is about leukemia. Leukemia is cancer of the blood and bone marrow ( ... This book covers: Basics about blood cells and leukemia Types of doctors who treat leukemia Treatments for ...

  11. Targeting signaling pathways in acute lymphoblastic leukemia: new insights.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Christine J

    2013-01-01

    The genetics of acute lymphoblastic leukemia are becoming well understood and the incidence of individual chromosomal abnormalities varies considerably with age. Cytogenetics provide reliable risk stratification for treatment: high hyperdiploidy and ETV6-RUNX1 are good risk, whereas BCR-ABL1, MLL rearrangements, and hypodiploidy are poor risk. Nevertheless, some patients within the good- and intermediate-risk groups will unpredictably relapse. With advancing technologies in array-based approaches (single nucleotide polymorphism arrays) and next-generation sequencing to study the genome, increasing numbers of new genetic changes are being discovered. These include deletions of B-cell differentiation and cell cycle control genes, as well as mutations of genes in key signaling pathways. Their associations and interactions with established cytogenetic subgroups and with each other are becoming elucidated. Whether they have a link to outcome is the most important factor for refinement of risk factors in relation to clinical trials. For several newly identified abnormalities, including intrachromosomal amplification of chromosome 21 (iAMP21), that are associated with a poor prognosis with standard therapy, appropriately modified treatment has significantly improved outcome. After the successful use of tyrosine kinase inhibitors in the treatment of BCR-ABL1-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia, patients with alternative ABL1 translocations and rearrangements involving PDGFRB may benefit from treatment with tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Other aberrations, for example, CRLF2 overexpression and JAK2 mutations, are also providing potential novel therapeutic targets with the prospect of reduced toxicity.

  12. What Is Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... blood, and lymphoid tissue What is chronic lymphocytic leukemia? Cancer starts when cells in the body begin ... the lymph nodes, liver, and spleen. What is leukemia? Leukemia is a cancer that starts in the ...

  13. Estimating the risk for late effects of therapy in children newly diagnosed with standard risk acute lymphoblastic leukemia using an historical cohort: A report from the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study

    PubMed Central

    Essig, Stefan; Li, Qiaozhi; Chen, Yan; Hitzler, Johann; Leisenring, Wendy; Greenberg, Mark; Sklar, Charles; Hudson, Melissa M; Armstrong, Gregory T; Krull, Kevin R; Neglia, Joseph P; Oeffinger, Kevin C; Robison, Leslie L; Kuehni, Claudia E; Yasui, Yutaka; Nathan, Paul C

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) therapy has evolved such that the risk for late effects in ALL survivors treated on contemporary protocols is likely different from that observed in survivors treated in prior eras. We estimated the risk for late effects in children with standard-risk ALL treated in the current era using data from similarly treated members of the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study (CCSS) cohort. Methods The CCSS is a multi-centre North American study of five-year survivors of childhood cancer diagnosed between 1970 and1986. Cohort members were eligible for this analysis if they were aged 1·0–9·9 years at the time of ALL diagnosis and received therapy consistent with contemporary standard-risk ALL protocols. Outcomes were compared to a sibling cohort (n=2788) and the general United States population. Findings 556/5980 cohort members treated for ALL met the inclusion criteria. After a median follow up of 18·4 years (range 0·0–33·0) from cohort entry, 28/556 (5%) had died (standardized mortality ratio, 3·5; 95% CI, 2·3–5·0). Sixteen deaths were due to causes other than ALL recurrence. Among 556 survivors, six (1%) developed a subsequent malignant neoplasm (standardized incidence ratio, 2·6; 95% CI, 1·0–5·7). 107 subjects in each group would need to be followed for one year in order to observe one extra chronic health condition in the ALL group compared to the sibling group (95% CI, 81–193). 415 subjects in each group would need to be followed for one year to observe one extra severe, life-threatening or fatal condition in the ALL group (95% CI, 376–939) Survivors did not differ from siblings in their educational attainment, rate of marriage or independent living. Interpretation Overall, the expected prevalence of adverse long-term outcomes among children treated for standard risk ALL on contemporary protocols is low, but regular care from a knowledgeable primary care practitioner is warranted. Funding

  14. The incidence of leukemia, lymphoma, and multiple myeloma among atomic bomb survivors: 1950 – 2001

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Wan-Ling; Preston, Dale L.; Soda, Midori; Sugiyama, Hiromi; Funamoto, Sachiyo; Kodama, Kazunori; Kimura, Akiro; Kamada, Nanao; Dohy, Hiroo; Tomonaga, Masao; Iwanaga, Masako; Miyazaki, Yasushi; Cullings, Harry M.; Suyama, Akihiko; Ozasa, Kotaro; Shore, Roy E.; Mabuchi, Kiyohiko

    2013-01-01

    A marked increase in leukemia risks was the first and most striking late effect of radiation exposure seen among the Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bomb survivors. This paper presents analyses of radiation effects on leukemia, lymphoma, and multiple myeloma incidence in the Life Span Study cohort of atomic bomb survivors updated 14 years since the last comprehensive report on these malignancies. These analyses make use of tumor- and leukemia-registry-based incidence data on 113,011 cohort members with 3.6 million person-years of follow-up from late 1950 through the end of 2001. In addition to a detailed analysis of the excess risk for all leukemias other than chronic lymphocytic leukemia or adult T-cell leukemia (neither of which appear to be radiation-related), we present results for the major hematopoietic malignancy types: acute lymphoblastic leukemia, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, acute myeloid leukemia, chronic myeloid leukemia, adult T-cell leukemia, Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphoma, and multiple myeloma. Poisson regression methods were used to characterize the shape of the radiation dose response relationship and, to the extent the data allowed, to investigate variation in the excess risks with sex, attained age, exposure age, and time since exposure. In contrast to the previous report that focused on describing excess absolute rates, we considered both excess absolute rate (EAR) and excess relative risk (ERR) models and found that ERR models can often provide equivalent and sometimes more parsimonious descriptions of the excess risk than EAR models. The leukemia results indicated that there was a non-linear dose response for leukemias other than chronic lymphocytic leukemia or adult T-cell leukemia, which varied markedly with time and age at exposure, with much of the evidence for this non-linearity arising from the acute myeloid leukemia risks. Although the leukemia excess risks generally declined with attained age or time since exposure, there was evidence

  15. The incidence of leukemia, lymphoma and multiple myeloma among atomic bomb survivors: 1950-2001.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Wan-Ling; Preston, Dale L; Soda, Midori; Sugiyama, Hiromi; Funamoto, Sachiyo; Kodama, Kazunori; Kimura, Akiro; Kamada, Nanao; Dohy, Hiroo; Tomonaga, Masao; Iwanaga, Masako; Miyazaki, Yasushi; Cullings, Harry M; Suyama, Akihiko; Ozasa, Kotaro; Shore, Roy E; Mabuchi, Kiyohiko

    2013-03-01

    A marked increase in leukemia risks was the first and most striking late effect of radiation exposure seen among the Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bomb survivors. This article presents analyses of radiation effects on leukemia, lymphoma and multiple myeloma incidence in the Life Span Study cohort of atomic bomb survivors updated 14 years since the last comprehensive report on these malignancies. These analyses make use of tumor- and leukemia-registry based incidence data on 113,011 cohort members with 3.6 million person-years of follow-up from late 1950 through the end of 2001. In addition to a detailed analysis of the excess risk for all leukemias other than chronic lymphocytic leukemia or adult T-cell leukemia (neither of which appear to be radiation-related), we present results for the major hematopoietic malignancy types: acute lymphoblastic leukemia, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, acute myeloid leukemia, chronic myeloid leukemia, adult T-cell leukemia, Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphoma and multiple myeloma. Poisson regression methods were used to characterize the shape of the radiation dose-response relationship and, to the extent the data allowed, to investigate variation in the excess risks with gender, attained age, exposure age and time since exposure. In contrast to the previous report that focused on describing excess absolute rates, we considered both excess absolute rate (EAR) and excess relative risk (ERR) models and found that ERR models can often provide equivalent and sometimes more parsimonious descriptions of the excess risk than EAR models. The leukemia results indicated that there was a nonlinear dose response for leukemias other than chronic lymphocytic leukemia or adult T-cell leukemia, which varied markedly with time and age at exposure, with much of the evidence for this nonlinearity arising from the acute myeloid leukemia risks. Although the leukemia excess risks generally declined with attained age or time since exposure, there was evidence

  16. Overexpression of Rac1 in leukemia patients and its role in leukemia cell migration and growth

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jiying; Rao, Qing; Wang, Min; Wei, Hui; Xing, Haiyan; Liu, Hang; Wang, Yanzhong; Tang, Kejing; Peng, Leiwen; Tian, Zheng; Wang, Jianxiang

    2009-09-04

    Rac1 belongs to the Rho family that act as critical mediators of signaling pathways controlling cell migration and proliferation and contributes to the interactions of hematopoietic stem cells with their microenvironment. Alteration of Rac1 might result in unbalanced interactions and ultimately lead to leukemogenesis. In this study, we analyze the expression of Rac1 protein in leukemia patients and determine its role in the abnormal behaviours of leukemic cells. Rac1 protein is overexpressed in primary acute myeloid leukemia cells as compared to normal bone marrow mononuclear cells. siRNA-mediated silencing of Rac1 in leukemia cell lines induced inhibition of cell migration, proliferation, and colony formation. Additionally, blocking Rac1 activity by an inhibitor of Rac1-GTPase, NSC23766, suppressed cell migration and growth. We conclude that overexpression of Rac1 contributes to the accelerated migration and high proliferation potential of leukemia cells, which could be implicated in leukemia development and progression.

  17. Overexpression of Rac1 in leukemia patients and its role in leukemia cell migration and growth.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiying; Rao, Qing; Wang, Min; Wei, Hui; Xing, Haiyan; Liu, Hang; Wang, Yanzhong; Tang, Kejing; Peng, Leiwen; Tian, Zheng; Wang, Jianxiang

    2009-09-01

    Rac1 belongs to the Rho family that act as critical mediators of signaling pathways controlling cell migration and proliferation and contributes to the interactions of hematopoietic stem cells with their microenvironment. Alteration of Rac1 might result in unbalanced interactions and ultimately lead to leukemogenesis. In this study, we analyze the expression of Rac1 protein in leukemia patients and determine its role in the abnormal behaviours of leukemic cells. Rac1 protein is overexpressed in primary acute myeloid leukemia cells as compared to normal bone marrow mononuclear cells. siRNA-mediated silencing of Rac1 in leukemia cell lines induced inhibition of cell migration, proliferation, and colony formation. Additionally, blocking Rac1 activity by an inhibitor of Rac1-GTPase, NSC23766, suppressed cell migration and growth. We conclude that overexpression of Rac1 contributes to the accelerated migration and high proliferation potential of leukemia cells, which could be implicated in leukemia development and progression.

  18. Women at High Risk for Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... 173-199. 3 Dabelea D, Crume T. Maternal environment and the transgenerational cycle of obesity and diabetes. Diabetes Care , 2011;60:1849-1855. 4 Kitzmiller JL, Dang-Kilduff L, Taslimi MM. Gestational diabetes after delivery: short-term management and long-term risks. Diabetes Care. 2007;30: ...

  19. Prevalence of High-Risk Human Papillomavirus Among Older Women

    PubMed Central

    Lindau, Stacy Tessler; Drum, Melinda L.; Gaumer, Elyzabeth; Surawska, Hanna; Jordan, Jeanne A.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To estimate the prevalence, genotypes, and individual-level correlates of high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) among women aged 57–85. Methods Community-residing women (n=1550), aged 57–85, were drawn from a nationally-representative probability sample. In-home interviews and biomeasures, including a self-collected vaginal specimen, were obtained between 2005 and 2006. Specimens were analyzed for high-risk HPV DNA using probe hybridization and signal amplification (hc2); of 1,028 specimens provided, 1,010 were adequate for analysis. All samples testing positive were analyzed for HPV DNA by L1 consensus polymerase chain reaction followed by type-specific hybridization. Results The overall population-based weighted estimate of high-risk HPV prevalence by hc2 was 6.0% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 4.5 to 7.9). Current marital and smoking status, frequency of sexual activity, history of cancer, and hysterectomy were associated with high-risk HPV positivity. Among high-risk HPV+ women, 63% had multiple type infections. HPV 16 or 18 was present in 17.4% of all high-risk HPV+ women. The most common high-risk genotypes among high-risk HPV+ women were HPV 61 (19.1%), 31 (13.1%), 52 (12.9%), 58 (12.5%), 83 (12.3%), 66(12.0%), 51 (11.7%), 45 (11.2%), 56 (10.3%), 53 (10.2%), 16 (9.7%), and 62 (9.2%). Being married and having an intact uterus were independently associated with lower prevalence of high-risk HPV. Among unmarried women, current sexual activity and smoking were independently and positively associated with high-risk HPV infection. Conclusions In this nationally representative population, nearly 1 in 16 women aged 57–85 were found to have high-risk HPV and prevalence was stable across older age groups. PMID:18978096

  20. Flavopiridol, Cytarabine, and Mitoxantrone in Treating Patients With Acute Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-10-07

    Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  1. Repairing effects of interleukin 11 (IL-11) towards high dose methotrexate-induced rat small intestinal mucositis and its impacts on T-lymphoblastic leukemia cell line

    PubMed Central

    Han, Yueqin; Zhu, Yanping; Wang, Jinshen; Han, Yanqin; Qin, Daogang; Yang, Qiaozhi; Sun, Xiaojing; Chen, Lijun

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): To investigate the efficacy of interleukin 11 (IL-11) towards the high dose methotrexate (HDMTX)-concurrent rat small intestinal mucositis and its impacts on the proliferation of the human T-lymphoblastic leukemia (CEM) cell line. Materials and Methods: 95 Wistar rats were randomly divided into five groups, the normal control group (A), the methotrexate (MTX) control group (B), the IL-11-pre-treated high-dose group (C), the post-IL-11-treatment high-dose group (D) and the post-IL-11-treatment low-dose group (E). After the intraperitoneal injection of MTX in the groups B-E, the rats were sacrificed at 1, 3, 5 and 7 days. The mortality, morphological and ultrastructural changes of small intestine of each group were observed. The cells were then cultured in vitro, and the MTT method was used to investigate the effects of different concentration of IL-11 on CEM proliferation and also on HDMTX-induced mucositis. Results: IL-11 could reduce the intestinal histopathological score, increase the height of small intestinal villi, promote the proliferation of intestinal lacunar cells and reduce the mortality rate of rats. The IL-11 pre-treatment group exhibited the best efficacies, demonstrating significant difference with the control group (P<0.01). In addition, the proliferation of CEM was not promoted, indicating that IL-11 could not inhibit HDMTX. Conclusion: IL-11 could reduce the severity of HDMTX-induced intestinal mucositis, and improve the survival rate of experimental rats, and could be safely used as the adjuvant treatment of HDMTX in childhood leukemia[PARANDCO1].

  2. Repairing effects of interleukin 11 (IL-11) towards high dose methotrexate-induced rat small intestinal mucositis and its impacts on T-lymphoblastic leukemia cell line

    PubMed Central

    Han, Yueqin; Zhu, Yanping; Wang, Jinshen; Han, Yanqin; Qin, Daogang; Yang, Qiaozhi; Sun, Xiaojing; Chen, Lijun

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): To investigate the efficacy of interleukin 11 (IL-11) towards the high dose methotrexate (HDMTX)-concurrent rat small intestinal mucositis and its impacts on the proliferation of the human T-lymphoblastic leukemia (CEM) cell line. Materials and Methods: 95 Wistar rats were randomly divided into five groups, the normal control group (A), the methotrexate (MTX) control group (B), the IL-11-pre-treated high-dose group (C), the post-IL-11-treatment high-dose group (D) and the post-IL-11-treatment low-dose group (E). After the intraperitoneal injection of MTX in the groups B-E, the rats were sacrificed at 1, 3, 5 and 7 days. The mortality, morphological and ultrastructural changes of small intestine of each group were observed. The cells were then cultured in vitro, and the MTT method was used to investigate the effects of different concentration of IL-11 on CEM proliferation and also on HDMTX-induced mucositis. Results: IL-11 could reduce the intestinal histopathological score, increase the height of small intestinal villi, promote the proliferation of intestinal lacunar cells and reduce the mortality rate of rats. The IL-11 pre-treatment group exhibited the best efficacies, demonstrating significant difference with the control group (P<0.01). In addition, the proliferation of CEM was not promoted, indicating that IL-11 could not inhibit HDMTX. Conclusion: IL-11 could reduce the severity of HDMTX-induced intestinal mucositis, and improve the survival rate of experimental rats, and could be safely used as the adjuvant treatment of HDMTX in childhood leukemia[PARANDCO1]. PMID:27635197

  3. Repairing effects of interleukin 11 (IL-11) towards high dose methotrexate-induced rat small intestinal mucositis and its impacts on T-lymphoblastic leukemia cell line

    PubMed Central

    Han, Yueqin; Zhu, Yanping; Wang, Jinshen; Han, Yanqin; Qin, Daogang; Yang, Qiaozhi; Sun, Xiaojing; Chen, Lijun

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): To investigate the efficacy of interleukin 11 (IL-11) towards the high dose methotrexate (HDMTX)-concurrent rat small intestinal mucositis and its impacts on the proliferation of the human T-lymphoblastic leukemia (CEM) cell line. Materials and Methods: 95 Wistar rats were randomly divided into five groups, the normal control group (A), the methotrexate (MTX) control group (B), the IL-11-pre-treated high-dose group (C), the post-IL-11-treatment high-dose group (D) and the post-IL-11-treatment low-dose group (E). After the intraperitoneal injection of MTX in the groups B-E, the rats were sacrificed at 1, 3, 5 and 7 days. The mortality, morphological and ultrastructural changes of small intestine of each group were observed. The cells were then cultured in vitro, and the MTT method was used to investigate the effects of different concentration of IL-11 on CEM proliferation and also on HDMTX-induced mucositis. Results: IL-11 could reduce the intestinal histopathological score, increase the height of small intestinal villi, promote the proliferation of intestinal lacunar cells and reduce the mortality rate of rats. The IL-11 pre-treatment group exhibited the best efficacies, demonstrating significant difference with the control group (P<0.01). In addition, the proliferation of CEM was not promoted, indicating that IL-11 could not inhibit HDMTX. Conclusion: IL-11 could reduce the severity of HDMTX-induced intestinal mucositis, and improve the survival rate of experimental rats, and could be safely used as the adjuvant treatment of HDMTX in childhood leukemia. PMID:27746864

  4. Identification of High Risk Students from Matriculation Information.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandusky, Sam T.

    A study was conducted at Sacramento City College (California) to determine the possibility of identifying high-risk students from information available from applications, assessment results, transcripts, and college enrollment data. Fall 1985 grade point averages (GPA) and progress percentages were used for high or low risk determination. Study…

  5. Identify and Assist the Development of High Risk Preschool Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mann, Marlis

    This speech offers a guide to identifying and teaching high-risk children, those who exhibit a lag in development severe enough to be a handicap in learning. The high-risk children focused on are those whose developmental lag is frequently not recognized until they fail in school. The two major areas of neurodevelopmental learning disorders are in…

  6. 15 CFR 14.14 - High risk special award conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false High risk special award conditions. 14.14 Section 14.14 Commerce and Foreign Trade Office of the Secretary of Commerce UNIFORM...-PROFIT, AND COMMERCIAL ORGANIZATIONS Pre-Award Requirements § 14.14 High risk special award...

  7. 40 CFR 35.6790 - High risk recipients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... described in 40 CFR 31.12. Requirements for Administering a Superfund State Contract (SSC) ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false High risk recipients. 35.6790 Section... Actions Other Administrative Requirements for Cooperative Agreements § 35.6790 High risk recipients....

  8. Highly efficient synthetic iron-dependent nucleases activate both intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic death pathways in leukemia cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Horn, Adolfo; Fernandes, Christiane; Parrilha, Gabrieli L; Kanashiro, Milton M; Borges, Franz V; de Melo, Edésio J T; Schenk, Gerhard; Terenzi, Hernán; Pich, Claus T

    2013-11-01

    The nuclease activity and the cytotoxicity toward human leukemia cancer cells of iron complexes, [Fe(HPClNOL)Cl2]NO3 (1), [Cl(HPClNOL)Fe(μ-O)Fe(HPClNOL)Cl]Cl2·2H2O (2), and [(SO4)(HPClNOL)Fe(μ-O)Fe(HPClNOL)(SO4)]·6H2O (3) (HPClNOL=1-(bis-pyridin-2-ylmethyl-amino)-3-chloropropan-2-ol), were investigated. Each complex was able to promote plasmid DNA cleavage and change the supercoiled form of the plasmid to circular and linear ones. Kinetic data revealed that (1), (2) and (3) increase the rate of DNA hydrolysis about 278, 192 and 339 million-fold, respectively. The activity of the complexes was inhibited by distamycin, indicating that they interact with the minor groove of the DNA. The cytotoxic activity of the complexes toward U937, HL-60, Jukart and THP-1 leukemia cancer cells was studied employing 3-(4,5-dimethythiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT), fluorescence and electronic transmission microscopies, flow cytometry and a cytochrome C release assay. Compound (2) has the highest activity toward cancer cells and is the least toxic for normal ones (i.e. peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs)). In contrast, compound (1) is the least active toward cancer cells but displays the highest toxicity toward normal cells. Transmission electronic microscopy indicates that cell death shows features typical of apoptotic cells, which was confirmed using the annexin V-FITC/PI (fluorescein isothiocyanate/propidium iodide) assay. Furthermore, our data demonstrate that at an early stage during the treatment with complex (2) mitochondria lose their transmembrane potential, resulting in cytochrome C release. A quantification of caspases 3, 9 (intrinsic apoptosis pathway) and caspase 8 (extrinsic apoptosis pathway) indicated that both the intrinsic (via mitochondria) and extrinsic (via death receptors) pathways are involved in the apoptotic stimuli. PMID:23933562

  9. Risk of cardiovascular disease? A qualitative study of risk interpretation among patients with high cholesterol

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Previous studies have shown the importance of paying attention to lay peoples’ interpretations of risk of disease, in order to explain health-related behavior. However, risk interpretations interplay with social context in complex ways. The objective was to explore how asymptomatic patients with high cholesterol interpret risk of cardiovascular disease. Methods Fourteen patients with high cholesterol and risk of cardiovascular disease were interviewed, and patterns across patient accounts were identified and analysed from an ethnographic approach. Results Information from the general practitioner about high cholesterol and risk of cardiovascular disease was reinterpreted in everyday social life. The risk associated with fatty foods was weighed against the pleasures of social and cultural events in which this type of food was common and cherished. A positive mindset was applied as a strategy to lower the risk of having high cholesterol, but knowledge about risk was viewed as a cause of anxiety and self-absorption, and this anxiety made the body susceptible to disease, hampering the chances for healthy life. Conclusion Interpretations of high cholesterol and risk of cardiovascular disease are embedded in social relations and everyday life concerns. This should be addressed in general practice in preference-sensitive cases about risk-reducing medication. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01187056 PMID:24040920

  10. Flavopiridol in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-03

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

  11. Road Traffic and Childhood Leukemia: The ESCALE Study (SFCE)

    PubMed Central

    Amigou, Alicia; Sermage-Faure, Claire; Orsi, Laurent; Leverger, Guy; Baruchel, André; Bertrand, Yves; Nelken, Brigitte; Robert, Alain; Michel, Gérard; Margueritte, Geneviève; Perel, Yves; Mechinaud, Françoise; Bordigoni, Pierre; Hémon, Denis; Clavel, Jacqueline

    2011-01-01

    Background Traffic is a source of environmental exposures, including benzene, which may be related to childhood leukemia. Objectives A national registry–based case–control study [ESCALE (Etude Sur les Cancers et les Leucémies de l’Enfant, Study on Environmental and Genetic Risk Factors of Childhood Cancers and Leukemia)] carried out in France was used to assess the effect of exposure to road traffic exhaust fumes on the risk of childhood leukemia. Methods Over the study period, 2003–2004, 763 cases and 1,681 controls < 15 years old were included, and the controls were frequency matched with the cases on age and sex. The ESCALE data were collected by a standardized telephone interview of the mothers. Various indicators of exposure to traffic and pollution were determined using the geocoded addresses at the time of diagnosis for the cases and of interview for the controls. Indicators of the distance from, and density of, main roads and traffic nitrogen dioxide (NO2) concentrations derived from traffic emission data were used. Odds ratios (ORs) were estimated using unconditional regression models adjusted for potential confounders. Results Acute leukemia (AL) was significantly associated with estimates of traffic NO2 concentration at the place of residence > 27.7 μg/m3 compared with NO2 concentration < 21.9 μg/m3 [OR = 1.2; confidence interval (CI), 1.0–1.5] and with the presence of a heavy-traffic road within 500 m compared with the absence of a heavy-traffic road in the same area (OR = 2.0; 95% CI, 1.0–3.6). There was a significant association between AL and a high density of heavy-traffic roads within 500 m compared with the reference category with no heavy-traffic road within 500 m (OR = 2.2; 95% CI, 1.1–4.2), with a significant positive linear trend of the association of AL with the total length of heavy-traffic road within 500m. Conclusion This study supports the hypothesis that living close to heavy-traffic roads may increase the risk of

  12. RNAi Screening of Leukemia Cells Using Electroporation.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Anupriya; Tyner, Jeffrey W

    2016-01-01

    RNAi-mediated screening has been an integral tool for biological discovery for the past 15 years. A variety of approaches have been employed for implementation of this technique, including pooled, depletion/enrichment screening with lentiviral shRNAs, and segregated screening of panels of individual siRNAs. The latter approach of siRNA panel screening requires efficient methods for transfection of siRNAs into the target cells. In the case of suspension leukemia cell lines and primary cells, many of the conventional transfection techniques using liposomal or calcium phosphate-mediated transfection provide very low efficiency. In this case, electroporation is the only transfection technique offering high efficiency transfection of siRNAs into the target leukemia cells. Here, we describe methods for optimization and implementation of siRNA electroporation into leukemia cell lines and primary patient specimens, and we further offer suggested electroporation settings for some commonly used leukemia cell lines. PMID:27581286

  13. Haploidentical Transplantation in Children with Acute Leukemia: The Unresolved Issues

    PubMed Central

    Jaiswal, Sarita Rani; Chakrabarti, Suparno

    2016-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) remains a curative option for children with high risk and advanced acute leukemia. Yet availability of matched family donor limits its use and although matched unrelated donor or mismatched umbilical cord blood (UCB) are viable options, they fail to meet the global need. Haploidentical family donor is almost universally available and is emerging as the alternate donor of choice in adult patients. However, the same is not true in the case of children. The studies of haploidentical HSCT in children are largely limited to T cell depleted grafts with not so encouraging results in advanced leukemia. At the same time, emerging data from UCBT are challenging the existing paradigm of less stringent HLA match requirements as perceived in the past. The use of posttransplantation cyclophosphamide (PTCY) has yielded encouraging results in adults, but data in children is sorely lacking. Our experience of using PTCY based haploidentical HSCT in children shows inadequacy of this approach in younger children compared to excellent outcome in older children. In this context, we discuss the current status of haploidentical HSCT in children with acute leukemia in a global perspective and dwell on its future prospects. PMID:27110243

  14. Background radiation and childhood leukemia: A nationwide register-based case-control study.

    PubMed

    Nikkilä, Atte; Erme, Sini; Arvela, Hannu; Holmgren, Olli; Raitanen, Jani; Lohi, Olli; Auvinen, Anssi

    2016-11-01

    High doses of ionizing radiation are an established cause of childhood leukemia. However, substantial uncertainty remains about the effect of low doses of radiation, including background radiation and potential differences between genetic subgroups of leukemia have rarely been explored. We investigated the effect of the background gamma radiation on childhood leukemia using a nationwide register-based case-control study. For each of the 1,093 cases, three age- and gender matched controls were selected (N = 3,279). Conditional logistic regression analyses were adjusted for confounding by Down syndrome, birth weight (large for gestational age), and maternal smoking. Complete residential histories and previously collected survey data of the background gamma radiation in Finland were used to assess the exposure of the study subjects to indoor and outdoor gamma radiation. Overall, background gamma radiation showed a non-significant association with the OR of childhood leukemia (OR 1.01, 95% CI 0.97, 1.05 for 10 nSv/h increase in average equivalent dose rate to red bone marrow). In subgroup analyses, age group 2-<7 years displayed a larger effect (OR 1.27, 95% CI 1.01, 1.60 for 1 mSv increase in equivalent cumulative dose to red bone marrow). Suggestive difference in OR by genetic subtype was found. Our results provide further support to the notion that low doses of ionizing radiation increase the risk for childhood leukemia, particularly at age 2-<7 years. Our findings suggest a larger effect of radiation on leukemia with high hyperpdiploidy than other subgroups, but this result requires further confirmation.

  15. Background radiation and childhood leukemia: A nationwide register-based case-control study.

    PubMed

    Nikkilä, Atte; Erme, Sini; Arvela, Hannu; Holmgren, Olli; Raitanen, Jani; Lohi, Olli; Auvinen, Anssi

    2016-11-01

    High doses of ionizing radiation are an established cause of childhood leukemia. However, substantial uncertainty remains about the effect of low doses of radiation, including background radiation and potential differences between genetic subgroups of leukemia have rarely been explored. We investigated the effect of the background gamma radiation on childhood leukemia using a nationwide register-based case-control study. For each of the 1,093 cases, three age- and gender matched controls were selected (N = 3,279). Conditional logistic regression analyses were adjusted for confounding by Down syndrome, birth weight (large for gestational age), and maternal smoking. Complete residential histories and previously collected survey data of the background gamma radiation in Finland were used to assess the exposure of the study subjects to indoor and outdoor gamma radiation. Overall, background gamma radiation showed a non-significant association with the OR of childhood leukemia (OR 1.01, 95% CI 0.97, 1.05 for 10 nSv/h increase in average equivalent dose rate to red bone marrow). In subgroup analyses, age group 2-<7 years displayed a larger effect (OR 1.27, 95% CI 1.01, 1.60 for 1 mSv increase in equivalent cumulative dose to red bone marrow). Suggestive difference in OR by genetic subtype was found. Our results provide further support to the notion that low doses of ionizing radiation increase the risk for childhood leukemia, particularly at age 2-<7 years. Our findings suggest a larger effect of radiation on leukemia with high hyperpdiploidy than other subgroups, but this result requires further confirmation. PMID:27405274

  16. FR901228 in Treating Children With Refractory or Recurrent Solid Tumors or Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-15

    Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Central Nervous System Germ Cell Tumor; Childhood Choroid Plexus Tumor; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Craniopharyngioma; Childhood Grade I Meningioma; Childhood Grade II Meningioma; Childhood Grade III Meningioma; Childhood High-grade Cerebral Astrocytoma; Childhood Infratentorial Ependymoma; Childhood Low-grade Cerebral Astrocytoma; Childhood Spinal Cord Neoplasm; Childhood Supratentorial Ependymoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Brain Stem Glioma; Recurrent Childhood Cerebellar Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Cerebral Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Ependymoma; Recurrent Childhood Medulloblastoma; Recurrent Childhood Supratentorial Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Recurrent Childhood Visual Pathway and Hypothalamic Glioma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  17. Overview on association of different types of leukemias with radiation exposure.

    PubMed

    Gluzman, D F; Sklyarenko, L M; Zavelevich, M P; Koval, S V; Ivanivska, T S; Rodionova, N K

    2015-06-01

    Exposure to ionizing radiation is associated with increasing risk of various types of hematological malignancies. The results of major studies on association of leukemias and radiation exposure of large populations in Japan and in Ukraine are analyzed. The patterns of different types of leukemia in 295 Chernobyl clean-up workers diagnosed according to the criteria of up-to-date World Health Organization classification within 10-25 years following Chernobyl catastrophe are summarized. In fact, a broad spectrum of radiation-related hematological malignancies has been revealed both in Life Span Study in Japan and in study of Chernobyl clean-up workers in Ukraine. The importance of the precise diagnosis of tumors of hematopoietic and lymphoid tissues according to up-to-date classifications for elucidating the role of radiation as a causative factor of leukemias is emphasized. Such studies are of high importance since according to the recent findings, radiation-associated excess risks of several types of leukemias seem to persist throughout the follow-up period up to 55 years after the radiation exposure.

  18. Overview on association of different types of leukemias with radiation exposure.

    PubMed

    Gluzman, D F; Sklyarenko, L M; Zavelevich, M P; Koval, S V; Ivanivska, T S; Rodionova, N K

    2015-06-01

    Exposure to ionizing radiation is associated with increasing risk of various types of hematological malignancies. The results of major studies on association of leukemias and radiation exposure of large populations in Japan and in Ukraine are analyzed. The patterns of different types of leukemia in 295 Chernobyl clean-up workers diagnosed according to the criteria of up-to-date World Health Organization classification within 10-25 years following Chernobyl catastrophe are summarized. In fact, a broad spectrum of radiation-related hematological malignancies has been revealed both in Life Span Study in Japan and in study of Chernobyl clean-up workers in Ukraine. The importance of the precise diagnosis of tumors of hematopoietic and lymphoid tissues according to up-to-date classifications for elucidating the role of radiation as a causative factor of leukemias is emphasized. Such studies are of high importance since according to the recent findings, radiation-associated excess risks of several types of leukemias seem to persist throughout the follow-up period up to 55 years after the radiation exposure. PMID:26112933

  19. Molecular Classification and Pharmacogenetics of Primary Plasma Cell Leukemia: An Initial Approach toward Precision Medicine.

    PubMed

    Simeon, Vittorio; Todoerti, Katia; La Rocca, Francesco; Caivano, Antonella; Trino, Stefania; Lionetti, Marta; Agnelli, Luca; De Luca, Luciana; Laurenzana, Ilaria; Neri, Antonino; Musto, Pellegrino

    2015-07-30

    Primary plasma cell leukemia (pPCL) is a rare and aggressive variant of multiple myeloma (MM) which may represent a valid model for high-risk MM. This disease is associated with a very poor prognosis, and unfortunately, it has not significantly improved during the last three decades. New high-throughput technologies have allowed a better understanding of the molecular basis of this disease and moved toward risk stratification, providing insights for targeted therapy studies. This knowledge, added to the pharmacogenetic profile of new and old agents in the analysis of efficacy and safety, could contribute to help clinical decisions move toward a precision medicine and a better clinical outcome for these patients. In this review, we describe the available literature concerning the genomic characterization and pharmacogenetics of plasma cell leukemia (PCL).

  20. Molecular Classification and Pharmacogenetics of Primary Plasma Cell Leukemia: An Initial Approach toward Precision Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Simeon, Vittorio; Todoerti, Katia; La Rocca, Francesco; Caivano, Antonella; Trino, Stefania; Lionetti, Marta; Agnelli, Luca; De Luca, Luciana; Laurenzana, Ilaria; Neri, Antonino; Musto, Pellegrino

    2015-01-01

    Primary plasma cell leukemia (pPCL) is a rare and aggressive variant of multiple myeloma (MM) which may represent a valid model for high-risk MM. This disease is associated with a very poor prognosis, and unfortunately, it has not significantly improved during the last three decades. New high-throughput technologies have allowed a better understanding of the molecular basis of this disease and moved toward risk stratification, providing insights for targeted therapy studies. This knowledge, added to the pharmacogenetic profile of new and old agents in the analysis of efficacy and safety, could contribute to help clinical decisions move toward a precision medicine and a better clinical outcome for these patients. In this review, we describe the available literature concerning the genomic characterization and pharmacogenetics of plasma cell leukemia (PCL). PMID:26263974

  1. Nilotinib and Imatinib Mesylate After Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-09

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Childhood Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  2. The Family Leukemia Association

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollitt, Eleanor

    1976-01-01

    An association of families of children with leukemia, the Family Leukemia Association (FLA), was recently established in Toronto. This paper discusses (a) philosophy of the FLA; (b) formative years of this organization; (c) problems encountered by leukemic children and their families; and (d) the FLA's past and future educational and social…

  3. Regulation of rat basophilic leukemia-2H3 mast cell secretion by a constitutive Lyn kinase interaction with the high affinity IgE receptor (Fc epsilon RI).

    PubMed

    Vonakis, Becky M; Gibbons, Scott P; Rotté, Masashi J; Brothers, Elizabeth A; Kim, Seok C; Chichester, Kristin; MacDonald, Susan M

    2005-10-01

    Signaling through the high affinity IgE receptor is initiated by noncovalently associated Lyn kinase, resulting in the secretion of inflammatory mediators from mast cells. A fraction of the total cellular Lyn is associated via its N-terminal unique domain with the cytoplasmic domain of the Fc epsilonRI beta subunit before receptor aggregation. In the current study, we stably transfected the unique domain of Lyn into rat basophilic leukemia-2H3 mast cells and examined the consequences on Fc epsilonRI-induced signal transduction and mediator secretion to further define the role of the unique domain of Lyn in mast cell secretion. Tyrosine phosphorylation of Fc epsilonRI beta and gamma subunits was partially inhibited in the Lyn unique domain transfectants after Ag stimulation. Ag stimulation of Lyn unique domain transfectants was accompanied by enhanced phosphorylation of MEK and ERK-2, which are required for leukotriene C4 (LTC4) release, and production of LTC4 was increased 3- to 5-fold, compared with cells transfected with vector alone. Conversely, tyrosine phosphorylation of the adaptor protein Gab2, which is essential for mast cell degranulation, was inhibited after Ag stimulation of Lyn unique domain transfectants, and Ag-induced release of histamine was inhibited up to 48%. In rat basophilic leukemia-2H3 cells, Lyn thus plays a dual role by positively regulating Fc epsilonRI phosphorylation and degranulation while negatively regulating LTC4 production. This study provides further evidence that the constitutive interaction between the unique domain of Lyn and the Fc epsilonRI beta subunit is a crucial step in the initiation of Fc epsilonRI signaling and that Lyn is limiting for Fc epsilonRI-induced secretion of inflammatory mediators.

  4. Adipocytes Cause Leukemia Cell Resistance to L-Asparaginase via Release of Glutamine

    PubMed Central

    Ehsanipour, Ehsan A.; Sheng, Xia; Behan, James W.; Wang, Xingchao; Butturini, Anna; Avramis, Vassilios I.; Mittelman, Steven D.

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is a significant risk factor for cancer. A link between obesity and a childhood cancer has been identified: obese children diagnosed with high-risk acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) had a 50% greater risk of relapse than their lean counterparts. L-asparaginase (ASNase) is a first-line therapy for ALL that breaks down asparagine and glutamine, exploiting the fact that ALL cells are more dependent on these amino acids than other cells. In the present study, we investigated whether adipocytes, which produce significant quantities of glutamine, may counteract the effects of ASNase. In children being treated for high-risk ALL, obesity was not associated with altered plasma levels of asparagine or glutamine. However, glutamine synthetase was markedly increased in bone marrow adipocytes after induction chemotherapy. Obesity substantially impaired ASNase efficacy in mice transplanted with syngeneic ALL cells, and, like in humans, without affecting plasma asparagine or glutamine levels. In co-culture, adipocytes inhibited leukemic cell cytotoxicity induced by ASNase, and this protection was dependent on glutamine secretion. These findings suggest that adipocytes work in conjunction with other cells of the leukemia microenvironment to protect leukemia cells during ASNase treatment. PMID:23585457

  5. Coordinating perioperative care for the 'high risk' general surgical patient using risk prediction scoring.

    PubMed

    Hafiz, Shaziz; Lees, Nicholas Peter

    2016-01-01

    Identifying 'high risk' (> 5% mortality score) emergency general surgical patients early, allows appropriate perioperative care to be allocated by securing critical care beds and ensuring the presence of senior surgeons and senior anesthetists intraoperatively. Scoring systems can be used to predict perioperative risk and coordinate resources perioperatively. Currently it is unclear which estimate of risk correlates with current resource deployment. A retrospective study was undertaken assessing the relationship between deployment of perioperative resources: senior surgeon, senior anesthetist and critical care bed. The study concluded that almost all high risk patients with high POSSUM mortality and morbidity scores had a consultant senior surgeon present intraoperatively. Critically unwell patients with higher operative severity and perioperative morbidity scores received higher care (HDU/ICU) beds postoperatively, ensuring that they received appropriate care if their condition deteriorated. Therefore POSSUM scoring should be used perioperatively in emergency cases to coordinate appropriate perioperative care for high risk general surgical patients. PMID:26901929

  6. Understand Your Risk for High Cholesterol

    MedlinePlus

    ... or trans fats also increases the amount of LDL cholesterol in your blood. If high blood cholesterol runs ... may not be enough to help lower your LDL blood cholesterol. View an animation of cholesterol . More information: Women ...

  7. High prevalence of suicide risk in people living with HIV: who is at higher risk?

    PubMed

    Passos, Susane Müller Klug; Souza, Luciano Dias de Mattos; Spessato, Bárbara Coiro

    2014-01-01

    A cross-sectional study was developed to evaluate suicide risk and associated factors in HIV/AIDS patients at a regional reference center for the treatment of HIV/AIDS in southern Brazil. We assessed 211 patients in regard to suicide risk, clinical and sociodemographic characteristics, drug use, depression, and anxiety. Suicide risk was assessed with Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview, Module C. Multivariate analysis was performed using Poisson regression. Of the total sample, 34.1% were at risk of suicide. In the multivariate analysis, the following variables were independently associated with suicide risk: female gender; age up to 47 years; unemployment; indicative of anxiety; indicative of depression; and abuse or addiction on psychoactive substances. Suicide risk is high in this population. Psychosocial factors should be included in the physical and clinical evaluation, given their strong association with suicide risk.

  8. Fludarabine Phosphate and Total-Body Irradiation Before Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Small Lymphocytic Leukemia