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Sample records for high shear modulus

  1. Muscle shear elastic modulus measured using supersonic shear imaging is highly related to muscle activity level.

    PubMed

    Nordez, Antoine; Hug, François

    2010-05-01

    This pilot study was designed to determine whether the shear elastic modulus measured using supersonic shear imaging can be used to accurately estimate muscle activity level. Using direct visual feedback of torque, six healthy subjects were asked to perform two incremental isometric elbow flexions, consisting of linear torque ramps of 30 s from 0 to 40% of maximal voluntary contraction. Both electromyographic (EMG) activity and shear elastic modulus were continuously measured in the biceps brachii during the two ramps. There was significant linear regression (P<0.001) between shear elastic modulus and EMG activity level for both ramps of all six subjects (R2=0.94+/-0.05, ranging from 0.82 to 0.98). Good repeatability was found for shear elastic modulus estimated at both 3% (trial 1: 21.7+/-6.7 kPa; trial 2: 23.2+/-7.2 kPa, intraclass correlation coefficient=0.89, standard error in measurement=2.3 kPa, coefficient of variation=12.7%) and 7% (trial 1: 42.6+/-14.1 kPa; trial 2: 44.8+/-15.8 kPa, intraclass correlation coefficient=0.94, standard error in measurement=3.7 kPa, coefficient of variation=7.1%) of maximal EMG activity. The shear elastic modulus estimated at both 3 and 7% of maximal EMG activity was not significantly different (P>0.05) between the two trials. These results confirm our hypothesis that the use of supersonic shear imaging greatly improves the correlation between muscle shear elastic modulus and EMG activity level. Due to the nonlinearity of muscle mechanical properties, the muscle elasticity should be linked to the muscle stress. Therefore, the present study represents a first step in attempting to show that supersonic shear imaging can be used to indirectly estimate muscle stress.

  2. Complex shear modulus of a magnetorheological elastomer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, G. Y.

    2004-10-01

    In our previous study (Zhou 2003 Smart Mater. Struct. 12 139-46), a technique to extract the field-induced shear modulus through an experiment testing the responded acceleration of a system composed of a magnetorheological elastomer (MRE) and a cuprous mass was introduced. In this paper, we present a different data processing method, based on the Steiglitz-McBride iteration method, to recover the complex shear modulus of an MRE in the frequency domain through the measured force excitation and responded acceleration of the mass in the above-mentioned experiment. The recovered complex shear modulus is analyzed in three ranges of the frequency domain: low-frequency range, moderate-frequency range, and high-frequency range. In the low-frequency range (<250 Hz), the shear modulus is a bell-type curve rising with the applied magnetic field. The average shear modulus over this frequency range is proportional to the applied magnetic field until magnetic saturation is reached. The maximum change of the average shear modulus over this range is found to be above 55% of the zero-field value. The above phenomenon reaffirms that the subquadratic field dependence, which arises from the saturation of the magnetization near the poles of closely spaced pairs of spheres, must be taken into account. In the moderate-frequency range and high-frequency range, the shear modulus is too complex to be analyzed completely by the proposed method. However, some interesting phenomena are also revealed by the proposed method. For instance, the shear modulus increases with frequency at least with the order of a quadratic polynomial, and the shear modulus is not significantly affected by the applied magnetic field.

  3. Static shear modulus of electrorheological fluids.

    PubMed

    Shi, Lihong; Tam, Wing Yim; Huang, Xianxiang; Sheng, Ping

    2006-05-01

    We report measurements of the static shear modulus of electrorheological (ER) fluids consisting of water-wetted silica microspheres in silicone oil. A shear-annealing method, using creep-recovery (CR) cycles under an external electric field, is used to enhance ER properties of the fluid. The shear-annealing method enables the silica spheres in the ER fluid to form better aligned and denser column microstructures. A stable state with elastic shear deformation is obtained after a sufficient number of CR cycles, with an optimal combination of stress duration and shear strength. Static shear modulus is obtained by measuring the elastic deformations at different shear stresses for an electric field frequency from 10 to 1000 Hz. A water-bridge model is proposed to explain the enhanced shear modulus.

  4. Shear modulus estimation with vibrating needle stimulation.

    PubMed

    Orescanin, Marko; Insana, Michael

    2010-06-01

    An ultrasonic shear wave imaging technique is being developed for estimating the complex shear modulus of biphasic hydropolymers including soft biological tissues. A needle placed in the medium is vibrated along its axis to generate harmonic shear waves. Doppler pulses synchronously track particle motion to estimate shear wave propagation speed. Velocity estimation is improved by implementing a k-lag phase estimator. Fitting shear-wave speed estimates to the predicted dispersion relation curves obtained from two rheological models, we estimate the elastic and viscous components of the complex shear modulus. The dispersion equation estimated using the standard linear solid-body (Zener) model is compared with that from the Kelvin-Voigt model to estimate moduli in gelatin gels in the 50 to 450 Hz shear wave frequency bandwidth. Both models give comparable estimates that agree with independent shear rheometer measurements obtained at lower strain rates. PMID:20529711

  5. Measuring shear modulus of individual fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behlow, Herbert; Saini, Deepika; Oliviera, Luciana; Skove, Malcolm; Rao, Apparao

    2014-03-01

    Fiber technology has advanced to new heights enabling tailored mechanical properties. For reliable fiber applications their mechanical properties must be well characterized at the individual fiber level. Unlike the tensile modulus, which can be well studied in a single fiber, the present indirect and dynamic methods of measuring the shear properties of fibers suffer from various disadvantages such as the interaction between fibers and the influence of damping. In this talk, we introduce a quasi-static method to directly measure the shear modulus of a single micron-sized fiber. Our simple and inexpensive setup yields a shear modulus of 16 and 2 GPa for a single IM7 carbon fiber and a Kevlar fiber, respectively. Furthermore, our setup is also capable of measuring the creep, hysteresis and the torsion coefficient, and examples of these will be presented.

  6. Validity of measurement of shear modulus by ultrasound shear wave elastography in human pennate muscle.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Naokazu; Hirata, Kosuke; Kanehisa, Hiroaki; Yoshitake, Yasuhide

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound shear wave elastography is becoming a valuable tool for measuring mechanical properties of individual muscles. Since ultrasound shear wave elastography measures shear modulus along the principal axis of the probe (i.e., along the transverse axis of the imaging plane), the measured shear modulus most accurately represents the mechanical property of the muscle along the fascicle direction when the probe's principal axis is parallel to the fascicle direction in the plane of the ultrasound image. However, it is unclear how the measured shear modulus is affected by the probe angle relative to the fascicle direction in the same plane. The purpose of the present study was therefore to examine whether the angle between the principal axis of the probe and the fascicle direction in the same plane affects the measured shear modulus. Shear modulus in seven specially-designed tissue-mimicking phantoms, and in eleven human in-vivo biceps brachii and medial gastrocnemius were determined by using ultrasound shear wave elastography. The probe was positioned parallel or 20° obliquely to the fascicle across the B-mode images. The reproducibility of shear modulus measurements was high for both parallel and oblique conditions. Although there was a significant effect of the probe angle relative to the fascicle on the shear modulus in human experiment, the magnitude was negligibly small. These findings indicate that the ultrasound shear wave elastography is a valid tool for evaluating the mechanical property of pennate muscles along the fascicle direction. PMID:25853777

  7. Validity of measurement of shear modulus by ultrasound shear wave elastography in human pennate muscle.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Naokazu; Hirata, Kosuke; Kanehisa, Hiroaki; Yoshitake, Yasuhide

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound shear wave elastography is becoming a valuable tool for measuring mechanical properties of individual muscles. Since ultrasound shear wave elastography measures shear modulus along the principal axis of the probe (i.e., along the transverse axis of the imaging plane), the measured shear modulus most accurately represents the mechanical property of the muscle along the fascicle direction when the probe's principal axis is parallel to the fascicle direction in the plane of the ultrasound image. However, it is unclear how the measured shear modulus is affected by the probe angle relative to the fascicle direction in the same plane. The purpose of the present study was therefore to examine whether the angle between the principal axis of the probe and the fascicle direction in the same plane affects the measured shear modulus. Shear modulus in seven specially-designed tissue-mimicking phantoms, and in eleven human in-vivo biceps brachii and medial gastrocnemius were determined by using ultrasound shear wave elastography. The probe was positioned parallel or 20° obliquely to the fascicle across the B-mode images. The reproducibility of shear modulus measurements was high for both parallel and oblique conditions. Although there was a significant effect of the probe angle relative to the fascicle on the shear modulus in human experiment, the magnitude was negligibly small. These findings indicate that the ultrasound shear wave elastography is a valid tool for evaluating the mechanical property of pennate muscles along the fascicle direction.

  8. Shear modulus of neutron star crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baiko, D. A.

    2011-09-01

    The shear modulus of solid neutron star crust is calculated by the thermodynamic perturbation theory, taking into account ion motion. At a given density, the crust is modelled as a body-centred cubic Coulomb crystal of fully ionized atomic nuclei of one type with a uniform charge-compensating electron background. Classic and quantum regimes of ion motion are considered. The calculations in the classic temperature range agree well with previous Monte Carlo simulations. At these temperatures, the shear modulus is given by the sum of a positive contribution due to the static lattice and a negative ∝ T contribution due to the ion motion. The quantum calculations are performed for the first time. The main result is that at low temperatures the contribution to the shear modulus due to the ion motion saturates at a constant value, associated with zero-point ion vibrations. Such behaviour is qualitatively similar to the zero-point ion motion contribution to the crystal energy. The quantum effects may be important for lighter elements at higher densities, where the ion plasma temperature is not entirely negligible compared to the typical Coulomb ion interaction energy. The results of numerical calculations are approximated by convenient fitting formulae. They should be used for precise neutron star oscillation modelling, a rapidly developing branch of stellar seismology.

  9. Shear modulus of structured electrorheological fluid mixtures.

    PubMed

    Shitara, Kyohei; Sakaue, Takahiro

    2016-05-01

    Some immiscible blends under a strong electric field often exhibit periodic structures, bridging the gap between two electrodes. Upon shear, the structures tilt, and exhibit an elastic response which is mostly governed by the electric energy. Assuming a two-dimensional stripe structure, we calculate the Maxwell stress, and derive an expression for the shear modulus, demonstrating how it depends on the external electric field, the composition, and the dielectric properties of the blend. We also suggest the notion of effective interfacial tension, which renormalizes the effect of the electric field. This leads to a simple derivation of the scaling law for the selection of the wavelength of the structure formed under an electric field. PMID:27300947

  10. Shear modulus of structured electrorheological fluid mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shitara, Kyohei; Sakaue, Takahiro

    2016-05-01

    Some immiscible blends under a strong electric field often exhibit periodic structures, bridging the gap between two electrodes. Upon shear, the structures tilt, and exhibit an elastic response which is mostly governed by the electric energy. Assuming a two-dimensional stripe structure, we calculate the Maxwell stress, and derive an expression for the shear modulus, demonstrating how it depends on the external electric field, the composition, and the dielectric properties of the blend. We also suggest the notion of effective interfacial tension, which renormalizes the effect of the electric field. This leads to a simple derivation of the scaling law for the selection of the wavelength of the structure formed under an electric field.

  11. Analyses of Failure Mechanisms in Woven Graphite/Polyimide Composites with Medium and High Modulus Graphite Fibers Subjected to In-Plane Shear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumosa, M.; Armentrout, D.; Rupnowski, P.; Kumosa, L.; Shin, E.; Sutter, J. K.

    2003-01-01

    The application of the Iosipescu shear test for the room and high temperature failure analyses of the woven graphite/polyimide composites with the medium (T-650) and igh (M40J and M60J) modulus graphite fibers is discussed. The M40J/PMR-II-50 and M60J/PMR-II-50 composites were tested as supplied and after thermal conditioning. The effect of temperature and conditioning on the initiation of intralaminar damage and the shear strength of the composites was established.

  12. In-Plane Shear Testing of Medium and High Modulus Woven Graphite Fiber Reinforced/Polyimide Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gentz, M.; Armentrout, D.; Rupnowski, P.; Kumosa, L.; Shin, E.; Sutter, J. K.; Kumosa, M.

    2004-01-01

    Iosipescu shear tests were performed at room temperature and at 316 C (600 F) o woven composites with either M40J or M60J graphite fibers and PMR-II-50 polyimide resin matrix. The composites were tested as supplied and after thermo-cycling, with the thermo-cycled composites being tested under dry and wet conditions. Acoustic emission (AE) was monitored during the room and high temperature Iosipescu experiments. The shear stresses at the maximum loads and the shear stresses at the significant onset of AE were determined for the composites as function of temperature and conditioning. The combined effects of thermo-cycling and moisture on the strength and stiffness properties of the composites were evaluated. It was determined that the room and high temperature shear stresses at the maximum loads were unaffected by conditioning. However, at room temperature the significant onset of AE was affected by conditioning; the thermal conditioned wet specimens showed the highest shear stress at the onset of AE followed by thermal-conditioned and then as received specimens. Also, at igh temperature the significant onset of AE occurred in some specimens after the maximum load due to the viscoelastoplastic nature of the matrix material.

  13. Mechanical Behaviour of Woven Graphite/Polyimide Composites with Medium and High Modulus Graphite Fibers Subjected to Biaxial Shear Dominated Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumose, M.; Gentz, M.; Rupnowski, P.; Armentrout, D.; Kumosa, L.; Shin, E.; Sutter, J. K.

    2003-01-01

    A major limitation of woven fiber/polymer matrix composite systems is the inability of these materials to resist intralaminar and interlaminar damage initiation and propagation under shear-dominated biaxial loading conditions. There are numerous shear test methods for woven fabric composites, each with its own advantages and disadvantages. Two techniques, which show much potential, are the Iosipescu shear and +/- 45 deg tensile tests. In this paper, the application of these two tests for the room and high temperature failure analyses of woven graphite/polyimide composites is briefly evaluated. In particular, visco-elastic micro, meso, and macro-stress distributions in a woven eight harness satin (8HS) T650/PMR-15 composite subjected to these two tests are presented and their effect on the failure process of the composite is evaluated. Subsequently, the application of the Iosipescu tests to the failure analysis of woven composites with medium (T650) and high (M40J and M60J) modulus graphite fibers and PMR-15 and PMR-II-50 polyimide resins is discussed. The composites were tested as-supplied and after thermal conditioning. The effect of temperature and thermal conditioning on the initiation of intralaminar damage and the shear strength of the composites was established.

  14. In vivo quantification of the shear modulus of the human Achilles tendon during passive loading using shear wave dispersion analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helfenstein-Didier, C.; Andrade, R. J.; Brum, J.; Hug, F.; Tanter, M.; Nordez, A.; Gennisson, J.-L.

    2016-03-01

    The shear wave velocity dispersion was analyzed in the Achilles tendon (AT) during passive dorsiflexion using a phase velocity method in order to obtain the tendon shear modulus (C 55). Based on this analysis, the aims of the present study were (i) to assess the reproducibility of the shear modulus for different ankle angles, (ii) to assess the effect of the probe locations, and (iii) to compare results with elasticity values obtained with the supersonic shear imaging (SSI) technique. The AT shear modulus (C 55) consistently increased with the ankle dorsiflexion (N  =  10, p  <  0.05). Furthermore, the technique showed a very good reproducibility (all standard error of the mean values  <10.7 kPa and all coefficient of variation (CV) values  ⩽0.05%). In addition, independently from the ankle dorsiflexion, the shear modulus was significantly higher in the proximal location compared to the more distal one. The shear modulus provided by SSI was always lower than C55 and the difference increased with the ankle dorsiflexion. However, shear modulus values provided by both methods were highly correlated (R  =  0.84), indicating that the conventional shear wave elastography technique (SSI technique) can be used to compare tendon mechanical properties across populations. Future studies should determine the clinical relevance of the shear wave dispersion analysis, for instance in the case of tendinopathy or tendon tear.

  15. The Role played by Shear Modulus Contrast in Earth Materials on Facilitating Shear Localization in the Lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    So, B.-D.; Yuen, D. A.; Regenauer-Lieb, K.; Lee, S.-M.

    2012-04-01

    Viscoplasticity has been considered to be a dominant element in causing the nucleation of shear instability leading to shear localization. Here we propose that a simple contrast in shear moduli may be sufficient for explaining the fast timescale asymmetric shear instability in a bi-material setting. Up to now, no studies have been made on asymmetric shear instability induced by elastic modulus contrast. Thermal-mechanical numerical simulations based on high resolution finite-element methods were performed to understand the effects of shear modulus contrast on inducing asymmetric instabilities. Strain-rate and stress dependent rheology are used with a wide range of activation energy 0-850 kJ/mol for all models. Numerical results with enough shear modulus contrast show the asymmetric shear instability, which is generated around the interface and then propagates across the interface. We also examined the role of activation energy (0-850 kJ/mol) on the geometrical pattern and the initiation time of asymmetric shear localization. The shear modulus contrast has to be close to 2 for triggering asymmetric shear instability and is found to be by far a more important controlling factor in causing shear instability than activation energy of the creep law. Our work suggests that initiation of lithosphere-scale asymmetric instability would be faster than previous considerations. In a view of the stored energy and its release as shear heating, the network between the various contrasts in yield strength and shear moduli controls the developing feature of asymmetric instability . Higher yield strength contrast induces severe deformation and a small temperature increase. It may hold the key for resolving the heat flow paradox question. Our finding stresses that naturally occurring shear modulus contrast have also important impact on many geological problems related to shear zone formation.

  16. Factors that influence muscle shear modulus during passive stretch.

    PubMed

    Koo, Terry K; Hug, François

    2015-09-18

    Although elastography has been increasingly used for evaluating muscle shear modulus associated with age, sex, musculoskeletal, and neurological conditions, its physiological meaning is largely unknown. This knowledge gap may hinder data interpretation, limiting the potential of using elastography to gain insights into muscle biomechanics in health and disease. We derived a mathematical model from a widely-accepted Hill-type passive force-length relationship to gain insight about the physiological meaning of resting shear modulus of skeletal muscles under passive stretching, and validated the model by comparing against the ex-vivo animal data reported in our recent work (Koo et al. 2013). The model suggested that resting shear modulus of a slack muscle is a function of specific tension and parameters that govern the normalized passive muscle force-length relationship as well as the degree of muscle anisotropy. The model also suggested that although the slope of the linear shear modulus-passive force relationship is primarily related to muscle anatomical cross-sectional area (i.e. the smaller the muscle cross-sectional area, the more the increase in shear modulus to result in the same passive muscle force), it is also governed by the normalized passive muscle force-length relationship and the degree of muscle anisotropy. Taken together, although muscle shear modulus under passive stretching has a strong linear relationship with passive muscle force, its actual value appears to be affected by muscle's mechanical, material, and architectural properties. This should be taken into consideration when interpreting the muscle shear modulus values. PMID:26113291

  17. Factors that influence muscle shear modulus during passive stretch.

    PubMed

    Koo, Terry K; Hug, François

    2015-09-18

    Although elastography has been increasingly used for evaluating muscle shear modulus associated with age, sex, musculoskeletal, and neurological conditions, its physiological meaning is largely unknown. This knowledge gap may hinder data interpretation, limiting the potential of using elastography to gain insights into muscle biomechanics in health and disease. We derived a mathematical model from a widely-accepted Hill-type passive force-length relationship to gain insight about the physiological meaning of resting shear modulus of skeletal muscles under passive stretching, and validated the model by comparing against the ex-vivo animal data reported in our recent work (Koo et al. 2013). The model suggested that resting shear modulus of a slack muscle is a function of specific tension and parameters that govern the normalized passive muscle force-length relationship as well as the degree of muscle anisotropy. The model also suggested that although the slope of the linear shear modulus-passive force relationship is primarily related to muscle anatomical cross-sectional area (i.e. the smaller the muscle cross-sectional area, the more the increase in shear modulus to result in the same passive muscle force), it is also governed by the normalized passive muscle force-length relationship and the degree of muscle anisotropy. Taken together, although muscle shear modulus under passive stretching has a strong linear relationship with passive muscle force, its actual value appears to be affected by muscle's mechanical, material, and architectural properties. This should be taken into consideration when interpreting the muscle shear modulus values.

  18. High modulus high temperature glass fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bacon, J. F.

    1973-01-01

    The search for a new high-modulus, high-temperature glass fiber involved the preparation of 500 glass compositions lying in 12 glass fields. These systems consisted primarily of low atomic number oxides and rare-earth oxides. Direct optical measurements of the kinetics of crystallization of the cordierite-rare earth system, for example, showed that the addition of rare-earth oxides decreased the rate of formation of cordierite crystals. Glass samples prepared from these systems proved that the rare-earth oxides made large specific contributions to the Young's modulus of the glasses. The best glasses have moduli greater than 21 million psi, the best glass fibers have moduli greater than 18 million psi, and the best glass fiber-epoxy resin composites have tensile strengths of 298,000 psi, compressive strengths of at least 220,000 psi, flexural strengths of 290,000 psi, and short-beam shear strengths of almost 17,000 psi.

  19. Quantitative imaging of nonlinear shear modulus by combining static elastography and shear wave elastography.

    PubMed

    Latorre-Ossa, Heldmuth; Gennisson, Jean-Luc; De Brosses, Emilie; Tanter, Mickaël

    2012-04-01

    The study of new tissue mechanical properties such as shear nonlinearity could lead to better tissue characterization and clinical diagnosis. This work proposes a method combining static elastography and shear wave elastography to derive the nonlinear shear modulus by applying the acoustoelasticity theory in quasi-incompressible soft solids. Results demonstrate that by applying a moderate static stress at the surface of the investigated medium, and by following the quantitative evolution of its shear modulus, it is possible to accurately and quantitatively recover the local Landau (A) coefficient characterizing the shear nonlinearity of soft tissues.

  20. Adhesion study of silicone coatings: the interaction of thickness, modulus and shear rate on adhesion force.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jongsoo; Chisholm, Bret J; Bahr, James

    2007-01-01

    Interactions between coating thickness, modulus and shear rate on pseudobarnacle adhesion to a platinum-cured silicone coating were studied using a statistical experimental design. A combined design method was used for two mixture components and two process variables. The two mixture components, vinyl end-terminated polydimethylsiloxanes (V21: MW=6 kg mole(-1) and V35: MW=4 9.5 kg mole(-1), Gelest Inc.) were mixed at five different levels to vary the modulus. The dry coating thickness was varied from 160 - 740 microm and shear tests were performed at four different shear rates (2, 7, 12, and 22 microm s(-1)). The results of the statistical analysis showed that the mixture components were significant factors on shear stress, showing an interaction with the process variable. For the soft silicone coating based on the high molecular weight polydimethylsiloxane (E=0.08 MPa), shear stress significantly increased as coating thickness decreased, while shear rate slightly impacted shear force especially at 160 microm coating thickness. As the modulus was increased (E=1.3 MPa), more force was required to detach the pseudobarnacle from the coatings, but thickness and rate dependence on shear stress became less important. PMID:17453735

  1. Mapping tissue shear modulus on Thiel soft-embalmed mouse skin with shear wave optical coherence elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Shaozhen; Joy, Joyce; Wang, Ruikang K.; Huang, Zhihong

    2015-03-01

    A quantitative measurement of the mechanical properties of biological tissue is a useful assessment of its physiologic conditions, which may aid medical diagnosis and treatment of, e.g., scleroderma and skin cancer. Traditional elastography techniques such as magnetic resonance elastography and ultrasound elastography have limited scope of application on skin due to insufficient spatial resolution. Recently, dynamic / transient elastography are attracting more applications with the advantage of non-destructive measurements, and revealing the absolute moduli values of tissue mechanical properties. Shear wave optical coherence elastography (SW-OCE) is a novel transient elastography method, which lays emphasis on the propagation of dynamic mechanical waves. In this study, high speed shear wave imaging technique was applied to a range of soft-embalmed mouse skin, where 3 kHz shear waves were launched with a piezoelectric actuator as an external excitation. The shear wave velocity was estimated from the shear wave images, and used to recover a shear modulus map in the same OCT imaging range. Results revealed significant difference in shear modulus and structure in compliance with gender, and images on fresh mouse skin are also compared. Thiel embalming technique is also proven to present the ability to furthest preserve the mechanical property of biological tissue. The experiment results suggest that SW-OCE is an effective technique for quantitative estimation of skin tissue biomechanical status.

  2. High elastic modulus polymer electrolytes

    DOEpatents

    Balsara, Nitash Pervez; Singh, Mohit; Eitouni, Hany Basam; Gomez, Enrique Daniel

    2013-10-22

    A polymer that combines high ionic conductivity with the structural properties required for Li electrode stability is useful as a solid phase electrolyte for high energy density, high cycle life batteries that do not suffer from failures due to side reactions and dendrite growth on the Li electrodes, and other potential applications. The polymer electrolyte includes a linear block copolymer having a conductive linear polymer block with a molecular weight of at least 5000 Daltons, a structural linear polymer block with an elastic modulus in excess of 1.times.10.sup.7 Pa and an ionic conductivity of at least 1.times.10.sup.-5 Scm.sup.-1. The electrolyte is made under dry conditions to achieve the noted characteristics.

  3. Repeated Rapid Shear-Responsiveness of Peptide Hydrogels with Tunable Shear Modulus

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandran, Sivakumar; Tseng, Yiider; Yu, Y. Bruce

    2006-01-01

    A pair of mutually-attractive but self-repulsive decapeptides, with alternating charged/neutral amino acid sequence patterns, was found to co-assemble into a viscoelastic material upon mixing at a low total peptide concentration of 0.25 wt%. Circular dichroism spectroscopy of individual decapeptide solutions revealed their random coil conformation. Transmission electron microscopy images showed the nanofibrillar network structure of the hydrogel. Dynamic rheological characterization revealed its high elasticity and shear-thinning nature. Furthermore, the co-assembled hydrogel was capable of rapid recoveries from repeated shear-induced breakdowns (compliance), a property desirable for designing injectable biomaterials for controlled drug delivery and tissue engineering applications. A systematic variation of the neutral amino acids in the sequence revealed some of the critical design principles involved in this novel class of biomaterials. Lowering the hydrophobicity of the neutral amino acids lowered the elastic modulus and the resilience of the assembled hydrogel, thereby providing a means to fine-tune material property. Replacement of neutral amino acids in the sequence with proline (a β-sheet breaker) impaired the ability of the peptides to co-assemble into a hydrogel. PMID:15877347

  4. 3D mapping of elastic modulus using shear wave optical micro-elastography

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jiang; Qi, Li; Miao, Yusi; Ma, Teng; Dai, Cuixia; Qu, Yueqiao; He, Youmin; Gao, Yiwei; Zhou, Qifa; Chen, Zhongping

    2016-01-01

    Elastography provides a powerful tool for histopathological identification and clinical diagnosis based on information from tissue stiffness. Benefiting from high resolution, three-dimensional (3D), and noninvasive optical coherence tomography (OCT), optical micro-elastography has the ability to determine elastic properties with a resolution of ~10 μm in a 3D specimen. The shear wave velocity measurement can be used to quantify the elastic modulus. However, in current methods, shear waves are measured near the surface with an interference of surface waves. In this study, we developed acoustic radiation force (ARF) orthogonal excitation optical coherence elastography (ARFOE-OCE) to visualize shear waves in 3D. This method uses acoustic force perpendicular to the OCT beam to excite shear waves in internal specimens and uses Doppler variance method to visualize shear wave propagation in 3D. The measured propagation of shear waves agrees well with the simulation results obtained from finite element analysis (FEA). Orthogonal acoustic excitation allows this method to measure the shear modulus in a deeper specimen which extends the elasticity measurement range beyond the OCT imaging depth. The results show that the ARFOE-OCE system has the ability to noninvasively determine the 3D elastic map. PMID:27762276

  5. Shear Modulus for Nonisotropic, Open-Celled Foams Using a General Elongated Kelvin Foam Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, Roy M.; Ghosn, Louis J.

    2008-01-01

    An equation for the shear modulus for nonisotropic, open-celled foams in the plane transverse to the elongation (rise) direction is derived using an elongated Kelvin foam model with the most general geometric description. The shear modulus was found to be a function of the unit cell dimensions, the solid material properties, and the cell edge cross-section properties. The shear modulus equation reduces to the relation derived by others for isotropic foams when the unit cell is equiaxed.

  6. Elastic shear modulus: Fits to data and extrapolation to large compressions and negative pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Straub, G.K.

    1990-12-01

    An analytic form for the elastic shear modulus is presented and its fit to data at different compressions is demonstrated for copper and tungsten. When only shear modulus at zero pressure and its logarithmic derivative are known, an approximate procedure is used to generate the parameters for an analytic form for the shear modulus. This procedure is demonstrated, and estimates are provided of the shear modulus as a function of compression, for Al, Cu, Fe, Mo, W, Ta, and U. 5 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. High strength high modulus ceramic fiber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fetterolf, R. N.

    1972-01-01

    Low cost method was developed for producing high strength, high modulus, continuous ceramic oxide fibers. Process transforms inexpensive metallic salts into syrup-like liquids that can be fiberized at room temperatures. Resulting salt fibers are then converted to oxides by calcination at relatively low temperatures.

  8. Non-invasive in vivo measurement of the shear modulus of human vocal fold tissue.

    PubMed

    Kazemirad, Siavash; Bakhshaee, Hani; Mongeau, Luc; Kost, Karen

    2014-03-21

    Voice is the essential part of singing and speech communication. Voice disorders significantly affect the quality of life. The viscoelastic mechanical properties of the vocal fold mucosa determine the characteristics of the vocal folds oscillations, and thereby voice quality. In the present study, a non-invasive method was developed to determine the shear modulus of human vocal fold tissue in vivo via measurements of the mucosal wave propagation speed during phonation. Images of four human subjects' vocal folds were captured using high speed digital imaging (HSDI) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for different phonation pitches, specifically fundamental frequencies between 110 and 440 Hz. The MRI images were used to obtain the morphometric dimensions of each subject's vocal folds in order to determine the pixel size in the high-speed images. The mucosal wave propagation speed was determined for each subject and at each pitch value using an automated image processing algorithm. The transverse shear modulus of the vocal fold mucosa was then calculated from a surface (Rayleigh) wave propagation dispersion equation using the measured wave speeds. It was found that the mucosal wave propagation speed and therefore the shear modulus of the vocal fold tissue were generally greater at higher pitches. The results were in good agreement with those from other studies obtained via in vitro measurements, thereby supporting the validity of the proposed measurement method. This method offers the potential for in vivo clinical assessments of vocal folds viscoelasticity from HSDI.

  9. Supersonic shear imaging provides a reliable measurement of resting muscle shear elastic modulus.

    PubMed

    Lacourpaille, Lilian; Hug, François; Bouillard, Killian; Hogrel, Jean-Yves; Nordez, Antoine

    2012-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the reliability of shear elastic modulus measurements performed using supersonic shear imaging (SSI) in nine resting muscles (i.e. gastrocnemius medialis, tibialis anterior, vastus lateralis, rectus femoris, triceps brachii, biceps brachii, brachioradialis, adductor pollicis obliquus and abductor digiti minimi) of different architectures and typologies. Thirty healthy subjects were randomly assigned to the intra-session reliability (n = 20), inter-day reliability (n = 21) and the inter-observer reliability (n = 16) experiments. Muscle shear elastic modulus ranged from 2.99 (gastrocnemius medialis) to 4.50 kPa (adductor digiti minimi and tibialis anterior). On the whole, very good reliability was observed, with a coefficient of variation (CV) ranging from 4.6% to 8%, except for the inter-operator reliability of adductor pollicis obliquus (CV = 11.5%). The intraclass correlation coefficients were good (0.871 ± 0.045 for the intra-session reliability, 0.815 ± 0.065 for the inter-day reliability and 0.709 ± 0.141 for the inter-observer reliability). Both the reliability and the ease of use of SSI make it a potentially interesting technique that would be of benefit to fundamental, applied and clinical research projects that need an accurate assessment of muscle mechanical properties.

  10. A comparison of three popular test methods for determining the shear modulus of composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, H.; Tsai, M. Y.; Morton, J.; Farley, G. L.

    1993-01-01

    Three popular shear tests - the 10 deg off-axis, the +/- 45 deg tensile and the Iosipescu specimen tested in the modified Wyoming fixture - for shear modulus measurement are evaluated for a graphite-epoxy composite material system. A comparison of the shear stress-strain response for each test method is made using conventional strain gage instrumentation and moire interferometry. The uniformity and purity of the strain fields in the test sections of the specimens are discussed, and the shear responses obtained from each test technique are presented and compared. For accurate measurement of the shear modulus, the 90 deg Iosipescu specimen is recommended.

  11. A comparison of three popular test methods for determining the shear modulus of composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, Henjen; Tsai, Ming-Yi; Morton, John; Farley, Gary L.

    1991-01-01

    Three popular shear tests (the 10 degree off-axis, the plus or minus 45 degree tensile, and the Iosipescu specimen tested in the modified Wyoming fixture) for shear modulus measurement are evaluated for a graphite-epoxy composite material system. A comparison of the shear stress-strain response for each test method is made using conventional strain gage instrumentation and moire interferometry. The uniformity and purity of the strain fields in the test sections of the specimens are discussed, and the shear responses obtained from each test technique are presented and compared. For accurate measurement of shear modulus, the 90 degree Iosipescu specimen is recommended.

  12. The Experiment and Simulation Method to Calibrate the Shear Modulus of Individual ZnO Nanorod.

    PubMed

    Yu, Guangbin; Jiang, Chengming; Dai, Bing; Song, Jinhui

    2016-04-01

    A general method is presented to directly measure the shear modulus of an individual nanorod using atomic force microscope (AFM). To obtain shear modulus with less experiment error, finite element simulation is employed to simulate the twisting process of a ZnO nanorod. Based on the experimental measurements, the shear modulus of ZnO nanorod with 4 µm in length and 166 nm in radius is characterized to be 9.1 ± 0.2 GPa, which is obviously more accurate than the simple averaged experimental result. PMID:27451763

  13. Shear modulus data for the human lens determined from a spinning lens test.

    PubMed

    Wilde, G S; Burd, H J; Judge, S J

    2012-04-01

    The paper describes a program of mechanical testing on donated human eye bank lenses. The principal purpose of the tests was to obtain experimental data on the shear modulus of the lens for use in future computational models of the accommodation process. Testing was conducted using a procedure in which deformations are induced in the lens by spinning it about its polar axis. Shear modulus data were inferred from these observed deformations by means of a finite element inverse analysis procedure in which the spatial variation of the shear modulus within the lens is represented by an appropriate function (see Burd et al., 2011 for a detailed specification of the design of the spinning lens test rig, experimental protocols and associated data analysis procedures that were employed in the tests). Inferred data on lens shear modulus are presented for a set of twenty-nine lenses in the age range 12 years to 58 years. The lenses were tested between 47 h and 110 h from the time of death (average post-mortem time 74 h). Care was taken to exclude any lenses that had been affected by excessive post-mortem swelling, or any lenses that had suffered mechanical damage during storage, transit or the testing process. The experimental data on shear modulus indicate that, for young lenses, the cortex is stiffer than the nucleus. The shear modulus of the nucleus and cortex both increase with increasing age. The shear modulus of the nucleus increases more rapidly than the cortex with the consequence that from an age of about 45 years onwards the nucleus is stiffer than the cortex. The principal shear modulus data presented in the paper were obtained by testing at a rotational speed of 1,000 rpm. Supplementary tests were conducted at rotational speeds of 700 rpm and 1,400 rpm. The results from these supplementary tests are in good agreement with the data obtained from the principal 1,000 rpm tests. Studies on the possible effects of lens drying during the test suggested that this factor

  14. Shear elastic modulus is a reproducible index reflecting the passive mechanical properties of medial gastrocnemius muscle belly

    PubMed Central

    Ikezoe, Tome; Umegaki, Hiroki; Kobayashi, Takuya; Nishisita, Satoru; Ichihashi, Noriaki

    2016-01-01

    Background Passive mechanical properties are important in muscle function because they are related to the muscle extensibility. Recently, the assessment of muscle shear elastic modulus using shear-wave elastographic (SWE) imaging was developed. However, reliability and validity of shear elastic modulus measurements during passive stretching remain undefined. Purpose To investigate the reproducibility and validity of the shear elastic modulus measured by SWE imaging during passive stretching. Material and Methods Ten healthy men volunteered for this study. The shear elastic modulus of medial gastrocnemius (MG) muscle belly was measured using ultrasonic SWE imaging during passive dorsiflexion. To assess the intra-session and inter-day reliabilities, the protocol was performed twice by the same investigator with a 5-min rest period between measurement sessions and twice on two different days by the same investigator with a 1–2-week interval between the two sessions. To assess the inter-investigator reliability, the protocol was performed on the same day by two investigators with a 5-min rest between measurement sessions. In addition, B-mode ultrasonography was used to determine the displacement of myotendinous junction (MTJ) of MG during passive ankle dorsiflexion. Results The intra-session, inter-day, and inter-investigator reliabilities of the method was confirmed on the basis of acceptably low coefficient of variations and substantially high intraclass correlation coefficients. In addition, a significant correlation was found between MTJ displacement and shear elastic modulus. Conclusion These results suggested that shear elastic modulus measured using SWE imaging is a reproducible index reflecting the passive mechanical properties. PMID:27170845

  15. Effect of depth-dependent shear modulus on tsunami generation along subduction zones

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Geist, E.L.; Bilek, S.L.

    2001-01-01

    Estimates of the initial size of tsunamis generated by subduction zone earthquakes are significantly affected by the choice of shear modulus at shallow depths. Analysis of over 360 circum-Pacific subduction zone earthquakes indicates that for a given seismic moment, source duration increases significantly with decreasing depth (Bilek and Lay, 1998; 1999). Under the assumption that stress drop is constant, the increase of source duration is explained by a 5-fold reduction of shear modulus from depths of 20 km to 5 km. This much lower value of shear modulus at shallow depths in comparison to standard earth models has the effect of increasing the amount of slip estimated from seismic moment determinations, thereby increasing tsunami amplitude. The effect of using depth dependent shear modulus values is tested by modeling the tsunami from the 1992 Nicaraguan tsunami earthquake using a previously determined moment distribution (lhmle??, 1996a). We find that the tide gauge record of this tsunami is well matched by synthetics created using the depth dependent shear modulus and moment distribution. Because excitation of seismic waves also depends on elastic heterogeneity, it is important, particularly for the inversion of short period waves, that a consistent seismic/tsunami shear modulus model be used for calculating slip distributions.

  16. The Shear Modulus of the Human Vocal Fold In A Transverse Direction

    PubMed Central

    Goodyer, Eric; Welham, Nathan V.; Choi, SeongHee; Yamashita, Masaru; Dailey, Seth H.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives To measure the shear modulus of the vocal fold in a human hemi-larynx, such that the data can be related to direction of applied stress and anatomical context. Methods Dynamic spring rate data were collected using a modified Linear Skin Rheometer (LSR) using human hemi-larynges, and converted to estimated shear modulus via application of a simple shear model. The measurement probe was attached to the epithelial layer of the vocal fold cover using suction. A sinusoidal force of 3 g was applied to the epithelium, and the resultant displacement logged at a rate of 1 kHz. Force measurement accuracy was 20 μg, position measurement accuracy was 4 μm. The force was applied in a transverse direction at the mid-membranous point between the vocal process and the anterior commissure. Results The shear modulus of the 3 female vocal folds ranged from 814 to 1232 Pa. The shear modulus of the 3 male vocal folds ranged from 1021 to 1796 Pa. Conclusions These data demonstrate that it is possible to obtain estimates for the shear modulus of the vocal fold while preserving anatomical context. The modulus values reported here are higher than those reported using parallel plate rheometry. This is to be expected as the tissue is attached to surrounding structures, and is under natural tension. PMID:18215500

  17. 3-D FDTD simulation of shear waves for evaluation of complex modulus imaging.

    PubMed

    Orescanin, Marko; Wang, Yue; Insana, Michael

    2011-02-01

    The Navier equation describing shear wave propagation in 3-D viscoelastic media is solved numerically with a finite differences time domain (FDTD) method. Solutions are formed in terms of transverse scatterer velocity waves and then verified via comparison to measured wave fields in heterogeneous hydrogel phantoms. The numerical algorithm is used as a tool to study the effects on complex shear modulus estimation from wave propagation in heterogeneous viscoelastic media. We used an algebraic Helmholtz inversion (AHI) technique to solve for the complex shear modulus from simulated and experimental velocity data acquired in 2-D and 3-D. Although 3-D velocity estimates are required in general, there are object geometries for which 2-D inversions provide accurate estimations of the material properties. Through simulations and experiments, we explored artifacts generated in elastic and dynamic-viscous shear modulus images related to the shear wavelength and average viscosity.

  18. Cartilage nominal strain correlates with shear modulus and glycosaminoglycans content in meniscectomized joints.

    PubMed

    Song, Yongnam; Carter, Dennis R; Giori, Nicholas J

    2014-06-01

    Postmeniscectomy osteoarthritis (OA) is hypothesized to be the consequence of abnormal mechanical conditions, but the relationship between postsurgical alterations in articular cartilage strain and in vivo biomechanical/biochemical changes in articular cartilage is unclear. We hypothesized that spatial variations in cartilage nominal strain (percentile thickness change) would correlate with previously reported in vivo articular cartilage property changes following meniscectomy. Cadevaric sheep knees were loaded in cyclic compression which was previously developed to mimic normal sheep gait, while a 4.7 T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) imaged the whole joint. 3D cartilage strain maps were compared with in vivo sheep studies that described postmeniscectomy changes in shear modulus, phase lag, proteoglycan content and collagen organization/content in the articular cartilage. The area of articular cartilage experiencing high (overloaded) and low (underloaded) strain was significantly increased in the meniscectomized tibial compartment by 10% and 25%, respectively, while no significant changes were found in the nonmeniscectomized compartment. The overloaded and underloaded regions of articular cartilage in our in vitro specimens correlated with regions of in vivo shear modulus reduction. Glycosaminoglycans (GAG) content only increased at the underloaded articular cartilage but decreased at the overloaded articular cartilage. No significant correlation was found in phase lag and collagen organization/content changes with the strain variation. Comparisons between postsurgical nominal strain and in vivo cartilage property changes suggest that both overloading and underloading after meniscectomy may directly damage the cartilage matrix stiffness (shear modulus). Disruption of superficial cartilage by overloading might be responsible for the proteoglycan (GAG) loss in the early stage of postmeniscectomy OA. PMID:24671447

  19. Why is the bulk modulus of jammed solids and granular packings much larger than the shear modulus?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaccone, Alessio; Weaire, Denis

    2013-03-01

    In granular packings and metallic glasses, the rigidity to compression is much more pronounced than with respect to shear, resulting in the bulk modulus being much larger than the shear modulus. This state of affairs becomes dramatic in marginal jammed solids which are solid-like to compression but not to shear (Ellenbroek, Zeravcic, van Saarloos, van Hecke, EPL 87, 34004 (2009)). For metallic glasses, it was argued by Weaire et al. some time ago (Acta Metall. 19, 779 (1971)) that this effect might be due to the nonaffinity of the particle displacements. These arise because the force acting on a particle upon strain as a result of the strain-induced motion of its neighbors is not balanced in the absence of local order. Hence the particles undergo nonaffine displacements to relax these forces to the expense of the elastic storage energy, leading to lower values of the elastic moduli. Using the nonaffine theory of Zaccone and Scossa-Romano (PRB, 83, 184205 (2011)) we found a conclusive solution to this long standing problem. We show that in packings and related materials the excluded volume between neighbors induces geometric correlations which significantly reduce the nonaffinity under compression but leave the nonaffinity in shear substantially unaltered.

  20. Shear elastic modulus estimation from indentation and SDUV on gelatin phantoms

    PubMed Central

    Amador, Carolina; Urban, Matthew W.; Chen, Shigao; Chen, Qingshan; An, Kai-Nan; Greenleaf, James F.

    2011-01-01

    Tissue mechanical properties such as elasticity are linked to tissue pathology state. Several groups have proposed shear wave propagation speed to quantify tissue mechanical properties. It is well known that biological tissues are viscoelastic materials; therefore velocity dispersion resulting from material viscoelasticity is expected. A method called Shearwave Dispersion Ultrasound Vibrometry (SDUV) can be used to quantify tissue viscoelasticity by measuring dispersion of shear wave propagation speed. However, there is not a gold standard method for validation. In this study we present an independent validation method of shear elastic modulus estimation by SDUV in 3 gelatin phantoms of differing stiffness. In addition, the indentation measurements are compared to estimates of elasticity derived from shear wave group velocities. The shear elastic moduli from indentation were 1.16, 3.40 and 5.6 kPa for a 7, 10 and 15% gelatin phantom respectively. SDUV measurements were 1.61, 3.57 and 5.37 kPa for the gelatin phantoms respectively. Shear elastic moduli derived from shear wave group velocities were 1.78, 5.2 and 7.18 kPa for the gelatin phantoms respectively. The shear elastic modulus estimated from the SDUV, matched the elastic modulus measured by indentation. On the other hand, shear elastic modulus estimated by group velocity did not agree with indentation test estimations. These results suggest that shear elastic modulus estimation by group velocity will be bias when the medium being investigated is dispersive. Therefore a rheological model should be used in order to estimate mechanical properties of viscoelastic materials. PMID:21317078

  1. Protocol-dependent shear modulus of amorphous solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayama, Daijyu; Yoshino, Hajime; Zamponi, Francesco

    2016-10-01

    We investigate the linear elastic response of amorphous solids to a shear strain at zero temperature. We find that the response is characterized by at least two distinct shear moduli. The first one, {μ\\text{ZFC}} , is associated with the linear response of a single energy minimum. The second, {μ\\text{FC}} , is related to sampling, through plastic events, an ensemble of distinct energy minima. We provide examples of protocols that allow one to measure both shear moduli. In agreement with a theoretical prediction based on the exact solution in infinite spatial dimensions, the ratio {μ\\text{FC}}/{μ\\text{ZFC}} is found to vanish proportionally to the square root of pressure at the jamming transition. Our results establish that amorphous solids are characterized by a rugged energy landscape, which has a deep impact on their elastic response, as suggested by the infinite-dimensional solution.

  2. Modeling shear modulus distribution in magnetic resonance elastography with piecewise constant level sets.

    PubMed

    Li, Bing Nan; Chui, Chee Kong; Ong, Sim Heng; Numano, Tomokazu; Washio, Toshikatsu; Homma, Kazuhiro; Chang, Stephen; Venkatesh, Sudhakar; Kobayashi, Etsuko

    2012-04-01

    Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) is designed for imaging the mechanical properties of soft tissues. However, the interpretation of shear modulus distribution is often confusing and cumbersome. For reliable evaluation, a common practice is to specify the regions of interest and consider regional elasticity. Such an experience-dependent protocol is susceptible to intrapersonal and interpersonal variability. In this study we propose to remodel shear modulus distribution with piecewise constant level sets by referring to the corresponding magnitude image. Optimal segmentation and registration are achieved by a new hybrid level set model comprised of alternating global and local region competitions. Experimental results on the simulated MRE data sets show that the mean error of elasticity reconstruction is 11.33% for local frequency estimation and 18.87% for algebraic inversion of differential equation. Piecewise constant level set modeling is effective to improve the quality of shear modulus distribution, and facilitates MRE analysis and interpretation.

  3. Dynamic transverse shear modulus for a heterogeneous fluid-filled porous solid containing cylindrical inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yongjia; Hu, Hengshan; Rudnicki, John W.; Duan, Yunda

    2016-06-01

    An exact analytical solution is presented for the effective dynamic transverse shear modulus in a heterogeneous fluid-filled porous solid containing cylindrical inclusions. The complex and frequency-dependent properties of the dynamic shear modulus are caused by the physical mechanism of mesoscopic-scale wave-induced fluid flow whose scale is smaller than wavelength but larger than the size of pores. Our model consists of three phases: a long cylindrical inclusion, a cylindrical shell of poroelastic matrix material with different mechanical and/or hydraulic properties than the inclusion and an outer region of effective homogeneous medium of laterally infinite extent. The behavior of both the inclusion and the matrix is described by Biot's consolidation equations, whereas the surrounding effective medium which is used to describe the effective transverse shear properties of the inner poroelastic composite is assumed to be a viscoelastic solid whose complex transverse shear modulus needs to be determined. The determined effective transverse shear modulus is used to quantify the S-wave attenuation and velocity dispersion in heterogeneous fluid-filled poroelastic rocks. The calculation shows the relaxation frequency and relative position of various fluid saturation dispersion curves predicted by this study exhibit very good agreement with those of a previous two-dimensional finite-element simulation. For the double-porosity model (inclusions having a different solid frame than the matrix but the same pore fluid as the matrix) the effective shear modulus also exhibits a size-dependent characteristic that the relaxation frequency moves to lower frequencies by two orders of magnitude if the radius of the cylindrical poroelastic composite increases by one order of magnitude. For the patchy-saturation model (inclusions having the same solid frame as the matrix but with a different pore fluid from the matrix), the heterogeneity in pore fluid cannot cause any attenuation in

  4. Dynamic transverse shear modulus for a heterogeneous fluid-filled porous solid containing cylindrical inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yongjia; Hu, Hengshan; Rudnicki, John W.; Duan, Yunda

    2016-09-01

    An exact analytical solution is presented for the effective dynamic transverse shear modulus in a heterogeneous fluid-filled porous solid containing cylindrical inclusions. The complex and frequency-dependent properties of the dynamic shear modulus are caused by the physical mechanism of mesoscopic-scale wave-induced fluid flow whose scale is smaller than wavelength but larger than the size of pores. Our model consists of three phases: a long cylindrical inclusion, a cylindrical shell of poroelastic matrix material with different mechanical and/or hydraulic properties than the inclusion and an outer region of effective homogeneous medium of laterally infinite extent. The behavior of both the inclusion and the matrix is described by Biot's consolidation equations, whereas the surrounding effective medium which is used to describe the effective transverse shear properties of the inner poroelastic composite is assumed to be a viscoelastic solid whose complex transverse shear modulus needs to be determined. The determined effective transverse shear modulus is used to quantify the S-wave attenuation and velocity dispersion in heterogeneous fluid-filled poroelastic rocks. The calculation shows the relaxation frequency and relative position of various fluid saturation dispersion curves predicted by this study exhibit very good agreement with those of a previous 2-D finite-element simulation. For the double-porosity model (inclusions having a different solid frame than the matrix but the same pore fluid as the matrix) the effective shear modulus also exhibits a size-dependent characteristic that the relaxation frequency moves to lower frequencies by two orders of magnitude if the radius of the cylindrical poroelastic composite increases by one order of magnitude. For the patchy-saturation model (inclusions having the same solid frame as the matrix but with a different pore fluid from the matrix), the heterogeneity in pore fluid cannot cause any attenuation in the

  5. Variation of shear and compressional wave modulus upon saturation for pure pre-compacted sands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhuiyan, M. H.; Holt, R. M.

    2016-07-01

    Gassmann's fluid substitution theory is commonly used to predict seismic velocity change upon change in saturation, and is hence essential for 4-D seismic and AVO studies. This paper addresses the basics assumptions of the Gassmann theory, in order to see how well they are fulfilled in controlled laboratory experiments. Our focus is to investigate the sensitivity of shear modulus to fluid saturation, and the predictability of Gassmann's fluid substitution theory for P-wave modulus. Ultrasonic P- and S-wave velocities in dry and saturated (3.5 wt per cent NaCl) unconsolidated clean sands (Ottawa and Columbia) were measured in an oedometer test system (uniaxial strain conditions) over a range of 0.5-10 MPa external vertical stress. This study shows shear modulus hardening upon brine saturation, which is consistent with previous data found in the literature. Analysis of the data shows that most of the hardening of the ultrasonic shear modulus may be explained by Biot dispersion. Isotropic Gassmann's fluid substitution is found to underestimate the P-wave modulus upon fluid saturation. However, adding the Biot dispersion effect improves the prediction. More work is required to obtain good measurements of parameters influencing dispersion, such as tortuosity, which is very ambiguous and challenging to measure accurately.

  6. Probabilistic characterization of cyclic shear modulus reduction for normally to moderately over-consolidated clays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Iok-Tong; Yuen, Ka-Veng; Lao, Ngai-Kuan

    2016-09-01

    Evaluation of the cyclic shear modulus of soils is a crucial but challenging task for many geotechnical earthquake engineering and soil dynamic issues. Improper determination of this property unnecessarily drives up design and maintenance costs or even leads to the construction of unsafe structures. Due to the complexities involved in the direct measurement, empirical curves for estimating the cyclic shear modulus have been commonly adopted in practice for simplicity and economical considerations. However, a systematic and robust approach for formulating a reliable model and empirical curve for cyclic shear modulus prediction for clayey soils is still lacking. In this study, the Bayesian model class selection approach is utilized to identify the most significant soil parameters affecting the normalized cyclic shear modulus and a reliable predictive model for normally to moderately over-consolidated clays is proposed. Results show that the predictability and reliability of the proposed model out performs the well-known empirical models. Finally, a new design chart is established for practical usage.

  7. Quantitative estimation of muscle shear elastic modulus of the upper trapezius with supersonic shear imaging during arm positioning.

    PubMed

    Leong, Hio-Teng; Ng, Gabriel Yin-Fat; Leung, Vivian Yee-Fong; Fu, Siu Ngor

    2013-01-01

    Pain and tenderness of the upper trapezius are the major complaints among people with chronic neck and shoulder disorders. Hyper-activation and increased muscle tension of the upper trapezius during arm elevation will cause imbalance of the scapular muscle force and contribute to neck and shoulder disorders. Assessing the elasticity of the upper trapezius in different arm positions is therefore important for identifying people at risk so as to give preventive programmes or for monitoring the effectiveness of the intervention programmes for these disorders. This study aimed to establish the reliability of supersonic shear imaging (SSI) in quantifying upper trapezius elasticity/shear elastic modulus and its ability to measure the modulation of muscle elasticity during arm elevation. Twenty-eight healthy adults (15 males, 13 females; mean age = 29.6 years) were recruited to participate in the study. In each participant, the shear elastic modulus of the upper trapezius while the arm was at rest and at 30° abduction was measured by two operators and twice by operator 1 with a time interval between the measurements. The results showed excellent within- and between-session intra-operator (ICC = 0.87-0.97) and inter-observer (ICC = 0.78-0.83) reliability for the upper trapezius elasticity with the arm at rest and at 30° abduction. An increase of 55.23% of shear elastic modulus from resting to 30° abduction was observed. Our findings demonstrate the possibilities for using SSI to quantify muscle elasticity and its potential role in delineating the modulation of upper trapezius elasticity, which is essential for future studies to compare the differences in shear elastic modulus between normal elasticity and that of individuals with neck and shoulder disorders.

  8. Elastic modulus of muscle and tendon with shear wave ultrasound elastography: variations with different technical settings.

    PubMed

    Kot, Brian Chin Wing; Zhang, Zhi Jie; Lee, Arthur Wai Chun; Leung, Vivian Yee Fong; Fu, Siu Ngor

    2012-01-01

    Standardization on Shear wave ultrasound elastography (SWUE) technical settings will not only ensure that the results are accurate, but also detect any differences over time that may be attributed to true physiological changes. The present study evaluated the variations of elastic modulus of muscle and tendon using SWUE when different technical aspects were altered. The results of this study indicated that variations of elastic modulus of muscle and tendon were found when different transducer's pressure and region of interest (ROI)'s size were applied. No significant differences in elastic modulus of the rectus femoris muscle and patellar tendon were found with different acquisition times of the SWUE sonogram. The SWUE on the muscle and tendon should be performed with the lightest transducer's pressure, a shorter acquisition time for the SWUE sonogram, while measuring the mean elastic modulus regardless the ROI's size.

  9. Feasibility of using magnetic resonance elastography to study the effect of aging on shear modulus of skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Domire, Zachary J; McCullough, Matthew B; Chen, Qingshan; An, Kai-Nan

    2009-02-01

    A common complication associated with aging is the stiffening of skeletal muscles. The purpose of this study was to determine the ability of magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) to study this phenomenon in vivo. Twenty female subjects were included in the study with an age range of 50 to 70 years. Shear modulus was calculated for the tibialis anterior of each subject. There was not a significant relationship between age and shear modulus. However, three subjects had abnormally high values and were among the oldest subjects tested. There was a significant relationship between age and tissue stiffness homogeneity. More research is needed to determine whether the changes seen here are reflective of increased tissue cross-linking or related to reduced muscle quality. However, MRE shows promise as a tool to study aging-related muscle stiffness changes or to evaluate treatments to counteract these changes.

  10. Peeling off an adhesive layer with spatially varying topography and shear modulus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghatak, Animangsu

    2014-03-01

    Inspired by recent experiments on hierarchically structured adhesives, we analyze here the effect of spatial variation in surface topography and shear modulus of an elastomeric adhesive on its ability to adhere strongly to a flexible contactor. The undulation of surface and modulus both were assumed to be periodic with periodicity, which is either identical or different for the two parameters; for identical periodicity, the phase lag between the respective undulations is also systematically varied. Calculations show that during continuous lifting of the flexible contactor from complete initial contact, the interfacial crack between the two adherents does not propagate continuously but intermittently, with crack arrest and initiation at the vicinity of minimum thickness and modulus of the layer; the torque required to initiate an arrested crack increases significantly over that required to propagate it on a smooth adhesive surface. The adhesion strength estimated from the corresponding force vs displacement plot is calculated to be higher than that achieved on a smooth and featureless adhesive surface. For in-phase variation in topography and shear modulus of the layer, the adhesive strength is found to be higher than for nonzero phase lag between the two parameters. The adhesion strength is found to diminish also for nonidentical periodicity between modulus and surface undulation. We have derived a scaling law for relating adhesion strength to several of these parameters.

  11. Peeling off an adhesive layer with spatially varying topography and shear modulus.

    PubMed

    Ghatak, Animangsu

    2014-03-01

    Inspired by recent experiments on hierarchically structured adhesives, we analyze here the effect of spatial variation in surface topography and shear modulus of an elastomeric adhesive on its ability to adhere strongly to a flexible contactor. The undulation of surface and modulus both were assumed to be periodic with periodicity, which is either identical or different for the two parameters; for identical periodicity, the phase lag between the respective undulations is also systematically varied. Calculations show that during continuous lifting of the flexible contactor from complete initial contact, the interfacial crack between the two adherents does not propagate continuously but intermittently, with crack arrest and initiation at the vicinity of minimum thickness and modulus of the layer; the torque required to initiate an arrested crack increases significantly over that required to propagate it on a smooth adhesive surface. The adhesion strength estimated from the corresponding force vs displacement plot is calculated to be higher than that achieved on a smooth and featureless adhesive surface. For in-phase variation in topography and shear modulus of the layer, the adhesive strength is found to be higher than for nonzero phase lag between the two parameters. The adhesion strength is found to diminish also for nonidentical periodicity between modulus and surface undulation. We have derived a scaling law for relating adhesion strength to several of these parameters. PMID:24730852

  12. A Six-Week Resistance Training Program Does Not Change Shear Modulus of the Triceps Brachii.

    PubMed

    Akagi, Ryota; Shikiba, Tomofumi; Tanaka, Jun; Takahashi, Hideyuki

    2016-08-01

    We investigated the effect of a 6-week resistance training program on the shear modulus of the triceps brachii (TB). Twenty-three young men were randomly assigned to either the training (n = 13) or control group (n = 10). Before and after conducting the resistance training program, the shear modulus of the long head of the TB was measured at the point 70% along the length of the upper arm from the acromial process of the scapula to the lateral epicondyle of the humerus using shear wave ultrasound elastography. Muscle thickness of the long head of the TB was also determined at the same site by ultrasonography used during both tests. A resistance exercise was performed 3 days a week for 6 weeks using a dumbbell mass-adjusted to 80% of the 1-repetition maximum (1RM). The training effect on the muscle thickness and 1RM was significant. Nevertheless, the muscle shear modulus was not significantly changed after the training program. From the perspective of muscle mechanical properties, the present results indicate that significant adaptation must occur to make the TB more resistant to subsequent damaging bouts during the 6-week training program to target the TB.

  13. The shear modulus of the neutron star crust and nonradial oscillations of neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strohmayer, T.; Van Horn, H. M.; Ogata, S.; Iyetomi, H.; Ichimaru, S.

    1991-01-01

    Shear moduli are calculated for bcc crystalline and rapidly quenched Coulomb solids produced by the Monte Carlo simulation method. The shear moduli are calculated up to the transition temperature and include the effects of thermal fluctuations. An effective shear modulus appropriate to an approximate 'isotropic' body is introduced. It is found that the values of the 'average shear modulus' for the quenched solids remain about the same as those for the corresponding bcc crystals, although the individual shear moduli of the former, disordered solids deviate considerably from the cubic symmetry of the latter. These results are applied to analyses of neutron star oscillations. It is found that the periods of the two interfacial modes are increased by about 10 percent compared to previous results, and that s-mode periods are increased by about 30 percent. The periods of the f and p modes are hardly affected at all. The surface g-mode periods are not greatly affected, while the t-mode periods are increased by 20-25 percent.

  14. The effects of interstitial tissue pressure on the measured shear modulus in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, John B.; Perrinez, P. R.; Bergeron, J. A.; Kennedy, F. E.; Wang, H.; Lollis, S. Scott; Doyley, M. M.; Hoopes, P. J.; Paulsen, K. D.

    2007-03-01

    It is well known that many pathologic processes, like cancer, result in increased tissue stiffness but the biologic mechanisms which cause pathologies to be stiffer than normal tissues are largely unknown. Increased collagen density has been presumed to be largely responsible because it has been shown to cause variations in normal tissue stiffness. However, other effects such as increased tissue pressure are also thought to be significant. We examined the effects of tissue pressure on shear modulus measured using MR elastography (MRE) by comparing the shear modulus in the pre-mortem, edematous and post-mortem porcine brain and found that the measured shear modulus increases with tissue pressure as expected. The slope of a linear fit to this preliminary data varied from 0.3 kPa/mmHg to 0.1 kPa/mmHg. These results represent the first in vivo demonstration of tissue pressure affecting intrinsic mechanical properties and have several implications. First, if the linear relationship described is correct, tissue pressure could contribute significantly (~20%) to the increase in stiffness observed in cancer. Second, tissue pressure effects must be considered when in vitro mechanical properties are extrapolated to in vivo settings. Moreover, MRE might provide a means to characterize pathologic conditions associated with increased or decreased tissue pressure, such as edema and ischemia, in a diverse set of diseases including cancer, diabetes, stroke, and transplant rejection.

  15. Pore Fluid Effects on Shear Modulus in a Model of Heterogeneous Rocks, Reservoirs, and Granular Media

    SciTech Connect

    Berryman, J G

    2005-03-23

    To provide quantitative measures of the importance of fluid effects on shear waves in heterogeneous reservoirs, a model material called a ''random polycrystal of porous laminates'' is introduced. This model poroelastic material has constituent grains that are layered (or laminated), and each layer is an isotropic, microhomogeneous porous medium. All grains are composed of exactly the same porous constituents, and have the same relative volume fractions. The order of lamination is not important because the up-scaling method used to determine the transversely isotropic (hexagonal) properties of the grains is Backus averaging, which--for quasi-static or long-wavelength behavior--depends only on the volume fractions and layer properties. Grains are then jumbled together totally at random, filling all space, and producing an overall isotropic poroelastic medium. The poroelastic behavior of this medium is then analyzed using the Peselnick-Meister-Watt bounds (of Hashin-Shtrikman type). We study the dependence of the shear modulus on pore fluid properties and determine the range of behavior to be expected. In particular we compare and contrast these results to those anticipated from Gassmann's fluid substitution formulas, and to the predictions of Mavko and Jizba for very low porosity rocks with flat cracks. This approach also permits the study of arbitrary numbers of constituents, but for simplicity the numerical examples are restricted here to just two constituents. This restriction also permits the use of some special exact results available for computing the overall effective stress coefficient in any two-component porous medium. The bounds making use of polycrystalline microstructure are very tight. Results for the shear modulus demonstrate that the ratio of compliance differences R (i.e., shear compliance changes over bulk compliance changes when going from drained to undrained behavior, or vice versa) is usually nonzero and can take a wide range of values, both

  16. Possible contribution of low shear modulus C₄₄ to the low Young’s modulus of Ti-36Nb-5Zr alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, Qingkun; Guo, Shun; Ren, Xiaobing; Xu, Huibin; Zhao, Xinqing

    2014-09-29

    Despite the importance of single-crystal elastic constants of β-phase titanium alloys in understanding their low Young's modulus—a property crucial for many applications, such data are often difficult to obtain when the alloy composition is close to the instability limit of the β phase, where the presence of α" martensite precludes the fabrication of β-phase single crystal. In the present study, we extracted the single-crystal elastic constants of such a β-phase titanium alloy with low Young's modulus, Ti-36Nb-5Zr (wt. %), from polycrystalline specimens by using an in-situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction technique. It is indicated that the low Young's modulus of the alloy originates from the anomalously low shear modulus C₄₄ as well as the low shear modulus C', which is different from a common viewpoint that the Young's modulus of β-phase titanium alloys is dominantly controlled by the C'. This suggests that low C₄₄ is an important contributor to low Young's modulus for instable β-phase titanium alloys.

  17. Possible contribution of low shear modulus C{sub 44} to the low Young's modulus of Ti-36Nb-5Zr alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, Qingkun; Xu, Huibin; Zhao, Xinqing; Guo, Shun; Ren, Xiaobing

    2014-09-29

    Despite the importance of single-crystal elastic constants of β-phase titanium alloys in understanding their low Young's modulus—a property crucial for many applications, such data are often difficult to obtain when the alloy composition is close to the instability limit of the β phase, where the presence of α' martensite precludes the fabrication of β-phase single crystal. In the present study, we extracted the single-crystal elastic constants of such a β-phase titanium alloy with low Young's modulus, Ti-36Nb-5Zr (wt. %), from polycrystalline specimens by using an in-situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction technique. It is indicated that the low Young's modulus of the alloy originates from the anomalously low shear modulus C{sub 44} as well as the low shear modulus C′, which is different from a common viewpoint that the Young's modulus of β-phase titanium alloys is dominantly controlled by the C′. This suggests that low C{sub 44} is an important contributor to low Young's modulus for instable β-phase titanium alloys.

  18. Calculating tissue shear modulus and pressure by 2D Log-Elastographic methods

    PubMed Central

    McLaughlin, Joyce R; Zhang, Ning; Manduca, Armando

    2010-01-01

    Shear modulus imaging, often called elastography, enables detection and characterization of tissue abnormalities. In this paper the data is two displacement components obtained from successive MR or ultrasound data sets acquired while the tissue is excited mechanically. A 2D plane strain elastic model is assumed to govern the 2D displacement, u. The shear modulus, μ, is unknown and whether or not the first Lamé parameter, λ, is known the pressure p = λ∇ · u which is present in the plane strain model cannot be measured and is unreliably computed from measured data and can be shown to be an order one quantity in the units kPa. So here we present a 2D Log-Elastographic inverse algorithm that: (1) simultaneously reconstructs the shear modulus, μ, and p, which together satisfy a first order partial differential equation system, with the goal of imaging μ; (2) controls potential exponential growth in the numerical error; and (3) reliably reconstructs the quantity p in the inverse algorithm as compared to the same quantity computed with a forward algorithm. This work generalizes the Log-Elastographic algorithm in [20] which uses one displacement component, is derived assuming the component satisfies the wave equation, and is tested on synthetic data computed with the wave equation model. The 2D Log-Elastographic algorithm is tested on 2D synthetic data and 2D in-vivo data from Mayo Clinic. We also exhibit examples to show that the 2D Log-Elastographic algorithm improves the quality of the recovered images as compared to the Log-Elastographic and Direct Inversion algorithms. PMID:21822349

  19. Lateral Earth Pressure at Rest and Shear Modulus Measurements on Hanford Sludge Simulants

    SciTech Connect

    Wells, Beric E.; Jenks, Jeromy WJ; Boeringa, Gregory K.; Bauman, Nathan N.; Guzman, Anthony D.; Arduino, P.; Keller, P. J.

    2010-09-30

    This report describes the equipment, techniques, and results of lateral earth pressure at rest and shear modulus measurements on kaolin clay as well as two chemical sludge simulants. The testing was performed in support of the problem of hydrogen gas retention and release encountered in the double- shell tanks (DSTs) at the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. Wastes from single-shell tanks (SSTs) are being transferred to double-shell tanks (DSTs) for safety reasons (some SSTs are leaking or are in danger of leaking), but the available DST space is limited.

  20. Effects of fabric anisotropy on elastic shear modulus of granular soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bo; Zeng, Xiangwu

    2014-06-01

    The fabric anisotropy of a granular soil deposit can strongly influence its engineering properties and behavior. This paper presents the results of a novel experimental study designed to examine the effects of fabric anisotropy on smallstrain stiffness and its evolution with loading on the elastic shear modulus of granular materials under a K 0 condition. Two primary categories of fabric anisotropy, i.e., deposition-induced and particle shape-induced, are investigated. Toyoura sand deposits with relative densities of 40% and 80% were prepared using deposition angles oriented at 0° and 90°. Piezoelectric transducers were used to obtain the elastic shear modulus in the vertical and horizontal directions ( G vh and G hh). The measurements indicate distinct differences in the values of G with respect to the different deposition angles. Particle shapeinduced fabric anisotropy was examined using four selected sands. It was concluded that sphericity is a controlling factor dominating the small-strain stiffness of granular materials. The degree of fabric anisotropy proves to be a good indicatorin the characterization of stress-induced fabric evolution during loading and unloading stress cycles. The experimental data were used to calibrate an existing micromechanical model, which was able to represent the behavior of the granular material and the degree of fabric anisotropy reasonably well.

  1. Feasibility of shear modulus imaging technique for monitoring the effectiveness of the interstitial rf electromagnetic wave thermal therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumi, Chikayoshi; Takegahara, Shinichi; Kanai, Hiroshi

    2001-06-01

    It is well known that the static mechanical properties of living soft tissues reversibly or irreversibly change by the degree of the thermal energy exposure, several researchers including us applied various ultrasonic elasticity imaging techniques to visualize variously energy-induced thermal tissues. Particularly, in this report we proposed that our previously developed ultrasonic strain measurement-based shear modulus imaging technique is used for monitoring the effectiveness of the interstitial RF electromagnetic wave thermal treatment. Since previously through in vivo experiment on human breast tissues we could confirm that the technique has high potential as the practical tool for differentiating early stage malignancies, we in novel realized the thermal applicator using only needle-type electrodes. Since we would also apply this therapy to deeply situated tissues, we also confirmed on in vivo human liver that shear modulus image could be stably obtained. Furthermore, to verify the feasibility as the monitoring technique we performed heating/imaging on the fresh in vitro calf liver. This imaging could specify the spatial and temporal change of elasticity due to tissue heating and cooling down. We believe that this monitoring technique will allow this type interstitial RF electromagnetic wave thermal therapy to be widely performed on various tissues. Moreover, low-invasively obtained insights about tissue thermal properties will significantly contribute to heightening the treatment efficiencies of various type thermal therapy systems.

  2. The effect of treatments on the shear modulus of human hair measured by the single fiber torsion pendulum.

    PubMed

    Harper, D L; Kamath, Y K

    2007-01-01

    Previous studies with the single fiber torsion pendulum have alluded to the ability of this device to selectively measure different regions of a fiber, namely, the core and the sheath. This selective ability of the torsion pendulum was explored further as a means of better understanding treatments effects. First, a substantial reduction in shear modulus was caused by simply abrading the hair fiber surface to remove the cuticle layer. In another experiment, bleaching was found to have a softening effect on the cuticle layer since the shear modulus was reduced significantly. Next, the fibers were subsequently treated with either Polyquaternium-10 or cetyl trimethylammonium bromide (CETAB) and measured again. The CETAB treatment resulted in an increase in the shear modulus indicating fortification of the cuticle layer. Polyquaternium-10 treatment increased the shear modulus slightly. These different effects are explained by the molecular sizes of these compounds-CETAB is a small molecule which can penetrate into the cuticle layer while Polyquaternium-10 is too large to do so. Lastly, the effect of moisture was evaluated by varying the humidity inside a chamber surrounding the sample mounted in the torsion pendulum. This showed a substantial inverse relationship between humidity level and shear modulus that was much more pronounced for bleached hair fibers than for untreated.

  3. The effect of treatments on the shear modulus of human hair measured by the single fiber torsion pendulum.

    PubMed

    Harper, D L; Kamath, Y K

    2007-01-01

    Previous studies with the single fiber torsion pendulum have alluded to the ability of this device to selectively measure different regions of a fiber, namely, the core and the sheath. This selective ability of the torsion pendulum was explored further as a means of better understanding treatments effects. First, a substantial reduction in shear modulus was caused by simply abrading the hair fiber surface to remove the cuticle layer. In another experiment, bleaching was found to have a softening effect on the cuticle layer since the shear modulus was reduced significantly. Next, the fibers were subsequently treated with either Polyquaternium-10 or cetyl trimethylammonium bromide (CETAB) and measured again. The CETAB treatment resulted in an increase in the shear modulus indicating fortification of the cuticle layer. Polyquaternium-10 treatment increased the shear modulus slightly. These different effects are explained by the molecular sizes of these compounds-CETAB is a small molecule which can penetrate into the cuticle layer while Polyquaternium-10 is too large to do so. Lastly, the effect of moisture was evaluated by varying the humidity inside a chamber surrounding the sample mounted in the torsion pendulum. This showed a substantial inverse relationship between humidity level and shear modulus that was much more pronounced for bleached hair fibers than for untreated. PMID:17728933

  4. Method and apparatus for measuring shear modulus and viscosity of a monomolecular film

    DOEpatents

    Abraham, B.M.; Miyano, K.; Ketterson, J.B.

    1983-10-18

    Apparatus for measuring the shear modulus of a monomolecular film comprises a circular trough having inwardly sloping sides containing a liquid for supporting the monolayer on the surface thereof; a circular rotor suspended above the trough such that the lower surface of the rotor contacts the surface of the liquid, positioned such that the axis of the rotor is concentric with the axis of the trough and freely rotable about its axis; means for hydrostatically compressing the monolayer in the annular region formed between the rotor and the sides of the trough; and means for rotating the trough about its axis. Preferably, hydrostatic compression of the monolayer is achieved by removing liquid from the bottom of the trough (decreasing the surface area) while raising the trough vertically along its axis to maintain the monolayer at a constant elevation (and maintain rotor contact). In order to measure viscosity, a means for rotating the rotor about its axis is added to the apparatus.

  5. Method and apparatus for measuring shear modulus and viscosity of a monomolecular film

    DOEpatents

    Abraham, Bernard M.; Miyano, Kenjiro; Ketterson, John B.

    1985-01-01

    Instrument for measuring the shear modulus of a monomolecular film comprises a circular trough having inwardly sloping sides containing a liquid for supporting the monolayer on the surface thereof; a circular rotor suspended above the trough such that the lower surface of the rotor contacts the surface of the liquid, positioned such that the axis of the rotor is concentric with the axis of the trough and freely rotable about its axis; apparatus for hydrostatically compressing the monolayer in the annular region formed between the rotor and the sides of the trough; and apparatus for rotating the trough about its axis. Preferably, hydrostatic compression of the monolayer is achieved by removing liquid from the bottom of the trough (decreasing the surface area) while raising the trough vertically along its axis to maintain the monolayer at a constant elevation (and maintain rotor contact). In order to measure viscosity, a apparatus for rotating the rotor about its axis is added to the apparatus.

  6. Reconstruction of the shear modulus of viscoelastic systems in a thin cylinder: an inversion scheme and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eom, Junyong; Kang, Hyeonbae; Nakamura, Gen; Wang, Yun-Che

    2016-09-01

    We consider a problem of reconstructing the shear modulus of an viscoelastic system in a thin cylinder from the measurements of displacements induced by torques applied at the bottom of the cylinder. The viscoelastic system is a mathematical model of a pendulum-type viscoelastic spectrometer (PVS). We first compute in an explicit form the solution of the viscoelastic system, and then derive with an error estimate the leading order term of the average of the solution. This leading order term yields a nonlinear inversion scheme to determine the shear modulus from the measurements of displacements. We apply the inversion scheme to determine the shear modulus using experimental data acquired from a PVS system.

  7. Shear modulus and thermal properties of gutta percha for root canal filling.

    PubMed

    Tsukada, G; Tanaka, T; Torii, M; Inoue, K

    2004-11-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to investigate the rheological properties of four commercially available gutta perchas for root canal filling. The relaxation modulus [Gr(0): instantaneous shear modulus] and specific volume of their materials were examined. In addition, the quantity of heat was also studied by differential scanning calorimeter. In a lower temperature range than the first-order transition temperature (melting point), the Gr(0) values of each material were almost identical. A marked decrease of Gr(0) was observed at the melting point, and the range of the first-order transition temperature at heating was from 42.0 to 60.0 degrees C. At higher temperatures than the first-order transition temperature of each material, a considerable difference in Gr(0) values was observed. The transition temperatures obtained by the results of the Gr(0), specific volume and quantity of heat agreed with one another. A marked specific volume change was observed at the first-order transition temperature. The technique using melted gutta percha may not be favourable compared with the conventional lateral condensation technique because melted gutta percha undergoes a large amount of shrinkage during setting. PMID:15525394

  8. Determining an Effective Shear Modulus in Tubular Organs for Fluid-Structure Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chisena, Robert; Brasseur, James; Costanzo, Francesco; Gregersen, Hans; Zhao, Jingbo

    2014-11-01

    Fluid-structure interaction (FSI) is central to the mechanics of fluid-filled tubular organs such as the intestine and esophagus. The motions of fluid chyme are driven by a muscularis wall layer of circular and longitudinal muscle fibers. The coupled motions of the fluid and elastic solid phases result from a local balance between active and passive muscle stress components, fluid pressure, and fluid viscous stresses. Model predictions depend on the passive elastic response of the muscularis layer, which is typically parameterized with an average isotropic elastic modulus (EM), currently measured in vivo and in vitro with estimates for total hoop stress within a distension experiment. We have shown that this approach contains serious error due to the overwhelming influence of incompressibility on the hydrostatic component. We present a new approach in which an effective shear modulus, containing only deviatoric contributions, is measured to overcome this serious error. Using in vitro measurements from pig intestines, we compare our new approach to the current method, showing vastly different predictions. We will also report on our current analysis which aims to determine the influence of residual stress on the EM measurements and comment on it use in FSI simulations.

  9. The effect of three-dimensional postural change on shear elastic modulus of the iliotibial band.

    PubMed

    Tateuchi, Hiroshige; Shiratori, Sakiko; Ichihashi, Noriaki

    2016-06-01

    To understand and treat iliotibial band (ITB) syndrome, caused by excessive compression between the ITB and lateral femoral condyle, it is important to identify factors contributing to an increase in ITB stiffness. The purpose of this study was to clarify the factors that contribute to an increase in ITB stiffness by examining the relationship between three-dimensional postural changes and ITB stiffness. Fourteen healthy individuals performed one-leg standing under 7 conditions (including normal one-leg standing as a control condition) in which the pelvic position was changed in three planes. The shear elastic modulus in the ITB was measured using shear-wave elastography, as a measure of ITB stiffness. The three-dimensional joint angles and external joint moments in the hip and knee joints were also measured to confirm the changes in joint angles and external load. Compared to the normal one-leg standing condition, ITB stiffness was significantly increased in the pelvic posterior tilted position (i.e. hip extension), contralateral pelvic dropped position (i.e. hip adduction), and contralateral pelvic posterior rotated position (i.e. hip external rotation). The findings suggest that interventions to reduce hip extension, adduction, and external rotation might be useful if these excessive positional changes are detected in patients with ITB syndrome.

  10. The effect of three-dimensional postural change on shear elastic modulus of the iliotibial band.

    PubMed

    Tateuchi, Hiroshige; Shiratori, Sakiko; Ichihashi, Noriaki

    2016-06-01

    To understand and treat iliotibial band (ITB) syndrome, caused by excessive compression between the ITB and lateral femoral condyle, it is important to identify factors contributing to an increase in ITB stiffness. The purpose of this study was to clarify the factors that contribute to an increase in ITB stiffness by examining the relationship between three-dimensional postural changes and ITB stiffness. Fourteen healthy individuals performed one-leg standing under 7 conditions (including normal one-leg standing as a control condition) in which the pelvic position was changed in three planes. The shear elastic modulus in the ITB was measured using shear-wave elastography, as a measure of ITB stiffness. The three-dimensional joint angles and external joint moments in the hip and knee joints were also measured to confirm the changes in joint angles and external load. Compared to the normal one-leg standing condition, ITB stiffness was significantly increased in the pelvic posterior tilted position (i.e. hip extension), contralateral pelvic dropped position (i.e. hip adduction), and contralateral pelvic posterior rotated position (i.e. hip external rotation). The findings suggest that interventions to reduce hip extension, adduction, and external rotation might be useful if these excessive positional changes are detected in patients with ITB syndrome. PMID:27151824

  11. MR elastographic methods for the evaluation of plantar fat pads: preliminary comparison of the shear modulus for shearing deformation and compressive deformation in normal subjects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, John B.; Miller, Timothy B.; Perrinez, Philip R.; Doyley, Marvin M.; Wang, Huifang; Cheung, Yvonne Y.; Wrobel, James S.; Comi, Richard J.; Kennedy, Francis E.; Paulsen, Keith D.

    2006-03-01

    MR elastography (MRE) images the intrinsic mechanical properties of soft tissues; e.g., the shear modulus, μ. The μ of the plantar soft tissues is important in understanding the mechanisms whereby the forces induced during normal motion produce ulcers that lead to amputation in diabetic feet. We compared the compliance of the heel fat pad to compressive forces and to shearing forces. The design of prosthetics to protect the foot depends on the proper understanding of the mechanisms inducing damage. In the heel fat pads of six normal subjects, between 25 and 65 years of age, the μ for deformation perpendicular to the direction of weight bearing is similar but not identical to that determined for deformation along the weight bearing axis. The average difference between μ along the weight bearing axis and μ perpendicular to the weight bearing axis, is well correlated with age (Correlation Coefficient = 0.789). The p-value for the data being random was 0.0347 indicating that the observed difference is not likely to be random. The p-value for control points is 0.8989, indicating a random process. The results are suggestive that the high compressive forces imposed during walking damage the heel fat pads over time resulting in softening to compression preferentially over shearing. It is important to validate the observed effect with larger numbers of subjects, and better controls including measures of activity, and to understand if diseases like diabetes increase the observed damage.

  12. Study to determine and analyze the strength of high modulus glass in epoxy-matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bacon, J. F.

    1974-01-01

    Glass composition research was conducted to produce a high modulus, high strength beryllium-free glass fiber. This program was built on the previous research for developing high modulus, high strength glass fibers which had a 5 weight percent beryllia content. The fibers resulting from the composition program were then used to produce fiber reinforced-epoxy resin composites which were compared with composites reinforced by commercial high modulus glass fibers, Thornel S graphite fiber, and hybrids where the external quarters were reinforced with Thornel S graphite fiber and the interior half with glass fiber as well as the reverse hybrid. The composites were given tensile strength, compressive strength, short-beam shear strength, creep and fatigue tests. Comments are included on the significance of the test data.

  13. Consideration of shear modulus in biomechanical analysis of peri-implant jaw bone: accuracy verification using image-based multi-scale simulation.

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, Satoru; Naito, Hiroyoshi; Tamatsu, Yuichi; Takano, Naoki; Abe, Shinichi; Ide, Yoshinobu

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to clarify the influence of shear modulus on the analytical accuracy in peri-implant jaw bone simulation. A 3D finite element (FE) model was prepared based on micro-CT data obtained from images of a jawbone containing implants. A precise model that closely reproduced the trabecular architecture, and equivalent models that gave shear modulus values taking the trabecular architecture into account, were prepared. Displacement norms during loading were calculated, and the displacement error was evaluated. The model that gave shear modulus values taking the trabecular architecture into account showed an analytical error of around 10-20% in the cancellous bone region, while in the model that used incorrect shear modulus, the analytical error exceeded 40% in certain regions. The shear modulus should be evaluated precisely in addition to the Young modulus when considering the mechanics of peri-implant trabecular bone structure.

  14. Ultra-high modulus organic fiber hybrid composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Champion, A. R.

    1981-01-01

    An experimental organic fiber, designated Fiber D, was characterized, and its performance as a reinforcement for composites was investigated. The fiber has a modulus of 172 GPa, tensile strength of 3.14 GPa, and density of 1.46 gm/cu cm. Unidirectional Fiber D/epoxy laminates containing 60 percent fiber by volume were evaluated in flexure, shear, and compression, at room temperature and 121 C in both the as fabricated condition and after humidity aging for 14 days at 95 percent RH and 82 C. A modulus of 94.1 GPa, flexure strength of 700 MPa, shear strength of 54 MPa, and compressive strength of 232 MPa were observed at room temperature. The as-fabricated composites at elevated temperature and humidity aged material at room temperature had properties 1 to 20 percent below these values. Combined humidity aging plus evaluated temperature testing resulted in even lower mechanical properties. Hybrid composite laminates of Fiber D with Fiber FP alumina or Thornel 300 graphite fiber were also evaluated and significant increases in modulus, flexure, and compressive strengths were observed.

  15. Shear modulus and attenuation Qs of olivine from forced-oscillation measurements under mantle conditions and seismic frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrillat, J. P.; Le Godec, Y.; Philippe, J.; Bergame, F.; Chambat, F.; Mezouar, N.; Tauzin, B.

    2015-12-01

    Interpretation of seismic profiles and tomographic models of the Earth's mantle requires exploring the viscoelastic behaviour of rocks / minerals at low strains and seismic frequencies. These physical properties can be investigated by cyclic loading experiments that measure the dynamic response of materials to an applied stress. To date, these data were only accessible by torsional forced-oscillation tests performed in gas vessel apparatus and limited to ~ 0.3 GPa. Here, we demonstrate the feasibility of forced-oscillations tests up to the Earth's upper mantle conditions thanks to the development of a torsion module in the Paris-Edinburgh press and the use of X-ray radiation. The experimental device is based on the frame of a V7 Paris-Edinburgh press where both of the two opposed anvils can rotate through two sets of gear reducer and thrust bearings located at the end of each anvil. The accurate rotation of the anvils is monitored by stepper motors and encoders, and enables to apply a low-frequency sinusoidal torque on the cell assembly. The sample and an elastic standard of known modulus and negligible dissipation are loaded in series in a boron-epoxy gasket. The measurement of the relative amplitudes and phases of the torsional mode displacements in standard and sample provides for the determination of the shear modulus and of the strain energy dissipation for the sample. The main challenge in applying the forced-oscillation method at high pressure is the need of a technique for measuring stress and strain with sufficient precision, and with sufficiently short measurement time, while the sample is embedded in the high-pressure vessel. These technical difficulties can be overcome through the use of synchrotron radiation. The strain of the sample is measured in situ and in real-time through X-ray radiography, while the stress is estimated from the strain of the elastic standard (a corundum sample in our case). Hence, coupling the new RoToPEc device with synchrotron

  16. Non-toxic invert analog glass compositions of high modulus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bacon, J. F. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    Glass compositions having a Young's modulus of at least 15 million psi are described. They and a specific modulus of at least 110 million inches consist essentially of, in mols, 15 to 40% SiO2, 6 to 15% Li2O, 24 to 45% of at least two bivalent oxides selected from the group consisting of Ca, NzO, MgO and CuO; 13 to 39% of at least two trivalent oxides selected from the group consisting of Al2O3, Fe2O3, B2O3, La2O3, and Y2O3 and up to 15% of one or more tetravelent oxides selected from the group consisting of ZrO2, TiO2 and CeO2. The high modulus, low density glass compositions contain no toxic elements. The composition, glass density, Young's modulus, and specific modulus for 28 representative glasses are presented. The fiber modulus of five glasses are given.

  17. A Methodology for the Indirect Determination and Spatial Resolution of Shear Modulus of PDMS-Silica Elastomers

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, B; Reimer, J; Maxwell, R

    2007-08-29

    A methodology is described that allows for the spatial resolution of shear modulus in silica-filled PDMS elastomers via {sup 1}H relaxation measurements and stray-field imaging (STRAFI) techniques. Traditional Hahn echoes provide a simple, robust route to the extraction of a proton residual dipolar coupling constant (RDC), a direct measure of chain mobility and a parameter that can be corollated to numerous mechanical properties. Defining a dimensionless RDC eliminates any artifacts associated with low-field measurement and allows the RDC to become independent of field strength. A direct correlation between the NMR determined dimensionless RDC and results from dynamic mechanical analysis is presented, then employed via STRAFI to determine spatial variations in moduli associated with irradiated elastomeric materials. Reliable performance, despite poorly optimized STRAFI conditions, is demonstrated with an error of no more than 22% between the calculated shear modulus and the measured value via DMA.

  18. High elastic modulus nanopowder reinforced resin composites for dental applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yijun

    2007-12-01

    Dental restorations account for more than $3 billion dollars a year on the market. Among them, all-ceramic dental crowns draw more and more attention and their popularity has risen because of their superior aesthetics and biocompatibility. However, their relatively high failure rate and labor-intensive fabrication procedure still limit their application. In this thesis, a new family of high elastic modulus nanopowder reinforced resin composites and their mechanical properties are studied. Materials with higher elastic modulus, such as alumina and diamond, are used to replace the routine filler material, silica, in dental resin composites to achieve the desired properties. This class of composites is developed to serve (1) as a high stiffness support to all-ceramic crowns and (2) as a means of joining independently fabricated crown core and veneer layers. Most of the work focuses on nano-sized Al2O3 (average particle size 47 nm) reinforcement in a polymeric matrix with 50:50 Bisphenol A glycidyl methacrylate (Bis-GMA): triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) monomers. Surfactants, silanizing agents and primers are examined to obtain higher filler levels and enhance the bonding between filler and matrix. Silane agents work best. The elastic modulus of a 57.5 vol% alumina/resin composite is 31.5 GPa compared to current commercial resin composites with elastic modulus <15 GPa. Chemical additives can also effectively raise the hardness to as much as 1.34 GPa. Besides>alumina, diamond/resin composites are studied. An elastic modulus of about 45 GPa is obtained for a 57 vol% diamond/resin composite. Our results indicate that with a generally monodispersed nano-sized high modulus filler, relatively high elastic modulus resin-based composite cements are possible. Time-dependent behavior of our resin composites is also investigated. This is valuable for understanding the behavior of our material and possible fatigue testing in the future. Our results indicate that with

  19. Shear elastic modulus can be used to estimate an index of individual muscle force during a submaximal isometric fatiguing contraction.

    PubMed

    Bouillard, Killian; Hug, François; Guével, Arnaud; Nordez, Antoine

    2012-11-01

    The present study was designed to determine whether fatigue alters the ability to estimate an index of individual muscle force from shear elastic modulus measurements (experiment I), and to test the ability of this technique to highlight changes in load sharing within a redundant muscle group during an isometric fatiguing task (experiment II). Twelve subjects participated in experiment I, which consisted of smooth linear torque ramps from 0 to 80% of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) performed before and after an isometric fatigue protocol, beginning at 40% of MVC and stopped when the force production dropped below 30% of MVC. Although the relationships between modulus and torque were very similar for pre- and postfatigue [root mean square deviation (RMS(deviation)) = 3.7 ± 2.6% of MVC], the relationships between electromyography activity level and torque were greatly altered by fatigue (RMS(deviation) = 10.3 ± 2.6% of MVC). During the fatiguing contraction, shear elastic modulus provided a significantly lower RMS(deviation) between measured torque and estimated torque than electromyography activity level (5.7 ± 0.9 vs. 15.3 ± 3.8% of MVC). Experiment II performed with eight participants consisted of an isometric knee extension at 25% of MVC sustained until exhaustion. Opposite changes in shear elastic modulus were observed between synergists (vastus medialis, vastus lateralis, and rectus femoris) of some participants, reflecting changes in load sharing. In conclusion, despite the fact that we did not directly estimate muscle force (in Newtons), this is the first demonstration of an experimental technique to accurately quantify relative changes in force in an individual human muscle during a fatiguing contraction.

  20. Ancestrally high elastic modulus of gecko setal beta-keratin.

    PubMed

    Peattie, Anne M; Majidi, Carmel; Corder, Andrew; Full, Robert J

    2007-12-22

    Typical bulk adhesives are characterized by soft, tacky materials with elastic moduli well below 1MPa. Geckos possess subdigital adhesives composed mostly of beta-keratin, a relatively stiff material. Biological adhesives like those of geckos have inspired empirical and modelling research which predicts that even stiff materials can be effective adhesives if they take on a fibrillar form. The molecular structure of beta-keratin is highly conserved across birds and reptiles, suggesting that material properties of gecko setae should be similar to that of beta-keratin previously measured in birds, but this has yet to be established. We used a resonance technique to measure elastic bending modulus in two species of gecko from disparate habitats. We found no significant difference in elastic modulus between Gekko gecko (1.6 GPa +/- 0.15s.e.; n=24 setae) and Ptyodactylus hasselquistii (1.4 GPa +/- 0.15s.e.; n=24 setae). If the elastic modulus of setal keratin is conserved across species, it would suggest a design constraint that must be compensated for structurally, and possibly explain the remarkable variation in gecko adhesive morphology.

  1. Mechanical Components from Highly Recoverable, Low Apparent Modulus Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padula, Santo, II (Inventor); Noebe, Ronald D. (Inventor); Stanford, Malcolm K. (Inventor); DellaCorte, Christopher (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A material for use as a mechanical component is formed of a superelastic intermetallic material having a low apparent modulus and a high hardness. The superelastic intermetallic material is conditioned to be dimensionally stable, devoid of any shape memory effect and have a stable superelastic response without irrecoverable deformation while exhibiting strains of at least 3%. The method of conditioning the superelastic intermetallic material is described. Another embodiment relates to lightweight materials known as ordered intermetallics that perform well in sliding wear applications using conventional liquid lubricants and are therefore suitable for resilient, high performance mechanical components such as gears and bearings.

  2. Acoustical Registration of Shear Modulus Variation under HIFU in Soft Tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konopatskaya, I. I.; Mironov, M. A.; Pyatakov, P. A.

    2006-05-01

    New method for noncontact measurements of shear elasticity and viscosity variations of soft materials with microstructure is proposed in the report. This method based on the analysis of amplitude-frequency response of a specially designed active tuning fork. A simple theoretical model is developed. Experimental researches were carried out on samples of biological tissues (bovine heart and liver) in vitro. The results demonstrate sensitive of the method to shear elasticity and viscosity changes, which arise in soft tissues under influence of ultrasound.

  3. Pore Fluid Effects on Shear Modulus for Sandstones with Soft Anisotropy

    SciTech Connect

    Berryman, J G

    2004-04-15

    A general analysis of poroelasticity for vertical transverse isotropy (VTI) shows that four eigenvectors are pure shear modes with no coupling to the pore-fluidmechanics. The remaining two eigenvectors are linear combinations of pure compression and uniaxial shear, both of which are coupled to the fluid mechanics. After reducing the problem to a 2x2 system, the analysis shows in a relatively elementary fashion how a poroelastic system with isotropic solid elastic frame, but with anisotropy introduced through the poroelastic coefficients, interacts with the mechanics of the pore fluid and produces shear dependence on fluid properties in the overall mechanical system. The analysis shows, for example, that this effect is always present (though sometimes small in magnitude) in the systems studied, and can be quite large (up to a definite maximum increase of 20 per cent) in some rocks--including Spirit River sandstone and Schuler-Cotton Valley sandstone.

  4. Analysis of the variation in the determination of the shear modulus of the erythrocyte membrane: Effects of the constitutive law and membrane modeling.

    PubMed

    Dimitrakopoulos, P

    2012-04-01

    Despite research spanning several decades, the exact value of the shear modulus Gs of the erythrocyte membrane is still ambiguous, and a wealth of studies, using measurements based on micropipette aspirations, ektacytometry systems and other flow chambers, and optical tweezers, as well as application of several models, have found different average values in the range 2-10μN/m. Our study shows that different methodologies have predicted the correct shear modulus for the specific membrane modeling employed, i.e., the variation in the shear modulus determination results from the specific membrane modeling. Available experimental findings from ektacytometry systems and optical tweezers suggest that the dynamics of the erythrocyte membrane is strain hardening at both moderate and large deformations. Thus the erythrocyte shear modulus cannot be determined accurately using strain-softening models (such as the neo-Hookean and Evans laws) or strain-softening/strain-hardening models (such as the Yeoh law), which overestimate the erythrocyte shear modulus. According to our analysis, the only available strain-hardening constitutive law, the Skalak et al. law, is able to match well both deformation-shear rate data from ektacytometry and force-extension data from optical tweezers at moderate and large strains, using an average value of the shear modulus of Gs=2.4-2.75μN/m, i.e., very close to that found in the linear regime of deformations via force-extension data from optical tweezers, Gs=2.5±0.4μN/m. In addition, our analysis suggests that a standard deviation in Gs of 0.4-0.5μN/m (owing to the inherent differences between erythrocytes within a large population) describes well the findings from optical tweezers at small and large strains as well as from micropipette aspirations.

  5. A high-damping magnetorheological elastomer with bi-directional magnetic-control modulus for potential application in seismology

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Miao Qi, Song; Fu, Jie; Zhu, Mi

    2015-09-14

    A high-damping magnetorheological elastomer (MRE) with bi-directional magnetic-control modulus is developed. This MRE was synthesized by filling NdFeB particles into polyurethane (PU)/ epoxy (EP) interpenetrating network (IPN) structure. The anisotropic samples were prepared in a permanent magnetic field and magnetized in an electromagnetic field of 1 T. Dynamic mechanical responses of the MRE to applied magnetic fields are investigated through magneto-rheometer, and morphology of MREs is observed via scanning electron microscope (SEM). Test result indicates that when the test field orientation is parallel to that of the sample's magnetization, the shear modulus of sample increases. On the other hand, when the orientation is opposite to that of the sample's magnetization, shear modulus decreases. In addition, this PU/EP IPN matrix based MRE has a high-damping property, with high loss factor and can be controlled by applying magnetic field. It is expected that the high damping property and the ability of bi-directional magnetic-control modulus of this MRE offer promising advantages in seismologic application.

  6. A high-damping magnetorheological elastomer with bi-directional magnetic-control modulus for potential application in seismology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Miao; Qi, Song; Fu, Jie; Zhu, Mi

    2015-09-01

    A high-damping magnetorheological elastomer (MRE) with bi-directional magnetic-control modulus is developed. This MRE was synthesized by filling NdFeB particles into polyurethane (PU)/ epoxy (EP) interpenetrating network (IPN) structure. The anisotropic samples were prepared in a permanent magnetic field and magnetized in an electromagnetic field of 1 T. Dynamic mechanical responses of the MRE to applied magnetic fields are investigated through magneto-rheometer, and morphology of MREs is observed via scanning electron microscope (SEM). Test result indicates that when the test field orientation is parallel to that of the sample's magnetization, the shear modulus of sample increases. On the other hand, when the orientation is opposite to that of the sample's magnetization, shear modulus decreases. In addition, this PU/EP IPN matrix based MRE has a high-damping property, with high loss factor and can be controlled by applying magnetic field. It is expected that the high damping property and the ability of bi-directional magnetic-control modulus of this MRE offer promising advantages in seismologic application.

  7. High modulus liquid crystalline thermosetting resins through novel processing techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M.E.; Douglas, E.P.; Benicewicz, B.C.; Earls, J.D.; Priester, R.D. Jr.

    1996-05-01

    The authors have demonstrated the effects of magnetic field alignment for the epoxy resin system, the diglycidyl ether of dihydroxy-{alpha}-methylstilbene cured with sulfanilamide. With increasing magnetic field, the tensile modulus of the thermoset can be enhanced by a factor of three, without compromise to the transverse value. Measurements of the coefficients of thermal expansion and the order parameter as determined by x-ray diffraction elucidate the high degree of alignment obtained at field strengths of 15--18 Tesla. The interrelationship between the reaction kinetics of curing with the molecular alignment process is central to successful processing of this class of thermosets. Preliminary relationships between the field strength, time in the magnetic field, reaction rate, and extent of reaction have been developed. Process control and sequencing allow a wide adjustment in the properties of the produced samples. These studies demonstrate the increased value of multi-mode processing in the development of tailored property, lightweight materials.

  8. Application of diffusion barriers to high modulus fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veltri, R. D.; Douglas, F. C.; Paradis, E. L.; Galasso, F. S.

    1977-01-01

    Barrier layers were coated onto high-modulus fibers, and nickel and titanium layers were overcoated as simulated matrix materials. The objective was to coat the high-strength fibers with unreactive selected materials without degrading the fibers. The fibers were tungsten, niobium, and single-crystal sapphire, while the materials used as barrier coating layers were Al2O3, Y2O3, TiC, ZrC, WC with 14% Co, and HfO2. An ion-plating technique was used to coat the fibers. The fibers were subjected to high-temperature heat treatments to evaluate the effectiveness of the barrier layer in preventing fiber-metal interactions. Results indicate that Al2O3, Y2O3, and HfO2 can be used as barrier layers to minimize the nickel-tungsten interaction. Further investigation, including thermal cycling tests at 1090 C, revealed that HfO2 is probably the best of the three.

  9. Evaluation of high-modulus pitch/cyanate material systems for dimensionally stable structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brand, Richard A.; Derby, Eddy A.

    1992-09-01

    Dimensional stability in composite structures has mainly focused on near-zero CTE, high- modulus fiber/epoxy resin systems. However, hygrothermal stability has been demonstrated to be a serious concern for structures moisturized on earth and dried in orbit. Composite sealing techniques have been developed to prevent this moisture absorption and desorption with the concomitant dimensional changes. New resin system are being developed which absorb significantly less moisture and show promise as optional systems in dimensionally stable structures. These resin systems have not been evaluated for their physical and mechanical properties. This paper describes the testing of various high-modulus, cyanate ester resin systems for evaluation in dimensionally stable composite applications. Physical testing included moisture absorption testing, coefficient of thermal expansion, and hygrothermal strain change. Mechanical testing included tensile, compression, Iosipescu shear, and bonded joint allowables. A comparison of the thermomechanical properties for the cyanate ester resin systems is made with a P75S/ERL1962 baseline epoxy resin systems.

  10. Instrument for determining the complex shear modulus of soft-tissue-like materials from 10 to 300 Hz

    PubMed Central

    Madsen, E L; Frank, G R; Hobson, M A; Lin-Gibson, S; Hall, T J; Jiang, J; Stiles, T A

    2010-01-01

    Accurate determination of the complex shear modulus of soft tissues and soft-tissue-like materials in the 10–300 Hz frequency range is very important to researchers in MR elastography and acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging. A variety of instruments for making such measurements has been reported, but none of them is easily reproduced, and none have been tested to conform to causality via the Kramers–Kronig (K-K) relations. A promising linear oscillation instrument described in a previous brief report operates between 20 and 160 Hz, but results were not tested for conformity to the K-K relations. We have produced a similar instrument with our own version of the electronic components and have also accounted for instrumental effects on the data reduction, which is not addressed in the previous report. The improved instrument has been shown to conform to an accurate approximation of the K-K relations over the 10–300 Hz range. The K-K approximation is based on the Weichert mechanical circuit model. We also found that the sample thickness must be small enough to obtain agreement with a calibrated commercial rheometer. A complete description of the improved instrument is given, facilitating replication in other labs. PMID:18758002

  11. High modulus invert analog glass compositions containing beryllia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bacon, J. F. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    Glass compositions having a Young's modulus of at least 15 million psi and a specific modulus of at least 110 million inches consisting essentially of, in mols, 10-45% SiO2, 2-15% Li2O, 3-34% BeO, 12-36% of at least one bivalent oxide selected from the group consisting of CaO, ZnO, MgO and CuO, 10-39% of at least one trivalent oxide selected from the group consisting of Al2O3, B2O3, La2O3, Y2O3 and the mixed rare earth oxides, the total number of said bivalent and trivalent oxides being at least three, and up to 10% of a tetravalent oxide selected from the group consisting of ZrO2, TiO2 and CeO2.

  12. Dynamic shear deformation in high purity Fe

    SciTech Connect

    Cerreta, Ellen K; Bingert, John F; Trujillo, Carl P; Lopez, Mike F; Gray, George T

    2009-01-01

    The forced shear test specimen, first developed by Meyer et al. [Meyer L. et al., Critical Adiabatic Shear Strength of Low Alloyed Steel Under Compressive Loading, Metallurgical Applications of Shock Wave and High Strain Rate Phenomena (Marcel Decker, 1986), 657; Hartmann K. et al., Metallurgical Effects on Impact Loaded Materials, Shock Waves and High Strain rate Phenomena in Metals (Plenum, 1981), 325-337.], has been utilized in a number of studies. While the geometry of this specimen does not allow for the microstructure to exactly define the location of shear band formation and the overall mechanical response of a specimen is highly sensitive to the geometry utilized, the forced shear specimen is useful for characterizing the influence of parameters such as strain rate, temperature, strain, and load on the microstructural evolution within a shear band. Additionally, many studies have utilized this geometry to advance the understanding of shear band development. In this study, by varying the geometry, specifically the ratio of the inner hole to the outer hat diameter, the dynamic shear localization response of high purity Fe was examined. Post mortem characterization was performed to quantify the width of the localizations and examine the microstructural and textural evolution of shear deformation in a bcc metal. Increased instability in mechanical response is strongly linked with development of enhanced intergranular misorientations, high angle boundaries, and classical shear textures characterized through orientation distribution functions.

  13. Shear modulus estimation on vastus intermedius of elderly and young females over the entire range of isometric contraction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cong-Zhi; Li, Tian-Jie; Zheng, Yong-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Elderly people often suffer from sarcopenia in their lower extremities, which gives rise to the increased susceptibility of fall. Comparing the mechanical properties of the knee extensor/flexors on elderly and young subjects is helpful in understanding the underlying mechanisms of the muscle aging process. However, although the stiffness of skeletal muscle has been proved to be positively correlated to its non-fatiguing contraction intensity by some existing methods, this conclusion has not been verified above 50% maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) due to the limitation of their measurement range. In this study, a vibro-ultrasound system was set up to achieve a considerably larger measurement range on muscle stiffness estimation. Its feasibility was verified on self-made silicone phantoms by comparing with the mechanical indentation method. The system was then used to assess the stiffness of vastus intermedius (VI), one of the knee extensors, on 10 healthy elderly female subjects (56.7 ± 4.9 yr) and 10 healthy young female subjects (27.6 ± 5.0 yr). The VI stiffness in its action direction was confirmed to be positively correlated to the % MVC level (R2 = 0.999) over the entire range of isometric contraction, i.e. from 0% MVC (relaxed state) to 100% MVC. Furthermore, it was shown that there was no significant difference between the mean VI shear modulus of the elderly and young subjects in a relaxed state (p > 0.1). However, when performing step isometric contraction, the VI stiffness of young female subjects was found to be larger than that of elderly participants (p < 0.001), especially at the relatively higher contraction levels. The results expanded our knowledge on the mechanical property of the elderly's skeletal muscle and its relationship with intensity of active contraction. Furthermore, the vibro-ultrasound system has a potential to become a powerful tool for investigating the elderly's muscle diseases.

  14. Probe Oscillation Shear Elastography (PROSE): A High Frame-Rate Method for Two-Dimensional Ultrasound Shear Wave Elastography.

    PubMed

    Mellema, Daniel C; Song, Pengfei; Kinnick, Randall R; Urban, Matthew W; Greenleaf, James F; Manduca, Armando; Chen, Shigao

    2016-09-01

    Ultrasound shear wave elastography (SWE) utilizes the propagation of induced shear waves to characterize the shear modulus of soft tissue. Many methods rely on an acoustic radiation force (ARF) "push beam" to generate shear waves. However, specialized hardware is required to generate the push beams, and the thermal stress that is placed upon the ultrasound system, transducer, and tissue by the push beams currently limits the frame-rate to about 1 Hz. These constraints have limited the implementation of ARF to high-end clinical systems. This paper presents Probe Oscillation Shear Elastography (PROSE) as an alternative method to measure tissue elasticity. PROSE generates shear waves using a harmonic mechanical vibration of an ultrasound transducer, while simultaneously detecting motion with the same transducer under pulse-echo mode. Motion of the transducer during detection produces a "strain-like" compression artifact that is coupled with the observed shear waves. A novel symmetric sampling scheme is proposed such that pulse-echo detection events are acquired when the ultrasound transducer returns to the same physical position, allowing the shear waves to be decoupled from the compression artifact. Full field-of-view (FOV) two-dimensional (2D) shear wave speed images were obtained by applying a local frequency estimation (LFE) technique, capable of generating a 2D map from a single frame of shear wave motion. The shear wave imaging frame rate of PROSE is comparable to the vibration frequency, which can be an order of magnitude higher than ARF based techniques. PROSE was able to produce smooth and accurate shear wave images from three homogeneous phantoms with different moduli, with an effective frame rate of 300 Hz. An inclusion phantom study showed that increased vibration frequencies improved the accuracy of inclusion imaging, and allowed targets as small as 6.5 mm to be resolved with good contrast (contrast-to-noise ratio ≥ 19 dB) between the target and

  15. Probe Oscillation Shear Elastography (PROSE): A High Frame-Rate Method for Two-Dimensional Ultrasound Shear Wave Elastography.

    PubMed

    Mellema, Daniel C; Song, Pengfei; Kinnick, Randall R; Urban, Matthew W; Greenleaf, James F; Manduca, Armando; Chen, Shigao

    2016-09-01

    Ultrasound shear wave elastography (SWE) utilizes the propagation of induced shear waves to characterize the shear modulus of soft tissue. Many methods rely on an acoustic radiation force (ARF) "push beam" to generate shear waves. However, specialized hardware is required to generate the push beams, and the thermal stress that is placed upon the ultrasound system, transducer, and tissue by the push beams currently limits the frame-rate to about 1 Hz. These constraints have limited the implementation of ARF to high-end clinical systems. This paper presents Probe Oscillation Shear Elastography (PROSE) as an alternative method to measure tissue elasticity. PROSE generates shear waves using a harmonic mechanical vibration of an ultrasound transducer, while simultaneously detecting motion with the same transducer under pulse-echo mode. Motion of the transducer during detection produces a "strain-like" compression artifact that is coupled with the observed shear waves. A novel symmetric sampling scheme is proposed such that pulse-echo detection events are acquired when the ultrasound transducer returns to the same physical position, allowing the shear waves to be decoupled from the compression artifact. Full field-of-view (FOV) two-dimensional (2D) shear wave speed images were obtained by applying a local frequency estimation (LFE) technique, capable of generating a 2D map from a single frame of shear wave motion. The shear wave imaging frame rate of PROSE is comparable to the vibration frequency, which can be an order of magnitude higher than ARF based techniques. PROSE was able to produce smooth and accurate shear wave images from three homogeneous phantoms with different moduli, with an effective frame rate of 300 Hz. An inclusion phantom study showed that increased vibration frequencies improved the accuracy of inclusion imaging, and allowed targets as small as 6.5 mm to be resolved with good contrast (contrast-to-noise ratio ≥ 19 dB) between the target and

  16. Structure and bulk modulus of high-strength boron compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Lundstroem, T.

    1997-10-01

    The structures and homogeneity ranges of B{sub 6}O{sub 1-x} and B{sub 12}S{sub 2-x} were studied using Rietveld analysis of powder X ray patterns. The oxygen content of boron suboxide decreases with temperature in the range 1250-1450{degrees}C. Stoichiometric boron suboxide cannot be prepared from amorphous or {alpha}-rh boron and B{sub 2}O{sub 3} at ambient pressure. Significantly higher pressures are required. The boron subsulfide was found to be stable from B{sub 12}S{sub <1} to B{sub 12}S{sub 1.3} at 1400-1600{degrees}C. Semiempirical bulk modulus calculations are reported for hard icosahedral boron-rich compounds and diamond-like tetrahedrally coordinated boron compounds. In connection with this the structure of diamond-like B{sub 2}O is discussed.

  17. High-modulus, high-conductivity nanostructured polymer electrolyte membranes via polymerization-induced phase separation.

    PubMed

    Schulze, Morgan W; McIntosh, Lucas D; Hillmyer, Marc A; Lodge, Timothy P

    2014-01-01

    The primary challenge in solid-state polymer electrolyte membranes (PEMs) is to enhance properties, such as modulus, toughness, and high temperature stability, without sacrificing ionic conductivity. We report a remarkably facile one-pot synthetic strategy based on polymerization-induced phase separation (PIPS) to generate nanostructured PEMs that exhibit an unprecedented combination of high modulus and ionic conductivity. Simple heating of a poly(ethylene oxide) macromolecular chain transfer agent dissolved in a mixture of ionic liquid, styrene and divinylbenzene, leads to a bicontinuous PEM comprising interpenetrating nanodomains of highly cross-linked polystyrene and poly(ethylene oxide)/ionic liquid. Ionic conductivities higher than the 1 mS/cm benchmark were achieved in samples with an elastic modulus approaching 1 GPa at room temperature. Crucially, these samples are robust solids above 100 °C, where the conductivity is significantly higher. This strategy holds tremendous potential to advance lithium-ion battery technology by enabling the use of lithium metal anodes or to serve as membranes in high-temperature fuel cells.

  18. Role of high shear rate in thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Casa, Lauren D C; Deaton, David H; Ku, David N

    2015-04-01

    Acute arterial occlusions occur in high shear rate hemodynamic conditions. Arterial thrombi are platelet-rich when examined histologically compared with red blood cells in venous thrombi. Prior studies of platelet biology were not capable of accounting for the rapid kinetics and bond strengths necessary to produce occlusive thrombus under these conditions where the stasis condition of the Virchow triad is so noticeably absent. Recent experiments elucidate the unique pathway and kinetics of platelet aggregation that produce arterial occlusion. Large thrombi form from local release and conformational changes in von Willebrand factor under very high shear rates. The effect of high shear hemodynamics on thrombus growth has profound implications for the understanding of all acute thrombotic cardiovascular events as well as for vascular reconstructive techniques and vascular device design, testing, and clinical performance.

  19. Performance evaluation of high modulus asphalt concrete mixes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haritonovs, V.; Tihonovs, J.; Zaumanis, M.

    2016-04-01

    Dolomite is one of the most available sedimentary rocks in the territory of Latvia. Dolomite quarries contain about 1000 million tons of this material. However, according to Latvian Road Specifications, this dolomite cannot be used for average and high intensity roads because of its low quality (mainly, LA index). Therefore, mostly imported magmatic rocks (granite, diabase, gabbro, basalt) or imported dolomite are used which makes asphalt expensive. However, practical experience shows that even with these high quality materials roads exhibit rutting, fatigue and thermal cracks. The aim of the research is to develop a high performance asphalt concrete for base and binder courses using only locally available aggregates. In order to achieve resistance against deformations at a high ambient temperature, a hard grade binder was used. Workability, fatigue and thermal cracking resistance, as well as sufficient water resistance is achieved by low porosity (3-5%) and higher binder content compared to traditional asphalt mixtures. The design of the asphalt includes a combination of empirical and performance based tests, which in laboratory circumstances allow simulating traffic and environmental loads. High performance AC 16 base asphalt concrete was created using local dolomite aggregate with polymer modified (PMB 10/40-65) and hard grade (B20/30) bitumen. The mixtures were specified based on fundamental properties in accordance to EN 13108-1 standard.

  20. In Vitro Engineering of High Modulus Cartilage-Like Constructs

    PubMed Central

    Seedhom, Bahaa B.; Carey, Duane O.; Bulpitt, Andy J.; Treanor, Darren E.; Kirkham, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    To date, the outcomes of cartilage repair have been inconsistent and have frequently yielded mechanically inferior fibrocartilage, thereby increasing the chances of damage recurrence. Implantation of constructs with biochemical composition and mechanical properties comparable to natural cartilage could be advantageous for long-term repair. This study attempted to create such constructs, in vitro, using tissue engineering principles. Bovine synoviocytes were seeded on nonwoven polyethylene terephthalate fiber scaffolds and cultured in chondrogenic medium for 4 weeks, after which uniaxial compressive loading was applied using an in-house bioreactor for 1 h per day, at a frequency of 1 Hz, for a further 84 days. The initial loading conditions, determined from the mechanical properties of the immature constructs after 4 weeks in chondrogenic culture, were strains ranging between 13% and 23%. After 56 days (sustained at 84 days) of loading, the constructs were stained homogenously with Alcian blue and for type-II collagen. Dynamic compressive moduli were comparable to the high end values for native cartilage and proportional to Alcian blue staining intensity. We suggest that these high moduli values were attributable to the bioreactor setup, which caused the loading regime to change as the constructs developed, that is, the applied stress and strain increased with construct thickness and stiffness, providing continued sufficient cell stimulation as further matrix was deposited. Constructs containing cartilage-like matrix with response to load similar to that of native cartilage could produce long-term effective cartilage repair when implanted. PMID:26850081

  1. Friction and wear of TPS fibers: A study of the adhesion and friction of high modulus fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bascom, Willard D.; Lee, Ilzoo

    1990-01-01

    The adhesional and frictional forces between filaments in a woven fabric or felt, strongly influenced the processability of the fiber and the mechanical durability of the final product. Even though the contact loads between fibers are low, the area of contact is extremely small giving rise to very high stresses; principally shear stresses. One consequence of these strong adhesional and frictional forces is the resistance of fibers to slide past each other during weaving or when processed into nonwoven mats or felts. Furthermore, the interfiber frictional forces may cause surface damage and thereby reduce the fiber strength. Once formed into fabrics, flexural handling and manipulation of the material again causes individual filaments to rub against each other resulting in modulus, brittle fibers such as those used in thermal protection systems (TPS). The adhesion and friction of organic fibers, notably polyethylene terephthalate (PET) fibers, have been extensively studied, but there has been very little work reported on high modulus inorganic fibers. An extensive study was made of the adhesion and friction of flame drawn silica fibers in order to develop experimental techniques and a scientific basis for data interpretation. Subsequently, these methods were applied to fibers of interest in TPS materials.

  2. Linear response theory for shear modulus C66 and Raman quadrupole susceptibility: evidence for nematic orbital fluctuations in Fe-based superconductors.

    PubMed

    Kontani, Hiroshi; Yamakawa, Youichi

    2014-07-25

    The emergence of the nematic order and fluctuations has been discussed as a central issue in Fe-based superconductors. To clarify the origin of the nematicity, we focus on the shear modulus C(66) and the Raman quadrupole susceptibility χ(x)(2)-y(2))(Raman). Because of the Aslamazov-Larkin vertex correction, the nematic-type orbital fluctuations are induced, and they enhance both 1/C(66) and χ(x(2)-y(2))(Raman) strongly. However, χ(x)(2)-y(2))(Raman) remains finite even at the structure transition temperature T(S), because of the absence of the band Jahn-Teller effect and the Pauli (intraband) contribution, as proved in terms of the linear response theory. The present study clarifies that the origin of the nematicity in Fe-based superconductors is the nematic orbital order and fluctuations. PMID:25105647

  3. Relation between the activation energy of oxygen diffusion and the instantaneous shear modulus in propylene carbonate near the glass transition temperature.

    PubMed

    Syutkin, V M

    2013-09-21

    We discuss the transport of small gas molecules in organic glassy matrices using oxygen diffusion in propylene carbonate as an example. The jumps of a penetrant from one interstitial cavity to another require energy to expand the channel between cavities to the size of the penetrant. It has been established that at temperatures below and slightly above the glass transition temperature, the activation energy of oxygen diffusion, E, is related to the instantaneous shear modulus G∞ of propylene carbonate via the equation E = V × G∞, where V is the temperature-independent parameter that characterizes the volume of the channel. Consequently, the E value is the work necessary for elastic deformation of the surrounding matrix to expand the channel available for oxygen diffusion.

  4. Linear Response Theory for Shear Modulus C66 and Raman Quadrupole Susceptibility: Evidence for Nematic Orbital Fluctuations in Fe-based Superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kontani, Hiroshi; Yamakawa, Youichi

    2014-07-01

    The emergence of the nematic order and fluctuations has been discussed as a central issue in Fe-based superconductors. To clarify the origin of the nematicity, we focus on the shear modulus C66 and the Raman quadrupole susceptibility χx2-y2Raman. Because of the Aslamazov-Larkin vertex correction, the nematic-type orbital fluctuations are induced, and they enhance both 1/C66 and χx2-y2Raman strongly. However, χx2-y2Raman remains finite even at the structure transition temperature TS, because of the absence of the band Jahn-Teller effect and the Pauli (intraband) contribution, as proved in terms of the linear response theory. The present study clarifies that the origin of the nematicity in Fe-based superconductors is the nematic orbital order and fluctuations.

  5. High-shear-rate capillary viscometer for inkjet inks

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Xi; Carr, Wallace W.; Bucknall, David G.; Morris, Jeffrey F.

    2010-06-15

    A capillary viscometer developed to measure the apparent shear viscosity of inkjet inks at high apparent shear rates encountered during inkjet printing is described. By using the Weissenberg-Rabinowitsch equation, true shear viscosity versus true shear rate is obtained. The device is comprised of a constant-flow generator, a static pressure monitoring device, a high precision submillimeter capillary die, and a high stiffness flow path. The system, which is calibrated using standard Newtonian low-viscosity silicone oil, can be easily operated and maintained. Results for measurement of the shear-rate-dependent viscosity of carbon-black pigmented water-based inkjet inks at shear rates up to 2x10{sup 5} s{sup -1} are discussed. The Cross model was found to closely fit the experimental data. Inkjet ink samples with similar low-shear-rate viscosities exhibited significantly different shear viscosities at high shear rates depending on particle loading.

  6. High-shear-rate capillary viscometer for inkjet inks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xi; Carr, Wallace W.; Bucknall, David G.; Morris, Jeffrey F.

    2010-06-01

    A capillary viscometer developed to measure the apparent shear viscosity of inkjet inks at high apparent shear rates encountered during inkjet printing is described. By using the Weissenberg-Rabinowitsch equation, true shear viscosity versus true shear rate is obtained. The device is comprised of a constant-flow generator, a static pressure monitoring device, a high precision submillimeter capillary die, and a high stiffness flow path. The system, which is calibrated using standard Newtonian low-viscosity silicone oil, can be easily operated and maintained. Results for measurement of the shear-rate-dependent viscosity of carbon-black pigmented water-based inkjet inks at shear rates up to 2×105 s-1 are discussed. The Cross model was found to closely fit the experimental data. Inkjet ink samples with similar low-shear-rate viscosities exhibited significantly different shear viscosities at high shear rates depending on particle loading.

  7. Microhardness and Young's modulus of high burn-up UO2 fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappia, F.; Pizzocri, D.; Marchetti, M.; Schubert, A.; Van Uffelen, P.; Luzzi, L.; Papaioannou, D.; Macián-Juan, R.; Rondinella, V. V.

    2016-10-01

    Vickers microhardness (HV0.1) and Young's modulus (E) measurements of LWR UO2 fuel at burn-up ≥60 GWd/tHM are presented. Their ratio HV0.1/E was found constant in the range 60-110 GWd/tHM. From the ratio and the microhardness values vs porosity, the Young's modulus dependence on porosity was derived and extended to the full radial profile, including the high burn-up structure (HBS). The dependence is well represented by a linear correlation. The data were compared to fuel performance codes correlations. A burn-up dependent factor was introduced in the Young's modulus expression. The modifications extend the experimental validation range of the TRANSURANUS correlation from un-irradiated to irradiated UO2 and up to 20% porosity. First simulations of LWR fuel rod irradiations were performed in order to illustrate the impact on fuel performance. In the specific cases selected, the simulations suggest a limited effect of the Young's modulus decrease due to burn-up on integral fuel performance.

  8. High strength semi-active energy absorbers using shear- and mixedmode operation at high shear rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becnel, Andrew C.

    This body of research expands the design space of semi-active energy absorbers for shock isolation and crash safety by investigating and characterizing magnetorheological fluids (MRFs) at high shear rates ( > 25,000 1/s) under shear and mixed-mode operation. Magnetorheological energy absorbers (MREAs) work well as adaptive isolators due to their ability to quickly and controllably adjust to changes in system mass or impact speed while providing fail-safe operation. However, typical linear stroking MREAs using pressure-driven flows have been shown to exhibit reduced controllability as impact speed (shear rate) increases. The objective of this work is to develop MREAs that improve controllability at high shear rates by using pure shear and mixed shear-squeeze modes of operation, and to present the fundamental theory and models of MR fluids under these conditions. A proof of concept instrument verified that the MR effect persists in shear mode devices at shear rates corresponding to low speed impacts. This instrument, a concentric cylinder Searle cell magnetorheometer, was then used to characterize three commercially available MRFs across a wide range of shear rates, applied magnetic fields, and temperatures. Characterization results are presented both as flow curves according to established practice, and as an alternate nondimensionalized analysis based on Mason number. The Mason number plots show that, with appropriate correction coefficients for operating temperature, the varied flow curve data can be collapsed to a single master curve. This work represents the first shear mode characterization of MRFs at shear rates over 10 times greater than available with commercial rheometers, as well as the first validation of Mason number analysis to high shear rate flows in MRFs. Using the results from the magnetorheometer, a full scale rotary vane MREA was developed as part of the Lightweight Magnetorheological Energy Absorber System (LMEAS) for an SH-60 Seahawk helicopter

  9. Some important aspects in testing high-modulus fiber composite tubes designed for multiaxial loading.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, T. L.; Chamis, C. C.

    1972-01-01

    Tubular specimens were potted in metal grips to determine the feasibility of this gripping method in applying multiaxial loads. Strain gage rosettes were used to assess grip transitional strains, through thickness strain variation and strain variations along the tube length and circumference. The investigation was limited to loading 0, 45, plus or minus 45, and 90 deg graphite/epoxy and glass/epoxy tubes in axial tension. Results include modifications made to the grips to reduce transitional strains, illustrations of the tube failure modes, and some material properties. The gripping concept shows promise as a satisfactory technique for applying multiaxial loads to high-strength, high-modulus fiber composite tubes.

  10. Some important aspects in testing high-modulus fiber composite tubes in axial tension.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, T. L.; Chamis, C. C.

    1973-01-01

    Tubular specimens were potted in metal grips to determine the feasibility of this gripping method in applying multiaxial loads. Strain gage rosettes were used to assess grip transitional strains, through thickness strain variation, and strain variations along the tube length and circumference. The investigation was limited to loading graphite/epoxy and glass/epoxy tubes in axial tension. Results include modifications made to the grips to reduce transitional strains, illustrations of the tube failure modes, and some material properties. The gripping concept shows promise as a satisfactory technique for applying multiaxial loads to high-strength, high-modulus fiber composite tubes.

  11. Some important aspects in testing high-modulus fiber composite tubes designed for multiaxial loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, T. L.; Chamis, C. C.

    1972-01-01

    Tubular specimens were potted in metal grips to determine the feasibility of this gripping method in applying multiaxial loads. Strain gage rosettes were used to assess grip transitional strains, through thickness strain variation and strain variations along the tube length and circumference. The investigation was limited to loading 0 deg, + or - 45 deg, and 90 deg graphite/epoxy and glass/epoxy tubes in axial tension. Results include modifications made to the grips to reduce transitional strains, illustrations of the tube failure modes, and some material properties. The gripping concept shows promise as a satisfactory technique for applying multiaxial loads to high strength, high modulus fiber composite tubes.

  12. The thermal conductivity of high modulus Zylon fibers between 400 mK and 4 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wikus, Patrick; Figueroa-Feliciano, Enectalí; Hertel, Scott A.; Leman, Steven W.; McCarthy, Kevin A.; Rutherford, John M.

    2008-11-01

    Zylon is a synthetic polyurethane polymer fiber featuring very high mechanical strength. Measurements of the thermal conductivity λZ(T) of high modulus Zylon fibers at temperatures between 400 mK and 4 K were performed to assess if they can be successfully employed in the design of high performance suspension systems for cold stages of adiabatic demagnetization refrigerators. The linear mass density of the yarn used in these measurements amounts to 3270 dtex, which is also a measure for the yarn's cross section. The experimental data for the thermal conductivity was fitted to a function of the form λZ=(1010±30)·TpWmmdtexK. This result was normalized to the breaking strength of the fibers and compared with Kevlar. It shows that Kevlar outperforms Zylon in the investigated temperature range. At 1.5 K, the thermal conductivity integral of Zylon yarn is twice as high as the thermal conductivity integral of Kevlar yarn with the same breaking strength. A linear mass density of 1 tex is equivalent to a yarn mass of 1 g/km. High modulus Zylon has a density of 1.56 g/cm 3.

  13. Thermal Conductivity and Elastic Modulus Evolution of Thermal Barrier Coatings under High Heat Flux Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    1999-01-01

    Laser high heat flux test approaches have been established to obtain critical properties of ceramic thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) under near-realistic temperature and thermal gradients that may he encountered in advanced engine systems. Thermal conductivity change kinetics of a thin ceramic coating were continuously monitored in real time at various test temperatures. A significant thermal conductivity increase was observed during the laser simulated engine heat flux tests. For a 0.25 mm thick ZrO2-8%Y2O3 coating system, the overall thermal conductivity increased from the initial value of 1.0 W/m-K to 1. 15 W/m-K, 1. 19 W/m-K and 1.5 W/m-K after 30 hour testing at surface temperatures of 990C, 1100C, and 1320C. respectively. Hardness and modulus gradients across a 1.5 mm thick TBC system were also determined as a function of laser testing time using the laser sintering/creep and micro-indentation techniques. The coating Knoop hardness values increased from the initial hardness value of 4 GPa to 5 GPa near the ceramic/bond coat interface, and to 7.5 GPa at the ceramic coating surface after 120 hour testing. The ceramic surface modulus increased from an initial value of about 70 GPa to a final value of 125 GPa. The increase in thermal conductivity and the evolution of significant hardness and modulus gradients in the TBC systems are attributed to sintering-induced micro-porosity gradients under the laser-imposed high thermal gradient conditions. The test techniques provide a viable means for obtaining coating data for use in design, development, stress modeling, and life prediction for various thermal barrier coating applications.

  14. Control of Ostwald ripening by using surfactants with high surface modulus.

    PubMed

    Tcholakova, Slavka; Mitrinova, Zlatina; Golemanov, Konstantin; Denkov, Nikolai D; Vethamuthu, Martin; Ananthapadmanabhan, K P

    2011-12-20

    We describe results from systematic measurements of the rate of bubble Ostwald ripening in foams with air volume fraction of 90%. Several surfactant systems, with high and low surface modulus, were used to clarify the effect of the surfactant adsorption layer on the gas permeability across the foam films. In one series of experiments, glycerol was added to the foaming solutions to clarify how changes in the composition of the aqueous phase affect the rate of bubble coarsening. The experimental results are interpreted by a new theoretical model, which allowed us to determine the overall gas permeability of the foam films in the systems studied, and to decompose the film permeability into contributions coming from the surfactant adsorption layers and from the aqueous core of the films. For verification of the theoretical model, the gas permeability determined from the experiments with bulk foams are compared with values, determined in an independent set of measurements with the diminishing bubble method (single bubble attached at large air-water interface) and reasonably good agreement between the results obtained by the two methods is found. The analysis of the experimental data showed that the rate of bubble Ostwald ripening in the studied foams depends on (1) type of used surfactant-surfactants with high surface modulus lead to much slower rate of Ostwald ripening, which is explained by the reduced gas permeability of the adsorption layers in these systems; (2) presence of glycerol which reduces the gas solubility and diffusivity in the aqueous core of the foam film (without affecting the permeability of the adsorption layers), thus also leading to slower Ostwald ripening. Direct measurements showed that the foam films in the studied systems had very similar thicknesses, thus ruling out the possible explanation that the observed differences in the Ostwald ripening are due to different film thicknesses. Experiments with the Langmuir trough were used to demonstrate

  15. High elastic modulus polymer electrolytes suitable for preventing thermal runaway in lithium batteries

    DOEpatents

    Mullin, Scott; Panday, Ashoutosh; Balsara, Nitash Pervez; Singh, Mohit; Eitouni, Hany Basam; Gomez, Enrique Daniel

    2014-04-22

    A polymer that combines high ionic conductivity with the structural properties required for Li electrode stability is useful as a solid phase electrolyte for high energy density, high cycle life batteries that do not suffer from failures due to side reactions and dendrite growth on the Li electrodes, and other potential applications. The polymer electrolyte includes a linear block copolymer having a conductive linear polymer block with a molecular weight of at least 5000 Daltons, a structural linear polymer block with an elastic modulus in excess of 1.times.10.sup.7 Pa and an ionic conductivity of at least 1.times.10.sup.-5 Scm.sup.-1. The electrolyte is made under dry conditions to achieve the noted characteristics. In another aspect, the electrolyte exhibits a conductivity drop when the temperature of electrolyte increases over a threshold temperature, thereby providing a shutoff mechanism for preventing thermal runaway in lithium battery cells.

  16. High Bulk Modulus of Ionic Liquid and Effects on Performance of Hydraulic System

    PubMed Central

    Kalb, Roland; Tasner, Tadej

    2014-01-01

    Over recent years ionic liquids have gained in importance, causing a growing number of scientists and engineers to investigate possible applications for these liquids because of their unique physical and chemical properties. Their outstanding advantages such as nonflammable liquid within a broad liquid range, high thermal, mechanical, and chemical stabilities, low solubility for gases, attractive tribological properties (lubrication), and very low compressibility, and so forth, make them more interesting for applications in mechanical engineering, offering great potential for new innovative processes, and also as a novel hydraulic fluid. This paper focuses on the outstanding compressibility properties of ionic liquid EMIM-EtSO4, a very important physical chemically property when IL is used as a hydraulic fluid. This very low compressibility (respectively, very high Bulk modulus), compared to the classical hydraulic mineral oils or the non-flammable HFDU type of hydraulic fluids, opens up new possibilities regarding its usage within hydraulic systems with increased dynamics, respectively, systems' dynamic responses. PMID:24526900

  17. Design and fabrication of a metastable β-type titanium alloy with ultralow elastic modulus and high strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Shun; Meng, Qingkun; Zhao, Xinqing; Wei, Qiuming; Xu, Huibin

    2015-10-01

    Titanium and its alloys have become the most attractive implant materials due to their high corrosion resistance, excellent biocompatibility and relatively low elastic modulus. However, the current Ti materials used for implant applications exhibit much higher Young’s modulus (50 ~ 120 GPa) than human bone (~30 GPa). This large mismatch in the elastic modulus between implant and human bone can lead to so-called “stress shielding effect” and eventual implant failure. Therefore, the development of β-type Ti alloys with modulus comparable to that of human bone has become an ever more pressing subject in the area of advanced biomedical materials. In this study, an attempt was made to produce a bone-compatible metastable β-type Ti alloy. By alloying and thermo-mechanical treatment, a metastable β-type Ti-33Nb-4Sn (wt. %) alloy with ultralow Young’s modulus (36 GPa, versus ~30 GPa for human bone) and high ultimate strength (853 MPa) was fabricated. We believe that this method can be applied to developing advanced metastable β-type titanium alloys for implant applications. Also, this approach can shed light on design and development of novel β-type titanium alloys with large elastic limit due to their high strength and low elastic modulus.

  18. Design and fabrication of a metastable β-type titanium alloy with ultralow elastic modulus and high strength

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Shun; Meng, Qingkun; Zhao, Xinqing; Wei, Qiuming; Xu, Huibin

    2015-01-01

    Titanium and its alloys have become the most attractive implant materials due to their high corrosion resistance, excellent biocompatibility and relatively low elastic modulus. However, the current Ti materials used for implant applications exhibit much higher Young’s modulus (50 ~ 120 GPa) than human bone (~30 GPa). This large mismatch in the elastic modulus between implant and human bone can lead to so-called “stress shielding effect” and eventual implant failure. Therefore, the development of β-type Ti alloys with modulus comparable to that of human bone has become an ever more pressing subject in the area of advanced biomedical materials. In this study, an attempt was made to produce a bone-compatible metastable β-type Ti alloy. By alloying and thermo-mechanical treatment, a metastable β-type Ti-33Nb-4Sn (wt. %) alloy with ultralow Young’s modulus (36 GPa, versus ~30 GPa for human bone) and high ultimate strength (853 MPa) was fabricated. We believe that this method can be applied to developing advanced metastable β-type titanium alloys for implant applications. Also, this approach can shed light on design and development of novel β-type titanium alloys with large elastic limit due to their high strength and low elastic modulus. PMID:26434766

  19. An ultra-high Q silicon compound cantilever resonator for Young's modulus measurements.

    PubMed

    Metcalf, Thomas H; Liu, Xiao

    2013-07-01

    We describe the design of ultra-high Q mechanical cantilever resonators, fabricated from single-crystal silicon wafers. The mechanical resonance mode at f ≈ 8.5 kHz achieves a background damping of Q(-1) modulus and internal friction of thin films. It is compatible with both the mounting apparatus and measurement electronics of the torsional resonator, and the two resonators together can be used to provide a complete description of the elastic properties of isotropic thin films. PMID:23902093

  20. Shear modeling: thermoelasticity at high temperature and pressure for tantalum

    SciTech Connect

    Orlikowski, D; Soderlind, P; Moriarty, J A

    2004-12-06

    For large-scale constitutive strength models the shear modulus is typically assumed to be linearly dependent on temperature. However, for materials compressed beyond the Hugoniot or in regimes where there is very little experimental data, accurate and validated models must be used. To this end, we present here a new methodology that fully accounts for electron- and ion-thermal contributions to the elastic moduli over broad ranges of temperature (<20,000 K) and pressure (<10 Mbar). In this approach, the full potential linear muffin-tin orbital (FP-LMTO) method for the cold and electron-thermal contributions is closely coupled with ion-thermal contributions. For the latter two separate approaches are used. In one approach, the quasi-harmonic, ion-thermal contribution is obtained through a Brillouin zone sum of strain derivatives of the phonons, and in the other a full anharmonic ion-thermal contribution is obtained directly through Monte Carlo (MC) canonical distribution averages of strain derivatives on the multi-ion potential itself. Both approaches use quantum-based interatomic potentials derived from model generalized pseudopotential theory (MGPT). For tantalum, the resulting elastic moduli are compared to available ultrasonic measurements and diamond-anvil-cell compression experiments. Over the range of temperature and pressure considered, the results are then used in a polycrystalline averaging for the shear modulus to assess the linear temperature dependence for Ta.

  1. Force measurements on natural membrane nanovesicles reveal a composition-independent, high Young's modulus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calò, Annalisa; Reguera, David; Oncins, Gerard; Persuy, Marie-Annick; Sanz, Guenhaël; Lobasso, Simona; Corcelli, Angela; Pajot-Augy, Edith; Gomila, Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical properties of nano-sized vesicles made up of natural membranes are crucial to the development of stable, biocompatible nanocontainers with enhanced functional, recognition and sensing capabilities. Here we measure and compare the mechanical properties of plasma and inner membrane nanovesicles ~80 nm in diameter obtained from disrupted yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells. We provide evidence of a highly deformable behaviour for these vesicles, able to support repeated wall-to-wall compressions without irreversible deformations, accompanied by a noticeably high Young's modulus (~300 MPa) compared to that obtained for reconstituted artificial liposomes of similar size and approaching that of some virus particles. Surprisingly enough, the results are approximately similar for plasma and inner membrane nanovesicles, in spite of their different lipid compositions, especially on what concerns the ergosterol content. These results point towards an important structural role of membrane proteins in the mechanical response of natural membrane vesicles and open the perspective to their potential use as robust nanocontainers for bioapplications.Mechanical properties of nano-sized vesicles made up of natural membranes are crucial to the development of stable, biocompatible nanocontainers with enhanced functional, recognition and sensing capabilities. Here we measure and compare the mechanical properties of plasma and inner membrane nanovesicles ~80 nm in diameter obtained from disrupted yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells. We provide evidence of a highly deformable behaviour for these vesicles, able to support repeated wall-to-wall compressions without irreversible deformations, accompanied by a noticeably high Young's modulus (~300 MPa) compared to that obtained for reconstituted artificial liposomes of similar size and approaching that of some virus particles. Surprisingly enough, the results are approximately similar for plasma and inner membrane nanovesicles, in

  2. Proton conducting, high modulus polymer electrolyte membranes by polymerization-induced microphase separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chopade, Sujay; Hillmyer, Marc; Lodge, Timothy

    Robust solid-state polymer electrolyte membranes (PEMs) are vital for designing next-generation lithium-ion batteries and high-temperature fuel cells. However, the performance of diblock polymer electrolytes is generally limited by poor mechanical stability and network defects in the conducting pathways. We present the in-situ preparation of robust cross-linked PEMs via polymerization-induced microphase separation, and incorporation of protic ionic liquid (IL) into one of the microphase separated domains. The facile design strategy involves a delicate balance between the controlled growth of polystyrene from a poly(ethylene oxide) macro-chain transfer agent (PEO-CTA) and simultaneous chemical cross-linking by divinylbenzene in the presence of IL. Small angle X-ray scattering and transmission electron microscopy confirmed the formation of a disordered structure with bicontinuous morphology and a characteristic domain size of order 20 nm. The long-range continuity of the PEO/protic IL conducting nanochannels and cross-linked polystyrene domains imparts high thermal and mechanical stability to the PEMs, with elastic modulus approaching 10 MPa and a high ionic conductivity of 15 mS/cm at 180 °C.

  3. Composite wall concept for high temperature turbine shrouds: Survey of low modulus strain isolator materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bill, R. C.; Allen, G. P.; Wisander, D. W.

    1980-01-01

    Plasma sprayed yttria stabilized zirconium oxide turbine seal specimens, incorporating various low modulus porous metal strain isolator pads between the zirconium oxide and a dense metal substrate, were subjected to cyclic thermal shock testing. Specimens that had a low modulus pad composed of sintered FeNiCrAlY fibermetal survived 1000 thermal shock cycles without spalling of the ceramic. A figure of merit for the low modulus pad materials taking into consideration the elastic modulus, thermal conductivity, strength, and oxidation resistance of the pad was proposed, and showed reasonable agreement with the thermal shock results. A potential surface distress problem on the zirconium oxide, associated with nonuniform temperature distribution and rapid stress relaxation was identified. One approach to solving the surface distress problem through application of laser surface fusion of the zirconium oxide layer showed some promise, but improvements in the laser surface fusion process are necessary to prevent process associated damage to the ceramic.

  4. Highly porous, low elastic modulus 316L stainless steel scaffold prepared by selective laser melting.

    PubMed

    Čapek, Jaroslav; Machová, Markéta; Fousová, Michaela; Kubásek, Jiří; Vojtěch, Dalibor; Fojt, Jaroslav; Jablonská, Eva; Lipov, Jan; Ruml, Tomáš

    2016-12-01

    Recently, porous metallic materials have been extensively studied as candidates for use in the fabrication of scaffolds and augmentations to repair trabecular bone defects, e.g. in surroundings of joint replacements. Fabricating these complex structures by using common approaches (e.g., casting and machining) is very challenging. Therefore, rapid prototyping techniques, such as selective laser melting (SLM), have been investigated for these applications. In this study, we characterized a highly porous (87 vol.%) 316L stainless steel scaffold prepared by SLM. 316L steel was chosen because it presents a biomaterial still widely used for fabrication of joint replacements and, from the practical point of view, use of the same material for fabrication of an augmentation and a joint replacement is beneficial for corrosion prevention. The results are compared to the reported properties of two representative nonporous 316L stainless steels prepared either by SLM or casting and subsequent hot forging. The microstructural and mechanical properties and the surface chemical composition and interaction with the cells were investigated. The studied material exhibited mechanical properties that were similar to those of trabecular bone (compressive modulus of elasticity ~0.15GPa, compressive yield strength ~3MPa) and cytocompatibility after one day that was similar to that of wrought 316L stainless steel, which is a commonly used biomaterial. Based on the obtained results, SLM is a suitable method for the fabrication of porous 316L stainless steel scaffolds with highly porous structures.

  5. High elastic modulus nanoparticles: a novel tool for subfailure connective tissue matrix damage.

    PubMed

    Empson, Yvonne M; Ekwueme, Emmanuel C; Hong, Jung K; Paynter, Danielle M; Kwansa, Albert L; Brown, Chalmers; Pekkanen, Allison M; Roman, Maren; Rylander, Nichole M; Brolinson, Gunnar P; Freeman, Joseph W

    2014-09-01

    Subfailure matrix injuries such as sprains and strains account for a considerable portion of ligament and tendon pathologies. In addition to the lack of a robust biological healing response, these types of injuries are often characterized by seriously diminished matrix biomechanics. Recent work has shown nanosized particles, such as nanocarbons and nanocellulose, to be effective in modulating cell and biological matrix responses for biomedical applications. In this article, we investigate the feasibility and effect of using high stiffness nanostructures of varying size and shape as nanofillers to mechanically reinforce damaged soft tissue matrices. To this end, nanoparticles (NPs) were characterized using atomic force microscopy and dynamic light scattering techniques. Next, we used a uniaxial tensile injury model to test connective tissue (porcine skin and tendon) biomechanical response to NP injections. After injection into damaged skin and tendon specimens, the NPs, more notably nanocarbons in skin, led to an increase in elastic moduli and yield strength. Furthermore, rat primary patella tendon fibroblast cell activity evaluated using the metabolic water soluble tetrazolium salt assay showed no cytotoxicity of the NPs studied, instead after 21 days nanocellulose-treated tenocytes exhibited significantly higher cell activity when compared with nontreated control tenocytes. Dispersion of nanocarbons injected by solution into tendon tissue was investigated through histologic studies, revealing effective dispersion and infiltration in the treated region. Such results suggest that these high modulus NPs could be used as a tool for damaged connective tissue repair.

  6. Highly porous, low elastic modulus 316L stainless steel scaffold prepared by selective laser melting.

    PubMed

    Čapek, Jaroslav; Machová, Markéta; Fousová, Michaela; Kubásek, Jiří; Vojtěch, Dalibor; Fojt, Jaroslav; Jablonská, Eva; Lipov, Jan; Ruml, Tomáš

    2016-12-01

    Recently, porous metallic materials have been extensively studied as candidates for use in the fabrication of scaffolds and augmentations to repair trabecular bone defects, e.g. in surroundings of joint replacements. Fabricating these complex structures by using common approaches (e.g., casting and machining) is very challenging. Therefore, rapid prototyping techniques, such as selective laser melting (SLM), have been investigated for these applications. In this study, we characterized a highly porous (87 vol.%) 316L stainless steel scaffold prepared by SLM. 316L steel was chosen because it presents a biomaterial still widely used for fabrication of joint replacements and, from the practical point of view, use of the same material for fabrication of an augmentation and a joint replacement is beneficial for corrosion prevention. The results are compared to the reported properties of two representative nonporous 316L stainless steels prepared either by SLM or casting and subsequent hot forging. The microstructural and mechanical properties and the surface chemical composition and interaction with the cells were investigated. The studied material exhibited mechanical properties that were similar to those of trabecular bone (compressive modulus of elasticity ~0.15GPa, compressive yield strength ~3MPa) and cytocompatibility after one day that was similar to that of wrought 316L stainless steel, which is a commonly used biomaterial. Based on the obtained results, SLM is a suitable method for the fabrication of porous 316L stainless steel scaffolds with highly porous structures. PMID:27612756

  7. Shockwave determination of the shear velocity at very high pressures.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, O. L.

    1972-01-01

    Description of a proposed shockwave experiment that may provide some understanding on the behavior of planet core materials in the presence of high temperatures and pressures. Shockwave experimentation is shown to offer promise of revealing some information on shear velocity behavior at high pressures, and its relevance to properties of planet interiors consists in that abrupt changes in shear velocities at boundary layers could be experimentally confirmed where abrupt changes in density are suspected from seismic interpretation.

  8. Improving the Transparency of Ultra-Drawn Melt-Crystallized Polyethylenes: Toward High-Modulus/High-Strength Window Application.

    PubMed

    Shen, Lihua; Nickmans, Koen; Severn, John; Bastiaansen, Cees W M

    2016-07-13

    Highly transparent, ultradrawn high-density polyethylene (HDPE) films were successfully prepared using compression molding and solid-state drawing techniques. The low optical transmittance (<50%) of the pure drawn HDPE films can be drastically improved (>90%) by incorporating a small amount (>1 wt %/wt) of specific additives to HDPE materials prior to drawing. It is shown that additives with relatively high refractive index result in an increased optical transmittance in the visible light wavelength which illustrates that the improvement in optical characteristics probably originates from refractive index matching between the crystalline and noncrystalline regions in the drawn films. Moreover, the optically transparent drawn HDPE films containing additives maintain their physical and mechanical properties, especially their high modulus and high strength, which make these films potentially useful in a variety of applications, such as high-impact windows. PMID:27314927

  9. Improving the Transparency of Ultra-Drawn Melt-Crystallized Polyethylenes: Toward High-Modulus/High-Strength Window Application.

    PubMed

    Shen, Lihua; Nickmans, Koen; Severn, John; Bastiaansen, Cees W M

    2016-07-13

    Highly transparent, ultradrawn high-density polyethylene (HDPE) films were successfully prepared using compression molding and solid-state drawing techniques. The low optical transmittance (<50%) of the pure drawn HDPE films can be drastically improved (>90%) by incorporating a small amount (>1 wt %/wt) of specific additives to HDPE materials prior to drawing. It is shown that additives with relatively high refractive index result in an increased optical transmittance in the visible light wavelength which illustrates that the improvement in optical characteristics probably originates from refractive index matching between the crystalline and noncrystalline regions in the drawn films. Moreover, the optically transparent drawn HDPE films containing additives maintain their physical and mechanical properties, especially their high modulus and high strength, which make these films potentially useful in a variety of applications, such as high-impact windows.

  10. Injectable, high modulus, and fatigue resistant composite scaffold for load-bearing soft tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Hayami, James W S; Waldman, Stephen D; Amsden, Brian G

    2013-12-01

    High modulus, two-phase, bicontinuous scaffolds were prepared by photocross-linking an aqueous suspension of chondrocytes and N-methacrylate glycol chitosan with a hydrolyzable, hydrophobic, acrylated star-copolymer. Two acrylated star-copolymers were examined: poly(ε-caprolactone-co-d,l-lactide) (5446DLLACL) and poly(ε-caprolactone-co-trimethylene carbonate) (7030TMCCL). The scaffolds were assessed for injectability, two-phase interconnectivity, fatigue resistance, and long-term static culture behavior. The 7030TMCCL scaffolds demonstrated decreased moduli of 17% after 1 × 10(6) cycles at 30% strain and 5% after 56 days in culture, compared to the 5446DLLACL scaffolds, which exhibited decreases of 58 and 68%, respectively. The 7030TMCCL scaffolds accumulated more extracellular matrix after 56 days of culture (GAG: 20.1 ± 1, collagen: 35.5 ± 1.8 μg) compared to 5446DLLACL scaffolds (GAG: 13.2 ± 0.6, collagen: 6.2 ± 3.4 μg). Overall, the 7030TMCCL-based scaffolds were shown to be better suited for use as a load bearing soft tissue scaffold. PMID:24147621

  11. Fluid Effects on Shear Waves in FInely Layered Porous Media

    SciTech Connect

    Berryman, J G

    2004-05-21

    Although there are five effective shear moduli for any layered VTI medium, one and only one effective shear modulus for the layered system contains all the dependence of pore fluids on the elastic or poroelastic constants that can be observed in vertically polarized shear waves. Pore fluids can increase the magnitude the shear energy stored by this modulus by a term that ranges from the smallest to the largest shear moduli of the VTI system. But, since there are five shear moduli in play, the increase in shear energy overall is reduced by a factor of about 5 in general. We can therefore give definite bounds on the maximum increase of shear modulus, being about 20% of the permitted range, when gas is fully replaced by liquid. An attendant increase of density (depending on porosity and fluid density) by approximately 5 to 10% partially offsets the effect of this shear modulus increase. Thus, an increase of shear wave speed on the order of 5 to 10% is shown to be possible when circumstances are favorable - i.e., when the shear modulus fluctuations are large (resulting in strong anisotropy), and the medium behaves in an undrained fashion due to fluid trapping. At frequencies higher than seismic (such as sonic and ultrasonic waves for well-logging or laboratory experiments), short response times also produce the requisite undrained behavior and, therefore, fluids also affect shear waves at high frequencies by increasing rigidity.

  12. Shear and shear friction of ultra-high performance concrete bridge girders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crane, Charles Kennan

    Ultra-High Performance Concrete (UHPC) is a new class of concrete characterized by no coarse aggregate, steel fiber reinforcement, low w/c, low permeability, compressive strength exceeding 29,000 psi (200 MPa), tensile strength ranging from 1,200 to 2,500 psi (8 to 17 MPa), and very high toughness. These properties make prestressed precast UHPC bridge girders a very attractive replacement material for steel bridge girders, particularly when site demands require a comparable beam depth to steel and a 100+ year life span is desired. In order to efficiently utilize UHPC in bridge construction, it is necessary to create new design recommendations for its use. The interface between precast UHPC girder and cast-in-place concrete decks must be characterized in order to safely use composite design methods with this new material. Due to the lack of reinforcing bars, all shear forces in UHPC girders have to be carried by the concrete and steel fibers. Current U.S. codes do not consider fiber reinforcement in calculating shear capacity. Fiber contribution must be accurately accounted for in shear equations in order to use UHPC. Casting of UHPC may cause fibers to orient in the direction of casting. If fibers are preferentially oriented, physical properties of the concrete may also become anisotropic, which must be considered in design. The current research provides new understanding of shear and shear friction phenomena in UHPC including: (1) Current AASHTO codes provide a non-conservative estimate of interface shear performance of smooth UHPC interfaces with and without interface steel. (2) Fluted interfaces can be created by impressing formliners into the surface of plastic UHPC. AASHTO and ACI codes for roughened interfaces are conservative for design of fluted UHPC interfaces.(3) A new equation for the calculation of shear capacity of UHPC girders is presented which takes into account the contribution of steel fiber reinforcement. (4) Fibers are shown to preferentially

  13. A new instrument for high-resolution in situ assessment of Young's modulus in shallow cohesive sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barry, Mark A.; Johnson, Bruce D.; Boudreau, Bernard P.

    2012-08-01

    This paper describes a new, miniature, instrumented flat dilatometer (mIDMT) designed to assess variations in nearly continuous compressive stress-strain behaviour with depth in shallow cohesive sediments. The instrument was tested both in situ in the Bay of Fundy, Nova Scotia, Canada, and in cored samples from Willapa Bay, Washington, USA. Comparisons between probe and laboratory uniaxial assessments for other elastic materials—gelatine and foam rubber specifically—show strong agreement over the range of strains induced in the experiments. Observed values of Young's modulus ( E) for the gelatine and ethylene-vinyl acetate foam ranged from 6-343 kPa. Sediment stress-strain curves were distinctly linear for the overconsolidated fine-grained sediments of the Minas Basin, and values of E were found to increase with depth from near zero to 500-1,300 kPa at 20 cm depth. At the Willapa site, the sandy tidal flat sediments also behave elastically but E tended to increase more strongly with depth than for sediments from the Minas Basin. Young's modulus was inversely correlated to porosity at all sites tested, and linearly related to shear strength in the Minas Basin. The newly designed instrument has much finer resolution than for other, similar methods of determining E in situ, and it provides data at a resolution sufficient to assess small-scale processes such as gas bubble growth and infaunal locomotion, for which elastic constants are needed for modelling and prediction.

  14. Interfacial shear stress measurement using high spatial resolution multiphase PIV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    André, Matthieu A.; Bardet, Philippe M.

    2015-06-01

    In multiphase flows, form drag and viscous shear stress transfer momentum between phases. For numerous environmental and man-made flows, it is of primary importance to predict this transfer at a liquid-gas interface. In its general expression, interfacial shear stress involves local velocity gradients as well as surface velocity, curvature, and surface tension gradients. It is therefore a challenging quantity to measure experimentally or compute numerically. In fact, no experimental work to date has been able to directly resolve all the terms contributing to the shear stress in the case of curved and moving surfaces. In an attempt to fully resolve the interface shear stress when surface tension gradients are negligible, high-resolution particle image velocimetry (PIV) data are acquired simultaneously on both sides of a water-air interface. The flow consists of a well-conditioned uniform and homogeneous water jet discharging in quiescent air, which exhibits two-dimensional surface waves as a result of a shear layer instability below the surface. PIV provides velocity fields in both phases, while planar laser-induced fluorescence is used to track the interface and obtain its curvature. To compute the interfacial shear stress from the data, several processing schemes are proposed and compared, using liquid and/or gas phase data. Vorticity at the surface, which relates to the shear stress through the dynamic boundary condition at the surface, is also computed and provides additional strategies for estimating the shear. The various schemes are in agreement within the experimental uncertainties, validating the methodology for experimentally resolving this demanding quantity.

  15. Measurement of Young's modulus and residual stress of thin SiC layers for MEMS high temperature applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pabst, Oliver; Schiffer, Michael; Obermeier, Ernst; Tekin, Tolga; Lang, Klaus Dieter; Ngo, Ha-Duong

    2011-06-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) is a promising material for applications in harsh environments. Standard silicon (Si) microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) are limited in operating temperature to temperatures below 130 °C for electronic devices and below 600 °C for mechanical devices. Due to its large bandgap SiC enables MEMS with significantly higher operating temperatures. Furthermore, SiC exhibits high chemical stability and thermal conductivity. Young's modulus and residual stress are important mechanical properties for the design of sophisticated SiC-based MEMS devices. In particular, residual stresses are strongly dependent on the deposition conditions. Literature values for Young's modulus range from 100 to 400 GPa, and residual stresses range from 98 to 486 MPa. In this paper we present our work on investigating Young's modulus and residual stress of SiC films deposited on single crystal bulk silicon using bulge testing. This method is based on measurement of pressure-dependent membrane deflection. Polycrystalline as well as single crystal cubic silicon carbide samples are studied. For the samples tested, average Young's modulus and residual stress measured are 417 GPa and 89 MPa for polycrystalline samples. For single crystal samples, the according values are 388 GPa and 217 MPa. These results compare well with literature values.

  16. Low-k Material Characterization with High Spatial Resolution: k Value and E Modulus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zschech, Ehrenfried; Potapov, Pavel; Chumakov, Dmytro; Engelmann, Hans-Juergen; Geisler, Holm; Sukharev, Valeriy

    2007-10-01

    Plasma processes for resist stripping, via etching and post-etch cleaning remove C and H containing molecular groups from the near-surface layer of organosilicate glass (OSG). Particularly, composition and chemical bonding of low-k materials are changed. In this paper, the effect of chemical bonding on permittivity and elastic modulus is studied. Compositional analysis and chemical bonding characterization of structured ILD films with nanometer resolution is done with electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). The fine structure near the C-K electron energy loss edge allows to differentiate between C-H, C-C, and C-O bonds, and consequently, between individual low-k materials and their modifications. Dielectric permittivity changes are studied based on VEELS (valence EELS) measurements and subsequent Kramers-Kronig analysis. The elastic modulus is determined with atomic force microscopy (AFM) in force modulation (FM) mode. Nanoindentation was applied as a complementary technique to obtain reference data.

  17. High modulus rare earth and beryllium containing silicate glass compositions. [for glass reinforcing fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bacon, J. F. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    Glass compositions having a Young's modulus of at least 16 million psi and a specific modulus of at least 110 million inches consisting essentially of approximately, by weight, 20 to 43% SiO2, 8 to 21% Al2O3, 4 to 10% BeO, 27 to 58% of at least one oxide selected from a first group consisting of Y2O3, La2O3, Nd2O3, Ce2O3, Ce2O3, and the mixed rare earth oxides, and 3 to 12% of at least one oxide selected from a second group consisting of MgO, ZrO2, ZnO and CaO are described. The molar ratio of BeO to the total content of the first group oxides is from 1.0 to 3.0.

  18. An improved fully integrated, high-speed, dual-modulus divider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Sun; Yong, Xu; Guangyan, Ma; Hui, Shi; Fei, Zhao; Ying, Lin

    2014-11-01

    A fully integrated 2n/2n+1 dual-modulus divider in GHz frequency range is presented. The improved structure can make all separated logic gates embed into correlative D flip—flops completely. In this way, the complex logic functions can be performed with a minimum number of devices and with maximum speed, so that lower power consumption and faster speed are obtained. In addition, the low-voltage bandgap reference needed by the frequency divider is specifically designed to provide a 1.0 V output. According to the design demand, the circuit is fabricated in 0.18 μm standard CMOS process, and the measured results show that its operating frequency range is 1.1-2.5 GHz. The dual-modulus divider dissipates 1.1 mA from a 1.8 V power supply. The temperature coefficient of the reference voltage circuit is 8.3 ppm/°C when the temperature varies from -40 to +125 °C. By comparison, the dual-modulus divide designed in this paper can possess better performance and flexibility.

  19. High shear stress induces atherosclerotic vulnerable plaque formation through angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi; Qiu, Juhui; Luo, Shisui; Xie, Xiang; Zheng, Yiming; Zhang, Kang; Ye, Zhiyi; Liu, Wanqian; Gregersen, Hans; Wang, Guixue

    2016-01-01

    Rupture of atherosclerotic plaques causing thrombosis is the main cause of acute coronary syndrome and ischemic strokes. Inhibition of thrombosis is one of the important tasks developing biomedical materials such as intravascular stents and vascular grafts. Shear stress (SS) influences the formation and development of atherosclerosis. The current review focuses on the vulnerable plaques observed in the high shear stress (HSS) regions, which localizes at the proximal region of the plaque intruding into the lumen. The vascular outward remodelling occurs in the HSS region for vascular compensation and that angiogenesis is a critical factor for HSS which induces atherosclerotic vulnerable plaque formation. These results greatly challenge the established belief that low shear stress is important for expansive remodelling, which provides a new perspective for preventing the transition of stable plaques to high-risk atherosclerotic lesions. PMID:27482467

  20. High resolution weak lensing mass mapping combining shear and flexion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanusse, F.; Starck, J.-L.; Leonard, A.; Pires, S.

    2016-06-01

    Aims: We propose a new mass mapping algorithm, specifically designed to recover small-scale information from a combination of gravitational shear and flexion. Including flexion allows us to supplement the shear on small scales in order to increase the sensitivity to substructures and the overall resolution of the convergence map without relying on strong lensing constraints. Methods: To preserve all available small scale information, we avoid any binning of the irregularly sampled input shear and flexion fields and treat the mass mapping problem as a general ill-posed inverse problem, which is regularised using a robust multi-scale wavelet sparsity prior. The resulting algorithm incorporates redshift, reduced shear, and reduced flexion measurements for individual galaxies and is made highly efficient by the use of fast Fourier estimators. Results: We tested our reconstruction method on a set of realistic weak lensing simulations corresponding to typical HST/ACS cluster observations and demonstrate our ability to recover substructures with the inclusion of flexion, which are otherwise lost if only shear information is used. In particular, we can detect substructures on the 15'' scale well outside of the critical region of the clusters. In addition, flexion also helps to constrain the shape of the central regions of the main dark matter halos. Our mass mapping software, called Glimpse2D, is made freely available at http://www.cosmostat.org/software/glimpse

  1. High Modulus Silicates/poly L-Lactic Acid) Based Polymers Assemblies for Potential Applications in Tissue Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Hui; Xu, Ronghua; Xu, Hong; Zhang, Linping; Zhong, Yi; Jiang, Qiuran; Yang, Yiqi; Mao, Zhiping

    2013-08-01

    In this paper, silicates/poly (l-lactic acid)-co-bisphenol A epoxy resin assemblies with high modulus were developed by in situ polymerization of l-lactic acid and surface-modified lamellar vermiculites for potential applications in tissue engineering. These assemblies represented advances in the mechanical properties that can be hardly obtained in other assemblies formed via physical interactions. The covalent grafting of the PLLA based polymers onto the vermiculites surface was confirmed by X-ray photon spectroscopy. The elastic moduli of the assemblies measured by an atomic force microscope were around 7 GPa, and higher than the elastic moduli of the pure polymer (3.2 GPa) and unmodified vermiculites (1.5 GPa), respectively. Images demonstrated that cells proliferated and reached confluence on both the assemblies and pure polymer materials, which indicated that the assemblies exhibited the similar cytocompatibility with pure polymer. With the addition of 5 wt.% assemblies, the polymer and assemblies blended-composites exhibited a 118% improvement in compressive strength and 117% improvement in modulus compared with pure polymer. The present work demonstrated a strategy for the assembly of biomacromolecules and inorganic layers and fabrication of biomaterials high in modulus for tissue engineering applications.

  2. Diamond anvil cell for spectroscopic investigation of materials at high temperature, high pressure and shear

    DOEpatents

    Westerfield, Curtis L.; Morris, John S.; Agnew, Stephen F.

    1997-01-01

    Diamond anvil cell for spectroscopic investigation of materials at high temperature, high pressure and shear. A cell is described which, in combination with Fourier transform IR spectroscopy, permits the spectroscopic investigation of boundary layers under conditions of high temperature, high pressure and shear.

  3. Diamond anvil cell for spectroscopic investigation of materials at high temperature, high pressure and shear

    DOEpatents

    Westerfield, C.L.; Morris, J.S.; Agnew, S.F.

    1997-01-14

    Diamond anvil cell is described for spectroscopic investigation of materials at high temperature, high pressure and shear. A cell is described which, in combination with Fourier transform IR spectroscopy, permits the spectroscopic investigation of boundary layers under conditions of high temperature, high pressure and shear. 4 figs.

  4. Analyzing cements and completion gels using dynamic modulus

    SciTech Connect

    Lacy, L.L.; Rickards, A.

    1996-12-31

    The measurement and control of the physical properties of completion fluids are important problems to the oil and gas industry. A new laboratory instrument, a dynamic modulus analyzer (DMA), has been developed that analyses the physical and mechanical properties of fluids and cement slurries under downhole conditions by using high resolution ultrasonics. A dynamic modulus analyzer can measure compressive strength, dynamic Young`s modulus, and the shrinkage or expansion of cements. The DMA can also be used to determine viscosity changes and changes in the density of fracturing and completion gels under static (10{sup -4} s{sup -1}) or zero shear conditions. Test data indicate the DMA is 20 to 100 times more sensitive than current laboratory instruments in evaluating changes in cements or gel properties. Cement shrinkage was measured simultaneously with compressive strength and dynamic modulus. The times required to achieve maximum gel strength and gel breaking were also determined for Fracturing gels and a temporary blocking gel.

  5. The Young's modulus of high-aspect-ratio carbon/carbon nanotube composite microcantilevers by experimental and modeling validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Peng; Yang, Xiao; He, Liang; Hao, Zhimeng; Luo, Wen; Xiong, Biao; Xu, Xu; Niu, Chaojiang; Yan, Mengyu; Mai, Liqiang

    2015-03-01

    This paper reports the Young's modulus of a carbon nanotube (CNT)-reinforced carbon/CNT (C/CNT) composite microcantilevers measured by laser Doppler vibrometer and validated by finite element method. Also, the microfabrication process of the high-aspect-ratio C/CNT microcantilever arrays based on silicon micromolding and pyrolysis is presented in detail. With the in-plane natural resonant frequencies of the microcantilevers measured by a laser Doppler vibrometer, a single degree of freedom (SDoF) model based on Euler-Bernoulli (E-B) beam theory is used to calculate the Young's modulus of this composite. To figure out whether this SDoF model can be applied to these composite microcantilevers, the finite element (FE) simulation of these microcantilevers was performed. The Young's modulus of C/CNT composite microcantilevers fabricated by the pyrolysis process at 600 °C is 9391 MPa, and a good agreement between the results from experiments and FE simulation is obtained.

  6. The Young's modulus of high-aspect-ratio carbon/carbon nanotube composite microcantilevers by experimental and modeling validation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Peng; Yang, Xiao; He, Liang E-mail: mlq518@whut.edu.cn; Hao, Zhimeng; Luo, Wen; Xiong, Biao; Xu, Xu; Niu, Chaojiang; Yan, Mengyu; Mai, Liqiang E-mail: mlq518@whut.edu.cn

    2015-03-16

    This paper reports the Young's modulus of a carbon nanotube (CNT)-reinforced carbon/CNT (C/CNT) composite microcantilevers measured by laser Doppler vibrometer and validated by finite element method. Also, the microfabrication process of the high-aspect-ratio C/CNT microcantilever arrays based on silicon micromolding and pyrolysis is presented in detail. With the in-plane natural resonant frequencies of the microcantilevers measured by a laser Doppler vibrometer, a single degree of freedom (SDoF) model based on Euler-Bernoulli (E-B) beam theory is used to calculate the Young's modulus of this composite. To figure out whether this SDoF model can be applied to these composite microcantilevers, the finite element (FE) simulation of these microcantilevers was performed. The Young's modulus of C/CNT composite microcantilevers fabricated by the pyrolysis process at 600 °C is 9391 MPa, and a good agreement between the results from experiments and FE simulation is obtained.

  7. Structure and Bulk Modulus of High-Strength Boron Compounds*1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundström, Torsten

    1997-10-01

    The structures and homogeneity ranges of B6O1-xand B12S2-xwere studied using Rietveld analysis of powder X ray patterns. The oxygen content of boron suboxide decreases with temperature in the range 1250-1450°C. Stoichiometric boron suboxide cannot be prepared from amorphous orα-rh boron and B2O3at ambient pressure. Significantly higher pressures are required. The boron subsulfide was found to be stable from B12S<1to B12S1.3at 1400-1600°C. Semiempirical bulk modulus calculations are reported for hard icosahedral boron-rich compounds and diamond-like tetrahedrally coordinated boron compounds. In connection with this the structure of diamond-like B2O is discussed.

  8. A Predictive Model of High Shear Thrombus Growth.

    PubMed

    Mehrabadi, Marmar; Casa, Lauren D C; Aidun, Cyrus K; Ku, David N

    2016-08-01

    The ability to predict the timescale of thrombotic occlusion in stenotic vessels may improve patient risk assessment for thrombotic events. In blood contacting devices, thrombosis predictions can lead to improved designs to minimize thrombotic risks. We have developed and validated a model of high shear thrombosis based on empirical correlations between thrombus growth and shear rate. A mathematical model was developed to predict the growth of thrombus based on the hemodynamic shear rate. The model predicts thrombus deposition based on initial geometric and fluid mechanic conditions, which are updated throughout the simulation to reflect the changing lumen dimensions. The model was validated by comparing predictions against actual thrombus growth in six separate in vitro experiments: stenotic glass capillary tubes (diameter = 345 µm) at three shear rates, the PFA-100(®) system, two microfluidic channel dimensions (heights = 300 and 82 µm), and a stenotic aortic graft (diameter = 5.5 mm). Comparison of the predicted occlusion times to experimental results shows excellent agreement. The model is also applied to a clinical angiography image to illustrate the time course of thrombosis in a stenotic carotid artery after plaque cap rupture. Our model can accurately predict thrombotic occlusion time over a wide range of hemodynamic conditions.

  9. Hydrodynamics of CNT dispersion in high shear dispersion mixers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Young Min; Lee, Dong Hyun; Hwang, Wook Ryol; Lee, Sang Bok; Jung, Seung-Il

    2014-11-01

    In this work, we investigate the carbon nanotube (CNT) fragmentation mechanism and dispersion in high shear homogenizers as a plausible dispersion technique, correlating with device geometries and processing conditions, for mass production of CNT-aluminum composites for automobile industries. A CNT dispersion model has been established in a turbulent flow regime and an experimental method in characterizing the critical yield stress of CNT flocs are presented. Considering CNT dispersion in ethanol as a model system, we tested two different geometries of high shear mixers — blade-stirrer type and rotor-stator type homogenizers — and reported the particle size distributions in time and the comparison has been made with the modeling approach and partly with the computational results.

  10. Hexagonal-structured ε-NbN: ultra-incompressibility, high shear rigidity, and a possible hard superconducting material.

    PubMed

    Zou, Yongtao; Wang, Xuebing; Chen, Ting; Li, Xuefei; Qi, Xintong; Welch, David; Zhu, Pinwen; Liu, Bingbing; Cui, Tian; Li, Baosheng

    2015-01-01

    Exploring the structural stability and elasticity of hexagonal ε-NbN helps discover correlations among its physical properties for scientific and technological applications. Here, for the first time, we measured the ultra-incompressibility and high shear rigidity of polycrystalline hexagonal ε-NbN using ultrasonic interferometry and in situ X-ray diffraction, complemented with first-principles density-functional theory calculations up to 30 GPa in pressure. Using a finite strain equation of state approach, the elastic bulk and shear moduli, as well as their pressure dependences are derived from the measured velocities and densities, yielding BS0 = 373.3(15) GPa, G0 = 200.5(8) GPa, ∂BS/∂P = 3.81(3) and ∂G/∂P = 1.67(1). The hexagonal ε-NbN possesses a very high bulk modulus, rivaling that of superhard material cBN (B0 = 381.1 GPa). The high shear rigidity is comparable to that for superhard γ-B (G0 = 227.2 GPa). We found that the crystal structure of transition-metal nitrides and the outmost electrons of the corresponding metals may dominate their pressure dependences in bulk and shear moduli. In addition, the elastic moduli, Vickers hardness, Debye temperature, melting temperature and a possible superconductivity of hexagonal ε-NbN all increase with pressures, suggesting its exceptional suitability for applications under extreme conditions. PMID:26028439

  11. Hexagonal-structured epsilon-NbN. Ultra-incompressibility, high shear rigidity, and a possible hard superconducting material

    SciTech Connect

    Zou, Y.; Wang, X.; Chen, T.; Li, X.; Qi, X; Welch, D.; Zhu, P.; Liu, B.; Cui, T.; Li, B.

    2015-06-01

    Exploring the structural stability and elasticity of hexagonal ε-NbN helps discover correlations among its physical properties for scientific and technological applications. Here, for the first time, we measured the ultra-incompressibility and high shear rigidity of polycrystalline hexagonal ε-NbN using ultrasonic interferometry and in situ X-ray diffraction, complemented with first-principles density-functional theory calculations up to 30 GPa in pressure. Using a finite strain equation of state approach, the elastic bulk and shear moduli, as well as their pressure dependences are derived from the measured velocities and densities, yielding BS0 = 373.3(15) GPa, G0 = 200.5(8) GPa, ∂BS/∂P = 3.81(3) and ∂G/∂P = 1.67(1). The hexagonal ε-NbN possesses a very high bulk modulus, rivaling that of superhard material cBN (B0 = 381.1 GPa). The high shear rigidity is comparable to that for superhard γ-B (G0 = 227.2 GPa). We found that the crystal structure of transition-metal nitrides and the outmost electrons of the corresponding metals may dominate their pressure dependences in bulk and shear moduli. In addition, the elastic moduli, Vickers hardness, Debye temperature, melting temperature and a possible superconductivity of hexagonal ε-NbN all increase with pressures, suggesting its exceptional suitability for applications under extreme conditions.

  12. Hexagonal-structured epsilon-NbN. Ultra-incompressibility, high shear rigidity, and a possible hard superconducting material

    DOE PAGES

    Zou, Y.; Wang, X.; Chen, T.; Li, X.; Qi, X; Welch, D.; Zhu, P.; Liu, B.; Cui, T.; Li, B.

    2015-06-01

    Exploring the structural stability and elasticity of hexagonal ε-NbN helps discover correlations among its physical properties for scientific and technological applications. Here, for the first time, we measured the ultra-incompressibility and high shear rigidity of polycrystalline hexagonal ε-NbN using ultrasonic interferometry and in situ X-ray diffraction, complemented with first-principles density-functional theory calculations up to 30 GPa in pressure. Using a finite strain equation of state approach, the elastic bulk and shear moduli, as well as their pressure dependences are derived from the measured velocities and densities, yielding BS0 = 373.3(15) GPa, G0 = 200.5(8) GPa, ∂BS/∂P = 3.81(3) and ∂G/∂Pmore » = 1.67(1). The hexagonal ε-NbN possesses a very high bulk modulus, rivaling that of superhard material cBN (B0 = 381.1 GPa). The high shear rigidity is comparable to that for superhard γ-B (G0 = 227.2 GPa). We found that the crystal structure of transition-metal nitrides and the outmost electrons of the corresponding metals may dominate their pressure dependences in bulk and shear moduli. In addition, the elastic moduli, Vickers hardness, Debye temperature, melting temperature and a possible superconductivity of hexagonal ε-NbN all increase with pressures, suggesting its exceptional suitability for applications under extreme conditions.« less

  13. Effect of orientation and targeted extracellular matrix degradation on annulus fibrosus shear mechanical properties

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Nathan T.; Smith, Lachlan J.; Han, Woojin M.; Morelli, Jeffrey; Yoder, Jonathon H.; Elliott, Dawn M.

    2011-01-01

    The intervertebral disc experiences combinations of compression, torsion, and bending that subject the disc substructures, particularly the annulus fibrosus (AF), to multidirectional loads and deformations. Combined tensile and shear loading is a particularly important loading paradigm, as compressive loads place the AF in circumferential hoop tension, and spine torsion or bending induces AF shear. Yet the anisotropy of AF mechanical properties in shear, as well as important structure-function mechanisms governing this response, are not well understood. The objective of this study, therefore, was to investigate the effects of tissue orientation and enzymatic degradation of glycosaminoglycan (GAG) and elastin on AF shear mechanical properties. Significant anisotropy was found: the circumferential shear modulus, Gθz, was an order of magnitude greater than the radial shear modulus, Grθ. In the circumferential direction, prestrain significantly increased the shear modulus, suggesting an important role for collagen fiber stretch in shear properties for this orientation. While not significant and highly variable, ChABC treatment increased the circumferential shear modulus compared to PBS control (p=0.15). Together with the established literature for tensile loading of fiber-reinforced GAG-rich tissues, the trends for changes in shear modulus with ChABC treatment reflect complex, structure-function relationships between GAG and collagen that potentially occur over several hierarchical scales. Elastase treatment caused no difference in shear modulus with respect to PBS control for either radial or circumferential orientation. Elastase digestion did not significantly affect shear modulus; further contributing to the notion that circumferential shear modulus is dominated by collagen fiber stretch. The results of this study highlight the complexity of the structure-function relationships that govern the mechanical response of the AF in radial and circumferential shear, and

  14. High temperature dynamic modulus and damping of aluminum and titanium matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dicarlo, J. A.; Maisel, J. E.

    1979-01-01

    Dynamic modulus and damping capacity property data were measured from 20 to over 500 C for unidirectional B/Al (1100), B/Al (6061), B/SiC/Al (6061), Al2O3/Al, SiC/Ti-6Al-4V, and SiC/Ti composites. The measurements were made under vacuum by the forced vibration of composite bars at free-free flexural resonance near 2000 Hz and at amplitudes below 0.000001. Whereas little variation was observed in the dynamic moduli of specimens with approximately the same fiber content (50 percent), the damping of B/Al composites was found at all temperatures to be significantly greater than the damping of the Al2O3/Al and SiC/Ti composites. For those few situations where slight deviations from theory were observed, the dynamic data were examined for information concerning microstructural changes induced by composite fabrication and thermal treatment. The 270 C damping peak observed in B/Al (6061) composites after heat treatment above 460 C appears to be the result of a change in the 6061 aluminum alloy microstructure induced by interaction with the boron fibers. The growth characteristics of the damping peak suggest its possible value for monitoring fiber strength degration caused by excess thermal treatment during B/Al (6061) fabrication and use.

  15. Silorane- and high filled-based "low-shrinkage" resin composites: shrinkage, flexural strength and modulus.

    PubMed

    Arrais, Cesar Augusto Galvão; Oliveira, Marcelo Tavares de; Mettenburg, Donald; Rueggeberg, Frederick Allen; Giannini, Marcelo

    2013-01-01

    This study compared the volumetric shrinkage (VS), flexural strength (FS) and flexural modulus (FM) properties of the low-shrinkage resin composite Aelite LS (Bisco) to those of Filtek LS (3M ESPE) and two regular dimethacrylate-based resin composites, the microfilled Heliomolar (Ivoclar Vivadent) and the microhybrid Aelite Universal (Bisco). The composites (n = 5) were placed on the Teflon pedestal of a video-imaging device, and VS was recorded every minute for 5 min after 40 s of light exposure. For the FS and FM tests, resin discs (0.6 mm in thickness and 6.0 mm in diameter) were obtained (n = 12) and submitted to a piston-ring biaxial test in a universal testing machine. VS, FS, and FM data were submitted to two-way repeated measures and one-way ANOVA, respectively, followed by Tukey's post-hoc test (a = 5%). Filtek LS showed lower VS than did Aelite LS, which in turn showed lower shrinkage than did the other composites. Aelite Universal and Filtek LS exhibited higher FS than did Heliomolar and Aelite LS, both of which exhibited the highest FM. No significant difference in FM was noted between Filtek LS and Aelite Universal, while Heliomolar exhibited the lowest values. Aelite LS was not as effective as Filtek LS regarding shrinkage, although both low-shrinkage composites showed lower VS than did the other composites. Only Filtek LS exhibited FS and FM comparable to those of the regular microhybrid dimethacrylate-based resin composite. PMID:23459774

  16. Design and Validation of a Compressive Tissue Stimulator with High-Throughput Capacity and Real-Time Modulus Measurement Capability

    PubMed Central

    Salvetti, David J.; Pino, Christopher J.; Manuel, Steven G.; Dallmeyer, Ian; Rangarajan, Sanjeet V.; Meyer, Tobias; Kotov, Misha

    2012-01-01

    Mechanical stimulation has been shown to impact the properties of engineered hyaline cartilage constructs and is relevant for engineering of cartilage and osteochondral tissues. Most mechanical stimulators developed to date emphasize precision over adaptability to standard tissue culture equipment and protocols. The realization of mechanical characteristics in engineered constructs approaching native cartilage requires the optimization of complex variables (type of stimulus, regimen, and bimolecular signals). We have proposed and validated a stimulator design that focuses on high construct capacity, compatibility with tissue culture plastic ware, and regimen adaptability to maximize throughput. This design utilizes thin force sensors in lieu of a load cell and a linear encoder to verify position. The implementation of an individual force sensor for each sample enables the measurement of Young's modulus while stimulating the sample. Removable and interchangeable Teflon plungers mounted using neodymium magnets contact each sample. Variations in plunger height and design can vary the strain and force type on individual samples. This allows for the evaluation of a myriad of culture conditions and regimens simultaneously. The system was validated using contact accuracy, and Young's modulus measurements range as key parameters. Contact accuracy for the system was excellent within 1.16% error of the construct height in comparison to measurements made with a micrometer. Biomaterials ranging from bioceramics (cancellous bone, 123 MPa) to soft gels (1% agarose, 20 KPa) can be measured without any modification to the device. The accuracy of measurements in conjunction with the wide range of moduli tested demonstrate the unique characteristics of the device and the feasibility of using this device in mapping real-time changes to Young's modulus of tissue constructs (cartilage, bone) through the developmental phases in ex vivo culture conditions. PMID:21988089

  17. Metastable β-type Ti-30Nb-1Mo-4Sn Alloy with Ultralow Young's Modulus and High Strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Liang; Guo, Shun; Meng, Qingkun; Zhao, Xinqing

    2014-02-01

    The effect of thermo-mechanical treatment on the mechanical properties of a novel metastable β-type Ti-30Nb-1Mo-4Sn (wt pct) alloy has been investigated. The solution-treated alloy consists of β and α″ phases and exhibits a two-stage yielding with a low yield stress (around 100 MPa). After cold rolling at a reduction of 87.5 pct and subsequent annealing treat at 623 K (350 °C) for 30 minutes, a fine microstructure with nano-sized α precipitates distributed in small β grains as well as high density of dislocations was obtained to achieve a yield strength of 954 MPa and an ultimate tensile strength of 999 MPa. With low stability of β phase and small volume fraction of α precipitates, the annealed specimen exhibits a low Young's modulus of 45 GPa. Such an excellent combination of the low elastic modulus and high strength in mechanical properties indicates a great potential candidate for biomedical applications.

  18. Experimental determination of bulk modulus of 14 A tobermorite using high pressure synchrotron X-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Jae Eun; Clark, Simon M.; Wenk, Hans-Rudolf; Monteiro, Paulo J.M.

    2012-02-15

    Using a diamond anvil cell, 14 A tobermorite, a structural analogue of calcium silicate hydrates (C-S-H), was examined by high-pressure synchrotron X-ray diffraction up to 4.8 GPa under hydrostatic conditions. The bulk modulus of 14 A tobermorite was calculated, K{sub o} = 47 GPa. Comparison of the current results with previous high pressure studies on C-S-H(I) indicates that: (1) the compression behavior of the lattice parameters a and b of 14 A tobermorite and C-S-H(I) are very similar, implying that both materials may have very similar Ca-O layers, and also implying that an introduction of structural defects into the Ca-O layers may not substantially change in-plane incompressibility of the ab plane of 14 A tobermorite; and (2) the bulk modulus values of 14 A tobermorite and C-S-H(I) are dominated by the incompressibility of the lattice parameter c, which is directly related to the interlayer spacing composed of dreierketten silicate chains, interlayer Ca, and water molecules.

  19. Effect of a High Density of Stacking Faults on the Young's Modulus of GaAs Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yujie; Burgess, Tim; An, Xianghai; Mai, Yiu-Wing; Tan, H Hoe; Zou, Jin; Ringer, Simon P; Jagadish, Chennupati; Liao, Xiaozhou

    2016-03-01

    Stacking faults (SFs) are commonly observed crystalline defects in III-V semiconductor nanowires (NWs) that affect a variety of physical properties. Understanding the effect of SFs on NW mechanical properties is critical to NW applications in nanodevices. In this study, the Young's moduli of GaAs NWs with two distinct structures, defect-free single crystalline wurtzite (WZ) and highly defective wurtzite containing a high density of SFs (WZ-SF), are investigated using combined in situ compression transmission electron microscopy and finite element analysis. The Young's moduli of both WZ and WZ-SF GaAs NWs were found to increase with decreasing diameter due to the increasing volume fraction of the native oxide shell. The presence of a high density of SFs was further found to increase the Young's modulus by 13%. This stiffening effect of SFs is attributed to the change in the interatomic bonding configuration at the SFs. PMID:26885570

  20. Behavior of Fiber Glass Bolts, Rock Bolts and Cable Bolts in Shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xuwei; Aziz, Naj; Mirzaghorbanali, Ali; Nemcik, Jan

    2016-07-01

    This paper experimentally compares the shear behavior of fiber glass (FG) bolt, rock bolt (steel rebar bolt) and cable bolt for the bolt contribution to bolted concrete surface shear strength, and bolt failure mode. Two double shear apparatuses of different size were used for the study. The tensile strength, the shear strength and the deformation modulus of bolt control the shear behavior of a sheared bolted joint. Since the strength and deformation modulus of FG bolt, rock bolt and cable bolt obtained from uniaxial tensile tests are different, their shear behavior in reinforcing joints is accordingly different. Test results showed that the shear stiffness of FG bolted joints decreased gradually from the beginning to end, while the shear stiffness of joints reinforced by rock bolt and cable bolt decreased bi-linearly, which is clearly consistent with their tensile deformation modulus. The bolted joint shear stiffness was highly influenced by bolt pretension in the high stiffness stage for both rock bolt and cable bolt, but not in the low stiffness stage. The rock bolt contribution to joint shear strength standardised by the bolt tensile strength was the largest, followed by cable bolts, then FG bolts. Both the rock bolts and cable bolts tended to fail in tension, while FG bolts in shear due to their low shear strength and constant deformation modulus.

  1. Local isotropy in high Reynolds number turbulent shear flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saddoughi, Seyed G.

    1993-01-01

    This is a report on the continuation of experiments, which Dr. Srinivas Veeravalli and the present author started in 1991, to investigate the hypothesis of local isotropy in shear flows. This hypothesis, which states that at sufficiently high Reynolds numbers the small-scale structures of turbulent motions are independent of large-scale structures and mean deformations, has been used in theoretical studies of turbulence and computational methods like large-eddy simulation. The importance of Kolmogorov's ideas arises from the fact that they create a foundation for turbulence theory.

  2. β-Type Zr-Nb-Ti biomedical materials with high plasticity and low modulus for hard tissue replacements.

    PubMed

    Nie, Li; Zhan, Yongzhong; Hu, Tong; Chen, Xiaoxian; Wang, Chenghui

    2014-01-01

    In order to develop new biomedical materials for hard tissue replacements, Zr-20Nb-xTi (x=0, 3, 7, 11 and 15) alloys with required properties were designed and prepared by using the vacuum arc melting method for the first time. Phase analysis and microstructural observation showed that all the as cast samples consisted of equiaxed β-Zr phase. The mechanical properties and fracture behaviors of the Zr-20Nb-xTi alloys have been analyzed. It is found that these alloys exhibit high plasticity, moderate compressive strength (1044-1325MPa) and yield stress (854-1080MPa), high elastic energy (12-20MJ/m(3)) and low Young's modulus (28-31GPa). This good combination of mechanical properties makes them potential biomedical materials for hard tissue replacement.

  3. β-Type Zr-Nb-Ti biomedical materials with high plasticity and low modulus for hard tissue replacements.

    PubMed

    Nie, Li; Zhan, Yongzhong; Hu, Tong; Chen, Xiaoxian; Wang, Chenghui

    2014-01-01

    In order to develop new biomedical materials for hard tissue replacements, Zr-20Nb-xTi (x=0, 3, 7, 11 and 15) alloys with required properties were designed and prepared by using the vacuum arc melting method for the first time. Phase analysis and microstructural observation showed that all the as cast samples consisted of equiaxed β-Zr phase. The mechanical properties and fracture behaviors of the Zr-20Nb-xTi alloys have been analyzed. It is found that these alloys exhibit high plasticity, moderate compressive strength (1044-1325MPa) and yield stress (854-1080MPa), high elastic energy (12-20MJ/m(3)) and low Young's modulus (28-31GPa). This good combination of mechanical properties makes them potential biomedical materials for hard tissue replacement. PMID:24036526

  4. The influence of removing sizing on strength and stiffness of conventional and high modulus E-glass fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nørgaard Petersen, Helga; Kusano, Yukihiro; Brøndsted, Povl; Almdal, Kristoffer

    2016-07-01

    Two types of E-glass fibres, a conventional and a high modulus where the last one in the following will be denoted as ECR-glass fibre, were investigated regarding density, diameter, stiffness and strength. The fibres were analysed as pristine and after sizing removal treatments. The sizing was removed by either burning at 565°C or soxhlet extraction with acetone. It was found that the density and the stiffness increased after removing the sizing by the two removal treatments whereas the diameter did not change significantly. The strength of the fibres decreased after burning as the sizing, protecting against water and fibre-fibre damage, had been removed. The strength of the fibres after extraction was not significantly different from the strength of the pristine fibres despite removing the sizing. This indicates that the bonded part of sizing is still protecting the glass fibre surface.

  5. Moisture absorption and mechanical properties for high-modulus Pitch 75 graphite-fiber-modified cyanate ester resin laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blair, Christopher; Zakrzewski, Jerry

    1992-09-01

    Structural epoxy resins used in the fabrication of composite structures for spacecraft applications absorb significant amounts of water. This moisture absorption results in swelling of the structures during fabrication and assembly and subsequent desorption shrinkage in space. Reduction of this effect will be required for development of dimensionally stable large advanced space structures. In the last several years modified epoxy resins, cyanate esters and cyanate esters/epoxy resins have been developed with lower moisture absorption structures to address this issue. Work has continued for several years on the evaluation of high modulus Pitch 75 laminates made using modified low moisture absorption epoxy and cyanate systems to developed structural and thermophysical data for use in the design of stable structures. This paper describes the evaluation of moisture absorption and mechanical properties of unidirectional and quasi-isotropic Pitch 75 laminates made from selected cyanate esters and cyanate ester-epoxy resins.

  6. High-frequency shear-horizontal surface acoustic wave sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Branch, Darren W

    2013-05-07

    A Love wave sensor uses a single-phase unidirectional interdigital transducer (IDT) on a piezoelectric substrate for leaky surface acoustic wave generation. The IDT design minimizes propagation losses, bulk wave interferences, provides a highly linear phase response, and eliminates the need for impedance matching. As an example, a high frequency (.about.300-400 MHz) surface acoustic wave (SAW) transducer enables efficient excitation of shear-horizontal waves on 36.degree. Y-cut lithium tantalate (LTO) giving a highly linear phase response (2.8.degree. P-P). The sensor has the ability to detect at the pg/mm.sup.2 level and can perform multi-analyte detection in real-time. The sensor can be used for rapid autonomous detection of pathogenic microorganisms and bioagents by field deployable platforms.

  7. High-frequency shear-horizontal surface acoustic wave sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Branch, Darren W

    2014-03-11

    A Love wave sensor uses a single-phase unidirectional interdigital transducer (IDT) on a piezoelectric substrate for leaky surface acoustic wave generation. The IDT design minimizes propagation losses, bulk wave interferences, provides a highly linear phase response, and eliminates the need for impedance matching. As an example, a high frequency (.about.300-400 MHz) surface acoustic wave (SAW) transducer enables efficient excitation of shear-horizontal waves on 36.degree. Y-cut lithium tantalate (LTO) giving a highly linear phase response (2.8.degree. P-P). The sensor has the ability to detect at the pg/mm.sup.2 level and can perform multi-analyte detection in real-time. The sensor can be used for rapid autonomous detection of pathogenic microorganisms and bioagents by field deployable platforms.

  8. Comminution of Ceramic Materials Under High-Shear Dynamic Compaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homel, Michael; Loiseau, Jason; Higgins, Andrew; Herbold, Eric; Hogan, Jamie

    The post-failure ``granular flow'' response of high-strength lightweight ceramics has important implications on the materials' effectiveness for ballistic protection. We study the dynamic compaction and shear flow of ceramic fragments and powders using computational and experimental analysis of a collapsing thick-walled cylinder geometry. Using newly developed tools for mesoscale simulation of brittle materials, we study the effect of fracture, comminution, shear-enhanced dilatation, and frictional contact on the continuum compaction response. Simulations are directly validated through particle Doppler velocimetry measurements at the inner surface of the cylindrical powder bed. We characterize the size distribution and morphologies of the initial and compacted material fragments to both validate the computational model and to elucidate the dominant failure processes. A portion of this work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC. LLNL-ABS-678862.

  9. Deformation-induced changeable Young's modulus with high strength in β-type Ti-Cr-O alloys for spinal fixture.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huihong; Niinomi, Mitsuo; Nakai, Masaaki; Hieda, Junko; Cho, Ken

    2014-02-01

    In order to meet the requirements of the patients and surgeons simultaneously for spinal fixation applications, a novel biomedical alloy with a changeable Young's modulus, that is, with a low Young's modulus to prevent the stress-shielding effect for patients and a high Young's modulus to suppress springback for surgeons, was developed. In this study, the chromium and oxygen contents in ternary Ti(11, 12 mass%)Cr-(0.2, 0.4, 0.6 mass%)O alloys were optimized in order to achieve a changeable Young's modulus via deformation-induced ω-phase transformation with good mechanical properties. The Young's moduli of all the examined alloys increase after cold rolling, which is attributed to the deformation-induced ω-phase transformation. This transformation is suppressed by oxygen but enhanced with lower chromium content, which is related to the β(bcc)-lattice stability. Among the examined alloys, the Ti-11Cr-0.2O alloy shows a low Young's modulus of less than 80GPa in the solution-treated (ST) condition and a high Young's modulus of more than 90GPa in the cold rolled (CR) condition. The Ti-11Cr-0.2O alloy also exhibits a high tensile strength, above 1000MPa, with an acceptable elongation of ~12% in the ST condition. Furthermore, the Ti-11Cr-0.2O alloy exhibits minimal springback. This value of springback is the closest to that of Ti64 ELI alloy among the compared alloys. Therefore, the Ti-11Cr-0.2O alloy, which has a good balance between large changeable Young's modulus, high tensile strength, good plasticity, and minimal springback, is considered to be a potential candidate for spinal fixation applications. PMID:24317494

  10. Deformation-induced changeable Young's modulus with high strength in β-type Ti-Cr-O alloys for spinal fixture.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huihong; Niinomi, Mitsuo; Nakai, Masaaki; Hieda, Junko; Cho, Ken

    2014-02-01

    In order to meet the requirements of the patients and surgeons simultaneously for spinal fixation applications, a novel biomedical alloy with a changeable Young's modulus, that is, with a low Young's modulus to prevent the stress-shielding effect for patients and a high Young's modulus to suppress springback for surgeons, was developed. In this study, the chromium and oxygen contents in ternary Ti(11, 12 mass%)Cr-(0.2, 0.4, 0.6 mass%)O alloys were optimized in order to achieve a changeable Young's modulus via deformation-induced ω-phase transformation with good mechanical properties. The Young's moduli of all the examined alloys increase after cold rolling, which is attributed to the deformation-induced ω-phase transformation. This transformation is suppressed by oxygen but enhanced with lower chromium content, which is related to the β(bcc)-lattice stability. Among the examined alloys, the Ti-11Cr-0.2O alloy shows a low Young's modulus of less than 80GPa in the solution-treated (ST) condition and a high Young's modulus of more than 90GPa in the cold rolled (CR) condition. The Ti-11Cr-0.2O alloy also exhibits a high tensile strength, above 1000MPa, with an acceptable elongation of ~12% in the ST condition. Furthermore, the Ti-11Cr-0.2O alloy exhibits minimal springback. This value of springback is the closest to that of Ti64 ELI alloy among the compared alloys. Therefore, the Ti-11Cr-0.2O alloy, which has a good balance between large changeable Young's modulus, high tensile strength, good plasticity, and minimal springback, is considered to be a potential candidate for spinal fixation applications.

  11. The high-energy-density counterpropagating shear experiment and turbulent self-heating

    SciTech Connect

    Doss, F. W.; Fincke, J. R.; Loomis, E. N.; Welser-Sherrill, L.; Flippo, K. A.

    2013-12-15

    The counterpropagating shear experiment has previously demonstrated the ability to create regions of shock-driven shear, balanced symmetrically in pressure, and experiencing minimal net drift. This allows for the creation of a high-Mach-number high-energy-density shear environment. New data from the counterpropagating shear campaign is presented, and both hydrocode modeling and theoretical analysis in the context of a Reynolds-averaged-Navier-Stokes model suggest turbulent dissipation of energy from the supersonic flow bounding the layer is a significant driver in its expansion. A theoretical minimum shear flow Mach number threshold is suggested for substantial thermal-turbulence coupling.

  12. The high-energy-density counterpropagating shear experiment and turbulent self-heating

    DOE PAGES

    Doss, F. W.; Fincke, J. R.; Loomis, E. N.; Welser-Sherrill, L.; Flippo, K. A.

    2013-12-06

    The counterpropagating shear experiment has previously demonstrated the ability to create regions of shockdriven shear, balanced symmetrically in pressure and experiencing minimal net drift. This allows for the creation of a high-Mach-number high-energy-density shear environment. New data from the counterpropagating shear campaign is presented, and both hydrocode modeling and theoretical analysis in the context of a Reynolds-averaged-Navier-Stokes model suggest turbulent dissipation of energy from the supersonic flow bounding the layer is a significant driver in its expansion. A theoretical minimum shear flow Mach number threshold is suggested for substantial thermal-turbulence coupling.

  13. Composite materials based on high-modulus compounds for additive technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoriev, M.; Kotelnikov, N.; Buyakova, S.; Kulkov, S.

    2016-07-01

    The effect of adding nanocrystalline ZrO2 and submicron TiC to ultrafine Al2O3 on mechanical properties and the microstructure of the composites developed by hot pressing was investigated. It was shown that by means of hot pressing in argon atmosphere at the sintering temperature of 1500 °C one can obtain the composites of Al2O3-ZrO2-TiC with a fine structure and minimal porosity. It was shown that in the material a multi-scale hierarchical structure is formed, which possesses high physical and mechanical properties: the hardness and fracture toughness was 22 GPa and 5.2 MPa*m1/2, respectively. It has been shown that mechanical properties of the composite are better than those of commercial composites based on aluminum oxide (Al2O3, ZTA, Al2O3-TiC) and are comparable to those of silicon nitride.

  14. On the axial and interfacial shear stresses due to thermal mismatch in hybrid composites

    SciTech Connect

    Rossettos, J.N.; Shen, X.

    1994-12-31

    An analytical model is formulated which attempts to account for the axial and the interfacial shear stresses which can develop in hybrid fiber composites due to the mismatch in coefficients of thermal expansion and Youngs modulus. A finite width hybrid composite monolayer with alternating high modulus and low modulus fibers is considered. To properly account for the interfacial shear between fiber and matrix, a modified shear lag model is used, which permits extensional deformation in the matrix in the fiber direction. Typical stresses due solely to temperature changes are calculated, and show steep boundary layer edge stresses at free corners.

  15. Hexagonal-structured ε-NbN: ultra-incompressibility, high shear rigidity, and a possible hard superconducting material

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Yongtao; Wang, Xuebing; Chen, Ting; Li, Xuefei; Qi, Xintong; Welch, David; Zhu, Pinwen; Liu, Bingbing; Cui, Tian; Li, Baosheng

    2015-01-01

    Exploring the structural stability and elasticity of hexagonal ε-NbN helps discover correlations among its physical properties for scientific and technological applications. Here, for the first time, we measured the ultra-incompressibility and high shear rigidity of polycrystalline hexagonal ε-NbN using ultrasonic interferometry and in situ X-ray diffraction, complemented with first-principles density-functional theory calculations up to 30 GPa in pressure. Using a finite strain equation of state approach, the elastic bulk and shear moduli, as well as their pressure dependences are derived from the measured velocities and densities, yielding BS0 = 373.3(15) GPa, G0 = 200.5(8) GPa, ∂BS/∂P = 3.81(3) and ∂G/∂P = 1.67(1). The hexagonal ε-NbN possesses a very high bulk modulus, rivaling that of superhard material cBN (B0 = 381.1 GPa). The high shear rigidity is comparable to that for superhard γ-B (G0 = 227.2 GPa). We found that the crystal structure of transition-metal nitrides and the outmost electrons of the corresponding metals may dominate their pressure dependences in bulk and shear moduli. In addition, the elastic moduli, Vickers hardness, Debye temperature, melting temperature and a possible superconductivity of hexagonal ε-NbN all increase with pressures, suggesting its exceptional suitability for applications under extreme conditions. PMID:26028439

  16. High-T Detachment Shear Zone in Mirdita Ophiolite (albania)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jousselin, D.; Nicolas, A. A.; Boudier, F. I.; Meshi, A.

    2013-12-01

    Two oceanic core complex (OCC) extending over 50km have been mapped in the northern part of the Mirdita ophiolite. Despite the fact that the ophiolite is encased between major Dinaric thrusts, a late Jurassic marine topography is still preserved, as demonstrated by the nearly horizontal sedimentary cover. The study area exposes two peridotite domes, aligned on a N-S trend, separated by a talweg 1km wide, occupied by gabbros. This alignment is parallel to the paleoridge indicated by the sheeted dike complex, exposed at the eastern margin, and trending N-S. The two mantle domes composed of clinopyroxene bearing harzburgite with high-T porphyroclastic textures are roofed by a ~1km thick mylonitic shell, particularly well exposed at the limit with the gabbros, and interpreted as an oceanic high-T detachment shear zone. Six mylonite samples are studied for textures and crystal preferred orientation (CPO) aiming to improve the kinematics of the oceanic detachment. The mylonitic peridotite are exceptionally fresh, serpentine minerals being restricted to the bordering porphyroclastic harzburgites. They exhibit a tight millimetric layering formed by olivine / olivine+orthopyroxene / olivine+clinopyroxene or pargasitic amphibole, with grain-size 100-200μm in olivine bands vs 20-50μm in polyphase bands; plagioclase is ubiquitous. Orthopyroxene porphyroclasts show both body rotation and slip with boudinage in the flowing matrix. Electron back scattering diffraction (EBSD) maps provide precise modal composition and phase distribution. Although olivine CPO is not strong, it consistently records solid state flow on the [100](0kl)(010) slip system; the slight obliquity of [100] slip line on the mineral lineation marks the sense of shear. Pargasitic amphibole having grown in the mylonitic development has a strong CPO with [001]pg parallel to [100]ol. The most surprising result is a weak but constant orientation of [001]opx, known as the unique slip direction in orthopyroxene, at

  17. Low power consumption high speed CMOS dual-modulus 15/16 prescaler for optical and wireless communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hui-Min; Zhang, Xiao-Xing; Dai, Yu-Jie; Lv, Ying-Jie

    2011-09-01

    Frequency synthesizer is an important part of optical and wireless communication system. Low power comsumption prescaler is one of the most critical unit of frequency synthesizer. For the frequency divider, it must be programmable for channel selection in multi-channel communication systems. A dual-modulus prescaler (DMP) is needed to provide variable division ratios. DMP is considered as a critical power dissipative block since it always operates at full speed. This paper introduces a high speed and low power complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) 15/16 DMP based on true single-phase-clock (TSPC) and transmission gates (TGs) cell. A conventional TSPC is optimized in terms of devices size, and it is resimulated. The TSPC is used in the synchronous and asynchronous counter. TGs are used in the control logic. The DMP circuit is implemented in 0.18 μm CMOS process. The simulation results are provided. The results show wide operating frequency range from 7.143 MHz to 4.76 GHz and it comsumes 3.625 mW under 1.8 V power supply voltage at 4.76 GHz.

  18. Visualizing ultrasonically-induced shear wave propagation using phase-sensitive optical coherence tomography for dynamic elastography

    PubMed Central

    Song, Shaozhen; Arnal, Bastien; Huang, Zhihong; O’Donnell, Matthew; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2015-01-01

    We report on the use of phase-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PhS-OCT) to detect and track temporally and spatially shear wave propagation within tissue induced by ultrasound radiation force. Kilohertz-range shear waves are remotely generated in sample using focused ultrasound emission and their propagation is tracked using PhS-OCT. Cross-sectional maps of the local shear modulus are reconstructed from local estimates of shear wave speed in tissue-mimicking phantoms. We demonstrate the feasibility of combining ultrasound radiation force and PhS-OCT to perform high-resolution mapping of the shear modulus. PMID:24562220

  19. Area Expansivity Moduli of Regenerating Plant Protoplast Cell Walls Exposed to Shear Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimura, Yuu; Iino, Masaaki; Watanabe, Ugai

    2005-05-01

    To control the elasticity of the plant cell wall, protoplasts isolated from cultured Catharanthus roseus cells were regenerated in shear flows of 115 s-1 (high shear) and 19.2 s-1 (low shear, as a control). The surface area expansivity modulus and the surface breaking strength of these regenerating protoplasts were measured by a micropipette aspiration technique. Cell wall synthesis was also measured using a cell wall-specific fluorescent dye. High shear exposure for 3 h doubled both the surface area modulus and breaking strength observed under low shear, significantly decreased cell wall synthesis, and roughly quadrupled the moduli of the cell wall. Based on the cell wall synthesis data, we estimated the three-dimensional modulus of the cell wall to be 4.1± 1.2 GPa for the high shear, and 0.35± 0.2 GPa for the low shear condition, using the surface area expansivity modulus divided by the cell wall thickness, which is identical with the Young’s modulus divided by 2(1-σ), where σ is Poisson's ratio. We concluded that high shear exposure considerably strengthens the newly synthesized cell wall.

  20. Review on Joint Shear Strength of Nano-Silver Paste and Its Long-Term High Temperature Reliability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khazaka, R.; Mendizabal, L.; Henry, D.

    2014-07-01

    Soldering has been the main die attach technology for several decades. Recently, in order to meet the high temperature electronic requirements (high temperature-operating SiC and GaN devices) as well as the health recommendations (replacing the toxic lead present in common solder alloys with lead-free alternatives), several new attach technologies have been developed. Among others, the sintering of nano-silver particles seems to be one of the most interesting choices, and has been extensively investigated during recent years. The emergence of this technology is mainly due to the desired high electrical and high thermal conductivities of the sintered joint, its low elastic modulus offering a good thermo-mechanical reliability, its low process temperature, and its high operating temperature. In this paper, a review of parameters affecting the initial shear strength of the sintered silver joint will be summarized as well as the high temperature long-term reliability issues. The sintering cycle (bonding pressure, bonding temperature, sintering dwell time, heating rate, and the sintering atmosphere), the joint size, and the attached materials properties (nature, roughness), are found to closely affect the initially measured shear strength of the joint. The long-term reliability of the joint has been shown to suffer initially from three phenomena: the silver electro-migration, the decrease of shear strength under harsh thermo-mechanical stresses, and the swelling of the sintered layer. While the latter phenomenon is observed during the storage at temperatures above 350°C, the electro-migration and thermo-mechanical stresses can influence the package reliability at temperatures as low as 250°C. However, some suggested precautions during the module fabrication can lead to the minimizing of the effects of these phenomena and the achievem a more reliable joint.

  1. In vivo non-invasive high resolution MR-based method for the determination of the elastic modulus of arterial vessels.

    PubMed

    Taviani, Valentina; Sutcliffe, Michael P F; Wong, Pauline; Li, Zhi-Yong; Young, Victoria; Graves, Martin J; Gillard, Jonathan H

    2008-01-01

    The mechanical properties of arterial walls have long been recognized to play an essential role in the development and progression of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Early detection of variations in the elastic modulus of arteries would help in monitoring patients at high cardiovascular risk stratifying them according to risk. An in vivo, non-invasive, high resolution MR-phase-contrast based method for the estimation of the time-dependent elastic modulus of healthy arteries was developed, validated in vitro by means of a thin walled silicon rubber tube integrated into an existing MR-compatible flow simulator and used on healthy volunteers. A comparison of the elastic modulus of the silicon tube measured from the MRI-based technique with direct measurements confirmed the method's capability. The repeatability of the method was assessed. Viscoelastic and inertial effects characterizing the dynamic response of arteries in vivo emerged from the comparison of the pressure waveform and the area variation curve over a period. For all the volunteers who took part in the study the elastic modulus was found to be in the range 50-250 kPa, to increase during the rising part of the cycle, and to decrease with decreasing pressure during the downstroke of systole and subsequent diastole. PMID:19163979

  2. In vivo non-invasive high resolution MR-based method for the determination of the elastic modulus of arterial vessels.

    PubMed

    Taviani, Valentina; Sutcliffe, Michael P F; Wong, Pauline; Li, Zhi-Yong; Young, Victoria; Graves, Martin J; Gillard, Jonathan H

    2008-01-01

    The mechanical properties of arterial walls have long been recognized to play an essential role in the development and progression of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Early detection of variations in the elastic modulus of arteries would help in monitoring patients at high cardiovascular risk stratifying them according to risk. An in vivo, non-invasive, high resolution MR-phase-contrast based method for the estimation of the time-dependent elastic modulus of healthy arteries was developed, validated in vitro by means of a thin walled silicon rubber tube integrated into an existing MR-compatible flow simulator and used on healthy volunteers. A comparison of the elastic modulus of the silicon tube measured from the MRI-based technique with direct measurements confirmed the method's capability. The repeatability of the method was assessed. Viscoelastic and inertial effects characterizing the dynamic response of arteries in vivo emerged from the comparison of the pressure waveform and the area variation curve over a period. For all the volunteers who took part in the study the elastic modulus was found to be in the range 50-250 kPa, to increase during the rising part of the cycle, and to decrease with decreasing pressure during the downstroke of systole and subsequent diastole.

  3. Compositional evolution of high-temperature sheared lherzolite PHN 1611

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D. ); Griffin, W.L.; Ryan, C.G. )

    1993-02-01

    The evolution of fertile' mantle has been studied by proton microprobe (PIXE) analysis of minerals of a high-temperature sheared xenolith from the Thaba Putsoa kimerlite in Lesotho, southern Africa. Analyzed elements include Ni, Cu, Zn, Ga, Sr, Y, and Zr. Garnets are homogeneous in Ni and Zn but have rims enriched relative to cores in Zr and Y. Compositions of olivine neoblasts define intergranular gradients of Fe, Zn, and Ni; Fe-rich olivine is relatively Zn-rich but Ni-poore. Although individual clinopyroxene grains are nearly homogeneous, clinopyroxene associated with Fe-rich olivine is relatively Fe- and Zn-rich but Sr- and Cr-poor. The trace-element abundances and compositional gradients constrain the processes of periodotite enrichment and the thermal history. Enrichment of Zr, Y, and Fe in garnet rims documents infiltration of a silica-undersaturated melt. The Fe-rich olivine compositions and the Zn and Fe gradients establish that the xenolith was sampled from near a melt conduit. Mechanical mixing of inhomogeneous peridotite and melt infiltration may have been concurrent. Because garnets appear homogeneous in Ni, mantle temperature changes affecting PHN 1611 occurred before or over a longer period than the melt infiltration. Measured and calculated abundances of many incompatible trace elements in the rock are similar to those proposed for primitive mantle. Calculated chondrite-normalized abundances of Sr, Ti, Zr, and Y are like those of appropriate REE. Enrichment processes in PHN 1611 proceeded at unusually high recorded temperature and in the apparent absence of minor phases common in lower-temperature metasomatized rocks, but similar processes may be common. In particular, mechanical mixing near mantle dikes may frequently occur. These enrichment mechanisms may produce xenolith compositions that resemble some proposed for primitive mantle but that have different implications for mantle evolution. 61 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Numerical Modeling for Springback Predictions by Considering the Variations of Elastic Modulus in Stamping Advanced High-Strength Steels (AHSS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyunok; Kimchi, Menachem

    2011-08-01

    This paper presents a numerical modeling approach for predicting springback by considering the variations of elastic modulus on springback in stamping AHSS. Various stamping tests and finite-element method (FEM) simulation codes were used in this study. The cyclic loading-unloading tensile tests were conducted to determine the variations of elastic modulus for dual-phase (DP) 780 sheet steel. The biaxial bulge test was used to obtain plastic flow stress data. The non-linear reduction of elastic modulus for increasing the plastic strain was formulated by using the Yoshida model that was implemented in FEM simulations for springback. To understand the effects of material properties on springback, experiments were conducted with a simple geometry such as U-shape bending and the more complex geometry such as the curved flanging and S-rail stamping. Different measurement methods were used to confirm the final part geometry. Two different commercial FEM codes, LS-DYNA and DEFORM, were used to compare the experiments. The variable elastic modulus improved springback predictions in U-shape bending and curved flanging tests compared to FEM with the constant elastic modulus. However, in S-rail stamping tests, both FEM models with the isotropic hardening model showed limitations in predicting the sidewall curl of the S-rail part after springback. To consider the kinematic hardening and Bauschinger effects that result from material bending-unbending in S-rail stamping, the Yoshida model was used for FEM simulation of S-rail stamping and springback. The FEM predictions showed good improvement in correlating with experiments.

  5. Fluid Effects on Shear for Seismic Waves in Finely Layered Porous Media

    SciTech Connect

    Berryman, J G

    2004-07-22

    Although there are five effective shear moduli for any layered VTI medium, one and only one effective shear modulus of the layered system (namely the uniaxial shear) contains all the dependence of pore fluids on the elastic or poroelastic constants that can be observed in vertically polarized shear waves. Pore fluids can increase the magnitude the shear energy stored in this modulus by an amount that ranges from the smallest to the largest effective shear moduli of the VTI system. But, since there are five shear moduli in play, the overall increase in shear energy due to fluids is reduced by a factor of about 5 in general. We can therefore give definite bounds on the maximum increase of overall shear modulus, being about 20% of the allowed range as liquid is fully substituted for gas. An attendant increase of density (depending on porosity and fluid density) by approximately 5 to 10% decreases the shear wave speed and, thereby, partially offsets the effect of this shear modulus increase. The final result is an increase of shear wave speed on the order of 5 to 10%. This increase is shown to be possible under most favorable circumstances - i.e. when the shear modulus fluctuations are large (resulting in strong anisotropy) and the medium behaves in an undrained fashion due to fluid trapping. At frequencies higher than seismic (such as sonic and ultrasonic waves for well-logging or laboratory experiments), resulting short response times also produce the requisite undrained behavior and, therefore, fluids also affect shear waves at high frequencies by increasing rigidity.

  6. FE Analysis on Shear Deformation for Asymmetrically Hot-Rolled High-Manganese Steel Strip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sui, Feng-Li; Wang, Xin; Li, Chang-Sheng; Zhao, Jun

    2016-09-01

    Shear deformation along the longitudinal cross section of the high-manganese steel strip has been analyzed in hot asymmetrical rolling process using rigid-plastic finite element model. The friction coefficient between the rolls and the strip surfaces, the diameter of the work rolls, the speed ratio for the lower/upper rolls, the reduction rate and the initial temperature of the billet were all taken into account. Influence of these process parameters on the shear stress, the shear strain and the related shear strain energy in the center layer of the hot-rolled strip was analyzed. It is indicated that increasing the speed ratio, the reduction rate and the work roll diameter is an effective way to accumulate more shear strain energy in the strip center. A mathematical model reflecting the relationship between the shear strain energy and the process parameters has been established.

  7. The kinetics of crystallization of molten binary and ternary oxide systems and their application to the origination of high modulus glass fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bacon, J. F.

    1971-01-01

    Emphasis on the consideration of glass formation on a kinetic process made it possible to think of glass compositions different from those normally employed in the manufacture of glass fibers. Approximately 450 new glass compositions were prepared and three dozen of these compositions have values for Young's modulus measured on bulk specimens greater than nineteen million pounds per square inch. Of the new glasses about a hundred could be drawn into fibers by mechanical methods at high speeds. The fiber which has a Young's modulus measured on the fiber of 18.6 million pounds per square inch and has been prepared in quantity as a monofilament (to date more than 150 million lineal feet of 0.2 to 0.4 mil fiber have been produced). This fiber has also been successfully incorporated both in epoxy and polyimide matrices. The epoxy resin composite has shown a modulus forty percent better than that achievable using the most common grade of competitive glass fiber, and twenty percent better than that obtainable with the best available grade of competitive glass fiber. Other glass fibers of even higher modulus have been developed.

  8. Mechanoradical-induced degradation in a pharmaceutical blend during high-shear processing.

    PubMed

    Polizzi, Mark A; Singhal, Dharmendra; Colvin, Joshua

    2008-01-01

    Mechanically generated radicals were shown to affect short-term stability of a model pharmaceutical formulation during high-shear processing. A formulation containing an oxidatively sensitive drug, either amorphous or crystalline, and a polymeric excipient was high-shear mixed and the resulting short-term degradation was determined with HPLC. High-shear mixing of the excipients was also carried out before drug addition to isolate effects on excipients versus those directly on the drug. Short-term drug stability was found to be strongly dependent on the amount of shear added to excipients prior to drug addition, regardless of morphology. A mechanism for the observed degradation based on mechanically generated radicals from microcrystalline cellulose is proposed. These results indicate that excipient high-shear exposure needs to be considered in regards to drug stability. PMID:18720240

  9. Exact two-dimensional zonal wavefront reconstruction with high spatial resolution in lateral shearing interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Fengzhao; Li, Jie; Wang, Xiangzhao; Bu, Yang

    2016-05-01

    A novel zonal method is proposed for exact discrete reconstruction of a two-dimensional wavefront with high spatial resolution for lateral shearing interferometry. Four difference wavefronts measured in the x and y shear directions are required. Each of the two shear directions is measured twice with different shear amounts. The shear amounts of the second measurements of the x and y directions are Sx+1 pixels and Sy+1 pixels, where Sx pixels and Sy pixels are the shear amounts of the first measurements in the x and y directions, respectively. The shear amount in each direction can be chosen freely, provided that it is below a maximum value determined by the pupil shape and the number of samples N in that direction; thus, the choices are not limited by the more stringent condition required by previous methods, namely, that the shear amounts must be divisors of N. This method can exactly reconstruct any wavefront at evaluation points up to an arbitrary constant if the data is noiseless, and high spatial resolution can be achieved even with large shear amounts. The method is applicable not only to square pupils, but also to general pupil shapes if a sufficient number of Gerchberg iterations are employed. In this study, the validity and capability of the method were confirmed by numerical experiments. In addition, the experiments demonstrated that the method is stable with respect to noise in the difference wavefronts.

  10. Shear melting and high temperature embrittlement: theory and application to machining titanium.

    PubMed

    Healy, Con; Koch, Sascha; Siemers, Carsten; Mukherji, Debashis; Ackland, Graeme J

    2015-04-24

    We describe a dynamical phase transition occurring within a shear band at high temperature and under extremely high shear rates. With increasing temperature, dislocation deformation and grain boundary sliding are supplanted by amorphization in a highly localized nanoscale band, which allows for massive strain and fracture. The mechanism is similar to shear melting and leads to liquid metal embrittlement at high temperature. From simulation, we find that the necessary conditions are lack of dislocation slip systems, low thermal conduction, and temperature near the melting point. The first two are exhibited by bcc titanium alloys, and we show that the final one can be achieved experimentally by adding low-melting-point elements: specifically, we use insoluble rare earth metals (REMs). Under high shear, the REM becomes mixed with the titanium, lowering the melting point within the shear band and triggering the shear-melting transition. This in turn generates heat which remains localized in the shear band due to poor heat conduction. The material fractures along the shear band. We show how to utilize this transition in the creation of new titanium-based alloys with improved machinability.

  11. Shear Melting and High Temperature Embrittlement: Theory and Application to Machining Titanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Healy, Con; Koch, Sascha; Siemers, Carsten; Mukherji, Debashis; Ackland, Graeme J.

    2015-04-01

    We describe a dynamical phase transition occurring within a shear band at high temperature and under extremely high shear rates. With increasing temperature, dislocation deformation and grain boundary sliding are supplanted by amorphization in a highly localized nanoscale band, which allows for massive strain and fracture. The mechanism is similar to shear melting and leads to liquid metal embrittlement at high temperature. From simulation, we find that the necessary conditions are lack of dislocation slip systems, low thermal conduction, and temperature near the melting point. The first two are exhibited by bcc titanium alloys, and we show that the final one can be achieved experimentally by adding low-melting-point elements: specifically, we use insoluble rare earth metals (REMs). Under high shear, the REM becomes mixed with the titanium, lowering the melting point within the shear band and triggering the shear-melting transition. This in turn generates heat which remains localized in the shear band due to poor heat conduction. The material fractures along the shear band. We show how to utilize this transition in the creation of new titanium-based alloys with improved machinability.

  12. Shear melting and high temperature embrittlement: theory and application to machining titanium.

    PubMed

    Healy, Con; Koch, Sascha; Siemers, Carsten; Mukherji, Debashis; Ackland, Graeme J

    2015-04-24

    We describe a dynamical phase transition occurring within a shear band at high temperature and under extremely high shear rates. With increasing temperature, dislocation deformation and grain boundary sliding are supplanted by amorphization in a highly localized nanoscale band, which allows for massive strain and fracture. The mechanism is similar to shear melting and leads to liquid metal embrittlement at high temperature. From simulation, we find that the necessary conditions are lack of dislocation slip systems, low thermal conduction, and temperature near the melting point. The first two are exhibited by bcc titanium alloys, and we show that the final one can be achieved experimentally by adding low-melting-point elements: specifically, we use insoluble rare earth metals (REMs). Under high shear, the REM becomes mixed with the titanium, lowering the melting point within the shear band and triggering the shear-melting transition. This in turn generates heat which remains localized in the shear band due to poor heat conduction. The material fractures along the shear band. We show how to utilize this transition in the creation of new titanium-based alloys with improved machinability. PMID:25955055

  13. High-pressure reactions and shear strength of serpentinized dunite.

    PubMed

    Sclar, C B; Carrison, L C; Rooney, T P; Riecker, R E

    1966-09-01

    The recently reported Pronounced decrease in shear strength of serpentine-bearing rocks at 30 to 40 kilobars in the temperature range 300 degrees to 520 degrees C may be attributed to the transformation of serpentine to a Pressure-dependent, 10-angstrom,2: 1 layer silicate plus brucite and periclase. This reaction increases density by about 8.5 percent. PMID:17754251

  14. Structure of Highly Sheared Tropical Storm Chantal during CAMEX-4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heymsfield, G. M.; Halverson, J.; Ritchie, E.; Simpson, Joanne; Molinari, J.; Tian, L.

    2006-01-01

    Tropical Storm Chantal during August 2001 was a storm that failed to intensify over the few days prior to making landfall on the Yucatan Peninsula. An observational study of Tropical Storm Chantal is presented using a diverse dataset including remote and in situ measurements from the NASA ER-2 and DC-8 and the NOAA WP-3D N42RF aircraft and satellite. The authors discuss the storm structure from the larger-scale environment down to the convective scale. Large vertical shear (850-200-hPa shear magnitude range 8-15 m/s) plays a very important role in preventing Chantal from intensifying. The storm had a poorly defined vortex that only extended up to 5-6-km altitude, and an adjacent intense convective region that comprised a mesoscale convective system (MCS). The entire low-level circulation center was in the rain-free western side of the storm, about 80 km to the west-southwest of the MCS. The MCS appears to have been primarily the result of intense convergence between large-scale, low-level easterly flow with embedded downdrafts, and the cyclonic vortex flow. The individual cells in the MCS such as cell 2 during the period of the observations were extremely intense, with reflectivity core diameters of 10 km and peak updrafts exceeding 20 m/s. Associated with this MCS were two broad subsidence (warm) regions, both of which had portions over the vortex. The first layer near 700 hPa was directly above the vortex and covered most of it. The second layer near 500 hPa was along the forward and right flanks of cell 2 and undercut the anvil divergence region above. There was not much resemblance of these subsidence layers to typical upper-level warm cores in hurricanes that are necessary to support strong surface winds and a low central pressure. The observations are compared to previous studies of weakly sheared storms and modeling studies of shear effects and intensification. The configuration of the convective updrafts, low-level circulation, and lack of vertical

  15. Nanometric Gouge in High-Speed Shearing Experiments: Superplasticity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, H. W.; Lockner, D. A.; Bozhilov, K. N.; Maddon, A.; Beeler, N. M.; Reches, Z.

    2010-12-01

    High-speed shearing experiments on solid rock samples typically generate a gouge with sub-micron grain size that appears to control the frictional resistance at velocities approaching 1 m/s (Reches & Lockner, Nature, in press). We conducted experiments on Kasota dolomite samples and observed profound weakening (friction drops from ~0.8 to ~ 0.2) under earthquake conditions (up to slip-velocity ~ 0.95 m/s and normal stress 28.4 MPa). During these runs the experimental fault had T ≥ 800°C and developed a shining, dark surface. We report here analysis of such a surface with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). SEM analysis shows a slickensided gouge made up of particles all ≤ 50nm with a large fraction ≤ 20nm. The spacing of the slickenside striations is less than 1 µm. Over large areas of the slickensided surface the nanometric gouge has been replaced by an undeformed, interlocking crystalline pavement of 100-300 nm grain size. Qualitative chemical analysis of this pavement surface by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy reveals only a weak carbon peak, suggesting that the dolomite has been decarbonated. The development of a “pavement” of grain size ~200 nm in our experiments is remarkably similar to the observations of Han et al. (JGR, 2010, Fig. 14(d)). However, their experiments either did not develop such a nanometric gouge or it was completely replaced by the coarser pavement. These present observations of nanometric gouge that recrystallizes during the short time interval of elevated temperature following termination of deformation are reminiscent of the nanometric “gouge” produced in very high-pressure experiments (1-14 GPa) that have failed by transformation-induced faulting during the olivine-spinel transformation (Green and Burnley, Nature, 1989; Green et al., Nature, 1990). In the high-pressure experiments, the gouge consists of a nanocrystalline aggregate of the spinel phase that flowed at very high strain

  16. A model for shear-band formation and high-explosive initiation in a hydrodynamics code

    SciTech Connect

    Kerrisk, J.F.

    1996-03-01

    This report describes work in progress to develop a shear band model for MESA-2D. The object of this work is (1) to predict the formation of shear bands and their temperature in high explosive (HE) during a MESA-2D calculation, (2) to then assess whether the HE would initiate, and (3) to allow a detonation wave initiated from a shear band to propagate. This requires developing a model that uses average cell data to estimate the size and temperature of narrow region (generally much narrower than the cell size) that is undergoing shear within the cell. The shear band temperature (rather than the average cell temperature) can be used to calculate the flow stress of the material in the cell or to calculate heat generation from reactive materials. Modifications have been made to MESA-2D to calculate shear band size and temperature, and to initiate HE detonation when conditions warrant. Two models have been used for shear-band size and temperature calculation, one based on an independent estimate of the shear band width and a second based on the temperature distribution around the shear band. Both models have been tested for calculations in which shear band formation occurs in steel. A comparison of the measured and calculated local temperature rise in a shear band has been made. A model for estimating the time to initiation of the HE based on the type of HE and the temperature distribution in a shear band has also been added to MESA-2D. Calculations of conditions needed to initiate HE in projectile-impact tests have been done and compared with experimental data. Further work is d to test the model.

  17. Molecular cloud formation in high-shear, magnetized colliding flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fogerty, E.; Frank, A.; Heitsch, F.; Carroll-Nellenback, J.; Haig, C.; Adams, M.

    2016-08-01

    The colliding flows (CF) model is a well-supported mechanism for generating molecular clouds. However, to-date most CF simulations have focused on the formation of clouds in the normal-shock layer between head-on colliding flows. We performed simulations of magnetized colliding flows that instead meet at an oblique-shock layer. Oblique shocks generate shear in the post-shock environment, and this shear creates inhospitable environments for star formation. As the degree of shear increases (i.e. the obliquity of the shock increases), we find that it takes longer for sink particles to form, they form in lower numbers, and they tend to be less massive. With regard to magnetic fields, we find that even a weak field stalls gravitational collapse within forming clouds. Additionally, an initially oblique collision interface tends to reorient over time in the presence of a magnetic field, so that it becomes normal to the oncoming flows. This was demonstrated by our most oblique shock interface, which became fully normal by the end of the simulation.

  18. The unexpected stability of multiwall nanotubes under high pressure and shear deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pashkin, E. Y.; Pankov, A. M.; Kulnitskiy, B. A.; Perezhogin, I. A.; Karaeva, A. R.; Mordkovich, V. Z.; Popov, M. Y.; Sorokin, P. B.; Blank, V. D.

    2016-08-01

    The behavior of multiwall carbon nanotubes under a high pressure (up to 55 GPa) combined with shear deformation was studied by experimental and theoretical methods. The unexpectedly high stability of the nanotubes' structure under high stresses was observed. After the pressure was released, we observed that the nanotubes had restored their shapes. Atomistic simulations show that the hydrostatic and shear stresses affect the nanotubes' structure in a different way. It was found that the shear stress load in the multiwall nanotubes' outer walls can induce their connection and formation of an amorphized sp3-hybridized region but internal core keeps the tubular structure.

  19. High speed all optical shear wave imaging optical coherence elastography (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Shaozhen; Hsieh, Bao-Yu; Wei, Wei; Shen, Tueng; O'Donnell, Matthew; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2016-03-01

    Optical Coherence Elastography (OCE) is a non-invasive testing modality that maps the mechanical property of soft tissues with high sensitivity and spatial resolution using phase-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PhS-OCT). Shear wave OCE (SW-OCE) is a leading technique that relies on the speed of propagating shear waves to provide a quantitative elastography. Previous shear wave imaging OCT techniques are based on repeated M-B scans, which have several drawbacks such as long acquisition time and repeated wave stimulations. Recent developments of Fourier domain mode-locked high-speed swept-source OCT system has enabled enough speed to perform KHz B-scan rate OCT imaging. Here we propose ultra-high speed, single shot shear wave imaging to capture single-shot transient shear wave propagation to perform SW-OCE. The frame rate of shear wave imaging is 16 kHz, at A-line rate of ~1.62 MHz, which allows the detection of high-frequency shear wave of up to 8 kHz. The shear wave is generated photothermal-acoustically, by ultra-violet pulsed laser, which requires no contact to OCE subjects, while launching high frequency shear waves that carries rich localized elasticity information. The image acquisition and processing can be performed at video-rate, which enables real-time 3D elastography. SW-OCE measurements are demonstrated on tissue-mimicking phantoms and porcine ocular tissue. This approach opens up the feasibility to perform real-time 3D SW-OCE in clinical applications, to obtain high-resolution localized quantitative measurement of tissue biomechanical property.

  20. Subsonic and Supersonic shear flows in laser driven high-energy-density plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harding, E. C.; Drake, R. P.; Gillespie, R. S.; Grosskopf, M. J.; Kuranz, C. C.; Visco, A.; Ditmar, J. R.; Aglitskiy, Y.; Weaver, J. L.; Velikovich, A. L.; Hurricane, O. A.; Hansen, J. F.; Remington, B. A.; Robey, H. F.; Bono, M. J.; Plewa, T.

    2009-05-01

    Shear flows arise in many high-energy-density (HED) and astrophysical systems, yet few laboratory experiments have been carried out to study their evolution in these extreme environments. Fundamentally, shear flows can initiate mixing via the Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability and may eventually drive a transition to turbulence. We present two dedicated shear flow experiments that created subsonic and supersonic shear layers in HED plasmas. In the subsonic case the Omega laser was used to drive a shock wave along a rippled plastic interface, which subsequently rolled-upped into large KH vortices. In the supersonic shear experiment the Nike laser was used to drive Al plasma across a low-density foam surface also seeded with a ripple. Unlike the subsonic case, detached shocks developed around the ripples in response to the supersonic Al flow.

  1. High shear enrichment improves the performance of the anodophilic microbial consortium in a microbial fuel cell

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Hai The; Boon, Nico; Aelterman, Peter; Clauwaert, Peter; De Schamphelaire, Liesje; Van Oostveldt, Patrick; Verbeken, Kim; Rabaey, Korneel; Verstraete, Willy

    2008-01-01

    Summary In many microbial bioreactors, high shear rates result in strong attachment of microbes and dense biofilms. In this study, high shear rates were applied to enrich an anodophilic microbial consortium in a microbial fuel cell (MFC). Enrichment at a shear rate of about 120 s−1 resulted in the production of a current and power output two to three times higher than those in the case of low shear rates (around 0.3 s−1). Biomass and biofilm analyses showed that the anodic biofilm from the MFC enriched under high shear rate conditions, in comparison with that under low shear rate conditions, had a doubled average thickness and the biomass density increased with a factor 5. The microbial community of the former, as analysed by DGGE, was significantly different from that of the latter. The results showed that enrichment by applying high shear rates in an MFC can result in a specific electrochemically active biofilm that is thicker and denser and attaches better, and hence has a better performance. PMID:21261869

  2. High-Sensitivity Optical Pulse Characterization Using Sagnac Electro-Optic Spectral Shearing Interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Dorrer, C.; Bromage, J.

    2010-05-04

    An electro-optic spectral shearing interferometer for high-sensitivity optical pulse characterization is described. Two replicas of the test pulse counterpropagate in a Sagnac interferometer with orthogonal polarization states, resulting in two relatively sheared copolarized replicas after temporal phase modulation. The polarization interferometer is intrinsically stable, and its birefringence sets the delay between interfering replicas to reduce the spectrometer resolution requirement. Experimental implementations demonstrate real-time pulse characterization at average powers as low as 1 nWwith spectral shears as high as 280 GHz.

  3. Development of a silicone ablator for high-heat-flux and high-shear-rate condition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, R. A.; Ramseyer, J. A.; Huntress, A.

    1972-01-01

    A silicone material was developed which gives suitable ablative protection in the high heat flux, high shear environments encountered in severe reentry applications, such as nose cones for ballistic vehicles and protection of leading edges or other critical areas of a vehicle. In addition, the ease of handling, low application cost, and room temperature cure make such a silicon material suitable nozzles for the large rockets necessary for vehicle launching. The development of this product is traced from the selection of suitable polymers through the choice of fillers and the finalization of filler loadings.

  4. Turbulence Decorrelation via Controlled Ex B Shear in High-Performance Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKee, G. R.

    2015-11-01

    Multi-scale spatiotemporal turbulence properties are significantly altered as toroidal rotation and resulting ExB shearing rate profile are systematically varied in advanced-inductive H-mode plasmas on DIII-D (βN ~ 2.7, q95=5.1). Density, electron and ion temperature profiles and dimensionless parameters (βN, q95, ν*, ρ*, and Te/Ti) are maintained nearly fixed during the rotation scan. Low-wavenumber turbulence (k⊥ρS < 1), measured with Beam Emission Spectroscopy, exhibits increased decorrelation rates (reduced eddy lifetime) as the ExB shear rises across the radial zone of maximum shearing rate (0.55 < ρ < 0 . 75), while the fluctuation amplitude undergoes little change. The poloidal wavenumber is reduced at higher shear, indicating a change in the wavenumber spectrum: eddies elongate in the direction orthogonal to shear and field. At both low and high shear, the 2D turbulence correlation function exhibits a tilted structure, consistent with flow shear. At mid-radius (ρ ~ 0.5), low-k density fluctuations show localized amplitude reduction, consistent with linear GYRO growth rates and ωExB shearing rates. Intermediate and high wavenumber fluctuations measured with Doppler Back-Scattering (k⊥ρS ~ 2.5-3.5) at ρ=0.7 and Phase Contrast Imaging (k⊥ρS > 5) exhibit decreasing amplitude at higher rotation. The energy confinement time increases from 105 ms to 150 ms as the toroidal Mach number (M=vTOR / vth , i) increases to Mo ~ 0.5, while transport decreases. TGLF calculations match the Ti profile with modest discrepancies in the Te and ne profiles. These results clarify the complex mechanisms by which ExB shear affects turbulence. Work supported in part by the US DOE under DE-FG02-08ER54999, DE-FC02-04ER54698.

  5. Experimental Reacting Hydrogen Shear Layer Data at High Subsonic Mach Number

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, C. T.; Marek, C. J.; Wey, C.; Wey, C. C.

    1996-01-01

    The flow in a planar shear layer of hydrogen reacting with hot air was measured with a two-component laser Doppler velocimeter (LDV) system, a schlieren system, and OH fluorescence imaging. It was compared with a similar air-to-air case without combustion. The high-speed stream's flow speed was about 390 m/s, or Mach 0.71, and the flow speed ratio was 0.34. The results showed that a shear layer with reaction grows faster than one without; both cases are within the range of data scatter presented by the established data base. The coupling between the streamwise and the cross-stream turbulence components inside the shear layers was low, and reaction only increased it slightly. However, the shear layer shifted laterally into the lower speed fuel stream, and a more organized pattern of Reynolds stress was present in the reaction shear layer, likely as a result of the formation of a larger scale structure associated with shear layer corrugation from heat release. Dynamic pressure measurements suggest that coherent flow perturbations existed inside the shear layer and that this flow became more chaotic as the flow advected downstream. Velocity and thermal variable values are listed in this report for a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) benchmark.

  6. Design of shear gaps for high-speed and high-load MRF brakes and clutches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güth, D.; Wiebe, A.; Maas, J.

    2013-02-01

    Magnetorheological fluids (MRF) are smart fluids with the particular characteristics of changing their apparent viscosity significantly under the influence of a magnetic field. This property allows the design of mechanical devices for torque transmission, such as brakes and clutches, with a continuously adjustable and smooth torque generation. Especially the use of MRF in devices for applications with the demand on high rotational speeds and high loads can offer advantages, because more dissipation energy and thermal load peaks can be compensated by the torque generating fluid volume. However, high rotational speeds can cause a centrifugation of the particles contained in the MRF especially in idle mode when no magnetic field is applied. This can yield on the one hand to labile and unpredictable behavior of the torque response and on the other hand to a higher wear of the MRF or in the worst case to a destruction of the MRF with respect to a long-term view. For ensuring reliable braking or coupling conditions, in this contribution the development of a Taylor-Couette flow with axisymmetric toroidal vortices in axial shear gaps of MRF brakes and clutches is considered. The developing flow profiles in these shear gaps are modeled and analyzed in detail and finally design rules for axial shear gaps are introduced. Measurements at high rotational speeds up to 6000min-1 with a test actuator based on this design prove the positive influence of the vortex flow on the homogeneity of the MRF suspension and on the consistency and predictability of the braking or coupling torque even under long-term conditions.

  7. Technique for Calculating the Bulk Modulus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greshnyakov, V. A.; Belenkov, E. A.

    2014-10-01

    A comparative analysis of different techniques for calculating the bulk modulus of solid bodies has been performed. A new technique for calculating the bulk modulus is proposed which is especially adapted for theoretical calculations of the elastic properties of crystals. The new technique makes it possible to calculate the values of bulk moduli at high pressures with greater accuracy.

  8. Prediction of the Viscoelastic Bulk Modulus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jiaxi; Simon, Sindee

    2010-03-01

    The bulk and shear viscoelastic responses for several materials appear to arise from the same molecular mechanisms at short times, i.e., Andrade creep where the KWW beta parameter is approximately 0.3. If this is indeed the case, prediction and placement of the bulk viscoelastic response can be made simply by knowing the limiting elastic and rubbery bulk moduli and the viscoelastic shear response. The proposed methodology, which uses only easily measured functions, is considerably less time- and labor-intensive than direct measurement of the viscoelastic bulk modulus. Here we investigate this hypothesis and compare the calculated viscoelastic bulk responses for several materials to existing data in the literature.

  9. Soft-materials elastic and shear moduli measurement using piezoelectric cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markidou, Anna; Shih, Wan Y.; Shih, Wei-Heng

    2005-06-01

    We have developed a soft-material elastic modulus and shear modulus sensor using piezoelectric cantilevers. A piezoelectric cantilever is consisted of a highly piezoelectric layer, e.g., lead-zirconate-titanate bonded to a nonpiezoelectric layer, e.g., stainless steel. Applying an electric field in the thickness direction causes a piezoelectric cantilever to bend, generating an axial displacement or force. When a piezoelectric cantilever is in contact with an object, this electric field-generated axial displacement is reduced due to the resistance by the object. With a proper design of the piezoelectric cantilever's geometry, its axial displacements with and without contacting the object could be accurately measured. From these measurements the elastic modulus of the object can be deduced. In this study, we tailored the piezoelectric cantilevers for measuring the elastic and shear moduli of tissue-like soft materials with forces in the submilli Newton to milliNewton range. Elastic moduli and shear moduli of soft materials were measured using piezoelectric cantilevers with a straight tip and an L-shaped tip, respectively. Using gelatin and commercial rubber material as model soft tissues, we showed that a piezoelectric cantilever 1.5-2cm long could measure the elastic modulus and the shear modulus of a small soft material sample (1-3mm wide) in the small strain range (<1%). For samples 5mm high, the resultant compressive (shear) strains were less than 0.5% (1%). The measurements were validated by (1) comparing the measured Young's modulus of the commercial rubber sample with its known value and (2) by measuring both the Young's modulus and shear modulus on the samples and confirming the thus deduced Poisson's ratios with the separately measured Poisson's ratios.

  10. Stability Limits in High Performance, Negative Central Shear Discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, J. M.; Bialek, J.; Navratil, G. A.; Olofsson, K. E. J.; Turco, F.; Clement, M.; Ferron, J. R.; Garofalo, A. M.; La Haye, R. J.; Lanctot, M. J.; Strait, E. J.; Holcomb, C. T.

    2014-10-01

    Exploration of negative central shear equilibria in DIII-D has yielded discharges that transiently achieve βN ~= 4 . The discharges exhibit broad current density profiles, leading to a significant separation in the no- and with-wall ideal kink stability limits predicted by MHD theory. As the no-wall limit is approached and exceeded in experiments, performance is often limited by n = 1 resistive wall mode (RWM) instabilities that lead to abrupt collapses of the plasma stored energy. In addition, instabilities with n = 1 rotating tearing precursors are observed when minimum q value drops below 2. Theoretical calculations predict that magnetic feedback control using the in-vessel coils (internal coils) can provide RWM stabilization to βN values approaching the n = 1 ideal-wall limit. In experiments, applying I-coil control indeed facilitates access to increased βN values above the no-wall limit. Work supported by the US Department of Energy under DE-FG02-04ER54761, DE-FG02-07ER54917, DE-FC02-04ER54698 and DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  11. Microstructural evolution in adiabatic shear bands of copper at high strain rates: Electron backscatter diffraction characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Tang Lin; Chen Zhiyong; Zhan Congkun; Yang Xuyue; Liu Chuming; Cai Hongnian

    2012-02-15

    The microstructural evolution of adiabatic shear bands in annealed copper with different large strains at high strain rates has been investigated by electron backscatter diffraction. The results show that mechanical twinning can occur with minimal contribution to shear localization under dynamic loading. Elongated ultrafine grains with widths of 100-300 nm are observed during the evolution of the adiabatic shear bands. A rotational dynamic recrystallization mechanism is proposed to explain the formation of the elongated ultrafine grains. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The microstructural evolution of ASB is studied by electron backscatter diffraction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Twinning can occur in ASB while the contribution to shear localization is slight. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Elongated ultrafine grains are observed during the evolution process of ASB. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A possible mechanism is proposed to explain the microstructure evolution of ASB.

  12. Suppression of endothelial t-PA expression by prolonged high laminar shear stress

    SciTech Connect

    Ulfhammer, Erik; Carlstroem, Maria; Bergh, Niklas; Larsson, Pia; Karlsson, Lena; Jern, Sverker

    2009-02-06

    Primary hypertension is associated with an impaired capacity for acute release of endothelial tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA), which is an important local protective response to prevent thrombus extension. As hypertensive vascular remodeling potentially results in increased vascular wall shear stress, we investigated the impact of shear on regulation of t-PA. Cultured human endothelial cells were exposed to low ({<=}1.5 dyn/cm{sup 2}) or high (25 dyn/cm{sup 2}) laminar shear stress for up to 48 h in two different experimental models. Using real-time RT-PCR and ELISA, shear stress was observed to time and magnitude-dependently suppress t-PA transcript and protein secretion to approximately 30% of basal levels. Mechanistic experiments revealed reduced nuclear protein binding to the t-PA specific CRE element (EMSA) and an almost completely abrogated shear response with pharmacologic JNK inhibition. We conclude that prolonged high laminar shear stress suppresses endothelial t-PA expression and may therefore contribute to the enhanced risk of arterial thrombosis in hypertensive disease.

  13. Elastic Properties in Tension and Shear of High Strength Nonferrous Metals and Stainless Steel - Effect of Previous Deformation and Heat Treatment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mebs, R W; Mcadam, D J

    1947-01-01

    A resume is given of an investigation of the influence of plastic deformation and of annealing temperature on the tensile and shear elastic properties of high strength nonferrous metals and stainless steels in the form of rods and tubes. The data were obtained from earlier technical reports and notes, and from unpublished work in this investigation. There are also included data obtained from published and unpublished work performed on an independent investigation. The rod materials, namely, nickel, monel, inconel, copper, 13:2 Cr-Ni steel, and 18:8 Cr-Ni steel, were tested in tension; 18:8 Cr-Ni steel tubes were tested in shear, and nickel, monel, aluminum-monel, and Inconel tubes were tested in both tension and shear. There are first described experiments on the relationship between hysteresis and creep, as obtained with repeated cyclic stressing of annealed stainless steel specimens over a constant load range. These tests, which preceded the measurements of elastic properties, assisted in devising the loading time schedule used in such measurements. From corrected stress-set curves are derived the five proof stresses used as indices of elastic or yield strength. From corrected stress-strain curves are derived the secant modulus and its variation with stress. The relationship between the forms of the stress-set and stress-strain curves and the values of the properties derived is discussed. Curves of variation of proof stress and modulus with prior extension, as obtained with single rod specimens, consist in wavelike basic curves with superposed oscillations due to differences of rest interval and extension spacing; the effects of these differences are studied. Oscillations of proof stress and modulus are generally opposite in manner. The use of a series of tubular specimens corresponding to different amounts of prior extension of cold reduction gave curves almost devoid of oscillation since the effects of variation of rest interval and extension spacing were

  14. Prolonged Application of High Fluid Shear to Chondrocytes Recapitulates Gene Expression Profiles Associated with Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Fei; Wang, Pu; Lee, Norman H.; Goldring, Mary B.; Konstantopoulos, Konstantinos

    2010-01-01

    Background Excessive mechanical loading of articular cartilage producing hydrostatic stress, tensile strain and fluid flow leads to irreversible cartilage erosion and osteoarthritic (OA) disease. Since application of high fluid shear to chondrocytes recapitulates some of the earmarks of OA, we aimed to screen the gene expression profiles of shear-activated chondrocytes and assess potential similarities with OA chondrocytes. Methodology/Principal Findings Using a cDNA microarray technology, we screened the differentially-regulated genes in human T/C-28a2 chondrocytes subjected to high fluid shear (20 dyn/cm2) for 48 h and 72 h relative to static controls. Confirmation of the expression patterns of select genes was obtained by qRT-PCR. Using significance analysis of microarrays with a 5% false discovery rate, 71 and 60 non-redundant transcripts were identified to be ≥2-fold up-regulated and ≤0.6-fold down-regulated, respectively, in sheared chondrocytes. Published data sets indicate that 42 of these genes, which are related to extracellular matrix/degradation, cell proliferation/differentiation, inflammation and cell survival/death, are differentially-regulated in OA chondrocytes. In view of the pivotal role of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in the pathogenesis and/or progression of OA in vivo and regulation of shear-induced inflammation and apoptosis in vitro, we identified a collection of genes that are either up- or down-regulated by shear-induced COX-2. COX-2 and L-prostaglandin D synthase (L-PGDS) induce reactive oxygen species production, and negatively regulate genes of the histone and cell cycle families, which may play a critical role in chondrocyte death. Conclusions/Significance Prolonged application of high fluid shear stress to chondrocytes recapitulates gene expression profiles associated with osteoarthritis. Our data suggest a potential link between exposure of chondrocytes/cartilage to abnormal mechanical loading and the pathogenesis/progression of OA

  15. Texture Development in High-Silicon Iron Sheet Produced by Simple Shear Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kustas, Andrew B.; Sagapuram, Dinakar; Trumble, Kevin P.; Chandrasekar, Srinivasan

    2016-06-01

    Sheet processing of high Si-Fe alloys (up to 6.5 wt pct Si) is demonstrated by application of highly confined shear deformation in cutting-extrusion. This alloy system, of major interest to electromagnetic applications, is characterized by poor workability. By a suitable interactive combination of simple shear, high strain rates, near-adiabatic heating, and large hydrostatic pressure in the deformation zone, flow localization, and cracking inherent to this alloy system are suppressed. This enables creation of sheet and foil forms from bulk ingots, cast or wrought, in a single deformation step, unlike rolling. The sheet is characterized by strong shear textures, described by partial {110} and <111> fibers, and fine-grained microstructures ( 20 µm grain size). The orientation (inclination) of these fibers, with respect to the sheet surface, can be varied over a range of 35 deg through selection of the deformation path. In contrast to rolling textures, the current shear deformation textures are negligibly influenced by recrystallization annealing. A recovery-based continuous recrystallization mechanism is proposed to explain the texture retention. Some general implications for shear-based processing of alloys of limited workability are discussed.

  16. Estimation of pseudo-2D shear-velocity section by inversion of high frequency surface waves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Luo, Y.; Liu, J.; Xia, J.; Xu, Y.; Liu, Q.

    2006-01-01

    A scheme to generate pseudo-2D shear-velocity sections with high horizontal resolution and low field cost by inversion of high frequency surface waves is presented. It contains six steps. The key step is the joint method of crossed correlation and phase shift scanning. This joint method chooses only two traces to generate image of dispersion curve. For Rayleigh-wave dispersion is most important for estimation of near-surface shear-wave velocity, it can effectively obtain reliable images of dispersion curves with a couple of traces. The result of a synthetic example shows the feasibility of this scheme. ?? 2005 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  17. Microturbulence and Flow Shear in High-performance JET ITB Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    R.V. Budny; A. Andre; A. Bicoulet; C. Challis; G.D. Conway; W. Dorland; D.R. Ernst; T.S. Hahm; T.C. Hender; D. McCune; G. Rewoldt; S.E. Sharapov

    2001-12-05

    The transport, flow shear, and linear growth rates of microturbulence are studied for a Joint European Torus (JET) plasma with high central q in which an internal transport barrier (ITB) forms and grows to a large radius. The linear microturbulence growth rates of the fastest growing (most unstable) toroidal modes with high toroidal mode number are calculated using the GS2 and FULL gyrokinetic codes. These linear growth rates, gamma (subscript lin) are large, but the flow-shearing rates, gamma (subscript ExB) (dominated by the toroidal rotation contribution) are also comparably large when and where the ITB exists.

  18. Evaluation of Young’s modulus of MgB2 filaments in composite wires for the superconducting links for the high-luminosity LHC upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugano, Michinaka; Ballarino, Amalia; Bartova, Barbora; Bjoerstad, Roger; Gerardin, Alexandre; Scheuerlein, Christian

    2016-02-01

    MgB2 wire is a promising superconductor for the superconducting links for the high-luminosity upgrade of the large Hadron collider at CERN. The mechanical properties of MgB2 must be fully quantified for the cable design, and in this study, we evaluate the Young’s modulus of MgB2 filaments in wires with a practical level of critical current. The Young’s moduli of MgB2 filaments by two different processes, in situ and ex situ, were compared. Two different evaluation methods were applied to an in situ MgB2 wire, a single-fiber tensile test and a tensile test after removing Monel. In addition, the Young’s modulus of the few-micron-thick Nb-Ni reaction layer in an ex situ processed wire was evaluated using a nanoindentation testing technique to improve the accuracy of analysis based on the rule of mixtures. The Young’s moduli of the in situ and ex situ MgB2 wires were in the range of 76-97 GPa and no distinct difference depending on the fabrication process was found.

  19. Room temperature shear properties of the strain isolator pad for the shuttle thermal protection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawyer, J. W.; Waters, W. A., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Tests were conducted at room temperature to determine the shear properties of the strain isolator pad (SIP) material used in the thermal protection system of the space shuttle. Tests were conducted on both the .23 cm and .41 cm thick SIP material in the virgin state and after fifty fully reversed shear cycles. The shear stress displacement relationships are highly nonlinear, exhibit large hysteresis effects, are dependent on material orientation, and have a large low modulus region near the zero stress level where small changes in stress can result in large displacements. The values at the higher stress levels generally increase with normal and shear force load conditioning. Normal forces applied during the shear tests reduces the low modulus region for the material. Shear test techniques which restrict the normal movement of the material give erroneous stress displacement results. However, small normal forces do not significantly effect the shear modulus for a given shear stress. Poisson's ratio values for the material are within the range of values for many common materials. The values are not constant but vary as a function of the stress level and the previous stress history of the material. Ultimate shear strengths of the .23 cm thick SIP are significantly higher than those obtained for the .41 cm thick SIP.

  20. High-frequency viscoelastic shear properties of vocal fold tissues: implications for vocal fold tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Teller, Sean S; Farran, Alexandra J E; Xiao, Longxi; Jiao, Tong; Duncan, Randall L; Clifton, Rodney J; Jia, Xinqiao

    2012-10-01

    The biomechanical function of the vocal folds (VFs) depends on their viscoelastic properties. Many conditions can lead to VF scarring that compromises voice function and quality. To identify candidate replacement materials, the structure, composition, and mechanical properties of native tissues need to be understood at phonation frequencies. Previously, the authors developed the torsional wave experiment (TWE), a stress-wave-based experiment to determine the linear viscoelastic shear properties of small, soft samples. Here, the viscoelastic properties of porcine and human VFs were measured over a frequency range of 10-200 Hz. The TWE utilizes resonance phenomena to determine viscoelastic properties; therefore, the specimen test frequency is determined by the sample size and material properties. Viscoelastic moduli are reported at resonance frequencies. Structure and composition of the tissues were determined by histology and immunochemistry. Porcine data from the TWE are separated into two groups: a young group, consisting of fetal and newborn pigs, and an adult group, consisting of 6-9-month olds and 2+-year olds. Adult tissues had an average storage modulus of 2309±1394 Pa and a loss tangent of 0.38±0.10 at frequencies of 36-200 Hz. The VFs of young pigs were significantly more compliant, with a storage modulus of 394±142 Pa and a loss tangent of 0.40±0.14 between 14 and 30 Hz. No gender dependence was observed. Histological staining showed that adult porcine tissues had a more organized, layered structure than the fetal tissues, with a thicker epithelium and a more structured lamina propria. Elastin fibers in fetal VF tissues were immature compared to those in adult tissues. Together, these structural changes in the tissues most likely contributed to the change in viscoelastic properties. Adult human VF tissues, recovered postmortem from adult patients with a history of smoking or disease, had an average storage modulus of 756±439 Pa and a loss tangent of 0

  1. Rheological and microstructural evolution of Carrara marble with high shear strain: results from high temperature torsion experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pieri, Marco; Burlini, Luigi; Kunze, Karsten; Stretton, Iona; Olgaard, David L.

    2001-09-01

    This study investigated the rheological and microstructural evolution of Carrara marble deformed to large shear strain to understand how dynamic recrystallization and lattice-preferred orientation (LPO) are related to strain softening processes. Solid cylinders of Carrara marble were deformed in torsion up to a shear strain of γ=11 at constant twist rates, which correspond to a shear strain rate of 3×10 -4 s -1 at the outer surface, and at temperatures of 1000 and 1200 K (727 and 927°C, respectively). For the initial grain size of 150 μm, these conditions are within the dislocation creep regime. Substantial changes in both rheology and microstructure were observed as the marble deformed to high shear strain at 1000 K (1200 K). A peak stress was reached at about γ=1 ( γ=0.5) followed by moderate strain weakening. An apparent steady-state flow stress was obtained at high shear strain of γ>5 ( γ>2). The stress exponent n decreased slowly with strain from 10 ( γ=1) to 6 ( γ=9) at 1000 K, but it remained approximately constant at 1200 K ( n around 10). At the maximum reached shear strain of γ=11 ( γ=8.5), the marble had almost completely recrystallized to a fine grain size of about 10 μm (20 μm). A secondary foliation developed in the recrystallized matrix, which is at a large oblique angle to the shear zone boundary (SZB). LPO was measured by electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). For both temperatures, the LPO evolved from an oblique deformation texture to a very sharp and symmetric single orientation component with r{101¯4} parallel to the shear plane and a<1¯21¯0> parallel to the shear direction. It is concluded that strain weakening was associated with the development of a strong LPO during dynamic recrystallization to a finer grain size. Mechanical and microstructural steady-state is only reached at large shear strain. The steady-state lattice and grain shape fabrics can hardly be used as shear sense indicators in such recrystallized calcite

  2. Dissipative heating effects and end corrections for viscous Newtonian flow in high shear capillary tube viscometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jakobsen, J.; Winer, W. O.

    1974-01-01

    The effect of dissipation heating on the apparent viscosity measured in capillary tube viscometry is described in this paper. Conditions of low Reynolds number and high shear are assumed. End corrections to the tube flow are incorporated. The flow curves show decreasing apparent viscosity when the shear stress increases. The configuration of the flow curves plotted in logarithmic presentation are found to be identical for fluids with Newtonian behavior. Convection is the predominant mechanism in removal of the heat in short capillary tube. The estimated upper bound for the shear stress obtainable in short length capillary tubes appears to be of the order of magnitude of 10 MPa limited primarily by the pressure drop associated with the constant end correction from the flat ended inlet and exit of the tube.

  3. Impact of triacylglycerol composition on shear-induced textural changes in highly saturated fats.

    PubMed

    Gregersen, Sandra B; Andersen, Morten D; Hammershøj, Marianne; Wiking, Lars

    2017-01-15

    This study demonstrates a strong interaction between triacylglycerol (TAG) composition and effects of shear rate on the microstructure and texture of fats. Cocoa butter alternatives with similar saturated fat content, but different major TAGs (PPO-, PSO-, SSO-, POP- and SOS-rich blends) were evaluated. Results show how shear can create a harder texture in fat blends based on symmetric monounsaturated TAGs (up to ∼200%), primarily due to reduction in crystal size, whereas shear has little effect on hardness of asymmetric monounsaturated TAGs. Such differences could not be ascribed to differences in the degree of supercooling, but was found to be a consequence of differences in the crystallisation behaviour of different TAGs. The fractal dimension was evaluated by dimensional detrended fluctuation analysis and Fourier transformation of microscopy images. However, the concept of fractal patterns was found to be insufficient to describe microstructural changes of fat blends with high solid fat content.

  4. Impact of triacylglycerol composition on shear-induced textural changes in highly saturated fats.

    PubMed

    Gregersen, Sandra B; Andersen, Morten D; Hammershøj, Marianne; Wiking, Lars

    2017-01-15

    This study demonstrates a strong interaction between triacylglycerol (TAG) composition and effects of shear rate on the microstructure and texture of fats. Cocoa butter alternatives with similar saturated fat content, but different major TAGs (PPO-, PSO-, SSO-, POP- and SOS-rich blends) were evaluated. Results show how shear can create a harder texture in fat blends based on symmetric monounsaturated TAGs (up to ∼200%), primarily due to reduction in crystal size, whereas shear has little effect on hardness of asymmetric monounsaturated TAGs. Such differences could not be ascribed to differences in the degree of supercooling, but was found to be a consequence of differences in the crystallisation behaviour of different TAGs. The fractal dimension was evaluated by dimensional detrended fluctuation analysis and Fourier transformation of microscopy images. However, the concept of fractal patterns was found to be insufficient to describe microstructural changes of fat blends with high solid fat content. PMID:27542496

  5. The effect of high speed shearing on disaggregation and degradation of pectin from creeping fig seeds.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jun; Wu, Shuang-Shuang; Liang, Rui-Hong; Liu, Wei; Liu, Cheng-Mei; Shuai, Xi-Xiang; Wang, Zhao-Jun

    2014-12-15

    The effect of high speed shearing (HSS) on disaggregation and degradation of pectin from creeping fig seeds was investigated. It was found that disaggregation and degradation occurred during the whole shearing process. When pectin solution was sheared at 24,000 rpm for less than 8h, degradation happened but disaggregation was dominant during this period. After 8h, degradation became obvious, however, a small amount of aggregates remained even after 24h treatment, indicating that HSS may not eliminate aggregates efficiently. The presence of aggregates is one of the most probable causes for the inaccurate determination of molecular weight of pectin. A new method was proposed for calculating more accurately the molecular weight based on the change of the reducing sugar content and the variation of molecular weight. Determination of unsaturated uronide and FT-IR spectra analysis indicated that neither β-elimination nor demethoxylation occurred during the HSS, and no new functional group was formed during the HSS process.

  6. A kinetic study of the polymorphic transformation of nimodipine and indomethacin during high shear granulation.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhen; Ma, Mingxin; Wang, Tianyi; Chang, Di; Jiang, Tongying; Wang, Siling

    2011-06-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the mechanism, kinetics, and factors affecting the polymorphic transformation of nimodipine (NMD) and indomethacin (IMC) during high shear granulation. Granules containing active pharmaceutical ingredient, microcrystalline cellulose, and low-substituted hydroxypropylcellulose were prepared with ethanolic hydroxypropylcellulose solution, and the effects of independent process variables including impeller speed and granulating temperature were taken into consideration. Two polymorphs of the model drugs and granules were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction analysis and quantitatively determined by differential scanning calorimetry. A theoretical kinetic method of ten kinetic models was applied to analyze the polymorphic transformation of model drugs. The results obtained revealed that both the transformation of modification I to modification II of NMD and the transformation of the α form to the γ form of IMC followed a two-dimensional nuclei growth mechanism. The activation energy of transformation was calculated to be 7.933 and 56.09 kJ·mol(-1) from Arrhenius plot, respectively. Both the granulating temperature and the impeller speed affected the transformation rate of the drugs and, in particular, the high shear stress significantly accelerated the transformation process. By analyzing the growth mechanisms of granules in high-shear mixer, it was concluded that the polymorphic transformation of NMD and IMC took place in accordance with granule growth in a high-shear mixer. PMID:21553164

  7. The plane strain shear fracture of the advanced high strength steels

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Li

    2013-12-16

    The “shear fracture” which occurs at the high-curvature die radii in the sheet metal forming has been reported to remarkably limit the application of the advanced high strength steels (AHSS) in the automobile industry. However, this unusual fracture behavior generally cannot be predicted by the traditional forming limit diagram (FLD). In this research, a new experimental system was developed in order to simulate the shear fracture, especially at the plane strain state which is the most common state in the auto-industry and difficult to achieve in the lab due to sample size. Furthermore, the system has the capability to operate in a strain rate range from quasi-static state to the industrial forming state. One kinds of AHSS, Quenching-Partitioning (QP) steels have been performed in this test and the results show that the limiting fracture strain is related to the bending ratio and strain rate. The experimental data support that deformation-induced heating is an important cause of “shear fracture” phenomena for AHSS: a deformation-induced quasi-heating caused by smaller bending ratio and high strain rate produce a smaller limiting plane strain and lead a “shear fracture” in the component.

  8. Characterization of Electro-Rheologcial Fluids Under High Shear Rate in Parallel Ducts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X. W.; Zhang, C. B.; Yu, T. X.; Wen, W. J.

    Electro-rheological (ER) fluid is a smart suspension which can be changed promptly from Newtonian to Bingham plastic material when subjected to a high-intensity electric field. This property of ER fluid makes it possible to be applied in adaptive energy absorbers. As the impact velocity encountered in applications could be very large, it is necessary to characterize the ERF under high shear rate. In this study, a capillary rheo-meter with parallel duct was designed and manufactured which is capable of producing a shear rate as high as 5000(1/s). Two giant ER fluids with mass concentration C = 51% and 44.5% and a commercial density-matched ER fluid with C = 37.5% were characterized. The experimental results show that when the ER fluids are free of electric field (E = 0kV/mm), they are Newtonian. However, for the former two ER fluids, the deposition effect is very remarkable and stirring has to be made continuously to keep the suspension stable. With the increase of the electric field intensity, the yield shear stresses of ER fluids increase exponentially but their viscosities do not change much. It is also found that within the parallel duct, the flow of ER fluids exhibits notable fluctuations, whose period increases with the increase of electric field intensity and is independent of the shear rate.

  9. Dynamic Strengthening During High Velocity Shear Experiments with Siliceous Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Z.; Chang, J. C.; Boneh, Y.; Chen, X.; Reches, Z.

    2011-12-01

    It is generally accepted that dynamic-weakening is essential for earthquake instability, and many experimental works have documented this weakening. Recent observations revealed also opposite trends of dynamic-strengthening in experiments (Reches & Lockner, 2010). We present here our experimental results of this dynamic-strengthening and discuss possible implications to earthquake behavior. We ran hundreds of experiments on experimental faults made of siliceous rock including granite, syenite, diorite, and quartzite. The experimental fault is comprised of two solid cylindrical blocks with a raised-ring contact of 7 cm diameter and 1 cm width. We recognized general, three regimes of strength-velocity relations: (I) Dynamic weakening (drop of 20-60% of static strength) as slip velocity increased from ~0.0003 m/s (lowest experimental velocity) to a critical velocity, Vc=0.008-0.16 m/s; (II) Abrupt transition to dynamic strengthening regime during which the fault strength almost regains its static strength; and (III) Quasi-constant strength with further possible drops as velocity approaches ~1 m/s. The critical velocity depends on the sample lithology: Vc is ~0.06 m/s for granite, ~0.008 m/s for syenite, ~0.01 m/s for diorite, and ~0.16 m/s for quartzite. The strengthening stage is associated with temperature increase, wear-rate increase, and the occurrence of intense, high frequency stick-slip events (Reches & Lockner, 2010). Sammis et al., (this meeting) attributed this strengthening to dehydration of the thin water layer that covers the gouge particles as the temperature increases. On the other hand, we note that tens of experiments with dolomite samples (non-siliceous), which were deformed under similar conditions, did not exhibit the velocity strengthening (unpublished). Based on the analyses by Andrews (2004, 2005), we speculate that velocity strengthening may bound the slip velocity. The numerical models of Andrews show that the slip velocity along a slip

  10. Winged inclusions: Pinch-and-swell objects during high-strain simple shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasemann, Bernhard; Dabrowski, Marcin

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we compare natural examples of isolated pinch-and-swell objects, which have been deformed in simple shear, with results of high-strain numerical models. Such structures, which have geometrical similarities with δ-clast systems and rolling structures, have been called winged inclusions. We suggest a new mechanical explanation for the evolution of winged inclusions, which form when pinch-and-swell shaped objects consisting of a core and pre-existing wings rotate out of the shear plane. The viscosity ratio, the stress exponent, and the shape of the winged inclusion have a significant influence on the rotation rate. The rotational behaviour of winged inclusions differs significantly from the rotational behaviour of simple elliptical objects with comparable aspect ratios. During the early stages of formation, winged inclusions may resemble mirror images of sigmoids and misinterpretations may lead to a wrong determination of the shear sense. During progressive shear to large strains, the structures may be approximately described as consisting of a pulsating rotating core and thinning wings that rotate with different rates. During rotation of the structure, the core of the winged inclusions records an overall decrease of the aspect ratio influencing the rotation rate of the inclusion. The wings are subject to ptygmatic folding, when they rotate through the field of instantaneous shortening and may unfold again in the field of instantaneous stretching. During ongoing shearing, the wings on both sides of the core rotate with the core, may change their positions and finally unfold after rotation about 180° resulting again in a pinch-and-swell shaped object. Therefore, winged inclusions record ambiguous information about the finite strain. Rotating winged inclusions create a significant flow perturbation in the matrix resulting in nucleation of folds, refolding and propagation of shear zones. Rootless intrafolial folds with opposing closures have strong

  11. Crack initiation observation and local stress analysis in shear fracture tests of ultra-high strength steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Ninshu; Takada, Kenji; Sugimoto, Nao

    2016-08-01

    To investigate the local strain and stress at the crack initiation position in shear fracture test pieces of ultra-high strength steels, a butterfly shear fracture specimen was employed. The crack initiation position and propagation direction were observed during shear fracture tests by high speed cameras and investigated through analysing the fracture surface by scanning electron microscope. Further, the finite element method was employed and the stress-triaxiality at the crack initiation position was investigated. It can be obtained that the crack initiated at the position where the stress state is close to uniaxial tensile state or plane strain state more than pure shear stress state.

  12. High Modulus and High T(sub g) Thermally Stable Polymers from p-Ethynyl-Terminated Rigid-Rod Monomers. Part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melissaris, Anastasios P.; Sutter, James K.; Litt, Morton H.; Scheiman, Daniel A.; Schuerman, Marla A.

    1995-01-01

    Novel p-ethynyl-substituted rigid rod monomers were studied by pressure Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC), ThermoGravimetric Analysis (TGA), IsothermoGravimetric Analysis (IGA), and TGA-IR. These monomers, 4,4'-bis(((4-ethynylphenyl)carbonyl)oxy)biphenyl, designated 1, 1,5-bis-(((4-ethynylphenyl)carbonyl)oxy)naphthalene, designated 2, and bis(4-ethynylphenyl)pyromellitimide, designated 3, were polymerized in the solid state. Thermal polymerization in N2 or air produced highly cross-linked resins with polymerization exotherms centered between 212 and 276 C. The (delta)H's of polymerization of these resins in air were found to be double those in N2. When monomers 1 and 2 were heated in air from 23 to 750 C at 10 C/min, the main decomposition product was carbon dioxide, evolving at a maximum rate between 500 and 600 C; water was also detected as a decomposition product. Void-free neat resin moldings, designated lp to 3p, were made by compression molding the monomers and then heating them. The resulting polymers were highly cross-linked, and their glass transition temperatures (T(sub g)) were much higher than their polymerization temperatures. Using ThermoMechanical Analysis (TMA), we found that polymers lp to 3p had T(sub g)'s of 422, 329, and 380 C, respectively. The thermal and thermooxidative stabilities improved when lp to 3p were postcured in N2 (the postcured polymers were designated 1pp to 3pp). The Linear Thermal Expansions (LTE) for lp and 3p were 1% between 23 and 420 C. Using rheological analysis, we could not clearly detect the T(sub g)'s of lp to 3p because their moduli dropped only slightly between 23 and 490 C and the changes in tan beta were very low. Because of high cross-link density, their moduli changed little as the resins went from a glassy to a rubbery state. Their shear storage moduli in air ranged from 0.82 (3p, 3pp) to 1.6 GPa (lpp) at 23 C, from 0.16 (2p) to 0.7GPa(lpp) at 380 C, and from 0.18(lpp)to 0.6GPa(2p) at 490 C. Finally, these

  13. Traction and nonequilibrium phase behavior of confined sheared liquids at high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gattinoni, Chiara; Heyes, David M.; Lorenz, Christian D.; Dini, Daniele

    2013-11-01

    Nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of confined model liquids under pressure and sheared by the relative sliding of the boundary walls have been carried out. The relationship between the time-dependent traction coefficient, μ(t), and the state of internal structure of the film is followed from commencement of shear for various control parameters, such as applied load, global shear rate, and solid-liquid atom interaction parameters. Phase diagrams, velocity and temperature profiles, and traction coefficient diagrams are analyzed for pure Lennard-Jones (LJ) liquids and a binary LJ mixture. A single component LJ liquid is found to form semicrystalline arrangements with high-traction coefficients, and stick-slip behavior is observed for high pressures and low-shear velocities, which is shown to involve periodic deformation and stress release of the wall atoms and slip in the solid-liquid boundary region. A binary mixture, which discourages crystallization, gives a more classical tribological response with the larger atoms preferentially adsorbing commensurate with the wall. The results obtained are analyzed in the context of tribology: the binary mixture behaves like a typical lubricant, whereas the monatomic system behaves like a traction fluid. It is discussed how this type of simulation can give insights on the tribological behavior of realistic systems.

  14. Shear instability of plastically-deforming metals in high-velocity impact welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nassiri, Ali; Kinsey, Brad; Chini, Greg

    2016-10-01

    High-speed oblique impact of two metal plates results in the development of an intense shear region at their interface leading to interfacial profile distortion and interatomic bonding. If the relative velocity is sufficient, a distinct wavy morphology with a well-defined amplitude and wavelength is observed. Emergence of this morphology below the melting point of the metal plates is usually taken as evidence of a successful weld. Amongvarious proposed mechanisms, instability owing to large tangential velocity variations near the interface has received significant attention. With one exception, the few quantitative stability analyses of this proposed mechanism have treated an anti-symmetric/shear-layer base profile (i.e., a Kelvin-Helmholtz configuration) and employed an inviscid or Newtonian viscous fluid constitutive relation. The former stipulation implies the energy source for the instability is the presumed relative shearing motion of the two plates, while the latter is appropriate only if melting occurs locally near the interface. In this study, these restrictions, which are at odds with the conditions realized in high-velocity impact welding, are relaxed. A quantitative temporal linear stability analysis is performed to investigate whether the interfacial wave morphology could be the signature of a shear-driven high strain-rate instability of a perfectly plastic material undergoing a jet-like deformation near the interface. The resulting partial differential eigenvalue problem is solved numerically using a spectral collocation method in which customized boundary conditions near the interface are implemented to properly treat the singularity arising from the vanishing of the base flow strain-rate at the symmetry plane of the jet. The solution of the eigenvalue problem yields the wavelength and growth rate of the dominant wave-like disturbances along the interface and confirms that a shear instability of a plastically-deforming material is compatible with the

  15. Size effect, critical resolved shear stress, stacking fault energy, and solid solution strengthening in the CrMnFeCoNi high-entropy alloy

    PubMed Central

    Okamoto, Norihiko L.; Fujimoto, Shu; Kambara, Yuki; Kawamura, Marino; Chen, Zhenghao M. T.; Matsunoshita, Hirotaka; Tanaka, Katsushi; Inui, Haruyuki; George, Easo P.

    2016-01-01

    High-entropy alloys (HEAs) comprise a novel class of scientifically and technologically interesting materials. Among these, equatomic CrMnFeCoNi with the face-centered cubic (FCC) structure is noteworthy because its ductility and strength increase with decreasing temperature while maintaining outstanding fracture toughness at cryogenic temperatures. Here we report for the first time by single-crystal micropillar compression that its bulk room temperature critical resolved shear stress (CRSS) is ~33–43 MPa, ~10 times higher than that of pure nickel. CRSS depends on pillar size with an inverse power-law scaling exponent of –0.63 independent of orientation. Planar ½ < 110 > {111} dislocations dissociate into Shockley partials whose separations range from ~3.5–4.5 nm near the screw orientation to ~5–8 nm near the edge, yielding a stacking fault energy of 30 ± 5 mJ/m2. Dislocations are smoothly curved without any preferred line orientation indicating no significant anisotropy in mobilities of edge and screw segments. The shear-modulus-normalized CRSS of the HEA is not exceptionally high compared to those of certain concentrated binary FCC solid solutions. Its rough magnitude calculated using the Fleischer/Labusch models corresponds to that of a hypothetical binary with the elastic constants of our HEA, solute concentrations of 20–50 at.%, and atomic size misfit of ~4%. PMID:27775026

  16. Dynamics of shear layers at the interface of a highly porous medium and a pure fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antoniadis, P. D.; Papalexandris, M. V.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we report on shear flows in domains that contain a macroscopic interface between a highly porous medium and a pure fluid. Our study is based on the single-domain approach, according to which, the same set of governing equations is employed for both inside the porous medium and in the pure-fluid domain. In particular, we introduce a mathematical model for the flows of interest that is derived directly from a continuum theory for fluid-saturated granular materials. The resulting set of equations is a variation of the well-known unsteady Darcy-Brinkman model. First, we employ this model to perform a linear stability analysis of inviscid shear layers over a highly porous medium. Our analysis shows that such layers are unconditionally unstable. Next, we present results from numerical simulations of temporally evolving shear layers in both two and three dimensions. The simulations are performed via a recently designed algorithm that employs a predictor-corrector time-marching scheme and a projection method for the computation of the pressure field on a collocated grid. According to our numerical predictions, the onset of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability leads to the formation of vortices that extend to both sides of the material interface, thus producing substantial recirculation inside the porous medium. These vortices eventually merge, leading to significant growth of the shear layer and, in three dimensional flows, transition to turbulence. The dynamics of the shear layers, including growth rate and self-similarity, is presented and analysed. Finally, the structure of these layers is described in detail and compared to the one of plain mixing layers.

  17. Analysing calcium signalling of cells under high shear flows using discontinuous dielectrophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soffe, Rebecca; Baratchi, Sara; Tang, Shi-Yang; Nasabi, Mahyar; McIntyre, Peter; Mitchell, Arnan; Khoshmanesh, Khashayar

    2015-07-01

    Immobilisation of cells is an important feature of many cellular assays, as it enables the physical/chemical stimulation of cells; whilst, monitoring cellular processes using microscopic techniques. Current approaches for immobilising cells, however, are hampered by time-consuming processes, the need for specific antibodies or coatings, and adverse effects on cell integrity. Here, we present a dielectrophoresis-based approach for the robust immobilisation of cells, and analysis of their responses under high shear flows. This approach is quick and label-free, and more importantly, minimises the adverse effects of electric field on the cell integrity, by activating the field for a short duration of 120 s, just long enough to immobilise the cells, after which cell culture media (such as HEPES) is flushed through the platform. In optimal conditions, at least 90% of the cells remained stably immobilised, when exposed to a shear stress of 63 dyn/cm2. This approach was used to examine the shear-induced calcium signalling of HEK-293 cells expressing a mechanosensitive ion channel, transient receptor potential vaniloid type 4 (TRPV4), when exposed to the full physiological range of shear stress.

  18. Effect of pressure on viscosity at high shear rates by using an injection molding machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volpe, Valentina; Pantani, Roberto

    2015-12-01

    The difficulties in performing accurate measurements of the effect of pressure on the viscosity of the polymeric materials results in a shortage of relevant experimental data in the literature. In this work, an atactic polystyrene has been characterized to determine the effect of pressure on viscosity during the injection molding process. In particular, the nozzle of the injection molding machine has been modified to host a slit rheometer that allows obtaining in-line rheological measurements by means of two pressure transducers. Slits with two different geometries have been adopted, in order to obtain a wide range of shear rates (102-105 s-1). Experiments have been conducted at increasing injection flow rates, corresponding to different shear rates. By analyzing the measured pressures it has been possible to determine the coefficient β, which describes the effect of pressure on viscosity. Results show that the effect of pressure on viscosity decreases on increasing the shear rate until a plateau is reached at very high shear rates.

  19. Ultrasound Shear Wave Simulation of Breast Tumor Using Nonlinear Tissue Elasticity

    PubMed Central

    Park, Dae Woo

    2016-01-01

    Shear wave elasticity imaging (SWEI) can assess the elasticity of tissues, but the shear modulus estimated in SWEI is often less sensitive to a subtle change of the stiffness that produces only small mechanical contrast to the background tissues. Because most soft tissues exhibit mechanical nonlinearity that differs in tissue types, mechanical contrast can be enhanced if the tissues are compressed. In this study, a finite element- (FE-) based simulation was performed for a breast tissue model, which consists of a circular (D: 10 mm, hard) tumor and surrounding tissue (soft). The SWEI was performed with 0% to 30% compression of the breast tissue model. The shear modulus of the tumor exhibited noticeably high nonlinearity compared to soft background tissue above 10% overall applied compression. As a result, the elastic modulus contrast of the tumor to the surrounding tissue was increased from 0.46 at 0% compression to 1.45 at 30% compression. PMID:27293476

  20. Analytical and experimental results of the coefficient of thermal expansion of high-modulus graphite-epoxy materials

    SciTech Connect

    Romeo, G.; Frulla, G.

    1995-09-01

    The coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) as determined by the Classical Laminate Theory is very sensitive to some orthotropic elastic constants and to the laminate layup. In particular, the non-Hookean behavior of a unidirectional lamina in the fiber direction have to be taken into account to exactly predict the CTE. To verify the theoretical analysis, a new test facility has been designed to carefully measure the CTE in advanced composite materials having a quasi zero value of CTE. Measurement error in the CTE was minimized by a careful choice of displacement sensors and the high control of their thermal stability. The results show that a variation of +/- 1 deg in the lamina orientation can change the CTE of the quasi-isotropic laminate up to -/+ 50.5% of the theoretical value. A variation of +/- 5% in the physical and mechanical properties can change the CTE up to -/+ 48%. 14 refs.

  1. Graphite/Ultra-High Modulus Polyethylene Hybrid Fiber Composites with Epoxy and Polyethylene Matrices for Cosmic Radiation Shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    One of the most significant technical challenges in long-duration space missions is that of protecting the crew from harmful radiation. Protection against such radiation on a manned Mars mission will be of vital importance both during transit and while on the surface of the planet. The development of multifunctional materials that serve as integral structural members of the space vehicle and provide the necessary radiation shielding for the crew would be both mission enabling and cost effective. Additionally, combining shielding and structure could reduce total vehicle mass. Hybrid laminated composite materials having both ultramodulus polyethylene (PE) and graphite fibers in epoxy and PE matrices could meet such mission requirements. PE fibers have excellent physical properties, including the highest specific strength of any known fiber. Moreover, the high hydrogen (H) content of polyethylene makes the material an excellent shielding material for cosmic radiation. When such materials are incorporated into an epoxy or PE matrix a very effective shielding material is expected. Boron (B) may be added to the matrix resin or used as a coating to further increase the shielding effectiveness due to B s ability to slow thermal neutrons. These materials may also serve as micrometeorites shields due to PE s high impact energy absorption properties. It should be noted that such materials can be fabricated by existing equipment and methods. It is the objective of this work therefore to: (a) perform preliminary analysis of the radiation transport within these materials; (b) fabricate panels for mechanical property testing before and after radiation exposure. Preliminary determination on the effectiveness of the combinations of material components on both shielding and structural efficiency will be made.

  2. Nanostructured bacterial cellulose-poly(4-styrene sulfonic acid) composite membranes with high storage modulus and protonic conductivity.

    PubMed

    Gadim, Tiago D O; Figueiredo, Andrea G P R; Rosero-Navarro, Nataly C; Vilela, Carla; Gamelas, José A F; Barros-Timmons, Ana; Neto, Carlos Pascoal; Silvestre, Armando J D; Freire, Carmen S R; Figueiredo, Filipe M L

    2014-05-28

    The present study reports the development of a new generation of bio-based nanocomposite proton exchange membranes based on bacterial cellulose (BC) and poly(4-styrene sulfonic acid) (PSSA), produced by in situ free radical polymerization of sodium 4-styrenesulfonate using poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA) as cross-linker, followed by conversion of the ensuing polymer into the acidic form. The BC nanofibrilar network endows the composite membranes with excellent mechanical properties at least up to 140 °C, a temperature where either pure PSSA or Nafion are soft, as shown by dynamic mechanical analysis. The large concentration of sulfonic acid groups in PSSA is responsible for the high ionic exchange capacity of the composite membranes, reaching 2.25 mmol g(-1) for a composite with 83 wt % PSSA/PEGDA. The through-plane protonic conductivity of the best membrane is in excess of 0.1 S cm(-1) at 94 °C and 98% relative humidity (RH), decreasing to 0.042 S cm(-1) at 60% RH. These values are comparable or even higher than those of ionomers such as Nafion or polyelectrolytes such as PSSA. This combination of electric and viscoelastic properties with low cost underlines the potential of these nanocomposites as a bio-based alternative to other polymer membranes for application in fuel cells, redox flow batteries, or other devices requiring functional proton conducting elements, such as sensors and actuators.

  3. Experimental and numerical study of plastic shear instability under high-speed loading conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Sokovikov, Mikhail E-mail: naimark@icmm.ru; Chudinov, Vasiliy E-mail: naimark@icmm.ru; Bilalov, Dmitry E-mail: naimark@icmm.ru; Oborin, Vladimir E-mail: naimark@icmm.ru; Uvarov, Sergey E-mail: naimark@icmm.ru; Plekhov, Oleg E-mail: naimark@icmm.ru; Terekhina, Alena E-mail: naimark@icmm.ru; Naimark, Oleg E-mail: naimark@icmm.ru

    2014-11-14

    The behavior of specimens dynamically loaded during the split Hopkinson (Kolsky) bar tests in a regime close to simple shear conditions was studied. The lateral surface of the specimens was investigated in a real-time mode with the aid of a high-speed infra-red camera CEDIP Silver 450M. The temperature field distribution obtained at different time made it possible to trace the evolution of plastic strain localization. The process of target perforation involving plug formation and ejection was examined using a high-speed infra-red camera and a VISAR velocity measurement system. The microstructure of tested specimens was analyzed using an optical interferometer-profilometer and a scanning electron microscope. The development of plastic shear instability regions has been simulated numerically.

  4. Temperature-Dependent Young's modulus, shear modulus and Poisson's ratio of p-type Ce0.9Fe3.5Co0.5Sb12 and n-type Co0.95Pd0.05Te0.05Sb3 Skutterudite Thermoelectric Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, Robert; Case, Eldon D; Ni, Jennifer E.; Trejo, Rosa M; Lara-Curzio, Edgar

    2012-01-01

    Effective models of the mechanical behavior of thermoelectric materials under device conditions require knowledge of the temperature-dependent elastic properties.Between room temperature and 600 K, Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy (RUS) measurements of the Young s and shear moduli of three skutterudite thermoelectric materials, n-type Co0.95Pd0.05Te0.05Sb3(both with and without 0.1 atomic % cerium dopant) and p-type Ce0.9Fe3.5Co0.5Sb12, decreased linearly with temperature at a rate between -0.011 GPa/K and -0.013 GPa/K. In contrast the Poisson s ratio was approximately 0.22 for the three materials and was relatively insensitive to temperature.For temperatures > 600 K, the elastic moduli decreased more rapidly and resonance peaks broadened indicating the onset of viscoelastic behavior.The viscoelastic relaxation of the moduli was least for Ce-doped n-type material, for which grain boundary precipitates may inhibit grain boundary sliding which in turn has important implications concerning creep resistance. In addition, powder processing of the n- and p-type materials should be done cautiously since submicron-sized powders of both the n- and p-type powders were pyrophoric

  5. Enhanced Actuation Performance and Reduced Heat Generation in Shear-Bending Mode Actuator at High Temperature.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jianguo; Liu, Guoxi; Cheng, Jinrong; Dong, Shuxiang

    2016-08-01

    The actuation performance, strain hysteresis, and heat generation of the shear-bending mode actuators based on soft and hard BiScO3-PbTiO3 (BS-PT) ceramics were investigated under different thermal (from room temperature to 300 °C) and electrical loadings (from 2 to 10 kV/cm and from 1 to 1000 Hz). The actuator based on both soft and hard BS-PT ceramics worked stably at the temperature as high as 300 °C. The maximum working temperature of this shear-bending actuators is 150 °C higher than those of the traditional piezoelectric actuators based on commercial Pb(Zr, Ti)O3 materials. Furthermore, although the piezoelectric properties of soft-type ceramics based on BS-PT ceramics were superior to those of hard ceramics, the maximum displacement of the actuator based on hard ceramics was larger than that fabricated by soft ceramics at high temperature. The maximum displacement of the actuator based on hard ceramics was [Formula: see text] under an applied electric field of 10 kV/cm at 300 °C. The strain hysteresis and heat generation of the actuator based on hard ceramics was smaller than those of the actuator based on soft ceramics in the wide temperature range. These results indicated that the shear-bending actuator based on hard piezoelectric ceramics was more suitable for high-temperature piezoelectric applications. PMID:27214895

  6. Scale-up of high shear granulation based on the internal stress measurement.

    PubMed

    Watano, Satoru; Okamoto, Takumi; Sato, Yoshinobu; Osako, Yoshifumi

    2005-04-01

    Scale-up of wet granulation in a vertical high shear mixer was conducted. Pharmaceutical excipient powders composed of lactose, cornstarch and micro-crystallinecellulose, and hydroxypropylcellulose as a binder were mixed together and then granulated with purified water under various operating conditions and vessel scales. A novel internal stress measurement system was developed and stress of normal and tangential directions that granules received from the agitator blade during the granulation was continuously measured. The results indicated that granules received stress mainly from the tangential direction, which also showed the largest value near at the vessel wall. The effects of the agitator tip speed and the centrifugal acceleration on the measured stress was investigated. It was found that the tip speed of the agitator blade could be the main factor for the granule growth. The physical properties such as strength, size distribution and compressibility of granules prepared by changing the operating conditions and the vessel scales were evaluated and the scale-up characteristics of high shear granulation were investigated experimentally. The results showed that these physical properties had linear correlations with the tip speed. It was finally concluded that the scale-up of high shear granulation could be well conducted by means of the tip speed of the agitator blade. PMID:15802830

  7. Effect of starting material particle size on its agglomeration behavior in high shear wet granulation.

    PubMed

    Badawy, Sherif I Farag; Hussain, Munir A

    2004-05-11

    The effect of anhydrous lactose particle size distribution on its performance in the wet granulation process was evaluated. Three grades of anhydrous lactose were used in the study: "as is" manufacturer grade and 2 particle size fractions obtained by screening of the 60M lactose. Particle growth behavior of the 3 lactose grades was evaluated in a high shear mixer. Compactibility and porosity of the resulting granules were also evaluated. A uniaxial compression test on moist agglomerates of the 3 lactose grades was performed in an attempt to explain the mechanism of particle size effect observed in the high shear mixer. Particle growth of anhydrous lactose in the high shear mixer was inversely related to the particle size of the starting material. In addition, granulation manufactured using the grade with the smallest particle size was more porous and demonstrated enhanced compactibility compared with the other grades. Compacts with similar porosity and low liquid saturation demonstrated brittle behavior and their breakage strength was inversely related to lactose particle size in the uniaxial compression test, suggesting that material with smaller particle size may exhibit more pronounced nucleation behavior during wet granulation. On the other hand, compacts prepared at higher liquid saturation and similar compression force exhibited more plastic behavior and showed lower yield stress for the grade with smallest particle size. The lower yield stress of compacts prepared with this grade may indicate a higher coalescence tendency for its granules during wet granulation. PMID:15760071

  8. Development and optimization of solid dispersion containing pellets of itraconazole prepared by high shear pelletization.

    PubMed

    Ye, Guanhao; Wang, Siling; Heng, Paul Wan Sia; Chen, Ling; Wang, Chao

    2007-06-01

    This study investigated the solid dispersion containing pellets of itraconazole for enhanced drug dissolution rate. The influence of process parameters used during high shear pelletization on the pellet properties including pellet size and dissolution rate was also studied. Solid dispersions of itraconazole were prepared with Eudragit E100, a hydrophilic polymer, by a simple fusion method followed by powdered and characterized by differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray powder diffraction. Solid dispersions containing pellets were consequently prepared using a lab-scale high shear mixer. In order to improve the product quality, a central composite design was applied to optimize the critical process variables, such as impeller speed and kneading time, and the results were modeled statistically. Itraconazole was presented as an amorphous state in the solid dispersion prepared at a drug to polymer ratio of 1:2. Both studied parameters had great effect on the responses. Powdered solid dispersion and pellets prepared using the optimal parameter settings showed approximately 30- and 70-fold increases in dissolution rate over the pure drug, respectively. Solid dispersion prepared by simple fusion method could be an option for itraconazole solubility enhancement. Pelletization process in high shear mixer can be optimized effectively by central composite design. PMID:17241757

  9. Biaxial mechanical response of bioprosthetic heart valve biomaterials to high in-plane shear.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wei; Sacks, Michael S; Sellaro, Tiffany L; Slaughter, William S; Scott, Michael J

    2003-06-01

    Utilization of novel biologically-derived biomaterials in bioprosthetic heart valves (BHV) requires robust constitutive models to predict the mechanical behavior under generalized loading states. Thus, it is necessary to perform rigorous experimentation involving all functional deformations to obtain both the form and material constants of a strain-energy density function. In this study, we generated a comprehensive experimental biaxial mechanical dataset that included high in-plane shear stresses using glutaraldehyde treated bovine pericardium (GLBP) as the representative BHV biomaterial. Compared to our previous study (Sacks, JBME, v.121, pp. 551-555, 1999), GLBP demonstrated a substantially different response under high shear strains. This finding was underscored by the inability of the standard Fung model, applied successfully in our previous GLBP study, to fit the high-shear data. To develop an appropriate constitutive model, we utilized an interpolation technique for the pseudo-elastic response to guide modification of the final model form. An eight parameter modified Fung model utilizing additional quartic terms was developed, which fitted the complete dataset well. Model parameters were also constrained to satisfy physical plausibility of the strain energy function. The results of this study underscore the limited predictive ability of current soft tissue models, and the need to collect experimental data for soft tissue simulations over the complete functional range. PMID:12929242

  10. Vortex Dynamics and Shear-Layer Instability in High-Intensity Cyclotrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerfon, Antoine J.

    2016-04-01

    We show that the space-charge dynamics of high-intensity beams in the plane perpendicular to the magnetic field in cyclotrons is described by the two-dimensional Euler equations for an incompressible fluid. This analogy with fluid dynamics gives a unified and intuitive framework to explain the beam spiraling and beam breakup behavior observed in experiments and in simulations. Specifically, we demonstrate that beam breakup is the result of a classical instability occurring in fluids subject to a sheared flow. We give scaling laws for the instability and predict the nonlinear evolution of beams subject to it. Our work suggests that cyclotrons may be uniquely suited for the experimental study of shear layers and vortex distributions that are not achievable in Penning-Malmberg traps.

  11. Vortex Dynamics and Shear-Layer Instability in High-Intensity Cyclotrons.

    PubMed

    Cerfon, Antoine J

    2016-04-29

    We show that the space-charge dynamics of high-intensity beams in the plane perpendicular to the magnetic field in cyclotrons is described by the two-dimensional Euler equations for an incompressible fluid. This analogy with fluid dynamics gives a unified and intuitive framework to explain the beam spiraling and beam breakup behavior observed in experiments and in simulations. Specifically, we demonstrate that beam breakup is the result of a classical instability occurring in fluids subject to a sheared flow. We give scaling laws for the instability and predict the nonlinear evolution of beams subject to it. Our work suggests that cyclotrons may be uniquely suited for the experimental study of shear layers and vortex distributions that are not achievable in Penning-Malmberg traps. PMID:27176525

  12. The change in orientation of subsidiary shears near faults containing pore fluid under high pressure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Byerlee, J.

    1992-01-01

    Byerlee, J., 1992. The change in orientation of subsidiary shears near faults containing pore fluid under high pressure. In: T. Mikumo, K. Aki, M. Ohnaka, L.J. Ruff and P.K.P. Spudich (Editors), Earthquake Source Physics and Earthquake Precursors. Tectonophysics, 211: 295-303. The mechanical effects of a fault containing near-lithostatic fluid pressure in which fluid pressure decreases monotonically from the core of the fault zone to the adjacent country rock is considered. This fluid pressure distribution has mechanical implications for the orientation of subsidiary shears around a fault. Analysis shows that the maximum principal stress is oriented at a high angle to the fault in the country rock where the pore pressure is hydrostatic, and rotates to 45?? to the fault within the fault zone where the pore pressure is much higher. This analysis suggests that on the San Andreas fault, where heat flow constraints require that the coefficient of friction for slip on the fault be less than 0.1, the pore fluid pressure on the main fault is 85% of the lithostatic pressure. The observed geometry of the subsidiary shears in the creeping section of the San Andreas are broadly consistent with this model, with differences that may be due to the heterogeneous nature of the fault. ?? 1992.

  13. Scale-up of high shear granulation based on agitation power.

    PubMed

    Sato, Yoshinobu; Okamoto, Takumi; Watano, Satoru

    2005-12-01

    Scale-up of wet granulation in a vertical high shear mixer was conducted. Pharmaceutical excipient mixtures composed of lactose, cornstarch and micro-crystalline cellulose, and hydroxypropylecellulose as a binder were mixed together and then granulated with purified water under various operating conditions and vessel scales. Torque of agitator shaft was continuously measured and then agitation power per unit vessel volume was calculated. The agitation power per unit vessel volume showed a good correlation with physical properties of obtained granules, such as mass median diameter, strength and compressibility. This implied that the scale-up characteristics could be well analyzed by means of the agitation power per unit vessel volume. In addition, the effects of agitator tip speed and Froude number on the agitation power per unit vessel volume were investigated. The results showed that the agitation power per unit vessel volume was well characterized by the tip speed rather than the Froude number. This meant that the granule growth mainly progressed by the shear stress from the agitator blade. Dynamic characteristics of high shear granulation were also discussed here. PMID:16327186

  14. The effect of particle shape on mixing in a high shear mixer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinnott, Matthew D.; Cleary, Paul W.

    2016-11-01

    Discrete element method modelling is used to study the effect of particle shape on the flow dynamics and mixing in a high shear mixer. The blade generates strong flow over its top surface while compacting and pushing forward particles that are directly in front of the blade. A complex three dimensional flow is established with vertical and radial flow components that are shape dependent and which control the nature of the mixing. Mixing was found to be fast in the azimuthal direction, of intermediate speed in the vertical direction and comparatively slow in the radial mixing. Diffusive mixing is characterised using the granular temperature which shows that the regions of higher granular temperature are larger for round particles than non-round ones leading to stronger diffusive mixing. The spatial distribution of the convective component of mixing is identified using novel calculation of shear strain rate. This size and shape of the high shear region is found to be only slightly sensitive to the particle shape indicating that the convective mixing is relatively independent of shape, except in the middle of the mixer. The blockiness of the particles has the strongest impact on flow and mixing while the mixing has only a weak dependence on the particle aspect ratio.

  15. Design and simulation of high-energy-density shear experiments on OMEGA and the NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doss, F. W.; Devolder, B.; di Stefano, C.; Flippo, K. A.; Kline, J. L.; Kot, L.; Loomis, E. N.; Merritt, E. C.; Perry, T. S.; MacLaren, S. A.; Wang, P.; Zhou, Y. K.

    2015-11-01

    High-energy-density shear experiments have been performed by LANL at the OMEGA Laser Facility and National Ignition Facility (NIF). The experiments have been simulated using the LANL radiation-hydrocode RAGE and have been used to assess turbulence models' ability to function in the high-energy-density, inertial-fusion-relevant regime. Beginning with the basic configuration of two counter-oriented shock-driven flows of > 100 km/s, which initiate a strong shear instability across an initially solid density, 20 micron thick Al plate, variations of the experiment have been performed and are studied. These variations have included increasing the fluid density (by modifying the metal plate material from Al to Ti), imposing sinusoidal perturbations on the plate, and directly modifying the plate's intrinsic surface roughness. In addition to examining the shear-induced mixing, the simulations reveal other physics, such as how the interaction of our indirect-drive halfraums with a mated shock tube's ablator impedes a stagnation-driven shock. This work is conducted by the US DOE by LANL under contract DE-AC52-06NA25396, and NIF facility operations by LLNL under contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  16. The effect of particle shape on mixing in a high shear mixer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinnott, Matthew D.; Cleary, Paul W.

    2015-09-01

    Discrete element method modelling is used to study the effect of particle shape on the flow dynamics and mixing in a high shear mixer. The blade generates strong flow over its top surface while compacting and pushing forward particles that are directly in front of the blade. A complex three dimensional flow is established with vertical and radial flow components that are shape dependent and which control the nature of the mixing. Mixing was found to be fast in the azimuthal direction, of intermediate speed in the vertical direction and comparatively slow in the radial mixing. Diffusive mixing is characterised using the granular temperature which shows that the regions of higher granular temperature are larger for round particles than non-round ones leading to stronger diffusive mixing. The spatial distribution of the convective component of mixing is identified using novel calculation of shear strain rate. This size and shape of the high shear region is found to be only slightly sensitive to the particle shape indicating that the convective mixing is relatively independent of shape, except in the middle of the mixer. The blockiness of the particles has the strongest impact on flow and mixing while the mixing has only a weak dependence on the particle aspect ratio.

  17. Three-dimensional shear wave imaging based on full-field laser speckle contrast imaging with one-dimensional mechanical scanning.

    PubMed

    Chao, Pei-Yu; Li, Pai-Chi

    2016-08-22

    The high imaging resolution and motion sensitivity of optical-based shear wave detection has made it an attractive technique in biomechanics studies with potential for improving the capabilities of shear wave elasticity imaging. In this study we implemented laser speckle contrast imaging for two-dimensional (X-Z) tracking of transient shear wave propagation in agarose phantoms. The mechanical disturbances induced by the propagation of the shear wave caused temporal and spatial fluctuations in the local speckle pattern, which manifested as local blurring. By mechanically moving the sample in the third dimension (Y), and performing two-dimensional shear wave imaging at every scan position, the three-dimensional shear wave velocity distribution of the phantom could be reconstructed. Based on comparisons with the reference shear wave velocity measurements obtained using a commercial ultrasound shear wave imaging system, the developed system can estimate the shear wave velocity with an error of less than 6% for homogeneous phantoms with shear moduli ranging from 1.52 kPa to 7.99 kPa. The imaging sensitivity of our system makes it capable of measuring small variations in shear modulus; the estimated standard deviation of the shear modulus was found to be less than 0.07 kPa. A submillimeter spatial resolution for three-dimensional shear wave imaging has been achieved, as demonstrated by the ability to detect a 1-mm-thick stiff plate embedded inside heterogeneous agarose phantoms. PMID:27557169

  18. Deep soil compaction as a method of ground improvement and to stabilization of wastes and slopes with danger of liquefaction, determining the modulus of deformation and shear strength parameters of loose rock.

    PubMed

    Lersow, M

    2001-01-01

    --Surface Mining, 1995;51(1):39-47] improved a direct procedure, the so-called plate-loading test. With this improved procedure, it is possible to produce profiles of deformation parameters and shear-strength parameters of the loose rock. On this basis the settlement behavior and the bearing behavior of the ground can be described. The PDV-BS cone-penetration test and the pressiometer test are compared and the reliability of the soil mechanical indexes are assessed critically. The PDV-BS can be used as a calibration test for cone penetration tests as well as for the calibration of pressiometer tests. With the application of a PDV-BS and a pressiometer test in combination in a testing field, the anisotropy properties of the loose rock can be proved.

  19. Ductility of Advanced High-Strength Steel in the Presence of a Sheared Edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggles, Tim; Cluff, Stephen; Miles, Michael; Fullwood, David; Daniels, Craig; Avila, Alex; Chen, Ming

    2016-07-01

    The ductility of dual-phase (DP) 980 and transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP) assisted bainitic ferritic (TBF) 980 steels was studied in the presence of a sheared edge. Specimens were tested in uniaxial tension in a standard test frame as well as in situ in the scanning electron microscope (SEM). Incremental tensile straining was done in the SEM with images taken at each strain increment. Then digital image correlation (DIC) was used to compute the effective strain at the level of the individual phases in the microstructure. Shear banding across multiple phases was seen in strained TBF specimens, while the DP specimens exhibited more of a patchwork strain pattern, with high strains concentrated in ferrite and low strains observed in the martensite. Two-point statistics were applied to the strain data from the DIC work and the corresponding microstructure images to evaluate the effect of phase hardness on localization and fracture. It was observed that the DP 980 material had a greater tendency for localization around hard phases compared to the TBF 980. This at least partially explains the greater ductility of the TBF material, especially in specimens where a sheared edge was present.

  20. Understanding High Recession Rates of Carbon Ablators Seen in Shear Tests in an Arc Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Driver, David M.; Olson, Michael W.; Barnhardt, Michael D.; MacLean, Matthew

    2010-01-01

    High rates of recession in arc jet shear tests of Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator (PICA) inspired a series of tests and analysis on FiberForm (a carbon preform used in the fabrication of PICA). Arc jet tests were performed on FiberForm in both air and pure nitrogen for stagnation and shear configurations. The nitrogen tests showed little or no recession, while the air tests of FiberForm showed recession rates similar to that of PICA (when adjusted for the difference in density). While mechanical erosion can not be ruled out, this is the first step in doing so. Analysis using a carbon oxidation boundary condition within DPLR was used to predict the recession rate of FiberForm. The analysis indicates that much of the anomalous recession behavior seen in shear tests may simply be an artifact of the non-flight like test configuration (copper upstream of the test article) a result of dissimilar enthalpy and oxygen concentration profiles on the copper. Shape change effects were also investigated and shown to be relatively small.

  1. Simulation of three-dimensional shear flow around a nozzle-afterbody at high speeds

    SciTech Connect

    Baysal, O.; Hoffman, W.B. )

    1992-06-01

    In this paper, turbulent shear flows at supersonic and hypersonic speeds around a nozzle-afterbody are simulated. The three-dimensional, Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations are solved by a finite-volume and implicit method. The convective and the pressure terms are differenced by an upwind-biased algorithm. The effect of turbulence is incorporated by a modified Baldwin-Lomax eddy viscosity model. The success of the standard Baldwin-Lomax model for this flow type is shown by comparing it to a laminar case. These modifications made to the model are also shown to improve flow prediction when compared to the standard Baldwin-Lomax model. These modifications to the model reflect the effects of high compressibility, multiple walls, vortices near walls, and turbulent memory effects in the shear layer. This numerically simulated complex flowfield includes a supersonic duct flow, a hypersonic flow over an external double corner, a flow through a non-axisymmetric, internal-external nozzle, and a three-dimensional shear layer. The specific application is for the flow around the nozzle-afterbody of a generic hypersonic vehicle powered by a scramjet engine. The computed pressure distributions compared favorably with the experimentally obtained surface and off-surface flow surveys.

  2. Stability of LAPONITE®-stabilized high internal phase Pickering emulsions under shear.

    PubMed

    Dinkgreve, M; Velikov, K P; Bonn, D

    2016-08-17

    Colloidal particles are often used to make Pickering emulsions that are reported to be very stable. Commonly the stabilization is a combined effect of particle adsorbing at the fluid interface and a particle network in the continuous phase; the contribution of each to the overall stability is difficult to assess. We investigate the role of LAPONITE® particles on high internal phase emulsion stability by considering three different situations: emulsion stabilization by surfactant only, by surfactant plus clay particles, and finally clay particles only. To clarify the structure of the emulsion and the role of the clay particles, we have succeeded in fluorescently labelling the clay particles by adsorbing the dye onto the particle surfaces. This allows us to show directly using confocal microscopy, that the clay particles are not only located at the interface but also aggregate and form a gel in the continuous aqueous phase. We show that the emulsions in the presence of surfactant (with or without clay) are stable to coalescence and shear. Without surfactant (with only LAPONITE® as stabilizer) the emulsions are stable to coalescence for several weeks, however they destabilize rapidly under shear. Our results suggest that the formation of the emulsions is mostly due to gel formation of the clay particles in the continuous phase, rather than that the clay is an emulsifier. This gel formation also accounts for the instability of the emulsions to shear that we observe caused by shear thinning of the continuous gel and inability of the adsorbed particles to rearrange effectively around the droplets due to their attractive nature. PMID:27485394

  3. Stability of LAPONITE®-stabilized high internal phase Pickering emulsions under shear.

    PubMed

    Dinkgreve, M; Velikov, K P; Bonn, D

    2016-08-17

    Colloidal particles are often used to make Pickering emulsions that are reported to be very stable. Commonly the stabilization is a combined effect of particle adsorbing at the fluid interface and a particle network in the continuous phase; the contribution of each to the overall stability is difficult to assess. We investigate the role of LAPONITE® particles on high internal phase emulsion stability by considering three different situations: emulsion stabilization by surfactant only, by surfactant plus clay particles, and finally clay particles only. To clarify the structure of the emulsion and the role of the clay particles, we have succeeded in fluorescently labelling the clay particles by adsorbing the dye onto the particle surfaces. This allows us to show directly using confocal microscopy, that the clay particles are not only located at the interface but also aggregate and form a gel in the continuous aqueous phase. We show that the emulsions in the presence of surfactant (with or without clay) are stable to coalescence and shear. Without surfactant (with only LAPONITE® as stabilizer) the emulsions are stable to coalescence for several weeks, however they destabilize rapidly under shear. Our results suggest that the formation of the emulsions is mostly due to gel formation of the clay particles in the continuous phase, rather than that the clay is an emulsifier. This gel formation also accounts for the instability of the emulsions to shear that we observe caused by shear thinning of the continuous gel and inability of the adsorbed particles to rearrange effectively around the droplets due to their attractive nature.

  4. Effects of annealing on texture evolution of cross shear rolled high-purity Al foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L.; Liu, Y.; Song, X.; He, J.; Zuo, L.

    2015-04-01

    The effects of annealing on recrystallization texture of cross shear rolled high-purity Al foil were investigated by orientation distribution functions (ODFs) and electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD). The results show that the intermediate annealing is beneficial to the development of the cube texture. The cube texture can be promoted by annealing, and the critical annealing temperature is about 280 °C. The cubic orientation grains firstly nucleate, and then expand into other grains with a high growth speed, and large angle grain boundary ratio increases, finally can swallow up most of the original grains, which results in the cube texture

  5. Monitoring of high-intensity focused ultrasound treatment by shear wave elastography induced by two-dimensional-array therapeutic transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasaki, Ryosuke; Takagi, Ryo; Nagaoka, Ryo; Jimbo, Hayato; Yoshizawa, Shin; Saijo, Yoshifumi; Umemura, Shin-ichiro

    2016-07-01

    Shear wave elastography (SWE) is expected to be a noninvasive monitoring method of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment. However, conventional SWE techniques encounter difficulty in inducing shear waves with adequate displacements in deep tissue. To observe tissue coagulation at the HIFU focal depth via SWE, in this study, we propose using a two-dimensional-array therapeutic transducer for not only HIFU exposure but also creating shear sources. The results show that the reconstructed shear wave velocity maps detected the coagulated regions as the area of increased propagation velocity even in deep tissue. This suggests that “HIFU-push” shear elastography is a promising solution for the purpose of coagulation monitoring in deep tissue, because push beams irradiated by the HIFU transducer can naturally reach as deep as the tissue to be coagulated by the same transducer.

  6. Documentation of programs that compute 1) quasi-static tilts produced by an expanding dislocation loop in an elastic and viscoelastic material, and 2) surface shear stresses, strains, and shear displacements produced by screw dislocations in a vertical slab with modulus contrast

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McHugh, Stuart

    1976-01-01

    The material in this report can be grouped into two categories: 1) programs that compute tilts produced by a vertically oriented expanding rectangular dislocation loop in an elastic or viscoelastic material and 2) programs that compute the shear stresses, strains, and shear displacements in a three-phase half-space (i.e. a half-space containing a vertical slab). Each section describes the relevant theory, and provides a detailed guide to the operation of the programs. A series of examples is provided at the end of each section.

  7. A high-order numerical study of reactive dissolution in an upwelling heterogeneous mantle: 2. Effect of shear deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baltzell, Conroy; Parmentier, E. M.; Liang, Yan; Tirupathi, Seshu

    2015-11-01

    High-porosity dunite channels produced by orthopyroxene dissolution may provide pathways for orthopyroxene-undersaturated melt generated in the deep mantle to reach shallower depth without extensive chemical reequilibration with surrounding mantle. Previous studies have considered these high-porosity channels and melt localization in the presence of a uniform upwelling mantle flow through the process of melt-rock reaction as well as shear deformation, but not both simultaneously. In this Part 2 of a numerical study of high-porosity melt and dunite channel formation during reactive dissolution, we considered the effect of shear deformation on channel distribution and channel geometry in an upwelling and viscously compacting mantle column. We formulated a high-order numerical experiment using conditions similar to those in Part 1, but with an additional prescribed horizontal shearing component in the solid matrix, as could be present in flowing mantle beneath spreading centers. Our focus was to examine orthopyroxene dissolution to determine the behavior of dunite formation and its interaction with melt flow field, by varying the upwelling and shear rate, orthopyroxene solubility gradient, and domain height. Introduction of shearing tilts the developing dunite, causing asymmetry in the orthopyroxene gradient between the dunite channels and the surrounding harzburgite. The downwind gradient is sharp, nearly discontinuous, whereas the upwind gradient is more gradual. For higher shear rates, a wave-like pattern of alternating high and low-porosity bands form on the downwind side of the channel. The band spacing increases with increasing shear rate, relative melt flow rate, and orthopyroxene solubility gradient, whereas the band angle is independent of solubility gradient and increases with increasing shear rate and decreasing relative melt flow rate. Such features could be observable in the field and provide evidence for mantle shearing. Standing wave-like patterns of

  8. Rotational and magnetic shear stabilization of magnetohydrodynamic modes and turbulence in DIII-D high performance discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Lao, L.L.; Burrell, K.H.; Casper, T.S.

    1996-08-01

    The confinement and the stability properties of the DIII-D tokamak high performance discharges are evaluated in terms of rotational and magnetic shear with emphasis on the recent experimental results obtained from the negative central magnetic shear (NCS) experiments. In NCS discharges, a core transport barrier is often observed to form inside the NCS region accompanied by a reduction in core fluctuation amplitudes. Increasing negative magnetic shear contributes to the formation of this core transport barrier, but by itself is not sufficient to fully stabilize the toroidal drift mode (trapped- electron-{eta}{sub i}mode) to explain this formation. Comparison of the Doppler shift shear rate to the growth rate of the {eta}{sub i} mode suggests that the large core {bold E x B} flow shear can stabilize this mode and broaden the region of reduced core transport . Ideal and resistive stability analysis indicates the performance of NCS discharges with strongly peaked pressure profiles is limited by the resistive interchange mode to low {Beta}{sub N} {lt} 2.3. This mode is insensitive to the details of the rotational and the magnetic shear profiles. A new class of discharges which has a broad region of weak or slightly negative magnetic shear (WNS) is described. The WNS discharges have broader pressure profiles and higher values than the NCS discharges together with high confinement and high fusion reactivity.

  9. High-shear granulation as a manufacturing method for cocrystal granules.

    PubMed

    Rehder, Sönke; Christensen, Niels Peter Aae; Rantanen, Jukka; Rades, Thomas; Leopold, Claudia S

    2013-11-01

    Cocrystal formation allows the tailoring of physicochemical as well as of mechanical properties of an API. However, there is a lack of large-scale manufacturing methods of cocrystals. Therefore, the objective of this work was to examine the suitability of high-shear wet granulation as a manufacturing method for cocrystal granules on a batch scale. Furthermore, the cocrystal granules were characterized regarding their mechanical properties as well as their dissolution behavior. High-shear wet granulation was found to be a feasible manufacturing method for cocrystal granules. Cocrystal formation depended on the exposure time of the solids to the granulation liquid (water), the amount of liquid, the impeller speed of the granulator, and on the excipients (hydroxyl propylcellulose, microcrystalline cellulose, calcium hydrogenphosphate) used in the formulation. Storage stability was strongly influenced by the excipients, since in presence of calcium hydrogenphosphate, the poorly water-soluble salt calcium tartrate monohydrate was formed at high relative humidity. Interestingly, compactability was increased by cocrystal formation compared to that of the reference granules (piracetam and the respective excipients). The drug release was slightly decreased by cocrystal formation, most likely due to the lower solubility of the cocrystal. In the presence of calcium hydrogenphosphate however, no influence of cocrystal formation on either compactability or on drug release were observed, compared with the reference tablets. It was concluded that high-shear wet granulation is a valuable, however complex, manufacturing method for cocrystals. Cocrystal formation may influence compactability and drug release and thus affect drug performance and should be investigated during pre-formulation.

  10. [Quality by design based high shear wet granulation process development for the microcrystalline cellulose].

    PubMed

    Luo, Gan; Xu, Bing; Sun, Fei; Cui, Xiang-long; Shi, Xin-yuan; Qiao, Yan-jiang

    2015-03-01

    The design space of the high shear wet granulation process was established and validated within the framework of quality by design (QbD). The system of microcrystalline cellulose-de-ioned water was used in this study. The median granule size and bulk density of granules were identified as critical quality attributes. Plackeet-Burmann experimental design was used to screen these factors as follows: dry mixing time, the impeller and chopper speed of dry mixing, water amount, water addition time, wet massing time, the impeller and chopper speed of wet massing and drying time. And the optimization was implemented with the central composite experimental design based on screened critical process parameters. The design space of the high shear wet granulation process was established based on the quadratic polynomial regression model. Since the P-values of both models were less than 0.05 and values of lack of fit were more than 0.1, the relationship between critical quality attributes and critical process parameters could be well described by the two models. The reliability of design space, illustrated by overlay plot, was improved with the addition of 95% confidence interval. For those granules whose process parameters were in the design space, the granule size could be controlled within 250 to 355 μm, and the bulk density could be controlled within a range of 0.4 to 0.6 g x cm(-3). The robustness and flexibility of the high shear wet granulation process have been enhanced via the establishment of the design space based on the QbD concept. PMID:26118117

  11. High performance reversed shear plasmas with a large radius transport barrier in JT-60U

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, T.; Hatae, T.; Oikawa, T.; Takeji, S.; Shirai, H.; Koide, Y.; Ishida, S.; Ide, S.; Ishii, Y.; Ozeki, T.; Higashijima, S.; Yoshino, R.; Kamada, Y.; Neyatani, Y.

    1998-02-01

    The operation of reversed shear plasmas in JT-60U has been extended to the low-q, high-Ip region keeping a large radius transport barrier, and a high fusion performance has been achieved. Record values of deuterium-tritium (DT)-equivalent power gain in JT-60U have been obtained: QDTeq = 1.05, τE = 0.97 s, nD(0) = 4.9 × 1019 m-3 and Ti(0) = 16.5 keV. A large improvement in confinement resulted from the formation of an internal transport barrier (ITB) with a large radius, which was characterized by steep gradients in electron density, electron temperature and ion temperature just inside the position of qmin. Large negative shear regions, up to 80% of the plasma minor radius in the low-qmin regime (qmin~2), were obtained by plasma current ramp-up after the formation of the ITB with the pressure and current profiles being controlled by adjustment of plasma volume and beam power. The ITB was established by on-axis beam heating into a low density target plasma with reversed shear that was formed by current ramp-up without beam heating. The confinement time increased with the radius of the ITB and the decrease of qmin at a fixed toroidal field. High H factors, up to 3.3, were achieved with an L mode edge. The effective one fluid thermal diffusivity χeff had its minimum in the ITB. The values of H/q95 and βt increased with the decrease of q95, and the highest performance was achieved at q95 ~3.1 (2.8 MA). The performance was limited by disruptive beta collapses with βN~2 at qmin~2.

  12. Demonstration of high performance negative central magnetic shear discharges on the DIII-D tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Rice, B.W.; Burrell, K.H.; Lao, L.L.

    1996-01-01

    Reliable operation of discharges with negative central magnetic shear has led to significant increases in plasma performance and reactivity in both low confinement, L-mode, and high confinement, H-mode, regimes in the DIII-D tokamak. Using neutral beam injection early in the initial current ramp, a large range of negative shear discharges have been produced with durations lasting up to 3.2 s. The total non- inductive current (beam plus bootstrap) ranges from 50% to 80% in these discharges. In the region of shear reversal, significant peaking of the toroidal rotation [f{sub {phi}} {approx} 30-60 kHz] and ion temperature [T{sub i}(0) {approx} 15-22 keV] profiles are observed. In high power discharges with an L-mode edge, peaked density profiles are also observed. Confinement enhancement factors up to H {equivalent_to} {tau}{sub E}/{tau}{sub ITER-89P} {approx} 2.5 with an L-mode edge, and H {approx} 3.3 in an Edge Localized Mode (ELM)-free H-mode, are obtained. Transport analysis shows both ion thermal diffusivity and particle diffusivity to be near or below standard neoclassical values in the core. Large pressure peaking in L- mode leads to high disruptivity with {Beta}{sub N} {equivalent_to} {Beta}{sub T}/(I/aB) {<=} 2.3, while broader pressure profiles in H- mode gives low disruptivity with {Beta}{sub N} {<=} 4.2.

  13. Demonstration of high-performance negative central magnetic shear discharges in the DIII-D tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Rice, B.W.; Burrell, K.H.; Lao, L.L.; Navratil, G.; Stallard, B.W.; Strait, E.J.; Taylor, T.S.; Austin, M.E.; Casper, T.A.; Chu, M.S.; Forest, C.B.; Gohil, P.; Groebner, R.J.; Heidbrink, W.W.; Hyatt, A.W.; Ikezi, H.; La Haye, R.J.; Lazarus, E.A.; Lin-Liu, Y.R.; Mauel, M.E.; Meyer, W.H.; Rettig, C.L.; Schissel, D.P.; St. John, H.E.; Taylor, P.L.; Turnbull, A.D.; the DIII-D Team

    1996-05-01

    Reliable operation of discharges with negative central magnetic shear has led to significant increases in plasma performance and reactivity in both low confinement, L-mode, and high confinement, H-mode, regimes in the DIII-D tokamak [{ital Plasma} {ital Physics} {ital and} {ital Controlled} {ital Nuclear} {ital Fusion} {ital Research} 1986 (International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, 1987), Vol. 1, p. 159]. Using neutral beam injection early in the initial current ramp, a large range of negative shear discharges have been produced with durations lasting up to 3.2 s. The total noninductive current (beam plus bootstrap) ranges from 50{percent} to 80{percent} in these discharges. In the region of shear reversal, significant peaking of the toroidal rotation [{ital f}{sub {phi}}(0){approximately}30{endash}60 kHz] and ion temperature [{ital T}{sub {ital i}}(0){approximately}15{endash}22 keV] profiles are observed. In high-power discharges with an L-mode edge, peaked density profiles are also observed. Confinement enhancement factors up to {ital H}{equivalent_to}{tau}{sub {ital E}}/{tau}{sub ITER-89P}{approximately}2.5 with an L-mode edge, and {ital H}{approximately}3.3 in an edge localized mode (ELM)-free H mode, are obtained. Transport analysis shows both ion thermal diffusivity and particle diffusivity to be near or below standard neoclassical values in the core. Large pressure peaking in the L mode leads to high disruptivity with {beta}{sub {ital N}}{equivalent_to}{beta}{sub {ital T}}/({ital I}/{ital aB}){le}2.3, while broader pressure profiles in the H mode gives low disruptivity with {beta}{sub {ital N}}{le}4.2. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  14. Application of MMC model on simulation of shearing process of thick hot-rolled high strength steel plate

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Liang; Li, Shuhui; Yang, Bing; Gao, Yongsheng

    2013-12-16

    Shear operation is widely used as the first step in sheet metal forming to cut the sheet or plate into the required size. The shear of thick hot-rolled High Strength Steel (HSS) requires large shearing force and the sheared edge quality is relatively poor because of the large thickness and high strength compared with the traditional low carbon steel. Bad sheared edge quality will easily lead to edge cracking during the post-forming process. This study investigates the shearing process of thick hot-rolled HSS plate metal, which is generally exploited as the beam of heavy trucks. The Modified Mohr-Coulomb fracture criterion (MMC) is employed in numerical simulation to calculate the initiation and propagation of cracks during the process evolution. Tensile specimens are designed to obtain various stress states in tension. Equivalent fracture strains are measured with Digital Image Correlation (DIC) equipment to constitute the fracture locus. Simulation of the tension test is carried out to check the fracture model. Then the MMC model is applied to the simulation of the shearing process, and the simulation results show that the MMC model predicts the ductile fracture successfully.

  15. Momentum Transport Studies in High E x B Shear Plasmas in NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    Solomon, W M; Bell, R E; LeBlanc, B P; Menard, J E; Rewoldt, G; Wang, W; Levinton, F M; Yuh, H

    2008-06-26

    Experiments have been conducted on NSTX to study both steady state and perturbative mo mentum transport. These studies are unique in their parameter space under investigation, where the low aspect ratio of NSTX results in rapid plasma rotation with E x B shearing rates high enough to suppress low-k turbulence. In some cases, the ratio of momentum to energy confinement time is found to exceed five. Momentum pinch velocities of order 10-40 m/s are inferred from the measured angular momentum flux evolution after non-resonant magnetic perturbations are applied to brake the plasma.

  16. A study on microwave-induced melt granulation in a single pot high shear processor.

    PubMed

    Liew, C V; Loh, Z H; Heng, P W S; Lee, C C

    2008-01-01

    Microwave-induced high shear melt granulation was compared with conventional melt granulation performed in the same processor. Admixtures of lactose 200M and anhydrous dicalcium phosphate were granulated with polyethylene glycol 3350. Different heating mechanisms in the two processes necessitated the use of different parameters for process monitoring and control. Mixer power consumption was suitable for monitoring agglomerate growth under microwave-induced heating. Product temperature was a better indicator of agglomeration propensity in conventional melt granulation. These were attributed to the disparities in heat acquisition rates and heating uniformities of the powders as well as variation in baseline mixer power consumption between the two processes. PMID:18720241

  17. Transport in high performance weak and negative central shear discharges in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Greenfield, C.M.; Schissel, D.P.; Stallard, B.W.

    1996-07-01

    In recent experiments in the DIII-D tokamak, the previously reported enhanced performance regime with negative central magnetic shear (NCS) has been extended to further improve fusion performance. This was done by using controlled L-H transitions to further broaden the pressure profile, thereby delaying the onset of MHD activity which would lead to the termination of the high performance phase. Such discharges have achieved record parameters for DIII-D, including D-D fusion power up to 28 kW and stored energy in excess of 4 MJ.

  18. Dissolution and reconstitution of casein micelle containing dairy powders by high shear using ultrasonic and physical methods.

    PubMed

    Chandrapala, Jayani; Martin, Gregory J O; Kentish, Sandra E; Ashokkumar, Muthupandian

    2014-09-01

    The effect of shear on the solubilization of a range of dairy powders was investigated. The rate of solubilization of low solubility milk protein concentrate and micellar casein powders was examined during ultrasonication, high pressure homogenization and high-shear rotor-stator mixing and compared to low-shear overhead stirring. The high shear techniques were able to greatly accelerate the solubilization of these powders by physically breaking apart the powder agglomerates and accelerating the release of individual casein micelles into solution. This was achieved without affecting the structure of the solubilized proteins. The effect of high shear on the re-establishment of the mineral balance between the casein micelles and the serum was examined by monitoring the pH of the reconstituted skim milk powder after prior exposure to ultrasonication. Only minor differences in the re-equilibration of the pH were observed after sonication for up to 3 min, suggesting that the localized high shear forces exerted by sonication did not significantly affect the mass transfer of minerals from within the casein micelles. PMID:24798226

  19. Platelet dysfunction detected at high shear in patients with heart valve disease.

    PubMed

    Francis, J L

    2000-05-01

    Whether patients with valvular heart disease have a defect of platelet function has been unclear. Despite evidence that these individuals have an abnormality detectable only under conditions of high shear stress, no methods have been widely available to adequately assess platelet function under such conditions. The Platelet Function Analyzer (PFA)-100 measures platelet function in a high shear environment and is well suited to the detection of platelet dysfunction in the clinical laboratory. The instrument records the time for platelets to occlude a membrane coated with collagen and either epinephrine (CEPI) or ADP (CADP). We studied the PFA-100 in 398 patients before open heart surgery; 308 for coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) and 90 for aortic or mitral valve replacement (VR). Patients were classified as normal (CEPI < or = 153 s); 'aspirin effect' (CEPI > 153 s but CADP < or = 109 s) or abnormal (CEPI > 153 s and CADP > 109 s). In the CABG group, 41.2% were classified as normal, 43.2% as 'aspirin effect' and 15.6% as abnormal. In contrast, in patients undergoing VR, these values were 6.7, 11.1 and 82.4%, respectively. Patients with valvular disease had significantly longer closure times for both CEPI and CADP tests (P < 0.001). In addition, the valvular disease group had a significantly higher proportion of patients with markedly prolonged (> 150 s) closure times in the CADP cartridge (43.3 vs. 3.6%, respectively). Only one (0.3%) patient in the CABG group had non-closure (> 300 s) in the CADP test compared to seven (7.8%) in the valvular disease group. Three of six patients in the latter group bled excessively during surgery. We conclude that abnormal CADP closure is much more frequent among patients with aortic or mitral valve disease compared to those with coronary artery disease. This may reflect pre-existing high-shear damage to platelets that renders them refractory to subsequent shear activation and aggregation in the PFA-100 system. Further studies

  20. Platelet dysfunction detected at high shear in patients with heart valve disease.

    PubMed

    Francis, J L

    2000-05-01

    Whether patients with valvular heart disease have a defect of platelet function has been unclear. Despite evidence that these individuals have an abnormality detectable only under conditions of high shear stress, no methods have been widely available to adequately assess platelet function under such conditions. The Platelet Function Analyzer (PFA)-100 measures platelet function in a high shear environment and is well suited to the detection of platelet dysfunction in the clinical laboratory. The instrument records the time for platelets to occlude a membrane coated with collagen and either epinephrine (CEPI) or ADP (CADP). We studied the PFA-100 in 398 patients before open heart surgery; 308 for coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) and 90 for aortic or mitral valve replacement (VR). Patients were classified as normal (CEPI < or = 153 s); 'aspirin effect' (CEPI > 153 s but CADP < or = 109 s) or abnormal (CEPI > 153 s and CADP > 109 s). In the CABG group, 41.2% were classified as normal, 43.2% as 'aspirin effect' and 15.6% as abnormal. In contrast, in patients undergoing VR, these values were 6.7, 11.1 and 82.4%, respectively. Patients with valvular disease had significantly longer closure times for both CEPI and CADP tests (P < 0.001). In addition, the valvular disease group had a significantly higher proportion of patients with markedly prolonged (> 150 s) closure times in the CADP cartridge (43.3 vs. 3.6%, respectively). Only one (0.3%) patient in the CABG group had non-closure (> 300 s) in the CADP test compared to seven (7.8%) in the valvular disease group. Three of six patients in the latter group bled excessively during surgery. We conclude that abnormal CADP closure is much more frequent among patients with aortic or mitral valve disease compared to those with coronary artery disease. This may reflect pre-existing high-shear damage to platelets that renders them refractory to subsequent shear activation and aggregation in the PFA-100 system. Further studies

  1. Turbulence modeling of free shear layers for high-performance aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sondak, Douglas L.

    1993-01-01

    The High Performance Aircraft (HPA) Grand Challenge of the High Performance Computing and Communications (HPCC) program involves the computation of the flow over a high performance aircraft. A variety of free shear layers, including mixing layers over cavities, impinging jets, blown flaps, and exhaust plumes, may be encountered in such flowfields. Since these free shear layers are usually turbulent, appropriate turbulence models must be utilized in computations in order to accurately simulate these flow features. The HPCC program is relying heavily on parallel computers. A Navier-Stokes solver (POVERFLOW) utilizing the Baldwin-Lomax algebraic turbulence model was developed and tested on a 128-node Intel iPSC/860. Algebraic turbulence models run very fast, and give good results for many flowfields. For complex flowfields such as those mentioned above, however, they are often inadequate. It was therefore deemed that a two-equation turbulence model will be required for the HPA computations. The k-epsilon two-equation turbulence model was implemented on the Intel iPSC/860. Both the Chien low-Reynolds-number model and a generalized wall-function formulation were included.

  2. Toward Quantitative, High-Shear Strain Deformation Experiments at Lower Mantle Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slivka, L.; Miyagi, L. M.; Amulele, G.; Otsuka, K.; Du, Z.; Karato, S.

    2010-12-01

    Relatively little is known about the deformation properties of lower mantle mineral phases. This is largely due to the fact that conventional deformation devices have been unable to reach pressure and temperature conditions beyond those of the transition zone. The Rotational Drickamer Apparatus (RDA) has been used successfully to perform quantitative, high shear strain deformation experiments at conditions of the transition zone. New technological advances such as beveling anvils to reduce cupping of the anvil tips at high pressures, and high precision laser machining of sample assemblies are allowing us to increase the available pressure range of the RDA toward lower mantle conditions. We have already performed deformation experiments on ringwoodite at ~23 GPa and 1800 K, conditions quite close to those of the top of the lower mantle. These experiments were performed at beamline X17B2 of the National Synchrotron Light Source, using white x-rays to collect energy-dispersive diffraction patterns at a fixed 2θ of 6.7° over ten azimuth angles. Determination of strain was made in-situ using x-ray radiography and a Pt strain marker. Equivalent strains of up to γ = 2 are achieved. Uniaxial and shear stresses were determined in-situ from the d-spacing of ringwoodite (311) and (400) lattice planes as a function of azimuth angle.

  3. Small-amplitude oscillatory shear magnetorheology of inverse ferrofluids.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Jose; de Vicente, Juan; Hidalgo-Alvarez, Roque

    2010-06-15

    A comprehensive investigation is performed on highly monodisperse silica-based inverse ferrofluids under small-amplitude oscillatory shear in the presence of external magnetic fields up to 1 T. The effect of particle volume fraction and continuous medium Newtonian viscosity is thoroughly investigated. Experimental results for storage modulus are used to validate existing micromechanical magnetorheological models assuming different particle-level field-induced structures. PMID:20345105

  4. High-order face-shear modes of relaxor-PbTiO3 crystals for piezoelectric motor applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ci, Penghong; Liu, Guoxi; Chen, Zhijiang; Zhang, Shujun; Dong, Shuxiang

    2014-06-01

    The face-shear vibration modes of [011] poled Zt ± 45° cut relaxor-PT crystals and their applications for linear piezoelectric motors were investigated. Unlike piezoelectric ceramics, the rotated crystal was found to exhibit asymmetric face-shear deformations, and its two high-order face-shear modes degraded into two non-isomorphic modes. As an application example, a standing wave ultrasonic linear motor (10 × 10 × 2 mm3) operating in high-order face-shear vibration modes was developed. The motor exhibits a large driving force (1.5 N) under a low driving voltage (22 Vpp). These findings could provide guidance for design of crystal resonance devices.

  5. Hitherto unknown shear rupture mechanism as a source of instability in intact hard rocks at highly confined compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasov, Boris G.

    2014-05-01

    Today, frictional shear resistance along pre-existing faults is considered to be the lower limit on rock shear strength for confined conditions corresponding to the seismogenic layer. This paper introduces a recently identified shear rupture mechanism providing a paradoxical feature of hard rocks - the possibility of shear rupture propagation through the highly confined intact rock mass at shear stress levels significantly less than frictional strength. In the new mechanism, the rock failure associated with consecutive creation of small slabs (known as ‘domino-blocks') from the intact rock in the rupture tip is driven by a fan-shaped domino structure representing the rupture head. The fan-head combines such unique features as: extremely low shear resistance, self-sustaining stress intensification, and self-unbalancing conditions. Due to this the failure process caused by the mechanism is very dynamic and violent. This makes it impossible to directly observe and study the mechanism and can explain why the mechanism has not been detected before. This paper provides physical motivation for the mechanism, based upon side effects accompanying the failure process. Physical and mathematical models of the mechanism presented in the paper explain unique and paradoxical features of the mechanism. The new shear rupture mechanism allows a novel point of view for understanding the nature of spontaneous failure processes in hard rocks including earthquakes.

  6. Microstructural characteristics of adiabatic shear localization in a metastable beta titanium alloy deformed at high strain rate and elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Zhan, Hongyi; Zeng, Weidong; Wang, Gui; Kent, Damon; Dargusch, Matthew

    2015-04-15

    The microstructural evolution and grain refinement within adiabatic shear bands in the Ti6554 alloy deformed at high strain rates and elevated temperatures have been characterized using transmission electron microscopy. No stress drops were observed in the corresponding stress–strain curve, indicating that the initiation of adiabatic shear bands does not lead to the loss of load capacity for the Ti6554 alloy. The outer region of the shear bands mainly consists of cell structures bounded by dislocation clusters. Equiaxed subgrains in the core area of the shear band can be evolved from the subdivision of cell structures or reconstruction and transverse segmentation of dislocation clusters. It is proposed that dislocation activity dominates the grain refinement process. The rotational recrystallization mechanism may operate as the kinetic requirements for it are fulfilled. The coexistence of different substructures across the shear bands implies that the microstructural evolution inside the shear bands is not homogeneous and different grain refinement mechanisms may operate simultaneously to refine the structure. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • The microstructure within the adiabatic shear band was characterized by TEM. • No stress drops were observed in the corresponding stress–strain curve. • Dislocation activity dominated the grain refinement process. • The kinetic requirements for rotational recrystallization mechanism were fulfilled. • Different grain refinement mechanisms operated simultaneously to refine the structure.

  7. An Evaluation of the Iosipescu Specimen for Composite Materials Shear Property Measurement. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, Henjen

    1991-01-01

    accuracy of the shear modulus values are made, and the implications for shear strength measurement discussed. Further application of the Iosipescu shear test to woven fabric composites is presented. The limitations of the traditional strain gage instrumentation on the satin weave and high tow plain weave fabrics is discussed. Test results of a epoxy based aluminum particulate composite is also presented. A modification of the Iosipescu specimen is proposed and investigated experimentally and numerically. It is shown that the proposed new specimen design provides a more uniform shear stress field in the test section and greatly reduces the normal and shear stress concentrations in the vicinity of the notches. While the fabrication and the material cost of the proposed specimen is tremendously reduced, it is shown the accuracy of the shear modulus measurement is not sacrificed.

  8. A quality by design approach to scale-up of high-shear wet granulation process.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Preetanshu; Badawy, Sherif

    2016-01-01

    High-shear wet granulation is a complex process that in turn makes scale-up a challenging task. Scale-up of high-shear wet granulation process has been studied extensively in the past with various different methodologies being proposed in the literature. This review article discusses existing scale-up principles and categorizes the various approaches into two main scale-up strategies - parameter-based and attribute-based. With the advent of quality by design (QbD) principle in drug product development process, an increased emphasis toward the latter approach may be needed to ensure product robustness. In practice, a combination of both scale-up strategies is often utilized. In a QbD paradigm, there is also a need for an increased fundamental and mechanistic understanding of the process. This can be achieved either by increased experimentation that comes at higher costs, or by using modeling techniques, that are also discussed as part of this review. PMID:26489403

  9. Comparison of single pot and multiphase high shear wet granulation processes related to excipient composition.

    PubMed

    Giry, K; Viana, M; Genty, M; Louvet, F; Désiré, A; Wüthrich, P; Chulia, D

    2009-10-01

    At present time, industrial production imperatives can require the transposition of a formulation from one equipment to another. In order to evaluate the impact of such a switch on the properties of granules and tablets, investigations were undertaken on formulations manufactured both in a single pot mixer-granulator-dryer (high shear granulator with in situ double jacket vacuum drying) and in a multiphase equipment (high shear granulator/fluid bed dryer). Principal component analysis highlighted the major contribution of the binder ratio on granule size distribution, flow and packing ability whereas the relative ratio of mannitol and lactose, used as fillers, mainly impacted on compressibility and tablet cohesion. In the studied domain, the lubricant ratio did not explain the considered responses. Statistical analysis (comparison of means, analysis of variance and PCA) showed that both processes led to products with similar characteristics which demonstrated the ability of the processes to produce granules with close quality. However, Fielder/Niro granule characteristic data were found to be more dispersed, thus demonstrating a higher sensitivity of the multiphase process to formulation changes. Technological properties of granules and tablets were found to be maintained or improved therefore securing the switch from single pot to multiphase equipments. PMID:19130608

  10. Melt granulation of pharmaceutical powders: a comparison of high-shear mixer and fluidised bed processes.

    PubMed

    Passerini, Nadia; Calogerà, Giacomo; Albertini, Beatrice; Rodriguez, Lorenzo

    2010-05-31

    The main aim of this research was to compare in situ melt granulation process in high-shear mixers and fluidised bed equipments with particular attention to the final properties of granules. In addition, the study evaluated the suitability of melt granulation in fluidised bed for improving the dissolution rate of drugs. Agglomerates having identical composition (10%, w/w, of ibuprofen or ketoprofen, 20%, w/w, of PEG 6000 and 70%, w/w, of lactose monohydrate) were produced using both equipments and their morphology, particle size, flowability, friability, drug loading, dissolution behaviors at pH 1.2 and 7.4 and physicochemical properties (DSC and XRD analysis) have been evaluated and compared. The results showed that melt granulation can be successfully performed in both granulators. The utilization of a different equipment had strong impact on the particle size distribution of the granules and on their morphology, while the effect on others physical properties was little, as all the granules possess low friability and excellent flowability. Moreover both the solid state characteristics of the products and the dissolution behaviors of ibuprofen and ketoprofen granules were found to be practically independent of the equipment and all granules showed a significant increase of the drug dissolution rate in acidic conditions. In conclusion in situ melt granulation in fluidised beds could be considered a suitable alternative to the melt granulation in high-shear mixers. PMID:20214959

  11. Ultrafast Harmonic Coherent Compound (UHCC) imaging for high frame rate echocardiography and Shear Wave Elastography

    PubMed Central

    Correia, Mafalda; Provost, Jean; Chatelin, Simon; Villemain, Olivier; Tanter, Mickael; Pernot, Mathieu

    2016-01-01

    Transthoracic shear wave elastography of the myocardium remains very challenging due to the poor quality of transthoracic ultrafast imaging and the presence of clutter noise, jitter, phase aberration, and ultrasound reverberation. Several approaches, such as, e.g., diverging-wave coherent compounding or focused harmonic imaging have been proposed to improve the imaging quality. In this study, we introduce ultrafast harmonic coherent compounding (UHCC), in which pulse-inverted diverging-waves are emitted and coherently compounded, and show that such an approach can be used to enhance both Shear Wave Elastography (SWE) and high frame rate B-mode Imaging. UHCC SWE was first tested in phantoms containing an aberrating layer and was compared against pulse-inversion harmonic imaging and against ultrafast coherent compounding (UCC) imaging at the fundamental frequency. In-vivo feasibility of the technique was then evaluated in six healthy volunteers by measuring myocardial stiffness during diastole in transthoracic imaging. We also demonstrated that improvements in imaging quality could be achieved using UHCC B-mode imaging in healthy volunteers. The quality of transthoracic images of the heart was found to be improved with the number of pulse-inverted diverging waves with reduction of the imaging mean clutter level up to 13.8-dB when compared against UCC at the fundamental frequency. These results demonstrated that UHCC B-mode imaging is promising for imaging deep tissues exposed to aberration sources with a high frame-rate. PMID:26890730

  12. Structure of the Highly Sheared Tropical Storm Chantal During CAMEX-4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heymsfield, G. M.; Halverson, J.; Ritchie, E.; Simpson, Joanne; Molinari, J.; Tian, L.

    2004-01-01

    NASA's 4th Convection and Moisture Experiment (CAMEX-4) focused on Atlantic hurricanes during the 2001 hurricane season and it involved both NASA and NOAA participation. The NASA ER-2 and DC-8 aircraft were instrumented with unique remote sensing instruments to help increase the overall understanding of hurricanes. This paper is concerned about one of the storms studied, Tropical Storm Chantal, that was a weak storm which failed to intense into a hurricane. One of the practical questions of high importance is why some tropical stoins intensify into hurricanes, and others remain weak or die altogether. The magnitude of the difference between the horizontal winds at lower levels and upper altitudes in a tropical storm, i.e., the wind shear, is one important quantity that can affect the intensification of a tropical storm. Strong shear as was present during Tropical Storm Chantal s lifetime and it was detrimental to its intensification. The paper presents an analysis of unique aircraft observations collected from Chantal including an on-board radar, radiometers, dropsondes, and flight level measurements. These measurements have enabled us to examine the internal structure of the winds and thermal structure of Chantal. Most of the previous studies have involved intense hurricanes that overcame the effects of shear and this work has provided new insights into what prevents a weaker storm from intensifying. The storm had extremely intense thunderstorms and rainfall, yet its main circulation was confined to low levels of the atmosphere. Chantal's thermal structure was not configured properly for the storm to intensify. It is most typical that huricanes have a warm core structure where warm temperatures in upper levels of a storm s circulation help intensify surface winds and lower its central pressure. Chantal had two weaker warm layers instead of a well-defined warm core. These layers have been related to the horizontal and vertical winds and precipitation structure and

  13. High Temperature Shear Horizontal Electromagnetic Acoustic Transducer for Guided Wave Inspection.

    PubMed

    Kogia, Maria; Gan, Tat-Hean; Balachandran, Wamadeva; Livadas, Makis; Kappatos, Vassilios; Szabo, Istvan; Mohimi, Abbas; Round, Andrew

    2016-04-22

    Guided Wave Testing (GWT) using novel Electromagnetic Acoustic Transducers (EMATs) is proposed for the inspection of large structures operating at high temperatures. To date, high temperature EMATs have been developed only for thickness measurements and they are not suitable for GWT. A pair of water-cooled EMATs capable of exciting and receiving Shear Horizontal (SH₀) waves for GWT with optimal high temperature properties (up to 500 °C) has been developed. Thermal and Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) simulations of the EMAT design have been performed and experimentally validated. The optimal thermal EMAT design, material selection and operating conditions were calculated. The EMAT was successfully tested regarding its thermal and GWT performance from ambient temperature to 500 °C.

  14. Gum tragacanth dispersions: Particle size and rheological properties affected by high-shear homogenization.

    PubMed

    Farzi, Mina; Yarmand, Mohammad Saeed; Safari, Mohammad; Emam-Djomeh, Zahra; Mohammadifar, Mohammad Amin

    2015-08-01

    The effect of high-shear homogenization on the rheological and particle size characteristics of three species of gum tragacanth (GT) was detected. Dispersions were subjected to 0-20 min treatment. Static light scattering techniques and rheological tests were used to study the effect of treatment. The results showed that the process caused a decrease in particle size parameters for all three species, but interestingly, the apparent viscosities increased. The highest increase of apparent viscosity was found for solutions containing Astragalus gossypinus, which possessed the highest insoluble fraction. The viscoelastic behaviors of dispersions were also significantly influenced by the process. Homogenization caused an increase in both G' and G″, in all three species. The alterations seem to be highly dependent on GT species and structure. The results could be of high importance in the industry, since the process will lead to textural modifications of food products containing GT.

  15. High Temperature Shear Horizontal Electromagnetic Acoustic Transducer for Guided Wave Inspection

    PubMed Central

    Kogia, Maria; Gan, Tat-Hean; Balachandran, Wamadeva; Livadas, Makis; Kappatos, Vassilios; Szabo, Istvan; Mohimi, Abbas; Round, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Guided Wave Testing (GWT) using novel Electromagnetic Acoustic Transducers (EMATs) is proposed for the inspection of large structures operating at high temperatures. To date, high temperature EMATs have been developed only for thickness measurements and they are not suitable for GWT. A pair of water-cooled EMATs capable of exciting and receiving Shear Horizontal (SH0) waves for GWT with optimal high temperature properties (up to 500 °C) has been developed. Thermal and Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) simulations of the EMAT design have been performed and experimentally validated. The optimal thermal EMAT design, material selection and operating conditions were calculated. The EMAT was successfully tested regarding its thermal and GWT performance from ambient temperature to 500 °C. PMID:27110792

  16. 4-D ultrafast shear-wave imaging.

    PubMed

    Gennisson, Jean-Luc; Provost, Jean; Deffieux, Thomas; Papadacci, Clément; Imbault, Marion; Pernot, Mathieu; Tanter, Mickael

    2015-06-01

    Over the last ten years, shear wave elastography (SWE) has seen considerable development and is now routinely used in clinics to provide mechanical characterization of tissues to improve diagnosis. The most advanced technique relies on the use of an ultrafast scanner to generate and image shear waves in real time in a 2-D plane at several thousands of frames per second. We have recently introduced 3-D ultrafast ultrasound imaging to acquire with matrix probes the 3-D propagation of shear waves generated by a dedicated radiation pressure transducer in a single acquisition. In this study, we demonstrate 3-D SWE based on ultrafast volumetric imaging in a clinically applicable configuration. A 32 × 32 matrix phased array driven by a customized, programmable, 1024-channel ultrasound system was designed to perform 4-D shear-wave imaging. A matrix phased array was used to generate and control in 3-D the shear waves inside the medium using the acoustic radiation force. The same matrix array was used with 3-D coherent plane wave compounding to perform high-quality ultrafast imaging of the shear wave propagation. Volumetric ultrafast acquisitions were then beamformed in 3-D using a delay-and-sum algorithm. 3-D volumetric maps of the shear modulus were reconstructed using a time-of-flight algorithm based on local multiscale cross-correlation of shear wave profiles in the three main directions using directional filters. Results are first presented in an isotropic homogeneous and elastic breast phantom. Then, a full 3-D stiffness reconstruction of the breast was performed in vivo on healthy volunteers. This new full 3-D ultrafast ultrasound system paves the way toward real-time 3-D SWE. PMID:26067040

  17. Development of K-Basin High-Strength Homogeneous Sludge Simulants and Correlations Between Unconfined Compressive Strength and Shear Strength

    SciTech Connect

    Onishi, Yasuo; Baer, Ellen BK; Chun, Jaehun; Yokuda, Satoru T.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Sande, Susan; Buchmiller, William C.

    2011-02-20

    K-Basin sludge will be stored in the Sludge Transport and Storage Containers (STSCs) at an interim storage location on Central Plateau before being treated and packaged for disposal. During the storage period, sludge in the STSCs may consolidate/agglomerate, potentially resulting in high-shear-strength material. The Sludge Treatment Project (STP) plans to use water jets to retrieve K-Basin sludge after the interim storage. STP has identified shear strength to be a key parameter that should be bounded to verify the operability and performance of sludge retrieval systems. Determining the range of sludge shear strength is important to gain high confidence that a water-jet retrieval system can mobilize stored K-Basin sludge from the STSCs. The shear strength measurements will provide a basis for bounding sludge properties for mobilization and erosion. Thus, it is also important to develop potential simulants to investigate these phenomena. Long-term sludge storage tests conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) show that high-uranium-content K-Basin sludge can self-cement and form a strong sludge with a bulk shear strength of up to 65 kPa. Some of this sludge has 'paste' and 'chunks' with shear strengths of approximately 3-5 kPa and 380-770 kPa, respectively. High-uranium-content sludge samples subjected to hydrothermal testing (e.g., 185 C, 10 hours) have been observed to form agglomerates with a shear strength up to 170 kPa. These high values were estimated by measured unconfined compressive strength (UCS) obtained with a pocket penetrometer. Due to its ease of use, it is anticipated that a pocket penetrometer will be used to acquire additional shear strength data from archived K-Basin sludge samples stored at the PNNL Radiochemical Processing Laboratory (RPL) hot cells. It is uncertain whether the pocket penetrometer provides accurate shear strength measurements of the material. To assess the bounding material strength and potential for erosion, it

  18. Frictional strength of wet- and dry- talc gouge in high-velocity shear experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, X.; Reches, Z.; Elwood Madden, A. S.

    2015-12-01

    The strength of the creeping segment of the San Andres fault may be controlled by the distinct weakness and stability of talc (Moore & Rymer, 2007). We analyze talc frictional strength at high slip-velocity of 0.002 - 0.66 m/s, long slip-distances of 0.01 m to 33 m, and normal stresses up to 4.1 MPa. This analysis bridges the gap between nucleation stage of low velocity/distance, and the frictional behavior during large earthquakes. We tested wet and dry samples of pure talc gouge in a confined rotary cell, and continuously monitored the slip-velocity, stresses, dilation and temperature. We run 29 experiments of single and stepped velocities to obtain 243 values of quasi-static frictional coefficients. Dry talc gouge showed distinct slip-strengthening: friction coefficient of µ ~0.4 at short slip-distances of D < 0.1 m, and it increased systematically to µ ~0.8 at slip-distances of D = 0.1- 1 m; at D > 1 m, the frictional strength saturated at µ= 0.8 - 1 level. Wet talc gouge (16-20% water) displayed low frictional strength of µ= 0.1-0.3, in agreement with published triaxial tests. The stepped-velocity runs revealed a consistent velocity-strengthening trend. For a velocity jump from V1 to V2, we used VD = (µ2 -µ1)/ln (V2/V1), and found that on average VD = 0.06 and 0.03 for dry and wet talc, respectively, and for slip distances shorter than 1 m. Microstructural analysis of post-shearing wet talc gouge revealed extreme slip localization to a principal-slip-zone of a few microns, and significant shear compaction of 10-30%. In contrast, dry talc gouge exhibited distributed shear in a wide zone and systematic shear dilation (10-50%). We propose slip along weak interlayer talc plates and thermal-pressurization as the possible weakening mechanisms for wet talc. The development of distributed secondary fault network along with substantial grain crushing is responsible for slip-strengthening in dry condition. Fig. 1. Friction maps of talc gouge as function of slip

  19. Effects of High Molecular Weight Species on Shear-Induced Orientation and Crystallization of Isotactic Polypropylene

    SciTech Connect

    Somani,R.; Yang, L.; Hsiao, B.

    2006-01-01

    In situ rheo-SAXS (small-angle X-ray scattering) and rheo-WAXD (wide-angle X-ray diffraction) techniques were used to investigate the role of high molecular weight species on the evolution of oriented microstructure in isotactic polypropylene (iPP) melt under shear flow. The two iPP samples, designated as PP-A and PP-B, respectively, had the same number-average (M{sub n}) but different weight-average (M{sub w}) and Z-average (M{sub z}) molecular weights. Molecular weight distribution (MWD) of PP-A and PP-B was such that for MW<10{sup 5} the MWD curves overlapped; whereas in the high MW tail region, the amount of high molecular weight species was higher in PP-B than PP-A. Both samples were subjected to an identical shear condition (rate=60 s{sup -1}, duration=5 s, T=155 degC). In situ 2D SAXS and WAXD images allowed the tracking of shear-induced oriented structures in the melt. It was found that the shish structures evolved much earlier, and the degree of crystal orientation and oriented crystal fractions were higher in PP-B than PP-A. Moreover, PP-B exhibited faster crystallization kinetics than PP-A. These results, along with the predictions of double reptation models of chain motion and experimental studies of chain conformation dynamics in dilute solutions under flow, suggest the following: When a polymer melt that consists of entangled chains of different lengths is deformed, the chain segments aligned with the flow eigenvector can undergo the abrupt coil-stretch-like transition, while other segments would remain in the coiled state. Since, flow-induced orientation decays much more slowly for long chains than for short chains, oriented high molecular weight species play a prominent role in formation of the stretched sections, where shish originates. Our experimental results are strong evidence of the hypothesis that even a small increase in the concentration of high molecular weight species causes a significant increase in the formation, stability and

  20. Experimental and Computational Study of the Shearing Resistance of Polyurea at High Pressures and High Strain Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grujicic, Mica; Yavari, R.; Snipes, J. S.; Ramaswami, S.; Jiao, T.; Clifton, R. J.

    2015-02-01

    Mechanical response of polyurea, a nanophase segregated elastomeric co-polymer, is investigated using all-atom, equilibrium, molecular-dynamics methods and tools. Specifically, the effects of high pressure (1-30 GPa) and high strain rate (105-106 s-1) on the shearing resistance of polyurea are examined. Such loading conditions are encountered by polyurea coatings subjected to impact by high-velocity projectiles, shell shrapnel, and improvised explosive device fragments. Computed results are compared with their experimental counterparts obtained using the so-called pressure-shear plate impact experiments. Computed results have also been rationalized in terms of the nanosegregated polyurea microstructure consisting of rod-shaped, discrete, the so-called hard domains embedded in a highly compliant, the so-called soft matrix. By analyzing molecular-level microstructure and its evolution during high-rate deformation and under high imposed pressures, an attempt is made to identify and quantify main phenomena in viscous/inelastic deformation and microstructure-reorganization processes that are most likely responsible for the observed mechanical response of polyurea.

  1. Evaluating scale-up rules of a high-shear wet granulation process.

    PubMed

    Tao, Jing; Pandey, Preetanshu; Bindra, Dilbir S; Gao, Julia Z; Narang, Ajit S

    2015-07-01

    This work aimed to evaluate the commonly used scale-up rules for high-shear wet granulation process using a microcrystalline cellulose-lactose-based low drug loading formulation. Granule properties such as particle size, porosity, flow, and tabletability, and tablet dissolution were compared across scales using scale-up rules based on different impeller speed calculations or extended wet massing time. Constant tip speed rule was observed to produce slightly less granulated material at the larger scales. Longer wet massing time can be used to compensate for the lower shear experienced by the granules at the larger scales. Constant Froude number and constant empirical stress rules yielded granules that were more comparable across different scales in terms of compaction performance and tablet dissolution. Granule porosity was shown to correlate well with blend tabletability and tablet dissolution, indicating the importance of monitoring granule densification (porosity) during scale-up. It was shown that different routes can be chosen during scale-up to achieve comparable granule growth and densification by altering one of the three parameters: water amount, impeller speed, and wet massing time. PMID:26010137

  2. Mechanism of platelet adhesion to von Willebrand factor and microparticle formation under high shear stress

    PubMed Central

    Reininger, Armin J.; Heijnen, Harry F. G.; Schumann, Hannah; Specht, Hanno M.; Schramm, Wolfgang; Ruggeri, Zaverio M.

    2006-01-01

    We describe here the mechanism of platelet adhesion to immobilized von Willebrand factor (VWF) and subsequent formation of platelet-derived microparticles mediated by glycoprotein Ibα (GPIbα) under high shear stress. As visualized in whole blood perfused in a flow chamber, platelet attachment to VWF involved one or few membrane areas of 0.05 to 0.1 μm2 that formed discrete adhesion points (DAPs) capable of resisting force in excess of 160 pN. Under the influence of hydrodynamic drag, membrane tethers developed between the moving platelet body and DAPs firmly adherent to immobilized VWF. Continued stretching eventually caused the separation of many such tethers, leaving on the surface tube-shaped or spherical microparticles with a diameter as low as 50 to 100 nm. Adhesion receptors (GPIbα, αIIbβ3) and phosphatidylserine were expressed on the surface of these microparticles, which were procoagulant. Shearing platelet-rich plasma at the rate of 10 000 s–1 in a cone-and-plate viscosimeter increased microparticle counts up to 55-fold above baseline. Blocking the GPIb-VWF interaction abolished microparticle generation in both experimental conditions. Thus, a biomechanical process mediated by GPIbα-VWF bonds in rapidly flowing blood may not only initiate platelet arrest onto reactive vascular surfaces but also generate procoagulant microparticles that further enhance thrombus formation. PMID:16449527

  3. Highly permeable silicon membranes for shear free chemotaxis and rapid cell labeling.

    PubMed

    Chung, Henry H; Chan, Charles K; Khire, Tejas S; Marsh, Graham A; Clark, Alfred; Waugh, Richard E; McGrath, James L

    2014-07-21

    Microfluidic systems are powerful tools for cell biology studies because they enable the precise addition and removal of solutes in small volumes. However, the fluid forces inherent in the use of microfluidics for cell cultures are sometimes undesirable. An important example is chemotaxis systems where fluid flow creates well-defined and steady chemotactic gradients but also pushes cells downstream. Here we demonstrate a chemotaxis system in which two chambers are separated by a molecularly thin (15 nm), transparent, and nanoporous silicon membrane. One chamber is a microfluidic channel that carries a flow-generated gradient while the other chamber is a shear-free environment for cell observation. The molecularly thin membranes provide effectively no resistance to molecular diffusion between the two chambers, making them ideal elements for creating flow-free chambers in microfluidic systems. Analytical and computational flow models that account for membrane and chamber geometry, predict shear reduction of more than five orders of magnitude. This prediction is confirmed by observing the pure diffusion of nanoparticles in the cell-hosting chamber despite high input flow (Q = 10 μL min(-1); vavg ~ 45 mm min(-1)) in the flow chamber only 15 nm away. Using total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy, we show that a flow-generated molecular gradient will pass through the membrane into the quiescent cell chamber. Finally we demonstrate that our device allows us to expose migrating neutrophils to a chemotactic gradient or fluorescent label without any influence from flow.

  4. Spray pattern and droplet size analyses for high-shear viscosity determination of aqueous suspension corticosteroid nasal sprays.

    PubMed

    Pennington, Justin; Pandey, Preetanshu; Tat, Henry; Willson, Jennifer; Donovan, Brent

    2008-09-01

    Aqueous suspension corticosteroid nasal sprays exhibit the rheological property of shear thinning, meaning they exhibit a decrease in viscosity upon application of shear. Most rheological methods are limited in the amount of shear that can be applied to samples (approximately 1,000 s(-1)) and thus can only approximate the viscosities at the high-shear conditions of nasal spray devices (approximately 10(5)-10(6) s(-1)). In the current work, spray area and droplet size were shown to demonstrate viscosity dependence. Three Newtonian fluids were used to determine equations to approximate viscosity at the spray nozzle from correlations to spray area and droplet size using a standard 100 microL Pfeiffer nasal spray pump. Several shear-thinning solutions, including four commercial aqueous suspension corticosteroid nasal sprays and three aqueous Avicel (1, 2, and 3%, wt/wt) samples, were analyzed to demonstrate the ability of spray area and droplet size analysis to estimate high-shear viscosities. The calculated viscosity values trend in accordance with the rheometer data along with the ability to distinguish differences between all samples analyzed.

  5. Open and closed shear-walls in high-rise structural systems: Static and dynamic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpinteri, Alberto; Lacidogna, Giuseppe; Nitti, Giuseppe

    2016-06-01

    In the present paper, a General Algorithm is applied to the analysis of high-rise structures. This algorithm is to be used as a calculation tool in preliminary design; it allows to define the interaction between closed and open, straight or curved shear-walls, and the forces exchanged in structures subject to mainly horizontal loads. The analysis can be performed in both static and dynamic regimes, the mode shapes and the natural frequencies being assessed. This general formulation allows analyses of high-rise structures by taking into account the torsional rigidity and the warping deformations of the elements composing the building without gross simplifications. In thisway it is possible to model the structure as a single equivalent cantilever, thus minimising the degrees of freedom of the system, and consequently the calculation time. Finally, potentials of the method proposed are demonstrated by a numerical example which emphasizes the link between global displacements and stresses in the elements composing the structure.

  6. Measurement of Young's relaxation modulus using nanoindentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Gang; Lu, Hongbing

    2006-09-01

    In a previous paper (Lu et al., Mechanics of Time-Dependent Materials, 7, 2003, 189 207), we described methods to measure the creep compliance of polymers using Berkovich and spherical indenters by nanoindentation. However, the relaxation modulus is often needed in stress and deformation analysis. It has been well known that the interconversion between creep compliance and relaxation function presents an ill-posed problem, so that converting the creep compliance function to the relaxation function cannot always give accurate results, especially considering that the creep data at short times in nanoindentation are often not reliable, and the overall nanoindentation time is short, typically a few hundred seconds. In this paper, we present methods to measure Young’s relaxation functions directly using nanoindentation. A constant-rate displacement loading history is usually used in nanoindentations. Using viscoelastic contact mechanics, Young’s relaxation modulus is extracted using nanoindentation load-displacement data. Three bulk polymers, Polymethyl Methacrylate (PMMA), Polycarbonate (PC) and Polyurethane (PU), are used in this study. The Young’s relaxation functions measured from the nanoindentation are compared with data measured from conventional tensile and shear tests to evaluate the precision of the methods. A reasonably good agreement has been reached for all these materials for indentation depth higher than a certain value, providing reassurance for these methods for measuring relaxation functions.

  7. Interlaminar shear properties of graphite fiber, high-performance resin composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Needles, H. L.; Kourtides, D. A.; Fish, R. H.; Varma, D. S.

    1983-01-01

    Short beam testing was used to determine the shear properties of laminates consisting of T-300 and Celion 3000 and 6000 graphite fibers, in epoxy, hot melt and solvent bismaleimide, polyimide and polystyrylpyridine (PSP). Epoxy, composites showed the highest interlaminar shear strength, with values for all other resins being substantially lower. The dependence of interlaminar shear properties on the fiber-resin interfacial bond and on resin wetting characteristics and mechanical properties is investigated, and it is determined that the lower shear strength of the tested composites, by comparison with epoxy resin matrix composites, is due to their correspondingly lower interfacial bond strengths. An investigation of the effect of the wettability of carbon fiber tow on shear strength shows wetting variations among resins that are too small to account for the large shear strength property differences observed.

  8. Vortex Formation in a High Speed Dust Flow with Large Velocity Shear in RF Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Iizuka, Satoru; Gohda, Takuma

    2008-09-07

    We have investigated a rotation of a dust cloud disc with strong velocity shear in a radio frequency (RF) plasma. The flow pattern of the dusts was evaluated by the Navier Stokes Equation with shear viscosity due to the Coulomb interactions. We have clarified dynamic behaviors of the dusts and observed generation of micro-vortices around rotational center, when the velocity shear is enhanced.

  9. Controlled High-Rate-Strain Shear Bands in Inert and Reactant Porous Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesterenko, Vitali

    1997-07-01

    Shear localization was considered as one of the main reasons for initiation of chemical reaction in energetic materials under dynamic loading (Dremin and Breusov 1968, Winter and Field 1975, Frey 1981, Kipp 1985, Iyer, Bennet et al., 1994) and for particles bonding during shock compaction (Nesterenko 1985). However despite of wide spread recognition of the importance of rapid shear flow the shear bands in porous heterogeneous materials did not become an object of research. The primary reason for this was a lack of appropriate experimental method. The "Thick-Walled Cylinder" method, which allows to reproduce shear bands in controlled conditions, was initially proposed by Nesterenko et al., 1989 for solid inert materials and then modified by Nesterenko, Meyers et al., 1994 to fit porous inert and energetic materials. The method allows to reproduce the array of shear bands with shear strains 10 - 100 and strain rate 107 s-1. Experimental results will be presented for inert materials (granular, fractured ceramics) and for reactant porous mixtures (Nb-Si, Ti-Si, Ti-C). Mechanisms of material deformation and shear induced chemical reactions inside shear localization zone as well as conditions for the initiation of the chemical reaction in the bulk of energetic material by array of shear bands will be considered.

  10. Optimization of the high-shear wet granulation wetting process using fuzzy logic modeling.

    PubMed

    Belohlav, Zdenek; Brenkova, Lucie; Kalcikova, Jana; Hanika, Jiri; Durdil, Petr; Tomasek, Vaclav; Palatova, Marta

    2007-01-01

    A fuzzy model has been developed for the optimization of high-shear wet granulation wetting on a plant scale depending on the characteristics of pharmaceutical active substance particles. The model optimized on the basis of experimental data involves a set of rules obtained from expert knowledge and full-scale process data. The skewness coefficient of particle size distribution and the tapped density of the granulated mixture were chosen as the model input variables. The output of the fuzzy ruled system is the optimal quantity of wetting liquid. In comparison to manufacturing practice, a very strong sensitivity of the optimal quantity of the added wetting liquid to the size and shape of the active substance particles has been identified by fuzzy modeling. PMID:17763139

  11. Stabilization of highly concentrated suspensions of iron nanoparticles using shear-thinning gels of xanthan gum.

    PubMed

    Comba, Silvia; Sethi, Rajandrea

    2009-08-01

    Nanoscale zerovalent iron (NZVI) particles have recently become subject of great interest in the field of groundwater remediation for their ability to treat a wide variety of organic and inorganic contaminants. However, the field application of this technology is strongly hindered by the lack of stability of NZVI water suspensions. This study demonstrates that highly concentrated NZVI slurries (15g/L) can be stabilized for more than 10 days adding 6g/L of xanthan gum biopolymer. Stability against aggregation and sedimentation was achieved in the range of ionic strength 6 x 10(-3)-12 mM and is mainly due to the formation of a viscous gel characterized by shear-thinning behaviour.

  12. Combining formulation and process aspects for optimizing the high-shear wet granulation of common drugs.

    PubMed

    Cavinato, Mauro; Andreato, Enrico; Bresciani, Massimo; Pignatone, Isabella; Bellazzi, Guido; Franceschinis, Erica; Realdon, Nicola; Canu, Paolo; Santomaso, Andrea C

    2011-09-15

    The purpose of this research was to determine the effects of some important drug properties (such as particle size distribution, hygroscopicity and solubility) and process variables on the granule growth behaviour and final drug distribution in high shear wet granulation. Results have been analyzed in the light of widely accepted theories and some recently developed approaches. A mixture composed of drug, some excipients and a dry binder was processed using a lab-scale high-shear mixer. Three common active pharmaceutical ingredients (paracetamol, caffeine and acetylsalicylic acid) were used within the initial formulation. Drug load was 50% (on weight basis). Influences of drug particle properties (e.g. particle size and shape, hygroscopicity) on the granule growth behaviour were evaluated. Particle size distribution (PSD) and granule morphology were monitored during the entire process through sieve analysis and scanning electron microscope (SEM) image analysis. Resistance of the wet mass to mixing was furthermore measured using the impeller torque monitoring technique. The observed differences in the granule growth behaviour as well as the discrepancies between the actual and the ideal drug content in the final granules have been interpreted in terms of dimensionless quantity (spray flux number, bed penetration time) and related to torque measurements. Analysis highlighted the role of liquid distribution on the process. It was demonstrated that where the liquid penetration time was higher (e.g. paracetamol-based formulations), the liquid distribution was poorer leading to retarded granule growth and selective agglomeration. On the other hand where penetration time was lower (e.g. acetylsalicylic acid-based formulations), the growth was much faster but uniformity content problem arose because of the onset of crushing and layering phenomena. PMID:21763764

  13. Enhancement of USM3D Unstructured Flow Solver for High-Speed High-Temperature Shear Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pandya, Mohagna J.; Abdol-Hamid, Khaled S.; Frink, Neal T.

    2009-01-01

    Large temperature and pressure fluctuations have a profound effect on turbulence development in transonic and supersonic jets. For high-speed, high-temperature jet flows, standard turbulence models lack the ability to predict the observed mixing rate of a shear layer. Several proposals to address this deficiency have been advanced in the literature to modify the turbulence transport equations in a variety of ways. In the present study, some of the most proven and simple modifications to two-equation turbulence models have been selected and implemented in NASA's USM3D tetrahedral Navier-Stokes flow solver. The modifications include the addition of compressibility correction and pressure dilatation terms in the turbulence transport equations for high-speed flows, and the addition of a simple modification to the Boussinesq's closure model coefficient for high-temperature jets. The efficacy of the extended models is demonstrated by comparison with experimental data for two supersonic axisymmetric jet test cases at design pressure ratio.

  14. Shear strain in Nd0.5Ca0.5MnO3 at high pressures.

    PubMed

    Arulraj, Anthony; Dinnebier, Robert E; Carlson, Stefan; Hanfland, Michael; van Smaalen, Sander

    2005-04-29

    High-pressure x-ray powder diffraction has been measured on the half doped rare earth manganite Nd0.5Ca0.5MnO3 up to a pressure of 15 GPa. We report the presence of a quantifiable amount of shear distortion of the MnO6 octahedra in Nd0.5Ca0.5MnO3 at high pressures. The lattice strain of Nd0.5Ca0.5MnO3 is minimal at a crossover pressure of p* approximately 7 GPa, with the same lattice strain above and below this pressure achieved by shear and Jahn-Teller-type distortions, respectively. The increase in shear strain with increasing pressure provides a mechanism for the insulating behavior of manganites at high pressures that has not been considered before. PMID:15904242

  15. Direct measurement of shear properties of microfibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behlow, H.; Saini, D.; Oliveira, L.; Durham, L.; Simpson, J.; Serkiz, S. M.; Skove, M. J.; Rao, A. M.

    2014-09-01

    As novel fibers with enhanced mechanical properties continue to be synthesized and developed, the ability to easily and accurately characterize these materials becomes increasingly important. Here we present a design for an inexpensive tabletop instrument to measure shear modulus (G) and other longitudinal shear properties of a micrometer-sized monofilament fiber sample, such as nonlinearities and hysteresis. This automated system applies twist to the sample and measures the resulting torque using a sensitive optical detector that tracks a torsion reference. The accuracy of the instrument was verified by measuring G for high purity copper and tungsten fibers, for which G is well known. Two industrially important fibers, IM7 carbon fiber and Kevlar® 119, were also characterized with this system and were found to have G = 16.5 ± 2.1 and 2.42 ± 0.32 GPa, respectively.

  16. Direct measurement of shear properties of microfibers.

    PubMed

    Behlow, H; Saini, D; Oliveira, L; Durham, L; Simpson, J; Serkiz, S M; Skove, M J; Rao, A M

    2014-09-01

    As novel fibers with enhanced mechanical properties continue to be synthesized and developed, the ability to easily and accurately characterize these materials becomes increasingly important. Here we present a design for an inexpensive tabletop instrument to measure shear modulus (G) and other longitudinal shear properties of a micrometer-sized monofilament fiber sample, such as nonlinearities and hysteresis. This automated system applies twist to the sample and measures the resulting torque using a sensitive optical detector that tracks a torsion reference. The accuracy of the instrument was verified by measuring G for high purity copper and tungsten fibers, for which G is well known. Two industrially important fibers, IM7 carbon fiber and Kevlar(®) 119, were also characterized with this system and were found to have G = 16.5 ± 2.1 and 2.42 ± 0.32 GPa, respectively.

  17. Direct measurement of shear properties of microfibers

    SciTech Connect

    Behlow, H.; Saini, D.; Durham, L.; Simpson, J.; Skove, M. J.; Rao, A. M.; Oliveira, L.; Serkiz, S. M.

    2014-09-15

    As novel fibers with enhanced mechanical properties continue to be synthesized and developed, the ability to easily and accurately characterize these materials becomes increasingly important. Here we present a design for an inexpensive tabletop instrument to measure shear modulus (G) and other longitudinal shear properties of a micrometer-sized monofilament fiber sample, such as nonlinearities and hysteresis. This automated system applies twist to the sample and measures the resulting torque using a sensitive optical detector that tracks a torsion reference. The accuracy of the instrument was verified by measuring G for high purity copper and tungsten fibers, for which G is well known. Two industrially important fibers, IM7 carbon fiber and Kevlar{sup ®} 119, were also characterized with this system and were found to have G = 16.5 ± 2.1 and 2.42 ± 0.32 GPa, respectively.

  18. Young's modulus of nanoconfined liquids?

    PubMed

    Khan, Shah Haidar; Hoffmann, Peter Manfred

    2016-07-01

    In material science, bioengineering, and biology, thin liquid films and soft matter membranes play an important role in micro-lubrication, ion transport, and fundamental biological processes. Various attempts have been made to characterize the elastic properties, such as Young's modulus, of such films using Hertz theory by incorporating convoluted mathematical corrections. We propose a simple way to extract tip-size independent elastic properties based on stiffness and force measurement through a spherical tip on a flat surface. Using our model, the Young's modulus of nanoconfined, molecularly-thin, layers of a model liquid TEHOS (tetrakis 2-ethylhexoxy silane) and water were determined using a small-amplitude AFM. This AFM can simultaneously measure the stiffness and forces of nanoscale films. While the stiffness scales linearly with the tip radius, the measured Young's modulus essentially remains constant over an order of magnitude variation in the tip radius. The values obtained for the elastic modulus of TEHOS and water films on the basis of our method are significantly lower than the confining surfaces' elastic moduli, in contrast with the uncorrected Hertz model, suggesting that our method can serve as a simple way to compare elastic properties of nanoscale thin films as well as to characterize a variety of soft films. In addition, our results show that the elastic properties (elastic modulus) of nanoconfined liquid films remain fairly independent of increasing confinement. PMID:27060229

  19. Earthquake Energy Dissipation in Light of High-Velocity, Slip-Pulse Shear Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reches, Z.; Liao, Z.; Chang, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    We investigated the energy dissipation during earthquakes by analysis of high-velocity shear experiments conducted on room-dry, solid samples of granite, tonalite, and dolomite sheared at slip-velocity of 0.0006-1m/s, and normal stress of 1-11.5MPa. The experimental fault were loaded in one of three modes: (1) Slip-pulse of abrupt, intense acceleration followed by moderate deceleration; (2) Impact by a spinning, heavy flywheel (225 kg); and (3) Constant velocity loading. We refer to energy dissipation in terms of power-density (PD=shear stress*slip-velocity; units of MW/m^2), and Coulomb-energy-density (CED= mechanical energy/normal stress; units of m). We present two aspects: Relative energy dissipation of the above loading modes, and relative energy dissipation between impact experiments and moderate earthquakes. For the first aspect, we used: (i) the lowest friction coefficient of the dynamic weakening; (ii) the work dissipated before reaching the lowest friction; and (iii) the cumulative mechanical work during the complete run. The results show that the slip-pulse/impact modes are energy efficient relatively to the constant-velocity mode as manifested by faster, more intense weakening and 50-90% lower energy dissipation. Thus, for a finite amount of pre-seismic crustal energy, the efficiency of slip-pulse would amplify earthquake instability. For the second aspect, we compare the experimental CED of the impact experiments to the reported breakdown energy (EG) of moderate earthquakes, Mw = 5.6 to 7.2 (Chang et al., 2012). In is commonly assumed that the seismic EG is a small fraction of the total earthquake energy, and as expected in 9 out of 11 examined earthquakes, EG was 0.005 to 0.07 of the experimental CED. We thus speculate that the experimental relation of Coulomb-energy-density to total slip distance, D, CED = 0.605 × D^0.933, is a reasonable estimate of total earthquake energy, a quantity that cannot be determined from seismic data.

  20. Magnetically applied pressure-shear : a new technique for direct strength measurement at high pressure (final report for LDRD project 117856).

    SciTech Connect

    Lamppa, Derek C.; Haill, Thomas A.; Alexander, C. Scott; Asay, James Russell

    2010-09-01

    A new experimental technique to measure material shear strength at high pressures has been developed for use on magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) drive pulsed power platforms. By applying an external static magnetic field to the sample region, the MHD drive directly induces a shear stress wave in addition to the usual longitudinal stress wave. Strength is probed by passing this shear wave through a sample material where the transmissible shear stress is limited to the sample strength. The magnitude of the transmitted shear wave is measured via a transverse VISAR system from which the sample strength is determined.

  1. Rapid distortion analysis of high speed homogeneous turbulence subject to periodic shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertsch, Rebecca L.; Girimaji, Sharath S.

    2015-12-01

    The effect of unsteady shear forcing on small perturbation growth in compressible flow is investigated. In particular, flow-thermodynamic field interaction and the resulting effect on the phase-lag between applied shear and Reynolds stress are examined. Simplified linear analysis of the perturbation pressure equation reveals crucial differences between steady and unsteady shear effects. The analytical findings are validated with numerical simulations of inviscid rapid distortion theory (RDT) equations. In contrast to steadily sheared compressible flows, perturbations in the unsteady (periodic) forcing case do not experience an asymptotic growth phase. Further, the resonance growth phenomenon found in incompressible unsteady shear turbulence is absent in the compressible case. Overall, the stabilizing influence of both unsteadiness and compressibility is compounded leading to suppression of all small perturbations. The underlying mechanisms are explained.

  2. Rapid distortion analysis of high speed homogeneous turbulence subject to periodic shear

    SciTech Connect

    Bertsch, Rebecca L.; Girimaji, Sharath S.

    2015-12-30

    The effect of unsteady shear forcing on small perturbation growth in compressible flow is investigated. In particular, flow-thermodynamic field interaction and the resulting effect on the phase-lag between applied shear and Reynolds stress are examined. Simplified linear analysis of the perturbation pressure equation reveals crucial differences between steady and unsteady shear effects. The analytical findings are validated with numerical simulations of inviscid rapid distortion theory (RDT) equations. In contrast to steadily sheared compressible flows, perturbations in the unsteady (periodic) forcing case do not experience an asymptotic growth phase. Further, the resonance growth phenomenon found in incompressible unsteady shear turbulence is absent in the compressible case. Overall, the stabilizing influence of both unsteadiness and compressibility is compounded leading to suppression of all small perturbations. As a result, the underlying mechanisms are explained.

  3. Rapid distortion analysis of high speed homogeneous turbulence subject to periodic shear

    DOE PAGES

    Bertsch, Rebecca L.; Girimaji, Sharath S.

    2015-12-30

    The effect of unsteady shear forcing on small perturbation growth in compressible flow is investigated. In particular, flow-thermodynamic field interaction and the resulting effect on the phase-lag between applied shear and Reynolds stress are examined. Simplified linear analysis of the perturbation pressure equation reveals crucial differences between steady and unsteady shear effects. The analytical findings are validated with numerical simulations of inviscid rapid distortion theory (RDT) equations. In contrast to steadily sheared compressible flows, perturbations in the unsteady (periodic) forcing case do not experience an asymptotic growth phase. Further, the resonance growth phenomenon found in incompressible unsteady shear turbulence ismore » absent in the compressible case. Overall, the stabilizing influence of both unsteadiness and compressibility is compounded leading to suppression of all small perturbations. As a result, the underlying mechanisms are explained.« less

  4. Rapid distortion analysis of high speed homogeneous turbulence subject to periodic shear

    SciTech Connect

    Bertsch, Rebecca L. Girimaji, Sharath S.

    2015-12-15

    The effect of unsteady shear forcing on small perturbation growth in compressible flow is investigated. In particular, flow-thermodynamic field interaction and the resulting effect on the phase-lag between applied shear and Reynolds stress are examined. Simplified linear analysis of the perturbation pressure equation reveals crucial differences between steady and unsteady shear effects. The analytical findings are validated with numerical simulations of inviscid rapid distortion theory (RDT) equations. In contrast to steadily sheared compressible flows, perturbations in the unsteady (periodic) forcing case do not experience an asymptotic growth phase. Further, the resonance growth phenomenon found in incompressible unsteady shear turbulence is absent in the compressible case. Overall, the stabilizing influence of both unsteadiness and compressibility is compounded leading to suppression of all small perturbations. The underlying mechanisms are explained.

  5. Depth Dependence of Shear Properties in Articular Cartilage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckley, Mark; Gleghorn, Jason; Bonassar, Lawrence; Cohen, Itai

    2007-03-01

    Articular cartilage is a highly complex and heterogeneous material in its structure, composition and mechanical behavior. Understanding these spatial variations is a critical step in designing replacement tissue and developing methods to diagnose and treat tissue affected by damage or disease. Existing techniques in particle image velocimetry (PIV) have been used to map the shear properties of complex materials; however, these methods have yet to be applied to understanding shear behavior in cartilage. In this talk, we will show that confocal microscopy in conjunction with PIV techniques can be used to determine the depth dependence of the shear properties of articular cartilage. We will show that the shear modulus of this tissue varies by over an order of magnitude over its depth, with the least stiff region located about 200 microns from the surface. Furthermore, our data indicate that the shear strain profile of articular cartilage is sensitive to both the degree of compression and the total applied shear strain. In particular, we find that cartilage strain stiffens most dramatically in a region 200-500 microns below the surface. Finally, we will describe a physical model that accounts for this behavior by taking into account the local buckling of collagen fibers just below the cartilage surface and present second harmonic generation (SHG) imaging data addressing the collagen orientation before and after shear.

  6. Frictional properties of DFDP-1 Alpine Fault rocks under hydrothermal conditions and high shear strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemeijer, André R.; Boulton, Carolyn; Toy, Virginia; Townend, John; Sutherland, Rupert

    2015-04-01

    The Alpine Fault, New Zealand, is a major plate-bounding fault that accommodates 65-75% of the total relative motion between the Australian and Pacific plates. Paleoseismic evidence of large-displacement surface-rupturing events, as well as an absence of measurable contemporary surface deformation, indicates that the fault slips mostly in quasi-periodic large-magnitude earthquakes (< Mw 8.0). To understand the mechanics of earthquakes, it is important to study the evolution of frictional properties of the fault rocks under conditions representative of the potential hypocentral depth. Here, we present data obtained on drill core samples of rocks that surround the principal slip zone(s) (PSZ) of the Alpine Fault and the PSZ itself. The drill core samples were obtained during phase 1 of the Deep Fault Drilling Project (DFDP-1) in 2011 at relatively shallow depths (down to ~150 m). Simulated fault gouges were sheared under elevated pressure and temperature conditions in a hydrothermal ring shear apparatus. We performed experiments at temperatures of 25, 150, 300, 450 ° C, and 600 oC. Using the shallow geothermal gradient of 63 ° C/km determined in DFDP-1, our highest temperature corresponds to a depth of ~7 km (Sutherland et al. 2012); it would correspond to 10 km depth using a more moderate geotherm of 45 oC/km (Toy et al. 2010). All samples show a transition from velocity-strengthening behavior, i.e. a positive value of (a-b), to velocity-weakening behavior, i.e. a negative value of (a-b) at a temperature of 150 ° C. The transition depends on the absolute value of sliding velocity, with velocity-weakening dominating at lower sliding velocities. At 600 oC, velocity-strengthening dominates at low sliding velocity, whereas the high-velocity steps are all velocity-weakening. Moreover, shear stress depends linearly on effective normal stress at 600 oC, indicating that shearing is essentially frictional and that no transition to ductile (normal stress independent) flow

  7. High temperature pseudotachylytes and ductile shear zones in dry rocks from the continental lower crust (Lofoten, Norway)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menegon, Luca; Pennacchioni, Giorgio; Harris, Katherine; Wood, Elliot

    2014-05-01

    Understanding the mechanisms of initiation and growth of shear zones under lower crustal conditions is of fundamental importance when assessing lithosphere rheology and strength. In this study we investigate brittle-ductile shear zones developed under lower crustal conditions in anorthosites from Nusfjord, Lofoten (northern Norway). Steep ductile shear zones trend E-W to ESE-WSW and have a stretching lineation plunging steeply to the SSW or SSE. The shear sense is normal (south block down to the south) as indicated by SC and SC' fabrics and sigmoidal foliations. The shear zone show a mylonitic to ultramylonitic fabric, sharp boundaries to the host anorthosites, and abundant anastomosing dark fine-grained layers along the main foliation. The fine-grained layers localized much of the strain. Relatively lower strain domains within or adjacent to shear zones indicate that the fine dark bands of mylonites represent transposed pseudotachylyte which still locally preserve the pristine structures such as chilled margins, breccia textures with angular clasts of the host rock and injection veins; intersecting veins of pseudotachylyte record multiple stages of seismic slip. The orientation of injection veins and marker offset along the most preserved pseudotachylyte fault veins indicate approximately a sinistral strike slip kinematic during faulting event responsible for the friction-induced melting. These observations indicate that ductile shear zones exploited pre-existing brittle fault zones including a network of pseudotachylytes, and that the fine-grained "ultramylonites" derive from former fine-grained pseudotachylytes. The pseudotachylyte microstructure is dominated by plagioclase microlites dispersed in a groundmass of fine-grained clinopyroxene. Clinopyroxene recrystallizes in the damage zone flanking the pseudotachylytes, indicating high metamorphic grade during pseudotachylyte formation. Small idioblastic or cauliflower garnet are scattered through the matrix and

  8. Temperature Effects on Adhesive Bond Strengths and Modulus for Commonly Used Spacecraft Structural Adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ojeda, Cassandra E.; Oakes, Eric J.; Hill, Jennifer R.; Aldi, Dominic; Forsberg, Gustaf A.

    2011-01-01

    A study was performed to observe how changes in temperature and substrate material affected the strength and modulus of an adhesive bondline. Seven different adhesives commonly used in aerospace bonded structures were tested. Aluminum, titanium and Invar adherends were cleaned and primed, then bonded using the manufacturer's recommendations. Following surface preparation, the coupons were bonded with the adhesives. The single lap shear coupons were then pull tested per ASTM D 1002 Standard Test Method for Apparent Shear Strength of Single- Lap-Joint over a temperature range from -150 deg C up to +150 deg C. The ultimate strength was calculated and the resulting data were converted into B-basis design allowables. Average and Bbasis results were compared. Results obtained using aluminum adherends are reported. The effects of using different adherend materials and temperature were also studied and will be reported in a subsequent paper. Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA) was used to study variations in adhesive modulus with temperature. This work resulted in a highly useful database for comparing adhesive performance over a wide range of temperatures, and has facilitated selection of the appropriate adhesive for spacecraft structure applications.

  9. The roles of electric field shear and Shafranov shift in sustaining high confinement in enhanced reversed shear plasmas on the TFTR tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Synakowski, E.J.; Beer, M.A.; Batha, S.H.

    1997-02-01

    The relaxation of core transport barriers in TFTR Enhanced Reversed Shear plasmas has been studied by varying the radial electric field using different applied torques from neutral beam injection. Transport rates and fluctuations remain low over a wide range of radial electric field shear, but increase when the local E x B shearing rates are driven below a threshold comparable to the fastest linear growth rates of the dominant instabilities. Shafranov-shift-induced stabilization alone is not able to sustain enhanced confinement.

  10. Frictional processes in smectite-rich gouges sheared at slow to high slip rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aretusini, Stefano; Mittempergher, Silvia; Gualtieri, Alessandro; Di Toro, Giulio

    2015-04-01

    The slipping zones of shallow sections of megathrusts and of large landslides are often smectite-rich (e.g., montmorillonite type). Consequently, similar "frictional" processes operating at high slip rates (> 1 m/s) might be responsible of the large slips estimated in megathrust (50 m for the 2011 Tohoku Mw 9.1 earthquake) and measured in large landslides (500 m for the 1963 Vajont slide, Italy). At present, only rotary shear apparatuses can reproduce simultaneously the large slips and slip rates of these events. Noteworthy, the frictional processes proposed so far (thermal and thermochemical pressurization, etc.) remain rather obscure. Here we present preliminary results obtained with the ROtary Shear Apparatus (ROSA) installed at Padua University. Thirty-one experiments were performed at ambient conditions on pure end-members of (1) smectite-rich standard powders (STx-1b: ~68 wt% Ca-montmorillonite, ~30 wt% opal-CT and ~2 wt% quartz), (2) quartz powders (qtz) and (3) on 80:20 = Stx-1b:qtz mixtures. The gouges were sandwiched between two (1) hollow (25/15 mm external/internal diameter) or (2) solid (25 mm in diameter) stainless-steel made cylinders and confined by inner and outer Teflon rings (only outer for solid cylinders). Gouges were sheared at a normal stress of 5 MPa, slip rates V from 300 μm/s to 1.5 m/s and total slip of 3 m. The deformed gouges were investigated with quantitative (Rietveld method with internal standard) X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). In the smectite-rich standard endmember, (1) for 300 μm/s ≤ V ≤ 0.1 m/s, initial friction coefficient (μi) was 0.6±0.05 whereas the steady-state friction coefficient (μss) was velocity and slip strengthening (μss 0.85±0.05), (2) for 0.1 m/s < V < 0.3 m/s, velocity and slip neutral (μi = μss = 0.62±0.08) and (3) for V > 0.8 m/s, velocity and slip weakening (μi = 0.7±0.1 and μss = 0.25±0.05). In the 80:20 Stx-1b:qtz mixtures, (1) for 300 μm/s ≤ V

  11. Comminution of solids caused by kinetic energy of high shear strain rate, with implications for impact, shock, and shale fracturing.

    PubMed

    Bazant, Zdenek P; Caner, Ferhun C

    2013-11-26

    Although there exists a vast literature on the dynamic comminution or fragmentation of rocks, concrete, metals, and ceramics, none of the known models suffices for macroscopic dynamic finite element analysis. This paper outlines the basic idea of the macroscopic model. Unlike static fracture, in which the driving force is the release of strain energy, here the essential idea is that the driving force of comminution under high-rate compression is the release of the local kinetic energy of shear strain rate. The density of this energy at strain rates >1,000/s is found to exceed the maximum possible strain energy density by orders of magnitude, making the strain energy irrelevant. It is shown that particle size is proportional to the -2/3 power of the shear strain rate and the 2/3 power of the interface fracture energy or interface shear stress, and that the comminution process is macroscopically equivalent to an apparent shear viscosity that is proportional (at constant interface stress) to the -1/3 power of this rate. A dimensionless indicator of the comminution intensity is formulated. The theory was inspired by noting that the local kinetic energy of shear strain rate plays a role analogous to the local kinetic energy of eddies in turbulent flow.

  12. Comminution of solids caused by kinetic energy of high shear strain rate, with implications for impact, shock, and shale fracturing

    PubMed Central

    Bažant, Zdeněk P.; Caner, Ferhun C.

    2013-01-01

    Although there exists a vast literature on the dynamic comminution or fragmentation of rocks, concrete, metals, and ceramics, none of the known models suffices for macroscopic dynamic finite element analysis. This paper outlines the basic idea of the macroscopic model. Unlike static fracture, in which the driving force is the release of strain energy, here the essential idea is that the driving force of comminution under high-rate compression is the release of the local kinetic energy of shear strain rate. The density of this energy at strain rates >1,000/s is found to exceed the maximum possible strain energy density by orders of magnitude, making the strain energy irrelevant. It is shown that particle size is proportional to the −2/3 power of the shear strain rate and the 2/3 power of the interface fracture energy or interface shear stress, and that the comminution process is macroscopically equivalent to an apparent shear viscosity that is proportional (at constant interface stress) to the −1/3 power of this rate. A dimensionless indicator of the comminution intensity is formulated. The theory was inspired by noting that the local kinetic energy of shear strain rate plays a role analogous to the local kinetic energy of eddies in turbulent flow. PMID:24218624

  13. Stress Modulus of Cancer Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonin, Keith; Guthold, Martin; Guo, Xinyi; Sigley, Justin

    2012-02-01

    Our main goal is to study the different physical and mechanical properties of cells as they advance through different stages of neoplastic transformation from normal to the metastatic state. Since recent reports indicate there is significant ambiguity about how these properties change for different cancer cells, we plan to measure these properties for a single line of cells, and to determine whether the changes vary for different cellular components: i.e. whether the change in physical properties is due to a change in the cytoskeleton, the cell membrane, the cytoplasm, or a combination of these elements. Here we expect to present data on the stress modulus of cancer cells at different stages: normal, mortal cancerous, immortal cancerous, and tumorigenic. The cells are Weinberg cell line Human Mammary Epithelial (HME) cells. Atomic force microscope (AFM) probes with different diameters are used to push on the cell membrane to measure the local, regional and global cell stress modulus. Preliminary results on normal HME cells suggests a stress modulus of 1.5 ± 0.8 kPa when pushing with 7 μm spherical probes. We anticipate reporting an improved value for the modulus as well as results for some of the Weinberg cancer cells.

  14. Investigation of high-speed free shear flows using improved pressure-strain correlated Reynolds stress turbulence model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiwari, S. N.; Lakshmanan, B.

    1993-01-01

    A high-speed shear layer is studied using compressibility corrected Reynolds stress turbulence model which employs newly developed model for pressure-strain correlation. MacCormack explicit prediction-corrector method is used for solving the governing equations and the turbulence transport equations. The stiffness arising due to source terms in the turbulence equations is handled by a semi-implicit numerical technique. Results obtained using the new model show a sharper reduction in growth rate with increasing convective Mach number. Some improvements were also noted in the prediction of the normalized streamwise stress and Reynolds shear stress. The computed results are in good agreement with the experimental data.

  15. High-speed ultrasound imaging in dense suspensions reveals impact-activated solidification due to dynamic shear jamming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Endao; Peters, Ivo R.; Jaeger, Heinrich M.

    2016-07-01

    A remarkable property of dense suspensions is that they can transform from liquid-like at rest to solid-like under sudden impact. Previous work showed that this impact-induced solidification involves rapidly moving jamming fronts; however, details of this process have remained unresolved. Here we use high-speed ultrasound imaging to probe non-invasively how the interior of a dense suspension responds to impact. Measuring the speed of sound we demonstrate that the solidification proceeds without a detectable increase in packing fraction, and imaging the evolving flow field we find that the shear intensity is maximized right at the jamming front. Taken together, this provides direct experimental evidence for jamming by shear, rather than densification, as driving the transformation to solid-like behaviour. On the basis of these findings we propose a new model to explain the anisotropy in the propagation speed of the fronts and delineate the onset conditions for dynamic shear jamming in suspensions.

  16. High content evaluation of shear dependent platelet function in a microfluidic flow assay.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Ryan R; Wufsus, Adam R; Barton, Steven T; Onasoga, Abimbola A; Johnson-Paben, Rebecca M; Neeves, Keith B

    2013-02-01

    The high blood volume requirements and low throughput of conventional flow assays for measuring platelet function are unsuitable for drug screening and clinical applications. In this study, we describe a microfluidic flow assay that uses 50 μL of whole blood to measure platelet function on ~300 micropatterned spots of collagen over a range of physiologic shear rates (50-920 s(-1)). Patterning of collagen thin films (CTF) was achieved using a novel hydrated microcontact stamping method. CTF spots of 20, 50, and 100 μm were defined on glass substrates and consisted of a dense mat of nanoscale collagen fibers (3.74 ± 0.75 nm). We found that a spot size of greater than 20 μm was necessary to support platelet adhesion under flow, suggesting a threshold injury size is necessary for stable platelet adhesion. Integrating 50 μm CTF microspots into a multishear microfluidic device yielded a high content assay from which we extracted platelet accumulation metrics (lag time, growth rate, total accumulation) on the spots using Hoffman modulation contrast microscopy. This method has potential broad application in identifying platelet function defects and screening, monitoring, and dosing antiplatelet agents. PMID:23001359

  17. Remotely-Controlled Shear for Dismantling Highly Radioactive Tools In Rokkasho Vitrification Facility - 12204

    SciTech Connect

    Mitsui, Takashi; Sawa, Shusuke; Sadaki, Akira; Awano, Toshihiko; Cole, Matt; Miura, Yasuhiko; Ino, Tooru

    2012-07-01

    A high-level liquid waste vitrification facility in the Japanese Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant (RRP) is right in the middle of hot commissioning tests toward starting operation in fall of 2012. In these tests, various tools were applied to address issues occurring in the vitrification cell. Because of these tools' unplanned placement in the cell it has been necessary to dismantle and dispose of them promptly. One of the tools requiring removal is a rod used in the glass melter to improve glass pouring. It is composed of a long rod made of Inconel 601 or 625 and has been highly contaminated. In order to dismantle these tools and to remotely put them in a designated waste basket, a custom electric shear machine was developed. It was installed in a dismantling area of the vitrification cell by remote cranes and manipulators and has been successfully operated. It can be remotely dismantled and placed in a waste basket for interim storage. This is a very good example of a successful deployment of a specialty remote tool in a hot cell environment. This paper also highlights how commissioning and operations are done in the Japanese Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant. (authors)

  18. ZaP-HD: High Energy Density Z-Pinch Plasmas using Sheared Flow Stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golingo, R. P.; Shumlak, U.; Nelson, B. A.; Claveau, E. L.; Doty, S. A.; Forbes, E. G.; Hughes, M. C.; Kim, B.; Ross, M. P.; Weed, J. R.

    2015-11-01

    The ZaP-HD flow Z-pinch project investigates scaling the flow Z-pinch to High Energy Density Plasma, HEDP, conditions by using sheared flow stabilization. ZaP used a single power supply to produce 100 cm long Z-pinches that were quiescent for many radial Alfven times and axial flow-through times. The flow Z-pinch concept provides an approach to achieve HED plasmas, which are dimensionally large and persist for extended durations. The ZaP-HD device replaces the single power supply from ZaP with two separate power supplies to independently control the plasma flow and current in the Z-pinch. Equilibrium is determined by diagnostic measurements of the density with interferometry and digital holography, the plasma flow and temperature with passive spectroscopy, the magnetic field with surface magnetic probes, and plasma emission with optical imaging. The diagnostics fully characterize the plasma from its initiation in the coaxial accelerator, through the pinch, and exhaust from the assembly region. The plasma evolution is modeled with high resolution codes: Mach2, WARPX, and NIMROD. Experimental results and scaling analyses are presented. This work is supported by grants from the U.S. Department of Energy and the U.S. National Nuclear Security Administration.

  19. High content evaluation of shear dependent platelet function in a microfluidic flow assay.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Ryan R; Wufsus, Adam R; Barton, Steven T; Onasoga, Abimbola A; Johnson-Paben, Rebecca M; Neeves, Keith B

    2013-02-01

    The high blood volume requirements and low throughput of conventional flow assays for measuring platelet function are unsuitable for drug screening and clinical applications. In this study, we describe a microfluidic flow assay that uses 50 μL of whole blood to measure platelet function on ~300 micropatterned spots of collagen over a range of physiologic shear rates (50-920 s(-1)). Patterning of collagen thin films (CTF) was achieved using a novel hydrated microcontact stamping method. CTF spots of 20, 50, and 100 μm were defined on glass substrates and consisted of a dense mat of nanoscale collagen fibers (3.74 ± 0.75 nm). We found that a spot size of greater than 20 μm was necessary to support platelet adhesion under flow, suggesting a threshold injury size is necessary for stable platelet adhesion. Integrating 50 μm CTF microspots into a multishear microfluidic device yielded a high content assay from which we extracted platelet accumulation metrics (lag time, growth rate, total accumulation) on the spots using Hoffman modulation contrast microscopy. This method has potential broad application in identifying platelet function defects and screening, monitoring, and dosing antiplatelet agents.

  20. High shear stress influences plaque vulnerability Part of the data presented in this paper were published in Stroke 2007;38:2379-81.

    PubMed Central

    Groen, H.C.; Gijsen, F.J.H.; van der Lugt, A.; Ferguson, M.S.; Hatsukami, T.S.; Yuan, C.; van der Steen, A.F.W.; Wentzel, J.J.

    2008-01-01

    Shear stress of the blood at the vessel wall plays an important role in many processes in the cardiovascular system primarily focused on the regulation of vessel lumen and wall dimensions. There is ample evidence that atherosclerotic plaques are generated at low shear stress regions in the cardiovascular system, while high shear stress regions are protected. In the course of plaque progression, advanced plaques start to encroach into the lumen, and thereby start to experience high shear stress at the endothelium. Until now the consequences of high shear stress working at the endothelium of an advanced plaque are unknown. As high shear stress influences tissue regression, we hypothesised that high shear stress can destabilise the plaque by cap weakening leading to ulceration. We investigated this hypothesis in a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) dataset of a 67-year-old woman with a plaque in the carotid artery at baseline and an ulcer at ten-month follow-up. The lumen, plaque components (lipid/necrotic core, intraplaque haemorrhage) and ulcer were reconstructed three dimensionally and the geometry at baseline was used for shear stress calculation using computational fluid dynamics. Correlation of the change in plaque composition with the shear stress at baseline showed that the ulcer was generated exclusively at the high shear stress location. In this serial MRI study we found plaque ulceration at the high shear stress location of a protruding plaque in the carotid artery. Our data suggest that high shear stress influences plaque vulnerability and therefore may become a potential parameter for predicting future events. (Neth Heart J 2008;16:280-3.) PMID:18711619

  1. Microscopic origin of volume modulus inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Cicoli, Michele; Muia, Francesco; Pedro, Francisco Gil

    2015-12-21

    High-scale string inflationary models are in well-known tension with low-energy supersymmetry. A promising solution involves models where the inflaton is the volume of the extra dimensions so that the gravitino mass relaxes from large values during inflation to smaller values today. We describe a possible microscopic origin of the scalar potential of volume modulus inflation by exploiting non-perturbative effects, string loop and higher derivative perturbative corrections to the supergravity effective action together with contributions from anti-branes and charged hidden matter fields. We also analyse the relation between the size of the flux superpotential and the position of the late-time minimum and the inflection point around which inflation takes place. We perform a detailed study of the inflationary dynamics for a single modulus and a two moduli case where we also analyse the sensitivity of the cosmological observables on the choice of initial conditions.

  2. Comparison of reacting and non-reacting shear layers at a high subsonic Mach number

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, C. T.; Marek, C. J.; Wey, C.; Jones, R. A.; Smith, M. J.

    1993-01-01

    The flow field in a hydrogen-fueled planar reacting shear layer was measured with an LDV system and is compared with a similar air to air case without combustion. Measurements were made with a speed ratio of 0.34 with the highspeed stream at Mach 0.71. They show that the shear layer with reaction grows faster than one without, and both cases are within the range of data scatter presented by the established database. The coupling between the streamwise and the cross-stream turbulence components inside the shear layer is slow, and reaction only increased it slightly. However, a more organized pattern of the Reynolds stress is present in the reacting shear layer, possibly as a result of larger scale structure formation in the layer associated with heat release.

  3. Deformation and Shear Band Development in an Ultrahigh Carbon Steel During High Strain Rate Deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Lesuer, D R; Syn, C K; Sherby, O D

    2004-07-06

    The mechanical response of a pearlitic UHCS-1.3C steel deformed at approximately 4000 s{sup -1} to large strains ({var_epsilon} = -0.9) has been studied. Failure, at both the macroscopic and the microscopic levels has been evaluated, and the ability of the material to absorb energy in compression has been examined. Failure occurred by the development of a shear band. However before failure, extensive buckling of the carbide plates was observed and the UHCS-1.3C material exhibited significant potential for compressive ductility and energy absorption due to the distributed buckling of these plates. Strain localization during adiabatic shear band development resulted in the formation of austenite. Subsequent cooling produced a divorced-eutectoid transformation with associated deformation, which resulted in a microstructure consisting of 50 to 100 nm sized grains. The stress-strain behavior within the shear band has also been determined. The results are used to critically evaluate the maximum shear stress criterion of shear band development. New criteria for the development of shear bands are developed based on a strain energy concept.

  4. PRODUCTION OF HIGHLY-ALIGNED COLLAGEN LAMELLAE BY COMBINING SHEAR FORCE AND THIN-FILM CONFINEMENT

    PubMed Central

    Saeidi, Nima; Sander, Edward A.; Zareian, Ramin

    2012-01-01

    Load-bearing tissues owe their mechanical strength to their highly-anisotropic collagenous structure. To date, attempts to engineer mechanically strong connective tissue have failed mainly due to the lack of the ability to reproduce native collagen organization in constructs synthesized by cultured cells in vitro. The ability to influence the direction of the self-assembling collagen molecules and produce highly anisotropic structures has applications ranging from de novo engineering of complex tissues to the production of organized scaffolds for cell culture contact guidance. In this investigation we have used the simple technique of spin coating to produce highly-aligned arrays of collagen fibrils. By a simple modification of the method we have also successfully produced orthogonal collagen lamellae. Alternating collagen lamellae are frequently seen in load-bearing tissues such as cornea, annulus fibrosus, and cortical bone. Culturing of corneal fibroblasts onto aligned collagen shows that the cells adopt the organization of the fibrils. In this investigation, we observed the reversal of fibrillar growth direction or “hook” formation similar to those seen previously in a microfluidic shear-flow chamber. Although the results of this investigation clearly show that it is possible to produce small areas (O) 1 cm2 of collagen fibrils with enough alignment to guide fibroblasts, there is evidence that thin film instabilities are likely to be a significant barrier to producing organized collagen fibrils over larger areas. Successful application of this method to produce highly-controlled and organized collagenous structures will require the development of techniques to control thin film instability and will be the subject of the future work. PMID:21362500

  5. Design and fabrication of a direction sensitive MEMS shear stress sensor with high spatial and temporal resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, A. V.; Haque, M. A.

    2004-12-01

    Shear stress at the fluid-wall interface is one of the most frequently studied parameters in fluid dynamics. It is also a parameter of very small magnitude and calls for high resolution force sensors. Macroscopic sensors compromise dynamic bandwidth for the required high resolution and therefore cannot resolve shear stress data in space and/or time, which is very important for fundamental understanding in non-laminar fluid dynamics. We exploit the linear reduction in stiffness accompanied by cubic reduction in mass by miniaturization to design and fabricate a novel micro-electro-mechanical sensor (MEMS) for direct measurement of shear stress along and across the direction of fluid flow, with 0.01 Pa resolution and 50 kHz bandwidth along the flow. The mechanical component of the sensor is a floating beam element and capacitive comb drives supported by an in-plane torsional spring. A resonant RLC circuit, capable of sub-femtofarad capacitive sensing, is used to sense the displacement in the floating beam under shear. Fabrication of the sensor is demonstrated using silicon-on wafer (SOI) technology. The small overall size of the sensor, wide range of measurement, large bandwidth and high spatial and temporal resolution will make it useful in a wide variety of civil and military applications such as aerospace, automotive, marine and biomedical.

  6. Effect of Li level, artificial aging, and TiB2 reinforcement on the modulus of Weldalite (tm) 049

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The dynamic Young's Modulus (E) was determined for (1) alloys 049(1.3)(heat 072), (2) 049(1.9), and (3) 049(1.3) TiB2 in the T3 temper and after aging at 160 C were made on a single 0.953 cm (0.375 in) cube to reduce scatter from microstructural inhomogeneities. Both shear and transverse wave velocities were measured for the L, LT, and ST directions by a pulse echo technique. These velocities were then used to calculate modulus. The change is shown in E with aging time at 160 C (320 F) for the three alloys. It is clear from the plots that aging has a minor, but measurable, influence on the E of alloys 049(1.3) and 049(1.9): E decreases by -2.5 pct. for 2 and 3 during the initial stages of artificial aging. This decrease in E generally follows the strength reversion. On further aging beyond the reversion well, E increases and then decreases again as the alloy overage. The slightly higher modulus in the T8 than in the T3 temper is consistent with the presence of the high modulus T sub 1 phase in the T8 temper. A similar change in E was observed on aging for the TiB2 reinforced variant that also follows the aging curve.

  7. Geometric aspects of shear jamming induced by deformation of frictionless sphere packings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinutha, H. A.; Sastry, Srikanth

    2016-09-01

    It has recently been demonstrated that shear deformation of frictionless sphere packings leads to structures that will undergo jamming in the presence of friction, at densities well below the isotropic jamming point {φj}≈ 0.64 , and at high enough strains. Here, we show that the geometric features induced by strain are robust with respect to finite size effects, and include the feature of hyperuniformity, previously studied in the context of jamming, and more recently in driven systems. We study the approach to jamming as strain is increased, by evolving frictionless sheared configurations through frictional dynamics, and thereby identify a critical, or jamming, strain for each density, for a chosen value of the coefficient of friction. In the presence of friction above a certain strain value the sheared frictionless packings begin to develop finite stresses, which marks the onset of shear jamming. At a higher strain value, the shear stress reaches a saturation value after rising rapidly above the onset of shear jamming, which permits identification of the shear jamming transition. The onset of shear jamming and shear jamming are found to occur when the coordination number Z reaches values of Z  =  3 and Z  =  4 respectively. By considering percolation probabilities for the contact network, clusters of four coordinated and six coordinated spheres, we show that the percolation of four coordinated spheres corresponds to the onset of shear jamming behaviour, whereas the percolation of six coordinated spheres corresponds to shear jamming, for the chosen friction coefficients. At the onset of shear jamming, the force distribution begins to develop a peak at finite value and the force network is anisotropic and heterogeneous. And at the shear jamming transition, the force distribution has a well defined peak close to < f> and the force network is less anisotropic and homogeneous. We briefly discuss mechanical aspects of the jamming behaviour by

  8. A formulation strategy for solving the overgranulation problem in high shear wet granulation.

    PubMed

    Osei-Yeboah, Frederick; Zhang, Minglun; Feng, Yushi; Sun, Changquan Calvin

    2014-08-01

    Granules prepared by the high shear wet granulation (HSWG) process commonly exhibit the problem of overgranulation, a phenomenon characterized by a severe loss of the ability to form adequately strong tablet. We hypothesize that the incorporation of brittle excipients promotes brittle fracture of granules during compaction, thereby improving tablet mechanical strength by increasing bonding area. On this basis, we have examined the effectiveness of incorporating a brittle excipient into a plastic matrix in addressing the overgranulation problem. A complete loss of tabletability is observed for plastic microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) when ≥ 55% of granulating water was used. The incorporation of a brittle excipient, either lactose or dibasic calcium phosphate (Dical) into the MCC matrix leads to improved tabletability in a concentration-dependent manner, with higher amount of brittle excipient being more effective. For each mixture, tablet tensile strength goes through a minimum as the granulating water increases, for example, 1.4 MPa for the mixture containing 80% of lactose and 2.1 MPa for the mixture containing 80% Dical. These results, along with scanning electron microscope evidence, show that the addition of brittle excipients to an otherwise plastic powder is an effective formulation strategy to address the overgranulation problem in HSWG.

  9. Improvement of enalapril maleate chemical stability by high shear melting granulation.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Ana Paula Montandon; Cunha, Talita Amorim; Serpa, Raphael Caixeta; Taveira, Stephânia Fleury; Lima, Eliana Martins; Almeida Diniz, Danielle Guimarães; de Freitas, Luis Alexandre Pedro; Marreto, Ricardo Neves

    2014-09-18

    Abstract Enalapril maleate is a widely used drug, which is chemically unstable when mixed with excipients resulting in enalaprilat and diketopiperazine as the main degradation products. The preparation of enalapril sodium salt has been used to improve drug stability in solid dosage forms; however, product rejection is observed when the chemical reaction for obtaining the sodium salt is not completely finished before packaging. In this study, granules were prepared by melting granulation using stearic acid or glyceryl monostearate, with a view to developing more stable enalapril maleate solid dosage forms. The granules were prepared in a laboratory-scale high shear mixer and compressed in a rotary machine. Size distribution, flow properties, in vitro drug release and enalapril maleate chemical stability were evaluated and compared with data obtained from tablets prepared without hydrophobic binders. All formulations showed good physical properties and immediate drug release. The greatest improvement in the enalapril maleate stability was observed in formulations containing stearic acid. This study showed that hot melting granulation could be successfully used to prepare enalapril maleate granules which could substitute the in situ formation of enalapril sodium salt, since they provided better enalapril stability in solid dosage forms. PMID:25231642

  10. Importance of evaluating the consolidation of granules manufactured by high shear mixer.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Ikumasa; Hasegawa, Susumu; Yada, Shuichi; Kusai, Akira; Moribe, Kunikazu; Yamamoto, Keiji

    2007-06-29

    The effects of the process parameters of high shear wet granulation on the granule properties and dissolution properties of mefenamic acid from tablets have been studied, and the importance of evaluating the consolidation of granules has been considered. The process parameters selected for investigation were the amount of water added, the impeller rotation speed and the kneading time. Increases in the amount of water and the kneading time led to increases in the particle diameter of the granules and to decreases in the mean pore diameter. The mean pore diameter decreased with increases in the impeller rotation speed, while the particle diameters were independent of the impeller rotation speed. The process parameters affected the surface morphology and the internal morphology of the granules. The mean particle diameter and the mean pore diameter of the granules basically correlated with the dissolution properties of the tablets. The contribution of the mean pore diameter to this correlation was higher than that of mean particle diameter. Therefore, it was concluded that evaluation of the granule consolidated state, such as the mean pore diameter, was important in order to assure the dissolution properties of drug products. PMID:17321085

  11. Crackle noise from high-speed free-shear-flow turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchta, David; Freund, Jonathan

    2015-11-01

    High-thrust jet engines radiate a particularly intense and distinct sound that has become known as `crackle'. Its root mechanisms are not fully understood, though they are thought to involve nonlinear acoustics because the sound waves appear steepened. They also have a positive skewness, pressure maxima are stronger than minima, for unknown reasons. We use direct numerical simulations of free-shear-flow turbulence with Mach numbers ranging from M = 0 . 9 to 3 . 5 to study the very near acoustic field and the turbulence interactions. Results indicate that crackle is insensitive to Reynolds number for the range considered, though DNS is restricted to modest Reynolds numbers. The very near field is teeming with weak, nonlinearly interacting Mach-like waves. Locally, these waves generate intense pressure fluctuations, especially as they merge. We observe that skewness changes are small over the propagation distances simulated, though more significant changes are to be expected over larger propagation distances. The source of the peculiar skewness is thus near or within the turbulence. Simulations modulating the underlying unstable linear modes reveal a sensitivity to crackle and are used to assess the role of large-scale structures in its source.

  12. Impact comminution of solids due to local kinetic energy of high shear strain rate: I. Continuum theory and turbulence analogy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bažant, Zdeněk P.; Caner, Ferhun C.

    2014-03-01

    The modeling of high velocity impact into brittle or quasibrittle solids is hampered by the unavailability of a constitutive model capturing the effects of material comminution into very fine particles. The present objective is to develop such a model, usable in finite element programs. The comminution at very high strain rates can dissipate a large portion of the kinetic energy of an impacting missile. The spatial derivative of the energy dissipated by comminution gives a force resisting the penetration, which is superposed on the nodal forces obtained from the static constitutive model in a finite element program. The present theory is inspired partly by Grady's model for expansive comminution due to explosion inside a hollow sphere, and partly by analogy with turbulence. In high velocity turbulent flow, the energy dissipation rate gets enhanced by the formation of micro-vortices (eddies) which dissipate energy by viscous shear stress. Similarly, here it is assumed that the energy dissipation at fast deformation of a confined solid gets enhanced by the release of kinetic energy of the motion associated with a high-rate shear strain of forming particles. For simplicity, the shape of these particles in the plane of maximum shear rate is considered to be regular hexagons. The particle sizes are assumed to be distributed according to the Schuhmann power law. The condition that the rate of release of the local kinetic energy must be equal to the interface fracture energy yields a relation between the particle size, the shear strain rate, the fracture energy and the mass density. As one experimental justification, the present theory agrees with Grady's empirical observation that, in impact events, the average particle size is proportional to the (-2/3) power of the shear strain rate. The main characteristic of the comminution process is a dimensionless number Ba (Eq. (37)) representing the ratio of the local kinetic energy of shear strain rate to the maximum possible

  13. Elastic modulus of viral nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yue; Ge, Zhibin; Fang, Jiyu

    2008-09-01

    We report an experimental and theoretical study of the radial elasticity of tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) nanotubes. An atomic force microscope tip is used to apply small radial indentations to deform TMV nanotubes. The initial elastic response of TMV nanotubes can be described by finite-element analysis in 5nm indentation depths and Hertz theory in 1.5nm indentation depths. The derived radial Young’s modulus of TMV nanotubes is 0.92±0.15GPa from finite-element analysis and 1.0±0.2GPa from the Hertz model, which are comparable with the reported axial Young’s modulus of 1.1GPa [Falvo , Biophys. J. 72, 1396 (1997)].

  14. Influence of metronidazole particle properties on granules prepared in a high-shear mixer-granulator.

    PubMed

    Di Martino, Piera; Censi, Roberta; Malaj, Ledjan; Martelli, Sante; Joiris, Etienne; Barthélémy, Christine

    2007-02-01

    Metronidazole is a good example of high-dose drug substance with poor granulating and tableting properties. Tablets are generally produced by liquid granulation; however, the technological process failure is quite frequent. In order to verify how the metronidazole particle characteristics can influence granule properties, three metronidazole batches differing for crystal habit, mean particle size, BET surface area and wettability were selected, primarily designed according to their different elongation ratio: needle-shaped, stick-shaped, and isodimensional. In the presence of lactose monohydrate and pregelatinized maize starch, respectively as diluent and binder, they were included in a formula for wet granulation in a high-shear mixer-granulator. In order to render the process comparable as far as possible, all parameters and experimental conditions were maintained constant. Four granule batches were obtained: granules from placebo (G-placebo), granules from needle-shaped crystals (G-needle-shaped), granules from stick-shaped crystals (G-stick-shaped), and granules from isodimensional crystals (G-isodimensional). Different granule properties were considered, in particular concerning porosity, friability, loss on drying (LOD), and flowability. In order to study their tabletability and compressibility, the different granules obtained were then compressed in a rotary press. The best tabletability was obtained with the isodimensional batch, while the poorest was exhibited by the stick-shaped one. Differences in tabletability are in good accordance with compressibility results: to a better tabletability corresponds an important granule ability to undergo a volume reduction as a result of an applied pressure. In particular, it was proposed that the greatest compressibility of the G-isodimensional must be related to the greatest granule porosity percentage. PMID:17454043

  15. Shear localization in high-strain-rate deformation of granular alumina

    SciTech Connect

    Nesterenko, V.F.; Meyers, M.A.; Chen, H.C.

    1996-05-01

    Dynamic deformation of densified granular alumina of two different particle sizes was investigated by the radial symmetric collapse of a thick-walled cylinder. The densified granular alumina was used to model the flow in ballistic impact and penetration of fragmented ceramic armor. Shear localization was a well developed deformation mode at an overall radial strain of {approximately}0.2--0.4 and strain rate of 10{sup 4}{sup {minus}1}. The following qualitative features of shear bands were established: (1) Shear bands have clear boundaries and their thickness does not depend on the initial particle size and has a typical value {approximately}10 {micro}m. (2) The structure of the shear bands was dependent on initial particle size, suggesting differences in the mechanisms of flow. For the {approximately}4 {micro}m alumina, comminution (break-up) and softening of particles were observed. For the {approximately}0.4 {micro}m particles, a peculiar structure consisting of a central crack with two lateral cracks was formed. (3) Distributions of shear bands and displacement magnitudes were dependent on initial particle size. The observed differences in powder behavior are associated with different mechanisms of powder repacking. For large particles ({approximately}4 {micro}m), additional hardening resulting from microfracture and subsequent repacking of different size particles in the powder takes place. The small-sized ({approximately}0.4 {micro}m) ceramic does not go through the particle fracturing stage and the hardening is due to ``classical`` repacking.

  16. Climatological characteristics of high altitude wind shear and lapse rate layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ehernberger, L. J.; Guttman, N. B.

    1981-01-01

    Indications of the climatological distribution of wind shear and temperature lapse and inversion rates as observed by rawinsonde measurements over the western United States are recorded. Frequencies of the strongest shear, lapse rates, and inversion layer strengths were observed for a 1 year period of record and were tabulated for the lower troposphere, the upper troposphere, and five altitude intervals in the lower stratosphere. Selected bivariate frequencies were also tabulated. Strong wind shears, lapse rates, and inversion are observed less frequently as altitude increases from 175 millibars to 20 millibars. On a seasonal basis the frequencies were higher in winter than in summer except for minor influences due to increased tropopause altitude in summer and the stratospheric wind reversal in the spring and fall.

  17. Elastic modulus of phases in Ti–Mo alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Wei-dong; Liu, Yong; Wu, Hong; Song, Min; Zhang, Tuo-yang; Lan, Xiao-dong; Yao, Tian-hang

    2015-08-15

    In this work, a series of binary Ti–Mo alloys with the Mo contents ranging from 3.2 to 12 at.% were prepared using non-consumable arc melting. The microstructures were investigated by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscope, and the elastic modulus was evaluated by nanoindentation testing technique. The evolution of the volume fractions of ω phase was investigated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The results indicated that the phase constitution and elastic modulus of the Ti–Mo alloys are sensitive to the Mo content. Ti–3.2Mo and Ti–8Mo alloys containing only α and β phases, respectively, have a low elastic modulus. In contrast, Ti–4.5Mo, Ti–6Mo, Ti–7Mo alloys, with different contents of ω phase, have a high elastic modulus. A simple micromechanical model was used to calculate the elastic modulus of ω phase (E{sub ω}), which was determined to be 174.354 GPa. - Highlights: • Ti–Mo alloys with the Mo contents ranging from 3.2 to 12 at.% were investigated. • XPS was used to investigate the volume fractions of ω phase. • The elastic modulus of Ti–Mo alloys is sensitive to the Mo content. • The elastic modulus of ω phase was determined to be 174.354 GPa.

  18. Observation and modeling of mixing-layer development in high-energy-density, blast-wave-driven shear flow

    SciTech Connect

    Di Stefano, C. A. Kuranz, C. C.; Klein, S. R.; Drake, R. P.; Malamud, G.; Henry de Frahan, M. T.; Johnsen, E.; Shimony, A.; Shvarts, D.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Martinez, D.

    2014-05-15

    In this work, we examine the hydrodynamics of high-energy-density (HED) shear flows. Experiments, consisting of two materials of differing density, use the OMEGA-60 laser to drive a blast wave at a pressure of ∼50 Mbar into one of the media, creating a shear flow in the resulting shocked system. The interface between the two materials is Kelvin-Helmholtz unstable, and a mixing layer of growing width develops due to the shear. To theoretically analyze the instability's behavior, we rely on two sources of information. First, the interface spectrum is well-characterized, which allows us to identify how the shock front and the subsequent shear in the post-shock flow interact with the interface. These observations provide direct evidence that vortex merger dominates the evolution of the interface structure. Second, simulations calibrated to the experiment allow us to estimate the time-dependent evolution of the deposition of vorticity at the interface. The overall result is that we are able to choose a hydrodynamic model for the system, and consequently examine how well the flow in this HED system corresponds to a classical hydrodynamic description.

  19. EXTREMELY RAPID STAR CLUSTER DISRUPTION IN HIGH-SHEAR CIRCUMNUCLEAR STARBURST RINGS: THE UNUSUAL CASE OF NGC 7742

    SciTech Connect

    De Grijs, Richard; Anders, Peter E-mail: anders@pku.edu.cn

    2012-10-10

    All known mass distributions of recently formed star cluster populations resemble a 'universal' power-law function. Here we assess the impact of the extremely disruptive environment in NGC 7742's circumnuclear starburst ring on the early evolution of the galaxy's high-mass ({approx}10{sup 5}-10{sup 7} M{sub Sun }) star cluster population. Surprisingly, and contrary to expectations, at all ages-including the youngest, {approx}< 15 Myr-the cluster mass functions are robustly and verifiably represented by lognormal distributions that resemble those commonly found only for old, evolved globular cluster systems in the local universe. This suggests that the high-shear conditions in the NGC 7742 starburst ring may significantly speed up dynamical star cluster destruction. This enhanced mass-dependent disruption rate at very young ages might be caused by a combination of the starburst ring's high density and the shear caused by the counterrotating gas disk.

  20. The Shear Testing Programme 2: Factors affecting high-precision weak-lensing analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massey, Richard; Heymans, Catherine; Bergé, Joel; Bernstein, Gary; Bridle, Sarah; Clowe, Douglas; Dahle, Håkon; Ellis, Richard; Erben, Thomas; Hetterscheidt, Marco; High, F. William; Hirata, Christopher; Hoekstra, Henk; Hudelot, Patrick; Jarvis, Mike; Johnston, David; Kuijken, Konrad; Margoniner, Vera; Mandelbaum, Rachel; Mellier, Yannick; Nakajima, Reiko; Paulin-Henriksson, Stephane; Peeples, Molly; Roat, Chris; Refregier, Alexandre; Rhodes, Jason; Schrabback, Tim; Schirmer, Mischa; Seljak, Uroš; Semboloni, Elisabetta; van Waerbeke, Ludovic

    2007-03-01

    The Shear Testing Programme (STEP) is a collaborative project to improve the accuracy and reliability of weak-lensing measurement, in preparation for the next generation of wide-field surveys. We review 16 current and emerging shear-measurement methods in a common language, and assess their performance by running them (blindly) on simulated images that contain a known shear signal. We determine the common features of algorithms that most successfully recover the input parameters. A desirable goal would be the combination of their best elements into one ultimate shear-measurement method. In this analysis, we achieve previously unattained discriminatory precision via a combination of more extensive simulations and pairs of galaxy images that have been rotated with respect to each other. That removes the otherwise overwhelming noise from their intrinsic ellipticities. Finally, the robustness of our simulation approach is confirmed by testing the relative calibration of methods on real data. Weak-lensing measurements have improved since the first STEP paper. Several methods now consistently achieve better than 2 per cent precision, and are still being developed. However, we can now distinguish all methods from perfect performance. Our main concern continues to be the potential for a multiplicative shear calibration bias: not least because this cannot be internally calibrated with real data. We determine which galaxy populations are responsible for bias and, by adjusting the simulated observing conditions, we also investigate the effects of instrumental and atmospheric parameters. The simulated point spread functions are not allowed to vary spatially, to avoid additional confusion from interpolation errors. We have isolated several previously unrecognized aspects of galaxy shape measurement, in which focused development could provide further progress towards the sub-per cent level of precision desired for future surveys. These areas include the suitable treatment of

  1. Magnetic fabric development in a highly anisotropic magnetite-bearing ductile shear zone (Seve Nappe Complex, Scandinavian Caledonides)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kontny, A.; Engelmann, R.; Grimmer, J. C.; Greiling, R. O.; Hirt, A.

    2012-04-01

    Magnetite-bearing mylonitic garnet-micaschists close to the major suture between the Baltica and Iapetus terranes (Seve Nappe Complex, Scandinavian Caledonides) show very high anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) with corrected degree of anisotropy ( P') up to 4.8. Three different magnetic fabric types can be distinguished. They correspond to protomylonite (type I, P' < 2), mylonite (type II, 2 < P' < 3), and ultramylonite (type III, P' > 3), respectively. The orientation of the ellipsoid axes from all applied magnetic fabric methods in this study is similar with shallow dips of the metamorphic foliation toward WSW and subhorizontal, mostly NW-SE trending mineral lineation. Differences between subfabrics were minimized under high shear strain as all markers tend to align parallel with the shear plane. The very high anisotropies and mostly oblate ellipsoid shapes of type III correlate with high magnetic susceptibility ( k mean up to 55 × 10-3 SI units) and are related to the concentration of magnetite aggregates with shape-preferred orientation. They show a distinct field dependence of magnetic susceptibility of up to 10% in the k max-direction. We attribute this field dependence to a "memory" of high strains in the domain walls of the crystals acquired during synkinematic magnetite growth during shear zone fabric development at temperatures of 550-570°C.

  2. Shearing stability of lubricants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shiba, Y.; Gijyutsu, G.

    1984-01-01

    Shearing stabilities of lubricating oils containing a high mol. wt. polymer as a viscosity index improver were studied by use of ultrasound. The oils were degraded by cavitation and the degradation generally followed first order kinetics with the rate of degradation increasing with the intensity of the ultrasonic irradiation and the cumulative energy applied. The shear stability was mainly affected by the mol. wt. of the polymer additive and could be determined in a short time by mechanical shearing with ultrasound.

  3. New insights into the Young's modulus of staggered biological composites.

    PubMed

    Bar-On, Benny; Wagner, H Daniel

    2013-03-01

    This communication presents a simplified "mechanics-of-materials" approach for describing the mechanics of staggered composite architectures, such as those arising in a variety of biological tissues. This analysis calculates the effective modulus of the bio-composite and provides physical insights into its elastic behavior. Simplified expressions for high- and low-mineralized tissues are then proposed and the effects of the mineral thickness ratio and aspect ratio on the modulus are demonstrated.

  4. Dynamic thermal field-induced gradient soft-shear for highly oriented block copolymer thin films.

    PubMed

    Singh, Gurpreet; Yager, Kevin G; Berry, Brian; Kim, Ho-Cheol; Karim, Alamgir

    2012-11-27

    As demand for smaller, more powerful, and energy-efficient devices continues, conventional patterning technologies are pushing up against fundamental limits. Block copolymers (BCPs) are considered prime candidates for a potential solution via directed self-assembly of nanostructures. We introduce here a facile directed self-assembly method to rapidly fabricate unidirectionally aligned BCP nanopatterns at large scale, on rigid or flexible template-free substrates via a thermally induced dynamic gradient soft-shear field. A localized differential thermal expansion at the interface between a BCP film and a confining polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) layer due to a dynamic thermal field imposes the gradient soft-shear field. PDMS undergoes directional expansion (along the annealing direction) in the heating zone and contracts back in the cooling zone, thus setting up a single cycle of oscillatory shear (maximum lateral shear stress ∼12 × 10(4) Pa) in the system. We successfully apply this process to create unidirectional alignment of BCP thin films over a wide range of thicknesses (nm to μm) and processing speeds (μm/s to mm/s) using both a flat and patterned PDMS layer. Grazing incidence small-angle X-ray scattering measurements show absolutely no sign of isotropic population and reveal ≥99% aligned orientational order with an angular spread Δθ(fwhm) ≤ 5° (full width at half-maximum). This method may pave the way to practical industrial use of hierarchically patterned BCP nanostructures. PMID:23106286

  5. High magnetic shear gain in a liquid sodium stable couette flow experiment A prelude to an alpha - omega dynamo

    SciTech Connect

    Colgate, Stirling; Li, Jui; Finn, John; Pariev, Vladimir; Beckley, Howard; Si, Jiahe; Martinic, Joe; Westpfahl, David; Slutz, James; Westrom, Zeb; Klein, Brianna

    2010-11-08

    The {Omega}-phase of the liquid sodium {alpha}-{Omega} dynamo experiment at NMIMT in cooperation with LANL has successfully demonstrated the production of a high toroidal field, B{sub {phi}} {approx_equal} 8 x B{sub r} from the radial component of an applied poloidal magnetic field, B{sub r}. This enhanced toroidal field is produced by rotational shear in stable Couette Row within liquid sodium at Rm {approx_equal} 120. The small turbulence in stable Taylor-Couette Row is caused by Ekman Row where ({delta}v/v){sup 2} {approx} 10{sup -3}. This high {Omega}-gain in low turbulence flow contrasts with a smaller {Omega}-gain in higher turbulence, Helmholtz-unstable shear flows. This result supports the ansatz that large scale astrophysical magnetic fields are created within semi-coherent large scale motions in which turbulence plays a diffusive role that enables magnetic flux linkage.

  6. The elastic modulus correction term in creep activation energies Applied to oxide dispersion strengthened superalloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malu, M.; Tien, J. K.

    1975-01-01

    The effect of elastic modulus and the temperature dependence of elastic modulus on creep activation energies for an oxide dispersion strengthened nickel-base superalloy are investigated. This superalloy is commercially known as Inconel Alloy MA 753, strengthened both by gamma-prime precipitates and by yttria particles. It is shown that at intermediate temperatures, say below 1500 F, where elastic modulus is weakly dependent on temperature, the modulus correction term to creep activation energy is small. Accordingly, modulus corrections are insignificant for the superalloy considered, which shows high apparent creep activation energies at this temperature. On the contrary, at very high temperatures, the elastic modulus correction term can be significant, thus reducing the creep activation energy to that of vacancy self-diffusion. In order to obtain high-temperature creep resistance, a high-value elastic modulus with a weak dependence on temperature is required.

  7. Effective elastic modulus of isolated gecko setal arrays.

    PubMed

    Autumn, K; Majidi, C; Groff, R E; Dittmore, A; Fearing, R

    2006-09-01

    Conventional pressure sensitive adhesives (PSAs) are fabricated from soft viscoelastic materials that satisfy Dahlquist's criterion for tack with a Young's modulus (E) of 100 kPa or less at room temperature and 1 Hz. In contrast, the adhesive on the toes of geckos is made of beta-keratin, a stiff material with E at least four orders of magnitude greater than the upper limit of Dahlquist's criterion. Therefore, one would not expect a beta-keratin structure to function as a PSA by deforming readily to make intimate molecular contact with a variety of surface profiles. However, since the gecko adhesive is a microstructure in the form of an array of millions of high aspect ratio shafts (setae), the effective elastic modulus (E(eff)) is much lower than E of bulk beta-keratin. In the first test of the E(eff) of a gecko setal adhesive, we measured the forces resulting from deformation of isolated arrays of tokay gecko (Gekko gecko) setae during vertical compression, and during tangential compression at angles of +45 degrees and -45 degrees . We tested the hypothesis that E(eff) of gecko setae falls within Dahlquist's criterion for tack, and evaluated the validity of a model of setae as cantilever beams. Highly linear forces of deformation under all compression conditions support the cantilever model. E(eff) of setal arrays during vertical and +45 degrees compression (along the natural path of drag of the setae) were 83+/-4.0 kPa and 86+/-4.4 kPa (means +/- s.e.m.), respectively. Consistent with the predictions of the cantilever model, setae became significantly stiffer when compressed against the natural path of drag: E(eff) during -45 degrees compression was 110+/-4.7 kPa. Unlike synthetic PSAs, setal arrays act as Hookean elastic solids; setal arrays function as a bed of springs with a directional stiffness, assisting alignment of the adhesive spatular tips with the contact surface during shear loading.

  8. Localization of toroidal motion and shear heating in 3-D high Rayleigh number convection with temperature-dependent viscosity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balachandar, S.; Yuen, D. A.; Reuteler, D. M.

    1995-01-01

    We have applied spectral-transform methods to study three-dimensional thermal convection with temperature-dependent viscosity. The viscosity varies exponentially with the form exp(-BT), where B controls the viscosity contrast and T is temperature. Solutions for high Rayleigh numbers, up to an effective Ra of 6.25 x 10(exp 6), have been obtained for an aspect-ratio of 5x5x1 and a viscosity contrast of 25. Solutions show the localization of toroidal velocity fields with increasing vigor of convection to a coherent network of shear-zones. Viscous dissipation increases with Rayleigh number and is particularly strong in regions of convergent flows and shear deformation. A time-varying depth-dependent mean-flow is generated because of the correlation between laterally varying viscosity and velocity gradients.

  9. Entropy production in high-energy heavy-ion collisions and the correlation of shear viscosity and thermalization time

    SciTech Connect

    Dumitru, A.; Molnar, E.; Nara, Y.

    2007-08-15

    We study entropy production in the early stage of high-energy heavy-ion collisions due to shear viscosity. We employ the second-order theory of Israel-Stewart with two different stress relaxation times, as appropriate for strong coupling or for a Boltzmann gas, respectively, and compare the hydrodynamic evolution. Based on the present knowledge of initial particle production, we argue that entropy production is tightly constrained. We derive new limits on the shear viscosity to entropy density ratio {eta}/s, independent from elliptic flow effects, and determine the corresponding Reynolds number. Furthermore, we show that for a given entropy production bound, the initial time {tau}{sub 0} for hydrodynamics is correlated to the viscosity. The conjectured lower bound for {eta}/s provides a lower limit for {tau}{sub 0}.

  10. Scalable shear-exfoliation of high-quality phosphorene nanoflakes with reliable electrochemical cycleability in nano batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Feng; Ge, Binghui; Chen, Jing; Nathan, Arokia; Xin, Linhuo L.; Ma, Hongyu; Min, Huihua; Zhu, Chongyang; Xia, Weiwei; Li, Zhengrui; Li, Shengli; Yu, Kaihao; Wu, Lijun; Cui, Yiping; Sun, Litao; Zhu, Yimei

    2016-06-01

    Atomically thin black phosphorus (called phosphorene) holds great promise as an alternative to graphene and other two-dimensional transition-metal dichalcogenides as an anode material for lithium-ion batteries (LIBs). However, bulk black phosphorus (BP) suffers from rapid capacity fading and poor rechargeable performance. This work reports for the first time the use of in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to construct nanoscale phosphorene LIBs. This enables direct visualization of the mechanisms underlying capacity fading in thick multilayer phosphorene through real-time capture of delithiation-induced structural decomposition, which serves to reduce electrical conductivity thus causing irreversibility of the lithiated phases. We further demonstrate that few-layer-thick phosphorene successfully circumvents the structural decomposition and holds superior structural restorability, even when subject to multi-cycle lithiation/delithiation processes and concomitant huge volume expansion. This finding provides breakthrough insights into thickness-dependent lithium diffusion kinetics in phosphorene. More importantly, a scalable liquid-phase shear exfoliation route has been developed to produce high-quality ultrathin phosphorene using simple means such as a high-speed shear mixer or even a household kitchen blender with the shear rate threshold of ˜1.25 × 104 s-1. The results reported here will pave the way for industrial-scale applications of rechargeable phosphorene LIBs.

  11. Steel Plate Shear Walls: Efficient Structural Solution for Slender High-Rise in China

    SciTech Connect

    Mathias, Neville; Long, Eric; Sarkisian, Mark; Huang Zhihui

    2008-07-08

    The 329.6 meter tall 74-story Jinta Tower in Tianjin, China, is expected, when complete, to be the tallest building in the world with slender steel plate shear walls used as the primary lateral load resisting system. The tower has an overall aspect ratio close to 1:8, and the main design challenge was to develop an efficient lateral system capable of resisting significant wind and seismic lateral loads, while simultaneously keeping wind induced oscillations under acceptable perception limits. This paper describes the process of selection of steel plate shear walls as the structural system, and presents the design philosophy, criteria and procedures that were arrived at by integrating the relevant requirements and recommendations of US and Chinese codes and standards, and current on-going research.

  12. Shockwave determination of the shear velocity at very high pressures. [for determining properties of planetary interiors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, O. L.

    1972-01-01

    A shock wave experiment is described for confirming changes in density, from seismic interpretation, for determining the properties of planet interiors. The experiment focuses on the problem of measurements in a pressure region, where the shear velocity tends to vanish, or become very small. Pressure-sensitive lattice stability, and the equations for an atomic model of the NaCl lattice are discussed along with the particle velocity shock technique.

  13. Evidence for modified transport due to sheared E x B flows in high-temperature plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Groebner, R.J.; Burrell, K.H.; Austin, M.E.

    1994-11-01

    Sheared mass flows are generated in many fluids and are often important for the dynamics of instabilities in these fluids. Similarly, large values of the E x B velocity have been observed in magnetic confinement machines and there is theoretical and experimental evidence that sufficiently large shear in this velocity may stabilize important instabilities. Two examples of this phenomenon have been observed in the DIII-D tokamak. In the first example, sufficient heating power can lead to the L-H transition, a rapid improvement in confinement in the boundary layer of the plasma. For discharges with heating power close to the threshold required to get the transition, changes in the edge radial electric field are observed to occur prior to the transition itself. In the second example, certain classes of discharges with toroidal momentum input from neutral beam injection exhibit a further improvement of confinement in the plasma core leading to a regime called the VH-mode. In both examples, the region of improved confinement is characterized by an increase of shear in the radial electric field E{sub r}, reduced levels of turbulence and increases in gradients of temperatures and densities. These observations are consistent with the hypothesis that the improved confinement is caused by an increase in shear of the E x B velocity which leads to a reduction of turbulence. For the VH-mode, the dominant term controlling E{sub r} is the toroidal rotation v{sub {phi}}, indicating that the E{sub r} profile is controlled by the source and transport of toroidal momentum.

  14. Platelet transport rates and binding kinetics at high shear over a thrombus.

    PubMed

    Bark, David L; Ku, David N

    2013-07-16

    Thrombus formation over a ruptured atherosclerotic plaque cap can occlude an artery with fatal consequences. We describe a computational model of platelet transport and binding to interpret rate-limiting steps seen in experimental thrombus formation over a collagen-coated stenosis. The model is used to compute shear rates in stenoses with growing boundaries. In the model, moving erythrocytes influence platelet transport based on shear-dependent enhanced diffusivity and a nonuniform platelet distribution. Adhesion is modeled as platelet-platelet binding kinetics. The results indicate that observed thrombus growth rates are limited by platelet transport to the wall for shear rates up to 6000 s(-1). Above 7000 s(-1), the thrombus growth rate is likely limited by binding kinetics (10(-4) m/s). Thrombus growth computed from these rate-limiting steps match the thrombus location and occlusion times for experimental conditions if a lag time for platelet activation is included. Using fitted parameters, the model is then used to predict thrombus size and shape at a higher Reynolds number flow consistent with coronary artery disease. PMID:23870271

  15. Platelet Transport Rates and Binding Kinetics at High Shear over a Thrombus

    PubMed Central

    Bark, David L.; Ku, David N.

    2013-01-01

    Thrombus formation over a ruptured atherosclerotic plaque cap can occlude an artery with fatal consequences. We describe a computational model of platelet transport and binding to interpret rate-limiting steps seen in experimental thrombus formation over a collagen-coated stenosis. The model is used to compute shear rates in stenoses with growing boundaries. In the model, moving erythrocytes influence platelet transport based on shear-dependent enhanced diffusivity and a nonuniform platelet distribution. Adhesion is modeled as platelet-platelet binding kinetics. The results indicate that observed thrombus growth rates are limited by platelet transport to the wall for shear rates up to 6000 s−1. Above 7000 s−1, the thrombus growth rate is likely limited by binding kinetics (10−4 m/s). Thrombus growth computed from these rate-limiting steps match the thrombus location and occlusion times for experimental conditions if a lag time for platelet activation is included. Using fitted parameters, the model is then used to predict thrombus size and shape at a higher Reynolds number flow consistent with coronary artery disease. PMID:23870271

  16. Miniature specimen shear punch test for UHMWPE used in total joint replacements.

    PubMed

    Kurt, S M; Jewett, C W; Bergström, J S; Foulds, J R; Edidin, A A

    2002-05-01

    Despite the critical role that shear is hypothesized to play in the damage modes that limit the performance of total hip and knee replacements, the shear behavior of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) remains poorly understood, especially after oxidative degradation or radiation crosslinking. In the present study, we developed the miniature specimen (0.5 mm thickness x 6.4mm diameter) shear punch test to evaluate the shear behavior of UHMWPE used in total joint replacement components. We investigated the shear punch behavior of virgin and crosslinked stock materials, as well as of UHMWPE from tibial implants that were gamma-irradiated in air and shelf aged for up to 8.5 years. Finite element analysis, scanning electron microscopy, and interrupted testing were conducted to aid in the interpretation of the shear punch load-displacement curves. The shear punch load-displacement curves exhibited similar distinctive features. Following toe-in, the load-displacement curves were typically bilinear, and characterized by an initial stiffness, a transition load, a hardening stiffness, and a peak load. The finite element analysis established that the initial stiffness was proportional to the elastic modulus of the UHMWPE, and the transition load of the bilinear curve reflected the development of a plastically deforming zone traversing through the thickness of the sample. Based on our observations, we propose two interpretations of the peak load during the shear punch test: one theory is based on the initiation of crystalline plasticity, the other based on the transition from shear to tension during the tests. Due to the miniature specimen size, the shear punch test offers several potential advantages over bulk test methods, including the capability to directly measure shear behavior, and quite possibly infer ultimate uniaxial behavior as well, from shelf aged and retrieved UHMWPE components. Thus, the shear punch test represents an effective and complementary

  17. Shrinkage, stress, and modulus of dimethacrylate, ormocer, and silorane composites

    PubMed Central

    Bacchi, Atais; Feitosa, Victor Pinheiro; da Silva Fonseca, Andrea Soares Quirino; Cavalcante, Larissa Maria Assad; Silikas, Nikolaos; Schneider, Luis Felipe Jochins

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: to evaluate the shrinkage, polymerization stress, elastic and bulk modulus resulting from composites formulated by siloranes, 2nd generation ormocers, and dimethacrylates. Materials and Methods: The bonded disc method was used to evaluate volumetric shrinkage. The polymerization stress was evaluated by mean of the Bioman. Cylindrical specimens (5 mm thickness and 6 mm diameter) were submitted to gradual loading. Young's and bulk modulus were obtained from the slope of the stress/strain curve. Data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance and Tukey's test (5%). Results: Grandio and ormocer showed significant higher elastic and bulk modulus. Silorane presented significant lowest bulk modulus and maximum shrinkage. Ormocer and silorane presented lower values for the maximum rate of shrinkage. Extra-low shrinkage (ELS) composite presented the greatest maximum shrinkage. The higher maximum rate of shrinkage was attained by Grandio and ELS, statistically similar from each other. The silorane showed lower values of maximum stress and maximum rate of stress. The higher values of maximum stress were presented by ELS and Grandio, statistical similar between them. Grandio showed the significantly greatest maximum rate of stress. Conclusion: Silorane showed to promote lower shrinkage/stress among the composites, with the lowest elastic modulus. Ormocer showed lower shrinkage/stress than methacrylates despite of its high modulus. PMID:26430302

  18. A novel all-elastomer MEMS tactile sensor for high dynamic range shear and normal force sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charalambides, Alexi; Bergbreiter, Sarah

    2015-09-01

    A novel all-elastomer MEMS tactile sensor with high dynamic force range is presented in this work. Conductive elastomeric capacitors formed from electrodes of varying heights enable robust sensing in both shear and normal directions without the need for multi-layered assembly. Sensor geometry has been tailored to maximize shear force sensitivity using multi-physics finite element simulations. A simple molding microfabrication process is presented to rapidly create the sensing skins with electrode gaps of 20 μ m and sensor spacing of 3 mm. Shear force resolution was found to be as small as 50 mN and tested up to a range of 2 N (dynamic range of 40:1 ). Normal force resolution was found to be 190 mN with a tested range of 8 N (dynamic range of 42:1 ). Single load and multiload tests were conducted and the sensor exhibited intended behavior with low deviations between trials. Spatial tests were conducted on a 2× 2 sensor array and a spatial resolution of 1.5 mm was found.

  19. High-speed ultrasound imaging in dense suspensions reveals impact-activated solidification due to dynamic shear jamming

    PubMed Central

    Han, Endao; Peters, Ivo R.; Jaeger, Heinrich M.

    2016-01-01

    A remarkable property of dense suspensions is that they can transform from liquid-like at rest to solid-like under sudden impact. Previous work showed that this impact-induced solidification involves rapidly moving jamming fronts; however, details of this process have remained unresolved. Here we use high-speed ultrasound imaging to probe non-invasively how the interior of a dense suspension responds to impact. Measuring the speed of sound we demonstrate that the solidification proceeds without a detectable increase in packing fraction, and imaging the evolving flow field we find that the shear intensity is maximized right at the jamming front. Taken together, this provides direct experimental evidence for jamming by shear, rather than densification, as driving the transformation to solid-like behaviour. On the basis of these findings we propose a new model to explain the anisotropy in the propagation speed of the fronts and delineate the onset conditions for dynamic shear jamming in suspensions. PMID:27436628

  20. High-speed ultrasound imaging in dense suspensions reveals impact-activated solidification due to dynamic shear jamming.

    PubMed

    Han, Endao; Peters, Ivo R; Jaeger, Heinrich M

    2016-01-01

    A remarkable property of dense suspensions is that they can transform from liquid-like at rest to solid-like under sudden impact. Previous work showed that this impact-induced solidification involves rapidly moving jamming fronts; however, details of this process have remained unresolved. Here we use high-speed ultrasound imaging to probe non-invasively how the interior of a dense suspension responds to impact. Measuring the speed of sound we demonstrate that the solidification proceeds without a detectable increase in packing fraction, and imaging the evolving flow field we find that the shear intensity is maximized right at the jamming front. Taken together, this provides direct experimental evidence for jamming by shear, rather than densification, as driving the transformation to solid-like behaviour. On the basis of these findings we propose a new model to explain the anisotropy in the propagation speed of the fronts and delineate the onset conditions for dynamic shear jamming in suspensions. PMID:27436628

  1. Urban Reflection Seismics: A High-resolution Shear-wave Survey in the Trondheim harbour area, Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krawczyk, Charlotte; Polom, Ulrich; L'Heureux, Jean-Sebastien; Hansen, Louise; Lecomte, Isabelle; Longva, Oddva

    2010-05-01

    A shallow reflection shear-wave seismic survey was carried out in mid summer 2008 in the harbour area of Trondheim, Norway, that suffers from prominent landslide events in the last decades. The harbour has been built on man-made land fillings at the coast of the Trondheim Fjord in several expansions implicated in some submarine landslides, which are reported since about 100 years. Whereas high-resolution marine seismic methods mapped the fjord area in detail in the range of decimeters, the seismic investigation below the infilled and paved harbour area was a difficult challenge. Therefore, SH-polarized shear-wave reflection seismics was applied experimentally, and the field configuration was especially adapted for the application on paved surfaces with underlying soft soil of estimated more than 150 m thickness. A land streamer system of 120 channels (geophone interval of 1 m) was used in combination with LIAG's newly developed shear-wave vibrator buggy of 30 kN peak force. This mini truck is designed for full environment-friendly urban use and enables fast and sensitive operation within a seismic survey area. The sweep parameters were configured to 25-100 Hz range, 10 s duration, using 14 s recording time sampled by 1 ms interval. Shear wave frequencies above the used frequency range, which can also be generated by the seismic source, were avoided consciously to prevent disturbing air wave reflections during operation. For an advantageous solution for the seismic imaging of the subsoil down to the bedrock a grid of 4.2 profile-km was gathered. The data recorded experimentally in the initial seismic survey stage achieved finally a highly resolved image of the structure of the sediment body with ca. 1 m vertical resolution, clear detection of the bedrock, and probably deeper structures. The profiles were processed up to FD time migration, and indicate that slip planes, turbidity masses and other features relevant for geohazards are present within the top of the

  2. Urban Shear-wave Reflection Seismics: A High-resolution Survey in the Landslide-affected Trondheim Harbour Area, Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krawczyk, C. M.; Polom, U.; Hansen, L.; L'Heureux, J.; Longva, O.; Lecomte, I.

    2009-12-01

    A shallow reflection shear-wave seismic survey was carried out in mid summer 2008 in the harbour area of Trondheim, Norway, that suffers from prominent landslide events in the last decades. The harbour has been built on man-made land fillings at the coast of the Trondheim Fjord in several expansions implicated in some submarine landslides. Whereas high-resolution marine seismic methods mapped the fjord area in detail, common seismic investigation of the infilled, paved harbour area was a difficult challenge. Therefore, SH-polarized shear-wave reflection seismics was applied experimentally, and the field configuration was especially adapted for the application on paved surfaces with underlying soft soil of more than 100 m thickness. A land streamer system of 120 channels (geophone interval of 1 m) was used in combination with LIAG's newly developed shear-wave vibrator buggy of 30 kN peak force. This mini truck is full environment-friendly for urban use and enables fast operation within a seismic survey area. The sweep parameters were configured to 25-100 Hz range, 10 s duration, using 14 s recording time sampled by 1 ms interval. Shear wave frequencies above the used frequency range, which can also be generated by the seismic source, were avoided consciously to prevent disturbing air wave reflections during operation. For an advantageous solution for the seismic imaging of the subsoil down to the bedrock ca. 4 km of 2.5-D profiles were gathered. The data recorded experimentally in the initial seismic survey stage achieved finally a highly resolved image of the structure of the sediment body with 1 m vertical resolution, clear detection of the bedrock, and probably deeper structures. These were processed up to FD time migration, and indicate that slip planes are present within the top of the bedrock. Due to the clear and continuous reflection events, also the shear-wave velocity could be calculated at least down to the bedrock to indicate the dynamic stiffness of the

  3. Shear wave elastography using phase sensitive optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Shaozhen; Huang, Zhihong; Nguyen, Thu-Mai; Wong, Emily Y.; Arnal, Bastien; O'Donnell, Matthew; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2014-03-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) provides high spatial resolution and sensitivity that are ideal for imaging the cornea and lens. Quantifying the biomechanical properties of these tissues could add clinically valuable information. Thus, we propose a dynamic elastography method combining OCT detection and a mechanical actuator to map the shear modulus of soft tissues. We used a piezoelectric actuator driven in the kHz range and we used phase-sensitive OCT (PhS-OCT) to track the resulting shear waves at an equivalent frame rate of 47 kHz. We mapped the shear wave speed of anesthetized mice cornea using monochromatic excitations. We found a significant difference between a group of knock-out (3.92 +/- 0.35 m/s, N=4) and wild-type mice (5.04 +/- 0.51 m/s, N=3). These preliminary results demonstrate the feasibility of using PhS-OCT to perform in vivo shear wave elastography of the cornea. We then implemented a shear pulse compression approach on ex vivo human cornea. For that purpose, frequency- modulated excitations were used and the resulting displacement field was digitally compressed in a short broadband pulse with a 7 dB gain in signal-to-noise ratio (SNR).

  4. Shear Thinning of Noncolloidal Suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vázquez-Quesada, Adolfo; Tanner, Roger I.; Ellero, Marco

    2016-09-01

    Shear thinning—a reduction in suspension viscosity with increasing shear rates—is understood to arise in colloidal systems from a decrease in the relative contribution of entropic forces. The shear-thinning phenomenon has also been often reported in experiments with noncolloidal systems at high volume fractions. However its origin is an open theoretical question and the behavior is difficult to reproduce in numerical simulations where shear thickening is typically observed instead. In this letter we propose a non-Newtonian model of interparticle lubrication forces to explain shear thinning in noncolloidal suspensions. We show that hidden shear-thinning effects of the suspending medium, which occur at shear rates orders of magnitude larger than the range investigated experimentally, lead to significant shear thinning of the overall suspension at much smaller shear rates. At high particle volume fractions the local shear rates experienced by the fluid situated in the narrow gaps between particles are much larger than the averaged shear rate of the whole suspension. This allows the suspending medium to probe its high-shear non-Newtonian regime and it means that the matrix fluid rheology must be considered over a wide range of shear rates.

  5. Shear Thinning of Noncolloidal Suspensions.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Quesada, Adolfo; Tanner, Roger I; Ellero, Marco

    2016-09-01

    Shear thinning-a reduction in suspension viscosity with increasing shear rates-is understood to arise in colloidal systems from a decrease in the relative contribution of entropic forces. The shear-thinning phenomenon has also been often reported in experiments with noncolloidal systems at high volume fractions. However its origin is an open theoretical question and the behavior is difficult to reproduce in numerical simulations where shear thickening is typically observed instead. In this letter we propose a non-Newtonian model of interparticle lubrication forces to explain shear thinning in noncolloidal suspensions. We show that hidden shear-thinning effects of the suspending medium, which occur at shear rates orders of magnitude larger than the range investigated experimentally, lead to significant shear thinning of the overall suspension at much smaller shear rates. At high particle volume fractions the local shear rates experienced by the fluid situated in the narrow gaps between particles are much larger than the averaged shear rate of the whole suspension. This allows the suspending medium to probe its high-shear non-Newtonian regime and it means that the matrix fluid rheology must be considered over a wide range of shear rates. PMID:27636496

  6. Shear wave transmissivity measurement by color Doppler shear wave imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamakoshi, Yoshiki; Yamazaki, Mayuko; Kasahara, Toshihiro; Sunaguchi, Naoki; Yuminaka, Yasushi

    2016-07-01

    Shear wave elastography is a useful method for evaluating tissue stiffness. We have proposed a novel shear wave imaging method (color Doppler shear wave imaging: CD SWI), which utilizes a signal processing unit in ultrasound color flow imaging in order to detect the shear wave wavefront in real time. Shear wave velocity is adopted to characterize tissue stiffness; however, it is difficult to measure tissue stiffness with high spatial resolution because of the artifact produced by shear wave diffraction. Spatial average processing in the image reconstruction method also degrades the spatial resolution. In this paper, we propose a novel measurement method for the shear wave transmissivity of a tissue boundary. Shear wave wavefront maps are acquired by changing the displacement amplitude of the shear wave and the transmissivity of the shear wave, which gives the difference in shear wave velocity between two mediums separated by the boundary, is measured from the ratio of two threshold voltages required to form the shear wave wavefronts in the two mediums. From this method, a high-resolution shear wave amplitude imaging method that reconstructs a tissue boundary is proposed.

  7. Structure of the Highly Sheared Tropical Storm Chantal During CAMEX-4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Tropical Storm Chantal during August 2001 was a storm that failed to intensify over the few days prior to making landfall on the Yucatan Peninsula. An observational study of Tropical Storm Chantal is presented using a diverse data set including remote and in situ measurements from the NASA ER-2 and DC-8 and the NOAA WP-3D N42RF aircraft and satellite data. The authors discuss the storm structure from the larger scale environment down to the convective scale. Large vertical shear (850-200 hPa shear magnitude range 8-15 m/s) plays a very important role in preventing Chantal from intensifying. The storm had a poorly defined vortex that only extended up to 5-6 km altitude, and an adjacent intense convective region that comprised an MCS. The entire low-level circulation center was in the rain-free western side of the storm, about 80 km to the west-southwest of the MCS. The MCS appears to have been primarily the result of intense convergence between large-scale, low-level easterly flow with embedded downdrafts, and the cyclonic vortex flow. The individual cells in the MCS such as Cell 2 during the period of the observations, were extremely intense with reflectivity core diameters of 10 km and peak updrafts exceeding 20 m/s. Associated with this MCS were two broad subsidence (warm) regions both of which had portions over the vortex. The first layer near 700 hPa was directly above the vortex and covered most of it. The second layer near 500 hPa was along the forward and right flanks of Cell 2 and undercut the anvil divergence region above. There was not much resemblance of these subsidence layers to typical upper level warm cores in hurricanes that are necessary to support strong surface winds and a low central pressure. The observations are compared to previous studies of weakly sheared storms and modeling studies of shear effects and intensification. Additional information is included in the original extended abstract.

  8. Formation and Stability of Shear-Induced Shish-Kebab Structure in Highly Entangled Melts of UHMWPE/HDPE Blends

    SciTech Connect

    Keum,J.; Zuo, F.; Hsiao, B.

    2008-01-01

    The formation and stability of a shear-induced shish-kebab structure was investigated by in situ rheo-SAXS (small-angle X-ray scattering) and -WAXD (wide-angle X-ray diffraction) measurements of highly entangled polyethylene melts based on two polymer blends, containing small fractions (2 and 5 wt %) of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) and high-density polyethylene (HDPE). Immediately after shear, the combined SAXS and WAXD results at 142 C confirmed the sole formation of shish without kebabs, indicating the interplay between the topological deformation of highly entangled UHMWPE chains and the extended-chain crystallization of stretched segments without the participation of coiled segments. The presence of HDPE chains influenced the entanglement of UHMWPE but they were not involved in the shish-kebab formation at the initial stage of crystallization. The final shish lengths in both blends were nearly identical at the same strain (e = 500), even though the UHMWPE concentration was different. When the temperature was cooled to 134 C, both sheared blends exhibited the kebab formation, following the diffusion-controlled growth process. Although the total kebab nucleation was higher in the 5/95 wt % UHMWPE/HDPE blend, the kebab density per shish was higher in the 2/98 wt % UHMWPE/HDPE blend. The thermal stability of the shish-kebab structure was also investigated by constrained melting. Both blends exhibited identical melting behavior of kebabs but different melting behavior of shish that is governed by the entanglement restraints of the stretched-chain network.

  9. Effect of High Temperature on Mineralogy, Microstructure, Shear Stiffness and Tensile Strength of Two Australian Mudstones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xianfeng; Zhang, Chonglei; Yuan, Shengyang; Fityus, Stephen; Sloan, Scott William; Buzzi, Olivier

    2016-09-01

    This study aims at providing quality experimental data on the effects of temperature on tensile strength and small strain shear stiffness of two Australian mudstones. The objective is to provide multiscale data in view of developing a numerical model that can capture and simulate the complex multiphysics of underground coal fire propagation. Two mudstones were collected in the Hunter Valley, close to a known underground coal fire, referred to as "Burning Mountain." The rock specimens were heated to a range of temperatures (maximum of 900 °C) for 24 h, and the materials were comprehensively characterized by X-ray diffraction, thermal gravimetric analyses, optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. In addition, mercury intrusion porosimetry was used in order to track changes in pore size distribution with temperature. Investigations at microscale were complemented by testing at the macroscale. In particular, the paper focuses on the evolution of the tensile strength and small strain shear stiffness as the materials are subjected to heating treatment. Results show that both parameters evolve in a non-monotonic manner with temperature. The observed mechanical responses are fully explained and corroborated by microstructural observations.

  10. High Shear Strain Behavior of Synthetic Muscovite Fault Gouges Under Hydrothermal Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Diggelen, E. W.; de Bresser, H. H.; Peach, C. J.; Spiers, C. J.

    2008-12-01

    Phyllosilicates are common constituents of mid-crustal fault zones and are widely believed to exert a strong influence on the strength of fault rocks, in particular around the brittle-ductile transition. The present study aims to experimentally determine the mechanical strength and frictional behaviour of muscovite gouge, in order to establish whether the presence of muscovite might contribute to the long term weakness often inferred to hold for large scale crustal fault zones. Rotary shear experiments in the temperature range 20-700°C, at 100 MPa fluid pressure, have been performed on synthetic muscovite gouges (average grain size 13 μm, < 10% quartz). The effects of sliding velocity, normal stress and shear strain on the frictional behavior of the muscovite gouges have been studied. Microstructural analysis of the experimentally deformed samples has been done using SEM and XED in order to obtain insight in the operating microphysical processes. The mechanical behavior under the conditions applied is independent of sliding velocity in the range 0.03-3.8 μm/s. The results show frictional behavior in samples deformed in velocity stepping experiments under 100 MPa normal stress with coefficients of friction of ~0.34 at 20°C, in agreement with previous data, gradually increasing to values of ~0.55 at 300°C, remaining around this value up to 600°C. During shear, samples compact continuously (15-20% at γ~25) at low temperatures (20-300°C). At higher temperatures, similar compaction is preceded by initial dilatation of up to 10%. The low temperature microstructures (< 300°C) show strong grain size reduction to form a well- foliated muscovite matrix (grain size < 2 μm) enclosing quartz and widespread muscovite porphyroclasts (~10 μm). Numerous shear bands in the Riedel and Y-shear orientations are present. Towards higher temperature, the microstructures are increasingly characterized by dense, elongate lenses (20-50 by 10 μm) of fine, folded and kinked grains

  11. Shearing of magma along a high-grade shear zone: Evolution of microstructures during the transition from magmatic to solid-state flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zibra, I.; Kruhl, J. H.; Montanini, A.; Tribuzio, R.

    2012-04-01

    Syntectonic plutons may record short-lived geological events related to crustal melting and deformation of the continental crust. Therefore, interpretation of microstructure and orientation of fabrics is critical in order to constrain space/time/temperature/deformation relationships during pluton crystallization. Here we describe the transition from magmatic to solid-state deformation in the late-Variscan Diorite-Granite Suite (DGS) emplaced along the Santa Lucia Shear Zone. The systematic collection of meso-, microstructural and quartz < c > axis data allow us to examine the spatial distribution and the mode of superposition of different fabrics. We identify three magmatic microfabric types, thought to reflect the microstructural evolution at decreasing melt content during pluton crystallization. Our data suggest that diffusion creep, dislocation creep and grain-scale fracturing cooperated in accommodating the shearing of the partially molten quartzofeldspathic aggregate. We suggest that the switch from upward to horizontal magmatic flow occurred at melt fractions gt; ˜0.40, and that most of the hypersolidus fabrics formed during horizontal flow, reflecting the stress field imposed by the shear zone, and preserving no memory of the ascent stage.

  12. The effect of plasma beta on high-n ballooning stability at low magnetic shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connor, J. W.; Ham, C. J.; Hastie, R. J.

    2016-08-01

    An explanation of the observed improvement in H-mode pedestal characteristics with increasing core plasma pressure or poloidal beta, {β\\text{pol}} , as observed in MAST and JET, is sought in terms of the impact of the Shafranov shift, {{Δ }\\prime} , on ideal ballooning MHD stability. To illustrate this succinctly, a self-consistent treatment of the low magnetic shear region of the ‘s-α ’ stability diagram is presented using the large aspect ratio Shafranov equilibrium, but enhancing both α and {{Δ }\\prime} so that they compete with each other. The method of averaging, valid at low s, is used to simplify the calculation and demonstrates how α , {{Δ }\\prime} , plasma shaping and ‘average favourable curvature’ all contribute to stability.

  13. Zero-temperature bulk modulus of alpha-plutonium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledbetter, H.; Migliori, A.; Betts, J.; Harrington, S.; El-Khatib, S.

    2005-05-01

    Using resonant-ultrasound spectroscopy, we measured alpha-plutonium’s bulk modulus B between 298 and 18K . Fitting the measurements to an Einstein-oscillator-based function gave the zero-temperature bulk modulus Bo=70.9GPa . We compare our measurement with numerous previous measurements and with numerous theoretical estimates ranging from 41to227GPa . From 0to300K , B(T) is regular and smooth, evincing no phase transition (electronic, magnetic, structural). The bulk modulus decreases to 54.4GPa , about 30%, a very large change compared with typical materials. We attribute this large decrease to electron localization during warming. High-temperature dB/dT yields a Gruneisen parameter γ=5.1 , too high we believe because of temperature-induced electron localization. From the low-temperature elastic constants, averaged in the usual Debye ⟨v-3⟩ manner, we obtain a Debye temperature ΘD=205K .

  14. Design and characteristics of MRF-based actuators for torque transmission under influence of high shear rates up to 34,000s-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güth, Dirk; Erbis, Vadim; Schamoni, Markus; Maas, Jürgen

    2014-04-01

    High rotational speeds for brakes and clutches based on magnetorheological fluids represent a remaining challenge for the industrial or automotive application. Beside particle centrifugation effects and rotational speed-depending no-load losses, the torque characteristic is an important property that needs to considered in the design process of actuators. Due to missing experimental data for these operating conditions, in this paper the shear rate and flux depending yield stress behavior of magnetorheological uids is experimentally investigated for high rotational speeds or respectively high shear rates. Therefore a brake actuator with variable shear gap heights up to 4 mm is designed, realized and used for the experimental investigation, which are performed for a maximum shear rate of ƴ= 34; 000 s-1 under large magnetic elds. The measurement results point out a strong dependency between shear rate, magnetic ux density and resulting yield stress. For low shear gap heights, a significant reduction in the yield stress up to 10 % can be determined. Additionally the development of Taylor vortices is determined, which will not only occur in viscous case without an applied magnetic field. The measurement results are important for a reliable actuator design which should be used in application with high rotational speeds.

  15. Multidirectional direct simple shear apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    DeGroot, D.J.; Germaine, J.T.; Ladd, C.C.

    1993-09-01

    The paper describes a new simple shear testing device, the multidirectional direct simple shear (MDSS) apparatus, for testing soil specimens under conditions that simulate, at the element level, the state of stress acting within the foundation soil of an offshore Arctic gravity structure. The MDSS uses a circular specimen that is consolidated under both a vertical effective stress ({sigma}{sub vc}{prime}) and a horizontal shear stress ({tau}{sub 1}). The specimen is subsequently sheared undrained by applying a second independent horizontal shear stress ({tau}{sub 2}) at an angle {theta} relative to the horizontal consolidation shear stress {tau}{sub 1}. Evaluation of the MDSS first compares conventional K{sub D}-consolidated undrained direct simple shear (CK{sub 0}UDSS) test data ({tau}{sub 1} = 0) on normally consolidated Boston blue clay (BBC) with results obtained in the Geonor DSS device. The MDSS gives lower secant Young`s modulus values and on average 8% lower strengths, but produces remarkably less scatter in the test results than the Geonor DSS. Kinematic proof tests with an elastic material (rubber) confirm that the setup procedure, application of forces, and strain measurement systems in the MDSS work properly and produce repeatable results. Results from a MDSS test program on BBC wherein specimens were first normally consolidated with {sigma}{sub vc}{prime} and {tau}{sub 1} = 0.2{sigma}{sub vc}{prime} and then sheared undrained at {theta} varing in 30{degree} increments from zero (shear in same direction) to 150{degree} show dramatic differences in the response of the soil as a function of {theta}. The peak undrained strength varies almost twofold from 0 = 0 to 120{degree}, while the deformation behavior varies from very brittle at low {theta} angles to becoming ductile at higher angles. 11 refs., 15 figs.

  16. Physico-chemical and technological properties of sodium naproxen granules prepared in a high-shear mixer-granulator.

    PubMed

    Di Martino, Piera; Malaj, Ledjan; Censi, Roberta; Martelli, Sante

    2008-12-01

    In the present work, authors produced tablets of anhydrous sodium naproxen by wet granulation using a high-shear mixer-granulator. Drug hydrated to the tetrahydrated form, as observed by X-ray powder diffractometry. After wet granulation, authors then performed two different drying procedures, obtaining granules of different water content and crystallographic characteristics. The first procedure dried granules in the high-shear mixer-granulator by applying vacuum at room temperature (batch A), while the second employed the same apparatus and time, under vacuum at 40 degrees C (batch B). X-ray powder diffractometry revealed that the sodium naproxen (SN) contained in batch A granules was a mixture of dihydrated and tetrahydrated forms (as demonstrated by the coexistence of peaks typical of both hydrated forms), while that of batch B granules was a mixture of monohydrated and tetrahydrated forms. This means that differences in drying procedures could lead to products of different crystallographic properties. The behavior under compression was evaluated, revealing that batch A offered the best tabletability and compressibility. These results make it possible to conclude that differences in the crystallographic properties and water content of SN are such that different hydration/drying processes can alter the drug crystal form and thus the tabletability of the resulting granules. PMID:18398910

  17. Scale-up studies on high shear wet granulation process from mini-scale to commercial scale.

    PubMed

    Aikawa, Shouhei; Fujita, Naomi; Myojo, Hidetoshi; Hayashi, Takashi; Tanino, Tadatsugu

    2008-10-01

    A newly developed mini-scale high shear granulator was used for scale-up study of wet granulation process from 0.2 to 200 L scales. Under various operation conditions and granulation bowl sizes, powder mixture composed of anhydrous caffeine, D-mannitol, dibasic calcium phosphate, pregelatinized starch and corn starch was granulated by adding water. The granules were tabletted, and disintegration time and hardness of the tablets were evaluated to seek correlations of granulation conditions and tablet properties. As the granulation proceeded, disintegration time was prolonged and hardness decreased. When granulation processes were operated under the condition that agitator tip speed was the same, similar relationship between granulation time and tablet properties, such as disintegration time and hardness, between 0.2 L and 11 L scales were observed. Likewise, between 11 L and 200 L scales similar relationship was observed when operated under the condition that the force to the granulation mass was the same. From the above results, the mini-scale high shear granulator should be useful tool to predict operation conditions of large-scale granulation from its mini-scale operation conditions, where similar tablet properties should be obtained.

  18. Brownian dynamics simulations of coagulation of dilute uniform and anisotropic particles under shear flow spanning low to high Peclet numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadi, Maziar; Larson, Eric D.; Liu, Jun; Larson, Ronald G.

    2015-01-01

    Brownian dynamics simulations are performed to study the binding kinetics in the dilute-sphere limit by considering interactions of two spheres under shear flow across the entire range of Peclet numbers, spanning both perikinetic (diffusion-controlled) and orthokinetic (flow-controlled) coagulation regimes. The dilute regime is attained by carrying out two-sphere simulations in periodic boxes of different sizes and aspect ratios and extrapolating toward the infinite box limit. Effects of particle type (Janus and isotropic particles), shear rate, hydrodynamic interactions, and inter-particle potential are explored. We find that rectangular boxes with appropriate aspect ratios overcome a particle "shadow effect" that cannot be overcome with cubic boxes unless huge boxes are used. With rectangular boxes, we obtain converged binding kinetics for the whole Peclet number range, while cubic boxes of increasing size allow converged results only in the absence of flow. We consider the effect of binding both in a secondary minimum controlled by a combination of electrostatic repulsion and depletion attraction, as well as in a primary minimum governed by induced-dipole attraction. Results are computed using both realistic interaction potentials and by replacing the potential with a simple cutoff gap distance at which binding is deemed to occur. Results agree with several existing reports including Smoluchowski predictions in the zero- and infinite-shear-rate limits, and high-Pe perturbation results of Feke and Schowalter [J. Fluid Mech. 133, 17-35 (1983)] at Peclet numbers (Pe) above 100. Finally, we compute binding times for anisotropic Janus particles which have both repulsive and attractive faces, for a wide range of Pe number.

  19. Shear-horizontal surface acoustic wave phononic device with high density filling material for ultra-low power sensing applications

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, M.; Bhethanabotla, V. R.; Sankaranarayanan, S. K. R. S.

    2014-06-23

    Finite element simulations of a phononic shear-horizontal surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensor based on ST 90°-X Quartz reveal a dramatic reduction in power consumption. The phononic sensor is realized by artificially structuring the delay path to form an acoustic meta-material comprised of a periodic microcavity array incorporating high-density materials such as tantalum or tungsten. Constructive interference of the scattered and secondary reflected waves at every microcavity interface leads to acoustic energy confinement in the high-density regions translating into reduced power loss. Tantalum filled cavities show the best performance while tungsten inclusions create a phononic bandgap. Based on our simulation results, SAW devices with tantalum filled microcavities were fabricated and shown to significantly decrease insertion loss. Our findings offer encouraging prospects for designing low power, highly sensitive portable biosensors.

  20. Double Sided Irradiation for Laser-assisted Shearing of Ultra High Strength Steels with Process Integrated Hardening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brecher, Christian; Emonts, Michael; Eckert, Markus; Weinbach, Matthias

    Most small or medium sized parts produced in mass production are made by shearing and forming of sheet metal. This technology is cost effective, but the achievable quality and geometrical complexity are limited when working high and highest strength steel. Based on the requirements for widening the process limits of conventional sheet metal working the Fraunhofer IPT has developed the laser-assisted sheet metal working technology. With this enhancement it is possible to produce parts made of high and highest strength steel with outstanding quality, high complexity and low tool wear. Additionally laser hardening has been implemented to adjust the mechanical properties of metal parts within the process. Currently the process is limited to lower sheet thicknesses (<2 mm) to maintain short cycle times. To enable this process for larger geometries and higher sheet thicknesses the Fraunhofer IPT developed a system for double sided laser-assisted sheet metal working within progressive dies.

  1. Fault rupture as a series of nano-seismic events during high-velocity shear experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zu, X.; Reches, Z.; Chen, X.; Chang, J. C.; Carpenter, B. M.

    2015-12-01

    The rupture process of experimental faults is investigated here by monitoring nano-seismic events (NSE) during slip in a rotary shear apparatus. Our experimental faults are made of two rock blocks with one to four miniature 3D accelerometers that are glued to the stationary block at distance of ~ 2 cm from the fault surface. Accelerations in the frequency range of 1 Hz to 200 kHz are recorded in slip-parallel (x), slip-transverse (y), and slip-vertical (z) directions. We conducted a series of 45 experiments on diorite and dolomite samples in two loading styles: classical velocity controlled loading, and power-density loading, in which the power-density (shear stress times slip velocity) is selected, and stick-slip events develop spontaneously according to the experimental fault response. The 3D accelerometer data were recorded at 106 samples/s, with acceleration resolution of 10 mV/g in recoding range of +/- 5 V. The experiments were conducted at slip-velocity of 0.001-0.8 m/s and slip distance up to 1.38 m. The accelerometer observations revealed tens to hundreds of NSEs per slip in both loading styles; peak acceleration ranged from 1g to over 500g. A typical stick-slip with tens of NSEs in Fig. 1, shows: (1) An initial NSE at ~59.72 s (green) that coincides with a small stress drop (~10%, red); (2) Simultaneous macroscopic slip initiation (blue); (3) A swarm of NSEs occur as the fault slips, each NSE lasts 1-2 milliseconds; and (4) Details of the initial NSE are shown in Fig. 2. Based on waveform cross-correlation between frequency band from 20 kHz to 70kHz, we identify several groups of NSE clusters, and apply empirical Green's function method to analyze event source spectra based on Brune-type source model. These NSEs are indicators of rupture propagation during the experimental fault slip.

  2. Fjord-valley fill stratigraphy from onshore high-resolution shear-wave seismics, Trondheim harbour area, central Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, L.; Polom, U.; L'Heureux, J.; Sauvin, G.; Lecomte, I.; Krawczyk, C. M.; Longva, O.

    2009-12-01

    To obtain information on the stratigraphic variability within the underlying fjord-valley fill, a shallow, shear-wave reflection seismic survey was successfully carried out on land in the Trondheim harbor area, central Norway. Since the last deglaciation, the region has been subjected to a fall of relative sea level of totally 175 m due to glacioisostatic rebound. The relative sea-level fall was accompanied by river erosion of emerging (glacio) marine deposits, several, large landslides, and delta progradation into the fjord. The infilled harbour area is located on the submerged part of a delta plain, and land reclamation is still going on. Historic and older submarine landslides are known to have taken place along the shoreline and an improved understanding of the ground conditions is therefore valuable for engineering purposes. In addition, the unique, S-wave seismic record gives insight into the overall architecture and long-term development of a fjord-valley filling influenced by relative sea level fall accompanied by occasional major mass-wasting events. Shear-wave reflection seismics was applied using a land streamer of 120 channels combined with a newly developed shear-wave vibrator from LIAG. Overall, 4.2 profile-km were acquired in a 2.5-D grid along paved roads and parking lots during night to minimize environmental noise. The investigations achieved a highly resolved image of the fjord-valley fill and clear bedrock detection. Vertical resolution is within a few meters over the entire profile whereas horizontal resolution decreases with depth. The entire fjord-valley fill is up to 160 m thick and five main stratigraphic units have been identified including bedrock. The fjord-valley fill is interpreted as consisting of glaciomarine deposits overlain by marine fjord sediments grading upwards into deltaic deposits. The change from continuous to more discontinuous or irregular reflection patterns reflects a progressive influence of delta-derived processes and

  3. Crack problems for bonded nonhomogeneous materials under antiplane shear loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erdogan, F.

    1984-01-01

    The singular nature of the crack tip stress field in a nonhomogeneous medium with a shear modulus with a discontinuous derivative was investigated. The simplest possible loading and geometry, the antiplane shear loading of two bonded half spaces in which the crack is perpendicular to the interface is considered. It is shown that the square root singularity of the crack tip stress field is unaffected by the discontinuity in the derivative of the shear modulus. The problem is solved for a finite crack and results for the stress intensity factors are presented.

  4. Shear waves in vegetal tissues at ultrasonic frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fariñas, M. D.; Sancho-Knapik, D.; Peguero-Pina, J. J.; Gil-Pelegrín, E.; Gómez Álvarez-Arenas, T. E.

    2013-03-01

    Shear waves are investigated in leaves of two plant species using air-coupled ultrasound. Magnitude and phase spectra of the transmission coefficient around the first two orders of the thickness resonances (normal and oblique incidence) have been measured. A bilayer acoustic model for plant leaves (comprising the palisade parenchyma and the spongy mesophyll) is proposed to extract, from measured spectra, properties of these tissues like: velocity and attenuation of longitudinal and shear waves and hence Young modulus, rigidity modulus, and Poisson's ratio. Elastic moduli values are typical of cellular solids and both, shear and longitudinal waves exhibit classical viscoelastic losses. Influence of leaf water content is also analyzed.

  5. Osteonectin-derived peptide increases the modulus of a bone-mimetic nanocomposite.

    PubMed

    Sarvestani, Alireza S; He, Xuezhong; Jabbari, Esmaiel

    2008-02-01

    Many factors contribute to the toughness of bone including the presence of nano-size apatite crystals, a dense network of collagen fibers, and acidic proteins with the ability to link the mineral phase to the gelatinous collagen phase. We investigated the effect of a glutamic acid (negatively charged) peptide (Glu6), which mimics the terminal region of the osteonectin glycoprotein of bone, on the shear modulus of a synthetic hydrogel/apatite nanocomposite. One end of the synthesized peptide was functionalized with an acrylate group (Ac-Glu6) to covalently attach the peptide to the hydrogel phase of the composite matrix. When microapatite crystals (5 microm diameter) were used, addition of Ac-Glu6 peptide did not affect the modulus of the microcomposite. However, when nanoapatite crystals (100 nm diameter) were used, addition of Ac-Glu6 resulted in significant reinforcement of the shear modulus of the nanocomposite ( approximately 100% in elastic shear modulus). Furthermore, addition of Ac-Gly6 (a neutral glycine sequence) or Ac-Lys6 (a positively charged sequence) did not reinforce the nanocomposite. These results demonstrate that the reinforcement effect of the Glu6 peptide, a sequence in the terminal region of osteonectin, is modulated by the size of the apatite crystals. The findings of this work can be used to develop advanced biomimetic composites for skeletal tissue regeneration.

  6. Osteonectin-derived peptide increases the modulus of a bone-mimetic nanocomposite.

    PubMed

    Sarvestani, Alireza S; He, Xuezhong; Jabbari, Esmaiel

    2008-02-01

    Many factors contribute to the toughness of bone including the presence of nano-size apatite crystals, a dense network of collagen fibers, and acidic proteins with the ability to link the mineral phase to the gelatinous collagen phase. We investigated the effect of a glutamic acid (negatively charged) peptide (Glu6), which mimics the terminal region of the osteonectin glycoprotein of bone, on the shear modulus of a synthetic hydrogel/apatite nanocomposite. One end of the synthesized peptide was functionalized with an acrylate group (Ac-Glu6) to covalently attach the peptide to the hydrogel phase of the composite matrix. When microapatite crystals (5 microm diameter) were used, addition of Ac-Glu6 peptide did not affect the modulus of the microcomposite. However, when nanoapatite crystals (100 nm diameter) were used, addition of Ac-Glu6 resulted in significant reinforcement of the shear modulus of the nanocomposite ( approximately 100% in elastic shear modulus). Furthermore, addition of Ac-Gly6 (a neutral glycine sequence) or Ac-Lys6 (a positively charged sequence) did not reinforce the nanocomposite. These results demonstrate that the reinforcement effect of the Glu6 peptide, a sequence in the terminal region of osteonectin, is modulated by the size of the apatite crystals. The findings of this work can be used to develop advanced biomimetic composites for skeletal tissue regeneration. PMID:17609937

  7. The effective modulus of super carbon nanotubes predicted by molecular structure mechanics.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying; Qiu, Xinming; Yang, Fan; Wang, Xi-Shu; Yin, Yajun

    2008-06-01

    A super carbon nanotube (ST) is a kind of hierarchical structure constructed from carbon nanotubes (named as CNT arm tubes). With the detailed construction of a Y-junction considered, the effective mechanical properties of ST structures are studied by the molecular structure mechanics (MSM) method. The Young's modulus and shear modulus of STs are found to depend mainly on the aspect ratio of CNT arm tubes instead of the chirality of the ST. A scale law is adopted to express the relation between the effective modulus (Young's modulus or shear modulus) and the aspect ratio of the CNT arm tubes. The Poisson's ratio of the ST is affected by both the aspect ratio of the CNT arm tubes and the chirality of the ST. The deformation of the ST comes from both the bending and the stretching of the CNT arm tubes. The Y-junction acts as an reinforcement phase to make the bending and stretching couple together and induce large linearity in ST structures. PMID:21825768

  8. Rheology of talc sheared at high pressure and temperature: a case study for hot subduction zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misra, Santanu; Boutareaud, Sébastien; Burg, Jean-Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Talc is a common fault-coating mineral occurring in a variety of tectonic settings from the immediate subsurface down to more than 100 km depth along subducting plate interfaces. It is considered to stabilize slip at seismogenic depth. To gain insight into the rheological behavior of talc and related deformation processes along the subduction interface of hot oceanic slabs, we conducted torsion experiments on intact synthetic talc samples at 200-600 °C under 100-300 MPa confining pressure at intermediate strain rates (3 × 10- 4 and 2.45 × 10- 3 s- 1) for bulk shear strains up to 12.6.We also conducted stepping strain rate experiments to investigate rate and temperature dependence on sliding velocity and slide-hold-slide experiments to explore the re-strengthening and frictional healing of the sliding zones. The experimental results reveal 1) post-yield strain hardening followed by brief weakening episodes and then again strain hardening with increasing deformation and 2) a gradual transition of friction evolution from velocity-strengthening to velocity-neutral. Microstructural observations coupled with mechanical data suggest that talc rheology combines localized and distributed deformation, in a state called the brittle-ductile transition, with a predominance of crystal-plastic over cataclastic (brittle to semi-brittle) processes at 600 °C and 300 MPa confining pressure. These data suggest that talc cannot accumulate the tectonic stress necessary for earthquake-generating rupture along the subduction interface. This result concurs with the concept that in weak heterogeneous talc-rich material, strong asperities that can resist the tectonic stress to a greater extent are responsible for the consequential earthquake occurrence.

  9. Enhanced skin adhesive patch with modulus-tunable composite micropillars.

    PubMed

    Bae, Won Gyu; Kim, Doogon; Kwak, Moon Kyu; Ha, Laura; Kang, Seong Min; Suh, Kahp Y

    2013-01-01

    Modulus-tunable composite micropillars are presented by combining replica molding and selective inking for skin adhesive patch in "ubiquitous"-health diagnostic devices. Inspired from hierarchical hairs in the gecko's toe pad, a simple method is presented to form composite polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) micropillars that are highly adhesive (∼1.8 N cm(-2) ) and mechanically robust (∼30 cycles).

  10. Two-dimensional strain-hardening membrane model for large deformation behavior of multiple red blood cells in high shear conditions

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Computational modeling of Red Blood Cell (RBC) flow contributes to the fundamental understanding of microhemodynamics and microcirculation. In order to construct theoretical RBC models, experimental studies on single RBC mechanics have presented a material description for RBC membranes based on their membrane shear, bending and area moduli. These properties have been directly employed in 3D continuum models of RBCs but practical flow analysis with 3D models have been limited by their computationally expensive nature. As such, various researchers have employed 2D models to efficiently and qualitatively study microvessel flows. Currently, the representation of RBC dynamics using 2D models is a limited methodology that breaks down at high shear rates due to excessive and unrealistic stretching. Methods We propose a localized scaling of the 2D elastic moduli such that it increases with RBC local membrane strain, thereby accounting for effects such as the Poisson effect and membrane local area incompressibility lost in the 2D simplification. Validation of our 2D Large Deformation (2D-LD) RBC model was achieved by comparing the predicted RBC deformation against the 3D model from literature for the case of a single RBC in simple shear flow under various shear rates (dimensionless shear rate G = 0.05, 0.1, 0.2, 0.5). The multi-cell flow of RBCs (38% Hematocrit) in a 20 μm width microchannel under varying shear rates (50, 150, 150 s-1) was then simulated with our proposed model and the popularly-employed 2D neo-Hookean model in order to evaluate the efficacy of our proposed 2D-LD model. Results The validation set indicated similar RBC deformation for both the 2D-LD and the 3D models across the studied shear rates, highlighting the robustness of our model. The multi-cell simulation indicated that the 2D neo-Hookean model predicts noodle-like RBC shapes at high shear rates (G = 0.5) whereas our 2D-LD model maintains sensible RBC deformations. Conclusion

  11. Determining the significance of high-grade shear zones by using temperature-time paths, with examples from the Grenville orogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Pluijm, Ben A.; Mezger, Klaus; Cosca, Michael A.; Essene, Eric J.

    1994-08-01

    Ductile shear zones preserve essential information on processes that are active in orogenic roots, but the significance of these zones is often difficult to interpret. Structural, petrologic, and geochronologic data from shear zones yield elements of the history that are not necessarily synchronous. However, by combining these data with temperature-time (T-t) paths, insights are obtained into the nature of shear zones, the relation between bounding blocks, and orogenic evolution of the deep crust. This procedure is illustrated with two examples from the mid-Proterozoic Grenville orogen. T-t paths from ˜1160 to ˜900 Ma are based on U-Pb dating of metamorphic minerals—including garnet (closure temperature, Tc, >800 °C), monazite (Tc ≅ 725 °C), sphene (Tc ≅ 600 °C), and rutile (Tc ≅ 400 °C)—and 40Ar/39Ar hornblende ages (Tc ≅ 480°C). Comparison of T-t paths from adjacent blocks allows predictions about the significance, kinematics, and timing of displacement of shear zones. In the Grenville orogen, T-t paths can distinguish between major terrane boundaries (e.g., the Carthage-Colton shear zone) and within-terrane shear zones (e.g., the Bancroft shear zone). Thus, these data can also be used to identify individual tectonic terranes in the deep crust. This integrated approach to analysis of shear zones provides constraints needed to determine the nature and rate of deep orogenic processes in areas that are complicated by high metamorphic grades.

  12. A High shear stress segment along the San Andreas Fault: Inferences based on near-field stress direction and stress magnitude observations in the Carrizo Plain Area

    SciTech Connect

    Castillo, D. A.,; Younker, L.W.

    1997-01-30

    Nearly 200 new in-situ determinations of stress directions and stress magnitudes near the Carrizo plain segment of the San Andreas fault indicate a marked change in stress state occurring within 20 km of this principal transform plate boundary. A natural consequence of this stress transition is that if the observed near-field ``fault-oblique`` stress directions are representative of the fault stress state, the Mohr-Coulomb shear stresses resolved on San Andreas sub-parallel planes are substantially greater than previously inferred based on fault-normal compression. Although the directional stress data and near-hydrostatic pore pressures, which exist within 15 km of the fault, support a high shear stress environment near the fault, appealing to elevated pore pressures in the fault zone (Byerlee-Rice Model) merely enhances the likelihood of shear failure. These near-field stress observations raise important questions regarding what previous stress observations have actually been measuring. The ``fault-normal`` stress direction measured out to 70 km from the fault can be interpreted as representing a comparable depth average shear strength of the principal plate boundary. Stress measurements closer to the fault reflect a shallower depth-average representation of the fault zone shear strength. If this is true, only stress observations at fault distances comparable to the seismogenic depth will be representative of the fault zone shear strength. This is consistent with results from dislocation monitoring where there is pronounced shear stress accumulation out to 20 km of the fault as a result of aseismic slip within the lower crust loading the upper locked section. Beyond about 20 km, the shear stress resolved on San Andreas fault-parallel planes becomes negligible. 65 refs., 15 figs.

  13. Effective Elastic Modulus as a Function of Angular Leaf Span for Curved Leaves of Pyrolytic Boron Nitride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaforey, M. L.; Deeb, C. W.; Matthiesen, D. H.

    1999-01-01

    A theoretical equation was derived to predict the spring constant (load/deflection) for a simply supported cylindrical section with a line force applied at the center. Curved leaves of PBN were mechanically deformed and the force versus deflection data was recorded and compared to the derived theoretical equation to yield an effective modulus for each leaf. The effective modulus was found to vary from the pure shear modulus for a flat plate to a mixed mode for a half cylinder as a function of the sine of one half the angular leaf span. The spring constants of individual PBN leaves were usually predicted to within 30%.

  14. Stretchable Polyurethane Sponge Scaffold Strengthened Shear Stiffening Polymer and Its Enhanced Safeguarding Performance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sheng; Xuan, Shouhu; Wang, Yunpeng; Xu, Chenhui; Mao, Ya; Liu, Mei; Bai, Linfeng; Jiang, Wanquan; Gong, Xinglong

    2016-02-01

    A simple and scalable "dip and dry" method was developed for fabricating stretchable polyurethane sponge-based polymer composite with excellent shear stiffening effect, creep resisting and adhesion property. The stiffness of the composite was tunable, the storage modulus (G') could automatically increase 3 orders of magnitude with the increasing of shear frequency, and the G'max could reach to as high as 1.55 MPa. Importantly, the composite with ideal damping capacity reduced the impact force by 2 orders of magnitude even under 26 cycles of consecutive dynamic impact loading with no obvious mechanical degradation. Moreover, an enhancing mechanism was proposed and it was found the "B-O cross bond" and the entanglement of polymer chains were attributed to the shear stiffening characteristic. Finally, the excellent adhesion ability and hydrophobicity guarantee the composite with reliable mechanical performance and longer lifespan. PMID:26835703

  15. Massing in high shear wet granulation can simultaneously improve powder flow and deteriorate powder compaction: a double-edged sword.

    PubMed

    Shi, Limin; Feng, Yushi; Sun, Changquan Calvin

    2011-05-18

    The influence of massing during high shear wet granulation (HSWG) process on granule properties and performance was investigated using microcrystalline cellulose (MCC). Massing time varied from 0 to 40 min while other factors were fixed. Granule physical properties, including morphology, size, porosity, and specific surface area (SSA), were characterized. Changes in powder properties were profound in the first 10 min of massing but negligible beyond 10 min. With 10 min of massing, granule tabletability decreased by 75% while flowability increased by 75%. The significantly deteriorated tabletability and improved flowability resulted from dramatic changes in granule morphology, porosity, and SSA. The results confirm that massing time is a key process parameter in HSWG, and it must be carefully evaluated and controlled during process development, scale up, and manufacturing.

  16. Understanding the implications of the data from recent high-energy-density Kelvin-Helmholtz shear layer experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Hurricane, O A; Hansen, J F; Harding, E C; Drake, R P; Robey, H F; Remington, B A; Kuranz, C C; Grosskopf, M J; Gillespie, R S; Park, H

    2009-10-26

    The first successful high energy density Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) shear layer experiments (O.A. Hurricane, et al., Phys. Plasmas, 16, 056305, 2009; E.C. Harding, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 103, 045005, 2009) demonstrated the ability to design and field a target that produces an array of large diagnosable KH vortices in a controlled fashion. Data from these experiments vividly showed the complete evolution of large distinct eddies, from formation to apparent turbulent break-up. Unexpectedly, low-density bubbles/cavities comparable to the vortex size ({approx} 300 - 400 {micro}m) appeared to grow up in the free-stream flow above the unstable material interface. In this paper, the basic principles of the experiment will be discussed, the data reviewed, and the progress on understanding the origin of the above bubble structures through theory and simulation will be reported on.

  17. Model-Independent Determination of the Shear Viscosity of a Trapped Unitary Fermi gas: Application to High-Temperature Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bluhm, M.; Schäfer, T.

    2016-03-01

    Determinations of the shear viscosity of trapped ultracold gases suffer from systematic, uncontrolled uncertainties related to the treatment of the dilute part of the gas cloud. In this work we present an analysis of expansion experiments based on a new method, anisotropic fluid dynamics, that interpolates between Navier-Stokes fluid dynamics at the center of the cloud and ballistic behavior in the dilute corona. We validate the method using a comparison between anisotropic fluid dynamics and numerical solutions of the Boltzmann equation. We then apply anisotropic fluid dynamics to the expansion data reported by Cao et al. In the high-temperature limit we find η =0.282 (m T )3 /2 , which agrees within about 5% with the theoretical prediction η =0.269 (m T )3/2.

  18. High Magnetic Shear Gain in a Liquid Sodium Stable Couette Flow Experiment: A Prelude to an {alpha}-{Omega} Dynamo

    SciTech Connect

    Colgate, Stirling A.; Beckley, Howard; Si, Jiahe; Martinic, Joe; Westpfahl, David; Slutz, James; Westrom, Cebastian; Klein, Brianna; Schendel, Paul; Scharle, Cletus; McKinney, Travis; Ginanni, Rocky; Bentley, Ian; Mickey, Timothy; Ferrel, Regnar; Li, Hui; Pariev, Vladimir; Finn, John

    2011-04-29

    The {Omega} phase of the liquid sodium {alpha}-{Omega} dynamo experiment at New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology in cooperation with Los Alamos National Laboratory has demonstrated a high toroidal field B{sub {phi}} that is {approx_equal}8xB{sub r}, where B{sub r} is the radial component of an applied poloidal magnetic field. This enhanced toroidal field is produced by the rotational shear in stable Couette flow within liquid sodium at a magnetic Reynolds number Rm{approx_equal}120. Small turbulence in stable Taylor-Couette flow is caused by Ekman flow at the end walls, which causes an estimated turbulence energy fraction of ({delta}v/v){sup 2{approx}}10{sup -3}.

  19. Model-Independent Determination of the Shear Viscosity of a Trapped Unitary Fermi gas: Application to High-Temperature Data.

    PubMed

    Bluhm, M; Schäfer, T

    2016-03-18

    Determinations of the shear viscosity of trapped ultracold gases suffer from systematic, uncontrolled uncertainties related to the treatment of the dilute part of the gas cloud. In this work we present an analysis of expansion experiments based on a new method, anisotropic fluid dynamics, that interpolates between Navier-Stokes fluid dynamics at the center of the cloud and ballistic behavior in the dilute corona. We validate the method using a comparison between anisotropic fluid dynamics and numerical solutions of the Boltzmann equation. We then apply anisotropic fluid dynamics to the expansion data reported by Cao et al. In the high-temperature limit we find η=0.282(mT)^{3/2}, which agrees within about 5% with the theoretical prediction η=0.269(mT)^{3/2}. PMID:27035308

  20. Model-Independent Determination of the Shear Viscosity of a Trapped Unitary Fermi gas: Application to High-Temperature Data.

    PubMed

    Bluhm, M; Schäfer, T

    2016-03-18

    Determinations of the shear viscosity of trapped ultracold gases suffer from systematic, uncontrolled uncertainties related to the treatment of the dilute part of the gas cloud. In this work we present an analysis of expansion experiments based on a new method, anisotropic fluid dynamics, that interpolates between Navier-Stokes fluid dynamics at the center of the cloud and ballistic behavior in the dilute corona. We validate the method using a comparison between anisotropic fluid dynamics and numerical solutions of the Boltzmann equation. We then apply anisotropic fluid dynamics to the expansion data reported by Cao et al. In the high-temperature limit we find η=0.282(mT)^{3/2}, which agrees within about 5% with the theoretical prediction η=0.269(mT)^{3/2}.

  1. Interlaminar shear test method development for long term durability testing of composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ifju, Peter G.

    1994-01-01

    The high speed civil transport is a commercial aircraft that is expected to carry 300 passengers at Mach 2.4 over a range of more than 6000 nautical miles. With the existing commercial structural material technology (i.e., aluminum) the performance characteristics of the high speed civil transport would not be realized. Therefore there has been a concerted effort in the development of light weight materials capable of withstanding elevated temperatures for long duration. Thermoplastic composite materials are such candidate materials and the understanding of how these materials perform over the long term under harsh environments is essential to safe and effective design. The matrix dominated properties of thermoplastic composites are most affected by both time and temperature. There is currently an effort to perform short term testing to predict long term behavior of in-plane mechanical properties E22 (transverse modulus of elasticity) and G12 (shear modulus). Out-of-plane properties such as E33, G13, and G23 are inherently more difficult to characterize. This is especially true for the out-of-plane shear modulus G23 and hence there is no existing acceptable standard test method. Since G23 is the most matrix dominated property, it is essential that a test method be developed. A shear test methodology is developed to do just that. The test method, called the double notched specimen, along with the previously developed shear gage was tested at room temperature. Mechanical testing confirmed the attributes of the methodology. A finite element parametric study was conducted for specimen optimization. Moire interferometry, a high sensitivity laser optical method, was used for full-field analysis of the specimen. From this work, material parameters will be determined and thus enable the prediction of long term material behavior of laminates subjected to general loading states.

  2. Versatility of Biofilm Matrix Molecules in Staphylococcus epidermidis Clinical Isolates and Importance of Polysaccharide Intercellular Adhesin Expression during High Shear Stress

    PubMed Central

    Schaeffer, Carolyn R.; Hoang, Tra-My N.; Sudbeck, Craig M.; Alawi, Malik; Tolo, Isaiah E.; Robinson, D. Ashley; Horswill, Alexander R.; Rohde, Holger

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Staphylococcus epidermidis is a leading cause of hospital-associated infections, including those of intravascular catheters, cerebrospinal fluid shunts, and orthopedic implants. Multiple biofilm matrix molecules with heterogeneous characteristics have been identified, including proteinaceous, polysaccharide, and nucleic acid factors. Two of the best-studied components in S. epidermidis include accumulation-associated protein (Aap) and polysaccharide intercellular adhesin (PIA), produced by the enzymatic products of the icaADBC operon. Biofilm composition varies by strain as well as environmental conditions, and strains producing PIA-mediated biofilms are more robust. Clinically, biofilm-mediated infections occur in a variety of anatomical sites with diverse physiological properties. To test the hypothesis that matrix composition exhibits niche specificity, biofilm-related genetic and physical properties were compared between S. epidermidis strains isolated from high-shear and low-shear environments. Among a collection of 105 clinical strains, significantly more isolates from high-shear environments carried the icaADBC operon than did those from low-shear settings (43.9% versus 22.9%, P < 0.05), while there was no significant difference in the presence of aap (77.2% versus 75.0%, P > 0.05). Additionally, a significantly greater number of high-shear isolates were capable of forming biofilm in vitro in a microtiter assay (82.5% versus 45.8%, P < 0.0001). However, even among high-shear clinical isolates, less than half contained the icaADBC locus; therefore, we selected for ica-negative variants with increased attachment to abiotic surfaces to examine PIA-independent biofilm mechanisms. Sequencing of selected variants identified substitutions capable of enhancing biofilm formation in multiple genes, further highlighting the heterogeneity of S. epidermidis biofilm molecules and mechanisms. IMPORTANCE Staphylococcus epidermidis is a leading cause of

  3. Size dependent elastic modulus and mechanical resilience of dental enamel.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Simona; Shaw, Jeremy; Zhao, Xiaoli; Abbott, Paul V; Munroe, Paul; Xu, Jiang; Habibi, Daryoush; Xie, Zonghan

    2014-03-21

    Human tooth enamel exhibits a unique microstructure able to sustain repeated mechanical loading during dental function. Although notable advances have been made towards understanding the mechanical characteristics of enamel, challenges remain in the testing and interpretation of its mechanical properties. For example, enamel was often tested under dry conditions, significantly different from its native environment. In addition, constant load, rather than indentation depth, has been used when mapping the mechanical properties of enamel. In this work, tooth specimens are prepared under hydrated conditions and their stiffnesses are measured by depth control across the thickness of enamel. Crystal arrangement is postulated, among other factors, to be responsible for the size dependent indentation modulus of enamel. Supported by a simple structure model, effective crystal orientation angle is calculated and found to facilitate shear sliding in enamel under mechanical contact. In doing so, the stress build-up is eased and structural integrity is maintained.

  4. Young's modulus of BF wood material by longitudinal vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phadke, Sushil; Darshan Shrivastava, Bhakt; Mishra, Ashutosh; Dagaonkar, N.

    2014-09-01

    All engineered structures are designed and built with consideration of resisting the same fundamental forces of tension, compression, shear, bending and torsion. Structural design is a balance of these internal and external forces. So, it is interesting to calculate the Young's moduli of Borassus Flabellifier BF wood are quite important from the application point of view. The ultrasonic waves are closely related with the elastic and inelastic properties of the materials. In the present study, we measured longitudinal wave ultrasonic velocities in BF wood material by longitudinal vibration method. After measuring ultrasonic velocity in BF wood material, we calculated Young's modulus of Borassus Flabellifier BF wood material. We used ultrasonic interferometer for measuring longitudinal wave ultrasonic velocity in BF wood material made by Mittal Enterprises, New Delhi, India in our laboratory. Borassus Flabellifier BF wood material was collected from Dhar district of Madhya Pradesh, India.

  5. Elastic area compressibility modulus of red cell membrane.

    PubMed Central

    Evans, E A; Waugh, R; Melnik, L

    1976-01-01

    Micropipette measurements of isotropic tension vs. area expansion in pre-swollen single human red cells gave a value of 288 +/- 50 SD dyn/cm for the elastic, area compressibility modulus of the total membrane at 25 degrees C. This elastic constant, characterizing the resistance to area expansion or compression, is about 4 X 10(4) times greater than the elastic modulus for shear rigidity; therefore, in situations where deformation of the membrane does not require large isotropic tensions (e.g., in passage through normal capillaries), the membrane can be treated by a simple constitutive relation for a two-dimensionally, incompressible material (i.e. fixed area). The tension was found to be linear and reversible for the range of area changes observed (within the experimental system resolution of 10%). The maximum fractional area expansion required to produce lysis was uniformly distributed between 2 and 4% with 3% average and 0.7% SD. By heating the cells to 50 degrees C, it appears that the structural matrix (responsible for the shear rigidity and most of the strength in isotropic tension) is disrupted and primarily the lipid bilayer resists lysis. Therefore, the relative contributions of the structural matrix and lipid bilayer to the elastic, area compressibility could be estimated. The maximum isotropic tension at 25 degrees C is 10-12 dyn/cm and at 50 degrees C is between 3 and 4 dyn/cm. From this data, the respective compressibilities are estimated at 193 dyn/cm and 95 dyn/cm for structural network and bilayer. The latter value correlates well with data on in vitro, monolayer surface pressure versus area curves at oil-water interfaces. Images FIGURE 2 PMID:1276386

  6. High-resolution compact shear stress sensor for direct measurement of skin friction in fluid flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Muchen; Kim, Chang-Jin ``Cj''

    2015-11-01

    The high-resolution measurement of skin friction in complex flows has long been of great interest but also a challenge in fluid mechanics. Compared with indirect measurement methods (e.g., laser Doppler velocimetry), direct measurement methods (e.g., floating element) do not involve any analogy and assumption but tend to suffer from instrumentation challenges, such as low sensing resolution or misalignments. Recently, silicon micromachined floating plates showed good resolution and perfect alignment but were too small for general purposes and too fragile to attach other surface samples repeatedly. In this work, we report a skin friction sensor consisting of a monolithic floating plate and a high-resolution optical encoder to measure its displacement. The key for the high resolution is in the suspension beams, which are very narrow (e.g., 0.25 mm) to sense small frictions along the flow direction but thick (e.g., 5 mm) to be robust along all other directions. This compact, low profile, and complete sensor is easy to use and allows repeated attachment and detachment of surface samples. The sheer-stress sensor has been tested in water tunnel and towing tank at different flow conditions, showing high sensing resolution for skin friction measurement. Supported by National Science Foundation (NSF) (No. 1336966) and Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) (No. HR0011-15-2-0021).

  7. Shear-stress relaxation and ensemble transformation of shear-stress autocorrelation functions.

    PubMed

    Wittmer, J P; Xu, H; Baschnagel, J

    2015-02-01

    We revisit the relation between the shear-stress relaxation modulus G(t), computed at finite shear strain 0<γ≪1, and the shear-stress autocorrelation functions C(t)|(γ) and C(t)|(τ) computed, respectively, at imposed strain γ and mean stress τ. Focusing on permanent isotropic spring networks it is shown theoretically and computationally that in general G(t)=C(t)|(τ)=C(t)|(γ)+G(eq) for t>0 with G(eq) being the static equilibrium shear modulus. G(t) and C(t)|(γ) thus must become different for solids and it is impossible to obtain G(eq) alone from C(t)|(γ) as often assumed. We comment briefly on self-assembled transient networks where G(eq)(f) must vanish for a finite scission-recombination frequency f. We argue that G(t)=C(t)|(τ)=C(t)|(γ) should reveal an intermediate plateau set by the shear modulus G(eq)(f=0) of the quenched network.

  8. Turbulence measurements of high shear flow fields in a turbomachine seal configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, Gerald L.; Deotte, Robert E., Jr.; Thames, H. Davis, III

    1992-09-01

    The mean velocity and Reynolds stress tensor throughout a whirling annular seal are presented. The data was collected with a three dimensional laser Doppler velocimeter using phase averaging. Two axial flow conditions (Re = 12,000 and 24,000) were studied at one shaft speed (Ta = 6,600). The eccentricity and whirl ratios were 50 and 100 percent, respectively. There is a region of high axial momentum in this region is higher in the low Reynolds number case due to an axial recirculation zone that occurs on the suction side of the rotor at the inlet. The recirculation zone does not occur in the high Reynolds number case. At both Reynolds numbers, there is a recirculation zone on the rotor surface in the pressure side of the inlet. This recirculation zone extends from 20 to 200 degrees rotor zenith in the tangential direction, and is one third of a clearance wide radially. The high Reynolds number recirculation zone is 1.5 mean clearances long, while the low Reynolds number zone extends 2 mean clearances downstream. When compared to previous studies, it is apparent that the tangential momentum is no greater for a seal with whirl than for one without if other parameters are constant. Areas of high tangential momentum occur in the clearance where the axial momentum is low. Average exit plane tangential velocities in the high Reynolds number case are 1.5 times greater than those in the other flow case. These results are in general agreement with predictions made by other investigators.

  9. Turbulence measurements of high shear flow fields in a turbomachine seal configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Gerald L.; Deotte, Robert E., Jr.; Thames, H. Davis, III.

    1992-01-01

    The mean velocity and Reynolds stress tensor throughout a whirling annular seal are presented. The data was collected with a three dimensional laser Doppler velocimeter using phase averaging. Two axial flow conditions (Re = 12,000 and 24,000) were studied at one shaft speed (Ta = 6,600). The eccentricity and whirl ratios were 50 and 100 percent, respectively. There is a region of high axial momentum in this region is higher in the low Reynolds number case due to an axial recirculation zone that occurs on the suction side of the rotor at the inlet. The recirculation zone does not occur in the high Reynolds number case. At both Reynolds numbers, there is a recirculation zone on the rotor surface in the pressure side of the inlet. This recirculation zone extends from 20 to 200 degrees rotor zenith in the tangential direction, and is one third of a clearance wide radially. The high Reynolds number recirculation zone is 1.5 mean clearances long, while the low Reynolds number zone extends 2 mean clearances downstream. When compared to previous studies, it is apparent that the tangential momentum is no greater for a seal with whirl than for one without if other parameters are constant. Areas of high tangential momentum occur in the clearance where the axial momentum is low. Average exit plane tangential velocities in the high Reynolds number case are 1.5 times greater than those in the other flow case. These results are in general agreement with predictions made by other investigators.

  10. Elevated Electrochemical Impedance in the Endoluminal Regions with High Shear Stress: Implication for Assessing Lipid-Rich Atherosclerotic Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Fei; Lee, Juhyun; Jen, Nelson; Li, Xiang; Zhang, Qian; Tang, Rui; Zhou, Qifa; Kim, Eun. S.; Hsiai, Tzung K.

    2012-01-01

    Background Identifying metabolically active atherosclerotic lesions remains an unmet clinical challenge during coronary intervention. Electrochemical impedance (EIS) increased in response to oxidized low density lipoprotein (oxLDL)-laden lesions. We hereby assessed whether integrating EIS with intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) and shear stress (ISS) provided a new strategy to assess oxLDL-laden lesions in the fat-fed New Zealand White (NZW) rabbits. Methods and Results A micro-heat transfer sensor was deployed to acquire the ISS profiles at baseline and post high-fat diet (HD) in the NZW rabbits (n=8). After 9 weeks of HD, serum oxLDL levels (mg/dL) increased by 140-fold, accompanied by a 1.5-fold increase in kinematic viscosity (cP) in the HD group. Time-averaged ISS (ISSave) in the thoracic aorta also increased in the HD group (baseline: 17.61±0.24 vs. 9 weeks: 25.22±0.95 dyne/cm2, n=4), but remained unchanged in the normal diet group (baseline: 22.85±0.53 dyne/cm2 vs. 9 weeks: 22.37±0.57 dyne/cm2, n=4). High-frequency Intravascular Ultrasound (IVUS) revealed atherosclerotic lesions in the regions with augmented ISSave, and concentric bipolar microelectrodes demonstrated elevated EIS signals, which were correlated with prominent anti-oxLDL immuno-staining (oxLDL-free regions: 497±55 Ω, n = 8 vs. oxLDL-rich lesions: 679±125 Ω, n = 12, P < 0.05). The equivalent circuit model for tissue resistance between the lesion-free and ox-LDL-rich lesions further validated the experimental EIS signals. Conclusions By applying electrochemical impedance in conjunction with shear stress and high-frequency ultrasound sensors, we provided a new strategy to identify oxLDL-laden lesions. The study demonstrated the feasibility of integrating EIS, ISS, and IVUS for a catheter-based approach to assess mechanically unstable plaque. PMID:23318546

  11. Lateral shear interferometry with holo shear lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joenathan, C.; Mohanty, R. K.; Sirohi, R. S.

    1984-12-01

    A simple method for obtaining lateral shear using holo shear lenses (HSL) has been discussed. This simple device which produces lateral shears in the orthogonal directions has been used for lens testing. The holo shear lens is placed at or near the focus of the lens to be tested. It has also been shown that HSL can be used in speckle shear interferometry as it performs both the functions of shearing and imaging.

  12. Design, analysis, and initial testing of a fiber-optic shear gage for three-dimensional, high-temperature flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orr, Matthew W.

    This investigation concerns the design, analysis, and initial testing of a new, two-component wall shear gage for 3D, high-temperature flows. This gage is a direct-measuring, non-nulling design with a round head surrounded by a small gap. Two flexure wheels are used to allow small motions of the floating head. Fiber-optic displacement sensors measure how far the polished faces of counterweights on the wheels move in relation to a fixed housing as the primary measurement system. No viscous damping was required. The gage has both fiber-optic instrumentation and strain gages mounted on the flexures for validation of the newer fiber optics. The sensor is constructed of Haynes RTM 230RTM, a high-temperature nickel alloy. The gage housing is made of 316 stainless steel. All components of the gage in pure fiber-optic form can survive to a temperature of 1073 K. The bonding methods of the backup strain gages limit their maximum temperature to 473 K. The dynamic range of the gage is from 0--500 Pa (0--10g) and higher shears can be measured by changing the floating head size. Extensive use of finite element modeling was critical to the design and analysis of the gage. Static structural, modal, and thermal analyses were performed on the flexures using the ANSYS finite element package. Static finite element analysis predicted the response of the flexures to a given load, and static calibrations using a direct force method confirmed these results. Finite element modal analysis results were within 16.4% for the first mode and within 30% for the second mode when compared with the experimentally determined modes. Vibration characteristics of the gage were determined from experimental free vibration data after the gage was subjected to an impulse. Uncertainties in the finished geometry make this level of error acceptable. A transient thermal analysis examined the effects of a very high heat flux on the exposed head of the gage. The 100,000 W/m2 heat flux used in this analysis is

  13. High shear rate flow in a linear stroke magnetorheological energy absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, W.; Wereley, N. M.; Hiemenz, G. J.; Ngatu, G. T.

    2014-05-01

    To provide adaptive stroking load in the crew seats of ground vehicles to protect crew from blast or impact loads, a magnetorheological energy absorber (MREA) or shock absorber was developed. The MREA provides appropriate levels of controllable stroking load for different occupant weights and peak acceleration because the viscous stroking load generated by the MREA force increases with velocity squared, thereby reducing its controllable range at high piston velocity. Therefore, MREA behavior at high piston velocity is analyzed and validated experimentally in order to investigate the effects of velocity and magnetic field on MREA performance. The analysis used to predict the MREA force as a function of piston velocity squared and applied field is presented. A conical fairing is mounted to the piston head of the MREA in order reduce predicted inlet flow loss by 9% at nominal velocity of 8 m/s, which resulted in a viscous force reduction of nominally 4%. The MREA behavior is experimentally measured using a high speed servo-hydraulic testing system for speeds up to 8 m/s. The measured MREA force is used to validate the analysis, which captures the transient force quite accurately, although the peak force is under-predicted at the peak speed of 8 m/s.

  14. Correlation of tensile and shear strengths of metals with their friction properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1982-01-01

    The relation between the theoretical tensile and the shear strengths and the friction properties of metals in contact with diamond, boron nitride, silicon carbide, manganese-zinc ferrite, and the metals themselves in vacuum was investigated. The relationship between the actual shear strength and the friction properties of the metal was also investigated. An estimate of the theoretical uniaxial tensile strength was obtained in terms of the equilibrium surface energy, interplanar spacing of the planes perpendicular to the tensile axis, and the Young's modulus of elasticity. An estimate of the theoretical shear strength for metals was obtained from the shear modulus, the repeat distance of atoms in the direction of shear of the metal and the interplanar spacing of the shear planes. The coefficient of friction for metals was found to be related to the theoretical tensile, theoretical shear, and actual shear strengths of metals. The higher the strength of the metal, the lower the coefficient of friction.

  15. Clarithromycin highly-loaded gastro-floating fine granules prepared by high-shear melt granulation can enhance the efficacy of Helicobacter pylori eradication.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Hajime; Iwao, Yasunori; Mizoguchi, Midori; Noguchi, Shuji; Itai, Shigeru

    2015-05-01

    In an effort to develop a new gastro-retentive drug delivery system (GRDDS) without a large amount of additives, 75% clarithromycin (CAM) loaded fine granules were prepared with three different hydrophobic binders by high-shear melt granulation and their properties were evaluated. Granules containing the higher hydrophobic binder showed sustained drug release and were able to float over 24h. The synchrotron X-ray CT measurement indicated that both the high hydrophobicity of the binder and the void space inside the granules might be involved in their buoyancy. In an in vivo experiment, the floating granules more effectively eradicated Helicobacter pylori than a CAM suspension by remaining in the stomach for a longer period. In short, CAM highly-loaded gastro-floating fine granules can enhance the eradication efficiency of H. pylori compared with CAM alone.

  16. Spheronization mechanism of pharmaceutical material crystals processed by extremely high shearing force using a mechanical powder processor.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Keita; Kido, Keisuke; Niwa, Toshiyuki

    2016-10-01

    We aimed to elucidate the mechanism of the spheronization of pharmaceutical material crystals through extremely high shearing force using a mechanical powder processor, which produces spherical crystals without a solvent. The spheronization of theophylline, acetaminophen, clarithromycin, ascorbic acid and lactose was investigated, and the relationship between the spheronization mechanism and material characteristics was also examined. Theophylline and ascorbic acid crystals were partially destroyed during mechanical processing, yielding large particles and dust, and the large fragments were then layered with powder to produce spheres with a core-shell structure. Acetaminophen crystals were completely fragmented under stress, yielding fine particles to which powder then agglomerated to produce spheres with a mosaic structure. Clarithromycin and lactose crystals were not spheronized. Our results showed that the fracture strength of intact material may be closely related to the size of intermediate fragments, determining spheronization mechanism. Furthermore, the results for powder cohesiveness suggest that the materials with moderate-to-high cohesiveness (theophylline, acetaminophen and ascorbic acid) are finally spheronized regardless of the degree of the strength, whereas those with low cohesiveness (clarithromycin and lactose) are not spheronized due to poor granulation. Hence, the cohesiveness of a material has a significant effect on the success of mechanical spheronization processes.

  17. Spheronization mechanism of pharmaceutical material crystals processed by extremely high shearing force using a mechanical powder processor.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Keita; Kido, Keisuke; Niwa, Toshiyuki

    2016-10-01

    We aimed to elucidate the mechanism of the spheronization of pharmaceutical material crystals through extremely high shearing force using a mechanical powder processor, which produces spherical crystals without a solvent. The spheronization of theophylline, acetaminophen, clarithromycin, ascorbic acid and lactose was investigated, and the relationship between the spheronization mechanism and material characteristics was also examined. Theophylline and ascorbic acid crystals were partially destroyed during mechanical processing, yielding large particles and dust, and the large fragments were then layered with powder to produce spheres with a core-shell structure. Acetaminophen crystals were completely fragmented under stress, yielding fine particles to which powder then agglomerated to produce spheres with a mosaic structure. Clarithromycin and lactose crystals were not spheronized. Our results showed that the fracture strength of intact material may be closely related to the size of intermediate fragments, determining spheronization mechanism. Furthermore, the results for powder cohesiveness suggest that the materials with moderate-to-high cohesiveness (theophylline, acetaminophen and ascorbic acid) are finally spheronized regardless of the degree of the strength, whereas those with low cohesiveness (clarithromycin and lactose) are not spheronized due to poor granulation. Hence, the cohesiveness of a material has a significant effect on the success of mechanical spheronization processes. PMID:27368746

  18. Multi-channel analysis of surface waves MASW of models with high shear-wave velocity contrast

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ivanov, J.; Miller, R.D.; Peterie, S.; Zeng, C.; Xia, J.; Schwenk, T.

    2011-01-01

    We use the multi-channel analysis of surface waves MASW method to analyze synthetic seismic data calculated using models with high shear-wave velocity Vs contrast. The MASW dispersion-curve images of the Rayleigh wave are obtained using various sets of source-offset and spread-size configurations from the synthetic seismic data and compared with the theoretically calculated fundamental- and higher-mode dispersion-curves. Such tests showed that most of the dispersion-curve images are dominated by higher-mode energy at the low frequencies, especially when analyzing data from long receiver offsets and thus significantly divert from numerically expected dispersion-curve trends, which can lead to significant Vs overestimation. Further analysis showed that using data with relatively short spread lengths and source offsets can image the desired fundamental-mode of the Rayleigh wave that matches the numerically expected dispersion-curve pattern. As a result, it was concluded that it might be possible to avoid higher-mode contamination at low frequencies at sites with high Vs contrast by appropriate selection of spread size and seismic source offset. ?? 2011 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  19. Validation of a turbulent Kelvin-Helmholtz shear layer model using a high-energy-density OMEGA laser experiment.

    PubMed

    Hurricane, O A; Smalyuk, V A; Raman, K; Schilling, O; Hansen, J F; Langstaff, G; Martinez, D; Park, H-S; Remington, B A; Robey, H F; Greenough, J A; Wallace, R; Di Stefano, C A; Drake, R P; Marion, D; Krauland, C M; Kuranz, C C

    2012-10-12

    Following the successful demonstration of an OMEGA laser-driven platform for generating and studying nearly two-dimensional unstable plasma shear layers [Hurricane et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 056305 (2009); Harding et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 045005 (2009)], this Letter reports on the first quantitative measurement of turbulent mixing in a high-energy-density plasma. As a blast wave moves parallel to an unperturbed interface between a low-density foam and a high-density plastic, baroclinic vorticity is deposited at the interface and a Kelvin-Helmholtz instability-driven turbulent mixing layer is created in the postshock flow due to surface roughness. The spatial scale and density profile of the turbulent layer are diagnosed using x-ray radiography with sufficiently small uncertainty so that the data can be used to ~0.17 μm) in the postshock plasma flow are consistent with an "inertial subrange," within which a Kolmogorov turbulent energy cascade can be active. An illustration of comparing the data set with the predictions of a two-equation turbulence model in the ares radiation hydrodynamics code is also presented. PMID:23102319

  20. Shear rigidity of spread stearic acid monolayers on water

    SciTech Connect

    Abraham, B.M.; Ketterson, J.B.; Miyano, K.; Kueny, A.

    1981-09-15

    The effect of Al/sup 3 +/, Fe/sup 3 +/, Ca/sup 2 +/, and Mg/sup 2 +/ ions and of pH on the two-dimensional shear modulus of stearic acid spread on a water substrate was determined. A large shear modulus was displayed by the films when the subphase contained Al/sup 3 +/ and Fe/sup 3 +/ ions at the self-buffered pH. With Fe/sup 2 +/ dissolved in the subphase, the film displayed a viscous relaxation when strained but no residual stress was observed. No effect was observed with the Ca/sup 2 +/ or Mg/sup 2 +/. Reducing the pH value in the subphase with the trivalent ions caused the shear modulus to disappear. The observations are interpreted in terms of hydrogen bonding.

  1. Shear rigidity of spread stearic acid monolayers on water

    SciTech Connect

    Abraham, B.M.; Ketterson, J.B.; Miyano, K.; Kueny, A.

    1981-01-01

    The effect of Al/sup 3 +/, Fe/sup 3 +/, Ca/sup 2 +/, and Mg/sup 2 +/ ions and of pH on the two-dimensional shear modulus of stearic acid spread on a water substrate was determined. A large shear modulus was displayed by the films when the subphase contained Al/sup 3 +/ and Fe/sup 3 +/ ions at the self buffered pH. With Fe/sup 3 +/ dissolved in the subphase, the film displayed a viscous relaxation when strained but no residual stress was observed. No effect was observed with the Ca/sup 2 +/ or Mg/sup 2 +/. Reducing the pH value in the subphase with the trivalent ions caused the shear modulus to disappear. The observations are interpreted in terms of hydrogen bonding.

  2. High resolution imaging of shearing configurations of [gamma][prime] precipitates in Ni-based superalloys. [Ni-6. 5Co-7. 5Cr-5. 3Al-5. 5W-8Ta-2Mo-1. 2Ti

    SciTech Connect

    Decamps, B.; Condat, M. . Lab. de Metallurgie Structurale); Penisson, J.M.; Guetaz, L. . Dept. de Recherche Fondamentale sur la Matiere Condensee); Morton, A.J. . Division of Material Science and Technology)

    1994-06-01

    It has been shown that shearing of [gamma][prime] precipitates involving superlattice stacking faults is one of the important mode of deformation in Ni-based superalloys containing a high volume fraction of precipitates. The purpose of this paper is to show how high resolution observations can give pertinent and precise information about shearing configurations of precipitates involving superlattice stacking faults. As a result, together with previous weak-beam studies, a shearing mechanisms connected to the atomic structure will be proposed.

  3. A high energy density shock driven Kelvin-Helmholtz shear layer experimenta)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurricane, O. A.; Hansen, J. F.; Robey, H. F.; Remington, B. A.; Bono, M. J.; Harding, E. C.; Drake, R. P.; Kuranz, C. C.

    2009-05-01

    Radiographic data from a novel and highly successful high energy density Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability experiment is presented along with synapses of the theory and simulation behind the target design. Data on instability growth are compared to predictions from simulation and theory. The key role played by baroclinic vorticity production in the functioning of the target and the key design parameters are also discussed. The data show the complete evolution of large distinct KH eddies, from formation to turbulent break-up. Unexpectedly, low density bubbles comparable to the vortex size are observed forming in the free-stream region above each vortex at late time. These bubbles have the appearance of localized shocks, possibly supporting a theoretical fluid dynamics conjecture about the existence of supersonic bubbles over the vortical structure [transonic convective Mach numbers, D. Papamoschou and A. Roshko, J. Fluid Mech. 197, 453 (1988)] that support localized shocks (shocklets) not extending into the free stream (P. E. Dimotakis, Proceedings of the 22nd Fluid Dynamics, Plasma Dynamics and Lasers Conference, 1991, Paper No. AIAA 91-1724). However, it is also possible that these low density bubbles are the result of a cavitationlike effect. Hypothesis that may explain the appearance of low density bubbles will be discussed.

  4. A high energy density shock driven Kelvin-Helmholtz shear layer experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Hurricane, O. A.; Hansen, J. F.; Robey, H. F.; Remington, B. A.; Bono, M. J.; Harding, E. C.; Drake, R. P.; Kuranz, C. C.

    2009-05-15

    Radiographic data from a novel and highly successful high energy density Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability experiment is presented along with synapses of the theory and simulation behind the target design. Data on instability growth are compared to predictions from simulation and theory. The key role played by baroclinic vorticity production in the functioning of the target and the key design parameters are also discussed. The data show the complete evolution of large distinct KH eddies, from formation to turbulent break-up. Unexpectedly, low density bubbles comparable to the vortex size are observed forming in the free-stream region above each vortex at late time. These bubbles have the appearance of localized shocks, possibly supporting a theoretical fluid dynamics conjecture about the existence of supersonic bubbles over the vortical structure [transonic convective Mach numbers, D. Papamoschou and A. Roshko, J. Fluid Mech. 197, 453 (1988)] that support localized shocks (shocklets) not extending into the free stream (P. E. Dimotakis, Proceedings of the 22nd Fluid Dynamics, Plasma Dynamics and Lasers Conference, 1991, Paper No. AIAA 91-1724). However, it is also possible that these low density bubbles are the result of a cavitationlike effect. Hypothesis that may explain the appearance of low density bubbles will be discussed.

  5. A novel cross-shear metric for application in computer simulation of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene wear.

    PubMed

    Petrella, Anthony J; Armstrong, Jeffrey R; Laz, Peter J; Rullkoetter, Paul J

    2012-01-01

    Wear testing of polyethylene in total joint replacements is common and required for any new device. Computational wear modelling has obvious utility in this context as it can be conducted with much greater economy than physical testing. Archard's law has become the accepted standard for wear simulation in total joints but it does not account for cross-shear, which is known to increase wear significantly relative to unidirectional sliding. The purpose of this study was to develop a robust cross-shear model applicable to any interface geometry under any kinematic conditions. The proposed metric, x (*), is distinguished from existing cross-shear models by the fact that it measures cross-path motion incrementally throughout a motion cycle and quantifies cross-shear based on incremental changes in sliding direction. Validation showed strong support for the predictive capability of x (*) when applied to pin-on-disc test data. PMID:22136186

  6. Acoustic emission monitoring from a lab scale high shear granulator--a novel approach.

    PubMed

    Watson, N J; Povey, M J W; Reynolds, G K; Xu, B H; Ding, Y

    2014-04-25

    A new approach to the monitoring of granulation processes using passive acoustics together with precise control over the granulation process has highlighted the importance of particle-particle and particle-bowl collisions in acoustic emission. The results have shown that repeatable acoustic results could be obtained but only when a spray nozzle water addition system was used. Acoustic emissions were recorded from a transducer attached to the bowl and an airborne transducer. It was found that the airborne transducer detected very little from the granulation and only experienced small changes throughout the process. The results from the bowl transducer showed that during granulation the frequency content of the acoustic emission shifted towards the lower frequencies. Results from the discrete element model indicate that when larger particles are used the number of collisions the particles experience reduces. This is a result of the volume conservation methodology used in this study, therefore larger particles results in less particles. These simulation results coupled with previous theoretical work on the frequency content of an impacting sphere explain why the frequency content of the acoustic emissions reduces during granule growth. The acoustic system used was also clearly able to identify when large over-wetted granules were present in the system, highlighting its benefit for detecting undesirable operational conditions. High-speed photography was used to study if visual changes in the granule properties could be linked with the changing acoustic emissions. The high speed photography was only possible towards the latter stages of the granulation process and it was found that larger granules produced a higher magnitude of acoustic emission across a broader frequency range.

  7. Acoustic emission monitoring from a lab scale high shear granulator--a novel approach.

    PubMed

    Watson, N J; Povey, M J W; Reynolds, G K; Xu, B H; Ding, Y

    2014-04-25

    A new approach to the monitoring of granulation processes using passive acoustics together with precise control over the granulation process has highlighted the importance of particle-particle and particle-bowl collisions in acoustic emission. The results have shown that repeatable acoustic results could be obtained but only when a spray nozzle water addition system was used. Acoustic emissions were recorded from a transducer attached to the bowl and an airborne transducer. It was found that the airborne transducer detected very little from the granulation and only experienced small changes throughout the process. The results from the bowl transducer showed that during granulation the frequency content of the acoustic emission shifted towards the lower frequencies. Results from the discrete element model indicate that when larger particles are used the number of collisions the particles experience reduces. This is a result of the volume conservation methodology used in this study, therefore larger particles results in less particles. These simulation results coupled with previous theoretical work on the frequency content of an impacting sphere explain why the frequency content of the acoustic emissions reduces during granule growth. The acoustic system used was also clearly able to identify when large over-wetted granules were present in the system, highlighting its benefit for detecting undesirable operational conditions. High-speed photography was used to study if visual changes in the granule properties could be linked with the changing acoustic emissions. The high speed photography was only possible towards the latter stages of the granulation process and it was found that larger granules produced a higher magnitude of acoustic emission across a broader frequency range. PMID:24491527

  8. Elastic modulus of polypyrrole nanotubes: AFM measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuenot, Stéphane; Demoustier-Champagne, Sophie; Nysten, Bernard

    2001-03-01

    Polypyrrole nanotubes were electrochemically synthesized within the pores of nanoporous track-etched membranes. After dissolution of the template membrane, they were dispersed on PET membranes. Their tensile elastic modulus was measured by probing them in three points bending using an atomic force microscope. The elastic modulus was deduced from force-curve measurements. In this communication, the effect of the synthesis temperature and of the nanotube diameter will be presented. Especially it will be shown that the elastic modulus strongly increases when the nanotube outer diameter is reduced from 160 nm down to 35 nm. These results are in good agreement with previous results showing that the electrical conductivity of polypyrrole nanotubes increases by more than one order of magnitude when the diameter decreases in the same range. These behaviors could be explained by a larger ratio of well-oriented defect-free polymer chains in smaller tubes.

  9. Layered atomic structures of silver vanadate compounds for low shear strength at high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abunada, A.; Aouadi, S.; Ge, Q.; Tsige, M.

    2010-03-01

    The aerospace industry has been a strong driving force for the creation of new and effective wear-resistant and lubricious materials at high temperatures (T > 500 C). Solid lubricants (SLs) such as graphite and molybdenum disulfide oxidize and, hence, degrade rapidly at T > 350 C. The selection of oxides is a clear viable alternative for the choice of SLs when confronting the problem of oxidation. Double metal oxides of the form MexTMyOz, where Me is a noble metal and TM a transition metal, were found to exhibit relatively low coefficients of friction in the 500 to 700 C range (μ = 0.1-0.3) . Very recently, our group has undertaken to understand the friction properties of a silver vanadate, which was shown to be an effective lubricant up to 1000 C. We show, using ab-initio calculations within the density functional theory framework, that the layered atomic structure of silver vanadate with weak inter-planar bonds that facilitate sliding, resulted in a low coefficient of friction.

  10. Shear Relaxations of Confined Liquids.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carson, George Amos, Jr.

    Ultrathin (<40 A) films of octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (OMCTS), hexadecane, and dodecane were subjected to linear and non-linear oscillatory shear between flat plates. Shearing frequencies of 0.1 to 800 s^{-1} were applied at pressures from zero to 0.8 MPa using a surface rheometer only recently developed. In most cases the plates were atomically smooth mica surfaces; the role of surface interactions was examined by replacing these with alkyl chain monolayers. OMCTS and hexadecane were examined at a temperature about 5 Celsius degrees above their melting points and tended to solidify. Newtonian plateaus having enormous viscosities were observed at low shear rates. The onset of shear thinning implied relaxation times of about 0.1 s in the linear structure of the confined liquids. Large activation volumes (~80 nm ^3) suggested that shear involved large-scale collective motion. Dodecane was studied at a much higher temperature relative to its melting point and showed no signs of impending solidification though it exhibited well-defined regions of Newtonian response and power law shear thinning. When treated with molecular sieves before use, dodecane had relaxation times which were short (0.02 s) compared to hexadecane, but still exhibited large-scale collective motion. When treated with silica gel, an unexplained long -time relaxation (10 s) was seen in the Newtonian viscosity of dodecane. The relaxation time of the linear structure, 0.005 s was very small, and the storage modulus was unresolvable. The small activation volume (7nm^3) indicated a much lower level of collective motion. The activation volume remained small when dodecane was confined between tightly bound, low energy, alkyl monolayers. At low strains the storage and loss moduli became very large (>10^4 Pa), probably due to interactions with flaws in the monolayers. Dramatic signs of wall slip were observed at large strains even at low pressures.

  11. Measuring the Weibull modulus of microscope slides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorensen, Carl D.

    1992-01-01

    The objectives are that students will understand why a three-point bending test is used for ceramic specimens, learn how Weibull statistics are used to measure the strength of brittle materials, and appreciate the amount of variation in the strength of brittle materials with low Weibull modulus. They will understand how the modulus of rupture is used to represent the strength of specimens in a three-point bend test. In addition, students will learn that a logarithmic transformation can be used to convert an exponent into the slope of a straight line. The experimental procedures are explained.

  12. Span-to-depth ratio effect on shear strength of steel fiber-reinforced high-strength concrete deep beams using ANN model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naik, Uday; Kute, Sunil

    2013-12-01

    The paper predicts the shear strength of high-strength steel fiber-reinforced concrete deep beams. It studies the effect of clear span-to-overall depth ratio on shear capacity of steel fiber high-strength deep beams using artificial neural network (ANN8). The three-layered model has eight input nodes which represent width, effective depth, volume fraction, fiber aspect ratio and shear span-to-depth ratio, longitudinal steel, compressive strength of concrete, and clear span-to-overall depth ratio. The model predicts the shear strength of high-strength steel fiber deep beams to be reasonably good when compared with the results of proposed equations by researchers as well as the results obtained by neural network (ANN7) which is developed for seven inputs excluding span-to-depth ratio. The developed neural network ANN8 proves the versatility of artificial neural networks to establish the relations between various parameters affecting complex behavior of steel fiber-reinforced concrete deep beams and costly experimental processes.

  13. The effect of shearing strain-rate on the ultimate shearing resistance of clay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, R. Y. K.

    1975-01-01

    An approach for investigating the shearing resistance of cohesive soils subjected to a high rate of shearing strain is described. A fast step-loading torque apparatus was used to induce a state of pure shear in a hollow cylindrical soil specimen. The relationship between shearing resistance and rate of shear deformation was established for various soil densities expressed in terms of initial void ratio or water content. For rate of shearing deformation studies, the shearing resistance increases initially with shearing velocity, but subsequently reaches a terminal value as the shearing velocity increases. The terminal shearing resistance is also found to increase as the density of the soil increases. The results of this investigation are useful in the rheological study of clay. It is particularly important for mobility problems of soil runways, since the soil resistance is found to be sensitive to the rate of shearing.

  14. The effect of shearing strain-rate on the ultimate shearing resistance of clay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, R. Y. K.

    1976-01-01

    The shearing resistance of cohesive soils subjected to a high rate of shearing strain was investigated. A fast step-loading torque apparatus was used to induce a state of pure shear in a hollow cylindrical soil specimen. The relationship between shearing resistance and rate of shear deformation was established for various soil densities expressed in terms of initial void ratio or water content. For rate of shearing deformation studies to date, the shearing resistance increases initially with shearing velocity but subsequently reaches a terminal value as the shearing velocity increases. The terminal shearing resistance is also found to increase as the density of the soil increases. The results are useful in the rheological study of clay. It is particularly important for mobility problems of soil runways, since the soil resistance is found to be sensitive to the rate of shearing.

  15. High shear mixing granulation of ibuprofen and beta-cyclodextrin: effects of process variables on ibuprofen dissolution.

    PubMed

    Ghorab, Mohamed K; Adeyeye, Moji Christianah

    2007-01-01

    The aims of the study were to evaluate the effect of high shear mixer (HSM) granulation process parameters and scale-up on wet mass consistency and granulation characteristics. A mixer torque rheometer (MTR) was employed to evaluate the granulating solvents used (water, isopropanol, and 1:1 vol/vol mixture of both) based on the wet mass consistency. Gral 25 and mini-HSM were used for the granulation. The MTR study showed that the water significantly enhanced the beta-cyclodextrin (beta CD) binding tendency and the strength of liquid bridges formed between the particles, whereas the isopropanol/water mixture yielded more suitable agglomerates. Mini-HSM granulation with the isopropanol/water mixture (1:1 vol/vol) showed a reduction in the extent of torque value rise by increasing the impeller speed as a result of more breakdown of agglomerates than coalescence. In contrast, increasing the impeller speed of the Gral 25 resulted in higher torque readings, larger granule size, and consequently, slower dissolution. This was due to a remarkable rise in temperature during Gral granulation that reduced the isopropanol/water ratio in the granulating solvent as a result of evaporation and consequently increased the beta CD binding strength. In general, the HSM granulation retarded ibuprofen dissolution compared with the physical mixture because of densification and agglomeration. However, a successful HSM granulation scale-up was not achieved due to the difference in the solvent mixture's effect from 1 scale to the other. PMID:18181545

  16. The surface roughness of lactose particles can be modulated by wet-smoothing using a high-shear mixer.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Franca; Cocconi, Daniela; Bettini, Ruggero; Giordano, Ferdinando; Santi, Patrizia; Tobyn, Michael; Price, Robert; Young, Paul; Caramella, Carla; Colombo, Paolo

    2004-01-01

    The surface morphology of a-lactose monohydrate particles was modified by a new wet-smoothing process performed in a high-shear mixer using solvents. Successive steps of wetting and drying of lactose powders during rolling in the mixer's cylindrical bowl were performed. Smoothed particles were tested for size distribution, flow, and packing. The wet-smoothing process flattened the surface and rounded the edges of lactose particles. In comparison with original lactose, an improvement of powder packing and flow properties was evidenced. When the process was performed in the presence of a ternary agent such as magnesium stearate, the smoothing was improved. The evolution of rugosity during the smoothing process was assessed through a fractal descriptor of SEM picture. Atomic force microscopy and surface area measurements quantified the surface rugosity. A very significant reduction of the rugosity, more remarkable in the presence of magnesium stearate, was measured. This new process of powder wet-smoothing allows the preparation of lactose particles with different degrees of smoothed surface for the control of flow and packing properties and particle-particle interactions. PMID:15760057

  17. Ultrasonic shear wave couplant

    DOEpatents

    Kupperman, David S.; Lanham, Ronald N.

    1985-01-01

    Ultrasonically testing of an article at high temperatures is accomplished by the use of a compact layer of a dry ceramic powder as a couplant in a method which involves providing an ultrasonic transducer as a probe capable of transmitting shear waves, coupling the probe to the article through a thin compact layer of a dry ceramic powder, propagating a shear wave from the probe through the ceramic powder and into the article to develop echo signals, and analyzing the echo signals to determine at least one physical characteristic of the article.

  18. Ultrasonic shear wave couplant

    DOEpatents

    Kupperman, D.S.; Lanham, R.N.

    1984-04-11

    Ultrasonically testing of an article at high temperatures is accomplished by the use of a compact layer of a dry ceramic powder as a couplant in a method which involves providing an ultrasonic transducer as a probe capable of transmitting shear waves, coupling the probe to the article through a thin compact layer of a dry ceramic powder, propagating a shear wave from the probe through the ceramic powder and into the article to develop echo signals, and analyzing the echo signals to determine at least one physical characteristic of the article.

  19. Real-time monitoring of high-intensity focused ultrasound treatment using axial strain and axial-shear strain elastograms.

    PubMed

    Xia, Rongmin; Thittai, Arun K

    2014-03-01

    Axial strain elastograms (ASEs) have been found to help visualize sonographically invisible thermal lesions. However, in most studies involving high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU)-induced thermal lesions, elastography imaging was performed separately later, after the lesion was formed. In this article, the feasibility of monitoring, in real time, tissue elasticity variation during HIFU treatment and immediately thereafter is explored using quasi-static elastography. Further, in addition to ASEs, we also explore the use of simultaneously acquired axial-shear strain elastograms (ASSEs) for HIFU lesion visualization. Experiments were performed on commercial porcine liver samples in vitro. The HIFU experiments were conducted at two applied acoustic power settings, 35 and 20 W. The experimental setup allowed us to interrupt the HIFU pulse momentarily several different times during treatment to perform elastographic compression and data acquisition. At the end of the experiments, the samples were cut along the imaging plane and photographed to compare size and location of the formed lesion with those visualized on ASEs and ASSEs. Single-lesion and multiple-lesion experiments were performed to assess the contribution of ASEs and ASSEs to lesion visualization and treatment monitoring tasks. At both power settings, ASEs and ASSEs provided accurate location information during HIFU treatment. At the low-power setting case, ASEs and ASSEs provide accurate lesion size in real-time monitoring. Lesion appearance in ASEs and ASSEs was affected by the cavitation bubbles produced at the high-power setting. The results further indicate that the cavitation bubbles influence lesion appearance more in ASEs than in ASSEs. Both ASEs and ASSEs provided accurate size information after a waiting period that allowed the cavitation bubbles to disappear. The results indicate that ASSEs not only improve lesion visualization and size measurement of a single lesion, but, under certain

  20. A regularization-free Young's modulus reconstruction algorithm for ultrasound elasticity imaging.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xiaochang; Gao, Jing; Shao, Jinhua; Luo, Jianwen; Bai, Jing

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasound elasticity imaging aims to reconstruct the distribution of elastic modulus (e.g., Young's modulus) within biological tissues, since the value of elastic modulus is often related to pathological changes. Currently, most elasticity imaging algorithms face a challenge of choosing the value of the regularization constant. We propose a more applicable algorithm without the need of any regularization. This algorithm is not only simple to use, but has a relatively high accuracy. Our method comprises of a nonrigid registration technique and tissue incompressibility assumption to estimate the two-dimensional (2D) displacement field, and finite element method (FEM) to reconstruct the Young's modulus distribution. Simulation and phantom experiments are performed to evaluate the algorithm. Simulation and phantom results showed that the proposed algorithm can reconstruct the Young's modulus with an accuracy of 63∼85%.

  1. Influence of Intensive Melt Shearing on the Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of an Al-Mg Alloy with High Added Impurity Content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, S.; Hari Babu, N.; Scamans, G. M.; Fan, Z.

    2011-10-01

    We have investigated the influence of melt conditioning by intensive shearing on the mechanical behavior and microstructure of Al-Mg-Mn-Fe-Cu-Si alloy sheet produced from a small book mold ingot with high added impurity content. The melt conditioned ingot has fine grains throughout its cross section, whereas a conventionally cast ingot, without melt shearing, has coarser grains and shows a wider variation of grain size. Both needle-shaped and coarse Chinese script iron bearing intermetallic particles are found in the microstructure at the center of the conventionally processed ingot, but for the melt conditioned ingot, only fine Chinese script intermetallic particles are observed. In addition to the iron bearing intermetallics, Mg2Si particles are also observed. The ingots were rolled to thin sheet and solution heat treated (SHT). During rolling, the iron-based intermetallics and Mg2Si particles are broken and aligned along the rolling direction. Yield strength (YS), ultimate tensile strength (UTS), and elongation of the intensively melt sheared and processed sheet are all improved compared to the conventionally cast and processed sheet. Fractographic analysis of the tensile fracture surfaces shows that the clustered and coarse iron bearing intermetallic particles are responsible for the observed reduction in mechanical properties of the conventionally cast sheet. We have shown that by refining the initial microstructure of the ingot by intensive shear melt conditioning, it is possible to achieve improved mechanical properties at the final sheet gage of an AlMgMn alloy with a high content of impurities.

  2. Finite element evaluation of the AIA shear specimen for bone.

    PubMed

    Mahanian, S; Piziali, R L

    1988-01-01

    An elastic-plastic finite element analysis is performed on the AIA shear specimen to evaluate its effectiveness to yield ultimate shear strength values. The effect of geometry, material properties, and yield criteria are discussed in the light of applications to human femoral cortical bone. Specimen dimensions are noted as follows: W, width, D, hole diameter and H, distance between holes. As the H/D ratio increases the stress distribution tends more toward pure shear at the same time the overshoot in the shear distribution increases. An H/D ratio equal to 1.2-1.5 is optimal. The H/W parameter does not affect the overshoot noticeably but it does slightly affect the purity of shear. The material parameters do affect the performance of the shear specimen. However, the effect of the material parameters are far more pronounced in the anisotropic case than it is in the isotropic case. In the isotropic case, the Young modulus does not affect the overshoot. The increase in Poisson's ratio does slightly decrease the overshoot. For the anisotropic case, the increase in the ratio of shear modulus to Young modulus in the transverse direction (G/E2) results in an increase in the overshoot (in the shear distribution). The increase in the ratio of the Young modulus in the transverse direction to that of the axial direction (E2/E1) also results in an increase in the overshoot. Creating a notch at the top of the hole is shown to have the effect of decreasing the overshoot. Its effect on the purity of the shear is rather slight. It is found that plasticity is initiated at the sides of the two holes where the tensile normal stresses are maximum. The plastic region first expands around the perimeter of the hole then radially outward; and finally, it expands into the significant region. If the W/H parameter is less than 5, a sizable portion of the width of the specimen around the hole can go plastic with the significant region still being in the elastic state. Such a situation can

  3. Review of the Shearing Process for Sheet Steels and Its Effect on Sheared-Edge Stretching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, B. S.; Van Tyne, C. J.

    2012-07-01

    Failure in sheared-edge stretching often limits the use of advanced high-strength steel sheets in automotive applications. The present study analyzes data in the literature from laboratory experiments on both the shearing process and the characteristics of sheared edges. Shearing produces a surface with regions of rollover, burnish, fracture, and burr. The effect of clearance and tensile strength on the shear face characteristics is quantified. Higher strength, lower ductility steels exhibit an increase in percent fracture region. The shearing process also creates a zone of deformation adjacent to the shear face called the shear-affected zone (SAZ). From an analysis of data in the literature, it is concluded that deformation in the SAZ is the dominant factor in controlling failure during sheared-edge stretching. The characteristics of the shear face are generally important for failures during sheared-edge stretching only as there is a correlation between the characteristics of the shear face and the characteristics of the SAZ. The effect of the shear burr on shear-edge stretching is also related to a correlation with the characteristics of the SAZ. In reviewing the literature, many shearing variables that could affect sheared-edge stretching limits are not identified or if identified, not quantified. It is likely that some of these variables could affect subsequent sheared-edge stretching limits.

  4. The invalidity of the Laplace law for biological vessels and of estimating elastic modulus from total stress vs. strain: a new practical method.

    PubMed

    Costanzo, Francesco; Brasseur, James G

    2015-03-01

    There are strong medical motivations to measure changes in material properties of tubular organs, in vivo and in vitro. The current approach estimates hoop stress from intraluminal pressure using the Laplace law and identifies 'elastic modulus' as the slope of a curve fitted hoop stress plotted against strain data. We show that this procedure is fundamentally flawed because muscle and other soft tissue are closely incompressible, so that the total stress includes a volume-preserving material-dependent hydrostatic response that invalidates the method. Furthermore, we show that the Laplace law incorrectly estimates total stress in biological vessels. However, the great need to estimate elastic modulus leads us to develop an alternative practical method, based on shear stress-strain, i.e. insensitive to nonelastic response from incompressibility, but that uses the same measurement data as the current (incorrect) method. The individual material parameters in the underlying (unknown) constitutive relation combine into an effective shear modulus that is a true measure of elastic response, unaffected by incompressibility and without reference to the Laplace law. Furthermore, our effective shear modulus is determined directly as a function of deformation, rather than as the slope of a fitted curve. We validate our method by comparing effective shear moduli against exact shear moduli for four theoretical materials with different degrees of nonlinearity and numbers of material parameters. To further demonstrate applicability, we reanalyse an in vivo study with our new method and show that it resolves an inconsistent change in modulus with the current method.

  5. Tunable shear thickening in suspensions.

    PubMed

    Lin, Neil Y C; Ness, Christopher; Cates, Michael E; Sun, Jin; Cohen, Itai

    2016-09-27

    Shear thickening, an increase of viscosity with shear rate, is a ubiquitous phenomenon in suspended materials that has implications for broad technological applications. Controlling this thickening behavior remains a major challenge and has led to empirical strategies ranging from altering the particle surfaces and shape to modifying the solvent properties. However, none of these methods allows for tuning of flow properties during shear itself. Here, we demonstrate that by strategic imposition of a high-frequency and low-amplitude shear perturbation orthogonal to the primary shearing flow, we can largely eradicate shear thickening. The orthogonal shear effectively becomes a regulator for controlling thickening in the suspension, allowing the viscosity to be reduced by up to 2 decades on demand. In a separate setup, we show that such effects can be induced by simply agitating the sample transversely to the primary shear direction. Overall, the ability of in situ manipulation of shear thickening paves a route toward creating materials whose mechanical properties can be controlled. PMID:27621472

  6. Mapping the functional properties of soft biological tissues under shear loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckley, Mark Raymond

    The structure and composition of articular cartilage and other load-bearing biological tissues are highly complex and heterogeneous. As a result, their functional mechanical properties exhibit clear spatial variations. Unlocking the structure-function relationship in these materials is critical for devising strategies to restore tissue impaired by injury or disease and can provide a template for successful implant design. Here, we describe a tissue deformation imaging stage (TDIS) allowing for simultaneous force measurement and visualization of microscale deformation in soft biological tissues under controlled shear strain. In combination with a fast confocal microscope, the TDIS is used to test the microscale response of articular cartilage to shear loading. To obtain the location-specific shear modulus of this tissue, we employ a high-resolution technique that involves tracking the deformation of a line photobleached into a fluorescently stained sample loaded in the TDIS. We find that the quasi-static and dynamic shear moduli are lowest roughly 100 mum below the articular surface. Here, articular cartilage is highly nonlinear, stiffening under increased shear strain and becoming more compliant under increased compressive strain. Using a simple thought model, we relate these results to structural features of the collagen network in articular cartilage. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the region of maximum compliance is also the primary site of shear energy dissipation in articular cartilage. Our findings suggest that damage to or surgical removal of the surface of this tissue will increase the joint's susceptibility to shear-induced damage. Finally, similar experiments are performed on intervertebral disc and growth plate, demonstrating the versatility of our in-situ strain mapping techniques.

  7. Correlation of ideal and actual shear strengths of metals with their friction properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1981-01-01

    The relation between the ideal and actual shear strengths and friction properties of clean metals in contact with clean diamond, boron nitride, silicon carbide, manganese-zinc ferrite, and the metals themselves in vacuum is discussed. An estimate of the ideal shear strength for metals is obtained from the shear modulus, the repeat distance of atoms in the direction of shear of the metal, and the interplanar spacing of the shearing planes. The coefficient of friction for metals is shown to be correlated with both the ideal and actual shear strength of metals. The higher the strength of the metal, the lower the coefficient of friction occurs.

  8. A Piezoelectric Shear Stress Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Taeyang; Saini, Aditya; Kim, Jinwook; Gopalarathnam, Ashok; Zhu, Yong; Palmieri, Frank L.; Wohl, Christopher J.; Jiang, Xiaoning

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a piezoelectric sensor with a floating element was developed for shear stress measurement. The piezoelectric sensor was designed to detect the pure shear stress suppressing effects of normal stress generated from the vortex lift-up by applying opposite poling vectors to the: piezoelectric elements. The sensor was first calibrated in the lab by applying shear forces and it showed high sensitivity to shear stress (=91.3 +/- 2.1 pC/Pa) due to the high piezoelectric coefficients of PMN-33%PT (d31=-1330 pC/N). The sensor also showed almost no sensitivity to normal stress (less than 1.2 pC/Pa) because of the electromechanical symmetry of the device. The usable frequency range of the sensor is 0-800 Hz. Keywords: Piezoelectric sensor, shear stress, floating element, electromechanical symmetry

  9. Acute effects of static stretching on muscle hardness of the medial gastrocnemius muscle belly in humans: an ultrasonic shear-wave elastography study.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Masatoshi; Ikezoe, Tome; Kobayashi, Takuya; Umegaki, Hiroki; Takeno, Yohei; Nishishita, Satoru; Ichihashi, Noriaki

    2014-09-01

    This study investigated the acute effects of static stretching (SS) on shear elastic modulus as an index of muscle hardness and muscle stiffness and the relationship between change in shear elastic modulus and change in muscle stiffness after SS. The patients were 17 healthy young males. Muscle stiffness was measured during passive ankle dorsiflexion using a dynamometer and ultrasonography before (pre) and immediately after (post) 2 min of SS. In addition, shear elastic modulus was measured by a new ultrasound technique called ultrasonic shear wave elastography. The post-SS values for muscle stiffness and shear elastic modulus were significantly lower than the pre-SS values. In addition, Spearman's rank correlation coefficient indicated a significant correlation between rate of change in shear elastic modulus and rate of change in muscle stiffness. These results suggest that SS is an effective method for decreasing shear elastic modulus as well as muscle stiffness and that shear elastic modulus measurement using the shear wave elastography technique is useful in determining the effects of SS.

  10. Interaction between a normal shock wave and a turbulent boundary layer at high transonic speeds. II - Wall shear stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, M. S.; Adamson, T. C., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Asymptotic methods are used to calculate the shear stress at the wall for the interaction between a normal shock wave and a turbulent boundary layer on a flat plate. A mixing length model is used for the eddy viscosity. The shock wave is taken to be strong enough that the sonic line is deep in the boundary layer and the upstream influence is thus very small. It is shown that unlike the result found for laminar flow an asymptotic criterion for separation is not found; however, conditions for incipient separation are computed numerically using the derived solution for the shear stress at the wall. Results are compared with available experimental measurements.

  11. The bulk modulus and young's modulus of the superconductor Ba sub 2 Cu sub 3 YO sub 7

    SciTech Connect

    Block, S.; Piermarini, G.J.; Munro, R.G.; Wong-Ng, W. )

    1987-07-01

    The isothermal equation of state of the high temperature superconducting ceramic material Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}YO{sub 7} has been determined by measurements in a diamond anvil pressure cell using an energy dispersive x-ray diffraction method. The orthorhombic unit cell lattice parameters (a = 3.8856 {angstrom}, b = 11.6804 {angstrom}, c = 3.8185 {angstrom}) were found to have compressions of (2.0%, 2.3%, 1.1%) respectively over the pressure range from one atmosphere to 10.6 GPa at room temperature. Subsequent equation of state analysis of the approximately linear compression of the volume determined that the isothermal bulk modulus was 196 {plus minus} 17 GPa. Young's modulus was estimated to be 235 {plus minus} 20 GPa assuming that the Poisson's ratio for Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}YO{sub 7} was 0.3 which is typical of many ceramics.

  12. Miniature specimen shear punch test for UHMWPE used in total joint replacements.

    PubMed

    Kurt, S M; Jewett, C W; Bergström, J S; Foulds, J R; Edidin, A A

    2002-05-01

    Despite the critical role that shear is hypothesized to play in the damage modes that limit the performance of total hip and knee replacements, the shear behavior of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) remains poorly understood, especially after oxidative degradation or radiation crosslinking. In the present study, we developed the miniature specimen (0.5 mm thickness x 6.4mm diameter) shear punch test to evaluate the shear behavior of UHMWPE used in total joint replacement components. We investigated the shear punch behavior of virgin and crosslinked stock materials, as well as of UHMWPE from tibial implants that were gamma-irradiated in air and shelf aged for up to 8.5 years. Finite element analysis, scanning electron microscopy, and interrupted testing were conducted to aid in the interpretation of the shear punch load-displacement curves. The shear punch load-displacement curves exhibited similar distinctive features. Following toe-in, the load-displacement curves were typically bilinear, and characterized by an initial stiffness, a transition load, a hardening stiffness, and a peak load. The finite element analysis established that the initial stiffness was proportional to the elastic modulus of the UHMWPE, and the transition load of the bilinear curve reflected the development of a plastically deforming zone traversing through the thickness of the sample. Based on our observations, we propose two interpretations of the peak load during the shear punch test: one theory is based on the initiation of crystalline plasticity, the other based on the transition from shear to tension during the tests. Due to the miniature specimen size, the shear punch test offers several potential advantages over bulk test methods, including the capability to directly measure shear behavior, and quite possibly infer ultimate uniaxial behavior as well, from shelf aged and retrieved UHMWPE components. Thus, the shear punch test represents an effective and complementary

  13. Pressure derivatives of the bulk modulus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmeister, A. M.

    1991-12-01

    Simple relations between the first (or second) pressure derivative of the bulk modulus and first (or second) thermal Grüneisen parameter γTh (or qTh) are derived from equations that relate KT(P) to vibrational frequencies Vi as a function of pressure for cubic structures or those that have only one nearest neighbor distance, by assuming that the mode Grüneisen parameters, γi = -∂ ln vi/∂ ln V, are approximately equal. The free volume equation results, which holds within experimental uncertainties for about 70% for solids meeting the symmetry requirements. Agreement is poor for compounds with the rutile structure, which have the largest range of γi observed. Another result is a three-parameter equation of state, KoK″o = (5/3 - K'o)2 - (5/3 - K'o)qTh(0) - (K'o - 1)2. All available experimental determinations of K″o are bracketed by the spectroscopic limits for qTh. Use of the average value of zero for qTh (or qTh calculated from other thermodynamic parameters) gives the proper sign for K″o and nearly the same values as experiment, suggesting that this approximate equation can be used predictively. The equations involving K″o and K'o are probably valid for any structure, if the γi are roughly equal, although this most likely occurs for solids that compress nearly isotropically. The new formula, with qTh of zero, give values similar to that obtained from the Vinet-Ferrante-Rose-Smith equation at low K'o gives the same values as the Birch-Murnaghan (third-order finite strain) equation near K'o of 4, and gives nearly equal values as the Grover-Getting-Kennedy equation of state at high K'o. Physically reasonable positive values of K″o as K'o approaches zero are obtained only from the new equation of state and that of Vinet et al. Comparison of the new equation of state with third-order finite strain suggests that the latter is also likely to be incorrect at high K'o and thus should be cautiously applied to V(P) for liquids.

  14. Interaction between a normal shock wave and a turbulent boundary layer at high transonic speeds. Part 2: Wall shear stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, M. S.; Adamson, T. C., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    An analysis is presented of the flow in the two inner layers, the Reynolds stress sublayer and the wall layer. Included is the calculation of the shear stress at the wall in the interaction region. The limit processes considered are those used for an inviscid flow.

  15. In vivo performance of a reduced-modulus bone cement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forehand, Brett Ramsey

    Total joint replacement has become one of the most common procedures in the area of orthopedics and is often the solution in patients with diseased or injured hip joints. Component loosening is a significant problem and is primarily caused by bone resorption at the bone-cement interface in cemented implants. It is our hypothesis that localized shear stresses are responsible for the resorption. It was previously shown analytically that local stresses at the interface could be reduced by using a cement of lower modulus. A new reduced modulus cement, polybutyl methylmethacrylate (PBMMA), was developed to test the hypothesis. PBMMA was formulated to exist as polybutyl methacrylate filler in a polymethyl methacrylate matrix. The success of PBMMA cement is based largely on the fact that the polybutyl component of the cement will be in the rubbery state at body temperature. In vitro characterization of the cement was undertaken previously and demonstrated a modulus of approximately one-eighth that of conventional bone cement, polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) and increased fracture toughness. The purpose of this experiment was to perform an in vivo comparison of the two cements. A sheep model was selected. Total hip arthroplasty was performed on 50 ewes using either PBMMA or PMMA. Radiographs were taken at 6 month intervals. At one year, the contralateral femur of each sheep was implanted so that each animal served as its own control, and the animals were sacrificed. The stiffness of the bone-cement interface of the femoral component within the femur was assessed by applying a torque to the femoral component and demonstrated a significant difference in loosening between the cements when the specimens were tested in external rotation (p < 0.007). Evaluation of the mechanical data also suggests that the PBMMA sheep had a greater amount of loosening for each subject, 59% versus 4% for standard PMMA. A radiographic analysis demonstrated more signs of loosening in the PMMA series

  16. Higher modulus compositions incorporating particulate rubber

    DOEpatents

    Bauman, B.D.; Williams, M.A.; Bagheri, R.

    1997-12-02

    Rubber particles, to be used as fillers or extenders for various composite polymer systems, are chlorinated by a gas-solid phase reaction with a chlorine-containing gas. A composite polymer containing the chlorinated rubber fillers or extenders exhibits a higher flexural modulus than if prepared using an unchlorinated rubber filler or extender. Chlorination of the rubber particles is carried out by contacting the finely divided rubber particles with a chlorine-containing gas comprising at least about 5 volume percent chlorine. Advantageously, the chlorine can be diluted with air, nitrogen or other essentially inert gases and may contain minor amounts of fluorine. Improved performance is obtained with nitrogen dilution of the chlorine gas over air dilution. Improved polymer composite systems having higher flexural modulus result from the use of the chlorinated rubber particles as fillers instead of unchlorinated rubber particles. 2 figs.

  17. Higher modulus compositions incorporating particulate rubber

    DOEpatents

    McInnis, E.L.; Bauman, B.D.; Williams, M.A.

    1996-04-09

    Rubber particles, to be used as fillers or extenders for various composite polymer systems, are chlorinated by a gas-solid phase reaction with a chlorine-containing gas. A composite polymer containing the chlorinated rubber fillers or extenders exhibits a higher flexural modulus than if prepared using an unchlorinated rubber filler or extender. Chlorination of the rubber particles is carried out by contacting the finely divided rubber particles with a chlorine-containing gas comprising at least about 5 volume percent chlorine. Advantageously, the chlorine can be diluted with air, nitrogen or other essentially inert gases and may contain minor amounts of fluorine. Improved performance is obtained with nitrogen dilution of the chlorine gas over air dilution. Improved polymer composite systems having higher flexural modulus result from the use of the chlorinated rubber particles as fillers instead of unchlorinated rubber particles. 2 figs.

  18. Modulus-tunable magnetorheological elastomer microcantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dongkyu; Lee, Moonchan; Jung, Namchul; Yun, Minhyuk; Lee, Jungchul; Thundat, Thomas; Jeon, Sangmin

    2014-05-01

    Modulus-tunable microcantilevers are fabricated from magnetorheological elastomers (MREs) consisting of polydimethylsiloxane and carbonyl iron particles by using a simple sandwich molding method. Depending on the presence or absence of an external magnetic field during curing, isotropic or anisotropic MRE cantilevers are obtained. Randomly distributed particles are present in the polymer matrix of the isotropic microcantilevers, whereas the particles in the anisotropic microcantilevers are aligned in the direction of the magnetic field. The fractional changes in the resonance frequencies of the MRE cantilevers are measured as functions of the magnetic field intensity and the quantity of particles in the matrix. The anisotropic microcantilevers undergo greater changes in frequency than the isotropic microcantilevers when exposed to external magnetic fields, which indicates that larger changes in modulus are induced in the anisotropic microcantilevers. In addition, the dissipation and damping ratios of the MRE microcantilevers are determined by fitting the exponential decays of their deflection amplitudes with time.

  19. Higher modulus compositions incorporating particulate rubber

    DOEpatents

    McInnis, E.L.; Scharff, R.P.; Bauman, B.D.; Williams, M.A.

    1995-01-17

    Rubber particles, to be used as fillers or extenders for various composite polymer systems, are chlorinated by a gas-solid phase reaction with a chlorine-containing gas. A composite polymer containing the chlorinated rubber fillers or extenders exhibits a higher flexural modulus than if prepared using an unchlorinated rubber filler or extender. Chlorination of the rubber particles is carried out by contacting the finely divided rubber particles with a chlorine-containing gas comprising at least about 5 volume percent chlorine. Advantageously, the chlorine can be diluted with air, nitrogen or other essentially inert gases and may contain minor amounts of fluorine. Improved performance is obtained with nitrogen dilution of the chlorine gas over air dilution. Improved polymer composite systems having higher flexural modulus result from the use of the chlorinated rubber particles as fillers instead of unchlorinated rubber particles. 2 figures.

  20. Higher modulus compositions incorporating particulate rubber

    DOEpatents

    McInnis, Edwin L.; Scharff, Robert P.; Bauman, Bernard D.; Williams, Mark A.

    1995-01-01

    Rubber particles, to be used as fillers or extenders for various composite polymer systems, are chlorinated by a gas-solid phase reaction with a chlorine-containing gas. A composite polymer containing the chlorinated rubber fillers or extenders exhibits a higher flexural modulus than if prepared using an unchlorinated rubber filler or extender. Chlorination of the rubber particles is carried out by contacting the finely divided rubber particles with a chlorine-containing gas comprising at least about 5 volume percent chlorine. Advantageously, the chlorine can be diluted with air, nitrogen or other essentially inert gases and may contain minor amounts of fluorine. Improved performance is obtained with nitrogen dilution of the chlorine gas over air dilution. Improved polymer composite systems having higher flexural modulus result from the use of the chlorinated rubber particles as fillers instead of unchlorinated rubber particles.

  1. Higher modulus compositions incorporating particulate rubber

    DOEpatents

    Bauman, Bernard D.; Williams, Mark A.; Bagheri, Reza

    1997-12-02

    Rubber particles, to be used as fillers or extenders for various composite polymer systems, are chlorinated by a gas-solid phase reaction with a chlorine-containing gas. A composite polymer containing the chlorinated rubber fillers or extenders exhibits a higher flexural modulus than if prepared using an unchlorinated rubber filler or extender. Chlorination of the rubber particles is carried out by contacting the finely divided rubber particles with a chlorine-containing gas comprising at least about 5 volume percent chlorine. Advantageously, the chlorine can be diluted with air, nitrogen or other essentially inert gases and may contain minor amounts of fluorine. Improved performance is obtained with nitrogen dilution of the chlorine gas over air dilution. Improved polymer composite systems having higher flexural modulus result from the use of the chlorinated rubber particles as fillers instead of unchlorinated rubber particles.

  2. Higher modulus compositions incorporating particulate rubber

    DOEpatents

    McInnis, Edwin L.; Bauman, Bernard D.; Williams, Mark A.

    1996-04-09

    Rubber particles, to be used as fillers or extenders for various composite polymer systems, are chlorinated by a gas-solid phase reaction with a chlorine-containing gas. A composite polymer containing the chlorinated rubber fillers or extenders exhibits a higher flexural modulus than if prepared using an unchlorinated rubber filler or extender. Chlorination of the rubber particles is carried out by contacting the finely divided rubber particles with a chlorine-containing gas comprising at least about 5 volume percent chlorine. Advantageously, the chlorine can be diluted with air, nitrogen or other essentially inert gases and may contain minor amounts of fluorine. Improved performance is obtained with nitrogen dilution of the chlorine gas over air dilution. Improved polymer composite systems having higher flexural modulus result from the use of the chlorinated rubber particles as fillers instead of unchlorinated rubber particles.

  3. Shear-Induced Anisotropy of Concentrated Multi-walled Carbon Nanotube Suspensions Using X-ray Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Pujari, Saswati; Rahatekar, Sameer; Gilman, Jeffrey W.; Koziol, Krzysztof K.; Windle, Alan H.; Burghardt, Wesley R.

    2012-02-07

    X-ray scattering is used to measure particle orientation in concentrated multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWNT) suspensions under shear flow. MWNTs were dispersed in a Newtonian suspending fluid (uncured epoxy). The dispersions exhibit shear thinning, approaching the matrix viscosity at high shear rates. This is accompanied by progressive development of MWNT orientation along the flow direction with increasing shear rate. The impact of MWNT aspect ratio and concentration on steady-state orientation is explored. In one sample (2 wt. % dispersion of short MWNTs), orientation was measured in both the flow-gradient (1-2) and flow-vorticity (1-3) planes of shear flow to provide a more complete picture of the three-dimensional orientation state. Also in this sample, 1-3 plane measurements were conducted using both small- and wide-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS and WAXS). While the two methods produce qualitatively similar results, WAXS-derived measures of flow-induced anisotropy are consistently larger than SAXS data. In transient measurements following step-down in shear rate, MWNT orientation is found to decrease on similar time scales as viscosity increases. Prolonged growth of storage modulus is observed following flow cessation, accompanied by an unexpectedly rapid partial loss of MWNT orientation. The rheological and orientation data are discussed in terms of distortion, breakdown, and reformation of percolated MWNT networks in these samples.

  4. Zipper and freeway shear zone junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passchier, Cees; Platt, John

    2016-04-01

    Ductile shear zones are usually presented as isolated planar high-strain domains in a less deformed wall rock, characterised by shear sense indicators such as characteristic deflected foliation traces. Many shear zones, however, form branched systems and if movement on such branches is contemporaneous, the resulting geometry can be complicated and lead to unusual fabric geometries in the wall rock. For Y-shaped shear zone junctions with three simultaneously operating branches, and with slip directions at a high angle to the branch line, eight basic types of shear zone triple junctions are possible, divided into three groups. The simplest type, called freeway junctions, have similar shear sense on all three branches. If shear sense is different on the three branches, this can lead to space problems. Some of these junctions have shear zone branches that join to form a single branch, named zipper junctions, or a single shear zone which splits to form two, known as wedge junctions. Closing zipper junctions are most unusual, since they form a non-active high-strain zone with opposite deflection of foliations. Shear zipper and shear wedge junctions have two shear zones with similar shear sense, and one with the opposite sense. All categories of shear zone junctions show characteristic flow patterns in the shear zone and its wall rock. Shear zone junctions with slip directions normal to the branch line can easily be studied, since ideal sections of shear sense indicators lie in the plane normal to the shear zone branches and the branch line. Expanding the model to allow slip oblique and parallel to the branch line in a full 3D setting gives rise to a large number of geometries in three main groups. Slip directions can be parallel on all branches but oblique to the branch line: two slip directions can be parallel and a third oblique, or all three branches can have slip in different directions. Such more complex shear zone junctions cannot be studied to advantage in a

  5. On the common modulus attack into the LUC4,6 cryptosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Tze Jin; Said, Mohd Rushdan Md; Othman, Mohamed; Koo, Lee Feng

    2015-05-01

    The LUC4,6 cryptosystem is a system analogy with RSA cryptosystem and extended from LUC and LUC3 cryptosystems. The process of encryption and decryption are derived from the fourth order linear recurrence sequence and based on Lucas function. This paper reports an investigation into the common modulus attack on the LUC4,6 cryptosystem. In general, the common modulus attack will be succeeded if the sender sends the plaintext to two users used same RSA-modulus and both of encryption keys of them are relatively prime to each other. However, based on the characteristics of high order Lucas sequence, the LUC4,6 cryptosystem is unattackable

  6. Predicting graded young modulus values of Ti alloys modified by ion implantation.

    PubMed

    Hassan, M H Mohamed

    2004-05-01

    There has been, and is still, concern about the high elastic modulus of Ti alloys compared to bone. Any reduction in the Young's modulus value of the implant is expected to enhance stress redistribution to the adjacent bone tissues, minimize stress shielding and eventually prolong device lifetime. Dynamic Monte Carlo simulation is used to predict the gradual reduction in Young's modulus values between the bulk of Ti alloys and the modified surface layers due to Ca ion implantation. The simulation can be used as a screening step when applying new alloys and/or coatings.

  7. Temperature Coefficient of the Modulus of Rigidity of Aircraft Instrument Diaphragm and Spring Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brombacher, W G; Melton, E R

    1931-01-01

    Experimental data are presented on the variation of the modulus of rigidity in the temperature range -20 to +50 degrees C. of a number of metals which are of possible use for elastic elements for aircraft and other instruments. The methods of the torsional pendulum was used to determine the modulus of rigidity and its temperature coefficient for aluminum, duralumin, monel metal, brass, phosphor bronze, coin silver, nickel silver, three high carbon steels, and three alloy steels. It was observed that tensile stress affected the values of the modulus by amounts of 1 per cent or less.

  8. Shear piezoelectricity in bone at the nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minary-Jolandan, Majid; Yu, Min-Feng

    2010-10-01

    Recent demonstration of shear piezoelectricity in an isolated collagen fibril, which is the origin of piezoelectricity in bone, necessitates investigation of shear piezoelectric behavior in bone at the nanoscale. Using high resolution lateral piezoresponse force microcopy (PFM), shear piezoelectricity in a cortical bone sample was studied at the nanoscale. Subfibrillar structure of individual collagen fibrils with a periodicity of 60-70 nm were revealed in PFM map, indicating the direct contribution of collagen fibrils to the shear piezoelectricity of bone.

  9. Mechanical properties of jammed packings of frictionless spheres under an applied shear stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hao; Tong, Hua; Xu, Ning

    2014-11-01

    By minimizing a thermodynamic-like potential, we unbiasedly sample the potential energy landscape of soft and frictionless spheres under a constant shear stress. We obtain zero-temperature jammed states under desired shear stresses and investigate their mechanical properties as a function of the shear stress. As a comparison, we also obtain the jammed states from the quasistatic-shear sampling in which the shear stress is not well-controlled. Although the yield stresses determined by both samplings show the same power-law scaling with the compression from the jamming transition point J at zero temperature and shear stress, for finite size systems the quasistatic-shear sampling leads to a lower yield stress and a higher critical volume fraction at point J. The shear modulus of the jammed solids decreases with increasing shear stress. However, the shear modulus does not decay to zero at yielding. This discontinuous change of the shear modulus implies the discontinuous nature of the unjamming transition under nonzero shear stress, which is further verified by the observation of a discontinuous jump in the pressure from the jammed solids to the shear flows. The pressure jump decreases upon decompression and approaches zero at the critical-like point J, in analogy with the well-known phase transitions under an external field. The analysis of the force networks in the jammed solids reveals that the force distribution is more sensitive to the increase of the shear stress near point J. The force network anisotropy increases with increasing shear stress. The weak particle contacts near the average force and under large shear stresses it exhibit an asymmetric angle distribution.

  10. Magnetic resonance elastography of slow and fast shear waves illuminates differences in shear and tensile moduli in anisotropic tissue.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, J L; Tweten, D J; Benegal, A N; Walker, C H; Portnoi, T E; Okamoto, R J; Garbow, J R; Bayly, P V

    2016-05-01

    Mechanical anisotropy is an important property of fibrous tissues; for example, the anisotropic mechanical properties of brain white matter may play a key role in the mechanics of traumatic brain injury (TBI). The simplest anisotropic material model for small deformations of soft tissue is a nearly incompressible, transversely isotropic (ITI) material characterized by three parameters: minimum shear modulus (µ), shear anisotropy (ϕ=µ1µ-1) and tensile anisotropy (ζ=E1E2-1). These parameters can be determined using magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) to visualize shear waves, if the angle between the shear-wave propagation direction and fiber direction is known. Most MRE studies assume isotropic material models with a single shear (µ) or tensile (E) modulus. In this study, two types of shear waves, "fast" and "slow", were analyzed for a given propagation direction to estimate anisotropic parameters µ, ϕ, and ζ in two fibrous soft materials: turkey breast ex vivo and aligned fibrin gels. As expected, the speed of slow shear waves depended on the angle between fiber direction and propagation direction. Fast shear waves were observed when the deformations due to wave motion induced stretch in the fiber direction. Finally, MRE estimates of anisotropic mechanical properties in turkey breast were compared to estimates from direct mechanical tests. PMID:26920505

  11. Laboratory Earthquake Measurements with the High-speed Digital Image Correlation Method and Applications to Super-shear Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubino, V.; Lapusta, N.; Rosakis, A.

    2012-12-01

    Mapping full-field displacements and strains on the Earth's surface during an earthquake is of paramount importance to enhance our understanding of earthquake mechanics. In this study, the feasibility of such measurements using image correlation methods is investigated in a laboratory earthquake setup. Earthquakes are mimicked in the laboratory by dynamic rupture propagating along an inclined frictional interface formed by two Homalite plates under compression, using the configuration developed by Rosakis and coworkers (e.g., Rosakis et al., 2007). In our study, the interface is partially glued, in order to confine the rupture before it reaches the ends of the specimen. The specimens are painted with a speckle pattern to provide the surface with characteristic features for image matching. Images of the specimens are taken before and after dynamic rupture with a 4 Megapixels resolution CCD camera. The digital images are analyzed with two software packages: VIC-2D (Correlated Solutions Inc.) and COSI-Corr (Leprince et. al, 2007). Both VIC-2D and COSI-Corr are able to characterize the full-field static displacement of a dynamic crack. For example, in a case with secondary mode I cracks, the correlation analysis performed with either software clearly shows (i) the relative displacement (slip) along the frictional interface, (ii) the rupture arrest on the glued boundaries, and (iii) the presence of two wing cracks. The obtained displacement measurements are converted to strains, using de-noising techniques. The digital image correlation method is then used in combination with high-speed photography. We will report our progress on the study of a spontaneously expanding sub-Rayleigh shear crack advancing along an interface containing a patch of favorable heterogeneity, such as a preexisting subcritical crack or a patch with higher prestress. According to the predictions of Liu and Lapusta (2008), intersonic transition and propagation can be achieved in the presence of a

  12. Structure-rheology relationship in a sheared lamellar fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaju, S. J.; Kumaran, V.

    2016-03-01

    The structure-rheology relationship in the shear alignment of a lamellar fluid is studied using a mesoscale model which provides access to the lamellar configurations and the rheology. Based on the equations and free energy functional, the complete set of dimensionless groups that characterize the system are the Reynolds number (ρ γ ˙L2/μ ) , the Schmidt number (μ /ρ D ) , the Ericksen number (μ γ ˙/B ) , the interface sharpness parameter r , the ratio of the viscosities of the hydrophilic and hydrophobic parts μr, and the ratio of the system size and layer spacing (L /λ ) . Here, ρ and μ are the fluid density and average viscosity, γ ˙ is the applied strain rate, D is the coefficient of diffusion, B is the compression modulus, μr is the maximum difference in the viscosity of the hydrophilic and hydrophobic parts divided by the average viscosity, and L is the system size in the cross-stream direction. The lattice Boltzmann method is used to solve the concentration and momentum equations for a two dimensional system of moderate size (L /λ =32 ) and for a low Reynolds number, and the other parameters are systematically varied to examine the qualitative features of the structure and viscosity evolution in different regimes. At low Schmidt numbers where mass diffusion is faster than momentum diffusion, there is fast local formation of randomly aligned domains with "grain boundaries," which are rotated by the shear flow to align along the extensional axis as time increases. This configuration offers a high resistance to flow, and the layers do not align in the flow direction even after 1000 strain units, resulting in a viscosity higher than that for an aligned lamellar phase. At high Schmidt numbers where momentum diffusion is fast, the shear flow disrupts layers before they are fully formed by diffusion, and alignment takes place by the breakage and reformation of layers by shear, resulting in defects (edge dislocations) embedded in a background of

  13. An evaluation of the Iosipescu specimen for composite materials shear property measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morton, J.; Ho, H.; Tsai, M. Y.; Farley, G. L.

    1992-01-01

    A detailed evaluation of the suitability of the Iosipescu specimen tested in the modified Wyoming fixture is presented. A linear finite element model of the specimen is used to assess the uniformity of the shear stress field in the vicinity of the notch, and demonstrate the effect of the nonuniform stress field upon strain gage measurements used for the determination of composite shear moduli. Based upon test results from graphite-epoxy laminates, the proximity of the load introduction point to the test section and the material orthotropy greatly influence the individual gage readings, however, shear modulus determination is not significantly affected by the lack of pure shear. Correction factors are needed to allow for the nonuniformity of the strain field and the use of the average shear stress in the shear modulus evaluation. The correction factors are determined for the region occupied by the strain gage rosette. A comparison of the strain gage readings from one surface of a specimen with corresponding data from moire interferometry on the opposite face documented an extreme sensitivity of some fiber orientations to eccentric loading which induced twisting and spurious shear stress-strain curves. The discovery of specimen twisting explains the apparently inconsistent shear property data found in the literature. Recommendations for improving the reliability and accuracy of the shear modulus values are made, and the implications for shear strength measurement discussed.

  14. Comparison between spring network models and continuum constitutive laws: application to the large deformation of a capsule in shear flow.

    PubMed

    Omori, T; Ishikawa, T; Barthès-Biesel, D; Salsac, A-V; Walter, J; Imai, Y; Yamaguchi, T

    2011-04-01

    A capsule is a liquid drop enclosed by a solid, deformable membrane. To analyze the deformation of a capsule accurately, both the fluid mechanics of the internal and external fluids and the solid mechanics of the membrane must be solved precisely. Recently, many researchers have used discrete spring network models to express the membrane mechanics of capsules and biological cells. However, it is unclear whether such modeling is sufficiently accurate to solve for capsule deformation. This study examines the correlations between the mechanical properties of the discrete spring network model and continuum constitutive laws. We first compare uniaxial and isotropic deformations of a two-dimensional (2D) sheet, both analytically and numerically. The 2D sheet is discretized with four kinds of mesh to analyze the effect of the spring network configuration. We derive the relationships between the spring constant and continuum properties, such as the Young modulus, Poisson ratio, area dilation modulus, and shear modulus. It is found that the mechanical properties of spring networks are strongly dependent on the mesh configuration. We then calculate the deformation of a capsule under inflation and in a simple shear flow in the Stokes flow regime, using various membrane models. To achieve high accuracy in the flow calculation, a boundary-element method is used. Comparing the results between the different membrane models, we find that it is hard to express the area incompressibility observed in biological membranes using a simple spring network model.

  15. Quantitative shear wave optical coherence elastography (SW-OCE) with acoustic radiation force impulses (ARFI) induced by phase array transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Shaozhen; Le, Nhan Minh; Wang, Ruikang K.; Huang, Zhihong

    2015-03-01

    Shear Wave Optical Coherence Elastography (SW-OCE) uses the speed of propagating shear waves to provide a quantitative measurement of localized shear modulus, making it a valuable technique for the elasticity characterization of tissues such as skin and ocular tissue. One of the main challenges in shear wave elastography is to induce a reliable source of shear wave; most of nowadays techniques use external vibrators which have several drawbacks such as limited wave propagation range and/or difficulties in non-invasive scans requiring precisions, accuracy. Thus, we propose linear phase array ultrasound transducer as a remote wave source, combined with the high-speed, 47,000-frame-per-second Shear-wave visualization provided by phase-sensitive OCT. In this study, we observed for the first time shear waves induced by a 128 element linear array ultrasound imaging transducer, while the ultrasound and OCT images (within the OCE detect