Science.gov

Sample records for high shear modulus

  1. Dynamic characteristics of Bridgestone low shear modulus-high damping seismic isolation bearings

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Y.W.; Seidensticker, R.W.

    1993-06-01

    Bridgestone Company of Japan is one of the leading seismic bearing manufacturers in the world. Their bearings have very good performance records. It appears that Bridgestone`s high damping bearings are made of a blend of filled natural and synthetic rubbers with fillers and plastizers whereas in the United States, the high damping compound is a carbon filled natural rubber. To compare the properties of the two different kinds of high damping compounds, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) purchased eight bearings from Bridgestone: four of which were made of high shear modulus-high damping rubber compound KL401; the other four were made of low shear modulus-high damping rubber compounds: two with KL301 elastomer and two with KL302 elastomer. Tests of the Bridgestone bearings were performed at the Earthquake Engineering Research Center. The dynamic characteristics of the high shear modulus Bridgestone bearings, KL401, are described in ANL/Shimizu Report ANL-003. This report describes the dynamic and failure characteristics of the low shear modulus Bridgestone bearings, KL301 and KL302.

  2. Measuring shear modulus of individual fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behlow, Herbert; Saini, Deepika; Oliviera, Luciana; Skove, Malcolm; Rao, Apparao

    2014-03-01

    Fiber technology has advanced to new heights enabling tailored mechanical properties. For reliable fiber applications their mechanical properties must be well characterized at the individual fiber level. Unlike the tensile modulus, which can be well studied in a single fiber, the present indirect and dynamic methods of measuring the shear properties of fibers suffer from various disadvantages such as the interaction between fibers and the influence of damping. In this talk, we introduce a quasi-static method to directly measure the shear modulus of a single micron-sized fiber. Our simple and inexpensive setup yields a shear modulus of 16 and 2 GPa for a single IM7 carbon fiber and a Kevlar fiber, respectively. Furthermore, our setup is also capable of measuring the creep, hysteresis and the torsion coefficient, and examples of these will be presented.

  3. In-Plane Shear Testing of Medium and High Modulus Woven Graphite Fiber Reinforced/Polyimide Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gentz, M.; Armentrout, D.; Rupnowski, P.; Kumosa, L.; Shin, E.; Sutter, J. K.; Kumosa, M.

    2004-01-01

    Iosipescu shear tests were performed at room temperature and at 316 C (600 F) o woven composites with either M40J or M60J graphite fibers and PMR-II-50 polyimide resin matrix. The composites were tested as supplied and after thermo-cycling, with the thermo-cycled composites being tested under dry and wet conditions. Acoustic emission (AE) was monitored during the room and high temperature Iosipescu experiments. The shear stresses at the maximum loads and the shear stresses at the significant onset of AE were determined for the composites as function of temperature and conditioning. The combined effects of thermo-cycling and moisture on the strength and stiffness properties of the composites were evaluated. It was determined that the room and high temperature shear stresses at the maximum loads were unaffected by conditioning. However, at room temperature the significant onset of AE was affected by conditioning; the thermal conditioned wet specimens showed the highest shear stress at the onset of AE followed by thermal-conditioned and then as received specimens. Also, at igh temperature the significant onset of AE occurred in some specimens after the maximum load due to the viscoelastoplastic nature of the matrix material.

  4. The Skin Acts to Maintain Muscle Shear Modulus.

    PubMed

    Yoshitake, Yasuhide; Miyamoto, Naokazu; Taniguchi, Keigo; Katayose, Masaki; Kanehisa, Hiroaki

    2016-03-01

    It is not clear how the tissues covering the skeletal muscles affect the muscles' mechanical properties. The main purpose of this study was to examine changes in muscle shear modulus as a representative mechanical property of muscle with and without the covering tissues of skin and epimysium (fascia). Shear modulus of the medial gastrocnemius (MG) muscle was determined using ultrasound shear-wave elastography in the Thiel's embalmed cadavers under three different conditions: original (intact cadavers), removal of the skin on the MG and subsequent removal of the epimysium. Muscle shear modulus significantly decreased by 50% after removal of the skin, whereas no additional changes in shear modulus were observed after subsequent removal of the epimysium. This study suggests that the skin is a main contributor for maintaining the muscle mechanical properties among tissues covering the skeletal muscle.

  5. In vivo quantification of the shear modulus of the human Achilles tendon during passive loading using shear wave dispersion analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helfenstein-Didier, C.; Andrade, R. J.; Brum, J.; Hug, F.; Tanter, M.; Nordez, A.; Gennisson, J.-L.

    2016-03-01

    The shear wave velocity dispersion was analyzed in the Achilles tendon (AT) during passive dorsiflexion using a phase velocity method in order to obtain the tendon shear modulus (C 55). Based on this analysis, the aims of the present study were (i) to assess the reproducibility of the shear modulus for different ankle angles, (ii) to assess the effect of the probe locations, and (iii) to compare results with elasticity values obtained with the supersonic shear imaging (SSI) technique. The AT shear modulus (C 55) consistently increased with the ankle dorsiflexion (N  =  10, p  <  0.05). Furthermore, the technique showed a very good reproducibility (all standard error of the mean values  <10.7 kPa and all coefficient of variation (CV) values  ⩽0.05%). In addition, independently from the ankle dorsiflexion, the shear modulus was significantly higher in the proximal location compared to the more distal one. The shear modulus provided by SSI was always lower than C55 and the difference increased with the ankle dorsiflexion. However, shear modulus values provided by both methods were highly correlated (R  =  0.84), indicating that the conventional shear wave elastography technique (SSI technique) can be used to compare tendon mechanical properties across populations. Future studies should determine the clinical relevance of the shear wave dispersion analysis, for instance in the case of tendinopathy or tendon tear.

  6. Shear modulus of kaolin containing methane bubbles

    SciTech Connect

    Duffy, S.M. ); Wheeler, S.J. . Dept. of Engineering Science); Bennell, J.D. )

    1994-05-01

    Measurements of undrained shear moduli are reported from a program of laboratory tests on reconstituted kaolin samples containing relatively large bubbles of methane gas. The experimental program included low-frequency torsional stress-strain loops and torsional resonant column tests, providing values of shear moduli for shear-strain similitudes from 0.0004% to 0.1%. At all values of strain amplitude, the reduction of shear moduli caused by the presence of gas bubbles was greater than predicted by a theoretical elastic expression. This pattern of behavior was attributed to te formation of local yield zones around the gas-bubble cavities during consolidation prior to shear testing (a phenomenon that would also occur in-situ within offshore sediments). The results of the research program suggest that reductions in shear moduli of up to 50% could be caused by relatively small volumes of gas bubbles, occupying just a few percent of the total soil volume. This would have considerable significance for the displacements of offshore foundations constructed on sediments containing undissolved gas.

  7. High modulus high temperature glass fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bacon, J. F.

    1973-01-01

    The search for a new high-modulus, high-temperature glass fiber involved the preparation of 500 glass compositions lying in 12 glass fields. These systems consisted primarily of low atomic number oxides and rare-earth oxides. Direct optical measurements of the kinetics of crystallization of the cordierite-rare earth system, for example, showed that the addition of rare-earth oxides decreased the rate of formation of cordierite crystals. Glass samples prepared from these systems proved that the rare-earth oxides made large specific contributions to the Young's modulus of the glasses. The best glasses have moduli greater than 21 million psi, the best glass fibers have moduli greater than 18 million psi, and the best glass fiber-epoxy resin composites have tensile strengths of 298,000 psi, compressive strengths of at least 220,000 psi, flexural strengths of 290,000 psi, and short-beam shear strengths of almost 17,000 psi.

  8. Shear modulus imaging by direct visualization of propagating shear waves with phase-sensitive optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Song, Shaozhen; Huang, Zhihong; Nguyen, Thu-Mai; Wong, Emily Y.; Arnal, Bastien; O’Donnell, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. We propose an integrated method combining low-frequency mechanics with optical imaging to map the shear modulus within the biological tissue. Induced shear wave propagating in tissue is tracked in space and time using phase-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PhS-OCT). Local estimates of the shear-wave speed obtained from tracking results can image the local shear modulus. A PhS-OCT system remotely records depth-resolved, dynamic mechanical waves at an equivalent frame rate of ∼47  kHz with the high spatial resolution. The proposed method was validated by examining tissue-mimicking phantoms made of agar and light scattering material. Results demonstrate that the shear wave imaging can accurately map the elastic moduli of these phantoms. PMID:24213539

  9. Permeability and shear modulus of articular cartilage in growing mice.

    PubMed

    Berteau, J-Ph; Oyen, M; Shefelbine, S J

    2016-02-01

    Articular cartilage maturation is the postnatal development process that adapts joint surfaces to their site-specific biomechanical demands. Understanding the changes in mechanical tissues properties during growth is a critical step in advancing strategies for orthopedics and for cell- and biomaterial- based therapies dedicated to cartilage repair. We hypothesize that at the microscale, the articular cartilage tissue properties of the mouse (i.e., shear modulus and permeability) change with the growth and are dependent on location within the joint. We tested cartilage on the medial femoral condyle and lateral femoral condyle of seven C57Bl6 mice at different ages (2, 3, 5, 7, 9, 12, and 17 weeks old) using a micro-indentation test. Results indicated that permeability decreased with age from 2 to 17 weeks. Shear modulus reached a peak at the end of the growth (9 weeks). Within an age group, shear modulus was higher in the MFC than in the LFC, but permeability did not change. We have developed a method that can measure natural alterations in cartilage material properties in a murine joint, which will be useful in identifying changes in cartilage mechanics with degeneration, pathology, or treatment.

  10. Muscle shear elastic modulus is linearly related to muscle torque over the entire range of isometric contraction intensity.

    PubMed

    Ateş, Filiz; Hug, François; Bouillard, Killian; Jubeau, Marc; Frappart, Thomas; Couade, Mathieu; Bercoff, Jeremy; Nordez, Antoine

    2015-08-01

    Muscle shear elastic modulus is linearly related to muscle torque during low-level contractions (<60% of Maximal Voluntary Contraction, MVC). This measurement can therefore be used to estimate changes in individual muscle force. However, it is not known if this relationship remains valid for higher intensities. The aim of this study was to determine: (i) the relationship between muscle shear elastic modulus and muscle torque over the entire range of isometric contraction and (ii) the influence of the size of the region of interest (ROI) used to average the shear modulus value. Ten healthy males performed two incremental isometric little finger abductions. The joint torque produced by Abductor Digiti Minimi was considered as an index of muscle torque and elastic modulus. A high coefficient of determination (R(2)) (range: 0.86-0.98) indicated that the relationship between elastic modulus and torque can be accurately modeled by a linear regression over the entire range (0% to 100% of MVC). The changes in shear elastic modulus as a function of torque were highly repeatable. Lower R(2) values (0.89±0.13 for 1/16 of ROI) and significantly increased absolute errors were observed when the shear elastic modulus was averaged over smaller ROI, half, 1/4 and 1/16 of the full ROI) than the full ROI (mean size: 1.18±0.24cm(2)). It suggests that the ROI should be as large as possible for accurate measurement of muscle shear modulus.

  11. High elastic modulus polymer electrolytes

    DOEpatents

    Balsara, Nitash Pervez; Singh, Mohit; Eitouni, Hany Basam; Gomez, Enrique Daniel

    2013-10-22

    A polymer that combines high ionic conductivity with the structural properties required for Li electrode stability is useful as a solid phase electrolyte for high energy density, high cycle life batteries that do not suffer from failures due to side reactions and dendrite growth on the Li electrodes, and other potential applications. The polymer electrolyte includes a linear block copolymer having a conductive linear polymer block with a molecular weight of at least 5000 Daltons, a structural linear polymer block with an elastic modulus in excess of 1.times.10.sup.7 Pa and an ionic conductivity of at least 1.times.10.sup.-5 Scm.sup.-1. The electrolyte is made under dry conditions to achieve the noted characteristics.

  12. The correlation between shear elastic modulus and glass transition temperature of bulk metallic glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Zhibin; Li Jiangong; Shao Hang; Ni Xia; Gleiter, H.

    2009-03-02

    Based on Varshni equation, the shear elastic modulus at the glass transition temperature [G(T{sub g})] and the shear elastic modulus at 0 K [G(0)] were calculated from the elastic modulus measured at room temperature for various bulk metallic glasses (BMGs). The G(T{sub g})/G(0) ratios for various BMGs are almost the same and have a value around 0.85. This unique correlation implies that the glass transition occurs when the shear modulus of a BMG decreases to about 85% of G(0). This correlation between shear modulus and glass transition is of significance in understanding the glass transition of BMGs.

  13. 3D mapping of elastic modulus using shear wave optical micro-elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jiang; Qi, Li; Miao, Yusi; Ma, Teng; Dai, Cuixia; Qu, Yueqiao; He, Youmin; Gao, Yiwei; Zhou, Qifa; Chen, Zhongping

    2016-10-01

    Elastography provides a powerful tool for histopathological identification and clinical diagnosis based on information from tissue stiffness. Benefiting from high resolution, three-dimensional (3D), and noninvasive optical coherence tomography (OCT), optical micro-elastography has the ability to determine elastic properties with a resolution of ~10 μm in a 3D specimen. The shear wave velocity measurement can be used to quantify the elastic modulus. However, in current methods, shear waves are measured near the surface with an interference of surface waves. In this study, we developed acoustic radiation force (ARF) orthogonal excitation optical coherence elastography (ARFOE-OCE) to visualize shear waves in 3D. This method uses acoustic force perpendicular to the OCT beam to excite shear waves in internal specimens and uses Doppler variance method to visualize shear wave propagation in 3D. The measured propagation of shear waves agrees well with the simulation results obtained from finite element analysis (FEA). Orthogonal acoustic excitation allows this method to measure the shear modulus in a deeper specimen which extends the elasticity measurement range beyond the OCT imaging depth. The results show that the ARFOE-OCE system has the ability to noninvasively determine the 3D elastic map.

  14. 3D mapping of elastic modulus using shear wave optical micro-elastography

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jiang; Qi, Li; Miao, Yusi; Ma, Teng; Dai, Cuixia; Qu, Yueqiao; He, Youmin; Gao, Yiwei; Zhou, Qifa; Chen, Zhongping

    2016-01-01

    Elastography provides a powerful tool for histopathological identification and clinical diagnosis based on information from tissue stiffness. Benefiting from high resolution, three-dimensional (3D), and noninvasive optical coherence tomography (OCT), optical micro-elastography has the ability to determine elastic properties with a resolution of ~10 μm in a 3D specimen. The shear wave velocity measurement can be used to quantify the elastic modulus. However, in current methods, shear waves are measured near the surface with an interference of surface waves. In this study, we developed acoustic radiation force (ARF) orthogonal excitation optical coherence elastography (ARFOE-OCE) to visualize shear waves in 3D. This method uses acoustic force perpendicular to the OCT beam to excite shear waves in internal specimens and uses Doppler variance method to visualize shear wave propagation in 3D. The measured propagation of shear waves agrees well with the simulation results obtained from finite element analysis (FEA). Orthogonal acoustic excitation allows this method to measure the shear modulus in a deeper specimen which extends the elasticity measurement range beyond the OCT imaging depth. The results show that the ARFOE-OCE system has the ability to noninvasively determine the 3D elastic map. PMID:27762276

  15. Shear Modulus for Nonisotropic, Open-Celled Foams Using a General Elongated Kelvin Foam Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, Roy M.; Ghosn, Louis J.

    2008-01-01

    An equation for the shear modulus for nonisotropic, open-celled foams in the plane transverse to the elongation (rise) direction is derived using an elongated Kelvin foam model with the most general geometric description. The shear modulus was found to be a function of the unit cell dimensions, the solid material properties, and the cell edge cross-section properties. The shear modulus equation reduces to the relation derived by others for isotropic foams when the unit cell is equiaxed.

  16. Shear Elastic Modulus on Patellar Tendon Captured from Supersonic Shear Imaging: Correlation with Tangent Traction Modulus Computed from Material Testing System and Test-Retest Reliability.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhi Jie; Fu, Siu Ngor

    2013-01-01

    Characterization of the elastic properties of a tendon could enhance the diagnosis and treatment of tendon injuries. The purpose of this study was to examine the correlation between the shear elastic modulus on the patellar tendon captured from a Supersonic Shear Imaging (SSI) and the tangent traction modulus computed from a Material testing system (MTS) on 8 fresh patellar pig tendons (Experiment I). Test-retest reliability of the shear elastic modulus captured from the SSI was established in Experiment II on 22 patellar tendons of 11 healthy human subjects using the SSI. Spearman Correlation coefficients for the shear elastic modulus and tangent traction modulus ranged from 0.82 to 1.00 (all p<0.05) on the 8 tendons. The intra and inter-operator reliabilities were 0.98 (95% CI: 0.93-0.99) and 0.97 (95% CI: 0.93-0.98) respectively. The results from this study demonstrate that the shear elastic modulus of the patellar tendon measured by the SSI is related to the tangent traction modulus quantified by the MTS. The SSI shows good intra and inter-operator repeatability. Therefore, the present study shows that SSI can be used to assess elastic properties of a tendon.

  17. Possible contribution of low shear modulus C44 to the low Young's modulus of Ti-36Nb-5Zr alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Qingkun; Guo, Shun; Ren, Xiaobing; Xu, Huibin; Zhao, Xinqing

    2014-09-01

    Despite the importance of single-crystal elastic constants of β-phase titanium alloys in understanding their low Young's modulus—a property crucial for many applications, such data are often difficult to obtain when the alloy composition is close to the instability limit of the β phase, where the presence of α" martensite precludes the fabrication of β-phase single crystal. In the present study, we extracted the single-crystal elastic constants of such a β-phase titanium alloy with low Young's modulus, Ti-36Nb-5Zr (wt. %), from polycrystalline specimens by using an in-situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction technique. It is indicated that the low Young's modulus of the alloy originates from the anomalously low shear modulus C44 as well as the low shear modulus C', which is different from a common viewpoint that the Young's modulus of β-phase titanium alloys is dominantly controlled by the C'. This suggests that low C44 is an important contributor to low Young's modulus for instable β-phase titanium alloys.

  18. A comparison of three popular test methods for determining the shear modulus of composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, Henjen; Tsai, Ming-Yi; Morton, John; Farley, Gary L.

    1991-01-01

    Three popular shear tests (the 10 degree off-axis, the plus or minus 45 degree tensile, and the Iosipescu specimen tested in the modified Wyoming fixture) for shear modulus measurement are evaluated for a graphite-epoxy composite material system. A comparison of the shear stress-strain response for each test method is made using conventional strain gage instrumentation and moire interferometry. The uniformity and purity of the strain fields in the test sections of the specimens are discussed, and the shear responses obtained from each test technique are presented and compared. For accurate measurement of shear modulus, the 90 degree Iosipescu specimen is recommended.

  19. Shear modulus data for the human lens determined from a spinning lens test.

    PubMed

    Wilde, G S; Burd, H J; Judge, S J

    2012-04-01

    The paper describes a program of mechanical testing on donated human eye bank lenses. The principal purpose of the tests was to obtain experimental data on the shear modulus of the lens for use in future computational models of the accommodation process. Testing was conducted using a procedure in which deformations are induced in the lens by spinning it about its polar axis. Shear modulus data were inferred from these observed deformations by means of a finite element inverse analysis procedure in which the spatial variation of the shear modulus within the lens is represented by an appropriate function (see Burd et al., 2011 for a detailed specification of the design of the spinning lens test rig, experimental protocols and associated data analysis procedures that were employed in the tests). Inferred data on lens shear modulus are presented for a set of twenty-nine lenses in the age range 12 years to 58 years. The lenses were tested between 47 h and 110 h from the time of death (average post-mortem time 74 h). Care was taken to exclude any lenses that had been affected by excessive post-mortem swelling, or any lenses that had suffered mechanical damage during storage, transit or the testing process. The experimental data on shear modulus indicate that, for young lenses, the cortex is stiffer than the nucleus. The shear modulus of the nucleus and cortex both increase with increasing age. The shear modulus of the nucleus increases more rapidly than the cortex with the consequence that from an age of about 45 years onwards the nucleus is stiffer than the cortex. The principal shear modulus data presented in the paper were obtained by testing at a rotational speed of 1,000 rpm. Supplementary tests were conducted at rotational speeds of 700 rpm and 1,400 rpm. The results from these supplementary tests are in good agreement with the data obtained from the principal 1,000 rpm tests. Studies on the possible effects of lens drying during the test suggested that this factor

  20. On the nature of heat effects and shear modulus softening in metallic glasses: A generalized approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobelev, N. P.; Khonik, V. A.; Makarov, A. S.; Afonin, G. V.; Mitrofanov, Yu. P.

    2014-01-01

    The paper presents a new approach to the nature of heat effects and shear modulus softening in metallic glasses. The approach is based on the assumption that the glass contains quenched-in "defects"—elastic dipoles. Using the nonlinear elastic representation of the internal energy of glass with quenched-in elastic dipoles, we derive a simple analytical law, which connects the heat flow and temperature derivative of the shear modulus. Specially performed experiments confirmed the validity of this law. The exothermal and endothermal heat processes in glass reveal through the relaxation of the shear modulus confirming it as a key parameter for the understanding the relaxation processes in glasses.

  1. Imaging and characterizing shear wave and shear modulus under orthogonal acoustic radiation force excitation using OCT Doppler variance method.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jiang; Qu, Yueqiao; Ma, Teng; Li, Rui; Du, Yongzhao; Huang, Shenghai; Shung, K Kirk; Zhou, Qifa; Chen, Zhongping

    2015-05-01

    We report on a novel acoustic radiation force orthogonal excitation optical coherence elastography (ARFOE-OCE) technique for imaging shear wave and quantifying shear modulus under orthogonal acoustic radiation force (ARF) excitation using the optical coherence tomography (OCT) Doppler variance method. The ARF perpendicular to the OCT beam is produced by a remote ultrasonic transducer. A shear wave induced by ARF excitation propagates parallel to the OCT beam. The OCT Doppler variance method, which is sensitive to the transverse vibration, is used to measure the ARF-induced vibration. For analysis of the shear modulus, the Doppler variance method is utilized to visualize shear wave propagation instead of Doppler OCT method, and the propagation velocity of the shear wave is measured at different depths of one location with the M scan. In order to quantify shear modulus beyond the OCT imaging depth, we move ARF to a deeper layer at a known step and measure the time delay of the shear wave propagating to the same OCT imaging depth. We also quantitatively map the shear modulus of a cross-section in a tissue-equivalent phantom after employing the B scan.

  2. Shear elastic modulus is a reproducible index reflecting the passive mechanical properties of medial gastrocnemius muscle belly

    PubMed Central

    Ikezoe, Tome; Umegaki, Hiroki; Kobayashi, Takuya; Nishisita, Satoru; Ichihashi, Noriaki

    2016-01-01

    Background Passive mechanical properties are important in muscle function because they are related to the muscle extensibility. Recently, the assessment of muscle shear elastic modulus using shear-wave elastographic (SWE) imaging was developed. However, reliability and validity of shear elastic modulus measurements during passive stretching remain undefined. Purpose To investigate the reproducibility and validity of the shear elastic modulus measured by SWE imaging during passive stretching. Material and Methods Ten healthy men volunteered for this study. The shear elastic modulus of medial gastrocnemius (MG) muscle belly was measured using ultrasonic SWE imaging during passive dorsiflexion. To assess the intra-session and inter-day reliabilities, the protocol was performed twice by the same investigator with a 5-min rest period between measurement sessions and twice on two different days by the same investigator with a 1–2-week interval between the two sessions. To assess the inter-investigator reliability, the protocol was performed on the same day by two investigators with a 5-min rest between measurement sessions. In addition, B-mode ultrasonography was used to determine the displacement of myotendinous junction (MTJ) of MG during passive ankle dorsiflexion. Results The intra-session, inter-day, and inter-investigator reliabilities of the method was confirmed on the basis of acceptably low coefficient of variations and substantially high intraclass correlation coefficients. In addition, a significant correlation was found between MTJ displacement and shear elastic modulus. Conclusion These results suggested that shear elastic modulus measured using SWE imaging is a reproducible index reflecting the passive mechanical properties. PMID:27170845

  3. Elastic superlattices with simultaneously negative effective mass density and shear modulus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solís-Mora, I. S.; Palomino-Ovando, M. A.; Pérez-Rodríguez, F.

    2013-03-01

    We investigate the vibrational properties of superlattices with layers of rubber and polyurethane foam, which can be either conventional or auxetic. Phononic dispersion calculations show a second pass band for transverse modes inside the lowest band gap of the longitudinal modes. In such a band, the superlattices behave as a double-negative elastic metamaterial since the effective dynamic mass density and shear modulus are both negative. The pass band is associated to a Fabry-Perot resonance band which turns out to be very narrow as a consequence of the high contrast between the acoustic impedances of the superlattice components.

  4. 3-D FDTD simulation of shear waves for evaluation of complex modulus imaging.

    PubMed

    Orescanin, Marko; Wang, Yue; Insana, Michael

    2011-02-01

    The Navier equation describing shear wave propagation in 3-D viscoelastic media is solved numerically with a finite differences time domain (FDTD) method. Solutions are formed in terms of transverse scatterer velocity waves and then verified via comparison to measured wave fields in heterogeneous hydrogel phantoms. The numerical algorithm is used as a tool to study the effects on complex shear modulus estimation from wave propagation in heterogeneous viscoelastic media. We used an algebraic Helmholtz inversion (AHI) technique to solve for the complex shear modulus from simulated and experimental velocity data acquired in 2-D and 3-D. Although 3-D velocity estimates are required in general, there are object geometries for which 2-D inversions provide accurate estimations of the material properties. Through simulations and experiments, we explored artifacts generated in elastic and dynamic-viscous shear modulus images related to the shear wavelength and average viscosity.

  5. Protocol-dependent shear modulus of amorphous solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayama, Daijyu; Yoshino, Hajime; Zamponi, Francesco

    2016-10-01

    We investigate the linear elastic response of amorphous solids to a shear strain at zero temperature. We find that the response is characterized by at least two distinct shear moduli. The first one, {μ\\text{ZFC}} , is associated with the linear response of a single energy minimum. The second, {μ\\text{FC}} , is related to sampling, through plastic events, an ensemble of distinct energy minima. We provide examples of protocols that allow one to measure both shear moduli. In agreement with a theoretical prediction based on the exact solution in infinite spatial dimensions, the ratio {μ\\text{FC}}/{μ\\text{ZFC}} is found to vanish proportionally to the square root of pressure at the jamming transition. Our results establish that amorphous solids are characterized by a rugged energy landscape, which has a deep impact on their elastic response, as suggested by the infinite-dimensional solution.

  6. Shear elastic modulus estimation from indentation and SDUV on gelatin phantoms

    PubMed Central

    Amador, Carolina; Urban, Matthew W.; Chen, Shigao; Chen, Qingshan; An, Kai-Nan; Greenleaf, James F.

    2011-01-01

    Tissue mechanical properties such as elasticity are linked to tissue pathology state. Several groups have proposed shear wave propagation speed to quantify tissue mechanical properties. It is well known that biological tissues are viscoelastic materials; therefore velocity dispersion resulting from material viscoelasticity is expected. A method called Shearwave Dispersion Ultrasound Vibrometry (SDUV) can be used to quantify tissue viscoelasticity by measuring dispersion of shear wave propagation speed. However, there is not a gold standard method for validation. In this study we present an independent validation method of shear elastic modulus estimation by SDUV in 3 gelatin phantoms of differing stiffness. In addition, the indentation measurements are compared to estimates of elasticity derived from shear wave group velocities. The shear elastic moduli from indentation were 1.16, 3.40 and 5.6 kPa for a 7, 10 and 15% gelatin phantom respectively. SDUV measurements were 1.61, 3.57 and 5.37 kPa for the gelatin phantoms respectively. Shear elastic moduli derived from shear wave group velocities were 1.78, 5.2 and 7.18 kPa for the gelatin phantoms respectively. The shear elastic modulus estimated from the SDUV, matched the elastic modulus measured by indentation. On the other hand, shear elastic modulus estimated by group velocity did not agree with indentation test estimations. These results suggest that shear elastic modulus estimation by group velocity will be bias when the medium being investigated is dispersive. Therefore a rheological model should be used in order to estimate mechanical properties of viscoelastic materials. PMID:21317078

  7. Effective shear modulus reconstruction obtained with approximate mean normal stress remaining unknown.

    PubMed

    Sumi, Chikayoshi

    2007-11-01

    We previously reported Methods A and B for reconstructing tissue shear modulus and density using mean normal stress as an unknown. The use of Method A enables us to obtain such reconstructions with the mean normal stress remaining unknown by using an iterative method to solve algebraic equations. However, Method A results in a low convergence speed and a low reconstruction accuracy compared with Method B that enables a reconstruction of mean normal stress together. Thus, in this report, we describe a new, rapid and accurate method, Method C, that enables the reconstructions of shear modulus and density in real time with a higher accuracy than Method A. In Method A, no reference mean normal stress is used. In Method C, an arbitrary finite value is used as a quasireference mean normal stress at an arbitrary point (i.e., a quasireference point) or an arbitrary region (i.e., a quasireference region) in the region of interest on the basis of the fact that the gradient operator implemented on the mean normal stress becomes positive-definite. When a quasireference region can be realized, Method C enables such reconstructions with a high accuracy and a high convergence speed similar to Method B. The effectiveness of Method C was verified using simulated phantom deformation data. Method C must be used instead of Method A as a practical method, in combination with Method B.

  8. An effective ultrasonic strain measurement-based shear modulus reconstruction technique for superficial tissues - demonstration on in vitro pork ribs and in vivo human breast tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumi, Chikayoshi; Nakayama, Kiyoshi; Kubota, Mitsuhiro

    2000-06-01

    An effective shear modulus reconstruction technique is described which uses ultrasonic strain measurements for diagnosis of superficial tissues, i.e. our previously developed ultrasonic strain measurement and shear modulus reconstruction methods are combined and enhanced. The technique realizes very low computational load, yet yields fairly high quantitativeness, high stability and spatial resolution, and large dynamic range. The suitability of the method is demonstrated on in vitro pork ribs and in vivo human breast tissues (fibroadenoma and scirrhous carcinoma).

  9. Monitoring of thermal therapy based on shear modulus changes: II. Shear wave imaging of thermal lesions.

    PubMed

    Arnal, Bastien; Pernot, Mathieu; Tanter, Mickael

    2011-08-01

    The clinical applicability of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) for noninvasive therapy is currently hampered by the lack of robust and real-time monitoring of tissue damage during treatment. The goal of this study is to show that the estimation of local tissue elasticity from shear wave imaging (SWI) can lead to a precise mapping of the lesion. HIFU treatment and monitoring were respectively performed using a confocal setup consisting of a 2.5-MHz single element transducer focused at 34 mm on ex vivo samples and an 8-MHz ultrasound diagnostic probe. Ultrasound-based strain imaging was combined with shear wave imaging on the same device. The SWI sequences consisted of 2 successive shear waves induced at different lateral positions. Each wave was created with pushing beams of 100 μs at 3 depths. The shear wave propagation was acquired at 17,000 frames/s, from which the elasticity map was recovered. HIFU sonications were interleaved with fast imaging acquisitions, allowing a duty cycle of more than 90%. Thus, elasticity and strain mapping was achieved every 3 s, leading to real-time monitoring of the treatment. When thermal damage occurs, tissue stiffness was found to increase up to 4-fold and strain imaging showed strong shrinkages that blur the temperature information. We show that strain imaging elastograms are not easy to interpret for accurate lesion characterization, but SWI provides a quantitative mapping of the thermal lesion. Moreover, the concept of shear wave thermometry (SWT) developed in the companion paper allows mapping temperature with the same method. Combined SWT and shear wave imaging can map the lesion stiffening and temperature outside the lesion, which could be used to predict the eventual lesion growth by thermal dose calculation. Finally, SWI is shown to be robust to motion and reliable in vivo on sheep muscle.

  10. On a thickness free expression for the shear modulus of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghadyani, Ghasem; Soufeiani, Leila; Öchsner, Andreas

    2016-11-01

    The thickness of carbon nanotubes is an important issue for the characterization and design of these structures. In this article, thickness free expressions for the shear modulus of single-walled carbon nanotubes have been developed by finite element simulations on the minimum potential energy circle. As a part of this work, some equations have been obtained to define the relation between the thickness and the shear modulus, which are in good agreement with previous studies. Moreover, these expressions are in good agreement with both continuum and quantum mechanics and capable to support "Yakobson's paradox," that the scattering data for the elastic properties of carbon nanotubes are due to the not-well-defined thickness for these structures. Furthermore, these expressions can provide a tool for the prediction of the shear modulus of single-walled carbon nanotubes in regards to any thickness assumption when the experimental investigations are too difficult to realize.

  11. Monte Carlo study of the shear modulus at the surface of a Lennard-Jones crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eerden, J. P. v. d.; Knops, H. J. F.; Roos, A.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper, we give a microscopic definition of local elastic constants. We apply this to the numerical evaluation of the shear modulus of an interface which is sharp as compared with the interaction range. The algorithm is applied to a study of the (001) face of a face-centered-cubic (fcc) Lennard-Jones crystal. The vanishing of the shear modulus gives an estimate of the melting temperature of the first layer which is well below the bulk triple point. Some theoretical aspects of surface melting are briefly discussed.

  12. The shear modulus of metastable amorphous solids with strong central and bond-bending interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaccone, Alessio

    2009-07-01

    We derive expressions for the shear modulus of deeply quenched, glassy solids, in terms of a Cauchy-Born free energy expansion around a rigid (quenched) reference state, following the approach due to Alexander (1998 Phys. Rep. 296 65). Continuum-limit explicit expressions of the shear modulus are derived starting from the microscopic Hamiltonians of central and bond-bending interactions. The applicability of the expressions to dense covalent glasses as well as colloidal glasses involving strongly attractive or adhesive bonds is discussed.

  13. Effects of pressure on the shear modulus, mass and thickness of the perfused porcine kidney.

    PubMed

    Helfenstein, C; Gennisson, J-L; Tanter, M; Beillas, P

    2015-01-02

    Eleven fresh ex vivo porcine kidneys were perfused in the artery, vein and ureter with degassed Dulbecco׳s Modified Eagle Medium (DMEM). The effect of perfusion pressure was evaluated using ten different pressures combinations. The shear modulus of the tissues was estimated during perfusion using shear wave elastography. The organ weight change was measured by a digital scale and cameras were used to follow the changes of the dimensions after each pressure combination. The effect of perfusion on the weight and the thickness was non-reversible, whereas the effect on the shear modulus was reversible. Pressure was found to increase the average shear modulus in the cortex by as much as 73%. A pressure of 80 mmHg was needed to observe tissues shear modulus in the same range as in vivo tests (Gcortex=9.1 kPa, Gmedulla=8.5 kPa ex vivo versus Gcortex=9.1 kPa, Gmedulla=8.7 kPa in vivo in Gennisson et al., 2012).

  14. Dynamic transverse shear modulus for a heterogeneous fluid-filled porous solid containing cylindrical inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yongjia; Hu, Hengshan; Rudnicki, John W.; Duan, Yunda

    2016-09-01

    An exact analytical solution is presented for the effective dynamic transverse shear modulus in a heterogeneous fluid-filled porous solid containing cylindrical inclusions. The complex and frequency-dependent properties of the dynamic shear modulus are caused by the physical mechanism of mesoscopic-scale wave-induced fluid flow whose scale is smaller than wavelength but larger than the size of pores. Our model consists of three phases: a long cylindrical inclusion, a cylindrical shell of poroelastic matrix material with different mechanical and/or hydraulic properties than the inclusion and an outer region of effective homogeneous medium of laterally infinite extent. The behavior of both the inclusion and the matrix is described by Biot's consolidation equations, whereas the surrounding effective medium which is used to describe the effective transverse shear properties of the inner poroelastic composite is assumed to be a viscoelastic solid whose complex transverse shear modulus needs to be determined. The determined effective transverse shear modulus is used to quantify the S-wave attenuation and velocity dispersion in heterogeneous fluid-filled poroelastic rocks. The calculation shows the relaxation frequency and relative position of various fluid saturation dispersion curves predicted by this study exhibit very good agreement with those of a previous 2-D finite-element simulation. For the double-porosity model (inclusions having a different solid frame than the matrix but the same pore fluid as the matrix) the effective shear modulus also exhibits a size-dependent characteristic that the relaxation frequency moves to lower frequencies by two orders of magnitude if the radius of the cylindrical poroelastic composite increases by one order of magnitude. For the patchy-saturation model (inclusions having the same solid frame as the matrix but with a different pore fluid from the matrix), the heterogeneity in pore fluid cannot cause any attenuation in the

  15. Variation of shear and compressional wave modulus upon saturation for pure pre-compacted sands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhuiyan, M. H.; Holt, R. M.

    2016-07-01

    Gassmann's fluid substitution theory is commonly used to predict seismic velocity change upon change in saturation, and is hence essential for 4-D seismic and AVO studies. This paper addresses the basics assumptions of the Gassmann theory, in order to see how well they are fulfilled in controlled laboratory experiments. Our focus is to investigate the sensitivity of shear modulus to fluid saturation, and the predictability of Gassmann's fluid substitution theory for P-wave modulus. Ultrasonic P- and S-wave velocities in dry and saturated (3.5 wt per cent NaCl) unconsolidated clean sands (Ottawa and Columbia) were measured in an oedometer test system (uniaxial strain conditions) over a range of 0.5-10 MPa external vertical stress. This study shows shear modulus hardening upon brine saturation, which is consistent with previous data found in the literature. Analysis of the data shows that most of the hardening of the ultrasonic shear modulus may be explained by Biot dispersion. Isotropic Gassmann's fluid substitution is found to underestimate the P-wave modulus upon fluid saturation. However, adding the Biot dispersion effect improves the prediction. More work is required to obtain good measurements of parameters influencing dispersion, such as tortuosity, which is very ambiguous and challenging to measure accurately.

  16. Microstructure, shear modulus and attenuation in igneous rocks approaching melting at seismic frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chien, S.; Redfern, S. A.

    2010-12-01

    Melt-related attenuation mechanisms, such as viscous flow and squirt processes, are of paramount importance in understanding high seismic wave attenuation in partially molten regions of the deep Earth. Strong temperature dependence of the anelastic quality factor, Q, is one obvious consequence of such mechanisms. Mineralogical composition, grain size, melt viscosity and microstructure (morphology and size of the inter-granular pores/micro-cracks), are important parameters for modeling attenuation mechanisms, and are control rock properties, particularly in the partially molten rocks. There have been many theoretical studies linking creep or viscosity models and laboratory experiments for partially molten rocks. However, experimental data on the relationship between temperature and attenuation remains. In this study, the shear modulus (G) and inverse quality factor (1/Q) of two igneous rocks (gabbro and basalt) were measured in the laboratory at temperatures approaching the melting point using the inverted forced torsion pendulum. Attenuation increases exponentially when shear modulus drops rapidly towards to melting temperature in both gabbro (1400 K) and basalt (1250 K). For measurements conducted using cyclic shear stresses at 1Hz, two attenuation relaxation peaks are found in gabbro at 1214 K and 1410 K, while only one attenuation relaxation peak occurs in basalt at 1151 K. These attenuation peaks may result from grain boundary sliding, diffusion creep and/or melt squirt. In addition to the relaxation peaks, there is a rising exponential increase in attenuation approaching the melting point from below. A power law model has been used to determine the effective activation energy associated with this high-temperature attenuation background. An activation energy of 68 kJ/mole in basalt and 882 kJ/mole in gabbro is found. The result for gabbro is in a good agreement with the study of Fontaine et al. in 2005 (873 kJ/mol), and the very different behaviour of basalt

  17. Ultrasonic measurement of viscoelastic shear modulus development in hydrating cement paste.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaojun; Subramaniam, Kolluru V; Lin, Fengbao

    2010-06-01

    A test procedure for measuring changes in amplitude and phase of SH ultrasonic waves from the interface between fused-quartz and cement paste samples is presented. The phase change is determined from the temporal shift in the reflected signal relative to the incident signal. The sensitivity of the measured parameters to changes in acoustic impedance of the materials in contact with fused-quartz is evaluated for different angles of incidence. It is shown that a reflection measurement at normal incidence at nano-second temporal resolution does not provide sufficient sensitivity to measure the viscous component of shear modulus of low viscosity fluids and cannot be applied to cement paste while it is in a fluid state. Monitoring the measured amplitude and phase at oblique angle of incidence allows for measuring fluids with acoustic impedance comparable to cement paste. The reflection measurements are used to determine the evolution of elastic and viscous components of shear modulus cement paste with time. Influence of sampling rate and temperature effects on the phase measurements are evaluated and shown to be significant. It is shown that the initial loss of workability of cement paste through setting process is associated with a larger relative increase in the viscous component of shear modulus. Following the initial rapid rise of the viscous component of shear modulus, there is a larger relative increase in the elastic component, which can be related to the emergence of a solid structure capable of retaining an imprint.

  18. Probabilistic characterization of cyclic shear modulus reduction for normally to moderately over-consolidated clays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Iok-Tong; Yuen, Ka-Veng; Lao, Ngai-Kuan

    2016-09-01

    Evaluation of the cyclic shear modulus of soils is a crucial but challenging task for many geotechnical earthquake engineering and soil dynamic issues. Improper determination of this property unnecessarily drives up design and maintenance costs or even leads to the construction of unsafe structures. Due to the complexities involved in the direct measurement, empirical curves for estimating the cyclic shear modulus have been commonly adopted in practice for simplicity and economical considerations. However, a systematic and robust approach for formulating a reliable model and empirical curve for cyclic shear modulus prediction for clayey soils is still lacking. In this study, the Bayesian model class selection approach is utilized to identify the most significant soil parameters affecting the normalized cyclic shear modulus and a reliable predictive model for normally to moderately over-consolidated clays is proposed. Results show that the predictability and reliability of the proposed model out performs the well-known empirical models. Finally, a new design chart is established for practical usage.

  19. Change of shear modulus and yield stress with pressure and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partom, Yehuda

    2017-01-01

    It is well known that the shear modulus (G) and the yield stress (Y) of metals increase with pressure (P) and decrease with temperature (T). Steinberg, in his popular compendium of dynamic material properties, assumes for Y/Y0(P,T)=G/G0(P,T) linear relations based on derivatives determined experimentally at ambient conditions. But recent tests with high pressure dynamic loadings of certain metals obtained results that generally deviate from Steinberg's predictions. Here we use a different approach to estimate G/G0(P,T). As a first approximation we let G/G0=K/K0, where K is the isentropic bulk modulus. With this assumption we compute the longitudinal sound speed of tantalum along its principal Hugoniot and compare to recent measurements. There is a very slight disagreement, which we can correct by assuming (second approximation) that Poisson ratio decreases slightly with pressure and increases slightly with temperature. As K=ρc2 is always available in a hydrocode run from the equation of state, so are therefore also G/G0 and Y/Y0.

  20. Temperature dependence of the shear modulus of soft tissues assessed by ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Sapin-de Brosses, E; Gennisson, J-L; Pernot, M; Fink, M; Tanter, M

    2010-03-21

    Soft tissue stiffness was shown to significantly change after thermal ablation. To better understand this phenomenon, the study aims (1) to quantify and explain the temperature dependence of soft tissue stiffness for different organs, (2) to investigate the potential relationship between stiffness changes and thermal dose and (3) to study the reversibility or irreversibility of stiffness changes. Ex vivo bovine liver and muscle samples (N = 3 and N = 20, respectively) were slowly heated and cooled down into a thermally controlled saline bath. Temperatures were assessed by thermocouples. Sample stiffness (shear modulus) was provided by the quantitative supersonic shear imaging technique. Changes in liver stiffness are observed only after 45 degrees C. In contrast, between 25 degrees C and 65 degrees C, muscle stiffness varies in four successive steps that are consistent with the thermally induced proteins denaturation reported in the literature. After a 6 h long heating and cooling process, the final muscle stiffness can be either smaller or bigger than the initial one, depending on the stiffness at the end of the heating. Another important result is that stiffness changes are linked to thermal dose. Given the high sensitivity of ultrasound to protein denaturation, this study gives promising prospects for the development of ultrasound-guided HIFU systems.

  1. The influence of void ratio on small strain shear modulus of granular materials: A micromechanical perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiaomin; Cheng, Yipik; Ling, Dongsheng

    2013-06-01

    The small strain shear modulus Gmax of granular materials is highly dependent on their current void ratio and stress state, generally expressed as the famous Hardin and Richart equation. Various forms of void ratio functions have been proposed, either based on experimental or theoretical research. It is noted that each of them can be applied for a certain soil within a limited void ratio range. Micromechanical studies on the influence of void ratio on Gmax are conducted in this paper, using Discrete Element Method. After each sample being isotropically consolidated, shear wave velocity is measured by applying a velocity pulse to the transmitter in a certain direction, and monitoring the corresponding average velocity of the receiver. The capabilities of various existing void ratio functions are examined, together with the relationship between coordination number and void ratio, distribution of coordination number, as well as the contact force network. The void ratio effect on Gmax is further explained in terms of the wave travel length and the travel time for different contact connectivity networks.

  2. Non-free gas of dipoles of non-singular screw dislocations and the shear modulus near the melting

    SciTech Connect

    Malyshev, Cyril

    2014-12-15

    The behavior of the shear modulus caused by proliferation of dipoles of non-singular screw dislocations with finite-sized core is considered. The representation of two-dimensional Coulomb gas with smoothed-out coupling is used, and the stress–stress correlation function is calculated. A convolution integral expressed in terms of the modified Bessel function K{sub 0} is derived in order to obtain the shear modulus in approximation of interacting dipoles. Implications are demonstrated for the shear modulus near the melting transition which are due to the singularityless character of the dislocations. - Highlights: • Thermodynamics of dipoles of non-singular screw dislocations is studied below the melting. • The renormalization of the shear modulus is obtained for interacting dipoles. • Dependence of the shear modulus on the system scales is presented near the melting.

  3. In Vivo Quantification of the Nonlinear Shear Modulus in Breast Lesions: Feasibility Study.

    PubMed

    Bernal, Miguel; Chamming's, Foucauld; Couade, Mathieu; Bercoff, Jeremy; Tanter, Mickaël; Gennisson, Jean-Luc

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer detection in the early stages is of great importance since the prognosis, and the treatment depends more on this. Multiple techniques relying on the mechanical properties of soft tissues have been developed to help in early detection. In this study, we implemented a technique that measures the nonlinear shear modulus (NLSM) (μ(NL)) in vivo and showed its utility to detect breast lesions from healthy tissue. The technique relies on the acoustoelasticity theory in quasi-incompressible media. In order to recover μ(NL), static elastography and supersonic shear imaging are combined to subsequently register strain maps and shear modulus maps while the medium is compressed. Then, μ(NL) can be recovered from the relationship between the stress, deduced from strain maps, and the shear modulus. For this study, a series of five nonlinear phantoms were built using biological tissue (pork liver) inclusions immersed in an agar-gelatin gel. Furthermore, 11 in vivo acquisitions were performed to characterize the NLSM of breast tissue. The phantom results showed a very good differentiation of the liver inclusions when measuring μ(NL) with a mean value of -114.1 kPa compared to -34.7 kPa for the gelatin. Meanwhile, values for the shear modulus for the liver and the gelatin were very similar, 3.7 and 3.4 kPa, respectively. In vivo NLSM mean value for the healthy breast tissue was of -95 kPa, while mean values of the benign and the malignant lesions were -619 and -806 kPa with a strong v ariability, respectively. This study shows the potential of the acoustoelasticity theory in quasi-incompressible medium to bring a new parameter for breast cancer diagnosis.

  4. The shear modulus of the neutron star crust and nonradial oscillations of neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strohmayer, T.; Van Horn, H. M.; Ogata, S.; Iyetomi, H.; Ichimaru, S.

    1991-01-01

    Shear moduli are calculated for bcc crystalline and rapidly quenched Coulomb solids produced by the Monte Carlo simulation method. The shear moduli are calculated up to the transition temperature and include the effects of thermal fluctuations. An effective shear modulus appropriate to an approximate 'isotropic' body is introduced. It is found that the values of the 'average shear modulus' for the quenched solids remain about the same as those for the corresponding bcc crystals, although the individual shear moduli of the former, disordered solids deviate considerably from the cubic symmetry of the latter. These results are applied to analyses of neutron star oscillations. It is found that the periods of the two interfacial modes are increased by about 10 percent compared to previous results, and that s-mode periods are increased by about 30 percent. The periods of the f and p modes are hardly affected at all. The surface g-mode periods are not greatly affected, while the t-mode periods are increased by 20-25 percent.

  5. Nonlinear Ultrasound Propagation in Solid ^4{He} Compared with Shear Modulus Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasa, Izumi; Kojima, Harry

    2016-10-01

    Ultrasound attenuation (α ) and velocity (V) at 9.6 MHz are measured in polycrystalline hcp ^4{He} . The ultrasound signal above 200 mK is linear and understood in terms of resonant vibration of dislocation segments pinned between network nodes with an average pinning length of 3.7 μ m, much shorter than 59 μ m estimated from a shear modulus measurement. Dramatic changes in α and V are observed below 200 mK. The changes are strongly dependent on temperature and are nonlinear and hysteretic. These effects result from pinning of dislocations by ^3{He} impurities (nominal concentration of 0.3 ppm). The dislocation damping constant due to thermal phonons, the binding energy between dislocation and ^3{He} , and the average network pinning length obtained from the ultrasound data are compared with those from the shear modulus experiments.

  6. Shear modulus of glasses: results from the full replica-symmetry-breaking solution.

    PubMed

    Yoshino, Hajime; Zamponi, Francesco

    2014-08-01

    We compute the shear modulus of amorphous hard and soft spheres, using the exact solution in infinite spatial dimensions that has been developed recently. We characterize the behavior of this observable in the whole phase diagram, and in particular around the glass and jamming transitions. Our results are consistent with other theoretical approaches, which are unified within this general picture, and they are also consistent with numerical and experimental results. Furthermore, we discuss some properties of the out-of-equilibrium dynamics after a deep quench close to the jamming transition, and we show that a combined measure of the shear modulus and of the mean square displacement allows one to probe experimentally the complex structure of phase space predicted by the full replica-symmetry-breaking solution.

  7. Dislocation Mobility and Anomalous Shear Modulus Effect in ^4He Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malmi-Kakkada, Abdul N.; Valls, Oriol T.; Dasgupta, Chandan

    2017-02-01

    We calculate the dislocation glide mobility in solid ^4He within a model that assumes the existence of a superfluid field associated with dislocation lines. Prompted by the results of this mobility calculation, we study within this model the role that such a superfluid field may play in the motion of the dislocation line when a stress is applied to the crystal. To do this, we relate the damping of dislocation motion, calculated in the presence of the assumed superfluid field, to the shear modulus of the crystal. As the temperature increases, we find that a sharp drop in the shear modulus will occur at the temperature where the superfluid field disappears. We compare the drop in shear modulus of the crystal arising from the temperature dependence of the damping contribution due to the superfluid field, to the experimental observation of the same phenomena in solid ^4He and find quantitative agreement. Our results indicate that such a superfluid field plays an important role in dislocation pinning in a clean solid ^4He at low temperatures and in this regime may provide an alternative source for the unusual elastic phenomena observed in solid ^4He.

  8. The effects of interstitial tissue pressure on the measured shear modulus in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, John B.; Perrinez, P. R.; Bergeron, J. A.; Kennedy, F. E.; Wang, H.; Lollis, S. Scott; Doyley, M. M.; Hoopes, P. J.; Paulsen, K. D.

    2007-03-01

    It is well known that many pathologic processes, like cancer, result in increased tissue stiffness but the biologic mechanisms which cause pathologies to be stiffer than normal tissues are largely unknown. Increased collagen density has been presumed to be largely responsible because it has been shown to cause variations in normal tissue stiffness. However, other effects such as increased tissue pressure are also thought to be significant. We examined the effects of tissue pressure on shear modulus measured using MR elastography (MRE) by comparing the shear modulus in the pre-mortem, edematous and post-mortem porcine brain and found that the measured shear modulus increases with tissue pressure as expected. The slope of a linear fit to this preliminary data varied from 0.3 kPa/mmHg to 0.1 kPa/mmHg. These results represent the first in vivo demonstration of tissue pressure affecting intrinsic mechanical properties and have several implications. First, if the linear relationship described is correct, tissue pressure could contribute significantly (~20%) to the increase in stiffness observed in cancer. Second, tissue pressure effects must be considered when in vitro mechanical properties are extrapolated to in vivo settings. Moreover, MRE might provide a means to characterize pathologic conditions associated with increased or decreased tissue pressure, such as edema and ischemia, in a diverse set of diseases including cancer, diabetes, stroke, and transplant rejection.

  9. Non-free gas of dipoles of non-singular screw dislocations and the shear modulus near the melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malyshev, Cyril

    2014-12-01

    The behavior of the shear modulus caused by proliferation of dipoles of non-singular screw dislocations with finite-sized core is considered. The representation of two-dimensional Coulomb gas with smoothed-out coupling is used, and the stress-stress correlation function is calculated. A convolution integral expressed in terms of the modified Bessel function K0 is derived in order to obtain the shear modulus in approximation of interacting dipoles. Implications are demonstrated for the shear modulus near the melting transition which are due to the singularityless character of the dislocations.

  10. Effective lateral modulations with applications to shear modulus reconstruction using displacement vector measurement.

    PubMed

    Sumi, Chikayoshi; Noro, Toshinori; Tanuma, Atsushi

    2008-12-01

    High accuracy in measuring target motions can be realized by combined use of our previously developed lateral Gaussian envelope cosine modulation method (LGECMM) and displacement vector measurement methods that enable simultaneous axial and lateral displacement measurements, such as the multidimensional autocorrelation method (MAM). In this paper, LGECMM is improved by using parabolic functions and Hanning windows instead of Gaussian functions in the apodization function, i.e., parabolic apodization and Hanning apodization. The new modulations enable decreases in effective aperture length (i.e., channels) and yield more accurate displacement vector measurements than LGECMM due to increased echo signal-to-noise ratio and lateral spatial resolution. That is, on the basis of a priori knowledge about ultrasound propagation using the focusing scheme and shape of the apodization function, we stopped using Fraunhofer approximation. As practical applications of the modulations, for an agar phantom that is deformed in a lateral direction, stable and accurate 2-D shear modulus reconstructions are performed using our previously developed direct inversion approach together with 2-D strain tensor measurements using MAM.

  11. Numerical simulation of seismic response of a base isolated building with low shear modulus rubber isolators

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.Y.

    1993-06-01

    This paper describes seismic-response simulations of a base-isolated building subjected to actual earthquakes using the 3-D computer program, SISEC, developed at Argonne National Laboratory. The isolation system consists of six medium shape factor, high damping, and low shear modulus rubber bearings. To ensure the accuracy of analytical simulation, recorded data of full-size reinforced concrete structures located in Sendai, Japan are used as the benchmarks for comparisons of numerical simulations with observations. Results obtained from both analytical simulations and earthquake observations indicate that the advantage of base isolation in mitigating the acceleration of superstructure is very pronounced. For the two representative earthquakes, one had the strongest ground motion and the other one had similar magnitudes as the rest of the earthquakes recorded at the test site, the simulated accelerations at the roof level of the isolated building are about 20% to 30% of the ordinary building accelerations. Also, results reveal that for both ordinary and base-isolated buildings the computed accelerations agree reasonably well with those recorded.

  12. Numerical simulation of seismic response of a base isolated building with low shear modulus rubber isolators

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.Y.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes seismic-response simulations of a base-isolated building subjected to actual earthquakes using the 3-D computer program, SISEC, developed at Argonne National Laboratory. The isolation system consists of six medium shape factor, high damping, and low shear modulus rubber bearings. To ensure the accuracy of analytical simulation, recorded data of full-size reinforced concrete structures located in Sendai, Japan are used as the benchmarks for comparisons of numerical simulations with observations. Results obtained from both analytical simulations and earthquake observations indicate that the advantage of base isolation in mitigating the acceleration of superstructure is very pronounced. For the two representative earthquakes, one had the strongest ground motion and the other one had similar magnitudes as the rest of the earthquakes recorded at the test site, the simulated accelerations at the roof level of the isolated building are about 20% to 30% of the ordinary building accelerations. Also, results reveal that for both ordinary and base-isolated buildings the computed accelerations agree reasonably well with those recorded.

  13. Possible contribution of low shear modulus C₄₄ to the low Young’s modulus of Ti-36Nb-5Zr alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, Qingkun; Guo, Shun; Ren, Xiaobing; Xu, Huibin; Zhao, Xinqing

    2014-09-29

    Despite the importance of single-crystal elastic constants of β-phase titanium alloys in understanding their low Young's modulus—a property crucial for many applications, such data are often difficult to obtain when the alloy composition is close to the instability limit of the β phase, where the presence of α" martensite precludes the fabrication of β-phase single crystal. In the present study, we extracted the single-crystal elastic constants of such a β-phase titanium alloy with low Young's modulus, Ti-36Nb-5Zr (wt. %), from polycrystalline specimens by using an in-situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction technique. It is indicated that the low Young's modulus of the alloy originates from the anomalously low shear modulus C₄₄ as well as the low shear modulus C', which is different from a common viewpoint that the Young's modulus of β-phase titanium alloys is dominantly controlled by the C'. This suggests that low C₄₄ is an important contributor to low Young's modulus for instable β-phase titanium alloys.

  14. Possible contribution of low shear modulus C{sub 44} to the low Young's modulus of Ti-36Nb-5Zr alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, Qingkun; Xu, Huibin; Zhao, Xinqing; Guo, Shun; Ren, Xiaobing

    2014-09-29

    Despite the importance of single-crystal elastic constants of β-phase titanium alloys in understanding their low Young's modulus—a property crucial for many applications, such data are often difficult to obtain when the alloy composition is close to the instability limit of the β phase, where the presence of α' martensite precludes the fabrication of β-phase single crystal. In the present study, we extracted the single-crystal elastic constants of such a β-phase titanium alloy with low Young's modulus, Ti-36Nb-5Zr (wt. %), from polycrystalline specimens by using an in-situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction technique. It is indicated that the low Young's modulus of the alloy originates from the anomalously low shear modulus C{sub 44} as well as the low shear modulus C′, which is different from a common viewpoint that the Young's modulus of β-phase titanium alloys is dominantly controlled by the C′. This suggests that low C{sub 44} is an important contributor to low Young's modulus for instable β-phase titanium alloys.

  15. Calculating tissue shear modulus and pressure by 2D Log-Elastographic methods

    PubMed Central

    McLaughlin, Joyce R; Zhang, Ning; Manduca, Armando

    2010-01-01

    Shear modulus imaging, often called elastography, enables detection and characterization of tissue abnormalities. In this paper the data is two displacement components obtained from successive MR or ultrasound data sets acquired while the tissue is excited mechanically. A 2D plane strain elastic model is assumed to govern the 2D displacement, u. The shear modulus, μ, is unknown and whether or not the first Lamé parameter, λ, is known the pressure p = λ∇ · u which is present in the plane strain model cannot be measured and is unreliably computed from measured data and can be shown to be an order one quantity in the units kPa. So here we present a 2D Log-Elastographic inverse algorithm that: (1) simultaneously reconstructs the shear modulus, μ, and p, which together satisfy a first order partial differential equation system, with the goal of imaging μ; (2) controls potential exponential growth in the numerical error; and (3) reliably reconstructs the quantity p in the inverse algorithm as compared to the same quantity computed with a forward algorithm. This work generalizes the Log-Elastographic algorithm in [20] which uses one displacement component, is derived assuming the component satisfies the wave equation, and is tested on synthetic data computed with the wave equation model. The 2D Log-Elastographic algorithm is tested on 2D synthetic data and 2D in-vivo data from Mayo Clinic. We also exhibit examples to show that the 2D Log-Elastographic algorithm improves the quality of the recovered images as compared to the Log-Elastographic and Direct Inversion algorithms. PMID:21822349

  16. Lateral Earth Pressure at Rest and Shear Modulus Measurements on Hanford Sludge Simulants

    SciTech Connect

    Wells, Beric E.; Jenks, Jeromy WJ; Boeringa, Gregory K.; Bauman, Nathan N.; Guzman, Anthony D.; Arduino, P.; Keller, P. J.

    2010-09-30

    This report describes the equipment, techniques, and results of lateral earth pressure at rest and shear modulus measurements on kaolin clay as well as two chemical sludge simulants. The testing was performed in support of the problem of hydrogen gas retention and release encountered in the double- shell tanks (DSTs) at the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. Wastes from single-shell tanks (SSTs) are being transferred to double-shell tanks (DSTs) for safety reasons (some SSTs are leaking or are in danger of leaking), but the available DST space is limited.

  17. The effect of hip rotation on shear elastic modulus of the medial and lateral hamstrings during stretching.

    PubMed

    Umegaki, Hiroki; Ikezoe, Tome; Nakamura, Masatoshi; Nishishita, Satoru; Kobayashi, Takuya; Fujita, Kosuke; Tanaka, Hiroki; Ichihashi, Noriaki

    2015-02-01

    Regarding hamstring stretching methods, many studies have investigated the effect of stretching duration or frequency on muscle stiffness. However, the most effective stretching positions for hamstrings are unclear because it is impossible to quantify muscle elongation directly and noninvasively in vivo. Recently, a new ultrasound technology, ultrasonic shear wave elastography, has permitted noninvasive and reliable measurement of muscle shear elastic modulus, which has a strong linear relationship to the amount of muscle elongation. This study aimed to investigate the effect of hip internal and external rotation on shear elastic modulus of the lateral and medial hamstrings, respectively, during stretching in vivo using ultrasonic shear wave elastography. Twenty-three healthy men (age, 23.0 ± 2.1 years) were recruited for this study. To investigate the effect of hip rotation on the elongation of the medial and lateral hamstrings, shear elastic modulus of the biceps femoris (BF) and semitendinosus (ST) was measured at rest (a supine position with 90° knee flexion, 90° hip flexion, and hip neutral rotation) and in seven stretching positions (with 45° knee flexion and hip internal, external, and neutral rotation) using ultrasonic shear wave elastography. In both BF and ST, the shear elastic modulus in the rest position was significantly lower than that in all stretching positions. However, no significant differences were seen among stretching positions. Our results suggest that adding hip rotation at a stretching position for the hamstrings may not have a significant effect on muscle elongation of the medial and lateral hamstrings.

  18. Effect of consolidation ratios on maximum dynamic shear modulus of sands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiaoming, Yuan; Jing, Sun; Rui, Sun

    2005-06-01

    The dynamic shear modulus (DSM) is the most basic soil parameter in earthquake or other dynamic loading conditions and can be obtained through testing in the field or in the laboratory. The effect of consolidation ratios of the maximum DSM for two types of sand is investigated by using resonant column tests. And, an increment formula to obtain the maximum DSM for cases of consolidation ratio k c>1 is presented. The results indicate that the maximum DSM rises rapidly when k c is near 1 and then slows down, which means that the power function of the consolidation ratio increment k c-1 can be used to describe the variation of the maximum DSM due to k c>1. The results also indicate that the increase in the maximum DSM due to k c>1 is significantly larger than that predicted by Hardin and Black's formula.

  19. Method and apparatus for measuring shear modulus and viscosity of a monomolecular film

    DOEpatents

    Abraham, Bernard M.; Miyano, Kenjiro; Ketterson, John B.

    1985-01-01

    Instrument for measuring the shear modulus of a monomolecular film comprises a circular trough having inwardly sloping sides containing a liquid for supporting the monolayer on the surface thereof; a circular rotor suspended above the trough such that the lower surface of the rotor contacts the surface of the liquid, positioned such that the axis of the rotor is concentric with the axis of the trough and freely rotable about its axis; apparatus for hydrostatically compressing the monolayer in the annular region formed between the rotor and the sides of the trough; and apparatus for rotating the trough about its axis. Preferably, hydrostatic compression of the monolayer is achieved by removing liquid from the bottom of the trough (decreasing the surface area) while raising the trough vertically along its axis to maintain the monolayer at a constant elevation (and maintain rotor contact). In order to measure viscosity, a apparatus for rotating the rotor about its axis is added to the apparatus.

  20. Method and apparatus for measuring shear modulus and viscosity of a monomolecular film

    DOEpatents

    Abraham, B.M.; Miyano, K.; Ketterson, J.B.

    1983-10-18

    Apparatus for measuring the shear modulus of a monomolecular film comprises a circular trough having inwardly sloping sides containing a liquid for supporting the monolayer on the surface thereof; a circular rotor suspended above the trough such that the lower surface of the rotor contacts the surface of the liquid, positioned such that the axis of the rotor is concentric with the axis of the trough and freely rotable about its axis; means for hydrostatically compressing the monolayer in the annular region formed between the rotor and the sides of the trough; and means for rotating the trough about its axis. Preferably, hydrostatic compression of the monolayer is achieved by removing liquid from the bottom of the trough (decreasing the surface area) while raising the trough vertically along its axis to maintain the monolayer at a constant elevation (and maintain rotor contact). In order to measure viscosity, a means for rotating the rotor about its axis is added to the apparatus.

  1. Reconstruction of the shear modulus of viscoelastic systems in a thin cylinder: an inversion scheme and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eom, Junyong; Kang, Hyeonbae; Nakamura, Gen; Wang, Yun-Che

    2016-09-01

    We consider a problem of reconstructing the shear modulus of an viscoelastic system in a thin cylinder from the measurements of displacements induced by torques applied at the bottom of the cylinder. The viscoelastic system is a mathematical model of a pendulum-type viscoelastic spectrometer (PVS). We first compute in an explicit form the solution of the viscoelastic system, and then derive with an error estimate the leading order term of the average of the solution. This leading order term yields a nonlinear inversion scheme to determine the shear modulus from the measurements of displacements. We apply the inversion scheme to determine the shear modulus using experimental data acquired from a PVS system.

  2. Determining an Effective Shear Modulus in Tubular Organs for Fluid-Structure Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chisena, Robert; Brasseur, James; Costanzo, Francesco; Gregersen, Hans; Zhao, Jingbo

    2014-11-01

    Fluid-structure interaction (FSI) is central to the mechanics of fluid-filled tubular organs such as the intestine and esophagus. The motions of fluid chyme are driven by a muscularis wall layer of circular and longitudinal muscle fibers. The coupled motions of the fluid and elastic solid phases result from a local balance between active and passive muscle stress components, fluid pressure, and fluid viscous stresses. Model predictions depend on the passive elastic response of the muscularis layer, which is typically parameterized with an average isotropic elastic modulus (EM), currently measured in vivo and in vitro with estimates for total hoop stress within a distension experiment. We have shown that this approach contains serious error due to the overwhelming influence of incompressibility on the hydrostatic component. We present a new approach in which an effective shear modulus, containing only deviatoric contributions, is measured to overcome this serious error. Using in vitro measurements from pig intestines, we compare our new approach to the current method, showing vastly different predictions. We will also report on our current analysis which aims to determine the influence of residual stress on the EM measurements and comment on it use in FSI simulations.

  3. Study to determine and analyze the strength of high modulus glass in epoxy-matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bacon, J. F.

    1974-01-01

    Glass composition research was conducted to produce a high modulus, high strength beryllium-free glass fiber. This program was built on the previous research for developing high modulus, high strength glass fibers which had a 5 weight percent beryllia content. The fibers resulting from the composition program were then used to produce fiber reinforced-epoxy resin composites which were compared with composites reinforced by commercial high modulus glass fibers, Thornel S graphite fiber, and hybrids where the external quarters were reinforced with Thornel S graphite fiber and the interior half with glass fiber as well as the reverse hybrid. The composites were given tensile strength, compressive strength, short-beam shear strength, creep and fatigue tests. Comments are included on the significance of the test data.

  4. Ultra-high modulus organic fiber hybrid composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Champion, A. R.

    1981-01-01

    An experimental organic fiber, designated Fiber D, was characterized, and its performance as a reinforcement for composites was investigated. The fiber has a modulus of 172 GPa, tensile strength of 3.14 GPa, and density of 1.46 gm/cu cm. Unidirectional Fiber D/epoxy laminates containing 60 percent fiber by volume were evaluated in flexure, shear, and compression, at room temperature and 121 C in both the as fabricated condition and after humidity aging for 14 days at 95 percent RH and 82 C. A modulus of 94.1 GPa, flexure strength of 700 MPa, shear strength of 54 MPa, and compressive strength of 232 MPa were observed at room temperature. The as-fabricated composites at elevated temperature and humidity aged material at room temperature had properties 1 to 20 percent below these values. Combined humidity aging plus evaluated temperature testing resulted in even lower mechanical properties. Hybrid composite laminates of Fiber D with Fiber FP alumina or Thornel 300 graphite fiber were also evaluated and significant increases in modulus, flexure, and compressive strengths were observed.

  5. MR elastographic methods for the evaluation of plantar fat pads: preliminary comparison of the shear modulus for shearing deformation and compressive deformation in normal subjects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, John B.; Miller, Timothy B.; Perrinez, Philip R.; Doyley, Marvin M.; Wang, Huifang; Cheung, Yvonne Y.; Wrobel, James S.; Comi, Richard J.; Kennedy, Francis E.; Paulsen, Keith D.

    2006-03-01

    MR elastography (MRE) images the intrinsic mechanical properties of soft tissues; e.g., the shear modulus, μ. The μ of the plantar soft tissues is important in understanding the mechanisms whereby the forces induced during normal motion produce ulcers that lead to amputation in diabetic feet. We compared the compliance of the heel fat pad to compressive forces and to shearing forces. The design of prosthetics to protect the foot depends on the proper understanding of the mechanisms inducing damage. In the heel fat pads of six normal subjects, between 25 and 65 years of age, the μ for deformation perpendicular to the direction of weight bearing is similar but not identical to that determined for deformation along the weight bearing axis. The average difference between μ along the weight bearing axis and μ perpendicular to the weight bearing axis, is well correlated with age (Correlation Coefficient = 0.789). The p-value for the data being random was 0.0347 indicating that the observed difference is not likely to be random. The p-value for control points is 0.8989, indicating a random process. The results are suggestive that the high compressive forces imposed during walking damage the heel fat pads over time resulting in softening to compression preferentially over shearing. It is important to validate the observed effect with larger numbers of subjects, and better controls including measures of activity, and to understand if diseases like diabetes increase the observed damage.

  6. High Modulus Asphalt Concrete with Dolomite Aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haritonovs, V.; Tihonovs, J.; Smirnovs, J.

    2015-11-01

    Dolomite is one of the most widely available sedimentary rocks in the territory of Latvia. Dolomite quarries contain about 1,000 million tons of this material. However, according to Latvian Road Specifications, this dolomite cannot be used for average and high intensity roads because of its low quality, mainly, its LA index (The Los Angeles abrasion test). Therefore, mostly the imported magmatic rocks (granite, diabase, gabbro, basalt) or imported dolomite are used, which makes asphalt expensive. However, practical experience shows that even with these high quality materials roads exhibit rutting, fatigue, and thermal cracks. The aim of the research is to develop a high performance asphalt concrete for base and binder courses using only locally available aggregates. In order to achieve resistance against deformations at a high ambient temperature, a hard grade binder was used. Workability, fatigue and thermal cracking resistance, as well as sufficient water resistance is achieved by low porosity (3-5%) and higher binder content compared to traditional asphalt mixtures. The design of the asphalt includes a combination of empirical and performance based tests, which in laboratory circumstances allow simulating traffic and environmental loads. High performance AC 16 base asphalt concrete was created using local dolomite aggregate with polymer modified (PMB 10/40-65) and hard grade (B20/30) bitumen. The mixtures were specified based on fundamental properties in accordance with EN 13108-1 standard.

  7. Non-toxic invert analog glass compositions of high modulus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bacon, J. F. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    Glass compositions having a Young's modulus of at least 15 million psi are described. They and a specific modulus of at least 110 million inches consist essentially of, in mols, 15 to 40% SiO2, 6 to 15% Li2O, 24 to 45% of at least two bivalent oxides selected from the group consisting of Ca, NzO, MgO and CuO; 13 to 39% of at least two trivalent oxides selected from the group consisting of Al2O3, Fe2O3, B2O3, La2O3, and Y2O3 and up to 15% of one or more tetravelent oxides selected from the group consisting of ZrO2, TiO2 and CeO2. The high modulus, low density glass compositions contain no toxic elements. The composition, glass density, Young's modulus, and specific modulus for 28 representative glasses are presented. The fiber modulus of five glasses are given.

  8. Shear modulus and attenuation Qs of olivine from forced-oscillation measurements under mantle conditions and seismic frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrillat, J. P.; Le Godec, Y.; Philippe, J.; Bergame, F.; Chambat, F.; Mezouar, N.; Tauzin, B.

    2015-12-01

    Interpretation of seismic profiles and tomographic models of the Earth's mantle requires exploring the viscoelastic behaviour of rocks / minerals at low strains and seismic frequencies. These physical properties can be investigated by cyclic loading experiments that measure the dynamic response of materials to an applied stress. To date, these data were only accessible by torsional forced-oscillation tests performed in gas vessel apparatus and limited to ~ 0.3 GPa. Here, we demonstrate the feasibility of forced-oscillations tests up to the Earth's upper mantle conditions thanks to the development of a torsion module in the Paris-Edinburgh press and the use of X-ray radiation. The experimental device is based on the frame of a V7 Paris-Edinburgh press where both of the two opposed anvils can rotate through two sets of gear reducer and thrust bearings located at the end of each anvil. The accurate rotation of the anvils is monitored by stepper motors and encoders, and enables to apply a low-frequency sinusoidal torque on the cell assembly. The sample and an elastic standard of known modulus and negligible dissipation are loaded in series in a boron-epoxy gasket. The measurement of the relative amplitudes and phases of the torsional mode displacements in standard and sample provides for the determination of the shear modulus and of the strain energy dissipation for the sample. The main challenge in applying the forced-oscillation method at high pressure is the need of a technique for measuring stress and strain with sufficient precision, and with sufficiently short measurement time, while the sample is embedded in the high-pressure vessel. These technical difficulties can be overcome through the use of synchrotron radiation. The strain of the sample is measured in situ and in real-time through X-ray radiography, while the stress is estimated from the strain of the elastic standard (a corundum sample in our case). Hence, coupling the new RoToPEc device with synchrotron

  9. Exceptionally Low Shear Modulus in a Prototypical Imidazole-Based Metal-Organic Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Jin-Chong; Civalleri, Bartolomeo; Lin, Chung-Cherng; Valenzano, Loredana; Galvelis, Raimondas; Chen, Po-Fei; Bennett, Thomas D.; Mellot-Draznieks, Caroline; Zicovich-Wilson, Claudio M.; Cheetham, Anthony K.

    2012-03-01

    Using Brillouin scattering, we measured the single-crystal elastic constants (Cij’s) of a prototypical metal-organic framework (MOF): zeolitic imidazolate framework (ZIF)-8 [Zn(2-methylimidazolate)2], which adopts a zeolitic sodalite topology and exhibits large porosity. Its Cij’s under ambient conditions are (in GPa) C11=9.522(7), C12=6.865(14), and C44=0.967(4). Tensorial analysis of the Cij’s reveals the complete picture of the anisotropic elasticity in cubic ZIF-8. We show that ZIF-8 has a remarkably low shear modulus Gmin⁡≲1GPa, which is the lowest yet reported for a single-crystalline extended solid. Using ab initio calculations, we demonstrate that ZIF-8’s Cij’s can be reliably predicted, and its elastic deformation mechanism is linked to the pliant ZnN4 tetrahedra. Our results shed new light on the role of elastic constants in establishing the structural stability of MOF materials and thus their suitability for practical applications.

  10. A Methodology for the Indirect Determination and Spatial Resolution of Shear Modulus of PDMS-Silica Elastomers

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, B; Reimer, J; Maxwell, R

    2007-08-29

    A methodology is described that allows for the spatial resolution of shear modulus in silica-filled PDMS elastomers via {sup 1}H relaxation measurements and stray-field imaging (STRAFI) techniques. Traditional Hahn echoes provide a simple, robust route to the extraction of a proton residual dipolar coupling constant (RDC), a direct measure of chain mobility and a parameter that can be corollated to numerous mechanical properties. Defining a dimensionless RDC eliminates any artifacts associated with low-field measurement and allows the RDC to become independent of field strength. A direct correlation between the NMR determined dimensionless RDC and results from dynamic mechanical analysis is presented, then employed via STRAFI to determine spatial variations in moduli associated with irradiated elastomeric materials. Reliable performance, despite poorly optimized STRAFI conditions, is demonstrated with an error of no more than 22% between the calculated shear modulus and the measured value via DMA.

  11. High elastic modulus nanopowder reinforced resin composites for dental applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yijun

    2007-12-01

    Dental restorations account for more than $3 billion dollars a year on the market. Among them, all-ceramic dental crowns draw more and more attention and their popularity has risen because of their superior aesthetics and biocompatibility. However, their relatively high failure rate and labor-intensive fabrication procedure still limit their application. In this thesis, a new family of high elastic modulus nanopowder reinforced resin composites and their mechanical properties are studied. Materials with higher elastic modulus, such as alumina and diamond, are used to replace the routine filler material, silica, in dental resin composites to achieve the desired properties. This class of composites is developed to serve (1) as a high stiffness support to all-ceramic crowns and (2) as a means of joining independently fabricated crown core and veneer layers. Most of the work focuses on nano-sized Al2O3 (average particle size 47 nm) reinforcement in a polymeric matrix with 50:50 Bisphenol A glycidyl methacrylate (Bis-GMA): triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) monomers. Surfactants, silanizing agents and primers are examined to obtain higher filler levels and enhance the bonding between filler and matrix. Silane agents work best. The elastic modulus of a 57.5 vol% alumina/resin composite is 31.5 GPa compared to current commercial resin composites with elastic modulus <15 GPa. Chemical additives can also effectively raise the hardness to as much as 1.34 GPa. Besides>alumina, diamond/resin composites are studied. An elastic modulus of about 45 GPa is obtained for a 57 vol% diamond/resin composite. Our results indicate that with a generally monodispersed nano-sized high modulus filler, relatively high elastic modulus resin-based composite cements are possible. Time-dependent behavior of our resin composites is also investigated. This is valuable for understanding the behavior of our material and possible fatigue testing in the future. Our results indicate that with

  12. Reconstructions of shear modulus, Poisson's ratio, and density using approximate mean normal stress lambda epsilon alpha alpha as unknown.

    PubMed

    Sumi, Chikayoshi

    2006-12-01

    As a differential diagnosis technique for living soft tissues, we are developing ultrasonic-strain-measurement-based shear modulus reconstruction methods. Previously, we reported three-dimensional (3-D) and 2-D reconstruction methods utilizing a typical Poisson's ratio very close to 0.5 (nearly-incompressible). However, because a decrease in the accuracy of the reconstructed value was confirmed to be due to the difference between the original value and the set value, we proposed 3-D and 2-D methods of reconstructing Poisson's ratio as well. Furthermore, we proposed methods of reconstructing density and dealing with dynamic deformation. However, due to tissue incompressibility, the reconstructions of shear modulus, Poisson's ratio, and density became unstable. In this report, to obtain stable, unique reconstructions, we describe a new reconstruction method using mean normal stress approximated by the product of one of Lame's constants X and volume strain epsilon alpha alpha as an unknown. Regularization is simultaneously applied to the respective distributions to decrease the instability of the reconstructions due to measurement errors of the deformation. This method also enables stable, unique reconstructions of shear modulus and density under the condition that the mean normal stress remains unknown. We also verify the effectiveness of this method through 3-D simulations, while showing erroneous artifacts occurring when 2-D and 1-D reconstructions are performed.

  13. Mechanical Components from Highly Recoverable, Low Apparent Modulus Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padula, Santo, II (Inventor); Noebe, Ronald D. (Inventor); Stanford, Malcolm K. (Inventor); DellaCorte, Christopher (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A material for use as a mechanical component is formed of a superelastic intermetallic material having a low apparent modulus and a high hardness. The superelastic intermetallic material is conditioned to be dimensionally stable, devoid of any shape memory effect and have a stable superelastic response without irrecoverable deformation while exhibiting strains of at least 3%. The method of conditioning the superelastic intermetallic material is described. Another embodiment relates to lightweight materials known as ordered intermetallics that perform well in sliding wear applications using conventional liquid lubricants and are therefore suitable for resilient, high performance mechanical components such as gears and bearings.

  14. Relationship between shear elastic modulus and passive muscle force: an ex-vivo study.

    PubMed

    Koo, Terry K; Guo, Jing-Yi; Cohen, Jeffrey H; Parker, Kevin J

    2013-08-09

    As muscle is stretched, it reacts with increasing passive resistance. This passive force component is important for normal muscle function. Unfortunately, direct measurement of passive muscle force is still beyond the current state-of-the-art. This study aimed to investigate the feasibility of using Supersonic shear wave elastography (SSWE) to indirectly measure passive muscle force. Sixteen gastronomies pars externus and 16 tibialis anterior muscles were dissected from 10 fresh roaster chickens. For each muscle specimen, the proximal bone-tendon junction was kept intact with its tibia or femur clamped in a fixture. Calibration weights (0-400 g in 25 g per increment) were applied to the distal tendon via a pulley system and muscle elasticity was measured simultaneously using SSWE. The measurements were repeated for 3 cycles. The elasticity-load relationship of each tested muscle for each loading cycle was analyzed by fitting a least-squares regression line to the data. Test-retest reliability was evaluated using intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). Results demonstrated that the relationships between SSWE elasticity and passive muscle force were highly linear for all the tested muscles with coefficients of determination ranging between 0.971 and 0.999. ICCs were 0.996 and 0.985, respectively, for the slope and y-intercept parameters of the regression lines, indicating excellent reliability. These findings indicate that SSWE, when carefully applied, can be a highly reliable technique for muscle elasticity measurements. The linear relationship between SSWE elasticity and passive muscle force identified in the present study demonstrated that SSWE may be used as an indirect measure of passive muscle force.

  15. Pore Fluid Effects on Shear Modulus for Sandstones with Soft Anisotropy

    SciTech Connect

    Berryman, J G

    2004-04-15

    A general analysis of poroelasticity for vertical transverse isotropy (VTI) shows that four eigenvectors are pure shear modes with no coupling to the pore-fluidmechanics. The remaining two eigenvectors are linear combinations of pure compression and uniaxial shear, both of which are coupled to the fluid mechanics. After reducing the problem to a 2x2 system, the analysis shows in a relatively elementary fashion how a poroelastic system with isotropic solid elastic frame, but with anisotropy introduced through the poroelastic coefficients, interacts with the mechanics of the pore fluid and produces shear dependence on fluid properties in the overall mechanical system. The analysis shows, for example, that this effect is always present (though sometimes small in magnitude) in the systems studied, and can be quite large (up to a definite maximum increase of 20 per cent) in some rocks--including Spirit River sandstone and Schuler-Cotton Valley sandstone.

  16. Analysis of the variation in the determination of the shear modulus of the erythrocyte membrane: Effects of the constitutive law and membrane modeling.

    PubMed

    Dimitrakopoulos, P

    2012-04-01

    Despite research spanning several decades, the exact value of the shear modulus Gs of the erythrocyte membrane is still ambiguous, and a wealth of studies, using measurements based on micropipette aspirations, ektacytometry systems and other flow chambers, and optical tweezers, as well as application of several models, have found different average values in the range 2-10μN/m. Our study shows that different methodologies have predicted the correct shear modulus for the specific membrane modeling employed, i.e., the variation in the shear modulus determination results from the specific membrane modeling. Available experimental findings from ektacytometry systems and optical tweezers suggest that the dynamics of the erythrocyte membrane is strain hardening at both moderate and large deformations. Thus the erythrocyte shear modulus cannot be determined accurately using strain-softening models (such as the neo-Hookean and Evans laws) or strain-softening/strain-hardening models (such as the Yeoh law), which overestimate the erythrocyte shear modulus. According to our analysis, the only available strain-hardening constitutive law, the Skalak et al. law, is able to match well both deformation-shear rate data from ektacytometry and force-extension data from optical tweezers at moderate and large strains, using an average value of the shear modulus of Gs=2.4-2.75μN/m, i.e., very close to that found in the linear regime of deformations via force-extension data from optical tweezers, Gs=2.5±0.4μN/m. In addition, our analysis suggests that a standard deviation in Gs of 0.4-0.5μN/m (owing to the inherent differences between erythrocytes within a large population) describes well the findings from optical tweezers at small and large strains as well as from micropipette aspirations.

  17. A high-damping magnetorheological elastomer with bi-directional magnetic-control modulus for potential application in seismology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Miao; Qi, Song; Fu, Jie; Zhu, Mi

    2015-09-01

    A high-damping magnetorheological elastomer (MRE) with bi-directional magnetic-control modulus is developed. This MRE was synthesized by filling NdFeB particles into polyurethane (PU)/ epoxy (EP) interpenetrating network (IPN) structure. The anisotropic samples were prepared in a permanent magnetic field and magnetized in an electromagnetic field of 1 T. Dynamic mechanical responses of the MRE to applied magnetic fields are investigated through magneto-rheometer, and morphology of MREs is observed via scanning electron microscope (SEM). Test result indicates that when the test field orientation is parallel to that of the sample's magnetization, the shear modulus of sample increases. On the other hand, when the orientation is opposite to that of the sample's magnetization, shear modulus decreases. In addition, this PU/EP IPN matrix based MRE has a high-damping property, with high loss factor and can be controlled by applying magnetic field. It is expected that the high damping property and the ability of bi-directional magnetic-control modulus of this MRE offer promising advantages in seismologic application.

  18. A high-damping magnetorheological elastomer with bi-directional magnetic-control modulus for potential application in seismology

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Miao Qi, Song; Fu, Jie; Zhu, Mi

    2015-09-14

    A high-damping magnetorheological elastomer (MRE) with bi-directional magnetic-control modulus is developed. This MRE was synthesized by filling NdFeB particles into polyurethane (PU)/ epoxy (EP) interpenetrating network (IPN) structure. The anisotropic samples were prepared in a permanent magnetic field and magnetized in an electromagnetic field of 1 T. Dynamic mechanical responses of the MRE to applied magnetic fields are investigated through magneto-rheometer, and morphology of MREs is observed via scanning electron microscope (SEM). Test result indicates that when the test field orientation is parallel to that of the sample's magnetization, the shear modulus of sample increases. On the other hand, when the orientation is opposite to that of the sample's magnetization, shear modulus decreases. In addition, this PU/EP IPN matrix based MRE has a high-damping property, with high loss factor and can be controlled by applying magnetic field. It is expected that the high damping property and the ability of bi-directional magnetic-control modulus of this MRE offer promising advantages in seismologic application.

  19. Effective Shear Modulus for Flexural and Extensional Waves in an Unloaded Thick Plate.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-09-29

    various texts (see e.g. Timo- shenko and Goodier [6] ). The relationships between the elements of the stress tensor o and the strain tensor e are given by...Extensional Vibrations of Plates," Trans. ASME, Ser. E, J. Appl. Mech. 23, 277-283 (1956). 6. S.P. Timoshenko and J.N. Goodier , Theory of Elasticity, 3d ed...private communication), David Taylor Naval Shin Research & Development Center, 1980. D2. R. D. Mindlin, "Influence of Rotatory inertia and Shear on

  20. Application of diffusion barriers to high modulus fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veltri, R. D.; Douglas, F. C.; Paradis, E. L.; Galasso, F. S.

    1977-01-01

    Barrier layers were coated onto high-modulus fibers, and nickel and titanium layers were overcoated as simulated matrix materials. The objective was to coat the high-strength fibers with unreactive selected materials without degrading the fibers. The fibers were tungsten, niobium, and single-crystal sapphire, while the materials used as barrier coating layers were Al2O3, Y2O3, TiC, ZrC, WC with 14% Co, and HfO2. An ion-plating technique was used to coat the fibers. The fibers were subjected to high-temperature heat treatments to evaluate the effectiveness of the barrier layer in preventing fiber-metal interactions. Results indicate that Al2O3, Y2O3, and HfO2 can be used as barrier layers to minimize the nickel-tungsten interaction. Further investigation, including thermal cycling tests at 1090 C, revealed that HfO2 is probably the best of the three.

  1. Determination of dynamic young's modulus, shear modulus, and poisson's ratio as a function of temperature for depleted Uranium-0.75 wt% Titanium using the piezoelectric ultrasonic composite oscillator technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keene, K. H.; Hartman, J. T.; Wolfenden, A.; Ludtka, G. M.

    1987-07-01

    Dynamic Young's modulus ( E) and shear modulus ( G) measurements were performed for three microstructures (gamma, alpha + delta, and alpha prime) of a depleted uranium-0.75 wt% titanium alloy. Measurements were made from 298 to 1123 K. From the measured values of E and G, values were obtained for Poisson's ratio (PR). The experimental apparatus was the piezoelectric ultrasonic composite oscillator technique (PUCOT) at 40 or 80 kHz. The ranges of values for E, G, and PR were 193 to 99 GPa, 81 to 35 GPa, and 0.17 to 0.56, respectively. Correlations for E, G, and PR as functions of temperature are presented.

  2. Analysis of the coupling between shear horizontal plate waves and liquids: Application to the measurement of the shear rigidity modulus of glycerol solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teston, F.; Feuillard, G.; Tessier, L.; Tran Hu Hue, L. P.; Lethiecq, M.

    2000-01-01

    This article presents an acoustic wave viscometer based on the shear horizontal acoustic plate mode excited by interdigital transducers on a ST-cut quartz substrate. A theoretical model, which is an extension of the plate effective permittivity function taking into account the presence of liquids, is developed in order to predict the phase and attenuation variations versus the viscosity of liquid. These results are discussed and compared to those of models from the literature such as variational or perturbation methods. The measured results for aqueous solutions of glycerol show linear dependence between the phase and attenuation variations and the square root of liquid viscosity, and are consistent with the theoretical results. The device can be used for viscosity measurements up to 1000 mPa s. For higher viscosities, the viscoelastic behavior of the solution appears and the shear rigidity modulus must be taken into account. The value of μ∞=2.5×109N m2 has been obtained for glycerol by fitting the theoretical curves to the experimental points.

  3. Shear jamming in highly strained granular system without shear banding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yiqiu; Barés, Jonathan; Zheng, Hu; Behringer, Robert

    2016-11-01

    Bi et al. have shown that, if sheared, a granular material can jam even if its packing fraction (ϕ) is lower than the critical isotropic jamming point ϕJ. They have introduced a new critical packing fraction value ϕS such that for ϕS< ϕ< ϕJ the system jams if sheared. Nevertheless, the value of ϕS as a function of the shear profile or the strain necessary to observe jamming remain poorly understood because of the experimental complexity to access high strain without shear band. We present a novel 2D periodic shear apparatus made of 21 independent, aligned and mirrored glass rings. Each ring can be moved independently which permits us to impose any desired shear profile. The circular geometry allows access to any strain value. The forces between grains are measured using reflective photoelasticity. By performing different shear profiles for different packing fractions we explored the details of jamming diagram including the location of the yield surface. This work is supported by NSF No.DMR1206351, NASA No.NNX15AD38G and W. M. Keck Foundation.

  4. Instrument for determining the complex shear modulus of soft-tissue-like materials from 10 to 300 Hz

    PubMed Central

    Madsen, E L; Frank, G R; Hobson, M A; Lin-Gibson, S; Hall, T J; Jiang, J; Stiles, T A

    2010-01-01

    Accurate determination of the complex shear modulus of soft tissues and soft-tissue-like materials in the 10–300 Hz frequency range is very important to researchers in MR elastography and acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging. A variety of instruments for making such measurements has been reported, but none of them is easily reproduced, and none have been tested to conform to causality via the Kramers–Kronig (K-K) relations. A promising linear oscillation instrument described in a previous brief report operates between 20 and 160 Hz, but results were not tested for conformity to the K-K relations. We have produced a similar instrument with our own version of the electronic components and have also accounted for instrumental effects on the data reduction, which is not addressed in the previous report. The improved instrument has been shown to conform to an accurate approximation of the K-K relations over the 10–300 Hz range. The K-K approximation is based on the Weichert mechanical circuit model. We also found that the sample thickness must be small enough to obtain agreement with a calibrated commercial rheometer. A complete description of the improved instrument is given, facilitating replication in other labs. PMID:18758002

  5. High modulus invert analog glass compositions containing beryllia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bacon, J. F. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    Glass compositions having a Young's modulus of at least 15 million psi and a specific modulus of at least 110 million inches consisting essentially of, in mols, 10-45% SiO2, 2-15% Li2O, 3-34% BeO, 12-36% of at least one bivalent oxide selected from the group consisting of CaO, ZnO, MgO and CuO, 10-39% of at least one trivalent oxide selected from the group consisting of Al2O3, B2O3, La2O3, Y2O3 and the mixed rare earth oxides, the total number of said bivalent and trivalent oxides being at least three, and up to 10% of a tetravalent oxide selected from the group consisting of ZrO2, TiO2 and CeO2.

  6. Low Modulus Biomimetic Microgel Particles with High Loading of Hemoglobin

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kai; Merkel, Timothy J.; Pandya, Ashish; Napier, Mary E.; Luft, J. Christopher; Daniel, Will; Sheiko, Sergei

    2012-01-01

    We synthesized extremely deformable red blood cell-like microgel particles and loaded them with bovine hemoglobin (Hb) to potentiate oxygen transport. With similar shape and size as red blood cells (RBCs), the particles were fabricated using the PRINT® (Particle Replication In Non-wetting Templates) technique. Low crosslinking of the hydrogel resulted in very low mesh density for these particles, allowing passive diffusion of hemoglobin throughout the particles. Hb was secured in the particles through covalent conjugation of the lysine groups of Hb to carboxyl groups in the particles via EDC/NHS coupling. Confocal microscopy of particles bound to fluorescent dye-labeled Hb confirmed the uniform distribution of Hb throughout the particle interior, as opposed to the surface conjugation only. High loading ratios, up to 5 times the amount of Hb to polymer by weight, were obtained, without a significant effect on particle stability, shape, though particle diameter decreased slightly with Hb conjugation. Analysis of the protein by circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy showed that the secondary structure of Hb was unperturbed by conjugation to the particles. Methemoglobin in the particles could be maintained at a low level and the loaded Hb could still bind oxygen as studied by UV-vis spectroscopy. Hb-loaded particles with moderate loading ratios demonstrated excellent deformability in microfluidic devices, easily deforming to pass through restricted pores half as wide as the diameter of the particles. The suspension of concentrated particles with Hb concentration of 5.2 g/dL showed comparable viscosity to that of mouse blood, and the particles remained intact even after being sheared at a constant high rate (1,000 1/s) for 10 min. Armed with the ability to control size, shape, deformability, and loading of Hb into RBC mimics, we will discuss the implications for artificial blood. PMID:22852860

  7. Dynamic shear deformation in high purity Fe

    SciTech Connect

    Cerreta, Ellen K; Bingert, John F; Trujillo, Carl P; Lopez, Mike F; Gray, George T

    2009-01-01

    The forced shear test specimen, first developed by Meyer et al. [Meyer L. et al., Critical Adiabatic Shear Strength of Low Alloyed Steel Under Compressive Loading, Metallurgical Applications of Shock Wave and High Strain Rate Phenomena (Marcel Decker, 1986), 657; Hartmann K. et al., Metallurgical Effects on Impact Loaded Materials, Shock Waves and High Strain rate Phenomena in Metals (Plenum, 1981), 325-337.], has been utilized in a number of studies. While the geometry of this specimen does not allow for the microstructure to exactly define the location of shear band formation and the overall mechanical response of a specimen is highly sensitive to the geometry utilized, the forced shear specimen is useful for characterizing the influence of parameters such as strain rate, temperature, strain, and load on the microstructural evolution within a shear band. Additionally, many studies have utilized this geometry to advance the understanding of shear band development. In this study, by varying the geometry, specifically the ratio of the inner hole to the outer hat diameter, the dynamic shear localization response of high purity Fe was examined. Post mortem characterization was performed to quantify the width of the localizations and examine the microstructural and textural evolution of shear deformation in a bcc metal. Increased instability in mechanical response is strongly linked with development of enhanced intergranular misorientations, high angle boundaries, and classical shear textures characterized through orientation distribution functions.

  8. High temperature steady shear and oscillatory rheometry of basaltic melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petford, N.; English, R.; Williams, R.; Rogers, N.

    2012-04-01

    There is a paucity of linear viscoelastic data on low viscosity (basaltic) silicate melts. We report here the initial results of a rheometrical characterisation (steady rotation, small angle oscillation) study on a geochemically well constrained aphyric basalt from Ethiopia (SiO2 48.51 wt.%, Mg# 0.44), in the temperature range 1200-1400 Celsius. Experiments were done using a recently developed commercial instrument (Anton Paar FRS 1600) and a wide gap Couette geometry. To the best of our knowledge these are the first reported silicate melt viscosity data obtained using small amplitude oscillatory shear and a rheometer with a high performance electrically commutated actuator. Results show that in the temperature range the system was very fluid, with the measured shear viscosity falling to ~ 2.3 Pa s at T = 1400 C. The melt exhibited a linear (Newtonian) response, with the shear viscosity remaining constant across two decades of deformation rate. As expected for a Newtonian fluid, the phase angle was 90 degrees across the entire range of angular frequencies studied. Correspondingly, the storage modulus (G') was zero and the loss modulus finite exhibiting a linear increase with frequency. The complex viscosity (oscillation) and shear viscosity (steady rotation) were equal in magnitude ('Cox-Merz' equivalence). These data are best interpreted in terms of a system with relatively low 'connectivity'/polymeric character and rapid relaxation dynamics, consistent with the mafic composition of the melt. As detailed compositional data are available the experimentally determined shear viscosity values are compared with those predicted from multicomponent chemical models in the literature. Discrepancies between the experimental and theoretical values are discussed.

  9. Structure of turbulence at high shear rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Moon Joo; Kim, John; Moin, Parviz

    1990-01-01

    The structure of homogeneous turbulence subject to high shear rate has been investigated by using three-dimensional, time-dependent numerical simulations of the Navier-Stokes equations. This study indicates that high shear rate alone is sufficient for generation of the streaky structures, and that the presence of a solid boundary is not necessary. Evolution of the statistical correlations is examined to determine the effect of high shear rate on the development of anisotropy in turbulence. It is shown that the streamwise fluctuating motions are enhanced so profoundly that a highly anisotropic turbulence state with a 'one-component' velocity field and 'two-component' vorticity field develops asymptotically as total shear increases. Because of high-shear rate, rapid distortion theory predicts remarkably well the anisotropic behavior of the structural quantities.

  10. Probe Oscillation Shear Elastography (PROSE): A High Frame-Rate Method for Two-Dimensional Ultrasound Shear Wave Elastography.

    PubMed

    Mellema, Daniel C; Song, Pengfei; Kinnick, Randall R; Urban, Matthew W; Greenleaf, James F; Manduca, Armando; Chen, Shigao

    2016-09-01

    Ultrasound shear wave elastography (SWE) utilizes the propagation of induced shear waves to characterize the shear modulus of soft tissue. Many methods rely on an acoustic radiation force (ARF) "push beam" to generate shear waves. However, specialized hardware is required to generate the push beams, and the thermal stress that is placed upon the ultrasound system, transducer, and tissue by the push beams currently limits the frame-rate to about 1 Hz. These constraints have limited the implementation of ARF to high-end clinical systems. This paper presents Probe Oscillation Shear Elastography (PROSE) as an alternative method to measure tissue elasticity. PROSE generates shear waves using a harmonic mechanical vibration of an ultrasound transducer, while simultaneously detecting motion with the same transducer under pulse-echo mode. Motion of the transducer during detection produces a "strain-like" compression artifact that is coupled with the observed shear waves. A novel symmetric sampling scheme is proposed such that pulse-echo detection events are acquired when the ultrasound transducer returns to the same physical position, allowing the shear waves to be decoupled from the compression artifact. Full field-of-view (FOV) two-dimensional (2D) shear wave speed images were obtained by applying a local frequency estimation (LFE) technique, capable of generating a 2D map from a single frame of shear wave motion. The shear wave imaging frame rate of PROSE is comparable to the vibration frequency, which can be an order of magnitude higher than ARF based techniques. PROSE was able to produce smooth and accurate shear wave images from three homogeneous phantoms with different moduli, with an effective frame rate of 300 Hz. An inclusion phantom study showed that increased vibration frequencies improved the accuracy of inclusion imaging, and allowed targets as small as 6.5 mm to be resolved with good contrast (contrast-to-noise ratio ≥ 19 dB) between the target and

  11. Turbulence structure at high shear rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Moon Joo; Kim, John; Moin, Parviz

    1987-01-01

    The structure of homogeneous turbulence in the presence of a high shear rate is studied using results obtained from three-dimensional time-dependent numerical simulations of the Navier-Stokes equations on a grid of 512 x 128 x 128 node points. It is shown that high shear rate enhances the streamwise fluctuating motion to such an extent that a highly anisotropic turbulence state with a one-dimensional velocity field and two-dimensional small-scale turbulence develops asymptotically as total shear increases. Instantaneous velocity fields show that high shear rate in homogeneous turbulent shear flow produces structures which are similar to the streaks present in the viscous sublayer of turbulent boundary layers.

  12. High temperature nanoindentation hardness and Young's modulus measurement in a neutron-irradiated fuel cladding material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kese, K.; Olsson, P. A. T.; Alvarez Holston, A.-M.; Broitman, E.

    2017-04-01

    Nanoindentation, in combination with scanning probe microscopy, has been used to measure the hardness and Young's modulus in the hydride and matrix of a high burn-up neutron-irradiated Zircaloy-2 cladding material in the temperature range 25-300 °C. The matrix hardness was found to decrease only slightly with increasing temperature while the hydride hardness was essentially constant within the temperature range. Young's modulus decreased with increasing temperature for both the hydride and the matrix of the high burn-up fuel cladding material. The hydride Young's modulus and hardness were higher than those of the matrix in the temperature range.

  13. Performance evaluation of high modulus asphalt concrete mixes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haritonovs, V.; Tihonovs, J.; Zaumanis, M.

    2016-04-01

    Dolomite is one of the most available sedimentary rocks in the territory of Latvia. Dolomite quarries contain about 1000 million tons of this material. However, according to Latvian Road Specifications, this dolomite cannot be used for average and high intensity roads because of its low quality (mainly, LA index). Therefore, mostly imported magmatic rocks (granite, diabase, gabbro, basalt) or imported dolomite are used which makes asphalt expensive. However, practical experience shows that even with these high quality materials roads exhibit rutting, fatigue and thermal cracks. The aim of the research is to develop a high performance asphalt concrete for base and binder courses using only locally available aggregates. In order to achieve resistance against deformations at a high ambient temperature, a hard grade binder was used. Workability, fatigue and thermal cracking resistance, as well as sufficient water resistance is achieved by low porosity (3-5%) and higher binder content compared to traditional asphalt mixtures. The design of the asphalt includes a combination of empirical and performance based tests, which in laboratory circumstances allow simulating traffic and environmental loads. High performance AC 16 base asphalt concrete was created using local dolomite aggregate with polymer modified (PMB 10/40-65) and hard grade (B20/30) bitumen. The mixtures were specified based on fundamental properties in accordance to EN 13108-1 standard.

  14. Relaxation of the bulk modulus in partially molten dunite?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cline, C. J.; Jackson, I.

    2016-11-01

    To address the possibility of melt-related bulk modulus relaxation, a forced oscillation experiment was conducted at seismic frequencies on a partially molten synthetic dunite specimen (melt fraction = 0.026) utilizing the enhanced capacity of the Australian National University attenuation apparatus to operate in both torsional and flexural oscillation modes. Shear modulus and dissipation data are consistent with those for melt-bearing olivine specimens previously tested in torsion, with a pronounced dissipation peak superimposed on high-temperature background. Flexural data exhibit a monotonic decrease in complex Young's modulus with increasing temperature under transsolidus temperatures. The observed variation of Young's modulus is well described by the relationship 1/E 1/3G, without requiring relaxation of the bulk modulus. At high homologous temperatures, when shear modulus is low, extensional and flexural oscillation measurements have little resolution of bulk modulus, and thus, only pressure oscillation measurements can definitively constrain bulk properties at these conditions.

  15. In Vitro Engineering of High Modulus Cartilage-Like Constructs.

    PubMed

    Finlay, Scott; Seedhom, Bahaa B; Carey, Duane O; Bulpitt, Andy J; Treanor, Darren E; Kirkham, Jennifer

    2016-04-01

    To date, the outcomes of cartilage repair have been inconsistent and have frequently yielded mechanically inferior fibrocartilage, thereby increasing the chances of damage recurrence. Implantation of constructs with biochemical composition and mechanical properties comparable to natural cartilage could be advantageous for long-term repair. This study attempted to create such constructs, in vitro, using tissue engineering principles. Bovine synoviocytes were seeded on nonwoven polyethylene terephthalate fiber scaffolds and cultured in chondrogenic medium for 4 weeks, after which uniaxial compressive loading was applied using an in-house bioreactor for 1 h per day, at a frequency of 1 Hz, for a further 84 days. The initial loading conditions, determined from the mechanical properties of the immature constructs after 4 weeks in chondrogenic culture, were strains ranging between 13% and 23%. After 56 days (sustained at 84 days) of loading, the constructs were stained homogenously with Alcian blue and for type-II collagen. Dynamic compressive moduli were comparable to the high end values for native cartilage and proportional to Alcian blue staining intensity. We suggest that these high moduli values were attributable to the bioreactor setup, which caused the loading regime to change as the constructs developed, that is, the applied stress and strain increased with construct thickness and stiffness, providing continued sufficient cell stimulation as further matrix was deposited. Constructs containing cartilage-like matrix with response to load similar to that of native cartilage could produce long-term effective cartilage repair when implanted.

  16. Friction and wear of TPS fibers: A study of the adhesion and friction of high modulus fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bascom, Willard D.; Lee, Ilzoo

    1990-01-01

    The adhesional and frictional forces between filaments in a woven fabric or felt, strongly influenced the processability of the fiber and the mechanical durability of the final product. Even though the contact loads between fibers are low, the area of contact is extremely small giving rise to very high stresses; principally shear stresses. One consequence of these strong adhesional and frictional forces is the resistance of fibers to slide past each other during weaving or when processed into nonwoven mats or felts. Furthermore, the interfiber frictional forces may cause surface damage and thereby reduce the fiber strength. Once formed into fabrics, flexural handling and manipulation of the material again causes individual filaments to rub against each other resulting in modulus, brittle fibers such as those used in thermal protection systems (TPS). The adhesion and friction of organic fibers, notably polyethylene terephthalate (PET) fibers, have been extensively studied, but there has been very little work reported on high modulus inorganic fibers. An extensive study was made of the adhesion and friction of flame drawn silica fibers in order to develop experimental techniques and a scientific basis for data interpretation. Subsequently, these methods were applied to fibers of interest in TPS materials.

  17. Full deflection profile calculation and Young’s modulus optimisation for engineered high performance materials

    PubMed Central

    Farsi, A.; Pullen, A. D.; Latham, J. P.; Bowen, J.; Carlsson, M.; Stitt, E. H.; Marigo, M.

    2017-01-01

    New engineered materials have critical applications in different fields in medicine, engineering and technology but their enhanced mechanical performances are significantly affected by the microstructural design and the sintering process used in their manufacture. This work introduces (i) a methodology for the calculation of the full deflection profile from video recordings of bending tests, (ii) an optimisation algorithm for the characterisation of Young’s modulus, (iii) a quantification of the effects of optical distortions and (iv) a comparison with other standard tests. The results presented in this paper show the capabilities of this procedure to evaluate the Young’s modulus of highly stiff materials with greater accuracy than previously possible with bending tests, by employing all the available information from the video recording of the tests. This methodology extends to this class of materials the possibility to evaluate both the elastic modulus and the tensile strength with a single mechanical test, without the need for other experimental tools.

  18. Relation between the activation energy of oxygen diffusion and the instantaneous shear modulus in propylene carbonate near the glass transition temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syutkin, V. M.

    2013-09-01

    We discuss the transport of small gas molecules in organic glassy matrices using oxygen diffusion in propylene carbonate as an example. The jumps of a penetrant from one interstitial cavity to another require energy to expand the channel between cavities to the size of the penetrant. It has been established that at temperatures below and slightly above the glass transition temperature, the activation energy of oxygen diffusion, E, is related to the instantaneous shear modulus G∞ of propylene carbonate via the equation E = V × G∞, where V is the temperature-independent parameter that characterizes the volume of the channel. Consequently, the E value is the work necessary for elastic deformation of the surrounding matrix to expand the channel available for oxygen diffusion.

  19. 'Slings' enable neutrophil rolling at high shear.

    PubMed

    Sundd, Prithu; Gutierrez, Edgar; Koltsova, Ekaterina K; Kuwano, Yoshihiro; Fukuda, Satoru; Pospieszalska, Maria K; Groisman, Alex; Ley, Klaus

    2012-08-16

    Most leukocytes can roll along the walls of venules at low shear stress (1 dyn cm−2), but neutrophils have the ability to roll at tenfold higher shear stress in microvessels in vivo. The mechanisms involved in this shear-resistant rolling are known to involve cell flattening and pulling of long membrane tethers at the rear. Here we show that these long tethers do not retract as postulated, but instead persist and appear as 'slings' at the front of rolling cells. We demonstrate slings in a model of acute inflammation in vivo and on P-selectin in vitro, where P-selectin-glycoprotein-ligand-1 (PSGL-1) is found in discrete sticky patches whereas LFA-1 is expressed over the entire length on slings. As neutrophils roll forward, slings wrap around the rolling cells and undergo a step-wise peeling from the P-selectin substrate enabled by the failure of PSGL-1 patches under hydrodynamic forces. The 'step-wise peeling of slings' is distinct from the 'pulling of tethers' reported previously. Each sling effectively lays out a cell-autonomous adhesive substrate in front of neutrophils rolling at high shear stress during inflammation.

  20. Velocity Based Modulus Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickson, W. C.

    2007-12-01

    A new set of equations are derived for the modulus of elasticity E and the bulk modulus K which are dependent only upon the seismic wave propagation velocities Vp, Vs and the density ρ. The three elastic moduli, E (Young's modulus), the shear modulus μ (Lamé's second parameter) and the bulk modulus K are found to be simple functions of the density and wave propagation velocities within the material. The shear and elastic moduli are found to equal the density of the material multiplied by the square of their respective wave propagation-velocities. The bulk modulus may be calculated from the elastic modulus using Poisson's ratio. These equations and resultant values are consistent with published literature and values in both magnitude and dimension (N/m2) and are applicable to the solid, liquid and gaseous phases. A 3D modulus of elasticity model for the Parkfield segment of the San Andreas Fault is presented using data from the wavespeed model of Thurber et al. [2006]. A sharp modulus gradient is observed across the fault at seismic depths, confirming that "variation in material properties play a key role in fault segmentation and deformation style" [Eberhart-Phillips et al., 1993] [EPM93]. The three elastic moduli E, μ and K may now be calculated directly from seismic pressure and shear wave propagation velocities. These velocities may be determined using conventional seismic reflection, refraction or transmission data and techniques. These velocities may be used in turn to estimate the density. This allows velocity based modulus calculations to be used as a tool for geophysical analysis, modeling, engineering and prospecting.

  1. Effect of hydroxyapatite concentration on high-modulus composite for biodegradable bone-fixation devices.

    PubMed

    Heimbach, Bryant; Grassie, Kevin; Shaw, Montgomery T; Olson, James R; Wei, Mei

    2016-06-14

    There are over 3 million bone fractures in the United States annually; over 30% of which require internal mechanical fixation devices to aid in the healing process. The current standard material used is a metal plate that is implanted onto the bone. However, metal fixation devices have many disadvantages, namely stress shielding and metal ion leaching. This study aims to fix these problems of metal implants by making a completely biodegradable material that will have a high modulus and exhibit great toughness. To accomplish this, long-fiber poly-l-lactic acid (PLLA) was utilized in combination with a matrix composed of polycaprolactone (PCL) and hydroxyapatite (HA) nano-rods. Through single fibril tensile tests, it was found that the PLLA fibers have a Young's modulus of 8.09 GPa. Synthesized HA nanorods have dimensions in the nanometer range with an aspect ratio over 6. By dip coating PLLA fibers in a suspension of PCL and HA and hot pressing the resulting coated fibers, dense fiber-reinforced samples were made having a flexural modulus up to 9.2 GPa and a flexural strength up to 187 MPa. The flexural modulus of cortical bone ranges from 7 to 25 GPa, so the modulus of the composite material falls into the range of bone. The typical flextural strength of bone is 130 MPa, and the samples here greatly exceed that with a strength of 187 MPa. After mechanical testing to failure the samples retained their shape, showing toughness with no catastrophic failure, indicating the possibility for use as a fixation material. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2016.

  2. Application of an elastic 2D tube-waveform tomography to estimate the shear modulus in the vicinity of the FINO3 offshore platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köhn, D.; Wilken, D.; Rabbel, W.

    2012-04-01

    The FINO3 project is aimed at the construction of an offshore research platform in the north-sea, hosting research projects dealing with offshore wind energy topics. As part of FINO3 our sub-project deals with the development of new seismic acquisition and inversion concepts for offshore-building foundation soil analysis. We are focussed on the determination of seismic parameters and structural information of the building plot of the platform. Possible changes of the shear modulus of the sediments in the vicinity of the FINO3 monopile due to mechanic loads on the platform are estimated by a tube-waveform tomography. The tube-waves are excited by a hammer blow at the internal wall of the FINO3 monopile above the water line. The tube-waves are propagating through the water column and the sediments and are measured in situ by hydrophones at the external wall of the monopile. Homogenous long wavelength starting models for the waveform tomography are estimated using simple 2D finite difference models. Possible shear-wave velocity starting models range from 150-300 m/s. The resolution of the tube-waveform tomography is estimated by simple chequerboard and random media models. Additionally first results of the data application in the vicinity of the monopile are presented.

  3. High-shear-rate capillary viscometer for inkjet inks

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Xi; Carr, Wallace W.; Bucknall, David G.; Morris, Jeffrey F.

    2010-06-15

    A capillary viscometer developed to measure the apparent shear viscosity of inkjet inks at high apparent shear rates encountered during inkjet printing is described. By using the Weissenberg-Rabinowitsch equation, true shear viscosity versus true shear rate is obtained. The device is comprised of a constant-flow generator, a static pressure monitoring device, a high precision submillimeter capillary die, and a high stiffness flow path. The system, which is calibrated using standard Newtonian low-viscosity silicone oil, can be easily operated and maintained. Results for measurement of the shear-rate-dependent viscosity of carbon-black pigmented water-based inkjet inks at shear rates up to 2x10{sup 5} s{sup -1} are discussed. The Cross model was found to closely fit the experimental data. Inkjet ink samples with similar low-shear-rate viscosities exhibited significantly different shear viscosities at high shear rates depending on particle loading.

  4. High strength semi-active energy absorbers using shear- and mixedmode operation at high shear rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becnel, Andrew C.

    This body of research expands the design space of semi-active energy absorbers for shock isolation and crash safety by investigating and characterizing magnetorheological fluids (MRFs) at high shear rates ( > 25,000 1/s) under shear and mixed-mode operation. Magnetorheological energy absorbers (MREAs) work well as adaptive isolators due to their ability to quickly and controllably adjust to changes in system mass or impact speed while providing fail-safe operation. However, typical linear stroking MREAs using pressure-driven flows have been shown to exhibit reduced controllability as impact speed (shear rate) increases. The objective of this work is to develop MREAs that improve controllability at high shear rates by using pure shear and mixed shear-squeeze modes of operation, and to present the fundamental theory and models of MR fluids under these conditions. A proof of concept instrument verified that the MR effect persists in shear mode devices at shear rates corresponding to low speed impacts. This instrument, a concentric cylinder Searle cell magnetorheometer, was then used to characterize three commercially available MRFs across a wide range of shear rates, applied magnetic fields, and temperatures. Characterization results are presented both as flow curves according to established practice, and as an alternate nondimensionalized analysis based on Mason number. The Mason number plots show that, with appropriate correction coefficients for operating temperature, the varied flow curve data can be collapsed to a single master curve. This work represents the first shear mode characterization of MRFs at shear rates over 10 times greater than available with commercial rheometers, as well as the first validation of Mason number analysis to high shear rate flows in MRFs. Using the results from the magnetorheometer, a full scale rotary vane MREA was developed as part of the Lightweight Magnetorheological Energy Absorber System (LMEAS) for an SH-60 Seahawk helicopter

  5. The dynamic bulk modulus of three glass-forming liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gundermann, Ditte; Niss, Kristine; Christensen, Tage; Dyre, Jeppe C.; Hecksher, Tina

    2014-06-01

    We present dynamic adiabatic bulk modulus data for three organic glass-forming liquids: two van der Waal's liquids, trimethyl-pentaphenyl-trisiloxane (DC705) and dibuthyl phtalate (DBP), and one hydrogen-bonded liquid, 1,2-propanediol (PD). All three liquids are found to obey time-temperature superposition within the uncertainty of the measurement in the adiabatic bulk modulus. The bulk modulus spectra are compared to the shear modulus spectra. The time scales of the two responses were found to be similar. The shapes of the shear and bulk modulus alpha loss peak are nearly identical for DBP and DC705, while the bulk modulus spectrum for PD is significantly broader than that of the shear modulus. The data further suggest that a "bulk modulus version of the shoving model" for the temperature dependence of the activation energy using the bulk modulus relaxation strength, ΔK(T), works well for DC705 and DBP, but not PD, while a formulation of the model using the high-frequency plateau value, K∞(T), gave a poor result for all three liquids.

  6. Estimation of the squared modulus of the mutual intensity from high-light-level intensity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, Timothy J.

    1995-06-01

    The problem of estimating the squared modulus of the mutual intensity (or the complex coherence factor) from high-light-level intensity measurements is addressed for the situation in which the fluctuations of the complex-valued amplitude are governed by circular-Gaussian statistics and the light level is high enough that all nonclassical fluctuations of the measurements can be ignored. A lower bound on the variance of any unbiased estimator is presented, and this bound is compared with the variance of Ebstein's polynomial estimators [J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 8, 1450 (1991)] along with the variance of the maximum-likelihood estimator.

  7. The thermal conductivity of high modulus Zylon fibers between 400 mK and 4 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wikus, Patrick; Figueroa-Feliciano, Enectalí; Hertel, Scott A.; Leman, Steven W.; McCarthy, Kevin A.; Rutherford, John M.

    2008-11-01

    Zylon is a synthetic polyurethane polymer fiber featuring very high mechanical strength. Measurements of the thermal conductivity λZ(T) of high modulus Zylon fibers at temperatures between 400 mK and 4 K were performed to assess if they can be successfully employed in the design of high performance suspension systems for cold stages of adiabatic demagnetization refrigerators. The linear mass density of the yarn used in these measurements amounts to 3270 dtex, which is also a measure for the yarn's cross section. The experimental data for the thermal conductivity was fitted to a function of the form λZ=(1010±30)·TpWmmdtexK. This result was normalized to the breaking strength of the fibers and compared with Kevlar. It shows that Kevlar outperforms Zylon in the investigated temperature range. At 1.5 K, the thermal conductivity integral of Zylon yarn is twice as high as the thermal conductivity integral of Kevlar yarn with the same breaking strength. A linear mass density of 1 tex is equivalent to a yarn mass of 1 g/km. High modulus Zylon has a density of 1.56 g/cm 3.

  8. Thermal Conductivity and Elastic Modulus Evolution of Thermal Barrier Coatings under High Heat Flux Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    1999-01-01

    Laser high heat flux test approaches have been established to obtain critical properties of ceramic thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) under near-realistic temperature and thermal gradients that may he encountered in advanced engine systems. Thermal conductivity change kinetics of a thin ceramic coating were continuously monitored in real time at various test temperatures. A significant thermal conductivity increase was observed during the laser simulated engine heat flux tests. For a 0.25 mm thick ZrO2-8%Y2O3 coating system, the overall thermal conductivity increased from the initial value of 1.0 W/m-K to 1. 15 W/m-K, 1. 19 W/m-K and 1.5 W/m-K after 30 hour testing at surface temperatures of 990C, 1100C, and 1320C. respectively. Hardness and modulus gradients across a 1.5 mm thick TBC system were also determined as a function of laser testing time using the laser sintering/creep and micro-indentation techniques. The coating Knoop hardness values increased from the initial hardness value of 4 GPa to 5 GPa near the ceramic/bond coat interface, and to 7.5 GPa at the ceramic coating surface after 120 hour testing. The ceramic surface modulus increased from an initial value of about 70 GPa to a final value of 125 GPa. The increase in thermal conductivity and the evolution of significant hardness and modulus gradients in the TBC systems are attributed to sintering-induced micro-porosity gradients under the laser-imposed high thermal gradient conditions. The test techniques provide a viable means for obtaining coating data for use in design, development, stress modeling, and life prediction for various thermal barrier coating applications.

  9. Studying solutions at high shear rates: a dedicated microfluidics setup.

    PubMed

    Wieland, D C F; Garamus, V M; Zander, T; Krywka, C; Wang, M; Dedinaite, A; Claesson, P M; Willumeit-Römer, R

    2016-03-01

    The development of a dedicated small-angle X-ray scattering setup for the investigation of complex fluids at different controlled shear conditions is reported. The setup utilizes a microfluidics chip with a narrowing channel. As a consequence, a shear gradient is generated within the channel and the effect of shear rate on structure and interactions is mapped spatially. In a first experiment small-angle X-ray scattering is utilized to investigate highly concentrated protein solutions up to a shear rate of 300000 s(-1). These data demonstrate that equilibrium clusters of lysozyme are destabilized at high shear rates.

  10. High elastic modulus polymer electrolytes suitable for preventing thermal runaway in lithium batteries

    DOEpatents

    Mullin, Scott; Panday, Ashoutosh; Balsara, Nitash Pervez; Singh, Mohit; Eitouni, Hany Basam; Gomez, Enrique Daniel

    2014-04-22

    A polymer that combines high ionic conductivity with the structural properties required for Li electrode stability is useful as a solid phase electrolyte for high energy density, high cycle life batteries that do not suffer from failures due to side reactions and dendrite growth on the Li electrodes, and other potential applications. The polymer electrolyte includes a linear block copolymer having a conductive linear polymer block with a molecular weight of at least 5000 Daltons, a structural linear polymer block with an elastic modulus in excess of 1.times.10.sup.7 Pa and an ionic conductivity of at least 1.times.10.sup.-5 Scm.sup.-1. The electrolyte is made under dry conditions to achieve the noted characteristics. In another aspect, the electrolyte exhibits a conductivity drop when the temperature of electrolyte increases over a threshold temperature, thereby providing a shutoff mechanism for preventing thermal runaway in lithium battery cells.

  11. High bulk modulus of ionic liquid and effects on performance of hydraulic system.

    PubMed

    Kambic, Milan; Kalb, Roland; Tasner, Tadej; Lovrec, Darko

    2014-01-01

    Over recent years ionic liquids have gained in importance, causing a growing number of scientists and engineers to investigate possible applications for these liquids because of their unique physical and chemical properties. Their outstanding advantages such as nonflammable liquid within a broad liquid range, high thermal, mechanical, and chemical stabilities, low solubility for gases, attractive tribological properties (lubrication), and very low compressibility, and so forth, make them more interesting for applications in mechanical engineering, offering great potential for new innovative processes, and also as a novel hydraulic fluid. This paper focuses on the outstanding compressibility properties of ionic liquid EMIM-EtSO4, a very important physical chemically property when IL is used as a hydraulic fluid. This very low compressibility (respectively, very high Bulk modulus), compared to the classical hydraulic mineral oils or the non-flammable HFDU type of hydraulic fluids, opens up new possibilities regarding its usage within hydraulic systems with increased dynamics, respectively, systems' dynamic responses.

  12. Background data for modulus mapping high-performance polyethylene fiber morphologies.

    PubMed

    Strawhecker, Kenneth E; Sandoz-Rosado, Emil J; Stockdale, Taylor A; Laird, Eric D

    2017-02-01

    The data included here provides a basis for understanding "Interior morphology of high-performance polyethylene fibers revealed by modulus mapping" (K.E. Strawhecker, E.J. Sandoz-Rosado, T.A. Stockdale, E.D. Laird, 2016) [1], in specific: the multi-frequency (AMFM) atomic force microscopy technique and its application to ultra-high-molecular-weight Polyethylene (UHMWPE) fibers. Furthermore, the data suggests why the Hertzian contact mechanics model can be used within the framework of AMFM theory, simple harmonic oscillator theory, and contact mechanics. The framework is first laid out followed by data showing cantilever dynamics, force-distance spectra in AC mode, and force-distance in contact mode using Polystyrene reference and UHMWPE. Finally topography and frequency shift (stiffness) maps are presented to show the cases where elastic versus plastic deformation may have occurred.

  13. High Bulk Modulus of Ionic Liquid and Effects on Performance of Hydraulic System

    PubMed Central

    Kalb, Roland; Tasner, Tadej

    2014-01-01

    Over recent years ionic liquids have gained in importance, causing a growing number of scientists and engineers to investigate possible applications for these liquids because of their unique physical and chemical properties. Their outstanding advantages such as nonflammable liquid within a broad liquid range, high thermal, mechanical, and chemical stabilities, low solubility for gases, attractive tribological properties (lubrication), and very low compressibility, and so forth, make them more interesting for applications in mechanical engineering, offering great potential for new innovative processes, and also as a novel hydraulic fluid. This paper focuses on the outstanding compressibility properties of ionic liquid EMIM-EtSO4, a very important physical chemically property when IL is used as a hydraulic fluid. This very low compressibility (respectively, very high Bulk modulus), compared to the classical hydraulic mineral oils or the non-flammable HFDU type of hydraulic fluids, opens up new possibilities regarding its usage within hydraulic systems with increased dynamics, respectively, systems' dynamic responses. PMID:24526900

  14. Design and fabrication of a metastable β-type titanium alloy with ultralow elastic modulus and high strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Shun; Meng, Qingkun; Zhao, Xinqing; Wei, Qiuming; Xu, Huibin

    2015-10-01

    Titanium and its alloys have become the most attractive implant materials due to their high corrosion resistance, excellent biocompatibility and relatively low elastic modulus. However, the current Ti materials used for implant applications exhibit much higher Young’s modulus (50 ~ 120 GPa) than human bone (~30 GPa). This large mismatch in the elastic modulus between implant and human bone can lead to so-called “stress shielding effect” and eventual implant failure. Therefore, the development of β-type Ti alloys with modulus comparable to that of human bone has become an ever more pressing subject in the area of advanced biomedical materials. In this study, an attempt was made to produce a bone-compatible metastable β-type Ti alloy. By alloying and thermo-mechanical treatment, a metastable β-type Ti-33Nb-4Sn (wt. %) alloy with ultralow Young’s modulus (36 GPa, versus ~30 GPa for human bone) and high ultimate strength (853 MPa) was fabricated. We believe that this method can be applied to developing advanced metastable β-type titanium alloys for implant applications. Also, this approach can shed light on design and development of novel β-type titanium alloys with large elastic limit due to their high strength and low elastic modulus.

  15. Design and fabrication of a metastable β-type titanium alloy with ultralow elastic modulus and high strength

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Shun; Meng, Qingkun; Zhao, Xinqing; Wei, Qiuming; Xu, Huibin

    2015-01-01

    Titanium and its alloys have become the most attractive implant materials due to their high corrosion resistance, excellent biocompatibility and relatively low elastic modulus. However, the current Ti materials used for implant applications exhibit much higher Young’s modulus (50 ~ 120 GPa) than human bone (~30 GPa). This large mismatch in the elastic modulus between implant and human bone can lead to so-called “stress shielding effect” and eventual implant failure. Therefore, the development of β-type Ti alloys with modulus comparable to that of human bone has become an ever more pressing subject in the area of advanced biomedical materials. In this study, an attempt was made to produce a bone-compatible metastable β-type Ti alloy. By alloying and thermo-mechanical treatment, a metastable β-type Ti-33Nb-4Sn (wt. %) alloy with ultralow Young’s modulus (36 GPa, versus ~30 GPa for human bone) and high ultimate strength (853 MPa) was fabricated. We believe that this method can be applied to developing advanced metastable β-type titanium alloys for implant applications. Also, this approach can shed light on design and development of novel β-type titanium alloys with large elastic limit due to their high strength and low elastic modulus. PMID:26434766

  16. Mach stem formation in explosion systems, which include high modulus elastic elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balagansky, Igor A.; Hokamoto, Kazuyuki; Manikandan, Palavesamuthu; Matrosov, Alexander D.; Stadnichenko, Ivan A.; Miyoshi, Hitoshi; Bataev, Ivan A.; Bataev, Anatoly A.

    2011-12-01

    Results of experimental and numerical research of the Mach stem formation in explosion systems, which include high modulus elastic elements, are presented. The experimental data are discussed, and the analysis using ANSYS AUTODYN 11.0 is provided. It is shown that the phenomenon is reproduced for various high explosives. The Mach stem formation is observed in the conditions close to critical conditions of detonation transfer from an active to a passive HE charge. The best conditions for the Mach stem formation have been observed for TG-40/60 (Russian analog of Composition B) with silicon carbide insert heights of 16.5 mm, 18 mm, and 19.5 mm. The physical reason of the phenomenon is the propagation of a convergent detonation wave into highly compressed HE. The phenomenon is reproduced in numerical simulation with ANSYS AUTODYN 11.0. Calculated maximum value of pressure on the symmetry axis of passive HE charge was up to 1.25 Mbar. Results of metallographic analysis of steel identification specimen on the rear end of the passive HE charge indirectly confirm very high local pressures and temperatures for this scheme of explosion loading.

  17. Force measurements on natural membrane nanovesicles reveal a composition-independent, high Young's modulus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calò, Annalisa; Reguera, David; Oncins, Gerard; Persuy, Marie-Annick; Sanz, Guenhaël; Lobasso, Simona; Corcelli, Angela; Pajot-Augy, Edith; Gomila, Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical properties of nano-sized vesicles made up of natural membranes are crucial to the development of stable, biocompatible nanocontainers with enhanced functional, recognition and sensing capabilities. Here we measure and compare the mechanical properties of plasma and inner membrane nanovesicles ~80 nm in diameter obtained from disrupted yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells. We provide evidence of a highly deformable behaviour for these vesicles, able to support repeated wall-to-wall compressions without irreversible deformations, accompanied by a noticeably high Young's modulus (~300 MPa) compared to that obtained for reconstituted artificial liposomes of similar size and approaching that of some virus particles. Surprisingly enough, the results are approximately similar for plasma and inner membrane nanovesicles, in spite of their different lipid compositions, especially on what concerns the ergosterol content. These results point towards an important structural role of membrane proteins in the mechanical response of natural membrane vesicles and open the perspective to their potential use as robust nanocontainers for bioapplications.Mechanical properties of nano-sized vesicles made up of natural membranes are crucial to the development of stable, biocompatible nanocontainers with enhanced functional, recognition and sensing capabilities. Here we measure and compare the mechanical properties of plasma and inner membrane nanovesicles ~80 nm in diameter obtained from disrupted yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells. We provide evidence of a highly deformable behaviour for these vesicles, able to support repeated wall-to-wall compressions without irreversible deformations, accompanied by a noticeably high Young's modulus (~300 MPa) compared to that obtained for reconstituted artificial liposomes of similar size and approaching that of some virus particles. Surprisingly enough, the results are approximately similar for plasma and inner membrane nanovesicles, in

  18. Proton conducting, high modulus polymer electrolyte membranes by polymerization-induced microphase separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chopade, Sujay; Hillmyer, Marc; Lodge, Timothy

    Robust solid-state polymer electrolyte membranes (PEMs) are vital for designing next-generation lithium-ion batteries and high-temperature fuel cells. However, the performance of diblock polymer electrolytes is generally limited by poor mechanical stability and network defects in the conducting pathways. We present the in-situ preparation of robust cross-linked PEMs via polymerization-induced microphase separation, and incorporation of protic ionic liquid (IL) into one of the microphase separated domains. The facile design strategy involves a delicate balance between the controlled growth of polystyrene from a poly(ethylene oxide) macro-chain transfer agent (PEO-CTA) and simultaneous chemical cross-linking by divinylbenzene in the presence of IL. Small angle X-ray scattering and transmission electron microscopy confirmed the formation of a disordered structure with bicontinuous morphology and a characteristic domain size of order 20 nm. The long-range continuity of the PEO/protic IL conducting nanochannels and cross-linked polystyrene domains imparts high thermal and mechanical stability to the PEMs, with elastic modulus approaching 10 MPa and a high ionic conductivity of 15 mS/cm at 180 °C.

  19. Dynamics of High Pressure Reacting Shear Flows

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-02

    side recirculation zone should be present DISTRIBUTION A: Approved for public release; distribution unlimited 13 Convection Velocities x y Extract...column of pixels at each time along shear layer edge as a function of time, dark streaks represent convecting liquid structures Positive slope streaks...represent upstream traveling features Structures convect at apparent constant velocity Structures start at slow speed and gradually accelerate

  20. Reduction of the bulk modulus at high pressure in CrN.

    PubMed

    Rivadulla, Francisco; Bañobre-López, Manuel; Quintela, Camilo X; Piñeiro, Alberto; Pardo, Victor; Baldomir, Daniel; López-Quintela, Manuel Arturo; Rivas, José; Ramos, Carlos A; Salva, Horacio; Zhou, Jian-Shi; Goodenough, John B

    2009-12-01

    Nitride coatings are increasingly demanded in the cutting- and machining-tool industry owing to their hardness, thermal stability and resistance to corrosion. These properties derive from strongly covalent bonds; understanding the bonding is a requirement for the design of superhard materials with improved capabilities. Here, we report a pressure-induced cubic-to-orthorhombic transition at approximately 1 GPa in CrN. High-pressure X-ray diffraction and ab initio calculations show an unexpected reduction of the bulk modulus, K0, of about 25% in the high-pressure (lower volume) phase. Our combined theoretical and experimental approach shows that this effect is the result of a large exchange striction due to the approach of the localized Cr:t3 electrons to becoming molecular-orbital electrons in Cr-Cr bonds. The softening of CrN under pressure is a manifestation of a strong competition between different types of chemical bond that are found at a crossover from a localized to a molecular-orbital electronic transition.

  1. Highly porous, low elastic modulus 316L stainless steel scaffold prepared by selective laser melting.

    PubMed

    Čapek, Jaroslav; Machová, Markéta; Fousová, Michaela; Kubásek, Jiří; Vojtěch, Dalibor; Fojt, Jaroslav; Jablonská, Eva; Lipov, Jan; Ruml, Tomáš

    2016-12-01

    Recently, porous metallic materials have been extensively studied as candidates for use in the fabrication of scaffolds and augmentations to repair trabecular bone defects, e.g. in surroundings of joint replacements. Fabricating these complex structures by using common approaches (e.g., casting and machining) is very challenging. Therefore, rapid prototyping techniques, such as selective laser melting (SLM), have been investigated for these applications. In this study, we characterized a highly porous (87 vol.%) 316L stainless steel scaffold prepared by SLM. 316L steel was chosen because it presents a biomaterial still widely used for fabrication of joint replacements and, from the practical point of view, use of the same material for fabrication of an augmentation and a joint replacement is beneficial for corrosion prevention. The results are compared to the reported properties of two representative nonporous 316L stainless steels prepared either by SLM or casting and subsequent hot forging. The microstructural and mechanical properties and the surface chemical composition and interaction with the cells were investigated. The studied material exhibited mechanical properties that were similar to those of trabecular bone (compressive modulus of elasticity ~0.15GPa, compressive yield strength ~3MPa) and cytocompatibility after one day that was similar to that of wrought 316L stainless steel, which is a commonly used biomaterial. Based on the obtained results, SLM is a suitable method for the fabrication of porous 316L stainless steel scaffolds with highly porous structures.

  2. Origin of high strength, low modulus superelasticity in nanowire-shape memory alloy composites.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xudong; Zong, Hongxiang; Cui, Lishan; Fan, Xueling; Ding, Xiangdong; Sun, Jun

    2017-04-12

    An open question is the underlying mechanisms for a recent discovered nanocomposite, which composed of shape memory alloy (SMA) matrix with embedded metallic nanowires (NWs), demonstrating novel mechanical properties, such as large quasi-linear elastic strain, low Young's modulus and high yield strength. We use finite element simulations to investigate the interplay between the superelasticity of SMA matrix and the elastic-plastic deformation of embedded NWs. Our results show that stress transfer plays a dominated role in determining the quasi-linear behavior of the nanocomposite. The corresponding microstructure evolution indicate that the transfer is due to the coupling between plastic deformation within the NWs and martensitic transformation in the matrix, i.e., the martensitic transformation of the SMA matrix promotes local plastic deformation nearby, and the high plastic strain region of NWs retains considerable martensite in the surrounding SMA matrix, thus facilitating continues martensitic transformation in subsequent loading. Based on these findings, we propose a general criterion for achieving quasi-linear elasticity.

  3. High modulus rare earth and beryllium containing silicate glass compositions. [for glass reinforcing fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bacon, J. F. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    Glass compositions having a Young's modulus of at least 16 million psi and a specific modulus of at least 110 million inches consisting essentially of approximately, by weight, 20 to 43% SiO2, 8 to 21% Al2O3, 4 to 10% BeO, 27 to 58% of at least one oxide selected from a first group consisting of Y2O3, La2O3, Nd2O3, Ce2O3, Ce2O3, and the mixed rare earth oxides, and 3 to 12% of at least one oxide selected from a second group consisting of MgO, ZrO2, ZnO and CaO are described. The molar ratio of BeO to the total content of the first group oxides is from 1.0 to 3.0.

  4. An improved fully integrated, high-speed, dual-modulus divider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Sun; Yong, Xu; Guangyan, Ma; Hui, Shi; Fei, Zhao; Ying, Lin

    2014-11-01

    A fully integrated 2n/2n+1 dual-modulus divider in GHz frequency range is presented. The improved structure can make all separated logic gates embed into correlative D flip—flops completely. In this way, the complex logic functions can be performed with a minimum number of devices and with maximum speed, so that lower power consumption and faster speed are obtained. In addition, the low-voltage bandgap reference needed by the frequency divider is specifically designed to provide a 1.0 V output. According to the design demand, the circuit is fabricated in 0.18 μm standard CMOS process, and the measured results show that its operating frequency range is 1.1-2.5 GHz. The dual-modulus divider dissipates 1.1 mA from a 1.8 V power supply. The temperature coefficient of the reference voltage circuit is 8.3 ppm/°C when the temperature varies from -40 to +125 °C. By comparison, the dual-modulus divide designed in this paper can possess better performance and flexibility.

  5. Desensitization of Heterogeneous High Explosives Under Initiation Through High Modulus Elastic Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balagansky, I. A.; Glumov, A. I.; Samsonov, A. V.; Matrosov, A. D.; Stadnichenko, I. A.

    We have experimentally investigated the influence of fluoroplastic, copper, and silicon carbide inert inserts on the process of detonation transmission through water. Active and passive HE charges were molded from high explosive (HE) Comp. B. The diameter and height of HE cartridges were 40 and 40 mm, respectively. On the rear end of the passive HE charge a steel witness plate was mounted, which detected presence or absence of detonation. Inert inserts were shaped as 20 mm × 20 mm square prisms of varying lengths, and were contained between active and passive HE charges without any clearance on the way of initiating shock wave with partial overlap of HE cross sections. We demonstrate that preloading a passive HE charge with a shock wave transmitted through a copper or a ceramic insert causes considerable desensitization of the Comp. B. Other conditions being the same, the crash distance of detonation transmission for copper was equal to 74%, and for silicon carbide - to 60% of the distance for fluoroplastic. This desensitization phenomenon may be used for development of protective shells for HE. While performing experiments with 20 mm ceramic inserts we have observed unknown cumulation phenomenon, which manifested itself as a hole in identification steel specimen with depth of about 10 mm.

  6. Shear and shear friction of ultra-high performance concrete bridge girders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crane, Charles Kennan

    Ultra-High Performance Concrete (UHPC) is a new class of concrete characterized by no coarse aggregate, steel fiber reinforcement, low w/c, low permeability, compressive strength exceeding 29,000 psi (200 MPa), tensile strength ranging from 1,200 to 2,500 psi (8 to 17 MPa), and very high toughness. These properties make prestressed precast UHPC bridge girders a very attractive replacement material for steel bridge girders, particularly when site demands require a comparable beam depth to steel and a 100+ year life span is desired. In order to efficiently utilize UHPC in bridge construction, it is necessary to create new design recommendations for its use. The interface between precast UHPC girder and cast-in-place concrete decks must be characterized in order to safely use composite design methods with this new material. Due to the lack of reinforcing bars, all shear forces in UHPC girders have to be carried by the concrete and steel fibers. Current U.S. codes do not consider fiber reinforcement in calculating shear capacity. Fiber contribution must be accurately accounted for in shear equations in order to use UHPC. Casting of UHPC may cause fibers to orient in the direction of casting. If fibers are preferentially oriented, physical properties of the concrete may also become anisotropic, which must be considered in design. The current research provides new understanding of shear and shear friction phenomena in UHPC including: (1) Current AASHTO codes provide a non-conservative estimate of interface shear performance of smooth UHPC interfaces with and without interface steel. (2) Fluted interfaces can be created by impressing formliners into the surface of plastic UHPC. AASHTO and ACI codes for roughened interfaces are conservative for design of fluted UHPC interfaces.(3) A new equation for the calculation of shear capacity of UHPC girders is presented which takes into account the contribution of steel fiber reinforcement. (4) Fibers are shown to preferentially

  7. High shear flow induces migration of adherent human platelets.

    PubMed

    Kraemer, Bjoern F; Schmidt, Christine; Urban, Benjamin; Bigalke, Boris; Schwanitz, Laura; Koch, Miriam; Seizer, Peter; Schaller, Martin; Gawaz, Meinrad; Lindemann, Stephan

    2011-01-01

    Shear forces are generated in all parts of the vascular system and contribute directly and indirectly to vascular disease progression. Endothelial cells are able to adapt to flow conditions, and are known to polarize and migrate in response to shear forces. Platelets exposed to shear stress are activated and release bioactive molecules from their alpha granules. So far, platelets have been considered to be static cells that do not leave the site of tight adhesion. However, we have recently been able to demonstrate the capacity of platelets to migrate in response to stromal derived factor-1 (SDF-1). In this project, we have demonstrated that platelets accumulate in areas with a high concentration of SDF-1 under flow conditions and respond to high shear stress by cellular polarization, cytoskeletal reorganisation, and flow-directed migration. In this context, we have shown increased Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome protein (WASP) phosphorylation and intracellular redistribution of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) under high-shear stress conditions. The effect of flow-induced platelet migration has not previously been recognized and offers a new role for platelets as mobile cells. Their migratory potential may enable platelets to cover intimal lesions and contribute to vascular repair.

  8. Characteristics of a magnetorheological fluid in high shear rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, Takehito; Abe, Isao; Inoue, Akio; Iwasaki, Akihiko; Okada, Katsuhiko

    2016-11-01

    The information on the properties of the magnetorheological fluid (MRF) in high shear rate, in particular a shear rate greater than 10 000 s-1, is important for the design of devices utilizing the MRF with very narrow fluid gaps, which are used in high-speed applications. However, very little research has been conducted on this subject. The objective of this study is to provide such information. MRF-140CG (Lord Corp.) is chosen as an example MRF. The plastic viscosity, thermal sensitivity, and durability of the fluid, especially under a shear rate greater than 10 000 s-1, are reported. The plastic viscosity is almost constant under a wide range of magnetic input. In contrast, MRF-140CG is sensitive to the shear rate; its sensitivity is relatively low at high shear rates. The thermal sensitivity shows negative values, and the effect of temperature decreases with increasing magnetic input. According to the result of the duration test at 30 000 s-1 and at a temperature of 120 °C, the lifetime dissipation energy is 5.48 MJ ml-1.

  9. High shear stress induces atherosclerotic vulnerable plaque formation through angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi; Qiu, Juhui; Luo, Shisui; Xie, Xiang; Zheng, Yiming; Zhang, Kang; Ye, Zhiyi; Liu, Wanqian; Gregersen, Hans; Wang, Guixue

    2016-01-01

    Rupture of atherosclerotic plaques causing thrombosis is the main cause of acute coronary syndrome and ischemic strokes. Inhibition of thrombosis is one of the important tasks developing biomedical materials such as intravascular stents and vascular grafts. Shear stress (SS) influences the formation and development of atherosclerosis. The current review focuses on the vulnerable plaques observed in the high shear stress (HSS) regions, which localizes at the proximal region of the plaque intruding into the lumen. The vascular outward remodelling occurs in the HSS region for vascular compensation and that angiogenesis is a critical factor for HSS which induces atherosclerotic vulnerable plaque formation. These results greatly challenge the established belief that low shear stress is important for expansive remodelling, which provides a new perspective for preventing the transition of stable plaques to high-risk atherosclerotic lesions. PMID:27482467

  10. The Young's modulus of high-aspect-ratio carbon/carbon nanotube composite microcantilevers by experimental and modeling validation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Peng; Yang, Xiao; He, Liang E-mail: mlq518@whut.edu.cn; Hao, Zhimeng; Luo, Wen; Xiong, Biao; Xu, Xu; Niu, Chaojiang; Yan, Mengyu; Mai, Liqiang E-mail: mlq518@whut.edu.cn

    2015-03-16

    This paper reports the Young's modulus of a carbon nanotube (CNT)-reinforced carbon/CNT (C/CNT) composite microcantilevers measured by laser Doppler vibrometer and validated by finite element method. Also, the microfabrication process of the high-aspect-ratio C/CNT microcantilever arrays based on silicon micromolding and pyrolysis is presented in detail. With the in-plane natural resonant frequencies of the microcantilevers measured by a laser Doppler vibrometer, a single degree of freedom (SDoF) model based on Euler-Bernoulli (E-B) beam theory is used to calculate the Young's modulus of this composite. To figure out whether this SDoF model can be applied to these composite microcantilevers, the finite element (FE) simulation of these microcantilevers was performed. The Young's modulus of C/CNT composite microcantilevers fabricated by the pyrolysis process at 600 °C is 9391 MPa, and a good agreement between the results from experiments and FE simulation is obtained.

  11. Development of a Highly Portable Plate Loading Device and In Situ Modulus Measurements in Weak Rock Masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallu, Raj R.; Keffeler, Evan R.; Watters, Robert J.; Warren, Sean N.

    2016-02-01

    In recent years, underground mines in Nevada are increasingly exploiting in weak mineralized zones at greater depths that are intensely fractured and highly altered. The mechanical behavior of these rock masses ranges between weak rock and very stiff soil. A common limitation for design of underground mining excavations in these types of rock masses is absence of in situ geotechnical data. This limitation is generally overcome by estimating in situ mechanical behavior from empirical relationships so that the continuum-based numerical methods can be used to evaluate ground support designs. Because of the cost, time, and specialized equipment involved, historically in situ tests have not been performed in these underground mines. Predictive rock mass modulus relationships that are currently available in the literature are derived from field testing of predominantly good-quality rock masses. Consequently, there is limited confidence in using these models for rock masses with Rock Mass Ratings less than 45. In order to overcome some of these limitations, a portable plate loading device (PPLD) was designed and fabricated. The PPLD allows one to perform low cost and relatively quick in situ deformability tests to be performed on weak rock masses in underground mines. Test procedures and data reduction methods were developed to limit potential sources of error associated with the PPLD test. A total of fourteen plate loading tests were performed in weak rock masses at two different active underground mines in Nevada, USA. The resulting the test data were compared to eight published empirical rock mass modulus relationships to determine which, if any, of these relationships are sufficiently accurate for estimating modulus in similar geotechnical conditions. Only two of these relationships were found to be sufficient for first-order estimations of in situ modulus.

  12. High frequency acoustic microscopy for the determination of porosity and Young's modulus in high burnup uranium dioxide nuclear fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Marchetti, M.; Laux, D.; Cappia, F.; Laurie, M.; Van Uffelen, P.; Rondinella, V.V.; Despaux, G.

    2015-07-01

    During irradiation UO{sub 2} nuclear fuel experiences the development of a non-uniform distribution of porosity which contributes to establish varying mechanical properties along the radius of the pellet. Radial variations of the porosity and of elastic properties in high burnup UO{sub 2} pellet can be investigated via high frequency acoustic microscopy. Ultrasound waves are generated by a piezoelectric transducer and focused on the sample, after having travelled through a coupling liquid. The elastic properties of the material are related to the velocity of the generated Rayleigh surface wave (VR). A 67 MWd/kgU UO{sub 2} pellet was characterized using the acoustic microscope installed in the hot cells of the Institute of Transuranium Elements: 90 MHz frequency was applied, methanol was used as coupling liquid and VR was measured at different radial positions. By comparing the porosity values obtained via acoustic microscopy with those determined using ceramographic image analysis a good agreement was found, especially in the areas close to the centre. In addition Young's modulus was calculated and its radial profile was correlated to the corresponding burnup profile. (authors)

  13. High resolution weak lensing mass mapping combining shear and flexion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanusse, F.; Starck, J.-L.; Leonard, A.; Pires, S.

    2016-06-01

    Aims: We propose a new mass mapping algorithm, specifically designed to recover small-scale information from a combination of gravitational shear and flexion. Including flexion allows us to supplement the shear on small scales in order to increase the sensitivity to substructures and the overall resolution of the convergence map without relying on strong lensing constraints. Methods: To preserve all available small scale information, we avoid any binning of the irregularly sampled input shear and flexion fields and treat the mass mapping problem as a general ill-posed inverse problem, which is regularised using a robust multi-scale wavelet sparsity prior. The resulting algorithm incorporates redshift, reduced shear, and reduced flexion measurements for individual galaxies and is made highly efficient by the use of fast Fourier estimators. Results: We tested our reconstruction method on a set of realistic weak lensing simulations corresponding to typical HST/ACS cluster observations and demonstrate our ability to recover substructures with the inclusion of flexion, which are otherwise lost if only shear information is used. In particular, we can detect substructures on the 15'' scale well outside of the critical region of the clusters. In addition, flexion also helps to constrain the shape of the central regions of the main dark matter halos. Our mass mapping software, called Glimpse2D, is made freely available at http://www.cosmostat.org/software/glimpse

  14. Diamond anvil cell for spectroscopic investigation of materials at high temperature, high pressure and shear

    DOEpatents

    Westerfield, C.L.; Morris, J.S.; Agnew, S.F.

    1997-01-14

    Diamond anvil cell is described for spectroscopic investigation of materials at high temperature, high pressure and shear. A cell is described which, in combination with Fourier transform IR spectroscopy, permits the spectroscopic investigation of boundary layers under conditions of high temperature, high pressure and shear. 4 figs.

  15. Diamond anvil cell for spectroscopic investigation of materials at high temperature, high pressure and shear

    DOEpatents

    Westerfield, Curtis L.; Morris, John S.; Agnew, Stephen F.

    1997-01-01

    Diamond anvil cell for spectroscopic investigation of materials at high temperature, high pressure and shear. A cell is described which, in combination with Fourier transform IR spectroscopy, permits the spectroscopic investigation of boundary layers under conditions of high temperature, high pressure and shear.

  16. High temperature dynamic modulus and damping of aluminum and titanium matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dicarlo, J. A.; Maisel, J. E.

    1979-01-01

    Dynamic modulus and damping capacity property data were measured from 20 to over 500 C for unidirectional B/Al (1100), B/Al (6061), B/SiC/Al (6061), Al2O3/Al, SiC/Ti-6Al-4V, and SiC/Ti composites. The measurements were made under vacuum by the forced vibration of composite bars at free-free flexural resonance near 2000 Hz and at amplitudes below 0.000001. Whereas little variation was observed in the dynamic moduli of specimens with approximately the same fiber content (50 percent), the damping of B/Al composites was found at all temperatures to be significantly greater than the damping of the Al2O3/Al and SiC/Ti composites. For those few situations where slight deviations from theory were observed, the dynamic data were examined for information concerning microstructural changes induced by composite fabrication and thermal treatment. The 270 C damping peak observed in B/Al (6061) composites after heat treatment above 460 C appears to be the result of a change in the 6061 aluminum alloy microstructure induced by interaction with the boron fibers. The growth characteristics of the damping peak suggest its possible value for monitoring fiber strength degration caused by excess thermal treatment during B/Al (6061) fabrication and use.

  17. Winged inclusions under high-strain simple shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasemann, Bernhard; Dabrowski, Marcin

    2014-05-01

    In this study we investigate pinch-and-swell objects, which have been subjected to layer parallel shear deformation. We use a high-resolution mechanical numerical model, which allows to model finite strains up to γ = 40. The developing structures have been called winged inclusions, which have geometrically similarities with δ-clast systems and rolling structures. However, our model results suggest markedly different mechanical evolution for winged inclusions, which has to be considered when these structures are used as shear sense indicator or finite strain gauge. During the early stages of formation winged inclusions may resemble mirror images of sigmoidal objects and miss-interpretations will lead to a wrong interpretation of the shear sense. During high-shear strain, the structures may be approximately described as consisting of a pulsating faster rotating core and thinning tails that experience differential slower rotation. The viscosity ratio and the shape of the winged inclusion have a significant influence on the rotation rate. The tails are subject to ptygmatic folding when they rotate through the field of instantaneous shortening and may unfold again in the field of instantaneous stretching. During on-going shearing the trailing wing may become the leading wing and finally unfold after rotation of 180° resulting again in a pinch and swell shaped objects. Therefore winged inclusions record little information about the finite strain. Rootless intrafolial folds with opposing closures have geometrically strong similarities with winged inclusions. It is speculated that the formation of winged inclusions might be an efficient mechanisms to produce rootless intrafolial folds, which might influence the rheological behaviour of natural highly strained rocks.

  18. Design and validation of a compressive tissue stimulator with high-throughput capacity and real-time modulus measurement capability.

    PubMed

    Salvetti, David J; Pino, Christopher J; Manuel, Steven G; Dallmeyer, Ian; Rangarajan, Sanjeet V; Meyer, Tobias; Kotov, Misha; Shastri, V Prasad

    2012-03-01

    Mechanical stimulation has been shown to impact the properties of engineered hyaline cartilage constructs and is relevant for engineering of cartilage and osteochondral tissues. Most mechanical stimulators developed to date emphasize precision over adaptability to standard tissue culture equipment and protocols. The realization of mechanical characteristics in engineered constructs approaching native cartilage requires the optimization of complex variables (type of stimulus, regimen, and bimolecular signals). We have proposed and validated a stimulator design that focuses on high construct capacity, compatibility with tissue culture plastic ware, and regimen adaptability to maximize throughput. This design utilizes thin force sensors in lieu of a load cell and a linear encoder to verify position. The implementation of an individual force sensor for each sample enables the measurement of Young's modulus while stimulating the sample. Removable and interchangeable Teflon plungers mounted using neodymium magnets contact each sample. Variations in plunger height and design can vary the strain and force type on individual samples. This allows for the evaluation of a myriad of culture conditions and regimens simultaneously. The system was validated using contact accuracy, and Young's modulus measurements range as key parameters. Contact accuracy for the system was excellent within 1.16% error of the construct height in comparison to measurements made with a micrometer. Biomaterials ranging from bioceramics (cancellous bone, 123 MPa) to soft gels (1% agarose, 20 KPa) can be measured without any modification to the device. The accuracy of measurements in conjunction with the wide range of moduli tested demonstrate the unique characteristics of the device and the feasibility of using this device in mapping real-time changes to Young's modulus of tissue constructs (cartilage, bone) through the developmental phases in ex vivo culture conditions.

  19. Design and Validation of a Compressive Tissue Stimulator with High-Throughput Capacity and Real-Time Modulus Measurement Capability

    PubMed Central

    Salvetti, David J.; Pino, Christopher J.; Manuel, Steven G.; Dallmeyer, Ian; Rangarajan, Sanjeet V.; Meyer, Tobias; Kotov, Misha

    2012-01-01

    Mechanical stimulation has been shown to impact the properties of engineered hyaline cartilage constructs and is relevant for engineering of cartilage and osteochondral tissues. Most mechanical stimulators developed to date emphasize precision over adaptability to standard tissue culture equipment and protocols. The realization of mechanical characteristics in engineered constructs approaching native cartilage requires the optimization of complex variables (type of stimulus, regimen, and bimolecular signals). We have proposed and validated a stimulator design that focuses on high construct capacity, compatibility with tissue culture plastic ware, and regimen adaptability to maximize throughput. This design utilizes thin force sensors in lieu of a load cell and a linear encoder to verify position. The implementation of an individual force sensor for each sample enables the measurement of Young's modulus while stimulating the sample. Removable and interchangeable Teflon plungers mounted using neodymium magnets contact each sample. Variations in plunger height and design can vary the strain and force type on individual samples. This allows for the evaluation of a myriad of culture conditions and regimens simultaneously. The system was validated using contact accuracy, and Young's modulus measurements range as key parameters. Contact accuracy for the system was excellent within 1.16% error of the construct height in comparison to measurements made with a micrometer. Biomaterials ranging from bioceramics (cancellous bone, 123 MPa) to soft gels (1% agarose, 20 KPa) can be measured without any modification to the device. The accuracy of measurements in conjunction with the wide range of moduli tested demonstrate the unique characteristics of the device and the feasibility of using this device in mapping real-time changes to Young's modulus of tissue constructs (cartilage, bone) through the developmental phases in ex vivo culture conditions. PMID:21988089

  20. Experimental determination of bulk modulus of 14 A tobermorite using high pressure synchrotron X-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Jae Eun; Clark, Simon M.; Wenk, Hans-Rudolf; Monteiro, Paulo J.M.

    2012-02-15

    Using a diamond anvil cell, 14 A tobermorite, a structural analogue of calcium silicate hydrates (C-S-H), was examined by high-pressure synchrotron X-ray diffraction up to 4.8 GPa under hydrostatic conditions. The bulk modulus of 14 A tobermorite was calculated, K{sub o} = 47 GPa. Comparison of the current results with previous high pressure studies on C-S-H(I) indicates that: (1) the compression behavior of the lattice parameters a and b of 14 A tobermorite and C-S-H(I) are very similar, implying that both materials may have very similar Ca-O layers, and also implying that an introduction of structural defects into the Ca-O layers may not substantially change in-plane incompressibility of the ab plane of 14 A tobermorite; and (2) the bulk modulus values of 14 A tobermorite and C-S-H(I) are dominated by the incompressibility of the lattice parameter c, which is directly related to the interlayer spacing composed of dreierketten silicate chains, interlayer Ca, and water molecules.

  1. Metastable β-type Ti-30Nb-1Mo-4Sn Alloy with Ultralow Young's Modulus and High Strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Liang; Guo, Shun; Meng, Qingkun; Zhao, Xinqing

    2014-02-01

    The effect of thermo-mechanical treatment on the mechanical properties of a novel metastable β-type Ti-30Nb-1Mo-4Sn (wt pct) alloy has been investigated. The solution-treated alloy consists of β and α″ phases and exhibits a two-stage yielding with a low yield stress (around 100 MPa). After cold rolling at a reduction of 87.5 pct and subsequent annealing treat at 623 K (350 °C) for 30 minutes, a fine microstructure with nano-sized α precipitates distributed in small β grains as well as high density of dislocations was obtained to achieve a yield strength of 954 MPa and an ultimate tensile strength of 999 MPa. With low stability of β phase and small volume fraction of α precipitates, the annealed specimen exhibits a low Young's modulus of 45 GPa. Such an excellent combination of the low elastic modulus and high strength in mechanical properties indicates a great potential candidate for biomedical applications.

  2. Hexagonal-structured ε-NbN: ultra-incompressibility, high shear rigidity, and a possible hard superconducting material.

    PubMed

    Zou, Yongtao; Wang, Xuebing; Chen, Ting; Li, Xuefei; Qi, Xintong; Welch, David; Zhu, Pinwen; Liu, Bingbing; Cui, Tian; Li, Baosheng

    2015-06-01

    Exploring the structural stability and elasticity of hexagonal ε-NbN helps discover correlations among its physical properties for scientific and technological applications. Here, for the first time, we measured the ultra-incompressibility and high shear rigidity of polycrystalline hexagonal ε-NbN using ultrasonic interferometry and in situ X-ray diffraction, complemented with first-principles density-functional theory calculations up to 30 GPa in pressure. Using a finite strain equation of state approach, the elastic bulk and shear moduli, as well as their pressure dependences are derived from the measured velocities and densities, yielding BS0 = 373.3(15) GPa, G0 = 200.5(8) GPa, ∂BS/∂P = 3.81(3) and ∂G/∂P = 1.67(1). The hexagonal ε-NbN possesses a very high bulk modulus, rivaling that of superhard material cBN (B0 = 381.1 GPa). The high shear rigidity is comparable to that for superhard γ-B (G0 = 227.2 GPa). We found that the crystal structure of transition-metal nitrides and the outmost electrons of the corresponding metals may dominate their pressure dependences in bulk and shear moduli. In addition, the elastic moduli, Vickers hardness, Debye temperature, melting temperature and a possible superconductivity of hexagonal ε-NbN all increase with pressures, suggesting its exceptional suitability for applications under extreme conditions.

  3. Hexagonal-structured epsilon-NbN. Ultra-incompressibility, high shear rigidity, and a possible hard superconducting material

    DOE PAGES

    Zou, Y.; Wang, X.; Chen, T.; ...

    2015-06-01

    Exploring the structural stability and elasticity of hexagonal ε-NbN helps discover correlations among its physical properties for scientific and technological applications. Here, for the first time, we measured the ultra-incompressibility and high shear rigidity of polycrystalline hexagonal ε-NbN using ultrasonic interferometry and in situ X-ray diffraction, complemented with first-principles density-functional theory calculations up to 30 GPa in pressure. Using a finite strain equation of state approach, the elastic bulk and shear moduli, as well as their pressure dependences are derived from the measured velocities and densities, yielding BS0 = 373.3(15) GPa, G0 = 200.5(8) GPa, ∂BS/∂P = 3.81(3) and ∂G/∂Pmore » = 1.67(1). The hexagonal ε-NbN possesses a very high bulk modulus, rivaling that of superhard material cBN (B0 = 381.1 GPa). The high shear rigidity is comparable to that for superhard γ-B (G0 = 227.2 GPa). We found that the crystal structure of transition-metal nitrides and the outmost electrons of the corresponding metals may dominate their pressure dependences in bulk and shear moduli. In addition, the elastic moduli, Vickers hardness, Debye temperature, melting temperature and a possible superconductivity of hexagonal ε-NbN all increase with pressures, suggesting its exceptional suitability for applications under extreme conditions.« less

  4. Hexagonal-structured epsilon-NbN. Ultra-incompressibility, high shear rigidity, and a possible hard superconducting material

    SciTech Connect

    Zou, Y.; Wang, X.; Chen, T.; Li, X.; Qi, X; Welch, D.; Zhu, P.; Liu, B.; Cui, T.; Li, B.

    2015-06-01

    Exploring the structural stability and elasticity of hexagonal ε-NbN helps discover correlations among its physical properties for scientific and technological applications. Here, for the first time, we measured the ultra-incompressibility and high shear rigidity of polycrystalline hexagonal ε-NbN using ultrasonic interferometry and in situ X-ray diffraction, complemented with first-principles density-functional theory calculations up to 30 GPa in pressure. Using a finite strain equation of state approach, the elastic bulk and shear moduli, as well as their pressure dependences are derived from the measured velocities and densities, yielding BS0 = 373.3(15) GPa, G0 = 200.5(8) GPa, ∂BS/∂P = 3.81(3) and ∂G/∂P = 1.67(1). The hexagonal ε-NbN possesses a very high bulk modulus, rivaling that of superhard material cBN (B0 = 381.1 GPa). The high shear rigidity is comparable to that for superhard γ-B (G0 = 227.2 GPa). We found that the crystal structure of transition-metal nitrides and the outmost electrons of the corresponding metals may dominate their pressure dependences in bulk and shear moduli. In addition, the elastic moduli, Vickers hardness, Debye temperature, melting temperature and a possible superconductivity of hexagonal ε-NbN all increase with pressures, suggesting its exceptional suitability for applications under extreme conditions.

  5. Search for New Highly Energetic Phases under Compression and Shear

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-01

    corresponding finite element algorithms and subroutines are developed. (c) Problems on compression and shear of a sample in rotational diamond anvil...release, using the diamond anvil cell. Polymeric N2 appears above 110 GPa pressure and above the temperature of 2000K but cannot be retained under...ambient conditions. In these studies, phase transformations (PTs) are obtained in a diamond anvil cell under high quasi-hydrostatic pressure. While it

  6. Local shear texture formation in adiabatic shear bands by high rate compression of high manganese TRIP steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.; Yang, P.; Mao, W. M.; Cui, F. E.

    2015-04-01

    Local shear textures in ASBs of high manganese TRIP steels under high rate straining are determined and the influences of initial microstructure is analyzed using EBSD technique. It is seen that even at the presence of majority of two types of martensite before deformation, ASB is preferred to evolve in austenite, rather than in martenite, due to reverse transformation. Ultrafine grains of thress phases due to dynamic recrystallization are formed and all show shear textures. The less ε-martensite in ASB is distributed as islands and its preferred orientation can be found to originate from the variants in matrix. The grain orientation rotation around ASB in multi-phase alloy reveals significant influence of α'- martensite on texture in ASB. The mechanism of local texture formation in ASB of high manganese TRIP steel is proposed in terms of the interaction of early TRIP and later reverse transformation.

  7. Duration of exposure to high fluid shear stress is critical in shear-induced platelet activation-aggregation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian-ning; Bergeron, Angela L; Yu, Qinghua; Sun, Carol; McBride, Latresha; Bray, Paul F; Dong, Jing-fei

    2003-10-01

    Platelet functions are increasingly measured under flow conditions to account for blood hydrodynamic effects. Typically, these studies involve exposing platelets to high shear stress for periods significantly longer than would occur in vivo. In the current study, we demonstrate that the platelet response to high shear depends on the duration of shear exposure. In response to a 100 dyn/cm2 shear stress for periods less than 10-20 sec, platelets in PRP or washed platelets were aggregated, but minimally activated as demonstrated by P-selectin expression and binding of the activation-dependent alphaIIbbeta3 antibody PAC-1 to sheared platelets. Furthermore, platelet aggregation under such short pulses of high shear was subjected to rapid disaggregation. The disaggregated platelets could be re-aggregated by ADP in a pattern similar to unsheared platelets. In comparison, platelets that are exposed to high shear for longer than 20 sec are activated and aggregated irreversibly. In contrast, platelet activation and aggregation were significantly greater in whole blood with significantly less disaggregation. The enhancement is likely via increased collision frequency of platelet-platelet interaction and duration of platelet-platelet association due to high cell density. It may also be attributed to the ADP release from other cells such as red blood cells because increased platelet aggregation in whole blood was partially inhibited by ADP blockage. These studies demonstrate that platelets have a higher threshold for shear stress than previously believed. In a pathologically relevant timeframe, high shear alone is likely to be insufficient in inducing platelet activation and aggregation, but acts synergistically with other stimuli.

  8. Simulation of erythrocyte deformation in a high shear flow.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Masanori; Bessho, Sadao; Wada, Shigeo

    2009-01-01

    Deformation of a red blood cell (RBC) in a high-shear flow was investigated. The RBC was modeled as a closed shell membrane consisting of spring networks in the framework of the energy minimum concept. The simulation of RBC in a parallel shear flow showed deformation parameters of RBC were well agreed with experimental results. The simulation of RBC behavior in various flow fields demonstrated that the shape was determined not only by instantaneous fluid force acting on it but also its deformation history. No consistency was found between the maximum of the first principal strain and conventionally used hemolysis index. Those results addressed the importance of considering an RBC deformation for accurately predicting hemolysis.

  9. The influence of removing sizing on strength and stiffness of conventional and high modulus E-glass fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nørgaard Petersen, Helga; Kusano, Yukihiro; Brøndsted, Povl; Almdal, Kristoffer

    2016-07-01

    Two types of E-glass fibres, a conventional and a high modulus where the last one in the following will be denoted as ECR-glass fibre, were investigated regarding density, diameter, stiffness and strength. The fibres were analysed as pristine and after sizing removal treatments. The sizing was removed by either burning at 565°C or soxhlet extraction with acetone. It was found that the density and the stiffness increased after removing the sizing by the two removal treatments whereas the diameter did not change significantly. The strength of the fibres decreased after burning as the sizing, protecting against water and fibre-fibre damage, had been removed. The strength of the fibres after extraction was not significantly different from the strength of the pristine fibres despite removing the sizing. This indicates that the bonded part of sizing is still protecting the glass fibre surface.

  10. Behavior of Fiber Glass Bolts, Rock Bolts and Cable Bolts in Shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xuwei; Aziz, Naj; Mirzaghorbanali, Ali; Nemcik, Jan

    2016-07-01

    This paper experimentally compares the shear behavior of fiber glass (FG) bolt, rock bolt (steel rebar bolt) and cable bolt for the bolt contribution to bolted concrete surface shear strength, and bolt failure mode. Two double shear apparatuses of different size were used for the study. The tensile strength, the shear strength and the deformation modulus of bolt control the shear behavior of a sheared bolted joint. Since the strength and deformation modulus of FG bolt, rock bolt and cable bolt obtained from uniaxial tensile tests are different, their shear behavior in reinforcing joints is accordingly different. Test results showed that the shear stiffness of FG bolted joints decreased gradually from the beginning to end, while the shear stiffness of joints reinforced by rock bolt and cable bolt decreased bi-linearly, which is clearly consistent with their tensile deformation modulus. The bolted joint shear stiffness was highly influenced by bolt pretension in the high stiffness stage for both rock bolt and cable bolt, but not in the low stiffness stage. The rock bolt contribution to joint shear strength standardised by the bolt tensile strength was the largest, followed by cable bolts, then FG bolts. Both the rock bolts and cable bolts tended to fail in tension, while FG bolts in shear due to their low shear strength and constant deformation modulus.

  11. Deformation-induced changeable Young's modulus with high strength in β-type Ti-Cr-O alloys for spinal fixture.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huihong; Niinomi, Mitsuo; Nakai, Masaaki; Hieda, Junko; Cho, Ken

    2014-02-01

    In order to meet the requirements of the patients and surgeons simultaneously for spinal fixation applications, a novel biomedical alloy with a changeable Young's modulus, that is, with a low Young's modulus to prevent the stress-shielding effect for patients and a high Young's modulus to suppress springback for surgeons, was developed. In this study, the chromium and oxygen contents in ternary Ti(11, 12 mass%)Cr-(0.2, 0.4, 0.6 mass%)O alloys were optimized in order to achieve a changeable Young's modulus via deformation-induced ω-phase transformation with good mechanical properties. The Young's moduli of all the examined alloys increase after cold rolling, which is attributed to the deformation-induced ω-phase transformation. This transformation is suppressed by oxygen but enhanced with lower chromium content, which is related to the β(bcc)-lattice stability. Among the examined alloys, the Ti-11Cr-0.2O alloy shows a low Young's modulus of less than 80GPa in the solution-treated (ST) condition and a high Young's modulus of more than 90GPa in the cold rolled (CR) condition. The Ti-11Cr-0.2O alloy also exhibits a high tensile strength, above 1000MPa, with an acceptable elongation of ~12% in the ST condition. Furthermore, the Ti-11Cr-0.2O alloy exhibits minimal springback. This value of springback is the closest to that of Ti64 ELI alloy among the compared alloys. Therefore, the Ti-11Cr-0.2O alloy, which has a good balance between large changeable Young's modulus, high tensile strength, good plasticity, and minimal springback, is considered to be a potential candidate for spinal fixation applications.

  12. Composite materials based on high-modulus compounds for additive technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoriev, M.; Kotelnikov, N.; Buyakova, S.; Kulkov, S.

    2016-07-01

    The effect of adding nanocrystalline ZrO2 and submicron TiC to ultrafine Al2O3 on mechanical properties and the microstructure of the composites developed by hot pressing was investigated. It was shown that by means of hot pressing in argon atmosphere at the sintering temperature of 1500 °C one can obtain the composites of Al2O3-ZrO2-TiC with a fine structure and minimal porosity. It was shown that in the material a multi-scale hierarchical structure is formed, which possesses high physical and mechanical properties: the hardness and fracture toughness was 22 GPa and 5.2 MPa*m1/2, respectively. It has been shown that mechanical properties of the composite are better than those of commercial composites based on aluminum oxide (Al2O3, ZTA, Al2O3-TiC) and are comparable to those of silicon nitride.

  13. Treatment of oily wastes using high-shear rotary ultrafiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, B.E.; Viadero, R. Jr.; Young, J.; Lin, W.

    1997-12-01

    The high-shear rotary ultrafiltration (UF) system uses membrane rotation to provide the turbulence required to minimize concentration polarization and flux decline. The high-shear UF system was effective in concentrating oily wastes from about 5% to as high as 65%. The decoupling of turbulence promotion from feed pressurization/recirculation by rotating the membrane was the primary reason for the improvement in performance over that observed with conventional UF systems. Transitional and gel layer oil concentrations (20% and 50--59%, respectively) were higher than values reported in the literature. Permeate flux was dependent on the temperature and rotational speed. Flux increased by about 45% when the temperature was increased from 43 to 60 C. A larger decrease in waste viscosity, over that predicted for water alone, and increased oil droplet diffusivity were hypothesized as reasons for the stronger than expected flux-temperature relationship. The flux-rotational speed ({omega}) relationship was described by J = f({omega}){sup 0.90}; however, the gel layer exhibited stability with increasing {omega}. The ceramic membrane was superior to the polymeric membrane in regards to permeate flux and quality as well as cleaning and durability.

  14. High-Energy-Density Shear Flow and Instability Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doss, F. W.; Flippo, K. A.; Merritt, E. C.; di Stefano, C. A.; Devolder, B. G.; Kurien, S.; Kline, J. L.

    2016-10-01

    High-energy-density shear experiments have been performed by LANL at the OMEGA Laser Facility and National Ignition Facility (NIF). The experiments have been simulated using the LANL radiation-hydrocode RAGE and have been used to assess turbulence models' ability to function in the high-energy-density, inertial-fusion-relevant regime. Beginning with the basic configuration of two counter-oriented shock-driven flows of > 100 km/s, which initiate a strong shear instability across an initially solid-density, 20 μm thick Al plate, variations of the experiment to details of the initial conditions have been performed. These variations have included increasing the fluid densities (by modifying the plate material from Al to Ti and Cu), imposing sinusoidal seed perturbations on the plate, and directly modifying the plate's intrinsic surface roughness. Radiography of the unseeded layer has revealed the presence of emergent Kelvin-Helmholtz structures which may be analyzed to infer fluid-mechanical properties including turbulent energy density. This work is conducted by the US DOE by LANL under contract DE-AC52-06NA25396.

  15. High-frequency shear-horizontal surface acoustic wave sensor

    DOEpatents

    Branch, Darren W

    2013-05-07

    A Love wave sensor uses a single-phase unidirectional interdigital transducer (IDT) on a piezoelectric substrate for leaky surface acoustic wave generation. The IDT design minimizes propagation losses, bulk wave interferences, provides a highly linear phase response, and eliminates the need for impedance matching. As an example, a high frequency (.about.300-400 MHz) surface acoustic wave (SAW) transducer enables efficient excitation of shear-horizontal waves on 36.degree. Y-cut lithium tantalate (LTO) giving a highly linear phase response (2.8.degree. P-P). The sensor has the ability to detect at the pg/mm.sup.2 level and can perform multi-analyte detection in real-time. The sensor can be used for rapid autonomous detection of pathogenic microorganisms and bioagents by field deployable platforms.

  16. High-frequency shear-horizontal surface acoustic wave sensor

    DOEpatents

    Branch, Darren W

    2014-03-11

    A Love wave sensor uses a single-phase unidirectional interdigital transducer (IDT) on a piezoelectric substrate for leaky surface acoustic wave generation. The IDT design minimizes propagation losses, bulk wave interferences, provides a highly linear phase response, and eliminates the need for impedance matching. As an example, a high frequency (.about.300-400 MHz) surface acoustic wave (SAW) transducer enables efficient excitation of shear-horizontal waves on 36.degree. Y-cut lithium tantalate (LTO) giving a highly linear phase response (2.8.degree. P-P). The sensor has the ability to detect at the pg/mm.sup.2 level and can perform multi-analyte detection in real-time. The sensor can be used for rapid autonomous detection of pathogenic microorganisms and bioagents by field deployable platforms.

  17. Hydrodynamic lubrication in nanoscale bearings under high shear velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yunfei; Li, Deyu; Jiang, Kai; Yang, Juekuan; Wang, Xiaohui; Wang, Yujuan

    2006-08-01

    The setting up process in a nanoscale bearing has been modeled by molecular dynamics simulation. Contrary to the prediction from the classical Reynolds' theory, simulation results show that the load capacity of the nanoscale bearing does not increase monotonically with the operation speed. This is attributed to the change of the local shear rate, which will decrease with the shear velocity of the bearing as the shear velocity exceeds a critical value, i.e., the local shear rate has an upper limit. A simple nonlinear dynamic model indicates that the momentum exchange between the liquid and the solid wall is reduced with the shear velocity when the shear velocity is above a critical value. The weak momentum exchange results in a decrease of the local shear rate, which in turn causes a sharp increase of the slip length.

  18. Comminution of Ceramic Materials Under High-Shear Dynamic Compaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homel, Michael; Loiseau, Jason; Higgins, Andrew; Herbold, Eric; Hogan, Jamie

    The post-failure ``granular flow'' response of high-strength lightweight ceramics has important implications on the materials' effectiveness for ballistic protection. We study the dynamic compaction and shear flow of ceramic fragments and powders using computational and experimental analysis of a collapsing thick-walled cylinder geometry. Using newly developed tools for mesoscale simulation of brittle materials, we study the effect of fracture, comminution, shear-enhanced dilatation, and frictional contact on the continuum compaction response. Simulations are directly validated through particle Doppler velocimetry measurements at the inner surface of the cylindrical powder bed. We characterize the size distribution and morphologies of the initial and compacted material fragments to both validate the computational model and to elucidate the dominant failure processes. A portion of this work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC. LLNL-ABS-678862.

  19. Modeling the high-frequency complex modulus of silicone rubber using standing Lamb waves and an inverse finite element method.

    PubMed

    Jonsson, Ulf; Lindahl, Olof; Andersson, Britt

    2014-12-01

    To gain an understanding of the high-frequency elastic properties of silicone rubber, a finite element model of a cylindrical piezoelectric element, in contact with a silicone rubber disk, was constructed. The frequency-dependent elastic modulus of the silicone rubber was modeled by a fourparameter fractional derivative viscoelastic model in the 100 to 250 kHz frequency range. The calculations were carried out in the range of the first radial resonance frequency of the sensor. At the resonance, the hyperelastic effect of the silicone rubber was modeled by a hyperelastic compensating function. The calculated response was matched to the measured response by using the transitional peaks in the impedance spectrum that originates from the switching of standing Lamb wave modes in the silicone rubber. To validate the results, the impedance responses of three 5-mm-thick silicone rubber disks, with different radial lengths, were measured. The calculated and measured transitional frequencies have been compared in detail. The comparison showed very good agreement, with average relative differences of 0.7%, 0.6%, and 0.7% for the silicone rubber samples with radial lengths of 38.0, 21.4, and 11.0 mm, respectively. The average complex elastic moduli of the samples were (0.97 + 0.009i) GPa at 100 kHz and (0.97 + 0.005i) GPa at 250 kHz.

  20. Low power consumption high speed CMOS dual-modulus 15/16 prescaler for optical and wireless communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hui-Min; Zhang, Xiao-Xing; Dai, Yu-Jie; Lv, Ying-Jie

    2011-09-01

    Frequency synthesizer is an important part of optical and wireless communication system. Low power comsumption prescaler is one of the most critical unit of frequency synthesizer. For the frequency divider, it must be programmable for channel selection in multi-channel communication systems. A dual-modulus prescaler (DMP) is needed to provide variable division ratios. DMP is considered as a critical power dissipative block since it always operates at full speed. This paper introduces a high speed and low power complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) 15/16 DMP based on true single-phase-clock (TSPC) and transmission gates (TGs) cell. A conventional TSPC is optimized in terms of devices size, and it is resimulated. The TSPC is used in the synchronous and asynchronous counter. TGs are used in the control logic. The DMP circuit is implemented in 0.18 μm CMOS process. The simulation results are provided. The results show wide operating frequency range from 7.143 MHz to 4.76 GHz and it comsumes 3.625 mW under 1.8 V power supply voltage at 4.76 GHz.

  1. The high-energy-density counterpropagating shear experiment and turbulent self-heating

    SciTech Connect

    Doss, F. W.; Fincke, J. R.; Loomis, E. N.; Welser-Sherrill, L.; Flippo, K. A.

    2013-12-06

    The counterpropagating shear experiment has previously demonstrated the ability to create regions of shockdriven shear, balanced symmetrically in pressure and experiencing minimal net drift. This allows for the creation of a high-Mach-number high-energy-density shear environment. New data from the counterpropagating shear campaign is presented, and both hydrocode modeling and theoretical analysis in the context of a Reynolds-averaged-Navier-Stokes model suggest turbulent dissipation of energy from the supersonic flow bounding the layer is a significant driver in its expansion. A theoretical minimum shear flow Mach number threshold is suggested for substantial thermal-turbulence coupling.

  2. Monitoring high-shear granulation using sound and vibration measurements.

    PubMed

    Briens, L; Daniher, D; Tallevi, A

    2007-02-22

    Sound and vibration measurements were investigated as monitoring methods for high-shear granulation. Five microphones and one accelerometer were placed at different locations on a 10 and a 25 l granulator and compared to find the optimum location and the effect of scale. The granulation process could be monitored using the mean frequency and root mean square sound pressure levels from acoustic emissions measured using a microphone in the filtered air exhaust of the granulators. These acoustic monitoring methods were successful for both the 10 and the 25 l granulation scales. The granulation phases, however, were more clearly defined for the larger scale granulation. The root mean square acceleration level from vibration measurements was also able to monitor the granulation, but only for the larger 25 l granulator.

  3. High spin spectroscopy and shears mechanism in {sup 107}In

    SciTech Connect

    Negi, D.; Mohanto, G.; Kumar, R.; Singh, R. P.; Muralithar, S.; Bhowmik, R. K.; Trivedi, T.; Dhal, A.; Kumar, S.; Kumar, V.; Roy, S.; Raju, M. K.; Appannababu, S.; Kaur, J.; Bhati, A. K.; Sinha, R. K.; Pancholi, S. C.

    2010-05-15

    High spin states of {sup 107}In have been investigated using the reaction {sup 94}Mo({sup 16}O,p2n){sup 107}In at a beam energy of 70 MeV. A total of 62 new gamma transitions have been placed in the level scheme and several DELTAI=1 sequences and one DELTAI=2 sequence have been found. Lifetime measurements using the Doppler-shift attenuation method (DSAM) have been carried out for band states of DELTAI=1 and DELTAI=2. A decreasing trend of B(M1) strengths with increasing spin deduced for the DELTAI=1 band indicates the presence of a shears mechanism. The experimental data for this band are compared with the tilted axis cranking (TAC) calculations. The DELTAI=2 band has been found to be a deformed band with beta{sub 2}approx0.2.

  4. Hexagonal-structured ε-NbN: ultra-incompressibility, high shear rigidity, and a possible hard superconducting material

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Yongtao; Wang, Xuebing; Chen, Ting; Li, Xuefei; Qi, Xintong; Welch, David; Zhu, Pinwen; Liu, Bingbing; Cui, Tian; Li, Baosheng

    2015-01-01

    Exploring the structural stability and elasticity of hexagonal ε-NbN helps discover correlations among its physical properties for scientific and technological applications. Here, for the first time, we measured the ultra-incompressibility and high shear rigidity of polycrystalline hexagonal ε-NbN using ultrasonic interferometry and in situ X-ray diffraction, complemented with first-principles density-functional theory calculations up to 30 GPa in pressure. Using a finite strain equation of state approach, the elastic bulk and shear moduli, as well as their pressure dependences are derived from the measured velocities and densities, yielding BS0 = 373.3(15) GPa, G0 = 200.5(8) GPa, ∂BS/∂P = 3.81(3) and ∂G/∂P = 1.67(1). The hexagonal ε-NbN possesses a very high bulk modulus, rivaling that of superhard material cBN (B0 = 381.1 GPa). The high shear rigidity is comparable to that for superhard γ-B (G0 = 227.2 GPa). We found that the crystal structure of transition-metal nitrides and the outmost electrons of the corresponding metals may dominate their pressure dependences in bulk and shear moduli. In addition, the elastic moduli, Vickers hardness, Debye temperature, melting temperature and a possible superconductivity of hexagonal ε-NbN all increase with pressures, suggesting its exceptional suitability for applications under extreme conditions. PMID:26028439

  5. A comparison of granules produced by high-shear and fluidized-bed granulation methods.

    PubMed

    Morin, Garett; Briens, Lauren

    2014-08-01

    Placebo granules were manufactured by both wet high-shear and fluidized-bed techniques. The granules were compared based on size, shape, surface morphology, and a variety of different flowability measurements. This comparison showed that granule formation and growth were different, with induction growth for high-shear granulation and steady growth for fluidized-bed granulation. Final granules from high-shear granulation were more spherical and dense compared with the irregular granules from fluidized-bed granulation. The high-shear granules demonstrated better overall flow properties.

  6. Numerical Modeling for Springback Predictions by Considering the Variations of Elastic Modulus in Stamping Advanced High-Strength Steels (AHSS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyunok; Kimchi, Menachem

    2011-08-01

    This paper presents a numerical modeling approach for predicting springback by considering the variations of elastic modulus on springback in stamping AHSS. Various stamping tests and finite-element method (FEM) simulation codes were used in this study. The cyclic loading-unloading tensile tests were conducted to determine the variations of elastic modulus for dual-phase (DP) 780 sheet steel. The biaxial bulge test was used to obtain plastic flow stress data. The non-linear reduction of elastic modulus for increasing the plastic strain was formulated by using the Yoshida model that was implemented in FEM simulations for springback. To understand the effects of material properties on springback, experiments were conducted with a simple geometry such as U-shape bending and the more complex geometry such as the curved flanging and S-rail stamping. Different measurement methods were used to confirm the final part geometry. Two different commercial FEM codes, LS-DYNA and DEFORM, were used to compare the experiments. The variable elastic modulus improved springback predictions in U-shape bending and curved flanging tests compared to FEM with the constant elastic modulus. However, in S-rail stamping tests, both FEM models with the isotropic hardening model showed limitations in predicting the sidewall curl of the S-rail part after springback. To consider the kinematic hardening and Bauschinger effects that result from material bending-unbending in S-rail stamping, the Yoshida model was used for FEM simulation of S-rail stamping and springback. The FEM predictions showed good improvement in correlating with experiments.

  7. High Shear Stresses under Exercise Condition Destroy Circulating Tumor Cells in a Microfluidic System

    PubMed Central

    Regmi, Sagar; Fu, Afu; Luo, Kathy Qian

    2017-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are the primary targets of cancer treatment as they cause distal metastasis. However, how CTCs response to exercise-induced high shear stress is largely unknown. To study the effects of hemodynamic microenvironment on CTCs, we designed a microfluidic circulatory system that produces exercise relevant shear stresses. We explore the effects of shear stresses on breast cancer cells with different metastatic abilities, cancer cells of ovarian, lung and leukemic origin. Three major findings were obtained. 1) High shear stress of 60 dynes/cm2 achievable during intensive exercise killed more CTCs than low shear stress of 15 dynes/cm2 present in human arteries at the resting state. 2) High shear stress caused necrosis in over 90% of CTCs within the first 4 h of circulation. More importantly, the CTCs that survived the first 4 h-circulation, underwent apoptosis during 16–24 h of post-circulation incubation. 3) Prolonged high shear stress treatment effectively reduced the viability of highly metastatic and drug resistant breast cancer cells. As high shear stress had much less damaging effects on leukemic cells mimicking the white blood cells, we propose that intensive exercise may be a good strategy for generating high shear stress that can destroy CTCs and prevent cancer metastasis. PMID:28054593

  8. Thermoplastic encapsulation of waste surrogates by high-shear mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Lageraaen, P.R.; Kalb, P.D.; Patel, B.R.

    1995-12-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has developed a robust, extrusion-based polyethylene encapsulation process applicable to a wide range of solid and aqueous low-level radioactive, hazardous and mixed wastes. However, due to the broad range of physical and chemical properties of waste materials, pretreatment of these wastes is often required to make them amenable to processing with polyethylene. As part of the scope of work identified in FY95 {open_quotes}Removal and Encapsulation of Heavy Metals from Ground Water,{close_quotes} EPA SERDP No. 387, that specifies a review of potential thermoplastic processing techniques, and in order to investigate possible pretreatment alternatives, BNL conducted a vendor test of the Draiswerke Gelimat (thermokinetic) mixer on April 25, 1995 at their test facility in Mahwah, NJ. The Gelimat is a batch operated, high-shear, high-intensity fluxing mixer that is often used for mixing various materials and specifically in the plastics industry for compounding additives such as stabilizers and/or colorants with polymers.

  9. Review on Joint Shear Strength of Nano-Silver Paste and Its Long-Term High Temperature Reliability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khazaka, R.; Mendizabal, L.; Henry, D.

    2014-07-01

    Soldering has been the main die attach technology for several decades. Recently, in order to meet the high temperature electronic requirements (high temperature-operating SiC and GaN devices) as well as the health recommendations (replacing the toxic lead present in common solder alloys with lead-free alternatives), several new attach technologies have been developed. Among others, the sintering of nano-silver particles seems to be one of the most interesting choices, and has been extensively investigated during recent years. The emergence of this technology is mainly due to the desired high electrical and high thermal conductivities of the sintered joint, its low elastic modulus offering a good thermo-mechanical reliability, its low process temperature, and its high operating temperature. In this paper, a review of parameters affecting the initial shear strength of the sintered silver joint will be summarized as well as the high temperature long-term reliability issues. The sintering cycle (bonding pressure, bonding temperature, sintering dwell time, heating rate, and the sintering atmosphere), the joint size, and the attached materials properties (nature, roughness), are found to closely affect the initially measured shear strength of the joint. The long-term reliability of the joint has been shown to suffer initially from three phenomena: the silver electro-migration, the decrease of shear strength under harsh thermo-mechanical stresses, and the swelling of the sintered layer. While the latter phenomenon is observed during the storage at temperatures above 350°C, the electro-migration and thermo-mechanical stresses can influence the package reliability at temperatures as low as 250°C. However, some suggested precautions during the module fabrication can lead to the minimizing of the effects of these phenomena and the achievem a more reliable joint.

  10. The kinetics of crystallization of molten binary and ternary oxide systems and their application to the origination of high modulus glass fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bacon, J. F.

    1971-01-01

    Emphasis on the consideration of glass formation on a kinetic process made it possible to think of glass compositions different from those normally employed in the manufacture of glass fibers. Approximately 450 new glass compositions were prepared and three dozen of these compositions have values for Young's modulus measured on bulk specimens greater than nineteen million pounds per square inch. Of the new glasses about a hundred could be drawn into fibers by mechanical methods at high speeds. The fiber which has a Young's modulus measured on the fiber of 18.6 million pounds per square inch and has been prepared in quantity as a monofilament (to date more than 150 million lineal feet of 0.2 to 0.4 mil fiber have been produced). This fiber has also been successfully incorporated both in epoxy and polyimide matrices. The epoxy resin composite has shown a modulus forty percent better than that achievable using the most common grade of competitive glass fiber, and twenty percent better than that obtainable with the best available grade of competitive glass fiber. Other glass fibers of even higher modulus have been developed.

  11. Anomalous Shear Properties of Coesite at High Pressure and Implications for the X-discontinuity in the Earth's Upper Mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, T.; Gwanmesia, G. D.; Wang, X.; Zou, Y.; Liebermann, R. C.; Michaut, C.; Li, B.

    2013-12-01

    The X-discontinuity (250-350km) in the upper mantle has been revealed under some continental or oceanic plates by a number of seismic studies, at which depth the P and S wave velocities increase by about 2%. One possible cause for this discontinuity, as suggested in previous studies, is the coesite-stishovite phase transition. Although the compressional behavior of coesite was determined by a previous single crystal study, its shear properties at high pressure have not yet been assessed experimentally. In this study, we conducted ultrasonic interferometry measurements on polycrystalline coesite up to 12.5GPa at ambient temperature. The sample was hot-pressed at 6.5GPa and 920°C and confirmed to be single phased by X-ray diffraction. We find that while the P wave velocities of coesite continuously increase with pressure, the S wave velocities exhibit a monotonic decrease to the peak pressure of the current experiment followed by a reversible recovery upon release of pressure. By fitting to finite strain equations, the elastic bulk and shear moduli and their pressure derivatives are precisely determined using the data collected during compression and decompression. Comparing with stishovite, coesite has lower pressure derivatives for both the bulk and shear moduli that is especially pronounced for the shear modulus. The volume-pressure relations obtained in the current study are in excellent agreement with those from single crystal compression of coesite. These results indicate that the velocity and impedance contrasts of the coesite-stishovite transition will increase with pressure, and its seismic signatures will be greatly enhanced at the depths of the X-discontinuity.

  12. Effect of orientation and targeted extracellular matrix degradation on the shear mechanical properties of the annulus fibrosus.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Nathan T; Smith, Lachlan J; Han, Woojin M; Morelli, Jeffrey; Yoder, Jonathon H; Elliott, Dawn M

    2011-11-01

    The intervertebral disc experiences combinations of compression, torsion, and bending that subject the disc substructures, particularly the annulus fibrosus (AF), to multidirectional loads and deformations. Combined tensile and shear loading is a particularly important loading paradigm, as compressive loads place the AF in circumferential hoop tension, and spine torsion or bending induces AF shear. Yet the anisotropy of AF mechanical properties in shear, as well as important structure-function mechanisms governing this response, are not well-understood. The objective of this study, therefore, was to investigate the effects of tissue orientation and enzymatic degradation of glycosaminoglycan (GAG) and elastin on AF shear mechanical properties. Significant anisotropy was found: the circumferential shear modulus, Gθz, was an order of magnitude greater than the radial shear modulus, Grθ. In the circumferential direction, prestrain significantly increased the shear modulus, suggesting an important role for collagen fiber stretch in shear properties for this orientation. While not significant and highly variable, ChABC treatment to remove GAG increased the circumferential shear modulus compared to PBS control (p=0.15). Together with the established literature for tensile loading of fiber-reinforced GAG-rich tissues, the trends for changes in shear modulus with ChABC treatment reflect complex, structure-function relationships between GAG and collagen that potentially occur over several hierarchical scales. Elastase digestion did not significantly affect shear modulus with respect to PBS control; further contributing to the notion that circumferential shear modulus is dominated by collagen fiber stretch. The results of this study highlight the complexity of the structure-function relationships that govern the mechanical response of the AF in radial and circumferential shear, and provide new and more accurate data for the validation of material models and tissue

  13. Compositional evolution of high-temperature sheared lherzolite PHN 1611

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D. ); Griffin, W.L.; Ryan, C.G. )

    1993-02-01

    The evolution of fertile' mantle has been studied by proton microprobe (PIXE) analysis of minerals of a high-temperature sheared xenolith from the Thaba Putsoa kimerlite in Lesotho, southern Africa. Analyzed elements include Ni, Cu, Zn, Ga, Sr, Y, and Zr. Garnets are homogeneous in Ni and Zn but have rims enriched relative to cores in Zr and Y. Compositions of olivine neoblasts define intergranular gradients of Fe, Zn, and Ni; Fe-rich olivine is relatively Zn-rich but Ni-poore. Although individual clinopyroxene grains are nearly homogeneous, clinopyroxene associated with Fe-rich olivine is relatively Fe- and Zn-rich but Sr- and Cr-poor. The trace-element abundances and compositional gradients constrain the processes of periodotite enrichment and the thermal history. Enrichment of Zr, Y, and Fe in garnet rims documents infiltration of a silica-undersaturated melt. The Fe-rich olivine compositions and the Zn and Fe gradients establish that the xenolith was sampled from near a melt conduit. Mechanical mixing of inhomogeneous peridotite and melt infiltration may have been concurrent. Because garnets appear homogeneous in Ni, mantle temperature changes affecting PHN 1611 occurred before or over a longer period than the melt infiltration. Measured and calculated abundances of many incompatible trace elements in the rock are similar to those proposed for primitive mantle. Calculated chondrite-normalized abundances of Sr, Ti, Zr, and Y are like those of appropriate REE. Enrichment processes in PHN 1611 proceeded at unusually high recorded temperature and in the apparent absence of minor phases common in lower-temperature metasomatized rocks, but similar processes may be common. In particular, mechanical mixing near mantle dikes may frequently occur. These enrichment mechanisms may produce xenolith compositions that resemble some proposed for primitive mantle but that have different implications for mantle evolution. 61 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. FE Analysis on Shear Deformation for Asymmetrically Hot-Rolled High-Manganese Steel Strip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sui, Feng-Li; Wang, Xin; Li, Chang-Sheng; Zhao, Jun

    2016-11-01

    Shear deformation along the longitudinal cross section of the high-manganese steel strip has been analyzed in hot asymmetrical rolling process using rigid-plastic finite element model. The friction coefficient between the rolls and the strip surfaces, the diameter of the work rolls, the speed ratio for the lower/upper rolls, the reduction rate and the initial temperature of the billet were all taken into account. Influence of these process parameters on the shear stress, the shear strain and the related shear strain energy in the center layer of the hot-rolled strip was analyzed. It is indicated that increasing the speed ratio, the reduction rate and the work roll diameter is an effective way to accumulate more shear strain energy in the strip center. A mathematical model reflecting the relationship between the shear strain energy and the process parameters has been established.

  15. Transition in high-speed free shear layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demetriades, A.

    1990-01-01

    The laminar free-shear layers considered in the study are formed by combinations of the velocities and momentum thicknesses of two adjacent parallel flows. Transition in wakes, pure free-shear layers of the Chapman type, and separate and partition flows are discussed. A stability-transition connection is emphasized, and it is suggested that a recurring deficiency in some stability calculations is the use of overly simplified laminar profiles. It is also noted that physical principles can be used for estimating the transition location or providing the factors affecting it. One such approach, a threshold theory, is discussed by way of example.

  16. Exact two-dimensional zonal wavefront reconstruction with high spatial resolution in lateral shearing interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Fengzhao; Li, Jie; Wang, Xiangzhao; Bu, Yang

    2016-05-01

    A novel zonal method is proposed for exact discrete reconstruction of a two-dimensional wavefront with high spatial resolution for lateral shearing interferometry. Four difference wavefronts measured in the x and y shear directions are required. Each of the two shear directions is measured twice with different shear amounts. The shear amounts of the second measurements of the x and y directions are Sx+1 pixels and Sy+1 pixels, where Sx pixels and Sy pixels are the shear amounts of the first measurements in the x and y directions, respectively. The shear amount in each direction can be chosen freely, provided that it is below a maximum value determined by the pupil shape and the number of samples N in that direction; thus, the choices are not limited by the more stringent condition required by previous methods, namely, that the shear amounts must be divisors of N. This method can exactly reconstruct any wavefront at evaluation points up to an arbitrary constant if the data is noiseless, and high spatial resolution can be achieved even with large shear amounts. The method is applicable not only to square pupils, but also to general pupil shapes if a sufficient number of Gerchberg iterations are employed. In this study, the validity and capability of the method were confirmed by numerical experiments. In addition, the experiments demonstrated that the method is stable with respect to noise in the difference wavefronts.

  17. High frequency ultrasound measurements on a translucent thin bioglass, based on Si, Ca, Na: Study of the distribution of elastic modulus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachar, Ahmed; Nassar, Georges; Mercier, Cyrille; Bouchart, Franck; Follet, Claudine; Amrousse, Rachid; Kazan, Michel

    2013-11-01

    In this work, an ultrasonic high frequency focused sensor (100 MHz) has been used to study the variation of the elastic modulus of a thin bioglass element, based on Si, Ca, Na. In fact, physical functionalization of materials may play a role in defining the properties of interfaces of the surface depending of the physico-chemical characteristics of the materials used. The study is restricted to the characterization by an ultrasonic method of the elastic modulus profile of the bioglass element during the final phase of processing: before and after thermal treatment. The initial objective is to produce an ultrasonic map of the element under investigation, such as a substrate, prior to further tests involving adhesion of biological cells in order to try to understand the relationship between the distribution of the measured mechanical properties and the adhesion phenomenon.

  18. Structure of Highly Sheared Tropical Storm Chantal during CAMEX-4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heymsfield, G. M.; Halverson, J.; Ritchie, E.; Simpson, Joanne; Molinari, J.; Tian, L.

    2006-01-01

    Tropical Storm Chantal during August 2001 was a storm that failed to intensify over the few days prior to making landfall on the Yucatan Peninsula. An observational study of Tropical Storm Chantal is presented using a diverse dataset including remote and in situ measurements from the NASA ER-2 and DC-8 and the NOAA WP-3D N42RF aircraft and satellite. The authors discuss the storm structure from the larger-scale environment down to the convective scale. Large vertical shear (850-200-hPa shear magnitude range 8-15 m/s) plays a very important role in preventing Chantal from intensifying. The storm had a poorly defined vortex that only extended up to 5-6-km altitude, and an adjacent intense convective region that comprised a mesoscale convective system (MCS). The entire low-level circulation center was in the rain-free western side of the storm, about 80 km to the west-southwest of the MCS. The MCS appears to have been primarily the result of intense convergence between large-scale, low-level easterly flow with embedded downdrafts, and the cyclonic vortex flow. The individual cells in the MCS such as cell 2 during the period of the observations were extremely intense, with reflectivity core diameters of 10 km and peak updrafts exceeding 20 m/s. Associated with this MCS were two broad subsidence (warm) regions, both of which had portions over the vortex. The first layer near 700 hPa was directly above the vortex and covered most of it. The second layer near 500 hPa was along the forward and right flanks of cell 2 and undercut the anvil divergence region above. There was not much resemblance of these subsidence layers to typical upper-level warm cores in hurricanes that are necessary to support strong surface winds and a low central pressure. The observations are compared to previous studies of weakly sheared storms and modeling studies of shear effects and intensification. The configuration of the convective updrafts, low-level circulation, and lack of vertical

  19. Nanometric Gouge in High-Speed Shearing Experiments: Superplasticity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, H. W.; Lockner, D. A.; Bozhilov, K. N.; Maddon, A.; Beeler, N. M.; Reches, Z.

    2010-12-01

    High-speed shearing experiments on solid rock samples typically generate a gouge with sub-micron grain size that appears to control the frictional resistance at velocities approaching 1 m/s (Reches & Lockner, Nature, in press). We conducted experiments on Kasota dolomite samples and observed profound weakening (friction drops from ~0.8 to ~ 0.2) under earthquake conditions (up to slip-velocity ~ 0.95 m/s and normal stress 28.4 MPa). During these runs the experimental fault had T ≥ 800°C and developed a shining, dark surface. We report here analysis of such a surface with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). SEM analysis shows a slickensided gouge made up of particles all ≤ 50nm with a large fraction ≤ 20nm. The spacing of the slickenside striations is less than 1 µm. Over large areas of the slickensided surface the nanometric gouge has been replaced by an undeformed, interlocking crystalline pavement of 100-300 nm grain size. Qualitative chemical analysis of this pavement surface by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy reveals only a weak carbon peak, suggesting that the dolomite has been decarbonated. The development of a “pavement” of grain size ~200 nm in our experiments is remarkably similar to the observations of Han et al. (JGR, 2010, Fig. 14(d)). However, their experiments either did not develop such a nanometric gouge or it was completely replaced by the coarser pavement. These present observations of nanometric gouge that recrystallizes during the short time interval of elevated temperature following termination of deformation are reminiscent of the nanometric “gouge” produced in very high-pressure experiments (1-14 GPa) that have failed by transformation-induced faulting during the olivine-spinel transformation (Green and Burnley, Nature, 1989; Green et al., Nature, 1990). In the high-pressure experiments, the gouge consists of a nanocrystalline aggregate of the spinel phase that flowed at very high strain

  20. Shear wave measurements in shock-induced, high-pressure phases

    SciTech Connect

    Aidun, J.B.

    1993-01-01

    Structural phase transformations under shock loading are of considerable interest for understanding the response of solids under nonhydrostatic stresses and at high strain-rates. Examining shock-induced transformations from continuum level measurements is fundamentally constrained by the inability to directly identify microscopic processes, and also by the limited number of material properties that can be directly measured. ne latter limitation can be reduced by measuring both shear and compression waves using Lagrangian gauges in combined, compression and shear loading. The shear wave serves as an important, real-time probe of the shocked state and unloading response. Using results from a recent study of CaCO[sub 3], the unique information obtained from the shear wave speed and the detailed structure of the shear wave are shown to be useful for distinguishing the effects of phase transformations from yielding, as well as in characterizing the high-pressure phases and the yielding process under shock loading.

  1. Shear wave measurements in shock-induced, high-pressure phases

    SciTech Connect

    Aidun, J.B.

    1993-07-01

    Structural phase transformations under shock loading are of considerable interest for understanding the response of solids under nonhydrostatic stresses and at high strain-rates. Examining shock-induced transformations from continuum level measurements is fundamentally constrained by the inability to directly identify microscopic processes, and also by the limited number of material properties that can be directly measured. ne latter limitation can be reduced by measuring both shear and compression waves using Lagrangian gauges in combined, compression and shear loading. The shear wave serves as an important, real-time probe of the shocked state and unloading response. Using results from a recent study of CaCO{sub 3}, the unique information obtained from the shear wave speed and the detailed structure of the shear wave are shown to be useful for distinguishing the effects of phase transformations from yielding, as well as in characterizing the high-pressure phases and the yielding process under shock loading.

  2. Extrusion granulation and high shear granulation of different grades of lactose and highly dosed drugs: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Keleb, E I; Vermeire, A; Vervaet, C; Remon, Jean Paul

    2004-07-01

    Formulations containing different lactose grades, paracetamol, and cimetidine were granulated by extrusion granulation and high shear granulation. Granules were evaluated for yield, friability, and compressibility. Tablets were prepared from those granules and evaluated for tensile strength, friability, disintegration time, and dissolution. The different lactose grades had an important effect on the extrusion granulation process. Particle size and morphology affected powder feeding and power consumption, but had only a minor influence on the granule and tablet properties obtained by extrusion granulation. In contrast, the lactose grades had a major influence on the granule properties obtained by high shear granulation. Addition of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) was required to process pure paracetamol and cimetidine by high shear granulation, whereas it was feasible to granulate these drugs without PVP by extrusion granulation. Granules prepared by extrusion granulation exhibited a higher yield and a lower friability than those produced by high shear granulation. Paracetamol and cimetidine tablets compressed from granules prepared by extrusion granulation showed a higher tensile strength, lower friability, and lower disintegration time than those prepared from granules produced by high shear granulation. Paracetamol tablets obtained via extrusion granulation exhibited faster dissolution than those obtained via high shear granulation. For all lactose grades studied, extrusion granulation resulted in superior granule and tablet properties in comparison with those obtained by high shear granulation. These results indicate that extrusion granulation is more efficient than high shear granulation.

  3. Enzymatic hydrolysis combined with mechanical shearing and high-pressure homogenization for nanoscale cellulose fibrils and strong gels.

    PubMed

    Pääkkö, M; Ankerfors, M; Kosonen, H; Nykänen, A; Ahola, S; Osterberg, M; Ruokolainen, J; Laine, J; Larsson, P T; Ikkala, O; Lindström, T

    2007-06-01

    Toward exploiting the attractive mechanical properties of cellulose I nanoelements, a novel route is demonstrated, which combines enzymatic hydrolysis and mechanical shearing. Previously, an aggressive acid hydrolysis and sonication of cellulose I containing fibers was shown to lead to a network of weakly hydrogen-bonded rodlike cellulose elements typically with a low aspect ratio. On the other hand, high mechanical shearing resulted in longer and entangled nanoscale cellulose elements leading to stronger networks and gels. Nevertheless, a widespread use of the latter concept has been hindered because of lack of feasible methods of preparation, suggesting a combination of mild hydrolysis and shearing to disintegrate cellulose I containing fibers into high aspect ratio cellulose I nanoscale elements. In this work, mild enzymatic hydrolysis has been introduced and combined with mechanical shearing and a high-pressure homogenization, leading to a controlled fibrillation down to nanoscale and a network of long and highly entangled cellulose I elements. The resulting strong aqueous gels exhibit more than 5 orders of magnitude tunable storage modulus G' upon changing the concentration. Cryotransmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and cross-polarization/magic-angle spinning (CP/MAS) 13C NMR suggest that the cellulose I structural elements obtained are dominated by two fractions, one with lateral dimension of 5-6 nm and one with lateral dimensions of about 10-20 nm. The thicker diameter regions may act as the junction zones for the networks. The resulting material will herein be referred to as MFC (microfibrillated cellulose). Dynamical rheology showed that the aqueous suspensions behaved as gels in the whole investigated concentration range 0.125-5.9% w/w, G' ranging from 1.5 Pa to 105 Pa. The maximum G' was high, about 2 orders of magnitude larger than typically observed for the corresponding nonentangled low aspect ratio cellulose I gels, and G' scales

  4. High speed all optical shear wave imaging optical coherence elastography (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Shaozhen; Hsieh, Bao-Yu; Wei, Wei; Shen, Tueng; O'Donnell, Matthew; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2016-03-01

    Optical Coherence Elastography (OCE) is a non-invasive testing modality that maps the mechanical property of soft tissues with high sensitivity and spatial resolution using phase-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PhS-OCT). Shear wave OCE (SW-OCE) is a leading technique that relies on the speed of propagating shear waves to provide a quantitative elastography. Previous shear wave imaging OCT techniques are based on repeated M-B scans, which have several drawbacks such as long acquisition time and repeated wave stimulations. Recent developments of Fourier domain mode-locked high-speed swept-source OCT system has enabled enough speed to perform KHz B-scan rate OCT imaging. Here we propose ultra-high speed, single shot shear wave imaging to capture single-shot transient shear wave propagation to perform SW-OCE. The frame rate of shear wave imaging is 16 kHz, at A-line rate of ~1.62 MHz, which allows the detection of high-frequency shear wave of up to 8 kHz. The shear wave is generated photothermal-acoustically, by ultra-violet pulsed laser, which requires no contact to OCE subjects, while launching high frequency shear waves that carries rich localized elasticity information. The image acquisition and processing can be performed at video-rate, which enables real-time 3D elastography. SW-OCE measurements are demonstrated on tissue-mimicking phantoms and porcine ocular tissue. This approach opens up the feasibility to perform real-time 3D SW-OCE in clinical applications, to obtain high-resolution localized quantitative measurement of tissue biomechanical property.

  5. High-Sensitivity Optical Pulse Characterization Using Sagnac Electro-Optic Spectral Shearing Interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Dorrer, C.; Bromage, J.

    2010-05-04

    An electro-optic spectral shearing interferometer for high-sensitivity optical pulse characterization is described. Two replicas of the test pulse counterpropagate in a Sagnac interferometer with orthogonal polarization states, resulting in two relatively sheared copolarized replicas after temporal phase modulation. The polarization interferometer is intrinsically stable, and its birefringence sets the delay between interfering replicas to reduce the spectrometer resolution requirement. Experimental implementations demonstrate real-time pulse characterization at average powers as low as 1 nWwith spectral shears as high as 280 GHz.

  6. High temperature and deformation field measurements at the vicinity of dynamically growing shear bands

    SciTech Connect

    Rosakis, A.J.; Ravichandran, G.; Zhou, M.

    1995-12-31

    The phenomenon of dynamic initiation and propagation of adiabatic shear bands is experimentally and numerically investigated. Pre-notched metal plates are subjected to asymmetric impact load histories (dynamic mode-II loading). Dynamic shear bands emanate from the notch tip and propagate rapidly in a direction nearly parallel to the direction of the impact. Real time temperature histories along a line intersecting and perpendicular to the shear band paths are recorded by means of a high-speed infrared detector system. The materials studied are C-300 (a maraging steel) and Ti - 6 Al - 4 V alloy. Experiments show that the peak temperatures inside the propagating shear bands are approaching 90% of the melting point for C-300 and are significantly lower for the titanium alloy (up to 600{degrees}C). Additionally, measured distances of shear band propagation indicate stronger resistance to shear banding by the Ti - 6Al - 4V alloy. Deformation fields around the propagating shear bands are recorded using high-speed photography. Shear band speeds are found to strongly depend on impact velocities, and are as high as 1200 m/s for C-300 steels. Finite Element simulations of the experiments are carried out under the context of plane strain, considering finite deformations, inertia, heat conduction, thermal softening, strain hardening and strain-rate hardening. In the simulations, the shear band propagation is assumed to be governed by a critical plastic strain criterion. The results are compared with experimental measurements obtained using the high-speed infrared detectors and high-speed photography.

  7. Strain localization in direct shear experiments on Solnhofen limestone at high temperature Effects of transpression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llana-Fúnez, Sergio; Rutter, Ernest H.

    2008-11-01

    Some features of natural shear zones formed under non-coaxial strain geometries, including some effects of transpression, can be simulated in the laboratory by using the direct shear experimental configuration. Slices of ˜1 mm thick Solnhofen limestone were deformed in direct shear between two stronger forcing blocks of cores of Tennessee sandstone pre-cut at 45° to the cylinder axis. Experiments were run dry at 600 °C, 200 MPa confining pressure and bulk shear strain rates of ˜5 × 10 -3 s -1, at which conditions Solnhofen limestone deformed by dislocation creep with a stress exponent of 4.7. When loaded, strain concentrates in the limestone band, producing non-coaxial deformation as one pre-cut block slides past the other. The orientation and intensity of the shape fabric developed in calcite grains indicate that strain is heterogeneous across the specimen, with the formation of two high-strain shear bands close to the limestone-sandstone interface, separated by a central zone of low strain. Crystallographic preferred orientation patterns in the calcite grains measured by electron backscatter diffraction are consistent with a switch in deformation geometry from flattening-dominated in the middle of the specimen towards shear-dominated in the high-strain bands. From tests on thin slices of the same material compressed axisymmetrically (without shearing) normal to the layer, heterogeneous thinning of the slice develops, from a maximum in the centre of the slice to zero at the edges. The formation of the paired shear zones observed in the sheared experiments is interpreted in terms of superposed strain fields, with shearing in the centre of the slice being inhibited by the strain hardening that accompanies the higher flattening strain in the centre of the specimen.

  8. Prediction of the Viscoelastic Bulk Modulus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jiaxi; Simon, Sindee

    2010-03-01

    The bulk and shear viscoelastic responses for several materials appear to arise from the same molecular mechanisms at short times, i.e., Andrade creep where the KWW beta parameter is approximately 0.3. If this is indeed the case, prediction and placement of the bulk viscoelastic response can be made simply by knowing the limiting elastic and rubbery bulk moduli and the viscoelastic shear response. The proposed methodology, which uses only easily measured functions, is considerably less time- and labor-intensive than direct measurement of the viscoelastic bulk modulus. Here we investigate this hypothesis and compare the calculated viscoelastic bulk responses for several materials to existing data in the literature.

  9. Ultrasonic shear velocities of MgSiO3-perovskite at high pressure and temperature and lower mantle composition

    SciTech Connect

    Sinelnikov,Y.; Chen, G.; Neuville, D.; Liebermann, R.

    1998-01-01

    Ultrasonic interferometric measurements of the shear elastic properties of MgSiO{sub 3} perovskite were conducted on three polycrystalline specimens at conditions up to pressures of 8 gigapascals and temperatures of 800 kelvin. The acoustic measurements produced the pressure (P) and temperature (T) derivatives of the shear modulus (G), namely ({partial_derivative}G/{partial_derivative}P){sub T} = 1.8 {+-} 0.4 and ({partial_derivative}G/{partial_derivative}T){sub P} = 2.9 {+-} 0.3 x 10{sup 2} gigapascals per kelvin. Combining these derivatives with the derivatives that were measured for the bulk modulus and thermal expansion of MgSiO{sub 3} perovskite provided data that suggest lower mantle compositions between pyrolite and C1 carbonaceous chondrite and a lower mantle potential temperature of 1500 {+-} 200 kelvin.

  10. Individual boron nanowire has ultra-high specific Young's modulus and fracture strength as revealed by in situ transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fei; Tang, Dai-Ming; Gan, Haibo; Mo, Xiaoshu; Chen, Jun; Deng, Shaozhi; Xu, Ningsheng; Bando, Yoshio; Golberg, Dmitri

    2013-11-26

    Boron nanowires (BNWs) may have potential applications as reinforcing materials because B fibers are widely known for their excellent mechanical performance. However until now, there have been only few reports on the mechanical properties of individual BNW, and in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) investigations shining a light on their fracture mechanism have not been performed. In this paper, we applied in situ high-resolution TEM (HRTEM) technique to study the mechanical properties of individual BNWs using three loading schemes. The mean fracture strength and the maximum strain of individual BNWs were measured to be 10.4 GPa and 4.1%, respectively, during the tensile tests. And the averaged Young's modulus was calculated to be 308.2 GPa under tensile and compression tests. Bending experiments for the first time performed on individual BNWs revealed that their maximum bending strain could reach 9.9% and their ultimate bending stress arrived at 36.2 GPa. These figures are much higher than those of Si and ZnO nanowires known for their high bending strength. Moreover, the BNWs exhibited very high specific fracture strength (3.9 (GPa·cm(3))/g) and specific elastic modulus (130.6 (GPa·cm(3))/g), which are several dozens of times larger compared to many nanostructures known for their superb mechanical behaviors. At last, the effect of surface oxide layer on the Young's modulus, fracture strength and maximum bending strength of individual BNWs was elucidated to extract their intrinsic mechanical parameters using calculated corrections. All experimental results suggest that the present BNW are a bright promise as lightweight reinforcing fillers.

  11. Fourier Modulus Image Construction.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-05-01

    Fourier Optics: the Encoding of Infor- mation by Complex Zeroes," Optica Acta 26, 1139-46 (1979). 13. Y.M. Bruck and L.(. Sodin, "On the Ambiguity of the...0002 UNCLASSIFIED RADC-TR-81-63 NL -- END LEVEL# " DC-TR-61143 Finul Technical Relort 0 FOURIER MODULUS IMAGE "N CONSTRUCTION C Environmental Research... FOURIER MODULUS IMAGE CONSTRUCTION 7Sep 9--3 Sep 8 _ N/A 7. AUTHOR(s) N . James E Fienup. 9. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME AND ADDRESS 10. PROGRAM ELEMENT

  12. Turbulence Decorrelation via Controlled Ex B Shear in High-Performance Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKee, G. R.

    2015-11-01

    Multi-scale spatiotemporal turbulence properties are significantly altered as toroidal rotation and resulting ExB shearing rate profile are systematically varied in advanced-inductive H-mode plasmas on DIII-D (βN ~ 2.7, q95=5.1). Density, electron and ion temperature profiles and dimensionless parameters (βN, q95, ν*, ρ*, and Te/Ti) are maintained nearly fixed during the rotation scan. Low-wavenumber turbulence (k⊥ρS < 1), measured with Beam Emission Spectroscopy, exhibits increased decorrelation rates (reduced eddy lifetime) as the ExB shear rises across the radial zone of maximum shearing rate (0.55 < ρ < 0 . 75), while the fluctuation amplitude undergoes little change. The poloidal wavenumber is reduced at higher shear, indicating a change in the wavenumber spectrum: eddies elongate in the direction orthogonal to shear and field. At both low and high shear, the 2D turbulence correlation function exhibits a tilted structure, consistent with flow shear. At mid-radius (ρ ~ 0.5), low-k density fluctuations show localized amplitude reduction, consistent with linear GYRO growth rates and ωExB shearing rates. Intermediate and high wavenumber fluctuations measured with Doppler Back-Scattering (k⊥ρS ~ 2.5-3.5) at ρ=0.7 and Phase Contrast Imaging (k⊥ρS > 5) exhibit decreasing amplitude at higher rotation. The energy confinement time increases from 105 ms to 150 ms as the toroidal Mach number (M=vTOR / vth , i) increases to Mo ~ 0.5, while transport decreases. TGLF calculations match the Ti profile with modest discrepancies in the Te and ne profiles. These results clarify the complex mechanisms by which ExB shear affects turbulence. Work supported in part by the US DOE under DE-FG02-08ER54999, DE-FC02-04ER54698.

  13. High spatial resolution PIV and CH-PLIF measurements of a Shear Layer Stabilized Flame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foley, Christopher; Chterev, Ianko; Seitzman, Jerry; Lieuwen, Tim

    2014-11-01

    In practical combustors, flames stabilize in thin shear layers with very high strain rates, which alter the flame burning rate - either enhancing or diminishing reaction rates, and even leading to extinction. Therefore, the bulk velocity that provides stable operation in these combustors is limited, presumably due to the associated maximum stretch rate that the flame is able to withstand. The focus of this work is to develop a deeper understanding of the interaction between flow and flame for a shear layer stabilized, premixed flame. This study consists of planar, high resolution, simultaneous PIV and CH-PLIF measurements, in a 8 x 6 mm plane with 0.11 mm and 0.16 mm PIV vector and CH-PLIF image resolution, respectively, of the flame stabilization region in a swirling jet. The hydrodynamic strain induced stretch rate along the high CH concentration layer of the flame front is calculated from these measurements. In addition, this study elucidates the unsteady behavior of the flame in the thin shear layer. The measured flame stretch is highly spatially and temporally dependent, and dominated by contributions from normal and shear strain terms of axial velocity. Although normal strain is much greater than shear, the near horizontal flame orientation results in neither strain term dominating flame stretch. Furthermore, the flame angle changes the sign of the shear strain contributions as observed experimentally, an important implication for reduced order modeling approaches.

  14. Experimental Reacting Hydrogen Shear Layer Data at High Subsonic Mach Number

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, C. T.; Marek, C. J.; Wey, C.; Wey, C. C.

    1996-01-01

    The flow in a planar shear layer of hydrogen reacting with hot air was measured with a two-component laser Doppler velocimeter (LDV) system, a schlieren system, and OH fluorescence imaging. It was compared with a similar air-to-air case without combustion. The high-speed stream's flow speed was about 390 m/s, or Mach 0.71, and the flow speed ratio was 0.34. The results showed that a shear layer with reaction grows faster than one without; both cases are within the range of data scatter presented by the established data base. The coupling between the streamwise and the cross-stream turbulence components inside the shear layers was low, and reaction only increased it slightly. However, the shear layer shifted laterally into the lower speed fuel stream, and a more organized pattern of Reynolds stress was present in the reaction shear layer, likely as a result of the formation of a larger scale structure associated with shear layer corrugation from heat release. Dynamic pressure measurements suggest that coherent flow perturbations existed inside the shear layer and that this flow became more chaotic as the flow advected downstream. Velocity and thermal variable values are listed in this report for a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) benchmark.

  15. Shallow Water Sediment Properties Derived from High-Frequency Shear and Interface Waves

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-04-10

    FREQUENCY SHEAR ONR N00014-88-C-1238 AND INTERFACE WAVES 6. AUTHOR(S) JOHN EWING, JERRY A. CARTER, GEORGE H. SUTTON AND NOEL BARSTOW 7. PERFORMING...B4. PAGES 4739--4762. APRIL 10. 1992 Shallow Water Sediment Properties Derived From High-Frequency Shear and Interface Waves JOHN EWING Woods Hole...calculating thickness. The amplitude falloff with range establishes a Q velocity gradients and penetration depths [ Nettleton . 19401 estimate of 40 in

  16. Shear shocks in fragile networks.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, Stephan; Upadhyaya, Nitin; van Opheusden, Bas; Vitelli, Vincenzo

    2013-12-24

    A minimal model for studying the mechanical properties of amorphous solids is a disordered network of point masses connected by unbreakable springs. At a critical value of its mean connectivity, such a network becomes fragile: it undergoes a rigidity transition signaled by a vanishing shear modulus and transverse sound speed. We investigate analytically and numerically the linear and nonlinear visco-elastic response of these fragile solids by probing how shear fronts propagate through them. Our approach, which we tentatively label shear front rheology, provides an alternative route to standard oscillatory rheology. In the linear regime, we observe at late times a diffusive broadening of the fronts controlled by an effective shear viscosity that diverges at the critical point. No matter how small the microscopic coefficient of dissipation, strongly disordered networks behave as if they were overdamped because energy is irreversibly leaked into diverging nonaffine fluctuations. Close to the transition, the regime of linear response becomes vanishingly small: the tiniest shear strains generate strongly nonlinear shear shock waves qualitatively different from their compressional counterparts in granular media. The inherent nonlinearities trigger an energy cascade from low to high frequency components that keep the network away from attaining the quasi-static limit. This mechanism, reminiscent of acoustic turbulence, causes a superdiffusive broadening of the shock width.

  17. Evaluation of Young’s modulus of MgB2 filaments in composite wires for the superconducting links for the high-luminosity LHC upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugano, Michinaka; Ballarino, Amalia; Bartova, Barbora; Bjoerstad, Roger; Gerardin, Alexandre; Scheuerlein, Christian

    2016-02-01

    MgB2 wire is a promising superconductor for the superconducting links for the high-luminosity upgrade of the large Hadron collider at CERN. The mechanical properties of MgB2 must be fully quantified for the cable design, and in this study, we evaluate the Young’s modulus of MgB2 filaments in wires with a practical level of critical current. The Young’s moduli of MgB2 filaments by two different processes, in situ and ex situ, were compared. Two different evaluation methods were applied to an in situ MgB2 wire, a single-fiber tensile test and a tensile test after removing Monel. In addition, the Young’s modulus of the few-micron-thick Nb-Ni reaction layer in an ex situ processed wire was evaluated using a nanoindentation testing technique to improve the accuracy of analysis based on the rule of mixtures. The Young’s moduli of the in situ and ex situ MgB2 wires were in the range of 76-97 GPa and no distinct difference depending on the fabrication process was found.

  18. Suppression of endothelial t-PA expression by prolonged high laminar shear stress

    SciTech Connect

    Ulfhammer, Erik; Carlstroem, Maria; Bergh, Niklas; Larsson, Pia; Karlsson, Lena; Jern, Sverker

    2009-02-06

    Primary hypertension is associated with an impaired capacity for acute release of endothelial tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA), which is an important local protective response to prevent thrombus extension. As hypertensive vascular remodeling potentially results in increased vascular wall shear stress, we investigated the impact of shear on regulation of t-PA. Cultured human endothelial cells were exposed to low ({<=}1.5 dyn/cm{sup 2}) or high (25 dyn/cm{sup 2}) laminar shear stress for up to 48 h in two different experimental models. Using real-time RT-PCR and ELISA, shear stress was observed to time and magnitude-dependently suppress t-PA transcript and protein secretion to approximately 30% of basal levels. Mechanistic experiments revealed reduced nuclear protein binding to the t-PA specific CRE element (EMSA) and an almost completely abrogated shear response with pharmacologic JNK inhibition. We conclude that prolonged high laminar shear stress suppresses endothelial t-PA expression and may therefore contribute to the enhanced risk of arterial thrombosis in hypertensive disease.

  19. Elastic Properties in Tension and Shear of High Strength Nonferrous Metals and Stainless Steel - Effect of Previous Deformation and Heat Treatment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mebs, R W; Mcadam, D J

    1947-01-01

    A resume is given of an investigation of the influence of plastic deformation and of annealing temperature on the tensile and shear elastic properties of high strength nonferrous metals and stainless steels in the form of rods and tubes. The data were obtained from earlier technical reports and notes, and from unpublished work in this investigation. There are also included data obtained from published and unpublished work performed on an independent investigation. The rod materials, namely, nickel, monel, inconel, copper, 13:2 Cr-Ni steel, and 18:8 Cr-Ni steel, were tested in tension; 18:8 Cr-Ni steel tubes were tested in shear, and nickel, monel, aluminum-monel, and Inconel tubes were tested in both tension and shear. There are first described experiments on the relationship between hysteresis and creep, as obtained with repeated cyclic stressing of annealed stainless steel specimens over a constant load range. These tests, which preceded the measurements of elastic properties, assisted in devising the loading time schedule used in such measurements. From corrected stress-set curves are derived the five proof stresses used as indices of elastic or yield strength. From corrected stress-strain curves are derived the secant modulus and its variation with stress. The relationship between the forms of the stress-set and stress-strain curves and the values of the properties derived is discussed. Curves of variation of proof stress and modulus with prior extension, as obtained with single rod specimens, consist in wavelike basic curves with superposed oscillations due to differences of rest interval and extension spacing; the effects of these differences are studied. Oscillations of proof stress and modulus are generally opposite in manner. The use of a series of tubular specimens corresponding to different amounts of prior extension of cold reduction gave curves almost devoid of oscillation since the effects of variation of rest interval and extension spacing were

  20. Neutrophil rolling at high shear: flattening, catch bond behavior, tethers and slings

    PubMed Central

    Sundd, Prithu; Pospieszalska, Maria K.; Ley, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    Neutrophil recruitment to sites of inflammation involves neutrophil rolling along the inflamed endothelium in the presence of shear stress imposed by blood flow. Neutrophil rolling in post-capillary venules in vivo is primarily mediated by P-selectin on the endothelium binding to P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1) constitutively expressed on neutrophils. Blood flow exerts a hydrodynamic drag on the rolling neutrophil which is partially or fully balanced by the adhesive forces generated in the P-selectin-PSGL-1 bonds. Rolling is the result of rapid formation and dissociation of P-selectin-PSGL-1 bonds at the center and rear of the rolling cell, respectively. Neutrophils roll stably on P-selectin in post-capillary venules in vivo and flow chambers in vitro at wall shear stresses greater than 6 dyn cm−2. However, the mechanisms that enable neutrophils to roll at such high shear stress are not completely understood. In vitro and in vivo studies have led to the discovery of four potential mechanisms, viz. cell flattening, catch bond behavior, membrane tethers, and slings. Rolling neutrophils undergo flattening at high shear stress, which not only increases the size of the cell footprint but also reduces the hydrodynamic drag experienced by the rolling cell. P-selectin-PSGL-1 bonds behave as catch bonds at small detachment forces and thus become stronger with increasing force. Neutrophils rolling at high shear stress form membrane tethers which can be longer than the cell diameter and promote the survival of P-selectin-PSGL-1 bonds. Finally, neutrophils rolling at high shear stress form slings, which act as cell autonomous adhesive substrates and support step-wise peeling. Tethers and slings act together and contribute to the forces balancing the hydrodynamic drag. How the synergy between the four mechanisms leads to stable rolling at high shear stress is an area that needs further investigation. PMID:23141302

  1. Measurements in the annular shear layer of high subsonic and under-expanded round jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Tong; McGuirk, James J.

    2016-01-01

    An experimental study has been undertaken to document compressibility effects in the annular shear layers of axisymmetric jets. Comparison is made of the measured flow development with the well-documented influence of compressibility in planar mixing layers. High Reynolds number (~106) and high Mach number jets issuing from a convergent nozzle at nozzle pressure ratios (NPRs) from 1.28 to 3.0 were measured using laser Doppler anemometry instrumentation. Detailed radial profile data are reported, particularly within the potential core region, for mean velocity, turbulence rms, and turbulence shear stress. For supercritical NPRs the presence of the pressure waves in the inviscid shock cell region as the jet expanded back to ambient pressure was found to exert a noticeable effect on shear layer location, causing this to shift radially outwards at high supercritical NPR conditions. After a boundary layer to free shear layer transition zone, the turbulence development displayed a short region of similarity before adjustment to near-field merged jet behaviour. Peak turbulence rms reduction due to compressibility was similar to that observed in planar layers with radial rms suppression much stronger than axial. Comparison of the compressibility-modified annular shear layer growth rate with planar shear layer data on the basis of the convective Mach number ( M C) showed notable differences; in the annular shear layer, compressibility effects began at lower M C and displayed a stronger reduction in growth. For high Mach number aerospace propulsion applications involving round jets, the current measurements represent a new data set for the calibration/validation of compressibility-affected turbulence models.

  2. High wall shear stress and high-risk plaque: an emerging concept.

    PubMed

    Eshtehardi, Parham; Brown, Adam J; Bhargava, Ankit; Costopoulos, Charis; Hung, Olivia Y; Corban, Michel T; Hosseini, Hossein; Gogas, Bill D; Giddens, Don P; Samady, Habib

    2017-01-10

    In recent years, there has been a significant effort to identify high-risk plaques in vivo prior to acute events. While number of imaging modalities have been developed to identify morphologic characteristics of high-risk plaques, prospective natural-history observational studies suggest that vulnerability is not solely dependent on plaque morphology and likely involves additional contributing mechanisms. High wall shear stress (WSS) has recently been proposed as one possible causative factor, promoting the development of high-risk plaques. High WSS has been shown to induce specific changes in endothelial cell behavior, exacerbating inflammation and stimulating progression of the atherosclerotic lipid core. In line with experimental and autopsy studies, several human studies have shown associations between high WSS and known morphological features of high-risk plaques. However, despite increasing evidence, there is still no longitudinal data linking high WSS to clinical events. As the interplay between atherosclerotic plaque, artery, and WSS is highly dynamic, large natural history studies of atherosclerosis that include WSS measurements are now warranted. This review will summarize the available clinical evidence on high WSS as a possible etiological mechanism underlying high-risk plaque development.

  3. High Shear Deformation to Produce High Strength and Energy Absorption in Mg Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, Vineet V.; Jana, Saumyadeep; Li, Dongsheng; Garmestani, Hamid; Nyberg, Eric A.; Lavender, Curt A.

    2014-02-01

    Magnesium alloys have the potential to reduce the mass of transportation systems however to fully realize the benefits it must be usable in more applications including those that require higher strength and ductility. It has been known that fine grain size in Mg alloys leads to high strength and ductility. However, the challenge is how to achieve this optimal microstructure in a cost effective way. This work has shown that by using optimized high shear deformation and second phase particles of Mg2Si and MgxZnZry the energy absorption of the extrusions can exceed that of AA6061. The extrusion process under development described in this presentation appears to be scalable and cost effective. In addition to process development a novel modeling approach to understand the roles of strain and state-of-strain on particle fracture and grain size control has been developed

  4. Texture Development in High-Silicon Iron Sheet Produced by Simple Shear Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kustas, Andrew B.; Sagapuram, Dinakar; Trumble, Kevin P.; Chandrasekar, Srinivasan

    2016-06-01

    Sheet processing of high Si-Fe alloys (up to 6.5 wt pct Si) is demonstrated by application of highly confined shear deformation in cutting-extrusion. This alloy system, of major interest to electromagnetic applications, is characterized by poor workability. By a suitable interactive combination of simple shear, high strain rates, near-adiabatic heating, and large hydrostatic pressure in the deformation zone, flow localization, and cracking inherent to this alloy system are suppressed. This enables creation of sheet and foil forms from bulk ingots, cast or wrought, in a single deformation step, unlike rolling. The sheet is characterized by strong shear textures, described by partial {110} and <111> fibers, and fine-grained microstructures ( 20 µm grain size). The orientation (inclination) of these fibers, with respect to the sheet surface, can be varied over a range of 35 deg through selection of the deformation path. In contrast to rolling textures, the current shear deformation textures are negligibly influenced by recrystallization annealing. A recovery-based continuous recrystallization mechanism is proposed to explain the texture retention. Some general implications for shear-based processing of alloys of limited workability are discussed.

  5. Influence of high deformation rate, brain region, transverse compression, and specimen size on rat brain shear stress morphology and magnitude.

    PubMed

    Haslach, Henry W; Gipple, Jenna M; Leahy, Lauren N

    2017-01-26

    An external mechanical insult to the brain, such as a blast, may create internal stress and deformation waves, which have shear and longitudinal components that can induce combined shear and compression of the brain tissue. To isolate the consequences of such interactions for the shear stress and to investigate the role of the extracellular fluid in the mechanical response, translational shear stretch at 10/s, 60/s, and 100/s translational shear rates under either 0% or 33% fixed transverse compression is applied without preconditioning to rat brain specimens. The specimens from the cerebrum, the cerebellum grey matter, and the brainstem white matter are nearly the full length of their respective regions. The translational shear stress response to translational shear deformation is characterized by the effect that each of four factors, high deformation rate, brain region, transverse compression, and specimen size, have on the shear stress magnitude averaged over ten specimens for each combination of factors. Increasing the deformation rate increases the magnitude of the shear stress at a given translational shear stretch, and as tested by ANOVAs so does applying transverse fixed compression of 33% of the thickness. The stress magnitude differs by the region that is the specimen source: cerebrum, cerebellum or brainstem. The magnitude of the shear stress response at a given deformation rate and stretch depends on the specimen length, called a specimen size effect. Surprisingly, under no compression a shorter length specimen requires more shear stress, but under 33% compression a shorter length specimen requires less shear stress, to meet a required shear deformation rate. The shear specimen size effect calls into question the applicability of the classical shear stress definition to hydrated soft biological tissue.

  6. Room temperature shear properties of the strain isolator pad for the shuttle thermal protection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawyer, J. W.; Waters, W. A., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Tests were conducted at room temperature to determine the shear properties of the strain isolator pad (SIP) material used in the thermal protection system of the space shuttle. Tests were conducted on both the .23 cm and .41 cm thick SIP material in the virgin state and after fifty fully reversed shear cycles. The shear stress displacement relationships are highly nonlinear, exhibit large hysteresis effects, are dependent on material orientation, and have a large low modulus region near the zero stress level where small changes in stress can result in large displacements. The values at the higher stress levels generally increase with normal and shear force load conditioning. Normal forces applied during the shear tests reduces the low modulus region for the material. Shear test techniques which restrict the normal movement of the material give erroneous stress displacement results. However, small normal forces do not significantly effect the shear modulus for a given shear stress. Poisson's ratio values for the material are within the range of values for many common materials. The values are not constant but vary as a function of the stress level and the previous stress history of the material. Ultimate shear strengths of the .23 cm thick SIP are significantly higher than those obtained for the .41 cm thick SIP.

  7. Microturbulence and Flow Shear in High-performance JET ITB Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    R.V. Budny; A. Andre; A. Bicoulet; C. Challis; G.D. Conway; W. Dorland; D.R. Ernst; T.S. Hahm; T.C. Hender; D. McCune; G. Rewoldt; S.E. Sharapov

    2001-12-05

    The transport, flow shear, and linear growth rates of microturbulence are studied for a Joint European Torus (JET) plasma with high central q in which an internal transport barrier (ITB) forms and grows to a large radius. The linear microturbulence growth rates of the fastest growing (most unstable) toroidal modes with high toroidal mode number are calculated using the GS2 and FULL gyrokinetic codes. These linear growth rates, gamma (subscript lin) are large, but the flow-shearing rates, gamma (subscript ExB) (dominated by the toroidal rotation contribution) are also comparably large when and where the ITB exists.

  8. Probing the dynamics of high-viscosity entangled polymers under shear using Neutron Spin Echo spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawecki, M.; Gutfreund, P.; Adlmann, F. A.; Lindholm, E.; Longeville, S.; Lapp, A.; Wolff, M.

    2016-09-01

    Neutron Spin Echo spectroscopy provides unique insight into molecular and submolecular dynamics as well as intra- and inter-molecular interactions in soft matter. These dynamics may change drastically under shear flow. In particular in polymer physics a stress plateau is observed, which might be explained by an entanglement-disentanglement transition. However, such a transition is difficult to identify directly by experiments. Neutron Spin Echo has been proven to provide information about entanglement length and degree by probing the local dynamics of the polymer chains. Combining shear experiments and neutron spin echo is challenging since, first the beam polarisation has to be preserved during scattering and second, Doppler scattered neutrons may cause inelastic scattering. In this paper we present a new shear device adapted for these needs. We demonstrate that a high beam polarisation can be preserved and present first data on an entangled polymer solution under shear. To complement the experiments on the dynamics we present novel SANS data revealing shear- induced conformational changes in highly entangled polymers.

  9. High Modulus and High T(sub g) Thermally Stable Polymers from p-Ethynyl-Terminated Rigid-Rod Monomers. Part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melissaris, Anastasios P.; Sutter, James K.; Litt, Morton H.; Scheiman, Daniel A.; Schuerman, Marla A.

    1995-01-01

    Novel p-ethynyl-substituted rigid rod monomers were studied by pressure Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC), ThermoGravimetric Analysis (TGA), IsothermoGravimetric Analysis (IGA), and TGA-IR. These monomers, 4,4'-bis(((4-ethynylphenyl)carbonyl)oxy)biphenyl, designated 1, 1,5-bis-(((4-ethynylphenyl)carbonyl)oxy)naphthalene, designated 2, and bis(4-ethynylphenyl)pyromellitimide, designated 3, were polymerized in the solid state. Thermal polymerization in N2 or air produced highly cross-linked resins with polymerization exotherms centered between 212 and 276 C. The (delta)H's of polymerization of these resins in air were found to be double those in N2. When monomers 1 and 2 were heated in air from 23 to 750 C at 10 C/min, the main decomposition product was carbon dioxide, evolving at a maximum rate between 500 and 600 C; water was also detected as a decomposition product. Void-free neat resin moldings, designated lp to 3p, were made by compression molding the monomers and then heating them. The resulting polymers were highly cross-linked, and their glass transition temperatures (T(sub g)) were much higher than their polymerization temperatures. Using ThermoMechanical Analysis (TMA), we found that polymers lp to 3p had T(sub g)'s of 422, 329, and 380 C, respectively. The thermal and thermooxidative stabilities improved when lp to 3p were postcured in N2 (the postcured polymers were designated 1pp to 3pp). The Linear Thermal Expansions (LTE) for lp and 3p were 1% between 23 and 420 C. Using rheological analysis, we could not clearly detect the T(sub g)'s of lp to 3p because their moduli dropped only slightly between 23 and 490 C and the changes in tan beta were very low. Because of high cross-link density, their moduli changed little as the resins went from a glassy to a rubbery state. Their shear storage moduli in air ranged from 0.82 (3p, 3pp) to 1.6 GPa (lpp) at 23 C, from 0.16 (2p) to 0.7GPa(lpp) at 380 C, and from 0.18(lpp)to 0.6GPa(2p) at 490 C. Finally, these

  10. Gas-Enhanced Ultra-High Shear Mixing: A Concept and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czerwinski, Frank; Birsan, Gabriel

    2017-04-01

    The processes of mixing, homogenizing, and deagglomeration are of paramount importance in many industries for modifying properties of liquids or liquid-based dispersions at room temperature and treatment of molten or semi-molten alloys at high temperatures, prior to their solidification. To implement treatments, a variety of technologies based on mechanical, electromagnetic, and ultrasonic principles are used commercially or tested at the laboratory scale. In a large number of techniques, especially those tailored toward metallurgical applications, the vital role is played by cavitation, generation of gas bubbles, and their interaction with the melt. This paper describes a novel concept exploring an integration of gas injection into the shear zone with ultra-high shear mixing. As revealed via experiments with a prototype of the cylindrical rotor-stator apparatus and transparent media, gases injected radially through the high-speed rotor generate highly refined bubbles of high concentration directly in the shear zone of the mixer. It is believed that an interaction of large volume of fine gas bubbles with the liquid, superimposed on ultra-high shear, will enhance mixing capabilities and cause superior refining and homogenizing of the liquids or solid-liquid slurries, thus allowing their effective property modification.

  11. Gas-Enhanced Ultra-High Shear Mixing: A Concept and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czerwinski, Frank; Birsan, Gabriel

    2016-12-01

    The processes of mixing, homogenizing, and deagglomeration are of paramount importance in many industries for modifying properties of liquids or liquid-based dispersions at room temperature and treatment of molten or semi-molten alloys at high temperatures, prior to their solidification. To implement treatments, a variety of technologies based on mechanical, electromagnetic, and ultrasonic principles are used commercially or tested at the laboratory scale. In a large number of techniques, especially those tailored toward metallurgical applications, the vital role is played by cavitation, generation of gas bubbles, and their interaction with the melt. This paper describes a novel concept exploring an integration of gas injection into the shear zone with ultra-high shear mixing. As revealed via experiments with a prototype of the cylindrical rotor-stator apparatus and transparent media, gases injected radially through the high-speed rotor generate highly refined bubbles of high concentration directly in the shear zone of the mixer. It is believed that an interaction of large volume of fine gas bubbles with the liquid, superimposed on ultra-high shear, will enhance mixing capabilities and cause superior refining and homogenizing of the liquids or solid-liquid slurries, thus allowing their effective property modification.

  12. High-frequency viscoelastic shear properties of vocal fold tissues: implications for vocal fold tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Teller, Sean S; Farran, Alexandra J E; Xiao, Longxi; Jiao, Tong; Duncan, Randall L; Clifton, Rodney J; Jia, Xinqiao

    2012-10-01

    The biomechanical function of the vocal folds (VFs) depends on their viscoelastic properties. Many conditions can lead to VF scarring that compromises voice function and quality. To identify candidate replacement materials, the structure, composition, and mechanical properties of native tissues need to be understood at phonation frequencies. Previously, the authors developed the torsional wave experiment (TWE), a stress-wave-based experiment to determine the linear viscoelastic shear properties of small, soft samples. Here, the viscoelastic properties of porcine and human VFs were measured over a frequency range of 10-200 Hz. The TWE utilizes resonance phenomena to determine viscoelastic properties; therefore, the specimen test frequency is determined by the sample size and material properties. Viscoelastic moduli are reported at resonance frequencies. Structure and composition of the tissues were determined by histology and immunochemistry. Porcine data from the TWE are separated into two groups: a young group, consisting of fetal and newborn pigs, and an adult group, consisting of 6-9-month olds and 2+-year olds. Adult tissues had an average storage modulus of 2309±1394 Pa and a loss tangent of 0.38±0.10 at frequencies of 36-200 Hz. The VFs of young pigs were significantly more compliant, with a storage modulus of 394±142 Pa and a loss tangent of 0.40±0.14 between 14 and 30 Hz. No gender dependence was observed. Histological staining showed that adult porcine tissues had a more organized, layered structure than the fetal tissues, with a thicker epithelium and a more structured lamina propria. Elastin fibers in fetal VF tissues were immature compared to those in adult tissues. Together, these structural changes in the tissues most likely contributed to the change in viscoelastic properties. Adult human VF tissues, recovered postmortem from adult patients with a history of smoking or disease, had an average storage modulus of 756±439 Pa and a loss tangent of 0

  13. Method for obtaining simple shear material properties of the intervertebral disc under high strain rates.

    PubMed

    Ott, Kyle A; Armiger, Robert S; Wickwire, Alexis C; Carneal, Catherine M; Trexler, Morgana M; Lennon, Andrew M; Zhang, Jiangyue; Merkle, Andrew C

    2012-01-01

    Predicting spinal injury under high rates of vertical loading is of interest, but the success of computational models in modeling this type of loading scenario is highly dependent on the material models employed. Understanding the response of these biological materials at high strain rates is critical to accurately model mechanical response of tissue and predict injury. While data exists at lower strain rates, there is a lack of the high strain rate material data that are needed to develop constitutive models. The Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar (SHPB) has been used for many years to obtain properties of various materials at high strain rates. However, this apparatus has mainly been used for characterizing metals and ceramics and is difficult to apply to softer materials such as biological tissue. Recently, studies have shown that modifications to the traditional SHPB setup allow for the successful characterization of mechanical properties of biological materials at strain rates and peak strain values that exceed alternate soft tissue testing techniques. In this paper, the previously-reported modified SHPB technique is applied to characterize human intervertebral disc material under simple shear. The strain rates achieved range from 5 to 250 strain s-1. The results demonstrate the sensitivity to the disc composition and structure, with the nucleus pulposus and annulus fibrosus exhibiting different behavior under shear loading. Shear tangent moduli are approximated at varying strain levels from 5 to 20% strain. This data and technique facilitates determination of mechanical properties of intervertebral disc materials under shear loading, for eventual use in constitutive models.

  14. High Rate Plasticity under Pressure using a Windowed Pressure-Shear Impact Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Florando, J N; Jiao, T; Grunschel, S E; Clifton, R J; Ferranti, L; Becker, R C; Minich, R W; Bazan, G

    2009-07-29

    An experimental technique has been developed to study the strength of materials under conditions of moderate pressures and high shear strain rates. The technique is similar to the traditional pressure-shear plate-impact experiments except that window interferometry is used to measure both the normal and transverse particle velocities at a sample-window interface. Experimental and simulation results on vanadium samples backed with a sapphire window show the utility of the technique to measure the flow strength under dynamic loading conditions. The results show that the strength of the vanadium is 600 MPa at a pressure of 4.5 GPa and a plastic strain of 1.7%.

  15. Impact of triacylglycerol composition on shear-induced textural changes in highly saturated fats.

    PubMed

    Gregersen, Sandra B; Andersen, Morten D; Hammershøj, Marianne; Wiking, Lars

    2017-01-15

    This study demonstrates a strong interaction between triacylglycerol (TAG) composition and effects of shear rate on the microstructure and texture of fats. Cocoa butter alternatives with similar saturated fat content, but different major TAGs (PPO-, PSO-, SSO-, POP- and SOS-rich blends) were evaluated. Results show how shear can create a harder texture in fat blends based on symmetric monounsaturated TAGs (up to ∼200%), primarily due to reduction in crystal size, whereas shear has little effect on hardness of asymmetric monounsaturated TAGs. Such differences could not be ascribed to differences in the degree of supercooling, but was found to be a consequence of differences in the crystallisation behaviour of different TAGs. The fractal dimension was evaluated by dimensional detrended fluctuation analysis and Fourier transformation of microscopy images. However, the concept of fractal patterns was found to be insufficient to describe microstructural changes of fat blends with high solid fat content.

  16. Graphite/Ultra-High Modulus Polyethylene Hybrid Fiber Composites with Epoxy and Polyethylene Matrices for Cosmic Radiation Shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    One of the most significant technical challenges in long-duration space missions is that of protecting the crew from harmful radiation. Protection against such radiation on a manned Mars mission will be of vital importance both during transit and while on the surface of the planet. The development of multifunctional materials that serve as integral structural members of the space vehicle and provide the necessary radiation shielding for the crew would be both mission enabling and cost effective. Additionally, combining shielding and structure could reduce total vehicle mass. Hybrid laminated composite materials having both ultramodulus polyethylene (PE) and graphite fibers in epoxy and PE matrices could meet such mission requirements. PE fibers have excellent physical properties, including the highest specific strength of any known fiber. Moreover, the high hydrogen (H) content of polyethylene makes the material an excellent shielding material for cosmic radiation. When such materials are incorporated into an epoxy or PE matrix a very effective shielding material is expected. Boron (B) may be added to the matrix resin or used as a coating to further increase the shielding effectiveness due to B s ability to slow thermal neutrons. These materials may also serve as micrometeorites shields due to PE s high impact energy absorption properties. It should be noted that such materials can be fabricated by existing equipment and methods. It is the objective of this work therefore to: (a) perform preliminary analysis of the radiation transport within these materials; (b) fabricate panels for mechanical property testing before and after radiation exposure. Preliminary determination on the effectiveness of the combinations of material components on both shielding and structural efficiency will be made.

  17. Optical Properties of Compressible Inhomogeneous Shear Layers Relevant to High Power Lasers.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-04-30

    191 615 OPTICAL PROPERTIES OF COMPRESSIBLE INb4ONOGENEOUS SHEAR 1/1 LAYERS RELEVANT TO HIGH PONER LASERS(U) WASHINGTON UNIV SEATTLE II H...so that a near-diffraction- limited laser beam may be attained. With the general trend of laser development towards shorter wavelengths, the fluid

  18. Preparation and Characterization of a Novel Epoxy Molding Compound with Low Storage Modulus at High Temperature and Low Glass-Transition Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Hui-wang; Li, Dong-sheng; Fan, Qiong

    2012-09-01

    Epoxy molding compound (EMC) has been widely used as a main material for encapsulation and protection of semiconductor packages because of its low cost, high moisture resistance, high heat resistance, and good mechanical performance. Due to the extensive application of lead-free solder in place of Sn-Pb, soldering temperature is higher than before; this demands that EMC, which is usually used for lead-free solder, should have extremely low thermal stress and excellent stability at elevated temperatures. In this work, 1,3-propanediol bis(4-aminobenzoate) (PBA) was added to an EMC product to form a novel epoxy molding compound (FEMC). PBA had very limited effect on the process feasibility of EMC, and caused reduction of the storage modulus by 40% to 50% at high temperatures and reduction of the glass-transition temperature by more than 10°C, which are very helpful to reduce thermal stress buildup during high-temperature soldering processes. The increases of the tab pull force of copper- and silver-plated lead frames within EMC due to PBA were up to 58% and 117%, respectively. With increasing PBA content in the EMC, water absorption increased in a linear fashion, so the amount of PBA added to the EMC should be limited, preferably to not more than 1%.

  19. Nanostructured bacterial cellulose-poly(4-styrene sulfonic acid) composite membranes with high storage modulus and protonic conductivity.

    PubMed

    Gadim, Tiago D O; Figueiredo, Andrea G P R; Rosero-Navarro, Nataly C; Vilela, Carla; Gamelas, José A F; Barros-Timmons, Ana; Neto, Carlos Pascoal; Silvestre, Armando J D; Freire, Carmen S R; Figueiredo, Filipe M L

    2014-05-28

    The present study reports the development of a new generation of bio-based nanocomposite proton exchange membranes based on bacterial cellulose (BC) and poly(4-styrene sulfonic acid) (PSSA), produced by in situ free radical polymerization of sodium 4-styrenesulfonate using poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA) as cross-linker, followed by conversion of the ensuing polymer into the acidic form. The BC nanofibrilar network endows the composite membranes with excellent mechanical properties at least up to 140 °C, a temperature where either pure PSSA or Nafion are soft, as shown by dynamic mechanical analysis. The large concentration of sulfonic acid groups in PSSA is responsible for the high ionic exchange capacity of the composite membranes, reaching 2.25 mmol g(-1) for a composite with 83 wt % PSSA/PEGDA. The through-plane protonic conductivity of the best membrane is in excess of 0.1 S cm(-1) at 94 °C and 98% relative humidity (RH), decreasing to 0.042 S cm(-1) at 60% RH. These values are comparable or even higher than those of ionomers such as Nafion or polyelectrolytes such as PSSA. This combination of electric and viscoelastic properties with low cost underlines the potential of these nanocomposites as a bio-based alternative to other polymer membranes for application in fuel cells, redox flow batteries, or other devices requiring functional proton conducting elements, such as sensors and actuators.

  20. The plane strain shear fracture of the advanced high strength steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Li

    2013-12-01

    The "shear fracture" which occurs at the high-curvature die radii in the sheet metal forming has been reported to remarkably limit the application of the advanced high strength steels (AHSS) in the automobile industry. However, this unusual fracture behavior generally cannot be predicted by the traditional forming limit diagram (FLD). In this research, a new experimental system was developed in order to simulate the shear fracture, especially at the plane strain state which is the most common state in the auto-industry and difficult to achieve in the lab due to sample size. Furthermore, the system has the capability to operate in a strain rate range from quasi-static state to the industrial forming state. One kinds of AHSS, Quenching-Partitioning (QP) steels have been performed in this test and the results show that the limiting fracture strain is related to the bending ratio and strain rate. The experimental data support that deformation-induced heating is an important cause of "shear fracture" phenomena for AHSS: a deformation-induced quasi-heating caused by smaller bending ratio and high strain rate produce a smaller limiting plane strain and lead a "shear fracture" in the component.

  1. The plane strain shear fracture of the advanced high strength steels

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Li

    2013-12-16

    The “shear fracture” which occurs at the high-curvature die radii in the sheet metal forming has been reported to remarkably limit the application of the advanced high strength steels (AHSS) in the automobile industry. However, this unusual fracture behavior generally cannot be predicted by the traditional forming limit diagram (FLD). In this research, a new experimental system was developed in order to simulate the shear fracture, especially at the plane strain state which is the most common state in the auto-industry and difficult to achieve in the lab due to sample size. Furthermore, the system has the capability to operate in a strain rate range from quasi-static state to the industrial forming state. One kinds of AHSS, Quenching-Partitioning (QP) steels have been performed in this test and the results show that the limiting fracture strain is related to the bending ratio and strain rate. The experimental data support that deformation-induced heating is an important cause of “shear fracture” phenomena for AHSS: a deformation-induced quasi-heating caused by smaller bending ratio and high strain rate produce a smaller limiting plane strain and lead a “shear fracture” in the component.

  2. Modulus and yield stress of drawn LDPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thavarungkul, Nandh

    Modulus and yield stress were investigated in drawn low density polyethylene (LDPE) film. Uniaxially drawn polymeric films usually show high values of modulus and yield stress, however, studies have normally only been conducted to identify the structural features that determine modulus. In this study small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS), thermal shrinkage, birefringence, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA) were used to examine, directly and indirectly, the structural features that determine both modulus and yield stress, which are often closely related in undrawn materials. Shish-kebab structures are proposed to account for the mechanical properties in drawn LDPE. The validity of this molecular/morphological model was tested using relationships between static mechanical data and structural and physical parameters. In addition, dynamic mechanical results are also in line with static data in supporting the model. In the machine direction (MD), "shish" and taut tie molecules (TTM) anchored in the crystalline phase account for E; whereas crystal lamellae with contributions from "shish" and TTM determine yield stress. In the transverse direction (TD), the crystalline phase plays an important roll in both modulus and yield stress. Modulus is determined by crystal lamellae functioning as platelet reinforcing elements in the amorphous matrix with an additional contributions from TTM and yield stress is determined by the crystal lamellae's resistance to deformation.

  3. Dynamic Strengthening During High Velocity Shear Experiments with Siliceous Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Z.; Chang, J. C.; Boneh, Y.; Chen, X.; Reches, Z.

    2011-12-01

    It is generally accepted that dynamic-weakening is essential for earthquake instability, and many experimental works have documented this weakening. Recent observations revealed also opposite trends of dynamic-strengthening in experiments (Reches & Lockner, 2010). We present here our experimental results of this dynamic-strengthening and discuss possible implications to earthquake behavior. We ran hundreds of experiments on experimental faults made of siliceous rock including granite, syenite, diorite, and quartzite. The experimental fault is comprised of two solid cylindrical blocks with a raised-ring contact of 7 cm diameter and 1 cm width. We recognized general, three regimes of strength-velocity relations: (I) Dynamic weakening (drop of 20-60% of static strength) as slip velocity increased from ~0.0003 m/s (lowest experimental velocity) to a critical velocity, Vc=0.008-0.16 m/s; (II) Abrupt transition to dynamic strengthening regime during which the fault strength almost regains its static strength; and (III) Quasi-constant strength with further possible drops as velocity approaches ~1 m/s. The critical velocity depends on the sample lithology: Vc is ~0.06 m/s for granite, ~0.008 m/s for syenite, ~0.01 m/s for diorite, and ~0.16 m/s for quartzite. The strengthening stage is associated with temperature increase, wear-rate increase, and the occurrence of intense, high frequency stick-slip events (Reches & Lockner, 2010). Sammis et al., (this meeting) attributed this strengthening to dehydration of the thin water layer that covers the gouge particles as the temperature increases. On the other hand, we note that tens of experiments with dolomite samples (non-siliceous), which were deformed under similar conditions, did not exhibit the velocity strengthening (unpublished). Based on the analyses by Andrews (2004, 2005), we speculate that velocity strengthening may bound the slip velocity. The numerical models of Andrews show that the slip velocity along a slip

  4. Crack initiation observation and local stress analysis in shear fracture tests of ultra-high strength steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Ninshu; Takada, Kenji; Sugimoto, Nao

    2016-08-01

    To investigate the local strain and stress at the crack initiation position in shear fracture test pieces of ultra-high strength steels, a butterfly shear fracture specimen was employed. The crack initiation position and propagation direction were observed during shear fracture tests by high speed cameras and investigated through analysing the fracture surface by scanning electron microscope. Further, the finite element method was employed and the stress-triaxiality at the crack initiation position was investigated. It can be obtained that the crack initiated at the position where the stress state is close to uniaxial tensile state or plane strain state more than pure shear stress state.

  5. Size effect, critical resolved shear stress, stacking fault energy, and solid solution strengthening in the CrMnFeCoNi high-entropy alloy.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Norihiko L; Fujimoto, Shu; Kambara, Yuki; Kawamura, Marino; Chen, Zhenghao M T; Matsunoshita, Hirotaka; Tanaka, Katsushi; Inui, Haruyuki; George, Easo P

    2016-10-24

    High-entropy alloys (HEAs) comprise a novel class of scientifically and technologically interesting materials. Among these, equatomic CrMnFeCoNi with the face-centered cubic (FCC) structure is noteworthy because its ductility and strength increase with decreasing temperature while maintaining outstanding fracture toughness at cryogenic temperatures. Here we report for the first time by single-crystal micropillar compression that its bulk room temperature critical resolved shear stress (CRSS) is ~33-43 MPa, ~10 times higher than that of pure nickel. CRSS depends on pillar size with an inverse power-law scaling exponent of -0.63 independent of orientation. Planar ½ < 110 > {111} dislocations dissociate into Shockley partials whose separations range from ~3.5-4.5 nm near the screw orientation to ~5-8 nm near the edge, yielding a stacking fault energy of 30 ± 5 mJ/m(2). Dislocations are smoothly curved without any preferred line orientation indicating no significant anisotropy in mobilities of edge and screw segments. The shear-modulus-normalized CRSS of the HEA is not exceptionally high compared to those of certain concentrated binary FCC solid solutions. Its rough magnitude calculated using the Fleischer/Labusch models corresponds to that of a hypothetical binary with the elastic constants of our HEA, solute concentrations of 20-50 at.%, and atomic size misfit of ~4%.

  6. Size effect, critical resolved shear stress, stacking fault energy, and solid solution strengthening in the CrMnFeCoNi high-entropy alloy

    PubMed Central

    Okamoto, Norihiko L.; Fujimoto, Shu; Kambara, Yuki; Kawamura, Marino; Chen, Zhenghao M. T.; Matsunoshita, Hirotaka; Tanaka, Katsushi; Inui, Haruyuki; George, Easo P.

    2016-01-01

    High-entropy alloys (HEAs) comprise a novel class of scientifically and technologically interesting materials. Among these, equatomic CrMnFeCoNi with the face-centered cubic (FCC) structure is noteworthy because its ductility and strength increase with decreasing temperature while maintaining outstanding fracture toughness at cryogenic temperatures. Here we report for the first time by single-crystal micropillar compression that its bulk room temperature critical resolved shear stress (CRSS) is ~33–43 MPa, ~10 times higher than that of pure nickel. CRSS depends on pillar size with an inverse power-law scaling exponent of –0.63 independent of orientation. Planar ½ < 110 > {111} dislocations dissociate into Shockley partials whose separations range from ~3.5–4.5 nm near the screw orientation to ~5–8 nm near the edge, yielding a stacking fault energy of 30 ± 5 mJ/m2. Dislocations are smoothly curved without any preferred line orientation indicating no significant anisotropy in mobilities of edge and screw segments. The shear-modulus-normalized CRSS of the HEA is not exceptionally high compared to those of certain concentrated binary FCC solid solutions. Its rough magnitude calculated using the Fleischer/Labusch models corresponds to that of a hypothetical binary with the elastic constants of our HEA, solute concentrations of 20–50 at.%, and atomic size misfit of ~4%. PMID:27775026

  7. Size effect, critical resolved shear stress, stacking fault energy, and solid solution strengthening in the CrMnFeCoNi high-entropy alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, Norihiko L.; Fujimoto, Shu; Kambara, Yuki; Kawamura, Marino; Chen, Zhenghao M. T.; Matsunoshita, Hirotaka; Tanaka, Katsushi; Inui, Haruyuki; George, Easo P.

    2016-10-01

    High-entropy alloys (HEAs) comprise a novel class of scientifically and technologically interesting materials. Among these, equatomic CrMnFeCoNi with the face-centered cubic (FCC) structure is noteworthy because its ductility and strength increase with decreasing temperature while maintaining outstanding fracture toughness at cryogenic temperatures. Here we report for the first time by single-crystal micropillar compression that its bulk room temperature critical resolved shear stress (CRSS) is ~33–43 MPa, ~10 times higher than that of pure nickel. CRSS depends on pillar size with an inverse power-law scaling exponent of –0.63 independent of orientation. Planar ½ < 110 > {111} dislocations dissociate into Shockley partials whose separations range from ~3.5–4.5 nm near the screw orientation to ~5–8 nm near the edge, yielding a stacking fault energy of 30 ± 5 mJ/m2. Dislocations are smoothly curved without any preferred line orientation indicating no significant anisotropy in mobilities of edge and screw segments. The shear-modulus-normalized CRSS of the HEA is not exceptionally high compared to those of certain concentrated binary FCC solid solutions. Its rough magnitude calculated using the Fleischer/Labusch models corresponds to that of a hypothetical binary with the elastic constants of our HEA, solute concentrations of 20–50 at.%, and atomic size misfit of ~4%.

  8. Analysing calcium signalling of cells under high shear flows using discontinuous dielectrophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soffe, Rebecca; Baratchi, Sara; Tang, Shi-Yang; Nasabi, Mahyar; McIntyre, Peter; Mitchell, Arnan; Khoshmanesh, Khashayar

    2015-07-01

    Immobilisation of cells is an important feature of many cellular assays, as it enables the physical/chemical stimulation of cells; whilst, monitoring cellular processes using microscopic techniques. Current approaches for immobilising cells, however, are hampered by time-consuming processes, the need for specific antibodies or coatings, and adverse effects on cell integrity. Here, we present a dielectrophoresis-based approach for the robust immobilisation of cells, and analysis of their responses under high shear flows. This approach is quick and label-free, and more importantly, minimises the adverse effects of electric field on the cell integrity, by activating the field for a short duration of 120 s, just long enough to immobilise the cells, after which cell culture media (such as HEPES) is flushed through the platform. In optimal conditions, at least 90% of the cells remained stably immobilised, when exposed to a shear stress of 63 dyn/cm2. This approach was used to examine the shear-induced calcium signalling of HEK-293 cells expressing a mechanosensitive ion channel, transient receptor potential vaniloid type 4 (TRPV4), when exposed to the full physiological range of shear stress.

  9. Phase field simulations of plastic strain-induced phase transformations under high pressure and large shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javanbakht, Mahdi; Levitas, Valery I.

    2016-12-01

    Pressure and shear strain-induced phase transformations (PTs) in a nanograined bicrystal at the evolving dislocations pile-up have been studied utilizing a phase field approach (PFA). The complete system of PFA equations for coupled martensitic PT, dislocation evolution, and mechanics at large strains is presented and solved using the finite element method (FEM). The nucleation pressure for the high-pressure phase (HPP) under hydrostatic conditions near a single dislocation was determined to be 15.9 GPa. Under shear, a dislocation pile-up that appears in the left grain creates strong stress concentration near its tip and significantly increases the local thermodynamic driving force for PT, which causes nucleation of HPP even at zero pressure. At pressures of 1.59 and 5 GPa and shear, a major part of a grain transforms to HPP. When dislocations are considered in the transforming grain as well, they relax stresses and lead to a slightly smaller stationary HPP region than without dislocations. However, they strongly suppress nucleation of HPP and require larger shear. Unexpectedly, the stationary HPP morphology is governed by the simplest thermodynamic equilibrium conditions, which do not contain contributions from plasticity and surface energy. These equilibrium conditions are fulfilled either for the majority of points of phase interfaces or (approximately) in terms of stresses averaged over the HPP region or for the entire grain, despite the strong heterogeneity of stress fields. The major part of the driving force for PT in the stationary state is due to deviatoric stresses rather than pressure. While the least number of dislocations in a pile-up to nucleate HPP linearly decreases with increasing applied pressure, the least corresponding shear strain depends on pressure nonmonotonously. Surprisingly, the ratio of kinetic coefficients for PT and dislocations affect the stationary solution and the nanostructure. Consequently, there are multiple stationary solutions

  10. Elastic Modulus Evolution and Behavior of Si/Mullite/BSAS-Based Environmental Barrier Coatings Exposed to High Temperature in Water Vapor Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cojocaru, C. V.; Kruger, S. E.; Moreau, C.; Lima, R. S.

    2011-01-01

    Si-based ceramics (e.g., SiC and Si3N4) are known as promising high-temperature structural materials in various components where metals/alloys reached their ultimate performances (e.g., advanced gas turbine engines and structural components of future hypersonic vehicles). To alleviate the surface recession that Si-based ceramics undergo in a high-temperature environmental attack (e.g., H2O vapor), appropriate refractory oxides are engineered to serve as environmental barrier coatings (EBCs). The current state-of-the-art EBCs multilayer system comprises a silicon (Si) bond coat, mullite (3Al2O3·2SiO2) interlayer and (1 - x)BaO· xSrO·Al2O3·2SiO2, 0 ≤ x ≤ 1 (BSAS) top coat. In this article, the role of high-temperature exposure (1300 °C) performed in H2O vapor environment (for time intervals up to 500 h) on the elastic moduli of air plasma sprayed Si/mullite/BSAS layers deposited on SiC substrates was investigated via depth-sensing indentation. Laser-ultrasonics was employed to evaluate the E values of as-sprayed BSAS coatings as an attempt to validate the indentation results. Fully crystalline, crack-free, and near-crack-free as-sprayed EBCs were engineered under controlled deposition conditions. The absence of phase transformation and stability of the low elastic modulus values (e.g., ~60-70 GPa) retained by the BSAS top layers after harsh environmental exposure provides a plausible explanation for the almost crack-free coatings observed. The relationships between the measured elastic moduli of the EBCs and their microstructural behavior during the high-temperature exposure are discussed.

  11. Observations of subsonic and supersonic shear flows in laser driven high-energy-density plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harding, E. C.

    2009-11-01

    Shear layers containing strong velocity gradients appear in many high-energy-density (HED) systems and play important roles in mixing and the transition to turbulence. Yet few laboratory experiments have been carried out to study their detailed evolution in this extreme environment where plasmas are compressible, actively ionizing, often involve strong shock waves and have complex material properties. Many shear flows produce the Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability, which initiates the mixing at a fluid interface. We present results from two dedicated shear flow experiments that produced overall subsonic and supersonic flows using novel target designs. In the subsonic case, the Omega laser was used to drive a blast wave along a rippled interface between plastic and foam, shocking both the materials to produce two fluids separated by a sharp shear layer. The interface subsequently rolled-upped into large KH vortices that were accompanied by bubble-like structures of unknown origin. This was the first time the evolution of a well-resolved KH instability was observed in a HED plasma in the laboratory. We have analyzed the properties and dynamics of the plasma based on the data and fundamental models, without resorting to simulated values. In the second, supersonic experiment the Nike laser was used to drive a supersonic flow of Al plasma along a rippled, low-density foam surface. Here again the flowing plasma drove a shock into the second material, so that two fluids were separated by a shear layer. In contrast to the subsonic case, the flow developed shocks around the ripples in response to the supersonic flow of Al. Collaborators: R.P. Drake, O.A. Hurricane, J.F. Hansen, Y. Aglitskiy, T. Plewa, B.A. Remington, H.F. Robey, J.L. Weaver, A.L. Velikovich, R.S. Gillespie, M.J. Bono, M.J. Grosskopf, C.C. Kuranz, A. Visco.

  12. Experimental and numerical study of plastic shear instability under high-speed loading conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Sokovikov, Mikhail E-mail: naimark@icmm.ru; Chudinov, Vasiliy E-mail: naimark@icmm.ru; Bilalov, Dmitry E-mail: naimark@icmm.ru; Oborin, Vladimir E-mail: naimark@icmm.ru; Uvarov, Sergey E-mail: naimark@icmm.ru; Plekhov, Oleg E-mail: naimark@icmm.ru; Terekhina, Alena E-mail: naimark@icmm.ru; Naimark, Oleg E-mail: naimark@icmm.ru

    2014-11-14

    The behavior of specimens dynamically loaded during the split Hopkinson (Kolsky) bar tests in a regime close to simple shear conditions was studied. The lateral surface of the specimens was investigated in a real-time mode with the aid of a high-speed infra-red camera CEDIP Silver 450M. The temperature field distribution obtained at different time made it possible to trace the evolution of plastic strain localization. The process of target perforation involving plug formation and ejection was examined using a high-speed infra-red camera and a VISAR velocity measurement system. The microstructure of tested specimens was analyzed using an optical interferometer-profilometer and a scanning electron microscope. The development of plastic shear instability regions has been simulated numerically.

  13. Deep soil compaction as a method of ground improvement and to stabilization of wastes and slopes with danger of liquefaction, determining the modulus of deformation and shear strength parameters of loose rock.

    PubMed

    Lersow, M

    2001-01-01

    --Surface Mining, 1995;51(1):39-47] improved a direct procedure, the so-called plate-loading test. With this improved procedure, it is possible to produce profiles of deformation parameters and shear-strength parameters of the loose rock. On this basis the settlement behavior and the bearing behavior of the ground can be described. The PDV-BS cone-penetration test and the pressiometer test are compared and the reliability of the soil mechanical indexes are assessed critically. The PDV-BS can be used as a calibration test for cone penetration tests as well as for the calibration of pressiometer tests. With the application of a PDV-BS and a pressiometer test in combination in a testing field, the anisotropy properties of the loose rock can be proved.

  14. Exposure of human megakaryocytes to high shear rates accelerates platelet production.

    PubMed

    Dunois-Lardé, Claire; Capron, Claude; Fichelson, Serge; Bauer, Thomas; Cramer-Bordé, Elisabeth; Baruch, Dominique

    2009-08-27

    Platelets originate from megakaryocytes (MKs) by cytoplasmic elongation into proplatelets. Direct platelet release is not seen in bone marrow hematopoietic islands. It was suggested that proplatelet fragmentation into platelets can occur intravascularly, yet evidence of its dependence on hydrodynamic forces is missing. Therefore, we investigated whether platelet production from MKs could be up-regulated by circulatory forces. Human mature MKs were perfused at a high shear rate on von Willebrand factor. Cells were observed in real time by videomicroscopy, and by confocal and electron microscopy after fixation. Dramatic cellular modifications followed exposure to high shear rates: 30% to 45% adherent MKs were converted into proplatelets and released platelets within 20 minutes, contrary to static conditions that required several hours, often without platelet release. Tubulin was present in elongated proplatelets and platelets, thus ruling out membrane tethers. By using inhibitors, we demonstrated the fundamental roles of microtubule assembly and MK receptor GPIb. Secretory granules were present along the proplatelet shafts and in shed platelets, as shown by P-selectin labeling. Platelets generated in vitro were functional since they responded to thrombin by P-selectin expression and cytoskeletal reorganization. In conclusion, MK exposure to high shear rates promotes platelet production via GPIb, depending on microtubule assembly and elongation.

  15. Enhanced Actuation Performance and Reduced Heat Generation in Shear-Bending Mode Actuator at High Temperature.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jianguo; Liu, Guoxi; Cheng, Jinrong; Dong, Shuxiang

    2016-08-01

    The actuation performance, strain hysteresis, and heat generation of the shear-bending mode actuators based on soft and hard BiScO3-PbTiO3 (BS-PT) ceramics were investigated under different thermal (from room temperature to 300 °C) and electrical loadings (from 2 to 10 kV/cm and from 1 to 1000 Hz). The actuator based on both soft and hard BS-PT ceramics worked stably at the temperature as high as 300 °C. The maximum working temperature of this shear-bending actuators is 150 °C higher than those of the traditional piezoelectric actuators based on commercial Pb(Zr, Ti)O3 materials. Furthermore, although the piezoelectric properties of soft-type ceramics based on BS-PT ceramics were superior to those of hard ceramics, the maximum displacement of the actuator based on hard ceramics was larger than that fabricated by soft ceramics at high temperature. The maximum displacement of the actuator based on hard ceramics was [Formula: see text] under an applied electric field of 10 kV/cm at 300 °C. The strain hysteresis and heat generation of the actuator based on hard ceramics was smaller than those of the actuator based on soft ceramics in the wide temperature range. These results indicated that the shear-bending actuator based on hard piezoelectric ceramics was more suitable for high-temperature piezoelectric applications.

  16. Preliminary modulus calculations for cellulose

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Young's modulus is a measure of the inherent stiffness of an elastic material. In the case of cellulose, it quantifies the ability of the material to undergo changes in length as tension or compression forces are applied. The modulus can be calculated by performing tensile tests on cotton fiber...

  17. On the measurement of shear elastic moduli and viscosities of erythrocyte plasma membranes by transient deformation in high frequency electric fields.

    PubMed Central

    Engelhardt, H; Sackmann, E

    1988-01-01

    We present a new method to measure the shear elastic moduli and viscosities of erythrocyte membranes which is based on the fixation and transient deformation of cells in a high-frequency electric field. A frequency domain of constant force (arising by Maxwell Wagner polarization) is selected to minimize dissipative effects. The electric force is thus calculated by electrostatic principles by considering the cell as a conducting body in a dielectric fluid and neglecting membrane polarization effects. The elongation A of the cells perpendicular to their rotational axis exhibits a linear regime (A proportional to Maxwell tension or to square of the electric field E2) at small, and a nonlinear regime (A proportional to square root of Maxwell tension or to the electric field E) at large extensions with a cross-over at A approximately 0.5 micron. The nonlinearity leads to amplitude-dependent response times and to differences of the viscoelastic response and relaxation functions. The cells exhibit pronounced yet completely reversible tip formations at large extensions. Absolute values of the shear elastic modulus, mu, and membrane viscosity, eta, are determined by assuming that field-induced stretching of the biconcave cell may be approximately described in terms of a sphere to ellipsoid deformation. The (nonlinear) elongation-vs.-force relationship calculated by the elastic theory of shells agress well with the experimentally observed curves and the values of mu = 6.1 x 10(-6) N/m and eta = 3.4 x 10(-7) Ns/m are in good agreement with the micropipette results of Evans and co-workers. The effect of physical, biochemical, and disease-induced structural changes on the viscoelastic parameters is studied. The variability of mu and eta of a cell population of a healthy donor is +/- 45%, which is mainly due to differences in the cell age. The average mu value of cells of different healthy donors scatters by +/- 18%. Osmotic deflation of the cells leads to a fivefold increase of

  18. Design and simulation of high-energy-density shear experiments on OMEGA and the NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doss, F. W.; Devolder, B.; di Stefano, C.; Flippo, K. A.; Kline, J. L.; Kot, L.; Loomis, E. N.; Merritt, E. C.; Perry, T. S.; MacLaren, S. A.; Wang, P.; Zhou, Y. K.

    2015-11-01

    High-energy-density shear experiments have been performed by LANL at the OMEGA Laser Facility and National Ignition Facility (NIF). The experiments have been simulated using the LANL radiation-hydrocode RAGE and have been used to assess turbulence models' ability to function in the high-energy-density, inertial-fusion-relevant regime. Beginning with the basic configuration of two counter-oriented shock-driven flows of > 100 km/s, which initiate a strong shear instability across an initially solid density, 20 micron thick Al plate, variations of the experiment have been performed and are studied. These variations have included increasing the fluid density (by modifying the metal plate material from Al to Ti), imposing sinusoidal perturbations on the plate, and directly modifying the plate's intrinsic surface roughness. In addition to examining the shear-induced mixing, the simulations reveal other physics, such as how the interaction of our indirect-drive halfraums with a mated shock tube's ablator impedes a stagnation-driven shock. This work is conducted by the US DOE by LANL under contract DE-AC52-06NA25396, and NIF facility operations by LLNL under contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  19. Three-dimensional shear wave imaging based on full-field laser speckle contrast imaging with one-dimensional mechanical scanning.

    PubMed

    Chao, Pei-Yu; Li, Pai-Chi

    2016-08-22

    The high imaging resolution and motion sensitivity of optical-based shear wave detection has made it an attractive technique in biomechanics studies with potential for improving the capabilities of shear wave elasticity imaging. In this study we implemented laser speckle contrast imaging for two-dimensional (X-Z) tracking of transient shear wave propagation in agarose phantoms. The mechanical disturbances induced by the propagation of the shear wave caused temporal and spatial fluctuations in the local speckle pattern, which manifested as local blurring. By mechanically moving the sample in the third dimension (Y), and performing two-dimensional shear wave imaging at every scan position, the three-dimensional shear wave velocity distribution of the phantom could be reconstructed. Based on comparisons with the reference shear wave velocity measurements obtained using a commercial ultrasound shear wave imaging system, the developed system can estimate the shear wave velocity with an error of less than 6% for homogeneous phantoms with shear moduli ranging from 1.52 kPa to 7.99 kPa. The imaging sensitivity of our system makes it capable of measuring small variations in shear modulus; the estimated standard deviation of the shear modulus was found to be less than 0.07 kPa. A submillimeter spatial resolution for three-dimensional shear wave imaging has been achieved, as demonstrated by the ability to detect a 1-mm-thick stiff plate embedded inside heterogeneous agarose phantoms.

  20. Documentation of programs that compute 1) quasi-static tilts produced by an expanding dislocation loop in an elastic and viscoelastic material, and 2) surface shear stresses, strains, and shear displacements produced by screw dislocations in a vertical slab with modulus contrast

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McHugh, Stuart

    1976-01-01

    The material in this report can be grouped into two categories: 1) programs that compute tilts produced by a vertically oriented expanding rectangular dislocation loop in an elastic or viscoelastic material and 2) programs that compute the shear stresses, strains, and shear displacements in a three-phase half-space (i.e. a half-space containing a vertical slab). Each section describes the relevant theory, and provides a detailed guide to the operation of the programs. A series of examples is provided at the end of each section.

  1. A Study of the Unstable Modes in High Mach Number Gaseous Jets and Shear Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassett, Gene Marcel

    1993-01-01

    Instabilities affecting the propagation of supersonic gaseous jets have been studied using high resolution computer simulations with the Piecewise-Parabolic-Method (PPM). These results are discussed in relation to jets from galactic nuclei. These studies involve a detailed treatment of a single section of a very long jet, approximating the dynamics by using periodic boundary conditions. Shear layer simulations have explored the effects of shear layers on the growth of nonlinear instabilities. Convergence of the numerical approximations has been tested by comparing jet simulations with different grid resolutions. The effects of initial conditions and geometry on the dominant disruptive instabilities have also been explored. Simulations of shear layers with a variety of thicknesses, Mach numbers and densities perturbed by incident sound waves imply that the time for the excited kink modes to grow large in amplitude and disrupt the shear layer is taug = (546 +/- 24) (M/4)^{1.7 } (Apert/0.02) ^{-0.4} delta/c, where M is the jet Mach number, delta is the half-width of the shear layer, and A_ {pert} is the perturbation amplitude. For simulations of periodic jets, the initial velocity perturbations set up zig-zag shock patterns inside the jet. In each case a single zig-zag shock pattern (an odd mode) or a double zig-zag shock pattern (an even mode) grows to dominate the flow. The dominant kink instability responsible for these shock patterns moves approximately at the linear resonance velocity, nu_ {mode} = cextnu_ {relative}/(cjet + c_ {ext}). For high resolution simulations (those with 150 or more computational zones across the jet width), the even mode dominates if the even penetration is higher in amplitude initially than the odd perturbation. For low resolution simulations, the odd mode dominates even for a stronger even mode perturbation. In high resolution simulations the jet boundary rolls up and large amounts of external gas are entrained into the jet. In low

  2. Ductility of Advanced High-Strength Steel in the Presence of a Sheared Edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggles, Tim; Cluff, Stephen; Miles, Michael; Fullwood, David; Daniels, Craig; Avila, Alex; Chen, Ming

    2016-07-01

    The ductility of dual-phase (DP) 980 and transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP) assisted bainitic ferritic (TBF) 980 steels was studied in the presence of a sheared edge. Specimens were tested in uniaxial tension in a standard test frame as well as in situ in the scanning electron microscope (SEM). Incremental tensile straining was done in the SEM with images taken at each strain increment. Then digital image correlation (DIC) was used to compute the effective strain at the level of the individual phases in the microstructure. Shear banding across multiple phases was seen in strained TBF specimens, while the DP specimens exhibited more of a patchwork strain pattern, with high strains concentrated in ferrite and low strains observed in the martensite. Two-point statistics were applied to the strain data from the DIC work and the corresponding microstructure images to evaluate the effect of phase hardness on localization and fracture. It was observed that the DP 980 material had a greater tendency for localization around hard phases compared to the TBF 980. This at least partially explains the greater ductility of the TBF material, especially in specimens where a sheared edge was present.

  3. Understanding High Recession Rates of Carbon Ablators Seen in Shear Tests in an Arc Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Driver, David M.; Olson, Michael W.; Barnhardt, Michael D.; MacLean, Matthew

    2010-01-01

    High rates of recession in arc jet shear tests of Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator (PICA) inspired a series of tests and analysis on FiberForm (a carbon preform used in the fabrication of PICA). Arc jet tests were performed on FiberForm in both air and pure nitrogen for stagnation and shear configurations. The nitrogen tests showed little or no recession, while the air tests of FiberForm showed recession rates similar to that of PICA (when adjusted for the difference in density). While mechanical erosion can not be ruled out, this is the first step in doing so. Analysis using a carbon oxidation boundary condition within DPLR was used to predict the recession rate of FiberForm. The analysis indicates that much of the anomalous recession behavior seen in shear tests may simply be an artifact of the non-flight like test configuration (copper upstream of the test article) a result of dissimilar enthalpy and oxygen concentration profiles on the copper. Shape change effects were also investigated and shown to be relatively small.

  4. Diverse forms of pulmonary hypertension remodel the arterial tree to a high shear phenotype.

    PubMed

    Allen, Roblee P; Schelegle, Edward S; Bennett, Stephen H

    2014-08-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is associated with progressive changes in arterial network complexity. An allometric model is derived that integrates diameter branching complexity between pulmonary arterioles of generation n and the main pulmonary artery (MPA) via a power-law exponent (X) in dn = dMPA2(-n/X) and the arterial area ratio β = 2(1-2/X). Our hypothesis is that diverse forms of PH demonstrate early decrements in X independent of etiology and pathogenesis, which alters the arteriolar shear stress load from a low-shear stress (X > 2, β > 1) to a high-shear stress phenotype (X < 2, β < 1). Model assessment was accomplished by comparing theoretical predictions to retrospective morphometric and hemodynamic measurements made available from a total of 221 PH-free and PH subjects diagnosed with diverse forms (World Health Organization; WHO groups I-IV) of PH: mitral stenosis, congenital heart disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary lung disease, chronic thromboembolism, idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH), familial (FPAH), collagen vascular disease, and methamphetamine exposure. X was calculated from pulmonary artery pressure (PPA), cardiac output (Q) and body weight (M), utilizing an allometric power-law prediction of X relative to a PH-free state. Comparisons of X between PAH-free and PAH subjects indicates a characteristic reduction in area that elevates arteriolar shear stress, which may contribute to mechanisms of endothelial dysfunction and injury before clinically defined thresholds of pulmonary vascular resistance and PH. We conclude that the evaluation of X may be of use in identifying reversible and irreversible phases of PH in the early course of the disease process.

  5. Stability of LAPONITE®-stabilized high internal phase Pickering emulsions under shear.

    PubMed

    Dinkgreve, M; Velikov, K P; Bonn, D

    2016-08-17

    Colloidal particles are often used to make Pickering emulsions that are reported to be very stable. Commonly the stabilization is a combined effect of particle adsorbing at the fluid interface and a particle network in the continuous phase; the contribution of each to the overall stability is difficult to assess. We investigate the role of LAPONITE® particles on high internal phase emulsion stability by considering three different situations: emulsion stabilization by surfactant only, by surfactant plus clay particles, and finally clay particles only. To clarify the structure of the emulsion and the role of the clay particles, we have succeeded in fluorescently labelling the clay particles by adsorbing the dye onto the particle surfaces. This allows us to show directly using confocal microscopy, that the clay particles are not only located at the interface but also aggregate and form a gel in the continuous aqueous phase. We show that the emulsions in the presence of surfactant (with or without clay) are stable to coalescence and shear. Without surfactant (with only LAPONITE® as stabilizer) the emulsions are stable to coalescence for several weeks, however they destabilize rapidly under shear. Our results suggest that the formation of the emulsions is mostly due to gel formation of the clay particles in the continuous phase, rather than that the clay is an emulsifier. This gel formation also accounts for the instability of the emulsions to shear that we observe caused by shear thinning of the continuous gel and inability of the adsorbed particles to rearrange effectively around the droplets due to their attractive nature.

  6. Monitoring of high-intensity focused ultrasound treatment by shear wave elastography induced by two-dimensional-array therapeutic transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasaki, Ryosuke; Takagi, Ryo; Nagaoka, Ryo; Jimbo, Hayato; Yoshizawa, Shin; Saijo, Yoshifumi; Umemura, Shin-ichiro

    2016-07-01

    Shear wave elastography (SWE) is expected to be a noninvasive monitoring method of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment. However, conventional SWE techniques encounter difficulty in inducing shear waves with adequate displacements in deep tissue. To observe tissue coagulation at the HIFU focal depth via SWE, in this study, we propose using a two-dimensional-array therapeutic transducer for not only HIFU exposure but also creating shear sources. The results show that the reconstructed shear wave velocity maps detected the coagulated regions as the area of increased propagation velocity even in deep tissue. This suggests that “HIFU-push” shear elastography is a promising solution for the purpose of coagulation monitoring in deep tissue, because push beams irradiated by the HIFU transducer can naturally reach as deep as the tissue to be coagulated by the same transducer.

  7. Realization of Combined Diagnosis/Treatment System By Ultrasound Strain Measurement-Based Shear Modulus Reconstruction/Imaging Technique Examples With Application on The New Type Interstitial RF Electromagnetic Wave Thermal Therapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    wave thermal therapy, tion I. INTRODUCTION ll known that the pathological stage of living human soft highly correlates with the static...demonstration on in vitro pork ribs and in vivo human breast tissues,” Phys. Med. Biol., vol. 45, pp. 1511-1520, 2000. [6] C. Sumi, “Toward 3D

  8. Shallow water sediment properties derived from high-frequency shear and interface waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewing, John; Carter, Jerry A.; Sutton, George H.; Barstow, Noel

    1992-04-01

    Low-frequency sound propagation in shallow water environments is not restricted to the water column but also involves the subbottom. Thus, as well as being important for geophysical description of the seabed, subbottom velocity/attenuation structure is essential input for predictive propagation models. To estimate this structure, bottom-mounted sources and receivers were used to make measurements of shear and compressional wave propagation in shallow water sediments of the continental shelf, usually where boreholes and high-resolution reflection profiles give substantial supporting geologic information about the subsurface. This colocation provides an opportunity to compare seismically determined estimates of physical properties of the seabed with the "ground truth" properties. Measurements were made in 1986 with source/detector offsets up to 200 m producing shear wave velocity versus depth profiles of the upper 30-50 m of the seabed (and P wave profiles to lesser depths). Measurements in 1988 were made with smaller source devices designed to emphasize higher frequencies and recorded by an array of 30 sensors spaced at 1-m intervals to improve spatial sampling and resolution of shallow structure. These investigations with shear waves have shown that significant lateral and vertical variations in the physical properties of the shallow seabed are common and are principally created by erosional and depositional processes associated with glacial cycles and sea level oscillations during the Quaternary. When the seabed structure is relatively uniform over the length of the profiles, the shear wave fields are well ordered, and the matching of the data with full waveform synthetics has been successful, producing velocity/attenuation models consistent with the subsurface lithology indicated by coring results. Both body waves and interface waves have been modeled for velocity/attenuation as a function of depth with the aid of synthetic seismograms and other analytical

  9. Rotational and magnetic shear stabilization of magnetohydrodynamic modes and turbulence in DIII-D high performance discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Lao, L.L.; Burrell, K.H.; Casper, T.S.

    1996-08-01

    The confinement and the stability properties of the DIII-D tokamak high performance discharges are evaluated in terms of rotational and magnetic shear with emphasis on the recent experimental results obtained from the negative central magnetic shear (NCS) experiments. In NCS discharges, a core transport barrier is often observed to form inside the NCS region accompanied by a reduction in core fluctuation amplitudes. Increasing negative magnetic shear contributes to the formation of this core transport barrier, but by itself is not sufficient to fully stabilize the toroidal drift mode (trapped- electron-{eta}{sub i}mode) to explain this formation. Comparison of the Doppler shift shear rate to the growth rate of the {eta}{sub i} mode suggests that the large core {bold E x B} flow shear can stabilize this mode and broaden the region of reduced core transport . Ideal and resistive stability analysis indicates the performance of NCS discharges with strongly peaked pressure profiles is limited by the resistive interchange mode to low {Beta}{sub N} {lt} 2.3. This mode is insensitive to the details of the rotational and the magnetic shear profiles. A new class of discharges which has a broad region of weak or slightly negative magnetic shear (WNS) is described. The WNS discharges have broader pressure profiles and higher values than the NCS discharges together with high confinement and high fusion reactivity.

  10. Effect of high molecular weight plasticizers on the gelatinization of starch under static and shear conditions.

    PubMed

    Taghizadeh, Ata; Favis, Basil D

    2013-02-15

    Starch gelatinization in the presence of high molecular weight polyol plasticizers and water was studied under static and dynamic conditions and was compared to a glycerol reference. For static gelatinization, glycerol, sorbitol, diglycerol and polyglycerol were examined using polarized light microscopy and differential scanning calorimetry. A wide range of starch/water/plasticizer compositions were prepared to explore the gelatinization regime for each plasticizer. The plasticizers show that the onset and conclusion temperatures for sorbitol and glycerol are in the same range and are lower than the other two plasticizers. On the other hand, polyglycerol shows a higher gelatinization temperature than diglycerol because of its higher molecular weight and viscosity. The results indicate that in the case of all plasticizers, increasing the water content tends to decrease the gelatinization temperature and, except for polyglycerol, increasing the plasticizer content increases the gelatinization temperature. In the case of polyglycerol, however, increasing the plasticizer content had the opposite effect and this was found to be related to the borderline solubility of polyglycerol in water. When the polyglycerol/water solubility was increased by increasing the temperature of the water/plasticizer/starch slurry, the gelatinization temperature dependence was found to be similar to the other polyols. A rheological technique was developed to study the dynamic gelatinization process by tracking the influence of shear on the complex viscosity in a couette flow system. Glycerol, diglycerol and sorbitol were subjected to different dynamic gelatinization treatments and the results were compared with static gelatinization. It is quantitatively shown that shear has a major effect on the gelatinization process. The conclusion temperature of gelatinization is significantly diminished (up to 21 °C) in the presence of shear whereas the onset temperature of gelatinization remains

  11. [Quality by design based high shear wet granulation process development for the microcrystalline cellulose].

    PubMed

    Luo, Gan; Xu, Bing; Sun, Fei; Cui, Xiang-long; Shi, Xin-yuan; Qiao, Yan-jiang

    2015-03-01

    The design space of the high shear wet granulation process was established and validated within the framework of quality by design (QbD). The system of microcrystalline cellulose-de-ioned water was used in this study. The median granule size and bulk density of granules were identified as critical quality attributes. Plackeet-Burmann experimental design was used to screen these factors as follows: dry mixing time, the impeller and chopper speed of dry mixing, water amount, water addition time, wet massing time, the impeller and chopper speed of wet massing and drying time. And the optimization was implemented with the central composite experimental design based on screened critical process parameters. The design space of the high shear wet granulation process was established based on the quadratic polynomial regression model. Since the P-values of both models were less than 0.05 and values of lack of fit were more than 0.1, the relationship between critical quality attributes and critical process parameters could be well described by the two models. The reliability of design space, illustrated by overlay plot, was improved with the addition of 95% confidence interval. For those granules whose process parameters were in the design space, the granule size could be controlled within 250 to 355 μm, and the bulk density could be controlled within a range of 0.4 to 0.6 g x cm(-3). The robustness and flexibility of the high shear wet granulation process have been enhanced via the establishment of the design space based on the QbD concept.

  12. Demonstration of high performance negative central magnetic shear discharges on the DIII-D tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Rice, B.W.; Burrell, K.H.; Lao, L.L.

    1996-01-01

    Reliable operation of discharges with negative central magnetic shear has led to significant increases in plasma performance and reactivity in both low confinement, L-mode, and high confinement, H-mode, regimes in the DIII-D tokamak. Using neutral beam injection early in the initial current ramp, a large range of negative shear discharges have been produced with durations lasting up to 3.2 s. The total non- inductive current (beam plus bootstrap) ranges from 50% to 80% in these discharges. In the region of shear reversal, significant peaking of the toroidal rotation [f{sub {phi}} {approx} 30-60 kHz] and ion temperature [T{sub i}(0) {approx} 15-22 keV] profiles are observed. In high power discharges with an L-mode edge, peaked density profiles are also observed. Confinement enhancement factors up to H {equivalent_to} {tau}{sub E}/{tau}{sub ITER-89P} {approx} 2.5 with an L-mode edge, and H {approx} 3.3 in an Edge Localized Mode (ELM)-free H-mode, are obtained. Transport analysis shows both ion thermal diffusivity and particle diffusivity to be near or below standard neoclassical values in the core. Large pressure peaking in L- mode leads to high disruptivity with {Beta}{sub N} {equivalent_to} {Beta}{sub T}/(I/aB) {<=} 2.3, while broader pressure profiles in H- mode gives low disruptivity with {Beta}{sub N} {<=} 4.2.

  13. Application of MMC model on simulation of shearing process of thick hot-rolled high strength steel plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Liang; Li, Shuhui; Yang, Bing; Gao, Yongsheng

    2013-12-01

    Shear operation is widely used as the first step in sheet metal forming to cut the sheet or plate into the required size. The shear of thick hot-rolled High Strength Steel (HSS) requires large shearing force and the sheared edge quality is relatively poor because of the large thickness and high strength compared with the traditional low carbon steel. Bad sheared edge quality will easily lead to edge cracking during the post-forming process. This study investigates the shearing process of thick hot-rolled HSS plate metal, which is generally exploited as the beam of heavy trucks. The Modified Mohr-Coulomb fracture criterion (MMC) is employed in numerical simulation to calculate the initiation and propagation of cracks during the process evolution. Tensile specimens are designed to obtain various stress states in tension. Equivalent fracture strains are measured with Digital Image Correlation (DIC) equipment to constitute the fracture locus. Simulation of the tension test is carried out to check the fracture model. Then the MMC model is applied to the simulation of the shearing process, and the simulation results show that the MMC model predicts the ductile fracture successfully.

  14. Momentum Transport Studies in High E x B Shear Plasmas in NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    Solomon, W M; Bell, R E; LeBlanc, B P; Menard, J E; Rewoldt, G; Wang, W; Levinton, F M; Yuh, H

    2008-06-26

    Experiments have been conducted on NSTX to study both steady state and perturbative mo mentum transport. These studies are unique in their parameter space under investigation, where the low aspect ratio of NSTX results in rapid plasma rotation with E x B shearing rates high enough to suppress low-k turbulence. In some cases, the ratio of momentum to energy confinement time is found to exceed five. Momentum pinch velocities of order 10-40 m/s are inferred from the measured angular momentum flux evolution after non-resonant magnetic perturbations are applied to brake the plasma.

  15. Turbulence measurement in a reacting and non-reacting shear layer at a high subsonic Mach number

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, C. T.; Marek, C. J.; Wey, C.; Jones, R. A.; Smith, M. J.

    1993-01-01

    The results of two component velocity and turbulence measurements are presented which were obtained on a planar reacting shear layer burning hydrogen. Quantitative LDV and temperature measurements are presented with and without chemical reaction within the shear layer at a velocity ratio of 0.34 and a high speed Mach number of 0.7. The comparison showed that the reacting shear layer grew faster than that without reaction. Using a reduced width coordinate, the reacting and non-reacting profiles were very similar. The peak turbulence for both cases was 20 percent.

  16. Dissolution and reconstitution of casein micelle containing dairy powders by high shear using ultrasonic and physical methods.

    PubMed

    Chandrapala, Jayani; Martin, Gregory J O; Kentish, Sandra E; Ashokkumar, Muthupandian

    2014-09-01

    The effect of shear on the solubilization of a range of dairy powders was investigated. The rate of solubilization of low solubility milk protein concentrate and micellar casein powders was examined during ultrasonication, high pressure homogenization and high-shear rotor-stator mixing and compared to low-shear overhead stirring. The high shear techniques were able to greatly accelerate the solubilization of these powders by physically breaking apart the powder agglomerates and accelerating the release of individual casein micelles into solution. This was achieved without affecting the structure of the solubilized proteins. The effect of high shear on the re-establishment of the mineral balance between the casein micelles and the serum was examined by monitoring the pH of the reconstituted skim milk powder after prior exposure to ultrasonication. Only minor differences in the re-equilibration of the pH were observed after sonication for up to 3 min, suggesting that the localized high shear forces exerted by sonication did not significantly affect the mass transfer of minerals from within the casein micelles.

  17. Turbulence modeling of free shear layers for high-performance aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sondak, Douglas L.

    1993-01-01

    The High Performance Aircraft (HPA) Grand Challenge of the High Performance Computing and Communications (HPCC) program involves the computation of the flow over a high performance aircraft. A variety of free shear layers, including mixing layers over cavities, impinging jets, blown flaps, and exhaust plumes, may be encountered in such flowfields. Since these free shear layers are usually turbulent, appropriate turbulence models must be utilized in computations in order to accurately simulate these flow features. The HPCC program is relying heavily on parallel computers. A Navier-Stokes solver (POVERFLOW) utilizing the Baldwin-Lomax algebraic turbulence model was developed and tested on a 128-node Intel iPSC/860. Algebraic turbulence models run very fast, and give good results for many flowfields. For complex flowfields such as those mentioned above, however, they are often inadequate. It was therefore deemed that a two-equation turbulence model will be required for the HPA computations. The k-epsilon two-equation turbulence model was implemented on the Intel iPSC/860. Both the Chien low-Reynolds-number model and a generalized wall-function formulation were included.

  18. High temperature gradient micro-sensor for wall shear stress and flow direction measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghouila-Houri, C.; Claudel, J.; Gerbedoen, J.-C.; Gallas, Q.; Garnier, E.; Merlen, A.; Viard, R.; Talbi, A.; Pernod, P.

    2016-12-01

    We present an efficient and high-sensitive thermal micro-sensor for near wall flow parameters measurements. By combining substrate-free wire structure and mechanical support using silicon oxide micro-bridges, the sensor achieves a high temperature gradient, with wires reaching 1 mm long for only 3 μm wide over a 20 μm deep cavity. Elaborated to reach a compromise solution between conventional hot-films and hot-wire sensors, the sensor presents a high sensitivity to the wall shear stress and to the flow direction. The sensor can be mounted flush to the wall for research studies such as turbulence and near wall shear flow analysis, and for technical applications, such as flow control and separation detection. The fabrication process is CMOS-compatible and allows on-chip integration. The present letter describes the sensor elaboration, design, and micro-fabrication, then the electrical and thermal characterizations, and finally the calibration experiments in a turbulent boundary layer wind tunnel.

  19. Ideal pure shear strength of aluminum and copper.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Shigenobu; Li, Ju; Yip, Sidney

    2002-10-25

    Although aluminum has a smaller modulus in [111]<112> shear than that of copper, we find by first-principles calculation that its ideal shear strength is larger because of a more extended deformation range before softening. This fundamental behavior, along with an abnormally high intrinsic stacking fault energy and a different orientation dependence on pressure hardening, are traced to the directional nature of its bonding. By a comparative analysis of ion relaxations and valence charge redistributions in aluminum and copper, we arrive at contrasting descriptions of bonding characteristics in these two metals that can explain their relative strength and deformation behavior.

  20. Manufacture of concentrated, lipid-based oxygen microbubble emulsions by high shear homogenization and serial concentration.

    PubMed

    Thomson, Lindsay M; Polizzotti, Brian D; McGowan, Frances X; Kheir, John N

    2014-05-26

    Gas-filled microbubbles have been developed as ultrasound contrast and drug delivery agents. Microbubbles can be produced by processing surfactants using sonication, mechanical agitation, microfluidic devices, or homogenization. Recently, lipid-based oxygen microbubbles (LOMs) have been designed to deliver oxygen intravenously during medical emergencies, reversing life-threatening hypoxemia, and preventing subsequent organ injury, cardiac arrest, and death. We present methods for scaled-up production of highly oxygenated microbubbles using a closed-loop high-shear homogenizer. The process can produce 2 L of concentrated LOMs (90% by volume) in 90 min. Resulting bubbles have a mean diameter of ~2 μm, and a rheologic profile consistent with that of blood when diluted to 60 volume %. This technique produces LOMs in high capacity and with high oxygen purity, suggesting that this technique may be useful for translational research labs.

  1. Modulus enhancement of natural rubber through the dispersion size reduction of protein/fiber aggregates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Improved mechanical properties of natural rubber are required for various rubber applications. Aggregates of protein and fiber that constitute soy protein concentrate were shear-reduced and used to enhance the tensile modulus of natural rubber. The aqueous dispersion of the shear-reduced aggregates ...

  2. High-order face-shear modes of relaxor-PbTiO3 crystals for piezoelectric motor applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ci, Penghong; Liu, Guoxi; Chen, Zhijiang; Zhang, Shujun; Dong, Shuxiang

    2014-06-01

    The face-shear vibration modes of [011] poled Zt ± 45° cut relaxor-PT crystals and their applications for linear piezoelectric motors were investigated. Unlike piezoelectric ceramics, the rotated crystal was found to exhibit asymmetric face-shear deformations, and its two high-order face-shear modes degraded into two non-isomorphic modes. As an application example, a standing wave ultrasonic linear motor (10 × 10 × 2 mm3) operating in high-order face-shear vibration modes was developed. The motor exhibits a large driving force (1.5 N) under a low driving voltage (22 Vpp). These findings could provide guidance for design of crystal resonance devices.

  3. An Evaluation of the Iosipescu Specimen for Composite Materials Shear Property Measurement. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, Henjen

    1991-01-01

    accuracy of the shear modulus values are made, and the implications for shear strength measurement discussed. Further application of the Iosipescu shear test to woven fabric composites is presented. The limitations of the traditional strain gage instrumentation on the satin weave and high tow plain weave fabrics is discussed. Test results of a epoxy based aluminum particulate composite is also presented. A modification of the Iosipescu specimen is proposed and investigated experimentally and numerically. It is shown that the proposed new specimen design provides a more uniform shear stress field in the test section and greatly reduces the normal and shear stress concentrations in the vicinity of the notches. While the fabrication and the material cost of the proposed specimen is tremendously reduced, it is shown the accuracy of the shear modulus measurement is not sacrificed.

  4. Elastic modulus of cetacean auditory ossicles.

    PubMed

    Tubelli, Andrew A; Zosuls, Aleks; Ketten, Darlene R; Mountain, David C

    2014-05-01

    In order to model the hearing capabilities of marine mammals (cetaceans), it is necessary to understand the mechanical properties, such as elastic modulus, of the middle ear bones in these species. Biologically realistic models can be used to investigate the biomechanics of hearing in cetaceans, much of which is currently unknown. In the present study, the elastic moduli of the auditory ossicles (malleus, incus, and stapes) of eight species of cetacean, two baleen whales (mysticete) and six toothed whales (odontocete), were measured using nanoindentation. The two groups of mysticete ossicles overall had lower average elastic moduli (35.2 ± 13.3 GPa and 31.6 ± 6.5 GPa) than the groups of odontocete ossicles (53.3 ± 7.2 GPa to 62.3 ± 4.7 GPa). Interior bone generally had a higher modulus than cortical bone by up to 36%. The effects of freezing and formalin-fixation on elastic modulus were also investigated, although samples were few and no clear trend could be discerned. The high elastic modulus of the ossicles and the differences in the elastic moduli between mysticetes and odontocetes are likely specializations in the bone for underwater hearing.

  5. Microstructural characteristics of adiabatic shear localization in a metastable beta titanium alloy deformed at high strain rate and elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Zhan, Hongyi; Zeng, Weidong; Wang, Gui; Kent, Damon; Dargusch, Matthew

    2015-04-15

    The microstructural evolution and grain refinement within adiabatic shear bands in the Ti6554 alloy deformed at high strain rates and elevated temperatures have been characterized using transmission electron microscopy. No stress drops were observed in the corresponding stress–strain curve, indicating that the initiation of adiabatic shear bands does not lead to the loss of load capacity for the Ti6554 alloy. The outer region of the shear bands mainly consists of cell structures bounded by dislocation clusters. Equiaxed subgrains in the core area of the shear band can be evolved from the subdivision of cell structures or reconstruction and transverse segmentation of dislocation clusters. It is proposed that dislocation activity dominates the grain refinement process. The rotational recrystallization mechanism may operate as the kinetic requirements for it are fulfilled. The coexistence of different substructures across the shear bands implies that the microstructural evolution inside the shear bands is not homogeneous and different grain refinement mechanisms may operate simultaneously to refine the structure. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • The microstructure within the adiabatic shear band was characterized by TEM. • No stress drops were observed in the corresponding stress–strain curve. • Dislocation activity dominated the grain refinement process. • The kinetic requirements for rotational recrystallization mechanism were fulfilled. • Different grain refinement mechanisms operated simultaneously to refine the structure.

  6. Ultrafast Harmonic Coherent Compound (UHCC) imaging for high frame rate echocardiography and Shear Wave Elastography

    PubMed Central

    Correia, Mafalda; Provost, Jean; Chatelin, Simon; Villemain, Olivier; Tanter, Mickael; Pernot, Mathieu

    2016-01-01

    Transthoracic shear wave elastography of the myocardium remains very challenging due to the poor quality of transthoracic ultrafast imaging and the presence of clutter noise, jitter, phase aberration, and ultrasound reverberation. Several approaches, such as, e.g., diverging-wave coherent compounding or focused harmonic imaging have been proposed to improve the imaging quality. In this study, we introduce ultrafast harmonic coherent compounding (UHCC), in which pulse-inverted diverging-waves are emitted and coherently compounded, and show that such an approach can be used to enhance both Shear Wave Elastography (SWE) and high frame rate B-mode Imaging. UHCC SWE was first tested in phantoms containing an aberrating layer and was compared against pulse-inversion harmonic imaging and against ultrafast coherent compounding (UCC) imaging at the fundamental frequency. In-vivo feasibility of the technique was then evaluated in six healthy volunteers by measuring myocardial stiffness during diastole in transthoracic imaging. We also demonstrated that improvements in imaging quality could be achieved using UHCC B-mode imaging in healthy volunteers. The quality of transthoracic images of the heart was found to be improved with the number of pulse-inverted diverging waves with reduction of the imaging mean clutter level up to 13.8-dB when compared against UCC at the fundamental frequency. These results demonstrated that UHCC B-mode imaging is promising for imaging deep tissues exposed to aberration sources with a high frame-rate. PMID:26890730

  7. A quality by design approach to scale-up of high-shear wet granulation process.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Preetanshu; Badawy, Sherif

    2016-01-01

    High-shear wet granulation is a complex process that in turn makes scale-up a challenging task. Scale-up of high-shear wet granulation process has been studied extensively in the past with various different methodologies being proposed in the literature. This review article discusses existing scale-up principles and categorizes the various approaches into two main scale-up strategies - parameter-based and attribute-based. With the advent of quality by design (QbD) principle in drug product development process, an increased emphasis toward the latter approach may be needed to ensure product robustness. In practice, a combination of both scale-up strategies is often utilized. In a QbD paradigm, there is also a need for an increased fundamental and mechanistic understanding of the process. This can be achieved either by increased experimentation that comes at higher costs, or by using modeling techniques, that are also discussed as part of this review.

  8. Structure of the Highly Sheared Tropical Storm Chantal During CAMEX-4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heymsfield, G. M.; Halverson, J.; Ritchie, E.; Simpson, Joanne; Molinari, J.; Tian, L.

    2004-01-01

    NASA's 4th Convection and Moisture Experiment (CAMEX-4) focused on Atlantic hurricanes during the 2001 hurricane season and it involved both NASA and NOAA participation. The NASA ER-2 and DC-8 aircraft were instrumented with unique remote sensing instruments to help increase the overall understanding of hurricanes. This paper is concerned about one of the storms studied, Tropical Storm Chantal, that was a weak storm which failed to intense into a hurricane. One of the practical questions of high importance is why some tropical stoins intensify into hurricanes, and others remain weak or die altogether. The magnitude of the difference between the horizontal winds at lower levels and upper altitudes in a tropical storm, i.e., the wind shear, is one important quantity that can affect the intensification of a tropical storm. Strong shear as was present during Tropical Storm Chantal s lifetime and it was detrimental to its intensification. The paper presents an analysis of unique aircraft observations collected from Chantal including an on-board radar, radiometers, dropsondes, and flight level measurements. These measurements have enabled us to examine the internal structure of the winds and thermal structure of Chantal. Most of the previous studies have involved intense hurricanes that overcame the effects of shear and this work has provided new insights into what prevents a weaker storm from intensifying. The storm had extremely intense thunderstorms and rainfall, yet its main circulation was confined to low levels of the atmosphere. Chantal's thermal structure was not configured properly for the storm to intensify. It is most typical that huricanes have a warm core structure where warm temperatures in upper levels of a storm s circulation help intensify surface winds and lower its central pressure. Chantal had two weaker warm layers instead of a well-defined warm core. These layers have been related to the horizontal and vertical winds and precipitation structure and

  9. High Temperature Shear Horizontal Electromagnetic Acoustic Transducer for Guided Wave Inspection

    PubMed Central

    Kogia, Maria; Gan, Tat-Hean; Balachandran, Wamadeva; Livadas, Makis; Kappatos, Vassilios; Szabo, Istvan; Mohimi, Abbas; Round, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Guided Wave Testing (GWT) using novel Electromagnetic Acoustic Transducers (EMATs) is proposed for the inspection of large structures operating at high temperatures. To date, high temperature EMATs have been developed only for thickness measurements and they are not suitable for GWT. A pair of water-cooled EMATs capable of exciting and receiving Shear Horizontal (SH0) waves for GWT with optimal high temperature properties (up to 500 °C) has been developed. Thermal and Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) simulations of the EMAT design have been performed and experimentally validated. The optimal thermal EMAT design, material selection and operating conditions were calculated. The EMAT was successfully tested regarding its thermal and GWT performance from ambient temperature to 500 °C. PMID:27110792

  10. Deformation and failure of OFHC copper under high strain rate shear compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggiero, Andrew; Testa, Gabriel; Bonora, Nicola; Iannitti, Gianluca; Persechino, Italo; Colliander, Magnus Hörnqvist

    2017-01-01

    Hat-shaped specimen geometries were developed to generate high strain, high-strain-rates deformation under prescribed conditions. These geometries offer also the possibility to investigate the occurrence of ductile rupture under low or negative stress triaxiality, where most failure models fail. In this work, three tophat geometries were designed, by means of extensive numerical simulation, to obtain desired stress triaxiality values within the shear region that develops across the ligament. Material failure was simulated using the Continuum Damage Model (CDM) formulation with a unilateral condition for damage accumulation and validated by comparing with quasi-static and high strain rate compression tests results on OFHC copper. Preliminary results seem to indicate that ductile tearing initiates at the specimen corner location where positive stress triaxiality occurs because of local rotation and eventually propagates along the ligament.

  11. Identification of high shears and compressive discontinuities in the inner heliosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Greco, A.; Perri, S.

    2014-04-01

    Two techniques, the Partial Variance of Increments (PVI) and the Local Intermittency Measure (LIM), have been applied and compared using MESSENGER magnetic field data in the solar wind at a heliocentric distance of about 0.3 AU. The spatial properties of the turbulent field at different scales, spanning the whole inertial range of magnetic turbulence down toward the proton scales have been studied. LIM and PVI methodologies allow us to identify portions of an entire time series where magnetic energy is mostly accumulated, and regions of intermittent bursts in the magnetic field vector increments, respectively. A statistical analysis has revealed that at small time scales and for high level of the threshold, the bursts present in the PVI and the LIM series correspond to regions of high shear stress and high magnetic field compressibility.

  12. Chronic high blood flow potentiates shear stress-induced release of NO in arteries of aged rats

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Changdong; Huang, An; Kaley, Gabor; Sun, Dong

    2011-01-01

    Aging impairs shear-stress-dependent dilation of arteries via increased superoxide production, decreased SOD activity, and decreased activation of endothelial nitric oxide (NO) synthase (eNOS). In the present study, we investigated whether chronic increases in shear stress, elicited by increases in blood flow, would improve vascular endothelial function of aged rats. To this end, second-order mesenteric arteries of young (6 mo) and aged (24 mo) male Fischer-344 rats were selectively ligated for 3 wk to elevate blood flow in a first-order artery [high blood flow (HF)]. An in vitro study was then conducted on first-order arteries with HF and normal blood flow (NF) to assess shear stress (1, 10, and 20 dyn/cm2)-induced release of NO into the perfusate. In HF arteries of both age groups, shear stress-induced NO production increased significantly. In 24-mo-old rats, the reduced shear stress-induced NO production in NF arteries was normalized by HF to a level similar to that in NF arteries of 6-mo-old rats. The increased NO production in HF arteries of 24-mo-old rats was associated with increased shear stress-induced dilation, expression of eNOS protein, and shear stress-induced eNOS phosphorylation. Wortmannin, a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitor, reduced shear stress-induced eNOS phosphorylation and vasodilation. Superoxide production decreased significantly in HF compared with NF arteries in 24-mo-old rats. The decreased superoxide production was associated with significant increases in CuZn-SOD and extracellular SOD protein expressions and total SOD activity. These results suggest that stimulation with chronic HF restores shear-stress-induced activation of eNOS and antioxidant ability in aged arteries. PMID:17873019

  13. Development of K-Basin High-Strength Homogeneous Sludge Simulants and Correlations Between Unconfined Compressive Strength and Shear Strength

    SciTech Connect

    Onishi, Yasuo; Baer, Ellen BK; Chun, Jaehun; Yokuda, Satoru T.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Sande, Susan; Buchmiller, William C.

    2011-02-20

    K-Basin sludge will be stored in the Sludge Transport and Storage Containers (STSCs) at an interim storage location on Central Plateau before being treated and packaged for disposal. During the storage period, sludge in the STSCs may consolidate/agglomerate, potentially resulting in high-shear-strength material. The Sludge Treatment Project (STP) plans to use water jets to retrieve K-Basin sludge after the interim storage. STP has identified shear strength to be a key parameter that should be bounded to verify the operability and performance of sludge retrieval systems. Determining the range of sludge shear strength is important to gain high confidence that a water-jet retrieval system can mobilize stored K-Basin sludge from the STSCs. The shear strength measurements will provide a basis for bounding sludge properties for mobilization and erosion. Thus, it is also important to develop potential simulants to investigate these phenomena. Long-term sludge storage tests conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) show that high-uranium-content K-Basin sludge can self-cement and form a strong sludge with a bulk shear strength of up to 65 kPa. Some of this sludge has 'paste' and 'chunks' with shear strengths of approximately 3-5 kPa and 380-770 kPa, respectively. High-uranium-content sludge samples subjected to hydrothermal testing (e.g., 185 C, 10 hours) have been observed to form agglomerates with a shear strength up to 170 kPa. These high values were estimated by measured unconfined compressive strength (UCS) obtained with a pocket penetrometer. Due to its ease of use, it is anticipated that a pocket penetrometer will be used to acquire additional shear strength data from archived K-Basin sludge samples stored at the PNNL Radiochemical Processing Laboratory (RPL) hot cells. It is uncertain whether the pocket penetrometer provides accurate shear strength measurements of the material. To assess the bounding material strength and potential for erosion, it

  14. Frictional strength of wet- and dry- talc gouge in high-velocity shear experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, X.; Reches, Z.; Elwood Madden, A. S.

    2015-12-01

    The strength of the creeping segment of the San Andres fault may be controlled by the distinct weakness and stability of talc (Moore & Rymer, 2007). We analyze talc frictional strength at high slip-velocity of 0.002 - 0.66 m/s, long slip-distances of 0.01 m to 33 m, and normal stresses up to 4.1 MPa. This analysis bridges the gap between nucleation stage of low velocity/distance, and the frictional behavior during large earthquakes. We tested wet and dry samples of pure talc gouge in a confined rotary cell, and continuously monitored the slip-velocity, stresses, dilation and temperature. We run 29 experiments of single and stepped velocities to obtain 243 values of quasi-static frictional coefficients. Dry talc gouge showed distinct slip-strengthening: friction coefficient of µ ~0.4 at short slip-distances of D < 0.1 m, and it increased systematically to µ ~0.8 at slip-distances of D = 0.1- 1 m; at D > 1 m, the frictional strength saturated at µ= 0.8 - 1 level. Wet talc gouge (16-20% water) displayed low frictional strength of µ= 0.1-0.3, in agreement with published triaxial tests. The stepped-velocity runs revealed a consistent velocity-strengthening trend. For a velocity jump from V1 to V2, we used VD = (µ2 -µ1)/ln (V2/V1), and found that on average VD = 0.06 and 0.03 for dry and wet talc, respectively, and for slip distances shorter than 1 m. Microstructural analysis of post-shearing wet talc gouge revealed extreme slip localization to a principal-slip-zone of a few microns, and significant shear compaction of 10-30%. In contrast, dry talc gouge exhibited distributed shear in a wide zone and systematic shear dilation (10-50%). We propose slip along weak interlayer talc plates and thermal-pressurization as the possible weakening mechanisms for wet talc. The development of distributed secondary fault network along with substantial grain crushing is responsible for slip-strengthening in dry condition. Fig. 1. Friction maps of talc gouge as function of slip

  15. Experimental and Computational Study of the Shearing Resistance of Polyurea at High Pressures and High Strain Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grujicic, Mica; Yavari, R.; Snipes, J. S.; Ramaswami, S.; Jiao, T.; Clifton, R. J.

    2015-02-01

    Mechanical response of polyurea, a nanophase segregated elastomeric co-polymer, is investigated using all-atom, equilibrium, molecular-dynamics methods and tools. Specifically, the effects of high pressure (1-30 GPa) and high strain rate (105-106 s-1) on the shearing resistance of polyurea are examined. Such loading conditions are encountered by polyurea coatings subjected to impact by high-velocity projectiles, shell shrapnel, and improvised explosive device fragments. Computed results are compared with their experimental counterparts obtained using the so-called pressure-shear plate impact experiments. Computed results have also been rationalized in terms of the nanosegregated polyurea microstructure consisting of rod-shaped, discrete, the so-called hard domains embedded in a highly compliant, the so-called soft matrix. By analyzing molecular-level microstructure and its evolution during high-rate deformation and under high imposed pressures, an attempt is made to identify and quantify main phenomena in viscous/inelastic deformation and microstructure-reorganization processes that are most likely responsible for the observed mechanical response of polyurea.

  16. Experimental analysis of the effect of vegetation on flow and bed shear stress distribution in high-curvature bends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Termini, Donatella

    2016-12-01

    The cross-sectional circulation, which develops in meandering bends, exerts an important role in velocity and the boundary shear stress redistributions. This paper considers the effect of vegetation on cross-sectional flow and bed shear distribution along a high-curvature bend. The analysis is conducted with the aid of data collected in a large-amplitude meandering flume during a reference experiment without vegetation and an experiment with vegetation on the bed. The results show that the presence of vegetation modifies the curvature-induced flow pattern and the directionality of turbulent structures. In fact, in the presence of vegetation, the turbulent structures tend to develop within and between the vegetated elements. The pattern of cross-sectional flow, modified by the presence of vegetation, affects the bed shear stress distribution along the bend so that the core of the highest value of the bed shear stress does not reach the outer bank.

  17. Lower hybrid current drive in FTU high density shear reversed discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuccillo, A. A.; Barbato, E.; Crisanti, F.; Panaccione, L.; Pericoli, V.; Podda, S.; Cirant, S.; Acitelli, L.; Alladio, F.; Amadeo, P.; Angelini, B.; Apicella, M. L.; Apruzzese, G.; Bertocchi, A.; Borra, M.; Bracco, G.; Bruschi, A.; Buceti, G.; Buratti, P.; Cardinali, A.; Centioli, C.; Cesario, R.; Ciattaglia, S.; Ciotti, M.; Cocilovo, V.; De Angelis, R.; De Marco, F.; Esposito, B.; Frigione, D.; Gabellieri, L.; Gatti, G.; Giovannozzi, E.; Gourlan, C.; Granucci, G.; Grolli, M.; Imparato, A.; Kroegler, H.; Leigheb, M.; Lovisetto, L.; Maddaluno, G.; Maffia, G.; Mancuso, A.; Marinucci, M.; Mazzitelli, G.; Micozzi, P.; Mirizzi, F.; Orsitto, P.; Pacella, D.; Panella, M.; Pieroni, L.; Righetti, G. B.; Romanelli, F.; Santini, F.; Simonetto, A.; Sozzi, C.; Sternini, S.; Tudisco, O.; Valente, F.; Vitale, V.; Vlad, G.; Zanza, V.; Zerbini, M.

    1997-04-01

    Results are reported of the 8 GHz Lower Hybrid experiments on FTU after the installation of the new toroidal limiter. A figure of merit of the Current Drive efficiency ηCD≈0.11ṡ1020 A/Wm2 is estimated for plasma density n¯e=1020 m-3 and no appreciable broadening of the launched frequency is detected. In low density experiments sawteeth are stabilised and m=1 activity is present in the plasma. Shear reversed discharges with large reversal radius, rs/a≈0.5, are obtained at higher density, lower temperature, BT=4 T, qa≈5.5, by off-axis LH CD. The reversed configurations exhibit high central temperature coexisting with regular m=2, n=1 relaxations of large amplitude and are maintained up to LH switch off. At higher magnetic field, B=5.2 T, qa≈7, irregular DTM crashes are present during the whole LH pulse. Confinement time of radiofrequency heated discharges (PLH=0.5÷2ṡPOH) exhibits the same behaviour of FTU ohmic discharges following the ITER89-P scaling. Preliminary results of central 140 GHz Electron Cyclotron Resonant Heating (ECRH) during the plasma current ramp-up, aimed at obtaining shear reversed configurations are also reported.

  18. High-spin states in {sup 205}Rn: A new shears band structure?

    SciTech Connect

    Novak, J.R.; Beausang, C.W.; Casten, R.F.; Cata Danil, G.; Cooper, J.R.; Juutinen, S.; Kruecken, R.; Liu, B.; Socci, T.; Thomas, J.T.; Zamfir, N.V.; Zhang, J.; Amzal, N.; Greenlees, P.T.; Cata Danil, G.; Zamfir, N.V.; Cocks, J.F.; Greenlees, P.T.; Helariutta, K.; Jones, P.; Julin, R.; Kankaanpaeae, H.; Kettunen, H.; Kuusiniemi, P.; Leino, M.; Muikku, M.; Savelius, A.; Hannachi, F.; Zamfir, N.V.; Zhang, J.; Frauendorf, S.

    1999-06-01

    The high-spin structure of {sup 205}Rn has been investigated for the first time following the {sup 170}Er({sup 40}Ar,5n) and {sup 197}Au({sup 14}N,6n) reactions at beam energies of 183 MeV and 90{endash}110 MeV, respectively, using the Jurosphere and YRAST Ball arrays. Two new cascades have been identified which dominate the high-spin decay. One of these, consisting of ten stretched M1 transitions with unobserved E2 crossover transitions, is interpreted as a shears structure based on the {nu}i{sub 13/2}{sup {minus}1}{circle_times}{pi}i{sub 13/2}{sup 2} (or {nu}i{sub 13/2}{sup {minus}1}{circle_times}{pi}h{sub 9/2}i{sub 13/2}) configuration. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  19. Calculation of high frequency ultrasonic signals for shear wave insonification in solid material.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, V; Langenberg, K J; Chakhlov, S

    2004-04-01

    The goal of the theoretical part is to simulate an automatic ultrasonic inspection with contact technique shear wave probes, where the high frequency signals are captured and used to perform a reconstruction based on the synthetic aperture focusing method "SAFT". Therefore the ultrasonic probe, the scanning path and the defects are parameters in a CAD model. The scattering behavior of the defect is calculated by the Kirchhoff approximation in its elastodynamic version. The result of the simulation--the high frequency data--and the result of the SAFT-reconstructions are compared with experimental results on a steel test block with side drilled and flat bottom holes. The model is validated by the experiment. One of the applications of the model is to identify multiple reflections.

  20. A simple model to understand the role of membrane shear elasticity and stress-free shape on the motion of red blood cells in shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viallat, Annie; Abkarian, Manouk; Dupire, Jules

    2015-11-01

    The analytical model presented by Keller and Skalak on the dynamics of red blood cells in shear flow described the cell as a fluid ellipsoid of fixed shape. It was extended to introduce shear elasticity of the cell membrane. We further extend the model when the cell discoid physiological shape is not a stress-free shape. We show that spheroid stress-free shapes enables fitting experimental data with values of shear elasticity typical to that found with micropipettes and optical tweezers. For moderate shear rates (when RBCs keep their discoid shape) this model enables to quantitatively determine an effective cell viscosity, that combines membrane and hemoglobin viscosities and an effective shear modulus of the membrane that combines shear modulus and stress-free shape. This model allows determining RBC mechanical parameters both in the tanktreading regime for cells suspended in a high viscosity medium, and in the tumbling regime for cells suspended in a low viscosity medium. In this regime,a transition is predicted between a rigid-like tumbling motion and a fluid-like tumbling motion above a critical shear rate, which is directly related to the mechanical parameters of the cell. A*MIDEX (n ANR-11-IDEX-0001-02) funded by the ''Investissements d'Avenir'', Region Languedoc-Roussillon, Labex NUMEV (ANR-10-LABX-20), BPI France project DataDiag.

  1. Fiber angle and aspect ratio influence the shear mechanics of oriented electrospun nanofibrous scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Driscoll, Tristan P; Nerurkar, Nandan L; Jacobs, Nathan T; Elliott, Dawn M; Mauck, Robert L

    2011-11-01

    Fibrocartilages, including the knee meniscus and the annulus fibrosus (AF) of the intervertebral disc, play critical mechanical roles in load transmission across joints and their function is dependent upon well-defined structural hierarchies, organization, and composition. All, however, are compromised in the pathologic transformations associated with tissue degeneration. Tissue engineering strategies that address these key features, for example, aligned nanofibrous scaffolds seeded with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), represent a promising approach for the regeneration of these fibrous structures. While such engineered constructs can replicate native tissue structure and uniaxial tensile properties, the multidirectional loading encountered by these tissues in vivo necessitates that they function adequately in other loading modalities as well, including shear. As previous findings have shown that native tissue tensile and shear properties are dependent on fiber angle and sample aspect ratio, respectively, the objective of the present study was to evaluate the effects of a changing fiber angle and sample aspect ratio on the shear properties of aligned electrospun poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) scaffolds, and to determine how extracellular matrix deposition by resident MSCs modulates the measured shear response. Results show that fiber orientation and sample aspect ratio significantly influence the response of scaffolds in shear, and that measured shear strains can be predicted by finite element models. Furthermore, acellular PCL scaffolds possessed a relatively high shear modulus, 2-4 fold greater than native tissue, independent of fiber angle and aspect ratio. It was further noted that under testing conditions that engendered significant fiber stretch, the aggregate resistance to shear was higher, indicating a role for fiber stretch in the overall shear response. Finally, with time in culture, the shear modulus of MSC laden constructs increased, suggesting that

  2. Disentangled solid state and metastable polymer melt; a solvent free route to high-modulus high-strength tapes and films of UHMWPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rastogi, Sanjay

    2013-03-01

    Ultra High Molecular Weight Polyethylene (UHMWPE) having average molar mass greater than a million g/mol is an engineering polymer. Due to its light-weight, high abrasion resistance and biocompatibility it is used for demanding applications such as body armour, prostheses etc. At present, because of its high melt viscosity to achieve the uniaxial/biaxial properties in the form of fibers/films the polymer is processed via solution route where nearly 95wt% of the solvent is used to process 5wt% of the polymer. In past several attempts have been made to process the polymer without using any solvent. However, compared to the solvent processing route the achieved mechanical properties were rather poor. Here we show that by controlled synthesis it is feasible to obtain UHMWPE that could be processed free of solvent to make uniaxial tapes and biaxial films, having unprecedented mechanical properties, exceeding that of the solution spun fibers. We address some of the fundamental aspects of chemistry, physics, rheology and processing for the development of desired morphological features to achieve the ultimate mechanical properties in tapes and films. The paper will also address the metastable melt state obtained on melting of the disentangled crystals and its implication on rheology in linear and nonlinear viscoelastic region. Solid state NMR studies will be applied to establish disentangled state in solid state to the polymerisation conditions. References: Macromolecules 2011, 44(14), 5558-5568; Nature Materials 2005, 4, 635-641; Phys Rev Lett 2006, 96(21), 218303-218205. The authors acknowledge financial support by the Dutch Polymer Institute.

  3. Vortex Formation in a High Speed Dust Flow with Large Velocity Shear in RF Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Iizuka, Satoru; Gohda, Takuma

    2008-09-07

    We have investigated a rotation of a dust cloud disc with strong velocity shear in a radio frequency (RF) plasma. The flow pattern of the dusts was evaluated by the Navier Stokes Equation with shear viscosity due to the Coulomb interactions. We have clarified dynamic behaviors of the dusts and observed generation of micro-vortices around rotational center, when the velocity shear is enhanced.

  4. Rotational and magnetic shear stabilization of magnetohydrodynamic modes and turbulence in DIII-D high performance discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Lao, L.L.; Burrell, K.H.; Casper, T.S.; Chan, V.S.; Chu, M.S.; DeBoo, J.C.; Doyle, E.J.; Durst, R.D.; Forest, C.B.; Greenfield, C.M.; Groebner, R.J.; Hinton, F.L.; Kawano, Y.; Lazarus, E.A.; Lin-Liu, Y.R.; Mauel, M.E.; Meyer, W.H.; Miller, R.L.; Navratil, G.A.; Osborne, T.H.; Peng, Q.; Rettig, C.L.; Rewoldt, G.; Rhodes, T.L.; Rice, B.W.; Schissel, D.P.; Stallard, B.W.; Strait, E.J.; Tang, W.M.; Taylor, T.S.; Turnbull, A.D.; Waltz, R.E.; the DIII-D Team

    1996-05-01

    The confinement and the stability properties of the DIII-D tokamak [{ital Plasma} {ital Physics} {ital and} {ital Controlled} {ital Nuclear} {ital Fusion} {ital Research} 1986 (International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, 1987), Vol. 1, p. 159] high-performance discharges are evaluated in terms of rotational and magnetic shear, with an emphasis on the recent experimental results obtained from the negative central magnetic shear (NCS) experiments. In NCS discharges, a core transport barrier is often observed to form inside the NCS region accompanied by a reduction in core fluctuation amplitudes. Increasing negative magnetic shear contributes to the formation of this core transport barrier, but by itself is not sufficient to fully stabilize the toroidal drift mode (trapped-electron-{eta}{sub {ital i}} mode) to explain this formation. Comparison of the Doppler shift shear rate to the growth rate of the {eta}{sub {ital i}} mode suggests that the large core {ital E}{times}{ital B} flow shear can stabilize this mode and broaden the region of reduced core transport. Ideal and resistive stability analysis indicates the performance of NCS discharges with strongly peaked pressure profiles is limited by the resistive interchange mode to low {beta}{sub {ital N}}{le}2.3. This mode is insensitive to the details of the rotational and the magnetic shear profiles. A new class of discharges, which has a broad region of weak or slightly negative magnetic shear (WNS), is described. The WNS discharges have broader pressure profiles and higher {beta} values than the NCS discharges, together with high confinement and high fusion reactivity. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  5. Temperature Effects on Adhesive Bond Strengths and Modulus for Commonly Used Spacecraft Structural Adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ojeda, Cassandra E.; Oakes, Eric J.; Hill, Jennifer R.; Aldi, Dominic; Forsberg, Gustaf A.

    2011-01-01

    A study was performed to observe how changes in temperature and substrate material affected the strength and modulus of an adhesive bondline. Seven different adhesives commonly used in aerospace bonded structures were tested. Aluminum, titanium and Invar adherends were cleaned and primed, then bonded using the manufacturer's recommendations. Following surface preparation, the coupons were bonded with the adhesives. The single lap shear coupons were then pull tested per ASTM D 1002 Standard Test Method for Apparent Shear Strength of Single- Lap-Joint over a temperature range from -150 deg C up to +150 deg C. The ultimate strength was calculated and the resulting data were converted into B-basis design allowables. Average and Bbasis results were compared. Results obtained using aluminum adherends are reported. The effects of using different adherend materials and temperature were also studied and will be reported in a subsequent paper. Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA) was used to study variations in adhesive modulus with temperature. This work resulted in a highly useful database for comparing adhesive performance over a wide range of temperatures, and has facilitated selection of the appropriate adhesive for spacecraft structure applications.

  6. Structure of the Highly Sheared Tropical Storm Chantal During CAMEX -4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heymsfield, Gerald M.; Halverson, J.; Black, M.; Marks, F.; Zipser, E.; Tian, L.; Belcher, L.; Bui, P.; Im, E.; Starr, David OC. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    On 20 August 2001 during the Convection and Moisture Experiment 4 (CAMEX-4) and NOAA Hurricane Field Program (HFP2001), the NASA high-altitude ER-2 and medium-altitude DC-8, and lower-altitude NOAA P3 aircraft conducted a coordinated Quantitative Precipitation Estimation (QPE) mission focused on convection in Tropical Storm Chantal. This storm first became a depression on 14 August, a tropical storm on 17 August, and it maintained maximum winds of about 65-70 mph during 19-20 August with minimum pressures ranging from 1008 mb on 19 August to 1001 mb late on 20 August. The storm was westward moving and was forecasted to intensify and landfall near the Yucatan-Belize border late on 20 August. Chanter failed to intensify and instead exhibited a highly sheared structure with an open low-level circulation and intense convection well to the northeast of this circulation center. The NASA ER-2 and DC-8 aircraft were closely coordinated with the NOAA P3 (NOAA-42). The NASA aircraft collected remote sensing and in situ data sets, while the P3 collected lower level in situ and radar data; both the DC-8 and P3 released 7 and 24 dropsondes, respectively. These aircraft measurements provided a unique opportunity to examine the structure of a sheared system and why it did not develop as forecasted a few days earlier. This paper will describe a preliminary study of the precipitation and wind structure provided by the NASA aircraft within the context of the NOAA P3 measurements.

  7. Enhancement of USM3D Unstructured Flow Solver for High-Speed High-Temperature Shear Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pandya, Mohagna J.; Abdol-Hamid, Khaled S.; Frink, Neal T.

    2009-01-01

    Large temperature and pressure fluctuations have a profound effect on turbulence development in transonic and supersonic jets. For high-speed, high-temperature jet flows, standard turbulence models lack the ability to predict the observed mixing rate of a shear layer. Several proposals to address this deficiency have been advanced in the literature to modify the turbulence transport equations in a variety of ways. In the present study, some of the most proven and simple modifications to two-equation turbulence models have been selected and implemented in NASA's USM3D tetrahedral Navier-Stokes flow solver. The modifications include the addition of compressibility correction and pressure dilatation terms in the turbulence transport equations for high-speed flows, and the addition of a simple modification to the Boussinesq's closure model coefficient for high-temperature jets. The efficacy of the extended models is demonstrated by comparison with experimental data for two supersonic axisymmetric jet test cases at design pressure ratio.

  8. Direct measurement of shear properties of microfibers

    SciTech Connect

    Behlow, H.; Saini, D.; Durham, L.; Simpson, J.; Skove, M. J.; Rao, A. M.; Oliveira, L.; Serkiz, S. M.

    2014-09-15

    As novel fibers with enhanced mechanical properties continue to be synthesized and developed, the ability to easily and accurately characterize these materials becomes increasingly important. Here we present a design for an inexpensive tabletop instrument to measure shear modulus (G) and other longitudinal shear properties of a micrometer-sized monofilament fiber sample, such as nonlinearities and hysteresis. This automated system applies twist to the sample and measures the resulting torque using a sensitive optical detector that tracks a torsion reference. The accuracy of the instrument was verified by measuring G for high purity copper and tungsten fibers, for which G is well known. Two industrially important fibers, IM7 carbon fiber and Kevlar{sup ®} 119, were also characterized with this system and were found to have G = 16.5 ± 2.1 and 2.42 ± 0.32 GPa, respectively.

  9. Direct measurement of shear properties of microfibers.

    PubMed

    Behlow, H; Saini, D; Oliveira, L; Durham, L; Simpson, J; Serkiz, S M; Skove, M J; Rao, A M

    2014-09-01

    As novel fibers with enhanced mechanical properties continue to be synthesized and developed, the ability to easily and accurately characterize these materials becomes increasingly important. Here we present a design for an inexpensive tabletop instrument to measure shear modulus (G) and other longitudinal shear properties of a micrometer-sized monofilament fiber sample, such as nonlinearities and hysteresis. This automated system applies twist to the sample and measures the resulting torque using a sensitive optical detector that tracks a torsion reference. The accuracy of the instrument was verified by measuring G for high purity copper and tungsten fibers, for which G is well known. Two industrially important fibers, IM7 carbon fiber and Kevlar(®) 119, were also characterized with this system and were found to have G = 16.5 ± 2.1 and 2.42 ± 0.32 GPa, respectively.

  10. Direct measurement of shear properties of microfibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behlow, H.; Saini, D.; Oliveira, L.; Durham, L.; Simpson, J.; Serkiz, S. M.; Skove, M. J.; Rao, A. M.

    2014-09-01

    As novel fibers with enhanced mechanical properties continue to be synthesized and developed, the ability to easily and accurately characterize these materials becomes increasingly important. Here we present a design for an inexpensive tabletop instrument to measure shear modulus (G) and other longitudinal shear properties of a micrometer-sized monofilament fiber sample, such as nonlinearities and hysteresis. This automated system applies twist to the sample and measures the resulting torque using a sensitive optical detector that tracks a torsion reference. The accuracy of the instrument was verified by measuring G for high purity copper and tungsten fibers, for which G is well known. Two industrially important fibers, IM7 carbon fiber and Kevlar® 119, were also characterized with this system and were found to have G = 16.5 ± 2.1 and 2.42 ± 0.32 GPa, respectively.

  11. Microscopic origin of volume modulus inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Cicoli, Michele; Muia, Francesco; Pedro, Francisco Gil E-mail: muia@bo.infn.it

    2015-12-01

    High-scale string inflationary models are in well-known tension with low-energy supersymmetry. A promising solution involves models where the inflaton is the volume of the extra dimensions so that the gravitino mass relaxes from large values during inflation to smaller values today. We describe a possible microscopic origin of the scalar potential of volume modulus inflation by exploiting non-perturbative effects, string loop and higher derivative perturbative corrections to the supergravity effective action together with contributions from anti-branes and charged hidden matter fields. We also analyse the relation between the size of the flux superpotential and the position of the late-time minimum and the inflection point around which inflation takes place. We perform a detailed study of the inflationary dynamics for a single modulus and a two moduli case where we also analyse the sensitivity of the cosmological observables on the choice of initial conditions.

  12. Microscopic origin of volume modulus inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Cicoli, Michele; Muia, Francesco; Pedro, Francisco Gil

    2015-12-21

    High-scale string inflationary models are in well-known tension with low-energy supersymmetry. A promising solution involves models where the inflaton is the volume of the extra dimensions so that the gravitino mass relaxes from large values during inflation to smaller values today. We describe a possible microscopic origin of the scalar potential of volume modulus inflation by exploiting non-perturbative effects, string loop and higher derivative perturbative corrections to the supergravity effective action together with contributions from anti-branes and charged hidden matter fields. We also analyse the relation between the size of the flux superpotential and the position of the late-time minimum and the inflection point around which inflation takes place. We perform a detailed study of the inflationary dynamics for a single modulus and a two moduli case where we also analyse the sensitivity of the cosmological observables on the choice of initial conditions.

  13. Earthquake Energy Dissipation in Light of High-Velocity, Slip-Pulse Shear Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reches, Z.; Liao, Z.; Chang, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    We investigated the energy dissipation during earthquakes by analysis of high-velocity shear experiments conducted on room-dry, solid samples of granite, tonalite, and dolomite sheared at slip-velocity of 0.0006-1m/s, and normal stress of 1-11.5MPa. The experimental fault were loaded in one of three modes: (1) Slip-pulse of abrupt, intense acceleration followed by moderate deceleration; (2) Impact by a spinning, heavy flywheel (225 kg); and (3) Constant velocity loading. We refer to energy dissipation in terms of power-density (PD=shear stress*slip-velocity; units of MW/m^2), and Coulomb-energy-density (CED= mechanical energy/normal stress; units of m). We present two aspects: Relative energy dissipation of the above loading modes, and relative energy dissipation between impact experiments and moderate earthquakes. For the first aspect, we used: (i) the lowest friction coefficient of the dynamic weakening; (ii) the work dissipated before reaching the lowest friction; and (iii) the cumulative mechanical work during the complete run. The results show that the slip-pulse/impact modes are energy efficient relatively to the constant-velocity mode as manifested by faster, more intense weakening and 50-90% lower energy dissipation. Thus, for a finite amount of pre-seismic crustal energy, the efficiency of slip-pulse would amplify earthquake instability. For the second aspect, we compare the experimental CED of the impact experiments to the reported breakdown energy (EG) of moderate earthquakes, Mw = 5.6 to 7.2 (Chang et al., 2012). In is commonly assumed that the seismic EG is a small fraction of the total earthquake energy, and as expected in 9 out of 11 examined earthquakes, EG was 0.005 to 0.07 of the experimental CED. We thus speculate that the experimental relation of Coulomb-energy-density to total slip distance, D, CED = 0.605 × D^0.933, is a reasonable estimate of total earthquake energy, a quantity that cannot be determined from seismic data.

  14. High-velocity deformation of Al0.3CoCrFeNi high-entropy alloy: Remarkable resistance to shear failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Z.; Zhao, S.; Diao, H.; Liaw, P. K.; Meyers, M. A.

    2017-02-01

    The mechanical behavior of a single phase (fcc) Al0.3CoCrFeNi high-entropy alloy (HEA) was studied in the low and high strain-rate regimes. The combination of multiple strengthening mechanisms such as solid solution hardening, forest dislocation hardening, as well as mechanical twinning leads to a high work hardening rate, which is significantly larger than that for Al and is retained in the dynamic regime. The resistance to shear localization was studied by dynamically-loading hat-shaped specimens to induce forced shear localization. However, no adiabatic shear band could be observed. It is therefore proposed that the excellent strain hardening ability gives rise to remarkable resistance to shear localization, which makes this material an excellent candidate for penetration protection applications such as armors.

  15. High-velocity deformation of Al0.3CoCrFeNi high-entropy alloy: Remarkable resistance to shear failure.

    PubMed

    Li, Z; Zhao, S; Diao, H; Liaw, P K; Meyers, M A

    2017-02-17

    The mechanical behavior of a single phase (fcc) Al0.3CoCrFeNi high-entropy alloy (HEA) was studied in the low and high strain-rate regimes. The combination of multiple strengthening mechanisms such as solid solution hardening, forest dislocation hardening, as well as mechanical twinning leads to a high work hardening rate, which is significantly larger than that for Al and is retained in the dynamic regime. The resistance to shear localization was studied by dynamically-loading hat-shaped specimens to induce forced shear localization. However, no adiabatic shear band could be observed. It is therefore proposed that the excellent strain hardening ability gives rise to remarkable resistance to shear localization, which makes this material an excellent candidate for penetration protection applications such as armors.

  16. High-velocity deformation of Al0.3CoCrFeNi high-entropy alloy: Remarkable resistance to shear failure

    PubMed Central

    Li, Z.; Zhao, S.; Diao, H.; Liaw, P. K.; Meyers, M. A.

    2017-01-01

    The mechanical behavior of a single phase (fcc) Al0.3CoCrFeNi high-entropy alloy (HEA) was studied in the low and high strain-rate regimes. The combination of multiple strengthening mechanisms such as solid solution hardening, forest dislocation hardening, as well as mechanical twinning leads to a high work hardening rate, which is significantly larger than that for Al and is retained in the dynamic regime. The resistance to shear localization was studied by dynamically-loading hat-shaped specimens to induce forced shear localization. However, no adiabatic shear band could be observed. It is therefore proposed that the excellent strain hardening ability gives rise to remarkable resistance to shear localization, which makes this material an excellent candidate for penetration protection applications such as armors. PMID:28210000

  17. Vorticity Based (External) Intermittency measurements in a High Rθ Single-Stream Shear Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foss, John F.; Hellum, Aren

    2006-11-01

    The MSU four-sensor (transverse) vorticity probe has been used to determine the intermittency function (I(t)=0,1) in a single-stream shear layer. The measurements were taken in the self-preserving region (x/θ(0)=484) with R[θ(x)=9x10^4]. The I(t) signal permits conditionally sampled measures of the intermittent turbulence field. The mean intermittency distribution is compared with that previously reported (1) and (2). It is also compared with the distribution created from the use of an advanced surrogate method (3). Distinctive conditionally sampled results include: i) a constant [mean(u'v')]/[σ(u)σ(v)] distribution for the I=1 condition, ii) clear evidence of fluid from both high- and low-speed irrotational streams to the peak location (u/Uo=0.5), and iii) robust dissipation even as -> for large values of [(y-y/2)/θ(x)]. 1. Wygnanski, I. and Fiedler, H. E., (1970). ``The two-dimensional mixing region''. JFM, Vol. 41, pp. 327-361. 2. R.C. Haw, J.K. Foss and J.F. Foss, ``Vorticity Based Intermittency Measurements in a Single Stream Shear Layer'' proc. Second European Turb. Conf. Advance in Turbulence 2, Ed. H.H. Fernholz and H.E. Fiedler Spring Verlag, Berlin (1989). 3. Hedley, T.B., and Keffer, J.F., (1974). ``Turbulent/non-turbulent decisions in an intermittent flow''. JFM, Vol. 64, pp. 625-644

  18. Magnetically applied pressure-shear : a new technique for direct strength measurement at high pressure (final report for LDRD project 117856).

    SciTech Connect

    Lamppa, Derek C.; Haill, Thomas A.; Alexander, C. Scott; Asay, James Russell

    2010-09-01

    A new experimental technique to measure material shear strength at high pressures has been developed for use on magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) drive pulsed power platforms. By applying an external static magnetic field to the sample region, the MHD drive directly induces a shear stress wave in addition to the usual longitudinal stress wave. Strength is probed by passing this shear wave through a sample material where the transmissible shear stress is limited to the sample strength. The magnitude of the transmitted shear wave is measured via a transverse VISAR system from which the sample strength is determined.

  19. Rapid distortion analysis of high speed homogeneous turbulence subject to periodic shear

    DOE PAGES

    Bertsch, Rebecca L.; Girimaji, Sharath S.

    2015-12-30

    The effect of unsteady shear forcing on small perturbation growth in compressible flow is investigated. In particular, flow-thermodynamic field interaction and the resulting effect on the phase-lag between applied shear and Reynolds stress are examined. Simplified linear analysis of the perturbation pressure equation reveals crucial differences between steady and unsteady shear effects. The analytical findings are validated with numerical simulations of inviscid rapid distortion theory (RDT) equations. In contrast to steadily sheared compressible flows, perturbations in the unsteady (periodic) forcing case do not experience an asymptotic growth phase. Further, the resonance growth phenomenon found in incompressible unsteady shear turbulence ismore » absent in the compressible case. Overall, the stabilizing influence of both unsteadiness and compressibility is compounded leading to suppression of all small perturbations. As a result, the underlying mechanisms are explained.« less

  20. Rapid distortion analysis of high speed homogeneous turbulence subject to periodic shear

    SciTech Connect

    Bertsch, Rebecca L. Girimaji, Sharath S.

    2015-12-15

    The effect of unsteady shear forcing on small perturbation growth in compressible flow is investigated. In particular, flow-thermodynamic field interaction and the resulting effect on the phase-lag between applied shear and Reynolds stress are examined. Simplified linear analysis of the perturbation pressure equation reveals crucial differences between steady and unsteady shear effects. The analytical findings are validated with numerical simulations of inviscid rapid distortion theory (RDT) equations. In contrast to steadily sheared compressible flows, perturbations in the unsteady (periodic) forcing case do not experience an asymptotic growth phase. Further, the resonance growth phenomenon found in incompressible unsteady shear turbulence is absent in the compressible case. Overall, the stabilizing influence of both unsteadiness and compressibility is compounded leading to suppression of all small perturbations. The underlying mechanisms are explained.

  1. Rapid distortion analysis of high speed homogeneous turbulence subject to periodic shear

    SciTech Connect

    Bertsch, Rebecca L.; Girimaji, Sharath S.

    2015-12-30

    The effect of unsteady shear forcing on small perturbation growth in compressible flow is investigated. In particular, flow-thermodynamic field interaction and the resulting effect on the phase-lag between applied shear and Reynolds stress are examined. Simplified linear analysis of the perturbation pressure equation reveals crucial differences between steady and unsteady shear effects. The analytical findings are validated with numerical simulations of inviscid rapid distortion theory (RDT) equations. In contrast to steadily sheared compressible flows, perturbations in the unsteady (periodic) forcing case do not experience an asymptotic growth phase. Further, the resonance growth phenomenon found in incompressible unsteady shear turbulence is absent in the compressible case. Overall, the stabilizing influence of both unsteadiness and compressibility is compounded leading to suppression of all small perturbations. As a result, the underlying mechanisms are explained.

  2. Late Oligocene high-temperature shear zones in the core of the Higher Himalayan Crystallines (Lower Dolpo, western Nepal)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carosi, R.; Montomoli, C.; Rubatto, D.; Visonã, D.

    2010-08-01

    A high-temperature shear zone, Toijem shear zone, with a top-to-the-SW sense of shear affects the core of the Higher Himalayan Crystallines (HHC) in western Nepal. The shear zone developed during the decompression, in the sillimanite stability field, of rocks that previously underwent relatively high-pressure metamorphism deformed under the kyanite stability field. PT conditions indicate that the footwall experienced higher pressure (˜9 kbar) than the hanging wall (˜7 kbar) and similar temperatures (675°-700°C). Monazite growth constrains the initial activity of the shear zone at 25.8 ± 0.3 Ma, before the onset of the Main Central Thrust zone, whereas the late intrusion of a crosscutting granitic dike at 17 ± 0.2 Ma limits its final activity. Monazites in kyanite-bearing gneisses from the footwall record prograde metamorphism in the HHC from ˜43 to 33 Ma. The new data confirm that exhumation of the HHC started earlier in western Nepal than in other portions of the belt and before the activity of both the South Tibetan Detachment System (STDS) and Main Central Thrust (MCT) zones. As a consequence, western Nepal represents a key area where the channel-flow-driven mechanism of exhumation, supposed to be active from Bhutan to central-eastern Nepal, does terminate. In this area, exhumation of crystalline units occurred by foreland propagation of ductile and, subsequently, brittle deformation.

  3. Frictional properties of DFDP-1 Alpine Fault rocks under hydrothermal conditions and high shear strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemeijer, André R.; Boulton, Carolyn; Toy, Virginia; Townend, John; Sutherland, Rupert

    2015-04-01

    The Alpine Fault, New Zealand, is a major plate-bounding fault that accommodates 65-75% of the total relative motion between the Australian and Pacific plates. Paleoseismic evidence of large-displacement surface-rupturing events, as well as an absence of measurable contemporary surface deformation, indicates that the fault slips mostly in quasi-periodic large-magnitude earthquakes (< Mw 8.0). To understand the mechanics of earthquakes, it is important to study the evolution of frictional properties of the fault rocks under conditions representative of the potential hypocentral depth. Here, we present data obtained on drill core samples of rocks that surround the principal slip zone(s) (PSZ) of the Alpine Fault and the PSZ itself. The drill core samples were obtained during phase 1 of the Deep Fault Drilling Project (DFDP-1) in 2011 at relatively shallow depths (down to ~150 m). Simulated fault gouges were sheared under elevated pressure and temperature conditions in a hydrothermal ring shear apparatus. We performed experiments at temperatures of 25, 150, 300, 450 ° C, and 600 oC. Using the shallow geothermal gradient of 63 ° C/km determined in DFDP-1, our highest temperature corresponds to a depth of ~7 km (Sutherland et al. 2012); it would correspond to 10 km depth using a more moderate geotherm of 45 oC/km (Toy et al. 2010). All samples show a transition from velocity-strengthening behavior, i.e. a positive value of (a-b), to velocity-weakening behavior, i.e. a negative value of (a-b) at a temperature of 150 ° C. The transition depends on the absolute value of sliding velocity, with velocity-weakening dominating at lower sliding velocities. At 600 oC, velocity-strengthening dominates at low sliding velocity, whereas the high-velocity steps are all velocity-weakening. Moreover, shear stress depends linearly on effective normal stress at 600 oC, indicating that shearing is essentially frictional and that no transition to ductile (normal stress independent) flow

  4. Elastic modulus of viral nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yue; Ge, Zhibin; Fang, Jiyu

    2008-09-01

    We report an experimental and theoretical study of the radial elasticity of tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) nanotubes. An atomic force microscope tip is used to apply small radial indentations to deform TMV nanotubes. The initial elastic response of TMV nanotubes can be described by finite-element analysis in 5nm indentation depths and Hertz theory in 1.5nm indentation depths. The derived radial Young’s modulus of TMV nanotubes is 0.92±0.15GPa from finite-element analysis and 1.0±0.2GPa from the Hertz model, which are comparable with the reported axial Young’s modulus of 1.1GPa [Falvo , Biophys. J. 72, 1396 (1997)].

  5. Effect of Li level, artificial aging, and TiB2 reinforcement on the modulus of Weldalite (tm) 049

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The dynamic Young's Modulus (E) was determined for (1) alloys 049(1.3)(heat 072), (2) 049(1.9), and (3) 049(1.3) TiB2 in the T3 temper and after aging at 160 C were made on a single 0.953 cm (0.375 in) cube to reduce scatter from microstructural inhomogeneities. Both shear and transverse wave velocities were measured for the L, LT, and ST directions by a pulse echo technique. These velocities were then used to calculate modulus. The change is shown in E with aging time at 160 C (320 F) for the three alloys. It is clear from the plots that aging has a minor, but measurable, influence on the E of alloys 049(1.3) and 049(1.9): E decreases by -2.5 pct. for 2 and 3 during the initial stages of artificial aging. This decrease in E generally follows the strength reversion. On further aging beyond the reversion well, E increases and then decreases again as the alloy overage. The slightly higher modulus in the T8 than in the T3 temper is consistent with the presence of the high modulus T sub 1 phase in the T8 temper. A similar change in E was observed on aging for the TiB2 reinforced variant that also follows the aging curve.

  6. Feasibility of optical coherence elastography measurements of shear wave propagation in homogeneous tissue equivalent phantoms.

    PubMed

    Razani, Marjan; Mariampillai, Adrian; Sun, Cuiru; Luk, Timothy W H; Yang, Victor X D; Kolios, Michael C

    2012-05-01

    In this work, we explored the potential of measuring shear wave propagation using optical coherence elastography (OCE) based on a swept-source optical coherence tomography (OCT) system. Shear waves were generated using a 20 MHz piezoelectric transducer (circular element 8.5 mm diameter) transmitting sine-wave bursts of 400 μs, synchronized with the OCT swept source wavelength sweep. The acoustic radiation force (ARF) was applied to two gelatin phantoms (differing in gelatin concentration by weight, 8% vs. 14%). Differential OCT phase maps, measured with and without the ARF, demonstrate microscopic displacement generated by shear wave propagation in these phantoms of different stiffness. We present preliminary results of OCT derived shear wave propagation velocity and modulus, and compare these results to rheometer measurements. The results demonstrate the feasibility of shear wave OCE (SW-OCE) for high-resolution microscopic homogeneous tissue mechanical property characterization.

  7. Fluid-loss control for high-permeability rocks in hydraulic fracturing under realistic shear conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Navarrete, R.C.; Mitchell, J.P.

    1995-12-31

    A study is presented on the effectiveness of different combinations of fluid and fluid-loss additives to control fluid loss in high-permeability formations under high shear rates. The impact on matrix damage and proppant-pack damage is also studied. Borate-crosslinked guars, hydroxyethylcellulose (HEC) and a surfactant water-base gravel packing fluid were investigated. The fluid-loss additive considered was silica flour. All fluid-loss tests were run in dynamic fluid-loss cells. To properly test high-permeability cores, new long core dynamic fluid-loss cells were used. The matrix damage caused by the invasion of the fluid was determined using pressure taps along the core. Conductivity tests were also run to determine the damage to the proppant pack. Results show that the effectiveness of particulate fluid-loss additives under dynamic conditions is strongly dependent on the initial leakoff rate, which depends on the pressure gradient across the core, permeability of the core and viscosity of the invading fluid. The use of silica flour helps matrix flowback, and it has a minimal effect on proppant-pack conductivity in clean fluids (e.g., surfactant water-base gravel packing fluid). With the exception of the borate-crosslinked guar with no fluid-loss additive, the variety of fluids used in these tests (with and without silica flour) have a negligible effect on postproduction.

  8. High temperature pseudotachylytes and ductile shear zones in dry rocks from the continental lower crust (Lofoten, Norway)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menegon, Luca; Pennacchioni, Giorgio; Harris, Katherine; Wood, Elliot

    2014-05-01

    Understanding the mechanisms of initiation and growth of shear zones under lower crustal conditions is of fundamental importance when assessing lithosphere rheology and strength. In this study we investigate brittle-ductile shear zones developed under lower crustal conditions in anorthosites from Nusfjord, Lofoten (northern Norway). Steep ductile shear zones trend E-W to ESE-WSW and have a stretching lineation plunging steeply to the SSW or SSE. The shear sense is normal (south block down to the south) as indicated by SC and SC' fabrics and sigmoidal foliations. The shear zone show a mylonitic to ultramylonitic fabric, sharp boundaries to the host anorthosites, and abundant anastomosing dark fine-grained layers along the main foliation. The fine-grained layers localized much of the strain. Relatively lower strain domains within or adjacent to shear zones indicate that the fine dark bands of mylonites represent transposed pseudotachylyte which still locally preserve the pristine structures such as chilled margins, breccia textures with angular clasts of the host rock and injection veins; intersecting veins of pseudotachylyte record multiple stages of seismic slip. The orientation of injection veins and marker offset along the most preserved pseudotachylyte fault veins indicate approximately a sinistral strike slip kinematic during faulting event responsible for the friction-induced melting. These observations indicate that ductile shear zones exploited pre-existing brittle fault zones including a network of pseudotachylytes, and that the fine-grained "ultramylonites" derive from former fine-grained pseudotachylytes. The pseudotachylyte microstructure is dominated by plagioclase microlites dispersed in a groundmass of fine-grained clinopyroxene. Clinopyroxene recrystallizes in the damage zone flanking the pseudotachylytes, indicating high metamorphic grade during pseudotachylyte formation. Small idioblastic or cauliflower garnet are scattered through the matrix and

  9. Frictional processes in smectite-rich gouges sheared at slow to high slip rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aretusini, Stefano; Mittempergher, Silvia; Gualtieri, Alessandro; Di Toro, Giulio

    2015-04-01

    The slipping zones of shallow sections of megathrusts and of large landslides are often smectite-rich (e.g., montmorillonite type). Consequently, similar "frictional" processes operating at high slip rates (> 1 m/s) might be responsible of the large slips estimated in megathrust (50 m for the 2011 Tohoku Mw 9.1 earthquake) and measured in large landslides (500 m for the 1963 Vajont slide, Italy). At present, only rotary shear apparatuses can reproduce simultaneously the large slips and slip rates of these events. Noteworthy, the frictional processes proposed so far (thermal and thermochemical pressurization, etc.) remain rather obscure. Here we present preliminary results obtained with the ROtary Shear Apparatus (ROSA) installed at Padua University. Thirty-one experiments were performed at ambient conditions on pure end-members of (1) smectite-rich standard powders (STx-1b: ~68 wt% Ca-montmorillonite, ~30 wt% opal-CT and ~2 wt% quartz), (2) quartz powders (qtz) and (3) on 80:20 = Stx-1b:qtz mixtures. The gouges were sandwiched between two (1) hollow (25/15 mm external/internal diameter) or (2) solid (25 mm in diameter) stainless-steel made cylinders and confined by inner and outer Teflon rings (only outer for solid cylinders). Gouges were sheared at a normal stress of 5 MPa, slip rates V from 300 μm/s to 1.5 m/s and total slip of 3 m. The deformed gouges were investigated with quantitative (Rietveld method with internal standard) X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). In the smectite-rich standard endmember, (1) for 300 μm/s ≤ V ≤ 0.1 m/s, initial friction coefficient (μi) was 0.6±0.05 whereas the steady-state friction coefficient (μss) was velocity and slip strengthening (μss 0.85±0.05), (2) for 0.1 m/s < V < 0.3 m/s, velocity and slip neutral (μi = μss = 0.62±0.08) and (3) for V > 0.8 m/s, velocity and slip weakening (μi = 0.7±0.1 and μss = 0.25±0.05). In the 80:20 Stx-1b:qtz mixtures, (1) for 300 μm/s ≤ V

  10. Comminution of solids caused by kinetic energy of high shear strain rate, with implications for impact, shock, and shale fracturing.

    PubMed

    Bazant, Zdenek P; Caner, Ferhun C

    2013-11-26

    Although there exists a vast literature on the dynamic comminution or fragmentation of rocks, concrete, metals, and ceramics, none of the known models suffices for macroscopic dynamic finite element analysis. This paper outlines the basic idea of the macroscopic model. Unlike static fracture, in which the driving force is the release of strain energy, here the essential idea is that the driving force of comminution under high-rate compression is the release of the local kinetic energy of shear strain rate. The density of this energy at strain rates >1,000/s is found to exceed the maximum possible strain energy density by orders of magnitude, making the strain energy irrelevant. It is shown that particle size is proportional to the -2/3 power of the shear strain rate and the 2/3 power of the interface fracture energy or interface shear stress, and that the comminution process is macroscopically equivalent to an apparent shear viscosity that is proportional (at constant interface stress) to the -1/3 power of this rate. A dimensionless indicator of the comminution intensity is formulated. The theory was inspired by noting that the local kinetic energy of shear strain rate plays a role analogous to the local kinetic energy of eddies in turbulent flow.

  11. Shear deformation and division of cylindrical walls in free-standing nematic films under high electric fields.

    PubMed

    Tadapatri, Pramod; Krishnamurthy, K S

    2008-10-30

    We report on the behavior of cylindrical walls formed in a substrate-free nematic film of PCH5 under the action of an in-plane ac field. In the film, with vertical molecular alignment at all the limiting surfaces, annular Brochard-Leger walls are induced well above the bend-Freedericksz threshold. They exhibit, at high field strengths, a new type of instability not encountered in sandwich, or any other, cell configuration. It manifests as a shearing of the loop-wall between the opposite free-surfaces. The shear strain is measured as a function of time, field strength, frequency, and temperature. Significantly, the strain is linear in field strength. The origin of shear and its dependence on field variables are explained through an adaptation of the Carr-Helfrich mechanism of charge separation. The sheared wall is stable against pincement up to several times the threshold field, and divides itself into two fragments under a large enough strain. With the shear distortion, linear defects appear in the opposite splay-bend regions, just as Neel lines in Bloch walls of magnetic systems. At very low frequencies, flexoelectric influence on distortion is revealed.

  12. Influence of loading-rate and steel fibers on the shear strength of ultra high performance concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bratislav, Lukic; Pascal, Forquin

    2015-09-01

    The paper describes quasi-static and dynamic experimental methods used to examine the confined shear strength of an Ultra High Performance Concrete, with and without the presence of steel fibers in the concrete composition. An experimental setup was created to investigate the concrete shear strength under quasi-static loading regime using a hydraulic press Schenk while dynamic shear strength was characterized by subjecting concrete samples to dynamic loading through a modified Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar. Both methods are based on a Punch Through Shear (PTS) test with a well-instrumented aluminum passive confinement ring that allows measuring the change of radial stress in the shear ligament throughout the test. Firstly, four equally distributed radial notches have been performed in order to deduce the radial stress by suppressing a self-confinement of the sample peripheral part. However, by analyzing the strain gauge data from the confinement ring, it has been noticed that these were apparently insufficient, especially for fiber-reinforced samples, resulting in subsequently practicing eight radial notches through the sample peripheral part. The results obtained from both procedures are reported and discussed.

  13. Size-sensitive Young's modulus of kinked silicon nanowires.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jin-Wu; Zhao, Jun-Hua; Rabczuk, Timon

    2013-05-10

    We perform both classical molecular dynamics simulations and beam model calculations to investigate the Young's modulus of kinked silicon nanowires (KSiNWs). The Young's modulus is found to be highly sensitive to the arm length of the kink and is essentially inversely proportional to the arm length. The mechanism underlying the size dependence is found to be the interplay between the kink angle potential and the arm length potential, where we obtain an analytic relationship between the Young's modulus and the arm length of the KSiNW. Our results provide insight into the application of this novel building block in nanomechanical devices.

  14. Investigation of high-speed free shear flows using improved pressure-strain correlated Reynolds stress turbulence model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiwari, S. N.; Lakshmanan, B.

    1993-01-01

    A high-speed shear layer is studied using compressibility corrected Reynolds stress turbulence model which employs newly developed model for pressure-strain correlation. MacCormack explicit prediction-corrector method is used for solving the governing equations and the turbulence transport equations. The stiffness arising due to source terms in the turbulence equations is handled by a semi-implicit numerical technique. Results obtained using the new model show a sharper reduction in growth rate with increasing convective Mach number. Some improvements were also noted in the prediction of the normalized streamwise stress and Reynolds shear stress. The computed results are in good agreement with the experimental data.

  15. High-speed ultrasound imaging in dense suspensions reveals impact-activated solidification due to dynamic shear jamming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Endao; Peters, Ivo R.; Jaeger, Heinrich M.

    2016-07-01

    A remarkable property of dense suspensions is that they can transform from liquid-like at rest to solid-like under sudden impact. Previous work showed that this impact-induced solidification involves rapidly moving jamming fronts; however, details of this process have remained unresolved. Here we use high-speed ultrasound imaging to probe non-invasively how the interior of a dense suspension responds to impact. Measuring the speed of sound we demonstrate that the solidification proceeds without a detectable increase in packing fraction, and imaging the evolving flow field we find that the shear intensity is maximized right at the jamming front. Taken together, this provides direct experimental evidence for jamming by shear, rather than densification, as driving the transformation to solid-like behaviour. On the basis of these findings we propose a new model to explain the anisotropy in the propagation speed of the fronts and delineate the onset conditions for dynamic shear jamming in suspensions.

  16. Optimization of curcumin loaded lipid nanoparticles formulated using high shear homogenization (HSH) and ultrasonication (US) methods.

    PubMed

    Puglia, Carmelo; Offerta, Alessia; Rizza, Luisa; Zingale, Giuseppe; Bonina, Francesco; Ronsisvalle, Simone

    2013-10-01

    Lipid nanoparticles (LN) are drug carriers possessing advantages with respect to stability, drug release profile, and biocompatibility. There are several production methods for lipid nanoparticles. Recently high shear homogenization (HSH) and ultrasound (US) techniques have been used to produce these systems in a cheaper and easier way. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effect of same important instrumental parameters, such as homogenization time (HT) and ultrasonication time (UT), on particle size (MD) and polydispersity index (PDI) of LNs obtained by HSH-US techniques. Curcumin was used as a model drug to be incapsulated in the LNs. LN were prepared by HSH-US technique using tripalmitin (Dynasan 116) and poloxamer 188 (Lutrol F68) as solid lipid and surfactant, respectively. The preparations were characterized and then evaluated using a factorial design study. From the results obtained, LNs produced by HSH-US method were characterized by nanodimension, high homogeneity and encapsulation efficiency. US technology plays an important role in controlling the final dimension of LN dispersion, while longer times of HSH seem mainly to exert a positive effect on the final homogeneity of particle dispersion. Additional studies are in progress to evaluate drug release profile from LNs, for further in vitro/in vivo correlation studies.

  17. Remotely-Controlled Shear for Dismantling Highly Radioactive Tools In Rokkasho Vitrification Facility - 12204

    SciTech Connect

    Mitsui, Takashi; Sawa, Shusuke; Sadaki, Akira; Awano, Toshihiko; Cole, Matt; Miura, Yasuhiko; Ino, Tooru

    2012-07-01

    A high-level liquid waste vitrification facility in the Japanese Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant (RRP) is right in the middle of hot commissioning tests toward starting operation in fall of 2012. In these tests, various tools were applied to address issues occurring in the vitrification cell. Because of these tools' unplanned placement in the cell it has been necessary to dismantle and dispose of them promptly. One of the tools requiring removal is a rod used in the glass melter to improve glass pouring. It is composed of a long rod made of Inconel 601 or 625 and has been highly contaminated. In order to dismantle these tools and to remotely put them in a designated waste basket, a custom electric shear machine was developed. It was installed in a dismantling area of the vitrification cell by remote cranes and manipulators and has been successfully operated. It can be remotely dismantled and placed in a waste basket for interim storage. This is a very good example of a successful deployment of a specialty remote tool in a hot cell environment. This paper also highlights how commissioning and operations are done in the Japanese Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant. (authors)

  18. Elastic modulus of phases in Ti–Mo alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Wei-dong; Liu, Yong; Wu, Hong; Song, Min; Zhang, Tuo-yang; Lan, Xiao-dong; Yao, Tian-hang

    2015-08-15

    In this work, a series of binary Ti–Mo alloys with the Mo contents ranging from 3.2 to 12 at.% were prepared using non-consumable arc melting. The microstructures were investigated by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscope, and the elastic modulus was evaluated by nanoindentation testing technique. The evolution of the volume fractions of ω phase was investigated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The results indicated that the phase constitution and elastic modulus of the Ti–Mo alloys are sensitive to the Mo content. Ti–3.2Mo and Ti–8Mo alloys containing only α and β phases, respectively, have a low elastic modulus. In contrast, Ti–4.5Mo, Ti–6Mo, Ti–7Mo alloys, with different contents of ω phase, have a high elastic modulus. A simple micromechanical model was used to calculate the elastic modulus of ω phase (E{sub ω}), which was determined to be 174.354 GPa. - Highlights: • Ti–Mo alloys with the Mo contents ranging from 3.2 to 12 at.% were investigated. • XPS was used to investigate the volume fractions of ω phase. • The elastic modulus of Ti–Mo alloys is sensitive to the Mo content. • The elastic modulus of ω phase was determined to be 174.354 GPa.

  19. Comparison of reacting and non-reacting shear layers at a high subsonic Mach number

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, C. T.; Marek, C. J.; Wey, C.; Jones, R. A.; Smith, M. J.

    1993-01-01

    The flow field in a hydrogen-fueled planar reacting shear layer was measured with an LDV system and is compared with a similar air to air case without combustion. Measurements were made with a speed ratio of 0.34 with the highspeed stream at Mach 0.71. They show that the shear layer with reaction grows faster than one without, and both cases are within the range of data scatter presented by the established database. The coupling between the streamwise and the cross-stream turbulence components inside the shear layer is slow, and reaction only increased it slightly. However, a more organized pattern of the Reynolds stress is present in the reacting shear layer, possibly as a result of larger scale structure formation in the layer associated with heat release.

  20. Image reconstruction with acoustic radiation force induced shear waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAleavey, Stephen A.; Nightingale, Kathryn R.; Stutz, Deborah L.; Hsu, Stephen J.; Trahey, Gregg E.

    2003-05-01

    Acoustic radiation force may be used to induce localized displacements within tissue. This phenomenon is used in Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse Imaging (ARFI), where short bursts of ultrasound deliver an impulsive force to a small region. The application of this transient force launches shear waves which propagate normally to the ultrasound beam axis. Measurements of the displacements induced by the propagating shear wave allow reconstruction of the local shear modulus, by wave tracking and inversion techniques. Here we present in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo measurements and images of shear modulus. Data were obtained with a single transducer, a conventional ultrasound scanner and specialized pulse sequences. Young's modulus values of 4 kPa, 13 kPa and 14 kPa were observed for fat, breast fibroadenoma, and skin. Shear modulus anisotropy in beef muscle was observed.

  1. Timing of initiation of left-lateral shearing along the Ailao Shan-Red River shear zone: microstructural and geochronological constraints from high temperature mylonites in Diancang Shan, SW China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, S.; Liu, J.; Leiss, B.; Neubauer, F.; Genser, J.

    2009-04-01

    The high grade metamorphic massifs (e.g. Xuelong Shan, Diancang Shan, Ailao Shan in China and Day Nui Con Voi metamorphic massif in Vietnam) along the Ailao Shan-Red River shear zone in Southwestern China bear much information on the large-scale left-lateral strike-slip shearing in eastern Tibet during Indian-Eurasian plate collision and post-collisional accommodation process in late Oligocene-early Miocene. The metamorphic massifs are narrow zones bounded by brittle faults. Low-grade metamorphic rocks are lying on the west and sedimentary rocks to the east. Rocks in these massifs are partly sheared with widespread occurrence of high temperature mylonites that have subhorizontal stretching lineations. Left-lateral shearing is indicated by mesoscale and microscale shear indicators in the mylonites. Debates exist on the timing of initiation and duration of left-lateral shearing, and mechanism of exhumation of the high grade metamorphic rocks along Ailao Shan Red River shear zone. The Diancang Shan complex, a typical metamorphic massif, is constituted by three units, i.e. a central high strain shear zone, a western low-grade metamorphic volcanic-sedimentary sequence in the Lanping basin, and an eastern superimposed retrograde metamorphic belt. The central high grade metamorphic complex consists of metamorphic rocks of amphibolite facies conditions. High-grade metamorphic mineral assemblages and structural elements indicate a deep level crustal metamorphism and deformation of the rocks. L-tectonites are typical indicators of high-temperature deformation in the highly sheared granitic mylonites. Widespread occurrence of different shear criteria (e.g. sheared veins, sigmoid and delta -porphyroclasts) suggests that these gneisses experienced very intensive high-temperature progressive left-lateral strike-slip shearing. A large synkinematic augen monzogranitic intrusion is recognized in the central belt by the present work. The intrusion has an obvious porphyritic texture

  2. Geometric aspects of shear jamming induced by deformation of frictionless sphere packings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinutha, H. A.; Sastry, Srikanth

    2016-09-01

    It has recently been demonstrated that shear deformation of frictionless sphere packings leads to structures that will undergo jamming in the presence of friction, at densities well below the isotropic jamming point {φj}≈ 0.64 , and at high enough strains. Here, we show that the geometric features induced by strain are robust with respect to finite size effects, and include the feature of hyperuniformity, previously studied in the context of jamming, and more recently in driven systems. We study the approach to jamming as strain is increased, by evolving frictionless sheared configurations through frictional dynamics, and thereby identify a critical, or jamming, strain for each density, for a chosen value of the coefficient of friction. In the presence of friction above a certain strain value the sheared frictionless packings begin to develop finite stresses, which marks the onset of shear jamming. At a higher strain value, the shear stress reaches a saturation value after rising rapidly above the onset of shear jamming, which permits identification of the shear jamming transition. The onset of shear jamming and shear jamming are found to occur when the coordination number Z reaches values of Z  =  3 and Z  =  4 respectively. By considering percolation probabilities for the contact network, clusters of four coordinated and six coordinated spheres, we show that the percolation of four coordinated spheres corresponds to the onset of shear jamming behaviour, whereas the percolation of six coordinated spheres corresponds to shear jamming, for the chosen friction coefficients. At the onset of shear jamming, the force distribution begins to develop a peak at finite value and the force network is anisotropic and heterogeneous. And at the shear jamming transition, the force distribution has a well defined peak close to < f> and the force network is less anisotropic and homogeneous. We briefly discuss mechanical aspects of the jamming behaviour by

  3. Deformation and Shear Band Development in an Ultrahigh Carbon Steel During High Strain Rate Deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Lesuer, D R; Syn, C K; Sherby, O D

    2004-07-06

    The mechanical response of a pearlitic UHCS-1.3C steel deformed at approximately 4000 s{sup -1} to large strains ({var_epsilon} = -0.9) has been studied. Failure, at both the macroscopic and the microscopic levels has been evaluated, and the ability of the material to absorb energy in compression has been examined. Failure occurred by the development of a shear band. However before failure, extensive buckling of the carbide plates was observed and the UHCS-1.3C material exhibited significant potential for compressive ductility and energy absorption due to the distributed buckling of these plates. Strain localization during adiabatic shear band development resulted in the formation of austenite. Subsequent cooling produced a divorced-eutectoid transformation with associated deformation, which resulted in a microstructure consisting of 50 to 100 nm sized grains. The stress-strain behavior within the shear band has also been determined. The results are used to critically evaluate the maximum shear stress criterion of shear band development. New criteria for the development of shear bands are developed based on a strain energy concept.

  4. Concentration polarization of high-density lipoprotein and its relation with shear stress in an in vitro model.

    PubMed

    Meng, Wei; Yu, Fengxu; Chen, Huaiqing; Zhang, Jianmin; Zhang, Eryong; Dian, Ke; Shi, Yingkang

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the concentration polarization of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) at the surface of the carotid artery under conditions of steady flow and to establish its relationship with shear stress using an in vitro vascular simulation model of carotid bifurcation. Shear stress, HDL concentration at the surface, and the ratio of HDL concentration at the surface to concentration in bulk flow were measured at different locations within the model under high-speed (1.451 m/s) and low-speed (0.559 m/s) flow. HDL showed concentration polarization at the surface of the carotid artery model, particularly in the internal carotid artery sinus. With decreasing flow velocity, the shear stress at the surface also decreased, and HDL concentration polarization increased. The concentration polarization of HDL was negatively and strongly correlated with shear stress at both low- (r = -0.872, P < .001) and high-speed flow (r = -0.592, P = .0018).

  5. Size-dependent bending modulus of nanotubes induced by the imperfect boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jin

    2016-12-01

    The size-dependent bending modulus of nanotubes, which was widely observed in most existing three-point bending experiments [e.g., J. Phys. Chem. B 117, 4618–4625 (2013)], has been tacitly assumed to originate from the shear effect. In this paper, taking boron nitride nanotubes as an example, we directly measured the shear effect by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and found that the shear effect is not the major factor responsible for the observed size-dependent bending modulus of nanotubes. To further explain the size-dependence phenomenon, we abandoned the assumption of perfect boundary conditions (BCs) utilized in the aforementioned experiments and studied the influence of the BCs on the bending modulus of nanotubes based on MD simulations. The results show that the imperfect BCs also make the bending modulus of nanotubes size-dependent. Moreover, the size-dependence phenomenon induced by the imperfect BCs is much more significant than that induced by the shear effect, which suggests that the imperfect BC is a possible physical origin that leads to the strong size-dependence of the bending modulus found in the aforementioned experiments. To capture the physics behind the MD simulation results, a beam model with the general BCs is proposed and found to fit the experimental data very well.

  6. Size-dependent bending modulus of nanotubes induced by the imperfect boundary conditions

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jin

    2016-01-01

    The size-dependent bending modulus of nanotubes, which was widely observed in most existing three-point bending experiments [e.g., J. Phys. Chem. B 117, 4618–4625 (2013)], has been tacitly assumed to originate from the shear effect. In this paper, taking boron nitride nanotubes as an example, we directly measured the shear effect by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and found that the shear effect is not the major factor responsible for the observed size-dependent bending modulus of nanotubes. To further explain the size-dependence phenomenon, we abandoned the assumption of perfect boundary conditions (BCs) utilized in the aforementioned experiments and studied the influence of the BCs on the bending modulus of nanotubes based on MD simulations. The results show that the imperfect BCs also make the bending modulus of nanotubes size-dependent. Moreover, the size-dependence phenomenon induced by the imperfect BCs is much more significant than that induced by the shear effect, which suggests that the imperfect BC is a possible physical origin that leads to the strong size-dependence of the bending modulus found in the aforementioned experiments. To capture the physics behind the MD simulation results, a beam model with the general BCs is proposed and found to fit the experimental data very well. PMID:27941866

  7. Fractal properties of isovelocity surfaces in high Reynolds number laboratory shear flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Praskovsky, Alexander A.; Foss, John F.; Kleis, Stanley J.; Karyakin, Mikhail Yu.

    1993-08-01

    The fractal properties of isovelocity surfaces are studied in three high Reynolds number (Rλ≊2.0×102-3.2×103) laboratory shear flows using the standard box-counting method. The fractal dimension D=-d(log Nr)/d(log r) was estimated within the range of box sizes r from several Kolmogorov scales up to several integral scales (Nr is the number of boxes with size r required to cover the line intersection of an isovelocity surface). The inertial subrange was of particular interest in this investigation. Measurements were carried out for external intermittency factors γ≊0.6-1.0. The data were processed using threshold levels U±2.5u' (U and u' denote mean and rms values of longitudinal velocity). Over the parameters studied, no wide range of constant fractal dimension was found. On the other hand, the accuracy of constant fractal dimension approximation with D≊0.4 over the inertial subranges was shown to be similar to that of the Kolmogorov [Dokl. Akad. Nauk SSSR 30, 301 (1941)] ``two-thirds law.''

  8. Optimization of β-carotene loaded solid lipid nanoparticles preparation using a high shear homogenization technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Triplett, Michael D.; Rathman, James F.

    2009-04-01

    Using statistical experimental design methodologies, the solid lipid nanoparticle design space was found to be more robust than previously shown in literature. Formulation and high shear homogenization process effects on solid lipid nanoparticle size distribution, stability, drug loading, and drug release have been investigated. Experimentation indicated stearic acid as the optimal lipid, sodium taurocholate as the optimal cosurfactant, an optimum lecithin to sodium taurocholate ratio of 3:1, and an inverse relationship between mixing time and speed and nanoparticle size and polydispersity. Having defined the base solid lipid nanoparticle system, β-carotene was incorporated into stearic acid nanoparticles to investigate the effects of introducing a drug into the base solid lipid nanoparticle system. The presence of β-carotene produced a significant effect on the optimal formulation and process conditions, but the design space was found to be robust enough to accommodate the drug. β-Carotene entrapment efficiency averaged 40%. β-Carotene was retained in the nanoparticles for 1 month. As demonstrated herein, solid lipid nanoparticle technology can be sufficiently robust from a design standpoint to become commercially viable.

  9. Particle-turbulence-acoustic interactions in high-speed free-shear flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shallcross, Gregory; Buchta, David; Capecelatro, Jesse

    2016-11-01

    Experimental studies have shown that the injection of micro-water droplets in turbulent flows can be used to reduce the intensity of near-field pressure fluctuations. In this study, direct numerical simulation (DNS) is used to evaluate the effects of particle-turbulence-acoustic coupling for the first time. Simulations of temporally developing mixing layers are conducted for a range of Mach numbers and mass loadings. Once the turbulence reaches a self-similar state, the air-density shear layer is seeded with a random distribution of mono disperse water-density droplets. For M =0.9 to M =1.75, preliminary results show reductions in the near-field pressure fluctuations for moderate mass loadings, consistent with experimental studies under similar conditions. At high speed, the principle reduction of the normal velocity fluctuations, which increases with particle mass loading, appears to correlate to the reduction of the near-field radiated pressure fluctuations. These findings demonstrate that the DNS reproduces the observed particle-turbulence-acoustic phenomenology, and its complete space-time database can be used to further understand their interactions.

  10. Effect of Material Ion Exchanges on the Mechanical Stiffness Properties and Shear Deformation of Hydrated Cement Material Chemistry Structure C-S-H Jennit - A Computational Modeling Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    and high versatility, cement has remained the most widely utilized material in the world [2]. The starting material of cement is the clinker phase...things of God. v Dedication This work is dedicated to God almighty the giver of life and strength . It is also dedicated to my parents Mr...Jennite Structures (% Weight) ................................................ 34 Table 5 Shear Modulus, Strength and Maximum Shear Deformation of cb

  11. Acoustic metamaterial with negative modulus.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sam Hyeon; Park, Choon Mahn; Seo, Yong Mun; Wang, Zhi Guo; Kim, Chul Koo

    2009-04-29

    We present experimental and theoretical results on an acoustic metamaterial that exhibits a negative effective modulus in a frequency range from 0 to 450 Hz. A one-dimensional acoustic metamaterial with an array of side holes on a tube was fabricated. We observed that acoustic waves above 450 Hz propagated well in this structure, but no sound below 450 Hz passed through. The frequency characteristics of the metamaterial has the same form as that of the permittivity in metals due to the plasma oscillation. We also provide a theory to explain the experimental results.

  12. Studies of wall shear and mass transfer in a large scale model of neonatal high-frequency jet ventilation.

    PubMed

    Muller, W J; Gerjarusek, S; Scherer, P W

    1990-01-01

    The problem of endotracheal erosion associated with neonatal high-frequency jet ventilation (HFJV) is investigated through measurement of air velocity profiles in a scaled up model of the system. Fluid mechanical scaling principles are applied in order to construct a model within which velocity profiles are measured by hot-wire anemometry. The effects of two different jet geometries are investigated. Velocity gradients measured near the tracheal wall are used to measure the shear stresses caused by the jet flow on the wall. The Chilton-Colburn analogy between the transport of momentum and mass is applied to investigate tracheal drying caused by the high shear flow. Shear forces are seen to be more than two times higher for jets located near the endotracheal tube wall than for those located axisymmetrically in the center of the tube. Since water vapor fluxes are dependent on these shears, they are also higher for the asymmetric case. Fluxes are shown to be greatly dependent on the temperature and relative humidity of the inspired gas. Water from the tracheal surface may be depleted within one second if inspired gases are inadequately heated and humidified. It is recommended that the design of neonatal HFJV devices include delivery of heated (near body temperature), humidified (as close to 100% humidity as possible) gases through an axisymmetric jet to best avoid the problem of endotracheal erosion.

  13. Effective Blending of Ultrahigh Molecular Weight Polyethylene with High-Density Polyethylene via Solid-State Shear Pulverization (SSSP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diop, Mirian; Torkelson, John

    2014-03-01

    Compared with conventional polyolefins, ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) possesses outstanding mechanical properties, including impact strength and crack resistance, that make it it highly desirable for applications ranging from body armor to implants. Unfortunately, UHMWPE has an ultrahigh melt viscosity that renders common melt processes ineffective for making products from UHMWPE. Attempts to overcome this problem by blending UHMWPE with polyethylene (PE) by conventional melt mixing have been unsuccessful because of the enormous viscosity mismatch between blend components and have led to large suspensions of UHMWPE particles within a PE matrix. Here, we show the utility of solid-state shear pulverization (SSSP) in achieving effectively and intimately mixed UHMWPE/PE blends. For blends with up to 50 wt% UHMWPE we observe only slight increases in viscosity (η) at high shear rates but major increases in η with increasing UHMWPE content at low shear rates. Using extensional rheology, we confirm the strain hardening behavior of SSSP blends. Additionally, shear rheology and differential scanning calorimetry data indicate that the degree of mixing between UHMWPE and HDPE domains can be increased dramatically with subsequent passes of SSSP and single screw extrusion. Finally, blends prepared via SSSP show dramatic increases in impact strength; e.g., for a 30/70 wt% UHMWPE/HDPE blend, impact strength increases by about 300 % (relative to the parent neat HDPE).

  14. The elastic modulus correction term in creep activation energies Applied to oxide dispersion strengthened superalloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malu, M.; Tien, J. K.

    1975-01-01

    The effect of elastic modulus and the temperature dependence of elastic modulus on creep activation energies for an oxide dispersion strengthened nickel-base superalloy are investigated. This superalloy is commercially known as Inconel Alloy MA 753, strengthened both by gamma-prime precipitates and by yttria particles. It is shown that at intermediate temperatures, say below 1500 F, where elastic modulus is weakly dependent on temperature, the modulus correction term to creep activation energy is small. Accordingly, modulus corrections are insignificant for the superalloy considered, which shows high apparent creep activation energies at this temperature. On the contrary, at very high temperatures, the elastic modulus correction term can be significant, thus reducing the creep activation energy to that of vacancy self-diffusion. In order to obtain high-temperature creep resistance, a high-value elastic modulus with a weak dependence on temperature is required.

  15. Measurement of viscosity and shear wave velocity of a liquid or slurry for on-line process control.

    PubMed

    Greenwood, Margaret Stautberg; Bamberger, Judith Ann

    2002-08-01

    An on-line sensor to measure the density of a liquid or slurry, based on longitudinal wave reflection at the solid-fluid interface, has been developed by the staff at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The objective of this research is to employ shear wave reflection at the solid-fluid interface to provide an on-line measurement of viscosity as well. Both measurements are of great interest for process control in many industries. Shear wave reflection measurements were conducted for a variety of liquids. By analyzing multiple reflections within the solid (only 0.63 cm thick-similar to pipe wall thickness) we increased the sensitivity of the measurement. At the sixth echo, sensitivity was increased sufficiently and this echo was used for fluid interrogation. Shear wave propagation of ultrasound in liquids is dependent upon the viscosity and the shear modulus. The data are analyzed using the theory for light liquids (such as water and sugar water solutions) and also using the theory for highly viscous liquids (such as silicone oils). The results show that, for light liquids, the shear wave reflection measurements interrogate the viscosity. However, for highly viscous liquids, it is the shear wave modulus that dominates the shear wave reflection. Since the density is known, the shear wave velocity in the liquid can be determined from the shear wave modulus. The results show that shear wave velocities in silicone oils are very small and range from 315 to 2389 cm/s. Shear wave reflection measurements are perhaps the only way that shear wave velocity in liquids can be determined, because the shear waves in liquids are highly attenuated. These results show that, depending on the fluid characteristics, either the viscosity or the shear wave velocity can be used for process control. There are several novel features of this sensor: (1) The sensor can be mounted as part of the wall of a pipeline or tank or submerged in a tank. (2) The sensor is very compact and can be

  16. Observation and modeling of mixing-layer development in high-energy-density, blast-wave-driven shear flow

    SciTech Connect

    Di Stefano, C. A. Kuranz, C. C.; Klein, S. R.; Drake, R. P.; Malamud, G.; Henry de Frahan, M. T.; Johnsen, E.; Shimony, A.; Shvarts, D.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Martinez, D.

    2014-05-15

    In this work, we examine the hydrodynamics of high-energy-density (HED) shear flows. Experiments, consisting of two materials of differing density, use the OMEGA-60 laser to drive a blast wave at a pressure of ∼50 Mbar into one of the media, creating a shear flow in the resulting shocked system. The interface between the two materials is Kelvin-Helmholtz unstable, and a mixing layer of growing width develops due to the shear. To theoretically analyze the instability's behavior, we rely on two sources of information. First, the interface spectrum is well-characterized, which allows us to identify how the shock front and the subsequent shear in the post-shock flow interact with the interface. These observations provide direct evidence that vortex merger dominates the evolution of the interface structure. Second, simulations calibrated to the experiment allow us to estimate the time-dependent evolution of the deposition of vorticity at the interface. The overall result is that we are able to choose a hydrodynamic model for the system, and consequently examine how well the flow in this HED system corresponds to a classical hydrodynamic description.

  17. Study of the strength of molybdenum under high pressure using electromagnetically applied compression-shear ramp loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Jow; Alexander, C. Scott; Asay, James

    2015-06-01

    MAPS (Magnetically Applied Pressure Shear) is a new technique that has the potential to study material strength under mega-bar pressures. By applying a mixed-mode pressure-shear loading and measuring the resultant material responses, the technique provides explicit and direct information on material strength under high pressure. In order to apply sufficient shear traction to the test sample, the driver must have substantial strength. Molybdenum was selected for this reason along with its good electrical conductivity. In this work, the mechanical behavior of molybdenum under MAPS loading was studied. To understand the experimental data, a viscoplasticity model with tension-compression asymmetry was also developed. Through a combination of experimental characterization, model development, and numerical simulation, many unique insights were gained on the inelastic behavior of molybdenum such as the effects of strength on the interplay between longitudinal and shear stresses, potential interaction between the magnetic field and molybdenum strength, and the possible tension-compression asymmetry of the inelastic material response. Sandia National Labs is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corp., for the U.S. Dept. of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  18. EXTREMELY RAPID STAR CLUSTER DISRUPTION IN HIGH-SHEAR CIRCUMNUCLEAR STARBURST RINGS: THE UNUSUAL CASE OF NGC 7742

    SciTech Connect

    De Grijs, Richard; Anders, Peter E-mail: anders@pku.edu.cn

    2012-10-10

    All known mass distributions of recently formed star cluster populations resemble a 'universal' power-law function. Here we assess the impact of the extremely disruptive environment in NGC 7742's circumnuclear starburst ring on the early evolution of the galaxy's high-mass ({approx}10{sup 5}-10{sup 7} M{sub Sun }) star cluster population. Surprisingly, and contrary to expectations, at all ages-including the youngest, {approx}< 15 Myr-the cluster mass functions are robustly and verifiably represented by lognormal distributions that resemble those commonly found only for old, evolved globular cluster systems in the local universe. This suggests that the high-shear conditions in the NGC 7742 starburst ring may significantly speed up dynamical star cluster destruction. This enhanced mass-dependent disruption rate at very young ages might be caused by a combination of the starburst ring's high density and the shear caused by the counterrotating gas disk.

  19. Shear, Bulk, and Young's Moduli of Clay/Polymer Nanocomposites Containing the Stacks of Intercalated Layers as Pseudoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zare, Yasser

    2016-10-01

    The pseudoparticles include the stacks of intercalated layers in the case of incomplete clay exfoliation in clay/polymer nanocomposites. In this article, the effects of pseudoparticle properties on the shear, bulk, and Young's moduli of nanocomposites are studied using the Norris model. The properties of pseudoparticles are determined in some samples by the experimental data of Young's modulus and the roles of pseudoparticles in the shear, bulk, and Young's moduli of nanocomposites are discussed. The calculations show a good agreement with the experimental data when the pseudoparticles are taken into account in the samples. A low number of clay layers in the pseudoparticles present high moduli in nanocomposites. Moreover, the Poisson ratio and Young's modulus of polymer matrix play different roles in the shear, bulk, and Young's moduli of nanocomposites.

  20. Piezoelectric Measurement Of Bulk Modulus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, Barry L.

    1992-01-01

    In method of measuring bulk modulus of elasticity of elastomeric material, piezoelectric crystals of various sizes and energized by alternating voltage embedded in material. Concept demonstrated in test cell in which piezoelectric crystal mounted either unconstrained or between two rubber pads and connected as actuator in loud-speaker. The 1-in. diameter crystal excited with 24 Vac at 60 Hz. When crystal was unconstrained, it drew current of 0.8 mA. When crystal was constrained between rubber pads, current fell to 0.65 mA. Low current, minimal heating, and absence of arcing makes technique suitable for measurement of bulk moduli of elasticity of flammable or explosive rubbery materials.

  1. Shearing stability of lubricants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shiba, Y.; Gijyutsu, G.

    1984-01-01

    Shearing stabilities of lubricating oils containing a high mol. wt. polymer as a viscosity index improver were studied by use of ultrasound. The oils were degraded by cavitation and the degradation generally followed first order kinetics with the rate of degradation increasing with the intensity of the ultrasonic irradiation and the cumulative energy applied. The shear stability was mainly affected by the mol. wt. of the polymer additive and could be determined in a short time by mechanical shearing with ultrasound.

  2. Dynamic thermal field-induced gradient soft-shear for highly oriented block copolymer thin films.

    PubMed

    Singh, Gurpreet; Yager, Kevin G; Berry, Brian; Kim, Ho-Cheol; Karim, Alamgir

    2012-11-27

    As demand for smaller, more powerful, and energy-efficient devices continues, conventional patterning technologies are pushing up against fundamental limits. Block copolymers (BCPs) are considered prime candidates for a potential solution via directed self-assembly of nanostructures. We introduce here a facile directed self-assembly method to rapidly fabricate unidirectionally aligned BCP nanopatterns at large scale, on rigid or flexible template-free substrates via a thermally induced dynamic gradient soft-shear field. A localized differential thermal expansion at the interface between a BCP film and a confining polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) layer due to a dynamic thermal field imposes the gradient soft-shear field. PDMS undergoes directional expansion (along the annealing direction) in the heating zone and contracts back in the cooling zone, thus setting up a single cycle of oscillatory shear (maximum lateral shear stress ∼12 × 10(4) Pa) in the system. We successfully apply this process to create unidirectional alignment of BCP thin films over a wide range of thicknesses (nm to μm) and processing speeds (μm/s to mm/s) using both a flat and patterned PDMS layer. Grazing incidence small-angle X-ray scattering measurements show absolutely no sign of isotropic population and reveal ≥99% aligned orientational order with an angular spread Δθ(fwhm) ≤ 5° (full width at half-maximum). This method may pave the way to practical industrial use of hierarchically patterned BCP nanostructures.

  3. Effect of starch 1500 as a binder and disintegrant in lamivudine tablets prepared by high shear wet granulation.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Bytul M; Ibne-Wahed, Mir Imam; Khondkar, Proma; Ahmed, Maruf; Islam, Robiul; Barman, Ranjan K; Islam, M Anwarul

    2008-10-01

    High shear wet granulation is a preferred manufacturing method of tablets. It allowed for rapid production of compressible granulations. The resultant granulation characteristics depend on a combination of formulation properties and processing parameters. Fully pregelatinized starches are currently being used as binders in wet granulated formulations. But due to the gelatinization, much of the disintegration properties are lost. Partially pregelatinized starches (starch 1,500) have a mixture of properties of both native and fully gelatinized starches; made them useful as both a binder and a disintegrant in wet granulated formulations. Starch 1,500 performed as an excellent binder producing a granulation that was compressible and produced lamivudine tablets of improved hardness and friability compared with those prepared with povidone. The formulation of lamivudine tablets with starch 1,500 exceeded the disintegration and dissolution performance of the povidone formulation that utilized a super disintegrant. High shear wet granulation is also well suited for the use of partially pregelatinized starches.

  4. High magnetic shear gain in a liquid sodium stable couette flow experiment A prelude to an alpha - omega dynamo

    SciTech Connect

    Colgate, Stirling; Li, Jui; Finn, John; Pariev, Vladimir; Beckley, Howard; Si, Jiahe; Martinic, Joe; Westpfahl, David; Slutz, James; Westrom, Zeb; Klein, Brianna

    2010-11-08

    The {Omega}-phase of the liquid sodium {alpha}-{Omega} dynamo experiment at NMIMT in cooperation with LANL has successfully demonstrated the production of a high toroidal field, B{sub {phi}} {approx_equal} 8 x B{sub r} from the radial component of an applied poloidal magnetic field, B{sub r}. This enhanced toroidal field is produced by rotational shear in stable Couette Row within liquid sodium at Rm {approx_equal} 120. The small turbulence in stable Taylor-Couette Row is caused by Ekman Row where ({delta}v/v){sup 2} {approx} 10{sup -3}. This high {Omega}-gain in low turbulence flow contrasts with a smaller {Omega}-gain in higher turbulence, Helmholtz-unstable shear flows. This result supports the ansatz that large scale astrophysical magnetic fields are created within semi-coherent large scale motions in which turbulence plays a diffusive role that enables magnetic flux linkage.

  5. A High Energy Density Shock Driven Kelvin-Helmholtz Shear Layer Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurricane, Omar

    2008-11-01

    In 2002, a high energy density Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability experiment was designed (O.A. Hurricane, High Energy Density Phys., 2008) for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) Early Light experiment. However, the long backlighter delay, required for the experiments success, could not be accommodated by NIF at that time. In early 2008, this experiment proposal was resurrected by our team, the target was fabricated at Livermore with final assembly at the University of Michigan, and then fielded at the Omega laser facility. The data return from the four shots of the experiment series exceeded expectation. In this paper, we describe the theory and simulation behind the experiment design, the unusual target construction, and present the radiographic data from the Omega experiment in raw form and a preliminary analysis of the data. Discussion of the target design theory and simulations focuses on the key role played by baroclinic vorticity production in the functioning of the target and also illuminates the key design parameters. The data shows the complete evolution of large distinct KH eddies, from formation to turbulent break-up. The data appears to graphically confirm a theoretical fluid dynamics conjecture about the existence of supersonic bubbles over the vortical structure [transonic convective Mach numbers (D. Papamoschou and A. Roshko, J. Fluid Mech., 197, 1988)] that support localized shocks (shocklets) not extending into the free-stream^ (P.E. Dimotakis, AIAA 91-1724, Proc. 22^nd Fluid Dyn., Plasma Dyn., & Lasers Conf., 1991). The consequences of these observations on understanding the turbulent transition, growth-rates and mixing in compressible supersonic turbulent shear layers will be discussed. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. A National Laser Users Facility grant also supported this work. Collaborators: J.F. Hansen, E.C. Harding , R

  6. Frictional Behavior of Amphibolite at Seismic Slip Rates from High-velocity Rotary Shear Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, S.; Ree, J.; Hirose, T.; Lee, S.

    2012-12-01

    Gabbroic rocks of oceanic crust transform into amphibolite with depth at subduction zone, and thus frictional property of amphibolite may be important for a better understanding of subduction zone earthquakes. We report preliminary results of high-velocity rotary shear experiments on amphibolite at a seismic slip rate (~1.05 m/s) and normal stresses of 2-15 MPa. Amphibolite from the Imjingang belt of South Korea is composed of hornblende (0.5-1.5 mm) and plagioclase (0.25-0.5 mm) with rare occurrence of quartz. The frictional behavior of the amphibolite is characterized by two phases of unstable slip weakening separated by strengthening, followed by a final weakening with a very low steady-state friction coefficient of 0.07. The average coefficient of the first, second and final peak frictions is 0.48, 0.36 and 0.22, respectively. The fault zone consists of a principal slip zone (PSZ, 200-300 μm thick) with molten material mantled by damage zone (1-3 mm thick). In the damage zone, the color of hornblende grains becomes darker toward the PSZ and thin, black stripes occur along cleavage planes of hornblende in plane-polarized light. Also fracture density of hornblende and plagioclase increases relative to those of wall rock. The PSZ comprises molten material and mineral clasts (25-50 μm) and the clasts tend to concentrate along the center of the PSZ. The surface temperature of the fault zones measured by a radiation thermography during experiments is about 1060°C and the internal temperature of the fault zones could be higher than the measured temperature in view of the melting of hornblende and plagioclase. The frictional behavior of amphibolite is much different from that of gabbro where the overall friction is much higher with the final peak friction of 0.84-1.09 and steady-state friction of ~0.6 (Hirose and Shimamoto, 2005 in Journal of Geophysical Research). This difference may be due to dehydration of hornblende by frictional heating and lower viscosity of

  7. Surface elastic modulus of barnacle adhesive and release characteristics from silicone surfaces.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yujie; Guo, Senli; Walker, Gilbert C; Kavanagh, Christopher J; Swain, Geoffrey W

    2004-12-01

    The properties of barnacle adhesive on silicone surfaces were studied by AFM indentation, imaging, and other tests and compared to the barnacle shear adhesion strength. A multilayered structure of barnacle adhesive plaque is proposed based on layered modulus regions measured by AFM indentation. The fracture of barnacles from PDMS surfaces was found to include both interfacial and cohesive failure of barnacle adhesive plaque, as determined by protein staining of the substratum after forced barnacle release from the substrate. Data for freshly released barnacles showed that there was a strong correlation between the mean Young's modulus of the outermost (softest) adhesive layer (E<0.3 MPa) and the shear strength of adhesion, but no correlation for other higher modulus regions. Linear, quadratic, and Griffith's failure criterion (based on rough estimate of crack length) regressions were used in the fit, and showed significance.

  8. Scalable shear-exfoliation of high-quality phosphorene nanoflakes with reliable electrochemical cycleability in nano batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Feng; Ge, Binghui; Chen, Jing; Nathan, Arokia; Xin, Linhuo L.; Ma, Hongyu; Min, Huihua; Zhu, Chongyang; Xia, Weiwei; Li, Zhengrui; Li, Shengli; Yu, Kaihao; Wu, Lijun; Cui, Yiping; Sun, Litao; Zhu, Yimei

    2016-06-01

    Atomically thin black phosphorus (called phosphorene) holds great promise as an alternative to graphene and other two-dimensional transition-metal dichalcogenides as an anode material for lithium-ion batteries (LIBs). However, bulk black phosphorus (BP) suffers from rapid capacity fading and poor rechargeable performance. This work reports for the first time the use of in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to construct nanoscale phosphorene LIBs. This enables direct visualization of the mechanisms underlying capacity fading in thick multilayer phosphorene through real-time capture of delithiation-induced structural decomposition, which serves to reduce electrical conductivity thus causing irreversibility of the lithiated phases. We further demonstrate that few-layer-thick phosphorene successfully circumvents the structural decomposition and holds superior structural restorability, even when subject to multi-cycle lithiation/delithiation processes and concomitant huge volume expansion. This finding provides breakthrough insights into thickness-dependent lithium diffusion kinetics in phosphorene. More importantly, a scalable liquid-phase shear exfoliation route has been developed to produce high-quality ultrathin phosphorene using simple means such as a high-speed shear mixer or even a household kitchen blender with the shear rate threshold of ˜1.25 × 104 s-1. The results reported here will pave the way for industrial-scale applications of rechargeable phosphorene LIBs.

  9. The function of ultra-large von Willebrand factor multimers in high shear flow controlled by ADAMTS13.

    PubMed

    Reininger, A J

    2015-01-01

    The paradigm that platelet aggregation, which contributes to bleeding arrest and also to thrombovascular disorders, initiates after signaling-induced platelet activation has been refuted in past recent years. Platelets can form aggregates independently of activation when soluble von Willebrand factor (VWF) is present and the shear rate exceeds a certain threshold where active A1 domains become exposed in soluble VWF multimers and can bind to platelet glycoprotein Ib. Subsequently - fostering each other - VWF can self-assemble into large nets combining with platelets into large conglomerates, which are entirely reversible when they enter a flow region with shear rates below the threshold. In addition the threshold changes from approximately 20 000 s⁻¹ in wall parallel flow to approximately 10 000 s⁻¹ in stagnation point flow. VWF containing ultra-large multimers - as when just released from endothelial storage sites - has been shown to have the highest binding potential to platelets and to each other, thus facilitating rapid platelet accrual to sites of vessel injury and exposed subendothelial structures, i.e. collagen. The VWF nets as well as the platelet-VWF conglomerates are controlled by the cleaving protease ADAMTS13 within minutes under high shear flow. Therewith the hemostatic potential is delivered where needed and the thrombogenic potential is highly controlled twofold: by flow and enzymatic proteolytic cleavage.

  10. Scalable shear-exfoliation of high-quality phosphorene nanoflakes with reliable electrochemical cycleability in nano batteries

    DOE PAGES

    Xu, Feng; Ge, Binghui; Chen, Jing; ...

    2016-03-30

    Atomically thin black phosphorus (called phosphorene) holds great promise as an alternative to graphene and other two-dimensional transition-metal dichalcogenides as an anode material for lithium-ion batteries (LIBs). But, bulk black phosphorus (BP) suffers from rapid capacity fading and poor rechargeable performance. This work reports for the first time the use of in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to construct nanoscale phosphorene LIBs. This enables direct visualization of the mechanisms underlying capacity fading in thick multilayer phosphorene through real-time capture of delithiation-induced structural decomposition, which serves to reduce electrical conductivity thus causing irreversibility of the lithiated phases. Furthermore, we demonstrate thatmore » few-layer-thick phosphorene successfully circumvents the structural decomposition and holds superior structural restorability, even when subject to multi-cycle lithiation/delithiation processes and concomitant huge volume expansion. This finding provides breakthrough insights into thickness-dependent lithium diffusion kinetics in phosphorene. More importantly, a scalable liquid-phase shear exfoliation route has been developed to produce high-quality ultrathin phosphorene using simple means such as a high-speed shear mixer or even a household kitchen blender with the shear rate threshold of ~1.25 × 104 s-1. Our results reported here will pave the way for industrial-scale applications of rechargeable phosphorene LIBs.« less

  11. Scalable shear-exfoliation of high-quality phosphorene nanoflakes with reliable electrochemical cycleability in nano batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Feng; Ge, Binghui; Chen, Jing; Nathan, Arokia; Xin, Linhuo L.; Ma, Hongyu; Zhu, Chongyang; Xia, Weiwei; Li, Zhengrui; Li, Shengli; Yu, Kaihao; Wu, Lijun; Cui, Yiping; Sun, Litao; Zhu, Yimei

    2016-03-30

    Atomically thin black phosphorus (called phosphorene) holds great promise as an alternative to graphene and other two-dimensional transition-metal dichalcogenides as an anode material for lithium-ion batteries (LIBs). But, bulk black phosphorus (BP) suffers from rapid capacity fading and poor rechargeable performance. This work reports for the first time the use of in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to construct nanoscale phosphorene LIBs. This enables direct visualization of the mechanisms underlying capacity fading in thick multilayer phosphorene through real-time capture of delithiation-induced structural decomposition, which serves to reduce electrical conductivity thus causing irreversibility of the lithiated phases. Furthermore, we demonstrate that few-layer-thick phosphorene successfully circumvents the structural decomposition and holds superior structural restorability, even when subject to multi-cycle lithiation/delithiation processes and concomitant huge volume expansion. This finding provides breakthrough insights into thickness-dependent lithium diffusion kinetics in phosphorene. More importantly, a scalable liquid-phase shear exfoliation route has been developed to produce high-quality ultrathin phosphorene using simple means such as a high-speed shear mixer or even a household kitchen blender with the shear rate threshold of ~1.25 × 104 s-1. Our results reported here will pave the way for industrial-scale applications of rechargeable phosphorene LIBs.

  12. Dynamics of a high viscosity layer in response to shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esmaili, Ehsan; Staples, Anne

    2016-11-01

    We use the Shan-Chen multicomponent Lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) to investigate the time evolution of a thin liquid film (phase I) coating a solid surface under the action of a shearing force imposed by a surrounding fluid (phase II), whose viscosity is significantly lower than that of the film. The goal of this study is to use LBM to capture the contact line motion and interfacial dynamics for an oil-like liquid film which is driven by the upper phase (water) movement as a first approach to modeling thin film dewetting in wave swept marine environments. Lubrication theory is used to validate the results for the driven thin film, and the LBM simulations investigate the effects of the upper phase movement, lower phase thickness, and angle of the imposed shearing force on the thin film profile. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant Number 1437387.

  13. Cryogenic High-Pressure Shear-Coaxial Jets Exposed to Transverse Acoustic Forcing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-12-13

    Air Force Research Laboratory (AFMC) AFRL/RZSA 10 E. Saturn Blvd. Edwards AFB CA 93524-7680 9. SPONSORING / MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND...pressure antinode ( PAN ). The role of injector exit geometry on the flow response was examined using two shear coaxial injectors with different outer-to...jets to pressure perturbations due to transverse acoustic forcing at a pressure antinode ( PAN ). The role of injector exit geometry on the flow

  14. High shear strain behaviour of synthetic muscovite fault gouges under hydrothermal conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Diggelen, Esther W. E.; De Bresser, Johannes H. P.; Peach, Colin J.; Spiers, Christopher J.

    2010-11-01

    Major continental fault zones typically contain phyllosilicates and have long been recognised as zones of persistent weakness. To establish whether the presence of micas can explain this weakness, we studied the frictional behaviour of simulated muscovite fault gouge by performing rotary shear experiments in the temperature range 20-700 °C, under constant effective normal stresses of 20-100 MPa, a fixed fluid pressure of 100 MPa and at sliding velocities of 0.03-3.7 μm/s, reaching shear strains up to 100. Cataclasis causes substantial grain size reduction up to 600 °C. With increasing strain, both pervasive and localized cataclasis and related compaction result in strain hardening, until steady state is reached. This reflects the progressive development of a continuous network of fine grained, hardening bands. Coarse grained relict lenses between these bands show folded and kinked muscovite grains indicative of ductile mechanisms. Samples deformed at 700 °C show evidence for chemical alteration and partial melting. Since our data suggest that muscovite gouge strengthens with depth and strain, it is questionable whether its presence can contribute to the long-term weakness of major crustal fault zones, unless a substantial decrease in strength occurs at shear strain rates lower than attained in our study.

  15. Effect of strain isolator pad modulus on inplane strain in Shuttle Orbiter thermal protection system tiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawyer, J. W.

    1983-01-01

    The thermal protection system used on the Space Shuttle orbiter to determine strains in the reusable surface insulation tiles under simulated flight loads was investigated. The effects of changes in the strain isolator pad (SIP) moduli on the strains in the tile were evaluated. To analyze the SIP/tile system, it was necessary to conduct tests to determine inplane tension and compression modulus and inplane failure strain for the densified layer of the tiles. It is shown that densification of the LI-900 tile material increases the modulus by a factor of 6 to 10 and reduces the failure strain by about 50%. It is indicated that the inplane strain levels in the Shuttle tiles in the highly loaded regions are approximately 2 orders of magnitude lower than the failure strain of the material. It is concluded that most of the LI-900 tiles on the Shuttle could be mounted on a SIP with tensile and shear stiffnesses 10 times those of the present SIP without inplane strain failure in the tile.

  16. Determination of elastic modulus of the components at dentin-resin interface using the ultrasonic device.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Tamayo; Miyazaki, Masashi; Inage, Hirohiko; Kurokawa, Hiroyasu

    2004-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the elastic moduli of the components at resin-dentin interface with the use of an ultrasonic device. Dentin plates were obtained from freshly extracted bovine incisors with a shape in rectangular form. Resin composites and bonding agents were polymerized and trimmed in the same shape as the dentin specimens. The ultrasonic equipment employed in this study was comprised of a Pulser-Receiver, transducers, and an oscilloscope. Each elastic modulus was determined by measuring the longitudinal and shear wave sound velocities. The mean elastic modulus of mineralized dentin was 17.4 GPa, while that of demineralized dentin was 1.4 GPa. When the demineralized dentin was immersed in bonding agents, the elastic modulus changed to 3.7-4.7 GPa, and these values were significantly higher than those of demineralized dentin. A gradient in elastic modulus was detected as the analysis shifted from the dentin side to the resin composite.

  17. High-speed ultrasound imaging in dense suspensions reveals impact-activated solidification due to dynamic shear jamming

    PubMed Central

    Han, Endao; Peters, Ivo R.; Jaeger, Heinrich M.

    2016-01-01

    A remarkable property of dense suspensions is that they can transform from liquid-like at rest to solid-like under sudden impact. Previous work showed that this impact-induced solidification involves rapidly moving jamming fronts; however, details of this process have remained unresolved. Here we use high-speed ultrasound imaging to probe non-invasively how the interior of a dense suspension responds to impact. Measuring the speed of sound we demonstrate that the solidification proceeds without a detectable increase in packing fraction, and imaging the evolving flow field we find that the shear intensity is maximized right at the jamming front. Taken together, this provides direct experimental evidence for jamming by shear, rather than densification, as driving the transformation to solid-like behaviour. On the basis of these findings we propose a new model to explain the anisotropy in the propagation speed of the fronts and delineate the onset conditions for dynamic shear jamming in suspensions. PMID:27436628

  18. Imaging shear wave propagation for elastic measurement using OCT Doppler variance method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jiang; Miao, Yusi; Qu, Yueqiao; Ma, Teng; Li, Rui; Du, Yongzhao; Huang, Shenghai; Shung, K. Kirk; Zhou, Qifa; Chen, Zhongping

    2016-03-01

    In this study, we have developed an acoustic radiation force orthogonal excitation optical coherence elastography (ARFOE-OCE) method for the visualization of the shear wave and the calculation of the shear modulus based on the OCT Doppler variance method. The vibration perpendicular to the OCT detection direction is induced by the remote acoustic radiation force (ARF) and the shear wave propagating along the OCT beam is visualized by the OCT M-scan. The homogeneous agar phantom and two-layer agar phantom are measured using the ARFOE-OCE system. The results show that the ARFOE-OCE system has the ability to measure the shear modulus beyond the OCT imaging depth. The OCT Doppler variance method, instead of the OCT Doppler phase method, is used for vibration detection without the need of high phase stability and phase wrapping correction. An M-scan instead of the B-scan for the visualization of the shear wave also simplifies the data processing.

  19. Anomalous bulk modulus in vanadate spinels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Z.-Y.; Li, X.; Cheng, J.-G.; Marshall, L. G.; Li, X.-Y.; dos Santos, A. M.; Yang, W.-G.; Wu, J. J.; Lin, J.-F.; Henkelman, G.; Okada, T.; Uwatoko, Y.; Cao, H. B.; Zhou, H. D.; Goodenough, J. B.; Zhou, J.-S.

    2016-10-01

    All single-valent oxide spinels are insulators. The relatively small activation energy in the temperature dependence of resistivity in vanadate spinels led to the speculation that the spinels are near the crossover from localized to itinerant electronic behavior, and the crossover could be achieved under pressure. We have performed a number of experiments and calculations aimed at obtaining information regarding structural changes under high pressure for the whole series of vanadate spinels, as well as transport and magnetic properties under pressure for Mg V2O4 . We have also studied the crystal structure under pressure of wide-gap insulators A C r2O4 (A =Mg , Mn, Fe, Zn) for comparison. Moreover, the relationship between the bulk modulus and the cell volume of A V2O4 (A =Mg , Mn, Fe, Co, Zn) has been simulated by a density functional theory calculation. The proximity of A V2O4 spinels to the electronic state crossover under high pressure has been tested by three criteria: (1) a predicted critical V-V bond length, (2) the observation of a sign change in the pressure dependence of Néel temperature, and (3) measurement of a reduced bulk modulus. The obtained results indicate that, although the crossover from localized to itinerant π bonding V-3 d electrons in the A V2O4 spinels is approached by reducing under pressure the V-V separation R , the critical separation Rc is not reached by 20 GPa in Co V2O4 , which has the smallest V-V separation in the A V2O4 (A =Mg , Mn, Fe, Co, Zn) spinels.

  20. Viscoelastic shear properties of porcine temporomandibular joint disc

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yongren; Kuo, Jonathan; Wright, Gregory J.; Cisewski, Sarah E.; Wei, Feng; Kern, Michael J.; Yao, Hai

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the intrinsic viscoelastic shear properties in porcine TMJ discs. Materials and Methods Twelve fresh porcine TMJ discs from young adult pigs (6-8 months) were used. Cylindrical samples (5 mm diameter) with uniform thickness (~1.2 mm) were prepared from five regions of the TMJ disc. Torsional shear tests were performed under 10% compressive strain. Dynamic shear was applied in two methods: (1) a frequency sweep test over the frequency range of 0.01-10 rad/s with a constant shear strain amplitude of 0.025 rad, and (2) a strain sweep test over the range of 0.005-0.05 rad at a constant frequency of 10 rad/s. Transient stress-relaxation tests were also performed to determine the equilibrium shear properties. Results As the frequency increased in the frequency sweep test, the dynamic shear complex modulus increased, with values ranging from 7 to 17 kPa. The phase angle, ranging from 11 to 15 degrees, displayed no pattern of regional variation as the frequency increased. The dynamic shear modulus decreased as the shear strain increased. The equilibrium shear modulus had values ranging from 2 to 4.5 kPa. The posterior region had significantly higher values for dynamic shear modulus than those in the anterior region while no significant regional difference was found for equilibrium shear modulus. Conclusion Our results suggest that the intrinsic region-dependent viscoelastic shear characteristics of TMJ disc may play a crucial role in determining the local strain of the TMJ disc under mechanical loading. PMID:25865544

  1. Shear Thinning of Noncolloidal Suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vázquez-Quesada, Adolfo; Tanner, Roger I.; Ellero, Marco

    2016-09-01

    Shear thinning—a reduction in suspension viscosity with increasing shear rates—is understood to arise in colloidal systems from a decrease in the relative contribution of entropic forces. The shear-thinning phenomenon has also been often reported in experiments with noncolloidal systems at high volume fractions. However its origin is an open theoretical question and the behavior is difficult to reproduce in numerical simulations where shear thickening is typically observed instead. In this letter we propose a non-Newtonian model of interparticle lubrication forces to explain shear thinning in noncolloidal suspensions. We show that hidden shear-thinning effects of the suspending medium, which occur at shear rates orders of magnitude larger than the range investigated experimentally, lead to significant shear thinning of the overall suspension at much smaller shear rates. At high particle volume fractions the local shear rates experienced by the fluid situated in the narrow gaps between particles are much larger than the averaged shear rate of the whole suspension. This allows the suspending medium to probe its high-shear non-Newtonian regime and it means that the matrix fluid rheology must be considered over a wide range of shear rates.

  2. Measurement of local strains in intervertebral disc anulus fibrosus tissue under dynamic shear: contributions of matrix fiber orientation and elastin content.

    PubMed

    Michalek, Arthur J; Buckley, Mark R; Bonassar, Lawrence J; Cohen, Itai; Iatridis, James C

    2009-10-16

    Shear strain has been implicated as an initiator of intervertebral disc anulus failure, however a clear, multi-scale picture of how shear strain affects the tissue microstructure has been lacking. The purposes of this study were to measure microscale deformations in anulus tissue under dynamic shear in two orientations, and to determine the role of elastin in regulating these deformations. Bovine AF tissue was simultaneously shear loaded and imaged using confocal microscopy following either a buffer or elastase treatment. Digital image analysis was used to track through time local shear strains in specimens sheared transversely, and stretch and rotation of collagen fiber bundles in specimens sheared circumferentially. The results of this study suggest that sliding does not occur between AF plies under shear, and that interlamellar connections are governed by collagen and fibrilin rather than elastin. The transverse shear modulus was found to be approximately 1.6 times as high in plies the direction of the collagen fibers as in plies across them. Under physiological levels of in-plane shear, fiber bundles stretched and re-oriented linearly. Elastin was found to primarily stiffen plies transversely. We conclude that alterations in the elastic fiber network, as found with IVD herniation and degeneration, can therefore be expected to significantly influence the AF response to shear making it more susceptible to micro failure under bending or torsion loading.

  3. Structure of the Highly Sheared Tropical Storm Chantal During CAMEX-4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Tropical Storm Chantal during August 2001 was a storm that failed to intensify over the few days prior to making landfall on the Yucatan Peninsula. An observational study of Tropical Storm Chantal is presented using a diverse data set including remote and in situ measurements from the NASA ER-2 and DC-8 and the NOAA WP-3D N42RF aircraft and satellite data. The authors discuss the storm structure from the larger scale environment down to the convective scale. Large vertical shear (850-200 hPa shear magnitude range 8-15 m/s) plays a very important role in preventing Chantal from intensifying. The storm had a poorly defined vortex that only extended up to 5-6 km altitude, and an adjacent intense convective region that comprised an MCS. The entire low-level circulation center was in the rain-free western side of the storm, about 80 km to the west-southwest of the MCS. The MCS appears to have been primarily the result of intense convergence between large-scale, low-level easterly flow with embedded downdrafts, and the cyclonic vortex flow. The individual cells in the MCS such as Cell 2 during the period of the observations, were extremely intense with reflectivity core diameters of 10 km and peak updrafts exceeding 20 m/s. Associated with this MCS were two broad subsidence (warm) regions both of which had portions over the vortex. The first layer near 700 hPa was directly above the vortex and covered most of it. The second layer near 500 hPa was along the forward and right flanks of Cell 2 and undercut the anvil divergence region above. There was not much resemblance of these subsidence layers to typical upper level warm cores in hurricanes that are necessary to support strong surface winds and a low central pressure. The observations are compared to previous studies of weakly sheared storms and modeling studies of shear effects and intensification. Additional information is included in the original extended abstract.

  4. Shear wave transmissivity measurement by color Doppler shear wave imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamakoshi, Yoshiki; Yamazaki, Mayuko; Kasahara, Toshihiro; Sunaguchi, Naoki; Yuminaka, Yasushi

    2016-07-01

    Shear wave elastography is a useful method for evaluating tissue stiffness. We have proposed a novel shear wave imaging method (color Doppler shear wave imaging: CD SWI), which utilizes a signal processing unit in ultrasound color flow imaging in order to detect the shear wave wavefront in real time. Shear wave velocity is adopted to characterize tissue stiffness; however, it is difficult to measure tissue stiffness with high spatial resolution because of the artifact produced by shear wave diffraction. Spatial average processing in the image reconstruction method also degrades the spatial resolution. In this paper, we propose a novel measurement method for the shear wave transmissivity of a tissue boundary. Shear wave wavefront maps are acquired by changing the displacement amplitude of the shear wave and the transmissivity of the shear wave, which gives the difference in shear wave velocity between two mediums separated by the boundary, is measured from the ratio of two threshold voltages required to form the shear wave wavefronts in the two mediums. From this method, a high-resolution shear wave amplitude imaging method that reconstructs a tissue boundary is proposed.

  5. Formation and Stability of Shear-Induced Shish-Kebab Structure in Highly Entangled Melts of UHMWPE/HDPE Blends

    SciTech Connect

    Keum,J.; Zuo, F.; Hsiao, B.

    2008-01-01

    The formation and stability of a shear-induced shish-kebab structure was investigated by in situ rheo-SAXS (small-angle X-ray scattering) and -WAXD (wide-angle X-ray diffraction) measurements of highly entangled polyethylene melts based on two polymer blends, containing small fractions (2 and 5 wt %) of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) and high-density polyethylene (HDPE). Immediately after shear, the combined SAXS and WAXD results at 142 C confirmed the sole formation of shish without kebabs, indicating the interplay between the topological deformation of highly entangled UHMWPE chains and the extended-chain crystallization of stretched segments without the participation of coiled segments. The presence of HDPE chains influenced the entanglement of UHMWPE but they were not involved in the shish-kebab formation at the initial stage of crystallization. The final shish lengths in both blends were nearly identical at the same strain (e = 500), even though the UHMWPE concentration was different. When the temperature was cooled to 134 C, both sheared blends exhibited the kebab formation, following the diffusion-controlled growth process. Although the total kebab nucleation was higher in the 5/95 wt % UHMWPE/HDPE blend, the kebab density per shish was higher in the 2/98 wt % UHMWPE/HDPE blend. The thermal stability of the shish-kebab structure was also investigated by constrained melting. Both blends exhibited identical melting behavior of kebabs but different melting behavior of shish that is governed by the entanglement restraints of the stretched-chain network.

  6. Effect of High Temperature on Mineralogy, Microstructure, Shear Stiffness and Tensile Strength of Two Australian Mudstones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xianfeng; Zhang, Chonglei; Yuan, Shengyang; Fityus, Stephen; Sloan, Scott William; Buzzi, Olivier

    2016-09-01

    This study aims at providing quality experimental data on the effects of temperature on tensile strength and small strain shear stiffness of two Australian mudstones. The objective is to provide multiscale data in view of developing a numerical model that can capture and simulate the complex multiphysics of underground coal fire propagation. Two mudstones were collected in the Hunter Valley, close to a known underground coal fire, referred to as "Burning Mountain." The rock specimens were heated to a range of temperatures (maximum of 900 °C) for 24 h, and the materials were comprehensively characterized by X-ray diffraction, thermal gravimetric analyses, optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. In addition, mercury intrusion porosimetry was used in order to track changes in pore size distribution with temperature. Investigations at microscale were complemented by testing at the macroscale. In particular, the paper focuses on the evolution of the tensile strength and small strain shear stiffness as the materials are subjected to heating treatment. Results show that both parameters evolve in a non-monotonic manner with temperature. The observed mechanical responses are fully explained and corroborated by microstructural observations.

  7. Determination of Young's Modulus of Graphene by Raman Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jae-Ung; Yoon, Duhee; Cheong, Hyeonsik

    2012-02-01

    The mechanical properties of graphene are interesting research subjects because its Young's modulus and strength are extremely high. Values of ˜1 TPa for the Young's modulus have been reported [Lee et al. Science, 321, 385 (2008), Koenig et al. Nat. Nanotech. 6, 543 (2011)]. We made a graphene sample on a SiO2/Si substrate with closed-bottom holes by mechanical exfoliation. A pressure difference across the graphene membrane was applied by putting the sample in a vacuum chamber. This pressure difference makes the graphene membrane bulge upward like a balloon. By measuring the shifts of the Raman G and 2D bands, we estimated the amount of strain on the graphene membrane. By comparing the strain estimated from the Raman measurements with numerical simulations based on the finite element method, we obtained the Young's modulus of graphene.

  8. Momentum-transport studies in high E x B shear plasmas in the National Spherical Torus Experiment.

    PubMed

    Solomon, W M; Kaye, S M; Bell, R E; Leblanc, B P; Menard, J E; Rewoldt, G; Wang, W; Levinton, F M; Yuh, H; Sabbagh, S A

    2008-08-08

    Experiments have been conducted at the National Sperical Torus Experiment (NSTX) to study both steady state and perturbative momentum transport. These studies are unique in their parameter space under investigation, where the low aspect ratio of NSTX results in rapid plasma rotation with ExB shearing rates high enough to suppress low-k turbulence. In some cases, the ratio of momentum to energy confinement time is found to exceed five. Momentum pinch velocities of order 10-40 m/s are inferred from the measured angular momentum flux evolution after nonresonant magnetic perturbations are applied to brake the plasma.

  9. A comparative study of several compressibility corrections to turbulence models applied to high-speed shear layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viegas, John R.; Rubesin, Morris W.

    1991-01-01

    Several recently published compressibility corrections to the standard k-epsilon turbulence model are used with the Navier-Stokes equations to compute the mixing region of a large variety of high speed flows. These corrections, specifically developed to address the weakness of higher order turbulence models to accurately predict the spread rate of compressible free shear flows, are applied to two stream flows of the same gas mixing under a large variety of free stream conditions. Results are presented for two types of flows: unconfined streams with either (1) matched total temperatures and static pressures, or (2) matched static temperatures and pressures, and a confined stream.

  10. Study of shear-stiffened elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Tongfei; Li, Weihua; Ding, Jie; Alici, Gursel; Du, Haiping

    2013-06-01

    Shear thickening fluids, which are usually concentrated colloidal suspensions composed of non-aggregating solid particles suspended in fluids, exhibit a marked increase in viscosity beyond a critical shear rate. This increased viscosity is seen as being both 'field-activated', due to the dependence on shearing rate, as well as reversible. Shear thickening fluids have found good applications as protection materials, such as in liquid body armor, vibration absorber or dampers. This research aims to expand the protection material family by developing a novel solid status shear thickening material, called shear-stiffened elastomers. These new shear-stiffened elastomers were fabricated with the mixture of silicone rubber and silicone oil. A total of four SSE samples were fabricated in this study. Their mechanical and rheological properties under both steady-state and dynamic loading conditions were tested with a parallel-plate. The effects of silicone oil composition and angular frequency were summarized. When raising the angular frequency in dynamic shear test, the storage modulus of conventional silicone rubber shows a small increasing trend with the frequency. However, if silicone oil is selected to be mixed with silicone rubber, the storage modulus increases dramatically when the frequency and strain are both beyond the critical values.

  11. Modulus-pressure equation for confined fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gor, Gennady Y.; Siderius, Daniel W.; Shen, Vincent K.; Bernstein, Noam

    2016-10-01

    Ultrasonic experiments allow one to measure the elastic modulus of bulk solid or fluid samples. Recently such experiments have been carried out on fluid-saturated nanoporous glass to probe the modulus of a confined fluid. In our previous work [G. Y. Gor et al., J. Chem. Phys., 143, 194506 (2015)], using Monte Carlo simulations we showed that the elastic modulus K of a fluid confined in a mesopore is a function of the pore size. Here we focus on the modulus-pressure dependence K(P), which is linear for bulk materials, a relation known as the Tait-Murnaghan equation. Using transition-matrix Monte Carlo simulations we calculated the elastic modulus of bulk argon as a function of pressure and argon confined in silica mesopores as a function of Laplace pressure. Our calculations show that while the elastic modulus is strongly affected by confinement and temperature, the slope of the modulus versus pressure is not. Moreover, the calculated slope is in a good agreement with the reference data for bulk argon and experimental data for confined argon derived from ultrasonic experiments. We propose to use the value of the slope of K(P) to estimate the elastic moduli of an unknown porous medium.

  12. On the Derivation of a High-Velocity Tail from the Boltzmann-Fokker-Planck Equation for Shear Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acedo, L.; Santos, A.; Bobylev, A. V.

    2002-12-01

    Uniform shear flow is a paradigmatic example of a nonequilibrium fluid state exhibiting non-Newtonian behavior. It is characterized by uniform density and temperature and a linear velocity profile U x ( y)= ay, where a is the constant shear rate. In the case of a rarefied gas, all the relevant physical information is represented by the one-particle velocity distribution function f( r, v)= f( V), with V≡ v- U( r), which satisfies the standard nonlinear integro-differential Boltzmann equation. We have studied this state for a two-dimensional gas of Maxwell molecules with a collision rate K( θ)∝lim ∈→0 ∈ -2 δ( θ- ∈), where θ is the scattering angle, in which case the nonlinear Boltzmann collision operator reduces to a Fokker-Planck operator. We have found analytically that for shear rates larger than a certain threshold value a th≃0.3520 ν (where ν is an average collision frequency and a th/ ν is the real root of the cubic equation 64 x 3+16 x 2+12 x-9=0) the velocity distribution function exhibits an algebraic high-velocity tail of the form f( V; a)˜| V|-4- σ( a) Φ( ϕ; a), where ϕ≡tan V y / V x and the angular distribution function Φ( ϕ; a) is the solution of a modified Mathieu equation. The enforcement of the periodicity condition Φ( ϕ; a)= Φ( ϕ+ π; a) allows one to obtain the exponent σ( a) as a function of the shear rate. It diverges when a→ a th and tends to a minimum value σ min≃1.252 in the limit a→∞. As a consequence of this power-law decay for a> a th, all the velocity moments of a degree equal to or larger than 2+ σ( a) are divergent. In the high-velocity domain the velocity distribution is highly anisotropic, with the angular distribution sharply concentrated around a preferred orientation angle ~ϕ( a), which rotates from ~ϕ=- π/4,3 π/4 when a→ a th to ~ϕ=0, π in the limit a→∞.

  13. Shear degradation in fiber reinforced laminates due to matrix damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salavatian, Mohammedmahdi

    The objective of this study was to develop and implement a shear modulus degradation model to improve the failure analysis of the fiber reinforced composite structures. Matrix damage, involving transverse and shear cracks, is a common failure mode for composite structures, yet little is known concerning their interaction. To understand the material behavior after matrix failure, the nonlinear response of the composite laminate was studied using pressure vessels made from a [+/-o] bias orientation, which tend to exhibit a matrix dominated failure. The result of this work showed laminate matrix hardening in shear and softening in the transverse direction. A modified Iosipescu coupon was proposed to study the evolution of shear and transverse damage and their mutual effects. The proposed method showed good agreement with tubular results and has advantages of simplified specimen fabrication using standard test fixtures. The proposed method was extended by introducing a novel experimental technique to study the shear degradation model under biaxial loading. Experimental results of the transverse modulus reduction were in good agreement with material degradation models, while the predicted shear modulus reduction was higher than experiment. The discrepancy between available models and observations was due to the presence of a traction between the crack surfaces. Accordingly, a closed form solution was proposed for the shear stress-strain field of a cracked laminate by replacing the cracks with cohesive zones. The constitutive equations of the crack laminate were derived including the effects of internal tractions and transverse stress on the shear modulus. The proposed analytical model was shown to be the most comprehensive model for shear modulus degradation reduction of the fiber reinforced laminates. A numerical implementation of the shear degradation model was done using continuum damage mechanics. Through this work it was shown the common assumption of a linear

  14. The effect of plasma beta on high-n ballooning stability at low magnetic shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connor, J. W.; Ham, C. J.; Hastie, R. J.

    2016-08-01

    An explanation of the observed improvement in H-mode pedestal characteristics with increasing core plasma pressure or poloidal beta, {β\\text{pol}} , as observed in MAST and JET, is sought in terms of the impact of the Shafranov shift, {{Δ }\\prime} , on ideal ballooning MHD stability. To illustrate this succinctly, a self-consistent treatment of the low magnetic shear region of the ‘s-α ’ stability diagram is presented using the large aspect ratio Shafranov equilibrium, but enhancing both α and {{Δ }\\prime} so that they compete with each other. The method of averaging, valid at low s, is used to simplify the calculation and demonstrates how α , {{Δ }\\prime} , plasma shaping and ‘average favourable curvature’ all contribute to stability.

  15. Impact comminution of solids due to local kinetic energy of high shear strain rate: II-Microplane model and verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caner, Ferhun C.; Bažant, Zdeněk P.

    2014-03-01

    The new theory presented in the preceding paper, which models the dynamic comminution of concrete due to very high shear strain rate, is now compared to recent test data on the penetration of projectiles through concrete walls of different thicknesses, ranging from 127 to 254 mm. These data are analyzed by an explicit finite element code using the new microplane constitutive model M7 for concrete, which was previously shown to provide the most realistic description of the quasi-static uni-, bi- and tri-axial test data with complex loading path and unloading. Model M7 incorporates the quasi-static strain rate effects due viscoelasticity and to the rate of cohesive crack debonding based on activation energy of bond ruptures, which are expected to extend to very high rates. Here model M7 is further enhanced by apparent viscosity capturing the energy dissipation due to the strain-rate effect of comminution. The maximum shear strain rates in the computations are of the order of 105 s-1. The simulations document that, within the inevitable uncertainties, the measured exit velocities of the projectiles can be matched quite satisfactorily and the observed shapes of the entry and exit craters can be reproduced correctly.

  16. Scale-up studies on high shear wet granulation process from mini-scale to commercial scale.

    PubMed

    Aikawa, Shouhei; Fujita, Naomi; Myojo, Hidetoshi; Hayashi, Takashi; Tanino, Tadatsugu

    2008-10-01

    A newly developed mini-scale high shear granulator was used for scale-up study of wet granulation process from 0.2 to 200 L scales. Under various operation conditions and granulation bowl sizes, powder mixture composed of anhydrous caffeine, D-mannitol, dibasic calcium phosphate, pregelatinized starch and corn starch was granulated by adding water. The granules were tabletted, and disintegration time and hardness of the tablets were evaluated to seek correlations of granulation conditions and tablet properties. As the granulation proceeded, disintegration time was prolonged and hardness decreased. When granulation processes were operated under the condition that agitator tip speed was the same, similar relationship between granulation time and tablet properties, such as disintegration time and hardness, between 0.2 L and 11 L scales were observed. Likewise, between 11 L and 200 L scales similar relationship was observed when operated under the condition that the force to the granulation mass was the same. From the above results, the mini-scale high shear granulator should be useful tool to predict operation conditions of large-scale granulation from its mini-scale operation conditions, where similar tablet properties should be obtained.

  17. Shear Behavior of 3D Woven Hollow Integrated Sandwich Composites: Experimental, Theoretical and Numerical Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Guangming; Liu, Chang; Cai, Deng'an; Li, Wenlong; Wang, Xiaopei

    2016-11-01

    An experimental, theoretical and numerical investigation on the shear behavior of 3D woven hollow integrated sandwich composites was presented in this paper. The microstructure of the composites was studied, then the shear modulus and load-deflection curves were obtained by double lap shear tests on the specimens in two principal directions of the sandwich panels, called warp and weft. The experimental results showed that the shear modulus of the warp was higher than that of the weft and the failure occurred in the roots of piles. A finite element model was established to predict the shear behavior of the composites. The simulated results agreed well with the experimental data. Simultaneously, a theoretical method was developed to predict the shear modulus. By comparing with the experimental data, the accuracy of the theoretical method was verified. The influence of structural parameters on shear modulus was also discussed. The higher yarn number, yarn density and dip angle of the piles could all improve the shear modulus of 3D woven hollow integrated sandwich composites at different levels, while the increasing height would decrease the shear modulus.

  18. Shear-horizontal surface acoustic wave phononic device with high density filling material for ultra-low power sensing applications

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, M.; Bhethanabotla, V. R.; Sankaranarayanan, S. K. R. S.

    2014-06-23

    Finite element simulations of a phononic shear-horizontal surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensor based on ST 90°-X Quartz reveal a dramatic reduction in power consumption. The phononic sensor is realized by artificially structuring the delay path to form an acoustic meta-material comprised of a periodic microcavity array incorporating high-density materials such as tantalum or tungsten. Constructive interference of the scattered and secondary reflected waves at every microcavity interface leads to acoustic energy confinement in the high-density regions translating into reduced power loss. Tantalum filled cavities show the best performance while tungsten inclusions create a phononic bandgap. Based on our simulation results, SAW devices with tantalum filled microcavities were fabricated and shown to significantly decrease insertion loss. Our findings offer encouraging prospects for designing low power, highly sensitive portable biosensors.

  19. Double Sided Irradiation for Laser-assisted Shearing of Ultra High Strength Steels with Process Integrated Hardening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brecher, Christian; Emonts, Michael; Eckert, Markus; Weinbach, Matthias

    Most small or medium sized parts produced in mass production are made by shearing and forming of sheet metal. This technology is cost effective, but the achievable quality and geometrical complexity are limited when working high and highest strength steel. Based on the requirements for widening the process limits of conventional sheet metal working the Fraunhofer IPT has developed the laser-assisted sheet metal working technology. With this enhancement it is possible to produce parts made of high and highest strength steel with outstanding quality, high complexity and low tool wear. Additionally laser hardening has been implemented to adjust the mechanical properties of metal parts within the process. Currently the process is limited to lower sheet thicknesses (<2 mm) to maintain short cycle times. To enable this process for larger geometries and higher sheet thicknesses the Fraunhofer IPT developed a system for double sided laser-assisted sheet metal working within progressive dies.

  20. Shear waves in vegetal tissues at ultrasonic frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fariñas, M. D.; Sancho-Knapik, D.; Peguero-Pina, J. J.; Gil-Pelegrín, E.; Gómez Álvarez-Arenas, T. E.

    2013-03-01

    Shear waves are investigated in leaves of two plant species using air-coupled ultrasound. Magnitude and phase spectra of the transmission coefficient around the first two orders of the thickness resonances (normal and oblique incidence) have been measured. A bilayer acoustic model for plant leaves (comprising the palisade parenchyma and the spongy mesophyll) is proposed to extract, from measured spectra, properties of these tissues like: velocity and attenuation of longitudinal and shear waves and hence Young modulus, rigidity modulus, and Poisson's ratio. Elastic moduli values are typical of cellular solids and both, shear and longitudinal waves exhibit classical viscoelastic losses. Influence of leaf water content is also analyzed.

  1. Effective Elastic Modulus as a Function of Angular Leaf Span for Curved Leaves of Pyrolytic Boron Nitride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaforey, M. L.; Deeb, C. W.; Matthiesen, D. H.

    1999-01-01

    A theoretical equation was derived to predict the spring constant (load/deflection) for a simply supported cylindrical section with a line force applied at the center. Curved leaves of PBN were mechanically deformed and the force versus deflection data was recorded and compared to the derived theoretical equation to yield an effective modulus for each leaf. The effective modulus was found to vary from the pure shear modulus for a flat plate to a mixed mode for a half cylinder as a function of the sine of one half the angular leaf span. The spring constants of individual PBN leaves were usually predicted to within 30%.

  2. Fault rupture as a series of nano-seismic events during high-velocity shear experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zu, X.; Reches, Z.; Chen, X.; Chang, J. C.; Carpenter, B. M.

    2015-12-01

    The rupture process of experimental faults is investigated here by monitoring nano-seismic events (NSE) during slip in a rotary shear apparatus. Our experimental faults are made of two rock blocks with one to four miniature 3D accelerometers that are glued to the stationary block at distance of ~ 2 cm from the fault surface. Accelerations in the frequency range of 1 Hz to 200 kHz are recorded in slip-parallel (x), slip-transverse (y), and slip-vertical (z) directions. We conducted a series of 45 experiments on diorite and dolomite samples in two loading styles: classical velocity controlled loading, and power-density loading, in which the power-density (shear stress times slip velocity) is selected, and stick-slip events develop spontaneously according to the experimental fault response. The 3D accelerometer data were recorded at 106 samples/s, with acceleration resolution of 10 mV/g in recoding range of +/- 5 V. The experiments were conducted at slip-velocity of 0.001-0.8 m/s and slip distance up to 1.38 m. The accelerometer observations revealed tens to hundreds of NSEs per slip in both loading styles; peak acceleration ranged from 1g to over 500g. A typical stick-slip with tens of NSEs in Fig. 1, shows: (1) An initial NSE at ~59.72 s (green) that coincides with a small stress drop (~10%, red); (2) Simultaneous macroscopic slip initiation (blue); (3) A swarm of NSEs occur as the fault slips, each NSE lasts 1-2 milliseconds; and (4) Details of the initial NSE are shown in Fig. 2. Based on waveform cross-correlation between frequency band from 20 kHz to 70kHz, we identify several groups of NSE clusters, and apply empirical Green's function method to analyze event source spectra based on Brune-type source model. These NSEs are indicators of rupture propagation during the experimental fault slip.

  3. Slip-localization within confined gouge powder sheared at moderate to high slip-velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reches, Zeev; Chen, Xiaofeng; Morgan, Chance; Madden, Andrew

    2015-04-01

    Slip along faults in the upper crust is always associated with comminution and formation of non-cohesive gouge powder that can be lithified to cataclasite. Typically, the fine-grained powders (grain-size < 1 micron) build a 1-10 cm thick inner-core of a fault-zone. The ubiquitous occurrence of gouge powder implies that gouge properties may control the dynamic weakening of faults. Testing these properties is the present objective. We built a Confined ROtary Cell, CROC, with a ring-shape, ~3 mm thick gouge chamber, with 62.5 and 81.2 mm of inner and outer diameters. The sheared powder is sealed by two sets of seals pressurized by nitrogen. In CROC, we can control the pore-pressure and to inject fluids, and to monitor CO2 and H2O concentration; in addition, we monitor the standard mechanical parameters (slip velocity, stresses, dilation, and temperature). We tested six types of granular materials (starting grain-size in microns): Talc (<250), Kasota dolomite (125-250), ooides grains (125-250), San Andreas fault zone powder (< 840), montmorillonite powder (1-2), kaolinite powder and gypsum. The experimental slip-velocity ranged 0.001-1 m/s, slip distances from a few tens of cm to tens of m, effective normal stress up to 6.1 MPa. The central ultra-microscopic (SEM) observation is that almost invariably the slip was localized along principal-slip-zone (PSZ) within the granular layer. Even though the starting material was loose, coarse granular material, the developed PSZ was cohesive, hard, smooth and shining. The PSZ is about 1 micron thick, and built of agglomerated, ultra-fine grains (20-50 nm) that were pulverized from the original granular material. We noted that PSZs of the different tested compositions display similar characteristics in terms of structure, grain size, and roughness. Further, we found striking similarities between PSZ in the granular samples and the PZS that developed along experimental faults made of solid rock that were sheared at similar

  4. Functional properties of whey proteins affected by heat treatment and hydrodynamic high-pressure shearing.

    PubMed

    Dissanayake, M; Vasiljevic, T

    2009-04-01

    Two batches of native whey proteins (WP) were subjected to microfluidization or heat denaturation accompanied by microfluidization, followed by spray drying. Powders were assessed for their solubility, heat stability, coagulation time, and emulsifying and foaming properties. Effects of denaturation and shearing were examined by particle size analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, reducing and nonreducing sodium dodecyl sulfate-PAGE, and size exclusion-HPLC. Heat treatment significantly decreased solubility, whereas the number of microfluidization passes markedly improved solubility. The combined effect of heat and pressure significantly increased heat coagulation time. Emulsifying activity index substantially increased upon heat denaturation and was further enhanced by microfluidization. Emulsion stability appeared unaffected by the combined treatment, but the concentration of adsorbed protein on fat droplets was significantly increased. Foaming properties were diminished by heating. Particle size distribution patterns, sodium dodecyl sulfate-PAGE, and size exclusion-HPLC revealed disappearance of major WP and creation of relatively higher, as well as smaller, molecular weight aggregates as a result of the 2 treatments. The use of heat and microfluidization in combination could be used to stabilize WP against heat by producing microparticulated species that have different surface and colloidal properties compared with native WP. These results have implications for the use of WP as an additive in heat-processed foods.

  5. Reducing the Ideal Shear Strengths of ZrB2 by High Efficient Alloying Elements (Ag, Au, Pd and Pt).

    PubMed

    Dai, Fu-Zhi; Zhou, Yanchun

    2017-02-24

    Activating the plasticity of ZrB2 is a promising approach to improve its key properties for applications in hypersonic vehicles, including high temperature strength and thermal shock resistance. The present work demonstrates that ideal shear strength of ZrB2, which is a good indicator of the critical stress for dislocation nucleation, can be significantly reduced by dissolving of appropriate alloying elements. Analyzing on the bonding nature of ZrB2 reveals that choosing alloying elements with low energy valence electrons will prevent electron transferring from alloying element to the electron deficient B-B π orbits, which will reduce the local stability of the region surrounding the alloying element. Under the criterion, elements with d electrons tending to be full-filled (Ag, Au, Pd and Pt, the full-filled state is associated with low energy level) are selected as promising candidates with their prominent efficiency in reducing ideal shear strengths verified by first-principles calculations. The results provide useful guidelines for further designs of ZrB2 based materials, especially for improving their mechanical properties.

  6. Reducing the Ideal Shear Strengths of ZrB2 by High Efficient Alloying Elements (Ag, Au, Pd and Pt)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Fu-Zhi; Zhou, Yanchun

    2017-02-01

    Activating the plasticity of ZrB2 is a promising approach to improve its key properties for applications in hypersonic vehicles, including high temperature strength and thermal shock resistance. The present work demonstrates that ideal shear strength of ZrB2, which is a good indicator of the critical stress for dislocation nucleation, can be significantly reduced by dissolving of appropriate alloying elements. Analyzing on the bonding nature of ZrB2 reveals that choosing alloying elements with low energy valence electrons will prevent electron transferring from alloying element to the electron deficient B-B π orbits, which will reduce the local stability of the region surrounding the alloying element. Under the criterion, elements with d electrons tending to be full-filled (Ag, Au, Pd and Pt, the full-filled state is associated with low energy level) are selected as promising candidates with their prominent efficiency in reducing ideal shear strengths verified by first-principles calculations. The results provide useful guidelines for further designs of ZrB2 based materials, especially for improving their mechanical properties.

  7. Reducing the Ideal Shear Strengths of ZrB2 by High Efficient Alloying Elements (Ag, Au, Pd and Pt)

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Fu-Zhi; Zhou, Yanchun

    2017-01-01

    Activating the plasticity of ZrB2 is a promising approach to improve its key properties for applications in hypersonic vehicles, including high temperature strength and thermal shock resistance. The present work demonstrates that ideal shear strength of ZrB2, which is a good indicator of the critical stress for dislocation nucleation, can be significantly reduced by dissolving of appropriate alloying elements. Analyzing on the bonding nature of ZrB2 reveals that choosing alloying elements with low energy valence electrons will prevent electron transferring from alloying element to the electron deficient B-B π orbits, which will reduce the local stability of the region surrounding the alloying element. Under the criterion, elements with d electrons tending to be full-filled (Ag, Au, Pd and Pt, the full-filled state is associated with low energy level) are selected as promising candidates with their prominent efficiency in reducing ideal shear strengths verified by first-principles calculations. The results provide useful guidelines for further designs of ZrB2 based materials, especially for improving their mechanical properties. PMID:28233838

  8. Size dependent elastic modulus and mechanical resilience of dental enamel.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Simona; Shaw, Jeremy; Zhao, Xiaoli; Abbott, Paul V; Munroe, Paul; Xu, Jiang; Habibi, Daryoush; Xie, Zonghan

    2014-03-21

    Human tooth enamel exhibits a unique microstructure able to sustain repeated mechanical loading during dental function. Although notable advances have been made towards understanding the mechanical characteristics of enamel, challenges remain in the testing and interpretation of its mechanical properties. For example, enamel was often tested under dry conditions, significantly different from its native environment. In addition, constant load, rather than indentation depth, has been used when mapping the mechanical properties of enamel. In this work, tooth specimens are prepared under hydrated conditions and their stiffnesses are measured by depth control across the thickness of enamel. Crystal arrangement is postulated, among other factors, to be responsible for the size dependent indentation modulus of enamel. Supported by a simple structure model, effective crystal orientation angle is calculated and found to facilitate shear sliding in enamel under mechanical contact. In doing so, the stress build-up is eased and structural integrity is maintained.

  9. Young's modulus of BF wood material by longitudinal vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phadke, Sushil; Darshan Shrivastava, Bhakt; Mishra, Ashutosh; Dagaonkar, N.

    2014-09-01

    All engineered structures are designed and built with consideration of resisting the same fundamental forces of tension, compression, shear, bending and torsion. Structural design is a balance of these internal and external forces. So, it is interesting to calculate the Young's moduli of Borassus Flabellifier BF wood are quite important from the application point of view. The ultrasonic waves are closely related with the elastic and inelastic properties of the materials. In the present study, we measured longitudinal wave ultrasonic velocities in BF wood material by longitudinal vibration method. After measuring ultrasonic velocity in BF wood material, we calculated Young's modulus of Borassus Flabellifier BF wood material. We used ultrasonic interferometer for measuring longitudinal wave ultrasonic velocity in BF wood material made by Mittal Enterprises, New Delhi, India in our laboratory. Borassus Flabellifier BF wood material was collected from Dhar district of Madhya Pradesh, India.

  10. Imaging feedback of histotripsy treatments using ultrasound shear wave elastography.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tzu-Yin; Hall, Timothy L; Xu, Zhen; Fowlkes, J Brian; Cain, Charles A

    2012-06-01

    Histotripsy is a cavitation-based ultrasound therapy that mechanically fractionates soft solid tissues into fluid-like homogenates. This paper investigates the feasibility of imaging the tissue elasticity change during the histotripsy process as a tool to provide feedback for the treatments. The treatments were performed on agar tissue phantoms and ex vivo kidneys using 3-cycle ultrasound pulses delivered by a 750-kHz therapeutic array at peak negative/positive pressure of 17/108 MPa and a repetition rate of 50 Hz. Lesions with different degrees of damage were created with increasing numbers of therapy pulses from 0 to 2000 pulses per treatment location. The elasticity of the lesions was measured with ultrasound shear wave elastography, in which a quasi-planar shear wave was induced by acoustic radiation force generated by the therapeutic array, and tracked with ultrasound imaging at 3000 frames per second. Based on the shear wave velocity calculated from the sequentially captured frames, the Young's modulus was reconstructed. Results showed that the lesions were more easily identified on the shear wave velocity images than on B-mode images. As the number of therapy pulses increased from 0 to 2000 pulses/location, the Young's modulus decreased exponentially from 22.1 ± 2.7 to 2.1 ± 1.1 kPa in the tissue phantoms (R2 = 0.99, N = 9 each), and from 33.0 ± 7.1 to 4.0 ± 2.5 kPa in the ex vivo kidneys (R2 = 0.99, N = 8 each). Correspondingly, the tissues transformed from completely intact to completely fractionated as examined via histology. A good correlation existed between the lesions' Young's modulus and the degree of tissue fractionation as examined with the percentage of remaining structurally intact cell nuclei (R2 = 0.91, N = 8 each). These results indicate that lesions produced by histotripsy can be detected with high sensitivity using shear wave elastography. Because the decrease in the tissue elasticity corresponded well with the morphological and

  11. Shear Yielding and Shear Jamming of Dense Hard Sphere Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbani, Pierfrancesco; Zamponi, Francesco

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the response of dense hard sphere glasses to a shear strain in a wide range of pressures ranging from the glass transition to the infinite-pressure jamming point. The phase diagram in the density-shear strain plane is calculated analytically using the mean-field infinite-dimensional solution. We find that just above the glass transition, the glass generically yields at a finite shear strain. The yielding transition in the mean-field picture is a spinodal point in presence of disorder. At higher densities, instead, we find that the glass generically jams at a finite shear strain: the jamming transition prevents yielding. The shear yielding and shear jamming lines merge in a critical point, close to which the system yields at extremely large shear stress. Around this point, highly nontrivial yielding dynamics, characterized by system-spanning disordered fractures, is expected.

  12. A High shear stress segment along the San Andreas Fault: Inferences based on near-field stress direction and stress magnitude observations in the Carrizo Plain Area

    SciTech Connect

    Castillo, D. A.,; Younker, L.W.

    1997-01-30

    Nearly 200 new in-situ determinations of stress directions and stress magnitudes near the Carrizo plain segment of the San Andreas fault indicate a marked change in stress state occurring within 20 km of this principal transform plate boundary. A natural consequence of this stress transition is that if the observed near-field ``fault-oblique`` stress directions are representative of the fault stress state, the Mohr-Coulomb shear stresses resolved on San Andreas sub-parallel planes are substantially greater than previously inferred based on fault-normal compression. Although the directional stress data and near-hydrostatic pore pressures, which exist within 15 km of the fault, support a high shear stress environment near the fault, appealing to elevated pore pressures in the fault zone (Byerlee-Rice Model) merely enhances the likelihood of shear failure. These near-field stress observations raise important questions regarding what previous stress observations have actually been measuring. The ``fault-normal`` stress direction measured out to 70 km from the fault can be interpreted as representing a comparable depth average shear strength of the principal plate boundary. Stress measurements closer to the fault reflect a shallower depth-average representation of the fault zone shear strength. If this is true, only stress observations at fault distances comparable to the seismogenic depth will be representative of the fault zone shear strength. This is consistent with results from dislocation monitoring where there is pronounced shear stress accumulation out to 20 km of the fault as a result of aseismic slip within the lower crust loading the upper locked section. Beyond about 20 km, the shear stress resolved on San Andreas fault-parallel planes becomes negligible. 65 refs., 15 figs.

  13. Tailoring hydrogel surface properties to modulate cellular response to shear loading.

    PubMed

    Meinert, Christoph; Schrobback, Karsten; Levett, Peter A; Lutton, Cameron; Sah, Robert L; Klein, Travis J

    2016-10-08

    Biological tissues at articulating surfaces, such as articular cartilage, typically have remarkable low-friction properties that limit tissue shear during movement. However, these frictional properties change with trauma, aging, and disease, resulting in an altered mechanical state within the tissues. Yet, it remains unclear how these surface changes affect the behaviour of embedded cells when the tissue is mechanically loaded. Here, we developed a cytocompatible, bilayered hydrogel system that permits control of surface frictional properties without affecting other bulk physicochemical characteristics such as compressive modulus, mass swelling ratio, and water content. This hydrogel system was applied to investigate the effect of variations in surface friction on the biological response of human articular chondrocytes to shear loading. Shear strain in these hydrogels during dynamic shear loading was significantly higher in high-friction hydrogels than in low-friction hydrogels. Chondrogenesis was promoted following dynamic shear stimulation in chondrocyte-encapsulated low-friction hydrogel constructs, whereas matrix synthesis was impaired in high-friction constructs, which instead exhibited increased catabolism. Our findings demonstrate that the surface friction of tissue-engineered cartilage may act as a potent regulator of cellular homeostasis by governing the magnitude of shear deformation during mechanical loading, suggesting a similar relationship may also exist for native articular cartilage.

  14. Quaternary layer anomalies around the Carlsberg Fault zone mapped with high-resolution shear-wave seismics south of Copenhagen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kammann, Janina; Hübscher, Christian; Nielsen, Lars; Boldreel, Lars Ole

    2015-04-01

    The Carlsberg Fault zone is located in the N-S striking Höllviken Graben and traverses the city of Copenhagen. The fault zone is a NNW-SSE striking structure in direct vicinity to the transition zone of the Danish Basin and the Baltic Shield. Recent small earthquakes indicate activity in the area, although none of the mapped earthquakes appear to have occurred on the Carlsberg Fault. We examined the fault evolution by a combination of very high resolution onshore shear-wave seismic data, one conventional onshore seismic profile and marine reflection seismic profiles. The chalk stratigraphy and the localization of the fault zone at depth was inferred from previous studies by other authors. We extrapolated the Jurassic and Triassic stratigraphy from the Pomeranian Bay to the area of investigation. The fault zone shows a flower structure in the Triassic as well as in Cretaceous sediments. The faulting geometry indicates strong influence of Triassic processes when subsidence and rifting prevailed in the Central European Basin System. Growth strata within the surrounding Höllviken Graben reveal syntectonic sedimentation in the lower Triassic, indicating the opening to be a result of Triassic rifting. In the Upper Cretaceous growth faulting documents continued rifting. This finding contrasts the Late Cretaceous to Paleogene inversion tectonics in neighbouring structures, as the Tornquist Zone. The high-resolution shear-wave seismic method was used to image structures in Quaternary layers in the Carlsberg Fault zone. The portable compact vibrator source ElViS III S8 was used to acquire a 1150 m long seismic section on the island Amager, south of Copenhagen. The shallow subsurface in the investigation area is dominated by Quaternary glacial till deposits in the upper 5-11 m and Danian limestone below. In the shear-wave profile, we imaged the 30 m of the upward continuation of the Carlsberg Fault zone. In our area of investigation, the fault zone appears to comprise

  15. Understanding the implications of the data from recent high-energy-density Kelvin-Helmholtz shear layer experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Hurricane, O A; Hansen, J F; Harding, E C; Drake, R P; Robey, H F; Remington, B A; Kuranz, C C; Grosskopf, M J; Gillespie, R S; Park, H

    2009-10-26

    The first successful high energy density Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) shear layer experiments (O.A. Hurricane, et al., Phys. Plasmas, 16, 056305, 2009; E.C. Harding, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 103, 045005, 2009) demonstrated the ability to design and field a target that produces an array of large diagnosable KH vortices in a controlled fashion. Data from these experiments vividly showed the complete evolution of large distinct eddies, from formation to apparent turbulent break-up. Unexpectedly, low-density bubbles/cavities comparable to the vortex size ({approx} 300 - 400 {micro}m) appeared to grow up in the free-stream flow above the unstable material interface. In this paper, the basic principles of the experiment will be discussed, the data reviewed, and the progress on understanding the origin of the above bubble structures through theory and simulation will be reported on.

  16. High Magnetic Shear Gain in a Liquid Sodium Stable Couette Flow Experiment: A Prelude to an {alpha}-{Omega} Dynamo

    SciTech Connect

    Colgate, Stirling A.; Beckley, Howard; Si, Jiahe; Martinic, Joe; Westpfahl, David; Slutz, James; Westrom, Cebastian; Klein, Brianna; Schendel, Paul; Scharle, Cletus; McKinney, Travis; Ginanni, Rocky; Bentley, Ian; Mickey, Timothy; Ferrel, Regnar; Li, Hui; Pariev, Vladimir; Finn, John

    2011-04-29

    The {Omega} phase of the liquid sodium {alpha}-{Omega} dynamo experiment at New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology in cooperation with Los Alamos National Laboratory has demonstrated a high toroidal field B{sub {phi}} that is {approx_equal}8xB{sub r}, where B{sub r} is the radial component of an applied poloidal magnetic field. This enhanced toroidal field is produced by the rotational shear in stable Couette flow within liquid sodium at a magnetic Reynolds number Rm{approx_equal}120. Small turbulence in stable Taylor-Couette flow is caused by Ekman flow at the end walls, which causes an estimated turbulence energy fraction of ({delta}v/v){sup 2{approx}}10{sup -3}.

  17. Influence of substrate modulus on gecko adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Klittich, Mena R.; Wilson, Michael C.; Bernard, Craig; Rodrigo, Rochelle M.; Keith, Austin J.; Niewiarowski, Peter H.; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2017-01-01

    The gecko adhesion system fascinates biologists and materials scientists alike for its strong, reversible, glue-free, dry adhesion. Understanding the adhesion system’s performance on various surfaces can give clues as to gecko behaviour, as well as towards designing synthetic adhesive mimics. Geckos encounter a variety of surfaces in their natural habitats; tropical geckos, such as Gekko gecko, encounter hard, rough tree trunks as well as soft, flexible leaves. While gecko adhesion on hard surfaces has been extensively studied, little work has been done on soft surfaces. Here, we investigate for the first time the influence of macroscale and nanoscale substrate modulus on whole animal adhesion on two different substrates (cellulose acetate and polydimethylsiloxane) in air and find that across 5 orders of magnitude in macroscale modulus, there is no change in adhesion. On the nanoscale, however, gecko adhesion is shown to depend on substrate modulus. This suggests that low surface-layer modulus may inhibit the gecko adhesion system, independent of other influencing factors such as macroscale composite modulus and surface energy. Understanding the limits of gecko adhesion is vital for clarifying adhesive mechanisms and in the design of synthetic adhesives for soft substrates (including for biomedical applications and wearable electronics). PMID:28287647

  18. Influence of substrate modulus on gecko adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klittich, Mena R.; Wilson, Michael C.; Bernard, Craig; Rodrigo, Rochelle M.; Keith, Austin J.; Niewiarowski, Peter H.; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2017-03-01

    The gecko adhesion system fascinates biologists and materials scientists alike for its strong, reversible, glue-free, dry adhesion. Understanding the adhesion system’s performance on various surfaces can give clues as to gecko behaviour, as well as towards designing synthetic adhesive mimics. Geckos encounter a variety of surfaces in their natural habitats; tropical geckos, such as Gekko gecko, encounter hard, rough tree trunks as well as soft, flexible leaves. While gecko adhesion on hard surfaces has been extensively studied, little work has been done on soft surfaces. Here, we investigate for the first time the influence of macroscale and nanoscale substrate modulus on whole animal adhesion on two different substrates (cellulose acetate and polydimethylsiloxane) in air and find that across 5 orders of magnitude in macroscale modulus, there is no change in adhesion. On the nanoscale, however, gecko adhesion is shown to depend on substrate modulus. This suggests that low surface-layer modulus may inhibit the gecko adhesion system, independent of other influencing factors such as macroscale composite modulus and surface energy. Understanding the limits of gecko adhesion is vital for clarifying adhesive mechanisms and in the design of synthetic adhesives for soft substrates (including for biomedical applications and wearable electronics).

  19. Versatility of Biofilm Matrix Molecules in Staphylococcus epidermidis Clinical Isolates and Importance of Polysaccharide Intercellular Adhesin Expression during High Shear Stress

    PubMed Central

    Schaeffer, Carolyn R.; Hoang, Tra-My N.; Sudbeck, Craig M.; Alawi, Malik; Tolo, Isaiah E.; Robinson, D. Ashley; Horswill, Alexander R.; Rohde, Holger

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Staphylococcus epidermidis is a leading cause of hospital-associated infections, including those of intravascular catheters, cerebrospinal fluid shunts, and orthopedic implants. Multiple biofilm matrix molecules with heterogeneous characteristics have been identified, including proteinaceous, polysaccharide, and nucleic acid factors. Two of the best-studied components in S. epidermidis include accumulation-associated protein (Aap) and polysaccharide intercellular adhesin (PIA), produced by the enzymatic products of the icaADBC operon. Biofilm composition varies by strain as well as environmental conditions, and strains producing PIA-mediated biofilms are more robust. Clinically, biofilm-mediated infections occur in a variety of anatomical sites with diverse physiological properties. To test the hypothesis that matrix composition exhibits niche specificity, biofilm-related genetic and physical properties were compared between S. epidermidis strains isolated from high-shear and low-shear environments. Among a collection of 105 clinical strains, significantly more isolates from high-shear environments carried the icaADBC operon than did those from low-shear settings (43.9% versus 22.9%, P < 0.05), while there was no significant difference in the presence of aap (77.2% versus 75.0%, P > 0.05). Additionally, a significantly greater number of high-shear isolates were capable of forming biofilm in vitro in a microtiter assay (82.5% versus 45.8%, P < 0.0001). However, even among high-shear clinical isolates, less than half contained the icaADBC locus; therefore, we selected for ica-negative variants with increased attachment to abiotic surfaces to examine PIA-independent biofilm mechanisms. Sequencing of selected variants identified substitutions capable of enhancing biofilm formation in multiple genes, further highlighting the heterogeneity of S. epidermidis biofilm molecules and mechanisms. IMPORTANCE Staphylococcus epidermidis is a leading cause of

  20. Versatility of Biofilm Matrix Molecules in Staphylococcus epidermidis Clinical Isolates and Importance of Polysaccharide Intercellular Adhesin Expression during High Shear Stress.

    PubMed

    Schaeffer, Carolyn R; Hoang, Tra-My N; Sudbeck, Craig M; Alawi, Malik; Tolo, Isaiah E; Robinson, D Ashley; Horswill, Alexander R; Rohde, Holger; Fey, Paul D

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus epidermidis is a leading cause of hospital-associated infections, including those of intravascular catheters, cerebrospinal fluid shunts, and orthopedic implants. Multiple biofilm matrix molecules with heterogeneous characteristics have been identified, including proteinaceous, polysaccharide, and nucleic acid factors. Two of the best-studied components in S. epidermidis include accumulation-associated protein (Aap) and polysaccharide intercellular adhesin (PIA), produced by the enzymatic products of the icaADBC operon. Biofilm composition varies by strain as well as environmental conditions, and strains producing PIA-mediated biofilms are more robust. Clinically, biofilm-mediated infections occur in a variety of anatomical sites with diverse physiological properties. To test the hypothesis that matrix composition exhibits niche specificity, biofilm-related genetic and physical properties were compared between S. epidermidis strains isolated from high-shear and low-shear environments. Among a collection of 105 clinical strains, significantly more isolates from high-shear environments carried the icaADBC operon than did those from low-shear settings (43.9% versus 22.9%, P < 0.05), while there was no significant difference in the presence of aap (77.2% versus 75.0%, P > 0.05). Additionally, a significantly greater number of high-shear isolates were capable of forming biofilm in vitro in a microtiter assay (82.5% versus 45.8%, P < 0.0001). However, even among high-shear clinical isolates, less than half contained the icaADBC locus; therefore, we selected for ica-negative variants with increased attachment to abiotic surfaces to examine PIA-independent biofilm mechanisms. Sequencing of selected variants identified substitutions capable of enhancing biofilm formation in multiple genes, further highlighting the heterogeneity of S. epidermidis biofilm molecules and mechanisms. IMPORTANCEStaphylococcus epidermidis is a leading cause of infections related

  1. High-Obliquity Impact of a Compact Penetrator on a Thin Plate: Penetrator Splitting and Adiabatic Shear

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-01-01

    stress deviator set to zero. On the time scale of our simulations, shear bands are hot and thus weak in tension as well as shear. To account for this...LIVERMORE CA 94550 R DAMINITY CODE U43 J P MATRA 7 DIRECTOR P WALTER SANDIA NATL LABS L MENSI E S HERTEL JR MS 0819 K KIDDY A ROBINSON MS 0819 F J

  2. Bulk modulus for polar covalent crystals

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Bo; Wang, Qianqian; Tian, Yongjun

    2013-01-01

    A microscopic empirical model of bulk modulus based on atomic-scale parameters is proposed. These parameters include the bond length, the effective bonded valence electron (EBVE) number, and the coordination number product of two bonded atoms, etc. The estimated bulk moduli from our model are in good agreement with experimental values for various polar covalent crystals including ionic crystals. Our current work sheds lights on the nature of bulk modulus, provides useful clues for design of crystals with low compressibility, and is applicable to complex crystals such as minerals of geophysical importance. PMID:24166098

  3. High-shear, jet-cooking, and alkali treatment of corn distillers' dried grains to obtain products with enhanced protein, oil and phenolic antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Inglett, G E; Chen, D; Rose, D J; Berhow, M

    2010-08-01

    Distillers dried grains (DDG) have potential to be a nutritionally important source of protein, oil and phenolic antioxidants. DDG was subjected to high-shear and jet-cooking, with or without alkaline pH adjustment and autoclaving. Soluble and insoluble fractions were analyzed for protein, oil and ash. Extracts were analyzed for phenolic acids and antioxidant activity. Protein contents were significantly elevated in the insoluble fractions after treatment and the oil content was drastically increased in the insoluble fraction after high-shear and jet-cooking without pH adjustment. Alkaline pH adjustment resulted in a soluble fraction that was highest in phenolic acids, but not antioxidant activity. The highest antioxidant activity was found in the 50% ethanol extract from DDG that had been subjected to high-shear and jet-cooking. These results suggest that high-shear and jet-cooking may be useful processing treatments to increase the value of DDG by producing fractions high in protein, oil and extractable phenolic acids with high antioxidant activity. The DDG fractions and extracts described herein may be useful as food and nutraceutical ingredients, and, if used for these applications, will increase the value of DDG and ease economic burdens on ethanol producers, allowing them to compete in the bio-fuel marketplace.

  4. Shear-stress relaxation and ensemble transformation of shear-stress autocorrelation functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittmer, J. P.; Xu, H.; Baschnagel, J.

    2015-02-01

    We revisit the relation between the shear-stress relaxation modulus G (t ) , computed at finite shear strain 0 <γ ≪1 , and the shear-stress autocorrelation functions C(t ) | γ and C(t ) | τ computed, respectively, at imposed strain γ and mean stress τ . Focusing on permanent isotropic spring networks it is shown theoretically and computationally that in general G(t ) =C (t ) | τ=C(t ) | γ+Geq for t >0 with Geq being the static equilibrium shear modulus. G (t ) and C(t ) | γ thus must become different for solids and it is impossible to obtain Geq alone from C(t ) | γ as often assumed. We comment briefly on self-assembled transient networks where Geq(f ) must vanish for a finite scission-recombination frequency f . We argue that G(t ) =C (t ) | τ=C(t ) | γ should reveal an intermediate plateau set by the shear modulus Geq(f =0 ) of the quenched network.

  5. Ultrasonic modulus determination in composite media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kline, R. A.; Sahay, S. K.; Madaras, E. I.

    1991-01-01

    A nondestructive test procedure for determining the elastic properties of anisotropic media is presented. The technique is based on transit time measurements for multiple angles of incidence and a numerical solution of the resulting coupled nonlinear equations for modulus determination. Methods for compensating for energy flux deviation from the wave normal and the resulting differences group and phase velocity are devised.

  6. High-resolution compact shear stress sensor for direct measurement of skin friction in fluid flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Muchen; Kim, Chang-Jin ``Cj''

    2015-11-01

    The high-resolution measurement of skin friction in complex flows has long been of great interest but also a challenge in fluid mechanics. Compared with indirect measurement methods (e.g., laser Doppler velocimetry), direct measurement methods (e.g., floating element) do not involve any analogy and assumption but tend to suffer from instrumentation challenges, such as low sensing resolution or misalignments. Recently, silicon micromachined floating plates showed good resolution and perfect alignment but were too small for general purposes and too fragile to attach other surface samples repeatedly. In this work, we report a skin friction sensor consisting of a monolithic floating plate and a high-resolution optical encoder to measure its displacement. The key for the high resolution is in the suspension beams, which are very narrow (e.g., 0.25 mm) to sense small frictions along the flow direction but thick (e.g., 5 mm) to be robust along all other directions. This compact, low profile, and complete sensor is easy to use and allows repeated attachment and detachment of surface samples. The sheer-stress sensor has been tested in water tunnel and towing tank at different flow conditions, showing high sensing resolution for skin friction measurement. Supported by National Science Foundation (NSF) (No. 1336966) and Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) (No. HR0011-15-2-0021).

  7. Correlation of tensile and shear strengths of metals with their friction properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1982-01-01

    The relation between the theoretical tensile and the shear strengths and the friction properties of metals in contact with diamond, boron nitride, silicon carbide, manganese-zinc ferrite, and the metals themselves in vacuum was investigated. The relationship between the actual shear strength and the friction properties of the metal was also investigated. An estimate of the theoretical uniaxial tensile strength was obtained in terms of the equilibrium surface energy, interplanar spacing of the planes perpendicular to the tensile axis, and the Young's modulus of elasticity. An estimate of the theoretical shear strength for metals was obtained from the shear modulus, the repeat distance of atoms in the direction of shear of the metal and the interplanar spacing of the shear planes. The coefficient of friction for metals was found to be related to the theoretical tensile, theoretical shear, and actual shear strengths of metals. The higher the strength of the metal, the lower the coefficient of friction.

  8. Pinched flow coupled shear-modulated inertial microfluidics for high-throughput rare blood cell separation.

    PubMed

    Bhagat, Ali Asgar S; Hou, Han Wei; Li, Leon D; Lim, Chwee Teck; Han, Jongyoon

    2011-06-07

    Blood is a highly complex bio-fluid with cellular components making up >40% of the total volume, thus making its analysis challenging and time-consuming. In this work, we introduce a high-throughput size-based separation method for processing diluted blood using inertial microfluidics. The technique takes advantage of the preferential cell focusing in high aspect-ratio microchannels coupled with pinched flow dynamics for isolating low abundance cells from blood. As an application of the developed technique, we demonstrate the isolation of cancer cells (circulating tumor cells (CTCs)) spiked in blood by exploiting the difference in size between CTCs and hematologic cells. The microchannel dimensions and processing parameters were optimized to enable high throughput and high resolution separation, comparable to existing CTC isolation technologies. Results from experiments conducted with MCF-7 cells spiked into whole blood indicate >80% cell recovery with an impressive 3.25 × 10(5) fold enrichment over red blood cells (RBCs) and 1.2 × 10(4) fold enrichment over peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL). In spite of a 20× sample dilution, the fast operating flow rate allows the processing of ∼10(8) cells min(-1) through a single microfluidic device. The device design can be easily customized for isolating other rare cells from blood including peripheral blood leukocytes and fetal nucleated red blood cells by simply varying the 'pinching' width. The advantage of simple label-free separation, combined with the ability to retrieve viable cells post enrichment and minimal sample pre-processing presents numerous applications for use in clinical diagnosis and conducting fundamental studies.

  9. Instabilities in shear and simple shear deformations of gold crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacheco, A. A.; Batra, R. C.

    We use the tight-binding potential and molecular mechanics simulations to study local and global instabilities in shear and simple shear deformations of three initially defect-free finite cubes of gold single crystal containing 3480, 7813, and 58,825 atoms. Displacements on all bounding surfaces are prescribed while studying simple shear deformations, but displacements on only two opposite surfaces are assigned during simulations of shear deformations with the remaining four surfaces kept free of external forces. The criteria used to delineate local instabilities in the system include the following: (i) a component of the second-order spatial gradients of the displacement field having large values relative to its average value in the body, (ii) the minimum eigenvalue of the Hessian of the energy of an atom becoming non-positive, and (iii) structural changes represented by a high value of the common neighborhood parameter. It is found that these criteria are met essentially simultaneously at the same atomic position. Effects of free surfaces are evidenced by different deformation patterns for the same specimen deformed in shear and simple shear. The shear strength of a specimen deformed in simple shear is more than three times that of the same specimen deformed in shear. It is found that for each cubic specimen deformed in simple shear the evolution with the shear strain of the average shear stress, prior to the onset of instabilities, is almost identical to that in an equivalent hyperelastic material with strain energy density derived from the tight-binding potential and the assumption that it obeys the Cauchy-Born rule. Even though the material response of the hyperelastic body predicted from the strain energy density is stable over the range of the shear strain simulated in this work, the molecular mechanics simulations predict local and global instabilities in the three specimens.

  10. Design, analysis, and initial testing of a fiber-optic shear gage for three-dimensional, high-temperature flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orr, Matthew W.

    This investigation concerns the design, analysis, and initial testing of a new, two-component wall shear gage for 3D, high-temperature flows. This gage is a direct-measuring, non-nulling design with a round head surrounded by a small gap. Two flexure wheels are used to allow small motions of the floating head. Fiber-optic displacement sensors measure how far the polished faces of counterweights on the wheels move in relation to a fixed housing as the primary measurement system. No viscous damping was required. The gage has both fiber-optic instrumentation and strain gages mounted on the flexures for validation of the newer fiber optics. The sensor is constructed of Haynes RTM 230RTM, a high-temperature nickel alloy. The gage housing is made of 316 stainless steel. All components of the gage in pure fiber-optic form can survive to a temperature of 1073 K. The bonding methods of the backup strain gages limit their maximum temperature to 473 K. The dynamic range of the gage is from 0--500 Pa (0--10g) and higher shears can be measured by changing the floating head size. Extensive use of finite element modeling was critical to the design and analysis of the gage. Static structural, modal, and thermal analyses were performed on the flexures using the ANSYS finite element package. Static finite element analysis predicted the response of the flexures to a given load, and static calibrations using a direct force method confirmed these results. Finite element modal analysis results were within 16.4% for the first mode and within 30% for the second mode when compared with the experimentally determined modes. Vibration characteristics of the gage were determined from experimental free vibration data after the gage was subjected to an impulse. Uncertainties in the finished geometry make this level of error acceptable. A transient thermal analysis examined the effects of a very high heat flux on the exposed head of the gage. The 100,000 W/m2 heat flux used in this analysis is

  11. Artificial Intelligence Tools for Scaling Up of High Shear Wet Granulation Process.

    PubMed

    Landin, Mariana

    2017-01-01

    The results presented in this article demonstrate the potential of artificial intelligence tools for predicting the endpoint of the granulation process in high-speed mixer granulators of different scales from 25L to 600L. The combination of neurofuzzy logic and gene expression programing technologies allowed the modeling of the impeller power as a function of operation conditions and wet granule properties, establishing the critical variables that affect the response and obtaining a unique experimental polynomial equation (transparent model) of high predictability (R(2) > 86.78%) for all size equipment. Gene expression programing allowed the modeling of the granulation process for granulators of similar and dissimilar geometries and can be improved by implementing additional characteristics of the process, as composition variables or operation parameters (e.g., batch size, chopper speed). The principles and the methodology proposed here can be applied to understand and control manufacturing process, using any other granulation equipment, including continuous granulation processes.

  12. Shear rigidity of spread stearic acid monolayers on water

    SciTech Connect

    Abraham, B.M.; Ketterson, J.B.; Miyano, K.; Kueny, A.

    1981-01-01

    The effect of Al/sup 3 +/, Fe/sup 3 +/, Ca/sup 2 +/, and Mg/sup 2 +/ ions and of pH on the two-dimensional shear modulus of stearic acid spread on a water substrate was determined. A large shear modulus was displayed by the films when the subphase contained Al/sup 3 +/ and Fe/sup 3 +/ ions at the self buffered pH. With Fe/sup 3 +/ dissolved in the subphase, the film displayed a viscous relaxation when strained but no residual stress was observed. No effect was observed with the Ca/sup 2 +/ or Mg/sup 2 +/. Reducing the pH value in the subphase with the trivalent ions caused the shear modulus to disappear. The observations are interpreted in terms of hydrogen bonding.

  13. High shear rate flow in a linear stroke magnetorheological energy absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, W.; Wereley, N. M.; Hiemenz, G. J.; Ngatu, G. T.

    2014-05-01

    To provide adaptive stroking load in the crew seats of ground vehicles to protect crew from blast or impact loads, a magnetorheological energy absorber (MREA) or shock absorber was developed. The MREA provides appropriate levels of controllable stroking load for different occupant weights and peak acceleration because the viscous stroking load generated by the MREA force increases with velocity squared, thereby reducing its controllable range at high piston velocity. Therefore, MREA behavior at high piston velocity is analyzed and validated experimentally in order to investigate the effects of velocity and magnetic field on MREA performance. The analysis used to predict the MREA force as a function of piston velocity squared and applied field is presented. A conical fairing is mounted to the piston head of the MREA in order reduce predicted inlet flow loss by 9% at nominal velocity of 8 m/s, which resulted in a viscous force reduction of nominally 4%. The MREA behavior is experimentally measured using a high speed servo-hydraulic testing system for speeds up to 8 m/s. The measured MREA force is used to validate the analysis, which captures the transient force quite accurately, although the peak force is under-predicted at the peak speed of 8 m/s.

  14. Evaluation of High Temperature Properties and Microstructural Characterization of Resistance Spot Welded Steel Lap Shear Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, R. K.; Anil Kumar, V.; Panicker, Paul G.

    2016-02-01

    Joining of thin sheets (0.5 mm) of stainless steel 304 and 17-4PH through resistance spot welding is highly challenging especially when joint is used for high temperature applications. Various combinations of stainless steel sheets of thickness 0.5 mm are spot welded and tested at room temperature as well as at high temperatures (800 K, 1,000 K, 1,200 K). Parent metal as well as spot welded joints are tested and characterized. It is observed that joint strength of 17-4PH steel is highest and then dissimilar steel joint of 17-4PH with SS-304 is moderate and of SS-304 is lowest at all the temperatures. Joint strength of 17-4PH steel is found to be >80% of parent metal properties up to 1,000 K then drastic reduction in strength is noted at 1,200 K. Gradual reduction in strength of SS-304 joint with increase in temperature from 800 to 1,200 K is noted. At 1,200 K, joint strength of all combinations of joints is found to be nearly same. Microstructural evaluation of weld nugget after testing at different temperatures shows presence of tempered martensite in 17-4PH containing welds and homogenized structure in stainless steel 304 weld.

  15. Modulus-regulated 3D-cell proliferation in an injectable self-healing hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongsan; Zhang, Yingwei; Shi, Feng; Tao, Lei; Wei, Yen; Wang, Xing

    2017-01-01

    Cell therapy has attracted wide attention among researchers in biomaterial and medical areas. As a carrier, hydrogels that could keep high viability of the embedded cells have been developed. However, few researches were conducted on 3D cell proliferation, a key factor for cell therapy, especially after injection. In this study, we demonstrated for the first time the proliferation regulation of the 3D-embedded L929 cells in a modulus-tunable and injectable self-healing hydrogel before and after injection without adding specific growth factor. The cells showed a stiffness-dependent proliferation to grow faster in higher stiffness hydrogels. The proliferating rates of the encapsulated cells before and after injection were quantified, and the shearing force as a possible negative influence factor was discussed, suggesting the both internal property of the hydrogel and injection process are critical for further practical applications. Due to the high operability and good biocompatibility, this injectable self-healing hydrogel can be a promising carrier for cell therapy.

  16. Validation of a turbulent Kelvin-Helmholtz shear layer model using a high-energy-density OMEGA laser experiment.

    PubMed

    Hurricane, O A; Smalyuk, V A; Raman, K; Schilling, O; Hansen, J F; Langstaff, G; Martinez, D; Park, H-S; Remington, B A; Robey, H F; Greenough, J A; Wallace, R; Di Stefano, C A; Drake, R P; Marion, D; Krauland, C M; Kuranz, C C

    2012-10-12

    Following the successful demonstration of an OMEGA laser-driven platform for generating and studying nearly two-dimensional unstable plasma shear layers [Hurricane et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 056305 (2009); Harding et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 045005 (2009)], this Letter reports on the first quantitative measurement of turbulent mixing in a high-energy-density plasma. As a blast wave moves parallel to an unperturbed interface between a low-density foam and a high-density plastic, baroclinic vorticity is deposited at the interface and a Kelvin-Helmholtz instability-driven turbulent mixing layer is created in the postshock flow due to surface roughness. The spatial scale and density profile of the turbulent layer are diagnosed using x-ray radiography with sufficiently small uncertainty so that the data can be used to ~0.17 μm) in the postshock plasma flow are consistent with an "inertial subrange," within which a Kolmogorov turbulent energy cascade can be active. An illustration of comparing the data set with the predictions of a two-equation turbulence model in the ares radiation hydrodynamics code is also presented.

  17. Validation of a Turbulent Kelvin-Helmholtz Shear Layer Model Using a High-Energy-Density OMEGA Laser Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurricane, O. A.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Raman, K.; Schilling, O.; Hansen, J. F.; Langstaff, G.; Martinez, D.; Park, H.-S.; Remington, B. A.; Robey, H. F.; Greenough, J. A.; Wallace, R.; Di Stefano, C. A.; Drake, R. P.; Marion, D.; Krauland, C. M.; Kuranz, C. C.

    2012-10-01

    Following the successful demonstration of an OMEGA laser-driven platform for generating and studying nearly two-dimensional unstable plasma shear layers [Hurricane et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 056305 (2009)PHPAEN1070-664X10.1063/1.3096790; Harding et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 045005 (2009)PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.103.045005], this Letter reports on the first quantitative measurement of turbulent mixing in a high-energy-density plasma. As a blast wave moves parallel to an unperturbed interface between a low-density foam and a high-density plastic, baroclinic vorticity is deposited at the interface and a Kelvin-Helmholtz instability-driven turbulent mixing layer is created in the postshock flow due to surface roughness. The spatial scale and density profile of the turbulent layer are diagnosed using x-ray radiography with sufficiently small uncertainty so that the data can be used to constrain turbulent mixing models. The estimated Reynolds number (˜106), Liepmann-Taylor scale (˜0.5μm), and inner viscous scale (˜0.17μm) in the postshock plasma flow are consistent with an “inertial subrange,” within which a Kolmogorov turbulent energy cascade can be active. An illustration of comparing the data set with the predictions of a two-equation turbulence model in the ares radiation hydrodynamics code is also presented.

  18. Multi-channel analysis of surface waves MASW of models with high shear-wave velocity contrast

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ivanov, J.; Miller, R.D.; Peterie, S.; Zeng, C.; Xia, J.; Schwenk, T.

    2011-01-01

    We use the multi-channel analysis of surface waves MASW method to analyze synthetic seismic data calculated using models with high shear-wave velocity Vs contrast. The MASW dispersion-curve images of the Rayleigh wave are obtained using various sets of source-offset and spread-size configurations from the synthetic seismic data and compared with the theoretically calculated fundamental- and higher-mode dispersion-curves. Such tests showed that most of the dispersion-curve images are dominated by higher-mode energy at the low frequencies, especially when analyzing data from long receiver offsets and thus significantly divert from numerically expected dispersion-curve trends, which can lead to significant Vs overestimation. Further analysis showed that using data with relatively short spread lengths and source offsets can image the desired fundamental-mode of the Rayleigh wave that matches the numerically expected dispersion-curve pattern. As a result, it was concluded that it might be possible to avoid higher-mode contamination at low frequencies at sites with high Vs contrast by appropriate selection of spread size and seismic source offset. ?? 2011 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  19. The invalidity of the Laplace law for biological vessels and of estimating elastic modulus from total stress vs. strain: a new practical method.

    PubMed

    Costanzo, Francesco; Brasseur, James G

    2015-03-01

    There are strong medical motivations to measure changes in material properties of tubular organs, in vivo and in vitro. The current approach estimates hoop stress from intraluminal pressure using the Laplace law and identifies 'elastic modulus' as the slope of a curve fitted hoop stress plotted against strain data. We show that this procedure is fundamentally flawed because muscle and other soft tissue are closely incompressible, so that the total stress includes a volume-preserving material-dependent hydrostatic response that invalidates the method. Furthermore, we show that the Laplace law incorrectly estimates total stress in biological vessels. However, the great need to estimate elastic modulus leads us to develop an alternative practical method, based on shear stress-strain, i.e. insensitive to nonelastic response from incompressibility, but that uses the same measurement data as the current (incorrect) method. The individual material parameters in the underlying (unknown) constitutive relation combine into an effective shear modulus that is a true measure of elastic response, unaffected by incompressibility and without reference to the Laplace law. Furthermore, our effective shear modulus is determined directly as a function of deformation, rather than as the slope of a fitted curve. We validate our method by comparing effective shear moduli against exact shear moduli for four theoretical materials with different degrees of nonlinearity and numbers of material parameters. To further demonstrate applicability, we reanalyse an in vivo study with our new method and show that it resolves an inconsistent change in modulus with the current method.

  20. Access to sustained high-beta with internal transport barrier and negative central magnetic shear in DIII-Da)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garofalo, A. M.; Doyle, E. J.; Ferron, J. R.; Greenfield, C. M.; Groebner, R. J.; Hyatt, A. W.; Jackson, G. L.; Jayakumar, R. J.; Kinsey, J. E.; La Haye, R. J.; McKee, G. R.; Murakami, M.; Okabayashi, M.; Osborne, T. H.; Petty, C. C.; Politzer, P. A.; Reimerdes, H.; Scoville, J. T.; Solomon, W. M.; St. John, H. E.; Strait, E. J.; Turnbull, A. D.; Wade, M. R.; VanZeeland, M. A.

    2006-05-01

    High values of normalized β (βN˜4) and safety factor (qmin˜2) have been sustained simultaneously for ˜2s in DIII-D [J.L. Luxon, Nucl. Fusion 42, 64 (2002)], suggesting a possible path to high fusion performance, steady-state tokamak scenarios with a large fraction of bootstrap current. The combination of internal transport barrier and negative central magnetic shear at high β results in high confinement (H89P>2.5) and large bootstrap current fraction (fBS>60%) with good alignment. Previously, stability limits in plasmas with core transport barriers have been observed at moderate values of βN (<3) because of the pressure peaking which normally develops from improved core confinement. In recent DIII-D experiments, the internal transport barrier is clearly observed in the electron density and in the ion temperature and rotation profiles at ρ ˜0.5 but not in the electron temperature profile, which is very broad. The misalignment of Ti and Te gradients may help to avoid a large local pressure gradient. Furthermore, at low internal inductance ˜0.6, the current density gradients are close to the vessel and the ideal kink modes are strongly wall-coupled. Simultaneous feedback control of both external and internal sets of n =1 magnetic coils was used to maintain optimal error field correction and resistive wall mode stabilization, allowing operation above the free-boundary β limit. Large particle orbits at high safety factor in the core help to broaden both the pressure and the beam-driven current profiles, favorable for steady-state operation. At plasma current flat top and β ˜5%, a noninductive current fraction of ˜100% has been observed. Stability modeling shows the possibility for operation up to the ideal-wall limit at β ˜6%.

  1. A high energy density shock driven Kelvin-Helmholtz shear layer experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Hurricane, O. A.; Hansen, J. F.; Robey, H. F.; Remington, B. A.; Bono, M. J.; Harding, E. C.; Drake, R. P.; Kuranz, C. C.

    2009-05-15

    Radiographic data from a novel and highly successful high energy density Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability experiment is presented along with synapses of the theory and simulation behind the target design. Data on instability growth are compared to predictions from simulation and theory. The key role played by baroclinic vorticity production in the functioning of the target and the key design parameters are also discussed. The data show the complete evolution of large distinct KH eddies, from formation to turbulent break-up. Unexpectedly, low density bubbles comparable to the vortex size are observed forming in the free-stream region above each vortex at late time. These bubbles have the appearance of localized shocks, possibly supporting a theoretical fluid dynamics conjecture about the existence of supersonic bubbles over the vortical structure [transonic convective Mach numbers, D. Papamoschou and A. Roshko, J. Fluid Mech. 197, 453 (1988)] that support localized shocks (shocklets) not extending into the free stream (P. E. Dimotakis, Proceedings of the 22nd Fluid Dynamics, Plasma Dynamics and Lasers Conference, 1991, Paper No. AIAA 91-1724). However, it is also possible that these low density bubbles are the result of a cavitationlike effect. Hypothesis that may explain the appearance of low density bubbles will be discussed.

  2. Acoustic emission monitoring from a lab scale high shear granulator--a novel approach.

    PubMed

    Watson, N J; Povey, M J W; Reynolds, G K; Xu, B H; Ding, Y

    2014-04-25

    A new approach to the monitoring of granulation processes using passive acoustics together with precise control over the granulation process has highlighted the importance of particle-particle and particle-bowl collisions in acoustic emission. The results have shown that repeatable acoustic results could be obtained but only when a spray nozzle water addition system was used. Acoustic emissions were recorded from a transducer attached to the bowl and an airborne transducer. It was found that the airborne transducer detected very little from the granulation and only experienced small changes throughout the process. The results from the bowl transducer showed that during granulation the frequency content of the acoustic emission shifted towards the lower frequencies. Results from the discrete element model indicate that when larger particles are used the number of collisions the particles experience reduces. This is a result of the volume conservation methodology used in this study, therefore larger particles results in less particles. These simulation results coupled with previous theoretical work on the frequency content of an impacting sphere explain why the frequency content of the acoustic emissions reduces during granule growth. The acoustic system used was also clearly able to identify when large over-wetted granules were present in the system, highlighting its benefit for detecting undesirable operational conditions. High-speed photography was used to study if visual changes in the granule properties could be linked with the changing acoustic emissions. The high speed photography was only possible towards the latter stages of the granulation process and it was found that larger granules produced a higher magnitude of acoustic emission across a broader frequency range.

  3. Application of high-velocity friction experiments to the shear rupture of a fault in an elastic half-space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Zonghu; Reches, Zeev

    2013-04-01

    We developed a physics-based model for earthquake rupture by numerically simulating shear rupture along a 2D vertical fault with the dynamic frictional strength of granite under high slip velocity. Recent experimental observations indicated that the steady-state frictional strength of silica-rich igneous rocks (granite, syenite, diorite) alternate between dynamic-weakening under low velocity (V < 0.03 m/s) and dynamic-strengthening under higher velocities (V > 0.03 m/s). This strength alternation was attributed to powder-lubrication (weakening), and powder dehydration (strengthening) (Sammis et al., 2011). We used the dynamic friction law which was determined on samples of Sierra White granite under experimental velocities approaching 1 m/s (Reches and Lockner, 2010). We converted their observed friction-distance-velocity relations into an empirical friction model referred to as WEST (WEakening - STrengthening). For the simulation calculations, we used the spectral element code of Ampuero (web.gps.caltech.edu/~ampuero/software), which computes the spontaneous rupture propagation along an anti-plane shear (mode III) fracture in an elastic half-space. In the present analysis, the WEST friction model is used as the fault strength while keeping all other parameters (crust properties and stresses) the same as Version 3 of the Southern California Earthquake Center (SCEC) benchmark problem (Harris et al., 2004). This approach allows for direct comparison between the WEST rupture and the benchmark rupture with a fault of slip-weakening friction model (Rojas et al., 2008). We found the following differences between the ruptures of the two models: (1) WEST-based rupture occurs earlier at all observation points away from the nucleation zone; (2) WEST-based model has lower (~ 35%) peak velocity and shorter rise-time; and (3) WEST-based rupture shows rich, frequent alteration of slip velocity, and consequently, the simulated rupture is more complex in stress drop, displacements

  4. Optimization of a high shear wet granulation process using focused beam reflectance measurement and particle vision microscope technologies.

    PubMed

    Arp, Zane; Smith, Ben; Dycus, Eric; O'grady, Des

    2011-08-01

    Application of process analytical technology in the pharmaceutical industry has led to a great number of studies into inline instrumentation. Near-infrared moisture monitoring in fluid bed drying and content uniformity assurance in blending are gaining acceptance for monitoring and quality control of these processes. Although these techniques are a great improvement over traditional methods, each is performed at points in processing wherein processing is well understood and interfacing equipment is relatively easy. More complex unit operations have largely been unexplored due to complexities interfacing inline analytical equipment to unit operations or a lack of methodologies that can be applied to measure attributes of interest. This paper reports results from a study utilizing a focused beam reflectance measurement system equipped with window scraper technology for the inline measurement and control of a high shear wet granulation (HSWG) process. In addition to this, offline results obtained with a particle vision microscope system are compared to verify the results obtained inline. It is shown that using these technologies in monitoring the HSWG process greatly increases process understanding of physical changes occurring during processing through real-time observation of particle size, leading to real-time control of the process.

  5. Nanoparticles and nanocapsules created using the Ouzo effect: spontaneous emulisification as an alternative to ultrasonic and high-shear devices.

    PubMed

    François, Ganachaud; Katz, Joseph L

    2005-02-01

    The preparation of polymeric particles and capsules by means of spontaneous droplet formation and subsequent polymer precipitation or synthesis is well-known. However, spontaneous emulsification is a phenomenon that has often been erroneously interpreted. This Minireview provides new insights into the preparation of metastable liquid dispersions by homogeneous liquid-liquid nucleation, and is based primarily on a recent study by Vitale and Katz (Langmuir, 2003, 19, 4105-4110). This spontaneous emulsification, which they named the Ouzo effect, occurs upon pouring, into water, a mixture of a totally water-miscible solvent and a hydrophobic oil--and optionally some water--thus generating long-lived small droplets, which are formed even though no surfactant is present. Herein, we review and reinterpret the most relevant publications on the synthesis of a variety of dispersions (pseudolatexes, silicone emulsions, biodegradable polymeric nanocapsules, etc.), which we believe have actually been synthesized using the Ouzo effect. The Ouzo effect may also become a substitute for high-shear techniques, which, to date have only been of limited utility on industrial scales.

  6. Higher modulus compositions incorporating particulate rubber

    DOEpatents

    McInnis, E.L.; Bauman, B.D.; Williams, M.A.

    1996-04-09

    Rubber particles, to be used as fillers or extenders for various composite polymer systems, are chlorinated by a gas-solid phase reaction with a chlorine-containing gas. A composite polymer containing the chlorinated rubber fillers or extenders exhibits a higher flexural modulus than if prepared using an unchlorinated rubber filler or extender. Chlorination of the rubber particles is carried out by contacting the finely divided rubber particles with a chlorine-containing gas comprising at least about 5 volume percent chlorine. Advantageously, the chlorine can be diluted with air, nitrogen or other essentially inert gases and may contain minor amounts of fluorine. Improved performance is obtained with nitrogen dilution of the chlorine gas over air dilution. Improved polymer composite systems having higher flexural modulus result from the use of the chlorinated rubber particles as fillers instead of unchlorinated rubber particles. 2 figs.

  7. Higher modulus compositions incorporating particulate rubber

    DOEpatents

    McInnis, Edwin L.; Scharff, Robert P.; Bauman, Bernard D.; Williams, Mark A.

    1995-01-01

    Rubber particles, to be used as fillers or extenders for various composite polymer systems, are chlorinated by a gas-solid phase reaction with a chlorine-containing gas. A composite polymer containing the chlorinated rubber fillers or extenders exhibits a higher flexural modulus than if prepared using an unchlorinated rubber filler or extender. Chlorination of the rubber particles is carried out by contacting the finely divided rubber particles with a chlorine-containing gas comprising at least about 5 volume percent chlorine. Advantageously, the chlorine can be diluted with air, nitrogen or other essentially inert gases and may contain minor amounts of fluorine. Improved performance is obtained with nitrogen dilution of the chlorine gas over air dilution. Improved polymer composite systems having higher flexural modulus result from the use of the chlorinated rubber particles as fillers instead of unchlorinated rubber particles.

  8. Higher modulus compositions incorporating particulate rubber

    DOEpatents

    McInnis, E.L.; Scharff, R.P.; Bauman, B.D.; Williams, M.A.

    1995-01-17

    Rubber particles, to be used as fillers or extenders for various composite polymer systems, are chlorinated by a gas-solid phase reaction with a chlorine-containing gas. A composite polymer containing the chlorinated rubber fillers or extenders exhibits a higher flexural modulus than if prepared using an unchlorinated rubber filler or extender. Chlorination of the rubber particles is carried out by contacting the finely divided rubber particles with a chlorine-containing gas comprising at least about 5 volume percent chlorine. Advantageously, the chlorine can be diluted with air, nitrogen or other essentially inert gases and may contain minor amounts of fluorine. Improved performance is obtained with nitrogen dilution of the chlorine gas over air dilution. Improved polymer composite systems having higher flexural modulus result from the use of the chlorinated rubber particles as fillers instead of unchlorinated rubber particles. 2 figures.

  9. Higher modulus compositions incorporating particulate rubber

    DOEpatents

    Bauman, Bernard D.; Williams, Mark A.; Bagheri, Reza

    1997-12-02

    Rubber particles, to be used as fillers or extenders for various composite polymer systems, are chlorinated by a gas-solid phase reaction with a chlorine-containing gas. A composite polymer containing the chlorinated rubber fillers or extenders exhibits a higher flexural modulus than if prepared using an unchlorinated rubber filler or extender. Chlorination of the rubber particles is carried out by contacting the finely divided rubber particles with a chlorine-containing gas comprising at least about 5 volume percent chlorine. Advantageously, the chlorine can be diluted with air, nitrogen or other essentially inert gases and may contain minor amounts of fluorine. Improved performance is obtained with nitrogen dilution of the chlorine gas over air dilution. Improved polymer composite systems having higher flexural modulus result from the use of the chlorinated rubber particles as fillers instead of unchlorinated rubber particles.

  10. Higher modulus compositions incorporating particulate rubber

    DOEpatents

    McInnis, Edwin L.; Bauman, Bernard D.; Williams, Mark A.

    1996-04-09

    Rubber particles, to be used as fillers or extenders for various composite polymer systems, are chlorinated by a gas-solid phase reaction with a chlorine-containing gas. A composite polymer containing the chlorinated rubber fillers or extenders exhibits a higher flexural modulus than if prepared using an unchlorinated rubber filler or extender. Chlorination of the rubber particles is carried out by contacting the finely divided rubber particles with a chlorine-containing gas comprising at least about 5 volume percent chlorine. Advantageously, the chlorine can be diluted with air, nitrogen or other essentially inert gases and may contain minor amounts of fluorine. Improved performance is obtained with nitrogen dilution of the chlorine gas over air dilution. Improved polymer composite systems having higher flexural modulus result from the use of the chlorinated rubber particles as fillers instead of unchlorinated rubber particles.

  11. Higher modulus compositions incorporating particulate rubber

    DOEpatents

    Bauman, B.D.; Williams, M.A.; Bagheri, R.

    1997-12-02

    Rubber particles, to be used as fillers or extenders for various composite polymer systems, are chlorinated by a gas-solid phase reaction with a chlorine-containing gas. A composite polymer containing the chlorinated rubber fillers or extenders exhibits a higher flexural modulus than if prepared using an unchlorinated rubber filler or extender. Chlorination of the rubber particles is carried out by contacting the finely divided rubber particles with a chlorine-containing gas comprising at least about 5 volume percent chlorine. Advantageously, the chlorine can be diluted with air, nitrogen or other essentially inert gases and may contain minor amounts of fluorine. Improved performance is obtained with nitrogen dilution of the chlorine gas over air dilution. Improved polymer composite systems having higher flexural modulus result from the use of the chlorinated rubber particles as fillers instead of unchlorinated rubber particles. 2 figs.

  12. Excitation of high-n toroidicity-induced shear Alfven eigenmodes by energetic particles and fusion alpha particles in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, G.Y.; Cheng, C.Z.

    1992-07-01

    The stability of high-n toroidicity-induced shear Alfven eigenmodes (TAE) in the presence of fusion alpha particles or energetic ions in tokamaks is investigated. The TAE modes are discrete in nature and thus can easily tap the free energy associated with energetic particle pressure gradient through wave particle resonant interaction. A quadratic form is derived for the high-n TAE modes using gyro-kinetic equation. The kinetic effects of energetic particles are calculated perturbatively using the ideal MHD solution as the lowest order eigenfunction. The finite Larmor radius (FLR) effects and the finite drift orbit width (FDW) effects are included for both circulating and trapped energetic particles. It is shown that, for circulating particles, FLR and FDW effects have two opposite influences on the stability of the high-n TAE modes. First, they have the usual stabilizing effects by reducing the wave particle interaction strength. Second, they also have destabilizing effects by allowing more particles to resonate with the TAE modes. It is found that the growth rate induced by the circulating alpha particles increase linearly with toroidal mode number n for small {kappa}{sub {theta}}{rho}{sub {alpha}}, and decreases as 1/n for {kappa}{sub {theta}}{rho}{sub {alpha}} {much_gt} 1. The maximum growth rate is obtained at {kappa}{sub {theta}}{rho}{sub {alpha}} on the order of unity and is nearly constant for the range of 0.7 < {upsilon}{sub {alpha}}/{upsilon}{sub A} < 2.5. On the other hand, the trapped particle response is dominated by the precessional drift resonance. The bounce resonant contribution is negligible. The growth rate peaks sharply at the value of {kappa}{sub {theta}}{rho}{sub {alpha}} such that the precessional drift resonance occurs for the most energetic trapped particles. The maximum growth rate due to the energetic trapped particles is comparable to that of circulating particles.

  13. Excitation of high-n toroidicity-induced shear Alfven eigenmodes by energetic particles and fusion alpha particles in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, G.Y.; Cheng, C.Z.

    1992-07-01

    The stability of high-n toroidicity-induced shear Alfven eigenmodes (TAE) in the presence of fusion alpha particles or energetic ions in tokamaks is investigated. The TAE modes are discrete in nature and thus can easily tap the free energy associated with energetic particle pressure gradient through wave particle resonant interaction. A quadratic form is derived for the high-n TAE modes using gyro-kinetic equation. The kinetic effects of energetic particles are calculated perturbatively using the ideal MHD solution as the lowest order eigenfunction. The finite Larmor radius (FLR) effects and the finite drift orbit width (FDW) effects are included for both circulating and trapped energetic particles. It is shown that, for circulating particles, FLR and FDW effects have two opposite influences on the stability of the high-n TAE modes. First, they have the usual stabilizing effects by reducing the wave particle interaction strength. Second, they also have destabilizing effects by allowing more particles to resonate with the TAE modes. It is found that the growth rate induced by the circulating alpha particles increase linearly with toroidal mode number n for small {kappa}{sub {theta}}{rho}{sub {alpha}}, and decreases as 1/n for {kappa}{sub {theta}}{rho}{sub {alpha}} {much gt} 1. The maximum growth rate is obtained at {kappa}{sub {theta}}{rho}{sub {alpha}} on the order of unity and is nearly constant for the range of 0.7 < {upsilon}{sub {alpha}}/{upsilon}{sub A} < 2.5. On the other hand, the trapped particle response is dominated by the precessional drift resonance. The bounce resonant contribution is negligible. The growth rate peaks sharply at the value of {kappa}{sub {theta}}{rho}{sub {alpha}} such that the precessional drift resonance occurs for the most energetic trapped particles. The maximum growth rate due to the energetic trapped particles is comparable to that of circulating particles.

  14. Ultrasonic shear wave couplant

    DOEpatents

    Kupperman, David S.; Lanham, Ronald N.

    1985-01-01

    Ultrasonically testing of an article at high temperatures is accomplished by the use of a compact layer of a dry ceramic powder as a couplant in a method which involves providing an ultrasonic transducer as a probe capable of transmitting shear waves, coupling the probe to the article through a thin compact layer of a dry ceramic powder, propagating a shear wave from the probe through the ceramic powder and into the article to develop echo signals, and analyzing the echo signals to determine at least one physical characteristic of the article.

  15. In vivo performance of a reduced-modulus bone cement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forehand, Brett Ramsey

    Total joint replacement has become one of the most common procedures in the area of orthopedics and is often the solution in patients with diseased or injured hip joints. Component loosening is a significant problem and is primarily caused by bone resorption at the bone-cement interface in cemented implants. It is our hypothesis that localized shear stresses are responsible for the resorption. It was previously shown analytically that local stresses at the interface could be reduced by using a cement of lower modulus. A new reduced modulus cement, polybutyl methylmethacrylate (PBMMA), was developed to test the hypothesis. PBMMA was formulated to exist as polybutyl methacrylate filler in a polymethyl methacrylate matrix. The success of PBMMA cement is based largely on the fact that the polybutyl component of the cement will be in the rubbery state at body temperature. In vitro characterization of the cement was undertaken previously and demonstrated a modulus of approximately one-eighth that of conventional bone cement, polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) and increased fracture toughness. The purpose of this experiment was to perform an in vivo comparison of the two cements. A sheep model was selected. Total hip arthroplasty was performed on 50 ewes using either PBMMA or PMMA. Radiographs were taken at 6 month intervals. At one year, the contralateral femur of each sheep was implanted so that each animal served as its own control, and the animals were sacrificed. The stiffness of the bone-cement interface of the femoral component within the femur was assessed by applying a torque to the femoral component and demonstrated a significant difference in loosening between the cements when the specimens were tested in external rotation (p < 0.007). Evaluation of the mechanical data also suggests that the PBMMA sheep had a greater amount of loosening for each subject, 59% versus 4% for standard PMMA. A radiographic analysis demonstrated more signs of loosening in the PMMA series

  16. Failure During Sheared Edge Stretching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, B. S.; van Tyne, C. J.

    2008-12-01

    Failure during sheared edge stretching of sheet steels is a serious concern, especially in advanced high-strength steel (AHSS) grades. The shearing process produces a shear face and a zone of deformation behind the shear face, which is the shear-affected zone (SAZ). A failure during sheared edge stretching depends on prior deformation in the sheet, the shearing process, and the subsequent strain path in the SAZ during stretching. Data from laboratory hole expansion tests and hole extrusion tests for multiple lots of fourteen grades of steel were analyzed. The forming limit curve (FLC), regression equations, measurement uncertainty calculations, and difference calculations were used in the analyses. From these analyses, an assessment of the primary factors that contribute to the fracture during sheared edge stretching was made. It was found that the forming limit strain with consideration of strain path in the SAZ is a major factor that contributes to the failure of a sheared edge during stretching. Although metallurgical factors are important, they appear to play a somewhat lesser role.

  17. Tunable shear thickening in suspensions

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Neil Y.C.; Ness, Christopher; Cates, Michael E.; Sun, Jin; Cohen, Itai

    2016-01-01

    Shear thickening, an increase of viscosity with shear rate, is a ubiquitous phenomenon in suspended materials that has implications for broad technological applications. Controlling this thickening behavior remains a major challenge and has led to empirical strategies ranging from altering the particle surfaces and shape to modifying the solvent properties. However, none of these methods allows for tuning of flow properties during shear itself. Here, we demonstrate that by strategic imposition of a high-frequency and low-amplitude shear perturbation orthogonal to the primary shearing flow, we can largely eradicate shear thickening. The orthogonal shear effectively becomes a regulator for controlling thickening in the suspension, allowing the viscosity to be reduced by up to 2 decades on demand. In a separate setup, we show that such effects can be induced by simply agitating the sample transversely to the primary shear direction. Overall, the ability of in situ manipulation of shear thickening paves a route toward creating materials whose mechanical properties can be controlled. PMID:27621472

  18. Temperature Coefficient of the Modulus of Rigidity of Aircraft Instrument Diaphragm and Spring Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brombacher, W G; Melton, E R

    1931-01-01

    Experimental data are presented on the variation of the modulus of rigidity in the temperature range -20 to +50 degrees C. of a number of metals which are of possible use for elastic elements for aircraft and other instruments. The methods of the torsional pendulum was used to determine the modulus of rigidity and its temperature coefficient for aluminum, duralumin, monel metal, brass, phosphor bronze, coin silver, nickel silver, three high carbon steels, and three alloy steels. It was observed that tensile stress affected the values of the modulus by amounts of 1 per cent or less.

  19. Correlation of ideal and actual shear strengths of metals with their friction properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1981-01-01

    The relation between the ideal and actual shear strengths and friction properties of clean metals in contact with clean diamond, boron nitride, silicon carbide, manganese-zinc ferrite, and the metals themselves in vacuum is discussed. An estimate of the ideal shear strength for metals is obtained from the shear modulus, the repeat distance of atoms in the direction of shear of the metal, and the interplanar spacing of the shearing planes. The coefficient of friction for metals is shown to be correlated with both the ideal and actual shear strength of metals. The higher the strength of the metal, the lower the coefficient of friction occurs.

  20. An Experimental and Analytical Evaluation of a Biaxial Test for Determining Shear Properties of Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, John M.; Barnett, Terry R.

    1988-01-01

    The results of an experimental and analytical investigation of a biaxial tension/compression test for determining shear properties of composite materials are reported. Using finite element models of isotropic and orthotropic laminates, a specimen geometry was optimized. A kinematic fixture was designed to introduce an equal and opposite pair of forces into a specimen with a one inch square test section. Aluminum and several composite laminates with the optimized geometry and a configuration with large stress gradients were tested in the fixture. The specimens were instrumented with strain gages in the center of the test section for shear stiffness measurements. Pure shear strain was measured. The results from the experiments correlated well with finite element results. Failure of the specimens occurred through the center of the test section and appeared to have initiated at the high stress points. The results lead to the conclusion that the optimized specimen is suitable for determining shear modulus for composite materials. Further revisions to the specimen geometry are necessary if the method is to give shear strength data.

  1. A Piezoelectric Shear Stress Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Taeyang; Saini, Aditya; Kim, Jinwook; Gopalarathnam, Ashok; Zhu, Yong; Palmieri, Frank L.; Wohl, Christopher J.; Jiang, Xiaoning

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a piezoelectric sensor with a floating element was developed for shear stress measurement. The piezoelectric sensor was designed to detect the pure shear stress suppressing effects of normal stress generated from the vortex lift-up by applying opposite poling vectors to the: piezoelectric elements. The sensor was first calibrated in the lab by applying shear forces and it showed high sensitivity to shear stress (=91.3 +/- 2.1 pC/Pa) due to the high piezoelectric coefficients of PMN-33%PT (d31=-1330 pC/N). The sensor also showed almost no sensitivity to normal stress (less than 1.2 pC/Pa) because of the electromechanical symmetry of the device. The usable frequency range of the sensor is 0-800 Hz. Keywords: Piezoelectric sensor, shear stress, floating element, electromechanical symmetry

  2. Wave-front analysis with high accuracy by use of a double-grating lateral shearing interferometer.

    PubMed

    Leibbrandt, G W; Harbers, G; Kunst, P J

    1996-11-01

    A phase-stepped double-grating lateral shearing interferometer to be used for wave-front analysis is presented. The resulting interference patterns are analyzed with a differential Zernike polynomial matrix-inversion method. Possible error sources are analyzed in the design stage, and it is shown that the inaccuracy can be kept within 2-5 mλ rms. The apparatus was tested and evaluated in practice. Comparison with a phase-stepped Twyman-Green interferometer demonstrates that the accuracy of the two methods is comparable. Lateral shearing interferometry scores better on reproducibility, owing to the stability and robustness of the method.

  3. Interaction between a normal shock wave and a turbulent boundary layer at high transonic speeds. II - Wall shear stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, M. S.; Adamson, T. C., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Asymptotic methods are used to calculate the shear stress at the wall for the interaction between a normal shock wave and a turbulent boundary layer on a flat plate. A mixing length model is used for the eddy viscosity. The shock wave is taken to be strong enough that the sonic line is deep in the boundary layer and the upstream influence is thus very small. It is shown that unlike the result found for laminar flow an asymptotic criterion for separation is not found; however, conditions for incipient separation are computed numerically using the derived solution for the shear stress at the wall. Results are compared with available experimental measurements.

  4. Are integrin alpha(2)beta(1), glycoprotein Ib and vWf levels correlated with their contributions to platelet adhesion on collagen under high-shear flow?

    PubMed

    Jung, Stephanie M; Sonoda, Mamiko; Tsuji, Kayoko; Jimi, Atsuo; Nomura, Shosaku; Kanaji, Taisuke; Moroi, Masaaki

    2010-01-01

    Platelets in flowing blood at high-shear stress are recruited to exposed subendothelial collagen of injured vessels by GPIb-von Willebrand factor (vWf) and integrin alpha(2)beta(1) (alpha(2)beta(1))-collagen interactions. Platelet adhesion to type I collagen depends mainly on the alpha(2)beta(1)-collagen interaction and that to type III collagen depends on the GPIb-vWf interaction due to vWf's weak affinity for type I collagen. Contributions of these two interactions would differ depending on expressions of alpha(2)beta(1), vWf, or GPIb. We quantitated platelet adhesion to low- and high-density collagen under high-shear flow conditions in the presence of anti-alpha(2)beta(1) (Gi9) and anti-GPIb (NNKY5-5) antibodies to determine if their inhibitory effects were correlated with the amounts of alpha(2)beta(1), GPIb and vWf. Gi9 inhibition of adhesion to type I collagen was decreased in platelets with more integrin alpha(2)beta(1). Gi9 and NNKY5-5 are more inhibitory against adhesion to low-density type III and I, respectively. Higher alpha(2)beta(1) expression decreases adhesion to low-density type III and increases Gi9 inhibition of adhesion to high-density type III, suggesting crosstalk between the alpha(2)beta(1)-collagen and GPIb-vWf interactions in adhesion to type III. Integrin alpha(2)beta(1)-collagen and GPIb-vWf interactions both contribute to platelet adhesion to collagen under high-shear flow. In adhesion under high-shear stress, the two interactions would compensate for each other, when there is a deficiency in one or the other. The alpha(2)beta(1)-collagen interaction was also suggested to have an inhibitory effect on platelet adhesion to type III collagen, through a yet undefined mechanism.

  5. Predictability of Sheared Tropical Cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, F.; Tao, D.

    2015-12-01

    Predictability of the formation, rapid intensification and eyewall replacement of sheared tropical cyclones (TCs) are explored through a series of convection-permitting ensemble simulations using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model with different environmental vertical wind shear, sea-surface temperature (SST), and ambient moisture conditions. It is found that the intrinsic predictability of the RI onset time is more limited with increasing shear magnitude until the shear magnitude is large enough to prevent the TC formation. Based on ensemble sensitivity and correlation analysis, the RI onset timing within one set is largely related to the vortex tilt magnitude, the diabatic heating distribution and the strength of the primary vortex circulation. Systematic differences amongst the ensemble members begin to arise right after the initial burst of moist convection associated with the incipient vortex. This difference from the randomness inherent in moist convection in terms of both location and intensity first changes the TC vortex structure subtly and then leads to the deviations in system scales and eventually in the development (and precession) of the TC. On average, a higher SST has a positive effect on the TC formation and reduces the uncertainty of development under all shear conditions, while a drier environment has a negative impact on the TCs development and either broadens the ensemble spread of RI onset time or prevents the storm from forming when the shear-induced tilt is large. Nevertheless, the uncertainty in environmental shear magnitudes may dominate over the effect of randomness in moist convection in terms of TC formation and predictability. A byproduct of tropical cyclones under vertical wind shear is the secondary eyewall formation (SEF). It is found that the eyewall formation is more often observed in TCs with moderate to high shear, which was inherently more unpredictable. The inward contraction/axisymmeterization of shear

  6. Active Tensile Modulus of an Epithelial Monolayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincent, Romaric; Bazellières, Elsa; Pérez-González, Carlos; Uroz, Marina; Serra-Picamal, Xavier; Trepat, Xavier

    2015-12-01

    A general trait of cell monolayers is their ability to exert contractile stresses on their surroundings. The scaling laws that link such contractile stresses with the size and geometry of constituent cells remain largely unknown. In this Letter, we show that the active tension of an epithelial monolayer scales linearly with the size of the constituent cells, a surprisingly simple relationship. The slope of this relationship defines an active tensile modulus, which depends on the concentration of myosin and spans more than 2 orders of magnitude across cell types and molecular perturbations.

  7. Interaction between a normal shock wave and a turbulent boundary layer at high transonic speeds. Part 2: Wall shear stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, M. S.; Adamson, T. C., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    An analysis is presented of the flow in the two inner layers, the Reynolds stress sublayer and the wall layer. Included is the calculation of the shear stress at the wall in the interaction region. The limit processes considered are those used for an inviscid flow.

  8. Emergent SO(3) Symmetry of the Frictionless Shear Jamming Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baity-Jesi, Marco; Goodrich, Carl P.; Liu, Andrea J.; Nagel, Sidney R.; Sethna, James P.

    2017-01-01

    We study the shear jamming of athermal frictionless soft spheres, and find that in the thermodynamic limit, a shear-jammed state exists with different elastic properties from the isotropically-jammed state. For example, shear-jammed states can have a non-zero residual shear stress in the thermodynamic limit that arises from long-range stress-stress correlations. As a result, the ratio of the shear and bulk moduli, which in isotropically-jammed systems vanishes as the jamming transition is approached from above, instead approaches a constant. Despite these striking differences, we argue that in a deeper sense, the shear jamming and isotropic jamming transitions actually have the same symmetry, and that the differences can be fully understood by rotating the six-dimensional basis of the elastic modulus tensor.

  9. A special relation between Young's modulus, Rayleigh-wave velocity, and Poisson's ratio.

    PubMed

    Malischewsky, Peter G; Tuan, Tran Thanh

    2009-12-01

    Bayon et al. [(2005). J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 117, 3469-3477] described a method for the determination of Young's modulus by measuring the Rayleigh-wave velocity and the ellipticity of Rayleigh waves, and found a peculiar almost linear relation between a non-dimensional quantity connecting Young's modulus, Rayleigh-wave velocity and density, and Poisson's ratio. The analytical reason for this special behavior remained unclear. It is demonstrated here that this behavior is a simple consequence of the mathematical form of the Rayleigh-wave velocity as a function of Poisson's ratio. The consequences for auxetic materials (those materials for which Poisson's ratio is negative) are discussed, as well as the determination of the shear and bulk moduli.

  10. Mechanical properties of hybrid (medium modulus graphite, Thornel P-55 Kevlar/Epoxy) composites

    SciTech Connect

    Raghava, R.S.; Peters, S.T.

    1987-01-01

    This paper treats the mechanical behavior of hybrid (Thornel P-55-Kevlar/Epoxy) composites under ambient conditions and under hostile environments. Interply (core/shell) and intraply tubes (5.75'' I.D.) were filament wound and NOL rings were machined from them. Apparently modulus and apparent strength were measured using the split D (ASTM D2290) test. The influence of boiling water exposure (2 hrs and 24 hrs) on short beam shear strength, apparent modulus, and apparent strength was also evaluated at room temperature and the fracture toughness for above configurations was measured at room temperature. Scanning electron microscopy was used to examine failure modes. 6 references, 4 figures, 3 tables.

  11. Elastic modulus imaging: on the uniqueness and nonuniqueness of the elastography inverse problem in two dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbone, Paul E.; Gokhale, Nachiket H.

    2004-02-01

    We examine the uniqueness of an N-field generalization of a 2D inverse problem associated with elastic modulus imaging: given N linearly independent displacement fields in an incompressible elastic material, determine the shear modulus. We show that for the standard case, N=1, the general solution contains two arbitrary functions which must be prescribed to make the solution unique. In practice, the data required to evaluate the necessary functions are impossible to obtain. For N=2, on the other hand, the general solution contains at most four arbitrary constants, and so very few data are required to find the unique solution. For N=4, the general solution contains only one arbitrary constant. Our results apply to both quasistatic and dynamic deformations.

  12. Shear horizontal guided wave modes to infer the shear stiffness of adhesive bond layers.

    PubMed

    Le Crom, Bénédicte; Castaings, Michel

    2010-04-01

    This paper presents a non-destructive, ultrasonic technique to evaluate the quality of bonds between substrates. Shear-horizontally polarized (SH) wave modes are investigated to infer the shear stiffness of bonds, which is necessarily linked to the shear resistance that is a critical parameter for bonded structures. Numerical simulations are run for selecting the most appropriate SH wave modes, i.e., with higher sensitivity to the bond than to other components, and experiments are made for generating-detecting pre-selected SH wave modes and for measuring their phase velocities. An inverse problem is finally solved, consisting of the evaluation of the shear stiffness modulus of a bond layer at different curing times between a metallic plate and a composite patch, such assembly being investigated in the context of repair of aeronautical structures.

  13. Zipper and freeway shear zone junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passchier, Cees; Platt, John

    2016-04-01

    Ductile shear zones are usually presented as isolated planar high-strain domains in a less deformed wall rock, characterised by shear sense indicators such as characteristic deflected foliation traces. Many shear zones, however, form branched systems and if movement on such branches is contemporaneous, the resulting geometry can be complicated and lead to unusual fabric geometries in the wall rock. For Y-shaped shear zone junctions with three simultaneously operating branches, and with slip directions at a high angle to the branch line, eight basic types of shear zone triple junctions are possible, divided into three groups. The simplest type, called freeway junctions, have similar shear sense on all three branches. If shear sense is different on the three branches, this can lead to space problems. Some of these junctions have shear zone branches that join to form a single branch, named zipper junctions, or a single shear zone which splits to form two, known as wedge junctions. Closing zipper junctions are most unusual, since they form a non-active high-strain zone with opposite deflection of foliations. Shear zipper and shear wedge junctions have two shear zones with similar shear sense, and one with the opposite sense. All categories of shear zone junctions show characteristic flow patterns in the shear zone and its wall rock. Shear zone junctions with slip directions normal to the branch line can easily be studied, since ideal sections of shear sense indicators lie in the plane normal to the shear zone branches and the branch line. Expanding the model to allow slip oblique and parallel to the branch line in a full 3D setting gives rise to a large number of geometries in three main groups. Slip directions can be parallel on all branches but oblique to the branch line: two slip directions can be parallel and a third oblique, or all three branches can have slip in different directions. Such more complex shear zone junctions cannot be studied to advantage in a

  14. Shear piezoelectricity in bone at the nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minary-Jolandan, Majid; Yu, Min-Feng

    2010-10-01

    Recent demonstration of shear piezoelectricity in an isolated collagen fibril, which is the origin of piezoelectricity in bone, necessitates investigation of shear piezoelectric behavior in bone at the nanoscale. Using high resolution lateral piezoresponse force microcopy (PFM), shear piezoelectricity in a cortical bone sample was studied at the nanoscale. Subfibrillar structure of individual collagen fibrils with a periodicity of 60-70 nm were revealed in PFM map, indicating the direct contribution of collagen fibrils to the shear piezoelectricity of bone.

  15. Elastic modulus of single cellulose microfibrils from tunicate measured by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, Shinichiro; Kai, Weihua; Isogai, Akira; Iwata, Tadahisa

    2009-09-14

    The elastic modulus of single microfibrils from tunicate ( Halocynthia papillosa ) cellulose was measured by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Microfibrils with cross-sectional dimensions 8 x 20 nm and several micrometers in length were obtained by oxidation of cellulose with 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl radical (TEMPO) as a catalyst and subsequent mechanical disintegration in water and by sulfuric acid hydrolysis. The nanocellulosic materials were deposited on a specially designed silicon wafer with grooves 227 nm in width, and a three-point bending test was applied to determine the elastic modulus using an AFM cantilever. The elastic moduli of single microfibrils prepared by TEMPO-oxidation and acid hydrolysis were 145.2 +/- 31.3 and 150.7 +/- 28.8 GPa, respectively. The result showed that the experimentally determined modulus of the highly crystalline tunicate microfibrils was in agreement with the elastic modulus of native cellulose crystals.

  16. Structural relaxation driven increase in elastic modulus for a bulk metallic glass

    SciTech Connect

    Arora, Harpreet Singh; Aditya, Ayyagari V.; Mukherjee, Sundeep

    2015-01-07

    The change in elastic modulus as a function of temperature was investigated for a zirconium-based bulk metallic glass. High temperature nano-indentation was done over a wide temperature range from room temperature to the glass-transition. At higher temperature, there was a transition from inhomogeneous to homogeneous deformation, with a decrease in serrated flow and an increase in creep displacement. Hardness was found to decrease, whereas elastic modulus was found to increase with temperature. The increase in elastic modulus for metallic glass at higher temperature was explained by diffusive rearrangement of atoms resulting in free volume annihilation. This is in contrast to elastic modulus increase with temperature for silicate glasses due to compaction of its open three dimensional coordinated structure without any atomic diffusion.

  17. Laboratory Earthquake Measurements with the High-speed Digital Image Correlation Method and Applications to Super-shear Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubino, V.; Lapusta, N.; Rosakis, A.

    2012-12-01

    Mapping full-field displacements and strains on the Earth's surface during an earthquake is of paramount importance to enhance our understanding of earthquake mechanics. In this study, the feasibility of such measurements using image correlation methods is investigated in a laboratory earthquake setup. Earthquakes are mimicked in the laboratory by dynamic rupture propagating along an inclined frictional interface formed by two Homalite plates under compression, using the configuration developed by Rosakis and coworkers (e.g., Rosakis et al., 2007). In our study, the interface is partially glued, in order to confine the rupture before it reaches the ends of the specimen. The specimens are painted with a speckle pattern to provide the surface with characteristic features for image matching. Images of the specimens are taken before and after dynamic rupture with a 4 Megapixels resolution CCD camera. The digital images are analyzed with two software packages: VIC-2D (Correlated Solutions Inc.) and COSI-Corr (Leprince et. al, 2007). Both VIC-2D and COSI-Corr are able to characterize the full-field static displacement of a dynamic crack. For example, in a case with secondary mode I cracks, the correlation analysis performed with either software clearly shows (i) the relative displacement (slip) along the frictional interface, (ii) the rupture arrest on the glued boundaries, and (iii) the presence of two wing cracks. The obtained displacement measurements are converted to strains, using de-noising techniques. The digital image correlation method is then used in combination with high-speed photography. We will report our progress on the study of a spontaneously expanding sub-Rayleigh shear crack advancing along an interface containing a patch of favorable heterogeneity, such as a preexisting subcritical crack or a patch with higher prestress. According to the predictions of Liu and Lapusta (2008), intersonic transition and propagation can be achieved in the presence of a

  18. Exact closed-form solutions for the natural frequencies and stability of elastically connected multiple beam system using Timoshenko and high-order shear deformation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stojanović, Vladimir; Kozić, Predrag; Janevski, Goran

    2013-02-01

    A general procedure for the determination of the natural frequencies and buckling load for a set of beam system under compressive axial loading is investigated using Timoshenko and high-order shear deformation theory. It is assumed that the set beams of the system are simply supported and continuously joined by a Winkler elastic layer. The model of beam includes the effects of axial loading, shear deformation and rotary inertia. In the special case of identical beams, explicit expressions for the natural frequencies and the critical buckling load are determined using a trigonometric method. The influences of the compressive axial loading and the number of beams in the system on the natural frequencies and the critical buckling load are discussed. These results are of considerable practical interest and have wide application in engineering practice of frameworks.

  19. Comparison between spring network models and continuum constitutive laws: application to the large deformation of a capsule in shear flow.

    PubMed

    Omori, T; Ishikawa, T; Barthès-Biesel, D; Salsac, A-V; Walter, J; Imai, Y; Yamaguchi, T

    2011-04-01

    A capsule is a liquid drop enclosed by a solid, deformable membrane. To analyze the deformation of a capsule accurately, both the fluid mechanics of the internal and external fluids and the solid mechanics of the membrane must be solved precisely. Recently, many researchers have used discrete spring network models to express the membrane mechanics of capsules and biological cells. However, it is unclear whether such modeling is sufficiently accurate to solve for capsule deformation. This study examines the correlations between the mechanical properties of the discrete spring network model and continuum constitutive laws. We first compare uniaxial and isotropic deformations of a two-dimensional (2D) sheet, both analytically and numerically. The 2D sheet is discretized with four kinds of mesh to analyze the effect of the spring network configuration. We derive the relationships between the spring constant and continuum properties, such as the Young modulus, Poisson ratio, area dilation modulus, and shear modulus. It is found that the mechanical properties of spring networks are strongly dependent on the mesh configuration. We then calculate the deformation of a capsule under inflation and in a simple shear flow in the Stokes flow regime, using various membrane models. To achieve high accuracy in the flow calculation, a boundary-element method is used. Comparing the results between the different membrane models, we find that it is hard to express the area incompressibility observed in biological membranes using a simple spring network model.

  20. Quantitative characterization of endothelial cell morphologies depending on shear stress in different blood vessels of domestic pigs using a focused ion beam and high resolution scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM).

    PubMed

    Pham, Tam Thanh; Maenz, Stefan; Lüdecke, Claudia; Schmerbauch, Christoph; Settmacher, Utz; Jandt, Klaus D; Bossert, Jörg; Zanow, Jürgen

    2015-04-01

    Microstructured surfaces mimicking the endothelial cell (EC) morphology is a new approach to improve the blood compatibility of synthetic vascular grafts. The ECs are capable of changing their shapes depending on different shear conditions. However, the quantitative correlation between EC morphology and shear stress has not yet been investigated statistically. The aim of this study was to quantitatively investigate the morphology of ECs in dependence on the shear stress. Blood flow rates in different types of natural blood vessels (carotid, renal, hepatic and iliac arteries) originated from domestic pigs were first measured in vivo to calculate the shear stresses. The EC morphologies were quantitatively characterized ex vivo by imaging with high resolution scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and cross-sectioning of the cells using a state-of-the-art focused ion beam (FIB). The relationships between EC geometrical parameters and shear stress were statistically analyzed and found to be exponential. ECs under high shear stress conditions had a longer length and narrower width, i.e. a higher aspect ratio, while the cell height was smaller compared to low shear conditions. Based on these results, suitable and valid geometrical parameters of microstructures mimicking EC can be derived for various shear conditions in synthetic vascular grafts to optimize blood compatibility.

  1. Influence of Through-Thickness Pinning on Composite Shear Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurin, Romain; Baley, Christophe; Cartié, Denis D. R.; Davies, Peter

    2012-12-01

    This paper describes results from tests to examine the influence of through-thickness pinning on in-plane shear behaviour, measured by tensile loading of ±45° specimens. Samples were produced by both aeronautical and marine manufacturing processes. As few previous studies have investigated pinning of marine composites these were also subjected to out-of-plane shear delamination tests. For both carbon/epoxy laminates the pins reduce the apparent in-plane shear modulus and strength. Pins modify the strain field measured by full-field image analysis, and slow damage development. A new damage mechanism, transverse pin cracking, was observed.

  2. Quantitative shear wave optical coherence elastography (SW-OCE) with acoustic radiation force impulses (ARFI) induced by phase array transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Shaozhen; Le, Nhan Minh; Wang, Ruikang K.; Huang, Zhihong

    2015-03-01

    Shear Wave Optical Coherence Elastography (SW-OCE) uses the speed of propagating shear waves to provide a quantitative measurement of localized shear modulus, making it a valuable technique for the elasticity characterization of tissues such as skin and ocular tissue. One of the main challenges in shear wave elastography is to induce a reliable source of shear wave; most of nowadays techniques use external vibrators which have several drawbacks such as limited wave propagation range and/or difficulties in non-invasive scans requiring precisions, accuracy. Thus, we propose linear phase array ultrasound transducer as a remote wave source, combined with the high-speed, 47,000-frame-per-second Shear-wave visualization provided by phase-sensitive OCT. In this study, we observed for the first time shear waves induced by a 128 element linear array ultrasound imaging transducer, while the ultrasound and OCT images (within the OCE detection range) were triggered simultaneously. Acoustic radiation force impulses are induced by emitting 10 MHz tone-bursts of sub-millisecond durations (between 50 μm - 100 μm). Ultrasound beam steering is achieved by programming appropriate phase delay, covering a lateral range of 10 mm and full OCT axial (depth) range in the imaging sample. Tissue-mimicking phantoms with agarose concentration of 0.5% and 1% was used in the SW-OCE measurements as the only imaging samples. The results show extensive improvements over the range of SW-OCE elasticity map; such improvements can also be seen over shear wave velocities in softer and stiffer phantoms, as well as determining the boundary of multiple inclusions with different stiffness. This approach opens up the feasibility to combine medical ultrasound imaging and SW-OCE for high-resolution localized quantitative measurement of tissue biomechanical property.

  3. Low-modulus PMMA bone cement modified with castor oil.

    PubMed

    López, Alejandro; Hoess, Andreas; Thersleff, Thomas; Ott, Marjam; Engqvist, Håkan; Persson, Cecilia

    2011-01-01

    Some of the current clinical and biomechanical data suggest that vertebroplasty causes the development of adjacent vertebral fractures shortly after augmentation. These findings have been attributed to high injection volumes as well as high Young's moduli of PMMA bone cements compared to that of the osteoporotic cancellous bone. The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of castor oil as a plasticizer for PMMA bone cements. The Young's modulus, yield strength, maximum polymerization temperature, doughing time, setting time and the complex viscosity curves during curing, were determined. The cytotoxicity of the materials extracts was assessed on cells of an osteoblast-like cell line. The addition of up to 12 wt% castor oil decreased yield strength from 88 to 15 MPa, Young's modulus from 1500 to 446 MPa and maximum polymerization temperature from 41.3 to 25.6°C, without affecting the setting time. However, castor oil seemed to interfere with the polymerization reaction, giving a negative effect on cell viability in a worst-case scenario.

  4. Macroscopic Discontinuous Shear Thickening versus Local Shear Jamming in Cornstarch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fall, A.; Bertrand, F.; Hautemayou, D.; Mezière, C.; Moucheront, P.; Lemaître, A.; Ovarlez, G.

    2015-03-01

    We study the emergence of discontinuous shear thickening (DST) in cornstarch by combining macroscopic rheometry with local magnetic resonance imaging measurements. We bring evidence that macroscopic DST is observed only when the flow separates into a low-density flowing and a high-density jammed region. In the shear-thickened steady state, the local rheology in the flowing region is not DST but, strikingly, is often shear thinning. Our data thus show that the stress jump measured during DST, in cornstarch, does not capture a secondary, high-viscosity branch of the local steady rheology but results from the existence of a shear jamming limit at volume fractions quite significantly below random close packing.

  5. Dynamic effective elastic modulus of polymer matrix composites with dense piezoelectric nano-fibers considering surface/interface effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, XueQian; Huang, MingJuan; Zhu, ZiTao; Liu, JinXi; Feng, WenJie

    2015-01-01

    Based on effective field method, the dynamic effective elastic modulus of polymer matrix composites embedded with dense piezoelectric nano-fibers is obtained, and the interacting effect of piezoelectric surfaces/interfaces around the nano-fibers is considered. The multiple scattering effects of harmonic anti-plane shear waves between the piezoelectric nano-fibers with surface/interface are averaged by effective field method. To analyze the interacting results among the random nano-fibers, the problem of two typical piezoelectric nano-fibers is introduced by employing the addition theorem of Bessel functions. Through numerical calculations, the influence of the distance between the randomly distributed piezoelectric nano-fibers under different surface/interface parameters is analyzed. The effect of piezoelectric property of surface/interface on the effective shear modulus under different volume fractions is also examined. Comparison with the simplified cases is given to validate this dynamic electro-elastic model.

  6. Modifying mixing and instability growth through the adjustment of initial conditions in a high-energy-density counter-propagating shear experiment on OMEGA

    SciTech Connect

    Merritt, E. C.; Doss, F. W.; Loomis, E. N.; Flippo, K. A.; Kline, J. L.

    2015-06-24

    Counter-propagating shear experiments conducted at the OMEGA Laser Facility have been evaluating the effect of target initial conditions, specifically the characteristics of a tracer foil located at the shear boundary, on Kelvin-Helmholtz instability evolution and experiment transition toward nonlinearity and turbulence in the high-energy-density (HED) regime. Experiments are focused on both identifying and uncoupling the dependence of the model initial turbulent length scale in variable-density turbulence models of k-ϵ type on competing physical instability seed lengths as well as developing a path toward fully developed turbulent HED experiments. We present results from a series of experiments controllably and independently varying two initial types of scale lengths in the experiment: the thickness and surface roughness (surface perturbation scale spectrum) of a tracer layer at the shear interface. We show that decreasing the layer thickness and increasing the surface roughness both have the ability to increase the relative mixing in the system, and thus theoretically decrease the time required to begin transitioning to turbulence in the system. In addition, we also show that we can connect a change in observed mix width growth due to increased foil surface roughness to an analytically predicted change in model initial turbulent scale lengths.

  7. Modifying mixing and instability growth through the adjustment of initial conditions in a high-energy-density counter-propagating shear experiment on OMEGA

    DOE PAGES

    Merritt, E. C.; Doss, F. W.; Loomis, E. N.; ...

    2015-06-24

    Counter-propagating shear experiments conducted at the OMEGA Laser Facility have been evaluating the effect of target initial conditions, specifically the characteristics of a tracer foil located at the shear boundary, on Kelvin-Helmholtz instability evolution and experiment transition toward nonlinearity and turbulence in the high-energy-density (HED) regime. Experiments are focused on both identifying and uncoupling the dependence of the model initial turbulent length scale in variable-density turbulence models of k-ϵ type on competing physical instability seed lengths as well as developing a path toward fully developed turbulent HED experiments. We present results from a series of experiments controllably and independently varyingmore » two initial types of scale lengths in the experiment: the thickness and surface roughness (surface perturbation scale spectrum) of a tracer layer at the shear interface. We show that decreasing the layer thickness and increasing the surface roughness both have the ability to increase the relative mixing in the system, and thus theoretically decrease the time required to begin transitioning to turbulence in the system. In addition, we also show that we can connect a change in observed mix width growth due to increased foil surface roughness to an analytically predicted change in model initial turbulent scale lengths.« less

  8. Modifying mixing and instability growth through the adjustment of initial conditions in a high-energy-density counter-propagating shear experiment on OMEGA

    SciTech Connect

    Merritt, E. C. Doss, F. W.; Loomis, E. N.; Flippo, K. A.; Kline, J. L.

    2015-06-15

    Counter-propagating shear experiments conducted at the OMEGA Laser Facility have been evaluating the effect of target initial conditions, specifically the characteristics of a tracer foil located at the shear boundary, on Kelvin-Helmholtz instability evolution and experiment transition toward nonlinearity and turbulence in the high-energy-density (HED) regime. Experiments are focused on both identifying and uncoupling the dependence of the model initial turbulent length scale in variable-density turbulence models of k-ϵ type on competing physical instability seed lengths as well as developing a path toward fully developed turbulent HED experiments. We present results from a series of experiments controllably and independently varying two initial types of scale lengths in the experiment: the thickness and surface roughness (surface perturbation scale spectrum) of a tracer layer at the shear interface. We show that decreasing the layer thickness and increasing the surface roughness both have the ability to increase the relative mixing in the system, and thus theoretically decrease the time required to begin transitioning to turbulence in the system. We also show that we can connect a change in observed mix width growth due to increased foil surface roughness to an analytically predicted change in model initial turbulent scale lengths.

  9. Quantitative shear wave imaging optical coherence tomography for noncontact mechanical characterization of myocardium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shang; Lopez, Andrew L.; Morikawa, Yuka; Tao, Ge; Li, Jiasong; Larina, Irina V.; Martin, James F.; Larin, Kirill V.

    2015-03-01

    Optical coherence elastography (OCE) is an emerging low-coherence imaging technique that provides noninvasive assessment of tissue biomechanics with high spatial resolution. Among various OCE methods, the capability of quantitative measurement of tissue elasticity is of great importance for tissue characterization and pathology detection across different samples. Here we report a quantitative OCE technique, termed quantitative shear wave imaging optical coherence tomography (Q-SWI-OCT), which enables noncontact measurement of tissue Young's modulus based on the ultra-fast imaging of the shear wave propagation inside the sample. A focused air-puff device is used to interrogate the tissue with a low-pressure short-duration air stream that stimulates a localized displacement with the scale at micron level. The propagation of this tissue deformation in the form of shear wave is captured by a phase-sensitive OCT system running with the scan of the M-mode imaging over the path of the wave propagation. The temporal characteristics of the shear wave is quantified based on the cross-correlation of the tissue deformation profiles at all the measurement locations, and linear regression is utilized to fit the data plotted in the domain of time delay versus wave propagation distance. The wave group velocity is thus calculated, which results in the quantitative measurement of the Young's modulus. As the feasibility demonstration, experiments are performed on tissuemimicking phantoms with different agar concentrations and the quantified elasticity values with Q-SWI-OCT agree well with the uniaxial compression tests. For functional characterization of myocardium with this OCE technique, we perform our pilot experiments on ex vivo mouse cardiac muscle tissues with two studies, including 1) elasticity difference of cardiac muscle under relaxation and contract conditions and 2) mechanical heterogeneity of the heart introduced by the muscle fiber orientation. Our results suggest the

  10. Improved technique for Young's modulus determination by flexural resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scafe, E.; Fabbri, L.; Grillo, G.; di Rese, L.

    1992-10-01

    Elastic properties in structural ceramics are widely studied with different experimental techniques in order to obtain engineering and diagnostic data about the processed materials. A new set-up for measuring flexural resonance is presented. The apparatus is based on electrostatic excitation where sample vibrations are detected by a laser modulation technique. Due to the high sensitivity and accuracy of this experimental set-up, it was possible to measure Young's modulus of samples with relatively high thickness/length ratios, thus allowing elastic properties determination directly on bending-strength test bars. The measurements were performed according to ASTM procedure. The high frequency resolution allowed the evaluation of internal friction variation due to processing, by nonlinear least square analysis of resonance curves.

  11. Frictional properties of Zuccale Fault rocks from room temperature to in-situ conditions: results from high strain rotary shear experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemeijer, A. R.; Collettini, C.; Smith, S.; Spiers, C.

    2011-12-01

    The Zuccale fault is a regionally-important, low-angle normal fault, exposed on the Isle of Elba in Central Italy, that accommodated a total shear displacement of 6-8 km.The fault zone structure and fault rocks formed at less than 8 km crustal depth. The present-day fault structure is the final product of several deformation processes superposed during the fault history. Here, we focus on a series of highly foliated and phyllosilicate-rich fault rocks that represent the basal horizon of the detachment. Previous experimental work on foliated, intact samples, sheared in their in-situ microstructural (foliated) condition, demonstrated a markedly lower friction coefficient compared to homogeneously mixed powdered samples of the same material. We concluded from these experiments that the existence of a continuous, through-going foliation provides numerous planes of weakness on which shear deformation could be accommodated. However, these experiments were performed under room-dry and room temperature conditions. Moreover, the question remains as to how foliation is formed in these rocks in the first place. In this study, we report results from a series of preliminary rotary shear experiments performed on two fault rock types obtained from the Zuccale Fault. The tests were done under conditions ranging from room temperature to in-situ conditions (i.e. at temperatures up to 350 °C, applied normal stresses up to 200 MPa and fluid-saturated). Samples consisting of calcite, talc, chlorite and kaolinite (sample ZF01) and of calcite, tremolite, hornblende, kaolinite, chlorite and quartz (sample ZF02) were sheared at sliding velocities of 0.3-300 μm/s to displacements larger than 40 mm (i.e. γ > 40). Sample ZF01 was weaker than sample ZF02 at all conditions investigated. We attribute the lower strength to the weak talc present in this sample which is absent in sample ZF02. Both samples showed inherently stable, velocity-strengthening behaviour at room temperature, in

  12. Low modulus Ti-Nb-Hf alloy for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    González, M; Peña, J; Gil, F J; Manero, J M

    2014-09-01

    β-Type titanium alloys with a low elastic modulus are a potential strategy to reduce stress shielding effect and to enhance bone remodeling in implants used to substitute failed hard tissue. For biomaterial application, investigation on the mechanical behavior, the corrosion resistance and the cell response is required. The new Ti25Nb16Hf alloy was studied before and after 95% cold rolling (95% C.R.). The mechanical properties were determined by tensile testing and its corrosion behavior was analyzed by potentiostatic equipment in Hank's solution at 37°C. The cell response was studied by means of cytotoxicity evaluation, cell adhesion and proliferation measurements. The stress-strain curves showed the lowest elastic modulus (42GPa) in the cold worked alloy and high tensile strength, similar to that of Ti6Al4V. The new alloy exhibited better corrosion resistance in terms of open circuit potential (EOCP), but was similar in terms of corrosion current density (iCORR) compared to Ti grade II. Cytotoxicity studies revealed that the chemical composition of the alloy does not induce cytotoxic activity. Cell studies in the new alloy showed a lower adhesion and a higher proliferation compared to Ti grade II presenting, therefore, mechanical features similar to those of human cortical bone and, simultaneously, a good cell response.

  13. Damping and modulus measurements in B2 transition metal aluminides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harmouche, M. R.; Wolfenden, A.

    1985-01-01

    The polycrystalline intermetallic alloys FeAl (50.9 to 58.2 percent Fe), NiAl (49.2 to 55.9 percent Ni) and CoAl (48.5 to 52.3 percent Co) have the B2 structure and are of interest for high temperature applications. The PUCOT (piezoelectric ultrasonic composite oscillator technique) has been used to measure mechanical damping or internal friction and Young's modulus has been used as a function of temperature and composition for these materials. The modulus data for six CoAl alloys at temperatures up to 1300 K are presented. Examples are given of the strain amplitude dependence of internal friction for four CoAl alloys. The curves showed the break away phenomenon and are interpreted in terms of a theory dealing with the pinning of dislocation lines and their eventual break away at large strain amplitudes. The dislocation density was calculated to be about 10 to the 8th per sq m. For all the compositions (X1) of CoAl studied, a single equation could be fitted to the data.

  14. Quantification of muscle co-contraction using supersonic shear wave imaging.

    PubMed

    Raiteri, Brent J; Hug, François; Cresswell, Andrew G; Lichtwark, Glen A

    2016-02-08

    Muscle stiffness estimated using shear wave elastography can provide an index of individual muscle force during isometric contraction and may therefore be a promising method for quantifying co-contraction. We estimated the shear modulus of the lateral gastrocnemius (LG) muscle using supersonic shear wave imaging and measured its myoelectrical activity using surface electromyography (sEMG) during graded isometric contractions of plantar flexion and dorsiflexion (n=7). During dorsiflexion, the average shear modulus was 26 ± 6 kPa at peak sEMG amplitude, which was significantly less (P=0.02) than that measured at the same sEMG level during plantar flexion (42 ± 10 kPa). The passive tension during contraction was estimated using the passive LG muscle shear modulus during a passive ankle rotation measured at an equivalent ankle angle to that measured during contraction. The passive shear modulus increased significantly (P<0.01) from the plantar flexed position (16 ± 5 kPa) to the dorsiflexed position (26 ± 9 kPa). Once this change in passive tension from joint rotation was accounted for, the average LG muscle shear modulus due to active contraction was significantly greater (P<0.01) during plantar flexion (26 ± 8 kPa) than at sEMG-matched levels of dorsiflexion (0 ± 4 kPa). The negligible shear modulus estimated during isometric dorsiflexion indicates negligible active force contribution by the LG muscle, despite measured sEMG activity of 19% of maximal voluntary plantar flexion contraction. This strongly suggests that the sEMG activity recorded from the LG muscle during isometric dorsiflexion was primarily due to cross-talk. However, it is clear that passive muscle tension changes can contribute to joint torque during isometric dorsiflexion.

  15. Effect of temperature on high shear-induced gelation of charge-stabilized colloids without adding electrolytes.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hua; Tsoutsoura, Aikaterini; Lattuada, Marco; Zaccone, Alessio; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2010-02-16

    We demonstrated previously (Wu, H.; Zaccone, A.; Tsoutsoura, A.; Lattuada, M.; Morbidelli, M. Langmuir 2009, 25, 4715) that, for a colloid stabilized by charges from both polymer chain-end groups and adsorbed sulfonate surfactants, when the surfactant surface density reaches a certain critical value, the shear-induced gelation becomes unachievable at room temperature, even at an extremely large Peclet number, Pe = 4.6 x 10(4). This is due to the presence of the short-range, repulsive hydration force generated by the adsorbed surfactant. In this work, we investigate how such hydration force affects the shear-induced gelation at higher temperatures, in the range between 303 and 338 K. It is found that a colloidal system, which does not gel at room temperature in a microchannel at a fixed Pe = 3.7 x 10(4), does gel when temperature increases to a certain value. The critical initial particle volume fraction for the gelation to occur decreases as temperature increases. These results indicate that the effect of the hydration force on the gelation decreases as temperature increases. Moreover, we have observed that at the criticality only part of the primary particles is converted to the gel network and the effective particle volume fraction forming the gel network does not change significantly with temperature. The effective particle volume fraction is also independent of the surfactant surface coverage. Since the effective particle volume fraction corresponds to space filling requirement of a standing gel network, which is mainly related to the clusters structure, this result indicates that at a given shear rate the cluster structure does not change significantly with the surfactant surface coverage. On the other hand, since the cluster morphology is a strong function of the shear rate, we have observed that when the Peclet number is lowered from Pe = 3.7 x 10(4) to 1.7 x 10(4), the effective particle volume fraction reduces from 0.19 to 0.12 at 313 K.

  16. Strain-dependent evolution of garnets in a high pressure ductile shear zone using Synchroton x-ray microtomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macente, Alice; Fusseis, Florian; Menegon, Luca; John, Timm

    2016-04-01

    Synkinematic reaction microfabrics carry important information on the kinetics, timing and rheology of tectonometamorphic processes. Despite being routinely interpreted in metamorphic and structural studies, reaction and deformation microfabrics are usually described in two dimensions. We applied Synchrotron-based x-ray microtomography to document the evolution of a pristine olivine gabbro into a deformed omphacite-garnet eclogite in 3D. In the investigated samples, which cover a strain gradient into a shear zone from the Western Gneiss Region (Norway) previously described by John et al., (2009), we focused on the spatial transformation of garnet coronas into elongated clusters of garnets. Our microtomographic data allowed us to quantify changes to the garnet volume, their shapes and their spatial arrangement. We combined microtomographic observations with light microscope- and backscatter electron images as well as electron microprobe- (EMPA) and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) analyses to correlate mineral composition and orientation data with the x-ray absorption signal of the same mineral grains. This allowed us to extrapolate our interpretation of the metamorphic microfabric evolution to the third dimension, effectively yielding a 4-dimensional dataset. We found that: - The x-ray absorption contrast between individual mineral phases in our microtomographic data is sufficient to allow the same petrographic observations than in light- and electron microscopy, but extended to 3D. - Amongst the major constituents of the synkinematic reactions, garnet is the only phase that can be segmented confidently from the microtomographic data. - With increasing deformation, the garnet volume increases from about 9% to 25%. - Garnet coronas in the gabbros never completely encapsulate olivine grains. This may indicate that the reaction progressed preferentially in some directions, but also leaves pathways for element transport to and from the olivines that are

  17. Strain Rate Sensitivity of Epoxy Resin in Tensile and Shear Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilat, Amos; Goldberg, Robert K.; Roberts, Gary D.

    2005-01-01

    The mechanical response of E-862 and PR-520 resins is investigated in tensile and shear loadings. At both types of loading the resins are tested at strain rates of about 5x10(exp 5), 2, and 450 to 700 /s. In addition, dynamic shear modulus tests are carried out at various frequencies and temperatures, and tensile stress relaxation tests are conducted at room temperature. The results show that the toughened PR-520 resin can carry higher stresses than the untoughened E-862 resin. Strain rate has a significant effect on the response of both resins. In shear both resins show a ductile response with maximum stress that is increasing with strain rate. In tension a ductile response is observed at low strain rate (approx. 5x10(exp 5) /s), and brittle response is observed at the medium and high strain rates (2, and 700 /s). The hydrostatic component of the stress in the tensile tests causes premature failure in the E-862 resin. Localized deformation develops in the PR-520 resin when loaded in shear. An internal state variable constitutive model is proposed for modeling the response of the resins. The model includes a state variable that accounts for the effect of the hydrostatic component of the stress on the deformation.

  18. Measuring the elastic modulus of small tissue samples.

    PubMed

    Erkamp, R Q; Wiggins, P; Skovoroda, A R; Emelianov, S Y; O'Donnell, M

    1998-01-01

    Independent measurements of the elastic modulus (Young's modulus) of tissue are necessary step in turning elasticity imaging into a clinical tool. A system capable of measuring the elastic modulus of small tissue samples was developed. The system tolerates the constraints of biological tissue, such as limited sample size (< or = 1.5 cm3) and imperfections in sample geometry. A known deformation is applied to the tissue sample while simultaneously measuring the resulting force. These measurements are then converted to an elastic modulus, where the conversion uses prior calibration of the system with plastisol samples of known Young's modulus. Accurate measurements have been obtained from 10 to 80 kPa, covering a wide range of tissue modulus values. In addition, the performance of the system was further investigated using finite element analysis. Finally, preliminary elasticity measurements on canine kidney samples are presented and discussed.

  19. Enhancing shear thickening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madraki, Yasaman; Hormozi, Sarah; Ovarlez, Guillaume; Guazzelli, Élisabeth; Pouliquen, Olivier

    2017-03-01

    A cornstarch suspension is the quintessential particulate system that exhibits shear thickening. By adding large non-Brownian spheres to a cornstarch suspension, we show that shear thickening can be significantly enhanced. More precisely, the shear-thickening transition is found to be increasingly shifted to lower critical shear rates. This influence of the large particles on the discontinuous shear-thickening transition is shown to be more dramatic than that on the viscosity or the yield stress of the suspension.

  20. High-precision analysis of a lateral shearing interferogram by use of the integration method and polynomials.

    PubMed

    Okuda, S; Nomura, T; Kamiya, K; Miyashiro, H; Yoshikawa, K; Tashiro, H

    2000-10-01

    Interferograms obtained with ordinary interferometers, such as the Fizeau interferometer or the Twyman-Green interferometer, show the contour maps of a wave front under test. On the other hand, lateral shearing interferograms show the difference between a wave front under test and a sheared wave front, that is, the inclination of the wave front. Therefore the shape of the wave front under test is reconstructed by means of analyzing the difference. To reconstruct the wave front, many methods have been proposed. An integration method is usually used to reconstruct the wave front under test rapidly. However, this method has two disadvantages: The analysis accuracy of the method is low, and part of the wave front cannot be measured. To overcome these two problems, a new, to our knowledge, integration method, improved by use of polynomials, is proposed. The validity of the proposed method is evaluated by computer simulations. In the simulations the analysis accuracy achieved by the proposed method is compared with the analysis accuracy of the ordinary integration method and that of the method proposed by Rimmer and Wyant. The results of the simulations show that the analysis accuracy of the newly proposed method is better than that of the integration method and that of the Rimmer-Wyant method.

  1. High Interlaminar Shear Strength Enhancement of Carbon Fiber/Epoxy Composite through Fiber- and Matrix-Anchored Carbon Nanotube Networks.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yilei; Raman Pillai, Suresh Kumar; Che, Jianfei; Chan-Park, Mary B

    2017-03-15

    To improve the interlaminar shear strength (ILSS) of carbon fiber reinforced epoxy composite, networks of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) were grown on micron-sized carbon fibers and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were dispersed into the epoxy matrix so that these two types of carbon nanotubes entangle at the carbon fiber (CF)/epoxy matrix interface. The MWNTs on the CF fiber (CF-MWNTs) were grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD), while the single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were finely dispersed in the epoxy matrix precursor with the aid of a dispersing agent polyimide-graft-bisphenol A diglyceryl acrylate (PI-BDA) copolymer. Using vacuum assisted resin transfer molding, the SWNT-laden epoxy matrix precursor was forced into intimate contact with the "hairy" surface of the CF-MWNT fiber. The tube density and the average tube length of the MWNT layer on CF was controlled by the CVD growth time. The ILSS of the CF-MWNT/epoxy resin composite was examined using the short beam shear test. With addition of MWNTs onto the CF surface as well as SWNTs into the epoxy matrix, the ILSS of CF/epoxy resin composite was 47.59 ± 2.26 MPa, which represented a ∼103% increase compared with the composite made with pristine CF and pristine epoxy matrix (without any SWNT filler). FESEM established that the enhanced composite did not fail at the CF/epoxy matrix interface.

  2. A new highly adaptable design of shear-flow device for orientation of macromolecules for Linear Dichroism (LD) measurement.

    PubMed

    Lundahl, P Johan; Kitts, Catherine C; Nordén, Bengt

    2011-08-21

    This article presents a new design of flow-orientation device for the study of bio-macromolecules, including DNA and protein complexes, as well as aggregates such as amyloid fibrils and liposome membranes, using Linear Dichroism (LD) spectroscopy. The design provides a number of technical advantages that should make the device inexpensive to manufacture, easier to use and more reliable than existing techniques. The degree of orientation achieved is of the same order of magnitude as that of the commonly used concentric cylinders Couette flow cell, however, since the device exploits a set of flat strain-free quartz plates, a number of problems associated with refraction and birefringence of light are eliminated, increasing the sensitivity and accuracy of measurement. The device provides similar shear rates to those of the Couette cell but is superior in that the shear rate is constant across the gap. Other major advantages of the design is the possibility to change parts and vary sample volume and path length easily and at a low cost.

  3. Young’s modulus of [111] germanium nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Maksud, M.; Palapati, N. K. R.; Subramanian, A.; Yoo, J.; Harris, C. T.

    2015-11-01

    This paper reports a diameter-independent Young’s modulus of 91.9 ± 8.2 GPa for [111] Germanium nanowires (Ge NWs). When the surface oxide layer is accounted for using a core-shell NW approximation, the YM of the Ge core approaches a near theoretical value of 147.6 ± 23.4 GPa. The ultimate strength of a NW device was measured at 10.9 GPa, which represents a very high experimental-to-theoretical strength ratio of ∼75%. With increasing interest in this material system as a high-capacity lithium-ion battery anode, the presented data provide inputs that are essential in predicting its lithiation-induced stress fields and fracture behavior.

  4. Young’s modulus of [111] germanium nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Maksud, M.; Yoo, J.; Harris, C. T.; Palapati, N. K. R.; Subramanian, A.

    2015-11-02

    Our paper reports a diameter-independent Young’s modulus of 91.9 ± 8.2 GPa for [111] Germanium nanowires (Ge NWs). When the surface oxide layer is accounted for using a core-shell NW approximation, the YM of the Ge core approaches a near theoretical value of 147.6 ± 23.4 GPa. The ultimate strength of a NW device was measured at 10.9 GPa, which represents a very high experimental-to-theoretical strength ratio of ~75%. Furthermore, with increasing interest in this material system as a high-capacity lithium-ion battery anode, the presented data provide inputs that are essential in predicting its lithiation-induced stress fields and fracture behavior.

  5. Analyses of Failure Mechanisms and Residual Stresses in Graphite/Polyimide Composites Subjected to Shear Dominated Biaxial Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumosa, M.; Predecki, P. K.; Armentrout, D.; Benedikt, B.; Rupnowski, P.; Gentz, M.; Kumosa, L.; Sutter, J. K.

    2002-01-01

    This research contributes to the understanding of macro- and micro-failure mechanisms in woven fabric polyimide matrix composites based on medium and high modulus graphite fibers tested under biaxial, shear dominated stress conditions over a temperature range of -50 C to 315 C. The goal of this research is also to provide a testing methodology for determining residual stress distributions in unidirectional, cross/ply and fabric graphite/polyimide composites using the concept of embedded metallic inclusions and X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements.

  6. Shear modulus of heavy oils, rheometer measurements: Confinement effect and amplitude dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Patricia Evelyn

    A technical and economic assessment of a small scale cogeneration system in an urban academic building is conducted. The methodology and mathematical simulation developed critically assesses Cooper Union's 2501 kW cogeneration plant at 41 Cooper Square. First, the existing cogeneration plant and its interaction with the building systems are described. Next, utility cost savings are calculated based on estimates of seasonal cogeneration electrical and thermal output. While the cogeneration system yields positive economic returns by shifting utility consumption from electricity to inherently cheaper natural gas, the study reveals four specific system limitations that prevent the system from reaching its full savings potential. A mathematical model of the cogeneration system at part-load and electrical and thermal demand profiles specific to 41 Cooper Square are developed to perform a more detailed economic analysis. Simulations reveal that the cogeneration system in its current configuration reduces annual utility expenses by $101,000. A series of four modest retrofits, each with favorable economic returns, are proposed to address the limitations of the cogeneration system. The four retrofits are: replace an undersized heat exchanger on the heat recovery system, upgrade the electrical connectivity of the cogeneration system, install a control mechanism on the natural gas supply, and commission a gas meter directly on cogeneration to lower the natural gas utility rate. Implementation of these retrofits would double the savings. The methodology presented in this study can be applied to other cogeneration systems to assess technical capabilities and potential savings.

  7. High resolution three-dimensional (256 to the 3rd) spatio-temporal measurements of the conserved scalar field in turbulent shear flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahm, Werner J. A.; Buch, Kenneth A.

    Results from highly resolved three-dimensional spatio-temporal measurements of the conserved scalar field zeta(x,t) in a turbulent shear flow. Each of these experiments consists of 256 to the 3rd individual point measurements of the local instantaneous conserved scalar value in the flow. The spatial and temporal resolution of these measurements reach beyond the local Kolmogorov scale and resolve the local strain-limited molecular diffusion scale in the flow. The results clearly show molecular mixing occurring in thin strained laminar diffusion layers in a turbulent flow.

  8. The relationship between the adiabatic bulk modulus and enthalpy for mantle-related minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Orson L.

    1989-07-01

    It is found that the adiabatic bulk modulus, KS, is linear with enthalpy over a wide temperature range: up to at least 1825 K, the present limit of the measurement of the bulk modulus. This correlation is shown to hold for Al2O3, MgO, and Mg2SiO4. Since the enthalpy is listed in thermodynamic tables up to 3000 K, one can reasonably safely extrapolate KS up to lower mantle temperatures using this correlation. This correlation was anticipated in a theoretical 1966 paper, where the definition of the anharmonic parameter δ S was made in terms of properties which vary with temperature, δ _s = - left( {1/{α K_S }} right)left( {{δ K}/{δ T}} right)_{P'} where α is the volume coefficient of thermal expansion. The correlation was first confirmed for polycrystalline oxides in an experimental 1966 paper. Since the isotropic shear modulus, G, is linear with T, it is possible to estimate the sound velocities in the temperature regime just below the melting point.

  9. Shear thinning of nanoparticle suspensions.

    SciTech Connect

    Grest, Gary Stephen; Petersen, Matthew K.; in't Veld, Pieter J.

    2008-08-01

    Results of large scale non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) simulations are presented for nanoparticles in an explicit solvent. The nanoparticles are modeled as a uniform distribution of Lennard-Jones particles, while the solvent is represented by standard Lennard-Jones particles. Here we present results for the shear rheology of spherical nanoparticles of size 5 to 20 times that of the solvent for a range of nanoparticle volume fractions and interactions. Results from NEMD simulations suggest that for strongly interacting nanoparticle that form a colloidal gel, the shear rheology of the suspension depends only weakly on the size of the nanoparticle, even for nanoparticles as small as 5 times that of the solvent. However for hard sphere-like colloids the size of the nanoparticles strongly affects the shear rheology. The shear rheology for dumbbell nanoparticles made of two fused spheres is also compared to spherical nanoparticles and found to be similar except at very high volume fractions.

  10. Grafted polymer under shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sanjiv; Foster, Damien P.; Giri, Debaprasad; Kumar, Sanjay

    2016-04-01

    A self-attracting-self-avoiding walk model of polymer chain on a square lattice has been used to gain an insight into the behaviour of a polymer chain under shear flow in a slit of width L. Using exact enumeration technique, we show that at high temperature, the polymer acquires the extended state continuously increasing with shear stress. However, at low temperature the polymer exhibits two transitions: a transition from the coiled to the globule state and a transition to a stem-flower like state. For a chain of finite length, we obtained the exact monomer density distributions across the layers at different temperatures. The change in density profile with shear stress suggests that the polymer under shear flow can be used as a molecular gate with potential application as a sensor.

  11. Effects of the ratio of hardness to Young's modulus on the friction and wear behavior of bilayer coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Ni Wangyang; Cheng, Y.-T.; Lukitsch, Michael J.; Weiner, Anita M.; Lev, Lenoid C.; Grummon, David S.

    2004-11-01

    We present a study of the effects of the ratio of hardness to Young's modulus on the friction and wear behavior of layered composite coatings. Layered coating structures with the same surface coating but different interlayers were prepared by physical vapor deposition. We found that the ratio of hardness to Young's modulus plays an important role in determining the friction coefficient and wear resistance of layered composite coatings. A low friction coefficient and high wear resistance can be achieved in structures with high ratio of hardness to Young's modulus and moderately high hardness.

  12. High-resolution shear-wave seismics across the Carlsberg Fault zone south of Copenhagen - Implications for linking Mesozoic and late Pleistocene structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kammann, Janina; Hübscher, Christian; Boldreel, Lars Ole; Nielsen, Lars

    2016-07-01

    The Carlsberg Fault zone (CFZ) is a NNW-SSE striking structure close to the transition zone between the Danish Basin and the Baltic Shield. We examine the fault evolution by combining very-high-resolution onshore shear-wave seismic data, one conventional onshore seismic profile and marine reflection seismic profiles. The faulting geometry indicates a strong influence of Triassic subsidence and rifting in the Central European Basin System. Growth strata within the CFZ surrounding Höllviken Graben reveal syntectonic sedimentation in the Lower Triassic, indicating the opening to be a result of Triassic rifting. In the Upper Cretaceous growth faulting documents continued rifting. These findings contrast the Late Cretaceous to Paleogene inversion tectonics in neighboring structures, such as the Tornquist Zone. The high-resolution shear-wave seismic method was used to image faulting in Quaternary and Danian layers in the CFZ. The portable compact vibrator source ElViS III S8 was used to acquire a 1150 m long seismic section on the island Amager, south of Copenhagen. The shallow subsurface in the investigation area is dominated by Quaternary glacial till deposits in the upper 5-11 m and Danian limestone below. In the shear-wave profile, we imaged the uppermost 30 m of the western part of CFZ. The complex fault zone comprises normal block faults and one reverse block fault. The observed faults cut through the Danian as well as the Quaternary overburden. Hence, there are strong indicators for ongoing faulting, like mapped faulting in Quaternary sediments and ongoing subsidence of the eastern block of the CFZ as interpreted by other authors. The lack of earthquakes localized in the fault zone implies that either the frequency of occurring earthquakes is too small to be recorded in the observation time-span, or that the movement of the shallow sub-surface layers may be due to other sources than purely tectonic processes.

  13. High-pressure elastic properties of cubic Ir2P from ab initio calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiao-Wei; Bioud, Nadhira; Fu, Zhi-Jian; Wei, Xiao-Ping; Song, Ting; Li, Zheng-Wei

    2016-10-01

    A study of the high-pressure elastic properties of new synthetic Ir2P in the anti-fluorite structure is conducted using ab initio calculations based on density functional theory. The elastic constants C11, C12 and C44 for the cubic Ir2P are obtained by the stress-strain method and the elastic stability calculations under pressure indicate that it is stable at least 100 GPa. Additionally, the electronic density of states, the aggregate elastic moduli, that is bulk modulus, shear modulus, and Young's modulus along with the Debye temperature, Poisson's ratio, and elastic anisotropy factor are all successfully obtained. Moreover, the pressure dependence of the longitudinal and shear wave velocities in three different directions [100], [110], and [111] for Ir2P are also predicted for the first time.

  14. Influence of High Shear Dispersion on the Production of Cellulose Nanofibers by Ultrasound-Assisted TEMPO-Oxidation of Kraft Pulp

    PubMed Central

    Loranger, Eric; Piché, André-Olivier; Daneault, Claude

    2012-01-01

    Cellulose nanofibers can be produced using a combination of TEMPO, sodium bromide (NaBr) and sodium hypochlorite, and mechanical dispersion. Recently, this process has been the subject of intensive investigation. However, studies on the aspects of mechanical treatment of this process remain marginal. The main objective of this study is to evaluate the high shear dispersion parameters (e.g., consistency, stator-rotor gap, recirculation rate and pH) and determine their influences on nanocellulose production using ultrasound-assisted TEMPO-oxidation of Kraft pulp. All nanofiber gels produced in this study exhibited rheological behaviors known as shear thinning. From all the dispersion parameters, the following conditions were identified as optimal: 0.042 mm stator-rotor gap, 200 mL/min recycle rate, dispersion pH of 7 and a feed consistency of 2%. High quality cellulose gel could be produced under these conditions. This finding is surely of great interest for the pulp and paper industry.

  15. Near-surface fault detection using high-resolution shear wave reflection seismics at the CO2CRC Otway Project site, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beilecke, Thies; Krawczyk, Charlotte M.; Ziesch, Jennifer; Tanner, David C.

    2016-09-01

    High-resolution, near-surface, shear wave reflection seismic measurements were carried out in November 2013 at the CO2CRC Otway Project site, Victoria, Australia, with the aim to determine whether and, if so, where deeper faults reach the near subsurface. From a previous P wave 3-D reflection seismic data set that was concentrated on a reservoir at 2 km depth, we can only interpret faults up to 400 m below sea level. For the future monitoring in the overburden of the CO2 reservoir it is important to know whether and how the faults continue in the subsurface. We prove that two regional fault zones do in fact reach the surface instead of dying out at depth. Individual first-break signatures in the shot gathers along the profiles support this interpretation. However, this finding does not imply perforce communication between the reservoir and the surface in the framework of CO2 injection. The shear wave seismic sections are complementary to existing P wave volumes. They image with high resolution (better than 3 m vertically) different tectonic structures. Similar structures also outcrop on the southern coast of the Otway Basin. Both the seismic and the outcrops evidence the complex youngest structural history of the area.

  16. Statistical analysis and comparison of a continuous high shear granulator with a twin screw granulator: Effect of process parameters on critical granule attributes and granulation mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Meng, Wei; Kotamarthy, Lalith; Panikar, Savitha; Sen, Maitraye; Pradhan, Shankali; Marc, Michaelis; Litster, James D; Muzzio, Fernando J; Ramachandran, Rohit

    2016-11-20

    This study is concerned with identifying the design space of two different continuous granulators and their respective granulation mechanisms. Performance of a continuous high shear granulator and a twin screw granulator with paracetamol formulations were examined by face-centered cubic design, which focused on investigating key performance metrics, namely, granule size, porosity, flowability and particle morphology of granules as a function of essential input process parameters (liquid content, throughput and rotation speed). Liquid and residence time distribution tests were also performed to gain insights into the liquid-powder mixing and flow behavior. The results indicated that continuous high shear granulation was more sensitive to process variation and produced spherical granules with monomodal size distribution and distinct internal structure and strength variation. Twin screw granulation with such a particular screw configuration showed narrower design space and granules were featured with multimodal size distribution, irregular shape, less detectible porosity difference and tighter range of strength. Granulation mechanisms explored on the basis of nucleation and growth regime maps revealed that for most cases liquid binder was uniformly distributed with fast droplet penetration into the powder bed and that granule consolidation and coalescence mainly took place in the nucleation, steady growth and rapid growth regimes.

  17. Effects of Fusion Zone Size and Failure Mode on Peak Load and Energy Absorption of Advanced High Strength Steel Spot Welds under Lap Shear Loading Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xin; Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2008-06-01

    This paper examines the effects of fusion zone size on failure modes, static strength and energy absorption of resistance spot welds (RSW) of advanced high strength steels (AHSS) under lap shear loading condition. DP800 and TRIP800 spot welds are considered. The main failure modes for spot welds are nugget pullout and interfacial fracture. Partial interfacial fracture is also observed. Static weld strength tests using lap shear samples were performed on the joint populations with various fusion zone sizes. The resulted peak load and energy absorption levels associated with each failure mode were studied for all the weld populations using statistical data analysis tools. The results in this study show that AHSS spot welds with conventionally required fusion zone size of can not produce nugget pullout mode for both the DP800 and TRIP800 welds under lap shear loading. Moreover, failure mode has strong influence on weld peak load and energy absorption for all the DP800 welds and the TRIP800 small welds: welds failed in pullout mode have statistically higher strength and energy absorption than those failed in interfacial fracture mode. For TRIP800 welds above the critical fusion zone level, the influence of weld failure modes on peak load and energy absorption diminishes. Scatter plots of peak load and energy absorption versus weld fusion zone size were then constructed, and the results indicate that fusion zone size is the most critical factor in weld quality in terms of peak load and energy absorption for both DP800 and TRIP800 spot welds.

  18. Preliminary Modulus and Breakage Calculations on Cellulose Models

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Young’s modulus of polymers can be calculated by stretching molecular models with the computer. The molecule is stretched and the derivative of the changes in stored potential energy for several displacements, divided by the molecular cross-section area, is the stress. The modulus is the slope o...

  19. Low Modulus Silicone Elastomer Networks with Desirable Viscoelastic Properties for Cell Mobility Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, Julie N. L.; Genzer, Jan

    2013-03-01

    Biocompatible silicone elastomer networks provide a versatile platform for studying the effect of compliance on cell movement. In conventional network formation schemes, poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) is cross-linked via reactive end groups, and the modulus of the material is controlled by the ratio of polymer to cross-linker. However, low modulus networks fabricated in this manner are imperfect and insufficiently cross-linked with high soluble fractions and reduced elasticity, especially as the network modulus approaches that of soft tissues (on the order of 10 kPa). In order to overcome these limitations, we synthesized PDMS chains in which vinylmethylsiloxane units were incorporated every ~15-20 kDa along the polymer backbone. We then cross-linked the polymer through the vinyl groups using hydrosilylation chemistry. The resultant networks exhibited lower soluble fractions and lower viscous dissipation/greater elasticity as compared to equivalent-modulus networks fabricated by the conventional end-group cross-linking scheme. We attribute the mechanical properties of our networks to the presence of network-bound free chain ends that effectively plasticize the network to lower the modulus without compromising network elasticity.

  20. Microhardness and Young's modulus of a bonding resin cured with different curing units.

    PubMed

    Yamauti, Monica; Nikaido, Toru; Ikeda, Masaomi; Otsuki, Masayuki; Tagami, Junji

    2004-12-01

    This study evaluated the microhardness and Young's modulus of a photocurable bonding resin, Clearfil SE Bond (SE), cured with four curing units at different distances. The curing units used were: Candelux (Quartz-tungsten halogen), Lux-O-Max (Blue light emitting diode), Arc-light (Plasma-arc), and Rayblaze (Metal halide). Discs of bonding resin were prepared using vinyl molds and were photocured at the top surface with light tip at three different distances (contact, 2 and 4 mm). After 24 hours of storage in water at 37 degrees C, the specimens were sectioned into halves, embedded in epoxy resin, and polished. The microhardness and Young's modulus of this bonding resin were measured using a nanoindentation tester. Six specimens were prepared for each group. The data was statistically analyzed using two-way ANOVA test and Tukey multiple comparison test (p < 0.01). The microhardness of SE was affected by light source and distance, as was Young's modulus. Candelux and Rayblaze presented the highest hardness and Young's modulus results. Both properties presented high values when the curing unit tip was maintained in contact with the irradiated surface. Increasing the distance between the curing unit tip and the irradiated surface decreased the hardness and Young's modulus of SE.