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Sample records for high specific impulse

  1. The evolutionary development of high specific impulse electric thruster technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sovey, James S.; Hamley, John A.; Patterson, Michael J.; Rawlin, Vincent K.; Myers, Roger M.

    1992-01-01

    Electric propulsion flight and technology demonstrations conducted primarily by Europe, Japan, China, the U.S., and the USSR are reviewed. Evolutionary mission applications for high specific impulse electric thruster systems are discussed, and the status of arcjet, ion, and magnetoplasmadynamic thrusters and associated power processor technologies are summarized.

  2. The evolutionary development of high specific impulse electric thruster technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sovey, James S.; Hamley, John A.; Patterson, Michael J.; Rawlin, Vincent K.; Myers, Roger M.

    1992-01-01

    Electric propulsion flight and technology demonstrations conducted in the USA, Europe, Japan, China, and USSR are reviewed with reference to the major flight qualified electric propulsion systems. These include resistojets, ion thrusters, ablative pulsed plasma thrusters, stationary plasma thrusters, pulsed magnetoplasmic thrusters, and arcjets. Evolutionary mission applications are presented for high specific impulse electric thruster systems. The current status of arcjet, ion, and magnetoplasmadynamic thrusters and their associated power processor technologies are summarized.

  3. Efficiency Analysis of a High-Specific Impulse Hall Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, David (Technical Monitor); Hofer, Richard R.; Gallimore, Alec D.

    2004-01-01

    Performance and plasma measurements of the high-specific impulse NASA-173Mv2 Hall thruster were analyzed using a phenomenological performance model that accounts for a partially-ionized plasma containing multiply-charged ions. Between discharge voltages of 300 to 900 V, the results showed that although the net decrease of efficiency due to multiply-charged ions was only 1.5 to 3.0 percent, the effects of multiply-charged ions on the ion and electron currents could not be neglected. Between 300 to 900 V, the increase of the discharge current was attributed to the increasing fraction of multiply-charged ions, while the maximum deviation of the electron current from its average value was only +5/-14 percent. These findings revealed how efficient operation at high-specific impulse was enabled through the regulation of the electron current with the applied magnetic field. Between 300 to 900 V, the voltage utilization ranged from 89 to 97 percent, the mass utilization from 86 to 90 percent, and the current utilization from 77 to 81 percent. Therefore, the anode efficiency was largely determined by the current utilization. The electron Hall parameter was nearly constant with voltage, decreasing from an average of 210 at 300 V to an average of 160 between 400 to 900 V. These results confirmed our claim that efficient operation can be achieved only over a limited range of Hall parameters.

  4. Solar-powered rocket engine optimization for high specific impulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pande, J. Bradley

    1993-11-01

    Hercules Aerospace is currently developing a solar-powered rocket engine (SPRE) design optimized for high specific impulse (Isp). The SPRE features a low loss geometry in its light-gathering cavity, which includes an integral secondary concentrator. The simple one-piece heat exchanger is made from refractory metal and/or ceramic open-celled foam. The foam's high surface-area-to-volume ratio will efficiently transfer the thermal energy to the hydrogen propellant. The single-pass flow of propellant through the heat exchanger further boosts thermal efficiency by regeneratively cooling surfaces near the entrance of the optical cavity. These surfaces would otherwise reradiate a significant portion of the captured solar energy back out of the solar entrance. Such design elements promote a high overall thermal efficiency and hence, a high operating Isp

  5. A Very-High-Specific-Impulse Relativistic Laser Thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Horisawa, Hideyuki; Kimura, Itsuro

    2008-04-28

    Characteristics of compact laser plasma accelerators utilizing high-power laser and thin-target interaction were reviewed as a potential candidate of future spacecraft thrusters capable of generating relativistic plasma beams for interstellar missions. Based on the special theory of relativity, motion of the relativistic plasma beam exhausted from the thruster was formulated. Relationships of thrust, specific impulse, input power and momentum coupling coefficient for the relativistic plasma thruster were derived. It was shown that under relativistic conditions, the thrust could be extremely large even with a small amount of propellant flow rate. Moreover, it was shown that for a given value of input power thrust tended to approach the value of the photon rocket under the relativistic conditions regardless of the propellant flow rate.

  6. Coaxial plasma thrusters for high specific impulse propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoenberg, Kurt F.; Gerwin, Richard A.; Barnes, Cris W.; Henins, Ivars; Mayo, Robert; Moses, Ronald, Jr.; Scarberry, Richard; Wurden, Glen

    1991-01-01

    A fundamental basis for coaxial plasma thruster performance is presented and the steady-state, ideal MHD properties of a coaxial thruster using an annular magnetic nozzle are discussed. Formulas for power usage, thrust, mass flow rate, and specific impulse are acquired and employed to assess thruster performance. The performance estimates are compared with the observed properties of an unoptimized coaxial plasma gun. These comparisons support the hypothesis that ideal MHD has an important role in coaxial plasma thruster dynamics.

  7. Plasmoid Thruster for High Specific-Impulse Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fimognari, Peter; Eskridge, Richard; Martin, Adam; Lee, Michael

    2007-01-01

    A report discusses a new multi-turn, multi-lead design for the first generation PT-1 (Plasmoid Thruster) that produces thrust by expelling plasmas with embedded magnetic fields (plasmoids) at high velocities. This thruster is completely electrodeless, capable of using in-situ resources, and offers efficiencies as high as 70 percent at a specific impulse, I(sub sp), of up to 8,000 s. This unit consists of drive and bias coils wound around a ceramic form, and the capacitor bank and switches are an integral part of the assembly. Multiple thrusters may be gauged to inductively recapture unused energy to boost efficiency and to increase the repetition rate, which, in turn increases the average thrust of the system. The thruster assembly can use storable propellants such as H2O, ammonia, and NO, among others. Any available propellant gases can be used to produce an I(sub sp) in the range of 2,000 to 8,000 s with a single-stage thruster. These capabilities will allow the transport of greater payloads to outer planets, especially in the case of an I(sub sp) greater than 6,000 s.

  8. Simulation of Trajectories for High Specific Impulse Deep Space Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polsgrove, Tara; Adams, Robert B.; Brady, Hugh J. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Difficulties in approximating flight times and deliverable masses for continuous thrust propulsion systems have complicated comparison and evaluation of proposed propulsion concepts. These continuous thrust propulsion systems are of interest to many groups, not the least of which are the electric propulsion and fusion communities. Several charts plotting the results of well-known trajectory simulation codes were developed and are contained in this paper. These charts illustrate the dependence of time of flight and payload ratio on jet power, initial mass, specific impulse and specific power. These charts are intended to be a tool by which people in the propulsion community can explore the possibilities of their propulsion system concepts. Trajectories were simulated using the tools VARITOP and IPOST. VARITOP is a well known trajectory optimization code that involves numerical integration based on calculus of variations. IPOST has several methods of trajectory simulation; the one used in this paper is Cowell's method for full integration of the equations of motion. The analytical method derived in the companion paper was also used to simulate the trajectory. The accuracy of this method is discussed in the paper.

  9. Development and Characterization of High-Efficiency, High-Specific Impulse Xenon Hall Thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hofer, Richard R.; Jacobson, David (Technical Monitor)

    2004-01-01

    This dissertation presents research aimed at extending the efficient operation of 1600 s specific impulse Hall thruster technology to the 2000 to 3000 s range. Motivated by previous industry efforts and mission studies, the aim of this research was to develop and characterize xenon Hall thrusters capable of both high-specific impulse and high-efficiency operation. During the development phase, the laboratory-model NASA 173M Hall thrusters were designed and their performance and plasma characteristics were evaluated. Experiments with the NASA-173M version 1 (v1) validated the plasma lens magnetic field design. Experiments with the NASA 173M version 2 (v2) showed there was a minimum current density and optimum magnetic field topography at which efficiency monotonically increased with voltage. Comparison of the thrusters showed that efficiency can be optimized for specific impulse by varying the plasma lens. During the characterization phase, additional plasma properties of the NASA 173Mv2 were measured and a performance model was derived. Results from the model and experimental data showed how efficient operation at high-specific impulse was enabled through regulation of the electron current with the magnetic field. The electron Hall parameter was approximately constant with voltage, which confirmed efficient operation can be realized only over a limited range of Hall parameters.

  10. Trajectories for High Specific Impulse High Specific Power Deep Space Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polsgrove, Tara; Adams, Robert B.; Brady, Hugh J. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Flight times and deliverable masses for electric and fusion propulsion systems are difficult to approximate. Numerical integration is required for these continuous thrust systems. Many scientists are not equipped with the tools and expertise to conduct interplanetary and interstellar trajectory analysis for their concepts. Several charts plotting the results of well-known trajectory simulation codes were developed and are contained in this paper. These charts illustrate the dependence of time of flight and payload ratio on jet power, initial mass, specific impulse and specific power. These charts are intended to be a tool by which people in the propulsion community can explore the possibilities of their propulsion system concepts. Trajectories were simulated using the tools VARITOP and IPOST. VARITOP is a well known trajectory optimization code that involves numerical integration based on calculus of variations. IPOST has several methods of trajectory simulation; the one used in this paper is Cowell's method for full integration of the equations of motion. An analytical method derived in the companion paper was also evaluated. The accuracy of this method is discussed in the paper.

  11. The Effect of High Concentration Guanidinium Azo-Tetrazolate on Thrust and Specific Impulse of a Hybrid Rocket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilahun, Dagim; Wright, A.; Foley, P.; Reason, M.

    2001-04-01

    A thrust and impulse study of the hybrid rocket fuel additive, Guanidinium Azo-Tetrazolate (GAT), was conducted at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock (UALR) Hybrid Rocket Facility. GAT is an organic salt with a high percentage of nitrogen. GAT was mixed with the standard hybrid rocket fuel, Hydroxyl-Terminated Polybutadiene (HTPB), in concentrations of 15% and 25%, by mass. The fuel grains with the GAT additive were fired for 4 second runs with oxygen flows of 0.04, 0.06, 0.08, and 0.10 lbm/sec. For each run, average thrust, standard deviation of thrust, total impulse, and specific impulse were measured. Average thrust, standard deviation of thrust, specific impulse and total impulse vs. oxygen flow were plotted. Similar data was collected for plain HTPB/PAPI fuels for comparison. GAT is found to increase the thrust output when added to the standard hybrid rocket fuel, HTPB. 25% GAT fuel produced approximately the same thrust as the 15% GAT fuel. Specific impulse was slightly lower with both 15% and 25% GAT fuels. Standard Deviation of thrust was used as a crude measure of amplitude of oscillations during combustion. GAT-added fuels showed a limited decrease in thrust oscillation amplitude.

  12. A centre-triggered magnesium fuelled cathodic arc thruster uses sublimation to deliver a record high specific impulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, Patrick R. C.; Bilek, Marcela; McKenzie, David R.

    2016-08-01

    The cathodic arc is a high current, low voltage discharge that operates in vacuum and provides a stream of highly ionised plasma from a solid conducting cathode. The high ion velocities, together with the high ionisation fraction and the quasineutrality of the exhaust stream, make the cathodic arc an attractive plasma source for spacecraft propulsion applications. The specific impulse of the cathodic arc thruster is substantially increased when the emission of neutral species is reduced. Here, we demonstrate a reduction of neutral emission by exploiting sublimation in cathode spots and enhanced ionisation of the plasma in short, high-current pulses. This, combined with the enhanced directionality due to the efficient erosion profiles created by centre-triggering, substantially increases the specific impulse. We present experimentally measured specific impulses and jet power efficiencies for titanium and magnesium fuels. Our Mg fuelled source provides the highest reported specific impulse for a gridless ion thruster and is competitive with all flight rated ion thrusters. We present a model based on cathode sublimation and melting at the cathodic arc spot explaining the outstanding performance of the Mg fuelled source. A further significant advantage of an Mg-fuelled thruster is the abundance of Mg in asteroidal material and in space junk, providing an opportunity for utilising these resources in space.

  13. Design Analysis of a High Temperature Radiator for the Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket (VASIMR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheth, Rubik B.; Ungar, Eugene K.; Chambliss, Joe P.; Cassady, Leonard D.

    2011-01-01

    The Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket (VASIMR), currently under development by Ad Astra Rocket Company, is a unique propulsion system that can potentially change the way space propulsion is performed. VASIMR's efficiency, when compared to that of a conventional chemical rocket, reduce propellant needed for exploration missions by a factor of 10. Currently plans include flight tests of a 200 kW VASIMR system, titled VF-200, on the International Space Station. The VF-200 will consist of two 100 kW thruster units packaged together in one engine bus. Each thruster unit has a unique heat rejection requirement of about 27 kW over a firing time of 15 minutes. In order to control rocket core temperatures, peak operating temperatures of about 300 C are expected within the thermal control loop. Design of a high temperature radiator is a unique challenge for the vehicle design. This paper will discuss the path taken to develop a steady state and transient based radiator design. The paper will describe radiator design options for the VASIMR thermal control system for use on ISS as well as future exploration vehicles.

  14. Design of a High Temperature Radiator for the Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheth, Rubik B.; Ungar, Eugene K.; Chambliss, Joe P.

    2012-01-01

    The Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket (VASIMR), currently under development by Ad Astra Rocket Company (Webster, TX), is a unique propulsion system that could change the way space propulsion is performed. VASIMR's efficiency, when compared to that of a conventional chemical rocket, reduces the propellant needed for exploration missions by a factor of 10. Currently plans include flight tests of a 200 kW VASIMR system, titled VF-200, on the International Space Station (ISS). The VF-200 will consist of two 100 kW thruster units packaged together in one engine bus. Each thruster core generates 27 kW of waste heat during its 15 minute firing time. The rocket core will be maintained between 283 and 573 K by a pumped thermal control loop. The design of a high temperature radiator is a unique challenge for the vehicle design. This paper will discuss the path taken to develop a steady state and transient-based radiator design. The paper will describe the radiator design option selected for the VASIMR thermal control system for use on ISS, and how the system relates to future exploration vehicles.

  15. Ultrahigh Specific Impulse Nuclear Thermal Propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Anne Charmeau; Brandon Cunningham; Samim Anghaie

    2009-02-09

    Research on nuclear thermal propulsion systems (NTP) have been in forefront of the space nuclear power and propulsion due to their design simplicity and their promise for providing very high thrust at reasonably high specific impulse. During NERVA-ROVER program in late 1950's till early 1970's, the United States developed and ground tested about 18 NTP systems without ever deploying them into space. The NERVA-ROVER program included development and testing of NTP systems with very high thrust (~250,000 lbf) and relatively high specific impulse (~850 s). High thrust to weight ratio in NTP systems is an indicator of high acceleration that could be achieved with these systems. The specific impulse in the lowest mass propellant, hydrogen, is a function of square root of absolute temperature in the NTP thrust chamber. Therefor optimizing design performance of NTP systems would require achieving the highest possible hydrogen temperature at reasonably high thrust to weight ratio. High hydrogen exit temperature produces high specific impulse that is a diret measure of propellant usage efficiency.

  16. The Use of the Propellant Specific Impulse for the Prediction of the Prompt and Terminal Gurney Velocity of High Explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frem, Dany

    2016-10-01

    Simple relationships are presented for the calculation of both prompt and terminal Gurney velocity of chemical high explosives. By considering that a given explosive behaves like a propellant, its specific impulse ? was calculated using Mader's ISPBKW code; it was found that the density impulse (?where ? is the explosive density and ? is an empirically optimized variable) performance factor correlates well with the terminal Gurney velocity of both ideal and nonideal explosives. Furthermore, the cylinder wall energy can be computed from (?from which the prompt Gurney velocity can be obtained through the application of the Gurney's cylinder equation. It was concluded that (? is a powerful factor for the prediction of the Gurney velocities, especially for nonideal compositions.

  17. Hybrid-PIC Modeling of a High-Voltage, High-Specific-Impulse Hall Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Brandon D.; Boyd, Iain D.; Kamhawi, Hani; Huang, Wensheng

    2013-01-01

    The primary life-limiting mechanism of Hall thrusters is the sputter erosion of the discharge channel walls by high-energy propellant ions. Because of the difficulty involved in characterizing this erosion experimentally, many past efforts have focused on numerical modeling to predict erosion rates and thruster lifespan, but those analyses were limited to Hall thrusters operating in the 200-400V discharge voltage range. Thrusters operating at higher discharge voltages (V(sub d) >= 500 V) present an erosion environment that may differ greatly from that of the lower-voltage thrusters modeled in the past. In this work, HPHall, a well-established hybrid-PIC code, is used to simulate NASA's High-Voltage Hall Accelerator (HiVHAc) at discharge voltages of 300, 400, and 500V as a first step towards modeling the discharge channel erosion. It is found that the model accurately predicts the thruster performance at all operating conditions to within 6%. The model predicts a normalized plasma potential profile that is consistent between all three operating points, with the acceleration zone appearing in the same approximate location. The expected trend of increasing electron temperature with increasing discharge voltage is observed. An analysis of the discharge current oscillations shows that the model predicts oscillations that are much greater in amplitude than those measured experimentally at all operating points, suggesting that the differences in oscillation amplitude are not strongly associated with discharge voltage.

  18. Specific Impulse Definition for Ablative Laser Propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregory, Don A.; Herren, Kenneth A.

    2005-04-01

    The term "specific impulse" is so ingrained in the field of rocket propulsion that it is unlikely that any fundamental argument would be taken seriously for its removal. It is not an ideal measure but it does give an indication of the amount of mass flow (mass loss/time), as in fuel rate, required to produce a measured thrust over some time period. This investigation explores the implications of being able to accurately measure the ablation rate and how the language used to describe the specific impulse results may have to change slightly, and recasts the specific impulse as something that is not a time average. It is not currently possible to measure the ablation rate accurately in real time so it is generally just assumed that a constant amount of material will be removed for each laser pulse delivered. The specific impulse dependence on the ablation rate is determined here as a correction to the classical textbook definition.

  19. Specific Impulse Definition for Ablative Laser Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herren, Kenneth A.; Gregory, Don A.

    2004-01-01

    The term "specific impulse" is so ingrained in the field of rocket propulsion that it is unlikely that any fundamental argument would be taken seriously for its removal. It is not an ideal measure but it does give an indication of the amount of mass flow (mass loss/time), as in fuel rate, required to produce a measured thrust over some time period This investigation explores the implications of being able to accurately measure the ablation rate and how the language used to describe the specific impulse results may have to change slightly, and recasts the specific impulse as something that is not a time average. It is not currently possible to measure the ablation rate accurately in real time so it is generally just assumed that a constant amount of material will be removed for each laser pulse delivered The specific impulse dependence on the ablation rate is determined here as a correction to the classical textbook definition.

  20. Specific Impulse and Mass Flow Rate Error

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, Don A.

    2005-01-01

    Specific impulse is defined in words in many ways. Very early in any text on rocket propulsion a phrase similar to .specific impulse is the thrust force per unit propellant weight flow per second. will be found.(2) It is only after seeing the mathematics written down does the definition mean something physically to scientists and engineers responsible for either measuring it or using someone.s value for it.

  1. Recent Results From Internal and Very-Near-Field Plasma Diagnostics of a High Specific Impulse Hall Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hofer, Richard R.; Gallimore, Alec D.; Jacobson, David (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    Floating potential and ion current density measurements were taken on the laboratory model NASA-173Mv2 in order to improve understanding of the physical processes affecting Hall thruster performance at high specific impulse. Floating potential was measured on discharge chamber centerline over axial positions spanning 10 mm from the anode to 100 mm downstream of the exit plane. Ion current density was mapped radially up to 300 mm from thruster centerline over axial positions in the very-near-field (10 to 250 mm from the exit plane). All data were collected using a planar probe in conjunction with a high-speed translation stage to minimize probe-induced thruster perturbations. Measurements of floating potential at a xenon flow rate of 10 mg/s have shown that the acceleration layer moved upstream 3 1 mm when the voltage increased from 300 to 600 V. The length of the acceleration layer was 14 2 mm and was approximately constant with voltage and magnetic field. Ion current density measurements indicated the annular ion beam crossed the thruster centerline 163 mm downstream of the exit plane. Radial integration of the ion current density at the cathode plane provided an estimate of the ion current fraction. At 500 V and 5 mg/s, the ion current fraction was calculated as 0.77.

  2. Liquid Bismuth Propellant Management System for the Very High Specific Impulse Thruster with Anode Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polzin, K. A.; Markusic, T. E.; Stanojev, B. J.

    2007-01-01

    Two prototype bismuth propellant feed systems were constructed and operated in conjunction with a propellant vaporizer. One system provided bismuth to a vaporizer using gas pressurization but did not include a means to measure the flow rate. The second system incorporated an electromagnetic pump to provide fine control of the hydrostatic pressure and a new type of in-line flow sensor that was developed for accurate, real-time measurement of the mass flow rate. High-temperature material compatibility was a driving design requirement for the pump and flow sensor, leading to the selection of Macor for the main body of both components. Posttest inspections of both components revealed no degradation of the material. The gas pressurization system demonstrated continuous pressure control over a range from zero to 200 torr. In separate proof-of-concept experiments, the electromagnetic pump produced a linear pressure rise as a function of current that compared favorably with theoretical pump pressure predictions, producing a pressure rise of 10 kPa at 30 A. Preliminary flow sensor operation indicated a bismuth flow rate of 6 mg/s with an uncertainty of plus or minus 6%. An electronics suite containing a real-time controller was successfully used to control the entire system, simultaneously monitoring all power supplies and performing data acquisition duties.

  3. Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang-Diaz, Franklin R. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    An engine is disclosed, including a controllable output plasma generator, a controllable heater for selectably raising a temperature of the plasma connected to an outlet of the plasma generator, and a nozzle connected to an outlet of the heater, through which heated plasma is discharged to provide thrust. In one embodiment, the source of plasma is a helicon generator. In one embodiment, the heater is an ion cyclotron resonator. In one embodiment, the nozzle is a radially diverging magnetic field disposed on a discharge side of the heater so that helically travelling particles in the beater exit the heater at high axial velocity. A particular embodiment includes control circuits for selectably directing a portion of radio frequency power from an RF generator to the helicon generator and to the cyclotron resonator so that the thrust output and the specific impulse of the engine can be selectively controlled. A method of propelling a vehicle is also disclosed. The method includes generating a plasma, heating said plasma, and discharging the heated plasma through a nozzle. In one embodiment, the nozzle is a diverging magnetic field. In this embodiment, the heating is performed by applying a radio frequency electro magnetic field to the plasma at the ion cyclotron frequency in an axially polarized DC magnetic field.

  4. The Influence of Current Density and Magnetic Field Topography in Optimizing the Performance, Divergence, and Plasma Oscillations of High Specific Impulse Hall Thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hofer, Richard R.; Jankovsky, Robert S.

    2003-01-01

    Recent studies of xenon Hall thrusters have shown peak efficiencies at specific impulses of less than 3000 s. This was a consequence of modern Hall thruster magnetic field topographies, which have been optimized for 300 V discharges. On-going research at the NASA Glenn Research Center is investigating this behavior and methods to enhance thruster performance. To conduct these studies, a laboratory model Hall thruster that uses a pair of trim coils to tailor the magnetic field topography for high specific impulse operation has been developed. The thruster-the NASA-173Mv2 was tested to determine how current density and magnetic field topography affect performance, divergence, and plasma oscillations at voltages up to 1000 V. Test results showed there was a minimum current density and optimum magnetic field topography at which efficiency monotonically increased with voltage. At 1000 V, 10 milligrams per second the total specific impulse was 3390 s and the total efficiency was 60.8%. Plume divergence decreased at 400-1000 V, but increased at 300-400 V as the result of plasma oscillations. The dominant oscillation frequency steadily increased with voltage, from 14.5 kHz at 300 V, to 22 kHz at 1000 V. An additional oscillatory mode in the 80-90 kHz frequency range began to appear above 500 V. The use of trim coils to modify the magnetic field improved performance while decreasing plume divergence and the frequency and magnitude of plasma oscillations.

  5. Cognitive impulsivity in specific learning disabilities.

    PubMed

    Donfrancesco, Renato; Mugnaini, Daniele; Dell'Uomo, Andrea

    2005-08-01

    Many studies on cognitive impulsivity in learning disabled children have been criticized for their methodological limitations, and they have not dealt with the different types of learning disability. The aim of this study was to overcome these limitations and to assess if there was a significant cognitive impulsivity in reading disorder and/or spelling disorder by using the 20-item Matching Familiar Figures Test (MFF20). A total of 110 children (second through eighth grades) were recruited from a cohort of children assessed for the first time in a National Health clinic specialized in the study of specific learning disabilities. In all, 30 dyslexic children and 25 children with spelling disorder (all children without an ADHD comorbidity) were compared with 55 children of a control group on the MMF20 (accuracy and time latency). Results showed that the children with reading disorder were less accurate than the children with spelling disability (p<0.05). Both these groups performed less accurately than the control group. Subjects with dyslexia were faster than both the other groups in response time (p<0.05), clearly showing a significantly higher cognitive impulsivity than the other groups. Hence, data seem to confirm the idea that, similar to ADHD children, dyslexic children have impaired frontal/prefrontal functions. Clinical and treatment implications are discussed. PMID:15981139

  6. Effective specific impulse of external nuclear pulse propulsion systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, T. W.

    1972-01-01

    An investigation of a simple self-similar flow model for an external nuclear pulse propulsion system indicates that to achieve the high effective specific impulse of such a system three principal factors are required. The are (1) attaining pulses of optimum energy, (2) attaining good propellant collimation, and (3) using an ablative material for the pusher surface which has high absorptivity for radiant energy at the propellant stagnation temperature.

  7. An Overview of the VHITAL Program: A Two-Stage Bismuth Fed Very High Specific Impulse Thruster with Anode Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sengupta, Anita; Marrese-Reading, Colleen; Capelli, Mark; Scharfe, David; Tverdokhlebov, Sergey; Semenkin, Sasha; Tverdokhlebov, Oleg; Boyd, Ian; Keidar, Michael; Yalin, Azer; Markusic, Tom; Polzin, Kurt

    2005-01-01

    The Very High Isp Thruster with Anode Layer (VHITAL) is a two stage Hall thruster program that is a part of NASA's Prometheus Program in NASA's New Exploration Systems Mission Directorate (ESMD). It is a potentially viable low-cost alternative to ion engines for near-term NEP applications with the growth potential to support mid-term and far-term NEP missions... This paper will present an overview of the thruster fabrication, pre-existing TAL 160 demonstration, feed system development, lifetime assessment, contamination assessment, and mission study activities performed to date.

  8. Domain-Specific Impulsivity in School-Age Children

    PubMed Central

    Tsukayama, Eli; Duckworth, Angela Lee; Kim, Betty

    2013-01-01

    Impulsivity is a salient individual difference in children with well-established predictive validity for life outcomes. The current investigation proposes that impulsive behaviors vary systematically by domain. In a series of studies with ethnically and socioeconomically diverse samples of middle school students, we find that schoolwork-related and interpersonal-related impulsivity, as observed by teachers, parents, and the students themselves, are distinct, moderately correlated behavioral tendencies. Each demonstrates differentiated relationships with dimensions of childhood temperament, Big Five personality factors, and outcomes, such as sociometric popularity, report card grades, and classroom conduct. Implications for theoretical conceptions of impulsivity as well as for practical applications (e.g., domain-specific interventions) are discussed. PMID:24118714

  9. Variable thrust/specific-impulse of multiplexed electrospray microthrusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenguito, G.; Fernandez de la Mora, J.; Gomez, A.

    We report on the development of a single-propellant ElectroSpray (ES) microthruster able to: (a) cover a wide range of specific impulse (Isp) and thrust at high propulsion efficiency, and (b) provide macroscopic thrust via micro-fabricated emitter arrays. The electrospray is a mature technology for the emission of fast nanodroplets at a propulsive efficiency larger than 50% over the full Isp range. The size of the droplets depends on the propellant flow rate and the physical properties of the electrolyte, especially the electric conductivity. To achieve a useful thrust one needs to multiplex the ES by operating many in parallel, which we achieve via silicon microfabrication of arrays of multiple and identical nozzles. The Multiplexed Electrospray (MES) micro-thruster is composed mainly of two electrodes: a nozzle-array and an extractor electrode, between which the electric field needed to form the ES is established. We tested nozzle arrays with up to 37 capillaries, that are spaced 1mm apart, with ID/OD = 10/30μ m. The capillaries are filled with 2.01μ m silicon dioxide beads to increase the hydraulic impedance and ensure uniform flow rate through the different emitters. A third electrode (accelerator) is mounted downstream the extractor to accelerate the droplets, thereby increasing the microthruster performance. The system is packaged in an alumina casing for electrical insulation and propellant feed. Tests run in a vacuum chamber at a pressure ≤ 10-5 mbar demonstrated reliable operation for several hours with a relatively high beam energy of 7.56kV. The 37-nozzle MES device was tested with the ionic liquid ethylammonium nitrate (EAN), at estimated total flow rates between 1.2 and 14 μ L/h, emitted currents between 14.2 and 23.0 μ A, specific impulse ranging between 710 and 1930s, and thrust ranging between 7.5 and 33 μ N. EAN is well suited to cover a relatively broad range of charge/mass- at an average propulsion efficiency of 66%. With further scale

  10. An Injector for the Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glover, T. W.; Chang-Diaz, F. R.; Squire, J. P.; Chan, A. A.

    1997-11-01

    We present a summary of progress on the development of a plasma injector for NASA's VASIMR (Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket) engine. The plasma rocket constrains a flowing plasma in an asymmetric magnetic bottle and exhausts it through a magnetic nozzle to produce thrust. The injector is a plasma source located on the axis of symmetry, forward of the series of coils forming the constraining magnetic field. The injector is intended to produce a well-collimated jet of highly ionized plasma which will enter the central cell of the machine through its forward mirror. The prototype design is based on that of a Lorentz Force Accelerator developed as a thruster by the electric propulsion research group at Princeton. Our investigation focuses on the effects of the rocket's magnetic field on the operation of the injector, the effect of a local magnetic field on the discharge behavior, and the effectiveness of discharge initiation by glow discharge versus initiation by ECRH. We evaluate the performance of this prototype injector by comparing the characteristics of the plasma it inserts into the central cell of the engine with the characteristics called for in the design of the plasma rocket.

  11. Sandia National Laboratories' high power electromagnetic impulse sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinehart, L. F.; Buttram, M. T.; Denison, G. J.; Lundstrom, J. M.; Crowe, W. R.; Aurand, J. F.; Patterson, P. E.

    1994-05-01

    Three impulse sources have been developed to cover a wide range of peak power, bandwidth and center frequency requirements. Each of the sources can operate in single shot, rep-rate, or burst modes. These devices are of rugged construction and are suitable for field use. This paper will describe the specifications and principals of operation for each source. The sources to be described are: SNIPER (Sub-Nanosecond ImPulsE Radiator), a coaxial Blumlein pulser with an in-line (series) peaking switch; EMBL (EnantioMorphic BLurfflein), a bipolar parallel plate Blumlein with a crowbar type (parallel) peaking switch; and the LCO (L-C Oscillator) a spark-switched L-C oscillator with damped sinusoidal output. SNIPER and EMBL are ultra-wideband (UWB) sources which produce a very fast high voltage transition. When differentiated by the antenna, an impulse whose width corresponds to the transition time is radiated. The LCO operates with a center frequency up to 800 MHz and up to 100 MHz bandwidth. Because the LCO output is relatively narrow band, high gain antennas may be employed to produce very high radiated field strengths.

  12. Sandia National Laboratories` high power electromagnetic impulse sources

    SciTech Connect

    Rinehart, L.F.; Buttram, M.T.; Denison, G.J.; Lundstrom, J.M.; Crowe, W.R.; Aurand, J.F.; Patterson, P.E.

    1994-10-01

    Three impulse sources have been developed to cover a wide range of peak power, bandwidth and center frequency requirements. Each of the sources can operate in single shot, rep-rate, or burst modes. These devices are of rugged construction and are suitable for field use. This paper will describe the specifications and principals of operation for each source. The sources to be described are: SNIPER (Sub-Nanosecond ImPulsE Radiator), a coaxial Blumlein pulser with an in-line (series) peaking switch; EMBL (EnantioMorphic BLurfflein), a bipolar parallel plate Blumlein with a crowbar type (parallel) peaking switch; and the LCO (L-C Oscillator) a spark-switched L-C oscillator with damped sinusoidal output. SNIPER and EMBL are ultra-wideband (UWB) sources which produce a very fast high voltage transition. When differentiated by the antenna, an impulse whose width corresponds to the transition time is radiated. The LCO operates with a center frequency up to 800 MHz and up to 100 MHz bandwidth. Because the LCO output is relatively narrow band, high gain antennas may be employed to produce very high radiated field strengths.

  13. On reactive high power impulse magnetron sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudmundsson, J. T.

    2016-01-01

    High power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) is an ionized physical vapor deposition (IPVD) technique that is particularly promising for reactive sputtering applications. However, there are few issues that have to be resolved before the full potential of this technique can be realized. Here we give an overview of the key experimental findings for the reactive HiPIMS discharge. An increase in the discharge current is commonly observed with increased partial pressure of the reactive gas or decreased repetition pulse frequency. There are somewhat conflicting claims regarding the hysteresis effect in the reactive HiPIMS discharge as some report reduction or elimination of the hysteresis effect while others claim a feedback control is essential. The ion energy distribution of the metal ion and the atomic ion of the reactive gas are similar and extend to very high energies while the ion energy distribution of the working gas and the molecular ion of the reactive gas are similar and are much less energetic.

  14. Bright and dark sides of impulsivity: performance of women with high and low trait impulsivity on neuropsychological tasks.

    PubMed

    Perales, Jose C; Verdejo-Garcia, Antonio; Moya, Maribel; Lozano, Oscar; Perez-Garcia, Miguel

    2009-11-01

    We administered a multidimensional measure of trait impulsivity (the UPPS-P impulsivity scale; Cyders et al., 2007) to a nonclinical sample of 155 individuals and selected 32 participants at the two ends of the trait impulsivity continuum: high (HI, n = 15) and low (LI, n = 17) impulsive women. We further tested these extreme groups on neuropsychological measures of motor impulsivity (go/no-go, d2), delay discounting (Now or Later Questionnaire), reflection impulsivity (Matching Familiar Figures Test), self-regulation (Revised-Strategy Application Test), and decision making (Iowa Gambling Task). High-trait-impulsivity women were found to commit more commission errors in the initial stage of the go/no-go task but also to make fewer omission errors in the d2 test than did low-trait-impulsivity women. Both effects can be accounted for by a lower response criterion in impulsive women. On the other hand, measures of delay discounting, reflection impulsivity, self-regulation, and decision making did not yield significant differences between the two groups. This pattern of results supports the idea that trait impulsivity in healthy women is linked to neurocognitive mechanisms involved in response monitoring and inhibition, but not to mechanisms involved in self-regulation or decision making. These findings temper the assumption that impulsivity is the core cause of dysfunctional risky and/or impulsive behavior in psychopathological or neuropsychological profiles. PMID:19358009

  15. Domain-Specific Impulsivity in School-Age Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsukayama, Eli; Duckworth, Angela Lee; Kim, Betty

    2013-01-01

    Impulsivity is a salient individual difference in children with well-established predictive validity for life outcomes. The current investigation proposes that impulsive behaviors vary systematically by domain. In a series of studies with ethnically and socioeconomically diverse samples of middle school students, we find that schoolwork-related…

  16. High-intensity drying processes: Impulse drying. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Orloff, D.I.; Phelan, P.M.

    1993-12-01

    Experiments were conducted on a sheet-fed pilot-scale shoe press to compare impulse drying and double-felted pressing. Both an IPST (Institute of Paper Science and Technology) ceramic coated and Beloit Type A press roll were evaluated for lienrboard sheet structures having a wide range of z-direction permeability. Purpose was to find ways of correcting sheet sticking problems observed in previous pilot-scale shoe press experiments. Results showed that impulse drying was superior to double felted pressing in both press dryness and in important paper physical properties. Impulse drying critical temperature was found to depend on specific surface of the heated layer of the sheet, thermal properties of the press roll surface, and choice of felt. Impulse drying of recycled and two-ply liner was demonstrated for both Southern Pile and Douglas fir-containing furnishes.

  17. Liquid Engine Design: Effect of Chamber Dimensions on Specific Impulse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoggard, Lindsay; Leahy, Joe

    2009-01-01

    Which assumption of combustion chemistry - frozen or equilibrium - should be used in the prediction of liquid rocket engine performance calculations? Can a correlation be developed for this? A literature search using the LaSSe tool, an online repository of old rocket data and reports, was completed. Test results of NTO/Aerozine-50 and Lox/LH2 subscale and full-scale injector and combustion chamber test results were found and studied for this task. NASA code, Chemical Equilibrium with Applications (CEA) was used to predict engine performance using both chemistry assumptions, defined here. Frozen- composition remains frozen during expansion through the nozzle. Equilibrium- instantaneous chemical equilibrium during nozzle expansion. Chamber parameters were varied to understand what dimensions drive chamber C* and Isp. Contraction Ratio is the ratio of the nozzle throat area to the area of the chamber. L is the length of the chamber. Characteristic chamber length, L*, is the length that the chamber would be if it were a straight tube and had no converging nozzle. Goal: Develop a qualitative and quantitative correlation for performance parameters - Specific Impulse (Isp) and Characteristic Velocity (C*) - as a function of one or more chamber dimensions - Contraction Ratio (CR), Chamber Length (L ) and/or Characteristic Chamber Length (L*). Determine if chamber dimensions can be correlated to frozen or equilibrium chemistry.

  18. Attenuation of high-level impulses by earmuffs.

    PubMed

    Zera, Jan; Mlynski, Rafal

    2007-10-01

    Attenuation of high-level acoustic impulses (noise reduction) by various types of earmuffs was measured using a laboratory source of type A impulses and an artificial test fixture compatible with the ISO 4869-3 standard. The measurements were made for impulses of peak sound-pressure levels (SPLs) from 150 to 170 dB. The rise time and A duration of the impulses depended on their SPL and were within a range of 12-400 mus (rise time) and 0.4-1.1 ms (A duration). The results showed that earmuff peak level attenuation increases by about 10 dB when the impulse's rise time and the A duration are reduced. The results also demonstrated that the signals under the earmuff cup have a longer rise and A duration than the original impulses recorded outside the earmuff. Results of the measurements were used to check the validity of various hearing damage risk criteria that specify the maximum permissible exposure to impulse noise. The present data lead to the conclusion that procedures in which hearing damage risk is assessed only from signal attenuation, without taking into consideration changes in the signal waveform under the earmuff, tend to underestimate the risk of hearing damage. PMID:17902846

  19. Mission maps for use in the choice of specific impulse for manned Mars missions

    SciTech Connect

    Madsen, W.W.; Neuman, J.E.; Olson, T.S.; Siahpush, A.S.

    1991-01-01

    The choice of engine concept for the initial manned missions to Mars should be driven by what can be feasibly built and flight qualified in the near term, and by the level of engine performance that is required for these missions. This paper addresses how mission requirements affect the choice of specific impulse, and consequently what values of the specific impulse best serve these missions. Broad mission surveys and sensitivity studies were performed to determine the specific impulse values that allow for fast transfer times and wide launch windows. We find that a specific impulse of around 1000 to 1200 sec is sufficient. Choosing an engine concept that has a higher specific impulse value is not justified for these missions because the modest reduction in propellant requirements and further widening of the launch windows does not compensate for the substantially greater technical risk. 3 refs., 8 figs.

  20. Effectiveness of earplugs in high-intensity impulse noise.

    PubMed

    Dancer, A; Grateau, P; Cabanis, A; Barnabé, G; Cagnin, G; Vaillant, T; Lafont, D

    1992-03-01

    The efficiency of different types of earplugs was assessed by means of Békésy audiometry following the exposure of 42 human subjects to weapon impulses. The peak pressure of the impulses ranged from 2.3-27.8 kPa (from 161 to 183-dB peak SPL) and the A-weighted equivalent level (over 8 h) of each exposure ranged from 100-114 dB. All subjects wore earplugs fitted by an experienced individual. The devices tested included one brand of conventional foam earplugs and a number of different models of perforated earplugs, one type of which had been previously shown to provide nonlinear attenuation. Perforated earplugs were tested because they provide better speech communication than conventional passive earplugs, and in the nonlinear case also afford attenuation that increases with the peak pressure of the impulses. The temporary threshold shifts (TTSs) observed in these experiments were very small and indicated no significant hazard for hearing. Well-fitted perforated earplugs seem to be able to protect the ear from infrequent exposures to the high-level impulses produced by small and large weapons while allowing good speech communication, and without impairing the operational capacity of soldiers who must remain aware of their acoustic environment.

  1. Method and apparatus for improved high power impulse magnetron sputtering

    DOEpatents

    Anders, Andre

    2013-11-05

    A high power impulse magnetron sputtering apparatus and method using a vacuum chamber with a magnetron target and a substrate positioned in the vacuum chamber. A field coil being positioned between the magnetron target and substrate, and a pulsed power supply and/or a coil bias power supply connected to the field coil. The pulsed power supply connected to the field coil, and the pulsed power supply outputting power pulse widths of greater that 100 .mu.s.

  2. High power impulse magnetron sputtering using a rotating cylindrical magnetron

    SciTech Connect

    Leroy, W. P.; Mahieu, S.; Depla, D.; Ehiasarian, A. P.

    2010-01-15

    Both the industrially favorable deposition technique, high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HIPIMS), and the industrially popular rotating cylindrical magnetron have been successfully combined. A stable operation without arcing, leaks, or other complications for the rotatable magnetron was attained, with current densities around 11 A cm{sup -2}. For Ti and Al, a much higher degree in ionization in the plasma region was observed for the HIPIMS mode compared to the direct current mode.

  3. High-intensity drying processes-impulse drying. Yearly report

    SciTech Connect

    Orloff, D.I.

    1991-06-01

    Impulse drying is an innovative process for drying paper that holds great promise for reducing the energy consumed during the manufacture of paper and similar web products. impulse drying occurs when a wet paper web passes through a press nip in which one of the rolls is heated to a high temperature. A steam layer adjacent to the heated surface grows and displaces water from the sheet in a very efficient manner. The energy required for water removal is very much less than that required for conventional evaporative drying. To eliminate sheet delamination, low thermal mass ceramic press roll coatings were developed to reduce heat transfer to the sheet, while maintaining high heat flux during early stages of the process. In so doing, most of the transferred energy is used to form steam that displaces liquid water, rather than in excessively heating the sheet. During this period, a prototype ceramic coating was developed and its impulse drying performance was compared to that of steel surfaces. It was observed that ceramic platens can be operated at higher temperatures and pressures resulting in improved water removal and physical properties without inducing sheet delamination. Heat flux measurement techniques were developed to provide a mechanistic explanation for the superior performance of the prototype. The work confirmed that the prototype ceramic coating is more energy efficient than the steel surface.

  4. Advanced concepts. [specific impulse, mass drivers, electromagnetic launchers, and the rail gun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, B. A.

    1980-01-01

    The relative strengths of those interactions which enable propulsive forces are listed as well as the specific impulse of various propellants. Graphics show the linear synchronous motor of the mass driver, the principle of the direct current electromagnetic launcher, and the characteristics of the rail gun.

  5. Positive association between trait impulsivity and high gambling-related cognitive biases among college students.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yuping; Zhong, Xue; Wu, Daxing; Li, Hangui; Li, Mulei

    2016-09-30

    The present study examined whether people with high gambling-related cognitive bias are more likely to have higher levels of impulsivity than are those with low gambling-related cognitive bias. We used Barratt Impulsiveness Scale version 11, Zuckerman-Kuhlman Personality Questionnaire and the Iowa gambling task to explore differences in impulsivity between high and low gambling-related cognitive bias groups. Extreme group design was applied. 110 participants (high gambling related cognition group=58, low one=52) were recruited to complete the gambling related cognition scale, impulsivity self-rating scales and Iowa gambling task. Impulsivity self-rating scores were higher among subjects with high than among those with low gambling-related cognitive bias. Compared with individuals with low gambling-related cognitive bias, those with high levels of such bias showed greater degrees of trait impulsivity. We are unable to identify group differences on IGT. State and trait impulsivity may be dissociated.

  6. Positive association between trait impulsivity and high gambling-related cognitive biases among college students.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yuping; Zhong, Xue; Wu, Daxing; Li, Hangui; Li, Mulei

    2016-09-30

    The present study examined whether people with high gambling-related cognitive bias are more likely to have higher levels of impulsivity than are those with low gambling-related cognitive bias. We used Barratt Impulsiveness Scale version 11, Zuckerman-Kuhlman Personality Questionnaire and the Iowa gambling task to explore differences in impulsivity between high and low gambling-related cognitive bias groups. Extreme group design was applied. 110 participants (high gambling related cognition group=58, low one=52) were recruited to complete the gambling related cognition scale, impulsivity self-rating scales and Iowa gambling task. Impulsivity self-rating scores were higher among subjects with high than among those with low gambling-related cognitive bias. Compared with individuals with low gambling-related cognitive bias, those with high levels of such bias showed greater degrees of trait impulsivity. We are unable to identify group differences on IGT. State and trait impulsivity may be dissociated. PMID:27371802

  7. High harmonic generation from impulsively aligned SO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devin, Julien; Wang, Song; Kaldun, Andreas; Bucksbaum, Phil

    2016-05-01

    Previous work in high harmonics generation (HHG) in aligned molecular gases has mainly focused on rotational dynamics in order to determine the contributions of different orbitals to the ionization step. In our experiment, we focus on the shorter timescale of vibrational dynamics. We generate high harmonics from impulsively aligned SO2 molecules in a gas jet and record the emitted attosecond pulse trains in a home-built high resolution vacuum ultra violet (VUV) spectrometer. Using the high temporal resolution of our setup, we are able to map out the effects of vibrational wavepackets with a sub-femtosecond resolution. The target molecule, SO2 gas, is impulsively aligned by a near-infrared laser pulse and has accessible vibrations on the timescale of the short laser pulse used. We present first experimental results for the response to this excitation in high-harmonics. We observe both fast oscillations in the time domain as well as shifts of the VUV photon energy outside of the pulse overlaps. Research supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences (BES), Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences Division and by the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship.

  8. Discharge current modes of high power impulse magnetron sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Zhongzhen Xiao, Shu; Ma, Zhengyong; Cui, Suihan; Ji, Shunping; Pan, Feng; Tian, Xiubo; Fu, Ricky K. Y.; Chu, Paul K.

    2015-09-15

    Based on the production and disappearance of ions and electrons in the high power impulse magnetron sputtering plasma near the target, the expression of the discharge current is derived. Depending on the slope, six possible modes are deduced for the discharge current and the feasibility of each mode is discussed. The discharge parameters and target properties are simplified into the discharge voltage, sputtering yield, and ionization energy which mainly affect the discharge plasma. The relationship between these factors and the discharge current modes is also investigated.

  9. Impulse control and restrained eating among young women: Evidence for compensatory cortical activation during a chocolate-specific delayed discounting task.

    PubMed

    Dong, Debo; Wang, Yulin; Jackson, Todd; Chen, Shuaiyu; Wang, Yu; Zhou, Feng; Chen, Hong

    2016-10-01

    Theory and associated research indicate that people with elevated restrained eating (RE) scores have higher risk for binge eating, future bulimic symptom onset and weight gain. Previous imaging studies have suggested hyper-responsive reward brain area activation in response to food cues contributes to this risk but little is known about associated neural impulse control mechanisms, especially when considering links between depleted cognitive resources related to unsuccessful RE. Towards illuminating this issue, we used a chocolate-specific delayed discounting (DD) task to investigate relations between RE scores, behavior impulsivity, and corresponding neural impulse control correlates in a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study of 27 young women. Specifically, participants were required to choose between more immediate, smaller versus delayed, larger hypothetical chocolate rewards following initial consumption of a chocolate. As predicted, RE scores were correlated positively with behavior impulse control levels. More critically, higher RE scores were associated with stronger activation in impulse control region, the dorsal-lateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) during the completion of difficult decision trials reflecting higher cognitive demands and resource depletion relative to easy decision trials. Exploratory analyses revealed a positive correlation between RE scores and activity in a reward system hub, the right striatum. Moreover, a positive correlation between left DLPFC and striatum activation was posited to reflect, in part, impulse control region compensation in response to stronger reward signal among women with RE elevations. Findings suggested impulse control lapses may contribute to difficulties in maintaining RE, particularly when cognitive demands are high. PMID:27208593

  10. Dysfunctional decision-making in pathological gambling: pattern specificity and the role of impulsivity.

    PubMed

    Kräplin, Anja; Dshemuchadse, Maja; Behrendt, Silke; Scherbaum, Stefan; Goschke, Thomas; Bühringer, Gerhard

    2014-03-30

    Dysfunctional decision-making in individuals with pathological gambling (PGs) may result from dominating reward-driven processes, indicated by higher impulsivity. In the current study we examined (1) if PGs show specific decision-making impairments related to dominating reward-driven processes rather than to strategic planning deficits and (2) whether these impairments are related to impulsivity. Nineteen PGs according to DSM-IV and 19 matched control subjects undertook the Cambridge Gambling Task (CGT) to assess decision-making. The delay discounting paradigm (DDP) as well as the UPPS Impulsive Behavior Scale (measuring urgency, premeditation, perseverance and sensation seeking) were administered as multidimensional measures of impulsivity. Results revealed that (1) PGs exhibited higher risk seeking and an immediate reward focus in the CGT and, in contrast, comparable strategic planning to the control group. (2) Decision-making impairments were related to more severe delay discounting and, specifically, to increased urgency and less premeditation. Our findings suggest (1) the necessity to disentangle decision-making components in order to improve etiological models of PGs, and (2) that urgency and premeditation are specifically related to disadvantageous decision-making and should be tackled in intervention strategies focusing on emotion tolerance and control strategies. PMID:24434041

  11. Neutronics analysis of an open-cycle high-impulse gas core reactor concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitmarsh, C. L., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    A procedure was developed to calculate the critical fuel mass, including the effects of propellant pressure, for coaxial-flow gas-core reactors operating at 196,600 newtons thrust and 4400 seconds specific impulse. Data were generated for a range of cavity diameter, reflector-moderator thickness, and quantity of structural material. Also presented are such core characteristics as upper limits on cavity pressure, spectral hardening in very-high-temperature hydrogen, and reactivity coefficients.

  12. Very low pressure high power impulse triggered magnetron sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre; Andersson, Joakim

    2013-10-29

    A method and apparatus are described for very low pressure high powered magnetron sputtering of a coating onto a substrate. By the method of this invention, both substrate and coating target material are placed into an evacuable chamber, and the chamber pumped to vacuum. Thereafter a series of high impulse voltage pulses are applied to the target. Nearly simultaneously with each pulse, in one embodiment, a small cathodic arc source of the same material as the target is pulsed, triggering a plasma plume proximate to the surface of the target to thereby initiate the magnetron sputtering process. In another embodiment the plasma plume is generated using a pulsed laser aimed to strike an ablation target material positioned near the magnetron target surface.

  13. Specific impulse loss due to friction and dissipation in the nozzle of a liquid propellant rocket engine with film cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lushchik, V. G.; Sizov, V. I.; Sternin, L. E.; Yakubenko, A. E.

    1993-07-01

    A method and algorithms for computing a compressible turbulent boundary layer in the nozzles of liquid propellant rocket engines with film cooling are developed which make it possible to determine losses of the specific impulse due to friction as well as heat fluxes and other flow characteristics. The calculations are based on the numerical solution of gasdynamic equations in the boundary layer approximation using a three-parameter turbulence model. The conditions for minimum specific impulse loss are determined.

  14. Monte-Carlo particle dynamics in a variable specific impulse magnetoplasma rocket

    SciTech Connect

    Ilin, A.V.; Diaz, F.R.C.; Squire, J.P.

    1999-01-01

    The self-consistent mathematical model in a Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket (VASIMR) is examined. Of particular importance is the effect of a magnetic nozzle in enhancing the axial momentum of the exhaust. Also, different geometries and rocket symmetries are considered. The magnetic configuration is modeled with an adaptable mesh, which increases accuracy without compromising the speed of the simulation. The single particle trajectories are integrated with an adaptive time-scheme, which can quickly solve extensive Monte-Carlo simulations for systems of hundred thousands of particles in a reasonable time (1--2 hours) and without the need for a powerful supercomputer.

  15. Discharge Physics of High Power Impulse Magnetron Sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre

    2010-10-13

    High power impulse magnetron sputtering (HIPIMS) is pulsed sputtering where the peak power exceeds the time-averaged power by typically two orders of magnitude. The peak power density, averaged over the target area, can reach or exceed 107 W/m2, leading to plasma conditions that make ionization of the sputtered atoms very likely. A brief review of HIPIMS operation is given in a tutorial manner, illustrated by some original data related to the self-sputtering of niobium in argon and krypton. Emphasis is put on the current-voltage-time relationships near the threshold of self-sputtering runaway. The great variety of current pulse shapes delivers clues on the very strong gas rarefaction, self-sputtering runaway conditions, and the stopping of runaway due to the evolution of atom ionization and ion return probabilities as the gas plasma is replaced by metal plasma. The discussions are completed by considering instabilities and the special case of ?gasless? self-sputtering.

  16. Plasma potential mapping of high power impulse magnetron sputtering discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Rauch, Albert; Mendelsberg, Rueben J.; Sanders, Jason M.; Anders, Andre

    2011-12-20

    Pulsed emissive probe techniques have been used to determine the plasma potential distribution of high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) discharges. An unbalanced magnetron with a niobium target in argon was investigated for pulse length of 100 μs at a pulse repetition rate of 100 Hz, giving a peak current of 170 A. The probe data were taken with a time resolution of 20 ns and a spatial resolution of 1 mm. It is shown that the local plasma potential varies greatly in space and time. The lowest potential was found over the target’s racetrack, gradually reaching anode potential (ground) several centimeters away from the target. The magnetic pre-sheath exhibits a funnel-shaped plasma potential resulting in an electric field which accelerates ions toward the racetrack. In certain regions and times, the potential exhibits weak local maxima which allow for ion acceleration to the substrate. Knowledge of the local E and static B fields lets us derive the electrons’ E×B drift velocity, which is about 105 m/s and shows structures in space and time.

  17. THE HIGH-ENERGY IMPULSIVE GROUND-LEVEL ENHANCEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    McCracken, K. G.; Moraal, H.; Shea, M. A.

    2012-12-20

    We have studied short-lived (21 minute average duration), highly anisotropic pulses of cosmic rays that constitute the first phase of 10 large ground-level enhancements (GLEs), and which extend to rigidities in the range 5-20 GV. We provide a set of constraints that must be met by any putative acceleration mechanism for this type of solar-energetic-particle (SEP) event. The pulses usually have very short rise-times (three to five minutes) at all rigidities, and exhibit the remarkable feature that the intensity drops precipitously by 50% to 70% from the maximum within another three to five minutes. Both the rising and falling phases exhibit velocity dispersion, which indicates that there are particles with rigidities in the range 1 < P (GV) < 3 in the beam, and the evidence is that there is little scattering en route from the Sun. We name these events the high-energy impulsive ground-level enhancement (HEI GLE). We argue that the time-dependence observed at Earth at {approx}5 GV is a close approximation to that of the SEP pulse injected into the open heliospheric magnetic field in the vicinity of the Sun. We conclude that the temporal characteristics of the HEI GLE impose nine constraints on any putative acceleration process. Two of the HEI GLEs are preceded by short-lived, fast-rising neutron and >90 MeV gamma-ray bursts, indicating that freshly accelerated SEPs had impinged on higher-density matter in the chromosphere prior to the departure of the SEP pulse for Earth. This study was based on an updated archive of the 71 GLEs in the historic record, which is now available for public use.

  18. High trait impulsivity predicts food addiction-like behavior in the rat.

    PubMed

    Velázquez-Sánchez, Clara; Ferragud, Antonio; Moore, Catherine F; Everitt, Barry J; Sabino, Valentina; Cottone, Pietro

    2014-09-01

    Impulsivity is a behavioral trait frequently seen not only in drug-addicted individuals but also in individuals who pathologically overeat. However, whether impulsivity predates the development of uncontrollable feeding is unknown. In this study, we hypothesized that a high impulsivity trait precedes and confers vulnerability for food addiction-like behavior. For this purpose, we trained ad libitum-fed male Wistar rats in a differential reinforcement of low rates of responding (DRL) task to select Low- and High-impulsive rats. Then, we allowed Low- and High-impulsive rats to self-administer a highly palatable diet (Palatable group) or a regular chow diet (Chow group) in 1-h daily sessions, under fixed ratio (FR) 1, FR3, FR5, and under a progressive ratio (PR) schedules of reinforcement. In addition, we tested the compulsiveness for food in Low- and High-impulsive rats by measuring the food eaten in the aversive, open compartment of a light/dark conflict test. Finally, we measured the expression of the transcription factor ΔFosB in the shell and the core of the nucleus accumbens, which is a marker for neuroadaptive changes following addictive drug exposure. The data we obtained demonstrate that impulsivity is a trait that predicts the development of food addiction-like behaviors, including: (i) excessive intake, (ii) heightened motivation for food, and (iii) compulsive-like eating, when rats are given access to highly palatable food. In addition, we show that the food addiction phenotype in high impulsive subjects is characterized by an increased expression of the transcription factor ΔFosB in the nucleus accumbens shell. These results reveal that impulsivity confers an increased propensity to develop uncontrollable overeating of palatable food. PMID:24776685

  19. High trait impulsivity predicts food addiction-like behavior in the rat.

    PubMed

    Velázquez-Sánchez, Clara; Ferragud, Antonio; Moore, Catherine F; Everitt, Barry J; Sabino, Valentina; Cottone, Pietro

    2014-09-01

    Impulsivity is a behavioral trait frequently seen not only in drug-addicted individuals but also in individuals who pathologically overeat. However, whether impulsivity predates the development of uncontrollable feeding is unknown. In this study, we hypothesized that a high impulsivity trait precedes and confers vulnerability for food addiction-like behavior. For this purpose, we trained ad libitum-fed male Wistar rats in a differential reinforcement of low rates of responding (DRL) task to select Low- and High-impulsive rats. Then, we allowed Low- and High-impulsive rats to self-administer a highly palatable diet (Palatable group) or a regular chow diet (Chow group) in 1-h daily sessions, under fixed ratio (FR) 1, FR3, FR5, and under a progressive ratio (PR) schedules of reinforcement. In addition, we tested the compulsiveness for food in Low- and High-impulsive rats by measuring the food eaten in the aversive, open compartment of a light/dark conflict test. Finally, we measured the expression of the transcription factor ΔFosB in the shell and the core of the nucleus accumbens, which is a marker for neuroadaptive changes following addictive drug exposure. The data we obtained demonstrate that impulsivity is a trait that predicts the development of food addiction-like behaviors, including: (i) excessive intake, (ii) heightened motivation for food, and (iii) compulsive-like eating, when rats are given access to highly palatable food. In addition, we show that the food addiction phenotype in high impulsive subjects is characterized by an increased expression of the transcription factor ΔFosB in the nucleus accumbens shell. These results reveal that impulsivity confers an increased propensity to develop uncontrollable overeating of palatable food.

  20. Exaggerated Waiting Impulsivity Associated with Human Binge Drinking, and High Alcohol Consumption in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez-Roige, Sandra; Baro, Victor; Trick, Leanne; Peña-Oliver, Yolanda; Stephens, David N; Duka, Theodora

    2014-01-01

    There are well-established links between impulsivity and alcohol use in humans and animal models; however, whether exaggerated impulsivity is a premorbid risk factor or a consequence of alcohol intake remains unclear. In a first approach, human young (18–25 years) social binge and non-binge drinkers were tested for motor impulsivity and attentional abilities in a human version of the Five-Choice Serial Reaction Time Task (Sx-5CSRTT), modeled on the rodent 5CSRTT. Participants completed four variants of the Sx-5CSRT, in addition to being screened for impulsive traits (BIS-11 questionnaire) and impulsive behavior (by means of the Delay Discounting Questionnaire, Two-Choice Impulsivity Paradigm (TCIP), Stop Signal Reaction Time, and Time Estimation Task). Using a second approach, we compared one of these impulsivity measures, 5CSRTT performance, in two inbred strains of mice known to differ in alcohol intake. Compared with non-bingers (NBD; n=22), binge drinkers (BD, n=22) showed robust impairments in attention and premature responding when evaluated under increased attentional load, in addition to presenting deficits in decision making using the TCIP. The best predictors for high binge drinking score were premature responding in the Sx-5CSRTT, trait impulsivity in the BIS-11, and decision making in the TCIP. Alcohol-naïve C57BL/6J (B6) mice (alcohol preferring) were more impulsive in the 5CSRTT than DBA2/J (D2) mice (alcohol averse); the degree of impulsivity correlated with subsequent alcohol consumption. Homologous measures in animal and human studies indicate increased premature responding in young social BD and in the ethanol-preferring B6 strain of mice. PMID:24947901

  1. Statistical studies of impulsive events at high latitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Z. M.; Bering, E. A.; Benbrook, J. R.; Liao, B.; Lanzerotti, L. J.; Maclennan, C. G.; Wolfe, A. N.; Friis-Christensen, E.

    1995-01-01

    A statistical study has been made of the high-latitude impulsive events that were observed during the 1985-1986 South Pole Balloon Campaign. The events were selected by searching for unipolar pulses greater than or equal to 10 nT above background in the vertical component of the magnetic field on the ground and/or pedestal or 'W' shaped horizontal electric field perturbations greater than or equal to 10 mV/m in amplitude and accompanied by perturbations in the vertical electric field at balloon altitude. A main event list comprising 112 events was compiled from the 468 hours of data available. Three aspects of the events were examined: the solar wind conditions prior to the event, local time of observation, and intrinsic properties of the events. The local time distribution was obtained from the 112 entry main event list and was found to be nearly uniform across the dayside, with no midday gap. The event rate found using our low-amplitude selection criteria was 0.7 event/hr, comparable to expectations based on in situ studies of the magnetopause. A total of 42 events were found for which data were available from Interplanetary Monitoring Platform (IMP) 8. Of these events, 12 occurred when the Z(sub GSM) component (B(sub Z)) of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) was northward and 30 occurred when B(sub Z) was southward or fluctuating. Only three of the B(sub Z) northward cases and only five of the B(sub Z) southward cases were preceded by pressure pulses greater than 0.4 nPa in amplitude. Ten of the events were studied in detail by means of a model-fitting method discussed elsewhere. This method infers values of several parameters, including the total current flowing in a coaxial or monopole system and a two-dimensional dipole system. The intrinsic properties of the events showed that only approximately 10% of the total current contributed to momentum transfer to the high-latitude ionosphere, that the direction of the motion depended more on local time of

  2. Single stage to orbit mass budgets derived from propellant density and specific impulse

    SciTech Connect

    Whitehead, J.C.

    1996-06-06

    The trade between specific impulse (Isp) and density is examined in view of Single Stage To Orbit (SSTO) requirements. Mass allocations for vehicle hardware are derived from these two properties, for several propellant combinations and a dual-fuel case. This comparative analysis, based on flight-proven hardware, indicates that the higher density of several alternative propellants compensates for reduced Isp, when compared with cryogenic oxygen and hydrogen. Approximately half the orbiting mass of a rocket- propelled SSTO vehicle must be allocated to propulsion hardware and residuals. Using hydrogen as the only fuel requires a slightly greater fraction of orbiting mass for propulsion, because hydrogen engines and tanks are heavier than those for denser fuels. The advantage of burning both a dense fuel and hydrogen in succession depends strongly on tripropellant engine weight. The implications of the calculations for SSTO vehicle design are discussed, especially with regard to the necessity to minimize non-tankage structure.

  3. Different relations between schedule-induced polydipsia and impulsive behaviour in the Spontaneously Hypertensive Rat and in high impulsive Wistar rats: questioning the role of impulsivity in adjunctive behaviour.

    PubMed

    Ibias, Javier; Pellón, Ricardo

    2014-09-01

    Rats belonging to three different strains (15 Wistar, 8 Spontaneously Hypertensive - SHR- and 8 Wistar Kyoto - WKY-) were used to evaluate the possible relationship between different levels of impulsivity and development of schedule-induced polydipsia (SIP). We first measured the rats' levels of impulsivity by means of delay-discounting and indifference-point procedures. Secondly, development of SIP was studied under a series of fixed time 15, 30, 60 and 120s food schedules, which were counterbalanced by means of a Latin-square design. Finally, we re-assessed the rats' levels of impulsivity by replicating the delay-discounting test. The findings showed that, starting from equivalent levels of impulsivity, development of SIP differed among the groups of rats. In comparison with the rest of the animals, the SHRs were observed to attain elevated drinking rates under SIP. On the other hand, the Wistar rats which had initial high impulsivity levels similar to those of the SHRs, displayed the lowest rates of induced drinking. Moreover, low levels of impulsivity in Wistar rats prior to SIP acquisition were reflected into high drinking rates. Relation of SIP and impulsivity is questioned by present results, which gives ground to the understanding of the behavioural mechanisms involved in adjunctive behaviour and its usefulness as an animal model of excessive behaviour.

  4. Mouthguard BITES (behavior, impulsivity, theory evaluation study): what drives mouthguard use among high school basketball and baseball/softball athletes.

    PubMed

    Collins, Christy L; McKenzie, Lara B; Roberts, Kristin J; Fields, Sarah K; Comstock, R Dawn

    2015-10-01

    Although mouthguards are effective, inexpensive, easy to use, and readily available, this form of protective equipment has been underutilized. "Impulsive delay discounting" (an index of impulsive behavior) among high school athletes may help explain their decision making regarding use of protective equipment such as mouthguards. We investigated the relationship between high school baseball, softball, and basketball players' mouthguard use, impulsive delay discounting, and the precaution adoption process model (a behavior change theory). A convenience sample of boys' and girls' basketball and baseball/softball players at 21 high schools in the Greater Columbus, Ohio, metro area completed a self-administered survey that captured their demographic information, knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs regarding mouthguard use, impulsive delay discounting, and precaution adoption process model stage. We surveyed a total of 1636 students (55.9 % male, 43.8 % female, 0.3 % unknown). Only 12.3 % reported using a mouthguard either every time or sometimes during practice or competition. The primary reasons reported for not wearing mouthguards were they were not required to (65.3 %) and that the athletes could not breathe or talk while wearing one (61.5 %). These reasons were consistent across sex and sport. Most athletes reported that their coaches (87.3 %) and parents (64.5 %) had never talked to them about wearing a mouthguard. Lower precaution adoption process model stage was significantly associated with higher impulsivity (p < 0.001) and higher delayed discounting (p = 0.016) after adjusting for school, sport, and sex. Voluntary mouthguard use among high school athletes playing basketball and baseball/softball remains low despite the risk of dental injury in these sports. Effective, evidence-based, targeted, and tailored interventions to improve adolescent athletes' use of mouthguards to prevent sports-related dental injuries should be based on the specific

  5. Mouthguard BITES (behavior, impulsivity, theory evaluation study): what drives mouthguard use among high school basketball and baseball/softball athletes.

    PubMed

    Collins, Christy L; McKenzie, Lara B; Roberts, Kristin J; Fields, Sarah K; Comstock, R Dawn

    2015-10-01

    Although mouthguards are effective, inexpensive, easy to use, and readily available, this form of protective equipment has been underutilized. "Impulsive delay discounting" (an index of impulsive behavior) among high school athletes may help explain their decision making regarding use of protective equipment such as mouthguards. We investigated the relationship between high school baseball, softball, and basketball players' mouthguard use, impulsive delay discounting, and the precaution adoption process model (a behavior change theory). A convenience sample of boys' and girls' basketball and baseball/softball players at 21 high schools in the Greater Columbus, Ohio, metro area completed a self-administered survey that captured their demographic information, knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs regarding mouthguard use, impulsive delay discounting, and precaution adoption process model stage. We surveyed a total of 1636 students (55.9 % male, 43.8 % female, 0.3 % unknown). Only 12.3 % reported using a mouthguard either every time or sometimes during practice or competition. The primary reasons reported for not wearing mouthguards were they were not required to (65.3 %) and that the athletes could not breathe or talk while wearing one (61.5 %). These reasons were consistent across sex and sport. Most athletes reported that their coaches (87.3 %) and parents (64.5 %) had never talked to them about wearing a mouthguard. Lower precaution adoption process model stage was significantly associated with higher impulsivity (p < 0.001) and higher delayed discounting (p = 0.016) after adjusting for school, sport, and sex. Voluntary mouthguard use among high school athletes playing basketball and baseball/softball remains low despite the risk of dental injury in these sports. Effective, evidence-based, targeted, and tailored interventions to improve adolescent athletes' use of mouthguards to prevent sports-related dental injuries should be based on the specific

  6. Maximization of the effective impulse delivered by a high-frequency/low-frequency planetary drill tool.

    PubMed

    Harkness, Patrick; Lucas, Margaret; Cardoni, Andrea

    2011-11-01

    Ultrasonic tools are used for a variety of cutting applications in surgery and the food industry, but when they are applied to harder materials, such as rock, their cutting performance declines because of the low effective impulse delivered by each vibration cycle. To overcome this problem, a technique known as high-frequency/low-frequency (or alternatively, ultrasonic/sonic) drilling is employed. In this approach, an ultrasonic step-horn is used to deliver an impulse to a free mass which subsequently moves toward a drilling bit, delivering the impulse on contact. The free mass then rebounds to complete the cycle. The horn has time between impacts to build significant vibration amplitude and thus delivers a much larger impulse to the free mass than could be delivered if it were applied directly to the target. To maximize the impulse delivered to the target by the cutting bit, both the momentum transfer from the ultrasonic horn to the free mass and the dynamics of the horn/free mass/cutting bit stack must be optimized. This paper uses finite element techniques to optimize the ultrasonic horns and numerical propagation of the stack dynamics to maximize the delivered effective impulse, validated in both cases by extensive experimental analysis.

  7. A review comparing cathodic arcs and high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS)

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, André

    2014-09-02

    In this study, high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) has been in the center of attention over the last years as it is an emerging physical vapor deposition (PVD) technology that combines advantages of magnetron sputtering with various forms of energetic deposition of films such as ion plating and cathodic arc plasma deposition. It should not come at a surprise that many extension and variations of HiPIMS make use, intentionally or unintentionally, of previously discovered approaches to film processing such as substrate surface preparation by metal ion sputtering and phased biasing for film texture and stress control. Therefore, in this review, an overview is given on some historical developments and features of cathodic arc and HiPIMS plasmas, showing commonalities and differences. To limit the scope, emphasis is put on plasma properties, as opposed to surveying the vast literature on specific film materials and their properties.

  8. A review comparing cathodic arcs and high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS)

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Anders, André

    2014-09-02

    In this study, high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) has been in the center of attention over the last years as it is an emerging physical vapor deposition (PVD) technology that combines advantages of magnetron sputtering with various forms of energetic deposition of films such as ion plating and cathodic arc plasma deposition. It should not come at a surprise that many extension and variations of HiPIMS make use, intentionally or unintentionally, of previously discovered approaches to film processing such as substrate surface preparation by metal ion sputtering and phased biasing for film texture and stress control. Therefore, in thismore » review, an overview is given on some historical developments and features of cathodic arc and HiPIMS plasmas, showing commonalities and differences. To limit the scope, emphasis is put on plasma properties, as opposed to surveying the vast literature on specific film materials and their properties.« less

  9. Silicon oxynitride films deposited by reactive high power impulse magnetron sputtering using nitrous oxide as a single-source precursor

    SciTech Connect

    Hänninen, Tuomas Schmidt, Susann; Jensen, Jens; Hultman, Lars; Högberg, Hans

    2015-09-15

    Silicon oxynitride thin films were synthesized by reactive high power impulse magnetron sputtering of silicon in argon/nitrous oxide plasmas. Nitrous oxide was employed as a single-source precursor supplying oxygen and nitrogen for the film growth. The films were characterized by elastic recoil detection analysis, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction, x-ray reflectivity, scanning electron microscopy, and spectroscopic ellipsometry. Results show that the films are silicon rich, amorphous, and exhibit a random chemical bonding structure. The optical properties with the refractive index and the extinction coefficient correlate with the film elemental composition, showing decreasing values with increasing film oxygen and nitrogen content. The total percentage of oxygen and nitrogen in the films is controlled by adjusting the gas flow ratio in the deposition processes. Furthermore, it is shown that the film oxygen-to-nitrogen ratio can be tailored by the high power impulse magnetron sputtering-specific parameters pulse frequency and energy per pulse.

  10. Impulsive movements lead to high hops on sand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilar, Jeffrey; Goldman, Daniel I.

    2014-03-01

    Various animals exhibit locomotive behaviors (like sprinting and hopping) involving transient bursts of actuation coupled to the ground through internal elastic elements. The performance of such maneuvers is subject to reaction forces on the feet from the environment. On substrates like dry granular media, the laws that govern these forces are not fully understood, and can vary with foot size and shape, material compaction (measured by the volume fraction ϕ) and intrusion kinematics. To gain insight into how such interactions affect jumps on granular media, we study the performance of an actuated spring mass robot. We compare performance between two jump strategies: a single-cycle sine-wave actuation (a ``single jump'') and this actuation preceded by an impulsive preload (a ``preload jump''). We vary ϕ for both strategies, and find that ϕ significantly affects performance: we observe a 200% increase in the single jump height with only a 5% increase in volume fraction using a 7.62 cm diameter flat foot. The preload jump outperforms the single jump height by 150% for all ϕ. We hypothesize that this increase in performance results from higher intrusion velocities and accelerations associated with the preload. NSF POLS CAREER, Burroughs Wellcome Fund, and ARO.

  11. Deriving a dosage-response relationship for community response to high-energy impulsive noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fidell, Sanford; Pearsons, Karl S.

    1994-01-01

    The inability to systematically predict community response to exposure to sonic booms (and other high energy impulsive sounds) is a major impediment to credible analyses of the environmental effects of supersonic flight operations. Efforts to assess community response to high energy impulsive sounds are limited in at least two important ways. First, a paucity of appropriate empirical data makes it difficult to infer a dosage-response relationship by means similar to those used in the case of general transportation noise. Second, it is unclear how well the 'equal energy hypothesis' (the notion that duration, number, and level of individual events are directly interchangeable determinants of annoyance) applies to some forms of impulsive noise exposure. Some of the issues currently under consideration by a CHABA working group addressing these problems are discussed. These include means for applying information gained in controlled exposure studies about different rates of growth of annoyance with impulsive and non-impulsive sound exposure levels, and strategies for developing a dosage-response relationship in a data-poor area.

  12. Cocaine-, caffeine-, and stress-evoked cocaine reinstatement in high vs. low impulsive rats: Treatment with allopregnanolone

    PubMed Central

    Regier, Paul S.; Claxton, Alexander B.; Zlebnik, Natalie E.; Carroll, Marilyn E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Previous research indicates that individual differences in traits such as impulsivity, avidity for sweets, and novelty reactivity are predictors of several aspects of drug addiction. Specifically, rats that rank high on these behavioral measures are more likely than their low drug-seeking counterparts to exhibit several characteristics of drug-seeking behavior. In contrast, initial work suggests that the low drug-seeking animals are more reactive to negative events (e.g., punishment and anxiogenic stimuli). The goal of this study was to compare high and low impulsive rats on reinstatement of cocaine-seeking behavior elicited by cocaine (COC) and by negative stimuli such as the stress-inducing agent yohimbine (YOH) or a high dose of caffeine (CAFF). An additional goal was to determine whether treatment with allopregnanolone (ALLO) would reduce reinstatement (or relapse) of cocaine-seeking behavior under these priming conditions. Methods Female rats were selected as high (HiI) or low (LoI) impulsive using a delay-discounting task. After selection, they were allowed to self-administer cocaine for 12 days. Cocaine was then replaced with saline, and rats extinguished lever responding over 16 days. Subsequently, rats were pretreated with either vehicle control or ALLO, and cocaine seeking was reinstated by injections of COC, CAFF, or YOH. Results While there were no phenotype differences in maintenance and extinction of cocaine self-administration or reinstatement under control treatment conditions, ALLO attenuated COC- and CAFF-primed reinstatement in LoI but not HiI rats. Conclusions Overall, the present findings suggest that individual differences in impulsive behavior may influence efficacy of interventions aimed to reduce drug-seeking behavior. PMID:25073834

  13. Deposition of highly textured AlN thin films by reactive high power impulse magnetron sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Moreira, Milena A.; Törndahl, Tobias; Katardjiev, Ilia; Kubart, Tomas

    2015-03-15

    Aluminum nitride thin films were deposited by reactive high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) and pulsed direct-current on Si (100) and textured Mo substrates, where the same deposition conditions were used for both techniques. The films were characterized by x-ray diffraction and atomic force microscopy. The results show a pronounced improvement in the AlN crystalline texture for all films deposited by HiPIMS on Si. Already at room temperature, the HiPIMS films exhibited a strong preferred (002) orientation and at 400 °C, no contributions from other orientations were detected. Despite the low film thickness of only 200 nm, an ω-scan full width at half maximum value of 5.1° was achieved on Si. The results are attributed to the high ionization of sputtered material achieved in HiPIMS. On textured Mo, there was no significant difference between the deposition techniques.

  14. Neural connectivity during reward expectation dissociates psychopathic criminals from non-criminal individuals with high impulsive/antisocial psychopathic traits.

    PubMed

    Geurts, Dirk E M; von Borries, Katinka; Volman, Inge; Bulten, Berend Hendrik; Cools, Roshan; Verkes, Robbert-Jan

    2016-08-01

    Criminal behaviour poses a big challenge for society. A thorough understanding of the neurobiological mechanisms underlying criminality could optimize its prevention and management. Specifically,elucidating the neural mechanisms underpinning reward expectation might be pivotal to understanding criminal behaviour. So far no study has assessed reward expectation and its mechanisms in a criminal sample. To fill this gap, we assessed reward expectation in incarcerated, psychopathic criminals. We compared this group to two groups of non-criminal individuals: one with high levels and another with low levels of impulsive/antisocial traits. Functional magnetic resonance imaging was used to quantify neural responses to reward expectancy. Psychophysiological interaction analyses were performed to examine differences in functional connectivity patterns of reward-related regions. The data suggest that overt criminality is characterized, not by abnormal reward expectation per se, but rather by enhanced communication between reward-related striatal regions and frontal brain regions. We establish that incarcerated psychopathic criminals can be dissociated from non-criminal individuals with comparable impulsive/antisocial personality tendencies based on the degree to which reward-related brain regions interact with brain regions that control behaviour. The present results help us understand why some people act according to their impulsive/antisocial personality while others are able to behave adaptively despite reward-related urges. PMID:27217111

  15. Comparison of New Methods for Assessing Community Response to High Energy Impulsive Sounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fidell, Sanford; Pearsons, Karl S.

    1996-01-01

    The latest CHABA Working Group to have reviewed published information about the effects of high energy impulsive sounds (such as sonic booms) on communities has recommended abandonment of the dosage-response relationship identified by its predecessor in favor of two alternate prediction method. Both of the new assessment methods continue to rely on C-weighted measurements of impulsive sounds One of the two assessment methods retains the standard assumptions of the 'equal energy hypothesis' (the notion that annoyance is governed simply by the product of level, duration, and number noise events), and further assumes that the rate of growth of the prevalence of annoyance is proportional to the rate of growth of loudness with level. The other assessment method, however, assumes a level dependent (non-equal energy) summation of the C-weighted sound exposure levels of individual impulsive events. Since predictions of the second method are distribution-dependent, they are not readily represents graphically in the form of a single dosage-response function. The effects on annoyance predictions of variance in distributions of CSEL values of impulsive sounds are explored in this presentation.

  16. Effects of smoking abstinence on impulsive behavior among smokers high and low in ADHD-like symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Hawk, Larry W.

    2011-01-01

    Rationale Impulsivity, a multifaceted construct that includes inhibitory control and heightened preference for immediate reward, is central to models of drug use and abuse. Within a self-medication framework, abstinence from smoking may lead to an increase in impulsive behavior and the likelihood of relapse, particularly among persons with disorders (e.g., attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, ADHD) and personality traits (e.g., impulsivity) linked to impulsive behavior. Objectives This study aimed to examine the effects of smoking abstinence on multiple measures of impulsivity among a non-clinical sample of adult smokers selected for high and low levels of ADHD symptoms. Methods In a within-subjects design, participants selected for high or low levels of self-reported ADHD symptoms (N=56) completed sessions following overnight abstinence and when smoking as usual (order counterbalanced). Measures of impulsive behavior included response inhibition (i.e., stop signal task), interference control (i.e., attentional modification of prepulse inhibition (PPI) of startle), and impulsive choice (i.e., hypothetical delay discounting). Results As hypothesized, abstinence decreased response inhibition and PPI. Although ADHD symptoms moderated abstinence effects on impulsive choice and response inhibition, the pattern was opposite to our predictions: the low-ADHD group responded more impulsively when abstinent, whereas the high-ADHD group was relatively unaffected by abstinence. Conclusions These findings highlight the importance of utilizing multiple laboratory measures to examine a multifactorial construct such as impulsive behavior and raise questions about how best to assess symptoms of ADHD and impulsivity among non-abstinent smokers. PMID:21559802

  17. Characterization of high power impulse magnetron sputtering discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hala, Matej

    Paper I: In the first paper, we present a new approach in the characterization of the high power pulsed magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) discharge evolution—time- and species-resolved plasma imaging—employing a set of band-pass optical interference filters suitable for the isolation of the emission originating from different species populating the plasma. We demonstrate that the introduction of such filters can be used to distinguish different phases of the discharge, and to visualize numerous plasma effects including background gas excitations during the discharge ignition, gas shock waves, and expansion of metal-rich plasmas. In particular, the application of this technique is shown on the diagnostics of the 200 µs long non-reactive HiPIMS discharges using a Cr target. Paper II: In order to gain further information about the dynamics of reactive HiPIMS discharges, both fast plasma imaging and time- and space-resolved optical emission spectroscopy (OES) are used for a systematic investigation of the 200 µs long HiPIMS pulses operated in Ar, N2 and N 2/Ar mixtures and at various pressures. It is observed that the dense metal plasma created next to the target propagates in the reactor at a speed ranging from 0.7 to 3.5 km s-1, depending on the working gas composition and the pressure. In fact, it increases with higher N 2 concentration and with lower pressure. The visible form of the propagating plasma wave changes from a hemispherical shape in Ar to a drop-like shape extending far from the target with increasing N2 concentration, owing to the significant emission from molecular N2. Interestingly, the evidence of the target self-sputtering is found for all investigated conditions, including pure N2 atmosphere. Paper III: Here, we report on the time- and species-resolved plasma imaging analysis of the dynamics of the 200 µs long HiPIMS discharges above a Cr target ignited in pure O2. It is shown that the discharge emission is dominated solely by neutral and

  18. The Influence of Using Momentum and Impulse Computer Simulation to Senior High School Students’ Concept Mastery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaniawati, I.; Samsudin, A.; Hasopa, Y.; Sutrisno, A. D.; Suhendi, E.

    2016-08-01

    This research is based on students’ lack of mastery of physics abstract concepts. Thus, this study aims to improve senior high school students’ mastery of momentum and impulse concepts with the use of computer simulation. To achieve these objectives, the research method employed was pre experimental design with one group pre-test post-test. A total of 36 science students of grade 11 in one of public senior high school in Bandung became the sample in this study. The instruments utilized to determine the increase of students’ concept mastery were pretest and posttest in the form of multiple choices. After using computer simulations in physics learning, students’ mastery of momentum and impulse concept has increased as indicated by the normalized gain of 0.64 with the medium category.

  19. On the electron energy in the high power impulse magnetron sputtering discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Gudmundsson, J. T.; Sigurjonsson, P.; Larsson, P.; Lundin, D.; Helmersson, U.

    2009-06-15

    The temporal variation of the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) was measured with a Langmuir probe in a high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) discharge at 3 and 20 mTorr pressures. In the HiPIMS discharge a high power pulse is applied to a planar magnetron giving a high electron density and highly ionized sputtered vapor. The measured EEDF is Maxwellian-like during the pulse; it is broader for lower discharge pressure and it becomes narrower as the pulse progresses. This indicates that the plasma cools as the pulse progresses, probably due to high metal content of the discharge.

  20. An Efficient Adaptive Weighted Switching Median Filter for Removing High Density Impulse Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nair, Madhu S.; Ameera Mol, P. M.

    2014-09-01

    Restoration of images corrupted by impulse noise is a very active research area in image processing. In this paper, an Efficient Adaptive Weighted Switching Median filter for restoration of images that are corrupted by high density impulse noise is proposed. The filtering is performed as a two phase process—a detection phase followed by a filtering phase. In the proposed method, noise detection is done by HEIND algorithm proposed by Duan et al. The filtering algorithm is then applied to the pixels which are detected as noisy by the detection algorithm. All uncorrupted pixels in the image are left unchanged. The filtering window size is chosen adaptively depending on the local noise distribution around each corrupted pixels. Noisy pixels are replaced by a weighted median value of uncorrupted pixels in the filtering window. The weight value assigned to each uncorrupted pixels depends on its closeness to the central pixel.

  1. Ion energies in high power impulse magnetron sputtering with and without localized ionization zones

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Yuchen; Tanaka, Koichi; Liu, Jason; Anders, André

    2015-03-23

    High speed imaging of high power impulse magnetron sputtering discharges has revealed that ionization is localized in moving ionization zones but localization disappears at high currents for high yield targets. This offers an opportunity to study the effect ionization zones have on ion energies. We measure that ions have generally higher energies when ionization zones are present, supporting the concept that these zones are associated with moving potential humps. We propose that the disappearance of ionization zones is caused by an increased supply of atoms from the target which cools electrons and reduces depletion of atoms to be ionized.

  2. fMRI investigation of response inhibition, emotion, impulsivity, and clinical high-risk behavior in adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Matthew R. G.; Benoit, James R. A.; Juhás, Michal; Dametto, Ericson; Tse, Tiffanie T.; MacKay, Marnie; Sen, Bhaskar; Carroll, Alan M.; Hodlevskyy, Oleksandr; Silverstone, Peter H.; Dolcos, Florin; Dursun, Serdar M.; Greenshaw, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    High-risk behavior in adolescents is associated with injury, mental health problems, and poor outcomes in later life. Improved understanding of the neurobiology of high-risk behavior and impulsivity shows promise for informing clinical treatment and prevention as well as policy to better address high-risk behavior. We recruited 21 adolescents (age 14–17) with a wide range of high-risk behavior tendencies, including medically high-risk participants recruited from psychiatric clinics. Risk tendencies were assessed using the Adolescent Risk Behavior Screen (ARBS). ARBS risk scores correlated highly (0.78) with impulsivity scores from the Barratt Impulsivity scale (BIS). Participants underwent 4.7 Tesla functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) while performing an emotional Go/NoGo task. This task presented an aversive or neutral distractor image simultaneously with each Go or NoGo stimulus. Risk behavior and impulsivity tendencies exhibited similar but not identical associations with fMRI activation patterns in prefrontal brain regions. We interpret these results as reflecting differences in response inhibition, emotional stimulus processing, and emotion regulation in relation to participant risk behavior tendencies and impulsivity levels. The results are consistent with high impulsivity playing an important role in determining high risk tendencies in this sample containing clinically high-risk adolescents. PMID:26483645

  3. Pay attention to impulsivity: modelling low attentive and high impulsive subtypes of adult ADHD in the 5-choice continuous performance task (5C-CPT) in female rats.

    PubMed

    Tomlinson, Anneka; Grayson, Ben; Marsh, Samuel; Harte, Michael K; Barnes, Samuel A; Marshall, Kay M; Neill, Joanna C

    2014-08-01

    Varying levels of attention and impulsivity deficits are core features of the three subtypes of adult attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). To date, little is known about the neurobiological correlates of these subtypes. Development of a translational animal model is essential to improve our understanding and improve therapeutic strategies. The 5-choice continuous performance task (5C-CPT) in rats can be used to examine different forms of attention and impulsivity. Adult rats were trained to pre-set 5C-CPT criterion and subsequently separated into subgroups according to baseline levels of sustained attention, vigilance, premature responding and response disinhibition in the 5C-CPT. The behavioural subgroups were selected to represent the different subtypes of adult ADHD. Consequently, effects of the clinically used pharmacotherapies (methylphenidate and atomoxetine) were assessed in the different subgroups. Four subgroups were identified: low-attentive (LA), high-attentive (HA), high-impulsive (HI) and low-impulsive (LI). Methylphenidate and atomoxetine produced differential effects in the subgroups. Methylphenidate increased sustained attention and vigilance in LA animals, and reduced premature responding in HI animals. Atomoxetine also improved sustained attention and vigilance in LA animals, and reduced response disinhibition and premature responding in HI animals. This is the first study using adult rats to demonstrate the translational value of the 5C-CPT to select subgroups of rats, which may be used to model the subtypes observed in adult ADHD. Our findings suggest that this as an important paradigm to increase our understanding of the neurobiological underpinnings of adult ADHD-subtypes and their response to pharmacotherapy.

  4. Genetics of impulsive behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Bevilacqua, Laura; Goldman, David

    2013-01-01

    Impulsivity, defined as the tendency to act without foresight, comprises a multitude of constructs and is associated with a variety of psychiatric disorders. Dissecting different aspects of impulsive behaviour and relating these to specific neurobiological circuits would improve our understanding of the etiology of complex behaviours for which impulsivity is key, and advance genetic studies in this behavioural domain. In this review, we will discuss the heritability of some impulsivity constructs and their possible use as endophenotypes (heritable, disease-associated intermediate phenotypes). Several functional genetic variants associated with impulsive behaviour have been identified by the candidate gene approach and re-sequencing, and whole genome strategies can be implemented for discovery of novel rare and common alleles influencing impulsivity. Via deep sequencing an uncommon HTR2B stop codon, common in one population, was discovered, with implications for understanding impulsive behaviour in both humans and rodents and for future gene discovery. PMID:23440466

  5. High-Resolution Analysis of Seismic Air Gun Impulses and Their Reverberant Field as Contributors to an Acoustic Environment.

    PubMed

    Guerra, Melania; Dugan, Peter J; Ponirakis, Dimitri W; Popescu, Marian; Shiu, Yu; Rice, Aaron N; Clark, Christopher W

    2016-01-01

    In September and October 2011, a seismic survey took place in Baffin Bay, Western Greenland, in close proximity to a marine protected area (MPA). As part of the mitigation effort, five bottom-mounted marine acoustic recording units (MARUs) collected data that were used for the purpose of measuring temporal and spectral features from each impulsive event, providing a high-resolution record of seismic reverberation persistent after the direct impulse. Results were compared with ambient-noise levels as computed after the seismic survey to evidence that as a consequence of a series of repeating seismic impulses, sustained elevated levels create the potential for masking.

  6. High power impulse magnetron sputtering discharges: Instabilities and plasma self-organization

    SciTech Connect

    Ehiasarian, A. P.; New, R.; Hecimovic, A.; Arcos, T. de los; Schulz-von der Gathen, V.; Boeke, M.; Winter, J.

    2012-03-12

    We report on instabilities in high power impulse magnetron sputtering plasmas which are likely to be of the generalized drift wave type. They are characterized by well defined regions of high and low plasma emissivity along the racetrack of the magnetron and cause periodic shifts in floating potential. The azimuthal mode number m depends on plasma current, plasma density, and gas pressure. The structures rotate in E-vectorxB-vector direction at velocities of {approx}10 km s{sup -1} and frequencies up to 200 kHz. Collisions with residual gas atoms slow down the rotating wave, whereas increasing ionization degree of the gas and plasma conductivity speeds it up.

  7. Spectroscopic imaging of self-organization in high power impulse magnetron sputtering plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Centre for Quantum Technologies, National University of Singapore, 3 Science Drive 2, 117543 Singapore, Singapore; Andersson, Joakim; Ni, Pavel; Anders, Andre

    2013-07-17

    Excitation and ionization conditions in traveling ionization zones of high power impulse magnetron sputtering plasmas were investigated using fast camera imaging through interference filters. The images, taken in end-on and side on views using light of selected gas and target atom and ion spectral lines, suggest that ionization zones are regions of enhanced densities of electrons, and excited atoms and ions. Excited atoms and ions of the target material (Al) are strongly concentrated near the target surface. Images from the highest excitation energies exhibit the most localized regions, suggesting localized Ohmic heating consistent with double layer formation.

  8. Plasma reactivity in high-power impulse magnetron sputtering through oxygen kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Vitelaru, Catalin; Lundin, Daniel; Brenning, Nils; Minea, Tiberiu

    2013-09-02

    The atomic oxygen metastable dynamics in a Reactive High-Power Impulse Magnetron Sputtering (R-HiPIMS) discharge has been characterized using time-resolved diode laser absorption in an Ar/O{sub 2} gas mixture with a Ti target. Two plasma regions are identified: the ionization region (IR) close to the target and further out the diffusion region (DR), separated by a transition region. The μs temporal resolution allows identifying the main atomic oxygen production and destruction routes, which are found to be very different during the pulse as compared to the afterglow as deduced from their evolution in space and time.

  9. Self-organization and self-limitation in high power impulse magnetron sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre

    2012-05-28

    The plasma over the racetrack in high power impulse magnetron sputtering develops in traveling ionization zones. Power densities can locally reach 10{sup 9} W/m{sup 2}, which is much higher than usually reported. Ionization zones move because ions are 'evacuated' by the electric field, exposing neutrals to magnetically confined, drifting electrons. Drifting secondary electrons amplify ionization of the same ionization zone where the primary ions came from, while sputtered and outgassing atoms are supplied to the following zone(s). Strong density gradients parallel to the target disrupt electron confinement: a negative feedback mechanism that stabilizes ionization runaway.

  10. Alfven's critical ionization velocity observed in high power impulse magnetron sputtering discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Brenning, N.; Lundin, D.

    2012-09-15

    Azimuthally rotating dense plasma structures, spokes, have recently been detected in several high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) devices used for thin film deposition and surface treatment, and are thought to be important for plasma buildup, energizing of electrons, as well as cross-B transport of charged particles. In this work, the drift velocities of these spokes are shown to be strongly correlated with the critical ionization velocity, CIV, proposed by Alfven. It is proposed as the most promising approach in combining the CIV and HiPIMS research fields is to focus on the role of spokes in the process of electron energization.

  11. Tridimensional Personality Questionnaire data on alcoholic violent offenders: specific connections to severe impulsive cluster B personality disorders and violent criminality

    PubMed Central

    Tikkanen, Roope; Holi, Matti; Lindberg, Nina; Virkkunen, Matti

    2007-01-01

    Background The validity of traditional categorical personality disorder diagnoses is currently re-evaluated from a continuous perspective, and the evolving DSM-V classification may describe personality disorders dimensionally. The utility of dimensional personality assessment, however, is unclear in violent offenders with severe personality pathology. Methods The temperament structure of 114 alcoholic violent offenders with antisocial personality disorder (ASPD) was compared to 84 offenders without ASPD, and 170 healthy controls. Inclusion occurred during a court-ordered mental examination preceded by homicide, assault, battery, rape or arson. Participants underwent assessment of temperament with the Tridimensional Personality Questionnaire (TPQ) and were diagnosed with DSM-III-R criteria. Results The typical temperament profile in violent offender having ASPD comprised high novelty seeking, high harm avoidance, and low reward dependence. A 21% minority scored low in trait harm avoidance. Results, including the polarized harm avoidance dimension, are in accordance with Cloninger's hypothesis of dimensional description of ASPD. The low harm avoidance offenders committed less impulsive violence than high harm avoidance offenders. High harm avoidance was associated with comorbid antisocial personality disorder and borderline personality disorder. Conclusion Results indicate that the DSM based ASPD diagnosis in alcoholic violent offenders associates with impulsiveness and high novelty seeking but comprises two different types of ASPD associated with distinct second-order traits that possibly explain differences in type of violent criminality. Low harm avoidance offenders have many traits in common with high scorers on the Hare Psychopathy Checklist-Revised (PCL-R). Results link high harm avoidance with broad personality pathology and argue for the usefulness of self-report questionnaires in clinical praxis. PMID:17662159

  12. Adolescent gambling and impulsivity: Does employment during high school moderate the association?

    PubMed

    Canale, Natale; Scacchi, Luca; Griffiths, Mark D

    2016-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the potential moderating relationships between adolescent gambling and impulsivity traits (negative urgency, positive urgency, lack of premeditation, lack of perseverance and sensation seeking) with employment status. High-school students (N=400; 69% male; mean age=18.35years; SD=1.16; past year gamblers) were surveyed to provide data on impulsivity and employment. Multiple linear regression analysis was applied to examine associations with gambling and related problems. Positive urgency was associated with stronger scores of both gambling frequency and problem gambling. Students in employment had substantially higher frequency of gambling and greater problem gambling. Moreover, the combination of having a job and low perseverance was associated with a particularly high frequency on gambling. These findings further support the importance of positive urgency and employment status in adolescent gambling. The study highlights unique moderating relationship between gambling and lack of perseverance with employment status. Youth with a low perseverance and having a job may have particular need for interventions to reduce gambling. PMID:27085156

  13. Model helicopter rotor high-speed impulsive noise: Measured acoustics and blade pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boxwell, D. A.; Schmitz, F. H.; Splettstoesser, W. R.; Schultz, K. J.

    1983-01-01

    A 1/17-scale research model of the AH-1 series helicopter main rotor was tested. Model-rotor acoustic and simultaneous blade pressure data were recorded at high speeds where full-scale helicopter high-speed impulsive noise levels are known to be dominant. Model-rotor measurements of the peak acoustic pressure levels, waveform shapes, and directively patterns are directly compared with full-scale investigations, using an equivalent in-flight technique. Model acoustic data are shown to scale remarkably well in shape and in amplitude with full-scale results. Model rotor-blade pressures are presented for rotor operating conditions both with and without shock-like discontinuities in the radiated acoustic waveform. Acoustically, both model and full-scale measurements support current evidence that above certain high subsonic advancing-tip Mach numbers, local shock waves that exist on the rotor blades ""delocalize'' and radiate to the acoustic far-field.

  14. Instantaneous Impulses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erlichson, Herman

    2000-01-01

    Describes an experiment that extends Newton's instantaneous-impulse method of orbital analysis to a graphical method of orbit determination. Discusses the experiment's usefulness for teaching both horizontal projectile motion and instantaneous impulse. (WRM)

  15. Swedish high-school pupils’ attitudes towards drugs in relation to drug usage, impulsiveness and other risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Jimmefors, Alexander; Archer, Trevor; Ewalds-Kvist, Béatrice

    2014-01-01

    Background. Illicit drug use influences people’s lives and elicits unwanted behaviour. Current research shows that there is an increase in young people’s drug use in Sweden. The aim was to investigate Swedish high-school pupils’ attitudes, impulsiveness and gender differences linked to drug use. Risk and protective factors relative to drug use were also a focus of interest. Method. High school pupils (n = 146) aged 17–21 years, responded to the Adolescent Health and Development Inventory, Barratt Impulsiveness Scale and Knowledge, and the Attitudes and Beliefs. Direct logistic, multiple regression analyses, and Multivariate Analysis of Variance were used to analyze the data. Results. Positive Attitudes towards drugs were predicted by risk factors (odds ratio = 37.31) and gender (odds ratio = .32). Risk factors (odds ratio = 46.89), positive attitudes towards drugs (odds ratio = 4.63), and impulsiveness (odds ratio = 1.11) predicted drug usage. Risk factors dimensions Family, Friends and Individual Characteristic were positively related to impulsiveness among drug users. Moreover, although boys reported using drugs to a greater extent, girls expressed more positive attitude towards drugs and even reported more impulsiveness than boys. Conclusion. This study reinforces the notion that research ought to focus on gender differences relative to pro-drug attitudes along with testing for differences in the predictors of girls’ and boys’ delinquency and impulsiveness. Positive attitudes towards drugs among adolescents seem to be part of a vicious circle including risk factors, such as friendly drug environments (e.g., friends who use drugs) and unsupportive family environments, individual characteristics, and impulsiveness. PMID:24949233

  16. Swedish high-school pupils' attitudes towards drugs in relation to drug usage, impulsiveness and other risk factors.

    PubMed

    Mousavi, Fariba; Garcia, Danilo; Jimmefors, Alexander; Archer, Trevor; Ewalds-Kvist, Béatrice

    2014-01-01

    Background. Illicit drug use influences people's lives and elicits unwanted behaviour. Current research shows that there is an increase in young people's drug use in Sweden. The aim was to investigate Swedish high-school pupils' attitudes, impulsiveness and gender differences linked to drug use. Risk and protective factors relative to drug use were also a focus of interest. Method. High school pupils (n = 146) aged 17-21 years, responded to the Adolescent Health and Development Inventory, Barratt Impulsiveness Scale and Knowledge, and the Attitudes and Beliefs. Direct logistic, multiple regression analyses, and Multivariate Analysis of Variance were used to analyze the data. Results. Positive Attitudes towards drugs were predicted by risk factors (odds ratio = 37.31) and gender (odds ratio = .32). Risk factors (odds ratio = 46.89), positive attitudes towards drugs (odds ratio = 4.63), and impulsiveness (odds ratio = 1.11) predicted drug usage. Risk factors dimensions Family, Friends and Individual Characteristic were positively related to impulsiveness among drug users. Moreover, although boys reported using drugs to a greater extent, girls expressed more positive attitude towards drugs and even reported more impulsiveness than boys. Conclusion. This study reinforces the notion that research ought to focus on gender differences relative to pro-drug attitudes along with testing for differences in the predictors of girls' and boys' delinquency and impulsiveness. Positive attitudes towards drugs among adolescents seem to be part of a vicious circle including risk factors, such as friendly drug environments (e.g., friends who use drugs) and unsupportive family environments, individual characteristics, and impulsiveness. PMID:24949233

  17. Investigation of high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HIPIMS) discharge using fast ICCD camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hecimovic, Ante

    2012-10-01

    High power impulse magnetron sputtering (HIPIMS) combines impulse glow discharges at power levels up to the MW range with conventional magnetron cathodes to achieve a highly ionised sputtered flux. The dynamics of the HIPIMS discharge was investigated using fast Intensified Charge Coupled Device (ICCD) camera. In the first experiment the HIPIMS plasma was recorded from the side with goal to analyse the plasma intensity using Abel inversion to obtain the emissivity maps of the plasma species. Resulting emissivity maps provide the information on the spatial distribution of Ar and sputtered material and evolution of the plasma chemistry above the cathode. In the second experiment the plasma emission was recorded with camera facing the target. The images show that the HIPIMS plasma develops drift wave type instabilities characterized by well defined regions of high and low plasma emissivity along the racetrack of the magnetron. The instabilities cause periodic shifts in the floating potential. The structures rotate in ExB direction at velocities of 10 kms-1 and frequencies up to 200 kHz. The high emissivity regions comprise Ar and metal ion emission with strong Ar and metal neutral emission depletion. A detailed analysis of the temporal evolution of the saturated instabilities using four consequently triggered fast ICCD cameras is presented. Furthermore working gas pressure and discharge current variation showed that the shape and the speed of the instability strongly depend on the working gas and target material combination. In order to better understand the mechanism of the instability, different optical interference band pass filters (of metal and gas atom, and ion lines) were used to observe the spatial distribution of each species within the instability.

  18. Steep front short duration low voltage impulse performance of distribution transformers

    SciTech Connect

    Burrage, L.M.; Veverka, E.F.; McConnell, B.W.

    1987-01-01

    An extensive literature search of steep front short duration (SFSD) impulse sources, their characteristics and effect on power system equipment has led to the specification of a test program to evaluate key apparatus and insulations. Distribution transformers, although not overly susceptible to impulse damage, have been selected as one of the candidate apparatus for low and high voltage SFSD impulse tests. This paper covers the low voltage SFSD impulse response of conventional oil insulated shell form and core form distribution transformers.

  19. Individual differences in the time course of reward processing: Stage-specific links with depression and impulsivity.

    PubMed

    Novak, Brittni K; Novak, Keisha D; Lynam, Donald R; Foti, Dan

    2016-09-01

    Reward dysfunction has been implicated in a wide range of psychological disorders, including internalizing and externalizing psychopathology. Basic neuroscience research has shown that reward is a multistage process, yet it is unclear how specific stages relate to individual differences in reward sensitivity. The current study utilized event-related potentials elicited during a monetary incentive task to parse sub-stages within anticipatory and consummatory reward processing. Effects of depressive symptoms and trait impulsivity were examined at each sub-stage (N=92). Reward anticipation modulated neural activity across three sub-stages: cue detection (cue-P3), approach behavior (contingent negative variation, CNV), and outcome anticipation (stimulus preceding negativity). Reward delivery modulated activity across two sub-stages: initial evaluation (reward positivity, RewP), and allocation of attention (feedback-P3). Sensation seeking predicted faster reaction times, as well as cue-P3 and RewP amplitudes. Depression and lack of premeditation interacted to predict CNV and RewP amplitudes. Results demonstrate that individual differences in reward functioning are stage-specific.

  20. Design and identification of high performance steel alloys for structures subjected to underwater impulsive loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Xiaoding; Latourte, Felix; Feinberg, Zack; Olson, Gregory; Espinosa, Horacio; Micro; Nanomechanics Laboratory Team; Olson Group Team

    2011-06-01

    To characterize the performance of naval structures, underwater blast experiments have been developed. Martensitic and austenitic steel alloys were designed to optimize the performance of structures subjected to impulsive loads. The deformation and fracture characteristics of the designed steel alloys were investigated experimentally and computationally. The experiments were based on an instrumented fluid structure interaction apparatus, in which deflection profiles were recorded. The computational study was based on a modified Gurson damage model able to accurately describe ductile failure under various loading paths. The model was calibrated for two high performance martensitic steels (HSLA-100 and BA-160) and an austenitic steel (TRIP-120). The martensitic steel (BA-160) was designed to maximize strength and fracture toughness while the austenitic steel (TRIP-120) was designed to maximize uniform ductility. The combined experimental-computational approach provided insight into the relationships between material properties and blast resistance of structures.

  1. Are the argon metastables important in high power impulse magnetron sputtering discharges?

    SciTech Connect

    Gudmundsson, J. T.; Lundin, D.; Minea, T. M.; Stancu, G. D.; Brenning, N.

    2015-11-15

    We use an ionization region model to explore the ionization processes in the high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) discharge in argon with a titanium target. In conventional dc magnetron sputtering (dcMS), stepwise ionization can be an important route for ionization of the argon gas. However, in the HiPIMS discharge stepwise ionization is found to be negligible during the breakdown phase of the HiPIMS pulse and becomes significant (but never dominating) only later in the pulse. For the sputtered species, Penning ionization can be a significant ionization mechanism in the dcMS discharges, while in the HiPIMS discharge Penning ionization is always negligible as compared to electron impact ionization. The main reasons for these differences are a higher plasma density in the HiPIMS discharge, and a higher electron temperature. Furthermore, we explore the ionization fraction and the ionized flux fraction of the sputtered vapor and compare with recent experimental work.

  2. Unstructured adaptive mesh computations of rotorcraft high-speed impulsive noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strawn, Roger; Garceau, Michael; Biswas, Rupak

    1993-01-01

    A new method is developed for modeling helicopter high-speed impulsive (HSI) noise. The aerodynamics and acoustics near the rotor blade tip are computed by solving the Euler equations on an unstructured grid. A stationary Kirchhoff surface integral is then used to propagate these acoustic signals to the far field. The near-field Euler solver uses a solution-adaptive grid scheme to improve the resolution of the acoustic signal. Grid points are locally added and/or deleted from the mesh at each adaptive step. An important part of this procedure is the choice of an appropriate error indicator. The error indicator is computed from the flow field solution and determines the regions for mesh coarsening and refinement. Computed results for HSI noise compare favorably with experimental data for three different hovering rotor cases.

  3. Particle visualization in high-power impulse magnetron sputtering. I. 2D density mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Britun, Nikolay Palmucci, Maria; Konstantinidis, Stephanos; Snyders, Rony

    2015-04-28

    Time-resolved characterization of an Ar-Ti high-power impulse magnetron sputtering discharge has been performed. This paper deals with two-dimensional density mapping in the discharge volume obtained by laser-induced fluorescence imaging. The time-resolved density evolution of Ti neutrals, singly ionized Ti atoms (Ti{sup +}), and Ar metastable atoms (Ar{sup met}) in the area above the sputtered cathode is mapped for the first time in this type of discharges. The energetic characteristics of the discharge species are additionally studied by Doppler-shift laser-induced fluorescence imaging. The questions related to the propagation of both the neutral and ionized discharge particles, as well as to their spatial density distributions, are discussed.

  4. Particle visualization in high-power impulse magnetron sputtering. II. Absolute density dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Britun, Nikolay Palmucci, Maria; Konstantinidis, Stephanos; Snyders, Rony

    2015-04-28

    Time-resolved characterization of an Ar-Ti high-power impulse magnetron sputtering discharge has been performed. The present, second, paper of the study is related to the discharge characterization in terms of the absolute density of species using resonant absorption spectroscopy. The results on the time-resolved density evolution of the neutral and singly-ionized Ti ground state atoms as well as the metastable Ti and Ar atoms during the discharge on- and off-time are presented. Among the others, the questions related to the inversion of population of the Ti energy sublevels, as well as to re-normalization of the two-dimensional density maps in terms of the absolute density of species, are stressed.

  5. Impulsivity and Academic Cheating

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderman, Eric M.; Cupp, Pamela K.; Lane, Derek

    2009-01-01

    The authors examined the relations between academic cheating and impulsivity in a large sample of adolescents enrolled in high school health education classes. Results indicated that impulsivity predicts academic cheating for students who report extensive involvement in cheating. However, students who engage in extensive cheating are less likely…

  6. Feasibility of Colliding-beam fast-fission reactor via 238U80++238 U80+ --> 4 FF + 5n + 430 MeV beam with suppressed plutonium and direct conversion of fission fragment (FF) energy into electricity and/or Rocket propellant with high specific impulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maglich, Bogdan; Hester, Tim; Calsec Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    Uranium-uranium colliding beam experiment1, used fully ionized 238U92+ at energy 100GeV --> <-- 100 GeV, has measured total σ = 487 b. Reaction rate of colliding beams is proportional to neutron flux-squared. First functional Auto-Collider3-6, a compact Migma IV, 1 m in diameter, had self-colliding deuterons, D+, of 725 KeV --> <-- 725 KeV, resulting in copious production of T and 3He. U +U Autocollider``EXYDER'' will use strong-focusing magnet7, which would increase reaction rate by 104. 80 times ionized U ions accelerated through 3 MV accelerator, will collide beam 240 MeV --> <-- 240 MeV. Reaction is: 238U80+ +238 U80+ --> 4 FF + 5n + 430 MeV. Using a simple model1 fission σf ~ 100 b. Suppression of Pu by a factor of 106 will be achieved because NO thermal neutron fission can take place; only fast, 1-3 MeV, where σabs is negligible. Direct conversion of 95% of 430 MeV produced is carried by electrically charged FFs which are magnetically funneled for direct conversion of energy of FFs via electrostatic decelerators4,11. 90% of 930 MeV is electrically recoverable. Depending on the assumptions, we project electric _ power density production of 20 to 200 MWe m-3, equivalent to Thermal 1.3 - 13 GWthm-3. If one-half of unburned U is used for propulsion while rest powers system, heavy FF ion mass provides specific impulse Isp = 106 sec., 103 times higher than current rocket engines.

  7. Impulsiveness in professional fighters.

    PubMed

    Banks, Sarah J; Mayer, Brittany; Obuchowski, Nancy; Shin, Wanyong; Lowe, Mark; Phillips, Michael; Modic, Michael; Bernick, Charles

    2014-01-01

    Sports involving repeated head trauma are associated with risk of neurodegenerative disorders such as chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). Among the behavioral manifestations of CTE is increased impulsiveness. Here, the authors investigate the relationship between impulsiveness and exposure to head trauma in a large group of active professional fighters. Fighters tended to report less impulsiveness than did non-fighting control respondents. Overall, greater fight exposure was associated with higher levels of a specific form of impulsiveness, although there were differences between mixed martial arts fighters and boxers. Fight exposure was associated with reduction in volume of certain brain structures, and these changes were also associated with impulsiveness patterns. Longitudinal studies of professional fighters are important to understand the risk for neuropsychiatric problems. PMID:24515676

  8. Rethinking impulsivity in suicide.

    PubMed

    Klonsky, E David; May, Alexis

    2010-12-01

    Elevated impulsivity is thought to facilitate the transition from suicidal thoughts to suicidal behavior. Therefore, impulsivity should distinguish those who have attempted suicide (attempters) from those who have only considered suicide (ideators-only). This hypothesis was examined in three large nonclinical samples: (1) 2,011 military recruits, (2) 1,296 college students, and (3) 399 high school students. In sample 1, contrary to traditional models of suicide risk, a unidimensional measure of impulsivity failed to distinguish attempters from ideators-only. In samples 2 and 3, which were administered a multidimensional measure of impulsivity (i.e., the UPPS impulsive behavior scale; Whiteside & Lynam, 2001), different impulsivity-related traits characterized attempters and ideators-only. Whereas both attempters and ideators-only exhibited high urgency (the tendency to act impulsive in the face of negative emotions), only attempters exhibited poor premeditation (a diminished ability to think through the consequences of one's actions). Neither attempters nor ideators-only exhibited high sensation seeking or lack of perseverance. Future research should continue to distinguish impulsivity-related traits that predict suicide ideation from those that predict suicide attempts, and models of suicide risk should be revised accordingly. PMID:21198330

  9. Study of the Helicon Source Operation in the Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket (VASIMR) Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molvig, Kim; Batishchev, Oleg

    2003-01-01

    During this research period the following models of the VASIMR helicon discharge have been further developed and applied to analyze the on-going VX- 10 ASPL experiment: A) 1D semi-analytical model for a mixed-collisional propellant flow B) OD power and balance model for the whole helicon discharge In this particular research period we have concentrated on the MW-level performance of the VASIMR helicon source. Favorable high-power scaling and reduced ionization costs were obtained, and presented at the VASIMR NASA review in the Fall '02. This Grant is continuation of the previous NAG9-1224 award. The research results are summarized in 14 publications; they were presented as 20+ talks at the major International Conferences and scientific seminars at the leading Academic and Research Institutions. The reported results allowed helicon discharge characterization, understanding of the several experimental observations, and helped to make predictions and propose structural modifications for the advanced VASIMR helicon source operation.

  10. Impulsive action: emotional impulses and their control

    PubMed Central

    Frijda, Nico H.; Ridderinkhof, K. Richard; Rietveld, Erik

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a novel theoretical view on impulsive action, integrating thus far separate perspectives on non-reflective action, motivation, emotion regulation, and impulse control. We frame impulsive action in terms of directedness of the individual organism toward, away, or against other givens – toward future states and away from one’s present state. First, appraisal of a perceived or thought-of event or object on occasion, rapidly and without premonition or conscious deliberation, triggers a motive to modify one’s relation to that event or object. Situational specifics of the event as perceived and appraised motivate and guide selection of readiness for a particular kind of purposive action. Second, perception of complex situations can give rise to multiple appraisals, multiple motives, and multiple simultaneous changes in action readiness. Multiple states of action readiness may interact in generating action, by reinforcing or attenuating each other, thereby yielding impulse control. We show how emotion control can itself result from a motive state or state of action readiness. Our view links impulsive action mechanistically to states of action readiness, which is the central feature of what distinguishes one kind of emotion from another. It thus provides a novel theoretical perspective to the somewhat fragmented literature on impulsive action. PMID:24917835

  11. ZrN coatings deposited by high power impulse magnetron sputtering and cathodic arc techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Purandare, Yashodhan Ehiasarian, Arutiun; Hovsepian, Papken; Santana, Antonio

    2014-05-15

    Zirconium nitride (ZrN) coatings were deposited on 1 μm finish high speed steel and 316L stainless steel test coupons. Cathodic Arc (CA) and High Power Impulse Magnetron Sputtering (HIPIMS) + Unbalanced Magnetron Sputtering (UBM) techniques were utilized to deposit coatings. CA plasmas are known to be rich in metal and gas ions of the depositing species as well as macroparticles (droplets) emitted from the arc sports. Combining HIPIMS technique with UBM in the same deposition process facilitated increased ion bombardment on the depositing species during coating growth maintaining high deposition rate. Prior to coating deposition, substrates were pretreated with Zr{sup +} rich plasma, for both arc deposited and HIPIMS deposited coatings, which led to a very high scratch adhesion value (L{sub C2}) of 100 N. Characterization results revealed the overall thickness of the coatings in the range of 2.5 μm with hardness in the range of 30–40 GPa depending on the deposition technique. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy and tribological experiments such as dry sliding wear tests and corrosion studies have been utilized to study the effects of ion bombardment on the structure and properties of these coatings. In all the cases, HIPIMS assisted UBM deposited coating fared equal or better than the arc deposited coatings, the reasons being discussed in this paper. Thus H+U coatings provide a good alternative to arc deposited where smooth, dense coatings are required and macrodroplets cannot be tolerated.

  12. High specific heat superconducting composite

    DOEpatents

    Steyert, Jr., William A.

    1979-01-01

    A composite superconductor formed from a high specific heat ceramic such as gadolinium oxide or gadolinium-aluminum oxide and a conventional metal conductor such as copper or aluminum which are insolubly mixed together to provide adiabatic stability in a superconducting mode of operation. The addition of a few percent of insoluble gadolinium-aluminum oxide powder or gadolinium oxide powder to copper, increases the measured specific heat of the composite by one to two orders of magnitude below the 5.degree. K. level while maintaining the high thermal and electrical conductivity of the conventional metal conductor.

  13. Novel high power impulse magnetron sputtering enhanced by an auxiliary electrical field.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunwei; Tian, Xiubo

    2016-08-01

    The high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HIPIMS) technique is a novel highly ionized physical vapor deposition method with a high application potential. However, the electron utilization efficiency during sputtering is rather low and the metal particle ionization rate needs to be considerably improved to allow for a large-scale industrial application. Therefore, we enhanced the HIPIMS technique by simultaneously applying an electric field (EF-HIPIMS). The effect of the electric field on the discharge process was studied using a current sensor and an optical emission spectrometer. Furthermore, the spatial distribution of the electric potential and electric field during the EF-HIPIMS process was simulated using the ANSYS software. The results indicate that a higher electron utilization efficiency and a higher particle ionization rate could be achieved. The auxiliary anode obviously changed the distribution of the electric potential and the electric field in the discharge region, which increased the plasma density and enhanced the degree of ionization of the vanadium and argon gas. Vanadium films were deposited to further compare both techniques, and the morphology of the prepared films was investigated by scanning electron microscopy. The films showed a smaller crystal grain size and a denser growth structure when the electric field was applied during the discharge process.

  14. Novel high power impulse magnetron sputtering enhanced by an auxiliary electrical field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chunwei; Tian, Xiubo

    2016-08-01

    The high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HIPIMS) technique is a novel highly ionized physical vapor deposition method with a high application potential. However, the electron utilization efficiency during sputtering is rather low and the metal particle ionization rate needs to be considerably improved to allow for a large-scale industrial application. Therefore, we enhanced the HIPIMS technique by simultaneously applying an electric field (EF-HIPIMS). The effect of the electric field on the discharge process was studied using a current sensor and an optical emission spectrometer. Furthermore, the spatial distribution of the electric potential and electric field during the EF-HIPIMS process was simulated using the ANSYS software. The results indicate that a higher electron utilization efficiency and a higher particle ionization rate could be achieved. The auxiliary anode obviously changed the distribution of the electric potential and the electric field in the discharge region, which increased the plasma density and enhanced the degree of ionization of the vanadium and argon gas. Vanadium films were deposited to further compare both techniques, and the morphology of the prepared films was investigated by scanning electron microscopy. The films showed a smaller crystal grain size and a denser growth structure when the electric field was applied during the discharge process.

  15. High sensitivity to punishment and low impulsivity in obsessive-compulsive patients with hoarding symptoms.

    PubMed

    Fullana, Miquel Angel; Mataix-Cols, David; Caseras, Xavier; Alonso, Pino; Manuel Menchón, Josep; Vallejo, Julio; Torrubia, Rafael

    2004-11-30

    Recent factor-analytic studies involving over 2000 patients have reduced the symptoms of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) into a few dimensions or potentially overlapping syndromes. Hoarding consistently emerged as a separate factor in all these studies. This study investigated the relationship between OCD symptom dimensions and normal personality traits in a sample of 56 OCD patients. They were administered the Sensitivity to Punishment and Sensitivity to Reward Questionnaire and the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire, derived from Gray's and Eysenck's personality models, respectively. The personality scores were correlated with previously identified symptom dimensions from the Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale Symptom Checklist (Y-BOCS-SC), controlling for overall illness severity. High scores on the hoarding dimension of the Y-BOCS-SC were positively correlated with scores on the Sensitivity to Punishment scale and negatively with Eysenck's Psychoticism scale. While high sensitivity to punishment is a personality feature common to many OCD patients, it is more strongly pronounced in patients with hoarding symptoms. These patients also appear to be less impulsive or novelty seeking as reflected by low scores on Eysenck's Psychoticism scale. High sensitivity to punishment and low novelty seeking in OCD hoarders might explain their poor compliance and response to conventional treatments, but this question needs to be explored further in a prospective treatment study.

  16. Plasma"anti-assistance" and"self-assistance" to high power impulse magnetron sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre; Yushkov, Georgy Yu.

    2009-01-30

    A plasma assistance system was investigated with the goal to operate high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) at lower pressure than usual, thereby to enhance the utilization of the ballistic atoms and ions with high kinetic energy in the film growth process. Gas plasma flow from a constricted plasma source was aimed at the magnetron target. Contrary to initial expectations, such plasma assistance turned out to be contra-productive because it led to the extinction of the magnetron discharge. The effect can be explained by gas rarefaction. A better method of reducing the necessary gas pressure is operation at relatively high pulse repetition rates where the afterglow plasma of one pulse assists in the development of the next pulse. Here we show that this method, known from medium-frequency (MF) pulsed sputtering, is also very important at the much lower pulse repetition rates of HiPIMS. A minimum in the possible operational pressure is found in the frequency region between HiPIMS and MF pulsed sputtering.

  17. Novel high power impulse magnetron sputtering enhanced by an auxiliary electrical field.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunwei; Tian, Xiubo

    2016-08-01

    The high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HIPIMS) technique is a novel highly ionized physical vapor deposition method with a high application potential. However, the electron utilization efficiency during sputtering is rather low and the metal particle ionization rate needs to be considerably improved to allow for a large-scale industrial application. Therefore, we enhanced the HIPIMS technique by simultaneously applying an electric field (EF-HIPIMS). The effect of the electric field on the discharge process was studied using a current sensor and an optical emission spectrometer. Furthermore, the spatial distribution of the electric potential and electric field during the EF-HIPIMS process was simulated using the ANSYS software. The results indicate that a higher electron utilization efficiency and a higher particle ionization rate could be achieved. The auxiliary anode obviously changed the distribution of the electric potential and the electric field in the discharge region, which increased the plasma density and enhanced the degree of ionization of the vanadium and argon gas. Vanadium films were deposited to further compare both techniques, and the morphology of the prepared films was investigated by scanning electron microscopy. The films showed a smaller crystal grain size and a denser growth structure when the electric field was applied during the discharge process. PMID:27587123

  18. Duty cycle control in reactive high-power impulse magnetron sputtering of hafnium and niobium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganesan, R.; Treverrow, B.; Murdoch, B.; Xie, D.; Ross, A. E.; Partridge, J. G.; Falconer, I. S.; McCulloch, D. G.; McKenzie, D. R.; Bilek, M. M. M.

    2016-06-01

    Instabilities in reactive sputtering have technological consequences and have been attributed to the formation of a compound layer on the target surface (‘poisoning’). Here we demonstrate how the duty cycle of high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) can be used to control the surface conditions of Hf and Nb targets. Variations in the time resolved target current characteristics as a function of duty cycle were attributed to gas rarefaction and to the degree of poisoning of the target surface. As the operation transitions from Ar driven sputtering to metal driven sputtering, the secondary electron emission changes and reduces the target current. The target surface transitions smoothly from a poisoned state at low duty cycles to a quasi-metallic state at high duty cycles. Appropriate selection of duty cycle increases the deposition rate, eliminates the need for active regulation of oxygen flow and enables stable reactive deposition of stoichiometric metal oxide films. A model is presented for the reactive HIPIMS process in which the target operates in a partially poisoned mode with different degrees of oxide layer distribution on its surface that depends on the duty cycle. Finally, we show that by tuning the pulse characteristics, the refractive indices of the metal oxides can be controlled without increasing the absorption coefficients, a result important for the fabrication of optical multilayer stacks.

  19. Origin of the Delayed Current Onset in High Power Impulse Magnetron Sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Yushkov, Georgy Yu.; Anders, Andre

    2010-07-19

    Repetitive pulses of voltage and current are applied in high power impulse magnetron sputtering. The current pulse usually lags the applied voltage by a significant time, which in some cases can reach many 10s of microseconds. The current time lag is generally highly reproducible and jitters less than 1percent of the delay time. This work investigates the time lag experimentally and theoretically. The experiments include several different target and gas combinations, voltage and current amplitudes, gas pressures, pulse repetition rates, and pulse durations. It is shown that in all cases the inverse delay is approximately proportional to the applied voltage, where the proportionality factor depends on the combination of materials and the conditions selected. The proportionality factor contains the parameters of ionization and secondary electron emission. The statistical time lag is negligible while the formative time lag is large and usually dominated by the ion motion (inertia), although, at low pressure, the long free path of magnetized electrons causing ionization contributes to the delay.

  20. Antimicrobial brass coatings prepared on poly(ethylene terephthalate) textile by high power impulse magnetron sputtering.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying-Hung; Wu, Guo-Wei; He, Ju-Liang

    2015-03-01

    The goal of this work is to prepare antimicrobial, corrosion-resistant and low-cost Cu65Zn35 brass film on poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) fabric by high-power impulse magnetron sputtering (HIPIMS), which is known to provide high-density plasma, so as to generate a strongly adherent film at a reduced substrate temperature. The results reveal that the brass film grows in a layer-plus-island mode. Independent of their deposition time, the obtained films retain a Cu/Zn elemental composition ratio of 1.86 and exhibit primarily an α copper phase structure. Oxygen plasma pre-treatment for 1min before coating can significantly increase film adhesion such that the brass-coated fabric of Grade 5 or Grade 4-5 can ultimately be obtained under dry and wet rubbing tests, respectively. However, a deposition time of 1min suffices to provide effective antimicrobial properties for both Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. As a whole, the feasibility of using such advanced HIPIMS coating technique to develop durable antimicrobial textile was demonstrated.

  1. Effect of the target power density on high-power impulse magnetron sputtering of copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozák, Tomáš

    2012-04-01

    We present a model analysis of high-power impulse magnetron sputtering of copper. We use a non-stationary global model based on the particle and energy conservation equations in two zones (the high density plasma ring above the target racetrack and the bulk plasma region), which makes it possible to calculate time evolutions of the averaged process gas and target material neutral and ion densities, as well as the fluxes of these particles to the target and substrate during a pulse period. We study the effect of the increasing target power density under conditions corresponding to a real experimental system. The calculated target current waveforms show a long steady state and are in good agreement with the experimental results. For an increasing target power density, an analysis of the particle densities shows a gradual transition to a metal dominated discharge plasma with an increasing degree of ionization of the depositing flux. The average fraction of target material ions in the total ion flux onto the substrate is more than 90% for average target power densities higher than 500 W cm-2 in a pulse. The average ionized fraction of target material atoms in the flux onto the substrate reaches 80% for a maximum average target power density of 3 kW cm-2 in a pulse.

  2. On linear acoustic solutions of high speed helicopter impulsive noise problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tam, C. K. W.

    1983-07-01

    The nature of linear acoustic solutions for a helicopter rotor blade with a blunt leading edge operating at high transonic tip Mach number is studied. As a part of this investigation a very efficient computation procedure for helicopter rotor blade thickness noise according to linear theory is developed. Numerical and analytical results reveal that as the blade tip Mach number approaches unity, the solution develops singularities and a radiating discontinuity. It is shown that these characteristic features are caused by the contributions of the higher harmonics which decrease in magnitude only as n exp-1/2 in the limit n tending to infinity. These higher harmonics are generated by the blunt leading edge. The far field wave form at sonic tip Mach number for a blade with a NACA 0012 airfoil section has a singularity of the inverse root type at its front and a logarithmic singularity near its end. Thus caution must be exercised in applying linear acoustic theory to high speed helicopter impulsive noise problems.

  3. Deposition rates of high power impulse magnetron sputtering: Physics and economics

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre

    2010-07-15

    Deposition by high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HIPIMS) is considered by some as the new paradigm of advanced sputtering technology, yet this is met with skepticism by others for the reported lower deposition rates, if compared to rates of more conventional sputtering of equal average power. In this contribution, the underlying physical reasons for the rate changes are discussed, including (i) ion return to the target and self-sputtering, (ii) the less-than-linear increase in the sputtering yield with increasing ion energy, (iii) yield changes due to the shift of species responsible for sputtering, (iv) changes due to greater film density, limited sticking, and self-sputtering on the substrate, (v) noticeable power losses in the switch module, (vi) changes in the magnetic balance and particle confinement of the magnetron due to self-fields at high current, and (vii) superposition of sputtering and sublimation/evaporation for selected materials. The situation is even more complicated for reactive systems where the target surface chemistry is a function of the reactive gas partial pressure and discharge conditions. While most of these factors imply a reduction in the normalized deposition rate, increased rates have been reported for certain conditions using hot targets and less poisoned targets. Finally, some points of economics and HIPIMS benefits are considered.

  4. High precision micro-impulse measurements for micro-thrusters based on torsional pendulum and sympathetic resonance techniques.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Daixian; Wu, Jianjun; Zhang, Rui; Zhang, Hua; He, Zhen

    2013-12-01

    A sympathetic resonance theory is analyzed and applied in a newly developed torsional pendulum to measure the micro-impulse produced by a μN s-class ablative pulsed plasma thruster. According to theoretical analysis on the dynamical behaviors of a torsional pendulum, the resonance amplification effect of micro-signals is presented. In addition, a new micro-impulse measurement method based on sympathetic resonance theory is proposed as an improvement of the original single pulse measurement method. In contrast with the single pulse measurement method, the advantages of sympathetic resonance method are significant. First, because of the magnification of vibration signals due to resonance processes, measurement precision for the sympathetic resonance method becomes higher especially in reducing reading error. With an increase in peak number, the relative errors induced by readout of voltage signals decrease to approximately ±1.9% for the sympathetic resonance mode, whereas the relative error in single pulse mode is estimated as ±13.4%. Besides, by using the resonance amplification effect the sympathetic resonance method makes it possible to measure an extremely low-impulse beyond the resolution of a thrust stand without redesigning or purchasing a new one. Moreover, because of the simple operational principle and structure the sympathetic resonance method is much more convenient and inexpensive to be implemented than other high-precision methods. Finally, the sympathetic resonance measurement method can also be applied in other thrust stands to improve further the ability to measure the low-impulse bits.

  5. High precision micro-impulse measurements for micro-thrusters based on torsional pendulum and sympathetic resonance techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Daixian; Wu, Jianjun; Zhang, Rui; Zhang, Hua; He, Zhen

    2013-12-01

    A sympathetic resonance theory is analyzed and applied in a newly developed torsional pendulum to measure the micro-impulse produced by a μN s-class ablative pulsed plasma thruster. According to theoretical analysis on the dynamical behaviors of a torsional pendulum, the resonance amplification effect of micro-signals is presented. In addition, a new micro-impulse measurement method based on sympathetic resonance theory is proposed as an improvement of the original single pulse measurement method. In contrast with the single pulse measurement method, the advantages of sympathetic resonance method are significant. First, because of the magnification of vibration signals due to resonance processes, measurement precision for the sympathetic resonance method becomes higher especially in reducing reading error. With an increase in peak number, the relative errors induced by readout of voltage signals decrease to approximately ±1.9% for the sympathetic resonance mode, whereas the relative error in single pulse mode is estimated as ±13.4%. Besides, by using the resonance amplification effect the sympathetic resonance method makes it possible to measure an extremely low-impulse beyond the resolution of a thrust stand without redesigning or purchasing a new one. Moreover, because of the simple operational principle and structure the sympathetic resonance method is much more convenient and inexpensive to be implemented than other high-precision methods. Finally, the sympathetic resonance measurement method can also be applied in other thrust stands to improve further the ability to measure the low-impulse bits.

  6. Investigation of ionized metal flux in enhanced high power impulse magnetron sputtering discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Stranak, Vitezslav; Hubicka, Zdenek; Cada, Martin; Drache, Steffen; Hippler, Rainer; Tichy, Milan

    2014-04-21

    The metal ionized flux fraction and production of double charged metal ions Me{sup 2+} of different materials (Al, Cu, Fe, Ti) by High Power Impulse Magnetron Sputtering (HiPIMS) operated with and without a pre-ionization assistance is compared in the paper. The Electron Cyclotron Wave Resonance (ECWR) discharge was employed as the pre-ionization agent providing a seed of charge in the idle time of HiPIMS pulses. A modified grid-free biased quartz crystal microbalance was used to estimate the metal ionized flux fraction ξ. The energy-resolved mass spectrometry served as a complementary method to distinguish particular ion contributions to the total ionized flux onto the substrate. The ratio between densities of doubly Me{sup 2+} and singly Me{sup +} charged metal ions was determined. It is shown that ECWR assistance enhances Me{sup 2+} production with respect of absorbed rf-power. The ECWR discharge also increases the metal ionized flux fraction of about 30% especially in the region of lower pressures. Further, the suppression of the gas rarefaction effect due to enhanced secondary electron emission of Me{sup 2+} was observed.

  7. Digital high-pass filter deconvolution by means of an infinite impulse response filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Födisch, P.; Wohsmann, J.; Lange, B.; Schönherr, J.; Enghardt, W.; Kaever, P.

    2016-09-01

    In the application of semiconductor detectors, the charge-sensitive amplifier is widely used in front-end electronics. The output signal is shaped by a typical exponential decay. Depending on the feedback network, this type of front-end electronics suffers from the ballistic deficit problem, or an increased rate of pulse pile-ups. Moreover, spectroscopy applications require a correction of the pulse-height, while a shortened pulse-width is desirable for high-throughput applications. For both objectives, digital deconvolution of the exponential decay is convenient. With a general method and the signals of our custom charge-sensitive amplifier for cadmium zinc telluride detectors, we show how the transfer function of an amplifier is adapted to an infinite impulse response (IIR) filter. This paper investigates different design methods for an IIR filter in the discrete-time domain and verifies the obtained filter coefficients with respect to the equivalent continuous-time frequency response. Finally, the exponential decay is shaped to a step-like output signal that is exploited by a forward-looking pulse processing.

  8. Rarefaction windows in a high-power impulse magnetron sputtering plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Palmucci, Maria; Britun, Nikolay; Konstantinidis, Stephanos; Snyders, Rony

    2013-09-21

    The velocity distribution function of the sputtered particles in the direction parallel to the planar magnetron cathode is studied by spatially- and time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy in a short-duration (20 μs) high-power impulse magnetron sputtering discharge. The experimental evidence for the neutral and ionized sputtered particles to have a constant (saturated) velocity at the end of the plasma on-time is demonstrated. The velocity component parallel to the target surface reaches the values of about 5 km/s for Ti atoms and ions, which is higher that the values typically measured in the direct current sputtering discharges before. The results point out on the presence of a strong gas rarefaction significantly reducing the sputtered particles energy dissipation during a certain time interval at the end of the plasma pulse, referred to as “rarefaction window” in this work. The obtained results agree with and essentially clarify the dynamics of HiPIMS discharge studied during the plasma off-time previously in the work: N. Britun, Appl. Phys. Lett. 99, 131504 (2011)

  9. Impulsive phase of solar flares. 1: Characteristics of high energy electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leach, J.; Petrosian, V.

    1981-01-01

    The variation along a magnetic field line of the energy and pitch angle distribution of high energy electrons injected into a cold hydrogen plasma containing either an open or closed magnetic field structure was investigated. The problem is formulated as a time independent Fokker-Planck Equation for the electron number distribution as a function of the electron energy, electron pitch angle, and the structure of the global magnetic field. Simple analytic solution valid in the small pitch angle regime and for slowly varying magnetic field is presented. For the more general situation a numerical code for solving the Fokker-Planck Equation was used and it was found that the analytic expression agrees well with the numerical results to values of the pitch angle much larger than expected. For most practical applications, one many confidently use the analytic expression instead of having to resort to lengthy numerical computations. These results are useful in the study of the nonthermal models of the impulsive phase of solar flares.

  10. A new efficient approach for the removal of impulse noise from highly corrupted images.

    PubMed

    Abreu, E; Lightstone, M; Mitra, S K; Arakawa, K

    1996-01-01

    A new framework for removing impulse noise from images is presented in which the nature of the filtering operation is conditioned on a state variable defined as the output of a classifier that operates on the differences between the input pixel and the remaining rank-ordered pixels in a sliding window. As part of this framework, several algorithms are examined, each of which is applicable to fixed and random-valued impulse noise models. First, a simple two-state approach is described in which the algorithm switches between the output of an identity filter and a rank-ordered mean (ROM) filter. The technique achieves an excellent tradeoff between noise suppression and detail preservation with little increase in computational complexity over the simple median filter. For a small additional cost in memory, this simple strategy is easily generalized into a multistate approach using weighted combinations of the identity and ROM filter in which the weighting coefficients can be optimized using image training data. Extensive simulations indicate that these methods perform significantly better in terms of noise suppression and detail preservation than a number of existing nonlinear techniques with as much as 40% impulse noise corruption. Moreover, the method can effectively restore images corrupted with Gaussian noise and mixed Gaussian and impulse noise. Finally, the method is shown to be extremely robust with respect to the training data and the percentage of impulse noise. PMID:18285188

  11. A new efficient approach for the removal of impulse noise from highly corrupted images.

    PubMed

    Abreu, E; Lightstone, M; Mitra, S K; Arakawa, K

    1996-01-01

    A new framework for removing impulse noise from images is presented in which the nature of the filtering operation is conditioned on a state variable defined as the output of a classifier that operates on the differences between the input pixel and the remaining rank-ordered pixels in a sliding window. As part of this framework, several algorithms are examined, each of which is applicable to fixed and random-valued impulse noise models. First, a simple two-state approach is described in which the algorithm switches between the output of an identity filter and a rank-ordered mean (ROM) filter. The technique achieves an excellent tradeoff between noise suppression and detail preservation with little increase in computational complexity over the simple median filter. For a small additional cost in memory, this simple strategy is easily generalized into a multistate approach using weighted combinations of the identity and ROM filter in which the weighting coefficients can be optimized using image training data. Extensive simulations indicate that these methods perform significantly better in terms of noise suppression and detail preservation than a number of existing nonlinear techniques with as much as 40% impulse noise corruption. Moreover, the method can effectively restore images corrupted with Gaussian noise and mixed Gaussian and impulse noise. Finally, the method is shown to be extremely robust with respect to the training data and the percentage of impulse noise.

  12. Impulsivity (delay discounting) for food and cocaine in male and female rats selectively bred for high and low saccharin intake.

    PubMed

    Perry, Jennifer L; Nelson, Sarah E; Anderson, Marissa M; Morgan, Andrew D; Carroll, Marilyn E

    2007-04-01

    Previous research in rats indicates that delay discounting for food, a model of impulsivity, predicted the rate of acquisition of cocaine self-administration. In other studies, rats bred for high saccharin intake (HiS) acquired cocaine self-administration at higher rates than those with low saccharin intake (LoS), and female (F) rats acquired cocaine self-administration more rapidly than males (M). The purpose of this study was to examine a possible connection between impulsivity, saccharin intake, and sex by comparing M and F rats from the HiS and LoS selectively bred lines on measures of impulsivity; i.e., their rate of delay discounting for food or i.v. cocaine infusions. The adjusting delay procedure allowed rats access to 2 response levers, and a pellet dispenser or an i.v. drug infusion pump. In 4 groups (HiS M, HiS F, LoS M, LoS F) responses under a fixed-ratio (FR) 1 schedule on one lever resulted in one 45 mg pellet immediately, and responses on the other lever resulted in 3 or 6 pellets after a delay. Four additional groups received either a small cocaine (0.2, 0.4, or 0.8 mg/kg) infusion immediately or a delayed larger infusion (3x the amount of the small infusions). The delay to the larger reinforcer began at 6 s and increased or decreased by 1 s following responses on the delay or immediate levers, respectively. A mean adjusted delay (MAD) was calculated over 30 choice trials during each daily 3-hour session, and it was used as a quantitative measure of impulsivity. In groups maintained by food, HiS rats were more impulsive (lower MADs) than LoS rats, and LoS females were more impulsive than LoS males. There were no phenotype or sex differences in delay discounting for cocaine. Understanding the relationship between impulsivity and other predictors of drug abuse (e.g., sex, saccharin intake) is important in developing prevention and treatment strategies.

  13. Specific dimensions of impulsivity are differentially associated with daily and non-daily cigarette smoking in young adults.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dustin C; Peters, Jessica R; Adams, Zachary W; Milich, Richard; Lynam, Donald R

    2015-07-01

    Young adults are at risk for initiation of tobacco use and progression to tobacco dependence. Not every person who smokes cigarettes becomes tobacco dependent, however, and non-daily smoking is becoming more prevalent among those who use tobacco. It is likely that individual differences in psychosocial and behavioral factors influence risk for engaging in non-daily and daily cigarette smoking. The objective of this study was to investigate the associations between impulsivity and smoking status in young adults who vary in frequency of cigarette smoking. Young adult first-year college students between the ages of 18-24 (512) were classified to one of three groups: non-smokers, non-daily smokers, or daily smokers, and impulsivity was assessed using the UPPS-P (negative and positive urgency, lack of premeditation, lack of perseverance, sensation seeking). When all impulsivity dimensions were used simultaneously to predict smoking status, negative urgency predicted increased risk of membership in the daily smoking group and lack of premeditation predicted increased risk of membership in the non-daily smoking group. These results suggest that dimensions of impulsivity may contribute differentially to forms of smoking behavior in young adults.

  14. Specific dimensions of impulsivity are differentially associated with daily and non-daily cigarette smoking in young adults.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dustin C; Peters, Jessica R; Adams, Zachary W; Milich, Richard; Lynam, Donald R

    2015-07-01

    Young adults are at risk for initiation of tobacco use and progression to tobacco dependence. Not every person who smokes cigarettes becomes tobacco dependent, however, and non-daily smoking is becoming more prevalent among those who use tobacco. It is likely that individual differences in psychosocial and behavioral factors influence risk for engaging in non-daily and daily cigarette smoking. The objective of this study was to investigate the associations between impulsivity and smoking status in young adults who vary in frequency of cigarette smoking. Young adult first-year college students between the ages of 18-24 (512) were classified to one of three groups: non-smokers, non-daily smokers, or daily smokers, and impulsivity was assessed using the UPPS-P (negative and positive urgency, lack of premeditation, lack of perseverance, sensation seeking). When all impulsivity dimensions were used simultaneously to predict smoking status, negative urgency predicted increased risk of membership in the daily smoking group and lack of premeditation predicted increased risk of membership in the non-daily smoking group. These results suggest that dimensions of impulsivity may contribute differentially to forms of smoking behavior in young adults. PMID:25827335

  15. Specific Dimensions of Impulsivity Are Differentially Associated with Daily and Non-Daily Cigarette Smoking in Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dustin C.; Peters, Jessica R.; Adams, Zachary W.; Milich, Richard; Lynam, Donald R.

    2015-01-01

    Young adults are at risk for initiation of tobacco use and progression to tobacco dependence. Not every person who smokes cigarettes becomes tobacco dependent, however, and non-daily smoking is becoming more prevalent among those who use tobacco. It is likely that individual differences in psychosocial and behavioral factors influence risk for engaging in non-daily and daily cigarette smoking. The objective of this study was to investigate the associations between impulsivity and smoking status in young adults who vary in frequency of cigarette smoking. Young adult first-year college students between the ages of 18-24 (512) were classified to one of three groups: non-smokers, non-daily smokers, or daily smokers, and impulsivity was assessed using the UPPS-P(Negative and Positive Urgency, lack of Premeditation, lack of Perseverance, Sensation Seeking). When all impulsivity dimensions were used simultaneously to predict smoking status, negative urgency predicted increased risk of membership in the daily smoking group and lack of premeditation predicted increased risk of membership in the non-daily smoking group. These results suggest that dimensions of impulsivity may contribute differentially to forms of smoking behavior in young adults. PMID:25827335

  16. Neural correlates of high-risk behavior tendencies and impulsivity in an emotional Go/NoGo fMRI task

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Matthew R. G.; Benoit, James R. A.; Juhás, Michal; Lebel, R. M.; MacKay, Marnie; Dametto, Ericson; Silverstone, Peter H.; Dolcos, Florin; Dursun, Serdar M.; Greenshaw, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    Improved neuroscientific understanding of high-risk behaviors such as alcohol binging, drug use, and unsafe sex will lead to therapeutic advances for high-risk groups. High-risk behavior often occurs in an emotionally-charged context, and behavioral inhibition and emotion regulation play important roles in risk-related decision making. High impulsivity is an important potential contributor to high-risk behavior tendencies. We explored the relationships between high-risk behavior tendencies, impulsivity, and fMRI brain activations in an emotional Go/NoGo task. This task presented emotional distractor pictures (aversive vs. neutral) simultaneously with Go/NoGo stimuli (square vs. circle) that required a button press or withholding of the press, respectively. Participants' risk behavior tendencies were assessed with the Cognitive Appraisal of Risky Events (CARE) scale. The Barratt Impulsivity Scale 11 (BIS) was used to assess participant impulsivity. Individuals with higher CARE risk scores exhibited reduced activation related to response inhibition (NoGo−Go) in right orbital frontal cortex (OFC) and ventromedial prefrontal cortex. These regions did not show a significant relationship with impulsivity scores. Conversely, more impulsive individuals showed reduced emotion-related activity (aversive−neutral distractors) in dorsomedial prefrontal cortex, perigenual anterior cingulate cortex, and right posterior OFC. There were distinct neural correlates of high-risk behavior tendency and impulsivity in terms of brain activity in the emotional Go/NoGo task. This dissociation supports the conception of high-risk behavior tendency as a distinct construct from that of impulsivity. Our results suggest that treatment for high-risk behavior may be more effective with a nuanced approach that does not conflate high impulsivity necessarily with high-risk behavior tendencies. PMID:25805975

  17. A fully enclosed, compact standard lightning impulse generator for testing ultra-high-voltage-class gas-insulated switchgears with high capacitance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Tao; Zhang, Qiaogen; Zhang, Lingli; Zhao, Junping; Liu, Xuandong; Li, Xiaoang; Guo, Can; You, Haoyang; Chen, Weijiang; Yin, Yu; Shi, Weidong

    2016-03-01

    At present, conducting standard lightning impulse (LI) tests in the field for gas-insulated switchgear (GIS) equipment is difficult because of the high capacitance of the test equipment and large circuit inductance of traditional impulse devices, which leads to a wavefront time Tf ≥ 2.5 μs. A novel fully enclosed, compact standard LI generator for testing ultra-high-voltage-class GIS equipment with high capacitance is presented to solve the problem of Tf exceeding the standard during LI voltage tests for actual large-sized equipment. The impulse generator is installed in a metal vessel filled with SF6 or SF6/N2 gas mixture at a pressure of 0.3-0.5 MPa, providing a more compact structure and a lower series inductance. A newly developed conical voltage sensor is used to accurately measure the output voltage waveform. Two test modes (via bushing docking and direct docking) for the GIS test based on the impulse generator are introduced. Calculation results show that the impulse generator can generate an LI test waveform following the present IEC standard for the test of equipment with capacitance >10 000 pF.

  18. A fully enclosed, compact standard lightning impulse generator for testing ultra-high-voltage-class gas-insulated switchgears with high capacitance.

    PubMed

    Wen, Tao; Zhang, Qiaogen; Zhang, Lingli; Zhao, Junping; Liu, Xuandong; Li, Xiaoang; Guo, Can; You, Haoyang; Chen, Weijiang; Yin, Yu; Shi, Weidong

    2016-03-01

    At present, conducting standard lightning impulse (LI) tests in the field for gas-insulated switchgear (GIS) equipment is difficult because of the high capacitance of the test equipment and large circuit inductance of traditional impulse devices, which leads to a wavefront time T(f) ≥ 2.5 μs. A novel fully enclosed, compact standard LI generator for testing ultra-high-voltage-class GIS equipment with high capacitance is presented to solve the problem of T(f) exceeding the standard during LI voltage tests for actual large-sized equipment. The impulse generator is installed in a metal vessel filled with SF6 or SF6/N2 gas mixture at a pressure of 0.3-0.5 MPa, providing a more compact structure and a lower series inductance. A newly developed conical voltage sensor is used to accurately measure the output voltage waveform. Two test modes (via bushing docking and direct docking) for the GIS test based on the impulse generator are introduced. Calculation results show that the impulse generator can generate an LI test waveform following the present IEC standard for the test of equipment with capacitance >10,000 pF. PMID:27036815

  19. A fully enclosed, compact standard lightning impulse generator for testing ultra-high-voltage-class gas-insulated switchgears with high capacitance.

    PubMed

    Wen, Tao; Zhang, Qiaogen; Zhang, Lingli; Zhao, Junping; Liu, Xuandong; Li, Xiaoang; Guo, Can; You, Haoyang; Chen, Weijiang; Yin, Yu; Shi, Weidong

    2016-03-01

    At present, conducting standard lightning impulse (LI) tests in the field for gas-insulated switchgear (GIS) equipment is difficult because of the high capacitance of the test equipment and large circuit inductance of traditional impulse devices, which leads to a wavefront time T(f) ≥ 2.5 μs. A novel fully enclosed, compact standard LI generator for testing ultra-high-voltage-class GIS equipment with high capacitance is presented to solve the problem of T(f) exceeding the standard during LI voltage tests for actual large-sized equipment. The impulse generator is installed in a metal vessel filled with SF6 or SF6/N2 gas mixture at a pressure of 0.3-0.5 MPa, providing a more compact structure and a lower series inductance. A newly developed conical voltage sensor is used to accurately measure the output voltage waveform. Two test modes (via bushing docking and direct docking) for the GIS test based on the impulse generator are introduced. Calculation results show that the impulse generator can generate an LI test waveform following the present IEC standard for the test of equipment with capacitance >10,000 pF.

  20. Enhanced alcohol self-administration and reinstatement in a highly impulsive, inattentive recombinant inbred mouse strain.

    PubMed

    Loos, Maarten; Staal, Jorn; Smit, August B; De Vries, Taco J; Spijker, Sabine

    2013-01-01

    Deficits in executive control have frequently been associated with alcohol use disorder. Here we investigated to what extent pre-existing genetically encoded levels of impulsive/inattentive behavior associate with motivation to take alcohol and vulnerability to cue-induced reinstatement of alcohol seeking in an operant self-administration paradigm. We took advantage of BXD16, a recombinant inbred strain previously shown to have enhanced impulsivity and poor attentional control. We compared BXD16 with C57BL/6J mice in a simple choice reaction time task (SCRTT) and confirmed its impulsive/inattentive phenotype. BXD16 mice were less active in a novel open field (OF), and were equally active in an automated home cage environment, showing that increased impulsive responding of BXD16 mice could not be explained by enhanced general activity compared to C57BL/6J mice. After training in a sucrose/alcohol fading self-administration procedure, BXD16 showed increased motivation to earn 10% alcohol solution, both under fixed ratio (FR1) and progressive ratio (PR2) schedules of reinforcement. Responding on the active lever readily decreased during extinction training with no apparent differences between strains. However, upon re-exposure to alcohol-associated cues, alcohol seeking was reinstated to a larger extent in BXD16 than in C57BL/6J mice. Although further studies are needed to determine whether impulsivity/inattention and alcohol seeking depend on common or separate genetic loci, these data show that in mice enhanced impulsivity coincides with increased motivation to take alcohol, as well as relapse vulnerability. PMID:24198771

  1. Enhancement of bioactivity on medical polymer surface using high power impulse magnetron sputtered titanium dioxide film.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yi-Ju; Tsou, Hsi-Kai; Chen, Ying-Hung; Chung, Chi-Jen; He, Ju-Liang

    2015-12-01

    This study utilizes a novel technique, high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HIPIMS), which provides a higher ionization rate and ion bombardment energy than direct current magnetron sputtering (DCMS), to deposit high osteoblast compatible titanium dioxide (TiO2) coatings with anatase (A-TiO2) and rutile (R-TiO2) phases onto the biomedical polyetheretherketone (PEEK) polymer substrates at low temperature. The adhesions of TiO2 coatings that were fabricated using HIPIMS and DCMS were compared. The in vitro biocompatibility of these coatings was confirmed. The results reveal that HIPIMS can be used to prepare crystallinic columnar A-TiO2 and R-TiO2 coatings on PEEK substrate if the ratio of oxygen to argon is properly controlled. According to a tape adhesion test, the HIPIMS-TiO2 coatings had an adhesion grade of 5B even after they were immersed in simulated body fluid (SBF) environments for 28days. Scratch tests proved that HIPIMS-TiO2 coatings undergo cohesive failure. These results demonstrate that the adhesive force between HIPIMS-TiO2 coating/PEEK is stronger than that between DCMS-TiO2 coating/PEEK. After a long period (28days) of immersion in SBF, a bone-like crystallinic hydroxyapatite layer with a corresponding Ca/P stoichiometry was formed on both HIPIMS-TiO2. The osteoblast compatibility of HIPIMS-TiO2 exceeded that of the bare PEEK substrate. It is also noticeable that the R-TiO2 performed better in vitro than the A-TiO2 due to the formation of many negatively charged hydroxyl groups (-OH(-)) groups on R-TiO2 (110) surface. In summary, the HIPIMS-TiO2 coatings satisfied the requirements for osseointegration, suggesting the possibility of using HIPIMS to modify the PEEK surface with TiO2 for spinal implants.

  2. Effects of Intoxicating Free-Choice Alcohol Consumption During Adolescence on Drinking and Impulsivity During Adulthood in Selectively Bred High Alcohol Preferring Mice

    PubMed Central

    O’Tousa, David Scott; Matson, Liana Marie; Grahame, Nicholas Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Background Abuse of alcohol during adolescence continues to be a problem, and it has been shown that earlier onset of drinking predicts increased alcohol abuse problems later in life. High levels of impulsivity have been demonstrated to be characteristic of alcoholics, and impulsivity has also been shown to predict later alcohol use in teenage subjects, showing that impulsivity may precede the development of alcohol use disorders. These experiments examined adolescent drinking in a high-drinking, relatively impulsive mouse population, and assessed its effects on adult drinking and adult impulsivity. Methods Experiment 1: Selectively bred High-Alcohol Preferring (HAPII) mice were given either alcohol (free choice access) or water only for two weeks during middle adolescence or adulthood. All mice were given free choice access to alcohol 30 days later, in adulthood. Experiment 2: Adolescent HAPII mice drank alcohol and water, or water alone, for two weeks, and were then trained to perform a delay discounting task as adults to measure impulsivity. In each experiment, effects of volitional ethanol consumption on later behavior were assessed. We expected adolescent alcohol exposure to increase subsequent drinking and impulsivity. Results Mice consumed significant quantities of ethanol, reaching average blood ethanol concentrations (BECs) of 142 mg/dl (adolescent) or 154 mg/dl (adult) in Experiment 1. Adolescent mice in experiment 2 reached an average of 108 mg/dl. Mice exposed to alcohol in either adolescence or adulthood showed a transient increase in ethanol consumption, but we observed no differences in impulsivity in adult mice as a function of whether mice drank alcohol during adolescence. Conclusions These findings indicate that HAPII mice drink intoxicating levels of alcohol during both adolescence and adulthood, and that this volitional intake has long-term effects on subsequent drinking behavior. Nonetheless, this profound exposure to alcohol during adolescence

  3. Does impulsivity predict outcome in treatment for binge eating disorder? A multimodal investigation.

    PubMed

    Manasse, Stephanie M; Espel, Hallie M; Schumacher, Leah M; Kerrigan, Stephanie G; Zhang, Fengqing; Forman, Evan M; Juarascio, Adrienne S

    2016-10-01

    Multiple dimensions of impulsivity (e.g., affect-driven impulsivity, impulsive inhibition - both general and food-specific, and impulsive decision-making) are associated with binge eating pathology cross-sectionally, yet the literature on whether impulsivity predicts treatment outcome is limited. The present pilot study explored impulsivity-related predictors of 20-week outcome in a small open trial (n = 17) of a novel treatment for binge eating disorder. Overall, dimensions of impulsivity related to emotions (i.e., negative urgency) and food cues emerged as predictors of treatment outcomes (i.e., binge eating frequency and global eating pathology as measured by the Eating Disorders Examination), while more general measures of impulsivity were statistically unrelated to global eating pathology or binge frequency. Specifically, those with higher levels of negative urgency at baseline experienced slower and less pronounced benefit from treatment, and those with higher food-specific impulsivity had more severe global eating pathology at baseline that was consistent at post-treatment and follow-up. These preliminary findings suggest that patients high in negative urgency and with poor response inhibition to food cues may benefit from augmentation of existing treatments to achieve optimal outcomes. Future research will benefit from replication with a larger sample, parsing out the role of different dimensions of impulsivity in treatment outcome for eating disorders, and identifying how treatment can be improved to accommodate higher levels of baseline impulsivity. PMID:27230611

  4. Does impulsivity predict outcome in treatment for binge eating disorder? A multimodal investigation.

    PubMed

    Manasse, Stephanie M; Espel, Hallie M; Schumacher, Leah M; Kerrigan, Stephanie G; Zhang, Fengqing; Forman, Evan M; Juarascio, Adrienne S

    2016-10-01

    Multiple dimensions of impulsivity (e.g., affect-driven impulsivity, impulsive inhibition - both general and food-specific, and impulsive decision-making) are associated with binge eating pathology cross-sectionally, yet the literature on whether impulsivity predicts treatment outcome is limited. The present pilot study explored impulsivity-related predictors of 20-week outcome in a small open trial (n = 17) of a novel treatment for binge eating disorder. Overall, dimensions of impulsivity related to emotions (i.e., negative urgency) and food cues emerged as predictors of treatment outcomes (i.e., binge eating frequency and global eating pathology as measured by the Eating Disorders Examination), while more general measures of impulsivity were statistically unrelated to global eating pathology or binge frequency. Specifically, those with higher levels of negative urgency at baseline experienced slower and less pronounced benefit from treatment, and those with higher food-specific impulsivity had more severe global eating pathology at baseline that was consistent at post-treatment and follow-up. These preliminary findings suggest that patients high in negative urgency and with poor response inhibition to food cues may benefit from augmentation of existing treatments to achieve optimal outcomes. Future research will benefit from replication with a larger sample, parsing out the role of different dimensions of impulsivity in treatment outcome for eating disorders, and identifying how treatment can be improved to accommodate higher levels of baseline impulsivity.

  5. A consistent approach to estimate the breakdown voltage of high voltage electrodes under positive switching impulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arevalo, L.; Wu, D.; Jacobson, B.

    2013-08-01

    The main propose of this paper is to present a physical model of long air gap electrical discharges under positive switching impulses. The development and progression of discharges in long air gaps are attributable to two intertwined physical phenomena, namely, the leader channel and the streamer zone. Experimental studies have been used to develop empirical and physical models capable to represent the streamer zone and the leader channel. The empirical ones have led to improvements in the electrical design of high voltage apparatus and insulation distances, but they cannot take into account factors associated with fundamental physics and/or the behavior of materials. The physical models have been used to describe and understand the discharge phenomena of laboratory and lightning discharges. However, because of the complex simulations necessary to reproduce real cases, they are not in widespread use in the engineering of practical applications. Hence, the aim of the work presented here is to develop a model based on physics of the discharge capable to validate and complement the existing engineering models. The model presented here proposes a new geometrical approximation for the representation of the streamer and the calculation of the accumulated electrical charge. The model considers a variable streamer region that changes with the temporal and spatial variations of the electric field. The leader channel is modeled using the non local thermo-equilibrium equations. Furthermore, statistical delays before the inception of the first corona, and random distributions to represent the tortuous nature of the path taken by the leader channel were included based on the behavior observed in experimental tests, with the intention of ensuring the discharge behaved in a realistic manner. For comparison purposes, two different gap configurations were simulated. A reasonable agreement was found between the physical model and the experimental test results.

  6. Antioxidant loading reduces oxidative stress induced by high-energy impulse noise (blast) exposure.

    PubMed

    Elsayed, N M; Armstrong, K L; William, M T; Cooper, M F

    2000-11-30

    Detonation of explosives, firing of large caliber weapons and occupational explosions, professional or accidental, produce high-energy impulse noise (blast) waves characterized by a rapid rise in atmospheric pressure (overpressure) followed by gradual decay to ambient level. Exposure to blast waves causes injury, predominantly to the hollow organs such as ears and lungs. We have previously reported that blast exposure can induce free radical-mediated oxidative stress in the lung characterized by antioxidant depletion, lipid peroxidation, and hemoglobin (Hb) oxidation. In this study, we examined whether pre-loading, adequately fed rats, with pharmacological doses of antioxidants would reduce the response to blast. Sprague-Dawley rats weighing 300-350 g were loaded with either 800 IU vitamin E (VE), 1000 mg vitamin C (VC) or 25 mg lipoic acid (LA) for 3 consecutive days by gavage before exposure to blast. Both VE, and LA were dissolved in 2 ml corn oil, but VC in 2 ml water. After the 3-day antioxidant loading, the rats were divided into six groups (five rats per group), deeply anesthetized with sodium pentobarbital (60 mg/kg body weight), then exposed to a low-level blast (62+/-2 kPa peak pressure and 5 ms duration). A matched number of groups were sham exposed and served as controls. One hour after exposure, all rats were euthanized then blood, and lung tissue was analyzed. We found that antioxidant loading resulted in restored Hb oxygenation, and reduced lipid peroxidation. Lung tissue VE content was elevated after loading but VC did not change possibly due to their different bioavailability and saturation kinetics. These observations, suggest that brief antioxidant loading with pharmacological doses can reduce blast-induced oxidative stress, and may have occupational and clinical implications. PMID:11154801

  7. Impulse noise generator--design and operation.

    PubMed

    Brinkmann, H

    1991-01-01

    In the seventies PFANDER (Pfander, 1975) proposed a screening test with an impulse noise simulator to check the particular responsivity of soldiers on vulnerability of the inner ear concerning the impulse noise-induced hearing loss. According to a system developed at the University of Oldenburg (Germany) (Klug & Radek, 1987), we have constructed an impulse noise generator designed for our specific requirements that will be presented. The simulator consists of an electrical ignited impulse noise spark gap which is supplied by a 3.5 kV high voltage source. At a distance of 1.10 m from the center of the impulse noise spark gap a peak pressure level of 155 dB with a C-Duration (Pfander, 1975) of .2 msec and with the main energy in the frequency range from 1 kHz to 2 kHz was good reproducible. It would be preferable to shift the impulse noise spectrum to lower frequencies but experimental effort has failed so far.

  8. Impulse noise generator--design and operation.

    PubMed

    Brinkmann, H

    1991-01-01

    In the seventies PFANDER (Pfander, 1975) proposed a screening test with an impulse noise simulator to check the particular responsivity of soldiers on vulnerability of the inner ear concerning the impulse noise-induced hearing loss. According to a system developed at the University of Oldenburg (Germany) (Klug & Radek, 1987), we have constructed an impulse noise generator designed for our specific requirements that will be presented. The simulator consists of an electrical ignited impulse noise spark gap which is supplied by a 3.5 kV high voltage source. At a distance of 1.10 m from the center of the impulse noise spark gap a peak pressure level of 155 dB with a C-Duration (Pfander, 1975) of .2 msec and with the main energy in the frequency range from 1 kHz to 2 kHz was good reproducible. It would be preferable to shift the impulse noise spectrum to lower frequencies but experimental effort has failed so far. PMID:1842469

  9. Effects of the combination of wheel running and atomoxetine on cue- and cocaine-primed reinstatement in rats selected for high or low impulsivity

    PubMed Central

    Zlebnik, Natalie E.; Carroll, Marilyn E.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Aerobic exercise and the attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder medication, atomoxetine (ATO), are two monotherapies that have been shown to suppress reinstatement of cocaine seeking in an animal model of relapse. The present study investigated the effects of combining wheel running and ATO vs. each treatment alone on cocaine seeking precipitated by cocaine and cocaine-paired cues in rats with differing susceptibility to drug abuse (i.e., high vs. low impulsive). METHODS Rats were screened for high (HiI) or low impulsivity (LoI) based on their performance on a delay-discounting task and then trained to self-administer cocaine (0.4 mg/kg/inf) for 10 days. Following 14 days of extinction, both groups were tested for reinstatement of cocaine seeking precipitated by cocaine or cocaine-paired cues in the presence of concurrent running wheel access (W), pretreatment with ATO, or both (W+ATO). RESULTS HiI rats acquired cocaine self-administration more quickly than LoI rats. While both individual treatments and W+ATO significantly attenuated cue-induced cocaine seeking in HiI and LoI rats, only W+ATO was effective in reducing cocaine-induced reinstatement compared to vehicle treatment. There were dose-dependent and phenotype-specific effects of ATO with HiI rats responsive to the low but not high ATO dose. Floor effects of ATO and W on cue-induced reinstatement prevented the assessment of combined treatment effects. CONCLUSIONS These findings demonstrated greater attenuation of cue- vs. cocaine-induced reinstatement by ATO and W alone and recapitulate impulsivity phenotype differences in both acquisition of cocaine self-administration and receptivity to treatment. PMID:25258161

  10. High-frequency vibration energy harvesting from impulsive excitation utilizing intentional dynamic instability caused by strong nonlinearity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remick, Kevin; Dane Quinn, D.; Michael McFarland, D.; Bergman, Lawrence; Vakakis, Alexander

    2016-05-01

    The authors investigate a vibration-based energy harvesting system utilizing essential (nonlinearizable) nonlinearities and electromagnetic coupling elements. The system consists of a grounded, weakly damped linear oscillator (primary system) subjected to a single impulsive load. This primary system is coupled to a lightweight, damped oscillating attachment (denoted as nonlinear energy sink, NES) via a neodymium magnet and an inductance coil, and a piano wire, which generates an essential geometric cubic stiffness nonlinearity. Under impulsive input, the transient damped dynamics of this system exhibit transient resonance captures (TRCs) causing intentional large-amplitude and high-frequency instabilities in the response of the NES. These TRCs result in strong energy transfer from the directly excited primary system to the light-weight attachment. The energy is harvested by the electromagnetic elements in the coupling and, in the present case, dissipated in a resistive element in the electrical circuit. The primary goal of this work is to numerically, analytically, and experimentally demonstrate the efficacy of employing this type of intentional high-frequency dynamic instability to achieve enhanced vibration energy harvesting under impulsive excitation.

  11. Test-retest reliability of behavioral measures of impulsive choice, impulsive action, and inattention.

    PubMed

    Weafer, Jessica; Baggott, Matthew J; de Wit, Harriet

    2013-12-01

    Behavioral measures of impulsivity are widely used in substance abuse research, yet relatively little attention has been devoted to establishing their psychometric properties, especially their reliability over repeated administration. The current study examined the test-retest reliability of a battery of standardized behavioral impulsivity tasks, including measures of impulsive choice (i.e., delay discounting, probability discounting, and the Balloon Analogue Risk Task), impulsive action (i.e., the stop signal task, the go/no-go task, and commission errors on the continuous performance task), and inattention (i.e., attention lapses on a simple reaction time task and omission errors on the continuous performance task). Healthy adults (n = 128) performed the battery on two separate occasions. Reliability estimates for the individual tasks ranged from moderate to high, with Pearson correlations within the specific impulsivity domains as follows: impulsive choice (r range: .76-.89, ps < .001); impulsive action (r range: .65-.73, ps < .001); and inattention (r range: .38-.42, ps < .001). Additionally, the influence of day-to-day fluctuations in mood, as measured by the Profile of Mood States, was assessed in relation to variability in performance on each of the behavioral tasks. Change in performance on the delay discounting task was significantly associated with change in positive mood and arousal. No other behavioral measures were significantly associated with mood. In sum, the current analysis demonstrates that behavioral measures of impulsivity are reliable measures and thus can be confidently used to assess various facets of impulsivity as intermediate phenotypes for drug abuse. PMID:24099351

  12. High specific activity silicon-32

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, Dennis R.; Brzezinski, Mark A.

    1996-01-01

    A process for preparation of silicon-32 is provided and includes contacting an irradiated potassium chloride target, including spallation products from a prior irradiation, with sufficient water, hydrochloric acid or potassium hydroxide to form a solution, filtering the solution, adjusting pH of the solution to from about 5.5 to about 7.5, admixing sufficient molybdate-reagent to the solution to adjust the pH of the solution to about 1.5 and to form a silicon-molybdate complex, contacting the solution including the silicon-molybdate complex with a dextran-based material, washing the dextran-based material to remove residual contaminants such as sodium-22, separating the silicon-molybdate complex from the dextran-based material as another solution, adding sufficient hydrochloric acid and hydrogen peroxide to the solution to prevent reformation of the silicon-molybdate complex and to yield an oxidization state of the molybdate adapted for subsequent separation by an anion exchange material, contacting the solution with an anion exchange material whereby the molybdate is retained by the anion exchange material and the silicon remains in solution, and optionally adding sufficient alkali metal hydroxide to adjust the pH of the solution to about 12 to 13. Additionally, a high specific activity silicon-32 product having a high purity is provided.

  13. High specific activity silicon-32

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, D.R.; Brzezinski, M.A.

    1996-06-11

    A process for preparation of silicon-32 is provided and includes contacting an irradiated potassium chloride target, including spallation products from a prior irradiation, with sufficient water, hydrochloric acid or potassium hydroxide to form a solution, filtering the solution, adjusting pH of the solution from about 5.5 to about 7.5, admixing sufficient molybdate-reagent to the solution to adjust the pH of the solution to about 1.5 and to form a silicon-molybdate complex, contacting the solution including the silicon-molybdate complex with a dextran-based material, washing the dextran-based material to remove residual contaminants such as sodium-22, separating the silicon-molybdate complex from the dextran-based material as another solution, adding sufficient hydrochloric acid and hydrogen peroxide to the solution to prevent reformation of the silicon-molybdate complex and to yield an oxidation state of the molybdate adapted for subsequent separation by an anion exchange material, contacting the solution with an anion exchange material whereby the molybdate is retained by the anion exchange material and the silicon remains in solution, and optionally adding sufficient alkali metal hydroxide to adjust the pH of the solution to about 12 to 13. Additionally, a high specific activity silicon-32 product having a high purity is provided.

  14. Impulsivity and methamphetamine use.

    PubMed

    Semple, Shirley J; Zians, Jim; Grant, Igor; Patterson, Thomas L

    2005-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between methamphetamine (meth) use and impulsivity in a sample of 385 HIV-negative heterosexually identified meth users. Participants who scored highest on a self-report measure of impulsivity were compared with those who scored lower in terms of background characteristics, meth use patterns, use of alcohol and other illicit drugs, sexual risk behavior, and psychiatric health variables. Methamphetamine users in the high impulsivity group were younger, less educated, used larger quantities of meth, were more likely to be binge users, had a larger number of sexual partners, engaged in more unprotected vaginal and oral sex, and scored higher on the Beck Depression Inventory as compared with those in the low impulsivity group. In a logistic regression analysis, Beck depression was the factor that best distinguished between meth users who scored high and those who scored low on impulsivity. Neurophysiological pathways that may underlie the relationship between impulsivity and meth use are discussed. PMID:16135337

  15. Impulse generation by detonation tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Marcia Ann

    Impulse generation with gaseous detonation requires conversion of chemical energy into mechanical energy. This conversion process is well understood in rocket engines where the high pressure combustion products expand through a nozzle generating high velocity exhaust gases. The propulsion community is now focusing on advanced concepts that utilize non-traditional forms of combustion like detonation. Such a device is called a pulse detonation engine in which laboratory tests have proven that thrust can be achieved through continuous cyclic operation. Because of poor performance of straight detonation tubes compared to conventional propulsion systems and the success of using nozzles on rocket engines, the effect of nozzles on detonation tubes is being investigated. Although previous studies of detonation tube nozzles have suggested substantial benefits, up to now there has been no systematic investigations over a range of operating conditions and nozzle configurations. As a result, no models predicting the impulse when nozzles are used exist. This lack of data has severely limited the development and evaluation of models and simulations of nozzles on pulse detonation engines. The first experimental investigation measuring impulse by gaseous detonation in plain tubes and tubes with nozzles operating in varying environment pressures is presented. Converging, diverging, and converging-diverging nozzles were tested to determine the effect of divergence angle, nozzle length, and volumetric fill fraction on impulse. The largest increases in specific impulse, 72% at an environment pressure of 100 kPa and 43% at an environment pressure of 1.4 kPa, were measured with the largest diverging nozzle tested that had a 12° half angle and was 0.6 m long. Two regimes of nozzle operation that depend on the environment pressure are responsible for these increases and were first observed from these data. To augment this experimental investigation, all data in the literature regarding

  16. Cocaine-induced c-Fos expression in rats selectively bred for high or low saccharin intake and in rats selected for high or low impulsivity.

    PubMed

    Regier, Paul S; Carroll, Marilyn E; Meisel, Robert L

    2012-08-01

    Sweet preference and impulsivity are predictors of cocaine self-administration; however, no research has been conducted to investigate neuronal activation in key brain reward areas after first time exposure to cocaine in rats that differ in their propensity for cocaine-seeking and -taking behavior. In this study we used rats that had been selectively bred for high vs. low saccharin intake and rats selected for high vs. low impulsivity for food. The goal of this study was to investigate whether there are differences of c-Fos reactivity between high and low phenotypes and determine whether these differences are similar between the two animal models. A group of rats was bred for high or low saccharin intake. Another group of rats was selected as high or low impulsive based on performance in a delay-discounting task. Subsequently, rats were given an acute injection of cocaine or saline and then c-Fos expression was observed and analyzed in several brain regions. The low reward-seeking phenotypes showed higher cocaine-induced c-Fos expression in several of these regions. Low saccharin preferring rats showed higher cocaine-induced c-Fos expression in the nucleus accumbens shell, and low impulsive rats showed higher cocaine-induced c-Fos expression in the orbitofrontal cortex and cingulate gyrus 1 area. In addition, both low impulsive and low saccharin rats had higher cocaine-induced c-Fos in the dorsal medial and dorsal lateral caudate putamen. The results indicate that individual differences in neuronal reactivity exist prior to chronic exposure to drugs of abuse. Furthermore, similar differences between the two animal models may be indicative of a common mechanism underlying vulnerability to drugs of abuse.

  17. High-intensity drying processes: Impulse drying modeling of fluid flow and heat transfer in a crown compensated impulse drying press roll, The lubrication problem. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Orloff, D.I.; Hojjatie, B.; Bloom, F.

    1994-08-01

    Although evaporative drying is currently used to dry paper, research has showed that significant energy savings could be realized with the newer impulse drying technology in drying heavy weight grades of paper. This report analyzes the lubrication problem which arises in modeling impulse drying employing a crown compensated roll. The geometry for the associated steady flow problem is constructed and expressions are derived for the relevant velocity fields, mass flow rates, and normal and tangential forces acting on both the bottom surface of an internal hydrostatic shoe and the inside surface of the crown-compensated roll. Results from the analytical model agreed well with experimental data from Beloit Corp. for the small shoe/roll configuration. The model can be used to predict effect of design and physical parameters on the performance of the press roll (lubricant thickness, pressure distributions, mechanical power required to operate the roll, etc.) and to determine optimal performance under various operating conditions.

  18. Seismic Emissions from a Highly Impulsive M6.7 Solar Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Oliveros, J. C.; Moradi, H.; Donea, A.-C.

    2008-09-01

    On 10 March 2001 the active region NOAA 9368 produced an unusually impulsive solar flare in close proximity to the solar limb. This flare has previously been studied in great detail, with observations classifying it as a type 1 white-light flare with a very hard spectrum in hard X-rays. The flare was also associated with a type II radio burst and coronal mass ejection. The flare emission characteristics appeared to closely correspond to previous instances of seismic emission from acoustically active flares. Using standard local helioseismic methods, we identified the seismic signatures produced by the flare that, to date, is the least energetic (in soft X-rays) of the flares known to have generated a detectable acoustic transient. Holographic analysis of the flare shows a compact acoustic source strongly correlated with the impulsive hard X-rays, visible continuum, and radio emission. Time distance diagrams of the seismic waves emanating from the flare region also show faint signatures, mainly in the eastern sector of the active region. The strong spatial coincidence between the seismic source and the impulsive visible continuum emission reinforces the theory that a substantial component of the seismic emission seen is a result of sudden heating of the low photosphere associated with the observed visible continuum emission. Furthermore, the low-altitude magnetic loop structure inferred from potential-field extrapolations in the flaring region suggests that there is a significant anti-correlation between the seismicity of a flare and the height of the magnetic loops that conduct the particle beams from the corona.

  19. Quenching electron runaway in positive high-voltage-impulse discharges in air by laser filaments.

    PubMed

    Eto, S; Zhidkov, A; Oishi, Y; Miki, M; Fujii, T

    2012-03-15

    Strong hard (ε>100 keV) x rays being observed from impulse atmospheric discharges with maximal voltages from U=0.5 to 0.9 MV just before the breakdown were completely stopped with the use of femtosecond-laser-filament plasma. Runaway electrons generating such x rays and being estimated to achieve their maximal energy, ε~U, near the positive electrode disappear if a laser filament plasma is ignited perpendicularly to the runaway near the positive electrode. A preheating mechanism for formation of the electron runaway in air is proposed.

  20. Evaporation-assisted high-power impulse magnetron sputtering: The deposition of tungsten oxide as a case study

    SciTech Connect

    Hemberg, Axel; Dauchot, Jean-Pierre; Snyders, Rony; Konstantinidis, Stephanos

    2012-07-15

    The deposition rate during the synthesis of tungsten trioxide thin films by reactive high-power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) of a tungsten target increases, above the dc threshold, as a result of the appropriate combination of the target voltage, the pulse duration, and the amount of oxygen in the reactive atmosphere. This behavior is likely to be caused by the evaporation of the low melting point tungsten trioxide layer covering the metallic target in such working conditions. The HiPIMS process is therefore assisted by thermal evaporation of the target material.

  1. Drifting potential humps in ionization zones: The “propeller blades” of high power impulse magnetron sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, André; Ni, Pavel; Panjan, Matjaž; Franz, Robert; Andersson, Joakim

    2013-09-30

    Ion energy distribution functions measured for high power impulse magnetron sputtering show features, such as a broad peak at several 10 eV with an extended tail, as well as asymmetry with respect to E×B, where E and B are the local electric and magnetic field vectors, respectively. Here it is proposed that those features are due to the formation of a potential hump of several 10 V in each of the traveling ionization zones. Potential hump formation is associated with a negative-positive-negative space charge that naturally forms in ionization zones driven by energetic drifting electrons.

  2. The Relationship between the UPPS-P Impulsivity Dimensions and Nonsuicidal Self-Injury Characteristics in Male and Female High-School Students.

    PubMed

    Claes, Laurence; Muehlenkamp, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    The present study investigated the association between nonsuicidal self-injury characteristics, functions, and the UPPS-P impulsivity-related traits in high-school students using self-report questionnaires. More than 17% of the 613 students engaged in at least one type of NSSI behavior. Compared to male students, female students engaged more often in cutting and less in head banging. All NSSI behaviors were significantly related to Negative and Positive Urgency, that is, the tendency to act impulsive in the presence of negative/positive affect. Interactions between different UPPS-P impulsivity dimensions did not increase the percentage of explained variance in the different NSSI behaviors. Furthermore, severe cutting was negatively related to Lack of Premeditation. Different NSSI functions showed differential relationships with the five UPPS-P impulsivity dimensions. PMID:24236284

  3. Impulsivity in the supermarket. Responses to calorie taxes and subsidies in healthy weight undergraduates.

    PubMed

    Giesen, Janneke C A H; Havermans, Remco C; Nederkoorn, Chantal; Jansen, Anita

    2012-02-01

    The present study investigated the effect of taxing high-energy dense products and subsidizing low-energy dense products on changes in calorie consumption. More specifically, we hypothesized that 'more impulsive' individuals were less influenced by such pricing strategies compared to 'less impulsive' individuals. Contrary to our hypothesis, results showed that 'more impulsive' individuals adjusted their calorie consumption with regard to price changes whereas 'less impulsive' participants were less influenced by price changes. Furthermore, taxing high-energy dense products was more successful in reducing calorie consumption than subsidizing low-energy dense products. PMID:22019544

  4. Impulsive Start of a Symmetric Airfoil at High Angle of Attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, Joseph; Yon, Steven; Rogers, Stuart E.

    1996-01-01

    The fluid dynamic phenomena following the impulsive start of a NACA 0015 airfoil were studied by using a time accurate solution of the incompressible laminar Navier-Stokes equations. Angle of attack was set at 10 deg to simulate steady-state poststall conditions at a Reynolds number of 1.2 x 10(exp 4). The calculation revealed that large initial lift values can be obtained, immediately following the impulsive start, when a trapped vortex develops above the airfoil. Before the buildup of this trapped vortex and immediately after the airfoil was set into motion, the fluid is attached to the airfoil's surface and flows around the trailing edge, demonstrating the delay in the buildup of the classical Kutta condition. The transient of this effect is quite short and is followed by an attached How event that leads to the trapped vortex that has a longer duration. The just described initial phenomenon eventually transits into a fully developed separated flow pattern identifiable by an alternating, periodic vortex shedding.

  5. High pressure, energy, and impulse loading of the wall in a 1-GJ Laboratory Microfusion Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Harrach, R.J.

    1989-07-24

    A proposed Laboratory Microfusion Facility (LMF) must be able to withstand repeated, low-repetition-rate fusion explosions at the 1-GJ (one-quarter ton) yield level. The energy release will occur at the center of a chamber only a few meters in radius, subjecting the interior or first wall to severe levels of temperature, pressure, and impulse. We show by theory and computation that the wall loading can be ameliorated by interposing a spherical shell of low-Z material between the fuel and the wall. This sacrificial shield converts the source energy components that are most damaging to the wall (soft x-rays and fast ions) to more benign plasma kinetic energy from the vaporized shield, and stretches the time duration over which this energy is delivered to the wall from nanoseconds to microseconds. Numerical calculations emphasize thin, volleyball-sized plastic shields, and much thicker ones of frozen nitrogen. Wall shielding criteria of small (or no) amount of surface ablation, low impulse and pressure loading, minimal shrapnel danger, small expense, and convenience in handling all favor the thin plastic shields. 7 refs., 4 figs.

  6. Optically measured explosive impulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biss, Matthew M.; McNesby, Kevin L.

    2014-06-01

    An experimental technique is investigated to optically measure the explosive impulse produced by laboratory-scale spherical charges detonated in air. Explosive impulse has historically been calculated from temporal pressure measurements obtained via piezoelectric transducers. The presented technique instead combines schlieren flow visualization and high-speed digital imaging to optically measure explosive impulse. Prior to an explosive event, schlieren system calibration is performed using known light-ray refractions and resulting digital image intensities. Explosive charges are detonated in the test section of a schlieren system and imaged by a high-speed digital camera in pseudo-streak mode. Spatiotemporal schlieren intensity maps are converted using an Abel deconvolution, Rankine-Hugoniot jump equations, ideal gas law, triangular temperature decay profile, and Schardin's standard photometric technique to yield spatiotemporal pressure maps. Temporal integration of individual pixel pressure profiles over the positive pressure duration of the shock wave yields the explosive impulse generated for a given radial standoff. Calculated explosive impulses are shown to exhibit good agreement between optically derived values and pencil gage pressure transducers.

  7. Impulsive and long duration high-energy gamma-ray emission from the very bright 2012 March 7 solar flares

    SciTech Connect

    Ajello, M.; Albert, A.; Allafort, A.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Charles, E.; Baldini, L.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Buson, S.; Bellazzini, R.; Bregeon, J.; Bissaldi, E.; Bonamente, E.; Cecchi, C.; Brandt, T. J.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Caraveo, P. A. E-mail: vahep@stanford.edu; and others

    2014-07-01

    The Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) detected gamma-rays up to 4 GeV from two bright X-class solar flares on 2012 March 7, showing both an impulsive and temporally extended emission phases. The gamma-rays appear to originate from the same active region as the X-rays associated with these flares. The >100 MeV gamma-ray flux decreases monotonically during the first hour (impulsive phase) followed by a slower decrease for the next 20 hr. A power law with a high-energy exponential cutoff can adequately describe the photon spectrum. Assuming that the gamma rays result from the decay of pions produced by accelerated protons and ions with a power-law spectrum, we find that the index of that spectrum is ∼3, with minor variations during the impulsive phase. During the extended phase the photon spectrum softens monotonically, requiring the proton index varying from ∼4 to >5. The >30 MeV proton flux observed by the GOES satellites also shows a flux decrease and spectral softening, but with a harder spectrum (index ∼2-3). Based on these observations, we explore the relative merits of prompt or continuous acceleration scenarios, hadronic or leptonic emission processes, and acceleration at the solar corona or by the fast coronal mass ejections. We conclude that the most likely scenario is continuous acceleration of protons in the solar corona that penetrate the lower solar atmosphere and produce pions that decay into gamma rays. However, acceleration in the downstream of the shock cannot be definitely ruled out.

  8. Application of a Channel Design Method to High-Solidity Cascades and Tests of an Impulse Cascade with 90 Degrees of Turning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanitz, John D; Sheldrake, Leonard J

    1953-01-01

    A technique is developed for the application of a channel design method to the design of high-solidity cascades with prescribed velocity distributions as a function of arc length along the blade-element profile. The technique is applied to both incompressible and subsonic compressible, nonviscous, irrotational fluid motion. For compressible flow, the ratio of specific heats is assumed equal to -1.0. An impulse cascade with 90 degree turning was designed for incompressible flow and was tested at the design angle of attack over a range of downstream Mach number from 0.2 to coke flow. To achieve good efficiency, the cascade was designed for prescribed velocities and maximum blade loading according to limitations imposed by considerations of boundary-layer separation.

  9. DEPOSITION OF NIOBIUM AND OTHER SUPERCONDUCTING MATERIALS WITH HIGH POWER IMPULSE MAGNETRON SPUTTERING: CONCEPT AND FIRST RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    High Current Electronics Institute, Tomsk, Russia; Anders, Andre; Mendelsberg, Rueben J.; Lim, Sunnie; Mentink, Matthijs; Slack, Jonathan L.; Wallig, Joseph G.; Nollau, Alexander V.; Yushkov, Georgy Yu.

    2011-07-24

    Niobium coatings on copper cavities have been considered as a cost-efficient replacement of bulk niobium RF cavities, however, coatings made by magnetron sputtering have not quite lived up to high expectations due to Q-slope and other issues. High power impulse magnetron sputtering (HIPIMS) is a promising emerging coatings technology which combines magnetron sputtering with a pulsed power approach. The magnetron is turned into a metal plasma source by using very high peak power density of ~ 1 kW/cm{sup 2}. In this contribution, the cavity coatings concept with HIPIMS is explained. A system with two cylindrical, movable magnetrons was set up with custom magnetrons small enough to be inserted into 1.3 GHz cavities. Preliminary data on niobium HIPIMS plasma and the resulting coatings are presented. The HIPIMS approach has the potential to be extended to film systems beyond niobium, including other superconducting materials and/or multilayer systems.

  10. Dopamine Gene Profiling to Predict Impulse Control and Effects of Dopamine Agonist Ropinirole.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, Hayley J; Stinear, Cathy M; Ren, April; Coxon, James P; Kao, Justin; Macdonald, Lorraine; Snow, Barry; Cramer, Steven C; Byblow, Winston D

    2016-07-01

    Dopamine agonists can impair inhibitory control and cause impulse control disorders for those with Parkinson disease (PD), although mechanistically this is not well understood. In this study, we hypothesized that the extent of such drug effects on impulse control is related to specific dopamine gene polymorphisms. This double-blind, placebo-controlled study aimed to examine the effect of single doses of 0.5 and 1.0 mg of the dopamine agonist ropinirole on impulse control in healthy adults of typical age for PD onset. Impulse control was measured by stop signal RT on a response inhibition task and by an index of impulsive decision-making on the Balloon Analogue Risk Task. A dopamine genetic risk score quantified basal dopamine neurotransmission from the influence of five genes: catechol-O-methyltransferase, dopamine transporter, and those encoding receptors D1, D2, and D3. With placebo, impulse control was better for the high versus low genetic risk score groups. Ropinirole modulated impulse control in a manner dependent on genetic risk score. For the lower score group, both doses improved response inhibition (decreased stop signal RT) whereas the lower dose reduced impulsiveness in decision-making. Conversely, the higher score group showed a trend for worsened response inhibition on the lower dose whereas both doses increased impulsiveness in decision-making. The implications of the present findings are that genotyping can be used to predict impulse control and whether it will improve or worsen with the administration of dopamine agonists. PMID:26942320

  11. Characterization of polycrystalline VO2 thin film with low phase transition temperature fabricated by high power impulse magnetron sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Tiegui; Wang, Langping; Wang, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Yufen

    2016-04-01

    VO2 is a unique material that undergoes a reversible phase transformation around 68∘C. Currently, applications of VO2 on smart windows are limited by its high transition temperature. In order to reduce the temperature, VO2 thin film was fabricated on quartz glass substrate by high power impulse magnetron sputtering with a modulated pulsed power. The phase transition temperature has been reduced to as low as 32∘C. In addition, the VO2 film possesses a typical metal-insulator transition. X-ray diffraction and selected area electron diffraction patterns reveal that an obvious lattice distortion has been formed in the as-deposited polycrystalline VO2 thin film. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy proves that oxygen vacancies have been formed in the as-deposited thin film, which will induce a lattice distortion in the VO2 thin film.

  12. High power impulse magnetron sputtering and related discharges: scalable plasma sources for plasma-based ion implantation and deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre

    2009-09-01

    High power impulse magnetron sputtering (HIPIMS) and related self-sputtering techniques are reviewed from a viewpoint of plasma-based ion implantation and deposition (PBII&D). HIPIMS combines the classical, scalable sputtering technology with pulsed power, which is an elegant way of ionizing the sputtered atoms. Related approaches, such as sustained self-sputtering, are also considered. The resulting intense flux of ions to the substrate consists of a mixture of metal and gas ions when using a process gas, or of metal ions only when using `gasless? or pure self-sputtering. In many respects, processing with HIPIMS plasmas is similar to processing with filtered cathodic arc plasmas, though the former is easier to scale to large areas. Both ion implantation and etching (high bias voltage, without deposition) and thin film deposition (low bias, or bias of low duty cycle) have been demonstrated.

  13. Impulsivity and rapid decision-making for reward.

    PubMed

    Burnett Heyes, Stephanie; Adam, Robert J; Urner, Maren; van der Leer, Leslie; Bahrami, Bahador; Bays, Paul M; Husain, Masud

    2012-01-01

    Impulsivity is a feature of many brain disorders. Although often defined as the predisposition to act with an inadequate degree of deliberation, forethought, or control, it has proven difficult to measure. This may in part be due to the fact that it is a multifaceted construct, with impulsive decisions potentially arising as a result of a number of underlying mechanisms. Indeed, a "functional" degree of impulsivity may even promote effective behavior in healthy participants in a way that can be advantageous under certain circumstances. Although many tasks have been developed to study impulsivity, few examine decisions made rapidly, for time-sensitive rewards. In the current study we examine behavior in 59 adults on a manual "Traffic Light" task which requires participants to take risks under time pressure, if they are to maximize reward. We show that behavioral variables that index rapid anticipatory responding in this paradigm are correlated with one, specific self-report measure of impulsivity: "lack of premeditation" on the UPPS Impulsive Behavior Scale. Participants who scored more highly on this subscale performed better on the task. Moreover, anticipatory behavior reduced significantly with age (18-79 years), an effect that continued to be upheld after correction for potential age differences in the ability to judge the timing of responses. Based on these findings, we argue that the Traffic Light task provides a parametric method to study one aspect of impulsivity in health and disease: namely, rapid decision-making in pursuit of risky, time-sensitive rewards. PMID:22661960

  14. Qualifying an impulse digitizer for measurements in HV impulse tests

    SciTech Connect

    McComb, T.R. ); Kuffel, J. . Research Div.); Malewski, R. ); Schon, K. )

    1990-07-01

    Working groups are presently engaged in preparing a standard on digital recorders for measurement in HV impulse tests. This paper shows how the main tests described in the proposed standard can be applied towards qualifying an impulse digitizer for HV Impulse measurements. Experimental results from the application of these techniques to different digitizers are presented. A major problem in using digital recorders in HV laboratories is electromagnetic interference. Previous low frequency measurements have indicated that high frequencies can be a problem and this paper reports some measurements at high frequencies. The consequences of these measurements for electromagnetic compatibility are discussed.

  15. Reward processing deficits and impulsivity in high-risk offspring of alcoholics: A study of event-related potentials during a monetary gambling task

    PubMed Central

    Kamarajan, Chella; Pandey, Ashwini K.; Chorlian, David B.; Manz, Niklas; Stimus, Arthur T.; Bauer, Lance O.; Hesselbrock, Victor M.; Schuckit, Marc A.; Kuperman, Samuel; Kramer, John; Porjesz, Bernice

    2015-01-01

    Background Individuals at high risk to develop alcoholism often manifest neurocognitive deficits as well as increased impulsivity. The goal of the present study is to elucidate reward processing deficits, externalizing disorders, and impulsivity as elicited by electrophysiological, clinical and behavioral measures in subjects at high risk for alcoholism from families densely affected by alcoholism in the context of brain maturation across age groups and gender. Methods Event-related potentials (ERPs) and current source density (CSD) during a monetary gambling task (MGT) were measured in 12–25 year old offspring (N = 1864) of families in the Collaborative Study on the Genetics of Alcoholism (COGA) Prospective study; the high risk (HR, N = 1569) subjects were from families densely affected with alcoholism and the low risk (LR, N = 295) subjects were from community families. Externalizing disorders and impulsivity scores were also compared between LR and HR groups. Results HR offspring from older (16–25 years) male and younger (12–15 years) female subgroups showed lower P3 amplitude than LR subjects. The amplitude decrement was most prominent in HR males during the loss condition. Overall, P3 amplitude increase at anterior sites and decrease at posterior areas were seen in older compared to younger subjects, suggesting frontalization during brain maturation. The HR subgroups also exhibited hypofrontality manifested as weaker CSD activity during both loss and gain conditions at frontal regions. Further, the HR subjects had higher impulsivity scores and increased prevalence of externalizing disorders. P3 amplitudes during the gain condition were negatively correlated with impulsivity scores. Conclusions Older male and younger female HR offspring, compared to their LR counterparts, manifested reward processing deficits as indexed by lower P3 amplitude and weaker CSD activity, along with higher prevalence of externalizing disorders and higher impulsivity scores

  16. Telomere length is highly inherited and associated with hyperactivity-impulsivity in children with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Danielle de Souza; Rosa, Daniela Valadão Freitas; Barros, Alexandre Guimarães Almeida; Romano-Silva, Marco Aurélio; Malloy-Diniz, Leandro Fernandes; Mattos, Paulo; de Miranda, Débora Marques

    2015-01-01

    Telomere length (TL) is highly heritable, and a shorter telomere at birth may increase the risk of age-related problems. Additionally, a shorter TL may represent a biomarker of chronic stress and has been associated with psychiatric disorders. However, no study has explored whether there is an association between TL and the symptoms of one of the most common neurodevelopmental disorders in childhood: Attention Deficit/Hyperactive Disorder (ADHD). We evaluated 61 (range, 6–16 years) ADHD children and their parents between 2012 and 2014. TL was measured with a quantitative polymerase chain reaction method with telomere signal normalized to the signal from a single copy gene (36B4) to generate a T/S ratio. Family data was processed through a generalized estimated equations (GEE) model to determine the effect of parental TL on children TL. Inattentive and hyperactive-impulsive symptoms were also evaluated in relation to TL. For the first time, we found general heritability to be the major mechanism explaining interindividual TL variation in ADHD (father-child: 95% CI = 0.35/0.91, p < 0.001; mother-child: 95% CI = 0.38/0.74, p < 0.001). The hyperactive-impulsive dimension of ADHD was related with children’s TL (r = −339, p = 0.008) and maternal TL (r = −264, p = 0.047), but not with paternal TL (p > 0.05). The ADHD inattentive dimension was not significant associated with TL in this study (p > 0.05). TL was shown to be a potential biomarker of the ADHD symptoms burden in families affected by this neurodevelopmental disorder. However, it is crucial that future studies investigating the rate of telomere attrition in relation to psychiatric problems to consider the strong determination of TL at birth by inheritance. PMID:26217174

  17. Relations among Academic Enablers and Academic Achievement in Children with and without High Levels of Parent-Rated Symptoms of Inattention, Impulsivity, and Hyperactivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Demaray, Michelle Kilpatrick; Jenkins, Lyndsay N.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the relationships among academic enablers (i.e., engagement, interpersonal skills, motivation, study skills) and academic achievement in children with and without high levels of parent-rated symptoms of inattention, impulsivity, and hyperactivity (Symptoms of IIH Group). The study included 69 participants (29 [42%] in the IIH…

  18. A parametric model for reactive high-power impulse magnetron sputtering of films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozák, Tomáš; Vlček, Jaroslav

    2016-02-01

    We present a time-dependent parametric model for reactive HiPIMS deposition of films. Specific features of HiPIMS discharges and a possible increase in the density of the reactive gas in front of the reactive gas inlets placed between the target and the substrate are considered in the model. The model makes it possible to calculate the compound fractions in two target layers and in one substrate layer, and the deposition rate of films at fixed partial pressures of the reactive and inert gas. A simplified relation for the deposition rate of films prepared using a reactive HiPIMS is presented. We used the model to simulate controlled reactive HiPIMS depositions of stoichiometric \\text{Zr}{{\\text{O}}2} films, which were recently carried out in our laboratories with two different configurations of the {{\\text{O}}2} inlets in front of the sputtered target. The repetition frequency was 500 Hz at the deposition-averaged target power densities of 5 Wcm-2and 50 Wcm-2 with a pulse-averaged target power density up to 2 kWcm-2. The pulse durations were 50 μs and 200 μs. Our model calculations show that the to-substrate {{\\text{O}}2} inlet provides systematically lower compound fractions in the target surface layer and higher compound fractions in the substrate surface layer, compared with the to-target {{\\text{O}}2} inlet. The low compound fractions in the target surface layer (being approximately 10% at the deposition-averaged target power density of 50 Wcm-2 and the pulse duration of 200 μs) result in high deposition rates of the films produced, which are in agreement with experimental values.

  19. High-Alcohol Preferring Mice Are More Impulsive Than Low-Alcohol Preferring Mice as Measured in the Delay Discounting Task

    PubMed Central

    Oberlin, B. G.; Grahame, N. J.

    2010-01-01

    Background Repeated studies have shown that high impulsivity, when defined as the tendency to choose small immediate rewards over larger delayed rewards, is more prevalent in drug addicts and alcoholics when compared with nonaddicts. Assessing whether impulsivity precedes and potentially causes addiction disorders is difficult in humans because they all share a history of drug use. In this study, we address this question by testing alcohol-naïve mice from lines showing heritable differences in alcohol intake. Methods Replicated selected lines of outbred high-alcohol preferring (HAP) mice were compared to a low-alcohol preferring (LAP) line as well as the low-drinking progenitor line (HS/Ibg) on an adjusting amount delay discounting (DD) task. The DD task employs 2 levers to present subjects with a choice between a small, immediate and a large, delayed saccharin reward. By adjusting the quantity of the immediate reward up and down based on choice behavior, the task allows an estimate of how the subjective value of the delayed reinforcer decreases as delays increase. Latency to respond was also measured for each trial. Results Both HAP2 and HAP1 lines of mice were more impulsive than the LAP2 and HS/Ibg lines, respectively. Hyperbolic curve-fitting confirmed steeper discounting in the high-alcohol drinking lines. In addition, the high-alcohol drinking lines demonstrated greater within-session increases in reaction times relative to the low-alcohol drinking lines. No other differences (consumption of saccharin, total trials completed) consistently mapped onto genetic differences in alcohol drinking. Conclusions Alcohol-naïve outbred mice selected for high-alcohol drinking were more impulsive with saccharin reinforcers than low-alcohol drinkers. These data are consistent with results seen using inbred strain descendents of high-alcohol drinking and low-alcohol drinking rat lines, and suggest that impulsivity is a heritable difference that precedes alcoholism. PMID

  20. Functional impulsivity and reinforcement sensitivity theory.

    PubMed

    Smillie, Luke D; Jackson, Chris J

    2006-02-01

    In this article, we attempt to integrate Dickman's (1990) descriptive concept of Functional Impulsivity (FI) with Gray's (1970, 1991) Reinforcement Sensitivity Theory (RST). Specifically, we consider that FI bears great conceptual similarity to Gray's concept of reward-reactivity, which is thought to be caused by the combined effects of a Behavioral Activation System (BAS) and Behavioral Inhibition System (BIS). In our first study, we examine the construct validity and structural correlates of FI. Results indicate that FI is related positively to measures of BAS and Extraversion, negatively to measures of BIS and Neuroticism, and is separate from Psychoticism and typical trait Impulsivity, which Dickman calls Dysfunctional Impulsivity (DI). In our second study, we use a go/no-go discrimination task to examine the relationship between FI and response bias under conditions of rewarding and punishing feedback. Results indicate that FI, along with two measures of BAS, predicted the development of a response bias for the rewarded alternative. In comparison, high DI appeared to reflect indifference toward either reward or punishment. We consider how these findings might reconcile the perspectives of Gray and Dickman and help clarify the broader understanding of Impulsivity.

  1. Impulse-based methods for fluid flow

    SciTech Connect

    Cortez, R.

    1995-05-01

    A Lagrangian numerical method based on impulse variables is analyzed. A relation between impulse vectors and vortex dipoles with a prescribed dipole moment is presented. This relation is used to adapt the high-accuracy cutoff functions of vortex methods for use in impulse-based methods. A source of error in the long-time implementation of the impulse method is explained and two techniques for avoiding this error are presented. An application of impulse methods to the motion of a fluid surrounded by an elastic membrane is presented.

  2. Emotion Regulation and Impulsivity in Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Schreiber, Liana R.N.; Grant, Jon E.; Odlaug, Brian L.

    2012-01-01

    Past research has linked both emotion regulation and impulsivity with the development and maintenance of addictions. However, no research has investigated the relationship between emotion regulation and impulsivity within young adults. In the present study, we analyzed 194 young adults (27.8% female; 21.3 ± 3.32 years old; 91.8% single; 85.1% Caucasian), grouping them as low, average, or high emotionally dysregulated, and compared self-reported impulsivity, impulsive behaviors (such as alcohol and substance use and gambling) and cognitive impulsivity. We hypothesized that those with high levels of emotion dysregulation would score higher on self-reported and cognitive impulsivity, and report more impulsive behaviors. Analysis indicated that compared to low, the high emotion dysregulation group scored significantly higher on two self-report measures of impulsivity, harm avoidance, and cognitive reasoning. No significant differences were found between groups in impulsive behaviors and cognitive impulsivity. Overall, this study highlights the relationship between emotion dysregulation and impulsivity, suggesting that emotion regulation may be an important factor to consider when assessing individuals at a higher risk for developing an addiction. PMID:22385661

  3. Psychosocial predictors of impulsivity in alcohol-dependent patients

    PubMed Central

    Jakubczyk, Andrzej; Klimkiewicz, Anna; Mika, Katarzyna; Bugaj, Marcin; Konopa, Aleksandra; Podgórska, Anna; Brower, Kirk J.; Wojnar, Marcin

    2012-01-01

    Impulsivity is an important risk factor of severe course of alcohol dependence. However, the significance of environmental determinants of impulsivity has been underestimated. The aim of the study was to identify psychosocial factors increasing the level of impulsivity in alcoholics. Levels of impulsivity were measured in 304 alcohol-dependent patients. Stop-signal task was used to assess behavioral impulsivity, and Barratt Impulsiveness Scale to measure global and cognitive impulsivity. Correlations between impulsivity and psychosocial variables were examined. A significant association between level of impulsivity and severity of psychopathological symptoms were observed. Patients who reported childhood sexual or physical abuse, lower social support, more severe course of alcohol dependence were more impulsive, especially in cognitive domain. When entered into a linear regression analysis model, severity of alcohol dependence, psychopathology and childhood physical abuse remained significant. These results suggest that psychosocial variables are important factors associated with high levels of impulsivity in alcohol-dependent patients. PMID:23274294

  4. Psychosocial predictors of impulsivity in alcohol-dependent patients.

    PubMed

    Jakubczyk, Andrzej; Klimkiewicz, Anna; Mika, Katarzyna; Bugaj, Marcin; Konopa, Aleksandra; Podgórska, Anna; Brower, Kirk J; Wojnar, Marcin

    2013-01-01

    Impulsivity is an important risk factor of severe course of alcohol dependence. However, the significance of environmental determinants of impulsivity has been underestimated. The aim of this study was to identify psychosocial factors increasing the level of impulsivity in alcoholics. Levels of impulsivity were measured in 304 alcohol-dependent patients. The stop-signal task was used to assess behavioral impulsivity, and the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale, to measure global and cognitive impulsivity. Correlations between impulsivity and psychosocial variables were examined. A significant association between level of impulsivity and severity of psychopathological symptoms was observed. Patients who reported childhood sexual or physical abuse, lower social support, and more severe course of alcohol dependence were more impulsive, especially in the cognitive domain. When entered into a linear regression analysis model, severity of alcohol dependence, psychopathology, and childhood physical abuse remained significant. These results suggest that psychosocial variables are important factors associated with high levels of impulsivity in alcohol-dependent patients.

  5. Psychosocial predictors of impulsivity in alcohol-dependent patients.

    PubMed

    Jakubczyk, Andrzej; Klimkiewicz, Anna; Mika, Katarzyna; Bugaj, Marcin; Konopa, Aleksandra; Podgórska, Anna; Brower, Kirk J; Wojnar, Marcin

    2013-01-01

    Impulsivity is an important risk factor of severe course of alcohol dependence. However, the significance of environmental determinants of impulsivity has been underestimated. The aim of this study was to identify psychosocial factors increasing the level of impulsivity in alcoholics. Levels of impulsivity were measured in 304 alcohol-dependent patients. The stop-signal task was used to assess behavioral impulsivity, and the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale, to measure global and cognitive impulsivity. Correlations between impulsivity and psychosocial variables were examined. A significant association between level of impulsivity and severity of psychopathological symptoms was observed. Patients who reported childhood sexual or physical abuse, lower social support, and more severe course of alcohol dependence were more impulsive, especially in the cognitive domain. When entered into a linear regression analysis model, severity of alcohol dependence, psychopathology, and childhood physical abuse remained significant. These results suggest that psychosocial variables are important factors associated with high levels of impulsivity in alcohol-dependent patients. PMID:23274294

  6. Constrained sheath optics for high thrust density, low specific impulse ion thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilbur, Paul J.; Han, Jian-Zhang

    1987-01-01

    The results of an experimental study showing that a contoured, fine wire mesh attached to the screen grid can be used to control the divergence characteristics of ion beamlets produced at low net-to-total accelerating voltage ratios are presented. The influence of free and constrained-sheath optics systems on beamlet divergence characteristics are found to be similar in the operating regime investigated, but it was found that constrained-sheath optics systems can be operated at higher perveance levels than free-sheath ones. The concept of a fine wire interference probe that can be used to study ion beamlet focusing behavior is introduced. This probe is used to demonstrate beamlet focusing to a diameter about one hundreth of the screen grid extraction aperture diameter. Additional testing is suggested to define an optimally contoured mesh that could yield well focused beamlets at net-to-total accelerating voltage ratios below about 0.1.

  7. Physics of Plasma-Based Ion Implantation&Deposition (PBIID)and High Power Impulse Magnetron Sputtering (HIPIMS): A Comparison

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre

    2007-08-28

    The emerging technology of High Power Impulse MagnetronSputtering (HIPIMS) has much in common with the more establishedtechnology of Plasma Based Ion Implantation&Deposition (PBIID):both use pulsed plasmas, the pulsed sheath periodically evolves andcollapses, the plasma-sheath system interacts with the pulse-drivingpower supply, the plasma parameters are affected by the power dissipated,surface atoms are sputtered and secondary electrons are emitted, etc.Therefore, both fields of science and technology could learn from eachother, which has not been fully explored. On the other hand, there aresignificant differences, too. Most importantly, the operation of HIPIMSheavilyrelies on the presence of a strong magnetic field, confiningelectrons and causing their ExB drift, which is closed for typicalmagnetron configurations. Second, at the high peak power levels used forHIPIMS, 1 kW/cm2 or greater averaged over the target area, the sputteredmaterial greatly affects plasma generation. For PBIID, in contrast,plasma generation and ion processing of the surface (ion implantation,etching, and deposition) are considered rela-tively independentprocesses. Third, secondary electron emission is generally considered anuisance for PBIID, especially at high voltages, whereas it is a criticalingredient to the operation of HIPIMS. Fourth, the voltages in PBIID areoften higher than in HIPIMS. For the first three reasons listed above,modelling of PBIID seems to be easier and could give some guidance forfuture HIPIMS models, which, clearly, will be more involved.

  8. High Flux Isotope Reactor technical specifications

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-11-01

    This report gives technical specifications for the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) on the following: safety limits and limiting safety system settings; limiting conditions for operation; surveillance requirements; design features; and administrative controls.

  9. Method to control deposition rate instabilities—High power impulse magnetron sputtering deposition of TiO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Kossoy, Anna E-mail: anna.kossoy@gmail.com; Magnusson, Rögnvaldur L.; Tryggvason, Tryggvi K.; Leosson, Kristjan; Olafsson, Sveinn

    2015-03-15

    The authors describe how changes in shutter state (open/closed) affect sputter plasma conditions and stability of the deposition rate of Ti and TiO{sub 2} films. The films were grown by high power impulse magnetron sputtering in pure Ar and in Ar/O{sub 2} mixture from a metallic Ti target. The shutter state was found to have an effect on the pulse waveform for both pure Ar and reactive sputtering of Ti also affecting stability of TiO{sub 2} deposition rate. When the shutter opened, the shape of pulse current changed from rectangular to peak-plateau and pulse energy decreased. The authors attribute it to the change in plasma impedance and gas rarefaction originating in geometry change in front of the magnetron. TiO{sub 2} deposition rate was initially found to be high, 1.45 Å/s, and then dropped by ∼40% during the first 5 min, while for Ti the change was less obvious. Instability of deposition rate poses significant challenge for growing multilayer heterostructures. In this work, the authors suggest a way to overcome this by monitoring the integrated average energy involved in the deposition process. It is possible to calibrate and control the film thickness by monitoring the integrated pulse energy and end growth when desired integrated pulse energy level has been reached.

  10. Trait impulsivity and impaired prefrontal impulse inhibition function in adolescents with internet gaming addiction revealed by a Go/No-Go fMRI study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Recent studies suggest that Internet gaming addiction (IGA) is an impulse disorder, or is at least related to impulse control disorders. In the present study, we hypothesized that different facets of trait impulsivity may be specifically linked to the brain regions with impaired impulse inhibition function in IGA adolescents. Methods Seventeen adolescents with IGA and seventeen healthy controls were scanned during performance of a response-inhibition Go/No-Go task using a 3.0 T MRI scanner. The Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS)-11 was used to assess impulsivity. Results There were no differences in the behavioral performance on the Go/No-Go task between the groups. However, the IGA group was significantly hyperactive during No-Go trials in the left superior medial frontal gyrus, right anterior cingulate cortex, right superior/middle frontal gyrus, left inferior parietal lobule, left precentral gyrus, and left precuneus and cuneus. Further, the bilateral middle temporal gyrus, bilateral inferior temporal gyrus, and right superior parietal lobule were significantly hypoactive during No-Go trials. Activation of the left superior medial frontal gyrus was positively associated with BIS-11 and Chen Internet Addiction Scale (CIAS) total score across IGA participants. Conclusions Our data suggest that the prefrontal cortex may be involved in the circuit modulating impulsivity, while its impaired function may relate to high impulsivity in adolescents with IGA, which may contribute directly to the Internet addiction process. PMID:24885073

  11. Influence of high power impulse magnetron sputtering plasma ionization on the microstructure of TiN thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehiasarian, A. P.; Vetushka, A.; Gonzalvo, Y. Aranda; Sáfrán, G.; Székely, L.; Barna, P. B.

    2011-05-01

    HIPIMS (High Power Impulse Magnetron Sputtering) discharge is a new PVD technology for the deposition of high-quality thin films. The deposition flux contains a high degree of metal ionization and nitrogen dissociation. The microstructure of HIPIMS-deposited nitride films is denser compared to conventional sputter technologies. However, the mechanisms acting on the microstructure, texture and properties have not been discussed in detail so far. In this study, the growth of TiN by HIPIMS of Ti in mixed Ar and N2 atmosphere has been investigated. Varying degrees of metal ionization and nitrogen dissociation were produced by increasing the peak discharge current (Id) from 5 to 30 A. The average power was maintained constant by adjusting the frequency. Mass spectrometry measurements of the deposition flux revealed a high content of ionized film-forming species, such as Ti1+, Ti2+ and atomic nitrogen N1+. Ti1+ ions with energies up to 50 eV were detected during the pulse with reducing energy in the pulse-off times. Langmuir probe measurements showed that the peak plasma density during the pulse was 3 × 1016 m-3. Plasma density, and ion flux ratios of N1+: N21+ and Ti1+: Ti0 increased linearly with peak current. The ratios exceeded 1 at 30 A. TiN films deposited by HIPIMS were analyzed by X-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy. At high Id, N1+: N21+> 1 and Ti1+: Ti0> 1 were produced; a strong 002 texture was present and column boundaries in the films were atomically tight. As Id reduced and N1+: N21+ and Ti1+: Ti0 dropped below 1, the film texture switched to strong 111 with a dense structure. At very low Id, porosity between columns developed. The effects of the significant activation of the deposition flux observed in the HIPIMS discharge on the film texture, microstructure, morphology and properties are discussed.

  12. Laboratory behavioral measures of impulsivity.

    PubMed

    Dougherty, Donald M; Mathias, Charles W; Marsh, Dawn M; Jagar, Ashley A

    2005-02-01

    Previous research and theory have conceptualized impulsivity as a multifaceted construct that requires multiple modes of measurement for accurate assessment. This article describes a software package that includes four paradigms for measuring multiple and unique aspects of impulsivity. Specifically, four tasks are described: (1) the two choice impulsivity paradigm, (2) the single key impulsivity paradigm, (3) the GoStop impulsivity paradigm, and (4) the time paradigm. These tasks measure processes related to the capacity to tolerate delay for reward, to inhibit an already initiated response, and to estimate the passage of time. These processes have been found to be important to the understanding of impulsive behaviors. The programs are flexible and allow the experimenter to manipulate a number of parameters related to delay-reward contingencies, timing, performance feedback/payment, and data output variables. Manipulation of these parameters makes the paradigms scalable to a wide range of ability levels and appropriate for samples ranging from children to adults. The four paradigms in this software package are available at no cost and can be obtained by contacting the corresponding author.

  13. Development of superlattice CrN/NbN coatings for joint replacements deposited by high power impulse magnetron sputtering.

    PubMed

    Hovsepian, Papken Ehiasarian; Ehiasarian, Arutiun Papken; Purandare, Yashodhan; Sugumaran, Arunprabhu Arunachalam; Marriott, Tim; Khan, Imran

    2016-09-01

    The demand for reliable coating on medical implants is ever growing. In this research, enhanced performance of medical implants was achieved by a CrN/NbN coating, utilising nanoscale multilayer/superlattice structure. The advantages of the novel high power impulse magnetron sputtering technology, namely, its unique highly ionised plasma, were exploited to deposit dense and strongly adherent coatings on CoCr implants. Transmission electron microscopy analysis revealed coating superlattice structure with bi-layer thickness of 3.5 nm. CrN/NbN deposited on CoCr samples showed exceptionally high adhesion, critical load values of LC2 = 50 N in scratch adhesion tests. Nanoindentation tests showed high hardness of 34 GPa and Young's modulus of 447 GPa. Low coefficient of friction (μ) 0.49 and coating wear coefficient (K C) = 4.94 × 10(-16) m(3) N(-1) m(-1) were recorded in dry sliding tests. Metal ion release studies showed a reduction in Co, Cr and Mo release at physiological and elevated temperatures (70 °C) to almost undetectable levels (<1 ppb). Rotating beam fatigue testing showed a significant increase in fatigue strength from 349 ± 59 MPa (uncoated) to 539 ± 59 MPa (coated). In vitro biological testing has been performed in order to assess the safety of the coating in biological environment; cytotoxicity, genotoxicity and sensitisation testing have been performed, all showing no adverse effects.

  14. Development of superlattice CrN/NbN coatings for joint replacements deposited by high power impulse magnetron sputtering.

    PubMed

    Hovsepian, Papken Ehiasarian; Ehiasarian, Arutiun Papken; Purandare, Yashodhan; Sugumaran, Arunprabhu Arunachalam; Marriott, Tim; Khan, Imran

    2016-09-01

    The demand for reliable coating on medical implants is ever growing. In this research, enhanced performance of medical implants was achieved by a CrN/NbN coating, utilising nanoscale multilayer/superlattice structure. The advantages of the novel high power impulse magnetron sputtering technology, namely, its unique highly ionised plasma, were exploited to deposit dense and strongly adherent coatings on CoCr implants. Transmission electron microscopy analysis revealed coating superlattice structure with bi-layer thickness of 3.5 nm. CrN/NbN deposited on CoCr samples showed exceptionally high adhesion, critical load values of LC2 = 50 N in scratch adhesion tests. Nanoindentation tests showed high hardness of 34 GPa and Young's modulus of 447 GPa. Low coefficient of friction (μ) 0.49 and coating wear coefficient (K C) = 4.94 × 10(-16) m(3) N(-1) m(-1) were recorded in dry sliding tests. Metal ion release studies showed a reduction in Co, Cr and Mo release at physiological and elevated temperatures (70 °C) to almost undetectable levels (<1 ppb). Rotating beam fatigue testing showed a significant increase in fatigue strength from 349 ± 59 MPa (uncoated) to 539 ± 59 MPa (coated). In vitro biological testing has been performed in order to assess the safety of the coating in biological environment; cytotoxicity, genotoxicity and sensitisation testing have been performed, all showing no adverse effects. PMID:27571960

  15. Uncertainty quantification of a containment vessel dynamic response subjected to high-explosive detonation impulse loading

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, E. A.; Pepin, J. E.; Thacker, B. H.; Riha, D. S.

    2002-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), in cooperation with Southwest Research Institute, has been developing capabilities to provide reliability-based structural evaluation techniques for performing weapon component and system reliability assessments. The development and applications of Probabilistic Structural Analysis Methods (PSAM) is an important ingredient in the overall weapon reliability assessments. Focus, herein, is placed on the uncertainty quantification associated with the structural response of a containment vessel for high-explosive (HE) experiments. The probabilistic dynamic response of the vessel is evaluated through the coupling of the probabilistic code NESSUS with the non-linear structural dynamics code, DYNA-3D. The probabilistic model includes variations in geometry and mechanical properties, such as Young's Modulus, yield strength, and material flow characteristics. Finally, the probability of exceeding a specified strain limit, which is related to vessel failure, is determined.

  16. SiNx Coatings Deposited by Reactive High Power Impulse Magnetron Sputtering: Process Parameters Influencing the Nitrogen Content.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Susann; Hänninen, Tuomas; Goyenola, Cecilia; Wissting, Jonas; Jensen, Jens; Hultman, Lars; Goebbels, Nico; Tobler, Markus; Högberg, Hans

    2016-08-10

    Reactive high power impulse magnetron sputtering (rHiPIMS) was used to deposit silicon nitride (SiNx) coatings for biomedical applications. The SiNx growth and plasma characterization were conducted in an industrial coater, using Si targets and N2 as reactive gas. The effects of different N2-to-Ar flow ratios between 0 and 0.3, pulse frequencies, target power settings, and substrate temperatures on the discharge and the N content of SiNx coatings were investigated. Plasma ion mass spectrometry shows high amounts of ionized isotopes during the initial part of the pulse for discharges with low N2-to-Ar flow ratios of <0.16, while signals from ionized molecules rise with the N2-to-Ar flow ratio at the pulse end and during pulse-off times. Langmuir probe measurements show electron temperatures of 2-3 eV for nonreactive discharges and 5.0-6.6 eV for discharges in transition mode. The SiNx coatings were characterized with respect to their composition, chemical bond structure, density, and mechanical properties by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray reflectivity, X-ray diffraction, and nanoindentation, respectively. The SiNx deposition processes and coating properties are mainly influenced by the N2-to-Ar flow ratio and thus by the N content in the SiNx films and to a lower extent by the HiPIMS frequencies and power settings as well as substrate temperatures. Increasing N2-to-Ar flow ratios lead to decreasing growth rates, while the N content, coating densities, residual stresses, and the hardness increase. These experimental findings were corroborated by density functional theory calculations of precursor species present during rHiPIMS.

  17. SiNx Coatings Deposited by Reactive High Power Impulse Magnetron Sputtering: Process Parameters Influencing the Nitrogen Content.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Susann; Hänninen, Tuomas; Goyenola, Cecilia; Wissting, Jonas; Jensen, Jens; Hultman, Lars; Goebbels, Nico; Tobler, Markus; Högberg, Hans

    2016-08-10

    Reactive high power impulse magnetron sputtering (rHiPIMS) was used to deposit silicon nitride (SiNx) coatings for biomedical applications. The SiNx growth and plasma characterization were conducted in an industrial coater, using Si targets and N2 as reactive gas. The effects of different N2-to-Ar flow ratios between 0 and 0.3, pulse frequencies, target power settings, and substrate temperatures on the discharge and the N content of SiNx coatings were investigated. Plasma ion mass spectrometry shows high amounts of ionized isotopes during the initial part of the pulse for discharges with low N2-to-Ar flow ratios of <0.16, while signals from ionized molecules rise with the N2-to-Ar flow ratio at the pulse end and during pulse-off times. Langmuir probe measurements show electron temperatures of 2-3 eV for nonreactive discharges and 5.0-6.6 eV for discharges in transition mode. The SiNx coatings were characterized with respect to their composition, chemical bond structure, density, and mechanical properties by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray reflectivity, X-ray diffraction, and nanoindentation, respectively. The SiNx deposition processes and coating properties are mainly influenced by the N2-to-Ar flow ratio and thus by the N content in the SiNx films and to a lower extent by the HiPIMS frequencies and power settings as well as substrate temperatures. Increasing N2-to-Ar flow ratios lead to decreasing growth rates, while the N content, coating densities, residual stresses, and the hardness increase. These experimental findings were corroborated by density functional theory calculations of precursor species present during rHiPIMS. PMID:27414283

  18. Three-Dimensional ISAR Imaging Method for High-Speed Targets in Short-Range Using Impulse Radar Based on SIMO Array

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xinpeng; Wei, Guohua; Wu, Siliang; Wang, Dawei

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes a three-dimensional inverse synthetic aperture radar (ISAR) imaging method for high-speed targets in short-range using an impulse radar. According to the requirements for high-speed target measurement in short-range, this paper establishes the single-input multiple-output (SIMO) antenna array, and further proposes a missile motion parameter estimation method based on impulse radar. By analyzing the motion geometry relationship of the warhead scattering center after translational compensation, this paper derives the receiving antenna position and the time delay after translational compensation, and thus overcomes the shortcomings of conventional translational compensation methods. By analyzing the motion characteristics of the missile, this paper estimates the missile’s rotation angle and the rotation matrix by establishing a new coordinate system. Simulation results validate the performance of the proposed algorithm. PMID:26978372

  19. Three-Dimensional ISAR Imaging Method for High-Speed Targets in Short-Range Using Impulse Radar Based on SIMO Array.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xinpeng; Wei, Guohua; Wu, Siliang; Wang, Dawei

    2016-03-11

    This paper proposes a three-dimensional inverse synthetic aperture radar (ISAR) imaging method for high-speed targets in short-range using an impulse radar. According to the requirements for high-speed target measurement in short-range, this paper establishes the single-input multiple-output (SIMO) antenna array, and further proposes a missile motion parameter estimation method based on impulse radar. By analyzing the motion geometry relationship of the warhead scattering center after translational compensation, this paper derives the receiving antenna position and the time delay after translational compensation, and thus overcomes the shortcomings of conventional translational compensation methods. By analyzing the motion characteristics of the missile, this paper estimates the missile's rotation angle and the rotation matrix by establishing a new coordinate system. Simulation results validate the performance of the proposed algorithm.

  20. Anatomy of a SAR impulse response.

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2007-08-01

    A principal measure of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) image quality is the manifestation in the SAR image of a spatial impulse, that is, the SAR's Impulse Response (IPR). IPR requirements direct certain design decisions in a SAR. Anomalies in the IPR can point to specific anomalous behavior in the radar's hardware and/or software.

  1. Impulsivity and the modular organization of resting-state neural networks.

    PubMed

    Davis, F Caroline; Knodt, Annchen R; Sporns, Olaf; Lahey, Benjamin B; Zald, David H; Brigidi, Bart D; Hariri, Ahmad R

    2013-06-01

    Impulsivity is a complex trait associated with a range of maladaptive behaviors, including many forms of psychopathology. Previous research has implicated multiple neural circuits and neurotransmitter systems in impulsive behavior, but the relationship between impulsivity and organization of whole-brain networks has not yet been explored. Using graph theory analyses, we characterized the relationship between impulsivity and the functional segregation ("modularity") of the whole-brain network architecture derived from resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data. These analyses revealed remarkable differences in network organization across the impulsivity spectrum. Specifically, in highly impulsive individuals, regulatory structures including medial and lateral regions of the prefrontal cortex were isolated from subcortical structures associated with appetitive drive, whereas these brain areas clustered together within the same module in less impulsive individuals. Further exploration of the modular organization of whole-brain networks revealed novel shifts in the functional connectivity between visual, sensorimotor, cortical, and subcortical structures across the impulsivity spectrum. The current findings highlight the utility of graph theory analyses of resting-state fMRI data in furthering our understanding of the neurobiological architecture of complex behaviors.

  2. Impulsivity and the Modular Organization of Resting-State Neural Networks

    PubMed Central

    Davis, F. Caroline; Knodt, Annchen R.; Sporns, Olaf; Lahey, Benjamin B.; Zald, David H.; Brigidi, Bart D.; Hariri, Ahmad R.

    2013-01-01

    Impulsivity is a complex trait associated with a range of maladaptive behaviors, including many forms of psychopathology. Previous research has implicated multiple neural circuits and neurotransmitter systems in impulsive behavior, but the relationship between impulsivity and organization of whole-brain networks has not yet been explored. Using graph theory analyses, we characterized the relationship between impulsivity and the functional segregation (“modularity”) of the whole-brain network architecture derived from resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data. These analyses revealed remarkable differences in network organization across the impulsivity spectrum. Specifically, in highly impulsive individuals, regulatory structures including medial and lateral regions of the prefrontal cortex were isolated from subcortical structures associated with appetitive drive, whereas these brain areas clustered together within the same module in less impulsive individuals. Further exploration of the modular organization of whole-brain networks revealed novel shifts in the functional connectivity between visual, sensorimotor, cortical, and subcortical structures across the impulsivity spectrum. The current findings highlight the utility of graph theory analyses of resting-state fMRI data in furthering our understanding of the neurobiological architecture of complex behaviors. PMID:22645253

  3. Current-Voltage Characteristics and Deposition of AlTiN Thin Films by High Power Impulse Magnetron Sputtering Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Wan-Yu; Su, Amei; Liu, Yawei; Yeh, Chi-Ming; Chen, Wei-Chih; Chang, Chi-Lung

    2015-09-01

    In this study, AlTiN thin films were deposited using a high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) process under a unipolar mode. The AlTi target had a composition of 70 at% Al and 30 at% Ti. Nitrogen was used as the reactive gas to deposite AlTiN thin films along with Ar gas at a working pressure of 1 ×10-3 torr. The target voltage and current were measured at different conditions including various duty cycles from 1 to 5%, pulse durations from 50 to 400 μs, target powers from 0.6 to 1.8 kW, and N2/Ar ratios from 0 to 1. Depending on the deposition condition, peak powers in the range of 104 to 105 W were observed. The effect of deposition conditions were discussed. For film deposition, the pulse duration and the duty cycle were fixed at 100 μs and 3%, respectively. A fixed bias of -150 V was applied to the substrates, including Si wafer, 304 stainless steel, and tungsten carbide.It was found that the nitrogen content increases with the N2/Ar ratio and then saturates. With increasing target power, a higher N2/Ar ratio was required for the AlTiN thin films to have a better mechanical properties. Meanwhile, the hardness of the AlTiN thin films also increases with the target power. The highest hardness of 41 GPa was observed as the N2/Ar ratio was 0.9 and the power was 1.8 kW. It was found that the amount Al-N bonding and the distribution of AlN phase within the AlTiN thin films play an important role in determining the mechanical properties.

  4. The use of segmented cathodes to determine the spoke current density distribution in high power impulse magnetron sputtering plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Poolcharuansin, Phitsanu; Estrin, Francis Lockwood; Bradley, James W.

    2015-04-28

    The localized target current density associated with quasi-periodic ionization zones (spokes) has been measured in a high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) discharge using an array of azimuthally separated and electrical isolated probes incorporated into a circular aluminum target. For a particular range of operating conditions (pulse energies up to 2.2 J and argon pressures from 0.2 to 1.9 Pa), strong oscillations in the probe current density are seen with amplitudes up to 52% above a base value. These perturbations, identified as spokes, travel around the discharge above the target in the E×B direction. Using phase information from the angularly separated probes, the spoke drift speeds, angular frequencies, and mode number have been determined. Generally, at low HiPIMS pulse energies E{sub p} < 0.8 J, spokes appear to be chaotic in nature (with random arrival times), however as E{sub p} increases, coherent spokes are observed with velocities between 6.5 and 10 km s{sup −1} and mode numbers m = 3 or above. At E{sub p} > 1.8 J, the plasma becomes spoke-free. The boundaries between chaotic, coherent, and no-spoke regions are weakly dependent on pressure. During each HiPIMS pulse, the spoke velocities increase by about 50%. Such an observation is explained by considering spoke velocities to be determined by the critical ionization velocity, which changes as the plasma composition changes during the pulse. From the shape of individual current density oscillations, it appears that the leading edge of the spoke is associated with a slow increase in local current density to the target and the rear with a more rapid decrease. The measurements show that the discharge current density associated with individual spokes is broadly spread over a wide region of the target.

  5. Process stabilization by peak current regulation in reactive high-power impulse magnetron sputtering of hafnium nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, T.; Villamayor, M.; Lundin, D.; Helmersson, U.

    2016-02-01

    A simple and cost effective approach to stabilize the sputtering process in the transition zone during reactive high-power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) is proposed. The method is based on real-time monitoring and control of the discharge current waveforms. To stabilize the process conditions at a given set point, a feedback control system was implemented that automatically regulates the pulse frequency, and thereby the average sputtering power, to maintain a constant maximum discharge current. In the present study, the variation of the pulse current waveforms over a wide range of reactive gas flows and pulse frequencies during a reactive HiPIMS process of Hf-N in an Ar-N2 atmosphere illustrates that the discharge current waveform is a an excellent indicator of the process conditions. Activating the reactive HiPIMS peak current regulation, stable process conditions were maintained when varying the N2 flow from 2.1 to 3.5 sccm by an automatic adjustment of the pulse frequency from 600 Hz to 1150 Hz and consequently an increase of the average power from 110 to 270 W. Hf-N films deposited using peak current regulation exhibited a stable stoichiometry, a nearly constant power-normalized deposition rate, and a polycrystalline cubic phase Hf-N with (1 1 1)-preferred orientation over the entire reactive gas flow range investigated. The physical reasons for the change in the current pulse waveform for different process conditions are discussed in some detail.

  6. Influence of high power impulse magnetron sputtering plasma ionization on the microstructure of TiN thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Ehiasarian, A. P.; Vetushka, A.; Gonzalvo, Y. Aranda; Safran, G.; Szekely, L.; Barna, P. B.

    2011-05-15

    HIPIMS (High Power Impulse Magnetron Sputtering) discharge is a new PVD technology for the deposition of high-quality thin films. The deposition flux contains a high degree of metal ionization and nitrogen dissociation. The microstructure of HIPIMS-deposited nitride films is denser compared to conventional sputter technologies. However, the mechanisms acting on the microstructure, texture and properties have not been discussed in detail so far. In this study, the growth of TiN by HIPIMS of Ti in mixed Ar and N{sub 2} atmosphere has been investigated. Varying degrees of metal ionization and nitrogen dissociation were produced by increasing the peak discharge current (I{sub d}) from 5 to 30 A. The average power was maintained constant by adjusting the frequency. Mass spectrometry measurements of the deposition flux revealed a high content of ionized film-forming species, such as Ti{sup 1+}, Ti{sup 2+} and atomic nitrogen N{sup 1+}. Ti{sup 1+} ions with energies up to 50 eV were detected during the pulse with reducing energy in the pulse-off times. Langmuir probe measurements showed that the peak plasma density during the pulse was 3 x 10{sup 16} m{sup -3}. Plasma density, and ion flux ratios of N{sup 1+}: N{sub 2}{sup 1+} and Ti{sup 1+}: Ti{sup 0} increased linearly with peak current. The ratios exceeded 1 at 30 A. TiN films deposited by HIPIMS were analyzed by X-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy. At high I{sub d}, N{sup 1+}: N{sub 2}{sup 1+} > 1 and Ti{sup 1+}: Ti{sup 0} > 1 were produced; a strong 002 texture was present and column boundaries in the films were atomically tight. As I{sub d} reduced and N{sup 1+}: N{sub 2}{sup 1+} and Ti{sup 1+}: Ti{sup 0} dropped below 1, the film texture switched to strong 111 with a dense structure. At very low I{sub d}, porosity between columns developed. The effects of the significant activation of the deposition flux observed in the HIPIMS discharge on the film texture, microstructure, morphology and

  7. Reliability and Validity of Measures of Impulsive Choice and Impulsive Action in Smokers Trying to Quit

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Danielle E.; Bold, Krysten W.; Minami, Haruka; Yeh, Vivian M.; Rutten, Emily; Nadkarni, Shruti G.; Chapman, Gretchen B.

    2016-01-01

    Cross-sectional research suggests that smokers are more impulsive than are non-smokers, but few studies have examined relations between impulsiveness and later success in quitting smoking. The purpose of this study was to investigate the reliability and predictive validity of facets of impulsiveness in adult smokers trying to quit. Baseline behavioral measures of impulsive choice (assessed with a delay discounting task) and impulsive action (assessed with a measure of behavioral disinhibition) were used as predictors of smoking cessation success over 12 weeks. The sample included 116 adult (18 years old or older) daily smokers from central New Jersey. Impulsive choice, impulsive action, and self-reported impulsiveness were not significantly related to one another at baseline. Impulsive choice had high test-retest reliability from pre- to post-quit, whereas impulsive action was less stable. Test-retest reliability from pre-quit to three weeks post-quit was moderated by achievement of seven-day abstinence. Baseline impulsive action was significantly negatively related to quitting for at least one day in the first two weeks of a quit attempt and of prolonged abstinence (no relapse over the next 10 weeks). Baseline impulsive choice was robustly associated with biochemically verified seven-day point-prevalence abstinence 12 weeks post-quit, such that those with lower delay discounting were more likely to achieve abstinence. Facets of impulsiveness appear to function largely independently in adult smokers, as indicated by their lack of inter-correlation, differential stability, and differential relations with abstinence. Impulsive action may impede initial quitting, whereas impulsive choice may be an obstacle to maintaining lasting abstinence. PMID:26751623

  8. A Twin Study of ADHD Symptoms in Early Adolescence: Hyperactivity-Impulsivity and Inattentiveness Show Substantial Genetic Overlap but Also Genetic Specificity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greven, Corina U.; Rijsdijk, Fruhling V.; Plomin, Robert

    2011-01-01

    A previous paper in this journal revealed substantial genetic overlap between the ADHD dimensions of hyperactivity-impulsivity and inattentiveness in a sample of 8-year old twins drawn from a UK-representative population sample. Four years later, when the twins were 12 years old, more than 5,500 pairs drawn from the same sample were rated again on…

  9. Conversion of Impulse Voltage Generator Into Steep Wave Impulse Test-Equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Mohammed Zaid; Tanwar, Surender Singh; Dayama, Ravindra; Choudhary, Rahul Raj; Mangal, Ravindra

    This paper demonstrates the alternative measures to generate the Steep wave impulse by using Impulse Voltage Generator (IVG) for high voltage testing of porcelain insulators. The modification of IVG by incorporating compensation of resistor, inductor, and capacitor has been achieved and further performance of the modified system has been analyzed by applying the generated lightning impulse and analyzing the electrical characteristics of impulse waves under standard lightning and fast rise multiple lightning waveform to determine the effect to improve rise time. The advantageous results have been received and being reported such as increase in overshoot compensation, increase in capacitive and inductive load ranges. Such further reduces the duration of oscillations of standard impulse voltages. The reduction in oscillation duration of steep front impulse voltages may be utilized in up gradation of Impulse Voltage Generator System. Stray capacitance could further be added in order to get the minimized difference of measurement between simulation and the field establishment.

  10. Production of high specific activity silicon-32

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, D.R.; Brzezinski, M.A.

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development Project (LDRD) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). There were two primary objectives for the work performed under this project. The first was to take advantage of capabilities and facilities at Los Alamos to produce the radionuclide {sup 32}Si in unusually high specific activity. The second was to combine the radioanalytical expertise at Los Alamos with the expertise at the University of California to develop methods for the application of {sup 32}Si in biological oceanographic research related to global climate modeling. The first objective was met by developing targetry for proton spallation production of {sup 32}Si in KCl targets and chemistry for its recovery in very high specific activity. The second objective was met by developing a validated field-useable, radioanalytical technique, based upon gas-flow proportional counting, to measure the dynamics of silicon uptake by naturally occurring diatoms.

  11. Development of High Specific Strength Envelope Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komatsu, Keiji; Sano, Masa-Aki; Kakuta, Yoshiaki

    Progress in materials technology has produced a much more durable synthetic fabric envelope for the non-rigid airship. Flexible materials are required to form airship envelopes, ballonets, load curtains, gas bags and covering rigid structures. Polybenzoxazole fiber (Zylon) and polyalirate fiber (Vectran) show high specific tensile strength, so that we developed membrane using these high specific tensile strength fibers as a load carrier. The main material developed is a Zylon or Vectran load carrier sealed internally with a polyurethane bonded inner gas retention film (EVOH). The external surface provides weather protecting with, for instance, a titanium oxide integrated polyurethane or Tedlar film. The mechanical test results show that tensile strength 1,000 N/cm is attained with weight less than 230g/m2. In addition to the mechanical properties, temperature dependence of the joint strength and solar absorptivity and emissivity of the surface are measured. 

  12. Impulsive phenomena, the impulsive character (der Triebhafte Charakter) and DSM personality disorders.

    PubMed

    Perry, J Christopher; Körner, Annett C

    2011-10-01

    Impulsive phenomena have frequently been associated with personality disorders, beginning with Reich's description of the impulsive-character (Reich, 1925/1975). However, questions remain regarding the cooccurrence of a wide variety of impulsive phenomena and whether an underlying structure influences the differential association of impulses to individual personality disorders. Adults entering residential treatment for treatment-refractory disorders were interviewed about their lifetime histories of 33 impulse items, following independent diagnostic interviews. Factor analysis suggested 12 underlying dimensions of impulsive phenomena, explaining 68% of the variance. Borderline and antisocial PDs had the highest impulse scores, followed by self-defeating, narcissistic, depressive, and passive-aggressive PDs. Schizoid, avoidant, obsessive-compulsive, and dependent types were negatively associated with impulsive phenomena. Individuals with the highest impulse scores showed higher levels of borderline, antisocial and either self-defeating or passive-aggressive personality pathology, and were characterized by high Neuroticism and Openness and low Agreeableness on the NEO-FFI. Personality disorders and the NEO-FFI personality traits both predicted unique variance in impulsive phenomena, with the former predominating. Our findings bear striking similarities to Reich's (1925/1975) descriptions of the impulsive character.

  13. 5-HT(2A) and mGlu2 receptor binding levels are related to differences in impulsive behavior in the Roman Low- (RLA) and High- (RHA) avoidance rat strains.

    PubMed

    Klein, A B; Ultved, L; Adamsen, D; Santini, M A; Tobeña, A; Fernandez-Teruel, A; Flores, P; Moreno, M; Cardona, D; Knudsen, G M; Aznar, S; Mikkelsen, J D

    2014-03-28

    The Roman Low- and High-Avoidance rat strains (RLA-I vs RHA-I) have been bidirectionally selected and bred according to their performance in the two-way active avoidance response in the shuttle-box test. Numerous studies have reported a pronounced divergence in emotionality between the two rat strains including differences in novelty seeking, anxiety, stress coping, and susceptibility to addictive substances. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms behind these divergent phenotypes are not known. Here, we determined impulsivity using the 5-choice serial reaction time task and levels of serotonin transporter (SERT), 5-HT(2A) and 5-HT(1A) receptor binding using highly specific radioligands ((3)H-escitalopram, (3)H-MDL100907 and (3)H-WAY100635) and mGlu2/3 receptor binding ((3)H-LY341495) using receptor autoradiography in fronto-cortical sections from RLA-I (n=8) and RHA-I (n=8) male rats. In the more impulsive RHA-I rats, 5-HT(2A), 5-HT(1A) and SERT binding in the frontal cortex was significantly higher compared to RLA-I rats. In contrast, mGlu2/3 receptor binding was decreased by 40% in RHA-I rats compared to RLA-I rats. To differentiate between mGlu2 and mGlu3 receptor protein levels, these were further studied using western blotting, which showed non-detectable levels of mGlu2 receptor protein in RHA rats, while no differences were observed for mGlu3 receptor protein levels. Collectively, these data show general congenital differences in the serotonergic system and a pronounced difference in mGlu2 receptor protein levels. We suggest that the differences in the serotonergic system may mediate some of the phenotypic characteristics in this strain such as hyper-impulsivity and susceptibility to drug addiction. PMID:24412375

  14. A Thrust and Impulse Study of Guanidinium Azo-Tetrazolate as an Additive for Hybrid Rocket Fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patton, J.; Wright, A. M.; Dunn, L.; Alford, B.

    2000-03-01

    A thrust and impulse study of the hybrid rocket fuel additive Guanidinium Azo-Tetrazolate (GAT) was conducted at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock (UALR) Hybrid Rocket Facility. GAT is an organic salt with a high percentage of nitrogen. GAT was mixed with the standard hybrid rocket fuel, Hydroxyl-Terminated Polybutadiene (HTPB), in the concentration of 15%, by mass. The fuel grains with the GAT additive were fired for 4 second runs with the oxygen flows of 0.05, 0.07, 0.09, and 0.12 lbm/sec. For each run average thrust, total impulse, and specific impulse were measured. Average thrust, specific impulse, and total impulse vs. oxygen flow were plotted. Similar data was collected for plain HTPB/PAPI fuels for comparison. GAT was found to increase the thrust output when it was added to the standard hybrid rocket fuel, HTPB. GAT also increased the total impulse during the run. The thrust and total impulse were increased at all flows, but especially at the lower oxygen flow rates. Specific impulse only increased during the lower oxygen flow runs, and decreased slightly for the higher oxygen flow runs.

  15. Electromagnetic properties of high specific surface minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Katherine Anne

    Interparticle electrical forces play a dominant role in the behaviour of high specific surface minerals, such as clays. This fact encourages the use of small electromagnetic perturbations to assess the microscale properties of these materials. Thus, this research focuses on using electromagnetic waves to understand fundamental particle-particle and particle-fluid interactions, and fabric formation in high specific surface mineral-fluid mixtures (particle size <~1 μm). Topics addressed in this study include: the role of specific surface and double layer phenomena in the engineering behaviour of clay-water-electrolyte mixtures; the interplay between surface conduction, double layer polarization, and interfacial polarization; the relationship between fabric, permittivity, shear wave velocity, and engineering properties in soft slurries; and the effect of ferromagnetic impurities on electromagnetic measurements. The critical role of specific surface on the engineering properties of fine-grained soils is demonstrated through fundamental principles and empirical correlations. Afterwards, the effect of specific surface on the electromagnetic properties of particulate materials is studied using simple microscale analyses of conduction and polarization phenomena in particle-fluid mixtures, and corroborated by experimentation. These results clarify the relative importance of specific surface, water content, electrolyte type, and ionic concentration on the electrical properties of particulate materials. The sensitivity of electromagnetic parameters to particle orientation is addressed in light of the potential assessment of anisotropy in engineering properties. It is shown that effective conductivity measurements provide a robust method to determine electrical anisotropy in particle-fluid mixtures. However, real relative dielectric measurements at frequencies below 1 MHz are unreliable due to electrode effects (especially in highly conductive mixtures). The relationship

  16. [Affective disorders and impulsivity].

    PubMed

    Belzeaux, R; Correard, N; Mazzola-Pomietto, P; Adida, M; Cermolacce, M; Azorin, J-M

    2014-12-01

    Impulsivity is a complex and important phenomenon in mood disorders. Impulse control disorders, as defined in DSM, are more frequent in mood disorders especially in Bipolar Disorder type I, and are associated with a more severe course of illness. Dimensional studies demonstrate that impulsivity is a core manifestation of bipolar disorder both as state- and trait-dependent markers in patients. Comorbid substance use disorders are often associated with a higher level of impulsivity whereas the relation between suicidal behaviors and higher impulsivity remains uncertain. Moreover, neuropsychological tests were used to study correlation between clinical impulsivity and laboratory measurements of impulsivity. Level of correlation remains weak and several explanations are proposed in the literature.

  17. Association of ventral striatum monoamine oxidase-A binding and functional connectivity in antisocial personality disorder with high impulsivity: A positron emission tomography and functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Kolla, Nathan J; Dunlop, Katharine; Downar, Jonathan; Links, Paul; Bagby, R Michael; Wilson, Alan A; Houle, Sylvain; Rasquinha, Fawn; Simpson, Alexander I; Meyer, Jeffrey H

    2016-04-01

    Impulsivity is a core feature of antisocial personality disorder (ASPD) associated with abnormal brain function and neurochemical alterations. The ventral striatum (VS) is a key region of the neural circuitry mediating impulsive behavior, and low monoamine oxidase-A (MAO-A) level in the VS has shown a specific relationship to the impulsivity of ASPD. Because it is currently unknown whether phenotypic MAO-A markers can influence brain function in ASPD, we investigated VS MAO-A level and the functional connectivity (FC) of two seed regions, superior and inferior VS (VSs, VSi). Nineteen impulsive ASPD males underwent [(11)C] harmine positron emission tomography scanning to measure VS MAO-A VT, an index of MAO-A density, and resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging that assessed the FC of bilateral seed regions in the VSi and VSs. Subjects also completed self-report impulsivity measures. Results revealed functional coupling of the VSs with bilateral dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (DMPFC) that was correlated with VS MAO-A VT (r=0.47, p=0.04), and functional coupling of the VSi with right hippocampus that was anti-correlated with VS MAO-A VT (r=-0.55, p=0.01). Additionally, VSs-DMPFC FC was negatively correlated with NEO Personality Inventory-Revised impulsivity (r=-0.49, p=0.03), as was VSi-hippocampus FC with Barratt Impulsiveness Scale-11 motor impulsiveness (r=-0.50, p=0.03). These preliminary results highlight an association of VS MAO-A level with the FC of striatal regions linked to impulsive behavior in ASPD and suggest that phenotype-based brain markers of ASPD have relevance to understanding brain function.

  18. Association of ventral striatum monoamine oxidase-A binding and functional connectivity in antisocial personality disorder with high impulsivity: A positron emission tomography and functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Kolla, Nathan J; Dunlop, Katharine; Downar, Jonathan; Links, Paul; Bagby, R Michael; Wilson, Alan A; Houle, Sylvain; Rasquinha, Fawn; Simpson, Alexander I; Meyer, Jeffrey H

    2016-04-01

    Impulsivity is a core feature of antisocial personality disorder (ASPD) associated with abnormal brain function and neurochemical alterations. The ventral striatum (VS) is a key region of the neural circuitry mediating impulsive behavior, and low monoamine oxidase-A (MAO-A) level in the VS has shown a specific relationship to the impulsivity of ASPD. Because it is currently unknown whether phenotypic MAO-A markers can influence brain function in ASPD, we investigated VS MAO-A level and the functional connectivity (FC) of two seed regions, superior and inferior VS (VSs, VSi). Nineteen impulsive ASPD males underwent [(11)C] harmine positron emission tomography scanning to measure VS MAO-A VT, an index of MAO-A density, and resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging that assessed the FC of bilateral seed regions in the VSi and VSs. Subjects also completed self-report impulsivity measures. Results revealed functional coupling of the VSs with bilateral dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (DMPFC) that was correlated with VS MAO-A VT (r=0.47, p=0.04), and functional coupling of the VSi with right hippocampus that was anti-correlated with VS MAO-A VT (r=-0.55, p=0.01). Additionally, VSs-DMPFC FC was negatively correlated with NEO Personality Inventory-Revised impulsivity (r=-0.49, p=0.03), as was VSi-hippocampus FC with Barratt Impulsiveness Scale-11 motor impulsiveness (r=-0.50, p=0.03). These preliminary results highlight an association of VS MAO-A level with the FC of striatal regions linked to impulsive behavior in ASPD and suggest that phenotype-based brain markers of ASPD have relevance to understanding brain function. PMID:26908392

  19. Wp specific methylation of highly proliferated LCLs.

    PubMed

    Park, Jung-Hoon; Jeon, Jae-Pil; Shim, Sung-Mi; Nam, Hye-Young; Kim, Joon-Woo; Han, Bok-Ghee; Lee, Suman

    2007-06-29

    The epigenetic regulation of viral genes may be important for the life cycle of EBV. We determined the methylation status of three viral promoters (Wp, Cp, Qp) from EBV B-lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) by pyrosequencing. Our pyrosequencing data showed that the CpG region of Wp was methylated, but the others were not. Interestingly, Wp methylation was increased with proliferation of LCLs. Wp methylation was as high as 74.9% in late-passage LCLs, but 25.6% in early-passage LCLs. From two Burkitt's lymphoma cell lines, Wp specific hypermethylation was also found (>80%). Interestingly, the expression of EBNA2 gene which located directly next to Wp was associated with its methylation. Our data suggested that Wp specific methylation may be important for the indicator of the proliferation status of LCLs, and the epigenetic viral gene regulation of EBNA2 gene by Wp should be further defined possibly with other biological processes.

  20. Wp specific methylation of highly proliferated LCLs

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jung-Hoon; Jeon, Jae-Pil; Shim, Sung-Mi; Nam, Hye-Young; Kim, Joon-Woo; Han, Bok-Ghee; Lee, Suman . E-mail: suman@cha.ac.kr

    2007-06-29

    The epigenetic regulation of viral genes may be important for the life cycle of EBV. We determined the methylation status of three viral promoters (Wp, Cp, Qp) from EBV B-lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) by pyrosequencing. Our pyrosequencing data showed that the CpG region of Wp was methylated, but the others were not. Interestingly, Wp methylation was increased with proliferation of LCLs. Wp methylation was as high as 74.9% in late-passage LCLs, but 25.6% in early-passage LCLs. From two Burkitt's lymphoma cell lines, Wp specific hypermethylation was also found (>80%). Interestingly, the expression of EBNA2 gene which located directly next to Wp was associated with its methylation. Our data suggested that Wp specific methylation may be important for the indicator of the proliferation status of LCLs, and the epigenetic viral gene regulation of EBNA2 gene by Wp should be further defined possibly with other biological processes.

  1. Production Of High Specific Activity Copper-67

    DOEpatents

    Jamriska, Sr., David J.; Taylor, Wayne A.; Ott, Martin A.; Fowler, Malcolm; Heaton, Richard C.

    2003-10-28

    A process for the selective production and isolation of high specific activity Cu.sup.67 from proton-irradiated enriched Zn.sup.70 target comprises target fabrication, target irradiation with low energy (<25 MeV) protons, chemical separation of the Cu.sup.67 product from the target material and radioactive impurities of gallium, cobalt, iron, and stable aluminum via electrochemical methods or ion exchange using both anion and cation organic ion exchangers, chemical recovery of the enriched Zn.sup.70 target material, and fabrication of new targets for re-irradiation is disclosed.

  2. Production Of High Specific Activity Copper-67

    DOEpatents

    Jamriska, Sr., David J.; Taylor, Wayne A.; Ott, Martin A.; Fowler, Malcolm; Heaton, Richard C.

    2002-12-03

    A process for the selective production and isolation of high specific activity cu.sup.67 from proton-irradiated enriched Zn.sup.70 target comprises target fabrication, target irradiation with low energy (<25 MeV) protons, chemical separation of the Cu.sup.67 product from the target material and radioactive impurities of gallium, cobalt, iron, and stable aluminum via electrochemical methods or ion exchange using both anion and cation organic ion exchangers, chemical recovery of the enriched Zn.sup.70 target material, and fabrication of new targets for re-irradiation is disclosed.

  3. Temporal Preparation, Response Inhibition and Impulsivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Correa, Angel; Trivino, Monica; Perez-Duenas, Carolina; Acosta, Alberto; Lupianez, Juan

    2010-01-01

    Temporal preparation and impulsivity involve overlapping neural structures (prefrontal cortex) and cognitive functions (response inhibition and time perception), however, their interrelations had not been investigated. We studied such interrelations by comparing the performance of groups with low vs. high non-clinical trait impulsivity during a…

  4. Evolution of the plasma composition of a high power impulse magnetron sputtering system studied with a time-of-flight spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Oks, Efim; Anders, Andre

    2008-12-31

    The plasma of a high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) system has been investigated using a time-of-flight (TOF) spectrometer. The target materials included high sputter yield materials (Cu, Ag), transition metals (Nb, Cr, Ti), and carbon (graphite); the sputtering gases were argon, krypton and nitrogen, and two different target thicknesses were selected to consider the role of the magnetic field strength. Measurements for selected combinations of those parameters give quantitative information on the transition from gas-dominated to metal-dominated (self-sputtering) plasma, on the fractions of ion charge states, and in the case of molecular gases, on the fraction of atomic and molecular ions.

  5. The Effect of Individual Differences on Adolescents' Impulsive Buying Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Chien-Huang; Chuang, Shin-Chieh

    2005-01-01

    This study posits a relationship between Emotional Intelligence (EI) and Impulsive Buying Tendency (IBT). A survey of 574 adolescents found that high-EI adolescents manifested less impulsive behavior than did low-EI adolescents, and high-IBT adolescents were more likely to engage in more impulsive buying behavior than were low-IBT adolescents.…

  6. High specific energy, high capacity nickel-hydrogen cell design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, James R.

    1993-01-01

    A 3.5 inch rabbit-ear-terminal nickel-hydrogen cell has been designed and tested to deliver high capacity at a C/1.5 discharge rate. Its specific energy yield of 60.6 wh/kg is believed to be the highest yet achieved in a slurry-process nickel-hydrogen cell, and its 10 C capacity of 113.9 AH the highest capacity yet made at a discharge rate this high in the 3.5 inch diameter size. The cell also demonstrated a pulse capability of 180 amps for 20 seconds. Specific cell parameters, performance, and future test plans are described.

  7. Impulsive phase transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canfield, Richard C.; Bely-Dubau, Francoise; Brown, John C.; Dulk, George A.; Emslie, A. Gordon; Enome, Shinzo; Gabriel, Alan H.; Kundu, Mukul R.; Melrose, Donald; Neidig, Donald F.

    1986-01-01

    The transport of nonthermal electrons is explored. The thick-target electron beam model, in which electrons are presumed to be accelerated in the corona and typically thermalized primarily in the chromosphere and photosphere, is supported by observations throughout the electromagnetic spectrum. At the highest energies, the anisotropy of gamma-ray emission above 10 MeV clearly indicates that these photons are emitted by anisotropically-directed particles. The timing of this high-energy gamma-radiation with respect to lower-energy hard X-radiation implies that the energetic particles have short life-times. For collisional energy loss, this means that they are stopped in the chromosphere or below. Stereoscopic (two-spacecraft) observations at hard X-ray energies (up to 350 keV) imply that these lower-energy (but certainly nonthermal) electrons are also stopped deep in the chromosphere. Hard X-ray images show that, in spatially resolved flares whose radiation consists of impulsive bursts, the impulsive phase starts with X-radiation that comes mostly from the foot-points of coronal loops whose coronal component is outlined by microwaves.

  8. Helicopter impulsive noise - Theoretical and experimental status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitz, F. H.; Yu, Y. H.

    1986-01-01

    The theoretical and experimental status of helicopter impulsive noise is reviewed. The two major source mechanisms of helicopter impulsive noise are addressed: high-speed impulsive noise and blade-vortex interaction impulsive noise. A thorough physical explanation of both generating mechanism is presented together with model and full-scale measurements of the phenomena. Current theoretical prediction methods are compared with experimental findings of isolated rotor tests. The noise generating mechanism of high speed impulsive noise are fairly well understood - theory and experiment compare nicely over Mach number ranges typical of today's helicopters. For the case of blade-vortex interaction noise, understanding of noise generating mechanisms and theoretical comparison with experiment are less satisfactory. Several methods for improving theory-experiment are suggested.

  9. Helicopter impulsive noise: Theoretical and experimental status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitz, F. H.; Yu, Y. H.

    1983-01-01

    The theoretical and experimental status of helicopter impulsive noise is reviewed. The two major source mechanisms of helicopter impulsive noise are addressed: high-speed impulsive noise and blade-vortex interaction impulsive noise. A thorough physical explanation of both generating mechanism is presented together with model and full-scale measurements of the phenomena. Current theoretical prediction methods are compared with experimental findings of isolated rotor tests. The noise generating mechanism of high speed impulsive noise are fairly well understood - theory and experiment compare nicely over Mach number ranges typical of today's helicopters. For the case of blade-vortex interaction noise, understanding of noise generating mechanisms and theoretical comparison with experiment are less satisfactory. Several methods for improving theory-experiment are suggested.

  10. Helicopter impulsive noise - Theoretical and experimental status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitz, F. H.; Yu, Y. H.

    1986-01-01

    The theoretical and experimental status of helicopter impulsive noise is reviewed. The two major source mechanisms of helicopter impulsive noise are addressed: high-speed impulsive noise and blade-vortex interaction impulsive noise. A thorough physical explanation of both generating mechanisms is presented together with model and full-scale measurements of the phenomena. Current theoretical prediction methods are compared with experimental findings of isolated rotor tests. The noise generating mechanisms of high speed impulsive noise are fairly well understood - theory and experiment compare nicely over Mach number ranges typical of today's helicopters. For the case of blade-vortex interaction noise, understanding of noise generating mechanisms and theoretical comparison with experiment are less satisfactory. Several methods for improving theory/experiment are suggested.

  11. Guidance and navigation requirements for unmanned flyby and swingby missions to the outer planets. Volume 2: impulsive high thrust missions, phase A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    The impulsive, high thrust missions portion of a study on guidance and navigation requirements for unmanned flyby and swingby missions to the outer planet is presented. The proper balance between groundbased navigational capability, using the deep space network (DSN) alone, and an onboard navigational capability with and without supplemental use of DSN tracking, for unmanned missions to the outer planets of the solar system is defined. A general guidance and navigation requirements program is used to survey parametrically the characteristics associated with three types of navigation systems: (1) totally onboard, (2) totally Earth-based, and (3) a combination of these two.

  12. Time Devours Things: How Impulsivity and Time Affect Temporal Decisions in Pathological Gamblers

    PubMed Central

    Grecucci, Alessandro; Giorgetta, Cinzia; Rattin, Andrea; Guerreschi, Cesare; Sanfey, Alan G.; Bonini, Nicolao

    2014-01-01

    Impulsivity is associated with several psychiatric disorders in which the loss of control of a specific behavior determines the syndrome itself. One particularly interesting population characterized by reported high impulsivity and problematic decision-making are those diagnosed with pathological gambling. However the association between impulsivity and decision making in pathological gambling has been only partially confirmed until now. We tested 23 normal controls and 23 diagnosed pathological gamblers in an intertemporal choice task, as well as other personality trait measurements. Results showed that gamblers scored higher on impulsivity questionnaires, and selected a higher percentage of impatient choices (higher percentage of smaller, sooner rewards), when compared to normal controls. Moreover, gamblers were faster in terms of reaction times at selecting the smaller, sooner options and discounted rewards more rapidly over time. Importantly, regression analyses clarified that self-reported measures of impulsivity played a significant role in biasing decisions towards small but more rapidly available rewards. In the present study we found evidence for impulsivity in personality traits and decisions in pathological gamblers relative to controls. We conclude by speculating on the need to incorporate impulsivity and decision biases in the conceptualization of pathological gambling for a better understanding and treatment of this pathology. PMID:25296184

  13. Nerve Impulses in Plants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blatt, F. J.

    1974-01-01

    Summarizes research done on the resting and action potential of nerve impulses, electrical excitation of nerve cells, electrical properties of Nitella, and temperature effects on action potential. (GS)

  14. Measuring Impulsivity in Adolescents with Serious Substance and Conduct Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Laetitia L.; Whitmore, Elizabeth A.; Raymond, Kristen M.; Crowley, Thomas J.

    2006-01-01

    Adolescents with substance use and conduct disorders have high rates of aggression and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), all of which have been characterized in part by impulsivity. Developing measures that capture impulsivity behaviorally and correlate with self-reported impulsivity has been difficult. One promising behavioral…

  15. High-intensity drying processes -- Impulse drying: Report 14 (progress report). Status of the pilot-scale research program

    SciTech Connect

    Orloff, D.I.

    1998-04-01

    As of April 1998, the project was behind on schedule. This was as a result of the need for additional process development work. Work has focused on evaluating nip decompression and post-nip depressurization techniques as used on the Beloit X2 pilot paper machine. The authors have also concentrated on implementing impulse drying technology on Beloit`s No. 4 and No. 2 pilot paper machines. Experiments on Beloit`s X4 pilot paper machine demonstrated that roll coating durability problems have been solved. They also showed that further development work on sheet picking, implementation of delamination suppression techniques and CD temperature control are necessary in order to ensure success on the X4 machine. Experiments on the Beloit`s X2 pilot paper machine were carried out to resolve issues identified on the X4 machine. Two methods of implementing press nip decompression were investigated. The results confirmed that the technology can be used to increase impulse drying operating temperatures. The work also led to the development of techniques to minimize picking.

  16. Production of high specific activity silicon-32

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, Dennis R.; Brzezinski, Mark A.

    1994-01-01

    A process for preparation of silicon-32 is provide and includes contacting an irradiated potassium chloride target, including spallation products from a prior irradiation, with sufficient water, hydrochloric acid or potassium hydroxide to form a solution, filtering the solution, adjusting pH of the solution to from about 5.5 to about 7.5, admixing sufficient molybdate-reagent to the solution to adjust the pH of the solution to about 1.5 and to form a silicon-molybdate complex, contacting the solution including the silicon-molybdate complex with a dextran-based material, washing the dextran-based material to remove residual contaminants such as sodium-22, separating the silicon-molybdate complex from the dextran-based material as another solution, adding sufficient hydrochloric acid and hydrogen peroxide to the solution to prevent reformation of the silicon-molybdate complex and to yield an oxidization state of the molybdate adapted for subsequent separation by an anion exchange material, contacting the solution with an anion exchange material whereby the molybdate is retained by the anion exchange material and the silicon remains in solution, and optionally adding sufficient alkali metal hydroxide to adjust the pH of the solution to about 12 to 13. Additionally, a high specific activity silicon-32 product having a high purity is provided.

  17. Successful restrained eating and trait impulsiveness.

    PubMed

    van Koningsbruggen, Guido M; Stroebe, Wolfgang; Aarts, Henk

    2013-01-01

    Restrained eaters with high scores on the Perceived Self-Regulatory Success in Dieting Scale (PSRS) are more successful than low scorers in regulating their food intake. According to the theory of temptation-elicited goal activation (Fishbach, Friedman, & Kruglanski, 2003), they have become successful because, due to earlier repeated instances of successful self-control, they formed an associative link between temptations and thoughts of dieting. It is unclear, however, why they should have been more successful in earlier attempts at self-control than their unsuccessful counterparts. We examined whether trait impulsiveness plays a role by investigating the associations between dietary restraint, trait impulsiveness, and PSRS. Results showed that the interaction between dietary restraint and impulsiveness predicted dieting success: A lower level of impulsiveness was associated with greater dieting success among restrained eaters. These results suggest that restrained eaters who are less impulsive are more likely to become successful restrained eaters as identified with the PSRS.

  18. Long-term, calorie-restricted intake of a high-fat diet in rats reduces impulse control and ventral striatal D2 receptor signalling - two markers of addiction vulnerability.

    PubMed

    Adams, Wendy K; Sussman, Jacob L; Kaur, Sukhbir; D'souza, Anna M; Kieffer, Timothy J; Winstanley, Catharine A

    2015-12-01

    High impulsivity, mediated through ventral striatal dopamine signalling, represents an established risk factor for substance abuse, and may likewise confer vulnerability to pathological overeating. Mechanistically, the assumption is that trait impulsivity facilitates the initiation of maladaptive eating styles or choices. However, whether consumption of appetitive macronutrients themselves causes deficits in impulse control and striatal signalling, thereby contributing to cognitive changes permissive of overeating behaviour, has yet to be considered. We examined the effects of chronic maintenance on restricted equicaloric, but high-fat or high-sugar, diets (48 kcal/day; 60 kcal% fat or sucrose) on rats' performance in the five-choice serial reaction time task, indexing impulsivity and attention. Markers of dopamine signalling in the dorsal and ventral striatum, and plasma insulin and leptin levels, were also assessed. Rats maintained on the high-fat diet (HFD) were more impulsive, whereas the high-sugar diet (HSD) did not alter task performance. Importantly, body weight and hormone levels were similar between groups when behavioural changes were observed. Maintenance on HFD, but not on HSD, reduced the levels of dopamine D2 receptor (D2 R), cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) and phosphophorylated CREB (Ser133) proteins in the ventral, but not dorsal, striatum. D2 R expression in the ventral striatum also negatively correlated with impulsive responding, independently of diet. These data indicate that chronic exposure to even limited amounts of high-fat foods may weaken impulse control and alter neural signalling in a manner associated with vulnerability to addictions - findings that have serious implications for the propagation of uncontrolled eating behaviour in obesity and binge-eating disorder.

  19. A neurogenetic approach to impulsivity.

    PubMed

    Congdon, Eliza; Canli, Turhan

    2008-12-01

    Impulsivity is a complex and multidimensional trait that is of interest to both personality psychologists and to clinicians. For investigators seeking the biological basis of personality traits, the use of neuroimaging techniques such as positron emission tomography (PET) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) revolutionized personality psychology in less than a decade. Now, another revolution is under way, and it originates from molecular biology. Specifically, new findings in molecular genetics, the detailed mapping and the study of the function of genes, have shown that individual differences in personality traits can be related to individual differences within specific genes. In this article, we will review the current state of the field with respect to the neural and genetic basis of trait impulsivity.

  20. A Neurogenetic Approach to Impulsivity

    PubMed Central

    Congdon, Eliza; Canli, Turhan

    2008-01-01

    Impulsivity is a complex and multidimensional trait that is of interest to both personality psychologists and to clinicians. For investigators seeking the biological basis of personality traits, the use of neuroimaging techniques such as positron emission tomography (PET) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) revolutionized personality psychology in less than a decade. Now, another revolution is under way, and it originates from molecular biology. Specifically, new findings in molecular genetics, the detailed mapping and the study of the function of genes, have shown that individual differences in personality traits can be related to individual differences within specific genes. In this article, we will review the current state of the field with respect to the neural and genetic basis of trait impulsivity. PMID:19012655

  1. Impulsive Social Influence Increases Impulsive Choices on a Temporal Discounting Task in Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Gilman, Jodi M.; Curran, Max T.; Calderon, Vanessa; Stoeckel, Luke E.; Evins, A. Eden

    2014-01-01

    Adolescents and young adults who affiliate with friends who engage in impulsive behavior are more likely to engage in impulsive behaviors themselves, and those who associate with prosocial (i.e. more prudent, future oriented) peers are more likely to engage in prosocial behavior. However, it is difficult to disentangle the contribution of peer influence vs. peer selection (i.e., whether individuals choose friends with similar traits) when interpreting social behaviors. In this study, we combined a novel social manipulation with a well-validated delay discounting task assessing impulsive behavior to create a social influence delay discounting task, in which participants were exposed to both impulsive (smaller, sooner or SS payment) and non-impulsive (larger, later or LL payment) choices from their peers. Young adults in this sample, n = 51, aged 18–25 had a higher rate of SS choices after exposure to impulsive peer influence than after exposure to non-impulsive peer influence. Interestingly, in highly susceptible individuals, the rate of non-impulsive choices did not increase after exposure to non-impulsive influence. There was a positive correlation between self-reported suggestibility and degree of peer influence on SS choices. These results suggest that, in young adults, SS choices appear to be influenced by the choices of same-aged peers, especially for individuals who are highly susceptible to influence. PMID:24988440

  2. Rethinking Impulsivity in Suicide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klonsky, E. David; May, Alexis

    2010-01-01

    Elevated impulsivity is thought to facilitate the transition from suicidal thoughts to suicidal behavior. Therefore, impulsivity should distinguish those who have attempted suicide (attempters) from those who have only considered suicide (ideators-only). This hypothesis was examined in three large nonclinical samples: (1) 2,011 military recruits,…

  3. High specific energy, high capacity nickel-hydrogen cell design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, James R.

    1993-01-01

    A 3.5 inch rabbit-ear-terminal nickel-hydrogen cell was designed and tested to deliver high capacity at steady discharge rates up to and including a C rate. Its specific energy yield of 60.6 wh/kg is believed to be the highest yet achieved in a slurry-process nickel-hydrogen cell, and its 10 C capacity of 113.9 AH the highest capacity yet of any type in a 3.5 inch diameter size. The cell also demonstrated a pulse capability of 180 amps for 20 seconds. Specific cell parameters and performance are described. Also covered is an episode of capacity fading due to electrode swelling and its successful recovery by means of additional activation procedures.

  4. Delay Discounting, Locus of Control, and Cognitive Impulsiveness Independently Predict Tobacco Dependence Treatment Outcomes in a Highly Dependent, Lower Socioeconomic Group of Smokers

    PubMed Central

    Sheffer, Christine; MacKillop, James; McGeary, John; Landes, Reid; Carter, Lawrence; Yi, Richard; Jones, Bryan; Christensen, Darren; Stitzer, Maxine; Jackson, Lisa; Bickel, Warren

    2013-01-01

    Tobacco use disproportionately affects lower socioeconomic status (SES) groups. Current explanations as to why lower SES groups respond less robustly to tobacco control efforts and tobacco dependence treatment do not fully account for this disparity. The identification of factors that predict relapse in this population might help to clarify these differences. Good candidates for novel prognostic factors include the constellation of behaviors associated with executive function including self-control/impulsiveness, the propensity to delay reward, and consideration and planning of future events. This study examined the ability of several measures of executive function and other key clinical, psychological, and cognitive factors to predict abstinence for highly dependent lower SES participants enrolled in intensive cognitive-behavioral treatment for tobacco dependence. Consistent with predictions, increased discounting and impulsiveness, an external locus of control as well as greater levels of nicotine dependence, stress, and smoking for negative affect reduction predicted relapse. These findings suggest that these novel factors are clinically relevant in predicting treatment outcomes and suggest new targets for therapeutic assessment and treatment approaches. PMID:22494224

  5. Delay discounting, locus of control, and cognitive impulsiveness independently predict tobacco dependence treatment outcomes in a highly dependent, lower socioeconomic group of smokers.

    PubMed

    Sheffer, Christine; Mackillop, James; McGeary, John; Landes, Reid; Carter, Lawrence; Yi, Richard; Jones, Bryan; Christensen, Darren; Stitzer, Maxine; Jackson, Lisa; Bickel, Warren

    2012-01-01

    Tobacco use disproportionately affects lower socioeconomic status (SES) groups. Current explanations as to why lower SES groups respond less robustly to tobacco control efforts and tobacco dependence treatment do not fully account for this disparity. The identification of factors that predict relapse in this population might help to clarify these differences. Good candidates for novel prognostic factors include the constellation of behaviors associated with executive function including self-control/impulsiveness, the propensity to delay reward, and consideration and planning of future events. This study examined the ability of several measures of executive function and other key clinical, psychological, and cognitive factors to predict abstinence for highly dependent lower SES participants enrolled in intensive cognitive-behavioral treatment for tobacco dependence. Consistent with predictions, increased discounting and impulsiveness, an external locus of control as well as greater levels of nicotine dependence, stress, and smoking for negative affect reduction predicted relapse. These findings suggest that these novel factors are clinically relevant in predicting treatment outcomes and suggest new targets for therapeutic assessment and treatment approaches.

  6. Impulsivity/sociability and reinforcement in verbal operant conditioning.

    PubMed

    Gupta, B S; Nagpal, M

    1978-05-01

    The present investigation was designed to study the relationship between impulsivity/sociability and modes of reinforcement in verbal operant conditioning. Two 2x3 randomized block designs, one each for impulsivity and sociability, were replicated ten times. One hundred and twenty undergraduate female students (60 for impulsivity and 60 for sociability) were individually subjected to Taffel's verbal conditioning procedure. When the conditioning scores of high and low scorers on the impulsivity and sociability scales were compared, it was found that under rewarding conditions ('good' and 'buzzer' in respect of sociability and 'good' in respect of impulsivity) the high scorers' score and under punishing conditions ('electric shock') the low scorers' score was the higher of the two. The study also revealed that the high scorers (on the impulsivity scale) conditioned more under rewarding conditions while the low scorers (both on the impulsivity and sociability scales) conditioned more under punishing ones.

  7. Final report of LDRD project: Electromagnetic impulse radar for detection of underground structures

    SciTech Connect

    Loubriel, G.; Aurand, J.; Buttram, M.; Zutavern, F.; Brown, D.; Helgeson, W.

    1998-03-01

    This report provides a summary of the LDRD project titled: Electromagnetic impulse radar for the detection of underground structures. The project met all its milestones even with a tight two year schedule and total funding of $400 k. The goal of the LDRD was to develop and demonstrate a ground penetrating radar (GPR) that is based on high peak power, high repetition rate, and low center frequency impulses. The idea of this LDRD is that a high peak power, high average power radar based on the transmission of short impulses can be utilized effect can be utilized for ground penetrating radar. This direct time-domain system the authors are building seeks to increase penetration depth over conventional systems by using: (1) high peak power, high repetition rate operation that gives high average power, (2) low center frequencies that better penetrate the ground, and (3) short duration impulses that allow for the use of downward looking, low flying platforms that increase the power on target relative to a high flying platform. Specifically, chirped pulses that are a microsecond in duration require (because it is difficult to receive during transmit) platforms above 150 m (and typically 1 km) while this system, theoretically could be at 10 m above the ground. The power on target decays with distance squared so the ability to use low flying platforms is crucial to high penetration. Clutter is minimized by time gating the surface clutter return. Short impulses also allow gating (out) the coupling of the transmit and receive antennas.

  8. Multidimensional Examination of Impulsivity in Relation to Disordered Gambling

    PubMed Central

    MacKillop, James; Miller, Joshua D.; Fortune, Erica; Maples, Jessica; Lance, Charles E.; Campbell, W. Keith; Goodie, Adam S.

    2014-01-01

    Impulsivity has been consistently associated with pathological gambling (PG), but the diversity of definitions and measures of impulsivity has led to ambiguity with regard to which indices are independently relevant. Toward clarifying this relationship, the current study examined indices from an array of commonly-used impulsivity measures in relation to PG severity in an adult community sample of frequent gamblers (N = 353). These included both survey assessments and behavioral tasks. Using a factor analytic approach, four latent factors were identified among 19 indices and were designated reward sensitivity, punishment sensitivity, delay discounting, and cognitive impulsivity. All four latent variables were positively and independently related to PG severity, albeit at a trend level for cognitive impulsivity in a combined model. These findings reveal four generally independent domains of impulsivity that are related to PG severity, clarify which assessment measures aggregate in each domain, and illustrate the importance of measurement specificity in studying impulsivity in relation to PG and other psychiatric disorders. PMID:24708148

  9. Measuring Specific Heats at High Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandersande, Jan W.; Zoltan, Andrew; Wood, Charles

    1987-01-01

    Flash apparatus for measuring thermal diffusivities at temperatures from 300 to 1,000 degrees C modified; measures specific heats of samples to accuracy of 4 to 5 percent. Specific heat and thermal diffusivity of sample measured. Xenon flash emits pulse of radiation, absorbed by sputtered graphite coating on sample. Sample temperature measured with thermocouple, and temperature rise due to pulse measured by InSb detector.

  10. Relationships between ground reaction force impulse and kinematics of sprint-running acceleration.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Joseph P; Marshall, Robert N; McNair, Peter J

    2005-02-01

    The literature contains some hypotheses regarding the most favorable ground reaction force (GRF) for sprint running and how it might be achieved. This study tested the relevance of these hypotheses to the acceleration phase of a sprint, using GRF impulse as the GRF variable of interest. Thirty-six athletes performed maximal-effort sprints from which video and GRF data were collected at the 16-m mark. Associations between GRF impulse (expressed relative to body mass) and various kinematic measures were explored with simple and multiple linear regressions and paired t-tests. The regression results showed that relative propulsive impulse accounted for 57% of variance in sprint velocity. Relative braking impulse accounted for only 7% of variance in sprint velocity. In addition, the faster athletes tended to produce only moderate magnitudes of relative vertical impulse. Paired t-tests revealed that lower magnitudes of relative braking impulse were associated with a smaller touchdown distance (p < 0.01) and a more active touchdown (p < 0.001). Also, greater magnitudes of relative propulsive impulse were associated with a high mean hip extension velocity of the stance limb (p < 0.05). In conclusion, it is likely that high magnitudes of propulsion are required to achieve high acceleration. Although there was a weak trend for faster athletes to produce lower magnitudes of braking, the possibility of braking having some advantages could not be ruled out. Further research is required to see if braking, propulsive, and vertical impulses can be modified with specific training. This will also provide insight into how a change in one GRF component might affect the others.

  11. BDNF concentration and impulsiveness level in post-traumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    Martinotti, Giovanni; Sepede, Gianna; Brunetti, Marcella; Ricci, Valerio; Gambi, Francesco; Chillemi, Eleonora; Vellante, Federica; Signorelli, Maria; Pettorruso, Mauro; De Risio, Luisa; Aguglia, Eugenio; Angelucci, Francesco; Caltagirone, Carlo; Di Giannantonio, Massimo

    2015-10-30

    Among the symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), impulsiveness has been observed in patients with high levels of hyperarousal. Recent literature reveals the importance of investigating the role of neurotrophins, such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), in several psychiatric disorders. Specifically, contrasting findings have been reported on the levels of serum BDNF in subjects with PTSD. The aim of the present study was to investigate the correlation between BDNF serum levels and impulsiveness in PTSD. To this end, we measured BDNF serum levels in 23 PTSD patients and a control group of 19 trauma-exposed non-PTSD subjects. Results indicate a positive correlation in the PTSD group; that is, the higher the BDNF levels the higher the impulsiveness score, as measured by the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS-11), suggesting that impulsiveness could be associated with greater BDNF production. Alternatively, it is also possible that high impulsiveness acts as a psychological mechanism that counteracts the negative effects exerted by the traumatic experience and the associated obsessive thoughts. The present paper discusses both hypotheses.

  12. Spin Stabilized Impulsively Controlled Missile (SSICM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crawford, J. I.; Howell, W. M.

    1985-12-01

    This patent is for the Spin Stabilized Impulsively Controlled Missile (SSICM). SSICM is a missile configuration which employs spin stabilization, nutational motion, and impulsive thrusting, and a body mounted passive or semiactive sensor to achieve very small miss distances against a high speed moving target. SSICM does not contain an autopilot, control surfaces, a control actuation system, nor sensor stabilization gimbals. SSICM spins at a rate sufficient to provide frequency separation between body motions and inertial target motion. Its impulsive thrusters provide near instantaneous changes in lateral velocity, whereas conventional missiles require a significant time delay to achieve lateral acceleration.

  13. Impulsivity and emotion dysregulation as predictors of food addiction.

    PubMed

    Pivarunas, Bernadette; Conner, Bradley T

    2015-12-01

    Food addiction is the clinical occurrence in which individuals develop physical and psychological dependencies on high fat, high sugar, and highly palatable foods. Past research has demonstrated a number of similarities between food addiction and drug use disorders including the activation of specific brain regions and neurotransmitters, disrupted neuronal circuitry, and behavioral indicators of addiction such as continued use despite negative consequences. The present study examined the role of impulsivity and emotion dysregulation in food addiction as both play salient roles in drug use disorders. Poisson regression analyses using data from 878 undergraduate students revealed negative urgency, the tendency to act impulsively when under distress, and emotion dysregulation positively predicted symptom count on the Yale Food Addiction Scale (Gearhardt, Corbin, & Brownell, 2009) whereas a lack of premeditation negatively predicted symptom count (all ps<0.05). Future research is needed to confirm precursors to eating episodes in food addiction, elucidate causal mechanisms, and support an explanatory model of food addiction.

  14. Adolescent aggression and social cognition in the context of personality: impulsivity as a moderator of predictions from social information processing.

    PubMed

    Fite, Jennifer E; Goodnight, Jackson A; Bates, John E; Dodge, Kenneth A; Pettit, Gregory S

    2008-01-01

    This study asked how individual differences in social cognition and personality interact in predicting later aggressive behavior. It was hypothesized that the relationship between immediate response evaluations in social information processing (SIP) and later aggressive behavior would be moderated by impulsivity. In particular, the immediate positive evaluations of aggressive responses would be more strongly related to later aggressive behavior for high-impulsive than for low-impulsive individuals, because high-impulsive children would be less likely to integrate peripheral information and consider long-term future consequences of their actions. Participants were 585 adolescents (52% male) and their mothers and teachers from the longitudinal Child Development Project. Structural equation modeling indicated that teacher-reported impulsivity at ages 11-13 moderated the association between adolescents' endorsement of aggressive responses in hypothetical, ambiguous situations and subsequent mother-reported aggressive behavior. Specifically, positive endorsement of aggressive responses at age 13 was significantly related to later aggressive behavior (age 14-17) for participants with high and medium levels of impulsivity, but this association was not significant for participants with low levels of impulsivity. This study provides evidence of personality variables as potential moderators of the link between SIP and behavior. PMID:18459110

  15. Icing tunnel tests of Electro-Impulse De-Icing of an engine inlet and high-speed wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zumwalt, G. W.

    1985-01-01

    A brief review is given of four earlier tests in the NASA Lewis Icing Research Tunnel and of flight tests in NASA's Icing Research Aircraft and in a Cessna 206 airplane. Details are given of recent icing tunnel tests of thicker-skinned wings, a Gates Learjet, a composite leading edge, and a Boeing 767, and of a Falcon Fanjet engine inlet. These were tested at speeds from 87 to 220 knots, air temperatures from -2 to -15 C, LWC values of 0.6 to 2.4 grams/cu meter, and median droplet diameters from 12 to 20 microns. Energy requirements are reported, as well as conclusions from comparisons of several Electro-Impulse De-Icing coil system designs. Fundamental studies of the structural dynamics and ice shedding of a 12.7 cm (5 inch) diameter semicylinder are described. Some potential problem areas are discussed: fatigue of skin and coil mountings, system weight and cost, electro-magnetic interference and noise.

  16. Lower Monoamine Oxidase-A Total Distribution Volume in Impulsive and Violent Male Offenders with Antisocial Personality Disorder and High Psychopathic Traits: An [11C] Harmine Positron Emission Tomography Study

    PubMed Central

    Kolla, Nathan J; Matthews, Brittany; Wilson, Alan A; Houle, Sylvain; Bagby, R Michael; Links, Paul; Simpson, Alexander I; Hussain, Amina; Meyer, Jeffrey H

    2016-01-01

    Antisocial personality disorder (ASPD) often presents with highly impulsive, violent behavior, and pathological changes in the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) and ventral striatum (VS) are implicated. Several compelling reasons support a relationship between low monoamine oxidase-A (MAO-A), an enzyme that regulates neurotransmitters, and ASPD. These include MAO-A knockout models in rodents evidencing impulsive aggression and positron emission tomography (PET) studies of healthy subjects reporting associations between low brain MAO-A levels and greater impulsivity or aggression. However, a fundamental gap in the literature is that it is unknown whether brain MAO-A levels are low in more severe, clinical disorders of impulsivity, such as ASPD. To address this issue, we applied [11C] harmine PET to measure MAO-A total distribution volume (MAO-A VT), an index of MAO-A density, in 18 male ASPD participants and 18 age- and sex-matched controls. OFC and VS MAO-A VT were lower in ASPD compared with controls (multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA): F2,33 = 6.8, P = 0.003; OFC and VS MAO-A VT each lower by 19%). Similar effects were observed in other brain regions: prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, dorsal putamen, thalamus, hippocampus, and midbrain (MANOVA: F7,28 = 2.7, P = 0.029). In ASPD, VS MAO-A VT was consistently negatively correlated with self-report and behavioral measures of impulsivity (r = −0.50 to −0.52, all P-values<0.05). This study is the first to demonstrate lower brain MAO-A levels in ASPD. Our results support an important extension of preclinical models of impulsive aggression into a human disorder marked by pathological aggression and impulsivity. PMID:26081301

  17. Lower Monoamine Oxidase-A Total Distribution Volume in Impulsive and Violent Male Offenders with Antisocial Personality Disorder and High Psychopathic Traits: An [(11)C] Harmine Positron Emission Tomography Study.

    PubMed

    Kolla, Nathan J; Matthews, Brittany; Wilson, Alan A; Houle, Sylvain; Bagby, R Michael; Links, Paul; Simpson, Alexander I; Hussain, Amina; Meyer, Jeffrey H

    2015-10-01

    Antisocial personality disorder (ASPD) often presents with highly impulsive, violent behavior, and pathological changes in the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) and ventral striatum (VS) are implicated. Several compelling reasons support a relationship between low monoamine oxidase-A (MAO-A), an enzyme that regulates neurotransmitters, and ASPD. These include MAO-A knockout models in rodents evidencing impulsive aggression and positron emission tomography (PET) studies of healthy subjects reporting associations between low brain MAO-A levels and greater impulsivity or aggression. However, a fundamental gap in the literature is that it is unknown whether brain MAO-A levels are low in more severe, clinical disorders of impulsivity, such as ASPD. To address this issue, we applied [(11)C] harmine PET to measure MAO-A total distribution volume (MAO-A VT), an index of MAO-A density, in 18 male ASPD participants and 18 age- and sex-matched controls. OFC and VS MAO-A VT were lower in ASPD compared with controls (multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA): F2,33=6.8, P=0.003; OFC and VS MAO-A VT each lower by 19%). Similar effects were observed in other brain regions: prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, dorsal putamen, thalamus, hippocampus, and midbrain (MANOVA: F7,28=2.7, P=0.029). In ASPD, VS MAO-A VT was consistently negatively correlated with self-report and behavioral measures of impulsivity (r=-0.50 to -0.52, all P-values<0.05). This study is the first to demonstrate lower brain MAO-A levels in ASPD. Our results support an important extension of preclinical models of impulsive aggression into a human disorder marked by pathological aggression and impulsivity.

  18. Lower Monoamine Oxidase-A Total Distribution Volume in Impulsive and Violent Male Offenders with Antisocial Personality Disorder and High Psychopathic Traits: An [11C] Harmine Positron Emission Tomography Study

    PubMed Central

    Kolla, Nathan J; Matthews, Brittany; Wilson, Alan A; Houle, Sylvain; Michael Bagby, R; Links, Paul; Simpson, Alexander I; Hussain, Amina; Meyer, Jeffrey H

    2015-01-01

    Antisocial personality disorder (ASPD) often presents with highly impulsive, violent behavior, and pathological changes in the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) and ventral striatum (VS) are implicated. Several compelling reasons support a relationship between low monoamine oxidase-A (MAO-A), an enzyme that regulates neurotransmitters, and ASPD. These include MAO-A knockout models in rodents evidencing impulsive aggression and positron emission tomography (PET) studies of healthy subjects reporting associations between low brain MAO-A levels and greater impulsivity or aggression. However, a fundamental gap in the literature is that it is unknown whether brain MAO-A levels are low in more severe, clinical disorders of impulsivity, such as ASPD. To address this issue, we applied [11C] harmine PET to measure MAO-A total distribution volume (MAO-A VT), an index of MAO-A density, in 18 male ASPD participants and 18 age- and sex-matched controls. OFC and VS MAO-A VT were lower in ASPD compared with controls (multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA): F2,33=6.8, P=0.003; OFC and VS MAO-A VT each lower by 19%). Similar effects were observed in other brain regions: prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, dorsal putamen, thalamus, hippocampus, and midbrain (MANOVA: F7,28=2.7, P=0.029). In ASPD, VS MAO-A VT was consistently negatively correlated with self-report and behavioral measures of impulsivity (r=−0.50 to −0.52, all P-values<0.05). This study is the first to demonstrate lower brain MAO-A levels in ASPD. Our results support an important extension of preclinical models of impulsive aggression into a human disorder marked by pathological aggression and impulsivity. PMID:26081301

  19. Irresistible impulse: psychiatric viewpoint.

    PubMed

    Weil, F

    1989-01-01

    The responses of the psychiatric profession to the legal criteria applied to irresistible impulse in cases of psychotic offenders are examined. An illustrative case, and its legal consequences, support the desirability of the psychiatric approach.

  20. The Association Between Impulsivity and Alcohol/Drug Use Among Prison Inmates

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, Michael H.; McSheffrey, Savannah N.; van den Berg, Jacob J.; Vela, Jamie E.; Stein, LAR; Roberts, Mary B.; Martin, Rosemarie A.; Clarke, Jennifer G.

    2015-01-01

    Background Few studies have examined the relation between impulsivity and drug involvement with prison inmates, in spite of their heavy drug use. Among this small body of work, most studies look at clinically relevant drug dependence, rather than drug use specifically. Method N=242 adult inmates (34.8% female, 52% White) with an average age of 35.58(SD=9.19) completed a modified version of the 15-item Barratt Impulsivity Scale (BIS) and measures assessing lifetime alcohol, opiates, benzodiazepines, cocaine, cannabis, hallucinogens, and polysubstance use. Lifetime users also reported the frequency of use for the 30 days prior to incarceration. Results Impulsivity was higher among lifetime users (versus never users) of all substances other than cannabis. Thirty day drug use frequency was only related to impulsivity for opiates and alcohol. Discussion This study extends prior work, by showing that a lifetime history of nonclinical substance use is positively associated with impulsivity among prison inmates. Implications for drug interventions are considered for this population, which is characterized by high rates of substance use and elevated impulsivity. PMID:25462662

  1. The role of impulsivity in the association between childhood trauma and dissociative psychopathology: mediation versus moderation.

    PubMed

    Somer, Eli; Ginzburg, Karni; Kramer, Lilach

    2012-03-30

    Previous studies on survivors of childhood trauma documented associations between psychological dysregulation, impulsivity, and both behavioral and emotional manifestations of distress. Yet, the mechanism that links these variables remains unclear. The current study aims to examine the pattern of relations between a history of child abuse, impulsivity and dissociation. More specifically, it examines whether impulsivity serves as a moderator or mediator in the association between childhood trauma and dissociation. Eighty-one inpatients from the acute wards of two psychiatric hospitals participated in this study. Data were collected by clinician-administered questionnaires. A highly significant linear hierarchical regression analysis revealed that both psychiatric comorbidity and childhood trauma made unique contributions to the variance of dissociation. Yet, the significant association between childhood trauma and dissociation decreased when impulsivity was entered into the regression model. Our findings suggest that impulsivity mediates the association between childhood trauma and dissociative psychopathology and imply that the identification and treatment of impulsivity could be a potentially valuable clinical target in individuals with dissociative disorders.

  2. High specific activity platinum-195m

    SciTech Connect

    Mirzadeh, Saed; Du, Miting; Beets, Arnold L.; Knapp, Jr., Furn F.

    2004-10-12

    A new composition of matter includes .sup.195m Pt characterized by a specific activity of at least 30 mCi/mg Pt, generally made by method that includes the steps of: exposing .sup.193 Ir to a flux of neutrons sufficient to convert a portion of the .sup.193 Ir to .sup.195m Pt to form an irradiated material; dissolving the irradiated material to form an intermediate solution comprising Ir and Pt; and separating the Pt from the Ir by cation exchange chromatography to produce .sup.195m Pt.

  3. Different subtypes of impulsivity differentiate uncontrolled eating and dietary restraint.

    PubMed

    Leitch, Margaret A; Morgan, Michael J; Yeomans, Martin R

    2013-10-01

    The current study explored the relationship between three subtypes of impulsivity (Reflection Impulsivity, Impulsive Choice, and Impulsive Action) and measures of uncontrolled eating (TFEQ-D) and restraint (TFEQ-R). Eighty women classified as scoring higher or lower on TFEQ-D and TFEQ-R completed the Matching Familiar Figures Test (MFFT20), Delay Discounting Task (DDT), a Go No Go task, Balloon Analogue Risk Task (BART), and the Barrett Impulsivity Scale-11 (BIS-11). To test whether these relationships were affected by enforced controls overeating, half of the participants fasted the night before and ate breakfast in the laboratory before testing and half had no such control. Women scoring higher on the TFEQ-D were significantly more impulsive on the MFFT20 and BIS-11 overall but not on DDT, Go No Go or BART. Women scoring higher on TFEQ-R were significantly less impulsive on the Go No Go task but did not differ on other measures. The eating manipulation modulated responses on the BART and BIS-11 non-planning scale depending on TFEQ-D classification. These results confirm recent data that high scores on TFEQ-D are related to impulsivity, but imply this relates more to Reflection Impulsivity rather than Impulsive Choice or Action. In contrast restrained eating was associated with better inhibitory control. Taken together, these results suggest that subtypes of impulsivity further differentiate uncontrolled eating and restraint, and suggest that a poor ability to reflect on decisions may underlie some aspects of overeating.

  4. Self-reported impulsivity, but not behavioral choice or response impulsivity, partially mediates the effect of stress on drinking behavior.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Kristen R; Ansell, Emily B; Reynolds, Brady; Potenza, Marc N; Sinha, Rajita

    2013-01-01

    Stress and impulsivity contribute to alcohol use, and stress may also act via impulsivity to increase drinking behavior. Impulsivity represents a multi-faceted construct and self-report and behavioral assessments may effectively capture distinct clinically relevant factors. The present research investigated whether aspects of impulsivity mediate the effect of stress on alcohol use. A community-based sample of 192 men and women was assessed on measures of cumulative stress, alcohol use, self-reported impulsivity, and behavioral choice and response impulsivity. Data were analyzed using regression and bootstrapping techniques to estimate indirect effects of stress on drinking via impulsivity. Cumulative adversity exhibited both direct effects and indirect effects (via self-reported impulsivity) on drinking behavior. Additional models examining specific types of stress indicated direct and indirect effects of trauma and recent life events, and indirect effects of major life events and chronic stressors on drinking behavior. Overall, cumulative stress was associated with increased drinking behavior, and this effect was partially mediated by self-reported impulsivity. Self-reported impulsivity also mediated the effects of different types of stress on drinking behavior. These findings highlight the value of mediation models to examine the pathways through which different types of stress increase drinking behavior. Treatment and prevention strategies should focus on enhancing stress management and self-control.

  5. Impulse-Momentum Diagrams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosengrant, David

    2011-01-01

    Multiple representations are a valuable tool to help students learn and understand physics concepts. Furthermore, representations help students learn how to think and act like real scientists.2 These representations include: pictures, free-body diagrams,3 energy bar charts,4 electrical circuits, and, more recently, computer simulations and animations.5 However, instructors have limited choices when they want to help their students understand impulse and momentum. One of the only available options is the impulse-momentum bar chart.6 The bar charts can effectively show the magnitude of the momentum as well as help students understand conservation of momentum, but they do not easily show the actual direction. This paper highlights a new representation instructors can use to help their students with momentum and impulse—the impulse-momentum diagram (IMD).

  6. Mixed-mode high-power impulse magnetron sputter deposition of tetrahedral amorphous carbon with pulse-length control of ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucker, M. D.; Ganesan, R.; McCulloch, D. G.; Partridge, J. G.; Stueber, M.; Ulrich, S.; Bilek, M. M. M.; McKenzie, D. R.; Marks, N. A.

    2016-04-01

    High-power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) is used to deposit amorphous carbon thin films with sp3 fractions of 13% to 82%. Increasing the pulse length results in a transition from conventional HiPIMS deposition to a "mixed-mode" in which an arc triggers on the target surface, resulting in a large flux of carbon ions. The films are characterized using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, ellipsometry, nanoindentation, elastic recoil detection analysis, and measurements of stress and contact angle. All properties vary in a consistent manner, showing a high tetrahedral character only for long pulses, demonstrating that mixed-mode deposition is the source of the high carbon ion flux. Varying the substrate bias reveals an "energy window" effect, where the sp3 fraction of the films is greatest for a substrate bias around -100 V and decreases for higher or lower bias values. In the absence of bias, the films' properties show little dependence on the pulse length, showing that energetic ions are the origin of the highly tetrahedral character.

  7. Ballistic impulse gauge

    DOEpatents

    Ault, S.K.

    1993-12-21

    A gauge for detecting the impulse generated in sample materials by X-rays or other impulse producing mechanisms utilizes a pair of flat annular springs to support a plunger relative to a housing which may itself be supported by a pair of flat annular springs in a second housing. The plunger has a mounting plate mounted on one end and at the other, a position or velocity transducer is mounted. The annular springs consist of an outer ring and an inner ring with at least three arcuate members connecting the outer ring with the inner ring. 4 figures.

  8. Ballistic impulse gauge

    DOEpatents

    Ault, Stanley K.

    1993-01-01

    A gauge for detecting the impulse generated in sample materials by X-rays or other impulse producing mechanisms utilizes a pair of flat annular springs to support a plunger relative to a housing which may itself be supported by a pair of flat annular springs in a second housing. The plunger has a mounting plate mounted on one end and at the other, a position or velocity transducer is mounted. The annular springs consist of an outer ring and an inner ring with at least three arcuate members connecting the outer ring with the inner ring.

  9. Preparation of diamond-like carbon films using reactive Ar/CH4 high power impulse magnetron sputtering system with negative pulse voltage source for substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Takashi; Kamata, Hikaru

    2016-04-01

    Diamond-like carbon films were prepared using a reactive Ar/CH4 high-power impulse magnetron sputtering system with a negative pulse voltage source for the substrate, changing the CH4 fraction up to 15% in the total pressure range from 0.3 to 2 Pa. The magnitude of the negative pulse voltage for the substrate was also varied up to about 500 V. The hardness of films monotonically increased with increasing magnitude of the negative pulse voltage. The films with hardnesses between 16.5 and 23 GPa were prepared at total pressures less than 0.5 Pa and CH4 fractions less than 10% by applying an appropriate negative pulse voltage of 300-400 V. In X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, the area ratio C-C sp3/(C-C sp2 + C-C sp3) in the C 1s core level was higher than 30% at pressures less than 0.5 Pa and CH4 fractions less than 15%. On the other hand, the films with hardnesses between 5 and 10 GPa were prepared with a relatively high growth rate at the partial pressures of CH4 higher than 0.1 Pa. However, the observation of the photoluminescence background in Raman spectroscopy indicated a relatively high hydrogen content.

  10. Does drinking refusal self-efficacy mediate the impulsivity-problematic alcohol use relation?

    PubMed

    Stevens, Angela K; Littlefield, Andrew K; Blanchard, Brittany E; Talley, Amelia E; Brown, Jennifer L

    2016-02-01

    There is consistent evidence that impulsivity-like traits relate to problematic alcohol involvement; however, identifying mechanisms that account for this relation remains an important area of research. Drinking refusal self-efficacy (or a person's ability to resist alcohol; DRSE) has been shown to predict alcohol use among college students and may be a relevant mediator of the impulsivity-alcohol relation. The current study examined the indirect effect of various constructs related to impulsivity (i.e., urgency, sensation seeking, and deficits in conscientiousness) via several facets of DRSE (i.e., social pressure, opportunistic, and emotional relief) on alcohol-related problems among a large sample of college students (N=891). Overall, results indicated that certain DRSE facets were significant mediators of the relation between impulsivity-related constructs and alcohol problems. More specifically, emotional-relief DRSE was a mediator for the respective relations between urgency and deficits in conscientiousness and alcohol problems, whereas social-DRSE was a significant mediator of the respective relations between urgency and sensation seeking with alcohol problems. Results from this study suggest particular types of DRSE are important mediators of the relations between specific impulsivity constructs and alcohol-related problems. These findings support prevention and intervention efforts that seek to enhance drinking refusal self-efficacy skills of college students, particularly those high in certain personality features, in order to reduce alcohol-related problems among this population.

  11. Does drinking refusal self-efficacy mediate the impulsivity-problematic alcohol use relation?

    PubMed

    Stevens, Angela K; Littlefield, Andrew K; Blanchard, Brittany E; Talley, Amelia E; Brown, Jennifer L

    2016-02-01

    There is consistent evidence that impulsivity-like traits relate to problematic alcohol involvement; however, identifying mechanisms that account for this relation remains an important area of research. Drinking refusal self-efficacy (or a person's ability to resist alcohol; DRSE) has been shown to predict alcohol use among college students and may be a relevant mediator of the impulsivity-alcohol relation. The current study examined the indirect effect of various constructs related to impulsivity (i.e., urgency, sensation seeking, and deficits in conscientiousness) via several facets of DRSE (i.e., social pressure, opportunistic, and emotional relief) on alcohol-related problems among a large sample of college students (N=891). Overall, results indicated that certain DRSE facets were significant mediators of the relation between impulsivity-related constructs and alcohol problems. More specifically, emotional-relief DRSE was a mediator for the respective relations between urgency and deficits in conscientiousness and alcohol problems, whereas social-DRSE was a significant mediator of the respective relations between urgency and sensation seeking with alcohol problems. Results from this study suggest particular types of DRSE are important mediators of the relations between specific impulsivity constructs and alcohol-related problems. These findings support prevention and intervention efforts that seek to enhance drinking refusal self-efficacy skills of college students, particularly those high in certain personality features, in order to reduce alcohol-related problems among this population. PMID:26547044

  12. Optimum Three Impulse Trajectory Generator with Patched Conic Trajectory Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Payne, M. H.; Pines, S.; Horsewood, J. L.

    1972-01-01

    Optimal multi-impulse trajectories were investigated as a nominal about which asymptotic expansion was used to obtain approximations of optimal low thrust trajectories. The work consisted of the analysis and description of an optimal 3-impulse trajectory program. A patched-conic trajectory model was specifically designed for compatibility with the subsequent addition of the low thrust expansion approximation.

  13. Ion Species Fractions in the Far-Field Plume of a High-Specific Impulse Hall Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hofer, Richard R.; Gallimore, Alec D.

    2003-01-01

    An ExB probe was used to measure the ion species fractions of Xe(+), Xe(2+), and Xe(3+) in the far-field plume of the NASA-173Mv2 laboratory-model Hall thruster. The thruster was operated at a constant xenon flow rate of 10 milligrams per second and discharge voltages of 300 to 900 V. The ExB probe was placed two meters downstream of the thruster exit plane on the thruster centerline. At a discharge voltage of 300 V, the species fractions of Xe(2+) and Xe(3+) were lower, but still consistent with, previous Hall thruster studies using other mass analyzers. Over discharge voltages of 300 to 900 V, the Xe(2+) species fractions increased from 0.04 to 0.12 and the Xe(3+) species fraction increased from 0.01 to 0.02.

  14. Ion Voltage Diagnostics in the Far-Field Plume of a High-Specific Impulse Hall Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hofer, Richard R.; Haas, James M.; Gallimore, Alec D.

    2003-01-01

    The effects of the magnetic field and discharge voltage on the far-field plume of the NASA 173Mv2 laboratory-model Hall thruster were investigated. A cylindrical Langmuir probe was used to measure the plasma potential and a retarding potential analyzer was employed to measure the ion voltage distribution. The plasma potential was affected by relatively small changes in the external magnetic field, which suggested a means to control the plasma surrounding the thruster. As the discharge voltage increased, the ion voltage distribution showed that the acceleration efficiency increased and the dispersion efficiency decreased. This implied that the ionization zone was growing axially and moving closer to the anode, which could have affected thruster efficiency and lifetime due to higher wall losses. However, wall losses may have been reduced by improved focusing efficiency since the total efficiency increased and the plume divergence decreased with discharge voltage.

  15. Relationships of impulsiveness and depressive symptoms in alcohol dependence

    PubMed Central

    Jakubczyk, Andrzej; Klimkiewicz, Anna; Topolewska-Wochowska, Aleksandra; Serafin, Piotr; Sadowska-Mazuryk, Joanna; Pupek-Pyzioł, Julia; Brower, Kirk J.; Wojnar, Marcin

    2011-01-01

    Background Depressive symptoms as well as high levels of impulsivity are subjects of special interest in alcohol dependence, as these factors are considered to influence the course of this disorder. However, until now mutual relationships between impulsivity and depression have not been investigated thoroughly in alcohol-dependent patients. Methods By means of the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS-11) and stop-signal task, levels of impulsivity among 304 alcohol-dependent patients were measured. The stop-signal task was used as a manipulation-free method of estimating the level of behavioral impulsiveness, and the BIS-11 is a self report measure of global as well as cognitive impulsivity. Patients were also asked to complete the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and Hopelessness Scale (BHS). The results were analyzed in order to examine relationships between impulsiveness and depressive symptoms. Results Statistical analyses revealed significant associations between impulsiveness and severity of depressive symptoms. Individuals with higher scores on the BDI were more impulsive on the BIS-11, whereas patients with higher scores on the BHS were more impulsive on both the stop-signal task and BIS-11. The strongest correlations were found with the attention impulsivity subscale of BIS-11. Adjusting for other variables, a linear regression analysis revealed that cognitive impulsivity was the strongest predictor of depression severity. Limitations The main limitation of the study is a not fully representative sample, with exclusion of patients with active mood disorders Conclusions The results indicate a strong association between depressive symptoms and impulsivity in alcohol-dependent patients, and suggest an important distinction between hopelessness and other depressive symptoms. PMID:22030134

  16. Impulse radar studfinder

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, Thomas E.

    1995-01-01

    An impulse radar studfinder propagates electromagnetic pulses and detects reflected pulses from a fixed range. Unmodulated pulses, about 200 ps wide, are emitted. A large number of reflected pulses are sampled and averaged. Background reflections are subtracted. Reflections from wall studs or other hidden objects are detected and displayed using light emitting diodes.

  17. Impulse radar studfinder

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, T.E.

    1995-10-10

    An impulse radar studfinder propagates electromagnetic pulses and detects reflected pulses from a fixed range. Unmodulated pulses, about 200 ps wide, are emitted. A large number of reflected pulses are sampled and averaged. Background reflections are subtracted. Reflections from wall studs or other hidden objects are detected and displayed using light emitting diodes. 9 figs.

  18. Relativistic impulse dynamics.

    PubMed

    Swanson, Stanley M

    2011-08-01

    Classical electrodynamics has some annoying rough edges. The self-energy of charges is infinite without a cutoff. The calculation of relativistic trajectories is difficult because of retardation and an average radiation reaction term. By reconceptuallizing electrodynamics in terms of exchanges of impulses rather than describing it by forces and potentials, we eliminate these problems. A fully relativistic theory using photonlike null impulses is developed. Numerical calculations for a two-body, one-impulse-in-transit model are discussed. A simple relationship between center-of-mass scattering angle and angular momentum was found. It reproduces the Rutherford cross section at low velocities and agrees with the leading term of relativistic distinguishable-particle quantum cross sections (Møller, Mott) when the distance of closest approach is larger than the Compton wavelength of the particle. Magnetism emerges as a consequence of viewing retarded and advanced interactions from the vantage point of an instantaneous radius vector. Radiation reaction becomes the local conservation of energy-momentum between the radiating particle and the emitted impulse. A net action is defined that could be used in developing quantum dynamics without potentials. A reinterpretation of Newton's laws extends them to relativistic motion.

  19. [Obsession-impulsion infanticide].

    PubMed

    Gourévitch, Michel

    2006-01-01

    In 1836, the case-history of a young mother, the victim of a phobia of the impulsion to murder her infant. Esquirol considers her case as one of homocidial monomania, and classifies her among psychotic patients who have actually killed.

  20. Irresistible impulse: legal viewpoint.

    PubMed

    Borichansky, L

    1989-01-01

    The legal point of view concerning irresistible impulse as an exemption from criminal liability is discussed. A defendant who pleads that at the time of committing an illegal act he was suffering from a mental disease must prove to the court that his version is the most possible one.

  1. Auto-programmable impulse neural circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watula, D.; Meador, J.

    1990-01-01

    Impulse neural networks use pulse trains to communicate neuron activation levels. Impulse neural circuits emulate natural neurons at a more detailed level than that typically employed by contemporary neural network implementation methods. An impulse neural circuit which realizes short term memory dynamics is presented. The operation of that circuit is then characterized in terms of pulse frequency modulated signals. Both fixed and programmable synapse circuits for realizing long term memory are also described. The implementation of a simple and useful unsupervised learning law is then presented. The implementation of a differential Hebbian learning rule for a specific mean-frequency signal interpretation is shown to have a straightforward implementation using digital combinational logic with a variation of a previously developed programmable synapse circuit. This circuit is expected to be exploited for simple and straightforward implementation of future auto-adaptive neural circuits.

  2. Combining a molecular modelling approach with direct current and high power impulse magnetron sputtering to develop new TiO2 thin films for antifouling applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillot, Jérôme; Lecoq, Elodie; Duday, David; Puhakka, Eini; Riihimäki, Markus; Keiski, Riitta; Chemin, Jean-Baptiste; Choquet, Patrick

    2015-04-01

    The accumulation of crystallization deposits at the surface of heat exchangers results in the increase of the heat transfer resistance and a drastic loss of efficiency. Coating surfaces with a thin film can limit the scale-surface adhesion force and thus the fouling process. This study compares the efficiency of TiO2 layers exhibiting various crystalline planes and microstructures to reduce the kinetic of fouling. Molecular modelling with density functional theory is first carried out to determine the energy of CaCO3 deposition on anatase (1 0 1), (0 0 4), and (2 0 0) surfaces as well as on a rutile (1 0 1) one. TiO2 thin films (thickness < 1 μm) are then synthesized by direct current and high power impulse magnetron sputtering (dcMS and HiPIMS respectively) in order to tune their crystallinity and microstructure. Lastly, the induction time to grow CaCO3 crystals at the surface of such materials is determined. Comparing the modelling and fouling results allows to draw general trends on the potential anti-scaling properties of TiO2 crystallized under various forms. Until now, such a comparison combining a theoretical approach with experimental fouling tests has never been reported in the literature.

  3. Time-resolved investigation of dual high power impulse magnetron sputtering with closed magnetic field during deposition of Ti-Cu thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Stranak, Vitezslav; Hippler, Rainer; Cada, Martin; Hubicka, Zdenek; Tichy, Milan

    2010-08-15

    Time-resolved comparative study of dual magnetron sputtering (dual-MS) and dual high power impulse magnetron sputtering (dual-HiPIMS) systems arranged with closed magnetic field is presented. The dual-MS system was operated with a repetition frequency 4.65 kHz (duty cycle {approx_equal}50%). The frequency during dual-HiPIMS is lower as well as its duty cycle (f=100 Hz, duty 1%). Different metallic targets (Ti, Cu) and different cathode voltages were applied to get required stoichiometry of Ti-Cu thin films. The plasma parameters of the interspace between magnetrons in the substrate position were investigated by time-resolved optical emission spectroscopy, Langmuir probe technique, and measurement of ion fluxes to the substrate. It is shown that plasma density as well as ion flux is higher about two orders of magnitude in dual-HiPIMS system. This fact is partially caused by low diffusion of ionized sputtered particles (Ti{sup +},Cu{sup +}) which creates a preionized medium.

  4. Time-resolved investigation of dual high power impulse magnetron sputtering with closed magnetic field during deposition of Ti-Cu thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stranak, Vitezslav; Cada, Martin; Hubicka, Zdenek; Tichy, Milan; Hippler, Rainer

    2010-08-01

    Time-resolved comparative study of dual magnetron sputtering (dual-MS) and dual high power impulse magnetron sputtering (dual-HiPIMS) systems arranged with closed magnetic field is presented. The dual-MS system was operated with a repetition frequency 4.65 kHz (duty cycle ≈50%). The frequency during dual-HiPIMS is lower as well as its duty cycle (f =100 Hz, duty 1%). Different metallic targets (Ti, Cu) and different cathode voltages were applied to get required stoichiometry of Ti-Cu thin films. The plasma parameters of the interspace between magnetrons in the substrate position were investigated by time-resolved optical emission spectroscopy, Langmuir probe technique, and measurement of ion fluxes to the substrate. It is shown that plasma density as well as ion flux is higher about two orders of magnitude in dual-HiPIMS system. This fact is partially caused by low diffusion of ionized sputtered particles (Ti+,Cu+) which creates a preionized medium.

  5. High School Educational Specifications: Facilities Planning Standards. Edition I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jefferson County School District R-1, Denver, CO.

    The Jefferson County School District (Colorado) has developed a manual of high school specifications for Design Advisory Groups and consultants to use for planning and designing the district's high school facilities. The specifications are provided to help build facilities that best meet the educational needs of the students to be served.…

  6. Neural substrates of time perception and impulsivity

    PubMed Central

    Wittmann, Marc; Simmons, Alan N.; Flagan, Taru; Lane, Scott D.; Wackermann, Jiří; Paulus, Martin P.

    2011-01-01

    Several studies provide empirical evidence for the association between impulsivity and time perception. However, little is known about the neural substrates underlying this function. This investigation examined the influence of impulsivity on neural activation patterns during the encoding and reproduction of intervals with durations of 3, 9 and 18 seconds using event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Twenty-seven subjects participated in this study, including 15 high impulsive subjects that were classified based on their self-rating. FMRI activation during the duration reproduction task was correlated with measures of two self-report questionnaires related to the concept of impulsivity (Barratt Impulsiveness Scale, BIS; Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory, ZTPI). Behaviorally, those individuals who under-reproduced temporal intervals also showed lower scores on the ZTPI future perspective subscale and higher scores on the BIS. FMRI activation revealed an accumulating pattern of neural activity peaking at the end of the 9- and 18-s interval within right posterior insula. Activations of brain regions during the reproduction phase of the timing task, such as those related to motor execution as well as to the ‘core control network’ – encompassing the inferior frontal and medial frontal cortex, the anterior insula as well as the inferior parietal cortex – were significantly correlated with reproduced duration, as well as with BIS and ZTPI subscales. In particular, the greater activation in these regions the shorter were the reproduced intervals, the more impulsive was an individual and the less pronounced the future perspective. Activation in the core control network, thus, may form a biological marker for cognitive time management and for impulsiveness. PMID:21763642

  7. Neural substrates of time perception and impulsivity.

    PubMed

    Wittmann, Marc; Simmons, Alan N; Flagan, Taru; Lane, Scott D; Wackermann, Jiří; Paulus, Martin P

    2011-08-11

    Several studies provide empirical evidence for the association between impulsivity and time perception. However, little is known about the neural substrates underlying this function. This investigation examined the influence of impulsivity on neural activation patterns during the encoding and reproduction of intervals with durations of 3, 9 and 18s using event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Twenty-seven subjects participated in this study, including 15 high impulsive subjects that were classified based on their self-rating. FMRI activation during the duration reproduction task was correlated with measures of two self-report questionnaires related to the concept of impulsivity (Barratt Impulsiveness Scale, BIS; Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory, ZTPI). Behaviorally, those individuals who under-reproduced temporal intervals also showed lower scores on the ZTPI future perspective subscale and higher scores on the BIS. FMRI activation revealed an accumulating pattern of neural activity peaking at the end of the 9- and 18-s intervals within right posterior insula. Activations of brain regions during the reproduction phase of the timing task, such as those related to motor execution as well as to the 'core control network' - encompassing the inferior frontal and medial frontal cortices, the anterior insula as well as the inferior parietal cortex - were significantly correlated with reproduced duration, as well as with BIS and ZTPI subscales. In particular, the greater activation in these regions the shorter were the reproduced intervals, the more impulsive was an individual and the less pronounced the future perspective. Activation in the core control network, thus, may form a biological marker for cognitive time management and for impulsiveness.

  8. Drifting localization of ionization runaway: Unraveling the nature of anomalous transport in high power impulse magnetron sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Ni, Pavel; Rauch, Albert

    2011-12-04

    The plasma over the magnetron’s erosion “racetrack” is not azimuthally uniform but concentrated in distinct dense plasma zones which move in the {vector E}×{vector B} direction with about 10% of the electrons’ {vector E}×{vector B}/B{sup 2} drift velocity. The plasma zones are investigated with a gated camera working in concert with a streak camera for Al, Nb, Cu, and W targets in Ar or Kr background gas. It is found that each plasma zone has a high density edge which is the origin of a plasma-generating electron jet leaving the target zone. Each region of strong azimuthal density gradient generates an azimuthal electric field which promotes the escape of magnetized electrons and the formation of electron jets and plasma flares. The phenomena are proposed to be caused by an ionization instability where each dense plasma zone exhibits a high stopping power for drifting high energy electrons, thereby enhancing itself.

  9. Attending at a Low Intensity Increases Impulsivity in an Auditory Sustained Attention to Response Task.

    PubMed

    Roebuck, Hettie; Guo, Kun; Bourke, Patrick

    2015-12-01

    Why attention lapses during prolonged tasks is debated, specifically whether errors are a consequence of under-arousal or exerted effort. To explore this, we investigated whether increased impulsivity is associated with effortful processing by modifying the demand of a task by presenting it at a quiet intensity. Here, we consider whether attending at low but detectable levels affects impulsivity in a population with intact hearing. A modification of the Sustained Attention to Response Task was used with auditory stimuli at two levels: the participants' personal "lowest detectable" level and a "normal speaking" level. At the quiet intensity, we found that more impulsive responses were made compared with listening at a normal speaking level. These errors were not due to a failure in discrimination. The findings suggest an increase in processing time for auditory stimuli at low levels that exceeds the time needed to interrupt a planned habitual motor response. This leads to a more impulsive and erroneous response style. These findings have important implications for understanding the nature of impulsivity in relation to effortful processing. They may explain why a high proportion of individuals with hearing loss are also diagnosed with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder.

  10. Dopaminergic modulation of impulsive decision making in the rat insular cortex.

    PubMed

    Pattij, Tommy; Schetters, Dustin; Schoffelmeer, Anton N M

    2014-08-15

    Neuroimaging studies have implicated the insular cortex in cognitive processes including decision making. Nonetheless, little is known about the mechanisms by which the insula contributes to impulsive decision making. In this regard, the dopamine system is known to be importantly involved in decision making processes, including impulsive decision making. The aim of the current set of experiments was to further elucidate the importance of dopamine signaling in the agranular insular cortex in impulsive decision making. This compartment of the insular cortex is highly interconnected with brain areas such as the medial prefrontal cortex, amygdala and ventral striatum which are implicated in decision making processes. Male rats were trained in a delay-discounting task and upon stable baseline performance implanted with bilateral cannulae in the agranular insular cortex. Intracranial infusions of the dopamine D1 receptor antagonist SCH23390 and dopamine D2 receptor antagonist eticlopride revealed that particularly blocking dopamine D1 receptors centered on the insular cortex promoted impulsive decision making. Together, the present results demonstrate an important role of the agranular insular cortex in impulsive decision making and, more specifically, highlight the contribution of dopamine D1-like receptors.

  11. Choice Impulsivity: Definitions, Measurement Issues, and Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Kristen R.; Mitchell, Marci R.; Wing, Victoria C.; Balodis, Iris M.; Bickel, Warren K.; Fillmore, Mark; Lane, Scott D.; Lejuez, C. W.; Littlefield, Andrew K.; Luijten, Maartje; Mathias, Charles W.; Mitchell, Suzanne H.; Napier, T. Celeste; Reynolds, Brady; Schütz, Christian G.; Setlow, Barry; Sher, Kenneth J.; Swann, Alan C.; Tedford, Stephanie E.; White, Melanie J.; Winstanley, Catharine A.; Yi, Richard; Potenza, Marc N.; Moeller, F. Gerard

    2015-01-01

    Background Impulsivity critically relates to many psychiatric disorders. Given the multi-faceted construct that impulsivity represents, defining core aspects of impulsivity is vital for the assessment and understanding of clinical conditions. Choice impulsivity (CI), involving the preferential selection of smaller sooner rewards over larger later rewards, represents one important type of impulsivity. Method The International Society for Research on Impulsivity (InSRI) convened to discuss the definition and assessment of CI and provide recommendations regarding measurement across species. Results Commonly used preclinical and clinical CI behavioral tasks are described, and considerations for each task are provided to guide CI task selection. Differences in assessment of CI (self-report, behavioral) and calculating CI indices (e.g., area-under-the-curve, indifference point, steepness of discounting curve) are discussed along with properties of specific behavioral tasks used in preclinical and clinical settings. Conclusions The InSRI group recommends inclusion of measures of CI in human studies examining impulsivity. Animal studies examining impulsivity should also include assessments of CI and these measures should be harmonized in accordance with human studies of the disorders being modeled in the preclinical investigations. The choice of specific CI measures to be included should be based on the goals of the study and existing preclinical and clinical literature using established CI measures. PMID:25867841

  12. Validity of proposed DSM-5 ADHD impulsivity symptoms in children.

    PubMed

    Ünsel Bolat, Gül; Ercan, Eyüp Sabri; Salum, Giovanni Abrahão; Bilaç, Öznur; Massuti, Rafael; Uysal Özaslan, Taciser; Bolat, Hilmi; Rohde, Luis Augusto

    2016-10-01

    The American Psychiatric Association (APA) working group on Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) proposed the inclusion of four new impulsivity symptoms. However, they were not included in DSM-5 due to the lack of sufficient evidence. The aim of this study is to investigate the performance of the proposed four ADHD impulsivity symptoms with respect to: (a) ADHD factor structure; (b) performance in predicting clinical impairment; (c) specificity for ADHD diagnosis and (d) best symptomatic threshold to predict clinical impairment. The sample comprised 416 children (31 ADHD subjects according to both DSM-IV and proposed DSM-5, 20 ADHD subjects according to just one diagnostic system and 365 controls) from 12 schools. Diagnoses were derived using semi-structured interviews and ADHD rating scales. Results from confirmatory factor analysis indicate that addition of the four new impulsivity items provided a slightly better factor structure if compared to models including only 18 items. Regression analyses showed that only one of the new impulsivity symptoms (impatient) was part of the list of best predictors of impairment. None of the four new impulsivity items was specifically associated with ADHD diagnosis. The best cutoff point in the hyperactivity/impulsivity dimension for predicting impairment did not change significantly. Overall, our findings suggest that the determination on how to best capture impulsivity dimension as part of the ADHD construct needs more investigation and that there is not enough evidence to include these four assessed impulsivity symptoms as part of the ADHD criteria.

  13. Cocaine self-administration punished by i.v. histamine in rat models of high and low drug abuse vulnerability: effects of saccharin preference, impulsivity, and sex.

    PubMed

    Holtz, Nathan A; Anker, Justin J; Regier, Paul S; Claxton, Alex; Carroll, Marilyn E

    2013-10-01

    A key feature of substance use disorders is continued drug consumption despite aversive consequences. This has been modeled in the animal laboratory by pairing drug self-administration with electric shock, thereby punishing drug intake (Deroche-Gamonet et al. 2004). In the present experiments, we examined the effects of punishment on i.v. cocaine self-administration by adding histamine to the cocaine solution with three different animal models of high and low vulnerability to drug abuse: rats selectively bred for high (HiS) and low (LoS) saccharin consumption, rats selected for high (HiI) and low (LoI) impulsivity, and sex differences. Animals were allowed to self-administer cocaine (0.4 mg/kg/infusion) to establish a baseline of operant responding. Histamine (4.0mg/kg/infusion) was then added directly into the cocaine solution and its consequent effects on self-administration were compared to baseline. The histamine+cocaine solution was then replaced with a cocaine-only solution, and the rats' operant responding was again compared to baseline. Concurrent histamine exposure was effective in reducing cocaine consumption in all groups of rats; however, LoS and female rats took longer to return to baseline levels of cocaine consumption after histamine was removed compared to HiS and male rats. These data suggest that the reduction of drug self-administration by aversive consequences may differ in groups that vary in drug use vulnerability . Such results may inform pharmacological strategies that enhance the negative aspects of drug consumption.

  14. Micropower impulse radar imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, M.S.

    1995-11-01

    From designs developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in radar and imaging technologies, there exists the potential for a variety of applications in both public and private sectors. Presently tests are being conducted for the detection of buried mines and the analysis of civil structures. These new systems use a patented ultra-wide band (impulse) radar technology known as Micropower Impulse Radar (GPR) imaging systems. LLNL has also developed signal processing software capable of producing 2-D and 3-D images of objects embedded in materials such as soil, wood and concrete. My assignment while at LLNL has focused on the testing of different radar configurations and applications, as well as assisting in the creation of computer algorithms which enable the radar to scan target areas of different geometeries.

  15. Impulsive for life? The nature of long-term impulsivity in domestic dogs

    PubMed Central

    Riemer, Stefanie; Mills, Daniel; Wright, Hannah

    2014-01-01

    Individual differences in impulsivity occur at a cognitive and/or behavioural level and are associated with differing life outcomes. However there is a lack of empirical evidence to support the long-term stability of these characteristics in non-human animals. This study reports on the stability of convergent measures of impulsivity in domestic dogs assessed more than six years apart. Measures were (1) owner assessment by means of a questionnaire, the validated ‘Dog Impulsivity Assessment Scale’ (DIAS) and (2) dogs’ performance in a delayed reward choice test. Dogs had 15 minutes free access to two food dispensers, one dispensing a piece of food immediately, the other dispensing three pieces after a delay, which increased by one second every other time the dogs sampled it. Maximum delay reached in this task reflects decision making, or cognitive impulsivity, whereas the rate of extra presses on the delayed reward device during the delay can be considered as a measure of motor or behavioural impulsivity. DIAS scores were strongly and significantly correlated across years. The maximum delay reached in the behaviour test was also highly stable, whereas paw pressing rate was uncorrelated between the years. These results demonstrate that cognitive but not motor impulsivity is highly consistent over time in dogs. PMID:24136014

  16. Impulsive actions and choices in laboratory animals and humans: effects of high vs. low dopamine states produced by systemic treatments given to neurologically intact subjects

    PubMed Central

    D’Amour-Horvat, Valérie; Leyton, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Increases and decreases in dopamine (DA) transmission have both been suggested to influence reward-related impulse-control. The present literature review suggests that, in laboratory animals, the systemic administration of DA augmenters preferentially increases susceptibility to premature responding; with continued DA transmission, reward approach behaviors are sustained. Decreases in DA transmission, in comparison, diminish the appeal of distal and difficult to obtain rewards, thereby increasing susceptibility to temporal discounting and other forms of impulsive choice. The evidence available in humans is not incompatible with this model but is less extensive. PMID:25566001

  17. Impulsivity, Coping, Stress, and Problem Gambling among University Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lightsey, Owen Richard, Jr.; Hulsey, C. Duncan

    2002-01-01

    The authors investigated whether coping styles moderated the relationship between (a) impulsivity and stress and (b) stress and gambling behavior and tested whether impulsive persons who use avoidant or emotion-focused coping under high-stress conditions are most likely to gamble. Among 202 university student volunteers, 33% of men but only 3% of…

  18. Short range micro-power impulse radar with high resolution swept range gate with damped transmit and receive cavities

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, T.E.

    1998-06-30

    A radar range finder and hidden object locator is based on ultra-wide band radar with a high resolution swept range gate. The device generates an equivalent time amplitude scan with atypical range of 4 inches to 20 feet, and an analog range resolution as limited by a jitter of on the order of 0.01 inches. A differential sampling receiver is employed to effectively eliminate ringing and other aberrations induced in the receiver by the near proximity of the transmit antenna, so a background subtraction is not needed, simplifying the circuitry while improving performance. Uses of the invention include a replacement of ultrasound devices for fluid level sensing, automotive radar, such as cruise control and parking assistance, hidden object location, such as stud and rebar finding. Also, this technology can be used when positioned over a highway lane to collect vehicle count and speed data for traffic control. Techniques are used to reduce clutter in the receive signal, such as decoupling the receive and transmit cavities by placing a space between them, using conductive or radiative damping elements on the cavities, and using terminating plates on the sides of the openings. 20 figs.

  19. Short range micro-power impulse radar with high resolution swept range gate with damped transmit and receive cavities

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, Thomas E.

    1998-01-01

    A radar range finder and hidden object locator is based on ultra-wide band radar with a high resolution swept range gate. The device generates an equivalent time amplitude scan with atypical range of 4 inches to 20 feet, and an analog range resolution as limited by a jitter of on the order of 0.01 inches. A differential sampling receiver is employed to effectively eliminate ringing and other aberrations induced in the receiver by the near proximity of the transmit antenna, so a background subtraction is not needed, simplifying the circuitry while improving performance. Uses of the invention include a replacement of ultrasound devices for fluid level sensing, automotive radar, such as cruise control and parking assistance, hidden object location, such as stud and rebar finding. Also, this technology can be used when positioned over a highway lane to collect vehicle count and speed data for traffic control. Techniques are used to reduce clutter in the receive signal, such as decoupling the receive and transmit cavities by placing a space between them, using conductive or radiative damping elements on the cavities, and using terminating plates on the sides of the openings.

  20. A pilot genetic study of the continuum between compulsivity and impulsivity in females: the serotonin transporter promoter polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Baca-García, Enrique; Salgado, Beatríz Rodríguez; Segal, Helen Dolengevich; Lorenzo, Concepción Vaquero; Acosta, Mercedes Navio; Romero, Manuel Arrojo; Hernández, Montserrat Díaz; Saiz-Ruiz, Jeronimo; Fernandez Piqueras, Jose; de Leon, Jose

    2005-06-01

    According to some authors the obsessive-compulsive (OC) spectrum includes on one extreme, the Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) and on the other extreme the most impulsive behaviors. This is a controversial idea and other authors define the OC spectrum in different ways. The serotonin transporter (5-HTT) gene is one of the main genes that control serotonergic function. A polymorphism in the promoter area of this gene classifies subjects with low expression as S individuals (s/s or s/l) and subjects with high expression as L individuals (l/l). This polymorphism was studied in female OCD patients (n = 24), non-impulsive controls (n = 112) and impulsive suicidal patients (n = 118) to support the OC spectrum hypothesis from a genetic perspective. A linear association exists among the serotonin transporter promoter functional genotypes (S versus L individuals) (chi2 linear by linear association = 8.9; df = 1; p = 0.003). The frequency of S individuals (s/l or s/s) was lowest in OCD (54%, 13/24); intermediate in non-impulsive controls (71%, 80/112) and highest in impulsive suicide attempters (82%, 96/117). More importantly, future studies need to consider that genetics may be related to behavioral dimensions (compulsivity to impulsivity) instead of to specific psychiatric disorders defined in clinical terms.

  1. Impulsive Aggression as a Comorbidity of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder in Children and Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Amann, Birgit H.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: This article examines the characteristics of impulsive aggression (IA) as a comorbidity in children and adolescents with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), focusing on its incidence, impact on ADHD outcomes, need for timely intervention, and limitations of current treatment practices. Methods: Relevant literature was retrieved with electronic searches in PubMed and PsycINFO using the search strategy of “ADHD OR attention deficit hyperactivity disorder” AND “impulsive aggression OR reactive aggression OR hostile aggression OR overt aggression” AND “pediatric OR childhood OR children OR pre-adolescent OR adolescent” with separate searches using review OR clinical trial as search limits. Key articles published before the 2007 Expert Consensus Report on IA were identified using citation analysis. Results: More than 50% of preadolescents with ADHD combined subtype reportedly display clinically significant aggression, with impulsive aggression being the predominant subtype. Impulsive aggression is strongly predictive of a highly unfavorable developmental trajectory characterized by the potential for persistent ADHD, increasing psychosocial burden, accumulating comorbidities, serious lifelong functional deficits across a broad range of domains, delinquency/criminality, and adult antisocial behavior. Impulsive aggression, which triggers peer rejection and a vicious cycle of escalating dysfunction, may be a key factor in unfavorable psychosocial outcomes attributed to ADHD. Because severe aggressive behavior does not remit in many children when treated with primary ADHD therapy (i.e., stimulants and behavioral therapy), a common practice is to add medication of a different class to specifically target aggressive behavior. Conclusions: Impulsive aggression in children and adolescents with ADHD is a serious clinical and public health problem. Although adjunctive therapy with an aggression-targeted agent is widely recommended when

  2. Oscillatory Activity in the Medial Prefrontal Cortex and Nucleus Accumbens Correlates with Impulsivity and Reward Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Rich, P. Dylan; Nevado-Holgado, Alejo J.; Fernando, Anushka B. P.; Van Dijck, Gert; Holzhammer, Tobias; Paul, Oliver; Ruther, Patrick; Paulsen, Ole; Robbins, Trevor W.; Dalley, Jeffrey W.

    2014-01-01

    Actions expressed prematurely without regard for their consequences are considered impulsive. Such behaviour is governed by a network of brain regions including the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and nucleus accumbens (NAcb) and is prevalent in disorders including attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and drug addiction. However, little is known of the relationship between neural activity in these regions and specific forms of impulsive behaviour. In the present study we investigated local field potential (LFP) oscillations in distinct sub-regions of the PFC and NAcb on a 5-choice serial reaction time task (5-CSRTT), which measures sustained, spatially-divided visual attention and action restraint. The main findings show that power in gamma frequency (50–60 Hz) LFP oscillations transiently increases in the PFC and NAcb during both the anticipation of a cue signalling the spatial location of a nose-poke response and again following correct responses. Gamma oscillations were coupled to low-frequency delta oscillations in both regions; this coupling strengthened specifically when an error response was made. Theta (7–9 Hz) LFP power in the PFC and NAcb increased during the waiting period and was also related to response outcome. Additionally, both gamma and theta power were significantly affected by upcoming premature responses as rats waited for the visual cue to respond. In a subgroup of rats showing persistently high levels of impulsivity we found that impulsivity was associated with increased error signals following a nose-poke response, as well as reduced signals of previous trial outcome during the waiting period. Collectively, these in-vivo neurophysiological findings further implicate the PFC and NAcb in anticipatory impulsive responses and provide evidence that abnormalities in the encoding of rewarding outcomes may underlie trait-like impulsive behaviour. PMID:25333512

  3. Reactive sputtering of δ-ZrH{sub 2} thin films by high power impulse magnetron sputtering and direct current magnetron sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Högberg, Hans Tengdelius, Lina; Eriksson, Fredrik; Broitman, Esteban; Lu, Jun; Jensen, Jens; Hultman, Lars; Samuelsson, Mattias

    2014-07-01

    Reactive sputtering by high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) and direct current magnetron sputtering (DCMS) of a Zr target in Ar/H{sub 2} plasmas was employed to deposit Zr-H films on Si(100) substrates, and with H content up to 61 at. % and O contents typically below 0.2 at. % as determined by elastic recoil detection analysis. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy reveals a chemical shift of ∼0.7 eV to higher binding energies for the Zr-H films compared to pure Zr films, consistent with a charge transfer from Zr to H in a zirconium hydride. X-ray diffraction shows that the films are single-phase δ-ZrH{sub 2} (CaF{sub 2} type structure) at H content >∼55 at. % and pole figure measurements give a 111 preferred orientation for these films. Scanning electron microscopy cross-section images show a glasslike microstructure for the HiPIMS films, while the DCMS films are columnar. Nanoindentation yield hardness values of 5.5–7 GPa for the δ-ZrH{sub 2} films that is slightly harder than the ∼5 GPa determined for Zr films and with coefficients of friction in the range of 0.12–0.18 to compare with the range of 0.4–0.6 obtained for Zr films. Wear resistance testing show that phase-pure δ-ZrH{sub 2} films deposited by HiPIMS exhibit up to 50 times lower wear rate compared to those containing a secondary Zr phase. Four-point probe measurements give resistivity values in the range of ∼100–120 μΩ cm for the δ-ZrH{sub 2} films, which is slightly higher compared to Zr films with values in the range 70–80 μΩ cm.

  4. High-intensity drying processes -- Impulse drying: Report 15 (final report). Production of linerboard on a pilot paper machine, subsequent commercial converting trials and preliminary economic assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Orloff, D.I.

    1999-04-01

    In September 1998, 33{number_sign} liner was produced on the {number_sign}4 pilot machine under both single-felted wet pressing and impulse drying conditions. In October 1998, the pilot produced liner and commercial liner were converted to combined board and corrugated boxes at a commercial box plant. In January 1999, linerboard, medium, and combined board and box testing were completed. The pilot trials demonstrated that 33{number_sign} liner could be impulse dried at a reel speed of 380 m/min. Press dryness was improved by as much as 4 points, while CD STFI and CD ring crush were improved by more than 10%. Improvements to the smoothness of heated side of sheet were also realized. Commercial box plant converting trials demonstrated that impulse dried linerboard can be used to increase ECT and box compression strength by as much as 10%. As anticipated, print quality was found to be superior. A preliminary economic analysis was performed in which an impulse dryer would increase press dryness by 4 points and would allow the basis weight to be reduced by 10%. The economic model showed that the 4 points in dryness would translate to a 17% tonnage increase. Applying the 10% basis weight reduction resulted in an increase in productivity, on an area basis, of 30%. The pulp cost savings was found to outweigh any additional electric power costs.

  5. The Antarctic Impulsive Transient Antenna ultra-high energy neutrino detector: Design, performance, and sensitivity for 2006-2007 balloon flight

    SciTech Connect

    Gorham, P. W.; Allison, P.; Barwick, S. W.; Beatty, J. J.; Besson, D. Z.; Binns, W. R.; Chen, C.; Chen, P.; Clem, J. M.; Connolly, A.; Dowkontt, P. F.; DuVernois, M. A.; Field, R. C.; Goldstein, D.; Goodhue, A.; Hast, C.; Hebert, C. L.; Hoover, S.; Israel, M. H.; Learned, J. G.

    2009-05-23

    In this article, we present a comprehensive report on the experimental details of the Antarctic Impulsive Transient Antenna (ANITA) long-duration balloon payload, including the design philosophy and realization, physics simulations, performance of the instrument during its first Antarctic flight completed in January of 2007, and expectations for the limiting neutrino detection sensitivity.

  6. Individual differences in impulsivity predict anticipatory eye movements.

    PubMed

    Cirilli, Laetitia; de Timary, Philippe; Lefèvre, Phillipe; Missal, Marcus

    2011-01-01

    Impulsivity is the tendency to act without forethought. It is a personality trait commonly used in the diagnosis of many psychiatric diseases. In clinical practice, impulsivity is estimated using written questionnaires. However, answers to questions might be subject to personal biases and misinterpretations. In order to alleviate this problem, eye movements could be used to study differences in decision processes related to impulsivity. Therefore, we investigated correlations between impulsivity scores obtained with a questionnaire in healthy subjects and characteristics of their anticipatory eye movements in a simple smooth pursuit task. Healthy subjects were asked to answer the UPPS questionnaire (Urgency Premeditation Perseverance and Sensation seeking Impulsive Behavior scale), which distinguishes four independent dimensions of impulsivity: Urgency, lack of Premeditation, lack of Perseverance, and Sensation seeking. The same subjects took part in an oculomotor task that consisted of pursuing a target that moved in a predictable direction. This task reliably evoked anticipatory saccades and smooth eye movements. We found that eye movement characteristics such as latency and velocity were significantly correlated with UPPS scores. The specific correlations between distinct UPPS factors and oculomotor anticipation parameters support the validity of the UPPS construct and corroborate neurobiological explanations for impulsivity. We suggest that the oculomotor approach of impulsivity put forth in the present study could help bridge the gap between psychiatry and physiology. PMID:22046334

  7. Different subtypes of impulsivity differentiate uncontrolled eating and dietary restraint.

    PubMed

    Leitch, Margaret A; Morgan, Michael J; Yeomans, Martin R

    2013-10-01

    The current study explored the relationship between three subtypes of impulsivity (Reflection Impulsivity, Impulsive Choice, and Impulsive Action) and measures of uncontrolled eating (TFEQ-D) and restraint (TFEQ-R). Eighty women classified as scoring higher or lower on TFEQ-D and TFEQ-R completed the Matching Familiar Figures Test (MFFT20), Delay Discounting Task (DDT), a Go No Go task, Balloon Analogue Risk Task (BART), and the Barrett Impulsivity Scale-11 (BIS-11). To test whether these relationships were affected by enforced controls overeating, half of the participants fasted the night before and ate breakfast in the laboratory before testing and half had no such control. Women scoring higher on the TFEQ-D were significantly more impulsive on the MFFT20 and BIS-11 overall but not on DDT, Go No Go or BART. Women scoring higher on TFEQ-R were significantly less impulsive on the Go No Go task but did not differ on other measures. The eating manipulation modulated responses on the BART and BIS-11 non-planning scale depending on TFEQ-D classification. These results confirm recent data that high scores on TFEQ-D are related to impulsivity, but imply this relates more to Reflection Impulsivity rather than Impulsive Choice or Action. In contrast restrained eating was associated with better inhibitory control. Taken together, these results suggest that subtypes of impulsivity further differentiate uncontrolled eating and restraint, and suggest that a poor ability to reflect on decisions may underlie some aspects of overeating. PMID:23702263

  8. Angular Impulse and Balance Regulation During the Golf Swing.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Travis J; Wilcox, Rand R; McNitt-Gray, Jill L

    2016-08-01

    Our aim was to determine how skilled players regulate linear and angular impulse while maintaining balance during the golf swing. Eleven highly-skilled golf players performed swings with a 6-iron and driver. Components contributing to linear and angular impulse generated by the rear and target legs (resultant horizontal reaction force [RFh], RFh-angle, and moment arm) were quantified and compared across the group and within a player (α = .05). Net angular impulse generated by both the rear and target legs was greater for the driver than the 6-iron. Mechanisms used to regulate angular impulse generation between clubs varied across players and required coordination between the legs. Increases in net angular impulse with a driver involved increases in target leg RFh. Rear leg RFh-angle was maintained between clubs whereas target leg RFh became more aligned with the target line. Net linear impulse perpendicular to the target line remained near zero, preserving balance, while net linear impulse along the target line decreased in magnitude. These results indicate that the net angular impulse was regulated between clubs by coordinating force generation of the rear and target legs while sustaining balance throughout the task. PMID:26958870

  9. Volume-surface barrier discharge in dried air in three-electrode system fed by impulse high voltage with nanosecond rise time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malashin, Maxim; Rebrov, Igor; Nebogatkin, Sergey; Sokolova, Marina; Nikitin, Alexey; Voevodin, Vadim; Krivov, Sergey

    2016-08-01

    Results of experimental investigation of a volume-surface barrier discharge in a three-electrode system under periodic impulse voltage applied to the surface discharge (SD) electrodes and a d.c. potential applied to an additional third electrode are presented. It is shown that there is a strong influence of polarity and amplitude of the d.c. potential on the direct current "extracted" out of the surface discharge plasma layer by electric field of the third electrode. The amount of charged positive species that constitute the "extracted" current prevails under positive impulse voltage for low values of the negative d.c. potential of the third electrode. The amount of negative species prevails with higher values of the positive d.c. positive of the third electrode. Contribution to the topical issue "6th Central European Symposium on Plasma Chemistry (CESPC-6)", edited by Nicolas Gherardi, Ester Marotta and Cristina Paradisi

  10. The effects of violence exposure on the development of impulse control and future orientation across adolescence and early adulthood: Time-specific and generalized effects in a sample of juvenile offenders.

    PubMed

    Monahan, Kathryn C; King, Kevin M; Shulman, Elizabeth P; Cauffman, Elizabeth; Chassin, Laurie

    2015-11-01

    Impulse control and future orientation increase across adolescence, but little is known about how contextual factors shape the development of these capacities. The present study investigates how stress exposure, operationalized as exposure to violence, alters the developmental pattern of impulse control and future orientation across adolescence and early adulthood. In a sample of 1,354 serious juvenile offenders, higher exposure to violence was associated with lower levels of future orientation at age 15 and suppressed development of future orientation from ages 15 to 25. Increases in witnessing violence or victimization were linked to declines in impulse control 1 year later, but only during adolescence. Thus, beyond previous experiences of exposure to violence, witnessing violence and victimization during adolescence conveys unique risk for suppressed development of self-regulation. PMID:26439073

  11. Heroin and amphetamine users display opposite relationships between trait and neurobehavioral dimensions of impulsivity

    PubMed Central

    Vassileva, Jasmin; Paxton, Jessica; Moeller, F. Gerard; Wilson, Michael; Bozgunov, Kiril; Martin, Eileen; Gonzalez, Raul; Vasilev, Georgi

    2014-01-01

    The multidimensional construct of impulsivity is implicated in all phases of the addiction cycle. Substance dependent individuals (SDIs) demonstrate elevated impulsivity on both trait and laboratory tests of neurobehavioral impulsivity; however our understanding of the relationship between these different aspects of impulsivity in users of different classes of drugs remains rudimentary. The goal of this study was to assess for commonalities and differences in the relationships between trait and neurobehavioral impulsivity in heroin and amphetamine addicts. Participants included 58 amphetamine dependent (ADI) and 74 heroin dependent individuals (HDI) in protracted abstinence. We conducted principal components analyses (PCA) on two self-report trait and six neurobehavioral measures of impulsivity, which resulted in two trait impulsivity (action, planning) and four neurobehavioral impulsivity composites (discriminability, response inhibition efficiency, decision-making efficiency, quality of decision-making). Multiple regression analyses were used to determine whether neurobehavioral impulsivity is predicted by trait impulsivity and drug type. The analyses revealed a significant interaction between drug type and trait action impulsivity on response inhibition efficiency, which showed opposite relationships for ADIs and HDIs. Specifically, increased trait action impulsivity was associated with worse response inhibition efficiency in ADIs, but with better efficiency in HDIs. These results challenge the unitary account of drug addiction and contribute to a growing body of literature that reveals important behavioral, cognitive, and neurobiological differences between users of different classes of drugs. PMID:24342174

  12. Relative rates of growth of annoyance of impulsive and non-impulsive noises.

    PubMed

    Fidell, Sanford; Silvati, Laura; Pearsons, Karl

    2002-01-01

    Twenty-nine people judged the relative annoyance of five variable level signals and 29 impulsive and non-impulsive fixed-level signals in an adaptive paired comparison study. Signals were presented for judgment as heard indoors in a facility capable of accurately reproducing the very low-frequency content of sonic booms. When the annoyance of sonic booms unaccompanied by rattle was compared with that of sounds containing more higher-frequency energy (an aircraft flyover and an octave band of noise centered at 1 kHz), the relative rate of growth of annoyance, as expressed in C-weighted SEL units, was nearly 2:1. In other words, to maintain subjective equality of annoyance, each increase in level of sonic booms had to be matched by nearly twice the increase in level of an aircraft flyover or an octave band of noise centered at 1 kHz. Relative rates of growth of annoyance of sonic booms accompanied by rattle and of non-impulsive sounds, including both low- (63-Hz octave band of noise) and high-frequency energy (1-kHz octave band of noise and an aircraft flyover), were closer to 1:1. Relative rates of growth of annoyance for sonic booms unaccompanied by rattle and low-frequency sounds (63 Hz) were also about 1:1. These differences in relative rates of growth of annoyance of impulsive and non-impulsive sounds are as plausibly attributed to their relative low-frequency content as to impulsiveness per se. It may therefore be more useful for some purposes to express the annoyance of impulsive signals and other environmental noises containing substantial low-frequency energy in terms of effective (duration-corrected) loudness level rather than commonplace ASEL or CSEL. PMID:11837963

  13. Solar impulsive energetic electron events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Linghua

    studies, I chose nearly scatter-free electron events and developed a forward-fitting method that assumes an isosceles triangular injection profile (equal rise and fall times) at the Sun. I find that in electron/3He-rich SEP events, the low-energy (~0.4 to 6-9 keV) electron injection starts ~9 min before the coronal release of the type III radio burst; the high-energy (~13 to ~300 keV) electron injection starts ~8 min after the type III burst; and the injection of ~MeV/nucleon, 3 He-rich ions begins ~1 hour later. I also find that the selected electron/ 3 He-rich SEP events have a remarkable one-to-one association with fast west-limb CMEs, and most of the associated CMEs are narrow. Finally, I present a case study to investigate the propagation of different energy electrons in solar impulsive electron events. I find that in the interplanetary medium, low-energy (<~ 10-30 keV) and high-energy (>~ 10-30 keV) electrons propagate differently, with more scattering at high energies. Such scattering appears to be caused by resonance with waves/turbulence at scale greater than ~ the thermal proton gyroradius in the solar wind. Although a transition to more scattering occurs at energies where the electron injection delays are detected, I show that the scattering is not enough to produce these delays. Based on the results of this thesis, a coherent picture of electron/ 3 He-rich SEP events can be built up. At the Sun, the low-energy (~0.4 to 6-9 keV) electrons may be accelerated in jets that are ejected upward from magnetic reconnection sites between closed and open field lines; these low-energy electrons generate the type III radio bursts. The jets may appear as CMEs high in the corona, and the high-energy (~13 to ~300 keV) electrons may then be accelerated at >~ 1 R S by CMEs, acting on the seed electrons provided by the low-energy injection. The ~MeV/nucleon, 3 He-rich ions may be accelerated by selective resonance with electron-beam generated waves and/or by fast, narrow CMEs

  14. Teaching about Impulse and Momentum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franklin, Bill

    2004-01-01

    This American Association of Physics Teachers/Physics Teaching Resource Agents (APPT/PTRA) spiral-bound manual features labs and demos physics teachers can use to give students hands-on opportunities to learn about impulse and momentum. "Make-and-take activities" include AAPT Apparatus Contest winners "An Air Impulse Rocket," "A Fan Driven…

  15. High specific energy and specific power aluminum/air battery for micro air vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kindler, A.; Matthies, L.

    2014-06-01

    Micro air vehicles developed under the Army's Micro Autonomous Systems and Technology program generally need a specific energy of 300 - 550 watt-hrs/kg and 300 -550 watts/kg to operate for about 1 hour. At present, no commercial cell can fulfill this need. The best available commercial technology is the Lithium-ion battery or its derivative, the Li- Polymer cell. This chemistry generally provides around 15 minutes flying time. One alternative to the State-of-the Art is the Al/air cell, a primary battery that is actually half fuel cell. It has a high energy battery like aluminum anode, and fuel cell like air electrode that can extract oxygen out of the ambient air rather than carrying it. Both of these features tend to contribute to a high specific energy (watt-hrs/kg). High specific power (watts/kg) is supported by high concentration KOH electrolyte, a high quality commercial air electrode, and forced air convection from the vehicles rotors. The performance of this cell with these attributes is projected to be 500 watt-hrs/kg and 500 watts/kg based on simple model. It is expected to support a flying time of approximately 1 hour in any vehicle in which the usual limit is 15 minutes.

  16. Calculating the parameters of full lightning impulses using model-based curve fitting

    SciTech Connect

    McComb, T.R.; Lagnese, J.E. )

    1991-10-01

    In this paper a brief review is presented of the techniques used for the evaluation of the parameters of high voltage impulses and the problems encountered. The determination of the best smooth curve through oscillations on a high voltage impulse is the major problem limiting the automatic processing of digital records of impulses. Non-linear regression, based on simple models, is applied to the analysis of simulated and experimental data of full lightning impulses. Results of model fitting to four different groups of impulses are presented and compared with some other methods. Plans for the extension of this work are outlined.

  17. Impulse control in pigeons.

    PubMed

    Ainslie, G W

    1974-05-01

    Pigeons were given a small, immediate food reinforcement for pecking a key, and a larger, delayed reinforcement for not pecking this key. Most subjects pecked the key on more than 95% of trials. However, when pecking a differently colored key at an earlier time prevented this option from becoming available, three of 10 subjects consistently pecked it, thereby forcing themselves to wait for the larger reward. They did not peck the earlier key when it did not prevent this option. This is an experimental example of psychological impulse and a learnable device to control it. Although only a minority of the subjects learned it, the fact that such learning is possible at all argues for a theory of delayed reward that can predict change of preference as a function of elapsing time.

  18. Recent Insights into the Neurobiology of Impulsivity

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Marci R.; Potenza, Marc N.

    2014-01-01

    Impulsivity is associated with various psychopathologies, and elevated impulsivity is typically disadvantageous. This manuscript reviews recent investigations into the neurobiology of impulsivity using human imaging techniques and animal models. Both human imaging and preclinical pharmacological manipulations have yielded important insights into the neurobiological underpinnings of impulsivity. A more thorough understanding of the complex neurobiology underlying aspects of impulsivity may provide insight into new treatment options that target elevated impulsivity and psychopathologies such as addictions. PMID:25431750

  19. Low-temperature growth of low friction wear-resistant amorphous carbon nitride thin films by mid-frequency, high power impulse, and direct current magnetron sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Bakoglidis, Konstantinos D. Schmidt, Susann; Garbrecht, Magnus; Ivanov, Ivan G.; Jensen, Jens; Greczynski, Grzegorz; Hultman, Lars

    2015-09-15

    The potential of different magnetron sputtering techniques for the synthesis of low friction and wear resistant amorphous carbon nitride (a-CN{sub x}) thin films onto temperature-sensitive AISI52100 bearing steel, but also Si(001) substrates was studied. Hence, a substrate temperature of 150 °C was chosen for the film synthesis. The a-CN{sub x} films were deposited using mid-frequency magnetron sputtering (MFMS) with an MF bias voltage, high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) with a synchronized HiPIMS bias voltage, and direct current magnetron sputtering (DCMS) with a DC bias voltage. The films were deposited using a N{sub 2}/Ar flow ratio of 0.16 at the total pressure of 400 mPa. The negative bias voltage, V{sub s}, was varied from 20 to 120 V in each of the three deposition modes. The microstructure of the films was characterized by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and selected area electron diffraction, while the film morphology was investigated by scanning electron microscopy. All films possessed an amorphous microstructure, while the film morphology changed with the bias voltage. Layers grown applying the lowest substrate bias of 20 V exhibited pronounced intercolumnar porosity, independent of the sputter technique. Voids closed and dense films are formed at V{sub s} ≥ 60 V, V{sub s} ≥ 100 V, and V{sub s} = 120 V for MFMS, DCMS, and HiPIMS, respectively. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy revealed that the nitrogen-to-carbon ratio, N/C, of the films ranged between 0.2 and 0.24. Elastic recoil detection analysis showed that Ar content varied between 0 and 0.8 at. % and increased as a function of V{sub s} for all deposition techniques. All films exhibited compressive residual stress, σ, which depends on the growth method; HiPIMS produces the least stressed films with values ranging between −0.4 and −1.2 GPa for all V{sub s}, while CN{sub x} films deposited by MFMS showed residual stresses up to −4.2

  20. Alexithymia, emotion dysregulation, impulsivity and aggression: A multiple mediation model.

    PubMed

    Velotti, Patrizia; Garofalo, Carlo; Petrocchi, Chiara; Cavallo, Francesca; Popolo, Raffaele; Dimaggio, Giancarlo

    2016-03-30

    There is a need to better understand the antecedent of aggressive behaviors in order to tailor treatments and reduce the associated damage to the others and the self. Possible mechanisms underlying aggression are poor emotional awareness and emotion dysregulation, as well as impulsivity. Here, we examined the relationships among alexithymia, emotion dysregulation, impulsivity and aggression, comparing a mixed psychiatric sample (N=257) and a community sample (N=617). The clinical sample reported greater levels of alexithymia, emotion dysregulation, trait impulsivity and aggression, than the community sample. Furthermore, in the community sample, emotion dysregulation and impulsivity mediated the relationship (i.e., accounted for the shared variance) between alexithymia and aggression. In the clinical sample, only emotion dysregulation explained the alexithymia-aggression link. In particular, specific dimensions of the emotion dysregulation (i.e., Negative Urgency) and impulsivity constructs (i.e., cognitive and motor impulsivity) played a unique role in explaining these associations. Finally, controlling for depressive symptoms reduced some of the findings involving impulsivity to nonsignificant results. Overall, our findings add to the extant literature attesting to the relevance of alexithymia and emotion dysregulation for understanding aggression, and providing concrete recommendation for the treatment and prevention of aggressive tendencies.

  1. Highly specific protein-protein interactions, evolution and negative design.

    PubMed

    Sear, Richard P

    2004-12-01

    We consider highly specific protein-protein interactions in proteomes of simple model proteins. We are inspired by the work of Zarrinpar et al (2003 Nature 426 676). They took a binding domain in a signalling pathway in yeast and replaced it with domains of the same class but from different organisms. They found that the probability of a protein binding to a protein from the proteome of a different organism is rather high, around one half. We calculate the probability of a model protein from one proteome binding to the protein of a different proteome. These proteomes are obtained by sampling the space of functional proteomes uniformly. In agreement with Zarrinpar et al we find that the probability of a protein binding a protein from another proteome is rather high, of order one tenth. Our results, together with those of Zarrinpar et al, suggest that designing, say, a peptide to block or reconstitute a single signalling pathway, without affecting any other pathways, requires knowledge of all the partners of the class of binding domains the peptide is designed to mimic. This knowledge is required to use negative design to explicitly design out interactions of the peptide with proteins other than its target. We also found that patches that are required to bind with high specificity evolve more slowly than those that are required only to not bind to any other patch. This is consistent with some analysis of sequence data for proteins engaged in highly specific interactions.

  2. Benchmarking Procedures for High-Throughput Context Specific Reconstruction Algorithms

    PubMed Central

    Pacheco, Maria P.; Pfau, Thomas; Sauter, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Recent progress in high-throughput data acquisition has shifted the focus from data generation to processing and understanding of how to integrate collected information. Context specific reconstruction based on generic genome scale models like ReconX or HMR has the potential to become a diagnostic and treatment tool tailored to the analysis of specific individuals. The respective computational algorithms require a high level of predictive power, robustness and sensitivity. Although multiple context specific reconstruction algorithms were published in the last 10 years, only a fraction of them is suitable for model building based on human high-throughput data. Beside other reasons, this might be due to problems arising from the limitation to only one metabolic target function or arbitrary thresholding. This review describes and analyses common validation methods used for testing model building algorithms. Two major methods can be distinguished: consistency testing and comparison based testing. The first is concerned with robustness against noise, e.g., missing data due to the impossibility to distinguish between the signal and the background of non-specific binding of probes in a microarray experiment, and whether distinct sets of input expressed genes corresponding to i.e., different tissues yield distinct models. The latter covers methods comparing sets of functionalities, comparison with existing networks or additional databases. We test those methods on several available algorithms and deduce properties of these algorithms that can be compared with future developments. The set of tests performed, can therefore serve as a benchmarking procedure for future algorithms. PMID:26834640

  3. Benchmarking Procedures for High-Throughput Context Specific Reconstruction Algorithms.

    PubMed

    Pacheco, Maria P; Pfau, Thomas; Sauter, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Recent progress in high-throughput data acquisition has shifted the focus from data generation to processing and understanding of how to integrate collected information. Context specific reconstruction based on generic genome scale models like ReconX or HMR has the potential to become a diagnostic and treatment tool tailored to the analysis of specific individuals. The respective computational algorithms require a high level of predictive power, robustness and sensitivity. Although multiple context specific reconstruction algorithms were published in the last 10 years, only a fraction of them is suitable for model building based on human high-throughput data. Beside other reasons, this might be due to problems arising from the limitation to only one metabolic target function or arbitrary thresholding. This review describes and analyses common validation methods used for testing model building algorithms. Two major methods can be distinguished: consistency testing and comparison based testing. The first is concerned with robustness against noise, e.g., missing data due to the impossibility to distinguish between the signal and the background of non-specific binding of probes in a microarray experiment, and whether distinct sets of input expressed genes corresponding to i.e., different tissues yield distinct models. The latter covers methods comparing sets of functionalities, comparison with existing networks or additional databases. We test those methods on several available algorithms and deduce properties of these algorithms that can be compared with future developments. The set of tests performed, can therefore serve as a benchmarking procedure for future algorithms.

  4. Impulsivity is relevant for trauma exposure and PTSD symptoms in a non-clinical population.

    PubMed

    Netto, Liana R; Pereira, Juliana L; Nogueira, José F; Cavalcanti-Ribeiro, Patrícia; Santana, Rejane Conceição; Teles, Carlos A; Koenen, Karestan C; Quarantini, Lucas C

    2016-05-30

    Impulsivity is a relevant construct for explaining both normal individual differences in personality and more extreme personality disorder, and is often investigated within clinical populations. This study aims to explore the college students' impulsivity patterns and to investigate the association across levels of impulsivity with trauma exposure and PTSD development in a non-clinical population. A one-phase census survey of seven college institutions assessed 2213 students in three metropolitan regions of Northeastern Brazil. All subjects anonymously completed a self-applied protocol consisting of: a socio-demographic questionnaire, Trauma History Questionnaire (THQ), PTSD Checklist (PCL-C), and Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS-11). The median for frequency of trauma exposure was 4 events for people with low and normal impulsivity, and 6 for highly impulsive ones. Individuals with higher impulsivity presented earlier exposition than non-impulsive ones, and worst outcome: 12.4% with PTSD, against 8.4% and 2.3% (normal and low impulsivity). Of the three factors of impulsivity, the Attentional factor conferred the strongest association with PTSD development. Results suggest that impulsivity is also a relevant trait in a non-clinical population and is associated with trauma exposure and PTSD. Strategies to promote mental health in adolescents may be pertinent, especially with the aim of managing impulsivity. PMID:27016879

  5. The flare kernel in the impulsive phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dejager, C.

    1986-01-01

    The impulsive phase of a flare is characterized by impulsive bursts of X-ray and microwave radiation, related to impulsive footpoint heating up to 50 or 60 MK, by upward gas velocities (150 to 400 km/sec) and by a gradual increase of the flare's thermal energy content. These phenomena, as well as non-thermal effects, are all related to the impulsive energy injection into the flare. The available observations are also quantitatively consistent with a model in which energy is injected into the flare by beams of energetic electrons, causing ablation of chromospheric gas, followed by convective rise of gas. Thus, a hole is burned into the chromosphere; at the end of impulsive phase of an average flare the lower part of that hole is situated about 1800 km above the photosphere. H alpha and other optical and UV line emission is radiated by a thin layer (approx. 20 km) at the bottom of the flare kernel. The upward rising and outward streaming gas cools down by conduction in about 45 s. The non-thermal effects in the initial phase are due to curtailing of the energy distribution function by escape of energetic electrons. The single flux tube model of a flare does not fit with these observations; instead we propose the spaghetti-bundle model. Microwave and gamma-ray observations suggest the occurrence of dense flare knots of approx. 800 km diameter, and of high temperature. Future observations should concentrate on locating the microwave/gamma-ray sources, and on determining the kernel's fine structure and the related multi-loop structure of the flaring area.

  6. Temperament and Impulsivity Predictors of Smoking Cessation Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    López-Torrecillas, Francisca; Perales, José C.; Nieto-Ruiz, Ana; Verdejo-García, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    respectively. Conclusion Temperament measures, and specifically novelty seeking and reward dependence, predict smoking cessation treatment retention, whereas persistence, non-planning impulsivity and poor decision-making predict smoking relapse. PMID:25474540

  7. Impulsivity in disorders of food and drug misuse

    PubMed Central

    Mole, Tom B.; Irvine, Michael A.; Worbe, Yulia; Collins, Phoebe; Mitchell, Simon P.; Bolton, Sorcha; Harrison, Neil A.; Robbins, Trevor W.; Voon, Valerie

    2016-01-01

    Background Evidence suggests some overlap between the pathological use of food and drugs, yet how impulsivity compares across these different clinical disorders remains unclear. Substance use disorders are commonly characterized by elevated impulsivity, and impulsivity subtypes may show commonalities and differences in various conditions. We hypothesized that obese subjects with binge eating disorder (BED) and abstinent alcohol-dependent cohorts would have relatively more impulsive profiles compared to obese subjects without BED. We also predicted decision impulsivity impairment in obesity with and without BED. Methods Thirty obese subjects with BED, 30 without BED and 30 abstinent alcohol-dependent subjects and age- and gender-matched controls were tested on delay discounting (preference for a smaller immediate reward over a larger delayed reward), reflection impulsivity (rapid decision making prior to evidence accumulation) and motor response inhibition (action cancellation of a prepotent response). Results All three groups had greater delay discounting relative to healthy volunteers. Both Obese subjects without BED and alcohol dependent subjects had impaired motor response inhibition. Only Obese subjects without BED had impaired integration of available information to optimize outcomes over later trials with a cost condition. Conclusions Delay discounting appears to be a common core impairment across disorders of food and drug intake. Unexpectedly, obese subjects without BED showed greater impulsivity than obese subjects with BED. We highlight the dissociability and heterogeneity of impulsivity subtypes and add to the understanding of neurocognitive profiles across disorders involving food and drugs. Our results have therapeutic implications suggesting that disorder-specific patterns of impulsivity could be targeted. PMID:25118940

  8. Effect of management of patients with Anorexia and Bulimia nervosa on symptoms and impulsive behavior.

    PubMed

    Sernec, Karin; Tomori, Martina; Zalar, Bojan

    2010-12-01

    The aim of the study was to provide further and up to date information on the evaluation of the management of Anorexia and Bulimia nervosa at the Eating Disorders Unit (EDU) of the Ljubljana Psychiatric Clinic, based upon detailed assessment of the eating disorders specific and non specific symptoms of impulsive behaviors, highly correlated with these entities. 34 female patients with anorexia (restrictive or purgative type) and 38 female patients with Bulimia nervosa (purgative or non-purgative type) undergoing hospital treatment at the EDU were evaluated upon admission, as well as upon discharge and three and six months after discharge, using the Eating Disorder Questionnaire. Upon discharge a marked decrease in the overall symptoms was noted. The differences in symptoms incidences between the two groups were significantly specific for the individual form of eating disorder, especially upon admission, and were more pronounced in anorexia group. In later measurements, performed during the period of three and six months after discharge, a mild trend of increase in the disorder specific symptoms was detected in both groups, but was not statistically significant. In addition to binging on food, striking, quarreling and spending sprees are characteristics of patients with eating disorders, which in particular apply to the Bulimia nervosa group. Apart from the disorder specific symptoms, impulsive behavior was also reduced during study period, while the difference in its occurrence between the two groups gradually became non-significant. The management of patients with eating disorders at the EDU was successful in both groups, confirmed by an intense reduction of the disorder specific symptoms, impulsive behavior and increased stability recorded three and six months after discharge. The study strongly suggests that the effect of treatment regime for eating disorders can be predicted by careful assessment of the relevant symptoms and impulsive behavioral patterns.

  9. High specificity in plant leaf metabolic responses to arbuscular mycorrhiza.

    PubMed

    Schweiger, Rabea; Baier, Markus C; Persicke, Marcus; Müller, Caroline

    2014-05-22

    The chemical composition of plants (phytometabolome) is dynamic and modified by environmental factors. Understanding its modulation allows to improve crop quality and decode mechanisms underlying plant-pest interactions. Many studies that investigate metabolic responses to the environment focus on single model species and/or few target metabolites. However, comparative studies using environmental metabolomics are needed to evaluate commonalities of chemical responses to certain challenges. We assessed the specificity of foliar metabolic responses of five plant species to the widespread, ancient symbiosis with a generalist arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus. Here we show that plant species share a large 'core metabolome' but nevertheless the phytometabolomes are modulated highly species/taxon-specifically. Such a low conservation of responses across species highlights the importance to consider plant metabolic prerequisites and the long time of specific plant-fungus coevolution. Thus, the transferability of findings regarding phytometabolome modulation by an identical AM symbiont is severely limited even between closely related species.

  10. Contextualizing individual differences in error monitoring: Links with impulsivity, negative affect, and conscientiousness.

    PubMed

    Hill, Kaylin E; Samuel, Douglas B; Foti, Dan

    2016-08-01

    The error-related negativity (ERN) is a neural measure of error processing that has been implicated as a neurobehavioral trait and has transdiagnostic links with psychopathology. Few studies, however, have contextualized this traitlike component with regard to dimensions of personality that, as intermediate constructs, may aid in contextualizing links with psychopathology. Accordingly, the aim of this study was to examine the interrelationships between error monitoring and dimensions of personality within a large adult sample (N = 208). Building on previous research, we found that the ERN relates to a combination of negative affect, impulsivity, and conscientiousness. At low levels of conscientiousness, negative urgency (i.e., impulsivity in the context of negative affect) predicted an increased ERN; at high levels of conscientiousness, the effect of negative urgency was not significant. This relationship was driven specifically by the conscientiousness facets of competence, order, and deliberation. Links between personality measures and error positivity amplitude were weaker and nonsignificant. Post-error slowing was also related to conscientiousness, as well as a different facet of impulsivity: lack of perseverance. These findings suggest that, in the general population, error processing is modulated by the joint combination of negative affect, impulsivity, and conscientiousness (i.e., the profile across traits), perhaps more so than any one dimension alone. This work may inform future research concerning aberrant error processing in clinical populations.

  11. Contextualizing individual differences in error monitoring: Links with impulsivity, negative affect, and conscientiousness.

    PubMed

    Hill, Kaylin E; Samuel, Douglas B; Foti, Dan

    2016-08-01

    The error-related negativity (ERN) is a neural measure of error processing that has been implicated as a neurobehavioral trait and has transdiagnostic links with psychopathology. Few studies, however, have contextualized this traitlike component with regard to dimensions of personality that, as intermediate constructs, may aid in contextualizing links with psychopathology. Accordingly, the aim of this study was to examine the interrelationships between error monitoring and dimensions of personality within a large adult sample (N = 208). Building on previous research, we found that the ERN relates to a combination of negative affect, impulsivity, and conscientiousness. At low levels of conscientiousness, negative urgency (i.e., impulsivity in the context of negative affect) predicted an increased ERN; at high levels of conscientiousness, the effect of negative urgency was not significant. This relationship was driven specifically by the conscientiousness facets of competence, order, and deliberation. Links between personality measures and error positivity amplitude were weaker and nonsignificant. Post-error slowing was also related to conscientiousness, as well as a different facet of impulsivity: lack of perseverance. These findings suggest that, in the general population, error processing is modulated by the joint combination of negative affect, impulsivity, and conscientiousness (i.e., the profile across traits), perhaps more so than any one dimension alone. This work may inform future research concerning aberrant error processing in clinical populations. PMID:27192958

  12. Method of preparing high specific activity platinum-195m

    SciTech Connect

    Mirzadeh, Saed; Du, Miting; Beets, Arnold L.; Knapp, Jr., Furn F.

    2004-06-15

    A method of preparing high-specific-activity .sup.195m Pt includes the steps of: exposing .sup.193 Ir to a flux of neutrons sufficient to convert a portion of the .sup.193 Ir to .sup.195m Pt to form an irradiated material; dissolving the irradiated material to form an intermediate solution comprising Ir and Pt; and separating the Pt from the Ir by cation exchange chromatography to produce .sup.195m Pt.

  13. Method for preparing high specific activity 177Lu

    SciTech Connect

    Mirzadeh, Saed; Du, Miting; Beets, Arnold L.; Knapp, Jr., Furn F.

    2004-04-06

    A method of separating lutetium from a solution containing Lu and Yb, particularly reactor-produced .sup.177 Lu and .sup.177 Yb, includes the steps of: providing a chromatographic separation apparatus containing LN resin; loading the apparatus with a solution containing Lu and Yb; and eluting the apparatus to chromatographically separate the Lu and the Yb in order to produce high-specific-activity .sup.177 Yb.

  14. Negative emotion-driven impulsivity predicts substance dependence problems.

    PubMed

    Verdejo-García, Antonio; Bechara, Antoine; Recknor, Emily C; Pérez-García, Miguel

    2007-12-01

    Impulsivity is predominant among users of several drugs of abuse including alcohol, cocaine, and amphetamines, and it is considered a risk factor for later development of alcohol and substance abuse and dependence. However, there is little consensus on how impulsivity should be defined and measured, and there are few studies on the relationship between separate dimensions of impulsivity and substance dependence. We used a multidimensional measure of impulsivity (the UPPS scale) to examine differences between 36 individuals with substance dependence (ISD) and 36 drug-free controls on the dimensions of urgency, lack of premeditation, lack of perseverance, and sensation seeking. In addition, we examined which dimensions of impulsivity better predicted addiction-related problems as measured with the addiction severity index. Results revealed that ISD show high scores on dimensions of urgency, lack of perseverance, and lack of premeditation (effect sizes ranging from 1.10 to 1.96), but not on sensation seeking. Among the different impulsivity dimensions, urgency was the best predictor of severity of medical, employment, alcohol, drug, family/social, legal and psychiatric problems in ISD, explaining 13-48% of the total variance of these indices. Furthermore, urgency scores alone correctly classified 83% of the participants in the ISD group. Urgency is characterized by a tendency to act impulsively in response to negative emotional states. Thus, our results could have important implications for novel treatment approaches for substance dependence focused on emotional regulation. PMID:17629632

  15. Elegant impulser developed for flat beam injection

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, M. J., LLNL

    1998-05-26

    The following report describes the design, construction, and checkout of a high-voltage (HV) impulser built for the heavy ion fusion (HIF) project [1]. The purpose of this impulser is to provide an adjustable diode voltage source of sufficient quality and level to allow the optimization of beam transport and accelerator sections of HIF [2, 3]. An elegant, low-impedance, high-energy storage capacitor circuit has been selected for this application. Circuit parameters of the retrofit to the diode region [4] have been included to provide the controlled rise time. The critical part of this circuit that is common to all candidates is the impedance matching component. The following report provides a description of the implemented circuit, the basic circuit variables for wave shaping, screening techniques revealing the weakest circuit component, and the resulting output of the injector.

  16. The utility of rat models of impulsivity in developing pharmacotherapies for impulse control disorders

    PubMed Central

    Winstanley, Catharine A

    2011-01-01

    High levels of impulsive behaviours are a clinically significant symptom in a range of psychiatric disorders, such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, bipolar disorder, personality disorders, pathological gambling and substance abuse. Although often measured using questionnaire assessments, levels of different types of impulsivity can also be determined using behavioural tests. Rodent analogues of these paradigms have been developed, and similar neural circuitry has been implicated in their performance in both humans and rats. In the current review, the methodology underlying the measurement of different aspects of impulsive action and choice are considered from the viewpoint of drug development, with a focus on the continuous performance task (CPT), stop-signal task (SST), go/no-go and delay-discounting paradigms. Current issues impeding translation between animal and human studies are identified, and comparisons drawn between the acute effects of dopaminergic, noradrenergic and serotonergic compounds across species. Although the field could benefit from a more systematic determination of different pharmacological agents across paradigms, there are signs of strong concordance between the animal and human data. However, the type of impulsivity measured appears to play a significant role, with the SST and delay discounting providing more consistent effects for dopaminergic drugs, while the CPT and SST show better predictive validity so far for serotonergic and noradrenergic compounds. Based on the available data, it would appear that these impulsivity models could be used more widely to identify potential pharmacotherapies for impulse control disorders. Novel targets within the glutamatergic and serotonergic system are also suggested. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed issue on Translational Neuropharmacology. To view the other articles in this issue visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2011.164.issue-4 PMID:21410459

  17. Impulsive choice and response in dopamine agonist-related impulse control behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Voon, Valerie; Reynolds, Brady; Brezing, Christina; Gallea, Cecile; Skaljic, Meliha; Ekanayake, Vindhya; Fernandez, Hubert; Potenza, Marc N; Dolan, Raymond J; Hallett, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Rationale Dopaminergic medication-related Impulse Control Disorders (ICDs) such as pathological gambling and compulsive shopping have been reported in Parkinson disease (PD). Hypothesis We hypothesized that dopamine agonists (DAs) would be associated with greater impulsive choice, or greater discounting of delayed rewards, in PD patients with ICDs (PDI). Methods Fourteen PDI patients, 14 PD controls without ICDs and 16 medication-free matched normal controls were tested on (i) the Experiential Discounting Task (EDT), a feedback-based intertemporal choice task, (ii) spatial working memory and (iii) attentional set shifting. The EDT was used to assess impulsivity choice (hyperbolic K-value), reaction time (RT) and decision conflict RT (the RT difference between high conflict and low conflict choices). PDI patients and PD controls were tested on and off DA. Results On the EDT, there was a group by medication interaction effect [F(1,26)=5.62; p=0.03] with pairwise analyses demonstrating that DA status was associated with increased impulsive choice in PDI patients (p=0.02) but not in PD controls (p=0.37). PDI patients also had faster RT compared to PD controls F(1,26)=7.51 p=0.01]. DA status was associated with shorter RT [F(3,24)=8.39, p=0.001] and decision conflict RT [F(1,26)=6.16, p=0.02] in PDI patients but not in PD controls. There were no correlations between different measures of impulsivity. PDI patients on DA had greater spatial working memory impairments compared to PD controls on DA (t=2.13, df=26, p=0.04). Conclusion Greater impulsive choice, faster RT, faster decision conflict RT and executive dysfunction may contribute to ICDs in PD. PMID:19838863

  18. Alcohol increases impulsivity and abuse liability in heavy drinking women.

    PubMed

    Reed, Stephanie Collins; Levin, Frances R; Evans, Suzette M

    2012-12-01

    Heavy drinking has increased in recent years and has been linked to numerous health-related risks, particularly in women. A number of factors may play a role in exacerbating the risks linked to heavy drinking, such as impulsivity, which itself is related to a number of risky behaviors. The present study investigated the effects of alcohol (0, 0.5, 0.75 g/kg) on impulsivity in female heavy drinkers (n = 23) and female light drinkers (n = 23) using a double-blind, placebo-controlled outpatient design; all women were tested during follicular phase of the menstrual cycle. Each session, participants completed a range of tasks including subjective measures of abuse liability, cognitive performance tasks, three behavioral impulsivity tasks, and a risk-taking task. Alcohol increased impulsivity on the Immediate and Delayed Memory Task (IMT and DMT) and Delay Discounting task. Heavy drinkers scored higher on impulsivity self-reports and were more impulsive on the IMT and the GoStop task than light drinkers. The high dose of alcohol further increased impulsive performance on the IMT and DMT in heavy drinkers. There were no group differences or alcohol effects on the Balloon Analogue Risk Task. Alcohol increased sedative-like effects more in light drinkers and increased stimulant-like effects and alcohol liking more in heavy drinkers. In summary, female heavy drinkers are less sensitive to the negative effects of alcohol, report more positive effects of alcohol, and are more impulsive than female light drinkers. Moreover, impulsive responding was exacerbated by alcohol drinking among female heavy drinkers, indicating that women who drink at this level are at increased risk for developing alcohol use disorders and engaging in other risky behaviors, particularly after drinking. PMID:23066857

  19. Impulsivity, Risk Taking, and Timing

    PubMed Central

    Baumann, Ana A.; Odum, Amy. L.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the relations among measures of impulsivity and timing. Impulsivity was assessed using delay and probability discounting, and self-report impulsivity (as measured by the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale; BIS-11). Timing was assessed using temporal perception as measured on a temporal bisection task and time perspective (as measured by the Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory). One hundred and forty three college students completed these measures in a computer laboratory. The degree of delay discounting was positively correlated with the mean and range of the temporal bisection procedure. The degree of delay and probability discounting were also positively correlated. Self-reported Motor impulsiveness on the BIS-11 was positively correlated with Present Hedonism and negatively correlated with Future orientation on the ZTPI. Self-reported Non-Planning on the BIS-11 was positively correlated with Fatalism on the ZTPI. These results show that people who overestimate the passage of time (perceive time as passing more quickly) hold less value in delayed rewards. They also confirm previous results regarding the relation between delay and probability discounting, as well as highlight similarities in self-report measures of impulsivity and time perspective. PMID:22542458

  20. Impulsivity, risk taking, and timing.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Ana A; Odum, Amy L

    2012-07-01

    This study examined the relations among measures of impulsivity and timing. Impulsivity was assessed using delay and probability discounting, and self-report impulsivity (as measured by the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale; BIS-11). Timing was assessed using temporal perception as measured on a temporal bisection task and time perspective (as measured by the Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory). One hundred and forty three college students completed these measures in a computer laboratory. The degree of delay discounting was positively correlated with the mean and range of the temporal bisection procedure. The degree of delay and probability discounting were also positively correlated. Self-reported motor impulsiveness on the BIS-11 was positively correlated with present hedonism and negatively correlated with future orientation on the ZTPI. Self-reported non-planning on the BIS-11 was positively correlated with fatalism on the ZTPI. These results show that people who overestimate the passage of time (perceive time as passing more quickly) hold less value in delayed rewards. They also confirm previous results regarding the relation between delay and probability discounting, as well as highlight similarities in self-report measures of impulsivity and time perspective.

  1. High efficiency cell-specific targeting of cytokine activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcin, Geneviève; Paul, Franciane; Staufenbiel, Markus; Bordat, Yann; van der Heyden, José; Wilmes, Stephan; Cartron, Guillaume; Apparailly, Florence; de Koker, Stefaan; Piehler, Jacob; Tavernier, Jan; Uzé, Gilles

    2014-01-01

    Systemic toxicity currently prevents exploiting the huge potential of many cytokines for medical applications. Here we present a novel strategy to engineer immunocytokines with very high targeting efficacies. The method lies in the use of mutants of toxic cytokines that markedly reduce their receptor-binding affinities, and that are thus rendered essentially inactive. Upon fusion to nanobodies specifically binding to marker proteins, activity of these cytokines is selectively restored for cell populations expressing this marker. This ‘activity-by-targeting’ concept was validated for type I interferons and leptin. In the case of interferon, activity can be directed to target cells in vitro and to selected cell populations in mice, with up to 1,000-fold increased specific activity. This targeting strategy holds promise to revitalize the clinical potential of many cytokines.

  2. Cellulose antibody films for highly specific evanescent wave immunosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, Andreas; Bock, Daniel; Jaworek, Thomas; Kaul, Sepp; Schulze, Matthais; Tebbe, H.; Wegner, Gerhard; Seeger, Stefan

    1996-01-01

    For the production of recognition elements for evanescent wave immunosensors optical waveguides have to be coated with ultrathin stable antibody films. In the present work non amphiphilic alkylated cellulose and copolyglutamate films are tested as monolayer matrices for the antibody immobilization using the Langmuir-Blodgett technique. These films are transferred onto optical waveguides and serve as excellent matrices for the immobilization of antibodies in high density and specificity. In addition to the multi-step immobilization of immunoglobulin G(IgG) on photochemically crosslinked and oxidized polymer films, the direct one-step transfer of mixed antibody-polymer films is performed. Both planar waveguides and optical fibers are suitable substrates for the immobilization. The activity and specificity of immobilized antibodies is controlled by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) technique. As a result reduced non-specific interactions between antigens and the substrate surface are observed if cinnamoylbutyether-cellulose is used as the film matrix for the antibody immobilization. Using the evanescent wave senor (EWS) technology immunosensor assays are performed in order to determine both the non-specific adsorption of different coated polymethylmethacrylat (PMMA) fibers and the long-term stability of the antibody films. Specificities of one-step transferred IgG-cellulose films are drastically enhanced compared to IgG-copolyglutamate films. Cellulose IgG films are used in enzymatic sandwich assays using mucine as a clinical relevant antigen that is recognized by the antibodies BM2 and BM7. A mucine calibration measurement is recorded. So far the observed detection limit for mucine is about 8 ng/ml.

  3. Investigation of impulsivity in a sample of treatment-seeking pathological gamblers: a multidimensional perspective.

    PubMed

    Billieux, Joël; Lagrange, Guillaume; Van der Linden, Martial; Lançon, Christophe; Adida, Marc; Jeanningros, Régine

    2012-07-30

    Numerous studies have shown that problem gambling is characterised by lack of impulse control. However, they have often been conducted without considering the multifaceted nature of impulsivity and related psychological mechanisms. The current study aims to disentangle which impulsivity facets are altered in pathological gambling. Twenty treatment-seeking pathological gamblers (PGs) and 20 matched control participants completed a self-reported questionnaire measuring the various facets of impulsive behaviours (UPPS Impulsive Behaviour Scale), as well as two laboratory tasks assessing inhibitory control (the go-stop task) and tolerance for delayed rewards (single key impulsivity paradigm). Compared with matched controls, PGs exhibited higher urgency, lower premeditation, impairment in prepotent inhibition, and lower tolerance towards delayed rewards. Nevertheless, complementary profile analyses showed that impulsivity-related deficits found in PGs are highly heterogeneous, and that some PGs are neither impulsive in the impulsivity facets assessed nor impaired in the cognitive mechanisms measured. These findings underscore (1) the necessity to disentangle the construct of impulsivity into lower-order components and (2) that further studies should take into account, in addition to impulsivity-related mechanisms, other psychological factors potentially involved in pathological gambling. PMID:22421073

  4. Dopamine-Agonists and Impulsivity in Parkinson’s Disease: Impulsive Choices vs. Impulsive Actions

    PubMed Central

    Antonelli, Francesca; Ko, Ji Hyun; Miyasaki, Janis; Lang, Anthony E.; Houle, Sylvain; Valzania, Franco; Ray, Nicola J.; Strafella, Antonio P.

    2014-01-01

    The control of impulse behavior is a multidimensional concept subdivided into separate subcomponents, which are thought to represent different underlying mechanisms due to either disinhibitory processes or poor decision-making. In patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD), dopamine-agonist (DA) therapy has been associated with increased impulsive behavior. However, the relationship among these different components in the disease and the role of DA is not well understood. In this imaging study, we investigated in PD patients the effects of DA medication on patterns of brain activation during tasks testing impulsive choices and actions. Following overnight withdrawal of antiparkinsonian medication, PD patients were studied with a H2 (15)O PET before and after administration of DA (1 mg of pramipexole), while they were performing the delay discounting task (DDT) and the GoNoGo Task (GNG). We observed that pramipexole augmented impulsivity during DDT, depending on reward magnitude and activated the medial prefrontal cortex and posterior cingulate cortex and deactivated ventral striatum. In contrast, the effect of pramipexole during the GNG task was not significant on behavioral performance and involved different areas (i.e., lateral prefrontal cortex). A voxel-based correlation analysis revealed a significant negative correlation between the discounting value (k) and the activation of medial prefrontal cortex and posterior cingulate suggesting that more impulsive patients had less activation in those cortical areas. Here we report how these different subcomponents of inhibition/impulsivity are differentially sensitive to DA treatment with pramipexole influencing mainly the neural network underlying impulsive choices but not impulsive action. PMID:24038587

  5. Impulsivity and overeating in children in the absence and presence of hunger.

    PubMed

    Nederkoorn, Chantal; Dassen, Fania C M; Franken, Loes; Resch, Christine; Houben, Katrijn

    2015-10-01

    Overweight children appear to be more responsive to environmental, hedonic cues and easily overeat in the current obesogenic environment. They are also found to overeat in the absence of hunger, and this overeating seems related to impulsivity: impulsive participants are more prone to external eating. However, some studies showed that impulsive adults are also more prone to hunger cues: impulsive participants overate especially when feeling hungry. This would mean impulsive people are more reactive to both external and internal cues. The overeating was limited to palatable high energy-dense foods: hunger made them fancy a snack. In the current study, we wanted to test the interaction between impulsivity, hunger and consumption of food type in children. Impulsivity was measured in 88 children between the ages of 7 and 9. Next, half of the participants performed a taste test before their own regular lunch and half of the participants immediately after their lunch. During the taste test, low, medium and high energy-dense food items were presented. Results showed that impulsive children ate more high energy-dense foods than low impulsive children, both before and after their lunch. No differences were found on low or medium energy-dense foods. Impulsive children therefore showed normal sensitivity for internal hunger and satiety cues, but abnormal response to high energy-dense foods. This might render them vulnerable to tasty temptation in the environment and to weight gain in their future.

  6. Analysis on Impulse Characteristics of PDRE with Exhaust Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Hong-bo; Weng, Chun-sheng; Lv, Xiao-jing; Li, Ning

    2014-06-01

    The exhaust characteristics related to impulse was investigated in a pulse detonation rocket engine (PDRE) by tunable diode laser absorption sensing system. The instantaneous parameters of temperature, velocity and pressure were obtained for exhaust at engine exit. Analysis on impulse characteristics based on control volume of the PDRE was conducted for a single operation circle with experimental results. It was concluded that the impulse (3.26 N·s) achieved by exhaust measurements was in agreement with that (3.09 N·s) by a load cell. The impulse caused by exhaust momentum experienced an extremely sharp ascending, a steep rising and a slow increment in sequence. The exhausts during the sharp ascending and steep rising were under expansion with high mass weighted average temperature (>1266 K), so there was a possible promotion for exhausts utilizing.

  7. Impulsively generated fast coronal pulsations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwin, P. M.; Roberts, B.

    1986-01-01

    Rapid oscillations in the corona are discussed from a theoretical standpoint, developing some previous work on ducted, fast magnetoacoustic waves in an inhomogeneous medium. In the theory, impulsively (e.g., flare) generated mhd (magnetohydrodynamic) waves are ducted by regions of low Alfven speed (high density) such as coronal loops. Wave propagation in such ducts is strongly dispersive and closely akin to the behavior of Love waves in seismology, Pekeris waves in oceanography and guided waves in fiber optics. Such flare-generated magnetoacoustic waves possess distinctive temporal signatures consisting of periodic, quasi-periodic and decay phases. The quasi-periodic phase possesses the strongest amplitudes and the shortest time scales. Time scales are typically of the order of a second for inhomogeneities (coronal loop width) of 1000 km and Alfven speeds of 1000/kms, and pulse duration times are of tens of seconds. Quasi-periodic signatures have been observed in radio wavelengths for over a decade and more recently by SMM. It is hoped that the theoretical ideas outlined may be successfully related to these observations and thus aid the interpretation of oscillatory signatures recorded by SMM. Such signatures may also provide a diagnostic of coronal conditions. New aspects of the ducted mhd waves, for example their behavior in smoothly varying as opposed to tube-like inhomogeneities, are currently under investigation. The theory is not restricted to loops but applied equally to open field regions.

  8. Trait Impulsivity and Anhedonia: Two Gateways for the Development of Impulse Control Disorders in Parkinson's Disease?

    PubMed

    Houeto, Jean-Luc; Magnard, Robin; Dalley, Jeffrey W; Belin, David; Carnicella, Sebastien

    2016-01-01

    Apathy and impulsivity are two major comorbid syndromes of Parkinson's disease (PD) that may represent two extremes of a behavioral spectrum modulated by dopamine-dependent processes. PD is characterized by a progressive loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta to which are attributed the cardinal motor symptoms of the disorder. Dopamine replacement therapy (DRT), used widely to treat these motor symptoms, is often associated with deficits in hedonic processing and motivation, including apathy and depression, as well as impulse control disorders (ICDs). ICDs comprise pathological gambling, hypersexuality, compulsive shopping, binge eating, compulsive overuse of dopaminergic medication, and punding. More frequently observed in males with early onset PD, ICDs are associated not only with comorbid affective symptoms, such as depression and anxiety, but also with behavioral traits, such as novelty seeking and impulsivity, as well as with personal or familial history of alcohol use. This constellation of associated risk factors highlights the importance of inter-individual differences in the vulnerability to develop comorbid psychiatric disorders in PD patients. Additionally, withdrawal from DRT in patients with ICDs frequently unmasks a severe apathetic state, suggesting that apathy and ICDs may be caused by overlapping neurobiological mechanisms within the cortico-striato-thalamo-cortical networks. We suggest that altered hedonic and impulse control processes represent distinct prodromal substrates for the development of these psychiatric symptoms, the etiopathogenic mechanisms of which remain unknown. Specifically, we argue that deficits in hedonic and motivational states and impulse control are mediated by overlapping, yet dissociable, neural mechanisms that differentially interact with DRT to promote the emergence of ICDs in vulnerable individuals. Thus, we provide a novel heuristic framework for basic and clinical research to better

  9. Partial sleep deprivation impacts impulsive action but not impulsive decision-making.

    PubMed

    Demos, K E; Hart, C N; Sweet, L H; Mailloux, K A; Trautvetter, J; Williams, S E; Wing, R R; McCaffery, J M

    2016-10-01

    Sleep deprivation may lead to increased impulsivity, however, previous literature has focused on examining effects of total sleep deprivation (TSD) rather than the more common condition, partial sleep deprivation (PSD) or 'short sleep'. Moreover, it has been unclear whether PSD impacts impulse-related cognitive processes, and specifically if it differentially affects impulsive action versus impulsive decision-making. We sought to determine if short compared to long sleep (6 vs. 9h/night) impacts impulsive action via behavioral inhibition (Go/No-Go), and/or impulsive decision-making processes of risk taking (Balloon Analogue Risk Task [BART]) and preferences for immediate over delayed rewards (Delay Discounting). In a within-subject design, 34 participants (71% female, mean age=37.0years, SD=10.54) were assigned to four consecutive nights of 6h/night (short sleep) and 9h/night (long sleep) in their own home in random counterbalanced order. Sleep was measured via wrist-worn actigraphs to confirm adherence to the sleep schedules (mean short sleep=5.9h, SD=0.3; mean long sleep=8.6h, SD=0.3, p<0.001). The Go/No-Go, BART, and Delay Discounting tasks were completed following both sleep conditions. Participants had more inhibition errors on the Go/No-Go task after short (mean false alarms=19.79%, SD=14.51) versus long sleep (mean=15.97%, SD=9.51, p=0.039). This effect was strongest in participants reporting longer habitual time in bed (p=0.04). There were no differences in performance following long- versus short-sleep for either delay discounting or the BART (p's>0.4). Overall, these results indicate that four days of PSD diminishes behavioral inhibition abilities, but may not alter impulsive decision-making. These findings contribute to the emerging understanding of how partial sleep deprivation, currently an epidemic, impacts cognitive ability. Future research should continue to explore the connection between PSD and cognitive functions, and ways to minimize the

  10. Partial sleep deprivation impacts impulsive action but not impulsive decision-making.

    PubMed

    Demos, K E; Hart, C N; Sweet, L H; Mailloux, K A; Trautvetter, J; Williams, S E; Wing, R R; McCaffery, J M

    2016-10-01

    Sleep deprivation may lead to increased impulsivity, however, previous literature has focused on examining effects of total sleep deprivation (TSD) rather than the more common condition, partial sleep deprivation (PSD) or 'short sleep'. Moreover, it has been unclear whether PSD impacts impulse-related cognitive processes, and specifically if it differentially affects impulsive action versus impulsive decision-making. We sought to determine if short compared to long sleep (6 vs. 9h/night) impacts impulsive action via behavioral inhibition (Go/No-Go), and/or impulsive decision-making processes of risk taking (Balloon Analogue Risk Task [BART]) and preferences for immediate over delayed rewards (Delay Discounting). In a within-subject design, 34 participants (71% female, mean age=37.0years, SD=10.54) were assigned to four consecutive nights of 6h/night (short sleep) and 9h/night (long sleep) in their own home in random counterbalanced order. Sleep was measured via wrist-worn actigraphs to confirm adherence to the sleep schedules (mean short sleep=5.9h, SD=0.3; mean long sleep=8.6h, SD=0.3, p<0.001). The Go/No-Go, BART, and Delay Discounting tasks were completed following both sleep conditions. Participants had more inhibition errors on the Go/No-Go task after short (mean false alarms=19.79%, SD=14.51) versus long sleep (mean=15.97%, SD=9.51, p=0.039). This effect was strongest in participants reporting longer habitual time in bed (p=0.04). There were no differences in performance following long- versus short-sleep for either delay discounting or the BART (p's>0.4). Overall, these results indicate that four days of PSD diminishes behavioral inhibition abilities, but may not alter impulsive decision-making. These findings contribute to the emerging understanding of how partial sleep deprivation, currently an epidemic, impacts cognitive ability. Future research should continue to explore the connection between PSD and cognitive functions, and ways to minimize the

  11. Response inhibition and its relation to multidimensional impulsivity.

    PubMed

    Wilbertz, Tilmann; Deserno, Lorenz; Horstmann, Annette; Neumann, Jane; Villringer, Arno; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Boehler, Carsten N; Schlagenhauf, Florian

    2014-12-01

    Impulsivity is a multidimensional construct that has been suggested as a vulnerability factor for several psychiatric disorders, especially addiction disorders. Poor response inhibition may constitute one facet of impulsivity. Trait impulsivity can be assessed by self-report questionnaires such as the widely used Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS-11). However, regarding the multidimensionality of impulsivity different concepts have been proposed, in particular the UPPS self-report questionnaire ('Urgency', 'Lack of Premeditation', 'Lack of Perseverance', 'Sensation Seeking') that is based on a factor analytic approach. The question as to which aspects of trait impulsivity map on individual differences of the behavioral and neural correlates of response inhibition so far remains unclear. In the present study, we investigated 52 healthy individuals that scored either very high or low on the BIS-11 and underwent a reward-modulated Stop-signal task during fMRI. Neither behavioral nor neural differences were observed with respect to high- and low-BIS groups. In contrast, UPPS subdomain Urgency best explained inter-individual variability in SSRT scores and was further negatively correlated to right IFG/aI activation in 'Stop>Go' trials - a key region for response inhibition. Successful response inhibition in rewarded compared to nonrewarded stop trials yielded ventral striatal (VS) activation which might represent a feedback signal. Interestingly, only participants with low Urgency scores were able to use this VS feedback signal for better response inhibition. Our findings indicate that the relationship of impulsivity and response inhibition has to be treated carefully. We propose Urgency as an important subdomain that might be linked to response inhibition as well as to the use of reward-based neural signals. Based on the present results, further studies examining the influence of impulsivity on psychiatric disorders should take into account Urgency as an important

  12. Examining impulsivity as a moderator of the relationship between body shame and bulimic symptoms in Black and White young women.

    PubMed

    Higgins, M K; Lin, Stacy L; Alvarez, Alexandra; Bardone-Cone, Anna M

    2015-06-01

    Impulsivity has been linked to bulimic symptomatology in a number of studies; however, few have examined this relationship among Black women. We investigated the correlations between impulsivity and bulimic symptoms, and tested impulsivity as a moderator of the body shame/bulimic symptoms relationship among a sample of female undergraduates (N=276; 97 Blacks, 179 Whites). These participants provided data on body shame, impulsivity, and bulimic symptoms (EDE-Q binge eating frequency, BULIT-R, EDI-Bulimia). Among Blacks, impulsivity was significantly positively associated with all bulimic symptoms measures; among Whites, impulsivity was only positively correlated with binge eating frequency. Furthermore, among Blacks, the combination of high body shame and high impulsivity was associated with the highest levels of bulimic symptoms; these findings were not observed among Whites. This study highlights the importance of impulsivity and body shame in identifying bulimic symptomatology among Black women. PMID:25867526

  13. Examining impulsivity as a moderator of the relationship between body shame and bulimic symptoms in Black and White young women.

    PubMed

    Higgins, M K; Lin, Stacy L; Alvarez, Alexandra; Bardone-Cone, Anna M

    2015-06-01

    Impulsivity has been linked to bulimic symptomatology in a number of studies; however, few have examined this relationship among Black women. We investigated the correlations between impulsivity and bulimic symptoms, and tested impulsivity as a moderator of the body shame/bulimic symptoms relationship among a sample of female undergraduates (N=276; 97 Blacks, 179 Whites). These participants provided data on body shame, impulsivity, and bulimic symptoms (EDE-Q binge eating frequency, BULIT-R, EDI-Bulimia). Among Blacks, impulsivity was significantly positively associated with all bulimic symptoms measures; among Whites, impulsivity was only positively correlated with binge eating frequency. Furthermore, among Blacks, the combination of high body shame and high impulsivity was associated with the highest levels of bulimic symptoms; these findings were not observed among Whites. This study highlights the importance of impulsivity and body shame in identifying bulimic symptomatology among Black women.

  14. Impulse source versus dodecahedral loudspeaker for measuring parameters derived from the impulse response in room acoustics.

    PubMed

    San Martín, Ricardo; Arana, Miguel; Machín, Jorge; Arregui, Abel

    2013-07-01

    This study investigates the performance of dodecahedral and impulse sources when measuring acoustic parameters in enclosures according to ISO 3382-1 [Acoustics-Measurement of room acoustic parameters. Part 1: Performance spaces (International Organization for Standardization, Geneva, Switzerland, 2009)]. In general, methods using speakers as a sound source are limited by their frequency response and directivity. On the other hand, getting impulse responses from impulse sources typically involves a lack of repeatability, and it is usually necessary to average several measurements for each position. Through experiments in different auditoriums that recreate typical situations in which the measurement standard is applied, it is found that using impulse sources leads to greater variation in the results, especially at low frequencies. However, this prevents subsequent dispersions due to variables that this technique does not require, such as the orientation of the emitting source. These dispersions may be relevant at high frequencies exceeding the established tolerance criteria for certain parameters. Finally, a new descriptor for dodecahedral sources reflecting the influence their lack of omnidirectionality produces on measuring acoustic parameters is proposed.

  15. Dopamine Agonists and the Suppression of Impulsive Motor Actions in Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wylie, S.A.; Claassen, D.O.; Huizenga, H.M.; Schewel, K.D.; Ridderinkhof, K.R.; Bashore, T.R.; van den Wildenberg, W.P.M.

    2012-01-01

    The suppression of spontaneous motor impulses is an essential facet of cognitive control that is linked to frontal-basal ganglia circuitry. Basal ganglia dysfunction caused by Parkinson’s disease (PD) disrupts the proficiency of action suppression, but how pharmacotherapy for PD impacts impulsive motor control is poorly understood. Dopamine agonists improve motor symptoms of PD, but can also provoke impulsive-compulsive behaviors (ICB). We investigated whether dopamine agonist medication has a beneficial or detrimental effect on impulsive action control in thirty-eight PD patients, half of whom had current ICB. Participants performed the Simon conflict task, which measures susceptibility to acting on spontaneous action impulses as well as the proficiency of suppressing these impulses. Compared to an off agonist state, patients on their agonist were no more susceptible to reacting impulsively, but were less proficient at suppressing the interference from the activation of impulsive actions. Importantly, agonist effects depended on baseline performance in the off agonist state; more proficient suppressors off agonist experienced a reduction in suppression on agonist, whereas less proficient suppressors off agonist showed improved suppression on agonist. Patients with active ICB were actually less susceptible to making fast, impulsive response errors than patients without ICB, suggesting that behavioral problems in this subset of patients may be less related to impulsivity in motor control. Our findings provide further evidence that dopamine agonist medication impacts specific cognitive control processes and that the direction of its effects depends on individual differences in performance off medication. PMID:22571461

  16. Impulsive Injection for Compressor Stator Separation Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Culley, Dennis E.; Braunscheidel, Edward P.; Bright, Michelle M.

    2005-01-01

    Flow control using impulsive injection from the suction surface of a stator vane has been applied in a low speed axial compressor. Impulsive injection is shown to significantly reduce separation relative to steady injection for vanes that were induced to separate by an increase in vane stagger angle of 4 degrees. Injected flow was applied to the airfoil suction surface using spanwise slots pitched in the streamwise direction. Injection was limited to the near-hub region, from 10 to 36 percent of span, to affect the dominant loss due to hub leakage flow. Actuation was provided externally using high-speed solenoid valves closely coupled to the vane tip. Variations in injected mass, frequency, and duty cycle are explored. The local corrected total pressure loss across the vane at the lower span region was reduced by over 20 percent. Additionally, low momentum fluid migrating from the hub region toward the tip was effectively suppressed resulting in an overall benefit which reduced corrected area averaged loss through the passage by 4 percent. The injection mass fraction used for impulsive actuation was typically less than 0.1 percent of the compressor through flow.

  17. Impulsive Reconnection in the Sun's Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antiochos, Spiro K.

    2009-01-01

    Recent high-resolution observations from the Hinode mission show dramatically that the Sun's atmosphere is filled with explosive activity ranging from chromospheric explosions that reach heights of Mm, to coronal jets that can extend to solar radii, to giant coronal mass ejections (CME) that reach the edge of the heliosphere. The driver for all this activity is believed to be 3D magnetic reconnection. From the large variation observed in the temporal behavior of solar activity, it is clear that reconnection in the corona must take on a variety of distinct forms. The explosive nature of jets and CMEs requires that the reconnection be impulsive in that it stays off until a substantial store of free energy has been accumulated, but then turns on abruptly and stays on until much of this free energy is released. The key question, therefore, is what determines whether the reconnection is impulsive or not. We present some of the latest observations and numerical models of explosive and non-explosive solar activity. We argue that, in order for the reconnection to be impulsive, it must be driven by a quasi-ideal instability. We discuss the generality of our results for understanding 31) reconnection in other contexts.

  18. Cigarette Cravings, Impulsivity, and the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Potvin, Stéphane; Tikàsz, Andràs; Dinh-Williams, Laurence Lê-Anh; Bourque, Josiane; Mendrek, Adrianna

    2015-01-01

    Craving is a core feature of tobacco use disorder as well as a significant predictor of smoking relapse. Studies have shown that appetitive smoking-related stimuli (e.g., someone smoking) trigger significant cravings in smokers impede their self-control capacities and promote drug seeking behavior. In this review, we begin by an overview of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies investigating the neural correlates of smokers to appetitive smoking cues. The literature reveals a complex and vastly distributed neuronal network underlying smokers’ craving response that recruits regions involved in self-referential processing, planning/regulatory processes, emotional responding, attentional biases, and automatic conducts. We then selectively review important factors contributing to the heterogeneity of results that significantly limit the implications of these findings, namely between- (abstinence, smoking expectancies, and self-regulation) and within-studies factors (severity of smoking dependence, sex-differences, motivation to quit, and genetic factors). Remarkably, we found that little to no attention has been devoted to examine the influence of personality traits on the neural correlates of cigarette cravings in fMRI studies. Impulsivity has been linked with craving and relapse in substance and tobacco use, which prompted our research team to examine the influence of impulsivity on cigarette cravings in an fMRI study. We found that the influence of impulsivity on cigarette cravings was mediated by fronto-cingulate mechanisms. Given the high prevalence of cigarette smoking in several psychiatric disorders that are characterized by significant levels of impulsivity, we conclude by identifying psychiatric patients as a target population whose tobacco-smoking habits deserve further behavioral and neuro-imaging investigation. PMID:26441686

  19. A Risk and Maintenance Model for Bulimia Nervosa: From Impulsive Action to Compulsive Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, Carolyn M.; Wonderlich, Stephen A.; Smith, Gregory T.

    2015-01-01

    This paper offers a new model for bulimia nervosa (BN) that explains both the initial impulsive nature of binge eating and purging as well as the compulsive quality of the fully developed disorder. The model is based on a review of advances in research on BN and advances in relevant basic psychological science. It integrates transdiagnostic personality risk, eating disorder specific risk, reinforcement theory, cognitive neuroscience, and theory drawn from the drug addiction literature. We identify both a state-based and a trait-based risk pathway, and we then propose possible state-by-trait interaction risk processes. The state-based pathway emphasizes depletion of self-control. The trait-based pathway emphasizes transactions between the trait of negative urgency (the tendency to act rashly when distressed) and high-risk psychosocial learning. We then describe a process by which initially impulsive BN behaviors become compulsive over time, and we consider the clinical implications of our model. PMID:25961467

  20. Are executive function and impulsivity antipodes? A conceptual reconstruction with special reference to addiction

    PubMed Central

    Bickel, Warren K.; Jarmolowicz, David P.; Mueller, E. Terry; Gatchalian, Kirstin M.; McClure, Samuel M.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Although there is considerable interest in how either executive function (EF) or impulsivity relate to addiction, there is little apparent overlap between these research areas. Objectives The present paper aims to determine if components of these two constructs are conceptual antipodes—widely separated on a shared continuum. Methods EFs and impulsivities were compared and contrasted. Specifically, the definitions of the components of EF and impulsivity, the methods used to measure the various components, the populations of drug users that show deficits in these components, and the neural substrates of these components were compared and contrasted. Results Each component of impulsivity had an antipode in EF. EF, however, covered a wider range of phenomena, including compulsivity. Conclusions Impulsivity functions as an antipode of certain components of EF. Recognition of the relationship between EF and impulsivity may inform the scientific inquiry of behavioral problems such as addiction. Other theoretical implications are discussed. PMID:22441659

  1. The role of affective instability and UPPS impulsivity in borderline personality disorder features.

    PubMed

    Tragesser, Sarah L; Robinson, R Joe

    2009-08-01

    Current theories of borderline personality disorder (BPD) suggest that extreme levels of affective instability/emotional dysregulation, impulsivity, or a combination of these traits account for the symptoms of BPD. The present study tested the extent to which personality measures of affective instability and impulsivity could account for BPD features in a nonclinical sample. One hundred forty-one undergraduates completed the Affective Lability Scale, the UPPS Impulsive Behavior Scale, and the Personality Assessment Inventory for Borderlines. Both affective instability and impulsivity were uniquely associated with BPD features. Shifts between euthymia and anger, and between anxiety and depression, were associated with BPD features, as were the urgency and (lack of) premeditation scales. Results indicated that specific BPD features may be differentially accounted for by affective instability vs. impulsivity, consistent with perspectives on BPD emphasizing combinations of affective instability and impulsivity as underlying dimensions of the disorder. PMID:19663657

  2. Impulsivity: four ways five factors are not basic to addiction.

    PubMed

    Gullo, Matthew J; Loxton, Natalie J; Dawe, Sharon

    2014-11-01

    Several impulsivity-related models have been applied to understanding the vulnerability to addiction. While there is a growing consensus that impulsivity is multifaceted, debate continues as to the precise number of facets and, more critically, which are most relevant to explaining the addiction-risk profile. In many ways, the current debate mirrors that which took place in the personality literature in the early 1990s (e.g., Eysenck's 'Big Three' versus Costa and McCrae's 'Big Five'). Indeed, many elements of this debate are relevant to the current discussion of the role of impulsivity in addictive behavior. Specifically, 1) the use of factor analysis as an atheoretical 'truth-grinding machine'; 2) whether additional facets add explanatory power over fewer; 3) the delineation of specific neurocognitive pathways from each facet to addictive behaviors, and; 4) the relative merit of 'top-down' versus 'bottom-up' approaches to the understanding of impulsivity. Ultimately, the utility of any model of impulsivity and addiction lies in its heuristic value and ability to integrate evidence from different levels of analysis. Here, we make the case that theoretically-driven, bottom-up models proposing two factors deliver the optimal balance of explanatory power, parsimony, and integration of evidence. PMID:24576666

  3. Nanoporous ultra-high specific surface inorganic fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanehata, Masaki; Ding, Bin; Shiratori, Seimei

    2007-08-01

    Nanoporous inorganic (silica) nanofibres with ultra-high specific surface have been fabricated by electrospinning the blend solutions of poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) and colloidal silica nanoparticles, followed by selective removal of the PVA component. The configurations of the composite and inorganic nanofibres were investigated by changing the average silica particle diameters and the concentrations of colloidal silica particles in polymer solutions. After the removal of PVA by calcination, the fibre shape of pure silica particle assembly was maintained. The nanoporous silica fibres were assembled as a porous membrane with a high surface roughness. From the results of Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) measurements, the BET surface area of inorganic silica nanofibrous membranes was increased with the decrease of the particle diameters. The membrane composed of silica particles with diameters of 15 nm showed the largest BET surface area of 270.3 m2 g-1 and total pore volume of 0.66 cm3 g-1. The physical absorption of methylene blue dye molecules by nanoporous silica membranes was examined using UV-vis spectrometry. Additionally, the porous silica membranes modified with fluoroalkylsilane showed super-hydrophobicity due to their porous structures.

  4. Behavior construction and refinement from high-level specifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martignoni, Andrew J., III; Smart, William D.

    2004-12-01

    Mobile robots are excellent examples of systems that need to show a high level of autonomy. Often robots are loosely supervised by humans who are not intimately familiar with the inner workings of the robot. We cannot generally predict exact environmental conditions in which the robot will operate in advance. This means that the behavior must be adapted in the field. Untrained individuals cannot (and probably should not) program the robot to effect these changes. We need a system that will (a) allow re-tasking, and (b) allow adaptation of the behavior to the specific conditions in the field. In this paper we concentrate on (b). We will describe how to assemble controllers, based on high-level descriptions of the behavior. We will show how the behavior can be tuned by the human, despite not knowing how the code is put together. We will also show how this can be done automatically, using reinforcement learning, and point out the problems that must be overcome for this approach to work.

  5. Highly efficient site-specific transgenesis in cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Transgenes introduced into cancer cell lines serve as powerful tools for identification of genes involved in cancer. However, the random nature of genomic integration site of a transgene highly influences the fidelity, reliability and level of its expression. In order to alleviate this bottleneck, we characterized the potential utility of a novel PhiC31 integrase-mediated site-specific insertion system (PhiC31-IMSI) for introduction of transgenes into a pre-inserted docking site in the genome of cancer cells. Methods According to this system, a “docking-site” was first randomly inserted into human cancer cell lines and clones with a single copy were selected. Subsequently, an “incoming” vector containing the gene of interest was specifically inserted in the docking-site using PhiC31. Results Using the Pc-3 and SKOV-3 cancer cell lines, we showed that transgene insertion is reproducible and reliable. Furthermore, the selection system ensured that all surviving stable transgenic lines harbored the correct integration site. We demonstrated that the expression levels of reporter genes, such as green fluorescent protein and luciferase, from the same locus were comparable among sister, isogenic clones. Using in vivo xenograft studies, we showed that the genetically altered cancer cell lines retain the properties of the parental line. To achieve temporal control of transgene expression, we coupled our insertion strategy with the doxycycline inducible system and demonstrated tight regulation of the expression of the antiangiogenic molecule sFlt-1-Fc in Pc-3 cells. Furthermore, we introduced the luciferase gene into the insertion cassette allowing for possible live imaging of cancer cells in transplantation assays. We also generated a series of Gateway cloning-compatible intermediate cassettes ready for high-throughput cloning of transgenes and demonstrated that PhiC31-IMSI can be achieved in a high throughput 96-well plate format. Conclusions The novel

  6. Impulsivity and Attention Deficit-Hyperactivity Disorder: Subtype Classification Using the UPPS Impulsive Behavior Scale.

    PubMed

    Miller, Drew J; Derefinko, Karen J; Lynam, Donald R; Milich, Richard; Fillmore, Mark T

    2010-09-01

    This study examined the classification accuracy of the UPPS Impulsive Behavior Scale (UPPS) in discriminating several attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) subtypes, including predominantly inattentive type (ADHD/I), combined type (ADHD/C), and combined type with behavioral problems (ADHD/ODD), between each other and a non-ADHD control group using logistic regression analyses. The sample consisted of 88 children ranging in age from 9.0 years to 12.8 years, with a mean of 10.9 years. Children were predominantly male (74%) and Caucasian (86%) and in grades 3-7. Results indicated that the UPPS performed well in classifying ADHD subtypes relative to traditional diagnostic measures. In addition, analyses indicated that differences in symptoms between subtypes can be explained by specific pathways to impulsivity. Implications for the assessment of ADHD and conceptual issues are discussed. PMID:21765593

  7. Impulsivity: a discussion of clinical and experimental findings.

    PubMed

    Evenden, J

    1999-01-01

    Impulsivity can often be an important clinical problem in psychiatry and neurology. In psychiatry, the manifestation of impulsive behaviour in syndromes such as personality disorders, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and in substance abuse may be different, and this has led to conflicting definitions. There has also been a tendency to concentrate on the nature of the behavioural manifestation (problems with the law, aggression, drug use, behavioural problems in school) rather than shared psychological processes, and to ignore the fact that impulsivity can also have positive aspects. In a normal population, the personality trait of impulsivity has been analysed using personality inventory questionnaires. Analysis of these data lead to the suggestion that impulsivity as commonly defined and understood may be made up of several independent factors, which may have separate biological bases. These self-rating questionnaires have been complemented by objective tests that are now often computerized, and which have been used in man (e.g. with criminal offenders, children, or patients who have undergone brain surgery). Some of these tests, such as the differential reinforcement of low rates procedure or the delay of reinforcement procedure, have also been used to study impulsivity in animals. Analysis of the behavioural principles of these tests suggests that they too may reflect different aspects of impulsivity. Many different biological systems have been proposed to contribute to the neurobiological basis of impulsivity. The serotonergic neurotransmitter system has recently received the most attention, with evidence of its involvement coming from animal studies as well as from studies in psychiatric patients. The frontal lobes have been proposed to play an important role in regulating impulsivity, although it unclear how specific this is. None of this biological knowledge has yet led to reliable pharmacotherapy for excessive impulsivity and, as yet, there is

  8. Impulsivity: a discussion of clinical and experimental findings.

    PubMed

    Evenden, J

    1999-01-01

    Impulsivity can often be an important clinical problem in psychiatry and neurology. In psychiatry, the manifestation of impulsive behaviour in syndromes such as personality disorders, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and in substance abuse may be different, and this has led to conflicting definitions. There has also been a tendency to concentrate on the nature of the behavioural manifestation (problems with the law, aggression, drug use, behavioural problems in school) rather than shared psychological processes, and to ignore the fact that impulsivity can also have positive aspects. In a normal population, the personality trait of impulsivity has been analysed using personality inventory questionnaires. Analysis of these data lead to the suggestion that impulsivity as commonly defined and understood may be made up of several independent factors, which may have separate biological bases. These self-rating questionnaires have been complemented by objective tests that are now often computerized, and which have been used in man (e.g. with criminal offenders, children, or patients who have undergone brain surgery). Some of these tests, such as the differential reinforcement of low rates procedure or the delay of reinforcement procedure, have also been used to study impulsivity in animals. Analysis of the behavioural principles of these tests suggests that they too may reflect different aspects of impulsivity. Many different biological systems have been proposed to contribute to the neurobiological basis of impulsivity. The serotonergic neurotransmitter system has recently received the most attention, with evidence of its involvement coming from animal studies as well as from studies in psychiatric patients. The frontal lobes have been proposed to play an important role in regulating impulsivity, although it unclear how specific this is. None of this biological knowledge has yet led to reliable pharmacotherapy for excessive impulsivity and, as yet, there is

  9. Commentary on Hyperkinetic Impulse Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barkley, Russell A.

    2011-01-01

    Dr. Goldstein continues the laudable practice of reprinting articles of historical significance in the history of ADHD with this selective reprinting of material from the original article by Maurice Laufer, Eric Denhoff, and Gerald Solomons on hyperkinetic impulsive disorder (HID) in children. This article on HID is among the first articles to…

  10. Demonstrating Sound Impulses in Pipes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raymer, M. G.; Micklavzina, Stan

    1995-01-01

    Describes a simple, direct method to demonstrate the effects of the boundary conditions on sound impulse reflections in pipes. A graphical display of the results can be made using a pipe, cork, small hammer, microphone, and fast recording electronics. Explains the principles involved. (LZ)

  11. High voltage and high specific capacity dual intercalating electrode Li-ion batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, William C. (Inventor); Blanco, Mario (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention provides high capacity and high voltage Li-ion batteries that have a carbonaceous cathode and a nonaqueous electrolyte solution comprising LiF salt and an anion receptor that binds the fluoride ion. The batteries can comprise dual intercalating electrode Li ion batteries. Methods of the present invention use a cathode and electrode pair, wherein each of the electrodes reversibly intercalate ions provided by a LiF salt to make a high voltage and high specific capacity dual intercalating electrode Li-ion battery. The present methods and systems provide high-capacity batteries particularly useful in powering devices where minimizing battery mass is important.

  12. High Performance Organ-Specific Nuclear Medicine Imagers.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majewski, Stan

    2006-04-01

    One of the exciting applications of nuclear science is nuclear medicine. Well-known diagnostic imaging tools such as PET and SPECT (as well as MRI) were developed as spin-offs of basic scientific research in atomic and nuclear physics. Development of modern instrumentation for applications in particle physics experiments offers an opportunity to contribute to development of improved nuclear medicine (gamma and positron) imagers, complementing the present set of standard imaging tools (PET, SPECT, MRI, ultrasound, fMRI, MEG, etc). Several examples of new high performance imagers developed in national laboratories in collaboration with academia will be given to demonstrate this spin-off activity. These imagers are designed to specifically image organs such as breast, heart, head (brain), or prostate. The remaining and potentially most important challenging application field for dedicated nuclear medicine imagers is to assist with cancer radiation treatments. Better control of radiation dose delivery requires development of new compact in-situ imagers becoming integral parts of the radiation delivery systems using either external beams or based on radiation delivery by inserting or injecting radioactive sources (gamma, beta or alpha emitters) into tumors.

  13. Streptococcal C5a peptidase is a highly specific endopeptidase.

    PubMed Central

    Cleary, P P; Prahbu, U; Dale, J B; Wexler, D E; Handley, J

    1992-01-01

    Compositional analysis of streptococcal C5a peptidase (SCPA) cleavage products from a synthetic peptide corresponding to the 20 C-terminal residues of C5a demonstrated that the target cleavage site is His-Lys rather than Lys-Asp, as previously suggested. A C5a peptide analog with Lys replaced by Gln was also subject to cleavage by SCPA. This confirmed that His-Lys rather than Lys-Asp is the scissile bond. Cleavage at histidine is unusual but is the same as that suggested for a peptidase produced by group B streptococci. Native C5 protein was also resistant to SCPA, suggesting that the His-Lys bond is inaccessible prior to proteolytic cleavage by C5 convertase. These experiments showed that the streptococcal C5a peptidase is highly specific for C5a and suggest that its function is not merely to process protein for metabolic consumption but to act primarily to eliminate this chemotactic signal from inflammatory foci. Images PMID:1452354

  14. Failure mechanisms in composite panels subjected to underwater impulsive loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latourte, Félix; Grégoire, David; Zenkert, Dan; Wei, Xiaoding; Espinosa, Horacio D.

    2011-08-01

    This work examines the performance of composite panels when subjected to underwater impulsive loads. The scaled fluid-structure experimental methodology developed by Espinosa and co-workers was employed. Failure modes, damage mechanisms and their distributions were identified and quantified for composite monolithic and sandwich panels subjected to typical blast loadings. The temporal evolutions of panel deflection and center deflection histories were obtained from shadow Moiré fringes acquired in real time by means of high speed photography. A linear relationship of zero intercept between peak center deflections versus applied impulse per areal mass was obtained for composite monolithic panels. For composite sandwich panels, the relationship between maximum center deflection versus applied impulse per areal mass was found to be approximately bilinear but with a higher slope. Performance improvement of sandwich versus monolithic composite panels was, therefore, established specially at sufficiently high impulses per areal mass ( I0/ M¯>170 m s -1). Severe failure was observed in solid panels subjected to impulses per areal mass larger than 300 m s -1. Extensive fiber fracture occurred in the center of the panels, where cracks formed a cross pattern through the plate thickness and delamination was very extensive on the sample edges due to bending effects. Similar levels of damage were observed in sandwich panels but at much higher impulses per areal mass. The experimental work reported in this paper encompasses not only characterization of the dynamic performance of monolithic and sandwich panels but also post-mortem characterization by means of both non-destructive and microscopy techniques. The spatial distribution of delamination and matrix cracking were quantified, as a function of applied impulse, in both monolithic and sandwich panels. The extent of core crushing was also quantified in the case of sandwich panels. The quantified variables represent ideal

  15. Psychedelic symptoms of cannabis and cocaine use as a function of trait impulsivity.

    PubMed

    van Wel, J H P; Spronk, D B; Kuypers, K P C; Theunissen, E L; Toennes, S W; Verkes, R J; Ramaekers, J G

    2015-03-01

    Trait impulsivity has been linked to addiction in humans. It has been suggested that drug users with high trait impulsivity levels are more sensitive to subjective drug intoxication. This study assessed whether subjective response to drugs differs between drug users with normal or high levels of trait impulsivity. Regular drug users (N = 122) received doses of cocaine HCl, cannabis, and placebo in a three-way crossover study. Their mood, dissociative state, and psychedelic symptoms were measured with subjective rating scales (CADDS, Bowdle, POMS). Trait impulsivity was assessed with the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale. Cannabis increased dissociation and psychedelic state, as well as fatigue, confusion, depression and anxiety, and decreased arousal, positive mood, vigor, friendliness, and elation. Cocaine increased dissociation, psychedelic state, vigor, friendliness, elation, positive mood, anxiety and arousal, while decreasing fatigue. Only a few subjective items revealed a drug × trait impulsivity interaction, suggesting that psychedelic symptoms were most intense in high impulsivity subjects. Trait impulsiveness ratings were negatively correlated with ratings of vigor (r = -.197) and positively correlated with ratings of loss of thought control (r = .237) during cannabis intoxication. It is concluded that a broad association between trait impulsivity and psychedelic subjective drug experience appears to be absent.

  16. Psychedelic symptoms of cannabis and cocaine use as a function of trait impulsivity.

    PubMed

    van Wel, J H P; Spronk, D B; Kuypers, K P C; Theunissen, E L; Toennes, S W; Verkes, R J; Ramaekers, J G

    2015-03-01

    Trait impulsivity has been linked to addiction in humans. It has been suggested that drug users with high trait impulsivity levels are more sensitive to subjective drug intoxication. This study assessed whether subjective response to drugs differs between drug users with normal or high levels of trait impulsivity. Regular drug users (N = 122) received doses of cocaine HCl, cannabis, and placebo in a three-way crossover study. Their mood, dissociative state, and psychedelic symptoms were measured with subjective rating scales (CADDS, Bowdle, POMS). Trait impulsivity was assessed with the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale. Cannabis increased dissociation and psychedelic state, as well as fatigue, confusion, depression and anxiety, and decreased arousal, positive mood, vigor, friendliness, and elation. Cocaine increased dissociation, psychedelic state, vigor, friendliness, elation, positive mood, anxiety and arousal, while decreasing fatigue. Only a few subjective items revealed a drug × trait impulsivity interaction, suggesting that psychedelic symptoms were most intense in high impulsivity subjects. Trait impulsiveness ratings were negatively correlated with ratings of vigor (r = -.197) and positively correlated with ratings of loss of thought control (r = .237) during cannabis intoxication. It is concluded that a broad association between trait impulsivity and psychedelic subjective drug experience appears to be absent. PMID:25572345

  17. Characteristics of Impulsive Suicide Attempts and Attempters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simon, Thomas R.; Swann, Alan C.; Powell, Kenneth E.; Potter, Lloyd B.; Kresnow, Marcie-jo; O'Carroll, Patrick W.

    2002-01-01

    Examined impulsive suicide attempts within a population-based, case-control study of nearly lethal suicide attempts among adolescents and young adults. Impulsive attempts were more likely among those who had been in a physical fight and less likely among those who were depressed. Findings suggest inadequate control of aggressive impulses as a…

  18. Adolescent Impulsivity: Findings from a Community Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    d'Acremont, Mathieu; Van der Linden, Martial

    2005-01-01

    Impulsivity is central to several psychopathological states in adolescence. However, there is little consensus concerning the definition of impulsivity and its core dimensions. In response to this lack of consensus, Whiteside and Lynam (2001, "Pers. Individ. Differ." 30, 669-689) have developed the UPPS Impulsive Behavior Scale, which is able to…

  19. Comparative Analysis of Median and Average Filters in Impulse Noise Suppression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Luyao; Chen, Yang; Yuan, Wenlong; Zhang, Libo; Yang, Benqiang; Shu, Huazhong; Luo, Limin; Coatrieux, Jean-Louis

    2015-10-01

    Median type filters coupled with the Laplacian distribution assumption have shown a high efficiency in suppressing impulse noise. We however demonstrate in this paper that the Gaussian distribution assumption is more preferable than Laplacian distribution assumption in suppressing impulse noise, especially for high noise densities. This conclusion is supported by numerical experiments with different noise densities and filter models.

  20. Diagnosis and treatment of impulse control disorders in patients with movement disorders

    PubMed Central

    Mestre, Tiago A.; Strafella, Antonio P.; Thomsen, Teri; Voon, Valerie

    2013-01-01

    Impulse control disorders are a psychiatric condition characterized by the failure to resist an impulsive act or behavior that may be harmful to self or others. In movement disorders, impulse control disorders are associated with dopaminergic treatment, notably dopamine agonists (DAs). Impulse control disorders have been studied extensively in Parkinson’s disease, but are also recognized in restless leg syndrome and atypical Parkinsonian syndromes. Epidemiological studies suggest younger age, male sex, greater novelty seeking, impulsivity, depression and premorbid impulse control disorders as the most consistent risk factors. Such patients may warrant special monitoring after starting treatment with a DA. Various individual screening tools are available for people without Parkinson’s disease. The Questionnaire for Impulsive-Compulsive Disorders in Parkinson’s Disease has been developed specifically for Parkinson’s disease. The best treatment for impulse control disorders is prevention. However, after the development of impulse control disorders, the mainstay intervention is to reduce or discontinue the offending anti-Parkinsonian medication. In refractory cases, other pharmacological interventions are available, including neuroleptics, antiepileptics, amantadine, antiandrogens, lithium and opioid antagonists. Unfortunately, their use is only supported by case reports, small case series or open-label clinical studies. Prospective, controlled studies are warranted. Ongoing investigations include naltrexone and nicotine. PMID:23634190

  1. Bender Gestalt Signs as Indicants of Conceptual Impulsivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brannigan, Gary G.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Sixty children were individually administered the Matching Familiar Figures Test and the Bender Gestalt Test. A significant relationship was found between errors on the Bender Gestalt Test and impulsivity. Specifically, increased or decreased loops, change in angulation, loops for circles, and circles for dots or dots for circles were all…

  2. Impulse-induced localized control of chaos in starlike networks.

    PubMed

    Chacón, Ricardo; Palmero, Faustino; Cuevas-Maraver, Jesús

    2016-06-01

    Locally decreasing the impulse transmitted by periodic pulses is shown to be a reliable method of taming chaos in starlike networks of dissipative nonlinear oscillators, leading to both synchronous periodic states and equilibria (oscillation death). Specifically, the paradigmatic model of damped kicked rotators is studied in which it is assumed that when the rotators are driven synchronously, i.e., all driving pulses transmit the same impulse, the networks display chaotic dynamics. It is found that the taming effect of decreasing the impulse transmitted by the pulses acting on particular nodes strongly depends on their number and degree of connectivity. A theoretical analysis is given explaining the basic physical mechanism as well as the main features of the chaos-control scenario. PMID:27415258

  3. Impulse-induced localized control of chaos in starlike networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chacón, Ricardo; Palmero, Faustino; Cuevas-Maraver, Jesús

    2016-06-01

    Locally decreasing the impulse transmitted by periodic pulses is shown to be a reliable method of taming chaos in starlike networks of dissipative nonlinear oscillators, leading to both synchronous periodic states and equilibria (oscillation death). Specifically, the paradigmatic model of damped kicked rotators is studied in which it is assumed that when the rotators are driven synchronously, i.e., all driving pulses transmit the same impulse, the networks display chaotic dynamics. It is found that the taming effect of decreasing the impulse transmitted by the pulses acting on particular nodes strongly depends on their number and degree of connectivity. A theoretical analysis is given explaining the basic physical mechanism as well as the main features of the chaos-control scenario.

  4. Impulse-induced localized control of chaos in starlike networks.

    PubMed

    Chacón, Ricardo; Palmero, Faustino; Cuevas-Maraver, Jesús

    2016-06-01

    Locally decreasing the impulse transmitted by periodic pulses is shown to be a reliable method of taming chaos in starlike networks of dissipative nonlinear oscillators, leading to both synchronous periodic states and equilibria (oscillation death). Specifically, the paradigmatic model of damped kicked rotators is studied in which it is assumed that when the rotators are driven synchronously, i.e., all driving pulses transmit the same impulse, the networks display chaotic dynamics. It is found that the taming effect of decreasing the impulse transmitted by the pulses acting on particular nodes strongly depends on their number and degree of connectivity. A theoretical analysis is given explaining the basic physical mechanism as well as the main features of the chaos-control scenario.

  5. Trajectory Specification for High-Capacity Air Traffic Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paielli, Russell A.

    2004-01-01

    In the current air traffic management system, the fundamental limitation on airspace capacity is the cognitive ability of human air traffic controllers to maintain safe separation with high reliability. The doubling or tripling of airspace capacity that will be needed over the next couple of decades will require that tactical separation be at least partially automated. Standardized conflict-free four-dimensional trajectory assignment will be needed to accomplish that objective. A trajectory specification format based on the Extensible Markup Language is proposed for that purpose. This format can be used to downlink a trajectory request, which can then be checked on the ground for conflicts and approved or modified, if necessary, then uplinked as the assigned trajectory. The horizontal path is specified as a series of geodetic waypoints connected by great circles, and the great-circle segments are connected by turns of specified radius. Vertical profiles for climb and descent are specified as low-order polynomial functions of along-track position, which is itself specified as a function of time. Flight technical error tolerances in the along-track, cross-track, and vertical axes define a bounding space around the reference trajectory, and conformance will guarantee the required separation for a period of time known as the conflict time horizon. An important safety benefit of this regimen is that the traffic will be able to fly free of conflicts for at least several minutes even if all ground systems and the entire communication infrastructure fail. Periodic updates in the along-track axis will adjust for errors in the predicted along-track winds.

  6. Solar flare impulsive phase emission observed with SDO/EVE

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, Michael B.; Milligan, Ryan O.; Mathioudakis, Mihalis; Keenan, Francis P.

    2013-12-10

    Differential emission measures (DEMs) during the impulsive phase of solar flares were constructed using observations from the EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) and the Markov-Chain Monte Carlo method. Emission lines from ions formed over the temperature range log T{sub e} = 5.8-7.2 allow the evolution of the DEM to be studied over a wide temperature range at 10 s cadence. The technique was applied to several M- and X-class flares, where impulsive phase EUV emission is observable in the disk-integrated EVE spectra from emission lines formed up to 3-4 MK and we use spatially unresolved EVE observations to infer the thermal structure of the emitting region. For the nine events studied, the DEMs exhibited a two-component distribution during the impulsive phase, a low-temperature component with peak temperature of 1-2 MK, and a broad high-temperature component from 7 to 30 MK. A bimodal high-temperature component is also found for several events, with peaks at 8 and 25 MK during the impulsive phase. The origin of the emission was verified using Atmospheric Imaging Assembly images to be the flare ribbons and footpoints, indicating that the constructed DEMs represent the spatially average thermal structure of the chromospheric flare emission during the impulsive phase.

  7. Impulsive choice behavior in four strains of rats: evaluation of possible models of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Ana; Kirkpatrick, Kimberly

    2013-02-01

    Several studies have examined impulsive choice behavior in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) as a possible pre-clinical model for Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). However, this strain was not specifically selected for the traits of ADHD and as a result their appropriateness as a model has been questioned. The present study investigated whether SHRs would exhibit impulsive behavior in comparison to their control strain, Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rats. In addition, we evaluated a strain that has previously shown high levels of impulsive choice, the Lewis (LEW) rats and compared them with their source strain, Wistar (WIS) rats. In the first phase, rats could choose between a smaller-sooner (SS) reward of 1 pellet after 10 s and a larger-later (LL) reward of 2 pellets after 30 s. Subsequently, the rats were exposed to increases in LL reward magnitude and SS delay. These manipulations were designed to assess sensitivity to magnitude and delay within the choice task to parse out possible differences in using the strains as models of specific deficits associated with ADHD. The SHR and WKY strains did not differ in their choice behavior under either delay or magnitude manipulations. In comparison to WIS, LEW showed deficits in choice behavior in the delay manipulation, and to a lesser extent in the magnitude manipulation. An examination of individual differences indicated that the SHR strain may not be sufficiently homogeneous in their impulsive choice behavior to be considered as a viable model for impulse control disorders such as ADHD. The LEW strain may be worthy of further consideration for their suitability as an animal model.

  8. THz impulse radar for biomedical sensing: nonlinear system behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, E. R.; Sung, Shijun; Grundfest, W. S.; Taylor, Z. D.

    2014-03-01

    The THz impulse radar is an "RF-inspired" sensor system that has performed remarkably well since its initial development nearly six years ago. It was developed for ex vivo skin-burn imaging, and has since shown great promise in the sensitive detection of hydration levels in soft tissues of several types, such as in vivo corneal and burn samples. An intriguing aspect of the impulse radar is its hybrid architecture which combines the high-peak-power of photoconductive switches with the high-responsivity and -bandwidth (RF and video) of Schottky-diode rectifiers. The result is a very sensitive sensor system in which the post-detection signal-to-noise ratio depends super-linearly on average signal power up to a point where the diode is "turned on" in the forward direction, and then behaves quasi-linearly beyond that point. This paper reports the first nonlinear systems analysis done on the impulse radar using MATLAB.

  9. Neurophysiological markers of multiple facets of impulsivity.

    PubMed

    Neal, Lauren B; Gable, Philip A

    2016-03-01

    Human behavior is influenced by three core personality systems: approach, avoidance, and supervisory control. The supervisory control system is inversely related to impulsivity. Although past research has related some aspects of impulsivity to frontal hemispheric asymmetry, impulsivity as a multi-faceted construct has not been studied in relation with frontal asymmetry. In addition, past work has potentially confounded impulsivity with approach-motivation. In the current study, greater relative left frontal activity was related to multiple facets of impulsivity: negative urgency, lack of premeditation, lack of perseverance, and positive urgency. Regressing both positive and negative urgency on frontal asymmetry revealed that approach-related positive urgency related to greater left frontal activity, but withdrawal-related negative urgency marginally related to greater right frontal activity. These results suggest that impulsivity, independent of affective valence, relates to greater left frontal activity. When controlling for trait approach motivation, the relationship between impulsivity and left frontal activity is unchanged.

  10. Impulsivity and nonsuicidal self-injury: A review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Hamza, Chloe A; Willoughby, Teena; Heffer, Taylor

    2015-06-01

    Nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI; direct self-injury without lethal intent) often is thought to be associated with impulse control problems. Recent research, however, offers conflicting results about whether impulsivity is a risk factor for NSSI engagement. To disentangle findings on the link between impulsivity and NSSI, an extensive review of the literature was conducted using several electronic databases (i.e., PsychInfo, PsychArticles, ERIC, CINAHL, and MEDLINE). In total, 27 studies that met the specific inclusion criteria were identified. Results of a meta-analysis revealed that individuals who engaged in NSSI self-reported greater impulsivity than individuals who did not engage in NSSI, and that this effect was most consistent for measures of negative urgency. In contrast, there was little evidence of an association between lab-based measures of impulsivity (e.g., Go/No-Go, Stop/Signal Task) and NSSI. Moreover, the link between impulsivity and NSSI found for self-report measures was sometimes eliminated when other risk factors for NSSI were controlled (e.g., abuse, depression, post-traumatic stress disorder). In addition to integrating findings, the present review provides several explanations for the discrepancies in findings between studies employing self-report versus lab-based measures of impulsivity. To conclude, several specific recommendations for future research directions to extend the literature on impulsivity and NSSI are offered.

  11. Electron acceleration in impulsive solar flares

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, S.R.; Benz, A.O.; Treumann, R.A.

    1982-12-01

    Simultaneous observations of the hard X-ray, microwave, and type III and DCIM (decimetric)radio bursts associated with the 1978 December 4 solar flare have been used to study the physical parameters relevant to the acceleration and propagation of energetic electrons during the impulsive phase of a solar flare. The hard X-ray observations were made with the X-ray spectrometer aboard the ISEE 3 spacecraft. The radio spectra in metric and decimetric bands were recorded with the radiospectrograph located at Durnten, near Zurich, Switzerland. The microwave observations were made at the Sagamore Hill and Bern observatories. The three metric type III bursts coincided with the three most prominent hard X-ray peaks. This is the fist time a clear one-to-one association between single type III bursts and hard X-ray peaks has been established. The average delay of the type III bursts with respect to the X-ray peaks was 0.5 s. The harder the X-ray spectrum, the higher was the drift rate of the associated type III burst. The characteristic electron energies inferred from the drift rate are of the order of 70 keV. The observed increase in the high-frequency cutoff of the metric type III bursts during the impulsive phase has been examined in terms of the decreasing altitude of the electron acceleration/injection region, the increasing hardness of the electron spectrum, and the decreasing acceleration time. A pulsating decimetric continuum (DCIM) was also found to be present during and before the impulsive phase. The DCIM source seems to coincide spatially with the electron acceleration region and the (projected) origin of the associated type II shock.ction region.

  12. Relationships between ground reaction impulse and sprint acceleration performance in team sport athletes.

    PubMed

    Kawamori, Naoki; Nosaka, Kazunori; Newton, Robert U

    2013-03-01

    Large horizontal acceleration in short sprints is a critical performance parameter for many team sport athletes. It is often stated that producing large horizontal impulse at each ground contact is essential for high short sprint performance, but the optimal pattern of horizontal and vertical impulses is not well understood, especially when the sprints are initiated from a standing start. This study was an investigation of the relationships between ground reaction impulses and sprint acceleration performance from a standing start in team sport athletes. Thirty physically active young men with team sport background performed 10-m sprint from a standing start, whereas sprint time and ground reaction forces were recorded during the first ground contact and at 8 m from the start. Associations between sprint time and ground reaction impulses (normalized to body mass) were determined by a Pearson's correlation coefficient (r) analysis. The 10-m sprint time was significantly (p < 0.01) correlated with net horizontal impulse (r = -0.52) and propulsive impulse (r = -0.66) measured at 8 m from the start. No significant correlations were found between sprint time and impulses recorded during the first ground contact after the start. These results suggest that applying ground reaction impulse in a more horizontal direction is important for sprint acceleration from a standing start. This is consistent with the hypothesis of training to increase net horizontal impulse production using sled towing or using elastic resistance devices, which needs to be validated by future longitudinal training studies.

  13. Ionospheric current contribution to the main impulse of a negative sudden impulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vichare, Geeta; Rawat, Rahul; Bhaskar, Ankush; Pathan, Bashir M.

    2014-12-01

    The geomagnetic field response to a moderate-amplitude negative sudden impulse (SI-) that occurred on 14 May 2009 at 10:30 UT was examined at 97 geomagnetic observatories situated all over the globe. The response signature contains a contribution from magnetospheric as well as ionospheric currents. The main impulse (MI) is defined as the maximum depression in the observed geomagnetic field. It is observed that for low-to-high latitudes, the amplitude of the MI is larger in the afternoon to post-dusk sector than in the dawn-noon sector, indicating asymmetry in the MI amplitude. We estimated the contribution at various observatories due to the Chapman-Ferraro magnetopause currents using the Tsyganenko model (T01) and subtracted this from the observed MI amplitude to obtain the contribution due to ionospheric currents. It is found that the ionospheric currents contribute significantly to the MI amplitude of moderate SI- even at low-to-mid latitudes and that the contribution is in the same direction as that from the magnetopause currents near dusk and in the opposite direction near dawn. The equivalent current vectors reveal a clockwise (anticlockwise) ionospheric current loop in the afternoon (morning) sector during the MI of the negative pressure impulse. This evidences an ionospheric twin-cell-vortex current system (DP2) due to field-aligned currents (FACs) associated with the dusk-to-dawn convection electric field during the MI of an SI-. We also estimated the magnetic field variation due to prompt penetration electric fields, which is found to be very small at low latitudes in the present case. The studied SI- is not associated with shock, and hence no preliminary reverse impulse was evident. In addition, the summer hemisphere reveals larger MI amplitudes than the winter hemisphere, indicating once again the role of ionospheric currents.

  14. Double trouble. Trait food craving and impulsivity interactively predict food-cue affected behavioral inhibition.

    PubMed

    Meule, Adrian; Kübler, Andrea

    2014-08-01

    Impulsivity and food craving have both been implicated in overeating. Recent results suggest that both processes may interactively predict increased food intake. In the present study, female participants performed a Go/No-go task with pictures of high- and low-calorie foods. They were instructed to press a button in response to the respective target category, but withhold responses to the other category. Target category was switched after every other block, thereby creating blocks in which stimulus-response mapping was the same as in the previous block (nonshift blocks) and blocks in which it was reversed (shift blocks). The Food Cravings Questionnaires and the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale were used to assess trait and state food craving and attentional, motor, and nonplanning impulsivity. Participants had slower reaction times and more omission errors (OE) in high-calorie than in low-calorie blocks. Number of commission errors (CE) and OE was higher in shift blocks than in nonshift blocks. Trait impulsivity was positively correlated with CE in shift blocks while trait food craving was positively correlated with CE in high-calorie blocks. Importantly, CE in high-calorie-shift blocks were predicted by an interaction of food craving × impulsivity such that the relationship between food craving and CE was particularly strong at high levels of impulsivity, but vanished at low levels of impulsivity. Thus, impulsive reactions to high-calorie food-cues are particularly pronounced when both trait impulsivity and food craving is high, but low levels of impulsivity can compensate for high levels of trait food craving. Results support models of self-regulation which assume that interactive effects of low top-down control and strong reward sensitive, bottom-up mechanisms may determine eating-related disinhibition, ultimately leading to increased food intake.

  15. Diet-induced obesity: dopamine transporter function, impulsivity and motivation

    PubMed Central

    Narayanaswami, V; Thompson, AC; Cassis, LA; Bardo, MT; Dwoskin, LP

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE A rat model of diet-induced obesity (DIO) was used to determine dopamine transporter (DAT) function, impulsivity and motivation as neurobehavioral outcomes and predictors of obesity. DESIGN To evaluate neurobehavioral alterations following the development of DIO induced by an 8-week high-fat diet (HF) exposure, striatal D2-receptor density, DAT function and expression, extracellular dopamine concentrations, impulsivity, and motivation for high- and low-fat reinforcers were determined. To determine predictors of DIO, neurobehavioral antecedents including impulsivity, motivation for high-fat reinforcers, DAT function and extracellular dopamine were evaluated before the 8-week HF exposure. METHODS Striatal D2-receptor density was determined by in vitro kinetic analysis of [3H]raclopride binding. DAT function was determined using in vitro kinetic analysis of [3H]dopamine uptake, methamphetamine-evoked [3H]dopamine overflow and no-net flux in vivo microdialysis. DAT cell-surface expression was determined using biotinylation and western blotting. Impulsivity and food-motivated behavior were determined using a delay discounting task and progressive ratio schedule, respectively. RESULTS Relative to obesity-resistant (OR) rats, obesity-prone (OP) rats exhibited 18% greater body weight following an 8-week HF-diet exposure, 42% lower striatal D2-receptor density, 30% lower total DAT expression, 40% lower in vitro and in vivo DAT function, 45% greater extracellular dopamine and twofold greater methamphetamine-evoked [3H]dopamine overflow. OP rats exhibited higher motivation for food, and surprisingly, were less impulsive relative to OR rats. Impulsivity, in vivo DAT function and extracellular dopamine concentration did not predict DIO. Importantly, motivation for high-fat reinforcers predicted the development of DIO. CONCLUSION Human studies are limited by their ability to determine if impulsivity, motivation and DAT function are causes or consequences of DIO. The

  16. Specification of High Activity Gamma-Ray Sources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements, Washington, DC.

    The report is concerned with making recommendations for the specifications of gamma ray sources, which relate to the quantity of radioactive material and the radiation emitted. Primary consideration is given to sources in teletherapy and to a lesser extent those used in industrial radiography and in irradiation units used in industry and research.…

  17. System Specification for Immobilized High-Level Waste Interim Storage

    SciTech Connect

    CALMUS, R.B.

    2000-12-27

    This specification establishes the system-level functional, performance, design, interface, and test requirements for Phase 1 of the IHLW Interim Storage System, located at the Hanford Site in Washington State. The IHLW canisters will be produced at the Hanford Site by a Selected DOE contractor. Subsequent to storage the canisters will be shipped to a federal geologic repository.

  18. Impulsivity and Its Relationship to Risky Sexual Behaviors and Drug Abuse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winters, Ken C.; Botzet, Andria M.; Fahnhorst, Tamara; Baumel, Lindsey; Lee, Susanne

    2009-01-01

    We examined a mediational model of the interrelationship of drug use, sexual risk, and impulsivity in a sample of young adults (N = 89), of which almost half displayed highly disruptive behaviors as children. We chose a mediational model given the emerging evidence that impulsivity is an underlying risk factor for many youth health risk problems,…

  19. "Speedy Action over Goal Orientation": Cognitive Impulsivity in Male Forensic Patients with Dyslexia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daderman, Anna M.; Meurling, Ann Wirsen; Levander, Sten

    2012-01-01

    Previous neuropsychiatric studies suggest a relationship between reading disability and cognitive impulsivity. This relationship is not entirely explained by the high comorbidity between reading disability and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), as children with a co-occurrence of these disorders tend to be more impulsive than those…

  20. Impulsivity and Concussion in Juvenile Rats: Examining Molecular and Structural Aspects of the Frontostriatal Pathway.

    PubMed

    Hehar, Harleen; Yeates, Keith; Kolb, Bryan; Esser, Michael J; Mychasiuk, Richelle

    2015-01-01

    Impulsivity and poor executive control have been implicated in the pathogenesis of many developmental and neuropsychiatric disorders. Similarly, concussions/mild traumatic brain injuries (mTBI) have been associated with increased risk for neuropsychiatric disorders and the development of impulsivity and inattention. Researchers and epidemiologists have therefore considered whether or not concussions induce symptoms of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), or merely unmask impulsive tendencies that were already present. The purpose of this study was to determine if a single concussion in adolescence could induce ADHD-like impulsivity and impaired response inhibition, and subsequently determine if inherent impulsivity prior to a pediatric mTBI would exacerbate post-concussion symptomology with a specific emphasis on impulsive and inattentive behaviours. As these behaviours are believed to be associated with the frontostriatal circuit involving the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and the prefrontal cortex (PFC), the expression patterns of 8 genes (Comt, Drd2, Drd3, Drd4, Maoa, Sert, Tph1, and Tph2) from these two regions were examined. In addition, Golgi-Cox staining of medium spiny neurons in the NAc provided a neuroanatomical examination of mTBI-induced structural changes. The study found that a single early brain injury could induce impulsivity and impairments in response inhibition that were more pronounced in males. Interestingly, when animals with inherent impulsivity experienced mTBI, injury-related deficits were exacerbated in female animals. The single concussion increased dendritic branching, but reduced synaptic density in the NAc, and these changes were likely associated with the increase in impulsivity. Finally, mTBI-induced impulsivity was associated with modifications to gene expression that differed dramatically from the gene expression pattern associated with inherent impulsivity, despite very similar behavioural phenotypes. Our findings suggest

  1. Distribution transformer performance when subjected to steep front impulses

    SciTech Connect

    Burrage, L.M.; Shaw, J.H. . Thomas A. Edison Technical Center); McConnell, B.W. )

    1990-04-01

    The experimental method and the results of subjecting arrester protected pole type distribution transformers to the combined stresses caused by the conducted steep front impulse and rated 60 Hz voltages are described. Comparisons are drawn between these results and those of similar experiments on unenergized distribution transformers. It is concluded that tank mounted direct connected arresters provide a high degree of protection to these transformers, tank mounted externally gapped or crossarm mounted arresters may not provide sufficient protection; internal transformer insulation system failures caused by the steep front impulse do not necessarily result in immediate catastrophic failures of the transformers.

  2. Silicone oil with high specific gravity for intraocular use.

    PubMed Central

    Gabel, V P; Kampik, A; Gabel, C; Spiegel, D

    1987-01-01

    Silicone oil with a higher specific gravity than that of intraocular fluid or polydimethylsiloxane may have special indications in vitreoretinal surgery. Trifluorsiloxane is such a substance, and therefore its biological compatibility was investigated in rabbit eyes. It was found that this substance was clinically well tolerated within the observation time of up to 6 months, even if there was some neovascularisation from the inferior limbus. Histologically both an inflammatory response and tissue impregnation were more pronounced than with normal polydimethylsiloxane. Images PMID:2437955

  3. Role of serotonin transporter function in rat orbitofrontal cortex in impulsive choice

    PubMed Central

    Darna, Mahesh; Chow, Jonathan J.; Yates, Justin R.; Charnigo, Richard J.; Beckmann, Joshua S.; Bardo, Michael T.; Dwoskin, Linda P.

    2016-01-01

    Impulsivity is a multi-faceted personality construct that plays a prominent role in drug abuse vulnerability. Dysregulation of 5-hydroxytryptamine (serotonin, 5-HT) systems in subregions of the prefrontal cortex has been implicated in impulsivity. Extracellular 5-HT concentrations are regulated by 5-HT transporters (SERTs), indicating that these transporters may be important molecular targets underlying individual differences in impulsivity and drug abuse vulnerability. The present study evaluated the role of SERT in mediating individual differences in impulsivity. Rats were tested for both impulsive action using the cued go/no-go task and for impulsive choice using a delay discounting task in a counterbalanced design. Following behavioral evaluation, Km and Vmax were obtained from kinetic analysis of [3H]5-HT uptake by SERT using synaptosomes prepared from both orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) obtained from each individual rat. Vmax for SERT in OFC, but not mPFC, was negatively correlated with mean adjusted delay scores in the delay discounting task. In contrast, Vmax for SERT in OFC and mPFC was not correlated with performance in the cued go/no-go task. To further evaluate the relationship between SERT function and impulsive choice, a selective SERT inhibitor, fluoxetine (0, 15, 50 and 150 pmol/side) was microinjected bilaterally into OFC and effects on the delay discounting task determined. Following stabilization of behavior, fluoxetine increased mean adjusted delay scores (decreased impulsivity) in high impulsive rats compared to saline microinjection, but had no effect in low impulsive rats. These ex vivo and in vivo results suggest that enhanced SERT function in OFC underlies high impulsive choice behavior. PMID:26183652

  4. Understanding the role of impulsivity and externalizing psychopathology in alcohol abuse: application of the UPPS impulsive behavior scale.

    PubMed

    Whiteside, Stephen P; Lynam, Donald R

    2003-08-01

    The present study explores the relation among 4 personality traits associated with impulsive behavior and alcohol abuse. Personality traits were measured using the 4 subscales of the UPPS Impulsive Behavior Scale (UPPS; S. P. Whiteside & D. R. Lynam, 2001). The UPPS and measures of psychopathology were administered to clinical samples of alcohol abusers high in antisocial personality traits (AAPD), alcohol abusers low in antisocial personality traits (AA), and a control group (total N = 60). Separate analyses of variance indicated that AAPDs had significant elevations on all 4 UPPS scales, whereas the AAs and controls differed only on the Urgency subscale. However, when controlling for psychopathology, group differences on the UPPS scales disappeared. The results suggest that personality traits related to impulsive behavior are not directly related to alcohol abuse but rather are associated with the elevated levels of psychopathology found in a subtype of alcohol abusers. PMID:12940500

  5. Evaluation of behavioral impulsivity and aggression tasks as endophenotypes for borderline personality disorder

    PubMed Central

    McCloskey, Michael S.; New, Antonia S.; Siever, Larry J.; Goodman, Marianne; Koenigsberg, Harold W.; Flory, Janine D.; Coccaro, Emil F.

    2010-01-01

    Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is marked by aggression and impulsive, often self-destructive behavior. Despite the severe risks associated with BPD, relatively little is known about the disorder’s etiology. Identification of genetic correlates (endophenotypes) of BPD would improve the prospects of targeted interventions for more homogeneous subsets of borderline patients characterized by specific genetic vulnerabilities. The current study evaluated behavioral measures of aggression and impulsivity as potential endophenotypes for BPD. Subjects with BPD (N = 127), a non cluster B personality disorder (OPD N = 122), or healthy volunteers (HV N = 112) completed self report and behavioral measures of aggression, motor impulsivity and cognitive impulsivity. Results showed that BPD subjects demonstrated more aggression and motor impulsivity than HV (but not OPD) subjects on behavioral tasks. In contrast, BPD subjects self-reported more impulsivity and aggression than either comparison group. Subsequent analyses showed that among BPD subjects behavioral aggression was associated with self-reported aggression, while behavioral and self-report impulsivity measures were more modestly associated. Overall, the results provide partial support for the use of behavioral measures of aggression and motor impulsivity as endophenotypes for BPD, with stronger support for behavioral aggression measures as an endophenotype for aggression within BPD samples. PMID:19232640

  6. Posttraumatic Stress Disorder's Underlying Dimensions and Their Relation With Impulsivity Facets.

    PubMed

    Contractor, Ateka A; Armour, Cherie; Forbes, David; Elhai, Jon D

    2016-01-01

    Research indicates a significant relationship between posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and impulsivity (Kotler, Julian, Efront, and Amir, J Nerv Ment Dis 189:162-167, 2001; Ledgerwood and Petry, J Trauma Stress 19:411-416, 2006). The present study assessed relations between PTSD symptom clusters and impulsivity subscales in an effort to assess the specific impulsivity component most related to PTSD's alterations in arousal/reactivity and alterations in mood/cognitions symptoms. In the current study, the PTSD Checklist for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th Edition, and the UPPS Impulsivity Scale were administered to a sample of 412 nonclinical subjects with a trauma history. Results indicated that PTSD's alterations in arousal/reactivity and mood/cognition factors were most related to impulsivity's sensation-seeking tendency compared with other impulsivity components. Results highlight the importance of assessing and addressing (1) sensation-seeking tendencies and (2) urges to act impulsively when experiencing negative affect in trauma treatment. Furthermore, it is possible that sensation-seeking tendencies are primarily driving the comorbidity between PTSD and certain impulsive behaviors. PMID:26558499

  7. Effects of Acute Tryptophan Depletion on Three Different Types of Behavioral Impulsivity

    PubMed Central

    Dougherty, Donald M.; Richard, Dawn M.; James, Lisa M.; Mathias, Charles W.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: While central nervous system serotonin has been implicated in a variety of problematic impulsive behaviors, biological manipulation of brain serotonin using acute tryptophan depletion for studying changes in impulsive behavior has received little attention. Methods: Using identical treatment conditions, we examined the effects of reduced serotonin synthesis for each of three matched groups using acute tryptophan depletion. Thirty healthy men and women (ages 18–45) were assigned to perform one of three tasks assessing different types of behavioral impulsivity: response initiation, response inhibition, and consequence sensitivity (N = 90). Participants completed two experimental days during which each consumed either a tryptophan-depletion or balanced-placebo amino-acid formulation and completed 5 sessions of their respective tasks at 0.25 h before and 1.5, 4.0, 5.0, and 6.0 h after beverage consumption. Results: During peak effectiveness (5.0 h to 6.0 h following amino-acid consumption), depletion produced selective differences dependent on the type of impulsivity being tested. Specifically, relative to baseline testing (pre-depletion), response initiation impulsivity was significantly increased during the peak effects of depletion. And, when compared to placebo control, both response initiation and consequence sensitivity impulsivity were increased during the peak effects of depletion. Conclusion: Though response initiation and consequence sensitivity impulsivity were affected by tryptophan depletion, response inhibition impulsivity was not, suggesting that other biological processes may underlie this specific component of impulsivity. Future research in other populations or using different pharmacological agents is warranted to further examine the biological processes underlying these components of impulsivity. PMID:22084592

  8. Two-domain formation during the epitaxial growth of GaN (0001) on c-plane Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (0001) by high power impulse magnetron sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Junaid, M.; Lundin, D.; Palisaitis, J.; Hsiao, C.-L.; Darakchieva, V.; Jensen, J.; Persson, P. O. A.; Sandstroem, P.; Helmersson, U.; Hultman, L.; Birch, J.; Lai, W.-J.; Chen, L.-C.; Chen, K.-H.

    2011-12-15

    We study the effect of high power pulses in reactive magnetron sputter epitaxy on the structural properties of GaN (0001) thin films grown directly on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (0001) substrates. The epilayers are grown by sputtering from a liquid Ga target, using a high power impulse magnetron sputtering power supply in a mixed N{sub 2}/Ar discharge. X-ray diffraction, micro-Raman, micro-photoluminescence, and transmission electron microscopy investigations show the formation of two distinct types of domains. One almost fully relaxed domain exhibits superior structural and optical properties as evidenced by rocking curves with a full width at half maximum of 885 arc sec and a low temperature band edge luminescence at 3.47 eV with the full width at half maximum of 10 meV. The other domain exhibits a 14 times higher isotropic strain component, which is due to the higher densities of the point and extended defects, resulting from the ion bombardment during growth. Voids form at the domain boundaries. Mechanisms for the formation of differently strained domains, along with voids during the epitaxial growth of GaN are discussed.

  9. A protein multiplex microarray substrate with high sensitivity and specificity

    PubMed Central

    Fici, Dolores A.; McCormick, William; Brown, David W.; Herrmann, John E.; Kumar, Vikram; Awdeh, Zuheir L.

    2010-01-01

    The problems that have been associated with protein multiplex microarray immunoassay substrates and existing technology platforms include: binding, sensitivity, a low signal to noise ratio, target immobilization and the optimal simultaneous detection of diverse protein targets. Current commercial substrates for planar multiplex microarrays rely on protein attachment chemistries that range from covalent attachment to affinity ligand capture, to simple adsorption. In this pilot study, experimental performance parameters for direct monoclonal mouse IgG detection were compared for available two and three dimensional slide surface coatings with a new colloidal nitrocellulose substrate. New technology multiplex microarrays were also developed and evaluated for the detection of pathogen specific antibodies in human serum and the direct detection of enteric viral antigens. Data supports the nitrocellulose colloid as an effective reagent with the capacity to immobilize sufficient diverse protein target quantities for increased specificory signal without compromising authentic protein structure. The nitrocellulose colloid reagent is compatible with the array spotters and scanners routinely used for microarray preparation and processing. More importantly, as an alternate to fluorescence, colorimetric chemistries may be used for specific and sensitive protein target detection. The advantages of the nitrocellulose colloid platform indicate that this technology may be a valuable tool for the further development and expansion of multiplex microarray immunoassays in both the clinical and research laborat environment. PMID:20974147

  10. Impulsivity and sexual assault in college men.

    PubMed

    Mouilso, Emily R; Calhoun, Karen S; Rosenbloom, Thomas G

    2013-01-01

    Although impulsivity has been consistently linked to perpetration of sexual aggression, results lack clarity because they do not account for the substantial heterogeneity associated with the construct. The UPPS-P model (Lynam, Smith, Whiteside, & Cyders, 2006), which was proposed to clarify the multidimensional nature of impulsivity, has yet to be applied to sexual aggression. We measured UPPS-P Impulsivity in a sample of male college students who also self-reported on perpetration of sexual aggression. As predicted, impulsivity distinguished perpetrators from nonperpetrators. Perpetrators scored higher than non-perpetrators on Negative Urgency, Positive Urgency, and lack of Premeditation. Results suggest that the impulsivity traits most relevant to sexual aggression are the tendency to act impulsively when experiencing intense emotions (Positive and Negative Urgency) and lack of forethought and planning (lack of Premeditation). PMID:23862308

  11. Microwave emission from lead zirconate titanate induced by impulsive mechanical load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aman, A.; Majcherek, S.; Hirsch, S.; Schmidt, B.

    2015-10-01

    This paper focuses on microwave emission from Lead zirconate titanate Pb [ZrxTi1-x] O3 (PZT) induced by mechanical stressing. The mechanical stress was initiated by impact of a sharp tungsten indenter on the upper surface of PZT ceramic. The sequences of microwave and current impulses, which flew from indenter to electric ground, were detected simultaneously. The voltage between the upper and lower surface of ceramic was measured to obtain the behavior of mechanical force acting on ceramic during the impact. It was found that the amplitude, form, and frequency of measured microwave impulses were different by compression and restitution phase of impact. Two different mechanisms of electron emission, responsible for microwave impulse generation, were proposed based on the dissimilar impulse behavior. The field emission from tungsten indenter is dominant during compression, whereas ferroemission dominates during restitution phase. Indeed, it was observed that the direction of the current flow, i.e., sign of current impulses is changed by transitions from compression to restitution phase of impact. The observed dissimilar behavior of microwave impulses, caused by increasing and decreasing applied force, can be used to calculate the contact time and behavior of mechanical force during mechanical impact on ceramic surface. It is shown that the generation of microwave impulses exhibits high reproducibility, impulse intensity, a low damping factor, and high mechanical failure resistance. Based on these microwave emission properties of PZT, the development of new type of stress sensor with spatial resolution of few microns becomes possible.

  12. Micro-channel-based high specific power lithium target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mastinu, P.; Martın-Hernández, G.; Praena, J.; Gramegna, F.; Prete, G.; Agostini, P.; Aiello, A.; Phoenix, B.

    2016-11-01

    A micro-channel-based heat sink has been produced and tested. The device has been developed to be used as a Lithium target for the LENOS (Legnaro Neutron Source) facility and for the production of radioisotope. Nevertheless, applications of such device can span on many areas: cooling of electronic devices, diode laser array, automotive applications etc. The target has been tested using a proton beam of 2.8MeV energy and delivering total power shots from 100W to 1500W with beam spots varying from 5mm2 to 19mm2. Since the target has been designed to be used with a thin deposit of lithium and since lithium is a low-melting-point material, we have measured that, for such application, a specific power of about 3kW/cm2 can be delivered to the target, keeping the maximum surface temperature not exceeding 150° C.

  13. Impulsive-reflective cognitive style, metacognition, and emotion in adolescence.

    PubMed

    Palladino, P; Poli, P; Masi, G; Marcheschi, M

    1997-02-01

    The study investigated the relationship between reflective or impulsive cognitive style, metacognitive functioning, and depression in young adolescents. Metacognitive functioning (metacognitive knowledge about reading and memory, monitoring of text comprehension) and self-reported depressive feelings were analyzed in a group of subjects who showed a Reflective or Impulsive cognitive style. The sample consisted of 56 junior high-school students (Grades 6, 7, and 8) selected from a larger original group of 61 subjects. We excluded from the original group those with an IQ below 75 on both the Verbal and Performance subscales on the short form of the WISC-R, those reported by teachers to have a severe learning disability, and those that did not complete the test battery due to long absences from school. The reflective-impulsive cognitive style was identified with the Matching Familiar Figures Test-20. Using the median of the distribution for both Latency (17 sec. per item) and Errors (9 errors) on this task, the sample was divided in four partially overlapping subgroups: 16 with Impulsive cognitive style (Latency below the median, Errors above the median), 13 with Reflective cognitive style (Latency above the median, Error below the median), 4 fast and accurate (both scores below the median), and 11 slow and inaccurate (both scores above the median). Twelve subjects with one or both scores coinciding with the critical value (median) were excluded. Analysis showed that subjects with Impulsive cognitive style had significantly lower scores than those with Reflective cognitive style in monitoring of comprehension of text. No differences were found on monitoring by eighth graders, irrespective of cognitive style. No differences between the two groups were found in metacognitive knowledge. Subjects with Impulsive cognitive style had significantly higher scores than subjects with Reflective cognitive style on a self-rating scale for childhood depression, the Children

  14. Cotton buds, momentum, and impulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Berg, Ed; Nuñez, Jover; Guirit, Alfredo; van Huis, Cor

    2000-01-01

    Here is a simple experiment demonstrating impulse and momentum that was picked up from a Japanese presenter at a physics teacher conference held in Cebu City. We have not been able to trace the experiment farther and have never seen it in print. After student-author Nuñez demonstrated it during an exam on conducting demonstrations, we converted the qualitative idea into a quanitative experiment and even discovered some possibilities for student research. The lab is also suitable as homework, since it uses universally available "equipment" — cotton buds (swabs), drinking straws, and a ruler.

  15. Motor inhibition, reflection impulsivity, and trait impulsivity in pathological skin picking.

    PubMed

    Snorrason, Ívar; Smári, Jakob; Ólafsson, Ragnar P

    2011-09-01

    Pathological skin picking (PSP) is often recognized as an impulse control disorder. The current study sought to investigate the relationship between PSP and different forms of impulsivity. University students that met criteria for PSP (n = 55) and university students without history of PSP (n = 55) answered a multidimensional impulsivity questionnaire (the UPPS Impulsive Behavior Scale) and completed 2 neurocognitive tasks that assess impulsivity (the Stop Signal Task and the Information Sampling Task). The PSP group scored significantly higher than the control group on the negative and positive urgency subscales of the UPPS, but the groups did not differ on other subscales or the neurocognitive tasks. Logistic regression demonstrated that the urgency scales added to the prediction of PSP after negative affect and other forms of impulsivity were adjusted for. The results indicate that PSP sufferers are characterized by emotion-based impulsivity and do not appear to be impulsive in other ways. PMID:21658533

  16. Approximate controllability of nonlinear impulsive differential systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakthivel, R.; Mahmudov, N. I.; Kim, J. H.

    2007-08-01

    Many practical systems in physical and biological sciences have impulsive dynamical be- haviours during the evolution process which can be modeled by impulsive differential equations. This paper studies the approximate controllability issue for nonlinear impulsive differential and neutral functional differential equations in Hilbert spaces. Based on the semigroup theory and fixed point approach, sufficient conditions for approximate controllability of impulsive differential and neutral functional differential equations are established. Finally, two examples are presented to illustrate the utility of the proposed result. The results improve some recent results.

  17. Impaired Decisional Impulsivity in Pathological Videogamers

    PubMed Central

    Irvine, Michael A.; Worbe, Yulia; Bolton, Sorcha; Harrison, Neil A.; Bullmore, Edward T.; Voon, Valerie

    2013-01-01

    Background Pathological gaming is an emerging and poorly understood problem. Impulsivity is commonly impaired in disorders of behavioural and substance addiction, hence we sought to systematically investigate the different subtypes of decisional and motor impulsivity in a well-defined pathological gaming cohort. Methods Fifty-two pathological gaming subjects and age-, gender- and IQ-matched healthy volunteers were tested on decisional impulsivity (Information Sampling Task testing reflection impulsivity and delay discounting questionnaire testing impulsive choice), and motor impulsivity (Stop Signal Task testing motor response inhibition, and the premature responding task). We used stringent diagnostic criteria highlighting functional impairment. Results In the Information Sampling Task, pathological gaming participants sampled less evidence prior to making a decision and scored fewer points compared with healthy volunteers. Gaming severity was also negatively correlated with evidence gathered and positively correlated with sampling error and points acquired. In the delay discounting task, pathological gamers made more impulsive choices, preferring smaller immediate over larger delayed rewards. Pathological gamers made more premature responses related to comorbid nicotine use. Greater number of hours played also correlated with a Motivational Index. Greater frequency of role playing games was associated with impaired motor response inhibition and strategy games with faster Go reaction time. Conclusions We show that pathological gaming is associated with impaired decisional impulsivity with negative consequences in task performance. Decisional impulsivity may be a potential target in therapeutic management. PMID:24146789

  18. The gas dynamics of fluids of high specific heat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, Gerd E. A.; Mueller, E.-A.

    1987-12-01

    Effects in the gas dynamics of real fluids other than those in ideal substances are reviewed. Complete adiabatic liquefaction and evaporation are possible for substances whose specific heat exceeds a limit of 20 gas constants. These fluids, consisting of large molecules, have so much internal energy storage capacity in their vibrational degrees of freedom that the heat of evaporation can be supplied or also stored in the case of condensation. Thus liquefaction shock waves, which transform a gas completely or partly into a liquid, are possible. In compression waves and the expansion waves, wave bifurcations which are caused by the splitting of isentropes at the phase boundaries can be observed. In steady flow in nozzles and free jets, Mach number discontinuities arise because of phase transition. The discontinuities are not accompanied by a pressure jump and are characterized by a jump in the sound velocity of the fluid. This is part of the wave bifurcation, which means for steady flow a separation of the waves of different speeds at different locations of the flow nozzle or the jet. In the case of free jets of supersaturated fluids flowing out of a nozzle, the explosion-like disintegration of the jet by propagation of the evaporation wave in three dimensions and the extremely large jet angles are noted.

  19. Range-Specific High-resolution Mesoscale Model Setup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Leela R.

    2013-01-01

    This report summarizes the findings from an AMU task to determine the best model configuration for operational use at the ER and WFF to best predict winds, precipitation, and temperature. The AMU ran test cases in the warm and cool seasons at the ER and for the spring and fall seasons at WFF. For both the ER and WFF, the ARW core outperformed the NMM core. Results for the ER indicate that the Lin microphysical scheme and the YSU PBL scheme is the optimal model configuration for the ER. It consistently produced the best surface and upper air forecasts, while performing fairly well for the precipitation forecasts. Both the Ferrier and Lin microphysical schemes in combination with the YSU PBL scheme performed well for WFF in the spring and fall seasons. The AMU has been tasked with a follow-on modeling effort to recommended local DA and numerical forecast model design optimized for both the ER and WFF to support space launch activities. The AMU will determine the best software and type of assimilation to use, as well as determine the best grid resolution for the initialization based on spatial and temporal availability of data and the wall clock run-time of the initialization. The AMU will transition from the WRF EMS to NU-WRF, a NASA-specific version of the WRF that takes advantage of unique NASA software and datasets. 37

  20. Influence of inter-parental conflict on adolescent delinquency via school connectedness: Is impulsivity a vulnerability or plasticity factor?

    PubMed

    Liu, Sha; Yu, Chengfu; Zhen, Shuangju; Zhang, Wei; Su, Ping; Xu, Yang

    2016-10-01

    This study examined the mediating effect of school connectedness on the relationship between inter-parental conflict and adolescent delinquency, and impulsivity's moderation of the conditional effect of school connectedness. In total, 1407 Chinese students (mean age = 12.74 years, SD = 0.57) from 4 middle schools completed anonymous questionnaires regarding inter-parental conflict, impulsivity, school connectedness, and delinquency. Path analysis revealed school connectedness was a mediator in the relationship between inter-parental conflict and adolescent delinquency. Furthermore, impulsivity moderated the indirect effect of school connectedness in the relationship between inter-parental conflict and adolescent delinquency. A simple slope plot, together with a proportion affected (PA) index, indicated that impulsivity functioned more as a plasticity, rather than a vulnerability, factor in school connectedness. When school connectedness was low, high impulsivity was associated with more delinquent behaviors; however, when it was high, high impulsivity was associated with fewer delinquent behaviors. PMID:27479865

  1. Particle swarm optimization applied to impulsive orbital transfers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pontani, Mauro; Conway, Bruce A.

    2012-05-01

    The particle swarm optimization (PSO) technique is a population-based stochastic method developed in recent years and successfully applied in several fields of research. It mimics the unpredictable motion of bird flocks while searching for food, with the intent of determining the optimal values of the unknown parameters of the problem under consideration. At the end of the process, the best particle (i.e. the best solution with reference to the objective function) is expected to contain the globally optimal values of the unknown parameters. The central idea underlying the method is contained in the formula for velocity updating. This formula includes three terms with stochastic weights. This research applies the particle swarm optimization algorithm to the problem of optimizing impulsive orbital transfers. More specifically, the following problems are considered and solved with the PSO algorithm: (i) determination of the globally optimal two- and three-impulse transfer trajectories between two coplanar circular orbits; (ii) determination of the optimal transfer between two coplanar, elliptic orbits with arbitrary orientation; (iii) determination of the optimal two-impulse transfer between two circular, non-coplanar orbits; (iv) determination of the globally optimal two-impulse transfer between two non-coplanar elliptic orbits. Despite its intuitiveness and simplicity, the particle swarm optimization method proves to be capable of effectively solving the orbital transfer problems of interest with great numerical accuracy.

  2. Neural response to reward anticipation is modulated by Gray's impulsivity.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Tim; Dresler, Thomas; Ehlis, Ann-Christine; Plichta, Michael M; Heinzel, Sebastian; Polak, Thomas; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Breuer, Felix; Jakob, Peter M; Fallgatter, Andreas J

    2009-07-15

    According to the Reinforcement Sensitivity Theory (RST), Gray's dimension of impulsivity, reflecting human trait reward sensitivity, determines the extent to which stimuli activate the Behavioural Approach System (BAS). The potential neural underpinnings of the BAS, however, remain poorly understood. In the present study, we examined the association between Gray's impulsivity as defined by the RST and event-related fMRI BOLD-response to anticipation of reward in twenty healthy human subjects in brain regions previously associated with reward processing. Anticipation of reward during a Monetary Incentive Delay Task elicited activation in key components of the human reward circuitry such as the ventral striatum, the amygdala and the orbitofrontal cortex. Interindividual differences in Gray's impulsivity accounted for a significant amount of variance of the reward-related BOLD-response in the ventral striatum and the orbitofrontal cortex. Specifically, higher trait reward sensitivity was associated with increased activation in response to cues indicating potential reward. Extending previous evidence, here we show that variance in functional brain activation during anticipation of reward is attributed to interindividual differences regarding Gray's dimension of impulsivity. Thus, trait reward sensitivity contributes to the modulation of responsiveness in major components of the human reward system which thereby display a core property of the BAS. Generally, fostering our understanding of the neural underpinnings of the association of reward-related interindividual differences in affective traits might aid researchers in quest for custom-tailored treatments of psychiatric disorders, further disentangling the complex relationship between personality traits, emotion, and health.

  3. Impulsivity moderates the association between racial discrimination and alcohol problems.

    PubMed

    Latzman, Robert D; Chan, Wing Yi; Shishido, Yuri

    2013-12-01

    Alcohol use among university students is a serious public health concern, particularly among minority students who may use alcohol to cope with experiences of racial discrimination. Although the impact of racial discrimination on alcohol use has been well-established, individual differences in factors that may act to either attenuate or exacerbate the negative effects of racial discrimination are largely unknown. One potentially fruitful individual differences trait that has repeatedly been found to predict alcohol problems is the multidimensional personality trait of impulsivity. Nonetheless, the ways in which various aspects of impulsivity interact with racial discrimination is yet unknown. The current study, therefore, examined the joint and interactive contribution of racial discrimination and impulsivity in the prediction of alcohol consumption among racial minority university students. Participants included 336 Black/African-American and Asian/Asian-American university students. Results revealed both racial discrimination and impulsivity to be significantly associated with alcohol problems. Further, individuals' responses to racial discrimination were not uniform. Specifically, the association between racial discrimination and alcohol problems was moderated by lack of Premeditation; racial discrimination was most strongly predictive of alcohol problems for those who reported low level of premeditation. Findings from the present study highlight the importance of investigating risk factors for alcohol problems across multiple levels of the ecology as individual personality traits appear to relate to how one might respond to the experience of racial discrimination.

  4. Epitaxial growth of γ-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} on Ti{sub 2}AlC(0001) by reactive high-power impulse magnetron sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Eklund, Per Frodelius, Jenny; Hultman, Lars; Lu, Jun; Magnfält, Daniel

    2014-01-15

    Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} was deposited by reactive high-power impulse magnetron sputtering at 600 °C onto pre-deposited Ti{sub 2}AlC(0001) thin films on α-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}(0001) substrates. The Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} was deposited to a thickness of 65 nm and formed an adherent layer of epitaxial γ-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}(111) as shown by transmission electron microscopy. The demonstration of epitaxial growth of γ-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} on Ti{sub 2}AlC(0001) open prospects for growth of crystalline alumina as protective coatings on Ti{sub 2}AlC and related nanolaminated materials. The crystallographic orientation relationships are γ-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}(111)//Ti{sub 2}AlC(0001) (out-of-plane) and γ- Al {sub 2}O{sub 3}(22{sup ¯}0)// Ti {sub 2} AlC (112{sup ¯}0) (in-plane) as determined by electron diffraction. Annealing in vacuum at 900 °C resulted in partial decomposition of the Ti{sub 2}AlC by depletion of Al and diffusion into and through the γ-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer.

  5. Impulsivity and the Sexes: Measurement and Structural Invariance of the UPPS-P Impulsive Behavior Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cyders, Melissa A.

    2013-01-01

    Before it is possible to test whether men and women differ in impulsivity, it is necessary to evaluate whether impulsivity measures are invariant across sex. The UPPS-P Impulsive Behavior Scale (negative urgency, lack of premeditation, lack of perseverance, and sensation seeking, with added subscale of positive urgency) is one measure of five…

  6. High Specific Power Motors in LN2 and LH2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Gerald V.; Jansen, Ralph H.; Trudell, Jeffrey J.

    2007-01-01

    A switched reluctance motor has been operated in liquid nitrogen (LN2) with a power density as high as that reported for any motor or generator. The high performance stems from the low resistivity of Cu at LN2 temperature and from the geometry of the windings, the combination of which permits steady-state rms current density up to 7000 A/cm2, about 10 times that possible in coils cooled by natural convection at room temperature. The Joule heating in the coils is conducted to the end turns for rejection to the LN2 bath. Minimal heat rejection occurs in the motor slots, preserving that region for conductor. In the end turns, the conductor layers are spaced to form a heat-exchanger-like structure that permits nucleate boiling over a large surface area. Although tests were performed in LN2 for convenience, this motor was designed as a prototype for use with liquid hydrogen (LH2) as the coolant. End-cooled coils would perform even better in LH2 because of further increases in copper electrical and thermal conductivities. Thermal analyses comparing LN2 and LH2 cooling are presented verifying that end-cooled coils in LH2 could be either much longer or could operate at higher current density without thermal runaway than in LN2.

  7. High Specific Power Motors in LN2 and LH2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Gerald V.; Jansen, Ralph H.; Trudell, Jeffrey J.

    2007-01-01

    A switched reluctance motor has been operated in liquid nitrogen (LN2) with a power density as high as that reported for any motor or generator. The high performance stems from the low resistivity of Cu at LN2 temperature and from the geometry of the windings, the combination of which permits steady-state rms current density up to 7000 A/sq cm, about 10 times that possible in coils cooled by natural convection at room temperature. The Joule heating in the coils is conducted to the end turns for rejection to the LN2 bath. Minimal heat rejection occurs in the motor slots, preserving that region for conductor. In the end turns, the conductor layers are spaced to form a heat-exchanger-like structure that permits nucleate boiling over a large surface area. Although tests were performed in LN2 for convenience, this motor was designed as a prototype for use with liquid hydrogen (LH2) as the coolant. End-cooled coils would perform even better in LH2 because of further increases in copper electrical and thermal conductivities. Thermal analyses comparing LN2 and LH2 cooling are presented verifying that end-cooled coils in LH2 could be either much longer or could operate at higher current density without thermal runaway than in LN2.

  8. Impulsive model for reactive collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marron, M. T.; Bernstein, R. B.

    1972-01-01

    A simple classical mechanical model of the reactive scattering of a structureless atom A and a quasi-diatomic BC is developed which takes full advantage of energy, linear and angular momentum conservation relations but introduces a minimum of further assumptions. These are as follows: (1) the vibrational degree of freedom of the reactant (BC) and product (AB) molecules is suppressed, so the change in vibrational energy is simply a parameter; (2) straight-line trajectories are assumed outside of a reaction shell; (3) within this zone, momentum transfer occurs impulsively (essentially instantaneously) following mass transfer; (4) the impulse, which may be either positive or negative, is directed along the BC axis, which may, however, assume all orientations with respect to the incident relative velocity. The model yields differential and total cross sections and product rotational energy distributions for a given collision exoergicity Q, or for any known distribution over Q. Numerical results are presented for several prototype reactions whose dynamics have been well-studied.

  9. Sensation-Seeking and Impulsivity as Predictors of Reactive and Proactive Aggression in Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Pérez Fuentes, María Del Carmen; Molero Jurado, Maria del Mar; Carrión Martínez, José J.; Mercader Rubio, Isabel; Gázquez, José J.

    2016-01-01

    In adolescence, such matters as substance use and impulsiveness may give rise to problematic behavior repertoires. This study was therefore done to analyze the predictive value of sensation-seeking and impulsiveness dimensions related to the functions of aggression (reactive/proactive) and types of expression (physical/relational). A total of 822 high school students in Almeria (Spain) aged 13–18, were administered the Sensation-Seeking Scale, the State Impulsiveness Scale and Peer Conflict Scale. The results show the existence of a positive correlation of the majority of factors analyzed, both in impulsiveness and sensation-seeking, with respect to the different types of aggression. Furthermore, aggressive behavior is explained by the combination of a sensation-seeking factor (Disinhibition) and two impulsiveness factors (Gratification and Automatism). This study shows the need to analyze aggression as a multidimensional construct. PMID:27729883

  10. Determining attenuation of impulse noise with an electrical equivalent of a hearing protection device.

    PubMed

    Młyński, Rafał; Kozłowski, Emil

    2013-01-01

    Determining the effectiveness of impulse noise attenuation with hearing protection devices (HPDs) is an important part of their selection. Measuring impulse noise parameters under an HPD would involve exposing subjects to impulses with a high peak sound pressure level. This paper presents a computational method of determining impulse noise parameters under the cups of earmuffs. Calculations are done using the transfer function of earmuffs, determined with Shaw's electrical equivalent of an HPD, taking into account the design parameters of earmuffs. The developed method was used for calculations in the presence of impulse noise generated by gunshots. To verify the computational method, the results of these calculations were compared with the results of measurements. PMID:23498707

  11. Visuospatial working memory underlies choice-impulsivity in boys with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

    PubMed

    Patros, Connor H G; Alderson, R Matt; Lea, Sarah E; Tarle, Stephanie J; Kasper, Lisa J; Hudec, Kristen L

    2015-03-01

    The present study examined the directional relationship between choice-impulsivity and separate indices of phonological and visuospatial working memory performance in boys (aged 8-12 years) with (n=16) and without ADHD (n=19). Results indicated that high ratings of overall ADHD, inattention, and hyperactivity were significantly associated with increased impulsivity and poorer phonological and visuospatial working memory performance. Further, results from bias-corrected bootstrapped mediation analyses revealed a significant indirect effect of visuospatial working memory performance, through choice-impulsivity, on overall ADHD, inattention, and hyperactivity/impulsivity. Collectively, the findings suggest that deficits of visuospatial working memory underlie choice-impulsivity, which in turn contributes to the ADHD phenotype. Moreover, these findings are consistent with a growing body of literature that identifies working memory as a central neurocognitive deficit of ADHD.

  12. Highly specific transgene expression mediated by a complex adenovirus vector incorporating a prostate-specific amplification feedback loop

    PubMed Central

    Woraratanadharm, Jan; Rubinchik, Semyon; Yu, Hong; Fan, Fan; Morrow, Scotty M.; Dong., John Y.

    2007-01-01

    Summary Development of novel therapeutic agents is needed to address the problems of locally recurrent, metastatic, and advanced hormone-refractory prostate cancer. We have constructed a novel complex adenovirus (Ad) vector regulation system that incorporates both the prostate-specific ARR2PB promoter and a positive feedback loop using the TRE promoter to enhance gene expression. This regulation strategy involves the incorporation of the TRE upstream of the prostate-specific ARR2PB promoter to enhance its activity with Tet-regulation. The expressions of both GFP and tTA were placed under the control of these TRE-ARR2PB promoters, so that in the cells of prostate origin, a positive feedback loop would be generated. This design greatly enhanced GFP reporter expression in prostate cancer cells, while retaining tight control of expression in non-prostate cancer cells, even at MOI as high as 1000. This novel positive feedback loop with prostate specificity (PFLPS) regulation system we have developed may have broad applications for expressing not only high levels of toxic proteins in cancer cells but alternatively could be manipulated to regulate essential genes in a highly efficient conditionally replicative adenovirus (CRAd) vector specifically directed to prostate cancer cells. The PFLPS regulation system, therefore, serves as a promising new approach in the development of both a specific and effective vector for cancer gene therapy. PMID:15229631

  13. An Abbreviated Impulsiveness Scale (ABIS) Constructed through Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the BIS-11

    PubMed Central

    Coutlee, Christopher G.; Politzer, Cary S.; Hoyle, Rick H.; Huettel, Scott A.

    2015-01-01

    Impulsiveness is a personality trait that reflects an urge to act spontaneously, without thinking or planning ahead for the consequences of your actions. High impulsiveness is characteristic of a variety of problematic behaviors including attention deficit disorder, hyperactivity, excessive gambling, risk-taking, drug use, and alcoholism. Researchers studying attention and self-control often assess impulsiveness using personality questionnaires, notably the common Barratt Impulsiveness Scale version 11 (BIS-11; last revised in 1995). Advances in techniques for producing personality questionnaires over the last 20 years prompted us to revise and improve the BIS-11. We sought to make the revised scale shorter – so that it would be quicker to administer – and better matched to current behaviors. We analyzed responses from 1549 adults who took the BIS-11 questionnaire. Using a statistical technique called factor analysis, we eliminated 17 questions that did a poor job of measuring the three major types of impulsiveness identified by the scale: inattention, spontaneous action, and lack of planning. We constructed our ABbreviated Impulsiveness Scale (ABIS) using the remaining 13 questions. We showed that the ABIS performed well when administered to additional groups of 657 and 285 adults. Finally, we showed expected relationships between the ABIS and other personality measurements related to impulsiveness, and showed that the ABIS can help predict alcohol consumption. We present the ABIS as a useful and efficient tool for researchers interested in measuring impulsive personality. PMID:26258000

  14. Impulsivity in Multiplayer Online Battle Arena Gamers: Preliminary Results on Experimental and Self-Report Measures.

    PubMed

    Nuyens, Filip; Deleuze, Jory; Maurage, Pierre; Griffiths, Mark D; Kuss, Daria J; Billieux, Joël

    2016-06-01

    Background and aims Multiplayer Online Battle Arena (MOBA) games have become the most popular type of video games played worldwide, superseding the playing of Massively Multiplayer Online Role-Playing Games and First-Person Shooter games. However, empirical studies focusing on the use and abuse of MOBA games are still very limited, particularly regarding impulsivity, which is an indicator of addictive states but has not yet been explored in MOBA games. In this context, the objective of the present study is to explore the associations between impulsivity and symptoms of addictive use of MOBA games in a sample of highly involved League of Legends (LoL, currently the most popular MOBA game) gamers. Methods Thirty-six LoL gamers were recruited and completed both experimental (Single Key Impulsivity Paradigm) and self-reported impulsivity assessments (s-UPPS-P Impulsive Behavior Scale, Barratt Impulsiveness Scale), in addition to an assessment of problematic video game use (Problematic Online Gaming Questionnaire). Results Results showed links between impulsivity-related constructs and signs of excessive MOBA game involvement. Findings indicated that impaired ability to postpone rewards in an experimental laboratory task was strongly related to problematic patterns of MOBA game involvement. Although less consistent, several associations were also found between self-reported impulsivity traits and signs of excessive MOBA game involvement. Conclusions Despite these results are preliminary and based upon a small (self-selected) sample, the present study highlights potential psychological factors related to the addictive use of MOBA games. PMID:27156376

  15. Impulse calculation and characteristic analysis of space debris by pulsed laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chenglin; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Kunpeng

    2016-11-01

    Ablation by high-energy pulsed laser provides recoil impulse that results in the de-orbiting and atmospheric re-entry of space debris, which may be the best method of clearing space debris in the size range of 1-10 cm. Both the magnitude and direction of the recoil impulse depend on the shape and orientation of the target and serve as the foundation for studying orbital evolution and evaluating removal effects. However, how to calculate the recoil impulse and analyze the features of recoil impulse have not received sufficient attention in the literature. Based on certain assumed conditions, a general numerical method is proposed to calculate the recoil impulse of free motion debris under a set of laser pulses. Selecting cylindrical debris as the research target, we derive an analytical method to calculate the ablation-driven impulse. Moreover, the characteristics of single impulses changing over time and the total impulse are examined using analytical expressions. Finally, simulation experiments are conducted to validate both the numerical and analytical methods.

  16. Impulsivity in Multiplayer Online Battle Arena Gamers: Preliminary Results on Experimental and Self-Report Measures.

    PubMed

    Nuyens, Filip; Deleuze, Jory; Maurage, Pierre; Griffiths, Mark D; Kuss, Daria J; Billieux, Joël

    2016-06-01

    Background and aims Multiplayer Online Battle Arena (MOBA) games have become the most popular type of video games played worldwide, superseding the playing of Massively Multiplayer Online Role-Playing Games and First-Person Shooter games. However, empirical studies focusing on the use and abuse of MOBA games are still very limited, particularly regarding impulsivity, which is an indicator of addictive states but has not yet been explored in MOBA games. In this context, the objective of the present study is to explore the associations between impulsivity and symptoms of addictive use of MOBA games in a sample of highly involved League of Legends (LoL, currently the most popular MOBA game) gamers. Methods Thirty-six LoL gamers were recruited and completed both experimental (Single Key Impulsivity Paradigm) and self-reported impulsivity assessments (s-UPPS-P Impulsive Behavior Scale, Barratt Impulsiveness Scale), in addition to an assessment of problematic video game use (Problematic Online Gaming Questionnaire). Results Results showed links between impulsivity-related constructs and signs of excessive MOBA game involvement. Findings indicated that impaired ability to postpone rewards in an experimental laboratory task was strongly related to problematic patterns of MOBA game involvement. Although less consistent, several associations were also found between self-reported impulsivity traits and signs of excessive MOBA game involvement. Conclusions Despite these results are preliminary and based upon a small (self-selected) sample, the present study highlights potential psychological factors related to the addictive use of MOBA games.

  17. The independent effects of child sexual abuse and impulsivity on lifetime suicide attempts among female patients.

    PubMed

    Daray, Federico M; Rojas, Sasha M; Bridges, Ana J; Badour, Christal L; Grendas, Leandro; Rodante, Demián; Puppo, Soledad; Rebok, Federico

    2016-08-01

    Child sexual abuse (CSA) is a causal agent in many negative adulthood outcomes, including the risk for life-threatening behaviors such as suicide ideation and suicide attempts. Traumatic events such as CSA may pose risk in the healthy development of cognitive and emotional functioning during childhood. In fact, high impulsivity, a risk factor for suicidal behavior, is characteristic of CSA victims. The current study aims to understand the relations among CSA, impulsivity, and frequency of lifetime suicide attempts among a female patient sample admitted for suicidal behavior. Participants included 177 female patients between the ages of 18 and 63 years admitted at two hospitals in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Number of previous suicide attempts and CSA were assessed via structured interviews, while impulsivity was assessed with the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS-11). A model of structural equations was employed to evaluate the role of impulsivity in the relation between CSA and suicide attempts. CSA (β=.18, p<.05) and impulsivity (β=.24, p<.05) were associated with the number of previous suicide attempts. However, impulsivity was not significantly associated with CSA (β=.09, p>.05). CSA and impulsivity are independently associated with lifetime suicide attempts among female patients with recent suicidal behavior. PMID:27352091

  18. A high-throughput screening for phosphatases using specific substrates.

    PubMed

    Senn, Alejandro M; Wolosiuk, Ricardo A

    2005-04-01

    A high-throughput screening was developed for the detection of phosphatase activity in bacterial colonies. Unlike other methods, the current procedure can be applied to any phosphatase because it uses physiological substrates and detects the compelled product of all phosphatase reactions, that is, orthophosphate. In this method, substrates diffuse from a filter paper across a nitrocellulose membrane to bacterial colonies situated on the opposite face, and then reaction products flow back to the paper. Finally, a colorimetric reagent discloses the presence of orthophosphate in the filter paper. We validated the performance of this assay with several substrates and experimental conditions and with different phosphatases, including a library of randomly mutagenized rapeseed chloroplast fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase. This procedure could be extended to other enzymatic activities provided that an appropriate detection of reaction products is available.

  19. Specific Analysis of Web Camera and High Resolution Planetary Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Youngsik; Lee, Dongju; Jin, Ho; Han, Wonyong; Park, Jang-Hyun

    2006-12-01

    Web camera is usually used for video communication between PC, it has small sensing area, cannot using long exposure application, so that is insufficient for astronomical application. But web camera is suitable for bright planet, moon, it doesn't need long exposure time. So many amateur astronomer using web camera for planetary imaging. We used ToUcam manufactured by Phillips for planetary imaging and Registax commercial program for a video file combining. And then, we are measure a property of web camera, such as linearity, gain that is usually using for analysis of CCD performance. Because of using combine technic selected high quality image from video frame, this method can take higher resolution planetary imaging than one shot image by film, digital camera and CCD. We describe a planetary observing method and a video frame combine method.

  20. High Performance Computing - Power Application Programming Interface Specification.

    SciTech Connect

    Laros, James H.,; Kelly, Suzanne M.; Pedretti, Kevin; Grant, Ryan; Olivier, Stephen Lecler; Levenhagen, Michael J.; DeBonis, David

    2014-08-01

    Measuring and controlling the power and energy consumption of high performance computing systems by various components in the software stack is an active research area [13, 3, 5, 10, 4, 21, 19, 16, 7, 17, 20, 18, 11, 1, 6, 14, 12]. Implementations in lower level software layers are beginning to emerge in some production systems, which is very welcome. To be most effective, a portable interface to measurement and control features would significantly facilitate participation by all levels of the software stack. We present a proposal for a standard power Application Programming Interface (API) that endeavors to cover the entire software space, from generic hardware interfaces to the input from the computer facility manager.

  1. Cavitation and bubble dynamics: the Kelvin impulse and its applications.

    PubMed

    Blake, John R; Leppinen, David M; Wang, Qianxi

    2015-10-01

    Cavitation and bubble dynamics have a wide range of practical applications in a range of disciplines, including hydraulic, mechanical and naval engineering, oil exploration, clinical medicine and sonochemistry. However, this paper focuses on how a fundamental concept, the Kelvin impulse, can provide practical insights into engineering and industrial design problems. The pathway is provided through physical insight, idealized experiments and enhancing the accuracy and interpretation of the computation. In 1966, Benjamin and Ellis made a number of important statements relating to the use of the Kelvin impulse in cavitation and bubble dynamics, one of these being 'One should always reason in terms of the Kelvin impulse, not in terms of the fluid momentum…'. We revisit part of this paper, developing the Kelvin impulse from first principles, using it, not only as a check on advanced computations (for which it was first used!), but also to provide greater physical insights into cavitation bubble dynamics near boundaries (rigid, potential free surface, two-fluid interface, flexible surface and axisymmetric stagnation point flow) and to provide predictions on different types of bubble collapse behaviour, later compared against experiments. The paper concludes with two recent studies involving (i) the direction of the jet formation in a cavitation bubble close to a rigid boundary in the presence of high-intensity ultrasound propagated parallel to the surface and (ii) the study of a 'paradigm bubble model' for the collapse of a translating spherical bubble, sometimes leading to a constant velocity high-speed jet, known as the Longuet-Higgins jet.

  2. Impulsive solar X-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crannell, C. J.; Frost, K. J.; Maetzler, C.; Ohki, K.; Saba, J. L.

    1977-01-01

    A set of 22 simple, impulsive solar flares, identified in the OSO-5 hard X-ray data, were analyzed together with coincident microwave and meterwave radio observations. The rise times and fall times of the X-ray bursts are found to be highly correlated and effectively equal, strongly suggesting a flare energizing mechanism that is reversible. The good time resolution available for these observations reveals that the microwave emission is influenced by an additional process, evident in the tendency of the microwave emission to peak later and decay more slowly than the symmetric X-ray bursts. Meterwave emission is observed in coincidence with the 5 events which show the strongest time correlation between the X-ray and microwave burst structure. This meterwave emission is characterized by U-burst radiation, indicating confinement of the flare source.

  3. Hyperkinetic Impulse Disorder in Children's Behavior Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laufer, Maurice W.; Denhoff, Eric; Solomons, Gerald

    2011-01-01

    A very common cause of children's behavior disorder disturbance is an entity described as the hyperkinetic impulse disorder. This is characterized by hyperactivity, short attention span and poor powers of concentration, irritability, impulsiveness, variability, and poor schoolwork. The existence of this complexity may lead to many psychological…

  4. Solar Impulse's Solar-Powered Plane

    ScienceCinema

    Moniz, Ernest; Piccard, Bertrand; Reicher, Dan

    2016-07-12

    Solar Impulse lands in Washington, DC at Washington Dulles International Airport as part of its journey across the United States. Secretary Ernest Moniz speaks about how advancements like those at the Department of Energy are leading the way for innovations like the solar-powered plane. Footage of the solar-powered plane courtesy of Solar Impulse.

  5. Semicontinuity of attractors for impulsive dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonotto, E. M.; Bortolan, M. C.; Collegari, R.; Czaja, R.

    2016-10-01

    In this paper we introduce the concept of collective tube conditions which assures a suitable behaviour for a family of dynamical systems close to impulsive sets. Using the collective tube conditions, we develop the theory of upper and lower semicontinuity of global attractors for a family of impulsive dynamical systems.

  6. Covert Suicidal Impulses in Maternally Deprived Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kliman, Gilbert; Lubin, Harriet

    This paper discusses the development of suicidal impulses in children who have lost their mothers due to abandonment or death. The paper is based on two psychoanalytic case studies, in which the children were in therapy when the first suicidal impulses emerged. A pattern is described in which bereaved children's intense wishes to have their…

  7. Impulsivity, School Context, and School Misconduct

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vogel, Matt; Barton, Michael S.

    2013-01-01

    Impulsivity holds a central place in the explanations of adolescent delinquency. Recent research suggests that neighborhood characteristics, particularly SES (socioeconomic status), perceived supervision, and collective efficacy, moderate the association between impulsivity and delinquency. However, findings to date have been equivocal, and the…

  8. Impulsivity and Psychoeducational Intervention in Hyperactive Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Ronald T.

    1980-01-01

    Two psychoeducational procedures were investigated for their effects on impulsivity in 120 hyperactive children in two groups: those receiving stimulant drug therapy and those not receiving stimulant drug therapy. Results indicated that the use of psychoeducational treatment approaches are of value in altering the impulsive responses of…

  9. Impulsivity: Self-Report and Performance Measure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cairns, E.; Harbison, J. I.

    1975-01-01

    The present study assessed the relationship between impulsivity as measured by the Matching Familiar Figures test (MFF) and by the impulsivity (IMP) factor derived from the Junior Eysenck Personality Inventory (JEPI) items identified by S. N. Bennet in 1973. (Author/RK)

  10. Assessing impulsivity changes in Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Rochat, Lucien; Delbeuck, Xavier; Billieux, Joël; d'Acremont, Mathieu; Van der Linden, Anne-Claude Juillerat; Van der Linden, Martial

    2008-01-01

    Impulsive behaviors are common in brain-damaged patients including those with neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer disease (AD). The objective of this study was to develop and validate a short version of the UPPS Impulsive Behavior Scale assessing changes on 4 different dimensions of impulsivity, namely urgency, (lack of) premeditation, (lack of) perseverance, and sensation seeking, arising in the course of a neurodegenerative disease. To this end, caregivers of 83 probable AD patients completed a short questionnaire adapted from the UPPS Impulsive Behavior Scale. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses of the data were performed and revealed that a model with 4 distinct but related latent variables corresponding to 4 different dimensions of impulsivity fit the data best. Furthermore, the results showed that lack of perseverance, followed by lack of premeditation and urgency, increased after the onset of the disease, whereas sensation seeking decreased. Overall, the multifaceted nature of impulsivity was confirmed in a sample of AD patients, whose caregivers reported significant changes regarding each facet of impulsivity. Consequently, the short version of the UPPS Impulsive Behavior Scale opens up interesting prospects for a better comprehension of behavioral symptoms of dementia. PMID:18580596

  11. Solar Impulse's Solar-Powered Plane

    SciTech Connect

    Moniz, Ernest; Piccard, Bertrand; Reicher, Dan

    2013-07-08

    Solar Impulse lands in Washington, DC at Washington Dulles International Airport as part of its journey across the United States. Secretary Ernest Moniz speaks about how advancements like those at the Department of Energy are leading the way for innovations like the solar-powered plane. Footage of the solar-powered plane courtesy of Solar Impulse.

  12. Impulsive stabilization and impulsive synchronization of discrete-time delayed neural networks.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wu-Hua; Lu, Xiaomei; Zheng, Wei Xing

    2015-04-01

    This paper investigates the problems of impulsive stabilization and impulsive synchronization of discrete-time delayed neural networks (DDNNs). Two types of DDNNs with stabilizing impulses are studied. By introducing the time-varying Lyapunov functional to capture the dynamical characteristics of discrete-time impulsive delayed neural networks (DIDNNs) and by using a convex combination technique, new exponential stability criteria are derived in terms of linear matrix inequalities. The stability criteria for DIDNNs are independent of the size of time delay but rely on the lengths of impulsive intervals. With the newly obtained stability results, sufficient conditions on the existence of linear-state feedback impulsive controllers are derived. Moreover, a novel impulsive synchronization scheme for two identical DDNNs is proposed. The novel impulsive synchronization scheme allows synchronizing two identical DDNNs with unknown delays. Simulation results are given to validate the effectiveness of the proposed criteria of impulsive stabilization and impulsive synchronization of DDNNs. Finally, an application of the obtained impulsive synchronization result for two identical chaotic DDNNs to a secure communication scheme is presented.

  13. Impulse position control algorithms for nonlinear systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sesekin, A. N.; Nepp, A. N.

    2015-11-30

    The article is devoted to the formalization and description of impulse-sliding regime in nonlinear dynamical systems that arise in the application of impulse position controls of a special kind. The concept of trajectory impulse-sliding regime formalized as some limiting network element Euler polygons generated by a discrete approximation of the impulse position control This paper differs from the previously published papers in that it uses a definition of solutions of systems with impulse controls, it based on the closure of the set of smooth solutions in the space of functions of bounded variation. The need for the study of such regimes is the fact that they often arise when parry disturbances acting on technical or economic control system.

  14. Investigation of Blade Impulsive Noise on a Scaled Fully Articulated Rotor System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheiman, James; Hoad, Danny R.

    1977-01-01

    Helicopter impulsive noise tests were conducted in the Langley V/STOL tunnel with an articulated rotor system. The tests demonstrated that impulsive noise could be simulated for low-speed forward flight with low descent rates and also in the high-speed level flight. For the low forward speed condition, the noise level was highly sensitive to small changes in descent rate. For the high-speed condition, the noise level was increased with an increase in rotor thrust.

  15. Regulation of angular impulse during two forward translating tasks.

    PubMed

    Mathiyakom, Witaya; McNitt-Gray, Jill L; Wilcox, Rand R

    2007-05-01

    Angular impulse generation is dependent on the position of the total body center of mass (CoM) relative to the ground reaction force (GRF) vector during contact with the environment. The purpose of this study was to determine how backward angular impulse was regulated during two forward translating tasks. Control of the relative angle between the CoM and the GRF was hypothesized to be mediated by altering trunk-leg coordination. Eight highly skilled athletes performed a series of standing reverse somersaults and reverse timers. Sagittal plane kinematics, GRF, and electromyograms of lower extremity muscles were acquired during the take-off phase of both tasks. The magnitude of the backward angular impulse generated during the push interval of both tasks was mediated by redirecting the GRF relative to the CoM. During the reverse timer, backward angular impulse generated during the early part of the take-off phase was negated by limiting backward trunk rotation and redirecting the GRF during the push interval. Biarticular muscles crossing the knee and hip coordinated the control of GRF direction and CoM trajectory via modulation of trunk-leg coordination. PMID:17603134

  16. Alexithymia, impulsiveness, and psychopathology in nonsuicidal self-injured adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Gatta, Michela; Dal Santo, Francesco; Rago, Alessio; Spoto, Andrea; Battistella, Pier Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) is a multifaceted phenomenon and a major health issue among adolescents. A better understanding of self-injury comorbidities is crucial to improve our ability to assess, treat, and prevent NSSI. Purpose This study aimed at analyzing some of the psychobehavioral correlates of NSSI: psychological problems, alexithymia, impulsiveness, and sociorelational aspects. Patients and methods This was a case–control study. The clinical sample (n=33) included adolescents attending our unit for NSSI and other issues; the controls (n=79) were high-school students. Data were collected using six questionnaires: Youth Self-Report, Barratt’s Impulsiveness Scale, Toronto Alexithymia Scale, Children’s Depression Inventory, Symptom Checklist-90-R, and Child Behavior Checklist. Results Cases scored significantly higher in all questionnaires. Habitual self-injurers scored higher on impulsiveness and alexithymia. The gesture’s repetition seems relevant to the global clinical picture: habitual self-injurers appear more likely to seek help from the sociosanitary services. We found a difference between the self-injurers’ and their parents’ awareness of the disorder. Conclusion Habitual self-injurers show signs of having difficulty with assessing the consequences of their actions (nonplanning impulsiveness) and the inability to manage their feelings. Given the significantly higher scores found for cases than for controls on all the psychopathological scales, NSSI can be seen as a cross-category psychiatric disorder, supporting the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders decision to include it as a pathological entity in its own right.

  17. Impulse-Excited Energy Harvester based on Potassium-Ion- Electret

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashizawa, H.; Mitsuya, H.; Ishibashi, K.; Ishikawa, T.; Fujita, H.; Hashiguchi, G.; Toshiyoshi, H.

    2015-12-01

    We have developed an energy harvester that is specifically desired for impulse acceleration of infrastructure vibrations such as sudden motion at railway bridges. The energy harvester based on potassium-ion-electret on the sidewalls of 1.8- μm-gap comb electrodes generated a 64 μAp-p current during low impulse acceleration, which was large enough to light a green LED.

  18. Highly specific expression of luciferase gene in lungs of naive nude mice directed by prostate-specific antigen promoter

    SciTech Connect

    Li Hongwei; Li Jinzhong; Helm, Gregory A.; Pan Dongfeng . E-mail: Dongfeng_pan@yahoo.com

    2005-09-09

    PSA promoter has been demonstrated the utility for tissue-specific toxic gene therapy in prostate cancer models. Characterization of foreign gene overexpression in normal animals elicited by PSA promoter should help evaluate therapy safety. Here we constructed an adenovirus vector (AdPSA-Luc), containing firefly luciferase gene under the control of the 5837 bp long prostate-specific antigen promoter. A charge coupled device video camera was used to non-invasively image expression of firefly luciferase in nude mice on days 3, 7, 11 after injection of 2 x 10{sup 9} PFU of AdPSA-Luc virus via tail vein. The result showed highly specific expression of the luciferase gene in lungs of mice from day 7. The finding indicates the potential limitations of the suicide gene therapy of prostate cancer based on selectivity of PSA promoter. By contrary, it has encouraging implications for further development of vectors via PSA promoter to enable gene therapy for pulmonary diseases.

  19. Trait Impulsivity and Anhedonia: Two Gateways for the Development of Impulse Control Disorders in Parkinson’s Disease?

    PubMed Central

    Houeto, Jean-Luc; Magnard, Robin; Dalley, Jeffrey W.; Belin, David; Carnicella, Sebastien

    2016-01-01

    Apathy and impulsivity are two major comorbid syndromes of Parkinson’s disease (PD) that may represent two extremes of a behavioral spectrum modulated by dopamine-dependent processes. PD is characterized by a progressive loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta to which are attributed the cardinal motor symptoms of the disorder. Dopamine replacement therapy (DRT), used widely to treat these motor symptoms, is often associated with deficits in hedonic processing and motivation, including apathy and depression, as well as impulse control disorders (ICDs). ICDs comprise pathological gambling, hypersexuality, compulsive shopping, binge eating, compulsive overuse of dopaminergic medication, and punding. More frequently observed in males with early onset PD, ICDs are associated not only with comorbid affective symptoms, such as depression and anxiety, but also with behavioral traits, such as novelty seeking and impulsivity, as well as with personal or familial history of alcohol use. This constellation of associated risk factors highlights the importance of inter-individual differences in the vulnerability to develop comorbid psychiatric disorders in PD patients. Additionally, withdrawal from DRT in patients with ICDs frequently unmasks a severe apathetic state, suggesting that apathy and ICDs may be caused by overlapping neurobiological mechanisms within the cortico-striato-thalamo-cortical networks. We suggest that altered hedonic and impulse control processes represent distinct prodromal substrates for the development of these psychiatric symptoms, the etiopathogenic mechanisms of which remain unknown. Specifically, we argue that deficits in hedonic and motivational states and impulse control are mediated by overlapping, yet dissociable, neural mechanisms that differentially interact with DRT to promote the emergence of ICDs in vulnerable individuals. Thus, we provide a novel heuristic framework for basic and clinical research to better

  20. Stimulation of the Subthalamic Nucleus and Impulsivity

    PubMed Central

    Ballanger, Benedicte; van Eimeren, Thilo; Moro, Elena; Lozano, Andres M.; Hamani, Clement; Boulinguez, Philippe; Pellecchia, Giovanna; Houle, Sylvain; Poon, Yu Yan; Lang, Anthony E.; Strafella, Antonio P.

    2010-01-01

    Objective In Parkinson disease (PD) patients, deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) may contribute to certain impulsive behavior during high-conflict decisions. A neurocomputational model of the basal ganglia has recently been proposed that suggests this behavioral aspect may be related to the role played by the STN in relaying a “hold your horses” signal intended to allow more time to settle on the best option. The aim of the present study was 2-fold: 1) to extend these observations by providing evidence that the STN may influence and prevent the execution of any response even during low-conflict decisions; and 2) to identify the neural correlates of this effect. Methods We measured regional cerebral blood flow during a Go/NoGo and a control (Go) task to study the motor improvement and response inhibition deficits associated with STN-DBS in patients with PD. Results Although it improved Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale motor ratings and induced a global decrease in reaction time during task performance, STN-DBS impaired response inhibition, as revealed by an increase in commission errors in NoGo trials. These behavioral effects were accompanied by changes in synaptic activity consisting of a reduced activation in the cortical networks responsible for reactive and proactive response inhibition. Interpretation The present results suggest that although it improves motor functions in PD patients, modulation of STN hyperactivity with DBS may tend at the same time to favor the appearance of impulsive behavior by acting on the gating mechanism involved in response initiation. PMID:20035509

  1. Adults with a family history of alcohol related problems are more impulsive on measures of response initiation and response inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Acheson, Ashley; Richard, Dawn M.; Mathias, Charles W.; Dougherty, Donald M.

    2011-01-01

    Background Previous studies have found individuals with family histories of alcohol use disorders are more impulsive on some but not all laboratory behavioral measures, suggesting deficits on specific forms of impulse control. However, drawing conclusions is tenuous because these different measures have not been administered together in the same group of participants. Methods In the present study, we compared healthy 21–35 year old adults with family histories of alcohol related problems (FHAP+) or without such histories (FHAP−) on behavioral measures of response inhibition, response initiation, and consequence sensitivity impulsivity. FHAP+ (n=36) and FHAP− (n=36) participants were compared on performance on the Immediate Memory Task (IMT, response initiation), GoStop Impulsivity Paradigm (GoStop, response inhibition), Two Choice Impulsivity Paradigm (TCIP, consequence sensitivity) and Single Key Impulsivity Paradigm (SKIP, consequence sensitivity). Results FHAP+ individuals were more impulsive on the IMT and GoStop but not on the TCIP or SKIP. Conclusions These results suggest that response initiation and response inhibition impulsivity are increased in individuals with family histories of alcohol related problems despite not having alcohol or drug use disorders themselves. In contrast, increased consequence sensitivity impulsivity may be associated with additional risk factors such as more severe family histories of alcohol use disorders, or it may be increased as a consequence of heavy drug or alcohol use. PMID:21376480

  2. Simulations of defense strategies for Bennu: Material characterization and impulse delivery

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Herbold, E. B.; Owen, J. M.; Swift, D. C.; Miller, P. L.

    2015-05-19

    Assessments of asteroid deflection strategies depend on material characterization to reduce the uncertainty in predictions of the deflection velocity resulting from impulsive loading. In addition to strength, equation of state, the initial state of the material including its competency (i.e. fractured or monolithic) and the amount of micro- or macroscopic porosity are important considerations to predict the thermomechanical response. There is recent interest in observing near-Earth asteroid (101955) Bennu due to its classification of being potentially hazardous with close approaches occurring every 6 years. Bennu is relatively large with a nominal diameter of 492 m, density estimates ranging from 0.9-1.26more » g/cm³ and is composed mainly of carbonaceous chondrite. There is a lack of data for highly porous carbonaceous chondrite at very large pressures and temperatures. In the absence of the specific material composition and state (e.g. layering, porosity as a function of depth) on Bennu we introduce a continuum constitutive model based on the response of granular materials and provide impact and standoff explosion simulations to investigate the response of highly porous materials to these types of impulsive loading scenarios. Simulations with impact speeds of 5 km/s show that the shock wave emanating from the impact site is highly dispersive and that a 10% porous material has a larger compacted volume compared with a 40% porous material with the same bulk density due to differences in compaction response.« less

  3. Simulations of defense strategies for Bennu: Material characterization and impulse delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Herbold, E. B.; Owen, J. M.; Swift, D. C.; Miller, P. L.

    2015-05-19

    Assessments of asteroid deflection strategies depend on material characterization to reduce the uncertainty in predictions of the deflection velocity resulting from impulsive loading. In addition to strength, equation of state, the initial state of the material including its competency (i.e. fractured or monolithic) and the amount of micro- or macroscopic porosity are important considerations to predict the thermomechanical response. There is recent interest in observing near-Earth asteroid (101955) Bennu due to its classification of being potentially hazardous with close approaches occurring every 6 years. Bennu is relatively large with a nominal diameter of 492 m, density estimates ranging from 0.9-1.26 g/cm³ and is composed mainly of carbonaceous chondrite. There is a lack of data for highly porous carbonaceous chondrite at very large pressures and temperatures. In the absence of the specific material composition and state (e.g. layering, porosity as a function of depth) on Bennu we introduce a continuum constitutive model based on the response of granular materials and provide impact and standoff explosion simulations to investigate the response of highly porous materials to these types of impulsive loading scenarios. Simulations with impact speeds of 5 km/s show that the shock wave emanating from the impact site is highly dispersive and that a 10% porous material has a larger compacted volume compared with a 40% porous material with the same bulk density due to differences in compaction response.

  4. Self-reported impulsivity is negatively correlated with amygdalar volumes in cocaine dependence

    PubMed Central

    Mei, Songli; Xu, Jiansong; Carroll, Kathleen M.; Potenza, Marc N.

    2015-01-01

    Although impulsivity has been associated with cocaine dependence and other addictive behaviors, the biological factors underlying impulsivity have yet to be precisely determined. This study aimed to examine relationships between impulsivity and volumes of the amygdala and hippocampus in cocaine-dependent and healthy comparison individuals. The Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS-11) was used to assess impulsivity. FreeSurfer was used to assess amygdalar and hippocampal volumes from high-resolution structural magnetic resonance images. Relative to healthy comparison subjects, cocaine-dependent individuals scored higher on all three subscales of BIS-11 but did not differ from healthy comparison subjects in amygdalar or hippocampal volumes. Cocaine-dependent individuals showed significant negative correlations between amygdalar volumes and scores on the BIS-11 Attentional subscale, and this relationship differed significantly from the non-significant relationship in healthy comparison subjects. As individual differences in amygdalar structure may contribute to the high impulsivity observed in cocaine-dependent individuals, the findings suggest that future studies should assess the extent to which therapies that target impulsivity in cocaine dependence may operate through the amygdala or alter its structure or function. PMID:26187551

  5. The value of impulsivity to define subgroups of addicted individuals differing in personality dysfunction, craving, psychosocial adjustment, and wellbeing: a latent class analysis.

    PubMed

    Albein-Urios, Natalia; Pilatti, Angelina; Lozano, Oscar; Martínez-González, José M; Verdejo-García, Antonio

    2014-02-01

    High impulsivity is common to substance and gambling addictions. Despite these commonalities, there is still substantial heterogeneity on impulsivity levels within these diagnostic groups, and variations in impulsive levels predict higher severity of symptoms and poorer outcomes. We addressed the question of whether impulsivity scores can yield empirically driven subgroups of addicted individuals that will exhibit different clinical presentations and outcomes. We applied latent class analysis (LCA) to trait (UPPS-P impulsive behavior scale) and cognitive impulsivity (Stroop and d2 tests) scores in three predominantly male addiction diagnostic groups: Cocaine with Personality Disorders, Cocaine Non-comorbid, and Gambling and analyzed the usefulness of the resulting subgroups to differentiate personality beliefs and relevant outcomes: Craving, psychosocial adjustment, and quality of life. In accordance with impulsivity scores, the three addiction diagnostic groups are best represented as two separate classes: Class 1 characterized by greater trait impulsivity and poorer cognitive impulsivity performance and Class 2 characterized by lower trait impulsivity and better cognitive impulsivity performance. The two empirically derived classes showed significant differences on personality features and outcome variables (Class 1 exhibited greater personality dysfunction and worse clinical outcomes), whereas conventional diagnostic groups showed non-significant differences on most of these measures. Trait and cognitive impulsivity scores differentiate subgroups of addicted individuals with more versus less severe personality features and clinical outcomes.

  6. The value of impulsivity to define subgroups of addicted individuals differing in personality dysfunction, craving, psychosocial adjustment, and wellbeing: a latent class analysis.

    PubMed

    Albein-Urios, Natalia; Pilatti, Angelina; Lozano, Oscar; Martínez-González, José M; Verdejo-García, Antonio

    2014-02-01

    High impulsivity is common to substance and gambling addictions. Despite these commonalities, there is still substantial heterogeneity on impulsivity levels within these diagnostic groups, and variations in impulsive levels predict higher severity of symptoms and poorer outcomes. We addressed the question of whether impulsivity scores can yield empirically driven subgroups of addicted individuals that will exhibit different clinical presentations and outcomes. We applied latent class analysis (LCA) to trait (UPPS-P impulsive behavior scale) and cognitive impulsivity (Stroop and d2 tests) scores in three predominantly male addiction diagnostic groups: Cocaine with Personality Disorders, Cocaine Non-comorbid, and Gambling and analyzed the usefulness of the resulting subgroups to differentiate personality beliefs and relevant outcomes: Craving, psychosocial adjustment, and quality of life. In accordance with impulsivity scores, the three addiction diagnostic groups are best represented as two separate classes: Class 1 characterized by greater trait impulsivity and poorer cognitive impulsivity performance and Class 2 characterized by lower trait impulsivity and better cognitive impulsivity performance. The two empirically derived classes showed significant differences on personality features and outcome variables (Class 1 exhibited greater personality dysfunction and worse clinical outcomes), whereas conventional diagnostic groups showed non-significant differences on most of these measures. Trait and cognitive impulsivity scores differentiate subgroups of addicted individuals with more versus less severe personality features and clinical outcomes. PMID:24014137

  7. The neuronal mechanisms underlying improvement of impulsivity in ADHD by theta/beta neurofeedback

    PubMed Central

    Bluschke, Annet; Broschwitz, Felicia; Kohl, Simon; Roessner, Veit; Beste, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Neurofeedback is increasingly recognized as an intervention to treat core symptoms of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Despite the large number of studies having been carried out to evaluate its effectiveness, it is widely elusive what neuronal mechanisms related to the core symptoms of ADHD are modulated by neurofeedback. 19 children with ADHD undergoing 8 weeks of theta/beta neurofeedback and 17 waiting list controls performed a Go/Nogo task in a pre-post design. We used neurophysiological measures combining high-density EEG recording with source localization analyses using sLORETA. Compared to the waiting list ADHD control group, impulsive behaviour measured was reduced after neurofeedback treatment. The effects of neurofeedback were very specific for situations requiring inhibitory control over responses. The neurophysiological data shows that processes of perceptual gating, attentional selection and resource allocation processes were not affected by neurofeedback. Rather, neurofeedback effects seem to be based on the modulation of response inhibition processes in medial frontal cortices. The study shows that specific neuronal mechanisms underlying impulsivity are modulated by theta/beta neurofeedback in ADHD. The applied neurofeedback protocol could be particularly suitable to address inhibitory control. The study validates assumed functional neuroanatomical target regions of an established neurofeedback protocol on a neurophysiological level. PMID:27514985

  8. The neuronal mechanisms underlying improvement of impulsivity in ADHD by theta/beta neurofeedback.

    PubMed

    Bluschke, Annet; Broschwitz, Felicia; Kohl, Simon; Roessner, Veit; Beste, Christian

    2016-08-12

    Neurofeedback is increasingly recognized as an intervention to treat core symptoms of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Despite the large number of studies having been carried out to evaluate its effectiveness, it is widely elusive what neuronal mechanisms related to the core symptoms of ADHD are modulated by neurofeedback. 19 children with ADHD undergoing 8 weeks of theta/beta neurofeedback and 17 waiting list controls performed a Go/Nogo task in a pre-post design. We used neurophysiological measures combining high-density EEG recording with source localization analyses using sLORETA. Compared to the waiting list ADHD control group, impulsive behaviour measured was reduced after neurofeedback treatment. The effects of neurofeedback were very specific for situations requiring inhibitory control over responses. The neurophysiological data shows that processes of perceptual gating, attentional selection and resource allocation processes were not affected by neurofeedback. Rather, neurofeedback effects seem to be based on the modulation of response inhibition processes in medial frontal cortices. The study shows that specific neuronal mechanisms underlying impulsivity are modulated by theta/beta neurofeedback in ADHD. The applied neurofeedback protocol could be particularly suitable to address inhibitory control. The study validates assumed functional neuroanatomical target regions of an established neurofeedback protocol on a neurophysiological level.

  9. The neuronal mechanisms underlying improvement of impulsivity in ADHD by theta/beta neurofeedback.

    PubMed

    Bluschke, Annet; Broschwitz, Felicia; Kohl, Simon; Roessner, Veit; Beste, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Neurofeedback is increasingly recognized as an intervention to treat core symptoms of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Despite the large number of studies having been carried out to evaluate its effectiveness, it is widely elusive what neuronal mechanisms related to the core symptoms of ADHD are modulated by neurofeedback. 19 children with ADHD undergoing 8 weeks of theta/beta neurofeedback and 17 waiting list controls performed a Go/Nogo task in a pre-post design. We used neurophysiological measures combining high-density EEG recording with source localization analyses using sLORETA. Compared to the waiting list ADHD control group, impulsive behaviour measured was reduced after neurofeedback treatment. The effects of neurofeedback were very specific for situations requiring inhibitory control over responses. The neurophysiological data shows that processes of perceptual gating, attentional selection and resource allocation processes were not affected by neurofeedback. Rather, neurofeedback effects seem to be based on the modulation of response inhibition processes in medial frontal cortices. The study shows that specific neuronal mechanisms underlying impulsivity are modulated by theta/beta neurofeedback in ADHD. The applied neurofeedback protocol could be particularly suitable to address inhibitory control. The study validates assumed functional neuroanatomical target regions of an established neurofeedback protocol on a neurophysiological level. PMID:27514985

  10. Behavioral Impulsivity in Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder.

    PubMed

    Abramovitch, Amitai; McKay, Dean

    2016-09-01

    Background Grassi et al. (2015) collected data to examine impulsivity in individuals with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) compared to nonpsychiatric controls. Their aim was to examine whether OCD may be fully captured by the behavioral addiction model, using the prototypical mechanism underlying drug addiction as their framework. Based on their findings, Grassi et al. concluded that OCD shares behavioral components with addictions, particularly behavioral impulsivity and risky decision making. Furthermore, the authors suggested that this model may be superior to the prevailing psychological model of OCD. Findings We argue that based on the nature of their data as well as the current dominant conceptualization of OCD in the literature, this conclusion is untenable. The authors inferred behavioral impulsivity, whereas their main finding was concerning cognitive impulsivity or difficulties in planning. Such items on the Barratt impulsiveness scale have been shown in other research to overpredict behavioral impulsive tendencies in OCD, where the nature of the condition involves doubting of action and a conservative estimate of how one's cognitions may impact behavior. Conclusions We conclude that similar to drug addiction, compulsive rituals in OCD may be governed by a negative reinforcement mechanism; the available data indicate that OCD does not share the two main components seen in addiction, namely, behavioral impulsivity and risky decision making. PMID:27156379

  11. Impulsive and non-impulsive suicide attempts in patients treated for alcohol dependence

    PubMed Central

    Wojnar, Marcin; Ilgen, Mark A.; Czyz, Ewa; Strobbe, Stephen; Klimkiewicz, Anna; Jakubczyk, Andrzej; Glass, Jennifer; Brower, Kirk J.

    2009-01-01

    Background Suicidal behavior has been recognized as an increasing problem among alcohol-dependent subjects. The aim of the study was to identify correlates of impulsive and non-impulsive suicide attempts among a treated population of alcohol-dependent patients. Methods A total of 154 patients with alcohol dependence consecutively admitted for addiction treatment participated in the study. Suicidal behavior was assessed together with severity of alcohol dependence, childhood abuse, impulsivity, and family history. A stop-signal procedure was used as a behavioral measure of impulsivity. Results and conclusions Lifetime suicide attempts were reported by 43% of patients in alcohol treatment; of which 62% were impulsive. Compared to patients without a suicide attempt, those with a non-impulsive attempt were more likely to have a history of sexual abuse (OR = 7.17), a family history of suicide (OR = 4.09), and higher scores on a personality measure of impulsiveness (OR = 2.27). The only significant factor that distinguished patients with impulsive suicide attempts from patients without a suicide attempt and from patients with a non-impulsive suicide attempt was a higher level of behavioral impulsivity (OR = 1.84 – 2.42). Limitations Retrospective self-report of suicide attempts and family history. Lack of diagnostic measure. PMID:18835498

  12. [Impulse control disorders in Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Joutsa, Juho; Kaasinen, Valtteri

    2013-01-01

    Of the patients having Parkinson's disease, up to third encounters some degree of impulse control problems and one out of seven suffers from true impulse control disorders such as pathological gambling, hypersexuality, compulsive shopping and binge eating. Dopaminergic drugs used in anti-Parkinson therapy, especially dopamine agonists, increase the risk of these disorders. Impulse control disorders are associated with a relatively more active dopamine-mediated neurotransmission of the mesolimbic and mesocortical system. Discontinuation of dopamine agonist medication can thus be considered as the first line treatment of these disorders. PMID:24397147

  13. Impulse Control Disorders in Parkinson’s Disease:Management, Controversies, and Potential Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Samuel, M; Rodriguez-Oroz, M; Antonini, A; Brotchie, JM; Ray Chaudhuri, K; Brown, RG; Galpern, WR; Nirenberg, MJ; Okun, MS; Lang, AE

    2016-01-01

    Impulse control disorders in Parkinson’s disease are a group of impulsive behaviors most often associated with dopaminergic treatment. Presently, there is a lack of high quality evidence available to guide their management. This manuscript reviews current management strategies, before concentrating on the concept of dopamine agonist withdrawal syndrome and its implications for the management of impulse control disorders. Further, we focus on controversies including the role of more recently available anti-parkinsonian drugs, and potential future approaches involving routes of drug delivery, non-pharmacological treatments (such as cognitive behaviour therapy and deep brain stimulation), and other as yet experimental strategies. PMID:25607799

  14. Immunohistochemical staining with EGFR mutation-specific antibodies: high specificity as a diagnostic marker for lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wen, Yong Hannah; Brogi, Edi; Hasanovic, Adnan; Ladanyi, Marc; Soslow, Robert A; Chitale, Dhananjay; Shia, Jinru; Moreira, Andre L

    2013-09-01

    We previously demonstrated a high specificity of immunohistochemistry using epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation-specific antibodies in lung adenocarcinoma and correlation with EGFR mutation analysis. In this study, we assessed EGFR mutation status by immunohistochemistry in a variety of extrapulmonary malignancies, especially those that frequently show EGFR overexpression. Tissue microarrays containing triplicate cores of breast carcinomas (n=300), colorectal carcinomas (n=65), pancreatic adenocarcinoma (n=145), and uterine carcinosarcoma or malignant mixed müllerian tumors (n=25) were included in the study. Tissue microarray of lung adenocarcinoma with known EGFR mutation status was used as reference. Immunohistochemistry was performed using antibodies specific for the E746-A750del and L858R mutations. In pulmonary adenocarcinoma, a staining intensity of 2+ or 3+ correlates with mutation status and is therefore considered as positive. Out of 300 breast carcinomas, 293 (98%) scored 0, 5 (2%) had 1+ staining, 2 (1%) were 2+ for the L858R antibody. All breast carcinomas scored 0 with the E746-A750 antibody. All the colorectal, pancreatic carcinomas and malignant mixed müllerian tumors were negative (0) for both antibodies. Molecular analysis of the breast carcinomas that scored 2+ for L858R showed no mutation. Our results show that EGFR mutation-specific antibodies could be an additional tool distinguishing primary versus metastatic carcinomas in the lung. False-positivity can be seen in breast carcinoma but is extremely rare (1%).

  15. The video head impulse test during post-rotatory nystagmus: physiology and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Mantokoudis, Georgios; Tehrani, Ali S Saber; Xie, Li; Eibenberger, Karin; Eibenberger, Bernhard; Roberts, Dale; Newman-Toker, David E; Zee, David S

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to test the effects of a sustained nystagmus on the head impulse response of the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) in healthy subjects. VOR gain (slow-phase eye velocity/head velocity) was measured using video head impulse test goggles. Acting as a surrogate for a spontaneous nystagmus (SN), a post-rotatory nystagmus (PRN) was elicited after a sustained, constant-velocity rotation, and then head impulses were applied. 'Raw' VOR gain, uncorrected for PRN, in healthy subjects in response to head impulses with peak velocities in the range of 150°/s-250°/s was significantly increased (as reflected in an increase in the slope of the gain versus head velocity relationship) after inducing PRN with slow phases of nystagmus of high intensity (>30°/s) in the same but not in the opposite direction as the slow-phase response induced by the head impulses. The values of VOR gain themselves, however, remained in the normal range with slow-phase velocities of PRN < 30°/s. Finally, quick phases of PRN were suppressed during the first 20-160 ms of a head impulse; the time frame of suppression depended on the direction of PRN but not on the duration of the head impulse. Our results in normal subjects suggest that VOR gains measured using head impulses may have to be corrected for any superimposed SN when the slow-phase velocity of nystagmus is relatively high and the peak velocity of the head movements is relatively low. The suppression of quick phases during head impulses may help to improve steady fixation during rapid head movements. PMID:26449967

  16. Fine specificities of two lectins from Cymbosema roseum seeds: a lectin specific for high-mannose oligosaccharides and a lectin specific for blood group H type II trisaccharide.

    PubMed

    Dam, Tarun K; Cavada, Benildo S; Nagano, Celso S; Rocha, Bruno Am; Benevides, Raquel G; Nascimento, Kyria S; de Sousa, Luiz Ag; Oscarson, Stefan; Brewer, C Fred

    2011-07-01

    The legume species of Cymbosema roseum of Diocleinae subtribe produce at least two different seed lectins. The present study demonstrates that C. roseum lectin I (CRL I) binds with high affinity to the "core" trimannoside of N-linked oligosaccharides. Cymbosema roseum lectin II (CRL II), on the other hand, binds with high affinity to the blood group H trisaccharide (Fucα1,2Galα1-4GlcNAc-). Thermodynamic and hemagglutination inhibition studies reveal the fine binding specificities of the two lectins. Data obtained with a complete set of monodeoxy analogs of the core trimannoside indicate that CRL I recognizes the 3-, 4- and 6-hydroxyl groups of the α(1,6) Man residue, the 3- and 4-hydroxyl group of the α(1,3) Man residue and the 2- and 4-hydroxyl groups of the central Man residue of the trimannoside. CRL I possesses enhanced affinities for the Man5 oligomannose glycan and a biantennary complex glycan as well as glycoproteins containing high-mannose glycans. On the other hand, CRL II distinguishes the blood group H type II epitope from the Lewis(x), Lewis(y), Lewis(a) and Lewis(b) epitopes. CRL II also distinguishes between blood group H type II and type I trisaccharides. CRL I and CRL II, respectively, possess differences in fine specificities when compared with other reported mannose and fucose recognizing lectins. This is the first report of a mannose-specific lectin (CRL I) and a blood group H type II-specific lectin (CRL II) from seeds of a member of the Diocleinae subtribe.

  17. Lithium, but not Valproate, Reduces Impulsive Choice in the Delay-Discounting Task in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Halcomb, Meredith E; Gould, Todd D; Grahame, Nicholas J

    2013-01-01

    Both lithium and valproate are well-established treatments for bipolar disorder. Studies have also found that lithium is effective at reducing suicidal behaviors in patients with mood disorders. Impulsivity is a validated endophenotype of both bipolar disorder and suicidal behavior. We assessed effects of treatment with lithium or valproate on cognitive impulsivity in selectively bred mice previously shown to manifest relatively high levels of cognitive impulsivity. Mice were trained in the delay-discounting paradigm, a measure of cognitive impulsivity reflecting a behavioral bias towards immediacy, and then treated with lithium, valproate, or control chow. After 3 weeks of drug treatment, mice were tested at various delays to a large, delayed reward. Drug treatment continued during this time. Lithium reduced impulsivity, whereas valproate had no effect on choice behavior. Both drugs increased the number of choice trials and reinforcer intake, but effects on choice behavior did not depend on these motivational changes. To our knowledge, this is the first study demonstrating lithium's effects to reduce cognitive impulsivity. Future studies may focus on the ability of putative pharmacotherapies for patients at risk for bipolar disorder or suicide to modify the impulsive choice dimension of this diseases. PMID:23584261

  18. 'Speedy action over goal orientation': cognitive impulsivity in male forensic patients with dyslexia.

    PubMed

    Dåderman, Anna M; Meurling, Ann Wirsén; Levander, Sten

    2012-11-01

    Previous neuropsychiatric studies suggest a relationship between reading disability and cognitive impulsivity. This relationship is not entirely explained by the high comorbidity between reading disability and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), as children with a co-occurrence of these disorders tend to be more impulsive than those with ADHD only. Other research has demonstrated that poor verbal skill (irrespective of the presence of dyslexia) deficits in executive functions and impulsivity are important risk factors for criminal behaviour. The present study bridges these two research traditions by examining whether patients undergoing forensic psychiatric investigation who also have dyslexia, have a cognitive style characterized by impulsivity. Male forensic patients (mean age 27 years, range 16-35) with (n = 9) and without (n = 13) dyslexia were evaluated on the computerized EuroCog test battery. The findings suggest that patients with dyslexia tend to use a cognitive impulsive style and suggest a more direct link between dyslexia and cognitive impulsivity that is not mediated by the presence of ADHD. In order to identify treatment needs and tailor treatment accordingly, forensic patients should be assessed with respect to poor verbal skill, dyslexia and impulsivity.

  19. Reward drive and rash impulsiveness as dimensions of impulsivity: implications for substance misuse.

    PubMed

    Dawe, Sharon; Gullo, Matthew J; Loxton, Natalie J

    2004-09-01

    One of the primary personality dimensions or traits that has consistently been linked to substance abuse is impulsivity. However, impulsivity is not a homogenous construct and although many of the measures of impulsivity are correlated, the most recent review of published factor analytic studies has proposed two independent dimensions of impulsivity: reward sensitivity, reflecting one of the primary dimension of J. A. Gray's personality theory, and rash impulsiveness. These two facets of impulsivity derived from the field of personality research parallel recent developments in the neurosciences where changes in the incentive value of rewarding substances has been linked to alterations in neural substrates involved in reward seeking and with a diminished capacity to inhibit behavior due to chronic drug exposure. In this paper, we propose a model that integrates the findings from research into individual differences with recent models of neural substrates implicated in the development of substance misuse.

  20. Effects of cannabis on impulsivity: a systematic review of neuroimaging findings.

    PubMed

    Wrege, Johannes; Schmidt, Andre; Walter, Anna; Smieskova, Renata; Bendfeldt, Kerstin; Radue, Ernst-Wilhelm; Lang, Undine E; Borgwardt, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    We conducted a systematic review to assess the evidence for specific effects of cannabis on impulsivity, disinhibition and motor control. The review had a specific focus on neuroimaging findings associated with acute and chronic use of the drug and covers literature published up until May 2012. Seventeen studies were identified, of which 13 met the inclusion criteria; three studies investigated acute effects of cannabis (1 fMRI, 2 PET), while six studies investigated non-acute functional effects (4 fMRI, 2 PET), and four studies investigated structural alterations. Functional imaging studies of impulsivity studies suggest that prefrontal blood flow is lower in chronic cannabis users than in controls. Studies of acute administration of THC or marijuana report increased brain metabolism in several brain regions during impulsivity tasks. Structural imaging studies of cannabis users found differences in reduced prefrontal volumes and white matter integrity that might mediate the abnormal impulsivity and mood observed in marijuana users. To address the question whether impulsivity as a trait precedes cannabis consumption or whether cannabis aggravates impulsivity and discontinuation of usage more longitudinal study designs are warranted.

  1. Effects of Cannabis on Impulsivity: A Systematic Review of Neuroimaging Findings

    PubMed Central

    Wrege, Johannes; Schmidt, André; Walter, Anna; Smieskova, Renata; Bendfeldt, Kerstin; Radue, Ernst-Wilhelm; Lang, Undine E.; Borgwardt, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    We conducted a systematic review to assess the evidence for specific effects of cannabis on impulsivity, disinhibition and motor control. The review had a specific focus on neuroimaging findings associated with acute and chronic use of the drug and covers literature published up until May 2012. Seventeen studies were identified, of which 13 met the inclusion criteria; three studies investigated acute effects of cannabis (1 fMRI, 2 PET), while six studies investigated non-acute functional effects (4 fMRI, 2 PET), and four studies investigated structural alterations. Functional imaging studies of impulsivity studies suggest that prefrontal blood flow is lower in chronic cannabis users than in controls. Studies of acute administration of THC or marijuana report increased brain metabolism in several brain regions during impulsivity tasks. Structural imaging studies of cannabis users found differences in reduced prefrontal volumes and white matter integrity that might mediate the abnormal impulsivity and mood observed in marijuana users. To address the question whether impulsivity as a trait precedes cannabis consumption or whether cannabis aggravates impulsivity and discontinuation of usage more longitudinal study designs are warranted. PMID:23829358

  2. Impulsive Driving: Definition and Measurement Using the I-Driving Scale (IDS).

    PubMed

    Pérez-Moreno, Elisa; Hernández-Lloreda, María José; Gallego-Largo, Trinidad Ruiz; Castellanos, Miguel Ángel

    2015-11-27

    Impulsivity has been widely studied in the context of traffic. The trait is believed to be the root of some accidents, along with other variables like aggression and anger. The present research objective is to develop a new scale - the I-Driving Scale (IDS) - to evaluate and measure the construct of impulsivity in specific driving situations. To that end, two studies were conducted, with 162 and 107 participants, respectively. In both studies, participants were recruited via their social networks, and answered anonymously. In addition to the IDS, they completed the Use the Vehicle to Express Anger subscale of the Driving Anger Expression Inventory (DAX), the Driving Anger Scale (DAS), and the Barratt Impulsivity Scale (BIS11), and also provided demographic information. The final scale had 11 items falling into two factors: impatience, and aggressiveness/abruptness. The results show a high consistency (αT = .81, αI = .70, and αA = .85 in the first study; αT = .83, αI = .80, and αA = .88 in the second study). Statistical results of Exploratory Factor Analysis in the first sample indicated goodness of fit to a two-factor model (RMSR = .057, GFI = .98). The second study confirmed that factorial structure (χ2/df = 80.50/43 = 1.87, RMSEA = .088, CFI = .94, TLI = .92). Correlations with other measures indicated the Impatience subscale is associated with different expressions of anger behind the wheel, and directly correlated with the loss of driver's license points. Furthermore, the Aggressiveness or Abruptness subscale was associated with more mechanical aspects, and correlated inversely with age.

  3. Impulsive Driving: Definition and Measurement Using the I-Driving Scale (IDS).

    PubMed

    Pérez-Moreno, Elisa; Hernández-Lloreda, María José; Gallego-Largo, Trinidad Ruiz; Castellanos, Miguel Ángel

    2015-01-01

    Impulsivity has been widely studied in the context of traffic. The trait is believed to be the root of some accidents, along with other variables like aggression and anger. The present research objective is to develop a new scale - the I-Driving Scale (IDS) - to evaluate and measure the construct of impulsivity in specific driving situations. To that end, two studies were conducted, with 162 and 107 participants, respectively. In both studies, participants were recruited via their social networks, and answered anonymously. In addition to the IDS, they completed the Use the Vehicle to Express Anger subscale of the Driving Anger Expression Inventory (DAX), the Driving Anger Scale (DAS), and the Barratt Impulsivity Scale (BIS11), and also provided demographic information. The final scale had 11 items falling into two factors: impatience, and aggressiveness/abruptness. The results show a high consistency (αT = .81, αI = .70, and αA = .85 in the first study; αT = .83, αI = .80, and αA = .88 in the second study). Statistical results of Exploratory Factor Analysis in the first sample indicated goodness of fit to a two-factor model (RMSR = .057, GFI = .98). The second study confirmed that factorial structure (χ2/df = 80.50/43 = 1.87, RMSEA = .088, CFI = .94, TLI = .92). Correlations with other measures indicated the Impatience subscale is associated with different expressions of anger behind the wheel, and directly correlated with the loss of driver's license points. Furthermore, the Aggressiveness or Abruptness subscale was associated with more mechanical aspects, and correlated inversely with age. PMID:26610847

  4. Behavioral Measures of Impulsivity and the Law

    PubMed Central

    Mathias, Charles W.; Marsh-Richard, Dawn M.; Dougherty, Donald M.

    2012-01-01

    The General Theory of Crime proposes that crime is explained by the combination of situational opportunity and lack of self-control. Impulsivity is one of the important components of self-control. Because behavioral measures of impulsivity are becoming more commonly utilized to assess forensic populations, this manuscript provides an overview of three current behavioral measures. In doing so, an example of their application is provided using a group of individuals likely to come into contact with the legal system: adolescents with Conduct Disorder. Earlier age of onset of Conduct Disorder symptoms has been shown to be an important predictor of the persistence of poor outcomes into adulthood including participation in criminal activities. This study found differential behavioral profiles across distinct measures of impulsivity by those with childhood- versus adolescent-onset Conduct Disorder. Legal implications for defining behavioral deficits using behavioral measures of impulsivity and their current limitations are discussed. PMID:19039792

  5. ['Nothing' or 'just a bit'? 'Much' or 'too much'? Impulsivity traits as markers of severity transitions within non-problematic and problematic ranges of alcohol and Internet use].

    PubMed

    J F, Navas; A, Torres; A, Cándido; J C, Perales

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to explore the relationship between impulsivity traits and perceived negative consequences of alcohol consumption and Internet use. More specifically, impulsivity traits - positive and negative urgency, sensation seeking, lack of premeditation, and lack of perseverance - in (1) the occurrence of initial negative consequences linked to use, and (2) the transition from consequences possibly indicating a problematic behavior to consequences very likely indicating a clinical problem. For this, 709 first-year college students were assessed using the UPPS-P impulsive behavior scale, and the Multicage CAD-4 scale for addictive behaviors. Logistic regressions were used to discriminate (a) between individuals with a 0-score and individuals with a 1-score in the Multicage scales (low severity range), and (b) between individuals with a 2-score and individuals with 3/4-score (high severity range), separately for alcohol and Internet use. For alcohol use, positive urgency and lack of premeditation marked the transition from 0 to 1 scores, whereas negative urgency marked the transition from 2 to 3/4 scores. For Internet use, however, none of the UPPS-P dimensions significantly marked the transition from 0 to 1 (occurrence of initial negative consequences), and positive urgency marked the transition from 2 to 3/4 (from possible to very likely problematic behavior). Negative urgency arises as a pathologization marker for alcohol abuse, whereas changes in non-clinical levels are linked to impulsivity elicited by appetitive emotions. Impulsivity does not seem to play any role in low severity levels of Internet use, and positive urgency marks the transition between high severity scores. These differential patterns are indicative of different etiological paths for excessive Internet use and substance abuse. PMID:25225732

  6. Extending the impulse response in order to reduce errors due to impulse noise and signal fading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, Joseph A.; Rolls, Andrew J.; Sirisena, H. R.

    1988-01-01

    A finite impulse response (FIR) digital smearing filter was designed to produce maximum intersymbol interference and maximum extension of the impulse response of the signal in a noiseless binary channel. A matched FIR desmearing filter at the receiver then reduced the intersymbol interference to zero. Signal fades were simulated by means of 100 percent signal blockage in the channel. Smearing and desmearing filters of length 256, 512, and 1024 were used for these simulations. Results indicate that impulse response extension by means of bit smearing appears to be a useful technique for correcting errors due to impulse noise or signal fading in a binary channel.

  7. Atorvastatin ameliorates endothelium-specific insulin resistance induced by high glucose combined with high insulin.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ou; Li, Jinliang; Chen, Haiyan; Li, Jie; Kong, Jian

    2016-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to establish an endothelial cell model of endothelium-specific insulin resistance to evaluate the effect of atorvastatin on insulin resistance-associated endothelial dysfunction and to identify the potential pathway responsible for its action. Cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were pretreated with different concentrations of glucose with, or without, 10‑5 M insulin for 24 h, following which the cells were treated with atorvastatin. The tyrosine phosphorylation of insulin receptor (IR) and insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS‑1), the production of nitric oxide (NO), the activity and phosphorylation level of endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) on serine1177, and the mRNA levels of endothelin‑1 (ET‑1) were assessed during the experimental procedure. Treatment of the HUVECs with 30 mM glucose and 10‑5 M insulin for 24 h impaired insulin signaling, with reductions in the tyrosine phosphorylation of IR and protein expression of IRS‑1 by almost 75 and 65%, respectively. This, in turn, decreased the activity and phosphorylation of eNOS on serine1177, and reduced the production of NO by almost 80%. By contrast, the mRNA levels of ET‑1 were upregulated. All these changes were ameliorated by atorvastatin. Taken together, these results demonstrated that high concentrations of glucose and insulin impaired insulin signaling leading to endothelial dysfunction, and that atorvastatin ameliorated these changes, acting primarily through the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt/eNOS signaling pathway. PMID:27484094

  8. Numerical vorticity creation based on impulse conservation.

    PubMed Central

    Summers, D M; Chorin, A J

    1996-01-01

    The problem of creating solenoidal vortex elements to satisfy no-slip boundary conditions in Lagrangian numerical vortex methods is solved through the use of impulse elements at walls and their subsequent conversion to vortex loops. The algorithm is not uniquely defined, due to the gauge freedom in the definition of impulse; the numerically optimal choice of gauge remains to be determined. Two different choices are discussed, and an application to flow past a sphere is sketched. PMID:11607636

  9. Response of electroexplosive devices to impulsive waveforms.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenthal, L. A.; Menichelli, V. J.

    1971-01-01

    The firing characteristics of insensitive electroexplosive devices to certain impulsive waveforms have been investigated. For these waveforms, energy is delivered in a time short compared to the thermal time constant and therefore cooling plays a negligible role. One waveform is a terminated capacitor discharge wherein the regular discharge of a capacitor is terminated at a preset point. Another is a half-sine wave pulse. The theory, design, and application of both impulsive waveform generators are presented together with certain limited experimental observations.

  10. Brain functional connectivity changes in children that differ in impulsivity temperamental trait

    PubMed Central

    Inuggi, Alberto; Sanz-Arigita, Ernesto; González-Salinas, Carmen; Valero-García, Ana V.; García-Santos, Jose M.; Fuentes, Luis J.

    2014-01-01

    Impulsivity is a core personality trait forming part of normal behavior and contributing to adaptive functioning. However, in typically developing children, altered patterns of impulsivity constitute a risk factor for the development of behavioral problems. Since both pathological and non-pathological states are commonly characterized by continuous transitions, we used a correlative approach to investigate the potential link between personality and brain dynamics. We related brain functional connectivity of typically developing children, measured with magnetic resonance imaging at rest, with their impulsivity scores obtained from a questionnaire completed by their parents. We first looked for areas within the default mode network (DMN) whose functional connectivity might be modulated by trait impulsivity. Then, we calculated the functional connectivity among these regions and the rest of the brain in order to assess if impulsivity trait altered their relationships. We found two DMN clusters located at the posterior cingulate cortex and the right angular gyrus which were negatively correlated with impulsivity scores. The whole-brain correlation analysis revealed the classic network of correlating and anti-correlating areas with respect to the DMN. The impulsivity trait modulated such pattern showing that the canonical anti-phasic relation between DMN and action-related network was reduced in high impulsive children. These results represent the first evidence that the impulsivity, measured as personality trait assessed through parents' report, exerts a modulatory influence over the functional connectivity of resting state brain networks in typically developing children. The present study goes further to connect developmental approaches, mainly based on data collected through the use of questionnaires, and behavioral neuroscience, interested in how differences in brain structure and functions reflect in differences in behavior. PMID:24834038

  11. Brain functional connectivity changes in children that differ in impulsivity temperamental trait.

    PubMed

    Inuggi, Alberto; Sanz-Arigita, Ernesto; González-Salinas, Carmen; Valero-García, Ana V; García-Santos, Jose M; Fuentes, Luis J

    2014-01-01

    Impulsivity is a core personality trait forming part of normal behavior and contributing to adaptive functioning. However, in typically developing children, altered patterns of impulsivity constitute a risk factor for the development of behavioral problems. Since both pathological and non-pathological states are commonly characterized by continuous transitions, we used a correlative approach to investigate the potential link between personality and brain dynamics. We related brain functional connectivity of typically developing children, measured with magnetic resonance imaging at rest, with their impulsivity scores obtained from a questionnaire completed by their parents. We first looked for areas within the default mode network (DMN) whose functional connectivity might be modulated by trait impulsivity. Then, we calculated the functional connectivity among these regions and the rest of the brain in order to assess if impulsivity trait altered their relationships. We found two DMN clusters located at the posterior cingulate cortex and the right angular gyrus which were negatively correlated with impulsivity scores. The whole-brain correlation analysis revealed the classic network of correlating and anti-correlating areas with respect to the DMN. The impulsivity trait modulated such pattern showing that the canonical anti-phasic relation between DMN and action-related network was reduced in high impulsive children. These results represent the first evidence that the impulsivity, measured as personality trait assessed through parents' report, exerts a modulatory influence over the functional connectivity of resting state brain networks in typically developing children. The present study goes further to connect developmental approaches, mainly based on data collected through the use of questionnaires, and behavioral neuroscience, interested in how differences in brain structure and functions reflect in differences in behavior.

  12. Rapid Vaporization of Thin Conductors Used for Impulse Metalworking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vivek, Anupam

    Forming, cutting and welding of metal by impulse has significant advantages, in that short time scales change the fundamental nature of the forming process and short duration impulses can be used with much lighter and more agile equipment because large static forces do not need to be resisted. Impulse metalworking is commonly implemented using explosives or electromagnetic actuators. Explosives have limitations such as space requirements, handling and storage restrictions and ability to scale down the process. The application of electromagnetic forming is limited at high energies and large numbers of operations by the availability of long-lived electromagnetic coils (or actuators, as they are sometimes referred to). Here low-cost, disposable actuators have been suggested as one method to treat this issue. Forming, cutting and welding of metal by impulse has significant advantages, in that short time scales change the fundamental nature of the forming process and short duration impulses can be used with much lighter and more agile equipment because large static forces do not need to be resisted. Impulse metalworking is commonly implemented using explosives or electromagnetic actuators. Explosives have limitations such as space requirements, handling and storage restrictions and ability to scale down the process. The application of electromagnetic forming is limited at high energies and large numbers of operations by the availability of long-lived electromagnetic coils (or actuators, as they are sometimes referred to). Here low-cost, disposable actuators have been suggested as one method to treat this issue. Applications including cutting, forming, axisymmetric joining and collision welding are demonstrated and discussed. From analysis of the data from these applications, it was seen that degree of confinement has a great effect on effective geometries of a vaporizing foil. With less confinement, thicker foils were found to be more efficient whereas thinner foils

  13. DRD4 and TH gene polymorphisms are associated with activity, impulsivity and inattention in Siberian Husky dogs.

    PubMed

    Wan, Michele; Hejjas, Krisztina; Ronai, Zsolt; Elek, Zsuzsanna; Sasvari-Szekely, Maria; Champagne, Frances A; Miklósi, Adám; Kubinyi, Enikő

    2013-12-01

    Both dopamine receptor D4 (DRD4) exon 3 and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) intron 4 repeat polymorphisms have been linked to activity and impulsivity in German Shepherd dogs (GSDs). However, the results in GSDs may not be generalisable to other breeds, as allelic frequencies vary markedly among breeds. We selected the Siberian Husky for further study, because it is highly divergent from most dog breeds, including the GSD. The study sample consisted of 145 racing Siberian Huskies from Europe and North America. We found that this breed possesses seven DRD4 length variants, two to five more variants than found in other breeds. Among them was the longest known allele, previously described only in wolves. Short alleles of the DRD4 and TH repeat polymorphisms were associated with higher levels of activity, impulsivity and inattention. Siberian Huskies possessing at least one short allele of the DRD4 polymorphism displayed greater activity in a behavioural test battery than did those with two long alleles. However, the behavioural test was brief and may not have registered variation in behaviour across time and situations. Owners also completed the Dog-Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Rating Scale (Dog-ADHD RS), a more general measure of activity and attention. Siberian Huskies from Europe with two short alleles of the TH polymorphism received higher ratings of inattention on the Dog-ADHD RS than did those with the long allele. Investigation of the joint effect of DRD4 and TH showed that dogs possessing long alleles at both sites were scored as less active-impulsive than were others. Our results are aligned with previous studies showing that DRD4 and TH polymorphisms are associated with activity-impulsivity related traits in dogs. However, the prevalence of variants of these genes differs across breeds, and the functional role of specific variants is unclear.

  14. Generalized transfers and the nonoptimality of purely radial impulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lashkin, V. I.

    1985-07-01

    A system of variables is proposed that is convenient for the precise formulation of the problem of optimal multiple-impulse transfer between arbitrary nonrectilinear Kepler orbits. The existence of a universal two-impulse transfer with transverse impulses is demonstrated for such orbits. Calculation formulas for these impulses are obtained which generalize the corresponding formulas of two-impulse Hohmann transfer between circular orbits. In addition, a lower-bound estimate is obtained for the characteristic velocity of a one-impulse transfer between orbits having a common point, and the nonoptimality of an arbitrary radial impulse is demonstrated.

  15. Transition Region and Chromospheric Signatures of Impulsive Heating Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, Harry; Reep, Jeffrey; Crump, Nicholas

    2016-05-01

    We exploit the high spatial resolution and high cadence of the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) to investigate the response of the transition region and chromosphere to energy deposition during several small flares. We find that during the impulsive phase of these events the intensities of the C II 1334.535 and Si IV 1402.770 A emission lines are characterized by numerous, small-scale impulsive bursts typically lasting 60 s or less followed by a slower decay over several minutes. These variations in intensity are usually accompanied by impulsive redshifts of 20-40 km/s, although some blueshifted profiles are also observed. For one particularly well observed event we combine the IRIS observations with co-temporal measurements of hard X-ray emission from RHESSSI, transition region density from EIS, and high-temperature coronal loops with XRT and AIA to constrain 1D hydrodynamic models of loop evolution. Many aspects of the observations can be explained with simple heating scenarios, but some cannot. The simulated Doppler shifts, for example, show very short-duration redshifts during the initial phase of the heating while the observed redshifts persist over several minutes.

  16. Enhanced awakening probability of repetitive impulse sounds.

    PubMed

    Vos, Joos; Houben, Mark M J

    2013-09-01

    In the present study relations between the level of impulse sounds and the observed proportion of behaviorally confirmed awakening reactions were determined. The sounds (shooting sounds, bangs produced by door slamming or by container transshipment, aircraft landings) were presented by means of loudspeakers in the bedrooms of 50 volunteers. The fragments for the impulse sounds consisted of single or multiple events. The sounds were presented during a 6-h period that started 75 min after the subjects wanted to sleep. In order to take account of habituation, each subject participated during 18 nights. At equal indoor A-weighted sound exposure levels, the proportion of awakening for the single impulse sounds was equal to that for the aircraft sounds. The proportion of awakening induced by the multiple impulse sounds, however, was significantly higher. For obtaining the same rate of awakening, the sound level of each of the successive impulses in a fragment had to be about 15-25 dB lower than the level of one single impulse. This level difference was largely independent of the degree of habituation. Various explanations for the enhanced awakening probability are discussed. PMID:23967934

  17. Increased Impulsivity Retards the Transition to Dorsolateral Striatal Dopamine Control of Cocaine Seeking

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Jennifer E.; Dilleen, Ruth; Pelloux, Yann; Economidou, Daina; Dalley, Jeffrey W.; Belin, David; Everitt, Barry J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Development of maladaptive drug-seeking habits occurs in conjunction with a ventral-to-dorsal striatal shift in dopaminergic control over behavior. Although these habits readily develop as drug use continues, high impulsivity predicts loss of control over drug seeking and taking. However, whether impulsivity facilitates the transition to dorsolateral striatum (DLS) dopamine-dependent cocaine-seeking habits or whether impulsivity and cocaine-induced intrastriatal shifts are additive processes is unknown. Methods High- and low-impulsive rats identified in the five-choice serial reaction-time task were trained to self-administer cocaine (.25 mg/infusion) with infusions occurring in the presence of a cue-light conditioned stimulus. Dopamine transmission was blocked in the DLS after three stages of training: early, transition, and late-stage, by bilateral intracranial infusions of α-flupenthixol (0, 5, 10, or 15 μg/side) during 15-min cocaine-seeking test sessions in which each response was reinforced by a cocaine-associated conditioned stimulus presentation. Results In early-stage tests, neither group was affected by DLS dopamine receptor blockade. In transition-stage tests, low-impulsive rats showed a significant dose-dependent reduction in cocaine seeking, whereas high-impulsive rats were still unaffected by α-flupenthixol infusions. In the final, late-stage seeking test, both groups showed dose-dependent sensitivity to dopamine receptor blockade. Conclusions The results demonstrate that high impulsivity is associated with a delayed transition to DLS-dopamine-dependent control over cocaine seeking. This suggests that, if impulsivity confers an increased propensity to addiction, it is not simply through a more rapid development of habits but instead through interacting corticostriatal and striato-striatal processes that result ultimately in maladaptive drug-seeking habits. PMID:24157338

  18. Error performance of digital subscriber lines in the presence of impulse noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerpez, Kenneth J.; Gottlieb, Albert M.

    1995-05-01

    This paper describes the error performance of the ISDN basic access digital subscriber line (DSL), the high bit rate digital subscriber line (HDSL), and the asymmetric digital subscriber line (ADSL) in the presence of impulse noise. Results are found by using data from the 1986 NYNEX impulse noise survey in simulations. It is shown that a simple uncoded ADSL would have an order of magnitude more errored seconds than DSL and HDSL.

  19. Effect of the overshoot level in an alternative method for processing of tail chopped lightning impulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, L. S.; Barbosa, C. R. H.; Silva, M. T.; Azevedo, L. C.

    2016-07-01

    The construction of new Ultra High Voltage laboratories requires more studies about standards for equipment as well as for testing and measurement techniques. Currently, the analysis of tail chopped lightning impulse waveforms is possible only by prior application of a full reference lightning impulse, creating difficulties for testing and processing of waveforms. A new method for evaluating the relevant parameters of tail chopped waveforms has been previously developed and this paper studies the effect of the overshoot in this alternative method.

  20. Impulse control and criminal responsibility: lessons from neuroscience.

    PubMed

    Penney, Steven

    2012-01-01

    Almost all of the world's legal systems recognize the "M'Naghten" exception to criminal responsibility: the inability to appreciate the wrongfulness of action. This exception rests on the assumption that punishment is morally justified only if the defendant was able to choose whether to do wrong. Jurists and jurisdictions differ, however, on whether to extend M'Naghten's logic to cases where the defendant understood the wrongfulness of an act but was incapable of resisting an impulse to commit it. In this article I ask whether contemporary neuroscience can help lawmakers to decide whether to adopt or retain this defense, known variously as the "irresistible impulse" defense or the "control" or "volitional" test for insanity. More specifically, I ask firstly, whether it is empirically true that a person can understand the wrongfulness of an act yet be powerless to refrain from committing it; and second (assuming an affirmative answer to the first), whether the law of criminal responsibility can practically accommodate this phenomenon? After canvassing the relevant neuroscientific literature, I conclude that the answer to the first question is "yes." After examining the varied treatment of the defense in the United States and other nations, I also give an affirmative answer to the second question, but only in limited circumstances. In short, the defense of irresistible impulse should be recognized, but only when it can be shown that the defendant experienced a total incapacity to control his or her conduct in the circumstances.