Science.gov

Sample records for high speed cmos

  1. CMOS Image Sensors for High Speed Applications

    PubMed Central

    El-Desouki, Munir; Deen, M. Jamal; Fang, Qiyin; Liu, Louis; Tse, Frances; Armstrong, David

    2009-01-01

    Recent advances in deep submicron CMOS technologies and improved pixel designs have enabled CMOS-based imagers to surpass charge-coupled devices (CCD) imaging technology for mainstream applications. The parallel outputs that CMOS imagers can offer, in addition to complete camera-on-a-chip solutions due to being fabricated in standard CMOS technologies, result in compelling advantages in speed and system throughput. Since there is a practical limit on the minimum pixel size (4∼5 μm) due to limitations in the optics, CMOS technology scaling can allow for an increased number of transistors to be integrated into the pixel to improve both detection and signal processing. Such smart pixels truly show the potential of CMOS technology for imaging applications allowing CMOS imagers to achieve the image quality and global shuttering performance necessary to meet the demands of ultrahigh-speed applications. In this paper, a review of CMOS-based high-speed imager design is presented and the various implementations that target ultrahigh-speed imaging are described. This work also discusses the design, layout and simulation results of an ultrahigh acquisition rate CMOS active-pixel sensor imager that can take 8 frames at a rate of more than a billion frames per second (fps). PMID:22389609

  2. CMOS Image Sensors for High Speed Applications.

    PubMed

    El-Desouki, Munir; Deen, M Jamal; Fang, Qiyin; Liu, Louis; Tse, Frances; Armstrong, David

    2009-01-01

    Recent advances in deep submicron CMOS technologies and improved pixel designs have enabled CMOS-based imagers to surpass charge-coupled devices (CCD) imaging technology for mainstream applications. The parallel outputs that CMOS imagers can offer, in addition to complete camera-on-a-chip solutions due to being fabricated in standard CMOS technologies, result in compelling advantages in speed and system throughput. Since there is a practical limit on the minimum pixel size (4∼5 μm) due to limitations in the optics, CMOS technology scaling can allow for an increased number of transistors to be integrated into the pixel to improve both detection and signal processing. Such smart pixels truly show the potential of CMOS technology for imaging applications allowing CMOS imagers to achieve the image quality and global shuttering performance necessary to meet the demands of ultrahigh-speed applications. In this paper, a review of CMOS-based high-speed imager design is presented and the various implementations that target ultrahigh-speed imaging are described. This work also discusses the design, layout and simulation results of an ultrahigh acquisition rate CMOS active-pixel sensor imager that can take 8 frames at a rate of more than a billion frames per second (fps).

  3. Design of high speed camera based on CMOS technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sei-Hun; An, Jun-Sick; Oh, Tae-Seok; Kim, Il-Hwan

    2007-12-01

    The capacity of a high speed camera in taking high speed images has been evaluated using CMOS image sensors. There are 2 types of image sensors, namely, CCD and CMOS sensors. CMOS sensor consumes less power than CCD sensor and can take images more rapidly. High speed camera with built-in CMOS sensor is widely used in vehicle crash tests and airbag controls, golf training aids, and in bullet direction measurement in the military. The High Speed Camera System made in this study has the following components: CMOS image sensor that can take about 500 frames per second at a resolution of 1280*1024; FPGA and DDR2 memory that control the image sensor and save images; Camera Link Module that transmits saved data to PC; and RS-422 communication function that enables control of the camera from a PC.

  4. A CMOS high speed imaging system design based on FPGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Hong; Wang, Huawei; Cao, Jianzhong; Qiao, Mingrui

    2015-10-01

    CMOS sensors have more advantages than traditional CCD sensors. The imaging system based on CMOS has become a hot spot in research and development. In order to achieve the real-time data acquisition and high-speed transmission, we design a high-speed CMOS imaging system on account of FPGA. The core control chip of this system is XC6SL75T and we take advantages of CameraLink interface and AM41V4 CMOS image sensors to transmit and acquire image data. AM41V4 is a 4 Megapixel High speed 500 frames per second CMOS image sensor with global shutter and 4/3" optical format. The sensor uses column parallel A/D converters to digitize the images. The CameraLink interface adopts DS90CR287 and it can convert 28 bits of LVCMOS/LVTTL data into four LVDS data stream. The reflected light of objects is photographed by the CMOS detectors. CMOS sensors convert the light to electronic signals and then send them to FPGA. FPGA processes data it received and transmits them to upper computer which has acquisition cards through CameraLink interface configured as full models. Then PC will store, visualize and process images later. The structure and principle of the system are both explained in this paper and this paper introduces the hardware and software design of the system. FPGA introduces the driven clock of CMOS. The data in CMOS is converted to LVDS signals and then transmitted to the data acquisition cards. After simulation, the paper presents a row transfer timing sequence of CMOS. The system realized real-time image acquisition and external controls.

  5. High speed CMOS/SOS standard cell notebook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The NASA/MSFC high speed CMOS/SOS standard cell family, designed to be compatible with the PR2D (Place, Route in 2-Dimensions) automatic layout program, is described. Standard cell data sheets show the logic diagram, the schematic, the truth table, and propagation delays for each logic cell.

  6. A high speed CMOS A/D converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiseman, Don R.; Whitaker, Sterling R.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents a high speed analog-to-digital (A/D) converter. The converter is a 7 bit flash converter with one half LSB accuracy. Typical parts will function at approximately 200 MHz. The converter uses a novel comparator circuit that is shown to out perform more traditional comparators, and thus increases the speed of the converter. The comparator is a clocked, precharged circuit that offers very fast operation with a minimal offset voltage (2 mv). The converter was designed using a standard 1 micron digital CMOS process and is 2,244 microns by 3,972 microns.

  7. High-speed binary CMOS image sensor using a high-responsivity MOSFET-type photodetector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Byoung-Soo; Jo, Sung-Hyun; Bae, Myunghan; Choi, Pyung; Shin, Jang-Kyoo

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, a complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) binary image sensor based on a gate/body-tied (GBT) MOSFET-type photodetector is proposed. The proposed CMOS binary image sensor was simulated and measured using a standard CMOS 0.18-μm process. The GBT MOSFET-type photodetector is composed of a floating gate (n+- polysilicon) tied to the body (n-well) of the p-type MOSFET. The size of the active pixel sensor (APS) using GBT photodetector is smaller than that of APS using the photodiode. This means that the resolution of the image can be increased. The high-gain GBT photodetector has a higher photosensitivity compared to the p-n junction photodiode that is used in a conventional APS. Because GBT has a high sensitivity, fast operation of the binary processing is possible. A CMOS image sensor with the binary processing can be designed with simple circuits composed of a comparator and a Dflip- flop while a complex analog to digital converter (ADC) is not required. In addition, the binary image sensor has low power consumption and high speed operation with the ability to switch back and forth between a binary mode and an analog mode.

  8. Precision of FLEET Velocimetry Using High-speed CMOS Camera Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, Christopher J.; Danehy, Paul M.; Bathel, Brett F.; Jiang, Naibo; Calvert, Nathan D.; Miles, Richard B.

    2015-01-01

    Femtosecond laser electronic excitation tagging (FLEET) is an optical measurement technique that permits quantitative velocimetry of unseeded air or nitrogen using a single laser and a single camera. In this paper, we seek to determine the fundamental precision of the FLEET technique using high-speed complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) cameras. Also, we compare the performance of several different high-speed CMOS camera systems for acquiring FLEET velocimetry data in air and nitrogen free-jet flows. The precision was defined as the standard deviation of a set of several hundred single-shot velocity measurements. Methods of enhancing the precision of the measurement were explored such as digital binning (similar in concept to on-sensor binning, but done in post-processing), row-wise digital binning of the signal in adjacent pixels and increasing the time delay between successive exposures. These techniques generally improved precision; however, binning provided the greatest improvement to the un-intensified camera systems which had low signal-to-noise ratio. When binning row-wise by 8 pixels (about the thickness of the tagged region) and using an inter-frame delay of 65 micro sec, precisions of 0.5 m/s in air and 0.2 m/s in nitrogen were achieved. The camera comparison included a pco.dimax HD, a LaVision Imager scientific CMOS (sCMOS) and a Photron FASTCAM SA-X2, along with a two-stage LaVision High Speed IRO intensifier. Excluding the LaVision Imager sCMOS, the cameras were tested with and without intensification and with both short and long inter-frame delays. Use of intensification and longer inter-frame delay generally improved precision. Overall, the Photron FASTCAM SA-X2 exhibited the best performance in terms of greatest precision and highest signal-to-noise ratio primarily because it had the largest pixels.

  9. Precision of FLEET Velocimetry Using High-Speed CMOS Camera Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, Christopher J.; Danehy, Paul M.; Bathel, Brett F.; Jiang, Naibo; Calvert, Nathan D.; Miles, Richard B.

    2015-01-01

    Femtosecond laser electronic excitation tagging (FLEET) is an optical measurement technique that permits quantitative velocimetry of unseeded air or nitrogen using a single laser and a single camera. In this paper, we seek to determine the fundamental precision of the FLEET technique using high-speed complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) cameras. Also, we compare the performance of several different high-speed CMOS camera systems for acquiring FLEET velocimetry data in air and nitrogen free-jet flows. The precision was defined as the standard deviation of a set of several hundred single-shot velocity measurements. Methods of enhancing the precision of the measurement were explored such as digital binning (similar in concept to on-sensor binning, but done in post-processing), row-wise digital binning of the signal in adjacent pixels and increasing the time delay between successive exposures. These techniques generally improved precision; however, binning provided the greatest improvement to the un-intensified camera systems which had low signal-to-noise ratio. When binning row-wise by 8 pixels (about the thickness of the tagged region) and using an inter-frame delay of 65 microseconds, precisions of 0.5 meters per second in air and 0.2 meters per second in nitrogen were achieved. The camera comparison included a pco.dimax HD, a LaVision Imager scientific CMOS (sCMOS) and a Photron FASTCAM SA-X2, along with a two-stage LaVision HighSpeed IRO intensifier. Excluding the LaVision Imager sCMOS, the cameras were tested with and without intensification and with both short and long inter-frame delays. Use of intensification and longer inter-frame delay generally improved precision. Overall, the Photron FASTCAM SA-X2 exhibited the best performance in terms of greatest precision and highest signal-to-noise ratio primarily because it had the largest pixels.

  10. A CMOS image sensor using high-speed lock-in pixels for stimulated Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lioe, DeXing; Mars, Kamel; Takasawa, Taishi; Yasutomi, Keita; Kagawa, Keiichiro; Hashimoto, Mamoru; Kawahito, Shoji

    2016-03-01

    A CMOS image sensor using high-speed lock-in pixels for stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) spectroscopy is presented in this paper. The effective SRS signal from the stimulated emission of SRS mechanism is very small in contrast to the offset of a probing laser source, which is in the ratio of 10-4 to 10-5. In order to extract this signal, the common offset component is removed, and the small difference component is sampled using switched-capacitor integrator with a fully differential amplifier. The sampling is performed over many integration cycles to achieve appropriate amplification. The lock-in pixels utilizes high-speed lateral electric field charge modulator (LEFM) to demodulate the SRS signal which is modulated at high-frequency of 20MHz. A prototype chip is implemented using 0.11μm CMOS image sensor technology.

  11. A 2.2M CMOS image sensor for high-speed machine vision applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xinyang; Bogaerts, Jan; Vanhorebeek, Guido; Ruythoren, Koen; Ceulemans, Bart; Lepage, Gérald; Willems, Pieter; Meynants, Guy

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a 2.2 Megapixel CMOS image sensor made in 0.18 μm CMOS process for high-speed machine vision applications. The sensor runs at 340 fps with digital output using 16 LVDS channels at 480MHz. The pixel array counts 2048x1088 pixels with a 5.5um pitch. The unique pixel architecture supports a true correlated double sampling, thus yields a noise level as low as 13 e- and a pixel parasitic light sensitivity (PLS) of 1/60 000. The sensitivity of the sensor is measured to be 4.64 Vlux.s and the pixel full well charge is 18k e-.

  12. A high-speed lateral PIN polysilicon photodiode on standard bulk CMOS process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Wanghui; Xia, Yu; Chen, Diping; Zeng, Yun

    2017-03-01

    This paper reports a lateral PIN polysilicon photodiode on standard bulk complementary metal-oxidesemiconductor (CMOS) process for monolithically integrated high-speed optoelectronic integrated circuits (OEIC). A nominal undoped polysilicon as the photodetection area is intentionally created without introducing any process modification. With the device area of 50 × 50 μm2, a measured responsivity of 46 mA/W and a quantum efficiency of 11% were observed under the reverse voltage of 10 V and the wavelength of 520 nm. A compact equivalent circuit model for the proposed lateral photodiode is built to analyze the frequency response, and a bandwidth of over 20 GHz was obtained from the measured data, which is to the best of our knowledge the largest bandwidth ever reported based on standard bulk CMOS process.

  13. A high speed, low power consumption LVDS interface for CMOS pixel sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Zhan; Tang, Zhenan; Tian, Yong; Pham, Hung; Valin, Isabelle; Jaaskelainen, Kimmo

    2015-01-01

    The use of CMOS Pixel Sensors (CPSs) offers a promising approach to the design of vertex detectors in High Energy Physics (HEP) experiments. As the CPS equipping the upgraded Solenoidal Tracker at RHIC (STAR) pixel detector, ULTIMATE perfectly illustrates the potential of CPSs for HEP applications. However, further development of CPSs with respect to readout speed is required to fulfill the readout time requirement of the next generation HEP detectors, such as the upgrade of A Large Ion Collider Experiment (ALICE) Inner Tracking System (ITS), the International Linear Collider (ILC), and the Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) vertex detectors. One actual limitation of CPSs is related to the speed of the Low-Voltage Differential Signaling (LVDS) circuitry implementing the interface between the sensor and the Data Acquisition (DAQ) system. To improve the transmission rate while keeping the power consumption at a low level, a source termination technique and a special current comparator were adopted for the LVDS driver and receiver, respectively. Moreover, hardening techniques are used. The circuitry was designed and submitted for fabrication in a 0.18-μm CMOS Image Sensor (CIS) process at the end of 2011. The test results indicated that the LVDS driver and receiver can operate properly at the data rate of 1.2 Gb/s with power consumption of 19.6 mW.

  14. Characterization of a fast CMOS imaging sensor for high-speed laser detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casadei, Bruno; Le Normand, J. P.; Hu, Y.; Cunin, Bernard

    2003-07-01

    CMOS active pixel sensors (APS) have performances competitive with charge-coupled device (CCD) technology, and offer advantages in on-chip functionality, system power reduction, cost and miniaturization. In this paper, we present characterization of a fast CMOS APS used in an imager for high-speed laser detections, which can replace the streak cameras. It produces the intensity information in function of one spatial dimension and time [I = f(x,t)] from one frame in two spatial dimensions. The time information is obtained for the first prototype camera to delay successively the integration phase in each pixel of the same row. The different noise sources of the APS sensors such as shot noise due to the photo sensor, the thermal noise and flicker noise due to the readout transistors and the photon shot noise are presented to determine the fundamental limits on image sensor. The first prototype FAMOSI (FAst MOS Imager) is composed of 64 x 64 active pixels. The simulation and experimental results show that a conversion gain of 6.73 +/- 0.25 μV/e- has been obtained with a noise level of 87 +/- 3e- rms. The power consumption of the chip is 25 mW at 50 images/sec.

  15. A low-power column-parallel ADC for high-speed CMOS image sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Ye; Li, Quanliang; Shi, Cong; Liu, Liyuan; Wu, Nanjian

    2013-08-01

    This paper presents a 10-bit low-power column-parallel cyclic analog-to-digital converter (ADC) used for high-speed CMOS image sensor (CIS). An opamp sharing technique is used to save power and area. Correlated double sampling (CDS) circuit and programmable gain amplifier (PGA) are integrated in the ADC, which avoids stand-alone circuit blocks. An offset cancellation technique is also introduced, which reduces the column fixed-pattern noise (FPN) effectively. One single channel ADC with an area less than 0.03mm2 was implemented in a 0.18μm 1P4M CMOS image sensor process. The resolution of the proposed ADC is 10-bit, and the conversion rate is 2MS/s. The measured differential nonlinearity (DNL) and integral nonlinearity (INL) are 0.62 LSB and 2.1 LSB together with CDS, respectively. The power consumption from 1.8V supply is only 0.36mW.

  16. Design and characterization of high-speed CMOS pseudo-LVDS transceivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondratenko, S. V.

    2016-02-01

    High-speed transceiver for on-board systems of data collection and processing need to meet additional requirements, such as low power consumption and increased radiation hardness. It is therefore necessary to compare and search for alternative variants of transceivers on the physical layer, where high transfer speed is not achieved at the cost of a significant increase in power consumption or a limitation of transmission distance by the size of a printed circuit board. For on-board applications, it is also necessary to solve the problem of increasing the radiation hardness without going to expensive types of technology. In this paper, we studied some variants of implementation of pseudo-LVDS transceivers and analyzed their achievable quantitative characteristics. According to the results of calculations and analysis of the literature, specialized transceivers of this type, intended for the manufacture or manufactured according to the bulk CMOS technology processes in the range of 250-80 nm, can provide data speeds up to 6 Gbps at a specific power consumption of less than 4 mW/Gbps.

  17. Pixel-based characterisation of CMOS high-speed camera systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, V.; Brübach, J.; Gordon, R. L.; Dreizler, A.

    2011-05-01

    Quantifying high-repetition rate laser diagnostic techniques for measuring scalars in turbulent combustion relies on a complete description of the relationship between detected photons and the signal produced by the detector. CMOS-chip based cameras are becoming an accepted tool for capturing high frame rate cinematographic sequences for laser-based techniques such as Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) and Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence (PLIF) and can be used with thermographic phosphors to determine surface temperatures. At low repetition rates, imaging techniques have benefitted from significant developments in the quality of CCD-based camera systems, particularly with the uniformity of pixel response and minimal non-linearities in the photon-to-signal conversion. The state of the art in CMOS technology displays a significant number of technical aspects that must be accounted for before these detectors can be used for quantitative diagnostics. This paper addresses these issues.

  18. A Dynamic Range Enhanced Readout Technique with a Two-Step TDC for High Speed Linear CMOS Image Sensors.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhiyuan; Yang, Congjie; Xu, Jiangtao; Nie, Kaiming

    2015-11-06

    This paper presents a dynamic range (DR) enhanced readout technique with a two-step time-to-digital converter (TDC) for high speed linear CMOS image sensors. A multi-capacitor and self-regulated capacitive trans-impedance amplifier (CTIA) structure is employed to extend the dynamic range. The gain of the CTIA is auto adjusted by switching different capacitors to the integration node asynchronously according to the output voltage. A column-parallel ADC based on a two-step TDC is utilized to improve the conversion rate. The conversion is divided into coarse phase and fine phase. An error calibration scheme is also proposed to correct quantization errors caused by propagation delay skew within -T(clk)~+T(clk). A linear CMOS image sensor pixel array is designed in the 0.13 μm CMOS process to verify this DR-enhanced high speed readout technique. The post simulation results indicate that the dynamic range of readout circuit is 99.02 dB and the ADC achieves 60.22 dB SNDR and 9.71 bit ENOB at a conversion rate of 2 MS/s after calibration, with 14.04 dB and 2.4 bit improvement, compared with SNDR and ENOB of that without calibration.

  19. High-Speed Scanning Interferometer Using CMOS Image Sensor and FPGA Based on Multifrequency Phase-Tracking Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohara, Tetsuo

    2012-01-01

    A sub-aperture stitching optical interferometer can provide a cost-effective solution for an in situ metrology tool for large optics; however, the currently available technologies are not suitable for high-speed and real-time continuous scan. NanoWave s SPPE (Scanning Probe Position Encoder) has been proven to exhibit excellent stability and sub-nanometer precision with a large dynamic range. This same technology can transform many optical interferometers into real-time subnanometer precision tools with only minor modification. The proposed field-programmable gate array (FPGA) signal processing concept, coupled with a new-generation, high-speed, mega-pixel CMOS (complementary metal-oxide semiconductor) image sensor, enables high speed (>1 m/s) and real-time continuous surface profiling that is insensitive to variation of pixel sensitivity and/or optical transmission/reflection. This is especially useful for large optics surface profiling.

  20. LGSD/NGSD: high speed visible CMOS imagers for E-ELT adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Downing, Mark; Kolb, Johann; Dierickx, Bart; Defernez, Arnaud; Feautrier, Philippe; Fryer, Martin; Gach, Jean-Luc; Jerram, Paul; Jorden, Paul; Meyer, Manfred; Pike, Andrew; Reyes, Javier; Stadler, Eric; Swift, Nick

    2016-08-01

    The success of the next generation of instruments for ELT class telescopes will depend upon improving the image quality by exploiting sophisticated Adaptive Optics (AO) systems. One of the critical components of the AO systems for the European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT) has been identified as the Large Visible Laser/Natural Guide Star AO Wavefront Sensing (WFS) detector. The combination of large format, 1600x1600 pixels to finely sample the wavefront and the spot elongation of laser guide stars (LGS), fast frame rate of 700 frames per second (fps), low read noise (< 3e-), and high QE (> 90%) makes the development of this device extremely challenging. Results of design studies concluded that a highly integrated Backside Illuminated CMOS Imager built on High Resistivity silicon as the most suitable technology. Two generations of the CMOS Imager are planned: a) a smaller `pioneering' device of > 800x800 pixels capable of meeting first light needs of the E-ELT. The NGSD, the topic of this paper, is the first iteration of this device; b) the larger full sized device called LGSD. The NGSD has come out of production, it has been thinned to 12μm, backside processed and packaged in a custom 370pin Ceramic PGA (Pin Grid Array). Results of comprehensive tests performed both at e2v and ESO are presented that validate the choice of CMOS Imager as the correct technology for the E-ELT Large Visible WFS Detector. These results along with plans for a second iteration to improve two issues of hot pixels and cross-talk are presented.

  1. LGSD/NGSD: high speed optical CMOS imagers for E-ELT adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Downing, Mark; Kolb, Johann; Balard, Philippe; Dierickx, Bart; Defernez, Arnaud; Feautrier, Philippe; Finger, Gert; Fryer, Martin; Gach, Jean-Luc; Guillaume, Christian; Hubin, Norbert; Jerram, Paul; Jorden, Paul; Meyer, Manfred; Payne, Andrew; Pike, Andrew; Reyes, Javier; Simpson, Robert; Stadler, Eric; Stent, Jeremy; Swift, Nick

    2014-07-01

    The success of the next generation of instruments for ELT class telescopes will depend upon improving the image quality by exploiting sophisticated Adaptive Optics (AO) systems. One of the critical components of the AO systems for the E-ELT has been identified as the optical Laser/Natural Guide Star WFS detector. The combination of large format, 1760×1680 pixels to finely sample the wavefront and the spot elongation of laser guide stars, fast frame rate of 700 frames per second (fps), low read noise (< 3e-), and high QE (> 90%) makes the development of this device extremely challenging. Design studies concluded that a highly integrated Backside Illuminated CMOS Imager built on High Resistivity silicon as the most likely technology to succeed. Two generations of the CMOS Imager are being developed: a) the already designed and manufactured NGSD (Natural Guide Star Detector), a quarter-sized pioneering device of 880×840 pixels capable of meeting first light needs of the E-ELT; b) the LGSD (Laser Guide Star Detector), the larger full size device. The detailed design is presented including the approach of using massive parallelism (70,400 ADCs) to achieve the low read noise at high pixel rates of ~3 Gpixel/s and the 88 channel LVDS 220Mbps serial interface to get the data off-chip. To enable read noise closer to the goal of 1e- to be achieved, a split wafer run has allowed the NGSD to be manufactured in the more speculative, but much lower read noise, Ultra Low Threshold Transistors in the unit cell. The NGSD has come out of production, it has been thinned to 12μm, backside processed and packaged in a custom 370pin Ceramic PGA (Pin Grid Array). First results of tests performed both at e2v and ESO are presented.

  2. A Comparative Study of Heavy Ion and Proton Induced Bit Error Sensitivity and Complex Burst Error Modes in Commercially Available High Speed SiGe BiCMOS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, Paul; Carts, Marty; Campbell, Art; Reed, Robert; Ladbury, Ray; Seidleck, Christina; Currie, Steve; Riggs, Pam; Fritz, Karl; Randall, Barb

    2004-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation that reviews recent SiGe bit error test data for different commercially available high speed SiGe BiCMOS chips that were subjected to various levels of heavy ion and proton radiation. Results for the tested chips at different operating speeds are displayed in line graphs.

  3. High speed wide field CMOS camera for Transneptunian Automatic Occultation Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shiang-Yu; Geary, John C.; Amato, Stephen M.; Hu, Yen-Sang; Ling, Hung-Hsu; Huang, Pin-Jie; Furesz, Gabor; Chen, Hsin-Yo; Chang, Yin-Chang; Szentgyorgyi, Andrew; Lehner, Matthew; Norton, Timothy

    2014-08-01

    The Transneptunian Automated Occultation Survey (TAOS II) is a three robotic telescope project to detect the stellar occultation events generated by Trans Neptunian Objects (TNOs). TAOS II project aims to monitor about 10000 stars simultaneously at 20Hz to enable statistically significant event rate. The TAOS II camera is designed to cover the 1.7 degree diameter field of view (FoV) of the 1.3m telescope with 10 mosaic 4.5kx2k CMOS sensors. The new CMOS sensor has a back illumination thinned structure and high sensitivity to provide similar performance to that of the backillumination thinned CCDs. The sensor provides two parallel and eight serial decoders so the region of interests can be addressed and read out separately through different output channels efficiently. The pixel scale is about 0.6"/pix with the 16μm pixels. The sensors, mounted on a single Invar plate, are cooled to the operation temperature of about 200K by a cryogenic cooler. The Invar plate is connected to the dewar body through a supporting ring with three G10 bipods. The deformation of the cold plate is less than 10μm to ensure the sensor surface is always within ±40μm of focus range. The control electronics consists of analog part and a Xilinx FPGA based digital circuit. For each field star, 8×8 pixels box will be readout. The pixel rate for each channel is about 1Mpix/s and the total pixel rate for each camera is about 80Mpix/s. The FPGA module will calculate the total flux and also the centroid coordinates for every field star in each exposure.

  4. Low power consumption high speed CMOS dual-modulus 15/16 prescaler for optical and wireless communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hui-Min; Zhang, Xiao-Xing; Dai, Yu-Jie; Lv, Ying-Jie

    2011-09-01

    Frequency synthesizer is an important part of optical and wireless communication system. Low power comsumption prescaler is one of the most critical unit of frequency synthesizer. For the frequency divider, it must be programmable for channel selection in multi-channel communication systems. A dual-modulus prescaler (DMP) is needed to provide variable division ratios. DMP is considered as a critical power dissipative block since it always operates at full speed. This paper introduces a high speed and low power complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) 15/16 DMP based on true single-phase-clock (TSPC) and transmission gates (TGs) cell. A conventional TSPC is optimized in terms of devices size, and it is resimulated. The TSPC is used in the synchronous and asynchronous counter. TGs are used in the control logic. The DMP circuit is implemented in 0.18 μm CMOS process. The simulation results are provided. The results show wide operating frequency range from 7.143 MHz to 4.76 GHz and it comsumes 3.625 mW under 1.8 V power supply voltage at 4.76 GHz.

  5. High Speed, Radiation Hard CMOS Pixel Sensors for Transmission Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contarato, Devis; Denes, Peter; Doering, Dionisio; Joseph, John; Krieger, Brad

    CMOS monolithic active pixel sensors are currently being established as the technology of choice for new generation digital imaging systems in Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). A careful sensor design that couples μm-level pixel pitches with high frame rate readout and radiation hardness to very high electron doses enables the fabrication of direct electron detectors that are quickly revolutionizing high-resolution TEM imaging in material science and molecular biology. This paper will review the principal characteristics of this novel technology and its advantages over conventional, optically-coupled cameras, and retrace the sensor development driven by the Transmission Electron Aberration corrected Microscope (TEAM) project at the LBNL National Center for Electron Microscopy (NCEM), illustrating in particular the imaging capabilities enabled by single electron detection at high frame rate. Further, the presentation will report on the translation of the TEAM technology to a finer feature size process, resulting in a sensor with higher spatial resolution and superior radiation tolerance currently serving as the baseline for a commercial camera system.

  6. A Stimulated Raman Scattering CMOS Pixel Using a High-Speed Charge Modulator and Lock-in Amplifier

    PubMed Central

    Lioe, De Xing; Mars, Kamel; Kawahito, Shoji; Yasutomi, Keita; Kagawa, Keiichiro; Yamada, Takahiro; Hashimoto, Mamoru

    2016-01-01

    A complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) lock-in pixel to observe stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) using a high speed lateral electric field modulator (LEFM) for photo-generated charges and in-pixel readout circuits is presented. An effective SRS signal generated after the SRS process is very small and needs to be extracted from an extremely large offset due to a probing laser signal. In order to suppress the offset components while amplifying high-frequency modulated small SRS signal components, the lock-in pixel uses a high-speed LEFM for demodulating the SRS signal, resistor-capacitor low-pass filter (RC-LPF) and switched-capacitor (SC) integrator with a fully CMOS differential amplifier. AC (modulated) components remained in the RC-LPF outputs are eliminated by the phase-adjusted sampling with the SC integrator and the demodulated DC (unmodulated) components due to the SRS signal are integrated over many samples in the SC integrator. In order to suppress further the residual offset and the low frequency noise (1/f noise) components, a double modulation technique is introduced in the SRS signal measurements, where the phase of high-frequency modulated laser beam before irradiation of a specimen is modulated at an intermediate frequency and the demodulation is done at the lock-in pixel output. A prototype chip for characterizing the SRS lock-in pixel is implemented and a successful operation is demonstrated. The reduction effects of residual offset and 1/f noise components are confirmed by the measurements. A ratio of the detected small SRS to offset a signal of less than 10−5 is experimentally demonstrated, and the SRS spectrum of a Benzonitrile sample is successfully observed. PMID:27089339

  7. A Stimulated Raman Scattering CMOS Pixel Using a High-Speed Charge Modulator and Lock-in Amplifier.

    PubMed

    Lioe, De Xing; Mars, Kamel; Kawahito, Shoji; Yasutomi, Keita; Kagawa, Keiichiro; Yamada, Takahiro; Hashimoto, Mamoru

    2016-04-13

    A complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) lock-in pixel to observe stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) using a high speed lateral electric field modulator (LEFM) for photo-generated charges and in-pixel readout circuits is presented. An effective SRS signal generated after the SRS process is very small and needs to be extracted from an extremely large offset due to a probing laser signal. In order to suppress the offset components while amplifying high-frequency modulated small SRS signal components, the lock-in pixel uses a high-speed LEFM for demodulating the SRS signal, resistor-capacitor low-pass filter (RC-LPF) and switched-capacitor (SC) integrator with a fully CMOS differential amplifier. AC (modulated) components remained in the RC-LPF outputs are eliminated by the phase-adjusted sampling with the SC integrator and the demodulated DC (unmodulated) components due to the SRS signal are integrated over many samples in the SC integrator. In order to suppress further the residual offset and the low frequency noise (1/f noise) components, a double modulation technique is introduced in the SRS signal measurements, where the phase of high-frequency modulated laser beam before irradiation of a specimen is modulated at an intermediate frequency and the demodulation is done at the lock-in pixel output. A prototype chip for characterizing the SRS lock-in pixel is implemented and a successful operation is demonstrated. The reduction effects of residual offset and 1/f noise components are confirmed by the measurements. A ratio of the detected small SRS to offset a signal of less than 10(-)⁵ is experimentally demonstrated, and the SRS spectrum of a Benzonitrile sample is successfully observed.

  8. Lateral drift-field photodiode for low noise, high-speed, large photoactive-area CMOS imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durini, Daniel; Spickermann, Andreas; Mahdi, Rana; Brockherde, Werner; Vogt, Holger; Grabmaier, Anton; Hosticka, Bedrich J.

    2010-12-01

    In this work a theoretical concept and simulations are presented for a novel lateral drift-field photodetector pixel to be fabricated in a 0.35 μm CMOS process. The proposed pixel consists of a specially designed n-well with a non-uniform lateral doping profile that follows a square-root spatial dependence. "Buried" MOS capacitor-based collection-gate, a transfer-gate, and an n-type MOSFET source/drain n + floating-diffusion serve to realize a non-destructive readout. The pixel readout is performed using an in-pixel source-follower pixel buffer configuration followed by an output amplifier featuring correlated double-sampling. The concentration gradient formed in the n-well employs a single extra implantation step in the 0.35 μm CMOS process mentioned and requires only a single extra mask. It generates an electrostatic potential gradient, i.e. a lateral drift-field, in the photoactive area of the pixel which enables high charge transfer speed and low image-lag. According to the simulation results presented, charge transfer times of less than 3 ns are to be expected.

  9. Single-event transient imaging with an ultra-high-speed temporally compressive multi-aperture CMOS image sensor.

    PubMed

    Mochizuki, Futa; Kagawa, Keiichiro; Okihara, Shin-ichiro; Seo, Min-Woong; Zhang, Bo; Takasawa, Taishi; Yasutomi, Keita; Kawahito, Shoji

    2016-02-22

    In the work described in this paper, an image reproduction scheme with an ultra-high-speed temporally compressive multi-aperture CMOS image sensor was demonstrated. The sensor captures an object by compressing a sequence of images with focal-plane temporally random-coded shutters, followed by reconstruction of time-resolved images. Because signals are modulated pixel-by-pixel during capturing, the maximum frame rate is defined only by the charge transfer speed and can thus be higher than those of conventional ultra-high-speed cameras. The frame rate and optical efficiency of the multi-aperture scheme are discussed. To demonstrate the proposed imaging method, a 5×3 multi-aperture image sensor was fabricated. The average rising and falling times of the shutters were 1.53 ns and 1.69 ns, respectively. The maximum skew among the shutters was 3 ns. The sensor observed plasma emission by compressing it to 15 frames, and a series of 32 images at 200 Mfps was reconstructed. In the experiment, by correcting disparities and considering temporal pixel responses, artifacts in the reconstructed images were reduced. An improvement in PSNR from 25.8 dB to 30.8 dB was confirmed in simulations.

  10. A high speed CMOS image sensor with a novel digital correlated double sampling and a differential difference amplifier.

    PubMed

    Kim, Daehyeok; Bae, Jaeyoung; Song, Minkyu

    2015-03-02

    In order to increase the operating speed of a CMOS image sensor (CIS), a new technique of digital correlated double sampling (CDS) is described. In general, the fixed pattern noise (FPN) of a CIS has been reduced with the subtraction algorithm between the reset signal and pixel signal. This is because a single-slope analog-to-digital converter (ADC) has been normally adopted in the conventional digital CDS with the reset ramp and signal ramp. Thus, the operating speed of a digital CDS is much slower than that of an analog CDS. In order to improve the operating speed, we propose a novel digital CDS based on a differential difference amplifier (DDA) that compares the reset signal and the pixel signal using only one ramp. The prototype CIS has been fabricated with 0.13 µm CIS technology and it has the VGA resolution of 640 × 480. The measured conversion time is 16 µs, and a high frame rate of 131 fps is achieved at the VGA resolution.

  11. PNP PIN bipolar phototransistors for high-speed applications built in a 180 nm CMOS process

    PubMed Central

    Kostov, P.; Gaberl, W.; Hofbauer, M.; Zimmermann, H.

    2012-01-01

    This work reports on three speed optimized pnp bipolar phototransistors build in a standard 180 nm CMOS process using a special starting wafer. The starting wafer consists of a low doped p epitaxial layer on top of the p substrate. This low doped p epitaxial layer leads to a thick space-charge region between base and collector and thus to a high −3 dB bandwidth at low collector–emitter voltages. For a further increase of the bandwidth the presented phototransistors were designed with small emitter areas resulting in a small base-emitter capacitance. The three presented phototransistors were implemented in sizes of 40 × 40 μm2 and 100 × 100 μm2. Optical DC and AC measurements at 410 nm, 675 nm and 850 nm were done for phototransistor characterization. Due to the speed optimized design and the layer structure of the phototransistors, bandwidths up to 76.9 MHz and dynamic responsivities up to 2.89 A/W were achieved. Furthermore simulations of the electric field strength and space-charge regions were done. PMID:23482349

  12. High speed CMOS imager with motion artifact supression and anti-blooming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pain, Bedabrata (Inventor); Wrigley, Chris (Inventor); Yang, Guang (Inventor); Yadid-Pecht, Orly (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    An image sensor includes pixels formed on a semiconductor substrate. Each pixel includes a photoactive region in the semiconductor substrate, a sense node, and a power supply node. A first electrode is disposed near a surface of the semiconductor substrate. A bias signal on the first electrode sets a potential in a region of the semiconductor substrate between the photoactive region and the sense node. A second electrode is disposed near the surface of the semiconductor substrate. A bias signal on the second electrode sets a potential in a region of the semiconductor substrate between the photoactive region and the power supply node. The image sensor includes a controller that causes bias signals to be provided to the electrodes so that photocharges generated in the photoactive region are accumulated in the photoactive region during a pixel integration period, the accumulated photocharges are transferred to the sense node during a charge transfer period, and photocharges generated in the photoactive region are transferred to the power supply node during a third period without passing through the sense node. The imager can operate at high shutter speeds with simultaneous integration of pixels in the array. High quality images can be produced free from motion artifacts. High quantum efficiency, good blooming control, low dark current, low noise and low image lag can be obtained.

  13. Bulk CMOS VLSI Technology Studies. Part 5. The Design and Implementation of a High Speed Integrated Circuit Functional Tester.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-26

    A,D-A1l-B 371 BULK CMOS VLSI TECHNOLOGY STUDIES PART 5 THE DESIGN AND J/2 IPLEMENTATION OF..(U) MISSISSIPPI STATE UNIV MISSISSIPPI STATE DEPT OF...SPEED INTEGRATED CIRCUIT FUNCTIONAL TESTER It Principal Investi-s tar J. Donald Trotter Associate Investigator Boyle Dwayne Robbins Mississippi State ...University Department of Electrical Engineering Mississippi State , Mississippi 39762 for Defense Advance Research Projects Agency 1400 Wilson Ave. Ci

  14. A high-speed 0.35μm CMOS optical communication link

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goosen, Marius E.; Venter, Petrus J.; du Plessis, Monuko; Bogalecki, Alfons W.; Alberts, Antonie C.; Rademeyer, Pieter

    2012-01-01

    The idea of integrating a light emitter and detector in the cost effective and mature technology which is CMOS remains an attractive one. Silicon light emitters, used in avalanche breakdown, are demonstrated to switch at frequencies above 1 GHz whilst still being electrically detected, a three-fold increase on previous reported results. Utilizing novel BEOLstack reflectors and increased array sizes have resulted in an increased power efficiency allowing multi-Mb/s data rates. In this paper we present an all-silicon optical communication link with data rates exceeding 10 Mb/s at a bit error rate of less than 10-12, representing a ten-fold increase over the previous fastest demonstrated silicon data link. Data rates exceeding 40 Mb/s are also presented and evaluated. The quality of the optical link is established using both eye diagram measurements as well as a digital communication system setup. The digital communication system setup comprises the generation of 232-1 random data, 8B/10B encoding and decoding, data recovery and the subsequent bit error counting.

  15. High-speed low-voltage CMOS line driver for SerDes applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, M.; Hayatleh, K.; Lidgey, F. J.; Joy, A.

    2013-04-01

    The challenge facing SerDes (Serialiser De-Serialiser) designers is common with all current communications technologies. Industry advances show a trend to increase speed, reduce power and improve efficiency. In this article a novel line driver that can operate at speeds of up to 40 Gbps with a power supply of 1 V and a power consumption of 4.54 mW/Gb/s is presented. Pre-distortion on the front-end is used to maintain signal integrity.

  16. A 12-bit high-speed column-parallel two-step single-slope analog-to-digital converter (ADC) for CMOS image sensors.

    PubMed

    Lyu, Tao; Yao, Suying; Nie, Kaiming; Xu, Jiangtao

    2014-11-17

    A 12-bit high-speed column-parallel two-step single-slope (SS) analog-to-digital converter (ADC) for CMOS image sensors is proposed. The proposed ADC employs a single ramp voltage and multiple reference voltages, and the conversion is divided into coarse phase and fine phase to improve the conversion rate. An error calibration scheme is proposed to correct errors caused by offsets among the reference voltages. The digital-to-analog converter (DAC) used for the ramp generator is based on the split-capacitor array with an attenuation capacitor. Analysis of the DAC's linearity performance versus capacitor mismatch and parasitic capacitance is presented. A prototype 1024 × 32 Time Delay Integration (TDI) CMOS image sensor with the proposed ADC architecture has been fabricated in a standard 0.18 μm CMOS process. The proposed ADC has average power consumption of 128 μW and a conventional rate 6 times higher than the conventional SS ADC. A high-quality image, captured at the line rate of 15.5 k lines/s, shows that the proposed ADC is suitable for high-speed CMOS image sensors.

  17. Design of High Speed and Low Offset Dynamic Latch Comparator in 0.18 µm CMOS Process

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Labonnah Farzana; Reaz, Mamun Bin Ibne; Yin, Chia Chieu; Ali, Mohammad Alauddin Mohammad; Marufuzzaman, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    The cross-coupled circuit mechanism based dynamic latch comparator is presented in this research. The comparator is designed using differential input stages with regenerative S-R latch to achieve lower offset, lower power, higher speed and higher resolution. In order to decrease circuit complexity, a comparator should maintain power, speed, resolution and offset-voltage properly. Simulations show that this novel dynamic latch comparator designed in 0.18 µm CMOS technology achieves 3.44 mV resolution with 8 bit precision at a frequency of 50 MHz while dissipating 158.5 µW from 1.8 V supply and 88.05 µA average current. Moreover, the proposed design propagates as fast as 4.2 nS with energy efficiency of 0.7 fJ/conversion-step. Additionally, the core circuit layout only occupies 0.008 mm2. PMID:25299266

  18. Transistor sizing in the design of high-speed CMOS (complementary-symmetry metal-oxide-semiconductor) super buffers. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Steele, G.R.

    1988-03-01

    An algorithm for sizing transistors for static Complementary-symmetry Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor (CMOS) integrated-circuit logic design using silicon-gate enhancement-mode Field-Effect Transistors (FET) is derived and implemented in software. The algorithm is applied to the mask-level hardware design of a three-micron-minimum feature-size p-well high-speed super buffer. A software representation of the super buffer can be used for the automated design of custom Very-Large-Scale Integrated (VLSI) circuits.

  19. High speed sCMOS-based oblique plane microscopy applied to the study of calcium dynamics in cardiac myocytes.

    PubMed

    Sikkel, Markus B; Kumar, Sunil; Maioli, Vincent; Rowlands, Christina; Gordon, Fabiana; Harding, Sian E; Lyon, Alexander R; MacLeod, Kenneth T; Dunsby, Chris

    2016-03-01

    Oblique plane microscopy (OPM) is a form of light sheet microscopy that uses a single high numerical aperture microscope objective for both fluorescence excitation and collection. In this paper, measurements of the relative collection efficiency of OPM are presented. An OPM system incorporating two sCMOS cameras is then introduced that enables single isolated cardiac myocytes to be studied continuously for 22 seconds in two dimensions at 667 frames per second with 960 × 200 pixels and for 30 seconds with 960 × 200 × 20 voxels at 25 volumes per second. In both cases OPM is able to record in two spectral channels, enabling intracellular calcium to be studied via the probe Fluo-4 AM simultaneously with the sarcolemma and transverse tubule network via the membrane dye Cellmask Orange. The OPM system was then applied to determine the spatial origin of spontaneous calcium waves for the first time and to measure the cell transverse tubule structure at their point of origin. Further results are presented to demonstrate that the OPM system can also be used to study calcium spark parameters depending on their relationship to the transverse tubule structure.

  20. A high-speed two-frame, 1-2 ns gated X-ray CMOS imager used as a hohlraum diagnostic on the National Ignition Facility (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hui; Palmer, N.; Dayton, M.; Carpenter, A.; Schneider, M. B.; Bell, P. M.; Bradley, D. K.; Claus, L. D.; Fang, L.; Hilsabeck, T.; Hohenberger, M.; Jones, O. S.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Kimmel, M. W.; Robertson, G.; Rochau, G.; Sanchez, M. O.; Stahoviak, J. W.; Trotter, D. C.; Porter, J. L.

    2016-11-01

    A novel x-ray imager, which takes time-resolved gated images along a single line-of-sight, has been successfully implemented at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). This Gated Laser Entrance Hole diagnostic, G-LEH, incorporates a high-speed multi-frame CMOS x-ray imager developed by Sandia National Laboratories to upgrade the existing Static X-ray Imager diagnostic at NIF. The new diagnostic is capable of capturing two laser-entrance-hole images per shot on its 1024 × 448 pixels photo-detector array, with integration times as short as 1.6 ns per frame. Since its implementation on NIF, the G-LEH diagnostic has successfully acquired images from various experimental campaigns, providing critical new information for understanding the hohlraum performance in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments, such as the size of the laser entrance hole vs. time, the growth of the laser-heated gold plasma bubble, the change in brightness of inner beam spots due to time-varying cross beam energy transfer, and plasma instability growth near the hohlraum wall.

  1. A 12-bit compact column-parallel SAR ADC with dynamic power control technique for high-speed CMOS image sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quanliang, Li; Liyuan, Liu; Ye, Han; Zhongxiang, Cao; Nanjian, Wu

    2014-10-01

    This paper presents a 12-bit column-parallel successive approximation register analog-to-digital converter (SAR ADC) for high-speed CMOS image sensors. A segmented binary-weighted switched capacitor digital-to-analog converter (CDAC) and a staggered structure MOM unit capacitor is used to reduce the ADC area and to make its layout fit double pixel pitches. An electrical field shielding layout method is proposed to eliminate the parasitic capacitance on the top plate of the unit capacitor. A dynamic power control technique is proposed to reduce the power consumption of a single channel during readout. An off-chip foreground digital calibration is adopted to compensate for the nonlinearity due to the mismatch of unit capacitors among the CDAC. The prototype SAR ADC is fabricated in a 0.18 μm 1P5M CIS process. A single SAR ADC occupies 20 × 2020 μm2. Sampling at 833 kS/s, the measured differential nonlinearity, integral nonlinearity and effective number of bits of SAR ADC with calibration are 0.9/-1 LSB, 1/-1.1 LSB and 11.24 bits, respectively; the power consumption is only 0.26 mW under a 1.8-V supply and decreases linearly as the frame rate decreases.

  2. A high-speed two-frame, 1-2 ns gated X-ray CMOS imager used as a hohlraum diagnostic on the National Ignition Facility (invited).

    PubMed

    Chen, Hui; Palmer, N; Dayton, M; Carpenter, A; Schneider, M B; Bell, P M; Bradley, D K; Claus, L D; Fang, L; Hilsabeck, T; Hohenberger, M; Jones, O S; Kilkenny, J D; Kimmel, M W; Robertson, G; Rochau, G; Sanchez, M O; Stahoviak, J W; Trotter, D C; Porter, J L

    2016-11-01

    A novel x-ray imager, which takes time-resolved gated images along a single line-of-sight, has been successfully implemented at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). This Gated Laser Entrance Hole diagnostic, G-LEH, incorporates a high-speed multi-frame CMOS x-ray imager developed by Sandia National Laboratories to upgrade the existing Static X-ray Imager diagnostic at NIF. The new diagnostic is capable of capturing two laser-entrance-hole images per shot on its 1024 × 448 pixels photo-detector array, with integration times as short as 1.6 ns per frame. Since its implementation on NIF, the G-LEH diagnostic has successfully acquired images from various experimental campaigns, providing critical new information for understanding the hohlraum performance in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments, such as the size of the laser entrance hole vs. time, the growth of the laser-heated gold plasma bubble, the change in brightness of inner beam spots due to time-varying cross beam energy transfer, and plasma instability growth near the hohlraum wall.

  3. Observations of in situ deep-sea marine bioluminescence with a high-speed, high-resolution sCMOS camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Brennan T.; Gruber, David F.; Vasan, Ganesh; Roman, Christopher N.; Pieribone, Vincent A.; Sparks, John S.

    2016-05-01

    Observing and measuring marine bioluminescence in situ presents unique challenges, characterized by the difficult task of approaching and imaging weakly illuminated bodies in a three-dimensional environment. To address this problem, a scientific complementary-metal-oxide-semiconductor (sCMOS) microscopy camera was outfitted for deep-sea imaging of marine bioluminescence. This system was deployed on multiple platforms (manned submersible, remotely operated vehicle, and towed body) in three oceanic regions (Western Tropical Pacific, Eastern Equatorial Pacific, and Northwestern Atlantic) to depths up to 2500 m. Using light stimulation, bioluminescent responses were recorded at high frame rates and in high resolution, offering unprecedented low-light imagery of deep-sea bioluminescence in situ. The kinematics of light production in several zooplankton groups was observed, and luminescent responses at different depths were quantified as intensity vs. time. These initial results signify a clear advancement in the bioluminescent imaging methods available for observation and experimentation in the deep-sea.

  4. Developments and Applications of High-Performance CCD and CMOS Imaging Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janesick, James; Putnam, Gloria

    2003-12-01

    For over 20 years, charge-coupled devices (CCDs) have dominated most digital imaging applications and markets. Today, complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) arrays are displacing CCDs in some applications, and this trend is expected to continue. Low cost, low power, on-chip system integration, and high-speed operation are unique features that have generated interest in CMOS arrays. This paper reviews current CCD and CMOS sensor developments and related applications. We compare fundamental performance parameters common to these technologies and describe why the CCD is considered a mature technology, whereas CMOS arrays have significant room for growth. The paper presents custom CMOS pixel designs and related fabrication processes that address performance deficiencies of the CCD in high-performance applications. We discuss areas of development for future CCD and CMOS imagers. The paper also briefly reviews hybrid imaging arrays that combine the advantages of CCD and CMOS, producing better sensors than either technology alone can provide.

  5. Design of a Sub-Picosecond Jitter with Adjustable-Range CMOS Delay-Locked Loop for High-Speed and Low-Power Applications.

    PubMed

    Abdulrazzaq, Bilal I; Ibrahim, Omar J; Kawahito, Shoji; Sidek, Roslina M; Shafie, Suhaidi; Yunus, Nurul Amziah Md; Lee, Lini; Halin, Izhal Abdul

    2016-09-28

    A Delay-Locked Loop (DLL) with a modified charge pump circuit is proposed for generating high-resolution linear delay steps with sub-picosecond jitter performance and adjustable delay range. The small-signal model of the modified charge pump circuit is analyzed to bring forth the relationship between the DLL's internal control voltage and output time delay. Circuit post-layout simulation shows that a 0.97 ps delay step within a 69 ps delay range with 0.26 ps Root-Mean Square (RMS) jitter performance is achievable using a standard 0.13 µm Complementary Metal-Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) process. The post-layout simulation results show that the power consumption of the proposed DLL architecture's circuit is 0.1 mW when the DLL is operated at 2 GHz.

  6. Design of a Sub-Picosecond Jitter with Adjustable-Range CMOS Delay-Locked Loop for High-Speed and Low-Power Applications

    PubMed Central

    Abdulrazzaq, Bilal I.; Ibrahim, Omar J.; Kawahito, Shoji; Sidek, Roslina M.; Shafie, Suhaidi; Yunus, Nurul Amziah Md.; Lee, Lini; Halin, Izhal Abdul

    2016-01-01

    A Delay-Locked Loop (DLL) with a modified charge pump circuit is proposed for generating high-resolution linear delay steps with sub-picosecond jitter performance and adjustable delay range. The small-signal model of the modified charge pump circuit is analyzed to bring forth the relationship between the DLL’s internal control voltage and output time delay. Circuit post-layout simulation shows that a 0.97 ps delay step within a 69 ps delay range with 0.26 ps Root-Mean Square (RMS) jitter performance is achievable using a standard 0.13 µm Complementary Metal-Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) process. The post-layout simulation results show that the power consumption of the proposed DLL architecture’s circuit is 0.1 mW when the DLL is operated at 2 GHz. PMID:27690040

  7. High-temperature Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductors (CMOS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcbrayer, J. D.

    1981-01-01

    The results of an investigation into the possibility of using complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology for high temperature electronics are presented. A CMOS test chip was specifically developed as the test bed. This test chip incorporates CMOS transistors that have no gate protection diodes; these diodes are the major cause of leakage in commercial devices.

  8. Video-rate fluorescence lifetime imaging camera with CMOS single-photon avalanche diode arrays and high-speed imaging algorithm.

    PubMed

    Li, David D-U; Arlt, Jochen; Tyndall, David; Walker, Richard; Richardson, Justin; Stoppa, David; Charbon, Edoardo; Henderson, Robert K

    2011-09-01

    A high-speed and hardware-only algorithm using a center of mass method has been proposed for single-detector fluorescence lifetime sensing applications. This algorithm is now implemented on a field programmable gate array to provide fast lifetime estimates from a 32 × 32 low dark count 0.13 μm complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor single-photon avalanche diode (SPAD) plus time-to-digital converter array. A simple look-up table is included to enhance the lifetime resolvability range and photon economics, making it comparable to the commonly used least-square method and maximum-likelihood estimation based software. To demonstrate its performance, a widefield microscope was adapted to accommodate the SPAD array and image different test samples. Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy on fluorescent beads in Rhodamine 6G at a frame rate of 50 fps is also shown.

  9. A custom CMOS imager for multi-beam laser scanning microscopy and an improvement of scanning speed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Min-Woong; Kagawa, Keiichiro; Yasutomi, Keita; Kawahito, Shoji

    2013-02-01

    Multi-beam laser scanning confocal microscopy with a 256 × 256-pixel custom CMOS imager performing focal-plane pinhole effect, in which any rotating disk is not required, is demonstrated. A specimen is illuminated by 32 × 32 diffraction limited light spots whose wavelength and pitch are 532nm and 8.4 μm, respectively. The spot array is generated by a microlens array, which is scanned by two-dimensional piezo actuator according to the scanning of the image sensor. The frame rate of the prototype is 0.17 Hz, which is limited by the actuator. The confocal effect has been confirmed by comparing the axial resolution in the confocal imaging mode with that of the normal imaging mode. The axial resolution in the confocal mode measured by the full width at half maximum (FWHM) for a planar mirror was 8.9 μm, which is showed that the confocality has been achieved with the proposed CMOS image sensor. The focal-plane pinhole effect in the confocal microscopy with the proposed CMOS imager has been demonstrated at low frame rate. An improvement of the scanning speed and a CMOS imager with photo-sensitivity modulation pixels suitable for high-speed scanning are also discussed.

  10. High speed technology development and evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, D. R.; Brown, E. R.; Dickson, J. F.

    1986-10-01

    Semiconductor technology suited to high on-board data handling rates was investigated. Very high speed discrete logic and high speed gate arrays; single chip digital signal processors and single chip floating point processing peripherals; and analog CCD technologies and custom designed CCD chips for synthetic aperture radar applications were assessed. The 2 micron CMOS technology is highly reliable, supporting semicustom design techniques. Process JGC, the CCD technology, is highly reliable except for tolerance to ionizing radiation. Reliability of the ECL 16-bit serial-parallel parallel-serial converter junction isolated bipolar process, process WZA, is compromised by a design error and oxide contamination contributing to high leakage levels. The bipolar circuit is tolerant to an ionizing radiation of 20kRad. Step stress environmental testing to 200 C produces no failures in CMOS and CCD technologies, but accelerates the degradation of the oxide contaminated bipolar process. All technologies are susceptible to single event upsets.

  11. High speed handpieces

    PubMed Central

    Bhandary, Nayan; Desai, Asavari; Shetty, Y Bharath

    2014-01-01

    High speed instruments are versatile instruments used by clinicians of all specialties of dentistry. It is important for clinicians to understand the types of high speed handpieces available and the mechanism of working. The centers for disease control and prevention have issued guidelines time and again for disinfection and sterilization of high speed handpieces. This article presents the recent developments in the design of the high speed handpieces. With a view to prevent hospital associated infections significant importance has been given to disinfection, sterilization & maintenance of high speed handpieces. How to cite the article: Bhandary N, Desai A, Shetty YB. High speed handpieces. J Int Oral Health 2014;6(1):130-2. PMID:24653618

  12. Theoretical performance analysis for CMOS based high resolution detectors.

    PubMed

    Jain, Amit; Bednarek, Daniel R; Rudin, Stephen

    2013-03-06

    High resolution imaging capabilities are essential for accurately guiding successful endovascular interventional procedures. Present x-ray imaging detectors are not always adequate due to their inherent limitations. The newly-developed high-resolution micro-angiographic fluoroscope (MAF-CCD) detector has demonstrated excellent clinical image quality; however, further improvement in performance and physical design may be possible using CMOS sensors. We have thus calculated the theoretical performance of two proposed CMOS detectors which may be used as a successor to the MAF. The proposed detectors have a 300 μm thick HL-type CsI phosphor, a 50 μm-pixel CMOS sensor with and without a variable gain light image intensifier (LII), and are designated MAF-CMOS-LII and MAF-CMOS, respectively. For the performance evaluation, linear cascade modeling was used. The detector imaging chains were divided into individual stages characterized by one of the basic processes (quantum gain, binomial selection, stochastic and deterministic blurring, additive noise). Ranges of readout noise and exposure were used to calculate the detectors' MTF and DQE. The MAF-CMOS showed slightly better MTF than the MAF-CMOS-LII, but the MAF-CMOS-LII showed far better DQE, especially for lower exposures. The proposed detectors can have improved MTF and DQE compared with the present high resolution MAF detector. The performance of the MAF-CMOS is excellent for the angiography exposure range; however it is limited at fluoroscopic levels due to additive instrumentation noise. The MAF-CMOS-LII, having the advantage of the variable LII gain, can overcome the noise limitation and hence may perform exceptionally for the full range of required exposures; however, it is more complex and hence more expensive.

  13. Delta Doping High Purity CCDs and CMOS for LSST

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blacksberg, Jordana; Nikzad, Shouleh; Hoenk, Michael; Elliott, S. Tom; Bebek, Chris; Holland, Steve; Kolbe, Bill

    2006-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation describing delta doping high purity CCD's and CMOS for LSST is shown. The topics include: 1) Overview of JPL s versatile back-surface process for CCDs and CMOS; 2) Application to SNAP and ORION missions; 3) Delta doping as a back-surface electrode for fully depleted LBNL CCDs; 4) Delta doping high purity CCDs for SNAP and ORION; 5) JPL CMP thinning process development; and 6) Antireflection coating process development.

  14. High Speed Research Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Robert E.; Corsiglia, Victor R.; Schmitz, Frederic H. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    An overview of the NASA High Speed Research Program will be presented from a NASA Headquarters perspective. The presentation will include the objectives of the program and an outline of major programmatic issues.

  15. High-Speed Photography

    SciTech Connect

    Paisley, D.L.; Schelev, M.Y.

    1998-08-01

    The applications of high-speed photography to a diverse set of subjects including inertial confinement fusion, laser surgical procedures, communications, automotive airbags, lightning etc. are briefly discussed. (AIP) {copyright} {ital 1998 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers.}

  16. High-performance VGA-resolution digital color CMOS imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agwani, Suhail; Domer, Steve; Rubacha, Ray; Stanley, Scott

    1999-04-01

    This paper discusses the performance of a new VGA resolution color CMOS imager developed by Motorola on a 0.5micrometers /3.3V CMOS process. This fully integrated, high performance imager has on chip timing, control, and analog signal processing chain for digital imaging applications. The picture elements are based on 7.8micrometers active CMOS pixels that use pinned photodiodes for higher quantum efficiency and low noise performance. The image processing engine includes a bank of programmable gain amplifiers, line rate clamping for dark offset removal, real time auto white balancing, per column gain and offset calibration, and a 10 bit pipelined RSD analog to digital converter with a programmable input range. Post ADC signal processing includes features such as bad pixel replacement based on user defined thresholds levels, 10 to 8 bit companding and 5 tap FIR filtering. The sensor can be programmed via a standard I2C interface that runs on 3.3V clocks. Programmable features include variable frame rates using a constant frequency master clock, electronic exposure control, continuous or single frame capture, progressive or interlace scanning modes. Each pixel is individually addressable allowing region of interest imaging and image subsampling. The sensor operates with master clock frequencies of up to 13.5MHz resulting in 30FPS. A total programmable gain of 27dB is available. The sensor power dissipation is 400mW at full speed of operation. The low noise design yields a measured 'system on a chip' dynamic range of 50dB thus giving over 8 true bits of resolution. Extremely high conversion gain result in an excellent peak sensitivity of 22V/(mu) J/cm2 or 3.3V/lux-sec. This monolithic image capture and processing engine represent a compete imaging solution making it a true 'camera on a chip'. Yet in its operation it remains extremely easy to use requiring only one clock and a 3.3V power supply. Given the available features and performance levels, this sensor will be

  17. A CMOS 0.18 μm 600 MHz clock multiplier PLL and a pseudo-LVDS driver for the high speed data transmission for the ALICE Inner Tracking System front-end chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lattuca, A.; Mazza, G.; Aglieri Rinella, G.; Cavicchioli, C.; Chanlek, N.; Collu, A.; Degerli, Y.; Dorokhov, A.; Flouzat, C.; Gajanana, D.; Gao, C.; Guilloux, F.; Hillemanns, H.; Hristozkov, S.; Junique, A.; Keil, M.; Kim, D.; Kofarago, M.; Kugathasan, T.; Kwon, Y.; Mager, M.; Sielewicz, K. Marek; Marin Tobon, C. Augusto; Marras, D.; Martinengo, P.; Mugnier, H.; Musa, L.; Pham, T. Hung; Puggioni, C.; Reidt, F.; Riedler, P.; Rousset, J.; Siddhanta, S.; Snoeys, W.; Song, M.; Usai, G.; Van Hoorne, J. Willem; Yang, P.

    2016-01-01

    This work presents the 600 MHz clock multiplier PLL and the pseudo-LVDS driver which are two essential components of the Data Transmission Unit (DTU), a fast serial link for the 1.2 Gb/s data transmission of the ALICE inner detector front-end chip (ALPIDE). The PLL multiplies the 40 MHz input clock in order to obtain the 600 MHz and the 200 MHz clock for a fast serializer which works in Double Data Rate mode. The outputs of the serializer feed the pseudo-LVDS driver inputs which transmits the data from the pixel chip to the patch panel with a limited number of signal lines. The driver drives a 5.3 m-6.5 m long differential transmission line by steering a maximum of 5 mA of current at the target speed. To overcome bandwidth limitations coming from the long cables the pre-emphasis can be applied to the output. Currents for the main and pre-emphasis driver can individually be adjusted using on-chip digital-to-analog converters. The circuits will be integrated in the pixel chip and are designed in the same 0.18 μm CMOS technology and will operate from the same 1.8 V supply. Design and test results of both circuits are presented.

  18. Investigation of CMOS pixel sensor with 0.18 μm CMOS technology for high-precision tracking detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, L.; Fu, M.; Zhang, Y.; Yan, W.; Wang, M.

    2017-01-01

    The Circular Electron Positron Collider (CEPC) proposed by the Chinese high energy physics community is aiming to measure Higgs particles and their interactions precisely. The tracking detector including Silicon Inner Tracker (SIT) and Forward Tracking Disks (FTD) has driven stringent requirements on sensor technologies in term of spatial resolution, power consumption and readout speed. CMOS Pixel Sensor (CPS) is a promising candidate to approach these requirements. This paper presents the preliminary studies on the sensor optimization for tracking detector to achieve high collection efficiency while keeping necessary spatial resolution. Detailed studies have been performed on the charge collection using a 0.18 μm CMOS image sensor process. This process allows high resistivity epitaxial layer, leading to a significant improvement on the charge collection and therefore improving the radiation tolerance. Together with the simulation results, the first exploratory prototype has bee designed and fabricated. The prototype includes 9 different pixel arrays, which vary in terms of pixel pitch, diode size and geometry. The total area of the prototype amounts to 2 × 7.88 mm2.

  19. High Speed Ice Friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seymour-Pierce, Alexandra; Sammonds, Peter; Lishman, Ben

    2014-05-01

    Many different tribological experiments have been run to determine the frictional behaviour of ice at high speeds, ostensibly with the intention of applying results to everyday fields such as winter tyres and sports. However, experiments have only been conducted up to linear speeds of several metres a second, with few additional subject specific studies reaching speeds comparable to these applications. Experiments were conducted in the cold rooms of the Rock and Ice Physics Laboratory, UCL, on a custom built rotational tribometer based on previous literature designs. Preliminary results from experiments run at 2m/s for ice temperatures of 271 and 263K indicate that colder ice has a higher coefficient of friction, in accordance with the literature. These results will be presented, along with data from further experiments conducted at temperatures between 259-273K (in order to cover a wide range of the temperature dependent behaviour of ice) and speeds of 2-15m/s to produce a temperature-velocity-friction map for ice. The effect of temperature, speed and slider geometry on the deformation of ice will also be investigated. These speeds are approaching those exhibited by sports such as the luge (where athletes slide downhill on an icy track), placing the tribological work in context.

  20. High speed door assembly

    DOEpatents

    Shapiro, Carolyn

    1993-01-01

    A high speed door assembly, comprising an actuator cylinder and piston rods, a pressure supply cylinder and fittings, an electrically detonated explosive bolt, a honeycomb structured door, a honeycomb structured decelerator, and a structural steel frame encasing the assembly to close over a 3 foot diameter opening within 50 milliseconds of actuation, to contain hazardous materials and vapors within a test fixture.

  1. High speed door assembly

    DOEpatents

    Shapiro, C.

    1993-04-27

    A high speed door assembly is described, comprising an actuator cylinder and piston rods, a pressure supply cylinder and fittings, an electrically detonated explosive bolt, a honeycomb structured door, a honeycomb structured decelerator, and a structural steel frame encasing the assembly to close over a 3 foot diameter opening within 50 milliseconds of actuation, to contain hazardous materials and vapors within a test fixture.

  2. High Speed Vortex Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Richard M.; Wilcox, Floyd J., Jr.; Bauer, Steven X. S.; Allen, Jerry M.

    2000-01-01

    A review of the research conducted at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Langley Research Center (LaRC) into high-speed vortex flows during the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s is presented. The data reviewed is for flat plates, cavities, bodies, missiles, wings, and aircraft. These data are presented and discussed relative to the design of future vehicles. Also presented is a brief historical review of the extensive body of high-speed vortex flow research from the 1940s to the present in order to provide perspective of the NASA LaRC's high-speed research results. Data are presented which show the types of vortex structures which occur at supersonic speeds and the impact of these flow structures to vehicle performance and control is discussed. The data presented shows the presence of both small- and large scale vortex structures for a variety of vehicles, from missiles to transports. For cavities, the data show very complex multiple vortex structures exist at all combinations of cavity depth to length ratios and Mach number. The data for missiles show the existence of very strong interference effects between body and/or fin vortices and the downstream fins. It was shown that these vortex flow interference effects could be both positive and negative. Data are shown which highlights the effect that leading-edge sweep, leading-edge bluntness, wing thickness, location of maximum thickness, and camber has on the aerodynamics of and flow over delta wings. The observed flow fields for delta wings (i.e. separation bubble, classical vortex, vortex with shock, etc.) are discussed in the context of' aircraft design. And data have been shown that indicate that aerodynamic performance improvements are available by considering vortex flows as a primary design feature. Finally a discussing of a design approach for wings which utilize vortex flows for improved aerodynamic performance at supersonic speed is presented.

  3. High speed multiphoton imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yongxiao; Brustle, Anne; Gautam, Vini; Cockburn, Ian; Gillespie, Cathy; Gaus, Katharina; Lee, Woei Ming

    2016-12-01

    Intravital multiphoton microscopy has emerged as a powerful technique to visualize cellular processes in-vivo. Real time processes revealed through live imaging provided many opportunities to capture cellular activities in living animals. The typical parameters that determine the performance of multiphoton microscopy are speed, field of view, 3D imaging and imaging depth; many of these are important to achieving data from in-vivo. Here, we provide a full exposition of the flexible polygon mirror based high speed laser scanning multiphoton imaging system, PCI-6110 card (National Instruments) and high speed analog frame grabber card (Matrox Solios eA/XA), which allows for rapid adjustments between frame rates i.e. 5 Hz to 50 Hz with 512 × 512 pixels. Furthermore, a motion correction algorithm is also used to mitigate motion artifacts. A customized control software called Pscan 1.0 is developed for the system. This is then followed by calibration of the imaging performance of the system and a series of quantitative in-vitro and in-vivo imaging in neuronal tissues and mice.

  4. High speed civil transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogardus, Scott; Loper, Brent; Nauman, Chris; Page, Jeff; Parris, Rusty; Steinbach, Greg

    1990-01-01

    The design process of the High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) combines existing technology with the expectation of future technology to create a Mach 3.0 transport. The HSCT was designed to have a range in excess of 6000 nautical miles and carry up to 300 passengers. This range will allow the HSCT to service the economically expanding Pacific Basin region. Effort was made in the design to enable the aircraft to use conventional airports with standard 12,000 foot runways. With a takeoff thrust of 250,000 pounds, the four supersonic through-flow engines will accelerate the HSCT to a cruise speed of Mach 3.0. The 679,000 pound (at takeoff) HSCT is designed to cruise at an altitude of 70,000 feet, flying above most atmospheric disturbances.

  5. High speed flywheel

    DOEpatents

    McGrath, Stephen V.

    1991-01-01

    A flywheel for operation at high speeds utilizes two or more ringlike coments arranged in a spaced concentric relationship for rotation about an axis and an expansion device interposed between the components for accommodating radial growth of the components resulting from flywheel operation. The expansion device engages both of the ringlike components, and the structure of the expansion device ensures that it maintains its engagement with the components. In addition to its expansion-accommodating capacity, the expansion device also maintains flywheel stiffness during flywheel operation.

  6. Mechanically Flexible and High-Performance CMOS Logic Circuits

    PubMed Central

    Honda, Wataru; Arie, Takayuki; Akita, Seiji; Takei, Kuniharu

    2015-01-01

    Low-power flexible logic circuits are key components required by the next generation of flexible electronic devices. For stable device operation, such components require a high degree of mechanical flexibility and reliability. Here, the mechanical properties of low-power flexible complementary metal–oxide–semiconductor (CMOS) logic circuits including inverter, NAND, and NOR are investigated. To fabricate CMOS circuits on flexible polyimide substrates, carbon nanotube (CNT) network films are used for p-type transistors, whereas amorphous InGaZnO films are used for the n-type transistors. The power consumption and voltage gain of CMOS inverters are <500 pW/mm at Vin = 0 V (<7.5 nW/mm at Vin = 5 V) and >45, respectively. Importantly, bending of the substrate is not found to cause significant changes in the device characteristics. This is also observed to be the case for more complex flexible NAND and NOR logic circuits for bending states with a curvature radius of 2.6 mm. The mechanical stability of these CMOS logic circuits makes them ideal candidates for use in flexible integrated devices. PMID:26459882

  7. Mechanically Flexible and High-Performance CMOS Logic Circuits.

    PubMed

    Honda, Wataru; Arie, Takayuki; Akita, Seiji; Takei, Kuniharu

    2015-10-13

    Low-power flexible logic circuits are key components required by the next generation of flexible electronic devices. For stable device operation, such components require a high degree of mechanical flexibility and reliability. Here, the mechanical properties of low-power flexible complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) logic circuits including inverter, NAND, and NOR are investigated. To fabricate CMOS circuits on flexible polyimide substrates, carbon nanotube (CNT) network films are used for p-type transistors, whereas amorphous InGaZnO films are used for the n-type transistors. The power consumption and voltage gain of CMOS inverters are <500 pW/mm at Vin = 0 V (<7.5 nW/mm at Vin = 5 V) and >45, respectively. Importantly, bending of the substrate is not found to cause significant changes in the device characteristics. This is also observed to be the case for more complex flexible NAND and NOR logic circuits for bending states with a curvature radius of 2.6 mm. The mechanical stability of these CMOS logic circuits makes them ideal candidates for use in flexible integrated devices.

  8. High speed transient sampler

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, T.E.

    1995-11-28

    A high speed sampler comprises a meandered sample transmission line for transmitting an input signal, a straight strobe transmission line for transmitting a strobe signal, and a plurality of sampling gates along the transmission lines. The sampling gates comprise a four terminal diode bridge having a first strobe resistor connected from a first terminal of the bridge to the positive strobe line, a second strobe resistor coupled from the third terminal of the bridge to the negative strobe line, a tap connected to the second terminal of the bridge and to the sample transmission line, and a sample holding capacitor connected to the fourth terminal of the bridge. The resistance of the first and second strobe resistors is much higher than the signal transmission line impedance in the preferred system. This results in a sampling gate which applies a very small load on the sample transmission line and on the strobe generator. The sample holding capacitor is implemented using a smaller capacitor and a larger capacitor isolated from the smaller capacitor by resistance. The high speed sampler of the present invention is also characterized by other optimizations, including transmission line tap compensation, stepped impedance strobe line, a multi-layer physical layout, and unique strobe generator design. A plurality of banks of such samplers are controlled for concatenated or interleaved sample intervals to achieve long sample lengths or short sample spacing. 17 figs.

  9. High speed transient sampler

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, Thomas E.

    1995-01-01

    A high speed sampler comprises a meandered sample transmission line for transmitting an input signal, a straight strobe transmission line for transmitting a strobe signal, and a plurality of sampling gates along the transmission lines. The sampling gates comprise a four terminal diode bridge having a first strobe resistor connected from a first terminal of the bridge to the positive strobe line, a second strobe resistor coupled from the third terminal of the bridge to the negative strobe line, a tap connected to the second terminal of the bridge and to the sample transmission line, and a sample holding capacitor connected to the fourth terminal of the bridge. The resistance of the first and second strobe resistors is much higher than the signal transmission line impedance in the preferred system. This results in a sampling gate which applies a very small load on the sample transmission line and on the strobe generator. The sample holding capacitor is implemented using a smaller capacitor and a larger capacitor isolated from the smaller capacitor by resistance. The high speed sampler of the present invention is also characterized by other optimizations, including transmission line tap compensation, stepped impedance strobe line, a multi-layer physical layout, and unique strobe generator design. A plurality of banks of such samplers are controlled for concatenated or interleaved sample intervals to achieve long sample lengths or short sample spacing.

  10. High-Voltage-Input Level Translator Using Standard CMOS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yager, Jeremy A.; Mojarradi, Mohammad M.; Vo, Tuan A.; Blalock, Benjamin J.

    2011-01-01

    proposed integrated circuit would translate (1) a pair of input signals having a low differential potential and a possibly high common-mode potential into (2) a pair of output signals having the same low differential potential and a low common-mode potential. As used here, "low" and "high" refer to potentials that are, respectively, below or above the nominal supply potential (3.3 V) at which standard complementary metal oxide/semiconductor (CMOS) integrated circuits are designed to operate. The input common-mode potential could lie between 0 and 10 V; the output common-mode potential would be 2 V. This translation would make it possible to process the pair of signals by use of standard 3.3-V CMOS analog and/or mixed-signal (analog and digital) circuitry on the same integrated-circuit chip. A schematic of the circuit is shown in the figure. Standard 3.3-V CMOS circuitry cannot withstand input potentials greater than about 4 V. However, there are many applications that involve low-differential-potential, high-common-mode-potential input signal pairs and in which standard 3.3-V CMOS circuitry, which is relatively inexpensive, would be the most appropriate circuitry for performing other functions on the integrated-circuit chip that handles the high-potential input signals. Thus, there is a need to combine high-voltage input circuitry with standard low-voltage CMOS circuitry on the same integrated-circuit chip. The proposed circuit would satisfy this need. In the proposed circuit, the input signals would be coupled into both a level-shifting pair and a common-mode-sensing pair of CMOS transistors. The output of the level-shifting pair would be fed as input to a differential pair of transistors. The resulting differential current output would pass through six standoff transistors to be mirrored into an output branch by four heterojunction bipolar transistors. The mirrored differential current would be converted back to potential by a pair of diode-connected transistors

  11. Micromachined high-performance RF passives in CMOS substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xinxin; Ni, Zao; Gu, Lei; Wu, Zhengzheng; Yang, Chen

    2016-11-01

    This review systematically addresses the micromachining technologies used for the fabrication of high-performance radio-frequency (RF) passives that can be integrated into low-cost complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS)-grade (i.e. low-resistivity) silicon wafers. With the development of various kinds of post-CMOS-compatible microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) processes, 3D structural inductors/transformers, variable capacitors, tunable resonators and band-pass/low-pass filters can be compatibly integrated into active integrated circuits to form monolithic RF system-on-chips. By using MEMS processes, including substrate modifying/suspending and LIGA-like metal electroplating, both the highly lossy substrate effect and the resistive loss can be largely eliminated and depressed, thereby meeting the high-performance requirements of telecommunication applications.

  12. HIGH SPEED CAMERA

    DOEpatents

    Rogers, B.T. Jr.; Davis, W.C.

    1957-12-17

    This patent relates to high speed cameras having resolution times of less than one-tenth microseconds suitable for filming distinct sequences of a very fast event such as an explosion. This camera consists of a rotating mirror with reflecting surfaces on both sides, a narrow mirror acting as a slit in a focal plane shutter, various other mirror and lens systems as well as an innage recording surface. The combination of the rotating mirrors and the slit mirror causes discrete, narrow, separate pictures to fall upon the film plane, thereby forming a moving image increment of the photographed event. Placing a reflecting surface on each side of the rotating mirror cancels the image velocity that one side of the rotating mirror would impart, so as a camera having this short a resolution time is thereby possible.

  13. High speed nozzles task

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamed, Awatef

    1995-01-01

    Supersonic cruise exhaust nozzles for advanced applications are optimized for a high nozzle pressure ratio (NPR) at design supersonic cruise Mach number and altitude. The performance of these nozzles with large expansion ratios are severely degraded for operations at subsonic speeds near sea level for NPR significantly less than the design values. The prediction of over-expanded 2DCD nozzles performance is critical to evaluating the internal losses and to the optimization of the integrated vehicle and propulsion system performance. The reported research work was aimed at validating and assessing existing computational methods and turbulence models for predicting the flow characteristics and nozzle performance at over-expanded conditions. Flow simulations in 2DCD nozzles were performed using five different turbulence models. The results are compared with the experimental data for the wall pressure distribution and thrust and flow coefficients at over-expanded static conditions.

  14. High speed packet switching

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This document constitutes the final report prepared by Proteon, Inc. of Westborough, Massachusetts under contract NAS 5-30629 entitled High-Speed Packet Switching (SBIR 87-1, Phase 2) prepared for NASA-Greenbelt, Maryland. The primary goal of this research project is to use the results of the SBIR Phase 1 effort to develop a sound, expandable hardware and software router architecture capable of forwarding 25,000 packets per second through the router and passing 300 megabits per second on the router's internal busses. The work being delivered under this contract received its funding from three different sources: the SNIPE/RIG contract (Contract Number F30602-89-C-0014, CDRL Sequence Number A002), the SBIR contract, and Proteon. The SNIPE/RIG and SBIR contracts had many overlapping requirements, which allowed the research done under SNIPE/RIG to be applied to SBIR. Proteon funded all of the work to develop new router interfaces other than FDDI, in addition to funding the productization of the router itself. The router being delivered under SBIR will be a fully product-quality machine. The work done during this contract produced many significant findings and results, summarized here and explained in detail in later sections of this report. The SNIPE/RIG contract was completed. That contract had many overlapping requirements with the SBIR contract, and resulted in the successful demonstration and delivery of a high speed router. The development that took place during the SNIPE/RIG contract produced findings that included the choice of processor and an understanding of the issues surrounding inter processor communications in a multiprocessor environment. Many significant speed enhancements to the router software were made during that time. Under the SBIR contract (and with help from Proteon-funded work), it was found that a single processor router achieved a throughput significantly higher than originally anticipated. For this reason, a single processor router was

  15. Monolithic CMOS-MEMS integration for high-g accelerometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narasimhan, Vinayak; Li, Holden; Tan, Chuan Seng

    2014-10-01

    This paper highlights work-in-progress towards the conceptualization, simulation, fabrication and initial testing of a silicon-germanium (SiGe) integrated CMOS-MEMS high-g accelerometer for military, munition, fuze and shock measurement applications. Developed on IMEC's SiGe MEMS platform, the MEMS offers a dynamic range of 5,000 g and a bandwidth of 12 kHz. The low noise readout circuit adopts a chopper-stabilization technique implementing the CMOS through the TSMC 0.18 µm process. The device structure employs a fully differential split comb-drive set up with two sets of stators and a rotor all driven separately. Dummy structures acting as protective over-range stops were designed to protect the active components when under impacts well above the designed dynamic range.

  16. High speed civil transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This report discusses the design and marketability of a next generation supersonic transport. Apogee Aeronautics Corporation has designated its High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT): Supercruiser HS-8. Since the beginning of the Concorde era, the general consensus has been that the proper time for the introduction of a next generation Supersonic Transport (SST) would depend upon the technical advances made in the areas of propulsion (reduction in emissions) and material composites (stronger, lighter materials). It is believed by many in the aerospace industry that these beforementioned technical advances lie on the horizon. With this being the case, this is the proper time to begin the design phase for the next generation HSCT. The design objective for a HSCT was to develop an aircraft that would be capable of transporting at least 250 passengers with baggage at a distance of 5500 nmi. The supersonic Mach number is currently unspecified. In addition, the design had to be marketable, cost effective, and certifiable. To achieve this goal, technical advances in the current SST's must be made, especially in the areas of aerodynamics and propulsion. As a result of these required aerodynamic advances, several different supersonic design concepts were reviewed.

  17. High resolution, high bandwidth global shutter CMOS area scan sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faramarzpour, Naser; Sonder, Matthias; Li, Binqiao

    2013-10-01

    Global shuttering, sometimes also known as electronic shuttering, enables the use of CMOS sensors in a vast range of applications. Teledyne DALSA Global shutter sensors are able to integrate light synchronously across millions of pixels with microsecond accuracy. Teledyne DALSA offers 5 transistor global shutter pixels in variety of resolutions, pitches and noise and full-well combinations. One of the recent generations of these pixels is implemented in 12 mega pixel area scan device at 6 um pitch and that images up to 70 frames per second with 58 dB dynamic range. These square pixels include microlens and optional color filters. These sensors also offer exposure control, anti-blooming and high dynamic range operation by introduction of a drain and a PPD reset gate to the pixel. The state of the art sense node design of Teledyne DALSA's 5T pixel offers exceptional shutter rejection ratio. The architecture is consistent with the requirements to use stitching to achieve very large area scan devices. Parallel or serial digital output is provided on these sensors using on-chip, column-wise analog to digital converters. Flexible ADC bit depth combined with windowing (adjustable region of interest, ROI) allows these sensors to run with variety of resolution/bandwidth combinations. The low power, state of the art LVDS I/O technology allows for overall power consumptions of less than 2W at full performance conditions.

  18. Design and characterization of high precision in-pixel discriminators for rolling shutter CMOS pixel sensors with full CMOS capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Y.; Hu-Guo, C.; Dorokhov, A.; Pham, H.; Hu, Y.

    2013-07-01

    In order to exploit the ability to integrate a charge collecting electrode with analog and digital processing circuitry down to the pixel level, a new type of CMOS pixel sensors with full CMOS capability is presented in this paper. The pixel array is read out based on a column-parallel read-out architecture, where each pixel incorporates a diode, a preamplifier with a double sampling circuitry and a discriminator to completely eliminate analog read-out bottlenecks. The sensor featuring a pixel array of 8 rows and 32 columns with a pixel pitch of 80 μm×16 μm was fabricated in a 0.18 μm CMOS process. The behavior of each pixel-level discriminator isolated from the diode and the preamplifier was studied. The experimental results indicate that all in-pixel discriminators which are fully operational can provide significant improvements in the read-out speed and the power consumption of CMOS pixel sensors.

  19. High-Voltage CMOS Controller for Microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Khorasani, M; Behnam, M; van den Berg, L; Backhouse, C J; Elliott, D G

    2009-04-01

    A high-voltage microfluidic controller designed using DALSA semiconductor's 0.8-mum low-voltage/high-voltage complementary metal-oxide semiconductor/double diffused metal-oxide semiconductor process is presented. The chip's four high-voltage output drivers can switch 300 V, and the dc-dc boost converter can generate up to 68 V using external passive components. This integrated circuit represents an advancement in microfluidic technology when used in conjunction with a charge coupling device (CCD)-based optical system and a glass microfluidic channel, enabling a portable and cost-efficient platform for genetic analysis.

  20. High speed nanotechnology-based photodetector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurtz, Russell M.; Pradhan, Ranjit D.; Parfenov, Alexander V.; Holmstedt, Jason; Esterkin, Vladimir; Menon, Naresh; Aye, Tin M.; Chua, Kang-Bin; Schindler, Axel; Balandin, Alexander A.; Nichter, James E.

    2005-08-01

    An inexpensive, easily integrated, 40 Gbps photoreceiver operating in the communications band would revolutionize the telecommunications industry. While generation of 40 Gbps data is not difficult, its reception and decoding require specific technologies. We present a 40 Gbps photoreceiver that exceeds the capabilities of current devices. This photoreceiver is based on a technology we call "nanodust." This new technology enables nanoscale photodetectors to be embedded in matrices made from a different semiconductor, or directly integrated into a CMOS amplification circuit. Photoreceivers based on quantum dust technology can be designed to operate in any spectral region, including the telecommunications bands near 1.31 and 1.55 micrometers. This technology also lends itself to normal-incidence detection, enabling a large detector size with its associated increase in sensitivity, even at high speeds and reception wavelengths beyond the capability of silicon.

  1. High speed metal removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pugh, R. F.; Pohl, R. F.

    1982-10-01

    Four types of steel (AISI 1340, 4140, 4340, and HF-1) which are commonly used in large caliber projectile manufacture were machined at different hardness ranges representing the as-forged and the heat treated condition with various ceramic tools using ceramic coated tungsten carbide as a reference. Results show that machining speeds can be increased significantly using present available tooling.

  2. Focused Mission High Speed Combatant

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-05-09

    hull types to determine which hull type best meets the requirements for the Focused Mission High Speed Combatant. The first step in the analysis...MAPC, uses parametric models and scaling to create high level designs of various hull types. The inputs are desired speed , range, payload, sea state...reached 10 SWATH vessels exhibit superior seakeeping at near zero speed compared to other hull forms 5 Assumes 2 equal-sized GE Gas Turbines 11

  3. A CMOS In-Pixel CTIA High Sensitivity Fluorescence Imager

    PubMed Central

    Murari, Kartikeya; Etienne-Cummings, Ralph; Thakor, Nitish; Cauwenberghs, Gert

    2012-01-01

    Traditionally, charge coupled device (CCD) based image sensors have held sway over the field of biomedical imaging. Complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) based imagers so far lack sensitivity leading to poor low-light imaging. Certain applications including our work on animal-mountable systems for imaging in awake and unrestrained rodents require the high sensitivity and image quality of CCDs and the low power consumption, flexibility and compactness of CMOS imagers. We present a 132×124 high sensitivity imager array with a 20.1 μm pixel pitch fabricated in a standard 0.5 μ CMOS process. The chip incorporates n-well/p-sub photodiodes, capacitive transimpedance amplifier (CTIA) based in-pixel amplification, pixel scanners and delta differencing circuits. The 5-transistor all-nMOS pixel interfaces with peripheral pMOS transistors for column-parallel CTIA. At 70 fps, the array has a minimum detectable signal of 4 nW/cm2 at a wavelength of 450 nm while consuming 718 μA from a 3.3 V supply. Peak signal to noise ratio (SNR) was 44 dB at an incident intensity of 1 μW/cm2. Implementing 4×4 binning allowed the frame rate to be increased to 675 fps. Alternately, sensitivity could be increased to detect about 0.8 nW/cm2 while maintaining 70 fps. The chip was used to image single cell fluorescence at 28 fps with an average SNR of 32 dB. For comparison, a cooled CCD camera imaged the same cell at 20 fps with an average SNR of 33.2 dB under the same illumination while consuming over a watt. PMID:23136624

  4. An integrated CMOS high data rate transceiver for video applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaping, Liang; Dazhi, Che; Cheng, Liang; Lingling, Sun

    2012-07-01

    This paper presents a 5 GHz CMOS radio frequency (RF) transceiver built with 0.18 μm RF-CMOS technology by using a proprietary protocol, which combines the new IEEE 802.11n features such as multiple-in multiple-out (MIMO) technology with other wireless technologies to provide high data rate robust real-time high definition television (HDTV) distribution within a home environment. The RF frequencies cover from 4.9 to 5.9 GHz: the industrial, scientific and medical (ISM) band. Each RF channel bandwidth is 20 MHz. The transceiver utilizes a direct up transmitter and low-IF receiver architecture. A dual-quadrature direct up conversion mixer is used that achieves better than 35 dB image rejection without any on chip calibration. The measurement shows a 6 dB typical receiver noise figure and a better than 33 dB transmitter error vector magnitude (EVM) at -3 dBm output power.

  5. High-Speed Electrochemical Imaging.

    PubMed

    Momotenko, Dmitry; Byers, Joshua C; McKelvey, Kim; Kang, Minkyung; Unwin, Patrick R

    2015-09-22

    The design, development, and application of high-speed scanning electrochemical probe microscopy is reported. The approach allows the acquisition of a series of high-resolution images (typically 1000 pixels μm(-2)) at rates approaching 4 seconds per frame, while collecting up to 8000 image pixels per second, about 1000 times faster than typical imaging speeds used up to now. The focus is on scanning electrochemical cell microscopy (SECCM), but the principles and practicalities are applicable to many electrochemical imaging methods. The versatility of the high-speed scan concept is demonstrated at a variety of substrates, including imaging the electroactivity of a patterned self-assembled monolayer on gold, visualization of chemical reactions occurring at single wall carbon nanotubes, and probing nanoscale electrocatalysts for water splitting. These studies provide movies of spatial variations of electrochemical fluxes as a function of potential and a platform for the further development of high speed scanning with other electrochemical imaging techniques.

  6. SEAL FOR HIGH SPEED CENTRIFUGE

    DOEpatents

    Skarstrom, C.W.

    1957-12-17

    A seal is described for a high speed centrifuge wherein the centrifugal force of rotation acts on the gasket to form a tight seal. The cylindrical rotating bowl of the centrifuge contains a closure member resting on a shoulder in the bowl wall having a lower surface containing bands of gasket material, parallel and adjacent to the cylinder wall. As the centrifuge speed increases, centrifugal force acts on the bands of gasket material forcing them in to a sealing contact against the cylinder wall. This arrangememt forms a simple and effective seal for high speed centrifuges, replacing more costly methods such as welding a closure in place.

  7. Gated high speed optical detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, S. I.; Carson, L. M.; Neal, G. W.

    1973-01-01

    The design, fabrication, and test of two gated, high speed optical detectors for use in high speed digital laser communication links are discussed. The optical detectors used a dynamic crossed field photomultiplier and electronics including dc bias and RF drive circuits, automatic remote synchronization circuits, automatic gain control circuits, and threshold detection circuits. The equipment is used to detect binary encoded signals from a mode locked neodynium laser.

  8. High responsivity CMOS imager pixel implemented in SOI technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zheng, X.; Wrigley, C.; Yang, G.; Pain, B.

    2000-01-01

    Availability of mature sub-micron CMOS technology and the advent of the new low noise active pixel sensor (APS) concept have enabled the development of low power, miniature, single-chip, CMOS digital imagers in the decade of the 1990's.

  9. High Speed Compressor Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-12-21

    Nov 2011. 11 Walker, G., Senft, J. R., “Free Piston Stirling Engines”, Springer-Verlag, Berlin, 1985, pp118. 12 Green RH, Bailey PB, Roberts L...carried out on a relatively old design of compressor, initially developed for use with a Stirling cycle domestic freezer12, and subsequently used in a...2003), pp 247-253. 3 Wang, X, Dai, W., et al, “Performance of a Stirling -Type Pulse Tube Cooler for High Efficiency Operation at 100Hz

  10. CMOS array design automation techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lombardi, T.; Feller, A.

    1976-01-01

    The design considerations and the circuit development for a 4096-bit CMOS SOS ROM chip, the ATL078 are described. Organization of the ATL078 is 512 words by 8 bits. The ROM was designed to be programmable either at the metal mask level or by a directed laser beam after processing. The development of a 4K CMOS SOS ROM fills a void left by available ROM chip types, and makes the design of a totally major high speed system more realizable.

  11. Broadband terahertz imaging with highly sensitive silicon CMOS detectors.

    PubMed

    Schuster, Franz; Coquillat, Dominique; Videlier, Hadley; Sakowicz, Maciej; Teppe, Frédéric; Dussopt, Laurent; Giffard, Benoît; Skotnicki, Thomas; Knap, Wojciech

    2011-04-11

    This paper investigates terahertz detectors fabricated in a low-cost 130 nm silicon CMOS technology. We show that the detectors consisting of a nMOS field effect transistor as rectifying element and an integrated bow-tie coupling antenna achieve a record responsivity above 5 kV/W and a noise equivalent power below 10 pW/Hz(0.5) in the important atmospheric window around 300 GHz and at room temperature. We demonstrate furthermore that the same detectors are efficient for imaging in a very wide frequency range from ~0.27 THz up to 1.05 THz. These results pave the way towards high sensitivity focal plane arrays in silicon for terahertz imaging.

  12. Cryogenic CMOS cameras for high voltage monitoring in liquid argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McConkey, N.; Spooner, N.; Thiesse, M.; Wallbank, M.; Warburton, T. K.

    2017-03-01

    The prevalent use of large volume liquid argon detectors strongly motivates the development of novel readout and monitoring technology which functions at cryogenic temperatures. This paper presents the development of a cryogenic CMOS camera system suitable for use inside a large volume liquid argon detector for online monitoring purposes. The characterisation of the system is described in detail. The reliability of such a camera system has been demonstrated over several months, and recent data from operation within the liquid argon region of the DUNE 35 t cryostat is presented. The cameras were used to monitor for high voltage breakdown inside the cryostat, with capability to observe breakdown of a liquid argon time projection chamber in situ. They were also used for detector monitoring, especially of components during cooldown.

  13. High speed optical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frankel, Michael Y.; Livas, Jeff

    2005-02-01

    This overview will discuss core network technology and cost trade-offs inherent in choosing between "analog" architectures with high optical transparency, and ones heavily dependent on frequent "digital" signal regeneration. The exact balance will be related to the specific technology choices in each area outlined above, as well as the network needs such as node geographic spread, physical connectivity patterns, and demand loading. Over the course of a decade, optical networks have evolved from simple single-channel SONET regenerator-based links to multi-span multi-channel optically amplified ultra-long haul systems, fueled by high demand for bandwidth at reduced cost. In general, the cost of a well-designed high capacity system is dominated by the number of optical to electrical (OE) and electrical to optical (EO) conversions required. As the reach and channel capacity of the transport systems continued to increase, it became necessary to improve the granularity of the demand connections by introducing (optical add/drop multiplexers) OADMs. Thus, if a node requires only small demand connectivity, most of the optical channels are expressed through without regeneration (OEO). The network costs are correspondingly reduced, partially balanced by the increased cost of the OADM nodes. Lately, the industry has been aggressively pursuing a natural extension of this philosophy towards all-optical "analog" core networks, with each demand touching electrical digital circuitry only at the in/egress nodes. This is expected to produce a substantial elimination of OEO costs, increase in network capacity, and a notionally simpler operation and service turn-up. At the same time, such optical "analog" network requires a large amount of complicated hardware and software for monitoring and manipulating high bit rate optical signals. New and more complex modulation formats that provide resiliency to both optical noise and nonlinear propagation effects are important for extended

  14. Flexible high speed CODEC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wernlund, James V.

    1993-01-01

    HARRIS, under contract with NASA Lewis, has developed a hard decision BCH (Bose-Chaudhuri-Hocquenghem) triple error correcting block CODEC ASIC, that can be used in either a bursted or continuous mode. the ASIC contains both encoder and decoder functions, programmable lock thresholds, and PSK related functions. The CODEC provides up to 4 dB of coding gain for data rates up to 300 Mbps. The overhead is selectable from 7/8 to 15/16 resulting in minimal band spreading, for a given BER. Many of the internal calculations are brought out enabling the CODEC to be incorporated in more complex designs. The ASIC has been tested in BPSK, QPSK and 16-ary PSK link simulators and found to perform to within 0.1 dB of theory for BER's of 10(exp -2) to 10(exp -9). The ASIC itself, being a hard decision CODEC, is not limited to PSK modulation formats. Unlike most hard decision CODEC's, the HARRIS CODEC doesn't upgrade BER performance significantly at high BER's but rather becomes transparent.

  15. Applications of High Speed Networks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-09-01

    extended computer interconnections are the charactenstic properties of ligh speed networks, low error rates, high bandwidth, low latency, full...implementation and designi of ligh speed networks, the need for gigabit per second services for an end user will be justified. A. FIBER OPTICS 1. Brief...conferencing muc& more useful. 5. Full motion video - HDTV The distribution of entertainment and news, based on broadcast signals, has been an activity

  16. High speed multiwire photon camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lacy, Jeffrey L. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    An improved multiwire proportional counter camera having particular utility in the field of clinical nuclear medicine imaging. The detector utilizes direct coupled, low impedance, high speed delay lines, the segments of which are capacitor-inductor networks. A pile-up rejection test is provided to reject confused events otherwise caused by multiple ionization events occuring during the readout window.

  17. High speed multiwire photon camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lacy, Jeffrey L. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    An improved multiwire proportional counter camera having particular utility in the field of clinical nuclear medicine imaging. The detector utilizes direct coupled, low impedance, high speed delay lines, the segments of which are capacitor-inductor networks. A pile-up rejection test is provided to reject confused events otherwise caused by multiple ionization events occurring during the readout window.

  18. Integrated, nonvolatile, high-speed analog random access memory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katti, Romney R. (Inventor); Wu, Jiin-Chuan (Inventor); Stadler, Henry L. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    This invention provides an integrated, non-volatile, high-speed random access memory. A magnetically switchable ferromagnetic or ferrimagnetic layer is sandwiched between an electrical conductor which provides the ability to magnetize the magnetically switchable layer and a magneto resistive or Hall effect material which allows sensing the magnetic field which emanates from the magnetization of the magnetically switchable layer. By using this integrated three-layer form, the writing process, which is controlled by the conductor, is separated from the storage medium in the magnetic layer and from the readback process which is controlled by the magnetoresistive layer. A circuit for implementing the memory in CMOS or the like is disclosed.

  19. High-frequency BiCMOS transconductance integrators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beards, R. Douglas

    1990-10-01

    The capabilities of a fine-line bipolar complementary metal oxide semiconductor (BiCMOS) process in the design of wideband transconductance integrators for precision monolithic continuous time filtering are explored. The design considerations of such an integrator are examined in detail, with an emphasis on tunability and phase compensation as a means for realizing a precision wideband design. The concept of open-loop transconductance filtering is described and possible circuit topologies are investigated. Detailed small-signal and large-signal analysis of one proposed circuit which has both tunable bandwidth and tunable phase compensation is presented. Application of such an integrator to open-loop transconductance filtering in the 10-50 MHz frequency range is studied. Simulation results show specific performance expectations of the proposed circuit. The tunable compensation circuit was seen to restrict the amplitude of signals which the integrator can pass without severe distortion or even instability occurring. A potential solution to this problem is deemed to be unsuitable for high frequency applications. The general design philosophy of applying low-frequency techniques to realize a high frequency circuit was seen to result in several fundamental problems.

  20. Correct CMOS IC defect models for quality testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soden, Jerry M.; Hawkins, Charles F.

    1993-01-01

    Leading edge, high reliability, and low escape CMOS IC test practices have now virtually removed the stuck-at fault model and replaced it with more defect-orientated models. Quiescent power supply current testing (I(sub DDQ)) combined with strategic use of high speed test patterns is the recommended approach to zero defect and high reliability testing goals. This paper reviews the reasons for the change in CMOS IC test practices and outlines an improved CMOS IC test methodology.

  1. High-content analysis of single cells directly assembled on CMOS sensor based on color imaging.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Tsuyoshi; Saeki, Tatsuya; Sunaga, Yoshihiko; Matsunaga, Tadashi

    2010-12-15

    A complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) image sensor was applied to high-content analysis of single cells which were assembled closely or directly onto the CMOS sensor surface. The direct assembling of cell groups on CMOS sensor surface allows large-field (6.66 mm×5.32 mm in entire active area of CMOS sensor) imaging within a second. Trypan blue-stained and non-stained cells in the same field area on the CMOS sensor were successfully distinguished as white- and blue-colored images under white LED light irradiation. Furthermore, the chemiluminescent signals of each cell were successfully visualized as blue-colored images on CMOS sensor only when HeLa cells were placed directly on the micro-lens array of the CMOS sensor. Our proposed approach will be a promising technique for real-time and high-content analysis of single cells in a large-field area based on color imaging.

  2. High-speed sorting of grains by color and surface texture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A high-speed, low-cost, image-based sorting device was developed to detect and separate grains with different colors/textures. The device directly combines a complementary metal–oxide–semiconductor (CMOS) color image sensor with a field-programmable gate array (FPGA) that was programmed to execute ...

  3. Hardware-based image processing for high-speed inspection of grains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A high-speed, low-cost, image-based sorting device was developed to detect and separate grains with slight color differences and small defects on grains The device directly combines a complementary metal–oxide–semiconductor (CMOS) color image sensor with a field-programmable gate array (FPGA) which...

  4. Design considerations for a new high resolution Micro-Angiographic Fluoroscope based on a CMOS sensor (MAF-CMOS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loughran, Brendan; Swetadri Vasan, S. N.; Singh, Vivek; Ionita, Ciprian N.; Jain, Amit; Bednarek, Daniel R.; Titus, Albert H.; Rudin, Stephen

    2013-03-01

    The detectors that are used for endovascular image-guided interventions (EIGI), particularly for neurovascular interventions, do not provide clinicians with adequate visualization to ensure the best possible treatment outcomes. Developing an improved x-ray imaging detector requires the determination of estimated clinical x-ray entrance exposures to the detector. The range of exposures to the detector in clinical studies was found for the three modes of operation: fluoroscopic mode, high frame-rate digital angiographic mode (HD fluoroscopic mode), and DSA mode. Using these estimated detector exposure ranges and available CMOS detector technical specifications, design requirements were developed to pursue a quantum limited, high resolution, dynamic x-ray detector based on a CMOS sensor with 50 μm pixel size. For the proposed MAF-CMOS, the estimated charge collected within the full exposure range was found to be within the estimated full well capacity of the pixels. Expected instrumentation noise for the proposed detector was estimated to be 50-1,300 electrons. Adding a gain stage such as a light image intensifier would minimize the effect of the estimated instrumentation noise on total image noise but may not be necessary to ensure quantum limited detector operation at low exposure levels. A recursive temporal filter may decrease the effective total noise by 2 to 3 times, allowing for the improved signal to noise ratios at the lowest estimated exposures despite consequent loss in temporal resolution. This work can serve as a guide for further development of dynamic x-ray imaging prototypes or improvements for existing dynamic x-ray imaging systems.

  5. Design considerations for a new, high resolution Micro-Angiographic Fluoroscope based on a CMOS sensor (MAF-CMOS).

    PubMed

    Loughran, Brendan; Swetadri Vasan, S N; Singh, Vivek; Ionita, Ciprian N; Jain, Amit; Bednarek, Daniel R; Titus, Albert; Rudin, Stephen

    2013-03-06

    The detectors that are used for endovascular image-guided interventions (EIGI), particularly for neurovascular interventions, do not provide clinicians with adequate visualization to ensure the best possible treatment outcomes. Developing an improved x-ray imaging detector requires the determination of estimated clinical x-ray entrance exposures to the detector. The range of exposures to the detector in clinical studies was found for the three modes of operation: fluoroscopic mode, high frame-rate digital angiographic mode (HD fluoroscopic mode), and DSA mode. Using these estimated detector exposure ranges and available CMOS detector technical specifications, design requirements were developed to pursue a quantum limited, high resolution, dynamic x-ray detector based on a CMOS sensor with 50 μm pixel size. For the proposed MAF-CMOS, the estimated charge collected within the full exposure range was found to be within the estimated full well capacity of the pixels. Expected instrumentation noise for the proposed detector was estimated to be 50-1,300 electrons. Adding a gain stage such as a light image intensifier would minimize the effect of the estimated instrumentation noise on total image noise but may not be necessary to ensure quantum limited detector operation at low exposure levels. A recursive temporal filter may decrease the effective total noise by 2 to 3 times, allowing for the improved signal to noise ratios at the lowest estimated exposures despite consequent loss in temporal resolution. This work can serve as a guide for further development of dynamic x-ray imaging prototypes or improvements for existing dynamic x-ray imaging systems.

  6. Small Scale High Speed Turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    London, Adam P. (Inventor); Droppers, Lloyd J. (Inventor); Lehman, Matthew K. (Inventor); Mehra, Amitav (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A small scale, high speed turbomachine is described, as well as a process for manufacturing the turbomachine. The turbomachine is manufactured by diffusion bonding stacked sheets of metal foil, each of which has been pre-formed to correspond to a cross section of the turbomachine structure. The turbomachines include rotating elements as well as static structures. Using this process, turbomachines may be manufactured with rotating elements that have outer diameters of less than four inches in size, and/or blading heights of less than 0.1 inches. The rotating elements of the turbomachines are capable of rotating at speeds in excess of 150 feet per second. In addition, cooling features may be added internally to blading to facilitate cooling in high temperature operations.

  7. High-speed rotorcraft propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutherford, John W.; Fitzpatrick, Robert E.

    1991-01-01

    Recently completed high-speed rotorcraft design studies for NASA provide the basis to assess technology needs for the development of these aircraft. Preliminary analysis of several concepts possessing helicopter-like hover characteristics and cruise capabilities in the 450 knot regime, led to the selection of two concepts for further study. The concepts selected included the Rotor/Wing and the Tilt Wing. The two unique concepts use turbofan and turboshaft engines respectively. Designs, based on current technology for each, established a baseline configuration from which technology trade studies could be conducted. Propulsion technology goals from the IHPTET program established the advanced technolgy year. Due to high-speed requirements, each concept possesses its own unique propulsion challenges. Trade studies indicate that achieving th IHPTET Phase III goals significantly improves the effectiveness of both concepts. Increased engine efficiency is particularly important to VTOL aircraft by reducing gross weight.

  8. High Speed Photometry for BUSCA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordes, O.; Reif, K.

    The camera BUSCA (Bonn University Simultaneous CAmera) is a standard instrument at the 2.2m telescope at Calar Alto Observatory (Spain) since 2001. At the moment some modifications of BUSCA are planned and partially realised. One major goal is the replacement of the old thick CCDs in the blue, yellow-green, and near-infrared channels. The newer CCDs have better cosmetics and performance in sensitivity. The other goal is to replace the old "Heidelberg"-style controller with a newly designed controller with the main focus on high-speed readout and on an advanced windowing mechanism. We present a theoretical analysis of the new controller design and its advantage in high speed photometry of rapidly pulsating stars. As an example PG1605+072 was chosen which was observed with BUSCA before in 2001 and 2002.

  9. Experiments on high speed ejectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, J. J.

    1986-01-01

    Experimental studies were conducted to investigate the flow and the performance of thrust augmenting ejectors for flight Mach numbers in the range of 0.5 to 0.8, primary air stagnation pressures up to 107 psig (738 kPa), and primary air stagnation temperatures up to 1250 F (677 C). The experiment verified the existence of the second solution ejector flow, where the flow after complete mixing is supersonic. Thrust augmentation in excess of 1.2 was demonstrated for both hot and cold primary jets. The experimental ejector performed better than the corresponding theoretical optimal first solution ejector, where the mixed flow is subsonic. Further studies are required to realize the full potential of the second solution ejector. The research program was started by the Flight Dynamics Research Corporation (FDRC) to investigate the characteristic of a high speed ejector which augments thrust of a jet at high flight speeds.

  10. A CMOS floating point multiplier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uya, M.; Kaneko, K.; Yasui, J.

    1984-10-01

    This paper describes a 32-bit CMOS floating point multiplier. The chip can perform 32-bit floating point multiplication (based on the proposed IEEE Standard format) and 24-bit fixed point multiplication (two's complement format) in less than 78.7 and 71.1 ns, respectively, and the typical power dissipation is 195 mW at 10 million operations per second. High-speed multiplication techniques - a modified Booth's allgorithm, a carry save adder scheme, a high-speed CMOS full adder, and a modified carry select adder - are used to achieve the above high performance. The chip is designed for compatibility with 16-bit microcomputer systems, and is fabricated in 2 micron n-well CMOS technology; it contains about 23000 transistors of 5.75 x 5.67 sq mm in size.

  11. High-Speed TCP Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, David E.; Gassman, Holly; Beering, Dave R.; Welch, Arun; Hoder, Douglas J.; Ivancic, William D.

    1999-01-01

    Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) is the underlying protocol used within the Internet for reliable information transfer. As such, there is great interest to have all implementations of TCP efficiently interoperate. This is particularly important for links exhibiting long bandwidth-delay products. The tools exist to perform TCP analysis at low rates and low delays. However, for extremely high-rate and lone-delay links such as 622 Mbps over geosynchronous satellites, new tools and testing techniques are required. This paper describes the tools and techniques used to analyze and debug various TCP implementations over high-speed, long-delay links.

  12. Quiet High-Speed Fan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lieber, Lysbeth; Repp, Russ; Weir, Donald S.

    1996-01-01

    A calibration of the acoustic and aerodynamic prediction methods was performed and a baseline fan definition was established and evaluated to support the quiet high speed fan program. A computational fluid dynamic analysis of the NASA QF-12 Fan rotor, using the DAWES flow simulation program was performed to demonstrate and verify the causes of the relatively poor aerodynamic performance observed during the fan test. In addition, the rotor flowfield characteristics were qualitatively compared to the acoustic measurements to identify the key acoustic characteristics of the flow. The V072 turbofan source noise prediction code was used to generate noise predictions for the TFE731-60 fan at three operating conditions and compared to experimental data. V072 results were also used in the Acoustic Radiation Code to generate far field noise for the TFE731-60 nacelle at three speed points for the blade passage tone. A full 3-D viscous flow simulation of the current production TFE731-60 fan rotor was performed with the DAWES flow analysis program. The DAWES analysis was used to estimate the onset of multiple pure tone noise, based on predictions of inlet shock position as a function of the rotor tip speed. Finally, the TFE731-60 fan rotor wake structure predicted by the DAWES program was used to define a redesigned stator with the leading edge configured to minimize the acoustic effects of rotor wake / stator interaction, without appreciably degrading performance.

  13. High-speed phosphor thermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuhrmann, N.; Baum, E.; Brübach, J.; Dreizler, A.

    2011-10-01

    Phosphor thermometry is a semi-invasive surface temperature measurement technique utilising the luminescence properties of doped ceramic materials. Typically, these phosphor materials are coated onto the object of interest and are excited by a short UV laser pulse. Up to now, primarily Q-switched laser systems with repetition rates of 10 Hz were employed for excitation. Accordingly, this diagnostic tool was not applicable to resolve correlated temperature transients at time scales shorter than 100 ms. This contribution reports on the first realisation of a high-speed phosphor thermometry system employing a highly repetitive laser in the kHz regime and a fast decaying phosphor. A suitable material was characterised regarding its temperature lifetime characteristic and its measurement precision. Additionally, the influence of laser power on the phosphor coating was investigated in terms of heating effects. A demonstration of this high-speed technique has been conducted inside the thermally highly transient system of an optically accessible internal combustion engine. Temperatures have been measured with a repetition rate of 6 kHz corresponding to one sample per crank angle degree at 1000 rpm.

  14. High-speed phosphor thermometry.

    PubMed

    Fuhrmann, N; Baum, E; Brübach, J; Dreizler, A

    2011-10-01

    Phosphor thermometry is a semi-invasive surface temperature measurement technique utilising the luminescence properties of doped ceramic materials. Typically, these phosphor materials are coated onto the object of interest and are excited by a short UV laser pulse. Up to now, primarily Q-switched laser systems with repetition rates of 10 Hz were employed for excitation. Accordingly, this diagnostic tool was not applicable to resolve correlated temperature transients at time scales shorter than 100 ms. This contribution reports on the first realisation of a high-speed phosphor thermometry system employing a highly repetitive laser in the kHz regime and a fast decaying phosphor. A suitable material was characterised regarding its temperature lifetime characteristic and its measurement precision. Additionally, the influence of laser power on the phosphor coating was investigated in terms of heating effects. A demonstration of this high-speed technique has been conducted inside the thermally highly transient system of an optically accessible internal combustion engine. Temperatures have been measured with a repetition rate of 6 kHz corresponding to one sample per crank angle degree at 1000 rpm.

  15. Flexible high-speed CODEC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Segallis, Greg P.; Wernlund, Jim V.; Corry, Glen

    1993-01-01

    This report is prepared by Harris Government Communication Systems Division for NASA Lewis Research Center under contract NAS3-25087. It is written in accordance with SOW section 4.0 (d) as detailed in section 2.6. The purpose of this document is to provide a summary of the program, performance results and analysis, and a technical assessment. The purpose of this program was to develop a flexible, high-speed CODEC that provides substantial coding gain while maintaining bandwidth efficiency for use in both continuous and bursted data environments for a variety of applications.

  16. High speed holographic digital recorder.

    PubMed

    Roberts, H N; Watkins, J W; Johnson, R H

    1974-04-01

    Concepts, feasibility experiments, and key component developments are described for a holographic digital record/reproduce system with the potential for 1.0 Gbit/sec rates and higher. Record rates of 500 Mbits/sec have been demonstrated with a ten-channel acoustooptic modulator array and a mode-locked, cavity-dumped argon-ion laser. Acoustooptic device technology has been advanced notably during the development of mode lockers, cavity dumpers, beam deflectors, and multichannel modulator arrays. The development of high speed multichannel photodetector arrays for the readout subsystem requires special attention. The feasibility of 1.0 Gbits/sec record rates has been demonstrated.

  17. High speed quantitative digital microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castleman, K. R.; Price, K. H.; Eskenazi, R.; Ovadya, M. M.; Navon, M. A.

    1984-01-01

    Modern digital image processing hardware makes possible quantitative analysis of microscope images at high speed. This paper describes an application to automatic screening for cervical cancer. The system uses twelve MC6809 microprocessors arranged in a pipeline multiprocessor configuration. Each processor executes one part of the algorithm on each cell image as it passes through the pipeline. Each processor communicates with its upstream and downstream neighbors via shared two-port memory. Thus no time is devoted to input-output operations as such. This configuration is expected to be at least ten times faster than previous systems.

  18. A high speed sequential decoder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lum, H., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    The performance and theory of operation for the High Speed Hard Decision Sequential Decoder are delineated. The decoder is a forward error correction system which is capable of accepting data from binary-phase-shift-keyed and quadriphase-shift-keyed modems at input data rates up to 30 megabits per second. Test results show that the decoder is capable of maintaining a composite error rate of 0.00001 at an input E sub b/N sub o of 5.6 db. This performance has been obtained with minimum circuit complexity.

  19. Development of High Speed Digital Camera: EXILIM EX-F1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nojima, Osamu

    The EX-F1 is a high speed digital camera featuring a revolutionary improvement in burst shooting speed that is expected to create entirely new markets. This model incorporates a high speed CMOS sensor and a high speed LSI processor. With this model, CASIO has achieved an ultra-high speed 60 frames per second (fps) burst rate for still images, together with 1,200 fps high speed movie that captures movements which cannot even be seen by human eyes. Moreover, this model can record movies at full High-Definition. After launching it into the market, it was able to get a lot of high appraisals as an innovation camera. We will introduce the concept, features and technologies about the EX-F1.

  20. Remote Transmission at High Speed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Omni and NASA Test Operations at Stennis entered a Dual-Use Agreement to develop the FOTR-125, a 125 megabit-per-second fiber-optic transceiver that allows accurate digital recordings over a great distance. The transceiver s fiber-optic link can be as long as 25 kilometers. This makes it much longer than the standard coaxial link, which can be no longer than 50 meters.The FOTR-125 utilizes laser diode transmitter modules and integrated receivers for the optical interface. Two transmitters and two receivers are employed at each end of the link with automatic or manual switchover to maximize the reliability of the communications link. NASA uses the transceiver in Stennis High-Speed Data Acquisition System (HSDAS). The HSDAS consists of several identical systems installed on the Center s test stands to process all high-speed data related to its propulsion test programs. These transceivers allow the recorder and HSDAS controls to be located in the Test Control Center in a remote location while the digitizer is located on the test stand.

  1. High-speed data search

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Driscoll, James N.

    1994-01-01

    The high-speed data search system developed for KSC incorporates existing and emerging information retrieval technology to help a user intelligently and rapidly locate information found in large textual databases. This technology includes: natural language input; statistical ranking of retrieved information; an artificial intelligence concept called semantics, where 'surface level' knowledge found in text is used to improve the ranking of retrieved information; and relevance feedback, where user judgements about viewed information are used to automatically modify the search for further information. Semantics and relevance feedback are features of the system which are not available commercially. The system further demonstrates focus on paragraphs of information to decide relevance; and it can be used (without modification) to intelligently search all kinds of document collections, such as collections of legal documents medical documents, news stories, patents, and so forth. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the usefulness of statistical ranking, our semantic improvement, and relevance feedback.

  2. Flexible High Speed Codec (FHSC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Segallis, G. P.; Wernlund, J. V.

    1991-01-01

    The ongoing NASA/Harris Flexible High Speed Codec (FHSC) program is described. The program objectives are to design and build an encoder decoder that allows operation in either burst or continuous modes at data rates of up to 300 megabits per second. The decoder handles both hard and soft decision decoding and can switch between modes on a burst by burst basis. Bandspreading is low since the code rate is greater than or equal to 7/8. The encoder and a hard decision decoder fit on a single application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) chip. A soft decision applique is implemented using 300 K emitter coupled logic (ECL) which can be easily translated to an ECL gate array.

  3. CMOS compatible high-Q photonic crystal nanocavity fabricated with photolithography on silicon photonic platform.

    PubMed

    Ooka, Yuta; Tetsumoto, Tomohiro; Fushimi, Akihiro; Yoshiki, Wataru; Tanabe, Takasumi

    2015-06-18

    Progress on the fabrication of ultrahigh-Q photonic-crystal nanocavities (PhC-NCs) has revealed the prospect for new applications including silicon Raman lasers that require a strong confinement of light. Among various PhC-NCs, the highest Q has been recorded with silicon. On the other hand, microcavity is one of the basic building blocks in silicon photonics. However, the fusion between PhC-NCs and silicon photonics has yet to be exploited, since PhC-NCs are usually fabricated with electron-beam lithography and require an air-bridge structure. Here we show that a 2D-PhC-NC fabricated with deep-UV photolithography on a silica-clad silicon-on-insulator (SOI) structure will exhibit a high-Q of 2.2 × 10(5) with a mode-volume of ~ 1.7(λ/n)(3). This is the highest Q demonstrated with photolithography. We also show that this device exhibits an efficient thermal diffusion and enables high-speed switching. The demonstration of the photolithographic fabrication of high-Q silica-clad PhC-NCs will open possibility for mass-manufacturing and boost the fusion between silicon photonics and CMOS devices.

  4. Preliminary study of high-speed machining

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, R.E.

    1980-07-01

    The feasibility of a high speed machining process has been established for application to Bendix aluminum products, based upon information gained through visits to existing high speed machining facilities and by the completion of a representative Bendix part using this process. The need for an experimental high speed machining capability at Bendix for further process evaluation is established.

  5. High speed sampler and demultiplexer

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, T.E.

    1995-12-26

    A high speed sampling demultiplexer based on a plurality of sampler banks, each bank comprising a sample transmission line for transmitting an input signal, a strobe transmission line for transmitting a strobe signal, and a plurality of sampling gates at respective positions along the sample transmission line for sampling the input signal in response to the strobe signal. Strobe control circuitry is coupled to the plurality of banks, and supplies a sequence of bank strobe signals to the strobe transmission lines in each of the plurality of banks, and includes circuits for controlling the timing of the bank strobe signals among the banks of samplers. Input circuitry is included for supplying the input signal to be sampled to the plurality of sample transmission lines in the respective banks. The strobe control circuitry can repetitively strobe the plurality of banks of samplers such that the banks of samplers are cycled to create a long sample length. Second tier demultiplexing circuitry is coupled to each of the samplers in the plurality of banks. The second tier demultiplexing circuitry senses the sample taken by the corresponding sampler each time the bank in which the sampler is found is strobed. A plurality of such samples can be stored by the second tier demultiplexing circuitry for later processing. Repetitive sampling with the high speed transient sampler induces an effect known as ``strobe kickout``. The sample transmission lines include structures which reduce strobe kickout to acceptable levels, generally 60 dB below the signal, by absorbing the kickout pulses before the next sampling repetition. 16 figs.

  6. High speed sampler and demultiplexer

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, Thomas E.

    1995-01-01

    A high speed sampling demultiplexer based on a plurality of sampler banks, each bank comprising a sample transmission line for transmitting an input signal, a strobe transmission line for transmitting a strobe signal, and a plurality of sampling gates at respective positions along the sample transmission line for sampling the input signal in response to the strobe signal. Strobe control circuitry is coupled to the plurality of banks, and supplies a sequence of bank strobe signals to the strobe transmission lines in each of the plurality of banks, and includes circuits for controlling the timing of the bank strobe signals among the banks of samplers. Input circuitry is included for supplying the input signal to be sampled to the plurality of sample transmission lines in the respective banks. The strobe control circuitry can repetitively strobe the plurality of banks of samplers such that the banks of samplers are cycled to create a long sample length. Second tier demultiplexing circuitry is coupled to each of the samplers in the plurality of banks. The second tier demultiplexing circuitry senses the sample taken by the corresponding sampler each time the bank in which the sampler is found is strobed. A plurality of such samples can be stored by the second tier demultiplexing circuitry for later processing. Repetitive sampling with the high speed transient sampler induces an effect known as "strobe kickout". The sample transmission lines include structures which reduce strobe kickout to acceptable levels, generally 60 dB below the signal, by absorbing the kickout pulses before the next sampling repetition.

  7. High-Speed Schlieren Movies of Decelerators at Supersonic Speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1960-01-01

    High-Speed Schlieren Movies of Decelerators at Supersonic Speeds. Tests were conducted on several types of porous parachutes, a paraglider, and a simulated retrorocket. Mach numbers ranged from 1.8-3.0, porosity from 20-80 percent, and camera speeds from 1680-3000 feet per second (fps) in trials with porous parachutes. Trials of reefed parachutes were conducted at Mach number 2.0 and reefing of 12-33 percent at camera speeds of 600 fps. A flexible parachute with an inflatable ring in the periphery of the canopy was tested at Reynolds number 750,000 per foot, Mach number 2.85, porosity of 28 percent, and camera speed of 36oo fps. A vortex-ring parachute was tested at Mach number 2.2 and camera speed of 3000 fps. The paraglider, with a sweepback of 45 degrees at an angle of attack of 45 degrees was tested at Mach number 2.65, drag coefficient of 0.200, and lift coefficient of 0.278 at a camera speed of 600 fps. A cold air jet exhausting upstream from the center of a bluff body was used to simulate a retrorocket. The free-stream Mach number was 2.0, free-stream dynamic pressure was 620 lb/sq ft, jet-exit static pressure ratio was 10.9, and camera speed was 600 fps. [Entire movie available on DVD from CASI as Doc ID 20070030973. Contact help@sti.nasa.gov

  8. Results of the 2015 testbeam of a 180 nm AMS High-Voltage CMOS sensor prototype

    SciTech Connect

    Benoit, M.; de Mendizabal, J. Bilbao; Casse, G.; Chen, H.; Chen, K.; Bello, F. A. Di; Ferrere, D.; Golling, T.; Gonzalez-Sevilla, S.; Iacobucci, G.; Lanni, F.; Liu, H.; Meloni, F.; Meng, L.; Miucci, A.; Muenstermann, D.; Nessi, M.; Perić, I.; Rimoldi, M.; Ristic, B.; Pinto, M. Vicente Barrero; Vossebeld, J.; Weber, M.; Wu, W.; Xu, L.

    2016-07-21

    We investigated the active pixel sensors based on the High-Voltage CMOS technology as a viable option for the future pixel tracker of the ATLAS experiment at the High-Luminosity LHC. Our paper reports on the testbeam measurements performed at the H8 beamline of the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron on a High-Voltage CMOS sensor prototype produced in 180 nm AMS technology. These results in terms of tracking efficiency and timing performance, for different threshold and bias conditions, are shown.

  9. Highly Flexible Hybrid CMOS Inverter Based on Si Nanomembrane and Molybdenum Disulfide.

    PubMed

    Das, Tanmoy; Chen, Xiang; Jang, Houk; Oh, Il-Kwon; Kim, Hyungjun; Ahn, Jong-Hyun

    2016-11-01

    2D semiconductor materials are being considered for next generation electronic device application such as thin-film transistors and complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) circuit due to their unique structural and superior electronics properties. Various approaches have already been taken to fabricate 2D complementary logics circuits. However, those CMOS devices mostly demonstrated based on exfoliated 2D materials show the performance of a single device. In this work, the design and fabrication of a complementary inverter is experimentally reported, based on a chemical vapor deposition MoS2 n-type transistor and a Si nanomembrane p-type transistor on the same substrate. The advantages offered by such CMOS configuration allow to fabricate large area wafer scale integration of high performance Si technology with transition-metal dichalcogenide materials. The fabricated hetero-CMOS inverters which are composed of two isolated transistors exhibit a novel high performance air-stable voltage transfer characteristic with different supply voltages, with a maximum voltage gain of ≈16, and sub-nano watt power consumption. Moreover, the logic gates have been integrated on a plastic substrate and displayed reliable electrical properties paving a realistic path for the fabrication of flexible/transparent CMOS circuits in 2D electronics.

  10. Design of optoelectronic imaging system with high resolution and large field-of-view based on dual CMOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Hanglin; Hao, Qun; Hu, Yao; Cao, Jie; Wang, Shaopu; Li, Lin

    2016-10-01

    With the advantages of high resolution, large field of view and compacted size, optoelectronic imaging sensors are widely used in many fields, such as robot's navigation, industrial measurement and remote sensing. Many researchers pay more attention to improve the comprehensive performances of imaging sensors, including large field of view (FOV), high resolution, compact size and high imaging efficiency, etc. One challenge is the tradeoff between high resolution and large field of view simultaneously considering compacted size. In this paper, we propose an optoelectronic imaging system combining the lenses of short focal length and long focal length based on dual CMOS to simulate the characters of human eyes which observe object within large FOV in high resolution. We design and optimize the two lens, the lens of short focal length is used to search object in a wide field and the long one is responsible for high resolution imaging of the target area. Based on a micro-CMOS imaging sensor with low voltage differential transmission technology-MIPI (Mobile Industry Processor Interface), we design the corresponding circuits to realize collecting optical information with high speed. The advantage of the interface is to help decreasing power consumption, improving transmission efficiency and achieving compacted size of imaging sensor. Meanwhile, we carried out simulations and experiments to testify the optoelectronic imaging system. The results show that the proposed method is helpful to improve the comprehensive performances of optoelectronic imaging sensors.

  11. Use of CMOS imagers to measure high fluxes of charged particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Servoli, L.; Tucceri, P.

    2016-03-01

    The measurement of high flux charged particle beams, specifically at medical accelerators and with small fields, poses several challenges. In this work we propose a single particle counting method based on CMOS imagers optimized for visible light collection, exploiting their very high spatial segmentation (> 3 106 pixels/cm2) and almost full efficiency detection capability. An algorithm to measure the charged particle flux with a precision of ~ 1% for fluxes up to 40 MHz/cm2 has been developed, using a non-linear calibration algorithm, and several CMOS imagers with different characteristics have been compared to find their limits on flux measurement.

  12. High-stage analog accumulator for TDI CMOS image sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jianxin, Li; Fujun, Huang; Yong, Zong; Jing, Gao

    2016-02-01

    The impact of the parasitic phenomenon on the performance of the analog accumulator in TDI CMOS image sensor is analyzed and resolved. A 128-stage optimized accumulator based on 0.18-μm one-poly four-metal 3.3 V CMOS technology is designed and simulated. A charge injection effect from the top plate sampling is employed to compensate the un-eliminated parasitics based on the accumulator with a decoupling switch, and then a calibration circuit is designed to restrain the mismatch and Process, Voltage and Temperature (PVT) variations. The post layout simulation indicates that the improved SNR of the accumulator upgrades from 17.835 to 21.067 dB, while an ideal value is 21.072 dB. In addition, the linearity of the accumulator is 99.62%. The simulation results of two extreme cases and Monte Carlo show that the mismatch and PVT variations are restrained by the calibration circuit. Furthermore, it is promising to design a higher stage accumulator based on the proposed structure. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 61404090, 61434004).

  13. High speed imager test station

    DOEpatents

    Yates, G.J.; Albright, K.L.; Turko, B.T.

    1995-11-14

    A test station enables the performance of a solid state imager (herein called a focal plane array or FPA) to be determined at high image frame rates. A programmable waveform generator is adapted to generate clock pulses at determinable rates for clock light-induced charges from a FPA. The FPA is mounted on an imager header board for placing the imager in operable proximity to level shifters for receiving the clock pulses and outputting pulses effective to clock charge from the pixels forming the FPA. Each of the clock level shifters is driven by leading and trailing edge portions of the clock pulses to reduce power dissipation in the FPA. Analog circuits receive output charge pulses clocked from the FPA pixels. The analog circuits condition the charge pulses to cancel noise in the pulses and to determine and hold a peak value of the charge for digitizing. A high speed digitizer receives the peak signal value and outputs a digital representation of each one of the charge pulses. A video system then displays an image associated with the digital representation of the output charge pulses clocked from the FPA. In one embodiment, the FPA image is formatted to a standard video format for display on conventional video equipment. 12 figs.

  14. High speed imager test station

    DOEpatents

    Yates, George J.; Albright, Kevin L.; Turko, Bojan T.

    1995-01-01

    A test station enables the performance of a solid state imager (herein called a focal plane array or FPA) to be determined at high image frame rates. A programmable waveform generator is adapted to generate clock pulses at determinable rates for clock light-induced charges from a FPA. The FPA is mounted on an imager header board for placing the imager in operable proximity to level shifters for receiving the clock pulses and outputting pulses effective to clock charge from the pixels forming the FPA. Each of the clock level shifters is driven by leading and trailing edge portions of the clock pulses to reduce power dissipation in the FPA. Analog circuits receive output charge pulses clocked from the FPA pixels. The analog circuits condition the charge pulses to cancel noise in the pulses and to determine and hold a peak value of the charge for digitizing. A high speed digitizer receives the peak signal value and outputs a digital representation of each one of the charge pulses. A video system then displays an image associated with the digital representation of the output charge pulses clocked from the FPA. In one embodiment, the FPA image is formatted to a standard video format for display on conventional video equipment.

  15. Hypereutectoid high-speed steels

    SciTech Connect

    Kremnev, L.S.

    1986-01-01

    Half of the tungsten and molybdenum contained in R6M5 and R18 steels is concentrated in the undissolved eutectic carbides hindering austenitic grain gowth in hardening and providing the necessary strength and impact strength. This article describes the tungsten-free low-alloy high-speed steel 11M5F with a chemical composition of 1.03-1.10% C, 5.2-5.7% Mo, 3.8-4.2% Cr, 1.3-1.7% V, 0.3-0.6% Si, and 0.3% Ce. The properties of 11M5F and R6M5 steels are examined and compared. The results of production and laboratory tests of the cutting properties of tools of the steels developed showed their high effectiveness, especially of 11M5F steel with 1% A1. The life of tools of the tungsten-free steels is two or three times greater than the life of tools of R6M5 steel.

  16. High speed holographic cine-recorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, Donald; Watts, David; Gordon, Joseph; Lysogorski, Charles; Powers, Aaron; Perry, John; Chenette, Eugene; Hudson, Roger; Young, Raymond

    2005-08-01

    Air Force Research Laboratory and North Dancer Labs researchers have completed the initial development and transition to operational use of a high-speed holographic movie system. This paper documents the first fully operational use of a novel and unique experimental capability for high-speed holographic movies and high-speed cinema interferometry. In this paper we document the initial experiments that were performed with the High Speed Holographic Recorder (HSHR) at the Munitions Directorate, Air Force Research Laboratory Site at Eglin, AFB, Florida. These experiments were performed to assess the possibilities for high-speed cine-laser holography combined with high-speed videography to document the formation and propagation of plumes of materials created by impact of high-speed projectiles. This paper details the development of the experimental procedures and initial results of this new tool. After successful integration and testing the system was delivered to Arnold Engineering Development Center.

  17. Butterflies' wings deformations using high speed digital holographic interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza Santoyo, Fernando; Aguayo, Daniel D.; de La Torre-Ibarra, Manuel H.; Salas-Araiza, Manuel D.

    2011-08-01

    A variety of efforts in different scientific disciplines have tried to mimic the insect's in-flight complex system. The gained knowledge has been applied to improve the performance of different flying artifacts. In this research report it is presented a displacement measurement on butterflies' wings using the optical noninvasive Digital Holographic Interferometry technique with out of plane sensitivity, using a high power cw laser and a high speed CMOS camera to record the unrepeatable displacement movements on these organic tissues. A series of digital holographic interferograms were recorded and the experimental results for several butterflies during flapping events. The relative unwrapped phase maps micro-displacements over the whole wing surface are shown in a wire-mesh representation. The difference between flying modes is remarkably depicted among them.

  18. Advanced MOSFET technologies for high-speed circuits and EPROM

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, A.T.T.

    1987-01-01

    In the first part of the thesis, two novel source-side injection EPROM (SI-EPROM) devices capable of 5-volt only, high-speed programming are studied. Both devices are asymmetrical n-channel stacked-gate MOSFETs, each with a short weak gate-control channel region introduced close to the source. Under high gate bias, a strong-channel electric field for hot-electron generation is created in this local region even at a relatively low drain voltage. Furthermore, the gate oxide field in this region is highly favorable for hot-electron injection into the floating-gate. As a results, a programming speed of 10..mu..s at a drain voltage of 5 volts was demonstrated with one of the SI-EPROM devices fabricated. In the second part of the thesis, technology design considerations accompanying MOSFET scaling are studied for high-speed analog circuits and densely packed digital circuits. It is shown that for sub-micron technologies, especially those for CMOS, the drain/source junction capacitances dominate device parasitic capacitances in digital applications. A novel MOS device structure that employs the COO and DOO schemes is described.

  19. High Precision Bright-Star Astrometry with the USNO Astrometric CMOS Hybrid Camera System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Secrest, Nathan; Dudik, Rachel; Berghea, Ciprian T.; Hennessy, Greg; Dorland, Bryan

    2015-05-01

    While GAIA will provide excellent positional measurements of hundreds of millions of stars between 5 < mag < 20, an ongoing challenge in the field of high-precision differential astrometry is the positional accuracy of very bright stars (mag < 5), due to the enormous dynamic range between bright stars of interest, such as those in the Hipparcos catalog, and their background field stars, which are especially important for differential astrometry. Over the past few years, we have been testing the USNO Astrometric CMOS Hybrid Camera System (UAHC), which utilizes an H4RG-10 detector in windowing mode, as a possible solution to the NOFS USNO Bright Star Astrometric Database (UBAD). In this work, we discuss the results of an astrometric analysis of single-epoch Hipparcos data taken with the UAHC from the 1.55m Kaj Strand Astrometric Reflector at NOFS from June 27-30, 2014. We discuss the calibration of this data, as well as an astrometric analysis pipeline we developed that will enable multi-epoch differential and absolute astrometry with the UAHC. We find that while the overall differential astrometric stability of data taken with the UAHC is good (5-10 mas single-measurement precision) and comparable to other ground-based astrometric camera systems, bright stars in the detector window suffer from several systematic effects, such as insufficient window geometry and centroiding failures due to read-out artifacts - both of which can be significantly improved with modifications to the electronics, read-out speed and microcode.

  20. High-speed pressure clamp.

    PubMed

    Besch, Stephen R; Suchyna, Thomas; Sachs, Frederick

    2002-10-01

    We built a high-speed, pneumatic pressure clamp to stimulate patch-clamped membranes mechanically. The key control element is a newly designed differential valve that uses a single, nickel-plated piezoelectric bending element to control both pressure and vacuum. To minimize response time, the valve body was designed with minimum dead volume. The result is improved response time and stability with a threefold decrease in actuation latency. Tight valve clearances minimize the steady-state air flow, permitting us to use small resonant-piston pumps to supply pressure and vacuum. To protect the valve from water contamination in the event of a broken pipette, an optical sensor detects water entering the valve and increases pressure rapidly to clear the system. The open-loop time constant for pressure is 2.5 ms for a 100-mmHg step, and the closed-loop settling time is 500-600 micros. Valve actuation latency is 120 micros. The system performance is illustrated for mechanically induced changes in patch capacitance.

  1. High speed all optical networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chlamtac, Imrich; Ganz, Aura

    1990-01-01

    An inherent problem of conventional point-to-point wide area network (WAN) architectures is that they cannot translate optical transmission bandwidth into comparable user available throughput due to the limiting electronic processing speed of the switching nodes. The first solution to wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) based WAN networks that overcomes this limitation is presented. The proposed Lightnet architecture takes into account the idiosyncrasies of WDM switching/transmission leading to an efficient and pragmatic solution. The Lightnet architecture trades the ample WDM bandwidth for a reduction in the number of processing stages and a simplification of each switching stage, leading to drastically increased effective network throughputs. The principle of the Lightnet architecture is the construction and use of virtual topology networks, embedded in the original network in the wavelength domain. For this construction Lightnets utilize the new concept of lightpaths which constitute the links of the virtual topology. Lightpaths are all-optical, multihop, paths in the network that allow data to be switched through intermediate nodes using high throughput passive optical switches. The use of the virtual topologies and the associated switching design introduce a number of new ideas, which are discussed in detail.

  2. Experimental high-speed network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNeill, Kevin M.; Klein, William P.; Vercillo, Richard; Alsafadi, Yasser H.; Parra, Miguel V.; Dallas, William J.

    1993-09-01

    Many existing local area networking protocols currently applied in medical imaging were originally designed for relatively low-speed, low-volume networking. These protocols utilize small packet sizes appropriate for text based communication. Local area networks of this type typically provide raw bandwidth under 125 MHz. These older network technologies are not optimized for the low delay, high data traffic environment of a totally digital radiology department. Some current implementations use point-to-point links when greater bandwidth is required. However, the use of point-to-point communications for a total digital radiology department network presents many disadvantages. This paper describes work on an experimental multi-access local area network called XFT. The work includes the protocol specification, and the design and implementation of network interface hardware and software. The protocol specifies the Physical and Data Link layers (OSI layers 1 & 2) for a fiber-optic based token ring providing a raw bandwidth of 500 MHz. The protocol design and implementation of the XFT interface hardware includes many features to optimize image transfer and provide flexibility for additional future enhancements which include: a modular hardware design supporting easy portability to a variety of host system buses, a versatile message buffer design providing 16 MB of memory, and the capability to extend the raw bandwidth of the network to 3.0 GHz.

  3. 8-Foot High Speed Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1936-01-01

    Control panel below the test section of the 8-Foot High Speed Tunnel (8-Foot HST). Authorized July 17, 1933, construction of the 8-Foot HST was paid for with funds from the Federal Public Works Administration. Manly Hood and Russell Robinson designed the unusual facility which could produce a 500 mph wind stream across an 8-Foot test section. The concrete shell was not part of the original design. Like most projects funded through New Deal programs, the PWA restricted the amount of money which could be spent on materials. The majority of funds were supposed to be expended on labor. Though originally, Hood and Robinson had planned a welded steel pressure vessel around the test section, PWA officials proposed the idea of concrete. This picture shows the test section inside the igloo-like structure with walls of 1-foot thick reinforced concrete. The thick walls were needed 'because of the Bernoulli effect, [which meant that] the text chamber had to withstand powerful, inwardly directed pressure. Operating personnel located inside the igloo were subjected to pressures equivalent to 10,000-foot altitude and had to wear oxygen masks and enter through airlocks. A heat exchanger removed the large quantities of heat generated by the big fan.'

  4. A very high speed lossless compression/decompression chip set

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venbrux, Jack; Liu, Norley; Liu, Kathy; Vincent, Peter; Merrell, Randy

    1991-01-01

    A chip is described that will perform lossless compression and decompression using the Rice Algorithm. The chip set is designed to compress and decompress source data in real time for many applications. The encoder is designed to code at 20 M samples/second at MIL specifications. That corresponds to 280 Mbits/second at maximum quantization or approximately 500 Mbits/second under nominal conditions. The decoder is designed to decode at 10 M samples/second at industrial specifications. A wide range of quantization levels is allowed (4...14 bits) and both nearest neighbor prediction and external prediction are supported. When the pre and post processors are bypassed, the chip set performs high speed entropy coding and decoding. This frees the chip set from being tied to one modeling technique or specific application. Both the encoder and decoder are being fabricated in a 1.0 micron CMOS process that has been tested to survive 1 megarad of total radiation dosage. The CMOS chips are small, only 5 mm on a side, and both are estimated to consume less than 1/4 of a Watt of power while operating at maximum frequency.

  5. High-speed Wind Tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackeret, J

    1936-01-01

    Wind tunnel construction and design is discussed especially in relation to subsonic and supersonic speeds. Reynolds Numbers and the theory of compressible flows are also taken into consideration in designing new tunnels.

  6. CMOS capacitive biosensors for highly sensitive biosensing applications.

    PubMed

    Chang, An-Yu; Lu, Michael S-C

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic microbeads are widely used in biotechnology and biomedical research for manipulation and detection of cells and biomolecules. Most lab-on-chip systems capable of performing manipulation and detection require external instruments to perform one of the functions, leading to increased size and cost. This work aims at developing an integrated platform to perform these two functions by implementing electromagnetic microcoils and capacitive biosensors on a CMOS (complementary metal oxide semiconductor) chip. Compared to most magnetic-type sensors, our detection method requires no externally applied magnetic fields and the associated fabrication is less complicated. In our experiment, microbeads coated with streptavidin were driven to the sensors located in the center of microcoils with functionalized anti-streptavidin antibody. Detection of a single microbead was successfully demonstrated using a capacitance-to-frequency readout. The average capacitance changes for the experimental and control groups were -5.3 fF and -0.2 fF, respectively.

  7. High-speed detection of DNA translocation in nanopipettes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraccari, Raquel L.; Ciccarella, Pietro; Bahrami, Azadeh; Carminati, Marco; Ferrari, Giorgio; Albrecht, Tim

    2016-03-01

    We present a high-speed electrical detection scheme based on a custom-designed CMOS amplifier which allows the analysis of DNA translocation in glass nanopipettes on a microsecond timescale. Translocation of different DNA lengths in KCl electrolyte provides a scaling factor of the DNA translocation time equal to p = 1.22, which is different from values observed previously with nanopipettes in LiCl electrolyte or with nanopores. Based on a theoretical model involving electrophoresis, hydrodynamics and surface friction, we show that the experimentally observed range of p-values may be the result of, or at least be affected by DNA adsorption and friction between the DNA and the substrate surface.We present a high-speed electrical detection scheme based on a custom-designed CMOS amplifier which allows the analysis of DNA translocation in glass nanopipettes on a microsecond timescale. Translocation of different DNA lengths in KCl electrolyte provides a scaling factor of the DNA translocation time equal to p = 1.22, which is different from values observed previously with nanopipettes in LiCl electrolyte or with nanopores. Based on a theoretical model involving electrophoresis, hydrodynamics and surface friction, we show that the experimentally observed range of p-values may be the result of, or at least be affected by DNA adsorption and friction between the DNA and the substrate surface. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Gel electrophoresis confirming lengths and purity of DNA samples, comparison between Axopatch 200B and custom-built setup, comprehensive low-noise amplifier characterization, representative I-V curves of nanopipettes used, typical scatter plots of τ vs. peak amplitude for the four LDNA's used, table of most probable τ values, a comparison between different fitting models for the DNA translocation time distribution, further details on the stochastic numerical simulation of the scaling statistics and the derivation of the extended

  8. High speed imaging - An important industrial tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Alton; Pinelli, Thomas E.

    1986-01-01

    High-speed photography, which is a rapid sequence of photographs that allow an event to be analyzed through the stoppage of motion or the production of slow-motion effects, is examined. In high-speed photography 16, 35, and 70 mm film and framing rates between 64-12,000 frames per second are utilized to measure such factors as angles, velocities, failure points, and deflections. The use of dual timing lamps in high-speed photography and the difficulties encountered with exposure and programming the camera and event are discussed. The application of video cameras to the recording of high-speed events is described.

  9. A high frequency active voltage doubler in standard CMOS using offset-controlled comparators for inductive power transmission.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyung-Min; Ghovanloo, Maysam

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, we present a fully integrated active voltage doubler in CMOS technology using offset-controlled high speed comparators for extending the range of inductive power transmission to implantable microelectronic devices (IMD) and radio-frequency identification (RFID) tags. This active voltage doubler provides considerably higher power conversion efficiency (PCE) and lower dropout voltage compared to its passive counterpart and requires lower input voltage than active rectifiers, leading to reliable and efficient operation with weakly coupled inductive links. The offset-controlled functions in the comparators compensate for turn-on and turn-off delays to not only maximize the forward charging current to the load but also minimize the back current, optimizing PCE in the high frequency (HF) band. We fabricated the active voltage doubler in a 0.5-μm 3M2P std . CMOS process, occupying 0.144 mm(2) of chip area. With 1.46 V peak AC input at 13.56 MHz, the active voltage doubler provides 2.4 V DC output across a 1 kΩ load, achieving the highest PCE = 79% ever reported at this frequency. In addition, the built-in start-up circuit ensures a reliable operation at lower voltages.

  10. Development of a 55 μm pitch 8 inch CMOS image sensor for the high resolution NDT application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, M. S.; Kim, G.; Cho, G.; Kim, D.

    2016-11-01

    A CMOS image sensor (CIS) with a large area for the high resolution X-ray imaging was designed. The sensor has an active area of 125 × 125 mm2 comprised with 2304 × 2304 pixels and a pixel size of 55 × 55 μm2. First batch samples were fabricated by using an 8 inch silicon CMOS image sensor process with a stitching method. In order to evaluate the performance of the first batch samples, the electro-optical test and the X-ray test after coupling with an image intensifier screen were performed. The primary results showed that the performance of the manufactured sensors was limited by a large stray capacitance from the long path length between the analog multiplexer on the chip and the bank ADC on the data acquisition board. The measured speed and dynamic range were limited up to 12 frame per sec and 55 dB respectively, but other parameters such as the MTF, NNPS and DQE showed a good result as designed. Based on this study, the new X-ray CIS with ~ 50 μm pitch and ~ 150 cm2 active area are going to be designed for the high resolution X-ray NDT equipment for semiconductor and PCB inspections etc.

  11. A High Frequency Active Voltage Doubler in Standard CMOS Using Offset-Controlled Comparators for Inductive Power Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyung-Min; Ghovanloo, Maysam

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we present a fully integrated active voltage doubler in CMOS technology using offset-controlled high speed comparators for extending the range of inductive power transmission to implantable microelectronic devices (IMD) and radio-frequency identification (RFID) tags. This active voltage doubler provides considerably higher power conversion efficiency (PCE) and lower dropout voltage compared to its passive counterpart and requires lower input voltage than active rectifiers, leading to reliable and efficient operation with weakly coupled inductive links. The offset-controlled functions in the comparators compensate for turn-on and turn-off delays to not only maximize the forward charging current to the load but also minimize the back current, optimizing PCE in the high frequency (HF) band. We fabricated the active voltage doubler in a 0.5-μm 3M2P std. CMOS process, occupying 0.144 mm2 of chip area. With 1.46 V peak AC input at 13.56 MHz, the active voltage doubler provides 2.4 V DC output across a 1 kΩ load, achieving the highest PCE = 79% ever reported at this frequency. In addition, the built-in start-up circuit ensures a reliable operation at lower voltages. PMID:23853321

  12. Frontend Receiver Electronics for High Frequency Monolithic CMUT-on-CMOS Imaging Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Gurun, Gokce; Hasler, Paul; Degertekin, F. Levent

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the design of CMOS receiver electronics for monolithic integration with capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer (CMUT) arrays for high-frequency intravascular ultrasound imaging. A custom 8-inch wafer is fabricated in a 0.35 μm two-poly, four-metal CMOS process and then CMUT arrays are built on top of the application specific integrated circuits (ASICs) on the wafer. We discuss advantages of the single-chip CMUT-on-CMOS approach in terms of receive sensitivity and SNR. Low-noise and high-gain design of a transimpedance amplifier (TIA) optimized for a forward-looking volumetric-imaging CMUT array element is discussed as a challenging design example. Amplifier gain, bandwidth, dynamic range and power consumption trade-offs are discussed in detail. With minimized parasitics provided by the CMUT-on-CMOS approach, the optimized TIA design achieves a 90 fA/√Hz input referred current noise, which is less than the thermal-mechanical noise of the CMUT element. We show successful system operation with a pulse-echo measurement. Transducer noise-dominated detection in immersion is also demonstrated through output noise spectrum measurement of the integrated system at different CMUT bias voltages. A noise figure of 1.8 dB is obtained in the designed CMUT bandwidth of 10 MHz to 20 MHz. PMID:21859585

  13. A review on high-resolution CMOS delay lines: towards sub-picosecond jitter performance.

    PubMed

    Abdulrazzaq, Bilal I; Abdul Halin, Izhal; Kawahito, Shoji; Sidek, Roslina M; Shafie, Suhaidi; Yunus, Nurul Amziah Md

    2016-01-01

    A review on CMOS delay lines with a focus on the most frequently used techniques for high-resolution delay step is presented. The primary types, specifications, delay circuits, and operating principles are presented. The delay circuits reported in this paper are used for delaying digital inputs and clock signals. The most common analog and digitally-controlled delay elements topologies are presented, focusing on the main delay-tuning strategies. IC variables, namely, process, supply voltage, temperature, and noise sources that affect delay resolution through timing jitter are discussed. The design specifications of these delay elements are also discussed and compared for the common delay line circuits. As a result, the main findings of this paper are highlighting and discussing the followings: the most efficient high-resolution delay line techniques, the trade-off challenge found between CMOS delay lines designed using either analog or digitally-controlled delay elements, the trade-off challenge between delay resolution and delay range and the proposed solutions for this challenge, and how CMOS technology scaling can affect the performance of CMOS delay lines. Moreover, the current trends and efforts used in order to generate output delayed signal with low jitter in the sub-picosecond range are presented.

  14. High-Speed Ring Bus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wysocky, Terry; Kopf, Edward, Jr.; Katanyoutananti, Sunant; Steiner, Carl; Balian, Harry

    2010-01-01

    The high-speed ring bus at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) allows for future growth trends in spacecraft seen with future scientific missions. This innovation constitutes an enhancement of the 1393 bus as documented in the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) 1393-1999 standard for a spaceborne fiber-optic data bus. It allows for high-bandwidth and time synchronization of all nodes on the ring. The JPL ring bus allows for interconnection of active units with autonomous operation and increased fault handling at high bandwidths. It minimizes the flight software interface with an intelligent physical layer design that has few states to manage as well as simplified testability. The design will soon be documented in the AS-1393 standard (Serial Hi-Rel Ring Network for Aerospace Applications). The framework is designed for "Class A" spacecraft operation and provides redundant data paths. It is based on "fault containment regions" and "redundant functional regions (RFR)" and has a method for allocating cables that completely supports the redundancy in spacecraft design, allowing for a complete RFR to fail. This design reduces the mass of the bus by incorporating both the Control Unit and the Data Unit in the same hardware. The standard uses ATM (asynchronous transfer mode) packets, standardized by ITU-T, ANSI, ETSI, and the ATM Forum. The IEEE-1393 standard uses the UNI form of the packet and provides no protection for the data portion of the cell. The JPL design adds optional formatting to this data portion. This design extends fault protection beyond that of the interconnect. This includes adding protection to the data portion that is contained within the Bus Interface Units (BIUs) and by adding to the signal interface between the Data Host and the JPL 1393 Ring Bus. Data transfer on the ring bus does not involve a master or initiator. Following bus protocol, any BIU may transmit data on the ring whenever it has data received from its host. There

  15. Design and Fabrication of High-Efficiency CMOS/CCD Imagers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pain, Bedabrata

    2007-01-01

    An architecture for back-illuminated complementary metal oxide/semiconductor (CMOS) and charge-coupled-device (CCD) ultraviolet/visible/near infrared- light image sensors, and a method of fabrication to implement the architecture, are undergoing development. The architecture and method are expected to enable realization of the full potential of back-illuminated CMOS/CCD imagers to perform with high efficiency, high sensitivity, excellent angular response, and in-pixel signal processing. The architecture and method are compatible with next-generation CMOS dielectric-forming and metallization techniques, and the process flow of the method is compatible with process flows typical of the manufacture of very-large-scale integrated (VLSI) circuits. The architecture and method overcome all obstacles that have hitherto prevented high-yield, low-cost fabrication of back-illuminated CMOS/CCD imagers by use of standard VLSI fabrication tools and techniques. It is not possible to discuss the obstacles in detail within the space available for this article. Briefly, the obstacles are posed by the problems of generating light-absorbing layers having desired uniform and accurate thicknesses, passivation of surfaces, forming structures for efficient collection of charge carriers, and wafer-scale thinning (in contradistinction to diescale thinning). A basic element of the present architecture and method - the element that, more than any other, makes it possible to overcome the obstacles - is the use of an alternative starting material: Instead of starting with a conventional bulk-CMOS wafer that consists of a p-doped epitaxial silicon layer grown on a heavily-p-doped silicon substrate, one starts with a special silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafer that consists of a thermal oxide buried between a lightly p- or n-doped, thick silicon layer and a device silicon layer of appropriate thickness and doping. The thick silicon layer is used as a handle: that is, as a mechanical support for the

  16. Design methodology and application of high speed gate arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decker, R.

    A system to provide real-time signal averaging of waveforms from a 50 MHz analog to digital converter has been fabricated to operate over a wide temperature range. This system evolved from conception, through an initial simulated design for emitter coupled logic (ECL), to a pair of CMOS gate array designs. Changing the implementation technology to CMOS gate arrays resulted in savings in cost, size, weight, and power. Design rules employed to obtain working silicon on the first cycle, at double state-of-the-art gate array speeds, are discussed. Also discussed are built-in, run-time, self-test features.

  17. Front-end receiver electronics for high-frequency monolithic CMUT-on-CMOS imaging arrays.

    PubMed

    Gurun, Gokce; Hasler, Paul; Degertekin, F

    2011-08-01

    This paper describes the design of CMOS receiver electronics for monolithic integration with capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer (CMUT) arrays for highfrequency intravascular ultrasound imaging. A custom 8-inch (20-cm) wafer is fabricated in a 0.35-μm two-poly, four-metal CMOS process and then CMUT arrays are built on top of the application specific integrated circuits (ASICs) on the wafer. We discuss advantages of the single-chip CMUT-on-CMOS approach in terms of receive sensitivity and SNR. Low-noise and high-gain design of a transimpedance amplifier (TIA) optimized for a forward-looking volumetric-imaging CMUT array element is discussed as a challenging design example. Amplifier gain, bandwidth, dynamic range, and power consumption trade-offs are discussed in detail. With minimized parasitics provided by the CMUT-on-CMOS approach, the optimized TIA design achieves a 90 fA/√Hz input-referred current noise, which is less than the thermal-mechanical noise of the CMUT element. We show successful system operation with a pulseecho measurement. Transducer-noise-dominated detection in immersion is also demonstrated through output noise spectrum measurement of the integrated system at different CMUT bias voltages. A noise figure of 1.8 dB is obtained in the designed CMUT bandwidth of 10 to 20 MHz.

  18. Reducing Heating In High-Speed Cinematography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, Howard A.

    1989-01-01

    Infrared-absorbing and infrared-reflecting glass filters simple and effective means for reducing rise in temperature during high-speed motion-picture photography. "Hot-mirror" and "cold-mirror" configurations, employed in projection of images, helps prevent excessive heating of scenes by powerful lamps used in high-speed photography.

  19. High Speed Video for Airborne Instrumentation Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tseng, Ting; Reaves, Matthew; Mauldin, Kendall

    2006-01-01

    A flight-worthy high speed color video system has been developed. Extensive system development and ground and environmental. testing hes yielded a flight qualified High Speed Video System (HSVS), This HSVS was initially used on the F-15B #836 for the Lifting Insulating Foam Trajectory (LIFT) project.

  20. High-Speed Photography with Computer Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winters, Loren M.

    1991-01-01

    Describes the use of a microcomputer as an intervalometer for the control and timing of several flash units to photograph high-speed events. Applies this technology to study the oscillations of a stretched rubber band, the deceleration of high-speed projectiles in water, the splashes of milk drops, and the bursts of popcorn kernels. (MDH)

  1. Lightweight, high speed bearing balls: A concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, R. J.

    1974-01-01

    Low mass bearing balls with hardened iron-plated surfaces can eliminate problems of low fatigue strength and flexure fatigue, and lead to increased life and reliability of high speed ball bearings. Low mass balls exert lower centrifugal forces on outer race of bearing thus eliminating detrimental effect of high speed operation.

  2. High speed flow past wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norstrud, H.

    1973-01-01

    The analytical solution to the transonic small perturbation equation which describes steady compressible flow past finite wings at subsonic speeds can be expressed as a nonlinear integral equation with the perturbation velocity potential as the unknown function. This known formulation is substituted by a system of nonlinear algebraic equations to which various methods are applicable for its solution. Due to the presence of mathematical discontinuities in the flow solutions, however, a main computational difficulty was to ensure uniqueness of the solutions when local velocities on the wing exceeded the speed of sound. For continuous solutions this was achieved by embedding the algebraic system in an one-parameter operator homotopy in order to apply the method of parametric differentiation. The solution to the initial system of equations appears then as a solution to a Cauchy problem where the initial condition is related to the accompanying incompressible flow solution. In using this technique, however, a continuous dependence of the solution development on the initial data is lost when the solution reaches the minimum bifurcation point. A steepest descent iteration technique was therefore, added to the computational scheme for the calculation of discontinuous flow solutions. Results for purely subsonic flows and supersonic flows with and without compression shocks are given and compared with other available theoretical solutions.

  3. Region-of-interest cone beam computed tomography (ROI CBCT) with a high resolution CMOS detector

    PubMed Central

    Jain, A; Takemoto, H; Silver, M D; Nagesh, S V S; Ionita, C N; Bednarek, D R; Rudin, S

    2015-01-01

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) systems with rotational gantries that have standard flat panel detectors (FPD) are widely used for the 3D rendering of vascular structures using Feldkamp cone beam reconstruction algorithms. One of the inherent limitations of these systems is limited resolution (<3 lp/mm). There are systems available with higher resolution but their small FOV limits them to small animal imaging only. In this work, we report on region-of-interest (ROI) CBCT with a high resolution CMOS detector (75 μm pixels, 600 μm HR-CsI) mounted with motorized detector changer on a commercial FPD-based C-arm angiography gantry (194 μm pixels, 600 μm HL-CsI). A cylindrical CT phantom and neuro stents were imaged with both detectors. For each detector a total of 209 images were acquired in a rotational protocol. The technique parameters chosen for the FPD by the imaging system were used for the CMOS detector. The anti-scatter grid was removed and the incident scatter was kept the same for both detectors with identical collimator settings. The FPD images were reconstructed for the 10 cm x10 cm FOV and the CMOS images were reconstructed for a 3.84 cm × 3.84 cm FOV. Although the reconstructed images from the CMOS detector demonstrated comparable contrast to the FPD images, the reconstructed 3D images of the neuro stent clearly showed that the CMOS detector improved delineation of smaller objects such as the stent struts (~70 μm) compared to the FPD. Further development and the potential for substantial clinical impact are suggested. PMID:26877577

  4. Region-of-interest cone beam computed tomography (ROI CBCT) with a high resolution CMOS detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, A.; Takemoto, H.; Silver, M. D.; Nagesh, S. V. S.; Ionita, C. N.; Bednarek, D. R.; Rudin, S.

    2015-03-01

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) systems with rotational gantries that have standard flat panel detectors (FPD) are widely used for the 3D rendering of vascular structures using Feldkamp cone beam reconstruction algorithms. One of the inherent limitations of these systems is limited resolution (<3 lp/mm). There are systems available with higher resolution but their small FOV limits them to small animal imaging only. In this work, we report on region-of-interest (ROI) CBCT with a high resolution CMOS detector (75 μm pixels, 600 μm HR-CsI) mounted with motorized detector changer on a commercial FPD-based C-arm angiography gantry (194 μm pixels, 600 μm HL-CsI). A cylindrical CT phantom and neuro stents were imaged with both detectors. For each detector a total of 209 images were acquired in a rotational protocol. The technique parameters chosen for the FPD by the imaging system were used for the CMOS detector. The anti-scatter grid was removed and the incident scatter was kept the same for both detectors with identical collimator settings. The FPD images were reconstructed for the 10 cm x10 cm FOV and the CMOS images were reconstructed for a 3.84 cm x 3.84 cm FOV. Although the reconstructed images from the CMOS detector demonstrated comparable contrast to the FPD images, the reconstructed 3D images of the neuro stent clearly showed that the CMOS detector improved delineation of smaller objects such as the stent struts (~70 μm) compared to the FPD. Further development and the potential for substantial clinical impact are suggested.

  5. Region-of-interest cone beam computed tomography (ROI CBCT) with a high resolution CMOS detector.

    PubMed

    Jain, A; Takemoto, H; Silver, M D; Nagesh, S V S; Ionita, C N; Bednarek, D R; Rudin, S

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) systems with rotational gantries that have standard flat panel detectors (FPD) are widely used for the 3D rendering of vascular structures using Feldkamp cone beam reconstruction algorithms. One of the inherent limitations of these systems is limited resolution (<3 lp/mm). There are systems available with higher resolution but their small FOV limits them to small animal imaging only. In this work, we report on region-of-interest (ROI) CBCT with a high resolution CMOS detector (75 μm pixels, 600 μm HR-CsI) mounted with motorized detector changer on a commercial FPD-based C-arm angiography gantry (194 μm pixels, 600 μm HL-CsI). A cylindrical CT phantom and neuro stents were imaged with both detectors. For each detector a total of 209 images were acquired in a rotational protocol. The technique parameters chosen for the FPD by the imaging system were used for the CMOS detector. The anti-scatter grid was removed and the incident scatter was kept the same for both detectors with identical collimator settings. The FPD images were reconstructed for the 10 cm x10 cm FOV and the CMOS images were reconstructed for a 3.84 cm × 3.84 cm FOV. Although the reconstructed images from the CMOS detector demonstrated comparable contrast to the FPD images, the reconstructed 3D images of the neuro stent clearly showed that the CMOS detector improved delineation of smaller objects such as the stent struts (~70 μm) compared to the FPD. Further development and the potential for substantial clinical impact are suggested.

  6. A Highly Sensitive CMOS Digital Hall Sensor for Low Magnetic Field Applications

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yue; Pan, Hong-Bin; He, Shu-Zhuan; Li, Li

    2012-01-01

    Integrated CMOS Hall sensors have been widely used to measure magnetic fields. However, they are difficult to work with in a low magnetic field environment due to their low sensitivity and large offset. This paper describes a highly sensitive digital Hall sensor fabricated in 0.18 μm high voltage CMOS technology for low field applications. The sensor consists of a switched cross-shaped Hall plate and a novel signal conditioner. It effectively eliminates offset and low frequency 1/f noise by applying a dynamic quadrature offset cancellation technique. The measured results show the optimal Hall plate achieves a high current related sensitivity of about 310 V/AT. The whole sensor has a remarkable ability to measure a minimum ±2 mT magnetic field and output a digital Hall signal in a wide temperature range from −40 °C to 120 °C. PMID:22438758

  7. A highly sensitive CMOS digital Hall sensor for low magnetic field applications.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yue; Pan, Hong-Bin; He, Shu-Zhuan; Li, Li

    2012-01-01

    Integrated CMOS Hall sensors have been widely used to measure magnetic fields. However, they are difficult to work with in a low magnetic field environment due to their low sensitivity and large offset. This paper describes a highly sensitive digital Hall sensor fabricated in 0.18 μm high voltage CMOS technology for low field applications. The sensor consists of a switched cross-shaped Hall plate and a novel signal conditioner. It effectively eliminates offset and low frequency 1/f noise by applying a dynamic quadrature offset cancellation technique. The measured results show the optimal Hall plate achieves a high current related sensitivity of about 310 V/AT. The whole sensor has a remarkable ability to measure a minimum ± 2 mT magnetic field and output a digital Hall signal in a wide temperature range from -40 °C to 120 °C.

  8. High Precision Bright-Star Astrometry with the USNO Astrometric CMOS Hybrid Camera System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Secrest, Nathan; Dudik, Rachel; Berghea, Ciprian; Hennessy, Greg; Dorland, Bryan

    2015-08-01

    While GAIA will provide excellent positional measurements of hundreds of millions of stars between 5 < mag < 20, an ongoing challenge in the field of high-precision differential astrometry is the positional accuracy of very bright stars (mag < 5), due to the enormous dynamic range between bright stars of interest, such as those in the Hipparcos catalog, and their background field stars, which are especially important for differential astrometry. Over the past few years, we have been testing the USNO Astrometric CMOS Hybrid Camera System (UAHC), which utilizes an H4RG-10 detector in windowing mode, as a possible solution to the NOFS USNO Bright Star Astrometric Database (UBAD). In this work, we discuss the results of an astrometric analysis of single-epoch Hipparcos data taken with the UAHC from the 1.55m Kaj Strand Astrometric Reflector at NOFS from June 27-30, 2014. We discuss the calibration of this data, as well as an astrometric analysis pipeline we developed that will enable multi-epoch differential and absolute astrometry with the UAHC. We find that while the overall differential astrometric stability of data taken with the UAHC is good (5-10 mas single-measurement precision) and comparable to other ground-based astrometric camera systems, bright stars in the detector window suffer from several systematic effects, such as insufficient window geometry and centroiding failures due to read-out artifacts—both of which can be significantly improved with modifications to the electronics, read-out speed and microcode.

  9. Active control system for high speed windmills

    DOEpatents

    Avery, Don E.

    1988-01-01

    A pump stroke is matched to the operating speed of a high speed windmill. The windmill drives a hydraulic pump for a control. Changes in speed of a wind driven shaft open supply and exhaust valves to opposite ends of a hydraulic actuator to lengthen and shorten an oscillating arm thereby lengthening and shortening the stroke of an output pump. Diminishing wind to a stall speed causes the valves to operate the hydraulic cylinder to shorten the oscillating arm to zero. A pressure accumulator in the hydraulic system provides the force necessary to supply the hydraulic fluid under pressure to drive the actuator into and out of the zero position in response to the windmill shaft speed approaching and exceeding windmill stall speed.

  10. Active control system for high speed windmills

    DOEpatents

    Avery, D.E.

    1988-01-12

    A pump stroke is matched to the operating speed of a high speed windmill. The windmill drives a hydraulic pump for a control. Changes in speed of a wind driven shaft open supply and exhaust valves to opposite ends of a hydraulic actuator to lengthen and shorten an oscillating arm thereby lengthening and shortening the stroke of an output pump. Diminishing wind to a stall speed causes the valves to operate the hydraulic cylinder to shorten the oscillating arm to zero. A pressure accumulator in the hydraulic system provides the force necessary to supply the hydraulic fluid under pressure to drive the actuator into and out of the zero position in response to the windmill shaft speed approaching and exceeding windmill stall speed. 4 figs.

  11. High-performance CMOS image sensors at BAE SYSTEMS Imaging Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vu, Paul; Fowler, Boyd; Liu, Chiao; Mims, Steve; Balicki, Janusz; Bartkovjak, Peter; Do, Hung; Li, Wang

    2012-07-01

    In this paper, we present an overview of high-performance CMOS image sensor products developed at BAE SYSTEMS Imaging Solutions designed to satisfy the increasingly challenging technical requirements for image sensors used in advanced scientific, industrial, and low light imaging applications. We discuss the design and present the test results of a family of image sensors tailored for high imaging performance and capable of delivering sub-electron readout noise, high dynamic range, low power, high frame rates, and high sensitivity. We briefly review the performance of the CIS2051, a 5.5-Mpixel image sensor, which represents our first commercial CMOS image sensor product that demonstrates the potential of our technology, then we present the performance characteristics of the CIS1021, a full HD format CMOS image sensor capable of delivering sub-electron read noise performance at 50 fps frame rate at full HD resolution. We also review the performance of the CIS1042, a 4-Mpixel image sensor which offers better than 70% QE @ 600nm combined with better than 91dB intra scene dynamic range and about 1 e- read noise at 100 fps frame rate at full resolution.

  12. Design of high speed LVDS transceiver ICs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jian, Xu; Zhigong, Wang; Xiaokang, Niu

    2010-07-01

    The design of low-power LVDS (low voltage differential signaling) transceiver ICs is presented. The LVDS transmitter integrates a common-mode feedback control on chip, while a specially designed pre-charge circuit is proposed to improve the speed of the circuit, making the highest data rate up to 622 Mb/s. For the LVDS receiver design, the performance degradation issues are solved when handling the large input common mode voltages of the conventional LVDS receivers. In addition, the LVDS receiver also supports the failsafe function. The transceiver chips were verified with the CSMC 0.5-μm CMOS process. The measured results showed that, for the LVDS transmitter with the pre-charge technique proposed, the maximum data rate is higher than 622 Mb/s. The power consumption is 6 mA with a 5-V power supply. The LVDS receiver can work properly with a larger input common mode voltage (0.1-2.4 V) but a differential input voltage as low as 100 mV. The power consumption is only 1.2 mA with a 5-V supply at the highest data rate of 400 Mb/s. The chip set meets the TIA/EIA-644-A standards and shows its potential prospects in LVDS transmission systems.

  13. ERROR CORRECTION IN HIGH SPEED ARITHMETIC,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The errors due to a faulty high speed multiplier are shown to be iterative in nature. These errors are analyzed in various aspects. The arithmetic coding technique is suggested for the improvement of high speed multiplier reliability. Through a number theoretic investigation, a large class of arithmetic codes for single iterative error correction are developed. The codes are shown to have near-optimal rates and to render a simple decoding method. The implementation of these codes seems highly practical. (Author)

  14. Lubrication and cooling for high speed gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, D. P.

    1985-01-01

    The problems and failures occurring with the operation of high speed gears are discussed. The gearing losses associated with high speed gearing such as tooth mesh friction, bearing friction, churning, and windage are discussed with various ways shown to help reduce these losses and thereby improve efficiency. Several different methods of oil jet lubrication for high speed gearing are given such as into mesh, out of mesh, and radial jet lubrication. The experiments and analytical results for the various methods of oil jet lubrication are shown with the strengths and weaknesses of each method discussed. The analytical and experimental results of gear lubrication and cooling at various test conditions are presented. These results show the very definite need of improved methods of gear cooling at high speed and high load conditions.

  15. Fundamental performance differences of CMOS and CCD imagers: part V

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janesick, James R.; Elliott, Tom; Andrews, James; Tower, John; Pinter, Jeff

    2013-02-01

    Previous papers delivered over the last decade have documented developmental progress made on large pixel scientific CMOS imagers that match or surpass CCD performance. New data and discussions presented in this paper include: 1) a new buried channel CCD fabricated on a CMOS process line, 2) new data products generated by high performance custom scientific CMOS 4T/5T/6T PPD pixel imagers, 3) ultimate CTE and speed limits for large pixel CMOS imagers, 4) fabrication and test results of a flight 4k x 4k CMOS imager for NRL's SoloHi Solar Orbiter Mission, 5) a progress report on ultra large stitched Mk x Nk CMOS imager, 6) data generated by on-chip sub-electron CDS signal chain circuitry used in our imagers, 7) CMOS and CMOSCCD proton and electron radiation damage data for dose levels up to 10 Mrd, 8) discussions and data for a new class of PMOS pixel CMOS imagers and 9) future CMOS development work planned.

  16. Speed control with end cushion for high speed air cylinder

    DOEpatents

    Stevens, Wayne W.; Solbrig, Charles W.

    1991-01-01

    A high speed air cylinder in which the longitudinal movement of the piston within the air cylinder tube is controlled by pressurizing the air cylinder tube on the accelerating side of the piston and releasing pressure at a controlled rate on the decelerating side of the piston. The invention also includes a method for determining the pressure required on both the accelerating and decelerating sides of the piston to move the piston with a given load through a predetermined distance at the desired velocity, bringing the piston to rest safely without piston bounce at the end of its complete stroke.

  17. Agile Electromagnetics Exploiting High Speed Logic (AEEHSL).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-26

    examination and alteration of codes and filter weights 3. READ Mode - This mode enables the reading or replaying of the data from the digital tape recorder...available in this subsystems are used to initialize the * radar, clock the code from the high-speed code storage memory to drive the code modulator, delay...correlation process. There is storage space within the high speed memory for 32 codes of length 64 bits or less. The radiated code can be changed by a

  18. High-speed mirror-scanning tracker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, HengWei

    1999-06-01

    This paper introduces a high speed single-mirror scanner developed by us as a versatile tracker. It can be connected with a high speed camera, a TV tracker (or color video recorder) /measurer/recorder. It can be guided by a computer, a joystick (automatic or manual) or TV tracker. In this paper, we also present the advantages of our scanner contrasted with the limitations of fixed camera system. In addition, several usable projects of mirror scanner are discussed.

  19. A Highly Linear and Wide Input Range Four-Quadrant CMOS Analog Multiplier Using Active Feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zhangcai; Jiang, Minglu; Inoue, Yasuaki

    Analog multipliers are one of the most important building blocks in analog signal processing circuits. The performance with high linearity and wide input range is usually required for analog four-quadrant multipliers in most applications. Therefore, a highly linear and wide input range four-quadrant CMOS analog multiplier using active feedback is proposed in this paper. Firstly, a novel configuration of four-quadrant multiplier cell is presented. Its input dynamic range and linearity are improved significantly by adding two resistors compared with the conventional structure. Then based on the proposed multiplier cell configuration, a four-quadrant CMOS analog multiplier with active feedback technique is implemented by two operational amplifiers. Because of both the proposed multiplier cell and active feedback technique, the proposed multiplier achieves a much wider input range with higher linearity than conventional structures. The proposed multiplier was fabricated by a 0.6µm CMOS process. Experimental results show that the input range of the proposed multiplier can be up to 5.6Vpp with 0.159% linearity error on VX and 4.8Vpp with 0.51% linearity error on VY for ±2.5V power supply voltages, respectively.

  20. A High Vacuum High Speed Ion Pump

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Foster, J. S. Jr.; Lawrence, E. O.; Lofgren, E. J.

    1952-08-27

    A vacuum pump based on the properties of a magnetically collimated electric discharge is described. It has a speed in the range 3000 to 7000 liters a second and a base pressure in the order of 10{sup -6} mm. (auth)

  1. Review of Millimeter-Wave Integrated Circuits With Low Power Consumption for High Speed Wireless Communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellinger, Frank; Fritsche, David; Tretter, Gregor; Leufker, Jan Dirk; Yodprasit, Uroschanit; Carta, C.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we review high-speed radio-frequency integrated circuits operating up to 210 GHz and present selected state-of-the-art circuits with leading-edge performance, which we have designed at our chair. The following components are discussed employing bipolar complementary metal oxide semiconductors (BiCMOS) technologies: a 200 GHz amplifier with 17 dB gain and around 9 dB noise figure consuming only 18 mW, a 200 GHz down mixer with 5.5 dB conversion gain and 40 mW power consumption, a 190 GHz receiver with 47 dB conversion gain and 11 dB noise figure and a 60 GHz power amplifier with 24.5 dBm output power and 12.9 % power added efficiency (PAE). Moreover, we report on a single-core flash CMOS analogue-to-digital converter (ADC) with 3 bit resolution and a speed of 24 GS/s. Finally, we discuss a 60 GHz on-off keying (OOK) BiCMOS transceiver chip set. The wireless transmission of data with 5 Gb/s at 42 cm distance between transmitter and receiver was verified by experiments. The complete transceiver consumes 396 mW.

  2. Key Technologies for Ultra High Dose CMOS Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Jeon, Y.; Koo, I.; Singh, V.; Oh, J.; Jin, S.; Lee, J.; Rouh, K.; Ju, M.; Jeon, S.; Ku, J.; Lee, S. B.; Lee, S. W.; Ok, M. T.; Butterbaugh, J.; Lee, A.; Kim, K.; Lee, S. W.; Ju, K. J.; Park, J. W.

    2008-11-03

    The trend towards shrinking advanced microelectronic Logic and DRAM devices will require ultra high dose implantation. One ultra high dose application in DRAM, being rapidly adopted in production is Dual Poly Gate (DPG). Three main challenges existed for the adoption of this high dose dual poly gate (DPG) doping applications: monitoring of high dose implantation, photoresist stripping and maintaining high throughput. In this paper we present how these challenges have been addressed. VSEA's plasma doping (PLAD) tool offers several unique advantages for DPG applications. When compared to conventional or molecular beam line implanters or other immersion techniques, PLAD delivers 3 to 7 times higher throughput (compared to traditional ion implanter) without dopant penetration through the thin doped polysilicon layer into the gate oxide. It also improves P{sup +} poly silicon DPG device properties at superior throughput. In this work we demonstrate how hot spray photoresist strip processing eliminates the need for multiple-tools required for wet+ash+wet process. In addition to PLAD's patented in-situ dose control metrology we also demonstrate an ex-situ high dose implantation metrology using spectroscopic ellipsometer (SE) and spectroscopic reflectometer (SR). The technique shows good correlation (R{sup 2}{approx}0.99) between implant dose and damaged layer thickness.

  3. Small high-speed dynamic target at close range laser active imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Jun; Wang, Du-yue; Zhang, Zheng; Zhang, Yue; Dai, Qin

    2016-11-01

    In the shooting range measuring, all-weather, high speed, unattended, the new concepts such as the remote control is gradually applied. In this paper, a new type of low cost range measurement system, using FPGA + MCU as electronic control system of laser active illumination and high-speed CMOS camera, data to the rear zone by using optical fiber communications, transmission and realizes the remote control of unmanned, due to the low cost of front-end equipment, can be used as consumables replacement at any time, combined with distributed layout principle, can maximum limit close to the measured with mutilate ability goal, thus to achieve the goal of small high-speed dynamic imaging from close range.

  4. Speckle noise reduction in high speed polarization sensitive spectral domain optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Götzinger, Erich; Pircher, Michael; Baumann, Bernhard; Schmoll, Tilman; Sattmann, Harald; Leitgeb, Rainer A.; Hitzenberger, Christoph K.

    2015-01-01

    We present a high speed polarization sensitive spectral domain optical coherence tomography system based on polarization maintaining fibers and two high speed CMOS line scan cameras capable of retinal imaging with up to 128 k A-lines/s. This high imaging speed strongly reduces motion artifacts and therefore averaging of several B-scans is possible, which strongly reduces speckle noise and improves image quality. We present several methods for averaging retardation and optic axis orientation, the best one providing a 5 fold noise reduction. Furthermore, a novel scheme of calculating images of degree of polarization uniformity is presented. We quantitatively compare the noise reduction depending on the number of averaged frames and discuss the limits of frame numbers that can usefully be averaged. PMID:21934820

  5. Optical waveguide taps on silicon CMOS circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenger, Vincent E.; Beyette, Fred R., Jr.

    2000-11-01

    As silicon CMOS circuit technology is scaled beyond the GHz range, both chipmakers and board makers face increasingly difficult challenges in implementing high speed metal interconnects. Metal traces are limited in density-speed performance due to the skin effect, electrical conductivity, and cross talk. Optical based interconnects have higher available bandwidth by virtue of the extremely high carrier frequencies of optical signals (> 100 THz). For this work, an effort has been made to determine an optimal optical tap receiver design for integration with commercial CMOS processes. Candidate waveguide tap technologies were considered in terms of optical loss, bandwidth, economy, and CMOS process compatibility. A new device, which is based on a variation of the multimode interference effect, has been found to be especially promising. BeamProp simulation results show nearly zero excess optical loss for the design, and up to 70% coupling into a 25 micrometer traveling wave CMOS photodetector device. Single-mode waveguides make the design readily compatible with wavelength multiplexing/demultiplexing elements. Polymer waveguide materials are targeted for fabrication due to planarization properties, low cost, broad index control, and poling abilities for modulation/tuning functions. Low cost, silicon CMOS based processing makes the new tap technology especially suitable for computer chip and board level interconnects, as well as metro fiber-to-the- home/desk telecommunications applications.

  6. Scientific Visualization in High Speed Network Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaziri, Arsi; Kutler, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    In several cases, new visualization techniques have vastly increased the researcher's ability to analyze and comprehend data. Similarly, the role of networks in providing an efficient supercomputing environment have become more critical and continue to grow at a faster rate than the increase in the processing capabilities of supercomputers. A close relationship between scientific visualization and high-speed networks in providing an important link to support efficient supercomputing is identified. The two technologies are driven by the increasing complexities and volume of supercomputer data. The interaction of scientific visualization and high-speed networks in a Computational Fluid Dynamics simulation/visualization environment are given. Current capabilities supported by high speed networks, supercomputers, and high-performance graphics workstations at the Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation Facility (NAS) at NASA Ames Research Center are described. Applied research in providing a supercomputer visualization environment to support future computational requirements are summarized.

  7. High speed hydrogen/graphite interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, A. J.; Hamman, R.; Sharma, O. P.; Harrje, D. T.

    1974-01-01

    Various aspects of a research program on high speed hydrogen/graphite interaction are presented. Major areas discussed are: (1) theoretical predictions of hydrogen/graphite erosion rates; (2) high temperature, nonequilibrium hydrogen flow in a nozzle; and (3) molecular beam studies of hydrogen/graphite erosion.

  8. High Speed Digital Camera Technology Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clements, Sandra D.

    2009-01-01

    A High Speed Digital Camera Technology Review (HSD Review) is being conducted to evaluate the state-of-the-shelf in this rapidly progressing industry. Five HSD cameras supplied by four camera manufacturers participated in a Field Test during the Space Shuttle Discovery STS-128 launch. Each camera was also subjected to Bench Tests in the ASRC Imaging Development Laboratory. Evaluation of the data from the Field and Bench Tests is underway. Representatives from the imaging communities at NASA / KSC and the Optical Systems Group are participating as reviewers. A High Speed Digital Video Camera Draft Specification was updated to address Shuttle engineering imagery requirements based on findings from this HSD Review. This draft specification will serve as the template for a High Speed Digital Video Camera Specification to be developed for the wider OSG imaging community under OSG Task OS-33.

  9. A clock generator for a high-speed high-resolution pipelined A/D converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Zhao; Yintang, Yang; Zhangming, Zhu; Lianxi, Liu

    2013-02-01

    A clock generator circuit for a high-speed high-resolution pipelined A/D converter is presented. The circuit is realized by a delay locked loop (DLL), and a new differential structure is used to improve the precision of the charge pump. Meanwhile, a dynamic logic phase detector and a three transistor NAND logic circuit are proposed to reduce the output jitter by improving the steepness of the clock transition. The proposed circuit, designed by SMIC 0.18 μm 3.3 V CMOS technology, is used as a clock generator for a 14 bit 100 MS/s pipelined ADC. The simulation results have shown that the duty cycle ranged from 10% to 90% and can be adjusted. The average duty cycle error is less than 1%. The lock-time is only 13 clock cycles. The active area is 0.05 mm2 and power consumption is less than 15 mW.

  10. DAC 22 High Speed Civil Transport Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Between tests, NASA research engineer Dave Hahne inspects a tenth-scale model of a supersonic transport model in the 30- by 60-Foot Tunnel at NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia. The model is being used in support of NASA's High-Speed Research (HSR) program. Langley researchers are applying advance aerodynamic design methods to develop a wing leading-edge flap system which significantly improves low-speed fuel efficiency and reduces noise generated during takeoff operation. Langley is NASA's lead center for the agency's HSR program, aimed at developing technology to help U.S. industry compete in the rapidly expanding trans-oceanic transport market. A U.S. high-speed civil transport is expected to fly in about the year 2010. As envisioned, it would fly 300 passengers across the Pacific in about four hours at Mach 2.4 (approximately 1,600 mph/1950 kph) for a modest increase over business class fares.

  11. High Speed and Slow Motion: The Technology of Modern High Speed Cameras

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vollmer, Michael; Mollmann, Klaus-Peter

    2011-01-01

    The enormous progress in the fields of microsystem technology, microelectronics and computer science has led to the development of powerful high speed cameras. Recently a number of such cameras became available as low cost consumer products which can also be used for the teaching of physics. The technology of high speed cameras is discussed,…

  12. Post-CMOS compatible high-throughput fabrication of AlN-based piezoelectric microcantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Campos, A.; Iriarte, G. F.; Hernando-Garcia, J.; Calle, F.

    2015-02-01

    A post-complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) compatible microfabrication process of piezoelectric cantilevers has been developed. The fabrication process is suitable for standard silicon technology and provides low-cost and high-throughput manufacturing. This work reports design, fabrication and characterization of piezoelectric cantilevers based on aluminum nitride (AlN) thin films synthesized at room temperature. The proposed microcantilever system is a sandwich structure composed of chromium (Cr) electrodes and a sputtered AlN film. The key issue for cantilever fabrication is the growth at room temperature of the AlN layer by reactive sputtering, making possible the innovative compatibility of piezoelectric MEMS devices with CMOS circuits already processed. AlN and Cr have been etched by inductively coupled plasma (ICP) dry etching using a BCl3-Cl2-Ar plasma chemistry. As part of the novelty of the post-CMOS micromachining process presented here, a silicon Si (1 0 0) wafer has been used as substrate as well as the sacrificial layer used to release the microcantilevers. In order to achieve this, the Si surface underneath the structure has been wet etched using an HNA (hydrofluoric acid + nitric acid + acetic acid) based solution. X-ray diffraction (XRD) characterization indicated the high crystalline quality of the AlN film. An atomic force microscope (AFM) has been used to determine the Cr electrode surface roughness. The morphology of the fabricated devices has been studied by scanning electron microscope (SEM). The cantilevers have been piezoelectrically actuated and their out-of-plane vibration modes were detected by vibrometry.

  13. Laser Trigger For High Speed Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Rong-Seng; Lin, Chin-Wu; Cheng, Tung

    1987-09-01

    High speed camera coorperated with laser trigger to catch high speed unpredictable events has many applications: such as scoring system for the end game of missile interception, war head explosive study etc. When the event happening in a very short duration, the repetition rate of the laser ranging must be as high as 5K herze and the pulse duration should be less than 10 nsec. In some environment, like inside the aircraft, the abailable space for high speed camera to set up is limited, large film capacity camera could not be used. In order to use the small capacity film, the exact trigger time for the camera are especially important. The target velocity, camera acceleration characteristics, speed regulation, camera size, weight and the ruggedness are all be considered before the laser trigger be designed. Electric temporal gate is used to measure the time of flight ranging datum. The triangular distance measurement principle are also used to get the ranging when the base line i.e. the distance between the laser transmitter and receiver are large enough.

  14. High-Speed Sealift Technology. Volume 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-09-01

    Engineering Directorate Technology Projection Report HIGH-SPEED SEALIFT TECHNOLOGY Volume 1 BY OWEN K. RITTER MICHAEL T. TEMPLEMAN...7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Naval Surface Warfare Center,Carderock Division,Total Ship Systems Engineering Directorate...11 3.4.3.2 Diesel Engines

  15. High speed optical tomography for flow visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, Ray; Hesselink, Lambertus

    1987-01-01

    A novel optical architecture (based on holographic optical elements) for making high speed tomographic measurements is presented. The system is designed for making density or species concentration measurements in a nonsteady fluid or combustion flow. Performance evaluations of the optical system are discussed, and a test phase object was successfully reconstructed using this optical arrangement.

  16. High-Speed Schlieren Movies of Decelerators at Supersonic Speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1960-01-01

    Tests were conducted on several types of porous parachutes, a paraglider, and a simulated retrorocket. Mach numbers ranged from 1.8-3.0, porosity from 20-80 percent, and camera speeds from 1680-3000 feet per second (fps) in trials with porous parachutes. Trials of reefed parachutes were conducted at Mach number 2.0 and reefing of 12-33 percent at camera speeds of 600 fps. A flexible parachute with an inflatable ring in the periphery of the canopy was tested at Reynolds number 750,000 per foot, Mach number 2.85, porosity of 28 percent, and camera speed of 36oo fps. A vortex-ring parachute was tested at Mach number 2.2 and camera speed of 3000 fps. The paraglider, with a sweepback of 45 degrees at an angle of attack of 45 degrees was tested at Mach number 2.65, drag coefficient of 0.200, and lift coefficient of 0.278 at a camera speed of 600 fps. A cold air jet exhausting upstream from the center of a bluff body was used to simulate a retrorocket. The free-stream Mach number was 2.0, free-stream dynamic pressure was 620 lb/sq ft, jet-exit static pressure ratio was 10.9, and camera speed was 600 fps.

  17. High Speed SPM of Functional Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Huey, Bryan D.

    2015-08-14

    The development and optimization of applications comprising functional materials necessitates a thorough understanding of their static and dynamic properties and performance at the nanoscale. Leveraging High Speed SPM and concepts enabled by it, efficient measurements and maps with nanoscale and nanosecond temporal resolution are uniquely feasible. This includes recent enhancements for topographic, conductivity, ferroelectric, and piezoelectric properties as originally proposed, as well as newly developed methods or improvements to AFM-based mechanical, friction, thermal, and photoconductivity measurements. The results of this work reveal fundamental mechanisms of operation, and suggest new approaches for improving the ultimate speed and/or efficiency, of data storage systems, magnetic-electric sensors, and solar cells.

  18. High-speed spectroradiometer for remote sensing.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, T; Shimizu, H; Yasuoka, Y

    1987-11-15

    A high-speed spectroradiometer designed for spectral reflectance measurement in remote sensing is described. This instrument uses a monochromatic grating and a photomultiplier system for light detection and sweeps over the 400-850-nm wavelength spectral range with the spectral resolution of 2 nm within 1 s. The instrument has the inherent advantage of portability and speed of operation which make it particularly suitable for field work in the area of fast moving surfaces, e.g., water with wave motion. Some applications of its use in laboratory and field experiments also have been presented. The instrument would seem to be an appropriate instrument for ground data collection in remote sensing.

  19. High-speed video-based tracking of optically trapped colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otto, O.; Gornall, J. L.; Stober, G.; Czerwinski, F.; Seidel, R.; Keyser, U. F.

    2011-04-01

    We have developed an optical tweezer setup, with high-speed and real-time position tracking, based on a CMOS camera technology. Our software encoded algorithm is cross-correlation based and implemented on a standard computer. By measuring the fluctuations of a confined colloid at 6000 frames s - 1, continuously for an hour, we show our technique is a viable alternative to quadrant photodiodes. The optical trap is calibrated by using power spectrum analysis and the Stokes method. The trap stiffness is independent of the camera frame rate and scales linearly with the applied laser power. The analysis of our data by Allan variance demonstrates single nanometer accuracy in position detection.

  20. Sensor study for high speed autonomous operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Anne; La Celle, Zachary; Lacaze, Alberto; Murphy, Karl; Del Giorno, Mark; Close, Ryan

    2015-06-01

    As robotic ground systems advance in capabilities and begin to fulfill new roles in both civilian and military life, the limitation of slow operational speed has become a hindrance to the wide-spread adoption of these systems. For example, military convoys are reluctant to employ autonomous vehicles when these systems slow their movement from 60 miles per hour down to 40. However, these autonomous systems must operate at these lower speeds due to the limitations of the sensors they employ. Robotic Research, with its extensive experience in ground autonomy and associated problems therein, in conjunction with CERDEC/Night Vision and Electronic Sensors Directorate (NVESD), has performed a study to specify system and detection requirements; determined how current autonomy sensors perform in various scenarios; and analyzed how sensors should be employed to increase operational speeds of ground vehicles. The sensors evaluated in this study include the state of the art in LADAR/LIDAR, Radar, Electro-Optical, and Infrared sensors, and have been analyzed at high speeds to study their effectiveness in detecting and accounting for obstacles and other perception challenges. By creating a common set of testing benchmarks, and by testing in a wide range of real-world conditions, Robotic Research has evaluated where sensors can be successfully employed today; where sensors fall short; and which technologies should be examined and developed further. This study is the first step to achieve the overarching goal of doubling ground vehicle speeds on any given terrain.

  1. Technology needs for high speed rotorcraft (2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, Mark W.

    1991-01-01

    An analytical study was conducted to identify rotorcraft concepts best capable of combining a cruise speed of 350 to 450 knots with helicopter-like low speed attributes, and to define the technology advancements needed to make them viable by the year 2000. A systematic approach was used to compare the relative attributes and mission gross weights for a wide range of concepts, resulting in a downselect to the most promising concept/mission pairs. For transport missions, tilt-wing and variable diameter tilt-rotor (VDTR) concepts were found to be superior. For a military scout/attack role, the VDTR was best, although a shrouded rotor concept could provide a highly agile, low observable alternative if its weight empty fraction could be reduced. A design speed of 375 to 425 knots was found to be the maximum desirable for transport missions, with higher speed producing rapidly diminishing benefits in productivity. The key technologies that require advancement to make the tilt-wing and VDTR concepts viable are in the areas of wing and proprotor aerodynamics, efficient structural design, flight controls, refinement of the geared flap pitch control system, expansion of the speed/descent envelope, and the structural and aerodynamic tradeoffs of wing thickness and forward sweep. For the shrouded rotor, weight reduction is essential, particularly with respect to the mechanism for covering the rotor in cruise.

  2. CMOS Amperometric ADC With High Sensitivity, Dynamic Range and Power Efficiency for Air Quality Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Li, Haitao; Boling, C Sam; Mason, Andrew J

    2016-08-01

    Airborne pollutants are a leading cause of illness and mortality globally. Electrochemical gas sensors show great promise for personal air quality monitoring to address this worldwide health crisis. However, implementing miniaturized arrays of such sensors demands high performance instrumentation circuits that simultaneously meet challenging power, area, sensitivity, noise and dynamic range goals. This paper presents a new multi-channel CMOS amperometric ADC featuring pixel-level architecture for gas sensor arrays. The circuit combines digital modulation of input currents and an incremental Σ∆ ADC to achieve wide dynamic range and high sensitivity with very high power efficiency and compact size. Fabricated in 0.5 [Formula: see text] CMOS, the circuit was measured to have 164 dB cross-scale dynamic range, 100 fA sensitivity while consuming only 241 [Formula: see text] and 0.157 [Formula: see text] active area per channel. Electrochemical experiments with liquid and gas targets demonstrate the circuit's real-time response to a wide range of analyte concentrations.

  3. High speed, high current pulsed driver circuit

    DOEpatents

    Carlen, Christopher R.

    2017-03-21

    Various technologies presented herein relate to driving a LED such that the LED emits short duration pulses of light. This is accomplished by driving the LED with short duration, high amplitude current pulses. When the LED is driven by short duration, high amplitude current pulses, the LED emits light at a greater amplitude compared to when the LED is driven by continuous wave current.

  4. High speed printing with polygon scan heads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stutz, Glenn

    2016-03-01

    To reduce and in many cases eliminate the costs associated with high volume printing of consumer and industrial products, this paper investigates and validates the use of the new generation of high speed pulse on demand (POD) lasers in concert with high speed (HS) polygon scan heads (PSH). Associated costs include consumables such as printing ink and nozzles, provisioning labor, maintenance and repair expense as well as reduction of printing lines due to high through put. Targets that are applicable and investigated include direct printing on plastics, printing on paper/cardboard as well as printing on labels. Market segments would include consumer products (CPG), medical and pharmaceutical products, universal ID (UID), and industrial products. In regards to the POD lasers employed, the wavelengths include UV(355nm), Green (532nm) and IR (1064nm) operating within the repetition range of 180 to 250 KHz.

  5. Pushing the material limit and physics novelty in high κ's/high carrier mobility semiconductors for post Si CMOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Minghwei

    2012-02-01

    The semiconductor industry is now facing unprecedented materials/physics challenges due to the scaling-limitation of Si CMOS transistor arising from non-scaling of matters, namely gate dielectrics and channel mobility. The new technology using high-κ plus metal gate on high carrier mobility semiconductors of InGaAs and Ge will lead to faster speed at lower power. The tasks for realizing the new devices equivalent oxide thickness (EOT) < 1 nm, interfacial density of state (Dit) <= 10^11 eV-1cm-2, self-aligned process, low parasitic, and integration with Si, have been solved or are being feverishly studied. The key of achieving the above goals is to understand/tailor interfaces of the high κ's/InGaAs (Ge). Tremendous progress has been made using molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) and atomic layer deposition (ALD) high κ's of Ga2O3(Gd2O3), Al2O3, and HfO2, and the novel ALD/MBE dual dielectrics in attaining an EOT of 0.5 nm, Dit of low 10^11 eV-1cm-2 (with a flat Dit distribution versus energy), and thermal stability at high temperatures higher than 800 C of the MOS structures. Electronic/electrical characteristics of the hetero-structures have been studied using in-situ synchrotron radiation photo-emission, cross-sectional scanning tunneling spectroscopy, capacitance (conductance)-voltage under various temperatures, and charge pumping methods. Device performance in world-record drain currents, transconductances, sub-threshold swings, etc. in self-aligned inversion-channel high κ's/InGaAs and /Ge MOSFET's will also be presented. This work has been supported by Nano National Program (NSC 100-2120-M-007-010) of the NSC of Taiwan, and the AOARD of the US Air Force. [4pt] In collaboration with J. Kwo, W. C. Lee, M. L. Huang, T. D. Lin, Y. C. Chang, Y. H. Chang, C. A. Lin, Y. M. Chang (NTHU and NTU in Taiwan), T. W. Pi, C. H. Hsu (NSRRC in Taiwan), Y. P. Chiu (NSYSU in Taiwan), C. Merckling (IMEC in Belgium), J. I. Chyi (NCU, Taiwan), and G. J. Brown (AFRL, USA).

  6. Data Capture Technique for High Speed Signaling

    DOEpatents

    Barrett, Wayne Melvin; Chen, Dong; Coteus, Paul William; Gara, Alan Gene; Jackson, Rory; Kopcsay, Gerard Vincent; Nathanson, Ben Jesse; Vranas, Paylos Michael; Takken, Todd E.

    2008-08-26

    A data capture technique for high speed signaling to allow for optimal sampling of an asynchronous data stream. This technique allows for extremely high data rates and does not require that a clock be sent with the data as is done in source synchronous systems. The present invention also provides a hardware mechanism for automatically adjusting transmission delays for optimal two-bit simultaneous bi-directional (SiBiDi) signaling.

  7. High-speed civil transport study. Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    A system of study of the potential for a high speed commercial transport aircraft addressed technology, economic, and environmental constraints. Market projections indicated a need for fleets of transport with supersonic or greater cruise speeds by the years 2000 to 2005. The associated design requirements called for a vehicle to carry 250 to 300 passengers over a range of 5000 to 6000 nautical miles. The study was initially unconstrained in terms of vehicle characteristics, such as cruise speed, propulsion systems, fuels, or structural materials. Analyses led to a focus on the most promising vehicle concepts. These were concepts that used a kerosene type fuel and cruised at Mach numbers between 2.0 to 3.2. Further systems study identified the impact of environmental constraints (for community noise, sonic boom, and engine emissions) on economic attractiveness and technological needs. Results showed that current technology cannot produce a viable high speed civil transport. Significant advances are needed to take off gross weight and allow for both economic attractiveness and environment acceptability. Specific technological requirements were identified to meet these needs.

  8. High-speed civil transport study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    A system study of the potential for a high-speed commercial transport has addressed technological, economic, and environmental constraints. Market projections indicate a need for fleets of transports with supersonic or greater cruise speeds by the year 2000 to 2005. The associated design requirements called for a vehicle to carry 250 to 300 passengers over a range of 5,000 to 6,000 nautical miles. The study was initially unconstrained in terms of vehicle characteristic, such as cruise speed, propulsion systems, fuels, or structural materials. Analyses led to a focus on the most promising vehicle concepts. These were concepts that used a kerosene-type fuel and cruised at Mach numbers between 2.0 to 3.2. Further systems study identified the impact of environmental constraints (for community noise, sonic boom, and engine emissions) on economic attractiveness and technological needs. Results showed that current technology cannot produce a viable high-speed civil transport; significant advances are required to reduce takeoff gross weight and allow for both economic attractiveness and environmental accepatability. Specific technological requirements were identified to meet these needs.

  9. Development of a Revolutionary High Speed Spindle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agba, Emmanuel I.

    1999-01-01

    This report presents the development of a hydraulic motor driven spindle system to be employed for high speed machining of composite materials and metals. The spindle system is conceived to be easily retrofitted into conventional milling machines. The need for the hydraulic spindle arises because of the limitations placed on conventional electric motor driven spindles by the low cutting power and the presence of vibrational phenomena associated with voltage frequency at high rotational speeds. Also, the electric motors are usually large and expensive when power requirements are moderately high. In contrast, hydraulic motor driven spindles promise a distinct increase in spindle life over the conventional electric motor driven spindles. In this report, existing technologies applicable to spindle holder for severe operating conditions were reviewed, conceptual designs of spindle holder system were developed and evaluated, and a detailed design of an acceptable concept was conducted. Finally, a rapid prototype of the design was produced for design evaluation.

  10. High Speed Research Program Sonic Fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rizzi, Stephen A. (Technical Monitor); Beier, Theodor H.; Heaton, Paul

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this sonic fatigue summary is to provide major findings and technical results of studies, initiated in 1994, to assess sonic fatigue behavior of structure that is being considered for the High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT). High Speed Research (HSR) program objectives in the area of sonic fatigue were to predict inlet, exhaust and boundary layer acoustic loads; measure high cycle fatigue data for materials developed during the HSR program; develop advanced sonic fatigue calculation methods to reduce required conservatism in airframe designs; develop damping techniques for sonic fatigue reduction where weight effective; develop wing and fuselage sonic fatigue design requirements; and perform sonic fatigue analyses on HSCT structural concepts to provide guidance to design teams. All goals were partially achieved, but none were completed due to the premature conclusion of the HSR program. A summary of major program findings and recommendations for continued effort are included in the report.

  11. Experiments with synchronized sCMOS cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steele, Iain A.; Jermak, Helen; Copperwheat, Chris M.; Smith, Robert J.; Poshyachinda, Saran; Soonthorntham, Boonrucksar

    2016-07-01

    Scientific-CMOS (sCMOS) cameras can combine low noise with high readout speeds and do not suffer the charge multiplication noise that effectively reduces the quantum efficiency of electron multiplying CCDs by a factor 2. As such they have strong potential in fast photometry and polarimetry instrumentation. In this paper we describe the results of laboratory experiments using a pair of commercial off the shelf sCMOS cameras based around a 4 transistor per pixel architecture. In particular using a both stable and a pulsed light sources we evaluate the timing precision that may be obtained when the cameras readouts are synchronized either in software or electronically. We find that software synchronization can introduce an error of 200-msec. With electronic synchronization any error is below the limit ( 50-msec) of our simple measurement technique.

  12. An ASIC memory buffer controller for a high speed disk system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodson, Robert F.; Campbell, Steve

    1993-01-01

    The need for large capacity, high speed mass memory storage devices has become increasingly evident at NASA during the past decade. High performance mass storage systems are crucial to present and future NASA systems. Spaceborne data storage system requirements have grown in response to the increasing amounts of data generated and processed by orbiting scientific experiments. Predictions indicate increases in the volume of data by orders of magnitude during the next decade. Current predictions are for storage capacities on the order of terabits (Tb), with data rates exceeding one gigabit per second (Gbps). As part of the design effort for a state of the art mass storage system, NASA Langley has designed a 144 CMOS ASIC to support high speed data transfers. This paper discusses the system architecture, ASIC design and some of the lessons learned in the development process.

  13. Architectures and applications of high-speed vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Yoshihiro; Oku, Hiromasa; Ishikawa, Masatoshi

    2014-11-01

    With the progress made in high-speed imaging technology, image processing systems that can process images at high frame rates, as well as their applications, are expected. In this article, we examine architectures for high-speed vision systems, and also dynamic image control, which can realize high-speed active optical systems. In addition, we also give an overview of some applications in which high-speed vision is used, including man-machine interfaces, image sensing, interactive displays, high-speed three-dimensional sensing, high-speed digital archiving, microvisual feedback, and high-speed intelligent robots.

  14. CAOS-CMOS camera.

    PubMed

    Riza, Nabeel A; La Torre, Juan Pablo; Amin, M Junaid

    2016-06-13

    Proposed and experimentally demonstrated is the CAOS-CMOS camera design that combines the coded access optical sensor (CAOS) imager platform with the CMOS multi-pixel optical sensor. The unique CAOS-CMOS camera engages the classic CMOS sensor light staring mode with the time-frequency-space agile pixel CAOS imager mode within one programmable optical unit to realize a high dynamic range imager for extreme light contrast conditions. The experimentally demonstrated CAOS-CMOS camera is built using a digital micromirror device, a silicon point-photo-detector with a variable gain amplifier, and a silicon CMOS sensor with a maximum rated 51.3 dB dynamic range. White light imaging of three different brightness simultaneously viewed targets, that is not possible by the CMOS sensor, is achieved by the CAOS-CMOS camera demonstrating an 82.06 dB dynamic range. Applications for the camera include industrial machine vision, welding, laser analysis, automotive, night vision, surveillance and multispectral military systems.

  15. Pulse Detonation Engines for High Speed Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Povinelli, Louis A.

    2002-01-01

    Revolutionary concepts in propulsion are required in order to achieve high-speed cruise capability in the atmosphere and for low cost reliable systems for earth to orbit missions. One of the advanced concepts under study is the air-breathing pulse detonation engine. Additional work remains in order to establish the role and performance of a PDE in flight applications, either as a stand-alone device or as part of a combined cycle system. In this paper, we shall offer a few remarks on some of these remaining issues, i.e., combined cycle systems, nozzles and exhaust systems and thrust per unit frontal area limitations. Currently, an intensive experimental and numerical effort is underway in order to quantify the propulsion performance characteristics of this device. In this paper, we shall highlight our recent efforts to elucidate the propulsion potential of pulse detonation engines and their possible application to high-speed or hypersonic systems.

  16. Abbreviated annealing of high-speed steel

    SciTech Connect

    Zablotskii, V.K.; Bartel, G.P.

    1987-07-01

    The authors investigate the structural and phase transformations during the heating, holding, and cooling of high-speed steels of two basic groups: tungsten (R18, R12, R12F3, and R12F4K5) and tungsten-molybdenum (R6M5, 10R6M5, R6M5K5, R8M3, 10R8M3, and R8M3K6S) steels in the forged state. They propose a cooling regime with complete alpha-gamma recrystallization whose implementation at a Soviet steel plant has made it possible to reduce the duration of heat treatment and increase productivity by 20% in cutting the annealed high-speed steels.

  17. High-speed massively parallel scanning

    DOEpatents

    Decker, Derek E.

    2010-07-06

    A new technique for recording a series of images of a high-speed event (such as, but not limited to: ballistics, explosives, laser induced changes in materials, etc.) is presented. Such technique(s) makes use of a lenslet array to take image picture elements (pixels) and concentrate light from each pixel into a spot that is much smaller than the pixel. This array of spots illuminates a detector region (e.g., film, as one embodiment) which is scanned transverse to the light, creating tracks of exposed regions. Each track is a time history of the light intensity for a single pixel. By appropriately configuring the array of concentrated spots with respect to the scanning direction of the detection material, different tracks fit between pixels and sufficient lengths are possible which can be of interest in several high-speed imaging applications.

  18. High-speed Digital Color Imaging Pyrometry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-08-01

    and environment of the events. To overcome these challenges, we have characterized and calibrated a digital high-speed color camera that may be...correction) to determine their effect on the calculated temperature. Using this technique with a Phantom color camera , we measured the temperature of...constant value of approximately 1980~K. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Pyrometry, color camera 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT

  19. The NASA high-speed turboprop program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dugan, J. F.; Miller, B. A.; Graber, E. J.; Sagerser, D. A.

    1980-01-01

    Technology readiness for Mach 0.7 to 0.8 turboprop powered aircraft with the potential for fuel savings and DOC reductions of up to 30 and 15 percent respectively relative to current in-service aircraft is addressed. The areas of propeller aeroacoustics, propeller structures, turboprop installed performance, aircraft cabin environment, and turboprop engine and aircraft studies are emphasized. Large scale propeller characteristics and high speed propeller flight research tests using a modified testbed aircraft are also considered.

  20. The high-speed camera ULTRACAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsh, T. R.; Dhillon, V. S.

    2006-08-01

    ULTRACAM is a high-speed, tri-band CCD camera designed for observations of time variable celestial objects. Commissioned on the 4.2m WHT in La Palma, it has now been used for observations of many types of phenomena and objects including stellar occultations, accreting black-holes, neutron stars and white dwarfs, pulsars, eclipsing binaries and pulsating stars. In this paper we describe the salient features of ULTRACAM and discuss some of the results of its use.

  1. A Monolithic CMOS Magnetic Hall Sensor with High Sensitivity and Linearity Characteristics.

    PubMed

    Huang, Haiyun; Wang, Dejun; Xu, Yue

    2015-10-27

    This paper presents a fully integrated linear Hall sensor by means of 0.8 μm high voltage complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology. This monolithic Hall sensor chip features a highly sensitive horizontal switched Hall plate and an efficient signal conditioner using dynamic offset cancellation technique. An improved cross-like Hall plate achieves high magnetic sensitivity and low offset. A new spinning current modulator stabilizes the quiescent output voltage and improves the reliability of the signal conditioner. The tested results show that at the 5 V supply voltage, the maximum Hall output voltage of the monolithic Hall sensor microsystem, is up to ±2.1 V and the linearity of Hall output voltage is higher than 99% in the magnetic flux density range from ±5 mT to ±175 mT. The output equivalent residual offset is 0.48 mT and the static power consumption is 20 mW.

  2. MM-122: High speed civil transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demarest, Bill; Anders, Kurt; Manchec, John; Yang, Eric; Overgaard, Dan; Kalkwarf, Mike

    1992-01-01

    The rapidly expanding Pacific Rim market along with other growing markets indicates that the future market potential for a high speed civil transport is great indeed. The MM-122 is the answer to the international market desire for a state of the art, long range, high speed civil transport. It will carry 250 passengers a distance of 5200 nm at over twice the speed of sound. The MM-122 is designed to incorporate the latest technologies in the areas of control systems, propulsions, aerodynamics, and materials. The MM-122 will accomplish these goals using the following design parameters. First, a double delta wing planform with highly swept canards and an appropriately area ruled fuselage will be incorporated to accomplish desired aerodynamic characteristics. Propulsion will be provided by four low bypass variable cycle turbofan engines. A quad-redundant fly-by-wire flight control system will be incorporated to provide appropriate static stability and level 1 handling qualities. Finally, the latest in conventional metallic and modern composite materials will be used to provide desired weight and performance characteristics. The MM-122 incorporates the latest in technology and cost minimization techniques to provide a viable solution to this future market potential.

  3. Technology needs for high speed rotorcraft (3)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Detore, Jack; Conway, Scott

    1991-01-01

    The spectrum of vertical takeoff and landing (VTOL) type aircraft is examined to determine which aircraft are most likely to achieve high subsonic cruise speeds and have hover qualities similar to a helicopter. Two civil mission profiles are considered: a 600-n.mi. mission for a 15- and a 30-passenger payload. Applying current technology, only the 15- and 30-passenger tiltfold aircraft are capable of attaining the 450-knot design goal. The two tiltfold aircraft at 450 knots and a 30-passenger tiltrotor at 375 knots were further developed for the Task II technology analysis. A program called High-Speed Total Envelope Proprotor (HI-STEP) is recommended to meet several of these issues based on the tiltrotor concept. A program called Tiltfold System (TFS) is recommended based on the tiltrotor concept. A task is identified to resolve the best design speed from productivity and demand considerations based on the technology that emerges from the recommended programs. HI-STEP's goals are to investigate propulsive efficiency, maneuver loads, and aeroelastic stability. Programs currently in progress that may meet the other technology needs include the Integrated High Performance Turbine Engine Technology (IHPTET) (NASA Lewis) and the Advanced Structural Concepts Program funded through NASA Langley.

  4. Novel digital logic gate for high-performance CMOS imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Hoon H.; Joo, Youngjoong

    2004-06-01

    In these days, the CMOS image sensors are commonly used in many low resolution applications because the CMOS imaging system has several advantages against the conventional CCD imaging system. However, there are still several problems for the realization of the single-chip CMOS imaging system. One main problem is the substrate coupling noise, which is caused by the digital switching noise. Because the CMOS image sensors share the same substrate with surrounding digital circuit, it is difficult for the CMOS image sensor to get a good performance. In order to investigate the substrate coupling noise effect of the CMOS image sensor, the conventional CMOS logic, C-CBL (Complementary-Current balanced logic) and proposed low switching noise logic are simulated and compared. Consequently, the proposed logic compensates not only the large digital switching noise of conventional CMOS logic ,but also the huge power consumption of the C-CBL. Both the total instantaneous current behaviors on the power supply and the peak-to-peak voltages of the substrate voltage variation (di/dt noise) are investigated. The simulation is performed by AMI 0.5μm CMOS technology.

  5. High dynamic range CMOS-based mammography detector for FFDM and DBT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Inge M.; Smit, Chiel; Miller, James J.; Lomako, Andrey

    2016-03-01

    Digital Breast Tomosynthesis (DBT) requires excellent image quality in a dynamic mode at very low dose levels while Full Field Digital Mammography (FFDM) is a static imaging modality that requires high saturation dose levels. These opposing requirements can only be met by a dynamic detector with a high dynamic range. This paper will discuss a wafer-scale CMOS-based mammography detector with 49.5 μm pixels and a CsI scintillator. Excellent image quality is obtained for FFDM as well as DBT applications, comparing favorably with a-Se detectors that dominate the X-ray mammography market today. The typical dynamic range of a mammography detector is not high enough to accommodate both the low noise and the high saturation dose requirements for DBT and FFDM applications, respectively. An approach based on gain switching does not provide the signal-to-noise benefits in the low-dose DBT conditions. The solution to this is to add frame summing functionality to the detector. In one X-ray pulse several image frames will be acquired and summed. The requirements to implement this into a detector are low noise levels, high frame rates and low lag performance, all of which are unique characteristics of CMOS detectors. Results are presented to prove that excellent image quality is achieved, using a single detector for both DBT as well as FFDM dose conditions. This method of frame summing gave the opportunity to optimize the detector noise and saturation level for DBT applications, to achieve high DQE level at low dose, without compromising the FFDM performance.

  6. Charged particle detection performances of CMOS pixel sensors produced in a 0.18 μm process with a high resistivity epitaxial layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senyukov, S.; Baudot, J.; Besson, A.; Claus, G.; Cousin, L.; Dorokhov, A.; Dulinski, W.; Goffe, M.; Hu-Guo, C.; Winter, M.

    2013-12-01

    The apparatus of the ALICE experiment at CERN will be upgraded in 2017/18 during the second long shutdown of the LHC (LS2). A major motivation for this upgrade is to extend the physics reach for charmed and beauty particles down to low transverse momenta. This requires a substantial improvement of the spatial resolution and the data rate capability of the ALICE Inner Tracking System (ITS). To achieve this goal, the new ITS will be equipped with 50 μm thin CMOS Pixel Sensors (CPS) covering either the three innermost layers or all the 7 layers of the detector. The CPS being developed for the ITS upgrade at IPHC (Strasbourg) is derived from the MIMOSA 28 sensor realised for the STAR-PXL at RHIC in a 0.35 μm CMOS process. In order to satisfy the ITS upgrade requirements in terms of readout speed and radiation tolerance, a CMOS process with a reduced feature size and a high resistivity epitaxial layer should be exploited. In this respect, the charged particle detection performance and radiation hardness of the TowerJazz 0.18 μm CMOS process were studied with the help of the first prototype chip MIMOSA 32. The beam tests performed with negative pions of 120 GeV/c at the CERN-SPS allowed to measure a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for the non-irradiated chip in the range between 22 and 32 depending on the pixel design. The chip irradiated with the combined dose of 1 MRad and 1013neq /cm2 was observed to yield an SNR ranging between 11 and 23 for coolant temperatures varying from 15 °C to 30 °C. These SNR values were measured to result in particle detection efficiencies above 99.5% and 98% before and after irradiation, respectively. These satisfactory results allow to validate the TowerJazz 0.18 μm CMOS process for the ALICE ITS upgrade.

  7. Cryogenic, high speed, turbopump bearing cooling requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolan, Fred J.; Gibson, Howard G.; Cannon, James L.; Cody, Joe C.

    1988-01-01

    Although the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) has repeatedly demonstrated the capability to perform during launch, the High Pressure Oxidizer Turbopump (HPOTP) main shaft bearings have not met their 7.5 hour life requirement. A tester is being employed to provide the capability of subjecting full scale bearings and seals to speeds, loads, propellants, temperatures, and pressures which simulate engine operating conditions. The tester design permits much more elaborate instrumentation and diagnostics than could be accommodated in an SSME turbopump. Tests were made to demonstrate the facilities; and the devices' capabilities, to verify the instruments in its operating environment and to establish a performance baseline for the flight type SSME HPOTP Turbine Bearing design. Bearing performance data from tests are being utilized to generate: (1) a high speed, cryogenic turbopump bearing computer mechanical model, and (2) a much improved, very detailed thermal model to better understand bearing internal operating conditions. Parametric tests were also made to determine the effects of speed, axial loads, coolant flow rate, and surface finish degradation on bearing performance.

  8. Pressure Distribution Over Airfoils at High Speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briggs, L J; Dryden, H L

    1927-01-01

    This report deals with the pressure distribution over airfoils at high speeds, and describes an extension of an investigation of the aerodynamic characteristics of certain airfoils which was presented in NACA Technical Report no. 207. The results presented in report no. 207 have been confirmed and extended to higher speeds through a more extensive and systematic series of tests. Observations were also made of the air flow near the surface of the airfoils, and the large changes in lift coefficients were shown to be associated with a sudden breaking away of the flow from the upper surface. The tests were made on models of 1-inch chord and comparison with the earlier measurements on models of 3-inch chord shows that the sudden change in the lift coefficient is due to compressibility and not to a change in the Reynolds number. The Reynolds number still has a large effect, however, on the drag coefficient. The pressure distribution observations furnish the propeller designer with data on the load distribution at high speeds, and also give a better picture of the air-flow changes.

  9. CMOS highly linear direct-conversion transmitter for WCDMA with fine gain accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Li; Jian, Fu; Yumei, Huang; Zhiliang, Hong

    2011-08-01

    A highly linear, high output power, 0.13 μm CMOS direct conversion transmitter for wideband code division multiple access (WCDMA) is described. The transmitter delivers 6.8 dBm output power with 38 mA current consumption. With careful design on the resistor bank in the IQ-modulator, the gain step accuracy is within 0.1 dB, hence the image rejection ratio can be kept below -47 dBc for the entire output range. The adjacent channel leakage ratio and the LO leakage at 6.8 dBm output power are -44 dBc @ 5 MHz and -37 dBc, respectively, and the corresponding EVM is 3.6%. The overall gain can be programmed in 6 dB steps in a 66-dB range.

  10. An Analog Gamma Correction Scheme for High Dynamic Range CMOS Logarithmic Image Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Yuan; Pan, Xiaofang; Zhao, Xiaojin; Wu, Huisi

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a novel analog gamma correction scheme with a logarithmic image sensor dedicated to minimize the quantization noise of the high dynamic applications is presented. The proposed implementation exploits a non-linear voltage-controlled-oscillator (VCO) based analog-to-digital converter (ADC) to perform the gamma correction during the analog-to-digital conversion. As a result, the quantization noise does not increase while the same high dynamic range of logarithmic image sensor is preserved. Moreover, by combining the gamma correction with the analog-to-digital conversion, the silicon area and overall power consumption can be greatly reduced. The proposed gamma correction scheme is validated by the reported simulation results and the experimental results measured for our designed test structure, which is fabricated with 0.35 μm standard complementary-metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) process. PMID:25517692

  11. A low-power CMOS WIA-PA transceiver with a high sensitivity GFSK demodulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Yang; Yu, Jiang; Shengyou, Liu; Guiliang, Guo; Yuepeng, Yan

    2015-06-01

    This paper presents a low power, high sensitivity Gaussian frequency shift keying (GFSK) demodulator with a flexible frequency offset canceling method for wireless networks for industrial automation process automation (WIA-PA) transceiver fabricated in 0.18 μm CMOS technology. The receiver uses a low-IF (1.5 MHz) architecture, and the transmitter uses a sigma delta PLL based modulation with Gaussian low-pass filter for low power consumption. The active area of the demodulator is 0.14 mm2. Measurement results show that the proposed demodulator operates without harmonic distortion, deals with ± 180 kHz frequency offset, needs SNR only 18.5 dB at 0.1% bit-error rate (BER), and consumes no more than 0.26 mA from a 1.8 V power supply. Project supported by the National High Technology Research and Development Program of China (No. 2011AA040102).

  12. An analog gamma correction scheme for high dynamic range CMOS logarithmic image sensors.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yuan; Pan, Xiaofang; Zhao, Xiaojin; Wu, Huisi

    2014-12-15

    In this paper, a novel analog gamma correction scheme with a logarithmic image sensor dedicated to minimize the quantization noise of the high dynamic applications is presented. The proposed implementation exploits a non-linear voltage-controlled-oscillator (VCO) based analog-to-digital converter (ADC) to perform the gamma correction during the analog-to-digital conversion. As a result, the quantization noise does not increase while the same high dynamic range of logarithmic image sensor is preserved. Moreover, by combining the gamma correction with the analog-to-digital conversion, the silicon area and overall power consumption can be greatly reduced. The proposed gamma correction scheme is validated by the reported simulation results and the experimental results measured for our designed test structure, which is fabricated with 0.35 μm standard complementary-metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) process.

  13. High-Speed, High-Resolution Time-to-Digital Conversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, Richard; Kleyner, Igor; Garcia, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    This innovation is a series of time-tag pulses from a photomultiplier tube, featuring short time interval between pulses (e.g., 2.5 ns). Using the previous art, dead time between pulses is too long, or too much hardware is required, including a very-high-speed demultiplexer. A faster method is needed. The goal of this work is to provide circuits to time-tag pulses that arrive at a high rate using the hardwired logic in an FPGA - specifically the carry chain - to create what is (in effect) an analog delay line. High-speed pulses travel down the chain in a "wave." For instance, a pulse train has been demonstrated from a 1- GHz source reliably traveling down the carry chain. The size of the carry chain is over 10 ns in the time domain. Thus, multiple pulses will travel down the carry chain in a wave simultaneously. A register clocked by a low-skew clock takes a "snapshot" of the wave. Relatively simple logic can extract the pulses from the snapshot picture by detecting the transitions between logic states. The propagation delay of CMOS (complementary metal oxide semiconductor) logic circuits will differ and/or change as a result of temperature, voltage, age, radiation, and manufacturing variances. The time-to-digital conversion circuits can be calibrated with test signals, or the changes can be nulled by a separate on-die calibration channel, in a closed loop circuit.

  14. An SAE high speed ring bus overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroeger, Brian W.; Shih, Hubert

    An overview of the protocols and important features of the SAE high-speed ring bus (HSRB) standard is presented here, along with the functional design of a typical ring interface unit architecture. The counterrotating ring topology, with both loopback and bypass mechanisms, provides the high degree of fault tolerance desirable in many military and avionic systems. The error-detection, fault-detection, and recovery mechanisms are briefly described to illustrate the robustness of the HSRB system. The reserved-priority token-passing protocol is shown to provide efficient and deterministic performance, uselful in real-time applications where messages must be transmitted predictably, quickly, and reliably.

  15. High-Speed Propeller for Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sagerser, D. A.; Gatzen, B. S.

    1986-01-01

    Engine efficiency increased. Propeller blades required to be quite thin and highly swept to minimize compressibility losses and propeller noise during high-speed cruise. Use of 8 or 10 blades with highpropeller-power loading allows overall propeller diameter to be kept relatively small. Area-ruled spinner and integrated nacelle shape reduce compressibility losses in propeller hub region. Finally, large modern turboshaft engine and gearbox provide power to advanced propeller. Fuel savings of 30 to 50 percent over present systems anticipated. Propfan system adaptable to number of applications, such as highspeed (subsonic) business and general-aviation aircraft, and military aircraft including V/STOL.

  16. High speed GaN micro-light-emitting diode arrays for data communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Scott; McKendry, Jonathan J. D.; Zhang, Shuailong; Massoubre, David; Rae, Bruce R.; Green, Richard P.; Gu, Erdan; Henderson, Robert K.; Kelly, A. E.; Dawson, Martin D.

    2012-10-01

    Micro light-emitting diode (micro-LED) arrays based on an AlInGaN structure have attracted much interest recently as light sources for data communications. Visible light communication (VLC), over free space or plastic optical fibre (POF), has become a very important technique in the role of data transmission. The micro-LEDs which are reported here contain pixels ranging in diameter from 14 to 84μm and can be driven directly using a high speed probe or via complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology. The CMOS arrays allow for easy, computer control of individual pixels within arrays containing up to 16×16 elements. The micro-LEDs best suited for data transmission have peak emissions of 450nm or 520nm, however various other wavelengths across the visible spectrum can also be used. Optical modulation bandwidths of over 400MHz have been achieved as well as error-free (defined as an error rate of <1x10-10) data transmission using on-off keying (OOK) non-return-to-zero (NRZ) modulation at data rates of over 500Mbit/s over free space. Also, as a step towards a more practical multi-emitter data transmitter, the frequency response of a micro-LED integrated with CMOS circuitry was measured and found to be up to 185MHz. Despite the reduction in bandwidth compared to the bare measurements using a high speed probe, a good compromise is achieved from the additional control available to select each pixel. It has been shown that modulating more than one pixel simultaneously can increase the data rate. As work continues in this area, the aim will be to further increase the data transmission rate by modulating more pixels on a single device to transmit multiple parallel data channels simultaneously.

  17. High-Speed, high-power, switching transistor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carnahan, D.; Ohu, C. K.; Hower, P. L.

    1979-01-01

    Silicon transistor rate for 200 angstroms at 400 to 600 volts combines switching speed of transistors with ruggedness, power capacity of thyristor. Transistor introduces unique combination of increased power-handling capability, unusally low saturation and switching losses, and submicrosecond switching speeds. Potential applications include high power switching regulators, linear amplifiers, chopper controls for high frequency electrical vehicle drives, VLF transmitters, RF induction heaters, kitchen cooking ranges, and electronic scalpels for medical surgery.

  18. High-speed Civil Transport Aircraft Emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miake-Lye, Richard C.; Matulaitis, J. A.; Krause, F. H.; Dodds, Willard J.; Albers, Martin; Hourmouziadis, J.; Hasel, K. L.; Lohmann, R. P.; Stander, C.; Gerstle, John H.

    1992-01-01

    Estimates are given for the emissions from a proposed high speed civil transport (HSCT). This advanced technology supersonic aircraft would fly in the lower stratosphere at a speed of roughly Mach 1.6 to 3.2 (470 to 950 m/sec or 920 to 1850 knots). Because it would fly in the stratosphere at an altitude in the range of 15 to 23 km commensurate with its design speed, its exhaust effluents could perturb the chemical balance in the upper atmosphere. The first step in determining the nature and magnitude of any chemical changes in the atmosphere resulting from these proposed aircraft is to identify and quantify the chemically important species they emit. Relevant earlier work is summarized, dating back to the Climatic Impact Assessment Program of the early 1970s and current propulsion research efforts. Estimates are provided of the chemical composition of an HSCT's exhaust, and these emission indices are presented. Other aircraft emissions that are not due to combustion processes are also summarized; these emissions are found to be much smaller than the exhaust emissions. Future advances in propulsion technology, in experimental measurement techniques, and in understanding upper atmospheric chemistry may affect these estimates of the amounts of trace exhaust species or their relative importance.

  19. Exhaust emissions from high speed passenger ferries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, D. A.

    Exhaust emission measurements have been carried out on-board three high-speed passenger ferries (A, B and C) during normal service routes. Ship A was powered by conventional, medium-speed, marine diesel engines, Ship B by gas turbine engines and Ship C conventional, medium-speed, marine diesel engines equipped with selective catalytic reduction (SCR) systems for NO x abatement. All ships had similar auxiliary engines (marine diesels) for generating electric power on-board. Real-world emission factors of NOx, SO2, CO, CO 2, NMVOC, CH4, N2O, NH3, PM and PAH at steady-state engine loads and for complete voyages were determined together with an estimate of annual emissions. In general, Ship B using gas turbines showed favourable NO x, PM and PAH emissions but at the expense of higher fuel consumption and CO 2 emissions. Ship C with the SCR had the lowest NO x emissions but highest NH 3 emissions especially during harbour approaches and stops. The greatest PM and PAH specific emissions were measured from auxiliary engines operating at low engine loads during harbour stops. Since all ships used a low-sulphur gas oil, SO 2 emissions were relatively low in all cases.

  20. An integrated low 1/f noise and high-sensitivity CMOS instrumentation amplifier for TMR sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Zhiqiang; Luan, Bo; Zhao, Jincai; Liu, Xiaowei

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, a very low 1/f noise integrated Wheatstone bridge magnetoresistive sensor ASIC based on magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) technology is presented for high sensitivity measurements. The present CMOS instrumentation amplifier employs the gain-boost folded-cascode structure based on the capacitive-feedback chopper-stabilized technique. By chopping both the input and the output of the amplifier, combined with MTJ magnetoresistive sensitive elements, a noise equivalent magnetoresistance 1 nT/Hz1/2 at 2 Hz, the equivalent input noise spectral density 17 nV/Hz1/2(@2Hz) is achieved. The chip-scale package of the TMR sensor and the instrumentation amplifier is only about 5 mm × 5 mm × 1 mm, while the whole DC current dissipates only 2 mA.

  1. Fibre-optic coupling to high-resolution CCD and CMOS image sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Silfhout, R. G.; Kachatkou, A. S.

    2008-12-01

    We describe a simple method of gluing fibre-optic faceplates to complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) active pixel and charge coupled device (CCD) image sensors and report on their performance. Cross-sectional cuts reveal that the bonding layer has a thickness close to the diameter of the individual fibres and is uniform over the whole sensor area. Our method requires no special tools or alignment equipment and gives reproducible and high-quality results. The method maintains a uniform bond layer thickness even if sensor dies are mounted at slight angles with their package. These fibre-coupled sensors are of particular interest to X-ray imaging applications but also provide a solution for compact optical imaging systems.

  2. A high linearity X-band SOI CMOS digitally-controlled phase shifter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Chen; Xinyu, Chen; Youtao, Zhang; Zhiqun, Li; Lei, Yang

    2015-06-01

    This paper proposed an X-band 6-bit passive phase shifter (PS) designed in 0.18 μm silicon-on-insulator (SOI) CMOS technology, which solves the key problem of high integration degree, low power, and a small size T/R module. The switched-topology is employed to achieve broadband and flat phase shift. The ESD circuit and driver are also integrated in the PS. It covers the frequency band from 7.5 to 10.5 GHz with an EMS phase error less than 7.5°. The input and output VSWRs are less than 2 and the insertion loss (IL) is between 8-14 dB across the 7.5 to 10.5 GHz, with a maximum IL difference of 4 dB. The input 1 dB compression point (IP1dB) is 20 dBm.

  3. Three-Dimensional Image Cytometer Based on Widefield Structured Light Microscopy and High-Speed Remote Depth Scanning

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Heejin; Wadduwage, Dushan N.; Tu, Ting Yuan; Matsudaira, Paul; So, Peter T. C.

    2014-01-01

    A high throughput 3D image cytometer have been developed that improves imaging speed by an order of magnitude over current technologies. This imaging speed improvement was realized by combining several key components. First, a depth-resolved image can be rapidly generated using a structured light reconstruction algorithm that requires only two wide field images, one with uniform illumination and the other with structured illumination. Second, depth scanning is implemented using the high speed remote depth scanning. Finally, the large field of view, high NA objective lens and the high pixelation, high frame rate sCMOS camera enable high resolution, high sensitivity imaging of a large cell population. This system can image at 800 cell/sec in 3D at submicron resolution corresponding to imaging 1 million cells in 20 min. The statistical accuracy of this instrument is verified by quantitatively measuring rare cell populations with ratio ranging from 1:1 to 1:105. PMID:25352187

  4. Experimental and theoretical performance analysis for a CMOS-based high resolution image detector

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Amit; Bednarek, Daniel R.; Rudin, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Increasing complexity of endovascular interventional procedures requires superior x-ray imaging quality. Present state-of-the-art x-ray imaging detectors may not be adequate due to their inherent noise and resolution limitations. With recent developments, CMOS based detectors are presenting an option to fulfill the need for better image quality. For this work, a new CMOS detector has been analyzed experimentally and theoretically in terms of sensitivity, MTF and DQE. The detector (Dexela Model 1207, Perkin-Elmer Co., London, UK) features 14-bit image acquisition, a CsI phosphor, 75 µm pixels and an active area of 12 cm × 7 cm with over 30 fps frame rate. This detector has two modes of operations with two different full-well capacities: high and low sensitivity. The sensitivity and instrumentation noise equivalent exposure (INEE) were calculated for both modes. The detector modulation-transfer function (MTF), noise-power spectra (NPS) and detective quantum efficiency (DQE) were measured using an RQA5 spectrum. For the theoretical performance evaluation, a linear cascade model with an added aliasing stage was used. The detector showed excellent linearity in both modes. The sensitivity and the INEE of the detector were found to be 31.55 DN/µR and 0.55 µR in high sensitivity mode, while they were 9.87 DN/µR and 2.77 µR in low sensitivity mode. The theoretical and experimental values for the MTF and DQE showed close agreement with good DQE even at fluoroscopic exposure levels. In summary, the Dexela detector's imaging performance in terms of sensitivity, linear system metrics, and INEE demonstrates that it can overcome the noise and resolution limitations of present state-of-the-art x-ray detectors. PMID:25300571

  5. Experimental and theoretical performance analysis for a CMOS-based high resolution image detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Amit; Bednarek, Daniel R.; Rudin, Stephen

    2014-03-01

    Increasing complexity of endovascular interventional procedures requires superior x-ray imaging quality. Present stateof- the-art x-ray imaging detectors may not be adequate due to their inherent noise and resolution limitations. With recent developments, CMOS based detectors are presenting an option to fulfill the need for better image quality. For this work, a new CMOS detector has been analyzed experimentally and theoretically in terms of sensitivity, MTF and DQE. The detector (Dexela Model 1207, Perkin-Elmer Co., London, UK) features 14-bit image acquisition, a CsI phosphor, 75 μm pixels and an active area of 12 cm x 7 cm with over 30 fps frame rate. This detector has two modes of operations with two different full-well capacities: high and low sensitivity. The sensitivity and instrumentation noise equivalent exposure (INEE) were calculated for both modes. The detector modulation-transfer function (MTF), noise-power spectra (NPS) and detective quantum efficiency (DQE) were measured using an RQA5 spectrum. For the theoretical performance evaluation, a linear cascade model with an added aliasing stage was used. The detector showed excellent linearity in both modes. The sensitivity and the INEE of the detector were found to be 31.55 DN/μR and 0.55 μR in high sensitivity mode, while they were 9.87 DN/μR and 2.77 μR in low sensitivity mode. The theoretical and experimental values for the MTF and DQE showed close agreement with good DQE even at fluoroscopic exposure levels. In summary, the Dexela detector's imaging performance in terms of sensitivity, linear system metrics, and INEE demonstrates that it can overcome the noise and resolution limitations of present state-of-the-art x-ray detectors.

  6. Experimental and theoretical performance analysis for a CMOS-based high resolution image detector.

    PubMed

    Jain, Amit; Bednarek, Daniel R; Rudin, Stephen

    2014-03-19

    Increasing complexity of endovascular interventional procedures requires superior x-ray imaging quality. Present state-of-the-art x-ray imaging detectors may not be adequate due to their inherent noise and resolution limitations. With recent developments, CMOS based detectors are presenting an option to fulfill the need for better image quality. For this work, a new CMOS detector has been analyzed experimentally and theoretically in terms of sensitivity, MTF and DQE. The detector (Dexela Model 1207, Perkin-Elmer Co., London, UK) features 14-bit image acquisition, a CsI phosphor, 75 µm pixels and an active area of 12 cm × 7 cm with over 30 fps frame rate. This detector has two modes of operations with two different full-well capacities: high and low sensitivity. The sensitivity and instrumentation noise equivalent exposure (INEE) were calculated for both modes. The detector modulation-transfer function (MTF), noise-power spectra (NPS) and detective quantum efficiency (DQE) were measured using an RQA5 spectrum. For the theoretical performance evaluation, a linear cascade model with an added aliasing stage was used. The detector showed excellent linearity in both modes. The sensitivity and the INEE of the detector were found to be 31.55 DN/µR and 0.55 µR in high sensitivity mode, while they were 9.87 DN/µR and 2.77 µR in low sensitivity mode. The theoretical and experimental values for the MTF and DQE showed close agreement with good DQE even at fluoroscopic exposure levels. In summary, the Dexela detector's imaging performance in terms of sensitivity, linear system metrics, and INEE demonstrates that it can overcome the noise and resolution limitations of present state-of-the-art x-ray detectors.

  7. High-speed multispectral confocal biomedical imaging

    PubMed Central

    Carver, Gary E.; Locknar, Sarah A.; Morrison, William A.; Krishnan Ramanujan, V.; Farkas, Daniel L.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. A new approach for generating high-speed multispectral confocal images has been developed. The central concept is that spectra can be acquired for each pixel in a confocal spatial scan by using a fast spectrometer based on optical fiber delay lines. This approach merges fast spectroscopy with standard spatial scanning to create datacubes in real time. The spectrometer is based on a serial array of reflecting spectral elements, delay lines between these elements, and a single element detector. The spatial, spectral, and temporal resolution of the instrument is described and illustrated by multispectral images of laser-induced autofluorescence in biological tissues. PMID:24658777

  8. Structure of High-Speed Sprays.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-02-01

    AD-Ri65 655 STRUCTURE OF HIGH-SPEED SPRAYS(U) PRINCETON UNIV NJ 1 /2 DEPT OF MECHRNICRL AND AEROSPACE ENGINEERING BRACCO FEB 85 ARO-i8333.7-EG DRAG29...and vaporization was negligible. During the second 3-year ARO grant for the period July 81-June 84 drop sizes ( 1 ) were measured by photography in the...tial drop size has been evaluated only preliminarily ( 1 ). But the prediction of the intact core length Is both weaker and largely untested. It Is weaker

  9. High Speed Solid State Circuit Breaker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podlesak, Thomas F.

    1993-01-01

    The U.S. Army Research Laboratory, Fort Monmouth, NJ, has developed and is installing two 3.3 MW high speed solid state circuit breakers at the Army's Pulse Power Center. These circuit breakers will interrupt 4160V three phase power mains in no more than 300 microseconds, two orders of magnitude faster than conventional mechanical contact type circuit breakers. These circuit breakers utilize Gate Turnoff Thyristors (GTO's) and are currently utility type devices using air cooling in an air conditioned enclosure. Future refinements include liquid cooling, either water or two phase organic coolant, and more advanced semiconductors. Each of these refinements promises a more compact, more reliable unit.

  10. Characterization and Compensation of High Speed Digitizers

    SciTech Connect

    Fong, P; Teruya, A; Lowry, M

    2005-04-04

    Increasingly, ADC technology is being pressed into service for single single-shot instrumentation applications that were formerly served by vacuum-tube based oscilloscopes and streak cameras. ADC technology, while convenient, suffers significant performance impairments. Thus, in these demanding applications, a quantitative and accurate representation of these impairments is critical to an understanding of measurement accuracy. We have developed a phase-plane behavioral model, implemented it in SIMULINK and applied it to interleaved, high-speed ADCs (up to 4 gigasamples/sec). We have also developed and demonstrated techniques to effectively compensate for these impairments based upon the model.

  11. Continuous QKD and high speed data encryption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zbinden, Hugo; Walenta, Nino; Guinnard, Olivier; Houlmann, Raphael; Wen, Charles Lim Ci; Korzh, Boris; Lunghi, Tommaso; Gisin, Nicolas; Burg, Andreas; Constantin, Jeremy; Legré, Matthieu; Trinkler, Patrick; Caselunghe, Dario; Kulesza, Natalia; Trolliet, Gregory; Vannel, Fabien; Junod, Pascal; Auberson, Olivier; Graf, Yoan; Curchod, Gilles; Habegger, Gilles; Messerli, Etienne; Portmann, Christopher; Henzen, Luca; Keller, Christoph; Pendl, Christian; Mühlberghuber, Michael; Roth, Christoph; Felber, Norbert; Gürkaynak, Frank; Schöni, Daniel; Muheim, Beat

    2013-10-01

    We present the results of a Swiss project dedicated to the development of high speed quantum key distribution and data encryption. The QKD engine features fully automated key exchange, hardware key distillation based on finite key security analysis, efficient authentication and wavelength division multiplexing of the quantum and the classical channel and one-time pas encryption. The encryption device allows authenticated symmetric key encryption (e.g AES) at rates of up to 100 Gb/s. A new quantum key can uploaded up to 1000 times second from the QKD engine.

  12. Applications for high-speed infrared imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, Austin A.

    2005-03-01

    The phrase high-speed imaging is generally associated with short exposure times, fast frame rates or both. Supersonic projectiles, for example, are often impossible to see with the unaided eye, and require strobe photography to stop their apparent motion. It is often necessary to image high-speed objects in the infrared region of the spectrum, either to detect them or to measure their surface temperature. Conventional infrared cameras have time constants similar to the human eye, so they too, are often at a loss when it comes to photographing fast-moving hot targets. Other types of targets or scenes such as explosions change very rapidly with time. Visualizing those changes requires an extremely high frame rate combined with short exposure times in order to slow down a dynamic event so that it can be studied and quantified. Recent advances in infrared sensor technology and computing power have pushed the envelope of what is possible to achieve with commercial IR camera systems.

  13. Study of high-speed civil transports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    A systems study to identify the economic potential for a high-speed commercial transport (HSCT) has considered technology, market characteristics, airport infrastructure, and environmental issues. Market forecasts indicate a need for HSCT service in the 2000/2010 time frame conditioned on economic viability and environmental acceptability. Design requirements focused on a 300 passenger, 3 class service, and 6500 nautical mile range based on the accelerated growth of the Pacific region. Compatibility with existing airports was an assumed requirement. Mach numbers between 2 and 25 were examined in conjunction with the appropriate propulsion systems, fuels, structural materials, and thermal management systems. Aircraft productivity was a key parameter with aircraft worth, in comparison to aircraft price, being the airline-oriented figure of merit. Aircraft screening led to determination that Mach 3.2 (TSJF) would have superior characteristics to Mach 5.0 (LNG) and the recommendation that the next generation high-speed commercial transport aircraft use a kerosene fuel. The sensitivity of aircraft performance and economics to environmental constraints (e.g., sonic boom, engine emissions, and airport/community noise) was identified together with key technologies. In all, current technology is not adequate to produce viable HSCTs for the world marketplace. Technology advancements must be accomplished to meet environmental requirements (these requirements are as yet undetermined for sonic boom and engine emissions). High priority is assigned to aircraft gross weight reduction which benefits both economics and environmental aspects. Specific technology requirements are identified and national economic benefits are projected.

  14. TOPICAL REVIEW: Plasmas in high speed aerodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bletzinger, P.; Ganguly, B. N.; Van Wie, D.; Garscadden, A.

    2005-02-01

    A review is presented of the studies in the former Soviet Union and in the USA of the mutual interactions of plasmas and high speed flows and shocks. There are reports from as early as the 1980s of large changes in the standoff distance ahead of a blunt body in ballistic tunnels, significantly reduced drag and modifications of travelling shocks in bounded weakly ionized gases. Energy addition to the flow results in an increase in the local sound speed that leads to expected modifications of the flow and changes to the pressure distribution around a vehicle due to the decrease in local Mach number. The critical question was, did a plasma provide a significant energy multiplier for the system? There have been a large number of experimental studies on the influence of a weakly ionized plasma on relatively low Mach number shocks and inherently also on the influence of the shock on the plasma. This literature is reviewed and illustrated with representative examples. The convergence through more controlled experiments and improved modelling to a physics understanding of the effects being essentially due to heating is outlined. It is demonstrated that the heating in many cases is global; however, tailored experiments with positive columns, dielectric barrier discharges and focused microwave plasmas can produce very localized heating. The latter appears more attractive for energy efficiency in flow control. Tailored localized ionization and thermal effects are also of interest for high speed inlet shock control and for producing reliable ignition for short residence time combustors, and work in these areas is also reviewed.

  15. Anti-scatter grid artifact elimination for high resolution x-ray imaging CMOS detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rana, R.; Singh, V.; Jain, A.; Bednarek, D. R.; Rudin, S.

    2015-03-01

    Higher resolution in dynamic radiological imaging such as angiography is increasingly being demanded by clinicians; however, when standard anti-scatter grids are used with such new high resolution detectors, grid-line artifacts become more apparent resulting in increased structured noise that may overcome the contrast signal improvement benefits of the scatter-reducing grid. Although grid-lines may in theory be eliminated by dividing the image of a patient taken with the grid by a flat-field image taken with the grid obtained prior to the clinical image, unless the remaining additive scatter contribution is subtracted in real-time from the dynamic clinical image sequence before the division by the reference image, severe grid-line artifacts may remain. To investigate grid-line elimination, a stationary Smit Röntgen X-ray grid (line density: 70 lines/cm, grid ratio 13:1) was used with both a 75 micron-pixel CMOS detector and a standard 194 micron-pixel flat panel detector (FPD) to image an artery block insert placed in a modified uniform frontal head phantom for a 20 x 20cm FOV (approximately). Contrast and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were measured with and without scatter subtraction prior to grid-line correction. The fixed pattern noise caused by the grid was substantially higher for the CMOS detector compared to the FPD and caused a severe reduction of CNR. However, when the scatter subtraction corrective method was used, the removal of the fixed pattern noise (grid artifacts) became evident resulting in images with improved CNR.

  16. Anti-scatter grid artifact elimination for high resolution x-ray imaging CMOS detectors

    PubMed Central

    Rana, R.; Singh, V.; Jain, A.; Bednarek, D.R.; Rudin, S.

    2015-01-01

    Higher resolution in dynamic radiological imaging such as angiography is increasingly being demanded by clinicians; however, when standard anti-scatter grids are used with such new high resolution detectors, grid-line artifacts become more apparent resulting in increased structured noise that may overcome the contrast signal improvement benefits of the scatter-reducing grid. Although grid-lines may in theory be eliminated by dividing the image of a patient taken with the grid by a flat-field image taken with the grid obtained prior to the clinical image, unless the remaining additive scatter contribution is subtracted in real-time from the dynamic clinical image sequence before the division by the reference image, severe grid-line artifacts may remain. To investigate grid-line elimination, a stationary Smit Röntgen X-ray grid (line density: 70 lines/cm, grid ratio 13:1) was used with both a 75 micron-pixel CMOS detector and a standard 194 micron-pixel flat panel detector (FPD) to image an artery block insert placed in a modified uniform frontal head phantom for a 20 × 20cm FOV (approximately). Contrast and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were measured with and without scatter subtraction prior to grid-line correction. The fixed pattern noise caused by the grid was substantially higher for the CMOS detector compared to the FPD and caused a severe reduction of CNR. However, when the scatter subtraction corrective method was used, the removal of the fixed pattern noise (grid artifacts) became evident resulting in images with improved CNR. PMID:26877578

  17. Anti-scatter grid artifact elimination for high resolution x-ray imaging CMOS detectors.

    PubMed

    Rana, R; Singh, V; Jain, A; Bednarek, D R; Rudin, S

    Higher resolution in dynamic radiological imaging such as angiography is increasingly being demanded by clinicians; however, when standard anti-scatter grids are used with such new high resolution detectors, grid-line artifacts become more apparent resulting in increased structured noise that may overcome the contrast signal improvement benefits of the scatter-reducing grid. Although grid-lines may in theory be eliminated by dividing the image of a patient taken with the grid by a flat-field image taken with the grid obtained prior to the clinical image, unless the remaining additive scatter contribution is subtracted in real-time from the dynamic clinical image sequence before the division by the reference image, severe grid-line artifacts may remain. To investigate grid-line elimination, a stationary Smit Röntgen X-ray grid (line density: 70 lines/cm, grid ratio 13:1) was used with both a 75 micron-pixel CMOS detector and a standard 194 micron-pixel flat panel detector (FPD) to image an artery block insert placed in a modified uniform frontal head phantom for a 20 × 20cm FOV (approximately). Contrast and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were measured with and without scatter subtraction prior to grid-line correction. The fixed pattern noise caused by the grid was substantially higher for the CMOS detector compared to the FPD and caused a severe reduction of CNR. However, when the scatter subtraction corrective method was used, the removal of the fixed pattern noise (grid artifacts) became evident resulting in images with improved CNR.

  18. Design and image-quality performance of high resolution CMOS-based X-ray imaging detectors for digital mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cha, B. K.; Kim, J. Y.; Kim, Y. J.; Yun, S.; Cho, G.; Kim, H. K.; Seo, C.-W.; Jeon, S.; Huh, Y.

    2012-04-01

    In digital X-ray imaging systems, X-ray imaging detectors based on scintillating screens with electronic devices such as charge-coupled devices (CCDs), thin-film transistors (TFT), complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) flat panel imagers have been introduced for general radiography, dental, mammography and non-destructive testing (NDT) applications. Recently, a large-area CMOS active-pixel sensor (APS) in combination with scintillation films has been widely used in a variety of digital X-ray imaging applications. We employed a scintillator-based CMOS APS image sensor for high-resolution mammography. In this work, both powder-type Gd2O2S:Tb and a columnar structured CsI:Tl scintillation screens with various thicknesses were fabricated and used as materials to convert X-ray into visible light. These scintillating screens were directly coupled to a CMOS flat panel imager with a 25 × 50 mm2 active area and a 48 μm pixel pitch for high spatial resolution acquisition. We used a W/Al mammographic X-ray source with a 30 kVp energy condition. The imaging characterization of the X-ray detector was measured and analyzed in terms of linearity in incident X-ray dose, modulation transfer function (MTF), noise-power spectrum (NPS) and detective quantum efficiency (DQE).

  19. High-speed optogenetic circuit mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Augustine, George J.; Chen, Susu; Gill, Harin; Katarya, Malvika; Kim, Jinsook; Kudolo, John; Lee, Li M.; Lee, Hyunjeong; Lo, Shun Qiang; Nakajima, Ryuichi; Park, Min-Yoon; Tan, Gregory; Tang, Yanxia; Teo, Peggy; Tsuda, Sachiko; Wen, Lei; Yoon, Su-In

    2013-03-01

    Scanning small spots of laser light allows mapping of synaptic circuits in brain slices from transgenic mice expressing channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2). These light spots photostimulate presynaptic neurons expressing ChR2, while postsynaptic responses can be monitored in neurons that do not express ChR2. Correlating the location of the light spot with the amplitude of the postsynaptic response elicited at that location yields maps of the spatial organization of the synaptic circuits. This approach yields maps within minutes, which is several orders of magnitude faster than can be achieved with conventional paired electrophysiological methods. We have applied this high-speed technique to map local circuits in many brain regions. In cerebral cortex, we observed that maps of excitatory inputs to pyramidal cells were qualitatively different from those measured for interneurons within the same layers of the cortex. In cerebellum, we have used this approach to quantify the convergence of molecular layer interneurons on to Purkinje cells. The number of converging interneurons is reduced by treatment with gap junction blockers, indicating that electrical synapses between interneurons contribute substantially to the spatial convergence. Remarkably, gap junction blockers affect convergence in sagittal cerebellar slices but not in coronal slices, indicating sagittal polarization of electrical coupling between interneurons. By measuring limb movement or other forms of behavioral output, this approach also can be used in vivo to map brain circuits non-invasively. In summary, ChR2-mediated high-speed mapping promises to revolutionize our understanding of brain circuitry.

  20. ACTS High-Speed VSAT Demonstrated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tran, Quang K.

    1999-01-01

    The Advanced Communication Technology Satellite (ACTS) developed by NASA has demonstrated the breakthrough technologies of Ka-band transmission, spot-beam antennas, and onboard processing. These technologies have enabled the development of very small and ultrasmall aperture terminals (VSAT s and USAT's), which have capabilities greater than have been possible with conventional satellite technologies. The ACTS High Speed VSAT (HS VSAT) is an effort at the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field to experimentally demonstrate the maximum user throughput data rate that can be achieved using the technologies developed and implemented on ACTS. This was done by operating the system uplinks as frequency division multiple access (FDMA), essentially assigning all available time division multiple access (TDMA) time slots to a single user on each of two uplink frequencies. Preliminary results show that, using a 1.2-m antenna in this mode, the High Speed VSAT can achieve between 22 and 24 Mbps of the 27.5 Mbps burst rate, for a throughput efficiency of 80 to 88 percent.

  1. Very high-speed digital holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez López, Carlos; Mendoza Santoyo, Fernando; Rodríguez Vera, Ramón; Moreno, David; Barrientos, Bernardino

    2006-08-01

    It is reported for the first time the use of a high speed camera in digital holography with an out of plane sensitivity. The camera takes the image plane holograms of a cw laser illuminated rectangular framed polyester material at a rate of 5000 per second, that is a spacing of 200 microseconds between holograms, and 512 by 500 pixels at 10 bit resolution. The freely standing object has a random movement due to non controlled environmental air currents. As is usual with this technique each digital hologram is Fourier processed in order to obtain upon comparison with a consecutive digital hologram the phase map of the displacement. High quality results showing the amplitude and direction of the random movement are presented.

  2. High Speed Fibre Optic Backbone LAN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanimoto, Masaaki; Hara, Shingo; Kajita, Yuji; Kashu, Fumitoshi; Ikeuchi, Masaru; Hagihara, Satoshi; Tsuzuki, Shinji

    1987-09-01

    Our firm has developed the SUMINET-4100 series, a fibre optic local area network (LAN), to serve the communications system trunk line needs for facilities, such as steel refineries, automobile plants and university campuses, that require large transmission capacity, and for the backbone networks used in intelligent building systems. The SUMINET-4100 series is already in service in various fields of application. Of the networks available in this series, the SUMINET-4150 has a trunk line speed of 128 Mbps and the multiplexer used for time division multiplexing (TDM) was enabled by designing an ECL-TTL gate array (3000 gates) based custom LSI. The synchronous, full-duplex V.24 and V.3.5 interfaces (SUMINET-2100) are provided for use with general purpose lines. And the IBM token ring network, the SUMINET-3200, designed for heterogeneous PCs and the Ethernet can all be connected to sub loops. Further, the IBM 3270 TCA and 5080 CADAM can be connected in the local mode. Interfaces are also provided for the NTT high-speed digital service, the digital PBX systems, and the Video CODEC system. The built-in loop monitor (LM) and network supervisory processor (NSP) provide management of loop utilization and send loop status signals to the host CPU's network configuration and control facility (NCCF). These built-in functions allow both the computer system and LAN to be managed from a single source at the host. This paper outlines features of the SUMINET-4150 and provides an example of its installation.

  3. Using a High-Speed Camera to Measure the Speed of Sound

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hack, William Nathan; Baird, William H.

    2012-01-01

    The speed of sound is a physical property that can be measured easily in the lab. However, finding an inexpensive and intuitive way for students to determine this speed has been more involved. The introduction of affordable consumer-grade high-speed cameras (such as the Exilim EX-FC100) makes conceptually simple experiments feasible. Since the…

  4. High speed operation of permanent magnet machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Refaie, Ayman M.

    This work proposes methods to extend the high-speed operating capabilities of both the interior PM (IPM) and surface PM (SPM) machines. For interior PM machines, this research has developed and presented the first thorough analysis of how a new bi-state magnetic material can be usefully applied to the design of IPM machines. Key elements of this contribution include identifying how the unique properties of the bi-state magnetic material can be applied most effectively in the rotor design of an IPM machine by "unmagnetizing" the magnet cavity center posts rather than the outer bridges. The importance of elevated rotor speed in making the best use of the bi-state magnetic material while recognizing its limitations has been identified. For surface PM machines, this research has provided, for the first time, a clear explanation of how fractional-slot concentrated windings can be applied to SPM machines in order to achieve the necessary conditions for optimal flux weakening. A closed-form analytical procedure for analyzing SPM machines designed with concentrated windings has been developed. Guidelines for designing SPM machines using concentrated windings in order to achieve optimum flux weakening are provided. Analytical and numerical finite element analysis (FEA) results have provided promising evidence of the scalability of the concentrated winding technique with respect to the number of poles, machine aspect ratio, and output power rating. Useful comparisons between the predicted performance characteristics of SPM machines equipped with concentrated windings and both SPM and IPM machines designed with distributed windings are included. Analytical techniques have been used to evaluate the impact of the high pole number on various converter performance metrics. Both analytical techniques and FEA have been used for evaluating the eddy-current losses in the surface magnets due to the stator winding subharmonics. Techniques for reducing these losses have been

  5. Very high speed cw digital holographic interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-López, Carlos; de La Torre-Ibarra, Manuel H.; Mendoza Santoyo, Fernando

    2006-10-01

    It is reported for the first time the use of a very high speed camera in digital holographic interferometry with an out of plane sensitivity setup. The image plane holograms of a spherical latex balloon illuminated by a cw laser were acquired at a rate of 4000 frames per second, representing a time spacing between holograms of 250 microseconds, for 512 × 512 pixels at 8 bits resolution. Two types of tests were accomplished for a proof of principle of the technique, one with no constrains on the object which meant random movements due to non controlled environmental air currents, and the other with specific controlled conditions on the object. Results presented correspond to a random sample of sequential digital holograms, chosen from a 1 second exposure, individually Fourier processed in order to perform the usual comparison by subtraction between consecutive pairs thus obtaining the phase map of the object out of plane displacement, shown as a movie.

  6. Design of a high speed business transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The design of a High Speed Business Transport (HSBT) was considered by the Aeronautical Design Class during the academic year 1989 to 1990. The project was chosen to offer an opportunity to develop user friendliness for some computer codes such as WAVE DRAG, supplied by NASA/Langley, and to experiment with several design lessons developed by Dr. John McMasters and his colleages at Boeing. Central to these design lessons was an appeal to marketing and feasibility considerations. There was an emphasis upon simplified analytical techniques to study trades and to stimulate creative thinking before committing to extensive analytical activity. Two designs stood out among all the rest because of the depth of thought and consideration of alternatives. One design, the Aurora, used a fixed wing design to satisfy the design mission: the Viero used a swept wing configuration to overcome problems related to supersonic flight. A summary of each of these two designs is given.

  7. Technology needs for high-speed rotorcraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutherford, John; Orourke, Matthew; Martin, Christopher; Lovenguth, Marc; Mitchell, Clark

    1991-01-01

    A study to determine the technology development required for high-speed rotorcraft development was conducted. The study begins with an initial assessment of six concepts capable of flight at, or greater than 450 knots with helicopter-like hover efficiency (disk loading less than 50 pfs). These concepts were sized and evaluated based on measures of effectiveness and operational considerations. Additionally, an initial assessment of the impact of technology advances on the vehicles attributes was made. From these initial concepts a tilt wing and rotor/wing concepts were selected for further evaluation. A more detailed examination of conversion and technology trade studies were conducted on these two vehicles, each sized for a different mission.

  8. HIGH SPEED KERR CELL FRAMING CAMERA

    DOEpatents

    Goss, W.C.; Gilley, L.F.

    1964-01-01

    The present invention relates to a high speed camera utilizing a Kerr cell shutter and a novel optical delay system having no moving parts. The camera can selectively photograph at least 6 frames within 9 x 10/sup -8/ seconds during any such time interval of an occurring event. The invention utilizes particularly an optical system which views and transmits 6 images of an event to a multi-channeled optical delay relay system. The delay relay system has optical paths of successively increased length in whole multiples of the first channel optical path length, into which optical paths the 6 images are transmitted. The successively delayed images are accepted from the exit of the delay relay system by an optical image focusing means, which in turn directs the images into a Kerr cell shutter disposed to intercept the image paths. A camera is disposed to simultaneously view and record the 6 images during a single exposure of the Kerr cell shutter. (AEC)

  9. High speed civil transport aerodynamic optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, James S.

    1994-01-01

    This is a report of work in support of the Computational Aerosciences (CAS) element of the Federal HPCC program. Specifically, CFD and aerodynamic optimization are being performed on parallel computers. The long-range goal of this work is to facilitate teraflops-rate multidisciplinary optimization of aerospace vehicles. This year's work is targeted for application to the High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT), one of four CAS grand challenges identified in the HPCC FY 1995 Blue Book. This vehicle is to be a passenger aircraft, with the promise of cutting overseas flight time by more than half. To meet fuel economy, operational costs, environmental impact, noise production, and range requirements, improved design tools are required, and these tools must eventually integrate optimization, external aerodynamics, propulsion, structures, heat transfer, controls, and perhaps other disciplines. The fundamental goal of this project is to contribute to improved design tools for U.S. industry, and thus to the nation's economic competitiveness.

  10. Merging of high speed argon plasma jets

    SciTech Connect

    Case, A.; Messer, S.; Brockington, S.; Wu, L.; Witherspoon, F. D.; Elton, R.

    2013-01-15

    Formation of an imploding plasma liner for the plasma liner experiment (PLX) requires individual plasma jets to merge into a quasi-spherical shell of plasma converging on the origin. Understanding dynamics of the merging process requires knowledge of the plasma phenomena involved. We present results from the study of the merging of three plasma jets in three dimensional geometry. The experiments were performed using HyperV Technologies Corp. 1 cm Minirailguns with a preionized argon plasma armature. The vacuum chamber partially reproduces the port geometry of the PLX chamber. Diagnostics include fast imaging, spectroscopy, interferometry, fast pressure probes, B-dot probes, and high speed spatially resolved photodiodes, permitting measurements of plasma density, temperature, velocity, stagnation pressure, magnetic field, and density gradients. These experimental results are compared with simulation results from the LSP 3D hybrid PIC code.

  11. Photodetector having high speed and sensitivity

    DOEpatents

    Morse, Jeffrey D.; Mariella, Jr., Raymond P.

    1991-01-01

    The present invention provides a photodetector having an advantageous combination of sensitivity and speed; it has a high sensitivity while retaining high speed. In a preferred embodiment, visible light is detected, but in some embodiments, x-rays can be detected, and in other embodiments infrared can be detected. The present invention comprises a photodetector having an active layer, and a recombination layer. The active layer has a surface exposed to light to be detected, and comprises a semiconductor, having a bandgap graded so that carriers formed due to interaction of the active layer with the incident radiation tend to be swept away from the exposed surface. The graded semiconductor material in the active layer preferably comprises Al.sub.1-x Ga.sub.x As. An additional sub-layer of graded In.sub.1-y Ga.sub.y As may be included between the Al.sub.1-x Ga.sub.x As layer and the recombination layer. The recombination layer comprises a semiconductor material having a short recombination time such as a defective GaAs layer grown in a low temperature process. The recombination layer is positioned adjacent to the active layer so that carriers from the active layer tend to be swept into the recombination layer. In an embodiment, the photodetector may comprise one or more additional layers stacked below the active and recombination layers. These additional layers may include another active layer and another recombination layer to absorb radiation not absorbed while passing through the first layers. A photodetector having a stacked configuration may have enhanced sensitivity and responsiveness at selected wavelengths such as infrared.

  12. High Speed/ Low Effluent Process for Ethanol

    SciTech Connect

    M. Clark Dale

    2006-10-30

    n this project, BPI demonstrated a new ethanol fermentation technology, termed the High Speed/ Low Effluent (HS/LE) process on both lab and large pilot scale as it would apply to wet mill and/or dry mill corn ethanol production. The HS/LE process allows very rapid fermentations, with 18 to 22% sugar syrups converted to 9 to 11% ethanol ‘beers’ in 6 to 12 hours using either a ‘consecutive batch’ or ‘continuous cascade’ implementation. This represents a 5 to 8X increase in fermentation speeds over conventional 72 hour batch fermentations which are the norm in the fuel ethanol industry today. The ‘consecutive batch’ technology was demonstrated on a large pilot scale (4,800 L) in a dry mill corn ethanol plant near Cedar Rapids, IA (Xethanol Biofuels). The pilot demonstrated that 12 hour fermentations can be accomplished on an industrial scale in a non-sterile industrial environment. Other objectives met in this project included development of a Low Energy (LE) Distillation process which reduces the energy requirements for distillation from about 14,000 BTU/gal steam ($0.126/gal with natural gas @ $9.00 MCF) to as low as 0.40 KW/gal electrical requirements ($0.022/gal with electricity @ $0.055/KWH). BPI also worked on the development of processes that would allow application of the HS/LE fermentation process to dry mill ethanol plants. A High-Value Corn ethanol plant concept was developed to produce 1) corn germ/oil, 2) corn bran, 3) ethanol, 4) zein protein, and 5) nutritional protein, giving multiple higher value products from the incoming corn stream.

  13. High-speed shutter for mirror cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trofimenko, Vladimir V.; Klimashin, V. P.; Drozhbin, Yu. A.

    1999-06-01

    High-speed mirror cameras are mainly used for investigations of quick processes in a wide spectral range of radiation including ultraviolet and infrared regions (from 0.2 to 11 micrometer). High-speed shutters for these cameras must be non-selective and when opened must transmit the whole radiation without refraction, absorption and scattering. Electromechanical, electrodynamic and induction-dynamic shutters possess such properties because their optical channels contain no medium. Electromechanical shutters are devices where the displacement of the working blind which opens or closes an aperture is produced by a spring. Such shutters are relatively slow and are capable of closing an aperture of 50 mm in diameter in 10 - 15 ms. Electrodynamic and induction-dynamic shutters are devices where displacement of a blind is produced by the electromagnetic interaction between circuits with electric currents. In induction-dynamic shutter the secondary circuit is current-conducting blind itself in which a short-circuited loop forms. The latter is more quick because of the lower mass of its moveable secondary circuit. For this reason induction-dynamic shutters with a flat primary circuit coil and a tightly fitted to it load- bearing aluminum plate have been investigated. The blind which opens or closes an aperture was attached to this plate. The dependencies of cut-off time on the form, size and the number of turns of the primary circuit coil, on size, type of material, thickness and weight of the load-bearing plate and the blind, as well as on capacitance in the discharge circuit and the capacitor voltage have been investigated. The influence of the environmental atmosphere on the cut-off time was also studied. For this purpose the shutter was placed into the chamber where vacuum up to 10- atm could be produced. As a result the values of the above mentioned parameters have been optimized and the designs of the shutters which are shown have been developed.

  14. Computation of high-speed reacting flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clutter, James Keith

    A computational study has been conducted for high-speed reacting flows relevant to munition problems, including shock-induced combustion and gun muzzle blast. The theoretical model considers inviscid and viscous flows, multi-species, finite rate chemical reaction schemes, and turbulence. Both the physical and numerical aspects are investigated to determine their impact on simulation accuracy. A range of hydrogen and oxygen reaction mechanisms are evaluated for the shock-induced combustion flow scenario. Characteristics of the mechanisms such as the induction time, heat release rate, and second explosion limit are found to impact the accuracy of the computation. On the numerical side, reaction source term treatments, including logarithmic weighting and scaling modifications, are investigated to determine their effectiveness in addressing numerical errors caused by disparate length scales between chemical reactions and fluid dynamics. It is demonstrated that these techniques can enhance solution accuracy. Computations of shock-induced combustion have also been performed using a κ-ɛ model to account for the turbulent transport of species and heat. An algebraic model of the temperature fluctuations has been used to estimate the impact of the turbulent effect on the chemical reaction source terms. The turbulence effects when represented with the current models are found to be minimal in the shock-induced combustion flow investigated in the present work. For the gun system simulations, computations for both a large caliber howitzer and small caliber firearms are carried out. A reduced kinetic scheme and an algebraic turbulence model are employed. The present approach, which accounts for the chemical reaction aspects of the gun muzzle blast problem, is found to improve the prediction of peak overpressures and can capture the effects produced by small caliber firearm sound suppressors. The present study has established the numerical and physical requirements for

  15. High-speed VLSI concentrators for terabit intelligent optical backplanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Supmonchai, Boonchuay; Szymanski, Ted H.

    1998-05-01

    Self-routing `concentrators' are fundamental building blocks of optical switching systems. An N-to-M concentrator can process and extract data packets from N optical channels and forward the packets to M electrical channels, where typically N M. Terabit Optical Backplanes which exploit free-space optical data links, with bandwidths approaching 1 - 10 Terabits per second will require extremely fast self- routing concentrators which can make routing decisions within a few nanoseconds. In this paper, a VLSI analysis of a new circuit called the `Daisy Chain' concentrator is presented. This concentrator has a regular topology suitable for very efficient VLSI layout, which leads to very high clock rates. The analyses are performed using 0.8 micrometers standard cell CMOS technology with the Synopsys CAD tool. The results shows that the proposed concentrator uses substantially less VLSI area from 20 - 50% less in the control logic and up to 150% less on the switching logic than the previous best known concentrator circuit. It also performs significantly faster, ranging from 20 - 40% faster in the control logic and 150 - 300% faster in the switching logic. Using 0.8 micrometers CMOS technology, the proposed concentrator can be used in smart pixel arrays for optical backplanes with clock rates in the range of 500 Mhz. Using faster CMOS or ECL logic, the concentrator can support clock rates in the several Gigahertz range.

  16. A Monolithic CMOS Magnetic Hall Sensor with High Sensitivity and Linearity Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Haiyun; Wang, Dejun; Xu, Yue

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a fully integrated linear Hall sensor by means of 0.8 μm high voltage complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology. This monolithic Hall sensor chip features a highly sensitive horizontal switched Hall plate and an efficient signal conditioner using dynamic offset cancellation technique. An improved cross-like Hall plate achieves high magnetic sensitivity and low offset. A new spinning current modulator stabilizes the quiescent output voltage and improves the reliability of the signal conditioner. The tested results show that at the 5 V supply voltage, the maximum Hall output voltage of the monolithic Hall sensor microsystem, is up to ±2.1 V and the linearity of Hall output voltage is higher than 99% in the magnetic flux density range from ±5 mT to ±175 mT. The output equivalent residual offset is 0.48 mT and the static power consumption is 20 mW. PMID:26516864

  17. High mobility CMOS technologies using III-V/Ge channels on Si platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takagi, S.; Kim, S.-H.; Yokoyama, M.; Zhang, R.; Taoka, N.; Urabe, Y.; Yasuda, T.; Yamada, H.; Ichikawa, O.; Fukuhara, N.; Hata, M.; Takenaka, M.

    2013-10-01

    MOSFETs using channel materials with high mobility and low effective mass have been regarded as strongly important for obtaining high current drive and low supply voltage CMOS under sub 10 nm regime. From this viewpoint, attentions have recently been paid to Ge and III-V channels. In this paper, possible solutions for realizing III-V/Ge MOSFETs on the Si platform are presented. The high quality III-V channel formation on Si substrates can be realized through direct wafer bonding. The gate stack formation is constructed on a basis of atomic layer deposition (ALD) Al2O3 gate insulators for both InGaAs and Ge MOSFETs. As the source/drain (S/D) formation, Ni-based metal S/D is implemented for both InGaAs and Ge MOSFETs. By combining these technologies, we demonstrate successful integration of InGaAs-OI nMOSFETs and Ge p-MOSFETs on a same wafer and their superior device performance.

  18. 8-Foot High Speed Tunnel (HST

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1957-01-01

    Interior view of the slotted throat test section installed in the 8-Foot High Speed Tunnel (HST) in 1950. The slotted region is about 160 inches in length. In this photograph, the sting-type model support is seen straight on. In a NASA report, the test section is described as follows: 'The test section of the Langley 8-foot transonic tunnel is dodecagonal in cross section and has a cross-sectional area of about 43 square feet. Longitudinal slots are located between each of the 12 wall panels to allow continuous operation through the transonic speed range. The slots contain about 11 percent of the total periphery of the test section. Six of the twelve panels have windows in them to allow for schlieren observations. The entire test section is enclosed in a hemispherical shaped chamber.' John Becker noted that the tunnel's 'final achievement was the development and use in routine operations of the first transonic slotted throat. The investigations of wing-body shapes in this tunnel led to Whitcomb's discovery of the transonic area rule.' James Hansen described the origins of the the slotted throat as follows: 'In 1946 Langley physicist Ray H. Wright conceived a way to do transonic research effectively in a wind tunnel by placing slots in the throat of the test section. The concept for what became known as the slotted-throat or slotted-wall tunnel came to Wright not as a solution to the chronic transonic problem, but as a way to get rid of wall interference (i.e., the mutual effect of two or more meeting waves or vibrations of any kind caused by solid boundaries) at subsonic speeds. For most of the year before Wright came up with this idea, he had been trying to develop a theoretical understanding of wall interference in the 8-Foot HST, which was then being repowered for Mach 1 capability.' When Wright presented these ideas to John Stack, the response was enthusiastic but neither Wright nor Stack thought of slotted-throats as a solution to the transonic problem, only

  19. High speed multispectral fluorescence lifetime imaging.

    PubMed

    Fereidouni, Farzad; Reitsma, Keimpe; Gerritsen, Hans C

    2013-05-20

    We report a spectrally resolved fluorescence lifetime imaging system based on time gated single photon detection with a fixed gate width of 200 ps and 7 spectral channels. Time gated systems can operate at high count rates but usually have large gate widths and sample only part of the fluorescence decay curve. In the system presented in this work, the fluorescence signal is sampled using a high speed transceiver. An error analysis is carried out to characterize the performance of both lifetime and spectral detection. The effect of gate width and spectral channel width on the accuracy of estimated lifetimes and spectral widths is described. The performance of the whole instrument is evaluated at count rates of up to 12 MHz. Accurate fluorescence lifetimes (error < 2%) are recorded at count rates as high as 5 MHz. This is limited by the PMT performance, not by the electronics. Analysis of the large spectral lifetime image sets is challenging and time-consuming. Here, we demonstrate the use of lifetime and spectral phasors for analyzing images of fibroblast cells with 2 different labeled components. The phasor approach provides a fast and intuitive way of analyzing the results of spectrally resolved fluorescence lifetime imaging experiments.

  20. High speed image correlation for vibration analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siebert, T.; Wood, R.; Splitthof, K.

    2009-08-01

    Digital speckle correlation techniques have already been successfully proven to be an accurate displacement analysis tool for a wide range of applications. With the use of two cameras, three dimensional measurements of contours and displacements can be carried out. With a simple setup it opens a wide range of applications. Rapid new developments in the field of digital imaging and computer technology opens further applications for these measurement methods to high speed deformation and strain analysis, e.g. in the fields of material testing, fracture mechanics, advanced materials and component testing. The high resolution of the deformation measurements in space and time opens a wide range of applications for vibration analysis of objects. Since the system determines the absolute position and displacements of the object in space, it is capable of measuring high amplitudes and even objects with rigid body movements. The absolute resolution depends on the field of view and is scalable. Calibration of the optical setup is a crucial point which will be discussed in detail. Examples of the analysis of harmonic vibration and transient events from material research and industrial applications are presented. The results show typical features of the system.

  1. A method for electrophysiological characterization of hamster retinal ganglion cells using a high-density CMOS microelectrode array

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Ian L.; Russell, Thomas L.; Farrow, Karl; Fiscella, Michele; Franke, Felix; Müller, Jan; Jäckel, David; Hierlemann, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of neuronal cell types in the mammalian retina is important for the understanding of human retinal disease and the advancement of sight-restoring technology, such as retinal prosthetic devices. A somewhat less utilized animal model for retinal research is the hamster, which has a visual system that is characterized by an area centralis and a wide visual field with a broad binocular component. The hamster retina is optimally suited for recording on the microelectrode array (MEA), because it intrinsically lies flat on the MEA surface and yields robust, large-amplitude signals. However, information in the literature about hamster retinal ganglion cell functional types is scarce. The goal of our work is to develop a method featuring a high-density (HD) complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) MEA technology along with a sequence of standardized visual stimuli in order to categorize ganglion cells in isolated Syrian Hamster (Mesocricetus auratus) retina. Since the HD-MEA is capable of recording at a higher spatial resolution than most MEA systems (17.5 μm electrode pitch), we were able to record from a large proportion of RGCs within a selected region. Secondly, we chose our stimuli so that they could be run during the experiment without intervention or computation steps. The visual stimulus set was designed to activate the receptive fields of most ganglion cells in parallel and to incorporate various visual features to which different cell types respond uniquely. Based on the ganglion cell responses, basic cell properties were determined: direction selectivity, speed tuning, width tuning, transience, and latency. These properties were clustered to identify ganglion cell types in the hamster retina. Ultimately, we recorded up to a cell density of 2780 cells/mm2 at 2 mm (42°) from the optic nerve head. Using five parameters extracted from the responses to visual stimuli, we obtained seven ganglion cell types. PMID:26528115

  2. A method for electrophysiological characterization of hamster retinal ganglion cells using a high-density CMOS microelectrode array.

    PubMed

    Jones, Ian L; Russell, Thomas L; Farrow, Karl; Fiscella, Michele; Franke, Felix; Müller, Jan; Jäckel, David; Hierlemann, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of neuronal cell types in the mammalian retina is important for the understanding of human retinal disease and the advancement of sight-restoring technology, such as retinal prosthetic devices. A somewhat less utilized animal model for retinal research is the hamster, which has a visual system that is characterized by an area centralis and a wide visual field with a broad binocular component. The hamster retina is optimally suited for recording on the microelectrode array (MEA), because it intrinsically lies flat on the MEA surface and yields robust, large-amplitude signals. However, information in the literature about hamster retinal ganglion cell functional types is scarce. The goal of our work is to develop a method featuring a high-density (HD) complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) MEA technology along with a sequence of standardized visual stimuli in order to categorize ganglion cells in isolated Syrian Hamster (Mesocricetus auratus) retina. Since the HD-MEA is capable of recording at a higher spatial resolution than most MEA systems (17.5 μm electrode pitch), we were able to record from a large proportion of RGCs within a selected region. Secondly, we chose our stimuli so that they could be run during the experiment without intervention or computation steps. The visual stimulus set was designed to activate the receptive fields of most ganglion cells in parallel and to incorporate various visual features to which different cell types respond uniquely. Based on the ganglion cell responses, basic cell properties were determined: direction selectivity, speed tuning, width tuning, transience, and latency. These properties were clustered to identify ganglion cell types in the hamster retina. Ultimately, we recorded up to a cell density of 2780 cells/mm(2) at 2 mm (42°) from the optic nerve head. Using five parameters extracted from the responses to visual stimuli, we obtained seven ganglion cell types.

  3. Development of Gated Pinned Avalanche Photodiode Pixels for High-Speed Low-Light Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Resetar, Tomislav; De Munck, Koen; Haspeslagh, Luc; Rosmeulen, Maarten; Süss, Andreas; Puers, Robert; Van Hoof, Chris

    2016-01-01

    This work explores the benefits of linear-mode avalanche photodiodes (APDs) in high-speed CMOS imaging as compared to different approaches present in literature. Analysis of APDs biased below their breakdown voltage employed in single-photon counting mode is also discussed, showing a potentially interesting alternative to existing Geiger-mode APDs. An overview of the recently presented gated pinned avalanche photodiode pixel concept is provided, as well as the first experimental results on a 8 × 16 pixel test array. Full feasibility of the proposed pixel concept is not demonstrated; however, informative data is obtained from the sensor operating under −32 V substrate bias and clearly exhibiting wavelength-dependent gain in frontside illumination. The readout of the chip designed in standard 130 nm CMOS technology shows no dependence on the high-voltage bias. Readout noise level of 15 e- rms, full well capacity of 8000e-, and the conversion gain of 75 µV/e- are extracted from the photon-transfer measurements. The gain characteristics of the avalanche junction are characterized on separate test diodes showing a multiplication factor of 1.6 for red light in frontside illumination. PMID:27537882

  4. A CMOS high resolution, process/temperature variation tolerant RSSI for WIA-PA transceiver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Yang; Yu, Jiang; Jie, Li; Jiangfei, Guo; Hua, Chen; Jingyu, Han; Guiliang, Guo; Yuepeng, Yan

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents a high resolution, process/temperature variation tolerant received signal strength indicator (RSSI) for wireless networks for industrial automation process automation (WIA-PA) transceiver fabricated in 0.18 μm CMOS technology. The active area of the RSSI is 0.24 mm2. Measurement results show that the proposed RSSI has a dynamic range more than 70 dB and the linearity error is within ±0.5 dB for an input power from -70 to 0 dBm (dBm to 50 Ω), the corresponding output voltage is from 0.81 to 1.657 V and the RSSI slope is 12.1 mV/dB while consuming all of 2 mA from a 1.8 V power supply. Furthermore, by the help of the integrated compensation circuit, the proposed RSSI shows the temperature error within ±1.5 dB from -40 to 85 °C, and process variation error within ±0.25 dB, which exhibits good temperature-independence and excellent robustness against process variation characteristics. Project supported by the National High Technology Research and Development Program of China (No. 2011AA040102).

  5. Integrated High Resolution Digital Color Light Sensor in 130 nm CMOS Technology.

    PubMed

    Strle, Drago; Nahtigal, Uroš; Batistell, Graciele; Zhang, Vincent Chi; Ofner, Erwin; Fant, Andrea; Sturm, Johannes

    2015-07-22

    This article presents a color light detection system integrated in 130 nm CMOS technology. The sensors and corresponding electronics detect light in a CIE XYZ color luminosity space using on-chip integrated sensors without any additional process steps, high-resolution analog-to-digital converter, and dedicated DSP algorithm. The sensor consists of a set of laterally arranged integrated photodiodes that are partly covered by metal, where color separation between the photodiodes is achieved by lateral carrier diffusion together with wavelength-dependent absorption. A high resolution, hybrid, ∑∆ ADC converts each photo diode's current into a 22-bit digital result, canceling the dark current of the photo diodes. The digital results are further processed by the DSP, which calculates normalized XYZ or RGB color and intensity parameters using linear transformations of the three photo diode responses by multiplication of the data with a transformation matrix, where the coefficients are extracted by training in combination with a pseudo-inverse operation and the least-mean square approximation. The sensor system detects the color light parameters with 22-bit accuracy, consumes less than 60 μA on average at 10 readings per second, and occupies approx. 0.8 mm(2) of silicon area (including three photodiodes and the analog part of the ADC). The DSP is currently implemented on FPGA.

  6. Trapping of hydrogen in hafnium-based high kappa dielectric thin films for advanced CMOS applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ukirde, Vaishali

    In recent years, advanced high kappa gate dielectrics are under serious consideration to replace SiO2 and SiON in semiconductor industry. Hafnium-based dielectrics such as hafnium oxides, oxynitrides and Hf-based silicates/nitrided silicates are emerging as some of the most promising alternatives to SiO2/SiON gate dielectrics in complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) devices. Extensive efforts have been taken to understand the effects of hydrogen impurities in semiconductors and its behavior such as incorporation, diffusion, trapping and release with the aim of controlling and using it to optimize the performance of electronic device structures. In this dissertation, a systematic study of hydrogen trapping and the role of carbon impurities in various alternate gate dielectric candidates, HfO2/Si, HfxSi1-xO2/Si, HfON/Si and HfON(C)/Si is presented. It has been shown that processing of high kappa dielectrics may lead to some crystallization issues. Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS) for measuring oxygen deficiencies, elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA) for quantifying hydrogen and nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) for quantifying carbon, X-ray diffraction (XRD) for measuring degree of crystallinity and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to characterize these thin dielectric materials. ERDA data are used to characterize the evolution of hydrogen during annealing in hydrogen ambient in combination with preprocessing in oxygen and nitrogen.

  7. Integrated High Resolution Digital Color Light Sensor in 130 nm CMOS Technology

    PubMed Central

    Strle, Drago; Nahtigal, Uroš; Batistell, Graciele; Zhang, Vincent Chi; Ofner, Erwin; Fant, Andrea; Sturm, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    This article presents a color light detection system integrated in 130 nm CMOS technology. The sensors and corresponding electronics detect light in a CIE XYZ color luminosity space using on-chip integrated sensors without any additional process steps, high-resolution analog-to-digital converter, and dedicated DSP algorithm. The sensor consists of a set of laterally arranged integrated photodiodes that are partly covered by metal, where color separation between the photodiodes is achieved by lateral carrier diffusion together with wavelength-dependent absorption. A high resolution, hybrid, ∑∆ ADC converts each photo diode’s current into a 22-bit digital result, canceling the dark current of the photo diodes. The digital results are further processed by the DSP, which calculates normalized XYZ or RGB color and intensity parameters using linear transformations of the three photo diode responses by multiplication of the data with a transformation matrix, where the coefficients are extracted by training in combination with a pseudo-inverse operation and the least-mean square approximation. The sensor system detects the color light parameters with 22-bit accuracy, consumes less than 60 μA on average at 10 readings per second, and occupies approx. 0.8 mm2 of silicon area (including three photodiodes and the analog part of the ADC). The DSP is currently implemented on FPGA. PMID:26205275

  8. 14 CFR 23.253 - High speed characteristics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false High speed characteristics. 23.253 Section 23.253 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT... Requirements § 23.253 High speed characteristics. If a maximum operating speed VMO/MMO is established...

  9. High speed exhaust gas recirculation valve

    SciTech Connect

    Fensom, Rod; Kidder, David J.

    2005-01-18

    In order to minimize pollutants such as Nox, internal combustion engines typically include an exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) valve that can be used to redirect a portion of exhaust gases to an intake conduit, such as an intake manifold, so that the redirected exhaust gases will be recycled. It is desirable to have an EGR valve with fast-acting capabilities, and it is also desirable to have the EGR valve take up as little space as possible. An exhaust gas recirculation valve is provided that includes an exhaust passage tube, a valve element pivotally mounted within the exhaust passage tube, a linear actuator; and a gear train. The gear train includes a rack gear operatively connected to the linear actuator, and at least one rotatable gear meshing with the rack gear and operatively connected to the valve element to cause rotation of the valve element upon actuation of the linear actuator. The apparatus provides a highly compact package having a high-speed valve actuation capability.

  10. Material constraints on high-speed design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucur, Diana; Militaru, Nicolae

    2015-02-01

    Current high-speed circuit designs with signal rates up to 100Gbps and above are implying constraints for dielectric and conductive materials and their dependence of frequency, for component elements and for production processes. The purpose of this paper is to highlight through various simulation results the frequency dependence of specific parameters like insertion and return loss, eye diagrams, group delay that are part of signal integrity analyses type. In low-power environment designs become more complex as the operation frequency increases. The need for new materials with spatial uniformity for dielectric constant is a need for higher data rates circuits. The fiber weave effect (FWE) will be analyzed through the eye diagram results for various dielectric materials in a differential signaling scheme given the fact that the FWE is a phenomenon that affects randomly the performance of the circuit on balanced/differential transmission lines which are typically characterized through the above mentioned approaches. Crosstalk between traces is also of concern due to propagated signals that have tight rise and fall times or due to high density of the boards. Criteria should be considered to achieve maximum performance of the designed system requiring critical electronic properties.

  11. High-Speed Data Recorder for Space, Geodesy, and Other High-Speed Recording Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taveniku, Mikael

    2013-01-01

    A high-speed data recorder and replay equipment has been developed for reliable high-data-rate recording to disk media. It solves problems with slow or faulty disks, multiple disk insertions, high-altitude operation, reliable performance using COTS hardware, and long-term maintenance and upgrade path challenges. The current generation data recor - ders used within the VLBI community are aging, special-purpose machines that are both slow (do not meet today's requirements) and are very expensive to maintain and operate. Furthermore, they are not easily upgraded to take advantage of commercial technology development, and are not scalable to multiple 10s of Gbit/s data rates required by new applications. The innovation provides a softwaredefined, high-speed data recorder that is scalable with technology advances in the commercial space. It maximally utilizes current technologies without being locked to a particular hardware platform. The innovation also provides a cost-effective way of streaming large amounts of data from sensors to disk, enabling many applications to store raw sensor data and perform post and signal processing offline. This recording system will be applicable to many applications needing realworld, high-speed data collection, including electronic warfare, softwaredefined radar, signal history storage of multispectral sensors, development of autonomous vehicles, and more.

  12. A High-Voltage SOI CMOS Exciter Chip for a Programmable Fluidic Processor System.

    PubMed

    Current, K W; Yuk, K; McConaghy, C; Gascoyne, P R C; Schwartz, J A; Vykoukal, J V; Andrews, C

    2007-06-01

    A high-voltage (HV) integrated circuit has been demonstrated to transport fluidic droplet samples on programmable paths across the array of driving electrodes on its hydrophobically coated surface. This exciter chip is the engine for dielectrophoresis (DEP)-based micro-fluidic lab-on-a-chip systems, creating field excitations that inject and move fluidic droplets onto and about the manipulation surface. The architecture of this chip is expandable to arrays of N X N identical HV electrode driver circuits and electrodes. The exciter chip is programmable in several senses. The routes of multiple droplets may be set arbitrarily within the bounds of the electrode array. The electrode excitation waveform voltage amplitude, phase, and frequency may be adjusted based on the system configuration and the signal required to manipulate a particular fluid droplet composition. The voltage amplitude of the electrode excitation waveform can be set from the minimum logic level up to the maximum limit of the breakdown voltage of the fabrication technology. The frequency of the electrode excitation waveform can also be set independently of its voltage, up to a maximum depending upon the type of droplets that must be driven. The exciter chip can be coated and its oxide surface used as the droplet manipulation surface or it can be used with a top-mounted, enclosed fluidic chamber consisting of a variety of materials. The HV capability of the exciter chip allows the generated DEP forces to penetrate into the enclosed chamber region and an adjustable voltage amplitude can accommodate a variety of chamber floor thicknesses. This demonstration exciter chip has a 32 x 32 array of nominally 100 V electrode drivers that are individually programmable at each time point in the procedure to either of two phases: 0deg and 180deg with respect to the reference clock. For this demonstration chip, while operating the electrodes with a 100-V peak-to-peak periodic waveform, the maximum HV electrode

  13. High Speed High Resolution Current Comparator and its Application to Analog to Digital Converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sridhar, Ranjana; Pandey, Neeta; Bhattacharyya, Asok; Bhatia, Veepsa

    2016-06-01

    This paper introduces a high speed high resolution current comparator which includes the current differencing stage and employs non linear feedback in the gain stage. The usefulness of the proposed comparator is demonstrated by implementing a 3-bit current mode flash analog-to-digital converter (ADC). Simulation program with integrated circuit emphasis (SPICE) simulations have been carried out to verify theoretical proposition and performance parameters of both comparator and ADC are obtained using TSMC 0.18 µm CMOS technology parameters. The current comparator shows a resolution of ±5 nA and a delay of 0.86 ns for current difference of ±1 µA. The impact of process variation on proposed comparator propagation delay has been studied through Monte Carlo simulation and it is found that percentage change in propagation delay in best case is 1.3 % only and in worst case is 9 % only. The ADC exhibits an offset, gain error, differential nonlinearity (DNL) and integral nonlinearity (INL) of 0.102 µA, 0.99, -0.34 LSB and 0.0267 LSB, respectively. The impact of process variation on ADC has also been studied at different process corners.

  14. SPADAS: a high-speed 3D single-photon camera for advanced driver assistance systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bronzi, D.; Zou, Y.; Bellisai, S.; Villa, F.; Tisa, S.; Tosi, A.; Zappa, F.

    2015-02-01

    Advanced Driver Assistance Systems (ADAS) are the most advanced technologies to fight road accidents. Within ADAS, an important role is played by radar- and lidar-based sensors, which are mostly employed for collision avoidance and adaptive cruise control. Nonetheless, they have a narrow field-of-view and a limited ability to detect and differentiate objects. Standard camera-based technologies (e.g. stereovision) could balance these weaknesses, but they are currently not able to fulfill all automotive requirements (distance range, accuracy, acquisition speed, and frame-rate). To this purpose, we developed an automotive-oriented CMOS single-photon camera for optical 3D ranging based on indirect time-of-flight (iTOF) measurements. Imagers based on Single-photon avalanche diode (SPAD) arrays offer higher sensitivity with respect to CCD/CMOS rangefinders, have inherent better time resolution, higher accuracy and better linearity. Moreover, iTOF requires neither high bandwidth electronics nor short-pulsed lasers, hence allowing the development of cost-effective systems. The CMOS SPAD sensor is based on 64 × 32 pixels, each able to process both 2D intensity-data and 3D depth-ranging information, with background suppression. Pixel-level memories allow fully parallel imaging and prevents motion artefacts (skew, wobble, motion blur) and partial exposure effects, which otherwise would hinder the detection of fast moving objects. The camera is housed in an aluminum case supporting a 12 mm F/1.4 C-mount imaging lens, with a 40°×20° field-of-view. The whole system is very rugged and compact and a perfect solution for vehicle's cockpit, with dimensions of 80 mm × 45 mm × 70 mm, and less that 1 W consumption. To provide the required optical power (1.5 W, eye safe) and to allow fast (up to 25 MHz) modulation of the active illumination, we developed a modular laser source, based on five laser driver cards, with three 808 nm lasers each. We present the full characterization of

  15. High-sensitivity chemiluminescence detection of cytokines using an antibody-immobilized CMOS image sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Dong-Gu; Joung, Hyou-Arm; Kim, Sang-Hyo; Kim, Min-Gon

    2013-05-01

    In this study, we used a Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) image sensor with immobilizing antibodies on its surface to detect human cytokines, which are activators that mediate intercellular communication including expression and control of immune responses. The CMOS image sensor has many advantages over the Charge Couple Device, including lower power consumption, operation voltage, and cost. The photodiode, a unit pixel component in the CMOS image sensor, receives light from the detection area and generates digital image data. About a million pixels are embedded, and size of each pixel is 3 x 3 μm. The chemiluminescence reaction produces light from the chemical reaction of luminol and hydrogen peroxide. To detect cytokines, antibodies were immobilized on the surface of the CMOS image sensor, and a sandwich immunoassay using an HRP-labeled antibody was performed. An HRP-catalyzed chemiluminescence reaction was measured by each pixel of the CMOS image sensor. Pixels with stronger signals indicated higher cytokine concentrations; thus, we were able to measure human interleukin-5 (IL-5) at femtomolar concentrations.

  16. ESD evaluation of radiation-hardened, high-reliability CMOS and MNOS ICs

    SciTech Connect

    Soden, J.M.; Stewart, H.D.; Pastorek, R.A.

    1983-01-01

    Standard human-body-equivalent circuit electrostatic discharge (ESD) tests were performed on the inputs of high-reliability, radiation-hardened integrated circuits (ICs) designed with seven different technologies. Metal and silicon gate complementary MOS (CMOS) and metal-nitride-oxide-semiconductor (MNOS) ICs with design rules ranging from 10 microns down to 2 microns were evaluated. The ESD hardness of these ICs ranged from 1 kV to greater than 9 kV. The low-range ESD hardness ICs were fabricated with a masking polysilicon ring that defined the input protection diodes. Tests on commercial equivalent ICs demonstrated that the ESD hardness of the radiation-hardened ICs was not significantly less than the ESD hardness of the commercial equivalent ICs. The failure modes and mechanisms of the ICs were evaluated. Most of the ICs that did not have the masking polysilicon ring failed because of input to V/sub DD/ or V/sub SS/ shorts due to degraded protection diodes. ESD tests with the pulse applied between the package metal lid and the package pins were also performed. These lid tests produced permanent input damage, the same as occurred during tests with the pulse applied to the package input, but the damage occurred at lower voltages. ESD pulses with peak voltages as low as 250 volts produced arcs from the lid to the input bond wires, resulting in degraded inputs.

  17. ESD evaluation of radiation-hardened, high reliability CMOS and MNOS ICs

    SciTech Connect

    Soden, J.M.; Pastorek, R.A.; Stewart, H.D.

    1984-02-01

    Standard human body equivalent circuit electrostatic discharge (ESD) tests were performed on the inputs of high-reliability, radiation-hardened integrated circuits (ICs) designed with seven different technologies. Metal and silicon gate complementary MOS (CMOS) and metal-nitrideoxide-semiconductor (MNOS) ICs with design rules ranging from 10 microns down to 2 microns were evaluated. The ESD hardness of these ICs ranged from 1 kV to greater than 9 kV. The low range ESD hardness ICs were fabricated with a masking polysilicon ring that defined the input protection diodes. Tests on commercial equivalent ICs demonstrated that the ESD hardness of the radiation-hardened ICs was not significantly less than the ESD hardness of the commercial equivalent ICs. The failure modes and mechanisms of the ICs were evaluated. Most of the ICs that did not have the masking polysilicon ring failed because of input to V/sub DD/ or V/sub SS/ shorts due to degraded protection diodes. ESD tests with the pulse applied between the package metal lid and the package pins were also performed. These lid tests produced permanent input damage, the same as occurred during tests with the pulse applied to the package input, but the damage occurred at lower voltages. ESD pulses with peak voltages as low as 250 volts produced arcs from the lid to the input bond wires, resulting in degraded inputs.

  18. ESD evaluation of radiation-hardened, high-reliability CMOS and MNOS ICs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soden, J. M.; Stewart, H. D.; Pastorek, R. A.

    Standard human-body-equivalent circuit electrostatic discharge (ESD) tests were performed on the inputs of high-reliability, radiation-hardened integrated circuits (ICs) designed with seven different technologies. Metal and silicon gate complementary metal oxide semiconductors (CMOS) and metal-nitride-oxide-semiconductor (MNOS) ICs with design rules ranging from 10 microns down to 2 microns were evaluated. The ESD hardness of these ICs ranged from 1 kV to greater than 9 kV. The low-range ESD hardness ICs were fabricated with a masking polysilicon ring that defined the input protection diodes. Tests on commercial equivalent ICs demonstrated that the ESD hardness of the radiation-hardened ICs was not significantly less than the ESD hardness of the commercial equivalent ICs. The failure modes and mechanisms of the ICs were evaluated. Most of the ICs that did not have the making polysilicon ring failed because of input to V sub DD or V sub SS shorts due to degraded protection diodes. ESD tests with the pulse applied between the package metal lid and the package pins were also performed. These lid tests produced permanent input damage, the same as occurred during tests with the pulse applied to the package input, but the damage occurred at lower voltages. ESD pulses with peak voltages as low as 250 volts produced arcs from the lid to the input bond wires, resulting in degraded inputs.

  19. High-resolution CMOS MEA platform to study neurons at subcellular, cellular, and network levels.

    PubMed

    Müller, Jan; Ballini, Marco; Livi, Paolo; Chen, Yihui; Radivojevic, Milos; Shadmani, Amir; Viswam, Vijay; Jones, Ian L; Fiscella, Michele; Diggelmann, Roland; Stettler, Alexander; Frey, Urs; Bakkum, Douglas J; Hierlemann, Andreas

    2015-07-07

    Studies on information processing and learning properties of neuronal networks would benefit from simultaneous and parallel access to the activity of a large fraction of all neurons in such networks. Here, we present a CMOS-based device, capable of simultaneously recording the electrical activity of over a thousand cells in in vitro neuronal networks. The device provides sufficiently high spatiotemporal resolution to enable, at the same time, access to neuronal preparations on subcellular, cellular, and network level. The key feature is a rapidly reconfigurable array of 26 400 microelectrodes arranged at low pitch (17.5 μm) within a large overall sensing area (3.85 × 2.10 mm(2)). An arbitrary subset of the electrodes can be simultaneously connected to 1024 low-noise readout channels as well as 32 stimulation units. Each electrode or electrode subset can be used to electrically stimulate or record the signals of virtually any neuron on the array. We demonstrate the applicability and potential of this device for various different experimental paradigms: large-scale recordings from whole networks of neurons as well as investigations of axonal properties of individual neurons.

  20. Characterization of high resolution CMOS monolithic active pixel detector in SOI technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, M. I.; Arai, Y.; Glab, S.; Idzik, M.; Kapusta, P.; Miyoshi, T.; Takeda, A.; Turala, M.

    2015-05-01

    Novel CMOS monolithic pixel detectors designed at KEK and fabricated at Lapis Semiconductor in 0.2 μm Silicon-on-Insulator (SOI) technology are presented. A thin layer of silicon oxide separates high and low resistivity silicon layers, allowing for optimization of design of detector and readout parts. Shallow wells buried under the oxide in the detector part screen the entire pixel electronics from electrical field applied to the detector. Several integration type SOI pixel detectors have been developed with pixel sizes 8-20 μm. The general features of 14 × 14 μm2 detectors designed on different wafers (CZ-n, FZ-n and FZ-p) were measured and compared. The detector performance was studied under irradiation with visible and infra-red laser, and also X-ray ionizing source. Using X-rays from an Am-241 source the noise of readout electronics was measured at different working conditions, showing the ENC in the range of 88-120 e-. The pixel current was calculated from average DC pedestal shift while varying the pixel integration time. The operation of the detector was studied under partial and full depletion conditions. The effects of temperature and detector bias voltage on noise and leakage current were studied. Characteristics of an ADC integrated in the front-end chip are also presented.

  1. High-dynamic-range 4-Mpixel CMOS image sensor for scientific applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vu, Paul; Fowler, Boyd; Liu, Chiao; Mims, Steve; Bartkovjak, Peter; Do, Hung; Li, Wang; Appelbaum, Jeff; Lopez, Angel

    2012-03-01

    As bio-technology transitions from research and development to high volume production, dramatic improvements in image sensor performance will be required to support the throughput and cost requirements of this market. This includes higher resolution, higher frame rates, higher quantum efficiencies, increased system integration, lower read-noise, and lower device costs. We present the performance of a recently developed low noise 2048(H) x 2048(V) CMOS image sensor optimized for scientific applications such as life science imaging, microscopy, as well as industrial inspection applications. The sensor architecture consists of two identical halves which can be operated independently and the imaging array consists of 4T pixels with pinned photodiodes on a 6.5μm pitch with integrated micro-lens. The operation of the sensor is programmable through a SPI interface. The measured peak quantum efficiency of the sensor is 73% at 600nm, and the read noise is about 1.1e- RMS at 100 fps data rate. The sensor features dual gain column parallel ouput amplifiers with 11-bit single slope ADCs. The full well capacity is greater than 36ke-, the dark current is less than 7pA/cm2 at 20°C. The sensor achieves an intra-scene linear dynamic range of greater than 91dB (36000:1) at room temperature.

  2. The high speed civil transport and NASA's High Speed Research (HSR) program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, Robert J.

    1994-01-01

    Ongoing studies being conducted not only in this country but in Europe and Asia suggest that a second generation supersonic transport, or High-Speed Civil Transport (HSCT), could become an important part of the 21st century international air transportation system. However, major environmental compatibility and economic viability issues must be resolved if the HSCT is to become a reality. This talk will overview the NASA High-Speed Research (HSR) program which is aimed at providing the U.S. industry with a technology base to allow them to consider launching an HSCT program early in the next century. The talk will also discuss some of the comparable activities going on within Europe and Japan.

  3. Enhanced high-speed coherent diffraction imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potier, Jonathan; Fricker, Sebastien; Idir, Mourad

    2011-03-01

    Due to recent advances in X-ray microscopy, we are now able to image objects with nanometer resolution thanks to Synchrotron beam lines or Free Electron Lasers (FEL). The PCI (Phase Contrast Imaging) is a robust technique that can recover the wavefront from measurements of only few intensity pictures in the Fresnel diffraction region. With our fast straightforward calculus methods, we manage to provide the phase induced by a microscopic specimen in few seconds. We can therefore obtain high contrasted images from transparent materials at very small scales. To reach atomic resolution imaging and thus make a transition from the near to the far field, the Coherent Diffraction Imaging (CDI) technique finds its roots in the analysis of diffraction patterns to obtain the phase of the altered complex wave. Theoretical results about existence and uniqueness of this retrieved piece of information by both iterative and direct algorithms have already been released. However, performances of algorithms remain limited by the coherence of the X-ray beam, presence of random noise and the saturation threshold of the detector. We will present reconstructions of samples using an enhanced version of HIO algorithm improving the speed of convergence and its repeatability. As a first step toward a practical X-Ray CDI system, initial images for reconstructions are acquired with the laser-based CDI system working in the visible spectrum.

  4. High speed curved position sensitive detector

    DOEpatents

    Hendricks, Robert W.; Wilson, Jack W.

    1989-01-01

    A high speed curved position sensitive porportional counter detector for use in x-ray diffraction, the detection of 5-20 keV photons and the like. The detector employs a planar anode assembly of a plurality of parallel metallic wires. This anode assembly is supported between two cathode planes, with at least one of these cathode planes having a serpentine resistive path in the form of a meander having legs generally perpendicular to the anode wires. This meander is produced by special microelectronic fabrication techniques whereby the meander "wire" fans outwardly at the cathode ends to produce the curved aspect of the detector, and the legs of the meander are small in cross-section and very closely spaced whereby a spatial resolution of about 50 .mu.m can be achieved. All of the other performance characteristics are about as good or better than conventional position sensitive proportional counter type detectors. Count rates of up to 40,000 counts per second with 0.5 .mu.s shaping time constants are achieved.

  5. High speed point derivative microseismic detector

    DOEpatents

    Uhl, James Eugene; Warpinski, Norman Raymond; Whetten, Ernest Blayne

    1998-01-01

    A high speed microseismic event detector constructed in accordance with the present invention uses a point derivative comb to quickly and accurately detect microseismic events. Compressional and shear waves impinging upon microseismic receiver stations disposed to collect waves are converted into digital data and analyzed using a point derivative comb including assurance of quiet periods prior to declaration of microseismic events. If a sufficient number of quiet periods have passed, the square of a two point derivative of the incoming digital signal is compared to a trip level threshold exceeding the determined noise level to declare a valid trial event. The squaring of the derivative emphasizes the differences between noise and signal, and the valid event is preferably declared when the trip threshold has been exceeded over a temporal comb width to realize a comb over a given time period. Once a trial event has been declared, the event is verified through a spatial comb, which applies the temporal event comb to additional stations. The detector according to the present invention quickly and accurately detects initial compressional waves indicative of a microseismic event which typically exceed the ambient cultural noise level by a small amount, and distinguishes the waves from subsequent larger amplitude shear waves.

  6. High speed point derivative microseismic detector

    DOEpatents

    Uhl, J.E.; Warpinski, N.R.; Whetten, E.B.

    1998-06-30

    A high speed microseismic event detector constructed in accordance with the present invention uses a point derivative comb to quickly and accurately detect microseismic events. Compressional and shear waves impinging upon microseismic receiver stations disposed to collect waves are converted into digital data and analyzed using a point derivative comb including assurance of quiet periods prior to declaration of microseismic events. If a sufficient number of quiet periods have passed, the square of a two point derivative of the incoming digital signal is compared to a trip level threshold exceeding the determined noise level to declare a valid trial event. The squaring of the derivative emphasizes the differences between noise and signal, and the valid event is preferably declared when the trip threshold has been exceeded over a temporal comb width to realize a comb over a given time period. Once a trial event has been declared, the event is verified through a spatial comb, which applies the temporal event comb to additional stations. The detector according to the present invention quickly and accurately detects initial compressional waves indicative of a microseismic event which typically exceed the ambient cultural noise level by a small amount, and distinguishes the waves from subsequent larger amplitude shear waves. 9 figs.

  7. 8-Foot High Speed Tunnel (HST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1953-01-01

    Semi-automatic readout equipment installed in the 1950s used for data recording and reduction in the 8-Foot High Speed Tunnel (HST). A 1957 NACA report on wind tunnel facilities at Langley included these comments on the data recording and reduction equipment for the 8-foot HST: 'The data recording and reduction equipment used for handling steady force and pressure information at the Langley 8-foot transonic tunnel is similar to that described for the Langley 16-foot transonic tunnel. Very little dynamic data recording equipment, however, is available.' The description of the 16-foot transonic tunnel equipment is as follows: 'A semiautomatic force data readout system provides tabulated raw data and punch card storage of raw data concurrent with the operation of the wind tunnel. Provision is made for 12 automatic channels of strain gage-data output, and eight channels of four-digit manually operated inputs are available for tabulating and punching constants, configuration codes, and other information necessary for data reduction and identification. The data are then processed on electronic computing machines to obtain the desired coefficients. These coefficients and their proper identification are then machine tabulated to provide a printed record of the results. The punched cards may also be fed into an automatic plotting device for the preparation of plots necessary for data analysis.'

  8. How to Combine Engines to Achieve High Speed, Hypersonic Speed, Speed of Light and Even Higher-Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mwizerwa, Celestin; Nishimwe, Celestine

    2014-03-01

    When Einstein left us, he left us a really big problem to solve, does anything can travel faster than the speed of light? There hasn't been any way to try this in the past, because there were any technology which could accelerate objects at this speed. What researchers tried to do, was to accelerate particles. But there must be a way to play with speeds so that, as we do math, we may practically multiply the speed by any number we want, we also may practically divide the speed by any number we want. In this paper I will try to show how. Also, In our real life, there might be a need of such high speeds, so that a lot of problems may be solved, as for example the airplane technology, electric power, space travel, car transmission, industrial high temperature and so on ...I do not say for sure that, the object will move faster than the speed of light, but, people who have ability may try to accelerate it at this speed and even faster to see what will happen as now it is very easy to realize. There are two ways; you go to space to do it or, you create a vacuum and move it inside.

  9. Control circuitry for high speed VLSI (Very Large Scale Integration) winograd fourier transform processors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossbach, P. C.

    1985-12-01

    The calculation of the Discrete Fourier Transform has long been a significant bottleneck in many Digital Signal Processing applications. With the arrival of Very Large Scale Integration and new DFT algorithms, system architectures that significantly reduce the DFT bottleneck are possible. This thesis addresses the design, simulation, implementation, and testing of the control circuitry for a high speed, VLSI Winograd Fourier Transform (WFT) processor. Three WFT processors are combined into a pipelined architecture that is capable of computing a 4080-point DFT on complex input data approximately every 120 microseconds when operating with 70 MHz clock signals. The chip control architecture features a special Programmable Logic Array (PLA) to control the on-chip arithmetic circuitry, and a dense, 54K ROM to generate data addresses for the external RAM. The PLA controller was fabricated in 3 micron CMOS and functioned properly for clock rates of over 60 MHz. The address generator ROM was designed and submitted for fabrication in 3 micron CMOS, and SPICE simulations predict an access time of 60 nanoseconds. Software that automatically generates a ROM layout description from a data file was developed to ensure the correctness of the final design. The transistor minimization procedure i s based on a graph partitioning heuristic, and the drain removal procedure is based on an algorithm that near-optimally solves the Traveling Salesman Problem.

  10. High Speed Linear Induction Motor Efficiency Optimization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-01

    58 4.2.2 Volts/H ertz D rives Sensorless Flux-V ector D rives...56 Figure 40 Fixed Volts/Hertz Controller [16] ............................................................................................ 58 Figure...9 Figure 57 DSLIM Operating Parameters vs. Speed ................................................................................ 84 Figure 58

  11. High Speed Dynamics in Brittle Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiermaier, Stefan

    2015-06-01

    Brittle Materials under High Speed and Shock loading provide a continuous challenge in experimental physics, analysis and numerical modelling, and consequently for engineering design. The dependence of damage and fracture processes on material-inherent length and time scales, the influence of defects, rate-dependent material properties and inertia effects on different scales make their understanding a true multi-scale problem. In addition, it is not uncommon that materials show a transition from ductile to brittle behavior when the loading rate is increased. A particular case is spallation, a brittle tensile failure induced by the interaction of stress waves leading to a sudden change from compressive to tensile loading states that can be invoked in various materials. This contribution highlights typical phenomena occurring when brittle materials are exposed to high loading rates in applications such as blast and impact on protective structures, or meteorite impact on geological materials. A short review on experimental methods that are used for dynamic characterization of brittle materials will be given. A close interaction of experimental analysis and numerical simulation has turned out to be very helpful in analyzing experimental results. For this purpose, adequate numerical methods are required. Cohesive zone models are one possible method for the analysis of brittle failure as long as some degree of tension is present. Their recent successful application for meso-mechanical simulations of concrete in Hopkinson-type spallation tests provides new insight into the dynamic failure process. Failure under compressive loading is a particular challenge for numerical simulations as it involves crushing of material which in turn influences stress states in other parts of a structure. On a continuum scale, it can be modeled using more or less complex plasticity models combined with failure surfaces, as will be demonstrated for ceramics. Models which take microstructural

  12. Chromotomosynthesis for high speed hyperspectral imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bostick, Randall L.; Perram, Glen P.

    2012-09-01

    A rotating direct vision prism, chromotomosynthetic imaging (CTI) system operating in the visible creates hyperspectral imagery by collecting a set of 2D images with each spectrally projected at a different rotation angle of the prism. Mathematical reconstruction techniques that have been well tested in the field of medical physics are used to reconstruct the data to produce the 3D hyperspectral image. The instrument operates with a 100 mm focusing lens in the spectral range of 400-900 nm with a field of view of 71.6 mrad and angular resolution of 0.8-1.6 μrad. The spectral resolution is 0.6 nm at the shortest wavelengths, degrading to over 10 nm at the longest wavelengths. Measurements using a pointlike target show that performance is limited by chromatic aberration. The accuracy and utility of the instrument is assessed by comparing the CTI results to spatial data collected by a wideband image and hyperspectral data collected using a liquid crystal tunable filter (LCTF). The wide-band spatial content of the scene reconstructed from the CTI data is of same or better quality as a single frame collected by the undispersed imaging system with projections taken at every 1°. Performance is dependent on the number of projections used, with projections at 5° producing adequate results in terms of target characterization. The data collected by the CTI system can provide spatial information of equal quality as a comparable imaging system, provide high-frame rate slitless 1-D spectra, and generate 3-D hyperspectral imagery which can be exploited to provide the same results as a traditional multi-band spectral imaging system. While this prototype does not operate at high speeds, components exist which will allow for CTI systems to generate hyperspectral video imagery at rates greater than 100 Hz. The instrument has considerable potential for characterizing bomb detonations, muzzle flashes, and other battlefield combustion events.

  13. Multiple-samples-method enabling high dynamic range imaging for high frame rate CMOS image sensor by FPGA and co-processor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacquot, Blake C.; Johnson-Williams, Nathan

    2014-09-01

    We present results from a prototype CMOS camera system implementing a multiple sampled pixel level algorithm ("Last Sample Before Saturation") to create High-Dynamic Range (HDR) images that approach the dynamic range of CCDs. The system is built around a commercial 1280 × 1024 CMOS image sensor with 10-bits per pixel and up to 500 Hz full frame rate with higher frame rates available through windowing. We analyze imagery data collected at room temperature for SNR versus photocurrent, among other figures of merit. Results conform to expectations of a model that uses only dark current, read noise, and photocurrent as input parameters.

  14. Silicon high speed modulator for advanced modulation: device structures and exemplary modulator performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milivojevic, Biljana; Wiese, Stefan; Whiteaway, James; Raabe, Christian; Shastri, Anujit; Webster, Mark; Metz, Peter; Sunder, Sanjay; Chattin, Bill; Anderson, Sean P.; Dama, Bipin; Shastri, Kal

    2014-03-01

    Fiber optics is well established today due to the high capacity and speed, unrivaled flexibility and quality of service. However, state of the art optical elements and components are hardly scalable in terms of cost and size required to achieve competitive port density and cost per bit. Next-generation high-speed coherent optical communication systems targeting a data rate of 100-Gb/s and beyond goes along with innovations in component and subsystem areas. Consequently, by leveraging the advanced silicon micro and nano-fabrication technologies, significant progress in developing CMOS platform-based silicon photonic devices has been made all over the world. These achievements include the demonstration of high-speed IQ modulators, which are important building blocks in coherent optical communication systems. In this paper, we demonstrate silicon photonic QPSK modulator based on a metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) capacitor structure, address different modulator configuration structures and report our progress and research associated with highspeed advanced optical modulation in silicon photonics

  15. Front-end electronics in a 65 nm CMOS process for high density readout of pixel sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaioni, Luigi; Manghisoni, Massimo; Ratti, Lodovico; Re, Valerio; Traversi, Gianluca

    2011-09-01

    In future high energy physics experiments (HEP), readout integrated circuits for vertexing and tracking applications will be implemented by means of CMOS devices belonging to processes with minimum feature size in the 100 nm span. In these nanoscale technologies the impact of new dielectric materials and processing techniques on the analog behavior of MOSFETs has to be carefully evaluated. This paper is concerned with the study of the analog properties, in particular in terms of noise performance and radiation hardness, of MOSFET devices belonging to a 65 nm CMOS low power technology. The behavior of the 1/ f and white noise terms is studied as a function of the main device parameters before and after exposure to 10 keV X-rays and 60Co γ-rays. A prototype chip designed in a 65 nm CMOS process including deep n-well MAPS structures and a fast front-end conceived for the readout of high-resistivity pixel sensors will be introduced.

  16. 14 CFR 23.253 - High speed characteristics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Requirements § 23.253 High speed characteristics. If a maximum operating speed VMO/MMO is established under... airspeed limit altitude. (b) Allowing for pilot reaction time after occurrence of the effective inherent or...) Exceeding VD/MD, or VDF/MDF for turbojets, the maximum speed shown under § 23.251, or the...

  17. 14 CFR 23.253 - High speed characteristics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Requirements § 23.253 High speed characteristics. If a maximum operating speed VMO/MMO is established under... airspeed limit altitude. (b) Allowing for pilot reaction time after occurrence of the effective inherent or...) Exceeding VD/MD, or VDF/MDF for turbojets, the maximum speed shown under § 23.251, or the...

  18. Calibration of GPS based high accuracy speed meter for vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Yin; Sun, Qiao; Du, Lei; Yu, Mei; Bai, Jie

    2015-02-01

    GPS based high accuracy speed meter for vehicles is a special type of GPS speed meter which uses Doppler Demodulation of GPS signals to calculate the speed of a moving target. It is increasingly used as reference equipment in the field of traffic speed measurement, but acknowledged standard calibration methods are still lacking. To solve this problem, this paper presents the set-ups of simulated calibration, field test signal replay calibration, and in-field test comparison with an optical sensor based non-contact speed meter. All the experiments were carried out on particular speed values in the range of (40-180) km/h with the same GPS speed meter. The speed measurement errors of simulated calibration fall in the range of +/-0.1 km/h or +/-0.1%, with uncertainties smaller than 0.02% (k=2). The errors of replay calibration fall in the range of +/-0.1% with uncertainties smaller than 0.10% (k=2). The calibration results justify the effectiveness of the two methods. The relative deviations of the GPS speed meter from the optical sensor based noncontact speed meter fall in the range of +/-0.3%, which validates the use of GPS speed meter as reference instruments. The results of this research can provide technical basis for the establishment of internationally standard calibration methods of GPS speed meters, and thus ensures the legal status of GPS speed meters as reference equipment in the field of traffic speed metrology.

  19. High-End CMOS Active Pixel Sensors For Space-Borne Imaging Instruments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-07-13

    sur la technologie CCD, alors que les capteurs CMOS à pixel actifs (APS) ont des nombreux avantages pour des applications embarquées. Cette...Les capteurs optiques intégrés sont utilisés dans le domaine spatial dans un large éventail d’applications. Beaucoup d’entres elles reposent toujours...publication présente des capteurs CMOS hautes performances d’aujourd’hui et met en lumière leurs avantages par rapport à leur équivalent CCD. Ces capteurs

  20. High Speed Link Radiated Emission Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisognin, P.; Pelissou, P.; Cissou, R.; Giniaux, M.; Vargas, O.

    2016-05-01

    To control the radiated emission of high-speed link and associated unit, the current approach is to implement overall harness shielding on cables bundles. This method is very efficient in the HF/ VHF (high frequency/ very high frequency) and UHF (ultra-high frequency) ranges when the overall harness shielding is properly bonded on EMC back-shell. Unfortunately, with the increasing frequency, the associated half wavelength matches with the size of Sub-D connector that is the case for the L band. Therefore, the unit connectors become the main source of interference emission. For the L-band and S-band, the current technology of EMC back-shell leaves thin aperture matched with the L band half wavelength and therefore, the shielding effectiveness is drastically reduced. In addition, overall harness shielding means significant increases of the harness mass.Airbus D&S Toulouse and Elancourt investigated a new solution to avoid the need of overall harness shielding. The objective is to procure EM (Electro-Magnetic) clean unit connected to cables bundles free of any overall harness shielding. The proposed solution is to implement EMC common mode filtering on signal interfaces directly on unit PCB as close as possible the unit connector.Airbus D&S Elancourt designed and manufactured eight mock-ups of LVDS (Low Voltage Differential Signaling) interface PCBs' with different solutions of filtering. After verification of the signal integrity, three mock-ups were retained (RC filter and two common mode choke coil) in addition to the reference one (without EMC filter).Airbus D&S Toulouse manufactured associated LVDS cable bundles and integrated the RX (Receiver) and TX (Transmitter) LVDS boards in shielded boxes.Then Airbus D&S performed radiated emission measurement of the LVDS links subassemblies (e.g. RX and TX boxes linked by LVDS cables) according to the standard test method. This paper presents the different tested solutions and main conclusions on the feasibility of such

  1. High Speed Balancing Applied to the T700 Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walton, J.; Lee, C.; Martin, M.

    1989-01-01

    The work performed under Contracts NAS3-23929 and NAS3-24633 is presented. MTI evaluated the feasibility of high-speed balancing for both the T700 power turbine rotor and the compressor rotor. Modifications were designed for the existing Corpus Christi Army Depot (CCAD) T53/T55 high-speed balancing system for balancing T700 power turbine rotors. Tests conducted under these contracts included a high-speed balancing evaluation for T700 power turbines in the Army/NASA drivetrain facility at MTI. The high-speed balancing tests demonstrated the reduction of vibration amplitudes at operating speed for both low-speed balanced and non-low-speed balanced T700 power turbines. In addition, vibration data from acceptance tests of T53, T55, and T700 engines were analyzed and a vibration diagnostic procedure developed.

  2. High speed vision processor with reconfigurable processing element array based on full-custom distributed memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhe; Yang, Jie; Shi, Cong; Qin, Qi; Liu, Liyuan; Wu, Nanjian

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, a hybrid vision processor based on a compact full-custom distributed memory for near-sensor high-speed image processing is proposed. The proposed processor consists of a reconfigurable processing element (PE) array, a row processor (RP) array, and a dual-core microprocessor. The PE array includes two-dimensional processing elements with a compact full-custom distributed memory. It supports real-time reconfiguration between the PE array and the self-organized map (SOM) neural network. The vision processor is fabricated using a 0.18 µm CMOS technology. The circuit area of the distributed memory is reduced markedly into 1/3 of that of the conventional memory so that the circuit area of the vision processor is reduced by 44.2%. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed design achieves correct functions.

  3. Interferometric comparison of the performance of a CMOS and sCMOS detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores-Moreno, J. M.; De la Torre I., Manuel H.; Hernández-Montes, M. S.; Pérez-López, Carlos; Mendoza S., Fernando

    2015-08-01

    We present an analysis of the imaging performance of two state-of-the-art sensors widely used in the nondestructive- testing area (NDT). The analysis is based on the quantification of the signal-to-noise (SNR) ratio from an optical phase image. The calculation of the SNR is based on the relation of the median (average) and standard deviation measurements over specific areas of interest in the phase images of both sensors. This retrieved phase is coming from the vibrational behavior of a large object by means of an out-of-plane holographic interferometer. The SNR is used as a figure-of-merit to evaluate and compare the performance of the CMOS and scientific CMOS (sCMOS) camera as part of the experimental set-up. One of the cameras has a high speed CMOS sensor while the other has a high resolution sCMOS sensor. The object under study is a metallically framed table with a Formica cover with an observable area of 1.1 m2. The vibration induced to the sample is performed by a linear step motor with an attached tip in the motion stage. Each camera is used once at the time to record the deformation keeping the same experimental conditions for each case. These measurements may complement the conventional procedures or technical information commonly used to evaluate a camerás performance such as: quantum efficiency, spatial resolution and others. Results present post processed images from both cameras, but showing a smoother and easy to unwrap optical phase coming from those recorded with the sCMOS camera.

  4. High Speed, High Accuracy Stage for Advanced Lithography. Phase I

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    noise and 5nm LSB of our laser interferometer. Zerodur Mounting bar Base expended in this direction Sensor heads Interferometer mirror ...state of the art. Their CORE machine claims an accuracy of 80nm over a 6- inch square field. This machine uses high-speed mirrors to scan multiple...variety of optical paths. If the laboratory is not quiet (e.g. if the interferometer mirror is moving, or if people are talking in the laboratory

  5. High speed flow cytometric separation of viable cells

    DOEpatents

    Sasaki, Dennis T.; Van den Engh, Gerrit J.; Buckie, Anne-Marie

    1995-01-01

    Hematopoietic cell populations are separated to provide cell sets and subsets as viable cells with high purity and high yields, based on the number of original cells present in the mixture. High-speed flow cytometry is employed using light characteristics of the cells to separate the cells, where high flow speeds are used to reduce the sorting time.

  6. High speed flow cytometric separation of viable cells

    DOEpatents

    Sasaki, D.T.; Van den Engh, G.J.; Buckie, A.M.

    1995-11-14

    Hematopoietic cell populations are separated to provide cell sets and subsets as viable cells with high purity and high yields, based on the number of original cells present in the mixture. High-speed flow cytometry is employed using light characteristics of the cells to separate the cells, where high flow speeds are used to reduce the sorting time.

  7. Large monolithic particle pixel-detector in high-voltage CMOS technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perić, I.; Takacs, C.

    2010-12-01

    A large monolithic particle pixel-detector implemented as system on a chip in a high-voltage 0.35 μm CMOS technology will be presented. The detector uses high-voltage n-well/p-substrate diodes as pixel-sensors. The diodes can be reversely biased with more than 60 V. In this way, depleted zones of about 10 μm thickness are formed, where the signal charges can be collected by drift. Due to fast charge collection in the strong electric-field zones, a higher radiation tolerance of the sensor is expected than in the case of the standard MAPS detectors. Simple pixel-readout electronics are implemented inside the n-wells. The readout is based on a source follower with one select- and two reset-transistors. Due to embedding of the pixel-readout electronics inside the collecting electrodes (n-wells) there are no insensitive zones within the pixel matrix. The detector chip contains a 128×128 matrix consisting of pixels of 21×21 μm2 -size. The diode voltages of one selected pixel-row are received at the bottom of the matrix by 128 eight-bit single-slope ADCs. All ADCs operate in parallel. The ADC codes are read out using eight LVDS 500 MBit/s output links. The readout electronics are designed to allow the readout of the whole pixel matrix in less than 50 μs. The total DC power consumption of the chip is 50 mW. All analog parts of the chip are implemented using radiation-hard layout techniques. Experimental results will be presented.

  8. A high linearity current mode second IF CMOS mixer for a DRM/DAB receiver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jian, Xu; Zheng, Zhou; Yiqiang, Wu; Zhigong, Wang; Jianping, Chen

    2015-05-01

    A passive current switch mixer was designed for the second IF down-conversion in a DRM/DAB receiver. The circuit consists of an input transconductance stage, a passive current switching stage, and a current amplifier stage. The input transconductance stage employs a self-biasing current reusing technique, with a resistor shunt feedback to increase the gain and output impedance. A dynamic bias technique is used in the switching stage to ensure the stability of the overdrive voltage versus the PVT variations. A current shunt feedback is introduced to the conventional low-voltage second-generation fully balanced multi-output current converter (FBMOCCII), which provides very low input impedance and high output impedance. With the circuit working in current mode, the linearity is effectively improved with low supply voltages. Especially, the transimpedance stage can be removed, which simplifies the design considerably. The design is verified with a SMIC 0.18 μm RF CMOS process. The measurement results show that the voltage conversation gain is 1.407 dB, the NF is 16.22 dB, and the IIP3 is 4.5 dBm, respectively. The current consumption is 9.30 mA with a supply voltage of 1.8 V. This exhibits a good compromise among the gain, noise, and linearity for the second IF mixer in DRM/DAB receivers. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 61306069), and the National High Technology Research and Development Program of China (No. 2011AA010301).

  9. LiH as Fuel for High Speed Propulsion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-01

    AFRL-AFOSR-UK-TR-2011-0058 LiH as Fuel for High Speed Propulsion Claudio Bruno Domenico Simone University of Rome...COVERED (From – To) 9 August 2010 – 09 August 2011 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE LiH as Fuel for High Speed Propulsion 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA8655-10-1...1-3091 ________________________________________________________________________________ 1 LiH as Fuel for High Speed Propulsion

  10. Chicago-St. Louis high speed rail plan

    SciTech Connect

    Stead, M.E.

    1994-12-31

    The Illinois Department of Transportation (IDOT), in cooperation with Amtrak, undertook the Chicago-St. Louis High Speed Rail Financial and Implementation Plan study in order to develop a realistic and achievable blueprint for implementation of high speed rail in the Chicago-St. Louis corridor. This report presents a summary of the Price Waterhouse Project Team`s analysis and the Financial and Implementation Plan for implementing high speed rail service in the Chicago-St. Louis corridor.

  11. Water Containment Systems for Testing High-Speed Flywheels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trase, Larry; Thompson, Dennis

    2006-01-01

    Water-filled containers are used as building blocks in a new generation of containment systems for testing high-speed flywheels. Such containment systems are needed to ensure safety by trapping high-speed debris in the event of centrifugal breakup or bearing failure. Traditional containment systems for testing flywheels consist mainly of thick steel rings. The effectiveness of this approach to shielding against high-speed debris was demonstrated in a series of tests.

  12. Measurements of speed of response of high-speed visible and IR optical detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowe, H. E.; Osmundson, J. S.

    1972-01-01

    A technique for measuring speed of response of high speed visible and IR optical detectors to mode-locked Nd:YAG laser pulses is described. Results of measurements of response times of four detectors are presented. Three detectors that can be used as receivers in a 500-MHz optical communication system are tested.

  13. High-speed dual Langmuir probe.

    PubMed

    Lobbia, Robert B; Gallimore, Alec D

    2010-07-01

    In an effort to temporally resolve the electron density, electron temperature, and plasma potential for turbulent plasma discharges, a unique high-speed dual Langmuir probe (HDLP) has been developed. A traditional single Langmuir probe of cylindrical geometry (exposed to the plasma) is swept simultaneously with a nearby capacitance and noise compensating null probe (fully insulated from the plasma) to enable bias sweep rates on a microsecond timescale. Traditional thin-sheath Langmuir probe theory is applied for interpretation of the collected probe data. Data at a sweep rate of 100 kHz are presented; however the developed system is capable of running at 1 MHz-near the upper limit of the applied electrostatic Langmuir probe theory for the investigated plasma conditions. Large sets (100,000 sweeps at each of 352 spatial locations) of contiguous turbulent plasma properties are collected using simple electronics for probe bias driving and current measurement attaining 80 dB signal-to-noise measurements with dc to 1 MHz bandwidth. Near- and far-field plume measurements with the HDLP system are performed downstream from a modern Hall effect thruster where the time-averaged plasma properties exhibit the approximate ranges: electron density n(e) from (1x10(15))-(5x10(16)) m(-3), electron temperature T(e) from 1 to 3.5 eV, and plasma potential V(p) from 5 to 15 V. The thruster discharge of 200 V (constant anode potential) and 2 A (average discharge current) displays strong, 2.2 A peak-to-peak, current oscillations at 19 kHz, characteristic of the thruster "breathing mode" ionization instability. Large amplitude discharge current fluctuations are typical for most Hall thrusters, yet the HDLP system reveals the presence of the same 19 kHz fluctuations in n(e)(t), T(e)(t), and V(p)(t) throughout the entire plume with peak-to-peak divided by mean plasma properties that average 94%. The propagation delays between the discharge current fluctuations and the corresponding plasma

  14. High speed data transmission for the SSC solenoidal detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leskovar, B.

    1991-04-01

    High speed data transmission using fiber optics for the Superconducting Super Collider solenoidal detector has been studied. The solenoidal detector system will consist of nine subsystems involving more than a total 10(exp 7) channels of readout electronics. Consequently, a new high performance data acquisition system, incorporating high-speed optical fiber networks, will be required to process this large quantity of data.

  15. Holistic design in high-speed optical interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saeedi, Saman

    Integrated circuit scaling has enabled a huge growth in processing capability, which necessitates a corresponding increase in inter-chip communication bandwidth. As bandwidth requirements for chip-to-chip interconnection scale, deficiencies of electrical channels become more apparent. Optical links present a viable alternative due to their low frequency-dependent loss and higher bandwidth density in the form of wavelength division multiplexing. As integrated photonics and bonding technologies are maturing, commercialization of hybrid-integrated optical links are becoming a reality. Increasing silicon integration leads to better performance in optical links but necessitates a corresponding co-design strategy in both electronics and photonics. In this light, holistic design of high-speed optical links with an in-depth understanding of photonics and state-of-the-art electronics brings their performance to unprecedented levels. This thesis presents developments in high-speed optical links by co-designing and co-integrating the primary elements of an optical link: receiver, transmitter, and clocking. In the first part of this thesis a 3D-integrated CMOS/Silicon-photonic receiver will be presented. The electronic chip features a novel design that employs a low-bandwidth TIA front-end, double-sampling and equalization through dynamic offset modulation. Measured results show -14.9dBm of sensitivity and energy eciency of 170fJ/b at 25Gb/s. The same receiver front-end is also used to implement source-synchronous 4-channel WDM-based parallel optical receiver. Quadrature ILO-based clocking is employed for synchronization and a novel frequency-tracking method that exploits the dynamics of IL in a quadrature ring oscillator to increase the effective locking range. An adaptive body-biasing circuit is designed to maintain the per-bit-energy consumption constant across wide data-rates. The prototype measurements indicate a record-low power consumption of 153fJ/b at 32Gb/s. The

  16. High-speed architecture for the decoding of trellis-coded modulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osborne, William P.

    1992-01-01

    Since 1971, when the Viterbi Algorithm was introduced as the optimal method of decoding convolutional codes, improvements in circuit technology, especially VLSI, have steadily increased its speed and practicality. Trellis-Coded Modulation (TCM) combines convolutional coding with higher level modulation (non-binary source alphabet) to provide forward error correction and spectral efficiency. For binary codes, the current stare-of-the-art is a 64-state Viterbi decoder on a single CMOS chip, operating at a data rate of 25 Mbps. Recently, there has been an interest in increasing the speed of the Viterbi Algorithm by improving the decoder architecture, or by reducing the algorithm itself. Designs employing new architectural techniques are now in existence, however these techniques are currently applied to simpler binary codes, not to TCM. The purpose of this report is to discuss TCM architectural considerations in general, and to present the design, at the logic gate level, or a specific TCM decoder which applies these considerations to achieve high-speed decoding.

  17. Time optimal paths for high speed maneuvering

    SciTech Connect

    Reister, D.B.; Lenhart, S.M.

    1993-01-01

    Recent theoretical results have completely solved the problem of determining the minimum length path for a vehicle with a minimum turning radius moving from an initial configuration to a final configuration. Time optimal paths for a constant speed vehicle are a subset of the minimum length paths. This paper uses the Pontryagin maximum principle to find time optimal paths for a constant speed vehicle. The time optimal paths consist of sequences of axes of circles and straight lines. The maximum principle introduces concepts (dual variables, bang-bang solutions, singular solutions, and transversality conditions) that provide important insight into the nature of the time optimal paths. We explore the properties of the optimal paths and present some experimental results for a mobile robot following an optimal path.

  18. High-speed optical 3D sensing and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Yoshihiro

    2016-12-01

    This paper reviews high-speed optical 3D sensing technologies for obtaining the 3D shape of a target using a camera. The focusing speed is from 100 to 1000 fps, exceeding normal camera frame rates, which are typically 30 fps. In particular, contactless, active, and real-time systems are introduced. Also, three example applications of this type of sensing technology are introduced, including surface reconstruction from time-sequential depth images, high-speed 3D user interaction, and high-speed digital archiving.

  19. Miniaturized High Speed Controls for Turbine Engines (Fabrication and Test)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-08-01

    AO/A-006 108 MINIATURIZED HIGH SPEED CONTROLS FOR TURBINE ENGINES (FABRICATION AND TEST ) D. G. Burnell, et al Colt lndustries, Incorporated Prepared...Speed Controlsma193-Ag97 for Turbine Engines (Fabrication and May 1973RIN ORD REugR 1974 Test ) 6.PRFRIA GOG EOTNME 7. AUTHOR(.) 6- CONTRACT OR GRANT... y asd Id..,tify by block numnb.) ’-This report summarizes the design and development of con- trol components and high speed fuel pump technology for

  20. High loading, low speed fan study, 5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keenan, M. J.; Burdsall, E. A.

    1973-01-01

    A low speed, low noise, single stage fan was designed and tested. Design pressure ratio was 1.5 at a rotor tip speed of 1000 ft/sec. No inlet guide vane was used, the rotor stator was spaced and the number of rotor and stator airfoils was selected for low noise. Tests were conducted with uniform and distorted inlet flows. Stall margin of the initial design was too low for practical application. Airfoil slots and boundary layer and endwall devices did not improve stall margin sufficiently. A redesigned stator with reduced loadings increased stall margin, giving a fan efficiency of 0.883, 15% stall margin, and a 1.474 pressure radio at a specific flow of 41.7 lb/sec sq ft. Casing treatment over rotor tips improved stall margin with distorted inlet flow; vortex generators did not. Blade passing frequency noise increased with rotor relative Mach number. No supersonic fan noise was measured below 105% of design speed. Slotting airfoils, casing treatments, and a reduction of the ratio (number-stators/number-rotors) from (2n + 16) to (2n + 2) had no significant effects on noise.

  1. Multi-point, high-speed passive ion velocity distribution diagnostic on the Pegasus Toroidal Experiment.

    PubMed

    Burke, M G; Fonck, R J; Bongard, M W; Schlossberg, D J; Winz, G R

    2012-10-01

    A passive ion temperature polychromator has been deployed on Pegasus to study power balance and non-thermal ion distributions that arise during point source helicity injection. Spectra are recorded from a 1 m F/8.6 Czerny-Turner polychromator whose output is recorded by an intensified high-speed camera. The use of high orders allows for a dispersion of 0.02 Å/mm in 4th order and a bandpass of 0.14 Å (~13 km/s) at 3131 Å in 4th order with 100 μm entrance slit. The instrument temperature of the spectrometer is 15 eV. Light from the output of an image intensifier in the spectrometer focal plane is coupled to a high-speed CMOS camera. The system can accommodate up to 20 spatial points recorded at 0.5 ms time resolution. During helicity injection, stochastic magnetic fields keep T(e) low (100 eV) and thus low ionization impurities penetrate to the core. Under these conditions, high core ion temperatures are measured (T(i) ≈ 1.2 keV, T(e) ≈ 0.1 keV) using spectral lines from carbon III, nitrogen III, and boron IV.

  2. Multi-point, high-speed passive ion velocity distribution diagnostic on the Pegasus Toroidal Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, M. G.; Fonck, R. J.; Bongard, M. W.; Schlossberg, D. J.; Winz, G. R.

    2012-10-15

    A passive ion temperature polychromator has been deployed on Pegasus to study power balance and non-thermal ion distributions that arise during point source helicity injection. Spectra are recorded from a 1 m F/8.6 Czerny-Turner polychromator whose output is recorded by an intensified high-speed camera. The use of high orders allows for a dispersion of 0.02 A/mm in 4th order and a bandpass of 0.14 A ({approx}13 km/s) at 3131 A in 4th order with 100 {mu}m entrance slit. The instrument temperature of the spectrometer is 15 eV. Light from the output of an image intensifier in the spectrometer focal plane is coupled to a high-speed CMOS camera. The system can accommodate up to 20 spatial points recorded at 0.5 ms time resolution. During helicity injection, stochastic magnetic fields keep T{sub e} low ({approx}100 eV) and thus low ionization impurities penetrate to the core. Under these conditions, high core ion temperatures are measured (T{sub i} Almost-Equal-To 1.2 keV, T{sub e} Almost-Equal-To 0.1 keV) using spectral lines from carbon III, nitrogen III, and boron IV.

  3. Full-field high-speed laser Doppler imaging system for blood-flow measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serov, Alexandre; Lasser, Theo

    2006-02-01

    We describe the design and performance of a new full-field high-speed laser Doppler imaging system developed for mapping and monitoring of blood flow in biological tissue. The total imaging time for 256x256 pixels region of interest is 1.2 seconds. An integrating CMOS image sensor is utilized to detect Doppler signal in a plurality of points simultaneously on the sample illuminated by a divergent laser beam of a uniform intensity profile. The integrating property of the detector improves the signal-to-noise ratio of the measurement, which results in high-quality flow-images provided by the system. The new technique is real-time, non-invasive and the instrument is easy to use. The wide range of applications is one of the major challenges for a future application of the imager. High-resolution high-speed laser Doppler perfusion imaging is a promising optical technique for diagnostic and assessing the treatment effect of the diseases such as e.g. atherosclerosis, psoriasis, diabetes, skin cancer, allergies, peripheral vascular diseases, skin irritancy and wound healing. We present some biological applications of the new imager and discuss the perspectives for the future implementations of the imager for clinical and physiological applications.

  4. Structural vulnerability and intervention of high speed railway networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jianhua; Hu, Funian; Wang, Shuliang; Dai, Yang; Wang, Yixing

    2016-11-01

    This paper employs complex network theory to assess the structural vulnerability of high speed railway networks subjected to two different malicious attacks. Chinese, US and Japanese high speed railway networks are used to discuss the vulnerable characteristics of systems. We find that high speed railway networks are very fragile when suffering serious disturbances and two attack rules can cause analogous damages to one high speed railway network, which illustrates that the station with large degree possesses high betweenness, vice versa. Meanwhile, we discover that Japanese high speed railway network has the best global connectivity, but Chinese high speed railway network has the best local connectivity and possesses the largest transport capacity. Moreover, we find that there exist several redundant paths in Chinese high speed railway network and discover the critical stations of three HSRNs. Furthermore, the nearest-link method is adopted to implement topological interventions and to improve the connectivity and reliability of high speed railway networks. In addition, the feasibility and effectiveness of topological interventions are shown by simulations.

  5. HIGH-SPEED GC/MS FOR AIR ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    High speed or fast gas chromatography (FGC) consists of narrow bandwidth injection into a high-speed carrier gas stream passing through a short column leading to a fast detector. Many attempts have been made to demonstrate FGC, but until recently no practical method for routin...

  6. The Advantages of ISDN for High-Speed Remote Access.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galvin, Mark; Hauf, Al

    1997-01-01

    Explains why ISDN (integrated services digital network) is the most practical solution for high-speed remote access, including reliability, cost, flexibility, scaleability, standards, and manageability. Other data transmission options are discussed, including asymmetric digital subscriber lines (ADSL), high-speed digital subscriber lines (HDSL),…

  7. High-Speed Video Analysis of Damped Harmonic Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poonyawatpornkul, J.; Wattanakasiwich, P.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we acquire and analyse high-speed videos of a spring-mass system oscillating in glycerin at different temperatures. Three cases of damped harmonic oscillation are investigated and analysed by using high-speed video at a rate of 120 frames s[superscript -1] and Tracker Video Analysis (Tracker) software. We present empirical data for…

  8. 33 CFR 84.24 - High-speed craft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... of the isosceles triangle formed by the side lights and masthead light when seen in end elevation is... RULES ANNEX I: POSITIONING AND TECHNICAL DETAILS OF LIGHTS AND SHAPES § 84.24 High-speed craft. (a) The masthead light of high-speed craft with a length to breadth ratio of less than 3.0 may be placed at...

  9. 33 CFR 84.24 - High-speed craft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... of the isosceles triangle formed by the side lights and masthead light when seen in end elevation is... RULES ANNEX I: POSITIONING AND TECHNICAL DETAILS OF LIGHTS AND SHAPES § 84.24 High-speed craft. (a) The masthead light of high-speed craft with a length to breadth ratio of less than 3.0 may be placed at...

  10. Investigation of HV/HR-CMOS technology for the ATLAS Phase-II Strip Tracker Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fadeyev, V.; Galloway, Z.; Grabas, H.; Grillo, A. A.; Liang, Z.; Martinez-Mckinney, F.; Seiden, A.; Volk, J.; Affolder, A.; Buckland, M.; Meng, L.; Arndt, K.; Bortoletto, D.; Huffman, T.; John, J.; McMahon, S.; Nickerson, R.; Phillips, P.; Plackett, R.; Shipsey, I.; Vigani, L.; Bates, R.; Blue, A.; Buttar, C.; Kanisauskas, K.; Maneuski, D.; Benoit, M.; Di Bello, F.; Caragiulo, P.; Dragone, A.; Grenier, P.; Kenney, C.; Rubbo, F.; Segal, J.; Su, D.; Tamma, C.; Das, D.; Dopke, J.; Turchetta, R.; Wilson, F.; Worm, S.; Ehrler, F.; Peric, I.; Gregor, I. M.; Stanitzki, M.; Hoeferkamp, M.; Seidel, S.; Hommels, L. B. A.; Kramberger, G.; Mandić, I.; Mikuž, M.; Muenstermann, D.; Wang, R.; Zhang, J.; Warren, M.; Song, W.; Xiu, Q.; Zhu, H.

    2016-09-01

    ATLAS has formed strip CMOS project to study the use of CMOS MAPS devices as silicon strip sensors for the Phase-II Strip Tracker Upgrade. This choice of sensors promises several advantages over the conventional baseline design, such as better resolution, less material in the tracking volume, and faster construction speed. At the same time, many design features of the sensors are driven by the requirement of minimizing the impact on the rest of the detector. Hence the target devices feature long pixels which are grouped to form a virtual strip with binary-encoded z position. The key performance aspects are radiation hardness compatibility with HL-LHC environment, as well as extraction of the full hit position with full-reticle readout architecture. To date, several test chips have been submitted using two different CMOS technologies. The AMS 350 nm is a high voltage CMOS process (HV-CMOS), that features the sensor bias of up to 120 V. The TowerJazz 180 nm high resistivity CMOS process (HR-CMOS) uses a high resistivity epitaxial layer to provide the depletion region on top of the substrate. We have evaluated passive pixel performance, and charge collection projections. The results strongly support the radiation tolerance of these devices to radiation dose of the HL-LHC in the strip tracker region. We also describe design features for the next chip submission that are motivated by our technology evaluation.

  11. High-speed on-chip windowed centroiding using photodiode-based CMOS imager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pain, Bedabrata (Inventor); Sun, Chao (Inventor); Yang, Guang (Inventor); Cunningham, Thomas J. (Inventor); Hancock, Bruce (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A centroid computation system is disclosed. The system has an imager array, a switching network, computation elements, and a divider circuit. The imager array has columns and rows of pixels. The switching network is adapted to receive pixel signals from the image array. The plurality of computation elements operates to compute inner products for at least x and y centroids. The plurality of computation elements has only passive elements to provide inner products of pixel signals the switching network. The divider circuit is adapted to receive the inner products and compute the x and y centroids.

  12. High-speed on-chip windowed centroiding using photodiode-based CMOS imager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pain, Bedabrata (Inventor); Sun, Chao (Inventor); Yang, Guang (Inventor); Cunningham, Thomas J. (Inventor); Hancock, Bruce (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A centroid computation system is disclosed. The system has an imager array, a switching network, computation elements, and a divider circuit. The imager array has columns and rows of pixels. The switching network is adapted to receive pixel signals from the image array. The plurality of computation elements operates to compute inner products for at least x and y centroids. The plurality of computation elements has only passive elements to provide inner products of pixel signals the switching network. The divider circuit is adapted to receive the inner products and compute the x and y centroids.

  13. High speed all-optical networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chlamtac, Imrich

    1993-01-01

    An inherent problem of conventional point-to-point WAN architectures is that they cannot translate optical transmission bandwidth into comparable user available throughput due to the limiting electronic processing speed of the switching nodes. This report presents the first solution to WDM based WAN networks that overcomes this limitation. The proposed Lightnet architecture takes into account the idiosyncrasies of WDM switching/transmission leading to an efficient and pragmatic solution. The Lightnet architecture trades the ample WDM bandwidth for a reduction in the number of processing stages and a simplification of each switching stage, leading to drastically increased effective network throughputs.

  14. Spontaneous sidebanding in high speed rotordynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrich, F. F.

    1992-10-01

    It is noted that the spontaneous sideband spacing frequency seems to be a whole number fraction (1/J) of the operating speed which indicates that the wave form is periodic and completes a full cycle every J rotations of the rotor. Employing a numerical model of a rotor that simulates local contact with a stator in close proximity as a bilinear spring, studies have been conducted to explore the circumstances for this spontaneous sidebanding. Two general classes of this type of response are determined in a system that is effectively single-degree-of-freedom.

  15. Nanoemulsions produced by rotor-stator high speed stirring.

    PubMed

    Scholz, Patrik; Keck, Cornelia M

    2015-03-30

    Nanoemulsions were produced by high speed stirring using an ART MICCRA D27 rotor-stator system. Nanoemulsions with a droplet size of 135 nm and a narrow size distribution were obtained. The emulsions are physically stable for at least three months. Optimized production parameters are a stirring speed of 36,000 rpm (maximum speed) and a production time of 5 min. A further reduction in processing time might be possible with a rotor with ultrafine slit size, i.e., 0.5 mm. The droplet size of the emulsion produced by high speed stirring is slightly larger than droplet sizes obtained by high pressure homogenization. However, the differences in size can be expected to have no influence on the in vivo efficacy of the emulsions. Thus, high speed stirring was found to be a highly effective method for the production of nanoemulsions. The process is fast, cost-effective and can be used for large scale production.

  16. Design automation techniques for high-resolution current folding and interpolating CMOS A/D converters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gevaert, D.

    2007-05-01

    The design and testing of a 12-bit Analog-to-Digital (A/D) converter, in current mode, arranged in an 8-bit LSB and a 4- bit MSB architecture together with the integration of specialized test building blocks on chip allows the set up of a design automation technique for current folding and interpolation CMOS A/D converter architectures. The presented design methodology focuses on the automation for CMOS A/D building blocks in a flexible target current folding and interpolating architecture for a downscaling technology and for different quality specifications. The comprehensive understanding of all sources of mismatching in the crucial building blocks and the use of physical based mismatch modeling in the prediction of mismatch errors, more adequate and realistic sizing of all transistors will result in an overall area reduction of the A/D converter. In this design the folding degree is 16, the number of folders is 64 and the interpolation level is 4. The number of folders is reduced by creating intermediate folding signals with a 4-level interpolator based on current division techniques. Current comparators detect the zero-crossing between the differential folder output currents. The outputs of the comparators deliver a cyclic thermometer code. The digital synthesis part for decoding and error correction building blocks is a standardized digital standard cell design. The basic building blocks in the target architecture were designed in 0.35μ CMOS technology; they are suitable for topological reuse and are in an automated way downscaled into a 0.18μ CMOS technology.

  17. Silicon CMOS-based vertical multimode interference optical taps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenger, Vincent E.; Beyette, Fred R., Jr.

    2001-12-01

    A compact, low loss, optical tap technology is critical for the incorporation of optical interconnects into mainstream CMOS processes. A recently introduced multimode interference effect based device has the potential for very high speed performance in a compact geometry and in a CMOS compatible process. For this work, 2-D and 3-D device simulations confirm a low excess optical loss on order of 0.1 dB, and a nominal 40% (2.2 dB) optical coupling into the CMOS circuitry over a wide range of guide to substrate distances. Simulated devices are on the order of 25micrometers in length and as narrow as 1 um. High temperature, hybrid polymer materials used for commercial CMOS inter-metal dielectric layers are targeted for tap fabrication and are incorporated into the models. Low cost, silicon CMOS based processing makes the new tap technology especially suitable for computer multi-chip module and board level interconnects, as well as for metro fiber to the home and desk telecommunications applications.

  18. High-speed tomography using pink beam at GeoSoilEnviroCARS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivers, Mark L.

    2016-10-01

    Synchrotron microtomography typically uses monochromatic beams, because these avoid beam-hardening artifacts and allow imaging above and below the absorption edges of specific elements. However, the monochromator greatly reduces the flux on the sample, and thus increases the data collection time. An alternative is to eliminate the monochromator, instead using absorbers to remove low-energy x-rays and reflection from a mirror to remove high-energy x-rays. This produces a pink beam with a large energy bandwidth and more than 1000 times greater flux. This is useful for dynamic studies, where an entire 3-D dataset can be collected in just a few seconds. We have implemented pink beam tomography at the 13-BM-D beamline at the GeoSoilEnviroCARS sector 13 at the Advanced Photon Source. A key component of such a system is a high-speed detector that can collect over 100 frames/s with excellent signal/noise. We are using a new generation of inexpensive CMOS detectors with very low read noise, large full-well capacity, and high speed. The system performs well, and first experiments in studying fluid imbibition and drainage are presented.

  19. Experimental Investigation of Micro Counter-Current Flow Using High-Speed Micro PIV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinohara, Kyosuke; Sugii, Yasuhiko; Aota, Arata; Hibara, Akihide; Kitamori, Takehiko; Okamoto, Koji

    2004-11-01

    Microfluidic devices have been developed for chemical analysis as micro total analysis systems (u-TAS). To utilize scale merits, continuous-flow chemical processing and micro unit operations had been proposed as microfluidic device including mixing, phase confluence, solvent extraction, and so on. Recently, as one of these integrated chemical processes, micro counter-current flow system had been developed for highly efficient solvent extraction. The system consisted of oil flow and water flow in inverse direction. Using the system, more efficient extraction of Co (II) complex than theoretical prediction was confirmed. In this paper, in order to investigate the fundamental characteristics of the micro counter-current flow, velocity fields of the micro counter-current flow were measured using high-speed micro PIV system. The system consisted of a high-speed CMOS camera with an image intensifier, an epi-fluorescent microscope with an objective lens and a color filter, and a CW laser. The velocity fields of water were visualized for a time resolution of 500 us and a spatial resolution of 2.2 x 2.2 um. Transient micro vortices at the water-butyl acetate interface were captured clearly.

  20. Nonparametric analysis of high wind speed data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francisco-Fernández, Mario; Quintela-del-Río, Alejandro

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, nonparametric curve estimation methods are applied to analyze time series of wind speeds, focusing on the extreme events exceeding a chosen threshold. Classical parametric statistical approaches in this context consist in fitting a generalized Pareto distribution (GPD) to the tail of the empirical cumulative distribution, using maximum likelihood or the method of the moments to estimate the parameters of this distribution. Additionally, confidence intervals are usually computed to assess the uncertainty of the estimates. Nonparametric methods to estimate directly some quantities of interest, such as the probability of exceedance, the quantiles or return levels, or the return periods, are proposed. Moreover, bootstrap techniques are used to develop pointwise and simultaneous confidence intervals for these functions. The proposed models are applied to wind speed data in the Gulf Coast of US, comparing the results with those using the GPD approach, by means of a split-sample test. Results show that nonparametric methods are competitive with respect to the standard GPD approximations. The study is completed generating synthetic data sets and comparing the behavior of the parametric and the nonparametric estimates in this framework.

  1. Final Report and Documentation for the Optical Backplane/Interconnect for High Speed Communication LDRD

    SciTech Connect

    ROBERTSON, PERRY J.; CHEN, HELEN Y.; BRANDT, JAMES M.; SULLIVAN, CHARLES T.; PIERSON, LYNDON G.; WITZKE, EDWARD L.; GASS, KARL

    2001-03-01

    Current copper backplane technology has reached the technical limits of clock speed and width for systems requiring multiple boards. Currently, bus technology such as VME and PCI (types of buses) will face severe limitations are the bus speed approaches 100 MHz. At this speed, the physical length limit of an unterminated bus is barely three inches. Terminating the bus enables much higher clock rates but at drastically higher power cost. Sandia has developed high bandwidth parallel optical interconnects that can provide over 40 Gbps throughput between circuit boards in a system. Based on Sandia's unique VCSEL (Vertical Cavity Surface Emitting Laser) technology, these devices are compatible with CMOS (Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor) chips and have single channel bandwidth in excess of 20 GHz. In this project, we are researching the use of this interconnect scheme as the physical layer of a greater ATM (Asynchronous Transfer Mode) based backplane. There are several advantages to this technology including small board space, lower power and non-contact communication. This technology is also easily expandable to meet future bandwidth requirements in excess of 160 Gbps sometimes referred to as UTOPIA 6. ATM over optical backplane will enable automatic switching of wide high-speed circuits between boards in a system. In the first year we developed integrated VCSELs and receivers, identified fiber ribbon based interconnect scheme and a high level architecture. In the second year, we implemented the physical layer in the form of a PCI computer peripheral card. A description of future work including super computer networking deployment and protocol processing is included.

  2. High-speed OCT light sources and systems [Invited

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Thomas; Huber, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Imaging speed is one of the most important parameters that define the performance of optical coherence tomography (OCT) systems. During the last two decades, OCT speed has increased by over three orders of magnitude. New developments in wavelength-swept lasers have repeatedly been crucial for this development. In this review, we discuss the historical evolution and current state of the art of high-speed OCT systems, with focus on wavelength swept light sources and swept source OCT systems. PMID:28270988

  3. A MHz speed wavelength sweeping for ultra-high speed FBG interrogation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Gyeong Hun; Lee, Hwi Don; Eom, Tae Joong; Jeong, Myung Yung; Kim, Chang-Seok

    2015-09-01

    We demonstrated a MHz speed wavelength-swept fiber laser based on the active mode locking (AML) technique and applied to interrogation system of an array of fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors. MHz speed wavelength sweeping of wavelength-swept fiber laser can be obtained by programmable frequency modulation of the semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) without any wavelength tunable filter. Both static and dynamic strain measurement of FBG sensors were successfully characterized with high linearity of an R-square value of 0.9999 at sweeping speed of 50 kHz.

  4. High speed demodulation systems for fiber optic grating sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Udd, Eric (Inventor); Weisshaar, Andreas (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Fiber optic grating sensor demodulation systems are described that offer high speed and multiplexing options for both single and multiple parameter fiber optic grating sensors. To attain very high speeds for single parameter fiber grating sensors ratio techniques are used that allow a series of sensors to be placed in a single fiber while retaining high speed capability. These methods can be extended to multiparameter fiber grating sensors. Optimization of speeds can be obtained by minimizing the number of spectral peaks that must be processed and it is shown that two or three spectral peak measurements may in specific multiparameter applications offer comparable or better performance than processing four spectral peaks. Combining the ratio methods with minimization of peak measurements allows very high speed measurement of such important environmental effects as transverse strain and pressure.

  5. Thermometry of a high temperature high speed micro heater.

    PubMed

    Xu, M; Slovin, G; Paramesh, J; Schlesinger, T E; Bain, J A

    2016-02-01

    A high temperature high-speed tungsten micro heater was fabricated and tested for application in phase change switches to indirectly heat and transform phase change material. Time domain transmissometry was used to measure heater temperature transients for given electrical inputs. Finite element modeling results on heater temperature transients show a good consistency between experiments and simulations with 0.2% mismatch in the best case and 13.1% in the worst case. The heater described in this work can reliably reach 1664 K at a rate of 1.67 × 10(10) K/s and quench to room temperature with a thermal RC time constant (time for T to fall by a factor of e) of less than 40 ns.

  6. Traction contact performance evaluation at high speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tevaarwerk, J. L.

    1981-01-01

    The results of traction tests performed on two fluids are presented. These tests covered a pressure range of 1.0 to 2.5 GPa, an inlet temperature range of 30 'C to 70 'C, a speed range of 10 to 80 m/sec, aspect ratios of .5 to 5 and spin from 0 to 2.1 percent. The test results are presented in the form of two dimensionless parameters, the initial traction slope and the maximum traction peak. With the use of a suitable rheological fluid model the actual traction curves measured can now be reconstituted from the two fluid parameters. More importantly, the knowledge of these parameters together with the fluid rheological model, allow the prediction of traction under conditions of spin, slip and any combination thereof. Comparison between theoretically predicted traction under these conditions and those measured in actual traction tests shows that this method gives good results.

  7. First Annual High-Speed Research Workshop, part 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitehead, Allen H., Jr. (Compiler)

    1992-01-01

    Papers presented at the First Annual High Speed Research Workshop held in Williamsburg, Viginia, on May 14-16, 1991 are presented. This NASA-sponsored workshop provided a national forum for presenting and discussing important technology issues related to the definition of an economically viable and environmentally compatible High Speed Civil Transport. The sessions are developed around the technical components of NASA's Phase 1 High Speed Research Program which addresses the environmental issues of atmospheric emissions, community noise, and sonic boom. In particular, this part of the publication, Part 4, addresses high lift research and supersonic laminar flow control.

  8. Turbomachinery technology for high-speed civil flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saunders, Neal T.; Glassman, Arthur J.

    1989-01-01

    NASA Lewis' research and technology efforts applicable to turbomachinery for high-speed flight are discussed. The potential benefits and cycle requirements for advanced variable cycle engines and the supersonic throughflow fan engine for a high-speed civil transport application are presented. The supersonic throughflow fan technology program is discussed. Technology efforts in the basic discipline areas addressing the severe operating conditions associated with high-speed flight turbomachinery are reviewed. Included are examples of work in internal fluid mechanics, high-temperature materials, structural analysis, instrumentation and controls.

  9. High speed sampling circuit design for pulse laser ranging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Rui-hai; Gao, Xuan-yi; Zhang, Yan-mei; Li, Huan; Guo, Hai-chao; Guo, Xiao-kang; He, Shi-jie

    2016-10-01

    In recent years, with the rapid development of digital chip, high speed sampling rate analog to digital conversion chip can be used to sample narrow laser pulse echo. Moreover, high speed processor is widely applied to achieve digital laser echo signal processing algorithm. The development of digital chip greatly improved the laser ranging detection accuracy. High speed sampling and processing circuit used in the laser ranging detection system has gradually been a research hotspot. In this paper, a pulse laser echo data logging and digital signal processing circuit system is studied based on the high speed sampling. This circuit consists of two parts: the pulse laser echo data processing circuit and the data transmission circuit. The pulse laser echo data processing circuit includes a laser diode, a laser detector and a high sample rate data logging circuit. The data transmission circuit receives the processed data from the pulse laser echo data processing circuit. The sample data is transmitted to the computer through USB2.0 interface. Finally, a PC interface is designed using C# language, in which the sampling laser pulse echo signal is demonstrated and the processed laser pulse is plotted. Finally, the laser ranging experiment is carried out to test the pulse laser echo data logging and digital signal processing circuit system. The experiment result demonstrates that the laser ranging hardware system achieved high speed data logging, high speed processing and high speed sampling data transmission.

  10. Experimental ball bearing dynamics study. [by high speed photography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Signer, H. R.

    1973-01-01

    A photographic method was employed to record the kinematic performance of rolling elements in turbo machinery ball bearings. The 110 mm split inner ring test bearings had nominal contact angles of 26 deg and 34 deg. High speed films were taken at inner ring speeds of 4,000, 8,000 and 12,000 rpm and at thrust loads of 4,448 N and 22,240 N (1,000 and 5,000 lbs). The films were measured and this data reduced to obtain separator speed, ball speed and ball spin axis orientation.

  11. Review of High-Speed Fiber Optic Grating Sensors Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Udd, E; Benterou, J; May, C; Mihailov, S J; Lu, P

    2010-03-24

    Fiber grating sensors can be used to support a wide variety of high speed measurement applications. This includes measurements of vibrations on bridges, traffic monitoring on freeways, ultrasonic detection to support non-destructive tests on metal plates and providing details of detonation events. This paper provides a brief overview of some of the techniques that have been used to support high speed measurements using fiber grating sensors over frequency ranges from 10s of kHz, to MHZ and finally toward frequencies approaching the GHz regime. Very early in the development of fiber grating sensor systems it was realized that a high speed fiber grating sensor system could be realized by placing an optical filter that might be a fiber grating in front of a detector so that spectral changes in the reflection from a fiber grating were amplitude modulated. In principal the only limitation on this type of system involved the speed of the output detector which with the development of high speed communication links moved from the regime of 10s of MHz toward 10s of GHz. The earliest deployed systems involved civil structures including measurements of the strain fields on composite utility poles and missile bodies during break tests, bridges and freeways. This was followed by a series of developments that included high speed fiber grating sensors to support nondestructive testing via ultrasonic wave detection, high speed machining and monitoring ship hulls. Each of these applications involved monitoring mechanical motion of structures and thus interest was in speeds up to a few 10s of MHz. Most recently there has been interest in using fiber grating to monitor the very high speed events such as detonations and this has led to utilization of fiber gratings that are consumed during an event that may require detection speeds of hundreds of MHz and in the future multiple GHz.

  12. High-speed LWR transients simulation for optimizing emergency response

    SciTech Connect

    Wulff, W.; Cheng, H.S.; Lekach, S.V.; Mallen, A.N.; Stritar, A.

    1984-11-19

    The purpose of computer-assisted emergency response in nuclear power plants, and the requirements for achieving such a response, are presented. An important requirement is the attainment of realistic high-speed plant simulations at the reactor site. Currently pursued development programs for plant simulations are reviewed. Five modeling principles are established and a criterion is presented for selecting numerical procedures and efficient computer hardware to achieve high-speed simulations. A newly developed technology for high-speed power plant simulation is described and results are presented. It is shown that simulation speeds ten times greater than real-time process-speeds are possible, and that plant instrumentation can be made part of the computational loop in a small, on-site minicomputer. Additional technical issues are presented which must still be resolved before the newly developed technology can be implemented in a nuclear power plant.

  13. Application Of High Speed Photography In Science And Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu Ji-Zong, Wu; Yu-Ju, Lin

    1983-03-01

    The service works in high-speed photography carried out by the Department of Precision Instruments, Tianjin University are described in this paper. A compensation type high-speed camera was used in these works. The photographic methods adopted and better results achieved in the studies of several technical fields, such as velocity field of flow of overflow surface of high dam, combustion process of internal combustion engine, metal cutting, electrical are welding, experiment of piling of steel tube piles for supporting the marine platforms and characteristics of motion of wrist watch escape mechanism and so on are illustrated in more detail. As the extension of human visual organs and for increasing the abi-lities of observing and studying the high-speed processes, high-speed photography plays a very important role. In order to promote the application and development on high-speed photography, we have carried out the consultative and service works inside and outside Tianjin Uni-versity. The Pentazet 35 compensation type high-speed camera, made in East Germany, was used to record the high-speed events in various kinds of technical investigations and necessary results have been ob-tained. 1. Measurement of flow velocity on the overflow surface of high dam. In the design of a key water control project with high head, it is extremely necessary to determinate various characteristics of flow velocity field on the overflow surface of high dam. Since the water flow on the surface of high overflow dam possesses the features of large flow velocity and shallow water depth, therefore it is difficult to use the conventional current meters such as pilot tube, miniature cur-rent meter or electrical measuring methods of non-electrical quantities for studying this problem. Adopting the high-speed photographic method to study analogously the characteristics of flow velocity field on the overflow surface of high dam is a kind of new measuring method. People

  14. The Lag Model Applied to High Speed Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, Michael E.; Coakley, Thomas J.; Lillard, Randolph P.

    2005-01-01

    The Lag model has shown great promise in prediction of low speed and transonic separations. The predictions of the model, along with other models (Spalart-Allmaras and Menter SST) are assessed for various high speed flowfields. In addition to skin friction and separation predictions, the prediction of heat transfer are compared among these models, and some fundamental building block flowfields, are investigated.

  15. Per-Pixel Coded Exposure for High-Speed and High-Resolution Imaging Using a Digital Micromirror Device Camera.

    PubMed

    Feng, Wei; Zhang, Fumin; Qu, Xinghua; Zheng, Shiwei

    2016-03-04

    High-speed photography is an important tool for studying rapid physical phenomena. However, low-frame-rate CCD (charge coupled device) or CMOS (complementary metal oxide semiconductor) camera cannot effectively capture the rapid phenomena with high-speed and high-resolution. In this paper, we incorporate the hardware restrictions of existing image sensors, design the sampling functions, and implement a hardware prototype with a digital micromirror device (DMD) camera in which spatial and temporal information can be flexibly modulated. Combined with the optical model of DMD camera, we theoretically analyze the per-pixel coded exposure and propose a three-element median quicksort method to increase the temporal resolution of the imaging system. Theoretically, this approach can rapidly increase the temporal resolution several, or even hundreds, of times without increasing bandwidth requirements of the camera. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our method via extensive examples and achieve 100 fps (frames per second) gain in temporal resolution by using a 25 fps camera.

  16. High speed high dynamic range high accuracy measurement system

    SciTech Connect

    Deibele, Craig E.; Curry, Douglas E.; Dickson, Richard W.; Xie, Zaipeng

    2016-11-29

    A measuring system includes an input that emulates a bandpass filter with no signal reflections. A directional coupler connected to the input passes the filtered input to electrically isolated measuring circuits. Each of the measuring circuits includes an amplifier that amplifies the signal through logarithmic functions. The output of the measuring system is an accurate high dynamic range measurement.

  17. High speed measurements using fiber-optic Bragg gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benterou, Jerry; May, Chadd; Udd, Eric; Mihailov, Stephen J.; Lu, Ping

    2011-06-01

    Fiber grating sensors may be used to monitor high-speed events that include catastrophic failure of structures, ultrasonic testing and detonations. This paper provides insights into the utility of fiber grating sensors to measure structural changes under extreme conditions. An emphasis is placed on situations where there is a structural discontinuity. Embedded chirped fiber Bragg grating (CFBG) sensors can track the very high-speed progress of detonation waves (6-9 km/sec) inside energetic materials. This paper discusses diagnostic instrumentation and analysis techniques used to measure these high-speed events.

  18. High-speed AFM of human chromosomes in liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picco, L. M.; Dunton, P. G.; Ulcinas, A.; Engledew, D. J.; Hoshi, O.; Ushiki, T.; Miles, M. J.

    2008-09-01

    Further developments of the previously reported high-speed contact-mode AFM are described. The technique is applied to the imaging of human chromosomes at video rate both in air and in water. These are the largest structures to have been imaged with high-speed AFM and the first imaging in liquid to be reported. A possible mechanism that allows such high-speed contact-mode imaging without significant damage to the sample is discussed in the context of the velocity dependence of the measured lateral force on the AFM tip.

  19. High Speed Measurements using Fiber-optic Bragg Grating Sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Benterou, J J; May, C A; Udd, E; Mihailov, S J; Lu, P

    2011-03-26

    Fiber grating sensors may be used to monitor high-speed events that include catastrophic failure of structures, ultrasonic testing and detonations. This paper provides insights into the utility of fiber grating sensors to measure structural changes under extreme conditions. An emphasis is placed on situations where there is a structural discontinuity. Embedded chirped fiber Bragg grating (CFBG) sensors can track the very high-speed progress of detonation waves (6-9 km/sec) inside energetic materials. This paper discusses diagnostic instrumentation and analysis techniques used to measure these high-speed events.

  20. Trend on High-speed Power Line Communication Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Osamu

    High-speed power line communication (PLC) is useful technology to easily build the communication networks, because construction of new infrastructure is not necessary. In Europe and America, PLC has been used for broadband networks since the beginning of 21th century. In Japan, high-speed PLC was deregulated only indoor usage in 2006. Afterward it has been widely used for home area network, LAN in hotels and school buildings and so on. And recently, PLC is greatly concerned as communication technology for smart grid network. In this paper, the author surveys the high-speed PLC technology and its current status.

  1. First Annual High-Speed Research Workshop, part 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitehead, Allen H., Jr. (Compiler)

    1992-01-01

    The First High-Speed Research (HSR) Workshop was hosted by NASA LaRC and was held 14-16 May 1991, in Williamsburg, Virginia. The purpose of the workshop was to provide a national forum for the government, industry, and university participants to present and discuss important technology issues related to the development of a commercially viable, environmentally compatible, U.S. High-Speed Civil Transport. The workshop sessions are organized around the major task elements in NASA's Phase 1 High-Speed Research Program which basically addresses the environmental issues of atmospheric emissions, community noise, and sonic boom.

  2. Highly Reliable, High-Speed, Unidirectional Serial Data Links

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, Robert M.; Bishop, Jamie

    2005-01-01

    Highly reliable, high-speed, unidirectional serial data-communication subsystems have been proposed to be installed in an upgrade of the computing systems aboard the space shuttles. The basic design concept of these serial data links is also adaptable to terrestrial use in applications in which there are requirements for highly reliable serial data communications. The hardware and software aspects of the architecture of the data links are dictated largely by a requirement, in the original space-shuttle application, for one computer to monitor the memory transactions and memory contents of other computers in real time with high reliability and without reliance on requests for retransmission. To minimize weight while affording a capability to transfer data at a required rate of 2.56 x 10(exp 8) bits per second, it was decided that the links would be serial ones of the fiber-channel type. [Fiber channel denotes a type of serial computer bus that is used to connect a computer (usually a supercomputer) with a high-speed data storage device. Depending on the specific application, the physical connection between the transmitter and receiver could be made via an optical fiber or a twisted pair of wires.] Heretofore, fiber-channel links have ordinarily been bidirectional and have operated under protocols that provide for receiving stations to detect errors and request retransmission when necessary. In the present case, the time taken by processing to request retransmission would conflict with the requirement for real-time transfer of data. To ensure reliability without retransmission, a link according to the proposal would utilize a modified version of the normal fiberchannel character set in conjunction with forward error correction by means of a Reed-Solomon code (see figure). The Reed-Solomon encoding and decoding and the translations between the normal and modified character sets would be effected by logic circuitry external to the fiber-channel transmitter and receiver

  3. MEMS-based high speed scanning probe microscopy.

    PubMed

    Disseldorp, E C M; Tabak, F C; Katan, A J; Hesselberth, M B S; Oosterkamp, T H; Frenken, J W M; van Spengen, W M

    2010-04-01

    The high speed performance of a scanning probe microscope (SPM) is improved if a microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) device is employed for the out-of-plane scanning motion. We have carried out experiments with MEMS high-speed z-scanners (189 kHz fundamental resonance frequency) in both atomic force microscope and scanning tunneling microscope modes. The experiments show that with the current MEMS z-scanner, lateral tip speeds of 5 mm/s can be achieved with full feedback on surfaces with significant roughness. The improvement in scan speed, obtained with MEMS scanners, increases the possibilities for SPM observations of dynamic processes. Even higher speed MEMS scanners with fundamental resonance frequencies in excess of a megahertz are currently under development.

  4. Concentric Parallel Combining Balun for Millimeter-Wave Power Amplifier in Low-Power CMOS with High-Power Density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jiang-An; Kong, Zhi-Hui; Ma, Kaixue; Yeo, Kiat Seng; Lim, Wei Meng

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents a novel balun for a millimeter-wave power amplifier (PA) design to achieve high-power density in a 65-nm low-power (LP) CMOS process. By using a concentric winding technique, the proposed parallel combining balun with compact size accomplishes power combining and unbalance-balance conversion concurrently. For calculating its power combination efficiency in the condition of various amplitude and phase wave components, a method basing on S-parameters is derived. Based on the proposed parallel combining balun, a fabricated 60-GHz industrial, scientific, and medical (ISM) band PA with single-ended I/O achieves an 18.9-dB gain and an 8.8-dBm output power at 1-dB compression and 14.3-dBm saturated output power ( P sat) at 62 GHz. This PA occupying only a 0.10-mm2 core area has demonstrated a high-power density of 269.15 mW/mm2 in 65 nm LP CMOS.

  5. FPGA Flash Memory High Speed Data Acquisition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzalez, April

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to design and implement a VHDL ONFI Controller module for a Modular Instrumentation System. The goal of the Modular Instrumentation System will be to have a low power device that will store data and send the data at a low speed to a processor. The benefit of such a system will give an advantage over other purchased binary IP due to the capability of allowing NASA to re-use and modify the memory controller module. To accomplish the performance criteria of a low power system, an in house auxiliary board (Flash/ADC board), FPGA development kit, debug board, and modular instrumentation board will be jointly used for the data acquisition. The Flash/ADC board contains four, 1 MSPS, input channel signals and an Open NAND Flash memory module with an analog to digital converter. The ADC, data bits, and control line signals from the board are sent to an Microsemi/Actel FPGA development kit for VHDL programming of the flash memory WRITE, READ, READ STATUS, ERASE, and RESET operation waveforms using Libero software. The debug board will be used for verification of the analog input signal and be able to communicate via serial interface with the module instrumentation. The scope of the new controller module was to find and develop an ONFI controller with the debug board layout designed and completed for manufacture. Successful flash memory operation waveform test routines were completed, simulated, and tested to work on the FPGA board. Through connection of the Flash/ADC board with the FPGA, it was found that the device specifications were not being meet with Vdd reaching half of its voltage. Further testing showed that it was the manufactured Flash/ADC board that contained a misalignment with the ONFI memory module traces. The errors proved to be too great to fix in the time limit set for the project.

  6. A global standardization trend for high-speed client and line side transceivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isono, Hideki

    2012-12-01

    Through the recent progress in information oriented society, the required information volume is expanding rapidly. Under these circumstances, high-speed and high-capacity optical communication systems are deployed in the industry. Especially high speed optical transceiver is the key device to realize high-speed system, and the practical development is accelerated in the industry. In order to develop these leading edge products timely, the establishment of the global standards is strongly demanded in the industry. Based on these backgrounds, Forum standardization bodies such as OIF/IEEE802.3 are energetically creating the standards in the industry. With regard to 40G/100G standardization activities, OIF leads telecom field and IEEE802.3 leads datacom field, and both activities become important recently. The recent topics of these two standardization bodies are reviewed and its future direction is discussed. Two organizations have completed the 1st gen 40G/100G standards, and soon after they starts creating the 2nd gen 40G/100G standards for targeting more compact size and low power consumption transceivers, mainly because the unexpected huge increase of the information volume. Key factor for the 2nd gen is the low power consumption technology such as new CMOS technology and the design improvement of the heat dissipation. Also from the mechanical point of view, the development of the new electrical interface such as 25G/50G and the brand-new hybrid integration technologies are strongly expected in the industry. New configurations using silicon-photonics are reported by many organizations in the recent standardization meetings.

  7. ASIC for high-speed-gating and free running operation of SPADs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rochas, Alexis; Guillaume-Gentil, Christophe; Gautier, Jean-Daniel; Pauchard, Alexandre; Ribordy, Gregoire; Zbinden, Hugo; Leblebici, Yusuf; Monat, Laurent

    2007-05-01

    Single photon detection at telecom wavelengths is of importance in many industrial applications ranging from quantum cryptography, quantum optics, optical time domain reflectometry, non-invasive testing of VLSI circuits, eye-safe LIDAR to laser ranging. In practical applications, the combination of an InGaAs/InP APD with an appropriate electronic circuit still stands as the best solution in comparison with emerging technologies such as superconducting single photon detectors, MCP-PMTs for the near IR or up-conversion technique. An ASIC dedicated to the operation of InGaAs/InP APDs in both gated mode and free-running mode is presented. The 1.6mm2 chip is fabricated in a CMOS technology. It combines a gate generator, a voltage limiter, a fast comparator, a precise timing circuit for the gate signal processing and an output stage. A pulse amplitude of up to +7V can be achieved, which allows the operation of commercially available APDs at a single photon detection probability larger than 25% at 1.55μm. The avalanche quenching process is extremely fast, thus reducing the afterpulsing effects. The packaging of the diode in close proximity with the quenching circuit enables high speed gating at frequencies larger than 10MHz. The reduced connection lengths combined with impedance adaptation technique provide excellent gate quality, free of oscillations or bumps. The excess bias voltage is thus constant over the gate width leading to a stable single photon detection probability and timing resolution. The CMOS integration guarantees long-term stability, reliability and compactness.

  8. Entire thickness profiles of the epithelium and contact lens in vivo imaged with high speed and high resolution optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Aizhu; Shao, Yilei; Jiang, Hong; Ye, Yufeng; Lu, Fan; Shen, Meixiao; Zhu, Dexi; Wang, Jianhua

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To test the feasibility of measuring the entire thickness profiles of the epithelium and contact lens in vivo, using high speed and high resolution spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). Methods A custom-built, long scan depth SD-OCT was developed based on a CMOS camera and the axial resolution was about 5.1 µm in tissue. Five eyes of 5 subjects were imaged twice across the horizontal meridian before and while wearing one contact lens (CL). Semi-automatic measurement was done to yield the entire thickness profiles of the epithelium, total cornea, and contact lens after correcting for optical distortion. Results The full width and depth of the epithelium, ocular surface and contact lens were clearly visualized. The epithelial thickness (ET) at the center was 51.9 ± 3.5 µm, it remained at this thickness across the central 7 mm diameter and then increased at both temporal and nasal peripheries. The contact lens profile showed the thinnest point at the center with thickness of 100.3 ± 4.9 µm. The thickness increased towards the mid-periphery and then decreased at the edge. Conclusions This pilot study demonstrated the feasibility of using high speed CMOS-based OCT to evaluate the entire thickness profiles of the epithelium and contact lens in vivo. Further development will be needed to extend the scanning from 2D to 3D with a robust automatic image processing ability. PMID:23982471

  9. High Electron Mobility Transistor Structures on Sapphire Substrates Using CMOS Compatible Processing Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, Carl; Alterovitz, Samuel; Croke, Edward; Ponchak, George

    2004-01-01

    System-on-a-chip (SOC) processes are under intense development for high-speed, high frequency transceiver circuitry. As frequencies, data rates, and circuit complexity increases, the need for substrates that enable high-speed analog operation, low-power digital circuitry, and excellent isolation between devices becomes increasingly critical. SiGe/Si modulation doped field effect transistors (MODFETs) with high carrier mobilities are currently under development to meet the active RF device needs. However, as the substrate normally used is Si, the low-to-modest substrate resistivity causes large losses in the passive elements required for a complete high frequency circuit. These losses are projected to become increasingly troublesome as device frequencies progress to the Ku-band (12 - 18 GHz) and beyond. Sapphire is an excellent substrate for high frequency SOC designs because it supports excellent both active and passive RF device performance, as well as low-power digital operations. We are developing high electron mobility SiGe/Si transistor structures on r-plane sapphire, using either in-situ grown n-MODFET structures or ion-implanted high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) structures. Advantages of the MODFET structures include high electron mobilities at all temperatures (relative to ion-implanted HEMT structures), with mobility continuously improving to cryogenic temperatures. We have measured electron mobilities over 1,200 and 13,000 sq cm/V-sec at room temperature and 0.25 K, respectively in MODFET structures. The electron carrier densities were 1.6 and 1.33 x 10(exp 12)/sq cm at room and liquid helium temperature, respectively, denoting excellent carrier confinement. Using this technique, we have observed electron mobilities as high as 900 sq cm/V-sec at room temperature at a carrier density of 1.3 x 10(exp 12)/sq cm. The temperature dependence of mobility for both the MODFET and HEMT structures provides insights into the mechanisms that allow for enhanced

  10. Effects of high-speed power training on muscle performance and braking speed in older adults.

    PubMed

    Sayers, Stephen P; Gibson, Kyle

    2012-01-01

    We examined whether high-speed power training (HSPT) improved muscle performance and braking speed using a driving simulator. 72 older adults (22 m, 50 f; age = 70.6 ± 7.3 yrs) were randomized to HSPT at 40% one-repetition maximum (1RM) (HSPT: n = 25; 3 sets of 12-14 repetitions), slow-speed strength training at 80%1RM (SSST: n = 25; 3 sets of 8-10 repetitions), or control (CON: n = 22; stretching) 3 times/week for 12 weeks. Leg press and knee extension peak power, peak power velocity, peak power force/torque, and braking speed were obtained at baseline and 12 weeks. HSPT increased peak power and peak power velocity across a range of external resistances (40-90% 1RM; P < 0.05) and improved braking speed (P < 0.05). Work was similar between groups, but perceived exertion was lower in HSPT (P < 0.05). Thus, the less strenuous HSPT exerted a broader training effect and improved braking speed compared to SSST.

  11. Driver assist behaviors for high-speed small UGVs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamauchi, Brian

    2011-05-01

    Currently deployed small UGVs operate at speeds up to around 6 mph and have proven their usefulness in explosives ordnance disposal (EOD) missions. As part of the TARDEC-funded Stingray Project, iRobot is investigating techniques to increase the speed of small UGVs so they can be useful in a wider range of missions, such as high-speed reconnaissance and infantry assault missions. We have developed a prototype Stingray PackBot, using wheels rather than tracks, that is capable of traveling at speeds up to 18 mph. A key issue when traveling at such speeds is how to maintain stability during sharp turns and over rough terrain. We are developing driver assist behaviors that will provide dynamic stability control for high-speed small UGVs using techniques such as dynamic weight shifting to limit oversteer and understeer. These driver assist behaviors will enable operators to use future high-speed small UGVs in high optempo infantry missions and keep warfighters out of harm's way.

  12. Explosive-driven, high speed, arcless switch

    DOEpatents

    Skogmo, P.J.; Tucker, T.J.

    1987-07-14

    An explosive-actuated, fast-acting arcless switch contains a highly conductive foil to carry high currents positioned adjacent a dielectric surface within a casing. At one side of the foil opposite the dielectric surface is an explosive which, when detonated, drives the conductive foil against the dielectric surface. A pattern of grooves in the dielectric surface ruptures the foil to establish a rupture path having a pattern corresponding to the pattern of the grooves. The impedance of the ruptured foil is greater than that of the original foil to divert high current to a load. Planar and cylindrical embodiments of the switch are disclosed. 7 figs.

  13. Explosive-driven, high speed, arcless switch

    DOEpatents

    Skogmo, P.J.; Tucker, T.J.

    1986-05-02

    An explosive-actuated, fast-acting arcless switch contains a highly conductive foil to carry high currents positioned adjacent a dielectric surface within a casing. At one side of the foil opposite the dielectric surface is an explosive which, when detonated, drives the conductive foil against the dielectric surface. A pattern of grooves in the dielectric surface ruptures the foil to establish a rupture path having a pattern corresponding to the pattern of the grooves. The impedance of the ruptured foil is greater than that of the original foil to divert high current to a load. Planar and cylindrical embodiments of the switch are disclosed.

  14. Explosive-driven, high speed, arcless switch

    DOEpatents

    Skogmo, Phillip J.; Tucker, Tillman J.

    1987-01-01

    An explosive-actuated, fast-acting arcless switch contains a highly conductive foil to carry high currents positioned adjacent a dielectric surface within a casing. At one side of the foil opposite the dielectric surface is an explosive which, when detonated, drives the conductive foil against the dielectric surface. A pattern of grooves in the dielectric surface ruptures the foil to establish a rupture path having a pattern corresponding to the pattern of the grooves. The impedance of the ruptured foil is greater than that of the original foil to divert high current to a load. Planar and cylindrical embodiments of the switch are disclosed.

  15. High-speed vertical cavity surface emitting lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Lear, K.L.; Ochiai, M.; Hietala, V.M.

    1997-03-01

    High speed modulation and pulsing are reported for oxide-confined vertical cavity surface emitting laser diodes (VCSELs) with inverted doping and proton implantation to reduce the extrinsic limitations.

  16. The flight of an autogiro at high speed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, J A J

    1933-01-01

    This report presents a method for computing the flight performance of an autogiro at high speed, the velocity component along the blades being accounted for by calculation of the profile drag and the equation for zero torque.

  17. Discharge characteristics of a high speed fuel injection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matthews, Robertson

    1925-01-01

    Discussed here are some discharge characteristics of a fuel injection system intended primarily for high speed service. The system consisted of a cam actuated fuel pump, a spring loaded automatic injection valve, and a connecting tube.

  18. High-speed seal and bearing test facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panos, Jean B.

    1994-01-01

    The following topics are discussed in this viewgraph presentation: high speed seal/bearing rig background, project status, facility features, test rig capabilities, EMD testing advantages, and future opportunities.

  19. High speed testing of the hollow roller bearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowen, W. L.; Murphy, T. W., Jr.

    1980-08-01

    This bearing with its preloaded, hollow rollers has the qualities required for high speed operation. Roller hollowness improves cooling ability and its lighter weight reduces the centrifugal force against the raceway. Preloading between inner and outer races for 360 deg insures good roller guidance and minimizes roller skidding. However, the problems of operating a full complement of rollers at very high speeds were unknown. Also, limitations caused by roller bending fatigue needed investigation. To answer these questions, a high speed test machine was constructed and a hollow roller test bearing was designed for operation at 3 million DN. This paper describes the construction of a high speed test cell and subsequent testing of a full complement, preloaded, 115 mm hollow roller bearing. Testing culminated in a successful endurance test of 1000 hours at 26,100 RPM (3 million DN). The results verified several advantages regarding roller stability and antiskidding qualities as well as demonstrating a unique fail-safe condition.

  20. High performance Si nanowire field-effect-transistors based on a CMOS inverter with tunable threshold voltage.

    PubMed

    Van, Ngoc Huynh; Lee, Jae-Hyun; Sohn, Jung Inn; Cha, Seung Nam; Whang, Dongmok; Kim, Jong Min; Kang, Dae Joon

    2014-05-21

    We successfully fabricated nanowire-based complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (NWCMOS) inverter devices by utilizing n- and p-type Si nanowire field-effect-transistors (NWFETs) via a low-temperature fabrication processing technique. We demonstrate that NWCMOS inverter devices can be operated at less than 1 V, a significantly lower voltage than that of typical thin-film based complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) inverter devices. This low-voltage operation was accomplished by controlling the threshold voltage of the n-type Si NWFETs through effective management of the nanowire (NW) doping concentration, while realizing high voltage gain (>10) and ultra-low static power dissipation (≤3 pW) for high-performance digital inverter devices. This result offers a viable means of fabricating high-performance, low-operation voltage, and high-density digital logic circuits using a low-temperature fabrication processing technique suitable for next-generation flexible electronics.

  1. Technology needs for high-speed rotorcraft, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkerson, J. B.; Schneider, J. J.; Bartie, K. M.

    1991-01-01

    High-speed rotorcraft concepts and the technology needed to extend rotorcraft cruise speeds up to 450 knots (while retaining the helicopter attributes of low downwash velocities) were identified. Task I identified 20 concepts with high-speed potential. These concepts were qualitatively evaluated to determine the five most promising ones. These five concepts were designed with optimum wing loading and disk loading to a common NASA-defined military transport mission. The optimum designs were quantitatively compared against 11 key criteria and ranked accordingly. The two highest ranking concepts were selected for the further study.

  2. Highly sensitive multipoint real-time kinetic detection of Surface Plasmon bioanalytes with custom CMOS cameras.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Smith, Richard J; Light, Roger A; Richens, Joanna L; Zhang, Jing; O'Shea, Paul; See, Chung; Somekh, Michael G

    2014-08-15

    Phase sensitive Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) techniques are a popular means of characterizing biomolecular interactions. However, limitations due to the narrow dynamic range and difficulty in adapting the method for multi-point sensing have restricted its range of applications. This paper presents a compact phase sensitive SPR technology using a custom CMOS camera. The system is exceptionally versatile enabling one to trade dynamic range for sensitivity without altering the optical system. We present results showing sensitivity over the array of better than 10(-6) Refractive Index Units (RIU) over a refractive index range of 2×10(-2)RIU, with peak sensitivity of 3×10(-7)RIU at the center of this range. We also explain how simply altering the settings of polarization components can give sensitivity on the order of 10(-8)RIU albeit at the cost of lower dynamic range. The consistent response of the custom CMOS camera in the system also allowed us to demonstrate precise quantitative detection of two Fibrinogen antibody-protein binding sites. Moreover, we use the system to determine reaction kinetics and argue how the multipoint detection gives useful insight into the molecular binding mechanisms.

  3. High Speed Oblivious Random Access Memory (HS-ORAM)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    HIGH SPEED OBLIVIOUS RANDOM ACCESS MEMORY (HS-ORAM) PRIVATE MACHINES, INC. SEPTEMBER 2015 FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT...REPORT 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) OCT 2013 – MAY 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE HIGH SPEED OBLIVIOUS RANDOM ACCESS MEMORY (HS-ORAM) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER...query policies beyond simple access control. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Oblivious Random Access Memory , Hardware-based Security, Embedded Hardware Roots of

  4. High speed data transmission at the Superconducting Super Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Leskovar, B. )

    1991-04-01

    In this paper high speed data transmission using fiber optics in the data acquisition system of the Superconducting Super Collider has been investigated. Emphasis is placed on the high speed data transmission system overview, the local data network and on subassemblies, such as optical transmitters and receivers. Also, the performance of candidate subassemblies having a low power dissipation for the data acquisition system is discussed.

  5. A CMOS application-specified-integrated-circuit for 40 GHz high-electron-mobility-transistors automatic biasing.

    PubMed

    De Matteis, M; De Blasi, M; Vallicelli, E A; Zannoni, M; Gervasi, M; Bau, A; Passerini, A; Baschirotto, A

    2017-02-01

    This paper presents the design and the experimental results of a CMOS Automatic Control System (ACS) for the biasing of High-Electron-Mobility-Transistors (HEMT). The ACS is the first low-power mixed-signal Application-Specified-Integrated-Circuit (ASIC) able to automatically set and regulate the operating point of an off-chip 6 HEMT Low-Noise-Amplifiers (LNAs), hence it composes a two-chip system (the ACS+LNAs) to be used in the Large Scale Polarization Explorer (LSPE) stratospheric balloon for Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) signal observation. The hereby presented ACS ASIC provides a reliable instrumentation for gradual and very stable LNAs characterization, switching-on, and operating point (<4 mV accuracy). Moreover, it simplifies the electronic instrumentation needed for biasing the LNAs, since it replaces several off-the-shelf and digital programmable device components. The ASIC prototype has been implemented in a CMOS 0.35 μm technology (12 mm(2) area occupancy). It operates at 4 kHz clock frequency. The power consumption of one-channel ASIC (biasing one LNA) is 3.6 mW, whereas 30 mW are consumed by a single LNA device.

  6. Low Noise and Highly Linear Wideband CMOS RF Front-End for DVB-H Direct-Conversion Receiver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nam, Ilku; Moon, Hyunwon; Woo, Doo Hyung

    In this paper, a wideband CMOS radio frequency (RF) front-end for digital video broadcasting-handheld (DVB-H) receiver is proposed. The RF front-end circuit is composed of a single-ended resistive feedback low noise amplifier (LNA), a single-to-differential amplifier, an I/Q down-conversion mixer with linearized transconductors employing third order intermodulation distortion cancellation, and a divide-by-two circuit with LO buffers. By employing a third order intermodulation (IMD3) cancellation technique and vertical NPN bipolar junction transistor (BJT) switching pair for an I/Q down-conversion mixer, the proposed RF front-end circuit has high linearity and low low-frequency noise performance. It is fabricated in a 0.18µm deep n-well CMOS technology and draws 12mA from a 1.8V supply voltage. It shows a voltage gain of 31dB, a noise figure (NF) lower than 2.6dB, and an IIP3 of -8dBm from 470MHz to 862MHz.

  7. Electrical characterization of thulium silicate interfacial layers for integration in high-k/metal gate CMOS technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dentoni Litta, Eugenio; Hellström, Per-Erik; Henkel, Christoph; Östling, Mikael

    2014-08-01

    This work presents a characterization of the electrical properties of thulium silicate thin films, within the scope of a possible application as IL (interfacial layer) in scaled high-k/metal gate CMOS technology. Silicate formation is investigated over a wide temperature range (500-900 °C) through integration in MOS capacitor structures and analysis of the resulting electrical properties. The results are compared to those obtained from equivalent devices integrating lanthanum silicate interfacial layers. The thulium silicate IL is formed through a gate-last CMOS-compatible process flow, providing IL EOT of 0.1-0.3 nm at low formation temperature and interface state density at flatband condition below 2 × 1011 cm-2 eV-1. The effects of a possible integration in a gate-first process flow with a maximum thermal budget of 1000 °C are also evaluated, achieving an IL EOT of 0.2-0.5 nm, an interface state density at flatband condition ∼1 × 1011 cm-2 eV-1 and a reduction in gate leakage current density of one order of magnitude compared to the same stack without IL.

  8. A CMOS application-specified-integrated-circuit for 40 GHz high-electron-mobility-transistors automatic biasing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Matteis, M.; De Blasi, M.; Vallicelli, E. A.; Zannoni, M.; Gervasi, M.; Bau, A.; Passerini, A.; Baschirotto, A.

    2017-02-01

    This paper presents the design and the experimental results of a CMOS Automatic Control System (ACS) for the biasing of High-Electron-Mobility-Transistors (HEMT). The ACS is the first low-power mixed-signal Application-Specified-Integrated-Circuit (ASIC) able to automatically set and regulate the operating point of an off-chip 6 HEMT Low-Noise-Amplifiers (LNAs), hence it composes a two-chip system (the ACS+LNAs) to be used in the Large Scale Polarization Explorer (LSPE) stratospheric balloon for Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) signal observation. The hereby presented ACS ASIC provides a reliable instrumentation for gradual and very stable LNAs characterization, switching-on, and operating point (<4 mV accuracy). Moreover, it simplifies the electronic instrumentation needed for biasing the LNAs, since it replaces several off-the-shelf and digital programmable device components. The ASIC prototype has been implemented in a CMOS 0.35 μ m technology (12 mm2 area occupancy). It operates at 4 kHz clock frequency. The power consumption of one-channel ASIC (biasing one LNA) is 3.6 mW, whereas 30 mW are consumed by a single LNA device.

  9. High-Speed Scalable Silicon-MoS2 P-N Heterojunction Photodetectors

    PubMed Central

    Dhyani, Veerendra; Das, Samaresh

    2017-01-01

    Two-dimensional molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) is a promising material for ultrasensitive photodetector owing to its favourable band gap and high absorption coefficient. However, their commercial applications are limited by the lack of high quality p-n junction and large wafer scale fabrication process. A high speed Si/MoS2 p-n heterojunction photodetector with simple and CMOS compatible approach has been reported here. The large area MoS2 thin film on silicon platform has been synthesized by sulfurization of RF-sputtered MoO3 films. The fabricated molecular layers of MoS2 on silicon offers high responsivity up to 8.75 A/W (at 580 nm and 3 V bias) with ultra-fast response of 10 μsec (rise time). Transient measurements of Si/MoS2 heterojunction under the modulated light reveal that the devices can function up to 50 kHz. The Si/MoS2 heterojunction is found to be sensitive to broadband wavelengths ranging from visible to near-infrared light with maximum detectivity up to ≈1.4 × 1012 Jones (2 V bias). Reproducible low dark current and high responsivity from over 20 devices in the same wafer has been measured. Additionally, the MoS2/Si photodetectors exhibit excellent stability in ambient atmosphere. PMID:28281652

  10. High-Speed Scalable Silicon-MoS2 P-N Heterojunction Photodetectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhyani, Veerendra; Das, Samaresh

    2017-03-01

    Two-dimensional molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) is a promising material for ultrasensitive photodetector owing to its favourable band gap and high absorption coefficient. However, their commercial applications are limited by the lack of high quality p-n junction and large wafer scale fabrication process. A high speed Si/MoS2 p-n heterojunction photodetector with simple and CMOS compatible approach has been reported here. The large area MoS2 thin film on silicon platform has been synthesized by sulfurization of RF-sputtered MoO3 films. The fabricated molecular layers of MoS2 on silicon offers high responsivity up to 8.75 A/W (at 580 nm and 3 V bias) with ultra-fast response of 10 μsec (rise time). Transient measurements of Si/MoS2 heterojunction under the modulated light reveal that the devices can function up to 50 kHz. The Si/MoS2 heterojunction is found to be sensitive to broadband wavelengths ranging from visible to near-infrared light with maximum detectivity up to ≈1.4 × 1012 Jones (2 V bias). Reproducible low dark current and high responsivity from over 20 devices in the same wafer has been measured. Additionally, the MoS2/Si photodetectors exhibit excellent stability in ambient atmosphere.

  11. High Speed Computing, LANs, and WAMs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergman, Larry A.; Monacos, Steve

    1994-01-01

    Optical fiber networks may one day offer potential capacities exceeding 10 terabits/sec. This paper describes present gigabit network techniques for distributed computing as illustrated by the CASA gigabit testbed, and then explores future all-optic network architectures that offer increased capacity, more optimized level of service for a given application, high fault tolerance, and dynamic reconfigurability.

  12. A new design for a high speed spindle

    SciTech Connect

    Weck, M.; Fischer, S.; Holster, P.; Carlisle, K.; Chen, Y.

    1996-12-31

    Precision grinding and micromachining both impose high demands on the machine behavior, since the achievable workpiece accuracy is determined not only by the technological parameters but also by the characteristics of the applicated machine components. Ultraprecision surface quality and the mechanical fabrication of structures in the micron range can only be achieved by using machine tools which have appropriate spindles. Structures cannot be manufactured using spindle types of which the radial error motion is greater than the level of contour accuracy or surface roughness required. In addition, the spindle speed is an important value. Not only a certain cutting speed is needed from the technological point of view, but also the machining time required for microstructuring surfaces is reduced by deploying a high frequency spindle, thereby increasing the economic efficiency of the technique. Hence, the main purpose of the project was to develop a high speed spindle with properties concerning accuracy, speed and stiffness beyond commercially available ones.

  13. A high-sensitivity 135 GHz millimeter-wave imager by compact split-ring-resonator in 65-nm CMOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Nan; Yu, Hao; Yang, Chang; Shang, Yang; Li, Xiuping; Liu, Xiong

    2015-11-01

    A high-sensitivity 135 GHz millimeter-wave imager is demonstrated in 65 nm CMOS by on-chip metamaterial resonator: a differential transmission-line (T-line) loaded with split-ring-resonator (DTL-SRR). Due to sharp stop-band introduced by the metamaterial load, high-Q oscillatory amplification can be achieved with high sensitivity when utilizing DTL-SRR as quench-controlled oscillator to provide regenerative detection. The developed 135 GHz mm-wave imager pixel has a compact core chip area of 0.0085 mm2 with measured power consumption of 6.2 mW, sensitivity of -76.8 dBm, noise figure of 9.7 dB, and noise equivalent power of 0.9 fW/√{HZ } Hz. Millimeter-wave images has been demonstrated with millimeter-wave imager integrated with antenna array.

  14. Backside-illuminated, high-QE, 3e- RoN, fast 700fps, 1760x1680 pixels CMOS imager for AO with highly parallel readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Downing, Mark; Kolb, Johann; Baade, Dietrich; Balard, Philippe; Dierickx, Bart; Defernez, Arnaud; Dupont, Benoit; Feautrier, Philippe; Finger, Gert; Fryer, Martin; Gach, Jean-Luc; Guillaume, Christian; Hubin, Norbert; Iwert, Olaf; Jerram, Paul; Jorden, Paul; Pike, Andrew; Pratlong, Jerome; Reyes, Javier; Stadler, Eric; Walker, Andrew

    2012-07-01

    The success of the next generation of instruments for 8 to 40-m class telescopes will depend upon improving the image quality (correcting the distortion caused by atmospheric turbulence) by exploiting sophisticated Adaptive Optics (AO) systems. One of the critical components of the AO systems for the E-ELT has been identified as the Laser/Natural Guide Star (LGS/NGS) WaveFront Sensing (WFS) detector. The combination of large format, 1760x1680 pixels to finely sample (84x84 sub-apertures) the wavefront and the spot elongation of laser guide stars, fast frame rate of 700 (up to 1000) frames per second, low read noise (< 3e-), and high QE (> 90%) makes the development of such a device extremely challenging. Design studies by industry concluded that a thinned and backside-illuminated CMOS Imager as the most promising technology. This paper describes the multi-phased development plan that will ensure devices are available on-time for E-ELT first-light AO systems; the different CMOS pixel architectures studied; measured results of technology demonstrators that have validated the CMOS Imager approach; the design explaining the approach of massive parallelism (70,000 ADCs) needed to achieve low noise at high pixel rates of ~3 Gpixel/s ; the 88 channel LVDS data interface; the restriction that stitching (required due to the 5x6cm size) posed on the design and the solutions found to overcome these limitations. Two generations of the CMOS Imager will be built: a pioneering quarter sized device of 880x840 pixels capable of meeting first light needs of the E-ELT called NGSD (Natural Guide Star Detector); followed by the full size device, the LGSD (Laser Guide Star Detector). Funding sources: OPTICON FP6 and FP7 from European Commission and ESO.

  15. High-speed quantum networking by ship

    PubMed Central

    Devitt, Simon J.; Greentree, Andrew D.; Stephens, Ashley M.; Van Meter, Rodney

    2016-01-01

    Networked entanglement is an essential component for a plethora of quantum computation and communication protocols. Direct transmission of quantum signals over long distances is prevented by fibre attenuation and the no-cloning theorem, motivating the development of quantum repeaters, designed to purify entanglement, extending its range. Quantum repeaters have been demonstrated over short distances, but error-corrected, global repeater networks with high bandwidth require new technology. Here we show that error corrected quantum memories installed in cargo containers and carried by ship can provide a exible connection between local networks, enabling low-latency, high-fidelity quantum communication across global distances at higher bandwidths than previously proposed. With demonstrations of technology with sufficient fidelity to enable topological error-correction, implementation of the quantum memories is within reach, and bandwidth increases with improvements in fabrication. Our approach to quantum networking avoids technological restrictions of repeater deployment, providing an alternate path to a worldwide Quantum Internet. PMID:27805001

  16. High-speed quantum networking by ship.

    PubMed

    Devitt, Simon J; Greentree, Andrew D; Stephens, Ashley M; Van Meter, Rodney

    2016-11-02

    Networked entanglement is an essential component for a plethora of quantum computation and communication protocols. Direct transmission of quantum signals over long distances is prevented by fibre attenuation and the no-cloning theorem, motivating the development of quantum repeaters, designed to purify entanglement, extending its range. Quantum repeaters have been demonstrated over short distances, but error-corrected, global repeater networks with high bandwidth require new technology. Here we show that error corrected quantum memories installed in cargo containers and carried by ship can provide a exible connection between local networks, enabling low-latency, high-fidelity quantum communication across global distances at higher bandwidths than previously proposed. With demonstrations of technology with sufficient fidelity to enable topological error-correction, implementation of the quantum memories is within reach, and bandwidth increases with improvements in fabrication. Our approach to quantum networking avoids technological restrictions of repeater deployment, providing an alternate path to a worldwide Quantum Internet.

  17. High speed cineradiography using electronic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucero, J. P.; Fry, D. A.; Gaskill, W. E.; Henderson, R. L.; Crawford, T. R.; Carey, N. E.

    1992-12-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory has constructed and is now operating a cineradiography system for imaging and evaluation of ballistic interaction events at the 1200 meter range of the Terminal Effects Research and Analysis (TERA) Group at the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology. Cineradiography is part of a complete firing, tracking, and analysis system at the range. The cine system consists of flash x-ray sources illuminating a one-half meter by two meter fast phosphor screen which is viewed by gated-intensified high resolution still video cameras via turning mirrors. The entire system is armored to protect against events containing up to 13.5 kg of high explosive. Digital images are available for immediate display and processing. The system is capable of frame rates up to 10(exp 5)/sec for up to five total images.

  18. High-speed cineradiography using electronic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucero, Jacob P.; Fry, David A.; Gaskill, William E.; Henderson, R. L.; Crawford, Ted R.; Carey, N. E.

    1993-01-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory has constructed and is now operating a cineradiography system for imaging and evaluation of ballistic interaction events at the 1200 meter range of the Terminal Effects Research and Analysis (TERA) Group at the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology. Cineradiography is part of a complete firing, tracking, and analysis system at the range. The cine system consists of flash x-ray sources illuminating a one-half meter by two meter fast phosphor screen which is viewed by gated-intensified high resolution still video cameras via turning mirrors. The entire system is armored to protect against events containing up to 13.5 kg of high explosive. Digital images are available for immediate display and processing. The system is capable of frame rates up to 105/sec for up to five total images.

  19. High-speed quantum networking by ship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devitt, Simon J.; Greentree, Andrew D.; Stephens, Ashley M.; van Meter, Rodney

    2016-11-01

    Networked entanglement is an essential component for a plethora of quantum computation and communication protocols. Direct transmission of quantum signals over long distances is prevented by fibre attenuation and the no-cloning theorem, motivating the development of quantum repeaters, designed to purify entanglement, extending its range. Quantum repeaters have been demonstrated over short distances, but error-corrected, global repeater networks with high bandwidth require new technology. Here we show that error corrected quantum memories installed in cargo containers and carried by ship can provide a exible connection between local networks, enabling low-latency, high-fidelity quantum communication across global distances at higher bandwidths than previously proposed. With demonstrations of technology with sufficient fidelity to enable topological error-correction, implementation of the quantum memories is within reach, and bandwidth increases with improvements in fabrication. Our approach to quantum networking avoids technological restrictions of repeater deployment, providing an alternate path to a worldwide Quantum Internet.

  20. Application of CMOS image sensor OV9620 in number recognition system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yu-feng; Liang, Fei; Xue, Rong-kun

    2009-11-01

    An image acquisition system is introduced, which consists of a color CMOS image sensor (OV9620), SRAM (CY62148), CPLD (EPM7128AE) and DSP (TMS320VC5509A). The CPLD implements the logic and timing control to the system. SRAM stores the image data, and DSP controls the image acquisition system through the SCCB (Omni Vision Serial Camera Control Bus). The timing sequence of the CMOS image sensor OV9620 is analyzed. The imaging part and the high speed image data memory unit are designed. The system structure and its application of CMOS image sensor OV9620 in paper currency number recognition are also introduced. The hardware and software design of the image acquisition and recognition system is given. In this system, we use the template matching character recognition method to guarantee fast recognition speed and high correct recognition probability.

  1. High-speed imaging system for observation of discharge phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanabe, R.; Kusano, H.; Ito, Y.

    2008-11-01

    A thin metal electrode tip instantly changes its shape into a sphere or a needlelike shape in a single electrical discharge of high current. These changes occur within several hundred microseconds. To observe these high-speed phenomena in a single discharge, an imaging system using a high-speed video camera and a high repetition rate pulse laser was constructed. A nanosecond laser, the wavelength of which was 532 nm, was used as the illuminating source of a newly developed high-speed video camera, HPV-1. The time resolution of our system was determined by the laser pulse width and was about 80 nanoseconds. The system can take one hundred pictures at 16- or 64-microsecond intervals in a single discharge event. A band-pass filter at 532 nm was placed in front of the camera to block the emission of the discharge arc at other wavelengths. Therefore, clear images of the electrode were recorded even during the discharge. If the laser was not used, only images of plasma during discharge and thermal radiation from the electrode after discharge were observed. These results demonstrate that the combination of a high repetition rate and a short pulse laser with a high speed video camera provides a unique and powerful method for high speed imaging.

  2. Coal-fueled high-speed diesel engine development

    SciTech Connect

    Kakwani, R. M.; Winsor, R. E.; Ryan, III, T. W.; Schwalb, J. A.; Wahiduzzaman, S.; Wilson, Jr., R. P.

    1991-11-01

    The objectives of this program are to study combustion feasibility by running Series 149 engine tests at high speeds with a fuel injection and combustion system designed for coal-water-slurry (CWS). The following criteria will be used to judge feasibility: (1) engine operation for sustained periods over the load range at speeds from 600 to 1900 rpm. The 149 engine for mine-haul trucks has a rated speed of 1900 rpm; (2) reasonable fuel economy and coal burnout rate; (3) reasonable cost of the engine design concept and CWS fuel compared to future oil prices.

  3. Control structures for high speed processors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maki, G. K.; Mankin, R.; Owsley, P. A.; Kim, G. M.

    1982-01-01

    A special processor was designed to function as a Reed Solomon decoder with throughput data rate in the Mhz range. This data rate is significantly greater than is possible with conventional digital architectures. To achieve this rate, the processor design includes sequential, pipelined, distributed, and parallel processing. The processor was designed using a high level language register transfer language. The RTL can be used to describe how the different processes are implemented by the hardware. One problem of special interest was the development of dependent processes which are analogous to software subroutines. For greater flexibility, the RTL control structure was implemented in ROM. The special purpose hardware required approximately 1000 SSI and MSI components. The data rate throughput is 2.5 megabits/second. This data rate is achieved through the use of pipelined and distributed processing. This data rate can be compared with 800 kilobits/second in a recently proposed very large scale integration design of a Reed Solomon encoder.

  4. Aeroacoustics of Turbulent High-Speed Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, Ram Mohan; Lundgren, Thomas S.

    1996-01-01

    Aeroacoustic noise generation in a supersonic round jet is studied to understand in particular the effect of turbulence structure on the noise without numerically compromising the turbulence itself. This means that direct numerical simulations (DNS's) are needed. In order to use DNS at high enough Reynolds numbers to get sufficient turbulence structure we have decided to solve the temporal jet problem, using periodicity in the direction of the jet axis. Physically this means that turbulent structures in the jet are repeated in successive downstream cells instead of being gradually modified downstream into a jet plume. Therefore in order to answer some questions about the turbulence we will partially compromise the overall structure of the jet. The first section of chapter 1 describes some work on the linear stability of a supersonic round jet and the implications of this for the jet noise problem. In the second section we present preliminary work done using a TVD numerical scheme on a CM5. This work is only two-dimensional (plane) but shows very interesting results, including weak shock waves. However this is a nonviscous computation and the method resolves the shocks by adding extra numerical dissipation where the gradients are large. One wonders whether the extra dissipation would influence small turbulent structures like small intense vortices. The second chapter is an extensive discussion of preliminary numerical work using the spectral method to solve the compressible Navier-Stokes equations to study turbulent jet flows. The method uses Fourier expansions in the azimuthal and streamwise direction and a 1-D B-spline basis representation in the radial direction. The B-spline basis is locally supported and this ensures block diagonal matrix equations which are solved in O(N) steps. A very accurate highly resolved DNS of a turbulent jet flow is expected.

  5. Multi-exposure laser speckle contrast imaging using a high frame rate CMOS sensor with a field programmable gate array.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shen; Hayes-Gill, Barrie R; He, Diwei; Zhu, Yiqun; Morgan, Stephen P

    2015-10-15

    A system has been developed in which multi-exposure laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI) is implemented using a high frame rate CMOS imaging sensor chip. Processing is performed using a field programmable gate array (FPGA). The system allows different exposure times to be simulated by accumulating a number of short exposures. This has the advantage that the image acquisition time is limited by the maximum exposure time and that regulation of the illuminating light level is not required. This high frame rate camera has also been deployed to implement laser Doppler blood flow processing, enabling a direct comparison of multi-exposure laser speckle imaging and laser Doppler imaging (LDI) to be carried out using the same experimental data. Results from a rotating diffuser indicate that both multi-exposure LSCI and LDI provide a linear response to changes in velocity. This cannot be obtained using single-exposure LSCI, unless an appropriate model is used for correcting the response.

  6. SPH simulations of high-speed collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozehnal, Jakub; Broz, Miroslav

    2016-10-01

    Our work is devoted to a comparison of: i) asteroid-asteroid collisions occurring at lower velocities (about 5 km/s in the Main Belt), and ii) mutual collisions of asteroids and cometary nuclei usually occurring at significantly higher relative velocities (> 10 km/s).We focus on differences in the propagation of the shock wave, ejection of the fragments and possible differences in the resultingsize-frequency distributions of synthetic asteroid families. We also discuss scaling with respect to the "nominal" target diameter D = 100 km, projectile velocity 3-7 km/s, for which a number of simulations were done so far (Durda et al. 2007, Benavidez et al. 2012).In the latter case of asteroid-comet collisions, we simulate the impacts of brittle or pre-damaged impactors onto solid monolithic targets at high velocities, ranging from 10 to 15 km/s. The purpose of this numerical experiment is to better understand impact processes shaping the early Solar System, namely the primordial asteroid belt during during the (late) heavy bombardment (as a continuation of Broz et al. 2013).For all hydrodynamical simulations we use a smoothed-particle hydrodynamics method (SPH), namely the lagrangian SPH3D code (Benz & Asphaug 1994, 1995). The gravitational interactions between fragments (re-accumulation) is simulated with the Pkdgrav tree-code (Richardson et al. 2000).

  7. Radiation tolerance study of a commercial 65 nm CMOS technology for high energy physics applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Lili; Gerardin, Simone; Bagatin, Marta; Bisello, Dario; Mattiazzo, Serena; Paccagnella, Alessandro

    2016-09-01

    This paper reports the radiation tolerance study of a commercial 65 nm technology, which is a strong candidate for the Large Hadron Collider applications. After exposure to 3 MeV protons till 1 Grad dose, the 65 nm CMOS transistors, especially the pMOSFETs, showed severe long-term degradation mainly in the saturation drain currents. There were some differences between the degradation levels in the nMOSFETs and the pMOSFETs, which were likely attributed to the positive charges trapped in the gate spacers. After exposure to heavy ions till multiple strikes, the pMOSFETs did not show any sudden loss of drain currents, the degradations in the characteristics were negligible.

  8. Low Speed and High Speed Correlation of SMART Active Flap Rotor Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kottapalli, Sesi B. R.

    2010-01-01

    Measured, open loop and closed loop data from the SMART rotor test in the NASA Ames 40- by 80- Foot Wind Tunnel are compared with CAMRAD II calculations. One open loop high-speed case and four closed loop cases are considered. The closed loop cases include three high-speed cases and one low-speed case. Two of these high-speed cases include a 2 deg flap deflection at 5P case and a test maximum-airspeed case. This study follows a recent, open loop correlation effort that used a simple correction factor for the airfoil pitching moment Mach number. Compared to the earlier effort, the current open loop study considers more fundamental corrections based on advancing blade aerodynamic conditions. The airfoil tables themselves have been studied. Selected modifications to the HH-06 section flap airfoil pitching moment table are implemented. For the closed loop condition, the effect of the flap actuator is modeled by increased flap hinge stiffness. Overall, the open loop correlation is reasonable, thus confirming the basic correctness of the current semi-empirical modifications; the closed loop correlation is also reasonable considering that the current flap model is a first generation model. Detailed correlation results are given in the paper.

  9. Ultra high speed image processing techniques. [electronic packaging techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anthony, T.; Hoeschele, D. F.; Connery, R.; Ehland, J.; Billings, J.

    1981-01-01

    Packaging techniques for ultra high speed image processing were developed. These techniques involve the development of a signal feedthrough technique through LSI/VLSI sapphire substrates. This allows the stacking of LSI/VLSI circuit substrates in a 3 dimensional package with greatly reduced length of interconnecting lines between the LSI/VLSI circuits. The reduced parasitic capacitances results in higher LSI/VLSI computational speeds at significantly reduced power consumption levels.

  10. Quality of service on high-speed data networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbero, Ezio; Antonelli, Ferruccio

    1995-02-01

    Since the beginning of this century the issue of `quality' has been gaining increasing importance in a number of fields of human activities. For telecommunication services, too, the quality perceived by customers has been taken into account early on as an issue of strategic importance. Whilst for telephony the Quality of Service (QoS) has been already investigated and identified in terms of parameters and related test methodology, the situation for high speed data services (i.e. CBDS/SMDS, Frame Relay, etc.), provided by means of high speed network based on Asynchronous Transfer Moe (ATM) or Metropolitan Area Network technologies, can still be considered `under study'. There is a death of experience not only in terms of measurement instruments and procedures, but also in terms of knowledge of the relationship between the QoS provided at a network level and the quality perceived by the user on his or her terminal. The complexity of the equipment involved in setting up an end-to-end solution based on high speed data communications makes the problems of knowledge and supply of quality very hard to solve. Starting from the experience gained in carrying out high- speed network field trials based on Metropolitan Area Networks and, more recently, on ATM technology, the paper mainly deals with the problem of defining, measuring and then offering a specific QoS. First, the issue of what the user expects from the `high-speed network' is addressed. This analysis is carried out trying to gather what is peculiar to high-speed data communications from the user standpoint. Next, the focus is on how to cope with the requirements due to users' expectations, while carefully considering the basic principles of quality. Finally, a solution is proposed, starting from the experience gained from high speed networks installed in Italy.

  11. Material requirements for the High Speed Civil Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, Joseph R.; Hecht, Ralph J.; Johnson, Andrew M.

    1993-01-01

    Under NASA-sponsored High Speed Research (HSR) programs, the materials and processing requirements have been identified for overcoming the environmental and economic barriers of the next generation High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) propulsion system. The long (2 to 5 hours) supersonic cruise portion of the HSCT cycle will place additional durability requirements on all hot section engine components. Low emissions combustor designs will require high temperature ceramic matrix composite liners to meet an emission goal of less than 5g NO(x) per Kg fuel burned. Large axisymmetric and two-dimensional exhaust nozzle designs are now under development to meet or exceed FAR 36 Stage III noise requirements, and will require lightweight, high temperature metallic, intermetallic, and ceramic matrix composites to reduce nozzle weight and meet structural and acoustic component performance goals. This paper describes and discusses the turbomachinery, combustor, and exhaust nozzle requirements of the High Speed Civil Transport propulsion system.

  12. High-speed particle image velocimetry for the efficient measurement of turbulence statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willert, Christian E.

    2015-01-01

    A high-frame-rate camera and a continuous-wave laser are used to capture long particle image sequences exceeding 100,000 consecutive frames at framing frequencies up to 20 kHz. The electronic shutter of the high-speed CMOS camera is reduced to s to prevent excessive particle image streaking. The combination of large image number and high frame rate is possible by limiting the field of view to a narrow strip, primarily to capture temporally resolved profiles of velocity and derived quantities, such as vorticity as well as higher order statistics. Multi-frame PIV processing algorithms are employed to improve the dynamic range of recovered PIV data. The recovered data are temporally well resolved and provide sufficient samples for statistical convergence of the fluctuating velocity components. The measurement technique is demonstrated on a spatially developing turbulent boundary layer inside a small wind tunnel with and . The chosen magnification permits a reliable estimation of the mean velocity profile down to a few wall units and yields statistical information such as the Reynolds stress components and probability density functions. By means of single-line correlation, it is further possible to extract the near-wall velocity profile in the viscous sublayer, both time-averaged as well as instantaneous, which permits the estimation the wall shear rate and along with it the shear stress and friction velocity . These data are then used for the calculation of space-time correlation maps of wall shear stress and velocity.

  13. A Low-Power High-Speed Smart Sensor Design for Space Exploration Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fang, Wai-Chi

    1997-01-01

    A low-power high-speed smart sensor system based on a large format active pixel sensor (APS) integrated with a programmable neural processor for space exploration missions is presented. The concept of building an advanced smart sensing system is demonstrated by a system-level microchip design that is composed with an APS sensor, a programmable neural processor, and an embedded microprocessor in a SOI CMOS technology. This ultra-fast smart sensor system-on-a-chip design mimics what is inherent in biological vision systems. Moreover, it is programmable and capable of performing ultra-fast machine vision processing in all levels such as image acquisition, image fusion, image analysis, scene interpretation, and control functions. The system provides about one tera-operation-per-second computing power which is a two order-of-magnitude increase over that of state-of-the-art microcomputers. Its high performance is due to massively parallel computing structures, high data throughput rates, fast learning capabilities, and advanced VLSI system-on-a-chip implementation.

  14. Digital-Centric RF CMOS Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuzawa, Akira

    Analog-centric RFCMOS technology has played an important role in motivating the change of technology from conventional discrete device technology or bipolar IC technology to CMOS technology. However it introduces many problems such as poor performance, susceptibility to PVT fluctuation, and cost increase with technology scaling. The most important advantage of CMOS technology compared with legacy RF technology is that CMOS can use more high performance digital circuits for very low cost. In fact, analog-centric RF-CMOS technology has failed the FM/AM tuner business and the digital-centric CMOS technology is becoming attractive for many users. It has many advantages; such as high performance, no external calibration points, high yield, and low cost. From the above facts, digital-centric CMOS technology which utilizes the advantages of digital technology must be the right path for future RF technology. Further investment in this technology is necessary for the advancement of RF technology.

  15. Assessment of rural soundscapes with high-speed train noise.

    PubMed

    Lee, Pyoung Jik; Hong, Joo Young; Jeon, Jin Yong

    2014-06-01

    In the present study, rural soundscapes with high-speed train noise were assessed through laboratory experiments. A total of ten sites with varying landscape metrics were chosen for audio-visual recording. The acoustical characteristics of the high-speed train noise were analyzed using various noise level indices. Landscape metrics such as the percentage of natural features (NF) and Shannon's diversity index (SHDI) were adopted to evaluate the landscape features of the ten sites. Laboratory experiments were then performed with 20 well-trained listeners to investigate the perception of high-speed train noise in rural areas. The experiments consisted of three parts: 1) visual-only condition, 2) audio-only condition, and 3) combined audio-visual condition. The results showed that subjects' preference for visual images was significantly related to NF, the number of land types, and the A-weighted equivalent sound pressure level (LAeq). In addition, the visual images significantly influenced the noise annoyance, and LAeq and NF were the dominant factors affecting the annoyance from high-speed train noise in the combined audio-visual condition. In addition, Zwicker's loudness (N) was highly correlated with the annoyance from high-speed train noise in both the audio-only and audio-visual conditions.

  16. Highly Scaled High Dielectric Constant Oxides on III-V CMOS with Low Interface Trap and Low Leakage Densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chobpattana, Varistha

    Complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) transistors are being aggressively scaled, reaching the fundamental limits of silicon. Due to their much higher electron mobilities, III-V semiconductors are being considered as alternative channel materials to potentially replace Si. This requires the integration of high dielectric constant (high-k) oxides with III-V semiconductor layers, which is the most significant challenge to achieve high performance of III-V metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs). Large interface trap densities, inherent to these interfaces, degrade the transistor performance. In this dissertation, we utilize in-situ atomic layer deposition (ALD) combined with surface passivation techniques to reduce the interface traps densities between high-k oxides and III-V semiconductors to obtain highly scaled, low defect density interfaces. Cycles of hydrogen and/or nitrogen plasmas and metal-organic precursors were applied directly onto n- and p type In0.53 Ga0.47As surfaces before high-k oxide ALD. The high-k oxides investigated include Al2O 3, HfO2, ZrO2, and TiO2. We examined the electrical characteristics of MOS capacitors (MOSCAPs), surface morphology of the surface, and chemical components of the interface. High quality interfaces of high-k oxide and n-type In0.53Ga0.47As with low interface trap densities (Dit) of 1012 eV-1 cm-2, low leakage current density, and high capacitance densities gate stacks (>5 muF/cm 2) were achieved by the optimized cycles of nitrogen plasma+tetrakis(dimethylamido)titanium (TDMAT) ALD surface cleaning. Using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, the interface region indicates that the removing As-oxides, sub-oxides, and As-As bonding are responsible for decreasing frequency dispersion in the midgap region of the n-type In0:53Ga0:47As, reducing midgap Dit, and unpinning Fermi level. The modified interface chemistry from Al2O3 to TiO2 leads to lower frequency dispersion in accumulation. The highly

  17. HDR {sup 192}Ir source speed measurements using a high speed video camera

    SciTech Connect

    Fonseca, Gabriel P.; Rubo, Rodrigo A.; Sales, Camila P. de; Verhaegen, Frank

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: The dose delivered with a HDR {sup 192}Ir afterloader can be separated into a dwell component, and a transit component resulting from the source movement. The transit component is directly dependent on the source speed profile and it is the goal of this study to measure accurate source speed profiles. Methods: A high speed video camera was used to record the movement of a {sup 192}Ir source (Nucletron, an Elekta company, Stockholm, Sweden) for interdwell distances of 0.25–5 cm with dwell times of 0.1, 1, and 2 s. Transit dose distributions were calculated using a Monte Carlo code simulating the source movement. Results: The source stops at each dwell position oscillating around the desired position for a duration up to (0.026 ± 0.005) s. The source speed profile shows variations between 0 and 81 cm/s with average speed of ∼33 cm/s for most of the interdwell distances. The source stops for up to (0.005 ± 0.001) s at nonprogrammed positions in between two programmed dwell positions. The dwell time correction applied by the manufacturer compensates the transit dose between the dwell positions leading to a maximum overdose of 41 mGy for the considered cases and assuming an air-kerma strength of 48 000 U. The transit dose component is not uniformly distributed leading to over and underdoses, which is within 1.4% for commonly prescribed doses (3–10 Gy). Conclusions: The source maintains its speed even for the short interdwell distances. Dose variations due to the transit dose component are much lower than the prescribed treatment doses for brachytherapy, although transit dose component should be evaluated individually for clinical cases.

  18. The application of high-speed digital image correlation.

    SciTech Connect

    Reu, Phillip L.; Miller, Timothy J.

    2008-02-01

    Digital image correlation (DIC) is a method of using digital images to calculate two-dimensional displacement and deformation or for stereo systems three-dimensional shape, displacement, and deformation. While almost any imaging system can be used with DIC, there are some important challenges when working with the technique in high- and ultra-high-speed applications. This article discusses three of these challenges: camera sensor technology, camera frame rate, and camera motion mitigation. Potential solutions are treated via three demonstration experiments showing the successful application of high-speed DIC for dynamic events. The application and practice of DIC at high speeds, rather than the experimental results themselves, provide the main thrust of the discussion.

  19. Thermal Behavior of High-Speed Helical Gear Trains Investigated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Handschuh, Robert F.

    2003-01-01

    High-speed and heavily loaded gearing are commonplace in the rotorcraft systems employed in helicopter and tiltrotor transmissions. The components are expected to deliver high power from the gas turbine engines to the high-torque, low-speed rotor, reducing the shaft rotational speed in the range of 25:1 to 100:1. These components are designed for high power-to-weight ratios, thus the components are fabricated as light as possible with the best materials and processing to transmit the required torque and carry the resultant loads without compromising the reliability of the drive system. This is a difficult task that is meticulously analyzed and thoroughly tested experimentally prior to being applied on a new or redesigned aircraft.

  20. High speed commercial transport fuels considerations and research needs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, C. M.; Niedzwiecki, R. W.

    1989-01-01

    NASA is currently evaluating the potential of incorporating High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) aircraft in the commercial fleet in the beginning of the 21st century. NASA sponsored HSCT enabling studies currently underway with airframers and engine manufacturers, are addressing a broad range of technical, environmental, economic, and related issues. Supersonic cruise speeds for these aircraft were originally focused in the Mach 2 to 5 range. At these flight speeds, both jet fuels and liquid methane were considered potential fuel candidates. For the year 2000 to 2010, cruise Mach numbers of 2 to 3+ are projected for aircraft fuel with thermally stable liquid jet fuels. For 2015 and beyond, liquid methane fueled aircraft cruising at Mach numbers of 4+ may be viable candidates. Operation at supersonic speeds will be much more severe than those encountered at subsonic flight. One of the most critical problems is the potential deterioration of the fuel due to the high temperature environment. HSCT fuels will not only be required to provide the energy necessary for flight, but will also be subject to aerodynamic heating and, will be required to serve as the primary heat sink for cooling the engine and airframe. To define fuel problems for high speed flight, a fuels workshop was conducted at NASA Lewis Research Center. The purpose of the workshop was to gather experts on aviation fuels, airframe fuel systems, airport infrastructure, and combustion systems to discuss high speed fuel alternatives, fuel supply scenarios, increased thermal stability approaches and measurements, safety considerations, and to provide directional guidance for future R and D efforts. Subsequent follow-up studies defined airport infrastructure impacts of high speed fuel candidates. The results of these activities are summarized. In addition, an initial case study using modified in-house refinery simulation model Gordian code (1) is briefly discussed. This code can be used to simulate different

  1. Custom ASIC development for high-speed Viterbi decoding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, S. P.; Becker, N.; Johnson, P. N.

    A high-speed, emitter-coupled logic (ECL) gate array which greatly facilitates the implementation of very-high-speed Viterbi algorithm processors has been developed. These high-speed Viterbi decoders were incorporated into two bandwidth-efficient, jointly optimized coded modulation systems with baseband information rates of 140 and 200 Mb/s. The 200-Mb/s system was developed for NASA under the advanced modulation technology development program. The octal phase shift keying (8PSK) modulation technique used in these systems requires symbol rates of 60 and 75 Msymbol/s. The gate array device also has the potential for use in similar systems with symbol rates in excess of 100 Msymbol/s. Some details of the coded modulation systems that require the implementation of high-speed Viterbi processors are provided to demonstrate current practical applications and the need for this processing capability. The specific gate array design is described in conjunction with the performance goals and measured parameters of the completed device. Performance measurements obtained from high-speed coded modulation systems that use the gate array are also presented to show the performance obtained.

  2. A high-resolution CMOS imaging detector for the search of neutrinoless double β decay in 82Se

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavarria, A. E.; Galbiati, C.; Li, X.; Rowlands, J. A.

    2017-03-01

    We introduce high-resolution solid-state imaging detectors for the search of neutrinoless double β decay. Based on the present literature, imaging devices from amorphous 82Se evaporated on a complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) active pixel array could have the energy and spatial resolution to produce two-dimensional images of ionizing tracks of utmost quality, effectively akin to an electronic bubble chamber in the double β decay energy regime. Still to be experimentally demonstrated, a detector consisting of a large array of these devices could have very low backgrounds, possibly reaching 1 × 10‑7/(kgy) in the neutrinoless decay region of interest (ROI), as it may be required for the full exploration of the neutrinoless double β decay parameter space in the most unfavorable condition of a strongly quenched nucleon axial coupling constant.

  3. Unsteady Flow Simulation of High-speed Turbopumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiris, Cetin C.; Kwak, dochan; Chan, William; Housman, Jeffrey A.

    2006-01-01

    Computation of high-speed hydrodynamics requires high-fidelity simulation to resolve flow features involving transient flow, cavitation, tip vortex and multiple scales of unsteady fluctuations. One example of this type in aerospace is related to liquid-fueled rocket turbopump. Rocket turbopumps operate under severe conditions at very high rotational speeds typically at thousands of rpm. For example, the Shuttle orbiter low-pressure-fuel-turbopump creates transient flow features associated with reverse flows, tip clearance effects, secondary flows, vortex shedding, junction flows, and cavitation effects. Flow unsteadiness originating from the orbiter Low-Pressure-Fuel-Turbopump (LPFTP) inducer is one of the major contributors to the high frequency cyclic loading that results in high cycle fatigue damage to the flow liners just upstream of the LPFTP. The reverse flow generated at the tip of the inducer blades travels upstream and interacts with the bellows cavity. Simulation procedure for this type high-speed hydrodynamic problems requires a method for quantifying multi-scale and multi-phase flow as well as an efficient high-end computing strategy. The current paper presents a high-fidelity computational procedure for unsteady hydrodynamic problems using a high-speed liquid-fueled rocket turbopump.

  4. A dual-camera cinematographic PIV measurement system at kilohertz frame rate for high-speed, unsteady flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Shiyao; Ceccio, Steven L.; Driscoll, James F.

    2010-03-01

    A digital dual-camera cinematographic particle image velocimetry (CPIV) system has been developed to provide time-resolved, high resolution flow measurements in high-Reynolds number, turbulent flows. Two high-speed CMOS cameras were optically combined to acquire double-pulsed CPIV images at kilohertz frame rates. Bias and random errors due to camera misalignment, camera vibration, and lens aberration were corrected or estimated. Systematic errors due to the camera misalignment were reduced to less than 2 pixels throughout the image plane using mechanical alignment, resulting in 3.1% positional uncertainty of velocity measurements. Frame-to-frame uncertainties caused by mechanical vibration were eliminated with the aid of digital image calibration and frame-to-frame camera registration. This dual-camera CPIV system is capable of resolving high speed, unsteady flows with high temporal and spatial resolutions. It also allows time intervals between the two exposures down to 4 μs, enabling the measurements of speed flows 5-10 times higher than possible with frame-straddling using similar cameras. A turbulent shallow cavity was then chosen as the experimental object investigated by this dual-camera CPIV technique.

  5. Concept Design Report for a Low draft Stabilized - High Speed Connector (LDS-HSC) Vessel for the ONR High Speed Sea Lift (HSSL) Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-04-30

    Revised Speed - Dependent Powering Predictions for High - Speed ...installation width. Increased installation width for the narrower hulls and transoms that are typical of high - speed ships is not desirable. Installation of...size but significant power to meet its high - speed goals. Two axial waterjet sizes were developed based on a single 50 MW gas turbine and a 100

  6. Towards High Throughput Cell Growth Screening: A New CMOS 8 × 8 Biosensor Array for Life Science Applications.

    PubMed

    Nabovati, Ghazal; Ghafar-Zadeh, Ebrahim; Letourneau, Antoine; Sawan, Mohamad

    2017-04-01

    In this paper we present a CMOS capacitive sensor array as a compact and low-cost platform for high-throughput cell growth monitoring. The proposed biosensor, consists of an array of 8 × 8 CMOS fully differential charge-based capacitive measurement sensors. A DC-input Σ∆ modulator is used to convert the sensors' signals to digital values for reading out the biological/chemical data and further signal processing. To compensate the mismatch variations between the current mirror transistors, a calibration circuitry is proposed which removes the output voltage offset with less than 8.2% error. We validate the chip functionality using various organic solvents with different dielectric constants. Moreover, we show the response of the chip to different concentrations of Polystyrene beads that have the same electrical properties as the living cells. The experimental results show that the chip allows the detection of a wide range of Polystyrene beads concentrations from as low as 10 beads/ml to 100 k beads/ml. In addition, we present the experimental results from H1299 (human lung carcinoma) cell line where we show that the chip successfully allows the detection of cell attachment and growth over capacitive electrodes in a 30 h measurement time and the results are in consistency with the standard cell-based assays. The capability of proposed device for label-free and real-time detection of cell growth with very high sensitivity opens up the important opportunity for utilizing the device in rapid screening of living cells.

  7. High-speed cylindrical collapse of two perfect fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharif, M.; Ahmad, Zahid

    2007-09-01

    In this paper, the study of the gravitational collapse of cylindrically distributed two perfect fluid system has been carried out. It is assumed that the collapsing speeds of the two fluids are very large. We explore this condition by using the high-speed approximation scheme. There arise two cases, i.e., bounded and vanishing of the ratios of the pressures with densities of two fluids given by c s , d s . It is shown that the high-speed approximation scheme breaks down by non-zero pressures p 1, p 2 when c s , d s are bounded below by some positive constants. The failure of the high-speed approximation scheme at some particular time of the gravitational collapse suggests the uncertainty on the evolution at and after this time. In the bounded case, the naked singularity formation seems to be impossible for the cylindrical two perfect fluids. For the vanishing case, if a linear equation of state is used, the high-speed collapse does not break down by the effects of the pressures and consequently a naked singularity forms. This work provides the generalisation of the results already given by Nakao and Morisawa (Prog Theor Phys 113:73, 2005) for the perfect fluid.

  8. Fiber laser for high speed laser transfer printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petkovšek, Rok; Novak, Vid; Agrež, Vid

    2017-01-01

    High speed industrial laser transfer printing requires high power lasers that can deliver pulses on demand and having arbitrary pulse duration in range of few nanoseconds to milliseconds or more. A special kind of MOPA fiber laser is presented using wavelength multiplexing to achieve pulses on demand with minimal transients. The system is further tested in printing application.

  9. Noise in the passenger cars of high-speed trains.

    PubMed

    Hong, Joo Young; Cha, Yongwon; Jeon, Jin Yong

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of both room acoustic conditions and spectral characteristics of noises on acoustic discomfort in a high-speed train's passenger car. Measurement of interior noises in a high-speed train was performed when the train was operating at speeds of 100 km/h and 300 km/h. Acoustic discomfort caused by interior noises was evaluated by paired comparison methods based on the variation of reverberation time (RT) in a passenger car and the spectral differences in interior noises. The effect of RT on acoustic discomfort was not significant, whereas acoustic discomfort significantly varied depending on spectral differences in noise. Acoustic discomfort increased with increment of the sound pressure level (SPL) ratio at high frequencies, and variation in high-frequency noise components were described using sharpness. Just noticeable differences of SPL with low- and high-frequency components were determined to be 3.7 and 2.9 dB, respectively. This indicates that subjects were more sensitive to differences in SPLs at the high-frequency range than differences at the low-frequency range. These results support that, for interior noises, reduction in SPLs at high frequencies would significantly contribute to improved acoustic quality in passenger cars of high-speed trains.

  10. Tank Tests of Two Floats for High-speed Seaplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, Joe W

    1933-01-01

    At the request of the Bureau of Aeronautics, Navy Department, a study of the design of floats especially suitable for use on high-speed seaplanes was undertaken in the N.A.C.A. tank. This note give the results obtained in tests of one-quarter full-size models of two floats for high-speed seaplanes. One was a float similar to that used on the Macchi high-speed seaplane which competed in the 1926 Schneider Trophy races, and the other a float designed at the N.A.C.A. tank in an attempt to improve on the water performance of the Macchi float. The model of the latter showed considerably better water performance than the model of the Macchi float.

  11. A fully-integrated 12.5-Gb/s 850-nm CMOS optical receiver based on a spatially-modulated avalanche photodetector.

    PubMed

    Lee, Myung-Jae; Youn, Jin-Sung; Park, Kang-Yeob; Choi, Woo-Young

    2014-02-10

    We present a fully integrated 12.5-Gb/s optical receiver fabricated with standard 0.13-µm complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) technology for 850-nm optical interconnect applications. Our integrated optical receiver includes a newly proposed CMOS-compatible spatially-modulated avalanche photodetector, which provides larger photodetection bandwidth than previously reported CMOS-compatible photodetectors. The receiver also has high-speed CMOS circuits including transimpedance amplifier, DC-balanced buffer, equalizer, and limiting amplifier. With the fabricated optical receiver, detection of 12.5-Gb/s optical data is successfully achieved at 5.8 pJ/bit. Our receiver achieves the highest data rate ever reported for 850-nm integrated CMOS optical receivers.

  12. Ultra-high-speed bionanoscope for cell and microbe imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etoh, T. Goji; Vo Le, Cuong; Kawano, Hiroyuki; Ishikawa, Ikuko; Miyawaki, Atshushi; Dao, Vu T. S.; Nguyen, Hoang Dung; Yokoi, Sayoko; Yoshida, Shigeru; Nakano, Hitoshi; Takehara, Kohsei; Saito, Yoshiharu

    2008-11-01

    We are developing an ultra-high-sensitivity and ultra-high-speed imaging system for bioscience, mainly for imaging of microbes with visible light and cells with fluorescence emission. Scarcity of photons is the most serious problem in applications of high-speed imaging to the scientific field. To overcome the problem, the system integrates new technologies consisting of (1) an ultra-high-speed video camera with sub-ten-photon sensitivity with the frame rate of more than 1 mega frames per second, (2) a microscope with highly efficient use of light applicable to various unstained and fluorescence cell observations, and (3) very powerful long-pulse-strobe Xenon lights and lasers for microscopes. Various auxiliary technologies to support utilization of the system are also being developed. One example of them is an efficient video trigger system, which detects a weak signal of a sudden change in a frame under ultra-high-speed imaging by canceling high-frequency fluctuation of illumination light. This paper outlines the system with its preliminary evaluation results.

  13. High-speed, two-dimensional synchrotron white-beam x-ray radiography of spray breakup and atomization.

    PubMed

    Halls, Benjamin R; Radke, Christopher D; Reuter, Benjamin J; Kastengren, Alan L; Gord, James R; Meyer, Terrence R

    2017-01-23

    High-speed, two-dimensional synchrotron x-ray radiography and phase-contrast imaging are demonstrated in propulsion sprays. Measurements are performed at the 7-BM beamline at the Advanced Photon Source user facility at Argonne National Laboratory using a recently developed broadband x-ray white beam. This novel enhancement allows for high speed, high fidelity x-ray imaging for the community at large. Quantitative path-integrated liquid distributions and spatio-temporal dynamics of the sprays were imaged with a LuAG:Ce scintillator optically coupled to a high-speed CMOS camera. Images are collected with a microscope objective at frame rates of 20 kHz and with a macro lens at 120 kHz, achieving spatial resolutions of 12 μm and 65 μm, respectively. Imaging with and without potassium iodide (KI) as a contrast-enhancing agent is compared, and the effects of broadband attenuation and spatial beam characteristics are determined through modeling and experimental calibration. In addition, phase contrast is used to differentiate liquid streams with varying concentrations of KI. The experimental approach is applied to different spray conditions, including quantitative measurements of mass distribution during primary atomization and qualitative visualization of turbulent binary fluid mixing.

  14. Nanopore-CMOS Interfaces for DNA Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Magierowski, Sebastian; Huang, Yiyun; Wang, Chengjie; Ghafar-Zadeh, Ebrahim

    2016-08-06

    DNA sequencers based on nanopore sensors present an opportunity for a significant break from the template-based incumbents of the last forty years. Key advantages ushered by nanopore technology include a simplified chemistry and the ability to interface to CMOS technology. The latter opportunity offers substantial promise for improvement in sequencing speed, size and cost. This paper reviews existing and emerging means of interfacing nanopores to CMOS technology with an emphasis on massively-arrayed structures. It presents this in the context of incumbent DNA sequencing techniques, reviews and quantifies nanopore characteristics and models and presents CMOS circuit methods for the amplification of low-current nanopore signals in such interfaces.

  15. Advanced superposition methods for high speed turbopump vibration analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nielson, C. E.; Campany, A. D.

    1981-01-01

    The small, high pressure Mark 48 liquid hydrogen turbopump was analyzed and dynamically tested to determine the cause of high speed vibration at an operating speed of 92,400 rpm. This approaches the design point operating speed of 95,000 rpm. The initial dynamic analysis in the design stage and subsequent further analysis of the rotor only dynamics failed to predict the vibration characteristics found during testing. An advanced procedure for dynamics analysis was used in this investigation. The procedure involves developing accurate dynamic models of the rotor assembly and casing assembly by finite element analysis. The dynamically instrumented assemblies are independently rap tested to verify the analytical models. The verified models are then combined by modal superposition techniques to develop a completed turbopump model where dynamic characteristics are determined. The results of the dynamic testing and analysis obtained are presented and methods of moving the high speed vibration characteristics to speeds above the operating range are recommended. Recommendations for use of these advanced dynamic analysis procedures during initial design phases are given.

  16. Magneto-optical system for high speed real time imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baziljevich, M.; Barness, D.; Sinvani, M.; Perel, E.; Shaulov, A.; Yeshurun, Y.

    2012-08-01

    A new magneto-optical system has been developed to expand the range of high speed real time magneto-optical imaging. A special source for the external magnetic field has also been designed, using a pump solenoid to rapidly excite the field coil. Together with careful modifications of the cryostat, to reduce eddy currents, ramping rates reaching 3000 T/s have been achieved. Using a powerful laser as the light source, a custom designed optical assembly, and a high speed digital camera, real time imaging rates up to 30 000 frames per seconds have been demonstrated.

  17. Magneto-optical system for high speed real time imaging.

    PubMed

    Baziljevich, M; Barness, D; Sinvani, M; Perel, E; Shaulov, A; Yeshurun, Y

    2012-08-01

    A new magneto-optical system has been developed to expand the range of high speed real time magneto-optical imaging. A special source for the external magnetic field has also been designed, using a pump solenoid to rapidly excite the field coil. Together with careful modifications of the cryostat, to reduce eddy currents, ramping rates reaching 3000 T/s have been achieved. Using a powerful laser as the light source, a custom designed optical assembly, and a high speed digital camera, real time imaging rates up to 30 000 frames per seconds have been demonstrated.

  18. Introduction of the M-85 high-speed rotorcraft concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stroub, Robert H.

    1991-01-01

    As a result of studying possible requirements for high-speed rotorcraft and studying many high-speed concepts, a new high-speed rotorcraft concept, designated as M-85, was derived. The M-85 is a helicopter that is reconfigured to a fixed-wing aircraft for high-speed cruise. The concept was derived as an approach to enable smooth, stable conversion between fixed-wing and rotary-wing while retaining hover and low-speed flight characteristics of a low disk loading helicopter. The name, M-85, reflects the high-speed goals of 0.85 Mach number at high altitude. For a high-speed rotorcraft, it is expected that a viable concept must be a cruise-efficient, fixed-wing aircraft so it may be attractive for a multiplicity of missions. It is also expected that a viable high-speed rotorcraft concept must be cruise efficient first and secondly, efficient in hover. What makes the M-85 unique is the large circular hub fairing that is large enough to support the aircraft during conversion between rotary-wind and fixed-wing modes. With the aircraft supported by this hub fairing, the rotor blades can be unloaded during the 100 percent change in rotor rpm. With the blades unloaded, the potential for vibratory loads would be lessened. In cruise, the large circular hub fairing would be part of the lifting system with additional lifting panels deployed for better cruise efficiency. In hover, the circular hub fairing would slightly reduce lift potential and/or decrease hover efficiency of the rotor system. The M-85 concept is described and estimated forward flight performance characteristics are presented in terms of thrust requirements and L/D with airspeed. The forward flight performance characteristics reflect recent completed wind tunnel tests of the wing concept. Also presented is a control system technique that is critical to achieving low oscillatory loads in rotary-wing mode. Hover characteristics, C(sub p) versus C(sub T) from test data, is discussed. Other techniques pertinent to

  19. Review of high-speed fiber optic grating sensor systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udd, Eric; Benterou, Jerry; May, Chadd; Mihailov, Stephen J.; Lu, Ping

    2010-04-01

    Fiber grating sensors can be used to support a wide variety of high speed measurement applications. This includes measurements of vibrations on bridges, traffic monitoring on freeways, ultrasonic detection to support non-destructive tests on metal plates, and providing details of detonation events. This paper provides a brief overview of some of the techniques that have been used to support high speed measurements using fiber grating sensors over frequency ranges from 10s of kHz, to MHZ and finally toward frequencies approaching the GHz regime.

  20. First Annual High-Speed Research Workshop, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitehead, Allen H., Jr. (Compiler)

    1992-01-01

    The workshop was presented to provide a national forum for the government, industry, and university participants in the program to present and discuss important technology issues related to the development of a commercially viable, environmentally compatible U.S. High Speed Civil Transport. The workshop sessions were organized around the major task elements in NASA's Phase 1 High Speed Research Program which basically addressed the environmental issues of atmospheric emissions, community noise, and sonic boom. This volume is divided into three sessions entitled: Plenary Session (which gives overviews from NASA, Boeing, Douglas, GE, and Pratt & Whitney on the HSCT program); Airframe Systems Studies; and Atmospheric Effects.

  1. Multiplexed broadband beam steering system utilizing high speed MEMS mirrors.

    PubMed

    Knoernschild, Caleb; Kim, Changsoon; Lu, Felix P; Kim, Jungsang

    2009-04-27

    We present a beam steering system based on micro-electromechanical systems technology that features high speed steering of multiple laser beams over a broad wavelength range. By utilizing high speed micromirrors with a broadband metallic coating, our system has the flexibility to simultaneously incorporate a wide range of wavelengths and multiple beams. We demonstrate reconfiguration of two independent beams at different wavelengths (780 and 635 nm) across a common 5x5 array with 4 micros settling time. Full simulation of the optical system provides insights on the scalability of the system. Such a system can provide a versatile tool for applications where fast laser multiplexing is necessary.

  2. A superconducting high-speed flywheel energy storage system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Andrade, R.; Ferreira, A. C.; Sotelo, G. G.; Suemitsu, W. I.; Rolim, L. G. B.; Silva Neto, J. L.; Neves, M. A.; dos Santos, V. A.; da Costa, G. C.; Rosario, M.; Stephan, R.; Nicolsky, R.

    2004-08-01

    High-speed flywheel systems have been studied as compensators of voltage sags and momentary interruptions of energy. Besides the complexity of these systems, the main concerns are bearing losses. This work is part of the development of a superconducting high-speed flywheel energy storage prototype. In order to minimize the bearing losses, this system uses a superconducting axial thrust magnetic bearing in a vacuum chamber, which guarantees low friction losses, and a switched reluctance motor-generator to drive the flywheel system. Dynamic simulations made for this prototype, connected to the electric power network, show the viability of use it as a compensator.

  3. Multiply-agile encryption in high speed communication networks

    SciTech Connect

    Pierson, L.G.; Witzke, E.L.

    1997-05-01

    Different applications have different security requirements for data privacy, data integrity, and authentication. Encryption is one technique that addresses these requirements. Encryption hardware, designed for use in high-speed communications networks, can satisfy a wide variety of security requirements if that hardware is key-agile, robustness-agile and algorithm-agile. Hence, multiply-agile encryption provides enhanced solutions to the secrecy, interoperability and quality of service issues in high-speed networks. This paper defines these three types of agile encryption. Next, implementation issues are discussed. While single-algorithm, key-agile encryptors exist, robustness-agile and algorithm-agile encryptors are still research topics.

  4. High speed propeller acoustics and aerodynamics - A boundary element approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farassat, F.; Myers, M. K.; Dunn, M. H.

    1989-01-01

    The Boundary Element Method (BEM) is applied in this paper to the problems of acoustics and aerodynamics of high speed propellers. The underlying theory is described based on the linearized Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings equation. The surface pressure on the blade is assumed unknown in the aerodynamic problem. It is obtained by solving a singular integral equation. The acoustic problem is then solved by moving the field point inside the fluid medium and evaluating some surface and line integrals. Thus the BEM provides a powerful technique in calculation of high speed propeller aerodynamics and acoustics.

  5. High-speed multiplexing of keyboard data inputs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, T. O. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A high speed multiplexing system is described in which keyboard entered data is sequentially and automatically sampled by the multiplexing system for input to a computer. A sequencer is provided which sequentially and automatically controls the multiplexer to sample each keyboard input in accordance with a predetermined sampling sequence. Whenever keyboard entered data appears on input lines to the multiplexer, the system inputs the keyboard data to the computer during a brief time interval in which the multiplexer remains at the particular keyboard address or port. Thus, a high speed sampling circuit is provided whereby the only operator action required is data entry through a keyboard. Priority or interrupt systems are not required.

  6. Secondary Containment Design for a High Speed Centrifuge

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, K.W.

    1999-03-01

    Secondary containment for high speed rotating machinery, such as a centrifuge, is extremely important for operating personnel safety. Containment techniques can be very costly, ungainly and time consuming to construct. A novel containment concept is introduced which is fabricated out of modular sections of polycarbonate glazed into a Unistrut metal frame. A containment study for a high speed centrifuge is performed which includes the development of parameters for secondary containment design. The Unistrut/polycarbonate shield framing concept is presented including design details and proof testing procedures. The economical fabrication and modularity of the design indicates a usefulness for this shielding system in a wide variety of containment scenarios.

  7. Miniature high speed compressor having embedded permanent magnet motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, Lei (Inventor); Zheng, Liping (Inventor); Chow, Louis (Inventor); Kapat, Jayanta S. (Inventor); Wu, Thomas X. (Inventor); Kota, Krishna M. (Inventor); Li, Xiaoyi (Inventor); Acharya, Dipjyoti (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A high speed centrifugal compressor for compressing fluids includes a permanent magnet synchronous motor (PMSM) having a hollow shaft, the being supported on its ends by ball bearing supports. A permanent magnet core is embedded inside the shaft. A stator with a winding is located radially outward of the shaft. The PMSM includes a rotor including at least one impeller secured to the shaft or integrated with the shaft as a single piece. The rotor is a high rigidity rotor providing a bending mode speed of at least 100,000 RPM which advantageously permits implementation of relatively low-cost ball bearing supports.

  8. Ethylene Trace-gas Techniques for High-speed Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, David O.; Reichert, Bruce A.

    1994-01-01

    Three applications of the ethylene trace-gas technique to high-speed flows are described: flow-field tracking, air-to-air mixing, and bleed mass-flow measurement. The technique involves injecting a non-reacting gas (ethylene) into the flow field and measuring the concentration distribution in a downstream plane. From the distributions, information about flow development, mixing, and mass-flow rates can be dtermined. The trace-gas apparatus and special considerations for use in high-speed flow are discussed. A description of each application, including uncertainty estimates is followed by a demonstrative example.

  9. Highly-Integrated CMOS Interface Circuits for SiPM-Based PET Imaging Systems.

    PubMed

    Dey, Samrat; Lewellen, Thomas K; Miyaoka, Robert S; Rudell, Jacques C

    2012-01-01

    Recent developments in the area of Positron Emission Tomography (PET) detectors using Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPMs) have demonstrated the feasibility of higher resolution PET scanners due to a significant reduction in the detector form factor. The increased detector density requires a proportionally larger number of channels to interface the SiPM array with the backend digital signal processing necessary for eventual image reconstruction. This work presents a CMOS ASIC design for signal reducing readout electronics in support of an 8×8 silicon photomultiplier array. The row/column/diagonal summation circuit significantly reduces the number of required channels, reducing the cost of subsequent digitizing electronics. Current amplifiers are used with a single input from each SiPM cathode. This approach helps to reduce the detector loading, while generating all the necessary row, column and diagonal addressing information. In addition, the single current amplifier used in our Pulse-Positioning architecture facilitates the extraction of pulse timing information. Other components under design at present include a current-mode comparator which enables threshold detection for dark noise current reduction, a transimpedance amplifier and a variable output impedance I/O driver which adapts to a wide range of loading conditions between the ASIC and lines with the off-chip Analog-to-Digital Converters (ADCs).

  10. A low power CMOS VCO using inductive-biasing with high performance FoM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weihao, Liu; Lu, Huang

    2016-04-01

    A novel voltage-controlled oscillator (VCO) topology with low voltage and low power is presented. It employed the inductive-biasing to build a feedback path between the tank and the MOS gate to enhance the voltage gain from output nodes of the tank to the gate node of the cross-coupled transistor. Theoretical analysis using time-varying phase noise theory derives closed-form symbolic formulas for the 1/f 2 phase noise region, showing that this feedback path could improve the phase noise performance. The proposed VCO is fabricated in TSMC 0.13 μm CMOS technology. Working under a 0.3 V supply voltage with 1.2 mW power consumption, the measured phase noise of the VCO is -119.4 dBc/Hz at 1 MHz offset frequency from the carrier of 4.92 GHz, resulting in an FoM of 192.5 dBc/Hz. Project supported by the National Science and Technology Major Project of China (No. 2011ZX03004-002-01).

  11. Research and design of high speed mass image storage system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yu-feng; Xue, Rong-kun; Liang, Fei

    2009-07-01

    The design of the high mass image storage system is introduced using DSP, FPGA and Flash structure. Texas Instruments Corporation DSP chip (TMS320VC5509APEG) is used as the main controller, Samsung's Flash chips (K9F2G08U0M) used as the main storage medium, and the Xilinx Corporation FPGA chip (XCV600E) used as logic control modules. In this system, Storage module consists of 32 Flash memory chips, which are divided into 8 groups that correspond to 8-level pipeline. The 4-Flash memory chip forms a basic 32-bit memory module. The entire system storage space is 64 G bit. Through simulation and verification, the storage speed is up to 352Mbps and readout speed is up to 290Mbps, it can meet the demand to the high-speed access, and which has strong environmental adaptability.

  12. Retinal photoreceptor imaging with high-speed line-field parallel spectral domain OCT (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fechtig, Daniel J.; Ginner, Laurin; Kumar, Abhishek; Pircher, Michael; Schmoll, Tilman; Wurster, Lara M.; Drexler, Wolfgang; Leitgeb, Rainer A.

    2016-03-01

    We present retinal photoreceptor imaging with a line-field parallel spectral domain OCT modality, utilizing a commercially available 2D CMOS detector array operating at and imaging speed of 500 B-scans/s. Our results demonstrate for the first time in vivo structural and functional retinal assessment with a line-field OCT setup providing sufficient sensitivity, lateral and axial resolution and 3D acquisition rates in order to resolve individual photoreceptor cells. The phase stability of the system is manifested by the high phase-correlation across the lateral FOV on the level of individual photoreceptors. The setup comprises a Michelson interferometer illuminated by a broadband light source, where a line-focus is formed via a cylindrical lens and the back-propagated light from sample and reference arm is detected by a 2D array after passing a diffraction grating. The spot size of the line-focus on the retina is 5μm, which corresponds to a PSF of 50μm and an oversampling factor of 3.6 at the detector plane, respectively. A full 3D stack was recorded in only 0.8 s. We show representative enface images, tomograms and phase-difference maps of cone photoreceptors with a lateral FOV close to 2°. The high-speed capability and the phase stability due to parallel illumination and detection may potentially lead to novel structural and functional diagnostic tools on a cellular and microvascular imaging level. Furthermore, the presented system enables competitive imaging results as compared to respective point scanning modalities and facilitates utilizing software based digital aberration correction algorithms for achieving 3D isotropic resolution across the full FOV.

  13. Spatio-temporal experiments of volume elastic objects with high speed digital holographic interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez López, C.; Hernández Montes, M. S.; Mendoza Santoyo, F.; Gutiérrez Hernandez, D. A.

    2011-08-01

    The optical non-destructive digital holographic interferometry (DHI) technique has proven to be a powerful tool in measuring vibration phenomena with a spatial resolution ranging from a few hundreds of nanometers to tens of micrometers. With the aid of high speed digital cameras it is possible to achieve simultaneously spatial and temporal resolution, and thus capable of measuring the entire object mechanical oscillation trajectory from one to several cycles. It is important to mention that due to faster computers with large data storage capacity there is an increasing interest in applying numerical simulation methods to mimic different real life objects for example, in the field of modern elastic materials and biological systems. The complex algorithms involved cannot render significant results mainly due to the rather large number of variables. In order to test these numerical simulations some experiments using optical techniques have been designed and reported. This is very important for example in measurements of the dynamic elastic properties of materials. In this work we present some preliminary results from experiments that use DHI to measure vibrations of an elastic spherical object subject to a mechanical excitation that induces resonant vibration modes in its volume. We report on the spatial and temporal effects that by their nature have a non-linear mechanical response. The use of a high speed CMOS camera in DHI assures the measurement of this nonlinear behavior as a sum of linear effects that happen during very short time lapses and with very small displacement amplitudes. We conclude by stating that complex numerical models may be compared to results using DHI, thus proposing an alternative method to prove and verify the mathematical models vs. real measurements on volumetric elastic objects.

  14. CCD/CMOS hybrid FPA for low light level imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xinqiao; Fowler, Boyd A.; Onishi, Steve K.; Vu, Paul; Wen, David D.; Do, Hung; Horn, Stuart

    2005-08-01

    We present a CCD / CMOS hybrid focal plane array (FPA) for low light level imaging applications. The hybrid approach combines the best of CCD imaging characteristics (e.g. high quantum efficiency, low dark current, excellent uniformity, and low pixel cross talk) with the high speed, low power and ultra-low read noise of CMOS readout technology. The FPA is comprised of two CMOS readout integrated circuits (ROIC) that are bump bonded to a CCD imaging substrate. Each ROIC is an array of Capacitive Transimpedence Amplifiers (CTIA) that connect to the CCD columns via indium bumps. The proposed column parallel readout architecture eliminates the slow speed, high noise, and high power limitations of a conventional CCD. This results in a compact, low power, ultra-sensitive solid-state FPA that can be used in low light level applications such as live-cell microscopy and security cameras at room temperature operation. The prototype FPA has a 1280×1024 format with 12-um square pixels. Measured dark current is less than 5.8 pA/cm2 at room temperature and the overall read noise is as low as 2.9e at 30 frames/sec.

  15. A Selective Change Driven System for High-Speed Motion Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Boluda, Jose A.; Pardo, Fernando; Vegara, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Vision-based sensing algorithms are computationally-demanding tasks due to the large amount of data acquired and processed. Visual sensors deliver much information, even if data are redundant, and do not give any additional information. A Selective Change Driven (SCD) sensing system is based on a sensor that delivers, ordered by the magnitude of its change, only those pixels that have changed most since the last read-out. This allows the information stream to be adjusted to the computation capabilities. Following this strategy, a new SCD processing architecture for high-speed motion analysis, based on processing pixels instead of full frames, has been developed and implemented into a Field Programmable Gate-Array (FPGA). The programmable device controls the data stream, delivering a new object distance calculation for every new pixel. The acquisition, processing and delivery of a new object distance takes just 1.7 μs. Obtaining a similar result using a conventional frame-based camera would require a device working at roughly 500 Kfps, which is far from being practical or even feasible. This system, built with the recently-developed 64 × 64 CMOS SCD sensor, shows the potential of the SCD approach when combined with a hardware processing system. PMID:27834800

  16. Comparison on different insects' wing displacements using high speed digital holographic interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguayo, Daniel D.; Santoyo, Fernando Mendoza; de La Torre-I, Manuel H.; Salas-Araiza, Manuel D.; Caloca-Mendez, Cristian

    2011-06-01

    In-flight insect wing motion behavior depends on a wide variety of conditions. They have a complex structural system and what seems to be a rather complicated motion. Researchers in many fields have endeavoured to study and reproduce these wing movements with the aim to apply the gained knowledge in their fields and for the benefit of avionic technological improvements and insect migration studies, among many other themes. The study of in-flight insect wing motion and its measurement is a relevant issue to understand and reproduce its functionality. Being capable of measuring the wing flapping using optical noninvasive methods adds scientific and technological value to the fundamental research in the area. Four different types of butterflies found widely in Mexico's forests are used to compare their wing flapping mechanisms. An out-of-plane digital holographic interferometry system is used to detect and measure its wingmicro deformations. Displacement changes from in vivo flapping wings are registered with a CMOS high speed camera yielding full field of view images depicting these insects' wing motion. The results have a resolution in the scale of hundreds of nanometers over the entire wing surface.

  17. Comparison on different insects' wing displacements using high speed digital holographic interferometry.

    PubMed

    Aguayo, Daniel D; Santoyo, Fernando Mendoza; De la Torre-I, Manuel H; Salas-Araiza, Manuel D; Caloca-Mendez, Cristian

    2011-06-01

    In-flight insect wing motion behavior depends on a wide variety of conditions. They have a complex structural system and what seems to be a rather complicated motion. Researchers in many fields have endeavoured to study and reproduce these wing movements with the aim to apply the gained knowledge in their fields and for the benefit of avionic technological improvements and insect migration studies, among many other themes. The study of in-flight insect wing motion and its measurement is a relevant issue to understand and reproduce its functionality. Being capable of measuring the wing flapping using optical noninvasive methods adds scientific and technological value to the fundamental research in the area. Four different types of butterflies found widely in Mexico's forests are used to compare their wing flapping mechanisms. An out-of-plane digital holographic interferometry system is used to detect and measure its wingmicro deformations. Displacement changes from in vivo flapping wings are registered with a CMOS high speed camera yielding full field of view images depicting these insects' wing motion. The results have a resolution in the scale of hundreds of nanometers over the entire wing surface.

  18. High-Speed Imaging Optical Pyrometry for Study of Boron Nitride Nanotube Generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Inman, Jennifer A.; Danehy, Paul M.; Jones, Stephen B.; Lee, Joseph W.

    2014-01-01

    A high-speed imaging optical pyrometry system is designed for making in-situ measurements of boron temperature during the boron nitride nanotube synthesis process. Spectrometer measurements show molten boron emission to be essentially graybody in nature, lacking spectral emission fine structure over the visible range of the electromagnetic spectrum. Camera calibration experiments are performed and compared with theoretical calculations to quantitatively establish the relationship between observed signal intensity and temperature. The one-color pyrometry technique described herein involves measuring temperature based upon the absolute signal intensity observed through a narrowband spectral filter, while the two-color technique uses the ratio of the signals through two spectrally separated filters. The present study calibrated both the one- and two-color techniques at temperatures between 1,173 K and 1,591 K using a pco.dimax HD CMOS-based camera along with three such filters having transmission peaks near 550 nm, 632.8 nm, and 800 nm.

  19. Safety of high speed ground transportation systems: Safety of advanced braking concepts for high speed ground transportation systems. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, D.P.; Ahlbeck, D.R.; Luedeke, J.F.; Cook, S.D.; Dielman, M.A.

    1995-09-01

    The objective of this study is to develop qualitative and quantitative information on the various braking strategies used in high-speed ground transportation systems in support of the Federal Railroad Administration (FRA). The approach employed in this study is composed of two steps: first, build a technical understanding of the various braking strategies, and second, perform a safety analysis for each system. The systems considered in this study include seven operating high-speed rail transportation systems and three existing magnetic levitation systems. The principal technique used in the system safety analysis is Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA), an inductive approach to identifying system failure modes that depends on a thorough understanding of the system design and operation. Key elements derived from the system safety analysis are the fault-tolerant and fail-safe characteristics of the braking systems. The report concludes with recommended guidance on the structure of potential future regulations governing high-speed rail braking systems.

  20. High-speed pulse-shape generator, pulse multiplexer

    DOEpatents

    Burkhart, Scott C.

    2002-01-01

    The invention combines arbitrary amplitude high-speed pulses for precision pulse shaping for the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The circuitry combines arbitrary height pulses which are generated by replicating scaled versions of a trigger pulse and summing them delayed in time on a pulse line. The combined electrical pulses are connected to an electro-optic modulator which modulates a laser beam. The circuit can also be adapted to combine multiple channels of high speed data into a single train of electrical pulses which generates the optical pulses for very high speed optical communication. The invention has application in laser pulse shaping for inertial confinement fusion, in optical data links for computers, telecommunications, and in laser pulse shaping for atomic excitation studies. The invention can be used to effect at least a 10.times. increase in all fiber communication lines. It allows a greatly increased data transfer rate between high-performance computers. The invention is inexpensive enough to bring high-speed video and data services to homes through a super modem.

  1. High speed magneto-resistive random access memory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Jiin-Chuan (Inventor); Stadler, Henry L. (Inventor); Katti, Romney R. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A high speed read MRAM memory element is configured from a sandwich of magnetizable, ferromagnetic film surrounding a magneto-resistive film which may be ferromagnetic or not. One outer ferromagnetic film has a higher coercive force than the other and therefore remains magnetized in one sense while the other may be switched in sense by a switching magnetic field. The magneto-resistive film is therefore sensitive to the amplitude of the resultant field between the outer ferromagnetic films and may be constructed of a high resistivity, high magneto-resistive material capable of higher sensing currents. This permits higher read voltages and therefore faster read operations. Alternate embodiments with perpendicular anisotropy, and in-plane anisotropy are shown, including an embodiment which uses high permeability guides to direct the closing flux path through the magneto-resistive material. High density, high speed, radiation hard, memory matrices may be constructed from these memory elements.

  2. Image sensor pixel with on-chip high extinction ratio polarizer based on 65-nm standard CMOS technology.

    PubMed

    Sasagawa, Kiyotaka; Shishido, Sanshiro; Ando, Keisuke; Matsuoka, Hitoshi; Noda, Toshihiko; Tokuda, Takashi; Kakiuchi, Kiyomi; Ohta, Jun

    2013-05-06

    In this study, we demonstrate a polarization sensitive pixel for a complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) image sensor based on 65-nm standard CMOS technology. Using such a deep-submicron CMOS technology, it is possible to design fine metal patterns smaller than the wavelengths of visible light by using a metal wire layer. We designed and fabricated a metal wire grid polarizer on a 20 × 20 μm(2) pixel for image sensor. An extinction ratio of 19.7 dB was observed at a wavelength 750 nm.

  3. High-speed imaging of explosive eruptions: applications and perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taddeucci, Jacopo; Scarlato, Piergiorgio; Gaudin, Damien; Capponi, Antonio; Alatorre-Ibarguengoitia, Miguel-Angel; Moroni, Monica

    2013-04-01

    Explosive eruptions, being by definition highly dynamic over short time scales, necessarily call for observational systems capable of relatively high sampling rates. "Traditional" tools, like as seismic and acoustic networks, have recently been joined by Doppler radar and electric sensors. Recent developments in high-speed camera systems now allow direct visual information of eruptions to be obtained with a spatial and temporal resolution suitable for the analysis of several key eruption processes. Here we summarize the methods employed to gather and process high-speed videos of explosive eruptions, and provide an overview of the several applications of these new type of data in understanding different aspects of explosive volcanism. Our most recent set up for high-speed imaging of explosive eruptions (FAMoUS - FAst, MUltiparametric Set-up,) includes: 1) a monochrome high speed camera, capable of 500 frames per second (fps) at high-definition (1280x1024 pixel) resolution and up to 200000 fps at reduced resolution; 2) a thermal camera capable of 50-200 fps at 480-120x640 pixel resolution; and 3) two acoustic to infrasonic sensors. All instruments are time-synchronized via a data logging system, a hand- or software-operated trigger, and via GPS, allowing signals from other instruments or networks to be directly recorded by the same logging unit or to be readily synchronized for comparison. FAMoUS weights less than 20 kg, easily fits into four, hand-luggage-sized backpacks, and can be deployed in less than 20' (and removed in less than 2', if needed). So far, explosive eruptions have been recorded in high-speed at several active volcanoes, including Fuego and Santiaguito (Guatemala), Stromboli (Italy), Yasur (Vanuatu), and Eyjafiallajokull (Iceland). Image processing and analysis from these eruptions helped illuminate several eruptive processes, including: 1) Pyroclasts ejection. High-speed videos reveal multiple, discrete ejection pulses within a single Strombolian

  4. A Low-Power Reduced Kick-Back Comparator with Improved Calibration for High-Speed Flash ADCs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torfs, Guy; Li, Zhisheng; Bauwelinck, Johan; Yin, Xin; Vandewege, Jan; Plas, Geert Van Der

    A novel low-power kick-back reduced comparator for use in high-speed flash analog-to-digital converters (ADC) is presented. The proposed comparator combines cascode transistors to reduce the kick-back noise with a built-in threshold voltage to remove the static power consumption of a reference. Without degrading other figures, the kick-back noise is reduced by a factor 8, compared to a previous design without cascode transistors. An improved calibration structure is also proposed to improve linearity when used in an ADC. Simulated in a standard CMOS technology the comparator consumes 106.5µW at 1.8V power supply and 1GHz clock frequency.

  5. Design of a Low-Voltage High-Speed Switched-Capacitor Filters Using Improved Auto Zeroed Integrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashtian, M.; Hashemipour, O.; Navi, K.

    The low-voltage high-speed auto zeroed integrator characteristics is improved by applying current steering mechanism in the opamp structure of the integrators and utilizing the non-linear properties of switches. The proposed design results in considerable reduction of power dissipation. Based on this improvement a band-pass filter with centre frequency of 1 MHz and clock frequency of 6 MHz is designed. Furthermore a new circuit for implementation of an auto-zero low-pass filter is presented. Based on this configuration a fourth order low-pass switched capacitor filter with cut off frequency of 600 KHz and clock frequency of 6 MHz is presented. The proposed circuits are simulated using HSPICE and 0.25 μm CMOS technology at 1.5 V supply voltage.

  6. Numerical Simulation of High-Speed Turbulent Reacting Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaberi, F. A.; Colucci, P. J.; James, S.; Givi, P.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to continue our efforts in advancing the state of knowledge in large eddy simulation (LES) methods for computational analysis of high-speed reacting turbulent flows. We have just completed the first year of Phase 3 of this research.

  7. Analysis of high speed flow, thermal and structural interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, Earl A.

    1994-01-01

    Research for this grant focused on the following tasks: (1) the prediction of severe, localized aerodynamic heating for complex, high speed flows; (2) finite element adaptive refinement methodology for multi-disciplinary analyses; (3) the prediction of thermoviscoplastic structural response with rate-dependent effects and large deformations; (4) thermoviscoplastic constitutive models for metals; and (5) coolant flow/structural heat transfer analyses.

  8. Cosmic ray modulation by high-speed solar wind fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorman, L. I.; Kaminer, N. S.; Kuzmicheva, A. E.; Mymrina, N. V.

    1985-01-01

    Cosmic ray intensity variations connected with recurrent high-speed fluxes (HSF) of solar wind are investigated. The increase of intensity before the Earth gets into a HSF, north-south anisotropy and diurnal variation of cosmic rays inside a HSF as well as the characteristics of Forbush decreases are considered.

  9. Numerical Simulation of High-Speed Turbulent Reacting Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Givi, P.; Taulbee, D. B.; Madnia, C. K.; Jaberi, F. A.; Colucci, P. J.; Gicquel, L. Y. M.; Adumitroaie, V.; James, S.

    1999-01-01

    The objectives of this research are: (1) to develop and implement a new methodology for large eddy simulation of (LES) of high-speed reacting turbulent flows. (2) To develop algebraic turbulence closures for statistical description of chemically reacting turbulent flows.

  10. Analysis of javelin throwing by high-speed photography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Yoshitaka; Matsuoka, Rutsu; Ishida, Yoshihisa; Seki, Kazuichi

    1999-06-01

    A xenon multiple exposure light source device was manufactured to record the trajectory of a flying javelin, and a wind tunnel experiment was performed with some javelin models to analyze the flying characteristics of the javelin. Furthermore, form of javelin throwing by athletes was recorded to estimate the characteristics in the form of each athlete using a high speed cameras.

  11. HIGH SPEED GC/MS FOR AIR ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A high speed GC/MS system consisting of a gas chromatograph equipped with a narrow bandwidth injection accessory and using a time-of-flight mass spectrometer detector has been adapted for analysis of ambient whole air samples which have been collected in passivated canisters. ...

  12. High-Speed Computer-Controlled Switch-Matrix System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spisz, E.; Cory, B.; Ho, P.; Hoffman, M.

    1985-01-01

    High-speed computer-controlled switch-matrix system developed for communication satellites. Satellite system controlled by onboard computer and all message-routing functions between uplink and downlink beams handled by newly developed switch-matrix system. Message requires only 2-microsecond interconnect period, repeated every millisecond.

  13. Hybrid hydrostatic/ball bearings in high-speed turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nielson, C. E.

    1983-01-01

    A high speed, high pressure liquid hydrogen turbopump was designed, fabricated, and tested under a previous contract. This design was then modified to incorporate hybrid hydrostatic/ball bearings on both the pump end and turbine end to replace the original conventional ball bearing packages. The design, analysis, turbopump modification, assembly, and testing of the turbopump with hybrid bearings is presented here. Initial design considerations and rotordynamic performance analysis was made to define expected turbopump operating characteristics and are reported. The results of testing the turbopump to speeds of 9215 rad/s (88,000 rpm) using a wide range of hydrostatic bearing supply pressures are presented. The hydrostatic bearing test data and the rotordynamic behavior of the turbopump was closely analyzed and are included in the report. The testing of hybrid hydrostatic/ball bearings on a turbopump to the high speed requirements has indicated the configuration concept is feasible. The program has presented a great deal of information on the technology requirements of integrating the hybrid bearing into high speed turbopump designs for improved bearing life.

  14. High-speed video processing and display system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dagtekin, Mustafa; DeMarco, Stephen C.; Ramanath, Rajeev; Snyder, Wesley E.

    2000-04-01

    A video processing and display system for performing high speed geometrical image transformations has been designed. It involves looking up the video image by using a pointer memory. The system supports any video format which does not exceed the clock rate that the system supports. It also is capable of changing the brightness and colormap of the image through hardware.

  15. New seed-cotton reclaimer for high speed roller gins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An experimental laboratory prototype reclaimer is being developed by the USDA-ARS in cooperation with Lummus Corporation. The objective of the project is to develop a seed-cotton reclaimer for high speed roller ginning that has a higher operational capacity and reduced seed loss in comparison to cur...

  16. Research in high speed fiber optics local area networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tobagi, F. A.

    1986-01-01

    The design of high speed local area networks (HSLAN) for communication among distributed devices requires solving problems in three areas: the network medium and its topology, the medium access control, and the network interface. Considerable progress was already made in the first two areas. Accomplishments are divided into two groups according to their theoretical or experimental nature. A brief summary is given.

  17. High-speed civil transport study: Special factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Studies relating to environmental factors associated with high speed civil transports were conducted. Projected total engine emissions for year 2015 fleets of several subsonic/supersonic transport fleet scenarios, discussion of sonic boom reduction methods, discussion of community noise level requirements, fuels considerations, and air traffic control impact are presented.

  18. High Speed Lunar Navigation for Crewed and Remotely Piloted Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pedersen, L.; Allan, M.; To, V.; Utz, H.; Wojcikiewicz, W.; Chautems, C.

    2010-01-01

    Increased navigation speed is desirable for lunar rovers, whether autonomous, crewed or remotely operated, but is hampered by the low gravity, high contrast lighting and rough terrain. We describe lidar based navigation system deployed on NASA's K10 autonomous rover and to increase the terrain hazard situational awareness of the Lunar Electric Rover crew.

  19. The impact of high speed roller ginning on yarn quality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent advance in cotton ginning technology have resulted in increases in the speed, throughput, and overall economics of roller ginning to make it competitive with conventional saw ginning. The present study was aimed at determining if the improvements in fiber quality, i.e. longer fibers with high...

  20. Fiber and yarn properties from high-speed roller ginning

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A study compared fiber and yarn properties from a high-speed roller gin stand, a conventional roller gin stand, and a conventional saw gin stand. The ginning treatments included three levels of lint cleaning. Four cultivars were used in the test. Emphasis will be placed on fiber length, uniformit...