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Sample records for high strength glass-ceramics

  1. High strength glass-ceramic to metal seals

    SciTech Connect

    Haws, L D; Kramer, D P; Moddeman, W E; Wooten, G W

    1986-12-01

    In many applications, ceramics are joined to other materials, especially metals. In such cases, interfacial strength is as important as the strength of each constituent material. Examples are presented for tailoring materials and processes to optimize the glass-ceramic-to-metal seal. Means for detecting defects, nondestructively, are also identified.

  2. IMPACT STRENGTH OF GLASS AND GLASS CERAMIC

    SciTech Connect

    Bless, S.; Tolman, J.

    2009-12-28

    Strength of glass and glass ceramic was measured with a bar impact technique. High-speed movies show regions of tensile and compressive failure. The borosilicate glass had a compressive strength of at least 2.2 GPa, and the glass ceramic at least 4 GPa. However, the BSG was much stronger in tension than GC. In ballistic tests, the BSG was the superior armor.

  3. Ca,P-rich layer formed on high-strength bioactive glass-ceramic A-W.

    PubMed

    Kokubo, T; Ito, S; Huang, Z T; Hayashi, T; Sakka, S; Kitsugi, T; Yamamuro, T

    1990-03-01

    Glass-ceramic A-W, containing crystalline apatite and wollastonite in a MgO-CaO-SiO2 glassy matrix shows high bioactivity as well as high mechanical strength, but other ceramics containing the same kinds of crystalline phases in different glassy matrices do not show the same bioactivity. In order to investigate the bone-bonding mechanism of this type of glass-ceramic, surface structural changes of the glass-ceramics after exposure to simulated body fluid were analyzed with various techniques. A solution with ion concentrations which are almost equal to those of the human blood plasma was used as the simulated body fluid, instead of Tris-buffer solution hitherto used. For analyzing the surface structural changes, thin-film x-ray diffraction was used in addition to conventional techniques. It was found that a bioactive glass-ceramic forms a Ca, P-rich layer on its surface in the fluid but nonbioactive ones do not, and that the Ca, P-rich layer consists of carbonate-containing hydroxyapatite of small crystallites and/or defective structure. These findings were common to those of Bioglass-type glasses. So, we conclude that the essential condition for glass and glass-ceramic to bond to bone is the formation of the surface apatite layer in the body environment but it is not essential to contain apatite within the material. Bioactivity of glass and glass-ceramic can be evaluated in vitro by examining the formation of the surface apatite layer in the simulated body fluid described above.

  4. Exploring high-strength glass-ceramic materials for upcycling of industrial wastes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Back, Gu-Seul; Park, Hyun Seo; Seo, Sung Mo; Jung, Woo-Gwang

    2015-11-01

    To promote the recycling of industrial waste and to develop value-added products using these resources, the possibility of manufacturing glass-ceramic materials of SiO2-CaO-Al2O3 system has been investigated by various heat treatment processes. Glass-ceramic materials with six different chemical compositions were prepared using steel industry slags and power plant waste by melting, casting and heat treatment. The X-ray diffraction results indicated that diopside and anorthite were the primary phases in the samples. The anorthite phase was formed in SiO2-rich material (at least 43 wt%). In CaO-rich material, the gehlenite phase was formed. By the differential scanning calorimetry analyses, it was found that the glass transition point was in the range of 973-1023 K, and the crystallization temperature was in the range of 1123-1223 K. The crystallization temperature increased as the content of Fe2O3 decreased. By the multi-step heat treatment process, the formation of the anorthite phase was enhanced. Using FactSage, the ratio of various phases was calculated as a function of temperature. The viscosities and the latent heats for the samples with various compositions were also calculated by FactSage. The optimal compositions for glass-ceramics materials were discussed in terms of their compressive strength, and micro-hardness.

  5. Strength aspects for the design of ZERODUR glass ceramics structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, Peter; Nattermann, Kurt; Doehring, Thorsten; Kuhr, Markus; Thomas, Peter; Kling, Guenther; Gath, Peter; Lucarelli, Stefano

    2007-09-01

    In some applications mirrors and support structures from the zero expansion glass ceramic material ZERODUR (R) have to endure mechanical loads, e.g. rocket launches or controlled deformations for optical image correction. Like for other glassy materials the strength of glass ceramics is dominated by its surface condition. Similar to other glass ceramics ZERODUR (R) has higher strengths than glasses for comparable surface conditions. For the design of ZERODUR (R) parts well known rules of thumb for its strength are not sufficient in any case. So new information and data with enlarged sample sets and hence better statistics have been collected to improve the understanding of its behavior under mechanical loads. Finally an outlook is given on the application of ZERODUR (R) in ambitious current and future space projects.

  6. Colorless and high strength MgO/Al2 O3 /SiO2 glass-ceramic dental material using zirconia as nucleating agent.

    PubMed

    Dittmer, Marc; Rüssel, Christian

    2012-02-01

    Glasses in the system of MgO/Al2 O3 /SiO2 with different concentrations of zirconia as nucleating agent, some of them additionally doped with ZnO or P2 O5 , were annealed in a temperature range from 950 to 1150°C. The use of zirconia led to colorless glass-ceramics, which were transparent to opaque. In all studied compositions, α-/β-quartz-solid-solutions, zirconia as well as spinel or gahnite (ZnAl2 O4 )/spinel-solid-solution precipitated. The highest bending strength of 475 MPa was obtained after annealing at 1000°C for 3 h. The increase of the annealing temperature or an increase in the zirconia concentration resulted in an increase of the microhardness up to 13.3 GPa and of the fracture toughness up to 2.7 MPa m(1/2) . The addition of ZnO results in an increase of the hardness up to 12.5 GPa. The addition of ZnO or P2 O5 led to a fracture toughness of 2 MPa m(1/2) . The described physical properties had to be highly advantageous for the preparation of colorless high strength dental glass-ceramics.

  7. Fabrication of anatase precipitated glass-ceramics possessing high transparency

    SciTech Connect

    Masai, Hirokazu; Toda, Tatsuya; Takahashi, Yoshihiro; Fujiwara, Takumi

    2009-04-13

    Transparent anatase precipitated glass-ceramics were fabricated using ZnO as a component. The particle size of precipitated anatase is several nanometers enough to possess high transparency. The preparation of the Bi-free transparent TiO{sub 2} glass-ceramic was attained by substitution of two different kinds of oxides for bismuth oxide. It is also noteworthy that we have demonstrated the crystallization of metastable anatase in the glass-ceramics as a main phase. The present bulk anatase glass-ceramics will open up an application field for a TiO{sub 2}-containing photocatalyst.

  8. Fibre-matrix bond strength studies of glass, ceramic, and metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grande, D. H.; Mandell, J. F.; Hong, K. C. C.

    1988-01-01

    An indentation test technique for compressively loading the ends of individual fibers to produce debonding has been applied to metal, glass, and glass-ceramic matrix composites; bond strength values at debond initiation are calculated using a finite-element model. Results are correlated with composite longitudinal and interlaminar shear behavior for carbon and Nicalon fiber-reinforced glasses and glass-ceramics including the effects of matrix modifications, processing conditions, and high-temperature oxidation embrittlement. The data indicate that significant bonding to improve off-axis and shear properties can be tolerated before the longitudinal behavior becomes brittle. Residual stress and other mechanical bonding effects are important, but improved analyses and multiaxial interfacial failure criteria are needed to adequately interpret bond strength data in terms of composite performance.

  9. Fiber reinforced glasses and glass-ceramics for high performance applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prewo, K. M.; Brennan, J. J.; Layden, G. K.

    1986-01-01

    The development of fiber reinforced glass and glass-ceramic matrix composites is described. The general concepts involved in composite fabrication and resultant composite properties are given for a broad range of fiber and matrix combinations. It is shown that composite materials can be tailored to achieve high levels of toughness, strength, and elastic stiffness, as well as wear resistance and dimensional stability.

  10. Effect of several surface treatments on the strength of a glass ceramic-to-metal seal

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, D P; Salerno, R F; Egleston, E E

    1982-02-10

    Test shells of Inconel 625, Inconel 718, 21-6-9 stainless steel, and Hastelloy, C-276 were plasma and/or chemically cleaned before sealing with a multi-component glass-ceramic-to-metal seal was evaluated using a hydrostatic burst test. The results show that plasma cleaning can be used to increase the hydrostatic burst strength and hermeticity of a glass ceramic-to-metal seal.

  11. Glass ceramics for sealing to high-thermal-expansion metals

    SciTech Connect

    Wilder, Jr., J. A.

    1980-10-01

    Glass ceramics were studied, formulated in the Na/sub 2/O CaO.P/sub 2/O/sub 5/, Na/sub 2/O.BaOP/sub 2/O/sub 5/, Na/sub 2/O.Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/.P/sub 2/O/sub 5/, and Li/sub 2/O.BaO.P/sub 2/O/sub 5/ systems to establish their suitability for sealing to high thermal expansion metals, e.g. aluminum, copper, and 300 series stainless steels. Glass ceramics in Na/sub 2/O.CaO.P/sub 2/O/sub 5/ and Na/sub 2/O.BaO.P/sub 2/O/sub 5/ systems have coefficients of thermal expansion in the range 140 x 10/sup -1/ per /sup 0/C less than or equal to ..cap alpha.. less than or equal to 225 x 10/sup -7/ per /sup 0/C and fracture toughness values generally greater than those of phosphate glasses; they are suitable for fabricating seals to high thermal expansion metals. Crystal phases include NaPo/sub 3/, (NaPO/sub 3/)/sub 3/, NaBa(PO/sub 3/)/sub 3/, and NaCa(PO/sub 3/)/sub 3/. Glass ceramics formed in the Na/sub 2/O.Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/.P/sub 2/O/sub 5/ systems have coefficients of thermal expansion greater than 240 x 10/sup -7/ per /sup 0/C, but they have extensive microcracking. Due to their low thermal expansion values (..cap alpha.. less than or equal to 120 x 10/sup -7/ per /sup 0/C), glass ceramics in the Li/sub 2/O.BaO.P/sub 2/O/sub 5/ system are unsuitable for sealing to high thermal expansion metals.

  12. Improving shear bond strength between feldspathic porcelain and zirconia substructure with lithium disilicate glass-ceramic liner.

    PubMed

    Wattanasirmkit, Kamolporn; Srimaneepong, Viritpon; Kanchanatawewat, Kanchana; Monmaturapoj, Naruporn; Thunyakitpisal, Pasutha; Jinawath, Supatra

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the shear bond strength (SBS) between veneering porcelain and zirconia substructure using lithium disilicate glass-ceramic as a liner. The mineral phases and microstructures of lithium disilicate glass-ceramic at temperature range of 800-900°C were preliminarily investigated. SBSs of porcelain-veneered zirconia specimens with and without lithium disilicate glassceramic liner fired at the same temperature were determined. Results showed that SBSs of veneering porcelain and zirconia with lithium disilicate glass-ceramic liner was notably increased (p<0.05). Specimens from the group with the highest SBS (59.7 MPa) were subject to thermocycling up to 10,000 cycles and their post-thermocycling SBSs investigated. Though weakened by thermocycling, SBSs were above the clinically acceptable limit (25 MPa) of ISO 9693. Fractographic analysis revealed mixed cohesive and adhesive failures. It was concluded that lithium disilicate glass-ceramic is a potential liner which generated high SBS between veneering porcelain and zirconia.

  13. High-temperature testing of glass/ceramic matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandell, John F.; Grande, Dodd H.; Dannemann, Kathryn A.

    1989-01-01

    Recent advances in ceramic and other high-temperature composites have created a need for test methods that can be used at 1000 C and above. Present test methods usually require adhesively bonded tabs that cannot be used at high temperatures. This paper discusses some of the difficulties with high-temperature test development and describes several promising test methods. Stress-strain data are given for Nicalon ceramic fiber reinforced glass and glass-ceramic matrix composites tested in air at temperatures up to 1000 C.

  14. Torsional Shear Strength Tests for Glass-Ceramic Joined Silicon Carbide

    DOE PAGES

    Ferraris, Monica; Ventrella, Andrea; Salvo, Milena; ...

    2014-03-17

    A torsion test on hour-glass-shaped samples with a full joined or a ring-shaped joined area was chosen in this study to measure shear strength of glass-ceramic joined silicon carbide. Shear strength of about 100 MPa was measured for full joined SiC with fracture completely inside their joined area. Attempts to obtain this shear strength with a ring-shaped joined area failed due to mixed mode fractures. However, full joined and ring-shaped steel hour-glasses joined by a glass-ceramic gave the same shear strength, thus suggesting that this test measures shear strength of joined components only when their fracture is completely inside theirmore » joined area.« less

  15. Torsional Shear Strength Tests for Glass-Ceramic Joined Silicon Carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Ferraris, Monica; Ventrella, Andrea; Salvo, Milena; Katoh, Yutai; Gross, Dietmar

    2014-03-17

    A torsion test on hour-glass-shaped samples with a full joined or a ring-shaped joined area was chosen in this study to measure shear strength of glass-ceramic joined silicon carbide. Shear strength of about 100 MPa was measured for full joined SiC with fracture completely inside their joined area. Attempts to obtain this shear strength with a ring-shaped joined area failed due to mixed mode fractures. However, full joined and ring-shaped steel hour-glasses joined by a glass-ceramic gave the same shear strength, thus suggesting that this test measures shear strength of joined components only when their fracture is completely inside their joined area.

  16. Glass-ceramic hermetic seals to high thermal expansion metals

    DOEpatents

    Kramer, D.P.; Massey, R.T.

    1987-04-28

    A process for forming glass-ceramic materials from an alkaline silica-lithia glass composition comprising 60-72 mole-% SiO/sub 2/, 18-27 mole-% Li/sub 2/O, 0-5 mole-% Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, 0-6 mole-% K/sub 2/O, 0-3 mole-% B/sub 2/O/sub 3/, and 0.5-2.5 mole-% P/sub 2/O/sub 5/, which comprises heating said glass composition at a first temperature within the 950-1050/degree/C range for 5-60 minutes, and then at a devitrification temperature within the 700-900/degree/C range for about 5-300 minutes to obtain a glass-ceramic having a thermal expansion coefficient of up to 210 x 10/sup /minus/7///degree/C. These ceramics form strong, hermetic seals with high expansion metals such as stainless steel alloys. An intermediate nucleation heating step conducted at a temperature within the range of 675-750/degree/C for 10-120 minutes may be employed between the first stage and the devitrification stage. 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  17. Evaluation of High Permittivity Glass Ceramics for Millimeter Wave Applications.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-26

    Millimeter Wave IfS ASTNACT (enew em reverse e* if n aesee7 wd Identify by block namber) - The crystallization and dielectric properties of strontium ...34Dielectric Properties of Strontium Titanate Glass Ceramics," is included in Appendix 3. ’- 5.0 PARTICIPATING SCIENTIFIC PERSONNEL Work on the contract was...OH, U.S.A Abstract Strontium titanate glass-ceramics, prepared by the crystallization of strontium titanate-aluminosilicate glasses have been

  18. Correlation between dielectric breakdown strength and interface polarization in barium strontium titanate glass ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Jiajia; Zhang Yong; Ma Tao; Li Hongtao; Zhang Linwen

    2010-01-25

    The correlation between the dielectric breakdown performance and interface polarization was studied by the measurements of the dielectric breakdown strength and impedance spectroscopy as a function of sintering temperatures in a BaO-SrO-TiO{sub 2}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-SiO{sub 2} glass ceramic system. It was found that dielectric breakdown strength strongly depends on the interface polarization. The sintering temperature dependence of breakdown strength is attributed to the variation in interfacial polarization based on the results of complex impedance analysis.

  19. Silanated Surface Treatment: Effects on the Bond Strength to Lithium Disilicate Glass-Ceramic.

    PubMed

    Baratto, Samantha Schaffer Pugsley; Spina, Denis Roberto Falcão; Gonzaga, Carla Castiglia; Cunha, Leonardo Fernandes da; Furuse, Adilson Yoshio; Baratto Filho, Flares; Correr, Gisele Maria

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of silanization protocols on the bond strength of two resin cements to a lithium disilicate glass-ceramic. Thirty-two ceramic discs were assigned to 2 groups (n=16): G1 - dual-cured resin cement and G2 - light-cured resin cement. Four subgroups were evaluated according to the used silanization protocol. The glass-ceramic was etched with 10% hydrofluoric acid for 20 s and silane was applied for 1 min, as follows: CTL - according to the manufacturer's instructions; HA - dried with hot air; NWA - washed and dried with water and air at room temperature; HWA - washed and dried with hot water and hot air. Thereafter, adhesive was applied and light-cured for 20 s. Silicon molds were used to prepare resin cement cylinders (1x1 mm) on the ceramic surface. The specimens were stored in deionized water at 37 °C for 48 h and subjected to a micro-shear test. The data were submitted to statistical analysis (?#61537;=0.05). Group G1 showed higher bond strengths than G2, except for the CTL and NWA subgroups. Differences as function of the silanization protocol were only observed in G1: HWA (25.13±6.83)≥HA (22.95±7.78)≥CTL(17.44±7.24) ≥NWA(14.63±8.76). For G2 there was no difference among the subgroups. In conclusion, the silanization protocol affected the resin cement/ceramic bond strengths, depending on the material. Washing/drying with hot water and/or hot air increased only the bond strength of the dual-cured resin cement.

  20. Cladding glass ceramic for use in high powered lasers

    DOEpatents

    Marker, Alexander J.; Campbell, John H.

    1998-01-01

    A Cu-doped/Fe-doped low expansion glass ceramic composition comprising in Wt. %: SiO{sub 2} 50--65; Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} 18--27; P{sub 2}O{sub 5} 0--10; Li{sub 2}O 2--6; Na{sub 2}O 0--2; K{sub 2}O 0--2; B{sub 2}O{sub 3} 0--1; MgO 0--4; ZnO 0--5; CaO 0--4; BaO 0--5; TiO{sub 2} 1--3; ZrO{sub 3} 1--3; As{sub 2}O{sub 3} 0--1.5; Sb{sub 2}O{sub 3} 0--1.5; CuO 0--3; and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} 0--1 wherein the total amount of SiO{sub 2}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and P{sub 2}O{sub 5} is 80--89 wt. %, and said glass ceramic contains as a dopant 0.1--3 wt. % CuO, 0.1--1 wt. % Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} or a combined CuO+Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} amount of 0.1--4 wt. %. The glass ceramic composition is suitable for use as a cladding material for solid laser energy storage mediums as well as for use in beam attenuators for measuring laser energy level and beam blocks or beam dumps used for absorbing excess or unused laser energy.

  1. Cladding glass ceramic for use in high powered lasers

    DOEpatents

    Marker, A.J.; Campbell, J.H.

    1998-02-17

    A Cu-doped/Fe-doped low expansion glass ceramic composition comprising in Wt. %: SiO{sub 2} 50--65; Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} 18--27; P{sub 2}O{sub 5} 0--10; Li{sub 2}O 2--6; Na{sub 2}O 0--2; K{sub 2}O 0--2; B{sub 2}O{sub 3} 0--1; MgO 0--4; ZnO 0--5; CaO 0--4; BaO 0--5; TiO{sub 2} 1--3; ZrO{sub 3} 1--3; As{sub 2}O{sub 3} 0--1.5; Sb{sub 2}O{sub 3} 0--1.5; CuO 0--3; and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} 0--1 wherein the total amount of SiO{sub 2}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and P{sub 2}O{sub 5} is 80--89 wt. %, and said glass ceramic contains as a dopant 0.1--3 wt. % CuO, 0.1--1 wt. % Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} or a combined CuO+Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} amount of 0.1--4 wt. %. The glass ceramic composition is suitable for use as a cladding material for solid laser energy storage mediums as well as for use in beam attenuators for measuring laser energy level and beam blocks or beam dumps used for absorbing excess or unused laser energy.

  2. Talc-silicon glass-ceramic waste forms for immobilization of high- level calcined waste

    SciTech Connect

    Vinjamuri, K.

    1993-06-01

    Talc-silicon glass-ceramic waste forms are being evaluated as candidates for immobilization of the high level calcined waste stored onsite at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant. These glass-ceramic waste forms were prepared by hot isostatically pressing a mixture of simulated nonradioactive high level calcined waste, talc, silicon and aluminum metal additives. The waste forms were characterized for density, chemical durability, and glass and crystalline phase compositions. The results indicate improved density and chemical durability as the silicon content is increased.

  3. Method for making glass-ceramic articles exhibiting high frangibility

    DOEpatents

    Beall, George H.; Brydges, III., William T.; Ference, Joseph; Kozlowski, Theodore R.

    1976-02-03

    This invention is concerned with glass-ceramic articles having compositions within a very narrowly-delimited area of the MgO-Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 -B.sub.2 O.sub.3 -SiO.sub.2 field and having alpha-quartz and sapphirine as the principal crystal phases, resulting from nucleation through a combination of TiO.sub.2 and ZrO.sub.2. Upon contacting such articles with lithium ions at an elevated temperature, said lithium ions will replace magnesium ions on a two Li.sup.+-for-one Mg.sup..sup.+2 basis within the crystal structures, thereby providing a unitary glass-ceramic article having an integral surface layer wherein the principal crystal phase is a lithium-stuffed beta-quartz solid solution. That transformation of crystal phases results in compressive stresses being set up within the surface layer as the articles are cooled. Through the careful control of composition, crystallization treatment, and the parameters of the replacement reaction in the crystal structures, a tremendous degree of stored elastic energy can be developed within the articles such that they will demonstrate frangibility when fractured but will not exhibit undesirable spontaneous breakage and/or spalling.

  4. Enamel and Dentin Surface Finishing Influence on the Roughness and Microshear Bond Strength of a Lithium Silicate Glass-Ceramic for Laminate Veneers

    PubMed Central

    Gonzaga, Carla Castiglia; Bravo, Ruth Peggy; Pavelski, Thiago Vinícius; Garcia, Paula Pontes; Correr, Gisele Maria; Leonardi, Denise Piotto; da Cunha, Leonardo Fernandes; Furuse, Adilson Yoshio

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. This study evaluated the influence of cavity surface finishing with diamond burs of different grit mounted on high-speed turbine and ultrasound on the roughness and microshear bond strength (MBS) of a lithium silicate glass-ceramic to enamel and dentin. Methods. Enamel and dentin specimens were divided into seven groups, according to the type of surface finishing: 1200-grit sandpaper (control), two different brands of medium-grit and fine-grit diamond burs in a high-speed turbine; medium-grit and fine-grit CVD (chemical vapor deposition) tips in an ultrasonic device. Roughness parameters (n = 5) and MSBS to a glass-ceramic (n = 10) were determined. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey's test (α = 5%). Results. Control group showed lower mean roughness readings and groups that used medium-grit diamond burs showed the highest mean roughness values. Regarding MSBS, there was no statistical difference when comparing the groups gritted with the same brand of medium- and fine-grit burs and tips. Conclusions. Cavity surface finishing influenced the roughness parameters and MSBS of a glass-ceramic to enamel and dentin. Medium-grit diamond burs in high-speed turbine showed the highest mean roughness values. Fine-grit CVD tips in ultrasound presented the highest MSBS values for both enamel and dentin. PMID:27347507

  5. Enamel and Dentin Surface Finishing Influence on the Roughness and Microshear Bond Strength of a Lithium Silicate Glass-Ceramic for Laminate Veneers.

    PubMed

    Gonzaga, Carla Castiglia; Bravo, Ruth Peggy; Pavelski, Thiago Vinícius; Garcia, Paula Pontes; Correr, Gisele Maria; Leonardi, Denise Piotto; da Cunha, Leonardo Fernandes; Furuse, Adilson Yoshio

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. This study evaluated the influence of cavity surface finishing with diamond burs of different grit mounted on high-speed turbine and ultrasound on the roughness and microshear bond strength (MBS) of a lithium silicate glass-ceramic to enamel and dentin. Methods. Enamel and dentin specimens were divided into seven groups, according to the type of surface finishing: 1200-grit sandpaper (control), two different brands of medium-grit and fine-grit diamond burs in a high-speed turbine; medium-grit and fine-grit CVD (chemical vapor deposition) tips in an ultrasonic device. Roughness parameters (n = 5) and MSBS to a glass-ceramic (n = 10) were determined. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey's test (α = 5%). Results. Control group showed lower mean roughness readings and groups that used medium-grit diamond burs showed the highest mean roughness values. Regarding MSBS, there was no statistical difference when comparing the groups gritted with the same brand of medium- and fine-grit burs and tips. Conclusions. Cavity surface finishing influenced the roughness parameters and MSBS of a glass-ceramic to enamel and dentin. Medium-grit diamond burs in high-speed turbine showed the highest mean roughness values. Fine-grit CVD tips in ultrasound presented the highest MSBS values for both enamel and dentin.

  6. Glasses, ceramics, and composites from lunar materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beall, George H.

    1992-01-01

    A variety of useful silicate materials can be synthesized from lunar rocks and soils. The simplest to manufacture are glasses and glass-ceramics. Glass fibers can be drawn from a variety of basaltic glasses. Glass articles formed from titania-rich basalts are capable of fine-grained internal crystallization, with resulting strength and abrasion resistance allowing their wide application in construction. Specialty glass-ceramics and fiber-reinforced composites would rely on chemical separation of magnesium silicates and aluminosilicates as well as oxides titania and alumina. Polycrystalline enstatite with induced lamellar twinning has high fracture toughness, while cordierite glass-ceramics combine excellent thermal shock resistance with high flexural strengths. If sapphire or rutile whiskers can be made, composites of even better mechanical properties are envisioned.

  7. Influence of aluminium nitride as a foaming agent on the preparation of foam glass-ceramics from high-titanium blast furnace slag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Huan; Feng, Ke-qin; Wang, Hai-bo; Chen, Chang-hong; Zhou, Hong-ling

    2016-05-01

    To effectively reuse high-titanium blast furnace slag (TS), foam glass-ceramics were successfully prepared by powder sintering at 1000°C. TS and waste glass were used as the main raw materials, aluminium nitride (AlN) as the foaming agent, and borax as the fluxing agent. The influence of the amount of AlN added (1wt%-5wt%) on the crystalline phases, microstructure, and properties of the produced foam glass-ceramics was studied. The results showed that the main crystal phases were perovskite, diopside, and augite. With increasing AlN content, a transformation from diopside to augite occurred and the crystallinity of the pyroxene phases slightly decreased. Initially, the average pore size and porosity of the foam glass-ceramics increased and subsequently decreased; similarly, their bulk density and compressive strength decreased and subsequently increased. The optimal properties were obtained when the foam glass-ceramics were prepared by adding 4wt% AlN.

  8. Molybdenum sealing glass-ceramic composition

    DOEpatents

    Eagan, Robert J.

    1976-01-01

    The invention relates to a glass-ceramic composition having low hydrogen and helium permeability properties, along with high fracture strength, a thermal coefficient of expansion similar to that of molybdenum, and adaptable for hermetically sealing to molybdenum at temperatures of between about 900.degree. and about 950.degree.C. to form a hermatically sealed insulator body.

  9. An evaluation of the processing conditions, structure, and properties (biaxial flexural strength and antibacterial efficacy) of sintered strontium-zinc-silicate glass ceramics.

    PubMed

    Looney, Mark; Shea, Helen O'; Gunn, Lynda; Crowley, Dolores; Boyd, Daniel

    2013-05-01

    The use of artificial bone grafts has increased in order to satisfy a growing demand for bone replacement materials. Initial mechanical stability of synthetic bone grafts is very advantageous for certain clinical applications. Coupled with the advantage of mechanical strength, a material with inherent antibacterial properties would be very beneficial. A series of strontium-doped zinc silicate (Ca-Sr-Na-Zn-Si) glass ceramics have been characterized in terms of their crystalline structure, biaxial flexural strength and antibacterial efficacy based on the identification of optimum sintering conditions. All three glass ceramics, namely, BT110, BT111, and BT112 were found to be fully crystalline, with BT111 and BT112 comprising of biocompatible crystalline phases. The biaxial flexural strengths of the three glass ceramics ranged from 70 to 149 MPa and were shown to be superior to those of clinically established ceramics in dry conditions and following incubation in simulated physiological conditions. The bacteriostatic effect for each glass ceramic was also established, where BT112 showed an inhibitory effect against three of the most common bacteria found at implantation sites, namely, Enterococcus faecalis, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The results of the evaluation suggest that the materials studied offer advantages over current clinical materials and indicate the potential suitability of the glass ceramics as therapeutic bone grafts.

  10. Growth and Characterization of Nanostructured Glass Ceramic Scintillators for Miniature High-Energy Radiation Sensors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    public release; distribution is unlimited. October 2013 HDTRA1-03-D-0009 Mansoor Sheik- Bahae Prepared by: OVPR...Characterization of Nanostructured Glass Ceramic Scintillators for Miniature High-Energy Radiation Sensors HDTRA01-03-D-0009 Mansoor Sheik- Bahae 26 OVPR...Table of Contents…………………………………………………………….3 I . Synthesis of Nano-Structured Glass Ceramic…..……………………………4 II. Characterize Structure and

  11. Reference-based optical characterization of glass-ceramic converter for high-power white LEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engel, A.; Letz, M.; Zachau, T.; Pawlowski, E.; Seneschal-Merz, K.; Korb, T.; Enseling, D.; Hoppe, B.; Peuchert, U.; Hayden, J. S.

    2007-02-01

    Fluorescence techniques are known for their high sensitivity and are widely used as analytical tools and detection methods for product and process control, material sciences, environmental and bio-technical analysis, molecular genetics, cell biology, medical diagnostics and drug screening. According to DIN/ISO 17025 certified standards are used for fluorescence diagnostics having the drawback of giving relative values for fluorescence intensities only. Therefore reference materials for a quantitative characterization have to be related directly to the materials under investigation. In order to evaluate these figures it is necessary to calculate absolute numbers like absorption/excitation cross section and quantum yield. This can be done for different types of dopants in different materials like glass, glass ceramics, crystals or nano crystalline material embedded in polymer matrices. Here we consider a special type of glass ceramic with Ce doped YAG as the main crystalline phase. This material has been developed for the generation of white light realized by a blue 460 nm semiconductor transition using a yellow phosphor or converter material respectively. Our glass ceramic is a pure solid state solution for a yellow phosphor. For the production of such a kind of material a well controlled thermal treatment is employed to transfer the original glass into a glass ceramic with a specific crystalline phase. In our material Ce doped YAG crystallites of a size of several µm are embedded in a matrix of a residual glass. We present chemical, structural and spectroscopic properties of our material. Based on this we will discuss design options for white LED's with respect to heat management, scattering regime, reflection losses, chemical durability and stability against blue and UV radiation, which evolve from our recently developed material. In this paper we present first results on our approaches to evaluate quantum yield and light output. Used diagnostics are

  12. Influence of high magnetic field on the luminescence of Eu{sup 3+}-doped glass ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Wei; Chen, Weibo; Chen, Ping; Xu, Beibei; Zheng, Shuhong; Guo, Qiangbing; Liu, Xiaofeng E-mail: qjr@zju.edu.cn; Zhang, Junpei; Han, Junbo; Qiu, Jianrong E-mail: qjr@zju.edu.cn

    2014-09-28

    Rare earth (RE) doped materials have been widely exploited as the intriguing electronic configuration of RE ions offers diverse functionalities from optics to magnetism. However, the coupling of magnetism with photoluminescence (PL) in such materials has been rarely reported in spite of its fundamental significance. In the present paper, the effect of high pulsed magnetic field on the photoluminescence intensity of Eu{sup 3+}-doped nano-glass-ceramics has been investigated. In our experiment, Eu-doped oxyfluoride glass and glass ceramic were prepared by the conventional melt-quenching process and controlled heat treatment. The results demonstrate that the integrated PL intensity of Eu{sup 3+} decreases with the enhancement of magnetic field, which can be interpreted in terms of cooperation effect of Zeeman splitting and magnetic field induced change in site symmetry. Furthermore, as a result of Zeeman splitting, both blue and red shift in the emission peaks of Eu{sup 3+} can be observed, and this effect becomes more prominent with the increase of magnetic field. Possible mechanisms associated with the observed magneto-optical behaviors are suggested. The results of the present paper may open a new gate for modulation of luminescence by magnetic field and remote optical detection of magnetic field.

  13. Preliminary Technology Maturation Plan for Immobilization of High-Level Waste in Glass Ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Vienna, John D.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Sevigny, Gary J.; Smith, G L.

    2012-09-30

    A technology maturation plan (TMP) was developed for immobilization of high-level waste (HLW) raffinate in a glass ceramics waste form using a cold-crucible induction melter (CCIM). The TMP was prepared by the following process: 1) define the reference process and boundaries of the technology being matured, 2) evaluate the technology elements and identify the critical technology elements (CTE), 3) identify the technology readiness level (TRL) of each of the CTE’s using the DOE G 413.3-4, 4) describe the development and demonstration activities required to advance the TRLs to 4 and 6 in order, and 5) prepare a preliminary plan to conduct the development and demonstration. Results of the technology readiness assessment identified five CTE’s and found relatively low TRL’s for each of them: • Mixing, sampling, and analysis of waste slurry and melter feed: TRL-1 • Feeding, melting, and pouring: TRL-1 • Glass ceramic formulation: TRL-1 • Canister cooling and crystallization: TRL-1 • Canister decontamination: TRL-4 Although the TRL’s are low for most of these CTE’s (TRL-1), the effort required to advance them to higher values. The activities required to advance the TRL’s are listed below: • Complete this TMP • Perform a preliminary engineering study • Characterize, estimate, and simulate waste to be treated • Laboratory scale glass ceramic testing • Melter and off-gas testing with simulants • Test the mixing, sampling, and analyses • Canister testing • Decontamination system testing • Issue a requirements document • Issue a risk management document • Complete preliminary design • Integrated pilot testing • Issue a waste compliance plan A preliminary schedule and budget were developed to complete these activities as summarized in the following table (assuming 2012 dollars). TRL Budget Year MSA FMP GCF CCC CD Overall $M 2012 1 1 1 1 4 1 0.3 2013 2 2 1 1 4 1 1.3 2014 2 3 1 1 4 1 1.8 2015 2 3 2 2 4 2 2.6 2016 2 3 2 2 4 2 4

  14. Damage to Macor glass-ceramic from high-dose 14 MeV neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Coghlan, W.A.; Clinard, F.W. Jr. . Dept. of Physics; Los Alamos National Lab., NM )

    1989-01-01

    Macor machinable glass-ceramic was irradiated to fluences up to 1 {times} 10{sup 23} 14 MeV n/m{sup 2} at room temperature. Post-irradiation measurements were carried out to determine changes in high-frequency electrical conductivity, hardness, and density. It was found that neutron damage caused slight increases in conductivity and hardness. The major changes noted was in density, where a fluence of 4 {times} 10{sup 22} n/m{sup 2} caused swelling of 1.55 vol % while a dose of 1 {times} 10{sup 23} n/m{sup 2} resulted in a lower swelling value (0.82 vol %). This unusual behavior is explained by a model involving expansion of the mica phase of Macor and contraction of the glassy phase. Implications of the present results for engineering performance of Macor at these and higher fluences are discussed. 11 refs., 5 figs.

  15. Bioactive and inert dental glass-ceramics.

    PubMed

    Montazerian, Maziar; Zanotto, Edgar Dutra

    2017-02-01

    The global market for dental materials is predicted to exceed 10 billion dollars by 2020. The main drivers for this growth are easing the workflow of dentists and increasing the comfort of patients. Therefore, remarkable research projects have been conducted and are currently underway to develop improved or new dental materials with enhanced properties or that can be processed using advanced technologies, such as CAD/CAM or 3D printing. Among these materials, zirconia, glass or polymer-infiltrated ceramics, and glass-ceramics (GCs) are of great importance. Dental glass-ceramics are highly attractive because they are easy to process and have outstanding esthetics, translucency, low thermal conductivity, high strength, chemical durability, biocompatibility, wear resistance, and hardness similar to that of natural teeth, and, in certain cases, these materials are bioactive. In this review article, we divide dental GCs into the following two groups: restorative and bioactive. Most restorative dental glass-ceramics (RDGCs) are inert and biocompatible and are used in the restoration and reconstruction of teeth. Bioactive dental glass-ceramics (BDGCs) display bone-bonding ability and stimulate positive biological reactions at the material/tissue interface. BDGCs are suggested for dentin hypersensitivity treatment, implant coating, bone regeneration and periodontal therapy. Throughout this paper, we elaborate on the history, processing, properties and applications of RDGCs and BDGCs. We also report on selected papers that address promising types of dental glass-ceramics. Finally, we include trends and guidance on relevant open issues and research possibilities. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 105A: 619-639, 2017.

  16. In vitro osteogenesis on a highly bioactive glass-ceramic (Biosilicate).

    PubMed

    Moura, João; Teixeira, Lucas Novaes; Ravagnani, Christian; Peitl, Oscar; Zanotto, Edgar Dutra; Beloti, Márcio Mateus; Panzeri, Heitor; Rosa, Adalberto Luiz; de Oliveira, Paulo Tambasco

    2007-09-01

    One of the strategies to improve the mechanical performance of bioactive glasses for load-bearing implant devices has been the development of glass-ceramic materials. The present study aimed to evaluate the effect of a highly bioactive, fully-crystallized glass-ceramic (Biosilicate) of the system P(2)O(5)-Na(2)O-CaO-SiO(2) on various key parameters of in vitro osteogenesis. Surface characterization was carried out by scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Osteogenic cells were obtained by enzymatic digestion of newborn rat calvarial bone and by growing on Biosilicate discs and on control bioactive glass surfaces (Biosilicate) parent glass and Bioglass(R) 45S5) for periods of up to 17 days. All materials developed an apatite layer in simulated body fluid for 24h. Additionally, as early as 12 h under culture conditions and in the absence of cells, all surfaces developed a layer of silica-gel that was gradually covered by amorphous calcium phosphate deposits, which remained amorphous up to 72 h. During the proliferative phase of osteogenic cultures, the majority of cells exhibited disassembly of the actin cytoskeleton, whereas reassembly of actin stress fibers took place only in areas of cell multilayering by day 5. Although no significant differences were detected in terms of total protein content and alkaline phosphatase activity at days 11 and 17, Biosilicate supported significantly larger areas of calcified matrix at day 17. The results indicate that full crystallization of bioactive glasses in a range of compositions of the system P(2)O(5)-Na(2)O-CaO-SiO(2) may promote enhancement of in vitro bone-like tissue formation in an osteogenic cell culture system.

  17. Bonding strength of resin cement to silicate glass ceramics for dental CAD/CAM systems is enhanced by combination treatment of the bonding surface.

    PubMed

    Shimakura, Yusuke; Hotta, Yasuhiro; Fujishima, Akihiro; Kunii, Jun; Miyazaki, Takashi; Kawawa, Tadaharu

    2007-09-01

    To increase the bond strength of CAD/CAM-fabricated, leucite-reinforced glass ceramics with a resin cement, the effects of the following were investigated: surface modification by tribochemical (TBC) treatment, followed by combined application of a silane coupling agent and a functional monomer as a primer. Bond strength was evaluated by a shear bond test. It was found that a silane coupling agent was useful for all the surfaces, particularly for the TBC-treated surface. This was because of the presence of a silica layer on the modified surface. The combination of a silane coupling agent and a functional monomer on the TBC surface allowed marked improvement in bonding, whereby the bonding endured 20,000 cycles of thermal cycling. Therefore, TBC treatment in combination with a silane coupling agent and a functional monomer as a primer substantially increased the bond strength of CAD/CAM-fabricated glass ceramics with resin cement, if the treatment conditions were appropriate.

  18. Nb-doped SrTiO3 glass-ceramics as high temperature stable n-type oxide thermoelectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lingner, Julian; Jakob, Gerhard; Letz, Martin

    2012-06-01

    Niobium doped SrTiO3 is known for its high potential as an oxide thermoelectric material and is one of the possible candidates for the n-type site in an oxidic thermoelectric module. The high thermal conductivity [1] and the lack of high-temperature stability of the oxygen vacancies [2] limit its properties in the ceramic systems. Glass-ceramics are intrinsic nano-structured systems and provide crystal phases densely embedded in a glass matrix which prevents the material from detoriation at high temperatures. In particular, the glass-matrix prevents an uncontrolled reoxidization as well as an uncontrolled grain growth therefore retaining the nano-structure even at high temperatures. Here, measurements and results of first glass-ceramic systems are presented, which show a low thermal conductivity due to the residue glass phase. Furthermore a stable thermal cycling up to 650 °C is demonstrated.

  19. Glass Ceramic Formulation Data Package

    SciTech Connect

    Crum, Jarrod V.; Rodriguez, Carmen P.; McCloy, John S.; Vienna, John D.; Chung, Chul-Woo

    2012-06-17

    A glass ceramic waste form is being developed for treatment of secondary waste streams generated by aqueous reprocessing of commercial used nuclear fuel (Crum et al. 2012b). The waste stream contains a mixture of transition metals, alkali, alkaline earths, and lanthanides, several of which exceed the solubility limits of a single phase borosilicate glass (Crum et al. 2009; Caurant et al. 2007). A multi-phase glass ceramic waste form allows incorporation of insoluble components of the waste by designed crystallization into durable heat tolerant phases. The glass ceramic formulation and processing targets the formation of the following three stable crystalline phases: (1) powellite (XMoO4) where X can be (Ca, Sr, Ba, and/or Ln), (2) oxyapatite Yx,Z(10-x)Si6O26 where Y is alkaline earth, Z is Ln, and (3) lanthanide borosilicate (Ln5BSi2O13). These three phases incorporate the waste components that are above the solubility limit of a single-phase borosilicate glass. The glass ceramic is designed to be a single phase melt, just like a borosilicate glass, and then crystallize upon slow cooling to form the targeted phases. The slow cooling schedule is based on the centerline cooling profile of a 2 foot diameter canister such as the Hanford High-Level Waste canister. Up to this point, crucible testing has been used for glass ceramic development, with cold crucible induction melter (CCIM) targeted as the ultimate processing technology for the waste form. Idaho National Laboratory (INL) will conduct a scaled CCIM test in FY2012 with a glass ceramic to demonstrate the processing behavior. This Data Package documents the laboratory studies of the glass ceramic composition to support the CCIM test. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) measured melt viscosity, electrical conductivity, and crystallization behavior upon cooling to identify a processing window (temperature range) for melter operation and cooling profiles necessary to crystallize the targeted phases in the

  20. Effect of Heat-Pressing Temperature and Holding Time on the Microstructure and Flexural Strength of Lithium Disilicate Glass-Ceramics

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jing; Wang, Hui; Chen, Jihua

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the influence of various heat-pressing procedures (different holding time and heat pressing temperature) on the microstructure and flexural strength of lithium disilicate glass ceramic. An experimental lithium silicate glass ceramic (ELDC) was prepared from the SiO2-Li2O-K2O-Al2O3-ZrO2-P2O5 system and heat-pressed following different procedures by varying temperature and holding time. The flexural strength was tested and microstructure was analyzed. The relationships between the microstructure, mechanical properties and heat-pressing procedures were discussed in-depth. Results verified the feasibility of the application of dental heat-pressing technique in processing the experimental lithium disilicate glass ceramic. Different heat-pressing procedures showed significant influence on microstructure and flexural strength. ELDC heat-pressed at 950℃ with holding time of 15 min achieved an almost pore-free microstructure and the highest flexural strength, which was suitable for dental restorative application. PMID:25985206

  1. Mesoporous Nitrogen-Doped Carbon-LiSICON Glass Ceramics as High Performance Cathodes in Solid-State Lithium Oxygen Batteries

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-18

    SUBTITLE MESOPOROUS NITROGEN-DOPED CARBON-LiSICON GLASS CERAMICS AS HIGH PERFORMANCE CATHODES IN SOLID-STATE LITHIUM -OXYGEN BATTERIES (POSTPRINT) 5a...AFRL-RQ-WP-TP-2015-0054 MESOPOROUS NITROGEN-DOPED CARBON-LiSICON GLASS CERAMICS AS HIGH PERFORMANCE CATHODES IN SOLID-STATE LITHIUM -OXYGEN...superior electrochemical activity of composite 3 for the reduction of oxygen and the higher ionic conductivity of LAGP to transport lithium ions in the

  2. Optimization of the Processing Parameters of High Temperature Superconducting Glass-Ceramics: Center Director's Discretionary Fund Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ethridge, E. C.; Kaukler, W. F.

    1993-01-01

    A number of promising glass forming compositions of high Tc superconducting Ba-Sr-Ca-Cu-O (BSCCO) materials were evaluated for their glass-ceramic crystallization ability. The BSCCO ceramics belonging to the class of superconductors in the Ba-Sr-Ca-Cu-O system were the focus of this study. By first forming the superconducting material as a glass, subsequent devitrification into the crystalline (glass-ceramic) superconductor can be performed by thermal processing of the glass preform body. Glass formability and phase formation were determined by a variety of methods in another related study. This study focused on the nucleation and crystallization of the materials. Thermal analysis during rapid cooling aids in the evaluation of nucleation and crystallization behavior. Melt viscosity is used to predict glass formation ability.

  3. Influence of glass particle size of resin cements on bonding to glass ceramic: SEM and bond strength evaluation.

    PubMed

    Valentini, Fernanda; Moraes, Rafael R; Pereira-Cenci, Tatiana; Boscato, Noéli

    2014-05-01

    This study investigated the effect of the filler particle size (micron or submicron) of experimental resin cements on the microtensile bond strength to a glass-ceramic pretreated with hydrofluoric acid (HFA) etching or alumina airborne-particle abrasion (AA). Cements were obtained from a Bis-GMA/TEGDMA mixture filled with 60 mass% micron-sized (1 ± 0.2 µm) or submicron-sized (180 ± 30 µm) Ba-Si-Al glass particles. Ceramic blocks (PM9; VITA) were treated with 10% HFA for 60 s or AA for 15 s. Silane and adhesive were applied. Ceramic blocks were bonded to resin composite blocks (Z250; 3M ESPE) using one of the cements. Bonded specimens were sectioned into beams (n = 20/group) and subjected to microtensile bond strength tests. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and Student-Newman-Keuls' tests (5%). Failure modes were classified under magnification. Morphologies of the treated ceramic surfaces and bonded interfaces were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy. The HFA-submicron group had lower bond strengths than the other groups. All AA-submicron specimens debonded prematurely. Mixed failures were predominant for HFA groups, whereas interfacial failures predominated for AA groups. SEM revealed a honeycomb-like aspect in the HFA-treated ceramic, whereas the AA-treated groups showed an irregular retentive pattern. Continuity of cement infiltration along the bonded interface was more uniform for HFA-treated compared to AA-treated specimens. Cracks toward the bulk of the ceramic were observed in AA-treated specimens. Particle size significantly influenced the ceramic bond strength, whereas surface treatment had a minor effect.

  4. Surface or internal nucleation and crystallization of glass-ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Höland, W.; Rheinberger, V. M.; Ritzberger, C.; Apel, E.

    2013-07-01

    Fluoroapatite (Ca5(PO4)3F) was precipitated in glass-ceramics via internal crystallization of base glasses. The crystals grew with a needle-like morphology in the direction of the crystallographic c-axis. Two different reaction mechanisms were analyzed: precipitation via a disordered primary apatite crystals and a solid state parallel reaction to rhenanite (NaCaPO4) precipitation. In contrast to the internal nucleation used in the formation of fluoroapatite, surface crystallization was induced to precipitate a phosphate-free oxyapatite of NaY9(SiO4)6O2-type. Internal nucleation and crystallization have been shown to be a very useful tool for developing high-strength lithium disilicate (Li2Si2O5) glass-ceramics. A very controlled process was conducted to transform the lithium metasilicate glass-ceramic precursor material into the final product of the lithium disilicate glass-ceramic without the major phase of the precursor material. The combination of all these methods allowed the driving forces of the internal nucleation and crystallization mechanisms to be explained. An amorphous phosphate primary phase was discovered in the process. Nucleation started at the interface between the amorphous phosphate phase and the glass matrix. The final products of all these glass-ceramics are biomaterials for dental restoration showing special optical properties, e.g. translucence and color close to dental teeth.

  5. Effect of zircon-based tricolor pigments on the color, microstructure, flexural strength and translucency of a novel dental lithium disilicate glass-ceramic.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Kun; Wang, Fu; Gao, Jing; Sun, Xiang; Deng, Zai-Xi; Wang, Hui; Jin, Lei; Chen, Ji-Hua

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of zircon-based tricolor pigments (praseodymium zircon yellow, ferrum zircon red, and vanadium zircon blue) on the color, thermal property, crystalline phase composition, microstructure, flexural strength, and translucency of a novel dental lithium disilicate glass-ceramic. The pigments were added to the glass frit, milled, pressed, and sintered. Ninety monochrome samples were prepared and the colors were analyzed. The effect of the pigments on thermal property, crystalline phase composition, and microstructure were determined by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), respectively. Addition of the pigments resulted in the acquisition of subtractive primary colors as well as tooth-like colors, and did not demonstrate significant effects on the thermal property, crystalline phase composition, microstructure, and flexural strength of the experimental glass-ceramic. Although significant differences (p < 0.01) were observed between the translucencies of the uncolored and 1.0 wt % zircon-based pigment colored ceramics, the translucencies of the latter were sufficient to fabricate dental restorations. These results indicate that the zircon-based tricolor pigments can be used with dental lithium disilicate glass-ceramic to produce abundant and predictable tooth-like colors without significant adverse effects, if mixed in the right proportions.

  6. Recent developments in glass-ceramic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Beall, G.H.

    1993-12-31

    Glass-ceramic materials can be made by sintering and crystallization of fine glass powders or by internal nucleation and crystallization of formed glass articles. In both cases, the final properties are controlled by phase assemblage and microstructure. Transparent glass-ceramics based upon ultra-fine grained {beta}-quartz solid solution have been developed with near-zero thermal expansion coefficient for a variety of consumer and technical products: cookware, stove-tops, telescope mirrors, optical gyroscopes. Fluormica glass-ceramics with a {open_quotes}house-of-cards{close_quotes} microstructure are easily machined and have found wide application in vacuum systems, precision dielectric components, insulators, and medical and dental prostheses. Acicular chain silicate glass-ceramics are strong and tough, and have recently been developed as high performance tableware and magnetic memory disk substrates. Sintered glass-ceramics based on magnesium aluminosilicate frits are the basis of copper-cordierite packaging for advanced IC packaging.

  7. Pressurized heat treatment of glass ceramic

    DOEpatents

    Kramer, D.P.

    1984-04-19

    A method of producing a glass-ceramic having a specified thermal expansion value is disclosed. The method includes the step of pressurizing the parent glass material to a predetermined pressure during heat treatment so that the glass-ceramic produced has a specified thermal expansion value. Preferably, the glass-ceramic material is isostatically pressed. A method for forming a strong glass-ceramic to metal seal is also disclosed in which the glass-ceramic is fabricated to have a thermal expansion value equal to that of the metal. The determination of the thermal expansion value of a parent glass material placed in a high-temperature environment is also used to determine the pressure in the environment.

  8. Fabrication of glass-ceramics containing spin-chain compound SrCuO{sub 2} and its high thermal conductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Terakado, Nobuaki Watanabe, Kouki; Kawamata, Takayuki; Yokochi, Yuudai; Takahashi, Yoshihiro; Koike, Yoji; Fujiwara, Takumi

    2015-04-06

    High thermal conductivity materials are in great demand for heat-flow control and heat dissipation in electronic devices. In this study, we have produced a glass-ceramics that contains spin-chain compound SrCuO{sub 2} and have found that the glass-ceramics yields high thermal conductivity of ∼5 W K{sup −1} m{sup −1} even at room temperature. The glass-ceramics is fabricated through crystallization of inhomogeneous melt-quenched oxides made from SrCO{sub 3}, CuO, Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3}, Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Transmission electron microscopy and X-ray and electron diffraction reveal that SrCuO{sub 2} crystallites with a size of 100–200 nm are precipitated in the glass-ceramics. The highness of the thermal conductivity is attributable to two sources: one is elongation of phonon mean free path due to the crystallization of the inhomogeneous structure or structural ordering. The other is emergence of the heat carriers, spinons, in the SrCuO{sub 2}. This highly thermal conductive glass-ceramics is expected to be utilized as base materials for heat-flow control devices.

  9. Celsian Glass-Ceramic Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P.; Dicarlo, James A.

    1996-01-01

    Glass-ceramic matrix reinforced fiber composite materials developed for use in low dielectric applications, such as radomes. Materials strong and tough, exhibit low dielectric properties, and endure high temperatures.

  10. Low-thermal expansion infrared glass ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Philip

    2009-05-01

    L2 Tech, Inc. is in development of an innovative infrared-transparent glass ceramic material with low-thermal expansion (<0.5 ppm/°C) and high thermal-shock resistance to be used as windows and domes for high speed flight. The material is an inorganic, non-porous glass ceramic, characterized by crystalline phases of evenly distributed nano-crystals in a residual glass phase. The major crystalline phase is zirconium tungstate (ZrW2O8) which has Negative Thermal Expansion (NTE). The glass phase is the infrared-transparent germanate glass which has positive thermal expansion (PTE). Then glass ceramic material has a balanced thermal expansion of near zero. The crystal structure is cubic and the thermal expansion of the glass ceramic is isotropic or equal in all directions.

  11. YAG glass-ceramic phosphor for white LED (I): background and development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, Shunsuke; Yoshihara, Satoru; Sakamoto, Akihiko; Yamamoto, Shigeru; Tanabe, Setsuhisa

    2005-09-01

    We have developed a Ce:YAG (Y3Al5O12) glass-ceramic phosphor for the white LED. The glass-ceramic phosphor was obtained by a heat treatment of a Ce-doped SiO2-Al2O3-Y2O3 mother glass between 1200°C and 1500°C for the prescribed time of period. We confirmed that, by XRD measurements, only YAG crystal precipitated in the mother glass after the heat treatment. It was shown from SEM observation that the YAG crystals with a grain size of approximately 20μm were uniformly dispersed in the glass matrix. The yellow emission, around 540nm in wavelength, was observed from the glass-ceramic phosphor, when it was excited by a blue LED (465nm). The white light due to the mix of yellow and blue light was observed from the glass-ceramic plate with a thickness of 0.5mm. The YAG glass-ceramic phosphor showed a high-temperature resistance and a good performance in a damp heat test. Moreover, a higher thermal conductivity of 2.18 Wm-1K-1 and bending strength of 125MPa were observed compared with a conventional soda-lime glass or an epoxy resin. In addition, since the YAG glass-ceramic phosphor can be formed in a plate-like shape, there is no need to be sealed in resins for the fabrication of the LED devices. Therefore, it is expected that this newly developed glass-ceramic phosphor is a promising candidate for the realization of resin-free, high-temperature and high-humidity resistant, long-life white LED devices.

  12. Bioactive glasses and glass-ceramics.

    PubMed

    Rawlings, R D

    1993-01-01

    Bioactive materials are designed to induce a specific biological activity; in most cases the desired biological activity is one that will give strong bonding to bone. A range of materials has been assessed as being capable of bonding to bone, but this paper is solely concerned with bioactive glasses and glass-ceramics. Firstly, the structure and processing of glasses and glass-ceramics are described, as a basic knowledge is essential for the understanding of the development and properties of the bioactive materials. The effect of composition and structure on the bioactivity is then discussed, and it will be shown that bioactivity is associated with the formation of an apatite layer on the surface of the implant. A survey of mechanical performance demonstrates that the structure and mechanical properties of glass-ceramics depend upon whether the processing involves casting or sintering and that the strength and toughness of glass-ceramics are superior to those of glasses. Attempts to further improve the mechanical performance by the use of non-monolithic components, i.e. bioactive coatings on metal substrates and glass and glass-ceramic matrix composites, are also reviewed and are shown to have varying degrees of success. Finally, some miscellaneous applications, namely bioactive bone cements and bone fillers, are briefly covered.

  13. The effect of ZrO2 and TiO 2 on solubility and strength of apatite-mullite glass-ceramics for dental applications.

    PubMed

    Fathi, Hawa M; Miller, Cheryl; Stokes, Christopher; Johnson, Anthony

    2014-03-01

    The effect of ZrO2 and TiO2 on the chemical and mechanical properties of apatite-mullite glass-ceramics was investigated after sample preparation according to the ISO (2768:2008) recommendations for dental ceramics. All materials were characterized using differential thermal analysis, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy. X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy was used to determine the concentrations of elements present in all materials produced. The chemical solubility test and the biaxial flexural strength (BFS) test were then carried out on all the samples. The best solubility value of 242 ± 61 μg/cm(2) was obtained when HG1T was heat-treated for 1 h at the glass transition temperature plus 20 °C (Tg + 20 °C) followed by 5 h at 1200 °C. The highest BFS value of 174 ± 38 MPa was achieved when HG1Z and HG1Z+T were heat-treated for 1 h at the Tg + 20 °C followed by 7 h at 1200 °C. The present study has demonstrated that the addition of TiO2 to the reference composition showed promise in both the glass and heat-treated samples. However, ZrO2 is an effective agent for developing the solubility or the mechanical properties of an apatite-mullite glass-ceramic separately but does not improve the solubility and the BFS simultaneously.

  14. Analysis of Self-Adhesive Resin Cement Microshear Bond Strength on Leucite-Reinforced Glass-Ceramic with/without Pure Silane Primer or Universal Adhesive Surface Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yoon; Kim, Jae-Hoon; Woo, Jung-Soo; Yi, Young-Ah; Hwang, Ji-Yun; Seo, Deog-Gyu

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the microshear bond strength (μSBS) of self-adhesive resin (SA) cement on leucite-reinforced glass-ceramic using silane or universal adhesive. Materials and Methods. Ceramic blocks were etched with 9.5% hydrofluoric acid and divided into three groups (n = 16): (1) negative control (NC) without treatment; (2) Single Bond Universal (SBU); (3) RelyX Ceramic Primer as positive control (PC). RelyX Unicem resin cement was light-cured, and μSBS was evaluated with/without thermocycling. The μSBS was analyzed using one-way analysis of variance. The fractured surfaces were examined using stereomicroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results. Without thermocycling, μSBS was highest for PC (30.50 MPa ± 3.40), followed by SBU (27.33 MPa ± 2.81) and NC (20.18 MPa ± 2.01) (P < 0.05). Thermocycling significantly reduced μSBS in SBU (22.49 MPa ± 4.11) (P < 0.05), but not in NC (20.68 MPa ± 4.60) and PC (28.77 MPa ± 3.52) (P > 0.05). PC and NC predominantly fractured by cohesive failure within the ceramic and mixed failure, respectively. Conclusion. SBU treatment improves μSBS between SA cement and glass ceramics, but to a lower value than PC, and the improvement is eradicated by thermocycling. NC exhibited the lowest μSBS, which remained unchanged after thermocycling. PMID:26557660

  15. Predictive Surface Roughness Model for End Milling of Machinable Glass Ceramic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohan Reddy, M.; Gorin, Alexander; Abou-El-Hossein, K. A.

    2011-02-01

    Advanced ceramics of Machinable glass ceramic is attractive material to produce high accuracy miniaturized components for many applications in various industries such as aerospace, electronics, biomedical, automotive and environmental communications due to their wear resistance, high hardness, high compressive strength, good corrosion resistance and excellent high temperature properties. Many research works have been conducted in the last few years to investigate the performance of different machining operations when processing various advanced ceramics. Micro end-milling is one of the machining methods to meet the demand of micro parts. Selecting proper machining parameters are important to obtain good surface finish during machining of Machinable glass ceramic. Therefore, this paper describes the development of predictive model for the surface roughness of Machinable glass ceramic in terms of speed, feed rate by using micro end-milling operation.

  16. Radiopaque Strontium Fluoroapatite Glass-Ceramics

    PubMed Central

    Höland, Wolfram; Schweiger, Marcel; Dittmer, Marc; Ritzberger, Christian

    2015-01-01

    The controlled precipitation of strontium fluoroapatite crystals was studied in four base glass compositions derived from the SiO2–Al2O3–Y2O3–SrO–Na2O–K2O/Rb2O/Cs2O–P2O5–F system. The crystal phase formation of these glasses and the main properties of the glass-ceramics, such as thermal and optical properties and radiopacity were compared with a fifth, a reference glass-ceramic. The reference glass-ceramic was characterized as Ca-fluoroapatite glass-ceramic. The four strontium fluoroapatite glass-ceramics showed the following crystal phases: (a) Sr5(PO4)3F – leucite, KAlSi2O6, (b) Sr5(PO4)3F – leucite, KAlSi2O6, and nano-sized NaSrPO4, (c) Sr5(PO4)3F – pollucite, CsAlSi2O6, and nano-sized NaSrPO4, and (d) Sr5(PO4)3F – Rb-leucite, RbAlSi2O6, and nano-sized NaSrPO4. The proof of crystal phase formation was possible by X-ray diffraction. The microstructures, which were studied using scanning electron microscopy, demonstrated a uniform distribution of the crystals in the glass matrix. The Sr-fluoroapatites were precipitated based on an internal crystallization process, and the crystals demonstrated a needle-like morphology. The study of the crystal growth of needle-like Sr-fluoroapatites gave a clear evidence of an Ostwald ripening mechanism. The formation of leucite, pollucite, and Rb-leucite was based on a surface crystallization mechanism. Therefore, a twofold crystallization mechanism was successfully applied to develop these types of glass-ceramics. The main focus of this study was the controlled development of glass-ceramics exhibiting high radiopacity in comparison to the reference glass-ceramic. This goal could be achieved with all four glass-ceramics with the preferred development of the Sr-fluoroapatite – pollucite-type glass-ceramic. In addition to this main development, it was possible to control the thermal properties. Especially the Rb-leucite containing glass-ceramic showed the highest coefficient of thermal

  17. Glass ceramic ionic conductor materials and method of making

    SciTech Connect

    Badzioch, S.

    1985-03-26

    Solid, crystalline glass ceramic compositions which are useful as ionic conductor materials, especially for use as solid electrolytes in high temperature, high energy density storage batteries. The glass ceramics are derived from sodium or calcium borates containing one or more metal halide, preferably the chlorides and bromides of the metals from Group 2 to 8 of the Periodic Table of the Elements.

  18. Glass-ceramic composition for hermetic seals

    DOEpatents

    Ballard, Jr., Clifford P.

    1979-01-01

    The invention relates to a glass-ceramic composition having a high fracture strength adaptable for hermetically sealing to chromium bearing iron or nickel base alloys at temperatures of between about 950.degree. C to about 1100.degree. C to form a hermetically sealed insulator body, comprising from about 55 to about 65 weight percent SiO.sub.2, from about 0 to about 5 weight percent Al.sub.2 O.sub.3, from about 6 to about 11 weight % Li.sub.2 O, from about 25 to about 32 weight percent BaO, from about 0.5 to about 1.0 weight percent CoO and from about 1.5 to about 3.5 weight percent P.sub.2 O.sub.5.

  19. Processing FeB03 glass-ceramics in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, C. T.

    1976-01-01

    The possibility of preparing FeBO3 glass-ceramic in space is explored. A transparent glass-ceramic of FeBO3, due to its unique properties could be an excellent material for magneto-optic applications which currently utilize high price materials such as single crystals of Ga-YIG. The unique magneto-optic properties of FeBO3 were found to come from glass-ceramic but not from the glass form. It was anticipated and later confirmed that the FeBO3 glass-ceramics could not be prepared on earth. Phase separation and iron valence reduction, were identified as the two terrestrial manufacturing obstacles. Since the phase separation problem could be overcome by space processing, the preparation of FeBO3 glass-ceramic in space appears attractive.

  20. Zero-expansion glass ceramic ZERODUR: recent developments reveal high potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, Peter; Jedamzik, Ralf; Westerhoff, Thomas

    2012-09-01

    ZERODUR® is a well-established material in astronomy and all fields of applications where temperature gradients might limit extreme precision and stability. Together with its rich heritage come a series of recent developments, which reveal the potential of the material for broader and more demanding applications. The outstanding degree of light-weighting achieved with progress in CNC grinding in the last two years shows its high suitability for space telescope mirrors. This is supported by new data on strength enabling higher mechanical loads. Also ground based telescopes benefit from the improved light-weight processing such as solar telescopes and downstream mirrors of extremely large telescopes. More and better data have been collected demonstrating the unique CTE homogeneity of ZERODUR® and its very high reproducibility a necessary precondition for large series mirror production. Deliveries of more than 250 ZERODUR mirrors of 1.5 m in diameter prove the availability of robust industrial serial production capability inevitable for ELT mirror segment production.

  1. Machinability of lithium disilicate glass ceramic in in vitro dental diamond bur adjusting process.

    PubMed

    Song, Xiao-Fei; Ren, Hai-Tao; Yin, Ling

    2016-01-01

    Esthetic high-strength lithium disilicate glass ceramics (LDGC) are used for monolithic crowns and bridges produced in dental CAD/CAM and oral adjusting processes, which machinability affects the restorative quality. A machinability study has been made in the simulated oral clinical machining of LDGC with a dental handpiece and diamond burs, regarding the diamond tool wear and chip control, machining forces and energy, surface finish and integrity. Machining forces, speeds and energy in in vitro dental adjusting of LDGC were measured by a high-speed data acquisition and force sensor system. Machined LDGC surfaces were assessed using three-dimensional non-contact chromatic confocal optical profilometry and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Diamond bur morphology and LDGC chip shapes were also examined using SEM. Minimum tool wear but significant LDGC chip accumulations were found. Machining forces and energy significantly depended on machining conditions (p<0.05) and were significantly higher than other glass ceramics (p<0.05). Machining speeds dropped more rapidly with increased removal rates than other glass ceramics (p<0.05). Two material machinability indices associated with the hardness, Young's modulus and fracture toughness were derived based on the normal force-removal rate relations, which ranked LDGC the most difficult to machine among glass ceramics. Surface roughness for machined LDGC was comparable for other glass ceramics. The removal mechanisms of LDGC were dominated by penetration-induced brittle fracture and shear-induced plastic deformation. Unlike most other glass ceramics, distinct intergranular and transgranular fractures of lithium disilicate crystals were found in LDGC. This research provides the fundamental data for dental clinicians on the machinability of LDGC in intraoral adjustments.

  2. Glass formation and crystallization in high-temperature glass-ceramics and Si3N4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drummond, Charles H., III

    1991-01-01

    The softening of glassy grain boundaries in ceramic matrix composites and Si3N4 at high temperatures reduces mechanical strength and the upper-use temperature. By crystallizing this glass to a more refractory crystalline phase, a material which performs at higher temperatures may result. Three systems were examined: a cordierite composition with ZrO2 as a nucleating agent; celsian compositions; and yttrium silicate glasses both in bulk and intergranular in Si3N4. For the cordierite compositions, a series of metastable phases was obtained. The crystallization of these compositions was summarized in terms of metastable ternary isothermal sections. Zircon formed at the expense of ZrO2 and spinel. In SiC composites, the transformations were slower. In celsian, two polymorphs were crystallized. One phase, hexacelsian, which always crystallized, even when metastable, had an undesirable volume change. The other phase, celsian, was very difficult to crystallize. In yttrium silicate bulk glasses, similar in composition to the intergranular glass in Si3N4, a number of polymorphs of Y2Si2O7 were crystallized. The conditions under which these polymorphs formed are compared with crystallization in Si3N4.

  3. Suppression effects of dental glass-ceramics with polarization-induced highly dense surface charges against bacterial adhesion.

    PubMed

    Nozaki, Kosuke; Koizumi, Hiroki; Horiuchi, Naohiro; Nakamura, Miho; Okura, Toshinori; Yamashita, Kimihiro; Nagai, Akiko

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the surface characteristics and antibacterial ability capacity of surface-improved dental glass-ceramics by an electrical polarization process. Commercially available dental glass-ceramic materials were electrically polarized to induce surface charges in a direct current field by heating. The surface morphology, chemical composition, crystal structure, and surface free energy (SFE) were evaluated using scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry, X-ray diffraction, and water droplet methods, respectively. The antibacterial capacity was assessed by a bacterial adhesion test using Streptococcus mutans. Although the surface morphology, chemical composition, and crystal structure were not affected by electrical polarization, the polar component and total SFE were enhanced. After 24 h incubation at 37ºC, bacterial adhesion to the polarized samples was inhibited. The electrical polarization method may confer antibacterial properties on prosthetic devices, such as porcelain fused to metal crowns or all ceramic restorations, without any additional bactericidal agents.

  4. Leaching behavior of glass ceramic nuclear waste forms

    SciTech Connect

    Lokken, R.O.

    1981-11-01

    Glass ceramic waste forms have been investigated as alternatives to borosilicate glasses for the immobilization of high-level radioactive waste at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). Three glass ceramic systems were investigated, including basalt, celsian, and fresnoite, each containing 20 wt % simulated high-level waste calcine. Static leach tests were performed on seven glass ceramic materials and one parent glass (before recrystallization). Samples were leached at 90/sup 0/C for 3 to 28 days in deionized water and silicate water. The results, expressed in normalized elemental mass loss, (g/m/sup 2/), show comparable releases from celsian and fresnoite glass ceramics. Basalt glass ceramics demonstrated the lowest normalized elemental losses with a nominal release less than 2 g/m/sup 2/ when leached in polypropylene containers. The releases from basalt glass ceramics when leached in silicate water were nearly identical with those in deionized water. The overall leachability of celsian and fresnoite glass ceramics was improved when silicate water was used as the leachant.

  5. The effect of silane applied to glass ceramics on surface structure and bonding strength at different temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Eraslan, Oguz

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE To evaluate the effect of various surface treatments on the surface structure and shear bond strength (SBS) of different ceramics. MATERIALS AND METHODS 288 specimens (lithium-disilicate, leucite-reinforced, and glass infiltrated zirconia) were first divided into two groups according to the resin cement used, and were later divided into four groups according to the given surface treatments: G1 (hydrofluoric acid (HF)+silane), G2 (silane alone-no heat-treatment), G3 (silane alone-then dried with 60℃ heat-treatment), and G4 (silane alone-then dried with 100℃ heat-treatment). Two different adhesive luting systems were applied onto the ceramic discs in all groups. SBS (in MPa) was calculated from the failure load per bonded area (in N/mm2). Subsequently, one specimen from each group was prepared for SEM evaluation of the separated-resin–ceramic interface. RESULTS SBS values of G1 were significantly higher than those of the other groups in the lithium disilicate ceramic and leucite reinforced ceramic, and the SBS values of G4 and G1 were significantly higher than those of G2 and G3 in glass infiltrated zirconia. The three-way ANOVA revealed that the SBS values were significantly affected by the type of resin cement (P<.001). FIN ceramics had the highest rate of cohesive failure on the ceramic surfaces than other ceramic groups. AFM images showed that the surface treatment groups exhibited similar topographies, except the group treated with HF. CONCLUSION The heat treatment was not sufficient to achieve high SBS values as compared with HF acid etching. The surface topography of ceramics was affected by surface treatments. PMID:27141250

  6. Effects of surface treatments, thermocycling, and cyclic loading on the bond strength of a resin cement bonded to a lithium disilicate glass ceramic.

    PubMed

    Guarda, G B; Correr, A B; Gonçalves, L S; Costa, A R; Borges, G A; Sinhoreti, M A C; Correr-Sobrinho, L

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Objectives : The aim of this present study was to investigate the effect of two surface treatments, fatigue and thermocycling, on the microtensile bond strength of a newly introduced lithium disilicate glass ceramic (IPS e.max Press, Ivoclar Vivadent) and a dual-cured resin cement. Methods : A total of 18 ceramic blocks (10 mm long × 7 mm wide × 3.0 mm thick) were fabricated and divided into six groups (n=3): groups 1, 2, and 3-air particle abraded for five seconds with 50-μm aluminum oxide particles; groups 4, 5, and 6-acid etched with 10% hydrofluoric acid for 20 seconds. A silane coupling agent was applied onto all specimens and allowed to dry for five seconds, and the ceramic blocks were bonded to a block of composite Tetric N-Ceram (Ivoclar Vivadent) with RelyX ARC (3M ESPE) resin cement and placed under a 500-g static load for two minutes. The cement excess was removed with a disposable microbrush, and four periods of light activation for 40 seconds each were performed at right angles using an LED curing unit (UltraLume LED 5, Ultradent) with a final 40 second light exposure from the top surface. All of the specimens were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 24 hours. Groups 2 and 5 were submitted to 3,000 thermal cycles between 5°C and 55°C, and groups 3 and 6 were submitted to a fatigue test of 100,000 cycles at 2 Hz. Specimens were sectioned perpendicular to the bonding area to obtain beams with a cross-sectional area of 1 mm(2) (30 beams per group) and submitted to a microtensile bond strength test in a testing machine (EZ Test) at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Data were submitted to analysis of variance and Tukey post hoc test (p≤0.05). Results : The microtensile bond strength values (MPa) were 26.9 ± 6.9, 22.2 ± 7.8, and 21.2 ± 9.1 for groups 1-3 and 35.0 ± 9.6, 24.3 ± 8.9, and 23.9 ± 6.3 for groups 4-6. For the control group, fatigue testing and thermocycling produced a predominance of adhesive failures. Fatigue and

  7. Ion Exchange in Glass-Ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beall, George; Comte, Monique; Deneka, Matthew; Marques, Paulo; Pradeau, Philippe; Smith, Charlene

    2016-08-01

    In the past few years ion-exchange in glasses has found a renewed interest with a lot of new development and research in industrial and academic labs and the commercialization of materials with outstanding mechanical properties. These glasses are now widely used in many electronic devices including hand-held displays and tablets. The exchange is generally conducted in a bath of molten salt below the transition temperature of the glass. The exchange at the surface of an alkali ion by a bigger one brings compressive stress at the surface. The mechanical properties are dependent on the stress level at the surface and the depth of penetration of the bigger ion. As compared to glasses, glass-ceramics have the interest to display a wide range of aspects (transparent to opaque) and different mechanical properties (especially higher modulus and toughness). There has been little research on ion-exchange in glass-ceramics. In these materials the mechanisms are much more complex than in glasses because of their polyphasic nature: ion-exchange generally takes place mostly in one phase (crystalline phase or residual glass). The mechanism can be similar to what is observed in glasses with the replacement of an ion by another in the structure. But in some cases this ion-exchange leads to microstructural modifications (for example amorphisation or phase change). This article reviews these ion-exchange mechanisms using several transparent and opaque alumino-silicate glass-ceramics as examples. The effect of the ion exchange in the various glass-ceramics will be described, with particular emphasis on flexural strength.

  8. Sintering behavior of lanthanide-containing glass-ceramic sealants for solid oxide fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Goel, Ashutosh; Reddy, Allu Amarnath; Pascual, Maria J.; Gremillard, Laurent; Malchere, Annie; Ferreira, Jose M.

    2012-05-01

    This article reports on the influence of different lanthanides (La, Nd, Gd and Yb) on sintering behavior of alkaline-earth aluminosilicate glass-ceramics sealants for their application in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC). All the glasses have been prepared by melt-quench technique. The in situ follow up of sintering behavior of glass powders has been done by high temperature - environmental scanning electron microscope (HT-ESEM) and hot-stage microscope (HSM) while the crystalline phase evolution and assemblage has been analyzed by x-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). All the glass compositions exhibit a glass-in-glass phase separation followed by two stage sintering resulting in well sintered glass powder compacts after heat treatment at 850 C for 1 h. Diopside (CaMgSi{sub 2}O{sub 6}) based phases constituted the major crystalline part in glass-ceramics followed by some minor phases. The increase in lanthanide content in glasses suppressed their tendency towards devitrification, thus, resulting in glass-ceramics with high amount of residual glassy phase (50-96 wt.%) which is expected to facilitate their self-healing behavior during SOFC operation. The electrical conductivity of the investigated glass-ceramics varied between (1.19 and 7.33) x 10{sup -7} S cm{sup -1} (750-800 C), and depended on the ionic field strength of lanthanide cations. Further experimentation with respect to the long term thermal and chemical stability of residual glassy phase under SOFC operation conditions along with high temperature viscosity measurements will be required in order to elucidate the potential of these glass-ceramics as self-healing sealants.

  9. Nanostructured glass-ceramic coatings for orthopaedic applications.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guocheng; Lu, Zufu; Liu, Xuanyong; Zhou, Xiaming; Ding, Chuanxian; Zreiqat, Hala

    2011-08-07

    Glass-ceramics have attracted much attention in the biomedical field, as they provide great possibilities to manipulate their properties by post-treatments, including strength, degradation rate and coefficient of thermal expansion. In this work, hardystonite (HT; Ca2ZnSi2O7) and sphene (SP; CaTiSiO5) glass-ceramic coatings with nanostructures were prepared by a plasma spray technique using conventional powders. The bonding strength and Vickers hardness for HT and SP coatings are higher than the reported values for plasma-sprayed hydroxyapatite coatings. Both types of coatings release bioactive calcium (Ca) and silicon (Si) ions into the surrounding environment. Mineralization test in cell-free culture medium showed that many mushroom-like Ca and phosphorus compounds formed on the HT coatings after 5 h, suggesting its high acellular mineralization ability. Primary human osteoblasts attach, spread and proliferate well on both types of coatings. Higher proliferation rate was observed on the HT coatings compared with the SP coatings and uncoated Ti-6Al-4V alloy, probably due to the zinc ions released from the HT coatings. Higher expression levels of Runx2, osteopontin and type I collagen were observed on both types of coatings compared with Ti-6Al-4V alloy, possibly due to the Ca and Si released from the coatings. Results of this study point to the potential use of HT and SP coatings for orthopaedic applications.

  10. Method of processing "BPS" glass ceramic and seals made therewith

    DOEpatents

    Reed, Scott T.; Stone, Ronald G.; McCollister, Howard L.; Wengert, deceased, Paul R.

    1998-01-01

    A glass ceramic composition, a glass ceramic-to-metal seal, and more specifically a hermetic glass ceramic-to-metal seal prepared by subjecting a glass composition comprising, by weight percent, SiO.sub.2 (65-80%), LiO.sub.2 (8-16%), Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 (2-8%), K.sub.2 O (1-8%), P.sub.2 O.sub.5 (1-5%), B.sub.2 O.sub.3 (0.5-7%), and ZnO (0-5%) to the following processing steps: 1) heating the glass composition in a belt furnace to a temperature sufficient to melt the glass and crystallize lithium phosphate, 2) holding at a temperature and for a time sufficient to create cristobalite nuclei, 3) cooling at a controlled rate and to a temperature to cause crystallization of lithium silicates and growth of cristobalite, and 4) still further cooling in stages to ambient temperature. This process produces a glass ceramic whose high coefficient of thermal expansion (up to 200.times.10.sup.-7 in/in/.degree.C.) permits the fabrication of glass ceramic-to-metal seals, and particularly hermetic glass ceramic seals to nickel-based and stainless steel alloys and copper.

  11. Method of processing ``BPS`` glass ceramic and seals made therewith

    DOEpatents

    Reed, S.T.; Stone, R.G.; McCollister, H.L.; Wengert, P.R.

    1998-10-13

    A glass ceramic composition, a glass ceramic-to-metal seal, and more specifically a hermetic glass ceramic-to-metal seal prepared by subjecting a glass composition comprising, by weight percent, SiO{sub 2} (65--80%), LiO{sub 2} (8--16%), Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (2--8%), K{sub 2}O (1--8%), P{sub 2}O{sub 5} (1--5%), B{sub 2}O{sub 3} (0.5--7%), and ZnO (0--5%) to the following processing steps: (1) heating the glass composition in a belt furnace to a temperature sufficient to melt the glass and crystallize lithium phosphate, (2) holding at a temperature and for a time sufficient to create cristobalite nuclei, (3) cooling at a controlled rate and to a temperature to cause crystallization of lithium silicates and growth of cristobalite, and (4) still further cooling in stages to ambient temperature. This process produces a glass ceramic whose high coefficient of thermal expansion (up to 200{times}10{sup {minus}7} in/in/C) permits the fabrication of glass ceramic-to-metal seals, and particularly hermetic glass ceramic seals to nickel-based and stainless steel alloys and copper. 5 figs.

  12. Low temperature sintering of fluorapatite glass-ceramics.

    PubMed

    Denry, Isabelle; Holloway, Julie A

    2014-02-01

    Fluorapatite glass-ceramics have been shown to be excellent candidates as scaffold materials for bone grafts, however, scaffold production by sintering is hindered by concurrent crystallization of the glass. Objective, our goal was to investigate the effect of Ca/Al ratio on the sintering behavior of Nb-doped fluorapatite-based glasses in the SiO2-Al2O3-P2O5-MgO-Na2O-K2O-CaO-CaF2 system. Methods, glass compositions with Ca/Al ratio of 1 (A), 2 (B), 4 (C) and 19 (D) were prepared by twice melting at 1525°C for 3h. Glasses were either cast as cylindrical ingots or ground into powders. Disk-shaped specimens were prepared by either sectioning from the ingots or powder-compacting in a mold, followed by heat treatment at temperatures ranging between 700 and 1050°C for 1h. The density was measured on both sintered specimens and heat treated discs as controls. The degree of sintering was determined from these measurements. Results and Significance XRD showed that fluorapatite crystallized in all glass-ceramics. A high degree of sintering was achieved at 775°C for glass-ceramic D (98.99±0.04%), and 900°C for glass-ceramic C (91.31±0.10). Glass-ceramics A or B were only partially sintered at 1000°C (63.6±0.8% and 74.1±1.5%, respectively). SEM revealed a unique microstructure of micron-sized spherulitic fluorapatite crystals in glass-ceramics C and D. Increasing the Ca/Al ratio promoted low temperature sintering of fluorapatite glass-ceramics, which are traditionally difficult to sinter.

  13. Low temperature sintering of fluorapatite glass-ceramics

    PubMed Central

    Denry, Isabelle; Holloway, Julie A.

    2014-01-01

    Fluorapatite glass-ceramics have been shown to be excellent candidates as scaffold materials for bone grafts, however, scaffold production by sintering is hindered by concurrent crystallization of the glass. Our goal was to investigate the effect of Ca/Al ratio on the sintering behavior of Nb-doped fluorapatite-based glasses in the SiO2-Al2O3-P2O5-MgO-Na2O-K2O-CaO-CaF2 system. Glass compositions with Ca/Al ratio of 1 (A), 2 (B), 4 (C) and 19 (D) were prepared by twice melting at 1525°C for 3h. Glasses were either cast as cylindrical ingots or ground into powders. Disc-shaped specimens were prepared by either sectioning from the ingots or powder-compacting in a mold, followed by heat treatment at temperatures ranging between 700 and 1050°C for 1h. The density was measured on both sintered specimens and heat treated discs as controls. The degree of sintering was determined from these measurements. XRD showed that fluorapatite crystallized in all glass-ceramics. A high degree of sintering was achieved at 775°C for glass-ceramic D (98.99±0.04%), and 900°C for glass-ceramic C (91.31±0.10). Glass-ceramics A or B were only partially sintered at 1000°C (63.6±0.8% and 74.1±1.5%, respectively). SEM revealed a unique microstructure of micron-sized spherulitic fluorapatite crystals in glass-ceramics C and D. Increasing the Ca/Al ratio promoted low temperature sintering of fluorapatite glass-ceramics, which are traditionally difficult to sinter. PMID:24252652

  14. High thermal behavior of a new glass ceramic developed from silica xerogel/SnO{sub 2} composite

    SciTech Connect

    Aripin, H.; Mitsudo, Seitaro; Sudiana, I. Nyoman; Priatna, Edvin; Sabchevski, Svilen

    2016-02-08

    In this investigation, a new glass ceramics have been produced by mixing SnO{sub 2} and amorphous silica xerogel (ASX) extracted from sago waste ash. The composition has been prepared by adding 10 mol% of SnO{sub 2} into SX. The samples have been dry pressed and sintered in the temperature range between 800 °C and 1500 °C. The effects of temperature on the crystallization of silica xerogel after adding SnO{sub 2} and their relationship to bulk density have been studied. The crystallization process of the silica xerogel/SnO{sub 2} composite has been examined by an X-ray diffraction (XRD) and the bulk density has been characterized on the basis of the experimental data obtained using Archimedes′ principle. It has been found that an addition of SnO{sub 2} confers an appreciable effect on the grain and from the interpretation of XRD patterns allow one to explain the increase in the density by an increased crystallite size of SnO{sub 2} in the composite.

  15. High thermal behavior of a new glass ceramic developed from silica xerogel/SnO2 composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aripin, H.; Mitsudo, Seitaro; Sudiana, I. Nyoman; Priatna, Edvin; Sabchevski, Svilen

    2016-02-01

    In this investigation, a new glass ceramics have been produced by mixing SnO2 and amorphous silica xerogel (ASX) extracted from sago waste ash. The composition has been prepared by adding 10 mol% of SnO2 into SX. The samples have been dry pressed and sintered in the temperature range between 800 °C and 1500 °C. The effects of temperature on the crystallization of silica xerogel after adding SnO2 and their relationship to bulk density have been studied. The crystallization process of the silica xerogel/SnO2 composite has been examined by an X-ray diffraction (XRD) and the bulk density has been characterized on the basis of the experimental data obtained using Archimedes' principle. It has been found that an addition of SnO2 confers an appreciable effect on the grain and from the interpretation of XRD patterns allow one to explain the increase in the density by an increased crystallite size of SnO2 in the composite.

  16. Cementation of Glass-Ceramic Posterior Restorations: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    van den Breemer, Carline R. G.; Gresnigt, Marco M. M.; Cune, Marco S.

    2015-01-01

    Aim. The aim of this comprehensive review is to systematically organize the current knowledge regarding the cementation of glass-ceramic materials and restorations, with an additional focus on the benefits of Immediate Dentin Sealing (IDS). Materials and Methods. An extensive literature search concerning the cementation of single-unit glass-ceramic posterior restorations was conducted in the databases of MEDLINE (Pubmed), CENTRAL (Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials), and EMBASE. To be considered for inclusion, in vitro and in vivo studies should compare different cementation regimes involving a “glass-ceramic/cement/human tooth” complex. Results and Conclusions. 88 studies were included in total. The in vitro data were organized according to the following topics: (micro)shear and (micro)tensile bond strength, fracture strength, and marginal gap and integrity. For in vivo studies survival and quality of survival were considered. In vitro studies showed that adhesive systems (3-step, etch-and-rinse) result in the best (micro)shear bond strength values compared to self-adhesive and self-etch systems when luting glass-ceramic substrates to human dentin. The highest fracture strength is obtained with adhesive cements in particular. No marked clinical preference for one specific procedure could be demonstrated on the basis of the reviewed literature. The possible merits of IDS are most convincingly illustrated by the favorable microtensile bond strengths. No clinical studies regarding IDS were found. PMID:26557651

  17. Properties of sintered glass-ceramics prepared from plasma vitrified air pollution control residues.

    PubMed

    Roether, J A; Daniel, D J; Rani, D Amutha; Deegan, D E; Cheeseman, C R; Boccaccini, A R

    2010-01-15

    Air pollution control (APC) residues, obtained from a major UK energy from waste (EfW) plant, processing municipal solid waste, have been blended with silica and alumina and melted using DC plasma arc technology. The glass produced was crushed, milled, uni-axially pressed and sintered at temperatures between 750 and 1150 degrees C, and the glass-ceramics formed were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Mechanical properties assessed included Vickers's hardness, flexural strength, Young's modulus and thermal shock resistance. The optimum sintering temperature was found to be 950 degrees C. This produced a glass-ceramic with high density (approximately 2.58 g/cm(3)), minimum water absorption (approximately 2%) and relatively high mechanical strength (approximately 81+/-4 MPa). Thermal shock testing showed that 950 degrees C sintered samples could withstand a 700 degrees C quench in water without micro-cracking. The research demonstrates that glass-ceramics can be readily formed from DC plasma treated APC residues and that these have comparable properties to marble and porcelain. This novel approach represents a technically and commercially viable treatment option for APC residues that allow the beneficial reuse of this problematic waste.

  18. Microstructure, mechanical, and in vitro properties of mica glass-ceramics with varying fluorine content.

    PubMed

    Molla, Atiar Rahaman; Basu, Bikramjit

    2009-04-01

    The design and development of glass ceramic materials provide us the unique opportunity to study the microstructure development with changes in either base glass composition or heat treatment conditions as well as to understand processing-microstructure-property (mechanical/biological) relationship. In the present work, it is demonstrated how various crystal morphology can develop when F(-) content in base glass (K(2)O-B(2)O(3)-Al(2)O(3)-SiO(2)-MgO-F) is varied in the range of 1.08-3.85% and when all are heat treated at varying temperatures of 1000-1120 degrees C. For some selected heat treatment temperature, the heat treatment time is also varied over 4-24 h. It was established that with increase in fluoride content in the glass composition, the crystal volume fraction of the glass-ceramic decreases. Using 1.08% fluoride, more than 80% crystal volume fraction could be achieved in the K(2)O-B(2)O(3)-Al(2)O(3)-SiO(2)-MgO-F system. It was observed that with lower fluoride content glass-ceramic, if heated at 1040 degrees C for 12 h, an oriented microstructure with 'envelop like' crystals can develop. For glass ceramics with higher fluorine content (2.83% or 3.85%), hexagonal-shaped crystals are formed. Importantly, high hardness of around 8 GPa has been measured in glass ceramics with maximum amount of crystals. The three-point flexural strength and elastic modulus of the glass-ceramic (heat treated at 1040 degrees C for 24 h) was 80 MPa and 69 GPa of the sample containing 3.85% fluorine, whereas, similar properties obtained for the sample containing 1.08% F(-) was 94 MPa and 57 GPa, respectively. Further, in vitro dissolution study of the all three glass-ceramic composition in artificial saliva (AS) revealed that leached fluoride ion concentration was 0.44 ppm, when the samples were immersed in AS for 8 weeks. This was much lower than the WHO recommended safety limits of 1.5 ppm. Among all the investigated glass-ceramic samples, the glass ceramic with 3.85% F

  19. Sintered glass ceramic composites from vitrified municipal solid waste bottom ashes.

    PubMed

    Aloisi, Mirko; Karamanov, Alexander; Taglieri, Giuliana; Ferrante, Fabiola; Pelino, Mario

    2006-09-01

    A glass ceramic composite was obtained by sinter-crystallisation of vitrified municipal solid waste bottom ashes with the addition of various percentages of alumina waste. The sintering was investigated by differential dilatometry and the crystallisation of the glass particles by differential thermal analysis. The crystalline phases produced by the thermal treatment were identified by X-ray diffraction analysis. The sintering process was found to be affected by the alumina addition and inhibited by the beginning of the crystal-phase precipitation. Scanning electron microscopy was performed on the fractured sintered samples to observe the effect of the sintering. Young's modulus and the mechanical strength of the sintered glass ceramic and composites were determined at different heating rates. The application of high heating rate and the addition of alumina powder improved the mechanical properties. Compared to the sintered glass ceramic without additives, the bending strength and the Young's modulus obtained at 20 degrees C/min, increased by about 20% and 30%, respectively.

  20. Initial Examination of Low Velocity Sphere Impact of Glass Ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Morrissey, Timothy G; Fox, Ethan E; Wereszczak, Andrew A; Ferber, Mattison K

    2012-06-01

    ) Spheres with a lower elastic modulus require less force to initiate fracture in Resistan{trademark}-G1 from quasi-static spherical indentation. This indicates that friction is affecting ring crack initiation in Resistan{trademark}-G1. Friction also affected ring crack initiation in Starphire{reg_sign} soda-lime silicate and BOROFLOAT{reg_sign} borosilicate glasses. Among these three materials, friction was the most pronounced (largest slope in the RCIF-elastic modulus graph) in the Starphire{reg_sign} and least pronounced in the BOROFLOAT{reg_sign}. The reason for this is not understood, but differences in deformation behavior under high contact stresses could be a cause or contributor to this. (4) The force necessary to initiate contact-induced fracture is higher under dynamic conditions than it is under quasi-static conditions in Resistan{trademark}-L and Resistan{trademark}-G1 glass ceramics. This is a trend observed too in Starphire{reg_sign} and BOROFLOAT{reg_sign}. (5) There is a subtle indication there was intra-tile differences in spherical indentation-induced ring crack initiation forces. This is not a material property nor is it exclusive to glass-ceramic Resistan{trademark}-G1 glass ceramic, rather, it is a statistical mechanical response to an accumulated history of processing and handling of that specific tile.

  1. Pressurized heat treatment of glass-ceramic to control thermal expansion

    DOEpatents

    Kramer, Daniel P.

    1985-01-01

    A method of producing a glass-ceramic having a specified thermal expansion value is disclosed. The method includes the step of pressurizing the parent glass material to a predetermined pressure during heat treatment so that the glass-ceramic produced has a specified thermal expansion value. Preferably, the glass-ceramic material is isostatically pressed. A method for forming a strong glass-ceramic to metal seal is also disclosed in which the glass-ceramic is fabricated to have a thermal expansion value equal to that of the metal. The determination of the thermal expansion value of a parent glass material placed in a high-temperature environment is also used to determine the pressure in the environment.

  2. Phase composition and elemental partitioning in glass-ceramics containing high-Na/Al high level waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefanovsky, S. V.; Sorokaletova, A. N.; Nikonov, B. S.

    2012-05-01

    Mixtures of surrogates of high level waste with high sodium and aluminum contents and sodium-lithium borosilicate frit were melted in alumina crucibles in a resistive furnace followed by quenching of one portion of the melt and annealing of the residual material in a turned-off furnace. The annealed materials with waste loading of up to 45 wt.% contained minor spinel type phase and trace of nepheline (Na,K)AlSiO4. In the annealed materials contained waste oxides in amount of 50 wt.% and more nepheline and spinel were found to be major and minor phases, respectively. At high waste loadings two extra phases: Cs-aluminosilicate (CsAlSiO4) and mixed Na/Cs-aluminosilicate were found in amount of 3-5 vol.% each. The latter phase contains of up to ˜5.7 wt.% SO3 or 0.13 formula units S (Na0.75K0.05Cs0.29Ca0.02Sr0.02Al0.99Fe0.03Si0.76S0.13O4). Sulfur incorporation as S6+ or SO42- ions into crystal lattice may be facilitated in the presence of large-size Cs+ cations. Simplified suggested formula of this phase may be represented as Na0.8Cs0.3AlSi0.8S0.1O3.95. It was also synthesized by sintering of mixture of chemicals at 1300 °C and found to be instable at temperatures higher than 1300 °C.

  3. Glass ceramic seals to inconel

    DOEpatents

    McCollister, Howard L.; Reed, Scott T.

    1983-11-08

    A glass ceramic composition prepared by subjecting a glass composition comprising, by weight, 65-80% SiO.sub.2, 8-16%, Li.sub.2 O, 2-8% , Al.sub.2 O.sub.3, 1-8% K.sub.2 O, 1-5% P.sub.2 O.sub.5 and 1.5-7% B.sub.2 O.sub.3, to the following processing steps of heating the glass composition to a temperature sufficient to crystallize lithium metasilicate therein, holding the glass composition at a temperature and for a time period sufficient to dissolve the lithium metasilicate therein thereby creating cristobalite nucleii, cooling the glass composition and maintaining the composition at a temperature and for a time period sufficient to recrystallize lithium metasilicate therein, and thermally treating the glass composition at a temperature and for a time period sufficient to cause growth of cristobalite and further crystallization of lithium metasilicate producing a glass ceramic composition having a specific thermal expansion coefficient and products containing said composition.

  4. Structure-Property-Environmental Relations in Glass and Glass-Ceramics.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-03-01

    procedure of ceraming to produce a glass-ceramic usually improves the mechanical strength of the final product, but its effects on chemical durability are...including the medical, 16 dental , 17 chemical , 18 7 communications, aerospace, and nuclear 19 fields. Since many of the properties of glass are determined...glass-ceramic may be quite different from that of the glass. _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _.. .. .. 37 The objective of this study is to establish the effects of

  5. Letter report on PCT/Monolith glass ceramic corrosion tests

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, Charles L.

    2015-09-24

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is collaborating with personnel from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to study advanced waste form glass ceramics for immobilization of waste from Used Nuclear Fuel (UNF) separations processes. The glass ceramic waste forms take advantage of both crystalline and glassy phases where ‘troublesome’ elements (e.g., low solubility in glass or very long-lived) partition to highly durable ceramic phases with the remainder of elements residing in the glassy phase. The ceramic phases are tailored to create certain minerals or unique crystalline structures that can host the radionuclides by binding them in their specific crystalline network while not adversely impacting the residual glass network (Crum et al., 2011). Glass ceramics have been demonstrated using a scaled melter test performed in a pilot scale (1/4 scale) cold crucible induction melter (CCIM) (Crum et al., 2014; Maio et al., 2015). This report summarizes recent results from both Phase I and Phase II bench scale tests involving crucible fabrication and corrosion testing of glass ceramics using the Product Consistency Test (PCT). Preliminary results from both Phase I and Phase II bench scale tests involving statistically designed matrices have previously been reported (Crawford, 2013; Crawford, 2014).

  6. Glass-ceramic frits from fly ash in terracotta production.

    PubMed

    Karamanova, Emilia; Karamanov, Alexander

    2009-02-01

    Preliminary results of an investigation into the possible use of glass-ceramic frits from fly ash and glass cullet in terracotta (stoneware) tile manufacture are reported. Two new ceramics were studied and compared with a plant composition, containing 45 wt.% sodium feldspar. In the first ceramic batch 20% of the feldspar was substituted by frits and in the second the whole amount of feldspar was eliminated and replaced by 35% frits and 10% refractory waste. It was found that the addition of low viscous glass-ceramic frits decreased the sintering temperature by 50-100 degrees C. At the same time, due to formation of an additional crystal phase (i.e. pyroxene or anorthite) the new ceramics showed an improvement of 25-50% in bending strength.

  7. Mechanical performance of a biocompatible biocide soda-lime glass-ceramic.

    PubMed

    López-Esteban, S; Bartolomé, J F; Dí Az, L A; Esteban-Tejeda, L; Prado, C; López-Piriz, R; Torrecillas, R; Moya, J S

    2014-06-01

    A biocompatible soda-lime glass-ceramic in the SiO2-Na2O-Al2O3-CaO-B2O3 system containing combeite and nepheline as crystalline phases, has been obtained at 750°C by two different routes: (i) pressureless sintering and (ii) Spark Plasma Sintering. The SPS glass-ceramic showed a bending strength, Weibull modulus, and toughness similar values to the cortical human bone. This material had a fatigue limit slightly superior to cortical bone and at least two times higher than commercial dental glass-ceramics and dentine. The in vitro studies indicate that soda-lime glass-ceramic is fully biocompatible. The in vivo studies in beagle jaws showed that implanted SPS rods presented no inflammatory changes in soft tissues surrounding implants in any of the 10 different cases after four months implantation. The radiological analysis indicates no signs of osseointegration lack around implants. Moreover, the biocide activity of SPS glass-ceramic versus Escherichia coli, was found to be >4log indicating that it prevents implant infections. Because of this, the SPS new glass-ceramic is particularly promising for dental applications (inlay, crowns, etc).

  8. Dynamic fatigue of a machinable glass-ceramic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smyth, K. K.; Magida, M. B.

    1982-01-01

    To assess the stress corrosion susceptibility of a machinable glass-ceramic, its dynamic fatigue behavior was investigated by measuring its strength as a function of stress rate. Fracture mechanics techniques were used to analyse the results for the purpose of making lifetime predictions for components of this material. This material was concluded to have only moderate resistance to stress in ambient conditions. The effects of specimen size on strength were assessed for the material used in this study: it was concluded that the Weibull edge-flaw scaling law adequately describes the observed strength-size relationship.

  9. Glass/Ceramic Composites for Sealing Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P.; Choi, Sung R.

    2007-01-01

    A family of glass/ceramic composite materials has been investigated for use as sealants in planar solid oxide fuel cells. These materials are modified versions of a barium calcium aluminosilicate glass developed previously for the same purpose. The composition of the glass in mole percentages is 35BaO + 15CaO + 5Al2O3 + 10B2O3 + 35SiO2. The glass seal was found to be susceptible to cracking during thermal cycling of the fuel cells. The goal in formulating the glass/ ceramic composite materials was to (1) retain the physical and chemical advantages that led to the prior selection of the barium calcium aluminosilicate glass as the sealant while (2) increasing strength and fracture toughness so as to reduce the tendency toward cracking. Each of the composite formulations consists of the glass plus either of two ceramic reinforcements in a proportion between 0 and 30 mole percent. One of the ceramic reinforcements consists of alumina platelets; the other one consists of particles of yttria-stabilized zirconia wherein the yttria content is 3 mole percent (3YSZ). In preparation for experiments, panels of the glass/ceramic composites were hot-pressed and machined into test bars.

  10. The effects of repeated heat-pressing on properties of pressable glass-ceramics.

    PubMed

    Chung, K-H; Liao, J-H; Duh, J-G; Chan, D C-N

    2009-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the properties of four heat-pressed glass-ceramic materials after repeated heat-pressing. Two commercially available heat-pressed glass-ceramic systems [Optimal pressable glass-ceramics (OPC and 3G) and Empress pressable glass-ceramics (Empress and Empress2)] were selected. Disc samples (14 mm x 1.4 mm) of each tested material were heat-pressed and used as controls. Sprue and button parts of the pressed groups were retrieved and used for repeated heat-pressing to construct specimens of re-pressed group. All the heat-pressed casting procedures were performed according to the manufacturers' instructions. A biaxial flexural strength (BFS) test (ISO 6872) was performed to determine the strength of pressed and re-pressed glass-ceramic disc specimens (n = 10) at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm min(-1). Ions eluted from etching procedure were collected and examined using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer. Surface characteristics were examined with electron probe microanalysis, X-ray diffraction and secondary electron imaging (SEI). The data were analysed statistically (ANOVA + Tukey's HSD post hoc test, P < 0.05). The BFS values obtained ranged from 123.5 +/- 18.5 to 365.9 +/- 35.5 MPa. The re-pressed Empress2 group had a statistically significant higher BFS mean than the pressed control group (P < 0.05). The SEI micrographs of the lithium disilicate-reinforced glass-ceramic material (Empress2) showed a densely packed, interlocking microstructure and an increase in size with preferred orientation of the lithium disilicate crystals after repeated heat-pressing. Repeated heat-pressing treatment produced a statistically significant increase in the flexural strength of Empress2 glass-ceramic material.

  11. Wear behavior of pressable lithium disilicate glass ceramic.

    PubMed

    Peng, Zhongxiao; Izzat Abdul Rahman, Muhammad; Zhang, Yu; Yin, Ling

    2016-07-01

    This article reports effects of surface preparation and contact loads on abrasive wear properties of highly aesthetic and high-strength pressable lithium disilicate glass-ceramics (LDGC). Abrasive wear testing was performed using a pin-on-disk device in which LDGC disks prepared with different surface finishes were against alumina pins at different contact loads. Coefficients of friction and wear volumes were measured as functions of initial surface finishes and contact loads. Wear-induced surface morphology changes in both LDGC disks and alumina pins were characterized using three-dimensional laser scanning microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The results show that initial surface finishes of LDGC specimens and contact loads significantly affected the friction coefficients, wear volumes and wear-induced surface roughness changes of the material. Both wear volumes and friction coefficients of LDGC increased as the load increased while surface roughness effects were complicated. For rough LDGC surfaces, three-body wear was dominant while for fine LDGC surfaces, two-body abrasive wear played a key role. Delamination, plastic deformation, and brittle fracture were observed on worn LDGC surfaces. The adhesion of LDGC matrix materials to alumina pins was also discovered. This research has advanced our understanding of the abrasive wear behavior of LDGC and will provide guidelines for better utilization and preparation of the material for long-term success in dental restorations. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 104B: 968-978, 2016.

  12. Wear Behaviour of Pressible Lithium Disilicate Glass Ceramic

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Zhongxiao; Rahman, Muhammad Izzat Abdul; Zhang, Yu; Yin, Ling

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports effects of surface preparation and contact loads on abrasive wear properties of highly aesthetic and high-strength pressible lithium disilicate glass-ceramics (LDGC). Abrasive wear testing was performed using a pin-on-disk device in which LDGC disks prepared with different surface finishes were against alumina pins at different contact loads. Coefficients of friction and wear volumes were measured as functions of initial surface finishes and contact loads. Wear-induced surface morphology changes in both LDGC disks and alumina pins were characterized using 3D laser scanning microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. The results show that initial surface finishes of LDGC specimens and contact loads significantly affected the friction coefficients, wear volumes and wear-induced surface roughness changes of the material. Both wear volumes and friction coefficients of LDGC increased as the load increased while surface roughness effects were complicated. For rough LDGC surfaces, three-body wear was dominant while for fine LDGC surfaces, two-body abrasive wear played a key role. Delamination, plastic deformation and brittle fracture were observed on worn LDGC surfaces. The adhesion of LDGC matrix materials to alumina pins was also discovered. This research has advanced our understanding of the abrasive wear behaviour of LDGC and will provide guidelines for better utilisation and preparation of the material for long-term success in dental restorations. PMID:25980530

  13. Comparison of the properties of glass, glass-ceramic and ceramic materials produced from coal fly ash.

    PubMed

    Erol, M; Küçükbayrak, S; Ersoy-Meriçboyu, A

    2008-05-01

    Glass, glass-ceramic and ceramic materials were produced from thermal power plant fly ash without any additives. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis revealed the amorphous phase of the glass sample. Augite phase was detected in the glass-ceramic sample, while the enstatite and mullite phases occurred in the ceramic samples. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) investigations showed that tiny crystallites homogeneously dispersed in the microstructure of the glass-ceramic sample and elongated crystals formed in the ceramic samples. Density values of the obtained samples are comparable to those of the commercially produced glass, glass-ceramic and ceramic samples. Toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) results indicated that the produced samples could be taken as non-hazardous materials. Produced samples showed high resistance to alkali solutions in contrast to acidic solutions. Microstructural, physical, chemical and mechanical properties of the produced glass-ceramic samples are better than those of the produced glass and ceramic samples.

  14. Crystallization Kinetics in Fluorochloroziroconate Glass-Ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez, Carlos J.

    Annealing fluorochlorozirconate (FCZ) glasses nucleates BaCl2 nanocrystals in the glass matrix, resulting in a nanocomposite glass-ceramic that has optical properties suitable for use as a medical X-ray imaging plate. Understanding the way in which the BaCl¬2 nanocrystal nucleation, growth and phase transformation processes proceed is critical to controlling the optical behavior. However, there is a very limited amount of information about the formation, morphology, and distribution of the nanocrystalline particles in FCZ glass-ceramics. In this thesis, the correlation between the microstructure and the crystallization kinetics of FCZ glass-ceramics, are studied in detail. In situ X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy annealing experiments are used to analyze the crystal structure, size and distribution of BaCl 2 nanocrystals in FCZ glass-ceramics as a function of annealing rate and temperature. Microstructural analysis of the early stages on nucleation identified the formation of both BaCl2 and BaF2 nanocrystals. Annealing FCZ glass-ceramics above 280°C can cause the formation of additional glass matrix phase crystals, their microstructure and the annealing parameters required for their growth are identified. As the crystalline phases grow directly from the glass, small variations in processing of the glass can have a profound influence on the crystallization process. The information obtained from these experiments improves the understanding of the nucleation, growth and phase transformation process of the BaCl¬2 nanocrystals and additional crystalline phases that form in FCZ glass-ceramics, and may help expedite the implementation of FCZ glass-ceramics as next-generation X-ray detectors. Lastly, as these glass-ceramics may one day be commercialized, an investigation into their degradation in different environmental conditions was also performed. The effects of direct contact with water or prolonged exposure to humid environments on the

  15. Effect of V2O5 on SrO-ZnO-B2O3-SiO2 glass-ceramics for high temperature sealant application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, Babita; Bhatacharya, S.; Dixit, A.; Gadkari, S. C.; Kothiyal, G. P.

    2012-06-01

    Glasses in the SrO-ZnO-B2O3-SiO2 (SZBS) system with and without V2O5 were prepared by melt-quench method and transformed into glass-ceramics by controlled crystallization. Investigated glasses and glass-ceramics have thermal expansion coefficients (TEC) in the range of 95-120 × 10-7/°C (30-600 °C), which match closely with TEC of other components of solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC). Study of thermo-physical properties of SZBS glasses revealed the network modifying effect of V2O5. Addition of V2O5 increases the TEC and decreases the viscosity of the glass which is beneficial for making seal with Crofer-22-APU. Microstructural investigations have shown good bonding of SZBS glasses with Crofer-22-APU. Elemental line scans indicate that inter-diffusion of Fe, Cr and Si across interface, which is thought to be responsible for good bonding with Crofer-22-APU.

  16. Biocompatible glass-ceramic materials for bone substitution.

    PubMed

    Vitale-Brovarone, Chiara; Verné, Enrica; Robiglio, Lorenza; Martinasso, Germana; Canuto, Rosa A; Muzio, Giuliana

    2008-01-01

    A new bioactive glass composition (CEL2) in the SiO(2)-P(2)O(5)-CaO-MgO-K(2)O-Na(2)O system was tailored to control pH variations due to ion leaching phenomena when the glass is in contact with physiological fluids. CEL2 was prepared by a traditional melting-quenching process obtaining slices that were heat-treated to obtain a glass-ceramic material (CEL2GC) that was characterized thorough SEM analysis. Pre-treatment of CEL2GC with SBF was found to enhance its biocompatibility, as assessed by in vitro tests. CEL2 powder was then used to synthesize macroporous glass-ceramic scaffolds. To this end, CEL2 powders were mixed with polyethylene particles within the 300-600 microm size-range and then pressed to obtain crack-free compacted powders (green). This was heat-treated to remove the organic phase and to sinter the inorganic phase, leaving a porous structure. The biomaterial thus obtained was characterized by X-ray diffraction, SEM equipped with EDS, density measurement, image analysis, mechanical testing and in vitro evaluation, and found to be a glass-ceramic macroporous scaffold with uniformly distributed and highly interconnected porosity. The extent and size-range of the porosity can be tailored by varying the amount and size of the polyethylene particles.

  17. Nanocrystallization in Fluorochlorozirconate Glass-Ceramics.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Carlos J; Liu, Yuzi; Leonard, Russell L; Johnson, Jacqueline A; Petford-Long, Amanda K

    2013-11-01

    Heat treating fluorochlorozirconate (FCZ) glasses nucleates nanocrystals in the glass matrix, resulting in a nanocomposite glass-ceramic that has optical properties suitable for use as a medical imaging plate. Understanding the way in which the nanocrystal nucleation proceeds is critical to controlling the optical behavior. The nucleation and growth of nanocrystals in FCZ glass-ceramics was investigated with in situ transmission electron microscopy heating experiments. The experiments showed the nucleation and growth of previously unreported BaF2 nanocrystals in addition to the expected BaCl2 nanocrystals. Chemical analysis of the BaF2 nanocrystals shows an association with the optically active dopant previously thought only to interact with BaCl2 nanocrystals. The association of the dopant with BaF2 crystals suggests that it plays a role in the photoluminescent (PL) properties of FCZ glass-ceramics.

  18. Tensile behavior of glass/ceramic composite materials at elevated temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandell, J. F.; Grande, D. H.; Jacobs, J.

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes the tensile behavior of high-temperature composite materials containing continuous Nicalon ceramic fiber reinforcement and glass and glass/ceramic matrices. The longitudinal properties of these materials can approach theoretical expectations for brittle matrix composites, failing at a strength and ultimate strain level consistent with those of the fibers. The brittle, high-modulus matrices result in a nonlinear stress-strain curve due to the onset of stable matrix cracking at 10 to 30 percent of the fiber strain to failure, and at strains below this range in off-axis plies. Current fibers and matrices can provide attractive properties well above 1000 C, but composites experience embrittlement in oxidizing atmospheres at 800 to 1000 C due to oxidation of a carbon interface reaction layer.The oxidation effect greatly increases the interface bond strength, causing composite embrittlement.

  19. Preparation and characterization of novel foamed porous glass-ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Sasmal, Nibedita; Garai, Mrinmoy; Karmakar, Basudeb

    2015-05-15

    Foamed glass-ceramics without using foaming agent have been synthesized in a novel glass system of SrO-CaO-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-TiO{sub 2}-B{sub 2}O{sub 3}-SiO{sub 2}-P{sub 2}O{sub 5}-M{sub x}O{sub y} (where M = Ba, Mg, La, Ce and Ni) by a simple process of powder sintering. The glass and glass-ceramics are characterized by dilatometry, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), heating stage microscopy (HSM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), optical microscopy and Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). All the glasses formed are amorphous and the glass transition temperature and dilatometric softening temperature of these glasses are found to be in the range 673–678 °C and 706–728 °C respectively. The glasses are highly stable as indicated by the DSC evaluated glass stability parameters of the range 195–240 °C. Quantitative sintering study of glass powder compacts revealed swelling in the samples with NiO and CeO{sub 2} corresponding to a geometry change of 75 and 108% around 900 °C respectively. With reference to this finding the glass powder compacts are heated to 900 °C and the foamed glass-ceramics are obtained. Characteristic crystalline silicate phases have been identified in the XRD studies and their microstructures are recorded by FESEM. Optical microscope study of the foamed samples revealed formation of bigger foamed cavity with residual pores in samples with NiO and CeO{sub 2} in comparison to samples with BaO, MgO and La{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The mean pore diameters of the samples with NiO and CeO{sub 2} are determined to be 43 and 32 μm, and their respective porosities are 2.34 and 1.82 cm{sup 3}/g respectively. Thus NiO and CeO{sub 2} are found to be very effective to obtain foamed glass-ceramics without using foaming agent by the viscous flow sintering of fine glass powder compacts along with the reduction of the respective polyvalent ions. - Highlights: • Synthesis of foamed porous glass-ceramics

  20. Machinable glass-ceramics forming as a restorative dental material.

    PubMed

    Chaysuwan, Duangrudee; Sirinukunwattana, Krongkarn; Kanchanatawewat, Kanchana; Heness, Greg; Yamashita, Kimihiro

    2011-01-01

    MgO, SiO(2), Al(2)O(3), MgF(2), CaF(2), CaCO(3), SrCO(3), and P(2)O(5) were used to prepare glass-ceramics for restorative dental materials. Thermal properties, phases, microstructures and hardness were characterized by DTA, XRD, SEM and Vickers microhardness. Three-point bending strength and fracture toughness were applied by UTM according to ISO 6872: 1997(E). XRD showed that the glass crystallized at 892°C (second crystallization temperature+20°C) for 3 hrs consisted mainly of calcium-mica and fluorapatite crystalline phases. Average hardness (3.70 GPa) closely matched human enamel (3.20 GPa). The higher fracture toughness (2.04 MPa√m) combined with the hardness to give a lower brittleness index (1.81 µm(-1/2)) which indicates that they have exceptional machinability. Bending strength results (176.61 MPa) were analyzed by Weibull analysis to determine modulus value (m=17.80). Machinability of the calcium mica-fluorapatite glass-ceramic was demonstrated by fabricating with CAD/CAM.

  1. Ceramic fiber-reinforced monoclinic celsian phase glass-ceramic matrix composite material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P. (Inventor); Dicarlo, James A. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A hyridopolysilazane-derived ceramic fiber reinforced monoclinic celsian phase barium aluminum silicate glass-ceramic matrix composite material is prepared by ball-milling an aqueous slurry of BAS glass powder and fine monoclinic celsian seeds. The fibers improve the mechanical strength and fracture toughness and with the matrix provide superior dielectric properties.

  2. Sodium nitrate containing mixture for producing ceramic-glass-ceramic seal by microwave heating

    DOEpatents

    Blake, R.D.; Meek, T.T.

    1984-10-10

    A mixture for, and method of using such a mixture, for producing a ceramic-glass-ceramic seal by the use of microwave energy are disclosed, wherein the mixture comprises a glass sealing material, a coupling agent, and an oxidizer. The seal produced exhibits greater strength due to its different microstructure. Sodium nitrate is the most preferred oxidizer.

  3. Mechanical evaluation of SiC particle reinforced oxynitride glass and glass-ceramic composites

    SciTech Connect

    Rouxel, T.; Lavelle, C. . Lab. de Materiaux Ceramiques et Traitements de Surface); Garnier, C.; Verdier, P.; Laurent, Y. . Lab. de Chimie des Materiaux)

    1994-07-01

    In silicon oxynitride glasses, the nitrogen occupies anion sites and is bonded to three silicons. Hence, replacement of divalent oxygen ions by trivalent nitrogen ones results in a considerable improvement of the mechanical resistance. In this exploratory work, the authors investigate some basic mechanical properties at room temperature of composite materials prepared by adding some SiC particles to a highly refractory Y-Mg-Si-Al-O-N oxynitride glass. Taking advantage of both constituents, the brittle particulate composites exhibit much better fracture strength and toughness and higher elastic moduli than the glassy matrix. Due to the easy crystallization of the selected glass, a further improvement is attainable through a crystallization treatment of the matrix. Fracture toughness and Young's modulus as high as 5.4 MPa.m[sup 0.5] and 215 GPa respectively have been measured on the glass-ceramic composite containing 50 vol.% SiC.

  4. Glass Ceramic Waste Forms for Combined CS+LN+TM Fission Products Waste Streams

    SciTech Connect

    Crum, Jarrod V.; Turo, Laura A.; Riley, Brian J.; Tang, Ming; Kossoy, Anna; Sickafus, Kurt E.

    2010-09-23

    In this study, glass ceramics were explored as an alternative waste form for glass, the current baseline, to be used for immobilizing alkaline/alkaline earth + lanthanide (CS+LN) or CS+LN+transition metal (TM) fission-product waste streams generated by a uranium extraction (UREX+) aqueous separations type process. Results from past work on a glass waste form for the combined CS+LN waste streams showed that as waste loading increased, large fractions of crystalline phases precipitated upon slow cooling.[1] The crystalline phases had no noticeable impact on the waste form performance by the 7-day product consistency test (PCT). These results point towards the development of a glass ceramic waste form for treating CS+LN or CS+LN+TM combined waste streams. Three main benefits for exploring glass ceramics are: (1) Glass ceramics offer increased solubility of troublesome components in crystalline phases as compared to glass, leading to increased waste loading; (2) The crystalline network formed in the glass ceramic results in higher heat tolerance than glass; and (3) These glass ceramics are designed to be processed by the same melter technology as the current baseline glass waste form. It will only require adding controlled canister cooling for crystallization into a glass ceramic waste form. Highly annealed waste form (essentially crack free) with up to 50X lower surface area than a typical High-Level Waste (HLW) glass canister. Lower surface area translates directly into increased durability. This was the first full year of exploring glass ceramics for the Option 1 and 2 combined waste stream options. This work has shown that dramatic increases in waste loading are achievable by designing a glass ceramic waste form as an alternative to glass. Table S1 shows the upper limits for heat, waste loading (based on solubility), and the decay time needed before treatment can occur for glass and glass ceramic waste forms. The improvements are significant for both combined waste

  5. Photoactive transparent nano-crystalline glass-ceramic for remazole red dye degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Gad-Allah, Tarek A.; Margha, Fatma H.

    2012-12-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ► Preparation and characterization of novel transparent nanocrystalline glass-ceramic. ► Precipitation of photoactive phases by using controlled heat-treatment. ► Conservation of transparency along with photoactivity. ► Using the prepared nanocrystalline glass-ceramic in water purification. -- Abstract: Transparent glass ceramic material was prepared from alkali-borosilicate glass containing titania by proper heat treatment scheme. The prepared samples were characterized using differential thermal analysis, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscope, selected area electron diffraction and UV–visible spectroscopy. The applied heat treatment program allowed the crystallization of nano-crystalline anatase, rutile, barium titanate, titanium borate and silicate phases while maintaining the transparency. The precipitated nano-crystalline anatase and rutile phases were responsible for the observed high photocatalytic activity of the prepared samples. Samples of 24.29 and 32.39 TiO{sub 2} wt% showed better efficiency for the decolorization of remazole red dye compared with commercial-TiO{sub 2} used in preparation of glass-ceramic. The reuse of prepared glass-ceramic photocatalyst with nearly same efficiency for different times was also proved.

  6. Effect of binder burnout on the sealing performance of glass ceramics for solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ertugrul, Tugrul Y.; Celik, Selahattin; Mat, Mahmut D.

    2013-11-01

    The glass ceramics composite sealants are among few materials suitable for the solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) due to their high operating temperatures (600 °C-850 °C). The glass ceramics chemically bond to both the metallic interconnector and the ceramic electrolyte and provide a gas tight connection. A careful and several stages manufacturing procedure is required to obtain a gas tight sealing. In this study, effects of binder burnout process on the sealing performance are investigated employing commercially available glass ceramic powders. The glass ceramic laminates are produced by mixing glass ceramic powders with the organic binders and employing a tape casting method. The laminates are sandwiched between the metallic interconnectors of an SOFC cell. The burnout and subsequent sealing quality are analyzed by measuring leakage rate and final macrostructure of sealing region. The effects of heating rate, dead weight load, solid loading, carrier gas and their flow rates are investigated. It is found that sealing quality is affected from all investigated parameters. While a slower heating rate is required for a better burnout, the mass flow rate of sweep gas must be adequate for removal of the burned gas. The leakage rate is reduced to 0.1 ml min-1 with 2 °C min-1 + 1 °C min-1 heating rate, 86.25% solid loading, 200 N dead weight load and 500 ml min-1 sweep gas flow rate.

  7. Chemical Vapor Deposited SiC (SCS-0) Fiber-Reinforced Strontium Aluminosilicate Glass-Ceramic Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P.

    1997-01-01

    Unidirectional SrO Al2O3 2SiO2 glass-ceramic matrix composites reinforced with uncoated Chemical Vapor Deposited (CVD) SiC (SCS-0) fibers have been fabricated by hot-pressing under appropriate conditions using the glass-ceramic approach. Almost fully dense composites having a fiber volume fraction of 0.24 have been obtained. Monoclinic celsian, SrAl2Si2O8, was the only crystalline phase observed in the matrix by x-ray diffraction. No chemical reaction was observed between the fiber and the matrix after high temperature processing. In three-point flexure, the composite exhibited a first matrix cracking stress of approx. 231 +/- 20 MPa and an ultimate strength of 265 +/- 17 MPa. Examination of fracture surfaces revealed limited short length fiber pull-out. From fiber push-out, the fiber/matrix interfacial debonding and frictional strengths were evaluated to be approx. 17.5 +/- 2.7 MPa and 11.3 +/- 1.6 MPa, respectively. Some fibers were strongly bonded to the matrix and could not be pushed out. The micromechanical models were not useful in predicting values of the first matrix cracking stress as well as the ultimate strength of the composites.

  8. Interactions at glass-ceramic to metal interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Knorovsky, G.A.; Brow, R.K.; Watkins, R.D.; Loehman, R.E.

    1990-01-01

    Advanced pyrotechnic components can be fabricated from Ni-based superalloys with hermetic seals to high expansion lithium-silicate glass ceramics (LSGC). Prior studies have characterized the interfacial reactions in these systems necessary for good chemical bonding. Similar reactions occur when LSGCs are bonded to 300-series stainless steel except that these seals debond on cooling to room temperature. Cr-depletion (from {approximately}18 wt % to {approximately}5 wt %) from the steel interface cases an fcc-to-bcc phase transition that expands the interfacial grains and decreases their thermal expansion coefficient, putting the LSGC into tension, causing the seal to fail. 9 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Fractal analysis of fracture in glass ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Mecholsky, J.J. Jr.

    1995-12-01

    The application of fractal geometry offers the potential to establish the scaling relationships between critical energies at all levels during fracture. The fracture energy, {gamma}, is directly related to the fractal dimensional increment, D*, and the elastic modulus, E: {gamma} = 0.5 E D* a{sub 0}, where the characteristic atomic parameter, a{sub 0}, can be interpreted as the fractal generator (on the atomic scale) or the process zone size. D* can be shown to be related to the crack/fracture-mirror size ratio. The purpose of this paper is to show the relationship between fractal geometry, fractography and the fracture process in the analysis of the fracture of glass ceramics. Examples of the fracture analysis of glass ceramics used as materials for dental restorations, radomes and electron generators will be presented.

  10. Glass ceramic toughened with tetragonal zirconia

    DOEpatents

    Keefer, K.D.

    1984-02-10

    A phase transformation-toughened glass ceramic and a process for making it are disclosed. A mixture of particulate network-forming oxide, network-modifying oxide, and zirconium oxide is heated to yield a homogeneous melt, and this melt is then heat treated to precipitate an appreciable quantity of tetragonal zirconia, which is retained at ambient temperature to form a phase transformation-toughened glass ceramic. Nuclearing agents and stabilizing agents may be added to the mixture to facilitate processing and improve the ceramic's properties. Preferably, the mixture is first melted at a temperature from 1200 to 1700/sup 0/C and is then heat-treated at a temperature within the range of 800 to 1200/sup 0/C in order to precipitate tetragonal ZrO/sub 2/. The composition, as well as the length and temperature of the heat treatment, must be carefully controlled to prevent solution of the precipitated tetragonal zirconia and subsequent conversion to the monoclinic phase.

  11. A glass-ceramic plate for mammography.

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J. A.; Schweizer, S.; Lubinsky, A. R.; Nuclear Engineering Division; Univ. of Paderborn; State Univ. of New York at Stony Brook

    2007-01-01

    We developed translucent glass-ceramic image plates for digital mammography. The glass ceramics are based on europium-doped fluorozirconate glasses, which were additionally doped with chlorine to initiate the nucleation of barium chloride nanoparticles therein. The X-ray image is stored in the form of stable electron-hole pairs, which can be read out afterwards with a scanning laser beam in a 'photostimulated luminescence' (PSL) process. Measurements of the required stimulating exposure, integrated PSL signal, and optical light spreading of the stimulating laser light were performed to allow projection of the detective quantum efficiency (DQE) for the proposed X-ray storage phosphor system. The projected DQE is compared with commercially available electronic mammography systems.

  12. Low level laser therapy does not modulate the outcomes of a highly bioactive glass-ceramic (Biosilicate) on bone consolidation in rats.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Poliani; Ribeiro, Daniel Araki; Pipi, Elaine Favaro; Driusso, Patricia; Parizotto, Nivaldo A; Renno, Ana Claudia Muniz

    2010-04-01

    The main purpose of the present work was to evaluate if low level laser therapy (LLLT) can improve the effects of novel fully-crystallized glass-ceramic (Biosilicate) on bone consolidation in tibial defects of rats. Forty male Wistar rats with tibial bone defects were used. Animals were divided into four groups: group bone defect control (CG); group bone defect filled with Biosilicate (BG); group bone defect filled with Biosilicate, irradiated with LLLT, at 60 J cm(-2) (BG 60) and group bone defect filled with Biosilicate, irradiated with LLLT, at 120 J cm(-2) (BG 120). A low-energy GaAlAs 830 nm, CW, 0.6 mm beam diameter, 100 W cm(-2), 60 and 120 J cm(-2) was used in this study. Laser irradiation was initiated immediately after the surgery procedure and it was performed every 48 h for 14 days. Fourteen days post-surgery, the three-point bending test revealed that the structural stiffness of the groups CG and BG was higher than the values of the groups BG60 and BG120. Morphometric analysis revealed no differences between the control group and the Biosilcate group. Interestingly, the groups treated with Biosilicate and laser (BG 60 and BG120) showed statistically significant lower values of newly formed bone in the area of the defect when compared to negative control (CG) and bone defect group filled with Biosilicate (CB). Our findings suggest that although Biosilicate exerts some osteogenic activity during bone repair, laser therapy is not able to modulate this process.

  13. Hot isostatically-pressed aluminosilicate glass-ceramic with natural crystalline analogues for immobilizing the calcined high-level nuclear waste at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Raman, S.

    1993-12-01

    The additives Si, Al, MgO, P{sub 2}O{sub 5} were mechanically blended with fluorinelsodium calcine in varying proportions. The batches were vacuum sealed in stainless steel canisters and hot isostatically pressed at 20,000 PSI and 1000 C for 4 hours. The resulting suite of glass-ceramic waste forms parallels the natural rocks in microstructural and compositional heterogeneity. Several crystalline phases ar analogous in composition and structure to naturally occurring minerals. Additional crystalline phases are zirconia and Ca-Mg borate. The glasses are enriched in silica and alumina. Approximately 7% calcine elements occur dissolved in this glass and the total glass content in the waste forms averages 20 wt%. The remainder of the calcine elements are partitioned into crystalline phases at 75 wt% calcine waste loading. The waste forms were tested for chemical durability in accordance with the MCC1-test procedure. The leach rates are a function of the relative proportions of additives and calcine, which in turn influence the composition and abundances of the glass and crystalline phases. The DOE leach rate criterion of less than 1 g/m{sup 2}-day is met by all the elements B, Cs and Na are increased by lowering the melt viscosity. This is related to increased crystallization or devitrification with increases in MgO addition. This exploratory work has shown that the increases in waste loading occur by preferred partitioning of the calcine components among crystalline and glass phases. The determination of optimum processing parameters in the form of additive concentration levels, homogeneous blending among the components, and pressure-temperature stabilities of phases must be continued to eliminate undesirable effects of chemical composition, microstructure and glass devitrification.

  14. Sealing of Al-containing stainless steel to lithia-alumina-silica glass-ceramic

    SciTech Connect

    Cassidy, R.T.; Moddeman, W.E.

    1989-12-31

    Recent work on a new glass-ceramic/alloy for pyrotechnic components is discussed. A newly developed family of austenitic stainless steels has been hermetically sealed to a widely used lithia-alumina-silica (LAS) glass-ceramic. These alloys, originally developed for high oxidation resistance, contain 4-5 wt% Al. The presence of Al offers several advantages from a glass or glass/ceramic sealing point of view: presence of a tenacious, stable oxide (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) on the alloys` surface as well as the fact that they can be strengthened during sealing via precipitation of a secondary phase, NiAl. In addition these new alloys offer lower material and machining costs and improved weldability compared to the widely used Ni-base superalloys.

  15. Ni(2+) doped glass ceramic fiber fabricated by melt-in-tube method and successive heat treatment.

    PubMed

    Fang, Zaijin; Zheng, Shupei; Peng, Wencai; Zhang, Hang; Ma, Zhijun; Dong, Guoping; Zhou, Shifeng; Chen, Danping; Qiu, Jianrong

    2015-11-02

    Glass ceramic fibers containing Ni(2+) doped LiGa(5)O(8) nanocrystals were fabricated by a melt-in-tube method and successive heat treatment. Fiber precursors were prepared by drawing at high temperature where fiber core glass was melted while fiber clad glass was softened. After heat treatment, LiGa(5)O(8) nanocrystals were precipitated in the fiber core. Excited by 980 nm laser, efficient broadband near-infrared emission was observed in the glass ceramic fiber compared to that of precursor fiber. The melt-in-tube method can realize controllable crystallization and is suitable for fabrication of novel glass ceramic fibers. The Ni(2+)-doped glass ceramic fiber is promising for broadband optical amplification.

  16. Effect of ZrO(2) additions on the crystallization, mechanical and biological properties of MgO-CaO-SiO(2)-P(2)O(5)-CaF(2) bioactive glass-ceramics.

    PubMed

    Li, H C; Wang, D G; Meng, X G; Chen, C Z

    2014-06-01

    A series of ZrO(2) doped MgO-CaO-SiO(2)-P(2)O(5)-CaF(2) bioactive glass-ceramics were obtained by sintering method. The crystallization behavior, phase composition, morphology and structure of glass-ceramics were characterized. The bending strength, elastic modulus, fracture toughness, micro-hardness and thermal expansion coefficient (TEC) of glass-ceramics were investigated. The in vitro bioactivity and cytotoxicity tests were used to evaluate the bioactivity and biocompatibility of glass-ceramics. The sedimentation mechanism and growth process of apatites on sample surface were discussed. The results showed that the mainly crystalline phases of glass-ceramics were Ca(5)(PO4)3F (fluorapatite) and β-CaSiO(3). (β-wollastonite). m-ZrO(2) (monoclinic zirconia) declined the crystallization temperatures of glasses. t-ZrO(2) (tetragonal zirconia) increased the crystallization temperature of Ca(5)(PO4)(3)F and declined the crystallization temperature of β-CaSiO(3). t-ZrO(2) greatly increased the fracture toughness, bending strength and micro-hardness of glass-ceramics. The nanometer apatites were induced on the surface of glass-ceramic after soaking 28 days in SBF (simulated body fluid), indicating the glass-ceramic has good bioactivity. The in vitro cytotoxicity test demonstrated the glass-ceramic has no toxicity to cell.

  17. Glass-ceramic optical fiber containing Ba2TiSi2O8 nanocrystals for frequency conversion of lasers

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Zaijin; Xiao, Xusheng; Wang, Xin; Ma, Zhijun; Lewis, Elfed; Farrell, Gerald; Wang, Pengfei; Ren, Jing; Guo, Haitao; Qiu, Jianrong

    2017-01-01

    A glass-ceramic optical fiber containing Ba2TiSi2O8 nanocrystals fabricated using a novel combination of the melt-in-tube method and successive heat treatment is reported for the first time. For the melt-in-tube method, fibers act as a precursor at the drawing temperature for which the cladding glass is softened while the core glass is melted. It is demonstrated experimentally that following heat treatment, Ba2TiSi2O8 nanocrystals with diameters below 10 nm are evenly distributed throughout the fiber core. Comparing to the conventional rod-in-tube method, the melt-in-tube method is superior in terms of controllability of crystallization to allow for the fabrication of low loss glass-ceramic fibers. When irradiated using a 1030 nm femtosecond laser, an enhanced green emission at a wavelength of 515 nm is observed in the glass-ceramic fiber, which demonstrates second harmonic generation of a laser action in the fabricated glass-ceramic fibers. Therefore, this new glass-ceramic fiber not only provides a highly promising development for frequency conversion of lasers in all optical fiber based networks, but the melt-in-tube fabrication method also offers excellent opportunities for fabricating a wide range of novel glass-ceramic optical fibers for multiple future applications including fiber telecommunications and lasers. PMID:28358045

  18. Photocatalytic properties of TiO{sub 2}-P{sub 2}O{sub 5} glass ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Jie

    2011-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Glass ceramics were prepared in the binary system P{sub 2}O{sub 5}-TiO{sub 2}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Main crystalline phases were anatase-type TiO{sub 2} crystals or (TiO){sub 2}P{sub 2}O{sub 7} crystals. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The glass ceramics containing the anatase crystals showed photocatalytic activity. -- Abstract: Binary TiO{sub 2}-P{sub 2}O{sub 5} glasses with 69 mol% and 76 mol% TiO{sub 2} were prepared and converted into glass ceramics by heat-treatments. XRD measurements show that the main crystalline phases precipitated in the glass ceramics are anatase-type TiO{sub 2} crystals or (TiO){sub 2}P{sub 2}O{sub 7} crystals, depending on the concentration of titanium constituent. Photocatalytic activities of the glass ceramics were evaluated by the decomposition of methylene blue (MB) and measuring the water contact angle. It is found that the glass ceramics containing anatase crystals exhibit both photocatalytic oxidation activity and highly photo-induced hydrophilicity under UV irradiation with intensity of 1.0 mW/cm{sup 2}.

  19. Glass-ceramic optical fiber containing Ba2TiSi2O8 nanocrystals for frequency conversion of lasers.

    PubMed

    Fang, Zaijin; Xiao, Xusheng; Wang, Xin; Ma, Zhijun; Lewis, Elfed; Farrell, Gerald; Wang, Pengfei; Ren, Jing; Guo, Haitao; Qiu, Jianrong

    2017-03-30

    A glass-ceramic optical fiber containing Ba2TiSi2O8 nanocrystals fabricated using a novel combination of the melt-in-tube method and successive heat treatment is reported for the first time. For the melt-in-tube method, fibers act as a precursor at the drawing temperature for which the cladding glass is softened while the core glass is melted. It is demonstrated experimentally that following heat treatment, Ba2TiSi2O8 nanocrystals with diameters below 10 nm are evenly distributed throughout the fiber core. Comparing to the conventional rod-in-tube method, the melt-in-tube method is superior in terms of controllability of crystallization to allow for the fabrication of low loss glass-ceramic fibers. When irradiated using a 1030 nm femtosecond laser, an enhanced green emission at a wavelength of 515 nm is observed in the glass-ceramic fiber, which demonstrates second harmonic generation of a laser action in the fabricated glass-ceramic fibers. Therefore, this new glass-ceramic fiber not only provides a highly promising development for frequency conversion of lasers in all optical fiber based networks, but the melt-in-tube fabrication method also offers excellent opportunities for fabricating a wide range of novel glass-ceramic optical fibers for multiple future applications including fiber telecommunications and lasers.

  20. Glass-ceramics: A class of nanostructured materials for photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Pablos-Martin, A.; Ferrari, M.; Pascual, M. J.; Righini, G. C.

    2015-07-01

    Glass-ceramics (GCs) are constituted by nanometer-to-micron-sized crystals embedded in a glass matrix; usually, their structural or functional elements (clusters, crystallites or molecules) have dimensions in the 1 to 100nm range. As the name says, GCs must be considered an intermediate material between inorganic glasses and ceramics; in most cases the crystallinity is between 30 and 50%. GCs share many properties with both glasses and ceramics, offering low defects, extra hardness, high thermal shock resistance (typical of ceramics) together with the ease of fabrication and moulding (typical of glasses). The embedded crystalline phase, however, can enhance the existing properties of the matrix glass or lead to entirely new properties. GCs are produced by controlled crystallization of certain glasses, generally induced by nucleating additives; they may result opaque or transparent. Transparent GCs are now gaining a competitive advantage with respect to amorphous glasses and, sometimes, to crystals too. The aim of the present paper is to introduce the basic characteristics of transparent glass-ceramics, with particular attention to the relationship between structure and transparency and to the mechanism of crystallization, which may also be induced by selective laser treatments. Their applications to the development of guided-wave structures are also briefly described.

  1. Inorganic glass ceramic slip rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glossbrenner, E. W.; Cole, S. R.

    1972-01-01

    Prototypes of slip rings have been fabricated from ceramic glass, a material which is highly resistant to deterioration due to high temperature. Slip ring assemblies were not structurally damaged by mechanical tests and performed statisfactorily for 200 hours.

  2. Sewage sludge ash characteristics and potential for use in bricks, tiles and glass ceramics.

    PubMed

    Lynn, Ciarán J; Dhir, Ravindra K; Ghataora, Gurmel S

    2016-01-01

    The characteristics of sewage sludge ash (SSA) and its use in ceramic applications pertaining to bricks, tiles and glass ceramics have been assessed using the globally published literature in the English medium. It is shown that SSA possesses similar chemical characteristics to established ceramic materials and under heat treatment achieves the targeted densification, strength increases and absorption reductions. In brick and tile applications, technical requirements relating to strength, absorption and durability are achievable, with merely manageable performance reductions with SSA as a partial clay replacement. Fluxing properties of SSA facilitate lower firing temperatures during ceramics production, although reductions in mix plasticity leads to higher forming water requirements. SSA glass ceramics attained strengths in excess of natural materials such as granite and marble and displayed strong durability properties. The thermal treatment and nature of ceramic products also effectively restricted heavy metal leaching to low levels. Case studies, predominantly in bricks applications, reinforce confidence in the material with suitable technical performances achieved in practical conditions.

  3. Intense red photoluminescence from Mn2+-doped (Na+; Zn2+) sulfophosphate glasses and glass ceramics as LED converters.

    PubMed

    Da, Ning; Peng, Mingying; Krolikowski, Sebastian; Wondraczek, Lothar

    2010-02-01

    We report on intense red fluorescence from Mn(2+)-doped sulfophosphate glasses and glass ceramics of the type ZnO-Na(2)O-SO(3)-P(2)O(5). As a hypothesis, controlled internal crystallization of as-melted glasses is achieved on the basis of thermally-induced bimodal separation of an SO(3)-rich phase. Crystal formation is then confined to the relict structure of phase separation. The whole synthesis procedure is performed in air at high dopant concentration of up to 3 mol.%. Recrystallization of the glass results in strongly increasing emission intensity. Dynamic emission spectroscopy reveals only on type of emission centers in the glassy material, whereas three different centers are observed in the glass ceramic. These are attributed to octahedrally coordinated Mn(2+) in the residual glass phase and in crystalline phosphate and sulfate lattices, respectively. Relatively low crystal field strength results in almost ideal red emission, peaking around 625 nm. Excitation bands lie in the blue-to-green spectral range and exhibit strong overlap. The optimum excitation range matches the emission properties of GaN- and InGaN-based light emitting devices.

  4. Glass ceramic toughened with tetragonal zirconia

    DOEpatents

    Keefer, Keith D.; Michalske, Terry A.

    1986-01-01

    A phase transformation-toughened glass ceramic and a process for making it are disclosed. A mixture of particulate network-forming oxide, network-modifying oxide, and zirconium oxide is heated to yield a homogeneous melt, and this melt is then heat-treated to precipitate an appreciable quantity of tetragonal zirconia, which is retained at ambient temperature to form a phase transformation-toughened glass ceramic. Nucleating agents and stabilizing agents may be added to the mixture to facilitate processing and improve the ceramic's properties. Preferably, the mixture is first melted at a temperature from 1200.degree. to 1700.degree. C. and is then heat-treated at a temperature within the range of 800.degree. to 1200.degree. C. in order to precipitate tetragonal ZrO.sub.2. The composition, as well as the length and temperature of the heat-treatment, must be carefully controlled to prevent solution of the precipitated tetragonal zirconia and subsequent conversion to the monoclinic phase.

  5. Glass ceramic-to-metal seals

    DOEpatents

    Not Available

    1982-04-19

    A glass ceramic composition prepared by subjecting a glass composition comprising, by weight, 65 to 80% SiO/sub 2/, 8 to 16% Li/sub 2/O, 2 to 8% Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, 1 to 8% K/sub 2/O, 1 to 5% P/sub 2/O/sub 5/ and 1.5 to 7% B/sub 2/O/sub 3/, to the following processing steps of heating the glass composition to a temperature sufficient to crystallize lithium metasilicate therein, holding the glass composition at a temperature and for a time period sufficient to dissolve the lithium metasilicate therein thereby creating cristobalite nucleii, cooling the glass composition and maintaining the composition at a temperature and for a time period sufficient to recrystallize lithium metasilicate therein, and thermally treating the glass composition at a temperature and for a time period sufficient to caus growth of cristobalite and further crystallization of lithium metasilicate producing a glass ceramic composition having a specific thermal expansion coefficient and products containing said composition.

  6. Influence of substituting B2O3 for CaF2 on the bonding behaviour to bone of glass-ceramics containing apatite and wollastonite.

    PubMed

    Kitsugi, T; Yamamuro, T; Nakamura, T; Yoshii, S; Kokubo, T; Takagi, M; Shibuya, T

    1992-01-01

    Glass-ceramics containing crystalline oxy-fluoroapatite (Ca10(PO4)6(O,F2)) and wollastonite (CaSiO3) (designated AWGC) are reported to have a fairly high mechanical strength as well as the capability of forming a chemical bond with bone tissue. The chemical composition is MgO 4.6, CaO 44.9, SiO2 34.2, P2O5 16.3, and CaF2 0.5 in weight ratio. In this study the influence of substituting B2O3 for CaF2 on the bonding behaviour of glass-ceramics containing apatite and wollastonite to bone tissue was investigated. Two kinds of glass-ceramics containing apatite and wollastonite were prepared. CaF2 0.5 was replaced with B2O3 at 0.5 and 2.0 in weight ratio (designated AWGC-0.5B and AWGC-2.0B). Rectangular ceramic plates (15 x 10 x 2 mm, abraded with No. 2000 alumina powder) were implanted into a rabbit tibia. The failure load, when an implant detached from the bone, or the bone itself broke, was measured. The failure load of AWGC-0.5B was 8.00 +/- 1.82 kg at 10 weeks after implantation and 8.16 +/- 1.36 kg at 25 weeks after implantation. The failure load of AWGC-2B was 8.08 +/- 1.70 kg at 10 weeks after implantation and 9.92 +/- 2.46 kg at 25 weeks after implantation. None of the loads for the two kinds of glass-ceramics decreased as time passed. Giemsa surface staining and contact microradiography revealed direct bonding between glass-ceramics and bone. SEM-EPMA showed a calcium-phosphorus rich layer (reaction zone) at the interface of ceramics and bone tissue. The thickness of the reaction zone was 10 to -15 microns and did not increase as time passed.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Indirect selective laser sintering of apatite-wollostonite glass-ceramic.

    PubMed

    Xiao, K; Dalgarno, K W; Wood, D J; Goodridge, R D; Ohtsuki, C

    2008-10-01

    This paper develops an indirect selective laser sintering (SLS) processing route for apatite-wollastonite (A-W) glass-ceramic, and shows that the processing route, which can create porous three-dimensional products suitable for bone implants or scaffolds, does not affect the excellent mechanical and biological properties of the glass-ceramic. 'Green parts' with fine integrity and well-defined shape have been produced from glass particles of single-size range or mixed-size ranges with acrylic binder in various ratios by weight. A subsequent heat treatment process has been developed to optimize the crystallization process, and an infiltration process has been explored to enhance mechanical strength. Three-point bending test results show flexural strengths of up to 102 MPa, dependent on porosity, and simulated body fluid (SBF) tests show that the laser sintered porous A-W has comparable biological properties to that of conventionally produced A-W.

  8. New bioactive glass-ceramic: synthesis and application in PMMA bone cement composites.

    PubMed

    Abd Samad, Hamizah; Jaafar, Mariatti; Othman, Radzali; Kawashita, Masakazu; Abdul Razak, Noor Hayati

    2011-01-01

    In present study, a new composition of glass-ceramic was synthesized based on the Na2O-CaO-SiO2-P2O5 glass system. Heat treatment of glass powder was carried out in 2 stages: 600 °C as the nucleation temperature and different temperature on crystallization at 850, 950 and 1000 °C. The glass-ceramic heat-treated at 950 °C was selected as bioactive filler in commercial PMMA bone cement; (PALACOS® LV) due to its ability to form 2 high crystallization phases in comparison with 850 and 1000 °C. The results of this newly glass-ceramic filled PMMA bone cement at 0-16 wt% of filler loading were compared with those of hydroxyapatite (HA). The effect of different filler loading on the setting properties was evaluated. The peak temperature during the polymerization of bone cement decreased when the liquid to powder (L/P) ratio was reduced. The setting time, however, did not show any trend when filler loading was increased. In contrast, dough time was observed to decrease with increased filler loading. Apatite morphology was observed on the surface of the glass-ceramic and selected cement after bioactivity test.

  9. Radioluminescence properties of Sm-doped fluorochlorozirconate glasses and glass-ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, Go; Edgar, Andy; Kasap, Safa; Yanagida, Takayuki

    2016-02-01

    We have investigated X-ray induced radioluminescence (XL) properties of Sm-doped fluorochlorozirconate (FCZ) glasses and glass-ceramics. The FCZ glass is a modified ZBLAN glass which shows a very high optical transmission over a wide spectral range. The glass matrix includes Sm3+-doped nanocrystals of BaCl2 after heat-treatment at temperatures above 250 °C. The glass-ceramic emits red light under UV and X-ray exposure. Since conventional Si-based photodetectors, e.g., CCDs, have the highest quantum efficiency to red light in general, the Sm-doped FCZ glass-ceramic plate can be a good candidate as a scintillator material for indirect radiation detection. Moreover, a very broad emission is present in the glass-ceramic around 300-500 nm, which is attributed to a self-trapped exciton (STE) emissions. The temperature dependence of X-ray induced luminescence and photoluminescence are very similar. The XL light yield is linearly proportional to the X-ray exposure rate for rates higher than 20 mR/s. For low exposure rates, emissions by Sm2+ are more sensitive than others, leading to a nonlinear response.

  10. Some developments on ceramic-to-metal and glass-ceramics-to-metal seals and related studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kothiyal, G. P.; Goswami, M.; Shrikhande, V. K.

    2008-05-01

    Seals and coatings based on ceramics and glass-ceramics find numerous applications in different disciplines of science and technology including space, accelerators, nuclear energy, chemical industry. Ceramic-to-metal (CM) seals based on conventional design (using brazing alloys) and glass-ceramics have been prepared. While Ag-Cu brazing alloy has been used in conventional CM seal, we have employed lithium zinc silicate (LZS) and lithium aluminum silicate (LAS) glass-ceramics for glass-ceramics-to-metal (GCM) seals. LZS glass-ceramics based on two different compositions; (a) LZSL composition (wt.%)- Li2O: 12.65, ZnO: 1.85, SiO2: 74.4, Al2O3: 3.8, K2O: 2.95, P2O5: 3.15, and B2O3: 1.2 (low ZnO) and (b) LZSH composition (wt.%)- Li2O: 8.9, ZnO: 24.03, SiO2: 53.7, Na2O: 5.42, P2O5: 2.95, and B2O3: 5.0 (high ZnO) were prepared with desired sealing characteristics for matched type seals. In addition, (wt.%) 12.6Li2O-71.7SiO2-5.1Al2O3-4.9K2O-3.2B2O3-2.5P2O5 (LAS-GC) was investigated for compressive type of seal. LZS glass-ceramics-to-Cu as well as SS-321 seals were found to withstand a vacuum of 10-6 Torr with leak rate 10-9 Torr. 1/s and LAS GC-to-SS304 seal showed high pressure endurance of 12000psi. In order to understand the mechanism of sealing, glass-ceramics-to-metal interface study has also been carried out.

  11. Producing Durable Continuously Reinforced Concrete Pavement using Glass-ceramic Coated Reinforcing Steel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-02-01

    BUILDING STRONG® Producing Durable Continuously Reinforced Concrete Pavement using Glass- ceramic Coated Reinforcing Steel Principal Investigator... ceramic Coated Reinforcing Steel 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER...Vitreous- Ceramic Coating  Ease of Application to Reinforcement Steel  Bond Strength and Corrosion-Resistance  Field Demonstration Program  Testing in

  12. Mechanical properties of bioactive glasses, glass-ceramics and composites.

    PubMed

    Thompson, I D; Hench, L L

    1998-01-01

    The application of bioactive glass and glass-ceramics has been widely documented over the past twenty years but the high modulus and low fracture toughness has made them less applicable for clinical, load bearing, applications. The development of non-resorbable polyethylene and polysulphone matrices for these materials has improved the mechanical properties. However, the primary concern of whether the bioactivity of the composites is reduced is still unresolved. The more recent development of resorbable carrier systems, dextran and collagen, for bioactive glasses does not introduce such problems, hence making this form of composite suitable for novel soft tissue applications. The development of a simple quality index has enabled some of the materials described within this paper to be ranked by their ability to replace bone, thus enabling possible new research directions to be emphasized.

  13. Influence of heat treatments upon the mechanical properties and in vitro bioactivity of ZrO2-toughened MgO-CaO-SiO2-P2O5-CaF2 glass-ceramics.

    PubMed

    Li, Huan-Cai; Wang, Dian-Gang; Meng, Xiang-Guo; Chen, Chuan-Zhong

    2014-09-01

    Zirconia-toughened MgO-CaO-SiO2-P2O5-CaF2 glass-ceramics are prepared using sintering techniques, and a series of heat treatment procedures are designed to obtain a glass-ceramic with improved properties. The crystallization behavior, phase composition, and morphology of the glass-ceramics are characterized. The bending strength, elastic modulus, fracture toughness, and microhardness of the glass-ceramics are investigated, and the effect mechanism of heat treatments upon the mechanical properties is discussed. The bioactivity of glass-ceramics is then evaluated using the in vitro simulated body fluid (SBF) soaking test, and the mechanism whereby apatite forms on the glass-ceramic surfaces in the SBF solution is discussed. The results indicate that the main crystal phase of the G-24 sample undergoing two heat treatment procedures is Ca5(PO4)3F (fluorapatite), and those of the G-2444 sample undergoing four heat treatment procedures are Ca5(PO4)3F and β-CaSiO3 (β-wollastonite). The heat treatment procedures are found to greatly influence the mechanical properties of the glass-ceramic, and an apatite layer is induced on the glass-ceramic surface after soaking in the SBF solution.

  14. Experimental Study of the Aging and Self-Healing of Glass/Ceramic Sealant Used in SOFCs

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wenning N.; Sun, Xin; Koeppel, Brian J.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2010-01-01

    High operating temperatures of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) require that sealant must function at a high temperature between 600oC and 900oC and in the oxidizing and reducing environments of fuel and air. This paper describes tests to investigate the temporal evolution of the volume fraction of ceramic phases, the evolution of micro-damage, and the self-healing behavior of the glass ceramic sealant used in SOFCs. It was found that after the initial sintering process, further crystallization of the glass ceramic sealant does not stop, but slows down and reduces the residual glass content while boosting the ceramic crystalline content. Under the long-term operating environment, distinct fibrous and needle-like crystals in the amorphous phase disappeared, and smeared/diffused phase boundaries between the glass phase and ceramic phase were observed. Meanwhile, the micro-damage was induced by the cooling-down process from the operating temperature to the room temperature, which can potentially degrade the mechanical properties of the glass/ceramic sealant. The glass/ceramic sealant self-healed upon reheating to the SOFC operating temperature, which can restore the mechanical performance of the glass/ceramic sealant.

  15. Distribution of Nd3+ ions in oxyfluoride glass ceramics

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    It has been an open question whether Nd3+ ions are incorporated into the crystalline phase in oxyfluoride glass ceramics or not. Moreover, relative research has indicated that spectra characters display minor differences between before and after heat treatment in oxyfluoride glass compared to similar Er3+-, Yb3+-, Tm3+-, Eu3+-, etc.-doped materials. Here, we have studied the distribution of Nd3+ ions in oxyfluoride glass ceramics by X-ray diffraction quantitative analysis and found that almost none of the Nd3+ ions can be incorporated into the crystalline phase. In order to confirm the rationality of the process, the conventional mathematical calculation and energy-dispersive spectrometry line scanning are employed, which show good consistency. The distribution of Nd3+ ions in oxyfluoride glass ceramics reported here is significant for further optical investigations and applications of rare-earth doped oxyfluoride glass ceramics. PMID:22647385

  16. Proof test diagrams for Zerodur glass-ceramic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, D. S.

    1991-01-01

    Proof test diagrams for Zerodur glass-ceramics are calculated from available fracture mechanics data. It is shown that the environment has a large effect on minimum time-to-failure as predicted by proof test diagrams.

  17. Photocatalytic activity of glass ceramics containing Nasicon-type crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Jie

    2013-01-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ► Glass ceramics containing Nasicon-type crystals were prepared. ► The glass ceramics showed photocatalytic activity under UV irradiation. ► Higher activity was observed in the MgTi{sub 4}(PO{sub 4}){sub 6}- and CaTi{sub 4}(PO{sub 4}){sub 6}-containing glass ceramics. -- Abstract: Glass ceramics were prepared by heat-treating MO–TiO{sub 2}–P{sub 2}O{sub 5} (M = Mg, Ca, Sr and Ba) and R{sub 2}O–TiO{sub 2}–P{sub 2}O{sub 5}–SiO{sub 2} (R = Li, Na and K) glasses, and their photocatalytic activity was investigated. The crystalline phases precipitated in the glasses were only Nasicon-type crystals, MTi{sub 4}(PO{sub 4}){sub 6} or RTi{sub 2}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3}. Decomposition experiments of both methylene blue (MB) and acetaldehyde showed that the glass ceramics exhibited effective photocatalytic activity. The activity did not depend on the radius of the M{sup 2+} or R{sup +} ion, and higher activity was observed in the MgTi{sub 4}(PO{sub 4}){sub 6} and CaTi{sub 4}(PO{sub 4}){sub 6} precipitated glass ceramics.

  18. Glass ceramic ZERODUR enabling nanometer precision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jedamzik, Ralf; Kunisch, Clemens; Nieder, Johannes; Westerhoff, Thomas

    2014-03-01

    The IC Lithography roadmap foresees manufacturing of devices with critical dimension of < 20 nm. Overlay specification of single digit nanometer asking for nanometer positioning accuracy requiring sub nanometer position measurement accuracy. The glass ceramic ZERODUR® is a well-established material in critical components of microlithography wafer stepper and offered with an extremely low coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE), the tightest tolerance available on market. SCHOTT is continuously improving manufacturing processes and it's method to measure and characterize the CTE behavior of ZERODUR® to full fill the ever tighter CTE specification for wafer stepper components. In this paper we present the ZERODUR® Lithography Roadmap on the CTE metrology and tolerance. Additionally, simulation calculations based on a physical model are presented predicting the long term CTE behavior of ZERODUR® components to optimize dimensional stability of precision positioning devices. CTE data of several low thermal expansion materials are compared regarding their temperature dependence between - 50°C and + 100°C. ZERODUR® TAILORED 22°C is full filling the tight CTE tolerance of +/- 10 ppb / K within the broadest temperature interval compared to all other materials of this investigation. The data presented in this paper explicitly demonstrates the capability of ZERODUR® to enable the nanometer precision required for future generation of lithography equipment and processes.

  19. Sealing glass-ceramics with near-linear thermal strain, Part II: Sequence of crystallization and phase stability

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, Mark A.; Griego, James J. M.; Dai, Steve

    2016-08-22

    The sequence of crystallization in a recrystallizable lithium silicate sealing glass-ceramic Li2O–SiO2–Al2O3–K2O–B2O3–P2O5–ZnO was analyzed by in situ high-temperature X-ray diffraction (HTXRD). Glass-ceramic specimens have been subjected to a two-stage heat-treatment schedule, including rapid cooling from sealing temperature to a first hold temperature 650°C, followed by heating to a second hold temperature of 810°C. Notable growth and saturation of Quartz was observed at 650°C (first hold). Cristobalite crystallized at the second hold temperature of 810°C, growing from the residual glass rather than converting from the Quartz. The coexistence of quartz and cristobalite resulted in a glass-ceramic having a near-linear thermal strain, as opposed to the highly nonlinear glass-ceramic where the cristobalite is the dominant silica crystalline phase. HTXRD was also performed to analyze the inversion and phase stability of the two types of fully crystallized glass-ceramics. While the inversion in cristobalite resembles the character of a first-order displacive phase transformation, i.e., step changes in lattice parameters and thermal hysteresis in the transition temperature, the inversion in quartz appears more diffuse and occurs over a much broader temperature range. Furthermore, localized tensile stresses on quartz and possible solid-solution effects have been attributed to the transition behavior of quartz crystals embedded in the glass-ceramics.

  20. Sealing glass-ceramics with near-linear thermal strain, Part II: Sequence of crystallization and phase stability

    DOE PAGES

    Rodriguez, Mark A.; Griego, James J. M.; Dai, Steve

    2016-08-22

    The sequence of crystallization in a recrystallizable lithium silicate sealing glass-ceramic Li2O–SiO2–Al2O3–K2O–B2O3–P2O5–ZnO was analyzed by in situ high-temperature X-ray diffraction (HTXRD). Glass-ceramic specimens have been subjected to a two-stage heat-treatment schedule, including rapid cooling from sealing temperature to a first hold temperature 650°C, followed by heating to a second hold temperature of 810°C. Notable growth and saturation of Quartz was observed at 650°C (first hold). Cristobalite crystallized at the second hold temperature of 810°C, growing from the residual glass rather than converting from the Quartz. The coexistence of quartz and cristobalite resulted in a glass-ceramic having a near-linear thermal strain,more » as opposed to the highly nonlinear glass-ceramic where the cristobalite is the dominant silica crystalline phase. HTXRD was also performed to analyze the inversion and phase stability of the two types of fully crystallized glass-ceramics. While the inversion in cristobalite resembles the character of a first-order displacive phase transformation, i.e., step changes in lattice parameters and thermal hysteresis in the transition temperature, the inversion in quartz appears more diffuse and occurs over a much broader temperature range. Furthermore, localized tensile stresses on quartz and possible solid-solution effects have been attributed to the transition behavior of quartz crystals embedded in the glass-ceramics.« less

  1. Spectroscopic investigations on glasses, glass-ceramics and ceramics developed for nuclear waste immobilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caurant, D.

    2014-05-01

    Highly radioactive nuclear waste must be immobilized in very durable matrices such as glasses, glass-ceramics and ceramics in order to avoid their dispersion in the biosphere during their radioactivity decay. In this paper, we present various examples of spectroscopic investigations (optical absorption, Raman, NMR, EPR) performed to study the local structure of different kinds of such matrices used or envisaged to immobilize different kinds of radioactive wastes. A particular attention has been paid on the incorporation and the structural role of rare earths—both as fission products and actinide surrogates—in silicate glasses and glass-ceramics. An example of structural study by EPR of a ceramic (hollandite) irradiated by electrons (to simulate the effect of the β-irradiation of radioactive cesium) is also presented.

  2. Dimensional stability. [of glass and glass-ceramic materials in diffraction telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hochen, R.; Justie, B.

    1976-01-01

    The temporal stability of glass and glass-ceramic materials is important to the success of a large diffraction-limited telescope. The results are presented of an experimental study of the dimensional stability of glasses and glass ceramics being considered for substrates of massive diffraction-limited mirrors designed for several years of service in earth orbit. The purpose of the study was to measure the relative change in length of the candidate substrate materials, to the order of 5 parts in 10 to the 8th power, as a function of several years time. The development of monolithic test etalons, the development and improvement of two types of ultra-high precision interferometers, and certain aspects of tests data presently achieved are discussed.

  3. Effect of heat treatment time on microstructure and electrical conductivity in LATP glass ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Sonigra, Dhiren E-mail: ajit.kulkarni@iitb.ac.in; Soman, Swati E-mail: ajit.kulkarni@iitb.ac.in; Kulkarni, Ajit R. E-mail: ajit.kulkarni@iitb.ac.in

    2014-04-24

    Glass-ceramic is prepared by heat treatment of melt quenched 14Li{sub 2}O−9Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}−38TiO{sub 2}−39P{sub 2}O{sub 5} glass in the vicinity of crystallization temperature. Growth of ceramic phase is controlled by tuning heat treatment time at fixed temperature. Ceramic phase was identified to be LiTi{sub 2}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3} from X Ray Diffraction analysis. Microstructural evolution of this phase with hold time was observed under high resolution Scanning Electron Microscope. DC conductivity is observed to increase by 4-5 orders of magnitude in this glass-ceramic compared to parent glass. However, formation of pores and cracks with very large heat treatment time seem to hinder further increase of conductivity.

  4. Effect of heat treatment time on microstructure and electrical conductivity in LATP glass ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonigra, Dhiren; Soman, Swati; Kulkarni, Ajit R.

    2014-04-01

    Glass-ceramic is prepared by heat treatment of melt quenched 14Li2O-9Al2O3-38TiO2-39P2O5 glass in the vicinity of crystallization temperature. Growth of ceramic phase is controlled by tuning heat treatment time at fixed temperature. Ceramic phase was identified to be LiTi2(PO4)3 from X Ray Diffraction analysis. Microstructural evolution of this phase with hold time was observed under high resolution Scanning Electron Microscope. DC conductivity is observed to increase by 4-5 orders of magnitude in this glass-ceramic compared to parent glass. However, formation of pores and cracks with very large heat treatment time seem to hinder further increase of conductivity.

  5. Transparent BaCl II:Eu 2+ glass-ceramic scintillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Gang; Johnson, Jacqueline; Schweizer, Stefan; Woodford, John; Newman, Peter; MacFarlane, Douglas

    2006-03-01

    Scintillators are the backbone of high-energy radiation detection devices. Most scintillators are based on inorganic crystals that have applications in medical radiography, nuclear medicine, security inspection, dosimetry, and high-energy physics. In this paper, we present a new type of scintillator that is based on glass ceramics (composites of glasses and crystals). These scintillators are made from Eu 2+-activated fluorozirconate glasses that are co-doped with Ba 2+, La 3+, Al 3+, Na +, and Cl -. Subsequent heat treatment of the glasses forms BaCl II nano-crystals (10-20 nm in size) that are embedded in the glass matrix. The resulting scintillators are transparent, efficient, inexpensive to fabricate, and easy to scale up. The physical structure and x-ray imaging performance of these glass-ceramic scintillators are presented, and an application of these materials to micro-computed tomography is demonstrated. Our study suggests that these glass-ceramic scintillators have high potential for medical x-ray imaging.

  6. Creep Behavior of Glass/Ceramic Sealant Used in Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wenning N.; Sun, Xin; Koeppel, Brian J.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2010-01-02

    High operating temperature of solid oxide fuel cells require that sealant must function at high temperature between 600o and 900oC and in the oxidizing and reducing environments of fuel and air. It should be noted that creep deformation becomes relevant for a material when the operating temperature is near or exceeds half of its melting temperature (in degrees of Kelvin). The operating temperatures for most of the solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) under development in the SECA program are around 800oC, which exceeds the glass transition temperature Tg for most glass ceramic materials. The goal of the study is to develop a creep model to capture the creep behavior of glass ceramic materials at high temperature and to investigate the effect of creep of glass ceramic sealant materials on stresses in glass seal and on the various interfaces of glass seal with other layers. The self-consistent creep models were incorporated into SOFC-MP and Mentat FC, and finite element analyses were performed to quantify the stresses in various parts. The stress in glass seals were released due to its creep behavior during the operating environments.

  7. Effect of host glass matrix on structural and optical behavior of glass-ceramic nanocomposite scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooke Barta, M.; Nadler, Jason H.; Kang, Zhitao; Wagner, Brent K.; Rosson, Robert; Kahn, Bernd

    2013-12-01

    Composite scintillator systems have received increased attention in recent years due to their promise for merging the radioisotope discrimination capabilities of single crystal scintillators with the high throughput scanning capabilities of portal monitors. However, producing the high light yield required for good energy resolution has proven challenging as scintillation photons are often scattered by variations in refractive index and agglomerated scintillator crystals within the composite. This investigation sought to mitigate these common problems by using glass-ceramic nanocomposite materials systems in which nanoscale scintillating crystallites are precipitated in a controlled manner from a transparent glass matrix. Precipitating crystallites in situ precludes nanoparticle agglomeration, and limiting crystallite size to 50 nm or less mitigates the effect of refractive index mismatch between the crystals and host glass. Cerium-doped gadolinium bromide (GdBr3(Ce)) scintillating crystals were incorporated into sodium-aluminosilicate (NAS) and alumino-borosilicate (ABS) host glass matrices, and the resulting glass-ceramic structures and luminescence behavior were characterized. The as-cast glass from the ABS system displayed a highly ordered microstructure that produced the highest luminescence intensity (light yield) of the samples studied. However, heat treating to form the glass-ceramic precipitated rare-earth oxide crystallites rather than rare-earth halides. This degraded light yield relative to the unaged sample.

  8. Electrophoretic deposition of mesoporous bioactive glass on glass-ceramic foam scaffolds for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Fiorilli, Sonia; Baino, Francesco; Cauda, Valentina; Crepaldi, Marco; Vitale-Brovarone, Chiara; Demarchi, Danilo; Onida, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    In this work, the coating of 3-D foam-like glass-ceramic scaffolds with a bioactive mesoporous glass (MBG) was investigated. The starting scaffolds, based on a non-commercial silicate glass, were fabricated by the polymer sponge replica technique followed by sintering; then, electrophoretic deposition (EPD) was applied to deposit a MBG layer on the scaffold struts. EPD was also compared with other techniques (dipping and direct in situ gelation) and it was shown to lead to the most promising results. The scaffold pore structure was maintained after the MBG coating by EPD, as assessed by SEM and micro-CT. In vitro bioactivity of the scaffolds was assessed by immersion in simulated body fluid and subsequent evaluation of hydroxyapatite (HA) formation. The deposition of a MBG coating can be a smart strategy to impart bioactive properties to the scaffold, allowing the formation of nano-structured HA agglomerates within 48 h from immersion, which does not occur on uncoated scaffold surfaces. The mechanical properties of the scaffold do not vary after the EPD (compressive strength ~19 MPa, fracture energy ~1.2 × 10(6) J m(-3)) and suggest the suitability of the prepared highly bioactive constructs as bone tissue engineering implants for load-bearing applications.

  9. Floor tile glass-ceramic glaze for improvement of the resistance to surface abrasion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gajek, M.; Lis, J.; Partyka, J.; Wójczyk, M.

    2011-10-01

    The results of research aimed at the study on frits and glass-ceramic glazes for floor tiles, based on compositions located in the primary field of cordierite crystallization within the system MgO-Al2O3-SiO2, have been presented. The results comprise investigations on the frits crystallization abilities, stability of the crystallizing phase under conditions of single-stage a fast firing cycle (time below 60 minutes) depending on their chemical composition and the influence of the nucleation agents. The influence of the nucleating agents namely TiO2, ZrO2, V2O5 on phase composition of obtained crystalline glazes, mechanical parameters and microstructure, has been examined. The strength tests proved increased mechanical resistance of crystalline glazes. Obtained glazes are characterized by high microhardness in range 6~8 GPa, as well as the increased wear resistance measured by the loss of weight below 100 mg / 55 cm2 (PN-EN ISO 10545-7). Significant increase of these parameters as compared with non-crystalline glazes, where micro-hardness values range between 5~6 GPa and the wear resistance values range from 120 to 200 mg, has been proved. Starting glasses (frits) and glazes of the ternary system MgO-SiO2-Al2O3, were examined with use of DTA, XRD and SEM methods.

  10. Radiation stability test on multiphase glass ceramic and crystalline ceramic waste forms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Ming; Kossoy, Anna; Jarvinen, Gordon; Crum, Jarrod; Turo, Laura; Riley, Brian; Brinkman, Kyle; Fox, Kevin; Amoroso, Jake; Marra, James

    2014-05-01

    A radiation stability study was performed on glass ceramic and crystalline ceramic waste forms. These materials are candidate host materials for immobilizing alkali/alkaline earth (Cs/Sr-CS) + lanthanide (LN) + transition metal (TM) fission product waste streams from nuclear fuel reprocessing. In this study, glass ceramics were fabricated using a borosilicate glass as a matrix in which to incorporate CS/LN/TM combined waste streams. The major phases in these multiphase materials are powellite, oxyaptite, pollucite, celsian, and durable residual glass phases. Al2O3 and TiO2 were combined with these waste components to produce multiphase crystalline ceramics containing hollandite-type phases, perovskites, pyrochlores and other minor metal titanate phases. For the radiation stability test, selected glass ceramic and crystalline ceramic samples were exposed to different irradiation environments including low fluxes of high-energy (∼1-5 MeV) protons and alpha particles generated by an ion accelerator, high fluxes of low-energy (hundreds of keV) krypton particles generated by an ion implanter, and in-situ electron irradiations in a transmission electron microscope. These irradiation experiments were performed to simulate self-radiation effects in a waste form. Ion irradiation-induced microstructural modifications were examined using X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. Our preliminary results reveal different radiation tolerance in different crystalline phases under various radiation damage environments. However, their stability may be rate dependent which may limit the waste loading that can be achieved.

  11. Radiation stability test on multiphase glass ceramic and crystalline ceramic waste forms

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Ming; Kossoy, Anna; Jarvinen, G. D.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Turo, Laura A.; Riley, Brian J.; Brinkman, Kyle; Fox, Kevin M.; Amoroso, Jake; Marra, James C.

    2014-02-03

    A radiation stability study was performed on glass ceramic and crystalline ceramic waste forms. These materials are candidate host materials for immobilizing alkali/alkaline earth (Cs/Sr-CS) + lanthanide (LN) + transition metal (TM) fission product waste streams from nuclear fuel reprocessing. In this study, glass ceramics were fabricated using a borosilicate glass as a matrix in which to incorporate CS/LN/TM combined waste streams. The major phases in these multiphase materials are powellite, oxyaptite, pollucite, celsian, and durable residual glass phases. Al2O3 and TiO2 were combined with these waste components to produce multiphase crystalline ceramics containing hollandite-type phases, perovskites, pyrochlores and other minor metal titanate phases. For the radiation stability test, selected glass ceramic and crystalline ceramic samples were exposed to different irradiation environments including low fluxes of high-energy (~1–5 MeV) protons and alpha particles generated by an ion accelerator, high fluxes of low-energy (hundreds of keV) krypton particles generated by an ion implanter, and in-situ electron irradiations in a transmission electron microscope. These irradiation experiments were performed to simulate self-radiation effects in a waste form. Ion irradiation-induced microstructural modifications were examined using X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. Our preliminary results reveal different radiation tolerance in different crystalline phases under various radiation damage environments. However, their stability may be rate dependent which may limit the waste loading that can be achieved.

  12. Interaction of HEPES buffer with glass-ceramic scaffold: Can HEPES replace TRIS in SBF?

    PubMed

    Rohanová, Dana; Horkavcová, Diana; Paidere, Laine; Boccaccini, Aldo Roberto; Bozděchová, Pavlína; Bezdička, Petr

    2016-11-27

    An international standard (ISO: 23317:2014) exists for the in vitro testing of inorganic biomaterials in simulated body fluid (SBF). This standard uses TRIS buffer to maintain neutral pH in SBF, but in our previous paper, we showed that the interaction of a tested glass-ceramic material with TRIS can produce false-positive results. In this study, we evaluated whether the HEPES buffer, which also belongs to the group of Good's buffers, would be more suitable for SBF. We compared its suitability in two media: SBF with HEPES and demineralized water with HEPES. The tested scaffold (45S5 bioactive glass-based) was exposed to the media under a static-dynamic arrangement (solutions were replaced on a daily basis) for 15 days. Leachate samples were collected daily for the analysis of Ca(2+) ions and Si (AAS), (PO4 )(3-) ions (UV-VIS), and to measure pH. The glass-ceramic scaffold was analyzed by SEM/EDS, XRD, and WD-XRF before and after 0.3, 1, 3, 7, 11, and 15 days of exposure. Our results confirmed the rapid selective dissolution of the glass-ceramic crystalline phase (Combeite) containing Ca(2+) ions due to the presence of HEPES, hydroxyapatite supersaturation being reached within 24 h in both solutions. These new results suggest that, like TRIS, HEPES buffer is not suitable for the in vitro testing of highly reactive inorganic biomaterials (glass, glass-ceramics). The ISO standard for such tests requires revision, but HEPES is not a viable alternative to TRIS buffer. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2016.

  13. Praseodymium doped NaYF4 nanocrystals in oxyfluoride glass-ceramics; morphological and spectroscopic studies.

    PubMed

    Dominiak-Dzik, G

    2009-04-01

    The synthesis, morphology, optical properties and excited state dynamics of the Pr-doped NaYF4 nanocrystals in glass-ceramics are presented. The crystalline cubic NaYF4:Pr were synthesized by the controlled heat-treatment of multicomponent oxyfluoride glass based on silica and YF3. A series of the two-hour heat treatments at 620-660 degrees C were carried out yielding visually transparent materials. Above 660 degrees C an opaque material was obtained. The crystalline phase was characterized by the X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and selected area electron diffraction (SAED). The effect of ceramming temperature on the NaYF4:Pr cell parameter (a = 5.470 A for NaYF4 and 5.4899 A, 5.4979 A and 5.5378 A in glass-ceramics) and particle average size (15-40 nm) was observed. Optical characteristics of formed glass-ceramics were favorably affected by the Pr3+ ions in well-defined sites of NaYF4; emission intensities increased and luminescence decay curves become single exponential with the longer corresponding lifetimes.

  14. Valorization of sugarcane bagasse ash: producing glass-ceramic materials.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, S R; Magalhães, R S; Arenales, A; Souza, A E; Romero, M; Rincón, J M

    2014-02-15

    Some aluminosilicates, for example mullite and wollastonite, are very important in the ceramic and construction industries. The most significant glass-ceramic for building applications has wollastonite as the main crystal phase. In this work we report on the use of sugarcane bagasse ash (SCBA) to produce glass-ceramics with silicates as the major crystalline phases. The glasses (frits) were prepared by mixing ash, limestone (calcium and magnesium carbonates) and potassium carbonate as the fluxing agent. X-ray fluorescence was used to determine the chemical composition of the glasses and their crystallization was assessed by using thermal analysis (DTA/DSC/TGA) and X-ray diffraction. The results showed that glass-ceramic material can be produced with wollastonite as the major phase, at a temperature lower than 900 °C.

  15. Glass-ceramic materials from electric arc furnace dust.

    PubMed

    Kavouras, P; Kehagias, T; Tsilika, I; Kaimakamis, G; Chrissafis, K; Kokkou, S; Papadopoulos, D; Karakostas, Th

    2007-01-31

    Electric arc furnace dust (EAFD) was vitrified with SiO2, Na2CO3 and CaCO3 powders in an electric furnace at ambient atmosphere. Vitreous products were transformed into glass-ceramic materials by two-stage heat treatment, at temperatures determined by differential thermal analysis. Both vitreous and glass-ceramic materials were chemically stable. Wollastonite (CaSiO3) was separated from the parent matrix as the dominant crystalline phase, verified by X-ray diffraction analysis and energy dispersive spectrometry. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that wollastonite crystallizes mainly in its monoclinic form. Knoop microhardness was measured with the static indentation test method in all initial vitreous products and the microhardness values were in the region of 5.0-5.5 GPa. Devitrification resulted in glass-ceramic materials with microhardness values strongly dependent on the morphology and orientation of the separated crystal phase.

  16. Study on surface modification of porous apatite-wollastonite bioactive glass ceramic scaffold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Bin; Zhou, Dali; Xue, Ming; Li, Guangda; Yang, Weizhong; Long, Qin; Ji, Li

    2008-11-01

    Chitosan (CS) was used to modify the surface of apatite-wollastonite bioactive glass ceramic (AW GC) scaffold to prepare AW/CS composite scaffold. The in vitro bioactivity of the AW/CS composite scaffold was investigated by simulated body fluid (SBF) soaking experiment. Cell growth on the surface of the material was evaluated by co-culturing osteogenic marrow stromal cells (MSCs) of rabbits with the scaffold. The results showed that the compressive strength of AW GC scaffold was improved dramatically after being modified by CS, whereas the mineralization rate was delayed. MSCs can attach well on the surface of the composite scaffold.

  17. A small angle neutron scattering study of mica based glass-ceramics with applications in dentistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilcoyne, S. H.; Bentley, P. M.; Al-Jawad, M.; Bubb, N. L.; Al-Shammary, H. A. O.; Wood, D. J.

    2004-07-01

    We are currently developing machinable and load-bearing mica-based glass-ceramics for use in restorative dental surgery. In this paper we present the results of an ambient temperature small angle neutron scattering (SANS) study of several such ceramics with chemical compositions chosen to optimise machinability and strength. The SANS spectra are all dominated by scattering from the crystalline-amorphous phase interface and exhibit Q-4 dependence (Porod scattering) indicating that, on a 100Å scale, the surface of the crystals is smooth.

  18. Glass-ceramics from vitrified sewage sludge pyrolysis residues and recycled glasses.

    PubMed

    Bernardo, E; Dal Maschio, R

    2011-11-01

    Pyrolysis of urban plant sewage sludge has been demonstrated to be an effective way to produce fuel gas. However, a complete disposal of this particular waste is not achieved if the solid residues from the treatment are not considered. In this paper we discuss the feasibility an integrated pyrolysis/vitrification/sintering approach, aimed at a "full" disposal: the pyrolysis residues are first converted into a glass, then transformed into glass-ceramics, by simple viscous flow sintering treatments, with or without additions of inexpensive recycled glasses and kaolin clay. The obtained products were demonstrated to constitute an alternative to natural stones, in terms of both mechanical strength and chemical stability.

  19. Dilute condition corrosion behavior of glass-ceramic waste form

    SciTech Connect

    Crum, Jarrod V.; Neeway, James J.; Riley, Brian J.; Zhu, Zihua; Olszta, Matthew J.; Tang, Ming

    2016-08-11

    Borosilicate glass-ceramics are being developed to immobilize high-level waste generated by aqueous reprocessing into a stable waste form. The corrosion behavior of this multiphase waste form is expected to be complicated by multiple phases and crystal-glass interfaces. A modified single-pass flow-through test was performed on polished monolithic coupons at a neutral pH (25 °C) and 90 °C for 33 d. The measured glass corrosion rates by micro analysis in the samples ranged from 0.019 to 0.29 g m-2 d-1 at a flow rate per surface area = 1.73 × 10-6 m s-1. The crystal phases (oxyapatite and Ca-rich powellite) corroded below quantifiable rates, by micro analysis. While, Ba-rich powellite corroded considerably in O10 sample. The corrosion rates of C1 and its replicate C20 were elevated an order of magnitude by mechanical stresses at crystal-glass interface caused by thermal expansion mismatch during cooling and unique morphology (oxyapatite clustering).

  20. Dilute condition corrosion behavior of glass-ceramic waste form

    DOE PAGES

    Crum, Jarrod V.; Neeway, James J.; Riley, Brian J.; ...

    2016-08-11

    Borosilicate glass-ceramics are being developed to immobilize high-level waste generated by aqueous reprocessing into a stable waste form. The corrosion behavior of this multiphase waste form is expected to be complicated by multiple phases and crystal-glass interfaces. A modified single-pass flow-through test was performed on polished monolithic coupons at a neutral pH (25 °C) and 90 °C for 33 d. The measured glass corrosion rates by micro analysis in the samples ranged from 0.019 to 0.29 g m-2 d-1 at a flow rate per surface area = 1.73 × 10-6 m s-1. The crystal phases (oxyapatite and Ca-rich powellite) corrodedmore » below quantifiable rates, by micro analysis. While, Ba-rich powellite corroded considerably in O10 sample. The corrosion rates of C1 and its replicate C20 were elevated an order of magnitude by mechanical stresses at crystal-glass interface caused by thermal expansion mismatch during cooling and unique morphology (oxyapatite clustering).« less

  1. Processing of glass-ceramics from lunar resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fabes, B. D.; Poisl, W. H.

    1991-01-01

    The goal is to fabricate useful ceramic materials from the by-products of lunar oxygen production processes. Specifically, the crystal nucleation and growth kinetics of ilmenite-extracted lunar regolith were studied in order to produce glass-ceramics with optimal mechanical, thermal, and abrasion resistant properties. In the initial year of the program, construction and calibration of a high temperature viscometer, used for determining the viscosity of simulated lunar glasses was finished. A series of lunar simulants were also prepared, and the viscosity of each was determined over a range of temperatures. It was found that an increase in the concentration of Fe2O3 decreases the viscosity of the glass. While this may be helpful in processing the glass, Fe2O3 concentrations greater than approximately 10 wt percent resulted in uncontrolled crystallization during viscosity measurements. Impurities (such as Na2O, MnO, and K2O) in the regolith appeared to decrease the viscosity of the parent glass. These effects, as well as those of TiO2 and SiO2 on the processability of the glass, however, remain to be quantified.

  2. Dilute condition corrosion behavior of glass-ceramic waste form

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crum, Jarrod V.; Neeway, James J.; Riley, Brian J.; Zhu, Zihua; Olszta, Matthew J.; Tang, Ming

    2016-12-01

    Borosilicate glass-ceramics are being developed to immobilize high-level waste generated by aqueous reprocessing into a stable waste form. The corrosion behavior of this multiphase waste form is expected to be complicated by multiple phases and crystal-glass interfaces. A modified single-pass flow-through test was performed on polished monolithic coupons at a neutral pH (25 °C) and 90 °C for 33 d. The measured glass corrosion rates by micro analysis in the samples ranged from 0.019 to 0.29 g m-2 d-1 at a flow rate per surface area = 1.73 × 10-6 m s-1. The crystal phases (oxyapatite and Ca-rich powellite) corroded below quantifiable rates, by micro analysis. While, Ba-rich powellite corroded considerably in O10 sample. The corrosion rates of C1 and its replicate C20 were elevated an order of magnitude by mechanical stresses at crystal-glass interface caused by thermal expansion mismatch during cooling and unique morphology (oxyapatite clustering).

  3. Optical properties of transparent cobalt-containing magnesium aluminosilicate glass-ceramics doped with gallium oxide for saturable absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loiko, P. A.; Skoptsov, N. A.; Dymshits, O. S.; Malyarevich, A. M.; Yumashev, K. V.; Zhilin, A. A.; Alekseeva, I. P.

    2016-10-01

    Transparent glass-ceramic materials based on glasses of the MgO-Al2O3-SiO2-TiO2 system doped with CoO and Ga2O3 are synthesized. The secondary heat treatment of the initial glasses at temperatures of 800-950°C leads to precipitation of nanosized (6-7 nm) crystals of magnesium aluminogallium spinel doped with cobalt ions and magnesium aluminotitanate solid solutions. The optical absorption spectra of the initial glass and glass-ceramic materials are studied. It is shown that the absorption band caused by the 4 A 2(4F)→ 4 T 1(4 F) transitions of tetrahedrally coordinated Co2+ ions in glass-ceramics with nanosized Co:Mg(Al,Ga)2O4 crystals is shifted to longer wavelengths (up to 1.67 µm) compared to the position of this band in materials with Co:MgAl2O4 crystals. The synthesized glass-ceramics are characterized by a relatively low saturation fluence FS 0.5 ± 0.1 J/cm2 at a wavelength of 1.54 µm, as well as by a high radiation resistance to nanosecond laser pulses, which is no lower than 15 ± 2 J/cm2. This explains their attractiveness as materials for saturable absorbers for erbium lasers emitting in the spectral range 1.5-1.7 µm.

  4. Remedial processing of oil shale fly ash (OSFA) and its value-added conversion into glass-ceramics.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhikun; Zhang, Lei; Li, Aimin

    2015-12-01

    Recently, various solid wastes such as sewage sludge, coal fly ash and slag have been recycled into various products such as sintered bricks, ceramics and cement concrete. Application of these recycling approaches is much better and greener than conventional landfills since it can solve the problems of storage of industrial wastes and reduce exploration of natural resources for construction materials to protect the environment. Therefore, in this study, an attempt was made to recycle oil shale fly ash (OSFA), a by-product obtained from the extracting of shale oil in the oil shale industry, into a value-added glass-ceramic material via melting and sintering method. The influence of basicity (CaO/SiO2 ratio) by adding calcium oxide on the performance of glass-ceramics was studied in terms of phase transformation, mechanical properties, chemical resistances and heavy metals leaching tests. Crystallization kinetics results showed that the increase of basicity reduced the activation energies of crystallization but did not change the crystallization mechanism. When increasing the basicity from 0.2 to 0.5, the densification of sintering body was enhanced due to the promotion of viscous flow of glass powders, and therefore the compression strength and bending strength of glass-ceramics were increased. Heavy metals leaching results indicated that the produced OSFA-based glass-ceramics could be taken as non-hazardous materials. The maximum mechanical properties of compression strength of 186 ± 3 MPa, bending strength of 78 ± 6 MPa, good chemical resistances and low heavy metals leaching concentrations showed that it could be used as a substitute material for construction applications. The proposed approach will be one of the potential sustainable solutions in reducing the storage of oil shale fly ash as well as converting it into a value-added product.

  5. Method of making in-situ whisker reinforced glass ceramic

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Jesse J.; Hirschfeld, Deidre A.; Lee, K. H.

    1993-02-16

    A heat processing procedure is used to create reinforcing whiskers of TiO.sub.2 in glass-ceramic materials in the LAS and MAS family. The heat processing procedure has particular application in creating TiO.sub.2 in-situ in a modified .beta.-eucryptite system.

  6. Study on effect of poly (ethylene oxide) addition and in-situ porosity generation on poly (vinylidene fluoride)-glass ceramic composite membranes for lithium polymer batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shubha, Nageswaran; Prasanth, Raghavan; Hng, Huey Hoon; Srinivasan, Madhavi

    2014-12-01

    The effect of blending polyethylene oxide with poly (vinylidene fluoride)-lithium aluminum germanium phosphate (LAGP) composite and in-situ porosity generation on the electrochemical performance of polymer electrolytes based on non-woven fibrous mats is studied. Electrospinning process parameters are controlled to get a fibrous membrane consisting of bead-free, multilayered, three dimensional network structure of ultrafine fibers. The electrospun membranes are subjected to a preferential polymer dissolution process to prepare a highly porous structure. The membranes show high surface roughness with uniformly sized and distributed pores on the fibers. The membranes with good mechanical strength, thermal stability and high porosity exhibit high swelling when activated with liquid electrolyte. The prepared composite polymer electrolytes show high ionic conductivity. The addition of the glass ceramic improves the mechanical and thermal stability, while blending and in-situ porosity generation improves the ionic conductivity, charge-discharge performance, cycling stability, interface properties and compatibility with lithium electrode.

  7. Structural features of vitreous and glass-ceramic materials prepared from brown coal ashes

    SciTech Connect

    Petrakovskaya, E.A.; Pavlov, V.F.; Bayukov, O.A.

    1995-05-01

    The ESR and Moessbauer spectra for the highly porous X-ray amorphous products of processing the high-calcium ashes of brown coals are studied. The tetrahedral coordination of Fe{sup 3+} ions and octahedral coordinations of Mn{sup 2+} and Ti{sup 3+}, ions are revealed. Some of the iron centers are attributed to the extrinsic crystalline phase. The character of change in the ESR spectra is investigated in the vitreous and glass--ceramic states. The correlation between the change in the valence of Ti and the amount of octahedrally coordinated Mn is established.

  8. Immobilization of gadolinium in iron borophosphate glasses and iron borophosphate based glass-ceramics: Implications for the immobilization of plutonium(Ⅲ)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fu; Liao, Qilong; Dai, Yunya; Zhu, Hanzhen

    2016-08-01

    Immobilization of gadolinium (Gd), a nonradioactive surrogate for Pu3+, in iron borophosphate glasses/glass-ceramics (IBP glasses/glass-ceramics) has been investigated. The IBP glass containing 4 mol% Gd2O3 is homogeneously amorphous. At higher Gd2O3 concentrations, additional Gd is retained in the glasses as crystalline inclusions of monazite GdPO4 crystalline phase detected with X-ray diffraction. Moreover, Gd2O3 addition increases the Tg of the IBP glasses in glass formation range, which is consistent with the structural modification of the glasses. The structure of the Gd2O3-loaded IBP glasses/glass-ceramics is mainly based on pyrophosphate units. The chemical durability of Gd2O3-loaded IBP glasses/glass-ceramics is comparable to widely used borosilicate glass waste forms and the existence of monazite GdPO4 crystalline phase does not degrade the aqueous chemical durability of the IBP glasses/glass-ceramics. The Gd-loading results imply that the solubility should not be a limiting factor in processing nuclide Pu3+ if the formed crystalline phase(s) have high chemical durability.

  9. Glass-ceramic material and method of making

    DOEpatents

    Meinhardt, Kerry D [Richland, WA; Vienna, John D [West Richland, WA; Armstrong, Timothy R [Pasco, WA; Pederson, Larry R [Kennewick, WA

    2002-08-13

    The present invention is a glass-ceramic material and method of making useful for joining at least two solid ceramic parts. The seal is a blend of M.sub.A O--M.sub.B O.sub.y --SiO.sub.2 that substantially matches a coefficient of thermal expansion of the solid electrolyte. According to the present invention, a series of glass ceramics in the M.sub.A O--M.sub.B O.sub.y --SiO.sub.2 system can be used to join or seal both tubular and planar ceramic solid oxide fuel cells, oxygen electrolyzers, and membrane reactors for the production of syngas, commodity chemicals and other products.

  10. EPR of radiation defects in lithium-oxyfluoride glass ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedotovs, A.; Rogulis, U.; Sarakovskis, A.; Dimitrocenko, L.

    2010-11-01

    We studied oxyfluoride composites based on lithium silicate glasses with yttrium fluorides and rare-earth dopants. The electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) has been used to obtain information about radiation induced defects in these materials. Spectra have been measured before and after X-ray irradiation at room temperature and at liquid nitrogen temperature. Fluoride crystallites within samples were created by means of thermal treatment at specific temperatures. EPR spectra of radiation induced defects in oxyfluoride glass ceramics, in which crystallites have not been yet created, show no explicit hfs interaction of fluorine nuclei. However, in glass ceramics, which already contains fluoride crystallites, the hfs characteristic to fluorine nuclei appears in the EPR spectra. EPR hyperfine structure could be explained within a model of an F-type centre in YF3 crystalline phase.

  11. Eu oxidation state in fluorozirconate-based glass ceramics

    PubMed Central

    Henke, B.; Paßlick, C.; Keil, P.; Johnson, J. A.; Schweizer, S.

    2009-01-01

    The influence of InF3 doping and remelting on Eu-doped fluorozirconate-based glass ceramics was investigated using near-edge x-ray absorption and optical spectroscopy. It was found that the addition of InF3 to the melt decreases the Eu2+∕Eu3+ mole ratio, while remelting leads to a significant change in the Eu2+∕Eu3+ ratio in favor of Eu2+. Photoluminescence spectroscopy shows that additional annealing steps lead to the formation of BaCl2 nanoparticles in the glass. In as-made glass ceramics containing InF3, a phase transition of the nanoparticles from hexagonal to orthorhombic structure is observed. This phase transition is not observed in the remelted glasses studied here. PMID:20057931

  12. Thermophysical Properties of Multiphase Borosilicate Glass-Ceramic Waste Forms

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Andrew T.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Tang, Ming; Rouxel, T.

    2014-01-22

    Multiphase borosilicate glass-ceramics represent one candidate to contain radioactive nuclear waste separated from used nuclear fuel. In this work, the thermophysical properties from room temperature to 1273 K were investigated for four different borosilicate glass-ceramic compositions containing waste loadings from 42 to 60 wt% to determine the sensitivity of these properties to waste loading, as-fabricated microstructure, and potential evolutions in microstructure brought about by temperature transients. The thermal expansion, specific heat capacity, thermal diffusivity, and thermal conductivity are presented. The impact of increasing waste loading is shown to have a small but measurable effect on the thermophysical properties between the four compositions, contrasted to a much greater impact observed when transitioning from predominantly crystalline to amorphous systems. Thermal cycling below 1273 K was not found to measurably impact the thermophysical properties of the compositions investigated here.

  13. Dynamic and static fatigue of a machinable glass ceramic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Magida, M. B.; Forrest, K. A.; Heslin, T. M.

    1984-01-01

    The dynamic and static fatigue behavior of a machinable glass ceramic was investigated to assess its susceptibility to stress corrosion-induced delayed failure. Fracture mechanics techniques were used to analyze the results so that lifetime predictions for components of this material could be made. The resistance to subcritical crack growth of this material was concluded to be only moderate and was found to be dependent on the size of its microstructure.

  14. Research on subsurface damage of glass-ceramics mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Ling-jie; Guo, Pei-ji; Chen, Xi; Wang, Zi-wu

    2016-10-01

    We discuss the depth of subsurface damage (SSD) on different processing conditions. Considering different conditions would produce different depths of SSD, this article seriously studies the depth influenced by different sizes of abrasive particles and different grinding discs. Then the depth of SSD would be detected via Three-Coordinate Measuring Machine (CMM) after traditional polishing. The target of this research is to provide some basic references for the choice of the glass-ceramics grinding machining process.

  15. Optimal glass-ceramic structures: Components of giant mirror telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eschenauer, Hans A.

    1990-01-01

    Detailed investigations are carried out on optimal glass-ceramic mirror structures of terrestrial space technology (optical telescopes). In order to find an optimum design, a nonlinear multi-criteria optimization problem is formulated. 'Minimum deformation' at 'minimum weight' are selected as contradictory objectives, and a set of further constraints (quilting effect, optical faults etc.) is defined and included. A special result of the investigations is described.

  16. Water analysis of glass ceramics by FT-IR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Nease, A B; Hale, M D; Kramer, D P

    1983-12-15

    A method for measuring water concentration in glasses has been described and the results of the study of ten batches of glasses have been tabulated. It has been shown that infrared spectroscopy is a satisfactory tool for measuring water concentration in glass ceramics. The water concentrations of ten batches of glass have been shown to differ significantly, and these variances are associated with environmental humidity and glass preparation method.

  17. Ceramic fiber reinforced glass-ceramic matrix composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A slurry of BSAS glass powders is cast into tapes which are cut to predetermined sizes. Mats of continuous chemical vapor deposition (CVD)-SiC fibers are alternately stacked with these matrix tapes. This tape-mat stack is warm-pressed to produce a 'green' composite which is heated to burn out organic constituents. The remaining interim material is then hot-pressed to form a BSAS glass-ceramic fiber-reinforced composite.

  18. Crystallization and Properties of Strontium Barium Niobate-Based Glass-Ceramics for Energy-Storage Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Linjiang; Wang, Wei; Shen, Bo; Zhai, Jiwei; Kong, Ling Bing

    2015-01-01

    The crystallization kinetics, phase development, and electric properties of Al2O3-SiO2-SrO-BaO-Nb2O5-ZnO glass-ceramics were investigated for potential application of the materials for energy storage. Strontium barium niobate (Ba x Sr1- x Nb2O6) with the tetragonal tungsten-bronze structure was the major crystalline phase formed by both surface and bulk crystallization. The presence of ZnO made the glasses less stable, and thus promoted their crystallization, but had no significant effect on the microstructure of the resulting glass-ceramics. All glass-ceramic samples had a uniform microstructure, with a crystal size of approximately 50 nm. Optimized energy storage density of approximately 6.0 J/cm3 was achieved for the sample containing 0.5% ZnO; the average dielectric constant was 150-180 and the breakdown strength was 950-870 kV/cm over the temperature range 850-950°C.

  19. Crystallization and Properties of Strontium Barium Niobate-Based Glass-Ceramics for Energy-Storage Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Linjiang; Wang, Wei; Shen, Bo; Zhai, Jiwei; Kong, Ling Bing

    2014-09-01

    The crystallization kinetics, phase development, and electric properties of Al2O3-SiO2-SrO-BaO-Nb2O5-ZnO glass-ceramics were investigated for potential application of the materials for energy storage. Strontium barium niobate (Ba x Sr1-x Nb2O6) with the tetragonal tungsten-bronze structure was the major crystalline phase formed by both surface and bulk crystallization. The presence of ZnO made the glasses less stable, and thus promoted their crystallization, but had no significant effect on the microstructure of the resulting glass-ceramics. All glass-ceramic samples had a uniform microstructure, with a crystal size of approximately 50 nm. Optimized energy storage density of approximately 6.0 J/cm3 was achieved for the sample containing 0.5% ZnO; the average dielectric constant was 150-180 and the breakdown strength was 950-870 kV/cm over the temperature range 850-950°C.

  20. The microstructure of erbium-ytterbium co-doped oxyfluoride glass-ceramic optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Augustyn, Elżbieta; Żelechower, Michał; Stróż, Danuta; Chrapoński, Jacek

    2012-04-01

    Oxyfluoride transparent glass-ceramics combine some features of glasses (easier shaping or lower than single crystals cost of fabrication) and some advantages of rare-earth doped single crystals (narrow absorption/emission lines and longer lifetimes of luminescent levels). Since the material seems to be promising candidate for efficient fiber amplifiers, the manufacturing as well as structural and optical examination of the oxyfluoride glass-ceramic fibers doped with rare-earth ions seems to be a serious challenge. In the first stage oxyfluoride glasses of the following compositions 48SiO2-11Al2O3-7Na2CO3-10CaO-10PbO-11PbF2-3ErF3 and 48SiO2-11Al2O3-7Na2CO3-10CaO-10PbO-10PbF2-3YbF3-1ErF3 (in molar%) were fabricated from high purity commercial chemicals (Sigma-Aldrich). The fabricated glass preforms were drawn into glass fibers using the mini-tower. Finally, the transparent Er3+ doped and Er3+/Yb3+ co-doped oxyfluoride glass-ceramic fibers were obtained by controlled heat treatment of glass fibers. The preceding differential thermal analysis (DTA) studies allowed estimating both the fiber drawing temperature and the controlled crystallization temperature of glass fibers. X-ray diffraction examination (XRD) at each stage of the glass-ceramic fibers fabrication confirmed the undesirable crystallization of preforms and glass fibers has been avoided. The fibers shown their mixed amorphous-crystalline microstructure with nano-crystals of size even below 10 nm distributed in the glassy host. The crystal structure of the grown nano-crystals has been determined by XRD and confirmed by electron diffraction (SAED). Results obtained by both techniques seem to be compatible: Er3FO10Si3 (monoclinic; ICSD 92512), Pb5Al3F19 (triclinic; ICSD 91325) and Er4F2O11Si3 (triclinic; ICSD 51510) against to initially expected PbF2 crystals.

  1. Development of all-solid lithium-ion battery using Li-ion conducting glass-ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inda, Yasushi; Katoh, Takashi; Baba, Mamoru

    We have developed a high performance lithium-ion conducting glass-ceramics. This glass-ceramics has the crystalline form of Li 1+ x+ yAl xTi 2- xSi yP 3- yO 12 with a NASICON-type structure, and it exhibits a high lithium-ion conductivity of 10 -3 S cm -1 or above at room temperature. Moreover, since this material is stable in the open atmosphere and even to exposure to moist air, it is expected to be applied for various uses. One of applications of this material is as a solid electrolyte for a lithium-ion battery. Batteries were developed by combining a LiCoO 2 positive electrode, a Li 4Ti 5O 12 negative electrode, and a composite electrolyte. The battery using the composite electrolyte with a higher conductivity exhibited a good charge-discharge characteristic.

  2. [Effect of temperature on the structure of CaO-MgO-Al2O3-SiO2 nanocrystalline glass-ceramics studied by Raman spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Li, Bao-Wei; Ouyang, Shun-Li; Zhang, Xue-Feng; Jia, Xiao-Lin; Deng, Lei-Bo; Liu, Fang

    2014-07-01

    In the present paper, nanocrystalline glass-ceramic of CaO-MgO-Al2O3-SiO2 system was produced by melting method. The CaO-MgO-Al2O3-SiO2 nanocrystalline glass-ceramic was measured by Raman spectroscopy in the temperature range from -190 to 310 degrees C in order to study the effect of temperature on the structure of this system nanocrystalline glass-ceramics. The results showed that different non-bridge oxygen bond silicon-oxygen tetrahedron structural unit changes are not consistent with rising temperature. Further analyses indicated that: the SiO4 tetrahedron with 2 non-bridged oxygen (Q2), the SiO4 tetrahedron with 3 non-bridged oxygen (Q(1)), which are situated at the edge of the 3-D SiO4 tetrahedrons network, and the SiO4 tetrahedron with 4 non-bridged oxygen (Q(0)), which is situated outside the 3-D network all suffered a significant influence by the temperature change, which has been expressed as: shifts towards the high wave-number, increased bond force constants, and shortened bond lengths. This paper studied the influence of temperature on CMAS system nanocrystalline glass-ceramics using variable temperature Raman technology. It provides experiment basis to the research on external environment influence on CMAS system nanocrystalline glass-ceramics materials in terms of structure and performance. In addition, the research provides experimental basis for controlling the expansion coefficient of nanocrystalline glass-ceramic of CaO-MgO-Al2O3-SiO2 system.

  3. Sealing glass-ceramics with near linear thermal strain, Part II: Sequence of crystallization and phase stability

    DOE PAGES

    Dai, Steve Xunhu; Rodriguez, Mark A.; Griego, James M.

    2016-06-01

    Here, the sequence of crystallization in a re-crystallizable lithium silicate sealing glass-ceramic Li2O-SiO2-Al2O3-K2O-B2O3-P2O5-ZnO was analyzed by in situ high temperature X-ray diffraction (HTXRD). Glass-ceramic specimens have been subjected to a 2-stage heat treatment schedule, including rapid cooling from sealing temperature to a 1st hold temperature 650 °C, following by heating to a 2nd hold temperature of 810 °C. Notable growth and saturation of Quartz was observed at 650 °C (1st hold).

  4. Sealing glass-ceramics with near linear thermal strain, Part II: Sequence of crystallization and phase stability

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Steve Xunhu; Rodriguez, Mark A.; Griego, James M.

    2016-06-01

    Here, the sequence of crystallization in a re-crystallizable lithium silicate sealing glass-ceramic Li2O-SiO2-Al2O3-K2O-B2O3-P2O5-ZnO was analyzed by in situ high temperature X-ray diffraction (HTXRD). Glass-ceramic specimens have been subjected to a 2-stage heat treatment schedule, including rapid cooling from sealing temperature to a 1st hold temperature 650 °C, following by heating to a 2nd hold temperature of 810 °C. Notable growth and saturation of Quartz was observed at 650 °C (1st hold).

  5. Bioactivity and cytotoxicity of glass and glass-ceramics based on the 3CaO·P₂O₅--SiO₂--MgO system.

    PubMed

    Daguano, Juliana K M F; Rogero, Sizue O; Crovace, Murilo C; Peitl, Oscar; Strecker, Kurt; Dos Santos, Claudinei

    2013-09-01

    The mechanical strength of bioactive glasses can be improved by controlled crystallization, turning its use as bulk bone implants viable. However, crystallization may affect the bioactivity of the material. The aim of this study was to develop glass-ceramics of the nominal composition (wt%) 52.75(3CaO·P₂O₅)-30SiO₂-17.25MgO, with different crystallized fractions and to evaluate their in vitro cytotoxicity and bioactivity. Specimens were heat-treated at 700, 775 and 975 °C, for 4 h. The major crystalline phase identified was whitlockite, an Mg-substituted tricalcium phosphate. The evaluation of the cytotoxicity was carried out by the neutral red uptake methodology. Ionic exchanges with the simulated body fluid SBF-K9 acellular solution during the in vitro bioactivity tests highlight the differences in terms of chemical reactivity between the glass and the glass-ceramics. The effect of crystallinity on the rates of hydroxycarbonate apatite (HCA) formation was followed by Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy. Although all glass-ceramics can be considered bioactive, the glass-ceramic heat-treated at 775 °C (V775-4) presented the most interesting result, because the onset for HCA formation is at about 24 h and after 7 days the HCA layer dominates completely the spectrum. This occurs probably due to the presence of the whitlockite phase (3(Ca,Mg)O·P₂O₅). All samples were considered not cytotoxic.

  6. Computational materials science aided design of glass ceramics and crystal properties (abstract only).

    PubMed

    Mannstadt, Wolfgang

    2008-02-13

    Today's high tech materials have in many cases highly specialized properties and designed functionalities. Materials parameters like high temperature stability, high stiffness and certain optical properties have to be optimized and in many cases an adaptation to given processes is necessary. Many materials are compounds or layered structures. Thus, surface and interface properties need to be considered as well. At the same time to some extent just a few atomic layers sometimes determine the properties of the material, as is well known in semiconductor and other thin film technologies. Therefore, a detailed understanding of the materials properties at the atomic scale becomes more and more important. In addition many high tech materials have to be of high purity or selective dopant concentrations have to be adjusted to fulfill the desired functionality. Modern materials developments successfully use computational materials science to achieve that goal. Improved software tools and continuously growing computational power allow us to predict macroscopic properties of materials on the basis of microscopic/atomic ab initio simulation approaches. At Schott, special materials, in particular glasses and glass ceramics, are produced for a variety of applications. For a glass ceramic all the above mentioned difficulties for materials development arise. The properties of a glass ceramic are determined by the interplay of crystalline phases embedded in an amorphous glass matrix. For materials development the understanding of crystal structures and their properties, surfaces and interface phenomena, and amorphous systems are necessary, likewise. Each by itself is already a challenging problem. Many crystal phases that are grown within the glass matrix do not exist as single crystals or are difficult to grow in reasonable amounts for experimental investigations. The only way to obtain the properties of these crystalline phases is through 'ab initio' simulations in the computer

  7. Surface functionalization of 3D glass-ceramic porous scaffolds for enhanced mineralization in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferraris, Sara; Vitale-Brovarone, Chiara; Bretcanu, Oana; Cassinelli, Clara; Vernè, Enrica

    2013-04-01

    Bone reconstruction after tissue loosening due to traumatic, pathological or surgical causes is in increasing demand. 3D scaffolds are a widely studied solution for supporting new bone growth. Bioactive glass-ceramic porous materials can offer a three-dimensional structure that is able to chemically bond to bone. The ability to surface modify these devices by grafting biologically active molecules represents a challenge, with the aim of stimulating physiological bone regeneration with both inorganic and organic signals. In this research work glass ceramic scaffolds with very high mechanical properties and moderate bioactivity have been functionalized with the enzyme alkaline phosphatase (ALP). The material surface was activated in order to expose hydroxyl groups. The activated surface was further grafted with ALP both via silanization and also via direct grafting to the surface active hydroxyl groups. Enzymatic activity of grafted samples were measured by means of UV-vis spectroscopy before and after ultrasonic washing in TRIS-HCl buffer solution. In vitro inorganic bioactivity was investigated by soaking the scaffolds after the different steps of functionalization in a simulated body fluid (SBF). SEM observations allowed the monitoring of the scaffold morphology and surface chemical composition after soaking in SBF. The presence of ALP enhanced the in vitro inorganic bioactivity of the tested material.

  8. In-process assessment of dental cutting of a leucite-reinforced glass-ceramic.

    PubMed

    Song, Xiao-Fei; Yin, Ling; Han, Yi-Gang

    2009-03-01

    This paper reports an in-process assessment of the dental cutting of a leucite-reinforced glass-ceramic with a high-speed dental handpiece under clinical operating conditions. The dental cutting was performed using a computer-controlled 2-degrees-of-freedom (2-DOF) testing regime and a coarse diamond bur of 106-125 microm grit size. Dynamic forces were monitored during the cutting process using a piezoelectric force dynamometer and a data acquisition system in both time and frequency domains. Bur speeds were found to decrease with the depth of cut and with the feed rate, by a maximum of 10.5% from the free-running speed of 322.2 krpm (1 krpm=1,000 rpm) to 288.4 krpm at the highest feed rate of 60mm/min and depth of cut of 50 microm. Both the tangential and normal forces increased with the depth of cut and the feed rate, in the ranges of 0.24-1.77 N and 0.60-2.93 N respectively. The torque increased with the depth of cut and feed rate. The specific cutting energy generally decreased with the depth of cut or the feed rate with the exception of a small-scale fluctuation at the higher depth of cut and feed rate. The dental cutting characteristics for the leucite glass-ceramic were similar to those for the feldspathic porcelain but had higher magnitudes.

  9. Cordierite glass-ceramics as glaze materials for refractory forming tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Frank Scott

    1999-11-01

    Glasses of the composition 2MgO·2Al2O 3·5SiO2 were successfully nucleated with additions of up to 8 mol% TiO2 to form fully crystalline glass-ceramic bodies. The predominant crystalline phase is a hexagonal stuffed quartz structure when the glasses are heated to temperatures near 950°C. This phase transforms to the hexagonal indialite phase at higher temperatures. The nucleating effect of the TiO2 addition results in a fine grained glass-ceramic. Both the glass transition temperature (Tg) and the melting temperature (Tm) decreased with a linear dependence on the amount of TiO 2 added to the glass. Glass of the composition 2MgO·2Al 2O3·5SiO2 + 8 mol% TiO2 was ground and air plasma sprayed onto low thermal expansion castable refractory concretes as a glaze. This glaze remained intact on the refractory concretes during crystallization. This behavior was observed during and after limited thermal cycling of the glazed refractory concretes, and also after high temperature heat treatment of the glazed refractory concretes.

  10. Glass-ceramic coated Mg-Ca alloys for biomedical implant applications.

    PubMed

    Rau, J V; Antoniac, I; Fosca, M; De Bonis, A; Blajan, A I; Cotrut, C; Graziani, V; Curcio, M; Cricenti, A; Niculescu, M; Ortenzi, M; Teghil, R

    2016-07-01

    Biodegradable metals and alloys are promising candidates for biomedical bone implant applications. However, due to the high rate of their biodegradation in human body environment, they should be coated with less reactive materials, such, for example, as bioactive glasses or glass-ceramics. Fort this scope, RKKP composition glass-ceramic coatings have been deposited on Mg-Ca(1.4wt%) alloy substrates by Pulsed Laser Deposition method, and their properties have been characterized by a number of techniques. The prepared coatings consist of hydroxyapatite and wollastonite phases, having composition close to that of the bulk target material used for depositions. The 100μm thick films are characterized by dense, compact and rough morphology. They are composed of a glassy matrix with various size (from micro- to nano-) granular inclusions. The average surface roughness is about 295±30nm due to the contribution of micrometric aggregates, while the roughness of the fine-texture particulates is approximately 47±4nm. The results of the electrochemical corrosion evaluation tests evidence that the RKKP coating improves the corrosion resistance of the Mg-Ca (1.4wt%) alloy in Simulated Body Fluid.

  11. Continuing the Validation of CCIM Processability for Glass Ceramic HLLW Forms: Plan for Test AFY14CCIM-GC1

    SciTech Connect

    Vince Maio

    2014-04-01

    This test plan covers test AFY14CCIM-GC1which is the first of two scheduled FY-2014 test runs involving glass ceramic waste forms in the Idaho National Laboratory’s Cold Crucible Induction Melter Pilot Plant. The test plan is based on the successes and challenges of previous tests performed in FY-2012 and FY-2013. The purpose of this test is to continue to collect data for validating the glass ceramic High Level Liquid Waste form processability advantages using Cold Crucible Induction Melter technology. The major objective of AFYCCIM-GC1 is to complete additional proposed crucible pouring and post tapping controlled cooling experiments not completed during previous tests due to crucible drain failure. This is necessary to qualify that no heat treatments in standard waste disposal canisters are necessary for the operational scale production of glass ceramic waste forms. Other objectives include the production and post-test analysis of surrogate waste forms made from separate pours into the same graphite mold canister, testing the robustness of an upgraded crucible bottom drain and drain heater assembly, testing the effectiveness of inductive melt initiation using a resistive starter ring with a square wave configuration, and observing the tapped molten flow behavior in pans with areas identical to standard High Level Waste disposal canisters. Testing conditions, the surrogate waste composition, key testing steps, testing parameters, and sampling and analysis requirements are defined.

  12. High strength alloys

    DOEpatents

    Maziasz, Phillip James [Oak Ridge, TN; Shingledecker, John Paul [Knoxville, TN; Santella, Michael Leonard [Knoxville, TN; Schneibel, Joachim Hugo [Knoxville, TN; Sikka, Vinod Kumar [Oak Ridge, TN; Vinegar, Harold J [Bellaire, TX; John, Randy Carl [Houston, TX; Kim, Dong Sub [Sugar Land, TX

    2010-08-31

    High strength metal alloys are described herein. At least one composition of a metal alloy includes chromium, nickel, copper, manganese, silicon, niobium, tungsten and iron. System, methods, and heaters that include the high strength metal alloys are described herein. At least one heater system may include a canister at least partially made from material containing at least one of the metal alloys. At least one system for heating a subterranean formation may include a tubular that is at least partially made from a material containing at least one of the metal alloys.

  13. High strength alloys

    DOEpatents

    Maziasz, Phillip James; Shingledecker, John Paul; Santella, Michael Leonard; Schneibel, Joachim Hugo; Sikka, Vinod Kumar; Vinegar, Harold J.; John, Randy Carl; Kim, Dong Sub

    2012-06-05

    High strength metal alloys are described herein. At least one composition of a metal alloy includes chromium, nickel, copper, manganese, silicon, niobium, tungsten and iron. System, methods, and heaters that include the high strength metal alloys are described herein. At least one heater system may include a canister at least partially made from material containing at least one of the metal alloys. At least one system for heating a subterranean formation may include a tublar that is at least partially made from a material containing at least one of the metal alloys.

  14. Strength of inorganic glass

    SciTech Connect

    Kurkjian, C.R.

    1985-01-01

    This book presents information on the following topics: a look at the history of glass strength; atomistic theory of fracture; surface chemistry in relation to the strength and fracture of silicate glasses; high-speed photographic investigations of the dynamic localized loading of some oxide glasses; a correction for measurements of contact area using Newton's rings; envionmentally enhanced crack growth; fatigue in glass; behavior of flaws in fused silica fibers; fracture toughness of chalcogenide glasses and glass-ceramics; fracture analysis of glass surfaces; and fracture mechanics parameters for glasses - a compilation and correlation.

  15. Structural and Microwave Properties of Silica Xerogel Glass-Ceramic Sintered by Sub-millimeter Wave Heating using a Gyrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aripin, H.; Mitsudo, S.; Prima, E. S.; Sudiana, I. N.; Tani, S.; Sako, K.; Fujii, Y.; Saito, T.; Idehara, T.; Sano, S.; Sunendar, B.; Sabchevski, S.

    2012-11-01

    In this paper, we present and discuss experimental results from a microwave sintering of silica glass-ceramics, produced from amorphous silica xerogel extracted from sago waste ash. As a radiation source for a microwave heating a sub-millimeter wave gyrotron (Gyrotron FU CW I) with an output frequency of 300 GHz has been used. The powders of the amorphous silica xerogel have been dry pressed and then sintered at temperatures ranging from 300 °C to 1200 °C. Microwave absorbing properties of the sintered samples were investigated by measuring the dielectric constant, the dielectric loss, and the reflection loss at different frequencies in the interval from 8.2 to 12.4 GHz. Furthermore, the characteristics of the formation process for producing silica glass-ceramics were studied using a Raman Spectroscopy and a Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The results indicate that the samples sintered at 1200 °C are characterized by lower reflection losses and a better transparency due to the formation of a fully crystallized silica glass- ceramic at sufficiently high temperature.

  16. Synthesis and evaluation of factors affecting the in vitro bioactivity and antibacterial activity of bioactive glass ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riaz, Madeeha; Zia, Rehana; Saleemi, Farhat

    2017-01-01

    In the present study, two novel silicate glass-ceramics having chemical composition 38SiO2-41CaO-6P2O5-(15 - x)Na2O-xCaF2 (x = 0, 0.43 mol%) were synthesized. These glass derivatives were subjected to stimulated body fluid for 24 days in SBF under static condition at 37∘C in order to evaluate the bioactive properties of specimens. The antibacterial activity of glass ceramics against three pathogenic bacteria was determined using the modified Kirby Bauer method. It was found that the antibacterial activity primarily depends on the dissolution rate; faster release of ions caused rapid increase in the pH of the solution. Antibacterial properties were found to be strongly affected by changes in the pH of supernatant. The in vitro bioactivity assays showed that both glass derivatives were capable of bonding with bone and secondly effectively inhibit bacteria. However, the glass ceramic without CaF2 (B2) showed high dissolution rate, better bioactive ability and stronger antibacterial efficacy.

  17. Ceramic-glass-ceramic seal by microwave heating

    DOEpatents

    Meek, Thomas T.; Blake, Rodger D.

    1985-01-01

    A method for producing a ceramic-glass-ceramic seal by microwaving, mixes a slurry of glass sealing material and coupling agent and applies same to ceramic workpieces. The slurry and workpieces are placed together, insulated and then microwaved at a power, time and frequency sufficient to cause a liquid phase reaction in the slurry. The reaction of the glass sealing material forms a chemically different seal than that which would be formed by conventional heating because it is formed by a diffusion rather than by wetting of the reactants.

  18. History and trends of bioactive glass-ceramics.

    PubMed

    Montazerian, Maziar; Dutra Zanotto, Edgar

    2016-05-01

    The interest around bioactive glass-ceramics (GCs) has grown significantly over the last two decades due to their appropriate biochemical and mechanical properties. The intense research effort in this field has led to some new commercial products for biomedical applications. This review article begins with the basic concepts of GC processing and development via controlled heat treatments of monolithic pieces or sinter-crystallization of powdered glasses. We then go on to describe the processing, properties, and applications of some commercial bioactive GCs and discuss selected valuable reported researches on several promising types of bioactive GCs. The article finishes with a section on open relevant research directions for bioactive GC development.

  19. Rare Earth Phosphate Glass and Glass-Ceramic Proton Conductors

    SciTech Connect

    De Jonghe, Lutgard C.; Ray, Hannah L.; Wang, Ruigang

    2008-12-03

    The structure and conductivity of cerium and lanthanum phosphate glasses and glass-ceramics were investigated. The effects of varying the metal to phosphate ratio in the glasses, doping LaP3O9 glasses with Ce, and recrystallization of CeP3O9 glasses, on the glasses' microstructure and total conductivity were investigated using XRD, SEM, and AC impedance techniques. Strong increases in conductivity occurred when the glasses were recrystallized: the conductivity of a cerium metaphosphate glass increased conductivity after recrystallization from 10-7.5 S/cm to 10-6 S/cm at 400oC.

  20. Ceramic-glass-ceramic seal by microwave heating

    DOEpatents

    Meek, T.T.; Blake, R.D.

    1983-10-04

    A method for producing a ceramic-glass-ceramic seal by microwaving, mixes a slurry of glass sealing material and coupling agent and applies same to ceramic workpieces. The slurry and workpieces are placed together, insulated and then microwaved at a power, time and frequency sufficient to cause a liquid phase reaction in the slurry. The reaction of the glass sealing material forms a chemically different seal than that which would be formed by conventional heating because it is formed by a diffusion rather than by wetting of the reactants.

  1. High strength composites evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Marten, S.M.

    1992-02-01

    A high-strength, thick-section, graphite/epoxy composite was identified. The purpose of this development effort was to evaluate candidate materials and provide LANL with engineering properties. Eight candidate materials (Samples 1000, 1100, 1200, 1300, 1400, 1500, 1600, and 1700) were chosen for evaluation. The Sample 1700 thermoplastic material was the strongest overall.

  2. Production of glass or glass-ceramic to metal seals with the application of pressure

    DOEpatents

    Kelly, M.D.; Kramer, D.P.

    1985-01-04

    In a process for preparing a glass or glass-ceramic to metal seal comprising contacting the glass with the metal and heat-treating the glass and metal under conditions whereby the glass to metal seal is effected and, optionally, the glass is converted to a glass-ceramic, an improvement comprises carrying out the heat-treating step using hot isostatic pressing.

  3. Production of glass or glass-ceramic to metal seals with the application of pressure

    DOEpatents

    Kelly, Michael D.; Kramer, Daniel P.

    1987-11-10

    In a process for preparing a glass or glass-ceramic to metal seal comprising contacting the glass with the metal and heat-treating the glass and metal under conditions whereby the glass to metal seal is effected and, optionally, the glass is converted to a glass-ceramic, an improvement comprises carrying out the heat-treating step using hot isostatic pressing.

  4. Fracture Strength of Zirconia and Alumina Ceramic Crowns Supported by Implants.

    PubMed

    Traini, Tonino; Sorrentino, Roberto; Gherlone, Enrico; Perfetti, Federico; Bollero, Patrizio; Zarone, Ferdinando

    2015-07-01

    Due to the brittleness and limited tensile strength of the veneering glass-ceramic materials, the methods that combine strong core material (as zirconia or alumina) are still under debate. The present study aims to evaluate the fracture strength and the mechanism of failure through fractographic analysis of single all-ceramic crowns supported by implants. Forty premolar cores were fabricated with CAD/CAM technology using alumina (n = 20) and zirconia (n = 20). The specimens were veneered with glass-ceramic, cemented on titanium abutments, and subjected to loading test until fracture. SEM fractographic analysis was also performed. The fracture load was 1165 (±509) N for alumina and 1638 (±662) N for zirconia with a statistically significant difference between the two groups (P = 0.026). Fractographic analysis of alumina-glass-ceramic crowns, showed the presence of catastrophic cracks through the entire thickness of the alumina core; for the zirconia-glass-ceramic crowns, the cracks involved mainly the thickness of the ceramic veneering layer. The sandblast procedure of the zirconia core influenced crack path deflection. Few samples (n = 3) showed limited microcracks of the zirconia core. Zirconia showed a significantly higher fracture strength value in implant-supported restorations, indicating the role played by the high resistant cores for premolar crowns.

  5. Use of a synthetic low-fusing quartz glass-ceramic material for the fabrication of metal-ceramic restorations.

    PubMed

    Chu, S J

    2001-01-01

    The development of natural aesthetics has been facilitated by various innovative ceramic materials and techniques. Although metal-ceramic restorations have traditionally been the standard for durable and predictable restorations, the use of metal core materials may result in dense, opaque restorations. The incorporation of low-fusing porcelain materials has enabled the provision of translucent restorations that enable sufficient light transmission and strength. This article presents two comparative case reports that demonstrate the clinical application of a synthetic low-fusing quartz glass-ceramic material for the fabrication of aesthetic and functional metal-ceramic restorations.

  6. Glass ceramics for incinerator ash immobilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinina, G. A.; Stefanovsky, O. I.; Stefanovsky, S. V.

    2011-09-01

    Calcined solid radioactive waste (incinerator slag) surrogate and either Na 2Si 2O 5 or Na 2B 4O 7 (borax) at various mass ratios were melted in silicon carbide crucibles in a resistive furnace at temperatures of up to 1775 K (slag without additives). Portions of the melts were poured onto a metal plate; the residues were slowly cooled in turned-off furnace. Both quenched and slowly cooled materials were composed of the same phases. At high slag contents in silicate-based materials nepheline and britholite were found to be major phases. Britholite formed at higher slag content (85 wt.%) became major phase in the vitrified slag. In the system with borax at low slag contents (25 and 50 wt.%) material are composed of predominant vitreous and minor calcium silicate larnite type phase Ca 2SiO 4 where Ca 2+ ions are replaced by different cations. The materials containing slag in amount of 75 wt.% and more are chemically durable. The changes in the structure of anionic motif of quenched samples depending on slag loading were studied by IR spectroscopy.

  7. Improvement of the stability of hydroxyapatite through glass ceramic reinforcement.

    PubMed

    Ha, Na Ra; Yang, Zheng Xun; Hwang, Kyu Hong; Kim, Tae Suk; Lee, Jong Kook

    2010-05-01

    Hydroxyapatite has achieved significant application in orthopedic and dental implants due to its excellent biocompatibility. Sintered hydroxyapatites showed significant dissolution, however, after their immersion in water or simulated body fluid (SBF). This grain boundary dissolution, even in pure hydroxyapatites, resulted in grain separation at the surfaces, and finally, in fracture. In this study, hydroxyapatite ceramics containing apatite-wollastonite (AW) or calcium silicate (SG) glass ceramics as additives were prepared to prevent the dissolution. AW and SG glass ceramics were added at 0-7 wt% and powder-compacted uniaxially followed by firing at moisture conditions. The glass phase was incorporated into the hydroxyapatite to act as a sintering aid, followed by crystallization, to improve the mechanical properties without reducing the biocompatibility. As seen in the results of the dissolution test, a significant amount of damage was reduced even after more than 14 days. TEM and SEM showed no decomposition of HA to the secondary phase, and the fracture toughness increased, becoming even higher than that of the commercial hydroxyapatite.

  8. Nano-mechanical behaviour of lithium metasilicate glass-ceramic.

    PubMed

    Alao, Abdur-Rasheed; Yin, Ling

    2015-09-01

    This paper reports the first study on the mechanical behavior of lithium metasilicate glass-ceramic using nanoindentation and in situ scanning probe imaging techniques. Indentation contact hardness, Hc, and Young's modulus, E, were measured at 10 mN peak load and 0.1-2 mN/s loading rates to understand the loading rate effect on its properties. Indentation imprints were analysed with the in situ scanning probe imaging to understand indentation mechanisms. The average contact hardness increased by 112% with the loading rate (ANOVA, p<0.05) while the Young's modulus showed the loading rate independence (ANOVA, p>0.05). A strain rate sensitivity model was applied to determine the intrinsic contact hardness. Extensive discontinuities and largest maximum, contact and final depths were also observed at the lowest loading rate. These phenomena corresponded to inhomogeneous shear-band flow and densification leading to the material strain softening. The in situ scanning probe images of indentation imprints showed plastic deformation at all loading rates and shear band-induced pileups at the lowest loading rate. With the increase in loading rate, the induced pile-ups decreased. The continuum model predicted the largest densified shear zone at the lowest loading rate. Finally, these results provide scientific insights into the abrasive machining responses of lithium metasilicate glass-ceramic during dental CAD/CAM processes using sharp diamond abrasives.

  9. Glass-ceramic joint and method of joining

    DOEpatents

    Meinhardt, Kerry D [Richland, WA; Vienna, John D [West Richland, WA; Armstrong, Timothy R [Clinton, TN; Pederson, Larry R [Kennewick, WA

    2003-03-18

    The present invention is a glass-ceramic material and method of making useful for joining a solid ceramic component and at least one other solid component. The material is a blend of M1-M2-M3, wherein M1 is BaO, SrO, CaO, MgO, or combinations thereof, M2 is Al.sub.2 O.sub.3, present in the blend in an amount from 2 to 15 mol %, M3 is SiO.sub.2 with up to 50 mol % B.sub.2 O.sub.3 that substantially matches a coefficient of thermal expansion of the solid electrolyte. According to the present invention, a series of glass ceramics in the M1-Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 -M3 system can be used to join or seal both tubular and planar solid oxide fuel cells, oxygen electrolyzers, and membrane reactors for the production of syngas, commodity chemicals and other products.

  10. Er-doped and Er, Yb co-doped oxyfluoride glasses and glass-ceramics, structural and optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisiecki, Radosław; Augustyn, Elżbieta; Ryba-Romanowski, Witold; Żelechower, Michał

    2011-09-01

    The selected glasses and glass-ceramics pertinent to following chemical composition in mol%:48%SiO 2-11%Al 2O 3-7%Na 2O-10%CaO-10%PbO-11%PbF 2-3%ErF 3 and 48%SiO 2-11%Al 2O 3-7%Na 2O-10%CaO-10%PbO-10%PbF 2-1%ErF 3-3%YbF 3 have been manufactured from high purity components (Aldrich) at 1450 °C in normal atmosphere. Glass optical fibers were successfully drawn. Subsequently they were subject to the heat-treatment at 700 °C in various time periods. The preceding differential thermal analysis (DTA) studies allowed estimating both the fiber drawing temperature and the controlled crystallization temperature of glass fibers. It has been observed that the controlled heat-treatment of oxyfluoride glass fibers results in the creation of Pb 5Al 3F 19, Er 4F 2O 11Si 3 and Er 3FO 10Si 3 crystalline phases. The identified phases were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and confirmed by selected area electron diffraction (SAED). The fibers consist of mixed amorphous-crystalline microstructure with nano-crystals of size even below 10 nm distributed in the glassy host. Their morphology was investigated applying high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. Optical properties and excited state relaxation dynamics of optically active ions (Er 3+, Yb 3+) in glass and glass-ceramics have been studied. Based on absorption spectra the Judd-Ofelt analysis was carried out. The main attention was directed to NIR luminescence at. 1.6 μm related to 4I 13/2 → 4I 15/2 Er 3+ and less effective emission associated with 4I 11/2 → 4I 15/2 Er 3+ and 2F 5/2 → 2F 7/2 Yb 3+ transitions. The dissimilar spectroscopic properties have been revealed for glasses and glass-ceramic samples, respectively. The reduction of emission linewidth at 1.6 and 1.0 μm combined with substantial increase of 4I 13/2 lifetimes of erbium in glass-ceramics appear to be evidences that Er 3+ ions are accommodated in crystalline phases. The structural and optical characteristics of oxyfluoride glass-ceramic

  11. Fabrication and characterization of Er+3 doped SiO2/SnO2 glass-ceramic thin films for planar waveguide applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guddala, S.; Chiappini, A.; Armellini, C.; Turell, S.; Righini, G. C.; Ferrari, M.; Narayana Rao, D.

    2015-02-01

    Glass-ceramics are a kind of two-phase materials constituted by nanocrystals embedded in a glass matrix and the respective volume fractions of crystalline and amorphous phase determine the properties of the glass-ceramics. Among these properties transparency is crucial in particular when confined structures, such as, dielectric optical waveguides, are considered. Moreover, the segregation of dopant rare-earth ions, like erbium, in low phonon energy crystalline medium makes these structures more promising in the development of waveguide amplifiers. Here we are proposing a new class of low phonon energy tin oxide semiconductor medium doped silicate based planar waveguides. Er3+ doped (100-x) SiO2-xSnO2 (x= 10, 20, 25 and 30mol%), glass-ceramic planar waveguide thin films were fabricated by a simple sol-gel processing and dip coating technique. XRD and HRTEM studies indicates the glass-ceramic phase of the film and the dispersion of ~4nm diameter of tin oxide nanocrystals in the amorphous phase of silica. The spectroscopic assessment indicates the distribution of the dopant erbium ions in the crystalline medium of tin oxide. The observed low losses, 0.5±0.2 dB/cm, at 1.54 μm communication wavelength makes them a quite promising material for the development of high gain integrated optical amplifiers.

  12. Intense 2.7 μm mid-infrared emission of Er{sup 3+} in oxyfluoride glass ceramic containing NaYF{sub 4} nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yin; Liu, Xueyun; Wang, Weichao; Yu, Ting; Zhang, Qinyuan

    2016-04-15

    Highlights: • Transparent oxyfluoride glass-ceramics containing NaYF{sub 4}:Er{sup 3+} nanocrystals have been prepared. • Intense 2.7 μm emission of the glass-ceramics has been demonstrated. • Prolonged decay lifetimes of Er{sup 3+}:{sup 4}I{sub 11/2} and {sup 4}I{sub 13/2} levels have been achieved. - Abstract: Transparent oxyfluoride glass ceramics containing NaYF{sub 4}:Er{sup 3+} nanocrystals have been prepared by melt quenching and subsequent thermal treatment. X-ray diffraction and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy analysis confirmed the precipitation of NaYF{sub 4} nanocrystals in glass. Energy dispersive spectrometer results evidenced the preferential concentration of Er{sup 3+} ions in nanocrystals. Mid-infrared, upconversion, and near-infrared emissions were measured upon excitation with 980 nm laser diode and the luminescence mechanisms were discussed. Intense 2.7 μm emission originating from the Er{sup 3+}:{sup 4}I{sub 11/2} → {sup 4}I{sub 13/2} transition was achieved due to the incorporation of Er{sup 3+} ions into the precipitated low phonon energy fluoride nanocrystals. The results indicate that oxyfluoride glass ceramic containing NaYF{sub 4}:Er{sup 3+} nanocrystals is a promising candidate material for 2.7 μm laser.

  13. Crystallization, Microstructure, and Viscosity Evolutions in Lithium Aluminosilicate Glass-Ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Qiang; Wheaton, Bryan; Geisinger, Karen; Credle, Allen; Wang, Jie

    2016-11-01

    Lithium aluminosilicate glass-ceramics have found widespread commercial success in areas such as consumer products, telescope mirrors, fireplace windows, etc. However, there is still much to learn regarding the fundamental mechanisms of crystallization, especially related to the evolution of viscosity as a function of the crystallization (ceramming) process. In this study, the impact of phase assemblage and microstructure on the viscosity was investigated using high temperature X-ray diffraction (HTXRD), beam bending viscometry (BBV), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Results from this study provide a first direct observation of viscosity evolution as a function of ceramming time and temperature. Sharp viscosity increases due to phase separation, nucleation and phase transformation are noticed through BBV measurement. A near-net shape ceramming can be achieved in TiO2-containing compositions by keeping the glass at a high viscosity (> 109 Pa.s) throughout the whole thermal treatment.

  14. Development of a sintering process for recycling oil shale fly ash and municipal solid waste incineration bottom ash into glass ceramic composite

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Zhikun; Zhang, Lei; Li, Aimin

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: • Glass ceramic composite is prepared from oil shale fly ash and MSWI bottom ash. • A novel method for the production of glass ceramic composite is presented. • It provides simple route and lower energy consumption in terms of recycling waste. • The vitrified slag can promote the sintering densification process of glass ceramic. • The performances of products decrease with the increase of oil shale fly ash content. - Abstract: Oil shale fly ash and municipal solid waste incineration bottom ash are industrial and municipal by-products that require further treatment before disposal to avoid polluting the environment. In the study, they were mixed and vitrified into the slag by the melt-quench process. The obtained vitrified slag was then mixed with various percentages of oil shale fly ash and converted into glass ceramic composites by the subsequent sintering process. Differential thermal analysis was used to study the thermal characteristics and determine the sintering temperatures. X-ray diffraction analysis was used to analyze the crystalline phase compositions. Sintering shrinkage, weight loss on ignition, density and compressive strength were tested to determine the optimum preparation condition and study the co-sintering mechanism of vitrified amorphous slag and oil shale fly ash. The results showed the product performances increased with the increase of sintering temperatures and the proportion of vitrified slag to oil shale fly ash. Glass ceramic composite (vitrified slag content of 80%, oil shale fly ash content of 20%, sintering temperature of 1000 °C and sintering time of 2 h) showed the properties of density of 1.92 ± 0.05 g/cm{sup 3}, weight loss on ignition of 6.14 ± 0.18%, sintering shrinkage of 22.06 ± 0.6% and compressive strength of 67 ± 14 MPa. The results indicated that it was a comparable waste-based material compared to previous researches. In particular, the energy consumption in the production process was reduced

  15. Er3+-doped transparent glass ceramics containing micron-sized SrF2 crystals for 2.7 μm emissions

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yiguang; Fan, Jintai; Jiang, Benxue; Mao, Xiaojian; Tang, Junzhou; Xu, Yinsheng; Dai, Shixun; Zhang, Long

    2016-01-01

    Er3+-doped transparent glass ceramics containing micron-sized SrF2 crystals were obtained by direct liquid-phase sintering of a mixture of SrF2 powders and precursor glass powders at 820 °C for 15 min. The appearance and microstructural evolution of the SrF2 crystals in the resulting glass ceramics were investigated using X-ray diffraction, field-emission scanning electron microscopy and transmission microscopy. The SrF2 crystals are ~15 μm in size and are uniformly distributed throughout the fluorophosphate glass matrix. The glass ceramics achieve an average transmittance of 75% in the visible region and more than 85% in the near-IR region. The high transmittance of the glass ceramics results from matching the refractive index of the SrF2 with that of the precursor glass. Energy dispersive spectroscopy, photoluminescence spectra, and photoluminescence lifetimes verified the incorporation of Er3+ into the micron-sized SrF2 crystals. Intense 2.7 μm emissions due to the 4I11/2 → 4I13/2 transition were observed upon excitation at 980 nm using a laser diode. The maximum value of the emission cross section of Er3+ around 2.7 μm is more than 1.2 × 10−20 cm2, which indicates the potential of using transparent glass ceramics containing micron-sized SrF2 crystals for efficient 2.7 μm lasers and amplifiers. PMID:27430595

  16. Er(3+)-doped transparent glass ceramics containing micron-sized SrF2 crystals for 2.7 μm emissions.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yiguang; Fan, Jintai; Jiang, Benxue; Mao, Xiaojian; Tang, Junzhou; Xu, Yinsheng; Dai, Shixun; Zhang, Long

    2016-07-19

    Er(3+)-doped transparent glass ceramics containing micron-sized SrF2 crystals were obtained by direct liquid-phase sintering of a mixture of SrF2 powders and precursor glass powders at 820 °C for 15 min. The appearance and microstructural evolution of the SrF2 crystals in the resulting glass ceramics were investigated using X-ray diffraction, field-emission scanning electron microscopy and transmission microscopy. The SrF2 crystals are ~15 μm in size and are uniformly distributed throughout the fluorophosphate glass matrix. The glass ceramics achieve an average transmittance of 75% in the visible region and more than 85% in the near-IR region. The high transmittance of the glass ceramics results from matching the refractive index of the SrF2 with that of the precursor glass. Energy dispersive spectroscopy, photoluminescence spectra, and photoluminescence lifetimes verified the incorporation of Er(3+) into the micron-sized SrF2 crystals. Intense 2.7 μm emissions due to the (4)I11/2 → (4)I13/2 transition were observed upon excitation at 980 nm using a laser diode. The maximum value of the emission cross section of Er(3+) around 2.7 μm is more than 1.2 × 10(-20) cm(2), which indicates the potential of using transparent glass ceramics containing micron-sized SrF2 crystals for efficient 2.7 μm lasers and amplifiers.

  17. Er3+-doped transparent glass ceramics containing micron-sized SrF2 crystals for 2.7 μm emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yiguang; Fan, Jintai; Jiang, Benxue; Mao, Xiaojian; Tang, Junzhou; Xu, Yinsheng; Dai, Shixun; Zhang, Long

    2016-07-01

    Er3+-doped transparent glass ceramics containing micron-sized SrF2 crystals were obtained by direct liquid-phase sintering of a mixture of SrF2 powders and precursor glass powders at 820 °C for 15 min. The appearance and microstructural evolution of the SrF2 crystals in the resulting glass ceramics were investigated using X-ray diffraction, field-emission scanning electron microscopy and transmission microscopy. The SrF2 crystals are ~15 μm in size and are uniformly distributed throughout the fluorophosphate glass matrix. The glass ceramics achieve an average transmittance of 75% in the visible region and more than 85% in the near-IR region. The high transmittance of the glass ceramics results from matching the refractive index of the SrF2 with that of the precursor glass. Energy dispersive spectroscopy, photoluminescence spectra, and photoluminescence lifetimes verified the incorporation of Er3+ into the micron-sized SrF2 crystals. Intense 2.7 μm emissions due to the 4I11/2 → 4I13/2 transition were observed upon excitation at 980 nm using a laser diode. The maximum value of the emission cross section of Er3+ around 2.7 μm is more than 1.2 × 10‑20 cm2, which indicates the potential of using transparent glass ceramics containing micron-sized SrF2 crystals for efficient 2.7 μm lasers and amplifiers.

  18. Advanced processing of the Zerodur R glass ceramic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marx, Thomas A.

    1991-11-01

    The Zerodur glass ceramic is an extraordinary material possessing a very low thermal expansion over a broad temperature range. Depending on the size of the castings, a continuous or a discontinuous melting technology is used in the manufacture of Zerodur. Continuous melters are being operated regularly in Germany and recently in the United States. The latest generation of discontinuous melters started production of 8.2 m spincast telescope blanks in early 1991. Zerodur fusion is a special process to generate lightweighted mirror blanks and special components. It requires glassy material and generates bonds that are as strong as the bulk material. Further process development such as waterjet cutting and insertion technologies are underway and may generate components of unique shapes and performance.

  19. A novel processing route for carbon nanotube reinforced glass-ceramic matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dassios, Konstantinos G.; Bonnefont, Guillaume; Fantozzi, Gilbert; Matikas, Theodore E.

    2015-03-01

    The current study reports the establishment of a novel feasible way for processing glass- and ceramic- matrix composites reinforced with carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The technique is based on high shear compaction of glass/ceramic and CNT blends in the presence of polymeric binders for the production of flexible green bodies which are subsequently sintered and densified by spark plasma sintering. The method was successfully applied on a borosilicate glass / multi-wall CNT composite with final density identical to that of the full-dense ceramic. Preliminary non-destructive evaluation of dynamic mechanical properties such as Young's and shear modulus and Poisson's ratio by ultrasonics show that property improvement maximizes up to a certain CNT loading; after this threshold is exceeded, properties degrade with further loading increase.

  20. Creep Properties of Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Glass-Ceramic Seal G18

    SciTech Connect

    Milhans, Jacqueline; Khaleel, Mohammad A.; Sun, Xin; Tehrani, Mehran; Al-Haik, Marwan; Garmestani, Hamid

    2010-11-01

    This study utilizes nanoindentation to investigate and measure creep properties of a barium calcium aluminosilicate glass-ceramic used for solid oxide fuel cell seals (SOFCs). Samples of the glassceramic seal material were aged for 5h, 50h, and 100h to obtain different degrees of crystallinity. Instrumented nanoindentation was performed on the samples with different aging times at different temperatures to investigate the strain rate sensitivity during inelastic deformation. The temperature dependent behavior is important since SOFCs operate at high temperatures (800-1000°C). Results show that the samples with higher crystallinity were more resistant to creep, and the creep compliance tended to decrease with increasing temperature, especially with further aged samples.

  1. Structures and optical properties of tellurite glasses and glass ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, Robert Theodore, Jr.

    The structures and optical properties of (K2O)15(Nb 2O5)15(TeO2)70 glass and glass ceramic have been studied in order to understand the second harmonic generation observed from the glass ceramic. We have used 93Nb NMR, Raman spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, small angle x-ray scattering, transmission electron microscopy, and powder x-ray and neutron scattering. We find that there is a microstructure consistent with binodal phase separation leading to spherical inclusions ˜20 nm in size. Upon heat treatment, these domains become nanocrystals of K2Te 4O9. A theory of optical heterogeneity is used to describe the observed second harmonic generation which is ˜95 times more intense that quartz. The chi(2) value for this material is 3.0 x 10-9 esu. A second project has used 125Te and 17O NMR to study alkali tellurite glasses in the system (M2O) x(TeO2)10-x, where M = Li, Na or K and x = 1, 2 or 3. The 125Te results show that complex models of network modification are needed to explain the resulting spectra that include a distribution of polyhedral tellurite units at all compositions. The 17O results show that there is a clear distinction between bridging and non-bridging oxygen sites in tellurite crystals and that sophisticated NMR experiments should be able to distinguish them in the glasses. Further, we have used Extended Huckel theory tight-binding calculations to predict the 17O NMR shifts of SiO2, GeO 2 and TeO2. We find that these calculations allow accurate predictions of the chemical shifts based solely on the trend in valence orbital size, and that expensive calculations of electron currents need not be used for this application.

  2. Mechanical and in vitro performance of apatite-wollastonite glass ceramic reinforced hydroxyapatite composite fabricated by 3D-printing.

    PubMed

    Suwanprateeb, J; Sanngam, R; Suvannapruk, W; Panyathanmaporn, T

    2009-06-01

    In situ hydroxyapatite/apatite-wollastonite glass ceramic composite was fabricated by a three dimensional printing (3DP) technique and characterized. It was found that the as-fabricated mean green strength of the composite was 1.27 MPa which was sufficient for general handling. After varying sintering temperatures (1050-1300 degrees C) and times (1-10 h), it was found that sintering at 1300 degrees C for 3 h gave the greatest flexural modulus and strength, 34.10 GPa and 76.82 MPa respectively. This was associated with a decrease in porosity and increase in densification ability of the composite resulting from liquid phase sintering. Bioactivity tested by soaking in simulated body fluid (SBF) and In Vitro toxicity studies showed that 3DP hydroxyapatite/A-W glass ceramic composite was non-toxic and bioactive. A new calcium phosphate layer was observed on the surface of the composite after soaking in SBF for only 1 day while osteoblast cells were able to attach and attain normal morphology on the surface of the composite.

  3. High strength ferritic alloy

    DOEpatents

    Hagel, William C.; Smidt, Frederick A.; Korenko, Michael K.

    1977-01-01

    A high-strength ferritic alloy useful for fast reactor duct and cladding applications where an iron base contains from about 9% to about 13% by weight chromium, from about 4% to about 8% by weight molybdenum, from about 0.2% to about 0.8% by weight niobium, from about 0.1% to about 0.3% by weight vanadium, from about 0.2% to about 0.8% by weight silicon, from about 0.2% to about 0.8% by weight manganese, a maximum of about 0.05% by weight nitrogen, a maximum of about 0.02% by weight sulfur, a maximum of about 0.02% by weight phosphorous, and from about 0.04% to about 0.12% by weight carbon.

  4. Structural and magnetic properties of SiO2-CaO-Na2O-P2O5 containing BaO-Fe2O3 glass-ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leenakul, W.; Kantha, P.; Pisitpipathsin, N.; Rujijanagul, G.; Eitssayeam, S.; Pengpat, K.

    2013-01-01

    The incorporation method was employed to produce bioactive glass-ceramics from the BaFe12O19-SiO2-CaO-Na2O-P2O5 glass system. The ferrimagnetic BaFe12O19 was first prepared using a simple mixed oxide method, where the oxide precursors of 45S5 bioglass were initially mixed and then melted to form glass. The devitrification of Na3Ca6(PO4)5 and Fe3O4 was observed in all of the quenched glass samples. The glass samples were then subjected to a heat treatment schedule for further crystallization. It was found that the small traces of BaFe12O19 phases started to crystallize in high BF content samples of 20 and 40 wt%. These samples also exhibited good magnetic properties comparable to that of other magnetic glass-ceramics. The bioactivity of the BF glass-ceramics improved with increasing BF content as was evident by the formation of bone-like apatite layers on the surface of all of the glass-ceramics after soaking in SBF for 14 days. The results support the use of these bioactive glass-ceramics for hyperthermia treatment within the human body.

  5. Production of coloured glass-ceramics from incinerator ash using thermal plasma technology.

    PubMed

    Cheng, T W; Huang, M Z; Tzeng, C C; Cheng, K B; Ueng, T H

    2007-08-01

    Incineration is a major treatment process for municipal solid waste in Taiwan. It is estimated that over 1.5 Mt of incinerator ash are produced annually. This study proposes using thermal plasma technology to treat incinerator ash. Sintered glass-ceramics were produced using quenched vitrified slag with colouring agents added. The experimental results showed that the major crystalline phases developed in the sintered glass-ceramics were gehlenite and wollastonite, but many other secondary phases also appeared depending on the colouring agents added. The physical/mechanical properties, chemical resistance and toxicity characteristic leaching procedure of the coloured glass-ceramics were satisfactory. The glass-ceramic products obtained from incinerator ash treated with thermal plasma technology have great potential for building applications.

  6. Bone response to three different chemical compositions of fluorcanasite glass-ceramic.

    PubMed

    da Rocha Barros, Valdemar Mallet; Liporaci, Jorge Luiz J; Rosa, Adalberto L; Junqueira, Marcela Caffarena; de Oliveira, Paulo Tambasco; Johnson, Anthony; van Noort, Richard

    2007-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the bone response to three fluorcanasite glass-ceramic compositions with different solubilities (K3, K5, and K8) after implantation in a femur rabbit model. Fluorcanasite glass-ceramic rods were implanted bilaterally in the mid-shafts rabbit femurs. Implants were harvested at 8 and 12 weeks and prepared for histological and histomorphometric analyses at the light microscope level. Bioglass 45S5 rods were used as a control material. At 8 weeks, all fluorcanasite glass-ceramics were entirely surrounded by a nonmineralized connective tissue. At 12 weeks, reduced areas of bone tissue were observed in the cortical area in direct contact with the K3 and K5 fluorcanasite glass-ceramics compared to Bioglass 45S5, whereas no bone tissue was observed in direct contact with the K8 surface. Bone-to-implant contact in the cortical area was affected by the material chemical composition and ranked as follows: Bioglass 45S5>K3>K5>K8 (p=0.001). In the bone marrow, a layer of fibrous connective tissue formed in direct contact with the fluorcanasite glass-ceramics and Bioglass 45S5, and only rarely exhibited contact osteogenesis. All the fluorcanasite glass-ceramics appeared to degrade in the biological environment. The solubility ratio did not alter significantly the biological reply of the fluorcanasite glass-ceramics in vivo. Further modifications of the chemical composition of the fluorcanasite glass-ceramic are required to increase the stability of the material in vivo.

  7. ZnO glass-ceramics: An alternative way to produce semiconductor materials

    SciTech Connect

    Masai, Hirokazu; Toda, Tatsuya; Ueno, Takahiro; Takahashi, Yoshihiro; Fujiwara, Takumi

    2009-04-13

    Fabrication of transparent glass-ceramics containing ZnO nanocrystallites has been reported. The obtained material shows UV-excited photoluminescence consisting of both broad emission in the visible region and the free exciton emission at 3.28 eV. Since the observed emission depends on the precipitated state of ZnO in the glass matrix, the glass-ceramics obtained by this way will give an alternative selection of semiconductor material with unique optical and electronic functions.

  8. Fabrication and evaluation of osteoblastic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells on novel CaO-SiO2-P2O5-B2O3 glass-ceramics.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Hyup; Seo, Jun-Hyuk; Lee, Kyung Mee; Ryu, Hyun-Seung; Baek, Hae-Ri

    2013-07-01

    Apatite-wollastonite glass-ceramics have high mechanical strength, and CaO-SiO2 -B2 O3 glass-ceramics showed excellent bioactivity and high biodegradability. A new type of CaO-SiO2 -P2 O5 -B2 O3 system of bioactive glass-ceramics (BGS-7) was fabricated, and the effect and usefulness was evaluated via bioactivity using simulated body fluid and human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). The purpose of this study was to compare BGS-7 and hydroxyapatite (HA) using hMSCs in order to evaluate the bioactivity of BGS-7 and its possibility as a bone graft extender. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) staining, ALP activity, cell proliferation 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium, inner salt (MTS) assay, Alizarin Red-S (AR-S) staining, calcium levels, the mRNA expression of ALP, osteocalcin, osteopontin, and runt-related transcription factor 2 (runx-2) using reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and the protein expression of osteocalcin and runx-2 using Western blot were measured by transplanting hMSC onto a tissue culture plate, HA, and BGS-7. The ALP staining and AR-S staining of BGS-7 was greater than that of HA and control. The ALP value of BGS-7 was significantly higher than that of HA and control. The MTS results showed that BGS-7 had a higher value than the groups transplanted onto HA and control on day 15. The calcium level was higher than the control in both HA and BGS-7, and was especially high in BGS-7. There were more mineral products on BGS-7 than on the HA when analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. The mRNA expression of ALP, osteopontin, osteocalcin, and runx-2 were higher on BGS-7 than on HA and the control when analyzed by RT-PCR. The relative gene expression of osteopontin and runx-2 were found to be higher on BGS-7 than on HA and the control by Western blot. Accordingly, it is predicted that BGS-7 would have high biocompatibility and good osteoconductivity, and presents a possibility as a new

  9. Progress on glass ceramic ZERODUR enabling nanometer precision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jedamzik, Ralf; Kunisch, Clemens; Nieder, Johannes; Weber, Peter; Westerhoff, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    The Semiconductor Industry is making continuous progress in shrinking feature size developing technologies and process to achieve < 10 nm feature size. The required Overlay specification for successful production is in the range one nanometer or even smaller. Consequently, materials designed into metrology systems of exposure or inspection tools need to fulfill ever tighter specification on the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE). The glass ceramic ZERODUR® is a well-established material in critical components of microlithography wafer stepper and offered with an extremely low coefficient of thermal expansion, the tightest tolerance available on market. SCHOTT is continuously improving manufacturing processes and it's method to measure and characterize the CTE behavior of ZERODUR®. This paper is focusing on the "Advanced Dilatometer" for determination of the CTE developed at SCHOTT in the recent years and introduced into production in Q1 2015. The achievement for improving the absolute CTE measurement accuracy and the reproducibility are described in detail. Those achievements are compared to the CTE measurement accuracy reported by the Physikalische Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), the National Metrology Institute of Germany. The CTE homogeneity is of highest importance to achieve nanometer precision on larger scales. Additionally, the paper presents data on the short scale CTE homogeneity and its improvement in the last two years. The data presented in this paper will explain the capability of ZERODUR® to enable the extreme precision required for future generation of lithography equipment and processes.

  10. Scanning translucent glass-ceramic x-ray storage phosphors.

    PubMed

    Lubinsky, A R; Johnson, J A; Schweizer, S; Weber, J K R; Nishikawa, R M; Domenicali, P; Fantone, S D

    2010-01-01

    A simple benchtop apparatus has been built, to measure the x-ray imaging properties of fluorozirconate-based glass-ceramic x-ray storage phosphor materials. The MTF degradation due to stimulating light spreading in the plate is lower in comparison to optically turbid screens resulting in higher image MTF. In addition, the degree of transparency, or the amount of light scattering at the wavelength of the stimulating (laser) light is adjustable by means of the glass preparation process. The amount of stimulating exposure required for plate readout is generally higher than in previous systems, but well within the range of commercially available laser systems, for practical readout times. The effects of flare or unwanted readout due to back-reflection from the imaging plate is also less than in previous systems.A novel telecentric scanning system has been developed that is able to rapidly read out the latent image stored in the translucent imaging plates. This system features a reflective primary scan mirror to achieve telecentricity, optical correction for scan line bow, and the design should enable the construction of a relatively inexpensive scanner system for the translucent x-ray storage plates.

  11. Synthesis of glass ceramics from kaolin and dolomite mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudchicha, Mohamed Reda; Rubio, Fausto; Achour, Slimane

    2017-02-01

    Cordierite- and anorthite-based binary glass ceramics of the CaO-MgO-Al2O3-SiO2 (CMAS) system were synthesized by mixing local and abundant raw minerals (kaolin and doloma by mass ratio of 82/18). A kinetics study reveals that the activation energy of crystallization ( E a) calculated by the methods of Kissinger and Marotta are 438 kJ·mol-1 and 459 kJ·mol-1, respectively. The Avrami parameter ( n) is estimated to be approximately equal to 1, corresponding to the surface crystallization mechanism. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis shows that the anorthite and cordierite crystals are precipitated from the parent glass as major phases. Anorthite crystals first form at 850°C, whereas the μ-cordierite phase appears after heat treatment at 950°C. Thereafter, the cordierite allotropically transforms to α-cordierite at 1000°C. Complete densification is achieved at 950°C; however, the density slightly decreases at higher temperatures, reaching a stable value of 2.63 kg·m-3 between 1000°C and 1100°C. The highest Vickers hardness of 6 GPa is also obtained at 950°C. However, a substantial decrease in hardness is recorded at 1000°C; at higher sintering temperatures, it slightly increases with increasing temperature as the α-cordierite crystallizes.

  12. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER: Physical mechanisms of CO2-laser-induced rapid structural changes in glass-ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veiko, V. P.; Yakovlev, E. B.; Shakhno, E. A.

    2009-02-01

    Laser-induced local structural changes in glass-ceramics have recently been the subject of intense research interest in connection with analytical, aerospace, optical-memory and other advanced applications. In this paper, we demonstrate that important features of such processes are very high rates and unusual kinetics. These features are interpreted in terms of thermophysical kinetics and a novel view of amorphous materials as vacancy-distorted crystals.

  13. The Effects of Gravity on the Combustion Synthesis of B2O3-Al2O3-MgO Glass Ceramic Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manerbino, A. R.; Yi, H. C.; Guigne, J. Y.; Moore, J. J.; Schowengerdt, F. D.

    2000-01-01

    Glass ceramic composites based on B2O3-Al2O3-MgO have been produced by combustion synthesis in a Self-propagating mode. The gravitational effects on the combustion characteristics such as combustion wave velocity (V), and combustion temperature (T(sub c)) were studied. The results showed that the gravitational effects on these parameters were inconclusive. The microstructure of this system has also been analyzed with X-ray Diffraction and light microscopy. These results showed a higher amount of divitrification occurs under both reduced gravity and high gravity conditions. The gravitational effects on formation of pores, overall porosity and apparent porosity for this family of glass-ceramics also shows to be inconclusive. Possible reasons for these results are discussed.

  14. The recycling of incinerated sewage sludge ash as a raw material for CaO-Al2O3-SiO2-P2O5 glass-ceramic production.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhikun; Zhang, Lei; Yin, Yulei; Liang, Xuanye; Li, Aimin

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the recycling of incinerated sewage sludge ash (ISSA) into glass-ceramic materials by a two-stage sintering cycle of nucleation stage and crystallization stage without any pressure and binder is presented. The parent glasses were subjected to the following nucleation/crystallization temperature and time level: (A) 790°C, 1.0 h/870°C, 1.0-3.0 h; (B) 790°C, 1.0 h/945°C, 1.0-3.0 h and (C) 790°C, 1.0 h/1065°C, 1.0-3.0 h. X-ray power diffraction analysis results revealed that multiple crystalline phases coexisted in the glass-ceramic materials and the crystalline phase compositions were more affected by crystallization temperature than crystallization time. Scanning electron microscopy analysis showed an interlocking microstructure of glass phases and crystals with different sizes and spatial distribution. The glass-ceramics crystallized at 945°C for 2.0 h exhibited optimal properties of density of 2.88±0.08 g/cm3, compression strength of 247±12 MPa, bending strength of 118±14 MPa and water absorption of 0.42±0.04. The leaching concentrations of heavy metals were far lower than the limits required by the regulatory standard of EPA. This paper provides a feasible, low-cost and promising method to produce ISSA-based glass-ceramics and highlights the principal characteristics that must be taken into account to use ISSA correctly in glass-ceramics.

  15. Calcium-borosilicate glass-ceramics wasteforms to immobilize rare-earth oxide wastes from pyro-processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Miae; Heo, Jong

    2015-12-01

    Glass-ceramics containing calcium neodymium(cerium) oxide silicate [Ca2Nd8-xCex(SiO4)6O2] crystals were fabricated for the immobilization of radioactive wastes that contain large portions of rare-earth ions. Controlled crystallization of alkali borosilicate glasses by heating at T ≥ 750 °C for 3 h formed hexagonal Ca-silicate crystals. Maximum lanthanide oxide waste loading was >26.8 wt.%. Ce and Nd ions were highly partitioned inside Ca-silicate crystals compared to the glass matrix; the rare-earth wastes are efficiently immobilized inside the crystalline phases. The concentrations of Ce and Nd ions released in a material characterization center-type 1 test were below the detection limit (0.1 ppb) of inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy. Normalized release values performed by a product consistency test were 2.64·10-6 g m-2 for Ce ion and 2.19·10-6 g m-2 for Nd ion. Results suggest that glass-ceramics containing calcium neodymium(cerium) silicate crystals are good candidate wasteforms for immobilization of lanthanide wastes generated by pyro-processing.

  16. Effect of glass-ceramic microstructure on its in vitro bioactivity.

    PubMed

    De Aza, P N; Luklinska, Z B

    2003-10-01

    Two routes were used to obtain a glass-ceramic composed of 43.5 wt % SiO(2) - 43.5 wt % CaO - 13 wt % ZrO(2). Heat treatment of a glass monolith produced a glass-ceramic (WZ1) containing wollastonite-2M and tetragonal zirconia as crystalline phases. The WZ1 did not display bioactivity in vitro. Ceramizing the glass via powder technology routes formed a bioactive glass-ceramic (WZ2). The two glass-ceramics, WZ1 and WZ2, were composed of the same crystalline phases, but differed in microstructure. The in vitro studies carried out on WZ2 showed the formation of an apatite-like layer on its surface during exposure to a simulated body fluid. This paper examined the influence of both chemical and morphological factors on the in vitro bioactivitity. The interfacial reaction product was examined by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Both instruments were fitted with energy-dispersive X-ray analyzers. Measurements of the pH made directly at the interface of the two glass-ceramics were important in understanding their different behavior during exposure to the same physiological environment.

  17. Study of an anisotropic ferrimagnetic bioactive glass ceramic for cancer treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Saqlain A.; Hashmi, M. U.; Shamim, A.; Alam, S.

    2010-07-01

    For the hyperthermia therapy of cancer, ferrimagnetic glass ceramics are a potential candidate. Ferrimagnetic zinc-ferrite-containing bioactive glass ceramics were prepared by quenching the glass ceramics from sintering temperature. Then the samples were heated to 600°C and cooled in an aligning magnetic field of 1 Tesla to cause anisotropy. The magnetically aligned samples were compared with non-aligned samples. Vibrating sample magnetometry measurements at 10 kOe showed that the magnetic properties were enhanced by the aligning magnetic field and it led to an enhancement of the magnetic heat generation under a magnetic induction furnace operating at 500 Oe and 400 kHz for 2 min. Data showed that the maximum specific power loss and temperature increase after 2 min were 31.5 W/g and 45°C, respectively, for the aligned sample of maximum zinc-ferrite crystalline content. The glass ceramics were immersed in simulated body fluid for 3 weeks. X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared and atomic absorption spectroscopy results indicated the growth of precipitated hydroxyapatite, suggesting that the ferrimagnetic glass ceramics were bioactive and could bond to living tissues in physiological environment.

  18. Sintering, crystallisation and biodegradation behaviour of Bioglass-derived glass-ceramics.

    PubMed

    Boccaccini, Aldo R; Chen, Qizhi; Lefebvre, Leila; Gremillard, Laurent; Chevalier, Jérôme

    2007-01-01

    Sintering and crystallisation phenomena in powders of a typical bioactive glass composition (45S5 Bioglass) have been investigated in order to gain further understanding of the processes involved in the fabrication of Bioglass, based glass-ceramic scaffolds for tissue engineering applications. In situ experiments in an environmental scanning electron microscope with a heating stage were carried out to follow the morphology of Bioglass particles during sintering and crystallisation. Optimal processing parameters for the manufacture of Bioglass based glass-ceramic scaffolds by the foam-replica technique were determined. To assess the in vitro performance and bioreactivity of Bioglass -derived glass-ceramic scaffolds, the biodegradation of samples in simulated body fluid (SBF) was investigated using various techniques, including SEM, TEM, XRD and EDX. The mechanism of interaction of the glass-ceramic surface with SBF was determined, which involves (i) preferential dissolution at glass/crystal interfaces, (ii) break-down of crystalline particles into very fine grains through preferential dissolution at crystal structural defects, and (iii) amorphisation of the crystalline structure by introduction of point defects produced during ion exchange. The present report thus offers for the first time a complete assessment of the processing parameters, microstructure, and in vitro performance of Bioglass derived glass-ceramic scaffolds intended for bone tissue engineering.

  19. Behavior of bioactive glass-ceramic implanted into long bone defects: a scintigraphic study.

    PubMed

    Sponer, Pavel; Urban, Karel; Urbanová, Elen; Karpas, Karel; Mathew, Pradeep George

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to assess the long-term behavior and incorporation of the bioactive oxyhydroxyapatite glass-ceramic used to fill defects of long bones after curettage of bone cysts in 17 patients. The method of evaluation was a three-phase bone scintigraphy combined with radiographic and clinical evaluation. At a mean follow-up of 7 years, the glass-ceramic material had been completely incorporated. Mean uptake ratio was 1.31+/-0.25 after implantation of glass-ceramic in the metaphyseal region and 2.07+/-0.62 after implantation of glass-ceramic in the diaphyseal region (P<0.05). Mean uptake ratio was 1.40+/-0.30 in patients without persistent pain and 2.07+/-0.69 in patients who complained of pain in the area of synthetic filling (P<0.05). The bioactive glass-ceramic can be implanted into the metaphyseal defects of long bones, but this material is not suitable for filling the diaphyseal defects.

  20. Nd3+-doped TeO2-Bi2O3-ZnO transparent glass ceramics for laser application at 1.06 μm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Xiaolin; Luo, Zhiwei; Liu, Taoyong; Lu, Anxian

    2017-04-01

    The high crystallinity transparent glass ceramics based on Nd3+-doped 70TeO2-15Bi2O3-15ZnO (TBZ) compositions were successfully prepared by two-step heat treatment process. The effects of Nd2O3 content on the thermal, structural, mechanical, and optical properties of TBZ glass ceramics were studied. The incorporation of Nd2O3 enhanced the crystallization tendency in the matrix glass composition. The crystal phase and morphology of Bi2Te4O11 in the glass ceramics were confirmed by X-ray diffraction and field emission scanning electron microscopy. Due to precipitate more crystal phase, the hardness values increased from 3.21 to 3.66 GPa. Eight absorption peaks were observed from 400 to 900 nm and three emission bands appeared in the range of 850-1400 nm. With the increasing of Nd2O3 content from 0.5 to 2.5 wt%, the intensity of absorption peaks enhanced and the emission intensity increased up to 1.0 wt% and then fell down for further dopant concentration. The fluorescence decay lifetime decreased rapidly starting from 1.5 wt% Nd2O3 content due to the obvious energy migration among Nd3+. According to the extreme strong emission band around 1062 nm and the optimum Nd2O3 content (1.0 wt%), N10 glass ceramic was considered as a potential material for 1.06 μm laser applications.

  1. Survey and research on up-conversion emission character and energy transition of Yb3+/Er3+/Tm3+ co-doped phosphate glass and glass ceramic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yin; Song, Feng; Ming, Chengguo; Liu, Jiadong; Li, Wei; Liu, Yanling; Zhao, Hongyan

    2012-11-01

    By conventional high-temperature melting method, Yb3+/Er3+/Tm3+ co-doped phosphate glass was synthesized. After annealing the precursor glass, the phosphate glass ceramic (GC) was obtained. By measuring the X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectrum, it is proved that the LiYbP4O12 and Li6P6O18 nano-crystals have existed in the phosphate GC. The up-conversion (UC) emission intensity of the GC is obvious stronger compared to that of the glass. The reason is that the shorter distance between rare earth ions in the glass ceramic increases the energy transitions from the sensitized ions (Yb3+) to the luminous ions (Er3+ and Tm3+). By studying the dependence of UC emissions on the pump power, the 523 and 546 nm green emissions of Er3+ ions in the glass are two-photon processes. But in the glass ceramic, they are two/three-photon processes. The phenomenon implies that a three-photon process has participated in the population of the two green emissions. Using Dexter theory, we discuss the energy transitions of Er3+ and Tm3+. The results indicate the energy transition of Tm3+ to Er3+ is very strong in the GC, which changes the population mechanism of UC emissions of Er3+.

  2. A fruitful demonstration in sensors based on upconversion luminescence of Yb3+/Er3+codoped Sb2O3-WO3-Li2O (SWL) glass-ceramic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad Sukul, Prasenjit; Kumar, Kaushal

    2016-07-01

    In this article, erbium and ytterbium doped lithium tungsten antimonate (Yb3+/Er3+:Sb2O3-WO3-Li2O) glass-ceramics (GC) is synthesized and its novel applications in temperature sensing and detection of latent fingerprints is studied. It is also estimated that this material could be useful as a solar cell concentrator. The upconversion emission studies on Yb3+/Er3+:SWL glass-ceramics have shown intense green emission at 525 nm (2H11/2 → 4I15/2) & 545 nm (4s3/2 → 4I15/2). The variation of UC intensities with external temperature have shown a well-fashioned pattern, which suggests that the 2H11/2 and 4S3/2 levels of Er3+ ion are thermally coupled and can act as a temperature sensor in the 300-500 K temperature range. Dry powder of Yb3+/Er3+:SWL glass-ceramic is used to develop latent fingerprint with high contrast in green color on glass slide.

  3. Crystal growth induced by Nd:YAG laser irradiation in patterning glass ceramic substrates with dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sola, D.; Escartín, A.; Cases, R.; Peña, J. I.

    2011-03-01

    In this work a glass ceramic substrate was processed by focusing a laser beam inside the said material. The crystal phase within the amorphous matrix provides mechanical properties to the glass ceramic substrate in such a way that dots can be patterned inside the fore-mentioned material without producing any cracks. These marks are made up of crystals, the growth of which has been induced by the laser beam. These inner structures can modify the optical, thermal and mechanical properties of the glass ceramic substrate. A Q-switched Nd:YAG laser at its fundamental wavelength of 1064 nm with pulsewidths in the nanosecond range has been used. Morphology, composition, microstructure, mechanical and thermal properties of the processed material are described.

  4. Microwave-assisted rapid discharge sintering of a bioactive glass-ceramic.

    PubMed

    O'Flynn, Kevin P; Twomey, Barry; Breen, Aidan; Dowling, Denis P; Stanton, Kenneth T

    2011-07-01

    Bioactive glass-ceramics have been developed as successful bone graft materials. Although conventional sintering in an electrically-heated furnace is most commonly used, an alternative microwave plasma batch processing technique, known as rapid discharge sintering (RDS), is examined to crystallise the metastable base glass to form one or more ceramic phases. Apatite-mullite glass-ceramics (AMGC) were examined to elucidate the effects of RDS on the crystallization of a bioactive glass-ceramic. By increasing the fluorine content of the glass, the fluorapatite (FAp) and mullite crystallization onset temperatures can be reduced. Samples were sintered in a hydrogen and hydrogen/nitrogen discharge at temperatures of ≈800 and 1000 °C respectively with the higher sintering temperature required to form mullite. Results show that the material can be densified and crystallised using RDS in a considerably shorter time than conventional sintering due to heating and cooling rates of ≈400 °C/min.

  5. Spectral investigations on Dy{sup 3+}-doped transparent oxyfluoride glasses and nanocrystalline glass ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Babu, P.; Jang, Kyoung Hyuk; Kim, Eun Sik; Shi, Liang; Seo, Hyo Jin; Rivera-Lopez, F.; Rodriguez-Mendoza, U. R.; Lavin, V.; Vijaya, R.; Jayasankar, C. K.; Rama Moorthy, L.

    2009-01-01

    Dysprosium-doped oxyfluoride glasses and nanocrystalline glass ceramics have been synthesized and studied by x-ray diffraction, absorption, and visible and near-infrared emission spectra. The samples emit intense white light when populating the {sup 4}F{sub 9/2} level with a 451 nm laser light and, from the visible emission spectra, yellow to blue intensity ratios and chromaticity color coordinates have been calculated and their relative variation have been discussed based on the concentration of Dy{sup 3+} ions and the heat treatment conditions used to prepare the glass ceramics. Infrared emission has also been observed in glasses and glass ceramics after laser excitation at 800 nm, showing bands at 1.33 and 1.67 {mu}m, useful for optical amplification in fiber amplifiers.

  6. Effect of niobium content on the microstructure and thermal properties of fluorapatite glass-ceramics.

    PubMed

    Denry, I L; Holloway, J A; Nakkula, R J; Walters, J D

    2005-10-01

    Niobium oxide has been shown to improve biocompatibility and promote bioactivity. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of niobium oxide additions on the microstructure and thermal properties of fluorapatite glass-ceramics for biomedical applications. Four glass-ceramic compositions with increasing amounts of niobium oxide from 0 to 5 wt % were prepared. The glass compositions were melted at 1,525 degrees C for 3 h, quenched, ground, melted again at 1,525 degrees C for 3 h and furnace cooled. The coefficient of thermal expansion was measured by dilatometry. The crystallization behavior was evaluated by differential thermal analysis. The nature of the crystalline phases was investigated by X-ray diffraction. The microstructure was studied by SEM. In addition, the cytotoxicity of the ceramics was evaluated according to the ASTM standard F895--84. The results from X-ray diffraction analyses showed that fluorapatite was the major crystalline phase in all glass-ceramics. Differential thermal analyses revealed that fluorapatite crystallization occurred between 800 and 934 degrees C depending on the composition. The coefficient of thermal expansion varied from 7.6 to 9.4 x 10(-6)/ degrees C. The microstructure after heat treatment at 975 degrees C for 30 min consisted of submicroscopic fluorapatite crystals (200--300 nm) for all niobium-containing glass-ceramics, whereas the niobium-free glass-ceramic contained needle-shaped fluorapatite crystals, 2 microm in length. None of the glass-ceramics tested exhibited any cytotoxic activity as tested by ASTM standard F895--84.

  7. Detoxification and immobilization of chromite ore processing residue in spinel-based glass-ceramic.

    PubMed

    Liao, Chang-Zhong; Tang, Yuanyuan; Lee, Po-Heng; Liu, Chengshuai; Shih, Kaimin; Li, Fangbai

    2017-01-05

    A promising strategy for the detoxification and immobilization of chromite ore processing residue (COPR) in a spinel-based glass-ceramic matrix is reported in this study. In the search for a more chemically durable matrix for COPR, the most critical crystalline phase for Cr immobilization was found to be a spinel solid solution with a chemical composition of MgCr1.32Fe0.19Al0.49O4. Using Rietveld quantitative X-ray diffraction analysis, we identified this final product is with the phases of spinel (3.5wt.%), diopside (5.2wt.%), and some amorphous contents (91.2wt.%). The partitioning ratio of Cr reveals that about 77% of the Cr was incorporated into the more chemically durable spinel phase. The results of Cr K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy show that no Cr(VI) was observed after conversion of COPR into a glass-ceramic, which indicates successful detoxification of Cr(VI) into Cr(III) in the COPR-incorporated glass-ceramic. The leaching performances of Cr2O3 and COPR-incorporated glass-ceramic were compared with a prolonged acid-leaching test, and the results demonstrate the superiority of the COPR-incorporated glass-ceramic matrix in the immobilization of Cr. The overall results suggest that the use of affordable additives has potential in more reliably immobilizing COPR with a spinel-based glass-ceramic for safer disposal of this hazardous waste.

  8. The Production of Advanced Glass Ceramic HLW Forms using Cold Crucible Induction Melter

    SciTech Connect

    Veronica J Rutledge; Vince Maio

    2013-10-01

    Cold Crucible Induction Melters (CCIMs) will favorably change how High-Level radioactive Waste (from nuclear fuel recovery) is treated in the 21st century. Unlike the existing Joule-Heated Melters (JHMs) currently in operation for the glass-based immobilization of High-Level Waste (HLW), CCIMs offer unique material features that will increase melt temperatures, increase throughput, increase mixing, increase loading in the waste form, lower melter foot prints, eliminate melter corrosion and lower costs. These features not only enhance the technology for producing HLW forms, but also provide advantageous attributes to the waste form by allowing more durable alternatives to glass. This paper discusses advantageous features of the CCIM, with emphasis on features that overcome the historical issues with the JHMs presently utilized, as well as the benefits of glass ceramic waste forms over borosilicate glass waste forms. These advantages are then validated based on recent INL testing to demonstrate a first-of-a-kind formulation of a non-radioactive ceramic-based waste form utilizing a CCIM.

  9. Elastic modulus measurements of LDEF glasses and glass-ceramics using a speckle technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiedlocher, D. E.; Kinser, D. L.

    1992-01-01

    Elastic moduli of five glass types and the glass-ceramic Zerodur, exposed to a near-earth orbit environment on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF), were compared to that of unexposed samples. A double exposure speckle photography technique utilizing 633 nm laser light was used in the production of the speckle pattern. Subsequent illumination of a double exposed negative using the same wavelength radiation produces Young's fringes from which the in-plane displacements are measured. Stresses imposed by compressive loading produced measurable strains in the glasses and glass-ceramic.

  10. A New Biocompatible and Antibacterial Phosphate Free Glass-Ceramic for Medical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabal, Belén; Alou, Luís; Cafini, Fabio; Couceiro, Ramiro; Sevillano, David; Esteban-Tejeda, Leticia; Guitián, Francisco; Torrecillas, Ramón; Moya, José S.

    2014-06-01

    In the attempt to find valid alternatives to classic antibiotics and in view of current limitations in the efficacy of antimicrobial-coated or loaded biomaterials, this work is focused on the development of a new glass-ceramic with antibacterial performance together with safe biocompatibility. This bactericidal glass-ceramic composed of combeite and nepheline crystals in a residual glassy matrix has been obtained using an antimicrobial soda-lime glass as a precursor. Its inhibitory effects on bacterial growth and biofilm formation were proved against five biofilm-producing reference strains. The biocompatibility tests by using mesenchymal stem cells derived from human bone indicate an excellent biocompatibility.

  11. Research on the residual stress of glass ceramic based on rotary ultrasonic drilling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Lipeng; Jin, Yuzhu; Chen, Jianhua

    2016-10-01

    In the process of machining, the glass ceramic is easy to crack and damage, etc. And the residual stress in the machined surface may cause the crack to different extent in the later stage. Some may even affect the performance of the product. The residual stress of rotary ultrasonic drilling and mechanical processing is compared in different machining parameters (spindle speed, feed rate). The effects of processing parameters and methods are researched, in order to reduce the residual stress in the mechanical processing of glass ceramic, and provide guidance for the actual processing.

  12. Impact Simulation and Analysis of a Glass Ceramic Spherical Dome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jung-Hee; Kim, Jae-Hoon; Lee, Je-Jun; Lee, Young-Shin; Koo, Song-Hoe; Moon, Soon-Il

    The dome port cover of a ramjet engine is used to seal off the ram air inlet during booster operation. When the ramjet engine undergoes the transition leading to ramjet operation phase, the port cover is fragmented by the ram pressure. Lately, the dome port cover has been made using a MACOR glass-filled ceramic that has high heat resistance and high compression strength, as well as low density. In this study, fracture simulations of a ceramic dome under shock pressure were performed through the finite element method, using the nonlinear code LS-DYNA. The material properties of the simulations were applied to the experimental results of a tensile test for the MACOR glass-filled ceramic. The simulation was carried out on the spherical dome model using various impact pulses. The fracture strength and fracture behavior mode were compared for each case. The type-A spherical dome fractured earlier than the other kinds of domes.

  13. Recovery of heavy metals and stabilization of spent hydrotreating catalyst using a glass-ceramic matrix.

    PubMed

    Sun, D D; Tay, J H; Cheong, H K; Leung, D L; Qian, G

    2001-10-12

    Chemical analysis of spent Co/Mo/gamma Al(2)O(3) catalyst revealed the presence of carbon, molybdenum, sulfur, vanadium and cobalt at levels of 16.0, 10.9, 7.3, 4.6 and 4.0 wt.%, respectively. It was found that calcination at 500 degrees C provides an effective solution for the removal of carbon and sulfur and this generates the oxide form of the heavy metals. The removal of these heavy metals can be achieved through a two-stage leaching process. During the first stage, in which concentrated ammonia is used and it has been found that this process can be successful in removing as much as 83% (w/v) Mo. In a second stage, it was found that using 10% (v/v) of sulfuric acid, it was possible to account for up to 77% (w/v) Co and 4% (w/v) Mo removal. Leaching test results indicated that the vanadium present in the heated spent catalyst was almost stabilized but the molybdenum and cobalt were not. The combination of two solid wastes, ladle furnace slag (LFS) and treated residue of spent catalyst, could be used for making a high value-added anorthite glass-ceramic materials. Further leaching tests showed that ceramic glass materials provided a very effective method of Co, Mo and V heavy metals stabilization resulting in a product with a possible commercial value.

  14. Halogen Containing Gases as Lubricants for Crystallized Glass Ceramic Metal Combinations at Temperatures to 1500 F

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, Donald H.; Johnson, Robert L.

    1960-01-01

    Pyroceram 9608 (a crystallized glass ceramic) has been considered for use in high-temperature bearing and seal applications. One of the problems encountered with Pyroceram is the lack of availability of lubricants for the temperature range in which this material becomes practical. Experiments were conducted with Pyroceram sliding on various nickel- and cobalt-base alloys using reactive halogen-containing gases as lubricants. Friction and wear data were obtained as a function of sliding velocity and temperature. Studies were made with a hemispherical rider (3/16-in. rad., Pyroceram 9608) sliding in a circumferential path on the flat surface of a rotating disk (2(1/2) in. diam., nickel- or cobalt-base alloys). The specimens were run in an atmosphere of the various gases with a load of 1200 grams, a sliding velocity of 3200 feet per minute, and temperatures from 75 to 1500 F. The gas CF2Br-CF2Br was found to be an effective lubricant for Pyroceram 9608 sliding on Hastelloy R-235 and Inconel X up to 1400 F. The gas CF2Cl-CF2Cl provided effective lubrication for Pyroceram sliding on various cobalt-base alloys at 1000 F.

  15. Study of structural, electrical, and dielectric properties of phosphate-borate glasses and glass-ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melo, B. M. G.; Graça, M. P. F.; Prezas, P. R.; Valente, M. A.; Almeida, A. F.; Freire, F. N. A.; Bih, L.

    2016-08-01

    In this work, phosphate-borate based glasses with molar composition 20.7P2O5-17.2Nb2O5-13.8WO3-34.5A2O-13.8B2O3, where A = Li, Na, and K, were prepared by the melt quenching technique. The as-prepared glasses were heat-treated in air at 800 °C for 4 h, which led to the formation of glass-ceramics. These high chemical and thermal stability glasses are good candidates for several applications such as fast ionic conductors, semiconductors, photonic materials, electrolytes, hermetic seals, rare-earth ion host solid lasers, and biomedical materials. The present work endorses the analysis of the electrical conductivity of the as-grown samples, and also the electrical, dielectric, and structural changes established by the heat-treatment process. The structure of the samples was analyzed using X-Ray powder Diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, and density measurements. Both XRD and Raman analysis confirmed crystals formation through the heat-treatment process. The electrical ac and dc conductivities, σac and σdc, respectively, and impedance spectroscopy measurements as function of the temperature, varying from 200 to 380 K, were investigated for the as-grown and heat-treated samples. The impedance spectroscopy was measured in the frequency range of 100 Hz-1 MHz.

  16. Influence of Er{sup 3+} doping on microstructure of oxyfluoride glass-ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Bao Feng; Wang Yuansheng . E-mail: yswang@fjirsm.ac.cn; Hu Zhongjian

    2005-10-06

    Oxyfluoride glasses with composition of 45SiO{sub 2}.20Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}.30PbF{sub 2}.5ZnF{sub 2} by molar ratio with a high stability against crystallization have been obtained by melt quenching. After doping with x (x = 1, 2, 4) mol% of Er{sup 3+} transparent or translucent glass-ceramics could be formed. The structural transformations of these materials were investigated by thermal analysis, X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). Spherical polycrystalline aggregates comprised of many nanosized and randomly oriented {beta}-PbF{sub 2} grains were embedded separately among glassy matrix. On heating these nanosized grains merge with their neighbors to form bigger single crystals in a way like Ostwald ripening. The size modification of polycrystalline aggregates in the samples was found to be dependent on Er{sup 3+} doping.

  17. Superionic glass-ceramic electrolytes for room-temperature rechargeable sodium batteries.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Akitoshi; Noi, Kousuke; Sakuda, Atsushi; Tatsumisago, Masahiro

    2012-05-22

    Innovative rechargeable batteries that can effectively store renewable energy, such as solar and wind power, urgently need to be developed to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. All-solid-state batteries with inorganic solid electrolytes and electrodes are promising power sources for a wide range of applications because of their safety, long-cycle lives and versatile geometries. Rechargeable sodium batteries are more suitable than lithium-ion batteries, because they use abundant and ubiquitous sodium sources. Solid electrolytes are critical for realizing all-solid-state sodium batteries. Here we show that stabilization of a high-temperature phase by crystallization from the glassy state dramatically enhances the Na(+) ion conductivity. An ambient temperature conductivity of over 10(-4) S cm(-1) was obtained in a glass-ceramic electrolyte, in which a cubic Na(3)PS(4) crystal with superionic conductivity was first realized. All-solid-state sodium batteries, with a powder-compressed Na(3)PS(4) electrolyte, functioned as a rechargeable battery at room temperature.

  18. Development of a sintering process for recycling oil shale fly ash and municipal solid waste incineration bottom ash into glass ceramic composite.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhikun; Zhang, Lei; Li, Aimin

    2015-04-01

    Oil shale fly ash and municipal solid waste incineration bottom ash are industrial and municipal by-products that require further treatment before disposal to avoid polluting the environment. In the study, they were mixed and vitrified into the slag by the melt-quench process. The obtained vitrified slag was then mixed with various percentages of oil shale fly ash and converted into glass ceramic composites by the subsequent sintering process. Differential thermal analysis was used to study the thermal characteristics and determine the sintering temperatures. X-ray diffraction analysis was used to analyze the crystalline phase compositions. Sintering shrinkage, weight loss on ignition, density and compressive strength were tested to determine the optimum preparation condition and study the co-sintering mechanism of vitrified amorphous slag and oil shale fly ash. The results showed the product performances increased with the increase of sintering temperatures and the proportion of vitrified slag to oil shale fly ash. Glass ceramic composite (vitrified slag content of 80%, oil shale fly ash content of 20%, sintering temperature of 1000 °C and sintering time of 2h) showed the properties of density of 1.92 ± 0.05 g/cm(3), weight loss on ignition of 6.14 ± 0.18%, sintering shrinkage of 22.06 ± 0.6% and compressive strength of 67 ± 14 MPa. The results indicated that it was a comparable waste-based material compared to previous researches. In particular, the energy consumption in the production process was reduced compared to conventional vitrification and sintering method. Chemical resistance and heavy metals leaching results of glass ceramic composites further confirmed the possibility of its engineering applications.

  19. Influences of CaO on Crystallization, Microstructures, and Properties of BaO-Al2O3-B2O3-SiO2 Glass-Ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bo; Tang, Bo; Xu, Mingjiang

    2015-10-01

    We have developed BaO-CaO-Al2O3-B2O3-SiO2 glass-ceramics with high thermal coefficient of expansion (TCE) to overcome thermal mismatch at board level. The crystalline phases include quartz (major), cristobalite (minor), and bazirite BaZrSi3O9 (minor). Calculations from whole-pattern fitting show that the crystallinity varies slightly within the range of 33.48% to 34.89%, while the mass fraction of the phases changes remarkably with the CaO content. This indicates that CaO cannot promote crystallization of Ba-Al-B-Si glass, but effectively suppresses the phase transformation from quartz to cristobalite, making the thermal expansion curves linear. An empirical equation for the TCE versus the temperature and the amount of CaO is established. Furthermore, the densification mechanism of Ca modifiers is revealed. Due to its higher field strength than Ba, substitution of Ca increases the glass viscosity and inhibits ion diffusion. Excessive CaO is thus harmful to the density, bending strength, and electrical properties. The sample with 10 wt.% CaO sintered at 950°C exhibited high bending strength (154.1 MPa) and high TCE (12.38 ppm/°C) as well as good electrical properties ( ɛ = 6.2, tan δ = 5 × 10-4, ρ = 3.8 × 1012 Ω cm).

  20. Effect of silane pretreatment on the immediate bonding of universal adhesives to computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing lithium disilicate glass ceramics.

    PubMed

    Yao, Chenmin; Zhou, Liqun; Yang, Hongye; Wang, Yake; Sun, Hualing; Guo, Jingmei; Huang, Cui

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of silane pretreatment on the universal adhesive bonding between lithium disilicate glass ceramic and composite resin. IPS e.max ceramic blocks etched with hydrofluoric acid were randomly assigned to one of eight groups treated with one of four universal adhesives (two silane-free adhesives and two silane-containing adhesives), each with or without silane pretreatment. Bonded specimens were stored in water for 24 h. The shear bond strength (SBS) of the ceramic-resin interface was measured to evaluate bond strength, and the debonded interface after the SBS test was analysed using field-emission scanning electron microscopy to determine failure mode. Light microscopy was performed to analyse microleakage and marginal sealing ability. Silane pretreatment significantly and positively influenced SBS and marginal sealing ability. For all the universal adhesive groups, SBS increased and the percentage of microleakage decreased after the pretreatment. Without the pretreatment, SBS and the percentage of microleakage were not significantly different between the silane-containing universal adhesive groups and the silane-free groups. Cohesive failure was the main fracture pattern. The results suggest that additional silane pretreatment can effectively improve the bonding strength and marginal sealing of adhesives to lithium disilicate glass ceramics. The bonding performance of silane-containing universal adhesives without pretreatment is similar to that of silane-free adhesives.

  1. Tailored spectroscopic and optical properties in rare earth-activated glass-ceramics planar waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ristic, Davor; Van Tran, Thi Thanh; Dieudonné, Belto; Cristina, Armellini; Berneschi, Simone; Chiappini, Andrea; Chiasera, Alessandro; Varas, Stefano; Carpentiero, Alessandro; Mazzola, Maurizio; Nunzi Conti, Gualtiero; Pelli, Stefano; Speranza, Giorgio; Feron, Patrice; Duverger Arfuso, Claire; Cibiel, Gilles; Turrell, Sylvia; Tran Ngoc, Khiem; Boulard, Brigitte; Righini, Giancarlo C.; Ferrari, Maurizio

    2013-03-01

    Glass ceramic activated by rare earth ions are nanocomposite systems that exhibit specific morphologic, structural and spectroscopic properties allowing to develop interesting new physical concepts, for instance the mechanism related to the transparency, as well as novel photonic devices based on the enhancement of the luminescence. At the state of art the fabrication techniques based on bottom-up and top-down approaches appear to be viable although a specific effort is required to achieve the necessary reliability and reproducibility of the preparation protocols. In particular, the dependence of the final product on the specific parent glass and on the employed synthesis still remain an important task of the research in material science. Glass-ceramic waveguides overcome some of the efficiency problems experienced with conventional waveguides. These two-phase materials are composed of nanocrystals embedded in an amorphous matrix. The respective volume fractions of the crystalline and amorphous phases determine the properties of the glass ceramic. They also represent a valid alternative to widely used glass hosts such as silica as an effective optical medium for light propagation and luminescence enhancement. Looking to application, the enhanced spectroscopic properties typical of glass ceramic in respect to those of the amorphous structures constitute an important point for the development of integrated optics devices, including optical amplifiers, monolithic waveguide laser, novel sensors, coating of spherical microresonators, and up and down converters for solar energy exploitation.

  2. Synthesis and Structural Characterization of Niobium Doped Lead-Telluride Glass-Ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathish, M.; Eraiah, B.

    2015-02-01

    The basic glasses with composition (70-x) TeO2-30PbO-xNb2O5 (where x=0.1 mol % and 0.2 mol %) were prepared by melt quenching method and heat treated at 280°C for 30 min. The samples becoming glass ceramics was confirmed by SEM. The XRD parameters such as crystallite size of these glass ceramics decreases as increase the impurity and is the order of 184-109A°. However, micro strain (ε) and dislocation density (δ) increases. Glass transition and thermal stability estimated from DSC measurements and it has been found that both increase with increasing of impurity. Infrared Absorption spectra were measured for TeO2 glass and glass ceramic doped with Nb2O5. The recorded bands attributed to the different modes of vibration and stretching of Te-O band. Optical Absorption spectra of TeO2-PbO- Nb2O5 system shows that the absorption edge has a tail extending towards the lower energies and shifts towards for higher energies for rare earths-doped glass-ceramics. The degree of the edge shift was found to depend on the structural rearrangement and the relative concentrations of the glass basic units. The general appearance of the absorption spectra of these rare earth doped TeO2 glasses are similar to the spectra observed for other glasses doped with the same kind of rare earth oxides.

  3. Osteoconductivity of modified fluorcanasite glass-ceramics for bone tissue augmentation and repair.

    PubMed

    Bandyopadhyay-Ghosh, S; Faria, P E P; Johnson, A; Felipucci, D N B; Reaney, I M; Salata, L A; Brook, I M; Hatton, P V

    2010-09-01

    Modified fluorcanasite glasses were fabricated by either altering the molar ratios of Na(2)O and CaO or by adding P(2)O(5) to the parent stoichiometric glass compositions. Glasses were converted to glass-ceramics by a controlled two-stage heat treatment process. Rods (2 mm x 4 mm) were produced using the conventional lost-wax casting technique. Osteoconductive 45S5 bioglass was used as a reference material. Biocompatibility and osteoconductivity were investigated by implantation into healing defects (2 mm) in the midshaft of rabbit femora. Tissue response was investigated using conventional histology and scanning electron microscopy. Histological and histomorphometric evaluation of specimens after 12 weeks implantation showed significantly more bone contact with the surface of 45S5 bioglass implants when compared with other test materials. When the bone contact for each material was compared between experimental time points, the Glass-Ceramic 2 (CaO rich) group showed significant difference (p = 0.027) at 4 weeks, but no direct contact at 12 weeks. Histology and backscattered electron photomicrographs showed that modified fluorcanasite glass-ceramic implants had greater osteoconductivity than the parent stoichiometric composition. Of the new materials, fluorcanasite glass-ceramic implants modified by the addition of P(2)O(5) showed the greatest stimulation of new mineralized bone tissue formation adjacent to the implants after 4 and 12 weeks implantation.

  4. Results of Mechanical Testing for Pyroceram(tm) Glass-Ceramic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    2003-01-01

    Mechanical testing for Pyroceram (trademark) 9606 glass-ceramic fabricated by Corning was conducted to determine mechanical properties of the material including slow crack growth.Valid testing was not achieved in tension, compression, and shear testing due to inappropriate test specimen configurations provided and primarily due to the existence of fortified layer( in tension).

  5. In Vitro Investigation of Bioactive Glass-Ceramic Composites Based on Biogenic Hydroxyapatite or Synthetic Calcium Phosphates.

    PubMed

    Pinchuk, Nataliia; Parkhomey, Oleksandr; Sych, Olena

    2017-12-01

    This in vitro investigation of the behavior of two types of calcium phosphate glass ceramics on the basis of phosphates of biogenic or synthetic origin prepared from initial mixtures with different particle size has revealed that some different factors affect the behavior, namely the phase composition of composite, fraction of open porosity, and average diameter of pore channels. It was established that the solubility of the composites on the basis of synthetic calcium phosphates and glass after 2 and 7 days contact with saline composites is the highest among the materials under study. First of all, this fact is related to the peculiarities of their phase composition, high fraction of open porosity, and high permeability. As for biogenic hydroxyapatite/glass materials, their solubility is several times lower in spite of close total porosity. The particle size of initial mixture practically does not affect the material solubility; the latter is only slightly lower for smaller particles.

  6. In Vitro Investigation of Bioactive Glass-Ceramic Composites Based on Biogenic Hydroxyapatite or Synthetic Calcium Phosphates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinchuk, Nataliia; Parkhomey, Oleksandr; Sych, Olena

    2017-02-01

    This in vitro investigation of the behavior of two types of calcium phosphate glass ceramics on the basis of phosphates of biogenic or synthetic origin prepared from initial mixtures with different particle size has revealed that some different factors affect the behavior, namely the phase composition of composite, fraction of open porosity, and average diameter of pore channels. It was established that the solubility of the composites on the basis of synthetic calcium phosphates and glass after 2 and 7 days contact with saline composites is the highest among the materials under study. First of all, this fact is related to the peculiarities of their phase composition, high fraction of open porosity, and high permeability. As for biogenic hydroxyapatite/glass materials, their solubility is several times lower in spite of close total porosity. The particle size of initial mixture practically does not affect the material solubility; the latter is only slightly lower for smaller particles.

  7. Summary Report: Glass-Ceramic Waste Forms for Combined Fission Products

    SciTech Connect

    Crum, Jarrod V.; Riley, Brian J.; Turo, Laura A.; Tang, Ming; Kossoy, Anna

    2011-09-23

    Glass-ceramic waste form development began in FY 2010 examining two combined waste stream options: (1) alkaline earth (CS) + lanthanide (Ln), and (2) + transition metal (TM) fission-product waste streams generated by the uranium extraction (UREX+) separations process. Glass-ceramics were successfully developed for both options however; Option 2 was selected over Option 1, at the conclusion of 2010, because Option 2 immobilized all three waste streams with only a minimal decrease in waste loading. During the first year, a series of three glass (Option 2) were fabricated that varied waste loading-WL (42, 45, and 50 mass%) at fixed molar ratios of CaO/MoO{sub 3} and B{sub 2}O{sub 3}/alkali both at 1.75. These glass-ceramics were slow cooled and characterized in terms of phase assemblage and preliminary irradiation stability. This fiscal year, further characterization was performed on the FY 2010 Option 2 glass-ceramics in terms of: static leach testing, phase analysis by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and irradiation stability (electron and ion). Also, a new series of glass-ceramics were developed for Option 2 that varied the additives: Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (0-6 mass%), molar ratio of CaO/MoO{sub 3} and B{sub 2}O{sub 3}/alkali (1.75 to 2.25) and waste loading (50, 55, and 60 mass%). Lastly, phase pure powellite and oxyapatite were synthesized for irradiation studies. Results of this fiscal year studies showed compositional flexibility, chemical stability, and radiation stability in the current glass-ceramic system. First, the phase assemblages and microstructure of all of the FY 2010 and 2011 glass-ceramics are very similar once subjected to the slow cool heat treatment. The phases identified in these glass-ceramics were oxyapatite, powellite, cerianite, and ln-borosilicate. This shows that variations in waste loading or additives can be accommodated without drastically changing the phase assemblage of the waste form, thus making the processing and performance

  8. Heat treatment of pre-hydrolyzed silane increases adhesion of phosphate monomer-based resin cement to glass ceramic.

    PubMed

    de Carvalho, Rodrigo Furtado; Cotes, Caroline; Kimpara, Estevão Tomomitsu; Leite, Fabíola Pessoa Pereira; Özcan, Mutlu

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the influence of different forms of heat treatment on a pre-hydrolyzed silane to improve the adhesion of phosphate monomer-based (MDP) resin cement to glass ceramic. Resin and feldspathic ceramic blocks (n=48, n=6 for bond test, n=2 for microscopy) were randomly divided into 6 groups and subject to surface treatments: G1: Hydrofluoric acid (HF) 9.6% for 20 s + Silane + MDP resin cement (Panavia F); G2: HF 9.6% for 20 s + Silane + Heat Treatment (oven) + Panavia F; G3: Silane + Heat Treatment (oven) + Panavia F; G4: HF 9.6% for 20 s + Silane + Heat Treatment (hot air) + Panavia F; G5: Silane + Heat Treatment (hot air) + Panavia F; G6: Silane + Panavia F. Microtensile bond strength (MTBS) test was performed using a universal testing machine (1 mm/min). After debonding, the substrate and adherent surfaces were analyzed using stereomicroscope and scanning electron microscope (SEM) to categorize the failure types. Data were analyzed statistically using two-way test ANOVA and Tukey's test (=0.05). Heat treatment of the silane containing MDP, with prior etching with HF (G2: 13.15 ± 0.89a; G4: 12.58 ± 1.03a) presented significantly higher bond strength values than the control group (G1: 9.16 ± 0.64b). The groups without prior etching (G3: 10.47 ± 0.70b; G5: 9.47 ± 0.32b) showed statistically similar bond strength values between them and the control group (G1). The silane application without prior etching and heat treatment resulted in the lowest mean bond strength (G6: 8.05 ± 0.37c). SEM analysis showed predominantly adhesive failures and EDS analysis showed common elements of spectra (Si, Na, Al, K, O, C) characterizing the microstructure of the glass-ceramic studied. Heat treatment of the pre-hydrolyzed silane containing MDP in an oven at 100 °C for 2 min or with hot air application at 50 ± 5 ºC for 1 min, was effective in increasing the bond strength values between the ceramic and resin cement containing MDP.

  9. Dopant distribution in a Tm(3+)-Yb(3+) codoped silica based glass ceramic: an infrared-laser induced upconversion study.

    PubMed

    Lahoz, F; Martin, I R; Mendez-Ramos, J; Nunez, P

    2004-04-01

    The optically active dopant distribution in a Tm(3+)-Yb(3+) doped silica based glass ceramic sample has been investigated. A systematic analysis of the upconversion fluorescence of the Tm(3+)-Yb(3+) codoped glass and glass ceramic has been performed at room temperature. Tm(3+) and Yb(3+) single doped glass and glass ceramics have also been included in the study. Upon infrared excitation at 790 nm into the (3)H(4) level of the Tm(3+) ions a blue upconversion emission is observed, which is drastically increased in the Yb(3+) codoped samples. A rate equation model confirmed the energy transfer upconversion mechanism. Based on these results, the temporal dynamic curves of the levels involved in the upconversion process, (3)H(4), (2)F(5/2), and (1)G(4) were interpreted in the glass ceramic samples. The contribution of the optically active Tm(3+) and Yb(3+) ions in the crystalline and in the vitreous phase of the glass ceramic was distinguished and the ratio of Tm(3+) ions in the crystalline phase could be quantified for the 1 mol % Tm(3+)-2.5 mol % Yb(3+) glass ceramic. A surprising result was obtained for that concentration: the main contribution to the upconversion emission of the glass ceramic is due to Tm(3+)-Yb(3+) ions in the vitreous phase.

  10. Translucency and strength of high-translucency monolithic zirconium oxide materials.

    PubMed

    Church, Todd D; Jessup, Jeffrey P; Guillory, Villa L; Vandewalle, Kraig S

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the translucency and strength of highly translucent monolithic zirconia ceramic materials recently introduced to the market. Four monolithic zirconium oxide materials promoted as having high translucency (BruxZir Shaded 16, BruxZir HT, Lava Plus, and inCoris TZI C) were compared to a high-translucency, lithium disilicate monolithic glass-ceramic material (IPS e.max CAD HT). To evaluate translucency, the materials were sectioned into 0.5-, 1.0-, 1.5-, and 2.0-mm-thick specimens; all were sintered and polished. Translucency parameters were calculated with a spectrophotometer. To evaluate flexural strength and modulus, the ceramic materials were sectioned to create beams and fractured in a universal testing machine. The lithium disilicate had significantly greater translucency than the zirconia materials at each thickness. In general, the translucencies of the zirconia materials were similar at each thickness. However, at the manufacturers' recommended minimal thicknesses, 0.5-mm specimens of BruxZir Shaded 16, inCoris TZI C, and Lava Plus were more translucent than the 1.0-mm-thick specimens of IPS e.max CAD HT. Translucency significantly decreased for each material at each increase in thickness. The flexural strengths of the zirconia materials were similar to each other and significantly greater than that of IPS e.max CAD HT. Flexural moduli were more variable. Of the zirconia materials, BruxZir Shaded 16 had an overall better combination of translucency, strength, and modulus.

  11. A two-scale model for simultaneous sintering and crystallization of glass-ceramic scaffolds for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Huang, R; Pan, J; Boccaccini, A R; Chen, Q Z

    2008-07-01

    Bioglass-based glass-ceramic foams have been developed recently as highly porous, mechanically competent, bioactive and degradable scaffolds for bone tissue engineering. However, the development of the material so far has been based on a trial-and-error approach, and the existing materials are far from being optimized. In this paper, a mechanism-based model is presented for sintering deformation of Bioglass foams. The porous foams consist of struts which, in turn, consist of Bioglass particles. A corresponding two-scale model is developed based on existing viscous sintering models. Crystallization plays a key role in the sintering deformation of Bioglass foams and is taken into account in the model. Qualitative comparison between the model predictions and experimental observations is presented, showing that the model is able to capture the complicated interplay between crystallization and viscous flow during the sintering process.

  12. Spectroscopic characteristics of chromium-doped mullite glass-ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Wojtowicz, A.J.; Meng, W.; Lempicki, A.; Beall, G.H.; Hall, D.W.

    1988-06-01

    The chromium (3+) ion has been widely used as an optical activator in solid-state, tunable laser materials. High octahedral field-stabilization energy and resistance against both oxidation and reduction minimize the dependence of chromium (3+) on the solid-state host matrix. However, the high sensitivity of electronic structure on crystal field strength makes the appropriate choice of host the condition for success. Characteristics of chromium-doped mullite ceramics are discussed with reference to possible laser applications. Dominant features are attributed to large and inherent spectroscopic inhomogeneity of mullite. The spectroscopic data are analyzed using a generalized McCumber theory. The peak-stimulated emission cross section is 0.54 x 10 to the -20 sq cm. This together with preliminary single-pass measurements, indicate that gain for mullite is about 2.6 times smaller than gain for alexandrite.

  13. Chemical adhesion rather than mechanical retention enhances resin bond durability of a dental glass-ceramic with leucite crystallites.

    PubMed

    Meng, X F; Yoshida, K; Gu, N

    2010-08-01

    This study aims to evaluate the effect of chemical adhesion by a silane coupler and mechanical retention by hydrofluoric acid (HFA) etching on the bond durability of resin to a dental glass ceramic with leucite crystallites. Half of the ceramic plates were etched with 4.8% HFA (HFA group) for 60 s, and the other half were not treated (NoHFA group). The scale of their surface roughness and rough area was measured by a 3D laser scanning microscope. These plates then received one of the following two bond procedures to form four bond test groups: HFA/cement, NoHFA/cement, HFA/silane/cement and NoHFA/silane/cement. The associated micro-shear bond strength and bond failure modes were tested after 0 and 30 000 thermal water bath cycles. Four different silane/cement systems (Monobond S/Variolink II, GC Ceramic Primer/Linkmax HV, Clearfil Ceramic Primer/Clearfil Esthetic Cement and Porcelain Liner M/SuperBond C&B) were used. The data for each silane/cement system were analyzed by three-way ANOVA. HFA treatment significantly increased the surface R(a) and R(y) values and the rough area of the ceramic plates compared with NoHFA treatment. After 30 000 thermal water bath cycles, the bond strength of all the test groups except the HFA/Linkmax HV group was significantly reduced, while the HFA/Linkmax HV group showed only adhesive interface failure. The other HFA/cement groups and all NoHFA/cement groups lost bond strength completely, and all NoHFA/silane/cement groups with chemical adhesion had significantly higher bond strength and more ceramic cohesive failures than the respective HFA/cement groups with mechanical retention. The result of the HFA/silane/cement groups with both chemical adhesion and mechanical retention revealed that HFA treatment could enhance the bond durability of resin/silanized glass ceramics, which might result from the increase of the chemical adhesion area on the ceramic rough surface and subsequently reduced degradation speed of the silane coupler

  14. Heavy metal-rich wastes sequester in mineral phases through a glass-ceramic process.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Valles, M; Avila, G; Martinez, S; Terradas, R; Nogués, J M

    2007-08-01

    Certain sludges generated by industry are rich in contaminating elements and are a major environmental problem. In this study, we determine the ability of these contaminating elements to be incorporated into a glass-matrix and in various mineral phases after a crystallization process. The contaminating elements studied were obtained from sewage sludges (SS) and galvanic sludges (GS), our raw materials. The sludge samples were taken from urban wastewater treatment plant in Catalonia (NE Spain) with high levels of phosphorus oxide (P(2)O(5)). In silica glasses, P(2)O(5) acts as a network former. We determined the chemical composition of both the SS and GS, as well as their thermal behaviour by differential thermal analysis and thermal gravimetric analysis (DTA-TG) to obtain their melting curves. The vitreous transition temperature of the obtained glass was established by dilatometer technique at 725 degrees C. The DTA-TG curve of the glass obtained has an exothermal wide peak at 860 degrees C corresponding to crystallization of the two phases: a spinel phase and a phosphate phase. A second exothermal wide peak at 960 degrees C was attributed to the crystallization of aluminium pyroxene, anorthite and fluor-apatite, with two exothermal phenomena attributed to the evolution of these phases. An exothermal peak at 1100 degrees C was attributed to gehlenite crystallization. Scanning electron microscope observations and energy-dispersed X-ray spectroscopy microanalyses of glass-ceramic showed that the contaminating elements were concentrated in the spinel phases, which are the first phases to crystallize during the cooling of glass. Finally, the spinel structure permits the incorporation of all the contaminating elements into it.

  15. Dual-Phase Glass Ceramic: Structure, Dual-Modal Luminescence, and Temperature Sensing Behaviors.

    PubMed

    Chen, Daqin; Wan, Zhongyi; Zhou, Yang; Zhou, Xiangzhi; Yu, Yunlong; Zhong, Jiasong; Ding, Mingye; Ji, Zhenguo

    2015-09-02

    Yb(3+)/Er(3+)/Cr(3+) triply doped transparent bulk glass ceramic containing orthorhombic YF3 and cubic Ga2O3 nanocrystals was fabricated by a melt-quenching route to explore its possible application in optical thermometry with high spatial and temperature resolution. It was experimentally observed that Yb(3+)/Er(3+) ions incorporated into the precipitated YF3 nanophase, while Cr(3+) ions partitioned into the crystallized Ga2O3 nanophase after glass crystallization. Importantly, such spatial isolation strategy efficiently suppressed adverse energy transfer among different active ions. As a consequence, intense green anti-Stokes luminescence originated from Er(3+): (2)H11/2,(4)S3/2 → (4)I15/2 transitions, and deep-red Stokes luminescence transitions assigned to Cr(3+): (2)E → (4)A2 radiation were simultaneously realized. Impressively, the intermediate crystal-field environment for Cr(3+) in Ga2O3 made it possible for lifetime-based temperature sensing owing to the competition of radiation transitions from the thermally coupled Cr(3+) (2)E and (4)T2 excited states. In the meantime, the low-phonon-energy environment for Er(3+) in YF3 was beneficial for upconversion fluorescence intensity ratio-based temperature sensing via thermal population between the (2)H11/2 state and (4)S3/2 state. The Boltzmann distribution theory and the two-level kinetic model were adopted to interpret these temperature-dependent luminescence of Er(3+) and Cr(3+), respectively, which gave the highest temperature sensitivities of 0.25% K(-1) at 514 K for Er(3+) and 0.59% K(-1) at 386 K for Cr(3+).

  16. Fabrication and luminescence behavior of phosphate glass ceramics co-doped with Er3+ and Yb3+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xiaochen; Duan, Li; Ni, Lei; Wang, Zhuo

    2012-08-01

    Transparent phosphate glass ceramics co-doped with Er3+ and Yb3+ in the system P2O5Li2OCaF2TiO2 were successfully synthesized by melt-quenching and subsequent heating. Formation of the nanocrystals was confirmed by X-ray powder diffraction. Judd-Ofelt analyses of Er3+ ions in the precursor glasses and glass ceramics were performed to evaluate the intensity parameters Ω2,4,6. Under 975 nm excitation, intense upconversion (UC) and infrared emission (1545 nm) were observed in the glass ceramics by efficient energy transfer from Yb3+ to Er3+. The luminescence processes were explained and the emission cross section was calculated by Fuchtbauer-Ladenburg (F-L) formula. The results confirm the potential applications of Er3+/Yb3+ co-doped glass ceramics as laser and fiber amplifier media.

  17. Histological response of soda-lime glass-ceramic bactericidal rods implanted in the jaws of beagle dogs

    PubMed Central

    Moya, José S.; Martínez, Arturo; López-Píriz, Roberto; Guitián, Francisco; Díaz, Luis A.; Esteban-Tejeda, Leticia; Cabal, Belén; Sket, Federico; Fernández-García, Elisa; Tomsia, Antoni P.; Torrecillas, Ramón

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial and fungal infections remain a major clinical challenge. Implant infections very often require complicated revision procedures that are troublesome to patients and costly to the healthcare system. Innovative approaches to tackle infections are urgently needed. We investigated the histological response of novel free P2O5 glass-ceramic rods implanted in the jaws of beagle dogs. Due to the particular percolated morphology of this glass-ceramic, the dissolution of the rods in the animal body environment and the immature bone formation during the fourth months of implantation maintained the integrity of the glass-ceramic rod. No clinical signs of inflammation took place in any of the beagle dogs during the four months of implantation. This new glass-ceramic biomaterial with inherent bactericidal and fungicidal properties can be considered as an appealing candidate for bone tissue engineering. PMID:27515388

  18. Histological response of soda-lime glass-ceramic bactericidal rods implanted in the jaws of beagle dogs.

    PubMed

    Moya, José S; Martínez, Arturo; López-Píriz, Roberto; Guitián, Francisco; Díaz, Luis A; Esteban-Tejeda, Leticia; Cabal, Belén; Sket, Federico; Fernández-García, Elisa; Tomsia, Antoni P; Torrecillas, Ramón

    2016-08-12

    Bacterial and fungal infections remain a major clinical challenge. Implant infections very often require complicated revision procedures that are troublesome to patients and costly to the healthcare system. Innovative approaches to tackle infections are urgently needed. We investigated the histological response of novel free P2O5 glass-ceramic rods implanted in the jaws of beagle dogs. Due to the particular percolated morphology of this glass-ceramic, the dissolution of the rods in the animal body environment and the immature bone formation during the fourth months of implantation maintained the integrity of the glass-ceramic rod. No clinical signs of inflammation took place in any of the beagle dogs during the four months of implantation. This new glass-ceramic biomaterial with inherent bactericidal and fungicidal properties can be considered as an appealing candidate for bone tissue engineering.

  19. Infrared Optical Properties of β-Spodumene Solid Solution Glass-Ceramic for Fiber-Optic Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamoto, Akihiko; Yamamoto, Shigeru

    2006-09-01

    The IR optical properties of an opaque β-spodumene solid solution (s.s.) glass-ceramic for fiber-optic devices were studied in relation to its refractive indices in both crystalline and glass phases. We investigated the refractive indices of both phases on the basis of IR transmittance change due to the structural relaxation of the glass phase. The refractive indices of this β-spodumene s.s. glass-ceramic at a wavelength of 1550 nm in the crystalline and glass phases were first determined to be 1.530 and 1.495, respectively. It was found from the refractive index data that the optical scattering intensity of this glass-ceramic approximately follows the Rayleigh-Gans model. We also demonstrated that the inner diameter of an opaque glass-ceramic capillary used in optical fiber connectors can be optically measured with a sub-micrometer accuracy using an IR laser.

  20. Novel resorbable glass-ceramic scaffolds for hard tissue engineering: from the parent phosphate glass to its bone-like macroporous derivatives.

    PubMed

    Bretcanu, Oana; Baino, Francesco; Verné, Enrica; Vitale-Brovarone, Chiara

    2014-05-01

    One of the major challenges of hard tissue engineering research focuses on the development of scaffolds that can match the mechanical properties of the host bone and resorb at the same rate as the bone is repaired. The aim of this work was the synthesis and characterization of a resorbable phosphate glass, as well as its application for the fabrication of three dimensional (3-D) scaffolds for bone regeneration. The glass microstructure and behaviour upon heating were analysed by X-ray diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry and hot stage microscopy. The glass solubility was investigated according to relevant ISO standards using distilled water, simulated body fluid (SBF) and Tris-HCl as testing media. The glass underwent progressive dissolution over time in all three media but the formation of a hydroxyapatite-like layer was also observed on the samples soaked in SBF and Tris-HCl, which demonstrated the bioactivity of the material. The glass powder was used to fabricate 3-D macroporous bone-like glass-ceramic scaffolds by adopting polyethylene particles as pore formers: during thermal treatment, the polymer additive was removed and the sintering of glass particles was allowed. The obtained scaffolds exhibited high porosity (87 vol.%) and compressive strength around 1.5 MPa. After soaking for 4 months in SBF, the scaffolds mass loss was 76 wt.% and the pH of the solution did not exceed the 7.55 value, thereby remaining in a physiological range. The produced scaffolds, being resorbable, bioactive, architecturally similar to trabecular bone and exhibiting interesting mechanical properties, can be proposed as promising candidates for bone repair applications.

  1. CVD silicon carbide monofilament reinforced SrO-Al2O3-2SiO2 (SAS) glass-ceramic composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P.

    1995-01-01

    Unidirectional CVD SiC fiber-reinforced SrO.Al2O3.2SiO2 (SAS) glass-ceramic matrix composites have been fabricated by hot pressing at various combinations of temperature, pressure and time. Both carbon-rich surface coated SCS-6 and uncoated SCS-0 fibers were used as reinforcements. Almost fully dense composites have been obtained. Monoclinic celsian, SrAl2Si2O8, was the only crystalline phase observed in the matrix from x-ray diffraction. During three point flexure testing of composites, a test span to thickness ratio of approximately 25 or greater was necessary to avoid sample delamination. Strong and tough SCS-6/SAS composites having a first matrix crack stress of approximately 300 MPa and an ultimate bend strength of approximately 825 MPa were fabricated. No chemical reaction between the SCS-6 fibers and the SAS matrix was observed after high temperature processing. The uncoated SCS-0 fiber-reinforced SAS composites showed only limited improvement in strength over SAS monolithic. The SCS-0/SAS composite having a fiber volume fraction of 0.24 and hot pressed at 1400 deg C exhibited a first matrix cracking stress of approximately 231 +/- 20 MPa and ultimate strength of 265 +/- 17 MPa. From fiber push-out tests, the fiber/matrix interfacial debonding strength (tau(sub debond)) and frictional sliding stress (tau(sub friction)) in the SCS-6/SAS system were evaluated to be approximately 6.7 +/- 2.3 MPa and 4.3 +/- 0.6 MPa, respectively, indicating a weak interface. However, for the SCS-0/SAS composite, much higher values of approximately 17.5 +/- 2.7 MPa for tau(sub debond) and 11.3 +/- 1.6 MPa for tau(sub friction) respectively, were observed; some of the fibers were so strongly bonded to the matrix that they could not be pushed out. Examination of fracture surfaces revealed limited short pull-out length of SCS-0 fibers. The applicability of various micromechanical models for predicting the values of first matrix cracking stress and ultimate strength of these

  2. Oxidation of Al-containing austenitic stainless steels as related to the formation of strong glass-ceramic to metal seals

    SciTech Connect

    Moddeman, W.E.; Birkbeck, J.C.; Bowling, W.C.; Burke, A.R.; Cassidy, R.T.

    1996-08-01

    In glass-ceramic to metal seals used in pyrotechnic actuators and ignitors, Ni-based alloys and Al-containing austenitic stainless steels are used. Metal attack by the glass is severe if Ni based alloys are used, less so for the Al-containing alloys. In this paper, lithia-alumina-silica glass-ceramic was sealed to Al-containing alloys that were first oxidized prior to sealing (preoxidation). Results show that this preoxidation substantially reduces the probability of glass/metal reactions during seal formation, thus improving the overall quality of the interface without loss of seal bond strength. Mechanism of surface oxide formation of these Al- containing steels is discussed. Auger data show the composition of the resulting oxides to be a function of oxidation temperature. There are two theories on the oxidation mechanism: (1) oxidation occurring at the air/oxide interface (Abderrazik et al, 1987), and (2) oxidation taking place at the oxide/metal interface (Hindam and Smeltzer, 1980). To test the theories, oxidation of the Al-containing alloys was carried out, first in pure oxygen-16, and then followed by pure oxygen-18. SIMS showed no layered structure, but did show a mixture of oxides. Thus, the oxidation mechanism is not simple and must be allowing oxygen to have access at all stages of the oxidation process.

  3. Magnetic behavior of erbium-zinc-borate glasses and glass ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Borodi, G.; Pascuta, P.; Bosca, M.; Pop, V.; Stefan, R.; Tetean, R.; Radulescu, D.

    2013-11-13

    Glasses of the system (Er{sub 2}O{sub 3}){sub x}⋅(B{sub 2}O{sub 3}){sub (60−x)}⋅(ZnO){sub 40} (3 ≤ x ≤ 15 mol%) were prepared by conventional melt quenching and subsequently converted to glass ceramics by heat treatment of glass samples at 860 °C for 2 h. The magnetic behaviour of the studied glasses and glass ceramics were investigated using a vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) and a Faraday-type magnetic balance. Magnetic data show that erbium ions are involved in negative superexchange interactions in all the investigated samples, being antiferromagnetically coupled. For all studied samples the experimental values obtained for the effective magnetic moments are lower than the value corresponding to free Er{sup 3+} ions and decrease with the increasing of Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} content. The decrease is more pronounced in heat treated samples than untreated ones.

  4. Enhanced broadband near-infrared luminescence from transparent Yb3+/Ni2+ codoped silicate glass ceramics.

    PubMed

    Wu, Botao; Zhou, Shifeng; Ruan, Jian; Qiao, Yanbo; Chen, Danping; Zhu, Congshan; Qiu, Jianrong

    2008-02-04

    The near-infrared emission intensity of Ni(2+) in Yb(3+)/Ni(2+) codoped transparent MgO-Al(2)O(3)-Ga(2)O(3)-SiO(2)-TiO(2) glass ceramics could be enhanced up to 4.4 times via energy transfer from Yb(3+) to Ni(2+) in nanocrystals. The best Yb(2)O(3) concentration was about 1.00 mol%. For the Yb(3+)/Ni(2+) codoped glass ceramic with 1.00 mol% Yb(2)O(3), a broadband near-infrared emission centered at 1265 nm with full width at half maximum of about 300 nm and lifetime of about 220 mus was observed. The energy transfer mechanism was also discussed.

  5. Green-white-yellow tunable luminescence from doped transparent glass ceramics containing nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X. F.; Yan, X. H.; Xuan, Y.; Zheng, J.; He, W. Y.

    2013-10-01

    , , and doped transparent ceramics containing nanocrystals were fabricated by a melt-quenching method and subsequent heating. Tetragonal phase spheres with 20 nm size are homogeneously precipitated among a borosilicate glass matrix. The photoluminescence spectrum of single doped transparent ceramics shows white light emission under 382 nm UV excitation. The emission color of co-doped transparent glass ceramics is tuned from green to white through energy transfer from to , and the emission color of co-doped transparent ceramics is tuned from white to yellow through energy transfer from to . CIE chromaticity and color temperature measurements show that the resulting transparent glass ceramics may be a candidate as a warm-white LED material pumped by a UV InGaN chip.

  6. Transport properties of lithium- lead-vanadium-telluride glass and glass ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Sathish, M.; Eraiah, B.

    2014-04-24

    Glasses with the chemical composition 35Li{sub 2}O-(45-x)V{sub 2}O{sub 5−}20PbO-xTeO{sub 2} (where x = 2.5, 5, 7.5, 10, 15 mol %) have prepared by conventional melt quenching method. The electrical conductivity of Li{sup +} ion conducting lead vanadium telluride glass samples has been carried out both as a function of temperature and frequency in the temperature range 503K-563K and over frequencies 40 Hz to 10 MHz. The electronic conduction has been observed in the present systems. When these samples annealed around 400°C for 2hour become the glass ceramic, which also shows increase tendency of conductivity. SEM confines glass and glass ceramic nature of the prepared samples.

  7. Mechanochemically synthesized kalsilite based bioactive glass-ceramic composite for dental vaneering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Pattem Hemanth; Singh, Vinay Kumar; Kumar, Pradeep

    2015-08-01

    Kalsilite glass-ceramic composites have been prepared by a mechanochemical synthesis process for dental veneering application. The aim of the present study is to prepare bioactive kalsilite composite material for application in tissue attachment and sealing of the marginal gap between fixed prosthesis and tooth. Mechanochemical synthesis is used for the preparation of microfine kalsilite glass-ceramic. Low temperature frit and bioglass have been prepared using the traditional quench method. Thermal, microstructural and bioactive properties of the composite material have been examined. The feasibility of the kalsilite to be coated on the base commercial opaque as well as the bioactive behavior of the coated specimen has been confirmed. This study indicates that the prepared kalsilite-based composites show similar structural, morphological and bioactive behavior to that of commercial VITA VMK95 Dentin 1M2.

  8. Ultraviolet and white photon avalanche upconversion in Ho{sup 3+}-doped nanophase glass ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Lahoz, F.; Martin, I.R.; Calvilla-Quintero, J.M.

    2005-01-31

    Ho{sup 3+}-doped fluoride nanophase glass ceramics have been synthesized from silica-based oxyfluoride glass. An intense white emission light is observed by the naked eye under near infrared excitation at 750 nm. This visible upconversion is due to three strong emission bands in the primary color components, red, green, and blue. Besides, ultraviolet signals are also recorded upon the same excitation wavelength. The excitation mechanism of both the ultraviolet and the visible emissions is a photon avalanche process with a relatively low pump power threshold at about 20 mW. The total upconverted emission intensity has been estimated to increase by about a factor of 20 in the glass ceramic compared to the precursor glass, in which an avalanche type mechanism is not generated.

  9. Preparation and Characterization of Niobium Doped Lead-Telluride Glass Ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Sathish, M.; Eraiah, B.; Anavekar, R. V.

    2011-07-15

    Niobium-lead-telluride glass ceramics of composition xNb{sub 2}O{sub 5}-(20-x) pbO-80TeO{sub 2}(where x = 0.1 mol% to 0.5 mol%) were prepared by using conventional melt quenching method. The prepared glass samples were initially amorphous in nature after annealed at 400 deg. c all samples were crystallized. This was confined by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. The particle size of these glass ceramics have been calculated by using Debye-Scherer formula and the particle size is in the order of 15 nm to 60 nm. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) photograph shows the presence of needle-like crystals in these samples.

  10. Method of producing a ceramic fiber-reinforced glass-ceramic matrix composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A fiber-reinforced composite composed of a BaO-Al2O3-2SiO2 (BAS) glass ceramic matrix is reinforced with CVD silicon carbide continuous fibers. A slurry of BAS glass powders is prepared and celsian seeds are added during ball melting. The slurry is cast into tapes which are cut to the proper size. Continuous CVD-SiC fibers are formed into mats of the desired size. The matrix tapes and the fiber mats are alternately stacked in the proper orientation. This tape-mat stack is warm pressed to produce a 'green' composite. The 'green' composite is then heated to an elevated temperature to burn out organic constituents. The remaining interim material is then hot pressed to form a silicon carbide fiber-reinforced celsian (BAS) glass-ceramic matrix composite which may be machined to size.

  11. Raman and Infrared Spectroscopy of Yttrium Aluminum Borate Glasses and Glass-ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, J.; Brooks, M.; Crenshaw, T.; Morris, A.; Chattopadhyay, K.; Morgan, S.

    1998-01-01

    Raman spectra of glasses and glass-ceramics in the Y2O3-Al2O3-B2O3 system are reported. Glasses with B2O3 contents ranging from 40 to 60 mole percent were prepared by melting 20 g of the appropriate oxide or carbonate powders in alumina crucibles at 1400 C for 45 minutes. Subsequent heat treatments of the glasses at temperatures ranging from 600 to 800 C were performed in order to induce nucleation and crystallization. It was found that Na2CO3 added to the melt served as a nucleating agent and resulted in uniform bulk crystallization. The Raman spectra of the glasses are interpreted primarily in terms of vibrations of boron - oxygen structural groups. Comparison of the Raman spectra of the glass-ceramic samples with spectra of aluminate and borate crystalline materials reveal that these glasses crystallize primarily as yttrium aluminum borate, YAl3(BO3)4.

  12. The size effect of crystalline inclusions on the fracture modes in glass-ceramic materials.

    PubMed

    Charitidis, C A; Karakasidis, T E; Kavouras, P; Karakostas, Th

    2007-07-04

    The main parameters influencing the mechanical performance of glass-ceramic materials are the shape and mean size of the ceramic phase, i.e. the crystalline inclusions. The aim of the present work is twofold: first, to study the effect of the above parameters on the modes of fracture in two kinds of glass-ceramic materials by the use of the static microindentation technique; second, to interpret the experimental results by the application of a simple physical model. It was found that reduction in the size of granularly shaped crystallite inclusions or reduction of the width of needle-like crystalline inclusions results in an increase of the extent of crack propagation, while the fracture mode shifts from intergranular to transgranular. These observations were successfully interpreted in terms of energetic arguments related to the size of the crystalline inclusions with respect to the width of a disordered zone acting as an interface between them and the amorphous matrix.

  13. Structural analysis and thermal behavior of diopside-fluorapatite-wollastonite-based glasses and glass-ceramics.

    PubMed

    Kansal, Ishu; Tulyaganov, Dilshat U; Goel, Ashutosh; Pascual, Maria J; Ferreira, José M F

    2010-11-01

    Glass-ceramics in the diopside (CaMgSi2O6)-fluorapatite (Ca5(PO4)3F)-wollastonite (CaSiO3) system are potential candidates for restorative dental and bone implant materials. The present study describes the influence of varying SiO2/CaO and CaF2/P2O5 molar ratio on the structure and thermal behavior of glass compositions in the CaO-MgO-SiO2-P2O5-Na2O-CaF2 system. The structural features and properties of the glasses were investigated by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), infrared spectroscopy, density measurements and dilatometry. Sintering and crystallization behavior of the glass powders were studied by hot-stage microscopy and differential thermal analysis, respectively. The microstructure and crystalline phase assemblage in the sintered glass powder compacts were studied under non-isothermal heating conditions at 825 °C. X-ray diffraction studies combined with the Rietveld-reference intensity ratio (R.I.R) method were employed to quantify the amount of amorphous and crystalline phases in the glass-ceramics, while scanning electron microscopy was used to shed some light on the microstructure of resultant glass-ceramics. An increase in CaO/SiO2 ratio degraded the sinterability of the glass powder compacts, resulting in the formation of akermanite as the major crystalline phase. On the other hand, an increase in P2O5/CaF2 ratio improved the sintering behavior of the glass-ceramics, while varying the amount of crystalline phases, i.e. diopside, fluorapatite and wollastonite.

  14. Effect of Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} dopant on electrical and optical properties of potassium sodium niobate silicate glass-ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Yongsiri, Ploypailin; Sirisoonthorn, Somnuk; Pengpat, Kamonpan

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • The KNN–SiO{sub 2} doped Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} glass-ceramics was prepared by incorporation method. • High dielectric constant (458.41 at 100 kHz) and low loss (0.0005) could be obtained. • TEM and SEM confirmed the existence of KNN crystals embedded in glass matrix. • The Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} dopant causes insignificant effect on modifying E{sub g} value. - Abstract: In this study, transparent glass-ceramics from potassium sodium niobate (KNN)-silicate glass system doped with erbium oxide (Er{sub 2}O{sub 3}) were successfully prepared by incorporation method. KNN was added in glass batches as heterogeneous nucleating agent. The KNN powder was mixed with SiO{sub 2} and Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} dopant with KNN and Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} content varied between 70–80 and 0.5–1.0 mol%, respectively. Each batch was subsequently melted at 1300 °C for 15 min in a platinum crucible using an electric furnace. The quenched glasses were then subjected to heat treatment at various temperatures for 4 h. XRD results showed that the prepared glass ceramics contained crystals of KNN solid solution. In contrary, dielectric constant (ϵ{sub r}) and dielectric loss (tan δ) were found to increase with increasing heat treatment temperature. Additionally, optical properties such as absorbance and energy band gap have been investigated.

  15. Agricultural wastes as a resource of raw materials for developing low-dielectric glass-ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danewalia, Satwinder Singh; Sharma, Gaurav; Thakur, Samita; Singh, K.

    2016-04-01

    Agricultural waste ashes are used as resource materials to synthesize new glass and glass-ceramics. The as-prepared materials are characterized using various techniques for their structural and dielectric properties to check their suitability in microelectronic applications. Sugarcane leaves ash exhibits higher content of alkali metal oxides than rice husk ash, which reduces the melting point of the components due to eutectic reactions. The addition of sugarcane leaves ash in rice husk ash promotes the glass formation. Additionally, it prevents the cristobalite phase formation. These materials are inherently porous, which is responsible for low dielectric permittivity i.e. 9 to 40. The presence of less ordered augite phase enhances the dielectric permittivity as compared to cristobalite and tridymite phases. The present glass-ceramics exhibit lower losses than similar materials synthesized using conventional minerals. The dielectric permittivity is independent to a wide range of temperature and frequency. The glass-ceramics developed with adequately devitrified phases can be used in microelectronic devices and other dielectric applications.

  16. Agricultural wastes as a resource of raw materials for developing low-dielectric glass-ceramics

    PubMed Central

    Danewalia, Satwinder Singh; Sharma, Gaurav; Thakur, Samita; Singh, K.

    2016-01-01

    Agricultural waste ashes are used as resource materials to synthesize new glass and glass-ceramics. The as-prepared materials are characterized using various techniques for their structural and dielectric properties to check their suitability in microelectronic applications. Sugarcane leaves ash exhibits higher content of alkali metal oxides than rice husk ash, which reduces the melting point of the components due to eutectic reactions. The addition of sugarcane leaves ash in rice husk ash promotes the glass formation. Additionally, it prevents the cristobalite phase formation. These materials are inherently porous, which is responsible for low dielectric permittivity i.e. 9 to 40. The presence of less ordered augite phase enhances the dielectric permittivity as compared to cristobalite and tridymite phases. The present glass-ceramics exhibit lower losses than similar materials synthesized using conventional minerals. The dielectric permittivity is independent to a wide range of temperature and frequency. The glass-ceramics developed with adequately devitrified phases can be used in microelectronic devices and other dielectric applications. PMID:27087123

  17. Magnetic glass ceramics for sustained 5-fluorouracil delivery: characterization and evaluation of drug release kinetics.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Hameed, S A M; El-Kady, A M; Marzouk, M A

    2014-11-01

    In the present study, magnetic glass ceramics in the system Fe2O3 ∙ TiO2 ∙ P2O5 ∙ SiO2 ∙ MO (M=Mg, Ca, Mn, Cu, Zn or Ce) are prepared. The effect of adding different cations on the thermal behavior, developed phases, microstructure and magnetic properties is studied using differental thermal analysis (DTA), X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), transmission electron microscope (TEM), FT-infrared transmission (FT-IR) and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) respectively. The magnetic glass ceramics are tested as delivery systems for 5-fluorouracil. Modeling and analysis of release kinetics are addressed. The application of Higuchi square root of time model and the first order release model indicated that, 5-FU is released by diffusion controlled mechanisms, and that its released rate depends greatly on the concentration of loaded drug during the loading stage. The obtained results suggested that, the prepared magnetic glass ceramics can be used for cancer treatment by hyperthermia and/or by localized delivery of therapeutic doses of 5-fluorouracil.

  18. Crack propagation and the material removal mechanism of glass-ceramics by the scratch test.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Zhongjun; Liu, Congcong; Wang, Haorong; Yang, Xue; Fang, Fengzhou; Tang, Junjie

    2016-12-01

    To eliminate the negative effects of surface flaws and subsurface damage of glass-ceramics on clinical effectiveness, crack propagation and the material removal mechanism of glass-ceramics were studied by single and double scratch experiments conducted using an ultra-precision machine. A self-manufactured pyramid shaped single-grit tool with a small tip radius was used as the scratch tool. The surface and subsurface crack propagations and interactions, surface morphology and material removal mechanism were investigated. The experimental results showed that the propagation of lateral cracks to the surface and the interaction between the lateral cracks and radial cracks are the two main types of material peeling, and the increase of the scratch depth increases the propagation angle of the radial cracks and the interaction between the cracks. In the case of a double scratch, the propagation of lateral cracks and radial cracks between paired scratches results in material peeling. The interaction between adjacent scratches depends on the scratch depth and separation distance. There is a critical separation distance where the normalized material removal volume reaches its peak. These findings can help reduce surface flaws and subsurface damage induced by the grinding process and improve the clinical effectiveness of glass-ceramics used as biological substitute and repair materials.

  19. XRD and FTIR structural investigation of gadolinium-zinc-borate glass ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Borodi, G.; Pascuta, P.; Dan, V.; Pop, V.; Stefan, R.; Radulescu, D.

    2013-11-13

    X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy measurements have been employed to investigate the (Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}){sub x}⋅(B{sub 2}O{sub 3}){sub (60−x)}⋅(ZnO){sub 40} glass ceramics system, with 0 ≤ x ≤ 15 mol%. After heat treatment applied at 860 °C for 2 h, some structural changes were observed and new crystalline phases appeared in the structure of the samples. In these glass ceramics four crystalline phases were identified using powder diffraction files (PDF 2), namely ZnB{sub 4}O{sub 7}, Zn{sub 4}O(B{sub 6}O{sub 12}), Zn{sub 3}(BO{sub 3}){sub 2} and GdBO{sub 3}. From the XRD data, the average unit-cell parameter and the quantitative ratio of the crystallographic phases in the studied samples were evaluated. FTIR data revealed that the BO{sub 3}, BO{sub 4} and ZnO{sub 4} are the main structural units of these glass ceramics network. The compositional dependence of the different structural units which appear in the studied samples was followed.

  20. Agricultural wastes as a resource of raw materials for developing low-dielectric glass-ceramics.

    PubMed

    Danewalia, Satwinder Singh; Sharma, Gaurav; Thakur, Samita; Singh, K

    2016-04-18

    Agricultural waste ashes are used as resource materials to synthesize new glass and glass-ceramics. The as-prepared materials are characterized using various techniques for their structural and dielectric properties to check their suitability in microelectronic applications. Sugarcane leaves ash exhibits higher content of alkali metal oxides than rice husk ash, which reduces the melting point of the components due to eutectic reactions. The addition of sugarcane leaves ash in rice husk ash promotes the glass formation. Additionally, it prevents the cristobalite phase formation. These materials are inherently porous, which is responsible for low dielectric permittivity i.e. 9 to 40. The presence of less ordered augite phase enhances the dielectric permittivity as compared to cristobalite and tridymite phases. The present glass-ceramics exhibit lower losses than similar materials synthesized using conventional minerals. The dielectric permittivity is independent to a wide range of temperature and frequency. The glass-ceramics developed with adequately devitrified phases can be used in microelectronic devices and other dielectric applications.

  1. EPR and magnetic susceptibility investigation of iron-zinc-phosphate glass ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Popa, A.; Stefan, R.; Bosca, M.; Dan, V.; Pop, V.; Pascuta, P.

    2013-11-13

    (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}){sub x}⋅(P{sub 2}O{sub 5}){sub 40}⋅(ZnO){sub 60−x} glass ceramics containing different concentrations of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} ranging from 1 to 20 mol% were obtained by heat treatment of glass samples at 650 °C for 2 h. The structural and magnetic properties of these glass ceramics were investigated by means of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and magnetic susceptibility measurements. The EPR spectra of the studied samples revealed absorptions centered at g ≈ 2.0 and 4.3. The compositional variations of the intensity and line width of these absorption lines was interpreted in terms of the variation in Fe{sup 3+} and Fe{sup 2+} ions concentration in the glass ceramics as well as the interaction between the iron ions. The magnetic susceptibility data evidenced the presence of both Fe{sup 3+} and Fe{sup 2+} ions, with their relative content depending on the Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} concentration. Dipolar and superexchange interactions involving iron ions were revealed depending on the iron content of the sample.

  2. Novel oxyfluoride glass and transparent glass-ceramics for fiber lasers and fiber amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Takenobu; Masaki, Shin-ichiro; Mizuno, Kento; Ohishi, Yasutake

    2010-05-01

    Transparent glass-ceramics containing nano-crystals were prepared by controlled heat-treatment of conventionally melt-quenched NaF-YF3-Al2O3-SiO2 oxyfluoride glass. The precipitated crystallites were composed of only cubic NaYF4 and the average diameter was estimated as less than 10 nm from the X-ray diffraction analysis. The crystallites were so small that the transparency of the glass was kept after crystallization. NaYF4 has a crystal structure of a fluorite type that cation sites were randomly occupied by Na+ and Y3+. It is expected that the Y3+ sites can be substituted to other rare-earth ions which have the similar ionic radii. We have been prepared Tb3+ and Yb3+ co-doped glass and glass-ceramics. Green fluorescence was observed when the glass and glass-ceramics were excited by a 974 nm laser. The up-conversion intensity was enhanced by the crystallization.

  3. Upconversion properties of Er3+-doped oxyfluoride glass-ceramics containing SrF2 nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kesavulu, C. R.; Kiran Kumar, K.; Jayasankar, C. K.

    2014-03-01

    Er3+-doped oxyfluoride glass and glass-ceramics containing SrF2 nanocrystals have been prepared and investigated their spectroscopic and luminescence properties. The formation of SrF2 nanocrystals in glass-ceramics were confirmed by Xray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Judd-Ofelt parameters have been evaluated from absorption spectra of the Er3+-doped glass, which in turn used to predict radiative properties for the fluorescent levels of Er3+ ions. The intensities of both Stokes and upconversion (anti-Stokes) emissions significantly increase with increase of the size of the fluoride crystals in the glass matrix. The mechanism of green and red upconversion emissions have been ascribed to two photon processes. The lifetime of the 4S3/2 level of the Er3+ ions in glass-ceramics is found to be slightly higher than that of the counter glass, which may be due to the incorporation of Er3+ ions into the low phonon sites of SrF2 nanocrystals.

  4. Fractographic features of glass-ceramic and zirconia-based dental restorations fractured during clinical function.

    PubMed

    Oilo, Marit; Hardang, Anne D; Ulsund, Amanda H; Gjerdet, Nils R

    2014-06-01

    Fractures during clinical function have been reported as the major concern associated with all-ceramic dental restorations. The aim of this study was to analyze the fracture features of glass-ceramic and zirconia-based restorations fractured during clinical use. Twenty-seven crowns and onlays were supplied by dentists and dental technicians with information about type of cement and time in function, if available. Fourteen lithium disilicate glass-ceramic restorations and 13 zirconia-based restorations were retrieved and analyzed. Fractographic features were examined using optical microscopy to determine crack initiation and crack propagation of the restorations. The material comprised fractured restorations from one canine, 10 incisors, four premolars, and 11 molars. One crown was not categorized because of difficulty in orientation of the fragments. The results revealed that all core and veneer fractures initiated in the cervical margin and usually from the approximal area close to the most coronally placed curvature of the margin. Three cases of occlusal chipping were found. The margin of dental all-ceramic single-tooth restorations was the area of fracture origin. The fracture features were similar for zirconia, glass-ceramic, and alumina single-tooth restorations. Design features seem to be of great importance for fracture initiation.

  5. Fractographic features of glass-ceramic and zirconia-based dental restorations fractured during clinical function

    PubMed Central

    Øilo, Marit; Hardang, Anne D; Ulsund, Amanda H; Gjerdet, Nils R

    2014-01-01

    Fractures during clinical function have been reported as the major concern associated with all-ceramic dental restorations. The aim of this study was to analyze the fracture features of glass-ceramic and zirconia-based restorations fractured during clinical use. Twenty-seven crowns and onlays were supplied by dentists and dental technicians with information about type of cement and time in function, if available. Fourteen lithium disilicate glass-ceramic restorations and 13 zirconia-based restorations were retrieved and analyzed. Fractographic features were examined using optical microscopy to determine crack initiation and crack propagation of the restorations. The material comprised fractured restorations from one canine, 10 incisors, four premolars, and 11 molars. One crown was not categorized because of difficulty in orientation of the fragments. The results revealed that all core and veneer fractures initiated in the cervical margin and usually from the approximal area close to the most coronally placed curvature of the margin. Three cases of occlusal chipping were found. The margin of dental all-ceramic single-tooth restorations was the area of fracture origin. The fracture features were similar for zirconia, glass-ceramic, and alumina single-tooth restorations. Design features seem to be of great importance for fracture initiation. PMID:24698173

  6. Ni2+-doped new silicate glass-ceramics for broadband near infrared luminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jian; Cheng, Yin

    2016-12-01

    The new composite transparent spinel silicate glass-ceramics containing Ni2+-doped ZnGa2O4 and solid solution MgxZn1-xGa2O4 nanocrystals were fabricated by in situ controlled crystallization method. After heat treatment, the crystal phase content of ZnGa2O4 increase with increasing heat treatment temperature, and the Mg2+ ions could enter the crystal lattice of ZnGa2O4 to replace the Zn2+ ions and form a new solid solution MgxZn1-xGa2O4. The coordination environment of Ni2+ was changed from tetrahedral in glasses to octahedral sites in glass ceramics. The super-broadband infrared luminescence with full width at half maximum (FWHM) of about 400 nm overing 1.1-1.7 μm wavelength region and fluorescent lifetime of about 480 μs were observed from the glass ceramics containing MgxZn1-xGa2O4 nanocrystals. It is probably due to the variety of solid solution structure making Ni2+ ions enter two different octahedral sites. At the same time, the impact of heat treatment temperature and the concentration of NiO on peak position and intensity were also discussed. The results demonstrate that the method presented may be an effective way to fabricate super-broadband optical amplifiers and tunable lasers.

  7. High strength, tough alloy steel

    DOEpatents

    Thomas, Gareth; Rao, Bangaru V. N.

    1979-01-01

    A high strength, tough alloy steel is formed by heating the steel to a temperature in the austenite range (1000.degree.-1100.degree. C.) to form a homogeneous austenite phase and then cooling the steel to form a microstructure of uniformly dispersed dislocated martensite separated by continuous thin boundary films of stabilized retained austenite. The steel includes 0.2-0.35 weight % carbon, at least 1% and preferably 3-4.5% chromium, and at least one other substitutional alloying element, preferably manganese or nickel. The austenite film is stable to subsequent heat treatment as by tempering (below 300.degree. C.) and reforms to a stable film after austenite grain refinement.

  8. The effect of pre-treatment parameters on the quality of glass-ceramic wasteforms for plutonium immobilisation, consolidated by hot isostatic pressing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thornber, Stephanie M.; Heath, Paul G.; Da Costa, Gabriel P.; Stennett, Martin C.; Hyatt, Neil C.

    2017-03-01

    Glass-ceramics with high glass fractions (70 wt%) were fabricated in stainless steel canisters by hot isostatic pressing (HIP), at laboratory scale. High (600 °C) and low (300 °C) temperature pre-treatments were investigated to reduce the canister evacuation time and to understand the effect on the phase assemblage and microstructure of the hot isostatically pressed product. Characterisation of the HIPed materials was performed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), coupled with energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX) and powder X-ray diffraction (XRD). This analysis showed the microstructure and phase assemblage was independent of the variation in pre-treatment parameters. It was demonstrated that a high temperature pre-treatment of batch reagents, prior to the HIP cycle, is beneficial when using oxide precursors, in order to remove volatiles and achieve high quality dense materials. Sample throughput can be increased significantly by utilising a high temperature ex-situ calcination prior to the HIP cycle. Investigation of glass-ceramic wasteform processing utilising a glass frit precursor, produced a phase assemblage and microstructure comparable to that obtained using oxide precursors. The use of a glass frit precursor should allow optimised throughput of waste packages in a production facility, avoiding the need for a calcination pre-treatment required to remove volatiles from oxide precursors.

  9. Thermal Expansion of Sintered Glass Ceramics in the System BaO-SrO-ZnO-SiO2 and Its Dependence on Particle Size.

    PubMed

    Thieme, Christian; Schlesier, Martin; Bocker, Christian; Buzatto de Souza, Gabriel; Rüssel, Christian

    2016-08-10

    The thermal expansion behavior of sintered glass-ceramics containing high concentrations of Ba1-xSrxZn2Si2O7, a phase with very low and highly anisotropic thermal expansion behavior, was investigated. The observed phase has the crystal structure of the high-temperature phase of BaZn2Si2O7, which can be stabilized by the introduction of Sr(2+) into this phase. The high anisotropy leads to microcracking within the volume of the samples, which strongly affects the dilatometric thermal expansion. However, these cracks also have an influence on the nominal thermal expansion of the as-mentioned phase, which decreases if the cracks appear. Below a grain size of approximately 80 μm, the sintered glass-ceramics have almost no cracks and show positive thermal expansion. Hence, coefficients of thermal expansion between -5.6 and 6.5 × 10(-6) K(-1) were measured. In addition to dilatometric studies, the effect of the microstructure on the thermal expansion was also measured using in situ X-ray diffraction at temperatures up to 1000 °C.

  10. Calcium phosphate invert glass-ceramic coatings joined by self-development of compositionally gradient layers on a titanium alloy.

    PubMed

    Kasuga, T; Mizuno, T; Watanabe, M; Nogami, M; Niinomi, M

    2001-03-01

    A glass-ceramic layer containing beta-Ca3(PO4)2 crystals could be joined easily with a new type of titanium alloy (Ti-29Nb-13Ta-4.6Zr) consisting of a beta-titanium phase by heating the metal, on which glass powders with a composition of 60CaO x 30P2O5 7Na2O x 3TiO2 were placed, at 800 degrees C in air. Measurement of tensile bonding strength revealed that the joining between the coating layer and the substrate is very strong. Even after the large deformation (e.g., approximately 90 degrees in bending angle) of the titanium alloy, the coating layer was not peeled off from the substrate. A compositionally gradient layer in the TiO2-P2O5-Na2O-CaO system is developed automatically on the titanium alloy during the heating, resulting in the formation of the strong joining. By soaking in simulated body fluid at 37 degrees C, hydroxyapatite phase was formed newly on the surface of the coating layer.

  11. High strength and high toughness steel

    DOEpatents

    Parker, Earl R.; Zackay, Victor F.

    1979-01-01

    A structural steel which possess both high strength and high toughness and has particular application of cryogenic uses. The steel is produced by the utilization of thermally induced phase transformation following heating in a three-phase field in iron-rich alloys of the Fe-Ni-Ti system, with a preferred composition of 12% nickel, 0.5% titanium, the remainder being iron.

  12. High strength, high ductility low carbon steel

    DOEpatents

    Koo, Jayoung; Thomas, Gareth

    1978-01-01

    A high strength, high ductility low carbon steel consisting essentially of iron, 0.05-0.15 wt% carbon, and 1-3 wt% silicon. Minor amounts of other constituents may be present. The steel is characterized by a duplex ferrite-martensite microstructure in a fibrous morphology. The microstructure is developed by heat treatment consisting of initial austenitizing treatment followed by annealing in the (.alpha. + .gamma.) range with intermediate quenching.

  13. GLASS-CERAMICS IN A COLD-CRUCIBLE MELTER : THE OPTIMUM COMBINATION FOR GREATER WASTE PROCESSING EFFICIENCY

    SciTech Connect

    DAY, R.A.; FERENCZY, J.; DRABAREK, E.; ADVOCAT, T.; FILLET, C.; LACOMBE, J.; LADIRAT, C.; VEYER, C.; QUANG, R. DO; THOMASSON, J.

    2003-02-27

    Improving the efficiency of nuclear waste immobilization is constantly desired by all nuclear waste management programs world-wide. For high-level and other waste to be vitrified in traditional ceramic Joule-heated melters operated at temperatures up to 1150 C, process flexibilities including waste loadings are often restricted by this temperature limit as well as the need to consider wasteform corrosion of refractory linings and electrodes. New melter technologies, such as the cold-crucible melter (CCM), enable processing up to significantly higher temperatures free of many of the limitations of conventional melters. Higher processing temperatures open up the way for wider composition and processing envelopes to be considered for the vitrification process, including the possibility for higher waste loadings. In many instances the presence of crystals in the final cooled wasteform is not considered desirable within presently existing glass specifications. For some feed compositions in creased waste loadings can lead to the formation of large amounts of crystals, and thus to a significant departure from the ''glass'' state. Nevertheless it is recognized that, in general, increasing the acceptable volume fractions of crystals in the glass offers the best opportunity to increase waste loading, all other factors being equal. In addition, the deliberate promotion of specific crystalline phases by design may enhance the quality of the wasteform, for example by partitioning a long-lived radionuclide into a very stable crystalline phase, or by depleting the glass in detrimental elements. In order to explore the potential improvements by harnessing the higher achievable processing temperatures and immunity to refractory corrosion available with the cold-crucible melter, and after promising indications for synroc-based matrices, it was decided to investigate the feasibility of designing and producing via melting new high temperature ''glass-ceramic'' wasteforms for high

  14. Structural and electrical properties of NASICON type solid electrolyte nanoscaled glass-ceramic powder by mechanical milling for thin film batteries.

    PubMed

    Patil, Vaishali; Patil, Arun; Yoon, Seok-Jin; Choi, Ji-Won

    2013-05-01

    During last two decades, lithium-based glasses have been studied extensively as electrolytes for solid-state secondary batteries. For practical use, solid electrolyte must have high ionic conductivity as well as chemical, thermal and electrochemical stability. Recent progresses have focused on glass electrolytes due to advantages over crystalline solid. Glass electrolytes are generally classified into two types oxide glass and sulfide glass. Oxide glasses do not react with electrode materials and this chemical inertness is advantageous for cycle performances of battery. In this study, major effort has been focused on the improvement of the ion conductivity of nanosized LiAlTi(PO4)3 oxide electrolyte prepared by mechanical milling (MM) method. After heating at 1000 degrees C the material shows good crystallinity and ionic conductivity with low electronic conductivity. In LiTi2(PO4)3, Ti4+ ions are partially substituted by Al3+ ions by heat-treatment of Li20-Al2O3-TiO2-P2O5 glasses at 1000 degrees C for 10 h. The conductivity of this material is 1.09 x 10(-3) S/cm at room temp. The glass-ceramics show fast ion conduction and low E(a) value. It is suggested that high conductivity, easy fabrication and low cost make this glass-ceramics promising to be used as inorganic solid electrolyte for all-solid-state Li rechargeable batteries.

  15. Synthesis and characterization of a BaGdF5:Tb glass ceramic as a nanocomposite scintillator for x-ray imaging.

    PubMed

    Lee, Gyuhyon; Struebing, Christian; Wagner, Brent; Summers, Christopher; Ding, Yong; Bryant, Alex; Thadhani, Naresh; Shedlock, Daniel; Star-Lack, Josh; Kang, Zhitao

    2016-05-20

    Transparent glass ceramics with embedded light-emitting nanocrystals show great potential as low-cost nanocomposite scintillators in comparison to single crystal and transparent ceramic scintillators. In this study, cubic structure BaGdF5:Tb nanocrystals embedded in an aluminosilicate glass matrix are reported for potential high performance MeV imaging applications. Scintillator samples with systematically varied compositions were prepared by a simple conventional melt-quenching method followed by annealing. Optical, structural and scintillation properties were characterized to guide the design and optimization of selected material systems, aiming at the development of a system with higher crystal volume and larger crystal size for improved luminosity. It is observed that enhanced scintillation performance was achieved by tuning the glass matrix composition and using GdF3 in the raw materials, which served as a nucleation agent. A 26% improvement in light output was observed from a BaGdF5:Tb glass ceramic with addition of GdF3.

  16. Glass-Ceramic Material from the SiO2-Al2O3-CaO System Using Sugar-Cane Bagasse Ash (SCBA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teixeira, S. R.; Romero, M.; Ma Rincón, J.; Magalhães, R. S.; Souza, A. E.; Santos, G. T. A.; Silva, R. A.

    2011-10-01

    Brazil is the world's largest producer of alcohol and sugar from sugarcane. Currently, sugarcane bagasse is burned in boilers to produce steam and electrical energy, producing a huge volume of ash. The major component of the ash is SiO2, and among the minor components there are some mineralizing agents or fluxing. Published works have shown the potential of transforming silicate-based residues into glass-ceramic products of great utility. This work reports the research results of SCBA use to produce glass-ceramics with wollastonite, rankinite and gehlenite as the major phases. These silicates have important applications as building industry materials, principally wollastonite, due to their special properties: high resistance to weathering, zero water absorption, and hardness among others. The glasses (frits) were prepared mixing ash, calcium carbonate and sodium or potassium carbonates as flux agents, in different concentrations. X-ray fluorescence was used to determine the chemical composition of the glasses and their crystallization was assessed by using thermal analysis (DTA/DSC/TGA) and X-ray diffraction. The crystallization kinetics was evaluated using the Kissinger method, giving activation energies ranging from 200 to 600 kJ/mol.

  17. Local modification of speed of sound in lithium alumino-silicate glass/ceramic material by pulsed laser irradiation and thermal processing.

    PubMed

    Kim, Y; Helvajian, H

    2013-11-21

    Glass and glass/ceramics are now used in modern devices with increasing frequency. A list of the notable material properties commonly will not include a capability to guide ultrasonic waves. The photosensitive glass ceramics (PSGCs), an old invention with recent technological rebirth, may enable this capability. The speed of sound (SoS) has been measured at an ultrasonic frequency (75 MHz) in a commercially available PSGC material. The measurements are made using a pulse echo time-of-flight (TOF) technique as a function of UV laser exposure and thermal processing. The measured increase in the SoS correlates with the density of crystalline matter present, which can be metered by controlling the exposure dose. For the Li2SiO3 crystalline phase, the results show the shear (transverse) wave mode velocity can be increased by 4.8% relative to an unexposed area where no crystalline matter exists. The maximum change in velocity for the longitudinal (compressional) wave mode is only 2%. However, by altering the thermal processing protocols to grow the high temperature Li2Si2O5 crystalline phase, the measured change in the SoS increases to 11% and 9%, respectively. These results permit the volumetric patterning of delay lines by laser direct write techniques for generating complex profile ultrasonic wave patterns. Moreover, by patterned 3D shaping (i.e., photostructuring), ultrasound energy can be harnessed and utilized to advantage.

  18. Role of SrO on the bioactivity behavior of some ternary borate glasses and their glass ceramic derivatives.

    PubMed

    Abdelghany, A M; Ouis, M A; Azooz, M A; ElBatal, H A; El-Bassyouni, G T

    2016-01-05

    Borate glasses containing SrO substituting both CaO and NaO were prepared and characterized for their bioactivity or bone bonding ability. Glass ceramic derivatives were prepared by thermal heat treatment process. FTIR, XRD and SEM measurements for the prepared glass and glass-ceramics before and after immersion in sodium phosphate solution for one and two weeks were carried out. The appearance of two IR peaks within the range 550-680cm(-1) after immersion in phosphate solution indicates the formation of hydroxyapatite or equivalent Sr phosphate layer. X-ray diffraction data agree with the FTIR spectral analysis. The solubility test was carried out for both glasses and glass ceramics derivatives in the same phosphate solution. The introduction of SrO increases the solubility for both glasses and glass ceramics and this is assumed to be due to the formation of Sr phosphate which is more soluble than calcium phosphate (hydroxyapatite). SEM images reveal varying changes in the surfaces of glass ceramics after immersion according to the SrO content.

  19. Role of SrO on the bioactivity behavior of some ternary borate glasses and their glass ceramic derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelghany, A. M.; Ouis, M. A.; Azooz, M. A.; ElBatal, H. A.; El-Bassyouni, G. T.

    2016-01-01

    Borate glasses containing SrO substituting both CaO and NaO were prepared and characterized for their bioactivity or bone bonding ability. Glass ceramic derivatives were prepared by thermal heat treatment process. FTIR, XRD and SEM measurements for the prepared glass and glass-ceramics before and after immersion in sodium phosphate solution for one and two weeks were carried out. The appearance of two IR peaks within the range 550-680 cm-1 after immersion in phosphate solution indicates the formation of hydroxyapatite or equivalent Sr phosphate layer. X-ray diffraction data agree with the FTIR spectral analysis. The solubility test was carried out for both glasses and glass ceramics derivatives in the same phosphate solution. The introduction of SrO increases the solubility for both glasses and glass ceramics and this is assumed to be due to the formation of Sr phosphate which is more soluble than calcium phosphate (hydroxyapatite). SEM images reveal varying changes in the surfaces of glass ceramics after immersion according to the SrO content.

  20. Preparation and characterization of novel glass-ceramic tile with microwave absorption properties from iron ore tailings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Rui; Liao, SongYi; Dai, ChangLu; Liu, YuChen; Chen, XiaoYu; Zheng, Feng

    2015-03-01

    A novel glass-ceramic tile consisting of one glass-ceramic layer (GC) attaining microwave absorption properties atop ceramic substrate was prepared through quench-heat treatment route derived from iron ore tailings (IOTs) and commercial raw materials (purity range 73-99%). X-ray diffraction (XRD), SEM, Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Physical property measurement system (PPMS) and Vector network analyzer (VNA) measurements were carried out to investigate phase, microstructure, magnetic and microwave absorption aspects of the glass-ceramic layer. Roughly 80.6±1.7 wt% borosilicate glass and 19.4±1.7 wt% spinel ferrite with chemical formula of (Zn2+0.17Fe3+0.83)[Fe3+1.17Fe2+0.06Ni2+0.77]O4 were found among the tested samples. Absorption of Electromagnetic wave by 3 mm thick glass-ceramic layer at frequency of 2-18 GHz reached peak reflection loss (RL) of -17.61 dB (98.27% microwave absorption) at 10.31 GHz. Altering the thickness of the glass-ceramic layer can meet the requirements of different level of microwave absorption.

  1. Composite bone cements loaded with a bioactive and ferrimagnetic glass-ceramic: Leaching, bioactivity and cytocompatibility.

    PubMed

    Verné, Enrica; Bruno, Matteo; Miola, Marta; Maina, Giovanni; Bianco, Carlotta; Cochis, Andrea; Rimondini, Lia

    2015-08-01

    In this work, composite bone cements, based on a commercial polymethylmethacrylate matrix (Palamed®) loaded with ferrimagnetic bioactive glass-ceramic particles (SC45), were produced and characterized in vitro. The ferrimagnetic bioactive glass-ceramic belongs to the system SiO2-Na2O-CaO-P2O5-FeO-Fe2O3 and contains magnetite (Fe3O4) crystals into a residual amorphous bioactive phase. Three different formulations (containing 10, 15 and 20 wt.% of glass-ceramic particles respectively) have been investigated. These materials are intended to be applied as bone fillers for the hyperthermic treatment of bone tumors. The morphological, compositional, calorimetric and mechanical properties of each formulation have been already discussed in a previous paper. The in vitro properties of the composite bone cements described in the present paper are related to iron ion leaching test (by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometer), bioactivity (i.e. the ability to stimulate the formation of a hydroxyapatite - HAp - layer on their surface after soaking in simulated body fluid SBF) and cytocompatibility toward human osteosarcoma cells (ATCC CRL-1427, Mg63). Morphological and chemical characterizations by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersion spectrometry have been performed on the composite samples after each test. The iron release was negligible and all the tested samples showed the growth of HAp on their surface after 28 days of immersion in a simulated body fluid (SBF). Cells showed good viability, morphology, adhesion, density and the ability to develop bridge-like structures on all investigated samples. A synergistic effect between bioactivity and cell mineralization was also evidenced.

  2. Chemical durability of Dicor and fluorocanasite-based glass-ceramics.

    PubMed

    Anusavice, K J; Zhang, N Z

    1998-07-01

    Fluorocanasite (Al2O3-CaO-F-K2O-Na2O-SiO2) glass-ceramics exhibit fracture toughness values of up to 5.0 MPa x m1/2. However, their chemical durability is not adequate for dental applications. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that an increased concentration of Al2O3 can increase the chemical durability of fluorocanasite-based glass-ceramics. Glass frits containing 2 wt% (CAN2), 5 wt% (CAN5), and 10 wt% Al2O3 (CAN10) were melted individually, poured into a graphite mold, and cut into 16-mm-diam. x 2-mm-thick disks. Each disk was crystallized at 850 degrees C for 6 hrs. The disks were immersed in a solution of de-ionized-distilled water, 4% acetic acid, or a pH 1 buffer solution, and sealed in 90-mL Teflon containers. Corrosion testing was performed by means of vibrational motion at 60 cycles per min in a shaker-bath at 80 degrees C for 15 days. Solution analyses were performed by means of a pH meter, an atomic absorption spectrophotometer, and an inductively coupled plasma spectrometer. Samples exposed to 4% acetic acid solution exhibited a mean weight loss rate (WLR) for the control group (Dicor) of 0.04+/-0.01 mg/cm2 day, which was significantly lower (p < or = 0.0001) than the mean WLR of the CAN2 (1.08+/-0.02 mg/cm2 x day), CAN5 (1.31+/-0.02 mg/cm2 x day), and CAN10(1.51+/-0.05 mg/cm2 x day) groups. The reduced durability of fluorocanasite-based glass-ceramics with increasing Al2O3 concentration is most likely associated with a more uniform distribution of smaller crystals during heat treatment of the glass.

  3. Medical imaging scintillators from glass-ceramics using mixed rare-earth halides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckert, M. Brooke; Gallego, Sabrina; Ding, Yong; Elder, Eric; Nadler, Jason H.

    2016-10-01

    Recent years have seen greater interest in developing new luminescent materials to replace scintillator panels currently used in medical X-ray imaging systems. The primary areas targeted for improvement are cost and image resolution. Cost reduction is somewhat straightforward in that less expensive raw materials and processing methods will yield a less expensive product. The path to improving image resolution is more complex because it depends on several properties of the scintillator material including density, transparency, and composition, among others. The present study focused on improving image resolution using composite materials, known as glass-ceramics that contain nanoscale scintillating crystallites formed within a transparent host glass matrix. The small size of the particles and in-situ precipitation from the host glass are key to maintaining transparency of the composite scintillator, which ensures that a majority of the light produced from absorbed X-rays can actually be used to create an image of the patient. Because light output is the dominating property that determines the image resolution achievable with a given scintillator, it was used as the primary metric to evaluate performance of the glass-ceramics relative to current scintillators. Several glass compositions were formulated and then heat treated in a step known as "ceramization" to grow the scintillating nanocrystals, whose light output was measured in response to a 65 kV X-ray source. Performance was found to depend heavily on the thermal history of the glass and glass-ceramic, and so additional studies are required to more precisely determine optimal process temperatures. Of the compositions investigated, an alumino-borosilicate host glass containing 56mol% scintillating rare-earth halides (BaF2, GdF3, GdBr3, TbF3) produced the highest recorded light output at nearly 80% of the value recorded using a commercially-available GOS:Tb panel as a reference.

  4. Pockels effect of silicate glass-ceramics: Observation of optical modulation in Mach–Zehnder system

    PubMed Central

    Yamaoka, Kazuki; Takahashi, Yoshihiro; Yamazaki, Yoshiki; Terakado, Nobuaki; Miyazaki, Takamichi; Fujiwara, Takumi

    2015-01-01

    Silicate glass has been used for long time because of its advantages from material’s viewpoint. In this paper, we report the observation of Pockels effect by Mach–Zehnder interferometer in polycrystalline ceramics made from a ternary silicate glass via crystallization due to heat-treatment, i.e., glass-ceramics. Since the silicate system is employed as the precursor, merits of glass material are fully utilized to fabricate the optical device component, in addition to that of functional crystalline material, leading us to provide an electro-optic device, which is introducible into glass-fiber network. PMID:26184722

  5. Light dynamic properties of a synthetic, low-fusing, quartz glass-ceramic material.

    PubMed

    Chu, Stephen J; Ahmad, Irfan

    2003-01-01

    Significant material advancements have resulted in the increased application of porcelain materials as an ideal restorative substitute for tooth enamel and dentin. This discussion introduces a synthetic, low-fusing, quartz glass-ceramic system for the fabrication of fixed dental prostheses. This article evaluates and compares the properties of this ceramic system with regard to its applicability for use in contemporary dental practices. The theoretical aspects are supplemented by clinical case studies that highlight examples of the authentic results achievable using the low-fusing restorative material.

  6. Stimulated emission in the red, green, and blue in a nanostructured glass ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Lahoz, F.; Haro-Gonzalez, P.; Martin, I. R.; Perez-Rodriguez, C.; Capuj, N.; Caceres, J. M.

    2011-02-15

    Red, green, and blue stimulated emissions have been achieved in Ho{sup 3+} doped oxyfluoride glass ceramic at room temperature. The material shows three emission bands at the red (650 nm), green (545 nm), and blue (488 nm) regions under infrared excitation at 750 nm. These emission bands are caused by a photon avalanche upconversion process previously reported. A pump and probe experimental setup has been designed to show stimulated emissions at the three bands. The pump power threshold for positive gain in the 490 nm band has been estimated around 2.7 kW/cm{sup 2}. Higher thresholds are expected for the other bands.

  7. Dynamic fatigue of a lithia-alumina-silica glass-ceramic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, Dennis S.

    1990-01-01

    A dynamic fatigue study was performed on a Li2O-Al2O3-SiO2 glass-ceramic in order to assess its susceptibility to delayed failure. Fracture mechanics techniques were used to analyze the results for the purpose of making lifetime predictions for optical elements made from this material. The material has reasonably good resistance (N = 20) to stress corrosion in ambient conditions. Analysis also indicated the elements should survive applied stresses incurred during grinding and polishing operations.

  8. Silicon carbide fiber reinforced strontium aluminosilicate glass-ceramic matrix composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A SrO-Al2O3 - 2SrO2 (SAS) glass ceramic matrix is reinforced with CVD SiC continuous fibers. This material is prepared by casting a slurry of SAS glass powder into tapes. Mats of continuous CVD-SiC fibers are alternately stacked with the matrix tapes. This tape-mat stack is warm-pressed to produce a 'green' composite. Organic constituents are burned out of the 'green' composite, and the remaining interim material is hot pressed.

  9. Method of producing a silicon carbide fiber reinforced strontium aluminosilicate glass-ceramic matrix composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A SrO-Al2O3-2SrO2 (SAS) glass ceramic matrix is reinforced with CVD SiC continuous fibers. This material is prepared by casting a slurry of SAS glass powder into tapes. Mats of continuous CVD-SiC fibers are alternately stacked with the matrix tapes. This tape-mat stack is warm-pressed to produce a 'green' composite. Organic constituents are burned out of the 'green' composite, and the remaining interim material is hot pressed.

  10. Exploratory development of a glass ceramic automobile thermal reactor. [anti-pollution devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gould, R. E.; Petticrew, R. W.

    1973-01-01

    This report summarizes the design, fabrication and test results obtained for glass-ceramic (CER-VIT) automotive thermal reactors. Several reactor designs were evaluated using both engine-dynamometer and vehicle road tests. A maximum reactor life of about 330 hours was achieved in engine-dynamometer tests with peak gas temperatures of about 1065 C (1950 F). Reactor failures were mechanically induced. No evidence of chemical degradation was observed. It was concluded that to be useful for longer times, the CER-VIT parts would require a mounting system that was an improvement over those tested in this program. A reactor employing such a system was designed and fabricated.

  11. Kramers-Kronig relations in modulation polarimetry diagnostics of glass-ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudar, B. V.; Matyash, I. E.; Minailova, I. A.; Mishchuk, O. N.; Serdega, B. K.

    2016-10-01

    It has been found that, in an aluminosilicate glass-ceramic sample cut from a massive ingot, there is a correlation of the residual stress with the temperature gradient. The magnitude and coordinate dependence of the stress along the temperature gradient have been determined from the stress-induced linear birefringence measured by the modulation polarimetry technique. Its functional relationship has been established in the form of the Poisson equation with the heterogeneity of the composition due to the preparation conditions. It has been shown that, in the absence of a temperature gradient, the birefringence and dichroism related by the Kramers-Kronig relation play the role of thermodynamic variables.

  12. Surface treatments for repair of feldspathic, leucite - and lithium disilicate-reinforced glass ceramics using composite resin.

    PubMed

    Neis, Christian Alencar; Albuquerque, Nadine Luísa Guimarães; Albuquerque, Ivo de Souza; Gomes, Erica Alves; Souza-Filho, Celso Bernardo de; Feitosa, Victor Pinheiro; Spazzin, Aloisio Oro; Bacchi, Atais

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of different surface conditioning methods on the microtensile bond strength of a restorative composite repair in three types of dental ceramics: lithium disilicate-reinforced, leucite-reinforced and feldspathic. Twelve blocks were sintered for each type of ceramic (n=3) and stored for 3 months in distilled water at 37 °C. The bonding surface of ceramics was abraded with 600-grit SiC paper. Surface treatments for each ceramic were: GC (control) - none; GDB - diamond bur #30 µm; GHF - hydrofluoric acid (10%); GT- tribochemical silica coating (45-μm size particles). Treatments were followed by cleaning with phosphoric acid 37% for 20 s + silane + adhesive. The composite resin was used as restorative material. After repair, samples were subjected to thermocycled ageing (10,000 cycles between 5 °C and 55 °C for 30 s). Thereafter, the samples were sectioned into 1.0 mm2 sticks and tested for microtensile bond strength with 0.5 mm/min crosshead speed. Data were compared by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=0.05). The superficial wear with diamond bur proved to be suitable for feldspathic porcelain and for leucite-reinforced glass ceramic while hydrofluoric acid-etching is indicated for repairs in lithium disilicate-reinforced ceramic; tribochemical silica coating is applicable to leucite-reinforced ceramic. Predominance of adhesive failures was observed (>85% in all groups). In conclusion, the success of surface treatments depends on the type of ceramic to be repaired.

  13. Experimental characterization of glass-ceramic seal properties and their constitutive implementation in solid oxide fuel cell stack models

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Vetrano, John S.; Koeppel, Brian J.; Chou, Y. S.; Sun, Xin; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2009-09-05

    This paper discusses experimental determination of solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) glass-ceramic seal material properties and seal/interconnect interfacial properties to support development and optimization of SOFC designs through modeling. Material property experiments such as dynamic resonance, dilatometry, flexure, creep, tensile, and shear tests were performed on PNNL’s glass-ceramic sealant material, designated as G18, to obtain property data essential to constitutive and numerical model development. Characterization methods for the physical, mechanical, and interfacial properties of the sealing material, results, and their application to the constitutive implementation in SOFC stack modeling are described.

  14. Er/Yb co-doped oxy-fluoride glass-ceramics core/polymer cladding optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czerska, E.; Świderska, M.

    2014-11-01

    Erbium/ytterbium co-doped glasses can be applied as NIR laser sources (1.55 μm) or optical amplifiers in this range. About hundred meters of Er/Yb co-doped oxy-fluoride glass-ceramics fibers have been drawn from a glass preform followed by controlled annealing. Processing temperatures (drawing and annealing) were selected upon thermal analysis results (DTA/DSC plots). Glass-ceramic structure was confirmed by the XRD measurements. Obtained fibers show good optical properties. As a cladding material polymer material (acrylic resin) is considered due to its low deposition temperature and suitable value of refractive index.

  15. Micro-CT based finite element models for elastic properties of glass-ceramic scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Tagliabue, Stefano; Rossi, Erica; Baino, Francesco; Vitale-Brovarone, Chiara; Gastaldi, Dario; Vena, Pasquale

    2017-01-01

    In this study, the mechanical properties of porous glass-ceramic scaffolds are investigated by means of three-dimensional finite element models based on micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) scan data. In particular, the quantitative relationship between the morpho-architectural features of the obtained scaffolds, such as macroscopic porosity and strut thickness, and elastic properties, is sought. The macroscopic elastic properties of the scaffolds have been obtained through numerical homogenization approaches using the mechanical characteristics of the solid walls of the scaffolds (assessed through nanoindentation) as input parameters for the numerical simulations. Anisotropic mechanical properties of the produced scaffolds have also been investigated by defining a suitable anisotropy index. A comparison with morphological data obtained through the micro-CT scans is also presented. The proposed study shows that the produced glass-ceramic scaffolds exhibited a macroscopic porosity ranging between 29% and 97% which corresponds to an average stiffness ranging between 42.4GPa and 36MPa. A quantitative estimation of the isotropy of the macroscopic elastic properties has been performed showing that the samples with higher solid fractions were those closest to an isotropic material.

  16. Effect of crystallization heat treatment on the microstructure of niobium-doped fluorapatite glass-ceramics.

    PubMed

    Denry, I; Holloway, J A; Gupta, P K

    2012-07-01

    Our goal was to study the effect of heat treatment temperature and heating rate on the microstructure and crystalline phases and assess the domain of existence of submicrometer fluorapatite crystals in niobium-doped fluorapatite glass-ceramics for biomedical applications. Glass-ceramic specimens were prepared by casting and heat treatment between 700 and 1200°C using a fast or a slow heating rate. The microstructure was characterized by atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Crystalline phases were analyzed by x-ray diffraction. AFM of the as-cast glass revealed that amorphous phase separation occurred in this system. XRD confirmed the presence of fluorapatite in all specimens, together with forsterite and enstatite at higher temperatures. Both heating rate and heat treatment temperature strongly influenced microstructure and crystallinity. A dual microstructure with submicrometer fluorapatite crystals and polygonal forsterite crystals was obtained when slow heating rates and crystallization temperatures between 950 and 1100°C were used. Needle-shaped fluorapatite crystals appeared after heat treatment above 1100°C. Fast heating rates led to an increase in crystal size. Heat treatment temperatures should remain below 1100°C, together with slow heating rates, to prevent crystal dissolution, and preserve a dual microstructure of finely dispersed submicrometer crystals without growth of needle-shaped crystals.

  17. Treatment of copper industry waste and production of sintered glass-ceramic.

    PubMed

    Coruh, Semra; Ergun, Osman Nuri; Cheng, Ta-Wui

    2006-06-01

    Copper waste is iron-rich hazardous waste containing heavy metals such as Cu, Zn, Co, Pb. The results of leaching tests show that the concentration of these elements exceeds the Turkish and EPA regulatory limits. Consequently, this waste cannot be disposed of in its present form and therefore requires treatment to stabilize it or make it inert prior to disposal. Vitrification was selected as the technology for the treatment of the toxic waste under investigation. During the vitrification process significant amounts of the toxic organic and inorganic chemical compounds could be destroyed, and at the same time, the metal species are immobilized as they become an integral part of the glass matrix. The copper flotation waste samples used in this research were obtained from the Black Sea Copper Works of Samsun, Turkey. The samples were vitrified after being mixed with other inorganic waste and materials. The copper flotation waste and their glass-ceramic products were characterized by X-ray analysis (XRD), scanning electron microscopy and by the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure test. The products showed very good chemical durability. The glass-ceramics fabricated at 850 degrees C/2 h have a large application potential especially as construction and building materials.

  18. Parasitic amorphous on single-domain crystal: Structural observations of silicate glass-ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Yoshihiro; Yamazaki, Yoshiki; Ihara, Rie; Fujiwara, Takumi

    2013-01-01

    Glass-ceramics (GCs) are materials obtained from the crystallisation of functional phases in glass, and have a structure that the crystallised phase embedded in the glass matrix. Glass-forming oxides are commonly added to the functional phases to improve the stability of precursor glass; however, the issue of glass-ceramics permitting the presence of residual phases resulting from addition is required to be clarified. To elucidate this issue, we prepared `perfectly surface-crystallised' GC consisting of fresnoite-type Sr2TiSi2O8 from a non-stoichiometric glass and performed texture/morphology observations. Numerous SiO2-rich binodal-like nanospheres (~10 nm) were parasitic on the fresnoite single-crystal domains. The parasitic texture is considered to form via the following process: (i) binodal-type phase separation into stoichiometric fresnoite (crystalline matrix) and SiO2-rich phases (amorphous nanoparticles) and (ii) single-domain formation by surface crystallisation in the matrix. Furthermore, in terms of texture, the resulting GC differs from the GCs reported to date, i.e., inverse GC.

  19. Structural analysis of Fe–Mn–O nanoparticles in glass ceramics by small angle scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Raghuwanshi, Vikram Singh; Harizanova, Ruzha; Tatchev, Dragomir; Hoell, Armin; Rüssel, Christian

    2015-02-15

    Magnetic nanocrystals containing Fe and Mn were obtained by annealing of silicate glasses with the composition 13.6Na{sub 2}O–62.9SiO{sub 2}–8.5MnO–15.0Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3−x} (mol%) at 580 °C for different periods of time. Here, we present Small Angle Neutron Scattering using Polarized neutrons (SANSPOL) and Anomalous Small Angle X-ray Scattering (ASAXS) investigation on these glass ceramic samples. Analysis of scattering data from both methods reveals the formation of spherical core–shell type of nanoparticles with mean sizes between 10 nm and 100 nm. ASAXS investigation shows the particles have higher concentration of iron atoms and the shell like region surrounding the particles is enriched in SiO{sub 2}. SANSPOL investigation shows the particles are found to be magnetic and are surrounded by a non-magnetic shell-like region. - Graphical abstract: Magnetic spherical core–shell nanoparticles in glass ceramics: SANSPOL and ASAXS investigations. - Highlights: • Formation and growth mechanisms of magnetic nanoparticles in silicate glass. • SANSPOL and ASAXS methods employed to evaluate quantitative information. • Analyses showed formation of nanoparticles with spherical core–shell structures. • Core of the particle is magnetic and surrounded by weak magnetic shell like region.

  20. Crystallization kinetics of magnetic glass-ceramics prepared by the processing of waste materials

    SciTech Connect

    Francis, A.A. . E-mail: adel_francis@hotmail.com

    2006-06-15

    The objective of the present investigation was to study the feasibility of conversion of an intimate mixture of blast furnace slag and blast furnace flue dust generated by a single industrial company into magnetic glass-ceramic product. Blast furnace slag (BFS) and blast furnace flue dust (BFD) are generated at a rate of 300,000 and 30,000 tons/year, respectively, from iron and steel factory. The crystallization mechanisms of a composition containing BFS and BFD in a 50/50 proportion were investigated by differential thermal analysis (DTA), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The crystallization temperature was found to vary from 900 to 1100 deg. C and two phases appeared in the crystallized samples: pyroxene Ca(Mg, Fe, Al)(Si, Al){sub 2}O{sub 6} and magnetite/maghemite. Heating rate and particle sizes effects on crystal growth of powdered samples were studied by DTA. The apparent activation energy of crystal growth using the particle size 180-315 {mu}m was determined to be 355 and 329 kJ/mol for the first and second peak, respectively. The presence of sharp and broad crystallization peaks indicate simultaneous surface and internal crystallization mechanism. Good wear resistance and chemical durability particularly in alkaline environment, combine with good hardness and magnetic properties make this glass-ceramic material potentially useful for various industrial applications.

  1. Gallic acid grafting modulates the oxidative potential of ferrimagnetic bioactive glass-ceramic SC-45.

    PubMed

    Corazzari, Ingrid; Tomatis, Maura; Turci, Francesco; Ferraris, Sara; Bertone, Elisa; Prenesti, Enrico; Vernè, Enrica

    2016-12-01

    Magnetite-containing glass-ceramics are promising bio-materials for replacing bone tissue after tumour resection. Thanks to their ferrimagnetic properties, they generate heat when subjected to an alternated magnetic field. In virtue of this they can be employed for the hyperthermic treatment of cancer. Moreover, grafting anti-cancer drugs onto their surface produces specific anti-neoplastic activity in these biomaterials. Gallic acid (GA) exhibits antiproliferative activity which renders it a promising candidate for anticancer applications. In the present paper, the reactivity of ferrimagnetic glass-ceramic SC-45 grafted with GA (SC-45+GA) was studied in terms of ROS release, rupture of the C-H bond of the formate molecule and Fenton reactivity by EPR/spin trapping in acellular systems. The ability of these materials to cause lipid peroxidation was assessed by UV-vis/TBA assay employing linoleic acid as a model of membrane lipid. The results, compared to those obtained with SC-45, showed that GA grafting (i) significantly enhanced the Fenton reactivity and (ii) restored the former reactivity of SC-45 towards both the C-H bond and linoleic acid which had been completely suppressed by prolonged contact with water. Fe(2+) centres at the surface are probably implicated. GA, acting as a pro-oxidant, reduces Fe(3+) to Fe(2+) by maintaining a supply of Fe(2+) at the surface of SC-45+GA.

  2. Influence of fluoride additions on biological and mechanical properties of Na2O-CaO-SiO2-P2O5 glass-ceramics.

    PubMed

    Li, H C; Wang, D G; Hu, J H; Chen, C Z

    2014-02-01

    Two series of Na2O-CaO-SiO2-P2O5 glass-ceramics doped with NH4HF2 (G-NH4HF2) or CaF2 (G-CaF2) have been prepared by sol-gel method. The glass-ceramic phase composition and morphology were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS). The mechanical properties and thermal expansion coefficient were measured by a microhardness tester, an electronic tensile machine and a thermal expansion coefficient tester. The structure difference between these two glass-ceramics was investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and the in vitro bioactivity of the glass-ceramics was determined by in vitro simulated body fluid (SBF) immersion test. The hemolysis test, in vitro cytotoxicity test, systemic toxicity test and the implanted experiment in animals were used to evaluate the biocompatibility of the glass-ceramics. The mechanical properties of sample G-NH4HF2 are lower than that of sample G-CaF2, and the bioactivity of sample G-NH4HF2 is better than that of sample G-CaF2. The thermal expansion coefficients of these two glass-ceramics are all closer to that of Ti6Al4V. After 7 days of SBF immersion, apatites were induced on glass-ceramic surface, indicating that the glass-ceramics have bioactivity. The hemolysis test, in vitro cytotoxicity test and systemic toxicity test demonstrate that the glass-ceramics do not cause hemolysis reaction, and have no toxicity to cell and living animal. The implanted experiment in animals shows that bone tissue can form a good osseointegration with the implant after implantation for two months, indicating that the glass-ceramics are safe to serve as implants.

  3. Fatigue analysis of computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing resin-based composite vs. lithium disilicate glass-ceramic.

    PubMed

    Ankyu, Shuhei; Nakamura, Keisuke; Harada, Akio; Hong, Guang; Kanno, Taro; Niwano, Yoshimi; Örtengren, Ulf; Egusa, Hiroshi

    2016-08-01

    Resin-based composite molar crowns made by computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) systems have been proposed as an inexpensive alternative to metal-ceramic or all-ceramic crowns. However, there is a lack of scientific information regarding fatigue resistance. This study aimed to analyze the fatigue behavior of CAD/CAM resin-based composite compared with lithium disilicate glass-ceramic. One-hundred and sixty bar-shaped specimens were fabricated using resin-based composite blocks [Lava Ultimate (LU); 3M/ESPE] and lithium disilicate glass-ceramic [IPS e.max press (EMP); Ivoclar/Vivadent]. The specimens were divided into four groups: no treatment (NT); thermal cycling (TC); mechanical cycling (MC); and thermal cycling followed by mechanical cycling (TCMC). Thermal cycling was performed by alternate immersion in water baths of 5°C and 55°C for 5 × 10(4) cycles. Mechanical cycling was performed in a three-point bending test, with a maximum load of 40 N, for 1.2 × 10(6) cycles. In addition, LU and EMP molar crowns were fabricated and subjected to fatigue treatments followed by load-to-failure testing. The flexural strength of LU was not severely reduced by the fatigue treatments. The fatigue treatments did not significantly affect the fracture resistance of LU molar crowns. The results demonstrate the potential of clinical application of CAD/CAM-generated resin-based composite molar crowns in terms of fatigue resistance.

  4. In vivo evaluation of CaO-SiO2-P2O5-B2O3 glass-ceramics coating on Steinman pins.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Hyup; Hong, Kug Sun; Baek, Hae-Ri; Seo, Jun-Hyuk; Lee, Kyung Mee; Ryu, Hyun-Seung; Lee, Hyun-Kyung

    2013-07-01

    Surface coating using ceramics improves the bone bonding strength of an implant. We questioned whether a new type of glass-ceramics (BGS-7) coating (CaO-SiO2 -P2 O5 -B2 O3 ) would improve the osseointegration of Steinman pins (S-pins) both biomechanically and histomorphometrically. An in vivo study was performed using rabbits by inserting three S-pins into each iliac bone. The pins were 2.2-mm S-pins with a coating of 30-μm-thick BGS-7 and 550-nm-thick hydroxyapatite (HA), as opposed to an S-pin without coating. A tensile strength test and histomorphometrical evaluation was performed. In the 2-week group, the BGS-7 implant showed a significantly higher tensile strength than the S-pin. In the 4- and 8-week groups, the BGS-7 implants had significantly higher tensile strengths than the S-pins and HA implants. The histomorphometrical study revealed that the BGS-7 implant had a significantly higher contact ratio than the S-pin and HA implants in the 4-week group. The biomechanical and histomorphometrical tests showed that the BGS-7 coating had superior bone bonding properties than the groups without the coating from the initial stage of insertion. The BGS-7 coating of an S-pin will enhance the bone bonding strength, and there might also be an advantage in human bone bonding.

  5. On formation of CaO-Al(2)O(3)-SiO2 glass-ceramics by vitrification of incinerator fly ash.

    PubMed

    Cheng, T W; Chen, Y S

    2003-06-01

    CaO-Al(2)O(3)-SiO(2) system glass ceramics of incinerator fly ash have been prepared by vitrification and then heat-treated in different conditions. The thermal molten process (TMP) was applied to heat treat vitrified samples at high temperatures whereas in the powder sintering process water-quenched vitrified samples were ground into powder and then sintered at high temperatures. Gehlenite was found present as the major phase in all treated samples. Treated samples in general exhibited good leachability characteristics as well as chemical durability, except in the HCl solution. Microstructure and physical properties varied with the treatment condition. Fine and relatively high dense structures with desirable properties were obtained for samples treated by the TMP. For both processes, higher temperature treatments caused crystal growth and thus poor properties were attained. Good physical and mechanical properties achieved at 900-950 degrees C in this study imply the treated samples have attractive potential for engineering applications.

  6. Effect of Stress Corrosion and Cyclic Fatigue on Fluorapatite Glass-Ceramic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Gaurav V.

    2011-12-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to test the following hypotheses: 1. Both cyclic degradation and stress corrosion mechanisms result in subcritical crack growth in a fluorapatite glass-ceramic. 2. There is an interactive effect of stress corrosion and cyclic fatigue to cause subcritical crack growth (SCG) for this material. 3. The material that exhibits rising toughness curve (R-curve) behavior also exhibits a cyclic degradation mechanism. Materials and Methods: The material tested was a fluorapatite glass-ceramic (IPS e.max ZirPress, Ivoclar-Vivadent). Rectangular beam specimens with dimensions of 25 mm x 4 mm x 1.2 mm were fabricated using the press-on technique. Two groups of specimens (N=30) with polished (15 mum) or air abraded surface were tested under rapid monotonic loading. Additional polished specimens were subjected to cyclic loading at two frequencies, 2 Hz (N=44) and 10 Hz (N=36), and at different stress amplitudes. All tests were performed using a fully articulating four-point flexure fixture in deionized water at 37°C. The SCG parameters were determined by using a statistical approach by Munz and Fett (1999). The fatigue lifetime data were fit to a general log-linear model in ALTA PRO software (Reliasoft). Fractographic techniques were used to determine the critical flaw sizes to estimate fracture toughness. To determine the presence of R-curve behavior, non-linear regression was used. Results: Increasing the frequency of cycling did not cause a significant decrease in lifetime. The parameters of the general log-linear model showed that only stress corrosion has a significant effect on lifetime. The parameters are presented in the following table.* SCG parameters (n=19--21) were similar for both frequencies. The regression model showed that the fracture toughness was significantly dependent (p<0.05) on critical flaw size. Conclusions: 1. Cyclic fatigue does not have a significant effect on the SCG in the fluorapatite glass-ceramic IPS e

  7. Luminescent properties of Eu{sup 2+}-doped BaGdF{sub 5} glass ceramics a potential blue phosphor for ultra-violet light-emitting diode

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Weihuan; Zhang, Yuepin Ouyang, Shaoye; Zhang, Zhixiong; Wang, Qian; Xia, Haiping

    2015-01-14

    Eu{sup 2+} doped transparent oxyfluoride glass ceramics containing BaGdF{sub 5} nanocrystals were successfully fabricated by melt-quenching technique under a reductive atmosphere. The structure of the glass and glass ceramics were investigated by differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The luminescent properties were investigated by transmission, excitation, and emission spectra. The decay time of the Gd{sup 3+} ions at 312 nm excited with 275 nm were also investigated. The results of XRD and TEM indicated the existence of BaGdF5 nanocrystals in the transparent glass ceramics. The excitation spectra of Eu{sup 2+} doped glass ceramics showed an excellent overlap with the main emission region of an ultraviolet light-emitting diode (UV-LED). Compared with the as-made glass, the emission of glass ceramics is much stronger by a factor of increasing energy transfer efficiency from Gd{sup 3+} to Eu{sup 2+} ions, the energy transfer efficiency from Gd{sup 3+} to Eu{sup 2+} ions was discussed. In addition, the chromaticity coordinates of glass and glass ceramics specimens were also discussed, which indicated that the Eu{sup 2+} doped BaGdF{sub 5} glass ceramics may be used as a potential blue-emitting phosphor for UV-LED.

  8. MAS-NMR study of lithium zinc silicate glasses and glass-ceramics with various ZnO content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, Madhumita; Kothiyal, Govind P.; Montagne, Lionel; Delevoye, Laurent

    2008-02-01

    Lithium zinc silicate glasses of composition (mol%): 17.5Li 2O-(72- x)SiO 2- xZnO-5.1Na 2O-1.3P 2O 5-4.1B 2O 3, 5.5⩽ x⩽17.7, were prepared by conventional melt-quenched technique and converted to glass-ceramic by controlled crystallization process. 29Si and 31P MAS-NMR was used to characterize the structure of both glass and glass-ceramic samples. Despite the complex glass composition, Q2, Q3 and Q4 sites are identified from 29Si MAS-NMR, which relative intensities are found to vary with the ZnO content, indicating a network depolymerization by ZnO. Moreover, well separated Q3 and Q4 resonances for low ZnO content indicates the occurrence of phase separation. From 31P MAS-NMR, it is seen that phosphorus is mainly present in the form of ortho-( Q0) and pyro-phosphate ( Q1) structural units and variation of ZnO content did not have much effect on these resonances, which provides an additional evidence for phase separation in the glass. On conversion to glass-ceramics, lithium disilicate (Li 2Si 2O 5), lithium zinc ortho-silicate (Li 3Zn 0.5SiO 4), tridymite (SiO 2) and cristobalite (SiO 2) were identified as major silicate crystalline phases. Using 29Si MAS-NMR, quantification of these silicate crystalline phases is carried out and correlated with the ZnO content in the glass-ceramics samples. In addition, 31P spectra unambiguously revealed the presence of crystalline Li 3PO 4 and (Na,Li) 3PO 4 in the glass-ceramics.

  9. The influence of crystallised Fe3O4 on the magnetic properties of coprecipitation-derived ferrimagnetic glass-ceramics.

    PubMed

    Bretcanu, O; Spriano, S; Verné, E; Cöisson, M; Tiberto, P; Allia, P

    2005-07-01

    Ferrimagnetic glass-ceramics are potential candidates for magnetic induction hyperthermia, which is one form of inducing deep-regional hyperthermia, by using a magnetic field. The aim of this work was to analyse the influence of the amount of crystallised magnetite on the magnetic properties of glass-ceramic samples. Thus, two different ferrimagnetic glass-ceramics with the composition of the system Na(2)O-CaO-SiO(2)-P(2)O(5)-FeO-Fe(2)O(3) were prepared by melting at 1500 degrees C for 30 min of the coprecipitation-derived starting products. The X-ray diffraction patterns show the presence of nanometric magnetite crystals in a glassy matrix after cooling from melting temperature. The estimated amount of crystallised magnetite varies between 20 and 45 wt.%, as a function of the chemical composition. The morphology of the crystals was studied by scanning electron micrography and transmission electron micrography. Glass transition temperature and thermal stability were investigated by differential thermal analysis. Magnetic hysteresis cycles were analysed using a vibrating sample magnetometer with a maximum applied field of 17 kOe, at room temperature, in quasi-static conditions. Calorimetric measurements were carried out using a magnetic induction furnace. The power losses estimated from calorimetric measurements under a magnetic field of 40 kA/m and 440 kHz are 65 W/g for the glass-ceramic with lower iron oxides content and 25 W/g for the glass-ceramic with higher iron oxide content.

  10. Rare earth-doped lead borate glasses and transparent glass-ceramics: structure-property relationship.

    PubMed

    Pisarski, W A; Pisarska, J; Mączka, M; Lisiecki, R; Grobelny, Ł; Goryczka, T; Dominiak-Dzik, G; Ryba-Romanowski, W

    2011-08-15

    Correlation between structure and optical properties of rare earth ions in lead borate glasses and glass-ceramics was evidenced by X-ray-diffraction, Raman, FT-IR and luminescence spectroscopy. The rare earths were limited to Eu(3+) and Er(3+) ions. The observed BO(3)↔BO(4) conversion strongly depends on the relative PbO/B(2)O(3) ratios in glass composition, giving important contribution to the luminescence intensities associated to (5)D(0)-(7)F(2) and (5)D(0)-(7)F(1) transitions of Eu(3+). The near-infrared luminescence and up-conversion spectra for Er(3+) ions in lead borate glasses before and after heat treatment were measured. The more intense and narrowing luminescence lines suggest partial incorporation of Er(3+) ions into the orthorhombic PbF(2) crystalline phase, which was identified using X-ray diffraction analysis.

  11. Laser ablation of advanced ceramics and glass-ceramic materials: Reference position dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sola, D.; Escartín, A.; Cases, R.; Peña, J. I.

    2011-04-01

    In this work, we present the effect produced by modifying the reference position as well as the method of machining on the results obtained when advanced ceramics and glass-ceramic materials are machined by laser ablation. A Q-switched Nd:YAG laser at its fundamental wavelength of 1064 nm with pulsewidths in the nanosecond range has been used. Morphology, depth and volume obtained by means of pulse bursts and grooves have been studied. Working within the same laser conditions, it has been shown that these values depend on the thermal, optical and mechanical features of the material processed. We have also studied the variation in the ablation yield when the position of the surface to be machined is modified. Material properties and work conditions are related to the results obtained. We have described and discussed the morphology, composition, microstructure and hardness of the materials processed.

  12. Ultra-broadband amplification properties of Ni2+-doped glass-ceramics amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Chun

    2009-04-13

    The energy level, transition configuration and mathematical model of Ni(2+)-doped glass-ceramics amplifiers are presented for the first time, to the best of one's knowledge. A quasi-three-level system is employed to model the gain and noise characteristics of the doped system, and the rate and power propagation equations of the mathematical model are solved to analyze the effect of the active ion concentration, fiber length, pump power as well as thermal-quenching on the gain spectra. It is shown that our model is in agreement with experimental result, and when excited at longer wavelength, the center of gain spectra of the amplifier red shifts, the ultra-broad band room-temperature gain spectra can cover 1.25-1.65 microm range for amplification of signal in the low-loss windows of the all-wave fiber without absorption peak caused by OH group.

  13. Characterization of porous glass-ceramic material as absorber of electromagnetic radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazmina, O.; Suslyaev, V.; Dushkina, M.; Semukhin, B.

    2015-04-01

    Investigations of a foam glass-ceramic material synthesized from raw siliceous earth material by the two-stage method at temperatures below 950°C have demonstrated the improvement of its physic mechanical properties in comparison with foam glass synthesized from glass cullet. This material actively interacts with microwaves and can be used for the development of protective screens reducing the adverse effect of microwaves on biological objects, anechoic chambers, and rooms with low level of electromagnetic background noise. Spectra of the transmission and absorption coefficients and of the complex dielectric permittivity for frequencies in the range 26-260 GHz are presented. The observed effects demonstrate the existence of regions with partial and total reflection arising on the glass-pore boundary and of the microwave interaction with ultradisperse carbon particles that remain after foaming with incomplete frothier transition from the soot to the gas phase.

  14. Fabrication and characterization of bioactive glass-ceramic using soda-lime-silica waste glass.

    PubMed

    Abbasi, Mojtaba; Hashemi, Babak

    2014-04-01

    Soda-lime-silica waste glass was used to synthesize a bioactive glass-ceramic through solid-state reactions. In comparison with the conventional route, that is, the melt-quenching and subsequent heat treatment, the present work is an economical technique. Structural and thermal properties of the samples were examined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and differential thermal analysis (DTA). The in vitro test was utilized to assess the bioactivity level of the samples by Hanks' solution as simulated body fluid (SBF). Bioactivity assessment by atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was revealed that the samples with smaller amount of crystalline phase had a higher level of bioactivity.

  15. Structural properties of fluorozirconate-based glass ceramics doped with multivalent europium

    SciTech Connect

    PaBlick, C.; Müller, O.; Lützenkirchen-Hecht, D.; Frahm, R.; Johnson, J.A.; Schweizer, S.

    2012-10-10

    The structure/property relationships of fluorochlorozirconate glass ceramics as a function of divalent and trivalent europium (Eu) co-doping and thermal processing have been investigated; the influence of doping ratio on the formation of barium chloride (BaCl2) nanocrystals therein was elucidated. X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy shows that the post-thermal annealing changes the Eu valence of the as-poured glass slightly, but during the melting process Eu3+ is more strongly reduced to Eu2+, in particular, when doped as a chloride instead of fluoride compound. The Eu2+-to-Eu3+ doping ratio also plays a significant role in chemical equilibrium in the melt. X-ray diffraction measurements indicate that a higher Eu2+ fraction leads to a BaCl2 phase transition from hexagonal to orthorhombic structure at a lower temperature.

  16. Glass-ceramic sealant for solid oxide fuel cells application: Characterization and performance in dual atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabato, A. G.; Cempura, G.; Montinaro, D.; Chrysanthou, A.; Salvo, M.; Bernardo, E.; Secco, M.; Smeacetto, F.

    2016-10-01

    A glass-ceramic composition was designed and tested for use as a sealant in solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) planar stack design. The crystallization behaviour was investigated by calculating the Avrami parameter (n) and the activation energy for crystallization (Ec) was obtained. The calculated values for n and Ec were 3 and 413.5 kJ/mol respectively. The results of thermal analyses indicate that this composition shows no overlap between the sintering and crystallization stages and thus an almost pore-free sealant can be deposited and sintered at 850 °C in air for 30 min. A gas tightness test has been carried out at 800 °C for 1100 h in dual atmosphere (Ar-H2 and air) without recording any leakage. Morphological and crystalline phase analyses were conducted prior and following tests in dual atmospheres in order to assess the compatibility of the proposed sealant with the metallic interconnect.

  17. Structural properties of fluorozirconate-based glass ceramics doped with multivalent europium

    SciTech Connect

    Passlick, C.; Mueller, O.; Luetzenkirchen-Hecht, D.; Frahm, R.; Johnson, J. A.; Schweizer, S.

    2011-12-01

    The structure/property relationships of fluorochlorozirconate glass ceramics as a function of divalent and trivalent europium (Eu) co-doping and thermal processing have been investigated; the influence of doping ratio on the formation of barium chloride (BaCl{sub 2}) nanocrystals therein was elucidated. X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy shows that the post-thermal annealing changes the Eu valence of the as-poured glass slightly, but during the melting process Eu{sup 3+} is more strongly reduced to Eu{sup 2+}, in particular, when doped as a chloride instead of fluoride compound. The Eu{sup 2+}-to-Eu{sup 3+} doping ratio also plays a significant role in chemical equilibrium in the melt. X-ray diffraction measurements indicate that a higher Eu{sup 2+} fraction leads to a BaCl{sub 2} phase transition from hexagonal to orthorhombic structure at a lower temperature.

  18. Optimisation of lithium borate barium chloride glass-ceramic thermal neutron imaging plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appleby, G. A.; Vontobel, P.

    2008-09-01

    Glass-ceramic thermal neutron imaging plates (NIPs) recently reported have been further developed for use in neutron radiography. The plate consists of nanocrystallites of the storage phosphor BaCl 2:Eu 2+ embedded within a neutron-sensitive lithium borate glass-matrix. A new generation of samples, enriched with both 10B and 6Li with thicknesses in the range 280-500 μm have been studied. Neutron images were read out using a Fuji BAS2500 imaging plate scanner and the quality of the images obtained was comparable to those recorded on a commercial NIP. Details of the response to neutron-irradiation as well as the obtained spatial resolution of the images are presented. The neutron absorption and radiation hardness of the materials studied is also measured.

  19. Structure and neutron imaging characteristics of lithium borate barium chloride glass-ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appleby, G. A.; Edgar, A.; Williams, G. V. M.; Vontobel, P.

    2006-08-01

    A glass-ceramic has been developed which can be used as a thermal neutron imaging plate (NIP) for neutron radiography. The plate consists of nanocrystallites of the storage phosphor BaCl 2:Eu 2+ embedded within a neutron sensitive lithium borate glass-matrix. Details of their preparation and structure are discussed. Neutron images were read out using a Fuji BAS2500 imaging plate scanner and the quality of the images obtained is comparable to those recorded on a commercial NIP. Details of the response to neutron and X-irradiation as well as the obtained spatial resolution of the images are presented. The neutron activation of the materials studied is also calculated.

  20. Cubic to tetragonal phase transition of Tm{sup 3+} doped nanocrystals in oxyfluoride glass ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yiming; Fu, Yuting; Shi, Yahui; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Yu, Hua E-mail: yuhua@nankai.edu.cn; Zhao, Lijuan E-mail: yuhua@nankai.edu.cn

    2016-02-15

    Tm{sup 3+} ions doped β-PbF{sub 2} nanocrystals in oxyfluoride glass ceramics with different doping concentrations and thermal temperatures are prepared by a traditional melt-quenching and thermal treatment method to investigate the structure and the phase transition of Tm{sup 3+} doped nanocrystals. The structures are characterized by X-ray diffraction Rietveld analysis and confirmed with numerical simulation. The phase transitions are proved further by the emission spectra. Both of the doping concentration and thermal temperature can induce an O{sub h} to D{sub 4h} site symmetry distortion and a cubic to tetragonal phase transition. The luminescence of Tm{sup 3+} doped nanocrystals at 800 nm was modulated by the phase transition of the surrounding crystal field.

  1. Spectroscopic properties of Eu-doped antimony-germanate glass and glass-ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zmojda, J.; Kochanowicz, M.; Miluski, P.; Ragin, T.; Dorosz, D.; ZajÄ c, A.

    2016-09-01

    In our work we focused on possibility of obtaining phosphate nano-phase structures in antimony-germanate glasses doped with europium ions. The glasses with molar composition of 50(Sb2O3 - GeO2) - 50(SiO2 - Al2O3 - Na2O) doped with 0.5mol% Eu2O3 were prepared by standard melt-quenching method. In order to optimize glass-ceramic system the influence of phosphate concentration (up to 10mol%) on spectroscopic properties have been investigated. The symmetry nature of molecular structure around europium ions have been determined from the intensity ratio between (5D0 →7F2)/(5D0 →7F1) transitions. The effect of prominent Stark splitting of luminescence band at 612 nm characterised as "hypersensitive transition" into 3 sub-wavelength was observed in glasses with 1mol% and 3mol% of P2O5.

  2. Glass/ceramic/refractory techniques, their development and introduction into dentistry: A historical literature review.

    PubMed

    Wildgoose, David G; Johnson, Anthony; Winstanley, Raymond B

    2004-02-01

    This review considered the development of glass, ceramic, refractory materials, and techniques over a period of 25,000 years, from the time of stone-age man to their introduction into dentistry. Currently a wide variety of all-ceramic dental restorations are provided using alumina-reinforced, leucite-forming, and novel glass and ceramic materials along with a range of refractory materials and associated techniques. However, some of the problems of dimensional and thermal change experienced by early craftsmen still persist during current laboratory fabrication techniques. Early English archaeological and dental publications were obtained through the Archaeology Education Department of the British Museum in London and the Archives of the British Dental Association Library. More recent peer-reviewed articles published from 1966 to the present were obtained through MEDLINE.

  3. Progress in rare-earth-doped nanocrystalline glass-ceramics for laser cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkata Krishnaiah, Kummara; Ledemi, Yannick; Soares de Lima Filho, Elton; Loranger, Sebastien; Nemova, Galina; Messaddeq, Younes; Kashyap, Raman

    2016-03-01

    Laser cooling with anti-Stokes fluorescencewas predicted by Pringsheim in 1929, but for solids was only demonstrated in 1995. There are many difficulties which have hindered laser assisted cooling, principally the chemical purity of a sample and the availability of suitable hosts. Recent progress has seen the cooled temperature plummet to 93K in Yb:YLF. One of the challenges for laser cooling to become ubiquitous, is incorporating the rare-earthcooling ion in a more easily engineered material, rather than a pure crystalline host. Rare-earth-doped nanocrystalline glass-ceramics were first developed by Wang and Ohwaki for enhanced luminescence and mechanical properties compared to their parent glasses. Our work has focused on creating a nanocrystalline environment for the cooling ion, in an easy to engineer glass. The glasses with composition 30SiO2-15Al2O3-27CdF2-22PbF2-4YF3-2YbF3 (mol%), have been prepared by the conventional melt-quenching technique. By a simple post fabrication thermal treatment, the rare-earth ions are embedded in the crystalline phase within the glass matrix. Nanocrystals with various sizes and rare-earth concentrations have been fabricated and their photoluminescence properties assessed in detail. These materials show close to unity photoluminescence quantum yield (PLQY) when pumped above the band. However, they exhibit strong up-conversion into the blue, characteristic of Tm trace impurity whose presence was confirmed. The purification of the starting materials is underway to reduce the background loss to demonstrate laser cooling. Progress in the development of these nano-glass-ceramics and their experimental characterization will be discussed.

  4. In vitro evaluation of fracture strength of zirconia restoration veneered with various ceramic materials

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yu-Sung; Lee, Jai-Bong; Han, Jung-Suk; Yeo, In-Sung

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE Fracture of the veneering material of zirconia restorations frequently occurs in clinical situations. The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the fracture strengths of zirconia crowns veneered with various ceramic materials by various techniques. MATERIALS AND METHODS A 1.2 mm, 360° chamfer preparation and occlusal reduction of 2 mm were performed on a first mandibular molar, and 45 model dies were fabricated in a titanium alloy by CAD/CAM system. Forty-five zirconia copings were fabricated and divided into three groups. In the first group (LT) zirconia copings were veneered with feldspathic porcelain by the layering technique. In the second group (HT) the glass ceramic was heat-pressed on the zirconia coping, and for the third group (ST) a CAD/CAM-fabricated high-strength anatomically shaped veneering cap was sintered onto the zirconia coping. All crowns were cemented onto their titanium dies with Rely X™ Unicem (3M ESPE) and loaded with a universal testing machine (Instron 5583) until failure. The mean fracture values were compared by an one-way ANOVA and a multiple comparison post-hoc test (α=0.05). Scanning electron microscope was used to investigate the fractured interface. RESULTS Mean fracture load and standard deviation was 4263.8±1110.8 N for Group LT, 5070.8±1016.4 for Group HT and 6242.0±1759.5 N for Group ST. The values of Group ST were significantly higher than those of the other groups. CONCLUSION Zirconia crowns veneered with CAD/CAM generated glass ceramics by the sintering technique are superior to those veneered with feldspathic porcelain by the layering technique or veneered with glass ceramics by the heat-pressing technique in terms of fracture strength. PMID:22977725

  5. Preparation and characterization of Sr0.5Ba0.5Nb2O6 glass-ceramic on piezoelectric properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Jiang; Xuan-Ming, Wang; Jia-Yu, Li; Yong, Zhang; Tao, Zheng; Jing-Wen, Lv

    2016-03-01

    We studied the influence of heat treatment time on the optical, thermal, electrical, and mechanical properties of strontium barium niobate (Sr1-xBaxNb2O6 hereafter SBN) piezoelectric glass-ceramics with tungsten bronze-type structure, which have good piezoelectric properties and are important lead-free piezoelectric materials. We found that the best heat treatment time is 4 h. The properties of the prepared materials are better than that of SBN ceramics and the glass-ceramic growth is faster than the SBN crystal when the heat treatment time of the SBN piezoelectric glass-ceramic is controlled, reducing the preparation costs greatly.

  6. High-Hot-Strength Ceramic Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sayir, Ali; Matson, Lawrence E.

    1994-01-01

    Continuous fibers consisting of laminae of alumina and yttrium aluminum garnet offer exceptionally high strength, resistance to creep, and chemical stability at high temperatures. These fibers exceed tensile strength of sapphire fibers. Leading candidates for reinforcement of intermetallic-matrix composites in exhaust nozzles of developmental high-speed civil transport aircraft engines. Other applications are in aerospace, automotive, chemical-process, and power-generation industries.

  7. Magnetic and bioactivity evaluation of ferrimagnetic ZnFe 2O 4 containing glass ceramics for the hyperthermia treatment of cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Saqlain A.; Hashmi, M. U.; Alam, S.; Shamim, A.

    2010-02-01

    Glass ceramics of the composition xZnO·25Fe 2O 3·(40- x)SiO 2·25CaO·7P 2O 5·3Na 2O were prepared by the melt-quench method using oxy-acetylene flame. Glass-powder compacts were sintered at 1100 °C for 3 h and then rapidly cooled at -10 °C. X-ray diffraction (XRD) revealed 3 prominent crystalline phases: ZnFe 2O 4, CaSiO 3 and Ca 10(PO 4) 6(OH) 2. Vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) data at 10 KOe and 500 Oe showed that saturation magnetization, coercivity and hence hysteresis area increased with the increase in ZnO content. Nano-sized ZnFe 2O 4 crystallites were of pseudo-single domain structure and thus coercivity increased with the increase in crystallite size. ZnFe 2O 4 exhibited ferrimagnetism due to the random distribution of Zn 2+ and Fe 3+ cations at tetrahedral A sites and octahedral B sites. This inversion/random distribution of cations was probably due to the surface effects of nano-ZnFe 2O 4 and rapid cooling of the material from 1100 °C (thus preserving the high temperature state of the random distribution of cations). Calorimetric measurements were carried out using magnetic induction furnace at 500 Oe magnetic field and 400 KHz frequency. The data showed that maximum specific power loss and temperature increase after 2 min were 26 W/g and 37 °C, respectively for the sample containing 10% ZnO. The samples were immersed in simulated body fluid (SBF) for 3 weeks. Scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDX) and XRD results confirmed the growth of precipitated hydroxyapatite phase after immersion in SBF, suggesting that the ferrimagnetic glass ceramics were bioactive and could bond to the living tissues in physiological environment.

  8. High-strength magnetic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Detert, K.

    1970-01-01

    Two new precipitation-hardened magnetic alloys are suitable for operation in 800 to 1600 deg F range. One is a martensitic alloy and the other a cobalt-based alloy. They possess improved creep resistance and have application in high temperature inductors and alternators.

  9. Enhanced upconversion emission in crystallization-controllable glass-ceramic fiber containing Yb3+-Er3+ codoped CaF2 nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Wencai; Fang, Zaijin; Ma, Zhijun; Qiu, Jianrong

    2016-10-01

    Functional nanocrystal-containing materials have been a hot topic in recent years. However, few researches have focused on functional nanocrystals contained in optical glass fibers. In this research, transparent CaF2 glass-ceramic was prepared by a melt-quenching method. Greatly enhanced upconversion luminescence was observed after heat treatment. By applying a novel method called melt-in-tube, precursor fiber free of crystals was fabricated at the drawing temperature where the clad was softened while the core was melted. Glass-ceramic fiber with fiber core containing Yb3+-Er3+ codoped CaF2 nanocrystals was obtained after heat treatment at a relatively low temperature. Electron probe micro-analyzer measurement shows no obvious element diffusion between the core and clad. Greatly enhanced upconversion emission was detected in the glass-ceramic fiber excited by a 980 nm laser, suggesting the developed glass-ceramic fiber is a promising material for upconversion laser.

  10. Enhanced upconversion emission in crystallization-controllable glass-ceramic fiber containing Yb(3+)-Er(3+) codoped CaF2 nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Peng, Wencai; Fang, Zaijin; Ma, Zhijun; Qiu, Jianrong

    2016-10-07

    Functional nanocrystal-containing materials have been a hot topic in recent years. However, few researches have focused on functional nanocrystals contained in optical glass fibers. In this research, transparent CaF2 glass-ceramic was prepared by a melt-quenching method. Greatly enhanced upconversion luminescence was observed after heat treatment. By applying a novel method called melt-in-tube, precursor fiber free of crystals was fabricated at the drawing temperature where the clad was softened while the core was melted. Glass-ceramic fiber with fiber core containing Yb(3+)-Er(3+) codoped CaF2 nanocrystals was obtained after heat treatment at a relatively low temperature. Electron probe micro-analyzer measurement shows no obvious element diffusion between the core and clad. Greatly enhanced upconversion emission was detected in the glass-ceramic fiber excited by a 980 nm laser, suggesting the developed glass-ceramic fiber is a promising material for upconversion laser.

  11. High-Strength, Superelastic Compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanford, Malcolm; Noebe, Ronald; Dellacorte, Christopher; Bigelow, Glen; Thomas, Fransua

    2013-01-01

    can be used in the heat treatment process, less energy will be consumed, and there will be less dimensional distortion and quench cracking. This results in fewer scrap parts, less material waste from large amounts of material removal, and fewer machining steps to rework parts that are out of specification. This material has a combination of properties that have been previously unobtainable. The material has a Young s modulus of approximately 95 GPa (about half that of conventional steels), moderate density (10 to 15% lower than conventional steels), excellent corrosion resistance, and high hardness (58 to 62 HRC). These properties make this material uniquely suited for advanced bearings.

  12. High toughness-high strength iron alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. R.; Witzke, W. R. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    An iron alloy is provided which exhibits strength and toughness characteristics at cryogenic temperatures. The alloy consists essentially of about 10 to 16 percent by weight nickel, about 0.1 to 1.0 percent by weight aluminum, and 0 to about 3 percent by weight copper, with the balance being essentially iron. The iron alloy is produced by a process which includes cold rolling at room temperature and subsequent heat treatment.

  13. Development of High Specific Strength Envelope Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komatsu, Keiji; Sano, Masa-Aki; Kakuta, Yoshiaki

    Progress in materials technology has produced a much more durable synthetic fabric envelope for the non-rigid airship. Flexible materials are required to form airship envelopes, ballonets, load curtains, gas bags and covering rigid structures. Polybenzoxazole fiber (Zylon) and polyalirate fiber (Vectran) show high specific tensile strength, so that we developed membrane using these high specific tensile strength fibers as a load carrier. The main material developed is a Zylon or Vectran load carrier sealed internally with a polyurethane bonded inner gas retention film (EVOH). The external surface provides weather protecting with, for instance, a titanium oxide integrated polyurethane or Tedlar film. The mechanical test results show that tensile strength 1,000 N/cm is attained with weight less than 230g/m2. In addition to the mechanical properties, temperature dependence of the joint strength and solar absorptivity and emissivity of the surface are measured. 

  14. Influence of Al 2O 3 additions on the crystallization mechanism and properties of diopside/anorthite hybrid glass-ceramics for LED packaging materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Mina; Kang, Seunggu

    2011-07-01

    The crystallization mechanism and properties of diopside (CaMgSi 2O 6)/anorthite (CaAl 2Si 2O 8) hybrid glass-ceramics fabricated from a CMSA (CaO-MgO-SiO 2-Al 2O 3) glass system were studied as a function of Al 2O 3 additions. The parent glass prepared was pressed to pellets isostatically and was sintered to produce glass-ceramics. A non-isothermal analysis was performed to study the crystallization behavior of diopside/anorthite hybrid glass-ceramics using differential thermal analysis (DTA) with various heating rates (5-20 K min -1) and John-Mehl-Avrami and Kissinger equations. The occupying ratio of diopside and anorthite phases, crystal identification and microstructure in the glass-ceramics containing various Al 2O 3 contents were analyzed. Also the thermal conductivity and density of diopside/anorthite composites were measured to apply to LED packaging materials. The main crystalline phases for CaO-MgO-SiO 2-Al 2O 3 glass-ceramics system containing 8.6 wt% or less Al 2O 3, and 15.9 wt% or more Al 2O 3 were the diopside and anorthite, respectively. The difference (Δ T) of initiation temperature for crystallized ( Tx) and glass transition temperature ( Tg), calculated from the DTA curve for a glass is inversely proportional to the density of glass-ceramics fabricated from the glass. The highest crystallization temperature was 946 °C for the glass-ceramics containing 27.4 wt% Al 2O 3, which is low enough to apply the LTCC process. The glass-ceramics of diopside base with no Al 2O 3 added had the highest thermal conductivity of 2.372 W/m °C among all specimens fabricated in this study.

  15. Enhancement of second harmonic generation signal in thermally poled glass ceramic with NaNbO{sub 3} nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Malakho, Artem; Fargin, Evelyne; Lahaye, Michel; Lazoryak, Bogdan; Morozov, Vladimir; Van Tendeloo, Gustaaf; Rodriguez, Vincent; Adamietz, Frederic

    2006-09-15

    Glass ceramic composites were prepared by bulk crystallization of NaNbO{sub 3} in sodium niobium borate glasses. A homogeneous bulk crystallization of the NaNbO{sub 3} phase takes place during heat treatments that produces visible-near infrared transparent materials with {approx}30 nm NaNbO{sub 3} nanocrystallites. Upon thermal poling, a strong Na{sup +} depleted nonlinear optical thin layer is observed at the anode side that should induce a large internal static electric field. In addition, the {chi}{sup (2)} response of the poled glass ceramic composites increases from 0.2 up to 1.9 pm/V with the rate of crystallization. Two mechanisms may be considered: a pure structural {chi}{sup (2)} process connected with the occurrence of a spontaneous ferroelectric polarization or an increase of the {chi}{sup (3)} response of the nanocrystallites that enhances the electric field induced second harmonic generation process.

  16. Microstructure and luminescence of transparent glass ceramic containing Er{sup 3+}:BaF{sub 2} nano-crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Daqin; Wang Yuansheng . E-mail: yswang@fjirsm.ac.cn; Yu Yunlong; Ma En; Zhou Lihua

    2006-02-15

    Transparent BaF{sub 2}-SiO{sub 2} glass ceramics doped with different content of Er{sup 3+} were prepared by sol-gel method. The microstructural evolution of the samples was studied with X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscope (TEM), absorption and infrared spectra (IR). BaF{sub 2} nano-crystals with 2-15 nm in size, depending on the crystallization temperature, distributed homogeneously among the amorphous silica matrix. The BaF{sub 2} lattice parameters decreased with the increasing of Er{sup 3+} doping, indicating the incorporation of Er{sup 3+} into nano-crystals, which was further confirmed by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and absorption spectra analysis. The upconversion emissions of Er{sup 3+} emerged under the excitation at 980 nm for glass ceramic heat-treated at 800 deg. C.

  17. Characteristics of the Mn2+ EPR spectra in the oxyfluoride glass ceramics containing SrF2 nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedotovs, A.; Berzins, Dz; Kiselova, O.; Sarakovskis, A.

    2012-08-01

    Characteristics of the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra of the Mn2+ ion in the oxyfluoride glass ceramics containing SrF2 crystalline counterpart has been investigated. Explicit superhyperfine structure (SHF) has been observed in the X-Band EPR spectra taken at 77 K after thermal treatment of the glass precursor. Such SHF structure is characteristic to Mn2+ ion in the fluorine coordinated nearest environment which is characteristic to cubic structure of the alkaline earth fluorides. Manganese replaces strontium in the SrF2 lattice where it has pronounced SHF interaction with surrounding fluorine nuclei. Thus Mn2+ ion provides information about crystalline structure of the particular oxyfluoride glass ceramics.

  18. Effect of sintering temperature on the thermal properties of diopside-based glass-ceramics of varying CaO/MgO ratio.

    PubMed

    Jang, Seokju; Kang, Seunggu

    2013-08-01

    The thermal properties of diopside (CaMgSi2O6)-based glass-ceramics of varying CaO/MgO ratio were investigated as a function of sintering temperature. The crystallization behavior of the glass was studied by a non-isothermal method using a differential thermal analysis (DTA) with various heating rates. Diopside, as a main crystalline phase, and cordierite, as a minor phase, were formed in the glass-ceramics with an - 0.67-2.23 CaO/MgO ratio. The X-ray diffraction peak for diopside in the glass-ceramic becomes higher with an increase of the CaO/MgO ratio. The crystallization volume fraction with sintering temperature was calculated showing that both the initiation temperature for crystallization and a temperature range of crystallization increased with an increased heating rate. The microstructure of all glass-ceramics had a lump area composed of several tens-of-nanometer particles and a matrix composed of rows of particles, and the matrix area decreased with a decreasing CaO/MgO ratio. The thermal conductivity of glass-ceramics of CaO/MgO = 2.23 was 44% higher than that of CaO/MgO = 0.67 owing to the higher crystallinity and less voids in a microstructure. All glass-ceramics fabricated in this study were sintered at below 955 degrees C, which makes them applicable to the LTCC process for light-emitting diode packaging.

  19. Effects of Fiber Content on Mechanical Properties of CVD SiC Fiber-Reinforced Strontium Aluminosilicate Glass-Ceramic Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P.

    1996-01-01

    Unidirectional CVD SiC(f)(SCS-6) fiber-reinforced strontium aluminosilicate (SAS) glass-ceramic matrix composites containing various volume fractions, approximately 16 to 40 volume %, of fibers were fabricated by hot pressing at 1400 C for 2 h under 27.6 MPa. Monoclinic celsian, SrAl2Si2O8, was the only crystalline phase formed, with complete absence of the undesired hexacelsian phase, in the matrix. Room temperature mechanical properties were measured in 3-point flexure. The matrix microcracking stress and the ultimate strength increased with increase in fiber volume fraction, reached maximum values for V(sub f) approximately equal to 0.35, and degraded at higher fiber loadings. This degradation in mechanical properties is related to the change in failure mode, from tensile at lower V(sub f) to interlaminar shear at higher fiber contents. The extent of fiber loading did not have noticeable effect on either fiber-matrix debonding stress, or frictional sliding stress at the interface. The applicability of micromechanical models in predicting the mechanical properties of the composites was also examined. The currently available theoretical models do not appear to be useful in predicting the values of the first matrix cracking stress, and the ultimate strength of the SCS-6/SAS composites.

  20. Replacement of missing lateral incisors with lithium disilicate glass-ceramic veneer-fixed dental prostheses: a clinical report

    PubMed Central

    Bissasu, Sami M; Al-houri, Nabil A

    2014-01-01

    Key Clinical Message This report describes the use of lithium disilicate glass-ceramic veneer-fixed dental prostheses in replacing congenitally missing maxillary lateral incisors. This kind of prosthesis has an advantage over a lingual-retainer resin-bonded fixed dental prosthesis in its capability of changing the color and shape of the abutment teeth. The prostheses provided an acceptable esthetics and comfort for the patient. PMID:25356269

  1. Generation of a bleaching wave in an ST-50-1 glass ceramics induced by a Nd:YAG laser

    SciTech Connect

    Veiko, V P; Novikov, B Yu; Shakhno, E A; Yakovlev, E B

    2009-01-31

    It is shown that upon exposing glass ceramics to laser radiation for which the initial polycrystalline phase is opaque, whereas the corresponding glass phase is transparent, the transparency oscillations can be produced due to the laser-induced phase transitions from the crystalline to amorphous state and vice versa, resulting in the propagation of a bleaching and darkening wave. (interaction of laser radiation with matter)

  2. Ultraviolet upconversion luminescence of Gd{sup 3+} and Eu{sup 3+} in nano-structured glass ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Hang; Chen, Daqin; Yu, Yunlong; Yang, Anping; Zhang, Rui; Wang, Yuansheng

    2012-02-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ultraviolet upconversion emissions of Eu{sup 3+} and Gd{sup 3+} are rarely studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanostructured glass ceramic is developed as a host for ultraviolet upconversion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ultraviolet upconversion signal are found greatly enhanced after crystallization. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It is promising for fabricating novel ultraviolet upconversion lasers. -- Abstract: Ultraviolet multiphoton upconversion emissions of Eu{sup 3+} ({sup 5}H{sub 3-7}, {sup 5}G{sub 2-6}, {sup 5}L{sub 6} {yields} {sup 7}F{sub 0}) and Gd{sup 3+} ({sup 6}I{sub J}, {sup 6}P{sub J} {yields} {sup 8}S{sub 7/2}) are studied in the Eu{sup 3+} (or Gd{sup 3+}) doped SiO{sub 2}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-NaF-YF{sub 3} precursor glasses and glass ceramics containing {beta}-YF{sub 3} nanocrystals, under continuous-wavelength 976 nm laser pumping. It is experimentally demonstrated that energy transfer from Yb{sup 3+} to Tm{sup 3+}, then further to Eu{sup 3+} or Gd{sup 3+} is responsible for the upconversion process. Compared to those in the precursor glasses, the upconversion emission intensities in the glass ceramics are greatly enhanced, owing to the participation of rare earth ions into the low-phonon-energy environment of {beta}-YF{sub 3} nanocrystals. Hopefully, the studied glass ceramics may find potential applications in the field of ultraviolet solid-state lasers.

  3. Analysis of Translucency Parameter of Glass-Ceramics Fabricated by Different Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Ledić, Karla; Majnarić, Igor; Milardović, Slađana; Ortolan; Špalj, Stipe; Štefančić, Sanja

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to analyse translucency parameter (TP values) of glass-ceramics fabricated by different techniques and investigate the effect of the corrosive medium on TP values. Materials and methods Three specimens of each type of IPS e.max ceramics (Ivoclar Vivadent, Schaan, Liechtenstein) were made in three colours (A2, C2 and B3) by three fabrication techniques (layering – e.max Ceram Dentin; heat-pressing – e.max Press; CAD/CAM – e.max CAD). Specimens were made in the form of plates (10 mm x 12 mm x 0.8 mm). CIE L*a*b* values were measured by a spectrophotometer (X-Rite DTP 20 Pulse, Neu Isenburg, Germany) before and after exposure to 4% acetic acid at 80 °C for 16 hours (ISO 6872) to calculate translucency parameter (TP values). Statistical data were analysed using the IBM SPSS 22 software. Results IPS e.max Ceram Dentin had significantly the lowest TP values, and IPS e.max Press the highest TP values of all colours (A2, C2, B3), both prior and after exposure to acid (p<0.001). The difference in TP values among colours was evident in the IPS e.max Ceram Dentin material, both before and after exposure to acid with a great effect size (p<0.001; η2 = 0.702 and 0.741), and in the IPS e.max Press material (p<0.001, effect size 0.547 and 0.576). CAD/CAD specimens showed uniform TP values between three colours. Further, exposure to a corrosive medium did not result in a statistically significant change of TP values in any of the materials tested. Conclusions Different types of glass-ceramics showed significant difference in TP values both with respect to the fabrication technique and colour. Exposure to a corrosive medium did not result in a statistically significant change of TP values. PMID:27688383

  4. Improvement of Er{sup 3+} emissions in oxyfluoride glass ceramic nano-composite by thermal treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Daqin; Wang Yuansheng . E-mail: yswang@fjirsm.ac.cn; Yu Yunlong; Ma En

    2006-05-15

    In order to improve the 1.53 {mu}m emission of Er{sup 3+}-doped oxyfluoride glass ceramic containing CaF{sub 2} nano-crystals, series of samples with same Er{sup 3+} doping lever thermal treated under different conditions were prepared. The UV-VIR-NIR absorption spectra, near-infrared and up-conversion emission spectra, and {sup 4} I {sub 13/2} decay curves were measured. Based on Judd-Ofelt theory, the radiative transition probability, fluorescence branching ratio and radiative decay time of various metastable transitions of precursor glass and glass ceramics were evaluated. With the increasing of heating temperature, the Judd-Ofelt intensity parameter {omega} {sub 2} monotonously decreased from 4.39x10{sup -2} to 2.72x10{sup -2} cm{sup 2}; the emission lifetime and quantum efficiency significantly increased from 5.9 to 8.0 ms and 70% to 98%, respectively. The wavelength dependence of gain cross-sections of oxyfluoride glass and glass ceramics were computed to be relatively flat in the range of 1530-1565 nm for population inversion from 0.7 to 1.0.

  5. White light upconversion emission in Yb3+/ Er3+/ Tm3+ codoped oxy-fluoride lithium tungsten tellurite glass ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, Ghizal F.; Mahajan, S. K.

    2012-02-01

    The bright white upconversion emission ( tri-colour UC) is generated in Er/Tm/Yb tri -doped oxy-fluoride lithium tungsten tellurite (TWLOF)glass ceramics containing crystalline phase LiYbF4 under the excitation of 980nm laser diode. The most appropriate combination of rare-earth ions (2mol% YbF3 1mol% ErF3 and 1mol%TmF3 )of glass ceramic sample has been determined to tune the primary colour (RGB and generate white light emission. By varying the pump power, intense and weak blue (487nm, 437nm), green (525nm and 545nm) and red (662nm) emission are simultaneously observed at room temperature. The dependence of upconversion emission intensity suggest that a theephoton process is responsible for the blue emission of Tm3+ ions and red emission due to both Tm3+ and Er3+ ions , while green emission originated from two photon processes in Er3+ ions. Also tri colour upconvesion and energy transfer in this glass ceramics sample were studied under 808nm laser diode excitation. The Upconversion mechanisms and Tm3+ ions plays role of both emitter and activator (transfer energy to Er) were discussed.

  6. Placenta Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Hosted on RKKP Glass-Ceramic: A Tissue Engineering Strategy for Bone Regenerative Medicine Applications

    PubMed Central

    Fosca, Marco; De Bonis, Angela; Curcio, Mariangela; Lolli, Maria Grazia; De Stefanis, Adriana; Marchese, Rodolfo; Rau, Julietta V.

    2016-01-01

    In tissue engineering protocols, the survival of transplanted stem cells is a limiting factor that could be overcome using a cell delivery matrix able to support cell proliferation and differentiation. With this aim, we studied the cell-friendly and biocompatible behavior of RKKP glass-ceramic coated Titanium (Ti) surface seeded with human amniotic mesenchymal stromal cells (hAMSCs) from placenta. The sol-gel synthesis procedure was used to prepare the RKKP glass-ceramic material, which was then deposited onto the Ti surface by Pulsed Laser Deposition method. The cell metabolic activity and proliferation rate, the cytoskeletal actin organization, and the cell cycle phase distribution in hAMSCs seeded on the RKKP coated Ti surface revealed no significant differences when compared to the cells grown on the treated plastic Petri dish. The health of of hAMSCs was also analysed studying the mRNA expressions of MSC key genes and the osteogenic commitment capability using qRT-PCR analysis which resulted in being unchanged in both substrates. In this study, the combination of the hAMSCs' properties together with the bioactive characteristics of RKKP glass-ceramics was investigated and the results obtained indicate its possible use as a new and interesting cell delivery system for bone tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications. PMID:28078286

  7. The effects of sulfate content on crystalline phase, microstructure, and chemical durability of zirconolite-barium borosilicate glass-ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Lang; Wang, Xin; Li, Huidong; Teng, Yuancheng; Peng, Long

    2016-09-01

    The effects of sulfate content on structure and chemical durability of barium borosilicate glass-ceramics were studied. The results show that the glass-ceramics with 0-1.10 mol% SO3 possess mainly CaZrTi2O7-2M phase along with a small amount of CaZrTi2O7-3T and ZrO2 phases. The hexagonal CaZrTi2O7-3T crystals crystallize on the surface of glass-ceramics. For the samples with 1.24-1.55 mol% SO3, the main crystalline phases are CaTiSiO5 and CaZrTi2O7-2M in the bulk, while a separate sulfate layer containing Na2SO4 and BaSO4 is observed on the surface. X-ray fluorescence analysis indicates that about 2/3 of the SO3 originally added has been lost by volatility. The normalized mass loss (NLi) for Na, B, Ca elements remains almost unchanged (∼10-2 g/m2) after 7 days for the samples with 0-1.10 mol% SO3. The NLi for both Na and B increases gradually after 7 days when the SO3 content is 1.24 mol%.

  8. Development of high strength high toughness third generation advanced high strength steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martis, Codrick John

    Third generation advanced high strength steels (AHSS's) are emerging as very important engineering materials for structural applications. These steels have high specific strength and thus will contribute significantly to weight reduction in automotive and other structural component. In this investigation two such low carbon low alloy steels (LCLA) with high silicon content (1.6-2wt %) has been developed. These two steel alloys were subjected to single step and two step austempering in the temperature range of 260-399°C to obtain desired microstructures and mechanical properties. Austempering heat treatment was carried out for 2 hours in a molten salt bath. The microstructures were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and optical metallography. Quantitative analysis was carried out by image analysis technique. The effect of austempering temperature on the mechanical properties of these two alloys was examined. The influence of microstructures on the mechanical properties of alloys was also studied. Austempering heat treatment resulted in fine carbide free bainitic ferrite and high carbon austenite microstructure in the samples austempered above Ms temperature, whereas tempered martensite and austenite microstructure was obtained in samples austempered below Ms temperature. Yield strength, tensile strength and fracture toughness were found to increase as the austempering temperature decreases, whereas ductility increases as the austempering temperature increases. Tensile strength in the range of 1276MPa -1658 MPa and the fracture toughness in the range of 80-141MPa√m were obtained in these two steels. Volume fractions of different phases present and their lath sizes are related to the mechanical properties. Austempered samples consisting of mixed microstructure of bainitic ferrite and tempered martensite phases resulted in the exceptional combination of strength and toughness.

  9. Method for producing high dielectric strength microvalves

    DOEpatents

    Kirby, Brian J.; Reichmuth, David S.; Shepodd, Timothy J.

    2006-04-04

    A microvalve having a cast-in-place and lithographically shaped mobile, polymer monolith for fluid flow control in microfluidic devices and method of manufacture. The microvalve contains a porous fluorinated polymer monolithic element whose pores are filled with an electrically insulating, high dielectric strength fluid, typically a perfluorinated liquid. This combination provides a microvalve that combines high dielectric strength with extremely low electrical conductivity. These microvalves have been shown to have resistivities of at least 100 G.OMEGA. and are compatible with solvents such as water at a pH between 2.7 and 9.0, 1-1 propanol, acetonitrile, and acetone.

  10. Mechanical properties of high-strength concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokhtarzadeh, Alireza

    This report summarizes an experimental program conducted to investigate production techniques and mechanical properties of high strength concrete in general and to provide recommendations for using these concretes in manufacturing precast/prestressed bridge girders. Test variables included total amount and composition of cementitious material (portland cement, fly ash, and silica fume), type and brand of cement, type of silica fume (dry densified and slurry), type and brand of high-range water-reducing admixture, type of aggregate, aggregate gradation, maximum aggregate size, and curing. Tests were conducted to determine the effects of these variables on changes in compressive strength and modulus of elasticity over time, splitting tensile strength, modulus of rupture, creep, shrinkage, and absorption potential (as an indirect indicator of permeability). Also investigated were the effects of test parameters such as mold size, mold material, and end condition. Over 6,300 specimens were cast from approximately 140 mixes over a period of 3 years.

  11. Surface modification of apatite-wollastonite glass ceramic by synthetic coupling agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Qin; Zhou, Da-Li; Zhang, Xiang; Zhou, Jia-Bei

    2014-06-01

    In this study, lysine was introduced into the surface of apatite—wollastonite glass ceramic (AW-GC) to improve its cytocompatibility by two steps reaction procedure. Firstly, lysine connected to N-β-(aminoethyl)-γ-aminopropyl trimethoxy silane (A-1120) by covalent binding of amide group. Secondly, the lysine-functionalized A-1120 was deposited on the surface of AW-GC through a silanization reaction involving a covalent attachment. FTIR spectra indicated that lysine had been immobilized onto the surface of AW-GC successfully. Bioactivity of the surface modified AW-GC was investigated by simulated body fluid (SBF), and the in vitro cytocompatibility was evaluated by coculturing with human osteosarcoma cell MG63. The results showed that the process of hydroxyapatite layer formed on the modified material was similar to AW-GC while the mode of hydroxyapatite deposition was changed. The growth of MG63 cells showed that modifying the AW-GC surface with lysine enhances the cell adhesion and proliferation.

  12. Spectroscopic properties of transparent Er-doped oxyfluoride glass-ceramics with GdF₃.

    PubMed

    Środa, Marcin; Szlósarczyk, Krzysztof; Różański, Marek; Sitarz, Maciej; Jeleń, Piotr

    2015-01-05

    Optically active glass-ceramics (GC) with the low-phonon phases of fluorides, doped with Er(3+) was studied. Glass based on SiO₂-Al₂O₃-Na₂F₂-Na₂O-GdF₃-BaO system was obtained. Dopant were introduced to the glass in an amount of 0.01 mol Er₂O₃ per 1 mol of glass. DTA/DSC study shows multi-stage crystallization. XRD identification of obtained phases did not confirm the presence of pure GdF₃ phase. Instead of that ceramization process led to formation of NaGdF₄ and BaGdF₅. The structural changes were studied using FT-IR spectroscopic method. The study of luminescence of the samples confirmed that optical properties of the obtained GC depend on crystallizing phases during ceramization. Time resolved spectroscopy of Er-doped glass showed the 3 and 8 times increase of lifetime of emission from (4)S₃/₂ and (4)F₉/₂ states, respectively. It confirms the erbium ions have ability to locate in the low phonon gadolinium-based crystallites. The results give possibility to obtain a new material for optoelectronic application.

  13. Development of a 100-gm-class inspector satellite using photostructurable glass/ceramic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Adam; Hansen, William W.; Janson, Siegfried W.; Helvajian, Henry

    2002-06-01

    A pulsed UV laser volumetric direct-write patterning technique has been used to fabricate the structural members and key fluidic distribution systems of a miniature 100 gm mass spacecraft called the Co-Orbital Satellite Assistant (COSA). A photostructurable glass ceramic material enables this photo-fabrication process. The COSA is a miniature space vehicle designed to assist its host ship by serving as a maneuverable external viewing platform. Using orbital dynamics simulation software, a minimum (Delta) V solution has been found that allows a COSA vehicle to eject from the host and maneuver into an observation orbit about the host vehicle. The result of the simulant show that a cold gas propulsion system can adequately support the mission given a total fuel volume of 5 cm3. A prototype COSA with dimensions of 50 X 50 X 50 mm has been fabricated and assembled for simulation experiments on an air table. The vehicle is fashioned out of 7 laser patterned wafers, electronics boards and a battery. The patterned wafers include an integrated 2-axis propulsion system, a fuel tank and a propellant distribution system. The electronics portion of the COSA vehicle includes a wireless communication system, 2 microcontrollers for system, 2 microcontrollers for system control and MEMS gyros for relative attitude determination. The COSA vehicle is designed to be mass producible and scalable.

  14. Inclusion of piroxicam in mesoporous phosphate glass-ceramic and evaluation of the physiochemical characteristics.

    PubMed

    Javadzadeh, Yousef; Bairami Atashgah, Rahimeh; Barzegar-Jalali, Mohammad; Soleimani, Farshad; Mohammadi, Ghobad; Sabzevari, Araz; Adibkia, Khosro

    2014-04-01

    The mesoporous glass-ceramic (GC) was employed as a carrier to investigate its capability for pharmaceutical applications. Piroxicam (PX) as a model drug was loaded in the GC by using of solvent evaporation technique. The physicochemical properties and morphology of the powders were evaluated employing X-ray powder diffractometry (XRPD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The drug adsorption isotherms were assessed as well. Drug release profiles were examined by fitting the data to the 10 common kinetic models. The specific surface area, Vm (the volume of the N2 adsorbed on the 1g of the GC when the monolayer is complete) and the average pore diameter of the GC powder before and after loading process were measured by the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) and Barrett-Joyner-Halenda (BJH) analysis benefiting N2 adsorption/desorption isotherms. The ideal loading of PX in the GC was 41.8%. The average pore diameter for the GC was determined to be about 10nm. The Freundlich model was found to be the best adsorption isotherm. Decrease of the GC specific surface area and Vm values were observed after loading process. Drug release data were best fitted to the Weibull model with the shape factor of 0.4-0.7 signifying the Fickian diffusion of PX from the GC. Accordingly, the GC could be considered as a suitable adsorbent to develop an oral drug delivery system.

  15. Nano-glass ceramic cathodes for Li+/Na+ mixed-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Wen; Zhang, Xudong; Jin, Chao; Wang, Yaoyao; Mossin, Susanne; Yue, Yuanzheng

    2017-02-01

    Electrode materials can display superior electrochemical performances and behavior via the nanoscale design. Here, the low-temperature synthesis of nano-glass ceramics (NGCs) is based on inheriting the network structure of yeast polyphosphate metabolism. The NGCs-3 sample synthesized with a molar ratio of Fe/V = 7:6 is composed of nano-domains of semiconducting oxide glass (Li2O-Na2O-Fe2O3-V2O5-P2O5, LNFVP), nanocrystalline particles (Li9Fe3P8O29, Li0.6V1.67O3.67 and VOPO4), and nanopores connected by interfaces. We have clarified the mixing ion transport mechanism and the electrochemical reactions, and the influences of molar ratio of Fe/V on the structure and electrochemical properties of NGCs. This nanoscale design offers a new possibility improved the electrochemical performances of Li+/Na+ mixed-ion batteries (LNMIBs). The NGCs-3 electrode exhibits a higher discharge capacity (145 mAh g-1) and energy storage density (525 Whkg-1) at 5C, and the capacity retention reaches 70% after 1000 cycles. More importantly, we have established a direct relationship between the electrochemical kinetics and nanostructure of NGC electrode materials.

  16. Liquid-assisted laser ablation of advanced ceramics and glass-ceramic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Giron, A.; Sola, D.; Peña, J. I.

    2016-02-01

    In this work, results obtained by laser ablation of advanced ceramics and glass-ceramic materials assisted by liquids are reported. A Q-switched Nd:YAG laser at its fundamental wavelength of 1064 nm with pulse-width in the nanosecond range was used to machine the materials, which were immersed in water and ethylene glycol. Variation in geometrical parameters, morphology, and ablation yields were studied by using the same laser working conditions. It was observed that machined depth and removed volume depended on the thermal, optical, and mechanical features of the processed materials as well as on the properties of the surrounding medium in which the laser processing was carried out. Variation in ablation yields was studied in function of the liquid used to assist the laser process and related to refractive index and viscosity. Material features and working conditions were also related to the obtained results in order to correlate ablation parameters with respect to the hardness of the processed materials.

  17. High strength composites evaluation. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Marten, S.M.

    1992-02-01

    A high-strength, thick-section, graphite/epoxy composite was identified. The purpose of this development effort was to evaluate candidate materials and provide LANL with engineering properties. Eight candidate materials (Samples 1000, 1100, 1200, 1300, 1400, 1500, 1600, and 1700) were chosen for evaluation. The Sample 1700 thermoplastic material was the strongest overall.

  18. High-strength mineralized collagen artificial bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Zhi-Ye; Tao, Chun-Sheng; Cui, Helen; Wang, Chang-Ming; Cui, Fu-Zhai

    2014-03-01

    Mineralized collagen (MC) is a biomimetic material that mimics natural bone matrix in terms of both chemical composition and microstructure. The biomimetic MC possesses good biocompatibility and osteogenic activity, and is capable of guiding bone regeneration as being used for bone defect repair. However, mechanical strength of existing MC artificial bone is too low to provide effective support at human load-bearing sites, so it can only be used for the repair at non-load-bearing sites, such as bone defect filling, bone graft augmentation, and so on. In the present study, a high strength MC artificial bone material was developed by using collagen as the template for the biomimetic mineralization of the calcium phosphate, and then followed by a cold compression molding process with a certain pressure. The appearance and density of the dense MC were similar to those of natural cortical bone, and the phase composition was in conformity with that of animal's cortical bone demonstrated by XRD. Mechanical properties were tested and results showed that the compressive strength was comparable to human cortical bone, while the compressive modulus was as low as human cancellous bone. Such high strength was able to provide effective mechanical support for bone defect repair at human load-bearing sites, and the low compressive modulus can help avoid stress shielding in the application of bone regeneration. Both in vitro cell experiments and in vivo implantation assay demonstrated good biocompatibility of the material, and in vivo stability evaluation indicated that this high-strength MC artificial bone could provide long-term effective mechanical support at human load-bearing sites.

  19. Making High-Tensile-Strength Amalgam Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, Richard

    2008-01-01

    Structural components made of amalgams can be made to have tensile strengths much greater than previously known to be possible. Amalgams, perhaps best known for their use in dental fillings, have several useful attributes, including room-temperature fabrication, corrosion resistance, dimensional stability, and high compressive strength. However, the range of applications of amalgams has been limited by their very small tensile strengths. Now, it has been discovered that the tensile strength of an amalgam depends critically on the sizes and shapes of the particles from which it is made and, consequently, the tensile strength can be greatly increased through suitable choice of the particles. Heretofore, the powder particles used to make amalgams have been, variously, in the form of micron-sized spheroids or flakes. The tensile reinforcement contributed by the spheroids and flakes is minimal because fracture paths simply go around these particles. However, if spheroids or flakes are replaced by strands having greater lengths, then tensile reinforcement can be increased significantly. The feasibility of this concept was shown in an experiment in which electrical copper wires, serving as demonstration substitutes for copper powder particles, were triturated with gallium by use of a mortar and pestle and the resulting amalgam was compressed into a mold. The tensile strength of the amalgam specimen was then measured and found to be greater than 10(exp 4) psi (greater than about 69 MPa). Much remains to be done to optimize the properties of amalgams for various applications through suitable choice of starting constituents and modification of the trituration and molding processes. The choice of wire size and composition are expected to be especially important. Perusal of phase diagrams of metal mixtures could give insight that would enable choices of solid and liquid metal constituents. Finally, whereas heretofore, only binary alloys have been considered for amalgams

  20. Up-conversion in sol-gel derived nano-glass-ceramics comprising NaYF 4 nano-crystals doped with Yb 3+, Ho 3+ and Tm 3+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santana-Alonso, A.; Méndez-Ramos, J.; Yanes, A. C.; del-Castillo, J.; Rodríguez, V. D.

    2010-07-01

    NaYF 4 is an excellent host material for rare-earth ions presenting very high efficiencies in up-conversion processes. Thus, nano-glass-ceramics containing NaYF 4 nano-crystals emerge as promising candidates for general lighting appliances and integrated optical devices. Here we report highly transparent sol-gel derived nano-glass-ceramics comprising Yb 3+-Ho 3+ and Yb 3+-Ho 3+-Tm 3+ co-doped NaYF 4 nano-crystals. A structural analysis by means of X-ray diffraction measurements confirmed the formation of NaYF 4 nano-crystals during thermal treatment. Luminescence features have been related to the crystallinity degree of the samples. Violet, blue, green and red up-conversion emissions were obtained under infrared excitation at 980 nm and corresponding mechanisms involved have been analysed. Additionally, the total visible up-conversion emission has been quantified in terms of the standard chromaticity coordinates. In particular, an overall colour emission, very close to the standard equal energy white-light illumination point of the chromaticity diagram, was obtained in the Yb 3+-Ho 3+-Tm 3+ triply-doped samples.

  1. High-Strength Bolt Corrosion Fatigue Life Model and Application

    PubMed Central

    Hui-li, Wang; Si-feng, Qin

    2014-01-01

    The corrosion fatigue performance of high-strength bolt was studied. Based on the fracture mechanics theory and the Gerberich-Chen formula, the high-strength bolt corrosion fracture crack model and the fatigue life model were established. The high-strength bolt crack depth and the fatigue life under corrosion environment were quantitatively analyzed. The factors affecting high-strength bolt corrosion fatigue life were discussed. The result showed that the high-strength bolt corrosion fracture biggest crack depth reduces along with the material yield strength and the applied stress increases. The material yield strength was the major factor. And the high-strength bolt corrosion fatigue life reduced along with the increase of material strength, the applied stress or stress amplitude. The stress amplitude influenced the most, and the material yield strength influenced the least. Low bolt strength and a low stress amplitude level could extend high-strength bolt corrosion fatigue life. PMID:25152916

  2. High-strength bolt corrosion fatigue life model and application.

    PubMed

    Hui-li, Wang; Si-feng, Qin

    2014-01-01

    The corrosion fatigue performance of high-strength bolt was studied. Based on the fracture mechanics theory and the Gerberich-Chen formula, the high-strength bolt corrosion fracture crack model and the fatigue life model were established. The high-strength bolt crack depth and the fatigue life under corrosion environment were quantitatively analyzed. The factors affecting high-strength bolt corrosion fatigue life were discussed. The result showed that the high-strength bolt corrosion fracture biggest crack depth reduces along with the material yield strength and the applied stress increases. The material yield strength was the major factor. And the high-strength bolt corrosion fatigue life reduced along with the increase of material strength, the applied stress or stress amplitude. The stress amplitude influenced the most, and the material yield strength influenced the least. Low bolt strength and a low stress amplitude level could extend high-strength bolt corrosion fatigue life.

  3. The Bendability of Ultra High strength Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazra, S. K.; Efthymiadis, P.; Alamoudi, A.; Kumar, R. L. V.; Shollock, B.; Dashwood, R.

    2016-08-01

    Automotive manufacturers have been reducing the weight of their vehicles to meet increasingly stringent environmental legislation that reflects public demand. A strategy is to use higher strength materials for parts with reduced cross-sections. However, such materials are less formable than traditional grades. The frequent result is increased processing and piece costs. 3D roll forming is a novel and flexible process: it is estimated that a quarter of the structure of a vehicle can be made with a single set of tooling. Unlike stamping, this process requires material with low work hardening rates. In this paper, we present results of ultra high strength steels that have low elongation in a tension but display high formability in bending through the suppression of the necking response.

  4. Bitter Patterns on Glass-Ceramic Magnetite: Links Among LEM States, Saturation Remanence, and Demagnetization Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muxworthy, A. R.; Williams, W.; Halgedahl, S. L.; Bollin, B.

    2003-12-01

    We have observed Bitter patterns on glass-ceramic magnetite particles in several states of magnetization induced at room temperature. Particle sizes range from 5 to 30 micrometers and most grains contain but a few (2-6) domains, placing them in the uppermost pseudosingle-domain to small multidomain ranges of size and behavior. Bitter patterns have been studied after the following treatments: (1) repeat demagnetizations in an alternating field (AF) with a peak amplitude of 500 Oe, (2) exposure to 25 kOe, resulting in saturation remanent magnetization (Mrs), (3) stepwise demagnetization of Mrs in back-fields of opposite polarity to the inducing field, and (4) stepwise AF demagnetization of Mrs. Similar to titanomagnetite and pyrrhotite, magnetite particles can occupy any one of a range of local energy minimum (LEM) domain states after each repeat AF treatment. However, the range of LEM states for most grains is quite narrow; for example, some grains fluctuate between only two states. Surprisingly, after AF demagnetization in a peak field of 500 Oe, some particles appear either to be saturated (no Bitter lines visible) or to contain only small, residual edge domains. Similar domain states also are observed when certain grains carry Mrs, and such saturated (or near-saturated) states can persist until demagnetization in hundreds of oersteds finally triggers nucleation of walls. The majority of particles do contain walls in states of Mrs. In these latter grains, both AF and back-field demagnetization drive three processes: wall motion, wall nucleation, and wall denucleation. Thus, remanence and demagnetization in small multidomain magnetite grains are not due to wall motion alone. Instead, these experiments suggest that, in magnetite, both the intensity of Mrs and the demagnetization of Mrs are crucially linked to LEM states and LEM-LEM transitions.

  5. Crystallisation in apatite-mullite glass-ceramics as a function of fluorine content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanton, Kenneth T.; Hill, Robert G.

    2005-02-01

    Apatite-mullite glass-ceramics are materials prepared by the controlled heat-induced devitrification of glasses of suitable composition and are under investigation for applications in dentistry and orthopaedics. The glasses used here are based on a system with the composition 1.5(5- x)SiO 2·(5- x)Al 2O 3·1.5P 2O 5·(5- x)CaO· xCaF 2. The amount of fluorine in the glasses was varied to investigate the crystallisation behaviour as a function of both fluorine content and temperature. The resultant crystalline phases are fluorapatite [Ca 10(PO 4) 6F 2], mullite [Al 6Si 2O 13] and in some cases, anorthite [CaAl 2Si 2O 8]. Crystal phases were identified using X-ray diffraction (XRD) from both the surface and the bulk of heat-treated monolithic samples and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to image the crystal phase morphologies. Crystallisation characteristics varied widely in terms of apparent nucleation mechanism, crystal phases formed and microstructure. In general, glasses with higher fluorine content devitrified more readily to fluorapatite (FAp) with a higher nucleation density and for glasses with an intermediate to low fluorine content there tended to be an interdependence between FAp and mullite crystallisation. A greater tendency towards anorthite formation, especially at surfaces, was observed for glasses with lower fluorine contents. Furthermore, on decreasing the fluorine content, glasses tended to crystallise by formation of FAp spherulites with increasing diameter and with greater crystal aspect ratio.

  6. Different effects of a novel CaO-MgO-SiO₂-based multiphase glass-ceramic on cell behaviors of normal and cancer cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mengjiao; Chen, Xianchun; Pu, Ximing; Liao, Xiaoming; Huang, Zhongbing; Yin, Guangfu

    2014-04-01

    The effects in vitro of a novel multiphase glass-ceramic (with nominal composition of 43.19% CaO, 7.68% MgO, and 49.13% SiO2 in weight percent) on cell adhesion, proliferation, differentiation and ultrastructure of human osteosarcoma cell line MG63, mouse fibroblasts L929, and human lung adenocarcinoma epithelial cell line A549 were investigated in this research. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) micrographs revealed that the surface morphology of this glass-ceramic was beneficial to cell adhesion. The glass-ceramic extracts at certain concentrations could stimulate the proliferation and differentiation of MG63 and L929 cells, whereas inhibit A549 proliferation, which might be resulted from the released Si ions. In addition, when cultured with 0.1mg/mL glass-ceramic powder suspension, the cell ultrastructure of MG63 showed abundant organelles and L929 displayed the phenomena of cellular stress response. While more interestingly, A549 exhibited chromatin condensation, mitochondria swell and RER expansion, which was presumed to be early signs of apoptosis. These results suggest that this novel CaO-MgO-SiO2-based multiphase glass-ceramic has potential for bone regeneration and tissue engineering applications.

  7. Effect of various additives on microstructure, mechanical properties, and in vitro bioactivity of sodium oxide-calcium oxide-silica-phosphorus pentoxide glass-ceramics.

    PubMed

    Li, H C; Wang, D G; Hu, J H; Chen, C Z

    2013-09-01

    The partial substitution of MgO, TiO2, or CaF2 for CaO in the Na2O-CaO-SiO2-P2O5 (45S5) system was conducted by the sol-gel method and a comparative study on structural, mechanical properties, and bioactivity of the glasses was reported. Based on thermogravimetric and differential thermal analysis, the gels were sintered with a suitable heat treatment procedure. The glass-ceramic properties were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS) and so on, and the bioactivity of the glass-ceramic was evaluated by in vitro assays in simulated body fluid (SBF). Results indicate that with the partial substitution of MgO, TiO2, CaF2 for CaO in glass composition, the mechanical properties of the glass-ceramics have been significantly improved. Furthermore, CaF2 promotes glass crystallization and the crystallization does not inhibit the glass-ceramic bioactivity. All samples possess bioactivity; however, the bioactivity of these glass-ceramics is quite different. Compared with 45S5, the introduction of MgO decreases the ability of apatite induction. The addition of TiO2 does not significantly improve the bioactivity, and the replacement of CaO by CaF2 shows a higher bioactivity.

  8. Spectroscopic features of copper ions in multi-component Na2Osbnd PbOsbnd Bi2O3sbnd SiO2 glass ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sambasiva Rao, M. V.; Suresh, S.; Narendrudu, T.; Suneel Kumar, A.; Chinna Ram, G.; Krishna Rao, D.

    2016-12-01

    Multi-component Na2Osbnd PbOsbnd Bi2O3sbnd SiO2 glasses were crystallised with different CuO contents (0-1 mol % in steps of 0.2) as nucleating agent. These glass ceramics were characterized by XRD, SEM and DTA techniques and indicated the samples contain well defined and randomly distributed grains of different crystalline phases. Spectroscopic studies viz., optical absorption, EPR, FTIR and Raman were also carried out on these glass ceramics. The broad absorption band observed in the wavelength region 550-1000 nm in these glass ceramics and is the characteristic of Cu2+ ions. Optical absorption and EPR studies suggest that Cu2+ ions enter into the lattice as tetragonally distorted octahedral symmetry for which the bonding parameters were evaluated. FTIR and Raman spectra give important information about the nature of various structural units in the glass ceramic matrix. The analysis of these spectroscopic investigations reveals that with increase in the concentration of nucleating agent CuO, copper ions exist in Cu2+ state they act as modifiers and increases the degree of disorder in the glass ceramic network.

  9. Biocompatibility property of 100% strontium-substituted SiO2 -Al2 O3 -P2 O5 -CaO-CaF2 glass ceramics over 26 weeks implantation in rabbit model: Histology and micro-Computed Tomography analysis.

    PubMed

    Basu, Bikramjit; Sabareeswaran, A; Shenoy, S J

    2015-08-01

    One of the desired properties for any new biomaterial composition is its long-term stability in a suitable animal model and such property cannot be appropriately assessed by performing short-term implantation studies. While hydroxyapatite (HA) or bioglass coated metallic biomaterials are being investigated for in vivo biocompatibility properties, such study is not extensively being pursued for bulk glass ceramics. In view of their inherent brittle nature, the implant stability as well as impact of long-term release of metallic ions on bone regeneration have been a major concern. In this perspective, the present article reports the results of the in vivo implantation experiments carried out using 100% strontium (Sr)-substituted glass ceramics with the nominal composition of 4.5 SiO2 -3Al2 O3 -1.5P2 O5 -3SrO-2SrF2 for 26 weeks in cylindrical bone defects in rabbit model. The combination of histological and micro-computed tomography analysis provided a qualitative and quantitative understanding of the bone regeneration around the glass ceramic implants in comparison to the highly bioactive HA bioglass implants (control). The sequential polychrome labeling of bone during in vivo osseointegration using three fluorochromes followed by fluorescence microscopy observation confirmed homogeneous bone formation around the test implants. The results of the present study unequivocally confirm the long-term implant stability as well as osteoconductive property of 100% Sr-substituted glass ceramics, which is comparable to that of a known bioactive implant, that is, HA-based bioglass.

  10. Hydrogen trapping in high-strength steels

    SciTech Connect

    Pound, B.G.

    1998-10-09

    Hydrogen trapping in three high-strength steels -- AerMet 100 and AISI 4340 and H11 -- was studied using a potentiostatic pulse technique. Irreversible trapping constants (k) and hydrogen entry fluxes were determined for these alloys in 1 mol/1 acetic acid/1 mol/1 sodium acetate. The order of the k values for the three steels and two 18Ni maraging steels previously studies inversely parallels their threshold stress intensities for stress corrosion cracking (K{sub 1SCC}). Irreversible trapping in AerMet 100 varies with aging temperature and appears to depend on the type of carbide (Fe{sub 3}C or M{sub 2}C) present. For 4340 steel, k can be correlated with K{sub 1SCC} over a range of yield strengths. The change in k is consistent with a change in the principal type of irreversible trap from matrix boundaries to incoherent Fe{sub 3}C. The principal irreversible traps in H11 at high yield strengths are thought to be similar to those in 4340 steel.

  11. The effect of colouring agent on the physical properties of glass ceramic produced from waste glass for antimicrobial coating deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juoi, J. M.; Ayoob, N. F.; Rosli, Z. M.; Rosli, N. R.; Husain, K.

    2016-07-01

    Domestic waste glass is utilized as raw material for the production of glass ceramic material (GCM) via sinter crystallisation route. The glass ceramic material in a form of tiles is to be utilized for the deposition of Ag-TiO2 antimicrobial coating. Two types of soda lime glass (SLG) that are non-coloured and green SLG are utilised as main raw materials during the batch formulation in order to study the effect of colouring agent (Fe2O3) on the physical and mechanical properties of glass ceramic produced. Glass powder were prepared by crushing bottles using hammer milled with milling machine and sieved until they passed through 75 µm sieve. The process continues by mixing glass powder with ball clay with ratio of 95:5 wt. %, 90:10 wt. % and 85:15 wt. %. Each batch mixture was then uniaxial pressed and sintered at 800°C, 825 °C and 850 °C. The physical and mechanical properties were then determined and compared between those produced from non-coloured and green coloured SLG in order to evaluate the effect of colouring agent (Fe2O3) on the GCM produced. The optimum properties of non-coloured SLG is produced with smaller ball clay content (10 wt. %) compared to green SLG (15 wt. %). The physical properties (determined thru ASTM C373) of the optimized GCM produced from non-coloured SLG and green SLG are 0.69 % of porosity, 1.92 g/cm3 of bulk density, 0.36 % of water absorption; and 1.96 % of porosity, 2.69 g/cm3 of bulk density, 0.73 % of water absorption; respectively. Results also indicate that the most suitable temperature in producing GCM from both glasses with optimized physical and mechanical properties is at 850 °C.

  12. Long-term conversion of 45S5 bioactive glass-ceramic microspheres in aqueous phosphate solution.

    PubMed

    Fu, Hailuo; Rahaman, Mohamed N; Day, Delbert E; Huang, Wenhai

    2012-05-01

    The conversion of 45S5 glass and glass-ceramics to a hydroxyapatite (HA)-like material in vitro has been studied extensively, but only for short reaction times (typically <3 months). In this paper, we report for the first time on the long-term conversion of 45S5 glass-ceramic microspheres (designated 45S5c) in an aqueous phosphate solution. Microspheres of 45S5c (75-150 μm) were immersed for 10 years at room temperature (~25 °C) in K(2)HPO(4) solution with a concentration of 0.01 M or 1.0 M, and with a starting pH of 7.0 or 9.5. The reacted 45S5c microspheres and solutions were analyzed using structural and analytical techniques. Only 25-45 vol% of the 45S5c microspheres were converted to an HA-like material after the 10 year reaction. In solutions with a starting pH of 9.5, an increase in the K(2)HPO(4) concentration from 0.01 to 1.0 M resulted in a doubling of the volume of the microspheres converted to an HA-like material but had little effect on the composition of the HA-like product. In comparison, reaction of the 45S5c microspheres in the solution with a starting pH of 7.0 resulted in an HA-like product in the 0.01 M K(2)HPO(4) solution but a calcium pyrophosphate product, Ca(10)K(4)(P(2)O(7))(6).9H(2)O, in the 1.0 M solution. The consequences of these results for the long-term use of 45S5 glass-ceramics in biomedical applications are discussed.

  13. High-strength iron aluminide alloys

    SciTech Connect

    McKamey, C.G.; Maziasz, P.J.

    1996-06-01

    Past studies have shown that binary Fe{sub 3}Al possesses low creep-rupture strength compared to many other alloys, with creep-rupture lives of less than 5 h being reported for tests conducted at 593{degrees}C and 207 MPa. The combination of poor creep resistance and low room-temperature tensile ductility due to a susceptibility to environmentally-induced dynamic hydrogen embrittlement has limited use of these alloys for structural applications despite their excellent corrosion properties. With regard to the ductility problem, alloy development efforts have produced significant improvements, with ductilities of 10-20% and tensile yield strengths as high as 500 MPa being reported. Likewise, initial improvements in creep resistance have been realized through small additions of Mo, Nb, and Zr.

  14. HIGH STRENGTH CONTROL RODS FOR NEUTRONIC REACTORS

    DOEpatents

    Lustman, B.; Losco, E.F.; Cohen, I.

    1961-07-11

    Nuclear reactor control rods comprised of highly compressed and sintered finely divided metal alloy panticles and fine metal oxide panticles substantially uniformly distributed theretbrough are described. The metal alloy consists essentially of silver, indium, cadmium, tin, and aluminum, the amount of each being present in centain percentages by weight. The oxide particles are metal oxides of the metal alloy composition, the amount of oxygen being present in certain percentages by weight and all the oxygen present being substantially in the form of metal oxide. This control rod is characterized by its high strength and resistance to creep at elevated temperatures.

  15. Three-photon near-infrared quantum cutting in Tm{sup 3+}-doped transparent oxyfluoride glass ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, D. C.; Zhang, J. P.; Chen, Q. J.; Zhang, W. J.; Yang, Z. M.; Zhang, Q. Y.

    2012-10-22

    Efficient three-step sequential three-photon near-infrared (NIR) quantum cutting in Tm{sup 3+}-doped transparent oxyfluoride glass ceramics has been demonstrated, where an absorbed blue photon could be cut into three NIR photons at 1190, 1460, and 1800 nm with quantum yield greater than unity. On the basis of static and dynamic photoemission, monitored excitation, and time-resolved fluorescence spectra, we investigate in detail the underlying optoelectronic mechanism. Further development of an efficient triply-cutting material might open up a path towards ultra-efficient photonic devices, which enables more photons emitted than absorbed in the excitation process.

  16. Structural deformations on fluorophlogopite crystals of a pre-heated and experimentally shocked mica glass-ceramic

    SciTech Connect

    Hiltl, M.; Hornemann, U.

    1998-07-10

    Shock experiments with the reflection method were carried out at room (T{sub room})- and pre-shock (T{sub pre}) temperatures of 300 and 600 deg. C at pressures ranging from 30 to 75 GPa to investigate the structural deformation on fluorophlogopite (KMg{sub 3}(Si{sub 3}AlO{sub 10})F{sub 2}) crystals of the Macor glass-ceramic. The recovered samples were examined by means of X-ray diffraction, SEM and TEM with respect to their microstructure. The examination shows that with increasing shock pressures and temperatures the crystals loose their morphology and undergo a transition into an amorphous state.

  17. Fabrication, photoluminescence, and potential application in white light emitting diode of Dy3+-Tm3+ doped transparent glass ceramics containing GdSr2F7 nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X. F.; Yan, X. H.; Bu, Y. Y.; Zhen, J.; Xuan, Y.

    2013-08-01

    Dy3+-Tm3+ doped transparent glass ceramics containing GdSr2F7 nanocrystals were fabricated successfully by a melt-quenching method and subsequent heating. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy analyses show that tetragonal GdSr2F7 nanocrystals are homogeneously precipitated among the borosilicate glass matrix. If excited with 354 nm UV light, the photoluminescence spectrum of Dy3+ single-doped transparent glass ceramics shows white-light emission. With doping of Tm3+, the overall emission color of Tm3+-Dy3+ co-doped transparent glass ceramics can be tuned from white to blue through energy transfer between Dy3+ and Tm3+. CIE chromaticity and color temperature measurements show that the resulting TGCS may be a candidate as a white LED material pumped by a UV InGaN chip.

  18. Preparation and properties of Nd3+:SrAlF5 nanocrystals embedded fluorophosphate transparent glass-ceramic with long fluorescence lifetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Ruilin; Wang, Jinlong; Zhang, Liaolin; Liu, Chunxiao; Wei, Wei

    2016-07-01

    Nd3+:SrAlF5 nanocrystals embedded fluorophosphate glass-ceramics were prepared by the melt quenching and subsequent thermal treatment method. The formation of SrAlF5 nanocrystals in the glass was confirmed by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscope. The fluorescence intensity and lifetime of the glass-ceramics increased with the increase of size of nanocrystals. Importantly, by controlling growth of nanocrystals, an obvious enhancement of lifetime (725 μs) emerged in the glass-ceramics heat-treated at 510 °C and the transmittance can reach to 72.2 % at 1049 nm. The enhanced fluorescence intensity and lifetime were ascribed to the comfortable local environment to the Nd3+ ion and scattering of the nanoparticle embedded into the glass matrix.

  19. High-strength iron aluminide alloys

    SciTech Connect

    McKamey, C.G.; Marrero-Santos, Y.; Maziasz, P.J.

    1995-06-01

    Past studies have shown that binary Fe{sub 3}Al possesses low creep-rupture strength compared to many other alloys, with creep-rupture lives of less than 5 h being reported for tests conducted at 593{degrees}C and 207 MPa. The combination of poor creep resistance and low room-temperature tensile density due to a susceptibility to environmentally-induced dynamic hydrogen embrittlement has limited use of these alloys for structural applications, despite their excellent corrosion properties. Improvements in room temperature tensile ductility have been realized mainly through alloying effects, changes in thermomechanical processing to control microstructure, and by control of the specimen`s surface condition. Ductilities of 10-20% and tensile yield strengths as high as 500 MPa have been reported. In terms of creep-rupture strength, small additions of Mo, Nb, and Zr have produced significant improvements, but at the expense of weldability and room-temperature tensile ductility. Recently an alloy containing these additions, designated FA-180, was shown to exhibit a creep-rupture life of over 2000 h after a heat treatment of 1 h at 1150{degrees}C. This study presents the results of creep-rupture tests at various test temperatures and stresses and discusses the results as part of our effort to understand the strengthening mechanisms involved with heat treatment at 1150{degrees}C.

  20. Protective claddings for high strength chromium alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, J. F.

    1971-01-01

    The application of a Cr-Y-Hf-Th alloy as a protective cladding for a high strength chromium alloy was investigated for its effectiveness in inhibiting nitrogen embrittlement of a core alloy. Cladding was accomplished by a combination of hot gas pressure bonding and roll cladding techniques. Based on bend DBTT, the cladding alloy was effective in inhibiting nitrogen embrittlement of the chromium core alloy for up to 720 ks (200hours) in air at 1422 K (2100 F). A significant increase in the bend DBTT occurred with longer time exposures at 1422 K or short time exposures at 1589 K (2400 F).

  1. Optical Property Requirements for Glasses, Ceramics and Plastics in Spacecraft Window Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estes, Lynda

    2011-01-01

    This is a preliminary draft of a standard published by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Johnson Space Center (JSC) that is intended to provide uniform window optical design requirements in support of the development of human-rated spaceflight hardware. The material covered in this standard is based on data from extensive testing by the Advanced Sensing and Optical Measurement Branch at NASA Langley Research Center, and compiled into requirements format by the NASA JSC Structural Engineering Division. At the time of this initial document release, a broader technical community has not reviewed this standard. The technical content of this standard is primarily based on the Constellation Program Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle Window Optical Properties Requirements, CxP 72407, Baseline. Unlike other optical requirements documents available for human rated spacecraft, this document includes requirements that ensure functionality for windows that contain glass/ceramic and/or plastic window substrate materials. These requirements were derived by measuring the optical properties of fused silica and aluminosilicate glass window assemblies and ensuring that the performance of any window assembly that includes a plastic pane or panes will meet the performance level of the all-glass assemblies. The resulting requirements are based upon the performance and parameter metrology testing of a variety of materials, including glass, transparent ceramics, acrylics, and polycarbonates. In general, these requirements are minimum specifications for each optical parameter in order to achieve the function specified for each functional category, A through D. Because acrylic materials perform at a higher level than polycarbonates in the optics regime, and CxP/Orion is planning to use acrylic in the Orion spacecraft, these requirements are based heavily on metrology from that material. As a result, two of the current Category D requirements for plastics are cited in

  2. Equivalent thermal history reconstruction from a partially crystallized glass-ceramic sensor array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heeg, Bauke

    2015-11-01

    The basic concept of a thermal history sensor is that it records the accumulated exposure to some unknown, typically varying temperature profile for a certain amount of time. Such a sensor is considered to be capable of measuring the duration of several (N) temperature intervals. For this purpose, the sensor deploys multiple (M) sensing elements, each with different temperature sensitivity. At the end of some thermal exposure for a known period of time, the sensor array is read-out and an estimate is made of the set of N durations of the different temperature ranges. A potential implementation of such a sensor was pioneered by Fair et al. [Sens. Actuators, A 141, 245 (2008)], based on glass-ceramic materials with different temperature-dependent crystallization dynamics. In their work, it was demonstrated that an array of sensor elements can be made sensitive to slight differences in temperature history. Further, a forward crystallization model was used to simulate the variations in sensor array response to differences in the temperature history. The current paper focusses on the inverse aspect of temperature history reconstruction from a hypothetical sensor array output. The goal of such a reconstruction is to find an equivalent thermal history that is the closest representation of the true thermal history, i.e., the durations of a set of temperature intervals that result in a set of fractional crystallization values which is closest to the one resulting from the true thermal history. One particular useful simplification in both the sensor model as well as in its practical implementation is the omission of nucleation effects. In that case, least squares models can be used to approximate the sensor response and make reconstruction estimates. Even with this simplification, sensor noise can have a destabilizing effect on possible reconstruction solutions, which is evaluated using simulations. Both regularization and non-negativity constrained least squares

  3. Optimizing header strength utilizing finite element analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burchett, S. N.

    Finite element techniques have been successfully applied as a design tool in the optimization of high strength headers for pyrotechnic-driven actuators. These techniques have been applied to three aspects of the design process of a high strength header. The design process was a joint effort of experts from several disciplines including design engineers, material scientists, test engineers, manufacturing engineers, and structural analysts. Following material selection, finite element techniques were applied to evaluate the residual stresses due to manufacturing which were developed in the high strength glass ceramic-to-metal seal headers. Results from these finite element analyses were used to identify header designs which were manufacturable and had a minimum residual stress state. Finite element techniques were than applied to obtain the response of the header due to pyrotechnic burn. The results provided realistic upper bounds on the pressure containment ability of various preliminary header designs and provided a quick and inexpensive method of strengthening and refining the designs. Since testing of the headers was difficult and sometimes destructive, results of the analyses were also used to interpret test results and identify failure modes. In this paper, details of the finite element element techniques including the models used, material properties, material failure models, and loading will be presented. Results from the analyses showing the header failure process will also be presented. This paper will show that significant gains in capability and understanding can result when finite element techniques are included as an integral part of the design process of complicated high strength headers.

  4. Transitioning glass-ceramic scintillators for diagnostic x-ray imaging from the laboratory to commercial scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckert, M. Brooke; Gallego, Sabrina; Elder, Eric; Nadler, Jason

    2016-10-01

    This study sought to mitigate risk in transitioning newly developed glass-ceramic scintillator technology from a laboratory concept to commercial product by identifying the most significant hurdles to increased scale. These included selection of cost effective raw material sources, investigation of process parameters with the most significant impact on performance, and synthesis steps that could see the greatest benefit from participation of an industry partner that specializes in glass or optical component manufacturing. Efforts focused on enhancing the performance of glass-ceramic nanocomposite scintillators developed specifically for medical imaging via composition and process modifications that ensured efficient capture of incident X-ray energy and emission of scintillation light. The use of cost effective raw materials and existing manufacturing methods demonstrated proof-of-concept for economical viable alternatives to existing benchmark materials, as well as possible disruptive applications afforded by novel geometries and comparatively lower cost per volume. The authors now seek the expertise of industry to effectively navigate the transition from laboratory demonstrations to pilot scale production and testing to evince the industry of the viability and usefulness of composite-based scintillators.

  5. Energy transfer kinetics in oxy-fluoride glass and glass-ceramics doped with rare-earth ions

    SciTech Connect

    Sontakke, Atul D.; Annapurna, K.

    2012-07-01

    An investigation of donor-acceptor energy transfer kinetics in dual rare earths doped precursor oxy-fluoride glass and its glass-ceramics containing NaYF{sub 4} nano-crystals is reported here, using three different donor-acceptor ion combinations such as Nd-Yb, Yb-Dy, and Nd-Dy. The precipitation of NaYF{sub 4} nano-crystals in host glass matrix under controlled post heat treatment of precursor oxy-fluoride glasses has been confirmed from XRD, FESEM, and transmission electron microscope (TEM) analysis. Further, the incorporation of dopant ions inside fluoride nano-crystals has been established through optical absorption and TEM-EDX analysis. The noticed decreasing trend in donor to acceptor energy transfer efficiency from precursor glass to glass-ceramics in all three combinations have been explained based on the structural rearrangements that occurred during the heat treatment process. The reduced coupling phonon energy for the dopant ions due to fluoride environment and its influence on the overall phonon assisted contribution in energy transfer process has been illustrated. Additionally, realization of a correlated distribution of dopant ions causing clustering inside nano-crystals has also been reported.

  6. Analysis of A.W glass-ceramic surface by micro-beam x-ray diffraction.

    PubMed

    Kitsugi, T; Yamamuro, T; Kokubo, T

    1990-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the formation of hydroxyapatite on the surface of glass-ceramics (chemical composition: SiO2, 34.2; P2O5, 16.3; CaO, 44.9; MgO, 4.6; CaF2, 0.5 in weight ratio). Two experiments were performed. In the first experiment, plates (2 x 25 x 25 mm) of glass-ceramics containing apatite-wollastonite (designated A.W-GC) were used. In the second experiment, plates (15 x 10 x 2 mm) of A.W-GC and its parent glass (designated G) were used. In each experiment, two paired specimens of identical material, one tied with silk thread, the other not tied, were implanted subcutaneously into rats. In both experiments, bonding to each other of both tied and untied specimens was observed one month after implantation. A pattern resembling hydroxyapatite was identified on the detached surface of the bonded A.W-GC by micro-beam x-ray diffraction. The weak crystalline pattern was also observed on the detached surface of bonded G samples. Analysis of the interface by SEM-EPMA showed that a calcium-phosphorus rich layer formed between the two bonded surfaces in both experiments. It is suggested that the bonding between the two materials was formed by the calcium-phosphorus rich layer, and that the calcium-phosphorus rich layer is virtually identical to hydroxyapatite.

  7. Histopathological, Histomorphometrical, and Radiographical Evaluation of Injectable Glass-Ceramic-Chitosan Nanocomposite in Bone Reconstruction of Rat

    PubMed Central

    Seyedmajidi, Maryam; Rabiee, Seyedmahmood; Haghanifar, Sina; Seyedmajidi, Seyedkamal; Jorsaraei, Seyed Gholam ali; Alaghehmand, Homayoun; Jamaatlu, Naghmeh; Bijani, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Background. Bone defects following tumor resection and osteolysis due to bone lesions, periodontal tissue disorders, and bone reconstruction are challenges that surgeons face. Gass-ceramic-chitosan nanocomposite contains chitosan, a derivative of crustaceans' exoskeleton. Methods. Thirty-two 6–8-week-old male Wistar rats were chosen. One hole on each right and left tibia was made. The right tibia holes were filled with injectable glass-ceramic-chitosan nanocomposite, and the left tibia holes were left empty. After 7, 14, 28, and 60 days, histopathological, histomorphometrical, and radiographical assessments were performed. Results. Radiographic density on days 7 and 14 was significantly higher in the right tibias than in the left tibias. Trabecular bone thickness, which was higher in the right tibias, increased from day 7 to day 60 in both right and left tibias, although not significantly. Conclusions. Glass-ceramic-chitosan nanocomposite is suggested for use in bone repair in cases of bone loss. More histopathological, histomorphometrical, and radiographical assessments are also recommended. PMID:25737725

  8. Effect of P2O5 and MnO2 on crystallization of magnetic glass ceramics

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Hameed, Salwa A.M.; Marzouk, Mohamed A.; Farag, Mohamed M.

    2013-01-01

    This work pointed out the effect of adding P2O5 and/or MnO2 on the crystallization behavior of magnetic glass ceramic in the system Fe2O3·ZnO·CaO·SiO2·B2O3. The differential thermal analysis of the quenched samples revealed decrease in the thermal effects by adding P2O5 and/or MnO2 to the base sample. The X-ray diffraction patterns show the development of nanometric magnetite crystals in a glassy matrix. Heat treatment at 800 °C for 2 h, under reducing atmosphere, caused an increase in the amount of the crystallized magnetite with the appearance of minor hematite and Ca2SiO4. The transmission electron microscope revealed a crystallite size in the range 10–30 nm. Magnetic hysteresis cycles were analyzed with a maximum applied field of 25 kOe at room temperature. The prepared magnetic glass ceramics are expected to be useful for localized treatment of cancer. PMID:25685522

  9. Analysis of nanostructure and nanochemistry by ASAXS: Accessing phase composition of oxyfluoride glass ceramics doped with Er3+/Yb3+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haas, Sylvio; Hoell, Armin; Wurth, Roman; Rüssel, Christian; Boesecke, Peter; Vainio, Ulla

    2010-05-01

    Here, we describe the analysis of the nanostructure and average chemical compositions of each phase present in an oxyfluoride glass ceramic, which is composed of fluoride nanocrystals and an oxide glass matrix. The overall composition of the oxyfluoride glass ceramic as prepared is 21.1%SiO26.5%B2O37.0%Al2O321.0%PbF214.3%CdF211.0%YbF30.5%ErF311.0%PbO7.6%CdO(mole%) . Nanocrystals begin to grow at temperatures above the glass transformation temperature at 678 K as observed by x-ray diffraction. We report results from anomalous small-angle x-ray scattering taken at energies of x-ray absorption edges of Er, Yb, Pb, and Cd. By nonlinear regression of the scattering curves obtained from different edges simultaneously, the nanocrystals were found to be describable as polydisperse spheroids. The length of the smaller axis was found to be 6.4±1.4nm while the larger axis was found to be 17.7±3.9nm . By analyzing the scattering contrast as a function of the x-ray energy we found cadmium only in the glass matrix.

  10. A Study on Nucleation, Crystallization Kinetics, Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Ru-Bi Partial Substituted BSCCO Glass Ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tasci, Ahmet Tolga; Ozturk, Ozgur; Gokcen, Tugba; Cavdar, Sukru; Koralay, Haluk; Senol, Abdulkadir

    2015-03-01

    This study deals with, the effects of Ru-Bi partial substitutions on the thermal, structural and mechanical properties of Bi1 . 8 - xRuxPb0.2Sr2CaCu2O10+δ (x =0.0, 0.025, 0.050, 0.075), produced with glass-ceramics method have been investigated. The effects of Ru-Bi Partial substitutions on glass transition, nucleation and crystallization temperature are analyzed by differential thermal analyzer (DTA). Furthermore, micro-structure and micro-mechanical properties of Ru-Bi partial substituted BSCCO glass ceramics have been investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Vickers microhardness measurements. From the DTA results, nucleation kinetics have been obtained by using Ozawa, Augis-Bennett, Takher and Kissinger equations. Also activation energies and Avrami parameters have been found. Oxidation amount is seen to be increased with increasing Ru concentration in consequence of thermogravimetric analyses results. Moreover, Lattice parameters, volume fractions and surface morphologies of the samples are obtained from XRD and SEM measurements, respectively.

  11. Structure, crystallization and dielectric resonances in 2-13 GHz of waste-derived glass-ceramic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Rui; Liao, SongYi; Chen, XiaoYu; Wang, GuangRong; Zheng, Feng

    2016-12-01

    Structure, kinetics of crystallization, and dielectric resonances of waste-derived glass-ceramic prepared via quench-heating route were studied as a function of dosage of iron ore tailing (IOT) within 20-40 wt% using X-ray diffraction (XRD), fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and vector network analyzer (VNA) measurements. The glass-ceramic mainly consisted of ferrite crystals embedded in borosilicate glass matrix. Crystallization kinetics and morphologies of ferrite crystals as well as coordination transformation of boron between [BO4] and [BO3] in glass network were adjustable by changing the amount of IOT. Dielectric resonances in 6-13 GHz were found to be dominated by oscillations of Ca2+ cations in glass network with [SiO4] units on their neighboring sites. Ni2+ ions made a small contribution to those resonances. Diopside formed when IOT exceeded 35 wt%, which led to weakening of the resonances.

  12. Mössbauer spectroscopy of europium-doped fluorochlorozirconate glasses and glass ceramics: optimization of storage phosphors in computed radiography.

    PubMed

    Pfau, C; Paßlick, C; Gray, S K; Johnson, J A; Johnson, C E; Schweizer, S

    2013-05-22

    Eu(2+)-doped fluorochlorozirconate (FCZ) glasses and glass ceramics, which are being developed for medical and photovoltaic applications, have been analysed by Mössbauer spectroscopy. The oxidation state and chemical environment of the europium ions, which are important for the performance of these materials, were investigated. Routes for maximizing the divalent europium content were also investigated. By using EuCl2 instead of EuF2 in the starting material a fraction of about 90% of the europium was maintained in the Eu(2+) state as opposed to about 70% when using EuF2. The glass ceramics produced by subsequent thermal processing contain BaCl2 nanocrystals in which Eu(2+) is incorporated, as shown by the narrower linewidth in the Mössbauer spectrum. Debye temperatures of 147 K and 186 K for Eu(2+) and Eu(3+), respectively, were determined from temperature dependent Mössbauer measurements. The f-factors were used to obtain the Eu(2+)/Eu(3+) ratio from the area ratio of the corresponding absorption lines.

  13. Synthesis of nano-bioactive glass-ceramic powders and its in vitro bioactivity study in bovine serum albumin protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabian, Nima; Jahanshahi, Mohsen; Rabiee, Sayed Mahmood

    2011-07-01

    Bioactive glasses and ceramics have proved to be able to chemically bond to living bone due to the formation of an apatite-like layer on its surface. The aim of this work was preparation and characterization of bioactive glass-ceramic by sol-gel method. Nano-bioglass-ceramic material was crushed into powder and its bioactivity was examined in vitro with respect to the ability of hydroxyapatite layer to form on the surface as a result of contact with bovine serum albumin (BSA) protein. The obtained nano-bioactive glass-ceramic was analyzed before and after contact with BSA solution. This study used scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis to examine its morphology, crystallinity and composition. The TEM images showed that the NBG particles size were 10-40 nm. Bioactivity of nanopowder was confirmed by SEM and XRD due to the presence of a rich bone-like apatite layer. Therefore, this nano-BSA-bioglass-ceramic composite material is promising for medical applications such as bone substitutes and drug carriers.

  14. The effect of a novel crystallised bioactive glass-ceramic powder on dentine hypersensitivity: a long-term clinical study.

    PubMed

    Tirapelli, C; Panzeri, H; Lara, E H G; Soares, R G; Peitl, O; Zanotto, E D

    2011-04-01

    The aim of this comparative clinical study was to evaluate a novel bioactive glass-ceramic (Biosilicate® 1-20 μm particles) to treat dentine hypersensitivity (DH). Volunteers (n = 120 patients/ 230 teeth) received the following treatments: G1-Sensodyne® , G2-SensiKill®, G3-Biosilicate® incorporated in a 1% water-free-gel and G4-Biosilicate® mixed with distilled water at 1:10 ratio. G1 and G3 were applied at home, daily for 30 days; G2 and G4 were applied once a week by a dentist (four applications). A visual analogue scale (VAS) was employed to evaluate pain for each quadrant in one sensitive tooth at baseline, weekly during treatment and during a 6-month follow-up period. Dentine hypersensitivity values (G1/n= 52), (G2/n =62), (G3/n = 59) and (G4/n = 59) were analysed with Kruskal-Wallis/Dunn tests. All the products were efficient in reducing DH after 4 weeks. Among the four materials tested, G4 demonstrated the best clinical performance and provided the fastest treatment to reduce DH pain. Distilled water proved to be an adequate vehicle to disperse Biosilicate®. Low DH scores were maintained during the 6-month follow-up period. The hypothesis that the novel bioactive glass-ceramic may be an efficient treatment for DH was confirmed.

  15. Glass and Glass-Ceramic Materials from Simulated Composition of Lunar and Martian Soils: Selected Properties and Potential Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, C. S.; Sen, S.; Reis, S. T.; Kim, C. W.

    2005-01-01

    In-situ resource processing and utilization on planetary bodies is an important and integral part of NASA's space exploration program. Within this scope and context, our general effort is primarily aimed at developing glass and glass-ceramic type materials using lunar and martian soils, and exploring various applications of these materials for planetary surface operations. Our preliminary work to date have demonstrated that glasses can be successfully prepared from melts of the simulated composition of both lunar and martian soils, and the melts have a viscosity-temperature window appropriate for drawing continuous glass fibers. The glasses are shown to have the potential for immobilizing certain types of nuclear wastes without deteriorating their chemical durability and thermal stability. This has a direct impact on successfully and economically disposing nuclear waste generated from a nuclear power plant on a planetary surface. In addition, these materials display characteristics that can be manipulated using appropriate processing protocols to develop glassy or glass-ceramic magnets. Also discussed in this presentation are other potential applications along with a few selected thermal, chemical, and structural properties as evaluated up to this time for these materials.

  16. Design and Fabrication of 3D printed Scaffolds with a Mechanical Strength Comparable to Cortical Bone to Repair Large Bone Defects.

    PubMed

    Roohani-Esfahani, Seyed-Iman; Newman, Peter; Zreiqat, Hala

    2016-01-19

    A challenge in regenerating large bone defects under load is to create scaffolds with large and interconnected pores while providing a compressive strength comparable to cortical bone (100-150 MPa). Here we design a novel hexagonal architecture for a glass-ceramic scaffold to fabricate an anisotropic, highly porous three dimensional scaffolds with a compressive strength of 110 MPa. Scaffolds with hexagonal design demonstrated a high fatigue resistance (1,000,000 cycles at 1-10 MPa compressive cyclic load), failure reliability and flexural strength (30 MPa) compared with those for conventional architecture. The obtained strength is 150 times greater than values reported for polymeric and composite scaffolds and 5 times greater than reported values for ceramic and glass scaffolds at similar porosity. These scaffolds open avenues for treatment of load bearing bone defects in orthopaedic, dental and maxillofacial applications.

  17. Design and Fabrication of 3D printed Scaffolds with a Mechanical Strength Comparable to Cortical Bone to Repair Large Bone Defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roohani-Esfahani, Seyed-Iman; Newman, Peter; Zreiqat, Hala

    2016-01-01

    A challenge in regenerating large bone defects under load is to create scaffolds with large and interconnected pores while providing a compressive strength comparable to cortical bone (100–150 MPa). Here we design a novel hexagonal architecture for a glass-ceramic scaffold to fabricate an anisotropic, highly porous three dimensional scaffolds with a compressive strength of 110 MPa. Scaffolds with hexagonal design demonstrated a high fatigue resistance (1,000,000 cycles at 1–10 MPa compressive cyclic load), failure reliability and flexural strength (30 MPa) compared with those for conventional architecture. The obtained strength is 150 times greater than values reported for polymeric and composite scaffolds and 5 times greater than reported values for ceramic and glass scaffolds at similar porosity. These scaffolds open avenues for treatment of load bearing bone defects in orthopaedic, dental and maxillofacial applications.

  18. Design and Fabrication of 3D printed Scaffolds with a Mechanical Strength Comparable to Cortical Bone to Repair Large Bone Defects

    PubMed Central

    Roohani-Esfahani, Seyed-Iman; Newman, Peter; Zreiqat, Hala

    2016-01-01

    A challenge in regenerating large bone defects under load is to create scaffolds with large and interconnected pores while providing a compressive strength comparable to cortical bone (100–150 MPa). Here we design a novel hexagonal architecture for a glass-ceramic scaffold to fabricate an anisotropic, highly porous three dimensional scaffolds with a compressive strength of 110 MPa. Scaffolds with hexagonal design demonstrated a high fatigue resistance (1,000,000 cycles at 1–10 MPa compressive cyclic load), failure reliability and flexural strength (30 MPa) compared with those for conventional architecture. The obtained strength is 150 times greater than values reported for polymeric and composite scaffolds and 5 times greater than reported values for ceramic and glass scaffolds at similar porosity. These scaffolds open avenues for treatment of load bearing bone defects in orthopaedic, dental and maxillofacial applications. PMID:26782020

  19. Press hardening of alternative high strength aluminium and ultra-high strength steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendiguren, Joseba; Ortubay, Rafael; Agirretxe, Xabier; Galdos, Lander; de Argandoña, Eneko Sáenz

    2016-10-01

    The boron steel press hardening process takes more and more importance on the body in white structure in the last decade. In this work, the advantages of using alternative alloys on the press hardening process is analysed. In particular, the press hardening of AA7075 high strength aluminium and CP800 complex phase ultra-high strength steel is analysed. The objective is to analyse the potential decrease on springback while taking into account the strength change associated with the microstructural modification carried out during the press hardening process. The results show a clear improvement of the final springback in both cases. Regarding the final mechanical properties, an important decrease has been measured in the AA7075 due to the process while an important increase has been found in the CP800 material.

  20. High strength ferritic alloy-D53

    DOEpatents

    Hagel, William C.; Smidt, Frederick A.; Korenko, Michael K.

    1977-01-01

    A high strength ferritic alloy is described having from about 0.2% to about 0.8% by weight nickel, from about 2.5% to about 3.6% by weight chromium, from about 2.5% to about 3.5% by weight molybdenum, from about 0.1% to about 0.5% by weight vanadium, from about 0.1% to about 0.5% by weight silicon, from about 0.1% to about 0.6% by weight manganese, from about 0.12% to about 0.20% by weight carbon, from about 0.02% to about 0.1% by weight boron, a maximum of about 0.05% by weight nitrogen, a maximum of about 0.02% by weight phosphorous, a maximum of about 0.02% by weight sulfur, and the balance iron.

  1. High strength air-dried aerogels

    DOEpatents

    Coronado, Paul R.; Satcher, Jr., Joe H.

    2012-11-06

    A method for the preparation of high strength air-dried organic aerogels. The method involves the sol-gel polymerization of organic gel precursors, such as resorcinol with formaldehyde (RF) in aqueous solvents with R/C ratios greater than about 1000 and R/F ratios less than about 1:2.1. Using a procedure analogous to the preparation of resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) aerogels, this approach generates wet gels that can be air dried at ambient temperatures and pressures. The method significantly reduces the time and/or energy required to produce a dried aerogel compared to conventional methods using either supercritical solvent extraction. The air dried gel exhibits typically less than 5% shrinkage.

  2. High strength cast aluminum alloy development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Druschitz, Edward A.

    The goal of this research was to understand how chemistry and processing affect the resulting microstructure and mechanical properties of high strength cast aluminum alloys. Two alloy systems were investigated including the Al-Cu-Ag and the Al-Zn-Mg-Cu systems. Processing variables included solidification under pressure (SUP) and heat treatment. This research determined the range in properties that can be achieved in BAC 100(TM) (Al-Cu micro-alloyed with Ag, Mn, Zr, and V) and generated sufficient property data for design purposes. Tensile, stress corrosion cracking, and fatigue testing were performed. CuAl2 and Al-Cu-Fe-Mn intermetallics were identified as the ductility limiting flaws. A solution treatment of 75 hours or longer was needed to dissolve most of the intermetallic CuAl 2. The Al-Cu-Fe-Mn intermetallic was unaffected by heat treatment. These results indicate that faster cooling rates, a reduction in copper concentration and a reduction in iron concentration might increase the ductility of the alloy by decreasing the size and amount of the intermetallics that form during solidification. Six experimental Al-Zn-Mg-Cu series alloys were produced. Zinc concentrations of 8 and 12wt% and Zn/Mg ratios of 1.5 to 5.5 were tested. Copper was held constant at 0.9%. Heat treating of the alloys was optimized for maximum hardness. Al-Zn-Mg-Cu samples were solution treated at 441°C (826°F) for 4 hours before ramping to 460°C (860°F) for 75 hours and then aged at 120°C (248°F) for 75 hours. X-ray diffraction showed that the age hardening precipitates in most of these alloys was the T phase (Mg32Zn 31.9Al17.1). Tensile testing of the alloys showed that the best mechanical properties were obtained in the lowest alloy condition. Chilled Al-8.2Zn-1.4Mg-0.9Cu solidified under pressure resulted in an alloy with a yield strength of 468MPa (68ksi), tensile strength of 525MPa (76ksi) and an elongation of 9%.

  3. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER: Generation of a bleaching wave in an ST-50-1 glass ceramics induced by a Nd:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veiko, V. P.; Novikov, B. Yu; Shakhno, E. A.; Yakovlev, E. B.

    2009-01-01

    It is shown that upon exposing glass ceramics to laser radiation for which the initial polycrystalline phase is opaque, whereas the corresponding glass phase is transparent, the transparency oscillations can be produced due to the laser-induced phase transitions from the crystalline to amorphous state and vice versa, resulting in the propagation of a bleaching and darkening wave.

  4. Spectroscopic properties and mechanism of Tm3+/Er3+/Yb3+co-doped oxyfluorogermanate glass ceramics containing BaF2 nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yue-Bo; Qiu, Jian-Bei; Zhou, Da-Cheng; Song, Zhi-Guo; Yang, Zheng-Wen; Wang, Rong-Fei; Jiao, Qing; Zhou, Da-Li

    2014-02-01

    Transparent Tm3+/Er3+/Yb3+ co-doped oxyfluorogermanate glass ceramics containing BaF2 nanocrystals are prepared. Under excitation of a 980-nm laser diode (LD), compared with the glass before heat treatment, the Tm3+/Er3+/Yb3+co-doped oxyfluorogermanate glass ceramics can emit intense blue, green and red up-conversion luminescence and Stark-split peaks; X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) results show that BaF2 nanocrystals with an average diameter of 20 nm are precipitated from the glass matrix. Stark splitting of the up-conversion luminescence peaks in the glass ceramics indicates that Tm3+, Er3+ and (or) Yb3+ ions are incorporated into the BaF2 nanocrystals. The up-conversion luminescence intensities of Tm3+, Er3+ and the splitting degree of luminescence peaks in the glass ceramics increase significantly with the increase of heat treat temperature and heat treat time extension. In addition, the possible energy transfer process between rare earth ions and the up-conversion luminescence mechanism are also proposed.

  5. Characterization of a wollastonite glass-ceramic material prepared using sugar cane bagasse ash (SCBA) as one of the raw materials

    SciTech Connect

    Teixeira, Silvio R.; Souza, Agda E.; Carvalho, Claudio L.; Reynoso, Victor C.S.; Romero, Maximina; Rincón, Jesús Ma.

    2014-12-15

    Glass-ceramic material prepared with sugar cane bagasse ash as one of the raw materials was characterized to determine some important properties for its application as a coating material. X-ray diffraction patterns showed that wollastonite-2M (CaSiO{sub 3}) was the major glass-ceramic phase. The Rietveld method was used to quantify the crystalline (60 wt.%) and vitreous (40 wt.%) phases in the glass-ceramic. The microstructure (determined by scanning electron microscopy) of this material had a marble appearance, showing a microporous network of elongated crystals with some areas with dendritic, feather-like ordering. Microhardness data gave a mean hardness value of 564.4 HV (Vickers-hardness), and light microscopy disclosed a greenish brown colored material with a vitreous luster. - Highlights: • We studied the properties of a glass-ceramic material obtained from sugarcane ash. • This material has the appearance and hardness of natural stones. • A refining method gave information about its amorphous and crystalline phases. • This material has potential to be used as coating plates for buildings.

  6. The effects of CeO{sub 2} addition on crystallization behavior and pore size in microporous calcium titanium phosphate glass ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Soleimani, F.; Rezvani, M.

    2012-06-15

    Highlights: ► We prepare a phosphate glass ceramic in the system of CaO–TiO{sub 2}–P{sub 2}O{sub 5} and add 2 to 6 mol% CeO{sub 2} to it. We determine the optimum percentage of CeO{sub 2} addition. ► We study phase separation, suitable time and temperature for crystallization in the microporous Calcium Titanium Phosphate Glass Ceramics utilizing DTA, SEM and XRD. ► We investigate on pore size utilizing BET and SEM techniques before and after CeO{sub 2} addition. ► CeO{sub 2} increases the pore size in the Calcium Titanium Phosphate Glass Ceramics. -- Abstract: In this research the effect of the addition of CeO{sub 2} to microporous Calcium Titanium Phosphate glass ceramics was studied. Different molar percentages of CeO{sub 2} were added to three samples of a base glass whose composition was P{sub 2}O{sub 5} 30, CaO 45, TiO{sub 2} 25 (mol%). The first sample had 2 mol% CeO{sub 2}, the second sample had 4 mol% CeO{sub 2}, and the third sample had 6 mol% CeO{sub 2}. The fourth sample did not contain any CeO{sub 2}. The glass samples were melted and crystallized to bulk glass ceramics by a conventional method. Differential Thermal Analysis (DTA) was utilized to determine the appropriate nucleation and crystallization temperatures. Among the samples, the DTA curve of the sample which had 2 mol% CeO{sub 2} had the sharpest crystallization peak. Therefore, this sample was chosen to prepare the glass ceramics. Using X-ray Diffraction (XRD) it was found that in all samples β-Ca{sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2} and CaTi{sub 4}(PO{sub 4}){sub 6} were the major phases. The β-Ca{sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2} phase was dissolved away by soaking the glass ceramics in HCl, leaving a porous skeleton of CaTi{sub 4}(PO{sub 4}){sub 6}. CeO{sub 2} addition increased the glass transition temperature and decreased the crystallization time and temperature. It was shown that CeO{sub 2} addition resulted in an increase in the mean pore diameter while the specific surface area decreased

  7. Diopside (CaO-MgO-2SiO2)-fluorapatite (9CaO-3P2O5-CaF2) glass-ceramics: Potential materials for bone tissue engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Kansal, Ishu; Goel, Ashutosh; Tulyaganov, Dilshat U.; Pascual, Maria J.; Lee, Hye-Young; Kim, Hae-Won; Ferreira, Jose M.

    2011-08-18

    Glass-ceramics in the diopside (CaMgSi2O6) - fluorapatite [Ca5(PO4)3F] system are potential candidates for restorative dental and bone implant materials. In the present study, a series of glasses along diopside - fluorapatite binary system have been prepared with varying diopside/fluorapatite ratios for their potential applications in bone tissue engineering. The glasses were obtained from compositions with fluorapatite contents varying between 0-40 wt.%. The sintering ability and crystallization kinetics of as obtained amorphous glasses have been studied through hot-stage microscopy (HSM) and differential thermal analysis (DTA), respectively while crystalline phase evolution in sintered GCs has been followed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) adjoined with Rietveld-R.I.R. technique and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Further, biodegradation and apatite forming ability of glass-ceramics were investigated by immersion of glass-ceramic discs in simulated body fluid (SBF) solution while chemical degradation and weight loss of glass-ceramics were studied by immersion in Tris-HCl in accordance with standard ISO 10993-14. The addition of fluorapatite (10-25 wt.%) in diopside glass system significantly enhanced the sintering ability of glass-ceramics and improved their apatite forming ability along with their biodegradation behaviour. Moreover, the in vitro cellular responses to glass-ceramics showed good cell viability and significant stimulation of osteoblastic differentiation, suggesting the possible use of the glass-ceramics for bone regeneration.

  8. SEM-EPMA observation of three types of apatite-containing glass-ceramics implanted in bone: the variance of a Ca-P-rich layer.

    PubMed

    Kitsugi, T; Nakamura, T; Yamamura, T; Kokubu, T; Shibuya, T; Takagi, M

    1987-10-01

    The progressive changes of a Ca-P-rich layer between bone and three types of apatite-containing glass-ceramics of the same chemical composition: MgO 4.6, CaO 44.9, SiO2 34.2, P2O5 16.3, CaF2 0.5 (in weight ratio) were examined. Plates (15 mm X 10 mm X 2 mm, mirror surface) containing apatite (35 wt%) (designated A-GC), apatite (35 wt%) and wollastonite (40 wt%) (designated A.W-GC), and apatite (20 wt%), wollastonite (55 wt%), and whitlockite (15 wt%) (designated A.W.CP-GC) were prepared. They were implanted into the tibia of mature male rabbits for 5 days, 10 days, 20 days, 30 days, 60 days, 6 months, and 12 months. All three types of glass-ceramics showed direct bonding to the bone 30 days after implantation. It was observed by SEM-EPMA 30 days after implantation that Si and Mg content decreased, P content increased, and Ca content did not change across the reactive zone from the glass-ceramics to bone. The level of P and Si in the A.W.CP-GC changed five days after implantation. In A.W-GC and A-GC, a little change in P and Si levels was observed between 10 and 20 days after implantation. The width of reactive zone was narrowest with A-GC, wider with A.W-GC, and widest with A.W.CP-GC. The dissolution of glass-ceramics stopped 6 months after implantation. This phenomenon shows that the glass-ceramics may be suitable for clinical use.

  9. The in vivo behaviour of a sol-gel glass and a glass-ceramic during critical diaphyseal bone defects healing.

    PubMed

    Gil-Albarova, Jorge; Salinas, Antonio J; Bueno-Lozano, Antonio L; Román, Jesus; Aldini-Nicolo, Nicolo; García-Barea, Agustina; Giavaresi, Gianluca; Fini, Milena; Giardino, Roberto; Vallet-Regí, Maria

    2005-07-01

    The in vivo evaluation, in New Zealand rabbits, of a sol-gel glass 70% CaO-30% SiO2 (in mol%) and a glass-ceramic obtained from thermal treatment of the glass, both bioactive in Kokubo's simulated body fluid (SBF), is presented. Femoral bone diaphyseal critical defects were filled with: (i) sol-gel glass cylinders, (ii) glass-ceramic cylinders, or (iii) no material (control group). Osteosynthesis was done by means of anterior screwed plates with an associate intramedullar Kirschner wire. Each group included 10 mature rabbits, 9 months old. Follow-up was 6 months. After sacrifice, macroscopic study showed healing of bone defects, with bone coating over the cylinders, but without evidence of satisfactory repair in control group. Radiographic study showed good implant stability and periosteal growth and bone remodelling around and over the filled bone defect. The morphometric study showed minimum evidences of degradation or resorption in glass-ceramic cylinders, maintaining its original shape, but sol-gel glass cylinders showed abundant fragmentation and surface resorption. An intimate union of the new-formed bone to both materials was observed. Mechanical study showed the higher results in the glass-ceramic group, whereas sol-gel glass and control group showed no differences. The minimum degradation of glass-ceramic cylinders suggests their application in critical bone defects locations of transmission forces or load bearing. The performance of sol-gel glass cylinders suggests their usefulness in locations where a quick resorption should be preferable, considering the possibility of serving as drug or cells vehicle for both of them.

  10. Evaluation of marginal fit of 2 CAD-CAM anatomic contour zirconia crown systems and lithium disilicate glass-ceramic crown

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Min-Kyung; Park, Ji-Hee; Park, Sang-Won; Yun, Kwi-Dug; Oh, Gye-Jeong

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE This study was to evaluate the marginal fit of two CAD-CAM anatomic contour zirconia crown systems compared to lithium disilicate glass-ceramic crowns. MATERIALS AND METHODS Shoulder and deep chamfer margin were formed on each acrylic resin tooth model of a maxillary first premolar. Two CAD-CAM systems (Prettau®Zirconia and ZENOSTAR®ZR translucent) and lithium disilicate glass ceramic (IPS e.max®press) crowns were made (n=16). Each crown was bonded to stone dies with resin cement (Rely X Unicem). Marginal gap and absolute marginal discrepancy of crowns were measured using a light microscope equipped with a digital camera (Leica DFC295) magnified by a factor of 100. Two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and post-hoc Tukey's HSD test were conducted to analyze the significance of crown marginal fit regarding the finish line configuration and the fabrication system. RESULTS The mean marginal gap of lithium disilicate glass ceramic crowns (IPS e.max®press) was significantly lower than that of the CAD-CAM anatomic contour zirconia crown system (Prettau®Zirconia) (P<.05). Both fabrication systems and finish line configurations significantly influenced the absolute marginal discrepancy (P<.05). CONCLUSION The lithium disilicate glass ceramic crown (IPS e.max®press) had significantly smaller marginal gap than the CAD-CAM anatomic contour zirconia crown system (Prettau®Zirconia). In terms of absolute marginal discrepancy, the CAD-CAM anatomic contour zirconia crown system (ZENOSTAR®ZR translucent) had under-extended margin, whereas the CAD-CAM anatomic contour zirconia crown system (Prettau®Zirconia) and lithium disilicate glass ceramic crowns (IPS e.max®press) had overextended margins. PMID:26330973

  11. DEVELOPMENT OF GLASS AND GLASS CERAMIC PROPPANTS FROM GAS SHALE WELL DRILL CUTTINGS

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, F.; Fox, K.

    2013-10-02

    The objective of this study was to develop a method of converting drill cuttings from gas shale wells into high strength proppants via flame spheroidization and devitrification processing. Conversion of drill cuttings to spherical particles was only possible for small particle sizes (< 53 {micro}m) using a flame former after a homogenizing melting step. This size limitation is likely to be impractical for application as conventional proppants due to particle packing characteristics. In an attempt to overcome the particle size limitation, sodium and calcium were added to the drill cuttings to act as fluxes during the spheroidization process. However, the flame former remained unable to form spheres from the fluxed material at the relatively large diameters (0.5 - 2 mm) targeted for proppants. For future work, the flame former could be modified to operate at higher temperature or longer residence time in order to produce larger, spherical materials. Post spheroidization heat treatments should be investigated to tailor the final phase assemblage for high strength and sufficient chemical durability.

  12. TiO2 effect on crystallization mechanism and physical properties of nano glass-ceramics of MgO-Al2O3-SiO2 glass system.

    PubMed

    Jo, Sinae; Kang, Seunggu

    2013-05-01

    The effect of TiO2 on the degree of crystallization, thermal properties and microstructure for MgO-Al2O3-SiO2 glass-ceramics system containing 0-13 wt% TiO2 and 0-1.5 wt% B2O3 in which the cordierite is the main phase was studied. Using Kissinger and Augis-Bennett equations, the activation energy, 510 kJ/mol and Avrami constant, 1.8 were calculated showing the surface-oriented crystallization would be preferred. The alpha-cordierite phase was generated in the glass-ceramics of containing TiO2 of 0-5.6 wt%. However, for the glass-ceramics of TiO2 content above 7 wt%, an alpha-cordierite disappeared and micro-cordierite phase was formed. The glass-ceramics of no TiO2 added had spherical crystals of few tens nanometer size spread in the matrix. As TiO2 content increased up to 5.6 wt%, a lump of dendrite was formed. In the glass-ceramics containing TiO2 7-13 wt%, in which the main phase is micro-cordierite, the dendrite crystal disappeared and a few hundred nanometer sized crystal particles hold tightly each other were generated. The thermal conductivity of glass-ceramics of both a-cordierite and micro-cordierite base decreased with TiO2 contend added. The thermal conductivity of glass-ceramics of 1.5 wt% TiO2 added was 3.4 W/mK which is 36% higher than that of glass-ceramics of no TiO2 added. The sintering temperature for 1.5 wt% TiO2 glass-ceramics was 965 degrees C which could be concluded as to apply to LTCC process for LED packaging.

  13. Nucleation and crystallization of Ca doped basaltic glass for the production of a glass-ceramic material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarrago, Mariona; Royo, Irene; Garcia-Valles, Maite; Martínez, Salvador

    2016-04-01

    Sewage sludge from wastewater treatment plants is a waste with a composition roughly similar to that of a basalt. It may contain potentially toxic elements that can be inertized by vitrification. Using a glass-ceramic process, these elements will be emplaced in newly formed mineral phases. Glass-ceramic production requires an accurate knowledge of the temperatures of nucleation (TN) and crystal growth of the corresponding minerals. This work arises from the study of the addition of ions to a basaltic matrix in order to establish a model of vitrification of sewage sludge. In this case a glass-ceramic is obtained from a glass made with a basalt that has been doped with 16% CaO. Two glasses which underwent different cooling processes have been produced and compared. The first was annealed at 650oC (AG) and the second was quenched (QG). The chemical composition of the glasses is SiO2 36.11 wt%, Al2O312.19 wt%, CaO 24.44 wt%, FeO 10.06 wt%, MgO 9.19 wt%, Na2O 2.28 wt%, TiO2 2.02 wt%, K2O 1.12 wt%, P2O5 0.46 wt%. Glass transition temperature obtained by dilatometry varies from 640 oC (AG) to 700 oC (QG). The temperatures of nucleation and crystal growth of the glass have been determined by Differential Thermal Analysis (DTA). The phases formed after these treatments were identified by X-Ray Diffraction. The temperatures of exothermic and endothermic peaks measured in the quenched glass are, in average, 10 oC higher than those found for the annealed glass. The exothermic peaks provide crystallization temperatures for different phases: a first event at 857 oC corresponds to the growth of magnetite, pyroxene and nepheline, whereas a second event at 1030 oC is due to the crystallization of melilite from the reaction between previous minerals and a remaining amorphous phase. The complete melting of this system occurs at 1201 oC. This glass has been nucleated inside the DTA furnace (500-850° C/3 hours) and then heated up to 1300 oC using the fraction between 400-500μm. TN

  14. Nanostructured all-solid-state supercapacitor based on Li2S-P2S5 glass-ceramic electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francisco, Brian E.; Jones, Christina M.; Lee, Se-Hee; Stoldt, Conrad R.

    2012-03-01

    While today's lithium-ion batteries offer acceptable energy storage capability, they lack the ability to be cycled repeatedly more than a couple thousand times. Electrochemical capacitors, i.e., supercapacitors, are being developed whose lifetimes exceed 1 × 106 cycles and power densities surpass those of batteries by several times. Here, we present an all-solid-state supercapacitor using a Li2S-P2S5 glass-ceramic electrolyte as both separator and ion conductor. Three device architectures are examined including two with nanostructured electrodes which incorporate multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). Cyclic voltammograms and electrochemical impedance measurements demonstrate that these devices develop reversible double layer capacitance, and a maximum of 7.75 F/g is achieved in the device constructed by mechanically mixing the nanostructured electrodes. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy explains non-idealities observed when MWCNTs are incorporated in the electrode layers.

  15. Microstructure of high-strength foam concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Just, A.; Middendorf, B.

    2009-07-15

    Foam concretes are divided into two groups: on the one hand the physically foamed concrete is mixed in fast rotating pug mill mixers by using foaming agents. This concrete cures under atmospheric conditions. On the other hand the autoclaved aerated concrete is chemically foamed by adding aluminium powder. Afterwards it is cured in a saturated steam atmosphere. New alternatives for the application of foam concretes arise from the combination of chemical foaming and air curing in manufacturing processes. These foam concretes are new and innovative building materials with interesting properties: low mass density and high strength. Responsible for these properties are the macro-, meso- and microporosity. Macropores are created by adding aluminium powder in different volumes and with different particle size distributions. However, the microstructure of the cement matrix is affected by meso- and micropores. In addition, the matrix of the hardened cement paste can be optimized by the specific use of chemical additives for concrete. The influence of aluminium powder and chemical additives on the properties of the microstructure of the hardened cement matrices were investigated by using petrographic microscopy as well as scanning electron microscopy.

  16. High Strength, Weldable Precipitation Aged Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Alexander D.

    1987-03-01

    The family of plate steels represented by ASTM Specification A7101 is finding increasing applications. These low carbon, Cu-Ni-Cr-Mo-Cb, copper precipitation hardened steels have been identified by a number of designations over the years. During early development in the late 1960's and first commercial production in 1970, the steels were known as IN-787 (trademark of International Nickel Company).2 ASTM specifications were subsequently developed for structural (A710) and pressure vessel (A736) applications over ten years ago. More recent interest and application of this family of steels by the U.S. Navy has lead to development of a military specification MIL-S-24645 (SH),3 also initially known as "HSLA-80." Significant tonnage is being produced for the U.S. Navy as a replacement for HY80 (MIL-S-16216) in cruiser deck, bulkhead and hull applications.4 In these applications, the enhanced weldability and requirement of no preheat at this high strength and toughness level has been the main motivation for its use. Over the past 15 years, A710 type steels have also been used in a variety of applications, including off-shore platforms, pressure vessels, arctic linepipe valves and off-highway mining truck frames.

  17. Mesoporous Nitrogen Doped Carbon-Glass Ceramic Cathode for High Performance Lithium-Oxygen Battery

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-01

    3 . DATES COVERED (From - To) June 2012 Conference Proceedings Postprint 01 June 2012 – 01 June 2012 4 . TITLE AND SUBTITLE MESOPOROUS NITROGEN... 3 , a solid-state lithium-oxygen cell with a 2 cm2 area was fabricated (Figure 4 ). Figure 4 . Photograph of a Solid-State lithium-oxygen...0.5 1 1.5 2 2.5 3 3.5 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 Vo lta ge (V ) Cell Capacity (mA.h) 1 2 3 Figure 5. Discharge profiles for a lithium-oxygen cell at 75 C

  18. Eu-doped ZnO-HfO2 hybrid nanocrystal-embedded low-loss glass-ceramic waveguides.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Subhabrata; Bhaktha B N, Shivakiran

    2016-03-11

    We report on the sol-gel fabrication, using a dip-coating technique, of low-loss Eu-doped 70SiO2 -[Formula: see text] HfO2-xZnO (x = 2, 5, 7 and 10 mol%) ternary glass-ceramic planar waveguides. Transmission electron microscopy and grazing incident x-ray diffraction experiments confirm the controlled growth of hybrid nanocrystals with an average size of 3 nm-25 nm, composed of ZnO encapsulated by a thin layer of nanocrystalline HfO2, with an increase of ZnO concentration from x = 2 mol% to 10 mol%  in the SiO2-HfO2 composite matrix. The effect of crystallization on the local environment of Eu ions, doped in the ZnO-HfO2 hybrid nanocrystal-embedded glass-ceramic matrix, is studied using photoluminescence spectra, wherein an intense mixed-valence state (divalent as well as trivalent) emission of Eu ions is observed. The existence of Eu(2+) and Eu(3+) in the SiO2-HfO2-ZnO ternary matrix is confirmed by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Importantly, the Eu[Formula: see text]-doped ternary waveguides exhibit low propagation losses (0.3 ± 0.2 dB cm(-1) at 632.8 nm) and optical transparency in the visible region of the electromagnetic spectrum, which makes ZnO-HfO2 nanocrystal-embedded SiO2-HfO2-ZnO waveguides a viable candidate for the development of on-chip, active, integrated optical devices.

  19. Effect of Mn-Zn ferrite on apatite-wollastonite glass-ceramic (A-W GC).

    PubMed

    Da Li, Guang; Zhou, Da Li; Pan, Tao Hua; Chen, Guo Sheng; Lin, Yun; Mao, Mao; Yan, Guo

    2009-08-01

    Magnetic bioactive glass-ceramics (M GC) were prepared by doping apatite-wollastonite glass-ceramic (A-W GC) with Mn-Zn ferrite. The effect of different contents of Mn-Zn ferrite on the phase structure, magnetic property and bioactivity of A-W GC was investigated. X-ray powder diffraction results showed that A-W GC exhibited apatite, fluorapatite and wollastonite as the main phases. The doping of Mn-Zn ferrite caused the formation of a new phase Zn(0.75)Mn(0.75)Fe(1.5)O(4) in M GC. The amount of this new phase increased with increasing content of Mn-Zn ferrite. Under a magnetic field of 7.96 x 10(5) A m(-1), the saturation magnetization of M GC increased from 4.63 to 9.7 A m(2) kg(-1), but the coercive forces of M GC decreased from 2.39 x 10(4) to 7.56 x 10(3) A m(-1) as the Mn-Zn ferrite content increased from 5% to 20% in the material. The bioactivity of samples was evaluated by soaking in simulated body fluid (SBF). The results showed that the doping of Mn-Zn ferrite decreased the bioactivity of A-W GC dramatically. It took 7 days for an apatite layer to form on the surface of A-W GC, while at least 30 days was needed for an apatite layer forming on the surface of M GC.

  20. Li.sub.2 O-Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 -SiO.sub.2 glass ceramic-aluminum containing austenitic stainless steel composite body and a method of producing the same

    DOEpatents

    Cassidy, Roger T.

    1990-05-01

    The present invention relates to a hermetically sealed Li.sub.2 O-Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 -SiO.sub.2 glass ceramic-aluminum containing stainless steel composite body and a method of producing the body. The composite body includes an oxide interfacial region between the glass ceramic and metal, wherein the interfacial region consists essentially of an Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 layer. The interfacial Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 region includes constituents of both the metal and glass ceramic.

  1. Enhancement of lithium ion conductivity by doping Li3BO3 in Li2S-P2S5 glass-ceramics electrolytes for all-solid-state batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eom, Minyong; Choi, Sunho; Son, Seunghyeon; Choi, Lakyoung; Park, Chanhwi; Shin, Dongwook

    2016-11-01

    (100-x) (0.78Li2S·0.22P2S5)·xLi3BO3 (0 ≤ x ≤ 5) solid electrolytes are prepared via mechanical milling and a post heat-treatment process, and the resulting electrochemical properties are investigated in conjunction with structural analysis. Adding of Li3BO3 into the (100-x) (0.78Li2S·0.22P2S5)·xLi3BO3 solid electrolyte is expected to enhance the conductivity and lower the activation energy as a consequence of changing the structural unit in the glass network. It turned out that the doping of Li3BO3 enhances the conductivity by enlarging the glass forming region and promoting precipitation of high lithium ion conductive thio-LISICON II analog. 97 (0.78Li2S·0.22P2S5)·3Li3BO3 (x = 3) glass-ceramics exhibits the highest conductivity (1.03 × 10-3 S cm-1). Structural analysis shows that the samples with Li3BO3 added to the electrolyte are composed of the main structural unit of PS43- with partially-modified structural unit of PO43-, which are believed to effectively enhance the conductivity and decrease the activation energy. In glass-ceramics produced from these materials, the thio-LISICON II phase with higher ionic conductivity tends to be stabilized by the addition of Li3BO3. Additionally, the formation of space-charge layer is relaxed by Li3BO3 doping. As a result, the all-solid-state cell shows high initial discharge capacity of 156 mAh g-1, and the capacity is retained to be 149 mAh g-1 for 40 cycles.

  2. Structural application of high strength, high temperature ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, W. B.

    1982-01-01

    The operation of rocket engine turbine pumps is limited by the temperature restrictions of metallic components used in the systems. Mechanical strength and stability of these metallic components decrease drastically at elevated temperatures. Ceramic materials that retain high strength at high temperatures appear to be a feasible alternate material for use in the hot end of the turbopumps. This project identified and defined the processing parameters that affected the properties of Si3N4, one of candidate ceramic materials. Apparatus was assembled and put into operation to hot press Si3N4 powders into bulk material for in house evaluation. A work statement was completed to seek outside contract services to design, manufacture, and evaluate Si3N4 components in the service environments that exists in SSME turbopumps.

  3. High Strength Steel Weldment Reliability: Weld Metal Hydrogen Trapping.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-02-01

    additions to welding consumables to control weld metal hydrogen and thus reduce susceptibility to cold cracking in high strength steel weldments. 14...applying weld metal hydrogen trapping to improve the resistance to hydrogen cracking in welding of high strength steels . Hydrogen cracking in high...requirements which are necessary to prevent hydrogen cracking in high strength steel welding. Common practices to prevent hydrogen cracking in steel

  4. Effect of sintering temperature variations on fabrication of 45S5 bioactive glass-ceramics using rice husk as a source for silica.

    PubMed

    Leenakul, Wilaiwan; Tunkasiri, Tawee; Tongsiri, Natee; Pengpat, Kamonpan; Ruangsuriya, Jetsada

    2016-04-01

    45S5 bioactive glass is a highly bioactive substance that has the ability to promote stem cell differentiation into osteoblasts--the cells that create bone matrix. The aim of this work is to analyze physical and mechanical properties of 45S5 bioactive glass fabricated by using rice husk ash as its silica source. The 45S5 bioactive glass was prepared by melting the batch at 1300 °C for 3h. The samples were sintered at different temperatures ranging from 900 to 1050 °C with a fixed dwell-time of 2h. The phase transitions, density, porosity and microhardness values were investigated and reported. DTA analysis was used to examine the crystallization temperatures of the glasses prepared. We found that the sintering temperature had a significant effect on the mechanical and physical properties of the bioactive glass. The XRD showed that when the sintering temperature was above 650 °C, crystallization occurred and bioactive glass-ceramics with Na2Ca2Si3O9, Na2Ca4(PO4)2SiO4 and Ca3Si2O7 were formed. The optimum sintering temperature resulting in maximum mechanical values was around 1050 °C, with a high density of 2.27 g/cm(3), 16.96% porosity and the vicker microhardness value of 364HV. Additionally, in vitro assay was used to examine biological activities in stimulated body fluid (SBF). After incubation in SBF for 7 days, all of the samples showed formations of apatite layers indicating that the 45S5 bioactive glasses using rice husk as a raw material were also bioactive.

  5. Gaseous hydrogen embrittlement of high strength steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gangloff, R. P.; Wei, R. P.

    1977-01-01

    The effects of temperature, hydrogen pressure, stress intensity, and yield strength on the kinetics of gaseous hydrogen assisted crack propagation in 18Ni maraging steels were investigated experimentally. It was found that crack growth rate as a function of stress intensity was characterized by an apparent threshold for crack growth, a stage where the growth rate increased sharply, and a stage where the growth rate was unchanged over a significant range of stress intensity. Cracking proceeded on load application with little or no detectable incubation period. Gaseous hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility increased with increasing yield strength.

  6. HIGH STRENGTH GLASS FIBERS DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Contents: Status of information relative to commercial fiberglass Intrinsic strength of the glass fiber Degree of surface damage existing in...the fibers after processing into the filament wound structure Failure mechanisms in a filament wound structure Need for understanding in two distinct problem areas

  7. Silicon nitride having a high tensile strength

    DOEpatents

    Pujari, V.K.; Tracey, D.M.; Foley, M.R.; Paille, N.I.; Pelletier, P.J.; Sales, L.C.; Willkens, C.A.; Yeckley, R.L.

    1996-11-05

    A silicon nitride ceramic is disclosed comprising: (a) inclusions no greater than 25 microns in length, (b) agglomerates no greater than 20 microns in diameter, and (c) a surface finish of less than about 8 microinches, said ceramic having a four-point flexural strength of at least about 900 MPa. 4 figs.

  8. Silicon nitride having a high tensile strength

    DOEpatents

    Pujari, Vimal K.; Tracey, Dennis M.; Foley, Michael R.; Paille, Norman I.; Pelletier, Paul J.; Sales, Lenny C.; Willkens, Craig A.; Yeckley, Russell L.

    1996-01-01

    A silicon nitride ceramic comprising: a) inclusions no greater than 25 microns in length, b) agglomerates no greater than 20 microns in diameter, and c) a surface finish of less than about 8 microinches, said ceramic having a four-point flexural strength of at least about 900 MPa.

  9. Formation and spectral probing of transparent oxyfluoride glass-ceramics containing (Eu2+, Eu3+:BaGdF5) nano-crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Kaushik; Balaji, S.; Karmakar, Prantik; Annapurna, K.

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we report the formation of transparent glass-ceramics containing BaGdF5 nanocrystals under optimum ceramization of SiO2-BaF2-K2O-Sb2O3-GdF3-Eu2O3 based oxyfluoride glass and the energy transfer mechanisms in Eu2+ → Eu3+ and Gd3+ → Eu3+ has been interpreted through luminescence study. The modification of local environment surrounding dopant ion in glass and glass ceramics has been studied using Eu3+ ion as spectral probe. The optimum ceramization temperature was determined from the differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) thermogram which revealed that the glass transition temperature (Tg), the crystallization onset temperature (Tx), and crystallization peak temperature (Tp) are 563 °C, 607 °C and 641 °C, respectively. X-ray diffraction pattern of the glass-ceramics sample displayed the presence of cubic BaGdF5 phase (JCPDS code: 24-0098). Transmission electron microscopy image of the glass-ceramics samples revealed homogeneous distribution of spherical fluoride nanocrystals ranging 5-15 nm in size. The emission transitions from the higher excited sates (5DJ, J = 1, 2, and 3) as well as lowered asymmetry ratio of the 5D0 → 7F2 transition (forced electric dipole transition) to that of the 5D0 → 7F1 transition (magnetic dipole) of Eu3+ in the glass-ceramics when compared to glass sample demonstrated the incorporation of dopant Eu3+ ions into the cubic BaGdF5 nanocrystals with higher local symmetry with enhanced ionic nature. The presence of absorption bands of Eu2+ ions and Gd3+ ions present in the glass matrix or fluoride nanocrystals in the excitation spectra of Eu3+ by monitoring emission at 614 nm indicated energy transfer from (Eu2+ → Eu3+) and (Gd3+ → Eu3+) in both glass and glass-ceramics samples.

  10. Development of K-Basin High-Strength Homogeneous Sludge Simulants and Correlations Between Unconfined Compressive Strength and Shear Strength

    SciTech Connect

    Onishi, Yasuo; Baer, Ellen BK; Chun, Jaehun; Yokuda, Satoru T.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Sande, Susan; Buchmiller, William C.

    2011-02-20

    K-Basin sludge will be stored in the Sludge Transport and Storage Containers (STSCs) at an interim storage location on Central Plateau before being treated and packaged for disposal. During the storage period, sludge in the STSCs may consolidate/agglomerate, potentially resulting in high-shear-strength material. The Sludge Treatment Project (STP) plans to use water jets to retrieve K-Basin sludge after the interim storage. STP has identified shear strength to be a key parameter that should be bounded to verify the operability and performance of sludge retrieval systems. Determining the range of sludge shear strength is important to gain high confidence that a water-jet retrieval system can mobilize stored K-Basin sludge from the STSCs. The shear strength measurements will provide a basis for bounding sludge properties for mobilization and erosion. Thus, it is also important to develop potential simulants to investigate these phenomena. Long-term sludge storage tests conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) show that high-uranium-content K-Basin sludge can self-cement and form a strong sludge with a bulk shear strength of up to 65 kPa. Some of this sludge has 'paste' and 'chunks' with shear strengths of approximately 3-5 kPa and 380-770 kPa, respectively. High-uranium-content sludge samples subjected to hydrothermal testing (e.g., 185 C, 10 hours) have been observed to form agglomerates with a shear strength up to 170 kPa. These high values were estimated by measured unconfined compressive strength (UCS) obtained with a pocket penetrometer. Due to its ease of use, it is anticipated that a pocket penetrometer will be used to acquire additional shear strength data from archived K-Basin sludge samples stored at the PNNL Radiochemical Processing Laboratory (RPL) hot cells. It is uncertain whether the pocket penetrometer provides accurate shear strength measurements of the material. To assess the bounding material strength and potential for erosion, it

  11. High-strength concrete for Peacekeeper facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saucier, K. L.

    1984-03-01

    An investigation is described which was conducted to determine the processes and techniques required to produce portland-cement concrete with a compressive strength of 15,000 psi or greater using conventional concreting methods and equipment, and to develop physical property data on the mixtures. It was permitted that special materials and admixtures be used, but a requirement was set that the aggregates and cements be selected from those available in the Cheyenne, Wyoming, area. Results indicated that it is feasible to achieve the 15,000-psi compressive strengths but that workability may decrease over a 2-hour period, and this latter development should be studied under job conditions. It is recommended that: (1) all materials and procedures to be used on a specific project be tested in the laboratory for basic property information, and (2) selected mixtures be tested in the field under expected environmental conditions prior to actual job use.

  12. High-temperature strength of sapphire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Daniel C.

    2000-10-01

    The Sapphire Statistical Characterization and Risk Reduction Program tested approximately 1500 4-point flexure bars with different crystal orientations at different temperatures to establish a mechanical strength database for engineering design. Sapphire coupons were selected to represent surfaces on two different missile windows and a missile dome. Sapphire was obtained from the same suppliers used for the windows or dome and, as much as possible, coupons were fabricated in the same manner as the corresponding part of the window or dome. Perhaps the most interesting result was that sapphire from one fabricator was 50% stronger than sapphire made to the same specifications from the same blanks by another fabricator. In laser heating tests, sapphire performed better than predicted from flexure tests. When a compliant layer of graphite was used as a pad between the test specimens and the load fixture, sapphire in which the principal axis of tension and compression was parallel to the c-axis increased in apparent strength by a factor of 2 - 3. Strengths of other crystal orientations were not significantly affected by the graphite pads, but the incidence of twinning at 883 K was reduced by graphite.

  13. Crystallization and properties of Sr-Ba aluminosilicate glass-ceramic matrices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P.; Hyatt, Mark J.; Drummond, Charles H., III

    1991-01-01

    Powders of roller quenched (Sr,Ba)O-Al2O3-2SiO2 glasses of various compositions were uniaxially pressed into bars and hot isostatically pressed at 1350 C for 4 hours or cold isostatically pressed and sintered at different temperatures between 800 to 1500 C for 10 or 20 hours. Densities, flexural strengths, and linear thermal expansion were measured for three compositions. The glass transition and crystallization temperatures were determined by Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC). The liquidus and crystallization temperature from the melt were measured using high temperature Differential Thermal Analysis (DTA). Crystalline phases formed on heat treatment of the glasses were identified by powder X ray diffraction. In Sr containing glasses, the monoclinic celsian phase always crystallized at temperatures above 1000 C. At lower temperatures, the hexagonal analog formed. The temperature for orthorhombic to hexagonal structural transformation increased monotonically with SrO content, from 327 C for BaO-Al2O3-2SiO2 to 758 C for SrO-Al2O3-2SiO2. These glass powders can be sintered to almost full densities and monoclinic celsian phase at a relatively low temperature of 1100 C.

  14. Crystallization and properties of Sr-Ba aluminosilicate glass-ceramic matrices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P.; Hyatt, Mark J.; Drummond, Charles H., III

    1991-01-01

    Powders of roller quenched (Sr,Ba)O-Al2O3-2SiO2 glasses of various compositions were uniaxially pressed into bars and hot isostatically pressed at 1350 C for 4 hours or cold isostatically pressed and sintered at different temperatures between 800 to 1500 C for 10 or 20 hours. Densities, flexural strengths, and linear thermal expansion were measured for three compositions. The glasss transition and crystallization temperatures were determined by Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC). The liquidus and crystallization temperature from the melt were measured using high temperature Differential Thermal Analysis (DTA). Crystalline phases formed on heat treatment of the glasses were identified by powder x ray diffraction. In Sr containing glasses, the monoclinic celsian phase always crystallized at temperatures above 1000 C. At lower temperatures, the hexagonal analog formed. The temperature for orthorhombic to hexagonal structure transformation increased monotonically with SrO content, from 327 C for BaO-Al2O3-2SiO2 to 758 C for SrO-Al2O3-2SiO2. These glass powders can be sintered to almost full densities and monoclinic celsian phase at a relatively low temperature of 1100 C.

  15. Friction Stir Spot Welding of Advanced High Strength Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Hovanski, Yuri; Grant, Glenn J.; Santella, M. L.

    2009-11-13

    Friction stir spot welding techniques were developed to successfully join several advanced high strength steels. Two distinct tool materials were evaluated to determine the effect of tool materials on the process parameters and joint properties. Welds were characterized primarily via lap shear, microhardness, and optical microscopy. Friction stir spot welds were compared to the resistance spot welds in similar strength alloys by using the AWS standard for resistance spot welding high strength steels. As further comparison, a primitive cost comparison between the two joining processes was developed, which included an evaluation of the future cost prospects of friction stir spot welding in advanced high strength steels.

  16. Random lasing in Eu³⁺ doped borate glass-ceramic embedded with Ag nanoparticles under direct three-photon excitation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xuhui; Zhang, Wenfei; Jin, Limin; Qiu, Jianbei; Yu, Siu Fung

    2015-10-21

    We report the observation of random lasing from Eu(3+) doped borate glass ceramic films embedded with Ag nanoparticles through three-photon absorption at room temperature. Under 1179 nm ultrashort femtosecond pulse excitation, discrete sharp peaks with linewidth ∼0.4 nm emerge randomly from a broad emission band with peak wavelength at ∼612 nm. In addition, the number of sharp peaks increases with the increase of excitation power. We also show that the emission spectrum varies with different observation angles and the corresponding lasing threshold is dependent on the excitation area. Hence, we verify unambiguously that the Eu(3+) doped borate glass ceramic film supports random lasing action via three-photon absorption excitation. In addition, Ag nanoparticles, which act as light scatterers, allow the formation of random microcavities inside the bulk film.

  17. Electrical transport and structural investigations in Cu2O substituted AgI-Ag2O-V2O5 glass-ceramic nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Neha; Dalvi, Anshuman; Awasthi, Barkha; Deva, Dinesh

    2012-06-01

    Glass-ceramic nanocomposites in Cu2O substituted AgI-(Ag2O)1-x-(Cu2O)x-V2O5 superionic system are prepared by annealing the melt-quenched glasses above the crystallization temperatures. Structural and electrical properties have been investigated. Scanning electron microscopy suggests the existence of fine particles of size 20-200 nm dispersed in the annealed glass matrix. Samples are essentially ionic and stable under conductivity-temperature cycles upto ˜ 160 °C. It is found that the conductivity in the nanocomposites increases with Cu2O substitution and highest conductivity is found to be ˜ 2 × 10-3 Ω-1cm-1 for x = 0.3 at room temperature. Differential scanning calorimetry scans confirm the existence of silver iodide crystallites in all the glass-ceramic compositions.

  18. Effects of Y3+/Er3+ ratio on the 2.7 μm emission of Er3+ ions in oxyfluoride glass-ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zhiyong; Liu, Chao; Xia, Mengling; Wang, Jing; Han, Jianjun; Xie, Jun; Zhao, Xiujian

    2016-04-01

    Y3+/Er3+ ions co-doped oxyfluoride glass-ceramics were investigated to realize efficient 2.7 μm emission. Incorporation of Er3+ ions into the fluoride nanocrystals was confirmed by the X-ray diffraction patterns, absorption spectra, emission spectra and Judd-Ofelt analysis. With an increase in the Y3+/Er3+ ratio, radiative lifetime, quantum efficiency and emission cross section of the 2.7 μm emission from Er3+ ions were greatly improved, due to the reduced effective concentration of Er3+ ions and suppressed cross relaxation processes among Er3+ ions in the fluoride nanocrystals. Compared to other Er3+-doped glasses, Y3+/Er3+ co-doped oxyfluoride glass-ceramics showed a promising potential for gain medium.

  19. Direct observation of Nd{sup 3+} and Tm{sup 3+} ion distributions in oxy-fluoride glass ceramics containing PbF{sub 2} nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jihong; Zhao, Zhiyong; Liu, Chao; Zhang, Gaoke; Zhao, Xiujian; Heo, Jong; Jiang, Yang

    2014-12-15

    Nd{sup 3+} and Tm{sup 3+}, doped oxy-fluoride glasses and glass ceramics were prepared by conventional melt-quenching and subsequent heat-treatment, respectively. β-PbF{sub 2} nanocrystals with diameter 50 –100 nm formed in the glass matrix after heat treatment. The Stark splitting in absorption peaks, enhanced photoluminescence and prolonged lifetimes that β-PbF{sub 2} nanocrystal formation increased the luminescence of rare earth ions. Both Nd{sup 3+} and Tm{sup 3+} ions were incorporated into nanocrystals that were enriched in lead and fluorine, and deficient in oxygen. - Highlights: • EELS analysis for rare-earth ion distribution in oxy-fluoride glass ceramics • No significant changes in lifetimes of Nd{sup 3+}, while obvious change for Tm{sup 3+} • Direct evidence of Nd{sup 3+} and Tm{sup 3+} aggregation into fluoride nanocrystals.

  20. In vitro evaluation of bioactivity of SiO2-CaO-P2O5-Na2O-CaF2-ZnO glass-ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riaz, Madeeha; Zia, Rehana; Saleemi, Farhat; Bashir, Farooq; Hossain, Tousif; Kayani, Zohra

    2014-09-01

    Zinc is an essential trace element that stimulates bone formation but it is also known as an inhibitor of apatite crystal growth. In this work addition of ZnO to SiO2-CaO-P2O5-Na2O-CaF2 glass-ceramic system was made by conventional melt-quenching technique. DSC curves showed that the addition of ZnO moved the endothermic and exothermic peaks to lower temperatures. X-ray diffraction analysis did not reveal any additional phase caused by ZnO addition and showed the presence of wollastonite and hydroxyapatite crystalline phases only in all the glass-ceramic samples. As bio-implant apatite forming ability is an essential condition, the surface reactivity of the prepared glass-ceramic specimens was studied in vitro in Kokubo's simulated body fluid (SBF) [1] with ion concentration nearly equal to human blood plasma for 30 days at 37 °C under static condition. Atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) was used to study the changes in element concentrations in soaking solutions and XRD, FT-IR and SEM were used to elucidate surface properties of prepared glass-ceramics, which confirmed the formation of HCAp on the surface of all glass-ceramics. It was found that the addition of ZnO had a positive effect on bioactivity of glass-ceramics and made it a potential candidate for restoration of damaged bones.

  1. Effect of adhesive luting on the fracture resistance of zirconia compared to that of composite resin and lithium disilicate glass ceramic

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Myung-Jin

    2017-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of adhesive luting on the fracture resistance of zirconia compared to that of a composite resin and a lithium disilicate glass ceramic. Materials and Methods The specimens (dimension: 2 mm × 2 mm × 25 mm) of the composite resin, lithium disilicate glass ceramic, and yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystal (Y-TZP) were prepared. These were then divided into nine groups: three non-luting groups, three non-adhesive luting groups, and three adhesive luting groups, for each restorative material. In the non-luting groups, specimens were placed on the bovine tooth without any luting agents. In the non-adhesive luting groups, only zinc phosphate cement was used for luting the specimen to the bovine tooth. In the adhesive luting groups, specimens were pretreated, and the adhesive luting procedure was performed using a self-adhesive resin cement. For all the groups, a flexural test was performed using universal testing machine, in which the fracture resistance was measured by recording the force at which the specimen was fractured. Results The fracture resistance after adhesive luting increased by approximately 29% in the case of the composite resin, 26% in the case of the lithium disilicate glass ceramic, and only 2% in the case of Y-TZP as compared to non-adhesive luting. Conclusions The fracture resistance of Y-TZP did not increased significantly after adhesive luting as compared to that of the composite resin and the lithium disilicate glass ceramic. PMID:28194358

  2. Investigation on up-conversion luminescence properties of novel transparent Ho3+-Tm3+-Yb3+ co-doped oxyfluoride glass ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiao-bo; Han, Wan-lei; Xu, Fang; Song, Ying-lin

    2011-06-01

    In the present letter, the transparent oxyfluoride glass ceramics containing Ho3+-Tm3+-Yb3+:NaYF4 were successfully prepared by melt-quenching at 1400°C and subsequent heating at 650-680°C for 1~2 hours . X-ray diffraction (XRD) with Cu Kα radiation (λ=0.154nm) investigation revealed that NaYF4 nano-crystals in the glass ceramics was fabricated. Their sizes were determined by Sherrer's equation. The emission spectra red green and blue up-conversion (UC) under 980nm laser diode (LD) pumping and absorption spectra were measured. Luminescence measurements confirmed the partition of RE ions in nano-crystals NaYF4. The blue red and green UC radiations correspond to the transitions 1G4-3H6, 1G4-3H4 of Tm3+, 5F4, 5S2-5I8, 5F5-5I8, of Ho3+ ions, respectively. This is similar to that in Tm3+-Yb3+ and/or Ho3+-Yb3+ co-doped glass ceramics. To obtain upconversion fluorescence mechanisms, upconversion fluorescence intensity versus LD pump power were analyzed in view of energy levels of rare earth. Up-conversion mechanisms were discussed and the ratio between red, green and blue UC emission bands was found to be varied as a function of temperature of heat treatment and pump power. This result could be mainly attributed to the cross-relaxation between Ho3+ ions. The excellent optical properties and its convenient, low-cost synthesis of the present glass ceramic imply that it is an excellent substitution material for the unobtainable bulk NaYF4 crystal and may have potentially applications in tunable visible laser or many other fields.

  3. Proceedings: 1986 Workshop on Advanced High-Strength Materials

    SciTech Connect

    1989-05-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) has contributed to many in-service failures of high-strength LWR components. In 25 workshop presentations, this report addresses the effects of metallurgical factors, manufacturing processes, design improvements, and installation practices on the resistance of high-strength alloys to SCC.

  4. Enhanced photoluminescence and structure of Dy3+-doped SrBi2Ta2O9-containing transparent glass-ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarafder, Anal; Molla, Atiar Rahaman; Karmakar, Basudeb

    2013-06-01

    Trivalent dysprosium (Dy3+)-doped precursor glass in the K2O-SiO2-SrO-Bi2O3-Ta2O5 (KSSBT) system have been prepared by melt-quench technique and strontium bismuth tantalate, SrBi2Ta2O9 (SBT) glass-ceramics has been synthesized by a controlled crystallization process of the precursor glass. With progression of heat-treatment it is observed that Dy3+:glass exhibit a blue emission at 486 nm (4F9/2 → 6H15/2) and also a bright fluorescent yellow emission at 576 nm (4F9/2 → 6H13/2) have been observed with λex = 455 nm (6H15/2 → 4I15/2). These spectra reveal that the Dy3+ ions are gradually entering into the SBT nanocrystals of the glass-ceramics. The photoluminescence characteristics originating from Dy3+-doping in nanocrystalline SBT reveals the dependence of the luminescent intensity on heat-treatment time. Their structural properties have also been evaluated by FTIR spectroscopic and microstructural studies. Such luminescent glass-ceramics are expected to find potential applications such as solid-state yellow lasers and optical display systems.

  5. White up-conversion emission in Ho3+/Tm3+/Yb3+ tri-doped glass ceramics embedding BaF2 nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chenxia; Xu, Shiqing; Ye, Rengguang; Deng, Degang; Hua, Youjie; Zhao, Shilong; Zhuang, Songlin

    2011-04-01

    Ho3+/Tm3+/Yb3+ tri-doped glass ceramics with white light emitting have been developed and demonstrated. Pumped by 980 nm laser diode (LD), intensive red, green and blue up-conversions (UC) were obtained. The green emission is assigned to Ho3+ ion and the blue emission is assigned to Tm3+ ion, whereas the red emission is the combination contribution of the Ho3+ and Tm3+ ions. The RGB intensities could be adjusted by tuning the rare-earth ion concentration and pump power intensity. Thus, multicolor of the luminescence, including perfect white light with CIE-X=0.329 and CIE-Y=0.342 in the 1931 CIE chromaticity diagram can be obtained in 0.15 Ho3+/0.2Tm3+/3Yb3+ tri-doped glass ceramics embedding BaF2 nanocrystals pumped by a single infrared laser diode source of 980 nm at 500 mW. The up-conversion luminescence mechanism of Yb3+ sensitize Ho3+ and Tm3+ ions and the energy transfer from Ho3+ to Tm3+ in oxy-fluoride silicate glass ceramics were analyzed.

  6. Temperature-controlled down-conversion luminescence behavior of Eu(3)(+) -doped transparent MF2 (M = Ba, Ca, Sr) glass ceramics.

    PubMed

    Zhou, B; E, C Q; Bu, Y Y; Meng, L; Yan, X H; Wang, X F

    2017-03-01

    Eu(3)(+) -doped transparent glass ceramics containing MF2 (M = Ba, Ca, Sr) nanocrystals were fabricated using a melt-quenching method, and the resulting structures were studied using X-ray diffraction. Levels (5) D1 and (5) D0 of Eu(3)(+) ions were verified as thermally coupled levels using the fluorescence intensity ratio method. The fluorescence intensity ratios, optical temperature sensitivity and thermal quenching ratios of the transparent glass ceramics were studied as a function of temperature. With an increase in temperature, the relative sensitivity (SR ) decreased sharply at first, then slowly increased, before finally decreasing. The minimum SR values of GCBaF2 (GCB), GCCaF2 (GCC) and GCSrF2 (GCS) were 2.8 × 10(-4) , 0.8 × 10(-4) and 1.9 × 10(-)(4)  K(-1) at 360, 269 and 319 K, respectively. Glass ceramics with an intense emission intensity can be used to convert the measured spectrum into temperature and may have an important role in temperature detectors.

  7. Investigating in vitro bioactivity and magnetic properties of the ferrimagnetic bioactive glass-ceramic fabricated using soda-lime-silica waste glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbasi, M.; Hashemi, B.; Shokrollahi, H.

    2014-04-01

    The main purpose of the current research is the production and characterization of a ferrimagnetic bioactive glass-ceramic prepared through the solid-state reaction method using soda-lime-silica waste glass as the main raw material. In comparison with the conventional route, that is, the melt-quenching and subsequent heat treatment, the present work is an economical technique. Structural, thermal and magnetic properties of the samples were examined by X-ray diffraction (XRD), differential thermal analysis (DTA) and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). The in vitro test was utilized to assess the bioactivity level of the samples by Hanks' solution as simulated body fluid (SBF). The apatite surface layer formation was examined by the scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). The calcium ion concentration in the solutions was measured by atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS). VSM results revealed that with the addition of 5-20 wt% strontium hexaferrite to bioactive glass-ceramics, the ferrimagnetic bioactive glass-ceramics with hysteresis losses between 7024 and 75,852 erg/g were obtained. The in vitro test showed that the onset formation time of hydroxyapatite layer on the surface of the samples was 14 days and after 30 days, this layer was completed.

  8. Spectroscopic properties in Er(3+)-doped germanotellurite glasses and glass ceramics for mid-infrared laser materials.

    PubMed

    Kang, Shiliang; Xiao, Xiudi; Pan, Qiwen; Chen, Dongdan; Qiu, Jianrong; Dong, Guoping

    2017-03-07

    Transparent Er(3+)-doped germanotellurite glass ceramics (GCs) with variable Te/Ge ratio were prepared by controllable heat-treated process. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) confirmed the formation of nanocrystals in glass matrix. Raman spectra were used to investigate the evolution of glass structure and photon energy. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra were introduced to characterize the change of hydroxyl group (OH(-)) content. Enhanced 2.7 μm emission was achieved from Er(3+)-doped GCs upon excitation with a 980 nm laser diode (LD), and the influence of GeO2 concentration and heat-treated temperature on the spectroscopic properties were also discussed in detail. It is found that the present Er(3+)-doped GC possesses large stimulated emission cross section at around 2.7 μm (0.85 × 10(-20) cm(2)). The advantageous spectroscopic characteristics suggest that the obtained GC may be a promising material for mid-infrared fiber lasers.

  9. Luminescence of nanostructured SnO2-SiO2 glass-ceramics prepared by sol-gel method.

    PubMed

    del-Castillo, J; Yanesl, A C; Méndez-Ramos, J; Rodríguez, V D

    2008-04-01

    Nanostructured silica based glass-ceramics samples of composition (100 - x)SiO2-xSnO2, with x from 1 to 10, have been synthesized by thermal treatment of precursor sol-gel glasses. The average size of the obtained SnO2 nanocrystals, calculated by using the X-ray diffraction, can be predetermined by using well-controlled concentration of tin precursor. The mean radius ranging from 1.6 to 5.5 nm, is comparable to the exciton Bohr radius, corresponding to wide band-gap semiconductor quantum-dots in an insulator SiO2 glass. A spectroscopy study in terms of optical absorption and photoluminescence spectra has been carried out as a function of SnO2 concentration. Size-dependent red-shifts of excitation and emission bands, with increasing of tin precursor concentration, point to the quantum confinement effect. The nanocrystal sizes have been obtained and compared by using the Brus and Scherrer equations. The band gap increase is in agreement with results, based on the effective mass model. The recombination of conduction band electron with oxygen vacancies is proposed to explain the luminescence red-shift.

  10. Isotropic octupolar second harmonic generation response in LaBGeO{sub 5} glass-ceramic with spherulitic precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Truong, Lo Nhat; Fargin, Evelyne E-mail: fargin@icmcb-bordeaux.cnrs.fr Vigouroux, Hélène; Fargues, Alexandre; Dussauze, Marc E-mail: fargin@icmcb-bordeaux.cnrs.fr Adamietz, Frédéric; Rodriguez, Vincent E-mail: fargin@icmcb-bordeaux.cnrs.fr; Santos, Luis

    2015-04-20

    A spherulitic crystallization of the crystalline phase LaBGeO{sub 5} is generated in the 25La{sub 2}O{sub 3}-25B{sub 2}O{sub 3}-50 GeO{sub 2} glass system. Linear and nonlinear optical properties of lanthanum borogermanate glass-ceramic have been investigated at both macroscopic and microscopic scales. Polarized μ-Raman analysis has evidenced a radial distribution of the crystallites along the c-axis inside spherulites, whereas polarized μ-Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) analysis revealed intensity maxima perpendicularly to the c-axis crystallites orientation. Polarized SHG mapping of a spherulite indicate that no dipolar response along the c-axis oriented crystallites occurs despite the individual dipolar symmetry C{sub 3} of the crystallites. At a larger mm scale, the isotropic scattering of spherulites recorded from macroscopic SHG experiment in the forward direction is consistent with an average coherent octupolar response per spherulite. These SHG analyses at different scale are both in accordance with radial antiferroelectric orientation along the c-axis of crystallites inside each spherulite.

  11. Undoped and Eu3+ doped In2O3 quantum-dots in transparent glass-ceramics.

    PubMed

    del-Castillo, J; Yanes, A C; Méndez-Ramos, J; Rodríguez, V D

    2009-08-01

    Nano-structured glass-ceramics comprising In2O3 nanocrystals (quantum dots) in a silica glassy matrix have been synthesized for the first time to our knowledge, by thermal treatment of sol-gel precursor glasses with different concentrations of In2O3. Undoped and Eu(3+)-doped samples have been obtained and characterized. By means of X-ray Diffraction and Transmission Electron Microscopy analysis, the precipitation of In2O3 cubic crystalline nanoparticles was confirmed. The mean radii of these nanocrystals, from 1 to 4 nm, are comparable to the exciton Bohr radius, corresponding to wide band-gap semiconductor quantum-dots. Under interband UV excitation of the nanocrystals, a broad visible emission is observed in the undoped samples. Meanwhile, the Eu(3+)-doped samples only show emission from these ions which are efficiently excited by energy transfer from the In2O3, nanocrystals. Selective excitation of the Eu3+ ions allow us to discern those remaining in the silica glassy matrix from the ones located in the interface SiO2-In2O3.

  12. Spectroscopic properties in Er3+-doped germanotellurite glasses and glass ceramics for mid-infrared laser materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Shiliang; Xiao, Xiudi; Pan, Qiwen; Chen, Dongdan; Qiu, Jianrong; Dong, Guoping

    2017-03-01

    Transparent Er3+-doped germanotellurite glass ceramics (GCs) with variable Te/Ge ratio were prepared by controllable heat-treated process. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) confirmed the formation of nanocrystals in glass matrix. Raman spectra were used to investigate the evolution of glass structure and photon energy. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra were introduced to characterize the change of hydroxyl group (OH‑) content. Enhanced 2.7 μm emission was achieved from Er3+-doped GCs upon excitation with a 980 nm laser diode (LD), and the influence of GeO2 concentration and heat-treated temperature on the spectroscopic properties were also discussed in detail. It is found that the present Er3+-doped GC possesses large stimulated emission cross section at around 2.7 μm (0.85 × 10‑20 cm2). The advantageous spectroscopic characteristics suggest that the obtained GC may be a promising material for mid-infrared fiber lasers.

  13. Optimisation of the enamelling of an apatite-mullite glass-ceramic coating on Ti6Al4V.

    PubMed

    O'Flynn, Kevin P; Stanton, Kenneth T

    2011-09-01

    Apatite-mullite glass-ceramics (AMGCs) are under investigation as a potential alternative to hydroxyapatite (HA) as a coating for cementless fixation of orthopaedic implants. These materials have tailorable mechanical and chemical properties that make them attractive for use as bioactive coatings. Here, AMGC coatings on Ti(6)Al(4)V were investigated to determine an improved heat treatment regime using a systematic examination of the different inputs: composition of glass, nucleation hold and crystallisation hold. An upper limit to the heat treatment temperature was determined by the α + β --> β of Ti(6)Al(4)V at 970°C. The glass composition was modified to produce different crystallisation temperatures and sintering characteristics. A glass was found that is fully crystalline below 970°C and has good sinterability. The effects of different heat treatment time and temperature combinations on the coating and substrate morphologies were examined and the most suitable combination determined. This sample was further investigated and was found to have qualitatively good adhesion and evidence of an interfacial reaction region between the coating and substrate indicating that a chemical reaction had occurred. Oxygen infiltration into the substrate was quantified and the new route was shown to result in a 63% reduction in penetration depth.

  14. Spectroscopic properties in Er3+-doped germanotellurite glasses and glass ceramics for mid-infrared laser materials

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Shiliang; Xiao, Xiudi; Pan, Qiwen; Chen, Dongdan; Qiu, Jianrong; Dong, Guoping

    2017-01-01

    Transparent Er3+-doped germanotellurite glass ceramics (GCs) with variable Te/Ge ratio were prepared by controllable heat-treated process. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) confirmed the formation of nanocrystals in glass matrix. Raman spectra were used to investigate the evolution of glass structure and photon energy. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra were introduced to characterize the change of hydroxyl group (OH−) content. Enhanced 2.7 μm emission was achieved from Er3+-doped GCs upon excitation with a 980 nm laser diode (LD), and the influence of GeO2 concentration and heat-treated temperature on the spectroscopic properties were also discussed in detail. It is found that the present Er3+-doped GC possesses large stimulated emission cross section at around 2.7 μm (0.85 × 10−20 cm2). The advantageous spectroscopic characteristics suggest that the obtained GC may be a promising material for mid-infrared fiber lasers. PMID:28266570

  15. Tm{sup 3+}-sensitized up- and down-conversions in nano-structured oxyfluoride glass ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Hang; Marqués-Hueso, José; Chen, Daqin; Wang, Yuansheng; Richards, Bryce S.

    2012-12-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ► UC and DC are achieved in a single-ion sensitized phosphor for PV applications. ► The most intense fractions of AM 1.5G spectrum below/above c-Si bandgap are absorbed. ► The converted photons match the optimal spectral response of c-Si. -- Abstract: Tm{sup 3+}-sensitized up-conversion and down-conversion are studied in transparent glass ceramics embedded with β-YF{sub 3} nanocrystals. Upon excitation at 1220 nm, where crystalline silicon (c-Si) solar cells no longer absorb, the sub-bandgap photons could be converted to the higher-energy ones via up-conversion. In addition, under excitation at 468 nm (a wavelength close to the peak in the air-mass 1.5 global solar spectrum), one blue photon might be split in up to two near-infrared ones via down-conversion. In both cases, the frequency-converted photons match the spectral response of c-Si solar cell well. Hopefully, the investigated luminescent materials may act as the spectral conversion layers to reduce the sub-bandgap transmission and charge carrier thermalization losses of c-Si solar cells, and in turn, enhance the energy efficiency.

  16. Ductilization of High-Strength Magnesium Alloys

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-17

    Wang thermodynamic model previously validated in high-performance steels . The calculations identify the cohesion enhancing potencies of grain boundary...thermodynamic model previously validated in high-performance steels . The calculations identify the cohesion enhancing potencies of grain boundary...boundary cohesion, based on the Rice-Wang thermodynamic model previously validated in high-performance steels . The calculations identify the cohesion

  17. Increasing Lean Mass and Strength: A Comparison of High Frequency Strength Training to Lower Frequency Strength Training.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Michael H; Burns, Steve P

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect strength training frequency has on improvements in lean mass and strength. Participants were 7 women and 12 men, age (χ̄= 34.64 years ± 6.91 years), with strength training experience, training age (χ̄= 51.16 months ± 39.02 months). Participants were assigned to one of two groups to equal baseline group demographics. High frequency training group (HFT) trained each muscle group as the agonist, 3 times per week, exercising with 3 sets per muscle group per session (3 total body workouts). Low frequency training group (LFT) trained each muscle group as the agonist one time per week, completing all 9 sets during that one workout. LFT consisted of a routine split over three days: 1) pectoralis, deltoids, and triceps; 2) upper back and biceps; 3) quadriceps, hamstrings, calves, and abdominals. Following eight weeks of training, HFT increased lean mass by 1.06 kg ± 1.78 kg, (1.9%), and LFT increased lean mass by .99 kg ± 1.31 kg, (2.0%). HFT strength improvements on the chest press was 9.07 kg ± 6.33 kg, (11%), and hack squat 20.16 kg ± 11.59 kg, (21%). LFT strength improvements on chest press was 5.80kg ± 4.26 kg, (7.0%), and hack squat 21.83 kg ± 11.17 kg, (24 %). No mean differences between groups were significant. These results suggest that HFT and LFT of equal set totals result in similar improvements in lean mass and strength, following 8 weeks of strength training.

  18. High-temperature-pressure Polymerized Resin-infiltrated Ceramic Networks

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, J.F.; Ruse, D.; Phan, A.C.; Sadoun, M.J.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to produce composite blocks (CB) for CAD/CAM applications by high-temperature-pressure (HT/HP) polymerization of resin-infiltrated glass-ceramic networks. The effect of network sintering and the absence/presence of initiator was investigated. Mechanical properties were determined and compared with those of Paradigm MZ100 (3M ESPE) blocks and HT/HP polymerized experimental “classic” CB, in which the filler had been incorporated by conventional mixing. The networks were made   from glass-ceramic powder (VITA Zahnfabrik) formed by slip casting and were either sintered or not. They were silanized, infiltrated by urethane dimethacrylate, with or without initiator, and polymerized under HT/HP (300 MPa, 180°C) to obtain resin-infiltrated glass-ceramic network (RIGCN) CB. HT/HP polymerized CB were also made from an experimental “classic” composite. Flexural strength (σf), fracture toughness (KIC), and Vickers hardness were determined and analyzed by one- or two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), Scheffé multiple-means comparisons (α = 0.05), and Weibull statistics (for σf). Fractured surfaces were characterized with scanning electron microscopy. The mechanical properties of RIGCN CB were significantly higher. Sintering induced significant increases in σf and hardness, while the initiator significantly decreased hardness. The results suggested that RIGCN and HT/HP polymerization could be used to obtain CB with superior mechanical properties, suitable for CAD/CAM applications. PMID:24186559

  19. High-strength silicon carbides by hot isostatic pressing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dutta, Sunil

    1989-01-01

    Silicon carbide has strong potential for heat engine hardware and other high-temperature applications because of its low density, good strength, high oxidation resistance, and good high-temperature creep resistance. Hot isostatic pressing (HIP) was used for producing alpha and beta silicon carbide (SiC) bodies with near-theoretical density, ultrafine grain size, and high strength at processing temperatures of 1900 to 2000 C. The HIPed materials exhibited ultrafine grain size. Furthermore, no phase transformation from beta to alpha was observed in HIPed beta-SiC. Both materials exhibited very high average flexural strength. It was also shown that alpha-SiC bodies without any sintering aids, when HIPed to high final density, can exhibit very high strength. Fracture toughness K (sub C) values were determined to be 3.6 to 4.0 MPa m (sup 1/2) for HIPed alpha-SiC and 3.7 to 4.1 MPa m (sup 1/2) for HIPed beta-SiC. In the HIPed specimens strength-controlling flaws were typically surface related. In spite of improvements in material properties such as strength and fracture toughness by elimination of the larger strength-limiting flaws and by grain size refinement, HIPing has no effect on the Weibull modulus.

  20. High-strength silicon carbides by hot isostatic pressing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dutta, Sunil

    1988-01-01

    Silicon carbide has strong potential for heat engine hardware and other high-temperature applications because of its low density, good strength, high oxidation resistance, and good high-temperature creep resistance. Hot isostatic pressing (HIP) was used for producing alpha and beta silicon carbide (SiC) bodies with near-theoretical density, ultrafine grain size, and high strength at processing temperatures of 1900 to 2000 C. The HIPed materials exhibited ultrafine grain size. Furthermore, no phase transformation from beta to alpha was observed in HIPed beta-SiC. Both materials exhibited very high average flexural strength. It was also shown that alpha-SiC bodies without any sintering aids, when HIPed to high final density, can exhibit very high strength. Fracture toughness K (sub C) values were determined to be 3.6 to 4.0 MPa m (sup 1/2) for HIPed alpha-SiC and 3.7 to 4.1 MPa m (sup 1/2) for HIPed beta-SiC. In the HIPed specimens strength-controlling flaws were typically surface related. In spite of improvements in material properties such as strength and fracture toughness by elimination of the larger strength-limiting flaws and by grain size refinement, HIPing has no effect on the Weibull modulus.