Science.gov

Sample records for high turnover rates

  1. Strategies for adapting to high rates of employee turnover.

    PubMed

    Mowday, R T

    1984-01-01

    For many organizations facing high rates of employee turnover, strategies for increasing employee retention may not be practical because employees leave for reasons beyond the control of management or the costs of reducing turnover exceed the benefits to be derived. In this situation managers need to consider strategies that can minimize or buffer the organization from the negative consequences that often follow from turnover. Strategies organizations can use to adapt to uncontrollably high employee turnover rates are presented in this article. In addition, suggestions are made for how managers should make choices among the alternative strategies.

  2. Organizational Strategies for Adapting to High Rates of Employee Turnover.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-07-01

    disrupt work. In addition, social involvement in the workplace has been identified as an important factor contributing to employee commitment (Mowday...scope of this paper to discuss how employee commitment to organizations can be increased (see Mowday et al., 1982). Where organizations are...successful in building and sustaining high levels of employee commitment , the probability of turnover itself, as well as the chance that work will be

  3. High Gene Family Turnover Rates and Gene Space Adaptation in the Compact Genome of the Carnivorous Plant Utricularia gibba.

    PubMed

    Carretero-Paulet, Lorenzo; Librado, Pablo; Chang, Tien-Hao; Ibarra-Laclette, Enrique; Herrera-Estrella, Luis; Rozas, Julio; Albert, Victor A

    2015-05-01

    Utricularia gibba is an aquatic carnivorous plant with highly specialized morphology, featuring fibrous floating networks of branches and leaf-like organs, no recognizable roots, and bladder traps that capture and digest prey. We recently described the compressed genome of U. gibba as sufficient to control the development and reproduction of a complex organism. We hypothesized intense deletion pressure as a mechanism whereby most noncoding DNA was deleted, despite evidence for three independent whole-genome duplications (WGDs). Here, we explore the impact of intense genome fractionation in the evolutionary dynamics of U. gibba's functional gene space. We analyze U. gibba gene family turnover by modeling gene gain/death rates under a maximum-likelihood statistical framework. In accord with our deletion pressure hypothesis, we show that the U. gibba gene death rate is significantly higher than those of four other eudicot species. Interestingly, the gene gain rate is also significantly higher, likely reflecting the occurrence of multiple WGDs and possibly also small-scale genome duplications. Gene ontology enrichment analyses of U. gibba-specific two-gene orthogroups, multigene orthogroups, and singletons highlight functions that may represent adaptations in an aquatic carnivorous plant. We further discuss two homeodomain transcription factor gene families (WOX and HDG/HDZIP-IV) showing conspicuous differential expansions and contractions in U. gibba. Our results 1) reconcile the compactness of the U. gibba genome with its accommodation of a typical number of genes for a plant genome, and 2) highlight the role of high gene family turnover in the evolutionary diversification of U. gibba's functional gene space and adaptations to its unique lifestyle and highly specialized body plan.

  4. Respiratory chain protein turnover rates in mice are highly heterogeneous but strikingly conserved across tissues, ages, and treatments.

    PubMed

    Karunadharma, Pabalu P; Basisty, Nathan; Chiao, Ying Ann; Dai, Dao-Fu; Drake, Rachel; Levy, Nick; Koh, William J; Emond, Mary J; Kruse, Shane; Marcinek, David; Maccoss, Michael J; Rabinovitch, Peter S

    2015-08-01

    The mitochondrial respiratory chain (RC) produces most of the cellular ATP and requires strict quality-control mechanisms. To examine RC subunit proteostasis in vivo, we measured RC protein half-lives (HLs) in mice by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry with metabolic [(2)H3]-leucine heavy isotope labeling under divergent conditions. We studied 7 tissues/fractions of young and old mice on control diet or one of 2 diet regimens (caloric restriction or rapamycin) that altered protein turnover (42 conditions in total). We observed a 6.5-fold difference in mean HL across tissues and an 11.5-fold difference across all conditions. Normalization to the mean HL of each condition showed that relative HLs were conserved across conditions (Spearman's ρ = 0.57; P < 10(-4)), but were highly heterogeneous between subunits, with a 7.3-fold mean range overall, and a 2.2- to 4.6-fold range within each complex. To identify factors regulating this conserved distribution, we performed statistical analyses to study the correlation of HLs to the properties of the subunits. HLs significantly correlated with localization within the mitochondria, evolutionary origin, location of protein-encoding, and ubiquitination levels. These findings challenge the notion that all subunits in a complex turnover at comparable rates and suggest that there are common rules governing the differential proteolysis of RC protein subunits under divergent cellular conditions.

  5. High turnover rate of Escherichia coli strains in the intestinal flora of infants in Pakistan.

    PubMed Central

    Adlerberth, I.; Jalil, F.; Carlsson, B.; Mellander, L.; Hanson, L. A.; Larsson, P.; Khalil, K.; Wold, A. E.

    1998-01-01

    The Escherichia coli flora of infants in developed countries is dominated by one or a few strains which persist for prolonged periods of time, but no longitudinal studies have been performed in developing countries. To this end, we studied the rectal enterobacterial flora in 22 home-delivered Pakistani infants during their first 6 months of life. Three colonies were isolated and species typed on each of 11 sampling occasions. E. coli isolates were strain typed using electromorphic typing of cytoplasmic enzymes, and their O serogroups were determined. There was a very rapid turnover of enterobacterial strains in the rectal flora of individual infants. On average, 8.5 different E. coli strains were found per infant, and several biotypes of other enterobacteria. Less than 50% of the infants were colonized with E. coli from their mothers, but strains of maternal origin were four times more likely to persists in the infants' flora than other E. coli strains. Enterobacteria other than E. coli were always of non-maternal origin, and Enterobacter cloacae and Klebsiella pneumoniae biotypes recovered from contaminated feeds were later identified in the infants' rectal flora. An early colonization with klebsiella or enterobacter was significantly associated with diarrhoea during the neonatal period, although these bacteria were not likely to be the cause of the disease. The results suggest that poor hygienic conditions result in an unstable and diverse enterobacterial flora, which may influence infant health. PMID:10030708

  6. Biotic turnover rates during the Pleistocene-Holocene transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stivrins, Normunds; Soininen, Janne; Amon, Leeli; Fontana, Sonia L.; Gryguc, Gražyna; Heikkilä, Maija; Heiri, Oliver; Kisielienė, Dalia; Reitalu, Triin; Stančikaitė, Miglė; Veski, Siim; Seppä, Heikki

    2016-11-01

    The Northern Hemisphere is currently warming at the rate which is unprecedented during the Holocene. Quantitative palaeoclimatic records show that the most recent time in the geological history with comparable warming rates was during the Pleistocene-Holocene transition (PHT) about 14,000 to 11,000 years ago. To better understand the biotic response to rapid temperature change, we explore the community turnover rates during the PHT by focusing on the Baltic region in the southeastern sector of the Scandinavian Ice Sheet, where an exceptionally dense network on microfossil and macrofossil data that reflect the biotic community history are available. We further use a composite chironomid-based summer temperature reconstruction compiled specifically for our study region to calculate the rate of temperature change during the PHT. The fastest biotic turnover in the terrestrial and aquatic communities occurred during the Younger Dryas-Holocene shift at 11,700 years ago. This general shift in species composition was accompanied by regional extinctions, including disappearance of mammoth (Mammuthus primigenius) and reindeer (Rangifer tarandus) and many arctic-alpine plant taxa, such as Dryas octopetala, Salix polaris and Saxifraga aizoides, from the region. This rapid biotic turnover rate occurred when the rate of warming was 0.17 °C/decade, thus slightly lower than the current Northern Hemisphere warming of 0.2 °C/decade. We therefore conclude that the Younger Dryas-Holocene shift with its rapid turnover rates and associated regional extinctions represents an important palaeoanalogue to the current high latitude warming and gives insights about the probable future turnover rates and patterns of the terrestrial and aquatic ecosystem change.

  7. Should I Stay or Should I Go? A Comparison Study of Intention to Leave among Public Child Welfare Systems with High and Low Turnover Rates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strolin-Goltzman, Jessica

    2008-01-01

    This comparison study analyzes the commonalties, similarities, and differences on supervisory and organizational factors between a group of high turnover systems and a group of low turnover systems. Significant differences on organizational factors, but not on supervisory factors, emerged from the statistical analysis. Additionally, this study…

  8. Forest turnover rates follow global and regional patterns of productivity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stephenson, N.L.; van Mantgem, P.J.

    2005-01-01

    Using a global database, we found that forest turnover rates (the average of tree mortality and recruitment rates) parallel broad-scale patterns of net primary productivity. First, forest turnover was higher in tropical than in temperate forests. Second, as recently demonstrated by others, Amazonian forest turnover was higher on fertile than infertile soils. Third, within temperate latitudes, turnover was highest in angiosperm forests, intermediate in mixed forests, and lowest in gymnosperm forests. Finally, within a single forest physiognomic type, turnover declined sharply with elevation (hence with temperature). These patterns of turnover in populations of trees are broadly similar to the patterns of turnover in populations of plant organs (leaves and roots) found in other studies. Our findings suggest a link between forest mass balance and the population dynamics of trees, and have implications for understanding and predicting the effects of environmental changes on forest structure and terrestrial carbon dynamics. ??2005 Blackwell Publishing Ltd/CNRS.

  9. Turnover rates and organizational performance: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Park, Tae-Youn; Shaw, Jason D

    2013-03-01

    The authors conducted a meta-analysis of the relationship between turnover rates and organizational performance to (a) determine the magnitude of the relationship; (b) test organization-, context-, and methods-related moderators of the relationship; and (c) suggest future directions for the turnover literature on the basis of the findings. The results from 300 total correlations (N = 309,245) and 110 independent correlations (N = 120,066) show that the relationship between total turnover rates and organizational performance is significant and negative (ρ = -.15). In addition, the relationship is more negative for voluntary (ρ = -.15) and reduction-in-force turnover (ρ = -.17) than for involuntary turnover (ρ = -.01). Moreover, the meta-analytic correlation differs significantly across several organization- and context-related factors (e.g., types of employment system, dimensions of organizational performance, region, and entity size). Finally, in sample-level regressions, the strength of the turnover rates-organizational performance relationship significantly varies across different average levels of total and voluntary turnover rates, which suggests a potential curvilinear relationship. The authors outline the practical magnitude of the findings and discuss implications for future organizational-level turnover research.

  10. Low turnover rates of carbon isotopes in tissues of two nectar-feeding bat species.

    PubMed

    Voigt, Christian C; Matt, Felix; Michener, Robert; Kunz, Thomas H

    2003-04-01

    Stable isotopes of carbon are commonly used to characterize dietary preferences in animals. Because turnover rates of carbon isotopes are related to metabolic rate, we wanted to determine the rates at which carbon isotopes are exchanged in tissues of two species of nectar-feeding bats (Leptonycteris curasoae and Glossophaga soricina), both of which have relatively high mass-specific metabolic rates. To test the hypothesis that isotope turnover is higher in nectar-feeding bats, because of their high mass-specific metabolic rates, than in other eutherian mammals, we conducted diet-switching experiments and chose three target tissues (hair, wing membrane and blood) to evaluate the isotopic turnover rates. We made the following predictions: (1) isotopic composition should change towards higher delta(13)C-values due to the turnover of carbon isotopes of C(3) origin with those of C(4)/CAM origin; (2) the turnover rates of carbon isotopes would differ between the three types of tissues in the following order of decreasing turnover rates: blood>wing membrane>hair; and (3) turnover rates of nectar-feeding bats should exceed those reported for other small mammals because of the high mass-specific metabolic rate of nectar-feeding bats. Compared to the initial diet, target tissues were enriched in heavy carbon isotopes by 2.8 per thousand in L. curasoae and by 2.6 per thousand in G. soricina. After changing the diet from C(3) to C(4)/CAM origin we found an increase in abundance of (13)C in blood and wing membrane in all experimental subjects. The estimated half life of carbon isotope turnover ranged from 100 to 134 days and did not differ significantly between blood and wing membrane, nor did it differ between the two species. The low turnover rate in wing membrane may reflect its specific composition and the relatively low temperature of this tissue, and long-lived erythrocytes in bat blood may be responsible for the low turnover rate of carbon isotopes in blood. The turnover

  11. Crowding enhances lipase turnover rate on surface-immobilized substrates.

    PubMed

    Balevicius, Zigmas; Ignatjeva, Dalia; Niaura, Gediminas; Ignatjev, Ilja; Vaicikauskas, Viktoras; Babonas, Gintautas Jurgis; Valincius, Gintaras

    2015-07-01

    Utilizing surface-immobilized synthetic lipid substrates containing the redox-active ferrocene groups, the enzymatic activity of lipase from Thermomyces lanuginosus was measured by the cyclic voltammetry method. The activity was correlated with the surface density of the protein by the ATR-IR spectroscopy and the total internal reflection ellipsometry. It was found that the lipase turnover rate significantly increases with its surface density. Despite expected hindrance effects due to the crowding of the enzyme molecules in the near surface-saturation range of concentrations, the turnover rate was consistently higher compared with the values measured at low concentrations. The effect was explained by the change in the surface arrangement of the enzyme. In the low concentration range, lipase adsorbs onto a surface adopting a predominantly horizontal position. At high concentrations, as the surface density approaches saturation, the enzyme molecules due to crowding are forced into the predominantly vertical position, which is more favorable for the activation of the lipase through the interaction between the "hydrophobic lid" of the lipase and the hydrophobic adsorbate surface.

  12. Differences in Bone Quality between High versus Low Turnover Renal Osteodystrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, Daniel S.; Pienkowski, David; Faugere, Marie-Claude; Malluche, Hartmut H.

    2012-01-01

    Abnormal bone turnover is common in chronic kidney disease (CKD), but its effects on bone quality remain unclear. This study sought to quantify the relationship between abnormal bone turnover and bone quality. Iliac crest bone biopsies were obtained from CKD-5 patients on dialysis with low (n=18) or high (n=17) turnover, and from volunteers (n=12) with normal turnover and normal kidney function. Histomorphometric methods were used to quantify the microstructural parameters; Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and nanoindentation were used to quantify the material and mechanical properties in bone. Reduced mineral-to-matrix ratio, mineral crystal size, stiffness and hardness were observed in bone with high turnover compared to bone with normal or low turnover. Decreased cancellous bone volume and trabecular thickness were seen in bone with low turnover compared to bone with normal or high turnover. Bone quality, as defined by its microstructural, material, and mechanical properties, is related to bone turnover. These data suggest that turnover related alterations in bone quality may contribute to the known diminished mechanical competence of bone in CKD patients, albeit from different mechanisms for bone with high (material abnormality) vs. low (microstructural alteration) turnover. The present findings suggest that improved treatments for renal osteodystrophy should seek to avoid low or high bone turnover and aim for turnover rates as close to normal as possible.

  13. Proteins with High Turnover Rate in Barley Leaves Estimated by Proteome Analysis Combined with in Planta Isotope Labeling1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Clark J.; Alexova, Ralitza; Jacoby, Richard P.; Millar, A. Harvey

    2014-01-01

    Protein turnover is a key component in cellular homeostasis; however, there is little quantitative information on degradation kinetics for individual plant proteins. We have used 15N labeling of barley (Hordeum vulgare) plants and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of free amino acids and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of proteins to track the enrichment of 15N into the amino acid pools in barley leaves and then into tryptic peptides derived from newly synthesized proteins. Using information on the rate of growth of barley leaves combined with the rate of degradation of 14N-labeled proteins, we calculate the turnover rates of 508 different proteins in barley and show that they vary by more than 100-fold. There was approximately a 9-h lag from label application until 15N incorporation could be reliably quantified in extracted peptides. Using this information and assuming constant translation rates for proteins during the time course, we were able to quantify degradation rates for several proteins that exhibit half-lives on the order of hours. Our workflow, involving a stringent series of mass spectrometry filtering steps, demonstrates that 15N labeling can be used for large-scale liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry studies of protein turnover in plants. We identify a series of abundant proteins in photosynthesis, photorespiration, and specific subunits of chlorophyll biosynthesis that turn over significantly more rapidly than the average protein involved in these processes. We also highlight a series of proteins that turn over as rapidly as the well-known D1 subunit of photosystem II. While these proteins need further verification for rapid degradation in vivo, they cluster in chlorophyll and thiamine biosynthesis. PMID:25082890

  14. Evidence for convergent nucleotide evolution and high allelic turnover rates at the complementary sex determiner gene of Western and Asian honeybees.

    PubMed

    Hasselmann, Martin; Vekemans, Xavier; Pflugfelder, Jochen; Koeniger, Nikolaus; Koeniger, Gudrun; Tingek, Salim; Beye, Martin

    2008-04-01

    Our understanding of the impact of recombination, mutation, genetic drift, and selection on the evolution of a single gene is still limited. Here we investigate the impact of all these evolutionary forces at the complementary sex determiner (csd) gene that evolves under a balancing mode of selection. Females are heterozygous at the csd gene and males are hemizygous; diploid males are lethal and occur when csd is homozygous. Rare alleles thus have a selective advantage, are seldom lost by the effect of genetic drift, and are maintained over extended periods of time when compared with neutral polymorphisms. Here, we report on the analysis of 17, 19, and 15 csd alleles of Apis cerana, Apis dorsata, and Apis mellifera honeybees, respectively. We observed great heterogeneity of synonymous (piS) and nonsynonymous (piN) polymorphisms across the gene, with a consistent peak in exons 6 and 7. We propose that exons 6 and 7 encode the potential specifying domain (csd-PSD) that has accumulated elevated nucleotide polymorphisms over time by balancing selection. We observed no direct evidence that balancing selection favors the accumulation of nonsynonymous changes at csd-PSD (piN/piS ratios are all <1, ranging from 0.6 to 0.95). We observed an excess of shared nonsynonymous changes, which suggest that strong evolutionary constraints are operating at csd-PSD resulting in the independent accumulation of the same nonsynonymous changes in different alleles across species (convergent evolution). Analysis of csd-PSD genealogy revealed relatively short average coalescence times ( approximately 6 Myr), low average synonymous nucleotide diversity (piS < 0.09), and a lack of trans-specific alleles that substantially contrasts with previously analyzed loci under strong balancing selection. We excluded the possibility of a burst of diversification after population bottlenecking and intragenic recombination as explanatory factors, leaving high turnover rates as the explanation for this

  15. Explaining the Gap in Charter and Traditional Public School Teacher Turnover Rates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuit, David A.; Smith, Thomas M.

    2012-01-01

    This study uses national survey data to examine why charter school teachers are more likely to turnover than their traditional public school counterparts. We test whether the turnover gap is explained by different distributions of factors that are empirically and theoretically linked to turnover risk. We find that the turnover rate of charter…

  16. Enhancer regions show high histone H3.3 turnover that changes during differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Deaton, Aimee M; Gómez-Rodríguez, Mariluz; Mieczkowski, Jakub; Tolstorukov, Michael Y; Kundu, Sharmistha; Sadreyev, Ruslan I; Jansen, Lars ET; Kingston, Robert E

    2016-01-01

    The organization of DNA into chromatin is dynamic; nucleosomes are frequently displaced to facilitate the ability of regulatory proteins to access specific DNA elements. To gain insight into nucleosome dynamics, and to follow how dynamics change during differentiation, we used a technique called time-ChIP to quantitatively assess histone H3.3 turnover genome-wide during differentiation of mouse ESCs. We found that, without prior assumptions, high turnover could be used to identify regions involved in gene regulation. High turnover was seen at enhancers, as observed previously, with particularly high turnover at super-enhancers. In contrast, regions associated with the repressive Polycomb-Group showed low turnover in ESCs. Turnover correlated with DNA accessibility. Upon differentiation, numerous changes in H3.3 turnover rates were observed, the majority of which occurred at enhancers. Thus, time-ChIP measurement of histone turnover shows that active enhancers are unusually dynamic in ESCs and changes in highly dynamic nucleosomes predominate at enhancers during differentiation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15316.001 PMID:27304074

  17. Hibernation, stress, intestinal functions, and catecholoamine turnover rate in hamsters and gerbils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musacchia, X. J.

    1973-01-01

    Bioenergetic studies on hamsters during depressed metabolic states are reported. External support of blood glucose extended the survival times of hibernating animals. Radioresistance increased in hibernating as well as in hypothermic hamsters. Marked changes in hamster catecholamine turnover rates were observed during acclimatization to high temperature stress. High radioresistance levels of the gerbil gastrointestinal system were attributed in part to the ability of the gut to maintain functional integrity.

  18. Greater soil carbon stocks and faster turnover rates with increasing agricultural productivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanderman, Jonathan; Creamer, Courtney; Baisden, W. Troy; Farrell, Mark; Fallon, Stewart

    2017-01-01

    Devising agricultural management schemes that enhance food security and soil carbon levels is a high priority for many nations. However, the coupling between agricultural productivity, soil carbon stocks and organic matter turnover rates is still unclear. Archived soil samples from four decades of a long-term crop rotation trial were analyzed for soil organic matter (SOM) cycling-relevant properties: C and N content, bulk composition by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, amino sugar content, short-term C bioavailability assays, and long-term C turnover rates by modeling the incorporation of the bomb spike in atmospheric 14C into the soil. After > 40 years under consistent management, topsoil carbon stocks ranged from 14 to 33 Mg C ha-1 and were linearly related to the mean productivity of each treatment. Measurements of SOM composition demonstrated increasing amounts of plant- and microbially derived SOM along the productivity gradient. Under two modeling scenarios, radiocarbon data indicated overall SOM turnover time decreased from 40 to 13 years with increasing productivity - twice the rate of decline predicted from simple steady-state models or static three-pool decay rates of measured C pool distributions. Similarly, the half-life of synthetic root exudates decreased from 30.4 to 21.5 h with increasing productivity, indicating accelerated microbial activity. These findings suggest that there is a direct feedback between accelerated biological activity, carbon cycling rates and rates of carbon stabilization with important implications for how SOM dynamics are represented in models.

  19. Simultaneous measurements of umbilical uptake, fetal utilization rate, and fetal turnover rate of glucose.

    PubMed

    Hay, W W; Sparks, J W; Quissell, B J; Battaglia, F C; Meschia, G

    1981-06-01

    Fetal umbilical glucose uptake was compared with simultaneous measurements of glucose turnover and utilization rates in 12 pregnant sheep, at a mean of 137 days gestational age (range, 118-146 days). Umbilical glucose uptake was calculated by application of the Fick principle. Fetal glucose turnover rate was measured by a primed-constant infusion of [14C]- and [3H]glucose (glucose turnover rate = tracer infusion rate divided by fetal glucose sp act). The calculation of fetal glucose utilization rate required substraction of the loss of tracer to the placenta from the tracer infusion rate, thus defining the net tracer entry into the fetus for direct comparison with the net umbilical glucose uptake. In fed, normoglycemic sheep, these measurements demonstrated statistical equivalence of umbilical glucose uptake rate (4.77 mg.min-1.kg-1 +/- 0.34 SE) and glucose utilization rate ([14C]glucose, 5.58 mg.min-1.kg-1 +/- 0.54 SE; and [3H]glucose, 7.19 mg.min-1.kg-1 +/- 1.24 SE) when tested by two-way analysis of variance (P greater than 0.1). In three fasted, hypoglycemic sheep, the umbilical glucose uptake rate fell to 1.43 mg.min-1.kg-1 +/- 0.56 SE, which was considerably lower than the simultaneous glucose utilization rate ([14C]glucose, 4.78 mg.min-1.kg-1 +/- 0.48 SE; and [3H]glucose, 6.81 mg.min-1.kg-1 +/- 2.19 SE). Thus, in the normoglycemic, late-gestation fetal lamb, there appears to be little glucogenesis, whereas glucogenesis may become significant during fasting-induced fetal hypoglycemia.

  20. Turnover of texture in low rate sputter-deposited nanocrystalline molybdenum films

    SciTech Connect

    Druesedau, T.P.; Klabunde, F.; Loehmann, M.; Hempel, T.; Blaesing, J.

    1997-07-01

    The crystallite size and orientation in molybdenum films prepared by magnetron sputtering at a low rate of typical 1 {angstrom}/s and a pressure of 0.45 Pa was investigated by X-ray diffraction and texture analysis. The surface topography was studied using atomic force microscopy. Increasing the film thickness from 20 nm to 3 {micro}m, the films show a turnover from a (110) fiber texture to a (211) mosaic-like texture. In the early state of growth (20 nm thickness) the development of dome-like structures on the surface is observed. The number of these structures increases with film thickness, whereas their size is weakly influenced. The effect of texture turnover is reduced by increasing the deposition rate by a factor of six, and it is absent for samples mounted above the center of the magnetron source. The effect of texture turnover is related to the bombardment of the films with high energetic argon neutrals resulting from backscattering at the target under oblique angle and causing resputtering. Due to the narrow angular distribution of the reflected argon, bombardment of the substrate plane is inhomogeneous and only significant for regions close to the erosion zone of the magnetron.

  1. Variability in root production, phenology, and turnover rate among 12 temperate tree species.

    PubMed

    McCormack, M Luke; Adams, Thomas S; Smithwick, Erica A H; Eissenstat, David M

    2014-08-01

    The timing of fine root production and turnover strongly influences both the seasonal potential for soil resource acquisition among competing root systems and the plant fluxes of root carbon into soil pools. However, basic patterns and variability in the rates and timing or fine root production and turnover are generally unknown among perennial plants species. We address this shortfall using a heuristic model relating root phenology to turnover together with three years of minirhizotron observations of root dynamics in 12 temperate tree species grown in a common garden. We specifically investigated how the amount and the timing of root production differ among species and how they impact estimates of fine root turnover. Across the 12 species, there was wide variation in the timing of root production with some species producing a single root flush in early summer and others producing roots either more uniformly over the growing season or in multiple pulses. Additionally, the pattern and timing of root production appeared to be consistent across years for some species but varied in others. Root turnover rate was related to total root production (P < 0.001) as species with greater root production typically had faster root turnover rates. We also found that, within species, annual root production varied up to a threefold increase between years, which led to large interannual differences in turnover rate. Results from the heuristic model indicated that shifting the pattern or timing of root production can impact estimates of root turnover rates for root populations with life spans less than one year while estimates of root turnover rate for longer lived roots were unaffected by changes in root phenology. Overall, we suggest that more detailed observations of root phenology and production will improve fidelity of root turnover estimates. Future efforts should link patterns of root phenology and production with whole-plant life history traits and variation in annual and

  2. Changes in skeletal collagen crosslinks and matrix hydration in high and low turnover chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Matthew R.; Newman, Christopher L.; Chen, Neal; Granke, Mathilde; Nyman, Jeffry S.; Moe, Sharon M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose/Introduction Clinical data have documented a clear increase in fracture risk associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Preclinical studies have shown reductions in bone mechanical properties although the tissue-level mechanisms for these differences remain unclear. The goal of this study was to assess collagen cross-links and matrix hydration, two variables known to affect mechanical properties, in animals with either high or low turnover CKD. Methods At 35 weeks of age (>75% reduction in kidney function), the femoral diaphysis of male Cy/+ rats with high or low bone turnover rates, along with normal littermate (NL) controls, were assessed for collagen cross-links (pyridinoline (PYD), deoxypyridinoline (DPD), and pentosidine (PE)) using a high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) assay as well as pore and bound water per volume (pw and bw) using a 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique. Material-level biomechanical properties were calculated based on previously published whole bone mechanical tests. Results Cortical bone from animals with high turnover disease had lower Pyd and Dpd crosslink levels (−21% each), lower bw (−10%), higher PE (+71%), and higher pw (+46%), compared to NL. Animals with low turnover had higher Dpd, PE (+71%), and bw (+7%) along with lower pw (−60%) compared to NL. Both high and low turnover animals had reduced material-level bone toughness compared to NL animals as determined by three-point bending. Conclusions These data document an increase in skeletal PE with advanced CKD that is independent of bone turnover rate and inversely related to decline in kidney function. Although hydration changes occur in both high and low turnover disease, the data suggest that non-enzymatic collagen crosslinks may be a key factor in compromised mechanical properties of CKD. PMID:25466530

  3. Implications of high species turnover on the south-western Australian sandplains

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, Neil; Prober, Suzanne; Meissner, Rachel; van Leeuwen, Stephen

    2017-01-01

    Species turnover and its components related to replacement and nestedness form a significant element of diversity that is historically poorly accounted for in conservation planning. To inform biodiversity conservation and contribute to a broader understanding of patterns in species turnover, we undertook a floristic survey of 160 plots along an 870 km transect across oligotrophic sandplains, extending from the mesic south coast to the arid interior of south-western Australia. A nested survey design was employed to sample distances along the transect as evenly as possible. Species turnover was correlated with geographic distance at both regional and local scales, consistent with dispersal limitation being a significant driver of species turnover. When controlled for species richness, species replacement was found to be the dominant component of species turnover and was uniformly high across the transect, uncorrelated with either climatic or edaphic factors. This high replacement rate, well documented in the mega-diverse south-west, appears to also be a consistent feature of arid zone vegetation systems despite a decrease in overall species richness. Species turnover increased rapidly with increasing extent along the transect reaching an asymptote at ca. 50 km. These findings are consistent with earlier work in sandplain and mallee vegetation in the south-west and suggests reserve based conservation strategies are unlikely to be practicable in the south-western Australia sandplains when communities are defined by species incidence rather than dominance. PMID:28245232

  4. Support Effects on Bronsted acid site densities and alcohol dehydration turnover rates on tungsten oxide domains

    SciTech Connect

    Macht, Josef; Baertsch, Chelsey D.; May-Lozano, Marcos; Soled, Stuart L.; Wang, Yong; Iglesia, Enrique

    2005-03-01

    Initial activity and acid site density of several WAl, WSi (MCM41) and one WSn sample were determined. Trans/cis 2-butene selectivity is dependent on the support. Presumably, these differences are due to subtle differences in base strengths. 2-Butanol dehydration rates (per W-atom) reached maximum values at intermediate WOx surface densities on WAl, as reported for 2-butanol dehydration reactions on WZr. Titration results indicate that Bronsted acid sites are required for 2-butanol dehydration on WAl, WSi and WSn. UV-visible studies suggest that WAl is much more difficult to reduce than WZr. The detection of reduced centers on WAl, the number of which correlates to Bronsted acid site density and catalyst activity, as well as the temperature dependence of Bronsted acid site density indicate the in-situ formation of these active sites. We infer that this mechanism is common among all supported WOx samples described in this study. Turnover rates are a function of Bronsted acid site density only. High acid site densities lead to high turnover rates. Higher active site densities may cause stronger conjugate bases, as a higher electron density has to be stabilized, and thus weaker acidity, enabling a faster rate of product desorption. The maximum achievable active site density is dependent on the support. WZr reaches a higher active site density than WAl.

  5. Local extinction and turnover rates at the edge and interior of species' ranges

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Doherty, P.F.; Boulinier, T.; James., D.

    2003-01-01

    One hypothesis for the maintenance of the edge of a species' range suggests that more central (and abundant) populations are relatively stable and edge populations are less stable with increased local extinction and turnover rates. To date, estimates of such metrics are equivocal due to design and analysis flaws. Apparent increased estimates of extinction and turnover rates at the edge of range, versus the interior, could be a function of decreased detection probabilities alone, and not of a biological process. We estimated extinction and turnover rates for species at the interiors and edges of their ranges using an approach which incorporates potential heterogeneity in species detection probabilities. Extinction rates were higher at the edges (0.17 ?? 0.03 []) than in the interiors (0.04 ?? 0.01), as was turnover. Without taking the probability of detection into account these differences would be artificially magnified. Knowledge of extinction and turnover rates is essential in furthering our understanding of range dynamics, and in directing conservation efforts. This study further illustrates the practical application of methods proposed recently for estimating extinction rates and other community dynamic parameters.

  6. Local extinction and turnover rates at the edge and interior of species' ranges

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Doherty, P.F.; Boulinier, T.; Nichols, J.D.

    2003-01-01

    One hypothesis for the maintenance of the edge of a species' range suggests that more central (and abundant) populations are relatively stable and edge populations are less stable with increased local extinction and turnover rates. To date, estimates of such metrics are equivocal due to design and analysis flaws. Apparent increased estimates of extinction and turnover rates at the edge of range, versus the interior, could be a function of decreased detection probabilities alone, and not of a biological process. We estimated extinction and turnover rates for species at the interiors and edges of their ranges using an approach which incorporates potential heterogeneity in species detection probabilities. Extinction rates were higher at the edges (0.17 ' 0.03 [SE]) than in the interiors (0.04 ' 0.01), as was turnover. Without taking the probability of detection into account these differences would be artificially magnified. Knowledge of extinction and turnover rates is essential in furthering our understanding of range dynamics, and in directing conservation efforts. This study further illustrates the practical application of methods proposed recently for estimating extinction rates and other community dynamic parameters.

  7. Blind Spots: Small Rural Communities and High Turnover in the Superintendency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kamrath, Barry; Brunner, C. Cryss

    2014-01-01

    This article examines high superintendency turnover through rural community members' perceptions of such attrition in their districts. Findings indicate that community members perceived high turnover as negative and believed that turnover was created by financial pressures, rural community resistance to educational trends, and bias against…

  8. Sources of variation in extinction rates, turnover, and diversity of marine invertebrate families during the Paleozoic

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nichols, J.D.; Morris, R.W.; Brownie, C.; Pollock, K.H.

    1986-01-01

    The authors present a new method that can be used to estimate taxonomic turnover in conjunction with stratigraphic range data for families in five phyla of Paleozoic marine invertebrates. Encounter probabilities varied among taxa and showed evidence of a decrease over time for the geologic series examined. The number of families varied substantially among the five phyla and showed some evidence of an increase over the series examined. There was no evidence of variation in extinction probabilities among the phyla. Although there was evidence of temporal variation in extinction probabilities within phyla, there was no evidence of a linear decrease in extinction probabilities over time, as has been reported by others. The authors did find evidence of high extinction probabilities for the two intervals that had been identified by others as periods of mass extinction. They found no evidence of variation in turnover among the five phyla. There was evidence of temporal variation in turnover, with greater turnover occurring in the older series.

  9. Special K: testing the potassium link between radioactive rubidium (86Rb) turnover and metabolic rate.

    PubMed

    Tomlinson, Sean; Mathialagan, Priya D; Maloney, Shane K

    2014-04-01

    The measurement of (86)Rb turnover recently has been suggested as a useful method for measuring field metabolic rate in small animals. We investigated a proposed mechanism of (86)Rb turnover, its analogy to K(+), by comparing the turnover of (86)Rb in a model insect, the rhinoceros beetle Xylotrupes gideon, fed a diet of plum jam or plum jam enriched with K(+) or Rb(+). The turnover of (86)Rb in the beetles on the K(+) and the Rb(+) diets was higher than that for beetles on the jam diet (F2,311=32.4; P=1.58×10(-13)). We also exposed the beetles to different ambient temperatures to induce differences in metabolic rate ( ) while feeding them the jam and K(+) diets. was higher at higher ambient temperature (Ta) for both jam (F1,11=14.56; P=0.003) and K(+) (F1,8=15.39; P=0.004) dietary groups, and the turnover of (86)Rb was higher at higher Ta for both jam (F1,11=10.80; P=0.007) and K(+) (F1,8=12.34; P=0.008) dietary groups. There was a significant relationship between (86)Rb turnover and for both the jam (F1,11=35.00; P=1.0×10(-3)) and the K(+) (F1,8=64.33; P=4.3×10(-5)) diets, but the relationship differed between the diets (F1,19=14.07; P=0.001), with a higher (86)Rb turnover in beetles on the K(+)-enriched than on the jam diet at all Ta. We conclude that (86)Rb turnover is related to K(+) metabolism, and that this is the mechanism of the relationship between (86)Rb turnover and . Studies relating (86)Rb turnover to should maintain dietary [K] as close as possible to that of natural diets for the most accurate calibrations for free-ranging animals.

  10. Estimating soil turnover rate from tree uprooting during hurricanes in Puerto Rico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lenart, M.T.; Falk, D.A.; Scatena, F.N.; Osterkamp, W.R.

    2010-01-01

    Soil turnover by tree uprooting in primary and secondary forests on the island of Puerto Rico was measured in 42 study plots in the months immediately after the passage of a Category 3 hurricane. Trunk basal area explained 61% of the variability of mound volume and 53% of the variability of mound area. The proportion of uprooted trees, the number of uprooted trees, or the proportion of uprooted basal area explained 84-85% of the variation in hurricane-created mound area. These same variables explain 79-85% of the variation in mound volume. The study indicates that the soil turnover period from tree uprooting by Puerto Rican hurricanes is between 1600 and 4800 years. These rates are faster than soil turnover by landslides and background treefall in the same area and provide a useful age constraint on soil profile development and soil carbon sequestration in these dynamic landscapes. ?? 2009 Elsevier B.V.

  11. Rate of promoter class turn-over in yeast evolution

    PubMed Central

    Bazykin, Georgii A; Kondrashov, Alexey S

    2006-01-01

    Background Phylogenetic conservation at the DNA level is routinely used as evidence of molecular function, under the assumption that locations and sequences of functional DNA segments remain invariant in evolution. In particular, short DNA segments participating in initiation and regulation of transcription are often conserved between related species. However, transcription of a gene can evolve, and this evolution may involve changes of even such conservative DNA segments. Genes of yeast Saccharomyces have promoters of two classes, class 1 (TATA-containing) and class 2 (non-TATA-containing). Results Comparison of upstream non-coding regions of orthologous genes from the five species of Saccharomyces sensu stricto group shows that among 212 genes which very likely have class 1 promoters in S. cerevisiae, 17 probably have class 2 promoters in one or more other species. Conversely, among 322 genes which very likely have class 2 promoters in S. cerevisiae, 44 probably have class 1 promoters in one or more other species. Also, for at least 2 genes from the set of 212 S. cerevisiae genes with class 1 promoters, the locations of the TATA consensus sequences are substantially different between the species. Conclusion Our results indicate that, in the course of yeast evolution, a promoter switches its class with the probability at least ~0.1 per time required for the accumulation of one nucleotide substitution at a non-coding site. Thus, key sequences involved in initiation of transcription evolve with substantial rates in yeast. PMID:16472383

  12. Turnover Rates of Hepatic Collagen and Circulating Collagen-Associated Proteins in Humans with Chronic Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Li, Kelvin; Gatmaitan, Michelle; Luo, Flora; Cattin, Jerome; Nakamura, Corelle; Holmes, William E.; Angel, Thomas E.; Peters, Marion G.; Turner, Scott M.; Hellerstein, Marc K.

    2015-01-01

    Accumulation and degradation of scar tissue in fibrotic liver disease occur slowly, typically over many years. Direct measurement of fibrogenesis, the rate of scar tissue deposition, may provide valuable therapeutic and prognostic information. We describe here results from a pilot study utilizing in vivo metabolic labeling to measure the turnover rate of hepatic collagen and collagen-associated proteins in plasma for the first time in human subjects. Eight subjects with chronic liver disease were labeled with daily oral doses of 2H2O for up to 8 weeks prior to diagnostic liver biopsy and plasma collection. Tandem mass spectrometry was used to measure the abundance and fractional synthesis rate (FSR) of proteins in liver and blood. Relative protein abundance and FSR data in liver revealed marked differences among subjects. FSRs of hepatic type I and III collagen ranged from 0.2–0.6% per day (half-lives of 4 months to a year) and correlated significantly with worsening histologic fibrosis. Analysis of plasma protein turnover revealed two collagen-associated proteins, lumican and transforming growth factor beta-induced-protein (TGFBI), exhibiting FSRs that correlated significantly with FSRs of hepatic collagen. In summary, this is the first direct measurement of liver collagen turnover in vivo in humans and suggests a high rate of collagen remodeling in advanced fibrosis. In addition, the FSRs of collagen-associated proteins in plasma are measurable and may provide a novel strategy for monitoring hepatic fibrogenesis rates. PMID:25909381

  13. Massive turnover rates of fine root detrital carbon in tropical Australian mangroves.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Alistar I; Alongi, Daniel M

    2016-03-01

    Dead fine roots are the major component of organic carbon (C) stored in mangrove forests. We measured the mass and decomposition of fine root detritus in three mangrove forests along an intertidal gradient in tropical Australia to provide the first integrated estimates of the rate of turnover of fine root detritus. The grand mean dry masses of dead fine roots in the forests decreased in the order mid-intertidal Rhizophora (mean 28.4 kg m(-2)), low-intertidal Rhizophora (16.3 kg m(-2)) and high-intertidal Ceriops (mean 8.9 kg m(-2)), and were some of the highest on record. The first-order decay coefficients (day(-1)) for dead fine roots in the low Rhizophora, mid Rhizophora and high Ceriops forest sites were 0.0014, 0.0017 and 0.0007, respectively, and were the lowest on record. The estimated mean fluxes of C via decomposition of dead fine roots were very high in all forests, decreasing in the order mid Rhizophora (18.8 g C m(-2) day(-1)), low Rhizophora (8.4 g C m(-2) day(-1)) and high Ceriops (2.5 g C m(-2) day(-1)). There were relatively low levels of uncertainty in these estimates when all sources of error were considered. The fluxes of C for the two Rhizophora sites integrate all losses from saprophytic decay and leaching of dissolved C and were 50-200 % higher than the estimated total annual loss of C derived by summing rates of bacterial metabolism and export via groundwater and surface waters in these forests. The significant difference reflects both the very high dead root masses and the incorporation of the impact of fungi in our estimates.

  14. Analysis of growth and tissue replacement rates by stable sulfur isotope turnover.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arneson, L. S.; Macko, S. A.; Macavoy, S. E.

    2003-12-01

    Stable isotope analysis has become a powerful tool to study animal ecology. Analysis of stable isotope ratios of elements such as carbon, nitrogen, sulfur, hydrogen, oxygen and others have been used to trace migratory routes, reconstruct dietary sources and determine the physiological condition of individual animals. The isotopes most commonly used are carbon, due to differential carbon fractionation in C3 and C4 plants, and nitrogen, due to the approximately 3% enrichment in 15N per trophic level. Although all cells express sulfur-containing compounds, such as cysteine, methionine, and coenzyme A, the turnover rate of sulfur in tissues has not been examined in most studies, owing to the difficulty in determining the δ 34S signature. In this study, we have assessed the rate of sulfur isotopic turnover in mouse tissues following a diet change from terrestrial (7%) to marine (19%) source. Turnover models reflecting both growth rate and metabolic tissue replacement will be developed for blood, liver, fat and muscle tissues.

  15. Effect of ensiled hop (Humulus lupulus L.) residues on plasma acetate turnover rate in sheep.

    PubMed

    Al-Mamun, Mohammad; Saito, Aya; Sano, Hiroaki

    2011-06-01

    An isotope dilution method using [1-(13)C]sodium acetate was applied to determine the effect of feeding ensiled hop (Humulus lupulus L.) residues on plasma acetate turnover rate in six adult crossbred sheep. The sheep were fed 63 g/kg body weight (BW)(0.75)/day of either mixed hay of orchardgrass (Dactylis glomerata L.) and reed canarygrass (Phalaris arundinacea L.) and round bale silage at 3:1 ratio (Hay-diet), or another where round bale silage was replaced by ensiled hop residues (Hop-diet) with a crossover design each of a 3-week period. The isotope dilution method was performed on day 21 of each dietary treatment. Dry matter digestibility was similar between diets, and nitrogen (N) digestibility was lower (P = 0.001) for Hop-diet than Hay-diet. However, N retention did not differ between diets. Plasma acetate concentration was lower (P = 0.04) for Hop-diet than Hay-diet, and the turnover rate of plasma acetate did not differ between diets. Plasma concentration of lactate and non-esterified fatty acids were similar between diets. Hop-diet was found almost comparable to Hay-diet on plasma acetate turnover rate in the present experimental conditions. Therefore, it could be concluded that hop residues partially could be used as an alternative to traditionally used round bale silage for rearing sheep.

  16. Campanian to Maastrichtian pollen biostratigraphy and floral turnover rates, Colville River region, north slope of Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Frederiksen, N.O.; Schindler, K.S.

    1987-05-01

    This study is based on occurrence data for 104 angiosperm pollen taxa from 83 pollen-bearing outcrop and core samples taken along the Colville River and stratigraphically distributed from the base of the Sentinel Hill Member of the Schrader Bluff Formation to the top of the Cretaceous section. Many of the pollen taxa are highly useful for intraregional correlations because they have remarkably short stratigraphic ranges and are consistently present within these ranges. Important similarities are present between North Slope pollen assemblages and those of western Canada, Siberia, and China. The Campanian-Maastrichtian boundary is approximately marked by the range bases of Wodehouseia edmontonicola and Senipites drummhellerensis and is nearly as far south (downsection) as Sentinel Hill core test 1. Based on pollen correlations with Alberta, the marine beds at Ocean Point are probably within the middle part of the Maastrichtian, and strata north of Ocean Point that contain Aquilapollenites conatus are uppermost Maastrichtian. Thus, if the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary in the study area is represented by an unconformity as their data suggest, the lowermost Paleocene is missing, not the uppermost Cretaceous. Maximum diversities of species of the stratigraphically significant Triprojectacites and Expressipollis groups are in the upper Campanian. Major turnovers of angiosperm taxa occurred late in the Campanian and in the Maastrichtian, but high rates of first appearances coincided with high rates of last appearances. Thus, once a fairly high overall angiosperm diversity was established in the middle(.) Campanian, the diversity remained relatively constant until at or near the end of the Maastrichtian.

  17. Changes in turnover and vacancy rates of care workers in England from 2008 to 2010: panel analysis of national workforce data.

    PubMed

    Hussein, Shereen; Ismail, Mohamed; Manthorpe, Jill

    2016-09-01

    The combination of growing demand for long-term care and higher expectations of care staff needs to be set in the context of long-standing concerns about the sustainability of recruitment and retention of front-line staff in the United Kingdom. Organisational and work environment factors are associated with vacancy levels and turnover rates. The aim of the current analysis was to investigate changes in turnover and vacancy rates over time experienced by a sample of social care employers in England. Taking a follow-up approach offers potentially more accurate estimates of changes in turnover and vacancy rates, and enables the identification of any different organisational characteristics which may be linked to reductions in these elements over time. The study constructed a panel of 2964 care providers (employers) using 18 separate data sets from the National Minimum Data Set for Social Care during 2008-2010. The findings indicate slight reductions in vacancy rates but the presence of enduring, high turnover rates among direct care workers over the study period. However, the experience of individual employers varied, with home-care providers experiencing significantly higher turnover rates than other parts of the sector. These findings raise questions around the quality and motivations of new recruits and methods of reducing specific vacancy levels. At a time of increased emphasis on care at home, it is worthwhile examining why care homes appear to have greater stability of staff and fewer vacancies than home-care agencies.

  18. Unit-level voluntary turnover rates and customer service quality: implications of group cohesiveness, newcomer concentration, and size.

    PubMed

    Hausknecht, John P; Trevor, Charlie O; Howard, Michael J

    2009-07-01

    Despite substantial growth in the service industry and emerging work on turnover consequences, little research examines how unit-level turnover rates affect essential customer-related outcomes. The authors propose an operational disruption framework to explain why voluntary turnover impairs customers' service quality perceptions. On the basis of a sample of 75 work units and data from 5,631 employee surveys, 59,602 customer surveys, and organizational records, results indicate that unit-level voluntary turnover rates are negatively related to service quality perceptions. The authors also examine potential boundary conditions related to the disruption framework. Of 3 moderators studied (group cohesiveness, group size, and newcomer concentration), results show that turnover's negative effects on service quality are more pronounced in larger units and in those with a greater concentration of newcomers.

  19. 6-( sup 18 F)fluoro-L-dopa probes dopamine turnover rates in central dopaminergic structures

    SciTech Connect

    Barrio, J.R.; Huang, S.C.; Melega, W.P.; Yu, D.C.; Hoffman, J.M.; Schneider, J.S.; Satyamurthy, N.; Mazziotta, J.C.; Phelps, M.E. )

    1990-12-01

    6-({sup 18}F)Fluoro-L-DOPA (FDOPA) cerebral kinetics and metabolism were correlated in normal primates (Macaca nemestrina) and primates with 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) induced unilateral Parkinsonism. Application of a tracer kinetic model to positron emission tomography (PET) data indicated that the model allows reliable estimation of FDOPA blood brain barrier transport, decarboxylation and release of stored 6-({sup 18}F)fluorodopamine (FDA) radioactivity in normal striatum (k4 = 0.005/min, turnover half-time greater than or equal to 2 hr), in agreement with biochemical data. PET scans of MPTP treated monkeys revealed 40-50% reduction in total striatal activity in comparison with pre-MPTP scans. Monkey brain biochemical analysis revealed that the reduction in activity was mainly due to a decrease in FDA and its metabolites, 6({sup 18}F)fluorohomovanillic (FHVA) and 6-({sup 18}F)fluoro-3, 4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (FDOPAC). The remaining activity in tissue was 3-0-methyl-6-({sup 18}F)fluoro-L-DOPA (3-OMFD) of peripheral origin. The (FHVA + FDOPAC)/FDA ratio was 1:2 in normal putamen and greater than or equal to 6:1 in the lesioned putamen, indicative of a dramatic increase in turnover of FDA. Both kinetic and biochemical data indicate that FDOPA labels a slow turnover rate pool of dopamine in rat and primate brain. This turnover rate for stored dopamine (DA) is accelerated with dopaminergic cell losses (e.g., MPTP-induced Parkinsonism).

  20. Differences in Bone Quality in Low- and High-Turnover Renal Osteodystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Porter, Daniel S.; Monier-Faugere, Marie-Claude; Mawad, Hanna; Pienkowski, David

    2012-01-01

    Abnormal bone turnover is common in CKD, but its effects on bone quality remain unclear. We qualitatively screened iliac crest bone specimens from patients on dialysis to identify those patients with low (n=18) or high (n=17) bone turnover. In addition, we obtained control bone specimens from 12 healthy volunteers with normal kidney function. In the patient and control specimens, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and nanoindentation quantified the material and mechanical properties of the specimens, and we used bone histomorphometry to assess parameters of bone microstructure and bone formation and resorption. Compared with high or normal turnover, bone with low turnover had microstructural abnormalities such as lower cancellous bone volume and reduced trabecular thickness. Compared with normal or low turnover, bone with high turnover had material and nanomechanical abnormalities such as reduced mineral to matrix ratio and lower stiffness. These data suggest that turnover-related alterations in bone quality may contribute to the diminished mechanical competence of bone in CKD, albeit through different mechanisms. Therapies tailored specifically to low- or high-turnover bone may treat renal osteodystrophy more effectively. PMID:22193385

  1. Large-scale variation in boreal and temperate forest carbon turnover rate related to climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thurner, Martin; Beer, Christian; Carvalhais, Nuno; Forkel, Matthias; Santoro, Maurizio; Tum, Markus; Schmullius, Christiane

    2016-05-01

    Vegetation carbon turnover processes in forest ecosystems and their dominant drivers are far from being understood at a broader scale. Many of these turnover processes act on long timescales and include a lateral dimension and thus can hardly be investigated by plot-level studies alone. Making use of remote sensing-based products of net primary production (NPP) and biomass, here we show that spatial gradients of carbon turnover rate (k) in Northern Hemisphere boreal and temperate forests are explained by different climate-related processes depending on the ecosystem. k is related to frost damage effects and the trade-off between growth and frost adaptation in boreal forests, while drought stress and climate effects on insects and pathogens can explain an elevated k in temperate forests. By identifying relevant processes underlying broadscale patterns in k, we provide the basis for a detailed exploration of these mechanisms in field studies, and ultimately the improvement of their representations in global vegetation models (GVMs).

  2. Predicting rates of isotopic turnover across the animal kingdom: a synthesis of existing data.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Stephen M; Crowther, Thomas W

    2015-05-01

    The stable isotopes of carbon ((12)C, (13)C) and nitrogen ((14)N, (15)N) represent powerful tools in food web ecology, providing a wide range of dietary information in animal consumers. However, identifying the temporal window over which a consumer's isotopic signature reflects its diet requires an understanding of elemental incorporation, a process that varies from days to years across species and tissue types. Though theory predicts body size and temperature are likely to control incorporation rates, this has not been tested empirically across a morphologically and phylogenetically diverse range of taxa. Readily available estimates of this relationship would, however, aid in the design of stable isotope food web investigations and improve the interpretation of isotopic data collected from natural systems. Using literature-derived turnover estimates from animal species ranging in size from 1 mg to 2000 kg, we develop a predictive tool for stable isotope ecologists, allowing for estimation of incorporation rates in the structural tissues of entirely novel taxa. In keeping with metabolic scaling theory, we show that isotopic turnover rates of carbon and nitrogen in whole organisms and muscle tissue scale allometrically with body mass raised approximately to the power -0.19, an effect modulated by body temperature. This relationship did not, however, apply to incorporation rates in splanchnic tissues, which were instead dependent on the thermoregulation tactic employed by an organism, being considerably faster in endotherms than ectotherms. We believe the predictive turnover equations we provide can improve the design of experiments and interpretation of results obtained in future stable isotopic food web studies.

  3. Effects of an advanced nursing assistant education program on job satisfaction, turnover rate, assistant education program on and clinical outcomes.

    PubMed

    Brown, Megan; Redfern, Roberta E; Bressler, Katrina; Swicegood, Tamara May; Molnar, Marianne

    2013-10-01

    Certified nursing assistants (CNAs) have become an integral part of the health care system, spend the most amount of time with residents, and yet have the least amount of training. Recent reports demonstrate that CNAs believe their salary is not commensurate with their workload, and turnover rates in this field have indicated low job satisfaction. In light of these issues, we developed an advanced training program for CNAs in our institution to determine whether investing in our employees would increase job satisfaction and therefore impact turnover rates and clinical outcomes. Although overall job satisfaction improved slightly during the study period, satisfaction with training offered was the only area significantly affected by the intervention; however, significant decreases in turnover rates were observed between the pre- and postintervention periods. Clinical indicators were slightly improved, and the number of resident urinary tract infections decreased significantly. Offering an advanced training program for CNAs may be an effective way to improve morale, turnover rates, and clinical outcomes.

  4. The High Cost of Teacher Turnover. Policy Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Commission on Teaching and America's Future, 2007

    2007-01-01

    In 2007, the National Commission on Teaching and America's Future (NCTAF) completed an 18-month study of the costs of teacher turnover in five school districts. The selected districts varied in size, location, and demographics enabling exploration of how these variations affected costs. Costs of recruiting, hiring, processing, and training…

  5. Determinants of local extinction and turnover rates in urban bird communities.

    PubMed

    Husté, Aurélie; Boulinier, Thierry

    2007-01-01

    Studying the effects of urbanization on the dynamics of communities has become a priority for biodiversity conservation. The consequences of urbanization are mainly an increased fragmentation of the original landscapes associated with a decrease in the amount of favorable habitats and an increased pressure of human activities on the remaining patches suitable for wildlife. Patterns of bird species richness have been studied at different levels of urbanization, but little is known about the temporal dynamics of animal communities in urban landscapes. In particular, urbanization is expected to have stronger negative effects on migratory breeding bird communities than on sedentary ones, which should lead to different patterns of change in composition. Using an estimation method accounting for heterogeneity in species detection probability and data collected between 2001 and 2003 within a suburban area near the city of Paris, France, we tested whether these communities differ in their local extinction and turnover rates. We considered the potential effects of patch size and distance to Paris' center as a measure of the degree of urbanization around the patches. As expected, local rates of extinction and turnover were higher for migratory than for sedentary species, and they were negatively related to patch size for migratory species. Mean species richness of the sedentary species increased during the study period and their local turnover rate was negatively related to the distance to the urban core, showing a trend to colonize the most urban patches. These results highlight the very dynamic nature of the composition of some local bird communities in fragmented habitats and help to identify factors affecting colonization and extinction.

  6. Effect of dietary protein and iron on the fractional turnover rate of rat liver xanthine oxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Cherry, D.M.; Amy, N.K.

    1987-12-01

    Rat liver xanthine oxidase activity is regulated in response to dietary protein and iron. To investigate whether the change in activity was mediated by a change in the rate of protein degradation, we measured the fractional turnover rate using the double-isotope technique with (/sup 3/H)- and (/sup 14/C)leucine and calculated the apparent half-life of xanthine oxidase in rats fed diets containing either 20 or 5% casein with either 35 or 5 mg iron/kg diet. Under control conditions, xanthine oxidase had an apparent half-life of 4.8 d and approximately 65% of the enzyme subunits were active. Rats fed diets with low dietary protein had lower xanthine oxidase activity, but the enzyme had a slower fractional turnover rate, resulting in an apparent half-life of 6.4 d, and only 15-20% of the enzyme was active. The apparent half-life of xanthine oxidase increased to 7.5 d in rats fed diets with low dietary iron, but dietary iron did not affect the specific activity of the enzyme or the percentage of active subunits. These results suggest that the loss of enzyme activity is not due to loss of enzyme protein by increased degradation, but rather to inactivation of the enzyme.

  7. Substrate metabolism, appetite and feeding behaviour under low and high energy turnover conditions in overweight women.

    PubMed

    Burton, Francesca L; Malkova, Dalia; Caslake, Muriel J; Gill, Jason M R

    2010-10-01

    The present study aimed to investigate whether substrate metabolism, appetite and feeding behaviour differed between high and low energy turnover conditions. Thirteen overweight premenopausal women completed two 1 d trials: low energy turnover (LET) and high energy turnover (HET), in a randomised, cross-over design. In LET, subjects consumed a test breakfast (49% carbohydrate, 37% fat, 14% protein) calculated to maintain energy balance over a 6 h observation period, during which metabolic rate and substrate utilisation were measured and blood samples taken. Immediately following this an ad libitum buffet meal was provided. HET was identical to LET, except that subjects walked on a treadmill for 60 min at 50% VO2max before the test breakfast, which was increased in size (by about 65%) to replace the energy expended during the walk and maintain energy balance over the observation period. Postprandial fat balance (i.e. the difference between fat intake and oxidation) was lower and carbohydrate balance higher in HET compared with LET throughout the postprandial period (P < 0.05 for both). After the buffet meal, carbohydrate balance did not differ between trials but energy and fat balances were lower (by 0.28 MJ and 11.6 g, respectively) in HET compared with LET (P < 0.001 for both). Carbohydrate balance immediately before the buffet meal correlated negatively with buffet energy intake (r -0.49) and postprandial acylated ghrelin responses (r -0.48), and positively with postprandial glucose responses (r 0.49). These findings demonstrate that HET resulted in a more positive carbohydrate balance than LET, which associated with lower subsequent energy intake. This may have implications for the regulation of body weight.

  8. Analysis of the reasons for the high turnover of clinicians in neighborhood health centers.

    PubMed Central

    Pantell, R H; Reilly, T; Liang, M H

    1980-01-01

    A high rate of turnover of professional personnel in a clinic is disruptive to patient care and organizational stability as well as to the individual clinician. The turnover rate for clinicians (physicians, nurse practitioners, and physician assistants) working in neighborhood health centers (NHCs) is considerably higher than that for clinicians in other forms of practices. All 10 of the neighborhood health centers in HEW (Department of Health, Education, and Welfare--now the Department of Health and Human Services) Region X (Alaska, Idaho, Washington, and Oregon) that offered a full range of medical services provided information about the clinicians that they had employed since their inception. One hundred and one clinicians were surveyed about their work experience. The vast majority of those clinicians who had left a neighborhood health center remained in the community; they cited organizational issues as being at the heart of their dissatisfaction with the centers. Clinicians who began work during the initiation of a clinic remained significantly longer. The results suggest the immediate need for a strategy directed at the smooth organizational evolution of each NHC right from its inception. PMID:6106956

  9. Fossils and a large molecular phylogeny show that the evolution of species richness, generic diversity, and turnover rates are disconnected.

    PubMed

    Xing, Yaowu; Onstein, Renske E; Carter, Richard J; Stadler, Tanja; Peter Linder, H

    2014-10-01

    The magnitude and extent of global change during the Cenozoic is remarkable, yet the impacts of these global changes on the biodiversity and evolutionary dynamics of species diversification remain poorly understood. To investigate this question, we combine paleontological and neontological data for the angiosperm order Fagales, an ecologically important clade of about 1370 species of trees with an exceptional fossil record. We show differences in patterns of accumulation of generic diversity, species richness, and turnover rates for Fagales. Generic diversity evolved rapidly since the Late Cretaceous and peaked during the Eocene or Oligocene. Turnover rates were high during periods of extreme global climate change, but relatively low when the climate remained stable. Species richness accumulated gradually throughout the Cenozoic, possibly at an accelerated pace after the Middle Miocene. Species diversification occurred in new environments: Quercoids radiating in Oligocene subtropical seasonally arid habitats, Casuarinaceae in Australian pyrophytic biomes, and Betula in Late Neogene holarctic habitats. These radiations were counterbalanced by regional extinctions in Late Neogene mesic warm-temperate forests. Thus, the overall diversification at species level is linked to regional radiations of clades with appropriate ecologies exploiting newly available habitats.

  10. Follicle turnover and pregnancy rates following oestrus synchronization protocols in Mediterranean Italian buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Presicce, G A; Senatore, E M; De Santis, G; Bella, A

    2005-10-01

    An ultrasound assessment of follicle turnover following two different protocols for synchronization of oestrus and ovulation, as well as an assessment of achieved synchronization between ovulation and AI and conception rates in nulliparous and pluriparous buffaloes were carried out during months of increasing day length. Nulliparous buffaloes (n = 30) were subjected only to Ovsynch protocol whereas pluriparous buffaloes (n = 31) were assigned to Ovsynch (n = 14) or to PRID-pregnant mare serum gonadotrophin (PMSG) (n = 17) protocol according to the presence of functional CL confirming cyclic and acyclic conditions. Ultrasound examination of ovarian follicular dynamics at critical days in the course of synchronization treatments was employed to monitor the fate of the largest available follicles at the beginning of treatments. Such available dominant follicle would persist throughout the protocol as ovulating follicle (no-follicle shift) or would regress giving way to a new follicle to become dominant and ovulate (follicle shift). Furthermore, ultrasound monitoring would determine the degree of synchronization of ovulation and final outcome represented by pregnancy rates. Pregnancy rate following Ovsynch protocol was 40% (12/30) and 42.8% (6/14) in nulliparous and pluriparous buffaloes respectively (p = 0.8575). Most ovulations were synchronized and recorded at AI and the following day in nulliparous (24/30; 80%) and pluriparous (12/14; 85.7%) buffaloes respectively (p = 1.000). A follicle shift was recorded in 14 of 30 (46.6%) and 11 of 14 (78.5%) in nulliparous and pluriparous buffaloes respectively (p = 0.0466). Among established pregnancies: eight derived from follicle shift (66.6%) and four from no-follicle shift (33.3%) in nulliparous buffaloes, p = 0.0729 whereas in pluriparous buffaloes five (83.3%) derived from follicle shift and one from no-follicle shift (16.6%), p = 0.6154. Collectively, from 18 pregnancies in nulliparous and pluriparous buffaloes

  11. Development and application of 15N-tracer substances for measuring the whole-body protein turnover rates in the human, especially in neonates: a review.

    PubMed

    Wutzke, Klaus D

    2012-06-01

    Our research group of the Children's Hospital of the University of Rostock (Rostock group) has long-time experience in (15)N-labelling and in using yeast protein and its hydrolysates for tracer kinetic studies to evaluate parameters of the whole-body protein metabolism in premature infants. The particular advantage of applying an economically convenient, highly (15)N-enriched, and completely labelled yeast protein for evaluating protein turnover rates is the fact that the (15)N dose is spread among all proteinogenic amino acids. The absorption has been improved by hydrolysing [(15)N]yeast protein with thermitase into a mixture of amino acids, dipeptides and tripeptides so that faecal analysis becomes unnecessary when determining turnover rates. The review shows that, in contrast to the application of single (15)N-labelled amino acids with resulting overestimation of protein turnover rates, the (15)N-labelled yeast protein thermitase hydrolysate represents the amino acid metabolism more closely without causing amino acid imbalances. The (15)N-labelled yeast protein thermitase hydrolysate leads to the estimation of reliable protein turnover rates, particularly in premature infants.

  12. Regional processes in mangrove ecosystems: Spatial scaling relationships, biomass, and turnover rates following catastrophic disturbance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ward, G.A.; Smith, T. J.; Whelan, K.R.T.; Doyle, T.W.

    2006-01-01

    Physiological processes and local-scale structural dynamics of mangroves are relatively well studied. Regional-scale processes, however, are not as well understood. Here we provide long-term data on trends in structure and forest turnover at a large scale, following hurricane damage in mangrove ecosystems of South Florida, U.S.A. Twelve mangrove vegetation plots were monitored at periodic intervals, between October 1992 and March 2005. Mangrove forests of this region are defined by a -1.5 scaling relationship between mean stem diameter and stem density, mirroring self-thinning theory for mono-specific stands. This relationship is reflected in tree size frequency scaling exponents which, through time, have exhibited trends toward a community average that is indicative of full spatial resource utilization. These trends, together with an asymptotic standing biomass accumulation, indicate that coastal mangrove ecosystems do adhere to size-structured organizing principles as described for upland tree communities. Regenerative dynamics are different between areas inside and outside of the primary wind-path of Hurricane Andrew which occurred in 1992. Forest dynamic turnover rates, however, are steady through time. This suggests that ecological, more-so than structural factors, control forest productivity. In agreement, the relative mean rate of biomass growth exhibits an inverse relationship with the seasonal range of porewater salinities. The ecosystem average in forest scaling relationships may provide a useful investigative tool of mangrove community biomass relationships, as well as offer a robust indicator of general ecosystem health for use in mangrove forest ecosystem management and restoration. ?? Springer 2006.

  13. Inositol induces a profound alteration in the pattern and rate of synthesis and turnover of membrane lipids in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Gaspar, Maria L; Aregullin, Manuel A; Jesch, Stephen A; Henry, Susan A

    2006-08-11

    The addition of inositol to actively growing yeast cultures causes a rapid increase in the rate of synthesis of phosphatidylinositol and, simultaneously, triggers changes in the expression of hundreds of genes. We now demonstrate that the addition of inositol to yeast cells growing in the presence of choline leads to a dramatic reprogramming of cellular lipid synthesis and turnover. The response to inositol includes a 5-6-fold increase in cellular phosphatidylinositol content within a period of 30 min. The increase in phosphatidylinositol content appears to be dependent upon fatty acid synthesis. Phosphatidylcholine turnover increased rapidly following inositol addition, a response that requires the participation of Nte1p, an endoplasmic reticulum-localized phospholipase B. Mass spectrometry revealed that the acyl species composition of phosphatidylinositol is relatively constant regardless of supplementation with inositol or choline, whereas phosphatidylcholine acyl species composition is influenced by both inositol and choline. In medium containing inositol, but lacking choline, high levels of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine were detected. Within 60 min following the addition of inositol, dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine levels had decreased from approximately 40% of total phosphatidylcholine to a basal level of less than 5%. nte1Delta cells grown in the absence of inositol and in the presence of choline exhibited lower levels of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine than wild type cells grown under these same conditions, but these levels remained largely constant after the addition of inositol. These results are discussed in relationship to transcriptional regulation known to be linked to lipid metabolism in yeast.

  14. Estimation of water turnover rates of captive West Indian manatees (Trichechus manatus) held in fresh and salt water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ortiz, R. M.; Worthy, G. A.; Byers, F. M.

    1999-01-01

    The ability of West Indian manatees (Trichechus manatus) to move between fresh and salt water raises the question of whether manatees drink salt water. Water turnover rates were estimated in captive West Indian manatees using the deuterium oxide dilution technique. Rates were quantified in animals using four experimental treatments: (1) held in fresh water and fed lettuce (N=4), (2) held in salt water and fed lettuce (N=2), (3) acutely exposed to salt water and fed lettuce (N=4), and (4) chronically exposed to salt water with limited access to fresh water and fed sea grass (N=5). Animals held in fresh water had the highest turnover rates (145+/-12 ml kg-1 day-1) (mean +/- s.e.m.). Animals acutely exposed to salt water decreased their turnover rate significantly when moved into salt water (from 124+/-15 to 65+/-15 ml kg-1 day-1) and subsequently increased their turnover rate upon re-entry to fresh water (146+/-19 ml kg-1 day-1). Manatees chronically exposed to salt water had significantly lower turnover rates (21+/-3 ml kg-1 day-1) compared with animals held in salt water and fed lettuce (45+/-3 ml kg-1 day-1). Manatees chronically exposed to salt water and fed sea grass had very low turnover rates compared with manatees held in salt water and fed lettuce, which is consistent with a lack of mariposia. Manatees in fresh water drank large volumes of water, which may make them susceptible to hyponatremia if access to a source of Na+ is not provided.

  15. Estimation of water turnover rates of captive West Indian manatees (Trichechus manatus) held in fresh and salt water.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, R M; Worthy, G A; Byers, F M

    1999-01-01

    The ability of West Indian manatees (Trichechus manatus) to move between fresh and salt water raises the question of whether manatees drink salt water. Water turnover rates were estimated in captive West Indian manatees using the deuterium oxide dilution technique. Rates were quantified in animals using four experimental treatments: (1) held in fresh water and fed lettuce (N=4), (2) held in salt water and fed lettuce (N=2), (3) acutely exposed to salt water and fed lettuce (N=4), and (4) chronically exposed to salt water with limited access to fresh water and fed sea grass (N=5). Animals held in fresh water had the highest turnover rates (145+/-12 ml kg-1 day-1) (mean +/- s.e.m.). Animals acutely exposed to salt water decreased their turnover rate significantly when moved into salt water (from 124+/-15 to 65+/-15 ml kg-1 day-1) and subsequently increased their turnover rate upon re-entry to fresh water (146+/-19 ml kg-1 day-1). Manatees chronically exposed to salt water had significantly lower turnover rates (21+/-3 ml kg-1 day-1) compared with animals held in salt water and fed lettuce (45+/-3 ml kg-1 day-1). Manatees chronically exposed to salt water and fed sea grass had very low turnover rates compared with manatees held in salt water and fed lettuce, which is consistent with a lack of mariposia. Manatees in fresh water drank large volumes of water, which may make them susceptible to hyponatremia if access to a source of Na+ is not provided.

  16. Carbon and nitrogen stable isotope turnover rates and diet-tissue discrimination in Florida manatees (Trichechus manatus latirostris).

    PubMed

    Alves-Stanley, Christy D; Worthy, Graham A J

    2009-08-01

    The Florida manatee (Trichechus manatus latirostris) is a herbivorous marine mammal that occupies freshwater, estuarine and marine habitats. Despite being considered endangered, relatively little is known about its feeding ecology. The present study expands on previous work on manatee feeding ecology by providing critical baseline parameters for accurate isotopic data interpretation. Stable carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios were examined over a period of more than 1 year in the epidermis of rescued Florida manatees that were transitioning from a diet of aquatic forage to terrestrial forage (lettuce). The mean half-life for (13)C turnover was 53 and 59 days for skin from manatees rescued from coastal and riverine regions, respectively. The mean half-life for (15)N turnover was 27 and 58 days, respectively. Because of these slow turnover rates, carbon and nitrogen stable isotope analysis in manatee epidermis is useful in summarizing average dietary intake over a long period of time rather than assessing recent diet. In addition to turnover rate, a diet-tissue discrimination value of 2.8 per thousand for (13)C was calculated for long-term captive manatees on a lettuce diet. Determining both turnover rate and diet-tissue discrimination is essential in order to accurately interpret stable isotope data.

  17. Environmental and historical imprints on beta diversity: insights from variation in rates of species turnover along gradients

    PubMed Central

    Fitzpatrick, Matthew C.; Sanders, Nathan J.; Normand, Signe; Svenning, Jens-Christian; Ferrier, Simon; Gove, Aaron D.; Dunn, Robert R.

    2013-01-01

    A common approach for analysing geographical variation in biodiversity involves using linear models to determine the rate at which species similarity declines with geographical or environmental distance and comparing this rate among regions, taxa or communities. Implicit in this approach are weakly justified assumptions that the rate of species turnover remains constant along gradients and that this rate can therefore serve as a means to compare ecological systems. We use generalized dissimilarity modelling, a novel method that accommodates variation in rates of species turnover along gradients and between different gradients, to compare environmental and spatial controls on the floras of two regions with contrasting evolutionary and climatic histories: southwest Australia and northern Europe. We find stronger signals of climate history in the northern European flora and demonstrate that variation in rates of species turnover is persistent across regions, taxa and different gradients. Such variation may represent an important but often overlooked component of biodiversity that complicates comparisons of distance–decay relationships and underscores the importance of using methods that accommodate the curvilinear relationships expected when modelling beta diversity. Determining how rates of species turnover vary along and between gradients is relevant to understanding the sensitivity of ecological systems to environmental change. PMID:23926147

  18. Environmental and historical imprints on beta diversity: insights from variation in rates of species turnover along gradients.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, Matthew C; Sanders, Nathan J; Normand, Signe; Svenning, Jens-Christian; Ferrier, Simon; Gove, Aaron D; Dunn, Robert R

    2013-10-07

    A common approach for analysing geographical variation in biodiversity involves using linear models to determine the rate at which species similarity declines with geographical or environmental distance and comparing this rate among regions, taxa or communities. Implicit in this approach are weakly justified assumptions that the rate of species turnover remains constant along gradients and that this rate can therefore serve as a means to compare ecological systems. We use generalized dissimilarity modelling, a novel method that accommodates variation in rates of species turnover along gradients and between different gradients, to compare environmental and spatial controls on the floras of two regions with contrasting evolutionary and climatic histories: southwest Australia and northern Europe. We find stronger signals of climate history in the northern European flora and demonstrate that variation in rates of species turnover is persistent across regions, taxa and different gradients. Such variation may represent an important but often overlooked component of biodiversity that complicates comparisons of distance-decay relationships and underscores the importance of using methods that accommodate the curvilinear relationships expected when modelling beta diversity. Determining how rates of species turnover vary along and between gradients is relevant to understanding the sensitivity of ecological systems to environmental change.

  19. Greater carbon stocks and faster turnover rates with increasing agricultural productivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanderman, J.; Fallon, S.; Baisden, T. W.

    2013-12-01

    H.H. Janzen (2006) eloquently argued that from an agricultural perspective there is a tradeoff between storing carbon as soil organic matter (SOM) and the soil nutrient and energy benefit provided during SOM mineralization. Here we report on results from the Permanent Rotation Trial at the Waite Agricultural Institute, South Australia, indicating that shifting to an agricultural management strategy which returns more carbon to the soil, not only leads to greater carbon stocks but also increases the rate of carbon cycling through the soil. The Permanent Rotation Trial was established on a red Chromosol in 1925 with upgrades made to several treatments in 1948. Decadal soil samples were collected starting in 1963 at two depths, 0-10 and 10-22.5 cm, by compositing 20 soil cores taken along the length of each plot. We have chosen to analyze five trials representing a gradient in productivity: permanent pasture (Pa), wheat-pasture rotation (2W4Pa), continuous wheat (WW), wheat-oats-fallow rotation (WOF) and wheat-fallow (WF). For each of the soil samples (40 in total), the radiocarbon activity in the bulk soil as well as size-fractionated samples was measured by accelerator mass spectrometry at ANU's Radiocarbon Dating Laboratory (Fallon et al. 2010). After nearly 70 years under each rotation, SOC stocks increased linearly with productivity data across the trials from 24 to 58 tC ha-1. Importantly, these differences were due to greater losses over time in the low productivity trials rather than gains in SOC in any of the trials. Uptake of the bomb-spike in atmospheric 14C into the soil was greatest in the trials with the greatest productivity. The coarse size fraction always had greater Δ14C values than the bulk soil samples. Several different multi-pool steady state and non-steady state models were used to interpret the Δ14C data in terms of SOC turnover rates. Regardless of model choice, either the decay rates of all pools needed to increase or the allocation of C to

  20. Slow isotope turnover rates and low discrimination values in the American alligator: implications for interpretation of ectotherm stable isotope data.

    PubMed

    Rosenblatt, Adam E; Heithaus, Michael R

    2013-01-01

    Stable isotope analysis has become a standard ecological tool for elucidating feeding relationships of organisms and determining food web structure and connectivity. There remain important questions concerning rates at which stable isotope values are incorporated into tissues (turnover rates) and the change in isotope value between a tissue and a food source (discrimination values). These gaps in our understanding necessitate experimental studies to adequately interpret field data. Tissue turnover rates and discrimination values vary among species and have been investigated in a broad array of taxa. However, little attention has been paid to ectothermic top predators in this regard. We quantified the turnover rates and discrimination values for three tissues (scutes, red blood cells, and plasma) in American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis). Plasma turned over faster than scutes or red blood cells, but turnover rates of all three tissues were very slow in comparison to those in endothermic species. Alligator δ(15)N discrimination values were surprisingly low in comparison to those of other top predators and varied between experimental and control alligators. The variability of δ(15)N discrimination values highlights the difficulties in using δ(15)N to assign absolute and possibly even relative trophic levels in field studies. Our results suggest that interpreting stable isotope data based on parameter estimates from other species can be problematic and that large ectothermic tetrapod tissues may be characterized by unique stable isotope dynamics relative to species occupying lower trophic levels and endothermic tetrapods.

  1. Local changes in rates of group A Streptococcus disease and antibiotic resistance are associated with geographically widespread strain turnover events.

    PubMed

    Metzgar, David; McDonough, Erin A; Hansen, Christian J; Blaesing, Carl R; Baynes, Darcie; Hawksworth, Anthony W; Blair, Patrick J; Faix, Dennis J; Russell, Kevin L

    2010-01-01

    This study addresses the effects of dynamic strain turnover and antibiotic prophylaxis on rates of group A Streptococcus (GAS) antibiotic resistance and disease. The authors analyzed the strain distributions, disease rates, and patterns of antibiotic resistance of 802 GAS isolates collected from 2002 through 2007. These samples were collected from patients with GAS infection symptoms at 10 military facilities. Macrolide resistance peaked at 25% during 2004, due to the geographically widespread dominance of a single resistant strain (M75). The resistant strain was not retained regardless of local patterns of macrolide use, and resistance rates decreased upon replacement of M75 with macrolide-susceptible strains. Disease rates were similarly correlated with dominance of specific M types. Statistical analysis revealed temporal correlations between strain distributions at multiple locations. Only the most common strains yielded enough data at multiple sites for statistically significant comparison of temporal fluctuations in dominance, but these (including M44, M3, M18, M118, and M6) all yielded highly significant temporal correlations of 90% or greater on yearly scales. As expected given the complexity and variability of strain distributions on shorter time scales, analysis on a monthly scale yielded lower degrees of positive correlation (31-62%), but in this case all significant correlations were still positive. Shifts in antibiotic resistance profiles and disease rates at specific sites appear to be associated with strain replacements happening on larger scales, independent of antibiotic use at individual sites.

  2. Kinetic mechanism of phenylalanine hydroxylase: intrinsic binding and rate constants from single-turnover experiments.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Kenneth M; Pavon, Jorge Alex; Fitzpatrick, Paul F

    2013-02-12

    Phenylalanine hydroxylase (PheH) catalyzes the key step in the catabolism of dietary phenylalanine, its hydroxylation to tyrosine using tetrahydrobiopterin (BH(4)) and O(2). A complete kinetic mechanism for PheH was determined by global analysis of single-turnover data in the reaction of PheHΔ117, a truncated form of the enzyme lacking the N-terminal regulatory domain. Formation of the productive PheHΔ117-BH(4)-phenylalanine complex begins with the rapid binding of BH(4) (K(d) = 65 μM). Subsequent addition of phenylalanine to the binary complex to form the productive ternary complex (K(d) = 130 μM) is approximately 10-fold slower. Both substrates can also bind to the free enzyme to form inhibitory binary complexes. O(2) rapidly binds to the productive ternary complex; this is followed by formation of an unidentified intermediate, which can be detected as a decrease in absorbance at 340 nm, with a rate constant of 140 s(-1). Formation of the 4a-hydroxypterin and Fe(IV)O intermediates is 10-fold slower and is followed by the rapid hydroxylation of the amino acid. Product release is the rate-determining step and largely determines k(cat). Similar reactions using 6-methyltetrahydropterin indicate a preference for the physiological pterin during hydroxylation.

  3. Estimating rates of local species extinction, colonization and turnover in animal communities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nichols, James D.; Boulinier, T.; Hines, J.E.; Pollock, K.H.; Sauer, J.R.

    1998-01-01

    Species richness has been identified as a useful state variable for conservation and management purposes. Changes in richness over time provide a basis for predicting and evaluating community responses to management, to natural disturbance, and to changes in factors such as community composition (e.g., the removal of a keystone species). Probabilistic capture-recapture models have been used recently to estimate species richness from species count and presence-absence data. These models do not require the common assumption that all species are detected in sampling efforts. We extend this approach to the development of estimators useful for studying the vital rates responsible for changes in animal communities over time; rates of local species extinction, turnover, and colonization. Our approach to estimation is based on capture-recapture models for closed animal populations that permit heterogeneity in detection probabilities among the different species in the sampled community. We have developed a computer program, COMDYN, to compute many of these estimators and associated bootstrap variances. Analyses using data from the North American Breeding Bird Survey (BBS) suggested that the estimators performed reasonably well. We recommend estimators based on probabilistic modeling for future work on community responses to management efforts as well as on basic questions about community dynamics.

  4. Retaining your high performers: moderators of the performance-job satisfaction-voluntary turnover relationship.

    PubMed

    Nyberg, Anthony

    2010-05-01

    Two divergent ideas explain the relationship between performance and voluntary turnover. One suggests that higher performing employees, who are rewarded for their superior work product, will desire to remain with an organization that values their performance and will, consequently, be less likely than lower performing employees to voluntarily leave. An alternative idea suggests that higher performing employees, who are more desirable to external companies as a result of their superior work product, will have more external job opportunities and will, consequently, be more likely than their lower performing colleagues to voluntarily leave. The current study evaluated the behaviors and attitudes of 12,545 insurance employees over a 3-year period to examine how these 2 divergent expectations influence the performance-voluntary turnover relationship. Results show that both pay growth and the relevant unemployment rate interact with performance to influence the performance-voluntary turnover relationship and that they work independently of employee job satisfaction influences.

  5. Glucose turnover in response to exercise during high- and low-FIo2 breathing in man

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, D.M.; Wasserman, D.H.; Vranic, M.; Wasserman, K.

    1986-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess whether breathing high or low concentrations of O2 could affect glucose turnover during exercise in man. Ten healthy subjects performed two constant work-rate exercise tests, one when the fraction of inspired O2 (FIo2) was 0.15 and the other at the same work rate but when the FIo2 was 0.80. The work rate for each subject was chosen so that blood lactate would be elevated during hypoxia, but would be lower during hyperoxia. Glucose appearance (R/sub a/) and disappearance (R/sub d/) were measured using the primed, constant infusion of (3-TH)glucose. Although the work rate was the same during hypoxia and hyperoxia in each subject, hypoxic exercise was accompanied by a significantly larger rest to exercise was accompanied by a significantly larger rest to exercise increase in R/sub d/ ( R/sub d/) compared with hyperoxia by 265%. Similarly, R/sub a/ was greater during hypoxia than during hyperoxia by 188%. Lactate to pyruvate ratios were significantly higher during hypoxic exercise suggesting a shift in the cell redox to a more reduced state. Insulin and glucagon were not affect by the FIo2, but both epinephrine and norepinephrine were increased during hypoxic exercise, which may explain the increase in R/sub a/. The regulation of blood glucose during exercise in vivo appears to be dependent on the availability of oxygen to the working muscle cells.

  6. Fatty acid turnover rates in the adipose tissues of the growing chicken (Gallus domesticus).

    PubMed

    Foglia, T A; Cartwright, A L; Gyurik, R J; Philips, J G

    1994-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the mobility of fatty acids in adipose tissue of the chicken and to determine whether adipose tissue dynamics are altered by dietary repartitioning agents. To this end, the turnover rates of fatty acids and triglycerides were estimated in adipose tissue of growing chicks by using isopentadecanoic acid (IPDA) and elaidic acid (EA) as marker dietary fatty acids. The half-life of IPDA in abdominal and sartorial adipose tissues of birds over 6 to 10 wk of age were 20 +/- 4 and 23 +/- 6 d, respectively. The half-life for the remaining total carcass lipids was 23 +/- 3 d. The corresponding half-life for EA in abdominal fat tissue of birds over 2 to 7 wk of age was 18 +/- 3 d, a half-life not significantly different from the IPDA half-lives. On the other hand, a thyromimetic repartitioning agent (L-94901) fed to birds at the 2 ppm level from 2 to 7 wk of age significantly decreased the half-life of EA in abdominal fat tissue to 6 +/- 2 d. The data suggest that fatty acids were released from a more labile adipose site and subsequently reincorporated into abdominal and sartorial tissues and that fat mobilization occurred at the same time as did adipose tissue deposition in the growing chicken.

  7. Large-Scale Variation in Forest Carbon Turnover Rate and its Relation to Climate - Remote Sensing vs. Global Vegetation Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalhais, N.; Thurner, M.; Beer, C.; Forkel, M.; Rademacher, T. T.; Santoro, M.; Tum, M.; Schmullius, C.

    2015-12-01

    While vegetation productivity is known to be strongly correlated to climate, there is a need for an improved understanding of the underlying processes of vegetation carbon turnover and their importance at a global scale. This shortcoming has been due to the lack of spatially extensive information on vegetation carbon stocks, which we recently have been able to overcome by a biomass dataset covering northern boreal and temperate forests originating from radar remote sensing. Based on state-of-the-art products on biomass and NPP, we are for the first time able to study the relation between carbon turnover rate and a set of climate indices in northern boreal and temperate forests. The implementation of climate-related mortality processes, for instance drought, fire, frost or insect effects, is often lacking or insufficient in current global vegetation models. In contrast to our observation-based findings, investigated models from the Inter-Sectoral Impact Model Intercomparison Project (ISI-MIP), including HYBRID4, JeDi, JULES, LPJml, ORCHIDEE, SDGVM, and VISIT, are able to reproduce spatial climate - turnover rate relationships only to a limited extent. While most of the models compare relatively well to observation-based NPP, simulated vegetation carbon stocks are severely biased compared to our biomass dataset. Current limitations lead to considerable uncertainties in the estimated vegetation carbon turnover, contributing substantially to the forest feedback to climate change. Our results are the basis for improving mortality concepts in global vegetation models and estimating their impact on the land carbon balance.

  8. Teacher Turnover in High-Poverty Schools: What We Know and Can Do

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simon, Nicole S.; Johnson, Susan Moore

    2015-01-01

    Background/Context: Over the past three decades, teacher turnover has increased substantially in U.S. public schools, especially in those serving large portions of low-income students of color. Teachers who choose to leave high-poverty schools serving large numbers of students of color usually transfer to schools serving wealthier, Whiter student…

  9. The High Cost of Leaving: An Analysis of the Cost of Teacher Turnover

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watlington, Eliah; Shockley, Robert; Guglielmino, Paul; Felsher, Rivka

    2010-01-01

    The cost of teacher turnover to schools and school districts has only recently been studied. This research reveals that when high-quality teachers leave the classroom, the effect on both student performance and school and district fiscal operations is significant and deleterious. The implications for study in this area include the planning of…

  10. Characteristics of Teacher Induction Programs and Turnover Rates of Beginning Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kang, Seok; Berliner, David C.

    2012-01-01

    The federal School and Staffing Survey (SASS) and Teacher Follow-up Survey (TFS) were used to examine the impacts of induction activities on beginning teacher turnover. This study excluded those teachers who moved or left schools for unavoidable and involuntary reasons, a confounding factor in previous research. This analysis revealed that three…

  11. Soil physical restrictions and hydrology regulate stand age and wood biomass turnover rates of Purus-Madeira interfluvial wetlands in Amazonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cintra, B. B. L.; Schietti, J.; Emillio, T.; Martins, D.; Moulatlet, G.; Souza, P.; Levis, C.; Quesada, C. A.; Schöngart, J.

    2013-11-01

    In Amazonia, wetlands constitute about 30% of its entire basin, of which ancient fluvial terraces located in vast interfluvial regions cover a large portion. Although the increased number of permanent plots in the recent years has contributed to improved understanding of regional variation in forest dynamics across the Amazon Basin, the functioning of large lowland interfluvial wetlands remain poorly understood. Here we present the first field-based estimate for tree ages, wood biomass productivity and biomass turnover rates for eight 1 ha plots in wetland and non-flooded forests distributed along the BR-319 Highway along a distance of about 600 km crossing the Purus-Madeira rivers interfluvial region in central-southwestern Amazon Basin. We estimate stand age, wood biomass productivity and biomass turnover rates combining tree-ring data and an allometric equation based on diameter, tree height and wood density and relate these structural parameters to physical soil and hydrological restrictions. Wood biomass and productivity varied twofold among the plots, with wood biomass stocks ranging between 138-294 Mg ha-1 and productivity varying between 3.4-6.6 Mg ha-1 yr-1. Soil effective depth, topography, structure and mainly soil water saturation significantly affected stand age (64-103 yr) and forest dynamics in terms of annual biomass turnover rates (2.0-3.2%). On harsher soils characterized by a poor structure, low effective depth and high water saturation, biomass turnover rates were increased and forests stands were younger compared to well-drained sites. We suggest that soil constraints, especially soil water saturation, limit the development of the stand structure, resulting in forests with younger stand ages and higher biomass turnover rates compared to forests growing on well-drained soils. We do not find, however, any relation between physical soil restrictions or hydrology and wood biomass productivity, but there is a trend of increasing wood biomass

  12. Employee Turnover: Evidence from a Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borland, Jeff

    1997-01-01

    Patterns of employee turnover from a medium-sized law firm in Australia were examined in regard to theories of worker mobility (matching, sectoral shift, and incentive). Results support a role for matching effects, but personnel practices affect the timing of turnover. Matching and incentive-based theories do not explain the high rates of turnover…

  13. Role of TGF-β in a Mouse Model of High Turnover Renal Osteodystrophy†

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shiguang; Song, Wenping; Boulanger, Joseph H; Tang, Wen; Sabbagh, Yves; Kelley, Brian; Gotschall, Russell; Ryan, Susan; Phillips, Lucy; Malley, Katie; Cao, Xiaohong; Xia, Tai-He; Zhen, Gehua; Cao, Xu; Ling, Hong; Dechow, Paul C; Bellido, Teresita M; Ledbetter, Steven R; Schiavi, Susan C

    2014-01-01

    Altered bone turnover is a key pathologic feature of chronic kidney disease-mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD). Expression of TGF-β1, a known regulator of bone turnover, is increased in bone biopsies from individuals with CKD. Similarly, TGF-β1 mRNA and downstream signaling is increased in bones from jck mice, a model of high-turnover renal osteodystropy. A neutralizing anti-TGF-β antibody (1D11) was used to explore TGF-βs role in renal osteodystrophy. 1D11 administration to jck significantly attenuated elevated serum osteocalcin and type I collagen C-telopeptides. Histomorphometric analysis indicated that 1D11 administration increased bone volume and suppressed the elevated bone turnover in a dose-dependent manner. These effects were associated with reductions in osteoblast and osteoclast surface areas. μCT confirmed the observed increase in trabecular bone volume and demonstrated improvements in trabecular architecture and increased cortical thickness. 1D11 administration was associated with significant reductions in expression of osteoblast marker genes (Runx2, alkaline phosphatase, osteocalcin) and the osteoclast marker gene, Trap5. Importantly, in this model, 1D11 did not improve kidney function or reduce serum PTH levels indicating that 1D11 effects on bone are independent of changes in renal or parathyroid function. 1D11 also significantly attenuated high turnover bone disease in the adenine-induced uremic rat model. Antibody administration was associated with a reduction in pSMAD2/SMAD2 in bone but not bone marrow as assessed by quantitative immunoblot analysis. Immunostaining revealed pSMAD staining in osteoblasts and osteocytes but not osteoclasts, suggesting 1D11 effects on osteoclasts may be indirect. Immunoblot and whole genome mRNA expression analysis confirmed our previous observation that repression of Wnt/β catenin expression in bone is correlated with increased osteoclast activity in jck mice and bone biopsies from CKD patients. Furthermore

  14. Low versus high cell turnover in diffusely growing non-Hodgkin's lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Spina, D; Leoncini, L; Del Vecchio, M T; Megha, T; Minacci, C; Poggi, S A; Pileri, S; Tosi, P; Kraft, R; Laissue, J A

    1995-12-01

    Cell loss, perhaps as important as cell production in determining the size of an expanding cell population, has not usually been registered in quantitative cellular kinetic analyses of neoplastic disorders. The present retrospective study on various types and subtypes of non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (NHLs; n = 170) was designed to test the usefulness of a novel additional parameter, the 'turnover index' (TI), which is the sum per case of the mitotic index and the apoptotic index. Results document that TIs clearly distinguished between categories and subtypes of NHLs according to the Kiel classification. Cluster analysis of TIs plotted against the percentage of Ki-67-positive cells per case revealed that about one-third of the high-grade malignancy lymphomas actually belonged to the low-turnover lymphomas. Overall survival was longer in the low- than in the high-turnover group of lymphomas. Assessment of TIs can, for practical diagnostic purposes, be replaced by counting mitotic figures and apoptotic cells in several high-power fields. The TI concept may help to interpret the kinetics of NHLs in terms of accumulation vs. proliferation of cells.

  15. High bone turnover elevates the risk of denosumab-induced hypocalcemia in women with postmenopausal osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Koji; Nagai, Takashi; Sakamoto, Keizo; Ohara, Kenji; Eguro, Takeshi; Ito, Hiroshi; Toyoshima, Yoichi; Kokaze, Akatsuki; Toyone, Tomoaki; Inagaki, Katsunori

    2016-01-01

    Hypocalcemia is the most common major adverse event in patients with osteoporosis receiving the bone resorption inhibitor denosumab; however, limited information is available regarding risk factors of hypocalcemia. Therefore, this study aimed to identify the risk factors of hypocalcemia induced by denosumab treatment for osteoporosis. We retrospectively reviewed the records of patients who had received initial denosumab supplemented with activated vitamin D for osteoporosis. Serum levels of the following bone turnover markers (BTMs) were measured at baseline: bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (BAP), total N-terminal propeptide of type 1 procollagen (P1NP), tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5b (TRACP-5b), and urinary cross-linked N-telopeptide of type 1 collagen (NTX). Of the 85 denosumab-treated patients with osteoporosis studied, 22 (25.9%) developed hypocalcemia. Baseline serum total P1NP, TRACP-5b, and urinary NTX were significantly higher in patients with hypocalcemia than in those with normocalcemia following denosumab administration (all P<0.01). Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that patients with total P1NP >76.5 μg/L, TRACP-5b >474 mU/dL, or urinary NTX >49.5 nmol bone collagen equivalent/mmol creatinine had a higher risk of hypocalcemia (P<0.01). Our study suggests that denosumab may have a greater impact on serum calcium levels in patients with postmenopausal osteoporosis with higher baseline bone turnover than in patients with postmenopausal osteoporosis with normal baseline bone turnover, because maintenance of normal serum calcium in this subgroup is more dependent on bone resorption. Close monitoring of serum calcium levels is strongly recommended for denosumab-treated patients with high bone turnover, despite supplementation with activated vitamin D and oral calcium.

  16. High bone turnover elevates the risk of denosumab-induced hypocalcemia in women with postmenopausal osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Koji; Nagai, Takashi; Sakamoto, Keizo; Ohara, Kenji; Eguro, Takeshi; Ito, Hiroshi; Toyoshima, Yoichi; Kokaze, Akatsuki; Toyone, Tomoaki; Inagaki, Katsunori

    2016-01-01

    Hypocalcemia is the most common major adverse event in patients with osteoporosis receiving the bone resorption inhibitor denosumab; however, limited information is available regarding risk factors of hypocalcemia. Therefore, this study aimed to identify the risk factors of hypocalcemia induced by denosumab treatment for osteoporosis. We retrospectively reviewed the records of patients who had received initial denosumab supplemented with activated vitamin D for osteoporosis. Serum levels of the following bone turnover markers (BTMs) were measured at baseline: bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (BAP), total N-terminal propeptide of type 1 procollagen (P1NP), tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5b (TRACP-5b), and urinary cross-linked N-telopeptide of type 1 collagen (NTX). Of the 85 denosumab-treated patients with osteoporosis studied, 22 (25.9%) developed hypocalcemia. Baseline serum total P1NP, TRACP-5b, and urinary NTX were significantly higher in patients with hypocalcemia than in those with normocalcemia following denosumab administration (all P<0.01). Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that patients with total P1NP >76.5 μg/L, TRACP-5b >474 mU/dL, or urinary NTX >49.5 nmol bone collagen equivalent/mmol creatinine had a higher risk of hypocalcemia (P<0.01). Our study suggests that denosumab may have a greater impact on serum calcium levels in patients with postmenopausal osteoporosis with higher baseline bone turnover than in patients with postmenopausal osteoporosis with normal baseline bone turnover, because maintenance of normal serum calcium in this subgroup is more dependent on bone resorption. Close monitoring of serum calcium levels is strongly recommended for denosumab-treated patients with high bone turnover, despite supplementation with activated vitamin D and oral calcium. PMID:27980413

  17. Arabidopsis ACT11 modifies actin turnover to promote pollen germination and maintain the normal rate of tube growth.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ming; Huang, Shanjin

    2015-08-01

    Actin is an ancient conserved protein that is encoded by multiple isovariants in multicellular organisms. There are eight functional actin genes in the Arabidopsis genome, and the precise function and mechanism of action of each isovariant remain poorly understood. Here, we report the characterization of ACT11, a reproductive actin isovariant. Our studies reveal that loss of function of ACT11 causes a delay in pollen germination, but enhances pollen tube growth. Cytological analysis revealed that the amount of filamentous actin decreased, and the rate of actin turnover increased in act11 pollen. Convergence of actin filaments upon the germination aperture was impaired in act11 pollen, consistent with the observed delay of germination. Reduction of actin dynamics with jasplakinolide suppressed the germination and tube growth phenotypes in act11 pollen, suggesting that the underlying mechanisms involve an increase in actin dynamics. Thus, we demonstrate that ACT11 is required to maintain the rate of actin turnover in order to promote pollen germination and maintain the normal rate of pollen tube growth.

  18. Measurement of the rates of oxindole-3-acetic acid turnover, and indole-3-acetic acid oxidation in Zea mays seedlings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nonhebel, H. M.; Bandurski, R. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1986-01-01

    Oxindole-3-acetic acid is the principal catabolite of indole-3-acetic acid in Zea mays seedlings. In this paper measurements of the turnover of oxindole-3-acetic acid are presented and used to calculate the rate of indole-3-acetic acid oxidation. [3H]Oxindole-3-acetic acid was applied to the endosperm of Zea mays seedlings and allowed to equilibrate for 24 h before the start of the experiment. The subsequent decrease in its specific activity was used to calculate the turnover rate. The average half-life of oxindole-3-acetic acid in the shoots was found to be 30 h while that in the kernels had an average half-life of 35h. Using previously published values of the pool sizes of oxindole-3-acetic acid in shoots and kernels from seedlings of the same age and variety, and grown under the same conditions, the rate of indole-3-acetic acid oxidation was calculated to be 1.1 pmol plant-1 h-1 in the shoots and 7.1 pmol plant-1 h-1 in the kernels.

  19. Performance and carbon turnover in fast- and slow-growing broilers submitted to cyclic heat stress and fed on high-protein diets.

    PubMed

    Campos, D M B; Macari, M; Fernadez-Alarcon, M F; Nogueira, W C L; de Souza, F A; Hada, F H; Lunedo, R; Denadai, J C

    2016-01-01

    Two experiments were conducted to test the hypothesis that when using similar protein/amino acid diets and environment temperature conditions, the performance and carbon turnover in muscle and liver tissues, as measured by the incorporation of stable isotopes ((13)C/(12)C), must be different between fast-growing Cobb 500® and slow-growing Label Rouge broilers. For both experiments (Cobb and Label Rouge), 21-d-old birds were distributed in a completely randomised, 3 × 3 factorial design; three environmental temperatures (cyclic heat stress ad libitum, 22°C ad libitum, and 22°C restricted) and three crude protein concentrations (189.1, 210 and 220 g/kg CP) were used. The Cobb 500® had better performance with higher concentrations of crude protein. Cyclic heat stress (a temperature factor), negatively affected this genetic strain's performance. For the Label Rouge birds, the crude protein concentrations in the diet presented inconsistent results and cyclic heat stress did not affect the performance. The carbon turnover rate was affected in the Cobb 500® strain, with a high protein content reducing carbon turnover in the evaluated tissues (liver and muscles). Feed intake had a greater impact on carbon turnover rates than cyclic heat stress. The Label Rouge birds were not affected by the evaluated factors, suggesting that genetic improvement has a leading role on tissue carbon turnover. There is a genetic influence on carbon turnover in the liver and muscle tissues of broiler chickens. In addition, genetically fast-growing broilers are more susceptible to variations in diet composition and environmental temperature than less rapidly growing animals.

  20. Storage/Turnover rate of inorganic carbon and its dissolvable part in the profile of saline/alkaline soils.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yugang; Wang, Zhongyuan; Li, Yan

    2013-01-01

    Soil inorganic carbon is the most common form of carbon in arid and semiarid regions, and has a very long turnover time. However, little is known about dissolved inorganic carbon storage and its turnover time in these soils. With 81 soil samples taken from 6 profiles in the southern Gurbantongute Desert, China, we investigated the soil inorganic carbon (SIC) and the soil dissolved inorganic carbon (SDIC) in whole profiles of saline and alkaline soils by analyzing their contents and ages with radiocarbon dating. The results showed that there is considerable SDIC content in SIC, and the variations of SDIC and SIC contents in the saline soil profile were much larger than that in the alkaline profile. SDIC storage accounted for more than 20% of SIC storage, indicating that more than 1/5 of the inorganic carbon in both saline and alkaline soil is not in non-leachable forms. Deep layer soil contains considerable inorganic carbon, with more than 80% of the soil carbon stored below 1 m, whether for SDIC or SIC. More importantly, SDIC ages were much younger than SIC in both saline soil and alkaline soil. The input rate of SDIC and SIC ranged from 7.58 to 29.54 g C m(-2) yr(-1) and 1.34 to 5.33 g C m(-2) yr(-1) respectively for saline soil, and from 1.43 to 4.9 g C m(-2) yr(-1) and 0.79 to 1.27 g C m(-2) yr(-1)respectively for alkaline soil. The comparison of SDIC and SIC residence time showed that using soil inorganic carbon to estimate soil carbon turnover would obscure an important fraction that contributes to the modern carbon cycle: namely the shorter residence and higher input rate of SDIC. This is especially true for SDIC in deep layers of the soil profile.

  1. High sequence turnover in the regulatory regions of the developmental gene hunchback in insects.

    PubMed

    Hancock, J M; Shaw, P J; Bonneton, F; Dover, G A

    1999-02-01

    Extensive sequence analysis of the developmental gene hunchback and its 5' and 3' regulatory regions in Drosophila melanogaster, Drosophila virilis, Musca domestica, and Tribolium castaneum, using a variety of computer algorithms, reveals regions of high sequence simplicity probably generated by slippage-like mechanisms of turnover. No regions are entirely refractory to the action of slippage, although the density and composition of simple sequence motifs varies from region to region. Interestingly, the 5' and 3' flanking regions share short repetitive motifs despite their separation by the gene itself, and the motifs are different in composition from those in the exons and introns. Furthermore, there are high levels of conservation of motifs in equivalent orthologous regions. Detailed sequence analysis of the P2 promoter and DNA footprinting assays reveal that the number, orientation, sequence, spacing, and protein-binding affinities of the BICOID-binding sites varies between species and that the 'P2' promoter, the nanos response element in the 3' untranslated region, and several conserved boxes of sequence in the gene (e.g., the two zinc-finger regions) are surrounded by cryptically-simple-sequence DNA. We argue that high sequence turnover and genetic redundancy permit both the general maintenance of promoter functions through the establishment of coevolutionary (compensatory) changes in cis- and trans-acting genetic elements and, at the same time, the possibility of subtle changes in the regulation of hunchback in the different species.

  2. The cellular growth rate controls overall mRNA turnover, and modulates either transcription or degradation rates of particular gene regulons

    PubMed Central

    García-Martínez, José; Delgado-Ramos, Lidia; Ayala, Guillermo; Pelechano, Vicent; Medina, Daniel A.; Carrasco, Fany; González, Ramón; Andrés-León, Eduardo; Steinmetz, Lars; Warringer, Jonas; Chávez, Sebastián; Pérez-Ortín, José E.

    2016-01-01

    We analyzed 80 different genomic experiments, and found a positive correlation between both RNA polymerase II transcription and mRNA degradation with growth rates in yeast. Thus, in spite of the marked variation in mRNA turnover, the total mRNA concentration remained approximately constant. Some genes, however, regulated their mRNA concentration by uncoupling mRNA stability from the transcription rate. Ribosome-related genes modulated their transcription rates to increase mRNA levels under fast growth. In contrast, mitochondria-related and stress-induced genes lowered mRNA levels by reducing mRNA stability or the transcription rate, respectively. We also detected these regulations within the heterogeneity of a wild-type cell population growing in optimal conditions. The transcriptomic analysis of sorted microcolonies confirmed that the growth rate dictates alternative expression programs by modulating transcription and mRNA decay. The regulation of overall mRNA turnover keeps a constant ratio between mRNA decay and the dilution of [mRNA] caused by cellular growth. This regulation minimizes the indiscriminate transmission of mRNAs from mother to daughter cells, and favors the response capacity of the latter to physiological signals and environmental changes. We also conclude that, by uncoupling mRNA synthesis from decay, cells control the mRNA abundance of those gene regulons that characterize fast and slow growth. PMID:26717982

  3. The cellular growth rate controls overall mRNA turnover, and modulates either transcription or degradation rates of particular gene regulons.

    PubMed

    García-Martínez, José; Delgado-Ramos, Lidia; Ayala, Guillermo; Pelechano, Vicent; Medina, Daniel A; Carrasco, Fany; González, Ramón; Andrés-León, Eduardo; Steinmetz, Lars; Warringer, Jonas; Chávez, Sebastián; Pérez-Ortín, José E

    2016-05-05

    We analyzed 80 different genomic experiments, and found a positive correlation between both RNA polymerase II transcription and mRNA degradation with growth rates in yeast. Thus, in spite of the marked variation in mRNA turnover, the total mRNA concentration remained approximately constant. Some genes, however, regulated their mRNA concentration by uncoupling mRNA stability from the transcription rate. Ribosome-related genes modulated their transcription rates to increase mRNA levels under fast growth. In contrast, mitochondria-related and stress-induced genes lowered mRNA levels by reducing mRNA stability or the transcription rate, respectively. We also detected these regulations within the heterogeneity of a wild-type cell population growing in optimal conditions. The transcriptomic analysis of sorted microcolonies confirmed that the growth rate dictates alternative expression programs by modulating transcription and mRNA decay.The regulation of overall mRNA turnover keeps a constant ratio between mRNA decay and the dilution of [mRNA] caused by cellular growth. This regulation minimizes the indiscriminate transmission of mRNAs from mother to daughter cells, and favors the response capacity of the latter to physiological signals and environmental changes. We also conclude that, by uncoupling mRNA synthesis from decay, cells control the mRNA abundance of those gene regulons that characterize fast and slow growth.

  4. Faster clonal turnover in high-infection habitats provides evidence for parasite-mediated selection.

    PubMed

    Paczesniak, D; Adolfsson, S; Liljeroos, K; Klappert, K; Lively, C M; Jokela, J

    2014-02-01

    According to the Red Queen hypothesis for sex, parasite-mediated selection against common clones counterbalances the reproductive advantage of asexual lineages, which would otherwise outcompete sexual conspecifics. Such selection on the clonal population is expected to lead to a faster clonal turnover in habitats where selection by parasites is stronger. We tested this prediction by comparing the genetic structure of clonal and sexual populations of freshwater snail Potamopyrgus antipodarum between years 2003 and 2007 in three depth-specific habitats in Lake Alexandrina (South Island, New Zealand). These habitats differ in the risk of infection by castrating trematodes and in the relative proportion of sexual individuals. As predicted, we found that the clonal structure changed significantly in shallow and mid-water habitats, where prevalence of infection was high, but not in the deep habitat, where parasite prevalence was low. Additionally, we found that both clonal diversity and evenness of the asexual population declined in the shallow habitat. In contrast, the genetic structure (based on F-statistics) of the coexisting sexual population did not change, which suggests that the change in the clonal structure cannot be related to genetic changes in the sexual population. Finally, the frequency of sexuals had no effect on the diversity of the sympatric clonal population. Taken together, our results show a more rapid clonal turnover in high-infection habitats, which gives support for the Red Queen hypothesis for sex.

  5. Internal repetition and intraindividual variation in the rDNA ITS1 of the anopheles punctulatus group (Diptera: Culicidae): multiple units and rates of turnover.

    PubMed

    Bower, James E; Cooper, Robert D; Beebe, Nigel W

    2009-01-01

    The rapid divergence of repetitive sequences makes them desirable markers for phylogenetic studies of closely related groups, provided that a high level of sequence homogeneity has been maintained within species. Intraspecific polymorphisms are found in an increasing number of studies now, and this highlights the need to determine why these occur. In this study we examined intraindividual variation present in the first ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS1) from a group of cryptic mosquito species. Individuals of the Anopheles punctulatus group contained multiple ITS1 length variants that ranged from 1.2 to 8.0 kb. Nucleotide and copy number variation for several homologous internal repeats is common, yet the intraspecific sequence divergence of cloned PCR isolates is comparable to that of other mosquito species (~0.2-1.5%). Most of the length variation is comprised of a 5'-ITS1 repeat that was identified as a duplication of a conserved ITS2 region. Secondary structure conservation for this repeat is pronounced and several repeat types that are highly homogenized have formed. Significant interspecific divergence indicates a high rate of evolutionary change for this spacer. A maximum likelihood tree constructed here was congruent with previous phylogenetic hypotheses and suggests that concerted evolution is also accompanied by interpopulation divergence. The lack of interindividual differences and the presence of homogenized internal repeats suggest that a high rate of turnover has reduced the overall level of variation. However, the intraindividual variation also appears to be maintained by the absence of a single turnover rate and the complex dynamics of ongoing recombination within the spacer.

  6. Docosahexaenoate-containing molecular species of glycerophospholipids from frog retinal rod outer segments show different rates of biosynthesis and turnover

    SciTech Connect

    Louie, K.; Wiegand, R.D.; Anderson, R.E.

    1988-12-13

    The authors have studied the de novo synthesis and subsequent turnover of major docosahexaenoate-containing molecular species in frog rod outer segment (ROS) phospholipids following intravitreal injection of (2-/sup 3/H)glycerol. On selected days after injection, ROS were prepared and phospholipids extracted. Phosphatidylcholine (PC), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), and phosphatidylserine (PS) were isolated and converted to diradylglycerols with phospholipase C. Diradylglycerols were derivatized with benzoic anhydride and resolve into diacylglycerobenzoates and ether-linked glycerobenzoates. The diacylglycerobenzoates were fractionated into molecular species by HPLC, quantitated, and counted for radioactivity. Label was incorporated into ROS phospholipids by day 1 and was followed up through the eighth day. The dipolyenoic species 22:6-22:6 from PC showed 1 3-5 times higher radiospecific activity than the same species from either PE or PS. The rate of decline was determined by calculating the half-life of each molecular species, which was used as a measure of the turnover of the species. The percent distribution of radioactivity in the molecular species of PC and PE was quite different from the relative mass distribution at day 1. However, percent dpm approached the mole percent by 31 days. In PS, percent dpm and mole percent were the same at all time points. These results indicate that the molecular species composition of PC and PE in frog retinal ROS is determined by a combination of factors, which include rate of synthesis, rate of degradation, and selective interconversions. In contrast, PS composition appears to be determined at the time of synthesis.

  7. Nonrandom community assembly and high temporal turnover promote regional coexistence in tropics but not temperate zone.

    PubMed

    Freestone, Amy L; Inouye, Brian D

    2015-01-01

    A persistent challenge for ecologists is understanding the ecological mechanisms that maintain global patterns of biodiversity, particularly the latitudinal diversity gradient of peak species richness in the tropics. Spatial and temporal variation in community composition contribute to these patterns of biodiversity, but how this variation and its underlying processes change across latitude remains unresolved. Using a model system of sessile marine invertebrates across 25 degrees of latitude, from the temperate zone to the tropics, we tested the prediction that spatial and temporal patterns of taxonomic richness and composition, and the community assembly processes underlying these patterns, will differ across latitude. Specifically, we predicted that high beta diversity (spatial variation in composition) and high temporal turnover contribute to the high species richness of the tropics. Using a standardized experimental approach that controls for several confounding factors that hinder interpretation of prior studies, we present results that support our predictions. In the temperate zone, communities were more similar across spatial scales from centimeters to tens of kilometers and temporal scales up to one year than at lower latitudes. Since the patterns at northern latitudes were congruent with a null model, stochastic assembly processes are implicated. In contrast, the communities in the tropics were a dynamic spatial and temporal mosaic, with low similarity even across small spatial scales and high temporal turnover at both local and regional scales. Unlike the temperate zone, deterministic community assembly processes such as predation likely contributed to the high beta diversity in the tropics. Our results suggest that community assembly processes and temporal dynamics vary across latitude and help structure and maintain latitudinal patterns of diversity.

  8. Preliminary results on the influence of mineralogy on the turnover rates of SOM from different Hungarian soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zacháry, Dóra; Szalai, Zoltán; Jakab, Gergely; Németh, Tibor; Sipos, Péter; Filep, Tibor

    2016-04-01

    Fine textured soils generally considered containing more microbial biomass, and having a lower rate of biomass turnover and organic matter decomposition than coarse textured soils. In spite of this, several recent studies have shown contradicting trends. For example, the relative importance of different clay minerals for stabilizing SOM remains an open question. The aim of this study is to evaluate soil mineralological effect on the turnover of SOM by identifying and quantifying soil phyllosilicates. Our samples are derived from C3 forests and C3 croplands from different sites of Hungary. C4 maize residues are added to the soils in order to get natural 13C enrichment as tracer for the young carbon. Bulk samples of the soils from 0 to 20 cm depth were collected. The samples were dried at room temperature and preincubated in the dark for 4 months at 20 °C. The basic soil properties (pH, cation exchange capacity) were analysed after 2 mm sieving and homogenization. The amount of total C and N in the soils and maize residues were analysed using NDIR-chemiluminescent analyzer (Tekmar Dohrman Apollo 9000N). Particle size distribution was determined by laser diffraction (Fritsch Analysette MicroTec 22 plus) and particle imaging method (Malvern Morphologi G3-ID). The mineralological composition of the samples was determined by X-ray diffraction (Philips PW 1730 X-ray diffractometer). Moist soil equivalent to 400 g dry soil mixed with 2 g maize leaves is kept in air tight glass chambers for 183 days at 20°C. The leaves had previously been dried at 60 °C, were cut into pieces and sieved through a 2 mm mesh. The evolved CO2 is trapped by 10 mL 2 M NaOH, which is exchanged on day 1, 3, 5, 7, 10, 14, 21, 28 and subsequently every 31 days. The fractional abundance of 13C of the soils, the plant material and the evolved CO2 is measured with isotope ratio mass spectrometer (Thermo Scientific Delta V IRMS). Our work show the preliminary results on the link between phyllosilicate

  9. Turnover rate, reaction order, and elementary steps for the hydrodechlorination of chlorofluorocarbon compounds on palladium catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, C.D.; Rioux, R.M.; Chen, N.; Ribeiro, F.H.

    2000-04-13

    The rates of hydrodechlorination catalyzed by Pd supported on carbon for four chlorofluorocarbons spanned a range of 7 orders of magnitude. The rates scaled up to the bond strength of the carbon-chlorine bond for the gas-phase reactant. This finding demonstrates that the rate-determining step involves the scission of the C-Cl bond and suggests, through Polanyi and linear free-energy relationships, that rates for other compounds can be estimated if the C-Cl bond strength is known. The reaction orders for the most abundant products are approximately first-order for the chlorine-containing compound, half-order in H{sub 2}, and inverse first-order in HCl. The reaction steps consistent with these orders include a rate-determining step involving the adsorption of the chlorofluorocarbon to a single site (which could be a single surface palladium atom) and equilibrated steps between gas-phase H{sub 2}, gas-phase HCl, and adsorbed hydrogen and chlorine atoms. The rates on the supported catalysts are comparable to the ones reported before on a Pd foil, indicating that the support does not play a role in the reaction. The product distribution is independent of conversion, implying that the various products are formed from a single visit of the reactant on the surface and not from readsorption of gas-phase products. The four compounds studied were chloropentafluoroethane (CF{sub 3}-CF{sub 2}Cl), 2-chloro-1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane (CF{sub 3}-CFClH), 1,1-dichlorotetrafluoroethane (CF{sub 3}-CFCl{sub 2}), and 1,1,1-trichloro-2,2,2-trifluoroethane (CF{sub 3}-CCl{sub 3}).

  10. Rate turnover in mechano-catalytic coupling: A model and its microscopic origin

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Mahua; Grazioli, Gianmarc; Andricioaei, Ioan

    2015-07-28

    A novel aspect in the area of mechano-chemistry concerns the effect of external forces on enzyme activity, i.e., the existence of mechano-catalytic coupling. Recent experiments on enzyme-catalyzed disulphide bond reduction in proteins under the effect of a force applied on the termini of the protein substrate reveal an unexpected biphasic force dependence for the bond cleavage rate. Here, using atomistic molecular dynamics simulations combined with Smoluchowski theory, we propose a model for this behavior. For a broad range of forces and systems, the model reproduces the experimentally observed rates by solving a reaction-diffusion equation for a “protein coordinate” diffusing in a force-dependent effective potential. The atomistic simulations are used to compute, from first principles, the parameters of the model via a quasiharmonic analysis. Additionally, the simulations are also used to provide details about the microscopic degrees of freedom that are important for the underlying mechano-catalysis.

  11. Assimilation efficiencies and turnover rates of trace elements in marine bivalves: A comparison of oysters, clams and mussels

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reinfelder, J.R.; Wang, W.-X.; Luoma, S. N.; Fisher, N.S.

    1997-01-01

    Assimilation efficiencies (AEs) and physiological turnover-rate constants (k) of six trace elements (Ag, Am, Cd, Co, Se, Zn) in four marine bivalves (Crassostrea virginica Gmelin,Macoma balthica Linnaeus, Mercenaria mercenaria Linnaeus, and Mytilus edulis Linnaeus) were measured in radiotracer-depuration experiments. Egestion rates of unassimilated elements were highest during the first 24 h of depuration and declined thereafter. Significant egestion of unassimilated Co, however, continued for up to 5 d in Macoma balthica,Mercenaria mercenaria and Mytilus edulis. With the exception of the extremely low values for110 mAg, 109Cd, and 65Zn in C. virginica, physiological turnover-rate constants (k) showed no general pattern of variation among elements, bivalve species or food types, and were relatively invariant. Values from  ≤0.001 to 0.1 d−1 were observed, but excluding those for Co, most values were  ≤0.04 d−1. In all four species, the AEs of Ag, Am, and Co were generally lower than those of Cd, Se, and Zn. The AEs of Ag, Cd, Se, and Zn in these bivalves are directly related to the proportion of each element in the cytoplasmic fraction of ingested phytoplankton, indicating that >80% of elements in a prey alga's cytoplasm was assimilated. C. virginica, Macoma balthica, and Mercenaria mercenaria assimilated ∼36% of the Ag and Cd associated with the non-cytoplasmic (membrane/organelle) fraction of ingested cells in addition to the cytoplasmic fraction. The ratio of AE:k, which is proportional to the consumer–prey trace-element bioaccumulation factor (concentration in consumer:concentration in prey) was generally greater for Cd, Se, and Zn than for Ag, Am, and Co. This ratio was lowest in Mytilus edulis, suggesting that this bivalve, the most widely employed organism in global biomonitoring, is relatively inefficient at accumulating important elements such as Ag, Cd, and Zn from ingested phytoplankton.

  12. Hypothalamic norepinephrine turnover response to a single low protein, high carbohydrate meal in the male Wistar rat

    SciTech Connect

    Raum, W.; Glick, Z.

    1986-03-01

    A single meal stimulates norepinephrine turnover (NET) by approximately 4-fold in the brown adipose tissue (BAT). In this experiment the role of the hypothalamus in regulating this response was examined. NET was measured in the cortex (C), ventro-medial (VMH), and the lateral hypothalamus (LH). A total of 48 male Wistar rats (200 g body weight) were trained to eat during two feeding sessions per day. On the experimental day, one group (N = 24) was meal deprived and the other (N = 24) was given a low protein, high carbohydrate test meal for 2 hours. NET was determined by the synthesis inhibition method using alpha-methyltyrosine (AMT) injected within one hour after the meal. Norepinephrine (NE) content in each brain section was measured by radioimmunoassay at 4 time points (0, 1, 2, 3 hours) after AMT. The turnover rate (TR) was calculated as the slope of the decline in NE content over time (ng/mg protein/hr) following AMT. The fraction of the total pool of NE released/hr (k) was calculated by dividing the slope (TR) by the Y intercept (NE content at zero time). NET (TR) increased significantly (p < .05) in the VMH following a meal (9.36 +/- .67 vs 8.04 +/- .98 ng/hr; fed vs deprived). There was no change in TR in the C or LH, or in k in any brain section. The marked (4-fold) increase in BAT NET and minimal increase in VMH NET suggests that the meal has a direct effect on BAT with the VMH playing a secondary or modulatory role.

  13. A rodent model of protein turnover used to design an experiment for measuring the rates of channeling, recycling and protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Johnson, H A; Baldwin, R L; Klasing, K C; France, J; Calvert, C C

    2000-12-01

    We described previously a mechanistic model of whole-body protein turnover in rodents. Channeling was defined as the flow of amino acids from the extracellular compartment to aminoacyl tRNA and protein synthesis. Recycling was defined as the flow of amino acids from protein degradation to aminoacyl tRNA (protein synthesis) without mixing with the intracellular pool of amino acids. In this paper, the model is applied to tissues and whole body and is used to develop an experimental protocol for estimating protein fractional synthesis rate, recycling and channeling. Channeling, recycling and protein synthesis must be estimated simultaneously because changes in specific radioactivities over time are highly dependent on the rate of protein synthesis. Injection-specific radioactivities, body weights and experimental variation were used with the model to generate data at different rates of recycling and channeling. The data generated were then used to determine the best time points and experimental method to estimate percentages of recycling, channeling and protein synthesis rate by the iterative Method of Maximum Likelihood. Specific radioactivity at each time point was based on simulated data from three rodents at each of six time points. Predicted protein synthesis rates were within 5%/d of observed rates for all methods. Predicted rates of recycling and channeling were generally within 15% of observed rates except recycling in muscle at high channeling and high recycling. Standard deviations of the predictions of percentages of channeling and recycling were between 0.148 and 44.5% for the pulse dose method, 0.0655 and 197% for the continuous infusion method and 0.351 and 962% for the flooding dose method. The experimental design that yields the best estimates of channeling, recycling and protein synthesis is the pulse dose. Changes in amino acid specific radioactivities in the extracellular, aminoacyl tRNA and protein pools were greatest and should be measured at 2, 6

  14. Production rates and turnover of triiodothyronine in rat-developing cerebral cortex and cerebellum. Responses to hypothyroidism.

    PubMed Central

    Silva, J E; Matthews, P S

    1984-01-01

    Local 5'-deiodination of serum thyroxine (T4) is the main source of triiodothyronine (T3) for the brain. Since we noted in previous studies that the cerebral cortex of neonatal rats tolerated marked reductions in serum T4 without biochemical hypothyroidism, we examined the in vivo T4 and T3 metabolism in that tissue and in the cerebellum of euthyroid and hypothyroid 2-wk-old rats. We also assessed the contribution of enhanced tissue T4 to T3 conversion and decreased T3 removal from the tissues to the T3 homeostasis in hypothyroid brain. Congenital and neonatal hypothyroidism was induced by adding methimazole to the drinking water. Serum, cerebral cortex (Cx), cerebellum (Cm), liver (L) and kidney (R) concentrations of 125I-T4, 125I-T3(T4), and 131I-T3 were measured at various times after injecting 125I-T4 and 131I-T3. The rate of T3 removal from the tissues was measured after injecting an excess of anti-T3-antibody to rats previously injected with tracer T3. In euthyroid rats, fractional turnover rates of T3 per hour were: Cx, 0.26 +/- 0.02 (SE); Cm, 0.20 +/- 0.02; L, 0.98 +/- 0.07; R, 0.97 +/- 0.12; and the calculated unidirectional plasma T3 clearance by these tissues were, in milliliters per gram per hour: Cx = 0.38, Cm = 0.32, L = 5.0, and R = 5.6. In hypothyroidism, the fractional removal rates and clearances were reduced in all tissues, in cortex and cerebellum by 70%, and in liver and kidney ranging from 30 to 50%. While greater than 80% of the 125I-T3(T4) in the brain tissues of euthyroid rats was locally produced, in hypothyroid cerebral cortex and cerebellum the integrated concentrations of 125I-T3(T4) were 2.7- and 1.5-fold greater than in euthyroid rats. In the Cx, this response resulted from an approximately sixfold increase in fractional conversion and an approximately fourfold decrease in T3 removal rate hampered by a decreased uptake of T4 from plasma, whereas in Cm the response resulted only from the reduced T3 removal rate. In euthyroid rats, the

  15. Carbon turnover rates in the One Tree Island reef: A 40-year perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silverman, J.; Kline, D. I.; Johnson, L.; Rivlin, T.; Schneider, K.; Erez, J.; Lazar, B.; Caldeira, K.

    2012-09-01

    During November-December 2009 community rates of gross photosynthesis (Pg), respiration (R) and net calcification (Gnet) were estimated from low-tide slack water measurements of dissolved oxygen, dissolved inorganic carbon and total alkalinity at the historical station DK13 One Tree Island reef, Great Barrier Reef, Australia. Compared to measurements made during the 1960s-1970s at DK13 in the same season,Pg increased from 833 to 914 mmol O2·m-2·d-1 and Pg:R increased from 1.14 to 1.30, indicating that the reef has become more autotrophic. In contrast, Gnet decreased from 133 mmol C·m-2·d-1 to 74 ± 24 mmol C·m-2·d-1. This decrease stems primarily from the threefold increase in nighttime CaCO3 dissolution from -2.5 mmol·m-2·h-1 to -7.5 mmol·m-2·h-1. Comparison of the benthic community survey results from DK13 and its vicinity conducted during this study and in studies from the 1970s, 1980s and 1990s suggest that there have been no significant changes in the live coral coverage during the past 40 years. The reduced Gnet most likely reflects the almost threefold increase in dissolution rates, possibly resulting from increased bioerosion due to changes in the biota (e.g., sea cucumbers, boring organisms) and/or from greater chemical dissolution produced by changing abiotic conditions over the past 40 years associated with climate change, such as increased temperatures and ocean acidification. However, at this stage of research on One Tree Island the effects of these changes are not entirely understood.

  16. Selective logging: do rates of forest turnover in stems, species composition and functional traits decrease with time since disturbance? - A 45 year perspective.

    PubMed

    Osazuwa-Peters, Oyomoare L; Jiménez, Iván; Oberle, Brad; Chapman, Colin A; Zanne, Amy E

    2015-12-01

    Selective logging, the targeted harvesting of timber trees in a single cutting cycle, is globally rising in extent and intensity. Short-term impacts of selective logging on tropical forests have been widely investigated, but long-term effects on temporal dynamics of forest structure and composition are largely unknown. Understanding these long-term dynamics will help determine whether tropical forests are resilient to selective logging and inform choices between competing demands of anthropogenic use versus conservation of tropical forests. Forest dynamics can be studied within the framework of succession theory, which predicts that temporal turnover rates should decline with time since disturbance. Here, we investigated the temporal dynamics of a tropical forest in Kibale National Park, Uganda over 45 years following selective logging. We estimated turnover rates in stems, species composition, and functional traits (wood density and diameter at breast height), using observations from four censuses in 1989, 1999, 2006, and 2013, of stems ≥ 10 cm diameter within 17 unlogged and 9 logged 200 × 10 m vegetation plots. We used null models to account for interdependencies among turnover rates in stems, species composition, and functional traits. We tested predictions that turnover rates should be higher and decrease with increasing time since the selective logging event in logged forest, but should be less temporally variable in unlogged forest. Overall, we found higher turnover rates in logged forest for all three attributes, but turnover rates did not decline through time in logged forest and was not less temporally variable in unlogged forest. These results indicate that successional models that assume recovery to pre-disturbance conditions are inadequate for predicting the effects of selective logging on the dynamics of the tropical forest in Kibale. Selective logging resulted in persistently higher turnover rates, which may compromise the carbon storage capacity

  17. Selective logging: do rates of forest turnover in stems, species composition and functional traits decrease with time since disturbance? – A 45 year perspective

    PubMed Central

    Osazuwa-Peters, Oyomoare L.; Jiménez, Iván; Oberle, Brad; Chapman, Colin A.; Zanne, Amy E.

    2015-01-01

    Selective logging, the targeted harvesting of timber trees in a single cutting cycle, is globally rising in extent and intensity. Short-term impacts of selective logging on tropical forests have been widely investigated, but long-term effects on temporal dynamics of forest structure and composition are largely unknown. Understanding these long-term dynamics will help determine whether tropical forests are resilient to selective logging and inform choices between competing demands of anthropogenic use versus conservation of tropical forests. Forest dynamics can be studied within the framework of succession theory, which predicts that temporal turnover rates should decline with time since disturbance. Here, we investigated the temporal dynamics of a tropical forest in Kibale National Park, Uganda over 45 years following selective logging. We estimated turnover rates in stems, species composition, and functional traits (wood density and diameter at breast height), using observations from four censuses in 1989, 1999, 2006, and 2013, of stems ≥ 10 cm diameter within 17 unlogged and 9 logged 200 × 10 m vegetation plots. We used null models to account for interdependencies among turnover rates in stems, species composition, and functional traits. We tested predictions that turnover rates should be higher and decrease with increasing time since the selective logging event in logged forest, but should be less temporally variable in unlogged forest. Overall, we found higher turnover rates in logged forest for all three attributes, but turnover rates did not decline through time in logged forest and was not less temporally variable in unlogged forest. These results indicate that successional models that assume recovery to pre-disturbance conditions are inadequate for predicting the effects of selective logging on the dynamics of the tropical forest in Kibale. Selective logging resulted in persistently higher turnover rates, which may compromise the carbon storage capacity

  18. Response of the Fine Root Production, Phenology, and Turnover Rate of Six Shrub Species from a Subtropical Forest to a Soil Moisture Gradient and Shading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, X.; Dai, X.; Wang, H.

    2015-12-01

    Knowledge of the fine root dynamics of different life forms in forest ecosystems is critical to understanding how the overall belowground carbon cycling is affected by climate change. However, our current knowledge regarding how endogenous or exogenous factors regulate the root dynamics of understory vegetation is limited. We selected a suite of study sites representing different habitats with gradients of soil moisture and solar radiation (shading or no shading). We assessed the fine root production phenology, the total fine root production, and the turnover among six understory shrub species in a subtropical climate, and examined the responses of the fine root dynamics to gradients in the soil moisture and solar radiation. The shrubs included three evergreen species, Loropetalum chinense, Vaccinium bracteatum, and Adinandra millettii, and three deciduous species, Serissa serissoides, Rubus corchorifolius, and Lespedeza davidii. We observed that variations in the annual fine root production and turnover among species were significant in the deciduous group but not in the evergreen group. Notably, V. bracteatum and S. serissoides presented the greatest responses in terms of root phenology to gradients in the soil moisture and shading: high-moisture habitat led to a decrease and shade led to an increase in fine root production during spring. Species with smaller fine roots of the 1st+2nd-order diameter presented more sensitive responses in terms of fine root phenology to a soil moisture gradient. Species with a higher fine root nitrogen-to -carbon ratio exhibited more sensitive responses in terms of fine root annual production to shading. Soil moisture and shading did not change the annual fine root production as much as the turnover rate. The fine root dynamics of some understory shrubs varied significantly with soil moisture and solar radiation status and may be different from tree species. Our results emphasize the need to study the understory fine root dynamics

  19. The island-mainland species turnover relationship.

    PubMed

    Stuart, Yoel E; Losos, Jonathan B; Algar, Adam C

    2012-10-07

    Many oceanic islands are notable for their high endemism, suggesting that islands may promote unique assembly processes. However, mainland assemblages sometimes harbour comparable levels of endemism, suggesting that island biotas may not be as unique as is often assumed. Here, we test the uniqueness of island biotic assembly by comparing the rate of species turnover among islands and the mainland, after accounting for distance decay and environmental gradients. We modelled species turnover as a function of geographical and environmental distance for mainland (M-M) communities of Anolis lizards and Terrarana frogs, two clades that have diversified extensively on Caribbean islands and the mainland Neotropics. We compared mainland-island (M-I) and island-island (I-I) species turnover with predictions of the M-M model. If island assembly is not unique, then the M-M model should successfully predict M-I and I-I turnover, given geographical and environmental distance. We found that M-I turnover and, to a lesser extent, I-I turnover were significantly higher than predicted for both clades. Thus, in the first quantitative comparison of mainland-island species turnover, we confirm the long-held but untested assumption that island assemblages accumulate biodiversity differently than their mainland counterparts.

  20. Modeling the rate of turnover of DOC and particulate organic carbon in a UK, peat-hosted stream: Including diurnal cycling in short-residence time systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worrall, F.; Moody, C. S.

    2014-10-01

    This study proposes a multicomponent, multiprocess scheme to explain the turnover of organic matter (particulate and dissolved organic matter) in streams. The scheme allows for production and degradation of organic matter by both photic and aphotic processes with transformation of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) to increasingly refractory forms. The proposed scheme was compared to 10 months of experimental observations of the turnover and fate of particulate and dissolved organic matter in stream water from a peat-covered catchment. The scheme was able to explain average decline in DOC concentration of 65% over 70 h with a 13% mean average percentage error based on turnover in three types of organic matter (particulate, labile dissolved, and refractory dissolved) although the order and rate of reactions did change between sets of experimental observations. The modeling suggests that activation energies are low for all except the most refractory forms of DOC in turn, suggesting that processes are not sensitive to temperature change. Application of the modeling scheme to organic matter turnover in the River Tees, northern England, showed that annual removal of total organic carbon was equivalent to between 13 and 33 t C/km2/yr from an at source export of between 22 and 56 t C/km2/yr giving a total in-stream loss rate of between 53 and 62% over a median in-stream residence time of 35 h.

  1. Effects of norepinephrine infusion on myocardial high-energy phosphate content and turnover in the living rat.

    PubMed Central

    Bittl, J A; Balschi, J A; Ingwall, J S

    1987-01-01

    Using 31P-nuclear magnetic resonance, we studied the relationship between myocardial high-energy phosphate content and flux values for the creatine kinase reaction in the living rat under inotropic states achieved during norepinephrine infusion and halothane anesthesia. Under 2% halothane anesthesia (n = 4), 1% halothane anesthesia (n = 5) and norepinephrine infusion (n = 4), rats developed rate-pressure products of 19.5 +/- 1.6, 32.0 +/- 3.5, and 48.5 +/- 2.0 X 1,000 mmHg/min, respectively. Adenosine triphosphate content was not affected by inotropic state, ranging from 24.3 +/- 1.1 to 25.6 +/- 1.1 mumol/g dry weight, but creatine phosphate content varied inversely and reversibly with cardiac performance from 45.6 +/- 6.0 under 2% halothane to 26.0 +/- 6.5 mumol/g dry weight during norepinephrine infusion. The flux values for the creatine kinase reaction were 15.4 +/- 4.6, 20.5 +/- 2.0, and 30.1 +/- 7.9 mumol/g dry weight per s under 2% halothane, 1% halothane, and 1% halothane with norepinephrine, respectively. These results suggest that the turnover of myocardial high-energy phosphate compounds, not their tissue contents, matches cardiac performance during inotropic stimulation. Images PMID:3584473

  2. Calcareous Nannoplankton and Rapid Climate Change: Was High Climate Variability Responsible for Nannofloral Turnover during the PETM and Plio-Pleistocene?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schueth, J.; Bralower, T. J.

    2010-12-01

    Modern climate change has the ability to drastically alter oceanic ecosystems and cause vast community disruptions and extinctions. However, the long-term effects of such drastic change are not known. Rapid climate change can push life to the limits of ecosystem tolerances, making extinction more likely. One of the best ways to understand long-term planktonic ecosystem responses is to study how previous climate changes impacted plankton assemblages. Calcareous nannoplankton are a good target for such an investigation because most species have very specific temperature and nutrient tolerances, and the group has a highly detailed fossil record. Most notably, there are two primary nannoplankton turnover events tied closely to significant climate changes, the rapid warming associated with the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) and global cooling and enhanced glaciations in the northern hemisphere in the Pliocene and Pleistocene. We hypothesize that these nannoplankton turnovers were a result of rapid ecospace shifts caused by high rates of change in key environmental variables such as temperature and nutrients. Because rates are usually calculated as the change between data points, they may not represent true paleoecologic processes. To lessen this problem we have constructed rate models by applying paleoecological data from a few Ocean Drilling Program Sites to a Bayesian Linear Regression and Gaussian Process. This is a practice used in modern ecological studies, but has not been extensively applied to paleoecological problems. Our results show that nannoplankton abundance is most variable when the rate of change of environmental variables is the highest, and some taxa go extinct while environmental variability is high or slightly after a period of rapid climate change. Several taxa that are dominant or have a wide geographical range are less variable during rapid change, suggesting that these characteristics may lower the probability of extinction during rapid

  3. Effect of a High Bone Turnover State Induced by Estrogen Deficiency on the Development and Progression of Breast Cancer Metastases

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-04-01

    postmenopausal women with large operable breast cancer. British Journal of Cancer 2002; 87(9):950-5. 6. Goss P, Ingle JN, Martino S et al. A randomized trial...AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-05-1-0311 TITLE: Effect of a High Bone Turnover State...provision of law, no person shall be subject to any penalty for failing to comply with a collection of information if it does not display a currently

  4. Subtle Ecological Gradient in the Tropics Triggers High Species-Turnover in a Local Geographical Scale

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Dinh T.

    2016-01-01

    Our perception of diversity, including both alpha- and beta-diversity components, depends on spatial scale. Studies of spatial variation of the latter are just starting, with a paucity of research on beta-diversity patterns at smaller scales. Understanding these patterns and the processes shaping the distribution of diversity is critical to describe this diversity, but it is paramount in conservation too. Here, we investigate the diversity and structure of a tropical community of herbivorous beetles at a reduced local scale of some 10 km2, evaluating the effect of a small, gradual ecological change on this structure. We sampled leaf beetles in the Núi Chúa National Park (S Vietnam), studying changes in alpha- and beta-diversity across an elevation gradient up to 500 m, encompassing the ecotone between critically endangered lowland dry deciduous forest and mixed evergreen forest at higher elevations. Leaf beetle diversity was assessed using several molecular tree-based species delimitation approaches (with mtDNA cox1 data), species richness using rarefaction and incidence-based diversity indexes, and beta-diversity was investigated decomposing the contribution of species turnover and nestedness. We documented 155 species in the area explored and species-richness estimates 1.5–2.0x higher. Species diversity was similar in both forest types and changes in alpha-diversity along the elevation gradient showed an expected local increase of diversity in the ecotone. Beta-diversity was high among forest paths (average Sørensen's dissimilarity = 0.694) and, tentatively fixing at 300 m the boundary between otherwise continuous biomes, demonstrated similarly high beta-diversity (Sørensen's dissimilarity = 0.581), with samples clustering according to biome/elevation. Highly relevant considering the local scale of the study, beta-diversity had a high contribution of species replacement among locales (54.8%) and between biomes (79.6%), suggesting environmental heterogeneity

  5. Metabolic turnover of myelin glycerophospholipids.

    PubMed

    Morell, P; Ousley, A H

    1994-08-01

    The apparent half life for metabolic turnover of glycerophospholipids in the myelin sheath, as determined by measuring the rate of loss of label in a myelin glycerophospholipid following radioactive precursor injection, varies with the radioactive precursor used, age of animal, and time after injection during which metabolic turnover is studied. Experimental strategies for resolving apparent inconsistencies consequent to these variables are discussed. Illustrative data concerning turnover of phosphatidylcholine (PC) in myelin of rat brain are presented. PC of the myelin membrane exhibits heterogeneity with respect to metabolic turnover rates. There are at least two metabolic pools of PC in myelin, one with a half life of the order of days, and another with a half life of the order of weeks. To a significant extent biphasic turnover is due to differential turnover of individual molecular species (which differ in acyl chain composition). The two predominant molecular species of myelin PC turnover at very different rates (16:0, 18:1 PC turning over several times more rapidly than 18:0, 18:1 PC). Therefore, within the same membrane, individual molecular species of a phospholipid class are metabolized at different rates. Possible mechanisms for differential turnover of molecular species are discussed, as are other factors that may contribute to a multiphasic turnover of glycerophospholipids.

  6. Comparative Genomics Uncovers Unique Gene Turnover and Evolutionary Rates in a Gene Family Involved in the Detection of Insect Cuticular Pheromones

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Oliva, Montserrat; Almeida, Francisca C.; Sánchez-Gracia, Alejandro; Rozas, Julio

    2016-01-01

    Chemoreception is an essential process for the survival and reproduction of animals. Many of the proteins responsible for recognizing and transmitting chemical stimuli in insects are encoded by genes that are members of moderately sized multigene families. The members of the CheB family are specialized in gustatory-mediated detection of long-chain hydrocarbon pheromones in Drosophila melanogaster and play a central role in triggering and modulating mating behavior in this species. Here, we present a comprehensive comparative genomic analysis of the CheB family across 12 species of the Drosophila genus. We have identified a total of 102 new CheB genes in the genomes of these species, including a functionally divergent member previously uncharacterized in D. melanogaster. We found that, despite its relatively small repertory size, the CheB family has undergone multiple gain and loss events and various episodes of diversifying selection during the divergence of the surveyed species. Present estimates of gene turnover and coding sequence substitution rates show that this family is evolving faster than any known Drosophila chemosensory family. To date, only other insect gustatory-related genes among these families had shown evolutionary dynamics close to those observed in CheBs. Our findings reveal the high adaptive potential of molecular components of the gustatory system in insects and anticipate a key role of genes involved in this sensory modality in species adaptation and diversification.

  7. Turnover Time

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ecosystems contain energy and materials such as carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, and water, and are open to their flow-through. Turnover time refers to the amount of time required for replacement by flow-through of the energy or substance of interest contained in the system, and is ...

  8. The Presence of Thyroid-Stimulation Blocking Antibody Prevents High Bone Turnover in Untreated Premenopausal Patients with Graves’ Disease

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Sun Wook; Bae, Jae Hyun; Noh, Gyeong Woon; Kim, Ye An; Moon, Min Kyong; Park, Kyoung Un; Song, Junghan; Yi, Ka Hee; Park, Do Joon; Chung, June-Key; Cho, Bo Youn; Park, Young Joo

    2015-01-01

    Osteoporosis-related fractures are one of the complications of Graves’ disease. This study hypothesized that the different actions of thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) antibodies, both stimulating and blocking activities in Graves’ disease patients might oppositely impact bone turnover. Newly diagnosed premenopausal Graves’ disease patients were enrolled (n = 93) and divided into two groups: patients with TSHR antibodies with thyroid-stimulating activity (stimulating activity group, n = 83) and patients with TSHR antibodies with thyroid-stimulating activity combined with blocking activity (blocking activity group, n = 10). From the stimulating activity group, patients who had matched values for free T4 and TSH binding inhibitor immunoglobulin (TBII) to the blocking activity group were further classified as stimulating activity-matched control (n = 11). Bone turnover markers BS-ALP, Osteocalcin, and C-telopeptide were significantly lower in the blocking activity group than in the stimulating activity or stimulating activity-matched control groups. The TBII level showed positive correlations with BS-ALP and osteocalcin levels in the stimulating activity group, while it had a negative correlation with the osteocalcin level in the blocking activity group. In conclusion, the activation of TSHR antibody-activated TSH signaling contributes to high bone turnover, independent of the actions of thyroid hormone, and thyroid-stimulation blocking antibody has protective effects against bone metabolism in Graves’ disease. PMID:26650844

  9. High Rate Digital Demodulator ASIC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghuman, Parminder; Sheikh, Salman; Koubek, Steve; Hoy, Scott; Gray, Andrew

    1998-01-01

    The architecture of High Rate (600 Mega-bits per second) Digital Demodulator (HRDD) ASIC capable of demodulating BPSK and QPSK modulated data is presented in this paper. The advantages of all-digital processing include increased flexibility and reliability with reduced reproduction costs. Conventional serial digital processing would require high processing rates necessitating a hardware implementation in other than CMOS technology such as Gallium Arsenide (GaAs) which has high cost and power requirements. It is more desirable to use CMOS technology with its lower power requirements and higher gate density. However, digital demodulation of high data rates in CMOS requires parallel algorithms to process the sampled data at a rate lower than the data rate. The parallel processing algorithms described here were developed jointly by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). The resulting all-digital receiver has the capability to demodulate BPSK, QPSK, OQPSK, and DQPSK at data rates in excess of 300 Mega-bits per second (Mbps) per channel. This paper will provide an overview of the parallel architecture and features of the HRDR ASIC. In addition, this paper will provide an over-view of the implementation of the hardware architectures used to create flexibility over conventional high rate analog or hybrid receivers. This flexibility includes a wide range of data rates, modulation schemes, and operating environments. In conclusion it will be shown how this high rate digital demodulator can be used with an off-the-shelf A/D and a flexible analog front end, both of which are numerically computer controlled, to produce a very flexible, low cost high rate digital receiver.

  10. High Rate GPS on Volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattia, M.

    2005-12-01

    The high rate GPS data processing can be considered as the "new deal" in geodetic monitoring of active volcanoes. Before an eruption, infact, transient episodes of ground displacements related to the dynamics of magmatic fluids can be revealed through a careful analysis of high rate GPS data. In the very first phases of an eruption the real time processing of high rate GPS data can be used by the authorities of Civil Protection to follow the opening of fractures field on the slopes of the volcanoes. During an eruption large explosions, opening of vents, migration of fractures fields, landslides and other dangerous phenomena can be followed and their potential of damage estimated by authorities. Examples from the recent eruption of Stromboli volcano and from the current activities of high rate GPS monitoring on Mt. Etna are reported, with the aim to show the great potential and the perspectives of this technique.

  11. Director Turnover: An Australian Academic Development Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraser, Kym; Ryan, Yoni

    2012-01-01

    Although it can be argued that directors of central academic development units (ADUs) are critical to the implementation of university teaching and learning strategies, it would appear there is a high director turnover rate. While research in the USA, the UK, and Australia illustrates that ADUs are frequently closed or restructured, that research…

  12. Avifauna: Turnover on Islands.

    PubMed

    Mayr, E

    1965-12-17

    The percentage of endemic species of birds on islands increases with island area at a double logarithmic rate. This relation is apparently due to extinction, which is more rapid the smaller the island. The turnover resulting from extinction and replacement appears to be far more rapid than hitherto suspected.

  13. Parathyroid hormone variability parameters for identifying high turnover osteodystrophy disease in hemodialysis patients: an observational retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    De Paola, Luciano; Coppolino, Giuseppe; Bolignano, Davide; Buemi, Michele; Lombardi, Luigi

    2010-12-01

    Abnormalities in bone morphology that develop secondary to chronic kidney disease are defined as renal osteodystrophy and are identified by bone biopsy. As systematic and sequential bone biopsy is not practicable on a large number of patients, various chemical bone markers are commonly used to detect the bone remodeling status in chronic kidney disease and to grade bone disease in the clinical setting. Recent literature has considered the effect of absolute levels of parathyroid hormone (PTH) on clinical outcomes and not the measurement of their change over time, the PTH variability. In a retrospective observational study, we examined PTH variability parameters in a group of hemodialysis patients as independent risk factors for high vs. low turnover osteopathy, and investigated their usefulness with respect to commonly used markers of renal osteodystrophy. The study was conducted on 90 chronic hemodialysis patients undergoing regular treatment at the same dialysis centre (Catanzaro, Italy) with standard bicarbonate dialysis. Patients were classified into either high or medium-low turnover osteopathy for the diagnosis based on renal osteodystrophy using the following criteria: PTH ≥ 400 pg/mL associated with bone ALP ≥ 20 ng/mL. We used a regression-based measurement of PTH variability, which was characterized by different parameters: PTH-Res-SD, PTH-Slope, PTH-Intercept, PTH-Abs-Var, and PTH-Res-SD. In our analysis, these parameters of PTH variability were demonstrated to be good independent predictive factors for high turnover osteodystrophy, and they had a greater sensitivity than the use of a single and/or mean PTH measurements in renal osteodystrophy classification.

  14. Changes in floral diversities, floral turnover rates, and climates in Campanian and Maastrichtian time, North Slope of Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frederiksen, N.O.

    1989-01-01

    One-hundred-and-ten angiosperm pollen taxa have been found in upper Campanian to Masstrichtian rocks of the Colville River region, North Slope of Alaska. These are the highest paleolatitude Campanian and Maastrichtian floras known from North America. Total angiosperm pollen diversity rose during the Campanian and declined toward the end of the Maastrichtian. However, anemophilous porate pollen of the Betulaceae-Myricaceae-Ulmaceae complex increased gradually in diversity during the late Campanian and Maastrichtian and into the Paleocene. Turnover of angiosperm taxa was active throughout most of late Campanian and Maastrichtian time; rapid turnover affected mainly the taxa of zoophilous herbs, representing an bundant but ecologically subordinate element of the vegetation. Last appearances of pollen taxa during the late Campanian and Maastrichtian probably represented mainly extinctions rather than emigrations; end- Cretaceous angiosperm extinctions in the North American Arctic began well before the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary event. The last appearances in the late Maastrichtian took place in bursts; they appear to represent stepwise rather than gradual events, which may indicate the existence of pulses of climatic change particularly in late Maastrichtian time. ?? 1989.

  15. A new method combining soil oxygen concentration measurements with the quantification of gross nitrogen turnover rates and associated formation of N2O and N2 emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gütlein, Adrian; Dannenmann, Michael; Sörgel, Christoph; Meier, Rudi; Meyer, Astrid; Kiese, Ralf

    2014-05-01

    Climate change and the expansion of land use have led to significant changes in terrestrial ecosystems. These include changes in the biogeochemical cycle of nitrogen and therewith implications for biodiversity, water cycle and pedosphere-atmosphere exchange. To understand these impacts detailed research on nitrogen turnover and fluxes are conducted at various (semi-) natural and managed ecosystems in the Mt. Kilimanjaro region. In this context, we execute 15N tracing analyses on soil samples in our stable isotope laboratory including a new experimental setup. The soils were sampled from different forest ecosystems of Mt. Kilimanjaro varying in altitude (1600 - 4500 m) and will be analyzed for gross rates of ammonification and nitrification, gross rates of microbial inorganic N uptake as well as for the gaseous losses of ^15N2 and ^15N2O using ^15NH4+ and ^15NO3- tracing and pool dilution approaches. Since nitrogen turnover of nitrification and denitrification is dependent on soil oxygen concentrations we developed an incubation method which allows to adjust soil samples to different oxygen concentrations. For this purpose, soil is incubated in glass bottles with side tubes to ensure a constant gas flow over the whole incubation time. To adjust the oxygen levels in the laboratory experiment as close as possible to the natural conditions, we started to monitor soil oxygen concentrations with a FirestingO2 Sensor (Pyroscience) connected to a timer and a datalogger (MSR 145 IP 60 E3333) at a Mt. Kilimanjaro rainforest site. The equipment is complemented with soil temperature, moisture and pressure sensors (MSR 145 IP 60). A solar panel connected to an energy source guarantees a working time for over 2 years by a measuring frequency of 20 seconds each 30 minutes. The new laboratory incubation method together with in-situ oxygen concentration measurements in soils will facilitate laboratory incubations with realistic oxygen concentrations and thus will allow for a better

  16. High Data Rate Instrument Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schober, Wayne; Lansing, Faiza; Wilson, Keith; Webb, Evan

    1999-01-01

    The High Data Rate Instrument Study was a joint effort between the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). The objectives were to assess the characteristics of future high data rate Earth observing science instruments and then to assess the feasibility of developing data processing systems and communications systems required to meet those data rates. Instruments and technology were assessed for technology readiness dates of 2000, 2003, and 2006. The highest data rate instruments are hyperspectral and synthetic aperture radar instruments which are capable of generating 3.2 Gigabits per second (Gbps) and 1.3 Gbps, respectively, with a technology readiness date of 2003. These instruments would require storage of 16.2 Terebits (Tb) of information (RF communications case of two orbits of data) or 40.5 Tb of information (optical communications case of five orbits of data) with a technology readiness date of 2003. Onboard storage capability in 2003 is estimated at 4 Tb; therefore, all the data created cannot be stored without processing or compression. Of the 4 Tb of stored data, RF communications can only send about one third of the data to the ground, while optical communications is estimated at 6.4 Tb across all three technology readiness dates of 2000, 2003, and 2006 which were used in the study. The study includes analysis of the onboard processing and communications technologies at these three dates and potential systems to meet the high data rate requirements. In the 2003 case, 7.8% of the data can be stored and downlinked by RF communications while 10% of the data can be stored and downlinked with optical communications. The study conclusion is that only 1 to 10% of the data generated by high data rate instruments will be sent to the ground from now through 2006 unless revolutionary changes in spacecraft design and operations such as intelligent data extraction are developed.

  17. Plant Trait Variation along an Altitudinal Gradient in Mediterranean High Mountain Grasslands: Controlling the Species Turnover Effect

    PubMed Central

    Pescador, David S.; de Bello, Francesco; Valladares, Fernando; Escudero, Adrián

    2015-01-01

    Assessing changes in plant functional traits along gradients is useful for understanding the assembly of communities and their response to global and local environmental drivers. However, these changes may reflect the effects of species composition (i.e. composition turnover), species abundance (i.e. species interaction), and intra-specific trait variability (i.e. species plasticity). In order to determine the relevance of the latter, trait variation can be assessed under minimal effects of composition turnover. Nine sampling sites were established along an altitudinal gradient in a Mediterranean high mountain grassland community with low composition turnover (Madrid, Spain; 1940 m–2419 m). Nine functional traits were also measured for ten individuals of around ten plant species at each site, for a total of eleven species across all sites. The relative importance of different sources of variability (within/between site and intra-/inter-specific functional diversity) and trait variation at species and community level along the considered gradients were explored. We found a weak individual species response to altitude and other environmental variables although in some cases, individuals were smaller and leaves were thicker at higher elevations. This lack of species response was most likely due to greater within- than between-site species variation. At the community level, inter-specific functional diversity was generally greater than the intra-specific component except for traits linked to leaf element content (leaf carbon content, leaf nitrogen content, δ13C and δ15N). Inter-specific functional diversity decreased with lower altitude for four leaf traits (specific leaf area, leaf dry matter content, δ13C and δ15N), suggesting trait convergence between species at lower elevations, where water shortage may have a stronger environmental filtering effect than colder temperatures at higher altitudes. Our results suggest that, within a vegetation type encompassing

  18. Plant trait variation along an altitudinal gradient in mediterranean high mountain grasslands: controlling the species turnover effect.

    PubMed

    Pescador, David S; de Bello, Francesco; Valladares, Fernando; Escudero, Adrián

    2015-01-01

    Assessing changes in plant functional traits along gradients is useful for understanding the assembly of communities and their response to global and local environmental drivers. However, these changes may reflect the effects of species composition (i.e. composition turnover), species abundance (i.e. species interaction), and intra-specific trait variability (i.e. species plasticity). In order to determine the relevance of the latter, trait variation can be assessed under minimal effects of composition turnover. Nine sampling sites were established along an altitudinal gradient in a Mediterranean high mountain grassland community with low composition turnover (Madrid, Spain; 1940 m-2419 m). Nine functional traits were also measured for ten individuals of around ten plant species at each site, for a total of eleven species across all sites. The relative importance of different sources of variability (within/between site and intra-/inter-specific functional diversity) and trait variation at species and community level along the considered gradients were explored. We found a weak individual species response to altitude and other environmental variables although in some cases, individuals were smaller and leaves were thicker at higher elevations. This lack of species response was most likely due to greater within- than between-site species variation. At the community level, inter-specific functional diversity was generally greater than the intra-specific component except for traits linked to leaf element content (leaf carbon content, leaf nitrogen content, δ13C and δ15N). Inter-specific functional diversity decreased with lower altitude for four leaf traits (specific leaf area, leaf dry matter content, δ13C and δ15N), suggesting trait convergence between species at lower elevations, where water shortage may have a stronger environmental filtering effect than colder temperatures at higher altitudes. Our results suggest that, within a vegetation type encompassing

  19. Aspartic Acid Racemization Reveals a High Turnover State in Knee Compared with Hip Osteoarthritic Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Catterall, Jonathan B; Zura, Robert D; Bolognesi, Michael P; Kraus, Virginia Byers

    2016-01-01

    Objective We investigated tissue turnover in healthy and osteoarthritic cartilage. We challenge long held views that osteoarthritis (OA) is dominated by a similar turnover process in all joints and present evidence that hip and knee cartilage respond very differently to OA. Methods D- and L-Aspartate (Asp) were quantified for whole cartilage, collagen and non-collagenous components of cartilage obtained at the time of joint replacement. We computed the Asp racemization ratio (Asp-RR=D/D+L Asp), reflecting the proportion of old to total protein, for each component. Results Compared with hip OA, knee OA collagen fibrils (P<0.0001), collagen (p=0.007), and non-collagenous proteins (p=0.0003) had significantly lower age-adjusted mean Asp-RRs consistent with elevated protein synthesis in knee OA. Knee OA collagen had a mean hydroxyproline/proline (H/P) ratio of 1.2 consistent with the presence of type III collagen whereas hip OA collagen had a mean H/P ratio of 0.99 consistent with type II collagen. Based on Asp-RR, the relative age was significantly different in knee and hip OA (p<0.0005); on average OA knees were estimated to be 30yrs ‘younger’, and OA hips 10yrs ‘older’ than non-OA. Conclusions The metabolic response to OA was strikingly different by joint site. Knee OA cartilage evinced an anabolic response that appeared to be absent in hip OA cartilage. These results challenge the long held view that OA cartilage is capable of only minimal repair and that collagen loss is irreversible. PMID:26417696

  20. The Effect of Parasite Infection on Stable Isotope Turnover Rates of δ15N, δ13C and δ34S in Multiple Tissues of Eurasian Perch Perca fluviatilis

    PubMed Central

    Yohannes, Elizabeth; Grimm, Claudia; Rothhaupt, Karl-Otto; Behrmann-Godel, Jasminca

    2017-01-01

    Stable isotope analysis of commercially and ecologically important fish can improve understanding of life-history and trophic ecology. However, accurate interpretation of stable isotope values requires knowledge of tissue-specific isotopic turnover that will help to describe differences in the isotopic composition of tissues and diet. We performed a diet-switch experiment using captive-reared parasite-free Eurasian perch (Perca fluviatilis) and wild caught specimens of the same species, infected with the pike tapeworm Triaenophorus nodulosus living in host liver tissue. We hypothesize that metabolic processes related to infection status play a major role in isotopic turnover and examined the influence of parasite infection on isotopic turn-over rate of carbon (δ13C), nitrogen (δ15N) and sulphur (δ34S) in liver, blood and muscle. The δ15N and δ13C turnovers were fastest in liver tissues, followed by blood and muscle. In infected fish, liver and blood δ15N and δ13C turnover rates were similar. However, in infected fish, liver and blood δ13C turnover was faster than that of δ15N. Moreover, in infected subjects, liver δ15N and δ13C turnover rates were three to five times faster than in livers of uninfected subjects (isotopic half-life of ca.3-4 days compared to 16 and 10 days, respectively). Blood δ34S turnover rate were about twice faster in non-infected individuals implying that parasite infection could retard the turnover rate of δ34S and sulphur containing amino acids. Slower turnover rate of essential amino acid could probably decrease individual immune function. These indicate potential hidden costs of chronic and persistent infections that may have accumulated adverse effects and might eventually impair life-history fitness. For the first time, we were able to shift the isotope values of parasites encapsulated in the liver by changing the dietary source of the host. We also report variability in isotopic turnover rates between tissues, elements and

  1. The Effect of Parasite Infection on Stable Isotope Turnover Rates of δ15N, δ13C and δ34S in Multiple Tissues of Eurasian Perch Perca fluviatilis.

    PubMed

    Yohannes, Elizabeth; Grimm, Claudia; Rothhaupt, Karl-Otto; Behrmann-Godel, Jasminca

    2017-01-01

    Stable isotope analysis of commercially and ecologically important fish can improve understanding of life-history and trophic ecology. However, accurate interpretation of stable isotope values requires knowledge of tissue-specific isotopic turnover that will help to describe differences in the isotopic composition of tissues and diet. We performed a diet-switch experiment using captive-reared parasite-free Eurasian perch (Perca fluviatilis) and wild caught specimens of the same species, infected with the pike tapeworm Triaenophorus nodulosus living in host liver tissue. We hypothesize that metabolic processes related to infection status play a major role in isotopic turnover and examined the influence of parasite infection on isotopic turn-over rate of carbon (δ13C), nitrogen (δ15N) and sulphur (δ34S) in liver, blood and muscle. The δ15N and δ13C turnovers were fastest in liver tissues, followed by blood and muscle. In infected fish, liver and blood δ15N and δ13C turnover rates were similar. However, in infected fish, liver and blood δ13C turnover was faster than that of δ15N. Moreover, in infected subjects, liver δ15N and δ13C turnover rates were three to five times faster than in livers of uninfected subjects (isotopic half-life of ca.3-4 days compared to 16 and 10 days, respectively). Blood δ34S turnover rate were about twice faster in non-infected individuals implying that parasite infection could retard the turnover rate of δ34S and sulphur containing amino acids. Slower turnover rate of essential amino acid could probably decrease individual immune function. These indicate potential hidden costs of chronic and persistent infections that may have accumulated adverse effects and might eventually impair life-history fitness. For the first time, we were able to shift the isotope values of parasites encapsulated in the liver by changing the dietary source of the host. We also report variability in isotopic turnover rates between tissues, elements and

  2. Using Turnover as a Recruitment Strategy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncan, Sandra

    2009-01-01

    Teacher turnover is notoriously high in the field of early childhood education with an estimated 33% of staff exiting the workplace each year. Turnover is costly. Not only do high levels of turnover negatively impact children's growth and development, it also erodes the program's economic stability and wherewithal to provide effective operations…

  3. High Data Rate Quantum Cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwiat, Paul; Christensen, Bradley; McCusker, Kevin; Kumor, Daniel; Gauthier, Daniel

    2015-05-01

    While quantum key distribution (QKD) systems are now commercially available, the data rate is a limiting factor for some desired applications (e.g., secure video transmission). Most QKD systems receive at most a single random bit per detection event, causing the data rate to be limited by the saturation of the single-photon detectors. Recent experiments have begun to explore using larger degree of freedoms, i.e., temporal or spatial qubits, to optimize the data rate. Here, we continue this exploration using entanglement in multiple degrees of freedom. That is, we use simultaneous temporal and polarization entanglement to reach up to 8.3 bits of randomness per coincident detection. Due to current technology, we are unable to fully secure the temporal degree of freedom against all possible future attacks; however, by assuming a technologically-limited eavesdropper, we are able to obtain 23.4 MB/s secure key rate across an optical table, after error reconciliation and privacy amplification. In this talk, we will describe our high-rate QKD experiment, with a short discussion on our work towards extending this system to ship-to-ship and ship-to-shore communication, aiming to secure the temporal degree of freedom and to implement a 30-km free-space link over a marine environment.

  4. On-call work and physicians' turnover intention: the moderating effect of job strain.

    PubMed

    Heponiemi, Tarja; Presseau, Justin; Elovainio, Marko

    2016-01-01

    Physician shortage and turnover are major problems worldwide. On-call duties may be among the risk factors of high turnover rates among physicians. We investigated whether having on-call duties is associated with physicians' turnover intention and whether job strain variables moderate this association. The present study was a cross-sectional questionnaire study among 3324 (61.6% women) Finnish physicians. The analyses were conducted using analyses of covariance adjusted for age, gender, response format, specialization status and employment sector. The results showed that job strain moderated the association between being on-call and turnover intention. The highest levels of turnover intention were among those who had on-call duties and high level of job strain characterized by high demands and low control opportunities. The lowest levels of turnover intention were among those who were not on-call and who had low strain involving low demands and high control. Also, job demands moderated the association between being on-call and turnover intention; turnover intention levels were higher among those with on-call duties and high demands than those being on-call and low demands. To conclude, working on-call was related to physicians' turnover intention particularly in those with high job strain. Health care organizations should focus more attention on working arrangements and scheduling of on-call work, provide a suitable working pace and implement means to increase physicians' participation and control over their job.

  5. Mobility-Related Teacher Turnover and the Unequal Distribution of Experienced Teachers in Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Özoglu, Murat

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the issue of mobility-related teacher turnover in Turkey through both quantitative and qualitative methods. The quantitative findings derived from descriptive and correlational analyses of countrywide teacher-assignment and transfer data indicate that a high rate of mobility-related turnover is observed in the…

  6. Estimating Teacher Turnover Costs: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, Abigail Jurist; Joy, Lois; Ellis, Pamela; Jablonski, Erica; Karelitz, Tzur M.

    2012-01-01

    High teacher turnover in large U.S. cities is a critical issue for schools and districts, and the students they serve; but surprisingly little work has been done to develop methodologies and standards that districts and schools can use to make reliable estimates of turnover costs. Even less is known about how to detect variations in turnover costs…

  7. Determination of protein-bound palmitate turnover rates using a three-compartment model that formally incorporates [3H]palmitate recycling.

    PubMed

    Qanbar, Riad; Bouvier, Michel

    2004-09-28

    The observation that the palmitoylation state of certain proteins can be biologically modulated led to the proposal that it could, much like phosphorylation, be an important dynamic regulator of protein function. However, based on single-phase exponential decay analysis of data from [(3)H]palmitate pulse/chase experiments, the measured protein-bound palmitate turnover rates were often found to be too slow to account for rapid physiological responses. This paper reports that exponential decay does not adequately describe the results of such experiments because it fails to account for the recycling of [(3)H]palmitate from cellular lipids to palmitoyl CoA. Taking this recycling into account, a three-compartment model was used to deduce the time-dependent changes of cellular [(3)H]palmitoyl CoA and to infer the time course for the incorporation of [(3)H]palmitate into proteins. The validity of the inferences made by the model was checked against data obtained by metabolic labeling of endogenous HEK293 cell proteins. In addition, the model could account for reported anomalies, discrepancies, and apparently paradoxical observations obtained by traditional analysis of data from pulse/chase experiments. Including the recycling of cellular palmitate in the formal description of the system offers a new tool for quantitative assessment of protein-bound palmitate turnover rates. Through the re-evaluation of these rates, the model provides a means for the reassessment of the potential physiological implications of dynamic palmitoylation. The model may also be generally applicable to other areas of research where recycling of tracer is a concern.

  8. Understanding the factors that determine registered nurses' turnover intentions.

    PubMed

    Osuji, Joseph; Uzoka, Faith-Michael; Aladi, Flora; El-Hussein, Mohammed

    2014-01-01

    Turnover among registered nurses (RNs) produces a negative impact on the health outcomes of any health care organization. It is also recognized universally as a problem in the nursing profession. Little is known about the turnover intentions and career orientations of RNs working in Calgary, Alberta, Canada. The aim of this study is to contribute to the knowledge of and to advance the discussion on the turnover of nursing professionals. The study population consisted of RNs employed in the five major hospitals in Calgary. There were 193 surveys returned, representing a response rate of 77.2%. The results show that age and education have a negative effect on turnover intention. Education was found to have a significant negative effect on career satisfaction but not on job satisfaction and organizational commitment. Length of service has a significant negative effect on turnover intention. Role ambiguity has significant highly negative effect on career satisfaction. Growth opportunity and supervisor support have a very significant positive effect on job satisfaction, career satisfaction, and organizational commitment. External career opportunities and organizational commitment do not seem to have a significant effect on turnover intention. Career satisfaction, on the other hand, had negative significant effects on turnover intention.

  9. High turnover drives prolonged persistence of influenza in managed pig herds

    PubMed Central

    Aguas, Ricardo; Riley, Steven; Loeffen, Willie L. A.; Wood, James L. N.; Grenfell, Bryan T.

    2016-01-01

    Pigs have long been hypothesized to play a central role in the emergence of novel human influenza A virus (IAV) strains, by serving as mixing vessels for mammalian and avian variants. However, the key issue of viral persistence in swine populations at different scales is ill understood. We address this gap using epidemiological models calibrated against seroprevalence data from Dutch finishing pigs to estimate the ‘critical herd size’ (CHS) for IAV persistence. We then examine the viral phylogenetic evidence for persistence by comparing human and swine IAV. Models suggest a CHS of approximately 3000 pigs above which influenza was likely to persist, i.e. orders of magnitude lower than persistence thresholds for IAV and other acute viruses in humans. At national and regional scales, we found much stronger empirical signatures of prolonged persistence of IAV in swine compared with human populations. These striking levels of persistence in small populations are driven by the high recruitment rate of susceptible piglets, and have significant implications for management of swine and for overall patterns of genetic diversity of IAV. PMID:27358277

  10. High turnover drives prolonged persistence of influenza in managed pig herds.

    PubMed

    Pitzer, Virginia E; Aguas, Ricardo; Riley, Steven; Loeffen, Willie L A; Wood, James L N; Grenfell, Bryan T

    2016-06-01

    Pigs have long been hypothesized to play a central role in the emergence of novel human influenza A virus (IAV) strains, by serving as mixing vessels for mammalian and avian variants. However, the key issue of viral persistence in swine populations at different scales is ill understood. We address this gap using epidemiological models calibrated against seroprevalence data from Dutch finishing pigs to estimate the 'critical herd size' (CHS) for IAV persistence. We then examine the viral phylogenetic evidence for persistence by comparing human and swine IAV. Models suggest a CHS of approximately 3000 pigs above which influenza was likely to persist, i.e. orders of magnitude lower than persistence thresholds for IAV and other acute viruses in humans. At national and regional scales, we found much stronger empirical signatures of prolonged persistence of IAV in swine compared with human populations. These striking levels of persistence in small populations are driven by the high recruitment rate of susceptible piglets, and have significant implications for management of swine and for overall patterns of genetic diversity of IAV.

  11. Fast demographic traits promote high diversification rates of Amazonian trees

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Timothy R; Pennington, R Toby; Magallon, Susana; Gloor, Emanuel; Laurance, William F; Alexiades, Miguel; Alvarez, Esteban; Araujo, Alejandro; Arets, Eric J M M; Aymard, Gerardo; de Oliveira, Atila Alves; Amaral, Iêda; Arroyo, Luzmila; Bonal, Damien; Brienen, Roel J W; Chave, Jerome; Dexter, Kyle G; Di Fiore, Anthony; Eler, Eduardo; Feldpausch, Ted R; Ferreira, Leandro; Lopez-Gonzalez, Gabriela; van der Heijden, Geertje; Higuchi, Niro; Honorio, Eurídice; Huamantupa, Isau; Killeen, Tim J; Laurance, Susan; Leaño, Claudio; Lewis, Simon L; Malhi, Yadvinder; Marimon, Beatriz Schwantes; Marimon Junior, Ben Hur; Monteagudo Mendoza, Abel; Neill, David; Peñuela-Mora, Maria Cristina; Pitman, Nigel; Prieto, Adriana; Quesada, Carlos A; Ramírez, Fredy; Ramírez Angulo, Hirma; Rudas, Agustin; Ruschel, Ademir R; Salomão, Rafael P; de Andrade, Ana Segalin; Silva, J Natalino M; Silveira, Marcos; Simon, Marcelo F; Spironello, Wilson; ter Steege, Hans; Terborgh, John; Toledo, Marisol; Torres-Lezama, Armando; Vasquez, Rodolfo; Vieira, Ima Célia Guimarães; Vilanova, Emilio; Vos, Vincent A; Phillips, Oliver L; Wiens, John

    2014-01-01

    The Amazon rain forest sustains the world's highest tree diversity, but it remains unclear why some clades of trees are hyperdiverse, whereas others are not. Using dated phylogenies, estimates of current species richness and trait and demographic data from a large network of forest plots, we show that fast demographic traits – short turnover times – are associated with high diversification rates across 51 clades of canopy trees. This relationship is robust to assuming that diversification rates are either constant or decline over time, and occurs in a wide range of Neotropical tree lineages. This finding reveals the crucial role of intrinsic, ecological variation among clades for understanding the origin of the remarkable diversity of Amazonian trees and forests. PMID:24589190

  12. High Resolution, High Frame Rate Video Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Papers and working group summaries presented at the High Resolution, High Frame Rate Video (HHV) Workshop are compiled. HHV system is intended for future use on the Space Shuttle and Space Station Freedom. The Workshop was held for the dual purpose of: (1) allowing potential scientific users to assess the utility of the proposed system for monitoring microgravity science experiments; and (2) letting technical experts from industry recommend improvements to the proposed near-term HHV system. The following topics are covered: (1) State of the art in the video system performance; (2) Development plan for the HHV system; (3) Advanced technology for image gathering, coding, and processing; (4) Data compression applied to HHV; (5) Data transmission networks; and (6) Results of the users' requirements survey conducted by NASA.

  13. High rates of denitrification and nitrate removal in cold seep sediments.

    PubMed

    Bowles, Marshall; Joye, Samantha

    2011-03-01

    We measured denitrification and nitrate removal rates in cold seep sediments from the Gulf of Mexico. Heterotrophic potential denitrification rates were assayed in time-series incubations. Surficial sediments inhabited by Beggiatoa exhibited higher heterotrophic potential denitrification rates (32 μM N reduced day(-1)) than did deeper sediments (11 μM N reduced day(-1)). Nitrate removal rates were high in both sediment horizons. These nitrate removal rates translate into rapid turnover times (<1 day) for the nitrate pool, resulting in a faster turnover for the nitrate pool than for the sulfate pool. Together, these data underscore the rigorous nature of internal nitrogen cycling at cold seeps and the requirement for novel mechanisms to provide nitrate to the sediment microbial community.

  14. Understanding Turnover Intentions and Behavior of Indian Information Systems Professionals: A Study of Organizational Justice, Job Satisfaction and Social Norms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iyer, Vidya V.

    2011-01-01

    Despite the phenomenal growth projected for the Indian information technology (IT) industry, one of the biggest challenges it faces is the high rate of turnover in offshore supplier firms based in India (Everest Research Group 2011). According to recent estimates, turnover rates among Indian information systems (IS) professionals have been…

  15. Protein turnover forms one of the highest maintenance costs in Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed

    Lahtvee, Petri-Jaan; Seiman, Andrus; Arike, Liisa; Adamberg, Kaarel; Vilu, Raivo

    2014-07-01

    Protein turnover plays an important role in cell metabolism by regulating metabolic fluxes. Furthermore, the energy costs for protein turnover have been estimated to account for up to a third of the total energy production during cell replication and hence may represent a major limiting factor in achieving either higher biomass or production yields. This work aimed to measure the specific growth rate (μ)-dependent abundance and turnover rate of individual proteins, estimate the ATP cost for protein production and turnover, and compare this with the total energy balance and other maintenance costs. The lactic acid bacteria model organism Lactococcus lactis was used to measure protein turnover rates at μ = 0.1 and 0.5 h(-1) in chemostat experiments. Individual turnover rates were measured for ~75% of the total proteome. On average, protein turnover increased by sevenfold with a fivefold increase in growth rate, whilst biomass yield increased by 35%. The median turnover rates found were higher than the specific growth rate of the bacterium, which suggests relatively high energy consumption for protein turnover. We found that protein turnover costs alone account for 38 and 47% of the total energy produced at μ = 0.1 and 0.5 h(-1), respectively, and gene ontology groups Energy metabolism and Translation dominated synthesis costs at both growth rates studied. These results reflect the complexity of metabolic changes that occur in response to changes in environmental conditions, and signify the trade-off between biomass yield and the need to produce ATP for maintenance processes.

  16. Taking It or Leaving It. Instability and Turnover in a High-Tech Firm.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schellenberg, Kathryn

    1996-01-01

    Interviews and other data collected from a high-tech firm found that organizational instability raises workers' inclination to quit, independent of whether their job security is threatened. Instability undermines trust and impairs the usefulness of incentives intended to increase commitment. (SK)

  17. Production rates and turnover of triiodothyronine in rat-developing cerebral cortex and cerebellum. Responses to hypothyroidism

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, J.E.; Matthews, P.S.

    1984-09-01

    Local 5'-deiodination of serum thyroxine (T4) is the main source of triiodothyronine (T3) for the brain. Since we noted in previous studies that the cerebral cortex of neonatal rats tolerated marked reductions in serum T4 without biochemical hypothyroidism, we examined the in vivo T4 and T3 metabolism in that tissue and in the cerebellum of euthyroid and hypothyroid 2-wk-old rats. We also assessed the contribution of enhanced tissue T4 to T3 conversion and decreased T3 removal from the tissues to the T3 homeostasis in hypothyroid brain. Congenital and neonatal hypothyroidism was induced by adding methimazole to the drinking water. Serum, cerebral cortex (Cx), cerebellum (Cm), liver (L) and kidney (R) concentrations of 125I-T4, 125I-T3(T4), and 131I-T3 were measured at various times after injecting 125I-T4 and 131I-T3. The rate of T3 removal from the tissues was measured after injecting an excess of anti-T3-antibody to rats previously injected with tracer T3. In hypothyroidism, the fractional removal rates and clearances were reduced in all tissues, in cortex and cerebellum by 70%, and in liver and kidney ranging from 30 to 50%. While greater than 80% of the 125I-T3(T4) in the brain tissues of euthyroid rats was locally produced, in hypothyroid cerebral cortex and cerebellum the integrated concentrations of 125I-T3(T4) were 2.7- and 1.5-fold greater than in euthyroid rats.

  18. Is Gastrectomy-Induced High Turnover of Bone with Hyperosteoidosis and Increase of Mineralization a Typical Osteomalacia?

    PubMed Central

    Ueyama, Takashi; Yamamoto, Yuta; Ueda, Kazuki; Yajima, Aiji; Maeda, Yoshimasa; Yamashita, Yasunobu; Ito, Takao; Tsuruo, Yoshihiro; Ichinose, Masao

    2013-01-01

    Gastrectomy (GX) is thought to result in osteomalacia due to deficiencies in Vitamin D and Ca. Using a GX rat model, we showed that GX induced high turnover of bone with hyperosteoidosis, prominent increase of mineralization and increased mRNA expression of both osteoclast-derived tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5b and osteocalcin. The increased 1, 25(OH)2D3 level and unchanged PTH and calcitonin levels suggested that conventional bone and Ca metabolic pathways were not involved or changed in compensation. Thus, GX-induced bone pathology was different from a typical osteomalacia. Gene expression profiles through microarray analysis and data mining using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis indicated that 612 genes were up-regulated and 1,097 genes were down-regulated in the GX bone. These genes were related functionally to connective tissue development, skeletal and muscular system development and function, Ca signaling and the role of osteoblasts, osteoclasts and chondrocytes. Network analysis indicated 9 genes (Aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 family, member A1; Aquaporin 9; Interleukin 1 receptor accessory protein; Very low density lipoprotein receptor; Periostin, osteoblast specific factor; Aggrecan; Gremlin 1; Angiopoietin-like 4; Wingless-type MMTV integration site family, member 10B) were hubs connected with tissue development and immunological diseases. These results suggest that chronic systemic inflammation might underlie the GX-induced pathological changes in bone. PMID:23776526

  19. The Effects of Intradistrict School Mobility and High Student Turnover Rates on Early Reading Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LeBoeuf, Whitney A.

    2013-01-01

    A number of studies have identified school mobility as one form of school disengagement that is disproportionately harmful for young children enrolled in large urban districts. However, there is substantial variation in these findings, with some studies actually evidencing positive associations between school mobility and academic outcomes (Mehana…

  20. Vertebrate Dissimilarity Due to Turnover and Richness Differences in a Highly Beta-Diverse Region: The Role of Spatial Grain Size, Dispersal Ability and Distance

    PubMed Central

    Calderón-Patrón, Jaime M.; Moreno, Claudia E.; Pineda-López, Rubén; Sánchez-Rojas, Gerardo; Zuria, Iriana

    2013-01-01

    We explore the influence of spatial grain size, dispersal ability, and geographic distance on the patterns of species dissimilarity of terrestrial vertebrates, separating the dissimilarity explained by species replacement (turnover) from that resulting from richness differences. With data for 905 species of terrestrial vertebrates distributed in the Isthmus of Tehuantepec, classified into five groups according to their taxonomy and dispersal ability, we calculated total dissimilarity and its additive partitioning as two components: dissimilarity derived from turnover and dissimilarity derived from richness differences. These indices were compared using fine (10 x 10 km), intermediate (20 x 20 km) and coarse (40 x 40 km) grain grids, and were tested for any correlations with geographic distance. The results showed that total dissimilarity is high for the terrestrial vertebrates in this region. Total dissimilarity, and dissimilarity due to turnover are correlated with geographic distance, and the patterns are clearer when the grain is fine, which is consistent with the distance-decay pattern of similarity. For all terrestrial vertebrates tested on the Isthmus of Tehuantepec both the dissimilarity derived from turnover and the dissimilarity resulting from richness differences make important contributions to total dissimilarity, and dispersal ability does not seem to influence the dissimilarity patterns. These findings support the idea that conservation efforts in this region require a system of interconnected protected areas that embrace the environmental, climatic and biogeographic heterogeneity of the area. PMID:24324840

  1. High dose sapropterin dihydrochloride therapy improves monoamine neurotransmitter turnover in murine phenylketonuria (PKU).

    PubMed

    Winn, Shelley R; Scherer, Tanja; Thöny, Beat; Harding, Cary O

    2016-01-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) deficiencies of the monoamine neurotransmitters, dopamine and serotonin, have been implicated in the pathophysiology of neuropsychiatric dysfunction in phenylketonuria (PKU). Increased brain phenylalanine concentration likely competitively inhibits the activities of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH), the rate limiting steps in dopamine and serotonin synthesis respectively. Tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) is a required cofactor for TH and TPH activity. Our hypothesis was that treatment of hyperphenylalaninemic Pah(enu2/enu2) mice, a model of human PKU, with sapropterin dihydrochloride, a synthetic form of BH4, would stimulate TH and TPH activities leading to improved dopamine and serotonin synthesis despite persistently elevated brain phenylalanine. Sapropterin (20, 40, or 100mg/kg body weight in 1% ascorbic acid) was administered daily for 4 days by oral gavage to Pah(enu2/enu2) mice followed by measurement of brain biopterin, phenylalanine, tyrosine, tryptophan and monoamine neurotransmitter content. A significant increase in brain biopterin content was detected only in mice that had received the highest sapropterin dose, 100mg/kg. Blood and brain phenylalanine concentrations were unchanged by sapropterin therapy. Sapropterin therapy also did not alter the absolute amounts of dopamine and serotonin in brain but was associated with increased homovanillic acid (HVA) and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA), dopamine and serotonin metabolites respectively, in both wild type and Pah(enu2/enu2) mice. Oral sapropterin therapy likely does not directly affect central nervous system monoamine synthesis in either wild type or hyperphenylalaninemic mice but may stimulate synaptic neurotransmitter release and subsequent metabolism.

  2. Total body water and water turnover rates in the estuarine diamondback terrapin (Malaclemys terrapin) during the transition from dormancy to activity.

    PubMed

    Harden, Leigh Anne; Duernberger, Kimberly Anne; Jones, T Todd; Williard, Amanda Southwood

    2014-12-15

    Water and salt concentrations in an animal's body fluids can fluctuate with changing environmental conditions, posing osmoregulatory challenges that require behavioral and physiological adjustments. The purpose of this study was to investigate body water dynamics in the estuarine diamondback terrapin (Malaclemys terrapin), a species that undergoes seasonal dormancy in salt marsh habitats. We conducted a field study to determine the total body water (%TBW), water turnover rate (WTR) and daily water flux (DWF) of female terrapins in south eastern North Carolina pre- and post-emergence from winter dormancy. Terrapins were injected with [(2)H]deuterium on two occasions and washout of the isotope was monitored by taking successive blood samples during the period of transition from dormancy to activity. The WTR and DWF of dormant terrapins were significantly lower than those of active terrapins (WTR(dormant)=49.70±15.94 ml day(-1), WTR(active)=100.20±20.36 ml day(-1), DWF(dormant)=10.52±2.92%TBW day(-1), DWF(active)=21.84±7.30%TBW day(-1)). There was no significant difference in %TBW between dormant and active terrapins (75.05±6.19% and 74.54±4.36%, respectively). The results from this field study provide insight into the terrapin's ability to maintain osmotic homeostasis while experiencing shifts in behavioral and environmental conditions.

  3. Orthophosphate turnover in East African lakes.

    PubMed

    Peters, Robert Henry; MacIntyre, Sally

    1976-12-01

    Turnover rates of (32)P-PO4 and concentrations of orthophosphate as soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP) were measured in five East African waters. Rapid incorporation of (32)P-PO4 by the seston and orthophosphate concentrations below the limit of detectibility were found in Lakes Elmenteita, Naivasha, and Naivasha Crater Lake. Turnover was slow and orthophosphate concentration high in both Lake Nakuru and the Crescent Island Crater basin of Lake Naivasha. Further experiments in Lake Nakuru indicated that colloidal binding of orthophosphate was limited and that particles retained by an 8.0 μ filter incorporated 66% as much tracer as particles retained by a 0.1 μ filter. These experiments strengthen our conclusion that a large quantity of orthophosphate is available for algal use in Lake Nakuru.

  4. Hybrid Mathematical Model of Cardiomyocyte Turnover in the Adult Human Heart

    PubMed Central

    Elser, Jeremy A.; Margulies, Kenneth B.

    2012-01-01

    Rationale The capacity for cardiomyocyte regeneration in the healthy adult human heart is fundamentally relevant for both myocardial homeostasis and cardiomyopathy therapeutics. However, estimates of cardiomyocyte turnover rates conflict greatly, with a study employing C14 pulse-chase methodology concluding 1% annual turnover in youth declining to 0.5% with aging and another using cell population dynamics indicating substantial, age-increasing turnover (4% increasing to 20%). Objective Create a hybrid mathematical model to critically examine rates of cardiomyocyte turnover derived from alternative methodologies. Methods and Results Examined in isolation, the cell population analysis exhibited severe sensitivity to a stem cell expansion exponent (20% variation causing 2-fold turnover change) and apoptosis rate. Similarly, the pulse-chase model was acutely sensitive to assumptions of instantaneous incorporation of atmospheric C14 into the body (4-fold impact on turnover in young subjects) while numerical restrictions precluded otherwise viable solutions. Incorporating considerations of primary variable sensitivity and controversial model assumptions, an unbiased numerical solver identified a scenario of significant, age-increasing turnover (4–6% increasing to 15–22% with age) that was compatible with data from both studies, provided that successive generations of cardiomyocytes experienced higher attrition rates than predecessors. Conclusions Assignment of histologically-observed stem/progenitor cells into discrete regenerative phenotypes in the cell population model strongly influenced turnover dynamics without being directly testable. Alternatively, C14 trafficking assumptions and restrictive models in the pulse-chase model artificially eliminated high-turnover solutions. Nevertheless, discrepancies among recent cell turnover estimates can be explained and reconciled. The hybrid mathematical model provided herein permits further examination of these and

  5. Dynamics of Cell Generation and Turnover in the Human Heart.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, Olaf; Zdunek, Sofia; Felker, Anastasia; Salehpour, Mehran; Alkass, Kanar; Bernard, Samuel; Sjostrom, Staffan L; Szewczykowska, Mirosława; Jackowska, Teresa; Dos Remedios, Cris; Malm, Torsten; Andrä, Michaela; Jashari, Ramadan; Nyengaard, Jens R; Possnert, Göran; Jovinge, Stefan; Druid, Henrik; Frisén, Jonas

    2015-06-18

    The contribution of cell generation to physiological heart growth and maintenance in humans has been difficult to establish and has remained controversial. We report that the full complement of cardiomyocytes is established perinataly and remains stable over the human lifespan, whereas the numbers of both endothelial and mesenchymal cells increase substantially from birth to early adulthood. Analysis of the integration of nuclear bomb test-derived (14)C revealed a high turnover rate of endothelial cells throughout life (>15% per year) and more limited renewal of mesenchymal cells (<4% per year in adulthood). Cardiomyocyte exchange is highest in early childhood and decreases gradually throughout life to <1% per year in adulthood, with similar turnover rates in the major subdivisions of the myocardium. We provide an integrated model of cell generation and turnover in the human heart.

  6. Salary and Ranking and Teacher Turnover: A Statewide Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia, Cynthia Martinez; Slate, John R.; Delgado, Carmen Tejeda

    2009-01-01

    This study examined three years of data obtained from the Academic Excellence Indicator System of the State of Texas regarding teacher turnover rate and teacher salary. Across all public school districts, teacher salary was consistently negatively related to teacher turnover; that is, where salary was lower, turnover rate was higher When data were…

  7. A high rate proportional chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, R.; Fraszer, W.; Openshaw, R.; Sheffer, G.; Salomon, M.; Dew, S.; Marans, J.; Wilson, P.

    1987-02-01

    Gas mixtures with high specific ionization allow the use of small interelectrode distances while still maintaining full efficiency. With the short electron drift distances the timing resolution is also improved. The authors have built and operated two 25 cm/sup 2/ chambers with small interelectrode distances. Also single wire detector cells have been built to test gas mixture lifetimes. Various admixtures of CF/sub 4/, DME, Isobutane, Ethane and Argon have been tested. Possible applications of such chambers are as beam profile monitors, position tagging of rare events and front end chambers in spectrometers.

  8. The longitudinal study of turnover and the cost of turnover in EMS

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, P. Daniel; Jones, Cheryl B.; Hubble, Michael W.; Carr, Matthew; Weaver, Matthew D.; Engberg, John; Castle, Nicholas

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Few studies have examined employee turnover and associated costs in emergency medical services (EMS). The purpose of this study was to quantify the mean annual rate of turnover, total median cost of turnover, and median cost per termination in a diverse sample of EMS agencies. Methods A convenience sample of 40 EMS agencies was followed over a 6 month period. Internet, telephone, and on-site data collection methods were used to document terminations, new hires, open positions, and costs associated with turnover. The cost associated with turnover was calculated based on a modified version of the Nursing Turnover Cost Calculation Methodology (NTCCM). The NTCCM identified direct and indirect costs through a series of questions that agency administrators answered monthly during the study period. A previously tested measure of turnover to calculate the mean annual rate of turnover was used. All calculations were weighted by the size of the EMS agency roster. The mean annual rate of turnover, total median cost of turnover, and median cost per termination were determined for 3 categories of agency staff mix: all paid staff, mix of paid and volunteer (mixed), and all-volunteer. Results The overall weighted mean annual rate of turnover was 10.7%. This rate varied slightly across agency staffing mix: (all-paid=10.2%, mixed=12.3%, all-volunteer=12.4%). Among agencies that experienced turnover (n=25), the weighted median cost of turnover was $71,613.75, which varied across agency staffing mix: (all-paid=$86,452.05, mixed=$9,766.65, and all-volunteer=$0). The weighted median cost per termination was $6,871.51 and varied across agency staffing mix: (all-paid=$7,161.38, mixed=$1,409.64, and all-volunteer=$0). Conclusions Annual rates of turnover and costs associated with turnover vary widely across types of EMS agencies. The study’s mean annual rate of turnover was lower than expected based on information appearing in the news media and EMS trade magazines. Findings

  9. Principal Turnover. Information Capsule. Volume 0914

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blazer, Christie

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that school districts are facing increasing rates of principal turnover. Frequent principal changes deprive schools of the leadership stability they need to succeed, disrupt long-term school reform efforts, and may even be linked to increased teacher turnover and lower levels of student achievement. This Information Capsule…

  10. Peri-implant and systemic effects of high-/low-affinity bisphosphonate-hydroxyapatite composite coatings in a rabbit model with peri-implant high bone turnover

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Hydroxyapatite (HA) coatings composed with bisphosphonates (BPs) which have high mineral-binding affinities have been confirmed to successfully enhance implant stability. However, few previous studies focused on HA coatings composed with low-affinity BPs or on systemic effects of locally released BPs. Methods In this long-term study, we developed two kinds of BP-HA composite coatings using either high-affinity BP (alendronate, ALN) or low-affinity BP (risedronate, RIS). Thirty-six rabbits were divided into three groups according to different coating applications (group I: HA, group II: ALN-HA, and group III: RIS-HA). Implants were inserted into the proximal region of the medullary cavity of the left tibiay. At insertion, 2 × 108 wear particles were injected around implants to induce a peri-implant high bone turnover environment. Both local (left tibias) and systemic (right tibias and lumbar vertebrae) inhibitory effect on bone resorption were compared, including bone-implant integration, bone architecture, bone mineral density (BMD), implant stability, and serum levels of bone turnover markers. Results The results indicated that ALN-HA composite coating, which could induce higher bone-implant contact (BIC) ratio, bone mass augmentation, BMD, and implant stability in the peri-implant region, was more potent on peri-implant bone, while RIS-HA composite coating, which had significant systemic effect, was more potent on non-peri-implant bone, especially lumbar vertebrae. Conclusions It is instructive and meaningful to further clinical studies that we could choose different BP-HA composite coatings according to the patient’s condition. PMID:22686414

  11. Modifying the high rate algal pond light environment and its effects on light absorption and photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, Donna L; Montemezzani, Valerio; Howard-Williams, Clive; Turnbull, Matthew H; Broady, Paul A; Craggs, Rupert J

    2015-03-01

    The combined use of high rate algal ponds (HRAPs) for wastewater treatment and commercial algal production is considered to be an economically viable option. However, microalgal photosynthesis and biomass productivity is constrained in HRAPs due to light limitation. This paper investigates how the light climate in the HRAP can be modified through changes in pond depth, hydraulic retention time (HRT) and light/dark turnover rate and how this impacts light absorption and utilisation by the microalgae. Wastewater treatment HRAPs were operated at three different pond depth and HRT during autumn. Light absorption by the microalgae was most affected by HRT, significantly decreasing with increasing HRT, due to increased internal self-shading. Photosynthetic performance (as defined by Pmax, Ek and α), significantly increased with increasing pond depth and decreasing HRT. Despite this, increasing pond depth and/or HRT, resulted in decreased pond light climate and overall integrated water column net oxygen production. However, increased light/dark turnover was able to compensate for this decrease, bringing the net oxygen production in line with shallower ponds operated at shorter HRT. On overcast days, modelled daily net photosynthesis significantly increased with increased light/dark turnover, however, on clear days such increased turnover did not enhance photosynthesis. This study has showed that light absorption and photosynthetic performance of wastewater microalgae can be modified through changes to pond depth, HRT and light/dark turnover.

  12. Structure of turbulence at high shear rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Moon Joo; Kim, John; Moin, Parviz

    1990-01-01

    The structure of homogeneous turbulence subject to high shear rate has been investigated by using three-dimensional, time-dependent numerical simulations of the Navier-Stokes equations. This study indicates that high shear rate alone is sufficient for generation of the streaky structures, and that the presence of a solid boundary is not necessary. Evolution of the statistical correlations is examined to determine the effect of high shear rate on the development of anisotropy in turbulence. It is shown that the streamwise fluctuating motions are enhanced so profoundly that a highly anisotropic turbulence state with a 'one-component' velocity field and 'two-component' vorticity field develops asymptotically as total shear increases. Because of high-shear rate, rapid distortion theory predicts remarkably well the anisotropic behavior of the structural quantities.

  13. Deconvolution of high rate flicker electroretinograms.

    PubMed

    Alokaily, A; Bóhorquez, J; Özdamar, Ö

    2014-01-01

    Flicker electroretinograms are steady-state electroretinograms (ERGs) generated by high rate flash stimuli that produce overlapping periodic responses. When a flash stimulus is delivered at low rates, a transient response named flash ERG (FERG) representing the activation of neural structures within the outer retina is obtained. Although FERGs and flicker ERGs are used in the diagnosis of many retinal diseases, their waveform relationships have not been investigated in detail. This study examines this relationship by extracting transient FERGs from specially generated quasi steady-state flicker and ERGs at stimulation rates above 10 Hz and similarly generated conventional flicker ERGs. The ability to extract the transient FERG responses by deconvolving flicker responses to temporally jittered stimuli at high rates is investigated at varying rates. FERGs were obtained from seven normal subjects stimulated with LED-based displays, delivering steady-state and low jittered quasi steady-state responses at five rates (10, 15, 32, 50, 68 Hz). The deconvolution method enabled a successful extraction of "per stimulus" unit transient ERG responses for all high stimulation rates. The deconvolved FERGs were used successfully to synthesize flicker ERGs obtained at the same high stimulation rates.

  14. ISS Update: High Rate Communications System

    NASA Video Gallery

    ISS Update Commentator Pat Ryan interviews Diego Serna, Communications and Tracking Officer, about the High Rate Communications System. Questions? Ask us on Twitter @NASA_Johnson and include the ha...

  15. [Hopes of high dose-rate radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Fouillade, Charles; Favaudon, Vincent; Vozenin, Marie-Catherine; Romeo, Paul-Henri; Bourhis, Jean; Verrelle, Pierre; Devauchelle, Patrick; Patriarca, Annalisa; Heinrich, Sophie; Mazal, Alejandro; Dutreix, Marie

    2017-03-07

    In this review, we present the synthesis of the newly acquired knowledge concerning high dose-rate irradiations and the hopes that these new radiotherapy modalities give rise to. The results were presented at a recent symposium on the subject.

  16. Superintendent Turnover in Texas, Connecticut, Kentucky, and Oregon Public School Districts: Contributing Factors and Trends

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berryhill, Kathy S.

    2009-01-01

    School district administrator openings are occurring across Texas and many other states at an increasing rate. The high rate of turnover in the superintendency has become a national problem. Texas was chosen for the study due to the total number of school districts in the state and the high percent of rural districts. The other selected states,…

  17. Altered bone turnover during spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, R. T.; Morey, E. R.; Liu, C.; Baylink, D. J.

    1982-01-01

    Modifications in calcium metabolism during spaceflight were studied, using parameters that reflect bone turnover. Bone formation rate, medullary area, bone length, bone density, pore size distribution, and differential bone cell number were evaluated in growing rate both immediately after and 25 days after orbital spaceflights aboard the Soviet biological satellites Cosmos 782 and 936. The primary effect of space flight on bone turnover was a reversible inhibition of bone formation at the periosteal surface. A simultaneous increase in the length of the periosteal arrest line suggests that bone formation ceased along corresponding portions of that surface. Possible reasons include increased secretion of glucocorticoids and mechanical unloading of the skeleton due to near-weightlessness, while starvation and immobilization are excluded as causes.

  18. Turbulence structure at high shear rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Moon Joo; Kim, John; Moin, Parviz

    1987-01-01

    The structure of homogeneous turbulence in the presence of a high shear rate is studied using results obtained from three-dimensional time-dependent numerical simulations of the Navier-Stokes equations on a grid of 512 x 128 x 128 node points. It is shown that high shear rate enhances the streamwise fluctuating motion to such an extent that a highly anisotropic turbulence state with a one-dimensional velocity field and two-dimensional small-scale turbulence develops asymptotically as total shear increases. Instantaneous velocity fields show that high shear rate in homogeneous turbulent shear flow produces structures which are similar to the streaks present in the viscous sublayer of turbulent boundary layers.

  19. High Bit Rate Experiments Over ACTS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergman, Larry A.; Gary, J. Patrick; Edelsen, Burt; Helm, Neil; Cohen, Judith; Shopbell, Patrick; Mechoso, C. Roberto; Chung-Chun; Farrara, M.; Spahr, Joseph

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes two high data rate experiments chat are being developed for the gigabit NASA Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS). The first is a telescience experiment that remotely acquires image data at the Keck telescope from the Caltech campus. The second is a distributed global climate application that is run between two supercomputer centers interconnected by ACTS. The implementation approach for each is described along with the expected results. Also. the ACTS high data rate (HDR) ground station is also described in detail.

  20. Cyanobacteria dominance influences resource use efficiency and community turnover in phytoplankton and zooplankton communities.

    PubMed

    Filstrup, Christopher T; Hillebrand, Helmut; Heathcote, Adam J; Harpole, W Stanley; Downing, John A

    2014-04-01

    Freshwater biodiversity loss potentially disrupts ecosystem services related to water quality and may negatively impact ecosystem functioning and temporal community turnover. We analysed a data set containing phytoplankton and zooplankton community data from 131 lakes through 9 years in an agricultural region to test predictions that plankton communities with low biodiversity are less efficient in their use of limiting resources and display greater community turnover (measured as community dissimilarity). Phytoplankton resource use efficiency (RUE = biomass per unit resource) was negatively related to phytoplankton evenness (measured as Pielou's evenness), whereas zooplankton RUE was positively related to phytoplankton evenness. Phytoplankton and zooplankton RUE were high and low, respectively, when Cyanobacteria, especially Microcystis sp., dominated. Phytoplankton communities displayed slower community turnover rates when dominated by few genera. Our findings, which counter findings of many terrestrial studies, suggest that Cyanobacteria dominance may play important roles in ecosystem functioning and community turnover in nutrient-enriched lakes.

  1. Norepinephrine turnover in heart and spleen of 7-, 22-, and 34 C-acclimated hamsters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, S. B.; Musacchia, X. J.

    1976-01-01

    The relationship of norepinephrine (NE) concentration and endogenous turnover rates in both myocardial and spleen tissues in the golden hamster is examined as a function of chronic exposure to either high or low ambient temperatures. Changes in myocardial and spleen NE turnover values are discussed in terms of functional alterations in sympathetic nerve activity and the importance of such changes in temperature acclimation. It is found that acclimation of hamsters to 7 C for 7-10 weeks results in decreased myocardial NE concentration and an apparent increase in myocardial NE turnover. In contrast, exposure to 34 C for 6-8 weeks results in increased myocardial NE concentration and an apparent decrease in NE turnover in both myocardial and spleen tissues. The implication of altered NE synthesis is that sympathetic nerve activity is reduced with heat acclimation and is enhanced with cold acclimation.

  2. Whole-body protein turnover response to short-term high-protein diets during weight loss: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Pasiakos, S M; Margolis, L M; McClung, J P; Cao, J J; Whigham, L D; Combs, G F; Young, A J

    2014-07-01

    To determine whole-body protein turnover responses to high-protein diets during weight loss, 39 adults (age, 21±1 years; VO2peak, 48±1 ml kg(-1) min(-1); body mass index, 25±1 kg m(2)) were randomized to diets providing protein at the recommend dietary allowance (RDA), 2 × -RDA or 3 × -RDA. A 10-day weight maintenance period preceded a 21-day, 40% energy deficit. Postabsorptive (FASTED) and postprandial (FED) whole-body protein turnover was determined during weight maintenance (day 10) and energy deficit (day 31) using [1-(13)C]leucine. FASTED flux, synthesis and breakdown were lower (P<0.05) for energy deficit than weight maintenance. Protein flux and synthesis were higher (P<0.05) for FED than FASTED. Feeding attenuated (P<0.05) breakdown during weight maintenance but not energy deficit. Oxidation increased (P<0.05) between dietary protein levels and feeding stimulated oxidation, although oxidative responses to feeding were higher (P<0.05) for energy deficit than weight maintenance. FASTED net balance decreased between dietary protein levels, but in the FED state, net balance was lower for 3 × -RDA as compared with RDA and 2 × -RDA (diet-by-state, P<0.05). Consuming dietary protein at levels above the RDA, particularly 3 × -RDA, during short-term weight loss increases protein oxidation with concomitant reductions in net protein balance.

  3. TMF ultra-high rate discharge performance

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, B.

    1997-12-01

    BOLDER Technologies Corporation has developed a valve-regulated lead-acid product line termed Thin Metal Film (TMF{trademark}) technology. It is characterized by extremely thin plates and close plate spacing that facilitate high rates of charge and discharge with minimal temperature increases, at levels unachievable with other commercially-available battery technologies. This ultra-high rate performance makes TMF technology ideal for such applications as various types of engine start, high drain rate portable devices and high-current pulsing. Data are presented on very high current continuous and pulse discharges. Power and energy relationships at various discharge rates are explored and the fast-response characteristics of the BOLDER{reg_sign} cell are qualitatively defined. Short-duration recharge experiments will show that devices powered by BOLDER batteries can be in operation for more than 90% of an extended usage period with multiple fast recharges. The BOLDER cell is ideal for applications such as engine-start, a wide range of portable devices including power tools, hybrid electric vehicles and pulse-power devices. Applications such as this are very attractive, and are well served by TMF technology, but an area of great interest and excitement is ultrahigh power delivery in excess of 1 kW/kg.

  4. High Resolution Measurement of the Glycolytic Rate

    PubMed Central

    Bittner, Carla X.; Loaiza, Anitsi; Ruminot, Iván; Larenas, Valeria; Sotelo-Hitschfeld, Tamara; Gutiérrez, Robin; Córdova, Alex; Valdebenito, Rocío; Frommer, Wolf B.; Barros, L. Felipe

    2010-01-01

    The glycolytic rate is sensitive to physiological activity, hormones, stress, aging, and malignant transformation. Standard techniques to measure the glycolytic rate are based on radioactive isotopes, are not able to resolve single cells and have poor temporal resolution, limitations that hamper the study of energy metabolism in the brain and other organs. A new method is described in this article, which makes use of a recently developed FRET glucose nanosensor to measure the rate of glycolysis in single cells with high temporal resolution. Used in cultured astrocytes, the method showed for the first time that glycolysis can be activated within seconds by a combination of glutamate and K+, supporting a role for astrocytes in neurometabolic and neurovascular coupling in the brain. It was also possible to make a direct comparison of metabolism in neurons and astrocytes lying in close proximity, paving the way to a high-resolution characterization of brain energy metabolism. Single-cell glycolytic rates were also measured in fibroblasts, adipocytes, myoblasts, and tumor cells, showing higher rates for undifferentiated cells and significant metabolic heterogeneity within cell types. This method should facilitate the investigation of tissue metabolism at the single-cell level and is readily adaptable for high-throughput analysis. PMID:20890447

  5. Faunal turnover in Neogene to Recent Caribbean reef corals and region environmental change

    SciTech Connect

    Budd, A.F. . Geology Dept.); Johnson, K.G. . Palaeontology Dept.); Stemann, T.A. . Geologisches Inst.)

    1993-03-01

    Quantitative analyses of species richness and species extinction and origination rates in the Neogene to Recent Caribbean reef coral fauna show that a major episode of turnover occurred during middle to late Pliocene time (4--1 Ma). The data for the authors analyses consist of a new compilation of occurrences of 175 species and 49 genera in reef sequences in the Dominican Republic and Costa Rica and in 21 scattered sites ranging in age from 22 Ma to present. The results show that: (1) during turnover, more than 75% of all species living between 6--4 Ma (n = 82) became extinct; (2) during turnover, extinction and origination rates were equally and simultaneously high, and a relatively constant number of species was maintained in the fauna; (3) the taxonomic composition of Caribbean reefs remained relatively constant before (10--4 Ma) and after (1--0 Ma) turnover. Turnover therefore preceded the high frequency sea level oscillations of late Pleistocene time, and appears related to long-term, unidirectional changes in climate and/or ocean circulation across the Caribbean region in association with closure of the Isthmus of Panama. The observed correspondence between high origination and extinction rates indicates that the same environmental factors may have been associated with increases in both rates, and that local habitat differentiation and fragmentation may have been involved. Stability persisted in the region despite the severe environmental stresses associated with Pleistocene climate change.

  6. High Rate for Type IC Supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Muller, R.A.; Marvin-Newberg, H.J.; Pennypacker, Carl R.; Perlmutter, S.; Sasseen, T.P.; Smith, C.K.

    1991-09-01

    Using an automated telescope we have detected 20 supernovae in carefully documented observations of nearby galaxies. The supernova rates for late spiral (Sbc, Sc, Scd, and Sd) galaxies, normalized to a blue luminosity of 10{sup 10} L{sub Bsun}, are 0.4 h{sup 2}, 1.6 h{sup 2}, and 1.1 h{sup 2} per 100 years for SNe type la, Ic, and II. The rate for type Ic supernovae is significantly higher than found in previous surveys. The rates are not corrected for detection inefficiencies, and do not take into account the indications that the Ic supernovae are fainter on the average than the previous estimates; therefore the true rates are probably higher. The rates are not strongly dependent on the galaxy inclination, in contradiction to previous compilations. If the Milky Way is a late spiral, then the rate of Galactic supernovae is greater than 1 per 30 {+-} 7 years, assuming h = 0.75. This high rate has encouraging consequences for future neutrino and gravitational wave observatories.

  7. High rate, high reliability Li/SO2 cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chireau, R.

    1982-03-01

    The use of the lithium/sulfur dioxide system for aerospace applications is discussed. The high rate density in the system is compared to some primary systems: mercury zinc, silver zinc, and magnesium oxide. Estimates are provided of the storage life and shelf life of typical lithium sulfur batteries. The design of lithium cells is presented and criteria are given for improving the output of cells in order to achieve high rate and high reliability.

  8. Baltimore District Tackles High Suspension Rates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maxwell, Lesli A.

    2007-01-01

    This article reports on how the Baltimore District tackles its high suspension rates. Driven by an increasing belief that zero-tolerance disciplinary policies are ineffective, more educators are embracing strategies that do not exclude misbehaving students from school for offenses such as insubordination, disrespect, cutting class, tardiness, and…

  9. High folic acid increases cell turnover and lowers differentiation and iron content in human HT29 colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Pellis, Linette; Dommels, Yvonne; Venema, Dini; Polanen, Ab van; Lips, Esther; Baykus, Hakan; Kok, Frans; Kampman, Ellen; Keijer, Jaap

    2008-04-01

    Folate, a water-soluble B vitamin, is a cofactor in one-carbon metabolism and is essential for DNA synthesis, amino acid interconversion, methylation and, consequently, normal cell growth. In animals with existing pre-neoplastic and neoplastic lesions, folic acid supplementation increases the tumour burden. To identify processes that are affected by increased folic acid levels, we compared HT29 human colon cancer cells exposed to a chronic supplemental (100 ng/ml) level of folic acid to cells exposed to a normal (10 ng/ml) level of folic acid, in the presence of vitamin B12 and other micronutrients involved in the folate-methionine cycle. In addition to higher intracellular folate levels, HT29 cells at 100 ng folic acid/ml displayed faster growth and higher metabolic activity. cDNA microarray analysis indicated an effect on cell turnover and Fe metabolism. We fully confirmed these effects at the physiological level. At 100 ng/ml, cell assays showed higher proliferation and apoptosis, while gene expression analysis and a lower E-cadherin protein expression indicated decreased differentiation. These results are in agreement with the promoting effect of folic acid supplementation on established colorectal neoplasms. The lower expression of genes related to Fe metabolism at 100 ng folic acid/ml was confirmed by lower intracellular Fe levels in the cells exposed to folic acid at 100 ng/ml. This suggests an effect of folate on Fe metabolism.

  10. Reversal in the relationship between species richness and turnover in a phytoplankton community.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Blake; Pomati, Francesco

    2012-11-01

    Negative relationships between species richness and the rate of compositional turnover are common, suggesting that diverse communities have greater stability than depauperate ones; however, the mechanistic basis for this pattern is still widely debated. Species richness and turnover can covary either because they are mechanistically linked or because they share common environmental drivers. Few empirical studies have combined long-term changes in community composition with multiple drivers of environmental change, and so little is known about how the underlying mechanisms of species coexistence interact with changes in the mean and variability of environmental conditions. Here, we use a 33 year long time series (1976-2008) of phytoplankton community composition from Lake Zurich, to examine how environmental variation influences the relationship between richness and annual turnover. We find that the relationship between richness and annual turnover reverses midway through the time series (1992-1993), leading to a hump-shaped relationship between species richness and annual turnover. Using structural equation modeling we show that annual turnover and diversity are independently associated with different drivers of environmental change. Furthermore, we find that the observed annual sequences of community assembly give rise to rates of species accumulation that are more heterogeneous through time than expected by chance, likely owing to a high proportion of species showing significant autocorrelation and to strong positive covariation in the occurrences of species.

  11. High strain rate behaviour of polypropylene microfoams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-del Río, T.; Garrido, M. A.; Rodríguez, J.; Arencón, D.; Martínez, A. B.

    2012-08-01

    Microcellular materials such as polypropylene foams are often used in protective applications and passive safety for packaging (electronic components, aeronautical structures, food, etc.) or personal safety (helmets, knee-pads, etc.). In such applications the foams which are used are often designed to absorb the maximum energy and are generally subjected to severe loadings involving high strain rates. The manufacture process to obtain polymeric microcellular foams is based on the polymer saturation with a supercritical gas, at high temperature and pressure. This method presents several advantages over the conventional injection moulding techniques which make it industrially feasible. However, the effect of processing conditions such as blowing agent, concentration and microfoaming time and/or temperature on the microstructure of the resulting microcellular polymer (density, cell size and geometry) is not yet set up. The compressive mechanical behaviour of several microcellular polypropylene foams has been investigated over a wide range of strain rates (0.001 to 3000 s-1) in order to show the effects of the processing parameters and strain rate on the mechanical properties. High strain rate tests were performed using a Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar apparatus (SHPB). Polypropylene and polyethylene-ethylene block copolymer foams of various densities were considered.

  12. Highly stable high-rate discriminator for nuclear counting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    English, J. J.; Howard, R. H.; Rudnick, S. J.

    1969-01-01

    Pulse amplitude discriminator is specially designed for nuclear counting applications. At very high rates, the threshold is stable. The output-pulse width and the dead time change negligibly. The unit incorporates a provision for automatic dead-time correction.

  13. Phosphor thermometry at high repetition rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuhrmann, N.; Brübach, J.; Dreizler, A.

    2013-09-01

    Phosphor thermometry is a semi-invasive surface temperature measurement technique utilizing the luminescence properties of thermographic phosphors. Typically these ceramic materials are coated onto the object of interest and are excited by a short UV laser pulse. Photomultipliers and high-speed camera systems are used to transiently detect the subsequently emitted luminescence decay point wise or two-dimensionally resolved. Based on appropriate calibration measurements, the luminescence lifetime is converted to temperature. Up to now, primarily Q-switched laser systems with repetition rates of 10 Hz were employed for excitation. Accordingly, this diagnostic tool was not applicable to resolve correlated temperature transients at time scales shorter than 100 ms. For the first time, the authors realized a high-speed phosphor thermometry system combining a highly repetitive laser in the kHz regime and a fast decaying phosphor. A suitable material was characterized regarding its temperature lifetime characteristic and precision. Additionally, the influence of laser power on the phosphor coating in terms of heating effects has been investigated. A demonstration of this high-speed technique has been conducted inside the thermally highly transient system of an optically accessible internal combustion engine. Temperatures have been measured with a repetition rate of one sample per crank angle degree at an engine speed of 1000 rpm. This experiment has proven that high-speed phosphor thermometry is a promising diagnostic tool for the resolution of surface temperature transients.

  14. High strain rate characterization of polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siviour, Clive R.

    2017-01-01

    This paper reviews the literature on the response of polymers to high strain rate deformation. The main focus is on the experimental techniques used to characterize this response. The paper includes a small number of examples as well as references to experimental data over a wide range of rates, which illustrate the key features of rate dependence in these materials; however this is by no means an exhaustive list. The aim of the paper is to give the reader unfamiliar with the subject an overview of the techniques available with sufficient references from which further information can be obtained. In addition to the `well established' techniques of the Hopkinson bar, Taylor Impact and Transverse impact, a discussion of the use of time-temperature superposition in interpreting and experimentally replicating high rate response is given, as is a description of new techniques in which mechanical parameters are derived by directly measuring wave propagation in specimens; these are particularly appropriate for polymers with low wave speeds. The vast topic of constitutive modelling is deliberately excluded from this review.

  15. High temperature electrochemical corrosion rate probes

    SciTech Connect

    Bullard, Sophie J.; Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Holcomb, Gordon R.; Ziomek-Moroz, M.

    2005-09-01

    Corrosion occurs in the high temperature sections of energy production plants due to a number of factors: ash deposition, coal composition, thermal gradients, and low NOx conditions, among others. Electrochemical corrosion rate (ECR) probes have been shown to operate in high temperature gaseous environments that are similar to those found in fossil fuel combustors. ECR probes are rarely used in energy production plants at the present time, but if they were more fully understood, corrosion could become a process variable at the control of plant operators. Research is being conducted to understand the nature of these probes. Factors being considered are values selected for the Stern-Geary constant, the effect of internal corrosion, and the presence of conductive corrosion scales and ash deposits. The nature of ECR probes will be explored in a number of different atmospheres and with different electrolytes (ash and corrosion product). Corrosion rates measured using an electrochemical multi-technique capabilities instrument will be compared to those measured using the linear polarization resistance (LPR) technique. In future experiments, electrochemical corrosion rates will be compared to penetration corrosion rates determined using optical profilometry measurements.

  16. Bone turnover in malnourished children.

    PubMed

    Branca, F; Robins, S P; Ferro-Luzzi, A; Golden, M H

    Pyridinoline (PYD) and deoxypyridinoline (DPD) are cross-linking aminoacids of collagen that are located mainly in bone and cartilage. When bone matrix is resorbed these cross-links are quantitatively excreted in the urine and therefore represent specific markers. We have measured the urinary excretion rate of PYD and DPD in 46 severely malnourished boys to assess their skeletal turnover and to relate this to their subsequent rate of growth. The children were aged 13 months (SD 6), and height-for-age was -3.6 (1.6) Z-score, and weight-for-height was -2.4 (0.8) Z-score. PYD excretion when malnourished and after "recovery" was 11.2 (4.6) nmol h-1m-2 and 32.2 (10.8) nmol h-1m-2 and DPD excretion was 2.6 (1.3) nmol h-1m-2 and 7.5 (3.0) nmol h-1m-2, respectively. The ratio of the two cross-links did not change with recovery. These data show that cartilage and bone turnover is much lower in the malnourished than in the recovered child. There was no difference in the degree of depression of turnover between the children with marasmus, marasmic-kwashiorkor, or kwashiorkor. The rate of height gain during recovery was significantly related to cross-link excretion, age, and weight-for-height on admission. These three factors accounted for 44% of the variance in the height velocity of the children. PYD and DPD excretion rate could be used to assess therapeutic interventions designed to alleviate stunting.

  17. The effects of temporal resolution on species turnover and on testing metacommunity models.

    PubMed

    Tomasových, Adam; Kidwell, Susan M

    2010-05-01

    Patterns of low temporal turnover in species composition found within paleoecological time series contrast with the high turnover predicted by neutral metacommunity models and thus have been used to support nonneutral models. However, these predictions assume temporal resolution on the scale of a season or year, whereas individual fossil assemblages are typically time averaged to decadal or centennial timescales. We simulate the effects of time averaging by building time-averaged assemblages from local dispersal-limited, nonaveraged assemblages and compare the predicted turnover with observed patterns in mollusk and ostracod fossil records. Time averaging substantially reduces temporal turnover such that neutral predictions converge with those of trade-off and density-dependent models, and it tends to decrease species dominance and increase the proportion of rare species. Observed turnover rates are comparable to an appropriately scaled neutral model: patterns of high community stability can be produced or reinforced by time averaging alone. The community attributes of local time-averaged assemblages approach those of the metacommunity. Time-averaged assemblages are thus unlikely to capture attributes arising from processes operating at small spatial scales, but they should do well at capturing the turnover and diversity of metacommunities and thus will be a valuable basis for analyzing the large-scale processes that determine metacommunity evolution.

  18. Analytical Modeling of High Rate Processes.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    TYPE AND DATES COVERED 1 13 Apr 98 Final (01 Sep 94 - 31 Aug 97) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5 . FUNDING NUMBERS Analytical Modeling of High Rate Processes...20332- 8050 FROM: S. E. Jones, University Research Professor Department of Aerospace Engineering and Mechanics University of Alabama SUBJECT: Final...Mr. Sandor Augustus and Mr. Jeffrey A. Drinkard. There are no outstanding commitments. The balance in the account, as of July 31 , 1997, was $102,916.42

  19. HIGH ENERGY RATE EXTRUSION OF URANIUM

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, L.

    1963-07-23

    A method of extruding uranium at a high energy rate is described. Conditions during the extrusion are such that the temperature of the metal during extrusion reaches a point above the normal alpha to beta transition, but the metal nevertheless remains in the alpha phase in accordance with the Clausius- Clapeyron equation. Upon exiting from the die, the metal automatically enters the beta phase, after which the metal is permitted to cool. (AEC)

  20. Reserve, flowing electrolyte, high rate lithium battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puskar, M.; Harris, P.

    Flowing electrolyte Li/SOCl2 tests in single cell and multicell bipolar fixtures have been conducted, and measurements are presented for electrolyte flow rates, inlet and outlet temperatures, fixture temperatures at several points, and the pressure drop across the fixture. Reserve lithium batteries with flowing thionyl-chloride electrolytes are found to be capable of very high energy densities with usable voltages and capacities at current densities as high as 500 mA/sq cm. At this current density, a battery stack 10 inches in diameter is shown to produce over 60 kW of power while maintaining a safe operating temperature.

  1. The shift from high to low turnover bone disease after parathyroidectomy is associated with the progression of vascular calcification in hemodialysis patients: A 12-month follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Hernandes, Fabiana Rodrigues; Canziani, Maria Eugênia Fernandes; Barreto, Fellype Carvalho; Santos, Rodrigo Oliveira; Moreira, Valéria de Melo; Rochitte, Carlos Eduardo; Carvalho, Aluizio Barbosa

    2017-01-01

    Parathyroidectomy (PTX) may cause low levels of PTH, leading to an excessive reduction of bone turnover, which is associated with poor outcomes in dialysis patients, including vascular calcification (VC). We aimed to prospectively investigate the impact of PTX on bone remodeling and its potential consequence on the progression of VC in hemodialysis patients. In this prospective study, 19 hemodialysis patients with severe secondary hyperparathyroidism (sHPT) were evaluated. All patients underwent laboratorial tests and coronary tomography at baseline and, 6 and 12 months after PTX; bone biopsy was performed at baseline and 12-month. At baseline, all patients had increased PTH levels up to 2500 pg/mL and high turnover bone disease in their bone biopsies. Fourteen (74%) patients had VC. During the follow-up, there was a significant decrease of PTH at 6 and 12-month. At 12-month, 90% of the patients evolved to low turnover bone disease. During the period of the hungry bone syndrome (first 6 months), no change of coronary calcium score was observed. However, calcium score increased significantly thereafter (12th month). There was an association between VC progression and the severity of low turnover bone disease. In conclusion, the shift from high to low turnover bone disease after PTX occurs in parallel to VC progression, contributing to the understanding of the complex pathophysiology involving mineral metabolism and cardiovascular disease in hemodialysis patients.

  2. Dynamics of Adipocyte Turnover in Humans

    SciTech Connect

    Spalding, K; Arner, E; Westermark, P; Bernard, S; Buchholz, B; Bergmann, O; Blomqvist, L; Hoffstedt, J; Naslund, E; Britton, T; Concha, H; Hassan, M; Ryden, M; Frisen, J; Arner, P

    2007-07-16

    Obesity is increasing in an epidemic fashion in most countries and constitutes a public health problem by enhancing the risk for cardiovascular disease and metabolic disorders such as type 2 diabetes. Owing to the increase in obesity, life expectancy may start to decrease in developed countries for the first time in recent history. The factors determining fat mass in adult humans are not fully understood, but increased lipid storage in already developed fat cells is thought to be most important. We show that adipocyte number is a major determinant for the fat mass in adults. However, the number of fat cells stays constant in adulthood in lean and obese and even under extreme conditions, indicating that the number of adipocytes is set during childhood and adolescence. To establish the dynamics within the stable population of adipocytes in adults, we have measured adipocyte turnover by analyzing the integration of {sup 14}C derived from nuclear bomb tests in genomic DNA. Approximately 10% of fat cells are renewed annually at all adult ages and levels of body mass index. Neither adipocyte death nor generation rate is altered in obesity, suggesting a tight regulation of fat cell number that is independent of metabolic profile in adulthood. The high turnover of adipocytes establishes a new therapeutic target for pharmacological intervention in obesity.

  3. Civilian residential fire fatality rates: Six high-rate states versus six low-rate states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, J. R., Jr.; Helzer, S. G.

    1983-08-01

    Results of an analysis of 1,600 fire fatalities occurring in six states with high fire-death rates and six states with low fire-death rates are presented. Reasons for the differences in rates are explored, with special attention to victim age, sex, race, and condition at time of ignition. Fire cause patterns are touched on only lightly but are addressed more extensively in the companion piece to this report, "Rural and Non-Rural Civilian Residential Fire Fatalities in Twelve States', NBSIR 82-2519.

  4. Analysis of the Educational Personnel System: IV. Teacher Turnover.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keeler, Emmett B.

    This report attempts to predict the rates of teacher turnover in the 1970s, which teachers will leave the profession, and what the effects of turnover will be on the educational personnel system. The overall termination rate has varied from six to 11 percent over the last 15 years. An analysis of recent changes in the teaching profession is used…

  5. High rate pulse processing algorithms for microcalorimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Rabin, Michael; Hoover, Andrew S; Bacrania, Mnesh K; Tan, Hui; Breus, Dimitry; Henning, Wolfgang; Sabourov, Konstantin; Collins, Jeff; Warburton, William K; Dorise, Bertrand; Ullom, Joel N

    2009-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that microcalorimeter spectrometers based on superconducting transition-edge-sensor can readily achieve sub-100 eV energy resolution near 100 keV. However, the active volume of a single microcalorimeter has to be small to maintain good energy resolution, and pulse decay times are normally in the order of milliseconds due to slow thermal relaxation. Consequently, spectrometers are typically built with an array of microcalorimeters to increase detection efficiency and count rate. Large arrays, however, require as much pulse processing as possible to be performed at the front end of the readout electronics to avoid transferring large amounts of waveform data to a host computer for processing. In this paper, they present digital filtering algorithms for processing microcalorimeter pulses in real time at high count rates. The goal for these algorithms, which are being implemented in the readout electronics that they are also currently developing, is to achieve sufficiently good energy resolution for most applications while being (a) simple enough to be implemented in the readout electronics and (b) capable of processing overlapping pulses and thus achieving much higher output count rates than the rates that existing algorithms are currently achieving. Details of these algorithms are presented, and their performance was compared to that of the 'optimal filter' that is the dominant pulse processing algorithm in the cryogenic-detector community.

  6. High Strain Rate Behavior of Polyurea Compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Vasant; Milby, Christopher

    2011-06-01

    Polyurea has been gaining importance in recent years due to its impact resistance properties. The actual compositions of this viscoelastic material must be tailored for specific use. It is therefore imperative to study the effect of variations in composition on the properties of the material. High-strain-rate response of three polyurea compositions with varying molecular weights has been investigated using a Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar arrangement equipped with titanium bars. The polyurea compositions were synthesized from polyamines (Versalink, Air Products) with a multi-functional isocyanate (Isonate 143L, Dow Chemical). Amines with molecular weights of 1000, 650, and a blend of 250/1000 have been used in the current investigation. The materials have been tested up to strain rates of 6000/s. Results from these tests have shown interesting trends on the high rate behavior. While higher molecular weight composition show lower yield, they do not show dominant hardening behavior. On the other hand, the blend of 250/1000 show higher load bearing capability but lower strain hardening effects than the 600 and 1000 molecular weight amine based materials. Refinement in experimental methods and comparison of results using aluminum Split Hopkinson Bar is presented.

  7. High strain rate behavior of polyurea compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Vasant S.; Milby, Christopher

    2012-03-01

    High-strain-rate response of three polyurea compositions with varying molecular weights has been investigated using a Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar arrangement equipped with aluminum bars. Three polyurea compositions were synthesized from polyamines (Versalink, Air Products) with a multi-functional isocyanate (Isonate 143L, Dow Chemical). Amines with molecular weights of 1000, 650, and a blend of 250/1000 have been used in the current investigation. These materials have been tested to strain rates of over 6000/s. High strain rate results from these tests have shown varying trends as a function of increasing strain. While higher molecular weight composition show lower yield, they do not show dominant hardening behavior at lower strain. On the other hand, the blend of 250/1000 show higher load bearing capability but lower strain hardening effects than the 600 and 1000 molecular weight amine based materials. Results indicate that the initial increase in the modulus of the blend of 250/1000 may lead to the loss of strain hardening characteristics as the material is compressed to 50% strain, compared to 1000 molecular weight amine based material.

  8. High strain-rate magnetoelasticity in Galfenol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domann, J. P.; Loeffler, C. M.; Martin, B. E.; Carman, G. P.

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents the experimental measurements of a highly magnetoelastic material (Galfenol) under impact loading. A Split-Hopkinson Pressure Bar was used to generate compressive stress up to 275 MPa at strain rates of either 20/s or 33/s while measuring the stress-strain response and change in magnetic flux density due to magnetoelastic coupling. The average Young's modulus (44.85 GPa) was invariant to strain rate, with instantaneous stiffness ranging from 25 to 55 GPa. A lumped parameters model simulated the measured pickup coil voltages in response to an applied stress pulse. Fitting the model to the experimental data provided the average piezomagnetic coefficient and relative permeability as functions of field strength. The model suggests magnetoelastic coupling is primarily insensitive to strain rates as high as 33/s. Additionally, the lumped parameters model was used to investigate magnetoelastic transducers as potential pulsed power sources. Results show that Galfenol can generate large quantities of instantaneous power (80 MW/m3 ), comparable to explosively driven ferromagnetic pulse generators (500 MW/m3 ). However, this process is much more efficient and can be cyclically carried out in the linear elastic range of the material, in stark contrast with explosively driven pulsed power generators.

  9. High strain rate deformation of layered nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae-Hwang; Veysset, David; Singer, Jonathan P; Retsch, Markus; Saini, Gagan; Pezeril, Thomas; Nelson, Keith A; Thomas, Edwin L

    2012-01-01

    Insight into the mechanical behaviour of nanomaterials under the extreme condition of very high deformation rates and to very large strains is needed to provide improved understanding for the development of new protective materials. Applications include protection against bullets for body armour, micrometeorites for satellites, and high-speed particle impact for jet engine turbine blades. Here we use a microscopic ballistic test to report the responses of periodic glassy-rubbery layered block-copolymer nanostructures to impact from hypervelocity micron-sized silica spheres. Entire deformation fields are experimentally visualized at an exceptionally high resolution (below 10 nm) and we discover how the microstructure dissipates the impact energy via layer kinking, layer compression, extreme chain conformational flattening, domain fragmentation and segmental mixing to form a liquid phase. Orientation-dependent experiments show that the dissipation can be enhanced by 30% by proper orientation of the layers.

  10. Development of hydraulic properties and nitrate turnover processes in minerotrophic fen soil on differnet scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleimeier, Christian; Lennartz, Bernd

    2014-05-01

    Generally, it is recommended to remove the uppermost highly degraded peat layer from fens prior to rewetting to eliminate a potential source of organic pollutants for downstream water bodies. We investigated this material as a potential medium for denitrifying filters to further use the organic material. We are aiming to remove nitrate from tile drainage runoff at the outlet drainage dominated catchments to fullfill the requirements of the European Water Framework Directive. In a lysimeter scale long term mesocosm experiments we were aiming to reveal the peats behavior after disturbing and rewetting under constant flow conditions. Tracer experiments revealed a restructuring of the peat ending up at 20/80 percentage of mobile immobile pore volume. Additionally we observed the nitrate turnover. The turnover rate was determined by the hydraulic load. Absolute turnover rates were equal at lower and higher concentrations as well as flow rates, whereas the turnover reached higher percentages at lower concentrations. To further reveal the nitrate turnover processes flow through rector experiments were conducted in an anaerobic environment. We found that strongly reducing conditions can be created in peat even at the presence of nitrate. Thus we can conclude that the minerotrophic peat with its high iron and sulfur concentrations also enables autotrophic denitrification oxidizing iron and sulfur. While the conditions are favorable to re-reduce iron and sulfur,thus an electron shuttling system developed transporting electrons from the organic material as initial e- donor to nitrate as terminal e- acceptor.

  11. High frame-rate digital radiographic videography

    SciTech Connect

    King, N.S.P.; Cverna, F.H.; Albright, K.L.; Jaramillo, S.A.; Yates, G.J.; McDonald, T.E.; Flynn, M.J.; Tashman, S.

    1994-09-01

    High speed x-ray imaging can be an important tool for observing internal processes in a wide range of applications. In this paper we describe preliminary implementation of a system having the eventual goal of observing the internal dynamics of bone and joint reactions during loading. Two Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) gated and image intensified camera systems were used to record images from an x-ray image convertor tube to demonstrate the potential of high frame-rate digital radiographic videography in the analysis of bone and joint dynamics of the human body. Preliminary experiments were done at LANL to test the systems. Initial high frame-rate imaging (from 500 to 1000 frames/s) of a swinging pendulum mounted to the face of an X-ray image convertor tube demonstrated high contrast response and baseline sensitivity. The systems were then evaluated at the Motion Analysis Laboratory of Henry Ford Health Systems Bone and Joint Center. Imaging of a 9 inch acrylic disk with embedded lead markers rotating at approximately 1000 RPM, demonstrated the system response to a high velocity/high contrast target. By gating the P-20 phosphor image from the X-ray image convertor with a second image intensifier (II) and using a 100-microsecond wide optical gate through the second II, enough prompt light decay from the x-ray image convertor phosphor had taken place to achieve reduction of most of the motion blurring. Measurement of the marker velocity was made by using video frames acquired at 500 frames/s. The data obtained from both experiments successfully demonstrated the feasibility of the technique. Several key areas for improvement are discussed along with salient test results and experiment details.

  12. Spatial turnover in the global avifauna.

    PubMed

    Gaston, Kevin J; Davies, Richard G; Orme, C David L; Olson, Valerie A; Thomas, Gavin H; Ding, Tzung-Su; Rasmussen, Pamela C; Lennon, Jack J; Bennett, Peter M; Owens, Ian P F; Blackburn, Tim M

    2007-07-07

    Despite its wide implications for many ecological issues, the global pattern of spatial turnover in the occurrence of species has been little studied, unlike the global pattern of species richness. Here, using a database on the breeding distributions of birds, we present the first global maps of variation in spatial turnover for an entire taxonomic class, a pattern that has to date remained largely a matter of conjecture, based on theoretical expectations and extrapolation of inconsistent patterns from different biogeographic realms. We use these maps to test four predictions from niche theory as to the form that this variation should take, namely that turnover should increase with species richness, towards lower latitudes, and with the steepness of environmental gradients and that variation in turnover is determined principally by rare (restricted) species. Contrary to prediction, we show that turnover is high both in areas of extremely low and high species richness, does not increase strongly towards the tropics, and is related both to average environmental conditions and spatial variation in those conditions. These results are closely associated with a further important and novel finding, namely that global patterns of spatial turnover are driven principally by widespread species rather than the restricted ones. This complements recent demonstrations that spatial patterns of species richness are also driven principally by widespread species, and thus provides an important contribution towards a unified model of how terrestrial biodiversity varies both within and between the Earth's major land masses.

  13. [Energy turnover of water bugs].

    PubMed

    Waitzbauer, Wolfgang

    1976-06-01

    1. This study concerns the energy turnover of the water bug species Naucoris cimicoides (Naucoridae), Notonecta glauca (Notonectidae) and Ranatra linearis (Nepidae). The results refer to the conditions in the reed belt of the lake "Neusiedler See" in eastern Austria. 2. Population density was, using various methods, quantitatively determined for each test species. In summer the values were as follows: Naucoris 8, Notonecta 2 and Ranatra 0.5 individuals per m(2) in the closed reed belt. Abundance in the next spring was a halving of the initial values due to an increase in the death rate of males in winter. Generally, mortality was very high; the highest death rate for all species occurred in the first two larval stages. The total mortality, beginning at emergence and continuing until immediately after oviposition, was determined to be 91% for Naucoris, 97% for Notonecta and 99% for Ranatra. 3. Production of an average male was 211.45 cal (Naucoris), 243.24 cal (Notonecta) and 256.26 cal (Ranatra) for the entire life span. The production values determined for average females until oviposition are 316.87 cal (Naucoris), 300.79 cal (Notonecta) and 559.51 cal (Ranatra). 53.89 cal (Naucoris), 73.35 cal (Notonecta) and 264.66 cal (Ranatra) are needed for egg production. 4. Respiration was determined by volumetric measurement for all developmental stages and the imago at different times of the year. From emergence until death the following spring the O2-consumption of an average individual was determined as 129.27 cal (♂), 156.45 cal (♀) for Naucoris, 690.66 cal (♂), 882.04 cal (♀) for Notonecta and 548.30 cal (♂), 589.16 cal (♀) for Ranatra. 5. Assimilation was calculated from production and respiration (A=P+R) for all larval and mature stages. Assimilation was determined as 340.72 cal (♂), 419.43 cal (♀) for Naucoris, 933.90 cal (♂), 1109.48 cal (♀) for Notonecta and 804.56 cal (♂), 884.01 cal (♀) for Ranatra, (cumulative values). 6. Since the

  14. Microalgal separation from high-rate ponds

    SciTech Connect

    Nurdogan, Y.

    1988-01-01

    High rate ponding (HRP) processes are playing an increasing role in the treatment of organic wastewaters in sunbelt communities. Photosynthetic oxygenation by algae has proved to cost only one-seventh as much as mechanical aeration for activated sludge systems. During this study, an advanced HRP, which produces an effluent equivalent to tertiary treatment has been studied. It emphasizes not only waste oxidation but also algal separation and nutrient removal. This new system is herein called advanced tertiary high rate ponding (ATHRP). Phosphorus removal in HRP systems is normally low because algal uptake of phosphorus is about one percent of their 200-300 mg/L dry weights. Precipitation of calcium phosphates by autofluocculation also occurs in HRP at high pH levels, but it is generally not complete due to insufficient calcium concentration in the pond. In the case of Richmond where the studies were conducted, the sewage is very low in calcium. Therefore, enhancement of natural autoflocculation was studied by adding small amounts of lime to the pond. Through this simple procedure phosphorus and nitrogen removals were virtually complete justifying the terminology ATHRP.

  15. Microbial carbon turnover in the plant-rhizosphere-soil continuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malik, Ashish; Dannert, Helena; Griffiths, Robert; Thomson, Bruce; Gleixner, Gerd

    2014-05-01

    Soil microbial biomass contributes significantly to maintenance of soil organic matter (SOM). It is well known that biochemical fractions of soil microorganisms have varying turnover and therefore contribute differentially to soil C storage. Here we compare the turnover rates of different microbial biochemical fractions using a pulse chase 13CO2 plant labelling experiment. The isotope signal was temporally traced into rhizosphere soil microorganisms using the following biomarkers: DNA, RNA, fatty acids and chloroform fumigation extraction derived microbial biomass size classes. C flow into soil microbial functional groups was assessed through phospholipid and neutral lipid fatty acid (PLFA/NLFA) analyses. Highest 13C enrichment was seen in the low molecular weight (LMW) size class of microbial biomass (Δδ13C =151) and in nucleic acids (DNA: 38o RNA: 66) immediately after the pulse followed by a sharp drop. The amount of 13C in the high molecular weight (HMW) microbial biomass (17-81) and total fatty acids (32-54) was lower initially and stayed relatively steady over the 4 weeks experimental period. We found significant differences in turnover rates of different microbial biochemical and size fractions. We infer that LMW cytosolic soluble compounds are rapidly metabolized and linked to respiratory C fluxes, whereas mid-sized products of microbial degradation and HMW polymeric compounds have lower renewal rate in that order. The turnover of cell wall fatty acids was also very slow. DNA and RNA showed faster turnover rate; and as expected RNA renewal was the fastest due to its rapid production by active microorganisms independent of cell replication. 13C incorporation into different functional groups confirmed that mutualistic arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi rely on root C and are important in the initial plant C flux. We substantiated through measurements of isotope incorporation into bacterial RNA that rhizosphere bacteria are also important in the initial C conduit

  16. Innovations in high rate condensate polishing systems

    SciTech Connect

    O`Brien, M.

    1995-01-01

    Test work is being conducted at two major east coast utilities to evaluate flow distribution in high flow rate condensate polishing service vessels. The work includes core sample data used to map the flow distribution in vessels as originally manufactured. Underdrain modifications for improved flow distribution are discussed with data that indicates performance increases of the service vessel following the modifications. The test work is on going, with preliminary data indicating that significant improvements in cycle run length are possible with underdrain modifications. The economic benefits of the above modifications are discussed.

  17. Whole-body protein turnover in malnourished patients with child class B and C cirrhosis on diets low to high in protein energy.

    PubMed

    Dichi, J B; Dichi, I; Maio, R; Correa, C R; Angeleli, A Y; Bicudo, M H; Rezende, T A; Burini, R C

    2001-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the rate of whole-body protein turnover in moderately and severely alcoholic, malnourished, cirrhotic patients fed with different amounts of protein or energy. Six male patients (Child classes B and C) and four age- and sex-matched healthy control subjects were studied for 18 d in fasting and feeding states; a single oral dose of [(15)N]glycine was used as a tracer and urinary ammonia was the end product. The kinetic study showed that patients had higher protein catabolism while fasting (patients: 3.14 +/- 1.2 g of lean body mass/9 h; controls: 1.8 +/- 0.3 g of lean body mass/9 h; P < 0.02). Although not statistically significant, protein catabolism (grams of lean body mass/9 h) was lower with the hyperproteic/hyperenergetic diet when compared with fasting. Nitrogen retention was consistent with the lower protein-catabolism rate; a statistically significant increase in nitrogen balance was observed when patients were fed with the hyperproteic/hyperenergetic diet compared with fasting (4.3 +/- 3.2 g of nitrogen/d and -2.2 +/- 1.9 g of nitrogen/d, respectively; P < 0.01). These data indicate that Child class B and C cirrhotic patients are hypercatabolic and that long-term nutritional intervention with a hyperproteic/hyperenergetic diet is likely needed to improve their clinical and nutritional status.

  18. Cervix cancer brachytherapy: high dose rate.

    PubMed

    Miglierini, P; Malhaire, J-P; Goasduff, G; Miranda, O; Pradier, O

    2014-10-01

    Cervical cancer, although less common in industrialized countries, is the fourth most common cancer affecting women worldwide and the fourth leading cause of cancer death. In developing countries, these cancers are often discovered at a later stage in the form of locally advanced tumour with a poor prognosis. Depending on the stage of the disease, treatment is mainly based on a chemoradiotherapy followed by uterovaginal brachytherapy ending by a potential remaining tumour surgery or in principle for some teams. The role of irradiation is crucial to ensure a better local control. It has been shown that the more the delivered dose is important, the better the local results are. In order to preserve the maximum of organs at risk and to allow this dose escalation, brachytherapy (intracavitary and/or interstitial) has been progressively introduced. Its evolution and its progressive improvement have led to the development of high dose rate brachytherapy, the advantages of which are especially based on the possibility of outpatient treatment while maintaining the effectiveness of other brachytherapy forms (i.e., low dose rate or pulsed dose rate). Numerous innovations have also been completed in the field of imaging, leading to a progress in treatment planning systems by switching from two-dimensional form to a three-dimensional one. Image-guided brachytherapy allows more precise target volume delineation as well as an optimized dosimetry permitting a better coverage of target volumes.

  19. High-Rate Digital Receiver Board

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghuman, Parminder; Bialas, Thomas; Brambora, Clifford; Fisher, David

    2004-01-01

    A high-rate digital receiver (HRDR) implemented as a peripheral component interface (PCI) board has been developed as a prototype of compact, general-purpose, inexpensive, potentially mass-producible data-acquisition interfaces between telemetry systems and personal computers. The installation of this board in a personal computer together with an analog preprocessor enables the computer to function as a versatile, highrate telemetry-data-acquisition and demodulator system. The prototype HRDR PCI board can handle data at rates as high as 600 megabits per second, in a variety of telemetry formats, transmitted by diverse phase-modulation schemes that include binary phase-shift keying and various forms of quadrature phaseshift keying. Costing less than $25,000 (as of year 2003), the prototype HRDR PCI board supplants multiple racks of older equipment that, when new, cost over $500,000. Just as the development of standard network-interface chips has contributed to the proliferation of networked computers, it is anticipated that the development of standard chips based on the HRDR could contribute to reductions in size and cost and increases in performance of telemetry systems.

  20. Relationship between analgesia and turnover of brain biogenic amines.

    PubMed

    Bensemana, D; Gascon, A L

    1978-10-01

    The analgesic activity of morphine, delta9THC, and sodium salicylate was studied concomitantly with changes in brainstem and cortex turnover of dopamine (DA), noradrenaline (NA), and serotonin (5HT). The results show that a correlation exists between the presence of analgesia and the increased turnover rates of the three biogenic amines. Morphine and sodium salicylate induced analgesia is accompanied by an increased turnover rate of all three biogenic amines; delta9THC-induced analgesia is accompanied by an increased turnover rate of DA and 5HT only. There is, however, no consistent relationship between the degree of analgesia and the degree of change in the turnover rates. The existence of the endogenous morphine-like substances, endorphines, may explain why morphine analgesia is distinct from that of delta9THC and sodium salicylate. The possible relationship between this morphine-like substance and biogenic amines is discussed.

  1. Understanding High Rate Behavior Through Low Rate Analog

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-28

    Transition Temperature[°C] 82.4 -20 Melting Point [°C] 100-260 40-50 Thermal conductivity [W·m -1 ·K -1 ] 0.14–0.28 0.14–0.17 Table 2. The four PVC...13) Here, the thermal diffusivity, α, is first calculated from the conductivity , k, density, ρ, and specific heat capacity, C; alternatively the...chapter. Furthermore, the low thermal conductivity means that specimen heating also occurs at lower strain rates than for PVC. Before performing

  2. Protein turnover measurement using selected reaction monitoring-mass spectrometry (SRM-MS)

    PubMed Central

    Holman, Stephen W.; Hammond, Dean E.; Simpson, Deborah M.; Waters, John; Hurst, Jane L.

    2016-01-01

    Protein turnover represents an important mechanism in the functioning of cells, with deregulated synthesis and degradation of proteins implicated in many diseased states. Therefore, proteomics strategies to measure turnover rates with high confidence are of vital importance to understanding many biological processes. In this study, the more widely used approach of non-targeted precursor ion signal intensity (MS1) quantification is compared with selected reaction monitoring (SRM), a data acquisition strategy that records data for specific peptides, to determine if improved quantitative data would be obtained using a targeted quantification approach. Using mouse liver as a model system, turnover measurement of four tricarboxylic acid cycle proteins was performed using both MS1 and SRM quantification strategies. SRM outperformed MS1 in terms of sensitivity and selectivity of measurement, allowing more confident determination of protein turnover rates. SRM data are acquired using cheaper and more widely available tandem quadrupole mass spectrometers, making the approach accessible to a larger number of researchers than MS1 quantification, which is best performed on high mass resolution instruments. SRM acquisition is ideally suited to focused studies where the turnover of tens of proteins is measured, making it applicable in determining the dynamics of proteins complexes and complete metabolic pathways. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Quantitative mass spectrometry’. PMID:27644981

  3. Protein turnover measurement using selected reaction monitoring-mass spectrometry (SRM-MS).

    PubMed

    Holman, Stephen W; Hammond, Dean E; Simpson, Deborah M; Waters, John; Hurst, Jane L; Beynon, Robert J

    2016-10-28

    Protein turnover represents an important mechanism in the functioning of cells, with deregulated synthesis and degradation of proteins implicated in many diseased states. Therefore, proteomics strategies to measure turnover rates with high confidence are of vital importance to understanding many biological processes. In this study, the more widely used approach of non-targeted precursor ion signal intensity (MS1) quantification is compared with selected reaction monitoring (SRM), a data acquisition strategy that records data for specific peptides, to determine if improved quantitative data would be obtained using a targeted quantification approach. Using mouse liver as a model system, turnover measurement of four tricarboxylic acid cycle proteins was performed using both MS1 and SRM quantification strategies. SRM outperformed MS1 in terms of sensitivity and selectivity of measurement, allowing more confident determination of protein turnover rates. SRM data are acquired using cheaper and more widely available tandem quadrupole mass spectrometers, making the approach accessible to a larger number of researchers than MS1 quantification, which is best performed on high mass resolution instruments. SRM acquisition is ideally suited to focused studies where the turnover of tens of proteins is measured, making it applicable in determining the dynamics of proteins complexes and complete metabolic pathways.This article is part of the themed issue 'Quantitative mass spectrometry'.

  4. Application of high-rate cutting tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moriarty, John L., Jr.

    1989-03-01

    Widespread application of the newest high-rate cutting tools to the most appropriate jobs is slowed by the sheer magnitude of developments in tool types, materials, workpiece applications, and by the rapid pace of change. Therefore, a study of finishing and roughing sizes of coated carbide inserts having a variety of geometries for single point turning was completed. The cutting tools were tested for tool life, chip quality, and workpiece surface finish at various cutting conditions with medium alloy steel. An empirical wear-life data base was established, and a computer program was developed to facilitate technology transfer, assist selection of carbide insert grades, and provide machine operating parameters. A follow-on test program was implemented suitable for next generation coated carbides, rotary cutting tools, cutting fluids, and ceramic tool materials.

  5. Consideration of wear rates at high velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hale, Chad S.

    The development of the research presented here is one in which high velocity relative sliding motion between two bodies in contact has been considered. Overall, the wear environment is truly three-dimensional. The attempt to characterize three-dimensional wear was not economically feasible because it must be analyzed at the micro-mechanical level to get results. Thus, an engineering approximation was carried out. This approximation was based on a metallographic study identifying the need to include viscoplasticity constitutive material models, coefficient of friction, relationships between the normal load and velocity, and the need to understand wave propagation. A sled test run at the Holloman High Speed Test Track (HHSTT) was considered for the determination of high velocity wear rates. In order to adequately characterize high velocity wear, it was necessary to formulate a numerical model that contained all of the physical events present. The experimental results of a VascoMax 300 maraging steel slipper sliding on an AISI 1080 steel rail during a January 2008 sled test mission were analyzed. During this rocket sled test, the slipper traveled 5,816 meters in 8.14 seconds and reached a maximum velocity of 1,530 m/s. This type of environment was never considered previously in terms of wear evaluation. Each of the features of the metallography were obtained through micro-mechanical experimental techniques. The byproduct of this analysis is that it is now possible to formulate a model that contains viscoplasticity, asperity collisions, temperature and frictional features. Based on the observations of the metallographic analysis, these necessary features have been included in the numerical model, which makes use of a time-dynamic program which follows the movement of a slipper during its experimental test run. The resulting velocity and pressure functions of time have been implemented in the explicit finite element code, ABAQUS. Two-dimensional, plane strain models

  6. The Causes and Effects of English Teachers' Turnover: A Case from Afghanistan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khawary, Omidullah; Ali, Sajid

    2015-01-01

    One of the challenging issues that educational organizations in developing countries face in staffing classrooms with qualified teachers is the high rate of teachers' turnover. It creates problems for schools, which eventually leads to substandard instruction and low student achievement. This research explores the causes of English teachers'…

  7. Turnover of human and monkey plasma kininogens in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, T; Wing, D A; Pierce, J V; Pettit, G W

    1979-01-01

    The normal metabolic turnover of plasma kininogens was studied by measuring the disappearance of intravenously administered radiolabeled human and monkey plasma kininogens from the circulation of healthy adult rhesus monkeys. Curves obtained by plotting log radioactivity against time could be expressed as double exponential equations, with the first term representing diffusion, and the second, catabolism. No significant difference between the turnovers of human and monkey kininogens was observed. The difference between the t1/2 of high molecular weight kininogen (25.95 +/- 1.60 h) (mean +/- SEM) and that of low molecular weight kininogen (18.94 +/- 1.93 h) was only marginally significant (P less than 0.05). In contrast, a highly significant (P less than 0.001) difference in their mean catabolic rates (1.12 +/- 0.08 d-1 for high molecular weight kininogen vs. 2.07 +/- 0.09 d-1 for low molecular weight kininogen) was observed. These differences between the two kininogens were attributed to differences in their distribution between the intra- and extravascular pools. Studies of kininogen turnover will be useful in elucidating the in vivo functions of the various kininogens in health as well as during clinical illness. PMID:105015

  8. "If I Should Stop Teaching Now, Where Will I Go?" Turnover Intentions among High School Teachers in Ghana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adusei, Henry; Sarfo, Jacob Owusu; Manukure, Portia; Cudjoe, Josephine

    2016-01-01

    Teachers form one of the essential professional groups in the development domain of every country. Although most senior high school teachers in Ghana complains about poor conditions of service, a lot of them are still at post. The key research goal was to explore the retaining factors of senior high school teachers, within their existing…

  9. High Data Rate Architecture (HiDRA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hylton, Alan; Raible, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    high-rate laser terminals. These must interface with the existing, aging data infrastructure. The High Data Rate Architecture (HiDRA) project is designed to provide networked store, carry, and forward capability to optimize data flow through both the existing radio frequency (RF) and new laser communications terminal. The networking capability is realized through the Delay Tolerant Networking (DTN) protocol, and is used for scheduling data movement as well as optimizing the performance of existing RF channels. HiDRA is realized as a distributed FPGA memory and interface controller that is itself controlled by a local computer running DTN software. Thus HiDRA is applicable to other arenas seeking to employ next-generation communications technologies, e.g. deep space. In this paper, we describe HiDRA and its far-reaching research implications.

  10. Photocathodes for High Repetition Rate Light Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Zvi, Ilan

    2014-04-20

    This proposal brought together teams at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and Stony Brook University (SBU) to study photocathodes for high repetition rate light sources such as Free Electron Lasers (FEL) and Energy Recovery Linacs (ERL). Below details the Principal Investigators and contact information. Each PI submits separately for a budget through his corresponding institute. The work done under this grant comprises a comprehensive program on critical aspects of the production of the electron beams needed for future user facilities. Our program pioneered in situ and in operando diagnostics for alkali antimonide growth. The focus is on development of photocathodes for high repetition rate Free Electron Lasers (FELs) and Energy Recovery Linacs (ERLs), including testing SRF photoguns, both normal-­conducting and superconducting. Teams from BNL, LBNL and Stony Brook University (SBU) led this research, and coordinated their work over a range of topics. The work leveraged a robust infrastructure of existing facilities and the support was used for carrying out the research at these facilities. The program concentrated in three areas: a) Physics and chemistry of alkali-­antimonide cathodes (BNL – LBNL) b) Development and testing of a diamond amplifier for photocathodes (SBU -­ BNL) c) Tests of both cathodes in superconducting RF photoguns (SBU) and copper RF photoguns (LBNL) Our work made extensive use of synchrotron radiation materials science techniques, such as powder-­ and single-­crystal diffraction, x-­ray fluorescence, EXAFS and variable energy XPS. BNL and LBNL have many complementary facilities at the two light sources associated with these laboratories (NSLS and ALS, respectively); use of these will be a major thrust of our program and bring our understanding of these complex materials to a new level. In addition, CHESS at Cornell will be used to continue seamlessly throughout the NSLS dark period and

  11. High rate PLD of diamond-like-carbon utilizing high repetition rate visible lasers

    SciTech Connect

    McLean, W. II; Fehring, E.J.; Dragon, E.P.; Warner, B.E.

    1994-09-15

    Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD) has been shown to be an effective method for producing a wide variety of thin films of high-value-added materials. The high average powers and high pulse repetition frequencies of lasers under development at LLNL make it possible to scale-up PLD processes that have been demonstrated in small systems in a number of university, government, and private laboratories to industrially meaningful, economically feasible technologies. A copper vapor laser system at LLNL has been utilized to demonstrate high rate PLD of high quality diamond-like-carbon (DLC) from graphite targets. The deposition rates for PLD obtained with a 100 W laser were {approx} 2000 {mu}m{center_dot}cm{sup 2}/h, or roughly 100 times larger than those reported by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) or physical vapor deposition (PVD) methods. Good adhesion of thin (up to 2 pm) films has been achieved on a small number of substrates that include SiO{sub 2} and single crystal Si. Present results indicate that the best quality DLC films can be produced at optimum rates at power levels and wavelengths compatible with fiber optic delivery systems. If this is also true of other desirable coating systems, this PLD technology could become an extremely attractive industrial tool for high value added coatings.

  12. Norepinephrine turnover in the goldfish brain is modulated by sex steroids and GABA.

    PubMed

    Trudeau, V L; Sloley, B D; Peter, R E

    1993-10-08

    It is known that norepinephrine (NE) is important in the neuroendocrine control of pituitary gonadotropin II (GTH-II) and growth hormone (GH) release but very little is known about the factors regulating NE neurons in the goldfish brain. Female gonad-intact goldfish were implanted intraperitoneally (100 micrograms/g) with testosterone (T) or estradiol (E2) to elevate serum steroid levels. High-performance liquid chromatography measurements showed that steroid implantation had no effect on NE content in the telencephalon, including preoptic area (TEL-POA), or the hypothalamus (HYP). The turnover rate of NE was estimated from the rate of depletion of NE content from tissues following inhibition of tyrosine hydroxylase by alpha-methyl-p-tyrosine (240 micrograms/g). The present study demonstrates that E2 can decrease NE turnover rates in TEL-POA and HYP of sexually regressed goldfish (August). The results in recrudescent fish (November), however, indicate a more complex interaction of E2 with NE neurons since E2 increased NE turnover in TEL-POA and HYP in these animals. Testosterone (T) has less prominent effects on NE turnover rates in TEL-POA and HYP; the only significant effect of T-implantation was a small reduction of NE turnover in the TEL-POA of sexually recrudescent fish. Elevation of endogenous brain GABA concentrations by injection of the GABA transaminase inhibitor, gamma-vinyl-GABA (300 micrograms/g), significantly reduced NE turnover in TEL-POA. These data demonstrate that goldfish NE neurons in the TEL-POA are sensitive to regulation by changes in circulating sex steroids and by increases in brain GABA.

  13. High resolution, high rate x-ray spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Goulding, F.S.; Landis, D.A.

    1983-07-14

    It is an object of the invention to provide a pulse processing system for use with detected signals of a wide dynamic range which is capable of very high counting rates, with high throughput, with excellent energy resolution and a high signal-to-noise ratio. It is a further object to provide a pulse processing system wherein the fast channel resolving time is quite short and substantially independent of the energy of the detected signals. Another object is to provide a pulse processing system having a pile-up rejector circuit which will allow the maximum number of non-interfering pulses to be passed to the output. It is also an object of the invention to provide new methods for generating substantially symmetrically triangular pulses for use in both the main and fast channels of a pulse processing system.

  14. Turnover of dhurrin in green sorghum seedlings. [Sorghum bicolor

    SciTech Connect

    Adewusi, S.R.A. )

    1990-11-01

    The turnover of dhurrin in green seedlings of Sorghum bicolor (Linn) Moench var Redland x Greenleaf, Sudan 70 has been investigated using glyphosate and pulse-labeling studies with {sup 14}C-tyrosine and ({sup 14}C)shikimic acid. The rate of dhurrin breakdown was 4.8 nanomoles per hour in the shoot and 1.4 nanomoles per hour in the root. The rate of dhurrin accumulation in the shoot of 4- to 5-day-old seedlings was high but decreased with age until at the peak period of dhurrin accumulation, the rates of dhurrin synthesis and breakdown were equal. Using a first order equation (an approximation) the rate of dhurrin synthesis (which equals accumulation plus breakdown rates) was 17.4 nanomoles per hour in the shoot and 4.1 nanomoles per hour in the root. In both tissues, the breakdown rate was between 27 and 34% of their synthetic capacity within the experimental period. Dhurrin synthesis in green sorghum seedlings occurred in both the light and dark photoperiods but was faster in the dark period. The result is discussed in relation to the possible metabolic roles of the turnover.

  15. PS foams at high pressure drop rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tammaro, Daniele; De Maio, Attilio; Carbone, Maria Giovanna Pastore; Di Maio, Ernesto; Iannace, Salvatore

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, we report data on PS foamed at 100 °C after CO2 saturation at 10 MPa in a new physical foaming batch that achieves pressure drop rates up to 120 MPa/s. Results show how average cell size of the foam nicely fit a linear behavior with the pressure drop rate in a double logarithmic plot. Furthermore, foam density initially decreases with the pressure drop rate, attaining a constant value at pressure drop rates higher than 40 MPa/s. Interestingly, furthermore, we observed that the shape of the pressure release curve has a large effect on the final foam morphology, as observed in tests in which the maximum pressure release rate was kept constant but the shape of the curve changed. These results allow for a fine tuning of the foam density and morphology for specific applications.

  16. High voltage high repetition rate pulse using Marx topology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakki, A.; Kashapov, N.

    2015-06-01

    The paper describes Marx topology using MOSFET transistors. Marx circuit with 10 stages has been done, to obtain pulses about 5.5KV amplitude, and the width of the pulses was about 30μsec with a high repetition rate (PPS > 100), Vdc = 535VDC is the input voltage for supplying the Marx circuit. Two Ferrite ring core transformers were used to control the MOSFET transistors of the Marx circuit (the first transformer to control the charging MOSFET transistors, the second transformer to control the discharging MOSFET transistors).

  17. High-Rate Compression of Polypropylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okereke, Michael; Buckley, C. Paul

    2008-08-01

    Three grades of polypropylene were tested in compression at room temperature, across an unusually wide range of strain rate: 10-4 to 104 s-1. The quasi-static testing was done in a Hounsfield machine fitted with a digital image acquisition kit, while tests at the highest strain rates were carried out using a compression split Hopkinson pressure bar. The strain rate dependence of compressive yield stress was compared with the Eyring prediction, and found to be a nonlinear function of log10(strain-rate). The nonlinearity is attributed to the presence of two relaxation processes in polypropylene, with differing activation volumes: the α- and β-processes. According to the Bauwens two-process model this would lead naturally to curved Eyring plots, where the apparent activation volume decreases with increasing strain-rate. Another prominent feature in the experimental results was the increase in magnitude of post-yield strain-softening with increase in strain-rate. This indicates that the dominant structural relaxation time exceeds the experimental time-scale at the highest strain-rates, but lies below it for the quasi-static tests.

  18. HIgh Rate X-ray Fluorescence Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Grudberg, Peter Matthew

    2013-04-30

    The purpose of this project was to develop a compact, modular multi-channel x-ray detector with integrated electronics. This detector, based upon emerging silicon drift detector (SDD) technology, will be capable of high data rate operation superior to the current state of the art offered by high purity germanium (HPGe) detectors, without the need for liquid nitrogen. In addition, by integrating the processing electronics inside the detector housing, the detector performance will be much less affected by the typically noisy electrical environment of a synchrotron hutch, and will also be much more compact than current systems, which can include a detector involving a large LN2 dewar and multiple racks of electronics. The combined detector/processor system is designed to match or exceed the performance and features of currently available detector systems, at a lower cost and with more ease of use due to the small size of the detector. In addition, the detector system is designed to be modular, so a small system might just have one detector module, while a larger system can have many you can start with one detector module, and add more as needs grow and budget allows. The modular nature also serves to simplify repair. In large part, we were successful in achieving our goals. We did develop a very high performance, large area multi-channel SDD detector, packaged with all associated electronics, which is easy to use and requires minimal external support (a simple power supply module and a closed-loop water cooling system). However, we did fall short of some of our stated goals. We had intended to base the detector on modular, large-area detectors from Ketek GmbH in Munich, Germany; however, these were not available in a suitable time frame for this project, so we worked instead with pnDetector GmbH (also located in Munich). They were able to provide a front-end detector module with six 100 m^2 SDD detectors (two monolithic arrays of three elements each) along with

  19. Turnover and dispersal of prairie falcons in southwestern Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lehman, Robert N.; Steenhof, Karen; Carpenter, L.B.; Kochert, Michael N.

    2000-01-01

    We studied Prairie Falcon (Falco mexicanus) breeding dispersal, natal dispersal, and turnover at nesting areas in the Snake River Birds of Prey National Conservation Area (NCA) from 1971- 95. Of 61 nesting areas where falcons identified one year were known to be present or absent the following year, 57% had a different falcon. This turnover rate was 2-3 times higher than that reported elsewhere for large falcons, and may have been related to high nesting densities in the NCA. Turnover at nesting areas was independent of nesting success in the previous year, but was significantly higher for females nesting on large cliffs. Mean distance between natal and breeding locations for 26 falcons banded as nestlings and later encountered as nesting adults was 8.9 km. Natal dispersal distances were similar for males and females, but more than twice as many males marked as nestlings were later encountered nesting in the NCA. Fourteen adult falcons found on different nesting areas in successive years moved an average of 1.5 km between nesting areas; males dispersed significantly farther than females. Natal and breeding dispersal distances in the NCA were lower than those reported for Prairie Falcons in other study areas. Only four falcons banded as nestlings were found outside NCA boundaries during the breeding period, and only one of these birds was known to be occupying a nesting area. We encountered no falcons banded outside the NCA occupying nesting areas in the NCA during this study.

  20. Long noncoding RNA turnover

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Je-Hyun; Kim, Jiyoung; Gorospe, Myriam

    2015-01-01

    Most RNAs transcribed in mammalian cells lack protein-coding sequences. Among them is a vast family of long (>200 nt) noncoding (lnc)RNAs. LncRNAs can modulate cellular protein expression patterns by influencing the transcription of many genes, the post-transcriptional fate of mRNAs and ncRNAs, and the turnover and localization of proteins. Given the broad impact of lncRNAs on gene regulation, there is escalating interest in elucidating the mechanisms that govern the steady-state levels of lncRNAs. In this review, we summarize our current knowledge of the factors and mechanisms that modulate mammalian lncRNA stability. PMID:25769416

  1. Bipolar high-repetition-rate high-voltage nanosecond pulser.

    PubMed

    Tian, Fuqiang; Wang, Yi; Shi, Hongsheng; Lei, Qingquan

    2008-06-01

    The pulser designed is mainly used for producing corona plasma in waste water treatment system. Also its application in study of dielectric electrical properties will be discussed. The pulser consists of a variable dc power source for high-voltage supply, two graded capacitors for energy storage, and the rotating spark gap switch. The key part is the multielectrode rotating spark gap switch (MER-SGS), which can ensure wider range modulation of pulse repetition rate, longer pulse width, shorter pulse rise time, remarkable electrical field distortion, and greatly favors recovery of the gap insulation strength, insulation design, the life of the switch, etc. The voltage of the output pulses switched by the MER-SGS is in the order of 3-50 kV with pulse rise time of less than 10 ns and pulse repetition rate of 1-3 kHz. An energy of 1.25-125 J per pulse and an average power of up to 10-50 kW are attainable. The highest pulse repetition rate is determined by the driver motor revolution and the electrode number of MER-SGS. Even higher voltage and energy can be switched by adjusting the gas pressure or employing N(2) as the insulation gas or enlarging the size of MER-SGS to guarantee enough insulation level.

  2. Bipolar high-repetition-rate high-voltage nanosecond pulser

    SciTech Connect

    Tian Fuqiang; Wang Yi; Shi Hongsheng; Lei Qingquan

    2008-06-15

    The pulser designed is mainly used for producing corona plasma in waste water treatment system. Also its application in study of dielectric electrical properties will be discussed. The pulser consists of a variable dc power source for high-voltage supply, two graded capacitors for energy storage, and the rotating spark gap switch. The key part is the multielectrode rotating spark gap switch (MER-SGS), which can ensure wider range modulation of pulse repetition rate, longer pulse width, shorter pulse rise time, remarkable electrical field distortion, and greatly favors recovery of the gap insulation strength, insulation design, the life of the switch, etc. The voltage of the output pulses switched by the MER-SGS is in the order of 3-50 kV with pulse rise time of less than 10 ns and pulse repetition rate of 1-3 kHz. An energy of 1.25-125 J per pulse and an average power of up to 10-50 kW are attainable. The highest pulse repetition rate is determined by the driver motor revolution and the electrode number of MER-SGS. Even higher voltage and energy can be switched by adjusting the gas pressure or employing N{sub 2} as the insulation gas or enlarging the size of MER-SGS to guarantee enough insulation level.

  3. High data rate systems for the future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chitwood, John

    1991-01-01

    Information systems in the next century will transfer data at rates that are much greater than those in use today. Satellite based communication systems will play an important role in networking users. Typical data rates; use of microwave, millimeter wave, or optical systems; millimeter wave communication technology; modulators/exciters; solid state power amplifiers; beam waveguide transmission systems; low noise receiver technology; optical communication technology; and the potential commercial applications of these technologies are discussed.

  4. Consideration of Wear Rates at High Velocities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    evaluations were performed for different velocity ranges depending on the interest of the individual researcher. As a result, an inconsistency 4 W L...together will produce heat. The slipper-rail interaction being studied is no different . The amount of heat generated is a function of the frictional...the one which provides the highest wear rate. To correlate specimens from different sources and of varying sizes and shapes, the wear rate, normal

  5. Low bone mineral density and decreased bone turnover in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Söderpalm, Ann-Charlott; Magnusson, Per; Ahlander, Anne-Christine; Karlsson, Jón; Kroksmark, Anna-Karin; Tulinius, Már; Swolin-Eide, Diana

    2007-12-01

    This cross-sectional study examined bone mineral density, bone turnover, body composition and calciotropic hormones in 24 boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) (2.3-19.7 years), most of whom were being treated with prednisolone, and 24 age-matched healthy boys. Our study demonstrated lower bone mineral density in the DMD group for total body, spine, hip, heel and forearm measurements. These differences between DMD patients and controls increased with increasing age. Biochemical markers of both bone formation and resorption revealed reduced bone turnover in DMD patients. The fracture rate was not higher in DMD patients. The DMD group had low vitamin D levels but high leptin levels in comparison with the control group. Muscle strength correlated with bone mineral density assessed at the hip and heel in the DMD group. Interventions that increase bone formation should be considered, as DMD patients have reduced bone turnover in addition to their low bone mineral density.

  6. Urbanization of black South African women may increase risk of low bone mass due to low vitamin D status, low calcium intake, and high bone turnover.

    PubMed

    Kruger, Marlena C; Kruger, Iolanthé M; Wentzel-Viljoen, Edelweiss; Kruger, Annamarie

    2011-10-01

    Globally, rural to urban migration is accompanied by changes in dietary patterns and lifestyle that have serious health implications, including development of low bone mass. We hypothesized that serum 25 (OH) vitamin D3 (25[OH]D3) levels will be lower, bone turnover higher, and nutrition inadequate in urban postmenopausal black women, increasing risk for low bone mass. We aimed to assess the prevalence of risk factors for low bone mass in 1261 black women from rural and urban areas in the North West Province of South Africa (Prospective Urban and Rural Epidemiology-South Africa project). Fasting blood samples were taken; and participants were interviewed to complete questionnaires on self-reported diseases, fractures, and dietary intakes. Bone health markers were assessed in a subgroup of 658 women older than 45 years. Specific lifestyle risk factors identified were inactivity, smoking, injectable progestin contraception use, and high alcohol consumption. Dietary risk factors identified were low calcium and high animal protein, phosphorous, and sodium intakes. The 25(OH)D3 and C-terminal telopeptide (CTX) levels were significantly higher in the rural vs the urban women older than 50 years. Parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels increased with age in both groups. The 25(OH)D levels were inversely correlated with CTX and PTH in rural women. In urban women, PTH and CTX were correlated while dietary calcium was inversely correlated with CTX and PTH with 25(OH)D3. The combination of low dietary calcium (<230 mg/d), marginally insufficient 25(OH)D3 status, and raised PTH may result in increased bone resorption. Further research is required to assess bone health and fracture risk in black African women.

  7. Cheetah: A high frame rate, high resolution SWIR image camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neys, Joel; Bentell, Jonas; O'Grady, Matt; Vermeiren, Jan; Colin, Thierry; Hooylaerts, Peter; Grietens, Bob

    2008-10-01

    A high resolution, high frame rate InGaAs based image sensor and associated camera has been developed. The sensor and the camera are capable of recording and delivering more than 1700 full 640x512pixel frames per second. The FPA utilizes a low lag CTIA current integrator in each pixel, enabling integration times shorter than one microsecond. On-chip logics allows for four different sub windows to be read out simultaneously at even higher rates. The spectral sensitivity of the FPA is situated in the SWIR range [0.9-1.7 μm] and can be further extended into the Visible and NIR range. The Cheetah camera has max 16 GB of on-board memory to store the acquired images and transfer the data over a Gigabit Ethernet connection to the PC. The camera is also equipped with a full CameralinkTM interface to directly stream the data to a frame grabber or dedicated image processing unit. The Cheetah camera is completely under software control.

  8. Social Disadvantage and Network Turnover

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. Research shows that socially disadvantaged groups—especially African Americans and people of low socioeconomic status (SES)—experience more unstable social environments. I argue that this causes higher rates of turnover within their personal social networks. This is a particularly important issue among disadvantaged older adults, who may benefit from stable networks. This article, therefore, examines whether social disadvantage is related to various aspects of personal network change. Method. Social network change was assessed using longitudinal egocentric network data from the National Social Life, Health, and Aging Project, a study of older adults conducted between 2005 and 2011. Data collection in Wave 2 included a technique for comparing respondents’ confidant network rosters between waves. Rates of network losses, deaths, and additions were modeled using multivariate Poisson regression. Results. African Americans and low-SES individuals lost more confidants—especially due to death—than did whites and college-educated respondents. African Americans also added more confidants than whites. However, neither African Americans nor low-SES individuals were able to match confidant losses with new additions to the extent that others did, resulting in higher levels of confidant network shrinkage. These trends are partly, but not entirely, explained by disadvantaged individuals’ poorer health and their greater risk of widowhood or marital dissolution. Discussion. Additional work is needed to shed light on the role played by race- and class-based segregation on group differences in social network turnover. Social gerontologists should examine the role these differences play in explaining the link between social disadvantage and important outcomes in later life, such as health decline. PMID:24997286

  9. Program needs and change orientation: implications for counselor turnover.

    PubMed

    Knight, Danica K; Landrum, Brittany; Becan, Jennifer E; Flynn, Patrick M

    2012-03-01

    Although evidence suggests that turnover rates are higher in high-stress/high-needs work environments, it is unclear whether agencies' attempts at improving practices influence individuals' decisions to stay at or leave a job. The purpose of this study was to examine whether program needs and change orientation influence individual decisions to quit. A sample of 206 counselors from 25 outpatient substance abuse treatment programs completed the Survey of Organizational Functioning, rating the organization on program needs, leadership, and change. They also rated themselves on stress, burnout, and job satisfaction. Multilevel modeling indicated a significant interaction between program needs and change orientation, even after controlling for stress, burnout, job satisfaction, tenure, and selected program characteristics. When perceptions of program needs were high, counselors were more likely to stay if they felt that the organization was making progress toward change. These findings suggest that an orientation toward change can counteract negative effects of perceived need within the workplace.

  10. Quantification of isotopic turnover in agricultural systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, A.; Auerswald, K.; Schnyder, H.

    2012-04-01

    The isotopic turnover, which is a proxy for the metabolic rate, is gaining scientific importance. It is quantified for an increasing range of organisms, from microorganisms over plants to animals including agricultural livestock. Additionally, the isotopic turnover is analyzed on different scales, from organs to organisms to ecosystems and even to the biosphere. In particular, the quantification of the isotopic turnover of specific tissues within the same organism, e.g. organs like liver and muscle and products like milk and faeces, has brought new insights to improve understanding of nutrient cycles and fluxes, respectively. Thus, the knowledge of isotopic turnover is important in many areas, including physiology, e.g. milk synthesis, ecology, e.g. soil retention time of water, and medical science, e.g. cancer diagnosis. So far, the isotopic turnover is quantified by applying time, cost and expertise intensive tracer experiments. Usually, this comprises two isotopic equilibration periods. A first equilibration period with a constant isotopic input signal is followed by a second equilibration period with a distinct constant isotopic input signal. This yields a smooth signal change from the first to the second signal in the object under consideration. This approach reveals at least three major problems. (i) The input signals must be controlled isotopically, which is almost impossible in many realistic cases like free ranging animals. (ii) Both equilibration periods may be very long, especially when the turnover rate of the object under consideration is very slow, which aggravates the first problem. (iii) The detection of small or slow pools is improved by large isotopic signal changes, but large isotopic changes also involve a considerable change in the input material; e.g. animal studies are usually carried out as diet-switch experiments, where the diet is switched between C3 and C4 plants, since C3 and C4 plants differ strongly in their isotopic signal. The

  11. The Combustion of HMX. [burning rate at high pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boggs, T. L.; Price, C. F.; Atwood, A. I.; Zurn, D. E.; Eisel, J. L.

    1980-01-01

    The burn rate of HMX was measured at high pressures (p more than 1000 psi). The self deflagration rate of HMX was determined from 1 atmosphere to 50,000 psi. The burning rate shows no significant slope breaks.

  12. Integrating Turnover Reasons and Shocks with Turnover Decision Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maertz, Carl P., Jr.; Kmitta, Kayla R.

    2012-01-01

    We interviewed and classified 186 quitters from many jobs and organizations via a theoretically-based protocol into five decision process types. We then tested exploratory hypotheses comparing users of these types on their propensity to report certain turnover reasons and turnover shocks. "Impulsive-type quitters," with neither a job offer in hand…

  13. Work and Career considerations in Understanding Employee Turnover Intentions and Turnover: Development of the Turnover Diagnostic.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-08-01

    reviews of the psychology of turnover (Brayfleld & Crockett, 1955; Herzberg, Mausner, Peterson, & Capwell, 1957; Mobley, 1982; Mobley, Hand, Meglino...Hand, H. H., Meglino, B. M., & Griffeth, R. W. (1979). Review and conceptual analysis of the employee turnover proess. Psychological Bulletin 86 49-522...Applied Psychology 6 318-328. Schuh, A. J. (1967). The predictability of employee turnover: A review of the literature. Personnel Psychology 20 133-152

  14. Distribution of ascorbate-2-sulfate and distribution, half-life and turnover rates of (1-/sup 14/C)ascorbic acid in rainbow trout

    SciTech Connect

    Tucker, B.W.; Halver, J.E.

    1984-06-01

    Rainbow trout (250 g) were maintained at 15 degrees C for 3 months on a low ascorbic acid diet, given (1-/sup 14/C)ascorbic acid by gavage, then fed the NAS/NRC requirement 12 times per week. Total urine, fecal water and branchial water were collected daily from five fish placed in metabolism chambers for four successive 5-day periods. Tissue samples were analyzed for /sup 14/C, ascorbic acid (C1) and ascorbate-2-sulfate (C2). Excretion analysis indicated t1/2 . 42 days. After 20 days, the feeding schedule was changed to 3 times per week. Fish fed /sup 14/C were sampled after 1, 2, 3 and 4 months. The half-life in each organ except brain was inversely proportional to the dietary level of ascorbate. Concentrations of C1 and C2 in the various tissues reflected dietary intake of vitamin C. Total C (CT . C1 + C2) levels were maintained in the liver even with the low vitamin C diet. Estimates of body pool for C1 are 27-29 mg/kg. At the higher ascorbate intake CT was 92-114 mg/kg, but decreased by 34% at the lower feeding rate to 51-62 mg/kg. Data indicate that there are two or more body pools that include a store of C2, which is readily interconverted in metabolizing tissues to and from C1. Since air and water stable C2 is antiscorbutic for fish, it is the preferred form of ascorbate for fish feeds.

  15. 8.2% of the Human genome is constrained: variation in rates of turnover across functional element classes in the human lineage.

    PubMed

    Rands, Chris M; Meader, Stephen; Ponting, Chris P; Lunter, Gerton

    2014-07-01

    Ten years on from the finishing of the human reference genome sequence, it remains unclear what fraction of the human genome confers function, where this sequence resides, and how much is shared with other mammalian species. When addressing these questions, functional sequence has often been equated with pan-mammalian conserved sequence. However, functional elements that are short-lived, including those contributing to species-specific biology, will not leave a footprint of long-lasting negative selection. Here, we address these issues by identifying and characterising sequence that has been constrained with respect to insertions and deletions for pairs of eutherian genomes over a range of divergences. Within noncoding sequence, we find increasing amounts of mutually constrained sequence as species pairs become more closely related, indicating that noncoding constrained sequence turns over rapidly. We estimate that half of present-day noncoding constrained sequence has been gained or lost in approximately the last 130 million years (half-life in units of divergence time, d1/2 = 0.25-0.31). While enriched with ENCODE biochemical annotations, much of the short-lived constrained sequences we identify are not detected by models optimized for wider pan-mammalian conservation. Constrained DNase 1 hypersensitivity sites, promoters and untranslated regions have been more evolutionarily stable than long noncoding RNA loci which have turned over especially rapidly. By contrast, protein coding sequence has been highly stable, with an estimated half-life of over a billion years (d1/2 = 2.1-5.0). From extrapolations we estimate that 8.2% (7.1-9.2%) of the human genome is presently subject to negative selection and thus is likely to be functional, while only 2.2% has maintained constraint in both human and mouse since these species diverged. These results reveal that the evolutionary history of the human genome has been highly dynamic, particularly for its noncoding yet

  16. Mitochondrial biogenesis and turnover.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Francisca; Moraes, Carlos T

    2008-07-01

    Mitochondrial biogenesis is a complex process involving the coordinated expression of mitochondrial and nuclear genes, the import of the products of the latter into the organelle and turnover. The mechanisms associated with these events have been intensively studied in the last 20 years and our understanding of their details is much improved. Mitochondrial biogenesis requires the participation of calcium signaling that activates a series of calcium-dependent protein kinases that in turn activate transcription factors and coactivators such as PGC-1alpha that regulates the expression of genes coding for mitochondrial components. In addition, mitochondrial biogenesis involves the balance of mitochondrial fission-fusion. Mitochondrial malfunction or defects in any of the many pathways involved in mitochondrial biogenesis can lead to degenerative diseases and possibly play an important part in aging.

  17. Salary, Performance, and Superintendent Turnover

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grissom, Jason A.; Mitani, Hajime

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Superintendent retention is an important goal for many school districts, yet the factors contributing to superintendent turnover are poorly understood. Most prior quantitative studies of superintendent turnover have relied on small, cross-sectional samples, limiting the evidence base. Utilizing longitudinal administrative records from…

  18. Commitment Profiles and Employee Turnover

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanley, Laura; Vandenberghe, Christian; Vandenberg, Robert; Bentein, Kathleen

    2013-01-01

    We examined how affective (AC), normative (NC), perceived sacrifice (PS), and few alternatives (FA) commitments combine to form profiles and determine turnover intention and turnover. We theorized that three mechanisms account for how profiles operate, i.e., the degree to which membership is internally regulated, the perceived desirability and…

  19. Teacher Turnover: A Conceptual Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez-Garcia, Cynthia; Slate, John R.

    2009-01-01

    In this article we reviewed the available literature concerning teacher turnover. The seriousness of this issue was addressed as cause for concern is clearly present. Issues we examined in this conceptual analysis were the federal government's role in public education, the No Child Left Behind Act, teacher turnover, teacher retention, teacher…

  20. Warming Effects Enzyme Turnover During Decomposition of Subtropical Peat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sihi, D.; Inglett, P.; Inglett, K. S.

    2015-12-01

    Extracellular enzymes are the proximate agents for organic matter degradation, but the turnover rate of enzymes is often assumed in most decomposition models without direct observations. Here, we assess turnover rates of C (ß-D-glucosidase), N (Leucine aminopeptidase), and P (Phosphomonoesterase) degrading enzymes by spiking commercially available enzymes to the dissolved organic matter of two subtropical peats incubated at 15°C and 25°C and monitoring of net activity of spiked enzymes (i.e. the difference between the spiked and the non-spiked samples) over time. Turnover rates of all three enzymes were greater in the samples incubated at 25°C (ranged between 0.006 hr-1 to 0.014 hr-1) as compared to those incubated at 15°C (ranged between 0.002 hr-1 to 0.009 hr-1). Concentrations of dissolved organic matter were positively correlated with the turnover rates (R2 ranged between 0.71-0.77) of all enzyme groups. To our knowledge, this is the first attempt to evaluate the turnover rates of enzymes in wetland soils as a function of warming and dissolved organic matter concentration. The findings suggest that warming-induced changes in the size of soil enzyme pool due to direct (by increasing protease activity) and indirect (by increasing concentrations of dissolved organic matter) effects on their turnover rates has potential to alter soil C stocks in a warmer world.

  1. RNA turnover in Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed Central

    Ehlers, B; Czichos, J; Overath, P

    1987-01-01

    Regulation of variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) mRNA turnover in Trypanosoma brucei was studied in bloodstream forms, in procyclic cells, and during in vitro transformation of bloodstream forms to procyclic cells by approach-to-equilibrium labeling and pulse-chase experiments. Upon initiation of transformation at 27 degrees C in the presence of citrate-cis-aconitate, the half-life of VSG mRNA was reduced from 4.5 h in bloodstream forms to 1.2 h in transforming cells. Concomitantly, an approximately 25-fold decrease in the rate of transcription was observed, resulting in a 100-fold reduction in the steady-state level of de novo-synthesized VSG mRNA. This low level of expression was maintained for at least 7 h, finally decreasing to an undetectable level after 24 h. Transcription of the VSG gene in established procyclic cells was undetectable. For comparison, the turnover of polyadenylated and nonpolyadenylated RNA, beta-tubulin mRNA, and mini-exon-derived RNA (medRNA) was studied. For medRNA, no significant changes in the rate of transcription or stability were observed during differentiation. In contrast, while the rate of transcription of beta-tubulin mRNA in in vitro-cultured bloodstream forms, transforming cells, and established procyclic cells was similar, the half life was four to five times longer in procyclic cells (t1/2, 7 h) than in cultured bloodstream forms (t1/2, 1.4 h) or transforming cells (t1/2, 1.7 h). Inhibition of protein synthesis in bloodstream forms at 37 degrees Celsius caused a dramatic 20-fold decrease in the rate of VSG mRNA synthesis and a 6-fold decrease in half-life to 45 min, while beta-tubulin mRNA was stabilized 2- to 3-fold and mRNA stability remained unaffected. It is postulated that triggering transformation or inhibiting protein synthesis induces changes in the abundance of the same regulatory molecules which effect the shutoff of VSG gene transcription in addition to shortening the half-life of VSG mRNA. Images PMID:2436040

  2. High Count Rate Electron Probe Microanalysis.

    PubMed

    Geller, Joseph D; Herrington, Charles

    2002-01-01

    Reducing the measurement uncertainty of quantitative analyses made using electron probe microanalyzers (EPMA) requires a careful study of the individual uncertainties from each definable step of the measurement. Those steps include measuring the incident electron beam current and voltage, knowing the angle between the electron beam and the sample (takeoff angle), collecting the emitted x rays from the sample, comparing the emitted x-ray flux to known standards (to determine the k-ratio) and transformation of the k-ratio to concentration using algorithms which includes, as a minimum, the atomic number, absorption, and fluorescence corrections. This paper discusses the collection and counting of the emitted x rays, which are diffracted into the gas flow or sealed proportional x-ray detectors. The representation of the uncertainty in the number of collected x rays collected reduces as the number of counts increase. The uncertainty of the collected signal is fully described by Poisson statistics. Increasing the number of x rays collected involves either counting longer or at a higher counting rate. Counting longer means the analysis time increases and may become excessive to get to the desired uncertainty. Instrument drift also becomes an issue. Counting at higher rates has its limitations, which are a function of the detector physics and the detecting electronics. Since the beginning of EPMA analysis, analog electronics have been used to amplify and discriminate the x-ray induced ionizations within the proportional counter. This paper will discuss the use of digital electronics for this purpose. These electronics are similar to that used for energy dispersive analysis of x rays with either Si(Li) or Ge(Li) detectors except that the shaping time constants are much smaller.

  3. Glucose turnover and recycling in colorectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kokal, W A; McCulloch, A; Wright, P D; Johnston, I D

    1983-11-01

    Glucose metabolism is affected by various pathologic states including tumors. In this project, glucose turnover and recycling rates in 11 patients with colorectal carcinoma were measured using a double-labelled 3-3H and 1-14C glucose injection technique. Fasting blood glucose, lactate, pyruvate, alanine, glycerol, 3-hydroxybutyrate, acetoacetate, plasma cortisol, and plasma insulin concentrations were also measured. No patient in the study had a history of diabetes mellitus or endocrine disorders, nor any abnormal liver function tests. The findings demonstrated a significantly elevated glucose turnover rate in patients with Dukes C and D lesions in comparison to patients with Dukes B lesions. Cori recycling rates were not significantly different between Dukes B vs. Dukes C and D patients. There were no differences between Dukes B and Dukes C and D patients in any of the metabolites measured. Furthermore, there were no significant differences in glucose turnover or recycling rates as a function of pre-illness weight loss. These data suggest that, when colorectal carcinoma extends beyond the limits of the bowel wall, glucose metabolism is significantly altered.

  4. High performance interconnection between high data rate networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foudriat, E. C.; Maly, K.; Overstreet, C. M.; Zhang, L.; Sun, W.

    1992-01-01

    The bridge/gateway system needed to interconnect a wide range of computer networks to support a wide range of user quality-of-service requirements is discussed. The bridge/gateway must handle a wide range of message types including synchronous and asynchronous traffic, large, bursty messages, short, self-contained messages, time critical messages, etc. It is shown that messages can be classified into three basic classes, synchronous and large and small asynchronous messages. The first two require call setup so that packet identification, buffer handling, etc. can be supported in the bridge/gateway. Identification enables resequences in packet size. The third class is for messages which do not require call setup. Resequencing hardware based to handle two types of resequencing problems is presented. The first is for a virtual parallel circuit which can scramble channel bytes. The second system is effective in handling both synchronous and asynchronous traffic between networks with highly differing packet sizes and data rates. The two other major needs for the bridge/gateway are congestion and error control. A dynamic, lossless congestion control scheme which can easily support effective error correction is presented. Results indicate that the congestion control scheme provides close to optimal capacity under congested conditions. Under conditions where error may develop due to intervening networks which are not lossless, intermediate error recovery and correction takes 1/3 less time than equivalent end-to-end error correction under similar conditions.

  5. High dose rate brachytherapy source measurement intercomparison.

    PubMed

    Poder, Joel; Smith, Ryan L; Shelton, Nikki; Whitaker, May; Butler, Duncan; Haworth, Annette

    2017-03-24

    This work presents a comparison of air kerma rate (AKR) measurements performed by multiple radiotherapy centres for a single HDR (192)Ir source. Two separate groups (consisting of 15 centres) performed AKR measurements at one of two host centres in Australia. Each group travelled to one of the host centres and measured the AKR of a single (192)Ir source using their own equipment and local protocols. Results were compared to the (192)Ir source calibration certificate provided by the manufacturer by means of a ratio of measured to certified AKR. The comparisons showed remarkably consistent results with the maximum deviation in measurement from the decay-corrected source certificate value being 1.1%. The maximum percentage difference between any two measurements was less than 2%. The comparisons demonstrated the consistency of well-chambers used for (192)Ir AKR measurements in Australia, despite the lack of a local calibration service, and served as a valuable focal point for the exchange of ideas and dosimetry methods.

  6. High-deposition-rate ceramics synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Allendorf, M.D.; Osterheld, T.H.; Outka, D.A.

    1995-05-01

    Parallel experimental and computational investigations are conducted in this project to develop validated numerical models of ceramic synthesis processes. Experiments are conducted in the High-Temperature Materials Synthesis Laboratory in Sandia`s Combustion Research Facility. A high-temperature flow reactor that can accommodate small preforms (1-3 cm diameter) generates conditions under which deposition can be observed, with flexibility to vary both deposition temperature (up to 1500 K) and pressure (as low as 10 torr). Both mass spectrometric and laser diagnostic probes are available to provide measurements of gas-phase compositions. Experiments using surface analytical techniques are also applied to characterize important processes occuring on the deposit surface. Computational tools developed through extensive research in the combustion field are employed to simulate the chemically reacting flows present in typical industrial reactors. These include the CHEMKIN and Surface-CHEMKIN suites of codes, which permit facile development of complex reaction mechanisms and vastly simplify the implementation of multi-component transport and thermodynamics. Quantum chemistry codes are also used to estimate thermodynamic and kinetic data for species and reactions for which this information is unavailable.

  7. High Strain Rate Tensile and Compressive Effects in Glassy Polymers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-02-08

    polymers under high strain rates has been determined in compression. Some research programs have studied the combined effects of temperature and strain rate...glassy polymers to high strain rate loading in compression. More recently, research programs that study the combined effects of temperature and strain...Force Materiel Command  United States Air Force  Eglin Air Force Base AFRL-RW-EG-TP-2013-006 High Strain Rate

  8. High rate fabrication of compression molded components

    DOEpatents

    Matsen, Marc R.; Negley, Mark A.; Dykstra, William C.; Smith, Glen L.; Miller, Robert J.

    2016-04-19

    A method for fabricating a thermoplastic composite component comprises inductively heating a thermoplastic pre-form with a first induction coil by inducing current to flow in susceptor wires disposed throughout the pre-form, inductively heating smart susceptors in a molding tool to a leveling temperature with a second induction coil by applying a high-strength magnetic field having a magnetic flux that passes through surfaces of the smart susceptors, shaping the magnetic flux that passes through surfaces of the smart susceptors to flow substantially parallel to a molding surface of the smart susceptors, placing the heated pre-form between the heated smart susceptors; and applying molding pressure to the pre-form to form the composite component.

  9. Using droplet-based microfluidics to improve the catalytic properties of RNA under multiple-turnover conditions.

    PubMed

    Ryckelynck, Michael; Baudrey, Stéphanie; Rick, Christian; Marin, Annick; Coldren, Faith; Westhof, Eric; Griffiths, Andrew D

    2015-03-01

    In vitro evolution methodologies are powerful approaches to identify RNA with new functionalities. While Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential enrichment (SELEX) is an efficient approach to generate new RNA aptamers, it is less suited for the isolation of efficient ribozymes as it does not select directly for the catalysis. In vitro compartmentalization (IVC) in aqueous droplets in emulsions allows catalytic RNAs to be selected under multiple-turnover conditions but suffers severe limitations that can be overcome using the droplet-based microfluidics workflow described in this paper. Using microfluidics, millions of genes in a library can be individually compartmentalized in highly monodisperse aqueous droplets and serial operations performed on them. This allows the different steps of the evolution process (gene amplification, transcription, and phenotypic assay) to be uncoupled, making the method highly flexible, applicable to the selection and evolution of a variety of RNAs, and easily adaptable for evolution of DNA or proteins. To demonstrate the method, we performed cycles of random mutagenesis and selection to evolve the X-motif, a ribozyme which, like many ribozymes selected using SELEX, has limited multiple-turnover activity. This led to the selection of variants, likely to be the optimal ribozymes that can be generated using point mutagenesis alone, with a turnover number under multiple-turnover conditions, k(ss) cat, ∼ 28-fold higher than the original X-motif, primarily due to an increase in the rate of product release, the rate-limiting step in the multiple-turnover reaction.

  10. Using droplet-based microfluidics to improve the catalytic properties of RNA under multiple-turnover conditions

    PubMed Central

    Baudrey, Stéphanie; Rick, Christian; Marin, Annick; Coldren, Faith; Westhof, Eric

    2015-01-01

    In vitro evolution methodologies are powerful approaches to identify RNA with new functionalities. While Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential enrichment (SELEX) is an efficient approach to generate new RNA aptamers, it is less suited for the isolation of efficient ribozymes as it does not select directly for the catalysis. In vitro compartmentalization (IVC) in aqueous droplets in emulsions allows catalytic RNAs to be selected under multiple-turnover conditions but suffers severe limitations that can be overcome using the droplet-based microfluidics workflow described in this paper. Using microfluidics, millions of genes in a library can be individually compartmentalized in highly monodisperse aqueous droplets and serial operations performed on them. This allows the different steps of the evolution process (gene amplification, transcription, and phenotypic assay) to be uncoupled, making the method highly flexible, applicable to the selection and evolution of a variety of RNAs, and easily adaptable for evolution of DNA or proteins. To demonstrate the method, we performed cycles of random mutagenesis and selection to evolve the X-motif, a ribozyme which, like many ribozymes selected using SELEX, has limited multiple-turnover activity. This led to the selection of variants, likely to be the optimal ribozymes that can be generated using point mutagenesis alone, with a turnover number under multiple-turnover conditions, ksscat, ∼28-fold higher than the original X-motif, primarily due to an increase in the rate of product release, the rate-limiting step in the multiple-turnover reaction. PMID:25605963

  11. Dynamics of telomeric DNA turnover in yeast.

    PubMed Central

    McEachern, Michael J; Underwood, Dana Hager; Blackburn, Elizabeth H

    2002-01-01

    Telomerase adds telomeric DNA repeats to telomeric termini using a sequence within its RNA subunit as a template. We characterized two mutations in the Kluyveromyces lactis telomerase RNA gene (TER1) template. Each initially produced normally regulated telomeres. One mutation, ter1-AA, had a cryptic defect in length regulation that was apparent only if the mutant gene was transformed into a TER1 deletion strain to permit extensive replacement of basal wild-type repeats with mutant repeats. This mutant differs from previously studied delayed elongation mutants in a number of properties. The second mutation, TER1-Bcl, which generates a BclI restriction site in newly synthesized telomeric repeats, was indistinguishable from wild type in all phenotypes assayed: cell growth, telomere length, and in vivo telomerase fidelity. TER1-Bcl cells demonstrated that the outer halves of the telomeric repeat tracts turn over within a few hundred cell divisions, while the innermost few repeats typically resisted turnover for at least 3000 cell divisions. Similarly deep but incomplete turnover was also observed in two other TER1 template mutants with highly elongated telomeres. These results indicate that most DNA turnover in functionally normal telomeres is due to gradual replicative sequence loss and additions by telomerase but that there are other processes that also contribute to turnover. PMID:11805045

  12. Relationships between soil microbial communities and soil carbon turnover along a vegetation and moisture gradient in interior Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldrop, M. P.; Harden, J. W.; Turetsky, M. R.; Petersen, D. G.; McGuire, A. D.; Briones, M. J.; Churchill, A. C.; Doctor, D. H.; Pruett, L. E.

    2010-12-01

    Boreal landscapes are characterized by a mosaic of uplands and lowlands, which differ in plant species composition, litter biochemistry, and biogeochemical cycling rates. Boreal ecosystems, from upland black spruce stands to lowland fens, are structured largely by water table position and contain quantitatively and qualitatively different forms of soil organic matter. Differences in carbon (C) availability among ecosystems likely translate to differences in the structure of soil microbial communities, which in turn could affect rates of organic matter decomposition and turnover. We examined relationships between microbial communities and soil C turnover in near-surface soils along a topographic soil moisture and vegetation gradient in interior Alaska. We tested the hypothesis that upland black spruce sites would be dominated by soil fungi and have slow rates of C turnover, whereas lowland ecosystems would be dominated by bacteria and mesofauna (enchytraeids) and have more rapid rates of C turnover. We utilized several isotopic measures of soil C turnover including bomb radiocarbon techniques, the δ15N of SOM, and the difference between δ13C of SOM, DOC, and respired CO2. All three measures indicated greater C turnover rates in the surface soils of the lowland fen sites compared to the more upland locations. Quantitative PCR analyses of soil bacteria and archaea, combined with enchytraed counts, confirmed that surface soils from the lowland fen ecosystems had the highest abundances of these functional groups. Fungal biomass was highly variable and tended to be more abundant in the upland forest sites. Soil enzymatic results were mixed: potential cellulase activities were higher in the more upland soils even though rates of microbial activity were generally lower. Oxidative enzyme activities were higher in fens, even though these ecosystems are saturated and partly anaerobic. Overall our data support soil food web theory which argues that rapidly cycling systems

  13. High data rate optical transceiver terminal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, E. S.

    1973-01-01

    The objectives of this study were: (1) to design a 400 Mbps optical transceiver terminal to operate from a high-altitude balloon-borne platform in order to permit the quantitative evaluation of a space-qualifiable optical communications system design, (2) to design an atmospheric propagation experiment to operate in conjunction with the terminal to measure the degrading effects of the atmosphere on the links, and (3) to design typical optical communications experiments for space-borne laboratories in the 1980-1990 time frame. As a result of the study, a transceiver package has been configured for demonstration flights during late 1974. The transceiver contains a 400 Mbps transmitter, a 400 Mbps receiver, and acquisition and tracking receivers. The transmitter is a Nd:YAG, 200 Mhz, mode-locked, CW, diode-pumped laser operating at 1.06 um requiring 50 mW for 6 db margin. It will be designed to implement Pulse Quaternary Modulation (PQM). The 400 Mbps receiver utilizes a Dynamic Crossed-Field Photomultiplier (DCFP) detector. The acquisition receiver is a Quadrant Photomultiplier Tube (QPMT) and receives a 400 Mbps signal chopped at 0.1 Mhz.

  14. The Effect of Minimum Wage Rates on High School Completion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warren, John Robert; Hamrock, Caitlin

    2010-01-01

    Does increasing the minimum wage reduce the high school completion rate? Previous research has suffered from (1. narrow time horizons, (2. potentially inadequate measures of states' high school completion rates, and (3. potentially inadequate measures of minimum wage rates. Overcoming each of these limitations, we analyze the impact of changes in…

  15. Dose rate in brachytherapy using after-loading machine: pulsed or high-dose rate?

    PubMed

    Hannoun-Lévi, J-M; Peiffert, D

    2014-10-01

    Since February 2014, it is no longer possible to use low-dose rate 192 iridium wires due to the end of industrial production of IRF1 and IRF2 sources. The Brachytherapy Group of the French society of radiation oncology (GC-SFRO) has recommended switching from iridium wires to after-loading machines. Two types of after-loading machines are currently available, based on the dose rate used: pulsed-dose rate or high-dose rate. In this article, we propose a comparative analysis between pulsed-dose rate and high-dose rate brachytherapy, based on biological, technological, organizational and financial considerations.

  16. Norepinephrine turnover in brown adipose tissue is stimulated by a single meal

    SciTech Connect

    Glick, Z.; Raum, W.J.

    1986-07-01

    A single meal stimulates brown adipose tissue (BAT) thermogenesis in rats. In the present study the role of norepinephrine in this thermogenic response was assessed from the rate of its turnover in BAT after a single test meal. For comparison, norepinephrine turnover was determined in the heart and spleen. A total of 48 male Wistar rats (200 g) were trained to eat during two feeding sessions per day. On the experimental day, one group (n = 24) was meal deprived and the other (n = 24) was given a low-protein high-carbohydrate test meal for 2 h. The synthesis inhibition method with ..cap alpha..-methyl-p-tyrosine was employed to determine norepinephrine turnover from its concentration at four hourly time points after the meal. Tissue concentrations of norepinephrine were determined by radioimmunoassay. Norepinephrine concentration and turnover rate were increased more than threefold in BAT of the meal-fed compared with the meal-deprived rats. Neither were significantly altered by the meal in the heart or spleen. The data suggest that norepinephrine mediates a portion of the thermic effect of meals that originate in BAT.

  17. Replicator dynamics with turnover of players

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juul, Jeppe; Kianercy, Ardeshir; Bernhardsson, Sebastian; Pigolotti, Simone

    2013-08-01

    We study adaptive dynamics in games where players abandon the population at a given rate and are replaced by naive players characterized by a prior distribution over the admitted strategies. We demonstrate how such a process leads macroscopically to a variant of the replicator equation, with an additional term accounting for player turnover. We study how Nash equilibria and the dynamics of the system are modified by this additional term for prototypical examples such as the rock-paper-scissors game and different classes of two-action games played between two distinct populations. We conclude by showing how player turnover can account for nontrivial departures from Nash equilibria observed in data from lowest unique bid auctions.

  18. High-Rate Strong-Signal Quantum Cryptography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuen, Horace P.

    1996-01-01

    Several quantum cryptosystems utilizing different kinds of nonclassical lights, which can accommodate high intensity fields and high data rate, are described. However, they are all sensitive to loss and both the high rate and the strong-signal character rapidly disappear. A squeezed light homodyne detection scheme is proposed which, with present-day technology, leads to more than two orders of magnitude data rate improvement over other current experimental systems for moderate loss.

  19. High Strain Rate Mechanical Properties of Glassy Polymers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-25

    Force Materiel Command  United States Air Force  Eglin Air Force Base AFRL-RW-EG-TP-2012-008 High Strain Rate...TITLE AND SUBTITLE High Strain Rate Mechanical Properties of Glassy Polymers 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT...1990s, a range of experimental data has been generated describing the response of glassy polymers to high strain rate loading in compression. More

  20. Occupational Stress and Turnover Intention: Implications for Nursing Management

    PubMed Central

    Mosadeghrad, Ali Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Background: The main purpose of this study was to explore the status of occupational stress among hospital nurses in Isfahan, Iran. It also aimed to examine the relationship between nurses’ occupational stress and their intention to leave the hospital. Methods: The study employed a cross-sectional research design. A validated questionnaire was used to collect data from 296 nurses. Respondents were asked to rate the intensity of 30 common occupational stressors using a five-point scale. Results: A third of hospital nurses rated their occupational stress high. The major sources of stress were inadequate pay, inequality at work, too much work, staff shortage, lack of promotion, job insecurity and lack of management support. More than 35% of nurses stated that they are considering leaving the hospital, if they could find another job opportunity. Occupational stress was positively associated with nurses’ turnover intentions. Conclusion: Hospital managers should develop and apply appropriate policies and strategies to reduce occupational stress and consequently nurses’ turnover intention. PMID:24596858

  1. Job Demand and Job Satisfaction in Latent Groups of Turnover Intention Among Licensed Nurses in Taiwan Nursing Homes.

    PubMed

    Chen, I-Hui; Brown, Roger; Bowers, Barbara J; Chang, Wen-Yin

    2015-10-01

    Nurses' turnover intention is not dichotomous; it may reflect intent to leave the profession, intent to leave a type of facility, or intent to leave a specific workplace. In a latent class analysis (LCA) of data from 186 licensed nurses (RNs and LPNs) recruited from 25 nursing homes (NHs) in Taiwan, we classified nurses into turnover intention subgroups based on seven questionnaire items and used a multilevel contrast analysis to characterize the subgroups according to demographic and facility factors, job demand, and job satisfaction. A multilevel probit model was used to examine how job demand and job satisfaction influenced subgroup membership. Three turnover subgroups were identified: high turnover intention (12%), middle turnover intention (57%), and low turnover intention (31%). The high turnover intention subgroup comprised the youngest nurses and had the lowest percentage of registered nurses (RNs); nurses in this subgroup had worked the longest at the current NH and had the greatest likelihood of working at a for-profit facility. Nurses in the middle turnover intention subgroup had the lowest likelihood of working at a for-profit facility. Nurses in the low turnover intention subgroup were primarily RNs and had the shortest work experience in the current facility. Nurses in the high and middle turnover intention subgroups reported lower intrinsic job satisfaction than those with low turnover intention. Extrinsic job satisfaction mediated the relationship between job demand and turnover intention subgroup assignment. The results of this LCA can help target interventions to address heterogeneity of turnover intention and ultimately lessen turnover.

  2. High-shear-rate capillary viscometer for inkjet inks

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Xi; Carr, Wallace W.; Bucknall, David G.; Morris, Jeffrey F.

    2010-06-15

    A capillary viscometer developed to measure the apparent shear viscosity of inkjet inks at high apparent shear rates encountered during inkjet printing is described. By using the Weissenberg-Rabinowitsch equation, true shear viscosity versus true shear rate is obtained. The device is comprised of a constant-flow generator, a static pressure monitoring device, a high precision submillimeter capillary die, and a high stiffness flow path. The system, which is calibrated using standard Newtonian low-viscosity silicone oil, can be easily operated and maintained. Results for measurement of the shear-rate-dependent viscosity of carbon-black pigmented water-based inkjet inks at shear rates up to 2x10{sup 5} s{sup -1} are discussed. The Cross model was found to closely fit the experimental data. Inkjet ink samples with similar low-shear-rate viscosities exhibited significantly different shear viscosities at high shear rates depending on particle loading.

  3. HIGH-RATE DISINFECTION TECHNIQUES FOR COMBIND SEWER OVERFLOW

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper presents high-rate disinfection technologies for combined sewer overflow (CSO). The high-rate disinfection technologies of interest are: chlorination/dechlorination, ultraviolet light irradiation (UV), chlorine dioxide (ClO2 ), ozone (O3), peracetic acid (CH3COOOH )...

  4. Chicory increases acetate turnover, but not propionate and butyrate peripheral turnovers in rats.

    PubMed

    Pouteau, Etienne; Rochat, Florence; Jann, Alfred; Meirim, Isabelle; Sanchez-Garcia, Jose-Luis; Ornstein, Kurt; German, Bruce; Ballèvre, Olivier

    2008-02-01

    Chicory roots are rich in inulin that is degraded into SCFA in the caecum and colon. Whole-body SCFA metabolism was investigated in rats during food deprivation and postprandial states. After 22 h of food deprivation, sixteen rats received an IV injection of radioactive 14C-labelled SCFA. The volume of distribution and the fractional clearance rate of SCFA were 0.25-0.27 litres/kg and 5.4-5.9 %/min, respectively. The half-life in the first extracellular rapidly decaying compartment was between 0.9 and 1.4 min. After 22 h of food deprivation, another seventeen rats received a primed continuous IV infusion of 13C-labelled SCFA for 2 h. Isotope enrichment (13C) of SCFA was determined in peripheral arterial blood by MS. Peripheral acetate, propionate and butyrate turnover rates were 29, 4 and 0.3 micromol/kg per min respectively. Following 4 weeks of treatment with chicory root or control diets, eighteen fed rats received a primed continuous IV infusion of 13C-labelled SCFA for 2 h. Intestinal degradation of dietary chicory lowered caecal pH, enhanced caecal and colonic weights, caecal SCFA concentrations and breath H2. The diet with chicory supplementation enhanced peripheral acetate turnover by 25 % (P = 0.017) concomitant with an increase in plasma acetate concentration. There were no changes in propionate or butyrate turnovers. In conclusion, by setting up a multi-tracer approach to simultaneously assess the turnovers of acetate, propionate and butyrate it was demonstrated that a chronic chicory-rich diet significantly increases peripheral acetate turnover but not that of propionate or butyrate in rats.

  5. Quantitative analysis of protein turnover in plants.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Clark J; Li, Lei; Millar, A Harvey

    2014-03-01

    Proteins are constantly being synthesised and degraded as plant cells age and as plants grow, develop and adapt the proteome. Given that plants develop through a series of events from germination to fruiting and even undertake whole organ senescence, an understanding of protein turnover as a fundamental part of this process in plants is essential. Both synthesis and degradation processes are spatially separated in a cell across its compartmented structure. The majority of protein synthesis occurs in the cytosol, while synthesis of specific components occurs inside plastids and mitochondria. Degradation of proteins occurs in both the cytosol, through the action of the plant proteasome, and in organelles and lytic structures through different protease classes. Tracking the specific synthesis and degradation rate of individual proteins can be undertaken using stable isotope feeding and the ability of peptide MS to track labelled peptide fractions over time. Mathematical modelling can be used to follow the isotope signature of newly synthesised protein as it accumulates and natural abundance proteins as they are lost through degradation. Different technical and biological constraints govern the potential for the use of (13)C, (15)N, (2)H and (18)O for these experiments in complete labelling and partial labelling strategies. Future development of quantitative protein turnover analysis will involve analysis of protein populations in complexes and subcellular compartments, assessing the effect of PTMs and integrating turnover studies into wider system biology study of plants.

  6. Onshore–offshore gradient in metacommunity turnover emerges only over macroevolutionary time-scales

    PubMed Central

    Tomašových, Adam; Dominici, Stefano; Zuschin, Martin; Merle, Didier

    2014-01-01

    Invertebrate lineages tend to originate and become extinct at a higher rate in onshore than in offshore habitats over long temporal durations (more than 10 Myr), but it remains unclear whether this pattern scales down to durations of stages (less than 5 Myr) or even sequences (less than 0.5 Myr). We assess whether onshore–offshore gradients in long-term turnover between the tropical Eocene and the warm-temperate Plio-Pleistocene can be extrapolated from gradients in short-term turnover, using abundances of molluscan species from bulk samples in the northeast Atlantic Province. We find that temporal turnover of metacommunities does not significantly decline with depth over short durations (less than 5 Myr), but significantly declines with depth between the Eocene and Plio-Pleistocene (approx. 50 Myr). This decline is determined by a higher onshore extinction of Eocene genera and families, by a higher onshore variability in abundances of genera and families, and by an onshore expansion of genera and families that were frequent offshore in the Eocene. Onshore–offshore decline in turnover thus emerges only over long temporal durations. We suggest that this emergence is triggered by abrupt and spatially extensive climatic or oceanographic perturbations that occurred between the Eocene and Plio-Pleistocene. Plio-Pleistocene metacommunities show a high proportion of bathymetric generalists, in contrast to Eocene metacommunities. Accordingly, the net cooling and weaker thermal gradients may have allowed offshore specialists to expand into onshore habitats and maintain their presence in offshore habitats. PMID:25297863

  7. Turnover of soil monosaccharides: Recycling versus Stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basler, Anna; Dyckmans, Jens

    2014-05-01

    Soil organic matter (SOM) represents a mixture of differently degradable compounds. Each of these compounds are characterised by different dynamics due to different chemical recalcitrance, transformation or stabilisation processes in soil. Carbohydrates represent one of these compounds and contribute up to 25 % to the soil organic matter. Vascular plants are the main source of pentose sugars (Arabinose and Xylose), whereas hexoses (Galactose and Mannose) are primarily produced by microorganisms. Several studies suggest that the mean turnover times of the carbon in soil sugars are similar to the turnover dynamics of the bulk carbon in soil. The aim of the study is to characterise the influence of stabilisation and turnover of soil carbohydrates. Soil samples are collected from (i) a continuous maize cropping experiment ('Höhere Landbauschule' Rotthalmünster, Bavaria) established 1979 on a Stagnic Luvisol and (ii) from a continuous wheat cropping, established 1969, as reference site. The effect of stabilisation is estimated by the comparison of turnover times of microbial and plant derived soil carbohydrates. As the dynamics of plant derived carbohydrate are solely influenced by stabilisation processes, whereas the dynamics of microbial derived carbohydrates are affected by recycling of organic carbon compounds derived by C3 plant substrate as well as stabilisation processes. The compound specific isotopic analysis (CSIA) of soil carbohydrates was performed using a HPLC/o/IRMS system. The chromatographic and mass spectrometric subunits were coupled with a LC-Isolink interface. Soil sugars were extracted after mild hydrolysis using 4 M trifluoroacetic acid (TFA). Chromatographic separation of the sugars was achieved using a low strength 0.25 mM NaOH solution as mobile phase at a ?ow rate of 250 μL min-1 at 10 ° C.

  8. The effect of positive interactions on temporal turnover of community composition along an environmental gradient.

    PubMed

    Wang, Youshi; Yang, Zhiyong; Zhou, Shurong; Soininen, Janne; Ai, Dexiecuo; Li, Yali; Chu, Chengjin

    2013-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that the interplay between negative and positive interactions simultaneously shapes community structure and composition. However, few studies have attempted to examine the effect of facilitation on compositional changes in communities through time. Additionally, due to the difficulties in collecting the long-term data, it would be useful to indicate the rate of temporal turnover using a readily obtainable metric. Using an individual-based model incorporating plant strategies, we examined the role of facilitation on the temporal turnover of communities located at different positions along an environmental gradient for three model scenarios: CM without facilitation; CFM-U, a unimodal relationship between facilitation and environmental severity; and CFM-L, a positively linear relationship between facilitation and environmental severity. Our results demonstrated that facilitation could increase, decrease or have no remarkable effect on temporal turnover. The specific outcome depended on the location of the focal community across the environmental gradient and the model employed. Compared with CM, the inclusion of positive interactions (i.e. CFM-U and CFM-L), at intermediate environmental stress levels (such as S = 0.7 and 0.8) resulted in lower Bray-Curtis similarity values; at other severity levels, facilitation slowed down (such as S = 0.3 and 0.4 at low to medium stress levels, and S = 0.9 at high stress levels) or had only a subtle effect (such as at S = 0.1) on temporal turnover. We also found that the coefficient of variation (CV) in species abundances and the rate of temporal variability showed a significant quadratic relationship. Our theoretical analysis contributes to the understanding of factors driving temporal turnover in biotic communities, and presents a potential metric (i.e. CV in species abundances) assessing the consequences of ongoing environmental change on community structure.

  9. High-Strain-Rate behavior of Hydrated Cement Paste.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-01-29

    bar and the transmitter bar are made from high yield- strength material, peak loads of 150,000 psi or 10 kbar are easily reached. Typical strain rates...was originally set up for testing very high yield- strength materials. Therefore, for use with cement paste samples, a series of new pressure bars -- 1...a. A a.5.. ~ A - a .- ~- . . . ~0 MML TR 87-12c HIGH -STRAIN-RATE BEHAVIOR OF HYDRATED CEMENT PASTE

  10. Listening to the Voices of Children in Foster Care: Youths Speak out about Child Welfare Workforce Turnover and Selection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strolin-Goltzman, Jessica; Kollar, Sharon; Trinkle, Joanne

    2010-01-01

    Child welfare workforce turnover rates across private and public child welfare agencies are concerning. Although research about the causes of child welfare workforce turnover has been plentiful, empirical studies on the effects of turnover on child outcomes are sparse. Furthermore, the voices and experiences of youths within the system have been…

  11. Electrochemical-driven hydrogen evolution from acetic acid and water catalyzed by a mixed-valent CoII-CoI complex with high turnover frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Jie-Ping; Fu, Ling-Zhi; Zhou, Ling-Ling; Zhan, Shu-Zhong

    2015-04-01

    The reaction of 2,3-bis(2-hydroxybenzylideneimino)-2,3-butenedinitrile (H2L1) and CoCl2·6H2O affords a mixed-valent dinuclear CoII-CoI complex [CoIL(py)3][CoIIL2] 1 (L = 2-(2-hydroxybenzylideneimino)-butenedinitrile ion), a new molecular electrocatalyst, which has been determined by X-ray crystallography and XPS spectrum. Electrochemical studies indicate that the catalyst is the first CoII-CoI complex species, that is among the most rapid homogeneous water-reduction catalysts, with a turnover frequency (TOF) of 2387 mol of hydrogen per mole of catalyst per hour at an overpotential of 787 mV vs SHE (pH 7.0). Sustained proton reduction catalysis occurs at glassy carbon (GC) to give H2 over a 46 h electrolysis period with 97% Faradaic yield and no observable decomposition of the catalyst.

  12. Investigation of High-Pressure Hydraulic Vortex Rate Sensor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    stability - augmentation system . The feasibility of low-pressure fluid stabilization systems was demonstrated. The primary component that requires development for implementation in a high pressure system is the vortex rate sensor. The high-pressure hydraulic vortex rate sensor has an on-board built-in supply of hydraulic fluid which is used in the primary hydro-mechanical flight control of the vehicle. A small amount of hydraulic fluid under high pressure can be diverted from the main system to the vortex rate sensor, used to perform a sensing function, and

  13. Quantum data locking for high-rate private communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lupo, Cosmo; Lloyd, Seth

    2015-03-01

    We show that, if the accessible information is used as a security quantifier, quantum channels with a certain symmetry can convey private messages at a tremendously high rate, as high as less than one bit below the rate of non-private classical communication. This result is obtained by exploiting the quantum data locking effect. The price to pay to achieve such a high private communication rate is that accessible information security is in general not composable. However, composable security holds against an eavesdropper who is forced to measure her share of the quantum system within a finite time after she gets it.

  14. Uncovering high-strain rate protection mechanism in nacre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zaiwang; Li, Haoze; Pan, Zhiliang; Wei, Qiuming; Chao, Yuh J.; Li, Xiaodong

    2011-11-01

    Under high-strain-rate compression (strain rate ~103 s-1), nacre (mother-of-pearl) exhibits surprisingly high fracture strength vis-à-vis under quasi-static loading (strain rate 10-3 s-1). Nevertheless, the underlying mechanism responsible for such sharply different behaviors in these two loading modes remains completely unknown. Here we report a new deformation mechanism, adopted by nacre, the best-ever natural armor material, to protect itself against predatory penetrating impacts. It involves the emission of partial dislocations and the onset of deformation twinning that operate in a well-concerted manner to contribute to the increased high-strain-rate fracture strength of nacre. Our findings unveil that Mother Nature delicately uses an ingenious strain-rate-dependent stiffening mechanism with a purpose to fight against foreign attacks. These findings should serve as critical design guidelines for developing engineered body armor materials.

  15. Uncovering high-strain rate protection mechanism in nacre.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zaiwang; Li, Haoze; Pan, Zhiliang; Wei, Qiuming; Chao, Yuh J; Li, Xiaodong

    2011-01-01

    Under high-strain-rate compression (strain rate approximately 10(3) s(-1)), nacre (mother-of-pearl) exhibits surprisingly high fracture strength vis-à-vis under quasi-static loading (strain rate 10(-3) s(-1)). Nevertheless, the underlying mechanism responsible for such sharply different behaviors in these two loading modes remains completely unknown. Here we report a new deformation mechanism, adopted by nacre, the best-ever natural armor material, to protect itself against predatory penetrating impacts. It involves the emission of partial dislocations and the onset of deformation twinning that operate in a well-concerted manner to contribute to the increased high-strain-rate fracture strength of nacre. Our findings unveil that Mother Nature delicately uses an ingenious strain-rate-dependent stiffening mechanism with a purpose to fight against foreign attacks. These findings should serve as critical design guidelines for developing engineered body armor materials.

  16. Uncovering high-strain rate protection mechanism in nacre

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Zaiwang; Li, Haoze; Pan, Zhiliang; Wei, Qiuming; Chao, Yuh J.; Li, Xiaodong

    2011-01-01

    Under high-strain-rate compression (strain rate ∼103 s−1), nacre (mother-of-pearl) exhibits surprisingly high fracture strength vis-à-vis under quasi-static loading (strain rate 10−3 s−1). Nevertheless, the underlying mechanism responsible for such sharply different behaviors in these two loading modes remains completely unknown. Here we report a new deformation mechanism, adopted by nacre, the best-ever natural armor material, to protect itself against predatory penetrating impacts. It involves the emission of partial dislocations and the onset of deformation twinning that operate in a well-concerted manner to contribute to the increased high-strain-rate fracture strength of nacre. Our findings unveil that Mother Nature delicately uses an ingenious strain-rate-dependent stiffening mechanism with a purpose to fight against foreign attacks. These findings should serve as critical design guidelines for developing engineered body armor materials. PMID:22355664

  17. Laser nanoablation of diamond surface at high pulse repetition rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kononenko, V. V.; Gololobov, V. M.; Pashinin, V. P.; Konov, V. I.

    2016-10-01

    The chemical etching of the surface of a natural diamond single crystal irradiated by subpicosecond laser pulses with a high repetition rate (f ≤slant 500 {\\text{kHz}}) in air is experimentally investigated. The irradiation has been performed by the second-harmonic (515 {\\text{nm}}) radiation of a disk Yb : YAG laser. Dependences of the diamond surface etch rate on the laser energy density and pulse repetition rate are obtained.

  18. Putative extremely high rate of proteome innovation in lancelets might be explained by high rate of gene prediction errors.

    PubMed

    Bányai, László; Patthy, László

    2016-08-01

    A recent analysis of the genomes of Chinese and Florida lancelets has concluded that the rate of creation of novel protein domain combinations is orders of magnitude greater in lancelets than in other metazoa and it was suggested that continuous activity of transposable elements in lancelets is responsible for this increased rate of protein innovation. Since morphologically Chinese and Florida lancelets are highly conserved, this finding would contradict the observation that high rates of protein innovation are usually associated with major evolutionary innovations. Here we show that the conclusion that the rate of proteome innovation is exceptionally high in lancelets may be unjustified: the differences observed in domain architectures of orthologous proteins of different amphioxus species probably reflect high rates of gene prediction errors rather than true innovation.

  19. Putative extremely high rate of proteome innovation in lancelets might be explained by high rate of gene prediction errors

    PubMed Central

    Bányai, László; Patthy, László

    2016-01-01

    A recent analysis of the genomes of Chinese and Florida lancelets has concluded that the rate of creation of novel protein domain combinations is orders of magnitude greater in lancelets than in other metazoa and it was suggested that continuous activity of transposable elements in lancelets is responsible for this increased rate of protein innovation. Since morphologically Chinese and Florida lancelets are highly conserved, this finding would contradict the observation that high rates of protein innovation are usually associated with major evolutionary innovations. Here we show that the conclusion that the rate of proteome innovation is exceptionally high in lancelets may be unjustified: the differences observed in domain architectures of orthologous proteins of different amphioxus species probably reflect high rates of gene prediction errors rather than true innovation. PMID:27476717

  20. Rural and Urban High School Dropout Rates: Are They Different?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, Jeffrey L.; Kostandini, Genti; Mykerezi, Elton

    2012-01-01

    This study estimates the high school dropout rate in rural and urban areas, the determinants of dropping out, and whether the differences in graduation rates have changed over time. We use geocoded data from two nationally representative panel household surveys (NLSY 97 and NLSY 79) and a novel methodology that corrects for biases in graduation…

  1. How Did Successful High Schools Improve Their Graduation Rates?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Janna Siegel; Smith, Robert W.; Rinka, Jason

    2016-01-01

    The researchers surveyed 23 North Carolina high schools that had markedly improved their graduation rates over the past five years. The administrators reported on the dropout prevention practices and programs to which they attributed their improved graduation rates. The majority of schools reported policy changes, especially with suspension. The…

  2. Identifying High-Rate Flows Based on Sequential Sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yu; Fang, Binxing; Luo, Hao

    We consider the problem of fast identification of high-rate flows in backbone links with possibly millions of flows. Accurate identification of high-rate flows is important for active queue management, traffic measurement and network security such as detection of distributed denial of service attacks. It is difficult to directly identify high-rate flows in backbone links because tracking the possible millions of flows needs correspondingly large high speed memories. To reduce the measurement overhead, the deterministic 1-out-of-k sampling technique is adopted which is also implemented in Cisco routers (NetFlow). Ideally, a high-rate flow identification method should have short identification time, low memory cost and processing cost. Most importantly, it should be able to specify the identification accuracy. We develop two such methods. The first method is based on fixed sample size test (FSST) which is able to identify high-rate flows with user-specified identification accuracy. However, since FSST has to record every sampled flow during the measurement period, it is not memory efficient. Therefore the second novel method based on truncated sequential probability ratio test (TSPRT) is proposed. Through sequential sampling, TSPRT is able to remove the low-rate flows and identify the high-rate flows at the early stage which can reduce the memory cost and identification time respectively. According to the way to determine the parameters in TSPRT, two versions of TSPRT are proposed: TSPRT-M which is suitable when low memory cost is preferred and TSPRT-T which is suitable when short identification time is preferred. The experimental results show that TSPRT requires less memory and identification time in identifying high-rate flows while satisfying the accuracy requirement as compared to previously proposed methods.

  3. Climate change creates rapid species turnover in montane communities.

    PubMed

    Gibson-Reinemer, Daniel K; Sheldon, Kimberly S; Rahel, Frank J

    2015-06-01

    Recent decades have seen substantial changes in patterns of biodiversity worldwide. Simultaneously, climate change is producing a widespread pattern of species' range shifts to higher latitudes and higher elevations, potentially creating novel assemblages as species shift at different rates. However, the direct link between species' turnover as a result of climate-induced range shifts has not yet been empirically evaluated. We measured rates of species turnover associated with species' range shifts in relatively undisturbed montane areas in Asia, Europe, North America, South America, and the Indo-Pacific. We show that species turnover is rapidly creating novel assemblages, and this can be explained by variable changes in species' range limits following warming. Across all the areas we analyzed, mean species' turnover was 12% per decade, which was nearly balanced between the loss of existing co-occurrences and the gain of novel co-occurrences. Turnover appears to be more rapid among ectothermic assemblages, and some evidence suggests tropical assemblages may be responding at more rapid rates than temperate assemblages.

  4. High Heating Rates Affect Greatly the Inactivation Rate of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Huertas, Juan-Pablo; Aznar, Arantxa; Esnoz, Arturo; Fernández, Pablo S.; Iguaz, Asunción; Periago, Paula M.; Palop, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Heat resistance of microorganisms can be affected by different influencing factors. Although, the effect of heating rates has been scarcely explored by the scientific community, recent researches have unraveled its important effect on the thermal resistance of different species of vegetative bacteria. Typically heating rates described in the literature ranged from 1 to 20°C/min but the impact of much higher heating rates is unclear. The aim of this research was to explore the effect of different heating rates, such as those currently achieved in the heat exchangers used in the food industry, on the heat resistance of Escherichia coli. A pilot plant tubular heat exchanger and a thermoresistometer Mastia were used for this purpose. Results showed that fast heating rates had a deep impact on the thermal resistance of E. coli. Heating rates between 20 and 50°C/min were achieved in the heat exchanger, which were much slower than those around 20°C/s achieved in the thermoresistometer. In all cases, these high heating rates led to higher inactivation than expected: in the heat exchanger, for all the experiments performed, when the observed inactivation had reached about seven log cycles, the predictions estimated about 1 log cycle of inactivation; in the thermoresistometer these differences between observed and predicted values were even more than 10 times higher, from 4.07 log cycles observed to 0.34 predicted at a flow rate of 70 mL/min and a maximum heating rate of 14.7°C/s. A quantification of the impact of the heating rates on the level of inactivation achieved was established. These results point out the important effect that the heating rate has on the thermal resistance of E. coli, with high heating rates resulting in an additional sensitization to heat and therefore an effective food safety strategy in terms of food processing. PMID:27563300

  5. High Heating Rates Affect Greatly the Inactivation Rate of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Huertas, Juan-Pablo; Aznar, Arantxa; Esnoz, Arturo; Fernández, Pablo S; Iguaz, Asunción; Periago, Paula M; Palop, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Heat resistance of microorganisms can be affected by different influencing factors. Although, the effect of heating rates has been scarcely explored by the scientific community, recent researches have unraveled its important effect on the thermal resistance of different species of vegetative bacteria. Typically heating rates described in the literature ranged from 1 to 20°C/min but the impact of much higher heating rates is unclear. The aim of this research was to explore the effect of different heating rates, such as those currently achieved in the heat exchangers used in the food industry, on the heat resistance of Escherichia coli. A pilot plant tubular heat exchanger and a thermoresistometer Mastia were used for this purpose. Results showed that fast heating rates had a deep impact on the thermal resistance of E. coli. Heating rates between 20 and 50°C/min were achieved in the heat exchanger, which were much slower than those around 20°C/s achieved in the thermoresistometer. In all cases, these high heating rates led to higher inactivation than expected: in the heat exchanger, for all the experiments performed, when the observed inactivation had reached about seven log cycles, the predictions estimated about 1 log cycle of inactivation; in the thermoresistometer these differences between observed and predicted values were even more than 10 times higher, from 4.07 log cycles observed to 0.34 predicted at a flow rate of 70 mL/min and a maximum heating rate of 14.7°C/s. A quantification of the impact of the heating rates on the level of inactivation achieved was established. These results point out the important effect that the heating rate has on the thermal resistance of E. coli, with high heating rates resulting in an additional sensitization to heat and therefore an effective food safety strategy in terms of food processing.

  6. Evaluation of climate-related carbon turnover processes in global vegetation models for boreal and temperate forests.

    PubMed

    Thurner, Martin; Beer, Christian; Ciais, Philippe; Friend, Andrew D; Ito, Akihiko; Kleidon, Axel; Lomas, Mark R; Quegan, Shaun; Rademacher, Tim T; Schaphoff, Sibyll; Tum, Markus; Wiltshire, Andy; Carvalhais, Nuno

    2017-02-13

    Turnover concepts in state-of-the-art global vegetation models (GVMs) account for various processes, but are often highly simplified and may not include an adequate representation of the dominant processes that shape vegetation carbon turnover rates in real forest ecosystems at a large spatial scale. Here we evaluate vegetation carbon turnover processes in GVMs participating in the Inter-Sectoral Impact Model Intercomparison Project (ISI-MIP; including HYBRID4, JeDi, JULES, LPJml, ORCHIDEE, SDGVM, and VISIT) using estimates of vegetation carbon turnover rate (k) derived from a combination of remote sensing based products of biomass and net primary production (NPP). We find that current model limitations lead to considerable biases in the simulated biomass and in k (severe underestimations by all models except JeDi and VISIT compared to observation-based average k), likely contributing to underestimation of positive feedbacks of the northern forest carbon balance to climate change caused by changes in forest mortality. A need for improved turnover concepts related to frost damage, drought and insect outbreaks in order to better reproduce observation-based spatial patterns in k is identified. Since direct frost damage effects on mortality are usually not accounted for in these GVMs, simulated relationships between k and winter length in boreal forests are not consistent between different regions and strongly biased compared to the observation-based relationships. Some models show a response of k to drought in temperate forests as a result of impacts of water availability on NPP, growth efficiency or carbon balance dependent mortality as well as soil or litter moisture effects on leaf turnover or fire. However, further direct drought effects like carbon starvation (only in HYBRID4) or hydraulic failure are usually not taken into account by the investigated GVMs. While they are considered dominant large-scale mortality agents, mortality mechanisms related to insects

  7. Studying solutions at high shear rates: a dedicated microfluidics setup.

    PubMed

    Wieland, D C F; Garamus, V M; Zander, T; Krywka, C; Wang, M; Dedinaite, A; Claesson, P M; Willumeit-Römer, R

    2016-03-01

    The development of a dedicated small-angle X-ray scattering setup for the investigation of complex fluids at different controlled shear conditions is reported. The setup utilizes a microfluidics chip with a narrowing channel. As a consequence, a shear gradient is generated within the channel and the effect of shear rate on structure and interactions is mapped spatially. In a first experiment small-angle X-ray scattering is utilized to investigate highly concentrated protein solutions up to a shear rate of 300000 s(-1). These data demonstrate that equilibrium clusters of lysozyme are destabilized at high shear rates.

  8. Bacterial and enchytraeid abundance accelerate soil carbon turnover along a lowland vegetation gradient in interior Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waldrop, M.P.; Harden, Jennifer W.; Turetsky, M.R.; Petersen, D.G.; McGuire, A.D.; Briones, M.J.I.; Churchill, A.C.; Doctor, D.H.; Pruett, L.E.

    2012-01-01

    Boreal wetlands are characterized by a mosaic of plant communities, including forests, shrublands, grasslands, and fens, which are structured largely by changes in topography and water table position. The soil associated with these plant communities contain quantitatively and qualitatively different forms of soil organic matter (SOM) and nutrient availability that drive changes in biogeochemical cycling rates. Therefore different boreal plant communities likely contain different soil biotic communities which in turn affect rates of organic matter decomposition. We examined relationships between plant communities, microbial communities, enchytraeids, and soil C turnover in near-surface soils along a shallow topographic soil moisture and vegetation gradient in interior Alaska. We tested the hypothesis that as soil moisture increases along the gradient, surface soils would become increasingly dominated by bacteria and mesofauna and have more rapid rates of C turnover. We utilized bomb radiocarbon techniques to infer rates of C turnover and the 13C isotopic composition of SOM and respired CO2 to infer the degree of soil humification. Soil phenol oxidase and peroxidase enzyme activities were generally higher in the rich fen compared with the forest and bog birch sites. Results indicated greater C fluxes and more rapid C turnover in the surface soils of the fen sites compared to the wetland forest and shrub sites. Quantitative PCR analyses of soil bacteria and archaea, combined with enchytraeid counts, indicated that surface soils from the lowland fen ecosystems had higher abundances of these microbial and mesofaunal groups. Fungal abundance was highly variable and not significantly different among sites. Microbial data was utilized in a food web model that confirmed that rapidly cycling systems are dominated by bacterial activity and enchytraeid grazing. However, our results also suggest that oxidative enzymes play an important role in the C mineralization process in

  9. Slow rate of molecular evolution in high-elevation hummingbirds.

    PubMed

    Bleiweiss, R

    1998-01-20

    Estimates of relative rates of molecular evolution from a DNA-hybridization phylogeny for 26 hummingbird species provide evidence for a negative association between elevation and rate of single-copy genome evolution. This effect of elevation on rate remains significant even after taking into account a significant negative association between body mass and molecular rate. Population-level processes do not appear to account for these patterns because (i) all hummingbirds breed within their first year and (ii) the more extensive subdivision and speciation of bird populations living at high elevations predicts a positive association between elevation and rate. The negative association between body mass and molecular rate in other organisms has been attributed to higher mutation rates in forms with higher oxidative metabolism. As ambient oxygen tensions and temperature decrease with elevation, the slow rate of molecular evolution in high-elevation hummingbirds also may have a metabolic basis. A slower rate of single-copy DNA change at higher elevations suggests that the dynamics of molecular evolution cannot be separated from the environmental context.

  10. Accidents, turnover, and use of a preemployment screening inventory.

    PubMed

    Borofsky, G L; Bielema, M; Hoffman, J

    1993-12-01

    This study examined the rates of work-related accidents and turnover among two contrasted groups of employees in a resort hotel/conference center environment. For each variable, measures were obtained for the year prior to the inclusion of a preemployment inventory in the organization's selection process and for each of two years subsequent to the start of inventory use. Analysis indicated the rates of work-related accidents and turnover were significantly lower in the years subsequent to the start of inventory use. Some possible design artifacts and cost/benefit implications are discussed.

  11. Dynamics of human adipose lipid turnover in health and metabolic disease.

    PubMed

    Arner, Peter; Bernard, Samuel; Salehpour, Mehran; Possnert, Göran; Liebl, Jakob; Steier, Peter; Buchholz, Bruce A; Eriksson, Mats; Arner, Erik; Hauner, Hans; Skurk, Thomas; Rydén, Mikael; Frayn, Keith N; Spalding, Kirsty L

    2011-09-25

    Adipose tissue mass is determined by the storage and removal of triglycerides in adipocytes. Little is known, however, about adipose lipid turnover in humans in health and pathology. To study this in vivo, here we determined lipid age by measuring (14)C derived from above ground nuclear bomb tests in adipocyte lipids. We report that during the average ten-year lifespan of human adipocytes, triglycerides are renewed six times. Lipid age is independent of adipocyte size, is very stable across a wide range of adult ages and does not differ between genders. Adipocyte lipid turnover, however, is strongly related to conditions with disturbed lipid metabolism. In obesity, triglyceride removal rate (lipolysis followed by oxidation) is decreased and the amount of triglycerides stored each year is increased. In contrast, both lipid removal and storage rates are decreased in non-obese patients diagnosed with the most common hereditary form of dyslipidaemia, familial combined hyperlipidaemia. Lipid removal rate is positively correlated with the capacity of adipocytes to break down triglycerides, as assessed through lipolysis, and is inversely related to insulin resistance. Our data support a mechanism in which adipocyte lipid storage and removal have different roles in health and pathology. High storage but low triglyceride removal promotes fat tissue accumulation and obesity. Reduction of both triglyceride storage and removal decreases lipid shunting through adipose tissue and thus promotes dyslipidaemia. We identify adipocyte lipid turnover as a novel target for prevention and treatment of metabolic disease.

  12. Stretching Behavior of Red Blood Cells at High Strain Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancuso, Jordan; Ristenpart, William

    2016-11-01

    Most work on the mechanical behavior of red blood cells (RBCs) has focused on simple shear flows. Relatively little work has examined RBC deformations in the physiologically important extensional flow that occurs at the entrance to a constriction. In particular, previous work suggests that RBCs rapidly stretch out and then retract upon entering the constriction, but to date no model predicts this behavior for the extremely high strain rates typically experienced there. In this work, we use high speed video to perform systematic measurements of the dynamic stretching behavior of RBCs as they enter a microfluidic constriction. We demonstrate that a simple viscoelastic model captures the observed stretching dynamics, up to strain rates as high as 1000 s-1. The results indicate that the effective elastic modulus of the RBC membrane at these strain rates is an order of magnitude larger than moduli measured by micropipette aspiration or other low strain rate techniques.

  13. Advances in solid polymer electrochemical capacitors for high rate applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lian, Keryn; Gao, Han

    2011-06-01

    All solid electrochemical capacitors (EC) have been demonstrated using proton conducting silicotungstic acid (SiWA) and poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) based polymer electrolytes. Graphite electrodes were utilized for electrochemical double layer capacitors (EDLC), while RuO2 electrodes were employed as pseudocapacitive electrodes. Both solid EDLC and pseudocapacitors exhibited very high charge/discharge rate capability. Especially for solid EDLC, a charge/discharge rate of 25 V/s and a 10 ms time constant ("factor of merit") were obtained. The rate capability of the solid EC is attributable to thin film thickness, good proton conductivity of the polymer electrolyte, and intimate contact between electrode and electrolyte. These results demonstrate promise of polymer electrolytes as enablers of high rate and high performance solid EC devices.

  14. Solidification at the High and Low Rate Extreme

    SciTech Connect

    Meco, Halim

    2004-12-19

    The microstructures formed upon solidification are strongly influenced by the imposed growth rates on an alloy system. Depending on the characteristics of the solidification process, a wide range of growth rates is accessible. The prevailing solidification mechanisms, and thus the final microstructure of the alloy, are governed by these imposed growth rates. At the high rate extreme, for instance, one can have access to novel microstructures that are unattainable at low growth rates. While the low growth rates can be utilized for the study of the intrinsic growth behavior of a certain phase growing from the melt. Although the length scales associated with certain processes, such as capillarity, and the diffusion of heat and solute, are different at low and high rate extremes, the phenomena that govern the selection of a certain microstructural length scale or a growth mode are the same. Consequently, one can analyze the solidification phenomena at both high and low rates by using the same governing principles. In this study, we examined the microstructural control at both low and high extremes. For the high rate extreme, the formation of crystalline products and factors that control the microstructure during rapid solidification by free-jet melt spinning are examined in Fe-Si-B system. Particular attention was given to the behavior of the melt pool at different quench-wheel speeds. Since the solidification process takes place within the melt-pool that forms on the rotating quench-wheel, we examined the influence of melt-pool dynamics on nucleation and growth of crystalline solidification products and glass formation. High-speed imaging of the melt-pool, analysis of ribbon microstructure, and measurement of ribbon geometry and surface character all indicate upper and lower limits for melt-spinning rates for which nucleation can be avoided, and fully amorphous ribbons can be achieved. Comparison of the relevant time scales reveals that surface-controlled melt

  15. Authoritative School Climate and High School Dropout Rates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jia, Yuane; Konold, Timothy R.; Cornell, Dewey

    2016-01-01

    This study tested the association between school-wide measures of an authoritative school climate and high school dropout rates in a statewide sample of 315 high schools. Regression models at the school level of analysis used teacher and student measures of disciplinary structure, student support, and academic expectations to predict overall high…

  16. Implementation of High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy and Androgen Deprivation in Patients With Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Lilleby, Wolfgang; Tafjord, Gunnar; Raabe, Nils K.

    2012-07-01

    external radiotherapy and long-term ADT. High-quality implants can be achieved by a trained specialized team at a high-turnover center using transrectal ultrasound-based treatment plans with acceptable morbidity and complication rates.

  17. Breakdown Limit Studies in High-Rate Gaseous Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivaniouchenkov, Yu; Fonte, P.; Peskov, V.; Ramsey, B. D.

    1999-01-01

    We report results from a systematic study of breakdown limits for novel high-rate gaseous detectors: MICROMEGAS, CAT and GEM, together with more conventional devices such as thin-gap parallel-mesh chambers and high-rate wire chambers. It was found that for all these detectors, the maximum achievable pin, before breakdown appears, drops dramatically with incident flux, and is sometimes inversely proportional to it. Further, in the presence of alpha particles, typical of the breakgrounds in high-energy experiments, additional gain drops of 1-2 orders of magnitude were observed for many detectors. It was found that breakdowns at high rates occur through what we have termed an "accumulative" mechanism, which does not seem to have been previously reported in the literature. Results of these studies may help in choosing the optimum detector for given experimental conditions.

  18. High-rate squeezing process of bulk metallic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Jitang

    2017-03-01

    High-rate squeezing process of bulk metallic glasses from a cylinder into an intact sheet achieved by impact loading is investigated. Such a large deformation is caused by plastic flow, accompanied with geometrical confinement, shear banding/slipping, thermo softening, melting and joining. Temperature rise during the high-rate squeezing process makes a main effect. The inherent mechanisms are illustrated. Like high-pressure torsion (HPT), equal channel angular pressing (ECAP) and surface mechanical attrition treatments (SMAT) for refining grain of metals, High-Rate Squeezing (HRS), as a multiple-functions technique, not only creates a new road of processing metallic glasses and other metallic alloys for developing advanced materials, but also directs a novel technology of processing, grain refining, coating, welding and so on for treating materials.

  19. High-rate squeezing process of bulk metallic glasses

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Jitang

    2017-01-01

    High-rate squeezing process of bulk metallic glasses from a cylinder into an intact sheet achieved by impact loading is investigated. Such a large deformation is caused by plastic flow, accompanied with geometrical confinement, shear banding/slipping, thermo softening, melting and joining. Temperature rise during the high-rate squeezing process makes a main effect. The inherent mechanisms are illustrated. Like high-pressure torsion (HPT), equal channel angular pressing (ECAP) and surface mechanical attrition treatments (SMAT) for refining grain of metals, High-Rate Squeezing (HRS), as a multiple-functions technique, not only creates a new road of processing metallic glasses and other metallic alloys for developing advanced materials, but also directs a novel technology of processing, grain refining, coating, welding and so on for treating materials. PMID:28338092

  20. Evolution of High Tooth Replacement Rates in Sauropod Dinosaurs

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Kathlyn M.; Fisher, Daniel C.; Wilson, Jeffrey A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Tooth replacement rate can be calculated in extinct animals by counting incremental lines of deposition in tooth dentin. Calculating this rate in several taxa allows for the study of the evolution of tooth replacement rate. Sauropod dinosaurs, the largest terrestrial animals that ever evolved, exhibited a diversity of tooth sizes and shapes, but little is known about their tooth replacement rates. Methodology/Principal Findings We present tooth replacement rate, formation time, crown volume, total dentition volume, and enamel thickness for two coexisting but distantly related and morphologically disparate sauropod dinosaurs Camarasaurus and Diplodocus. Individual tooth formation time was determined by counting daily incremental lines in dentin. Tooth replacement rate is calculated as the difference between the number of days recorded in successive replacement teeth. Each tooth family in Camarasaurus has a maximum of three replacement teeth, whereas each Diplodocus tooth family has up to five. Tooth formation times are about 1.7 times longer in Camarasaurus than in Diplodocus (315 vs. 185 days). Average tooth replacement rate in Camarasaurus is about one tooth every 62 days versus about one tooth every 35 days in Diplodocus. Despite slower tooth replacement rates in Camarasaurus, the volumetric rate of Camarasaurus tooth replacement is 10 times faster than in Diplodocus because of its substantially greater tooth volumes. A novel method to estimate replacement rate was developed and applied to several other sauropodomorphs that we were not able to thin section. Conclusions/Significance Differences in tooth replacement rate among sauropodomorphs likely reflect disparate feeding strategies and/or food choices, which would have facilitated the coexistence of these gigantic herbivores in one ecosystem. Early neosauropods are characterized by high tooth replacement rates (despite their large tooth size), and derived titanosaurs and diplodocoids independently

  1. Turnover of synaptic membranes: age-related changes and modulation by dietary restriction.

    PubMed

    Ando, Susumu; Tanaka, Yasukazu; Toyoda nee Ono, Yuriko; Kon, Kazuo; Kawashima, Sei-Ichi

    2002-11-01

    We examined age-related changes in the turnover rates of synaptic membrane components that might underlie the decrease in synaptic functions in senescence. Synaptic membrane constituents were labeled in vivo with deuterium and the disappearance of the deuterated molecules from synaptic membranes was measured by mass spectrometry. The turnover rates of phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, cholesterol, and synaptophysin were all shown to slow down with aging. Dietary restriction, which is known to retard various aging processes, was found to decrease the turnover rates of membrane lipid species. Consequently, the fatty acid composition in phospholipids remained unchanged in the synaptic plasma membranes of food restricted mice. In contrast, the turnover rate of synaptophysin was accelerated under dietary restriction. This may mean that increased turnover enhances the removal of damaged proteins from membranes.

  2. Protein turnover, nitrogen balance and rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Fern, E B; Waterlow, J C

    1983-01-01

    Not many studies have been done on protein turnover during recovery from malnutrition. Some relevant information can, however, be obtained from measurements on normal growing animals, since rehabilitation and normal growth have in common a rapid rate of net protein synthesis. The key question is the extent to which net gain in protein results from an increase in synthesis or a decrease in breakdown or both. Different studies have used different methods, and all methods for measuring protein turnover have some disadvantages and sources of error. It is important to bear this in mind in evaluating the results. Consequently, part of this paper will be devoted to questions of methodology. Whole body protein turnover has been measured in children recovering from severe malnutrition. During the phase of rapid catch-up growth the rate of protein synthesis is increased. As might be expected, it increases linearly with the rate of weight gain. At the same time there is a smaller increase in the rate of protein breakdown. The resultant of these two processes is that, over and above the basal rate of protein synthesis, 1.4 grams of protein have to be synthesized for 1 gram to be laid down. Very similar results have been obtained in rapidly growing young pigs. Experimental studies on muscle growth in general confirm the conclusion that, at least in muscle, rapid growth is associated with rapid rates of protein breakdown as well as of synthesis. This has been shown in muscles of young growing rats, as well as in muscles in which hypertrophy has been induced by stretch or other stimuli. In contrast, the evidence suggests that rapid growth involves a fall in the rate of protein degradation. The magnitude of the nitrogen balance under any conditions is determined by the difference between synthesis and breakdown. In the absence of any storage of amino acids, this must be the same as the difference between intake and excretion (S - B = I - E). A question of great interest is whether

  3. High rate and stable cycling of lithium metal anode

    DOE PAGES

    Qian, Jiangfeng; Henderson, Wesley A.; Xu, Wu; ...

    2015-02-20

    Lithium (Li) metal is an ideal anode material for rechargeable batteries. However, dendritic Li growth and limited Coulombic efficiency (CE) during repeated Li deposition/stripping processes have prevented the application of this anode in rechargeable Li metal batteries, especially for use at high current densities. Here, we report that the use of highly concentrated electrolytes composed of ether solvents and the lithium bis(fluorosulfonyl)imide (LiFSI) salt enables the high rate cycling of a Li metal anode at high CE (up to 99.1 %) without dendrite growth. With 4 M LiFSI in 1,2-dimethoxyethane (DME) as the electrolyte, a Li|Li cell can be cycledmore » at high rates (10 mA cm-2) for more than 6000 cycles with no increase in the cell impedance, and a Cu|Li cell can be cycled at 4 mA cm-2 for more than 1000 cycles with an average CE of 98.4%. These excellent high rate performances can be attributed to the increased solvent coordination and increased availability of Li+ concentration in the electrolyte. Lastly, further development of this electrolyte may lead to practical applications for Li metal anode in rechargeable batteries. The fundamental mechanisms behind the high rate ion exchange and stability of the electrolytes also shine light on the stability of other electrochemical systems.« less

  4. High rate and stable cycling of lithium metal anode

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, Jiangfeng; Henderson, Wesley A.; Xu, Wu; Bhattacharya, Priyanka; Engelhard, Mark H.; Borodin, Oleg; Zhang, Jiguang

    2015-02-20

    Lithium (Li) metal is an ideal anode material for rechargeable batteries. However, dendritic Li growth and limited Coulombic efficiency (CE) during repeated Li deposition/stripping processes have prevented the application of this anode in rechargeable Li metal batteries, especially for use at high current densities. Here, we report that the use of highly concentrated electrolytes composed of ether solvents and the lithium bis(fluorosulfonyl)imide (LiFSI) salt enables the high rate cycling of a Li metal anode at high CE (up to 99.1 %) without dendrite growth. With 4 M LiFSI in 1,2-dimethoxyethane (DME) as the electrolyte, a Li|Li cell can be cycled at high rates (10 mA cm-2) for more than 6000 cycles with no increase in the cell impedance, and a Cu|Li cell can be cycled at 4 mA cm-2 for more than 1000 cycles with an average CE of 98.4%. These excellent high rate performances can be attributed to the increased solvent coordination and increased availability of Li+ concentration in the electrolyte. Lastly, further development of this electrolyte may lead to practical applications for Li metal anode in rechargeable batteries. The fundamental mechanisms behind the high rate ion exchange and stability of the electrolytes also shine light on the stability of other electrochemical systems.

  5. Role of oestrogen in the regulation of bone turnover at the menarche.

    PubMed

    Eastell, Richard

    2005-05-01

    The rise in oestrogen levels at menarche in girls is associated with a large reduction in bone turnover markers. This reduction reflects the closure of the epiphyseal growth plates, the reduction in periosteal apposition and endosteal resorption within cortical bone, and in bone remodelling within cortical and cancellous bone. Oestrogen promotes these changes, in part, by promoting apoptosis of chondrocytes in the growth plate and osteoclasts within cortical and cancellous bone. The period of early puberty is associated with an increased risk of fracture, particularly of the distal forearm, and this may be related to the high rate of bone turnover. A late menarche is a consistent risk factor for fracture and low bone mineral density in the postmenopausal period; models that might explain this association are considered.

  6. High power, high efficiency millimeter wavelength traveling wave tubes for high rate communications from deep space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dayton, James A., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    The high-power transmitters needed for high data rate communications from deep space will require a new class of compact, high efficiency traveling wave tubes (TWT's). Many of the recent TWT developments in the microwave frequency range are generically applicable to mm wave devices, in particular much of the technology of computer aided design, cathodes, and multistage depressed collectors. However, because TWT dimensions scale approximately with wavelength, mm wave devices will be physically much smaller with inherently more stringent fabrication tolerances and sensitivity to thermal dissipation.

  7. High Strain Rate Behavior of Polymer Matrix Composites Analyzed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, Robert K.; Roberts, Gary D.

    2001-01-01

    Procedures for modeling the high-speed impact of composite materials are needed for designing reliable composite engine cases that are lighter than the metal cases in current use. The types of polymer matrix composites that are likely to be used in such an application have a deformation response that is nonlinear and that varies with strain rate. To characterize and validate material models that could be used in the design of impactresistant engine cases, researchers must obtain material data over a wide variety of strain rates. An experimental program has been carried out through a university grant with the Ohio State University to obtain deformation data for a representative polymer matrix composite for strain rates ranging from quasi-static to high rates of several hundred per second. This information has been used to characterize and validate a constitutive model that was developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center.

  8. Study of High Strain Rate Response of Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilat, Amos

    2003-01-01

    The objective of the research was to continue the experimental study of the effect of strain rate on mechanical response (deformation and failure) of epoxy resins and carbon fibers/epoxy matrix composites, and to initiate a study of the effects of temperature by developing an elevated temperature test. The experimental data provide the information needed for NASA scientists for the development of a nonlinear, rate dependent deformation and strength models for composites that can subsequently be used in design. This year effort was directed into testing the epoxy resin. Three types of epoxy resins were tested in tension and shear at various strain rates that ranges from 5 x 10(exp -5), to 1000 per second. Pilot shear experiments were done at high strain rate and an elevated temperature of 80 C. The results show that all, the strain rate, the mode of loading, and temperature significantly affect the response of epoxy.

  9. High-Strain Rate Testing of Gun Propellants

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-12-01

    specimen is loaded beyond the elastic range. Instrumentation of the bars allows recording of the strain history in the bars during the test event. The...strain history on the input bar gives a record of the strain rate history in the sample. )The output bar strain history is proportional to the stress... history in the sample.) The data were compared to the results reported in the literature of earlier high strain rate tests on the same propellants. The

  10. Measuring Staff Turnover in Nursing Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castle, Nicholas G.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: In this study the levels of staff turnover reported in the nursing home literature (1990-2003) are reviewed, as well as the definitions of turnover used in these prior studies. With the use of primary data collected from 354 facilities, the study addresses the various degrees of bias that result, depending on how staff turnover is defined…

  11. High-Strain-Rate Compression Testing of Ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shazly, Mostafa; Prakash, Vikas; Lerch, Bradley A.

    2006-01-01

    In the present study a modified split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) was employed to study the effect of strain rate on the dynamic material response of ice. Disk-shaped ice specimens with flat, parallel end faces were either provided by Dartmouth College (Hanover, NH) or grown at Case Western Reserve University (Cleveland, OH). The SHPB was adapted to perform tests at high strain rates in the range 60 to 1400/s at test temperatures of -10 and -30 C. Experimental results showed that the strength of ice increases with increasing strain rates and this occurs over a change in strain rate of five orders of magnitude. Under these strain rate conditions the ice microstructure has a slight influence on the strength, but it is much less than the influence it has under quasi-static loading conditions. End constraint and frictional effects do not influence the compression tests like they do at slower strain rates, and therefore the diameter/thickness ratio of the samples is not as critical. The strength of ice at high strain rates was found to increase with decreasing test temperatures. Ice has been identified as a potential source of debris to impact the shuttle; data presented in this report can be used to validate and/or develop material models for ice impact analyses for shuttle Return to Flight efforts.

  12. Semi-solid electrodes having high rate capability

    DOEpatents

    Chiang, Yet-Ming; Duduta, Mihai; Holman, Richard; Limthongkul, Pimpa; Tan, Taison

    2015-11-10

    Embodiments described herein relate generally to electrochemical cells having high rate capability, and more particularly to devices, systems and methods of producing high capacity and high rate capability batteries having relatively thick semi-solid electrodes. In some embodiments, an electrochemical cell includes an anode, a semi-solid cathode that includes a suspension of an active material and a conductive material in a liquid electrolyte, and an ion permeable membrane disposed between the anode and the cathode. The semi-solid cathode has a thickness in the range of about 250 .mu.m-2,500 .mu.m, and the electrochemical cell has an area specific capacity of at least 5 mAh/cm.sup.2 at a C-rate of C/2.

  13. Semi-solid electrodes having high rate capability

    DOEpatents

    Chiang, Yet-Ming; Duduta, Mihai; Holman, Richard; Limthongkul, Pimpa; Tan, Taison

    2016-07-05

    Embodiments described herein relate generally to electrochemical cells having high rate capability, and more particularly to devices, systems and methods of producing high capacity and high rate capability batteries having relatively thick semi-solid electrodes. In some embodiments, an electrochemical cell includes an anode, a semi-solid cathode that includes a suspension of an active material and a conductive material in a liquid electrolyte, and an ion permeable membrane disposed between the anode and the cathode. The semi-solid cathode has a thickness in the range of about 250 .mu.m-2,500 .mu.m, and the electrochemical cell has an area specific capacity of at least 5 mAh/cm.sup.2 at a C-rate of C/2.

  14. Online aging study of a high rate MRPC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jie; Wang, Yi; Feng, S. Q.; Xie, Bo; Lv, Pengfei; Wang, Fuyue; Guo, Baohong; Han, Dong; Li, Yuanjing

    2016-05-01

    With the constant increase of accelerator luminosity, the rate requirements of MRPC detectors have become very important, and the aging characteristics of the detector have to be studied meticulously. An online aging test system has been set up in our lab, and in this paper the setup of the system is described and the performance stability of a high-rate MRPC studied over a long running time under a high luminosity environment. The high rate MRPC was irradiated by X-rays for 36 days and the accumulated charge density reached 0.1 C/cm2. No obvious performance degradation was observed for the detector. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11420101004, 11461141011, 11275108), Ministry of Science and Technology (2015CB856905)

  15. Quantifying T Lymphocyte Turnover

    PubMed Central

    De Boer, Rob J.; Perelson, Alan S.

    2013-01-01

    Peripheral T cell populations are maintained by production of naive T cells in the thymus, clonal expansion of activated cells, cellular self-renewal (or homeostatic proliferation), and density dependent cell life spans. A variety of experimental techniques have been employed to quantify the relative contributions of these processes. In modern studies lymphocytes are typically labeled with 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine (BrdU), deuterium, or the fluorescent dye carboxy-fluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester (CFSE), their division history has been studied by monitoring telomere shortening and the dilution of T cell receptor excision circles (TRECs) or the dye CFSE, and clonal expansion has been documented by recording changes in the population densities of antigen specific cells. Proper interpretation of such data in terms of the underlying rates of T cell production, division, and death has proven to be notoriously difficult and involves mathematical modeling. We review the various models that have been developed for each of these techniques, discuss which models seem most appropriate for what type of data, reveal open problems that require better models, and pinpoint how the assumptions underlying a mathematical model may influence the interpretation of data. Elaborating various successful cases where modeling has delivered new insights in T cell population dynamics, this review provides quantitative estimates of several processes involved in the maintenance of naive and memory, CD4+ and CD8+ T cell pools in mice and men. PMID:23313150

  16. Flexible high-repetition-rate ultrafast fiber laser

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Dong; Liu, Xueming; Sun, Zhipei; Lu, Hua; Han, Dongdong; Wang, Guoxi; Wang, Fengqiu

    2013-01-01

    High-repetition-rate pulses have widespread applications in the fields of fiber communications, frequency comb, and optical sensing. Here, we have demonstrated high-repetition-rate ultrashort pulses in an all-fiber laser by exploiting an intracavity Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI) as a comb filter. The repetition rate of the laser can be tuned flexibly from about 7 to 1100 GHz by controlling the optical path difference between the two arms of the MZI. The pulse duration can be reduced continuously from about 10.1 to 0.55 ps with the spectral width tunable from about 0.35 to 5.7 nm by manipulating the intracavity polarization controller. Numerical simulations well confirm the experimental observations and show that filter-driven four-wave mixing effect, induced by the MZI, is the main mechanism that governs the formation of the high-repetition-rate pulses. This all-fiber-based laser is a simple and low-cost source for various applications where high-repetition-rate pulses are necessary. PMID:24226153

  17. Can Good Principals Keep Teachers in Disadvantaged Schools? Linking Principal Effectiveness to Teacher Satisfaction and Turnover in Hard-to-Staff Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grissom, Jason A.

    2011-01-01

    Background: High rates of teacher turnover likely mean greater school instability, disruption of curricular cohesiveness, and a continual need to hire inexperienced teachers, who typically are less effective, as replacements for teachers who leave. Unfortunately, research consistently finds that teachers who work in schools with large numbers of…

  18. High strain rate deformation of NiAl

    SciTech Connect

    Maloy, S.A.; Gray, G.T. III; Darolia, R.

    1994-07-01

    NiAl is a potential high temperature structural material. Applications for which NiAl is being considered (such as rotating components in jet engines) requires knowledge of mechanical properties over a wide range of strain rates. Single crystal NiAl (stoichiometric and Ni 49.75Al 0.25Fe) has been deformed in compression along [100] at strain rates of 0.001, 0.1/s and 2000/s and temperatures of 76,298 and 773K. <111> slip was observed after 76K testing at a strain rate of 0.001/s and 298K testing at a strain rate of 2000/s. Kinking was observed after deformation at 298K and a strain rate of 0.001/s and sometimes at 298 K and a strain rate of 0.1/s. Strain hardening rates of 8200 and 4000 MPa were observed after 773 and 298K testing respectively, at a strain rate of 2000/s. Results are discussed in reference to resulting dislocation substructure.

  19. Temporal pitch perception at high rates in cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Kong, Ying-Yee; Carlyon, Robert P

    2010-05-01

    A recent study reported that a group of Med-El COMBI 40+CI (cochlear implant) users could, in a forced-choice task, detect changes in the rate of a pulse train for rates higher than the 300 pps "upper limit" commonly reported in the literature [Kong, Y.-Y., et al. (2009). J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 125, 1649-1657]. The present study further investigated the upper limit of temporal pitch in the same group of CI users on three tasks [pitch ranking, rate discrimination, and multidimensional scaling (MDS)]. The patterns of results were consistent across the three tasks and all subjects could follow rate changes above 300 pps. Two subjects showed exceptional ability to follow temporal pitch change up to about 900 pps. Results from the MDS study indicated that, for the two listeners tested, changes in pulse rate over the range of 500-840 pps were perceived along a perceptual dimension that was orthogonal to the place of excitation. Some subjects showed a temporal pitch reversal at rates beyond their upper limit of pitch and some showed a reversal within a small range of rates below the upper limit. These results are discussed in relation to the possible neural bases for temporal pitch processing at high rates.

  20. Calcium thionyl chloride high-rate reserve cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peled, E.; Meitav, A.; Brand, M.

    1981-09-01

    The goal is to assess the high-rate capability of a reserve type calcium-Ca(AlCl4) thionyl chloride cell and to demonstrate its excellent safety features. The good discharge performance at a discharge time of 10-15 min, together with the excellent safety features of the cell, is seen as warranting further investigations of this system as a candidate for high-rate multicell reserved and nonreserved battery applications. A test is described proving that it is practically impossible to 'charge' this cell.

  1. High removal rate laser-based coating removal system

    DOEpatents

    Matthews, Dennis L.; Celliers, Peter M.; Hackel, Lloyd; Da Silva, Luiz B.; Dane, C. Brent; Mrowka, Stanley

    1999-11-16

    A compact laser system that removes surface coatings (such as paint, dirt, etc.) at a removal rate as high as 1000 ft.sup.2 /hr or more without damaging the surface. A high repetition rate laser with multiple amplification passes propagating through at least one optical amplifier is used, along with a delivery system consisting of a telescoping and articulating tube which also contains an evacuation system for simultaneously sweeping up the debris produced in the process. The amplified beam can be converted to an output beam by passively switching the polarization of at least one amplified beam. The system also has a personal safety system which protects against accidental exposures.

  2. Bone and bone turnover.

    PubMed

    Crofton, Patricia M

    2009-01-01

    Children with cancer are exposed to multiple influences that may adversely affect bone health. Some treatments have direct deleterious effects on bone whilst others may have indirect effects mediated through various endocrine abnormalities. Most clinical outcome studies have concentrated on survivors of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). There is now good evidence that earlier treatment protocols that included cranial irradiation with doses of 24 Gy or greater may result in growth hormone deficiency and low bone mineral density (BMD) in the lumbar spine and femoral neck. Under current protocols, BMD decreases during intensive chemotherapy and fracture risk increases. Although total body BMD may eventually return to normal after completion of chemotherapy, lumbar spine trabecular BMD may remain low for many years. The implications for long-term fracture risk are unknown. Risk factors for low BMD include high dose methotrexate, higher cumulative doses of glucocorticoids, male gender and low physical activity. BMD outcome in non-ALL childhood cancers has been less well studied but there is evidence that survivors of childhood brain or bone tumours, and survivors of bone marrow transplants for childhood malignancy, all have a high risk of long-term osteopenia. Long-term follow-up is required, with appropriate treatment of any endocrine abnormalities identified.

  3. Proteome turnover in the green alga Ostreococcus tauri by time course 15N metabolic labeling mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Martin, Sarah F; Munagapati, Vijaya S; Salvo-Chirnside, Eliane; Kerr, Lorraine E; Le Bihan, Thierry

    2012-01-01

    Protein synthesis and degradation determine the cellular levels of proteins, and their control hence enables organisms to respond to environmental change. Experimentally, these are little known proteome parameters; however, recently, SILAC-based mass spectrometry studies have begun to quantify turnover in the proteomes of cell lines, yeast, and animals. Here, we present a proteome-scale method to quantify turnover and calculate synthesis and degradation rate constants of individual proteins in autotrophic organisms such as algae and plants. The workflow is based on the automated analysis of partial stable isotope incorporation with (15)N. We applied it in a study of the unicellular pico-alga Ostreococcus tauri and observed high relative turnover in chloroplast-encoded ATPases (0.42-0.58% h(-1)), core photosystem II proteins (0.34-0.51% h(-1)), and RbcL (0.47% h(-1)), while nuclear-encoded RbcS2 is more stable (0.23% h(-1)). Mitochondrial targeted ATPases (0.14-0.16% h(-1)), photosystem antennae (0.09-0.14% h(-1)), and histones (0.07-0.1% h(-1)) were comparatively stable. The calculation of degradation and synthesis rate constants k(deg) and k(syn) confirms RbcL as the bulk contributor to overall protein turnover. This study performed over 144 h of incorporation reveals dynamics of protein complex subunits as well as isoforms targeted to different organelles.

  4. Ultra High-Rate Germanium (UHRGe) Modeling Status Report

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, Glen A.; Rodriguez, Douglas C.

    2012-06-07

    The Ultra-High Rate Germanium (UHRGe) project at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is conducting research to develop a high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector that can provide both the high resolution typical of germanium and high signal throughput. Such detectors may be beneficial for a variety of potential applications ranging from safeguards measurements of used fuel to material detection and verification using active interrogation techniques. This report describes some of the initial radiation transport modeling efforts that have been conducted to help guide the design of the detector as well as a description of the process used to generate the source spectrum for the used fuel application evaluation.

  5. Nursing Home Staff Turnover: Impact on Nursing Home Compare Quality Measures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castle, Nicholas G.; Engberg, John; Men, Aiju

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: We used data from a large sample of nursing homes to examine the association between staff turnover and quality. Design and Methods: The staff turnover measures came from primary data collected from 2,840 nursing homes in 2004 (representing a 71% response rate). Data collection included measures for nurse aides, licensed practical nurses,…

  6. Teacher Turnover: Examining Exit Attrition, Teaching Area Transfer, and School Migration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boe, Erling E.; Cook, Lynne H.; Sunderland, Robert J.

    2008-01-01

    The purposes of this research were to quantify trends in three components of teacher turnover and to investigate claims of excessive teacher turnover as the predominant source of teacher shortages. Attrition and teaching area transfer rates were comparable in special and general education and increased substantially from 1991-1992 to 2000-2001.…

  7. Machining and grinding: High rate deformation in practice

    SciTech Connect

    Follansbee, P.S.

    1993-04-01

    Machining and grinding are well-established material-working operations involving highly non-uniform deformation and failure processes. A typical machining operation is characterized by uncertain boundary conditions (e.g.,surface interactions), three-dimensional stress states, large strains, high strain rates, non-uniform temperatures, highly localized deformations, and failure by both nominally ductile and brittle mechanisms. While machining and grinding are thought to be dominated by empiricism, even a cursory inspection leads one to the conclusion that this results more from necessity arising out of the complicated and highly interdisciplinary nature of the processes than from the lack thereof. With these conditions in mind, the purpose of this paper is to outline the current understanding of strain rate effects in metals.

  8. Machining and grinding: High rate deformation in practice

    SciTech Connect

    Follansbee, P.S.

    1993-01-01

    Machining and grinding are well-established material-working operations involving highly non-uniform deformation and failure processes. A typical machining operation is characterized by uncertain boundary conditions (e.g.,surface interactions), three-dimensional stress states, large strains, high strain rates, non-uniform temperatures, highly localized deformations, and failure by both nominally ductile and brittle mechanisms. While machining and grinding are thought to be dominated by empiricism, even a cursory inspection leads one to the conclusion that this results more from necessity arising out of the complicated and highly interdisciplinary nature of the processes than from the lack thereof. With these conditions in mind, the purpose of this paper is to outline the current understanding of strain rate effects in metals.

  9. High frame rate CCD camera with fast optical shutter

    SciTech Connect

    Yates, G.J.; McDonald, T.E. Jr.; Turko, B.T.

    1998-09-01

    A high frame rate CCD camera coupled with a fast optical shutter has been designed for high repetition rate imaging applications. The design uses state-of-the-art microchannel plate image intensifier (MCPII) technology fostered/developed by Los Alamos National Laboratory to support nuclear, military, and medical research requiring high-speed imagery. Key design features include asynchronous resetting of the camera to acquire random transient images, patented real-time analog signal processing with 10-bit digitization at 40--75 MHz pixel rates, synchronized shutter exposures as short as 200pS, sustained continuous readout of 512 x 512 pixels per frame at 1--5Hz rates via parallel multiport (16-port CCD) data transfer. Salient characterization/performance test data for the prototype camera are presented, temporally and spatially resolved images obtained from range-gated LADAR field testing are included, an alternative system configuration using several cameras sequenced to deliver discrete numbers of consecutive frames at effective burst rates up to 5GHz (accomplished by time-phasing of consecutive MCPII shutter gates without overlap) is discussed. Potential applications including dynamic radiography and optical correlation will be presented.

  10. Characteristics of a magnetorheological fluid in high shear rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, Takehito; Abe, Isao; Inoue, Akio; Iwasaki, Akihiko; Okada, Katsuhiko

    2016-11-01

    The information on the properties of the magnetorheological fluid (MRF) in high shear rate, in particular a shear rate greater than 10 000 s-1, is important for the design of devices utilizing the MRF with very narrow fluid gaps, which are used in high-speed applications. However, very little research has been conducted on this subject. The objective of this study is to provide such information. MRF-140CG (Lord Corp.) is chosen as an example MRF. The plastic viscosity, thermal sensitivity, and durability of the fluid, especially under a shear rate greater than 10 000 s-1, are reported. The plastic viscosity is almost constant under a wide range of magnetic input. In contrast, MRF-140CG is sensitive to the shear rate; its sensitivity is relatively low at high shear rates. The thermal sensitivity shows negative values, and the effect of temperature decreases with increasing magnetic input. According to the result of the duration test at 30 000 s-1 and at a temperature of 120 °C, the lifetime dissipation energy is 5.48 MJ ml-1.

  11. Turnover of microbial groups and cell components in soil: 13C analysis of cellular biomarkers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunina, Anna; Dippold, Michaela; Glaser, Bruno; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2017-01-01

    Microorganisms regulate the carbon (C) cycle in soil, controlling the utilization and recycling of organic substances. To reveal the contribution of particular microbial groups to C utilization and turnover within the microbial cells, the fate of 13C-labelled glucose was studied under field conditions. Glucose-derived 13C was traced in cytosol, amino sugars and phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) pools at intervals of 3, 10 and 50 days after glucose addition into the soil. 13C enrichment in PLFAs ( ˜ 1.5 % of PLFA C at day 3) was an order of magnitude greater than in cytosol, showing the importance of cell membranes for initial C utilization. The 13C enrichment in amino sugars of living microorganisms at day 3 accounted for 0.57 % of total C pool; as a result, we infer that the replacement of C in cell wall components is 3 times slower than that of cell membranes. The C turnover time in the cytosol (150 days) was 3 times longer than in PLFAs (47 days). Consequently, even though the cytosol pool has the fastest processing rates compared to other cellular compartments, intensive recycling of components here leads to a long C turnover time. Both PLFA and amino-sugar profiles indicated that bacteria dominated in glucose utilization. 13C enrichment decreased with time for bacterial cell membrane components, but it remained constant or even increased for filamentous microorganisms. 13C enrichment of muramic acid was the 3.5 times greater than for galactosamine, showing a more rapid turnover of bacterial cell wall components compared to fungal. Thus, bacteria utilize a greater proportion of low-molecular-weight organic substances, whereas filamentous microorganisms are responsible for further C transformations. Thus, tracing 13C in cellular compounds with contrasting turnover rates elucidated the role of microbial groups and their cellular compartments in C utilization and recycling in soil. The results also reflect that microbial C turnover is not restricted to the death or

  12. Turnover: strategies for staff retention.

    PubMed

    SnowAntle, S

    1990-01-01

    This discussion has focused on a number of areas where organizations may find opportunities for more effectively managing employee retention. Given the multitude of causes and consequences, there is no one quick fix. Effective management of employee retention requires assessment of the entire human resources process, that is, recruitment, selection, job design, compensation, supervision, work conditions, etc. Regular and systematic diagnosis of turnover and implementation of multiple strategies and evaluation are needed (Mobley, 1982).

  13. User microprogrammable processors for high data rate telemetry preprocessing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pugsley, J. H.; Ogrady, E. P.

    1973-01-01

    The use of microprogrammable processors for the preprocessing of high data rate satellite telemetry is investigated. The following topics are discussed along with supporting studies: (1) evaluation of commercial microprogrammable minicomputers for telemetry preprocessing tasks; (2) microinstruction sets for telemetry preprocessing; and (3) the use of multiple minicomputers to achieve high data processing. The simulation of small microprogrammed processors is discussed along with examples of microprogrammed processors.

  14. High-rate deformation of nanocrystalline iron and copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinani, A. B.; Shpeizman, V. V.; Vlasov, A. S.; Zil'berbrand, E. L.; Kozachuk, A. I.

    2016-11-01

    Stress-strain curves are recorded during a high-speed impact and slow loading for nanocrystalline and coarse-grained iron and copper. The strain-rate sensitivity is determined as a function of the grain size and the strain. It is shown that the well-known difference between the variations of the strain-rate sensitivity of the yield strength with the grain size in fcc and bcc metals can be extended to other strain dependences: the strain-rate sensitivity of flow stresses in iron decreases with increasing strain, and that in copper increases. This difference also manifests itself in different slopes of the dependence of the strain-rate sensitivity on the grain size when the strain changes.

  15. Performance Evaluation of High-Rate GPS Seismometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, T.; Ebinuma, T.

    2011-12-01

    High-rate GPS observations with higher than once-per-second sampling are getting increasingly important for seismology. Unlike a traditional seismometer which measures short period vibration using accelerometers, the GPS receiver can measure its antenna position directly and record long period seismic wave and permanent displacements as well. The high-rate GPS observations are expected to provide new insights in understanding the whole aspects of earthquake process. In this study, we investigated dynamic characteristics of the high-rate GPS receivers capable of outputting the observations at up to 50Hz. This higher output rate, however, doesn't mean higher dynamics range of the GPS observations. Since many GPS receivers are designed for low dynamics applications, such as static survey, personal and car navigation, the bandwidth of the loop filters tend to be narrower in order to reduce the noise level of the observations. The signal tracking loop works like a low-pass filter. Thus the narrower the bandwidth, the lower the dynamics range. In order to extend this dynamical limit, high-rate GPS receivers might use wider loop bandwidth for phase tracking. In this case, the GPS observations are degraded by higher noise level in return. In addition to the limitation of the loop bandwidth, higher acceleration due to earthquake may cause the steady state error in the signal tracking loop. As a result, kinematic solutions experience undesirable position offsets, or the receiver may lose the GPS signals in an extreme case. In order to examine those effects for the high-rate GPS observations, we made an experiment using a GPS signal simulator and several geodetic GPS receivers, including Trimble Net-R8, NovAtel OEMV, Topcon Net-G3A, and Javad SIGMA-G2T. We set up the zero-baseline simulation scenario in which the rover receiver was vibrating in a periodic motion with the frequency from 1Hz to 10Hz around the reference station. The amplitude of the motion was chosen to provide

  16. High Reported Spontaneous Stuttering Recovery Rates: Fact or Fiction?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramig, Peter R.

    1993-01-01

    Contact after 6 to 8 years with families of 21 children who were diagnosed as stuttering but did not receive fluency intervention services found that almost all subjects still had a stuttering problem. Results dispute the high spontaneous recovery rates reported in the literature and support the value of early intervention. (Author/DB)

  17. Distance Education: Why Are the Attrition Rates so High?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moody, Johnette

    2004-01-01

    Distance education is being hailed as the next best thing to sliced bread. But is it really? Many problems exist with distance-delivered courses. Everything from course development and management to the student not being adequately prepared are problematic and result in high attrition rates in distance-delivered courses. Students initially…

  18. Binary interactions with high accretion rates onto main sequence stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiber, Sagiv; Schreier, Ron; Soker, Noam

    2016-07-01

    Energetic outflows from main sequence stars accreting mass at very high rates might account for the powering of some eruptive objects, such as merging main sequence stars, major eruptions of luminous blue variables, e.g., the Great Eruption of Eta Carinae, and other intermediate luminosity optical transients (ILOTs; red novae; red transients). These powerful outflows could potentially also supply the extra energy required in the common envelope process and in the grazing envelope evolution of binary systems. We propose that a massive outflow/jets mediated by magnetic fields might remove energy and angular momentum from the accretion disk to allow such high accretion rate flows. By examining the possible activity of the magnetic fields of accretion disks, we conclude that indeed main sequence stars might accrete mass at very high rates, up to ≈ 10-2 M ⊙ yr-1 for solar type stars, and up to ≈ 1 M ⊙ yr-1 for very massive stars. We speculate that magnetic fields amplified in such extreme conditions might lead to the formation of massive bipolar outflows that can remove most of the disk's energy and angular momentum. It is this energy and angular momentum removal that allows the very high mass accretion rate onto main sequence stars.

  19. Design of abrasive tool for high-rate grinding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilinykh, AS

    2017-02-01

    The experimental studies aimed to design heavy-duty abrasive wheels for high-rate grinding are presented. The design of abrasive wheels with the working speed up to 100 m/s is based on the selection of optimized material composition and manufacture technology of the wheels.

  20. Plant respirometer enables high resolution of oxygen consumption rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, D. L.

    1966-01-01

    Plant respirometer permits high resolution of relatively small changes in the rate of oxygen consumed by plant organisms undergoing oxidative metabolism in a nonphotosynthetic state. The two stage supply and monitoring system operates by a differential pressure transducer and provides a calibrated output by digital or analog signals.

  1. Cassini High Rate Detector V16.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Economou, T.; DiDonna, P.

    2016-05-01

    The High Rate Detector (HRD) from the University of Chicago is an independent part of the CDA instrument on the Cassini Orbiter that measures the dust flux and particle mass distribution of dust particles hitting the HRD detectors. This data set includes all data from the HRD through December 31, 2015. Please refer to Srama et al. (2004) for a detailed HRD description.

  2. Predicting the College Attendance Rate of Graduating High School Classes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoover, Donald R.

    1990-01-01

    An important element of school counseling is providing assessments on the collective future needs and activities of a graduating school class. The College Attendance Rate (CAR) is defined here as the proportion of seniors graduating from a given high school, during a given year, that will enroll full-time at an academic college sometime during the…

  3. Digital approach to high rate gamma-ray spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Korolczuk, Stefan; Mianowski, Slawomir; Rzadkiewicz, Jacek; Sibczynski, Pawel; Swiderski, Lukasz; Szewinski, Jaroslaw; Zychor, Izabella

    2015-07-01

    Basic concepts and preliminary results of creating high rate digital spectrometry system using efficient ADCs and latest FPGA are presented as well as a comparison with commercially available devices. The possibility to use such systems, coupled to scintillators, in plasma experiments is discussed. (authors)

  4. Corrected High-Frame Rate Anchored Ultrasound with Software Alignment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Amanda L.; Finch, Kenneth B.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To improve lingual ultrasound imaging with the Corrected High Frame Rate Anchored Ultrasound with Software Alignment (CHAUSA; Miller, 2008) method. Method: A production study of the IsiXhosa alveolar click is presented. Articulatory-to-acoustic alignment is demonstrated using a Tri-Modal 3-ms pulse generator. Images from 2 simultaneous…

  5. Childhood Onset Schizophrenia: High Rate of Visual Hallucinations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    David, Christopher N.; Greenstein, Deanna; Clasen, Liv; Gochman, Pete; Miller, Rachel; Tossell, Julia W.; Mattai, Anand A.; Gogtay, Nitin; Rapoport, Judith L.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To document high rates and clinical correlates of nonauditory hallucinations in childhood onset schizophrenia (COS). Method: Within a sample of 117 pediatric patients (mean age 13.6 years), diagnosed with COS, the presence of auditory, visual, somatic/tactile, and olfactory hallucinations was examined using the Scale for the Assessment…

  6. Cassini High Rate Detector V14.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Economou, T.; DiDonna, P.

    2014-06-01

    The High Rate Detector (HRD) from the University of Chicago is an independent part of the CDA instrument on the Cassini Orbiter that measures the dust flux and particle mass distribution of dust particles hitting the HRD detectors. This data set includes all data from the HRD through December 31, 2013. Please refer to Srama et al. (2004) for a detailed HRD description.

  7. READOUT ELECTRONICS FOR A HIGH-RATE CSC DETECTOR

    SciTech Connect

    OCONNOR,P.; GRATCHEV,V.; KANDASAMY,A.; POLYCHRONAKOS,V.; TCHERNIATINE,V.; PARSONS,J.; SIPPACH,W.

    1999-09-25

    A readout system for a high-rate muon Cathode Strip Chamber (CSC) is described. The system, planned for use in the forward region of the ATLAS muon spectrometer, uses two custom CMOS integrated circuits to achieve good position resolution at a flux of up to 2,500 tracks/cm{sup 2}/s.

  8. Trends in High School Graduation Rates. Research Brief. Volume 0710

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romanik, Dale; Froman, Terry

    2008-01-01

    This Research Brief addresses an outcome measure that is of paramount importance to senior high schools--graduation rate. Nationwide a student drops out of school approximately every nine seconds. The significance of this issue locally is exemplified by a recent American Civil Liberties Union filing of a class action law suit against the Palm…

  9. High Interview Response Rates: Much Ado about Nothing?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berdie, Doug R.

    The question of how high a response rate is needed in order for telephone surveys to obtain data that accurately represent the entire sample, was investigated via reevaluating results of three previously published studies and reporting on three 1989 studies for the first time. The three previous studies indicated that, if the sample…

  10. Principal Turnover: Upheaval and Uncertainty in Charter Schools?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ni, Yongmei; Sun, Min; Rorrer, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Informed by literature on labor market and school choice, this study aims to examine the dynamics of principal career movements in charter schools by comparing principal turnover rates and patterns between charter schools and traditional public schools. Research Methods/Approach: This study uses longitudinal data on Utah principals and…

  11. Cytoplasmic mRNA turnover and ageing

    PubMed Central

    Borbolis, Fivos; Syntichaki, Popi

    2015-01-01

    Messenger RNA (mRNA) turnover that determines the lifetime of cytoplasmic mRNAs is a means to control gene expression under both normal and stress conditions, whereas its impact on ageing and age-related disorders has just become evident. Gene expression control is achieved at the level of the mRNA clearance as well as mRNA stability and accessibility to other molecules. All these processes are regulated by cis-acting motifs and trans-acting factors that determine the rates of translation and degradation of transcripts. Specific messenger RNA granules that harbor the mRNA decay machinery or various factors, involved in translational repression and transient storage of mRNAs, are also part of the mRNA fate regulation. Their assembly and function can be modulated to promote stress resistance to adverse conditions and over time affect the ageing process and the lifespan of the organism. Here, we provide insights into the complex relationships of ageing modulators and mRNA turnover mechanisms. PMID:26432921

  12. Transformational leadership moderates the relationship between emotional exhaustion and turnover intention among community mental health providers.

    PubMed

    Green, Amy E; Miller, Elizabeth A; Aarons, Gregory A

    2013-08-01

    Public sector mental health care providers are at high risk for burnout and emotional exhaustion which negatively affect job performance and client satisfaction with services. Few studies have examined ways to reduce these associations, but transformational leadership may have a positive effect. We examine the relationships between transformational leadership, emotional exhaustion, and turnover intention in a sample of 388 community mental health providers. Emotional exhaustion was positively related to turnover intention, and transformational leadership was negatively related to both emotional exhaustion and turnover intention. Transformational leadership moderated the relationship between emotional exhaustion and turnover intention, indicating that having a transformational leader may buffer the effects of providers' emotional exhaustion on turnover intention. Investing in transformational leadership development for supervisors could reduce emotional exhaustion and turnover among public sector mental health providers.

  13. High frame rate photoacoustic imaging using clinical ultrasound system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivasubramanian, Kathyayini; Pramanik, Manojit

    2016-03-01

    Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) is a potential hybrid imaging modality which is gaining attention in the field of medical imaging. Typically a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser is used to excite the tissue and generate photoacoustic signals. But, they are not suitable for clinical applications owing to their high cost, large size. Also, their low pulse repetition rate (PRR) of few tens of hertz prevents them from being used in real-time PAT. So, there is a growing need for an imaging system capable of real-time imaging for various clinical applications. In this work, we are using a nanosecond pulsed laser diode as an excitation source and a clinical ultrasound imaging system to obtain the photoacoustic imaging. The excitation laser is ~803 nm in wavelength with energy of ~1.4 mJ per pulse. So far, the reported frame rate for photoacoustic imaging is only a few hundred Hertz. We have demonstrated up to 7000 frames per second framerate in photoacoustic imaging (B-mode) and measured the flow rate of fast moving obje ct. Phantom experiments were performed to test the fast imaging capability and measure the flow rate of ink solution inside a tube. This fast photoacoustic imaging can be used for various clinical applications including cardiac related problems, where the blood flow rate is quite high, or other dynamic studies.

  14. High strain rate behavior of pure metals at elevated temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Testa, Gabriel; Bonora, Nicola; Ruggiero, Andrew; Iannitti, Gianluca; Domenico, Gentile

    2013-06-01

    In many applications and technology processes, such as stamping, forging, hot working etc., metals and alloys are subjected to elevated temperature and high strain rate deformation process. Characterization tests, such as quasistatic and dynamic tension or compression test, and validation tests, such as Taylor impact and DTE - dynamic tensile extrusion -, provide the experimental base of data for constitutive model validation and material parameters identification. Testing material at high strain rate and temperature requires dedicated equipment. In this work, both tensile Hopkinson bar and light gas gun where modified in order to allow material testing under sample controlled temperature conditions. Dynamic tension tests and Taylor impact tests, at different temperatures, on high purity copper (99.98%), tungsten (99.95%) and 316L stainless steel were performed. The accuracy of several constitutive models (Johnson and Cook, Zerilli-Armstrong, etc.) in predicting the observed material response was verified by means of extensive finite element analysis (FEA).

  15. Magnetic Implosion for Novel Strength Measurements at High Strain Rates

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, H.; Preston, D.L.; Bartsch, R.R.; Bowers, R.L.; Holtkamp, D.; Wright, B.L.

    1998-10-19

    Recently Lee and Preston have proposed to use magnetic implosions as a new method for measuring material strength in a regime of large strains and high strain rates inaccessible to previously established techniques. By its shockless nature, this method avoids the intrinsic difficulties associated with an earlier approach using high explosives. The authors illustrate how the stress-strain relation for an imploding liner can be obtained by measuring the velocity and temperature history of its inner surface. They discuss the physical requirements that lead us to a composite liner design applicable to different test materials, and also compare the code-simulated prediction with the measured data for the high strain-rate experiments conducted recently at LANL. Finally, they present a novel diagnostic scheme that will enable us to remove the background in the pyrometric measurement through data reduction.

  16. High repetition rate plasma mirror device for attosecond science

    SciTech Connect

    Borot, A.; Douillet, D.; Iaquaniello, G.; Lefrou, T.; Lopez-Martens, R.; Audebert, P.; Geindre, J.-P.

    2014-01-15

    This report describes an active solid target positioning device for driving plasma mirrors with high repetition rate ultra-high intensity lasers. The position of the solid target surface with respect to the laser focus is optically monitored and mechanically controlled on the nm scale to ensure reproducible interaction conditions for each shot at arbitrary repetition rate. We demonstrate the target capabilities by driving high-order harmonic generation from plasma mirrors produced on glass targets with a near-relativistic intensity few-cycle pulse laser system operating at 1 kHz. During experiments, residual target surface motion can be actively stabilized down to 47 nm (root mean square), which ensures sub-300-as relative temporal stability of the plasma mirror as a secondary source of coherent attosecond extreme ultraviolet radiation in pump-probe experiments.

  17. Systematic Uncertainties in High-Rate Germanium Data

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, Andrew J.; Fast, James E.; Fulsom, Bryan G.; Pitts, William K.; VanDevender, Brent A.; Wood, Lynn S.

    2016-10-06

    For many nuclear material safeguards inspections, spectroscopic gamma detectors are required which can achieve high event rates (in excess of 10^6 s^-1) while maintaining very good energy resolution for discrimination of neighboring gamma signatures in complex backgrounds. Such spectra can be useful for non-destructive assay (NDA) of spent nuclear fuel with long cooling times, which contains many potentially useful low-rate gamma lines, e.g., Cs-134, in the presence of a few dominating gamma lines, such as Cs-137. Detectors in use typically sacrifice energy resolution for count rate, e.g., LaBr3, or visa versa, e.g., CdZnTe. In contrast, we anticipate that beginning with a detector with high energy resolution, e.g., high-purity germanium (HPGe), and adapting the data acquisition for high throughput will be able to achieve the goals of the ideal detector. In this work, we present quantification of Cs-134 and Cs-137 activities, useful for fuel burn-up quantification, in fuel that has been cooling for 22.3 years. A segmented, planar HPGe detector is used for this inspection, which has been adapted for a high-rate throughput in excess of 500k counts/s. Using a very-high-statistic spectrum of 2.4*10^11 counts, isotope activities can be determined with very low statistical uncertainty. However, it is determined that systematic uncertainties dominate in such a data set, e.g., the uncertainty in the pulse line shape. This spectrum offers a unique opportunity to quantify this uncertainty and subsequently determine required counting times for given precision on values of interest.

  18. High rate constitutive modeling of aluminium alloy tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salisbury, C. P.; Worswick, M. J.; Mayer, R.

    2006-08-01

    As the need for fuel efficient automobiles increases, car designers are investigating light-weight materials for automotive bodies that will reduce the overall automobile weight. Aluminium alloy tube is a desirable material to use in automotive bodies due to its light weight. However, aluminium suffers from lower formability than steel and its energy absorption ability in a crash event after a forming operation is largely unknown. As part of a larger study on the relationship between crashworthiness and forming processes, constitutive models for 3mm AA5754 aluminium tube were developed. A nominal strain rate of 100/s is often used to characterize overall automobile crash events, whereas strain rates on the order of 1000/s can occur locally. Therefore, tests were performed at quasi-static rates using an Instron test fixture and at strain rates of 500/s to 1500/s using a tensile split Hopkinson bar. High rate testing was then conducted at rates of 500/s, 1000/s and 1500/s at 21circC, 150circC and 300circC. The generated data was then used to determine the constitutive parameters for the Johnson-Cook and Zerilli-Armstrong material models.

  19. High strain-rate model for fiber-reinforced composites

    SciTech Connect

    Aidun, J.B.; Addessio, F.L.

    1995-07-01

    Numerical simulations of dynamic uniaxial strain loading of fiber-reinforced composites are presented that illustrate the wide range of deformation mechanisms that can be captured using a micromechanics-based homogenization technique as the material model in existing continuum mechanics computer programs. Enhancements to the material model incorporate high strain-rate plastic response, elastic nonlinearity, and rate-dependent strength degradation due to material damage, fiber debonding, and delamination. These make the model relevant to designing composite structural components for crash safety, armor, and munitions applications.

  20. Demonstration of a high repetition rate capillary discharge waveguide

    SciTech Connect

    Gonsalves, A. J. Pieronek, C.; Daniels, J.; Bulanov, S. S.; Waldron, W. L.; Mittelberger, D. E.; Leemans, W. P.; Liu, F.; Antipov, S.; Butler, J. E.; Bobrova, N. A.; Sasorov, P. V.

    2016-01-21

    A hydrogen-filled capillary discharge waveguide operating at kHz repetition rates is presented for parameters relevant to laser plasma acceleration (LPA). The discharge current pulse was optimized for erosion mitigation with laser guiding experiments and MHD simulation. Heat flow simulations and measurements showed modest temperature rise at the capillary wall due to the average heat load at kHz repetition rates with water-cooled capillaries, which is promising for applications of LPAs such as high average power radiation sources.

  1. Highly Challenging Balance Program Reduces Fall Rate in Parkinson Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sparrow, David; DeAngelis, Tamara R.; Hendron, Kathryn; Thomas, Cathi A.; Saint-Hilaire, Marie; Ellis, Terry

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose There is a paucity of effective treatment options to reduce falls in Parkinson’s disease (PD). Although a variety of rehabilitative approaches have been shown to improve balance, evidence of a reduction in falls has been mixed. Prior balance trials suggest that programs with highly challenging exercises had superior outcomes. We investigated the effects of a theoretically driven, progressive, highly challenging group exercise program on fall rate, balance, and fear of falling. Methods Twenty-three subjects with PD participated in this randomized cross-over trial. Subjects were randomly allocated to 3 months of active balance exercises or usual care followed by the reverse. During the active condition, subjects participated in a progressive, highly challenging group exercise program twice weekly for 90 minutes. Outcomes included a change in fall rate over the 3-month active period and differences in balance (Mini-BESTest), and fear of falling (Falls Efficacy Scale-International (FES-I)) between active and usual care conditions. Results: The effect of time on falls was significant (regression coefficient = −0.015 per day, p<0.001). The estimated rate ratio comparing incidence rates at time points one month apart was 0.632 (95% CI 0.524 to 0.763). Thus, there was an estimated 37% decline in fall rate per month (95% CI 24% to 48%). Improvements were also observed on the Mini-BESTest (p=0.037) and FES-I (p=0.059). Discussion and Conclusions The results of this study show that a theoretically based, highly challenging, and progressive exercise program was effective in reducing falls, improving balance, and reducing fear of falling in PD. PMID:26655100

  2. Palaeohistological Evidence for Ancestral High Metabolic Rate in Archosaurs.

    PubMed

    Legendre, Lucas J; Guénard, Guillaume; Botha-Brink, Jennifer; Cubo, Jorge

    2016-11-01

    Metabolic heat production in archosaurs has played an important role in their evolutionary radiation during the Mesozoic, and their ancestral metabolic condition has long been a matter of debate in systematics and palaeontology. The study of fossil bone histology provides crucial information on bone growth rate, which has been used to indirectly investigate the evolution of thermometabolism in archosaurs. However, no quantitative estimation of metabolic rate has ever been performed on fossils using bone histological features. Moreover, to date, no inference model has included phylogenetic information in the form of predictive variables. Here we performed statistical predictive modeling using the new method of phylogenetic eigenvector maps on a set of bone histological features for a sample of extant and extinct vertebrates, to estimate metabolic rates of fossil archosauromorphs. This modeling procedure serves as a case study for eigenvector-based predictive modeling in a phylogenetic context, as well as an investigation of the poorly known evolutionary patterns of metabolic rate in archosaurs. Our results show that Mesozoic theropod dinosaurs exhibit metabolic rates very close to those found in modern birds, that archosaurs share a higher ancestral metabolic rate than that of extant ectotherms, and that this derived high metabolic rate was acquired at a much more inclusive level of the phylogenetic tree, among non-archosaurian archosauromorphs. These results also highlight the difficulties of assigning a given heat production strategy (i.e., endothermy, ectothermy) to an estimated metabolic rate value, and confirm findings of previous studies that the definition of the endotherm/ectotherm dichotomy may be ambiguous.

  3. Hispanic High School Graduates Pass Whites in Rate of College Enrollment: High School Drop-out Rate at Record Low

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fry, Richard; Taylor, Paul

    2013-01-01

    A record seven-in-ten (69%) Hispanic high school graduates in the class of 2012 enrolled in college that fall, two percentage points higher than the rate (67%) among their white counterparts, according to a Pew Research Center analysis of new data from the U.S. Census Bureau. This milestone is the result of a long-term increase in Hispanic…

  4. Vitreous bond CBN high speed and high material removal rate grinding of ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Shih, A.J.; Grant, M.B.; Yonushonis, T.M.; Morris, T.O.; McSpadden, S.B.

    1998-08-01

    High speed (up to 127 m/s) and high material removal rate (up to 10 mm{sup 3}/s/mm) grinding experiments using a vitreous bond CBN wheel were conducted to investigate the effects of material removal rate, wheel speed, dwell time and truing speed ratio on cylindrical grinding of silicon nitride and zirconia. Experimental results show that the high grinding wheel surface speed can reduce the effective chip thickness, lower grinding forces, enable high material removal rate grinding and achieve a higher G-ratio. The radial feed rate was increased to as high as 0.34 {micro}m/s for zirconia and 0.25 {micro}m/s for silicon nitride grinding to explore the advantage of using high wheel speed for cost-effective high material removal rate grinding of ceramics.

  5. A high-rate PCI-based telemetry processor system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turri, R.

    2002-07-01

    The high performances reached by the Satellite on-board telemetry generation and transmission, as consequently, will impose the design of ground facilities with higher processing capabilities at low cost to allow a good diffusion of these ground station. The equipment normally used are based on complex, proprietary bus and computing architectures that prevent the systems from exploiting the continuous and rapid increasing in computing power available on market. The PCI bus systems now allow processing of high-rate data streams in a standard PC-system. At the same time the Windows NT operating system supports multitasking and symmetric multiprocessing, giving the capability to process high data rate signals. In addition, high-speed networking, 64 bit PCI-bus technologies and the increase in processor power and software, allow creating a system based on COTS products (which in future may be easily and inexpensively upgraded). In the frame of EUCLID RTP 9.8 project, a specific work element was dedicated to develop the architecture of a system able to acquire telemetry data of up to 600 Mbps. Laben S.p.A - a Finmeccanica Company -, entrusted of this work, has designed a PCI-based telemetry system making possible the communication between a satellite down-link and a wide area network at the required rate.

  6. Ectomycorrhizal fungal mycelia turnover in a longleaf pine forest.

    PubMed

    Hendricks, Joseph J; Mitchell, Robert J; Kuehn, Kevin A; Pecot, Stephen D

    2016-03-01

    Elucidation of the patterns and controls of carbon (C) flow and nitrogen (N) cycling in forests has been hindered by a poor understanding of ectomycorrhizal fungal mycelia (EFM) dynamics. In this study, EFM standing biomass (based on soil ergosterol concentrations), production (based on ergosterol accrual in ingrowth cores), and turnover rate (the quotient of annual production and average standing biomass estimates) were assessed in a 25-yr-old longleaf pine (Pinus palustris) plantation where C flow was manipulated by foliar scorching and N fertilization for 5 yr before study initiation. In the controls, EFM standing biomass was 30 ± 7 g m(-2) , production was 279 ± 63 g m(-2)  yr(-1) , and turnover rate was 10 ± 3 times yr(-1) . The scorched × fertilized treatment had significantly higher EFM standing biomass (38 ± 8 g m(-2) ), significantly lower production (205 ± 28 g m(-2)  yr(-1) ), and a trend of decreased turnover rate (6 ± 1 times yr(-1) ). The EFM turnover estimates, which are among the first reported for natural systems, indicate that EFM are a dynamic component of ecosystems, and that conventional assessments have probably underestimated the role of EFM in C flow and nutrient cycling.

  7. High Pressure Burn Rate Measurements on an Ammonium Perchlorate Propellant

    SciTech Connect

    Glascoe, E A; Tan, N

    2010-04-21

    High pressure deflagration rate measurements of a unique ammonium perchlorate (AP) based propellant are required to design the base burn motor for a Raytheon weapon system. The results of these deflagration rate measurements will be key in assessing safety and performance of the system. In particular, the system may experience transient pressures on the order of 100's of MPa (10's kPSI). Previous studies on similar AP based materials demonstrate that low pressure (e.g. P < 10 MPa or 1500 PSI) burn rates can be quite different than the elevated pressure deflagration rate measurements (see References and HPP results discussed herein), hence elevated pressure measurements are necessary in order understand the deflagration behavior under relevant conditions. Previous work on explosives have shown that at 100's of MPa some explosives will transition from a laminar burn mechanism to a convective burn mechanism in a process termed deconsolidative burning. The resulting burn rates that are orders-of-magnitude faster than the laminar burn rates. Materials that transition to the deconsolidative-convective burn mechanism at elevated pressures have been shown to be considerably more violent in confined heating experiments (i.e. cook-off scenarios). The mechanisms of propellant and explosive deflagration are extremely complex and include both chemical, and mechanical processes, hence predicting the behavior and rate of a novel material or formulation is difficult if not impossible. In this work, the AP/HTPB based material, TAL-1503 (B-2049), was burned in a constant volume apparatus in argon up to 300 MPa (ca. 44 kPSI). The burn rate and pressure were measured in-situ and used to calculate a pressure dependent burn rate. In general, the material appears to burn in a laminar fashion at these elevated pressures. The experiment was reproduced multiple times and the burn rate law using the best data is B = (0.6 {+-} 0.1) x P{sup (1.05{+-}0.02)} where B is the burn rate in mm/s and

  8. Modeling Large-Strain, High-Rate Deformation in Metals

    SciTech Connect

    Lesuer, D R; Kay, G J; LeBlanc, M M

    2001-07-20

    The large strain deformation response of 6061-T6 and Ti-6Al-4V has been evaluated over a range in strain rates from 10{sup -4} s{sup -1} to over 10{sup 4} s{sup -1}. The results have been used to critically evaluate the strength and damage components of the Johnson-Cook (JC) material model. A new model that addresses the shortcomings of the JC model was then developed and evaluated. The model is derived from the rate equations that represent deformation mechanisms active during moderate and high rate loading. Another model that accounts for the influence of void formation on yield and flow behavior of a ductile metal (the Gurson model) was also evaluated. The characteristics and predictive capabilities of these models are reviewed.

  9. Nitrogen stress affects the turnover and size of nitrogen pools supplying leaf growth in a grass.

    PubMed

    Lehmeier, Christoph Andreas; Wild, Melanie; Schnyder, Hans

    2013-08-01

    The effect of nitrogen (N) stress on the pool system supplying currently assimilated and (re)mobilized N for leaf growth of a grass was explored by dynamic ¹⁵N labeling, assessment of total and labeled N import into leaf growth zones, and compartmental analysis of the label import data. Perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne) plants, grown with low or high levels of N fertilization, were labeled with ¹⁵NO₃⁻/¹⁴NO₃⁻ from 2 h to more than 20 d. In both treatments, the tracer time course in N imported into the growth zones fitted a two-pool model (r² > 0.99). This consisted of a "substrate pool," which received N from current uptake and supplied the growth zone, and a recycling/mobilizing "store," which exchanged with the substrate pool. N deficiency halved the leaf elongation rate, decreased N import into the growth zone, lengthened the delay between tracer uptake and its arrival in the growth zone (2.2 h versus 0.9 h), slowed the turnover of the substrate pool (half-life of 3.2 h versus 0.6 h), and increased its size (12.4 μg versus 5.9 μg). The store contained the equivalent of approximately 10 times (low N) and approximately five times (high N) the total daily N import into the growth zone. Its turnover agreed with that of protein turnover. Remarkably, the relative contribution of mobilization to leaf growth was large and similar (approximately 45%) in both treatments. We conclude that turnover and size of the substrate pool are related to the sink strength of the growth zone, whereas the contribution of the store is influenced by partitioning between sinks.

  10. Dynamic High-Temperature Characterization of an Iridium Alloy in Compression at High Strain Rates

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Bo; Nelson, Kevin; Lipinski, Ronald J.; Bignell, John L.; Ulrich, G. B.; George, E. P.

    2014-06-01

    Iridium alloys have superior strength and ductility at elevated temperatures, making them useful as structural materials for certain high-temperature applications. However, experimental data on their high-temperature high-strain-rate performance are needed for understanding high-speed impacts in severe elevated-temperature environments. Kolsky bars (also called split Hopkinson bars) have been extensively employed for high-strain-rate characterization of materials at room temperature, but it has been challenging to adapt them for the measurement of dynamic properties at high temperatures. Current high-temperature Kolsky compression bar techniques are not capable of obtaining satisfactory high-temperature high-strain-rate stress-strain response of thin iridium specimens investigated in this study. We analyzed the difficulties encountered in high-temperature Kolsky compression bar testing of thin iridium alloy specimens. Appropriate modifications were made to the current high-temperature Kolsky compression bar technique to obtain reliable compressive stress-strain response of an iridium alloy at high strain rates (300 – 10000 s-1) and temperatures (750°C and 1030°C). Uncertainties in such high-temperature high-strain-rate experiments on thin iridium specimens were also analyzed. The compressive stress-strain response of the iridium alloy showed significant sensitivity to strain rate and temperature.

  11. High rates of evolution preceded the origin of birds.

    PubMed

    Puttick, Mark N; Thomas, Gavin H; Benton, Michael J

    2014-05-01

    The origin of birds (Aves) is one of the great evolutionary transitions. Fossils show that many unique morphological features of modern birds, such as feathers, reduction in body size, and the semilunate carpal, long preceded the origin of clade Aves, but some may be unique to Aves, such as relative elongation of the forelimb. We study the evolution of body size and forelimb length across the phylogeny of coelurosaurian theropods and Mesozoic Aves. Using recently developed phylogenetic comparative methods, we find an increase in rates of body size and body size dependent forelimb evolution leading to small body size relative to forelimb length in Paraves, the wider clade comprising Aves and Deinonychosauria. The high evolutionary rates arose primarily from a reduction in body size, as there were no increased rates of forelimb evolution. In line with a recent study, we find evidence that Aves appear to have a unique relationship between body size and forelimb dimensions. Traits associated with Aves evolved before their origin, at high rates, and support the notion that numerous lineages of paravians were experimenting with different modes of flight through the Late Jurassic and Early Cretaceous.

  12. HIGH RATES OF EVOLUTION PRECEDED THE ORIGIN OF BIRDS

    PubMed Central

    Puttick, Mark N; Thomas, Gavin H; Benton, Michael J; Polly, P David

    2014-01-01

    The origin of birds (Aves) is one of the great evolutionary transitions. Fossils show that many unique morphological features of modern birds, such as feathers, reduction in body size, and the semilunate carpal, long preceded the origin of clade Aves, but some may be unique to Aves, such as relative elongation of the forelimb. We study the evolution of body size and forelimb length across the phylogeny of coelurosaurian theropods and Mesozoic Aves. Using recently developed phylogenetic comparative methods, we find an increase in rates of body size and body size dependent forelimb evolution leading to small body size relative to forelimb length in Paraves, the wider clade comprising Aves and Deinonychosauria. The high evolutionary rates arose primarily from a reduction in body size, as there were no increased rates of forelimb evolution. In line with a recent study, we find evidence that Aves appear to have a unique relationship between body size and forelimb dimensions. Traits associated with Aves evolved before their origin, at high rates, and support the notion that numerous lineages of paravians were experimenting with different modes of flight through the Late Jurassic and Early Cretaceous. PMID:24471891

  13. Investigation of high-rate lithium-thionyl chloride cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, Catherine A.; Gust, Steven; Farrington, Michael D.; Lockwood, Judith A.; Donaldson, George J.

    Chemical analysis of a commercially produced high-rate D-size lithium-thionyl cell was carried out, as a function of rate of discharge (1 ohm and 5 ohms), depth of discharge, and temperature (25 C and -40 C), using specially developed methods for identifying suspected minor cell products or impurities which may effect cell performance. These methods include a product-retrieval system which involves solvent extraction to enhance the recovery of suspected semivolatile minor chemicals, and methods of quantitative GC analysis of volatile and semivolatile products. The nonvolatile products were analyzed by wet chemical methods. The results of the analyses indicate that the predominant discharge reaction in this cell is 4Li + 2SOCl2 going to 4LiCl + S + SO2, with SO2 formation decreasing towards the end of cell life (7 to 12 Ah). The rate of discharge had no effect on the product distribution. Upon discharge of the high-rate cell at -40 C, one cell exploded, and all others exhibited overheating and rapid internal pressure rise when allowed to warm up to room temperature.

  14. Small cryptopredators contribute to high predation rates on coral reefs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goatley, Christopher H. R.; González-Cabello, Alonso; Bellwood, David R.

    2017-03-01

    Small fishes suffer high mortality rates on coral reefs, primarily due to predation. Although studies have identified the predators of early post-settlement fishes, the predators of small cryptobenthic fishes remain largely unknown. We therefore used a series of mesocosm experiments with natural habitat and cryptobenthic fish communities to identify the impacts of a range of small potential predators, including several invertebrates, on prey fish populations. While there was high variability in predation rates, many members of the cryptobenthic fish community act as facultative cryptopredators, being prey when small and piscivores when larger. Surprisingly, we also found that smashing mantis shrimps may be important fish predators. Our results highlight the diversity of the predatory community on coral reefs and identify previously unknown trophic links in these complex ecosystems.

  15. Failure Rate Data Analysis for High Technology Components

    SciTech Connect

    L. C. Cadwallader

    2007-07-01

    Understanding component reliability helps designers create more robust future designs and supports efficient and cost-effective operations of existing machines. The accelerator community can leverage the commonality of its high-vacuum and high-power systems with those of the magnetic fusion community to gain access to a larger database of reliability data. Reliability studies performed under the auspices of the International Energy Agency are the result of an international working group, which has generated a component failure rate database for fusion experiment components. The initial database work harvested published data and now analyzes operating experience data. This paper discusses the usefulness of reliability data, describes the failure rate data collection and analysis effort, discusses reliability for components with scarce data, and points out some of the intersections between magnetic fusion experiments and accelerators.

  16. Elastoplastic behavior of copper upon high-strain-rate deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chembarisova, R. G.

    2015-06-01

    The deformation behavior of copper under conditions of high-strain-rate deformation has been investigated based on the model of elastoplastic medium with allowance for the kinetics of plastic deformation. Data have been obtained on the evolution of the dislocation subsystem, namely, on the average dislocation density, density of mobile dislocations, velocity of dislocation slip, concentration of deformation-induced vacancies, and density of twins. The coefficient of the annihilation of screw dislocations has been estimated depending on pressure and temperature. It has been shown that severe shear stresses that arise upon high-strain-rate deformation can lead to a significant increase in the concentration of vacancies. The time of the dislocation annihilation upon their nonconservative motion has been estimated. It has been shown that this time is much greater than the time of the deformation process in the samples, which makes it possible to exclude the annihilation of dislocations upon their nonconservative motion from the active mechanisms of deformation.

  17. High-rate diamond deposition by microwave plasma CVD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xianglin

    In this dissertation, the growth of CVD (Chemical Vapor Deposition) diamond thin films is studied both theoretically and experimentally. The goal of this research is to deposit high quality HOD (Highly Oriented Diamond) films with a growth rate greater than 1 mum/hr. For the (100)-oriented HOD films, the growth rate achieved by the traditional process is only 0.3 mum/hr while the theoretical limit is ˜0.45 mum/hr. This research increases the growth rate up to 5.3 mum/hr (with a theoretical limit of ˜7 mum/hr) while preserving the crystal quality. This work builds a connection between the theoretical study of the CVD process and the experimental research. The study is extended from the growth of regular polycrystalline diamond to highly oriented diamond (HOD) films. For the increase of the growth rate of regular polycrystalline diamond thin films, a scaling growth model developed by Goodwin is introduced in details to assist in the understanding of the MPCVD (Microwave Plasma CVD) process. Within the Goodwin's scaling model, there are only four important sub-processes for the growth of diamond: surface modification, adsorption, desorption, and incorporation. The factors determining the diamond growth rate and film quality are discussed following the description of the experimental setup and process parameters. Growth rate and crystal quality models are reviewed to predict and understand the experimental results. It is shown that the growth rate of diamond can be increased with methane input concentration and the amount of atomic hydrogen (by changing the total pressure). It is crucial to provide enough atomic hydrogen to conserve crystal quality of the deposited diamond film. The experimental results demonstrate that for a fixed methane concentration, there is a minimum pressure for growth of good diamond. Similarly, for a fixed total pressure, there is a maximum methane concentration for growth of good diamond, and this maximum methane concentration increases

  18. Adjunct payload for ISS high-rate communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, W. Carl; Cleave, Robert; Ford, David

    1999-01-01

    An adjunct payload on commercial geosynchronous satellites is developed for ISS and similar high-rate communications. The technical parameters of this payload are set forth and bounds on user fees are established. Depending on the financial arrangements-e.g., development funds, long-term lease agreement, other value offered, commercial subscriptions-the adjunct payload can be a viable option for ISS communications service.

  19. Data Feature Extraction for High-Rate 3-Phase Data

    SciTech Connect

    2016-10-18

    This algorithm processes high-rate 3-phase signals to identify the start time of each signal and estimate its envelope as data features. The start time and magnitude of each signal during the steady state is also extracted. The features can be used to detect abnormal signals. This algorithm is developed to analyze Exxeno's 3-phase voltage and current data recorded from refrigeration systems to detect device failure or degradation.

  20. Semi-solid electrodes having high rate capability

    DOEpatents

    Chiang, Yet-Ming; Duduta, Mihai; Holman, Richard; Limthongkul, Pimpa; Tan, Taison

    2016-06-07

    Embodiments described herein relate generally to electrochemical cells having high rate capability, and more particularly to devices, systems and methods of producing high capacity and high rate capability batteries having relatively thick semi-solid electrodes. In some embodiments, an electrochemical cell includes an anode and a semi-solid cathode. The semi-solid cathode includes a suspension of an active material of about 35% to about 75% by volume of an active material and about 0.5% to about 8% by volume of a conductive material in a non-aqueous liquid electrolyte. An ion-permeable membrane is disposed between the anode and the semi-solid cathode. The semi-solid cathode has a thickness of about 250 .mu.m to about 2,000 .mu.m, and the electrochemical cell has an area specific capacity of at least about 7 mAh/cm.sup.2 at a C-rate of C/4. In some embodiments, the semi-solid cathode slurry has a mixing index of at least about 0.9.

  1. Whole body and tissue cholesterol turnover in the baboon

    SciTech Connect

    Dell, R.B.; Mott, G.E.; Jackson, E.M.; Ramakrishnan, R.; Carey, K.D.; McGill, H.C. Jr.; Goodman, D.S.

    1985-03-01

    Cholesterol turnover was studied in four baboons by injecting (/sup 14/C)cholesterol 186 days and (/sup 3/H)cholesterol 4 days before necropsy, and fitting a two- or three-pool model to the resulting specific activity-time data. At necropsy, cholesterol mass and specific activity were determined for the total body and for many tissues. The principal aim of this study was to estimate the extent of cholesterol synthesis in the side pools of the model, by computing the amount of side pool synthesis needed to equal the measured total body cholesterol. Central pool synthesis varied from 61 to 89% of the total cholesterol production rate. Moreover, the finding that the measured total body cholesterol fell within the range obtained from the kinetic analysis by using reasonable assumptions, provides evidence for the physiological validity of the model. A second aim of this study was to explore cholesterol turnover in various tissues. A pool model predicts that rapidly turning over tissues will have higher specific activities at early times and lower specific activities at later times after injection of tracer relative to slowly turning over tissues, except where significant synthesis occurs. Results in all four baboons were similar. Turnover rates for the different tissues loosely fell into three groups which were turning over at fast, intermediate, and slow rates. Finally, the magnitude of variation of cholesterol specific activity was moderate for several distributed tissues (fat, muscle, arteries, and the alimentary tract), but was small for liver. Cholesterol turnover in serial biopsies of skin, muscle, and fat could, however, be fitted with a single pool to estimate tissue turnover rates.

  2. Nitrogen turnover in soil and global change.

    PubMed

    Ollivier, Julien; Töwe, Stefanie; Bannert, Andrea; Hai, Brigitte; Kastl, Eva-Maria; Meyer, Annabel; Su, Ming Xia; Kleineidam, Kristina; Schloter, Michael

    2011-10-01

    Nitrogen management in soils has been considered as key to the sustainable use of terrestrial ecosystems and a protection of major ecosystem services. However, the microorganisms driving processes like nitrification, denitrification, N-fixation and mineralization are highly influenced by changing climatic conditions, intensification of agriculture and the application of new chemicals to a so far unknown extent. In this review, the current knowledge concerning the influence of selected scenarios of global change on the abundance, diversity and activity of microorganisms involved in nitrogen turnover, notably in agricultural and grassland soils, is summarized and linked to the corresponding processes. In this context, data are presented on nitrogen-cycling processes and the corresponding microbial key players during ecosystem development and changes in functional diversity patterns during shifts in land use. Furthermore, the impact of increased temperature, carbon dioxide and changes in precipitation regimes on microbial nitrogen turnover is discussed. Finally, some examples of the effects of pesticides and antibiotics after application to soil for selected processes of nitrogen transformation are also shown.

  3. Mechanical Solder Characterisation Under High Strain Rate Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, Karsten; Roellig, Mike; Wiese, Steffen; Wolter, Klaus-Juergen

    2010-11-01

    Using a setup for high strain rate tensile experiments the mechanical behavior of two lead-free tin based solders is investigated. The first alloy is SnAg1.3Cu0.5Ni. The second alloy has a higher silver content but no addition of Ni. Solder joints are the main electrical, thermal and mechanical interconnection technology on the first and second interconnection level. With the recent rise of 3D packaging technologies many novel interconnection ideas are proposed with innovative or visionary nature. Copper pillar, stud bump, intermetallic (SLID) and even spring like joints are presented in a number of projects. However, soldering will remain one of the important interconnect technologies. Knowing the mechanical properties of solder joints is important for any reliability assessment, especially when it comes to vibration and mechanical shock associated with mobile applications. Taking the ongoing miniaturization and linked changes in solder joint microstructure and mechanical behavior into account the need for experimental work on that issue is not satisfied. The tests are accomplished utilizing miniature bulk specimens to match the microstructure of real solder joints as close as possible. The dogbone shaped bulk specimens have a crucial diameter of 1 mm, which is close to BGA solder joints. Experiments were done in the strain rate range from 20 s-1 to 600 s-1. Solder strengthening has been observed with increased strain rate for both SAC solder alloys. The yield stress increases by about 100% in the investigated strain rate range. The yield level differs strongly. A high speed camera system was used to assist the evaluation process of the stress and strain data. Besides the stress and strain data extracted from the experiment the ultimate fracture strain is determined and the fracture surfaces are evaluated using SEM technique considering rate dependency.

  4. Copper-deficient mice have higher cardiac norepinephrine turnover

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, A.M.; Prohaska, J.R. )

    1989-02-01

    Male Swiss albino mice were studied at 6 weeks of age. Their dams were fed a copper-deficient diet (modified AIN-76A) starting 4 days after birth and given deionized water (-Cu) or water with CuSO{sub 4} added (+Cu) (20 {mu}g Cu/ml). When 3 weeks of age mice were weaned and housed in stainless steel cages on the respective treatment of their dams. Turnover of norepinephrine (NE) was studied in 8 experiments using 2 separate techniques. The first procedure used {alpha}-methyl-p-tyrosine methyl ester (300 mg/kg i.p.) to inhibit tyrosine hydroxlase activity. The loss of residual NE was determined by HPLC with electrochemical detection. Regression lines were constructed and fractional turnover (%/h) and calculated turnover (ng/g/h) were determined for heart, cerebellum and adrenal gland. In 4 experiments loss of NE in cerebellum of -Cu ad +Cu mice was equivalent. Loss of NE from adrenal gland could not be detected in the 8 h time course. Loss of NE, both fractional turnover and calculated turnover, from heart of -Cu mice was 4-5 fold higher compared to +Cu controls. A second method using m- hydroxybenzylhydrazine (NSD-1015) (100 mg/kg i.p.), which inhibits aromatic amino acid decarboxylase, confirmed the results. For all 4 experiments the cardiac accumulation of L-DOPA (measured by HPLC) was faster in -Cu mice compared to controls. The higher turnover rate of NE in heart and perhaps other sympathetic nerves may contribute to the higher urinary NE output observed previously.

  5. Method for generating high-energy and high repetition rate laser pulses from CW amplifiers

    DOEpatents

    Zhang, Shukui

    2013-06-18

    A method for obtaining high-energy, high repetition rate laser pulses simultaneously using continuous wave (CW) amplifiers is described. The method provides for generating micro-joule level energy in pico-second laser pulses at Mega-hertz repetition rates.

  6. Counting High School Graduates when Graduates Count: Measuring Graduation Rates under the High Stakes of NCLB.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swanson, Christopher B.; Chaplin, Duncan

    This paper addresses the debate over high school graduation rates, examining how the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 (NCLB) has redirected attention toward graduation rates. It introduces provisions of the NCLB pertaining to high school graduation, discussing implications from a measurement perspective, and presents strategies for developing a…

  7. Soman-induced seizures impair norepinephrine-stimulated phosphoinositide turnover

    SciTech Connect

    Filbert, M.G.; Phann, S.; Forster, J.; Ballough, G.P.; Cann, F.J.

    1993-05-13

    Seizure activity increases turnover of phosphoinositide bisphosphate (PIP2). Turnover of PIP2 is thought to be modulated by neurotransmitter interactions. The effect of soman-induced seizures on neurotransmitter-stimulated PIP 2 turnover was examined in rats. Thirty minutes after induction of seizure activity, rats were euthanized and slices prepared from the hippocampus or cerebral cortex were incubated with myo-(2-3H) inositol for incorporation into phospholipids. Hydrolysis of phosphoinositides was determined by measuring the accumulation of (3H) inositol-l-phosphate (IP1) in the presence of LiCl. Carbachol, norepinephrine (NE) and high K+ increased accumulation of IP1 in slices from control rats. GABA was without effect on IP1 accumulation but potentiated the stimulation of PIP, hydrolysis by NE. NE-stimulated IP1 accumulation in slices from rats undergoing seizures was significantly reduced. GABA potentiation of the NE-stimulated hydrolysis was also reduced.

  8. Protein Turnover during in vitro Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qiyao; Chang, Zhen; Oliveira, Gisele; Xiong, Maiyer; Smith, Lloyd M.; Frey, Brian L.; Welham, Nathan V.

    2015-01-01

    Repopulating acellular biological scaffolds with phenotypically appropriate cells is a promising approach for regenerating functional tissues and organs. Under this tissue engineering paradigm, reseeded cells are expected to remodel the scaffold by active protein synthesis and degradation; however, the rate and extent of this remodeling remain largely unknown. Here, we present a technique to measure dynamic proteome changes during in vitro remodeling of decellularized tissue by reseeded cells, using vocal fold mucosa as the model system. Decellularization and recellularization were optimized, and a stable isotope labeling strategy was developed to differentiate remnant proteins constituting the original scaffold from proteins newly synthesized by reseeded cells. Turnover of matrix and cellular proteins and the effects of cell-scaffold interaction were elucidated. This technique sheds new light on in vitro tissue remodeling and the process of tissue regeneration, and is readily applicable to other tissue and organ systems. PMID:26724458

  9. Dynamic Strength of Metals at High Pressure and Strain Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, Thomas

    2006-03-01

    A new approach to materials science at very high pressures and strain rates has been developed on the Omega laser, using a ramped plasma piston drive. A laser drives an ablative shock through a solid plastic reservoir where it unloads at the rear free surface, expands across a vacuum gap, and stagnates on the metal sample under study. This produces a gently increasing ram pressure, compressing the sample nearly isentropically. The peak pressure on the sample, diagnosed with VISAR measurements, can be varied by adjusting the laser energy and pulse length, gap size, and reservoir density, and obeys a simple scaling relation.^1 This has been demonstrated at OMEGA at pressures to 200 GPa in Al foils. In an important application, using in-flight x-ray radiography, the material strength of solid-state samples at high pressure can be inferred by measuring the reductions in the growth rates (stabilization) of Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) unstable interfaces. RT instability measurements of solid of Al-6061-T6 ^2 and vanadium, at pressures of 20-100 GPa, and strain rates of 10^6 to 10^8 s-1, show clear material strength effects. Modelling results for two constitutive strength models -- Steinberg-Guinan and Preston-Tonks-Wallace, show enhanced dynamic strength that may be correlated with a high-strain-rate, phono-drag mechanism. Data, modeling details and future prospects for this project using the National Ignition Facility laser, will be presented. [1] J. Edwards et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 92, 075002 (2004). [2] K. T. Lorenz et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 056309 (2005). This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by the University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract W-7405-Eng-48.

  10. Scale dependence of rock friction at high work rate.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Futoshi; Fukuyama, Eiichi; Mizoguchi, Kazuo; Takizawa, Shigeru; Xu, Shiqing; Kawakata, Hironori

    2015-12-10

    Determination of the frictional properties of rocks is crucial for an understanding of earthquake mechanics, because most earthquakes are caused by frictional sliding along faults. Prior studies using rotary shear apparatus revealed a marked decrease in frictional strength, which can cause a large stress drop and strong shaking, with increasing slip rate and increasing work rate. (The mechanical work rate per unit area equals the product of the shear stress and the slip rate.) However, those important findings were obtained in experiments using rock specimens with dimensions of only several centimetres, which are much smaller than the dimensions of a natural fault (of the order of 1,000 metres). Here we use a large-scale biaxial friction apparatus with metre-sized rock specimens to investigate scale-dependent rock friction. The experiments show that rock friction in metre-sized rock specimens starts to decrease at a work rate that is one order of magnitude smaller than that in centimetre-sized rock specimens. Mechanical, visual and material observations suggest that slip-evolved stress heterogeneity on the fault accounts for the difference. On the basis of these observations, we propose that stress-concentrated areas exist in which frictional slip produces more wear materials (gouge) than in areas outside, resulting in further stress concentrations at these areas. Shear stress on the fault is primarily sustained by stress-concentrated areas that undergo a high work rate, so those areas should weaken rapidly and cause the macroscopic frictional strength to decrease abruptly. To verify this idea, we conducted numerical simulations assuming that local friction follows the frictional properties observed on centimetre-sized rock specimens. The simulations reproduced the macroscopic frictional properties observed on the metre-sized rock specimens. Given that localized stress concentrations commonly occur naturally, our results suggest that a natural fault may lose its

  11. High Dose-Rate Versus Low Dose-Rate Brachytherapy for Lip Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Ghadjar, Pirus; Bojaxhiu, Beat; Simcock, Mathew; Terribilini, Dario; Isaak, Bernhard; Gut, Philipp; Wolfensberger, Patrick; Broemme, Jens O.; Geretschlaeger, Andreas; Behrensmeier, Frank; Pica, Alessia; Aebersold, Daniel M.

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: To analyze the outcome after low-dose-rate (LDR) or high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy for lip cancer. Methods and Materials: One hundred and three patients with newly diagnosed squamous cell carcinoma of the lip were treated between March 1985 and June 2009 either by HDR (n = 33) or LDR brachytherapy (n = 70). Sixty-eight patients received brachytherapy alone, and 35 received tumor excision followed by brachytherapy because of positive resection margins. Acute and late toxicity was assessed according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events 3.0. Results: Median follow-up was 3.1 years (range, 0.3-23 years). Clinical and pathological variables did not differ significantly between groups. At 5 years, local recurrence-free survival, regional recurrence-free survival, and overall survival rates were 93%, 90%, and 77%. There was no significant difference for these endpoints when HDR was compared with LDR brachytherapy. Forty-two of 103 patients (41%) experienced acute Grade 2 and 57 of 103 patients (55%) experienced acute Grade 3 toxicity. Late Grade 1 toxicity was experienced by 34 of 103 patients (33%), and 5 of 103 patients (5%) experienced late Grade 2 toxicity; no Grade 3 late toxicity was observed. Acute and late toxicity rates were not significantly different between HDR and LDR brachytherapy. Conclusions: As treatment for lip cancer, HDR and LDR brachytherapy have comparable locoregional control and acute and late toxicity rates. HDR brachytherapy for lip cancer seems to be an effective treatment with acceptable toxicity.

  12. Development of a high-rate submerged anaerobic membrane bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, I; Gao, W J; Liao, B Q; Cumin, J; Dagnew, M; Hong, Y

    2017-04-04

    Typically, anaerobic membrane bioreactors are operated at an organic loading rate (OLR) less than 10 kg chemical oxygen demand (COD)/m(3 )d. This paper discusses the development and performance of a high-rate submerged anaerobic membrane bioreactor (SAnMBR) for a high-strength synthetic industrial wastewater treatment. An OLR as high as 41 kg COD/m(3) d was achieved with excellent COD removal efficiency (>99%). The membrane was operated at constant fluxes (9.4-9.9 ± 0.5 L/m(2) h) and the change in trans-membrane pressure (TMP) was monitored to characterize the membrane performance. The results showed a low TMP (<5 kPa) under steady-state operation with only biogas sparging and relaxation as control strategy for over 300 days, implying no significant fouling was developed. Inorganic fouling was the dominant fouling mechanism occurred at the end of the study. The results suggest that the newly developed SAnMBR configuration can treat high-strength wastewater at lower capital expenditure while still providing superior effluent quality for water reuse or system closure.

  13. High rate reactive sputtering of MoN(x) coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudnik, Paul J.; Graham, Michael E.; Sproul, William D.

    1991-01-01

    High rate reactive sputtering of MoN(x) films was performed using feedback control of the nitorgen partial pressure. Coatings were made at four different target powers: 2.5, 5.0, 7.5 and 10 kW. No hysteresis was observed in the nitrogen partial pressure vs. flow plot, as is typically seen for the Ti-N system. Four phases were determined by X-ray diffraction: molybdenum, Mo-N solid solution, Beta-Mo2N and gamma-Mo2N. The hardness of the coatings depended upon composition, substrate bias, and target power. The phases present in the hardest films differed depending upon deposition parameters. For example, the Beta-Mo2N phase was hardest (load 25 gf) at 5.0 kW with a value of 3200 kgf/sq mm, whereas the hardest coatings at 10 kW were the gamma-Mo2N phase (3000 kgf/sq mm). The deposition rate generally decreased with increasing nitrogen partial pressure, but there was a range of partial pressures where the rate was relatively constant. At a target power of 5.0 kW, for example, the deposition rates were 3300 A/min for a N2 partial pressure of 0.05 - 1.0 mTorr.

  14. High monetary reward rates and caloric rewards decrease temporal persistence

    PubMed Central

    Bode, Stefan; Murawski, Carsten

    2017-01-01

    Temporal persistence refers to an individual's capacity to wait for future rewards, while forgoing possible alternatives. This requires a trade-off between the potential value of delayed rewards and opportunity costs, and is relevant to many real-world decisions, such as dieting. Theoretical models have previously suggested that high monetary reward rates, or positive energy balance, may result in decreased temporal persistence. In our study, 50 fasted participants engaged in a temporal persistence task, incentivised with monetary rewards. In alternating blocks of this task, rewards were delivered at delays drawn randomly from distributions with either a lower or higher maximum reward rate. During some blocks participants received either a caloric drink or water. We used survival analysis to estimate participants' probability of quitting conditional on the delay distribution and the consumed liquid. Participants had a higher probability of quitting in blocks with the higher reward rate. Furthermore, participants who consumed the caloric drink had a higher probability of quitting than those who consumed water. Our results support the predictions from the theoretical models, and importantly, suggest that both higher monetary reward rates and physiologically relevant rewards can decrease temporal persistence, which is a crucial determinant for survival in many species. PMID:28228517

  15. Understanding the Level and Causes of Teacher Turnover: A Comparison with Other Professions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Douglas N.; Adams, Scott J.

    2007-01-01

    It is commonly believed that teacher turnover is unusually high and that this is a sign of failure in the education system. Previous studies have tested this idea by comparing teacher turnover with that of similar professions, but have come to contradictory conclusions. We provide additional evidence by comparing teachers with professionals from…

  16. Alcohol, signaling, and ECM turnover.

    PubMed

    Seth, Devanshi; D'Souza El-Guindy, Nympha B; Apte, Minoti; Mari, Montserrat; Dooley, Steven; Neuman, Manuela; Haber, Paul S; Kundu, Gopal C; Darwanto, Agus; de Villiers, Willem J; Vonlaufen, A; Xu, Z; Phillips, P; Yang, S; Goldstein, D; Pirola, R M; Wilson, J S; Moles, Anna; Fernández, Anna; Colell, Anna; García-Ruiz, Carmen; Fernández-Checa, José C; Meyer, Christoph; Meindl-Beinker, Nadja M

    2010-01-01

    Alcohol is recognized as a direct hepatotoxin, but the precise molecular pathways that are important for the initiation and progression of alcohol-induced tissue injury are not completely understood. The current understanding of alcohol toxicity to organs suggests that alcohol initiates injury by generation of oxidative and nonoxidative ethanol metabolites and via translocation of gut-derived endotoxin. These processes lead to cellular injury and stimulation of the inflammatory responses mediated through a variety of molecules. With continuing alcohol abuse, the injury progresses through impairment of tissue regeneration and extracellular matrix (ECM) turnover, leading to fibrogenesis and cirrhosis. Several cell types are involved in this process, the predominant being stellate cells, macrophages, and parenchymal cells. In response to alcohol, growth factors and cytokines activate many signaling cascades that regulate fibrogenesis. This mini-review brings together research focusing on the underlying mechanisms of alcohol-mediated injury in a number of organs. It highlights the various processes and molecules that are likely involved in inflammation, immune modulation, susceptibility to infection, ECM turnover and fibrogenesis in the liver, pancreas, and lung triggered by alcohol abuse.

  17. Solid State Experiments at High Pressure and Strain Rates

    SciTech Connect

    Kalantar, D.H.; Remington, B.A.; Colvin, J.D.; Mikaelian, K.O.; Weber, S.V.; Wiley, L.G.; Wark, J.S.; Loveridge, A.; Allen, A.M.; Hauer, A.; Meyers, M.A.

    1999-11-24

    Experiments have been developed using high powered laser facilities to study the response of materials in the solid state under extreme pressures and strain rates. Details of the target and drive development required for solid state experiments and results from two separate experiments are presented. In the first, thin foils were compressed to a peak pressure of 180 GPa and accelerated. A pre-imposed modulation at the embedded RT unstable interface was observed to grow. The growth rates were fluid-like at early time, but suppressed at later time. This result is suggestive of the theory of localized heating in shear bands, followed by dissipation of the heat, allowing for recovery of the bulk material strength. In the second experiment, the response of Si was studied by dynamic x-ray diffraction. The crystal was observed to respond with uni-axial compression at a peak pressure 11.5-13.5 GPa.

  18. Low resistance bakelite RPC study for high rate working capability

    DOE PAGES

    Dai, T.; Han, L.; Hou, S.; ...

    2014-11-19

    This paper presents series efforts to lower resistance of bakelite electrode plate to improve the RPC capability under high rate working condition. New bakelite material with alkali metallic ion doping has been manufactured and tested. This bakelite is found unstable under large charge flux and need further investigation. A new structure of carbon-embedded bakelite RPC has been developed, which can reduce the effective resistance of electrode by a factor of 10. The prototype of the carbon-embedded chamber could function well under gamma radiation source at event rate higher than 10 kHz/cm2. The preliminary tests show that this kind of newmore » structure performs as efficiently as traditional RPCs.« less

  19. Low resistance bakelite RPC study for high rate working capability

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, T.; Han, L.; Hou, S.; Liu, M.; Li, Q.; Song, H.; Xia, L.; Zhang, Z.

    2014-11-19

    This paper presents series efforts to lower resistance of bakelite electrode plate to improve the RPC capability under high rate working condition. New bakelite material with alkali metallic ion doping has been manufactured and tested. This bakelite is found unstable under large charge flux and need further investigation. A new structure of carbon-embedded bakelite RPC has been developed, which can reduce the effective resistance of electrode by a factor of 10. The prototype of the carbon-embedded chamber could function well under gamma radiation source at event rate higher than 10 kHz/cm2. The preliminary tests show that this kind of new structure performs as efficiently as traditional RPCs.

  20. Multianode cylindrical proportional counter for high count rates

    DOEpatents

    Hanson, J.A.; Kopp, M.K.

    1980-05-23

    A cylindrical, multiple-anode proportional counter is provided for counting of low-energy photons (< 60 keV) at count rates of greater than 10/sup 5/ counts/sec. A gas-filled proportional counter cylinder forming an outer cathode is provided with a central coaxially disposed inner cathode and a plurality of anode wires disposed in a cylindrical array in coaxial alignment with and between the inner and outer cathodes to form a virtual cylindrical anode coaxial with the inner and outer cathodes. The virtual cylindrical anode configuration improves the electron drift velocity by providing a more uniform field strength throughout the counter gas volume, thus decreasing the electron collection time following the detection of an ionizing event. This avoids pulse pile-up and coincidence losses at these high count rates. Conventional RC position encoding detection circuitry may be employed to extract the spatial information from the counter anodes.

  1. Multianode cylindrical proportional counter for high count rates

    DOEpatents

    Hanson, James A.; Kopp, Manfred K.

    1981-01-01

    A cylindrical, multiple-anode proportional counter is provided for counting of low-energy photons (<60 keV) at count rates of greater than 10.sup.5 counts/sec. A gas-filled proportional counter cylinder forming an outer cathode is provided with a central coaxially disposed inner cathode and a plurality of anode wires disposed in a cylindrical array in coaxial alignment with and between the inner and outer cathodes to form a virtual cylindrical anode coaxial with the inner and outer cathodes. The virtual cylindrical anode configuration improves the electron drift velocity by providing a more uniform field strength throughout the counter gas volume, thus decreasing the electron collection time following the detection of an ionizing event. This avoids pulse pile-up and coincidence losses at these high count rates. Conventional RC position encoding detection circuitry may be employed to extract the spatial information from the counter anodes.

  2. High-pressure burning rate studies of solid rocket propellants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atwood, A. I.; Ford, K. P.; Wheeler, C. J.

    2013-03-01

    Increased rocket motor performance is a major driver in the development of solid rocket propellant formulations for chemical propulsion systems. The use of increased operating pressure is an option to improve performance potentially without the cost of reformulation. A technique has been developed to obtain burning rate data across a range of pressures from ambient to 345 MPa. The technique combines the use of a low loading density combustion bomb with a high loading density closed bomb technique. A series of nine ammonium perchlorate (AP) based propellants were used to demonstrate the use of the technique, and the results were compared to the neat AP burning rate "barrier". The effect of plasticizer, oxidizer particle size, catalyst, and binder type were investigated.

  3. Guide to good practices for operations turnover

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-01

    This Guide to Good Practices is written to enhance understanding of, and provide direction for, Operations Turnover, Chapter XII of Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5480.19, Conduct of Operations Requirements for DOE Facilities. The practices in this guide should be considered when planning or reviewing operations turnover programs. Contractors are advised to adopt procedures that meet the intent of DOE Order 5480.19. Operations Turnover is an element of an effective Conduct of Operations program. The complexity and array of activities performed in DOE facilities dictate the necessity for a formal operations turnover program to promote safe and efficient operations.

  4. Experimental investigation of bond strength under high loading rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michal, Mathias; Keuser, Manfred; Solomos, George; Peroni, Marco; Larcher, Martin; Esteban, Beatriz

    2015-09-01

    The structural behaviour of reinforced concrete is governed significantly by the transmission of forces between steel and concrete. The bond is of special importance for the overlapping joint and anchoring of the reinforcement, where rigid bond is required. It also plays an important role in the rotational capacity of plastic hinges, where a ductile bond behaviour is preferable. Similar to the mechanical properties of concrete and steel also the characteristics of their interaction changes with the velocity of the applied loading. For smooth steel bars with its main bond mechanisms of adhesion and friction, nearly no influence of loading rate is reported in literature. In contrast, a high rate dependence can be found for the nowadays mainly used deformed bars. For mechanical interlock, where ribs of the reinforcing steel are bracing concrete material surrounding the bar, one reason can be assumed to be in direct connection with the increase of concrete compressive strength. For splitting failure of bond, characterized by the concrete tensile strength, an even higher dynamic increase is observed. For the design of Structures exposed to blast or impact loading the knowledge of a rate dependent bond stress-slip relationship is required to consider safety and economical aspects at the same time. The bond behaviour of reinforced concrete has been investigated with different experimental methods at the University of the Bundeswehr Munich (UniBw) and the Joint Research Centre (JRC) in Ispra. Both static and dynamic tests have been carried out, where innovative experimental apparatuses have been used. The bond stress-slip relationship and maximum pull-out-forces for varying diameter of the bar, concrete compressive strength and loading rates have been obtained. It is expected that these experimental results will contribute to a better understanding of the rate dependent bond behaviour and will serve for calibration of numerical models.

  5. Handling high data rate detectors at Diamond Light Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedersen, U. K.; Rees, N.; Basham, M.; Ferner, F. J. K.

    2013-03-01

    An increasing number of area detectors, in use at Diamond Light Source, produce high rates of data. In order to capture, store and process this data High Performance Computing (HPC) systems have been implemented. This paper will present the architecture and usage for handling high rate data: detector data capture, large volume storage and parallel processing. The EPICS area Detector frame work has been adopted to abstract the detectors for common tasks including live processing, file format and storage. The chosen data format is HDF5 which provides multidimensional data storage and NeXuS compatibility. The storage system and related computing infrastructure include: a centralised Lustre based parallel file system, a dedicated network and a HPC cluster. A well defined roadmap is in place for the evolution of this to meet demand as the requirements and technology advances. For processing the science data the HPC cluster allow efficient parallel computing, on a mixture of ×86 and GPU processing units. The nature of the Lustre storage system in combination with the parallel HDF5 library allow efficient disk I/O during computation jobs. Software developments, which include utilising optimised parallel file reading for a variety of post processing techniques, are being developed in collaboration as part of the Pan-Data EU Project (www.pan-data.eu). These are particularly applicable to tomographic reconstruction and processing of non crystalline diffraction data.

  6. High-rate anaerobic composting with biogas recovery

    SciTech Connect

    DeBaere, L.; Verstraete, W.

    1984-03-01

    In Belgium a novel high rate anaerobic composting process with biogas has been developed as an alternative to aerobic systems, producing a commercial dry compost and 60 to 95 cubic metres methane per ton of municipal solid waste. This is a high value energy source simultaneously yielding a stabilized end product. The process was developed so that digestion could take place at 25 to 35% total solids, thus reducing the amount of water needed to dilute the waste, decreasing the digestor volume and cutting transportation costs. The end product is odorless and stable. High rate anaerobic composting of MSW can be combined with sewage sludge stabilization. Manure, vegetable or fruit wastes can be co-treated in certain proportions as required. About 15 to 20% of the energy produced is transformed into electricity and heat and consumed as the waste disposal plant itself. 120 to 140 US $ worth of methane gas and compost can be produced per cubic metre of reactor per year, making anaerobic composting economically attractive.

  7. Measurement of fracture properties of concrete at high strain rates.

    PubMed

    Rey-De-Pedraza, V; Cendón, D A; Sánchez-Gálvez, V; Gálvez, F

    2017-01-28

    An analysis of the spalling technique of concrete bars using the modified Hopkinson bar was carried out. A new experimental configuration is proposed adding some variations to previous works. An increased length for concrete specimens was chosen and finite-element analysis was used for designing a conic projectile to obtain a suitable triangular impulse wave. The aim of this initial work is to establish an experimental framework which allows a simple and direct analysis of concrete subjected to high strain rates. The efforts and configuration of these primary tests, as well as the selected geometry and dimensions for the different elements, have been focused to achieve a simple way of identifying the fracture position and so the tensile strength of tested specimens. This dynamic tensile strength can be easily compared with previous values published in literature giving an idea of the accuracy of the method and technique proposed and the possibility to extend it in a near future to obtain other mechanical properties such as the fracture energy. The tests were instrumented with strain gauges, accelerometers and high-speed camera in order to validate the results by different ways. Results of the dynamic tensile strength of the tested concrete are presented.This article is part of the themed issue 'Experimental testing and modelling of brittle materials at high strain rates'.

  8. GPU accelerated processing of astronomical high frame-rate videosequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vítek, Stanislav; Švihlík, Jan; Krasula, Lukáš; Fliegel, Karel; Páta, Petr

    2015-09-01

    Astronomical instruments located around the world are producing an incredibly large amount of possibly interesting scientific data. Astronomical research is expanding into large and highly sensitive telescopes. Total volume of data rates per night of operations also increases with the quality and resolution of state-of-the-art CCD/CMOS detectors. Since many of the ground-based astronomical experiments are placed in remote locations with limited access to the Internet, it is necessary to solve the problem of the data storage. It mostly means that current data acquistion, processing and analyses algorithm require review. Decision about importance of the data has to be taken in very short time. This work deals with GPU accelerated processing of high frame-rate astronomical video-sequences, mostly originating from experiment MAIA (Meteor Automatic Imager and Analyser), an instrument primarily focused to observing of faint meteoric events with a high time resolution. The instrument with price bellow 2000 euro consists of image intensifier and gigabite ethernet camera running at 61 fps. With resolution better than VGA the system produces up to 2TB of scientifically valuable video data per night. Main goal of the paper is not to optimize any GPU algorithm, but to propose and evaluate parallel GPU algorithms able to process huge amount of video-sequences in order to delete all uninteresting data.

  9. Diamond detector for high rate monitors of fast neutrons beams

    SciTech Connect

    Giacomelli, L.; Rebai, M.; Cippo, E. Perelli; Tardocchi, M.; Fazzi, A.; Andreani, C.; Pietropaolo, A.; Frost, C. D.; Rhodes, N.; Schooneveld, E.; Gorini, G.

    2012-06-19

    A fast neutron detection system suitable for high rate measurements is presented. The detector is based on a commercial high purity single crystal diamond (SDD) coupled to a fast digital data acquisition system. The detector was tested at the ISIS pulsed spallation neutron source. The SDD event signal was digitized at 1 GHz to reconstruct the deposited energy (pulse amplitude) and neutron arrival time; the event time of flight (ToF) was obtained relative to the recorded proton beam signal t{sub 0}. Fast acquisition is needed since the peak count rate is very high ({approx}800 kHz) due to the pulsed structure of the neutron beam. Measurements at ISIS indicate that three characteristics regions exist in the biparametric spectrum: i) background gamma events of low pulse amplitudes; ii) low pulse amplitude neutron events in the energy range E{sub dep}= 1.5-7 MeV ascribed to neutron elastic scattering on {sup 12}C; iii) large pulse amplitude neutron events with E{sub n} < 7 MeV ascribed to {sup 12}C(n,{alpha}){sup 9}Be and 12C(n,n')3{alpha}.

  10. New tool designs for high rate gravel pack operations

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, C.M.

    1995-12-31

    Fracturing of the wellbore to improve hydrocarbon recovery has been a universally accepted practice in the oilfield. The fracturing procedures reduce skin by breaking through or bypassing near wellbore damage that inhibits production. In loosely consolidated formations, a propped fracture can reduce fluid velocity in the near wellbore region, which subsequently reduces fines migration that can plug the wellbore. Fracturing also provides highly conductive paths for gas and oil production. Gravel packing is another operation that is often needed during a well`s productive cycle. When a highly conductive fracture is created before a gravel packing operation is run, it has been found that well productivity increases. Performing the operations separately, however, diminishes the productivity gains because of formation damage that can occur between completion operations. A method of gravel packing that includes a tip-screenout-design fracturing procedure, performed with the gravel pack packer, screen, and blank in the hole, was proposed to allow the procedures to be performed simultaneously. This paper will describe the various types of gravel packing tools that are currently in use, their specific application, and a new series of gravel packing tools that was developed to resolve the difficulties that arose when the operations of fracturing and gravel packing were combined. Also discussed is the need that arose for tools that could sustain high flow rates in small casing diameters. Test results will be used to provide acceptable flow rates for different bore sizes.

  11. New tool designs for high rate gravel pack operations

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, C.M.

    1995-10-01

    A universally accepted practice in the oilfield has been fracturing of the wellbore to improve hydrocarbon recovery. Fracturing procedures reduce skin by breaking through or bypassing near wellbore damage that inhibits production. In loosely consolidated formations, a propped fracture can reduce fluid velocity in the near wellbore region, which subsequently reduces fines migration that can plug the wellbore. Fracturing also provides highly conductive paths for gas and oil production. Gravel packing is another operation that is often needed during a well`s productive cycle. When a highly-conductive fracture is created before a gravel packing operation is run, it has been found that well productivity increases. Performing the operations separately however, diminishes the productivity gains because of formation damage that can occur between completion operations. A method of gravel packing that includes a tip-screen-out-design fracturing procedure, performed with the gravel pack packer, screen, and blank in the hole, was proposed to allow the procedures to be performed simultaneously. This paper will describe the various types of gravel packing tools that are currently in use, their specific application, and a new series of gravel packing tools that was developed to resolve the difficulties that arose when the operations of fracturing and gravel packing were combined. Also discussed is the need that arose for tools that could sustain high flow rates in small casing diameters. Test results will be used to provide acceptable flow rates for different bore sizes.

  12. Measurement of fracture properties of concrete at high strain rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rey-De-Pedraza, V.; Cendón, D. A.; Sánchez-Gálvez, V.; Gálvez, F.

    2017-01-01

    An analysis of the spalling technique of concrete bars using the modified Hopkinson bar was carried out. A new experimental configuration is proposed adding some variations to previous works. An increased length for concrete specimens was chosen and finite-element analysis was used for designing a conic projectile to obtain a suitable triangular impulse wave. The aim of this initial work is to establish an experimental framework which allows a simple and direct analysis of concrete subjected to high strain rates. The efforts and configuration of these primary tests, as well as the selected geometry and dimensions for the different elements, have been focused to achieve a simple way of identifying the fracture position and so the tensile strength of tested specimens. This dynamic tensile strength can be easily compared with previous values published in literature giving an idea of the accuracy of the method and technique proposed and the possibility to extend it in a near future to obtain other mechanical properties such as the fracture energy. The tests were instrumented with strain gauges, accelerometers and high-speed camera in order to validate the results by different ways. Results of the dynamic tensile strength of the tested concrete are presented. This article is part of the themed issue 'Experimental testing and modelling of brittle materials at high strain rates'.

  13. Comparison of pulse rate variability and heart rate variability for high frequency content estimation.

    PubMed

    Logier, R; De Jonckheere, J; Dassonneville, A; Jeanne, M

    2016-08-01

    Heart Rate Variability (HRV) analysis can be of precious help in most of clinical situations because it is able to quantify the Autonomic Nervous System (ANS) activity. The HRV high frequency (HF) content, related to the parasympathetic tone, reflects the ANS response to an external stimulus responsible of pain, stress or various emotions. We have previously developed the Analgesia Nociception Index (ANI), based on HRV high frequency content estimation, which quantifies continuously the vagal tone in order to guide analgesic drug administration during general anesthesia. This technology has been largely validated during the peri-operative period. Currently, ANI is obtained from a specific algorithm analyzing a time series representing successive heart periods measured on the electrocardiographic (ECG) signal. In the perspective of widening the application fields of this technology, in particular for homecare monitoring, it has become necessary to simplify signal acquisition by using e.g. a pulse plethysmographic (PPG) sensor. Even if Pulse Rate Variability (PRV) analysis issued from PPG sensors has been shown to be unreliable and a bad predictor of HRV analysis results, we have compared PRV and HRV both estimated by ANI as well as HF and HF/(HF+LF) spectral analysis on both signals.

  14. Design of high-bit-rate coherent communication links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konyshev, V. A.; Leonov, A. V.; Nanii, O. E.; Novikov, A. G.; Treshchikov, V. N.; Ubaydullaev, R. R.

    2016-12-01

    We report an analysis of the problems encountered in the design of modern high-bit-rate coherent communication links. A phenomenological communication link model is described, which is suitable for solving applied tasks of the network design with nonlinear effects taken into account. We propose an engineering approach to the design that is based on the use of fundamental nonlinearity coefficients calculated in advance for the experimental configurations of communication links. An experimental method is presented for calculating the nonlinearity coefficient of communication links. It is shown that the proposed approach allows one to successfully meet the challenges in designing communication networks.

  15. High Rate Laser Pitting Technique for Solar Cell Texturing

    SciTech Connect

    Hans J. Herfurth; Henrikki Pantsar

    2013-01-10

    High rate laser pitting technique for solar cell texturing Efficiency of crystalline silicon solar cells can be improved by creating a texture on the surface to increase optical absorption. Different techniques have been developed for texturing, with the current state-of-the-art (SOA) being wet chemical etching. The process has poor optical performance, produces surfaces that are difficult to passivate or contact and is relatively expensive due to the use of hazardous chemicals. This project shall develop an alternative process for texturing mc-Si using laser micromachining. It will have the following features compared to the current SOA texturing process: -Superior optical surfaces for reduced front-surface reflection and enhanced optical absorption in thin mc-Si substrates -Improved surface passivation -More easily integrated into advanced back-contact cell concepts -Reduced use of hazardous chemicals and waste treatment -Similar or lower cost The process is based on laser pitting. The objective is to develop and demonstrate a high rate laser pitting process which will exceed the rate of former laser texturing processes by a factor of ten. The laser and scanning technologies will be demonstrated on a laboratory scale, but will use inherently technologies that can easily be scaled to production rates. The drastic increase in process velocity is required for the process to be implemented as an in-line process in PV manufacturing. The project includes laser process development, development of advanced optical systems for beam manipulation and cell reflectivity and efficiency testing. An improvement of over 0.5% absolute in efficiency is anticipated after laser-based texturing. The surface textures will be characterized optically, and solar cells will be fabricated with the new laser texturing to ensure that the new process is compatible with high-efficiency cell processing. The result will be demonstration of a prototype process that is suitable for scale-up to a

  16. Radiation Hardened, Modulator ASIC for High Data Rate Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCallister, Ron; Putnam, Robert; Andro, Monty; Fujikawa, Gene

    2000-01-01

    Satellite-based telecommunication services are challenged by the need to generate down-link power levels adequate to support high quality (BER approx. equals 10(exp 12)) links required for modem broadband data services. Bandwidth-efficient Nyquist signaling, using low values of excess bandwidth (alpha), can exhibit large peak-to-average-power ratio (PAPR) values. High PAPR values necessitate high-power amplifier (HPA) backoff greater than the PAPR, resulting in unacceptably low HPA efficiency. Given the high cost of on-board prime power, this inefficiency represents both an economical burden, and a constraint on the rates and quality of data services supportable from satellite platforms. Constant-envelope signals offer improved power-efficiency, but only by imposing a severe bandwidth-efficiency penalty. This paper describes a radiation- hardened modulator which can improve satellite-based broadband data services by combining the bandwidth-efficiency of low-alpha Nyquist signals with high power-efficiency (negligible HPA backoff).

  17. Resistance of the boreal forest to high burn rates.

    PubMed

    Héon, Jessie; Arseneault, Dominique; Parisien, Marc-André

    2014-09-23

    Boreal ecosystems and their large carbon stocks are strongly shaped by extensive wildfires. Coupling climate projections with records of area burned during the last 3 decades across the North American boreal zone suggests that area burned will increase by 30-500% by the end of the 21st century, with a cascading effect on ecosystem dynamics and on the boreal carbon balance. Fire size and the frequency of large-fire years are both expected to increase. However, how fire size and time since previous fire will influence future burn rates is poorly understood, mostly because of incomplete records of past fire overlaps. Here, we reconstruct the length of overlapping fires along a 190-km-long transect during the last 200 y in one of the most fire-prone boreal regions of North America to document how fire size and time since previous fire will influence future fire recurrence. We provide direct field evidence that extreme burn rates can be sustained by a few occasional droughts triggering immense fires. However, we also show that the most fire-prone areas of the North American boreal forest are resistant to high burn rates because of overabundant young forest stands, thereby creating a fuel-mediated negative feedback on fire activity. These findings will help refine projections of fire effect on boreal ecosystems and their large carbon stocks.

  18. Resistance of the boreal forest to high burn rates

    PubMed Central

    Héon, Jessie; Arseneault, Dominique; Parisien, Marc-André

    2014-01-01

    Boreal ecosystems and their large carbon stocks are strongly shaped by extensive wildfires. Coupling climate projections with records of area burned during the last 3 decades across the North American boreal zone suggests that area burned will increase by 30–500% by the end of the 21st century, with a cascading effect on ecosystem dynamics and on the boreal carbon balance. Fire size and the frequency of large-fire years are both expected to increase. However, how fire size and time since previous fire will influence future burn rates is poorly understood, mostly because of incomplete records of past fire overlaps. Here, we reconstruct the length of overlapping fires along a 190-km-long transect during the last 200 y in one of the most fire-prone boreal regions of North America to document how fire size and time since previous fire will influence future fire recurrence. We provide direct field evidence that extreme burn rates can be sustained by a few occasional droughts triggering immense fires. However, we also show that the most fire-prone areas of the North American boreal forest are resistant to high burn rates because of overabundant young forest stands, thereby creating a fuel-mediated negative feedback on fire activity. These findings will help refine projections of fire effect on boreal ecosystems and their large carbon stocks. PMID:25201981

  19. Simulation of ceramics fracture due to high rate dynamic impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazarinov, N. A.; Bratov, V. A.; Petrov, Y. V.

    2015-11-01

    In this paper dynamic fracture process due to high-speed impact of steel plunger into ceramic sample is simulated. The developed numerical model is based on finite element method and a concept of incubation time criterion, which is proven applicable in order to predict brittle fracture under high-rate deformation. Simulations were performed for ZrO2(Y2O3) ceramic plates. To characterize fracture process quantitatively fracture surface area parameter is introduced and controlled. This parameter gives the area of new surface created during dynamic fracture of a sample and is essentially connected to energetic peculiarities of fracture process. Multiple simulations with various parameters made it possible to explore dependencies of fracture area on plunger velocity and material properties. Energy required to create unit of fracture area at fracture initiation (dynamic analogue of Griffith surface energy) was evaluated and was found to be an order of magnitude higher as comparing to its static value.

  20. On the response of rubbers at high strain rates.

    SciTech Connect

    Niemczura, Johnathan Greenberg

    2010-02-01

    In this report, we examine the propagation of tensile waves of finite deformation in rubbers through experiments and analysis. Attention is focused on the propagation of one-dimensional dispersive and shock waves in strips of latex and nitrile rubber. Tensile wave propagation experiments were conducted at high strain-rates by holding one end fixed and displacing the other end at a constant velocity. A high-speed video camera was used to monitor the motion and to determine the evolution of strain and particle velocity in the rubber strips. Analysis of the response through the theory of finite waves and quantitative matching between the experimental observations and analytical predictions was used to determine an appropriate instantaneous elastic response for the rubbers. This analysis also yields the tensile shock adiabat for rubber. Dispersive waves as well as shock waves are also observed in free-retraction experiments; these are used to quantify hysteretic effects in rubber.

  1. Automated Production of High Rep Rate Foam Targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, F.; Spindloe, C.; Haddock, D.; Tolley, M.; Nazarov, W.

    2016-04-01

    Manufacturing low density targets in the numbers needed for high rep rate experiments is highly challenging. This report summarises advances from manual production to semiautomated and the improvements that follow both in terms of production time and target uniformity. The production process is described and shown to be improved by the integration of an xyz robot with dispensing capabilities. Results are obtained from manual and semiautomated production runs and compared. The variance in the foam thickness is reduced significantly which should decrease experimental variation due to target parameters and could allow for whole batches to be characterised by the measurement of a few samples. The work applies to both foil backed and free standing foam targets.

  2. Dynamic Aspects of Voluntary Turnover: An Integrated Approach to Curvilinearity in the Performance-Turnover Relationship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, William J.; Cropanzano, Russell

    2011-01-01

    Previous research pertaining to job performance and voluntary turnover has been guided by 2 distinct theoretical perspectives. First, the push-pull model proposes that there is a quadratic or curvilinear relationship existing between these 2 variables. Second, the unfolding model of turnover posits that turnover is a dynamic process and that a…

  3. Prolonged Adaptation to a Low or High Protein Diet Does Not Modulate Basal Muscle Protein Synthesis Rates – A Substudy

    PubMed Central

    Hursel, Rick; Martens, Eveline A. P.; Gonnissen, Hanne K. J.; Hamer, Henrike M.; Senden, Joan M. G.; van Loon, Luc J. C.; Westerterp-Plantenga, Margriet S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Based on controlled 36 h experiments a higher dietary protein intake causes a positive protein balance and a negative fat balance. A positive net protein balance may support fat free mass accrual. However, few data are available on the impact of more prolonged changes in habitual protein intake on whole-body protein metabolism and basal muscle protein synthesis rates. Objective To assess changes in whole-body protein turnover and basal muscle protein synthesis rates following 12 weeks of adaptation to a low versus high dietary protein intake. Methods A randomized parallel study was performed in 40 subjects who followed either a high protein (2.4 g protein/kg/d) or low protein (0.4 g protein/kg/d) energy-balanced diet (30/35/35% or 5/60/35% energy from protein/carbohydrate/fat) for a period of 12 weeks. A subgroup of 7 men and 8 women (body mass index: 22.8±2.3 kg/m2, age: 24.3±4.9 y) were selected to evaluate the impact of prolonged adaptation to either a high or low protein intake on whole body protein metabolism and basal muscle protein synthesis rates. After the diet, subjects received continuous infusions with L-[ring-2H5]phenylalanine and L-[ring-2H2]tyrosine in an overnight fasted state, with blood samples and muscle biopsies being collected to assess post-absorptive whole-body protein turnover and muscle protein synthesis rates in vivo in humans. Results After 12 weeks of intervention, whole-body protein balance in the fasted state was more negative in the high protein treatment when compared with the low protein treatment (-4.1±0.5 vs -2.7±0.6 μmol phenylalanine/kg/h;P<0.001). Whole-body protein breakdown (43.0±4.4 vs 37.8±3.8 μmol phenylalanine/kg/h;P<0.03), synthesis (38.9±4.2 vs 35.1±3.6 μmol phenylalanine/kg/h;P<0.01) and phenylalanine hydroxylation rates (4.1±0.6 vs 2.7±0.6 μmol phenylalanine/kg/h;P<0.001) were significantly higher in the high vs low protein group. Basal muscle protein synthesis rates were maintained on a low

  4. Design and construction of a high frame rate imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jing; Waugaman, John L.; Liu, Anjun; Lu, Jian-Yu

    2002-05-01

    A new high frame rate imaging method has been developed recently [Jian-yu Lu, ``2D and 3D high frame rate imaging with limited diffraction beams,'' IEEE Trans. Ultrason. Ferroelectr. Freq. Control 44, 839-856 (1997)]. This method may have a clinical application for imaging of fast moving objects such as human hearts, velocity vector imaging, and low-speckle imaging. To implement the method, an imaging system has been designed. The system consists of one main printed circuit board (PCB) and 16 channel boards (each channel board contains 8 channels), in addition to a set-top box for connections to a personal computer (PC), a front panel board for user control and message display, and a power control and distribution board. The main board contains a field programmable gate array (FPGA) and controls all channels (each channel has also an FPGA). We will report the analog and digital circuit design and simulations, multiplayer PCB designs with commercial software (Protel 99), PCB signal integrity testing and system RFI/EMI shielding, and the assembly and construction of the entire system. [Work supported in part by Grant 5RO1 HL60301 from NIH.

  5. Twin Interactions in Pure Ti Under High Strain Rate Compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ping; Xiao, Dawu; Jiang, Chunli; Sang, Ge; Zou, Dongli

    2017-01-01

    Twin interactions associated with {11 overline{2} 1} (E2) twins in titanium deformed by high strain rate ( 2600 s-1) compression were studied using electron backscatter diffraction technique. Three types of twins, {10 overline{1} 2} (E1), {11 overline{2} 2} (C1), and {11 overline{2} 4} (C3), were observed to interact with the preformed E2 twins in four parent grains. The E1 variants nucleated at twin boundaries of some E2 variants. And the C3 twins were originated from the intersection of C1 and E2. The selection of twin variant was investigated by the Schmid factors (SFs) and the twinning shear displacement gradient tensors (DGTs) calculations. The results show that twin variants that did not follow the Schmid law were more frequently observed under high strain rate deformation than quasi-static deformation. Among these low-SF active variants, 73 pct (8 out of 11) can be interpreted by DGT. Besides, 26 variants that have SF values close to or higher than their active counterparts were absent. Factors that may affect the twin variant selections were discussed.

  6. High teleportation rates using Rydberg-based quantum repeaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solmeyer, Neal; Quraishi, Qudsia

    2015-05-01

    Quantum networking over long distances may be achieved using repeater protocols to generate entanglement between memory nodes. Typically, long-lived memories have low entanglement generation rates. Neutral atom memories can be long-lived, emit at visible wavelengths and can be collectively excited leading to directionally emitted entangled photons. Here, we propose a simplified Rydberg-based quantum repeater based on recent work, where we reduce the number of ground states used for entanglement generation and use only one ensemble at each node, reducing the required resources. The collective excitation allows for deterministic memory generation that is mapped into a directionally emitted photonic qubit without the use of a high finesse optical cavity. We demonstrate a protocol between multiple memories stored within a single ensemble to implement a two-qubit gate. Additionally, we predict teleportation rates of 1 Hz without the use of a high finesse optical cavity, which could be increased to kHz if efficiencies are improved over the currently realized values. We plan to explore these protocols in ultra-cold ensemble of neutral 87Rb atoms and are currently building this setup.

  7. Pattern and process in Amazon tree turnover, 1976-2001.

    PubMed

    Phillips, O L; Baker, T R; Arroyo, L; Higuchi, N; Killeen, T J; Laurance, W F; Lewis, S L; Lloyd, J; Malhi, Y; Monteagudo, A; Neill, D A; Vargas, P Núñez; Silva, J N M; Terborgh, J; Martínez, R Vásquez; Alexiades, M; Almeida, S; Brown, S; Chave, J; Comiskey, J A; Czimczik, C I; Di Fiore, A; Erwin, T; Kuebler, C; Laurance, S G; Nascimento, H E M; Olivier, J; Palacios, W; Patiño, S; Pitman, N C A; Quesada, C A; Saldias, M; Lezama, A Torres; Vinceti, B

    2004-03-29

    Previous work has shown that tree turnover, tree biomass and large liana densities have increased in mature tropical forest plots in the late twentieth century. These results point to a concerted shift in forest ecological processes that may already be having significant impacts on terrestrial carbon stocks, fluxes and biodiversity. However, the findings have proved controversial, partly because a rather limited number of permanent plots have been monitored for rather short periods. The aim of this paper is to characterize regional-scale patterns of 'tree turnover' (the rate with which trees die and recruit into a population) by using improved datasets now available for Amazonia that span the past 25 years. Specifically, we assess whether concerted changes in turnover are occurring, and if so whether they are general throughout the Amazon or restricted to one region or environmental zone. In addition, we ask whether they are driven by changes in recruitment, mortality or both. We find that: (i) trees 10 cm or more in diameter recruit and die twice as fast on the richer soils of southern and western Amazonia than on the poorer soils of eastern and central Amazonia; (ii) turnover rates have increased throughout Amazonia over the past two decades; (iii) mortality and recruitment rates have both increased significantly in every region and environmental zone, with the exception of mortality in eastern Amazonia; (iv) recruitment rates have consistently exceeded mortality rates; (v) absolute increases in recruitment and mortality rates are greatest in western Amazonian sites; and (vi) mortality appears to be lagging recruitment at regional scales. These spatial patterns and temporal trends are not caused by obvious artefacts in the data or the analyses. The trends cannot be directly driven by a mortality driver (such as increased drought or fragmentation-related death) because the biomass in these forests has simultaneously increased. Our findings therefore indicate that

  8. Pattern and process in Amazon tree turnover, 1976-2001.

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, O L; Baker, T R; Arroyo, L; Higuchi, N; Killeen, T J; Laurance, W F; Lewis, S L; Lloyd, J; Malhi, Y; Monteagudo, A; Neill, D A; Vargas, P Núñez; Silva, J N M; Terborgh, J; Martínez, R Vásquez; Alexiades, M; Almeida, S; Brown, S; Chave, J; Comiskey, J A; Czimczik, C I; Di Fiore, A; Erwin, T; Kuebler, C; Laurance, S G; Nascimento, H E M; Olivier, J; Palacios, W; Patiño, S; Pitman, N C A; Quesada, C A; Saldias, M; Lezama, A Torres; Vinceti, B

    2004-01-01

    Previous work has shown that tree turnover, tree biomass and large liana densities have increased in mature tropical forest plots in the late twentieth century. These results point to a concerted shift in forest ecological processes that may already be having significant impacts on terrestrial carbon stocks, fluxes and biodiversity. However, the findings have proved controversial, partly because a rather limited number of permanent plots have been monitored for rather short periods. The aim of this paper is to characterize regional-scale patterns of 'tree turnover' (the rate with which trees die and recruit into a population) by using improved datasets now available for Amazonia that span the past 25 years. Specifically, we assess whether concerted changes in turnover are occurring, and if so whether they are general throughout the Amazon or restricted to one region or environmental zone. In addition, we ask whether they are driven by changes in recruitment, mortality or both. We find that: (i) trees 10 cm or more in diameter recruit and die twice as fast on the richer soils of southern and western Amazonia than on the poorer soils of eastern and central Amazonia; (ii) turnover rates have increased throughout Amazonia over the past two decades; (iii) mortality and recruitment rates have both increased significantly in every region and environmental zone, with the exception of mortality in eastern Amazonia; (iv) recruitment rates have consistently exceeded mortality rates; (v) absolute increases in recruitment and mortality rates are greatest in western Amazonian sites; and (vi) mortality appears to be lagging recruitment at regional scales. These spatial patterns and temporal trends are not caused by obvious artefacts in the data or the analyses. The trends cannot be directly driven by a mortality driver (such as increased drought or fragmentation-related death) because the biomass in these forests has simultaneously increased. Our findings therefore indicate that

  9. High Data Rate Satellite Communications for Environmental Remote Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, J. M.; Munger, J.; Emch, P. G.; Sen, B.; Gu, D.

    2014-12-01

    Satellite to ground communication bandwidth limitations place constraints on current earth remote sensing instruments which limit the spatial and spectral resolution of data transmitted to the ground for processing. Instruments such as VIIRS, CrIS and OMPS on the Soumi-NPP spacecraft must aggregate data both spatially and spectrally in order to fit inside current data rate constraints limiting the optimal use of the as-built sensors. Future planned missions such as HyspIRI, SLI, PACE, and NISAR will have to trade spatial and spectral resolution if increased communication band width is not made available. A number of high-impact, environmental remote sensing disciplines such as hurricane observation, mega-city air quality, wild fire detection and monitoring, and monitoring of coastal oceans would benefit dramatically from enabling the downlinking of sensor data at higher spatial and spectral resolutions. The enabling technologies of multi-Gbps Ka-Band communication, flexible high speed on-board processing, and multi-Terabit SSRs are currently available with high technological maturity enabling high data volume mission requirements to be met with minimal mission constraints while utilizing a limited set of ground sites from NASA's Near Earth Network (NEN) or TDRSS. These enabling technologies will be described in detail with emphasis on benefits to future remote sensing missions currently under consideration by government agencies.

  10. Carbon stock and carbon turnover in boreal and temperate forests - Integration of remote sensing data and global vegetation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thurner, Martin; Beer, Christian; Carvalhais, Nuno; Forkel, Matthias; Tito Rademacher, Tim; Santoro, Maurizio; Tum, Markus; Schmullius, Christiane

    2016-04-01

    Long-term vegetation dynamics are one of the key uncertainties of the carbon cycle. There are large differences in simulated vegetation carbon stocks and fluxes including productivity, respiration and carbon turnover between global vegetation models. Especially the implementation of climate-related mortality processes, for instance drought, fire, frost or insect effects, is often lacking or insufficient in current models and their importance at global scale is highly uncertain. These shortcomings have been due to the lack of spatially extensive information on vegetation carbon stocks, which cannot be provided by inventory data alone. Instead, we recently have been able to estimate northern boreal and temperate forest carbon stocks based on radar remote sensing data. Our spatially explicit product (0.01° resolution) shows strong agreement to inventory-based estimates at a regional scale and allows for a spatial evaluation of carbon stocks and dynamics simulated by global vegetation models. By combining this state-of-the-art biomass product and NPP datasets originating from remote sensing, we are able to study the relation between carbon turnover rate and a set of climate indices in northern boreal and temperate forests along spatial gradients. We observe an increasing turnover rate with colder winter temperatures and longer winters in boreal forests, suggesting frost damage and the trade-off between frost adaptation and growth being important mortality processes in this ecosystem. In contrast, turnover rate increases with climatic conditions favouring drought and insect outbreaks in temperate forests. Investigated global vegetation models from the Inter-Sectoral Impact Model Intercomparison Project (ISI-MIP), including HYBRID4, JeDi, JULES, LPJml, ORCHIDEE, SDGVM, and VISIT, are able to reproduce observation-based spatial climate - turnover rate relationships only to a limited extent. While most of the models compare relatively well in terms of NPP, simulated

  11. Consistent assignment of nurse aides: association with turnover and absenteeism.

    PubMed

    Castle, Nicholas G

    2013-01-01

    Consistent assignment refers to the same caregivers consistently caring for the same residents almost every time caregivers are on duty. This article examines the association of consistent assignment of nurse aides with turnover and absenteeism. Data came from a survey of nursing home administrators, the Online Survey Certification and Reporting data, and the Area Resource File. The measures were from 2007 and came from 3,941 nursing homes. Multivariate logistic regression models were used to examine turnover and absenteeism. An average of 68% of nursing homes reported using consistent assignment, with 28% of nursing homes using nurse aides consistent assignment at the often recommended level of 85% (or more). Nursing homes using recommended levels of consistent assignment had significantly lower rates of turnover and of absenteeism. In the multivariate analyses, consistent assignment was significantly associated with both lower turnover and lower absenteeism (p < .01). Consistent assignment is a practice recommended by many policy makers, government agencies, and industry advocates. The findings presented here provide some evidence that the use of this staffing practice can be beneficial.

  12. An intrinsic mechanism of secreted protein aging and turnover.

    PubMed

    Yang, Won Ho; Aziz, Peter V; Heithoff, Douglas M; Mahan, Michael J; Smith, Jeffrey W; Marth, Jamey D

    2015-11-03

    The composition and functions of the secreted proteome are controlled by the life spans of different proteins. However, unlike intracellular protein fate, intrinsic factors determining secreted protein aging and turnover have not been identified and characterized. Almost all secreted proteins are posttranslationally modified with the covalent attachment of N-glycans. We have discovered an intrinsic mechanism of secreted protein aging and turnover linked to the stepwise elimination of saccharides attached to the termini of N-glycans. Endogenous glycosidases, including neuraminidase 1 (Neu1), neuraminidase 3 (Neu3), beta-galactosidase 1 (Glb1), and hexosaminidase B (HexB), possess hydrolytic activities that temporally remodel N-glycan structures, progressively exposing different saccharides with increased protein age. Subsequently, endocytic lectins with distinct binding specificities, including the Ashwell-Morell receptor, integrin αM, and macrophage mannose receptor, are engaged in N-glycan ligand recognition and the turnover of secreted proteins. Glycosidase inhibition and lectin deficiencies increased protein life spans and abundance, and the basal rate of N-glycan remodeling varied among distinct proteins, accounting for differences in their life spans. This intrinsic multifactorial mechanism of secreted protein aging and turnover contributes to health and the outcomes of disease.

  13. An intrinsic mechanism of secreted protein aging and turnover

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Won Ho; Aziz, Peter V.; Heithoff, Douglas M.; Mahan, Michael J.; Smith, Jeffrey W.; Marth, Jamey D.

    2015-01-01

    The composition and functions of the secreted proteome are controlled by the life spans of different proteins. However, unlike intracellular protein fate, intrinsic factors determining secreted protein aging and turnover have not been identified and characterized. Almost all secreted proteins are posttranslationally modified with the covalent attachment of N-glycans. We have discovered an intrinsic mechanism of secreted protein aging and turnover linked to the stepwise elimination of saccharides attached to the termini of N-glycans. Endogenous glycosidases, including neuraminidase 1 (Neu1), neuraminidase 3 (Neu3), beta-galactosidase 1 (Glb1), and hexosaminidase B (HexB), possess hydrolytic activities that temporally remodel N-glycan structures, progressively exposing different saccharides with increased protein age. Subsequently, endocytic lectins with distinct binding specificities, including the Ashwell–Morell receptor, integrin αM, and macrophage mannose receptor, are engaged in N-glycan ligand recognition and the turnover of secreted proteins. Glycosidase inhibition and lectin deficiencies increased protein life spans and abundance, and the basal rate of N-glycan remodeling varied among distinct proteins, accounting for differences in their life spans. This intrinsic multifactorial mechanism of secreted protein aging and turnover contributes to health and the outcomes of disease. PMID:26489654

  14. High rate response of ultra-high-performance fiber-reinforced concretes under direct tension

    SciTech Connect

    Tran, Ngoc Thanh; Tran, Tuan Kiet; Kim, Dong Joo

    2015-03-15

    The tensile response of ultra-high-performance fiber-reinforced concretes (UHPFRCs) at high strain rates (5–24 s{sup −} {sup 1}) was investigated. Three types of steel fibers, including twisted, long and short smooth steel fibers, were added by 1.5% volume content in an ultra high performance concrete (UHPC) with a compressive strength of 180 MPa. Two different cross sections, 25 × 25 and 25 × 50 mm{sup 2}, of tensile specimens were used to investigate the effect of the cross section area on the measured tensile response of UHPFRCs. Although all the three fibers generated strain hardening behavior even at high strain rates, long smooth fibers produced the highest tensile resistance at high rates whereas twisted fiber did at static rate. The breakages of twisted fibers were observed from the specimens tested at high strain rates unlike smooth steel fibers. The tensile behavior of UHPFRCs at high strain rates was clearly influenced by the specimen size, especially in post-cracking strength.

  15. Dietary arginine affects energy metabolism through polyamine turnover in juvenile Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar).

    PubMed

    Andersen, Synne M; Holen, Elisabeth; Aksnes, Anders; Rønnestad, Ivar; Zerrahn, Jens-Erik; Espe, Marit

    2013-12-14

    In the present study, quadruplicate groups of juvenile Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) were fed plant protein-based diets with increasing arginine inclusions (range 28·8-37·4 g/kg DM) to investigate whether arginine supplementation affects growth and lipid accumulation through an elevated polyamine turnover. Dietary lysine was held at a constant concentration, just below the requirement. All other amino acids were balanced and equal in the diets. Arginine supplementation increased protein and fat accretion, without affecting the hepatosomatic or visceralsomatic indices. Dietary arginine correlated with putrescine in the liver (R 0·78, P= 0·01) and with ornithine in the muscle, liver and plasma (P= 0·0002, 0·003 and 0·0002, respectively). The mRNA of ornithine decarboxylase, the enzyme producing putrescine, was up-regulated in the white adipose tissue of fish fed the high-arginine inclusion compared with those fed the low-arginine diet. Concomitantly, spermidine/spermine-(N1)-acetyltransferase, the rate-limiting enzyme for polyamine turnover that consumes acetyl-CoA, showed an increased activity in the liver of fish fed the arginine-supplemented diets. In addition, lower acetyl-CoA concentrations were observed in the liver of fish fed the high-arginine diet, while ATP, which is used in the process of synthesising spermidine and spermine, did not show a similar trend. Gene expression of the rate-limiting enzyme for β-oxidation of long-chain fatty acids, carnitine palmitoyl transferase-1, was up-regulated in the liver of fish fed the high-arginine diet. Taken together, the data support that increased dietary arginine activates polyamine turnover and β-oxidation in the liver of juvenile Atlantic salmon and may act to improve the metabolic status of the fish.

  16. Southern Ocean phytoplankton turnover in response to stepwise Antarctic cooling over the past 15 million years

    PubMed Central

    Crampton, James S.; Cody, Rosie D.; Levy, Richard; Harwood, David; McKay, Robert; Naish, Tim R.

    2016-01-01

    It is not clear how Southern Ocean phytoplankton communities, which form the base of the marine food web and are a crucial element of the carbon cycle, respond to major environmental disturbance. Here, we use a new model ensemble reconstruction of diatom speciation and extinction rates to examine phytoplankton response to climate change in the southern high latitudes over the past 15 My. We identify five major episodes of species turnover (origination rate plus extinction rate) that were coincident with times of cooling in southern high-latitude climate, Antarctic ice sheet growth across the continental shelves, and associated seasonal sea-ice expansion across the Southern Ocean. We infer that past plankton turnover occurred when a warmer-than-present climate was terminated by a major period of glaciation that resulted in loss of open-ocean habitat south of the polar front, driving non-ice adapted diatoms to regional or global extinction. These findings suggest, therefore, that Southern Ocean phytoplankton communities tolerate “baseline” variability on glacial–interglacial timescales but are sensitive to large-scale changes in mean climate state driven by a combination of long-period variations in orbital forcing and atmospheric carbon dioxide perturbations. PMID:27274061

  17. Southern Ocean phytoplankton turnover in response to stepwise Antarctic cooling over the past 15 million years.

    PubMed

    Crampton, James S; Cody, Rosie D; Levy, Richard; Harwood, David; McKay, Robert; Naish, Tim R

    2016-06-21

    It is not clear how Southern Ocean phytoplankton communities, which form the base of the marine food web and are a crucial element of the carbon cycle, respond to major environmental disturbance. Here, we use a new model ensemble reconstruction of diatom speciation and extinction rates to examine phytoplankton response to climate change in the southern high latitudes over the past 15 My. We identify five major episodes of species turnover (origination rate plus extinction rate) that were coincident with times of cooling in southern high-latitude climate, Antarctic ice sheet growth across the continental shelves, and associated seasonal sea-ice expansion across the Southern Ocean. We infer that past plankton turnover occurred when a warmer-than-present climate was terminated by a major period of glaciation that resulted in loss of open-ocean habitat south of the polar front, driving non-ice adapted diatoms to regional or global extinction. These findings suggest, therefore, that Southern Ocean phytoplankton communities tolerate "baseline" variability on glacial-interglacial timescales but are sensitive to large-scale changes in mean climate state driven by a combination of long-period variations in orbital forcing and atmospheric carbon dioxide perturbations.

  18. Southern Ocean phytoplankton turnover in response to stepwise Antarctic cooling over the past 15 million years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crampton, James S.; Cody, Rosie D.; Levy, Richard; Harwood, David; McKay, Robert; Naish, Tim R.

    2016-06-01

    It is not clear how Southern Ocean phytoplankton communities, which form the base of the marine food web and are a crucial element of the carbon cycle, respond to major environmental disturbance. Here, we use a new model ensemble reconstruction of diatom speciation and extinction rates to examine phytoplankton response to climate change in the southern high latitudes over the past 15 My. We identify five major episodes of species turnover (origination rate plus extinction rate) that were coincident with times of cooling in southern high-latitude climate, Antarctic ice sheet growth across the continental shelves, and associated seasonal sea-ice expansion across the Southern Ocean. We infer that past plankton turnover occurred when a warmer-than-present climate was terminated by a major period of glaciation that resulted in loss of open-ocean habitat south of the polar front, driving non-ice adapted diatoms to regional or global extinction. These findings suggest, therefore, that Southern Ocean phytoplankton communities tolerate “baseline” variability on glacial-interglacial timescales but are sensitive to large-scale changes in mean climate state driven by a combination of long-period variations in orbital forcing and atmospheric carbon dioxide perturbations.

  19. Acid-sensing ion channel 3 or P2X2/3 is involved in the pain-like behavior under a high bone turnover state in ovariectomized mice.

    PubMed

    Kanaya, Kumiko; Iba, Kousuke; Abe, Yasuhisa; Dohke, Takayuki; Okazaki, Shunichiro; Matsumura, Tadaki; Yamashita, Toshihiko

    2016-04-01

    We have recently demonstrated that pathological changes leading to increased bone resorption by osteoclast activation are related to the induction of pain-like behavior in ovariectomized (OVX) mice. In addition, bisphosphonate and the antagonist of transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1), an acid-sensing nociceptor, improved the threshold value of pain-like behaviors accompanying an improvement in the acidic environment in the bone tissue based on osteoclast inactivation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of (i) an inhibitor of vacuolar H(+) -ATPase, known as an proton pump, (ii) an antagonist of acid-sensing ion channel (ASIC) 3, as another acid-sensing nociceptor, and (iii) the P2X2/3 receptor, as an ATP-ligand nociceptor, on pain-like behavior in OVX mice. This inhibitor and antagonists were found to improve the threshold value of pain-like behavior in OVX mice. These results indicated that the skeletal pain accompanying osteoporosis is possibly associated with the acidic microenvironment and increased ATP level caused by osteoclast activation under a high bone turnover state.

  20. Methane and carbon monoxide production, oxidation, and turnover times in the Caribbean Sea as influenced by the Orinoco River

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, R.D.; Amador, J.A. )

    1993-02-15

    The surface distribution of CH[sub 4], photoproduction capacity of seawater for CO, and CH[sub 4] and CO microbial oxidation rates and turnover times were determined for the surface waters of the southeastern Carribean Sea and Gulf of Paria as affected by the Orinoco River. Measurements were made during the spring (low river flow) and the fall (high river flow) in order to determine the influence of Orinoco River discharge on these parameters. Methane concentrations were generally lower in the fall than in the spring. Low CH[sub 4] oxidation rates and similar surface distributions were observed during both seasons. Methane oxidation in the river plume was significantly higher in the fall. Potential CO photoproduction and CO oxidation rates were generally higher during the fall. Possible effects of the Orinoco River on potential CO photoproduction capacity were observed as far as Puerto Rico. Turnover times for CH[sub 4] were in the order of years, whereas CO turnover times were in the order of hours. The Orinoco River has a significant impact on the consumption of CO and CH[sub 4] and the photoproduction of CO in the southeastern Caribbean Sea, presumably resulting from inputs of riverine carbon and nutrients. 22 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. The Soft Underbelly of System Change: The Role of Leadership and Organizational Climate in Turnover during Statewide Behavioral Health Reform.

    PubMed

    Aarons, Gregory A; Sommerfeld, David H; Willging, Cathleen E

    2011-01-01

    This study examined leadership, organizational climate, staff turnover intentions, and voluntary turnover during a large-scale statewide behavioral health system reform. The initial data collection occurred nine months after initiation of the reform with a follow-up round of data collected 18 months later. A self-administered structured assessment was completed by 190 participants (administrators, support staff, providers) employed by 14 agencies. Key variables included leadership, organizational climate, turnover intentions, turnover, and reform-related financial stress ("low" versus "high") experienced by the agencies. Analyses revealed that positive leadership was related to a stronger empowering climate in both high and low stress agencies. However, the association between more positive leadership and lower demoralizing climate was evident only in high stress agencies. For both types of agencies empowering climate was negatively associated with turnover intentions, and demoralizing climate was associated with stronger turnover intentions. Turnover intentions were positively associated with voluntary turnover. Results suggest that strong leadership is particularly important in times of system and organizational change and may reduce poor climate associated with turnover intentions and turnover. Leadership and organizational context should be addressed to retain staff during these periods of systemic change.

  2. High count rate gamma camera with independent modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massari, R.; Ucci, A.; Campisi, C.; Scopinaro, F.; Soluri, A.

    2015-11-01

    Advances in nuclear medical imaging are based on the improvements of the detector's performance. Generally the research is focussed on the spatial resolution improvement. However, another important parameter is the acquisition time that can significantly affect performance in some clinical investigation (e.g. first-pass cardiac studies). At present, there are several clinical imaging systems which are able to solve these diagnostic requirements, such as the D-SPECT Cardiac Imaging System (Spectrum Dynamics) or the Nucline Cardiodesk Medical Imaging System (Mediso). Actually, these solutions are organ-specific dedicated systems, while it would be preferable having general purpose planar detectors with high counting rate. Our group has recently introduced the use of scintillation matrices whose size is equal to the overall area of a position sensitive photomultiplier tube (PSPMT) in order to design a modular gamma camera. This study allowed optimising the overall pixel identification by improving and controlling the light collection efficiency of each PSPMT. Although we achieved a solution for the problems about the dead area at the junction of the PSPMTs when they are set side by side. In this paper, we propose a modular gamma camera design as the basis to build large area detectors. The modular detector design allows us to achieve better counting performance. In this approach, each module that is made of one or more PSPMTs, can actually acquire data independently and simultaneously, increasing the overall detection efficiency. To verify the improvement in count rate capability we have built two detectors with a field of view of 5 × 5cm2, by using four R8900-C12 PSPMTs (Hamamatsu Photonics K.K.). Each PSPMT was coupled to a dedicated discrete scintillation structure designed to obtain a good homogeneity, high imaging performance and high efficiency. One of the detectors was designed as a standard gamma camera, while the other was composed by four independent

  3. Ultra High Bit-Rate Communications for Future Space Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudelzak, A. E.; Jha, V. K.; Pasmanik, G. A.

    2002-01-01

    systems. Needs of applications such as real-time surveillance of dynamic situations on the ground or in near space, video data on event scenes in search and rescue, real-time video communications with spacecraft, etc. can only be provided with signal carrying frequencies in the optical wavelength range. Today's optical free-space communication technologies promise to reach the performance quality of the ground optical fiber networks. Recent developments based on using the optical phase conjugation and photo- dynamic holography phenomena allow transmission of high data volumes (such as dynamic imagery and real-time video communications) between moving communication terminals. surveillance and communications with spacecraft (both within and beyond solar system) using non-linear optical systems. The advantage of the discussed concept is that it may not require lasers (as sources of the signal-carrying electromagnetic waves) on both communicating terminals. A combination of a limited number of ground-based laser stations with compact, light-weight passive non-linear optical systems on high and low orbits or on long-range spacecraft provides for reliable, ultra-high rate, economic systems for voice, data and video communications as well as real-time observations of Earth, near and deep space. presented.

  4. High rate copper and energy recovery in microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Rodenas Motos, Pau; Ter Heijne, Annemiek; van der Weijden, Renata; Saakes, Michel; Buisman, Cees J N; Sleutels, Tom H J A

    2015-01-01

    Bioelectrochemical systems (BESs) are a novel, promising technology for the recovery of metals. The prerequisite for upscaling from laboratory to industrial size is that high current and high power densities can be produced. In this study we report the recovery of copper from a copper sulfate stream (2 g L(-1) Cu(2+)) using a laboratory scale BES at high rate. To achieve this, we used a novel cell configuration to reduce the internal voltage losses of the system. At the anode, electroactive microorganisms produce electrons at the surface of an electrode, which generates a stable cell voltage of 485 mV when combined with a cathode where copper is reduced. In this system, a maximum current density of 23 A m(-2) in combination with a power density of 5.5 W m(-2) was produced. XRD analysis confirmed 99% purity in copper of copper deposited onto cathode surface. Analysis of voltage losses showed that at the highest current, most voltage losses occurred at the cathode, and membrane, while anode losses had the lowest contribution to the total voltage loss. These results encourage further development of BESs for bioelectrochemical metal recovery.

  5. High rate and stable cycling of lithium metal anode

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Jiangfeng; Henderson, Wesley A.; Xu, Wu; Bhattacharya, Priyanka; Engelhard, Mark; Borodin, Oleg; Zhang, Ji-Guang

    2015-01-01

    Lithium metal is an ideal battery anode. However, dendrite growth and limited Coulombic efficiency during cycling have prevented its practical application in rechargeable batteries. Herein, we report that the use of highly concentrated electrolytes composed of ether solvents and the lithium bis(fluorosulfonyl)imide salt enables the high-rate cycling of a lithium metal anode at high Coulombic efficiency (up to 99.1%) without dendrite growth. With 4 M lithium bis(fluorosulfonyl)imide in 1,2-dimethoxyethane as the electrolyte, a lithium|lithium cell can be cycled at 10 mA cm−2 for more than 6,000 cycles, and a copper|lithium cell can be cycled at 4 mA cm−2 for more than 1,000 cycles with an average Coulombic efficiency of 98.4%. These excellent performances can be attributed to the increased solvent coordination and increased availability of lithium ion concentration in the electrolyte. Further development of this electrolyte may enable practical applications for lithium metal anode in rechargeable batteries. PMID:25698340

  6. High rate copper and energy recovery in microbial fuel cells

    PubMed Central

    Rodenas Motos, Pau; ter Heijne, Annemiek; van der Weijden, Renata; Saakes, Michel; Buisman, Cees J. N.; Sleutels, Tom H. J. A.

    2015-01-01

    Bioelectrochemical systems (BESs) are a novel, promising technology for the recovery of metals. The prerequisite for upscaling from laboratory to industrial size is that high current and high power densities can be produced. In this study we report the recovery of copper from a copper sulfate stream (2 g L-1 Cu2+) using a laboratory scale BES at high rate. To achieve this, we used a novel cell configuration to reduce the internal voltage losses of the system. At the anode, electroactive microorganisms produce electrons at the surface of an electrode, which generates a stable cell voltage of 485 mV when combined with a cathode where copper is reduced. In this system, a maximum current density of 23 A m-2 in combination with a power density of 5.5 W m-2 was produced. XRD analysis confirmed 99% purity in copper of copper deposited onto cathode surface. Analysis of voltage losses showed that at the highest current, most voltage losses occurred at the cathode, and membrane, while anode losses had the lowest contribution to the total voltage loss. These results encourage further development of BESs for bioelectrochemical metal recovery. PMID:26150802

  7. Earth Science Mission Benefits of High Data Rate Satellite Communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, J. M.; Munger, J.; Emch, P. G.; Sen, B.; Gu, D.

    2013-12-01

    Satellite to ground communication bandwidth limitations place constraints on current earth remote sensing instruments which limit the spatial and spectral resolution of data transmitted to the ground for processing. Instruments such as VIIRS, CrIS and OMPS on the Soumi-NPP spacecraft must aggregate data both spatially and spectrally in order to fit inside current data rate constraints limiting the optimal use of the as-built sensors. Future planned missions such as PACE, TEMPO and DESDynI Radar will have to trade spatial and spectral resolution if increased communication band width is not made available. A number of high-impact, environmental remote sensing disciplines such as hurricane observation, mega-city air quality, wild fire detection and monitoring, and monitoring of coastal oceans would benefit dramatically from enabling the downlinking of sensor data at higher spatial and spectral resolutions. The enabling technologies of multi-Gbps Ka-Band communication and multi-Terabit SSRs are currently available with high technological maturity enabling high data volume mission requirements to be met with minimal mission constraints while utilizing only a very few ground sites from NASA's Near Earth Network (NEN). These enabling technologies will be described in detail with emphasis on benefits to future remote sensing missions currently under consideration by government agencies.

  8. Advances in high-rate uncooled detector fabrication at Raytheon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, S. H.; Kraft, R.; Medrano, A.; Kocian, T.; Bradstreet, D.; Williams, R.; Yang, T.

    2010-04-01

    Over the past two years Raytheon has made a major investment aimed at establishing a high volume uncooled manufacturing capability. This effort has addressed three elements of the uncooled value stream, namely bolometer fabrication, packaging and calibration/test. To facilitate a low cost / high volume source of bolometers Raytheon has formed a partnership with a high volume 200mm commercial silicon wafer fabrication. Over a 12 month period Raytheon has installed 200mm VOx deposition equipment, matched the metrology used on the Raytheon 150mm line, transferred the process flow used to fabricate Raytheon's double layer bolometer process and qualified the product. In this paper we will review the process transfer methodology and bolometer performance. To reduce bolometer packaging cost and increase production rates, Raytheon has implemented an automated packaging line. This line utilizes automated adhesive dispense, component pick and place, wire bonding and solder seal. In this paper we will review the process flow, qualification process and line capacity Calibration and test has traditionally been performed using a number of temperature chambers, with increased throughput being obtained by adding more chambers. This comes at the expense of increased test labor required to feed the chambers and an increased energy and floor space foot print. To avoid these collateral costs, Raytheon has implemented an automated robotic calibration cell capable of performing in excess of 5,000 calibrations a month. In this paper we will provide an overview of the calibration cell along with takt time and throughput data.

  9. Serum phosphorus adds to value of serum parathyroid hormone for assessment of bone turnover in renal osteodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Gentry, Jimmy; Webb, Jonathan; Davenport, Daniel; Malluche, Hartmut H

    2016-07-01

    It is well-established that parathyroid hormone (PTH) correlates with the level of bone turnover in patients with chronic kidney disease stage 5D (CKD-5D). Hyperphosphatemia is a well-established complication of end-stage renal disease and is usually attributed to dietary intake. This study evaluates the relationship between serum phosphorus levels and bone turnover in patients with CKD-5D. 93 patients with CKD-5D from the Kentucky Bone Registry who had sequentially undergone anterior iliac bone biopsies were reviewed. Undecalcified bone sections were qualitatively assessed for turnover and placed into a group with low turnover and a group with non-low (normal/high) turnover. Results of PTH and phosphorus concentrations in blood drawn at the time of biopsies were compared between the groups. PTH and phosphorus levels were significantly higher in the non-low turnover group compared to the low turnover group. Cutoff levels for PTH and phosphorus were tested for predictive power of bone turnover. Both PTH and phosphorus correlated with turnover. Adding serum phosphorus to serum PTH enhanced predictive power of PTH for low turnover. The vast majority of patients with serum phosphorus levels ≥ 6.0 mg/dL had non-low turnover, while the majority of those with low turnover had phosphorus values < 6.0 mg/dL. Classification and regression-tree analysis showed that elevated serum phosphorus (> 6.2 mg/dL) in patients with PTH < 440 pg/mL was helpful in diagnosing nonlow turnover in this range of PTH. In patients with PTH ranges of 440 - 814 pg/mL, serum phosphorus levels > 4.55 mg/dL ruled out low turnover bone disease. This suggests that not only dietary intake but also bone affects serum phosphorus levels.

  10. Coal plasticity at high heating rates and temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Gerjarusak, S.; Peters, W.A.; Howard, J.B.

    1992-09-01

    Effects of pressure, temperature, and coal type on coal plasticity were investigated. Seven coals, from the Argonne premium sample bank ranging from lignite to low volatile bituminous, were studied. Elevated pressures, up to 10 atm of helium, did not affect coal plasticity, but reducing pressure from atmosphere to vacuum resulted in diminished plasticity, i.e. a shorter plastic period and a higher minimum apparent viscosity. It is hypothesized that high pressure inhibits mass transport of metaplast to tar vapors, but also favors metaplast repolymerization into coke and char. Higher holding temperature decreased the coal plastic period. It is hypothesized that higher temperature increases mass transport of liquid metaplast to tar vapors and metaplast repolymerization to coke and char. Heating rate had essentially no effect on the individual softening temperatures of five different plastic coals. Possible explanations are that, depending on coal type, metaplast generation, by chemical bond breaking or physical melting, or both, is not strongly affected by heating rate. In particular, for medium and low volatile bituminous cools, there is evidence that generation of the metaplast responsible for initial softening involves largely chemical bond breaking as opposed to physical melting.

  11. Dynamic behaviour of birch and sequoia at high strain rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anatoly, Bragov; Andrey, Lomunov; Ivan, Sergeichev; Gray, George, III

    2005-07-01

    The paper presents results of experimental analysis for structural woods, i.e. birch and sequoia at high strain rates. Monotonic and cyclic compression testing at room temperature of these materials was performed by experimental Kolsky method, using the 20-mm diameter split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB). The cut out specimens were loaded along and across fibers of woods, as well as, in others angles of cutting out from wooden materials. There were obtained dynamic deformation diagrams in various above conditions for these materials. Directions of specimens' cutting out, as well as, confined conditions effect on mechanical dynamic properties of the woods tested. Loading and unloading branches of stress-strain diagrams obtained are nonlinear and strain rates sensitive. Post-failure behavior of woods' specimens tested results from various forms of their fracture, such cracking and spalling. Experimental stress-strain curves showed significant influence of cutting out angles of specimens on fracture stresses' values. Dynamic deformation diagrams at cyclic loading, obtained by original modification of SPHB, are also presented for tested materials. Alongside with the SHPB tests, plane-wave experiments were conducted and the shock adiabates for the wood samples were obtained.

  12. A smart repetitive-rate wideband high power microwave source

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Wei; Zhang, Jun; Qian, Bao-liang; Yang, Han-wu; Zhang, Zi-cheng

    2016-01-15

    A smart repetitive-rate wideband High Power Microwave (HPM) source based on the A6 Magnetron with Diffraction Output is described in this paper. The length of the HPM source is 30 cm and its weight is 35 kg. Computer simulations show that the source can produce microwave with central frequency of 1.91 GHz and bandwidth of about 11%. Experimental measurements show that the output microwave power from the source reaches in maximum 110 MW when the input electric power from the pulsed driver is ∼500 MW, which gives the power conversion efficiency 22%. Central frequency of the output HPM in the experiment is 1.94 GHz with the bandwidth ranging from 1.82 GHz to 2.02 GHz. The jitter of the output HPM power is lower than 3 dB when the source operates in the repetition mode with 50 Hz rate.

  13. Compact High Repetition Rate CO2 TEA Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohn, David B.; Hasselbeck, Michael P.; Affleck, Wayde H.; Eldridge, Robert E.; Moser, Thomas P.; Sasaki, Gregory R.; Watson, Tom A.; Bailey, Peter J.

    1989-07-01

    CO2 TEA lasers have been extensively developed at Hughes for a number of important military applications, including chemical defense, long range rangefinders, and uplink guidance control of projectiles. The devices are characterized by highly compact geometries using hermetically sealed, closed cycle gas flow with catalysts. Repetition rates are on the order of 200 Hz and output energies range from 100 mJ to to 300 mJ per pulse. Total prototype laser package volume and weight at the higher output energies is on the order of 1.5 ft3 and 40 pounds, respectively, and includes all components, requiring only an external source of 28 VDC. shot lifetimes have been achieved in closed cycle operation with room temperature catalysts for both the normal and 13C1602 isotopes. Wavelength tunability over 60 lines in the R and P branches of the 9.4 and 10.6 μm bands has been shown with emphasis on the 9P(42) line (of interest in chemical defense) where 170 mJ was obtained in multi-mode output. Rapid switching among lines at 10 Hz was achieved and extension in this rate by at least an order of magnitude is in progress.

  14. Modelling high data rate communication network access protocol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khanna, S.; Foudriat, E. C.; Paterra, Frank; Maly, Kurt J.; Overstreet, C. Michael

    1990-01-01

    Modeling of high data rate communication systems is different from the low data rate systems. Three simulations were built during the development phase of Carrier Sensed Multiple Access/Ring Network (CSMA/RN) modeling. The first was a model using SIMCRIPT based upon the determination and processing of each event at each node. The second simulation was developed in C based upon isolating the distinct object that can be identified as the ring, the message, the node, and the set of critical events. The third model further identified the basic network functionality by creating a single object, the node which includes the set of critical events which occur at the node. The ring structure is implicit in the node structure. This model was also built in C. Each model is discussed and their features compared. It should be stated that the language used was mainly selected by the model developer because of his past familiarity. Further the models were not built with the intent to compare either structure or language but because the complexity of the problem and initial results contained obvious errors, so alternative models were built to isolate, determine, and correct programming and modeling errors. The CSMA/RN protocol is discussed in sufficient detail to understand modeling complexities. Each model is described along with its features and problems. The models are compared and concluding observations and remarks are presented.

  15. Dystropathology increases energy expenditure and protein turnover in the mdx mouse model of duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Radley-Crabb, Hannah G; Marini, Juan C; Sosa, Horacio A; Castillo, Liliana I; Grounds, Miranda D; Fiorotto, Marta L

    2014-01-01

    The skeletal muscles in Duchenne muscular dystrophy and the mdx mouse model lack functional dystrophin and undergo repeated bouts of necrosis, regeneration, and growth. These processes have a high metabolic cost. However, the consequences for whole body energy and protein metabolism, and on the dietary requirements for these macronutrients at different stages of the disease, are not well-understood. This study used juvenile (4- to 5- wk-old) and adult (12- to 14-wk-old) male dystrophic C57BL/10ScSn-mdx/J and age-matched C57BL/10ScSn/J control male mice to measure total and resting energy expenditure, food intake, spontaneous activity, body composition, whole body protein turnover, and muscle protein synthesis rates. In juvenile mdx mice that have extensive muscle damage, energy expenditure, muscle protein synthesis, and whole body protein turnover rates were higher than in age-matched controls. Adaptations in food intake and decreased activity were insufficient to meet the increased energy and protein needs of juvenile mdx mice and resulted in stunted growth. In (non-growing) adult mdx mice with less severe dystropathology, energy expenditure, muscle protein synthesis, and whole body protein turnover rates were also higher than in age-matched controls. Food intake was sufficient to meet their protein and energy needs, but insufficient to result in fat deposition. These data show that dystropathology impacts the protein and energy needs of mdx mice and that tailored dietary interventions are necessary to redress this imbalance. If not met, the resultant imbalance blunts growth, and may limit the benefits of therapies designed to protect and repair dystrophic muscles.

  16. Production of carboxylates from high rate activated sludge through fermentation.

    PubMed

    Cagnetta, C; Coma, M; Vlaeminck, S E; Rabaey, K

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this work was to study the key parameters affecting fermentation of high rate activated A-sludge to carboxylates, including pH, temperature, inoculum, sludge composition and iron content. The maximum volatile fatty acids production was 141mgCg(-1) VSSfed, at pH 7. Subsequently the potential for carboxylate and methane production for A-sludge from four different plants at pH 7 and 35°C were compared. Initial BOD of the sludge appeared to be key determining carboxylate yield from A-sludge. Whereas methanogenesis could be correlated linearly to the quantity of ferric used for coagulation, fermentation did not show a dependency on iron presence. This difference may enable a strategy whereby A-stage sludge is separated to achieve fermentation, and iron dosing for phosphate removal is only implemented at the B-stage.

  17. Single chain stochastic polymer modeling at high strain rates.

    SciTech Connect

    Harstad, E. N.; Harlow, Francis Harvey,; Schreyer, H. L.

    2001-01-01

    Our goal is to develop constitutive relations for the behavior of a solid polymer during high-strain-rate deformations. In contrast to the classic thermodynamic techniques for deriving stress-strain response in static (equilibrium) circumstances, we employ a statistical-mechanics approach, in which we evolve a probability distribution function (PDF) for the velocity fluctuations of the repeating units of the chain. We use a Langevin description for the dynamics of a single repeating unit and a Lioville equation to describe the variations of the PDF. Moments of the PDF give the conservation equations for a single polymer chain embedded in other similar chains. To extract single-chain analytical constitutive relations these equations have been solved for representative loading paths. By this process we discover that a measure of nonuniform chain link displacement serves this purpose very well. We then derive an evolution equation for the descriptor function, with the result being a history-dependent constitutive relation.

  18. Ka-band MMIC microstrip array for high rate communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, R. Q.; Raquet, C. A.; Tolleson, J. B.; Sanzgiri, S. M.

    1991-01-01

    In a recent technology assessment of alternative communication systems for the space exploration initiative (SEI), Ka-band (18 to 40 GHz) communication technology was identified to meet the mission requirements of telecommunication, navigation, and information management. Compared to the lower frequency bands, Ka-band antennas offer higher gain and broader bandwidths; thus, they are more suitable for high data rate communications. Over the years, NASA has played an important role in monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) phased array technology development, and currently, has an ongoing contract with Texas Instrument (TI) to develop a modular Ka-band MMIC microstrip subarray (NAS3-25718). The TI contract emphasizes MMIC integration technology development and stipulates using existing MMIC devices to minimize the array development cost. The objective of this paper is to present array component technologies and integration techniques used to construct the subarray modules.

  19. Wastewater treatment high rate algal ponds for biofuel production.

    PubMed

    Park, J B K; Craggs, R J; Shilton, A N

    2011-01-01

    While research and development of algal biofuels are currently receiving much interest and funding, they are still not commercially viable at today's fossil fuel prices. However, a niche opportunity may exist where algae are grown as a by-product of high rate algal ponds (HRAPs) operated for wastewater treatment. In addition to significantly better economics, algal biofuel production from wastewater treatment HRAPs has a much smaller environmental footprint compared to commercial algal production HRAPs which consume freshwater and fertilisers. In this paper the critical parameters that limit algal cultivation, production and harvest are reviewed and practical options that may enhance the net harvestable algal production from wastewater treatment HRAPs including CO(2) addition, species control, control of grazers and parasites and bioflocculation are discussed.

  20. Parallel Modem Architectures for High-Data-Rate Space Modems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satorius, E.

    2014-08-01

    Existing software-defined radios (SDRs) for space are limited in data volume by several factors, including bandwidth, space-qualified analog-to-digital converter (ADC) technology, and processor throughput, e.g., the throughput of a space-qualified field-programmable gate array (FPGA). In an attempt to further improve the throughput of space-based SDRs and to fully exploit the newer and more capable space-qualified technology (ADCs, FPGAs), we are evaluating parallel transmitter/receiver architectures for space SDRs. These architectures would improve data volume for both deep-space and particularly proximity (e.g., relay) links. In this article, designs for FPGA implementation of a high-rate parallel modem are presented as well as both fixed- and floating-point simulated performance results based on a functional design that is suitable for FPGA implementation.

  1. Human naïve regulatory T-cells feature high steady-state turnover and are maintained by IL-7.

    PubMed

    Silva, Susana L; Albuquerque, Adriana S; Serra-Caetano, Ana; Foxall, Russell B; Pires, Ana R; Matoso, Paula; Fernandes, Susana M; Ferreira, João; Cheynier, Rémi; Victorino, Rui M M; Caramalho, Iris; Barata, João T; Sousa, Ana E

    2016-03-15

    Naïve FoxP3-expressing regulatory T-cells (Tregs) are essential to control immune responses via continuous replenishment of the activated-Treg pool with thymus-committed suppressor cells. The mechanisms underlying naïve-Treg maintenance throughout life in face of the age-associated thymic involution remain unclear. We found that in adults thymectomized early in infancy the naïve-Treg pool is remarkably well preserved, in contrast to conventional naïve CD4 T-cells. Naïve-Tregs featured high levels of cycling and pro-survival markers, even in healthy individuals, and contrasted with other circulating naïve/memory CD4 T-cell subsets in terms of their strong γc-cytokine-dependent signaling, particularly in response to IL-7. Accordingly, ex-vivo stimulation of naïve-Tregs with IL-7 induced robust cytokine-dependent signaling, Bcl-2 expression, and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)-dependent proliferation, whilst preserving naïve phenotype and suppressive capacity. Altogether, our data strongly implicate IL-7 in the thymus-independent long-term survival of functional naïve-Tregs, and highlight the potential of targeting the IL-7 pathway to modulate Tregs in different clinical settings.

  2. The Soft Underbelly of System Change: The Role of Leadership and Organizational Climate in Turnover during Statewide Behavioral Health Reform

    PubMed Central

    Aarons, Gregory A.; Sommerfeld, David H.; Willging, Cathleen E.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined leadership, organizational climate, staff turnover intentions, and voluntary turnover during a large-scale statewide behavioral health system reform. The initial data collection occurred nine months after initiation of the reform with a follow-up round of data collected 18 months later. A self-administered structured assessment was completed by 190 participants (administrators, support staff, providers) employed by 14 agencies. Key variables included leadership, organizational climate, turnover intentions, turnover, and reform-related financial stress (“low” versus “high”) experienced by the agencies. Analyses revealed that positive leadership was related to a stronger empowering climate in both high and low stress agencies. However, the association between more positive leadership and lower demoralizing climate was evident only in high stress agencies. For both types of agencies empowering climate was negatively associated with turnover intentions, and demoralizing climate was associated with stronger turnover intentions. Turnover intentions were positively associated with voluntary turnover. Results suggest that strong leadership is particularly important in times of system and organizational change and may reduce poor climate associated with turnover intentions and turnover. Leadership and organizational context should be addressed to retain staff during these periods of systemic change. PMID:22229021

  3. An integrated CMOS high data rate transceiver for video applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaping, Liang; Dazhi, Che; Cheng, Liang; Lingling, Sun

    2012-07-01

    This paper presents a 5 GHz CMOS radio frequency (RF) transceiver built with 0.18 μm RF-CMOS technology by using a proprietary protocol, which combines the new IEEE 802.11n features such as multiple-in multiple-out (MIMO) technology with other wireless technologies to provide high data rate robust real-time high definition television (HDTV) distribution within a home environment. The RF frequencies cover from 4.9 to 5.9 GHz: the industrial, scientific and medical (ISM) band. Each RF channel bandwidth is 20 MHz. The transceiver utilizes a direct up transmitter and low-IF receiver architecture. A dual-quadrature direct up conversion mixer is used that achieves better than 35 dB image rejection without any on chip calibration. The measurement shows a 6 dB typical receiver noise figure and a better than 33 dB transmitter error vector magnitude (EVM) at -3 dBm output power.

  4. High strain rate fracture behaviour of fused silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggiero, A.; Iannitti, G.; Testa, G.; Limido, J.; Lacome, J. L.; Olovsson, L.; Ferraro, M.; Bonora, N.

    2014-05-01

    Fused silica is a high purity synthetic amorphous silicon dioxide characterized by low thermal expansion coefficient, excellent optical qualities and exceptional transmittance over a wide spectral range. Because of its wide use in the military industry as window material, it may be subjected to high-energy ballistic impacts. Under such dynamic conditions, post-yield response of the ceramic as well as the strain rate related effects become significant and should be accounted for in the constitutive modelling. In this study, the Johnson-Holmquist (J-H) model parameters have been identified by inverse calibration technique, on selected validation test configurations, according to the procedure described hereafter. Numerical simulations were performed with LS-DYNA and IMPETUS-FEA, a general non-linear finite element software which offers NURBS finite element technology for the simulation of large deformation and fracture in materials. In order to overcome numerical drawbacks associated with element erosion, a modified version of the J-H model is proposed.

  5. The strain-rate sensitivity of high-strength high-toughness steels.

    SciTech Connect

    Dilmore, M.F.; Crenshaw, Thomas B.; Boyce, Brad Lee

    2006-01-01

    The present study examines the strain-rate sensitivity of four high strength, high-toughness alloys at strain rates ranging from 0.0002 s-1 to 200 s-1: Aermet 100, a modified 4340, modified HP9-4-20, and a recently developed Eglin AFB steel alloy, ES-1c. A refined dynamic servohydraulic method was used to perform tensile tests over this entire range. Each of these alloys exhibit only modest strain-rate sensitivity. Specifically, the strain-rate sensitivity exponent m, is found to be in the range of 0.004-0.007 depending on the alloy. This corresponds to a {approx}10% increase in the yield strength over the 7-orders of magnitude change in strain-rate. Interestingly, while three of the alloys showed a concominant {approx}3-10% drop in their ductility with increasing strain-rate, the ES1-c alloy actually exhibited a 25% increase in ductility with increasing strain-rate. Fractography suggests the possibility that at higher strain-rates ES-1c evolves towards a more ductile dimple fracture mode associated with microvoid coalescence.

  6. New liquid cathode electrolytes in high rate cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Jean W.; Kalisz, David W.; Blomgren, George E.

    1990-03-01

    The power limitations of liquid oxyhalide batteries were explored by examining the physical and electrical properties of new electrolytes. Conductivity, kinematic viscosity, and specific gravity of electrolytes were measured inside a specially adapted argon filled drybox. Liquid cathode oxyhalide electrolytes designed to enhance power density were tested first in demountable test cells and then, the most promising, in hermetically sealed high rate F size jellyroll cells. For F cells, the capacity on constant current discharge was measured at 3.5 and 12.5 mA/sq cm for fresh cells at 21 C and at 3.5 mA/sq cm for cells stored 4 weeks at 54 C then discharged at -30 C. An optimized cell design with thicker electrodes was developed for testing electrolytes with higher conductivity than LiAlCl4-SOCl2. The best capacity at 2A was achieved with LiGaCl4-SOCl2 or LiAlCl4-SOCl2. The best capacity at 7A was achieved with LiGaCl4-SOCl2. LiGaCl4 in SOCl2 was found to discharge at higher temperatures than LiAlCl4 in SOCl2. Imidazolium, aralkylammonium, and sulfonium chlorides were found to have high solubility and conductivity in thionyl chloride, but lithium was found to be passive in contact with these solutions and most metals corroded excessively. These salts mixed with aluminum chloride were much less aggressive and when mixed with lithium salts in addition gave high conductivity and test cell capacities.

  7. Rate of Change Knowledge in High School and College Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hauger, Garnet Smith

    Rate of change has its basis in everyday experience like growth and motion and is a fundamental organizing idea for relationships between varying quantities. In this paper three types of rate of change knowledge for functions are discussed: global, interval, and point-wise. Each of these types of rate of change knowledge can be examined using…

  8. Flowmeter measures flow rates of high temperature fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vary, A.

    1966-01-01

    Flowmeter in which flow rate is determined by measuring the position and thus the displacement of an internal float acted upon by the flowing fluid determines the flow rates of various liquid metals at elevated temperatures. Viscous forces cause the float to move from its mounted position, affording several means for measuring this motion and the flow rate.

  9. An infrared high rate video imager for various space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svedhem, Hâkan; Koschny, Detlef

    2010-05-01

    Modern spacecraft with high data transmission capabilities have opened up the possibility to fly video rate imagers in space. Several fields concerned with observations of transient phenomena can benefit significantly from imaging at video frame rate. Some applications are observations and characterization of bolides/meteors, sprites, lightning, volcanic eruptions, and impacts on airless bodies. Applications can be found both on low and high Earth orbiting spacecraft as well as on planetary and lunar orbiters. The optimum wavelength range varies depending on the application but we will focus here on the near infrared, partly since it allows exploration of a new field and partly because it, in many cases, allows operation both during day and night. Such an instrument has to our knowledge never flown in space so far. The only sensors of a similar kind fly on US defense satellites for monitoring launches of ballistic missiles. The data from these sensors, however, is largely inaccessible to scientists. We have developed a bread-board version of such an instrument, the SPOSH-IR. The instrument is based on an earlier technology development - SPOSH - a Smart Panoramic Optical Sensor Head, for operation in the visible range, but with the sensor replace by a cooled IR detector and new optics. The instrument is using a Sofradir 320x256 pixel HgCdTe detector array with 30µm pixel size, mounted directly on top of a four stage thermoelectric Peltier cooler. The detector-cooler combination is integrated into an evacuated closed package with a glass window on its front side. The detector has a sensitive range between 0.8 and 2.5 µm. The optical part is a seven lens design with a focal length of 6 mm and a FOV 90deg by 72 deg optimized for use at SWIR. The detector operates at 200K while the optics operates at ambient temperature. The optics and electronics for the bread-board has been designed and built by Jena-Optronik, Jena, Germany. This talk will present the design and the

  10. An asteroid impact in the Late Triassic triggered mid-Norian radiolarian faunal turnover in the Panthalassa Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onoue, T.; Sato, H.; Yamashita, D.; Ikehara, M.; Yasukawa, K.; Fujinaga, K.; Kato, Y.; Matsuoka, A.

    2015-12-01

    Anomalously high platinum group element (PGE) concentrations in Upper Triassic (middle-upper Norian) pelagic bedded chert succession in Japan, have been attributed to an extraterrestrial source and impact event that formed the 90-km-diameter Manicouagan crater in Canada. Previous geochemical studies have revealed that the anomalously high PGE abundances resulted from a large chondritic impactor (3.3-7.8 km in diameter). Here we report evidence that the Late Triassic impact triggered the remarkable faunal turnover of siliceous plankton (radiolaria) in the Panthalassa Ocean. Radiolarian species data indicate that this faunal turnover records the largest extinction and origination rates within the 30 Myr interval in the Late Triassic to earliest Jurassic. Our high-resolution biostratigraphic, sedimentological and geochemical data revealed that there are two paleoenvironmental events in the initial phase of the radiolarian faunal turnover interval: (1) the post-impact shutdown of primary productivity within the timespan of 104 years, and (2) significant and sustained reduction in the sinking flux of radiolarian silica for 0.4-0.6 Myr after the impact. A sharp reduction in marine primary and secondary productivity, triggered by a large impact, may have also played an important role in the extinction of Norian marine faunas (ammonoids, monotid bivalves, and conodonts) in the Panthalassa Ocean.

  11. Rapid and persistent change of microbial community and gross N turnover under experimentally simulated climate change conditions in alpine grassland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Changhui; Chen, Zhe; Unteregelsbacher, Sebastian; Gschwendtner, Silvia; Schloter, Michael; Butterbach-Bahl, Klaus; Dannenmann, Michael

    2013-04-01

    Alpine grasslands of Central Europe are exposed to strong warming and to altered precipitation patterns, suggesting that ecosystem nitrogen (N) cycling may be vulnerable to future climatic conditions. In order to investigate the response of soil microbial community and N transformations to predicted climate change conditions, we conducted an ecosystem manipulation experiment following the "space for time" approach in the TERENO (Terrestrial Environmental Observatories) pre-alpine grassland observatory. For this purpose, we dislocated 200 mini-lysimeters containing intact plant-soil systems down an altitudinal gradient from 860m to 550m above sea level, with corresponding control transfers within the high altitude site. After an equilibration period of 2.5 years, a full annual cycle of gross rates of N turnover as well as microbial biomass- and -community dynamics was monitored based on 15 sampling dates in two soil layers. For the monitored year, simulation of climate change via lysimeter transfer had increased mean annual soil temperature in 5 cm depth on average by 2.4 °C, but on the other hand promoted soil frost in winter due to reduced snow cover. Soil moisture was decreased on average by 20%. Gross N turnover and the abundance of N cycle genes in soil were characterized by pronounced seasonal dynamics, with both summer and winter representing key periods for the annual sum of N turnover. The abundance of ammonia oxidizing archae (AOA) genes exceeded the abundance of ammonia oxidizing bacterial (AOB) genes by approximately three orders of magnitude. Climate change simulation strongly increased the abundance of both AOB and AOA gene copies in soil, consistent with an increase of annual gross nitrification rates by 41%. Gross N mineralization was even increased by 141% in the climate change treatment. The abundance of AOA genes in soil explained 80% of the variability of gross nitrification rates over the full annual course. These results provide strong

  12. High-dose-rate brachytherapy in uterine cervical carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, Firuza D. . E-mail: patelfd@glide.net.in; Rai, Bhavana; Mallick, Indranil; Sharma, Suresh C.

    2005-05-01

    Purpose: High-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy is in wide use for curative treatment of cervical cancer. The American Brachytherapy Society has recommended that the individual fraction size be <7.5 Gy and the range of fractions should be four to eight; however, many fractionation schedules, varying from institution to institution, are in use. We use 9 Gy/fraction of HDR in two to five fractions in patients with carcinoma of the uterine cervix. We found that our results and toxicity were comparable to those reported in the literature and hereby present our experience with this fractionation schedule. Methods and Materials: A total of 121 patients with Stage I-III carcinoma of the uterine cervix were treated with HDR brachytherapy between 1996 and 2000. The total number of patients analyzed was 113. The median patient age was 53 years, and the histopathologic type was squamous cell carcinoma in 93% of patients. The patients were subdivided into Groups 1 and 2. In Group 1, 18 patients with Stage Ib-IIb disease, tumor size <4 cm, and preserved cervical anatomy underwent simultaneous external beam radiotherapy to the pelvis to a dose of 40 Gy in 20 fractions within 4 weeks with central shielding and HDR brachytherapy of 9 Gy/fraction, given weekly, and interdigitated with external beam radiotherapy. The 95 patients in Group 2, who had Stage IIb-IIIb disease underwent external beam radiotherapy to the pelvis to a dose of 46 Gy in 23 fractions within 4.5 weeks followed by two sessions of HDR intracavitary brachytherapy of 9 Gy each given 1 week apart. The follow-up range was 3-7 years (median, 36.4 months). Late toxicity was graded according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group criteria. Results: The 5-year actuarial local control and disease-free survival rate was 74.5% and 62.0%, respectively. The actuarial local control rate at 5 years was 100% for Stage I, 80% for Stage II, and 67.2% for Stage III patients. The 5-year actuarial disease-free survival rate was 88.8% for

  13. Coherent Detection of High-Rate Optical PPM Signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vilnrotter, Victor; Fernandez, Michela Munoz

    2006-01-01

    A method of coherent detection of high-rate pulse-position modulation (PPM) on a received laser beam has been conceived as a means of reducing the deleterious effects of noise and atmospheric turbulence in free-space optical communication using focal-plane detector array technologies. In comparison with a receiver based on direct detection of the intensity modulation of a PPM signal, a receiver based on the present method of coherent detection performs well at much higher background levels. In principle, the coherent-detection receiver can exhibit quantum-limited performance despite atmospheric turbulence. The key components of such a receiver include standard receiver optics, a laser that serves as a local oscillator, a focal-plane array of photodetectors, and a signal-processing and data-acquisition assembly needed to sample the focal-plane fields and reconstruct the pulsed signal prior to detection. The received PPM-modulated laser beam and the local-oscillator beam are focused onto the photodetector array, where they are mixed in the detection process. The two lasers are of the same or nearly the same frequency. If the two lasers are of different frequencies, then the coherent detection process is characterized as heterodyne and, using traditional heterodyne-detection terminology, the difference between the two laser frequencies is denoted the intermediate frequency (IF). If the two laser beams are of the same frequency and remain aligned in phase, then the coherent detection process is characterized as homodyne (essentially, heterodyne detection at zero IF). As a result of the inherent squaring operation of each photodetector, the output current includes an IF component that contains the signal modulation. The amplitude of the IF component is proportional to the product of the local-oscillator signal amplitude and the PPM signal amplitude. Hence, by using a sufficiently strong local-oscillator signal, one can make the PPM-modulated IF signal strong enough to

  14. Process for High-Rate Fabrication of Alumina Nanotemplates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myung, Nosang; Fleurial, Jean-Pierre; Yun, Minhee; West, William; Choi, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    An anodizing process, at an early stage of development at the time of reporting the information for this article, has shown promise as a means of fabricating alumina nanotemplates integrated with silicon wafers. Alumina nanotemplates are basically layers of alumina, typically several microns thick, in which are formed approximately regular hexagonal arrays of holes having typical diameters of the order of 10 to 100 nm. Interest in alumina nanotemplates has grown in recent years because they have been found to be useful as templates in the fabrication of nanoscale magnetic, electronic, optoelectronic, and other devices. The present anodizing process is attractive for the fabrication of alumina nanotemplates integrated with silicon wafers in two respects: (1) the process involves self-ordering of the holes; that is, the holes as formed by the process are spontaneously arranged in approximately regular hexagonal arrays; and (2) the rates of growth (that is, elongation) of the holes are high enough to make the process compatible with other processes used in the mass production of integrated circuits. In preparation for fabrication of alumina nanotemplates in this process, one first uses electron-beam evaporation to deposit thin films of titanium, followed by thin films of aluminum, on silicon wafers. Then the alumina nanotemplates are formed by anodizing the aluminum layers, as described below. In experiments in which the process was partially developed, the titanium films were 200 A thick and the aluminum films were 5 m thick. The aluminum films were oxidized to alumina, and the arrays of holes were formed by anodizing the aluminum in aqueous solutions of sulfuric and/or oxalic acid at room temperature (see figure). The diameters, spacings, and rates of growth of the holes were found to depend, variously, on the composition of the anodizing solution, the applied current, or the applied potential, as follows: In galvanostatically controlled anodizing, regardless of the

  15. High rate composting of herbal pharmaceutical industry solid waste.

    PubMed

    Ali, M; Duba, K S; Kalamdhad, A S; Bhatia, A; Khursheed, A; Kazmi, A A; Ahmed, N

    2012-01-01

    High rate composting studies of hard to degrade herbal wastes were conducted in a 3.5 m(3) capacity rotary drum composter. Studies were spread out in four trials: In trial 1 and 2, one and two turns per day rotation was observed, respectively, by mixing of herbal industry waste with cattle (buffalo) manure at a ratio of 3:1 on wet weight basis. In trial 3 inocula was added in raw waste to enhance the degradation and in trial 4 composting of a mixture of vegetable market waste and herbal waste was conducted at one turn per day. Results demonstrated that the operation of the rotary drum at one turn a day (trial 1) could provide the most conducive composting conditions and co-composting (trial 4) gave better quality compost in terms of temperature, moisture, nitrogen, and Solvita maturity index. In addition a FT-IR study also revealed that trial 1 and trial 4 gave quality compost in terms of stability and maturity due to the presence of more intense peaks in the aromatic region and less intense peaks were found in the aliphatic region compared with trial 2 and trial 3.

  16. An All-Digital High Data-Rate Parallel Receiver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, M.; Chen, C.-C.; Grebowsky, G.; Gray, A.

    1997-07-01

    The all-digital, high data-rate parallel receiver that is currently being developed jointly by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) is presented. The role of JPL has been to analyze and simulate the receiver architecture and subsystems. Implementation of the receiver using field-programmable gate arrays (FPGAs) and subsequent application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) design take place at GSFC. The parallel receiver architecture that is currently being implemented differs from the original multirate filter-bank-based parallel architecture that was first developed by JPL. This alternate parallel receiver (APRX) is essentially a frequency-domain implementation of detection filtering and symbol-timing correction and is significantly easier to implement than the original version of the parallel receiver (PRX). It is shown that the APRX is equivalent to both the PRX and the conventional serial receiver in terms of performance. Results on the effect of analog antialiasing filter bandwidth and analog-to-digital sampling offset on the receiver performance are presented, along with discussion and results of the frequency-domain digital data-transition tracking-loop simulation.

  17. Substrate inhibition and control for high rate biogas production

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, H.S.

    1982-01-01

    This research addresses a critical aspect of the technical feasibility of biogas recovery with poultry manure using anaerobic digestion, namely, inhibition and toxicity factors limiting methane generation under high rate conditions. The research was designed to identify the limiting factors and to examine alternative pretreatment and in situ control methods for the anaerobic digestion of poultry manure as an energy producing system. Biogas production was indicated by the daily gas volume produced per unit digester capacity. Enhanced biogas generation from the anaerobic digester systems using poultry manure was studied in laboratory- and pilot-scale digester operations. It was found that ammonia nitrogen concentration above 4000 mg/l was inhibitory to biogas production. Pretreatment of the manure by elutriation was effective for decreasing inhibitory/toxic conditions. Increased gas production resulted without an indication of serious inhibition by increased volatile acids, indicating a limitation of available carbon sources. For poultry manure digestion, the optimum pH range was 7.1 to 7.6. Annual costs for pretreatment/biogas systems for 10,000, 30,000 and 50,000 birds were estimated and compared with annual surplus energy produced. The economic break-even point was achieved in digesters for greater than 30,000 birds. Capital cost of the digester system was estimated to be $18,300 with annual costs around $4000. It is anticipated that the digester system could be economically applied to smaller farms as energy costs increase.

  18. Cassini High Rate Detector V5.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Economou, T.; Didonna, P.

    2009-06-01

    The High Rate Detector (HRD) from the University of Chicago is an independent part of the CDA instrument on the Cassini Orbiter that measures the dust flux and particle mass distribution of dust particles hitting the HRD detectors. This data set includes all data from the HRD through the end of 2008. Please refer to Srama et al. (2004) for a detailed HRD description. --Apple-Mail-2--243167724 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII; format=flowed; delsp=yes Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit On Aug 5, 2008, at 1:54 PM, Carolyn Stern Grant wrote: >> I am preparing to send you a new batch of publications for >> inclusion in the ADS system. I notice that I never got a response >> from you to the following question. Should I send the publications >> in >> the format we have used in the past, or would you like us to change >> our software to fix this problem? (see your earlier message >> attached.) > > Hi Carol, > > Go ahead and use the format you've used in the past. > > Thanks, > -Carolyn > ************************************************************************* > Carolyn Stern Grant Astrophysics Data System (ADS) > stern@cfa.harvard.edu Center for Astrophysics > 617-495-7154 (voicemail) 60 Garden Street MS 67 > 617-495-7356 fax Cambridge, MA 02138 > ************************************************************************* > > --Apple-Mail-2--243167724--

  19. Smart Payload Development for High Data Rate Instrument Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pingree, Paula J.; Norton, Charles D.

    2007-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the development of smart payloads instruments systems with high data rates. On-board computation has become a bottleneck for advanced science instrument and engineering capabilities. In order to improve the computation capability on board, smart payloads have been proposed. A smart payload is a Localized instrument, that can offload the flight processor of extensive computing cycles, simplify the interfaces, and minimize the dependency of the instrument on the flight system. This has been proposed for the Mars mission, Mars Atmospheric Trace Molecule Spectroscopy (MATMOS). The design of this system is discussed; the features of the Virtex-4, are discussed, and the technical approach is reviewed. The proposed Hybrid Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) technology has been shown to deliver breakthrough performance by tightly coupling hardware and software. Smart Payload designs for instruments such as MATMOS can meet science data return requirements with more competitive use of available on-board resources and can provide algorithm acceleration in hardware leading to implementation of better (more advanced) algorithms in on-board systems for improved science data return

  20. Algal biofuels from wastewater treatment high rate algal ponds.

    PubMed

    Craggs, R J; Heubeck, S; Lundquist, T J; Benemann, J R

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines the potential of algae biofuel production in conjunction with wastewater treatment. Current technology for algal wastewater treatment uses facultative ponds, however, these ponds have low productivity (∼10 tonnes/ha.y), are not amenable to cultivating single algal species, require chemical flocculation or other expensive processes for algal harvest, and do not provide consistent nutrient removal. Shallow, paddlewheel-mixed high rate algal ponds (HRAPs) have much higher productivities (∼30 tonnes/ha.y) and promote bioflocculation settling which may provide low-cost algal harvest. Moreover, HRAP algae are carbon-limited and daytime addition of CO(2) has, under suitable climatic conditions, the potential to double production (to ∼60 tonnes/ha.y), improve bioflocculation algal harvest, and enhance wastewater nutrient removal. Algae biofuels (e.g. biogas, ethanol, biodiesel and crude bio-oil), could be produced from the algae harvested from wastewater HRAPs, The wastewater treatment function would cover the capital and operation costs of algal production, with biofuel and recovered nutrient fertilizer being by-products. Greenhouse gas abatement results from both the production of the biofuels and the savings in energy consumption compared to electromechanical treatment processes. However, to achieve these benefits, further research is required, particularly the large-scale demonstration of wastewater treatment HRAP algal production and harvest.

  1. Accuracy of High-Rate GPS for Seismology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elosegui, P.; Davis, J. L.; Oberlander, D.; Baena, R.; Ekstrom, G.

    2006-01-01

    We built a device for translating a GPS antenna on a positioning table to simulate the ground motions caused by an earthquake. The earthquake simulator is accurate to better than 0.1 mm in position, and provides the "ground truth" displacements for assessing the technique of high-rate GPS. We found that the root-mean-square error of the 1-Hz GPS position estimates over the 15-min duration of the simulated seismic event was 2.5 mm, with approximately 96% of the observations in error by less than 5 mm, and is independent of GPS antenna motion. The error spectrum of the GPS estimates is approximately flicker noise, with a 50% decorrelation time for the position error of approx.1.6 s. We that, for the particular event simulated, the spectrum of dependent error in the GPS measurements. surface deformations exceeds the GPS error spectrum within a finite band. More studies are required to determine whether a generally optimal bandwidth exists for a target group of seismic events.

  2. A high rate clarifier for load levelling in sewerage systems.

    PubMed

    Jago, R A; Davey, A; Li, H

    2003-01-01

    The combining of chemically assisted clarification with a proprietary physical separation technology has led to a high rate process for clarifying flocculated sewage and other waste streams. This hybrid physico-chemical system, known as the CDS Fine Solids Separation (FSS) System, was developed over a two year period within a sewage treatment plant environment. This paper summarises the results of a recent field trial of the system with a Victorian water authority which experiences heavy loading of sewers in a coastal town during holiday periods. The trial sought to evaluate the FSS as a tool for smoothing the load on the 11 km long sewer to the sewage treatment plant (STP). The FSS system could possibly enable the costly augmentation of the sewer to be deferred, particularly as the capacity of the existing sewer pipe is satisfactory for most of the year. Water quality parameters were determined for a range of flowrates and operational conditions over a two month period. Large reductions were achieved in TSS, TP, FC, turbidity and BOD5, with only minimal reductions in NH3 and TON. These results showed that the FSS could meet the authority's objectives for load levelling and would provide a 20-25% increase in effective sewer capacity. The data are also discussed in terms of possible use of the effluent from the FSS for water reuse applications.

  3. Strain rate viscoelastic analysis of soft and highly hydrated biomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Tirella, A; Mattei, G; Ahluwalia, A

    2014-01-01

    Measuring the viscoelastic behavior of highly hydrated biological materials is challenging because of their intrinsic softness and labile nature. In these materials, it is difficult to avoid prestress and therefore to establish precise initial stress and strain conditions for lumped parameter estimation using creep or stress-relaxation (SR) tests. We describe a method ( or epsilon dot method) for deriving the viscoelastic parameters of soft hydrated biomaterials which avoids prestress and can be used to rapidly test degradable samples. Standard mechanical tests are first performed compressing samples using different strain rates. The dataset obtained is then analyzed to mathematically derive the material's viscoelastic parameters. In this work a stable elastomer, polydimethylsiloxane, and a labile hydrogel, gelatin, were first tested using the, in parallel SR was used to compare lumped parameter estimation. After demonstrating that the elastic parameters are equivalent and that the estimation of short-time constants is more precise using the proposed method, the viscoelastic behavior of porcine liver was investigated using this approach. The results show that the constitutive parameters of hepatic tissue can be quickly quantified without the application of any prestress and before the onset of time-dependent degradation phenomena. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 102A: 3352–3360, 2014 PMID:23946054

  4. Theoretical analysis of the importance of recycling in measurements of protein turnover by constant infusion of a labelled amino acid.

    PubMed

    Slevin, Keith; Waterlow, John

    2008-07-07

    In studies of whole body protein turnover, recycling of tracer from the breakdown of labelled protein is usually neglected; this neglect may introduce a significant error. A three-pool model with fast and slowly turning over protein pools has been used to calculate recycling rates over a range of sizes and turnover rates of the protein pools. Complete and approximate solutions of the equations are given. The recycling rate of 1% per hour would fit the available data on the turnover rates of human tissue proteins.

  5. Diagnosing turnover times of carbon in terrestrial ecosystems to address global climate co-variability and for model evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalhais, Nuno; Thurner, Martin; Forkel, Matthias; Beer, Christian; Reichstein, Markus

    2016-04-01

    The response of the global terrestrial carbon cycle to climate change and the associated climate-carbon feedback has been shown to be highly uncertain. Ultimately this response depends on how carbon assimilation by vegetation changes relatively to the effective mean turnover time of carbon in vegetation and soils. Consequently, these turnover times of carbon are expected to depend on vegetation longevity and relative allocation to woody and non-woody biomass, and to litter and soil organic matter decomposition rates, which depend on climate variables, but also soil properties, biological activity and chemical composition of the litter. Data oriented estimates of whole ecosystem carbon turnover rates (τ) are based on global datasets of carbon stocks and fluxes and used to diagnose the co-variability of τ with climate. The overall mean global carbon turnover time estimated is 23 years (with 95% confidence intervals between 19 and 30 years), showing a strong spatial variability ranging from 15 years in equatorial regions to 255 years at latitudes north of 75°N. This latitudinal pattern reflects the expected dependencies of metabolic activity and ecosystem dynamics to temperature. However, a strong local correlation of τ with mean annual precipitation patterns is at least as prevalent as the expected effect of temperature on the global patterns of τ. The comparing between observation-based estimates of τ with current state-of-the-art Earth system models shows a consistent latitudinal pattern but a significant underestimation bias of ˜36% globally. Models consistently show a stronger association of τ to temperature and do not reproduce the observed association to mean annual precipitation in different latitudinal bands. A further breakdown of τ focusing on forest background mortality also shows contrasting regional patterns to those of global vegetation models, suggesting that the treatment of plant mortality may be overly simplistic in different model

  6. Cryogenic, high-resolution x-ray detector with high count rate capability

    DOEpatents

    Frank, Matthias; Mears, Carl A.; Labov, Simon E.; Hiller, Larry J.; Barfknecht, Andrew T.

    2003-03-04

    A cryogenic, high-resolution X-ray detector with high count rate capability has been invented. The new X-ray detector is based on superconducting tunnel junctions (STJs), and operates without thermal stabilization at or below 500 mK. The X-ray detector exhibits good resolution (.about.5-20 eV FWHM) for soft X-rays in the keV region, and is capable of counting at count rates of more than 20,000 counts per second (cps). Simple, FET-based charge amplifiers, current amplifiers, or conventional spectroscopy shaping amplifiers can provide the electronic readout of this X-ray detector.

  7. High power, high repetition rate, few picosecond Nd:LuVO₄ oscillator with cavity dumping.

    PubMed

    Gao, Peng; Guo, Jie; Li, Jinfeng; Lin, Hua; Yu, Haohai; Zhang, Huaijin; Liang, Xiaoyan

    2015-12-28

    We investigate the potential use of Nd:LuVO4 in high average power, high repetition rate ultrafast lasers. Maximum mode-locked average power of 28 W is obtained at the repetition rate of 58 MHz. The shortest pulse duration is achieved at 4 ps without dispersion compensation. With a cavity dumping technique, the pulse energy is scaling up to 40.7 μJ at 300 kHz and 14.3 μJ at 1.5 MHz.

  8. Comparison of Intent-to-Leave with Actual Turnover within the FAA

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-12-01

    Incentives for early retirement (e.g., “buy-outs”) were offered in 1997 throughout the federal government as part of the shrinking of the federal...workforce under the Clinton administration (National Performance Review, 1993). It is possible that incentives for early retirement inflated the expressed...buy-out” as the primary reason. The FAA did not offer incentives for early retirement in 2000 through 2004. Actual turnover The actual turnover rate

  9. Regional scale patterns of fine root lifespan and turnover under current and future climate.

    PubMed

    McCormack, Luke M; Eissenstat, David M; Prasad, Anantha M; Smithwick, Erica A H

    2013-06-01

    Fine root dynamics control a dominant flux of carbon from plants and into soils and mediate potential uptake and cycling of nutrients and water in terrestrial ecosystems. Understanding of these patterns is needed to accurately describe critical processes like productivity and carbon storage from ecosystem to global scales. However, limited observations of root dynamics make it difficult to define and predict patterns of root dynamics across broad spatial scales. Here, we combine species-specific estimates of fine root dynamics with a model that predicts current distribution and future suitable habitat of temperate tree species across the eastern United States (US). Estimates of fine root lifespan and turnover are based on empirical observations and relationships with fine root and whole-plant traits and apply explicitly to the fine root pool that is relatively short-lived and most active in nutrient and water uptake. Results from the combined model identified patterns of faster root turnover rates in the North Central US and slower turnover rates in the Southeastern US. Portions of Minnesota, Ohio, and Pennsylvania were also predicted to experience >10% increases in root turnover rates given potential shifts in tree species composition under future climate scenarios while root turnover rates in other portions of the eastern US were predicted to decrease. Despite potential regional changes, the average estimates of root lifespan and turnover for the entire study area remained relatively stable between the current and future climate scenarios. Our combined model provides the first empirically based, spatially explicit, and spatially extensive estimates of fine root lifespan and turnover and is a potentially powerful tool allowing researchers to identify reasonable approximations of forest fine root turnover in areas where no direct observations are available. Future efforts should focus on reducing uncertainty in estimates of root dynamics by better understanding how

  10. Facile electrochemical co-deposition of a graphene-cobalt nanocomposite for highly efficient water oxidation in alkaline media: direct detection of underlying electron transfer reactions under catalytic turnover conditions.

    PubMed

    Guo, Si-Xuan; Liu, Yuping; Bond, Alan M; Zhang, Jie; Esakki Karthik, P; Maheshwaran, I; Senthil Kumar, S; Phani, K L N

    2014-09-21

    A facile electrochemical co-deposition method has been developed for the fabrication of graphene-cobalt nanocomposite modified electrodes that achieve exceptionally efficient water oxidation in highly alkaline media. In the method reported, a graphene-cobalt nanocomposite film was deposited electrochemically from a medium containing 1 mg ml(-1) graphene oxide, 0.8 mM cobalt nitrate and 0.05 M phytic acid (pH 7). The formation of the nanocomposite film was confirmed using electrochemical, Raman spectroscopic and scanning electron microscopic techniques. The nanocomposite film exhibits excellent activity and stability towards water oxidation to generate oxygen in 1 M NaOH aqueous electrolyte media. A turn over frequency of 34 s(-1) at an overpotential of 0.59 V and a faradaic efficiency of 97.7% were deduced from analysis of data obtained by rotating ring disk electrode voltammetry. Controlled potential electrolysis data suggests that the graphene supported catalyst exhibits excellent stability under these harsh conditions. Phytate anion acts as stabilizer for the electrochemical formation of cobalt nanoparticles. Fourier transformed ac voltammetry allowed the redox chemistry associated with catalysis to be detected directly under catalytic turnover conditions. Estimates of formal reversible potentials obtained from this method and derived from the overall reactions 3Co(OH)2 + 2OH(-) ⇌ Co3O4 + 4H2O + 2e(-), Co3O4 + OH(-) ⇌ 3CoOOH + e(-) and CoOOH + OH(-) ⇌ CoO2 + H2O + e(-) are 0.10, 0.44 and 0.59 V vs. Ag/AgCl, respectively.

  11. Does Enhancing Work-Time Control and Flexibility Reduce Turnover? A Naturally Occurring Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Moen, Phyllis; Kelly, Erin L.; Hill, Rachelle

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the turnover effects of an organizational innovation (ROWE—Results Only Work Environment) aimed at moving away from standard time practices to focus on results rather than time spent at work. To model rates of turnover, we draw on survey data from a sample of employees at a corporate headquarters (N = 775) and institutional records of turnover over eight months following the ROWE implementation. We find the odds of turnover are indeed lower for employees participating in the ROWE initiative, which offers employees greater work-time control and flexibility, and that this is the case regardless of employees’ gender, age, or family life stage. ROWE also moderates the turnover effects of organizational tenure and negative home-to-work spillover, physical symptoms, and job insecurity, with those in ROWE who report these situations generally less likely to leave the organization. Additionally, ROWE reduces turnover intentions among those remaining with the corporation. This research moves the “opting-out” argument from one of private troubles to an issue of greater employee work-time control and flexibility by showing that an organizational policy initiative can reduce turnover. PMID:21532909

  12. High temperature electrochemical corrosion rate probes for combustion environments

    SciTech Connect

    Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Bullard, Sophie J.; Cramer, Stephen D.; Holcomb, Gordon R.; Ziomek-Moroz, Margaret; Eden, David A.; Kane, Russell D.; Eden, Dawn C.

    2004-01-01

    Electrochemical corrosion rate probes have been constructed and tested along with mass loss coupons in an air plus water vapor and a N2/O2/CO2 plus water vapor environment. Temperatures ranged from 200? to 700?C. Results show that electrochemical corrosion rates for ash-covered mild steel are a function of time, temperature and process environment. Correlation between the electrochemical and mass loss corrosion rates was poor.

  13. High strain rate and high temperature behaviour of metallic materials for jet engine turbine containment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gálvez, F.; Cendón, D.; Enfedaque, A.; Sánchez-Gálvez, V.

    2006-08-01

    This work presents a study on the mechanical characterisation of the materials involved in air jet engine turbines. The final objective is to analyse the phenomenon of a turbine blade off failure, to verify the requirements of the case containment. The materials in the turbine are under high temperatures, ranging from 400circC to 800circC and when the fail of the blade occurs if impacts against the case, reaching strain rates up to 103 s - 1. To obtain the behaviour of the materials, testing at high strain rate and high temperature at one time is necessary. The experimental set-up used was a split Hopkinson pressure bar, with a high temperature furnace adapted. The bars used on the device were high strength nickel alloys with a cooling system to decrease the temperature of the measurement devices. The effect of wave dispersion due to the temperature gradient has been also studied to correct the measurements if necessary. The material tested has been the FV535 stainless steel used on the case. The full stress-strain curves at different temperatures and at strain rates up to 103 s-1 have been obtained. The experimental results show a marked influence of the strain rate and the temperature that cannot be neglected. The Johnson-Cook material model has been used to fit the results of the material tests.

  14. Characterization of Composites Response at High Rates of Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilat, Amos

    2002-01-01

    The objective of the proposed research is to experimentally study the effect of strain rate on mechanical response (deformation and failure) carbon fiber/epoxy matrix composites. The experimental data provide the information needed for the development of a nonlinear, rate dependent deformation and strength models that can subsequently be used in design. This year effort was directed into testing the epoxy resin. Two types of epoxy were tested each in tension and shear at various strain rate that ranges from 5x10(exp -5), to 700/s. The results show that both the strain rate and the mode of loading affect the epoxy response.

  15. Sex-chromosome turnovers: the hot-potato model.

    PubMed

    Blaser, Olivier; Neuenschwander, Samuel; Perrin, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    Sex-determining systems often undergo high rates of turnover but for reasons that remain largely obscure. Two recent evolutionary models assign key roles, respectively, to sex-antagonistic (SA) mutations occurring on autosomes and to deleterious mutations accumulating on sex chromosomes. These two models capture essential but distinct key features of sex-chromosome evolution; accordingly, they make different predictions and present distinct limitations. Here we show that a combination of features from the two models has the potential to generate endless cycles of sex-chromosome transitions: SA alleles accruing on a chromosome after it has been co-opted for sex induce an arrest of recombination; the ensuing accumulation of deleterious mutations will soon make a new transition ineluctable. The dynamics generated by these interactions share several important features with empirical data, namely, (i) that patterns of heterogamety tend to be conserved during transitions and (ii) that autosomes are not recruited randomly, with some chromosome pairs more likely than others to be co-opted for sex.

  16. Cholesterol turnover and metabolism in two patients with abetalipoproteinemia

    SciTech Connect

    Goodman, D.S.; Deckelbaum, R.J.; Palmer, R.H.; Dell, R.B.; Ramakrishnan, R.; Delpre, G.; Beigel, Y.; Cooper, M.

    1983-12-01

    Total body turnover of cholesterol was studied in two patients with abetalipoproteinemia, a 32-year-old man and a 31-year-old woman. The patients received (14C)cholesterol intravenously, and the resulting specific activity-time curves (for 40 and 30 weeks, respectively) were fitted with a three-pool model. Parameters were compared with those from studies of cholesterol turnover in 82 normal and hyperlipidemic subjects. A three-pool model gave the best fit for the abetalipoproteinemic patients, as well as for the 82 previously studied subjects, suggesting general applicability of this model. Cholesterol production rates in the two abetalipoproteinemic subjects (0.82 and 0.89 g/day) were close to values predicted for persons of their body weight. Thus, total body turnover rate of cholesterol was quite normal in abetalipoproteinemia, confirming previous reports. Very low values (9.2 and 8.4 g) were found for M1, the size of the rapidly exchanging compartment pool 1, in the two abetalipoproteinemic subjects. These values were well below the values predicted (from the comparison study population) for normal persons of this size with low plasma cholesterol levels. For one patient, total body exchangeable cholesterol was very low, although not significantly below the predicted values for a person of his size. In the second patient, the observed estimate for total body exchangeable cholesterol was well within the range of values predicted for persons of her size with low to extremely low cholesterol levels.

  17. Long-term sensitivity of soil carbon turnover to warming.

    PubMed

    Knorr, W; Prentice, I C; House, J I; Holland, E A

    2005-01-20

    The sensitivity of soil carbon to warming is a major uncertainty in projections of carbon dioxide concentration and climate. Experimental studies overwhelmingly indicate increased soil organic carbon (SOC) decomposition at higher temperatures, resulting in increased carbon dioxide emissions from soils. However, recent findings have been cited as evidence against increased soil carbon emissions in a warmer world. In soil warming experiments, the initially increased carbon dioxide efflux returns to pre-warming rates within one to three years, and apparent carbon pool turnover times are insensitive to temperature. It has already been suggested that the apparent lack of temperature dependence could be an artefact due to neglecting the extreme heterogeneity of soil carbon, but no explicit model has yet been presented that can reconcile all the above findings. Here we present a simple three-pool model that partitions SOC into components with different intrinsic turnover rates. Using this model, we show that the results of all the soil-warming experiments are compatible with long-term temperature sensitivity of SOC turnover: they can be explained by rapid depletion of labile SOC combined with the negligible response of non-labile SOC on experimental timescales. Furthermore, we present evidence that non-labile SOC is more sensitive to temperature than labile SOC, implying that the long-term positive feedback of soil decomposition in a warming world may be even stronger than predicted by global models.

  18. A forward error correction technique using a high-speed, high-rate single chip codec

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, R. W.; Hartman, W. F.; Jones, Robert E.

    1989-01-01

    The authors describe an error-correction coding approach that allows operation in either burst or continuous modes at data rates of multiple hundreds of megabits per second. Bandspreading is low since the code rate is 7/8 or greater, which is consistent with high-rate link operation. The encoder, along with a hard-decision decoder, fits on a single application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) chip. Soft-decision decoding is possible utilizing applique hardware in conjunction with the hard-decision decoder. Expected coding gain is a function of the application and is approximately 2.5 dB for hard-decision decoding at 10-5 bit-error rate with phase-shift-keying modulation and additive Gaussian white noise interference. The principal use envisioned for this technique is to achieve a modest amount of coding gain on high-data-rate, bandwidth-constrained channels. Data rates of up to 300 Mb/s can be accommodated by the codec chip. The major objective is burst-mode communications, where code words are composed of 32 n data bits followed by 32 overhead bits.

  19. High-order harmonic generation using a high-repetition-rate turnkey laser

    SciTech Connect

    Lorek, E. Larsen, E. W.; Heyl, C. M.; Carlström, S.; Mauritsson, J.; Paleček, D.; Zigmantas, D.

    2014-12-15

    We generate high-order harmonics at high pulse repetition rates using a turnkey laser. High-order harmonics at 400 kHz are observed when argon is used as target gas. In neon, we achieve generation of photons with energies exceeding 90 eV (∼13 nm) at 20 kHz. We measure a photon flux of up to 4.4 × 10{sup 10} photons per second