Science.gov

Sample records for high vacuum technology

  1. Vacuum Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Biltoft, P J

    2004-10-15

    The environmental condition called vacuum is created any time the pressure of a gas is reduced compared to atmospheric pressure. On earth we typically create a vacuum by connecting a pump capable of moving gas to a relatively leak free vessel. Through operation of the gas pump the number of gas molecules per unit volume is decreased within the vessel. As soon as one creates a vacuum natural forces (in this case entropy) work to restore equilibrium pressure; the practical effect of this is that gas molecules attempt to enter the evacuated space by any means possible. It is useful to think of vacuum in terms of a gas at a pressure below atmospheric pressure. In even the best vacuum vessels ever created there are approximately 3,500,000 molecules of gas per cubic meter of volume remaining inside the vessel. The lowest pressure environment known is in interstellar space where there are approximately four molecules of gas per cubic meter. Researchers are currently developing vacuum technology components (pumps, gauges, valves, etc.) using micro electro mechanical systems (MEMS) technology. Miniature vacuum components and systems will open the possibility for significant savings in energy cost and will open the doors to advances in electronics, manufacturing and semiconductor fabrication. In conclusion, an understanding of the basic principles of vacuum technology as presented in this summary is essential for the successful execution of all projects that involve vacuum technology. Using the principles described above, a practitioner of vacuum technology can design a vacuum system that will achieve the project requirements.

  2. Ultrasonic Spray Drying vs High Vacuum and Microwaves Technology for Blueberries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Candia-Muñoz, N.; Ramirez-Bunster, M.; Vargas-Hernández, Y.; Gaete-Garretón, L.

    Interest in high quality foods: good taste and a high content of nutrients with healthy beneficial effects are increasing. Fruits have good properties but, they are lost because the oxidation process, additionally, for different reasons a 40% of harvested fruit are lost. To conserve the fruit properties an ultrasonic assisted spray dryer was developed and tested, comparing its results with microwave-vacuum drying technology. Results did shown taste, color, smell, particle shape and size distribution better than the conventional one. The antioxidants conservation were quite good except in the anthocyanins, in which the microwave and vacuum technology shown best results.

  3. Ultra-high vacuum and switchgear technology - a late but promising marriage

    SciTech Connect

    Leonhardt, G.

    1996-12-31

    A historical retrospective leads us back to the time in which a vacuum was still considered as a physical phenomenon. The precursors of switches were contact devices, which were only gradually developed to form circuit breakers. Vacuum and switchgear technology went their separate ways for a long time. Various technologies, all of which failed to a greater or lesser extent, characterized the time up to around 1960. Only then did any interdisciplinary development take place. This is the time of the {open_quotes}marriage{close_quotes}. The result is today`s maintenance-free high performance circuit breakers, which are designed for long life. Circuit breaker designs have always had an influence on switchboards: this applies in particular to the modern vacuum circuit breakers. New technologies from other fields are now being added, and their integration in switchgear and switchboard construction is leading to hightech products for the next century.

  4. Vacuum Technology and Standardization-An Update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akram, H. M.; Rashid, H.

    2011-06-01

    Vacuum technology has been vital for the progress in almost every field of modern industrial & scientific research and technological developments. Research in this field is therefore important for the rapid progress in other sophisticated technologies. The modern society require precise know-how of vacuum metrology for its complex and sophisticated manufacturing processes and research activities. Accuracy in vacuum measurements is therefore an essential need for every application. The required accuracy is achieved with the help of well-calibrated vacuum gauges and this is possible only, if there exist proper vacuum standards of required range and accuracy. In this paper, a brief review of recently developed different vacuum standards, namely Standard Mercury Manometer, Standard Volume Expansion System and Standard Orifice Flow System will be presented, employed for the calibration of low, medium and high vacuum gauges respectively. Our recently developed standards are simple in design, least in vibration & degassing rate with desired accuracy, ease of operation and cost effective.

  5. Vacuum-Packaging Technology for IRFPAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumura, Takeshi; Tokuda, Takayuki; Tsutinaga, Akinobu; Kimata, Masafumi; Abe, Hideyuki; Tokashiki, Naotaka

    We developed vacuum-packaging equipment and low-cost vacuum packaging technology for IRFPAs. The equipment is versatile and can process packages with various materials and structures. Getters are activated before vacuum packaging, and we can solder caps/ceramic-packages and caps/windows in a high-vacuum condition using this equipment. We also developed a micro-vacuum gauge to measure pressure in vacuum packages. The micro-vacuum gauge uses the principle of thermal conduction of gases. We use a multi-ceramic package that consists of six packages fabricated on a ceramic sheet, and confirm that the pressure in the processed packages is sufficiently low for high-performance IRFPA.

  6. Ethanol production from food waste at high solids content with vacuum recovery technology.

    PubMed

    Huang, Haibo; Qureshi, Nasib; Chen, Ming-Hsu; Liu, Wei; Singh, Vijay

    2015-03-18

    Ethanol production from food wastes does not only solve environmental issues but also provides renewable biofuels. This study investigated the feasibility of producing ethanol from food wastes at high solids content (35%, w/w). A vacuum recovery system was developed and applied to remove ethanol from fermentation broth to reduce yeast ethanol inhibition. A high concentration of ethanol (144 g/L) was produced by the conventional fermentation of food waste without a vacuum recovery system. When the vacuum recovery is applied to the fermentation process, the ethanol concentration in the fermentation broth was controlled below 100 g/L, thus reducing yeast ethanol inhibition. At the end of the conventional fermentation, the residual glucose in the fermentation broth was 5.7 g/L, indicating incomplete utilization of glucose, while the vacuum fermentation allowed for complete utilization of glucose. The ethanol yield for the vacuum fermentation was found to be 358 g/kg of food waste (dry basis), higher than that for the conventional fermentation at 327 g/kg of food waste (dry basis).

  7. Ethanol production from food waste at high solid contents with vacuum recovery technology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ethanol production from food wastes does not only solve the environmental issues but also provide renewable biofuel to partially substitute fossil fuels. This study investigated the feasibility of utilization of food wastes for producing ethanol at high solid contents (35%, w/w). Vacuum recovery sys...

  8. Edison's vacuum technology patents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waits, Robert K.

    2003-07-01

    During 1879 Thomas Edison's Menlo Park, New Jersey laboratory developed the means to evacuate glass lamp globes to less than a mTorr in 20 min and in mid-1880 began production of carbon-filament incandescent lamps. Among Edison's nearly 1100 U.S. patents are five for vacuum pump improvements, and at least eight others that are vacuum-related; all applied for between 1880 and 1886. Inspired by an 1878 article by De La Rue and Müller [Philos. Trans. R. Soc. London, Ser. A 169, 155 (1878)] on studies of glow discharges, Edison devised a combination pump using the Geissler pump as a rough pump and the Sprengel pump for continuous exhaustion. Edison's patents described means to control the mercury flow and automate the delivery of the mercury to banks of up to a hundred pumps. Other patents described various means to remove residual gases during lamp processing.

  9. HIGH PRODUCTIVITY VACUUM BLASTING SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    William S. McPhee

    2001-08-31

    The Department of Energy (DOE) needs improved technologies to decontaminate large areas of both concrete and steel surfaces. The technology should have high operational efficiency, minimize exposures to workers, and produce low levels of secondary waste. In order to meet the DOE's needs, an applied research and development project for the improvement of a current decontamination technology, Vacuum Blasting, is proposed. The objective of this project is to improve the productivity and lower the expense of the existing vacuum blasting technology which has been widely used in DOE sites for removing radioactive contamination, PCBs, and lead-based paint. The proposed work would increase the productivity rate and provide safe and cost-effective decontamination of the DOE sites.

  10. ULTRA HIGH VACUUM VALVE

    DOEpatents

    Fry, W.A.

    1962-05-29

    A valve for high vacuum applications such as the CStellarator where chamber pressures as low as 2 x 10/sup -10/ mm Hg are necessary is designed with a line-of-sight path through the valve for visual inspection of the contents of reactants in such chambers. The valve comprises a turnable resilient metal ball having an aperture therethrough, means for selectively turning the ball to rotate the axis of its line-of-sight path, and soft, deformable opposing orifices that are movable relatively toward said ball to seal with opposite ball surfaces upon said movement of said axis of said line-of-sight path. The valve also includes a bellows seal connected between said orifices and internal actuating means that eliminates the requirement for gasketed turnable valve closing stems. (AEC)

  11. HIGH PRODUCTIVITY VACUUM BLASTING SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. M.A. Ebadian

    2000-01-13

    The purpose of the project is to increase the productivity and economics of existing vacuum blasting technology. This technology is used to remove radioactive contamination, PCB's and lead-base paint and provides worker and environmental protection by continuously recycling the blast media and the full containment of the dust generated in the process.

  12. Steam vacuum cleaning. Innovative technology summary report

    SciTech Connect

    1999-05-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) continually seeks safer and more cost-effective remediation technologies for use in the decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) of nuclear facilities. The baseline technology currently used for washing debris is a high-pressure water cleaning (HPWC) system. The system used at the FEMP is the Hotsy{reg_sign} Model 550B HPWC. Although the HPWC technology has functioned satisfactorily, improvements are being sought in areas related to reduced liquid waste volume, increased productivity, increased washing effectiveness, and decreased airborne contamination. An innovative technology that offers potential improvements in these areas is a steam vacuum cleaning (SVC) system that integrates high-pressure steam cleaning with a vacuum recovery sub-system that simultaneously collects dislodged contaminants thereby reducing airborne contamination. The SVC system selected for demonstration at the FEMP was the Kelly{trademark} Decontamination System shown. This report provides comparative performance and cost analyses between the Hotsy HPWC system and the Kelly Decontamination System. Both technologies were demonstrated at the FEMP site located at Fernald, Ohio from July 29, 1996 through August 15, 1996. The demonstrations were conducted at the FEMP Plant 1 as part of the LSTD project sponsored by the Deactivation and Decommissioning Focus Area (DDFA) of the US DOE`s Office of Science and Technology.

  13. Vacuum Technology in the study of Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghoshal, A. K.; Banerjee, S. N.; Chakraborty, D.

    2012-11-01

    Graphene, an allotrope of carbon is a two-dimensional sheet of covalently bonded carbon atoms that has been attracting great attention in the field of electronics. In a recent review graphene is defined as a flat monolayer of carbon atoms tightly packed into a 2-D honeycomb lattice. A survey has been made of the production processes and instrumentation for characterization of graphene. In the production of graphene, the methods mainly used are Epitaxial growth, oxide reduction, growth from metal-carbon melts, growth from sugar. In the characterization of graphene, the instruments that are mainly used to study the atomic properties, electronic properties, optical properties, spin properties are Scanning Electron Microscopy, Transmission Electron Microscopy, Raman Spectroscopy. In all these instruments high or ultra-high vacuum is required. This paper attempts to correlate vacuum technology in the production and characterization of graphene.

  14. Vacuum Technology Considerations For Mass Metrology

    PubMed Central

    Abbott, Patrick J.; Jabour, Zeina J.

    2011-01-01

    Vacuum weighing of mass artifacts eliminates the necessity of air buoyancy correction and its contribution to the measurement uncertainty. Vacuum weighing is also an important process in the experiments currently underway for the redefinition of the SI mass unit, the kilogram. Creating the optimum vacuum environment for mass metrology requires careful design and selection of construction materials, plumbing components, pumping, and pressure gauging technologies. We review the vacuum technology1 required for mass metrology and suggest procedures and hardware for successful and reproducible operation. PMID:26989593

  15. Vacuum packaging technology for mass production of uncooled IRFPAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Takuya; Tokuda, Takayuki; Kimata, Masafumi; Abe, Hideyuki; Tokashiki, Naotaka

    2009-05-01

    We developed vacuum packaging equipment and low-cost vacuum packaging technology for the mass production of uncooled IRFPAs. The equipment consists of two chambers with identical construction. Two-chamber architecture provides flexibility in the vacuum packaging process, so we can bake the components and achieve getter activation by heating, stem/cap soldering, and cap/window soldering in a series under high-vacuum conditions. Heaters and component-holding jigs are made of graphite to assure rapid and uniform heating to 500°C. The batch size is 27 if we choose a 15-mm diameter TO8 package and can be increased by enlarging the graphite heater area. We also developed a micro-vacuum gauge to evaluate the vacuum level in encapsulated packages. The operation principle of this vacuum gauge is based on thermal conduction by air molecules. It can be integrated in IRFPA chips since the fabrication process is compatible with that for IRFPAs. We encapsulated the vacuum gauges in TO8 packages with our vacuum packaging equipment, and confirmed that the pressure in fabricated packages is sufficiently low for high performance IRFPA operation (<< 1 Pa) with the micro-vacuum gauges.

  16. Ultra high vacuum seal arrangement

    DOEpatents

    Flaherty, Robert

    1981-01-01

    Arrangement for demountably sealing two concentric metallic tubes in an ultra high vacuum system which facilitates remote actuation. A tubular seal includes integral spaced lips which circumferentially engage the metallic tubes. The lips plastically deform the metallic tubes by mechanical forces resulting from a martensite to austenite transformation of the tubular seal upon application of a predetermined temperature. The sealing force is released upon application of another temperature which causes a transformation from the stronger austenite to the weaker martensite. Use of a dual acting sealing ring and driving ring circumferentially contacting the sealing ring is particularly applicable to sealing larger diameter concentric metallic members.

  17. The vacuum system for technological unit development and design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhukeshov, A. M.; Gabdullina, A. T.; Amrenova, A. U.; Giniyatova, Sh G.; Kaibar, A.; Sundetov, A.; Fermakhan, K.

    2015-11-01

    The paper shows results of development of plasma technological unit on the basis of accelerator of vacuum arc and automated system. During the previous years, the authors investigated the operation of pulsed plasma accelerator and developed unique technologies for hardening of materials. Principles of plasma formation in pulsed plasma accelerator were put into basis of the developed unit. Operation of the pulsed arc accelerator was investigated at different parameters of the charge. The developed vacuum system is designed for production of hi-tech plasma units in high technologies in fields of nanomaterials, mechanical and power engineering and production with high added value. Unlike integrated solutions, the system is a module one to allow its low cost, high reliability and simple maintenance. The problems of use of robots are discussed to modernize the technological process.

  18. Review of Current Nuclear Vacuum System Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, M.; McCracken, J.; Shope, T.

    2003-02-25

    Nearly all industrial operations generate unwanted dust, particulate matter, and/or liquid wastes. Waste dust and particulates can be readily tracked to other work locations, and airborne particulates can be spread through ventilation systems to all locations within a building, and even vented outside the building - a serious concern for processes involving hazardous, radioactive, or nuclear materials. Several varieties of vacuum systems have been proposed and/or are commercially available for clean up of both solid and liquid hazardous and nuclear materials. A review of current technologies highlights both the advantages and disadvantages of the various systems, and demonstrates the need for a system designed to address issues specific to hazardous and nuclear material cleanup. A review of previous and current hazardous/nuclear material cleanup technologies is presented. From simple conventional vacuums modified for use in industrial operations, to systems specifically engineered for such purposes, the advantages and disadvantages are examined in light of the following criteria: minimal worker exposure; minimal secondary waste generation;reduced equipment maintenance and consumable parts; simplicity of design, yet fully compatible with all waste types; and ease of use. The work effort reviews past, existing and proposed technologies in light of such considerations. Accomplishments of selected systems are presented, including identified areas where technological improvements could be suggested.

  19. Wafer-level vacuum/hermetic packaging technologies for MEMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sang-Hyun; Mitchell, Jay; Welch, Warren; Lee, Sangwoo; Najafi, Khalil

    2010-02-01

    An overview of wafer-level packaging technologies developed at the University of Michigan is presented. Two sets of packaging technologies are discussed: (i) a low temperature wafer-level packaging processes for vacuum/hermeticity sealing, and (ii) an environmentally resistant packaging (ERP) technology for thermal and mechanical control as well as vacuum packaging. The low temperature wafer-level encapsulation processes are implemented using solder bond rings which are first patterned on a cap wafer and then mated with a device wafer in order to encircle and encapsulate the device at temperatures ranging from 200 to 390 °C. Vacuum levels below 10 mTorr were achieved with yields in an optimized process of better than 90%. Pressures were monitored for more than 4 years yielding important information on reliability and process control. The ERP adopts an environment isolation platform in the packaging substrate. The isolation platform is designed to provide low power oven-control, vibration isolation and shock protection. It involves batch flip-chip assembly of a MEMS device onto the isolation platform wafer. The MEMS device and isolation structure are encapsulated at the wafer-level by another substrate with vertical feedthroughs for vacuum/hermetic sealing and electrical signal connections. This technology was developed for high performance gyroscopes, but can be applied to any type of MEMS device.

  20. Measurement of partial pressures in vacuum technology and vacuum physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huber, W. K.

    1986-01-01

    It is pointed out that the measurement of gaseous pressures of less than 0.0001 torr is based on the ionization of gas atoms and molecules due to collisions with electrons. The particle density is determined in place of the pressure. The ionization cross sections for molecules of various gases are discussed. It is found that the true pressure in a vacuum system cannot be determined with certainty if it is unknown which gas is present. Effects of partial pressure determination on the condition of the vacuum system are discussed together with ion sources, systems of separation, and ion detection.

  1. PREFACE: International Symposium on `Vacuum Science and Technology' (IVS 2007)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittal, K. C.; Gupta, S. K.

    2008-03-01

    The Indian Vacuum Society (established in 1970) has organized a symposium every alternate year on various aspects of vacuum science and technology. There has been considerable participation from R & D establishments, universities and Indian industry in this event. In view of the current global scenario and emerging trends in vacuum technology, this year, the executive committee of IVS felt it appropriate to organize an international symposium at Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Colaba, Mumbai 400 005 from 29-30 November 2007. This symposium provided a forum for exchange of information among vacuum scientists, technologists and industrialists on recent advances made in the areas of large vacuum systems, vacuum production, its measurement and applications in industry, and material processing in vacuum. Vacuum science and technology has made vital contributions in high tech areas like space, high energy particle accelerators, large plasma systems, electronics, thin films, melting and refining of metals, extraction and processing of advanced materials etc. The main areas covered in the symposium were the production and measurement of vacuums, leak detection, large vacuum systems, vacuum metallurgy, vacuum materials and processing inclusive of applications of vacuum in industry. Large vacuum systems for high energy particle accelerators, plasma devices and light sources are of special significance for this symposium. Vacuum evaporation, hard coatings, thin films, joining techniques, sintering, melting and heat treatment, furnaces and thermo dynamics are also covered in this symposium. There were eighteen invited talks from the best experts in the respective fields and more than one hundred contributed papers. This fact itself indicates the interest that has been generated amongst the scientists, technologists and industrialists in this field. In view of the industrial significance of the vacuum technology, an exhibition of vacuum and vacuum processing related

  2. Directed Vapor Deposition: Low Vacuum Materials Processing Technology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-01-01

    Directed Vapor Deposition: Low Vacuum Materials Processing Technology J.F. Groves*, G. Mattausch**, H. Morgner**, D.D. Hass*, H.N.G. Wadley...2000 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Directed Vapor Deposition: Low Vacuum Materials Processing Technology 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM

  3. Characterization of Venezuelan vacuum residua and product vacuum residua obtained using the HDM{trademark} technology

    SciTech Connect

    Izquierdo, A.; Espidel, Y.; Fraile, R.

    1995-12-31

    Detailed characterization of heavy crudes and vacuum residua, as well as the resulting products of the necessary upgrading process, are of great importance in the use of these energy sources. The physical and chemical properties vary among different feedstocks and they determine different behavior during the upgrading process. This paper describes the characterization of five Venezuelan vacuum residua, 500{degrees}C+, and the vacuum residua of the products obtained when they were processed using the HDH{trademark} technology. The operating conditions were kept constant in order to be able to compare the reactivity of the different feedstocks. Special emphasis is given to the asphaltenes characterization and, in particular, to the results room the Average Molecular Parameters obtained by proton NMR. A correlation between these parameters and the reactivity was found. It was equally found that the asphaltenes of the feeds were very different in aromaticity, number of bridging aromatic carbons, and other properties involving the aromatic portion of these samples, whereas the asphaltenes of the resulting products had strong similarities. This indicates that despite the different nature o the starting material, the transformations during the process bring the high molecular weight aromatic components to similar structures.

  4. Vacuum Outgassing of High Density Polyethylene

    SciTech Connect

    Dinh, L N; Sze, J; Schildbach, M A; Chinn, S C; Maxwell, R S; Raboin, P; McLean II, W

    2008-08-11

    A combination of thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and temperature programmed decomposition (TPD) was employed to identify the outgassing species, the total amount of outgassing, and the outgassing kinetics of high density polyethylene (HDPE) in a vacuum environment. The isoconversional kinetic analysis was then used to analyze the outgassing kinetics and to predict the long-term outgassing of HDPE in vacuum applications at ambient temperature. H{sub 2}O and C{sub n}H{sub x} with n as high as 9 and x centering around 2n are the major outgassing species from solid HDPE, but the quantities evolved can be significantly reduced by vacuum baking at 368 K for a few hours prior to device assembly.

  5. A High Vacuum High Speed Ion Pump

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Foster, J. S. Jr.; Lawrence, E. O.; Lofgren, E. J.

    1952-08-27

    A vacuum pump based on the properties of a magnetically collimated electric discharge is described. It has a speed in the range 3000 to 7000 liters a second and a base pressure in the order of 10{sup -6} mm. (auth)

  6. Sewerage force adjustment technology for energy conservation in vacuum sanitation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Zhonghua; Li, Xiaoning; Kagawa, Toshiharu

    2013-03-01

    The vacuum sanitation is the safe and sound disposal approach of human excreta under the specific environments like flights, high speed trains and submarines. However, the propulsive force of current systems is not adjustable and the energy consumption does not adapt to the real time sewerage requirement. Therefore, it is important to study the sewerage force adjustment to improve the energy efficiency. This paper proposes an energy conservation design in vacuum sanitation systems with pneumatic ejector circuits. The sewerage force is controlled by changing the systematic vacuum degree according to the amount of the excreta. In particular, the amount of the excreta is tested by liquid level sensor and mass sensor. According to the amount of the excreta, the relationship between the excreta amount and the sewerage force is studied to provide proper propulsive force. In the other aspect, to provide variable vacuum degrees for different sanitation requirements, the suction and discharge system is designed with pneumatic vacuum ejector. On the basis of the static flow-rate characteristics and the vacuum generation model, the pressure response in the ejector circuit is studied by using the static flow rate characteristics of the ejector and air status equation. The relationship is obtained between supplied compressed air and systematic vacuum degree. When the compressed air is supplied to the ejector continuously, the systematic vacuum degree increases until the vacuum degree reaches the extreme value. Therefore, the variable systematic vacuum degree is obtained by controlling the compressed air supply of the ejector. To verify the effect of energy conservation, experiments are carried out in the artificial excreta collection, and the variable vacuum-degree design saves more than 30% of the energy supply. The energy conservation is realized effectively in the new vacuum sanitation systems with good application prospect. The proposed technology provides technological

  7. THE FRICTION OF QUARTZ IN HIGH VACUUM

    DTIC Science & Technology

    the effects of surface cleanliness . Ultra-high vacuums (to 10 to the minus 10th power torr) and high temperatures (to 350 deg C) were combined with...chemical cleaning and careful handling techniques to produce the maximum surface cleanliness . The coefficient of static friction under varying...on 30-40 mesh glass balls. The coefficient of friction of smooth quartz was found to vary from 0.1 to 1.0 depending on the surface cleanliness . The

  8. Probing the vacuum with highly charged ions

    SciTech Connect

    Bottcher, C.; Strayer, M.R.

    1987-01-01

    The physics of the Fermion vacuum is briefly described, and applied to pair production in heavy ion collisions. We consider in turn low energies (<50 MeV/nucleon), intermediate energies (<5 GeV/nucleon), and ultrahigh energies such as would be produced in a ring collider. At high energies, interesting questions of Lorentz and gauge invariance arise. Finally, some applications to the structure of high Z atoms are examined. 14 refs., 11 figs.

  9. A squeezed light source operated under high vacuum

    PubMed Central

    Wade, Andrew R.; Mansell, Georgia L.; Chua, Sheon S. Y.; Ward, Robert L.; Slagmolen, Bram J. J.; Shaddock, Daniel A.; McClelland, David E.

    2015-01-01

    Non-classical squeezed states of light are becoming increasingly important to a range of metrology and other quantum optics applications in cryptography, quantum computation and biophysics. Applications such as improving the sensitivity of advanced gravitational wave detectors and the development of space-based metrology and quantum networks will require robust deployable vacuum-compatible sources. To date non-linear photonics devices operated under high vacuum have been simple single pass systems, testing harmonic generation and the production of classically correlated photon pairs for space-based applications. Here we demonstrate the production under high-vacuum conditions of non-classical squeezed light with an observed 8.6 dB of quantum noise reduction down to 10 Hz. Demonstration of a resonant non-linear optical device, for the generation of squeezed light under vacuum, paves the way to fully exploit the advantages of in-vacuum operations, adapting this technology for deployment into new extreme environments. PMID:26657616

  10. Vacuum stripping of ethanol during high solids fermentation of corn.

    PubMed

    Shihadeh, Jameel K; Huang, Haibo; Rausch, Kent D; Tumbleson, Mike E; Singh, Vijay

    2014-05-01

    In corn-ethanol industry, yeast stress inducing glucose concentrations produced during liquefaction and subsequent high ethanol concentrations produced during fermentation restrict slurry solids to 32 % w/w. These limits were circumvented by combining two novel technologies: (1) granular starch hydrolyzing enzyme (GSHE) to break down starch simultaneously with fermentation and (2) vacuum stripping to remove ethanol. A vacuum stripping system was constructed and applied to fermentations at 30, 40, and 45 % solids. As solids increased from 30 to 40 %, ethanol yield decreased from 0.35 to 0.29 L/kg. Ethanol yield from 45 % solids was only 0.18 L/kg. An improvement was conducted by increasing enzyme dose from 0.25 to 0.75 g/g corn and reducing yeast inoculum by half. After improvement, ethanol yield from 40 % solids vacuum treatment increased to 0.36 L/kg, comparable to ethanol yield from 30 % solids (control).

  11. Study on a fast loading high vacuum multilayer insulation (MLI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Xian; Zhang, Sheng; Wang, Bo; Gan, Zhihu; Ying, Jianming; Zhang, Chunlin

    2014-01-01

    With the continuous development of vacuum technology, the proportion of high vacuum multilayer insulation method in all kinds of insulation methods is growing [1]. For large cryogenic tanks, the multilayer insulation traditional layer by layer winding way is very inconvenient and takes a lot of time. Different layer density of the multilayer insulation material leads to different thermal insulation performance [2]. Because of the influence of man-made factors, the traditional way of winding is difficult to achieve a consistent density. This paper compared the fast loading type insulation and traditional insulation in a different degree of vacuum, it can be seen that the apparent thermal conductivity of these two types is similar. But fast loading multilayer insulation material is more convenient on the installation and it can eliminate the man-made factors. So it has practical value in engineering applications.

  12. Vacuum MOCVD fabrication of high efficience cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Partain, L. D.; Fraas, L. M.; Mcleod, P. S.; Cape, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    Vacuum metal-organic-chemical-vapor-deposition (MOCVD) is a new fabrication process with improved safety and easier scalability due to its metal rather than glass construction and its uniform multiport gas injection system. It uses source materials more efficiently than other methods because the vacuum molecular flow conditions allow the high sticking coefficient reactants to reach the substrates as undeflected molecular beams and the hot chamber walls cause the low sticking coefficient reactants to bounce off the walls and interact with the substrates many times. This high source utilization reduces the materials costs power device and substantially decreases the amounts of toxic materials that must be handled as process effluents. The molecular beams allow precise growth control. With improved source purifications, vacuum MOCVD has provided p GaAs layers with 10-micron minority carrier diffusion lengths and GaAs and GaAsSb solar cells with 20% AMO efficiencies at 59X and 99X sunlight concentration ratios. Mechanical stacking has been identified as the quickest, most direct and logical path to stacked multiple-junction solar cells that perform better than the best single-junction devices. The mechanical stack is configured for immediate use in solar arrays and allows interconnections that improve the system end-of-life performance in space.

  13. Processing of extraterrestrial materials by high temperature vacuum vaporization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grimley, R. T.; Lipschutz, M. E.

    1983-01-01

    It is noted that problems associated with the extraction and concentration of elements and commpounds important for the construction and operation of space habitats have received little attention. High temperature vacuum vaporization is considered a promising approach; this is a technique for which the space environment offers advantages in the form of low ambient pressures and temperatures and the possibility of sustained high temperatures via solar thermal energy. To establish and refine this new technology, experimental determinations must be made of the material release profiles as a function of temperature, of the release kinetics and chemical forms of material being transported, and of the various means of altering release kinetics. Trace element data determined by neutron activation analysis of meteorites heated to 1400 C in vacuum is summarized. The principal tool, high temperature spectrometry, is used to examine the vaporization thermodynamics and kinetics of major and minor elements from complex multicomponent extraterrestrial materials.

  14. Feed-through connector withstands high temperatures in vacuum environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kreisman, W. S.

    1965-01-01

    Feed-through connector with sealing action augmented by any temperature increase can be used through the wall of a vacuum device. It retains vacuum integrity through successive cycles of high temperature.

  15. Vacuum Surface Flashover And High Pressure Gas Streamers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-06-01

    Optical Emission Characteristics of Polycrystalline Diamond During Surface Flashover in Vacuum ," 1996 IEEE 1~ International Symposium on... VACUUM SURFACE FLASHOVER AND HIGH PRESSURE GAS STREAMERS J. M. Elizondo, M. L. Krogh, D. Smith, D. Stoltz, and S. N. Wright AlliedSignal Federal...breakdown current traces obtained during high pressure gas breakdown and vacuum surface flashover show similar signatures. The initial

  16. Ultra-high vacuum compatible image furnace.

    PubMed

    Neubauer, A; Boeuf, J; Bauer, A; Russ, B; Löhneysen, H v; Pfleiderer, C

    2011-01-01

    We report the design of an optical floating-zone furnace for single-crystal growth under ultra-high vacuum (UHV) compatible conditions. The system is based on a commercial image furnace, which has been refurbished to be all-metal sealed. Major changes concern the use of UHV rotary feedthroughs and bespoke quartz-metal seals with metal-O-rings at the lamp stage. As a consequence, the procedure of assembling the furnace for crystal growth is changed completely. Bespoke heating jackets permit to bake the system. For compounds with elevated vapor pressures, the ultra-high vacuum serves as a precondition for the use of a high-purity argon atmosphere up to 10 bar. In the ferromagnetic Heusler compound Cu(2)MnAl, the improvements of purity result in an improved stability of the molten zone, grain selection, and, hence, single-crystal growth. Similar improvements are observed in traveling-solvent floating-zone growth of the antiferromagnetic Heusler compound Mn(3)Si. These improvements underscore the great potential of optical float-zoning for the growth of high-purity single crystals of intermetallic compounds.

  17. Ultra-high vacuum compatible image furnace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neubauer, A.; BÅ`uf, J.; Bauer, A.; Russ, B.; Löhneysen, H. v.; Pfleiderer, C.

    2011-01-01

    We report the design of an optical floating-zone furnace for single-crystal growth under ultra-high vacuum (UHV) compatible conditions. The system is based on a commercial image furnace, which has been refurbished to be all-metal sealed. Major changes concern the use of UHV rotary feedthroughs and bespoke quartz-metal seals with metal-O-rings at the lamp stage. As a consequence, the procedure of assembling the furnace for crystal growth is changed completely. Bespoke heating jackets permit to bake the system. For compounds with elevated vapor pressures, the ultra-high vacuum serves as a precondition for the use of a high-purity argon atmosphere up to 10 bar. In the ferromagnetic Heusler compound Cu _2MnAl, the improvements of purity result in an improved stability of the molten zone, grain selection, and, hence, single-crystal growth. Similar improvements are observed in traveling-solvent floating-zone growth of the antiferromagnetic Heusler compound Mn _3Si. These improvements underscore the great potential of optical float-zoning for the growth of high-purity single crystals of intermetallic compounds.

  18. Ultra-high vacuum photoelectron linear accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Yu, David U.L.; Luo, Yan

    2013-07-16

    An rf linear accelerator for producing an electron beam. The outer wall of the rf cavity of said linear accelerator being perforated to allow gas inside said rf cavity to flow to a pressure chamber surrounding said rf cavity and having means of ultra high vacuum pumping of the cathode of said rf linear accelerator. Said rf linear accelerator is used to accelerate polarized or unpolarized electrons produced by a photocathode, or to accelerate thermally heated electrons produced by a thermionic cathode, or to accelerate rf heated field emission electrons produced by a field emission cathode.

  19. BAKABLE ULTRA-HIGH VACUUM VALVE

    DOEpatents

    Mark, J.T.; Gantz, I.H.

    1962-07-10

    S>This patent relates to a valve useful in applications involving successively closing and opening a communication between a chamber evacuated to an ultra-high vacuum condition of the order of 10/sup -10/ millimeters of mercury and another chamber or the ambient. The valve is capable of withstanding extended baking at 450 deg C and repeated opening and closing without repiacement of the valve seat (approximately 200 cycle limit). The seal is formed by mutual interdiffusion weld, coerced by a pneumatic actuator. (AEC)

  20. Materials for ultra-high vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, G.

    1989-08-15

    This report discusses materials for use in ultrahigh vacuum systems of 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}9} Torr or lower. The author briefly discusses alloys, solders, insulators and joining methods for vacuum systems. (JDL)

  1. Physical sciences: Thermodynamics, cryogenics, and vacuum technology: A compilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Technological developments which have potential application outside the aerospace community are reported. A variety of thermodynamic devices including heat pipes and cooling systems are described along with methods of handling cryogenic fluids. Vacuum devices are also described. Pata et information is included.

  2. Ultra high vacuum broad band high power microwave window

    DOEpatents

    Nguyen-Tuong, V.; Dylla, H.F. III

    1997-11-04

    An improved high vacuum microwave window has been developed that utilizes high density polyethylene coated on two sides with SiOx, SiNx, or a combination of the two. The resultant low dielectric and low loss tangent window creates a low outgassing, low permeation seal through which broad band, high power microwave energy may be passed. No matching device is necessary and the sealing technique is simple. The features of the window are broad band transmission, ultra-high vacuum compatibility with a simple sealing technique, low voltage standing wave ratio, high power transmission and low cost. 5 figs.

  3. Ultra high vacuum broad band high power microwave window

    DOEpatents

    Nguyen-Tuong, Viet; Dylla, III, Henry Frederick

    1997-01-01

    An improved high vacuum microwave window has been developed that utilizes high density polyethylene coated on two sides with SiOx, SiNx, or a combination of the two. The resultant low dielectric and low loss tangent window creates a low outgassing, low permeation seal through which broad band, high power microwave energy may be passed. No matching device is necessary and the sealing technique is simple. The features of the window are broad band transmission, ultra-high vacuum compatibility with a simple sealing technique, low voltage standing wave ratio, high power transmission and low cost.

  4. VACUUM WINDOW DESIGN FOR HIGH-POWER LASERS.

    SciTech Connect

    SHAFTAN, T.

    2005-04-21

    One of the problems in the high-power lasers design is in outcoupling of a powerful laser beam out of a vacuum volume into atmosphere. Usually the laser device is located inside a vacuum tank. The laser radiation is transported to the outside world through the transparent vacuum window. While considered transparent, some of the light passing through the glass is absorbed and converted to heat. For most applications, these properties are academic curiosities; however, in multi-kilowatt lasers, the heat becomes significant and can lead to a failure. The absorbed power can result in thermal stress, reduction of light transmission and, consequently, window damage. Modern optical technology has developed different types of glass (Silica, BK7, diamond, etc.) that have high thermal conductivity and damage threshold. However, for kilo- and megawatt lasers the issue still remains open. In this paper we present a solution that may relieve the heat load on the output window. We discuss advantages and issues of this particular window design.

  5. Development of vacuum underfill technology for a 3D chip stack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakuma, Katsuyuki; Kohara, Sayuri; Sueoka, Kuniaki; Orii, Yasumitsu; Kawakami, Mikio; Asai, Kazuo; Hirayama, Yoshikazu; Knickerbocker, John U.

    2011-03-01

    We developed a vacuum underfill technology for 3D chip stacks and for flip chips in high performance system integration. We fabricated a 3D prototype chip stack using the vacuum underfill technology to apply the adhesive. The underfill was injected into each 6 µm gaps in a 3-layer chip stack and no voids were detected in acoustic microscopy images. Electrical tests and thermal reliability tests were used to measure the resistance of the vertical interconnections and the impact of the underfill. The results showed there was minimal difference in the average interconnection resistance of the chip stack with and without underfill.

  6. Thermal Stabilization in a High Vacuum Cryogenic Optical System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, Rosa; Cripe, Jonathan; Corbitt, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    The existing technology for gravitational wave detection is limited in part by quantum noise. In our tabletop experiments, we are attempting to lower the noise floor to the quantum limit through the use of a seismically isolated cryogenic high vacuum environment, with the intention of exploring different methods to reduce quantum noise. In the development phase of this environment, we have implemented a customized strategy of ultraviolet irradiation combined with cryogenically cooled radiation shielding to reduce the impact of water vapor and blackbody radiation on the thermal stability of the cryogenic micro-components. Supported by National Science Foundation REU Site #1262890 and CAREER Award #1150531.

  7. High vacuum cells for classical surface techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, Imee Su; Baldelli, Steven

    2010-04-15

    Novel glass cells were designed and built to be able to perform surface potential and surface tension measurements in a contained environment. The cells can withstand pressures of approximately 1x10{sup -6} Torr, providing a reasonable level of control in terms of the amounts of volatile contaminants during experimentation. The measurements can take several hours; thus the cells help maintain the integrity of the sample in the course of the experiment. To test for the feasibility of the cell design, calibration measurements were performed. For the surface potential cell, the modified TREK 6000B-7C probe exhibited performance comparable to its unmodified counterpart. The correlation measurements between applied potential on the test surface and the measured potential showed R-values very close to 1 as well as standard deviation values of less than 1. Results also demonstrate improved measurement values for experiments performed in vacuum. The surface tension cell, on the other hand, which was used to perform the pendant drop method, was tested on common liquids and showed percentage errors of 0.5% when compared to literature values. The fabricated cells redefine measurements using classical surface techniques, providing unique and novel methods of sample preparation, premeasurement preparation, and sample analysis at highly beneficial expenditure cost.

  8. Low-Cost, Rugged High-Vacuum System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorensen, Paul; Kline-Schoder, Robert

    2012-01-01

    A need exists for miniaturized, rugged, low-cost high-vacuum systems. Recent advances in sensor technology have led to the development of very small mass spectrometer detectors as well as other analytical instruments such as scanning electron microscopes. However, the vacuum systems to support these sensors remain large, heavy, and power-hungry. To meet this need, a miniaturized vacuum system was developed based on a very small, rugged, and inexpensive-to-manufacture molecular drag pump (MDP). The MDP is enabled by a miniature, very-high-speed (200,000 rpm), rugged, low-power, brushless DC motor optimized for wide temperature operation and long life. The key advantages of the pump are reduced cost and improved ruggedness compared to other mechanical hig-hvacuum pumps. The machining of the rotor and stators is very simple compared to that necessary to fabricate rotor and stator blades for other pump designs. Also, the symmetry of the rotor is such that dynamic balancing of the rotor will likely not be necessary. Finally, the number of parts in the unit is cut by nearly a factor of three over competing designs. The new pump forms the heart of a complete vacuum system optimized to support analytical instruments in terrestrial applications and on spacecraft and planetary landers. The MDP achieves high vacuum coupled to a ruggedized diaphragm rough pump. Instead of the relatively complicated rotor and stator blades used in turbomolecular pumps, the rotor in the MDP consists of a simple, smooth cylinder of aluminum. This will turn at approximately 200,000 rpm inside an outer stator housing. The pump stator comprises a cylindrical aluminum housing with one or more specially designed grooves that serve as flow channels. To minimize the length of the pump, the gas is forced down the flow channels of the outer stator to the base of the pump. The gas is then turned and pulled toward the top through a second set of channels cut into an inner stator housing that surrounds the

  9. [Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy system for elements analysis in high-temperature and vacuum environment].

    PubMed

    Pan, Cong-Yuan; Du, Xue-Wei; An, Ning; Han, Zhen-Yu; Wang, Sheng-Bo; Wei, Wei; Wang, Qiu-Ping

    2013-12-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is one of the most promising technologies to be applied to metallurgical composition online monitoring in these days. In order to study the spectral characters of LIBS spectrum and to investigate the quantitative analysis method of material composition under vacuum and high temperature environment, a LIBS measurement system was designed and set up which can be used for conducting experiments with high-temperature or molten samples in different vacuum environment. The system consists of a Q-switched Nd : YAG laser used as the light source, lens with different focus lengths used for laser focusing and spectrum signal collecting, a spectrometer used for detecting the signal of LIBS spectrums, and a vacuum system for holding and heating the samples while supplying a vacuum environment. The vacuum was achieved and maintained by a vacuum pump and an electric induction furnace was used for heating the system. The induction coil was integrated to the vacuum system by attaching to a ceramic sealing flange. The system was installed and testified, and the results indicate that the vacuum of the system can reach 1X 10(-4) Pa without heating, while the heating temperature could be about 1 600 degreeC, the system can be used for melting metal samples such as steel and aluminum and get the LIBS spectrum of the samples at the same time. Utilizing this system, LIBS experiments were conducted using standard steel samples under different vacuum or high-temperature conditions. Results of comparison between LIBS spectrums of solid steel samples under different vacuum were achieved, and so are the spectrums of molten and solid steel samples under vacuum environment. Through data processing and theoretical analyzing of these spectrums, the initial results of those experiments are in good agreement with the results that are presently reported, which indicates that the whole system functions well and is available for molten metal LIBS experiment

  10. Internal motion in high vacuum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, J. M.

    Three transfer and positioning mechanisms have been developed for the non-air exposed, multistep processing of components in vacuum chambers. The functions to be performed in all of the systems include ultraviolet/ozone cleaning, vacuum baking, deposition of thin films, and thermocompression sealing of the enclosures. Precise positioning of the components is required during the evaporation and sealing processes. The three methods of transporting and positioning the components were developed to accommodate the design criteria and goals of each individual system. The design philosophy, goals, and operation of the three mechanisms are discussed.

  11. MEMS ion-sorption high vacuum pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grzebyk, T.; Knapkiewicz, P.; Szyszka, P.; Gorecka-Drzazga, A.; Dziuban, J. A.

    2016-11-01

    In the article a miniature MEMS-type ion-sorption vacuum pump has been presented. The influence of electric and magnetic field, as well as horizontal and vertical dimensions of the micropump and type of material used for electrodes on the pump properties has been investigated. It has been found that the micropump works efficiently as long as the magnetic field is higher than 0.3 T, and pumping cell is larger than 1x1x1 mm3. The pump allows generating vacuum at the level of 10-7-10-9 hPa in 100 mm3 volume.

  12. Very high-vacuum heat treatment facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Folkner, W. M.; Moody, M. V.; Richard, J.-P.

    1987-01-01

    A vacuum heat treatment facility, with hot zone dimensions of 12 x 19 x 19 cm, has been designed and constructed at a cost substantially below that of a commercial unit. The design incorporates efficient water cooling and a resistive heating element. A vacuum pressure of 1.5 x 10 to the -8th torr at room temperature has been obtained after baking. The temperature limit is approximately 1900 C. This limit results from the choice of niobium as the hot zone material.

  13. Germanium detector vacuum encapsulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madden, N. W.; Malone, D. F.; Pehl, R. H.; Cork, C. P.; Luke, P. N.; Landis, D. A.; Pollard, M. J.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes an encapsulation technology that should significantly improve the viability of germanium gamma-ray detectors for a number of important applications. A specialized vacuum chamber has been constructed in which the detector and the encapsulating module are processed in high vacuum. Very high vacuum conductance is achieved within the valveless encapsulating module. The detector module is then sealed without breaking the chamber vacuum. The details of the vacuum chamber, valveless module, processing, and sealing method are presented.

  14. Lubricants for High-Vacuum Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-03-15

    reverse if necessary and identify by block number) FIELD GROUP SUB-GROUP Bearings Lubricants Oils Vacuum Coatings Mechanisms Space Environment Greases MoS2 ...various types of MoS2 as a function of cycles in pin-on-disk tests ......................................................................... 20 2... outgassing within "a space vehicle is estimated to expose any internal mechanism to "a pressure of 1.3 x 10-5 (1 x 10- torr) or lower.1 Externally

  15. CRYOGENIC AND VACUUM TECHNOLOGICAL ASPECTS OF THE LOW-ENERGY ELECTROSTATIC CRYOGENIC STORAGE RING

    SciTech Connect

    Orlov, D. A.; Lange, M.; Froese, M.; Hahn, R. von; Grieser, M.; Mallinger, V.; Sieber, T.; Weber, T.; Wolf, A.; Rappaport, M.

    2008-03-16

    The cryogenic and vacuum concepts for the electrostatic Cryogenic ion Storage Ring (CSR), under construction at the Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik in Heidelberg, is presented. The ring will operate in a broad temperature range from 2 to 300 K and is required to be bakeable up to 600 K. Extremely high vacuum and low temperatures are necessary to achieve long lifetimes of the molecular ions stored in the ring so that the ions will have enough time to cool by radiation to their vibrational and rotational ground states. To test cryogenic and vacuum technological aspects of the CSR, a prototype is being built and will be connected to the commercial cryogenic refrigerator recently installed, including a specialized 2-K connection system. The first results and the status of current work with the prototype are also presented.

  16. Highly sensitive vacuum ion pump current measurement system

    DOEpatents

    Hansknecht, John Christopher

    2006-02-21

    A vacuum system comprising: 1) an ion pump; 2) power supply; 3) a high voltage DC--DC converter drawing power from the power supply and powering the vacuum pump; 4) a feedback network comprising an ammeter circuit including an operational amplifier and a series of relay controlled scaling resistors of different resistance for detecting circuit feedback; 5) an optional power block section intermediate the power supply and the high voltage DC--DC converter; and 6) a microprocessor receiving feedback information from the feedback network, controlling which of the scaling resistors should be in the circuit and manipulating data from the feedback network to provide accurate vacuum measurement to an operator.

  17. Evolution of gettering technologies for vacuum tubes to getters for MEMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amiotti, M.

    2008-05-01

    Getter materials are technically proven and industrially accepted practical ways to maintain vacuum inside hermetically sealed tubes or devices to assure high reliability and long lifetime of the operating devices. The most industrially proven vacuum tube is the cathode rays tubes (CRTs), where large surfaces are available for the deposition of an evaporated barium film by a radio frequency inductive heating of a stainless steel container filled with a BaAl4 powder mixed to Ni powder. The evolution of the CRTs manufacturing technologies required also new types of barium getters able to withstand some thermal process in air without any deterioration of the evaporation characteristics. In other vacuum tubes such as traveling waves tubes, the space available for the evaporation of a barium film and the sorption capacity required to assure the vacuum for the lifetime of the devices did not allow the use of the barium film, prompting the development of sintered non evaporable getter pills that can be activated during the manufacturing process or by flowing current through an embedded resistance. The same sintered non evaporable getter pills could find usage also in evacuated parts to thermally isolate the infrared sensors for different final applications. In high energy physics particle accelerators, the getter technology moved from localized vacuum getter pumps or getter strips to a getter coating over the surface of vacuum chambers in order to guarantee a more uniform pumping speed. With the advent of solid state electronics, new challenges faced the getter technology to assure long life to vacuum or inert gas filled hermetical packages containing microelectronic devices, especially in the telecommunication and military applications. A well known problem of GaAs devices with Pd or Pt metalization is the H2 poisoning of the metal gate: to prevent this degradation a two layer getter film has been develop to absorb a large quantity of H2 per unit of getter surface. The

  18. Piezoelectrically Actuated Shutter for High Vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Robert; Klose, Gerhard

    2003-01-01

    A piezoelectrically actuated shutter is undergoing development for use in experiments on laser cooling of atoms. The shutter is required to be compatible with ultrahigh vacuum [pressure of 10(exp -9) torr (.1.3 x 10(exp -7) Pa) or less] and to be capable of performing reliably in the vacuum for at least one year. In operation, the shutter would enable the collection and launch of successive samples of cold atoms and would enable the interrogation of the immediately preceding sample while preventing disturbance of the atoms of that sample by light from the collection region. A major constraint is imposed on the design and operation of the shutter by a requirement that it not generate a magnetic field large enough to perturb an atomic clock. An electromagnetically actuated shutter could satisfy all requirements except this one. Hence, it was decided to use piezoelectric instead of electromagnetic actuation. The shutter (see figure) includes two commercial piezoelectrically driven flexure stages that produce a travel of 0.5 mm. Levers mechanically amplify the travel to the required level of 1 cm. Problems that remained to be addressed at the time of reporting the information for this article included lifetime testing and correction of a tendency for shutter blades to bounce open.

  19. High temp vacuum furnace offers new option

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-11

    Vacuum furnaces operating up to 2,350 F are commonly used for metallurgical processes such as hardening tool steels, treating super alloys, power metal sintering, and brazing. Traditionally electric, these furnaces are costly to operate and maintain. They are often sensitivity to impurities driven off work pieces in the heating chamber because the vapors condense on the walls of the heating chamber and negatively effect operation. The gas-fired vacuum furnace now in development by Surface Combustion, with support from the Gas Research Institute (GRI) will, however, have none of the drawbacks of the electric models while maintaining or improving on performance. Costly electric operating and demand charges will be avoided through the use of natural gas as a fuel. Its ``hot wall`` furnace design means that impurities driven off the work piece can be pulled out of the chamber before they condense. Because ceramic radiant tubes will be used in conjunction with the hot wall design, temperature uniformity and productivity are expected to equal, or surpass, that of the electric furnaces.

  20. Ultra-high vacuum in superconducting accelerator rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazanov, A. M.; Butenko, A. V.; Galimov, A. R.; Lugovnin, A. K.; Smirnov, A. V.

    2016-12-01

    Achieving the ultra-high vacuum (UHV) in the collider and booster of the NICA project is one of the main challenges when creating this device. It determines the need for a serious approach to this issue and conducting research in this direction. First, it is necessary to understand the effect of the various components of the vacuum systems on the degree of vacuum. It is also necessary to carry out studies of pumping devices for producing the required vacuum (10-9 Pa) in the beam chamber and choose the most optimal pumping scheme. At the same time, it is necessary to figure out how various operations are carried out with the vacuum chamber: preparation of vacuum surfaces, letting in the atmosphere, and warming the chamber after closing the influence on the degree of vacuum and the composition of the residual gas. The temperature may vary from room temperature to liquid helium temperature due to the difficulty of keeping the beam-chamber walls at a constant temperature, including the inner components. This complicates the processes taking place within it. Additional complexity arises due the heating of the chamber walls by various processes during the operation of the accelerator (for example, cycling the magnetic field).

  1. Aircraft Quality High Temperature Vacuum Carburizing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-11-01

    carburizing temperature should :’Auce the desired su-’ace contact fatigue properties. , a ue t, the following heat treat cyc e was used to vacuum carburize the...RESPONSIBLt NFD-VDUAL 24 iE E "M0NjIncjvdo AntCg 2c"CESMO Martin Wells 1 17)92313J27 ’C*’rSL CMTE-EMk4O E lDD Forni 1473, JUN M ’,o.,6~ros, o0aoJ4. SECUIjAT...data contained In this report. Mr. B. Boutilier Mr. E . Slate Mr. J. Kacheir-es Mr. M. Brody Mr. B. Johnson Mr. G. Turk Ms. P. Conyers F - tri V TABLE

  2. Overview of High Power Vacuum Dry RF Load Designs

    SciTech Connect

    Krasnykh, Anatoly

    2015-08-27

    A specific feature of RF linacs based on the pulsed traveling wave (TW) mode of operation is that only a portion of the RF energy is used for the beam acceleration. The residual RF energy has to be terminated into an RF load. Higher accelerating gradients require higher RF sources and RF loads, which can stably terminate the residual RF power. RF feeders (from the RF source though the accelerating section to the load) are vacuumed to transmit multi-megawatt high power RF. This overview will outline vacuumed RF loads only. A common method to terminate multi-MW RF power is to use circulated water (or other liquid) as an absorbing medium. A solid dielectric interface (a high quality ceramic) is required to separate vacuum and liquid RF absorber mediums. Using such RF load approaches in TW linacs is troubling because there is a fragile ceramic window barrier and a failure could become catastrophic for linac vacuum and RF systems. Traditional loads comprising of a ceramic disk have limited peak and average power handling capability and are therefore not suitable for high gradient TW linacs. This overview will focus on ''vacuum dry'' or ''all-metal'' loads that do not employ any dielectric interface between vacuum and absorber. The first prototype is an original design of RF loads for the Stanford Two-Mile Accelerator.

  3. Determining the mode of high voltage breakdowns in vacuum devices

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, H.C.; Furno, E.J.; Sturtz, J.P.

    1980-08-11

    Devices were constructed which were essentially vacuum diodes equipped with windows allowing observation of high voltage breakdowns. The waveform of the applied voltage was photographed, and the x-ray output was monitored to investigate electrical breakdown in these vacuum diodes. Results indicate that breakdowns may be divided into two types: (1) vacuum (interelectrode) breakdown - characterized by a diffuse moderately bright discharge, a relative slow and smooth voltage collapse, and a large burst of x-rays, and (2) surface (insulator) flashover - characterized by a bright discharge with a very bright filamentary core, a relatively fast and noisy voltage collapse and no x-ray burst. Useful information concerning the type of breakdown in a vacuum device can be obtained by monitoring the voltage (current) waveform and the x-ray output.

  4. High temperature furnace system for vacuum ultraviolet spectroscopic studies.

    PubMed

    Brown, C M; Naber, R H; Tilford, S G; Ginter, M L

    1973-08-01

    An improved furnace system for use in vacuum ultraviolet spectroscopic studies of atomic and molecular species stable at high temperatures (800-2500 degrees C) is described in detail. A new and improved high resolution spectrum of Mg I and several impurity spectra produced in the furnace are presented.

  5. PREFACE: International Symposium on Vacuum Science & Technology and its Application for Accelerators (IVS 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandit, V. S.; Pal, Gautam

    2012-11-01

    The Indian Vacuum Society (IVS) was established in 1970 to promote vacuum science and technology in academic, industrial and R&D institutions in India. IVS is a member society of the International Union for Vacuum Science, Technique and Applications (IUVSTA). It has organized International and national symposia, short term courses and workshops on different aspects of Vacuum Science and Technology at regular intervals. So far 27 National symposia, 4 International Symposia and 47 courses have been organized at various locations in India. There has been an active participation from R&D establishments, universities and Indian industries during all these events. In view of the current global situation and emerging trends in vacuum technology, the executive committee of the IVS suggested to us that we organize an International Symposium at the Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, Kolkata from 15-17 February 2012. At the Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre we have a large number of high vacuum systems used in the K130 Cyclotron and K500 Superconducting Cyclotron. Also a large cryogenic system using LHe plant is in operation for cryopanels and a superconducting magnet for K-500 Cyclotron. The main areas covered at the symposium were the production and measurement of vacuums, leak detection, design and development of large vacuum systems, vacuum metallurgy, vacuum materials and the application of high vacuums in cyclotrons, LINACS and other accelerators. This symposium provided an opportunity for interaction between active researchers and technologists and allowed them to review the current situation, report recent experimental results, share the available expertise and consider the future R&D efforts needed in this area. Keeping the industrial significance of vacuum technology in mind, an exhibition of the vacuum related equipment, accessories, products etc by various suppliers and manufactures was organized alongside the symposium. Participation by a large number of exhibitors

  6. Vacuum mechatronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hackwood, Susan; Belinski, Steven E.; Beni, Gerardo

    1989-01-01

    The discipline of vacuum mechatronics is defined as the design and development of vacuum-compatible computer-controlled mechanisms for manipulating, sensing and testing in a vacuum environment. The importance of vacuum mechatronics is growing with an increased application of vacuum in space studies and in manufacturing for material processing, medicine, microelectronics, emission studies, lyophylisation, freeze drying and packaging. The quickly developing field of vacuum mechatronics will also be the driving force for the realization of an advanced era of totally enclosed clean manufacturing cells. High technology manufacturing has increasingly demanding requirements for precision manipulation, in situ process monitoring and contamination-free environments. To remove the contamination problems associated with human workers, the tendency in many manufacturing processes is to move towards total automation. This will become a requirement in the near future for e.g., microelectronics manufacturing. Automation in ultra-clean manufacturing environments is evolving into the concept of self-contained and fully enclosed manufacturing. A Self Contained Automated Robotic Factory (SCARF) is being developed as a flexible research facility for totally enclosed manufacturing. The construction and successful operation of a SCARF will provide a novel, flexible, self-contained, clean, vacuum manufacturing environment. SCARF also requires very high reliability and intelligent control. The trends in vacuum mechatronics and some of the key research issues are reviewed.

  7. Sealing Materials for Use in Vacuum at High Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pettit, Donald R.; Camarda, Charles J.; Lee Vaughn, Wallace

    2012-01-01

    Sealing materials that can be applied and left in place in vacuum over a wide range of temperatures (especially temperatures of a few thousand degrees Celsius) have been conceived and investigated for potential utility in repairing thermal-protection tiles on the space shuttles in orbit before returning to Earth. These materials are also adaptable to numerous terrestrial applications that involve vacuum processing and/or repair of structures that must withstand high temperatures. These materials can be formulated to have mechanical handling characteristics ranging from almost freely flowing liquid-like consistency through paste-like consistency to stiff puttylike consistency, and to retain these characteristics in vacuum until heated to high curing temperatures. A sealing material of this type can be formulated to be used in any of several different ways for example, to be impregnated into a high-temperature-fabric patch, impregnated into a high-temperature-fabric gasket for sealing a patch, applied under a patch, or applied alone in the manner of putty or wallboard compound. The sealing material must be formulated to be compatible with, and adhere to, the structural material(s) to be repaired. In general, the material consists of a vacuum-compatible liquid containing one or more dissolved compound(s) and/or mixed with suspended solid particles. Depending on the intended application, the liquid can be chosen to be of a compound that can remain in place in vacuum for a time long enough to be useful, and/or to evaporate or decompose in a controlled way to leave a useful solid residue behind. The evaporation rate is determined by proper choice of vapor pressure, application of heat, and/or application of ultraviolet light or other optical radiation. The liquid chosen for the original space shuttle application is a commercial silicone vacuum-pump oil.

  8. Vacuum surface flashover and high pressure gas streamers

    SciTech Connect

    Elizondo, J.M.; Krogh, M.L.; Smith, D.; Stolz, D.; Wright, S.N.; Sampayan, S.E.; Caporaso, G.J.; Vitello, P.; Tishchenko, N.

    1997-07-01

    Pre-breakdown current traces obtained during high pressure gas breakdown and vacuum surface flashover show similar signatures. The initial pre-breakdown current spike, a flat constant current phase, and the breakdown phase with voltage collapse and current surge differ mostly in magnitude. Given these similarities, a model, consisting of the initial current spike corresponding to a fast precursor streamer (ionization wave led by a photoionizing front), the flat current stage as the heating or glow phase, and the terminal avalanche and gap closure, is applied to vacuum surface flashover. A simple analytical approximation based on the resistivity changes induced in the vacuum and dielectric surface is presented. The approximation yields an excellent fit to pre-breakdown time delay vs applied field for previously published experimental data. A detailed kinetics model that includes surface and gas contributions is being developed based in the initial approximation.

  9. Wear Testing of Moving Components in Ultra-High Vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Short, Arnelia; McAlister, T.; Ellis, R.; Mosleh, M.

    2010-11-01

    Wear and friction in moving parts in an Ultra-High Vacuum (UHV) environment is a fundamental challenge in the design of mechanical assemblies in fusion experiments. In a reactor-scale experiment, constraints have been placed on the material choices and mechanical motions within the system due to their vacuum environment. Wear and friction only serve to complicate these constraints. Textured surfaces, bonded lubricants, and vacuum compatible greases have shown promise as possible means of reducing friction and wear. We have designed a machine for testing wear in a UHV environment, at room temperature, and elevated temperatures. This poster describes the design of the wear test machine and its operating parameters. We have presented an outline of the material test program along with a discussion of the pros and cons of anti-friction and anti-wear treatments.

  10. Glow discharge techniques for conditioning high vacuum systems

    SciTech Connect

    Dylla, H.F.

    1988-03-01

    A review is given of glow discharge techniques which are useful for conditioning vacuum vessels for high vacuum applications. Substantial development of glow discharge techniques has been done for the purpose of in-situ conditioning of the large ultrahigh vacuum systems for particle accelerators and magnetic fusion devices. In these applications the glow discharge treatments remove impurities from vessel surfaces in order to minimize particle-induced desorption coefficients. Cleaning mechanisms involve a mixture of sputtering and ion- (or neutral) induced desorption effects depending on the gas mixture (ArO/sub 2/ vs. H/sub 2/) and excitation method (DC, RF, and ECR). The author will review the methodology of glow discharge conditioning, diagnostic measurements provided by residual gas and surface composition analysis, and applications to vessel conditioning and materials processing. 76 refs., 16 figs.

  11. Semipermanent sealing of leaks in high vacuum systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christian, J. D.; Gilbreath, W. P.

    1974-01-01

    Silicone-rubber adhesive is applied externally to seal hair-line cracks in sections of high vacuum system while system is partially evacuated. No pretreatment of surface is required since adhesive will be drawn into crack while diffusion or ion pump is off.

  12. Vacuum compatible, high-speed, 2-D mirror tilt stage

    DOEpatents

    Denham; Paul E.

    2007-09-25

    A compact and vacuum compatible magnetic-coil driven tiltable stage that is equipped with a high efficiency reflective coating can be employed as a scanner in EUV applications. The drive electronics for the scanner is fully in situ programmable and rapidly switchable.

  13. Solid lubricant mass contact transfer technology usage for vacuum ball bearings longevity increasing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arzymatov, B.; Deulin, E.

    2016-07-01

    A contact mass transfer technological method of solid lubricant deposition on components of vacuum ball bearings is presented. Physics-mathematical model of process contact mass transfer is being considered. The experimental results of ball bearings covered with solid lubricant longevity in vacuum are presented. It is shown that solid lubricant of contact mass transfer method deposition is prospective for ball bearing longevity increasing.

  14. A large high vacuum, high pumping speed space simulation chamber for electric propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grisnik, Stanley P.; Parkes, James E.

    1994-01-01

    Testing high power electric propulsion devices poses unique requirements on space simulation facilities. Very high pumping speeds are required to maintain high vacuum levels while handling large volumes of exhaust products. These pumping speeds are significantly higher than those available in most existing vacuum facilities. There is also a requirement for relatively large vacuum chamber dimensions to minimize facility wall/thruster plume interactions and to accommodate far field plume diagnostic measurements. A 4.57 m (15 ft) diameter by 19.2 m (63 ft) long vacuum chamber at NASA Lewis Research Center is described. The chamber utilizes oil diffusion pumps in combination with cryopanels to achieve high vacuum pumping speeds at high vacuum levels. The facility is computer controlled for all phases of operation from start-up, through testing, to shutdown. The computer control system increases the utilization of the facility and reduces the manpower requirements needed for facility operations.

  15. Diffuser/ejector system for a very high vacuum environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riggs, K. E.; Wojciechowski, C. J. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    Turbo jet engines are used to furnish the necessary high temperature, high volume, medium pressure gas to provide a high vacuum test environment at comparatively low cost for space engines at sea level. Moreover, the invention provides a unique way by use of the variable area ratio ejectors with a pair of meshing cones are used. The outer cone is arranged to translate fore and aft, and the inner cone is interchangeable with other cones having varying angles of taper.

  16. SECONDARY ELECTRON TRAJECTORIES IN HIGH-GRADIENT VACUUM INSULATORS WITH FAST HIGH-VOLTAGE PULSES

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y; Blackfield, D; Nelson, S D; Poole, B

    2010-04-21

    Vacuum insulators composed of alternating layers of metal and dielectric, known as high-gradient insulators (HGIs), have been shown to withstand higher electric fields than conventional insulators. Primary or secondary electrons (emitted from the insulator surface) can be deflected by magnetic fields from external sources, the high-current electron beam, the conduction current in the transmission line, or the displacement current in the insulator. These electrons are deflected either toward or away from the insulator surface and this affects the performance of the vacuum insulator. This paper shows the effects of displacement current from short voltage pulses on the performance of high gradient insulators. Generally, vacuum insulator failure is due to surface flashover, initiated by electrons emitted from a triple junction. These electrons strike the insulator surface thus producing secondary electrons, and can lead to a subsequent electron cascade along the surface. The displacement current in the insulator can deflect electrons either toward or away from the insulator surface, and affects the performance of the vacuum insulator when the insulator is subjected to a fast high-voltage pulse. Vacuum insulators composed of alternating layers of metal and dielectric, known as high-gradient insulators (HGIs), have been shown to withstand higher electric fields than conventional insulators. HGIs, being tolerant of the direct view of high-current electron and ion beams, and having desirable RF properties for accelerators, are a key enabling technology for the dielectric-wall accelerators (DWA) being developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Characteristically, insulator surface breakdown thresholds go up as the applied voltage pulse width decreases. To attain the highest accelerating gradient in the DWA, short accelerating voltage pulses are only applied locally, along the HGI accelerator tube, in sync with the charged particle bunch, and the effects of

  17. Vacuum high-harmonic generation and electromagnetic shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böhl, P.; King, B.; Ruhl, H.

    2016-04-01

    > When one takes into account the presence of virtual charged states in the quantum vacuum, a nonlinear self-interaction can arise in the propagation of electromagnetic fields. This self-interaction is often referred to as `real photon-photon scattering'. When the centre-of-mass energy of colliding photons is much lower than the rest energy of an electron-positron pair, this quantum effect can be included in the classical field equations of motion as a vacuum current and charge density using the Heisenberg-Euler Lagrangian. Using analytical and numerical methods for subcritical fields, the intrinsic solution to Maxwell's equations has been found for counterpropagating probe and pump plane waves in the presence of vacuum four- and six-wave mixing. In the corresponding all-order solution for the scattered probe, a route to vacuum high-harmonic generation is identified in which a long phase length can compensate for the weakness of interacting fields. The resulting shocks in the probe carrier wave and envelope are studied for different parameter regimes and polarisation set-ups. In this special issue, we study two additional set-ups: that of a slowly varying single-cycle background to highlight the effect of an oscillating background on the probe harmonic spectrum, and that of a few-cycle probe to highlight the smoothing of the harmonic peaks produced by a wider spectrum of probe photons. We also correct sign errors in an earlier publication.

  18. Technology profile: Vacuum-mediated LNAPL free product recovery/bioremediation (bioslurper), issue 1. Technology profile

    SciTech Connect

    Haas, P.E.

    1994-03-01

    Vacuum-mediated Free Product Recovery/Bioremediation (Bioslurping) is applicable to sites where light nonaqueous phase liquids (LNAPLs) (e.g.. petroleum hydrocarbons: gasoline, jet fuels, diesel, heating oils, etc.) form a measurable layer of LNAPL on the water table. All parameters that affect the recoverability of the LNAPLs should be considered in site selection. Major factors include the mass of LNAPL (Is there enough to recover.) and the relative permeability of the subsurface matrix to air, water, and LNAPL. This technology can simultaneously remove LNAPL free product and treat the unsaturated (vadose) zone (via bioventing).

  19. Understanding and Improving High Voltage Vacuum Insulators for Microsecond Pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Javedani, J B; Goerz, D A; Houck, T L; Lauer, E J; Speer, R D; Tully, L K; Vogtlin, G E; White, A D

    2007-03-05

    High voltage insulation is one of the main areas of pulsed power research and development, and dielectric breakdown is usually the limiting factor in attaining the highest possible performance in pulsed power devices. For many applications the delivery of pulsed power into a vacuum region is the most critical aspect of operation. The surface of an insulator exposed to vacuum can fail electrically at an applied field more than an order or magnitude below the bulk dielectric strength of the insulator. This mode of breakdown, called surface flashover, imposes serious limitations on the power flow into a vacuum region. This is especially troublesome for applications where high voltage conditioning of the insulator and electrodes is not practical and for applications where relatively long pulses, on the order of several microseconds, are required. The goal of this project is to establish a sound fundamental understanding of the mechanisms that lead to surface flashover, and then evaluate the most promising techniques to improve vacuum insulators and enable high voltage operation at stress levels near the intrinsic bulk breakdown limits of the material. The approach we proposed and followed was to develop this understanding through a combination of theoretical and computation methods coupled with experiments to validate and quantify expected behaviors. In this report we summarize our modeling and simulation efforts, theoretical studies, and experimental investigations. The computational work began by exploring the limits of commercially available codes and demonstrating methods to examine field enhancements and defect mechanisms at microscopic levels. Plasma simulations with particle codes used in conjunction with circuit models of the experimental apparatus enabled comparisons with experimental measurements. The large scale plasma (LSP) particle-in-cell (PIC) code was run on multiprocessor platforms and used to simulate expanding plasma conditions in vacuum gap regions

  20. Microfabricated Millimeter-Wave High-Power Vacuum Electronic Amplifiers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    Research Laboratory is demonstrating and developing millimeter-wave vacuum electronic traveling wave tube amplifiers at W- and G-band in the 10’s to 100...much promise for fabricating millimeter-wave (mmW) and sub- mmW amplifiers [1-2]. Trends toward higher frequencies come at the expense of more...demonstrated that allow extremely high aspect ratio beam tunnels to be fabricated along with the all-copper slow-wave amplifier circuits (Patent

  1. Performance of solid lubricated ball bearings at high-temperatures in a vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seki, Katsumi; Suzuki, Mineo; Nishimura, Makoto; Hasegawa, Masaji; Moriyama, Minoru

    1994-07-01

    Ball bearings which can operate at high temperatures in a vacuum will be required with advances in technology. Among the issues for the operation of ball bearings at high temperatures, solid lubricants and bearing materials are crucial. The aim of this study was to develop ball bearings for use at high temperatures in a vacuum. The tested bearings were 20-mm bore-sized angular contact ball bearings. Three combinations of bearing materials were tested: M-50 bearings, hybrid bearings with M-50 races and Si3N4 balls, and Si3N4 bearings. M-50 bearings were lubricated with a silver film. Hybrid and ceramic bearings were lubricated with a pre-coated sputtered MoS2 film and a self-lubricating hot-pressed composite retainer. Tests were carried out at temperatures up to 500 C and a rotational speed of 600 rpm under an axial load of 50 N in a vacuum. Excellent performance at 500 C in a vacuum was obtained for Si3N4 bearings. Frictional torque was low and stable for more than 5x10(exp 7) revolutions. After the tests, the bearings were in very good condition with a small amount of wear. Hybrid bearings also showed very good performance at 350 C in a vacuum. M-50 steel bearings were operated without failure at 350 C in a vacuum, although frictional torque was rather high and unstable. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observation revealed the existence of a film on the ball surface transferred from the composite retainer for both hybrid and ceramic bearings.

  2. Understanding High Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goetsch, David L.

    1988-01-01

    "High technology" is merely the latest technological advances of the day in any technology area. Technology is divided into three broad categories: the physical, information/communication, and biotechnologies. The best way to clear up the confusion surrounding "high technology" is to substitute the term "advanced…

  3. High Charge State Ions Extracted from Metal Plasmas in the Transition Regime from Vacuum Spark to High Current Vacuum Arc

    SciTech Connect

    Yushkov, Georgy Yu.; Anders, A.

    2008-06-19

    Metal ions were extracted from pulsed discharge plasmas operating in the transition region between vacuum spark (transient high voltage of kV) and vacuum arc (arc voltage ~;; 20 V). At a peak current of about 4 kA, and with a pulse duration of 8 ?s, we observed mean ion charges states of about 6 for several cathode materials. In the case of platinum, the highest average charge state was 6.74 with ions of charge states as high as 10 present. For gold we found traces of charge state 11, with the highest average charge state of 7.25. At currents higher than 5 kA, non-metallic contaminations started to dominate the ion beam, preventing further enhancement of the metal charge states.

  4. Field installed brazed thermocouple feedthroughs for high vacuum experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, P. M.; Messick, C.

    1983-12-01

    In order to reduce the occurrence of vacuum leaks and to increase the availability of the DIII vacuum vessel for experimental operation, effort was applied to developing a vacuum-tight brazed feedthrough system for sheathed thermocouples, stainless steel sheathed conductor cables and tubes for cooling fluids. This brazed technique is a replacement for elastomer O ring sealed feedthroughs that have proven vulnerable to leaks caused by thermal cycling, etc. To date, about 200 feedthroughs were used. Up to 91 were grouped on a single conflat flange mounted in a bulkhead connector configuration which facilitates installation and removal. Investigation was required to select a suitable braze alloy, flux and installation procedure. Braze alloy selection was challenging since the alloy was required to have: (1) melting temperature in excess of the 250 C (482 F) bakeout temperature; (2) no high vapor pressure elements; (3) good wetting properties when used in air with acceptable flux; and (4) good wettability to 300 series stainless steel and Inconel.

  5. Experimental study on the storage performance of high-vacuum-multilayer-insulation tank after sudden, catastrophic loss of insulating vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, G. F.; Li, X. D.; Wang, R. S.

    2012-05-01

    High-vacuum-multilayer-insulation (HVMLI) cryogenic tank is one kind of dangerous pressure vessels. One of the worst accidents that may occur in a high-vacuum-multilayer-insulation (HVMLI) cryogenic tank is a sudden, catastrophic loss of insulating vacuum (SCLIV). The influence of SCLIV on storage performance for a HVMLI cryogenic tank is experimentally studied in this paper. A test rig was built up and experiments were conducted using LN2 as the test medium. The cryogenic tank was tested in the conditions of various combinations with different initial liquid level and number of insulation layers. Some important conclusions for storage performance with a vacuum-lost HVMLI cryogenic tank have been obtained. The experimental results show that the numbers of insulation layers and the initial liquid level have obvious effect on the storage performance after SCLIV for cryogenic tanks.

  6. Applications of vacuum technology to novel accelerator problems

    SciTech Connect

    Garwin, E.L.

    1983-01-01

    Vacuum requirements for electron storage rings are most demanding to fulfill, due to the presence of gas desorption caused by large quantities of synchrotron radiation, the very limited area accessible for pumping ports, the need for 10/sup -9/ torr pressures in the ring, and for pressures a decade lower in the interaction regions. Design features of a wide variety of distributed ion sublimation pumps (DIP) developed at SLAC to meet these requirements are discussed, as well as NEG (non-evaporable getter) pumps tested for use in the Large Electron Positron Collider at CERN. Application of DIP to much higher pressures in electron damping rings for the Stanford Linear Collider are discussed.

  7. FOREWORD: 7th Symposium on Vacuum-based Science and Technology (SVBST2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulbiński, W.

    2014-11-01

    These are the proceedings of the 7th Symposium on Vacuum based Science and Technology organized in Kołobrzeg (PL) on November 19-21, 2013 by the Institute of Technology and Education, Koszalin University of Technology and the Clausius Tower Society under auspices of the Polish Vacuum Society (PTP) and the German Vacuum Society (DVG) and in collaboration with the BalticNet PlasmaTec and the Society of Vacuum Coaters (SVC). It was accompanied by the 12-th Annual Meeting of the German Vacuum Society. The mission of the Symposium is to provide a forum for presentation and exchange of expertise and research results in the field of vacuum and plasma science. After already six successful meetings organized alternately in Poland and Germany our goal is to continue and foster cooperation within the vacuum and plasma science community. This year, the Rudolf-Jaeckel Prize, awarded by the DVG for outstanding achievements in the field of vacuum based sciences, was presented to Dr Ute Bergner, president of the VACOM Vakuum Komponenten & Messtechnik GmbH and a member of our community. The full-day course organized in the framework of the Educational Program by the Society of Vacuum Coaters (SVC) and entitled: An Introduction to Physical Vapor Deposition (PVD) Processes was held on November 18, 2013 as a satellite event of the Symposium. The instructor was Prof. Ismat Shah from Delaware University (US). The Clausius Session, already traditionally organized during the Symposium was addressed this year to young generation. We invited our young colleagues to attend a series of educational lectures reporting on achievements in graphene science, scanning probe microscopy and plasma science. Lectures were given by: Prof. Jacek Baranowski from the Institute of Electronic Materials Technology in Warsaw, Prof. Teodor Gotszalk from the Wroclaw University of Technology and Prof. Holger Kersten from the Christian Albrechts University in Kiel. The Symposium was accompanied by an industry

  8. Plasma cleaning device. [designed for high vacuum environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shannon, R. L.; Gillette, R. B. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    High vacuum cleaning of contaminated surfaces such as hydrocarbon containment films can be accomplished by a plasma cleaning device which includes a plasma discharge housing to permit generation of a plasma in an environment having a higher pressure than the surface which is to be cleaned. A ground electrode and a radio frequency electrode partially surround a quartz plasma tube, for the introduction of an ionizable gas. These electrodes ionize the gas and help generate the plasma. This plasma flows through a non-constrictive aperture, through the plasma discharge housing and then on to the contaminated surface.

  9. Diffuser-ejector system for a very high vacuum environment

    SciTech Connect

    Riggs, K.E.

    1984-06-19

    A system for testing space engines at sea level under a very low pressure environment. The system includes a space simulation chamber connected to a diffuser, which has two variable area ratio ejectors connected to it in tandem. Each of the ejectors is driven by a jet engine, preferably a turbo jet. The system is capable of providing a low pressure environment of about three or four millimeters of mercury for testing of engines mounted in the space simulation chamber. The system also may be used for other purposes requiring very high vacuum, such as evaporation and dehydration of food products or drugs.

  10. High-temperature vacuum distillation separation of plutonium waste salts

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, E.

    1996-10-01

    In this task, high-temperature vacuum distillation separation is being developed for residue sodium chloride-potassium chloride salts resulting from past pyrochemical processing of plutonium. This process has the potential of providing clean separation of the salt and the actinides with minimal amounts of secondary waste generation. The process could produce chloride salt that could be discarded as low-level waste (LLW) or low actinide content transuranic (TRU) waste, and a concentrated actinide oxide powder that would meet long-term storage standards (DOE-DTD-3013-94) until a final disposition option for all surplus plutonium is chosen.

  11. Wide band cryogenic ultra-high vacuum microwave absorber

    DOEpatents

    Campisi, I.E.

    1992-05-12

    An absorber waveguide assembly for absorbing higher order modes of microwave energy under cryogenic ultra-high vacuum conditions, that absorbs wide-band multi-mode energy. The absorber is of a special triangular shape, made from flat tiles of silicon carbide and aluminum nitride. The leading sharp end of the absorber is located in a corner of the waveguide and tapers to a larger cross-sectional area whose center is located approximately in the center of the wave guide. The absorber is relatively short, being of less height than the maximum width of the waveguide. 11 figs.

  12. Wide band cryogenic ultra-high vacuum microwave absorber

    DOEpatents

    Campisi, Isidoro E.

    1992-01-01

    An absorber wave guide assembly for absorbing higher order modes of microwave energy under cryogenic ultra-high vacuum conditions, that absorbs wide-band multi-mode energy. The absorber is of a special triangular shape, made from flat tiles of silicon carbide and aluminum nitride. The leading sharp end of the absorber is located in a corner of the wave guide and tapers to a larger cross-sectional area whose center is located approximately in the center of the wave guide. The absorber is relatively short, being of less height than the maximum width of the wave guide.

  13. High vacuum portable pumping station suitable for accelerator use

    SciTech Connect

    Stattel, P.; Briggs, J.; DeBoer, W.; Skelton, R.

    1985-01-01

    The need for a Portable Pump Station for Ultra High Vacuum use became apparent when the ''Isabelle'' collider was first being designed. A Portable Pump Station had to be developed which contained the following features: maneuverability, compact size, rugged, self protected against various failures, capable of running unattended, and capable of reaching 10/sup -9/ torr. The Pump Station that was developed and other variations are the subject of this paper. Emphasis will be on the Isabelle and HITL versions. 1 ref., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Triggered vacuum flashover switch for high-power applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kellogg, J.C.; Boller, J.R.; Commisso, R.J.; Jenkins, D.J. ); Ford, R.D. ); Lupton, W.H. ); Shipman, J.D. Jr. )

    1991-11-01

    A command triggered, high-power, surface-flashover closing switch that operates in vacuum has been developed for use on a prototype inductive-storage pulsed power generator, Pawn. This vacuum flashover switch isolates the high-pressure-gas tamped wire fuse from a second opening switch. The switch consists of an insulating ring sandwiched between electrodes. Plasma and ultraviolet light from eight small spark discharges driven by a 5 keV pulse initiate a flashover across the switch insulator. The entire triggering unit resides inside one of Pawn's metallic conductors. The switch can be triggered after holding off voltage for {congruent}15 {mu}s. Normally, switch closure occurs at 22--45 kV. Time to closure at a voltage of {congruent}30 kV is {congruent}320 ns, with a typical jitter of {plus minus}50 ns. Peak current is typically {congruent}1 MA. Current density in the switch is approximately 25 kA/cm{sup 2}. The average risetime of the fuse output current pulse can be varied by a factor of 2 by triggering the switch at different closing voltages.

  15. Understanding High Voltage Vacuum Insulators for Microsecond Pulses

    SciTech Connect

    J.B., J; D.A., G; T.L., H; E.J., L; R.D., S; L.K., T; G.E., V

    2007-08-15

    High voltage insulation is one of the main areas of pulsed power research and development since the surface of an insulator exposed to vacuum can fail electrically at an applied field more than an order or magnitude below the bulk dielectric strength of the insulator. This is troublesome for applications where high voltage conditioning of the insulator and electrodes is not practical and where relatively long pulses, on the order of several microseconds, are required. Here we give a summary of our approach to modeling and simulation efforts and experimental investigations for understanding flashover mechanism. The computational work is comprised of both filed and particle-in-cell modeling with state-of-the-art commercial codes. Experiments were performed in using an available 100-kV, 10-{micro}s pulse generator and vacuum chamber. The initial experiments were done with polyethylene insulator material in the shape of a truncated cone cut at +45{sup o} angle between flat electrodes with a gap of 1.0 cm. The insulator was sized so there were no flashovers or breakdowns under nominal operating conditions. Insulator flashover or gap closure was induced by introducing a plasma source, a tuft of velvet, in proximity to the insulator or electrode.

  16. Vacuum Packaging for Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-10-01

    The Vacuum Packaging for MEMS Program focused on the development of an integrated set of packaging technologies which in totality provide a low cost...high volume product-neutral vacuum packaging capability which addresses all MEMS vacuum packaging requirements. The program balanced the need for...near term component and wafer-level vacuum packaging with the development of advanced high density wafer-level packaging solutions. Three vacuum

  17. High-Reflectivity Coatings for a Vacuum Ultraviolet Spectropolarimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narukage, Noriyuki; Kubo, Masahito; Ishikawa, Ryohko; Ishikawa, Shin-nosuke; Katsukawa, Yukio; Kobiki, Toshihiko; Giono, Gabriel; Kano, Ryouhei; Bando, Takamasa; Tsuneta, Saku; Auchère, Frédéric; Kobayashi, Ken; Winebarger, Amy; McCandless, Jim; Chen, Jianrong; Choi, Joanne

    2017-03-01

    Precise polarization measurements in the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) region are expected to be a new tool for inferring the magnetic fields in the upper atmosphere of the Sun. High-reflectivity coatings are key elements to achieving high-throughput optics for precise polarization measurements. We fabricated three types of high-reflectivity coatings for a solar spectropolarimeter in the hydrogen Lyman-α (Lyα; 121.567 nm) region and evaluated their performance. The first high-reflectivity mirror coating offers a reflectivity of more than 80 % in Lyα optics. The second is a reflective narrow-band filter coating that has a peak reflectivity of 57 % in Lyα, whereas its reflectivity in the visible light range is lower than 1/10 of the peak reflectivity (˜ 5 % on average). This coating can be used to easily realize a visible light rejection system, which is indispensable for a solar telescope, while maintaining high throughput in the Lyα line. The third is a high-efficiency reflective polarizing coating that almost exclusively reflects an s-polarized beam at its Brewster angle of 68° with a reflectivity of 55 %. This coating achieves both high polarizing power and high throughput. These coatings contributed to the high-throughput solar VUV spectropolarimeter called the Chromospheric Lyman-Alpha SpectroPolarimeter (CLASP), which was launched on 3 September, 2015.

  18. High specific surface area aerogel cryoadsorber for vacuum pumping applications

    DOEpatents

    Hill, Randal M.; Fought, Eric R.; Biltoft, Peter J.

    2000-01-01

    A cryogenic pumping system is provided, comprising a vacuum environment, an aerogel sorbent formed from a carbon aerogel disposed within the vacuum environment, and cooling means for cooling the aerogel sorbent sufficiently to adsorb molecules from the vacuum environment onto the aerogel sorbent. Embodiments of the invention include a liquid refrigerant cryosorption pump, a compressed helium cryogenic pump, a cryopanel and a Meissner coil, each of which uses carbon aerogel as a sorbent material.

  19. High Technology Needs Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southeastern Louisiana Univ., Hammond.

    A project produced a high technology status report providing needs assessment data for educational planning. The purpose was to determine the impact and future of high technology in Louisiana. Information was obtained from 68 Louisiana manufacturing industries by mailed questionnaire. Data indicated that 45 industries were involved in high tech. A…

  20. High-speed electret charging using vacuum UV photoionization

    SciTech Connect

    Honzumi, Makoto; Suzuki, Yuji; Hagiwara, Kei; Iguchi, Yoshinori

    2011-01-31

    We propose a high-speed charging method of electrets using vacuum ultraviolet irradiation. Due to a large amount of the ionization current at reduced pressure, it takes only a few seconds to charge 15-{mu}m-thick polymer electret film to the surface potential of -900 V. This charging rate is two orders of magnitudes larger than corona/soft-x-ray charging methods. The purity of N{sub 2} gas depends on the charging rate since the O{sub 2} quenching mechanisms of exited N{sub 2} molecule would exist. No charge decay is observed for 3000 h, which indicates charged electrets are as stable as those by other charging methods.

  1. Fabrication of ultrathin silicon dioxide layers in ultra high vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majamaa, T.; Airaksinen, V.-M.; Sinkkonen, J.

    1996-11-01

    Silicon dioxide layers of thickness 1-10 nm have been manufactured by the plasma oxidation of silicon in ultra high vacuum (UHV). UHV chamber is a very clean environment, temperature and molecular fluxes are easily controllable and in situ device processing is possible. In the temperature range 700-850°C the oxidation is very slow in the beginning. After an uniform layer is developed on the surface, the growth rate increases. Increasing temperature also clearly increases the growth rate, as the temperature dependence of the initial growth phase is probably less. Our measurements predict, that to get a good quality layer, the processing temperature should be at least 700°C.

  2. High-intensity laser-induced electron acceleration in vacuum.

    PubMed

    Wang, J X; Ho, Y K; Feng, L; Kong, Q; Wang, P X; Yuan, Z S; Scheid, W

    1999-12-01

    In this paper, an approximate pulsed-laser-beam solution of Maxwell's equation in vacuum is derived. Then with the numerical simulation method, electron acceleration induced by high-intensity [Q(0)=eE(0)/(m(e)omega c)=3] lasers is discussed in connection with the recent experiment of Malka et al. It is found that the maximum energy gain and the relationship between the final energy and the scattering angle can be well reproduced, but the polarization effect of electron-laser interactions is not very prominent. These results show that the ponderomotive potential model is still applicable, which means that the stimulated Compton scattering is the main fundamental mechanism responsible for the electron acceleration at this laser intensity.

  3. Ultra high vacuum heating and rotating specimen stage

    DOEpatents

    Coombs, III, Arthur W.

    1995-01-01

    A heating and rotating specimen stage provides for simultaneous specimen heating and rotating. The stage is ideally suited for operation in ultrahigh vacuum (1.times.10.sup.-9 torr or less), but is useful at atmosphere and in pressurized systems as well. A specimen is placed on a specimen holder that is attached to a heater that, in turn, is attached to a top housing. The top housing is rotated relative to a bottom housing and electrically connected thereto by electrically conductive brushes. This stage is made of materials that are compatible with UHV, able to withstand high temperatures, possess low outgassing rates, are gall and seize resistant, and are able to carry substantial electrical loading without overheating.

  4. Fusion reactor high vacuum pumping: Charcoal cryosorber tritium exposure results

    SciTech Connect

    Sedgley, D.W.; Walthers, C.R.; Jenkins, E.M. )

    1991-01-01

    Recent experiments, have shown the practically of using activated charcoal (coconut charcoal) at 4{degrees}K to pump helium and hydrogen isotopes for a fusion reactor. Both speed and capacity for deuterium/helium and tritium/helium-3 mixtures were shown to be satisfactory. The long term effects of tritium on the charcoal/cement system developed by Grumman and LLNL were not known and a program was undertaken to see what, if any, effect long term tritium exposure has on the cryosorber. Several charcoal on aluminum test samples were subjected to six months exposure of tritium at approximately 77{degrees}K. The tritium was scanned several times with a residual gas analyzer and the speed-capacity performance of the samples was measured before, approximately half way through and after the exposure. Modest effects were noted which would not seriously restrict charcoal's use as a cryosorber for fusion reactor high vacuum pumping applications. 4 refs., 8 figs.

  5. Ultra high vacuum heating and rotating specimen stage

    DOEpatents

    Coombs, A.W. III

    1995-05-02

    A heating and rotating specimen stage provides for simultaneous specimen heating and rotating. The stage is ideally suited for operation in ultrahigh vacuum (1{times}10{sup {minus}9} torr or less), but is useful at atmosphere and in pressurized systems as well. A specimen is placed on a specimen holder that is attached to a heater that, in turn, is attached to a top housing. The top housing is rotated relative to a bottom housing and electrically connected thereto by electrically conductive brushes. This stage is made of materials that are compatible with UHV, able to withstand high temperatures, possess low outgassing rates, are gall and seize resistant, and are able to carry substantial electrical loading without overheating. 5 figs.

  6. Application of porcelain enamel as an ultra-high-vacuum-compatible electrical insulator

    SciTech Connect

    Biscardi, C.; Hseuh, H.; Mapes, M.

    2000-07-01

    Many accelerator vacuum system components require electrical insulation internal to the vacuum system. Some accelerator components at Brookhaven National Laboratory are installed in ultra-high-vacuum systems which require the insulation to have excellent vacuum characteristics, be radiation resistant, and be able to withstand high temperatures when used on baked systems. Porcelain enamel satisfies all these requirements. This article describes the process and application of coating metal parts with porcelain enamel to provide electrical insulation. The mechanical and vacuum testing of Marman flanges coated with porcelain and using metal Helicoflex seals to form a zero-length electrical break are detailed. The use of porcelain enameled parts is attractive since it can be done quickly, is inexpensive and environmentally safe, and most of all satisfies stringent vacuum system requirements. (c) 2000 American Vacuum Society.

  7. New High Capacity Getter for Vacuum-Insulated Mobile Liquid Hydrogen Storage Systems

    SciTech Connect

    H. Londer; G. R. Myneni; P. Adderley; G. Bartlok; J. Setina; W. Knapp; D. Schleussner

    2006-05-01

    Current ''Non evaporable getters'' (NEGs), based on the principle of metallic surface sorption of gas molecules, are important tools for the improving the performance of many vacuum systems. High porosity alloys or powder mixtures of Zr, Ti, Al, V, Fe and other metals are the base materials for this type of getters. The continuous development of vacuum technologies has created new challenges for the field of getter materials. The main sorption parameters of the current NEGs, namely, pumping speed and sorption capacity, have reached certain upper limits. Chemically active metals are the basis of a new generation of NEGs. The introduction of these new materials with high sorption capacity at room temperature is a long-awaited development. These new materials enable the new generation of NEGs to reach faster pumping speeds, significantly higher sticking rates and sorption capacities up to 104 times higher during their lifetimes. Our development efforts focus on producing these chemically active metals with controlled insulation or protection. The main structural forms of our new getter materials are spherical powders, granules and porous multi-layers. The full pumping performance can take place at room temperature with activation temperatures ranging from room temperature to 650 C. In one of our first pilot projects, our proprietary getter solution was successfully introduced as a getter pump in a double-wall mobile LH2 tank system. Our getters were shown to have very high sorption capacity of all relevant residual gases, including H2. This new concept opens the opportunity for significant vacuum improvements, especially in the field of H2 pumping which is an important task in many different vacuum applications.

  8. New High Capacity Getter for Vacuum-Insulated Mobile Liquid Hydrogen Storage Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Londer, H.; Myneni, G. R.; Adderley, P.; Bartlok, G.; Setina, J.; Knapp, W.; Schleussner, D.

    2006-05-01

    Current "Non evaporable getters" (NEGs), based on the principle of metallic surface sorption of gas molecules, are important tools for the improving the performance of many vacuum systems. High porosity alloys or powder mixtures of Zr, Ti, Al, V, Fe and other metals are the base materials for this type of getters. The continuous development of vacuum technologies has created new challenges for the field of getter materials. The main sorption parameters of the current NEGs, namely, pumping speed and sorption capacity, have reached certain upper limits. Chemically active metals are the basis of a new generation of NEGs. The introduction of these new materials with high sorption capacity at room temperature is a long-awaited development. These new materials enable the new generation of NEGs to reach faster pumping speeds, significantly higher sticking rates and sorption capacities up to 104 times higher during their lifetimes. Our development efforts focus on producing these chemically active metals with controlled insulation or protection. The main structural forms of our new getter materials are spherical powders, granules and porous multi-layers. The full pumping performance can take place at room temperature with activation temperatures ranging from room temperature to 650 °C. In one of our first pilot projects, our proprietary getter solution was successfully introduced as a getter pump in a double-wall mobile LH2 tank system. Our getters were shown to have very high sorption capacity of all relevant residual gases, including H2. This new concept opens the opportunity for significant vacuum improvements, especially in the field of H2 pumping which is an important task in many different vacuum applications.

  9. Ultra-high vacuum compatible preparation chain for intermetallic compounds.

    PubMed

    Bauer, A; Benka, G; Regnat, A; Franz, C; Pfleiderer, C

    2016-11-01

    We report the development of a versatile material preparation chain for intermetallic compounds, which focuses on the realization of a high-purity growth environment. The preparation chain comprises an argon glovebox, an inductively heated horizontal cold boat furnace, an arc melting furnace, an inductively heated rod casting furnace, an optically heated floating-zone furnace, a resistively heated annealing furnace, and an inductively heated annealing furnace. The cold boat furnace and the arc melting furnace may be loaded from the glovebox by means of a load-lock permitting to synthesize compounds starting with air-sensitive elements while handling the constituents exclusively in an inert gas atmosphere. All furnaces are all-metal sealed, bakeable, and may be pumped to ultra-high vacuum. We find that the latter represents an important prerequisite for handling compounds with high vapor pressure under high-purity argon atmosphere. We illustrate the operational aspects of the preparation chain in terms of the single-crystal growth of the heavy-fermion compound CeNi2Ge2.

  10. Ultra-high vacuum compatible preparation chain for intermetallic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, A.; Benka, G.; Regnat, A.; Franz, C.; Pfleiderer, C.

    2016-11-01

    We report the development of a versatile material preparation chain for intermetallic compounds, which focuses on the realization of a high-purity growth environment. The preparation chain comprises an argon glovebox, an inductively heated horizontal cold boat furnace, an arc melting furnace, an inductively heated rod casting furnace, an optically heated floating-zone furnace, a resistively heated annealing furnace, and an inductively heated annealing furnace. The cold boat furnace and the arc melting furnace may be loaded from the glovebox by means of a load-lock permitting to synthesize compounds starting with air-sensitive elements while handling the constituents exclusively in an inert gas atmosphere. All furnaces are all-metal sealed, bakeable, and may be pumped to ultra-high vacuum. We find that the latter represents an important prerequisite for handling compounds with high vapor pressure under high-purity argon atmosphere. We illustrate the operational aspects of the preparation chain in terms of the single-crystal growth of the heavy-fermion compound CeNi2Ge2.

  11. High Contrast Vacuum Nuller Testbed (VNT) Contrast, Performance and Null Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyon, Richard G.; Clampin, Mark; Petrone, Peter; Mallik, Udayan; Madison, Timothy; Bolcar, Matthew R.

    2012-01-01

    Herein we report on our Visible Nulling Coronagraph high-contrast result of 109 contrast averaged over a focal planeregion extending from 14 D with the Vacuum Nuller Testbed (VNT) in a vibration isolated vacuum chamber. TheVNC is a hybrid interferometriccoronagraphic approach for exoplanet science. It operates with high Lyot stopefficiency for filled, segmented and sparse or diluted-aperture telescopes, thereby spanning the range of potential futureNASA flight telescopes. NASAGoddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) has a well-established effort to develop the VNCand its technologies, and has developed an incremental sequence of VNC testbeds to advance this approach and itsenabling technologies. These testbeds have enabled advancement of high-contrast, visible light, nulling interferometry tounprecedented levels. The VNC is based on a modified Mach-Zehnder nulling interferometer, with a W configurationto accommodate a hex-packed MEMS based deformable mirror, a coherent fiber bundle and achromatic phase shifters.We give an overview of the VNT and discuss the high-contrast laboratory results, the optical configuration, criticaltechnologies and null sensing and control.

  12. Extremely High Vacuum Chamber for Low Outgassing Processing at NASA Goddard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, Andrew; Gelman, Joseph

    2008-01-01

    The levels of vacuum that proceed past the high vacuum range into the ultra high and then the extremely high vacuum range become more difficult to achieve each decade that a system progresses through. This paper will explore the difficulties and cover some of the design principles used in achieving vacuum levels in the low 10-12 torr pressure range. This system was entirely built with commercially-available off the shelf (COTS) components. This chamber was designed in 1998 to provide a very low outgassing environment for the processing and sealing of charge-coupled devices (CCD's) for some of the Hubble Space Telescope replacement optics.

  13. Vacuum decay container/closure integrity testing technology. Part 2. Comparison to dye ingress tests.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Heinz; Stauffer, Tony; Chen, Shu-Chen Y; Lee, Yoojin; Forster, Ronald; Ludzinski, Miron; Kamat, Madhav; Mulhall, Brian; Guazzo, Dana Morton

    2009-01-01

    Part 1 of this series demonstrated that a container closure integrity test performed according to ASTM F2338-09 Standard Test Method for Nondestructive Detection of Leaks in Packages by Vacuum Decay Method using a VeriPac 325/LV vacuum decay leak tester by Packaging Technologies & Inspection, LLC (PTI) is capable of detecting leaks > or = 5.0 microm (nominal diameter) in rigid, nonporous package systems, such as prefilled glass syringes. The current study compared USP, Ph.Eur. and ISO dye ingress integrity test methods to PTI's vacuum decay technology for the detection of these same 5-, 10-, and 15-microm laser-drilled hole defects in 1-mL glass prefilled syringes. The study was performed at three test sites using several inspectors and a variety of inspection conditions. No standard dye ingress method was found to reliably identify all holed syringes. Modifications to these standard dye tests' challenge conditions increased the potential for dye ingress, and adjustments to the visual inspection environment improved dye ingress detection. However, the risk of false positive test results with dye ingress tests remained. In contrast, the nondestructive vacuum decay leak test method reliably identified syringes with holes > or = 5.0 microm.

  14. Cavity cooling of free silicon nanoparticles in high vacuum.

    PubMed

    Asenbaum, Peter; Kuhn, Stefan; Nimmrichter, Stefan; Sezer, Ugur; Arndt, Markus

    2013-01-01

    Laser cooling has given a boost to atomic physics throughout the last 30 years, as it allows one to prepare atoms in motional states, which can only be described by quantum mechanics. Most methods rely, however, on a near-resonant and cyclic coupling between laser light and well-defined internal states, which has remained a challenge for mesoscopic particles. An external cavity may compensate for the lack of internal cycling transitions in dielectric objects and it may provide assistance in the cooling of their centre-of-mass state. Here we demonstrate cavity cooling of the transverse kinetic energy of silicon nanoparticles freely propagating in high vacuum (<10(-8) mbar). We create and launch them with longitudinal velocities down to v≤1 m s(-1) using laser-induced ablation of a pristine silicon wafer. Their interaction with the light of a high-finesse infrared cavity reduces their transverse kinetic energy by up to a factor of 30.

  15. Cavity cooling of free silicon nanoparticles in high vacuum

    PubMed Central

    Asenbaum, Peter; Kuhn, Stefan; Nimmrichter, Stefan; Sezer, Ugur; Arndt, Markus

    2013-01-01

    Laser cooling has given a boost to atomic physics throughout the last 30 years, as it allows one to prepare atoms in motional states, which can only be described by quantum mechanics. Most methods rely, however, on a near-resonant and cyclic coupling between laser light and well-defined internal states, which has remained a challenge for mesoscopic particles. An external cavity may compensate for the lack of internal cycling transitions in dielectric objects and it may provide assistance in the cooling of their centre-of-mass state. Here we demonstrate cavity cooling of the transverse kinetic energy of silicon nanoparticles freely propagating in high vacuum (<10−8 mbar). We create and launch them with longitudinal velocities down to v≤1 m s−1 using laser-induced ablation of a pristine silicon wafer. Their interaction with the light of a high-finesse infrared cavity reduces their transverse kinetic energy by up to a factor of 30. PMID:24193438

  16. High Current Density Scandate Cathodes for Future Vacuum Electronics Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-05-30

    braze alloy . The structure was fired in a furnace at 16500 C for 15 minutes. The resultant structure was sectioned to determine if the scandium flowed...Density Cathodes for Future Vacuum Electronics Applications FA9550-07-C-0063 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION...Current Density Scandate Cathodes for Future Vacuum Electronics Applications USAF/AFRL Contract Number FA9550-07-C-0063 Final Report Calabazas Creek

  17. Vacuum birefringence in high-energy laser-electron collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, B.; Elkina, N.

    2016-12-01

    Real photon-photon scattering is a long-predicted phenomenon that is being searched for in experiment in the form of a birefringent vacuum at optical and x-ray frequencies. We present results of calculations and numerical simulations for a scenario to measure this effect using multi-MeV photons generated in the collision of electrons with a laser pulse. We find that the birefringence of the vacuum should be measurable using experimental parameters attainable in the near future.

  18. Vacuum surface flashover: A high-pressure phenomenon

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, E.W.

    1985-07-01

    Desorbed gases from insulator surfaces may be much more important in flashover initiation than properties of the dielectric surface. Ambient neutral densities, immediately above the insulator surface, in the initial stages of flashover have been calculated to lie in the range from 2 x 10/sup 17//cm/sup 3/ to 2 x 10/sup 21//cm/sup 3/ with a mean of about 1 x 10/sup 19//cm/sup 3/, whether flashover occurred on surfaces in air at atmospheric pressure or in vacuum as low as 10/sup -6/ Torr. The evidence presented indicates that, for dc and microsecond pulse voltages, surface flashover is a local, relatively high-pressure phenomenon. Comparison of field strengths of surface flashover for various insulating materials perpendicular to the electrodes, operating pressures, and voltage waveforms appears to indicate that flashover values range well within an order of magnitude (approx.18--80kV/cm). A filamentary nature of the flashover discharge is shown and is consistent with gas breakdown phenomena. Ionization wave front velocities are examined and these compare favorably with those obtained from gaseous breakdown studies.

  19. High Reliability R-10 Windows Using Vacuum Insulating Glass Units

    SciTech Connect

    Stark, David

    2012-08-16

    The objective of this effort was for EverSealed Windows (“EverSealed” or “ESW”) to design, assemble, thermally and environmentally test and demonstrate a Vacuum Insulating Glass Unit (“VIGU” or “VIG”) that would enable a whole window to meet or exceed the an R-10 insulating value (U-factor ≤ 0.1). To produce a VIGU that could withstand any North American environment, ESW believed it needed to design, produce and use a flexible edge seal system. This is because a rigid edge seal, used by all other know VIG producers and developers, limits the size and/or thermal environment of the VIG to where the unit is not practical for typical IG sizes and cannot withstand severe outdoor environments. The rigid-sealed VIG’s use would be limited to mild climates where it would not have a reasonable economic payback when compared to traditional double-pane or triple-pane IGs. ESW’s goals, in addition to achieving a sufficiently high R-value to enable a whole window to achieve R-10, included creating a VIG design that could be produced for a cost equal to or lower than a traditional triple-pane IG (low-e, argon filled). ESW achieved these goals. EverSealed produced, tested and demonstrated a flexible edge-seal VIG that had an R-13 insulating value and the edge-seal system durability to operate reliably for at least 40 years in the harshest climates of North America.

  20. High current multicharged metal ion source using high power gyrotron heating of vacuum arc plasma.

    PubMed

    Vodopyanov, A V; Golubev, S V; Khizhnyak, V I; Mansfeld, D A; Nikolaev, A G; Oks, E M; Savkin, K P; Vizir, A V; Yushkov, G Yu

    2008-02-01

    A high current, multi charged, metal ion source using electron heating of vacuum arc plasma by high power gyrotron radiation has been developed. The plasma is confined in a simple mirror trap with peak magnetic field in the plug up to 2.5 T, mirror ratio of 3-5, and length variable from 15 to 20 cm. Plasma formed by a cathodic vacuum arc is injected into the trap either (i) axially using a compact vacuum arc plasma gun located on axis outside the mirror trap region or (ii) radially using four plasma guns surrounding the trap at midplane. Microwave heating of the mirror-confined, vacuum arc plasma is accomplished by gyrotron microwave radiation of frequency 75 GHz, power up to 200 kW, and pulse duration up to 150 micros, leading to additional stripping of metal ions by electron impact. Pulsed beams of platinum ions with charge state up to 10+, a mean charge state over 6+, and total (all charge states) beam current of a few hundred milliamperes have been formed.

  1. Analysis of high vacuum systems using SINDA'85

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spivey, R. A.; Clanton, S. E.; Moore, J. D.

    1993-01-01

    The theory, algorithms, and test data correlation analysis of a math model developed to predict performance of the Space Station Freedom Vacuum Exhaust System are presented. The theory used to predict the flow characteristics of viscous, transition, and molecular flow is presented in detail. Development of user subroutines which predict the flow characteristics in conjunction with the SINDA'85/FLUINT analysis software are discussed. The resistance-capacitance network approach with application to vacuum system analysis is demonstrated and results from the model are correlated with test data. The model was developed to predict the performance of the Space Station Freedom Vacuum Exhaust System. However, the unique use of the user subroutines developed in this model and written into the SINDA'85/FLUINT thermal analysis model provides a powerful tool that can be used to predict the transient performance of vacuum systems and gas flow in tubes of virtually any geometry. This can be accomplished using a resistance-capacitance (R-C) method very similar to the methods used to perform thermal analyses.

  2. Radiant heater for vacuum furnaces offers high structural rigidity, low heat loss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vary, A.

    1964-01-01

    Some problems associated with high temperature heaters for vacuum furnaces have been eliminated by the use of shaped filaments of refractory metal. These filaments, supported in cylindrical array by ceramic spacers, operate with high voltage, low current power.

  3. Precision optical slit for high heat load or ultra high vacuum

    DOEpatents

    Andresen, N.C.; DiGennaro, R.S.; Swain, T.L.

    1995-01-24

    This invention relates generally to slits used in optics that must be precisely aligned and adjusted. The optical slits of the present invention are useful in x-ray optics, x-ray beam lines, optical systems in which the entrance slit is critical for high wavelength resolution. The invention is particularly useful in ultra high vacuum systems where lubricants are difficult to use and designs which avoid the movement of metal parts against one another are important, such as monochromators for high wavelength resolution with ultra high vacuum systems. The invention further relates to optical systems in which temperature characteristics of the slit materials is important. The present invention yet additionally relates to precision slits wherein the opposing edges of the slit must be precisely moved relative to a center line between the edges with each edge retaining its parallel orientation with respect to the other edge and/or the center line. 21 figures.

  4. Precision optical slit for high heat load or ultra high vacuum

    DOEpatents

    Andresen, Nord C.; DiGennaro, Richard S.; Swain, Thomas L.

    1995-01-01

    This invention relates generally to slits used in optics that must be precisely aligned and adjusted. The optical slits of the present invention are useful in x-ray optics, x-ray beam lines, optical systems in which the entrance slit is critical for high wavelength resolution. The invention is particularly useful in ultra high vacuum systems where lubricants are difficult to use and designs which avoid the movement of metal parts against one another are important, such as monochrometers for high wavelength resolution with ultra high vacuum systems. The invention further relates to optical systems in which temperature characteristics of the slit materials is important. The present invention yet additionally relates to precision slits wherein the opposing edges of the slit must be precisely moved relative to a center line between the edges with each edge retaining its parallel orientation with respect to the other edge and/or the center line.

  5. Growth and characteristics of tantalum oxide thin films deposited using thermionic vacuum arc technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vladoiu, Rodica; Ciupina, Victor; Mandes, Aurelia; Dinca, Virginia; Prodan, Madalina; Musa, Geavit

    2010-11-01

    Tantalum pentoxide (Ta2O5) thin films were synthesized using thermionic vacuum arc (TVA) technology. TVA is an original deposition method using a combination of anodic arc and electron gun system for the growth of thin films from solid precursors under vacuum of 10-6 Torr. The properties of the deposited Ta2O5 thin films were investigated in terms of wettability, refractive index, morphology, and structure. The surface free energy was determined by means of surface energy evaluation system indicating a hydrophilic character and the refractive index was measured by Filmetrics F20 device. The morphology was determined from bright field transmission electron microscopy (TEM) image performed by Philips CM 120 ST TEM system. It exhibits nanoparticles of 3-6 nm diameter smoothly distributed. Selected area electron diffraction pattern revealed the contrast fringes given by complex polycrystalline particles included in the amorphous film. The measured fringes could be indexed using monoclinic structure of Ta2O5.

  6. Efficient thermoelectric trap for metal vapours suitable for high-vacuum system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piwinski, Mariusz; Klosowski, Lukasz; Dziczek, Darek; Chwirot, Stanislaw

    2016-09-01

    Atomic beams are widely used in various collisional experiments. Typically, cold traps are used to prevent the investigated atoms from spreading within the vacuum chamber and contaminating the system. Usually such a trap consists of a vacuum feedthrough with metal element cooled with liquid nitrogen or dry ice on the atmosphere side and a metal trap in the vacuum. Using liquid nitrogen or dry ice is relatively inconvenient due to high costs of operation and a need of periodically refilling the reservoir of the cold medium. We present a new thermoelectric cold trap composed of water-cooled vacuum feedthrough with Peltier modules placed at the high vacuum end. The present system ensures the cold trap temperature below -20°C, low enough to efficiently catch the atoms of interest. The new cold trap was characterised and compared with typical LN2 trap.

  7. Development of 72kV High Pressure Air-insulated GIS with Vacuum Circuit Breaker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rokunohe, Toshiaki; Yagihashi, Yoshitaka; Endo, Fumihiro; Aoyagi, Kenji; Saitoh, Hitoshi; Oomori, Takashi

    SF6 gas has excellent dielectric strength and interruption performance. For these reasons, it has been widely used for gas insulated switchgear (GIS). However, use of SF6 gas has become regulated under agreements set at the 1997 COP3. So investigation and development for GIS with a lower amount of SF6 gas are being carried out worldwide. Presently, SF6 gas-free GIS has been commercialized for the 24kV class. Air or N2 gas is used as insulation gas for this GIS. On the other hand, SF6 gas-free GIS has not been commercialized for 72kV class GIS. Dielectric strengths of air and N2 gas are approximately 1/3 that of SF6 gas. So to enhance insulation performance of air and N2, we have investigated a hybrid gas insulation system which has the combined features of providing an insulation coating and suitable insulation gas. We have developed the world's first 72kV SF6 gas-free GIS. This paper deals with key technologies for SF6 gas-free GIS such as the hybrid insulation structure, bellows for the high pressure vacuum circuit breaker, a newly designed disconnector and spacer and prevention of particle levitation. Test results of 72kV high pressure air-insulated GIS with the vacuum circuit breaker are described.

  8. An (ultra) high-vacuum compatible sputter source for oxide thin film growth

    SciTech Connect

    Mayr, Lukas; Köpfle, Norbert; Auer, Andrea; Klötzer, Bernhard; Penner, Simon

    2013-09-15

    A miniaturised CF-38 mountable sputter source for oxide and metal thin film preparation with enhanced high-vacuum and ultra-high-vacuum compatibility is described. The all home-built sputtering deposition device allows a high flexibility also in oxidic sputter materials, suitable deposition rates for preparation of films in the nm- and the sub-monolayer regime and excellent reliability and enhanced cleanliness for usage in UHV chambers. For a number of technologically important – yet hardly volatile – materials, the described source represents a significant improvement over thermal deposition techniques like electron-beam- or thermal evaporation, as especially the latter are no adequate tool to prepare atomically clean layers of refractory oxide materials. Furthermore, it is superior to commercially available magnetron sputter devices, especially for applications, where highly reproducible sub-monolayer thin film preparation under very clean UHV conditions is required (e.g., for studying phase boundary effects in catalysis). The device in turn offers the usage of a wide selection of evaporation materials and special target preparation procedures also allow the usage of pressed oxide powder targets. To prove the performance of the sputter-source, test preparations with technologically relevant oxide components, comprising ZrO{sub 2} and yttrium-stabilized ZrO{sub 2}, have been carried out. A wide range of characterization methods (electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, low-energy ion scattering, atomic force microscopy, and catalytic testing) were applied to demonstrate the properties of the sputter-deposited thin film systems.

  9. PREFACE: 16th International Summer School on Vacuum, Electron, and Ion Technologies (VEIT 2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Möller, Wolfhard; Guerassimov, Nikolay; Ghelev, Chavdar

    2010-04-01

    The International Summer School on Vacuum, Electron and Ion Technologies (VEIT) has been organized biennially since 1977 when the series of VEIT Schools was launched by the Institute of Electronics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences with the aim to act as a forum for interchange and dissemination of knowledge and ideas on the latest developments in electron-, ion-, and plasma-assisted technologies. Beginning from 2001, the school has been jointly organized with the Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Germany. Whereas, the school initially provided a meeting place for researchers mainly from Eastern and Central European countries, its importance grew issue by issue. The school is now a major scientific event and a meeting place for young scientists from Eastern and Western Europe involved in research and development associated with high-tech industries. Many former school participants have gone on to become leading scientists in research establishments and companies throughout the world. Leading international companies, such as High Voltage Engineering, Balzers, Varian, and Hauzer have used the VEIT forum to present their products through oral presentations, poster contributions or exhibits. The School Proceedings have been published in special issues of the international journals Vacuum, Plasma Processes and Polymers, Journal of Physics: Conference Series. The Sixteenth VEIT school was held in the Black Sea resort Sunny Beach, Bulgaria on 28 September to 2 October 2009. It was attended by close to 110 participants from 13 countries: Belgium, Bulgaria, Czech Republic, France, Germany, The Netherlands, Romania, Slovak Republic, Spain, Sweden, Ukraine, UK and USA. Following the tradition of publishing the VEIT Proceedings, a selection of papers presented at the event is published in this volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series, under the originality and quality criteria of acceptance by the journal, including

  10. Multiscale Thermo-Mechanical Design and Analysis of High Frequency and High Power Vacuum Electron Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamzina, Diana

    Diana Gamzina March 2016 Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Multiscale Thermo-Mechanical Design and Analysis of High Frequency and High Power Vacuum Electron Devices Abstract A methodology for performing thermo-mechanical design and analysis of high frequency and high average power vacuum electron devices is presented. This methodology results in a "first-pass" engineering design directly ready for manufacturing. The methodology includes establishment of thermal and mechanical boundary conditions, evaluation of convective film heat transfer coefficients, identification of material options, evaluation of temperature and stress field distributions, assessment of microscale effects on the stress state of the material, and fatigue analysis. The feature size of vacuum electron devices operating in the high frequency regime of 100 GHz to 1 THz is comparable to the microstructure of the materials employed for their fabrication. As a result, the thermo-mechanical performance of a device is affected by the local material microstructure. Such multiscale effects on the stress state are considered in the range of scales from about 10 microns up to a few millimeters. The design and analysis methodology is demonstrated on three separate microwave devices: a 95 GHz 10 kW cw sheet beam klystron, a 263 GHz 50 W long pulse wide-bandwidth sheet beam travelling wave tube, and a 346 GHz 1 W cw backward wave oscillator.

  11. Special Technology Area Review on Vacuum Electronics Technology for RF Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-12-12

    devices and transmitters. Feasibility has been demonstrated using a field emitter array cathode on a C-band helix TWT . 16. Advanced materials and...and Broadband TWTs 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 Year Ef fic ie nc y (% ) Space TWT EW TWT Three - Fold...Development of specific VE device types for identified and potential system insertion opportunities including: • Ultra-wide-band helix TWTs and Vacuum

  12. APPLICATION OF VACUUM SALT DISTILLATION TECHNOLOGY FOR THE REMOVAL OF FLUORIDE

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, R.; Pak, D.

    2011-08-10

    Vacuum distillation of chloride salts from plutonium oxide (PuO{sub 2}) and simulant PuO{sub 2} has been previously demonstrated at Department of Energy (DOE) sites using kilogram quantities of chloride salt. The apparatus for vacuum distillation contains a zone heated using a furnace and a zone actively cooled using either recirculated water or compressed air. During a vacuum distillation operation, a sample boat containing the feed material is placed into the apparatus while it is cool, and the system is sealed. The system is evacuated using a vacuum pump. Once a sufficient vacuum is attained, heating begins. Volatile salts distill from the heated zone to the cooled zone where they condense, leaving behind the non-volatile materials in the feed boat. The application of vacuum salt distillation (VSD) is of interest to the HB-Line Facility and the MOX Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). Both facilities are involved in efforts to disposition excess fissile materials. Many of these materials contain chloride and fluoride salt concentrations which make them unsuitable for dissolution without prior removal of the chloride and fluoride salts. Between September 2009 and January 2011, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and HB-Line designed, developed, tested, and successfully deployed a system for the distillation of chloride salts. Subsequent efforts are attempting to adapt the technology for the removal of fluoride. Fluoride salts of interest are less-volatile than the corresponding chloride salts. Consequently, an alternate approach is required for the removal of fluoride without significantly increasing the operating temperature. HB-Line Engineering requested SRNL to evaluate and demonstrate the feasibility of an alternate approach using both non-radioactive simulants and plutonium-bearing materials. Whereas the earlier developments targeted the removal of sodium chloride (NaCl) and potassium chloride (KCl), the current

  13. Cermet insert high voltage holdoff for ceramic/metal vacuum devices

    DOEpatents

    Ierna, William F.

    1987-01-01

    An improved metal-to-ceramic seal is provided wherein the ceramic body of the seal contains an integral region of cermet material in electrical contact with the metallic member, e.g., an electrode, of the seal. The seal is useful in high voltage vacuum devices, e.g., vacuum switches, and increases the high-voltage holdoff capabilities of such devices. A method of fabricating such seals is also provided.

  14. Cermet insert high voltage holdoff improvement for ceramic/metal vacuum devices

    DOEpatents

    Ierna, W.F.

    1986-03-11

    An improved metal-to-ceramic seal is provided wherein the ceramic body of the seal contains an integral region of cermet material in electrical contact with the metallic member, e.g., an electrode, of the seal. The seal is useful in high voltage vacuum devices, e.g., vacuum switches, and increases the high-voltage holdoff capabilities of such devices. A method of fabricating such seals is also provided.

  15. High ion charge states in a high-current, short-pulse, vacuum ARC ion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, A.; Brown, I.; MacGill, R.; Dickinson, M.

    1996-08-01

    Ions of the cathode material are formed at vacuum arc cathode spots and extracted by a grid system. The ion charge states (typically 1-4) depend on the cathode material and only little on the discharge current as long as the current is low. Here the authors report on experiments with short pulses (several {mu}s) and high currents (several kA); this regime of operation is thus approaching a more vacuum spark-like regime. Mean ion charge states of up to 6.2 for tungsten and 3.7 for titanium have been measured, with the corresponding maximum charge states of up to 8+ and 6+, respectively. The results are discussed in terms of Saha calculations and freezing of the charge state distribution.

  16. Venting and High Vacuum Performance of Low Density Multilayer Insulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riesco, M. E.; McLean, C. H.; Mills, G. L.; Buerger, S.; Meyer, M. L.

    2010-04-01

    The NASA Exploration Program is currently studying the use liquid oxygen, liquid methane and liquid hydrogen for propulsion in future spacecraft for Exploration of the Moon and Mars. This will require the efficient long term, on-orbit storage of these cryogenic propellants. Multilayer Insulation (MLI) will be critical to achieving the required thermal performance since it has much lower heat transfer than any other insulation when used in a vacuum. MLI with a low density (⩽10 layers/cm) has been shown in previous work to be the most mass efficient. The size and mass constraints of these propulsion systems will not allow a structural shell to be used to provide vacuum for the MLI during ground hold and launch. The baseline approach is to purge the MLI during ground hold with an inert gas which is then vented during launch ascent and on-orbit. This paper presents the results on experimental tests and modeling performed by Ball Aerospace on low density, non-perforated MLI used to insulate a cryogenic tank simulating an Exploration cryogenic propellant storage vessel. These include measurements of the rate of venting and of the heat transfer of gas filled insulation, fully evacuated insulation and during the transition in between. Results of transient computer modeling of the MLI venting and heat transfer process are also presented. Previous work by some of the authors performed vent testing using MLI with perforations and slits and a slow pump down rate.

  17. EDITORIAL: 17th International Summer School on Vacuum, Electron, and Ion Technologies (VEIT 2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Sanden, M. C. M.; Dimitrova, Miglena; Ghelev, Chavdar

    2012-03-01

    The International Summer School on Vacuum, Electron and Ion Technologies (VEIT) has been organized biennially since 1977, when the VEIT Summer School series was launched by the Institute of Electronics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences. The aim was to act as a forum for the exchange and dissemination of knowledge and ideas on the latest developments in electron-, ion- and plasma-assisted technologies. The organizers of the 2011 edition of the event were the Institute of Electronics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia, Bulgaria and the Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven, The Netherlands. Whilst the school initially provided a meeting place for researchers mainly from Eastern and Central European countries, its importance has grown issue by issue. The school is now a major scientific event and a meeting place for young scientists from Eastern and Western Europe involved in research and development associated with high-tech industries. Many former school participants have gone on to become leading scientists in research establishments and companies throughout the world. Leading international companies, such as High Voltage Engineering, Balzers, Varian, and Hauzer have used the VEIT forum to present their products through oral presentations, poster contributions and exhibits. The School Proceedings have been published in special issues of the international journals Vacuum, Plasma Processes and Polymers and Journal of Physics: Conference Series. The Seventeenth edition of VEIT was held in the Black Sea resort of Sunny Beach, Bulgaria on 19-23 September 2011. It was attended by 96 participants from 18 countries: Belgium, Brazil, Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Denmark, France, Germany, Greece, The Netherlands, Romania, Russia, Serbia, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, Ukraine, UK and USA. Following the tradition of publishing the VEIT Proceedings, a selection of papers presented at the event is published in this special issue of Journal of

  18. Study on the heat transfer of high-vacuum-multilayer-insulation tank after sudden, catastrophic loss of insulating vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, G. F.; Li, X. D.; Wang, R. S.

    2010-10-01

    One of the worst accidents that may occur in a high-vacuum-multilayer-insulation (HVMLI) cryogenic tank is a sudden, catastrophic loss of insulating vacuum (SCLIV). There is no doubt that the gases leaking into the insulation jacket have some influence on the heat transfer process of it. However, this issue has not been thoroughly studied so far. In this paper, a test rig was built up and experiments were conducted using a SCLIV cryogenic tank and with nitrogen, helium and air as the working medium, respectively. The venting rates of the tank and temperature in the insulation jacket were measured respectively after the three different gases leaking into the jacket. A heat transfer model describing the heat transfer process of a SCLIV tank was also presented. The calculated results using this model were compared against the experimental data. It is found that the heat transfer performance of the HVMLI cryogenic tank after SCLIV is strong relevant to the type of gas leaking into the insulation jacket.

  19. Influence of a high vacuum on the precise positioning using an ultrasonic linear motor.

    PubMed

    Kim, Wan-Soo; Lee, Dong-Jin; Lee, Sun-Kyu

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an investigation of the ultrasonic linear motor stage for use in a high vacuum environment. The slider table is driven by the hybrid bolt-clamped Langevin-type ultrasonic linear motor, which is excited with its different modes of natural frequencies in both lateral and longitudinal directions. In general, the friction behavior in a vacuum environment becomes different from that in an environment of atmospheric pressure and this difference significantly affects the performance of the ultrasonic linear motor. In this paper, to consistently provide stable and high power of output in a high vacuum, frequency matching was conducted. Moreover, to achieve the fine control performance in the vacuum environment, a modified nominal characteristic trajectory following control method was adopted. Finally, the stage was operated under high vacuum condition, and the operating performances were investigated compared with that of a conventional PI compensator. As a result, robustness of positioning was accomplished in a high vacuum condition with nanometer-level accuracy.

  20. Influence of a high vacuum on the precise positioning using an ultrasonic linear motor

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Wan-Soo; Lee, Dong-Jin; Lee, Sun-Kyu

    2011-01-15

    This paper presents an investigation of the ultrasonic linear motor stage for use in a high vacuum environment. The slider table is driven by the hybrid bolt-clamped Langevin-type ultrasonic linear motor, which is excited with its different modes of natural frequencies in both lateral and longitudinal directions. In general, the friction behavior in a vacuum environment becomes different from that in an environment of atmospheric pressure and this difference significantly affects the performance of the ultrasonic linear motor. In this paper, to consistently provide stable and high power of output in a high vacuum, frequency matching was conducted. Moreover, to achieve the fine control performance in the vacuum environment, a modified nominal characteristic trajectory following control method was adopted. Finally, the stage was operated under high vacuum condition, and the operating performances were investigated compared with that of a conventional PI compensator. As a result, robustness of positioning was accomplished in a high vacuum condition with nanometer-level accuracy.

  1. Influence of a high vacuum on the precise positioning using an ultrasonic linear motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Wan-Soo; Lee, Dong-Jin; Lee, Sun-Kyu

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an investigation of the ultrasonic linear motor stage for use in a high vacuum environment. The slider table is driven by the hybrid bolt-clamped Langevin-type ultrasonic linear motor, which is excited with its different modes of natural frequencies in both lateral and longitudinal directions. In general, the friction behavior in a vacuum environment becomes different from that in an environment of atmospheric pressure and this difference significantly affects the performance of the ultrasonic linear motor. In this paper, to consistently provide stable and high power of output in a high vacuum, frequency matching was conducted. Moreover, to achieve the fine control performance in the vacuum environment, a modified nominal characteristic trajectory following control method was adopted. Finally, the stage was operated under high vacuum condition, and the operating performances were investigated compared with that of a conventional PI compensator. As a result, robustness of positioning was accomplished in a high vacuum condition with nanometer-level accuracy.

  2. SITE TECHNOLOGY CAPSULE: UNTERDRUCK-VERDAMPFER- BRUNNEN TECHNOLOGY (UVB) VACUUM VAPORIZING WELL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The UVB technology is an in situ groundwater remediation technology for aquifers contaminated with compounds amenable to air stripping, and is an alternative method to pump-and-treat remediation of groundwater. The UVB technology is designed to remove VOCs from groundwater by tra...

  3. Development of high pressure-high vacuum-high conductance piston valve for gas-filled radiation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, D. N.; Ayyappan, R.; Kamble, L. P.; Singh, J. P.; Muralikrishna, L. V.; Alex, M.; Balagi, V.; Mukhopadhyay, P. K.

    2008-05-01

    Gas-filled radiation detectors need gas filling at pressures that range from few cms of mercury to as high as 25kg/cm2 at room temperature. Before gas-filling these detectors require evacuation to a vacuum of the order of ~1 × 10-5 mbar. For these operations of evacuation and gas filling a system consisting of a vacuum pump with a high vacuum gauge, gas cylinder with a pressure gauge and a valve is used. The valve has to meet the three requirements of compatibility with high-pressure and high vacuum and high conductance. A piston valve suitable for the evacuation and gas filling of radiation detectors has been designed and fabricated to meet the above requirements. The stainless steel body (80mm×160mm overall dimensions) valve with a piston arrangement has a 1/2 inch inlet/outlet opening, neoprene/viton O-ring at piston face & diameter for sealing and a knob for opening and closing the valve. The piston movement mechanism is designed to have minimum wear of sealing O-rings. The valve has been hydrostatic pressure tested up to 75bars and has Helium leak rate of less than 9.6×10-9 m bar ltr/sec in vacuum mode and 2×10-7 mbar ltr/sec in pressure mode. As compared to a commercial diaphragm valve, which needed 3 hours to evacuate a 7 litre chamber to 2.5×10-5 mbar, the new valve achieved vacuum 7.4×10-6mbar in the same time under the same conditions.

  4. High vacuum indirectly-heated rotary kiln for the removal and recovery of mercury from air pollution control scrubber waste

    SciTech Connect

    Hawk, G.G.; Aulbaugh, R.A.

    1998-12-31

    SepraDyne corporation (Denton, TX, US) has conducted pilot-scale treatability studies of dewatered acid plant blowdown sludge generated by a copper smelter using its recently patented high temperature and high vacuum indirectly-heated rotary retort technology. This unique rotary kiln is capable of operating at internal temperatures up to 850 C with an internal pressure of 50 torr and eliminates the use of sweep gas to transport volatile substances out of the retort. By removing non-condensables such as oxygen and nitrogen at relatively low temperatures and coupling the process with a temperature ramp-up program and low temperature condensation, virtually all of the retort off-gases produced during processing can be condensed for recovery. The combination of rotation, heat and vacuum produce the ideal environment for the rapid volatilization of virtually all organic compounds, water and low-to-moderate boiling point metals such as arsenic, cadmium and mercury.

  5. Cooling and manipulation of nanoparticles in high vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millen, J.; Kuhn, S.; Patolsky, F.; Kosloff, A.; Arndt, M.

    2016-09-01

    Optomechanical systems, where the mechanical motion of objects is measured and controlled using light, have a huge range of applications, from the metre-scale mirrors of LIGO which detect gravitational waves, to micron scale superconducting systems that can transduce quantum signals. A fascinating addition to this field are free or levitated optomechanical systems, where the oscillator is not physically tethered. We study a variety of nanoparticles which are launched through vacuum (10-8 mbar) and interact with an optical cavity. The centre of mass motion of a nanoparticle can be cooled by the optical cavity field. It is predicted that the quantum ground state of motion can be reached, leaving the particle free to evolve after release from the light field, thus preparing nanoscale matter for quantum interference experiments.

  6. Eco-sewerage System Design for Modern Office Buildings: based on Vacuum and Source-separation Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Kangning; Wang, Chengwen; Zheng, Min; Yuan, Xin

    2010-11-01

    This study aimed to construct an on-site eco-sewerage system for modern office buildings in urban area based on combined innovative technologies of vacuum and source-separation. Results showed that source-separated grey water had low concentrations of pollutants, which helped the reuse of grey water. However, the system had a low separation efficiency between the yellow water and the brown water, which was caused by the plug problem in the urine collection from the urine-diverting toilets. During the storage of yellow water for liquid fertilizer production, nearly all urea nitrogen transferred to ammonium nitrogen and about 2/3 phosphorus was lost because of the struvite precipitation. Total bacteria and coliforms increased first in the storage, but then decreased to low concentrations. The anaerobic/anoxic/aerobic MBR had high elimination rates of COD, ammonium nitrogen and total nitrogen of the brown water, which were 94.2%, 98.1% and 95.1%, respectively. However, the effluent still had high contents of colority, nitrate and phosphorus, which affected the application of the effluent for flushing water. Even though, the effluent might be used as dilution water for the yellow water fertilizer. Based on the results and the assumption of an ideal operation of the vacuum source-separation system, a future plan for on-site eco-sewerage system of modern office buildings was constructed. Its sustainability was validated by the analysis of the substances flow of water and nutrients.

  7. Vacuum-integrated electrospray deposition for highly reliable polymer thin film.

    PubMed

    Park, Soohyung; Lee, Younjoo; Yi, Yeonjin

    2012-10-01

    Vacuum electrospray deposition (ESD) equipment was designed to prepare polymer thin films. The polymer solution can be injected directly into vacuum system through multi-stage pumping line, so that the solvent residues and ambient contaminants are highly reduced. To test the performance of ESD system, we fabricated organic photovoltaic cells (OPVCs) by injecting polymer solution directly onto the substrate inside a high vacuum chamber. The OPVC fabricated has the structure of Al∕P3HT:PCBM∕PEDOT:PSS∕ITO and was optimized by varying the speed of solution injection and concentration of the solution. The power conversion efficiency (PCE) of the optimized OPVC is 3.14% under AM 1.5G irradiation without any buffer layer at the cathode side. To test the advantages of the vacuum ESD, we exposed the device to atmosphere between the deposition steps of the active layer and cathode. This showed that the PCE of the vacuum processed device is 24% higher than that of the air exposed device and confirms the advantages of the vacuum prepared polymer film for high performance devices.

  8. High aspect ratio, high-quality microholes in PMMA: a comparison between femtosecond laser drilling in air and in vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Bo; Jiang, Lan; Li, Xiaowei; Yan, Xueliang; Zhao, Weiwei; Lu, Yongfeng

    2015-04-01

    Microholes, especially high aspect ratio, high-quality microholes with small diameters (<100 μm), have broad applications. However, it is very difficult for traditional drilling methods to obtain deep microholes, especially with aspect ratios of over 50:1. Femtosecond lasers provide a promising solution for efficient drilling of deep microholes with high-precision material removal, reduced recast/microcracks, minimized heat-affected zones, and the absence of plasma-shielding effects. In this work, a comparison study of high aspect ratio, high-quality microholes fabricated in a poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) bulk substrate with the ambient pressure adjusted from 105 Pa (air) down to 1 Pa (vacuum) is presented. High aspect ratio (over 100:1) microholes were obtained in a vacuum environment. The contrast between microhole evolution in air and in vacuum was investigated. The results indicate that efficient energy propagation and easy ejection of ablated material/plasma are probably the most important benefits of drilling microholes in vacuum. The dependence of microhole shapes on different fabrication parameters, including pulse energy and ambient pressure, was investigated to quantitatively reveal the underlying mechanisms. The enhanced drilling effect in vacuum was only found in a high pulse energy region ( E p > 20 μJ), and it becomes saturated when the ambient pressure was reduced to ~102 Pa at a pulse energy of 50 μJ. Drilling microholes in a vacuum provides a simple and effective way of rapidly fabricating high aspect ratio, high-quality microholes.

  9. A highly miniaturized vacuum package for a trapped ion atomic clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwindt, Peter D. D.; Jau, Yuan-Yu; Partner, Heather; Casias, Adrian; Wagner, Adrian R.; Moorman, Matthew; Manginell, Ronald P.; Kellogg, James R.; Prestage, John D.

    2016-05-01

    We report on the development of a highly miniaturized vacuum package for use in an atomic clock utilizing trapped ytterbium-171 ions. The vacuum package is approximately 1 cm3 in size and contains a linear quadrupole RF Paul ion trap, miniature neutral Yb sources, and a non-evaporable getter pump. We describe the fabrication process for making the Yb sources and assembling the vacuum package. To prepare the vacuum package for ion trapping, it was evacuated, baked at a high temperature, and then back filled with a helium buffer gas. Once appropriate vacuum conditions were achieved in the package, it was sealed with a copper pinch-off and was subsequently pumped only by the non-evaporable getter. We demonstrated ion trapping in this vacuum package and the operation of an atomic clock, stabilizing a local oscillator to the 12.6 GHz hyperfine transition of 171Y b+. The fractional frequency stability of the clock was measured to be 2 × 10-11/τ1/2.

  10. Atomically Thin Graphene Windows That Enable High Contrast Electron Microscopy without a Specimen Vacuum Chamber.

    PubMed

    Han, Yimo; Nguyen, Kayla X; Ogawa, Yui; Park, Jiwoong; Muller, David A

    2016-12-14

    Scanning electron microscopes (SEMs) require a high vacuum environment to generate and shape an electron beam for imaging; however, the vacuum conditions greatly limit the nature of specimens that can be examined. From a purely scattering physics perspective, it is not necessary to place the specimen inside the vacuum chamber-the mean free paths (MFPs) for electron scattering in air at typical SEM beam voltages are 50-100 μm. This is the idea behind the airSEM, which removes the specimen vacuum chamber from the SEM and places the sample in air. The thickness of the gas layer is less than a MFP from an electron-transparent window to preserve the shape and resolution of the incident beam, resulting in comparable imaging quality to an all-vacuum SEM. Present silicon nitride windows scatter far more strongly than the air gap and are currently the contrast and resolution limiting factor in the airSEM. Graphene windows have been used previously to wrap or seal samples in vacuum for imaging. Here we demonstrate the use of a robust bilayer graphene window for sealing the electron optics from the room environment, providing an electron transparent window with only a 2% drop in contrast. There is a 5-fold-increase in signal/noise ratio for imaging compared to multi-MFP-thick silicon nitride windows, enabling high contrast in backscattered, transmission, and surface imaging modes for the new airSEM geometry.

  11. A highly miniaturized vacuum package for a trapped ion atomic clock

    DOE PAGES

    Schwindt, Peter D. D.; Jau, Yuan-Yu; Partner, Heather; ...

    2016-05-12

    We report on the development of a highly miniaturized vacuum package for use in an atomic clock utilizing trapped ytterbium-171 ions. The vacuum package is approximately 1 cm3 in size and contains a linear quadrupole RF Paul ion trap, miniature neutral Yb sources, and a non-evaporable getter pump. We describe the fabrication process for making the Yb sources and assembling the vacuum package. To prepare the vacuum package for ion trapping, it was evacuated, baked at a high temperature, and then back filled with a helium buffer gas. Once appropriate vacuum conditions were achieved in the package, the package wasmore » sealed with a copper pinch-off and was then pumped only by the non-evaporable getter. We demonstrated ion trapping in this vacuum package and the operation of an atomic clock, stabilizing a local oscillator to the 12.6 GHz hyperfine transition of 171Yb+. The fractional frequency stability of the clock was measured to be 2 × 10-11 / τ1/2.« less

  12. A highly miniaturized vacuum package for a trapped ion atomic clock

    SciTech Connect

    Schwindt, Peter D. D.; Jau, Yuan-Yu; Partner, Heather; Casias, Adrian; Wagner, Adrian R.; Moorman, Matthew; Manginell, Ronald P.; Kellogg, James R.; Prestage, John D.

    2016-05-12

    We report on the development of a highly miniaturized vacuum package for use in an atomic clock utilizing trapped ytterbium-171 ions. The vacuum package is approximately 1 cm3 in size and contains a linear quadrupole RF Paul ion trap, miniature neutral Yb sources, and a non-evaporable getter pump. We describe the fabrication process for making the Yb sources and assembling the vacuum package. To prepare the vacuum package for ion trapping, it was evacuated, baked at a high temperature, and then back filled with a helium buffer gas. Once appropriate vacuum conditions were achieved in the package, the package was sealed with a copper pinch-off and was then pumped only by the non-evaporable getter. We demonstrated ion trapping in this vacuum package and the operation of an atomic clock, stabilizing a local oscillator to the 12.6 GHz hyperfine transition of 171Yb+. The fractional frequency stability of the clock was measured to be 2 × 10-11 / τ1/2.

  13. Thermo-Mechanical Stress in High-Frequency Vacuum Electron Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamzina, Diana; Luhmann, Neville C.; Ravani, Bahram

    2017-01-01

    Analysis of the thermo-mechanical performance of high-frequency vacuum electron devices is essential to the advancement of RF sources towards high-power generation. Operation in an ultra-high vacuum environment, space restricting magnetic focusing, and limited material options are just some of the constraints that complicate thermal management in a high-power VED. An analytical method for evaluating temperature, stress, and deformation distribution in thin vacuum-to-cooling walls is presented, accounting for anisotropic material properties. Thin plate geometry is used and analytical expressions are developed for thermo-mechanical analysis that includes the microstructure effects of grain orientations. The method presented evaluates the maximum allowable heat flux that can be used to establish the power-handling limitation of high-frequency VEDs prior to full-scale design, accelerating time-to-manufacture.

  14. Technology Demonstration Summary: Terra Vac In Situ Vacuum Extraction System, Groveland, Massachusetts

    EPA Science Inventory

    Terra Vac Inc's vacuum extraction system was demonstrated at the Valley Manufactured Products Company, Inc., site in Groveland, Massachusetts. The property is part of the Groveland Wells Superfund site and is contaminated mainly by trichloroethylene (TCE). Vacuum extraction...

  15. High vacuum measurements and calibrations, molecular flow fluid transient effects

    SciTech Connect

    Leishear, Robert A.; Gavalas, Nickolas A.

    2015-04-29

    High vacuum pressure measurements and calibrations below 1 × 10-8 Torr are problematic. Specifically, measurement accuracies change drastically for vacuum gauges when pressures are suddenly lowered in vacuum systems. How can gauges perform like this? A brief system description is first required to answer this question. Calibrations were performed using a vacuum calibration chamber with attached vacuum gauges. To control chamber pressures, vacuum pumps decreased the chamber pressure while nitrogen tanks increased the chamber pressure. By balancing these opposing pressures, equilibrium in the chamber was maintained at selected set point pressures to perform calibrations. When pressures were suddenly decreased during set point adjustments, a sudden rush of gas from the chamber also caused a surge of gas from the gauges to decrease the pressures in those gauges. Gauge pressures did not return to equilibrium as fast as chamber pressures due to the sparse distribution of gas molecules in the system. This disparity in the rate of pressure changes caused the pressures in different gauges to be different than expected. This discovery was experimentally proven to show that different gauge designs return to equilibrium at different rates, and that gauge accuracies vary for different gauge designs due to fluid transients in molecular flow.

  16. High vacuum measurements and calibrations, molecular flow fluid transient effects

    DOE PAGES

    Leishear, Robert A.; Gavalas, Nickolas A.

    2015-04-29

    High vacuum pressure measurements and calibrations below 1 × 10-8 Torr are problematic. Specifically, measurement accuracies change drastically for vacuum gauges when pressures are suddenly lowered in vacuum systems. How can gauges perform like this? A brief system description is first required to answer this question. Calibrations were performed using a vacuum calibration chamber with attached vacuum gauges. To control chamber pressures, vacuum pumps decreased the chamber pressure while nitrogen tanks increased the chamber pressure. By balancing these opposing pressures, equilibrium in the chamber was maintained at selected set point pressures to perform calibrations. When pressures were suddenly decreased duringmore » set point adjustments, a sudden rush of gas from the chamber also caused a surge of gas from the gauges to decrease the pressures in those gauges. Gauge pressures did not return to equilibrium as fast as chamber pressures due to the sparse distribution of gas molecules in the system. This disparity in the rate of pressure changes caused the pressures in different gauges to be different than expected. This discovery was experimentally proven to show that different gauge designs return to equilibrium at different rates, and that gauge accuracies vary for different gauge designs due to fluid transients in molecular flow.« less

  17. An ultra-high vacuum chamber for scattering experiments featuring in-vacuum continuous in-plane variation of the angle between entrance and exit vacuum ports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Englund, Carl-Johan; Agâker, Marcus; Fredriksson, Pierre; Olsson, Anders; Johansson, Niklas; Rubensson, Jan-Erik; Nordgren, Joseph

    2015-09-01

    A concept that enables in-vacuum continuous variation of the angle between two ports in one plane has been developed and implemented. The vacuum chamber allows for measuring scattering cross sections as a function of scattering angle and is intended for resonant inelastic X-ray scattering experiments. The angle between the ports can be varied in the range of 30°-150°, while the pressure change is less than 2 × 10-10 mbars.

  18. An ultra-high vacuum chamber for scattering experiments featuring in-vacuum continuous in-plane variation of the angle between entrance and exit vacuum ports

    SciTech Connect

    Englund, Carl-Johan; Agåker, Marcus Fredriksson, Pierre; Olsson, Anders; Johansson, Niklas; Rubensson, Jan-Erik; Nordgren, Joseph

    2015-09-15

    A concept that enables in-vacuum continuous variation of the angle between two ports in one plane has been developed and implemented. The vacuum chamber allows for measuring scattering cross sections as a function of scattering angle and is intended for resonant inelastic X-ray scattering experiments. The angle between the ports can be varied in the range of 30°-150°, while the pressure change is less than 2 × 10{sup −10} mbars.

  19. High Voltage Insulation Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherb, V.; Rogalla, K.; Gollor, M.

    2008-09-01

    In preparation of new Electronic Power Conditioners (EPC's) for Travelling Wave Tub Amplifiers (TWTA's) on telecom satellites a study for the development of new high voltage insulation technology is performed. The initiative is mandatory to allow compact designs and to enable higher operating voltages. In a first task a market analysis was performed, comparing different materials with respect to their properties and processes. A hierarchy of selection criteria was established and finally five material candidates (4 Epoxy resins and 1 Polyurethane resin) were selected to be further investigated in the test program. Samples for the test program were designed to represent core elements of an EPC, the high voltage transformer and Printed Circuit Boards of the high voltage section. All five materials were assessed in the practical work flow of the potting process and electrical, mechanical, thermal and lifetime testing was performed. Although the lifetime tests results were overlayed by a larges scatter, finally two candidates have been identified for use in a subsequent qualification program. This activity forms part of element 5 of the ESA ARTES Programme.

  20. Tribological characteristics of perfluoropolyether liquid lubricants under sliding conditions in high vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masuko, Masabumi; Jones, William R., Jr.; Helmick, Larry S.

    1993-01-01

    Tribological characteristics of three PFPE's (Fomblin Z, Demnum, and Krytox) were studied under high vacuum using a four-ball apparatus with 440C steel specimens. Fomblin Z and Demnum exhibited initial scuffing-like high friction whereas Krytox did not. Steady state friction with Fomblin Z was the lowest among the three oils. Frictional values for Demnum and Krytox were almost the same. The lowest wear rate in air was provided by Krytox regardless of load, and low wear rates in vacuum at high load were achieved with Krytox and Demnum. Results are explained by reactivity and pressure-viscosity characteristics of the oils.

  1. Vacuum: From Art to Exact Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lafferty, James M.

    1981-01-01

    Reviews the history of vacuum technology. Includes vacuum pump developments (mechanical, ion, and cyrogenic pumps), measurement techniques, the development of the American Vacuum Society, and electronics in vacuum technology. (JN)

  2. Vacuum encapsulated, high temperature diamond amplified cathode capsule and method for making same

    DOEpatents

    Rao, Triveni; Walsh, Josh; Gangone, Elizabeth

    2015-12-29

    A vacuum encapsulated, hermetically sealed cathode capsule for generating an electron beam of secondary electrons, which generally includes a cathode element having a primary emission surface adapted to emit primary electrons, an annular insulating spacer, a diamond window element comprising a diamond material and having a secondary emission surface adapted to emit secondary electrons in response to primary electrons impinging on the diamond window element, a first high-temperature solder weld disposed between the diamond window element and the annular insulating spacer and a second high-temperature solder weld disposed between the annular insulating spacer and the cathode element. The cathode capsule is formed by a high temperature weld process under vacuum such that the first solder weld forms a hermetical seal between the diamond window element and the annular insulating spacer and the second solder weld forms a hermetical seal between the annular spacer and the cathode element whereby a vacuum encapsulated chamber is formed within the capsule.

  3. Apollo Experiment Report: Lunar-Sample Processing in the Lunar Receiving Laboratory High-Vacuum Complex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, D. R.

    1976-01-01

    A high-vacuum complex composed of an atmospheric decontamination system, sample-processing chambers, storage chambers, and a transfer system was built to process and examine lunar material while maintaining quarantine status. Problems identified, equipment modifications, and procedure changes made for Apollo 11 and 12 sample processing are presented. The sample processing experiences indicate that only a few operating personnel are required to process the sample efficiently, safely, and rapidly in the high-vacuum complex. The high-vacuum complex was designed to handle the many contingencies, both quarantine and scientific, associated with handling an unknown entity such as the lunar sample. Lunar sample handling necessitated a complex system that could not respond rapidly to changing scientific requirements as the characteristics of the lunar sample were better defined. Although the complex successfully handled the processing of Apollo 11 and 12 lunar samples, the scientific requirement for vacuum samples was deleted after the Apollo 12 mission just as the vacuum system was reaching its full potential.

  4. PREFACE: Fifteenth International Summer School on Vacuum, Electron and Ion Technologies (VEIT 2007)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerassimov, Nikolay; Möller, Wolfhard; Ghelev, Chavdar

    2008-03-01

    The International Summer School on Vacuum, Electron and Ion Technologies (VEIT) has been organized biannually since 1977. It is a forum for the interchange and dissemination of knowledge and ideas on the latest developments in electron-, ion-, and plasma-assisted technologies. The organizers of the event (since 2001) have been the Institute of Electronics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia, Bulgaria, the Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden, Germany, and the Evrika Foundation, Sofia, Bulgaria. The fifteenth meeting of VEIT was held in the Black Sea resort of Sozopol, Bulgaria from 17-21 September 2007 and was attended by around 120 participants from 17 countries: Australia, Belgium, Bulgaria, Canada, Czech Republic, Germany, Hungary, Italy, The Netherlands, Poland, Pakistan, Romania, Sweden, Switzerland, Ukraine, UK and USA. Following the tradition of publishing the VEIT Proceedings, a selection of papers presented at the event is published in this volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series, all peer reviewed to meet the originality and quality criteria of the journal. The school consisted of 11 oral and 3 poster sessions. There were 17 invited talks of general interest and 12 progress reports were presented orally. In total 86 contributed papers were presented during the three poster sessions. There were several scientific highlights covering the fundamentals of gas discharges and interaction of fast particles with solids, a wide range of conventional and novel applications such as for hard coatings and optical/protective layers, nanosized structures produced by evaporation, sputtering or external irradiation. Recent achievements in the modification of materials using charged particles or laser beams, thin layers deposition, properties, and characterization and novel materials, techniques, devices were highlighted. Despite the busy scientific program, the atmosphere was relaxed and informal

  5. High-performance parallel image reconstruction for the New Vacuum Solar Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xue-Bao; Liu, Zhong; Wang, Feng; Jin, Zhen-Yu; Xiang, Yong-Yuan; Zheng, Yan-Fang

    2015-06-01

    Many technologies have been developed to help improve spatial resolution of observational images for ground-based solar telescopes, such as adaptive optics (AO) systems and post-processing reconstruction. As any AO system correction is only partial, it is indispensable to use post-processing reconstruction techniques. In the New Vacuum Solar Telescope (NVST), a speckle-masking method is used to achieve the diffraction-limited resolution of the telescope. Although the method is very promising, the computation is quite intensive, and the amount of data is tremendous, requiring several months to reconstruct observational data of one day on a high-end computer. To accelerate image reconstruction, we parallelize the program package on a high-performance cluster. We describe parallel implementation details for several reconstruction procedures. The code is written in the C language using the Message Passing Interface (MPI) and is optimized for parallel processing in a multiprocessor environment. We show the excellent performance of parallel implementation, and the whole data processing speed is about 71 times faster than before. Finally, we analyze the scalability of the code to find possible bottlenecks, and propose several ways to further improve the parallel performance. We conclude that the presented program is capable of executing reconstruction applications in real-time at NVST.

  6. High-sensitivity quantitative Kelvin probe microscopy by noncontact ultra-high-vacuum atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sommerhalter, Ch.; Matthes, Th. W.; Glatzel, Th.; Jäger-Waldau, A.; Lux-Steiner, M. Ch.

    1999-07-01

    We present quantitative measurements of the work function of semiconductor and metal surfaces prepared in ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) using a combination of UHV noncontact atomic force microscopy and Kelvin probe force microscopy. High energetic and lateral resolution is achieved by using the second resonance frequency of the cantilever to measure the electrostatic forces, while the first resonance frequency is used to simultaneously obtain topographic images by the frequency modulation technique. Spatially resolved work-function measurements reveal a reduced work function in the vicinity of steps on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite. On the GaAs(110) surface it could be demonstrated that defect states in the forbidden band gap cause a local pinning of the Fermi level along monolayer steps. On p-WSe2(0001) work-function variations due to the Coulomb potential of single dopant sites were resolved.

  7. Microbiological hazard from the exhaust of a high-vacuum sterilizer.

    PubMed Central

    Barbeito, M S; Brookey, E A

    1976-01-01

    Data are presented which show the potential for release of viable microorganisms into the atmosphere from high-vacuum steam sterilizers during the evacuation cycle preceding application of steam under pressure. Bacillus subtilis var. niger spores, Serratia marcescens cells, and T1 coliphage disseminated into the sterilizer chamber as small particles from liquid suspensions, and dried spores of B. subtilis var. niger distributed on bulk discard materials were recovered from the atmosphere around pipes venting steam from the steam ejectors used to create chamber vacuum. Evaluation of the hazard involved is discussed, and the design, fabrication, and installation of a valved filter system for preventing release of viable microorganisms are presented. The filtration system utilized an F-700 water-resistant filter and was shown to eliminate the release of viable airborne microorganisms from a high-vacuum sterilizer. A method is presented for determining size requirements for an atmospheric vent filter in relation to the volume of a sterilizer. PMID:825044

  8. Use of Polycarbonate Vacuum Vessels in High-Temperature Fusion-Plasma Research

    SciTech Connect

    B. Berlinger, A. Brooks, H. Feder, J. Gumbas, T. Franckowiak and S.A. Cohen

    2012-09-27

    Magnetic fusion energy (MFE) research requires ultrahigh-vacuum (UHV) conditions, primarily to reduce plasma contamination by impurities. For radiofrequency (RF)-heated plasmas, a great benefit may accrue from a non-conducting vacuum vessel, allowing external RF antennas which avoids the complications and cost of internal antennas and high-voltage high-current feedthroughs. In this paper we describe these and other criteria, e.g., safety, availability, design flexibility, structural integrity, access, outgassing, transparency, and fabrication techniques that led to the selection and use of 25.4-cm OD, 1.6-cm wall polycarbonate pipe as the main vacuum vessel for an MFE research device whose plasmas are expected to reach keV energies for durations exceeding 0.1 s

  9. Automatic Vacuum Flushing Technology for Combined Sewer Solids: Laboratory Testing and Proposed Improvements (WERF Report INFR7SG09)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This research study included an extensive literature review on existing sewer sediment flushing technologies. An innovative vacuum flush system previously developed by the U.S. EPA was tested under laboratory conditions. The tests revealed a strong correlation between the strengt...

  10. High Frequency Integrated Vacuum Electronics (HiFIVE) Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-10

    this document. 2 List of Figures Figure 1: Measured MAG/MSG and H21 of 120 µm transistor at a drain bias of 1.5 V and 54 mA de- embedded to the...the transistor unit cell used in power amplifiers. The cell consists of two individual emitter fingers and each finger has 0.25x6 µm 2 emitter area...mobility transistor (HEMT) technology. This included investigating the efficient power combining techniques, transitions from monolithic microwave

  11. High Contrast Vacuum Nuller Testbed (VNT) Contrast, Performance and Null Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyon, Richard G.; Clampin, Mark; Petrone, Peter; Mallik, Udayan; Madison, Timothy; Bolcar, Matthew R.

    2012-01-01

    Herein we report on our contrast assessment and the development, sensing and control of the Vacuum Nuller Testbed to realize a Visible Nulling Coronagraphy (VNC) for exoplanet detection and characterization. Tbe VNC is one of the few approaches that works with filled, segmented and sparse or diluted-aperture telescope systems. It thus spans a range of potential future NASA telescopes and could be flown as a separate instrument on such a future mission. NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center has an established effort to develop VNC technologies, and an incremental sequence of testbeds to advance this approach and its critical technologies. We discuss the development of the vacuum Visible Nulling Coronagraph testbed (VNT). The VNT is an ultra-stable vibration isolated testbed that operates under closed-loop control within a vacuum chamber. It will be used to achieve an incremental sequence of three visible-light nulling milestones with sequentially higher contrasts of 10(exp 8), 10(exp 9) and ideally 10(exp 10) at an inner working angle of 2*lambda/D. The VNT is based on a modified Mach-Zehnder nulling interferometer, with a "W" configuration to accommodate a hex-packed MEMS based deformable mirror, a coherent fiber bundle and achromatic phase shifters. We discuss the laboratory results, optical configuration, critical technologies and the null sensing and control approach.

  12. The use of the Molecular Adsorber Coating technology to mitigate vacuum chamber contamination during Pathfinder testing for the James Webb Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, Nithin S.; Hasegawa, Mark M.; Wooldridge, Eve M.; Henderson-Nelson, Kelly A.

    2016-09-01

    As a coating made of highly porous zeolite materials, the Molecular Adsorber Coating (MAC) was developed to capture outgassed molecular contaminants, such as hydrocarbons and silicones. For spaceflight applications, the adsorptive capabilities of the coating can alleviate on-orbit outgassing concerns on or near sensitive surfaces and instruments within the spacecraft. Similarly, this sprayable paint technology has proven to be significantly beneficial for ground based space applications, in particular, for vacuum chamber environments. This paper describes the recent use of the MAC technology during Pathfinder testing of the Optical Ground Support Equipment (OGSE) for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) at NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC). The coating was used as a mitigation tool to entrap persistent outgassed contaminants, specifically silicone based diffusion pump oil, from within JSC's cryogenic optical vacuum chamber test facility called Chamber A. This paper summarizes the sample fabrication, installation, laboratory testing, post-test chemical analysis results, and future plans for the MAC technology, which was effectively used to protect the JWST test equipment from vacuum chamber contamination.

  13. The Use of the Molecular Adsorber Coating Technology to Mitigate Vacuum Chamber Contamination During Pathfinder Testing for the James Webb Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abraham, Nithin S.; Hasegawa, Mark M.; Wooldridge, Eve M.; Henderson-Nelson, Kelly A.

    2016-01-01

    As a coating made of highly porous zeolite materials, the Molecular Adsorber Coating (MAC) was developed to capture outgassed molecular contaminants, such as hydrocarbons and silicones. For spaceflight applications, the adsorptive capabilities of the coating can alleviate on-orbit outgassing concerns on or near sensitive surfaces and instruments within the spacecraft. Similarly, this sprayable paint technology has proven to be significantly beneficial for ground based space applications, in particular, for vacuum chamber environments. This paper describes the recent use of the MAC technology during Pathfinder testing of the Optical Ground Support Equipment (OGSE) for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) at NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC). The coating was used as a mitigation tool to entrap persistent outgassed contaminants, specifically silicone based diffusion pump oil, from within JSC's cryogenic optical vacuum chamber test facility called Chamber A. This paper summarizes the sample fabrication, installation, laboratory testing, post-test chemical analysis results, and future plans for the MAC technology, which was effectively used to protect the JWST test equipment from vacuum chamber contamination.

  14. Vacuum Outgassing Behavior of Carbon Nanotube Cathode with High-Intensity Pulsed Electron Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yi; Zhang, Huang; Xia, Liansheng; Liu, Xingguang; Pan, Haifeng; Lv, Lu; Yang, Anmin; Shi, Jinshui; Zhang, Linwen; Deng, Jianjun

    2015-02-01

    Experimental investigations on the vacuum outgassing of a carbon nanotube (CNT) cathode with high-intensity pulsed electron emission on a 2 MeV linear induction accelerator injector are presented. Under the 1.60 MV diode voltage, the CNT cathode could provide 1.67 kA electron beam with the amount of outgassing of about 0.51 Pa·L. It is found that the amount of outgassing, which determines the cathode emission current, depends on the diode voltage and the vacuum.

  15. Note: mounting ultra-high vacuum windows with low stress-induced birefringence.

    PubMed

    Solmeyer, Neal; Zhu, Kunyan; Weiss, David S

    2011-06-01

    We have developed a way to mount ultra-high vacuum windows onto standard ConFlat(®) vacuum systems with very low stress-induced birefringence. Each window is sealed to a stainless steel flange with a compressed indium wire, and that flange is connected to a vacuum chamber with another indium seal. We find that deformation of a standard ConFlat flange during indium sealing dominates the stress on the window, so an extra-rigid flange is needed for minimal birefringence. With this mounting scheme, the typical residual birefringence is Δn = 2.3 × 10(-7) and is unchanged by a 120 °C bake.

  16. High-Intensity Scattering Processes of Relativistic Electrons in Vacuum and Their Relevance to High-Energy Astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Hartemann, Frederic V.; Troha, Anthony L.; Baldis, Hector A.; Gupta, Atul; Kerman, Arthur K.; Landahl, Eric C.; Luhmann, Neville C. Jr.; Van Meter, James R.

    2000-04-01

    The recent advent of ultra-short pulse, high-intensity lasers, together with advances in other novel technologies, such as high-gradient radiofrequency photoinjectors, have afforded researchers the possibility to simulate astrophysical conditions in the laboratory. Laser-produced plasmas have been successfully used to simulate astrophysical plasmas and supernovae in the laboratory for several years. Now, femtosecond laser systems operating in the terawatt to petawatt range are available, as are synchronized relativistic electron bunches with subpicosecond durations and terahertz bandwidths. With these tools, experiments have been conducted to study phenomena related to supernova explosions, stellar winds, solar coronae, cosmic rays, planetary and celestial matter, and interstellar plasmas. Other experiments have been proposed to investigate Unruh radiation, as well as ponderomotive scattering, which can accelerate electrons in vacuum to relativistic energies using the extremely high gradients in a three-dimensional laser focus. The nonlinear Doppler shift induced by ultrarelativistic radiation pressure is shown to yield complex nonlinear Compton backscattered spectra. Finally, strong radiative corrections are expected when the Doppler-upshifted laser wavelength approaches the Compton scale. These are discussed within the context of high-field classical electrodynamics, a new discipline borne out of the aforementioned innovations. (c) 2000 The American Astronomical Society.

  17. Sealing of large leaks in high-vacuum systems subject to mechanical and thermal stresses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christian, J. D.; Gilbreath, W. P.

    1974-01-01

    The use of silicone rubber adhesive (particularly, G.E. RTV-108) for sealing large leaks in high vacuum systems subject to mechanical and thermal stresses is shown to be more effective than that of epoxy cements. The sealant is applied externally to the leak while the system is partially evacuated so that it is drawn into the hole.

  18. Rubber and alumina gaskets retain vacuum seal in high temperature EMF cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hesson, J. C.

    1966-01-01

    Silicone rubber gasket and an alumina gasket retain a vacuum inside a high temperature EMF cell in which higher and lower density liquid metal electrodes are separated by an intermediate density fused salt electrolyte. This innovation is in use on a sodium bismuth regenerable EMF cell in which the fused salts and metals are at about 500 deg to 600 deg C.

  19. Air lock mechanism speeds specimen testing in high-temperature vacuum furnaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitehead, C.

    1971-01-01

    Mechanism, made of 347 stainless steel, is attached to furnace port by bolted flange. Unit incorporates quick opening, high vacuum valve and associated fittings which provide connections to air lock evacuation and to inert gas supply for quenching specimen after it is withdrawn from furnace into air lock.

  20. An improved air break receiver unit. A design suited to high-vacuum scavenging systems.

    PubMed

    Houldsworth, H B; O'Sullivan, J; Smith, M

    1983-07-01

    The advantages of active anti-pollution systems are discussed, in particular those depending on a high vacuum and narrow-bore pipework. The design requirements of a receiver for such a system are set out and the detailed design of such a receiver described. The performance of the unit is assessed with special regard to efficiency and safety.

  1. High-efficiency solar cells fabricated by vacuum MO-CVD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fraas, L. M.; Cape, J. A.; Partain, L. D.; Mcleod, P. S.

    1984-01-01

    High-efficiency, monolithic, two-color, three-terminal solar cells were fabricated by a novel growth technique, vacuum metal-organic chemical vapor deposition. The technique uses the expensive metal alkyls efficiently and toxic gases sparingly. The fact that the outer chamber is constructed of nonbreakable stainless steel is an attractive safety feature associated with this deposition system.

  2. National Missile Defense: High-Technology in a Strategic Vacuum

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-01-01

    IV. Reading the Scales Part Four: Thinking Strategically About Rogue-Nation ICBMs 24 I. What Would be Better than NMD? II. Deterrence and...National Missile Defense is significantly more likely to decrease America’s overall security than to enhance it. Part Four: Thinking ... Strategically About Rogue-Nation ICBMs But if NMD is not the way to deal with the rogue-nation ICBM threat, what is? Do we simply have to abandon

  3. A vacuum spark ion source: High charge state metal ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Yushkov, G. Yu. Nikolaev, A. G.; Frolova, V. P.; Oks, E. M.

    2016-02-15

    High ion charge state is often important in ion beam physics, among other reasons for the very practical purpose that it leads to proportionately higher ion beam energy for fixed accelerating voltage. The ion charge state of metal ion beams can be increased by replacing a vacuum arc ion source by a vacuum spark ion source. Since the voltage between anode and cathode remains high in a spark discharge compared to the vacuum arc, higher metal ion charge states are generated which can then be extracted as an ion beam. The use of a spark of pulse duration less than 10 μs and with current up to 10 kA allows the production of ion beams with current of several amperes at a pulse repetition rate of up to 5 pps. We have demonstrated the formation of high charge state heavy ions (bismuth) of up to 15 + and a mean ion charge state of more than 10 +. The physics and techniques of our vacuum spark ion source are described.

  4. A vacuum spark ion source: High charge state metal ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yushkov, G. Yu.; Nikolaev, A. G.; Oks, E. M.; Frolova, V. P.

    2016-02-01

    High ion charge state is often important in ion beam physics, among other reasons for the very practical purpose that it leads to proportionately higher ion beam energy for fixed accelerating voltage. The ion charge state of metal ion beams can be increased by replacing a vacuum arc ion source by a vacuum spark ion source. Since the voltage between anode and cathode remains high in a spark discharge compared to the vacuum arc, higher metal ion charge states are generated which can then be extracted as an ion beam. The use of a spark of pulse duration less than 10 μs and with current up to 10 kA allows the production of ion beams with current of several amperes at a pulse repetition rate of up to 5 pps. We have demonstrated the formation of high charge state heavy ions (bismuth) of up to 15 + and a mean ion charge state of more than 10 +. The physics and techniques of our vacuum spark ion source are described.

  5. Investigation of a quadrupole ultra-high vacuum ion pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwarz, H. J.

    1974-01-01

    The new nonmagnetic ion pump resembles the quadrupole ionization gage. The dimensions are larger, and hyperbolically shaped electrodes replace the four rods. Their surfaces follow y sq. = 36 + x sq. (x, y in centimeters). The electrodes, 55 cm long, are positioned lengthwise in a tube. At one end a cathode emits electrons; at the other end a narrowly wound flat spiral of tungsten clad with titanium on cathode potential can be heated for titanium evaporation. Electrons accelerated by a dc potential of the surface electrodes oscillate between the ends on rotational trajectories, if a high frequency potential superimposed on the dc potential is properly adjusted. Pumping speeds (4-100 liter/sec) for different gases at different peak voltages (1000-3000V) at corresponding frequencies (57-100 MHz), and at different pressures 0.00001 to the minus 9 power Torr were observed. The lowest pressure reached was below 10 to the minus 10 power Torr.

  6. RF Breakdown in High Vacuum Multimegawatt X-Band Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Dolgashev, V

    2004-06-15

    Increasing the power handling capabilities of rf components is an important issue for the design of rf accelerators and rf sources. RF breakdown is a phenomena that limit the high power performance. A major concern is the damage that can occur in rf components from breakdown. To better understand this damage, we have studied rf breakdown in a rectangular waveguide experimentally and theoretically. The breakdown process in a waveguide is both easier to measure and simulate than breakdown in a complex geometry such as an accelerating structure. We used a particle tracking code and a Particle-In-Cell code to model the breakdown behavior. Models developed for the waveguide were applied to the breakdown in accelerating structures. RF breakdown in traveling wave and standing wave accelerating structures was simulated. We compare the experimental data with results of the simulations for the accelerating structures.

  7. Automated Fabrication Technologies for High Performance Polymer Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shuart , M. J.; Johnston, N. J.; Dexter, H. B.; Marchello, J. M.; Grenoble, R. W.

    1998-01-01

    New fabrication technologies are being exploited for building high graphite-fiber-reinforced composite structure. Stitched fiber preforms and resin film infusion have been successfully demonstrated for large, composite wing structures. Other automatic processes being developed include automated placement of tacky, drapable epoxy towpreg, automated heated head placement of consolidated ribbon/tape, and vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding. These methods have the potential to yield low cost high performance structures by fabricating composite structures to net shape out-of-autoclave.

  8. High-flux, high-temperature thermal vacuum qualification testing of a solar receiver aperture shield

    SciTech Connect

    Kerslake, T.W.; Mason, L.S.; Strumpf, H.J.

    1997-12-31

    As part of the International Space Station (ISS) Phase 1 program, NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC) and the Russian Space Agency (RSA) teamed together to design, build and flight test the world`s first orbital Solar Dynamic Power System (SDPS) on the Russian space station Mir. The Solar Dynamic Flight Demonstration (SDFD) program was to operate a nominal 2 kWe SDPS on Mir for a period up to 1-year starting in late 1997. Unfortunately, the SDFD mission was demanifested from the ISS Phase 1 shuttle program in early 1996. However, substantial flight hardware and prototypical flight hardware was built including a heat receiver and aperture shield. The aperture shield comprises the front face of the cylindrical cavity heat receiver and is located at the focal plane of the solar concentrator. It is constructed of a stainless steel plate with a 1-m outside diameter, a 0.24-m inside diameter and covered with high-temperature, refractory metal multi-foil insulation (MFI). The aperture shield must minimize heat loss from the receiver cavity, provide a stiff, high strength structure to accommodate shuttle launch loads and protect receiver structures from highly concentrated solar fluxes during concentrator off-pointing events. To satisfy Mir operational safety protocols, the aperture shield was required to accommodate direct impingement of the intensely concentrated solar image for a 1-hour period. To verify thermal-structural durability under the anticipated high-flux, high-temperature loading, an aperture shield test article was constructed and underwent a series of two tests in a large thermal vacuum chamber configured with a reflective, point-focus solar concentrator and a solar simulator. The test article was positioned near the focal plane and exposed to concentrated solar flux for a period of 1-hour. In the first test, a near equilibrium temperature of 1862 K was attained in the center of the shield hot spot. In the second test, with increased incident flux, a near

  9. High-Flux, High-Temperature Thermal Vacuum Qualification Testing of a Solar Receiver Aperture Shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerslake, Thomas W.; Mason, Lee S.; Strumpf, Hal J.

    1997-01-01

    As part of the International Space Station (ISS) Phase 1 program, NASA Lewis Research Center (LERC) and the Russian Space Agency (RSA) teamed together to design, build and flight test the world's first orbital Solar Dynamic Power System (SDPS) on the Russian space station Mir. The Solar Dynamic Flight Demonstration (SDFD) program was to operate a nominal 2 kWe SDPS on Mir for a period up to 1-year starting in late 1997. Unfortunately, the SDFD mission was demanifested from the ISS phase 1 shuttle program in early 1996. However, substantial flight hardware and prototypical flight hardware was built including a heat receiver and aperture shield. The aperture shield comprises the front face of the cylindrical cavity heat receiver and is located at the focal plane of the solar concentrator. It is constructed of a stainless steel plate with a 1-m outside diameter, a 0.24-m inside diameter and covered with high-temperature, refractory metal Multi-Foil Insulation (MFI). The aperture shield must minimize heat loss from the receiver cavity, provide a stiff, high strength structure to accommodate shuttle launch loads and protect receiver structures from highly concentrated solar fluxes during concentrator off-pointing events. To satisfy Mir operational safety protocols, the aperture shield was required to accommodate direct impingement of the intensely concentrated solar image for a 1-hour period. To verify thermal-structural durability under the anticipated high-flux, high-temperature loading, an aperture shield test article was constructed and underwent a series of two tests in a large thermal vacuum chamber configured with a reflective, point-focus solar concentrator and a solar simulator. The test article was positioned near the focal plane and exposed to concentrated solar flux for a period of 1-hour. In the first test, a near equilibrium temperature of 1862 K was attained in the center of the shield hot spot. In the second test, with increased incident flux, a near

  10. Electron beam gun with kinematic coupling for high power RF vacuum devices

    SciTech Connect

    Borchard, Philipp

    2016-11-22

    An electron beam gun for a high power RF vacuum device has components joined by a fixed kinematic coupling to provide both precise alignment and high voltage electrical insulation of the components. The kinematic coupling has high strength ceramic elements directly bonded to one or more non-ductile rigid metal components using a high temperature active metal brazing alloy. The ceramic elements have a convex surface that mates with concave grooves in another one of the components. The kinematic coupling, for example, may join a cathode assembly and/or a beam shaping focus electrode to a gun stem, which is preferably composed of ceramic. The electron beam gun may be part of a high power RF vacuum device such as, for example, a gyrotron, klystron, or magnetron.

  11. Calculation of the vacuum Green's function valid for high toroidal mode number in tokamaks.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chance, Morrell; Turnbull, Alan

    2005-10-01

    The present evaluation of the Green's function used for the magmetic scalar potential in vacuum calculations for axisymmetric geometry in the vacuum segments of gato, pest and other mhd stability codes has been found to be deficient for moderately high toroidal mode numbers. This was due to the loss of numerical precision arising from the upward recursion relation used for generating the functions to high mode numbers. The recursion is initiated from the complete elliptic integrals of the first and second kinds. To ameliorate this, a direct integration of the integral representation of the function was crafted to achieve the necessary high accuracy for moderately high mode numbers. At very high mode numbers the loss of numerical precision due to the oscillatory behavior of the integrand is further avoided by judiciously deforming the integration contour in the complex plane. Machine precision, roughly 14 -- 16 digits, accuracy can be achieved by using a combination of both these techniques.

  12. Ultra-high speed vacuum pump system with first stage turbofan and second stage turbomolecular pump

    SciTech Connect

    Jostlein, Hans

    2006-04-04

    An ultra-high speed vacuum pump evacuation system includes a first stage ultra-high speed turbofan and a second stage conventional turbomolecular pump. The turbofan is either connected in series to a chamber to be evacuated, or is optionally disposed entirely within the chamber. The turbofan employs large diameter rotor blades operating at high linear blade velocity to impart an ultra-high pumping speed to a fluid. The second stage turbomolecular pump is fluidly connected downstream from the first stage turbofan. In operation, the first stage turbofan operates in a pre-existing vacuum, with the fluid asserting only small axial forces upon the rotor blades. The turbofan imparts a velocity to fluid particles towards an outlet at a high volume rate, but moderate compression ratio. The second stage conventional turbomolecular pump then compresses the fluid to pressures for evacuation by a roughing pump.

  13. Design and fabrication of high performance wafer-level vacuum packaging based on glass-silicon-glass bonding techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jinwen; Jiang, Wei; Wang, Xin; Zhou, Jilong; Yang, Huabing

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, a high performance wafer-level vacuum packaging technology based on GSG triple-layer sealing structure for encapsulating large mass inertial MEMS devices fabricated by silicon-on-glass bulk micromachining technology is presented. Roughness controlling strategy of bonding surfaces was proposed and described in detail. Silicon substrate was thinned and polished by CMP after the first bonding with the glass substrate and was then bonded with the glass micro-cap. Zr thin film was embedded into the concave of the micro-cap by a shadow-mask technique. The glass substrate was thinned to about 100 µm, wet etched through and metalized for realizing vertical feedthrough. During the fabrication, all patterning processes were operated carefully so as to reduce extrusive fragments to as little as possible. In addition, a high-performance micro-Pirani vacuum gauge was integrated into the package for monitoring the pressure and the leak rate further. The result shows that the pressure in the package is about 120 Pa and has no obvious change for more than one year indicating 10-13 stdcc s-1 leak rate.

  14. High energy density capacitors for vacuum operation with a pulsed plasma load

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guman, W. J.

    1976-01-01

    Results of the effort of designing, fabricating, and testing of a 40 joules/lb (88.2 joules/Kg) high voltage energy storage capacitor suitable for operating a pulsed plasma thruster in a vacuum environment for millions of pulses are presented. Using vacuum brazing and heli-arc welding techniques followed by vacuum and high pressure helium leak tests it was possible to produce a hermetically sealed relatively light weight enclosure for the dielectric system. An energy density of 40 joules/lb was realized with a KF-polyvinylidene fluoride dielectric system. One capacitor was D.C. life tested at 4 KV (107.8 joules/lb) for 2,000 hours before it failed. Another exceeded 2,670 hours without failure at 38.3 joules/lb. Pulse life testing in a vacuum exceeded 300,000 discharges with testing still in progress. The D.C. life test data shows a small decrease in capacitance and an increase in dissipation factor with time. Heat transfer from the load to the capacitor must also be considered besides the self-heat generated by the capacitor.

  15. Impermeable ``single-monolayer'' Graphenic encasement of bacteria for high vacuum Transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padavala, Balabalaji; Nguyen, Phong; Podrebarac, Joshua; Tate, Jenae; Berry, Vikas

    2012-02-01

    Biological cells are hygroscopic, permeable, and electron-absorbing, and imaging them via electron microscopes has been an important challenge due to the volumetric-shrinkage and structural degradation of cells under high vacuum and fixed electron beam. In this talk, we will show that ``single-monolayer'' graphenic encasement of individual whole ``wet'' bacterial cells can enable wet-phase TEM imaging by preserving their dimensional, topological characteristics and cellular water under high vacuum (10-5 Torr) and beam current (150 A/cm^2). Ultrathin and impermeable ``single monolayer'' graphene microsheet was wrapped around or laid on bacteria. The combination of strongly-packed honeycomb-lattice, high Young's modulus, high electrical and thermal conductivity, and mesoscale flexibility of the single graphene monolayer reduced the permeability of cells under TEM conditions, significantly abated electron beam damage and cell-delamination from substrate.

  16. Wafer bonding technology for new generation vacuum MEMS: challenges and promises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dragoi, V.; Pabo, E.

    2015-05-01

    Various MEMS devices are incorporated into consumer electronic devices. A particular category of MEMS require vacuum packaging by wafer bonding with the need to encapsulate vacuum levels of 10-2 mbar or higher with long time stability. The vacuum requirement is limiting the choice of the wafer bonding process and raises significant challenges to the existing investigation methods (metrology) used for results qualification. From the broad range of wafer bonding processes only few are compatible with vacuum applications: fusion bonding, anodic bonding, glass frit bonding and metal-based bonding. The outgassing from the enclosed surfaces after bonding will affect the vacuum level in the cavity: in some cases, a getter material is used inside the device cavity to compensate for this outgassing. Additionally the selected bonding process must be compatible with the devices on the wafers being bonded. This work reviews the principles of vacuum encapsulation using wafer bonding. Examples showing the suitability of each process for specific applications types will be presented. A significant challenge in vacuum MEMS fabrication is the lack of analytical methods needed for process characterization or reliability testing. A short overview of the most used methods and their limitations will be presented. Specific needs to be addressed will be introduced with examples.

  17. Preparation of High-Grade Powders from Tomato Paste Using a Vacuum Foam Drying Method.

    PubMed

    Sramek, Martin; Schweiggert, Ralf Martin; van Kampen, Andreas; Carle, Reinhold; Kohlus, Reinhard

    2015-08-01

    We present a rapid and gentle drying method for the production of high-grade tomato powders from double concentrated tomato paste, comparing results with powders obtained by foam mat air drying and freeze dried powders. The principle of this method consists of drying tomato paste in foamed state at low temperatures in vacuum. The formulations were dried at temperatures of 50, 60, and 70 °C and vacuum of 200 mbar. Foam stability was affected by low serum viscosity and the presence of solid particles in tomato paste. Consequently, serum viscosity was increased by maltodextrin addition, yielding optimum stability at tomato paste:maltodextrin ratio of 2.4:1 (w/w) in dry matter. Material foamability was improved by addition of 0.5% (w/w, fresh weight) egg white. Because of solid particles in tomato paste, foam air filling had to be limited to critical air volume fraction of Φ = 0.7. The paste was first pre-foamed to Φ = 0.2 and subsequently expanded in vacuo. After drying to a moisture content of 5.6% to 7.5% wet base (w.b.), the materials obtained were in glassy state. Qualities of the resulting powders were compared with those produced by freeze and air drying. Total color changes were the least after vacuum drying, whereas air drying resulted in noticeable color changes. Vacuum foam drying at 50 °C led to insignificant carotenoid losses, being equivalent to the time-consuming freeze drying method. In contrast, air drying caused lycopene and β-carotene losses of 18% to 33% and 14% to 19% respectively. Thus, vacuum foam drying enables production of high-grade tomato powders being qualitatively similar to powders obtained by freeze drying.

  18. Observation of Live Ticks (Haemaphysalis flava) by Scanning Electron Microscopy under High Vacuum Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Ishigaki, Yasuhito; Nakamura, Yuka; Oikawa, Yosaburo; Yano, Yasuhiro; Kuwabata, Susumu; Nakagawa, Hideaki; Tomosugi, Naohisa; Takegami, Tsutomu

    2012-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopes (SEM), which image sample surfaces by scanning with an electron beam, are widely used for steric observations of resting samples in basic and applied biology. Various conventional methods exist for SEM sample preparation. However, conventional SEM is not a good tool to observe living organisms because of the associated exposure to high vacuum pressure and electron beam radiation. Here we attempted SEM observations of live ticks. During 1.5×10−3 Pa vacuum pressure and electron beam irradiation with accelerated voltages (2–5 kV), many ticks remained alive and moved their legs. After 30-min observation, we removed the ticks from the SEM stage; they could walk actively under atmospheric pressure. When we tested 20 ticks (8 female adults and 12 nymphs), they survived for two days after SEM observation. These results indicate the resistance of ticks against SEM observation. Our second survival test showed that the electron beam, not vacuum conditions, results in tick death. Moreover, we describe the reaction of their legs to electron beam exposure. These findings open the new possibility of SEM observation of living organisms and showed the resistance of living ticks to vacuum condition in SEM. These data also indicate, for the first time, the usefulness of tick as a model system for biology under extreme condition. PMID:22431980

  19. Annealing effect for SnS thin films prepared by high-vacuum evaporation

    SciTech Connect

    Revathi, Naidu Bereznev, Sergei; Loorits, Mihkel; Raudoja, Jaan; Lehner, Julia; Gurevits, Jelena; Traksmaa, Rainer; Mikli, Valdek; Mellikov, Enn; Volobujeva, Olga

    2014-11-01

    Thin films of SnS are deposited onto molybdenum-coated soda lime glass substrates using the high-vacuum evaporation technique at a substrate temperature of 300 °C. The as-deposited SnS layers are then annealed in three different media: (1) H{sub 2}S, (2) argon, and (3) vacuum, for different periods and temperatures to study the changes in the microstructural properties of the layers and to prepare single-phase SnS photoabsorber films. It is found that annealing the layers in H{sub 2}S at 400 °C changes the stoichiometry of the as-deposited SnS films and leads to the formation of a dominant SnS{sub 2} phase. Annealing in an argon atmosphere for 1 h, however, causes no deviations in the composition of the SnS films, though the surface morphology of the annealed SnS layers changes significantly as a result of a 2 h annealing process. The crystalline structure, surface morphology, and photosensitivity of the as-deposited SnS films improves significantly as the result of annealing in vacuum, and the vacuum-annealed films are found to exhibit promising properties for fabricating complete solar cells based on these single-phase SnS photoabsorber layers.

  20. Integration of LHCD system with SST1 machine and its high power rf performance in vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, P. K.; Ambulkar, K. K.; Dalakoti, S.; Parmar, P. R.; Virani, C. G.; Thakur, A. L.

    2014-02-01

    A 2.0 MW CW lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) system based on 3.7 GHz klystron sources, is in advanced stage of commissioning, which would drive and sustain plasma current, non-inductively, in superconducting steadystate tokamak (SST1) for long pulse operation. Four klystrons, each rated for 0.5 MW CW rf power, delivers 2.0 MW of rf power to four layer of the LHCD system, which finally feeds the rf power to grill antenna. The antenna system along with vacuum window and vacuum transmission line is successfully integrated on the machine. Its vacuum and pressurization compatibility has been successfully established. To validate the high power performance of LHCD system for SST1 machine, stage-wise commissioning of LHCD system in staggered manner is planned. It has been envisaged that LHCD power may be gradually increased initially, since full power may not be required during the initial phases of SST1 plasma operation. Also if the system is integrated in steps or in phases, then integration issues, as well as high power operational issues, if any, can be addressed, attended and handled in a simpler way before integrating all the layers to the grill antenna. To begin with, one klystron is connected to one layer, out of four layers, which energizes a quarter of the grill antenna. Gradually, the rf power and its pulse length is increased to validate high power performance of the system. Arcing and reflections are observed as rf power is gradually increased. The problems are analysed and after taking appropriate remedial action the system performance is improved for operation up to 160kW. Several trains of short pulses are launched in SST1 vacuum vessel for rf conditioning of the LHCD system. Normally, reflections are high when power is launched in vacuum; therefore the pulse length is restricted up to 100 milliseconds. The high power performance of this layer, connected with grill antenna is validated by launching high power microwaves in vacuum vessel of SST1 machine

  1. Vacuum system of the high energy ring of an asymmetric B-factory based on PEP

    SciTech Connect

    Barletta, W.A.; Calderon, M.O.; Wong, R. ); Jenkins, T.M. )

    1991-05-07

    The multi-ampere currents required for high luminosity operation of an asymmetric B factory leads to extremely stressing requirements on a vacuum system suitable for maintaining long beam-gas lifetimes and acceptable background levels in the detector. We present the design for a Cu alloy vacuum chamber and its associated pumping system for the 9 GeV electron storage ring of the proposed B factory based on PEP. The excellent thermal and photo-desorption properties of Cu allows handling the high proton flux in a conventional, single chamber design with distributed ion pumps. The x-ray opacity of the Cu is sufficiently high that no additional lead shielding is necessary to protect the dipoles from the intense synchrotron radiation generated by the beam. The design allows chamber commissioning in <500 hr of operation. 5 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Ultra-high vacuum compatible optical chopper system for synchrotron x-ray scanning tunneling microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Hao; Cummings, Marvin; Shirato, Nozomi; Stripe, Benjamin; Preissner, Curt; Freeland, John W.; Rosenmann, Daniel; Kersell, Heath; Hla, Saw-Wai; Rose, Volker

    2016-01-28

    High-speed beam choppers are a crucial part of time-resolved x-ray studies as well as a necessary component to enable elemental contrast in synchrotron x-ray scanning tunneling microscopy (SX-STM). However, many chopper systems are not capable of operation in vacuum, which restricts their application to x-ray studies with high photon energies, where air absorption does not present a significant problem. To overcome this limitation, we present a fully ultra-high vacuum (UHV) compatible chopper system capable of operating at variable chopping frequencies up to 4 kHz. The lightweight aluminum chopper disk is coated with Ti and Au films to provide the required beam attenuation for soft and hard x-rays with photon energies up to about 12 keV. The chopper is used for lock-in detection of x-ray enhanced signals in SX-STM.

  3. Technological process and optimum design of organic materials vacuum pyrolysis and indium chlorinated separation from waste liquid crystal display panels.

    PubMed

    Ma, En; Xu, Zhenming

    2013-12-15

    In this study, a technology process including vacuum pyrolysis and vacuum chlorinated separation was proposed to convert waste liquid crystal display (LCD) panels into useful resources using self-design apparatuses. The suitable pyrolysis temperature and pressure are determined as 300°C and 50 Pa at first. The organic parts of the panels were converted to oil (79.10 wt%) and gas (2.93 wt%). Then the technology of separating indium was optimized by central composite design (CCD) under response surface methodology (RSM). The results indicated the indium recovery ratio was 99.97% when the particle size is less than 0.16 mm, the weight percentage of NH4Cl to glass powder is 50 wt% and temperature is 450°C. The research results show that the organic materials, indium and glass of LCD panel can be recovered during the recovery process efficiently and eco-friendly.

  4. Vacuum Cleaner Fan Being Improved

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tweedt, Daniel L.

    1997-01-01

    As part of the technology utilization program at the NASA Lewis Research Center, efforts are underway to transfer aerospace technologies to new areas of practical application. One such effort involves using advanced computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes for turbomachinery to analyze the internal fluid dynamics of low-speed fans and blowers. This year, the Kirby Company in Cleveland, Ohio, approached NASA with a request for technologies that could help them improve their vacuum cleaners. Of particular interest to Kirby is the high-frequency blade-passing noise generation of their vacuum cleaner fan at low airflow rates.

  5. Removal of aluminum from drinking water treatment sludge using vacuum electrokinetic technology.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hang; Ding, Mingmei; Shen, Kunlun; Cui, Jianfeng; Chen, Wei

    2017-04-01

    A vacuum electrokinetic apparatus was operated at a municipal water supply plant in Wuxi, China to study the removal of aluminum from the plant's drinking water treatment sludge, high in trivalent aluminum content. The effect of several experimental variables (initial pH, potential gradient, and zone in the sludge tank) and the trivalent aluminum removal mechanism were analyzed. The speciation of trivalent aluminum mainly depends on the initial pH of drinking water treatment sludge, and more fractions of trivalent aluminum were migrated at pH 4 than at higher or lower pH. The application of high voltage can enhance the removal efficiency of aluminum. A three-dimensional electric field analysis explained the difference in the removal efficiency at different zones in the sludge tank. In view of energy consumption, when the initial pH was 4 and a potential gradient of 2 V cm(-1) was applied, achieving a final aluminum concentration of 30 g kg(-1) after 120 h. The specific energy consumption was 11.7 kWh kg(-1) of Al removed.

  6. Thermocouples of tantalum and rhenium alloys for more stable vacuum-high temperature performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, J. F. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    Thermocouples of the present invention provide stability and performance reliability in systems involving high temperatures and vacuums by employing a bimetallic thermocouple sensor wherein each metal of the sensor is selected from a group of metals comprising tantalum and rhenium and alloys containing only those two metals. The tantalum, rhenium thermocouple sensor alloys provide bare metal thermocouple sensors having advantageous vapor pressure compatibilities and performance characteristics. The compatibility and physical characteristics of the thermocouple sensor alloys of the present invention result in improved emf, temperature properties and thermocouple hot junction performance. The thermocouples formed of the tantalum, rhenium alloys exhibit reliability and performance stability in systems involving high temperatures and vacuums and are adaptable to space propulsion and power systems and nuclear environments.

  7. Generation of high charge state platinum ions on vacuum arc plasma heated by gyrotron radiation.

    PubMed

    Yushkov, G Yu; Vodopyanov, A V; Nikolaev, A G; Izotov, I V; Savkin, K P; Golubev, S V; Oks, E M

    2014-02-01

    The hybrid high charge metal ion source based on vacuum arc plasma heated by gyrotron radiation into simple magnetic trap has been developed. Two types of magnetic traps were used: a mirror configuration and a cusp one with inherent "minimum-B" structure. Pulsed high power (>100 kW) gyrotrons with frequency 37.5 GHz and 75 GHz were used for heating the vacuum arc plasma injected into the traps. Two different ways were used for injecting the metal plasma-axial injection by a miniature arc source located on-axis near the microwave window, and simultaneous radial injection by a number of sources mounted radially at the midplane of the traps. This article represents all data gathered for platinum ions, thus making comparison of the experimental results obtained with different traps and injections convenient and accurate.

  8. Pump-probe photoelectron spectroscopy by a high-power 90 nm vacuum-ultraviolet laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Motoki; Suzuki, Yoshi-ichi; Suzuki, Toshinori; Adachi, Shunsuke

    2016-02-01

    We present pump-probe photoelectron spectroscopy of Kr and NO using a high-power vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) laser at a wavelength of 90 nm. Clear quantum beats are observed in the photoelectron angular distributions as well as in the photoelectron yields, resulting from the coherent excitation of two Kr Rydberg states by the VUV pump. The entire Franck-Condon envelope of the NO A(2Σ+) excited state is also successfully captured by the VUV probe.

  9. Project W-320 high vacuum 241-AY-102 annulus ventilation system operability test report

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, J.W.

    1998-03-12

    This report documents the test results of OTP-320-001, Tank 241-AY-102 Annulus Ventilation System Testing. Included in the appendices are: (1) Supporting documentation prepared to demonstrate the structural integrity of the tank at high annulus vacuum (<20 INWG), and (2) a report that identifies potential cross connections between the primary and annulus ventilation systems. These cross connections were verified to be eliminated prior to the start of testing.

  10. Elimination of the Vacuum Pump Requirement for High-Resolution Rotational Spectroscopy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holt, Jennifer; Daly, Ryan W.; Neese, Christopher F.; De Lucia, Frank C.

    2015-06-01

    It has been observed that with the advances being driven by the wireless communications industry, the microwave components for submillimeter wave spectrometers and sensors will become almost "free". Moreover, these electronic components will require little power. However, neither of these attributes applies to the vacuum requirements for high-resolution rotational spectroscopy. We will report on the design, construction, and operation of a simple spectroscopic cell that overcomes these problems.

  11. Spontaneous Patterning of High-Resolution Electronics via Parallel Vacuum Ultraviolet.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xuying; Kanehara, Masayuki; Liu, Chuan; Sakamoto, Kenji; Yasuda, Takeshi; Takeya, Jun; Minari, Takeo

    2016-08-01

    A spontaneous patterning technique via parallel vacuum ultraviolet is developed for fabricating large-scale, complex electronic circuits with 1 μm resolution. The prepared organic thin-film transistors exhibit a low contact resistance of 1.5 kΩ cm, and high mobilities of 0.3 and 1.5 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) in the devices with channel lengths of 1 and 5 μm, respectively.

  12. High resolution reconstruction of solar prominence images observed by the New Vacuum Solar Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Yong-yuan; Liu, Zhong; Jin, Zhen-yu

    2016-11-01

    A high resolution image showing fine structures is crucial for understanding the nature of solar prominence. In this paper, high resolution imaging of solar prominence on the New Vacuum Solar Telescope (NVST) is introduced, using speckle masking. Each step of the data reduction especially the image alignment is discussed. Accurate alignment of all frames and the non-isoplanatic calibration of each image are the keys for a successful reconstruction. Reconstructed high resolution images from NVST also indicate that under normal seeing condition, it is feasible to carry out high resolution observations of solar prominence by a ground-based solar telescope, even in the absence of adaptive optics.

  13. High-temperature compatible 3D-integration processes for a vacuum-sealed CNT-based NEMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gueye, R.; Lee, S. W.; Akiyama, T.; Briand, D.; Roman, C.; Hierold, C.; de Rooij, N. F.

    2013-03-01

    A System-in-Package (SiP) concept for the 3D-integration of a Single Wall Carbon Nanotube (SWCNT) resonator with its CMOS driving electronics is presented. The key element of this advanced SiP is the monolithic 3D-integration of the MEMS with the CMOS electronics using Through Silicon Vias (TSVs) on an SOI wafer. This SiP includes: A glass cap vacuum-sealed to the main wafer using an eutectic bonding process: a low leak rate of 2.7 10-9 mbar•l/s was obtained; Platinum-TSVs, compatible with the SWCNT growth and release process; The TSVs were developed in a "via first" process and characterized at high-temperature — up to 850 °C. An ohmic contact between the Pt-metallization and the SOI silicon device layer was obtained; The driving CMOS electronic device is assembled to the MEMS using an Au stud bump technology. Keywords: System-in-Package (SiP), vacuum packaging, eutectic bonding, "via-first" TSVs, high-temperature platinum interconnects, ohmic contacts, Au-stud bumps assembly, CMOS electronics.

  14. Controlled injection of a liquid into ultra-high vacuum: Submonolayers of adenosine triphosphate deposited on Cu(110)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobrado, J. M.; Martín-Gago, J. A.

    2016-10-01

    We have combined a fast-valve device with vacuum technology for implementing a new method that allows introducing liquid solutions in an ultra-high vacuum chamber in the form of very small droplets. This technical development allows the easy deposition of (bio) organic molecules or small nanoparticles on a surface in a fully in-situ process, avoiding possible contamination due to the handle of the material. Moreover, our experimental set-up is suitable for any liquid and does not require any voltage application as in electrospray. We can easily change the operating regime from liquid droplet injection to the formation of a highly dispersive jet of micro-droplets by exclusively adjusting external parameters. Due to the nature of the injection process, the operational protocol makes possible the deposition of delicate molecular species that cannot be thermally sublimated. In particular, we have used this system to study the deposition of adenosine triphosphate on Cu(110). The structure of the layer was analyzed by X-ray photoemission spectroscopy and the evolution of the signal from the deposited molecule with the number of injections indicates that the molecular coverage can be controlled with submonolayer precision.

  15. Vacuum oscillations and excess of high energy solar neutrino events observed in Superkamiokande

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezinsky, V.; Fiorentini, G.; Lissia, M.

    2000-01-01

    The excess of solar-neutrino events above 13 MeV that has been recently observed by Superkamiokande can be explained by the vacuum oscillation solution to the Solar Neutrino Problem (SNP). If the boron neutrino flux is 20% smaller than the standard solar model (SSM) prediction and the chlorine signal is assumed 30% (or 3.4σ) higher than the measured one, there exists a vacuum oscillation solution to SNP that reproduces both the observed spectrum of the recoil electrons, including the high energy distortion, and the other measured neutrino rates. The most distinct signature of this solution is a semi-annual seasonal variation of the 7Be neutrino flux with maximal amplitude. While the temporal series of the GALLEX and Homestake signals suggest that such a seasonal variation could be present, future detectors (BOREXINO, LENS and probably GNO) will be able to test it.

  16. Radio frequency vacuum feedthroughs for high-power ICRF heating applications

    SciTech Connect

    Owens, T.L.; Baity, F.W.; Hoffman, D.J.; Whealton, J.H.

    1985-01-01

    Frequently, high-power pulsed ion cyclotron range of frequency experiments are limited by breakdown at the vacuum feedthrough. This paper describes the development and testing of vacuum feedthroughs to increase both reliability and capability. The ultimate goal of the program is to develop a continuous-wave feedthrough for the next generation of fusion experiments. A feedthrough concept currently under investigation consists of a simple, cylindrical alumina ceramic brazed between tapered coaxial conductors. A prototype has been tested to voltage levels in excess of 100 kV for 100-ms pulses and 70 kV for 5-s pulses at 28 MHz. Insertion-voltage-standing-wave ratios are <1.15:1 for frequencies below 450 MHz. An upgraded water-cooled version being fabricated for use on TEXTOR will be described.

  17. Initiation of vacuum insulator surface high-voltage flashover with electrons produced by laser illumination

    SciTech Connect

    Krasik, Ya. E.; Leopold, J. G.

    2015-08-15

    In this paper, experiments are described in which cylindrical vacuum insulator samples and samples inclined at 45° relative to the cathode were stressed by microsecond timescale high-voltage pulses and illuminated by focused UV laser beam pulses. In these experiments, we were able to distinguish between flashover initiated by the laser producing only photo-electrons and when plasma is formed. It was shown that flashover is predominantly initiated near the cathode triple junction. Even dense plasma formed near the anode triple junction does not necessarily lead to vacuum surface flashover. The experimental results directly confirm our conjecture that insulator surface breakdown can be avoided by preventing its initiation [J. G. Leopold et al., Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 10, 060401 (2007)] and complement our previous experimental results [J. Z. Gleizer et al., IEEE Trans. Dielectr. Electr. Insul. 21, 2394 (2014) and J. Z. Gleizer et al., J. Appl. Phys. 117, 073301 (2015)].

  18. A near-wearless and extremely long lifetime amorphous carbon film under high vacuum

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Liping; Zhang, Renhui; Jansson, Ulf; Nedfors, Nils

    2015-01-01

    Prolonging wear life of amorphous carbon films under vacuum was an enormous challenge. In this work, we firstly reported that amorphous carbon film as a lubricant layer containing hydrogen, oxygen, fluorine and silicon (a-C:H:O:F:Si) exhibited low friction (~0.1), ultra-low wear rate (9.0 × 10–13 mm3 N–1 mm–1) and ultra-long wear life (>2 × 106 cycles) under high vacuum. We systematically examined microstructure and composition of transfer film for understanding of the underlying frictional mechanism, which suggested that the extraordinarily excellent tribological properties were attributed to the thermodynamically and structurally stable FeF2 nanocrystallites corroborated using first-principles calculations, which were induced by the tribochemical reaction. PMID:26059254

  19. Probing vacuum birefringence using x-ray free electron and optical high-intensity lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karbstein, Felix; Sundqvist, Chantal

    2016-07-01

    Vacuum birefringence is one of the most striking predictions of strong field quantum electrodynamics: Probe photons traversing a strong field region can indirectly sense the applied "pump" electromagnetic field via quantum fluctuations of virtual charged particles which couple to both pump and probe fields. This coupling is sensitive to the field alignment and can effectively result in two different indices of refraction for the probe photon polarization modes giving rise to a birefringence phenomenon. In this article, we perform a dedicated theoretical analysis of the proposed discovery experiment of vacuum birefringence at an x-ray free electron laser/optical high-intensity laser facility. Describing both pump and probe laser pulses realistically in terms of their macroscopic electromagnetic fields, we go beyond previous analyses by accounting for various effects not considered before in this context. Our study facilitates stringent quantitative predictions and optimizations of the signal in an actual experiment.

  20. Cooling the motion of diamond nanocrystals in a magneto-gravitational trap in high vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, Jen -Feng; Ji, Peng; Lewandowski, Charles W.; D’Urso, Brian

    2016-07-22

    Levitated diamond nanocrystals with nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centres in high vacuum have been proposed as a unique system for experiments in fundamental quantum mechanics, including the generation of large quantum superposition states and tests of quantum gravity. This system promises extreme isolation from its environment while providing quantum control and sensing through the NV centre spin. While optical trapping has been the most explored method of levitation, recent results indicate that excessive optical heating of the nanodiamonds under vacuum may make the method impractical with currently available materials. Here, we study an alternative magneto-gravitational trap for diamagnetic particles, such as diamond nanocrystals, with stable levitation from atmospheric pressure to high vacuum. Magnetic field gradients from permanent magnets confine the particle in two dimensions, while confinement in the third dimension is gravitational. Furthermore, we demonstrate that feedback cooling of the centre-of-mass motion of a trapped nanodiamond cluster results in cooling of one degree of freedom to less than 1 K.

  1. Cooling the Motion of Diamond Nanocrystals in a Magneto-Gravitational Trap in High Vacuum

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Jen-Feng; Ji, Peng; Lewandowski, Charles W.; D’Urso, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Levitated diamond nanocrystals with nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centres in high vacuum have been proposed as a unique system for experiments in fundamental quantum mechanics, including the generation of large quantum superposition states and tests of quantum gravity. This system promises extreme isolation from its environment while providing quantum control and sensing through the NV centre spin. While optical trapping has been the most explored method of levitation, recent results indicate that excessive optical heating of the nanodiamonds under vacuum may make the method impractical with currently available materials. Here, we study an alternative magneto-gravitational trap for diamagnetic particles, such as diamond nanocrystals, with stable levitation from atmospheric pressure to high vacuum. Magnetic field gradients from permanent magnets confine the particle in two dimensions, while confinement in the third dimension is gravitational. We demonstrate that feedback cooling of the centre-of-mass motion of a trapped nanodiamond cluster results in cooling of one degree of freedom to less than 1 K. PMID:27444654

  2. Cooling the motion of diamond nanocrystals in a magneto-gravitational trap in high vacuum

    DOE PAGES

    Hsu, Jen -Feng; Ji, Peng; Lewandowski, Charles W.; ...

    2016-07-22

    Levitated diamond nanocrystals with nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centres in high vacuum have been proposed as a unique system for experiments in fundamental quantum mechanics, including the generation of large quantum superposition states and tests of quantum gravity. This system promises extreme isolation from its environment while providing quantum control and sensing through the NV centre spin. While optical trapping has been the most explored method of levitation, recent results indicate that excessive optical heating of the nanodiamonds under vacuum may make the method impractical with currently available materials. Here, we study an alternative magneto-gravitational trap for diamagnetic particles, such as diamondmore » nanocrystals, with stable levitation from atmospheric pressure to high vacuum. Magnetic field gradients from permanent magnets confine the particle in two dimensions, while confinement in the third dimension is gravitational. Furthermore, we demonstrate that feedback cooling of the centre-of-mass motion of a trapped nanodiamond cluster results in cooling of one degree of freedom to less than 1 K.« less

  3. Development of ball bearings with solid film for high-vacuum, high-temperature, high-speed application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Takashi; Konishi, Kazuaki; Aihara, Satoru; Sawamoto, Takeshi

    1993-04-01

    This paper describes the experimental results of long-life solid lubricated ball bearings tested under high-vacuum of 10 exp -4 Pa, high-temperature of 300 C, and high-speed (9000 rpm) conditions. For full ball-type bearings, the thin soft metals, either Ag or Pb, which were coated on the races and balls, appeared to have good torque properties. However, the durability of such bearings was less than 300 hours. The transfer films from the lamellar solid MoS2 and metal composite retainers improved the torque and wear properties. For ceramic, i.e., silicon nitride, balls used with steel rings, wear occurred on the inner rings. All ceramic bearings with composite retainers showed improved torque and wear properties.

  4. Vacuum Brazing of Accelerator Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Rajvir; Pant, K. K.; Lal, Shankar; Yadav, D. P.; Garg, S. R.; Raghuvanshi, V. K.; Mundra, G.

    2012-11-01

    Commonly used materials for accelerator components are those which are vacuum compatible and thermally conductive. Stainless steel, aluminum and copper are common among them. Stainless steel is a poor heat conductor and not very common in use where good thermal conductivity is required. Aluminum and copper and their alloys meet the above requirements and are frequently used for the above purpose. The accelerator components made of aluminum and its alloys using welding process have become a common practice now a days. It is mandatory to use copper and its other grades in RF devices required for accelerators. Beam line and Front End components of the accelerators are fabricated from stainless steel and OFHC copper. Fabrication of components made of copper using welding process is very difficult and in most of the cases it is impossible. Fabrication and joining in such cases is possible using brazing process especially under vacuum and inert gas atmosphere. Several accelerator components have been vacuum brazed for Indus projects at Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology (RRCAT), Indore using vacuum brazing facility available at RRCAT, Indore. This paper presents details regarding development of the above mentioned high value and strategic components/assemblies. It will include basics required for vacuum brazing, details of vacuum brazing facility, joint design, fixturing of the jobs, selection of filler alloys, optimization of brazing parameters so as to obtain high quality brazed joints, brief description of vacuum brazed accelerator components etc.

  5. Optimization of Multilayer Laminated Film and Absorbent of Vacuum Insulation Panel for Use at High Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araki, Kuninari; Echigoya, Wataru; Tsuruga, Toshimitsu; Kamoto, Daigorou; Matsuoka, Shin-Ichi

    For the energy saving regulation and larger capacity, Vacuum Insulation Panel (VIP) has been used in refrigerators with urethane foam in recent years. VIP for low temperature is constructed by laminated plastic film, using heat welding of each neighboring part for keeping vacuum, so that the performance decrement is very large under high temperature. But recently high efficiency insulation material is desired for high temperature water holding devices (automatic vending machine, heat pump water heater, electric hot-water pot water, etc.), and we especially focused on cost and ability of the laminated plastic film and absorbent for high temperature VIP. We measured the heatproof temperature of plastic films and checked the amount of water vapor and out coming gas on temperature-programmed adsorption in absorbent. These results suggest the suitable laminated film and absorbent system for VIP use at high temperature, and the long-term reliability was evaluated by measuring thermal conductivity of high temperature. As a result it was found that high-retort pouch of CPP (cast polypropylene film) and adding of aluminum coating are the most suitable materials for use in the welded layers of high-temperature VIPs (105°C).

  6. Rolling contact fatigue in high vacuum using ion plated nickel-copper-silver solid lubrication

    SciTech Connect

    Danyluk, Mike; Dhingra, Anoop

    2011-01-15

    Ion plated, nickel-copper-silver coated steel ball bearings that were tested in rolling contact fatigue (RCF) experiments in high vacuum are presented in this article. ANSI T5 ball bearings were coated with approximately 10 nm of nickel-copper followed by 100 nm of silver using a dc ion plating process. The balls were then tested for RCF in vacuum in the 10{sup -7} Torr range at 130 Hz rotational speed and at 4.1 GPa Hertzian contact stress. The significance of this work is in the extension of RCF testing to an ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) application using silver as a lubricant instead of oil. The effects of pressure and voltage on the ion plating process were also investigated using scanning electron microscopy and RCF life testing in UHV. Test results with a ball size of 5/16 in. in UHV show that deposition at voltages greater than 2.5 kV shortens the RCF life and introduces a unique failure mode. Voltage and pressure fluctuations during the deposition process result in significant thickness monitor measurement errors as well. A regulator control scheme that minimizes the process pressure overshoot is also simulated.

  7. Investigation of vacuum properties of CuCrZr alloy for high-heat-load absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shueh, C.; Chan, C. K.; Chang, C. C.; Sheng, I. C.

    2017-01-01

    The Taiwan Photon Source (TPS) uses high-heat-load (HHL) absorbers to protect downstream ultrahigh-vacuum chambers from overheating. In this work, we propose to use the CuCrZr alloy (ASTM C18150) for the HHL absorber body and the ConFlat flanges. We use the throughput method to measure the thermal outgassing rate and a helium leak detector to verify the vacuum seal between the CuCrZr alloy and stainless-steel flanges. The measured outgassing rate of the CuCrZr alloy was 5.8×10-10 Pa m/s after 72 h of pumping and decreased to 2.0 × 10-10 Pa m/s after 100 h of pumping. The leak rate through the vacuum seal between a CuCrZr flange and a stainless-steel flange was less than 1 × 10-10 Pa m3/s even after mounting and unmounting the flanges ten times and baking them at 250 °C. These results indicate that CuCrZr alloy is suitable for integrating HHL components with ConFlat CuCrZr flanges for the absorption of the synchrotron radiation generated by the TPS.

  8. Development of fast heating electron beam annealing setup for ultra high vacuum chamber.

    PubMed

    Das, Sadhan Chandra; Majumdar, Abhijit; Katiyal, Sumant; Shripathi, T; Hippler, R

    2014-02-01

    We report the design and development of a simple, electrically low powered and fast heating versatile electron beam annealing setup (up to 1000 °C) working with ultra high vacuum (UHV) chamber for annealing thin films and multilayer structures. The important features of the system are constant temperature control in UHV conditions for the temperature range from room temperature to 1000 ºC with sufficient power of 330 W, at constant vacuum during annealing treatment. It takes approximately 6 min to reach 1000 °C from room temperature (∼10(-6) mbar) and 45 min to cool down without any extra cooling. The annealing setup consists of a UHV chamber, sample holder, heating arrangement mounted on suitable UHV electrical feed-through and electronic control and feedback systems to control the temperature within ±1 ºC of set value. The outside of the vacuum chamber is cooled by cold air of 20 °C of air conditioning machine used for the laboratory, so that chamber temperature does not go beyond 50 °C when target temperature is maximum. The probability of surface oxidation or surface contamination during annealing is examined by means of x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of virgin Cu sample annealed at 1000 °C.

  9. Development of fast heating electron beam annealing setup for ultra high vacuum chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Sadhan Chandra; Majumdar, Abhijit E-mail: majumdar@uni-greifswald.de; Hippler, R.; Katiyal, Sumant; Shripathi, T.

    2014-02-15

    We report the design and development of a simple, electrically low powered and fast heating versatile electron beam annealing setup (up to 1000 °C) working with ultra high vacuum (UHV) chamber for annealing thin films and multilayer structures. The important features of the system are constant temperature control in UHV conditions for the temperature range from room temperature to 1000 ºC with sufficient power of 330 W, at constant vacuum during annealing treatment. It takes approximately 6 min to reach 1000 °C from room temperature (∼10{sup −6} mbar) and 45 min to cool down without any extra cooling. The annealing setup consists of a UHV chamber, sample holder, heating arrangement mounted on suitable UHV electrical feed-through and electronic control and feedback systems to control the temperature within ±1 ºC of set value. The outside of the vacuum chamber is cooled by cold air of 20 °C of air conditioning machine used for the laboratory, so that chamber temperature does not go beyond 50 °C when target temperature is maximum. The probability of surface oxidation or surface contamination during annealing is examined by means of x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of virgin Cu sample annealed at 1000 °C.

  10. Development of fast heating electron beam annealing setup for ultra high vacuum chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Sadhan Chandra; Majumdar, Abhijit; Katiyal, Sumant; Shripathi, T.; Hippler, R.

    2014-02-01

    We report the design and development of a simple, electrically low powered and fast heating versatile electron beam annealing setup (up to 1000 °C) working with ultra high vacuum (UHV) chamber for annealing thin films and multilayer structures. The important features of the system are constant temperature control in UHV conditions for the temperature range from room temperature to 1000 °C with sufficient power of 330 W, at constant vacuum during annealing treatment. It takes approximately 6 min to reach 1000 °C from room temperature (˜10-6 mbar) and 45 min to cool down without any extra cooling. The annealing setup consists of a UHV chamber, sample holder, heating arrangement mounted on suitable UHV electrical feed-through and electronic control and feedback systems to control the temperature within ±1 °C of set value. The outside of the vacuum chamber is cooled by cold air of 20 °C of air conditioning machine used for the laboratory, so that chamber temperature does not go beyond 50 °C when target temperature is maximum. The probability of surface oxidation or surface contamination during annealing is examined by means of x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of virgin Cu sample annealed at 1000 °C.

  11. High-Speed Automated Tester for Vacuum Chamber Feedthrough Connectors and Cables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swope, Robert H.; Powers, Edward I. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Goddard Space Flight Center's thermal vacuum laboratory has developed a high-speed automated system for testing the integrity of 37-pin MIL-C-5015 cylindrical electrical feedthrough connectors used on penetration plates of thermal vacuum chambers. The system consists of a desktop PC driving a data acquisition front end. The latter measures the resistance through each pin of the connector and the resistance from each pin to all other pins and the connector shell. In addition to identifying unacceptable feedthroughs, the system is also used for testing cables. In the special case of Type T thermocouples (used almost exclusively at the lab), the difference in resistance between the copper and constantan wires provides positive proof of accidentally reversed connector wiring. Data acquisition time to completely test a cable or feedthrough connector is less than thirty seconds. The system provides a hardcopy printout of the resistance readings. Connectors or cables with fewer wires are tested using simple adapter cables. Initial tests indicate that the performance of a given feedthrough connector can be predicted on the basis of measured resistance readings, reducing ongoing cost of connector replacement. The opportunity to positively certify the integrity of cables, cable connectors and feedthroughs before the start of a thermal vacuum test minimizes the likelihood of a circuit problem that would require returning the chamber to ambient conditions for repair. This system has two principal advantages for the Goddard thermal vacuum laboratory. Its only significant cost was the labor to fabricate the test cable and shorting cable -- about 40 man-hours total. The system was built around a computer and data acquisition unit that were already on hand. The second advantage is that it very quickly tests both of the parameters that are essential.

  12. General information for operation of the high-temperature electromagnetic containerless vacuum induction furnace

    SciTech Connect

    Hahs, C.A.; Fox, R.J.

    1994-06-01

    The High-Temperature Electromagnetic Containerless Vacuum Induction Furnace was developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Marshall Space Flight Center, Alabama. The high-efficiency radio-frequency system developed for the conceptual design of the Modular Electromagnetic Levitator was created to evaluate this hardware on the KC135 microgravity airplane operated by NASA. Near-future KC135 flights are being planned to levitate, melt, and undercool 5-mm samples of niobium. General information on the operation of this hardware is included.

  13. Development of High Power Electron Beam Measuring and Analyzing System for Microwave Vacuum Electron Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruan, C. J.; Wu, X. L.; Li, Q. S.; Li, C. S.

    The measurement and analysis of high power electron beam during its formation and transmission are the basic scientific problems and key techniques for the development of high performance microwave vacuum electron devices, which are widely used in the fields of military weapon, microwave system and scientific instruments. In this paper, the dynamic parameters measurement and analysis system being built in Institute of Electronics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (IECAS) recently are introduced. The instrument are designed to determine the cross-section, the current density, and the energy resolution of the high power electron beam during its formation and transmission process, which are available both for the electron gun and the electron optics system respectively. Then the three dimension trajectory images of the electron beam can be rebuilt and display with computer controlled data acquisition and processing system easily. Thus, much more complicated structures are considered and solved completely to achieve its detection and analysis, such as big chamber with 10-6 Pa high vacuum system, the controlled detector movement system in axis direction with distance of 600 mm inside the vacuum chamber, the electron beam energy analysis system with high resolution of 0.5%, and the electron beam cross-section and density detector using the YAG: Ce crystal and CCD imaging system et al. At present, the key parts of the instrument have been finished, the cross-section experiment of the electron beam have been performed successfully. Hereafter, the instrument will be used to measure and analyze the electron beam with the electron gun and electron optics system for the single beam and multiple beam klystron, gyrotron, sheet beam device, and traveling wave tube etc. thoroughly.

  14. Mercury Conditions for the MESSENGER Mission Simulated in High- Solar-Radiation Vacuum Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, Wayne A.

    2003-01-01

    The MESSENGER (Mercury Surface, Space Environment, Geochemistry, and Ranging) spacecraft, planned for launch in March 2004, will perform two flybys of Mercury before entering a year-long orbit of the planet in September 2009. The mission will provide opportunities for detailed characterization of the surface, interior, atmosphere, and magnetosphere of the closest planet to the Sun. The NASA Glenn Research Center and the MESSENGER spacecraft integrator, the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, have partnered under a Space Act Agreement to characterize a variety of critical components and materials under simulated conditions expected near Mercury. Glenn's Vacuum Facility 6, which is equipped with a solar simulator, can simulate the vacuum and high solar radiation anticipated in Mercury orbit. The MESSENGER test hardware includes a variety of materials and components that are being characterized during the Tank 6 vacuum tests, where the hardware will be exposed to up to 11 suns insolation, simulating conditions expected in Mercury orbit. In 2002, ten solar vacuum tests were conducted, including beginning of life, end of life, backside exposure, and solar panel thermal shock cycling tests. Components tested include candidate solar array panels, sensors, thermal shielding materials, and communication devices. As an example, for the solar panel thermal shock cycling test, two candidate solar array panels were suspended on a lift mechanism that lowered the panels into a liquid-nitrogen-cooled box. After reaching -140 C, the panels were then lifted out of the box and exposed to the equivalent of 6 suns (8.1 kilowatts per square meters). After five cold soak/heating cycles were completed successfully, there was no apparent degradation in panel performance. An anticipated 100-hr thermal shield life test is planned for autumn, followed by solar panel flight qualification tests in winter. Glenn's ongoing support to the MESSENGER program has been instrumental in

  15. Some Questions of Vacuum Technology during the Deposition of Thin Films,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The structure and properties of thin films obtained by thermal vaporization in a vacuum are determined to a considerable degree by the conditions of condensation and depend on temperature of vaporization, rate of condensation, and angle of incidence of deposited substance on the base layer; nature of the base layer, its degree of purity, and microrelief of the

  16. High vacuum tip-enhanced Raman spectroscope based on a scanning tunneling microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Yurui; Zhang, Zhenglong; Sun, Mengtao

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we present the construction of a high-vacuum tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (HV-TERS) system that allows in situ sample preparation and measurement. A detailed description of the prototype instrument is presented with experimental validation of its use and novel ex situ experimental results using the HV-TERS system. The HV-TERS system includes three chambers held under a 10-7 Pa vacuum. The three chambers are an analysis chamber, a sample preparation chamber, and a fast loading chamber. The analysis chamber is the core chamber and contains a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) and a Raman detector coupled with a 50 × 0.5 numerical aperture objective. The sample preparation chamber is used to produce single-crystalline metal and sub-monolayer molecular films by molecular beam epitaxy. The fast loading chamber allows ex situ preparation of samples for HV-TERS analysis. Atomic resolution can be achieved by the STM on highly ordered pyrolytic graphite. We demonstrate the measurement of localized temperature using the Stokes and anti-Stokes TERS signals from a monolayer of 1,2-benzenedithiol on a gold film using a gold tip. Additionally, plasmonic catalysis can be monitored label-free at the nanoscale using our device. Moreover, the HV-TERS experiments show simultaneously activated infrared and Raman vibrational modes, Fermi resonance, and some other non-linear effects that are not observed in atmospheric TERS experiments. The high spatial and spectral resolution and pure environment of high vacuum are beneficial for basic surface studies.

  17. First high-convergence cryogenic implosion in a near-vacuum hohlraum

    SciTech Connect

    Berzak Hopkins, L.  F.; Meezan, N.  B.; Le Pape, S.; Divol, L.; Mackinnon, A.  J.; Ho, D.  D.; Hohenberger, M.; Jones, O.  S.; Kyrala, G.; Milovich, J.  L.; Pak, A.; Ralph, J.  E.; Ross, J.  S.; Benedetti, L.  R.; Biener, J.; Bionta, R.; Bond, E.; Bradley, D.; Caggiano, J.; Callahan, D.; Cerjan, C.; Church, J.; Clark, D.; Döppner, T.; Dylla-Spears, R.; Eckart, M.; Edgell, D.; Field, J.; Fittinghoff, D.  N.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Grim, G.; Guler, N.; Haan, S.; Hamza, A.; Hartouni, E.  P.; Hatarik, R.; Herrmann, H.  W.; Hinkel, D.; Hoover, D.; Huang, H.; Izumi, N.; Khan, S.; Kozioziemski, B.; Kroll, J.; Ma, T.; MacPhee, A.; McNaney, J.; Merrill, F.; Moody, J.; Nikroo, A.; Patel, P.; Robey, H.  F.; Rygg, J.  R.; Sater, J.; Sayre, D.; Schneider, M.; Sepke, S.; Stadermann, M.; Stoeffl, W.; Thomas, C.; Town, R.  P. J.; Volegov, P.  L.; Wild, C.; Wilde, C.; Woerner, E.; Yeamans, C.; Yoxall, B.; Kilkenny, J.; Landen, O.  L.; Hsing, W.; Edwards, M.  J.

    2015-04-29

    Recent experiments on the National Ignition Facility [M. J. Edwards et al., Phys. Plasmas 20, 070501 (2013)] demonstrate that utilizing a near-vacuum hohlraum (low pressure gas-filled) is a viable option for high convergence cryogenic deuterium-tritium (DT) layered capsule implosions. This is made possible by using a dense ablator (high-density carbon), which shortens the drive duration needed to achieve high convergence: a measured 40% higher hohlraum efficiency than typical gas-filled hohlraums, which requires less laser energy going into the hohlraum, and an observed better symmetry control than anticipated by standard hydrodynamics simulations. The first series of near-vacuum hohlraum experiments culminated in a 6.8 ns, 1.2 MJ laser pulse driving a 2-shock, high adiabat (α ~ 3.5) cryogenic DT layered high density carbon capsule. This resulted in one of the best performances so far on the NIF relative to laser energy, with a measured primary neutron yield of 1.8 X 10¹⁵ neutrons, with 20% calculated alpha heating at convergence ~27X.

  18. First High-Convergence Cryogenic Implosion in a Near-Vacuum Hohlraum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Meezan, N. B.; Le Pape, S.; Divol, L.; Mackinnon, A. J.; Ho, D. D.; Hohenberger, M.; Jones, O. S.; Kyrala, G.; Milovich, J. L.; Pak, A.; Ralph, J. E.; Ross, J. S.; Benedetti, L. R.; Biener, J.; Bionta, R.; Bond, E.; Bradley, D.; Caggiano, J.; Callahan, D.; Cerjan, C.; Church, J.; Clark, D.; Döppner, T.; Dylla-Spears, R.; Eckart, M.; Edgell, D.; Field, J.; Fittinghoff, D. N.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Grim, G.; Guler, N.; Haan, S.; Hamza, A.; Hartouni, E. P.; Hatarik, R.; Herrmann, H. W.; Hinkel, D.; Hoover, D.; Huang, H.; Izumi, N.; Khan, S.; Kozioziemski, B.; Kroll, J.; Ma, T.; MacPhee, A.; McNaney, J.; Merrill, F.; Moody, J.; Nikroo, A.; Patel, P.; Robey, H. F.; Rygg, J. R.; Sater, J.; Sayre, D.; Schneider, M.; Sepke, S.; Stadermann, M.; Stoeffl, W.; Thomas, C.; Town, R. P. J.; Volegov, P. L.; Wild, C.; Wilde, C.; Woerner, E.; Yeamans, C.; Yoxall, B.; Kilkenny, J.; Landen, O. L.; Hsing, W.; Edwards, M. J.

    2015-05-01

    Recent experiments on the National Ignition Facility [M. J. Edwards et al., Phys. Plasmas 20, 070501 (2013)] demonstrate that utilizing a near-vacuum hohlraum (low pressure gas-filled) is a viable option for high convergence cryogenic deuterium-tritium (DT) layered capsule implosions. This is made possible by using a dense ablator (high-density carbon), which shortens the drive duration needed to achieve high convergence: a measured 40% higher hohlraum efficiency than typical gas-filled hohlraums, which requires less laser energy going into the hohlraum, and an observed better symmetry control than anticipated by standard hydrodynamics simulations. The first series of near-vacuum hohlraum experiments culminated in a 6.8 ns, 1.2 MJ laser pulse driving a 2-shock, high adiabat (α ˜3.5 ) cryogenic DT layered high density carbon capsule. This resulted in one of the best performances so far on the NIF relative to laser energy, with a measured primary neutron yield of 1.8 ×1015 neutrons, with 20% calculated alpha heating at convergence ˜27 × .

  19. Ultra-high vacuum compatible induction-heated rod casting furnace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, A.; Neubauer, A.; Münzer, W.; Regnat, A.; Benka, G.; Meven, M.; Pedersen, B.; Pfleiderer, C.

    2016-06-01

    We report the design of a radio-frequency induction-heated rod casting furnace that permits the preparation of polycrystalline ingots of intermetallic compounds under ultra-high vacuum compatible conditions. The central part of the system is a bespoke water-cooled Hukin crucible supporting a casting mold. Depending on the choice of the mold, typical rods have a diameter between 6 mm and 10 mm and a length up to 90 mm, suitable for single-crystal growth by means of float-zoning. The setup is all-metal sealed and may be baked out. We find that the resulting ultra-high vacuum represents an important precondition for processing compounds with high vapor pressures under a high-purity argon atmosphere up to 3 bars. Using the rod casting furnace, we succeeded to prepare large high-quality single crystals of two half-Heusler compounds, namely, the itinerant antiferromagnet CuMnSb and the half-metallic ferromagnet NiMnSb.

  20. Ultra-high vacuum compatible induction-heated rod casting furnace.

    PubMed

    Bauer, A; Neubauer, A; Münzer, W; Regnat, A; Benka, G; Meven, M; Pedersen, B; Pfleiderer, C

    2016-06-01

    We report the design of a radio-frequency induction-heated rod casting furnace that permits the preparation of polycrystalline ingots of intermetallic compounds under ultra-high vacuum compatible conditions. The central part of the system is a bespoke water-cooled Hukin crucible supporting a casting mold. Depending on the choice of the mold, typical rods have a diameter between 6 mm and 10 mm and a length up to 90 mm, suitable for single-crystal growth by means of float-zoning. The setup is all-metal sealed and may be baked out. We find that the resulting ultra-high vacuum represents an important precondition for processing compounds with high vapor pressures under a high-purity argon atmosphere up to 3 bars. Using the rod casting furnace, we succeeded to prepare large high-quality single crystals of two half-Heusler compounds, namely, the itinerant antiferromagnet CuMnSb and the half-metallic ferromagnet NiMnSb.

  1. First high-convergence cryogenic implosion in a near-vacuum hohlraum

    DOE PAGES

    Berzak Hopkins, L.  F.; Meezan, N.  B.; Le Pape, S.; ...

    2015-04-29

    Recent experiments on the National Ignition Facility [M. J. Edwards et al., Phys. Plasmas 20, 070501 (2013)] demonstrate that utilizing a near-vacuum hohlraum (low pressure gas-filled) is a viable option for high convergence cryogenic deuterium-tritium (DT) layered capsule implosions. This is made possible by using a dense ablator (high-density carbon), which shortens the drive duration needed to achieve high convergence: a measured 40% higher hohlraum efficiency than typical gas-filled hohlraums, which requires less laser energy going into the hohlraum, and an observed better symmetry control than anticipated by standard hydrodynamics simulations. The first series of near-vacuum hohlraum experiments culminated inmore » a 6.8 ns, 1.2 MJ laser pulse driving a 2-shock, high adiabat (α ~ 3.5) cryogenic DT layered high density carbon capsule. This resulted in one of the best performances so far on the NIF relative to laser energy, with a measured primary neutron yield of 1.8 X 10¹⁵ neutrons, with 20% calculated alpha heating at convergence ~27X.« less

  2. First high-convergence cryogenic implosion in a near-vacuum hohlraum.

    PubMed

    Berzak Hopkins, L F; Meezan, N B; Le Pape, S; Divol, L; Mackinnon, A J; Ho, D D; Hohenberger, M; Jones, O S; Kyrala, G; Milovich, J L; Pak, A; Ralph, J E; Ross, J S; Benedetti, L R; Biener, J; Bionta, R; Bond, E; Bradley, D; Caggiano, J; Callahan, D; Cerjan, C; Church, J; Clark, D; Döppner, T; Dylla-Spears, R; Eckart, M; Edgell, D; Field, J; Fittinghoff, D N; Gatu Johnson, M; Grim, G; Guler, N; Haan, S; Hamza, A; Hartouni, E P; Hatarik, R; Herrmann, H W; Hinkel, D; Hoover, D; Huang, H; Izumi, N; Khan, S; Kozioziemski, B; Kroll, J; Ma, T; MacPhee, A; McNaney, J; Merrill, F; Moody, J; Nikroo, A; Patel, P; Robey, H F; Rygg, J R; Sater, J; Sayre, D; Schneider, M; Sepke, S; Stadermann, M; Stoeffl, W; Thomas, C; Town, R P J; Volegov, P L; Wild, C; Wilde, C; Woerner, E; Yeamans, C; Yoxall, B; Kilkenny, J; Landen, O L; Hsing, W; Edwards, M J

    2015-05-01

    Recent experiments on the National Ignition Facility [M. J. Edwards et al., Phys. Plasmas 20, 070501 (2013)] demonstrate that utilizing a near-vacuum hohlraum (low pressure gas-filled) is a viable option for high convergence cryogenic deuterium-tritium (DT) layered capsule implosions. This is made possible by using a dense ablator (high-density carbon), which shortens the drive duration needed to achieve high convergence: a measured 40% higher hohlraum efficiency than typical gas-filled hohlraums, which requires less laser energy going into the hohlraum, and an observed better symmetry control than anticipated by standard hydrodynamics simulations. The first series of near-vacuum hohlraum experiments culminated in a 6.8 ns, 1.2 MJ laser pulse driving a 2-shock, high adiabat (α∼3.5) cryogenic DT layered high density carbon capsule. This resulted in one of the best performances so far on the NIF relative to laser energy, with a measured primary neutron yield of 1.8×10(15) neutrons, with 20% calculated alpha heating at convergence ∼27×.

  3. 75 FR 76019 - Compliance Policy Guide Sec. 390.500 Definition of “High-Voltage Vacuum Switch”-21 CFR 1002.61(a...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-07

    ...-Voltage Vacuum Switch''--21 CFR 1002.61(a)(3) and (b)(2); Withdrawal of Guidance AGENCY: Food and Drug... the withdrawal of Compliance Policy Guide Sec. 390.500 Definition of ``High-Voltage Vacuum...

  4. High temperature solar thermal technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leibowitz, L. P.; Hanseth, E. J.; Peelgren, M. L.

    1980-01-01

    Some advanced technology concepts under development for high-temperature solar thermal energy systems to achieve significant energy cost reductions and performance gains and thus promote the application of solar thermal power technology are presented. Consideration is given to the objectives, current efforts and recent test and analysis results in the development of high-temperature (950-1650 C) ceramic receivers, thermal storage module checker stoves, and the use of reversible chemical reactions to transport collected solar energy. It is pointed out that the analysis and testing of such components will accelerate the commercial deployment of solar energy.

  5. High temperature solar thermal technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leibowitz, L. P.; Hanseth, E. J.; Peelgren, M. L.

    1980-11-01

    Some advanced technology concepts under development for high-temperature solar thermal energy systems to achieve significant energy cost reductions and performance gains and thus promote the application of solar thermal power technology are presented. Consideration is given to the objectives, current efforts and recent test and analysis results in the development of high-temperature (950-1650 C) ceramic receivers, thermal storage module checker stoves, and the use of reversible chemical reactions to transport collected solar energy. It is pointed out that the analysis and testing of such components will accelerate the commercial deployment of solar energy.

  6. Ultra-high vacuum surface analysis study of rhodopsin incorporation into supported lipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Michel, Roger; Subramaniam, Varuni; McArthur, Sally L; Bondurant, Bruce; D'Ambruoso, Gemma D; Hall, Henry K; Brown, Michael F; Ross, Eric E; Saavedra, S Scott; Castner, David G

    2008-05-06

    Planar supported lipid bilayers that are stable under ambient atmospheric and ultra-high-vacuum conditions were prepared by cross-linking polymerization of bis-sorbylphosphatidylcholine (bis-SorbPC). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) were employed to investigate bilayers that were cross-linked using either redox-initiated radical polymerization or ultraviolet photopolymerization. The redox method yields a more structurally intact bilayer; however, the UV method is more compatible with incorporation of transmembrane proteins. UV polymerization was therefore used to prepare cross-linked bilayers with incorporated bovine rhodopsin, a light-activated, G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). A previous study (Subramaniam, V.; Alves, I. D.; Salgado, G. F. J.; Lau, P. W.; Wysocki, R. J.; Salamon, Z.; Tollin, G.; Hruby, V. J.; Brown, M. F.; Saavedra, S. S. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2005, 127, 5320-5321) showed that rhodopsin retains photoactivity after incorporation into UV-polymerized bis-SorbPC, but did not address how the protein is associated with the bilayer. In this study, we show that rhodopsin is retained in supported bilayers of poly(bis-SorbPC) under ultra-high-vacuum conditions, on the basis of the increase in the XPS nitrogen concentration and the presence of characteristic amino acid peaks in the ToF-SIMS data. Angle-resolved XPS data show that the protein is inserted into the bilayer, rather than adsorbed on the bilayer surface. This is the first study to demonstrate the use of ultra-high-vacuum techniques for structural studies of supported proteolipid bilayers.

  7. MEMS scanning laser projection based on high-Q vacuum packaged 2D-resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, U.; Eisermann, C.; Quenzer, H.-J.; Janes, J.; Schroeder, C.; Schwarzelbach, O.; Jensen, B.; Ratzmann, L.; Giese, T.; Senger, F.; Hagge, J.; Weiss, M.; Wagner, B.; Benecke, W.

    2011-03-01

    Small size, low power consumption and the capability to produce sharp images without need of an objective make MEMS scanning laser based pico-projectors an attractive solution for embedded cell-phone projection displays. To fulfil the high image resolution demands the MEMS scanning mirror has to show large scan angles, a large mirror aperture size and a high scan frequency. An additional important requirement in pico-projector applications is to minimize power consumption of the MEMS scanner to enable a long video projection time. Typically high losses in power are caused by gas damping. For that reason Fraunhofer ISIT has established a fabrication process for 2D-MEMS mirrors that includes vacuum encapsulation on 8-inch wafers. Quality factors as high as 145,000 require dedicated closed loop phase control electronics to enable stable image projection even at rapidly changing laser intensities. A capacitive feedback signal is the basis for controlling the 2D MEMS oscillation and for synchronising the laser sources. This paper reports on fabrication of two-axis wafer level vacuum packaged scanning micromirrors and its use in a compact laser projection display. The paper presents different approaches of overcoming the well-known reflex problem of packaged MEMS scanning mirrors.

  8. The reduction and distillation of isotopically enriched zinc oxides under high vacuum conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcus, C.; Zevenbergen, L. A.

    1999-12-01

    Historically, enriched zinc (Zn) metal was produced at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Isotope Enrichment Facility (IEF) by either electrodeposition, followed by melting to produce a metal ingot, or purified by hydrogen reduction and distillation at atmospheric pressure in a tube furnace as a prelude to electroplating. Electroplated material was generally poor in quality, and losses were high during subsequent melting. Adapting the distillation purifying technique as an ultimate means of recovery of Zn metal proved to be difficult and inefficient. To resolve these problems, the well-established vacuum reduction/distillation process was adapted for the conversion of Zn oxide to metal.

  9. O-Ring sealing arrangements for ultra-high vacuum systems

    DOEpatents

    Kim, Chang-Kyo; Flaherty, Robert

    1981-01-01

    An all metal reusable O-ring sealing arrangement for sealing two concentric tubes in an ultra-high vacuum system. An O-ring of a heat recoverable alloy such as Nitinol is concentrically positioned between protruding sealing rings of the concentric tubes. The O-ring is installed between the tubes while in a stressed martensitic state and is made to undergo a thermally induced transformation to an austenitic state. During the transformation the O-ring expands outwardly and contracts inwardly toward a previously sized austenitic configuration, thereby sealing against the protruding sealing rings of the concentric tubes.

  10. A Versatile High-Vacuum Cryo-transfer System for Cryo-microscopy and Analytics

    PubMed Central

    Tacke, Sebastian; Krzyzanek, Vladislav; Nüsse, Harald; Wepf, Roger Albert; Klingauf, Jürgen; Reichelt, Rudolf

    2016-01-01

    Cryogenic microscopy methods have gained increasing popularity, as they offer an unaltered view on the architecture of biological specimens. As a prerequisite, samples must be handled under cryogenic conditions below their recrystallization temperature, and contamination during sample transfer and handling must be prevented. We present a high-vacuum cryo-transfer system that streamlines the entire handling of frozen-hydrated samples from the vitrification process to low temperature imaging for scanning transmission electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. A template for cryo-electron microscopy and multimodal cryo-imaging approaches with numerous sample transfer steps is presented. PMID:26910419

  11. Vacuum Seed Sowing Manifold: a novel device for high-throughput sowing of Arabidopsis seeds

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The small size of Arabidopsis provides both opportunities and difficulties for laboratory research. Large numbers of plants can be grown in a relatively small area making it easy to observe and investigate interesting phenotypes. Conversely, their small size can also make it difficult to obtain large quantities of tissue for investigation using modern molecular techniques. Sowing large numbers of their seed can overcome this; however, their small seed size makes this difficult. Here we present the Vacuum Seed Sowing Manifold (VSSM), a simple device that can be printed using a 3D printer and provides a new high throughput method to sow large numbers of seeds at a range of densities. PMID:24148867

  12. Thermocouples of molybdenum and iridium alloys for more stable vacuum-high temperature performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, J. F. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    Thermocouples providing stability and performance reliability in systems involving high temperatures and vacuums by employing a bimetallic thermocouple sensor are described. Each metal of the sensor is selected from a group of metals comprising molybdenum and iridium and alloys containing only those two metals. The molybdenum, iridium thermocouple sensor alloys provide bare metal thermocouple sensors having advantageous vapor pressure compatibility and performance characteristics. The compatibility and physical characteristics of the thermocouple sensor alloys result in improved emf, temperature properties and thermocouple hot junction performance.

  13. Air sparging/high vacuum extraction to remove chlorinated solvents in groundwater and soil

    SciTech Connect

    Phelan, J.M.; Gilliat, M.D.

    1998-11-01

    An air sparging and high vacuum extraction was installed as an alternative to a containment pump and treat system to reduce the long-term remediation schedule. The site is located at the DOE Mound facility in Miamisburg, Ohio, just south of Dayton. The air sparging system consists of 23 wells interspersed between 17 soil vapor extraction wells. The SVE system has extracted about 1,500 lbs of VOCs in five months. The air sparging system operated for about 6 weeks before shutdown due to suspected biochemical fouling. Technical data are presented on the operating characteristics of the system.

  14. Low loss hollow optical-waveguide connection from atmospheric pressure to ultra-high vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Ermolov, A.; Mak, K. F.; Tani, F.; Hölzer, P.; Travers, J. C.; Russell, P. St. J.

    2013-12-23

    A technique for optically accessing ultra-high vacuum environments, via a photonic-crystal fiber with a long small hollow core, is described. The small core and the long bore enable a pressure ratio of over 10{sup 8} to be maintained between two environments, while permitting efficient and unimpeded delivery of light, including ultrashort optical pulses. This delivery can be either passive or can encompass nonlinear optical processes such as optical pulse compression, deep UV generation, supercontinuum generation, or other useful phenomena.

  15. Development of high-vacuum planar magnetron sputtering using an advanced magnetic field geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Ohno, Takahiro; Yagyu, Daisuke; Saito, Shigeru Ohno, Yasunori; Itoh, Masatoshi; Uhara, Yoshio; Miura, Tsutomu; Nakano, Hirofumi

    2015-11-15

    A permanent magnet in a new magnetic field geometry (namely, with the magnetization in the radial direction) was fabricated and used for high-vacuum planar magnetron sputtering using Penning discharge. Because of the development of this magnet, the discharge current and deposition rate were increased two to three times in comparison with the values attainable with a magnet in the conventional geometry. This improvement was because the available space for effective discharge of the energetic electrons for the ionization increased because the magnetic field distribution increased in both the axial and radial directions of discharge.

  16. Housing protects laser in vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canali, V. G.

    1978-01-01

    Airtight housing encloses laser for easy alinement and operation in high-vacuum chamber. Beam is transmitted through window into vacuum chamber. Flexible line runs through vacuum chamber to outside, maintaining laser enclosure at atmospheric pressure.

  17. Extension of the shelf life of prawns (Penaeus japonicus) by vacuum packaging and high-pressure treatment.

    PubMed

    López-Caballero, M E; Pérez-Mateos, M; Borderías, J A; Montero, P

    2000-10-01

    The present study has investigated the application of high pressures (200 and 400 MPa) in chilled prawn tails, both conventionally stored (air) and vacuum packaged. Vacuum packaging and high-pressure treatment did extend the shelf life of the prawn samples, although it did affect muscle color very slightly, giving it a whiter appearance. The viable shelf life of 1 week for the air-stored samples was extended to 21 days in the vacuum-packed samples, 28 days in the samples treated at 200 MPa, and 35 days in the samples pressurized at 400 MPa. Vacuum packaging checked the onset of blackening, whereas high-pressure treatment aggravated the problem. From a microbiological point of view, batches conventionally stored reached about 6 log CFU/g or even higher at 14 days. Similar figures were reached in total number of bacteria in vacuum-packed samples and in pressurized at 200-MPa samples at 21 days. When samples were pressurized at 400 MPa, total numbers of bacteria were below 5.5 log CFU/g at 35 days of storage. Consequently, a combination of vacuum packaging and high-pressure treatment would appear to be beneficial in prolonging freshness and preventing spotting.

  18. High Efficiency Engine Technologies Program

    SciTech Connect

    Rich Kruiswyk

    2010-07-13

    Caterpillar's Product Development and Global Technology Division carried out a research program on waste heat recovery with support from DOE (Department of Energy) and the DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory. The objective of the program was to develop a new air management and exhaust energy recovery system that would demonstrate a minimum 10% improvement in thermal efficiency over a base heavy-duty on-highway diesel truck engine. The base engine for this program was a 2007 C15 15.2L series-turbocharged on-highway truck engine with a LPL (low-pressure loop) exhaust recirculation system. The focus of the program was on the development of high efficiency turbomachinery and a high efficiency turbocompound waste heat recovery system. The focus of each area of development was as follows: (1) For turbine stages, the focus was on investigation and development of technologies that would improve on-engine exhaust energy utilization compared to the conventional radial turbines in widespread use today. (2) For compressor stages, the focus was on investigating compressor wheel design parameters beyond the range typically utilized in production, to determine the potential efficiency benefits thereof. (3) For turbocompound, the focus was on the development of a robust bearing system that would provide higher bearing efficiencies compared to systems used in turbocompound power turbines in production. None of the turbocharger technologies investigated involved addition of moving parts, actuators, or exotic materials, thereby increasing the likelihood of a favorable cost-value tradeoff for each technology. And the turbocompound system requires less hardware addition than competing bottoming cycle technologies, making it a more attractive solution from a cost and packaging standpoint. Main outcomes of the program are as follows: (1) Two turbine technologies that demonstrated up to 6% improvement in turbine efficiency on gas stand and 1-3% improvement in thermal efficiency in

  19. High Performance Tools And Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Collette, M R; Corey, I R; Johnson, J R

    2005-01-24

    This goal of this project was to evaluate the capability and limits of current scientific simulation development tools and technologies with specific focus on their suitability for use with the next generation of scientific parallel applications and High Performance Computing (HPC) platforms. The opinions expressed in this document are those of the authors, and reflect the authors' current understanding and functionality of the many tools investigated. As a deliverable for this effort, we are presenting this report describing our findings along with an associated spreadsheet outlining current capabilities and characteristics of leading and emerging tools in the high performance computing arena. This first chapter summarizes our findings (which are detailed in the other chapters) and presents our conclusions, remarks, and anticipations for the future. In the second chapter, we detail how various teams in our local high performance community utilize HPC tools and technologies, and mention some common concerns they have about them. In the third chapter, we review the platforms currently or potentially available to utilize these tools and technologies on to help in software development. Subsequent chapters attempt to provide an exhaustive overview of the available parallel software development tools and technologies, including their strong and weak points and future concerns. We categorize them as debuggers, memory checkers, performance analysis tools, communication libraries, data visualization programs, and other parallel development aides. The last chapter contains our closing information. Included with this paper at the end is a table of the discussed development tools and their operational environment.

  20. Near-vacuum hohlraums for driving fusion implosions with high density carbon ablatorsa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Le Pape, S.; Divol, L.; Meezan, N. B.; Mackinnon, A. J.; Ho, D. D.; Jones, O. S.; Khan, S.; Milovich, J. L.; Ross, J. S.; Amendt, P.; Casey, D.; Celliers, P. M.; Pak, A.; Peterson, J. L.; Ralph, J.; Rygg, J. R.

    2015-05-01

    Recent experiments at the National Ignition Facility [M. J. Edwards et al., Phys. Plasmas 20, 070501 (2013)] have explored driving high-density carbon ablators with near-vacuum hohlraums, which use a minimal amount of helium gas fill. These hohlraums show improved efficiency relative to conventional gas-filled hohlraums in terms of minimal backscatter, minimal generation of suprathermal electrons, and increased hohlraum-capsule coupling. Given these advantages, near-vacuum hohlraums are a promising choice for pursuing high neutron yield implosions. Long pulse symmetry control, though, remains a challenge, as the hohlraum volume fills with material. Two mitigation methodologies have been explored, dynamic beam phasing and increased case-to-capsule ratio (larger hohlraum size relative to capsule). Unexpectedly, experiments have demonstrated that the inner laser beam propagation is better than predicted by nominal simulations, and an enhanced beam propagation model is required to match measured hot spot symmetry. Ongoing work is focused on developing a physical model which captures this enhanced propagation and on utilizing the enhanced propagation to drive longer laser pulses than originally predicted in order to reach alpha-heating dominated neutron yields.

  1. High-Sensitivity, Broad-Range Vacuum Gauge Using Nanotubes for Micromachined Cavities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manohara, Harish; Kaul, Anupama B.

    2011-01-01

    A broad-range vacuum gauge has been created by suspending a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) (metallic or semiconducting) in a Schottky diode format or in a bridge conductor format, between two electrically charged mesas. SWNTs are highly sensitive to molecular collisions because of their extremely small diameters in the range of 1 to 3 nanometers. The measurement parameter will be the change in conductivity of SWNT due to decreasing rate of molecular collisions as the pressure inside a chamber decreases. The rate of heat removal approaches a saturation limit as the mean free path (m.f.p.) lengths of molecules increase due to decreasing pressure. Only those sensing elements that have a long relaxation time can produce a measureable response when m.f.p. of molecules increases (or time between two consecutive collisions increases). A suspended SWNT offers such a capability because of its one-dimensional nature and ultrasmall diameter. In the initial approach, similar architecture was used as that of a SWNT-Schottky diode that has been developed at JPL, and has its changing conductivity measured as the test chamber is pumped down from atmospheric pressure to high vacuum (10(exp -7) Torr). Continuous response of decreasing conductivity has been measured as a function of decreasing pressure (SWNT is a negative thermal coefficient material) from atmosphere to less than 10(exp -6) Torr. A measureable current change in the hundreds of nA range has been recorded in the 10(exp -6) Torr regime.

  2. Deformation of contact surfaces in a vacuum interrupter after high-current interruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haoran; Wang, Zhenxing; Zhou, Zhipeng; Jiang, Yanjun; Wang, Jianhua; Geng, Yingsan; Liu, Zhiyuan

    2016-08-01

    In a high-current interruption, the contact surface in a vacuum interrupter might be severely damaged by constricted vacuum arcs causing a molten area on it. As a result, a protrusion will be initiated by a transient recovery voltage after current zero, enhancing the local electric field and making breakdowns occur easier. The objective of this paper is to simulate the deformation process on the molten area under a high electric field by adopting the finite element method. A time-dependent Electrohydrodynamic model was established, and the liquid-gas interface was tracked by the level-set method. From the results, the liquid metal can be deformed to a Taylor cone if the applied electric field is above a critical value. This value is correlated to the initial geometry of the liquid metal, which increases as the size of the liquid metal decreases. Moreover, the buildup time of a Taylor cone obeys the power law t = k × E-3, where E is the initial electric field and k is a coefficient related to the material property, indicating a temporal self-similar characteristic. In addition, the influence of temperature has little impact on the deformation but has great impact on electron emission. Finally, the possible reason to initiate a delayed breakdown is associated with the deformation. The breakdown does not occur immediately when the voltage is just applied upon the gap but is postponed to several milliseconds later when the tip is formed on the liquid metal.

  3. High frequency limit of vacuum microelectronic grating free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, M.; Walsh, J.E.

    1995-12-31

    The dependencies that limit high frequency operation of a vacuum microelectronic grating free-electron laser are examined. The important parameters are identified as the electron beam energy, emittance, and generalized perveance. The scaling of power with emittance and frequency is studied in the far-infrared spectral range using a modified scanning electron microscope (SEM) and submillimeter diffraction gratings. The SEM is suited to the task of generating and positioning a low emittance (10{sup -2}{pi}-mm-mrad), low current (100 {mu}A), but high current density (50-500 A cm{sup -2}) electron beam. It has been used to demonstrate the spontaneous emission process known as the Smith-Purcell effect. A vacuum microelectronic grating free-electron laser has the potential of generating radiation throughout the entire far-infrared spectral range which extends from approximately 10 to 10{sup 3}{mu}m. An introduction to the theory, initial results, and details of the experiment are reported.

  4. APPLICATION OF VACUUM SALT DISTILLATION TECHNOLOGY FOR THE REMOVAL OF FLUORIDE AND CHLORIDE FROM LEGACY FISSILE MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, R.; Peters, T.

    2011-11-01

    Between September 2009 and January 2011, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and the Savannah River Site (SRS) HB-Line Facility designed, developed, tested, and successfully deployed a production-scale system for the distillation of sodium chloride (NaCl) and potassium chloride (KCl) from plutonium oxide (PuO{sub 2}). Subsequent efforts adapted the vacuum salt distillation (VSD) technology for the removal of chloride and fluoride from less-volatile halide salts at the same process temperature and vacuum. Calcium chloride (CaCl{sub 2}), calcium fluoride (CaF{sub 2}), and plutonium fluoride (PuF{sub 3}) were of particular concern. To enable the use of the same operating conditions for the distillation process, SRNL employed in situ exchange reactions to convert the less-volatile halide salts to compounds that facilitated the distillation of halide without removal of plutonium. SRNL demonstrated the removal of halide from CaCl{sub 2}, CaF{sub 2} and PuF{sub 3} below 1000 C using VSD technology.

  5. An efficient, movable single-particle detector for use in cryogenic ultra-high vacuum environments.

    PubMed

    Spruck, Kaija; Becker, Arno; Fellenberger, Florian; Grieser, Manfred; von Hahn, Robert; Klinkhamer, Vincent; Novotný, Oldřich; Schippers, Stefan; Vogel, Stephen; Wolf, Andreas; Krantz, Claude

    2015-02-01

    A compact, highly efficient single-particle counting detector for ions of keV/u kinetic energy, movable by a long-stroke mechanical translation stage, has been developed at the Max-Planck-Institut für Kernphysik (Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics, MPIK). Both, detector and translation mechanics, can operate at ambient temperatures down to ∼10 K and consist fully of ultra-high vacuum compatible, high-temperature bakeable, and non-magnetic materials. The set-up is designed to meet the technical demands of MPIK's Cryogenic Storage Ring. We present a series of functional tests that demonstrate full suitability for this application and characterise the set-up with regard to its particle detection efficiency.

  6. A HIGH SPEED VACUUM CENTRIFUGE SUITABLE FOR THE STUDY OF FILTERABLE VIRUSES

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Johannes H.; Pickels, Edward G.

    1936-01-01

    1. A high speed centrifuge is described in which the speed is limited only by the strength of the material of which the rotor is made. It carries sixteen tubes, each of which conveniently accommodates 7 cc. of fluid. 2. The centrifuge operates in a very high vacuum and therefore requires only a small amount of driving energy. The arrangement has been found to eliminate the possibility of producing injurious frictional heat. 3. The rotating parts are supported by anair-bearing and are driven by compressed air. 4. The centrifuge has been successfully operated at a speed of 30,000 revolutions per minute, representing a maximum centrifugal force in the fluid of 95,000 times gravity. 5 Celluloid tubes used for centrifugation of fluid at high speeds are described. 6. Experiments are described in which good sedimentation of the yellow fever virus was obtained. PMID:19870550

  7. Nodular graphite formation in vacuum melted high purity Fe-C-Si alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhindaw, B.; Verhoeven, J. D.

    1980-06-01

    This paper describes a study of the cast structure of vacuum melted high purity Fe-C-Si alloys with emphasis on hypoeutectic and eutectic compositions. Nodular graphite was observed to form at high cooling rates and coral graphite at low cooling rates. This result was also confirmed by a limited study on directional solidification of alloys prepared from the same starting materials. The formation of nodular graphite at the high cooling rates was suppressed to near zero by changing the starting iron from 99.94 pct electrolytic iron to an ultra-pure zone refined iron, or by holding the melt at a low super-heat prior to cooling. Chemical analysis showed only that the impurity responsible for nodular formation was present at the low ppm level. An attempt is made to explain the appearance of the various microstructures in terms of the nucleation and growth of nodular graphite, coral graphite and the carbide structure of white iron.

  8. An efficient, movable single-particle detector for use in cryogenic ultra-high vacuum environments

    SciTech Connect

    Spruck, Kaija; Becker, Arno; Fellenberger, Florian; Grieser, Manfred; Hahn, Robert von; Klinkhamer, Vincent; Vogel, Stephen; Wolf, Andreas; Krantz, Claude; Novotný, Oldřich; Schippers, Stefan

    2015-02-15

    A compact, highly efficient single-particle counting detector for ions of keV/u kinetic energy, movable by a long-stroke mechanical translation stage, has been developed at the Max-Planck-Institut für Kernphysik (Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics, MPIK). Both, detector and translation mechanics, can operate at ambient temperatures down to ∼10 K and consist fully of ultra-high vacuum compatible, high-temperature bakeable, and non-magnetic materials. The set-up is designed to meet the technical demands of MPIK’s Cryogenic Storage Ring. We present a series of functional tests that demonstrate full suitability for this application and characterise the set-up with regard to its particle detection efficiency.

  9. High-Resolution Electronics: Spontaneous Patterning of High-Resolution Electronics via Parallel Vacuum Ultraviolet (Adv. Mater. 31/2016).

    PubMed

    Liu, Xuying; Kanehara, Masayuki; Liu, Chuan; Sakamoto, Kenji; Yasuda, Takeshi; Takeya, Jun; Minari, Takeo

    2016-08-01

    On page 6568, T. Minari and co-workers describe spontaneous patterning based on the parallel vacuum ultraviolet (PVUV) technique, enabling the homogeneous integration of complex, high-resolution electronic circuits, even on large-scale, flexible, transparent substrates. Irradiation of PVUV to the hydrophobic polymer surface precisely renders the selected surface into highly wettable regions with sharply defined boundaries, which spontaneously guides a metal nanoparticle ink into a series of circuit lines and gaps with the widths down to a resolution of 1 μm.

  10. SITE TECHNOLOGY CAPSULE; MULTI-VENDOR BIOREMEDIATION DEMONSTRATION PROJECT: ENVIRONMENTAL LABORATORIES/SBP TECHNOLOGIES' UVB VACUUM VAPORIZATION WELL PROCESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This technology capsule summarizes the findings of an evaluation of the Unterdruck-Verdampfer-Brunnen (UVB) technology developed by IEG Technologies (IEG) and licensed in the eastern United States by Environmental Laboratories, Inc. (ELI) and SBP Technologies, Inc. (SBP). This e...

  11. Laser damage of dichroic coatings in a high average power laser vacuum resonator

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, P A; Berzins, L V; Chow, R; Erbert, G V

    1999-07-28

    In our application, dichroics in a high average power, near-infrared, laser system have short operating lifetimes. These dichroics were used as the resonator fold mirrors and permitted the transmission of the pumping argon (Ar) ion laser light. Representative samples of two different dichroic optics were taken off-line and the transmission performance monitored in various scenarios. Irradiating these optics under resonator vacuum conditions, ({le}1 mT, 11.7 kW/cm{sup 2}, Ar laser running all wavelengths) resulted in a degradation of transmission with time. Irradiating these optics in a rarefied oxygen atmosphere (1 to 10 T of oxygen, 11.7 kW/cm{sup 2}, Ar laser running all wavelengths) the transmission remained steady over a period of days. The transmission loss observed in the optic tested in vacuum was somewhat reversible if the optic was subsequently irradiated in a rarefied oxygen atmosphere. This reversibility was only possible if the transmission degradation was not too severe. Further tests demonstrated that an atmosphere of 10 T of air also prevented the transmission degradation. In addition, tests were performed to demonstrate that the optic damage was not caused by the ultra-violet component in the Ar ion laser. Mechanisms that may account for this behavior are proposed.

  12. Fabrication of High-Porosity Lotus-Type Porous Aluminum in Vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaobang; Li, Yanxiang; He, Yun

    2017-03-01

    Lotus-type porous aluminums with porosities from 10 to 26 pct were fabricated with the Bridgman-type directional solidification method (Gasar). A vacuum atmosphere is critical to obtain high-porosity lotus-type porous aluminum by the Gasar process. The lotus-type porous aluminum was directionally solidified under a pure hydrogen pressure of 0.2 to 16 kPa. The influence of hydrogen pressure on the porosity and pore size in vacuum was investigated. The porosity and pore size increase with decreasing hydrogen pressure, but there exists a maximum porosity at some critical hydrogen pressure. Since a low hydrogen pressure is adopted, the effect of capillary pressure and hydrostatic pressure on the porosity becomes important. With the decreasing of hydrogen pressure, the influence of hydrostatic pressure and capillary pressure on porosity becomes stronger and stronger. The influence of melt height, which is proportional hydrostatic pressure, on porosity and pore size was investigated. The calculated porosities considering capillary pressure and hydrostatic pressure are in good agreement with experimental results.

  13. Fabrication of High-Porosity Lotus-Type Porous Aluminum in Vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaobang; Li, Yanxiang; He, Yun

    2017-01-01

    Lotus-type porous aluminums with porosities from 10 to 26 pct were fabricated with the Bridgman-type directional solidification method (Gasar). A vacuum atmosphere is critical to obtain high-porosity lotus-type porous aluminum by the Gasar process. The lotus-type porous aluminum was directionally solidified under a pure hydrogen pressure of 0.2 to 16 kPa. The influence of hydrogen pressure on the porosity and pore size in vacuum was investigated. The porosity and pore size increase with decreasing hydrogen pressure, but there exists a maximum porosity at some critical hydrogen pressure. Since a low hydrogen pressure is adopted, the effect of capillary pressure and hydrostatic pressure on the porosity becomes important. With the decreasing of hydrogen pressure, the influence of hydrostatic pressure and capillary pressure on porosity becomes stronger and stronger. The influence of melt height, which is proportional hydrostatic pressure, on porosity and pore size was investigated. The calculated porosities considering capillary pressure and hydrostatic pressure are in good agreement with experimental results.

  14. Isolated Bacterial Spores at High-velocity Survive Surface Impacts in Vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austin, Daniel; Barney, Brandon

    We present experiments in which bacterial spores were found to survive being accelerated in vacuum to velocities in the range 30-120 m/s and impacted on a dense target. In these experiments, spores of Bacillus subtilis spores were charged using electrospray at atmospheric pressure, dried, and then introduced into high vacuum. Through choice of skimmers and beam tubes, different velocity ranges were achieved. An image-charge detector observed the charged spores, providing total charge and velocity. The spores then impacted a glass target within a collection vessel. After the experiment, the collection vessel contents were extracted and cultured. Several positive and negative controls were used, including the use of antibiotic-resistant spores and antibiotic-containing (rifampicin) agar for culturing. These impact velocities are of particular interest for possible transport of bacterial spores from Mars to Phobos, and may have implications for planetary protection in a Phobos sample return mission. In addition, bacteria may reach similar velocities during a spacecraft crash (e.g., within components, or from spacecraft to surface materials during impact, etc.), raising concerns about forward contamination. The velocities of interest to transport of life between planets (panspermia) are somewhat higher, but these results complement shock-based experiments and contribute to the general discussion of impact survivability of organisms.

  15. [Design and study of a high resolution vacuum ultraviolet imaging spectrometer carried by satellite].

    PubMed

    Yu, Lei; Lin, Guan-yu; Qu, Yi; Wang, Shu-rong; Wang, Long-qi

    2011-12-01

    A high resolution vacuum ultraviolet imaging spectrometer prototype carried by satellite applied to the atmosphere detection of particles distribution in 115-300 nm was developed for remote sensing. First, based on the analysis of advanced loads, the optical system including an off-axis parabolic mirror as the telescope and Czerny-Turner structure as the imaging spectrometer was chosen Secondly, the 2-D photon counting detector with MCP was adopted for the characteristic that the radiation is weak in vacuum ultraviolet waveband. Then the geometric method and 1st order differential calculation were introduced to improve the disadvantages that aberrations in the traditional structure can not be corrected homogeneously to achieve perfect broadband imaging based on the aberration theory. At last, an advanced example was designed. The simulation and calculation of results demonstrate that the modulation transfer function (MTF) of total field of view is more than 0.6 in the broadband, and the spectral resolution is 1.23 nm. The structure is convenient and predominant. It proves that the design is feasible.

  16. Dynamic vacuum analysis for APS high heat flux beamline front ends using optical ray-tracing simulation methods

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, S.; Nielsen, R.W.

    1992-01-01

    The high-power and high-flux x-ray beams produced by third generation synchrotron radiation sources such as the Advanced Photon Source (APS) can cause significantly high gas desorption rates on beamline front-end components if beam missteering occurs. The effect of this gas desorption needs to be understood for dynamic vacuum analysis. To simulate beam missteering conditions, optical ray-tracing methods have been employed. The results of the ray-tracing analysis have been entered into a system-oriented vacuum program to provide dynamic vacuum calculations for determination of pumping requirements for the beamline front-ends. The APS will provide several types of synchrotron radiation sources, for example, undulators, wigglers, and bending magnets. For the purpose of this study, the wiggler source was chosen as a worst case'' scenario due to its high photon flux, high beam power, and relatively large beam cross section.

  17. Dynamic vacuum analysis for APS high heat flux beamline front ends using optical ray-tracing simulation methods

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, S.; Nielsen, R.W.

    1992-09-01

    The high-power and high-flux x-ray beams produced by third generation synchrotron radiation sources such as the Advanced Photon Source (APS) can cause significantly high gas desorption rates on beamline front-end components if beam missteering occurs. The effect of this gas desorption needs to be understood for dynamic vacuum analysis. To simulate beam missteering conditions, optical ray-tracing methods have been employed. The results of the ray-tracing analysis have been entered into a system-oriented vacuum program to provide dynamic vacuum calculations for determination of pumping requirements for the beamline front-ends. The APS will provide several types of synchrotron radiation sources, for example, undulators, wigglers, and bending magnets. For the purpose of this study, the wiggler source was chosen as a ``worst case`` scenario due to its high photon flux, high beam power, and relatively large beam cross section.

  18. Efficiency enhancement of high power vacuum BWO's using nonuniform slow wave structures

    SciTech Connect

    Moreland, L.D.; Schamiloglu, E. . Pulsed Power and Plasma Science Lab.); Lemke, R.W. ); Korovin, S.D.; Rostov, V.V.; Roitman, A.M. . Inst. of High Current Electronics); Hendricks, K.J.; Spencer, T.A. . Advanced Weapons and Survivability Directorate)

    1994-10-01

    The Sinus-6, a high-power relativistic repetitively-pulsed electron beam accelerator, is used to drive various slow wave structures in a BWO configuration in vacuum. Peak output power of about 550 MW at 9.45 GHz was radiated in an 8-ns pulse. The authors describe experiments which study the relative efficiencies of microwave generation from a two-stage nonuniform amplitude slow wave structure and its variations without an initial stage. Experimental results are compared with 2.5 D particle-in-cell computer simulations. The results suggest that prebunching the electron beam in the initial section of the nonuniform BWO results in increased microwave generation efficiency. Furthermore, simulations reveal that, in addition to the backward propagating surface harmonic of the TM[sub 01] mode, backward and forward propagating volume harmonics with phase velocity twice that of the surface harmonic play an important role in high-power microwave generation and radiation.

  19. High-vacuum adhesion and friction properties of sliding contact-mode micromachines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, H.; Komvopoulos, K.

    2013-07-01

    The evolution of adhesion and friction in contact-mode micromachines operated in high vacuum was studied by tracking changes in the adhesive pressure, interfacial shear strength, and static coefficient of friction with accumulating sliding cycles. Low adhesion and high static friction observed during the initial stage of sliding were followed by monotonically intensifying adhesion and decreasing friction until reaching an equilibrium stage at steady-state sliding. This trend revealed the existence of two friction regimes in which asperity deformation and adhesion were the dominant friction mechanisms. Scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy observations indicated that sliding resulted in physical and chemical surface changes. The evolution of the adhesion and friction properties with sliding cycles is attributed to the increase of both the real contact area and the work of adhesion due to nanoscale surface smoothening and the removal of contaminant adsorbents, respectively.

  20. Highly transparent and conductive ZnO:Al thin films prepared by vacuum arc plasma evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyata, Toshihiro; Minamino, Youhei; Ida, Satoshi; Minami, Tadatsugu

    2004-07-01

    A vacuum arc plasma evaporation (VAPE) method using both oxide fragments and gas sources as the source materials is demonstrated to be very effective for the preparation of multicomponent oxide thin films. Highly transparent and conductive Al-doped ZnO (AZO) thin films were prepared by the VAPE method using a ZnO fragment target and a gas source Al dopant, aluminum acethylacetonate (Al(C5H7O2)3) contained in a stainless steel vessel. The Al content in the AZO films was altered by controlling the partial pressure (or flow rate) of the Al dopant gas. High deposition rates as well as uniform distributions of resistivity and thickness on the substrate surface were obtained on large area glass substrates. A low resistivity on the order of 10-4 Ω cm and an average transmittance above 80% in the visible range were obtained in AZO thin films deposited on glass substrates. .

  1. Silicon epitaxy using tetrasilane at low temperatures in ultra-high vacuum chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazbun, Ramsey; Hart, John; Hickey, Ryan; Ghosh, Ayana; Fernando, Nalin; Zollner, Stefan; Adam, Thomas N.; Kolodzey, James

    2016-06-01

    The deposition of silicon using tetrasilane as a vapor precursor is described for an ultra-high vacuum chemical vapor deposition tool. The growth rates and morphology of the Si epitaxial layers over a range of temperatures and pressures are presented. The layers were characterized using transmission electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, spectroscopic ellipsometry, Atomic Force Microscopy, and secondary ion mass spectrometry. Based on this characterization, high quality single crystal silicon epitaxy was observed. Tetrasilane was found to produce higher growth rates relative to lower order silanes, with the ability to deposit crystalline Si at low temperatures (T=400 °C), with significant amorphous growth and reactivity measured as low as 325 °C, indicating the suitability of tetrasilane for low temperature chemical vapor deposition such as for SiGeSn alloys.

  2. Ultraviolet-Induced Flashover of Highly-Angled Polymeric Insulators in Vacuum

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-01-01

    holdoff performance of alumina insulators in vacuum ," J. Appi. Phys. 49 (11), 5416 (1978). Mil80 H. C. Miller, " Improving the Voltage Holdoff Performance ...on the Voltage Holdoff T erformance of Alumina Insulators in Vacuum ," IEEE Trans. Electi. Ir:’.L. EI-20 (3), 505 (1985). Nas79 V. Nassisi and A...of Alumina Insulators in Vacuum Through Quasimetallizing ," IEEE Trans.

  3. Use of space ultra-vacuum for high quality semiconductor thin film growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ignatiev, A.; Sterling, M.; Sega, R. M.

    1992-01-01

    The utilization of space for materials processing is being expanded through a unique concept of epitaxial thin film growth in the ultra-vacuum of low earth orbit (LEO). This condition can be created in the wake of an orbiting space vehicle; and assuming that the vehicle itself does not pertub the environment, vacuum levels of better than 10 exp -14 torr can be attained. This vacuum environment has the capacity of greatly enhancing epitaxial thin film growth and will be the focus of experiments conducted aboard the Wake Shield Facility (WSF) currently being developed by the Space Vacuum Epitaxy Center (SVEC), Industry, and NASA.

  4. Recycling of organic materials and solder from waste printed circuit boards by vacuum pyrolysis-centrifugation coupling technology.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yihui; Wu, WenBiao; Qiu, Keqiang

    2011-12-01

    Here, we focused on the recycling of waste printed circuit boards (WPCBs) using vacuum pyrolysis-centrifugation coupling technology (VPCT) aiming to obtain valuable feedstock and resolve environmental pollution. The two types of WPCBs were pyrolysed at 600°C for 30 min under vacuum condition. During the pyrolysis process, the solder of WPCBs was separated and recovered when the temperature range was 400-600°C, and the rotating drum was rotated at 1000 rpm for 10 min. The type-A of WPCBs pyrolysed to form an average of 67.91 wt.% residue, 27.84 wt.% oil, and 4.25 wt.% gas; and pyrolysis of the type-B of WPCBs led to an average mass balance of 72.22 wt.% residue, 21.57 wt.% oil, and 6.21 wt.% gas. The GC-MS and FT-IR analyses showed that the two pyrolysis oils consisted mainly of phenols and substituted phenols. The pyrolysis oil can be used for fuel or chemical feedstock for further processing. The recovered solder can be recycled directly and it can also be a good resource of lead and tin for refining. The pyrolysis residues contained various metals, glass fibers and other inorganic materials, which could be recovered after further treatment. The pyrolysis gases consisted mainly of CO, CO(2), CH(4), and H(2), which could be collected and recycled.

  5. Vacuum thermal-mechanical fatigue testing of two iron base high temperature alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheffler, K. D.

    1974-01-01

    Ultrahigh vacuum elevated temperature low cycle fatigue and thermal fatigue tests of 304 stainless steel and A-286 alloy have shown significant effects of frequency and combined temperature-strain cycling on fatigue life. At constant temperature, the cyclic life of both alloys was lower at lower frequencies. Combined temperature-strain cycling reduced fatigue life with respect to isothermal life at the maximum temperature of the thermal cycle. Life reductions with in-phase thermal cycling (tension at high temperature, compression at low temperature) were attributed to grain boundary cavitation caused by unreversed tensile grain boundary sliding. The proposed mechanism for out-of-phase cavity generation involved accumulation of unreversed compressive grain boundary displacements which could not be geometrically accomodated by intragranular deformation in the low-ductility A-286 alloy.

  6. Chirped-Pulse Inverse Free Electron Laser: A Tabletop, High-Gradient Vacuum Laser Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Hartemann, F V; Troha, A L; Baldis, H A

    2001-03-05

    The inverse free-electron laser (IFEL) interaction is studied both theoretically and numerically in the case where the drive laser intensity approaches the relativistic regime, and the pulse duration is only a few optical cycles long. We show that by using an ultrashort, ultrahigh-intensity drive laser pulse, the IFEL interaction bandwidth and accelerating gradient are increased considerably, thus yielding large energy gains. Using a chirped pulse and negative dispersion focusing optics allows one to take further advantage of the laser optical bandwidth and produce a chromatic line focus maximizing the gradient. The combination of these novel ideas results in a compact vacuum laser accelerator capable of accelerating picosecond electron bunches with a high gradient (GeV/m) and very low energy spread. A computer code which takes into account the three-dimensional nature of the interaction is currently in development and results are expected this Spring.

  7. Low-jitter, high-voltage, infrared, laser-triggered, vacuum switch

    SciTech Connect

    Earley, L.M.; Barnes, G.A.

    1991-01-01

    A laser-triggered, high-voltage vacuum switch using a triggering pellet embedded in the cathode has been developed. The switch was constructed with tungsten electrodes and used either KC1 or Poco graphite pellets. An aperture in the anode allowed the laser beam to strike the pellet on the cathode surface. Reliable triggering was achieved with only 200 {mu}J of laser energy at a wavelength of 1064 nm. The switch was operated with an A-K gap voltage ranging from 5- to 30-kV with switching currents up to 15 kA peak. The delay time of the switch vaired from 70 {plus minus} 3 ns at 25 kv to 500 {plus minus} 100 ns at 5 kV. 6 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Apparatus for inserting and removing specimens from high temperature vacuum furnaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitehead, C. W. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    The apparatus comprises a high speed gate valve for isolating the interior of the furnance from an air lock chamber on the opposite side of the gate valve. The air lock chamber is provided with valve ports connected to a vacuum source, a source of inert quenching gas, and the atmosphere, respectively. Attached to the end of the air lock chamber away from the furnace is a cylindrical tube having disposed within it a rod carrying specimen pan at the end towards the furnace and having mounted at its top end an annular magnet having a diameter slightly less than the interior diameter of the tube. The top end of the tube is closed by a removeable cap. Encircling the tube in the vicinity of the magnet is a carbon steel ring which when axially moved along the tube causes the magnet to follow it and thereby controls the position of the rod and specimen pan within the tube.

  9. Amplification properties of vacuum ultraviolet Ar2* produced by infrared high-intensity laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaku, Masanori; Harano, Shinya; Matsumoto, Ryota; Katto, Masahito; Kubodera, Shoichi

    2011-07-01

    We report optical amplification of Ar2* at 126nm, pumped by optical-field-induced ionization (OFI) created by an infrared high-intensity laser. A gain--length product of 0.84 was obtained by using multipass amplification with a vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) cavity. The gain--length product was increased up to 4.3 through the use of single-pass amplification with a VUV reflector and a hollow 5.0cm-long fiber. Similar small signal gain coefficients of 0.84 and 0.86cm-1 were obtained in two different experiments, in which OFI Ar plasma gain media were produced in free space filled with Ar and inside an Ar-filled hollow fiber.

  10. Highly reflective and adhesive surface of aluminized polyvinyl chloride film by vacuum evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Denian; Tai, Qile; Feng, Qiang; Li, Qi; Xu, Xizhe; Li, Hairong; Huang, Jing; Dong, Lijie; Xie, Haian; Xiong, Chuanxi

    2014-08-01

    Aluminized poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) film with high reflectivity and strong adhesion was facilely fabricated by vacuum evaporation. The technical study revealed that both alkali-pretreatment of the PVC matrix and thermal annealing after aluminization could greatly promote the peeling adhesion force of this metal/polymer composite by producing interfacial active chemical groups and removing the inner stress, respectively. Reflectivity test and AFM study indicated that the reflecting capacitance of the aluminum coating was closely related to the surface roughness, which can be easily controlled by modulating deposition of aluminum. Moreover, the formation of aluminum layer follows an island model process, and a continuous and smooth coating with highest reflectivity and lowest surface resistance was achieved at deposition time of 60 s. We anticipate that the cost-effective metallized PVC film by this strategy may find extensive applications in light harvesting, solar energy, and flexible mirrors, among others.

  11. Nano-materials for adhesive-free adsorbers for bakable extreme high vacuum cryopump surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Stutzman, Marcy; Jordan, Kevin; Whitney, Roy R.

    2016-10-11

    A cryosorber panel having nanomaterials used for the cryosorption material, with nanomaterial either grown directly on the cryopanel or freestanding nanomaterials attached to the cryopanel mechanically without the use of adhesives. Such nanomaterial cryosorber materials can be used in place of conventional charcoals that are attached to cryosorber panels with special low outgassing, low temperature capable adhesives. Carbon nanotubes and other nanomaterials could serve the same purpose as conventional charcoal cryosorbers, providing a large surface area for cryosorption without the need for adhesive since the nanomaterials can be grown directly on a metallic substrate or mechanically attached. The nanomaterials would be capable of being fully baked by heating above 100.degree. C., thereby eliminating water vapor from the system, eliminating adhesives from the system, and allowing a full bake of the system to reduce hydrogen outgassing, with the goal of obtaining extreme high vacuum where the pump can produce pressures below 1.times.10.sup.-12 Torr.

  12. Electrical breakdown properties of stainless steel and titanium electrodes in ultra-high vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beukema, G. P.

    1981-02-01

    The breakdown voltage in ultra-high vacuum of stainless steel and titanium electrodes is measured as a function of the electrode separation in the range 0.05-0.80 mm. This relationship can be described by the simple equation Vb = Cda. Values for c and a are given for all electrode combinations. For titanium electrodes the current just before breakdown was about three times that for stainless steel electrodes. Comparative measurements with all combinations of stainless steel and titanium show that the cause of this difference must be sought in the anode. The microscopic breakdown field strength was a function of the emitting cathode area, as derived from Fowler-Nordheim plots. This dependence suggests that the breakdown was initiated by thermal instabilities at the anode due to field emission electrons. This is consistent with a theoretical analysis. Measurements of the pre-breakdown current allow an estimate of the number and dimensions of emitting sites.

  13. Dynamic superlubricity on insulating and conductive surfaces in ultra-high vacuum and ambient environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnecco, E.; Socoliuc, A.; Maier, S.; Gessler, J.; Glatzel, T.; Baratoff, A.; Meyer, E.

    2009-01-01

    Atomic-scale friction between a sharp tip at the end of a micro-fabricated silicon cantilever and atomically flat surfaces (NaCl, KBr, HOPG and mica) can be significantly reduced by piezo-induced perpendicular mechanical oscillations at specific resonance frequencies of the cantilever in gentle contact with the sample. The reported measurements confirm and extend the applicability of the effect recently demonstrated using electro-capacitive actuation on alkali halide surfaces in ultra-high vacuum (Socoliuc et al 2006 Science 313 208). A controlled reduction of friction is now observed even on a conductive surface and under ambient conditions, which is quite promising for applications to micro-electromechanical devices. The theory previously used to interpret 'dynamic superlubricity' is supported by new measurements showing that the contact can be maintained in that regime and that the initial reduction of friction is linear versus oscillation amplitude. The calibration of the oscillating component of the normal force is also discussed.

  14. Dynamic superlubricity on insulating and conductive surfaces in ultra-high vacuum and ambient environment.

    PubMed

    Gnecco, E; Socoliuc, A; Maier, S; Gessler, J; Glatzel, T; Baratoff, A; Meyer, E

    2009-01-14

    Atomic-scale friction between a sharp tip at the end of a micro-fabricated silicon cantilever and atomically flat surfaces (NaCl, KBr, HOPG and mica) can be significantly reduced by piezo-induced perpendicular mechanical oscillations at specific resonance frequencies of the cantilever in gentle contact with the sample. The reported measurements confirm and extend the applicability of the effect recently demonstrated using electro-capacitive actuation on alkali halide surfaces in ultra-high vacuum (Socoliuc et al 2006 Science 313 208). A controlled reduction of friction is now observed even on a conductive surface and under ambient conditions, which is quite promising for applications to micro-electromechanical devices. The theory previously used to interpret 'dynamic superlubricity' is supported by new measurements showing that the contact can be maintained in that regime and that the initial reduction of friction is linear versus oscillation amplitude. The calibration of the oscillating component of the normal force is also discussed.

  15. Vacuum decay container/closure integrity testing technology. Part 1. ASTM F2338-09 precision and bias studies.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Heinz; Stauffer, Tony; Chen, Shu-Chen Y; Lee, Yoojin; Forster, Ronald; Ludzinski, Miron; Kamat, Madhav; Godorov, Phillip; Guazzo, Dana Morton

    2009-01-01

    ASTM F2338-09 Standard Test Method for Nondestructive Detection of Leaks in Packages by Vacuum Decay Method is applicable for leak-testing rigid and semi-rigid non-lidded trays; trays or cups sealed with porous barrier lidding materials; rigid, nonporous packages; and flexible, nonporous packages. Part 1 of this series describes the precision and bias studies performed in 2008 to expand this method's scope to include rigid, nonporous packages completely or partially filled with liquid. Round robin tests using three VeriPac 325/LV vacuum decay leak testers (Packaging Technologies & Inspection, LLC, Tuckahoe, NY) were performed at three test sites. Test packages were 1-mL glass syringes. Positive controls had laser-drilled holes in the barrel ranging from about 5 to 15 microm in nominal diameter. Two different leak tests methods were performed at each site: a "gas leak test" performed at 250 mbar (absolute) and a "liquid leak test" performed at about 1 mbar (absolute). The gas leak test was used to test empty, air-filled syringes. All defects with holes > or = 5.0 microm and all no-defect controls were correctly identified. The only false negative result was attributed to a single syringe with a < 5.0-microm hole. Tests performed using a calibrated air leak supported a 0.10-cm3 x min(-1) (ccm) sensitivity limit (99/99 lower tolerance limit). The liquid leak test was used to test both empty, air-filled syringes and water-filled syringes. Test results were 100% accurate for all empty and water-filled syringes, both without holes and with holes (5, 10, and 15 microm). Tests performed using calibrated air flow leaks of 0, 0.05, and 0.10 ccm were also 100% accurate; data supported a 0.10-ccm sensitivity limit (99/99 lower tolerance limit). Quantitative differential pressure results strongly correlated to hole size using either liquid or gas vacuum decay leak tests. The higher vacuum liquid leak test gave noticeably higher pressure readings when water was present in the

  16. High density interconnection technology - Surface mount technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menozzi, G.

    The design features of surface mount technology (SMT) circuits for data transmission, engineering and aerospace applications are examined. Details of pin out, dual face, and interconnection techniques employed for SMT circuits mounted on plastic or ceramic leadless chip carriers are explored. The industrial processes applied to obtain the SMT boards are discussed, along with methods for quality assurance, especially for the soldered connections. SMT installations in the form of 4 Mbit multilayer circuits for an ESA project and a 32-bit mainframe computer are described.

  17. A vacuum sealed high emission current and transmission efficiency carbon nanotube triode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di, Yunsong; Wang, Qilong; Zhang, Xiaobing; Lei, Wei; Du, Xiaofei; Yu, Cairu

    2016-04-01

    A vacuum sealed carbon nanotubes (CNTs) triode with a concave and spoke-shaped Mo grid is presented. Due to the high aperture ratio of the grid, the emission current could be modulated at a relatively high electric field. Totally 75mA emission current has been obtained from the CNTs cathode with the average applied field by the grid shifting from 8 to 13 V/μm. Whilst with the electron transmission efficiency of the grid over 56%, a remarkable high modulated current electron beam over 42mA has been collected by the anode. Also contributed by the high aperture ration of the grid, desorbed gas molecules could flow away from the emission area rapidly when the triode has been operated at a relative high emission current, and finally collected by a vacion pump. The working pressure has been maintained at ˜1 × 10-7 Torr, seldom spark phenomena occurred. Nearly perfect I-V curve and corresponding Fowler-Nordheim (FN) plot confirmed the accuracy of the measured data, and the emission current was long term stable and reproducible. Thusly, this kind of triode would be used as a high-power electron source.

  18. High-Throughput Sequencing Technologies

    PubMed Central

    Reuter, Jason A.; Spacek, Damek; Snyder, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The human genome sequence has profoundly altered our understanding of biology, human diversity and disease. The path from the first draft sequence to our nascent era of personal genomes and genomic medicine has been made possible only because of the extraordinary advancements in DNA sequencing technologies over the past ten years. Here, we discuss commonly used high-throughput sequencing platforms, the growing array of sequencing assays developed around them as well as the challenges facing current sequencing platforms and their clinical application. PMID:26000844

  19. High Resolution, High Frame Rate Video Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Papers and working group summaries presented at the High Resolution, High Frame Rate Video (HHV) Workshop are compiled. HHV system is intended for future use on the Space Shuttle and Space Station Freedom. The Workshop was held for the dual purpose of: (1) allowing potential scientific users to assess the utility of the proposed system for monitoring microgravity science experiments; and (2) letting technical experts from industry recommend improvements to the proposed near-term HHV system. The following topics are covered: (1) State of the art in the video system performance; (2) Development plan for the HHV system; (3) Advanced technology for image gathering, coding, and processing; (4) Data compression applied to HHV; (5) Data transmission networks; and (6) Results of the users' requirements survey conducted by NASA.

  20. Modification of a high vacuum, crossed molecular beam scattering system to perform angle-resolved, gas-surface scattering studies under ultrahigh vacuum conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshikawa, Hiroshi; Ohashi, Haruhiko; Tabayashi, Kiyohiko; Suzui, Mitsukazu; Horigome, Toshio; Hayakawa, Kazuo; Kato, Shinji; Shobatake, Kosuke; Ito, Koji; Fujimoto, Tetsuo

    1999-03-01

    A molecular beam apparatus which was formerly used for crossed molecular beam chemiluminescence experiments under high vacuum conditions has been modified into an ultrahigh vacuum apparatus with a rotatable mass spectrometer detector equipped with an electron bombardment ionizer to study (1) the molecule-surface scattering process, (2) molecular beam-surface reaction dynamics, and (3) light-excited molecular desorption. Every flange surface originally sealed using a Viton o ring is sealed with a combination of an inner spring-loaded Teflon or aluminum seal with an outer Viton o ring, the intermediate region being pumped with a diffusion pump. Due to the limited space available for a rotatable detector chamber and to make the neutral flight length in time-of-flight (TOF) measurements as long as possible, the electron bombardment ionizer is installed at the farthest end of a triply differentially pumped detector chamber; thus, the ions formed are extracted toward the reverse direction of the scattered neutral molecular beam, mass selected with a quadrupole mass filter, and detected by an electron multiplier. Using this apparatus, angular and TOF distributions have been measured for Xe scattered from crystalline graphite surface and for the desorbed product, SiCl2, from the etching reaction of Si(111) with a beam of hyperthermal Cl2 molecules.

  1. Study of the possibility to control ion generation and transport in a high-current vacuum spark

    SciTech Connect

    Dolgov, A. N.; Zemchenkova, N. V.; Prokhorovich, D. E.

    2011-06-15

    The possibilities of optimizing a high-current vacuum spark as a source of metal ions are discussed. The influence of the shape and size of the electrodes on both the depth to which the hot plasma region is immersed in the surrounding cold matter and the plasma state in the hot spot, which is the source of multicharged ions, is demonstrated. Methods for optimization of the design of the discharge device for increasing the ion yield from a high-current vacuum spark are considered.

  2. Effect of residual gases in high vacuum on the energy-level alignment at noble metal/organic interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Helander, M. G.; Wang, Z. B.; Lu, Z. H.

    2011-10-31

    The energy-level alignment at metal/organic interfaces has traditionally been studied using ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS) in ultra-high vacuum (UHV). However, since most devices are fabricated in high vacuum (HV), these studies do not accurately reflect the interfaces in real devices. We demonstrate, using UPS measurements of samples prepared in HV and UHV and current-voltage measurements of devices prepared in HV, that the small amounts of residual gases that are adsorbed on the surface of clean Cu, Ag, and Au (i.e., the noble metals) in HV can significantly alter the energy-level alignment at metal/organic interfaces.

  3. Phase stabilization of VO{sub 2} thin films in high vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Hai-Tian; Eaton, Craig; Ye, Hansheng; Engel-Herbert, Roman

    2015-11-14

    A new growth approach to stabilize VO{sub 2} on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} in high vacuum is reported by reducing vanadium oxytriisopropoxide (VTIP) with vanadium metal. Phase stabilization and surface wetting behavior were studied as a function of growth parameters. The flux balance of VTIP to V in combination with growth temperature was identified to be critical for the growth of high quality VO{sub 2} thin films. High V fluxes were required to suppress the island formation and to ensure a coalesced film, while too high V fluxes ultimately favored the formation of the undesired, epitaxially stabilized V{sub 2}O{sub 3} phase. Careful optimization of growth temperature, VTIP to V ratio, and growth rate led to high quality single phase VO{sub 2} thin films with >3.5 orders of magnitude change in resistivity across the metal-to-insulator transition. This approach opens up another synthesis avenue to stabilize oxide thin films into desired phases.

  4. Development of High Performance Composite Foam Insulation with Vacuum Insulation Cores

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, Kaushik; Desjarlais, Andre Omer; SmithPhD, Douglas; LettsPhD, John; YaoPhD, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Development of a high performance thermal insulation (thermal resistance or R-value per inch of R-12 hr-ft2- F/Btu-in or greater), with twice the thermal resistance of state-of-the-art commercial insulation materials ( R6/inch for foam insulation), promises a transformational impact in the area of building insulation. In 2010, in the US, the building envelope-related primary energy consumption was 15.6 quads, of which 5.75 quads were due to opaque wall and roof sections; the total US consumption (building, industrial and transportation) was 98 quads. In other words, the wall and roof contribution was almost 6% of the entire US primary energy consumption. Building energy modeling analyses have shown that adding insulation to increase the R-value of the external walls of residential buildings by R10-20 (hr-ft2- F/Btu) can yield savings of 38-50% in wall-generated heating and cooling loads. Adding R20 will require substantial thicknesses of current commercial insulation materials, often requiring significant (and sometimes cost-prohibitive) alterations to existing buildings. This article describes the development of a next-generation composite insulation with a target thermal resistance of R25 for a 2 inch thick board (R12/inch or higher). The composite insulation will contain vacuum insulation cores, which are nominally R35-40/inch, encapsulated in polyisocyanurate foam. A recently-developed variant of vacuum insulation, called modified atmosphere insulation (MAI), was used in this research. Some background information on the thermal performance and distinguishing features of MAI has been provided. Technical details of the composite insulation development and manufacturing as well as laboratory evaluation of prototype insulation boards are presented.

  5. Voltage breakdown limits at a high material temperature for rapid pulse heating in a vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Pincosy, P A; Speer, R

    1999-06-07

    The proposed Advanced Hydro Facility (AHF) is required to produce multi-pulse radiographs. Electron beam pulse machines with sub-microsecond repetition are not yet available to test the problem of electron beam propagation through the hydro-dynamically expanding plasma from the nearby previously heated target material. A proposed test scenario includes an ohmically heated small volume of target material simulating the electron beam heating, along with an actual electron beam pulse impinging on nearby target material. A pulse power heating circuit was tested to evaluate the limits of pulse heating a small volume of material to tens of kilo-joules per gram. The main pulse heating time (50 to 100 ns) was to simulate the electron beam heating of a converter target material. To avoid skin heating non-uniformity a longer time scale pulse of a few microseconds first heats the target material to a few thousand degrees near the liquid to vapor transition. Under this state the maximum electric field that the current carrying conductor can support is the important parameter for insuring that the 100 ns heating pulse can deposit sufficient power. A small pulse power system was built for tests of this limit. Under cold conditions the vacuum electric field hold-off limit has been quoted as high as many tens of kilovolts per centimeter. The tests for these experiments found that the vacuum electric field hold-off was limited to a few kilovolts per centimeter when the material approached melting temperatures. Therefore the proposed test scenario for AHF was not achievable.*

  6. DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN: UNTERDUCK-VERDAMPFER- BRUNNEN TECHNOLOGY (UVB) VACUUM VAPORIZING WELL - ROY F. WESTON, INC./IEG TECHNOLOGIES CORPORATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Weston/IEG UVB technology is an in situ groundwater remediation technology that combines air-lift pumping and air stripping to clean aquifers contaminated with volatile organic compounds. A UVB system consists of a single well with two hydraulically separated screened interva...

  7. [Nuclear medicine in Spain: high technology 2013].

    PubMed

    Soriano Castrejón, A M; Prats Rivera, E; Alonso Farto, J C; Vallejo Casas, J A; Rodriguez Gasen, A; Setoain Perego, J; Arbizu Lostao, J

    2014-01-01

    This article details the high technology equipment in Spain obtained through a survey sent to the three main provider companies of equipment installed in Spain. The geographical distribution of high technology by Autonomous Communities and its antiquity have been analyzed.

  8. Growth control of oxygen stoichiometry in homoepitaxial SrTiO3 films by pulsed laser epitaxy in high vacuum

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ho Nyung; Ambrose Seo, Sung S.; Choi, Woo Seok; Rouleau, Christopher M.

    2016-01-01

    In many transition metal oxides, oxygen stoichiometry is one of the most critical parameters that plays a key role in determining the structural, physical, optical, and electrochemical properties of the material. However, controlling the growth to obtain high quality single crystal films having the right oxygen stoichiometry, especially in a high vacuum environment, has been viewed as a challenge. In this work, we show that, through proper control of the plume kinetic energy, stoichiometric crystalline films can be synthesized without generating oxygen defects even in high vacuum. We use a model homoepitaxial system of SrTiO3 (STO) thin films on single crystal STO substrates. Physical property measurements indicate that oxygen vacancy generation in high vacuum is strongly influenced by the energetics of the laser plume, and it can be controlled by proper laser beam delivery. Therefore, our finding not only provides essential insight into oxygen stoichiometry control in high vacuum for understanding the fundamental properties of STO-based thin films and heterostructures, but expands the utility of pulsed laser epitaxy of other materials as well. PMID:26823119

  9. Growth control of oxygen stoichiometry in homoepitaxial SrTiO3 films by pulsed laser epitaxy in high vacuum

    DOE PAGES

    Lee, Ho Nyung; Ambrose Seo, Sung S.; Choi, Woo Seok; ...

    2016-01-29

    In many transition metal oxides, oxygen stoichiometry is one of the most critical parameters that plays a key role in determining the structural, physical, optical, and electrochemical properties of the material. However, controlling the growth to obtain high quality single crystal films having the right oxygen stoichiometry, especially in a high vacuum environment, has been viewed as a challenge. In this work, we show that, through proper control of the plume kinetic energy, stoichiometric crystalline films can be synthesized without generating oxygen defects even in high vacuum. We use a model homoepitaxial system of SrTiO3 (STO) thin films on singlemore » crystal STO substrates. Physical property measurements indicate that oxygen vacancy generation in high vacuum is strongly influenced by the energetics of the laser plume, and it can be controlled by proper laser beam delivery. Thus, our finding not only provides essential insight into oxygen stoichiometry control in high vacuum for understanding the fundamental properties of STO-based thin films and heterostructures, but it expands the utility of pulsed laser epitaxy of other materials as well.₃« less

  10. Growth control of oxygen stoichiometry in homoepitaxial SrTiO3 films by pulsed laser epitaxy in high vacuum.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ho Nyung; Ambrose Seo, Sung S; Choi, Woo Seok; Rouleau, Christopher M

    2016-01-29

    In many transition metal oxides, oxygen stoichiometry is one of the most critical parameters that plays a key role in determining the structural, physical, optical, and electrochemical properties of the material. However, controlling the growth to obtain high quality single crystal films having the right oxygen stoichiometry, especially in a high vacuum environment, has been viewed as a challenge. In this work, we show that, through proper control of the plume kinetic energy, stoichiometric crystalline films can be synthesized without generating oxygen defects even in high vacuum. We use a model homoepitaxial system of SrTiO3 (STO) thin films on single crystal STO substrates. Physical property measurements indicate that oxygen vacancy generation in high vacuum is strongly influenced by the energetics of the laser plume, and it can be controlled by proper laser beam delivery. Therefore, our finding not only provides essential insight into oxygen stoichiometry control in high vacuum for understanding the fundamental properties of STO-based thin films and heterostructures, but expands the utility of pulsed laser epitaxy of other materials as well.

  11. Suppression of sludge formation by two-stage hydrocracking of vacuum residue at high conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Mochida, I.; Zhao, X.; Sakanishi, K. )

    1990-12-01

    This paper reports on hydrocracked products from Arabian light vacuum residue at high conversion into distillate ({gt}50%) that were analyzed in order to reveal how sludge formation was suppressed in the two-stage reaction. Although the asphaltene in the starting residue was highly soluble in the starting maltene in spite of is largest molecular weight, single-stage hydrocracking at a higher temperature of 420{degrees}C increased the aromaticity of the asphaltene through extensive deaklylation and dehydrogenation, leading to sludge formation. In contrast, two-stage hydrocracking at 390{degrees}C--3 h/420{degrees}C--1/h accomplished effective depolymerization of the asphaltene, high conversion being achieved without sludge. The carbon aromaticity (f{sub a}) of the produced asphaltene was maintained rather low, although its amount in the product was much the same regardless of the reaction conditions. The heptane-soluble maltenes in the hydrocracked oils exhibited variable dissolving abilities against the asphaltene according to the content and aromaticity of its aromatic fraction, also influencing sludge formation. Hydrocracking produced paraffins through the hydrogenative deaklylation of long-chain alkylbenzenes, decreasing f{sub a} and the dissolving ability of the hydrocracked maltene.

  12. Statistics of vacuum breakdown in the high-gradient and low-rate regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wuensch, Walter; Degiovanni, Alberto; Calatroni, Sergio; Korsbäck, Anders; Djurabekova, Flyura; Rajamäki, Robin; Giner-Navarro, Jorge

    2017-01-01

    In an increasing number of high-gradient linear accelerator applications, accelerating structures must operate with both high surface electric fields and low breakdown rates. Understanding the statistical properties of breakdown occurrence in such a regime is of practical importance for optimizing accelerator conditioning and operation algorithms, as well as of interest for efforts to understand the physical processes which underlie the breakdown phenomenon. Experimental data of breakdown has been collected in two distinct high-gradient experimental set-ups: A prototype linear accelerating structure operated in the Compact Linear Collider Xbox 12 GHz test stands, and a parallel plate electrode system operated with pulsed DC in the kV range. Collected data is presented, analyzed and compared. The two systems show similar, distinctive, two-part distributions of number of pulses between breakdowns, with each part corresponding to a specific, constant event rate. The correlation between distance and number of pulses between breakdown indicates that the two parts of the distribution, and their corresponding event rates, represent independent primary and induced follow-up breakdowns. The similarity of results from pulsed DC to 12 GHz rf indicates a similar vacuum arc triggering mechanism over the range of conditions covered by the experiments.

  13. Plasmon-assisted chemical reactions revealed by high-vacuum tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Shuaicheng; Sheng, Shaoxiang; Zhang, Zhenglong; Xu, Hongxing; Zheng, Hairong

    2014-08-01

    Tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS) is the technique that combines the nanoscale spatial resolution of a scanning probe microscope and the highly sensitive Raman spectroscopy enhanced by the surface plasmons. It is suitable for chemical analysis at nanometer scale. Recently, TERS exhibited powerful potential in analyzing the chemical reactions at nanoscale. The high sensitivity and spatial resolution of TERS enable us to learn the reaction processes more clearly. More importantly, the chemical reaction in TERS is assisted by surface plasmons, which provides us an optical method to manipulate the chemical reactions at nanoscale. Here using our home-built high-vacuum tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (HV-TERS) setup, we successfully observed the plasmon-assisted molecule dimerization and dissociation reactions. In HV-TERS system, under laser illumination, 4-nitrobenzenethiol (4NBT) molecules can be dimerized to p,p'-dimercaptoazobenzene (DMAB), and dissociation reaction occurs for malachite green (MG) molecules. Using our HV-TERS setup, the dynamic processes of the reactions are clearly revealed. The chemical reactions can be manipulated by controlling the plasmon intensity through changing the power of the incident laser, the tunneling current and the bias voltage. We also investigated the role of plasmonic thermal effect in the reactions by measuring both the Stokes and anti- Stokes Raman peaks. Our findings extend the applications of TERS, which can help to study the chemical reactions and understand the dynamic processes at single molecular level, and even design molecules by the plasmon-assisted chemical reactions.

  14. Probe characterization of high-current driven metal plasma in a vacuum-arc rail gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayan, T.; Roychowdhury, P.; Venkatramani, N.

    2004-10-01

    The characteristics of metal plasma launched by high-current electric arc in a vacuum-arc rail gun are determined by employing electrical and magnetic probes. These measurements are validated by results from theoretical simulations. The arc coupled nonlinear circuit equations are solved simultaneously with the Newtonian arc motion and revealed the undercritically damped behavior of the arc current identical to the arc-current signal recorded by the Rogowski magnetic probe. Similarly the arc velocity and displacement derived from the signatures of B-dot probes are shown to concur closely with the results of J ×B propulsion from simulation. The heating of plasma is formulated in a three-electron population regime with direct arc energy coupling through magnetohydrodynamic, ion-acoustic, Coulomb, and neutral interactions. This results in high temperature (Te) of hundreds of eV in the arc as revealed by the simulation. Hence Te of the rapidly cooling and equilibrating plasma that emerged from the muzzle is high around 80-90eV, which is confirmed by Langmuir electric probe measurements. Density ne of this metal plasma is shown to be in the range 4×1021-6×1021m-3 and includes multiple ion charge states. The exit velocity of the plasma measured by a pair of Langmuir probes is close to 2.2×106cm/s and matched well with the arc velocity determined by the B-dot probes and the results from simulation.

  15. Direct electroplating of copper on tantalum from ionic liquids in high vacuum: origin of the tantalum oxide layer.

    PubMed

    Schaltin, Stijn; D'Urzo, Lucia; Zhao, Qiang; Vantomme, André; Plank, Harald; Kothleitner, Gerald; Gspan, Christian; Binnemans, Koen; Fransaer, Jan

    2012-10-21

    In this paper, it is shown that high vacuum conditions are not sufficient to completely remove water and oxygen from the ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride. Complete removal of water demands heating above 150 °C under reduced pressure, as proven by Nuclear Reaction Analysis (NRA). Dissolved oxygen gas can only be removed by the use of an oxygen scavenger such as hydroquinone, despite the fact that calculations show that oxygen should be removed completely by the applied vacuum conditions. After applying a strict drying procedure and scavenging of molecular oxygen, it was possible to deposit copper directly on tantalum without the presence of an intervening oxide layer.

  16. Systematic study of the dolomite (104) surface by bimodal dynamic force microscopy in ultra-high vacuum.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Shigeki; Pina, Carlos M; Bubendorf, Alexander; Fessler, Gregor; Glatzel, Thilo; Gnecco, Enrico; Meyer, Ernst

    2013-02-08

    We have investigated the morphology and structure of dolomite MgCa(CO(3))(2)(104) surfaces by bimodal dynamic force microscopy with flexural and torsional resonance modes in ultra-high vacuum at room temperature. We found that the surface slowly decomposes by degassing CO(2) in a vacuum and becomes covered by amorphous clusters, presumably MgO and CaO. By choosing an optimal sample preparation procedure (i.e. cleaving in a vacuum and mild annealing for stabilizing clusters for a short time), atomically clean surfaces were obtained. The complex tip-sample interaction, arising from carbonate groups and Mg and Ca atoms of the surface, induces a large variety of atomic-scale imaging features.

  17. Note: Hollow cathode lamp with integral, high optical efficiency isolation valve: A modular vacuum ultraviolet source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sloan Roberts, F.; Anderson, Scott L.

    2013-12-01

    The design and operating conditions of a hollow cathode discharge lamp for the generation of vacuum ultraviolet radiation, suitable for ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) application, are described in detail. The design is easily constructed, and modular, allowing it to be adapted to different experimental requirements. A thin isolation valve is built into one of the differential pumping stages, isolating the discharge section from the UHV section, both for vacuum safety and to allow lamp maintenance without venting the UHV chamber. The lamp has been used both for ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy of surfaces and as a "soft" photoionization source for gas-phase mass spectrometry.

  18. High Technology Training at Greenville Technical College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barton, Thomas E.; And Others

    These three papers focus on various aspects of high technology training at Greenville Technical College (GTC). First, "High Technology and the Community College," by Thomas E. Barton, discusses what high technology should mean to educators and argues that changes in the nature of industrial production require that community colleges not only keep…

  19. High-Technology Industries through Entrepreneurial Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parikh, V. M.

    This report examines a study to promote high-technology industries in British Columbia using an essentially integrated educational and economic development program. Human resources, skilled in high-technology and entrepreneurship, are recognized as prime sources of potential development of high-technology industries in the Province. An educational…

  20. Understanding initiation and termination events in the primary amine-initiated polymerization of NCAs by high-vacuum techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Pickel, Deanna L; Messman, Jamie M

    2010-01-01

    High-vacuum polymerization of -amino acid-N-carboxyanhydrides (NCAs) affords polymers with controlled molecular weights and narrow polydispersities, however a comprehensive study of the end-group composition of the resulting polypeptides has not yet been performed. This reveals crucial information, as the end-groups are indicative of both the polymerization mechanism (i.e., initiation event) as well as the termination pathways. To this end, poly(O-benzyl-L-tyrosine) initiated by 1,6-diaminohexane was synthesized and subsequently characterized by MALDI-TOF MS, NALDI -TOF MS and 13C NMR spectroscopy to ascertain the end-group structure. Polymers were prepared by both high vacuum and glove box techniques in DMF/THF. Preparation of poly(O-benzyl-L-tyrosine) by high vacuum techniques yielded a polymer initiated exclusively by the normal amine mechanism, and termination by reaction with DMF was observed. In contrast, polymers prepared in the glove box were initiated by the normal amine and activated monomer mechanisms, and several termination products are evident. To our knowledge, this is the first rigorous and comparative analysis of the end-group structure, and it demonstrates the advantage of high vacuum techniques for polymerization of NCAs for the preparation of well-defined polypeptides with end-group fidelity.

  1. Cryogenic THD and DT layer implosions with high density carbon ablators in near-vacuum hohlraums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meezan, N. B.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Le Pape, S.; Khan, S. F.; Pak, A. E.; Divol, L.; Ho, D. D.; Ma, T.; Doeppner, T.; Rygg, J. R.; Field, J. E.; Jones, O. S.; Milovich, J. L.; Kozioziemski, B. J.; Hamza, A. V.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Hsing, W. W.; Edwards, M. J.

    2014-10-01

    High Density Carbon (HDC or diamond) is a promising ablator material for use in near-vacuum hohlraums, as its high density allows for ignition designs with laser pulse durations <10 ns. A series of experiments in 2013 on the National Ignition Facility culminated in a DT layered implosion driven by a 6.5 ns, 2-shock laser pulse. This talk describes these experiments and comparisons with the design code HYDRA. Backlit radiography of a THD layered capsule demonstrated an ablator implosion velocity of 385 km/s with a slightly oblate hot spot shape; however, other diagnostics suggested an asymmetric compressed fuel layer. The streak camera-based SPIDER diagnostic showed a double-peaked history of the capsule self-emission. Simulations suggest that this is a signature of a low-temperature hot spot. Changes to the laser pulse-shape and pointing for a subsequent DT implosion resulted in a higher temperature, prolate hot-spot and a thermonuclear yield of 1 . 8 ×1015 neutrons. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  2. High-energy limit of collision-induced false vacuum decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demidov, Sergei; Levkov, Dmitry

    2015-06-01

    We develop a consistent semiclassical description of field-theoretic collision-induced tunneling at arbitrary high collision energies. As a playground we consider a (1 + 1)-dimensional false vacuum decay initiated by a collision of N particles at energy E, paying special attention to the realistic case of N = 2 particles. We demonstrate that the cross section of this process is exponentially suppressed at all energies. Moreover, the respective suppressesion exponent F N ( E) exhibits a specific behavior which is significant for our semiclassical method and assumed to be general: it decreases with energy, reaches absolute minimum F = F min( N ) at a certain threshold energy E = E rt( N ), and stays constant at higher energies. We show that the minimal suppression F min( N ) and threshold energy can be evaluated using a special class of semiclassical solutions which describe exponentially suppressed transitions but nevertheless evolve in real time. Importantly, we argue that the cross section at energies above E rt( N ) is computed perturbatively in the background of the latter solutions, and the terms of this perturbative expansion stay bounded in the infinite-energy limit. Transitions in the high-energy regime proceed via emission of many soft quanta with total energy E rt; the energy excess E - E rt remains in the colliding particles till the end of the process.

  3. Three-dimensional failure analysis of high power semiconductor laser diodes operated in vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeoh, Terence S.; Chaney, John A.; Leung, Martin S.; Ives, Neil A.; Feinberg, Z. D.; Ho, James G.; Wen, Jianguo

    2007-12-01

    The damaged region of a semiconductor laser diode that failed in a vacuum environment was analyzed using focused ion beam (FIB) serial sectioning, time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM), electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS), energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS), and nanodiffraction. The FIB nanotomography models and the TEM cross sections show a damage structure extending deep into the core and originating at the diode/antireflective (AR) coating interface. Nanocrystalline gold was detected at this interface using both TEM diffraction and EDS, and the localization of gold along the core at the diode/AR interface was corroborated using 3D ToF-SIMS. A thinning of the AR coating above the failure site was observed by TEM with a corresponding increase in carbon content on the AR surface detected with EELS. It is suggested that failure proceeded by pyrolysis of adsorbed hydrocarbons on the AR coating, which, in the presence of a high optical flux, contributed to carbothermal reduction of the AR coating. As the optical flux increased, thermal gradients facilitate metal migration, leading to larger gold clusters. These clusters are sites for deep level traps and may promote catalytic reactions.

  4. Concept for support and heating of plate-like samples in the ultra-high vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tröger, L.; Pieper, H. H.; Reichling, M.

    2013-01-01

    We present the concept for a sample holder designed for mounting and heating of plate-like samples that is based on a clamping mechanism for easy handling. The clamping mechanism consists of a U-shaped bracket encompassing the sample support plate from the rear. Two spring wires are fixed in the walls of the bracket spanning the sample to secure it with only two point contacts. This enables the sample to freely expand or contract during heating and cooling. To accommodate for a large variety in sample size, shape, and quality, we introduce two designs differing in the generation of the clamping force: One pressing the sample against the spring wires, the other one pulling the spring wires onto the sample. Both designs yield an automatically even alignment of the sample during the mounting process to achieve an even load distribution and reliable fixation specifically for brittle samples. For high temperature treatment, the sample holders are enhanced by a resistive heating plate. As only the sample and a small fraction of the sample holder are heated, temperatures of 1300 °C are reached with only 8 W heating power. The sample support and heating components are mounted on a 11 mm × 13 mm base plate with a handle that can be transferred between the sample entry stage, the preparation stage, and surface science experiments in the ultra-high vacuum system.

  5. Microfluidic liquid jet system with compatibility for atmospheric and high-vacuum conditions.

    PubMed

    Trebbin, Martin; Krüger, Kilian; DePonte, Daniel; Roth, Stephan V; Chapman, Henry N; Förster, Stephan

    2014-05-21

    We present microfluidic chip based devices that produce liquid jets with micrometer diameters while operating at very low flow rates. The chip production is based on established soft-lithographical techniques employing a three-layer design protocol. This allows the exact, controlled and reproducible design of critical parts such as nozzles and the production of nozzle arrays. The microfluidic chips reproducibly generate liquid jets exiting at perfect right angles with diameters between 20 μm and 2 μm, and under special circumstances, even down to 0.9 μm. Jet diameter, jet length, and the domain of the jetting/dripping instability can be predicted and controlled based on the theory for liquid jets in the plate-orifice configuration described by Gañán-Calvo et al. Additionally, conditions under which the device produces highly reproducible monodisperse droplets at exact and predictable rates can be achieved. The devices operate under atmospheric and under vacuum conditions making them highly relevant for a wide range of applications, for example, for free-electron lasers. Further, the straightforward integration of additional features such as a jet-in-jet is demonstrated. This device design has the potential to integrate more features based on established microfluidic components and may become a standard device for small liquid jet production.

  6. Cryogenic THD and DT layer implosions with high density carbon ablators in near-vacuum hohlraums

    DOE PAGES

    Meezan, N. B.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Le Pape, S.; ...

    2015-06-02

    High Density Carbon (HDC or diamond) is a promising ablator material for use in near-vacuum hohlraums, as its high density allows for ignition designs with laser pulse durations of <10 ns. A series of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) experiments in 2013 on the National Ignition Facility [E. I. Moses et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 041006 (2009)] culminated in a DT layered implosion driven by a 6.8 ns, 2-shock laser pulse. This paper describes these experiments and comparisons with ICF design code simulations. Backlit radiography of a THD layered capsule demonstrated an ablator implosion velocity of 385 km/s with a slightlymore » oblate hot spot shape. Other diagnostics suggested an asymmetric compressed fuel layer. A streak camera-based hot spot self-emission diagnostic (SPIDER) showed a double-peaked history of the capsule self-emission. Simulations suggest that this is a signature of low quality hot spot formation. Changes to the laser pulse and pointing for a subsequent DT implosion resulted in a higher temperature, prolate hot spot and a thermonuclear yield of 1.8 x 10¹⁵ neutrons, 40% of the 1D simulated yield.« less

  7. Cryogenic THD and DT layer implosions with high density carbon ablators in near-vacuum hohlraums

    SciTech Connect

    Meezan, N. B.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Le Pape, S.; Divol, L.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Döppner, T.; Ho, D. D.; Jones, O. S.; Khan, S. F.; Ma, T.; Milovich, J. L.; Pak, A. E.; Ross, J. S.; Thomas, C. A.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bradley, D. K.; Celliers, P. M.; Clark, D. S.; Field, J. E.; Haan, S. W.; Izumi, N.; Kyrala, G. A.; Moody, J. D.; Patel, P. K.; Ralph, J. E.; Rygg, J. R.; Sepke, S. M.; Spears, B. K.; Tommasini, R.; Town, R. P. J.; Biener, J.; Bionta, R. M.; Bond, E. J.; Caggiano, J. A.; Eckart, M. J.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Grim, G. P.; Hamza, A. V.; Hartouni, E. P.; Hatarik, R.; Hoover, D. E.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Kozioziemski, B. J.; Kroll, J. J.; McNaney, J. M.; Nikroo, A.; Sayre, D. B.; Stadermann, M.; Wild, C.; Yoxall, B. E.; Landen, O. L.; Hsing, W. W.; Edwards, M. J.

    2015-06-02

    High Density Carbon (HDC or diamond) is a promising ablator material for use in near-vacuum hohlraums, as its high density allows for ignition designs with laser pulse durations of <10 ns. A series of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) experiments in 2013 on the National Ignition Facility [E. I. Moses et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 041006 (2009)] culminated in a DT layered implosion driven by a 6.8 ns, 2-shock laser pulse. This paper describes these experiments and comparisons with ICF design code simulations. Backlit radiography of a THD layered capsule demonstrated an ablator implosion velocity of 385 km/s with a slightly oblate hot spot shape. Other diagnostics suggested an asymmetric compressed fuel layer. A streak camera-based hot spot self-emission diagnostic (SPIDER) showed a double-peaked history of the capsule self-emission. Simulations suggest that this is a signature of low quality hot spot formation. Changes to the laser pulse and pointing for a subsequent DT implosion resulted in a higher temperature, prolate hot spot and a thermonuclear yield of 1.8 x 10¹⁵ neutrons, 40% of the 1D simulated yield.

  8. Vacuum thermal cycle life testing of high temperature thermal energy storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponnappan, Rengasamy; Beam, Jerry E.

    1991-01-01

    An experimental program to investigate the corrosion compatibility of the high temperature thermal energy storage (TES) salts with Inconel-617 container was initiated at the Thermal Laboratory of the Wright Research and Development Center (WRDC) in 1985. Three fluoride eutectic mixtures: LiF-MgF2-KF, LiF-MgF2-NaF, and LiF-MgF2 having melting points in the neighborhood of 1000 K and heats of fusion above 750 kJ/kg were chosen. High purity analytical grade component salts were processed in oxygen and moisture-free inert atmosphere, and melted in situ in the Inconel-617 containers. The containers were sealed by electron beam-welding of the end caps thereby evacuating the void volume. The TES capsules thus formed were placed in a tubular vacuum furnace for continuous thermal cycle life testing by cycling them ±100 K from the eutectic temperature every 2 hours. The capsules have successfully undergone 40,000 hours and 10,000 cycles of testing as of April 1990 and continuing on the test. This is believed to be the longest record available on the TES corrosion compatibility data. The present results clearly indicate that careful processing and proper welding are key factors in obtaining a longlife TES salt-containment system.

  9. High-resolution vacuum-ultraviolet photoabsorption spectra of 1-butyne and 2-butyne.

    PubMed

    Jacovella, U; Holland, D M P; Boyé-Péronne, S; Gans, B; de Oliveira, N; Joyeux, D; Archer, L E; Lucchese, R R; Xu, H; Pratt, S T

    2015-07-21

    The absolute photoabsorption cross sections of 1- and 2-butyne have been recorded at high resolution by using the vacuum-ultraviolet Fourier-Transform spectrometer at the SOLEIL Synchrotron. Both spectra show more resolved structure than previously observed, especially in the case of 2-butyne. In this work, we assess the potential importance of Rydberg states with higher values of orbital angular momentum, l, than are typically observed in photoabsorption experiments from ground state molecules. We show how the character of the highest occupied molecular orbitals in 1- and 2-butyne suggests the potential importance of transitions to such high-l (l = 3 and 4) Rydberg states. Furthermore, we use theoretical calculations of the partial wave composition of the absorption cross section just above the ionization threshold and the principle of continuity of oscillator strength through an ionization threshold to support this conclusion. The new absolute photoabsorption cross sections are discussed in light of these arguments, and the results are consistent with the expectations. This type of argument should be valuable for assessing the potential importance of different Rydberg series when sufficiently accurate direct quantum chemical calculations are difficult, for example, in the n ≥ 5 manifolds of excited states of larger molecules.

  10. High-resolution vacuum-ultraviolet photoabsorption spectra of 1-butyne and 2-butyne

    SciTech Connect

    Jacovella, U.; Holland, D. M. P.; Boyé-Péronne, S.; Gans, B.; Oliveira, N. de; Joyeux, D.; Archer, L. E.; Lucchese, R. R.; Xu, H.; Pratt, S. T.

    2015-07-21

    The absolute photoabsorption cross sections of 1- and 2-butyne have been recorded at high resolution by using the vacuum-ultraviolet Fourier-Transform spectrometer at the SOLEIL Synchrotron. Both spectra show more resolved structure than previously observed, especially in the case of 2-butyne. In this work, we assess the potential importance of Rydberg states with higher values of orbital angular momentum, l, than are typically observed in photoabsorption experiments from ground state molecules. We show how the character of the highest occupied molecular orbitals in 1- and 2-butyne suggests the potential importance of transitions to such high-l (l = 3 and 4) Rydberg states. Furthermore, we use theoretical calculations of the partial wave composition of the absorption cross section just above the ionization threshold and the principle of continuity of oscillator strength through an ionization threshold to support this conclusion. The new absolute photoabsorption cross sections are discussed in light of these arguments, and the results are consistent with the expectations. This type of argument should be valuable for assessing the potential importance of different Rydberg series when sufficiently accurate direct quantum chemical calculations are difficult, for example, in the n ≥ 5 manifolds of excited states of larger molecules.

  11. Unintentional carbide formation evidenced during high-vacuum magnetron sputtering of transition metal nitride thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greczynski, G.; Mráz, S.; Hultman, L.; Schneider, J. M.

    2016-11-01

    Carbide signatures are ubiquitous in the surface analyses of industrially sputter-deposited transition metal nitride thin films grown with carbon-less source materials in typical high-vacuum systems. We use high-energy-resolution photoelectron spectroscopy to reveal details of carbon temporal chemical state evolution, from carbide formed during film growth to adventitious carbon adsorbed upon contact with air. Using in-situ grown Al capping layers that protect the as-deposited transition metal nitride surfaces from oxidation, it is shown that the carbide forms during film growth rather than as a result of post deposition atmosphere exposure. The XPS signature of carbides is masked by the presence of adventitious carbon contamination, appearing as soon as samples are exposed to atmosphere, and eventually disappears after one week-long storage in lab atmosphere. The concentration of carbon assigned to carbide species varies from 0.28 at% for ZrN sample, to 0.25 and 0.11 at% for TiN and HfN, respectively. These findings are relevant for numerous applications, as unintentionally formed impurity phases may dramatically alter catalytic activity, charge transport and mechanical properties by offsetting the onset of thermally-induced phase transitions. Therefore, the chemical state of C impurities in PVD-grown films should be carefully investigated.

  12. Indian Vacuum Society: The Indian Vacuum Society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, T. K.

    2008-03-01

    The Indian Vacuum Society (IVS) was established in 1970. It has over 800 members including many from Industry and R & D Institutions spread throughout India. The society has an active chapter at Kolkata. The society was formed with the main aim to promote, encourage and develop the growth of Vacuum Science, Techniques and Applications in India. In order to achieve this aim it has conducted a number of short term courses at graduate and technician levels on vacuum science and technology on topics ranging from low vacuum to ultrahigh vacuum So far it has conducted 39 such courses at different parts of the country and imparted training to more than 1200 persons in the field. Some of these courses were in-plant training courses conducted on the premises of the establishment and designed to take care of the special needs of the establishment. IVS also regularly conducts national and international seminars and symposia on vacuum science and technology with special emphasis on some theme related to applications of vacuum. A large number of delegates from all over India take part in the deliberations of such seminars and symposia and present their work. IVS also arranges technical visits to different industries and research institutes. The society also helped in the UNESCO sponsored post-graduate level courses in vacuum science, technology and applications conducted by Mumbai University. The society has also designed a certificate and diploma course for graduate level students studying vacuum science and technology and has submitted a syllabus to the academic council of the University of Mumbai for their approval, we hope that some colleges affiliated to the university will start this course from the coming academic year. IVS extended its support in standardizing many of the vacuum instruments and played a vital role in helping to set up a Regional Testing Centre along with BARC. As part of the development of vacuum education, the society arranges the participation of

  13. Development of spoilage bacterial community and volatile compounds in chilled beef under vacuum or high oxygen atmospheres.

    PubMed

    Jääskeläinen, Elina; Hultman, Jenni; Parshintsev, Jevgeni; Riekkola, Marja-Liisa; Björkroth, Johanna

    2016-04-16

    Research into microbial community development and metabolism is essential to understand meat spoilage. Recent years have seen the emergence of powerful molecular techniques that are being used alongside conventional microbiology approaches. This enables more accurate studies on meat spoilage. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of packaging (under vacuum and in high oxygen atmosphere) on the development of microbial communities and metabolic activities at 6 °C by using culture-dependent (cultivation, ribotyping) and culture-independent (amplicon sequencing) methods. At the beginning of shelf life, the microbial community mostly consisted of Carnobacterium and Lactobacillus. After two weeks of storage, Lactococcus and Lactobacillus were the dominant genera under vacuum and Leuconostoc in high oxygen meat packages. This indicates that oxygen favoured the genus Leuconostoc comprising only heterofermentative species and hence potential producers of undesirable compounds. Also the number of volatile compounds, such as diacetyl, 1-octen-3-ol and hexanoic acids, was higher in high oxygen packages than under vacuum packages. The beef in high oxygen atmosphere packaging was detected as spoiled in sensory evaluation over 10 days earlier than beef under vacuum packaging. Leuconostoc gelidum, Lactococcus piscium, Lactobacillus sakei and Lactobacillus algidus were the most common species of bacteria. The results obtained from identification of the isolates using ribotyping and amplicon sequencing correlated, except for L. algidus, which was detected in both types of packaging by amplicon sequencing, but only in vacuum packaged samples using the culture-based technique. This indicates that L. algidus grew, but was not cultivable in high oxygen beef using the Nordic Committee on Food Analysis standard method.

  14. Near-vacuum hohlraums with uranium walls for driving high density carbon ablators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meezan, N. B.; Dewald, E. L.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Moore, A. S.; Schneider, M. V.; Thomas, C. A.; Tommasini, R.; Ho, D. D.; Clark, D. S.; Weber, C. R.; Hamza, A. V.; Nikroo, A.; Le Pape, S.; Divol, L.; MacKinnon, A. J.

    2015-11-01

    We present experimental results for unlined uranium near-vacuum hohlraums on the National Ignition Facility. X-ray wall losses are lower in uranium than in gold at radiation temperatures near 300 eV. In addition, the intensity of x-rays with energy hν > 1 . 8 keV is lower for uranium hohlraums. The softer uranium spectrum allows the use of ablators with lower levels of dopants that reduce rocket efficiency and increase the risk of polluting the hot-spot with emissive material. Experiments in the ViewFactor platform measured 5% higher total x-ray intensity and 30% lower intensity of hν > 1 . 8 keV for uranium relative to gold. Back-lit implosions using undoped high-density carbon (HDC, or diamond) capsules achieved a velocity of 400 +/- 20 km/s compared to 360 +/- 20 km/s for gold. These results have led the NIF HDC campaign to baseline uranium hohlraums for upcoming experiments. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  15. XPS analysis of 440C steel surfaces lubricated with perfluoropolyethers under sliding conditions in high vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrera-Fierro, Pilar; Masuko, Masabumi; Jones, William R., Jr.; Pepper, Stephen V.

    1994-01-01

    This work presents the results of the X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) analysis of AISI 440C ball surfaces lubricated with perfluoropolyether (PFPE) oils after friction experiments under sliding conditions at high load in air and vacuum environments. The PFPE lubricants tested were Demnum S100, Fomblin Z-25, and Krytox 143AB. It was found that all the PFPE lubricants were degraded by sliding contact causing the formation of inorganic fluorides on the metallic surfaces and a layer of organic decomposition products. KRYTOX 143AB was the least reactive of the three lubricants tested. It was also found that metal fluoride formed at off-scar areas. This suggests the formation of reactive species, such as COF2 or R(sub f)COF, during sliding experiments, which can diffuse through the lubricant film and react with the metallic surfaces away from the contact region. Comparison of reference specimens before sliding with those that had undergone the sliding tests showed that the amount of non-degraded PFPE remaining on the surface of the balls after the sliding experiments was greater than that of the balls without sliding.

  16. Ultra-high vacuum scanning thermal microscopy for nanometer resolution quantitative thermometry.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyeongtae; Jeong, Wonho; Lee, Woochul; Reddy, Pramod

    2012-05-22

    Understanding energy dissipation at the nanoscale requires the ability to probe temperature fields with nanometer resolution. Here, we describe an ultra-high vacuum (UHV)-based scanning thermal microscope (SThM) technique that is capable of quantitatively mapping temperature fields with ∼15 mK temperature resolution and ∼10 nm spatial resolution. In this technique, a custom fabricated atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever, with a nanoscale Au-Cr thermocouple integrated into the tip of the probe, is used to measure temperature fields of surfaces. Operation in an UHV environment eliminates parasitic heat transport between the tip and the sample enabling quantitative measurement of temperature fields on metal and dielectric surfaces with nanoscale resolution. We demonstrate the capabilities of this technique by directly imaging thermal fields in the vicinity of a 200 nm wide, self-heated, Pt line. Our measurements are in excellent agreement with computational results-unambiguously demonstrating the quantitative capabilities of the technique. UHV-SThM techniques will play an important role in the study of energy dissipation in nanometer-sized electronic and photonic devices and the study of phonon and electron transport at the nanoscale.

  17. Reducing the impurity incorporation from residual gas by ion bombardment during high vacuum magnetron sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, Johanna; Widenkvist, Erika; Larsson, Karin; Kreissig, Ulrich; Mraz, Stanislav; Martinez, Carlos; Music, Denis; Schneider, J. M.

    2006-05-08

    The influence of ion energy on the hydrogen incorporation has been investigated for alumina thin films, deposited by reactive magnetron sputtering in an Ar/O{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O environment. Ar{sup +} with an average kinetic energy of {approx}5 eV was determined to be the dominating species in the plasma. The films were analyzed with x-ray diffraction, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and elastic recoil detection analysis, demonstrating evidence for amorphous films with stoichiometric O/Al ratio. As the substrate bias potential was increased from -15 V (floating potential) to -100 V, the hydrogen content decreased by {approx}70%, from 9.1 to 2.8 at. %. Based on ab initio calculations, these results may be understood by thermodynamic principles, where a supply of energy enables surface diffusion, H{sub 2} formation, and desorption [Rosen et al., J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 17, L137 (2005)]. These findings are of importance for the understanding of the correlation between ion energy and film composition and also show a pathway to reduce impurity incorporation during film growth in a high vacuum ambient.

  18. High levels of polybrominated diphenyl ethers in vacuum cleaner dust from California fire stations.

    PubMed

    Shen, Beverly; Whitehead, Todd P; McNeel, Sandra; Brown, F Reber; Dhaliwal, Joginder; Das, Rupali; Israel, Leslie; Park, June-Soo; Petreas, Myrto

    2015-04-21

    Firefighters are exposed to chemicals during fire events and may also experience chemical exposure in their fire stations. Dust samples from used vacuum cleaner bags were collected from 20 fire stations in California and analyzed for polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Median dust concentrations were higher for PBDEs (e.g., 47 000 ng/g for BDE-209) than for PAHs (e.g., 220 ng/g for benzo[a]pyrene) or PCBs (e.g., 9.3 ng/g for PCB-180). BDE-209 concentrations in dust from California fire stations were among the highest of any previously documented homes or occupational settings in the world. We examined factors such as the frequency of emergency responses, the number of fire vehicles on site, and building age, but we could not account for the high levels of BDE-209 observed in fire station dust. Based on the findings of our pilot study, we hypothesize that possible sources of BDE-209 in fire stations include contaminated ash tracked back from fire events via boots, clothing, and other equipment as well as specialized equipment treated with BDE-209, including turnout gear and fire vehicles. We suggest possible follow-up studies to confirm these hypotheses.

  19. New type of drift tubes for gas-discharge detectors operating in vacuum: Production technology and quality control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azorskii, N. I.; Gusakov, Yu. V.; Elsha, V. V.; Enik, T. L.; Ershov, Yu. V.; Kekelidze, V. D.; Kislov, E. M.; Kolesnikov, A. O.; Madigozhin, D. T.; Movchan, S. A.; Polenkevich, I. A.; Potrebenikov, Yu. K.; Samsonov, V. A.; Shkarovskiy, S. N.; Sotnikov, A. N.; Volkov, A. D.; Zinchenko, A. I.

    2017-01-01

    A device for fabricating thin-wall (straw) drift tubes using polyethylene terephthalate film 36 μm thick by ultrasonic welding is described together with the technique for controlling their quality. The joint width amounts to 0.4-1.0 mm. The joint breaking strength is 31.9 kg/mm2. The argon leakage from a tube of volume 188.6 cm3 under a pressure gradient of 1.0 atm does not exceed 0.3 × 10-3 cm3/min, which is mainly related to the absence of metallization in the joint vicinity. The high strength, the low tensile creep due to the absence of glued layers, the small value of gas leakage makes the new tubes capable of reliable and long-term operation in vacuum, which is confirmed by the operation of 7168 straw tubes for two years in the NA62 experiment.

  20. A novel high vacuum chest drainage system – a pilot study*

    PubMed Central

    Tille, Jean-Christophe; Khabiri, Ebrahim; Giliberto, Jean-Pierre; Courvoisier, Delphine S.; Kalangos, Afksendiyos; Walpoth, Beat H.

    2014-01-01

    Aim To assess the safety and feasibility of use of a novel high vacuum chest drainage system (HVCDS) and its influence on the cardiovascular system compared to a conventional system (CCDS). Material and methods Five anesthetized pigs underwent a median sternotomy. Three drains were placed in retrocardiac, retrosternal and left pleural positions. The animals received a HVCDS (22 Fr with 180 2-mm holes, n = 2) or a CCDS (n = 2). In the fifth animal off pump coronary artery bypass graft (OPCABG) stabilizers were tested. After chest closure animals had three 30 min runs of artificial bleeding (5 ml/min) under different negative aspiration pressures (–2, –20, –40 kPa) for both groups, followed by standardized surgical bleeding (–40 kPa – HVCDS, – 2 kPa – CCDS). Hemodynamic parameters and each drain's output were registered every 5 minutes and the residual blood was assessed. All catheters, the heart and left lung underwent macroscopic and histopathological examination. Results The application of the different pressures showed neither hemodynamic changes nor differences in blood drainage with both systems in two bleeding models. The HVCDS enabled drainage comparable to the CCDS but showed relevant clotting. Application of –20 kPa and –40 kPa caused macroscopic epicardial and pulmonary lesions in all tested devices including OPCABG stabilizers consisting of sub-epicardial or sub-pleural hemorrhage without myocyte or alveolar damage. Conclusions The novel and conventional chest drainage systems used at pressures up to 40 kPa induced no hemodynamic instability. Both systems showed adequate equal drainage, despite major HVCDS clotting. High negative pressure drainage with both systems showed focal sub-epicardial and subpleural hemorrhage. Thus, long-term assessment of high pressure drainage and potential interaction with fragile structures (coronary bypass graft) should be carried out. PMID:26336441

  1. Near-vacuum hohlraums for driving fusion implosions with high density carbon ablators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berzak Hopkins, Laura

    2014-10-01

    Achieving ignition requires reaching fast implosion velocities, which highlights the need for a highly efficient hohlraum to drive indirect-drive inertial confinement fusion implosions. Gas-filled hohlraums are typically utilized due to the pulse length (15-20 ns) needed to drive plastic (CH) capsules. With the recent use of 3× denser high-density carbon (HDC) capsules, ignition pulses can be less than 10 ns in duration, providing the opportunity to utilize near-vacuum hohlraums (NVH) to drive ignition-relevant implosions on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) with minimal laser-plasma instabilities which complicate standard gas-filled hohlraums. Initial NVH implosions on the NIF have demonstrated coupling efficiency significantly higher than observed in gas-filled hohlraums - backscatter losses less than 2% and virtually no suprathermal electron generation. A major design challenge for the NVH is symmetry control. Without tamping gas, the hohlraum wall quickly expands filling the volume with gold plasma. However, results to-date indicate that the inner-cone beams propagate freely to the hohlraum wall for at least 6.5 ns. With minimal predicted cross-beam power transfer, this propagation enables symmetry control via dynamic beam phasing - time-dependent direct adjustment of the inner- and outer-cone laser pulses. A series of experiments with an HDC ablator and NVH culminated in a 6 ns, 1.2 MJ cryogenic DT layered implosion yielding 1.8 × 1015 neutrons--significantly higher yield than any CH implosion at comparable energy. This implosion reached an ignition-relevant velocity -350 km/s - with no observed ablator mix in the hot spot. Recent experiments have explored two-shock designs in a larger, 6.72 mm hohlraum, and upcoming experiments will incrementally extend the pulse duration toward a 9 ns long, three-shock ignition design. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  2. Ultra high vacuum fabrication of metallic contacts for molecular devices on an insulating surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fostner, Shawn

    The preparation and characterization of metallic wires on insulating substrates by a variety of mechanisms has been explored. A multi-scale approach utilizing microfabricated silicon stencil masks, feedback controlled electromigration, and field induced metal cluster deposition in a novel geometry has been explored on potassium bromide (KBr), indium phosphide (InP), and silicon oxide substrates in an ultra-high vacuum environment (UHV). The initial deposition of gold, and tantalum wires between one hundred nanometers and micrometers in size was performed using reinforced silicon nanostencils. The stencil fabrication was discussed, and an examination of the deformation of the integrated structures under the deposition of highly stressed tantalum films was shown to be significantly smaller than typical structures. Metallic wires deposited using these stencils as well as electron beam lithography were electrically stressed and the breaking characteristics analyzed. Typical nanometer scale gaps were observed, as well as larger features more commonly found in the breaking of bamboo-like structures in gold wires 100 nm in size or less, particularly with a significant series resistance. These larger gaps are expected to be more applicable for the deposition of subsequent metallic clusters and preparation of molecular devices. As a step towards connecting the initially deposited wires as well as localized molecules in an a fashion allowing atomic scale imaging by AFM, modelling and experiments of field induced deposition of gold clusters on KBr and InP substrates was carried out. Deposition on InP substrates with a backside 2D electron gas as a counter-electrode demonstrated the feability of this deposition technique in UHV. Subsequent depositions on or adjacent to metallic pads on the bulk insulating KBr provided a proof of principle of the technique, though some experimental limitations such as large current pulses with the tip in close proximity to the surface are

  3. Electrical characterization of SiGeSn grown on Ge substrate using ultra high vacuum chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahoujja, Mo; Kang, S.; Hamilton, M.; Yeo, Y. K.; Kouvetakis, J.; Menendez, J.

    2012-02-01

    There has been recently considerable interest in growing SiyGe1-x-ySnx alloys for the fabrication of photonic devices that could be integrated with Si technologies. We report temperature dependent Hall (TDH) measurements of the hole concentration and mobility from high quality p-type doped Si0.08Ge0.90Sn0.02 layers grown on p-type doped Ge substrates using ultra high vacuum chemical vapor deposition. The TDH measurements show the hole sheet density remains constant at low temperatures before slightly decreasing and dipping at ˜ 125 K. It then exponentially increases with temperature due to the activation of shallow acceptors. At temperatures above ˜ 450 K, the hole sheet density increases sharply indicating the onset of intrinsic conduction in the SiGeSn and/or Ge layers. To extract the electrical properties of the SiGeSn layer alone, a parametric fit using a multi layer conducting model is applied to the measured hole concentration and mobility data. The analysis yields boron and gallium doping concentrations of 3x10^17 cm-3 and 1x10^18 cm-3 with activation energies of 10 meV and 11 meV for the SiGeSn layer and Ge substrate, respectively. Furthermore, a temperature independent hole sheet concentration of ˜5x10^15 cm-2 with a mobility of ˜250 cm^2/Vs, which is believed to be due to an interfacial layer between the SiGeSn layer and the Ge substrate, is also determined.

  4. Generation of high charge state metal ion beams by electron cyclotron resonance heating of vacuum arc plasma in cusp trap

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolaev, A. G.; Savkin, K. P.; Oks, E. M.; Vizir, A. V.; Yushkov, G. Yu.; Vodopyanov, A. V.; Izotov, I. V.; Mansfeld, D. A.

    2012-02-15

    A method for generating high charge state heavy metal ion beams based on high power microwave heating of vacuum arc plasma confined in a magnetic trap under electron cyclotron resonance conditions has been developed. A feature of the work described here is the use of a cusp magnetic field with inherent ''minimum-B'' structure as the confinement geometry, as opposed to a simple mirror device as we have reported on previously. The cusp configuration has been successfully used for microwave heating of gas discharge plasma and extraction from the plasma of highly charged, high current, gaseous ion beams. Now we use the trap for heavy metal ion beam generation. Two different approaches were used for injecting the vacuum arc metal plasma into the trap - axial injection from a miniature arc source located on-axis near the microwave window, and radial injection from sources mounted radially at the midplane of the trap. Here, we describe preliminary results of heating vacuum arc plasma in a cusp magnetic trap by pulsed (400 {mu}s) high power (up to 100 kW) microwave radiation at 37.5 GHz for the generation of highly charged heavy metal ion beams.

  5. Generation of high charge state metal ion beams by electron cyclotron resonance heating of vacuum arc plasma in cusp trap.

    PubMed

    Nikolaev, A G; Savkin, K P; Oks, E M; Vizir, A V; Yushkov, G Yu; Vodopyanov, A V; Izotov, I V; Mansfeld, D A

    2012-02-01

    A method for generating high charge state heavy metal ion beams based on high power microwave heating of vacuum arc plasma confined in a magnetic trap under electron cyclotron resonance conditions has been developed. A feature of the work described here is the use of a cusp magnetic field with inherent "minimum-B" structure as the confinement geometry, as opposed to a simple mirror device as we have reported on previously. The cusp configuration has been successfully used for microwave heating of gas discharge plasma and extraction from the plasma of highly charged, high current, gaseous ion beams. Now we use the trap for heavy metal ion beam generation. Two different approaches were used for injecting the vacuum arc metal plasma into the trap--axial injection from a miniature arc source located on-axis near the microwave window, and radial injection from sources mounted radially at the midplane of the trap. Here, we describe preliminary results of heating vacuum arc plasma in a cusp magnetic trap by pulsed (400 μs) high power (up to 100 kW) microwave radiation at 37.5 GHz for the generation of highly charged heavy metal ion beams.

  6. Generation of high charge state metal ion beams by electron cyclotron resonance heating of vacuum arc plasma in cusp trapa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolaev, A. G.; Savkin, K. P.; Oks, E. M.; Vizir, A. V.; Yushkov, G. Yu.; Vodopyanov, A. V.; Izotov, I. V.; Mansfeld, D. A.

    2012-02-01

    A method for generating high charge state heavy metal ion beams based on high power microwave heating of vacuum arc plasma confined in a magnetic trap under electron cyclotron resonance conditions has been developed. A feature of the work described here is the use of a cusp magnetic field with inherent "minimum-B" structure as the confinement geometry, as opposed to a simple mirror device as we have reported on previously. The cusp configuration has been successfully used for microwave heating of gas discharge plasma and extraction from the plasma of highly charged, high current, gaseous ion beams. Now we use the trap for heavy metal ion beam generation. Two different approaches were used for injecting the vacuum arc metal plasma into the trap - axial injection from a miniature arc source located on-axis near the microwave window, and radial injection from sources mounted radially at the midplane of the trap. Here, we describe preliminary results of heating vacuum arc plasma in a cusp magnetic trap by pulsed (400 μs) high power (up to 100 kW) microwave radiation at 37.5 GHz for the generation of highly charged heavy metal ion beams.

  7. ELETTRA vacuum system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernardini, M.

    1991-08-01

    A status report of the vacuum system of ELETTRA, the 2 GeV, 400 mA light source under construction in Trieste, will be described. The Vacuum project, presented at ``Synchrotron Radiation Vacuum Workshop'' at Riken (Japan 22-24 March 1990) and more recently at EVC-2, the European Vacuum Conference at Trieste (Italy 21-26 May 1990), is now in the phase of testing a prototype sector, which is 1/24 of the ring circumference. Details and some technological aspects of the fabrication will be reviewed together with the vacuum performances. Results of laboratory experiments on components, standard or not, allowed us to finalize the main choices in light of the general philosophy of the project and will be properly summarized.

  8. SEPRADYNE/RADUCE HIGH VACUUM THERMAL PROCESS FOR DESTRUCTION OF DIOXINS IN INEEL/WERF FLY ASH.

    SciTech Connect

    ADAMS,J.W.; KALB,P.D.; MALKMUS,D.B.

    1999-08-02

    This study investigated the use of an indirectly heated, high temperature (900 C), high vacuum (28 inch Hg) rotary kiln, developed and patented by Raduce, Inc. (subsidiary of Sepradyne Corp.), to treat a dioxin contaminated mixed waste incinerator ash from the Idaho National Engineering Lab (INEEL) Waste Experimental Reduction Facility (WERF). A 500 cm{sup 3} bench-scale rotary vacuum thermal desorption and destruction unit (DDU) was used at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) to demonstrate this thermal treatment process. Dioxins and furans were successfully decomposed at both low (450 C) and high (700-800 C) temperature regimes. In addition, substantial volume and mass reduction of the ash was achieved. Stabilization of the nonvolatile residues by a post-treatment encapsulation process may be required to reduce the leachability of RCRA metals to levels below the EPA Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) requirements.

  9. SEPRADYNE/REDUCE HIGH VACUUM THERMAL PROCESS FOR DESTRUCTION OF DIOXINS IN INEEL/WERF FLY ASH.

    SciTech Connect

    ADAMS,J.W.; KALB,P.D.; MALKMUS,D.B.

    1999-08-02

    This study investigated the use of an indirectly heated, high temperature (900 C), high vacuum (28'' Hg) rotary kiln, developed and patented by Raduce, Inc. (subsidiary of Sepradyne Corp.), to treat a dioxin contaminated mixed waste incinerator ash from the Idaho National Engineering Lab (INEEL) Waste Experimental Reduction Facility (WERF). A 500 cm{sup 3} bench-scale rotary vacuum thermal desorption and destruction unit (DDU) was used at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) to demonstrate this thermal treatment process. Dioxins and furans were successfully decomposed at both low (450 C) and high (700-800 C) temperature regimes. In addition, substantial volume and mass reduction of the ash was achieved. Stabilization of the nonvolatile residues by a post-treatment encapsulation process may be required to reduce the leachability of RCRA metals to levels below the EPA Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) requirements.

  10. Development of vacuum arc ion sources for heavy ion accelerator injectors and ion implantation technology (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oks, Efim M.

    1998-02-01

    The status of experimental research and ongoing development and upgrade of MEVVA-type ion sources over the last two years since the previous ICIS-95 is reviewed. There are two main application fields for this ion source: heavy ion accelerators and material surface implantation technology. For particle accelerator ion injection to accelerators it is important to enhance the fractions of multiply charged ions in the ion beam as well as controlling the charge state distribution, and to improve of beam current stability (i.e., to minimize the beam noise) and pulse-to-pulse reproducibility. For ion implantation application we need to increase both the implantation dose rate and the source lifetime (between required maintenance downtime) as well as making this kind of source more reliable and of yet low cost. Most of experimental results reported on here have been obtained in a collaborative program between research groups LBNL (Berkeley, USA), GSI (Darmstadt, Germany), HCEI (Tomsk, Russia), and other important contributions have been made by the groups at (BNU, Beijing, China), EDU (Izmir, Turkey), and elsewhere.

  11. High Frequency Electronic Packaging Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, M.; Lowry, L.; Lee, K.; Kolawa, E.; Tulintseff, A.; Shalkhauser, K.; Whitaker, J.; Piket-May, M.

    1994-01-01

    Commercial and government communication, radar, and information systems face the challenge of cost and mass reduction via the application of advanced packaging technology. A majority of both government and industry support has been focused on low frequency digital electronics.

  12. Effect of vacuum conditions and plasma concentration on the chemical composition and adhesion of vacuum-plasma coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisov, D. P.; Kuznetsov, V. M.; Slabodchikov, V. A.

    2015-11-01

    The paper reports on the chemical composition of titanium nitride (TiN) and silicon (Si) coatings deposited with a new technological vacuum plasma setup which comprises magnetron sputtering systems, arc evaporators, and an efficient plasma generator. It is shown that due to highly clean vacuum conditions and highly clean surface treatment in the gas discharge plasma, both the coating-substrate interface and the coatings as such are almost free from oxygen and carbon. It is found that the coating-substrate interface represents a layer of thickness ≥ 60 nm formed through vacuum plasma mixing of the coating and substrate materials. The TiN coatings obtained on the new equipment display a higher adhesion compared to brass coatings deposited by industrial technologies via intermediate titanium oxide layers. It is concluded that the designed vacuum plasma equipment allows efficient surface modification of materials and articles by vacuum plasma immersion processes.

  13. FOREWORD: The 4th CCM International Conference on Pressure Metrology from Ultra-High Vacuum to Very High Pressures (10-9 Pa to 109 Pa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legras, Jean-Claude; Jousten, Karl; Severn, Ian

    2005-12-01

    The fourth CCM (Consultative Committee for Mass and related quantities) International Conference on Pressure Metrology from Ultra-High Vacuum to Very High Pressures (10-9 Pa to 109 Pa) was held at the Institute of Physics in London from 19-21 April 2005. The event, which was organized by the Low, Medium and High Pressure working groups of the CCM, was attended by in excess of one hundred participants with representatives from five continents and every regional metrology organization. The purpose of this conference is to review all the work that is devoted to the highest quality of pressure measurement by primary standards as well as the dissemination of the pressure scale. A total of 52 papers were presented orally, and 26 as posters, in sessions that covered the following topics: Latest scientific advances in pressure and vacuum metrology Innovative transfer standards, advanced sensors and new instrument development Primary (top-level) measurement standards International and regional key comparisons New approaches to calibration It is interesting the note that since the third conference in 1999 the pressure range covered has increased by two orders of magnitude to 109 Pa, to take into account more exacting scientific and industrial demands for traceable vacuum measurement. A further feature of the conference was the increased range of instrumentation and techniques used in the realization and potential realization of pressure standards. Seton Bennett, Director of International Metrology at the National Physical Laboratory, opened the conference and Andrew Wallard, Director of the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM), gave the keynote address which described the implementation of the mutual recognition arrangement and the resulting removal of metrological barriers to international trade. Many experts have contributed significant amounts of their time to organize the event and to review the submitted papers. Thanks are due to all of these people

  14. Conceptual Design of Vacuum Chamber for testing of high heat flux components using electron beam as a source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, M. S.; Swamy, Rajamannar; Khirwadkar, S. S.; Divertors Division, Prototype

    2012-11-01

    A conceptual design of vacuum chamber is proposed to study the thermal response of high heat flux components under energy depositions of the magnitude and durations expected in plasma fusion devices. It is equipped with high power electron beam with maximum beam power of 200 KW mounted in a stationary horizontal position from back side of the chamber. The electron beam is used as a heat source to evaluate the heat removal capacity, material performance under thermal loads & stresses, thermal fatigue etc on actively cooled mock - ups which are mounted on a flange system which is the front side door of the chamber. The tests mock - ups are connected to a high pressure high temperature water circulation system (HPHT-WCS) operated over a wide range of conditions. The vacuum chamber consists of different ports at different angles to view the mock -up surface available for mock -up diagnostics. The vacuum chamber is pumped with different pumps mounted on side ports of the chamber. The chamber is shielded from X - rays which are generated inside the chamber when high-energy electrons are incident on the mock-up. The design includes development of a conceptual design with theoretical calculations and CAD modelling of the system using CATIA V5. These CAD models give an outline on the complete geometry of HHF test chamber, fabrication challenges and safety issues. FEA analysis of the system has been performed to check the structural integrity when the system is subjected to structural & thermal loads.

  15. High speed technology development and evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, D. R.; Brown, E. R.; Dickson, J. F.

    1986-10-01

    Semiconductor technology suited to high on-board data handling rates was investigated. Very high speed discrete logic and high speed gate arrays; single chip digital signal processors and single chip floating point processing peripherals; and analog CCD technologies and custom designed CCD chips for synthetic aperture radar applications were assessed. The 2 micron CMOS technology is highly reliable, supporting semicustom design techniques. Process JGC, the CCD technology, is highly reliable except for tolerance to ionizing radiation. Reliability of the ECL 16-bit serial-parallel parallel-serial converter junction isolated bipolar process, process WZA, is compromised by a design error and oxide contamination contributing to high leakage levels. The bipolar circuit is tolerant to an ionizing radiation of 20kRad. Step stress environmental testing to 200 C produces no failures in CMOS and CCD technologies, but accelerates the degradation of the oxide contaminated bipolar process. All technologies are susceptible to single event upsets.

  16. Is a Higgs vacuum instability fatal for high-scale inflation?

    DOE PAGES

    Kearney, John; Yoo, Hojin; Zurek, Kathryn M.

    2015-06-25

    We study the inflationary evolution of a scalar field h with an unstable potential for the case where the Hubble parameter H during inflation is larger than the instability scale ΛI of the potential. Quantum fluctuations in the field of size δh ~ H/2π imply that the unstable part of the potential is sampled during inflation. We investigate the evolution of these fluctuations to the unstable regime and in particular whether they generate cosmological defects or even terminate inflation. We apply the results of a toy scalar model to the case of the Standard Model (SM) Higgs boson, the quarticmore » of which evolves to negative values at high scales, and extend previous analyses of Higgs dynamics during inflation utilizing statistical methods to a perturbative and fully gauge-invariant formulation. We show that the dynamics are controlled by the renormalization group-improved quartic coupling λ(μ) evaluated at a scale μ = H, such that Higgs fluctuations are enhanced by the instability if H > ΛI. Even if H > ΛI, the instability in the Standard Model Higgs potential does not end inflation; instead the universe slowly sloughs off crunching patches of space that never come to dominate the evolution. As inflation proceeds past 50 e-folds, a significant proportion of patches exits inflation in the unstable vacuum, and as much as 1% of the spacetime can rapidly evolve to a defect. Depending on the nature of these defects, however, the resulting universe could still be compatible with ours.« less

  17. Is a Higgs vacuum instability fatal for high-scale inflation?

    SciTech Connect

    Kearney, John; Yoo, Hojin; Zurek, Kathryn M.

    2015-06-25

    We study the inflationary evolution of a scalar field h with an unstable potential for the case where the Hubble parameter H during inflation is larger than the instability scale ΛI of the potential. Quantum fluctuations in the field of size δh ~ H/2π imply that the unstable part of the potential is sampled during inflation. We investigate the evolution of these fluctuations to the unstable regime and in particular whether they generate cosmological defects or even terminate inflation. We apply the results of a toy scalar model to the case of the Standard Model (SM) Higgs boson, the quartic of which evolves to negative values at high scales, and extend previous analyses of Higgs dynamics during inflation utilizing statistical methods to a perturbative and fully gauge-invariant formulation. We show that the dynamics are controlled by the renormalization group-improved quartic coupling λ(μ) evaluated at a scale μ = H, such that Higgs fluctuations are enhanced by the instability if H > ΛI. Even if H > ΛI, the instability in the Standard Model Higgs potential does not end inflation; instead the universe slowly sloughs off crunching patches of space that never come to dominate the evolution. As inflation proceeds past 50 e-folds, a significant proportion of patches exits inflation in the unstable vacuum, and as much as 1% of the spacetime can rapidly evolve to a defect. Depending on the nature of these defects, however, the resulting universe could still be compatible with ours.

  18. High Residual Tumor Rate for Early Breast Cancer Patients Receiving Vacuum-assisted Breast Biopsy

    PubMed Central

    He, Xiao-Fang; Ye, Feng; Wen, Jia-Huai; Li, Shuai-Jie; Huang, Xiao-Jia; Xiao, Xiang-Sheng; Xie, Xiao-Ming

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The objective of study is aiming to investigate the residual tumor rate after Vacuum-assisted Breast Biopsy (VABB) for early breast cancer excision and the efficacy of mammogram and ultrasound in detecting residual tumor. Methods: Patients who underwent VABB and were confirmed with breast cancer in Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center from 2010 to 2015 were reviewed retrospectively. The residual tumor rate determined by histological examination was calculated, and then was compared with the results estimated by mammogram and ultrasound which were performed post VABB but before subsequent surgery. Univariate and multivariate analysis (logistic regression) were carried out to identify the independent risk factors associated with residual tumor. Results: In total, 126 eligible patients with early breast cancer were recruited for this study, of whom 79 (62.7%) had residual tumor and 47 (37.3 %) underwent complete excision. The residual tumor rates for lesions < 10mm, lesions 10 to 20 mm and lesions >20mm in size were 55.0%, 68.9% and 53.1%, respectively. The complete excision rates estimated by mammogram and ultrasound were 76.5% and 73.9%, with a negative predictive value of only 46.2% and 50.6%, respectively. In the multivariate logistic regression analysis, no specific factors were found associated with risk of residual tumor (all P > 0.05). Conclusions: There was a high residual tumor rate after VABB in early breast cancer. Both mammogram and ultrasound could not effectively detect the residual tumor after VABB. PMID:28261351

  19. Design of a Pilot Plant for Vacuum Infusion of High Lipoidal Liquids into Dried Foods

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-07-01

    programmable logic controller monitors the temperatures, pressures, and...operational steps are implemented through the programmable logic controller . Emergency stops and manual overrides for automatic equipment are designed in...Figure 1. The primary control element of the vacuum infusion system is a microprocessor-based programmable logic controller . The programmable logic controller

  20. Comparative study between Glauber-Velasco and the Stochastic Vacuum models for high energy hadronic collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szilard, D.; Kodama, T.

    2016-04-01

    The outlines of the Glauber-Velasco (GV) and the Stochastic Vacuum models (SVM) for describing pp elastic scattering are presented. The amplitudes and the cross-sections of both models are investigated and compared at √s = 7TeV. The asymptotic energy behaviour for the SVM is also studied.

  1. Fundamental Studies of Electronic Properties of Materials and Devices for High Power, Compact Terahertz Vacuum Electron Devices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-12-23

    Workshop on Computational Electronics, (full length conference paper) Beijing, China, May 2009, pp. 265-268. Available online through IEEE Xplore ...of traveling-wave tube regenerative oscillators,” IEEE Trans Elec Dev, vol 57, 1152-1159 (2010). [5] P. Gao, J. H. Booske, Z.-H. Yang, B. Li, J. He...J. Temkin, “Vacuum Electronic High Power Terahertz Sources,” invited review paper, Inaugural Issue, IEEE Transactions on Terahertz Science and

  2. Working in a Vacuum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rathey, Allen

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses several myths about vacuum cleaners and offers tips on evaluating and purchasing this essential maintenance tool. These myths are: (1) Amps mean performance; (2) Everyone needs high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA): (3) Picking up a "bowling ball" shows cleaning power; (4) All vacuum bags are the same; (5)…

  3. K-130 Cyclotron vacuum system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, R. C.; Bhattacharya, S.; Bhole, R. B.; Roy, Anindya; Pal, Sarbajit; Mallik, C.; Bhandari, R. K.

    2012-11-01

    The vacuum system for K-130 cyclotron has been operational since 1977. It consists of two sub-systems, main vacuum system and beam line vacuum system. The main vacuum system is designed to achieve and maintain vacuum of about 1 × 10-6 mbar inside the 23 m3 volume of acceleration chamber comprising the Resonator tank and the Dee tank. The beam line vacuum system is required for transporting the extracted beam with minimum loss. These vacuum systems consist of diffusion pumps backed by mechanical pumps like roots and rotary pumps. The large vacuum pumps and valves of the cyclotron vacuum system were operational for more than twenty five years. In recent times, problems of frequent failures and maintenance were occurring due to aging and lack of appropriate spares. Hence, modernisation of the vacuum systems was taken up in order to ensure a stable high voltage for radio frequency system and the extraction system. This is required for efficient acceleration and transportation of high intensity ion beam. The vacuum systems have been upgraded by replacing several pumps, valves, gauges and freon units. The relay based control system for main vacuum system has also been replaced by PLC based state of the art control system. The upgraded control system enables inclusion of additional operational logics and safety interlocks into the system. The paper presents the details of the vacuum system and describes the modifications carried out for improving the performance and reliability of the vacuum system.

  4. A 10 mK scanning tunneling microscope operating in ultra high vacuum and high magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Assig, Maximilian; Etzkorn, Markus; Enders, Axel; Stiepany, Wolfgang; Ast, Christian R; Kern, Klaus

    2013-03-01

    We present design and performance of a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) that operates at temperatures down to 10 mK providing ultimate energy resolution on the atomic scale. The STM is attached to a dilution refrigerator with direct access to an ultra high vacuum chamber allowing in situ sample preparation. High magnetic fields of up to 14 T perpendicular and up to 0.5 T parallel to the sample surface can be applied. Temperature sensors mounted directly at the tip and sample position verified the base temperature within a small error margin. Using a superconducting Al tip and a metallic Cu(111) sample, we determined an effective temperature of 38 ± 1 mK from the thermal broadening observed in the tunneling spectra. This results in an upper limit for the energy resolution of ΔE = 3.5 kBT = 11.4 ± 0.3 μeV. The stability between tip and sample is 4 pm at a temperature of 15 mK as demonstrated by topography measurements on a Cu(111) surface.

  5. A 10Â mK scanning tunneling microscope operating in ultra high vacuum and high magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assig, Maximilian; Etzkorn, Markus; Enders, Axel; Stiepany, Wolfgang; Ast, Christian R.; Kern, Klaus

    2013-03-01

    We present design and performance of a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) that operates at temperatures down to 10 mK providing ultimate energy resolution on the atomic scale. The STM is attached to a dilution refrigerator with direct access to an ultra high vacuum chamber allowing in situ sample preparation. High magnetic fields of up to 14 T perpendicular and up to 0.5 T parallel to the sample surface can be applied. Temperature sensors mounted directly at the tip and sample position verified the base temperature within a small error margin. Using a superconducting Al tip and a metallic Cu(111) sample, we determined an effective temperature of 38 ± 1 mK from the thermal broadening observed in the tunneling spectra. This results in an upper limit for the energy resolution of ΔE = 3.5kBT = 11.4 ± 0.3 μeV. The stability between tip and sample is 4 pm at a temperature of 15 mK as demonstrated by topography measurements on a Cu(111) surface.

  6. Flow Visualization Proposed for Vacuum Cleaner Nozzle Designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    In 1995, the NASA Lewis Research Center and the Kirby Company (a major vacuum cleaner company) began negotiations for a Space Act Agreement to conduct research, technology development, and testing involving the flow behavior of airborne particulate flow behavior. Through these research efforts, we hope to identify ways to improve suction, flow rate, and surface agitation characteristics of nozzles used in vacuum cleaner nozzles. We plan to apply an advanced visualization technology, known as Stereoscopic Imaging Velocimetry (SIV), to a Kirby G-4 vacuum cleaner. Resultant data will be analyzed with a high-speed digital motion analysis system. We also plan to evaluate alternative vacuum cleaner nozzle designs. The overall goal of this project is to quantify both velocity fields and particle trajectories throughout the vacuum cleaner nozzle to optimize its "cleanability"--its ability to disturb and remove embedded dirt and other particulates from carpeting or hard surfaces. Reference

  7. A thin polymer membrane, nano-suit, enhancing survival across the continuum between air and high vacuum

    PubMed Central

    Takaku, Yasuharu; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Ohta, Isao; Ishii, Daisuke; Muranaka, Yoshinori; Shimomura, Masatsugu; Hariyama, Takahiko

    2013-01-01

    Most multicellular organisms can only survive under atmospheric pressure. The reduced pressure of a high vacuum usually leads to rapid dehydration and death. Here we show that a simple surface modification can render multicellular organisms strongly tolerant to high vacuum. Animals that collapsed under high vacuum continued to move following exposure of their natural extracellular surface layer (or that of an artificial coat-like polysorbitan monolaurate) to an electron beam or plasma ionization (i.e., conditions known to enhance polymer formation). Transmission electron microscopic observations revealed the existence of a thin polymerized extra layer on the surface of the animal. The layer acts as a flexible “nano-suit” barrier to the passage of gases and liquids and thus protects the organism. Furthermore, the biocompatible molecule, the component of the nano-suit, was fabricated into a “biomimetic” free-standing membrane. This concept will allow biology-related fields especially to use these membranes for several applications. PMID:23589878

  8. Wireless Integrated Microelectronic Vacuum Sensor System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krug, Eric; Philpot, Brian; Trott, Aaron; Lawrence, Shaun

    2013-01-01

    NASA Stennis Space Center's (SSC's) large rocket engine test facility requires the use of liquid propellants, including the use of cryogenic fluids like liquid hydrogen as fuel, and liquid oxygen as an oxidizer (gases which have been liquefied at very low temperatures). These fluids require special handling, storage, and transfer technology. The biggest problem associated with transferring cryogenic liquids is product loss due to heat transfer. Vacuum jacketed piping is specifically designed to maintain high thermal efficiency so that cryogenic liquids can be transferred with minimal heat transfer. A vacuum jacketed pipe is essentially two pipes in one. There is an inner carrier pipe, in which the cryogenic liquid is actually transferred, and an outer jacket pipe that supports and seals the vacuum insulation, forming the "vacuum jacket." The integrity of the vacuum jacketed transmission lines that transfer the cryogenic fluid from delivery barges to the test stand must be maintained prior to and during engine testing. To monitor the vacuum in these vacuum jacketed transmission lines, vacuum gauge readings are used. At SSC, vacuum gauge measurements are done on a manual rotation basis with two technicians, each using a handheld instrument. Manual collection of vacuum data is labor intensive and uses valuable personnel time. Additionally, there are times when personnel cannot collect the data in a timely fashion (i.e., when a leak is detected, measurements must be taken more often). Additionally, distribution of this data to all interested parties can be cumbersome. To simplify the vacuum-gauge data collection process, automate the data collection, and decrease the labor costs associated with acquiring these measurements, an automated system that monitors the existing gauges was developed by Invocon, Inc. For this project, Invocon developed a Wireless Integrated Microelectronic Vacuum Sensor System (WIMVSS) that provides the ability to gather vacuum

  9. The evaluation of vacuum venting and variotherm process for improving the replication by injection molding of high aspect ratio micro features for biomedical application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorgato, Marco; Lucchetta, Giovanni

    2015-05-01

    The aspect ratio achievable in replicating micro features is one of the most important process characteristics and it is a major manufacturing constraint in applying injection molding in a range of micro engineering applications. Vacuum venting has been reported to be an effective technique in replicating micro features by microinjection molding. High surface-to-volume ratio and reduced dimensions of micro parts promote the instantaneous drop of melt temperature and consequently lead to incomplete filling. This study aims to investigate the effects of variotherm process, cavity evacuation and their interaction on the production of a micro fluidic filter for biomedical applications. A low-viscosity polystyrene and a cyclic olefin copolymer were molded applying a combination of mold evacuation and a rapid mold temperature variation that keeps the cavity temperature above the glass transition temperature during the injection phase. The research revealed the importance of these molding technologies in enhancing part filling and the replication quality for high aspect ratio micro features.

  10. Modeling and simulation of high-current vacuum arc considering the micro process of anode vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lijun; Huang, Xiaolong; Zhang, Xiao; Jia, Shenli

    2017-03-01

    In vacuum arc (VA), when the arc current is very high (usually in the tens of kilo-ampere), the heat flux density injecting into an anode is larger and leads to a higher anode temperature with the increasing of current. The strong anode evaporation drives the evaporated atoms from the anode surface to the arc column. Simultaneously, the anode evaporated atoms impact with the cathode plasma, and then the micro processes as ionization and recombination between anode atoms and plasma will happen. In this paper, the two fluid three-dimensional (3D) magneto-hydro-dynamic (MHD) model of VA considering ionization and recombination processes is built, and the influence of the anode vapor and its micro processes on the arc column is obtained by solving the two fluid MHD equations, which control anode neutral atoms and cathode plasma, respectively. In the model, the ionization of neutral atoms and the recombination of ions are both considered, the mass, momentum and energy exchange caused by the ionization and recombination processes are also considered. Moreover, the influence of ionization and recombination processes on the electromagnetic process of VA is also considered in the model. By numerical simulation, the anode vapor distribution, cathode plasma distribution and VA distribution, such as density, temperature, pressure, etc, are all obtained, and the parameters related to ionization and recombination processes are also obtained. When the anode temperature is high enough, the anode neutral vapor will enter into the arc column, and strong ionization happens at the interface between anode vapor and cathode plasma. Then, the anode vapor will be quickly ionized (usually smaller than a few microseconds) and generate a lot of ions (usually higher than 1021 m‑3 orders of magnitude). The anode neutral vapor has the same temperature with the anode surface, which is much lower than the temperature of the arc column, so the anode neutral vapor obviously has a cooling effect

  11. Large area scanning probe microscope in ultra-high vacuum demonstrated for electrostatic force measurements on high-voltage devices

    PubMed Central

    Glatzel, Thilo; Schmölzer, Thomas; Schöner, Adolf; Reshanov, Sergey; Bartolf, Holger; Meyer, Ernst

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background: The resolution in electrostatic force microscopy (EFM), a descendant of atomic force microscopy (AFM), has reached nanometre dimensions, necessary to investigate integrated circuits in modern electronic devices. However, the characterization of conducting or semiconducting power devices with EFM methods requires an accurate and reliable technique from the nanometre up to the micrometre scale. For high force sensitivity it is indispensable to operate the microscope under high to ultra-high vacuum (UHV) conditions to suppress viscous damping of the sensor. Furthermore, UHV environment allows for the analysis of clean surfaces under controlled environmental conditions. Because of these requirements we built a large area scanning probe microscope operating under UHV conditions at room temperature allowing to perform various electrical measurements, such as Kelvin probe force microscopy, scanning capacitance force microscopy, scanning spreading resistance microscopy, and also electrostatic force microscopy at higher harmonics. The instrument incorporates beside a standard beam deflection detection system a closed loop scanner with a scan range of 100 μm in lateral and 25 μm in vertical direction as well as an additional fibre optics. This enables the illumination of the tip–sample interface for optically excited measurements such as local surface photo voltage detection. Results: We present Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) measurements before and after sputtering of a copper alloy with chromium grains used as electrical contact surface in ultra-high power switches. In addition, we discuss KPFM measurements on cross sections of cleaved silicon carbide structures: a calibration layer sample and a power rectifier. To demonstrate the benefit of surface photo voltage measurements, we analysed the contact potential difference of a silicon carbide p/n-junction under illumination. PMID:26885461

  12. Process of vacuum hardening of cutting and sharpening tools of high-speed steels in belt furnaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasovi, A. N.

    1996-12-01

    The technical possibilities of vacuum elevator and bell furnaces commonly used for brazing and annealing precision parts in instrument-making and electronics can be widened. Small thin-blade tools of powder steels R6M5-P, 10R6M5-MP and "silver" steels R6M5, R6M5K5 with a minimum tolerance for sizing after hardening at a low cooling rate have high operational properties. The present paper is devoted to the process of heat treatment of special tools of the listed steels used to cut and shape ribbons, rods, and foils of alloys 36NKhTYu, 29NK, BrB2 in vacuum bcil furnaces under conditions of batch and small-batch production in electrical-engineering enterprises.

  13. VACUUM TRAP

    DOEpatents

    Gordon, H.S.

    1959-09-15

    An improved adsorption vacuum trap for use in vacuum systems was designed. The distinguishing feature is the placement of a plurality of torsionally deformed metallic fins within a vacuum jacket extending from the walls to the central axis so that substantially all gas molecules pass through the jacket will impinge upon the fin surfaces. T fins are heated by direct metallic conduction, thereby ol taining a uniform temperature at the adeorbing surfaces so that essentially all of the condensible impurities from the evacuating gas are removed from the vacuum system.

  14. Microfabricated triggered vacuum switch

    DOEpatents

    Roesler, Alexander W.; Schare, Joshua M.; Bunch, Kyle

    2010-05-11

    A microfabricated vacuum switch is disclosed which includes a substrate upon which an anode, cathode and trigger electrode are located. A cover is sealed over the substrate under vacuum to complete the vacuum switch. In some embodiments of the present invention, a metal cover can be used in place of the trigger electrode on the substrate. Materials used for the vacuum switch are compatible with high vacuum, relatively high temperature processing. These materials include molybdenum, niobium, copper, tungsten, aluminum and alloys thereof for the anode and cathode. Carbon in the form of graphitic carbon, a diamond-like material, or carbon nanotubes can be used in the trigger electrode. Channels can be optionally formed in the substrate to mitigate against surface breakdown.

  15. High Technology in Australia: Rhetoric or Reality?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sekhon, J. G.; Shannon, A. G.

    1985-01-01

    This paper outlines the imbalance in Australia's intellectual and high technology trade, and argues that if Australia is to move beyond being a high technology colony, a new attitude toward research and development needs to be engendered, particularly in the private sector of industry. It is noted that Australia supplies a small number of the…

  16. A High-resolution Vacuum Ultraviolet Laser Photoionization and Photoelectron Study of the Co Atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Huang; Wang, Hailing; Luo, Zhihong; Shi, Xiaoyu; Chang, Yih-Chung; Ng, C. Y.

    2016-12-01

    We have measured the vacuum ultraviolet-photoionization efficiency (VUV-PIE) spectrum of Co in the energy range of 63,500-67,000 cm-1, which covers the photoionization transitions of Co(3d74s2 4F9/2) \\to Co+(3d8 3F4), Co(3d74s2 4F7/2) \\to Co+(3d8 3F3), Co(3d74s2 4F9/2) \\to Co+(3d8 3F3), Co(3d74s2 4F9/2) \\to Co+(3d8 3F2), and Co(3d74s2 4F9/2) \\to Co+(3d74s1 5F5). We have also recorded the pulsed field ionization photoelectron spectrum of Co in the same energy range, allowing accurate determinations of ionization energies (IEs) for the photoionization transitions from the Co(3d74s2 4F9/2) ground neutral state to the Co+(3F J ) (J = 4 and 3) and Co+(5F5) ionic states, as well as from the Co(3d74s2 4F7/2) excited neural state to the Co+(3d8 3F3) ionic state. The high-resolution nature of the VUV laser used has allowed the observation of many well-resolved autoionizing resonances in the VUV-PIE spectrum, among which an autoionizing Rydberg series, 3d74s1(5F5)np (n = 19-38), converging to the Co+(3d74s1 5F5) ionic state from the Co(3d74s2 4F9/2) ground neutral state is identified. The fact that no discernible step-like structures are present at these ionization thresholds in the VUV-PIE spectrum indicates that direct photoionization of Co is minor compared to autoionization in this energy range. The IE values, the autoionizing Rydberg series, and the photoionization cross sections obtained in this experiment are valuable for understanding the VUV opacity and abundance measurement of the Co atom in stars and solar atmospheres, as well as for benchmarking the theoretical results calculated in the Opacity Project and the IRON Project, and thus are of relevance to astrophysics.

  17. Ultra high vacuum fracture and transfer device for AES analysis of irradiated austenitic stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Urie, M.W.; Panayotou, N.F.; Robinson, J.E.

    1980-01-01

    An ultrahigh vacuum fracture and transfer device for analysis of irradiated and non-irradiated SS 316 fuel cladding is described. Mechanical property tests used to study the behavior of cladding during reactor transient over-power conditions are reported. The stress vs temperature curves show minimal differences between unirradiated cladding and unfueled cladding. The fueled cladding fails at a lower temperature. All fueled specimens failed in an intergranular mode. (FS)

  18. Influence of vacuum-ageing duration of whole beef on retail shelf life of steaks packaged with oregano (Origanum vulgare L.) active film under high O2.

    PubMed

    Djenane, Djamel; Beltrán, José Antonio; Camo, Javier; Roncalés, Pedro

    2016-12-01

    Beef Longissimus lumborum (LL) was no aged (LL0), aged for 7 days (LL7) and 14 days (LL14) under vacuum at 1 ± 1 °C. The obtained beefsteaks were packaged in high oxygen (Hi-O2) with active packaging (AP) during 13-21 days at 1 ± 1 °C. Redness (CIE a* values), metmyoglobin percentage (MetMb%), total flora (PCA), thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBA-RS), instrumental tenderness (Warner-Bratzler shear force: WBSF), and sensory analyses were performed. The various variables differed amongst the ageing times and packaging systems (AP vs. control). Three and ten additional days of retail shelf life were observed for steaks from LL7 and LL14, respectively. AP increased efficiently the retail shelf life of beefsteaks, but did not affect meat tenderness. The extended ageing from 7 to 14 days also induced higher tenderness in beefsteaks and did not show any affect negative effect on other quality parameters. Innovative technology referring to ageing under vacuum combined with Hi-O2 MA/AP would be desirable for beefsteaks during display and constituted a good alternative for meat supermarkets.

  19. Vacuum Virtues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rathey, Allen

    2007-01-01

    Upright vacuums, like cars, vary in quality, features and performance. Like automobiles, some uprights are reliable, others may be problematic, and some become a problem as a result of neglect or improper use. So, how do education institutions make an informed choice and, having done so, ensure that an upright vacuum goes the distance? In this…

  20. A compact sub-Kelvin ultrahigh vacuum scanning tunneling microscope with high energy resolution and high stability.

    PubMed

    Zhang, L; Miyamachi, T; Tomanić, T; Dehm, R; Wulfhekel, W

    2011-10-01

    We designed a scanning tunneling microscope working at sub-Kelvin temperatures in ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) in order to study the magnetic properties on the nanoscale. An entirely homebuilt three-stage cryostat is used to cool down the microscope head. The first stage is cooled with liquid nitrogen, the second stage with liquid (4)He. The third stage uses a closed-cycle Joule-Thomson refrigerator of a cooling power of 1 mW. A base temperature of 930 mK at the microscope head was achieved using expansion of (4)He, which can be reduced to ≈400 mK when using (3)He. The cryostat has a low liquid helium consumption of only 38 ml/h and standing times of up to 280 h. The fast cooling down of the samples (3 h) guarantees high sample throughput. Test experiments with a superconducting tip show a high energy resolution of 0.3 meV when performing scanning tunneling spectroscopy. The vertical stability of the tunnel junction is well below 1 pm (peak to peak) and the electric noise floor of tunneling current is about 6fA/√Hz. Atomic resolution with a tunneling current of 1 pA and 1 mV was achieved on Au(111). The lateral drift of the microscope at stable temperature is below 20 pm/h. A superconducting spilt-coil magnet allows to apply an out-of-plane magnetic field of up to 3 T at the sample surface. The flux vortices of a Nb(110) sample were clearly resolved in a map of differential conductance at 1.1 K and a magnetic field of 0.21 T. The setup is designed for in situ preparation of tip and samples under UHV condition.

  1. Gravitational vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoryan, L. S.; Saakyan, G. S.

    1984-09-01

    The existence of a special gravitational vacuum is considered in this paper. A phenomenological method differing from the traditional Einsteinian formalization is utilized. Vacuum, metric and matter form a complex determined by field equations and at great distances from gravitational masses vacuum effects are small but could be large in powerful fields. Singularities and black holes justify the approach as well as the Ambartsmyan theory concerning the existence of supermassive and superdense prestallar bodies that then disintegrate. A theory for these superdense bodies is developed involving gravitational field equations that describe the vacuum by an energy momentum tensor and define the field and mass distribution. Computations based on the theory for gravitational radii with incompressible liquid models adequately reflecting real conditions indicate that a gravitational vacuum could have considerable effects on superdense stars and could have radical effects for very large masses.

  2. Enhancements of photoluminescence intensity in high-quality floating-zone Si by thermal annealing in vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kataoka, Keita; Hattori, Ken; Yamamoto, Aishi; Nakamoto Hattori, Azusa; Hatayama, Tomoaki; Kimoto, Yasuji; Endo, Katsuyoshi; Fuyuki, Takashi; Daimon, Hiroshi

    2016-11-01

    Inactivation of non-radiative defects by hydrogen and their thermal stabilities in a high-quality floating-zone Si wafer depending on annealing conditions have been studied using in-situ photoluminescence (PL) and thermal desorption under an ultra-high vacuum. The PL intensity increased to ∼400% of its initial value after annealing at 450 °C and decreased to ∼6% of its initial value after annealing at 600 °C due to inactivation and activation of non-radiative defects, respectively. Based on the annealing temperature- and duration-dependence of the PL intensity, we propose two types of hydrogenated defects with different thermal stabilities.

  3. Influence of Crucible Materials on High-temperature Properties of Vacuum-melted Nickel-chromium-cobalt Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, R F; Rowe, John P; Freeman, J W

    1957-01-01

    A study of the effect of induction-vacuum-melting procedure on the high-temperature properties of a titanium-and-aluminum-hardened nickel-base alloy revealed that a major variable was the type of ceramic used as a crucible. Reactions between the melt and magnesia or zirconia crucibles apparently increased high-temperature properties by introducing small amounts of boron or zirconium into the melts. Heats melted in alumina crucibles had relatively low rupture life and ductility at 1,600 F and cracked during hot-working as a result of deriving no boron or zirconium from the crucible.

  4. High-Temperature Test Technology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-03-01

    APR EDITION OF I JAN 73 IS OBSOLETE. Unclassif iedm"M SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF THIS PAGE FORWORD The work documented in this report was performed...and turbine blades of jet engines. The objective of much of this work is a reliable, high- temperature, fast -response thermocouple which interferes as...In the latter case, durability, reasonable accuracy at high temperature and relatively small size are all important; fast response is perhaps less

  5. A Review of Maintenance of Vacuum inside Vacuum Insulation Panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chun Guang; Xu, Lie

    The growing concerns over global energy crisis and the phasing out of polyurethane foams blown with CFC-11, which has high Ozone Depletion Potential(ODP), have pushed thermal insulation technology to improve its efficiency. Vacuum Insulation Panel(VIP) has been regarded as a super thermal insulation material with a thermal resistance of about 5-10 times higher than conventional thermal insulation. Appropriate vacuum in VIP is one of the most important factors contributing to the long term heat insulation performance of VIP. In this paper, the researches on three factors, which influence internal pressure inside VIP, including gas and water vapor permeation through the barrier, gas absorption by getters and desiccants and outgassing of the kernel, were reviewed respectively. Following this, the research emphasis and suggestions, which should be paid attention to, were summarized.

  6. High-Efficiency Solar Thermal Vacuum Demonstration Completed for Refractive Secondary Concentrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, Wayne A.

    2001-01-01

    Common to many of the space applications that utilize solar thermal energy--such as electric power conversion, thermal propulsion, and furnaces--is a need for highly efficient, solar concentration systems. An effort is underway at the NASA Glenn Research Center to develop the refractive secondary concentrator, which uses refraction and total internal reflection to efficiently concentrate and direct solar energy. When used in combination with advanced lightweight primary concentrators, the refractive secondary concentrator enables very high system concentration ratios (10,000 to 1) and very high temperatures (>2000 K). The innovative refractive secondary concentrator offers significant advantages over all other types of secondary concentrators. The refractive secondary offers the highest throughput efficiency, provides for flux tailoring, requires no active cooling, relaxes the pointing and tracking requirements of the primary concentrator, and enables very high system concentration ratios. This technology has broad applicability to any system that requires the conversion of solar energy to heat. Glenn initiated the development of the refractive secondary concentrator in support of Shooting Star, a solar thermal propulsion flight experiment, and continued the development in support of Space Solar Power.

  7. Preparing for High Technology: Strategies for Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faddis, Constance; And Others

    In order to help postsecondary technical colleges to keep abreast of changing technology, a study was conducted (1) to investigate the current and future status of three high technology areas in terms of their impacts on occupations, labor demand, and training requirements; and (2) to provide guidelines to help colleges change their programs to…

  8. High-Speed Sealift Technology. Volume 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-09-01

    Engineering Directorate Technology Projection Report HIGH-SPEED SEALIFT TECHNOLOGY Volume 1 BY OWEN K. RITTER MICHAEL T. TEMPLEMAN...7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Naval Surface Warfare Center,Carderock Division,Total Ship Systems Engineering Directorate...11 3.4.3.2 Diesel Engines

  9. A Kilogauss-scale, High-vacuum Toroidal Electron Plasma Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Marler, J. P.; Stoneking, M. R.

    2006-10-18

    We describe in detail the newly constructed Lawrence Non-Neutral Torus (LNT) II apparatus. The LNT II features an improved toroidal magnetic field magnitude ({approx} 1 kG) and base vacuum pressure (<10-9 Torr). A segmented Au-plated Al electrode shell contributes to the reduction in field asymmetries and enables enhanced diagnostic capabilities. Additionally, the electron source is located on a retractable bellows for study of confinement dynamics in a complete torus. Conservative estimates suggest confinement times on the order of 1 second are achievable which would represent almost two orders of magnitude improvement over measurements made with the previous apparatus.

  10. Ultrahigh vacuum, high temperature, low cycle fatigue of coated and uncoated Rene 80

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kortovich, C. S.

    1976-01-01

    A study was conducted on the ultrahigh vacuum strain controlled by low cycle fatigue behavior of uncoated and CODEP B-1 aluminide coated Rene' 80 nickel-base superalloy at 1000 C (1832 F) and 871 C (1600 F). The results indicated little effect of coating or temperature on the fatigue properties. There was, however, a significant effect on fatigue life when creep was introduced into the strain cycles. The effect of this creep component was analyzed in terms of the method of strainrange partitioning.

  11. Quasi-adiabatic vacuum-based column housing for very high-pressure liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Gritti, Fabrice; Gilar, Martin; Jarrell, Joseph A

    2016-07-22

    A prototype vacuum-based (10(-6)Torr) column housing was built to thermally isolate the chromatographic column from the external air environment. The heat transfer mechanism is solely controlled by surface radiation, which was minimized by wrapping the column with low-emissivity aluminum tape. The adiabaticity of the column housing was quantitatively assessed from the measurement of the operational pressure and fluid temperature at the outlet of a 2.1mm×100mm column (sub-2 μm particles). The pressure drop along the column was raised up to 1kbar. The enthalpy balance of the eluent (water, acetonitrile, and one water/acetonitrile mixture, 70/30, v/v) showed that less than 1% of the viscous heat generated by friction of the fluid against the packed bed was lost to the external air environment. Such a vacuum-based column oven minimizes the amplitude of the radial temperature gradients across the column diameter and maximizes its resolving power.

  12. A Large High Vacuum Reaction Chamber for Nuclear Physics Research at VECC, Kolkata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundu, S.; Bhattacharya, S.; Meena, J. K.; Ghosh, T. K.; Bhattacharjee, T.; Mukhopadhyay, P.; Bhattacharya, C.; Rana, T. K.; Banerjee, K.; Mukherjee, G.; Banerjee, S. R.; Bandyopadhyay, D. L.; Ahammed, M.; Bhattacharya, P.

    2012-11-01

    A large, segmented, horizontal axis, reaction chamber (SHARC) has recently been fabricated, installed and integrated with the beam line in the VECC superconducting cyclotron (SCC) experimental area. It is a cylindrical, three segment, stainless steel chamber of length 2.2 m, diameter 1 m. Two pairs of parallel rails have been provided internally for placement of the target assembly and detector systems within the chamber. The whole target assembly can be placed anywhere on the rail to facilitate optimum flight path. The nominal vacuum of ~1×10-7 mbar has been obtained in ~8 hrs by means of two turbo molecular (1000 l/s) and two cryo pumps (2500 l/s) backed by mechanical pumps. The whole vacuum system as well as the target positioning (vertical and rotational movements) operations are fully automated with manual override option; both are monitored and controlled locally as well as remotely through the local and remote control units providing real time status display.

  13. High Temperature Acoustic Liner Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrott, Tony L.; Jones, Michael G.; Posey, Joe W.

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes work currently in progress at Langley on liner concepts that employ structures that may be suitable for broadband exhaust noise attenuation in high speed flow environments and at elevated temperatures characteristic of HSCT applications. Because such liners will need to provide about 10 dB suppression over a 2 to 3 octave frequency range, conventional single-degree-of-freedom resonant structures will not suffice. Bulk absorbers have the needed broadband absorption characteristic; however, at lower frequencies they tend to be inefficient.

  14. Ultra High Pressure (UHP) Technology (BRIEFING SLIDES)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-08-25

    AFRL-RX-TY-TP-2008-4600 POSTPRINT ULTRA HIGH PRESSURE ( UHP ) TECHNOLOGY (BRIEFING SLIDES) Patrick D. Sullivan Air Force Research...Since the discovery of the unprecedented effectiveness of 1500 psi Ultra High Pressure ( UHP ) technology in September of 2002 , AFRL scientists and... engineers have sought to increase Aircraft Rescue Fire Fighting (ARFF) performance by moving to higher flow rates to obtain greater throw distance and

  15. Study of the contributions of the electrode materials to the plasma of a high-current vacuum spark

    SciTech Connect

    Bashutin, O. A.; Vovchenko, E. D.; Dodulad, E. I.; Savjolov, A. S.; Sarantsev, S. A.

    2012-03-15

    The contribution of the electrode material to the formation of the plasma of a low-inductive high-current vacuum spark and its influence on the process of discharge micropinching were studied using X-ray spectroscopy and laser diagnostics. Electrode system configurations are determined in which the contributions of the materials of both electrodes to the plasma emitting X-rays are comparable and in which the contribution of one electrode is dominating. It is found that discharge pinching occurs primarily in the vapor of the pointed electrode independently of its polarity. The experimental results indicate the formation of a suprathermal electron beam in the micropinch region.

  16. Mechanisms for the formation and transport of ion fluxes in the plasma of a high-current vacuum spark

    SciTech Connect

    Dolgov, A. N.; Zemchenkova, N. V.; Klyachin, N. A.; Prokhorovich, D. E.

    2010-09-15

    The processes of ion flux formation in the plasma of a high-current vacuum spark were investigated experimentally. It is shown that multicharged ions are generated in the neck formed in the erosion products of the inner electrode. The plasma escaping from the neck region plays a role of a piston dragging particles of the cold peripheral plasma into ambient space. As the discharge current increases, the flux of the evaporated electrode material grows, the degree of ionization of the plasma produced decreases, and the efficiency of plasma heating caused by the pinching effect is reduced.

  17. Trapping of xenon gas in closed inner spaces of carbon nanomaterials for stable gas storage under high-vacuum condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Keita; Yasuda, Hidehiro

    2017-01-01

    Xe gas can be trapped in the closed inner spaces of glassy carbon derived from C60 fullerene by thermal coalescence of C60 in Xe atmosphere and in cap-opened carbon nanotubes (CNTs) covered with an ionic liquid by soaking Xe-adsorbing CNTs in an ionic liquid. The trapped Xe gas is detected by energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry using a spectrometer mounted on an analytical transmission electron microscope. The closed inner spaces store gas molecules even under high-vacuum condition (˜10-5 Pa).

  18. Vacuum-induced Stark shifts for quantum logic using a collective system in a high-quality dispersive cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Gabris, A.; Agarwal, G.S.

    2005-05-15

    A collective system of atoms in a high-quality cavity can be described by a nonlinear interaction which arises due to the Lamb shift of the energy levels due to the cavity vacuum [Agarwal et al., Phys. Rev. A 56, 2249 (1997)]. We show how this collective interaction can be used to perform quantum logic. In particular we produce schemes to realize controlled-NOT gates not only for two-qubit but also for three-qubit systems. We also discuss realizations of Toffoli gates. Our effective Hamiltonian is also realized in other systems such as trapped ions or magnetic molecules.

  19. High Temperature Particle Filtration Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Besmann, T.M.

    2001-11-13

    High temperature filtration can serve to improve the economic, environmental, and energy performance of chemical processes. This project was designed to evaluate the stability of filtration materials in the environments of the production of dimethyldichlorosilane (DDS). In cooperation with Dow Corning, chemical environments for the fluidized bed reactor where silicon is converted to DDS and the incinerator where vents are cornbusted were characterized. At Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) an exposure system was developed that could simulate these two environments. Filter samples obtained from third parties were exposed to the environments for periods up to 1000 hours. Mechanical properties before and after exposure were determined by burst-testing rings of filter material. The results indicated that several types of filter materials would likely perform well in the fluid bed environment, and two materials would be good candidates for the incinerator environment.

  20. Pulsed U.V. Laser Cleaning Of GaSb Single Crystal Surface In Ultra-High-Vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petit, E. J.; Humblet, V. M.; Brezini, A.; Caudano, R.; Gouskov, A.; Bougnot, G.

    1989-01-01

    Surface modifications induced to GaSb single crystals by pulsed U.V. laser annealing (PLA) in ultra-high-vacuum have been studied. The (111) surfaces of GaSb single crystals were prepared by a mechanical and chemical etching before introducing into vacuum. The samples were subsequently exposed in vacuum to the U.V. radiation (193 nm) of an high power excimer laser. The analysis by Auger electron spectroscopy performed in situ shows that an atomically clean surface (free of native oxides and of carbon pollution) can be achieved by PLA. The effects of the Energy Density (ED) and of the repetition of the PLA are addressed. Superficial topology changes observed in situ by low resolution scanning electron microscopy, and later by optical microscopy, are described too. From our observations we conclude that She antimony oxides begin to decompose noticely when the surface is irradiated with 50 mJ/cm2 laser pulses. Their evaporation explains the onset of the sharp chemical reduction observed at higher fluences. We propose that superficial melting of the GaSb single crystal starts as soon as the laser beam ED reaches 100 mJ/cm . Beyond this fluence the superficial chemical reduction is completed not only by evaporation, but also : - first : by thermal stress induced fracture of the gallium oxide layer and its ejection due to the strong evaporation from the substrate, and, - second : by the gallium oxide dissolution into the melt. The amount of antimony segregated on ple surface becomes important when the surface melts deeply (i.e. at ED superior of 150 mJ/cm2).

  1. Design Criteria for Vacuum Wastewater Transfer Systems in Advanced Base Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-05-01

    System Performance ... ..... 23 Air Admisiion and Control Criteria ..... ............. ... 24 Vacuum Systel-s in Network Applications...States via Vacuum Technology, Inc., in 1970 (Ref 5 ). A number of large-scale operational installations have been made in housing developments in the...lift requirements 4. Sizing the vacuum discharge pumps without recognizing their functions 5 . High potential for solids and grease deposition in the

  2. Vacuum brazing of high volume fraction SiC particles reinforced aluminum matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Dongfeng; Niu, Jitai; Gao, Zeng; Wang, Peng

    2015-03-01

    This experiment chooses A356 aluminum matrix composites containing 55% SiC particle reinforcing phase as the parent metal and Al-Si-Cu-Zn-Ni alloy metal as the filler metal. The brazing process is carried out in vacuum brazing furnace at the temperature of 550°C and 560°C for 3 min, respectively. The interfacial microstructures and fracture surfaces are investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy spectrum analysis (EDS). The result shows that adequacy of element diffusion are superior when brazing at 560°C, because of higher activity and liquidity. Dislocations and twins are observed at the interface between filler and composite due to the different expansion coefficient of the aluminum alloy matrix and SiC particles. The fracture analysis shows that the brittle fracture mainly located at interface of filler and composites.

  3. Photochemical/Microchannel Plasma Reactors Driven By High Power Vacuum Ultraviolet Lamps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Chul; Park, Sung-Jin; Eden, Gary

    2016-09-01

    Experiments are being conducted in which molecular dissociation or other chemical reactions in microchannel plasmas are accelerated by the introduction of vacuum ultraviolet photons. Initial emphasis is being placed on recently-developed Xe2 lamps that are efficient sources of 172 nm (h ν 7.2 eV) photons. Thin, flat lamps, fabricated from fused silica and having microcavity arrays internal to the lamp, have been developed by the University of Illinois and Eden Park Illumination and produce intensities above 200 mW/cm2. Integrating such lamps into a microcavity plasma reactor yields a hybrid photochemical/plasma system in which product yield and power consumption can be optimized. The selectivity of photodissociation in generating radicals and atomic fragments offers new synergies in plasma processing. Data concerning CO2 dissociation in arrays of microchannel plasmas, and the modification of this process by external 172 nm radiation, will be presented.

  4. Vacuum-barrier window for wide-bandwidth high-power microwave transmission

    DOEpatents

    Caplan, Malcolm; Shang, Clifford C.

    1996-01-01

    A vacuum output window comprises a planar dielectric material with identical systems of parallel ridges and valleys formed in opposite surfaces. The valleys in each surface neck together along parallel lines in the bulk of the dielectric. Liquid-coolant conduits are disposed linearly along such lines of necking and have water or even liquid nitrogen pumped through to remove heat. The dielectric material can be alumina, or its crystalline form, sapphire. The electric-field of a broadband incident megawatt millimeter-wave radio frequency energy is oriented perpendicular to the system of ridges and valleys. The ridges, about one wavelength tall and with a period of about one wavelength, focus the incident energy through in ribbons that squeeze between the liquid-coolant conduits without significant losses over very broad bands of the radio spectrum. In an alternative embodiment, the liquid-coolant conduits are encased in metal within the bulk of the dielectric.

  5. High intensity vacuum ultraviolet and extreme ultraviolet production by noncollinear mixing in laser vaporized media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todt, Michael A.; Albert, Daniel R.; Davis, H. Floyd

    2016-06-01

    A method is described for generating intense pulsed vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) and extreme ultraviolet (XUV) laser radiation by resonance enhanced four-wave mixing of commercial pulsed nanosecond lasers in laser vaporized mercury under windowless conditions. By employing noncollinear mixing of the input beams, the need of dispersive elements such as gratings for separating the VUV/XUV from the residual UV and visible beams is eliminated. A number of schemes are described, facilitating access to the 9.9-14.6 eV range. A simple and convenient scheme for generating wavelengths of 125 nm, 112 nm, and 104 nm (10 eV, 11 eV, and 12 eV) using two dye lasers without the need for dye changes is described.

  6. High intensity vacuum ultraviolet and extreme ultraviolet production by noncollinear mixing in laser vaporized media.

    PubMed

    Todt, Michael A; Albert, Daniel R; Davis, H Floyd

    2016-06-01

    A method is described for generating intense pulsed vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) and extreme ultraviolet (XUV) laser radiation by resonance enhanced four-wave mixing of commercial pulsed nanosecond lasers in laser vaporized mercury under windowless conditions. By employing noncollinear mixing of the input beams, the need of dispersive elements such as gratings for separating the VUV/XUV from the residual UV and visible beams is eliminated. A number of schemes are described, facilitating access to the 9.9-14.6 eV range. A simple and convenient scheme for generating wavelengths of 125 nm, 112 nm, and 104 nm (10 eV, 11 eV, and 12 eV) using two dye lasers without the need for dye changes is described.

  7. A versatile ultra high vacuum sample stage with six degrees of freedom

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, A. W.; Tromp, R. M.

    2013-07-15

    We describe the design and practical realization of a versatile sample stage with six degrees of freedom. The stage was designed for use in a Low Energy Electron Microscope, but its basic design features will be useful for numerous other applications. The degrees of freedom are X, Y, and Z, two tilts, and azimuth. All motions are actuated in an ultrahigh vacuum base pressure environment by piezoelectric transducers with integrated position sensors. The sample can be load-locked. During observation, the sample is held at a potential of −15 kV, at temperatures between room temperature and 1500 °C, and in background gas pressures up to 1 × 10{sup −4} Torr.

  8. Vacuum-barrier window for wide-bandwidth high-power microwave transmission

    DOEpatents

    Caplan, M.; Shang, C.C.

    1996-08-20

    A vacuum output window comprises a planar dielectric material with identical systems of parallel ridges and valleys formed in opposite surfaces. The valleys in each surface neck together along parallel lines in the bulk of the dielectric. Liquid-coolant conduits are disposed linearly along such lines of necking and have water or even liquid nitrogen pumped through to remove heat. The dielectric material can be alumina, or its crystalline form, sapphire. The electric-field of a broadband incident megawatt millimeter-wave radio frequency energy is oriented perpendicular to the system of ridges and valleys. The ridges, about one wavelength tall and with a period of about one wavelength, focus the incident energy through in ribbons that squeeze between the liquid-coolant conduits without significant losses over very broad bands of the radio spectrum. In an alternative embodiment, the liquid-coolant conduits are encased in metal within the bulk of the dielectric. 4 figs.

  9. A vacuum flash-assisted solution process for high-efficiency large-area perovskite solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiong; Bi, Dongqin; Yi, Chenyi; Décoppet, Jean-David; Luo, Jingshan; Zakeeruddin, Shaik Mohammed; Hagfeldt, Anders; Grätzel, Michael

    2016-07-01

    Metal halide perovskite solar cells (PSCs) currently attract enormous research interest because of their high solar-to-electric power conversion efficiency (PCE) and low fabrication costs, but their practical development is hampered by difficulties in achieving high performance with large-size devices. We devised a simple vacuum flash-assisted solution processing method to obtain shiny, smooth, crystalline perovskite films of high electronic quality over large areas. This enabled us to fabricate solar cells with an aperture area exceeding 1 square centimeter, a maximum efficiency of 20.5%, and a certified PCE of 19.6%. By contrast, the best certified PCE to date is 15.6% for PSCs of similar size. We demonstrate that the reproducibility of the method is excellent and that the cells show virtually no hysteresis. Our approach enables the realization of highly efficient large-area PSCs for practical deployment.

  10. Phase-Coherent Frequency Combs in the Vacuum Ultraviolet via High-Harmonic Generation inside a Femtosecond Enhancement Cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, R. Jason; Moll, Kevin D.; Thorpe, Michael J.; Ye, Jun

    2005-05-01

    We demonstrate the generation of phase-coherent frequency combs in the vacuum utraviolet spectral region. The output from a mode-locked laser is stabilized to a femtosecond enhancement cavity with a gas jet at the intracavity focus. The resulting high-peak power of the intracavity pulse enables efficient high-harmonic generation by utilizing the full repetition rate of the laser. Optical-heterodyne-based measurements reveal that the coherent frequency comb structure of the original laser is fully preserved in the high-harmonic generation process. These results open the door for precision frequency metrology at extreme ultraviolet wavelengths and permit the efficient generation of phase-coherent high-order harmonics using only a standard laser oscillator without active amplification of single pulses.

  11. Low-Dimensional Structure Vacuum-Ultraviolet-Sensitive (λ < 200 nm) Photodetector with Fast-Response Speed Based on High-Quality AlN Micro/Nanowire.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Wei; Huang, Feng; Zheng, Ruisheng; Wu, Honglei

    2015-07-08

    A low-dimensional-structure vacuum-ultraviolet-sensitive photodetector based on high-quality aluminum nitride (AlN) micro-/nanowires is reported. This work, for the first time, demonstrates that a semiconductor nanostructure can be applied in vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) photon detection and opens a way for developing diminutive, power-saving, and low-cost VUV materials and sensors that can be potentially applied in geospace sciences and solar-terrestrial physics.

  12. Electron-positron pair production from vacuum in the field of high-intensity laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, V. S.; Mur, V. D.; Narozhnyi, N. B.; Popruzhenko, S. V.

    2016-03-01

    The works dealing with the theory of e + e - pair production from vacuum under the action of highintensity laser radiation are reviewed. The following problems are discussed: pair production in a constant electric field E and time-variable homogeneous field E( t); the dependence of the number of produced pairs {N_{{e^ + }{e^ - }}} on the shape of a laser pulse (dynamic Schwinger effect); and a realistic three-dimensional model of a focused laser pulse, which is based on exact solution of Maxwell's equations and contains parameters such as focal spot radius R, diffraction length L, focusing parameter Δ, pulse duration τ, and pulse shape. This model is used to calculate {N_{{e^ + }{e^ - }}} for both a single laser pulse ( n = 1) and several ( n ≥ 2) coherent pulses with a fixed total energy that simultaneously "collide" in a laser focus. It is shown that, at n ≫ 1, the number of pairs increases by several orders of magnitude as compared to the case of a single pulse. The screening of a laser field by the vapors that are generated in vacuum, its "depletion," and the limiting fields to be achieved in laser experiments are considered. The relation between pair production, the problem of a quantum frequency-variable oscillator, and the theory of groups SU(1, 1) and SU(2) is discussed. The relativistic version of the imaginary time method is used in calculations. In terms of this version, a relativistic theory of tunneling is developed and the Keldysh theory is generalized to the case of ionization of relativistic bound systems, namely, atoms and ions. The ionization rate of a hydrogen-like ion with a charge 1 ≤ Z ≤ 92 is calculated as a function of laser radiation intensity ( F and ellipticity ρ.

  13. Air bearing vacuum seal assembly

    DOEpatents

    Booth, Rex

    1978-01-01

    An air bearing vacuum seal assembly capable of rotating at the speed of several thousand revolutions per minute using an air cushion to prevent the rotating and stationary parts from touching, and a two stage differential pumping arrangement to maintain the pressure gradient between the air cushion and the vacuum so that the leak rate into the vacuum is, for example, less than 1 .times. 10.sup.-4 Pa m.sup.3 /s. The air bearing vacuum seal has particular application for mounting rotating targets to an evacuated accelerator beam tube for bombardment of the targets with high-power charged particle beams in vacuum.

  14. Development of High Temperature Gas Sensor Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Gary W.; Chen, Liang-Yu; Neudeck, Philip G.; Knight, Dak; Liu, Chung-Chiun; Wu, Quing-Hai; Zhou, Huan-Jun

    1997-01-01

    The measurement of engine emissions is important for their monitoring and control. However, the ability to measure these emissions in-situ is limited. We are developing a family of high temperature gas sensors which are intended to operate in harsh environments such as those in an engine. The development of these sensors is based on progress in two types of technology: (1) The development of SiC-based semiconductor technology; and (2) Improvements in micromachining and microfabrication technology. These technologies are being used to develop point-contact sensors to measure gases which are important in emission control especially hydrogen, hydrocarbons, nitrogen oxides, and oxygen. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the development of this point-contact sensor technology. The detection of each type of gas involves its own challenges in the fields of materials science and fabrication technology. Of particular importance is sensor sensitivity, selectivity, and stability in long-term, high temperature operation. An overview is presented of each sensor type with an evaluation of its stage of development. It is concluded that this technology has significant potential for use in engine applications but further development is necessary.

  15. [Evaluation of the quality of poultry meat and its processing for vacuum packaging].

    PubMed

    Swiderski, F; Russel, S; Waszkiewicz-Robak, B; Cholewińska, E

    1997-01-01

    The aim of study was to evaluate the quality of poultry meat, roasted and smoked chicken and poultry pie packing under low and high vacuum. All investigated products were stored at +4 degrees C and evaluated by microbiological analysis. It was showed that packing under low and high vacuum inhibited development of aerobic microorganisms, proteolytic bacteria, yeasts and moulds. Vacuum-packaged storage of poultry meat and its products stimulated activity of anaerobic, nonsporeforming bacteria. The fast spoilage of fresh poultry meat was observed both under vacuum and conventional storage. The microbiology quality of poultry products depended on technology of production and microbiological quality of raw material.

  16. Bioslurping: Combined vacuum-enhanced free fuel removal and bioventing

    SciTech Connect

    Hoeppel, R.; Goetz, F.; Kittel, J.; Place, M.; Di Julio, S.

    1996-12-31

    Bioslurping is a new in situ technology that teams bioventing with vacuum-assisted free-phase fuel recovery to promote biodegradation in the vadose zone while simultaneously removing light nonaqueous phase liquid (LNAPL) from the water table and capillary fringe soil pores. Bioslurping differs from dual- or multi-phase extraction primarily in the same manner that bioventing differs from soil venting. The primary purpose of multi-phase extraction is to physically remove more volatile compounds from the groundwater, free product zones and vadose zone through use of high vacuum exerted usually below the water table. Bioslurping typically uses lower vacuum and removal of groundwater is minimized by placing a drop tube in the vacuum well near the free fuel-groundwater interface. Bioslurping is designed to accentuate in situ aerobic biodegradation and vapor extraction is an undesirable component. Thus this technology is ideal for the remediation of soils containing low volatility fuels.

  17. High Spatial Resolution Thermal Satellite Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, Robert

    2003-01-01

    This document in the form of viewslides, reviews various low-cost alternatives to high spatial resolution thermal satellite technologies. There exists no follow-on to Landsat 7 or ASTER high spatial resolution thermal systems. This document reviews the results of the investigation in to the use of new technologies to create a low-cost useful alternative. Three suggested technologies are examined. 1. Conventional microbolometer pushbroom modes offers potential for low cost Landsat Data Continuity Mission (LDCM) thermal or ASTER capability with at least 60-120 ground sampling distance (GSD). 2. Backscanning could produce MultiSpectral Thermal Imager performance without cooled detectors. 3. Cooled detector could produce hyperspectral thermal class system or extremely high spatial resolution class instrument.

  18. Multifunctional ultra-high vacuum apparatus for studies of the interactions of chemical warfare agents on complex surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Wilmsmeyer, Amanda R.; Morris, John R.; Gordon, Wesley O.; Mantooth, Brent A.; Lalain, Teri A.; Davis, Erin Durke

    2014-01-15

    A fundamental understanding of the surface chemistry of chemical warfare agents is needed to fully predict the interaction of these toxic molecules with militarily relevant materials, catalysts, and environmental surfaces. For example, rules for predicting the surface chemistry of agents can be applied to the creation of next generation decontaminants, reactive coatings, and protective materials for the warfighter. Here, we describe a multifunctional ultra-high vacuum instrument for conducting comprehensive studies of the adsorption, desorption, and surface chemistry of chemical warfare agents on model and militarily relevant surfaces. The system applies reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and mass spectrometry to study adsorption and surface reactions of chemical warfare agents. Several novel components have been developed to address the unique safety and sample exposure challenges that accompany the research of these toxic, often very low vapor pressure, compounds. While results of vacuum-based surface science techniques may not necessarily translate directly to environmental processes, learning about the fundamental chemistry will begin to inform scientists about the critical aspects that impact real-world applications.

  19. Multifunctional ultra-high vacuum apparatus for studies of the interactions of chemical warfare agents on complex surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilmsmeyer, Amanda R.; Gordon, Wesley O.; Davis, Erin Durke; Mantooth, Brent A.; Lalain, Teri A.; Morris, John R.

    2014-01-01

    A fundamental understanding of the surface chemistry of chemical warfare agents is needed to fully predict the interaction of these toxic molecules with militarily relevant materials, catalysts, and environmental surfaces. For example, rules for predicting the surface chemistry of agents can be applied to the creation of next generation decontaminants, reactive coatings, and protective materials for the warfighter. Here, we describe a multifunctional ultra-high vacuum instrument for conducting comprehensive studies of the adsorption, desorption, and surface chemistry of chemical warfare agents on model and militarily relevant surfaces. The system applies reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and mass spectrometry to study adsorption and surface reactions of chemical warfare agents. Several novel components have been developed to address the unique safety and sample exposure challenges that accompany the research of these toxic, often very low vapor pressure, compounds. While results of vacuum-based surface science techniques may not necessarily translate directly to environmental processes, learning about the fundamental chemistry will begin to inform scientists about the critical aspects that impact real-world applications.

  20. Vacuum chamber with distributed titanium sublimation pumping for the G-line wiggler at Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; He, Y.; Mistry, N. B.

    2003-07-01

    This article describes a 3-m-long vacuum chamber for the new wiggler magnet at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring (CESR) for the synchrotron light beam line of the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source (CHESS). Copper was chosen as the main chamber material for its good electric and thermal conductivities. Proper mechanical design and welding procedure were implemented to meet very tight tolerances to ensure adequate vertical aperture for the stored beams in CESR while allowing the required small wiggler gap. Distributed titanium sublimation pumping is incorporated along the 3 m length of the chamber to provide sufficient pumping speed and capacity for CESR and CHESS operations. The chamber pumping performance was evaluated prior to installation. Linear distributed pumping speeds at the beam line of ~720 l/s/m for N2 and CO and ~4000 l/s/m for H2 were measured. The measured pumping capacities for N2, CO and H2 are ~1.0, ~2.0 and ~77 Torr l, respectively, for each titanium sublimation cycle. Measurements also showed that CO molecules adsorb on the N2 and H2 saturated titanium films with virtually the same initial sticking coefficient as on a fresh titanium film. Analyses indicated very different CO adsorption mechanisms between the N2 and H2 saturated titanium films. While the replacement of surface H2 by CO was observed, little desorption of nitrogen was measured. Operational experience showed excellent vacuum pumping performance over two years after the chamber installation.

  1. Multifunctional ultra-high vacuum apparatus for studies of the interactions of chemical warfare agents on complex surfaces.

    PubMed

    Wilmsmeyer, Amanda R; Gordon, Wesley O; Davis, Erin Durke; Mantooth, Brent A; Lalain, Teri A; Morris, John R

    2014-01-01

    A fundamental understanding of the surface chemistry of chemical warfare agents is needed to fully predict the interaction of these toxic molecules with militarily relevant materials, catalysts, and environmental surfaces. For example, rules for predicting the surface chemistry of agents can be applied to the creation of next generation decontaminants, reactive coatings, and protective materials for the warfighter. Here, we describe a multifunctional ultra-high vacuum instrument for conducting comprehensive studies of the adsorption, desorption, and surface chemistry of chemical warfare agents on model and militarily relevant surfaces. The system applies reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and mass spectrometry to study adsorption and surface reactions of chemical warfare agents. Several novel components have been developed to address the unique safety and sample exposure challenges that accompany the research of these toxic, often very low vapor pressure, compounds. While results of vacuum-based surface science techniques may not necessarily translate directly to environmental processes, learning about the fundamental chemistry will begin to inform scientists about the critical aspects that impact real-world applications.

  2. High-G Gimbal Technology Studies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-07-01

    will verify the proposed High-G platform concept technology. 20 a -_ REFERENCES I. Invention Disclosure "High-G Gimbal Platform,* AMPC 37b6, 30 August...1977, Aubrey Rodgers. 2. Invention Disclosure "Snap-Lock Mechanism for High-G Gimbal Platform," AMPC 3831, 24 February 1978, Aubrey Rodgers. 3...Invention Disclosure "Rea.•tion Jet Torquer," AMPC 3832, 24 February 1978, Aubrey Rodgers and Eacar L. Bailey. 21 DISTRIBUTION No. of Copies Defense

  3. Investigations of the electrical breakdown properties of insulator materials used in high voltage vacuum diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Shurter, R.P.; Carlson, R.L.; Melton, J.G.

    1993-08-01

    The Injector for the proposed Dual-Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Testing (DARHT) Facility at Los Alamos utilizes a monolithic insulator deployed in a radial configuration. The 1.83-m-diam {times} 25.4-cm-thick insulator with embedded grading rings separates the output oil transmission line from the vacuum vessel that contains the re-entrant anode and cathode assemblies. Although much work has been done by the pulse power community in studying surface flash-over of insulating materials used in both axial and radial configurations, dendrite growth at the roots of grading rings embedded in materials suitable for very large insulators is less well characterized. Degradation of several acrylic insulators has been observed in the form of dendrites growing at the roots of the grading rings for large numbers (100`s) of pulses on the prototype DARHT Injector and other machines using similar radial geometries. In a few cases, these dendrites have led to catastrophic bulk breakdown of the acrylic between two grading rings making the insulator a costly loss. Insulating materials under investigation are acrylic (Lucite), epoxy (Furane), and cross-linked polystyrene (Rexolite); each of these materials has its own particular mechanical and electrical merits. All of these materials have been cast and machined into the required large size for the Injector. Test methods and the results of investigations into the breakdown strength of various interface geometries and the susceptibility of these materials to dendrite growth are reported.

  4. High-intensity coherent vacuum ultraviolet source using unfocussed commercial dye lasers.

    PubMed

    Albert, Daniel R; Proctor, David L; Davis, H Floyd

    2013-06-01

    Using two or three commercial pulsed nanosecond dye lasers pumped by a single 30 Hz Nd:YAG laser, generation of 0.10 mJ pulses at 125 nm (6 × 10(13) photons∕pulse) has been demonstrated by resonance enhanced four-wave mixing of collimated (unfocussed) laser beams in mercury (Hg) vapor. Phase matching at various vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) wavelengths is achieved by tuning one laser in the vicinity of the 6 (1)S0 → 6 (3)P1 resonance near 253.1 nm. A number of different mixing schemes are characterized. Our observations using broadband lasers (~0.15 cm(-1) bandwidths) are compared to previous calculations pertaining to four-wave mixing of low intensity narrowband laser beams. Prospects for further increases in pulse energies are discussed. We find that VUV tuning curves and intensities are in good agreement with theoretical predictions. The utility of the VUV light source is demonstrated by "soft universal" single-photon VUV ionization in crossed molecular beam studies and for generation of light at 130.2 nm for oxygen atom Rydberg time-of-flight experiments.

  5. Control of the polarization of a vacuum-ultraviolet, high-gain, free-electron laser

    DOE PAGES

    Allaria, Enrico; Diviacco, Bruno; Callegari, Carlo; ...

    2014-12-02

    The two single-pass, externally seeded free-electron lasers (FELs) of the FERMI user facility are designed around Apple-II-type undulators that can operate at arbitrary polarization in the vacuum ultraviolet-to-soft x-ray spectral range. Furthermore, within each FEL tuning range, any output wavelength and polarization can be set in less than a minute of routine operations. We report the first demonstration of the full output polarization capabilities of FERMI FEL-1 in a campaign of experiments where the wavelength and nominal polarization are set to a series of representative values, and the polarization of the emitted intense pulses is thoroughly characterized by three independentmore » instruments and methods, expressly developed for the task. The measured radiation polarization is consistently >90% and is not significantly spoiled by the transport optics; differing, relative transport losses for horizontal and vertical polarization become more prominent at longer wavelengths and lead to a non-negligible ellipticity for an originally circularly polarized state. The results from the different polarimeter setups validate each other, allow a cross-calibration of the instruments, and constitute a benchmark for user experiments.« less

  6. Control of the polarization of a vacuum-ultraviolet, high-gain, free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Allaria, Enrico; Diviacco, Bruno; Callegari, Carlo; Finetti, Paola; Mahieu, Benoît; Viefhaus, Jens; Zangrando, Marco; De Ninno, Giovanni; Lambert, Guillaume; Ferrari, Eugenio; Buck, Jens; Ilchen, Markus; Vodungbo, Boris; Mahne, Nicola; Svetina, Cristian; Spezzani, Carlo; Di Mitri, Simone; Penco, Giuseppe; Trovó, Mauro; Fawley, William M.; Rebernik, Primoz R.; Gauthier, David; Grazioli, Cesare; Coreno, Marcello; Ressel, Barbara; Kivimäki, Antti; Mazza, Tommaso; Glaser, Leif; Scholz, Frank; Seltmann, Joern; Gessler, Patrick; Grünert, Jan; De Fanis, Alberto; Meyer, Michael; Knie, André; Moeller, Stefan P.; Raimondi, Lorenzo; Capotondi, Flavio; Pedersoli, Emanuele; Plekan, Oksana; Danailov, Miltcho B.; Demidovich, Alexander; Nikolov, Ivaylo; Abrami, Alessandro; Gautier, Julien; Lüning, Jan; Zeitoun, Philippe; Giannessi, Luca

    2014-12-02

    The two single-pass, externally seeded free-electron lasers (FELs) of the FERMI user facility are designed around Apple-II-type undulators that can operate at arbitrary polarization in the vacuum ultraviolet-to-soft x-ray spectral range. Furthermore, within each FEL tuning range, any output wavelength and polarization can be set in less than a minute of routine operations. We report the first demonstration of the full output polarization capabilities of FERMI FEL-1 in a campaign of experiments where the wavelength and nominal polarization are set to a series of representative values, and the polarization of the emitted intense pulses is thoroughly characterized by three independent instruments and methods, expressly developed for the task. The measured radiation polarization is consistently >90% and is not significantly spoiled by the transport optics; differing, relative transport losses for horizontal and vertical polarization become more prominent at longer wavelengths and lead to a non-negligible ellipticity for an originally circularly polarized state. The results from the different polarimeter setups validate each other, allow a cross-calibration of the instruments, and constitute a benchmark for user experiments.

  7. Fabrication of ZnO Nanowires Arrays by Anodization and High-Vacuum Die Casting Technique, and Their Piezoelectric Properties.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Chin-Guo; Chang, Ho; Wang, Jian-Hao

    2016-03-24

    In this investigation, anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) with arrayed and regularly arranged nanopores is used as a template in the high-vacuum die casting of molten zinc metal (Zn) into the nanopores. The proposed technique yields arrayed Zn nanowires with an aspect ratio of over 600. After annealing, arrayed zinc oxide (ZnO) nanowires are obtained. Varying the anodizing time yields AAO templates with thicknesses of approximately 50 μm, 60 μm, and 70 μm that can be used in the fabrication of nanowires of three lengths with high aspect ratios. Experimental results reveal that a longer nanowire generates a greater measured piezoelectric current. The ZnO nanowires that are fabricated using an alumina template are anodized for 7 h and produce higher piezoelectric current of up to 69 pA.

  8. Fabrication of ZnO Nanowires Arrays by Anodization and High-Vacuum Die Casting Technique, and Their Piezoelectric Properties

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Chin-Guo; Chang, Ho; Wang, Jian-Hao

    2016-01-01

    In this investigation, anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) with arrayed and regularly arranged nanopores is used as a template in the high-vacuum die casting of molten zinc metal (Zn) into the nanopores. The proposed technique yields arrayed Zn nanowires with an aspect ratio of over 600. After annealing, arrayed zinc oxide (ZnO) nanowires are obtained. Varying the anodizing time yields AAO templates with thicknesses of approximately 50 μm, 60 μm, and 70 μm that can be used in the fabrication of nanowires of three lengths with high aspect ratios. Experimental results reveal that a longer nanowire generates a greater measured piezoelectric current. The ZnO nanowires that are fabricated using an alumina template are anodized for 7 h and produce higher piezoelectric current of up to 69 pA. PMID:27023546

  9. Influence of electrode surface microstructures on the state of short vacuum gaps after interruption of high-frequency currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niayesh, Kaveh

    2000-09-01

    In this paper the influences of electrode surface microstructures on the electrical field near the new cathode surface and on the distribution of ion density and velocity in the space-charge region after interruption of high-frequency currents in short vacuum gaps have been studied. To investigate these effects, the equations of conservation of mass and momentum are solved two dimensionally in the space-charge region. The results indicate a considerable increase in ion density at the points with high electrical fields, which results in an enhancement of the electrical field at these points compared with one-dimensional calculations. Considering the calculated electrical field near the cathode surface and the power density deposited into the cathode surface by ions, the initiation of a breakdown during the post arc period under the mechanism of explosive electron emission may be possible.

  10. On the Intrinsic High Temperature Calcium Oxide-Sulfur Dioxide Reaction Using the Vacuum Thermogravimetric Analysis Technique.

    PubMed

    Ye, Zhicheng; Bjerle, Ingemar

    1996-08-01

    The high temperature CaO/SO2 reaction was studied using four Swedish limestones and one dolomite as sorbents. The measurements were carried out in a vacuum thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) apparatus in order to investigate the intrinsic reaction mechanism. The reaction was found to be fast at the beginning due to the surface reaction, while the subsequent stage was controlled by the product layer diffusion, showing a lower reaction rate. The reaction rate increased as temperature increased up to 1000 °C in the range tested. SO2 partial pressure weakly affected the reaction. The fine sorbent particles used in the study resulted in the high CaO conversion. Further grinding of the sorbents gave a small increase in CaO conversion. Sintering generally decreased the initial reactivity but might not affect the ultimate CaO capacity. The larger pores in nascent CaO particles were valuable for the initial reaction conversion.

  11. Strain sensing technology for high temperature applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, W. Dan

    1993-01-01

    This review discusses the status of strain sensing technology for high temperature applications. Technologies covered are those supported by NASA such as required for applications in hypersonic vehicles and engines, advanced subsonic engines, as well as material and structure development. The applications may be at temperatures of 540 C (1000 F) to temperatures in excess of 1400 C (2500 F). The most promising technologies at present are the resistance strain gage and remote sensing schemes. Resistance strain gages discussed include the BCL gage, the LaRC compensated gage, and the PdCr gage. Remote sensing schemes such as laser based speckle strain measurement, phase-shifling interferometry, and x-ray extensometry are discussed. Present status and limitations of these technologies are presented.

  12. Characterization of Diamond Like Carbon Thin Films Fabricated by Unbalanced Magnetron Sputtering under Ultra-High Vacuum Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Kevin W.

    DLC thin films were fabricated under high vacuum and ultra-high vacuum conditions using Type II UBM sputtering with a graphite target. Ultra-high purity argon sputtering gas at nominally 2.8 - 3.0 mtorr was used as a working gas during deposition. Film thickness and elemental composition was determined through a combination of Rutherford Backscattering and Forward Recoil Elastic Scattering spectroscopy at Ohio University using the 4.5 MV tandem particle accelerator at Edwards Accelerator Laboratory. Electronic characterization of the films consisted of measurements of room and low temperature current-voltage curves, temperature dependent conductivity, Seebeck coefficient, and the temperature dependent Seebeck coefficient. Hydrogen concentration profiles of the films indicated a three layer structure: surface, bulk, and interface. Total hydrogen concentration in the film was reduced to ≈3 at.% for the films with lowest hydrogen content. This low-level of hydrogen content was achieved through UHV base chamber pressure, pre-sputtering of the graphite target, and the use of a hydrogen filter on the UHP argon supply line. The films exhibited linear current-voltage relations in both high and low temperature regimes. A thermally assisted conduction relationship in temperature dependent conductivity was observed. Nominal film conductivity was measured to be ≈2 - 3 S/cm.. Measurements of the Seebeck coefficient indicated a p-type material with values of the coefficient ≈10 muV/K. The Seebeck coefficient was found to have a weak linear dependence on temperature indicative of a diffusive thermopower relationship. Measurements of the electronic properties as a function of hydrogen concentration indicated at most a weak relationship over the range of the low hydrogen concentrations in this work.

  13. Technology needs for high speed rotorcraft (3)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Detore, Jack; Conway, Scott

    1991-01-01

    The spectrum of vertical takeoff and landing (VTOL) type aircraft is examined to determine which aircraft are most likely to achieve high subsonic cruise speeds and have hover qualities similar to a helicopter. Two civil mission profiles are considered: a 600-n.mi. mission for a 15- and a 30-passenger payload. Applying current technology, only the 15- and 30-passenger tiltfold aircraft are capable of attaining the 450-knot design goal. The two tiltfold aircraft at 450 knots and a 30-passenger tiltrotor at 375 knots were further developed for the Task II technology analysis. A program called High-Speed Total Envelope Proprotor (HI-STEP) is recommended to meet several of these issues based on the tiltrotor concept. A program called Tiltfold System (TFS) is recommended based on the tiltrotor concept. A task is identified to resolve the best design speed from productivity and demand considerations based on the technology that emerges from the recommended programs. HI-STEP's goals are to investigate propulsive efficiency, maneuver loads, and aeroelastic stability. Programs currently in progress that may meet the other technology needs include the Integrated High Performance Turbine Engine Technology (IHPTET) (NASA Lewis) and the Advanced Structural Concepts Program funded through NASA Langley.

  14. Improving Vacuum Cleaners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Under a Space Act Agreement between the Kirby company and Lewis Research Center, NASA technology was applied to a commercial vacuum cleaner product line. Kirby engineers were interested in advanced operational concepts, such as particle flow behavior and vibration, critical factors to improve vacuum cleaner performance. An evaluation of the company 1994 home care system, the Kirby G4, led to the refinement of the new G5 and future models. Under the cooperative agreement, Kirby had access to Lewis' holography equipment, which added insight into how long a vacuum cleaner fan would perform, as well as advanced computer software that can simulate the flow of air through fans. The collaboration resulted in several successes including fan blade redesign and continuing dialogue on how to improve air-flow traits in various nozzle designs.

  15. Thermal noise limit for ultra-high vacuum noncontact atomic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lübbe, Jannis; Temmen, Matthias; Rode, Sebastian; Rahe, Philipp; Kühnle, Angelika

    2013-01-01

    Summary The noise of the frequency-shift signal Δf in noncontact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM) consists of cantilever thermal noise, tip–surface-interaction noise and instrumental noise from the detection and signal processing systems. We investigate how the displacement-noise spectral density d z at the input of the frequency demodulator propagates to the frequency-shift-noise spectral density d Δ f at the demodulator output in dependence of cantilever properties and settings of the signal processing electronics in the limit of a negligible tip–surface interaction and a measurement under ultrahigh-vacuum conditions. For a quantification of the noise figures, we calibrate the cantilever displacement signal and determine the transfer function of the signal-processing electronics. From the transfer function and the measured d z, we predict d Δ f for specific filter settings, a given level of detection-system noise spectral density d z ds and the cantilever-thermal-noise spectral density d z th. We find an excellent agreement between the calculated and measured values for d Δ f. Furthermore, we demonstrate that thermal noise in d Δ f, defining the ultimate limit in NC-AFM signal detection, can be kept low by a proper choice of the cantilever whereby its Q-factor should be given most attention. A system with a low-noise signal detection and a suitable cantilever, operated with appropriate filter and feedback-loop settings allows room temperature NC-AFM measurements at a low thermal-noise limit with a significant bandwidth. PMID:23400758

  16. Thermal noise limit for ultra-high vacuum noncontact atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Lübbe, Jannis; Temmen, Matthias; Rode, Sebastian; Rahe, Philipp; Kühnle, Angelika; Reichling, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The noise of the frequency-shift signal Δf in noncontact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM) consists of cantilever thermal noise, tip-surface-interaction noise and instrumental noise from the detection and signal processing systems. We investigate how the displacement-noise spectral density d(z) at the input of the frequency demodulator propagates to the frequency-shift-noise spectral density d(Δ) (f) at the demodulator output in dependence of cantilever properties and settings of the signal processing electronics in the limit of a negligible tip-surface interaction and a measurement under ultrahigh-vacuum conditions. For a quantification of the noise figures, we calibrate the cantilever displacement signal and determine the transfer function of the signal-processing electronics. From the transfer function and the measured d(z), we predict d(Δ) (f) for specific filter settings, a given level of detection-system noise spectral density d(z) (ds) and the cantilever-thermal-noise spectral density d(z) (th). We find an excellent agreement between the calculated and measured values for d(Δ) (f). Furthermore, we demonstrate that thermal noise in d(Δ) (f), defining the ultimate limit in NC-AFM signal detection, can be kept low by a proper choice of the cantilever whereby its Q-factor should be given most attention. A system with a low-noise signal detection and a suitable cantilever, operated with appropriate filter and feedback-loop settings allows room temperature NC-AFM measurements at a low thermal-noise limit with a significant bandwidth.

  17. Vacuum filtration based formation of liquid crystal films of semiconducting carbon nanotubes and high performance transistor devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Benjamin; Panchapakesan, Balaji

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, we report ultra-thin liquid crystal films of semiconducting carbon nanotubes using a simple vacuum filtration process. Vacuum filtration of nanotubes in aqueous surfactant solution formed nematic domains on the filter membrane surface and exhibited local ordering. A 2D fast Fourier transform was used to calculate the order parameters from scanning electron microscopy images. The order parameter was observed to be sensitive to the filtration time demonstrating different regions of transformation namely nucleation of nematic domains, nanotube accumulation and large domain growth.Transmittance versus sheet resistance measurements of such films resulted in optical to dc conductivity of σ opt/σ dc = 9.01 indicative of purely semiconducting nanotube liquid crystal network.Thin films of nanotube liquid crystals with order parameters ranging from S = 0.1-0.5 were patterned into conducting channels of transistor devices which showed high I on/I off ratios from 10-19 800 and electron mobility values μ e = 0.3-78.8 cm2 (V-s)-1, hole mobility values μ h = 0.4-287 cm2 (V-s)-1. High I on/I off ratios were observed at low order parameters and film mass. A Schottky barrier transistor model is consistent with the observed transistor characteristics. Electron and hole mobilities were seen to increase with order parameters and carbon nanotube mass fractions. A fundamental tradeoff between decreasing on/off ratio and increasing mobility with increasing nanotube film mass and order parameter is therefore concluded. Increase in order parameters of nanotubes liquid crystals improved the electronic transport properties as witnessed by the increase in σ dc/σ opt values on macroscopic films and high mobilities in microscopic transistors. Liquid crystal networks of semiconducting nanotubes as demonstrated here are simple to fabricate, transparent, scalable and could find wide ranging device applications.

  18. Society for College Science Teachers: High Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Menefee, Robert

    1983-01-01

    Presents findings of a study group on high technology charged with determining a definition, assessing current educational response, and examining implications for the future. Topics addressed include: super-techs; computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacture (CAD/CAM); structural unemployment; a two-plus-two curriculum; and educational…

  19. Space applications of high temperature superconductivity technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connolly, D. J.; Aron, P. R.; Leonard, R. F.; Wintucky, E. G.

    1991-01-01

    A review is presented of the present status of high temperature superconductivity (HTS) technology and related areas of potential space application. Attention is given to areas of application that include microwave communications, cryogenic systems, remote sensing, and space propulsion and power. Consideration is given to HTS phase shifters, miniaturization of microwave filters, far-IR bolometers, and magnetic refrigeration using flux compression.

  20. Human factors of the high technology cockpit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiener, Earl L.

    1990-01-01

    The rapid advance of cockpit automation in the last decade has outstripped the ability of the human factors profession to understand the changes in human functions required. High technology cockpits require less physical (observable) workload, but are highly demanding of cognitive functions such as planning, alternative selection, and monitoring. Furthermore, automation creates opportunity for new and more serious forms of human error, and many pilots are concerned about the possibility of complacency affecting their performance. On the positive side, the equipment works as advertized with high reliability, offering highly efficient, computer-based flight. These findings from the cockpit studies probably apply equally to other industries, such as nuclear power production, other modes of transportation, medicine, and manufacturing, all of which traditionally have looked to aviation for technological leadership. The challenge to the human factors profession is to aid designers, operators, and training departments in exploiting the positive side of automation, while seeking solutions to the negative side. Viewgraphs are given.

  1. Recent advances in vacuum sciences and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mozetič, M.; Ostrikov, K.; Ruzic, D. N.; Curreli, D.; Cvelbar, U.; Vesel, A.; Primc, G.; Leisch, M.; Jousten, K.; Malyshev, O. B.; Hendricks, J. H.; Kövér, L.; Tagliaferro, A.; Conde, O.; Silvestre, A. J.; Giapintzakis, J.; Buljan, M.; Radić, N.; Dražić, G.; Bernstorff, S.; Biederman, H.; Kylián, O.; Hanuš, J.; Miloševič, S.; Galtayries, A.; Dietrich, P.; Unger, W.; Lehocky, M.; Sedlarik, V.; Stana-Kleinschek, K.; Drmota-Petrič, A.; Pireaux, J. J.; Rogers, J. W.; Anderle, M.

    2014-04-01

    Recent advances in vacuum sciences and applications are reviewed. Novel optical interferometer cavity devices enable pressure measurements with ppm accuracy. The innovative dynamic vacuum standard allows for pressure measurements with temporal resolution of 2 ms. Vacuum issues in the construction of huge ultra-high vacuum devices worldwide are reviewed. Recent advances in surface science and thin films include new phenomena observed in electron transport near solid surfaces as well as novel results on the properties of carbon nanomaterials. Precise techniques for surface and thin-film characterization have been applied in the conservation technology of cultural heritage objects and recent advances in the characterization of biointerfaces are presented. The combination of various vacuum and atmospheric-pressure techniques enables an insight into the complex phenomena of protein and other biomolecule conformations on solid surfaces. Studying these phenomena at solid-liquid interfaces is regarded as the main issue in the development of alternative techniques for drug delivery, tissue engineering and thus the development of innovative techniques for curing cancer and cardiovascular diseases. A review on recent advances in plasma medicine is presented as well as novel hypotheses on cell apoptosis upon treatment with gaseous plasma. Finally, recent advances in plasma nanoscience are illustrated with several examples and a roadmap for future activities is presented.

  2. Studies of bimolecular reaction dynamics using pulsed high-intensity vacuum-ultraviolet lasers for photoionization detection.

    PubMed

    Albert, Daniel R; Davis, H Floyd

    2013-09-21

    This article describes recent progress on the development and application of pulsed high-intensity (~0.1 mJ per pulse) vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) radiation produced by commercial tabletop lasers for studies of gas phase chemical reaction dynamics involving polyatomic free radicals. Our approach employs near-triply resonant four-wave mixing of unfocussed nanosecond dye lasers in an atomic gas as an alternative to the use of synchrotron light sources for sensitive universal soft photoionization detection of reaction products using a rotatable source crossed molecular beams apparatus with fixed detector. We illustrate this approach in studies of the reactions of phenyl radicals with molecular oxygen and with propene. Future prospects for the use of tabletop laser-based VUV sources for studies of chemical reaction dynamics are discussed.

  3. Electrical conductivity of cluster-assembled carbon/titania nanocomposite films irradiated by highly focused vacuum ultraviolet photon beams

    SciTech Connect

    Amati, M.; Lenardi, C.; Agostino, R. G.; Caruso, T.; Ducati, C.; La Rosa, S.; Bongiorno, G.; Cassina, V.; Podesta, P.; Ravagnan, L.; Piseri, P.; Milani, P.

    2007-03-15

    We investigated the electrical transport properties of nanostructured carbon and carbon/titanium oxide nanocomposite films produced by supersonic cluster beam deposition and irradiated by highly focused vacuum UV photon beam. We have observed a relevant increase of the density of states at Fermi level, suggesting that the films acquire a 'metallic' character. This is confirmed by the increment of the conductivity of four orders of magnitude for pure nanostructured carbon films and at least eight orders of magnitude for films containing 9 at. % of titanium. A partial reversibility of the process is observed by exposing the modified films to molecular oxygen or directly to air. We demonstrate the capability of writing micrometric conductive strips (2-3 {mu}m width and 60 {mu}m length) and controlling the variation of the conductivity as a function of the titanium concentration.

  4. Modular, Reconfigurable, High-Energy Technology Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carrington, Connie; Howell, Joe

    2006-01-01

    The Modular, Reconfigurable High-Energy (MRHE) Technology Demonstrator project was to have been a series of ground-based demonstrations to mature critical technologies needed for in-space assembly of a highpower high-voltage modular spacecraft in low Earth orbit, enabling the development of future modular solar-powered exploration cargo-transport vehicles and infrastructure. MRHE was a project in the High Energy Space Systems (HESS) Program, within NASA's Exploration Systems Research and Technology (ESR&T) Program. NASA participants included Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), and Glenn Research Center (GRC). Contractor participants were the Boeing Phantom Works in Huntsville, AL, Lockheed Martin Advanced Technology Center in Palo Alto, CA, ENTECH, Inc. in Keller, TX, and the University of AL Huntsville (UAH). MRHE's technical objectives were to mature: (a) lightweight, efficient, high-voltage, radiation-resistant solar power generation (SPG) technologies; (b) innovative, lightweight, efficient thermal management systems; (c) efficient, 100kW-class, high-voltage power delivery systems from an SPG to an electric thruster system; (d) autonomous rendezvous and docking technology for in-space assembly of modular, reconfigurable spacecraft; (e) robotic assembly of modular space systems; and (f) modular, reconfigurable distributed avionics technologies. Maturation of these technologies was to be implemented through a series of increasingly-inclusive laboratory demonstrations that would have integrated and demonstrated two systems-of-systems: (a) the autonomous rendezvous and docking of modular spacecraft with deployable structures, robotic assembly, reconfiguration both during assembly and (b) the development and integration of an advanced thermal heat pipe and a high-voltage power delivery system with a representative lightweight high-voltage SPG array. In addition, an integrated simulation testbed would have been developed

  5. The fabrication of a double-layer atom chip with through silicon vias for an ultra-high-vacuum cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, Ho-Chiao; Lin, Yun-Siang; Lin, Yu-Hsin; Huang, Chi-Sheng

    2014-04-01

    This study presents a double-layer atom chip that provides users with increased diversity in the design of the wire patterns and flexibility in the design of the magnetic field. It is more convenient for use in atomic physics experiments. A negative photoresist, SU-8, was used as the insulating layer between the upper and bottom copper wires. The electrical measurement results show that the upper and bottom wires with a width of 100 µm can sustain a 6 A current without burnout. Another focus of this study is the double-layer atom chips integrated with the through silicon via (TSV) technique, and anodically bonded to a Pyrex glass cell, which makes it a desired vacuum chamber for atomic physics experiments. Thus, the bonded glass cell not only significantly reduces the overall size of the ultra-high-vacuum (UHV) chamber but also conducts the high current from the backside to the front side of the atom chip via the TSV under UHV (9.5 × 10-10 Torr). The TSVs with a diameter of 70 µm were etched through by the inductively coupled plasma ion etching and filled by the bottom-up copper electroplating method. During the anodic bonding process, the electroplated copper wires and TSVs on atom chips also need to pass the examination of the required bonding temperature of 250 °C, under an applied voltage of 1000 V. Finally, the UHV test of the double-layer atom chips with TSVs at room temperature can be reached at 9.5 × 10-10 Torr, thus satisfying the requirements of atomic physics experiments under an UHV environment.

  6. Extending the laserspray ionization concept to produce highly charged ions at high vacuum on a time-of-flight mass analyzer.

    PubMed

    Trimpin, Sarah; Ren, Yue; Wang, Beixi; Lietz, Christopher B; Richards, Alicia L; Marshall, Darrell D; Inutan, Ellen D

    2011-07-15

    A new matrix compound, 2-nitrophloroglucinol, is reported which not only produces highly charged ions similar to electrospray ionization (ESI) under atmospheric pressure (AP) and intermediate pressure (IP) laserspray ionization (LSI) conditions but also the most highly charged ions so far observed for small proteins in mass spectrometry (MS) under high vacuum (HV) conditions. This new matrix extends the compounds that can successfully be employed as matrixes with LSI, as demonstrated on an LTQ Velos (Thermo) at AP, a matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI)-ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) time-of-flight (TOF) SYNAPT G2 (Waters) at IP, and MALDI-TOF Ultraflex, UltrafleXtreme, and Autoflex Speed (Bruker) mass spectrometers at HV. Measurements show that stable multiple charged molecular ions of proteins are formed under all pressure conditions indicating softer ionization than MALDI, which suffers a high degree of metastable fragmentation when multiply charged ions are produced. An important analytical advantage of this new LSI matrix are the potential for high sensitivity equivalent or better than AP-LSI and vacuum MALDI and the potential for enhanced mass selected fragmentation of the abundant highly charged protein ions. A second new LSI matrix, 4,6-dinitropyrogallol, produces abundant multiply charged ions at AP but not under HV conditions. The differences in these similar compounds ability to produce multiply charged ions under HV conditions is believed to be related to their relative ability to evaporate from charged matrix/analyte clusters.

  7. Vacuum Flushing of Sewer Solids

    EPA Science Inventory

    The vacuum sewer and tank cleaning (flushing) technology removes sewer solids from urban drainage systems, such as storage tanks and pipes. This technology is both effective and inexpensive. In addition, it can be considered a true green technology. It operates under atmospheri...

  8. ELI/SBP'S UVB (VACUUM VAPORIZATION WELL) SYSTEM FOR TREATMENT OF VOC-CONTAMINATED SOILS; INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report summarizes the findings of an evaluation of the Unterdruck-Verdampfer-Brunnen (UVB) technology developed by IEG Technologies (IEG) and licensed in the eastern United States by Environmental Laboratories, Inc. (ELI) and SBP Technologies (SBP). This evaluation was cond...

  9. Technology needs for high-speed rotorcraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutherford, John; Orourke, Matthew; Martin, Christopher; Lovenguth, Marc; Mitchell, Clark

    1991-01-01

    A study to determine the technology development required for high-speed rotorcraft development was conducted. The study begins with an initial assessment of six concepts capable of flight at, or greater than 450 knots with helicopter-like hover efficiency (disk loading less than 50 pfs). These concepts were sized and evaluated based on measures of effectiveness and operational considerations. Additionally, an initial assessment of the impact of technology advances on the vehicles attributes was made. From these initial concepts a tilt wing and rotor/wing concepts were selected for further evaluation. A more detailed examination of conversion and technology trade studies were conducted on these two vehicles, each sized for a different mission.

  10. Advanced high-bandwidth optical fuzing technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jony J.; von der Lippe, Christian M.

    2005-10-01

    A robust and compact photonic proximity sensor is developed for optical fuze in munitions applications. The design of the optical fuze employed advanced optoelectronic technologies including high-power vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs), the p-i-n or metal-semiconductor-metal (MSM) photodetectors, SiGe ASIC driver, and miniature optics. The development combines pioneering work and unique expertise at ARDEC, ARL, and Sandia National Laboratories and synergizes the key optoelectronic technologies in components and system designs. This compact sensor will replace conventional costly assemblies based on discrete lasers, photodetectors, and bulky optics and provide a new capability for direct fire applications. It will be mass manufacturable in low cost and simplicity. In addition to the specific applications for gun-fired munitions, numerous civilian uses can be realized by this proximity sensor in automotive, robotics, and aerospace applications. This technology is also applicable to robotic ladar and short-range 3-D imaging.

  11. Effective passivation and high-performance metal-oxide-semiconductor devices using ultra-high-vacuum deposited high- κ dielectrics on Ge without interfacial layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, L. K.; Chu, R. L.; Lin, T. D.; Lee, W. C.; Lin, C. A.; Huang, M. L.; Lee, Y. J.; Kwo, J.; Hong, M.

    2010-09-01

    Without using any interfacial passivation layers, high- κ dielectric Y 2O 3, HfO 2, and Ga 2O 3(Gd 2O 3) [GGO], by electron beam evaporation in ultra-high-vacuum (UHV), have been directly deposited on Ge substrate. Comprehensive investigations have been carried out to study the oxide/Ge interfaces chemically, structurally, and electronically: hetero-structures of all the studied oxides on Ge are highly thermally stable with annealing to 500 °C, and their interfaces remain atomically sharp. The electrical analyses have been conducted on metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) devices, i.e. MOS capacitors (MOSCAPs) and MOS field-effect-transistors (MOSFETs). Dielectrics constants of the Y 2O 3, HfO 2, and GGO have been extracted to be ˜17, 20, and 13-15, respectively, indicating no interfacial layer formation with 500 °C annealing. A low interfacial density of states ( Dits), as low as 3 × 10 11 cm -2 eV -1, has been achieved for GGO/Ge near mid-gap along with a high Fermi-level movement efficiency as high as 80%. The GGO/Ge pMOSFETs with TiN as the metal gate have yielded very high-performances, in terms of 496 μA/μm, 178 μS/μm, and 389 cm 2/V s in saturation drain current density, maximum transconductance, and effective hole mobility, respectively. The gate width and gate length of the MOSFET are 10 μm and 1 μm.

  12. Superoleophobicity under vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xinjie; Wang, Xiaolong; Liang, Yongmin; Bell, Steven E. J.; Liu, Weimin; Zhou, Feng

    2011-05-01

    By using superoleophobic alumina and low vapor pressure oils we have been able to study wetting behavior at high vacuum. Here, we show that a superoleophobic state can exist for some probe liquids, even under high vacuum. However, with other liquids the surfaces are only superoloephobic because air is trapped beneath the droplet and the contact angle decreases dramatically (150°-120°) if this air is removed. These observations open up the possibility of designing materials which fully exploit the potential of physically trapped air to achieve extreme oleophobicity and/or hydrophobicity.

  13. Experimental Evaluation and Comparison of Thermal Conductivity of High-Voltage Insulation Materials for Vacuum Electronic Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suresh, C.; Srikrishna, P.

    2017-03-01

    Vacuum electronic devices operate with very high voltage differences between their sub-assemblies which are separated by very small distances. These devices also emit large amounts of heat that needs to be dissipated. Hence, there exists a requirement for high-voltage insulators with good thermal conductivity for voltage isolation and efficient heat dissipation. However, these voltage insulators are generally poor conductors of heat. In the present work, an effort has been made to obtain good high-voltage insulation materials with substantial improvement in their thermal conductivity. New mixtures of composites were formed by blending varying percentages (by volumes) of aluminum nitride powders with that of neat room-temperature vulcanizing (RTV) silicone elastomer compound. In this work, a thermal conductivity test setup has been devised for the quantification of the thermal conductivity of the insulators. The thermal conductivities and high-voltage isolation capabilities of various blended composites were quantified and were compared with that of neat RTV to evaluate the relative improvement.

  14. Highly coherent vacuum ultraviolet radiation at the 15th harmonic with echo-enabled harmonic generation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemsing, E.; Dunning, M.; Hast, C.; Raubenheimer, T. O.; Weathersby, S.; Xiang, D.

    2014-07-01

    X-ray free-electron lasers are enabling access to new science by producing ultrafast and intense x rays that give researchers unparalleled power and precision in examining the fundamental nature of matter. In the quest for fully coherent x rays, the echo-enabled harmonic generation technique is one of the most promising methods. In this technique, coherent radiation at the high harmonic frequencies of two seed lasers is generated from the recoherence of electron beam phase space memory. Here we report on the generation of highly coherent and stable vacuum ultraviolet radiation at the 15th harmonic of an infrared seed laser with this technique. The experiment demonstrates two distinct advantages that are intrinsic to the highly nonlinear phase space gymnastics of echo-enabled harmonic generation in a new regime, i.e., high frequency up-conversion efficiency and insensitivity to electron beam phase space imperfections. Our results allow comparison and confirmation of predictive models and scaling laws, and mark a significant step towards fully coherent x-ray free-electron lasers that will open new scientific research.

  15. Development of a High-Temperature Vacuum Assisted Resin Transfer Molding Testbed for Aerospace Grade Composites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-11-10

    conventional RTM and hand lay-up prepreg/autoclave techniques. Manufacturing high-quality, large composite parts for high temperature applications using VARTM ...composite 3 parts via RTM and/or resin infusion (here called VARTM ) [3]. Thereafter Connell and Criss et al. fabricated carbon fiber reinforced...It was found that these imide resins show the combination of processability for RTM and high performance. The goal of the HT- VARTM research is to

  16. High-temperature technological processes: Thermophysical principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rykalin, N. N.; Uglov, A. A.; Anishchenko, L. M.

    The book is concerned with the principles of thermodynamics and heat transfer theory underlying high-temperature technological processes. Some characteristics of electromagnetic radiation and heat transfer in solids, liquids, and gases are reviewed, and boundary layer theory, surface phenomena, and phase transitions are examined. The discussion includes an analysis of a number of specific processes, such as treatment by concentrated energy fluxes (electron-beam and laser processing) and plasma machining.

  17. High-yield pulping effluent treatment technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Su, W.X.; Hsieh, J.S. . School of Chemical Engineering)

    1993-03-01

    The objective of this report is to examine the high-yield (mechanical) pulp processes with respect to environmental issues affected by the discharge of their waste streams. Various statistics are given that support the view that high-yield pulping processes will have major growth in the US regions where pulp mills are located, and sites for projects in the development phase are indicated. Conventional and innovative effluent-treatment technologies applicable to these processes are reviewed. The different types of mechanical pulping or high-yield processes are explained, and the chemical additives are discussed. The important relationship between pulp yield and measure of BOD in the effluent is graphically presented. Effluent contaminants are identified, along with other important characteristics of the streams. Current and proposed environmental limitations specifically related to mechanical pulp production are reviewed. Conventional and innovative effluent-treatment technologies are discussed, along with their principle applications, uses, advantages, and disadvantages. Sludge management and disposal techniques become an intimate part of the treatment of waste streams. The conclusion is made that conventional technologies can successfully treat effluent streams under current waste-water discharge limitations, but these systems may not be adequate when stricter standards are imposed. At present, the most important issue in the treatment of pulp-mill waste is the management and disposal of the resultant sludge.

  18. High-precision potassium measurements using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy under high vacuum conditions for in situ K-Ar dating of planetary surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Yuichiro; Sugita, Seiji; Kameda, Shingo; Miura, Yayoi N.; Ishibashi, Ko; Ohno, Sohsuke; Kamata, Shunichi; Arai, Tomoko; Morota, Tomokatsu; Namiki, Noriyuki; Matsui, Takafumi

    2015-04-01

    We conducted a series of laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) experiments for K measurements under high vacuum conditions (10- 6 Pa) for the purpose of developing in-situ isochron type K-Ar dating instruments for planetary missions. Unlike whole rock measurement methods, isochron measurements require LIBS experiments in a vacuum chamber because simultaneous Ar isotopic measurements are necessary. However, detailed examination of detection limits and accuracy of this method at low pressures has not been examined extensively before. In this study, the capability of K measurements under high vacuum conditions was examined using LIBS. A compact Czerny-Turner type spectrometer equipped with a charge-coupled device (CCD) as a detector was employed. Twenty-three geologic standard samples were measured using the LIBS method. The second strongest K emission line at 769.89 nm was used for calibration because the strongest emission line at 766.49 nm may suffer from strong interference from another emission line. A calibration curve was constructed for K using internal normalization with the oxygen line at 777 nm and well fitted by a power-law function. Based on the prediction band method, the detection limit and the quantitation limit were estimated to be 300 and 800 ppm, respectively. The 1σ relative uncertainty of the K calibration was 20% for 1 wt.% K2O and 40% for 3000 ppm K2O. If the amount of Ar is measured with 15% error for the 3.5 billion years rocks containing 1 and 0.3 wt.% K2O, the K-Ar ages would be determined with 10% and 20% 1σ errors, respectively. This level of precision will significantly improve the current Martian chronology, which has uncertainty about a factor of two to four. These results indicate that the concentration of K can be measured quantitatively under high vacuum conditions using a combination of instruments that have previously been carried in planetary missions, which suggests the viability of building in situ isochron K-Ar dating

  19. High-Speed Sealift Technology Development Plan

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-05-01

    E-Glass/Polyester) SmallBoat ResinImpregnator (E-Glass/Polyester) Intermarine/MHC-51 VA- RTM Seemann/TPI/Sunrez (E-Glass/VinylEster) LowTempPre...this issue, new fabrication processes (see Figure 4.3.2-1) such as vacuum-assisted resin transfer methods ( VARTM ) have been developed to provide more

  20. Technology development for high power induction accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Birx, D.L.; Reginato, L.L.

    1985-06-11

    The marriage of Induction Linac technology with Nonlinear Magnetic Modulators has produced some unique capabilities. It appears possible to produce electron beams with average currents measured in amperes, at gradients exceeding 1 MeV/meter, and with power efficiencies approaching 50%. A 2 MeV, 5 kA electron accelerator has been constructed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to demonstrate these concepts and to provide a test facility for high brightness sources. The pulse drive for the accelerator is based on state-of-the-art magnetic pulse compressors with very high peak power capability, repetition rates exceeding a kilohertz and excellent reliability.

  1. Growth control of oxygen stoichiometry in homoepitaxial SrTiO3 films by pulsed laser epitaxy in high vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Ho Nyung; Ambrose Seo, Sung S.; Choi, Woo Seok; Rouleau, Christopher M.

    2016-01-29

    In many transition metal oxides, oxygen stoichiometry is one of the most critical parameters that plays a key role in determining the structural, physical, optical, and electrochemical properties of the material. However, controlling the growth to obtain high quality single crystal films having the right oxygen stoichiometry, especially in a high vacuum environment, has been viewed as a challenge. In this work, we show that, through proper control of the plume kinetic energy, stoichiometric crystalline films can be synthesized without generating oxygen defects even in high vacuum. We use a model homoepitaxial system of SrTiO3 (STO) thin films on single crystal STO substrates. Physical property measurements indicate that oxygen vacancy generation in high vacuum is strongly influenced by the energetics of the laser plume, and it can be controlled by proper laser beam delivery. Thus, our finding not only provides essential insight into oxygen stoichiometry control in high vacuum for understanding the fundamental properties of STO-based thin films and heterostructures, but it expands the utility of pulsed laser epitaxy of other materials as well.₃

  2. High-resolution three-dimensional spin- and angle-resolved photoelectron spectrometer using vacuum ultraviolet laser light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaji, Koichiro; Harasawa, Ayumi; Kuroda, Kenta; Toyohisa, Sogen; Nakayama, Mitsuhiro; Ishida, Yukiaki; Fukushima, Akiko; Watanabe, Shuntaro; Chen, Chuangtian; Komori, Fumio; Shin, Shik

    2016-05-01

    We describe a spin- and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (SARPES) apparatus with a vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) laser (hν = 6.994 eV) developed at the Laser and Synchrotron Research Center at the Institute for Solid State Physics, The University of Tokyo. The spectrometer consists of a hemispherical photoelectron analyzer equipped with an electron deflector function and twin very-low-energy-electron-diffraction-type spin detectors, which allows us to analyze the spin vector of a photoelectron three-dimensionally with both high energy and angular resolutions. The combination of the high-performance spectrometer and the high-photon-flux VUV laser can achieve an energy resolution of 1.7 meV for SARPES. We demonstrate that the present laser-SARPES machine realizes a quick SARPES on the spin-split band structure of a Bi(111) film even with 7 meV energy and 0.7∘ angular resolutions along the entrance-slit direction. This laser-SARPES machine is applicable to the investigation of spin-dependent electronic states on an energy scale of a few meV.

  3. High-resolution three-dimensional spin- and angle-resolved photoelectron spectrometer using vacuum ultraviolet laser light.

    PubMed

    Yaji, Koichiro; Harasawa, Ayumi; Kuroda, Kenta; Toyohisa, Sogen; Nakayama, Mitsuhiro; Ishida, Yukiaki; Fukushima, Akiko; Watanabe, Shuntaro; Chen, Chuangtian; Komori, Fumio; Shin, Shik

    2016-05-01

    We describe a spin- and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (SARPES) apparatus with a vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) laser (hν = 6.994 eV) developed at the Laser and Synchrotron Research Center at the Institute for Solid State Physics, The University of Tokyo. The spectrometer consists of a hemispherical photoelectron analyzer equipped with an electron deflector function and twin very-low-energy-electron-diffraction-type spin detectors, which allows us to analyze the spin vector of a photoelectron three-dimensionally with both high energy and angular resolutions. The combination of the high-performance spectrometer and the high-photon-flux VUV laser can achieve an energy resolution of 1.7 meV for SARPES. We demonstrate that the present laser-SARPES machine realizes a quick SARPES on the spin-split band structure of a Bi(111) film even with 7 meV energy and 0.7(∘) angular resolutions along the entrance-slit direction. This laser-SARPES machine is applicable to the investigation of spin-dependent electronic states on an energy scale of a few meV.

  4. Calculation of the vacuum Green’s function valid even for high toroidal mode numbers in tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chance, M. S.; Turnbull, A. D.; Snyder, P. B.

    2007-01-01

    The present evaluation of the Green's function used for the magnetic scalar potential in vacuum calculations for axisymmetric geometry has been found to be deficient even for moderately high, n, the toroidal mode number. This is relevant to the edge localized peeling-ballooning modes calculated by GATO, PEST and other MHD stability codes. The deficiency was due to the loss of numerical precision arising from the upward recursion relation used for generating the functions from the values at n = 0 from the complete elliptic integrals of the first and second kinds. To ameliorate this, a direct integration of the integral representation of the function is crafted to achieve the necessary high accuracy for moderately high mode numbers, with due consideration to the singular behavior of the integrand involved. At higher mode numbers the loss of numerical precision due to cancellations from the oscillatory behavior of the integrand is further avoided by judiciously deforming the integration contour into the complex plane to obtain a new integral representation for the Green's function. Near machine precision, roughly 12-16 digits, can be achieved by using a combination of these techniques. The relation to the associated Legendre functions, as well as a novel integral representation of these are also described.

  5. Fundamental Materials Studies for Advanced High Power Microwave and Terahertz Vacuum Electronic Radiation Sources

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-10

    Models for Microstrip Computer-Aided Design,” in Microwave Symposium Digest , 1980 IEEE MTT-S International, 1980, p. 407. [2] B.B. Yang, S.L...AFRL-OSR-VA-TR-2014-0359 Fundamental Materials Studies for Advanced High Power Microwave and Terahertz John Booske UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN SYSTEM...12-2014 Final Technical Performance Report October 1, 2011 - September 30, 2014 Fundamental Materials Studies for Advanced High Power Microwave and

  6. Theory and practice of self-lubricated, oscillatory bearings for high-vacuum applications. II - Accelerated life tests and analysis of bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meeks, C. R.

    1980-08-01

    Accelerated vacuum life tests of dry self-lubricating bearings were carried out by monitoring of friction torque and evaluation of the effects of thermal cycling and radial temperature gradients. Twenty-two bearings were tested for periods up to 15,000 hr in high vacuum and operated to 31 x 10 to the 9th degrees of oscillatory travel. A theoretical model of wear was constructed on the basis of friction, wear, and bearing torque test results, along with optical-scanning electron microscope and X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopic examination of bearing components.

  7. Behavior of sustained high-current arcs on molten-alloy electrodes during vacuum consumable-arc remelting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanner, F. J.; Bertram, L. A.

    Vacuum consumable arc remelting is a casting process carried out in a vacuum with the aim of remelting the consumable electrode in such a way that the new ingot has improved chemical and physical homogeneity. The power which causes the melting is supplied by a vacuum arc burning between the electrodes. In order to determine the furnace partitions of electrical power and current, experiments were conducted on molten faced round electrodes. The quasi-steady melt rate was determined for both horizontally opposed 15 cm dia. Ni electrodes and for vertically suspended 40 cm dia. Inconel 718 electrodes.

  8. R&D ERL: Vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Mapes, M.; Smart, L.; Weiss, D.; Steszyn, A.; Todd, R.

    2010-01-01

    The ERL Vacuum systems are depicted in a figure. ERL has eight vacuum volumes with various sets of requirements. A summary of vacuum related requirements is provided in a table. Five of the eight volumes comprise the electron beamline. They are the 5-cell Superconducting RF Cavity, Superconducting e-gun, injection, loop and beam dump. Two vacuum regions are the individual cryostats insulating the 5-cell Superconducting RF Cavity and the Superconducting e-gun structures. The last ERL vacuum volume not shown in the schematic is the laser transport line. The beamline vacuum regions are separated by electropneumatic gate valves. The beam dump is common with loop beamline but is considered a separate volume due to geometry and requirements. Vacuum in the 5-cell SRF cavity is maintained in the {approx}10{sup -9} torr range at room temperature by two 20 l/s ion pumps and in the e-gun SRF cavity by one 60 l/s ion pump. Vacuum in the SRF cavities operated at 2{sup o}K is reduced to low 10{sup -11} torr via cryopumping of the cavity walls. The cathode of the e-gun must be protected from poisoning, which can occur if vacuum adjacent to the e-gun in the injection line exceeds 10-11 torr range in the injection warm beamline near the e-gun exit. The vacuum requirements for beam operation in the loop and beam dump are 10-9 torr range. The beamlines are evacuated from atmospheric pressure to high vacuum level with a particulate free, oil free turbomolecular pumping cart. 25 l/s shielded ion pumps distributed throughout the beamlines maintain the vacuum requirement. Due to the more demanding vacuum requirement of the injection beamline proximate to the e-gun, a vacuum bakeout of the injection beamline is required. In addition, two 200 l/s diode ion pumps and supplemental pumping provided by titanium sublimation pumps are installed in the injection line just beyond the exit of the e-gun. Due to expected gas load a similar pumping arrangement is planned for the beam dump. The

  9. High-resolution, vacuum-ultraviolet absorption spectrum of boron trifluoride.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Patrick P; Beasten, Amy; McComb, Jacob C; Coplan, Michael A; Al-Sheikhly, Mohamad; Thompson, Alan K; Vest, Robert E; Sprague, Matthew K; Irikura, Karl K; Clark, Charles W

    2014-11-21

    In the course of investigations of thermal neutron detection based on mixtures of (10)BF3 with other gases, knowledge was required of the photoabsorption cross sections of (10)BF3 for wavelengths between 135 and 205 nm. Large discrepancies in the values reported in existing literature led to the absolute measurements reported in this communication. The measurements were made at the SURF III Synchrotron Ultraviolet Radiation Facility at the National Institute of Standards and Technology. The measured absorption cross sections vary from 10(-20) cm(2) at 135 nm to less than 10(-21) cm(2) in the region from 165 to 205 nm. Three previously unreported absorption features with resolvable structure were found in the regions 135-145 nm, 150-165 nm, and 190-205 nm. Quantum mechanical calculations, using the TD-B3LYP/aug-cc-pVDZ variant of time-dependent density functional theory implemented in Gaussian 09, suggest that the observed absorption features arise from symmetry-changing adiabatic transitions.

  10. Molecular Surface Chemistry by Metal Single Crystals and Nanoparticles from Vacuum to High Pressure.

    SciTech Connect

    Somorjai, Gabor A.; Park, Jeong Y.

    2008-04-05

    Model systems for studying molecular surface chemistry have evolved from single crystal surfaces at low pressure to colloidal nanoparticles at high pressure. Low pressure surface structure studies of platinum single crystals using molecular beam surface scattering and low energy electron diffraction techniques probe the unique activity of defects, steps and kinks at the surface for dissociation reactions (H-H, C-H, C-C, O{double_bond}O bonds). High-pressure investigations of platinum single crystals using sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy have revealed the presence and the nature of reaction intermediates. High pressure scanning tunneling microscopy of platinum single crystal surfaces showed adsorbate mobility during a catalytic reaction. Nanoparticle systems are used to determine the role of metal-oxide interfaces, site blocking and the role of surface structures in reactive surface chemistry. The size, shape and composition of nanoparticles play important roles in determining reaction activity and selectivity.

  11. Method for producing evaporation inhibiting coating for protection of silicon--germanium and silicon--molybdenum alloys at high temperatures in vacuum

    DOEpatents

    Chao, P.J.

    1974-01-01

    A method is given for protecting Si--Ge and Si-- Mo alloys for use in thermocouples. The alloys are coated with silicon to inhibit the evaporation of the alloys at high tempenatures in a vacuum. Specific means and methods are provided. (5 fig) (Official Gazette)

  12. A Mechanistic Study of a-Amino Acid-N-Carboxy Anhydride Polymerization: Comparing Initiation and Termination Events in High Vacuum and Traditional Polymerization Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Pickel, Deanna L; Politakos, Nikolaos; Avgeropoulos, Apostolos; Messman, Jamie M

    2009-01-01

    High-vacuum polymerization of -amino acid-N-carboxyanhydride (NCAs) affords polymers with controlled molecular weights and narrow polydispersities, however a comprehensive study of the end-group composition of the resulting poly(amino acid)s has not yet been performed. This reveals crucial information, as the end-groups are indicative of both the polymerization mechanism (i.e., initiation event) as well as the termination pathways. To this end, poly(O-benzyl-L-tyrosine) initiated by 1,6-diaminohexane was synthesized and subsequently characterized by MALDI-TOF MS, NALDI -TOF MS and 13C NMR spectroscopy to ascertain the end-group structure. Polymers were prepared by both high vacuum and glove box techniques in DMF/THF. Preparation of poly(O-benzyl-L-tyrosine) by high vacuum techniques yielded a polymer initiated exclusively by the normal amine mechanism, and termination by reaction with DMF was observed. In contrast, polymers prepared in the glove box were initiated by the normal amine and activated monomer mechanisms, and several termination products are evident. To our knowledge, this is the first rigorous and comparative analysis of the end-group structure, and it demonstrates the advantage of high vacuum techniques for polymerization of NCAs for the preparation of well-defined poly(amino acid)s with end-group fidelity.

  13. Reactive and non-reactive interactions of thiophene with WS2 fullerene-like nanoparticles: an ultra-high vacuum surface chemistry study

    SciTech Connect

    Goering, J.; Burghaus, Uwe; Arey, Bruce W.; Eidelman, O.; Zak, A.; Tenne, R.

    2008-10-01

    The adsorption kinetics of thiophene on WS2 nanoparticles with fullerene-like (onion-like) structure has been studied at ultra-high vacuum conditions by sample temperature ramping techniques. At low temperatures, thiophene adsorbs molecularly. The formation of H2S and alkanes is evident at greater temperatures on fully sulfided as well as reduced and oxidized WS2 nanoparticles.

  14. Highly undercooled W and Re drops in an ultrahigh-vacuum drop tube

    SciTech Connect

    Vinet, B.; Cortella, L.; Favier, J.J. ); Desre, P. )

    1991-01-07

    The Grenoble drop tube first experiments and results on pure W and Re droplets are presented. High absolute amounts of undercooling have been reached (530 K for W and 975 K for Re). The solidified samples are single crystals in the case of W and polycrystals in the case of Re. The liquid-solid interfacial energy is derived from these experiments.

  15. Vacuum ultra-violet damage and damage mitigation for plasma processing of highly porous organosilicate glass dielectrics

    SciTech Connect

    Marneffe, J.-F. de Lukaszewicz, M.; Porter, S. B.; Vajda, F.; Rutigliani, V.; Verdonck, P.; Baklanov, M. R.; Zhang, L.; Heyne, M.; El Otell, Z.; Krishtab, M.; Goodyear, A.; Cooke, M.

    2015-10-07

    Porous organosilicate glass thin films, with k-value 2.0, were exposed to 147 nm vacuum ultra-violet (VUV) photons emitted in a Xenon capacitive coupled plasma discharge. Strong methyl bond depletion was observed, concomitant with a significant increase of the bulk dielectric constant. This indicates that, besides reactive radical diffusion, photons emitted during plasma processing do impede dielectric properties and therefore need to be tackled appropriately during patterning and integration. The detrimental effect of VUV irradiation can be partly suppressed by stuffing the low-k porous matrix with proper sacrificial polymers showing high VUV absorption together with good thermal and VUV stability. In addition, the choice of an appropriate hard-mask, showing high VUV absorption, can minimize VUV damage. Particular processing conditions allow to minimize the fluence of photons to the substrate and lead to negligible VUV damage. For patterned structures, in order to reduce VUV damage in the bulk and on feature sidewalls, the combination of both pore stuffing/material densification and absorbing hard-mask is recommended, and/or the use of low VUV-emitting plasma discharge.

  16. Complete elution of vacuum gas oil resins by comprehensive high-temperature two-dimensional gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Boursier, Laure; Souchon, Vincent; Dartiguelongue, Cyril; Ponthus, Jérémie; Courtiade, Marion; Thiébaut, Didier

    2013-03-08

    The development of efficient conversion processes requires extended knowledge on vacuum gas oils (VGOs). Among these processes, hydrocracking is certainly one of the best suited to meet the increasing demand on high quality diesel fuels. Most of refractory and inhibiting compounds towards hydrocracking and especially nitrogen containing compounds are contained in a fraction of the VGO called the resin fraction, which corresponds to the most polar fraction of a VGO obtained by liquid chromatography (LC) fractionation on a silica column. However, the lack of resolution observed through existing analytical methods does not allow a detailed characterization of these fractions. A recent study showed that comprehensive high temperature two-dimensional gas chromatography (HT-GC×GC) methods could be optimized in order to elute heavy compounds. This method was implemented for the analysis of VGO resin fractions and complete elution was reached. Firstly, the method was validated through repeatability, accuracy, linearity and response factors calculations. Four VGO resin fractions were analyzed and their HT-GC×GC simulated distillation curves were compared to their GC simulated distillation (GC-SimDist) curves. This comparison showed that the method allows complete elution of most of the analyzed VGO resin fractions. However, a detailed characterization of these fractions is not yet obtained due to the very large number of heteroatomic and aromatic species that a flame ionization detector can detect. Current work aims at increasing the selectivity of GC×GC by using heteroatom selective detectors in order to improve the characterization of such products.

  17. Better vacuum by removal of diffusion-pump-oil contaminants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buggele, A. E.

    1975-01-01

    The complex problem of why large space simulation chambers do not realize true ultimate vacuum was investigated. Some contaminating factors affecting diffusion pump performance were identified, and some advances in vacuum distillation-fractionation technology were achieved which resulted in a two-decade-or-more lower ultimate pressure. Data are presented to show the overall or individual contaminating effects of commonly used phthalate ester plasticizers of 390 to 530 molecular weight on diffusion pump performance. Methods for removing contaminants from diffusion pump silicone oil during operation and for reclaiming contaminated oil by high-vacuum molecular distillation are described. Conceptual self-cleansing designs and operating procedures are proposed for modifying large diffusion pumps into high-efficiency distillation devices. The potential exists for application of these technological advancements to other disciplines, such as medicine, biomedical materials, metallurgy, refining, and chemical (diffusion-enrichment) processing.

  18. High-Power, High-Temperature Superconductor Technology Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhasin, Kul B.

    2005-01-01

    Since the first discovery of high-temperature superconductors (HTS) 10 years ago, the most promising areas for their applications in microwave systems have been as passive components for communication systems. Soon after the discovery, experiments showed that passive microwave circuits made from HTS material exceeded the performance of conventional devices for low-power applications and could be 10 times as small or smaller. However, for superconducting microwave components, high-power microwave applications have remained elusive until now. In 1996, DuPont and Com Dev Ltd. developed high-power superconducting materials and components for communication applications under a NASA Lewis Research Center cooperative agreement, NCC3-344 "High Power High Temperature Superconductor (HTS) Technology Development." The agreement was cost shared between the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency's (DARPA) Technology Reinvestment Program Office and the two industrial partners. It has the following objectives: 1) Material development and characterization for high-power HTS applications; 2) Development and validation of generic high-power microwave components; 3) Development of a proof-of-concept model for a high-power six-channel HTS output multiplexer.

  19. Sorption vacuum trap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrington, A. E.; Caruso, A. J.

    1970-01-01

    Modified sorption trap for use in high vacuum systems contains provisions for online regeneration of sorbent material. Trap is so constructed that it has a number of encapsulated resistance heaters and a valving and pumping device for removing gases from heated sorbing material. Excessive downtime is eliminated with this trap.

  20. Development of Sub-Ischial Prosthetic Sockets with Vacuum-Assisted Suspension for Highly Active Persons with Transfemoral Amputations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    Caldwell R , Hansen A, Fatone S (in press) Methods for Characterization of Mechanical and Electrical Prosthetic Vacuum Pumps. Journal of Rehabilitation...Research and Development, 50(8). Appendix E Komolafe O, Caldwell R , Fatone S (prepared) Finite Element Analysis of Rigid Frame Designs for...Design, in The Academy Today 2007. p. A7-9. 4 Fairley , M., ’Hanging Tight’: Elevated Vacuum Suspension Systems Step Forward, in The O&P Edge March

  1. High Speed Digital Camera Technology Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clements, Sandra D.

    2009-01-01

    A High Speed Digital Camera Technology Review (HSD Review) is being conducted to evaluate the state-of-the-shelf in this rapidly progressing industry. Five HSD cameras supplied by four camera manufacturers participated in a Field Test during the Space Shuttle Discovery STS-128 launch. Each camera was also subjected to Bench Tests in the ASRC Imaging Development Laboratory. Evaluation of the data from the Field and Bench Tests is underway. Representatives from the imaging communities at NASA / KSC and the Optical Systems Group are participating as reviewers. A High Speed Digital Video Camera Draft Specification was updated to address Shuttle engineering imagery requirements based on findings from this HSD Review. This draft specification will serve as the template for a High Speed Digital Video Camera Specification to be developed for the wider OSG imaging community under OSG Task OS-33.

  2. Voltage Breakdown Limits at a High Material Temperature for Rapid Pulse Heating in a Vacuum

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-06-01

    expanding plasma from a previous pulse. One method produces a blow-off plasma through the application of laser power to the surface . This...velocity at the end of the heating pulse is 0.3 ern/us. There may well be some much hotter plasma on the surface produced by the high electric...Kristiansen, "Increasing surface flashover potential using magnetic insulation", Proc. 7th IEEE Pulse Power Conf., p812, (1989) [3] R.E. Tipton, "A 2D

  3. High throughput screening technologies for ion channels

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hai-bo; Li, Min; Wang, Wei-ping; Wang, Xiao-liang

    2016-01-01

    Ion channels are involved in a variety of fundamental physiological processes, and their malfunction causes numerous human diseases. Therefore, ion channels represent a class of attractive drug targets and a class of important off-targets for in vitro pharmacological profiling. In the past decades, the rapid progress in developing functional assays and instrumentation has enabled high throughput screening (HTS) campaigns on an expanding list of channel types. Chronologically, HTS methods for ion channels include the ligand binding assay, flux-based assay, fluorescence-based assay, and automated electrophysiological assay. In this review we summarize the current HTS technologies for different ion channel classes and their applications. PMID:26657056

  4. Design and initial characterization of a compact, ultra high vacuum compatible, low frequency, tilt accelerometer

    SciTech Connect

    O’Toole, A. E-mail: riccardo.desalvo@gmail.com; Peña Arellano, F. E.; Rodionov, A. V.; Kim, C.; Shaner, M.; Asadoor, M.; Sobacchi, E.; Dergachev, V.; DeSalvo, R. E-mail: riccardo.desalvo@gmail.com; Bhawal, A.; Gong, P.; Lottarini, A.; Minenkov, Y.; Murphy, C.

    2014-07-15

    A compact tilt accelerometer with high sensitivity at low frequency was designed to provide low frequency corrections for the feedback signal of the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory active seismic attenuation system. It has been developed using a Tungsten Carbide ceramic knife-edge hinge designed to avoid the mechanical 1/f noise believed to be intrinsic in polycrystalline metallic flexures. Design and construction details are presented; prototype data acquisition and control limitations are discussed. The instrument's characterization reported here shows that the hinge is compatible with being metal-hysteresis-free, and therefore also free of the 1/f noise generated by the dislocation Self-Organized Criticality in the metal. A tiltmeter of this kind will be effective to separate the ground tilt component from the signal of horizontal low frequency seismometers, and to correct the ill effects of microseismic tilt in advanced seismic attenuation systems.

  5. Negative Ion Crystal Formation in Nonequilibrium Dusty Plasma at a Gas Evacuation from Technological Devices for Vacuum Support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azarenkov, Nikolai A.; Egorov, Alexei M.; Maslov, Vasyl I.; Onishchenko, Ivan N.; Frolova, Darya Yu.

    2002-11-01

    Plasma crystal formation (or so called ion crystal formation) are investigated now intensively (see, for example, [1-5]). In particular, the formation of the plasma crystals has been observed in experiments at providing of nonequilibrium state. If in equilibrium dusty plasma there was no plasma crystal but at providing of nonequilibrium state at a gas evacuation from devices for vacuum support in a dusty plasma in experiment an ion crystal has been formed. In this case at gas evacuation the plasma flow has been appeared due to gradient of the pressure. The flow excites the perturbations of large amplitudes. The generalised equation is derived for the spatial distribution of field of any amplitude. It is shown that these perturbations of large amplitude lead to spatial ordering of heavy negative ions. It is shown that the crystal is almost motionless, because heavy negative ions are trapped by chain of perturbations formed due to instability development on generalised dusty-ion-acoustic mode with velocity equal almost zero. 1.H.M.Thomas, G.E. Morfill. Nature. 379 (1996) 806. 2.R.K.Varma, P.K.Shukla. Physica Scripta. 51 (1995) 522. 3.M.Nambu, S.V.Vladimirov, P.K.Shukla. Phys. Lett. A. 203 (1995) 40. 4.A.Melzer, A.Piel et al. Proc. Int. Top. Conf. on Plasma Physics. Trieste. Italy. 2000. 5.V.E.Fortov, A.P.Nefedov et al. Proc. Int. Conf. on Plasma Physics. Trieste. Italy. 2000. 6.D.A.Law, B.M.Annaratone, J.E.Allen et al. Dust Particle Interaction in RF Plasma Sheaths.

  6. Reduction of Listeria Innocua Contamination in Vacuum-Packaged Dry-Cured Italian Pork Products After High Hydrostatic Pressure Treatment.

    PubMed

    Merialdi, Giuseppe; Ramini, Mattia; Ravanetti, Emanuela; Gherri, Giorgio; Bonilauri, Paolo

    2015-05-28

    The present work aims to present the results of the application of a treatment with high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) on Italian fermented and dry-cured pork products. The products used in this study were portioned cured ham, portioned bacon and salami, vacuumpackaged and produced by a single processing company. Two studies were conducted on a single batch of the three products by means of an artificial contamination with Listeria innocua as a surrogate of L. monocytogenes. In the first trial a superficial contamination was obtained by immersion for 3 min in the culture broth with a concentration of approximately 9 log cfu/mL. At the end of the inoculum step, the pieces were dred at room temperature and vacuum packaged. In the second trial 50 kg of minced pork meat were contaminated before production of salami. In both cases the inoculum contained 5 strains of L. innocua. Subsequently, in both trials, 10 samples were randomly divided into two groups of 5 pieces each: i) TH group, samples treated with HHP; ii) group C, control samples, not subjected to any treatment. All samples were stored at refrigeration temperature at the end of HHP treatments (if applied), and analyzed for the determination of the surface (1st trial) and deep (2nd trial) quantitative contamination of L. innocua. pH and aW were also determined on 3 pieces of each products belonging to group C. The difference between the medians of the log cfu/cm2 or g established between controls and treated were compared using the non-parametric test (Kruskal-Wallis test) with P<0.01. In all products and in both trials the level of contamination detected in treatment groups was always significantly lower than in controls (P<0.01). In particular, in vacuum-packaged ham, bacon and salami viability logarithmic viability reductions equal to -2.29, -2.54 and -2.51 were observed, respectively. This study aimed to evaluate a not-thermal treatment on Italian cured or fermented pork products. The results of this study

  7. Mass-spring matching layers for high-frequency ultrasound transducers: a new technique using vacuum deposition.

    PubMed

    Brown, Jeremy; Sharma, Srikanta; Leadbetter, Jeff; Cochran, Sandy; Adamson, Rob

    2014-11-01

    We have developed a technique of applying multiple matching layers to high-frequency (>30 MHz) imaging transducers, by using carefully controlled vacuum deposition alone. This technique uses a thin mass-spring matching layer approach that was previously described in a low-frequency (1 to 10 MHz) transducer design with epoxied layers. This mass- spring approach is more suitable to vacuum deposition in highfrequency transducers over the conventional quarter-wavelength resonant cavity approach, because thinner layers and more versatile material selection can be used, the difficulty in precisely lapping quarter-wavelength matching layers is avoided, the layers are less attenuating, and the layers can be applied to a curved surface. Two different 3-mm-diameter 45-MHz planar lithium niobate transducers and one geometrically curved 3-mm lithium niobate transducer were designed and fabricated using this matching layer approach with copper as the mass layer and parylene as the spring layer. The first planar lithium niobate transducer used a single mass-spring matching network, and the second planar lithium niobate transducer used a single mass-spring network to approximate the first layer in a dual quarter-wavelength matching layer system in addition to a conventional quarter-wavelength layer as the second matching layer. The curved lithium niobate transducer was press focused and used a similar mass-spring plus quarter-wavelength matching layer network. These transducers were then compared with identical transducers with no matching layers and the performance improvement was quantified. The bandwidth of the lithium niobate transducer with the single mass-spring layer was measured to be 46% and the insertion loss was measured to be -21.9 dB. The bandwidth and insertion loss of the lithium niobate transducer with the mass-spring network plus quarter-wavelength matching were measured to be 59% and -18.2 dB, respectively. These values were compared with the unmatched

  8. Design of AN Ultra-High Vacuum Scanned Probe Microscope (spm) and Application of SPM to Ceramic Surfaces.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudd, Gregory Ian

    Scanned probe microscopies are a class of techniques in which a sharp probe is brought very close to a surface by stable micropositioners. Some interaction between them is sensed and may be used to maintain a setpoint value as the probe is scanned above or along the surface. Examples are scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), which senses the current that flows when a small bias is imposed between a sharp metal tip and conductive surface, and atomic force microscopy (AFM), which senses the forces between a sharp tip and a surface. These have proved to be sensitive probes of surface structure and chemistry, resolving atom-to-atom variations on the surface. The construction of an AFM/STM instrument compatible with an ultra-high vacuum environment is described. Atomic resolution is demonstrated in both modes. Investigations of the surface structure of various ceramic materials by STM and AFM are discussed. The adsorption of tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS) onto graphite is explored. Adsorption is enhanced by exposure to TEOS plasma. The results are observed in STM images. The atomic-scale structure of the surface of two molybdenum bronzes, rm Rb_{0.3 }MoO_3 and rm Na_ {0.9}MoO_6O_{17}, is also observed by STM. The STM tip is used to deliberately modify the bronze surfaces. It appears that the tip penetrates the surface under certain conditions. This is attributed in part to the low-dimensional conductivity of the materials. The use of the AFM to measure interfacial forces between the tip and silicate glasses is described. Using a tungsten tip on 30 mole% alkali glasses in ambient conditions and controlled atmosphere, a soft, reacted layer can be detected. The layer is attributed to reaction with CO _2 and water, occurring in the order Li < Na < K. Spatial variations in the adhesion force are observed on alkali glass surfaces, but not on pure v-silica, fractured in vacuum. This heterogeneity was attributed to the alkali glass structure. Pure v-silica was reacted with

  9. Integration of a broad beam ion source with a high-temperature x-ray diffraction vacuum chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Manova, D.; Bergmann, A.; Maendl, S.; Neumann, H.; Rauschenbach, B.

    2012-11-15

    Here, the integration of a low energy, linearly variable ion beam current density, mechanically in situ adjustable broad beam ion source with a high-temperature x-ray diffraction (XRD) vacuum chamber is reported. This allows in situ XRD investigation of phase formation and evolution processes induced by low energy ion implantation. Special care has been taken to an independent adjustment of the ion beam for geometrical directing towards the substrate, a 15 mm small ion source exit aperture to avoid a secondary sputter process of the chamber walls, linearly variable ion current density by using a pulse length modulation (PLM) for the accelerating voltages without changing the ion beam density profile, nearly homogeneous ion beam distribution over the x-ray footprint, together with easily replaceable Kapton{sup Registered-Sign} windows for x-rays entry and exit. By combining a position sensitive x-ray detector with this PLM-modulated ion beam, a fast and efficient time resolved investigation of low energy implantation processes is obtained in a compact experimental setup.

  10. Reduction of Vanadium Oxide (VOx) under High Vacuum Conditions as Investigated by X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chourasia, A.

    2015-03-01

    Vanadium oxide thin films were formed by depositing thin films of vanadium on quartz substrates and oxidizing them in an atmosphere of oxygen. The deposition was done by the e-beam technique. The oxide films were annealed at different temperatures for different times under high vacuum conditions. The technique of x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy has been employed to study the changes in the oxidation states of vanadium and oxygen in such films. The spectral features in the vanadium 2p, oxygen 1s, and the x-ray excited Auger regions were investigated. The Auger parameter has been utilized to study the changes. The complete oxidation of elemental vanadium to V2O5 was observed to occur at 700°C. At any other temperature, a mixture of oxides consisting of V2O5 and VO2 was observed in the films. Annealing of the films resulted in the gradual loss of oxygen followed by reduction in the oxidation state from +5 to 0. The reduction was observed to depend upon the annealing temperature and the annealing time. Organized Research, TAMU-Commerce.

  11. Integration of a broad beam ion source with a high-temperature x-ray diffraction vacuum chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manova, D.; Bergmann, A.; Mändl, S.; Neumann, H.; Rauschenbach, B.

    2012-11-01

    Here, the integration of a low energy, linearly variable ion beam current density, mechanically in situ adjustable broad beam ion source with a high-temperature x-ray diffraction (XRD) vacuum chamber is reported. This allows in situ XRD investigation of phase formation and evolution processes induced by low energy ion implantation. Special care has been taken to an independent adjustment of the ion beam for geometrical directing towards the substrate, a 15 mm small ion source exit aperture to avoid a secondary sputter process of the chamber walls, linearly variable ion current density by using a pulse length modulation (PLM) for the accelerating voltages without changing the ion beam density profile, nearly homogeneous ion beam distribution over the x-ray footprint, together with easily replaceable Kapton® windows for x-rays entry and exit. By combining a position sensitive x-ray detector with this PLM-modulated ion beam, a fast and efficient time resolved investigation of low energy implantation processes is obtained in a compact experimental setup.

  12. Impact of high oxygen and vacuum retail ready packaging formats on lamb loin and topside eating quality.

    PubMed

    Frank, Damian Conrad; Geesink, Geert; Alvarenga, Tharcilla I R C; Polkinghorne, Rod; Stark, Janet; Lee, Michael; Warner, Robyn

    2017-01-01

    Lamb steaks from semimembranosus (SM) and longissimus thoracis et lumborum (LTL) muscles were allocated to three different packaging treatments - Darfresh® vacuum skin packaging (VSP), Darfresh® Bloom packaging (80% O2:20% CO2; Hi-Ox-DB) or high oxygen modified atmosphere packaging (80% O2:20% CO2; Hi-Ox-MAP) - and stored in simulated retail display for 5 or 10days and then subjected to consumer sensory and chemical analyses. Hi-Ox-MAP and Hi-Ox-DB samples had lower tenderness, flavor, juiciness and overall liking scores and higher TBARS values, compared to VSP. Hi-Ox-MAP samples deteriorated in juiciness and flavor between 5 and 10days. Hi-Ox-MAP LTL samples had a lower myofibrillar fragmentation index, consistent with reduced proteolysis, although desmin proteolysis and desmin and troponin-T cross-linking were not influenced by packaging. The LTL exhibited greater desmin degradation and reduced desmin cross-linking relative to the SM, supporting the higher tenderness scores in this muscle. Direct packaging of lamb into retail ready VSP may provide the sheepmeat industry with greater flexibility while increasing consumer satisfaction.

  13. On the Sn loss from thin films of the material system Cu-Zn-Sn-S in high vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, A.; Mainz, R.; Schock, H. W.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper the Sn loss from thin films of the material system Cu-Zn-Sn-S and the subsystems Cu-Sn-S and Sn-S in high vacuum is investigated. A combination of in situ x-ray diffractometry and x-ray fluorescence (XRF) at a synchrotron light source allowed identifying phases, which tend to decompose and evaporate a Sn-containing compound. On the basis of the XRF results a quantification of the Sn loss from the films during annealing experiments is presented. It can be shown that the evaporation rate from the different phases decreases according to the order SnS→Cu2SnS3→Cu4SnS4→Cu2ZnSnS4. The phase SnS is assigned as the evaporating compound. The influence of an additional inert gas component on the Sn loss and on the formation of Cu2ZnSnS4 thin films is discussed.

  14. Integration of a broad beam ion source with a high-temperature x-ray diffraction vacuum chamber.

    PubMed

    Manova, D; Bergmann, A; Mändl, S; Neumann, H; Rauschenbach, B

    2012-11-01

    Here, the integration of a low energy, linearly variable ion beam current density, mechanically in situ adjustable broad beam ion source with a high-temperature x-ray diffraction (XRD) vacuum chamber is reported. This allows in situ XRD investigation of phase formation and evolution processes induced by low energy ion implantation. Special care has been taken to an independent adjustment of the ion beam for geometrical directing towards the substrate, a 15 mm small ion source exit aperture to avoid a secondary sputter process of the chamber walls, linearly variable ion current density by using a pulse length modulation (PLM) for the accelerating voltages without changing the ion beam density profile, nearly homogeneous ion beam distribution over the x-ray footprint, together with easily replaceable Kapton(®) windows for x-rays entry and exit. By combining a position sensitive x-ray detector with this PLM-modulated ion beam, a fast and efficient time resolved investigation of low energy implantation processes is obtained in a compact experimental setup.

  15. Determination of band oscillator strengths of atmospheric molecules from high resolution vacuum ultraviolet cross section measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parkinson, W. H.

    1986-01-01

    An account is given of progress in work on (1) the determination of band oscillator strengths of the Schumann-Runge absorption bands of (16)O2 and (18)O2 from cross section measurements conducted at 79 K; (2) the determination of the absolute absorption cross section of the Schumann-Runge bands of (16)O(18)O from optical depth measurements performed on mixtures of (16)O2, (18)O2 and (16)O(18)O at 79K; and (3) the influence of Schumann-Runge linewing contributions on the determination of the Herzberg continuum absorption cross section of (16)O2 in the wavelength region 194 to 204 nm. The experimental investigations are effected at high resolution with a 6.65 m scanning spectrometer which is, by virtue of its small instrumental width (EWHM = 0.0013 nm), uniquely suitable for cross section measurements of molecular bands with discrete rotational structure. Absolute cross sections, which are independent of the instrumental function and from which band oscillator strengths are directly determined, are measured for the absorption bands that are most predissociated. Such measurements are needed for (1) accurate calculations of the stratospheric production of atomic oxygen and heavy ozone formed following the photopredissociation of (18)O(16)O by solar radiation penetrating between the absorption lines of (16)O2; (2) elucidation of the mechanism of predissociation of the upper state of the Schumann-Runge bands; and (3) determination of the true shape of the Herzberg continuum cross section.

  16. Beam Interaction Measurements with a Retarding Field Analyzer in a High-Current High-Vacuum Positively-Charged Particle Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Covo, M K; Molvik, A W; Friedman, A; Barnard, J J; Seidl, P A; Logan, B G; Baca, D; Vujic, J L

    2006-07-11

    A Retarding Field Analyzer (RFA) was inserted in a drift region of a magnetic transport section of the high-current experiment (HCX) that is at high-vacuum to measure ions and electrons resulting from beam interaction with background gas and walls. The ions are expelled during the beam by the space-charge potential and the electrons are expelled mainly at the end of the beam, when the beam potential decays. The ion energy distribution shows the beam potential of {approx} 2100 V and the beam-background gas total cross-section of 1.6x10{sup -20} m{sup 2}. The electron energy distribution reveals that the expelled electrons are mainly desorbed from the walls and gain {approx} 22 eV from the beam potential decaying with time before entering the RFA. Details of the RFA design and of the measured energy distributions are presented and discussed.

  17. Technology Management within Product Lines in High Technology Markets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sarangee, Kumar R.

    2009-01-01

    Understanding the nuances of product line management has been of great interest to business scholars and practitioners. This assumes greater significance for firms conducting business in technologically dynamic industries, where they face certain challenges regarding the management of multiple, overlapping technologies within their product lines.…

  18. High average power, high current pulsed accelerator technology

    SciTech Connect

    Neau, E.L.

    1995-05-01

    Which current pulsed accelerator technology was developed during the late 60`s through the late 80`s to satisfy the needs of various military related applications such as effects simulators, particle beam devices, free electron lasers, and as drivers for Inertial Confinement Fusion devices. The emphasis in these devices is to achieve very high peak power levels, with pulse lengths on the order of a few 10`s of nanoseconds, peak currents of up to 10`s of MA, and accelerating potentials of up to 10`s of MV. New which average power systems, incorporating thermal management techniques, are enabling the potential use of high peak power technology in a number of diverse industrial application areas such as materials processing, food processing, stack gas cleanup, and the destruction of organic contaminants. These systems employ semiconductor and saturable magnetic switches to achieve short pulse durations that can then be added to efficiently give MV accelerating, potentials while delivering average power levels of a few 100`s of kilowatts to perhaps many megawatts. The Repetitive High Energy Puled Power project is developing short-pulse, high current accelerator technology capable of generating beams with kJ`s of energy per pulse delivered to areas of 1000 cm{sup 2} or more using ions, electrons, or x-rays. Modular technology is employed to meet the needs of a variety of applications requiring from 100`s of kV to MV`s and from 10`s to 100`s of kA. Modest repetition rates, up to a few 100`s of pulses per second (PPS), allow these machines to deliver average currents on the order of a few 100`s of mA. The design and operation of the second generation 300 kW RHEPP-II machine, now being brought on-line to operate at 2.5 MV, 25 kA, and 100 PPS will be described in detail as one example of the new high average power, high current pulsed accelerator technology.

  19. Measuring Extreme Vacuum Pressure with Ultraintense Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paredes, Angel; Novoa, David; Tommasini, Daniele

    2012-12-01

    We show that extreme vacuum pressures can be measured with current technology by detecting the photons produced by the relativistic Thomson scattering of ultraintense laser light by the electrons of the medium. We compute the amount of radiation scattered at different frequencies and angles when a Gaussian laser pulse crosses a vacuum tube and design strategies for the efficient measurement of pressure. In particular, we show that a single day experiment at a high repetition rate petawatt laser facility such as Vega, that will be operating in 2014 in Salamanca, will be sensitive, in principle, to pressures p as low as 10-16Pa, and will be able to provide highly reliable measurements for p≳10-14Pa.

  20. Vacuum ultra-violet emission of plasma discharges with high Xe partial pressure using a cathode protective layer with high secondary electron emission

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Di; Song, Le; Zhang, Xiong; Kajiyama, Hiroshi

    2014-02-14

    In this work, the mechanism of the vacuum ultra-violet (VUV) emission of plasma discharges, with high Xe partial pressure and high ion-induced secondary electrons emission protective layer, is studied by measuring the VUV light emission directly and comparing it with two-dimensional simulations. From the panel measurement, we find that the high intensity of excimer VUV mainly contributes to the high luminous efficacy of SrCaO-plasma display panels (PDP) at a low sustain voltage. The unchanged Xe excitation efficiency indicates that the electron temperature is not decreased by the high secondary electrons emission protective layer, even though the sustain voltage is much lower. From the two-dimensional simulations, we can find that the ratio of excimer VUV to resonant VUV, which is determined by the collision rate in the discharge, is only significantly affected by the Xe partial pressure, while it is independent of the sustain voltage and the secondary-electrons-emission capability of protective layer. The unchanged average electron energy at the moment when the electric field becomes maximum confirms that the improvement of the VUV production efficiency mainly is attributed to the increase in electron heating efficiency of a PDP with high ion-induced secondary electrons emission protective layer. Combining the experimental and the simulation results, we conclude about the mechanism by which the VUV production is improved for the plasma display panel with a high Xe partial pressure and a cold cathode with high ion-induced secondary electrons emission.