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Sample records for high velocity oxygen-fuel

  1. A Numerical Study on Gas Phase Dynamics of High-Velocity Oxygen Fuel Thermal Spray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baik, Jae-Sang; Park, Sun-Kyu; Kim, Youn-Jea

    2008-08-01

    The high-velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) thermal spray is used for a particulate deposition process in which micro-sized particles are propelled and heated in a supersonic combusting gas stream. It is characterized by high gas velocity and high density and is being used in an increasing variety of coating applications, such as ceramic and composite coatings, to improve wear and abrasion resistance. The particle temperature and velocity are two of the most important parameters in HVOF thermal spraying, which affect the quality of the coatings. To understand the particle dynamics, it is necessary to study, first, the thermal flow characteristics in the HVOF system. In this study, a numerical analysis is performed to predict the gas dynamic behaviors, and the effect of the geometrical parameter is studied to optimize the nozzle design.

  2. Analysis of a High Velocity Oxygen-Fuel (HVOF) thermal spray torch. Part 1, Numerical formulation

    SciTech Connect

    Oberkampf, W.L.; Talpallikar, M.

    1994-01-01

    The fluid and particle dynamics of a High Velocity Oxygen-Fuel (HVOF) torch are analyzed using computational fluid dynamic (CFD) techniques. The thermal spray device analyzed is similar to a Metco Diamond Jet torch with powder injection. The spray nozzle is axisymmetric with powder injection on the centerline, premixed fuel and oxygen fed from an annulus, and air cooling injected along the interior surface of the aircap. Choked flow conditions occur at the exit of the aircap and a supersonic, under-expanded jet develops externally. The CFD simulation assumes three injection streams (solid metal particles with argon as a carrier gas, premixed oxygen/fuel, and air) inside the aircap and solves the combusting two-phase flow until the external spray stream decays to sonic conditions. The numerical formulation solves the mass, momentum, and energy transfer for both the gas and particle phase and strongly couples each phase. The combustion process is modeled using approximate equilibrium chemistry with dissociation of the gas with a total of nine species. Melting and re-solidification of the metal panicles is modeled as a lumped-mass system. Turbulent flow is modeled by a two equation k-{epsilon} turbulence model, including compressibility effects on turbulent dissipation. A time iterative, implicit, finite volume numerical method is used to solve the partial differential equations. A companion paper [10] presents the results of the numerical simulation and gives a detailed discussion of the gas and panicle dynamics.

  3. Computational fluid dynamic analysis of a High-Velocity Oxygen-Fuel (HVOF) thermal spray torch

    SciTech Connect

    Hassan, B.; Oberkampf, W.L.; Neiser, R.A.; Roemer, T.J.

    1995-09-01

    The gas dynamics of a High-Velocity Oxygen-Fuel (HVOF) torch are analyzed using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) techniques. The thermal spray device analyzed is similar to a Metco Diamond Jet torch with powder feed. The injection nozzle is assumed to be axisymmetric with premixed fuel and oxygen fed from an annulus, and air cooling injected along the interior surface of the aircap. The aircap, a cronically converging nozzle, achieves choked flow conditions at the exit and a supersonic, under-expanded jet develops externally. Finite difference equations for mass, momentum, and energy conservation are solved for the gas dynamics. The combustion process is modeled using a single-step and a 12-step quasi-global finite-rate chemistry model with dissociation of the gas and a total of nine species. Turbulent flow inside the aircap and in the free-jet decay is modeled using a two-equation k-{epsilon} model. An iterative, implicit, finite volume numerical method is used to solve the gas dynamic equations inside and outside the torch . The CFD results are compared with recent experimental measurements of pressure inside the HVOF aircap. Comparisons are made for two flow rates of premixed fuel and oxygen and air cooling. This paper presents the first published comparisons of CFD predictions and experimental measurements for HVOF tbermal spraying.

  4. Effect of Operating Parameters on a Dual-Stage High Velocity Oxygen Fuel Thermal Spray System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Mohammed N.; Shamim, Tariq

    2014-08-01

    High velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) thermal spray systems are being used to apply coatings to prevent surface degradation. The coatings of temperature sensitive materials such as titanium and copper, which have very low melting points, cannot be applied using a single-stage HVOF system. Therefore, a dual-stage HVOF system has been introduced and modeled computationally. The dual-spray system provides an easy control of particle oxidation by introducing a mixing chamber. In addition to the materials being sprayed, the thermal spray coating quality depends to a large extent on flow behavior of reacting gases and the particle dynamics. The present study investigates the influence of various operating parameters on the performance of a dual-stage thermal spray gun. The objective is to develop a predictive understanding of various parameters. The gas flow field and the free jet are modeled by considering the conservation of mass, momentum, and energy with the turbulence and the equilibrium combustion sub models. The particle phase is decoupled from the gas phase due to very low particle volume fractions. The results demonstrate the advantage of a dual-stage system over a single-stage system especially for the deposition of temperature sensitive materials.

  5. Duplex coating of electroless nickel and HVOF (high-velocity oxygen fuel) sprayed WC-Co

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jokinen, P.; Korpiola, K.; Mahiout, A.

    2000-06-01

    The porosity of thermal sprayed coatings is usually a problem when coatings are used in wet corrosion application. The porosity allows media to penetrate to the surface of the base material. Corrosion spreads rapidly and the coating loses contact with the substrate and delaminates. This problem can be initiated by impregnating different polymers into the pores. An alternative approach has been tested in the present work to prevent corrosion of cemented carbide coated carbon steel in wet corrosion environments. Carbon steel substrates were coated with a thin film of electroless nickel (electroless nickel plating) and then HVOF (High-Velocity Oxygen Fuel) sprayed with cemented carbide. Reference specimens without electroless nickel were sprayed at the same time. The microhardness of the specimens was measured and the coating structure examined using optical microscopy and X-ray diffractometry (XRD). The bond between the layers and the base material was examined by means of a bend test. A salt chamber test was also performed for the specimens. The structure of the electroless nickel layer was crystalline as a result of the HVOF spraying. There were no cracks in the nickel layer, if the layer was about 20 µm thick. According to the results of the bend test, the adhesion between coatings and substrate was good, and there was no difference between the duplex-coated specimen and the reference specimen. A sample with a thin nickel layer under an HVOF sprayed cemented carbide did not exhibit corrosion after 8 h in the salt chamber test.

  6. Numerical Investigation of Combustion and Flow Dynamics in a High Velocity Oxygen-Fuel Thermal Spray Gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoguang; Song, Qiuzhi; Yu, Zhiyi

    2016-02-01

    The combustion and flow behavior within a high velocity oxygen-fuel (HVOF) thermal spray gun is very complex and involves multiphase flow, heat transfer, chemical reactions, and supersonic/subsonic transitions. Additionally, this behavior has a significant effect on the formation of a coating. Non-premixed combustion models have been developed and are able to provide insight into the underlying physics of the process. Therefore, this investigation employs a non-premixed combustion model and the SST k - ω turbulence model to simulate the flow field of the JP5000 (Praxair-TAFA, US) HVOF thermal spray gun. The predicted temperature and velocity have a high level of agreement with experimental data when using the non-premixed combustion model. The results are focused on the fuel combustion, the subsequent gas dynamics within the HVOF gun, and the development of a supersonic free jet outside the gun. Furthermore, the oxygen/fuel inlet turbulence intensity, the fuel droplet size, and the oxygen/fuel ratio are investigated to determine their effect on the supersonic flow characteristics of the combustion gas.

  7. Deposition and properties of high-velocity-oxygen-fuel and plasma-sprayed Mo-Mo2C composite coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prchlik, L.; Gutleber, J.; Sampath, S.

    2001-12-01

    Molybdenum thermal-spray coatings, dispersion strengthened by molybdenum oxides and molybdenum carbides, play an important role in industrial tribological applications. Traditionally, they have been prepared by plasma and wire flame spraying. High porosity and lower cohesion strength limit their application in situations where both galling and abrasion wear is involved. In this study, high-velocity-oxygen-fuel (HVOF) deposition of molybdenum and molybdenum carbide coatings was attempted. Deposition was achieved for all powders used. Composition, microstructure, mechanical, and wear properties of the HVOF synthesized coatings were evaluated and compared with plasma-sprayed counterparts. The HVOF coatings possessed a very good abrasion resistance, whereas plasma deposits performed better in dry sliding tests. Measurements showed a close relationship between the coating surface hardness and its abrasion resistance. Results also suggested correlation between molybdenum carbide distribution in the molybdenum matrix and the sliding friction response of Mo-Mo2C coatings.

  8. Computational fluid dynamics analysis of a wire-feed, high-velocity oxygen-fuel (HVOF) thermal spray torch

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, A.R.; Hassan, B.; Oberkampf, W.L.; Neiser, R.A.; Roemer, T.J.

    1996-09-01

    The fluid and particle dynamics of a High-Velocity Oxygen-Fuel Thermal Spray torch are analyzed using computational and experimental techniques. Three-dimensional Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) results are presented for a curved aircap used for coating interior surfaces such as engine cylinder bores. The device analyzed is similar to the Metco Diamond Jet Rotating Wire (DJRW) torch. The feed gases are injected through an axisymmetric nozzle into the curved aircap. Premixed propylene and oxygen are introduced from an annulus in the nozzle, while cooling air is injected between the nozzle and the interior wall of the aircap. The combustion process is modeled using a single-step finite-rate chemistry model with a total of 9 gas species which includes dissociation of combustion products. A continually-fed steel wire passes through the center of the nozzle and melting occurs at a conical tip near the exit of the aircap. Wire melting is simulated computationally by injecting liquid steel particles into the flow field near the tip of the wire. Experimental particle velocity measurements during wire feed were also taken using a Laser Two-Focus (L2F) velocimeter system. Flow fields inside and outside the aircap are presented and particle velocity predictions are compared with experimental measurements outside of the aircap.

  9. Abrasive wear of high velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) superalloy coatings under vibration load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandeva, M.; Ivanova, B.; Karastoyanov, D.; Grozdanova, T.; Assenova, E.

    2017-02-01

    The present paper considers wear of coatings deposited by HVOF (High velocity oxy-fuel) technology, under conditions of dry friction against abrasive surface accompanied with the action of vibrations perpendicular to the sliding axis. Results are obtained with four type coatings: two types with Ni matrix of composition 602P – without preliminary heating of the basic surface (the substrate) and after substrate heating up to 650°C in a chamber; coating WC-12Co with tungsten matrix and coating obtained by 1:1 proportion powder mixture of both compositions 602P and WC-12Co. Results about the thickness, hardness and coating’ morphology are presented, as well as dependences of the wear and the relative wear resistance on vibration speeds in the interval 3.03 to 21.08 mm/s. New results are obtained about the nonlinear relationship between abrasive wear and vibration speed showing minimal wear for all specimens by 6.04 mm/s. It is found that lowest wear shows WC-12Co coating in the entire interval of vibration speed variation: 3.03 to 21.08 mm/s. The obtained results are new in the literature; they are not presented and published by the authors.

  10. Computational analysis of a three-dimensional High-Velocity Oxygen-Fuel (HVOF) Thermal Spray torch

    SciTech Connect

    Hassan, B.; Lopez, A.R.; Oberkampf, W.L.

    1995-07-01

    An analysis of a High-Velocity Oxygen-Fuel Thermal Spray torch is presented using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Three-dimensional CFD results are presented for a curved aircap used for coating interior surfaces such as engine cylinder bores. The device analyzed is similar to the Metco Diamond Jet Rotating Wire torch, but wire feed is not simulated. To the authors` knowledge, these are the first published 3-D results of a thermal spray device. The feed gases are injected through an axisymmetric nozzle into the curved aircap. Argon is injected through the center of the nozzle. Pre-mixed propylene and oxygen are introduced from an annulus in the nozzle, while cooling air is injected between the nozzle and the interior wall of the aircap. The combustion process is modeled assuming instantaneous chemistry. A standard, two-equation, K-{var_epsilon} turbulence model is employed for the turbulent flow field. An implicit, iterative, finite volume numerical technique is used to solve the coupled conservation of mass, momentum, and energy equations for the gas in a sequential manner. Flow fields inside and outside the aircap are presented and discussed.

  11. Evaluation of High Velocity Oxygen Fuel (HVOF) Al/SiCp Coatings as Corrosion Control Coatings for Magnesium Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taltavull, C.; Lopez, A. J.; Torres, B.; Rams, J.

    2014-06-01

    High velocity oxygen-fuel (HVOF) thermal spray technique has been used to fabricate Al and MMC (Al/SiCp) coatings on the AZ91 Mg alloy as a corrosion-control coatings. Corrosion behaviour of the coated specimens had been evaluated by electrochemical tests which revealed that some coated specimens presented an improvement on the corrosion behaviour of the AZ91 substrate. Taguchi DOE method has been used to analyse the relationship between the spraying conditions, i.e. spraying distance, % SiCp in feedstock, number of layers deposited and gun speed, and the corrosion behaviour of the coated specimens. In addition, a relationship between the coating characteristic, i.e. thickness, porosity, adhesion and roughness, and the corrosion behaviour of the coated specimens had also been studied. Optimum spraying conditions were fabricated and corrosion tested to validate the Taguchi DOE method analysis. Among the different coatings features, thickness and compactness seems to be the most relevant ones in terms of corrosion.

  12. High-Velocity Oxygen Fuel Thermal Spray of Fe-Based Amorphous Alloy: a Numerical and Experimental Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajdelsztajn, L.; Dannenberg, J.; Lopez, J.; Yang, N.; Farmer, J.; Lavernia, E. J.

    2009-09-01

    The fabrication of dense coatings with appropriate properties using a high velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) spray process requires an in-depth understanding of the complete gas flow field and particle behavior during the process. A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model is implemented to investigate the gas flow behavior that occurs during the HVOF process and a simplified one-dimensional decoupled model of the in-flight thermal behavior of the amorphous Fe-based powder particles was developed and applied for three different spray conditions. The numerical results were used to rationalize the different coating microstructures described in the experimental results. Low porosity and amorphous coatings were produced using two different particle size distributions (16 to 25 μm and 25 to 53 μm). The amorphous characteristics of the powder were retained in the coating due to melting and rapid solidification in the case of very fine powder or ligaments (<16 μm) and to the fact that the crystallization temperature was not reached in the case of the large particles (16 to 53 μm).

  13. Manufacturing and Properties of High-Velocity Oxygen Fuel (HVOF)-Sprayed FeVCrC Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sassatelli, Paolo; Bolelli, Giovanni; Lusvarghi, Luca; Manfredini, Tiziano; Rigon, Rinaldo

    2016-10-01

    This paper studies the microstructure, sliding wear behavior and corrosion resistance of high-velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF)-sprayed FeVCrC-based coatings. Various process parameters were tested to evaluate their effects on the coating properties, which were also compared to those of HVOF-sprayed NiCrBSi and Stellite-6 coatings. The Fe alloy coatings are composed of flattened splats, originating from molten droplets and consisting of a super-saturated solid solution, together with rounded particles, coming from partially unmolten material and containing V- and Fe-based carbide precipitates. All process parameters, apart from "extreme" settings with excess comburent in the flame, produce dense coatings, indicating that the feedstock powder is quite easily processable by HVOF. These coatings, with a microhardness of 650-750 HV0.3, exhibit wear rates of ≈2 × 10-6 mm3/(Nm) in ball-on-disk tests against sintered Al2O3 spheres. They perform far better than the reference coatings, and better than other Fe- and Ni-based alloy coatings tested in previous research. On the other hand, the corrosion resistance of the coating material (tested by electrochemical polarization in 0.1 M HCl solution) is quite low. Even in the absence of interconnected porosity, this results in extensive, selective damage to the Fe-based matrix. This coating material is therefore unadvisable for severely corrosive environments.

  14. Production of Babbitt Coatings by High Velocity Oxygen Fuel (HVOF) Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nascimento, A. R. C.; Ettouil, F. B.; Moreau, C.; Savoie, S.; Schulz, R.

    2017-10-01

    This work presents HVOF as an alternative means to produce dense Babbitt coatings by thermal spray. A radial injection setup and low fuel flow rates were used to minimize heat transfer to the low melting point alloy. In-flight particle diagnostic systems were used to correlate spray parameters with the changes in particle velocity and thermal radiation intensity. The use of particles with larger diameters resulted in higher deposition efficiencies. It was shown that HVOF Babbitt coatings combine a dense structure and a fine distribution of intermetallic phases when compared to more traditional babbitting techniques.

  15. Production of Babbitt Coatings by High Velocity Oxygen Fuel (HVOF) Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nascimento, A. R. C.; Ettouil, F. B.; Moreau, C.; Savoie, S.; Schulz, R.

    2017-08-01

    This work presents HVOF as an alternative means to produce dense Babbitt coatings by thermal spray. A radial injection setup and low fuel flow rates were used to minimize heat transfer to the low melting point alloy. In-flight particle diagnostic systems were used to correlate spray parameters with the changes in particle velocity and thermal radiation intensity. The use of particles with larger diameters resulted in higher deposition efficiencies. It was shown that HVOF Babbitt coatings combine a dense structure and a fine distribution of intermetallic phases when compared to more traditional babbitting techniques.

  16. Friction and wear properties of high-velocity oxygen fuel sprayed WC-17Co coating under rotational fretting conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Jun; Cai, Zhenbing; Mo, Jiliang; Peng, Jinfang; Zhu, Minhao

    2016-05-01

    Rotational fretting which exist in many engineering applications has incurred enormous economic loss. Thus, accessible methods are urgently needed to alleviate or eliminate damage by rotational fretting. Surface engineering is an effective approach that is successfully adopted to enhance the ability of components to resist the fretting damage. In this paper, using a high-velocity oxygen fuel sprayed (HVOF) technique WC-17Co coating is deposited on an LZ50 steel surface to study its properties through Vickers hardness testing, scanning electric microscope (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), and X-ray diffractrometry (XRD). Rotational fretting wear tests are conducted under normal load varied from 10 N to 50 N, and angular displacement amplitudes vary from 0.125° to 1°. Wear scars are examined using SEM, EDX, optical microscopy (OM), and surface topography. The experimental results reveal that the WC-17Co coating adjusted the boundary between the partial slip regime (PSR) and the slip regime (SR) to the direction of smaller amplitude displacement. As a result, the coefficients of friction are consistently lower than the substrate's coefficients of friction both in the PSR and SR. The damage to the coating in the PSR is very slight. In the SR, the coating exhibits higher debris removal efficiency and load-carrying capacity. The bulge is not found for the coating due to the coating's higher hardness to restrain plastic flow. This research could provide experimental bases for promoting industrial application of WC-17Co coating in prevention of rotational fretting wear.

  17. Characterization of microstructure and surface properties of hybrid coatings of WC-CoCr prepared by laser heat treatment and high velocity oxygen fuel spraying

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Shihong Cho, Tong-Yul; Yoon, Jae-Hong; Fang, Wei; Song, Ki-O; Li Mingxi; Joo, Yun-Kon; Lee, Chan Gyu

    2008-10-15

    The microstructure and microhardness of high velocity oxygen fuel-sprayed WC-CoCr coatings were comparatively studied both before and after laser heat treatment of the coatings. Optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and microhardness testing were applied to investigate the microstructure, phase composition, porosity and microhardness. The results indicate that WC is still present, and W{sub 2}C has appeared, while neither cobalt nor {sigma}-CrCo is detectable. Co{sub 4}W{sub 2}C has appeared in the high velocity oxygen fuel-sprayed coating after laser heat treatment as compared to the coating before laser treatment. The relative content of the W{sub 2}C has not increased with laser treatment, but the laser treatment has essentially eliminated the porosity almost entirely, providing a more homogeneous and densified microstructure. The laser heat treatment has effected the formation of a denser compact coating on the substrate. After laser heat treatment, the thickness of the coating has decreased from 300 {mu}m to 225 {mu}m. This corresponds to an average porosity in the high velocity oxygen fuel-sprayed coating that is approximately five times greater than that in the subsequently laser heat-treated coating. The laser treatment has also resulted in an increased hardness of the coating near the surface, where the average value increased from Hv{sub 0.2} = 1262.4 in the coating before laser heat treatment to Hv{sub 0.2} = 1818.7 after laser heat treatment.

  18. Slurry Erosion Behavior of F6NM Stainless Steel and High-Velocity Oxygen Fuel-Sprayed WC-10Co-4Cr Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, S. Y.; Miao, Q.; Liang, W. P.; Huang, B. Z.; Ding, Z.; Chen, B. W.

    2016-12-01

    WC-10Co-4Cr coating was applied to the surface of F6NM stainless steel by high-velocity oxygen-fuel spraying. The slurry erosion behavior of the matrix and coating was examined at different rotational speeds using a self-made machine. This experiment effectively simulates real slurry erosion in an environment with high silt load. At low velocity (<6 m/s), the main failure mechanism was cavitation. Small bubbles acted as an air cushion, obstructing direct contact between sand and the matrix surface. However, at velocity above 9 m/s, abrasive wear was the dominant failure mechanism. The results indicate that WC-10Co-4Cr coating significantly improved the slurry resistance at higher velocity, because it created a thin and dense WC coating on the surface.

  19. Slurry Erosion Behavior of F6NM Stainless Steel and High-Velocity Oxygen Fuel-Sprayed WC-10Co-4Cr Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, S. Y.; Miao, Q.; Liang, W. P.; Huang, B. Z.; Ding, Z.; Chen, B. W.

    2017-02-01

    WC-10Co-4Cr coating was applied to the surface of F6NM stainless steel by high-velocity oxygen-fuel spraying. The slurry erosion behavior of the matrix and coating was examined at different rotational speeds using a self-made machine. This experiment effectively simulates real slurry erosion in an environment with high silt load. At low velocity (<6 m/s), the main failure mechanism was cavitation. Small bubbles acted as an air cushion, obstructing direct contact between sand and the matrix surface. However, at velocity above 9 m/s, abrasive wear was the dominant failure mechanism. The results indicate that WC-10Co-4Cr coating significantly improved the slurry resistance at higher velocity, because it created a thin and dense WC coating on the surface.

  20. A comparative study of high velocity oxygen fuel, vacuum plasma spray, and axial plasma spray for the deposition of CoNiCrAlY bond coat alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scrivani, A.; Bardi, U.; Carrafiello, L.; Lavacchi, A.; Niccolai, F.; Rizzi, G.

    2003-12-01

    In the aerospace field as well as in the stationary gas turbine field, thermally sprayed coatings are used to improve the surface properties of nickel-super-alloys materials. Coatings are commonly used as bond coat and antioxidation materials (mainly MCrAlY alloys) and as thermal barrier coatings (mainly yttria partially stabilized zirconia). The purpose of the current study was to assess the properties of thermally sprayed bond coat CoNiCrAlY alloys comparing the performance of three different techniques: vacuum plasma spray (VPS), high velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF), and axial plasma spray (AxPS). The quality of the deposited films has been assessed and compared from the point of view of microstructural (porosity, oxide concentration, unmelted particles presence) and mechanical (hardness) characteristics. The surface composition and morphology of the coatings were also determined. Specific efficiency tests were performed for the three examined technologies. The highest quality coatings are obtained by VPS, but also high velocity oxygen fuel and AxPS sprayed films have interesting properties, which can make their use interesting for some applications.

  1. Effect of ultrasonic cavitation erosion on corrosion behavior of high-velocity oxygen-fuel (HVOF) sprayed near-nanostructured WC-10Co-4Cr coating.

    PubMed

    Hong, Sheng; Wu, Yuping; Zhang, Jianfeng; Zheng, Yugui; Qin, Yujiao; Lin, Jinran

    2015-11-01

    The effect of ultrasonic cavitation erosion on electrochemical corrosion behavior of high-velocity oxygen-fuel (HVOF) sprayed near-nanostructured WC-10Co-4Cr coating in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution, was investigated using free corrosion potential, potentiodynamic polarization curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) in comparison with stainless steel 1Cr18Ni9Ti. The results showed that cavitation erosion strongly enhanced the cathodic current density, shifted the free corrosion potential in the anodic direction, and reduced the magnitude of impedance of the coating. The impedance of the coating decreased more slowly under cavitation conditions than that of the stainless steel 1Cr18Ni9Ti, suggesting that corrosion behavior of the coating was less affected by cavitation erosion than that of the stainless steel.

  2. Effect of the increase in the entrance convergent section length of the gun nozzle on the high-velocity oxygen fuel and cold spray process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakaki, K.; Shimizu, Y.

    2001-09-01

    Nozzle geometry, which influences combustion gas dynamics and, therefore, sprayed particle behavior, is one of the most important parameters in the high-velocity oxygen-fuel (HVOF) thermal spray process. The nozzle geometry is also important in the cold spray method. The gas flows in the entrance convergent section of the nozzle exhibit a relatively higher temperature and are subsonic; thus, this region is most suitable for heating spray particles. In this study, numerical simulation and experiments investigated the effect of the entrance geometry of the gun nozzle on the HVOF process. The process changes inside the nozzle, as obtained by numerical simulation studies, were related to the coating properties. An Al2O3-40 mass% TiO2 powder was used for the experimental studies. The change in entrance convergent section length (rather than barrel part length or total length) of the gun nozzle had a significant effect on the deposition efficiency, microstructure, and hardness. The deposition efficiency and hardness increased as this geometry increased. On the other hand, the calculated and measured particle velocity showed a slight decrease. This effect on the HVOF process will also be applied to the nozzle design for the cold spray method.

  3. High performance methanol-oxygen fuel cell with hollow fiber electrode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, Daniel D. (Inventor); Ingham, John D. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A methanol/air-oxygen fuel cell including an electrode formed by open-ended ion-exchange hollow fibers having a layer of catalyst deposited on the inner surface thereof and a first current collector in contact with the catalyst layer. A second current collector external of said fibers is provided which is immersed along with the hollow fiber electrode in an aqueous electrolyte body. Upon passage of air or oxygen through the hollow fiber electrode and introduction of methanol into the aqueous electrolyte, a steady current output is obtained. Two embodiments of the fuel cell are disclosed. In the first embodiment the second metal electrode is displaced away from the hollow fiber in the electrolyte body while in the second embodiment a spiral-wrap electrode is provided about the outer surface of the hollow fiber electrode.

  4. Properties of Aluminum Deposited by a High-Velocity Oxygen-Fueled Process

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, R; Decker, T A; Gansert, R V; Gansert, D; Lee, D

    2001-06-12

    Aluminum coatings deposited by a HVOF process have been demonstrated and relevant coating properties evaluated according to two deposition parameters, the spray distance and the oxygen-to-fuel flow ratio. The coating porosity, surface roughness, and microhardness are measured. The coating properties are fairly insensitive to spray distance, the distance between the nozzle and the workpiece, and fuel ratios, the oxygen-to-fuel flow. Increasing the fuel content does appear to improve the process productivity in terms of surface roughness. Minimization of nozzle loading is discussed.

  5. Health effects of oxygenated fuels.

    PubMed Central

    Costantini, M G

    1993-01-01

    The use of oxygenated fuels is anticipated to increase over the next decades. This paper reviews the toxicological and exposure information for methyl tertiary-butyl ether (MTBE), a fuel additive, and methanol, a replacement fuel, and discusses the possible health consequences of exposure of the general public to these compounds. For MTBE, the health effects information available is derived almost exclusively from rodent studies, and the exposure data are limited to a few measurements at some service stations. Based on these data, it appears unlikely that the normal population is at high risk of exposure to MTBE vapor. However, in the absence of health and pharmacokinetic data in humans or in nonhuman primates, this conclusion is not strongly supported. Similarly, there are a number of uncertainties to take into consideration in estimating human risk from the use of methanol as a fuel. Although methanol may be toxic to humans at concentrations that overwhelm certain enzymes involved in methanol metabolism, the data available provide little evidence to indicate that exposure to methanol vapors from the use of methanol as a motor vehicle fuel will result in adverse health effects. The uncertainties in this conclusion are based on the lack of information on dose-response relationship at reasonable, projected exposure levels and of studies examining end points of concern in sensitive species. In developing a quantitative risk assessment, more needs to be known about health effects in primates or humans and the range of exposure expected for the general public for both compounds. PMID:8020439

  6. High Velocity Gas Gun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    A video tape related to orbital debris research is presented. The video tape covers the process of loading a High Velocity Gas Gun and firing it into a mounted metal plate. The process is then repeated in slow motion.

  7. High Velocity Gas Gun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    A video tape related to orbital debris research is presented. The video tape covers the process of loading a High Velocity Gas Gun and firing it into a mounted metal plate. The process is then repeated in slow motion.

  8. Extremely High Velocity Outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Minho; Evans, Neal J., II; Jaffe, Daniel T.

    1993-11-01

    Extremely high velocity (EHV) wings, with full widths of 72 to 140 km s-1, are seen on the CO J = 3 → 2 lines toward W3 IRS 5, GL 490, NGC 2071, W28 A2 (G05.89-0.39), GL 2591, S140, and Cepheus A. Observations of 12CO and 13CO J = 3 → 2 and J = 2 → 1 lines indicate that optical depth generally decreases with increasing velocity separation from the ambient cloud velocity. Maps of the extremely high velocity (|V-V0| ≳ 20 km s-1) and the high-velocity (5 ≲ |V-V0| ≲ 20 km s-1) CO emission components show that the morphology of the two components is similar in W3 IRS 5 and W28 A2 but may be different in GL 2591, S140, and Cepheus A. The results of our survey suggest that EHV wings are common around infrared sources of moderate to high luminosity [500 to (4 × 105) Lsun] in dense regions. Line ratios imply that the EHV gas is usually optically thin and warm. Characteristic velocities range from 20 to 40 km s-1, yielding timescales of 1600-4200 yr. Since most sources in this study are producing some ionizing photons, these short timescales suggest that neutral winds coexist with ionizing photons. We examined two possible sources for the extremely high velocity CO emission: a neutral stellar wind; and swept-up or entrained molecular gas. Neither can be ruled out. If the high-velocity (HV) gas is swept up by a momentum-conserving stellar wind traced by the extremely high velocity CO emission, most of the C in the winds from luminous objects cannot be in CO. If the EHV and HV forces are equal, the fraction of C in a form other than CO increases with source luminosity and with the production rate of ionizing photons. This trend is natural in the stellar wind hypothesis, but models of winds around such luminous objects are needed. We consider other possible chemical states for the carbon in the stellar wind.

  9. The characteristics of alumina scales formed on HVOF-sprayed MCrAlY coatings[High Velocity Oxygen Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Toma, D.; Brandl, W.; Koester, U.

    2000-02-01

    HVOF MCrAlY (M = Ni, Co) coatings were isothermally oxidized in synthetic air between 850 and 1050 C for times up to 167 hr. During thermal spraying, aluminum and yttrium oxidized to form a fine oxide dispersion. The HVOF MCrAlY coatings exhibited a microstructure similar to ODS alloys. The fine dispersion consisted of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and aluminum-yttrium oxides. The oxidation experiments showed that the oxidation rate of HVOF coatings was two times slower than the oxidation rate of VPS MCrAlY coatings. The oxidation mechanism changed mainly in the transient-stage (no metastable modification of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} formed) and it was assumed that the oxide dispersion hindered diffusion of various elements from the bulk material during oxidation. The formation of the fine oxide dispersion also influenced the adherence of the oxide scale. The microstructures of the transient oxide scales were examined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM).

  10. An Investigation of Spalling Behavior of High Velocity Oxygen Fuel (HVOF) Coatings on the 4340 Steel and HyTuf

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    J.•tAM I 170 -0.33 132.1 -44 20 AOU 0MM •V#OJ?1 U&.L & M ND J 180 -0.33 139.8 -46.6 20 am 10 -0.33 147.8 -492 20 cm *7mm-I-- J21 AAPPN.TODIXELAD 21...1 134.2 -134.2 20 A1Au NA.TOW x Mm c-a 1, 4, AMA 180 .1 142.1 .142.1 2 SPECIMEN HVOF 16 OUTSIDE DIAMETER (In.): 2.3 EFFECTIVE OUTSIDE DIAMETER (In

  11. High Velocity Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfire, M. G.; McKee, C. F.; Hollenbach, D. J.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Morrison, David (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    We calculate the thermal equilibrium gas temperature of high velocity clouds (HVCs) in the Galactic Halo. Our method accounts for the photoelectric heating from small grains and PAHs, and includes a detailed treatment of the ionization rates and heating due to the soft X-ray background and due to cosmic rays. Phase diagrams (thermal pressure P versus gas density n) are presented for gas with a range of dust/gas ratios (D/G) and a range of metallicities (Z). Variations in D/G affect mainly the photoelectric heating rate, while variations in Z affect both the photoelectric heating and gas cooling. Curves are shown for D/G = 1 (local value) to D/G less than approx. equal to 0.005 and for Z=1 (local value) to Z= 0.005. We find that a two phase medium (CNM + WNM) can be in pressure equilibrium with a hot (T approximately 1-2 x 10(exp 6) K) halo within a range of permitted pressures, P(sup min) to P(sup max). We take halo parameters consistent with observed properties of the soft X-ray background. In general, both P(sup min) and P(sup max) decrease with lower D/G due to a drop in photoelectric heating from grains, while. P(sup min) and P(sup max) increase with lower Z due to a drop in gas coolants. We demonstrate that successful two phase models can be constructed with pressure in the range 10(exp 3) less than approximately equal to P/k less than approximately equal to 10(exp 4) K cm(exp -3) consistent with the thermal pressure in the Galactic disk. In addition, using the observed relation between CNM density and distance in HVCs, (n = 75/fDkpc cm(exp -3); Wakker & Schwarz 1991, AA, 250, 484) we show that our pressure curves constrain the allowed range of HVC heights to be between 0.3 - 16 kpc.

  12. High Velocity Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfire, M. G.; McKee, C. F.; Hollenbach, D. J.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Morrison, David (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    We calculate the thermal equilibrium gas temperature of high velocity clouds (HVCs) in the Galactic Halo. Our method accounts for the photoelectric heating from small grains and PAHs, and includes a detailed treatment of the ionization rates and heating due to the soft X-ray background and due to cosmic rays. Phase diagrams (thermal pressure P versus gas density n) are presented for gas with a range of dust/gas ratios (D/G) and a range of metallicities (Z). Variations in D/G affect mainly the photoelectric heating rate, while variations in Z affect both the photoelectric heating and gas cooling. Curves are shown for D/G = 1 (local value) to D/G less than approx. equal to 0.005 and for Z=1 (local value) to Z= 0.005. We find that a two phase medium (CNM + WNM) can be in pressure equilibrium with a hot (T approximately 1-2 x 10(exp 6) K) halo within a range of permitted pressures, P(sup min) to P(sup max). We take halo parameters consistent with observed properties of the soft X-ray background. In general, both P(sup min) and P(sup max) decrease with lower D/G due to a drop in photoelectric heating from grains, while. P(sup min) and P(sup max) increase with lower Z due to a drop in gas coolants. We demonstrate that successful two phase models can be constructed with pressure in the range 10(exp 3) less than approximately equal to P/k less than approximately equal to 10(exp 4) K cm(exp -3) consistent with the thermal pressure in the Galactic disk. In addition, using the observed relation between CNM density and distance in HVCs, (n = 75/fDkpc cm(exp -3); Wakker & Schwarz 1991, AA, 250, 484) we show that our pressure curves constrain the allowed range of HVC heights to be between 0.3 - 16 kpc.

  13. Hydrogen azide-oxygen fuel cell

    SciTech Connect

    Bohannon, R. C.

    1983-12-20

    A powerful hydrogen azide-oxygen fuel cell can be obtained by passing an aqueous solution of Hydrogen Azide (not to exceed 30% by weight) and Sodium Sulphate over a platinized electrode which forms the anode (-) of the fuel cell. Oxidation takes place at the cathode (+) by the introduction of Oxygen over a platinized electrode. The azide (N/sub 3/) radical looses electrons and forms gaseous nitrogen while the oxygen atom picks up the electrons, in the presence of platinum, and forms water with the surplus hydrogen atoms (H+) present. The measured cell voltage is 5 volts.

  14. High velocity collisions of nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Donald F.; Mattson, William D.

    2017-01-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are a unique class of material with highly functionalizable surfaces and exciting applications. With a large surface-to-volume ratio and potentially high surface tension, shocked nanoparticles might display unique materials behavior. Using density functional theory, we have simulated high-velocity NP collisions under a variety of conditions. NPs composed of diamond-C, cubic-BN, and diamond-Si were considered with particle sizes up to 3.5 nm diameter. Additional simulations involved NPs that were destabilized by incorporating internal strain. The initial spherical NP structures were carved out of bulk crystals while the NPs with internal strain were constructed as a dense core (compressive strain) encompassed by a thin shell (tensile strain). Both on-axis and off-axis collisions were simulated at 10 km/s relative velocity. The amount of internal strain was artificially increased by creating a dense inner core with bond lengths compressed up to 8%. Collision dynamics, shock propagation, and fragmentation will be analyzed, but the simulation are ongoing and results are not finalized. The effect of material properties, internal strain, and collision velocity will be discussed.

  15. High velocity impact experiment (HVIE)

    SciTech Connect

    Toor, A.; Donich, T.; Carter, P.

    1998-02-01

    The HVIE space project was conceived as a way to measure the absolute EOS for approximately 10 materials at pressures up to {approximately}30 Mb with order-of-magnitude higher accuracy than obtainable in any comparable experiment conducted on earth. The experiment configuration is such that each of the 10 materials interacts with all of the others thereby producing one-hundred independent, simultaneous EOS experiments The materials will be selected to provide critical information to weapons designers, National Ignition Facility target designers and planetary and geophysical scientists. In addition, HVIE will provide important scientific information to other communities, including the Ballistic Missile Defense Organization and the lethality and vulnerability community. The basic HVIE concept is to place two probes in counter rotating, highly elliptical orbits and collide them at high velocity (20 km/s) at 100 km altitude above the earth. The low altitude of the experiment will provide quick debris strip-out of orbit due to atmospheric drag. The preliminary conceptual evaluation of the HVIE has found no show stoppers. The design has been very easy to keep within the lift capabilities of commonly available rides to low earth orbit including the space shuttle. The cost of approximately 69 million dollars for 100 EOS experiment that will yield the much needed high accuracy, absolute measurement data is a bargain!

  16. Thermally regenerative hydrogen/oxygen fuel cell power cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morehouse, J. H.

    1986-07-01

    Two innovative thermodynamic power cycles are analytically examined for future engineering feasibility. The power cycles use a hydrogen-oxygen fuel cell for electrical energy production and use the thermal dissociation of water for regeneration of the hydrogen and oxygen. The TDS (thermal dissociation system) uses a thermal energy input at over 2000 K to thermally dissociate the water. The other cycle, the HTE (high temperature electrolyzer) system, dissociates the water using an electrolyzer operating at high temperature (1300 K) which receives its electrical energy from the fuel cell. The primary advantages of these cycles is that they are basically a no moving parts system, thus having the potential for long life and high reliability, and they have the potential for high thermal efficiency. Both cycles are shown to be classical heat engines with ideal efficiency close to Carnot cycle efficiency. The feasibility of constructing actual cycles is investigated by examining process irreversibilities and device efficiencies for the two types of cycles. The results show that while the processes and devices of the 2000 K TDS exceed current technology limits, the high temperature electrolyzer system appears to be a state-of-the-art technology development. The requirements for very high electrolyzer and fuel cell efficiencies are seen as determining the feasbility of the HTE system, and these high efficiency devices are currently being developed. It is concluded that a proof-of-concept HTE system experiment can and should be conducted.

  17. Thermally regenerative hydrogen/oxygen fuel cell power cycles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morehouse, J. H.

    1986-01-01

    Two innovative thermodynamic power cycles are analytically examined for future engineering feasibility. The power cycles use a hydrogen-oxygen fuel cell for electrical energy production and use the thermal dissociation of water for regeneration of the hydrogen and oxygen. The TDS (thermal dissociation system) uses a thermal energy input at over 2000 K to thermally dissociate the water. The other cycle, the HTE (high temperature electrolyzer) system, dissociates the water using an electrolyzer operating at high temperature (1300 K) which receives its electrical energy from the fuel cell. The primary advantages of these cycles is that they are basically a no moving parts system, thus having the potential for long life and high reliability, and they have the potential for high thermal efficiency. Both cycles are shown to be classical heat engines with ideal efficiency close to Carnot cycle efficiency. The feasibility of constructing actual cycles is investigated by examining process irreversibilities and device efficiencies for the two types of cycles. The results show that while the processes and devices of the 2000 K TDS exceed current technology limits, the high temperature electrolyzer system appears to be a state-of-the-art technology development. The requirements for very high electrolyzer and fuel cell efficiencies are seen as determining the feasbility of the HTE system, and these high efficiency devices are currently being developed. It is concluded that a proof-of-concept HTE system experiment can and should be conducted.

  18. High velocity pulsed wire-arc spray

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witherspoon, F. Douglas (Inventor); Massey, Dennis W. (Inventor); Kincaid, Russell W. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    Wire arc spraying using repetitively pulsed, high temperature gas jets, usually referred to as plasma jets, and generated by capillary discharges, substantially increases the velocity of atomized and entrained molten droplets. The quality of coatings produced is improved by increasing the velocity with which coating particles impact the coated surface. The effectiveness of wire-arc spraying is improved by replacing the usual atomizing air stream with a rapidly pulsed high velocity plasma jet. Pulsed power provides higher coating particle velocities leading to improved coatings. 50 micron aluminum droplets with velocities of 1500 m/s are produced. Pulsed plasma jet spraying provides the means to coat the insides of pipes, tubes, and engine block cylinders with very high velocity droplet impact.

  19. High Velocity Implanting of Anchors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-07-01

    easily by a direct rocket. The sponsors had suggested a water jet approach using cold high pressure gas to supply the energy, instead of propellant gas...development promises to be expensive and lengthy. Fortunately, the water jet does not share this problem. Its development should be timely, and costs should be reasonable. Keyword: Anchors (Marine).

  20. Comparison of high group velocity accelerating structures

    SciTech Connect

    Farkas, Z.D.; Wilson, P.B.

    1987-02-01

    It is well known that waveguides with no perturbations have phase velocities greater than the velocity of light c. If the waveguide dimensions are chosen so that the phase velocity is only moderately greater than c, only small perturbations are required to reduce the phase velocity to be synchronous with a high energy particle bunch. Such a lightly loaded accelerator structure will have smaller longitudinal and transverse wake potentials and hence will lead to lower emittance growth in an accelerated beam. Since these structures are lightly loaded, their group velocities are only slightly less than c and not in the order of 0.01c, as is the case for the standard disk-loaded structures. To ascertain that the peak and average power requirements for these structures are not prohibitive, we examine the elastance and the Q for several traveling wave structures: phase slip structures, bellows-like structures, and lightly loaded disk-loaded structures.

  1. Instrumented impact testing at high velocities

    SciTech Connect

    Delfosse, D.; Pageau, G.; Bennett, R.; Poursartip, A. Defence Research Establishment Valcartier, Courcelette )

    1993-01-01

    Impact loading of carbon fiber-reinforced plastic (CFRP) aircraft parts is a major concern. Birds or hailstones striking an aircraft generally have a low mass and a high velocity, whereas typically instrumented impact experiments are performed with a high mass and a low velocity. Our aim has been to build an instrumented impact facility with a low-mass projectile capable of simulating these impact events, since there is evidence that a low-velocity impact will not always result in the same amount or even type of damage as a high-velocity impact. This paper provides a detailed description of the instrumented low-mass impact facility at The University of British Columbia (UBC). A gas gun is used to accelerate the instrumented projectile to impact velocities as high as 50 m/s, corresponding to an energy level of 350 J. The contact force during the impact event is measured by an incorporated load cell. The necessary mathematical operations to determine the real load-displacement curves are outlined, and the results of some impact events at different velocities are shown. 23 refs.

  2. High velocity formability and factors affecting it

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehra, Mala Seth

    High velocity forming methods successfully address problems faced in conventional forming techniques. They can be effectively used for forming metals with low formability like aluminum alloys and high strength steel. They can be instrumental is manufacturing of lighter vehicles with higher fuel efficiency. Electromagnetic forming (EMF) is an HVF method that is gaining wide acceptance due to its advantages and scope for commercialization. A number of experimental studies were carried out with EMF with the main goal of exploring fundamentals about material formability at high velocities, which can be used to establish practical design guidelines and to make models of high velocity formability. Thus the main factors that influence high velocity formability-inertia/size effects; changes in constitutive behavior; impact; and dynamic failure modes, were studied mainly with experiments. The role of changes in constitutive behavior in improving formability was studied from existing studies and new theoretical studies involving High velocity Forming Limit Diagram (FLD) and through solving an inverse problem of ring expansion. Tube free-expansion experiments were carried out to demonstrate enhanced metal formability even in the absence of die impact. To further establish the significance of inertia, electromagnetic ring free-expansion experiments with rings of different aspect ratios were carried out. A higher aspect ratio sample had better formability in terms of uniform and total elongation and also had fewer necks than a low aspect ratio (more slender) ring at the same velocity. The results clearly demonstrated the influence of sample aspect ratio (dimensions) and hence inertia on high velocity formability. Die impact experiments were carried out with tubes and rings to show the beneficial influence of die arrest of a moving sample. It was revealed that die impact in an appropriate range of velocities can significantly suppress failure and reduce the number of tears and

  3. Internal Detonation Velocity Measurements Inside High Explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Benterou, J; Bennett, C V; Cole, G; Hare, D E; May, C; Udd, E

    2009-01-16

    In order to fully calibrate hydrocodes and dynamic chemistry burn models, initiation models and detonation models of high explosives, the ability to continuously measure the detonation velocity within an explosive is required. Progress on an embedded velocity diagnostic using a 125 micron diameter optical fiber containing a chirped fiber Bragg grating is reported. As the chirped fiber Bragg grating is consumed by the moving detonation wave, the physical length of the unconsumed Bragg grating is monitored with a fast InGaAs photodiode. Experimental details of the associated equipment and data in the form of continuous detonation velocity records within PBX-9502 are presented. This small diameter fiber sensor has the potential to measure internal detonation velocities on the order of 10 mm/{micro}sec along path lengths tens of millimeters long.

  4. Organic carbonyl compounds in Albuquerque, New Mexico, air: A preliminary study of the effects of oxygenated fuel use

    SciTech Connect

    Popp, C.J.; Zhang, Lin; Gaffney, J.S.

    1993-06-01

    A suite of inorganic and organic species were analyzed for four 2--4 day time periods over a year in Albuquerque, New Mexico to determine baseline conditions for organic pollutants under the current air pollution control parameters. Concentrations of low molecular weight carbonyl compounds were relatively high compared with areas such as Los Angeles. Formio acid concentrations in air samples were significant even in winter. In addition, ratios of peroxypropionyl nitrate to peroxyacyetyl nitrate are higher than expected and may be related to the use of oxygenated fuels which are used to mitigate CO concentrations. The number of CO violations in Albuquerque has decreased steadily since 1982 and the downward trend has continued since 1989 when oxygenated fuel use was mandated. It is, therefore, difficult to correlate the drop in CO violations directly to the use of oxygenated fuels when such factors as fleet turnover, woodburning controls, emissions testing and meteorological conditions also may be playing significant roles. More detailed studies are needed to determine the specific relationship between the use of oxygenated fuels and the air quality in Albuquerque, New Mexico and similar urban areas in the western United States.

  5. High Resolution Velocity Structure in Eastern Turkey

    SciTech Connect

    Pasyanos, M; Gok, R; Zor, E; Walter, W

    2004-09-03

    We investigate the crustal and upper mantle structure of eastern Turkey where the Anatolian, Arabian and Eurasian Plates meet and form a complex tectonic structure. The Bitlis suture is a continental collision zone between the Anatolian plateau and the Arabian plate. Broadband data available through the Eastern Turkey Seismic Experiment (ETSE) provided a unique opportunity for studying the high resolution velocity structure. Zor et al. found an average 46 km thick crust in Anatolian plateau using six-layered grid search inversion of the ETSE receiver functions. Receiver functions are sensitive to the velocity contrast of interfaces and the relative travel time of converted and reverberated waves between those interfaces. The interpretation of receiver function alone with many-layered parameterization may result in an apparent depth-velocity tradeoff. In order to improve previous velocity model, we employed the joint inversion method with many layered parameterization of Julia et al. (2000) to the ETSE receiver functions. In this technique, the receiver function and surface-wave observations are combined into a single algebraic equation and each data set is weighted by an estimate of the uncertainty in the observations. We consider azimuthal changes of receiver functions and have stacked them into different groups. We calculated the receiver functions using iterative time-domain deconvolution technique and surface wave group velocity dispersion curves between 10-100 sec. We are making surface wave dispersion measurements at the ETSE stations and have incorporated them into a regional group velocity model. Preliminary results indicate a strong trend in the long period group velocity in the northeast. This indicates slow upper mantle velocities in the region consistent with Pn, Sn and receiver function results. We started with both the 1-D model that is obtained with the 12 tones dam explosion shot data recorded by ETSE network and the existing receiver function

  6. Consideration of wear rates at high velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hale, Chad S.

    The development of the research presented here is one in which high velocity relative sliding motion between two bodies in contact has been considered. Overall, the wear environment is truly three-dimensional. The attempt to characterize three-dimensional wear was not economically feasible because it must be analyzed at the micro-mechanical level to get results. Thus, an engineering approximation was carried out. This approximation was based on a metallographic study identifying the need to include viscoplasticity constitutive material models, coefficient of friction, relationships between the normal load and velocity, and the need to understand wave propagation. A sled test run at the Holloman High Speed Test Track (HHSTT) was considered for the determination of high velocity wear rates. In order to adequately characterize high velocity wear, it was necessary to formulate a numerical model that contained all of the physical events present. The experimental results of a VascoMax 300 maraging steel slipper sliding on an AISI 1080 steel rail during a January 2008 sled test mission were analyzed. During this rocket sled test, the slipper traveled 5,816 meters in 8.14 seconds and reached a maximum velocity of 1,530 m/s. This type of environment was never considered previously in terms of wear evaluation. Each of the features of the metallography were obtained through micro-mechanical experimental techniques. The byproduct of this analysis is that it is now possible to formulate a model that contains viscoplasticity, asperity collisions, temperature and frictional features. Based on the observations of the metallographic analysis, these necessary features have been included in the numerical model, which makes use of a time-dynamic program which follows the movement of a slipper during its experimental test run. The resulting velocity and pressure functions of time have been implemented in the explicit finite element code, ABAQUS. Two-dimensional, plane strain models

  7. High Resolution Velocity Structure in Eastern Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasyanos, M. E.; Gok, R.; Zor, E.; Walter, W. R.

    2004-12-01

    We investigate the crust and upper mantle structure of eastern Turkey where the Anatolian, Arabian and Eurasian Plates meet, forming a complex tectonic regime. The Bitlis suture is a continental collision zone between the Anatolian plateau and the Arabian plate. Broadband data available through the Eastern Turkey Seismic Experiment (ETSE) provide a unique opportunity for studying the high resolution velocity structure of the region. Zor et al. (2003) found an average 46 km thick crust in the Anatolian plateau using a six-layered grid search inversion of the ETSE receiver functions. Receiver functions are sensitive to the velocity contrast of interfaces and the relative travel time of converted and reverberated waves between those interfaces. The interpretation of receiver functions alone, however, may result in an apparent depth-velocity trade-off [Ammon et al., 1990]. In order to improve upon this velocity model, we have combined the receiver functions with surface wave data using the joint inversion method of Julia et al. (2000). In this technique, the two sets of observations are combined into a single algebraic equation and each data set is weighted by an estimate of the uncertainty in the observations. The receiver functions are calculated using an iterative time-domain deconvolution technique. We also consider azimuthal changes in the receiver functions and have stacked them into different groups accordingly. We are improving our surface wave model by making Love and Rayleigh dispersion measurements at the ETSE stations and incorporating them into a regional group velocity model for periods between 10 and 100 seconds. Preliminary results indicate a strong trend in the long period group velocities toward the northeast, indicating slow upper mantle velocities in the area consistent with Pn, Sn and receiver function results. Starting models used for the joint inversions include both a 1-D model from a 12-ton dam shot recorded by ETSE [Gurbuz et al., 2004] and

  8. Detailed chemical kinetic modeling of diesel combustion with oxygenated fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Pitz, W J; Curran, H J; Fisher, E; Glaude, P A; Marinov, N M; Westbrook, C K

    1999-10-28

    The influence of oxygenated hydrocarbons as additives to diesel fuels on ignition, NOx emissions and soot production has been examined using a detailed chemical kinetic reaction mechanism. N-heptane was used as a representative diesel fuel, and methanol, ethanol, dimethyl ether and dimethoxymethane were used as oxygenated fuel additives. It was found that addition of oxygenated hydrocarbons reduced NOx levels and reduced the production of soot precursors. When the overall oxygen content in the fuel reached approximately 25% by mass, production of soot precursors fell effectively to zero, in agreement with experimental studies. The kinetic factors responsible for these observations are discussed.

  9. High-Velocity Collisions of Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Donald; Mattson, William

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are interesting materials with exciting applications due to their large surface-to-volume ratio and functionalizable surfaces. The large surface area and potentially high surface tension might result in unique materials behavior when subject to shock loading. Using density functional theory, we have simulated high-velocity NP collisions producing high-pressure, high-temperature, and extreme shock conditions. NPs composed of diamond-C, cubic-BN, and diamond-Si were considered with particle sizes up to 3.5 nm diameter. Some simulations involved NPs that were destabilized by incorporating internal strain. Normal, spherical NPs were carved out of bulk crystals and structurally optimized while the NPs with internal strain were constructed as a dense core (compressive strain) encompassed by a thin shell (tensile strain). Both on-axis and off-axis collisions were simulated at various speeds. Collision dynamics, shock propagation, and fragmentation will be presented and analyzed. The effect of material properties, internal strain, and collision velocity on the final temperature of the fragments will be discussed.

  10. NGC 1275, High Velocity Filamentary System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caulet, Adeline

    The extensive filamentary system surrounding NGC 1275 is known to exhibit two velocity components, one at 5200 km/s which is the same as the velocity of NGC 1275 itself, and one at 8300 km/s. The low velocity (LV) system has been studied extensively with a view to elucidating the nature of a putative cooling flow of intracluster (A426) gas into NGC1275. A plausible hypothesis based on optical and radio data describes the high velocity (HV) system as a late-type galaxy caught in the gravitational potential well of NGC 1275 and falling into it with a velocity of about 3000 km/s. In this picture the HV filaments are composed of giant HII regions which have been imaged in H-alpha and observed spectroscopically in other optical lines. Our lack of certainty about the morphology of the HV system, the dynamical relationship between the HV and LV systems, and the optical spectral characteristics of the HV filaments coupled with the fact that spiral galaxies are rare in the inner regions of A426 make this hypothesis tentative. Yet it is important to understand the nature of the HV system in order to properly interpret observations of the LV system in terms of a cooling flow. We propose to obtain vacuum ultraviolet spectra with the IUE of several emission regions of the HV system. The objectives are: a) to use any observed vacuum ultraviolet emission lines together with existing optical emission line data to infer the physical processes by which the emission lines are produced, b) to use any vacuum ultraviolet emission line data to help determine abundances, particularly that of carbon, with a view to finding evidence bearing on the origin of the HV system, and c) and to search for an ultraviolet continuum characteristic of an OB stellar population. The proposed work is part of a larger effort to obtain groundbased Fabry-Perot imagery and sounding rocket vacuum ultraviolet imagery of the HV and LV systems.

  11. High precision radial velocities with GIANO spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carleo, I.; Sanna, N.; Gratton, R.; Benatti, S.; Bonavita, M.; Oliva, E.; Origlia, L.; Desidera, S.; Claudi, R.; Sissa, E.

    2016-06-01

    Radial velocities (RV) measured from near-infrared (NIR) spectra are a potentially excellent tool to search for extrasolar planets around cool or active stars. High resolution infrared (IR) spectrographs now available are reaching the high precision of visible instruments, with a constant improvement over time. GIANO is an infrared echelle spectrograph at the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo (TNG) and it is a powerful tool to provide high resolution spectra for accurate RV measurements of exoplanets and for chemical and dynamical studies of stellar or extragalactic objects. No other high spectral resolution IR instrument has GIANO's capability to cover the entire NIR wavelength range (0.95-2.45 μm) in a single exposure. In this paper we describe the ensemble of procedures that we have developed to measure high precision RVs on GIANO spectra acquired during the Science Verification (SV) run, using the telluric lines as wavelength reference. We used the Cross Correlation Function (CCF) method to determine the velocity for both the star and the telluric lines. For this purpose, we constructed two suitable digital masks that include about 2000 stellar lines, and a similar number of telluric lines. The method is applied to various targets with different spectral type, from K2V to M8 stars. We reached different precisions mainly depending on the H-magnitudes: for H ˜ 5 we obtain an rms scatter of ˜ 10 m s-1, while for H ˜ 9 the standard deviation increases to ˜ 50 ÷ 80 m s-1. The corresponding theoretical error expectations are ˜ 4 m s-1 and 30 m s-1, respectively. Finally we provide the RVs measured with our procedure for the targets observed during GIANO Science Verification.

  12. High Velocity Droplet Rebound On Liquid Pools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doak, William; Laiacona, Danielle; Chiarot, Paul; German, Guy

    2015-11-01

    Rebound of high velocity, periodic droplet streams off viscous liquid pools is studied experimentally. Droplets, approximately 60 micrometers in diameter, impact the oil surface at velocities up to 13 m/s and at angles between 2-25 degrees. The oil surface does not degrade or lose its ability to provide rebound even after millions of droplet impacts. The oil was varied to examine the effect that surface tension and viscosity had on droplet rebound. Stable rebound is achievable on oils varying in dynamic viscosity in the range 13-970 Pa.s and surface tensions in the range 19-28 mN/m. When rebound occurs, a consistent 29% loss of droplet kinetic energy is observed. This is a surprising relationship due to the fact that it holds true for all cases of stable rebound regardless of the oil used. We further observe an upper inertial limit where droplets no longer provide stable rebound and instead become fully entrained in the oil pool. This limit is governed by the Rayleigh-Plateau instability and can be characterized and predicted using a modified version of the Weber number. The droplet rebound presented in this study is unique due to the size, velocity, and frequency of the droplets used. Another unique feature is that the rebound manifests itself as an effectively static phenomenon. No motion of the interface - oscillations, waves, or otherwise - was observed during rebound. The quasi-static nature of rebound enabled distinctions to be made regarding energy dissipation and the transition from droplet rebound to entrainment.

  13. High velocity clouds in nearby disk galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulman, Eric; Bregman, Joel N.; Roberts, Morton S.; Brinks, Elias

    1993-01-01

    Clouds of neutral hydrogen in our galaxy with the absolute value of v greater than 100 km/s cover approximately 10 percent of the sky to a limiting column density of 1 x 10(exp 18) cm(exp -2). These high velocity clouds (HVCs) may dominate the kinetic energy of neutral hydrogen in non-circular motion, and are an important though poorly understood component of galactic gas. It has been suggested that the HVCs can be reproduced by a combination of three phenomena: a galactic fountain driven by disk supernovae which would account for most of the HVCs, material tidally torn from the Magellanic Clouds, and an outer arm complex which is associated with the large scale structure of the warped galactic disk. We sought to detect HVCs in external galaxies in order to test the galactic fountain model.

  14. Hα Distances to High Velocity Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Putman, M. E.

    2004-06-01

    Several observing teams have now obtained deep Hα spectroscopy towards high-velocity clouds (HVCs) which vary in structure from compact (CHVCs) to the Magellanic Stream. Our team has observed clouds which range from being bright (˜640 mR) to having upper limits on the order of 30 to 70 mR. The Hα measurements can be interpreted as a distance constraint if we adopt a halo ionization model based on fesc ≈ 6% of the ionizing photons escaping normal to the Galactic disk (fesc ≈ 1 - 2% when averaged over solid angle). The results suggest that many HVCs and CHVCs are within a ˜40 kpc radius from the Galaxy and are not members of the Local Group at megaparsec distances. We refer the reader to Putman et al. (2003) for the full version of the paper presented here.

  15. Experimental high-velocity missile head injury.

    PubMed

    Allen, I V; Scott, R; Tanner, J A

    1982-09-01

    A standardized experimental high-velocity penetrating head-injury model has been produced in which pathological lesions were observed, not only in the wound track but at sites more remote from the track in the hypothalamus, brain stem and cerebellum. Diffuse subarachnoid haemorrhage was common and intraventricular haemorrhage was a constant feature. Other constant histological abnormalities were:L 1. Perivascular "ring' haemorrhages. 2. Perivascular haemorrhage with a surrounding zone of decreased staining intensity. 3. Perivascular increased staining intensity. 4. Areas of decreased staining intensity apparently dissociated from areas of haemorrhage. The pathogenesis of the perivascular lesions is discussed and preliminary studies suggest that these may be the site of early oedema. The implications of this experiment for military surgery and for ballistic protection of the head are discussed.

  16. The Distance of High-Velocity Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakker, Bart

    1994-01-01

    We request time on the HST to obtain high-resolution (20 km/s) spectra around the 2800A MgII doublet of two stars and one quasar which lie projected toward the high-velocity HI cloud complex A. The prime purpose of this project is to determine the distance to complex A. Using these spectra we will be able to derive for the first time a firm upper or lower distance limit of 2.5 kpc for a HVC, which allows us to exclude several of the many proposed explanations. If we find that the object is beyond 2.5 kpc this will have important implications for the understanding of the structure of the Galaxy, especially for the energy balance and dynamics of interstellar matter and the exchange of material between the halo and the disk. A byproduct of the observations will be the first measurement of the MgII abundance in a HVC. Metal abundances are important for the problem of the origin of HVCs. We discuss the principle and problems of the method used to estimate distances and describe the current status of knowledge. Ground-based observations have been limited by sensitivity and ST allows us to reach stars faint enough so that a clear answer can be found.

  17. Quench propagation velocity for highly stabilized conductors

    SciTech Connect

    Mints, R.G. |; Ogitsu, T. |; Devred, A.

    1995-05-01

    Quench propagation velocity in conductors having a large amount of stabilizer outside the multifilamentary area is considered. It is shown that the current redistribution process between the multifilamentary area and the stabilizer can strongly effect the quench propagation. A criterion is derived determining the conditions under which the current redistribution process becomes significant, and a model of effective stabilizer area is suggested to describe its influence on the quench propagation velocity. As an illustration, the model is applied to calculate the adiabatic quench propagation velocity for a conductor geometry with a multifilamentary area embedded inside the stabilizer.

  18. Compact, Isolated High-Velocity Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler Burton, W.; Braun, Robert; de Heij, Vincent

    2004-01-01

    We consider the class of compact, isolated, high-velocity H i clouds, CHVCs, which are sharply bounded in angular extent, with no kinematic or spatial connection to other H i features down to a limiting column density of 1.5×1018 cm-2. We describe the automated search algorithm developed by de Heij et al. (2002b) and applied by them to the Leiden-Dwingeloo Survey north of δ=-28° and by Putman et al. (2002) to the Parkes HIPASS data south of δ=0°, resulting in an all-sky catalog numbering 246 CHVCs. We argue that these objects are more likely to represent a single phenomenon in a similar evolutionary state than would a sample that included any of the major HVC complexes. Five principal observables are defined for the CHVC population: (1) the spatial deployment of the objects on the sky, (2) the kinematic distribution, (3) the number distribution of observed H i column densities, (4) the number distribution of angular sizes, and (5) the number distribution of line widths. We show that the spatial and kinematic deployments of the ensemble of CHVCs contain various clues regarding their characteristic distance. These clues are not compatible with a location of the ensemble within the Galaxy proper. The deployments resemble in several regards those of the Local Group galaxies.

  19. On optical studies of high-velocity clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    York, D. G.; Burks, G. S.; Gibney, T. B.

    1986-01-01

    Lists of distant objects that can be used to study physical conditions in, and distances of, 21 cm (Oort) high-velocity clouds are presented. Recent published observations are used to compile positions, velocities, and distances of the clouds.

  20. Simple Motor Control Concept Results High Efficiency at High Velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starin, Scott; Engel, Chris

    2013-09-01

    The need for high velocity motors in space applications for reaction wheels and detectors has stressed the limits of Brushless Permanent Magnet Motors (BPMM). Due to inherent hysteresis core losses, conventional BPMMs try to balance the need for torque verses hysteresis losses. Cong-less motors have significantly less hysteresis losses but suffer from lower efficiencies. Additionally, the inherent low inductance in cog-less motors result in high ripple currents or high switching frequencies, which lowers overall efficiency and increases performance demands on the control electronics.However, using a somewhat forgotten but fully qualified technology of Isotropic Magnet Motors (IMM), extremely high velocities may be achieved at low power input using conventional drive electronics. This paper will discuss the trade study efforts and empirical test data on a 34,000 RPM IMM.

  1. Auditory velocity discrimination in the horizontal plane at very high velocities.

    PubMed

    Frissen, Ilja; Féron, François-Xavier; Guastavino, Catherine

    2014-10-01

    We determined velocity discrimination thresholds and Weber fractions for sounds revolving around the listener at very high velocities. Sounds used were a broadband white noise and two harmonic sounds with fundamental frequencies of 330 Hz and 1760 Hz. Experiment 1 used velocities ranging between 288°/s and 720°/s in an acoustically treated room and Experiment 2 used velocities between 288°/s and 576°/s in a highly reverberant hall. A third experiment addressed potential confounds in the first two experiments. The results show that people can reliably discriminate velocity at very high velocities and that both thresholds and Weber fractions decrease as velocity increases. These results violate Weber's law but are consistent with the empirical trend observed in the literature. While thresholds for the noise and 330 Hz harmonic stimulus were similar, those for the 1760 Hz harmonic stimulus were substantially higher. There were no reliable differences in velocity discrimination between the two acoustical environments, suggesting that auditory motion perception at high velocities is robust against the effects of reverberation.

  2. Models of high velocity impact phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Wingate, C.A.; Stellingwerf, R.F.; Davidson, R.F.; Burkett, M.W.

    1992-09-01

    Models of craters formed by impacts at velocities of up to 27 km/sec have been computed using the Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics, MESA, EPIC and CALE codes. These modeling efforts will be compared to data obtained from the Hypervelocity Microparticle Impact project at Los Alamos using the van de Graaff accelerator. This work aids in understanding the fine features and scaling laws found in the experimental results.

  3. Models of high velocity impact phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Wingate, C.A.; Stellingwerf, R.F.; Davidson, R.F.; Burkett, M.W.

    1992-01-01

    Models of craters formed by impacts at velocities of up to 27 km/sec have been computed using the Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics, MESA, EPIC and CALE codes. These modeling efforts will be compared to data obtained from the Hypervelocity Microparticle Impact project at Los Alamos using the van de Graaff accelerator. This work aids in understanding the fine features and scaling laws found in the experimental results.

  4. Application of TiC reinforced Fe-based coatings by means of High Velocity Air Fuel Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobzin, K.; Öte, M.; Knoch, M. A.; Liao, X.; Sommer, J.

    2017-03-01

    In the field of hydraulic applications, different development trends can cause problems for coatings currently used as wear and corrosion protection for piston rods. Aqueous hydraulic fluids and rising raw material prices necessitate the search for alternatives to conventional coatings like galvanic hard chrome or High Velocity Oxygen Fuel (HVOF)-sprayed WC/Co coatings. In a previous study, Fe/TiC coatings sprayed by a HVOF-process, were identified to be promising coating systems for wear and corrosion protection in hydraulic systems. In this feasibility study, the novel High Velocity Air Fuel (HVAF)-process, a modification of the HVOF-process, is investigated using the same feedstock material, which means the powder is not optimized for the HVAF-process. The asserted benefits of the HVAF-process are higher particle velocities and lower process temperatures, which can result in a lower porosity and oxidation of the coating. Further benefits of the HVAF process are claimed to be lower process costs and higher deposition rates. In this study, the focus is set on to the applicability of Fe/TiC coatings by HVAF in general. The Fe/TiC HVAF coating could be produced, successfully. The HVAF- and HVOF-coatings, produced with the same powder, were investigated using micro-hardness, porosity, wear and corrosion tests. A similar wear coefficient and micro-hardness for both processes could be achieved. Furthermore the propane/hydrogen proportion of the HVAF process and its influence on the coating thickness and the porosity was investigated.

  5. 46 CFR 153.353 - High velocity vents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false High velocity vents. 153.353 Section 153.353 Shipping... Systems § 153.353 High velocity vents. The discharge point of a B/3 or 4m venting system must be located..., unimpeded jet; (b) The jet has a minimum exit velocity of 30 m/sec (approx. 98.4 ft/sec); and (c) The...

  6. 46 CFR 153.353 - High velocity vents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false High velocity vents. 153.353 Section 153.353 Shipping... Systems § 153.353 High velocity vents. The discharge point of a B/3 or 4m venting system must be located..., unimpeded jet; (b) The jet has a minimum exit velocity of 30 m/sec (approx. 98.4 ft/sec); and (c) The...

  7. Cryogenic Testing of High-Velocity Spoke Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Hopper, Christopher S.; Delayen, Jean R.; Park, HyeKyoung

    2014-12-01

    Spoke-loaded cavities are being investigated for the high-velocity regime. The relative compactness at low-frequency makes them attractive for applications requiring, or benefiting from, 4 K operation. Additionally, the large velocity acceptance makes them good candidates for the acceleration of high-velocity protons and ions. Here we present the results of cryogenic testing of a 325 MHz, β0= 0.82 single-spoke cavity and a 500 MHz, β0 = 1 double-spoke cavity.

  8. 46 CFR 153.353 - High velocity vents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false High velocity vents. 153.353 Section 153.353 Shipping... Systems § 153.353 High velocity vents. The discharge point of a B/3 or 4m venting system must be located..., unimpeded jet; (b) The jet has a minimum exit velocity of 30 m/sec (approx. 98.4 ft/sec); and (c) The...

  9. 46 CFR 153.353 - High velocity vents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false High velocity vents. 153.353 Section 153.353 Shipping... Systems § 153.353 High velocity vents. The discharge point of a B/3 or 4m venting system must be located..., unimpeded jet; (b) The jet has a minimum exit velocity of 30 m/sec (approx. 98.4 ft/sec); and (c) The...

  10. 46 CFR 153.353 - High velocity vents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false High velocity vents. 153.353 Section 153.353 Shipping... Systems § 153.353 High velocity vents. The discharge point of a B/3 or 4m venting system must be located..., unimpeded jet; (b) The jet has a minimum exit velocity of 30 m/sec (approx. 98.4 ft/sec); and (c) The...

  11. Microdroplet impact at very high velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visser, Claas Willem; Tagawa, Yoshiyuki; Sun, Chao; Lohse, Detlef; Physics of Fluids Group Team

    2012-11-01

    At APS-DFD 2011, we presented preliminary data of water microdroplet impact at velocities up to 100 m/s and droplet diameters from 12 to 100 μm. Now we place these results into context and use them to improve understanding of droplet spreading. The parameter range covers the transition from capillary-limited to viscosity-limited spreading of the impacting droplet. The maximum spreading radius is compared to several existing models. The model by Pasandideh-Fard et al. (1996) agrees well with the measured data, indicating the importance of a thin boundary layer just above the surface. Here, most of the viscous dissipation of the spreading droplet takes place. As explained by the initial air layer under the impacting droplet, a contact angle of 180 degrees is used as model input. Stichting Fundamenteel Onderzoek der Materie is acknowledged for funding.

  12. Punch valve development testing: Low and high velocity test results

    SciTech Connect

    Replogle, W.C.; Brandon, S.L.

    1996-09-01

    This is a report on the use of quasi-static tests to predict fundamental parameters for punch valve development. This report summarizes the results from low and high velocity tests performed with 0.63 and 0.38 cm diameter plungers, 5 cm long penetrating aluminium and composite targets. The low velocity tests, 0.025 m/s, were performed to understand the effects and interactions of plunger diameter plunger tip shape, target material, and target support on penetration energy and plunger functionality. High velocity tests, 75 m/s, were compared to low velocity results.

  13. Lagrangian statistical model for transport in highly heterogeneous velocity fields.

    PubMed

    Le Borgne, Tanguy; Dentz, Marco; Carrera, Jesus

    2008-08-29

    We define an effective Lagrangian statistical model in phase space (x, t, v) for describing transport in highly heterogeneous velocity fields with complex spatial organizations. The spatial Markovian nature (and temporal non-Markovian nature) of Lagrangian velocities leads to an effective transport description that turns out to be a correlated continuous time random walk. This model correctly captures the Lagrangian velocity correlation properties and is demonstrated to represent a forward model for predicting transport in highly heterogeneous porous media for different types of velocity organizations.

  14. [Effects of oxygenated fuels on emissions and carbon composition of fine particles from diesel engine].

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiao-Yan; He, Ke-Bin; Zhang, Jie; Ge, Yun-Shan; Tan, Jian-Wei

    2009-06-15

    Acetal (1,1-diethoxyethane) is considered as an alternative to ethanol as bio-derived additive for diesel fuel, which is miscible in diesel fuel. Biodiesel can improve the oxygen content and flash point of the fuel blend of acetal and diesel fuel. Two oxygenated fuels were prepared: a blend of 10% acetal + 90% diesel fuel and 10% acetal + 10% biodiesel + 80% diesel fuel. The emissions of NO(x), HC and PM2.5 from oxygenated fuels were investigated on a diesel engine bench at five modes according to various loads at two steady speeds and compared with base diesel fuel. Additionally, the carbon compositions of PM2.5 were analyzed by DRI thermal/optical carbon analyzer. Oxygenated fuels have unconspicuous effect on NO(x) emission rate but HC emission rate is observed significantly increased at some modes. The emission rate of PM2.5 is decreased by using oxygenated fuels and it decreases with the increase of fuel oxygen content. The emission rates of TC (total carbon) and EC (elemental carbon) in PM2.5 are also decreased by oxygenated fuels. The emission rate of organic carbon (OC) is greatly decreased at modes of higher engine speed. The OC/EC ratios of PM2.5 from oxygenated fuels are higher than that from base diesel fuel at most modes. The carbon compositions fractions of PM2.5 from the three test fuels are similar, and OC1 and EC1 are contributed to the most fractions of OC and EC, respectively. Compared with base diesel fuel, oxygenated fuels decrease emission rate of PM2.5, and have more OC contribution to PM2.5 but have little effect on carbon composition fractions.

  15. High Velocity White Dwarfs from Type Ia Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, B.

    2002-12-01

    The single degenerate scenario for Type Ia supernovae predicts the post-supernova release of the donor star with a space velocity determined by the original binary orbital velocity. The mass transfer criteria for successful supernova ignition also place constraints on the mass of the donor. The combination of these two factors means that the great majority of high velocity donor remnants will be white dwarfs. We present models of the Type Ia supernova progenitors and antecedents in the Galaxy, and examine the donor remnant white dwarf population in the light of the current interest in high velocity white dwarfs. One potential discriminant between donor remnants and normal high velocity white dwarfs (from a thick disk or spheroid stellar population) is a determination of the binary fraction. White dwarfs which have their origin in disrupted close binaries will always be single.

  16. Acceleration of objects to high velocity by electromagnetic forces

    DOEpatents

    Post, Richard F

    2017-02-28

    Two exemplary approaches to the acceleration of projectiles are provided. Both approaches can utilize concepts associated with the Inductrack maglev system. Either of them provides an effective means of accelerating multi-kilogram projectiles to velocities of several kilometers per second, using launchers of order 10 meters in length, thus enabling the acceleration of projectiles to high velocities by electromagnetic forces.

  17. High Velocity Absorption during Eta Car B's Periastron Passage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nielsen, Krister E.; Groh, J. H.; Hillier, J.; Gull, Theodore R.; Owocki, S. P.; Okazaki, A. T.; Damineli, A.; Teodoro, M.; Weigelt, G.; Hartman, H.

    2010-01-01

    Eta Car is one of the most luminous massive stars in the Galaxy, with repeated eruptions with a 5.5 year periodicity. These events are caused by the periastron passage of a massive companion in an eccentric orbit. We report the VLT/CRIRES detection of a strong high-velocity, (<1900 km/s) , broad absorption wing in He I at 10833 A during the 2009.0 periastron passage. Previous observations during the 2003.5 event have shown evidence of such high-velocity absorption in the He I 10833 transition, allowing us to conclude that the high-velocity gas is crossing the line-of-sight toward Eta Car over a time period of approximately 2 months. Our analysis of HST/STlS archival data with observations of high velocity absorption in the ultraviolet Si IV and C IV resonance lines, confirm the presence of a high-velocity material during the spectroscopic low state. The observations provide direct detection of high-velocity material flowing from the wind-wind collision zone around the binary system, and we discuss the implications of the presence of high-velocity gas in Eta Car during periastron

  18. High Velocity Absorption during Eta Car B's Periastron Passage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nielsen, Krister E.; Groh, J. H.; Hillier, J.; Gull, Theodore R.; Owocki, S. P.; Okazaki, A. T.; Damineli, A.; Teodoro, M.; Weigelt, G.; Hartman, H.

    2010-01-01

    Eta Car is one of the most luminous massive stars in the Galaxy, with repeated eruptions with a 5.5 year periodicity. These events are caused by the periastron passage of a massive companion in an eccentric orbit. We report the VLT/CRIRES detection of a strong high-velocity, (<1900 km/s) , broad absorption wing in He I at 10833 A during the 2009.0 periastron passage. Previous observations during the 2003.5 event have shown evidence of such high-velocity absorption in the He I 10833 transition, allowing us to conclude that the high-velocity gas is crossing the line-of-sight toward Eta Car over a time period of approximately 2 months. Our analysis of HST/STlS archival data with observations of high velocity absorption in the ultraviolet Si IV and C IV resonance lines, confirm the presence of a high-velocity material during the spectroscopic low state. The observations provide direct detection of high-velocity material flowing from the wind-wind collision zone around the binary system, and we discuss the implications of the presence of high-velocity gas in Eta Car during periastron

  19. Protection from high-velocity projectiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerasimov, A.; Pashkov, S.

    2012-08-01

    Creation of reliable system of target protection demands research of various ways of counteraction high-speed elongated projectiles. This paper considers the interaction of projectiles with plates and rods thrown towards by explosion. At contact projectiles and rods form a crosswise configuration. Deformation and destruction of projectiles reduce their penetrability and capacity to strike armor-target.

  20. Superconducting spoke cavities for high-velocity applications

    SciTech Connect

    Hopper, Christopher S.; Delayen, Jean R.

    2013-10-01

    To date, superconducting spoke cavities have been designed, developed, and tested for particle velocities up to {beta}{sub 0}~0.6, but there is a growing interest in possible applications of multispoke cavities for high-velocity applications. We have explored the design parameter space for low-frequency, high-velocity, double-spoke superconducting cavities in order to determine how each design parameter affects the electromagnetic properties, in particular the surface electromagnetic fields and the shunt impedance. We present detailed design for cavities operating at 325 and 352 MHz and optimized for {beta}{sub 0}~=0.82 and 1.

  1. High-Speed Vortex Wind Velocity Imaging by Acoustic Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, H.; Ueki, T.; Hayashi, K.; Yamada, A.

    A technique for monitoring strong vortex wind fields is highly desired due to the rapid development of global warming. Vortex wind velocity imaging using an acoustic travel time tomography technique was developed to meet this need. The method can be implemented with a small number of parallel facing pairs of acoustic transmitters/receivers from just a single illumination view direction, so that high-speed data acquisition compatible with instantaneous wind-flow imaging was accomplished. A test using an indoor wind velocity tomography system demonstrated that vortex wind velocity profiles generated by an electric fan could be instantaneously reconstructed with satisfactory quantitative precision.

  2. The Distance of High-Velocity Clouds CYC3-HIGH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakker, Bart

    1992-06-01

    We request time on the HST to obtain high-resolution (20 km/s) spectra around the 2800A MgII doublet of two stars and one quasar which lie projected toward the high-velocity HI cloud complex A. The prime purpose of this project is to determine the distance to complex A. Using these spectra we will be able to derive for the first time a firm upper or lower distance limit of 2.5 kpc for a HVC, which allows us to exclude several of the many proposed explanations. If we find that the object is beyond 2.5 kpc this will have important implications for the understanding of the structure of the Galaxy, especially for the energy balance and dynamics of interstellar matter and the exchange of material between the halo and the disk. A byproduct of the observations will be the first measurement of the MgII abundance in a HVC. Metal abundances are important for the problem of the origin of HVCs. We discuss the principle and problems of the method used to estimate distances and describe the current status of knowledge. Ground-based observations have been limited by sensitivity and ST allows us to reach stars faint enough so that a clear answer can be found.

  3. Response of polymer composites to high and low velocity impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsieh, C. Y.; Mount, A.; Jang, B. Z.; Zee, R. H.

    1990-01-01

    The present investigation of fiber-reinforced polymer matrix composites' impact characteristics employed a drop tower for the low-velocity impact case and a novel, projectile instantaneous velocity-measuring sensor for high-velocity impact. Attention was given to the energy loss of projectiles in composites reinforced with polyethylene, kevlar, and graphite. Two distinct energy-loss mechanisms are noted, the first of which is due to the actual fracture process while the other is due to the generation of friction heat. The drop-tower impact-test results furnish the strain-rate dependence of the energy loss.

  4. Fluid shielding of high-velocity jet noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodykoontz, J. H.

    1984-01-01

    Experimental noise data for a nozzle exhaust system incorporating a thermal acoustic shield (TAS) are presented to show the effect of changes in geometric and flow parameters on attenuation of high-velocity jet exhaust noise in the flyover plane. The results are presented for a 10.00-cm-diameter primary conical nozzle with a TAS configuration consisting of a 2.59- or 5.07-cm-wide annular gap. Shield-stream exhaust velocity was varied from 157 to 248 m/sec to investigate the effect of velocity ratio. The results showed that increasing the annular gap width increases attenuation of high-frequency noise when comparisons are made on the same ideal thrust basis. Varying the velocity ratio had a minor effect on the noise characteristics of the nozzles investigated.

  5. Detection of velocity in high temperature liquid metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikrovas, A. C.; Argyropoulos, S. A.

    1993-01-01

    Various efforts have been made to measure velocity in liquid metals. All of these efforts, however, share the same inherent limitation, namely, not being operative at the high temperatures required by liquid metals and liquid slags in an industrial application. In this paper, the current methods used were reviewed, and a new technique was presented for the measurement of velocity in high temperature liquid metals. In using this technique there are two stages. Starting with the calibration stage and then moving to the actual measurement stage by making use of the data obtained from calibration stage. Calibration proceeds in the following manner. Metallic spheres moving with a specific velocity are immersed in liquid metal held under isothermal conditions and at specific temperature. Their melting times are determined very accurately with a novel technique. These measurements are repeated for different metal bath temperatures and for different velocities of metallic spheres. In this manner it is possible to calculate the correlation between velocity and melting times for each metal bath temperature. During the actual measurement stage, when the metal bath temperature is known and its velocity is unknown, the magnitude of the unknown liquid metal velocity can be derived as follows: metallic spheres are immersed into the moving liquid metal and their melting times are determined. Using the above mentioned correlations, it will be shown that the magnitude of the unknown velocity in liquid metal can be deduced. This new technique was applied to high temperature liquid aluminum and liquid steel and these results were presented. The potential applicability of this technique in other liquid metals and liquid slags will also be discussed.

  6. Orbital transfer vehicle engine technology high velocity ratio diffusing crossover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lariviere, Brian W.

    1992-12-01

    High speed, high efficiency head rise multistage pumps require continuous passage diffusing crossovers to effectively convey the pumped fluid from the exit of one impeller to the inlet of the next impeller. On Rocketdyne's Orbital Transfer Vehicle (OTV), the MK49-F, a three stage high pressure liquid hydrogen turbopump, utilizes a 6.23 velocity ratio diffusing crossover. This velocity ratio approaches the diffusion limits for stable and efficient flow over the operating conditions required by the OTV system. The design of the high velocity ratio diffusing crossover was based on advanced analytical techniques anchored by previous tests of stationary two-dimensional diffusers with steady flow. To secure the design and the analytical techniques, tests were required with the unsteady whirling characteristics produced by an impeller. A tester was designed and fabricated using a 2.85 times scale model of the MK49-F turbopumps first stage, including the inducer, impeller, and the diffusing crossover. Water and air tests were completed to evaluate the large scale turbulence, non-uniform velocity, and non-steady velocity on the pump and crossover head and efficiency. Suction performance tests from 80 percent to 124 percent of design flow were completed in water to assess these pump characteristics. Pump and diffuser performance from the water and air tests were compared with the actual MK49-F test data in liquid hydrogen.

  7. Orbital Transfer Vehicle Engine Technology High Velocity Ratio Diffusing Crossover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lariviere, Brian W.

    1992-01-01

    High speed, high efficiency head rise multistage pumps require continuous passage diffusing crossovers to effectively convey the pumped fluid from the exit of one impeller to the inlet of the next impeller. On Rocketdyne's Orbital Transfer Vehicle (OTV), the MK49-F, a three stage high pressure liquid hydrogen turbopump, utilizes a 6.23 velocity ratio diffusing crossover. This velocity ratio approaches the diffusion limits for stable and efficient flow over the operating conditions required by the OTV system. The design of the high velocity ratio diffusing crossover was based on advanced analytical techniques anchored by previous tests of stationary two-dimensional diffusers with steady flow. To secure the design and the analytical techniques, tests were required with the unsteady whirling characteristics produced by an impeller. A tester was designed and fabricated using a 2.85 times scale model of the MK49-F turbopumps first stage, including the inducer, impeller, and the diffusing crossover. Water and air tests were completed to evaluate the large scale turbulence, non-uniform velocity, and non-steady velocity on the pump and crossover head and efficiency. Suction performance tests from 80 percent to 124 percent of design flow were completed in water to assess these pump characteristics. Pump and diffuser performance from the water and air tests were compared with the actual MK49-F test data in liquid hydrogen.

  8. SPE (tm) regenerative hydrogen/oxygen fuel cells for extraterrestrial surface and microgravity applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcelroy, J. F.

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on SPE regenerative hydrogen/oxygen fuel cells for extraterrestrial surface and microgravity applications are presented. Topics covered include: hydrogen-oxygen regenerative fuel cell energy storage system; electrochemical cell reactions; SPE cell voltage stability; passive water removal SPE fuel cell; fuel cell performance; SPE water electrolyzers; hydrophobic oxygen phase separator; hydrophilic/electrochemical hydrogen phase separator; and unitized regenerative fuel cell.

  9. SPE (tm) regenerative hydrogen/oxygen fuel cells for extraterrestrial surface and microgravity applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcelroy, J. F.

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on SPE regenerative hydrogen/oxygen fuel cells for extraterrestrial surface and microgravity applications are presented. Topics covered include: hydrogen-oxygen regenerative fuel cell energy storage system; electrochemical cell reactions; SPE cell voltage stability; passive water removal SPE fuel cell; fuel cell performance; SPE water electrolyzers; hydrophobic oxygen phase separator; hydrophilic/electrochemical hydrogen phase separator; and unitized regenerative fuel cell.

  10. High-resolution imaging of compact high-velocity clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Heij, V.; Braun, R.; Burton, W. B.

    2002-08-01

    We have imaged five compact high-velocity clouds in H I with arcmin angular resolution and km s-1 spectral resolution using the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope. These CHVCs have a characteristic morphology, consisting of one or more quiescent, low-dispersion compact cores embedded in a diffuse warm halo. The compact cores can be unambiguously identified with the cool neutral medium of condensed atomic hydrogen, since their linewidths are significantly narrower than the thermal linewidth of the warm neutral medium. Because of the limited sensitivity to diffuse emission inherent to interferometric data, the warm medium is not directly detected in the WSRT observations. Supplementary total-power data, which is fully sensitive to both the cool and warm components of H I, is available for comparison for all the sources, albeit with angular resolutions that vary from 3' to 36'. The fractional H I flux in compact CNM components varies from 4% to 16% in our sample. All objects have at least one local peak in the CNM column density which exceeds about 1019;cm-2 when observed with arcmin resolution. It is plausible that a peak column density of 1-2 x 1019;cm-2 is a prerequisite for the long-term survival of these sources. One object in our sample, CHVC 120-20-443 (Davies' cloud), lies in close projected proximity to the disk of M 31. This object is characterized by exceptionally broad linewidths in its CNM concentrations, more than 5 times greater than the median value found in the 13 CHVCs studied to date at comparable resolution. These CNM concentrations lie in an arc on the edge of the source facing the M 31 disk. The diffuse H I component of this source, seen in total-power data from the NRAO 140-foot telescope, has a positional offset in the direction of the M 31 disk. All of these attributes suggest that CHVC 120-20-443 is in a different evolutionary state than most of the other CHVCs which have been studied. Similarly broad CNM linewidths have only been detected

  11. Mixing between high velocity clouds and the galactic halo

    SciTech Connect

    Gritton, Jeffrey A.; Shelton, Robin L.; Kwak, Kyujin E-mail: rls@physast.uga.edu

    2014-11-01

    In the Galactic halo, metal-bearing Galactic halo material mixes into high velocity clouds (HVCs) as they hydrodynamically interact. This interaction begins long before the clouds completely dissipate and long before they slow to the velocity of the Galactic material. In order to make quantitative estimates of the mixing efficiency and resulting metal enrichment of HVCs, we made detailed two- and three-dimensional simulations of cloud-interstellar medium interactions. Our simulations track the hydrodynamics and time-dependent ionization levels. They assume that the cloud originally has a warm temperature and extremely low metallicity while the surrounding medium has a high temperature, low density, and substantial metallicity, but our simulations can be generalized to other choices of initial metallicities. In our simulations, mixing between cloud and halo gas noticeably raises the metallicity of the high velocity material. We present plots of the mixing efficiency and metal enrichment as a function of time.

  12. 3D finite element simulations of high velocity projectile impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ožbolt, Joško; İrhan, Barış; Ruta, Daniela

    2015-09-01

    An explicit three-dimensional (3D) finite element (FE) code is developed for the simulation of high velocity impact and fragmentation events. The rate sensitive microplane material model, which accounts for large deformations and rate effects, is used as a constitutive law. In the code large deformation frictional contact is treated by forward incremental Lagrange multiplier method. To handle highly distorted and damaged elements the approach based on the element deletion is employed. The code is then used in 3D FE simulations of high velocity projectile impact. The results of the numerical simulations are evaluated and compared with experimental results. It is shown that it realistically predicts failure mode and exit velocities for different geometries of plain concrete slab. Moreover, the importance of some relevant parameters, such as contact friction, rate sensitivity, bulk viscosity and deletion criteria are addressed.

  13. High-velocity stars from decay of small stellar systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiseleva, L. G.; Colin, J.; Dauphole, B.; Eggleton, P.

    1998-12-01

    In this paper we present numerical results on the decay of small stellar systems under different initial conditions (multiplicity 3<=N<=10, and various mass spectra, initial velocities and initial configurations). The numerical treatment uses the CHAIN1 code (Mikkola & Aarseth). Particular attention is paid to the distribution of high-velocity escapers: we define these as stars with velocity above 30 km s^-1. These numerical experiments confirm that small N-body systems are dynamically unstable and produce cascades of escapers in the process of their decay. It is shown that the fraction of stars that escape from small dense stellar systems with an escape velocity greater than 30 km s^-1 is ~1 per cent for all systems treated here. This relatively small fraction must be considered in relation to the rate of star formation in the Galaxy in small groups: this could explain some moderately high-velocity stars observed in the Galactic disc and possibly some young stars with relatively high metallicity in the thick disc.

  14. MAGNETIZED GAS IN THE SMITH HIGH VELOCITY CLOUD

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, Alex S.; McClure-Griffiths, Naomi M.; Mao, S. A.; Benjamin, Robert A.; Lockman, Felix J. E-mail: naomi.mcclure-griffiths@csiro.au E-mail: benjamir@uww.edu

    2013-11-01

    We report the first detection of magnetic fields associated with the Smith High Velocity Cloud. We use a catalog of Faraday rotation measures toward extragalactic radio sources behind the Smith Cloud, new H I observations from the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope, and a spectroscopic map of Hα from the Wisconsin H-Alpha Mapper Northern Sky Survey. There are enhancements in rotation measure (RM) of ≈100 rad m{sup –2} which are generally well correlated with decelerated Hα emission. We estimate a lower limit on the line-of-sight component of the field of ≈8 μG along a decelerated filament; this is a lower limit due to our assumptions about the geometry. No RM excess is evident in sightlines dominated by H I or Hα at the velocity of the Smith Cloud. The smooth Hα morphology of the emission at the Smith Cloud velocity suggests photoionization by the Galactic ionizing radiation field as the dominant ionization mechanism, while the filamentary morphology and high (≈1 Rayleigh) Hα intensity of the lower-velocity magnetized ionized gas suggests an ionization process associated with shocks due to interaction with the Galactic interstellar medium. The presence of the magnetic field may contribute to the survival of high velocity clouds like the Smith Cloud as they move from the Galactic halo to the disk. We expect these data to provide a test for magnetohydrodynamic simulations of infalling gas.

  15. High-Velocity Clouds Merging with the Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lockman, Felix J.

    HI observations with the Green Bank Telescope have now given us two clear examples of high-velocity HI clouds which are encountering the Milky Way disk and losing matter to it: Complex H, passing through the plane of the Milky Way in the far outer Galaxy, and Smith's Cloud, just entering the disk in the inner Galaxy. These clouds may give unique insights into the ongoing formation of the Milky Way, its chemical history, and the nature of the high-velocity cloud phenomenon.

  16. A mechanism for high wall-rock velocities in rockbursts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGarr, A.

    1997-01-01

    Considerable evidence has been reported for wall-rock velocities during rockbursts in deep gold mines that are substantially greater than ground velocities associated with the primary seismic events. Whereas varied evidence suggests that slip across a fault at the source of an event generates nearby particle velocities of, at most, several m/s, numerous observations, in nearby damaged tunnels, for instance, imply wall-rock velocities of the order of 10 m/s and greater. The common observation of slab buckling or breakouts in the sidewalls of damaged excavations suggests that slab flexure may be the mechanism for causing high rock ejection velocities. Following its formation, a sidewall slab buckles, causing the flexure to increase until the stress generated by flexure reaches the limit 5 that can be supported by the sidewall rock. I assume here that S is the uniaxial compressive strength. Once the flexural stress exceeds S, presumably due to the additional load imposed by a nearby seismic event, the slab fractures and unflexes violently. The peak wall-rock velocity v thereby generated is given by v=(3 + 1-??2/2)1 2 S/?????E for rock of density ??, Young's modulus E, and Poisson's ratio ??. Typical values of these rock properties for the deep gold mines of South Africa yield v= 26 m/s and for especially strong quartzites encountered in these same mines, v> 50m/s. Even though this slab buckling process leads to remarkably high ejection velocities and violent damage in excavations, the energy released during this failure is only a tiny fraction of that released in the primary seismic event, typically of magnitude 2 or greater.

  17. HD 69686: A MYSTERIOUS HIGH VELOCITY B STAR

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Wenjin; Gies, D. R.; McSwain, M. V. E-mail: gies@chara.gsu.ed

    2009-09-20

    We report on the discovery of a high velocity B star, HD 69686. We estimate its space velocity, distance, surface temperature, gravity, and age. With these data, we are able to reconstruct the trajectory of the star and to trace it back to its birthplace. We use evolutionary tracks for single stars to estimate that HD 69686 was born 73 Myr ago in the outer part of our Galaxy (r {approx} 12 kpc) at a position well below the Galactic plane (z {approx} -1.8 kpc), a very unusual birthplace for a B star. Along the star's projected path in the sky, we also find about 12 other stars having similar proper motions, and their photometry data suggest that they are located at the same distance as HD 69686 and probably have the same age. We speculate on the origin of this group by star formation in a high velocity cloud or as a Galactic merger fragment.

  18. A High-Velocity Collision With Our Galaxy's Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-08-01

    What caused the newly discovered supershell in the outskirts of our galaxy? A new study finds evidence that a high-velocity cloud may have smashed into the Milky Ways disk millions of years ago.Mysterious Gas ShellsA single velocity-channel map of the supershell GS040.2+00.670, with red contours marking the high-velocity cloud at its center. [Adapted from Park et al. 2016]The neutral hydrogen gas that fills interstellar space is organized into structures like filaments, loops, and shells. Supershells are enormous shells of hydrogen gas that can have radii of a thousand light-years or more; weve spotted about 20 of these in our own galaxy, and more in nearby dwarfs and spiral galaxies.How do these structures form? One theory is that they result from several supernovae explosions occurring in the same area. But the energy needed to create a supershell is more than 3 x 1052 erg, which corresponds to over 30 supernovae quite a lot to have exploding in the same region.Theres an interesting alternative scenario: the supershells might instead be caused by the impacts of high-velocity clouds that fall into the galactic disk.Velocity data for the compact high-velocity cloud CHVC040. The cloud is moving fast enough to create the supershell observed. [Adapted from Park et al. 2016]The Milky Ways Speeding CloudsHigh-velocity clouds are clouds of mostly hydrogen that speed through the Milky Way with radial velocities that are very different from the material in the galactic disk. The origins of these clouds are unknown, but its proposed that they come from outside the galaxy they might be fragments of a nearby, disrupting galaxy, or they might have originated from flows of accreting gas in the space in between galaxies.Though high-velocity clouds have long been on the list of things that might cause supershells, weve yet to find conclusive evidence of this. But that might have just changed, with a recent discovery by a team of scientists led by Geumsook Park (Seoul National

  19. High precision radial velocities: the case for NIR.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carleo, I.; Gratton, R.

    In the context of the preparation for the high resolution spectrograph HIRES for E-ELT, we are studying the possibility to derive high-precision radial velocities (RV) on a prototype:GIANO, the near-infrared (NIR) echelle spectrograph now available at the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo. Radial velocities measured from near-infrared spectra are a potential tool to search for extrasolar planets around cool stars. High resolution infrared spectrographs now available are reaching the high precision of visible instruments, with a constant improvement over time. In particular, no other IR instruments have GIANO's capability to cover the entire NIR wavelength range. We have developed an ensemble of IDL procedures to measure high precision radial velocities on GIANO spectra. Taking into account the achieved precisions with GIANO, we constrain the sample of targets for which GIANO is better than HARPS-N, but with the advent of GIARPS (GIANO+HARPS-N), GIANO will improve its performances and include a much larger sample of stars. The NIR range is the future of RV measurements, especially because the jitter due to the star surface activities is reduced in the NIR. As a consequence, HIRES working in NIR range might be very useful, and for a wide range of cases, it will be more efficient than HIRES working in the visible range, for detection and characterization of planets using radial velocity technique.

  20. High-velocity pulsars in the galactic halo.

    PubMed

    Eichler, D; Silk, J

    1992-08-14

    It is proposed that high-velocity pulsars are produced in extended galactic halos, and possibly in extragalactic space, from primordial (population III) stars. Such a population of neutron stars could provide an explanation for the gamma-ray bursters and would then accommodate the possibility that most bursters are not in the visible parts of galaxies.

  1. Electric rail gun projectile acceleration to high velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, D. P.; Mccormick, T. J.; Barber, J. P.

    1982-01-01

    Electric rail accelerators are being investigated for application in electric propulsion systems. Several electric propulsion applications require that the rail accelerator be capable of launching projectiles at velocities above 10 km/s. An experimental program was conducted to develop rail accelerator technology for high velocity projectile launch. Several 6 mm bore, 3 m long rail accelerators were fabricated. Projectiles with a mass of 0.2 g were accelerated by plasmas, carrying currents up to 150 kA. Experimental design and results are described. Results indicate that the accelerator performed as predicted for a fraction of the total projectile acceleration. The disparity between predicted and measured results are discussed.

  2. High-Velocity Star Formation in the Large Magellanic Cloud.

    PubMed

    Graff; Gould

    2000-05-01

    Light-echo measurements show that SN 1987A is 425 pc behind the LMC disk. It is continuing to move away from the disk at 18 km s-1. Thus, it has been suggested that SN 1987A was ejected from the LMC disk. However, SN 1987A is a member of a star cluster, so this entire cluster would have to have been ejected from the disk. We show that the cluster was formed in the LMC disk, with a velocity perpendicular to the disk of about 50 km s-1. Such high-velocity formation of a star cluster is unusual, having no known counterpart in the Milky Way.

  3. Electric rail gun projectile acceleration to high velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, D. P.; Mccormick, T. J.; Barber, J. P.

    1982-01-01

    Electric rail accelerators are being investigated for application in electric propulsion systems. Several electric propulsion applications require that the rail accelerator be capable of launching projectiles at velocities above 10 km/s. An experimental program was conducted to develop rail accelerator technology for high velocity projectile launch. Several 6 mm bore, 3 m long rail accelerators were fabricated. Projectiles with a mass of 0.2 g were accelerated by plasmas, carrying currents up to 150 kA. Experimental design and results are described. Results indicate that the accelerator performed as predicted for a fraction of the total projectile acceleration. The disparity between predicted and measured results are discussed.

  4. Extremely high velocity CO emission from NGC 2071

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernin, Lawrence M.; Masson, Colin R.

    1992-09-01

    The CO J = 3-2 transition is used to map the extremely high velocity (EHV) gas in the bipolar outflow from the NGC 2071 infrared cluster. The EHV material is found only within 1.5 arcmin of the source, while the high-velocity outflow extends to over +/-3 arcmin from the source. The EHV gas is well collimated, and symmetric, with sharp velocity peaks appearing at +/-1 arcmin from the source. The EHV gas has a temperature of about 80 K, significantly hotter than that of the HV gas. In view of this temperature enhancement and spatial confinement, it is suggested that velocity peaks occur at the working surfaces of jets. Since molecules are dissociated in shocks faster than about 40 km/s, the EHV gas most likely arises from molecules reformed behind a fast shock. The presence of a working surface in the middle of the outflow suggests that the outflowing material is reaccelerated, extending the lifetime of the flow.

  5. Erosion corrosion of copper in a high velocity water environment

    SciTech Connect

    Dobson, R.L.; Whitley, J.B.

    1987-08-01

    In certain fusion energy applications, high velocity, sub-cooled water must be provided to cool high heat flux components. Because of its heat transfer properties, copper proves to be an attractive material to use for the coolant tube walls. However, the existing literature pertaining to the effect of high water velocities (>7 m/s) on copper tubing is extremely limited. Thus, a study of the erosion corrosion of copper tubing and one of its alloys (Glidcop Al-15) was carried out for approximately 582 hours with water circulating at 12 m/s. Evidence of erosion corrosion was found and, in general, to a greater extent in the copper than in the Glidcop. 11 refs.

  6. High-speed velocity measurements on an EFI-system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prinse, W. C.; van't Hof, P. G.; Cheng, L. K.; Scholtes, J. H. G.

    2007-01-01

    For the development of an Exploding Foil Initiator for Insensitive Munitions applications the following topics are of interest: the electrical circuit, the exploding foil, the velocity of the flyer, the driver explosive, the secondary flyer and the acceptor explosive. Several parameters of the EFI have influences on the velocity of the flyer. To investigate these parameters a Fabry-Perot Velocity Interferometer System (F-PVIS) has been used. The light to and from the flyer is transported by a multimode fibre terminated with a GRIN-lens. By this method the velocity of very tiny objects (0.1 mm), can be measured. The velocity of flyer can be recorded with nanosecond resolution, depending on the Fabry-Perot etalon and the streak camera. With this equipment the influence of the dimensions of the exploding foil and the flyer on the velocity and the acceleration of the flyer are investigated. Also the integrity of the flyer during flight can be analyzed. To characterize the explosive material, to be used as driver explosive in EFI's, the initiation behaviour of the explosive has been investigated by taking pictures of the explosion with a high speed framing and streak camera. From these pictures the initiation distance and the detonation behaviour of the explosive has been analyzed. Normally, the driver explosive initiates the acceptor explosive (booster) by direct contact. This booster explosive is embedded in the main charge of the munitions. The combination of initiator, booster explosive and main charge explosive is called the detonation train. In this research the possibility of initiation of the booster by an intermediate flyer is investigated. This secondary flyer can be made of different materials, like aluminium, steel and polyester with different sizes. With the aid of the F-PVIS the acceleration of the secondary flyer is investigated. This reveals the influence of the thickness and density of the flyer on the acceleration and final velocity. Under certain

  7. New electrocatalysts for hydrogen-oxygen fuel cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cattabriga, R. A.; Giner, J.; Parry, J.; Swette, L. L.

    1970-01-01

    Platinum-silver, palladium-gold, and platinum-gold alloys serve as oxygen reduction catalysts in high-current-density cells. Catalysts were tested on polytetrafluoroethylene-bonded cathodes and a hydrogen anode at an operating cell temperature of 80 degrees C.

  8. A coupled-physics model for the vanadium oxygen fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wandschneider, F. T.; Küttinger, M.; Noack, J.; Fischer, P.; Pinkwart, K.; Tübke, J.; Nirschl, H.

    2014-08-01

    A stationary two-dimensional model for the vanadium oxygen fuel cell is developed. The model consists of a single cell with two membranes, set up as of two half-cells and an intermediate chamber. The transport and balance of mass, momentum and charge are linked to the electrochemical reaction kinetics of the vanadium species and oxygen. The kinetic model for the cathode half-cell is extended by an empirical logistic function to describe the transient behavior of the half-cell. Additionally, experiments are conducted on a single vanadium oxygen fuel cell with 40 cm2 active membrane area. The experimental results are used to validate the simulation data. The effects of constant current discharging, polarization behavior and different flow rates on the cathode overpotential are studied by means of this model.

  9. Phase velocity limit of high-frequency photon density waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haskell, Richard C.; Svaasand, Lars O.; Madsen, Sten; Rojas, Fabio E.; Feng, T.-C.; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    1995-05-01

    In frequency-domain photon migration (FDPM), two factors make high modulation frequencies desirable. First, with frequencies as high as a few GHz, the phase lag versus frequency plot has sufficient curvature to yield both the scattering and absorption coefficients of the tissue under examination. Second, because of increased attenuation, high frequency photon density waves probe smaller volumes, an asset in small volume in vivo or in vitro studies. This trend toward higher modulation frequencies has led us to re-examine the derivation of the standard diffusion equation (SDE) from the Boltzman transport equation. We find that a second-order time-derivative term, ordinarily neglected in the derivation, can be significant above 1 GHz for some biological tissue. The revised diffusion equation, including the second-order time-derivative, is often termed the P1 equation. We compare the dispersion relation of the P1 equation with that of the SDE. The P1 phase velocity is slower than that predicted by the SDE; in fact, the SDE phase velocity is unbounded with increasing modulation frequency, while the P1 phase velocity approaches c/sqrt(3) is attained only at modulation frequencies with periods shorter than the mean time between scatterings of a photon, a frequency regime that probes the medium beyond the applicability of diffusion theory. Finally we caution that values for optical properties deduced from FDPM data at high frequencies using the SDE can be in error by 30% or more.

  10. Strength calculation for fiber concrete slabs under high velocity impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artem, Ustinov; Kopanica, Dmitry; Belov, Nikolay; Jugov, Nikolay; Jugov, Alexey; Koshko, Bogdan; Kopanitsa, Georgy

    2017-01-01

    The paper presents results of the research on strength of concrete slabs reinforced with steel fiber and tested under a high velocity impact. Mathematical models are proposed to describe the behavior of continua with a complex structure with consideration of porosity, non-elastic effects, phase transformations and dynamic destructions of friable and plastic materials under shock wave impact. The models that describe the behavior of structural materials were designed in the RANET-3 CAD software system. This allowed solving the tasks of hit and explosion in the full three-dimensional statement using finite elements method modified for dynamic problems. The research results demonstrate the validity of the proposed mathematical model to calculate stress-strain state and fracture of layered fiber concrete structures under high velocity impact caused by blast wave.

  11. Gouge initiation in high-velocity rocket sled testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tachau, R. D. M.; Trucano, T. G.; Yew, C. H.

    1994-07-01

    A model is presented which describes the formation of surface damage 'gouging' on the rails that guide rocket sleds. An unbalanced sled can randomly cause a very shallow-angle, oblique impact between the sled shoe and the rail. This damage phenomenon has also been observed in high-velocity guns where the projectile is analogous to the moving sled shoe and the gun barrel is analogous to the stationary rail. At sufficiently high velocity, the oblique impact will produce a thin hot layer of soft material on the contact surfaces. Under the action of a normal moving load, the soft layer lends itself to an anti-symmetric deformation and the formation of a 'hump' in front of the moving load. A gouge is formed when this hump is overrun by the sled shoe. The phenomenon is simulated numerically using the CTH strong shock physics code, and the results are in good agreement with experimental observation.

  12. High Velocity Forming of Magnesium and Titanium Sheets

    SciTech Connect

    Revuelta, A.; Larkiola, J.; Korhonen, A. S.; Kanervo, K.

    2007-04-07

    Cold forming of magnesium and titanium is difficult due to their hexagonal crystal structure and limited number of available slip systems. However, high velocity deformation can be quite effective in increasing the forming limits. In this study, electromagnetic forming (EMF) of thin AZ31B-O magnesium and CP grade 1 titanium sheets were compared with normal deep drawing. Same dies were used in both forming processes. Finite element (FE) simulations were carried out to improve the EMF process parameters. Constitutive data was determined using Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar tests (SHPB). To study formability, sample sheets were electromagnetically launched to the female die, using a flat spiral electromagnetic coil and aluminum driver sheets. Deep drawing tests were made by a laboratory press-machine.Results show that high velocity forming processes increase the formability of Magnesium and Titanium sheets although process parameters have to be carefully tuned to obtain good results.

  13. Gouge initiation in high-velocity rocket sled testing

    SciTech Connect

    Tachau, R.D.M.; Trucano, T.G.; Yew, C.H.

    1994-07-01

    A model is presented which describes the formation of surface damage ``gouging`` on the rails that guide rocket sleds. An unbalanced sled can randomly cause a very shallow-angle, oblique impact between the sled shoe and the rail. This damage phenomenon has also been observed in high-velocity guns where the projectile is analogous to the moving sled shoe and the gun barrel is analogous to the stationary rail. At sufficiently high velocity, the oblique impact will produce a thin hot layer of soft material on the contact surfaces. Under the action of a normal moving load, the soft layer lends itself to an anti-symmetric deformation and the formation of a ``hump`` in front of the moving load. A gouge is formed when this hump is overrun by the sled shoe. The phenomenon is simulated numerically using the CTH strong shock physics code, and the results are in good agreement with experimental observation.

  14. Three-dimensional orientation of compact high velocity clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heitsch, F.; Bartell, B.; Clark, S. E.; Peek, J. E. G.; Cheng, D.; Putman, M.

    2016-10-01

    We present a proof-of-concept study of a method to estimate the inclination angle of compact high velocity clouds (CHVCs), i.e. the angle between a CHVC's trajectory and the line of sight. The inclination angle is derived from the CHVC's morphology and kinematics. We calibrate the method with numerical simulations, and we apply it to a sample of CHVCs drawn from HIPASS (Putman et al.). Implications for CHVC distances are discussed.

  15. Gentle protein ionization assisted by high-velocity gas flow.

    PubMed

    Yang, Pengxiang; Cooks, R Graham; Ouyang, Zheng; Hawkridge, Adam M; Muddiman, David C

    2005-10-01

    Gentle protein electrospray ionization is achieved using the high-velocity gas flow of an air amplifier to improve desolvation in conventional ESI and generate intact folded protein ions in the gas phase. Comparisons are made between the ESI spectra of a number of model proteins, including ubiquitin, cytochrome c, lysozyme, and myoglobin, over a range of pH values under optimized conditions, with and without using an air amplifier to achieve high-velocity gas flow. Previously reported increased ion signals are confirmed. In addition, the peaks recorded using the air amplifier are shown to be narrower, corresponding to more complete desolvation. Significant changes in the charge-state distribution also are observed, with a shift to lower charge state at high-velocity flow. The relationship between the observed charge-state distribution and protein conformation was explored by comparing the charge-state shifts and the distributions of charge states for proteins that are or are not stable in their native conformations in low pH solutions. The data suggest retention of native or nativelike protein conformations using the air amplifier in all cases examined. This is explained by a mechanism in which the air amplifier rapidly creates small droplets from the original large ESI droplets and these microdroplets then desolvate without a significant decrease in pH, resulting in retention of the folded protein conformations. Furthermore, the holoform of ionized myoglobin is visible at pH 3.5, a much lower value than the minimum needed to see this form in conventional ESI. These results provide evidence for the importance of the conditions used in the desolvation process for the preservation of the protein conformation and suggest that the conditions achieved when using high-velocity gas flows to assist droplet evaporation and ion desolvation are much gentler than those in conventional ESI experiments.

  16. Two high-velocity encounters of elliptical galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balcells, Marc; Borne, Kirk D.; Hoessel, John G.

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes results obtained on a simulation of two high-velocity encounters of NGC 4782/4783 and NGC 2672/2673 binary elliptical galaxies which differ substantially in mass ratio (about 1 for the first pair, and about 10 for the second). CCD images and velocities obtained from digital spectra were used to constrain simulations of the galaxy collisions. The binary orbital elements, the orientation of the orbit in the sky, the time since pericenter, and the dynamical mass of the pair were derived. Results suggested that the dumb-bell galaxy NGC 4782/4783 is not a supermassive galaxy, as was claimed earlier on the basis of the high relative velocity and high central dispersion, but has a moderate mass to luminosity ratio M/L(B) of about 10. It was concluded that its trajectory changed from hyperbolic to elliptical as a result of energy lost during the collision. It was found that the NGC 2672/2673 also has a moderate M/L(B) of about 7.

  17. Experimental and numerical studies of high-velocity impact fragmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Kipp, M.E.; Grady, D.E.; Swegle, J.W.

    1993-08-01

    Developments are reported in both experimental and numerical capabilities for characterizing the debris spray produced in penetration events. We have performed a series of high-velocity experiments specifically designed to examine the fragmentation of the projectile during impact. High-strength, well-characterized steel spheres (6.35 mm diameter) were launched with a two-stage light-gas gun to velocities in the range of 3 to 5 km/s. Normal impact with PMMA plates, thicknesses of 0.6 to 11 mm, applied impulsive loads of various amplitudes and durations to the steel sphere. Multiple flash radiography diagnostics and recovery techniques were used to assess size, velocity, trajectory and statistics of the impact-induced fragment debris. Damage modes to the primary target plate (plastic) and to a secondary target plate (aluminum) were also evaluated. Dynamic fragmentation theories, based on energy-balance principles, were used to evaluate local material deformation and fracture state information from CTH, a three-dimensional Eulerian solid dynamics shock wave propagation code. The local fragment characterization of the material defines a weighted fragment size distribution, and the sum of these distributions provides a composite particle size distribution for the steel sphere. The calculated axial and radial velocity changes agree well with experimental data, and the calculated fragment sizes are in qualitative agreement with the radiographic data. A secondary effort involved the experimental and computational analyses of normal and oblique copper ball impacts on steel target plates. High-resolution radiography and witness plate diagnostics provided impact motion and statistical fragment size data. CTH simulations were performed to test computational models and numerical methods.

  18. IMPACT OF OXYGENATED FUEL ON DIESEL ENGINE PERFORMANCE AND EMISSIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Boehman, Andre L.

    2000-08-20

    potential improvements in energy efficiency within the transportation section, particularly in sport utility vehicles and light-duty trucks, that can be provided by deployment of diesel engines in passenger cars and trucks is a strong incentive to develop cleaner burning diesel engines and cleaner burning fuels for diesel engines. Thus, serious consideration of oxygenated diesel fuels is of significant practical interest and value to society. In the present work, a diesel fuel reformulating agent, CETANERTM, has been examined in a popular light-medium duty turbodiesel engine over a range of blending ratios. This additive is a mixture of glycol ethers and can be produced from dimethyl ether, which itself can be manufactured from synthesis gas using Air Products' Liquid Phase Dimethyl Ether (LPDME TM) technology. CETANERTM is a liquid, has an oxygen content of 36 wt.%, has a cetane number over 100 and is highly miscible in diesel fuel. This combination of physical and chemical properties makes CETANERTM an attractive agent for oxygenating diesel fuel. The present study considered CETANERTM ratios from 0 to 40 wt.% in a California Air Resources Board (CARB) specification diesel fuel. Particulate matter emissions, gaseous emissions and in-cylinder pressure traces were monitored over the AVL 8-Mode engine test protocol [7]. This paper presents the results from these measurements and discusses the implications of using high cetane number oxygenates in diesel fuel reformulation.

  19. High velocity compact clouds in the sagittarius C region

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Kunihiko; Oka, Tomoharu; Matsumura, Shinji; Nagai, Makoto; Kamegai, Kazuhisa

    2014-03-01

    We report the detection of extremely broad emission toward two molecular clumps in the Galactic central molecular zone. We have mapped the Sagittarius C complex (–0.°61 < l < –0.°27, –0.°29 < b < 0.°04) in the HCN J = 4-3, {sup 13}CO J = 3-2, and H{sup 13}CN J = 1-0 lines with the ASTE 10 m and NRO 45 m telescopes, detecting bright emission with 80-120 km s{sup –1} velocity width (in full-width at zero intensity) toward CO–0.30–0.07 and CO–0.40–0.22, which are high velocity compact clouds (HVCCs) identified with our previous CO J = 3-2 survey. Our data reveal an interesting internal structure of CO–0.30–0.07 comprising a pair of high velocity lobes. The spatial-velocity structure of CO–0.40–0.22 can be also understood as a multiple velocity component, or a velocity gradient across the cloud. They are both located on the rims of two molecular shells of about 10 pc in radius. Kinetic energies of CO–0.30–0.07 and CO–0.40–0.22 are (0.8-2) × 10{sup 49} erg and (1-4) × 10{sup 49} erg, respectively. We propose several interpretations of their broad emission: collision between clouds associated with the shells, bipolar outflow, expansion driven by supernovae (SNe), and rotation around a dark massive object. These scenarios cannot be discriminated because of the insufficient angular resolution of our data, though the absence of a visible energy source associated with the HVCCs seems to favor the cloud-cloud collision scenario. Kinetic energies of the two molecular shells are 1 × 10{sup 51} erg and 0.7 × 10{sup 51} erg, which can be furnished by multiple SN or hypernova explosions in 2 × 10{sup 5} yr. These shells are candidates of molecular superbubbles created after past active star formation.

  20. Velocity field measurements on high-frequency, supersonic microactuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreth, Phillip A.; Ali, Mohd Y.; Fernandez, Erik J.; Alvi, Farrukh S.

    2016-05-01

    The resonance-enhanced microjet actuator which was developed at the Advanced Aero-Propulsion Laboratory at Florida State University is a fluidic-based device that produces pulsed, supersonic microjets by utilizing a number of microscale, flow-acoustic resonance phenomena. The microactuator used in this study consists of an underexpanded source jet that flows into a cylindrical cavity with a single, 1-mm-diameter exhaust orifice through which an unsteady, supersonic jet issues at a resonant frequency of 7 kHz. The flowfields of a 1-mm underexpanded free jet and the microactuator are studied in detail using high-magnification, phase-locked flow visualizations (microschlieren) and two-component particle image velocimetry. These are the first direct measurements of the velocity fields produced by such actuators. Comparisons are made between the flow visualizations and the velocity field measurements. The results clearly show that the microactuator produces pulsed, supersonic jets with velocities exceeding 400 m/s for roughly 60 % of their cycles. With high unsteady momentum output, this type of microactuator has potential in a range of ow control applications.

  1. High resolved velocity measurements using Laser Cantilever Anemometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puczylowski, Jaroslaw; Hölling, Michael; Peinke, Joachim

    2016-11-01

    We have developed a new anemometer, namely the 2d-LCA (2d-Laser-Cantilever-Anemometer), that is capable of performing high resolved velocity measurements in fluids. The anemometer uses a micostructured cantilever made of silicon as a sensing element. The specific shape and the small dimensions (about 150µm) of the cantilever allow for precise measurements of two velocity component at a temporal resolution of about 150kHz. The angular acceptance range is 180° in total. The 2d-LCA is a simple to use alternative to x-wires and can be used in many areas of operation including measurements in liquids or in particle-laden flows. Unlike hot-wires, the resolution power of the 2d-LCA does not decrease with increasing flow velocity, making it particularly suitable for measurements in high-speed flows. In the recent past new cantilever designs were implemented with the goal to further improve the angular resolution and increase the stability. In addition, we have designed more robust cantilevers for measurements in rough environments such as offshore areas. Successful comparative measurements with hot-wires have been carried out in order to assess the performance of the 2d-LCA.

  2. High velocity electromagnetic particle launcher for aerosol production studies

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, D.A.; Rader, D.J.

    1986-05-01

    This report describes the development of a new device for study of metal combustion, breakup and production of aerosols in a high velocity environment. Metal wires are heated and electromagnetically launched with this device to produce molten metal droplets moving at velocities ranging up to about Mach 1. Such tests are presently intended to simulate the behavior of metal streamers ejected from a high-explosive detonation. A numerical model of the launcher performance in terms of sample properties, sample geometry and pulser electrical parameters is presented which can be used as a tool for design of specific test conditions. Results from several tests showing the range of sample velocities accessible with this device are described and compared with the model. Photographic measurements showing the behavior of tungsten and zirconium metal droplets are presented. Estimates of the Weber breakup and drag on the droplets, as well as calculations of the droplet trajectories, are described. Such studies may ultimately be useful in assessing environmental hazards in the handling and storage of devices containing metallic plutonium.

  3. Ultrasonic Velocity and Texture of High RRR Niobium

    SciTech Connect

    S. R. Agnew; F. Zeng; G.R. Myneni

    2003-06-01

    Conventional assessments of the mechanical properties of rolled high RRR niobium plate material via tensile testing have revealed an unusually low apparent Young's moduli and yield strength in some annealed samples. These observations motivated a series of measurements of ultrasonic velocity, a dynamic assessment of the elastic moduli. In fact, the dynamic modulus is within the range of normal for all samples tested. However, there is a trend of increasing shear velocities for shear waves propagating through the sheet thickness and polarized in the sheet transverse direction. Careful analyses of the crystallographic texture using SEM-based electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) have revealed a subtle, but systematic change in the texture, which can explain the trend. It is further important to note that the change in texture is not observable from surface measurements using x-ray diffraction, but requires sectioning of the samples. Thus, measurements of ultrasonic velocity represent a non-destructive evaluation tool which is extremely sensitive to subtle changes in the texture of high RRR niobium. Finally, there are material lot variations, which are currently attributed to the effects of impurities, such as Ta and H.

  4. Response of Cable Harnesses Subjected to High-velocity Impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitta, Kumi; Kawakita, Shirou; Takeba, Atsushi; Katayama, Masahide

    We compared numerical simulation results obtained using AUTODYN-3D, which is used for impact analysis of complex physical systems including fluid and solid materials, with experimental results obtained using a two-stage light gas gun. The response of electric power supply cable harnesses subjected to high-velocity impact at 4.01 km/s is shown and discussed. In addition, AUTODYN-3D was applied to the numerical simulation of the hypervelocity impact of micrometeoroids and space debris (M/OD) at 15 km/s and 20 km/s, respectively. Material models used in the numerical simulation are also discussed and investigated in order to cover a wide range of impact velocities, including shock-induced vaporization.

  5. Ignition of metals and alloys by high-velocity particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benz, F. J.; Williams, R. E.; Armstrong, D.

    1986-01-01

    The ignition of metals and alloys by impacting high-velocity particles in gaseous oxygen was investigated. A convergent/divergent nozzle was used to accelerate the flowing oxygen, which in turn accelerated the particles to velocities greater than 305 m/s (1000 ft/s). The test sample (target) was placed at the end of the chamber in the flow path. Aluminum 6061, type 316 stainless steel, type 304 stainless steel, and Inconel 718 were ignited with 1600-micron aluminum 2017 particles at elevated temperatures and pressures whereas Monel 400 could not be ignited. The ignition susceptibility of metals and alloys appeared to increase as the inlet pressure, sample temperature, and particle size were increased. Type 304 stainless steel particles required more extreme conditions for ignition of materials than similar sized aluminum particles. The results indicated that ignition and subsequent burning of the particles were required for ignition of the target materials with the possible exception of aluminum 6061.

  6. Low and high velocity impact response of thick hybrid composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hiel, Clement; Ishai, Ori

    1993-01-01

    The effects of low and high velocity impact on thick hybrid composites (THC's) were experimentally compared. Test Beams consisted of CFRP skins which were bonded onto an interleaved syntactic foam core and cured at 177 C (350 F). The impactor tip for both cases was a 16 mm (0.625 inch) steel hemisphere. In spite of the order of magnitude difference in velocity ranges and impactor weights, similar relationships between impact energy, damage size, and residual strength were found. The dependence of the skin compressive strength on damage size agree well with analytical open hole models for composite laminates and may enable the prediction of ultimate performance for the damaged composite, based on visual inspection.

  7. The distance to the high velocity clouds of neutral hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bregman, Joel N.

    1992-01-01

    The goal of this project was to determine the distance to high velocity gas clouds. These clouds are believed to lie in the halo of the galaxy, but this is a matter of controversy. The technique was used to look for the effect of absorption by these clouds against the light of stars at various distances along the line of sight to these clouds. This was done in the ultraviolet using the International Ultraviolet Explorer. Absorption at the velocity of the clouds was not found in any of the stars, which have kiloparsec distances. It was concluded that the vertical distance to these clouds is at least 1.5 kpc, putting them firmly in the halo of the galaxy.

  8. Measuring the Spin Period of a High-Velocity Pulsar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomsick, John

    2012-10-01

    X-ray observations of IGR J11014-6103 show that it has a complex morphology with a point source and two components of extended emission. Its properties indicate that it is very likely to be a pulsar wind nebula (PWN). Chandra and radio observations strongly suggest that the compact object is moving away from SNR MSH 11-61A. Based on the evolution of this supernova remnant, an association would indicate that IGR J11014-6103 has a transverse velocity of 2,400 to 2,900 km/s. The possibility of such a high kick velocity makes the proposed timing study important for proving that the compact object is a pulsar, determining its period (P), and measuring dP/dt to determine if the characteristic age is consistent with the pulsar originating in MSH 11-61A.

  9. Analysis of high velocity impact on hybrid composite fan blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Sinclair, J. H.

    1979-01-01

    Recent developments in the analysis of high velocity impact of composite blades are described, using a computerized capability which consists of coupling a composites mechanics code with the direct-time integration features of NASTRAN. The application of the capability to determine the linear dynamic response of an interply hybrid composite aircraft engine fan blade is described in detail. The results also show that the impact stresses reach sufficiently high magnitudes to cause failures in the impact region at early times of the impact event.

  10. Analysis of high velocity impact on hybrid composite fan blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Sinclair, J. H.

    1979-01-01

    This paper describes recent developments in the analysis of high velocity impact of composite blades using a computerized capability which consists of coupling a composites mechanics code with the direct-time integration features of NASTRAN. The application of the capability to determine the linear dynamic response of an intraply hybrid composite aircraft engine fan blade is described in detail. The predicted results agree with measured data. The results also show that the impact stresses reach sufficiently high magnitudes to cause failures in the impact region at early times of the impact event.

  11. Velocity alignment leads to high persistence in confined cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camley, Brian A.; Rappel, Wouter-Jan

    2014-06-01

    Many cell types display random motility on two-dimensional substrates but crawl persistently in a single direction when confined in a microchannel or on an adhesive micropattern. Does this imply that the motility mechanism of confined cells is fundamentally different from that of unconfined cells? We argue that both free- and confined-cell migration may be described by a generic model of cells as "velocity-aligning" active Brownian particles previously proposed to solve a completely separate problem in collective cell migration. Our model can be mapped to a diffusive escape over a barrier and analytically solved to determine the cell's orientation distribution and repolarization rate. In quasi-one-dimensional confinement, velocity-aligning cells maintain their direction for times that can be exponentially larger than their persistence time in the absence of confinement. Our results suggest an important connection between single- and collective-cell migration: high persistence in confined cells corresponds with fast alignment of velocity to cell-cell forces.

  12. Production of high density molecular beams with wide velocity scanning

    SciTech Connect

    Sheffield, L. S.; Woo, S. O.; Rathnayaka, K. D. D.; Lyuksyutov, I. F. Herschbach, D. R.

    2016-06-15

    We describe modifications of a pulsed rotating supersonic beam source that improve performance, particularly increasing the beam density and sharpening the pulse profiles. As well as providing the familiar virtues of a supersonic molecular beam (high intensity, narrowed velocity distribution, and drastic cooling of rotation and vibration), the rotating source enables scanning the translational velocity over a wide range. Thereby, beams of any atom or molecule available as a gas can be slowed or speeded. Using Xe beams in the slowing mode, we have obtained lab speeds down to about 40 ± 5 m/s with density near 10{sup 11} cm{sup −3} and in the speeding mode lab speeds up to about 660 m/s and density near 10{sup 14} cm{sup −3}. We discuss some congenial applications. Providing low lab speeds can markedly enhance experiments using electric or magnetic fields to deflect, steer, or further slow polar or paramagnetic molecules. The capability to scan molecular speeds facilitates merging velocities with a codirectional partner beam, enabling study of collisions at very low relative kinetic energies, without requiring either beam to be slow.

  13. Decision making in high-velocity environments: implications for healthcare.

    PubMed

    Stepanovich, P L; Uhrig, J D

    1999-01-01

    Healthcare can be considered a high-velocity environment and, as such, can benefit from research conducted in other industries regarding strategic decision making. Strategic planning is not only relevant to firms in high-velocity environments, but is also important for high performance and survival. Specifically, decision-making speed seems to be instrumental in differentiating between high and low performers; fast decision makers outperform slow decision makers. This article outlines the differences between fast and slow decision makers, identifies five paralyses that can slow decision making in healthcare, and outlines the role of a planning department in circumventing these paralyses. Executives can use the proposed planning structure to improve both the speed and quality of strategic decisions. The structure uses planning facilitators to avoid the following five paralyses: 1. Analysis. Decision makers can no longer afford the luxury of lengthy, detailed analysis but must develop real-time systems that provide appropriate, timely information. 2. Alternatives. Many alternatives (beyond the traditional two or three) need to be considered and the alternatives must be evaluated simultaneously. 3. Group Think. Decision makers must avoid limited mind-sets and autocratic leadership styles by seeking out independent, knowledgeable counselors. 4. Process. Decision makers need to resolve conflicts through "consensus with qualification," as opposed to waiting for everyone to come on board. 5. Separation. Successful implementation requires a structured process that cuts across disciplines and levels.

  14. Corrosion of Aluminum Alloys in High Velocity Seawater

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-11-01

    JR. FINAL REPORT PREPARED FOR DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY OFFICE OF NAVAL RESEARCH C1 METALLURGY PROGRAM - CODE 471 : ,NOVEMBER, 1979 (a~ b , 214...ACCESSIOiNO . . ACCtP1igu’S CAT A60G %U161111 4 TILE rad S~ firo )S. lYPIEO EP mORT a Pamoo COVERED GP SION OF ALUNINL24 ALLOYS IN HIGH VELOCITY Final, 7/78...Rotating in Salt Water’, Proc. Third International Congress On Metallic Corrosion, Moscow, III, 83, (1969). 4. B . K. Mahato, S. K. Voora, & L. W

  15. High-velocity features in Type Ia supernova spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Childress, Michael J.; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Ganeshalingam, Mohan; Schmidt, Brian P.

    2014-01-01

    We use a sample of 58 low-redshift (z ≤ 0.03) Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) having well-sampled light curves and spectra near maximum light to examine the behaviour of high-velocity features (HVFs) in SN Ia spectra. We take advantage of the fact that Si II λ6355 is free of HVFs at maximum light in all SNe Ia, while HVFs are still strong in the Ca II near-infrared feature in many SNe, allowing us to quantify the strength of HVFs by comparing the structure of these two lines. We find that the average HVF strength increases with decreasing light-curve decline rate, and rapidly declining SNe Ia (Δm15(B) ≥ 1.4 mag) show no HVFs in their maximum-light spectra. Comparison of HVF strength to the light-curve colour of the SNe Ia in our sample shows no evidence of correlation. We find a correlation of HVF strength with the velocity of Si II λ6355 at maximum light (vSi), such that SNe Ia with lower vSi have stronger HVFs, while those SNe Ia firmly in the `high-velocity' (i.e. vSi ≥ 12 000 km s-1) subclass exhibit no HVFs in their maximum-light spectra. While vSi and Δm15(B) show no correlation in the full sample of SNe Ia, we find a significant correlation between these quantities in the subset of SNe Ia having weak HVFs. In general, we find that slowly declining (low Δm15(B)) SNe Ia, which are more luminous and more energetic than average SNe Ia, tend to produce either high photospheric ejecta velocities (i.e. high vSi) or strong HVFs at maximum light, but not both. Finally, we examine the evolution of HVF strength for a sample of SNe Ia having extensive pre-maximum spectroscopic coverage and find significant diversity of the pre-maximum HVF behaviour.

  16. Experimental investigation of high velocity impacts on brittle materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nathenson, David Isaac

    Experiments were conducted on soda lime glass and AS800 grade silicon nitride. Soda lime glass is often used in windows of military vehicles and aircraft where integrity in the event of shrapnel impacts is of vital concern. AS800 grade silicon nitride is considered one of the leading material candidates for the next generation of aircraft engine turbine blades because of its superior high temperature properties when compared with nickel based super-alloys. The suitability of these materials for their applications depends upon their response to point and planar dynamic impact loading. An experimental apparatus was constructed to fire one-sixteenth inch diameter hardened chrome steel ball bearings at 50 mm square soda lime glass blocks of thicknesses between 3 mm and 25.4 mm. Inelasticity due to the crushed zone effects the coefficients of restitution and the surface strains. The change in severity of cracking with velocity and specimen thickness is observed. Shock compression and pressure-shear experiments were conducted by means of a single stage gas gun capable of attaining impact velocities of 600 m/s. High velocity planar shock compression experiments on soda lime glass reveal a lack of spall strength, and a decrease of shear impedance and shear strength in the presence of a failure wave. The longitudinal impedance remains nearly constant. The spall strength of glass is 3.49 GPa and is sensitive to the presence of shear. Shock compression studies on silicon nitride using normal shock compression show that the material has a Hugoniot Elastic Limit of 12 GPa and that the spall strength decreases with increasing impact velocity due to damage below the HEL. The presence of inelastic deformation stops this trend, while the presence of shear increases the rate of spall strength drop by five times because of more severe microscopic damage. Experiments involving multiple shocks on silicon nitride show that material loading and unloading follows the shock Hugoniot

  17. Resonant Orbits and the High Velocity Peaks toward the Bulge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molloy, Matthew; Smith, Martin C.; Evans, N. Wyn; Shen, Juntai

    2015-10-01

    We extract the resonant orbits from an N-body bar that is a good representation of the Milky Way, using the method recently introduced by Molloy et al. By decomposing the bar into its constituent orbit families, we show that they are intimately connected to the boxy-peanut shape of the density. We highlight the imprint due solely to resonant orbits on the kinematic landscape toward the Galactic center. The resonant orbits are shown to have distinct kinematic features and may be used to explain the cold velocity peak seen in the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment commissioning data. We show that high velocity peaks are a natural consequence of the motions of stars in the 2:1 orbit family and that stars on other higher order resonances can contribute to the peaks. The locations of the peaks vary with bar angle and, with the tacit assumption that the observed peaks are due to the 2:1 family, we find that the locations of the high velocity peaks correspond to bar angles in the range {10}\\circ ≲ {θ }{bar}≲ 25^\\circ . However, some important questions about the nature of the peaks remain, such as their apparent absence in other surveys of the Bulge and the deviations from symmetry between equivalent fields in the north and south. We show that the absence of a peak in surveys at higher latitudes is likely due to the combination of a less prominent peak and a lower number density of bar supporting orbits at these latitudes.

  18. Paradoxes of high and low velocities in modern geodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarov, P. V.

    2016-11-01

    An analysis of the data on the vertical and horizontal movements of the Earth's crust obtained within recent 40 years has revealed paradoxical deviations of its deformations from the movements inherited from the past geological times. Currently, high local deformation velocities are observed both in the aseismic and seismically active regions. There are no clues to this phenomenon within the conventional concepts of geodynamics and mechanics of deformed solids. It is shown in this work that the paradoxes of high and low velocities could be solved if deformation processes taking place in the Earths' crust would be treated as the evolution of the stress-strain state of the loaded medium as a typical non-linear dynamic system. In this case, fracture develops in two stages—a comparatively slow quasi-stationary stage and a superfast catastrophic one, wherein the spatial localization of parameters is followed by the localization of the deformation process in time. This property is a fundamental characteristic of any non-linear dynamic systems.

  19. High-velocity streams of dust originating from Saturn.

    PubMed

    Kempf, Sascha; Srama, Ralf; Horányi, Mihaly; Burton, Marcia; Helfert, Stefan; Moragas-Klostermeyer, Georg; Roy, Mou; Grün, Eberhard

    2005-01-20

    High-velocity submicrometre-sized dust particles expelled from the jovian system have been identified by dust detectors on board several spacecraft. On the basis of periodicities in the dust impact rate, Jupiter's moon Io was found to be the dominant source of the streams. The grains become positively charged within the plasma environment of Jupiter's magnetosphere, and gain energy from its co-rotational electric field. Outside the magnetosphere, the dynamics of the grains are governed by the interaction with the interplanetary magnetic field that eventually forms the streams. A similar process was suggested for Saturn. Here we report the discovery by the Cassini spacecraft of bursts of high-velocity dust particles (> or = 100 km s(-1)) within approximately 70 million kilometres of Saturn. Most of the particles detected at large distances appear to originate from the outskirts of Saturn's outermost main ring. All bursts of dust impacts detected within 150 Saturn radii are characterized by impact directions markedly different from those measured between the bursts, and they clearly coincide with the spacecraft's traversals through streams of compressed solar wind.

  20. High-Velocity H I Gas in Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koo, Bon-Chul

    1993-05-01

    Using the Hat Creek 85 foot telescope, we had carried out a survey of H I 21 cm emission lines toward all 103 known northern supernova remnants (SNRs) in order to find rapidly expanding SNR shells (Koo & Heiles 1991). We detected 15 SNRs that have associated high-velocity (HV) H I gas, most of which are quite likely the gas accelerated by the SN blast wave. Although the large beam-size (FWHM~ 30') of the 85 foot telescope prevented us to see the structure of the HV H I gas, the H I mass distribution in line-of-sight velocity suggested clumpy shell structures in several SNRs. In order to resolve the structure of the HV H I gas, we have been carrying out high-resolution H I 21 cm line observations using the Arecibo telescope and the VLA. We report preliminary results on two SNRs, CTB 80 and W51. In CTB 80, the VLA observations revealed fast moving H I clumps, which have a dense (n_H ~ 100 cm(-3) ) core surrounded by a relatively diffuse envelope. The clumps are small, 3 pc to 5 pc, and have velocities between +40 km s(-1) and +80 km s(-1) with respect to the systematic velocity of CTB 80. The clumps have relatively large momentum per unit volume, which implies that they have been swept-up at an early stage of the SNR evolution. By analyzing the Arecibo data, we found that the interstellar medium around CTB 80 is far from being uniform and homogeneous, which explains the peculiar morphology of CTB 80 in infrared and radio continuum. In W51, HV H I gas moving up to v_LSR>+150 km s(-1) has been detected. The H I distribution is elongated along the northwest-southeast direction, and the peak is very close to an X-ray bright region. We discuss the implications of our results in relation to the X-ray and the radio continuum morphology of W51. This work was supported in part by NON DIRECTED RESEARCH FUND, Korea Research Foundation, 1992.

  1. Properties of solid polymer electrolyte fluorocarbon film. [used in hydrogen/oxygen fuel cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alston, W. B.

    1973-01-01

    The ionic fluorocarbon film used as the solid polymer electrolyte in hydrogen/oxygen fuel cells was found to exhibit delamination failures. Polarized light microscopy of as-received film showed a lined region at the center of the film thickness. It is shown that these lines were not caused by incomplete saponification but probably resulted from the film extrusion process. The film lines could be removed by an annealing process. Chemical, physical, and tensile tests showed that annealing improved or sustained the water contents, spectral properties, thermo-oxidative stability, and tensile properties of the film. The resistivity of the film was significantly decreased by the annealing process.

  2. Lyman-Alpha Observations of High Radial Velocity Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bookbinder, Jay

    1990-12-01

    H I LYMAN -ALPHA (LY-A) IS ONE OF THE MOST IMPORTANT LINES EMITTED BY PLASMA IN THE TEMPERATURE RANGE OF 7000 TO 10 TO THE FIFTH POWER K IN LATE-TYPE STARS. IT IS A MAJOR COMPONENT OF THE TOTAL RADIATIVE LOSS RATE, AND IT PLAYS A CRUCIAL ROLE IN DETERMINING THE ATMOSPHERIC STRUCTURE AND IN FLUORESCING OTHER UV LINES. YET IT IS ALSO THE LEAST STUDIED MAJOR LINE IN THE FAR UV, BECAUSE MOST OF THE LINE FLUX IS ABSORBED BY THE ISM ALONG THE LINE OF SIGHT AND BECAUSE IT IS STRONGLY COMTAMINATED BY THE GEOCORONAL BACKGROUND. A KNOWLEDGE OF THE Ly-A PROFILE IS ALSO IMPORTANT FOR STUDIES OF DEUTERIUM IN THE INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM. BY OBSERVING HIGH RADIAL VELOCITY STARS WE WILL OBTAIN FOR THE FIRST TIME HIGH RESOLUTION SPECTRA OF THE CORE OF A STELLAR H I LYMAN-A EMISSION LINE PROFILE.

  3. Compressional velocity measurements for a highly fractured lunar anorthosite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sondergeld, C. H.; Granryd, L. A.; Spetzler, H. A.

    1979-01-01

    The compressional wave (V sub p) velocities in three mutually perpendicular directions have been measured in lunar sample 60025,174, lunar anorthosite. V sub p measurements were made at ambient temperature and pressure and a new technique was developed to measure the velocities because of the tremendous acoustic wave attenuation of the lunar sample. The measured velocities were all less than 1 km/sec and displayed up to a 21% departure from the mean value of the three directions. The velocities agree with seismic wave velocities determined for the lunar surface at the collection site.

  4. High Velocity Horizontal Motions at the Edge of Sunspot Penumbrae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagenaar-Daggett, Hermance J.; Shine, R.

    2010-05-01

    The outer edges of sunspot penumbrae have long been noted as a region of interesting dynamics including formation of MMFs, extensions and retractions of the penumbral tips, fast moving (2-3 km/s) bright features dubbed"streakers", and localized regions of high speed downflows interpreted as Evershed "sinks". Using 30s cadence movies of high spatial resolution G band and Ca II H images taken by the Hinode SOT/FPP instrument from 5-7 Jan 2007, we have been investigating the penumbra around a sunspot in AR 10933. In addition to the expected phenomena, we also see occasional small dark crescent-shaped features with high horizontal velocities (6.5 km/s) in G band movies. These appear to be emitted from penumbral tips. They travel about 1.5 Mm developing a bright wake that evolves into a slower moving (1-2 km/s) bright feature. In some cases, there may be an earlier outward propagating disturbance within the penumbra. We have also analyzed available Fe 6302 Stokes V images to obtain information on the magnetic field. Although only lower resolution 6302 images made with a slower cadence are available for these particular data sets, we can establish that the features have the opposite magnetic polarity of the sunspot. This observation may be in agreement with simulations showing that a horizontal flux tube develops crests that move outward with a velocity as large as 10 km/s. This work was supported by NASA contract NNM07AA01C.

  5. Sensitivities of phase-velocity dispersion curves of surface waves due to high-velocity-layer and low-velocity-layer models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Chao; Xu, Yixian; Pan, Yudi; Wang, Ao; Gao, Lingli

    2016-12-01

    High-velocity-layer (HVL) and low-velocity-layer (LVL) models are two kinds of the most common irregular layered models in near-surface geophysical applications. When calculating dispersion curves of some extreme irregular models, current algorithms (e.g., Knopoff transfer matrix algorithm) should be modified. We computed the correct dispersion curves and analyzed their sensitivities due to several synthetic HVL and LVL models. The results show that phase-velocity dispersion curves of both Rayleigh and Love waves are sensitive to variations in S-wave velocity of an LVL, but insensitive to that of an HVL. In addition, they are both insensitive to those of layers beneath the HVL or LVL. With an increase in velocity contrast between the irregular layer and its neighboring layers, the sensitivity effects (high sensitivity for the LVL and low sensitivity for the HVL) will amplify. These characteristics may significantly influence the inversion stability, leading to an inverted result with a low level of confidence. To invert surface-wave phase velocities for a more accurate S-wave model with an HVL or LVL, priori knowledge may be required and an inversion algorithm should be treated with extra caution.

  6. Heterogeneous fragmentation of metallic liquid microsheet with high velocity gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An-Min, He; Pei, Wang; Jian-Li, Shao

    2016-01-01

    Large-scale molecular dynamics simulations are performed to study the fragmentation of metallic liquid sheets with high velocity gradient. Dynamic fragmentation of the system involves the formation of a network of fragments due to the growth and coalescence of holes, decomposition of the network into filaments, and further breakup of the filaments into spherical clusters. The final size distribution of the fragmented clusters in the large volume limit is found to obey a bilinear exponential form, which is resulted from the heterogeneous breakup of quasi-cylindrical filaments. The main factors contributing to fragmentation heterogeneity are introduced, including strain rate inhomogeneity and matter distribution nonuniformity of fragments produced during decomposition of the network structure. Project supported by the Science and Technology Development Foundation of China Academy of Engineering Physics (Grant Nos. 2013A0201010 and 2015B0201039) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11402032).

  7. Monolithic interferometer for high precision radial velocity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Xiaoke; Ge, Jian; Wang, Ji; Lee, Brian

    2009-08-01

    In high precision radial velocity (RV) measurements for extrasolar planets searching and studies, a stable wide field Michelson interferometer is very critical in Exoplanet Tracker (ET) instruments. Adopting a new design, monolithic interferometers are homogenous and continuous in thermal expansion, and field compensation and thermal compensation are both satisfied. Interferometer design and fabrication are decrypted in details. In performance evaluations, field angle is typically 22° and thermal sensitivity is typically -1.7 x 10-6/°C, which corresponds to ~500 m/s /°C in RV scale. In interferometer stability monitoring using a wavelength stabilized laser source, phase shift data was continuously recorded for nearly seven days. Appling a frequent calibration every 30 minutes as in typical star observations, the interferometer instability contributes less than 1.4 m/s in RV error, in a conservative estimation.

  8. Solar wind collimation of the Jupiter high velocity dust streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flandes, A.; Krueger, H.

    2006-12-01

    The dust bursts discovered by the Ulysses dust sensor when approaching Jupiter in 1992 were later confirmed as collimated streams of high velocity (~200 km/s) charged (~5V) dust grains escaping from Jupiter and dominated by the interplanetary Magnetic field (IMF). With Cassini, a similar phenomenon was observed in Saturn. It was demonstrated that the Jovian dust streams are closely related to the solar wind compressed regions, either Corotating interaction regions (CIRs) or Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) ¨Cto a minor extent-. Actually the dust streams seem ultimately to be generated by such events. This can be explained considering that dust grains are accelerated as they gain substantial energy while compressed at the forward and reverse shocks that bound or precede these solar wind regions.

  9. Stetson Revisited: Identifying High-Velocity Early-Type Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinman, T. D.

    1999-02-01

    Our current knowledge of the local blue horizontal branch (BHB) and other high-velocity early-type stars largely depends upon Stetson's survey (in the 1980s) that was based on the SAO catalog. He selected the stars by their reduced proper motion as a function of spectral type. We argue that it is worth repeating Stetson's work using a more recent proper motion source such as the PPM catalog (published 1991) which (inter alia) contains many more stars with spectral types than the SAO. A photometric program is described (using the 0.9-m telescope at full moon) to observe the candidate stars (mostly with V<=10 mag.) and so identify the interesting stars (BHB, RR Lyrae, SW Phoenicis variables, Blue stragglers) that may be expected among them. The new data would materially improve our knowledge of the local space densities of these stars (Kinman 1998).

  10. Deployable Emergency Shutoff Device Blocks High-Velocity Fluid Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nabors, Sammy A.

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center has developed a device and method for blocking the flow of fluid from an open pipe. Motivated by the sea-bed oil-drilling catastrophe in the Gulf of Mexico in 2010, NASA innovators designed the device to plug, control, and meter the flow of gases and liquids. Anchored with friction fittings, spikes, or explosively activated fasteners, the device is well-suited for harsh environments and high fluid velocities and pressures. With the addition of instrumentation, it can also be used as a variable area flow metering valve that can be set based upon flow conditions. With robotic additions, this patent-pending innovation can be configured to crawl into a pipe then anchor and activate itself to block or control fluid flow.

  11. Collisional Disruption of Ice by High-Velocity Impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arakawa, Masahiko

    1999-11-01

    High-velocity impact among icy planetesimals is a physical phenomenon important to the planetary evolution process in the outer Solar System. In order to study this phenomenon, impact experiments on water ice were made by using a two-stage light gas gun installed in a cold room (-10°C) to clarify the elementary processes of collisional disruption and to study the reaccumulation and the escape conditions of the impact fragments. Cubic ice targets ranging in size from 15 to 100 mm were impacted by a nylon projectile of 7 mg with an impact velocity ( vi) from 2.3 to 4.7 km/s. The corresponding mass ratio of the projectile to the target ( mp/ Mt) ranged from 10 -3 to 10 -6, which is two orders of magnitude lower than that used in previous studies (Arakawa et al. 1995, Icarus118, 341-354). As a result, we obtained data on elementary processes such as attenuation of the shock wave and fragmentation dynamics. We found that the shock pressure attenuates in the ice target according to the relation of P∝( Lp/ r2, irrespective of the mass ratio between 10 -3 and 10 -5, where Lp is the projectile size and r is a propagation distance. The largest fragment mass ( ml) normalized by the original target mass has a good relationship to a nondimensional impact stress ( PI, NDIS) defined as the ratio of the antipodal pressure to the material strength. This relationship is described as ml/ Mt ∝ PI-1.7 for a wide range of impact conditions (50 m/s< vi<4 km/s and 10 -1< ml/ Mt<10 -6), and shows the utility of NDIS. Using a measured shock wave decay constant of 2, the reaccumulation and the escape conditions of icy bodies in high-velocity collisions were estimated. As a result, it was clarified that a rubble pile could be formed when large icy bodies (radius>20 km) reaccumulated. On the other hand, when smaller icy bodies (radius<2 km) disrupted catastrophically, all fragments escaped and a rubble pile was never formed.

  12. Seismic Radiation in High-Velocity Shear Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zu, X.; Carpenter, B. M.; Reches, Z.

    2016-12-01

    High-speed rotary shear experiments allow to monitor co-seismic weakening along experimental faults, and to observe near source fault behavior. We used a system of 3D accelerometers during high-velocity shear experiments, and present our preliminary observations of the seismic radiation. The experimental faults were composed of solid igneous (diorite, gabbro) and sedimentary rocks (dolomite, sandstone), and slip area is a ring-shaped zone. The faults were loaded under constant velocity, and under controlled power density, in which slip occurs spontaneously and is controlled by the properties of the fault. The four 3D accelerometers were mounted 2 cm away from the experimental fault, recorded waveforms at 1 MHz, and accelerations up to 500 g.Preliminary results show hundreds of acoustic emission (AE) events in a single slip event with varied amplitudes, up to 500 g, and durations of up to 100 milliseconds. The hypocenter location in a given experiment revealed that AE initiated at two sites that are interpreted as strong asperities which were broken first to facilitate slip of the entire fault. Spectrograms of the AEs show multi-component patterns with the influence of both rock attributes and machine artifact. We also ran bi-material fault experiments (Carpenter et al, this meeting) in which the fault was composed of contrasting rock types. In a sandstone/gabbro fault, the arrival of the AEs was emergent, i.e., it had a low acceleration phase before a more impulsive acceleration. In contrast, the diorite/diorite fault displayed only the impulsive acceleration phase without a preceding low acceleration. Future analyses will focus on refinement of event source location patterns, spectral analysis, and the relationship between acoustic and mechanical properties of the faults.

  13. High velocity vortex channeling in vicinal YBCO thin films.

    PubMed

    Puica, I; Lang, W; Durrell, J H

    2012-09-01

    We report on electrical transport measurements at high current densities on optimally doped YBa2Cu3O7-δ thin films grown on vicinal SrTiO3 substrates. Data were collected by using a pulsed-current technique in a four-probe arrangement, allowing to extend the current-voltage characteristics to high supercritical current densities (up to 24 MA cm(-2)) and high electric fields (more than 20 V/cm), in the superconducting state at temperatures between 30 and 80 K. The electric measurements were performed on tracks perpendicular to the vicinal step direction, such that the current crossed between ab planes, under magnetic field rotated in the plane defined by the crystallographic c axis and the current density. At magnetic field orientation parallel to the cuprate layers, evidence for the sliding motion along the ab planes (vortex channeling) was found. The signature of vortex channeling appeared to get enhanced with increasing electric field, due to the peculiar depinning features in the kinked vortex range. They give rise to a current-voltage characteristics steeper than in the more off-plane rectilinear vortex orientations, in the electric field range below approximately 1 V/cm. Roughly above this value, the high vortex channeling velocities (up to 8.6 km/s) could be ascribed to the flux flow, although the signature of ohmic transport appeared to be altered by unavoidable macroscopic self-heating and hot-electron-like effects.

  14. Probability density distribution of velocity differences at high Reynolds numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Praskovsky, Alexander A.

    1993-01-01

    Recent understanding of fine-scale turbulence structure in high Reynolds number flows is mostly based on Kolmogorov's original and revised models. The main finding of these models is that intrinsic characteristics of fine-scale fluctuations are universal ones at high Reynolds numbers, i.e., the functional behavior of any small-scale parameter is the same in all flows if the Reynolds number is high enough. The only large-scale quantity that directly affects small-scale fluctuations is the energy flux through a cascade. In dynamical equilibrium between large- and small-scale motions, this flux is equal to the mean rate of energy dissipation epsilon. The pdd of velocity difference is a very important characteristic for both the basic understanding of fully developed turbulence and engineering problems. Hence, it is important to test the findings: (1) the functional behavior of the tails of the probability density distribution (pdd) represented by P(delta(u)) is proportional to exp(-b(r) absolute value of delta(u)/sigma(sub delta(u))) and (2) the logarithmic decrement b(r) scales as b(r) is proportional to r(sup 0.15) when separation r lies in the inertial subrange in high Reynolds number laboratory shear flows.

  15. Laboratory investigations involving high-velocity oxygen atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leger, Lubert J.; Koontz, Steven L.; Visentine, James T.; Cross, Jon B.

    1989-01-01

    Facilities for measuring material reactive characteristics have been under development for several years and span the atom energy range from thermal to 5 eV, the orbital collision energy. One of the high-atom energy facilities (The High Intensity/Energy Atomic Oxygen Source) capable of simulating the reactive part of LEO is described, along with results of beam characterization and preliminary material studies. The oxygen atom beam source was a continuous wave plasma produced by focusing a high-power CO2 laser through a lens system into a rare gas/molecular oxygen mixture chamber at elevated temperature. Material samples were exposed to the high velocity beam through an external feedthrough. The facility showed good stability in continued operation for more than 100 hours, producing fluences of 10 to the 21st to 10 to the 22nd atoms/sq cm. Reaction efficiencies and surface morphology have been measured for several materials at energies of 1.5 and 2.8 eV, matching with data generated from previous space flights. Activation energies for carbon and Kapton as measured in this facility were 800 cal/mole.

  16. Fault gouge rheology under confined, high-velocity conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reches, Z.; Madden, A. S.; Chen, X.

    2012-12-01

    We recently developed the experimental capability to investigate the shear properties of fine-grain gouge under confined conditions and high-velocity. The experimental system includes a rotary apparatus that can apply large displacements of tens of meters, slip velocity of 0.001- 2.0 m/s, and normal stress of 35 MPa (Reches and Lockner, 2010). The key new component is a Confined ROtary Cell (CROC) that can shear a gouge layer either dry or under pore-pressure. The pore pressure is controlled by two syringe pumps. CROC includes a ring-shape gouge chamber of 62.5 mm inner diameter, 81.25 mm outer diameter, and up to 3 mm thick gouge sample. The lower, rotating part of CROC contains the sample chamber, and the upper, stationary part includes the loading, hollow cylinder and setting for temperature, and dilation measurements, and pore-pressure control. Each side of the gouge chamber has two pairs of industrial, spring-energized, self-lubricating, teflon-graphite seals, built for particle media and can work at temperature up to 250 ded C. The space between each of the two sets of seals is pressurized by nitrogen. This design generates 'zero-differential pressure' on the inner seal (which is in contact with the gouge powder), and prevents gouge leaks. For the preliminary dry experiments, we used ~2.0 mm thick layers of room-dry kaolinite powder. Total displacements were on the order of meters and normal stress up to 4 MPa. The initial shear was accommodated by multiple internal slip surfaces within the kaolinite layer accommodated as oriented Riedel shear structures. Later, the shear was localized within a thin, plate-parallel Y-surface. The kaolinite layer was compacted at a quasi-asymptotic rate, and displayed a steady-state friction coefficient of ~ 0.5 with no clear dependence on slip velocity up to 0.15 m/s. Further experiments with loose quartz sand (grain size ~ 125 micron) included both dry runs and pore-pressure (distilled water) controlled runs. The sand was

  17. Real-time high-velocity resolution color Doppler OCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westphal, Volker; Yazdanfar, Siavash; Rollins, Andrew M.; Izatt, Joseph A.

    2001-05-01

    Color Doppler optical coherence tomography (CDOCT), also called Optical Doppler Tomography) is a noninvasive optical imaging technique, which allows for micron-scale physiological flow mapping simultaneous with morphological OCT imaging. Current systems for real-time endoscopic optical coherence tomography (EOCT) would be enhanced by the capability to visualize sub-surface blood flow for applications in early cancer diagnosis and the management of bleeding ulcers. Unfortunately, previous implementations of CDOCT have either been sufficiently computationally expensive (employing Fourier or Hilbert transform techniques) to rule out real-time imaging of flow, or have been restricted to imaging of excessively high flow velocities when used in real time. We have developed a novel Doppler OCT signal-processing strategy capable of imaging physiological flow rates in real time. This strategy employs cross-correlation processing of sequential A-scans in an EOCT image, as opposed to autocorrelation processing as described previously. To measure Doppler shifts in the kHz range using this technique, it was necessary to stabilize the EOCT interferometer center frequency, eliminate parasitic phase noise, and to construct a digital cross correlation unit able to correlate signals of megahertz bandwidth by a fixed lag of up to a few ms. The performance of the color Doppler OCT system was demonstrated in a flow phantom, demonstrating a minimum detectable flow velocity of ~0.8 mm/s at a data acquisition rate of 8 images/second (with 480 A-scans/image) using a handheld probe. Dynamic flow as well as using it freehanded was shown. Flow was also detectable in a phantom in combination with a clinical usable endoscopic probe.

  18. Numerical Investigation of High Velocity Suspension Flame Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taleby, M.; Hossainpour, S.

    2012-12-01

    High-velocity suspension flame spraying (HVSFS) has recently developed as a possible alternative to conventional HVOF-spraying employing liquid suspensions instead of dry powder feedstock enables the use of nanoparticles. From the fluid dynamics point of view, the HVSFS system is complex and involves three-phase (gas, liquid and solid particles) turbulent flow, heat transfer, evaporation of the suspension solvent, chemical reactions of main fuel (propane) and suspension solvent (ethanol) and supersonic/subsonic flow transitions. Computational fluid dynamic techniques were carried out to solve the mass, momentum, and energy conservation equations. The realizable k-ɛ turbulence model was used to account for the effect of turbulence. The HVSFS process involves two combustion reactions. A primary combustion process is the premixed oxygen-propane reaction and secondary process is the non-premixed oxygen-gaseous ethanol reaction. For each reaction, one step global reaction, which takes dissociations and intermediate reactions into account, was derived from the equilibrium chemistry code developed by Gordon and McBride and eddy dissipation model was used to calculate the rate of reactions based on the transport equations for all species (10 species) mass fractions. Droplets were tracked in the continuum in a Lagrangian approach. In this paper, flow field inside and outside the gun simulated to provide clear and complete insight about the HVSFS processes. Moreover, the effect of some operative parameters (oxy-fuel flow rate, ethanol flow rate, droplets injection velocity and droplets size) on the gas flow field along the centerline and droplets evaporation behavior was discussed.

  19. High velocity properties of the dynamic frictional force between ductile metals

    SciTech Connect

    Hammerberg, James Edward; Hollan, Brad L; Germann, Timothy C; Ravelo, Ramon J

    2010-01-01

    The high velocity properties of the tangential frictional force between ductile metal interfaces seen in large-scale NonEquilibrium Molecular Dynamics (NEMD) simulations are characterized by interesting scaling behavior. In many cases a power law decrease in the frictional force with increasing velocity is observed at high velocities. We discuss the velocity dependence of the high velocity branch of the tangential force in terms of structural transformation and ultimate transition, at the highest velocities, to confined fluid behavior characterized by a critical strain rate. The particular case of an Al/Al interface is discussed.

  20. Dynamic weakening by nanoscale smoothing during high velocity fault slip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, X.; Madden, A. S.; Bickmore, B. R.; Reches, Z.

    2012-12-01

    Rock friction is commonly determined through measurements on rock samples with areas from a few cm^2 to 1 m^2. On the other hand, theoretical models suggest that frictional processes are scale-dependent, and active at scales of a few microns or less. We used Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) to determine the frictional strength and roughness of experimental fault surfaces that slipped under high velocity (< 0.9 m/s) and moderate normal stress (< 7.0 MPa). The high velocity tests (Reches and Lockner, 2010) were conducted on experimental faults made of Sierra White granite (SWG) and Kasota dolomite (KD), and the sheared surfaces were sampled for the nanoscale measurements by the AFM. The friction coefficient (FC) at the sub-micron scale was measured by using the AFM to press & shear a tiny silica glass bead against the rock surface (Stiernstedt et al., 2005). The 3D morphology of the fault surfaces at the nano- to microscale was measured with the standard AFM intermittent contact mode with sharp tip probe. In the AFM friction measurements, a total of 43 sites have been measured and each site was repeated hundreds of times; 33 of these sites were measured under air and 10 sites were measured under deionized water. The SWG and KD samples display FC values that vary systematically with orientation and conditions. Room-dry, un-sheared surfaces have FC = 0.64 ± 0.05 for both rock types. KD normal to striations has FC = 0.60 ± 0.15. SWG rough, sheared surface display FC = 0.71 ± 0.02. Significant friction drop was observed under dry, parallel to striations, with FC = 0.34 ± 0.08 (KD) and FC = 0.52 ± 0.03 (SWG). Under wet (water covered) conditions parallel to slickensides, the friction dropped even further to FC = 0.15 ± 0.05 (dolomite) and FC = 0.31 ± 0.05 (granite). The nanoscale FC (room dry, parallel to striations) is comparable to the macroscopic FC for the host experiments. Roughness calculations are based on AFM topographic images, and analyzed by both Power

  1. X-ray scattering and spectroscopy studies on diesel soot from oxygenated fuel under various engine load conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Braun, Andreas; Shah, N.; Huggins, Frank E.; Kelly, K.E.; Sarofim, A.; Jacobsen, C.; Wirick, S.; Francis, H.; Ilavsky, J.; Thomas, G.E.; Huffman, G.P.

    2005-01-01

    Diesel soot from reference diesel fuel and oxygenated fuel under idle and load engine conditions was investigated with X-ray scattering and X-ray carbon K-edge absorption spectroscopy. Up to five characteristic size ranges were found. Idle soot was generally found to have larger primary particles and aggregates but smaller crystallites, than load soot. Load soot has a higher degree of crystallinity than idle soot. Adding oxygenates to diesel fuel enhanced differences in the characteristics of diesel soot, or even reversed them. Aromaticity of idle soot from oxygenated diesel fuel was significantly larger than from the corresponding load soot. Carbon near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy was applied to gather information about the presence of relative amounts of carbon double bonds (CC, CO) and carbon single bonds (C-H, C-OH, COOH). Using scanning X-ray transmission microspectroscopy (STXM), the relative amounts of these carbon bond states were shown to vary spatially over distances approximately 50 to 100 nm. The results from the X-ray techniques are supported by thermo-gravimetry analysis and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. ?? 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. High velocity vortex channeling in vicinal YBCO thin films

    PubMed Central

    Puica, I.; Lang, W.; Durrell, J.H.

    2012-01-01

    We report on electrical transport measurements at high current densities on optimally doped YBa2Cu3O7−δ thin films grown on vicinal SrTiO3 substrates. Data were collected by using a pulsed-current technique in a four-probe arrangement, allowing to extend the current–voltage characteristics to high supercritical current densities (up to 24 MA cm−2) and high electric fields (more than 20 V/cm), in the superconducting state at temperatures between 30 and 80 K. The electric measurements were performed on tracks perpendicular to the vicinal step direction, such that the current crossed between ab planes, under magnetic field rotated in the plane defined by the crystallographic c axis and the current density. At magnetic field orientation parallel to the cuprate layers, evidence for the sliding motion along the ab planes (vortex channeling) was found. The signature of vortex channeling appeared to get enhanced with increasing electric field, due to the peculiar depinning features in the kinked vortex range. They give rise to a current–voltage characteristics steeper than in the more off-plane rectilinear vortex orientations, in the electric field range below approximately 1 V/cm. Roughly above this value, the high vortex channeling velocities (up to 8.6 km/s) could be ascribed to the flux flow, although the signature of ohmic transport appeared to be altered by unavoidable macroscopic self-heating and hot-electron-like effects. PMID:23482832

  3. Robustness of waves with a high phase velocity

    SciTech Connect

    Tajima, T.; Necas, A.

    2016-03-25

    Norman Rostoker pioneered research of (1) plasma-driven accelerators and (2) beam-driven fusion reactors. The collective acceleration, coined by Veksler, advocates to drive above-ionization plasma waves by an electron beam to accelerate ions. The research on this, among others, by the Rostoker group incubated the idea that eventually led to the birth of the laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA), by which a large and robust accelerating collective fields may be generated in plasma in which plasma remains robust and undisrupted. Besides the emergence of LWFA, the Rostoker research spawned our lessons learned on the importance of adiabatic acceleration of ions in collective accelerators, including the recent rebirth in laser-driven ion acceleration efforts in a smooth adiabatic fashion by a variety of ingenious methods. Following Rostoker’s research in (2), the beam-driven Field Reversed Configuration (FRC) has accomplished breakthroughs in recent years. The beam-driven kinetic plasma instabilities have been found to drive the reactivity of deuteron-deuteron fusion beyond the thermonuclear yield in C-2U plasma that Rostoker started. This remarkable result in FRCs as well as the above mentioned LWFA may be understood with the aid of the newly introduced idea of the “robustness hypothesis of waves with a high phase velocity”. It posits that when the wave driven by a particle beam (or laser pulse) has a high phase velocity, its amplitude is high without disrupting the supporting bulk plasma. This hypothesis may guide us into more robust and efficient fusion reactors and more compact accelerators.

  4. Extremely high-velocity molecular flows in young stellar objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koo, Bon-Chul

    1989-02-01

    Very sensitive, wideband CO J = 1-0, J = 2-1, and HCO+ J = 1-0 spectra of several young stellar objects are presented. Extremely weak and very broad extremely high velocity (EHV) wings are found in GL 4909, HH 7-11, S140, and MWC 1080. The line profiles of EHV wings are smooth or flat, quite different from steep HV wings. In L551 and HL Tau, EHV wings as broad as other sources are not found, which would be due to the inclination of the bipolar flows to the line of sight. From the excitation temperature of about 10 K derived for the EHV flows, the estimated column density of CO yields a number density too small to explain the observed ratio of CO J = 2-1 to J = 1-0 intensity. It is concluded that either EHV flows are composed of small dense clumps or most of the carbon in the flow is atomic carbon, unless the kinetic temperature of the flow is much higher than 100 K.

  5. High-velocity Bipolar Molecular Emission from an AGN Torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallimore, Jack F.; Elitzur, Moshe; Maiolino, Roberto; Marconi, Alessandro; O'Dea, Christopher P.; Lutz, Dieter; Baum, Stefi A.; Nikutta, Robert; Impellizzeri, C. M. V.; Davies, Richard; Kimball, Amy E.; Sani, Eleonora

    2016-09-01

    We have detected in ALMA observations CO J=6\\to 5 emission from the nucleus of the Seyfert galaxy NGC 1068. The low-velocity (up to ±70 km s-1 relative to systemic) CO emission resolves into a 12 × 7 pc structure, roughly aligned with the nuclear radio source. Higher-velocity emission (up to ±400 km s-1) is consistent with a bipolar outflow in a direction nearly perpendicular (≃80°) to the nuclear disk. The position-velocity diagram shows that in addition to the outflow, the velocity field may also contain rotation about the disk axis. These observations provide compelling evidence in support of the disk-wind scenario for the active galactic nucleus obscuring torus.

  6. Hydrodynamic lubrication in nanoscale bearings under high shear velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yunfei; Li, Deyu; Jiang, Kai; Yang, Juekuan; Wang, Xiaohui; Wang, Yujuan

    2006-08-01

    The setting up process in a nanoscale bearing has been modeled by molecular dynamics simulation. Contrary to the prediction from the classical Reynolds' theory, simulation results show that the load capacity of the nanoscale bearing does not increase monotonically with the operation speed. This is attributed to the change of the local shear rate, which will decrease with the shear velocity of the bearing as the shear velocity exceeds a critical value, i.e., the local shear rate has an upper limit. A simple nonlinear dynamic model indicates that the momentum exchange between the liquid and the solid wall is reduced with the shear velocity when the shear velocity is above a critical value. The weak momentum exchange results in a decrease of the local shear rate, which in turn causes a sharp increase of the slip length.

  7. Thermal iron ions in high speed solar wind streams. II - Temperatures and bulk velocities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, D. G.; Roelof, E. C.; Feldman, W. C.; Bame, S. J.; Williams, D. J.

    1981-01-01

    Mitchel and Roelof (1980) reported the detection of iron in high speed solar wind flows using the small, but finite sensitivity of solid state detectors to Fe ions in the low energy (50-200 keV protons) L1 channel of the NOAA/JHU energetic particle experiment (EPE). In the current investigation, the EPE response is modeled to a convected Maxwellian to obtain the thermal velocity, flow angle, and bulk velocity of the iron distribution. It is assumed that the iron bulk flow velocity can be represented as a vector sum of the hydrogen bulk velocity and an interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) aligned velocity increment. It is found that the velocity increment is smaller than the local Alfven speed in magnitude, and that the iron thermal velocity is comparable with or greater than the proton thermal velocity, with the 'thermal' velocity defined as the square root of 2kT/m.

  8. High-speed non-intrusive measurements of fuel velocity fields at high-pressure injectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gürtler, Johannes; Schlüßler, Raimund; Fischer, Andreas; Czarske, Jürgen

    2017-03-01

    Using a single high-speed camera and a frequency modulated laser, a novel approach is presented for fast velocity field measurements in unsteady spray flows. The velocity range is from zero up to several 100 m/s, which requires a high measurement rate and a large dynamic. Typically, flow measurements require to seed tracer particles to the fluid. A paradigm shift to seeding-free measurements is presented. The light scattered at the phase boundaries of the fluid droplets is evaluated. In order to validate the high-speed measurement system, a detailed uncertainty analysis is performed by means of measurements as well as simulations. Thereby, variations of the scattered light intensity, which are based on the high temporal velocity gradients, are found to be the main contribution to the uncertainty. The eventually measurement results, obtained at a measurement rate of 500 kHz, exhibit spray velocities ranging from 0 m/s up to 400 m/s in less than 1 ms, and the detection of unsteady and irregular flow phenomena with a characteristic time of several μs is achieved. This demonstrates the high measurement rate, the high temporal resolution and the large measurement range of the proposed high-speed measurement system.

  9. Photonic systems for high precision radial velocity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halverson, Samuel P.

    The discovery of Earth-like exoplanets has profound implications for our understanding of the origins and diversity of life in our universe. As such, developing new and improved Doppler radial velocity (RV) spectrometers capable of discovering and characterizing these planets is a high priority in the astronomical community. However, detection of true Earth-analogs remains beyond the technical reach of current Doppler RV instruments. This thesis discusses a number of technological developments designed specifically to overcome classical instrumental limitations of high precision Doppler RV measurements. These technologies are essential components of next generation instruments that aim to achieve the RV precision necessary to detect low-mass planets. This instrumentation research is driven by the development of the Habitable-zone Planet Finder (HPF), a near-infrared (NIR) Doppler spectrograph currently under development at Penn State that will detect terrestrial-mass planets orbiting nearby M-dwarfs. Furthermore, many technologies discussed will also be applied to the NASA-NSF Extreme Precision Doppler Spectrometer concept NEID, a Doppler RV instrument for the 3.5 meter WIYN telescope, slated for delivery in 2019. NEID is an ultra-stable, high resolution optical spectrometer also under development at Penn State. This thesis describes new specialized optical fiber delivery systems, designed to significantly improve instrument illumination stability, modal noise suppression systems, which suppress mode interference in optical fibers and allow spectrometers to fully realize the exquisite precision of modern wavelength calibration sources, and new photonic calibration sources, which show significant promise as potential Doppler wavelength references. These technologies represent important steps in enabling next generation instruments to reach precisions sufficient to detect terrestrial-mass planets orbiting in the Habitable-zones of nearby stars. Improving measurement

  10. Velocity of change in vegetation productivity over northern high latitudes.

    PubMed

    Huang, Mengtian; Piao, Shilong; Janssens, Ivan A; Zhu, Zaichun; Wang, Tao; Wu, Donghai; Ciais, Philippe; Myneni, Ranga B; Peaucelle, Marc; Peng, Shushi; Yang, Hui; Peñuelas, Josep

    2017-10-02

    Warming is projected to increase the productivity of northern ecosystems. However, knowledge on whether the northward displacement of vegetation productivity isolines matches that of temperature isolines is still limited. Here we compared changes in the spatial patterns of vegetation productivity and temperature using the velocity of change concept, which expresses these two variables in the same unit of displacement per time. We show that across northern regions (>50° N), the average velocity of change in growing-season normalized difference vegetation index (NDVIGS, an indicator of vegetation productivity; 2.8 ± 1.1 km yr(-1)) is lower than that of growing-season mean temperature (T GS; 5.4 ± 1.0 km yr(-1)). In fact, the NDVIGS velocity was less than half of the T GS velocity in more than half of the study area, indicating that the northward movement of productivity isolines is much slower than that of temperature isolines across the majority of northern regions (about 80% of the area showed faster changes in temperature than productivity isolines). We tentatively attribute this mismatch between the velocities of productivity and temperature to the effects of limited resource availability and vegetation acclimation mechanisms. Analyses of ecosystem model simulations further suggested that limited nitrogen availability is a crucial obstacle for vegetation to track the warming trend.Here the concept of climate-change velocity is used to explore whether northward displacement of vegetation will keep pace with temperature under climate change. Remote sensing data suggest it will not, possibly due to resource availability.

  11. Low inlet gas velocity high throughput biomass gasifier

    DOEpatents

    Feldmann, Herman F.; Paisley, Mark A.

    1989-01-01

    The present invention discloses a novel method of operating a gasifier for production of fuel gas from carbonaceous fuels. The process disclosed enables operating in an entrained mode using inlet gas velocities of less than 7 feet per second, feedstock throughputs exceeding 4000 lbs/ft.sup.2 -hr, and pressures below 100 psia.

  12. Modeling of High-Velocity Flows in ITAM Impulse Facilities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-01

    violated , the phenomenon under study is essentially unsteady. For instance, acoustic waves obey the condition ≈ f aλ = , where λ is the wavelength, f...well known that the velocity of hypersonic flying vehicles moving at altitudes of 30–50 km reaches 2000 m/s, which allows using the Lorentz force

  13. Predicting High Explosive Detonation Velocities from Their Composition and Structure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-09-01

    for a gamut of ideal explosives. The explosives ranged from nitroaromatics, cyclic and linear nitramines, nitrate esters and nitro-nitrato...structure is postulated for a gamut of explosives. Since detonation velocity, DQ, is density dependent, the linear regression plot. Figure 1, of the

  14. Results on fibre scrambling for high accuracy radial velocity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avila, Gerardo; Singh, Paul; Chazelas, Bruno

    2010-07-01

    We present in this paper experimental data on fibres and scramblers to increase the photometrical stability of the spectrograph PSF. We have used round, square, octagonal fibres and beam homogenizers. This study is aimed to enhance the accuracy measurements of the radial velocities for ESO ESPRESSO (VLT) and CODEX (E-ELT) instruments.

  15. Treatment protocol for high velocity/high energy gunshot injuries to the face.

    PubMed

    Peled, Micha; Leiser, Yoav; Emodi, Omri; Krausz, Amir

    2012-03-01

    Major causes of facial combat injuries include blasts, high-velocity/high-energy missiles, and low-velocity missiles. High-velocity bullets fired from assault rifles encompass special ballistic properties, creating a transient cavitation space with a small entrance wound and a much larger exit wound. There is no dispute regarding the fact that primary emergency treatment of ballistic injuries to the face commences in accordance with the current advanced trauma life support (ATLS) recommendations; the main areas in which disputes do exist concern the question of the timing, sequence, and modes of surgical treatment. The aim of the present study is to present the treatment outcome of high-velocity/high-energy gunshot injuries to the face, using a protocol based on the experience of a single level I trauma center. A group of 23 injured combat soldiers who sustained bullet and shrapnel injuries to the maxillofacial region during a 3-week regional military conflict were evaluated in this study. Nine patients met the inclusion criteria (high-velocity/high-energy injuries) and were included in the study. According to our protocol, upon arrival patients underwent endotracheal intubation and were hemodynamically stabilized in the shock-trauma unit and underwent total-body computed tomography with 3-D reconstruction of the head and neck and computed tomography angiography. All patients underwent maxillofacial surgery upon the day of arrival according to the protocol we present. In view of our treatment outcomes, results, and low complication rates, we conclude that strict adherence to a well-founded and structured treatment protocol based on clinical experience is mandatory in providing efficient, appropriate, and successful treatment to a relatively large group of patients who sustain various degrees of maxillofacial injuries during a short period of time.

  16. Treatment Protocol for High Velocity/High Energy Gunshot Injuries to the Face

    PubMed Central

    Peled, Micha; Leiser, Yoav; Emodi, Omri; Krausz, Amir

    2011-01-01

    Major causes of facial combat injuries include blasts, high-velocity/high-energy missiles, and low-velocity missiles. High-velocity bullets fired from assault rifles encompass special ballistic properties, creating a transient cavitation space with a small entrance wound and a much larger exit wound. There is no dispute regarding the fact that primary emergency treatment of ballistic injuries to the face commences in accordance with the current advanced trauma life support (ATLS) recommendations; the main areas in which disputes do exist concern the question of the timing, sequence, and modes of surgical treatment. The aim of the present study is to present the treatment outcome of high-velocity/high-energy gunshot injuries to the face, using a protocol based on the experience of a single level I trauma center. A group of 23 injured combat soldiers who sustained bullet and shrapnel injuries to the maxillofacial region during a 3-week regional military conflict were evaluated in this study. Nine patients met the inclusion criteria (high-velocity/high-energy injuries) and were included in the study. According to our protocol, upon arrival patients underwent endotracheal intubation and were hemodynamically stabilized in the shock-trauma unit and underwent total-body computed tomography with 3-D reconstruction of the head and neck and computed tomography angiography. All patients underwent maxillofacial surgery upon the day of arrival according to the protocol we present. In view of our treatment outcomes, results, and low complication rates, we conclude that strict adherence to a well-founded and structured treatment protocol based on clinical experience is mandatory in providing efficient, appropriate, and successful treatment to a relatively large group of patients who sustain various degrees of maxillofacial injuries during a short period of time. PMID:23449809

  17. The effects of high-air velocity on broiler performance.

    PubMed

    Simmons, J D; Lott, B D; Miles, D M

    2003-02-01

    Two trials using a total of 1,484 Ross male broilers were conducted to study the effect of air velocities of 180 and 120 m/min versus still air (<15 m/min) on BW gain (BWG) and feed:gain from 3 to 7 wk of age. Broilers were raised in a common environment to 3 wk of age. The experimental facility was a closed sided house containing eight wind tunnel floor pens and six floor pens. There were two wind tunnels (four pens/tunnel) used to test air velocities of 180 or 120 m/min. At 3 wk of age, 53 birds were placed in pens on litter in each of two wind tunnels (four pens/tunnel) or on litter in floor pens (six pens) in an environmentally controlled facility. All floor pens contained 3.75 square meters of floor space, one tube feeder, and one trough waterer. The temperature regimen was a diurnal cycle of 25-30-25 C with 23 C dewpoint. Air velocities of 180 and 120 m/min had no significant effect on BWG or feed:gain during the first week (3 to 4 wk) in the tunnels as compared with the still air. However, significant improvements were noted in BWG and feed:gains for increased air velocities from 4 to 5 and 5 to 6 wk of age. During the last week (6 to 7), an air velocity of 180 m/min significantly improved BWG and feed:gain, as compared with the 120 m/min or the still air.

  18. High-resolution OH LIF velocity measurement technique for high-speed reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klavuhn, K. G.; Gauba, G.; Mcdaniel, J. C.

    1992-01-01

    A nonintrusive optical technique was developed for the quantitative study of velocity fields in steady, high-speed, reacting flows. A narrow-linewidth laser source was tuned through an isolated OH absorption line to measure the Doppler-shifted linecenter frequency relative to an iodine reference line. A counterpropagating beam approach was used to eliminate collisional impact shift effects. Pointwise measurements of velocity were made in a unique reacting underexpanded jet facility as an extensive calibration of the technique over a wide range of flow conditions. The extension of the technique to planar measurements is also discussed.

  19. High-resolution OH LIF velocity measurement technique for high-speed reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klavuhn, K. G.; Gauba, G.; Mcdaniel, J. C.

    1992-01-01

    A nonintrusive optical technique was developed for the quantitative study of velocity fields in steady, high-speed, reacting flows. A narrow-linewidth laser source was tuned through an isolated OH absorption line to measure the Doppler-shifted linecenter frequency relative to an iodine reference line. A counterpropagating beam approach was used to eliminate collisional impact shift effects. Pointwise measurements of velocity were made in a unique reacting underexpanded jet facility as an extensive calibration of the technique over a wide range of flow conditions. The extension of the technique to planar measurements is also discussed.

  20. Optical Doppler tomographic imaging of fluid flow velocity in highly scattering media

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Z.; Milner, T.E.; Dave, D.; Nelson, J.S.

    1997-01-01

    An optical Doppler tomography (ODT) system that permits imaging of fluid flow velocity in highly scattering media is described. ODT combines Doppler velocimetry with the high spatial resolution of low-coherence optical interferometry to measure fluid flow velocity at discrete spatial locations. Tomographic imaging of particle flow velocity within a circular conduit submerged 1mm below the surface in a highly scattering phantom of Intralipid is demonstrated. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital Optical Society of America}

  1. Vortex shedding flow meter performance at high flow velocities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegwarth, J. D.

    1986-01-01

    In some of the ducts of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME), the maximum liquid oxygen flow velocities approach 10 times those at which liquid flow measurements are normally made. The hydrogen gas flow velocities in other ducts exceed the maximum for gas flow measurement by more than a factor of 3. The results presented here show from water flow tests that vortex shedding flow meters of the appropriate design can measure water flow to velocities in excess of 55 m/s, which is a Reynolds number of about 2 million. Air flow tests have shown that the same meter can measure flow to a Reynolds number of at least 22 million. Vortex shedding meters were installed in two of the SSME ducts and tested with water flow. Narrow spectrum lines were obtained and the meter output frequencies were proportional to flow to + or - 0.5% or better over the test range with no flow conditioning, even though the ducts had multiple bends preceeding the meter location. Meters with the shedding elements only partially spanning the pipe and some meters with ring shaped shedding elements were also tested.

  2. High- and low-temperature-stable thermite composition for producing high-pressure, high-velocity gases

    DOEpatents

    Halcomb, Danny L.; Mohler, Jonathan H.

    1990-10-16

    A high- and low-temperature-stable thermite composition for producing high-pressure and high-velocity gases comprises an oxidizable metal, an oxidizing reagent, and a high-temperature-stable gas-producing additive selected from the group consisting of metal carbides and metal nitrides.

  3. Scaling rule for target ionization by highly charged ions at low-to-intermediate velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, W.; Deveney, E. F.; Datz, S.; Desai, D. D.; Krause, H. F.; Sanders, J. M.; Vane, C. R.; Cocke, C. L.; Giese, J. P.

    1996-04-01

    Cross sections for ionization of He by highly charged Clq+, Cuq+, and Iq+ (q=6-10) impact at velocities from 1.6 to 3.1 a.u. were measured. These results are compared with other experimental and theoretical results available over a wide velocity range. A universal scaling rule for target ionization by nearly bare, highly charged ions at low to intermediate velocities (0.2-3.5 a.u.) is reported.

  4. Final Report: Cathode Catalysis in Hydrogen/Oxygen Fuel Cells: New Catalysts, Mechanism, and Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Gewirth, Andrew A.; Kenis, Paul J.; Nuzzo, Ralph G.; Rauchfuss, Thomas B.

    2016-01-18

    In this research, we prosecuted a comprehensive plan of research directed at developing new catalysts and new understandings relevant to the operation of low temperature hydrogen-oxygen fuel cells. The focal point of this work was one centered on the Oxygen Reduction Reaction (ORR), the electrochemical process that most fundamentally limits the technological utility of these environmentally benign energy conversion devices. Over the period of grant support, we developed new ORR catalysts, based on Cu dimers and multimers. In this area, we developed substantial new insight into design rules required to establish better ORR materials, inspired by the three-Cu active site in laccase which has the highest ORR onset potential of any material known. We also developed new methods of characterization for the ORR on conventional (metal-based) catalysts. Finally, we developed a new platform to study the rate of proton transfer relevant to proton coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions, of which the ORR is an exemplar. Other aspects of work involved theory and prototype catalyst testing.

  5. Study of the long-term operation of a vanadium/oxygen fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noack, Jens; Cognard, Gwenn; Oral, Meryem; Küttinger, Michael; Roznyatovskaya, Nataliya; Pinkwart, Karsten; Tübke, Jens

    2016-09-01

    A vanadium/oxygen fuel cell (VOFC) with a geometrically active area of 51 cm2 and two membranes was discontinuously operated over a period of over 676 h with 47 successive tests at room temperature with a current density of 19.6 mA/cm2 in order to investigate signs of ageing. As well as measuring cell voltages, the test setup was also used to measure anode and redox potentials as well as cell and half-cell impedances. The performance data of the VOFC fluctuated widely over the course of the test period, due to different V2+ concentrations and instabilities of the starting solutions on the one hand and complex changes in cathode conditions on the other. The desired behaviour of the anode reactions was achieved primarily through improved methods for producing the V2+ solutions, and remained stable at the end of the experiments. The kinetics of the cathode reactions were temporarily increased by purging with 2 M H2SO4, however their performance decreased over time. The VOFC had symptoms of ageing by complex and overlaid changes in the cathode's triple phase boundary layer and in the special conditions between the two electrodes and membranes.

  6. The study on the heat transfer characteristics of oxygen fuel combustion boiler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Haibo; Liu, Zhaohui; Liao, Haiyan

    2016-10-01

    According to 350MW and 600MW boilers, under oxygen fuel condition, through the reasonable control of the primary and secondary flow and the correct option and revision of mathematical model, the temperature distribution, heat flux distribution and absorption heat distribution, etc. was obtained which compared with those under air condition. Through calculation, it is obtained that the primary and secondary flow mixed well, good tangentially fired combustion in furnace was formed, the temperature under air condition obviously higher than the temperature under O26 condition. The adiabatic flame temperature of wet cycle was slightly higher than that of dry cycle. The maximum heat load appeared on the waterwall around the burner area. The heat load gradually decreased along the furnace height up and down in burner area. The heat absorption capacity of the furnace under O26 was lower than that under the air condition. The heat absorption capacity of the platen heating surface under O26 was equal to that under air condition. And the heat absorbing capacity of waterwall under O26 was about7%~12% less than that under air condition.

  7. Effect of oxygenated fuels on physicochemical and toxicological characteristics of diesel particulate emissions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhi-Hui; Balasubramanian, Rajasekhar

    2014-12-16

    A systematic study was conducted to make a comparative evaluation of the effects of blending five different oxygenates (diglyme (DGM), palm oil methyl ester (PME), dimethyl carbonate (DMC), diethyl adipate (DEA), and butanol (Bu)) with ultralow sulfur diesel (ULSD) at 2% and 4% oxygen levels on physicochemical and toxicological characteristics of particulate emissions from a nonroad diesel engine. All blended fuels led to an overall decrease in the particulate mass concentration and elemental carbon (EC) emissions, which was strongly associated with the oxygen content in fuels and the specific type of fuels used. In general, the proportion of particulate-bound organic carbon (OC) and water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) increased while using oxygenated fuel blends. Compared to ULSD, all fuel blends showed different emission factors of particle-phase PAHs and n-alkanes, slight alterations in soot nanostructure, lower soot ignition temperature, and lower activation energy. The total counts of particles (≤ 560 nm diameter) emitted decreased gradually for ULSD blended with DMC, DEA, and Bu, while they increased significantly for other fuel blends. The in vitro toxicity of particulates significantly increased with ULSD blended with DMC and DEA, while it decreased when ULSD was blended with PME, DGM, and Bu.

  8. Sound velocity and density of liquid Fe-Ni-S at high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terasaki, H. G.; Kurokawa, F.; Shimoyama, Y.; Urakawa, S.; Takubo, Y.; Machida, A.; Nishida, K.; Shibazaki, Y.; Higo, Y.; Kondo, T.

    2016-12-01

    Elastic properties, such as sound velocity and density, of liquid Fe-alloys at high pressure are important for identifying light elements in the cores of terrestrial planets by comparing with geophysical observations. In this study, we have measured sound velocity and density of liquid Fe-Ni-S simultaneously using multianvil apparatus and studied the effects of pressure and sulfur content on these properties. Sound velocity and density were measured using ultrasonic pulse-echo method and X-ray absorption method, respectively. Addition of sulfur significantly reduced the sound velocity and density. Measured sound velocity of liquid Fe-Ni-S is consistent with the reported sound velocity at 15 GPa obtained from ab initio calculation (Umemoto et al. 2014). Bulk modulus and its pressure derivatives of liquid Fe-Ni-S were precisely determined from the present sound velocity and density data. Based on these results, implication of Fe-Ni-S core of the terrestrial planets will be discussed.

  9. The influence of slip velocity and temperature on permeability during and after high-velocity fault slip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanikawa, W.; Mukoyoshi, H.; Tadai, O.; Hirose, T.; Lin, W.

    2011-12-01

    Fluid transport properties in fault zones play an important role in dynamic processes during large earthquakes. If the permeability in a fault zone is low, high pore-fluid pressures caused by thermal pressurization (Sibson, 1973) or shear-induced compaction (Blanpied et al., 1992) can lead to an apparent reduction of fault strength. Changes in porosity and permeability of fault rocks within a fault zone during earthquakes and the subsequent progressive recovery of these properties may have a large influence on earthquake recurrence (Sleep and Blanpied, 1992). A rotary shear apparatus was used to investigate changes of fluid transport properties in a fault zone by real-time measurement of gas flow rates during and after shearing of hollow sandstone and granite cylinders at various slip rates. Our apparatus measures permeability parallel to the slip plane in both the slip zone and wall rocks. In all cases, permeability decreased rapidly with an increase of friction, but recovered soon after slip, reaching a steady state within several tens of minutes. The rate of reduction of permeability increased with increasing slip velocity. Permeability did not recover to pre-slip levels after low-velocity tests but recovered to exceed them after high-velocity tests. Frictional heating of gases at the slip surface increased gas viscosity, which increased gas flow rate to produce an apparent permeability increase. The irreversible permeability changes of the low-velocity tests were caused by gouge formation due to wearing and smoothing of the slip surface. The increase of permeability after high-velocity tests was caused by mesoscale fracturing in response to rapid temperature rise. Changes of pore fluid viscosity contributed more to changes of flow rate than did permeability changes caused by shear deformation, although test results from different rocks and pore fluids might be different. References Blanpied, M.L., Lockner, D.A., Byerlee, J.D., 1992. An earthquake mechanism

  10. Mechanical factors associated with the development of high ball velocity during an instep soccer kick.

    PubMed

    De Witt, John K; Hinrichs, Richard N

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether joint velocities and segmental angular velocities are significantly correlated with ball velocity during an instep soccer kick. We developed a deterministic model that related ball velocity to kicking leg and pelvis motion from the initiation of downswing until impact. Three-dimensional videography was used to collect data from 16 experienced male soccer players (age = 24.8 +/- 5.5 years; height = 1.80 +/- 0.07m; mass = 76.73 +/- 8.31 kg) while kicking a stationary soccer ball into a goal 12 m away with their right foot with maximal effort. We found that impact velocities of the foot center of mass (CM), the impact velocity of the foot CM relative to the knee, peak velocity of the knee relative to the hip, and the peak angular thigh velocity were significantly correlated with ball velocity. These data suggest that linear and angular velocities at and prior to impact are critical to developing high ball velocity. Since events prior to impact are critical for kick success, coordination and summation of speeds throughout the kicking motion are important factors. Segmental coordination that occurs during a maximal effort kick is critical for completing a successful kick.

  11. Turbulence velocity profiling for high sensitivity and vertical-resolution atmospheric characterization with Stereo-SCIDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osborn, J.; Butterley, T.; Townson, M. J.; Reeves, A. P.; Morris, T. J.; Wilson, R. W.

    2017-02-01

    As telescopes become larger, into the era of ˜40 m Extremely Large Telescopes, the high-resolution vertical profile of the optical turbulence strength is critical for the validation, optimization and operation of optical systems. The velocity of atmospheric optical turbulence is an important parameter for several applications including astronomical adaptive optics systems. Here, we compare the vertical profile of the velocity of the atmospheric wind above La Palma by means of a comparison of Stereo-SCIntillation Detection And Ranging (Stereo-SCIDAR) with the Global Forecast System models and nearby balloon-borne radiosondes. We use these data to validate the automated optical turbulence velocity identification from the Stereo-SCIDAR instrument mounted on the 2.5 m Isaac Newton Telescope, La Palma. By comparing these data we infer that the turbulence velocity and the wind velocity are consistent and that the automated turbulence velocity identification of the Stereo-SCIDAR is precise. The turbulence velocities can be used to increase the sensitivity of the turbulence strength profiles, as weaker turbulence that may be misinterpreted as noise can be detected with a velocity vector. The turbulence velocities can also be used to increase the altitude resolution of a detected layer, as the altitude of the velocity vectors can be identified to a greater precision than the native resolution of the system. We also show examples of complex velocity structure within a turbulent layer caused by wind shear at the interface of atmospheric zones.

  12. Are High Velocity Peaks in the Milky Way Bulge due to the Bar?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhao-Yu; Shen, Juntai; Rich, R. Michael; Kunder, Andrea; Mao, Shude

    2014-04-01

    Recently the commissioning APOGEE observations of the Galactic bulge reported that a significant fraction of stars (~10%) are in a cold (σV ≈ 30 km s-1) high velocity peak (Galactocentric radial velocity ≈200 km s-1). These stars are speculated to reflect the stellar orbits in the Galactic bar. In this study, we use two N-body models of a Milky Way-like disk galaxy with different bar strengths to critically examine this possibility. The general trends of the Galactocentric radial velocity distribution in observations and simulations are similar, but neither our models nor the BRAVA data reveal a statistically significant cold high velocity peak. A Monte Carlo test further suggests that it is possible for a spurious high velocity peak to appear if there are only a limited number of stars observed. Thus, the reported cold high velocity peak, even if it is real, is unlikely due to stars on the bar-supporting orbits. Our models do predict an excess of stars with high radial velocity, but not in a distinct peak. In the distance-velocity diagram, the high velocity particles in different fields exist at a similar distance ~8.5 ± 1 kpc away from the Sun. This result may be explained by geometric intersections between the line-of-sight and the particle orbits; high velocity stars naturally exist approximately at the tangent point, without constituting a distinct peak. We further demonstrate that even without the presence of a bar structure, particle motions in an axisymmetric disk can also exhibit an excess of high velocity stars.

  13. ARE HIGH VELOCITY PEAKS IN THE MILKY WAY BULGE DUE TO THE BAR?

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zhao-Yu; Shen, Juntai; Rich, R. Michael; Kunder, Andrea; Mao, Shude

    2014-04-10

    Recently the commissioning APOGEE observations of the Galactic bulge reported that a significant fraction of stars (∼10%) are in a cold (σ{sub V} ≈ 30 km s{sup –1}) high velocity peak (Galactocentric radial velocity ≈200 km s{sup –1}). These stars are speculated to reflect the stellar orbits in the Galactic bar. In this study, we use two N-body models of a Milky Way-like disk galaxy with different bar strengths to critically examine this possibility. The general trends of the Galactocentric radial velocity distribution in observations and simulations are similar, but neither our models nor the BRAVA data reveal a statistically significant cold high velocity peak. A Monte Carlo test further suggests that it is possible for a spurious high velocity peak to appear if there are only a limited number of stars observed. Thus, the reported cold high velocity peak, even if it is real, is unlikely due to stars on the bar-supporting orbits. Our models do predict an excess of stars with high radial velocity, but not in a distinct peak. In the distance-velocity diagram, the high velocity particles in different fields exist at a similar distance ∼8.5 ± 1 kpc away from the Sun. This result may be explained by geometric intersections between the line-of-sight and the particle orbits; high velocity stars naturally exist approximately at the tangent point, without constituting a distinct peak. We further demonstrate that even without the presence of a bar structure, particle motions in an axisymmetric disk can also exhibit an excess of high velocity stars.

  14. CRC Volatility Program on the Effect of Oxygenated Fuels and Altitude on Cold-Start Drivability at Low Ambient Temperatures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-01-01

    t CRC eport No. 569 CRC VOLATILITY PROGRAM ON THE EFFECT OF OXYGENATED FUELS AND ALTITUDE ON COLD-START DRIVEABILITY AT LOW AMBIENT TEMPERATURES...Research Committee of the Coordinating Research Council, Inc. ABSTRACT The 1988 CRC driveability program investigated the effects of altitude and fuel...and gasoline-MTBE blends. The altitude change between the two sites was found to have no statistically significant effect on driveability for the

  15. On the Relation between Circular Velocity and Central Velocity Dispersion in High and Low Surface Brightness Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pizzella, A.; Corsini, E. M.; Dalla Bontà, E.; Sarzi, M.; Coccato, L.; Bertola, F.

    2005-10-01

    In order to investigate the correlation between the circular velocity Vc and the central velocity dispersion of the spheroidal component σc, we analyzed these quantities for a sample of 40 high surface brightness (HSB) disk galaxies, eight giant low surface brightness (LSB) spiral galaxies, and 24 elliptical galaxies characterized by flat rotation curves. Galaxies have been selected to have a velocity gradient <=2 km s-1 kpc-1 for R>=0.35R25. We used these data to better define the previous Vc-σc correlation for spiral galaxies (which turned out to be HSB) and elliptical galaxies, especially at the lower end of the σc values. We find that the Vc-σc relation is described by a linear law out to velocity dispersions as low as σc~50 km s-1, while in previous works a power law was adopted for galaxies with σc>80 km s-1. Elliptical galaxies with Vc based on dynamical models or directly derived from the H I rotation curves follow the same relation as the HSB galaxies in the Vc-σc plane. On the other hand, the LSB galaxies follow a different relation, since most of them show either higher Vc or lower σc with respect to the HSB galaxies. This argues against the relevance of baryon collapse to the radial density profile of the dark matter halos of LSB galaxies. Moreover, if the Vc-σc relation is equivalent to one between the mass of the dark matter halo and that of the supermassive black hole, then these results suggest that the LSB galaxies host a supermassive black hole (SMBH) with a smaller mass compared to HSB galaxies with an equal dark matter halo. On the other hand, if the fundamental correlation of SMBH mass is with the halo circular velocity, then LSB galaxies should have larger black hole masses for a given bulge dispersion. Elliptical galaxies with Vc derived from H I data and LSB galaxies were not considered in previous studies. Based on observations made with European Southern Observatory telescopes at the Paranal Observatory under programs 67.B-0283

  16. Isolation of ATP from a yeast fermentation broth using a cryogel column at high flow velocities.

    PubMed

    Yan, Chen; Shen, Shaochuan; Yun, Junxian; Wang, Lianghua; Yao, Kejian; Yao, Shan-Jing

    2008-12-01

    This communication presents an effective method for isolating adenosine triphosphate (ATP) from a yeast fermentation broth using an anion-exchange supermacroporous cryogel column at high flow velocities. The breakthrough and elution behaviors of pure ATP in the cryogel bed were investigated at flow velocities of 2, 5, and 10 cm/min and the ATP binding capacities were determined. Then the ATP-containing yeast fermentation broth was employed as the test feedstock and various chromatographic runs were conducted to isolate ATP by the cryogel at different high flow velocities. The ATP samples obtained were analyzed quantitatively by HPLC. The results showed that even at a flow velocity of 5 or 10 cm/min, a product purity of 97.4 or 98.0% can be achieved, illustrating the potential of the present method for separation of high-purity ATP directly from fermentation feedstock at high flow velocities.

  17. Hohlraum Designs for High Velocity Implosions on NIF

    SciTech Connect

    Meezan, N B; Hicks, D G; Callahan, D A; Olson, R E; Schneider, M S; Thomas, C A; Robey, H F; Celliers, P M; Kline, J K; Dixit, S N; Michel, P A; Jones, O S; Clark, D S; Ralph, J E; Doeppner, T; MacKinnon, A J; Haan, S W; Landen, O L; Glenzer, S H; Suter, L J; Edwards, M J; Macgowan, B J; Lindl, J D; Atherton, L J

    2011-10-19

    In this paper, we compare experimental shock and capsule trajectories to design calculations using the radiation-hydrodynamics code HYDRA. The measured trajectories from surrogate ignition targets are consistent with reducing the x-ray flux on the capsule by about 85%. A new method of extracting the radiation temperature as seen by the capsule from x-ray intensity and image data shows that about half of the apparent 15% flux deficit in the data with respect to the simulations can be explained by HYDRA overestimating the x-ray flux on the capsule. The National Ignition Campaign (NIC) point-design target is designed to reach a peak fuel-layer velocity of 370 km/s by ablating 90% of its plastic (CH) ablator. The 192-beam National Ignition Facility laser drives a gold hohlraum to a radiation temperature (T{sub RAD}) of 300 eV with a 20 ns-long, 420 TW, 1.3 MJ laser pulse. The hohlraum x-rays couple to the CH ablator in order to apply the required pressure to the outside of the capsule. In this paper, we compare experimental measurements of the hohlraum T{sub RAD} and the implosion trajectory with design calculations using the code hydra. The measured radial positions of the leading shock wave and the unablated shell are consistent with simulations in which the x-ray flux on the capsule is artificially reduced by 85%. We describe a new method of inferring the T{sub RAD} seen by the capsule from time-dependent x-ray intensity data and static x-ray images. This analysis shows that hydra overestimates the x-ray flux incident on the capsule by {approx}8%.

  18. Trigonometric parallaxes of high velocity halo white dwarf candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ducourant, C.; Teixeira, R.; Hambly, N. C.; Oppenheimer, B. R.; Hawkins, M. R. S.; Rapaport, M.; Modolo, J.; Lecampion, J. F.

    2007-07-01

    Context: The status of 38 halo white dwarf candidates identified by Oppenheimer et al. (2001, Science, 292, 698) has been intensively discussed by various authors. In analyses undertaken to date, trigonometric parallaxes are crucial missing data. Distance measurements are mandatory to kinematically segregate halo object from disk objects and hence enable a more reliable estimate of the local density of halo dark matter residing in such objects. Aims: We present trigonometric parallax measurements for 15 candidate halo white dwarfs (WDs) selected from the Oppenheimer et al. (2001) list. Methods: We observed the stars using the ESO 1.56-m Danish Telescope and ESO 2.2-m telescope from August 2001 to July 2004. Results: Parallaxes with accuracies of 1-2 mas were determined yielding relative errors on distances of ~5% for 6 objects, ~12% for 3 objects, and ~20% for two more objects. Four stars appear to be too distant (probably farther than 100 pc) to have measurable parallaxes in our observations. Conclusions: Distances, absolute magnitudes and revised space velocities were derived for the 15 halo WDs from the Oppenheimer et al. (2001) list. Halo membership is confirmed unambiguously for 6 objects while 5 objects may be thick disk members and 4 objects are too distant to draw any conclusion based solely on kinematics. Comparing our trigonometric parallaxes with photometric parallaxes used in previous work reveals an overestimation of distance as derived from photometric techniques. This new data set can be used to revise the halo white dwarf space density, and that analysis will be presented in a subsequent publication. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Chile (067.D-0107, 069.D-0054, 070.D-0028, 071.D-0005, 072.D-0153, 073.D-0028).

  19. Role of group and phase velocity in high-energy neutrino observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, P. B.; Woschnagg, K.

    2001-03-01

    Kuzmichev recently showed that use of phase velocity rather than group velocity for Cherenkov light signals and pulses from calibration lasers in high-energy neutrino telescopes leads to errors in track reconstruction and distance measurement. We amplify on his remarks and show that errors for four cases of interest to AMANDA, IceCube, and radio Cherenkov detector are negligibly small.

  20. High-velocity, high-excitation neutral carbon in a cloud in the Vela supernova remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, Edward B.; Wallerstein, George

    1995-01-01

    HD 72089 is situated behind the Vela supernova remnant, and the interstellar absorption lines in the spectrum of this star are remarkable for two reasons. First, there are six distinct velocity components that span the (heliocentric) velocity range -60 to +121 km/s in the lines of Na I and Ca II. Second, two of the components at high velocity, one at +85 km/s and another at +121.5 km/s, have densities that are large enough to produce observable lines from neutral carbon. The gas moving at +121.5 km/s has such a large pressure that the excited fine-structure levels of the ground electronic state of C I are collisionally populated nearly in proportion to their level degeneracies. This high-velocity gas exhibits unusually low column densities of Mg I and Na I, compared to that of C I. We propose that the +121.5 km/s component represents gas that has cooled and recombined in a zone that follows a shock driven into a cloud by the very recent passage of a supernova blast wave. A representative preshock density of n(sub H) approximately = 13/cc and velocity v(sub s) = 100 km/s is indicated by the strength of diffuse (O III) emission lines seen in directions very near HD 72089. The strong collisional population of excited C I and apparent absence of excited levels of O I give a most favorable fit to the conditions 1000 less than n(sub H) less than 2900/cc over a temperature range 300 less than T less than 1000 K. The fact that the compression is not substantially more than this indicates that the preshock gas may have had an embedded, transverse magnetic field with a strength B greater than or approximately = 1 micro-G. The large dynamical pressure of the supernova blast wave that would be needed to create the cloud shock that we describe implies that the energy of the supernova was 8 x 10(exp 51) ergs, if the Vela remnant is 500 pc away. We can bring this value much closer to typical supernova energies E less than or approximately = 10(exp 51) ergs if the distance to the

  1. High-velocity, high-excitation neutral carbon in a cloud in the Vela supernova remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, Edward B.; Wallerstein, George

    1995-01-01

    HD 72089 is situated behind the Vela supernova remnant, and the interstellar absorption lines in the spectrum of this star are remarkable for two reasons. First, there are six distinct velocity components that span the (heliocentric) velocity range -60 to +121 km/s in the lines of Na I and Ca II. Second, two of the components at high velocity, one at +85 km/s and another at +121.5 km/s, have densities that are large enough to produce observable lines from neutral carbon. The gas moving at +121.5 km/s has such a large pressure that the excited fine-structure levels of the ground electronic state of C I are collisionally populated nearly in proportion to their level degeneracies. This high-velocity gas exhibits unusually low column densities of Mg I and Na I, compared to that of C I. We propose that the +121.5 km/s component represents gas that has cooled and recombined in a zone that follows a shock driven into a cloud by the very recent passage of a supernova blast wave. A representative preshock density of n(sub H) approximately = 13/cc and velocity v(sub s) = 100 km/s is indicated by the strength of diffuse (O III) emission lines seen in directions very near HD 72089. The strong collisional population of excited C I and apparent absence of excited levels of O I give a most favorable fit to the conditions 1000 less than n(sub H) less than 2900/cc over a temperature range 300 less than T less than 1000 K. The fact that the compression is not substantially more than this indicates that the preshock gas may have had an embedded, transverse magnetic field with a strength B greater than or approximately = 1 micro-G. The large dynamical pressure of the supernova blast wave that would be needed to create the cloud shock that we describe implies that the energy of the supernova was 8 x 10(exp 51) ergs, if the Vela remnant is 500 pc away. We can bring this value much closer to typical supernova energies E less than or approximately = 10(exp 51) ergs if the distance to the

  2. High spatial range velocity measurements in a high Reynolds number turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Silva, C. M.; Gnanamanickam, E. P.; Atkinson, C.; Buchmann, N. A.; Hutchins, N.; Soria, J.; Marusic, I.

    2014-02-01

    Here, we detail and analyse a multi-resolution particle image velocity measurement that resolves the wide range of scales prevalent in a zero pressure gradient turbulent boundary layer at high Reynolds numbers (up to Reτ ≈ 20 000). A unique configuration is utilised, where an array of eight high resolution cameras at two magnification levels are used simultaneously to obtain a large field of view, while still resolving the smaller scales prevalent in the flow. Additionally, a highly magnified field of view targeted at the near wall region is employed to capture the viscous sublayer and logarithmic region, with a spatial resolution of a few viscous length scales. Flow statistics from these measurements show good agreement with prior, well resolved hot-wire anemometry measurements. Analysis shows that the instantaneous wall shear stress can be reliably computed, which is historically known to be challenging in boundary layers. A statistical assessment of the wall shear stress shows good agreement with existing correlations, prior experimental and direct numerical simulation data, extending this view to much higher Reynolds numbers. Furthermore, conditional analysis using multiple magnification levels is detailed, to study near-wall events associated with high skin friction fluctuations and their associated overlaying structures in the log region. Results definitively show that the passage of very large-scale positive (or negative) velocity fluctuations are associated with increased (or reduced) small-scale variance in wall shear stress fluctuations.

  3. Observations of CO J = 2 - 1 and 3 - 2 Lines Toward Extremely High Velocity Outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, M.

    1996-12-01

    The author observed CO J = 2→1 and J = 3→2 lines toward several star formation regions with extremely high velocity (EHV) outflows: W3 IRS5, W28 A2, GL2591, S140, and Cepheus A. The full width of the wings are 90 - 235 km s-1. Some wings show a clear break of the slope in the line profile implying that the nature of the EHV outflow is different from that of the high velocity outflow. He suggests that the EHV CO wing emission is tracing CO molecules in the stellar wind or jet which drives the high velocity outflow.

  4. Experimental study of the development and structure of high-velocity liquid jets in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baev, V. K.; Bazhaikin, A. N.; Buzukov, A. A.; Timoshenko, B. P.; Bichenko, E. I.

    The dynamics of unsteady high-velocity liquid jets injected into air were studied by methods of high-speed cinematography, roentgenography, microphotography using pulsed lasers, and pulsed X-rays. It has been shown that in a jet with a positive longitudinal velocity gradient, a hydrodynamical instability develops, resulting in the appearance of density inhomogeneity. The concentration of liquid components along the jet differs by an order of magnitude. The compression and rarefaction waves affecting the jet structure and the flow pattern at its different sections may propagate along the jet. A cumulative type flow develops at the head of the high-velocity jet in a gaseous medium.

  5. Acoustic and streaming velocity components in a resonant waveguide at high acoustic levels.

    PubMed

    Daru, Virginie; Reyt, Ida; Bailliet, Hélène; Weisman, Catherine; Baltean-Carlès, Diana

    2017-01-01

    Rayleigh streaming is a steady flow generated by the interaction between an acoustic wave and a solid wall, generally assumed to be second order in a Mach number expansion. Acoustic streaming is well known in the case of a stationary plane wave at low amplitude: it has a half-wavelength spatial periodicity and the maximum axial streaming velocity is a quadratic function of the acoustic velocity amplitude at antinode. For higher acoustic levels, additional streaming cells have been observed. Results of laser Doppler velocimetry measurements are here compared to direct numerical simulations. The evolution of axial and radial velocity components for both acoustic and streaming velocities is studied from low to high acoustic amplitudes. Two streaming flow regimes are pointed out, the axial streaming dependency on acoustics going from quadratic to linear. The evolution of streaming flow is different for outer cells and for inner cells. Also, the hypothesis of radial streaming velocity being of second order in a Mach number expansion, is not valid at high amplitudes. The change of regime occurs when the radial streaming velocity amplitude becomes larger than the radial acoustic velocity amplitude, high levels being therefore characterized by nonlinear interaction of the different velocity components.

  6. High-Velocity Quadriceps Exercises Compared to Slow-Velocity Quadriceps Exercises Following Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Randomized Clinical Study.

    PubMed

    Doerfler, Deborah; Gurney, Burke; Mermier, Christine; Rauh, Mitchell; Black, Liza; Andrews, Ron

    2016-01-01

    Despite improvement in pain and perceived function in older adults following total knee arthroplasty (TKA), objective outcome measures of muscular impairment and ambulatory function demonstrate significant deficits. Evidence suggests that quadriceps power may play a greater role in ambulatory function than measures of strength alone following TKA. The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of high-velocity (HV) quadriceps exercises with that of slow-velocity (SV) quadriceps exercises on functional outcomes and quadriceps power following TKA. This study was a randomized clinical study conducted in an outpatient physical therapy clinic. Twenty-one participants who were 4 to 6 weeks post unilateral TKA were randomly assigned to an HV or SV group. Participants performed an evidence-based standardized progressive resistance exercise program in addition to HV quadriceps exercises or SV quadriceps exercises. Participants attended 2 sessions per week for 8 weeks. Before and after the 8-week exercise intervention, participants completed a functional questionnaire, health survey, functional testing, and underwent quadriceps strength and power testing. Both groups demonstrated improvements in ambulatory outcome measures, strength, speed, and power. The HV group demonstrated significantly greater improvements in distance walked and quadriceps strength than the SV group. These data should be considered preliminary because of a small sample size. HV quadriceps exercises may be an effective rehabilitation strategy in conjunction with a standardized progressive resistance exercise program beginning 4 to 6 weeks after TKA.

  7. Transport dynamics of a high-power-density matrix-type hydrogen-oxygen fuel cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prokopius, P. R.; Hagedorn, N. H.

    1974-01-01

    Experimental transport dynamics tests were made on a space power fuel cell of current design. Various operating transients were introduced and transport-related response data were recorded with fluidic humidity sensing instruments. Also, sampled data techniques were developed for measuring the cathode-side electrolyte concentration during transient operation.

  8. A laboratory study of friction-velocity estimates from scatterometry - Low and high regimes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bliven, L. F.; Giovanangeli, J.-P.; Wanninkhof, R. H.; Chapron, B.

    1993-01-01

    Measurements from scatterometers pointing at wind-waves in three large wave tanks are examined to study fetch effects and the correlation with wind friction velocity. Time-series measurements were made at 13, 35, and 95 m with a Ka-band scatterometer aimed upwind at 30 deg incidence angle and vertical polarization. Average normalized radar cross-section (sigma-0) values from all fetches follow a common trend for sigma-0 as a function of wind friction velocity, so the fetch dependence is negligible. An empirical power-law model yields a high correlation between sigma-0 and wind friction velocity, but, because systematic anomalies arise, we reexamine a turbulence approach that delineates low and high regimes with a transition at a wind friction velocity of approximately 25 cm/s. Using this criteria, the data are well represented by a two-section power-law relationship between sigma-0 and wind friction velocity.

  9. Inflow velocities of cold flows streaming into massive galaxies at high redshifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goerdt, Tobias; Ceverino, Daniel

    2015-07-01

    We study the velocities of the accretion along streams from the cosmic web into massive galaxies at high redshift with the help of three different suites of AMR hydrodynamical cosmological simulations. The results are compared to free-fall velocities and to the sound speeds of the hot ambient medium. The sound speed of the hot ambient medium is calculated using two different methods to determine the medium's temperature. We find that the simulated cold stream velocities are in violent disagreement with the corresponding free-fall profiles. The sound speed is a better albeit not always correct description of the cold flows' velocity. Using these calculations as a first order approximation for the gas inflow velocities vinflow = 0.9 vvir is given. We conclude from the hydrodynamical simulations as our main result that the velocity profiles for the cold streams are constant with radius. These constant inflow velocities seem to have a `parabola-like' dependency on the host halo mass in units of the virial velocity that peaks at Mvir = 1012 M⊙ and we also propose that the best-fitting functional form for the dependency of the inflow velocity on the redshift is a square root power-law relation: v_inflow ∝ √{z + 1} v_vir.

  10. Rheology of serpentinite in high-temperature and low-slip-velocity regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, M.; Uehara, S.; Mizoguchi, K.; Takeda, N.; Masuda, K.

    2009-12-01

    This study was designed to clarify the rheology of serpentinite experimentally, related both the sliding velocity and the temperature. The frictional behavior of serpentinite is of particular interest in the study of earthquake generation processes along subducting plates and transform faults. Previous studies [Reinen et al., 1991-93] revealed that the serpentinites indicated two-mechanical behaviors at velocity-step test: ‘state-variable dominated behavior’ at relatively higher velocity (0.1-10 μm/sec) and ‘flow-dominated behavior’ at lower velocity (less than 0.1 μm/sec). Such complexity on the frictional behavior could make it complicated to forecast on the slip acceleration process from the plate motion velocity to the earthquake. Even under the room-temperature condition, those multiple behavior could be observed, thus, serpentinite can be a model substance to present a new constitutive law at the brittle-ductile transition regime. We, therefore, focus to discuss the transient behaviors of serpentinite at the velocity-step test. We used a gas-medium, high-pressure, and high-temperature triaxial testing machine belonging to the National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Japan. Sliding deformation was applied on the thin zone of the serpentinite gouge (1.0 g of almost pure antigorite powder) sandwiched between two alumina blocks with oblique surfaces at 30° to the axis. All experiments were carried out under a set of constant conditions, 100 MPa of the confining pressure (Ar-gas) and 30 MPa of the pore pressure (distilled water). The temperature conditions were varied from the room-temperature to 500° C, and three sliding velocity-regimes were adopted: low (0.0115 - 0.115 μm/sec), middle (0.115 - 1.15 μm/sec) and high (1.15 - 11.5 μm/sec) velocity regimes. In each velocity regime, the sliding velocity was increased or decreased in a stepwise fashion, and then we observed the transient behaviors until it reached the

  11. APPARATUS FOR PRODUCING HIGH VELOCITY SHOCK WAVES IN GASES

    DOEpatents

    Scott, F.R.; Josephson, V.

    1960-02-01

    >A device for producing a high-energy ionized gas region comprises an evacuated tapered insulating vessel and a substantially hemispherical insulating cap hermetically affixed to the large end of the vessel, an annular electrode having a diameter equal to and supported in the interior wall of the vessel at the large end and having a conductive portion inside the vessel, a second electrode supported at the small end of the vessel, means connected to the vessel for introducing a selected gas therein, a source of high potential having two poles. means for connecting one pole of the high potential source to the annular electrode, and means for connecting the other pole of the potential source to the second electrode.

  12. Unique charge distribution in surface loops confers high velocity on the fast motor protein Chara myosin.

    PubMed

    Ito, Kohji; Yamaguchi, Yukie; Yanase, Kenji; Ichikawa, Yousuke; Yamamoto, Keiichi

    2009-12-22

    Most myosins have a positively charged loop 2 with a cluster of lysine residues that bind to the negatively charged N-terminal segment of actin. However, the net charge of loop 2 of very fast Chara myosin is zero and there is no lysine cluster in it. In contrast, Chara myosin has a highly positively charged loop 3. To elucidate the role of these unique surface loops of Chara myosin in its high velocity and high actin-activated ATPase activity, we have undertaken mutational analysis using recombinant Chara myosin motor domain. It was found that net positive charge in loop 3 affected V(max) and K(app) of actin activated ATPase activity, while it affected the velocity only slightly. The net positive charge in loop 2 affected K(app) and the velocity, although it did not affect V(max). Our results suggested that Chara myosin has evolved to have highly positively charged loop 3 for its high ATPase activity and have less positively charged loop 2 for its high velocity. Since high positive charge in loop 3 and low positive charge in loop 2 seem to be one of the reasons for Chara myosin's high velocity, we manipulated charge contents in loops 2 and 3 of Dictyostelium myosin (class II). Removing positive charge from loop 2 and adding positive charge to loop 3 of Dictyostelium myosin made its velocity higher than that of the wild type, suggesting that the charge strategy in loops 2 and 3 is widely applicable.

  13. High-Velocity Estimates for the Scattering Operator and Aharonov-Bohm Effect in Three Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballesteros, Miguel; Weder, Ricardo

    2009-01-01

    We obtain high-velocity estimates with error bounds for the scattering operator of the Schrödinger equation in three dimensions with electromagnetic potentials in the exterior of bounded obstacles that are handlebodies. A particular case is a finite number of tori. We prove our results with time-dependent methods. We consider high-velocity estimates where the direction of the velocity of the incoming electrons is kept fixed as its absolute value goes to infinity. In the case of one torus our results give a rigorous proof that quantum mechanics predicts the interference patterns observed in the fundamental experiments of Tonomura et al. that gave conclusive evidence of the existence of the Aharonov-Bohm effect using a toroidal magnet. We give a method for the reconstruction of the flux of the magnetic field over a cross-section of the torus modulo 2π. Equivalently, we determine modulo 2π the difference in phase for two electrons that travel to infinity, when one goes inside the hole and the other outside it. For this purpose we only need the high-velocity limit of the scattering operator for one direction of the velocity of the incoming electrons. When there are several tori-or more generally handlebodies-the information that we obtain in the fluxes, and on the difference of phases, depends on the relative position of the tori and on the direction of the velocities when we take the high-velocity limit of the incoming electrons. For some locations of the tori we can determine all the fluxes modulo 2π by taking the high-velocity limit in only one direction. We also give a method for the unique reconstruction of the electric potential and the magnetic field outside the handlebodies from the high-velocity limit of the scattering operator.

  14. Ultra Low Velocity Zone existence in the high shear velocity region beneath Cocos Plate, Central America, and the Caribbean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, S.; Garnero, E.; Shim, S. H. D.; Zhao, C.

    2014-12-01

    The lowermost mantle beneath subduction is typically characterized by higher than average shear wave speeds, often with the presence of one or more D" discontinuities. These regions are considered the cooler parts of the convective cycle, in contrast to warmer zones of convective return flow, namely, the vicinity of large low shear velocity provinces (LLSVPs). Ultra-low velocity zones (ULVZs) have been long characterized as related to elevated temperature (and/or chemistry) of LLSVP regions. However, some past work has suggested evidence for ULVZ in the presumed cooler regions. In this study we investigate the region beneath the Cocos Plate, Central America, and the Carribbean for ULVZ using high quality broadband Transportable Array data from EarthScope's USArray for the presence of ULVZs. We utilize an ScS-stripping technique that combines a precursor and postcursor to ScS that arise from ULVZ structure, if present. The precursor is a reflection off the top of the ULVZ, while the postcursor is a core-reflection with an added reverberation between the ULVZ top and the core-mantle boundary (CMB). We collected data from deep South American earthquakes recorded in North America and stack data in geographic bins. We find clear evidence for a ULVZ beneath the Gulf of Mexico, but the rest of the study area appears to lack any significant structure. The structure we find is of the order of 100 km wide. The ULVZ properties will be constrained by comparison to predictions from synthetic seismograms. We explore hypotheses for the origin of a ULVZ in a high shear velocity region. These include mineralogical heterogeneities that convective currents have collected; notable possibilities are accumulated melts from subducted materials, such as ocean crust basalts and banded-iron formation. If water can be transported by subducted slabs to the deep mantle, it can significantly decrease the melting temperature of mantle materials and cause such anomalies. A ULVZ a relatively cold

  15. Dark Solitons in High Velocity Waveguide Polariton Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, P. M.; Tinkler, L.; Royall, B.; Skryabin, D. V.; Farrer, I.; Ritchie, D. A.; Skolnick, M. S.; Krizhanovskii, D. N.

    2017-09-01

    We study exciton-polariton nonlinear optical fluids in the high momentum waveguide regime for the first time. We demonstrate the formation of dark solitons with the expected dependence of width on fluid density for both main classes of soliton-forming fluid defects. The results are well described by numerical modeling of the fluid propagation. We deduce a continuous wave nonlinearity more than ten times that on picosecond time scales, arising due to interaction with the exciton reservoir.

  16. Dark Solitons in High Velocity Waveguide Polariton Fluids.

    PubMed

    Walker, P M; Tinkler, L; Royall, B; Skryabin, D V; Farrer, I; Ritchie, D A; Skolnick, M S; Krizhanovskii, D N

    2017-09-01

    We study exciton-polariton nonlinear optical fluids in the high momentum waveguide regime for the first time. We demonstrate the formation of dark solitons with the expected dependence of width on fluid density for both main classes of soliton-forming fluid defects. The results are well described by numerical modeling of the fluid propagation. We deduce a continuous wave nonlinearity more than ten times that on picosecond time scales, arising due to interaction with the exciton reservoir.

  17. The Location of Extremely High Velocity HCO+ in the HH 7-11 Outflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehringer, David M.

    1996-04-01

    In order to determine the location of extremely high velocity HCO+ emission in the HH 7-11 outflow, BIMA array observations of the J=1-0 transition with 11" by 8.9" angular resolution were carried out. Two spatially unresolved clumps with average velocities ~ 40 km/s blueward of the ambient material are detected. The two clumps are projected < 4" (1400 AU) and 25" (8800 AU) from SVS 13, the IR source which drives the outflow. EHV redshifted material is also observed, although it is not as easily separated from lower velocity material. No high velocity HCO+ emission is observed toward the HH objects. The position of high-velocity HCO+ emission relative to the exciting source in this region is similar to that observed in the L1551:IRS 5 outflow (Rudolph 1992). This similarity suggests that, as in the case of L1551:IRS 5, the high-velocity molecular material in the HH 7-11 outflow may have been entrained in the neutral atomic wind of SVS 13 as it passed through the surrounding cloud. In addition, lower velocity HCO+ J=1-0 emission traces a curved structure near HH 7, the most distant HH object from SVS 13. The symmetry axis of the curved structure is nearly coincident with the HH object outflow/jet axis, suggesting that the SVS 13 wind/jet is responsible for sweeping up molecular material which forms the curved structure.

  18. The Location of Extremely High Velocity HCO + in the HH 7-11 Outflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehringer, David M.

    1996-05-01

    In order to determine the location of extremely high velocity (EHV) HCO+ emission in the HH 7-11 outflow, BIMA observations of the j = 1 → 0 transition with 11" x 8."9 angular resolution were carried out. Two spatially unresolved clumps with average velocities 40 km s-1 blueward of the ambient material are detected. The two clumps are projected less than 4" (1400 AU) and 25" (8800 AU) from SVS 13, the IR source which drives the outflow. EHV redshifted material is also observed, although it is not as easily separated from lower velocity material. No high-velocity HCO+ emission is observed toward the HH objects. The position of high-velocity HCO+ emission relative to the exciting source in this region is similar to that observed in the L1551 IRS 5 outflow by Rudolph. This similarity suggests that, as in the case of L1551 IRS 5, the high-velocity molecular material in the HH 7-11 outflow may have been entrained in the neutral atomic wind of SVS 13 as it passed through the surrounding cloud. In addition, lower velocity HCO+ J = 1 → 0 emission traces a curved structure near HH 7, the most distant HH object from SVS 13. The symmetry axis of the curved structure is nearly coincident with the HH object outflow/jet axis, suggesting that the SVS 13 wind/jet is responsible for sweeping up molecular material that forms the curved structure.

  19. Temperature Dependence of Sound Velocity in High-Strength Fiber-Reinforced Plastics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, Ryuji; Yoneyama, Keiichi; Ogasawara, Futoshi; Ueno, Masashi; Okuda, Yuichi; Yamanaka, Atsuhiko

    2003-08-01

    Longitudinal sound velocity in unidirectional hybrid composites or high-strength fiber-reinforced plastics (FRPs) was measured along the fiber axis over a wide temperature range (from 77 K to 420 K). We investigated two kinds of high-strength crystalline polymer fibers, polyethylene (Dyneema) and polybenzobisoxazole (Zylon), which are known to have negative thermal expansion coefficients and high thermal conductivities along the fiber axis. Both FRPs had very high sound velocities of about 9000 m/s at low temperatures and their temperature dependences were very strong. Sound velocity monotonically decreased with increasing temperature. The temperature dependence of sound velocity was much stronger in Dyneema-FRP than in Zylon-FRP.

  20. Variables Affecting Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics Simulation of High-Velocity Flyer Plate Impact Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Somasundaram, Deepak S; Trabia, Mohamed; O'Toole, Brendan; Hixson, Robert S

    2014-01-23

    This paper describes our work to characterize the variables affecting the smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) method in the LS-DYNA package for simulating high-velocity flyer plate impact experiments. LS-DYNA simulations are compared with one-dimensional experimental data of an oxygen-free high-conductivity (OFHC) copper flyer plate impacting another plate of the same material. The comparison is made by measuring the velocity of a point on the back surface of the impact plate using the velocity interferometer system for any reflector (VISAR) technique.

  1. Search for auroral belt E-parallel fields with high-velocity barium ion injections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heppner, J. P.; Ledley, B. G.; Miller, M. L.; Marionni, P. A.; Pongratz, M. B.

    1989-01-01

    In April 1984, four high-velocity shaped-charge Ba(+) injections were conducted from two sounding rockets at 770-975 km over northern Alaska under conditions of active auroral and magnetic disturbance. Spatial ionization (brightness) profiles of high-velocity Ba(+) clouds from photometric scans following each release were found to be consistent with the 28-sec theoretical time constant for Ba photoionization determined by Carlsten (1975). These observations therefore revealed no evidence of anomalous fast ionization predicted by the Alfven critical velocity hypothesis.

  2. Radar measurements of very high velocity meteors with AMOR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, A. D.; Baggaley, W. J.; Bennett, R. G. T.; Steel, D. I.

    1994-02-01

    The Christchurch (New Zealand) meteor radar AMOR (Advanced Meteor Orbit Radar) has yielded about 1% of meteoroids having an atmospheric speed in excess of 100 km/s. This indicates an influx of particles that is well above the heliocentric parabolic limit for closed orbits. The evidence for these extremely high Earth-encounter speeds comes from meteor echo timing and ionization height characteristics. It is shown that aliasing association with a finite radar sampling rate imposes an upper limit on the atmospheric speeds avaliable from echo diffraction characteristics. The possibility of an interstellar source as evidenced by the heliocentric radiant distribution is discussed.

  3. MAGNETIC METHOD FOR PRODUCING HIGH VELOCITY SHOCK WAVES IN GASES

    DOEpatents

    Josephson, V.

    1960-01-26

    A device is described for producing high-energy plasmas comprising a tapered shock tube of dielectric material and having a closed small end, an exceedingly low-inductance coll supported about and axially aligned with the small end of the tapered tube. an elongated multiturn coil supported upon the remninder of the exterior wall of the shock tube. a potential source and switch connected in series with the low-inductance coil, a potential source and switch connected in series with the elongated coil, means for hermetically sealing the large end of the tube, means for purging the tube of gases, and means for admitting a selected gas into the shock tube.

  4. CELFE/NASTRAN Code for the Analysis of Structures Subjected to High Velocity Impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.

    1978-01-01

    CELFE (Coupled Eulerian Lagrangian Finite Element)/NASTRAN Code three-dimensional finite element code has the capability for analyzing of structures subjected to high velocity impact. The local response is predicted by CELFE and, for large problems, the far-field impact response is predicted by NASTRAN. The coupling of the CELFE code with NASTRAN (CELFE/NASTRAN code) and the application of the code to selected three-dimensional high velocity impact problems are described.

  5. An Approach for Measuring and Modeling of Plastic Deformation of Metallic Plates during High Velocity Impacts

    SciTech Connect

    O'Toole, Brendan J.; Trabia, Mohamed B.; Roy, Shawoon K.; Somasundarum, Deepak; Jennings, Richard; Matthes, Melissa; Hixson, Robert S.; Becker, Steven; Daykin, Edward P.; Pena, Michael T.; Machorro, Eric A.

    2014-05-29

    During high velocity impact experiments, projectile impact creates extreme pressure waves that results in a significant localized deformation within a short period of time. Experiments under these conditions require sophisticated data acquisition technique to better understand the materials deformation mechanisms. Since these experiments are expensive, it is also beneficial to develop accurate computational models that can predict this kind of deformation in high velocity impact events.

  6. A new correlation among high-velocity clouds in the galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silk, J.; Siluk, R. S.

    1973-01-01

    Search for correlations among the various parameters associated with the hydrogen gas in high-velocity clouds in the galaxy. The results obtained indicate that there may be some general trends, but in most cases it is difficult to assess the significance of the correlation because of the large amount of scatter. In one case, however, there appears to be a significant relationship that leads to an estimate of the distance to the high-velocity gas of about 600 pc.

  7. Disorder-induced domain wall velocity shift at high fields in perpendicularly magnetized thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voto, Michele; Lopez-Diaz, Luis; Torres, Luis; Moretti, Simone

    2016-11-01

    Domain wall dynamics in a perpendicularly magnetized system is studied by means of micromagnetic simulations in which disorder is introduced as a dispersion of both the easy-axis orientation and the anisotropy constant over regions reproducing a granular structure of the material. High field dynamics show a linear velocity-field relationship and an additional grain size dependent velocity shift, weakly dependent on both applied field and intrinsic Gilbert's damping parameter. We find the origin of this velocity shift in the nonhomogeneous in-plane effective field generated by the tilting of anisotropy easy axis introduced by disorder. We show that a one-dimensional analytical approach cannot predict the observed velocities and we augment it with the additional dissipation of energy arising from internal domain wall dynamics triggered by disorder. This way we prove that the main cause of higher velocity is the ability of the domain wall to irradiate energy into the domains, acquired with a precise feature of disorder.

  8. High Velocity Videoculography to Determination of the Pupil Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Villamar, Luis A.; Suaste, E.

    2008-08-11

    The characterization and determination of the dynamics pupillary in normal subjects, we can help to more accurately determine the behavior of the pupil; the videoculography is a tool that allows us to study the eye and especially the pupil to 30 frames per second in traditional form with the videoculography at high speed allows us to discuss our case in the pupil at 928 frames per second, this speed can determine with greater accuracy and precision dynamics eye, analyzing the movement pupillary each 1 ms approximately. This work shows the results of the capture and escape pupillary through this methodology, the results more accurately taking the capture of images between 5 and 7 ms about using a pulse with duration of 200 ms stimulation.

  9. High speed coding for velocity by archerfish retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Kretschmer, Viola; Kretschmer, Friedrich; Ahlers, Malte T; Ammermüller, Josef

    2012-06-18

    Archerfish show very short behavioural latencies in response to falling prey. This raises the question, which response parameters of retinal ganglion cells to moving stimuli are best suited for fast coding of stimulus speed and direction. We compared stimulus reconstruction quality based on the ganglion cell response parameters latency, first interspike interval, and rate. For stimulus reconstruction of moving stimuli using latency was superior to using the other stimulus parameters. This was true for absolute latency, with respect to stimulus onset, as well as for relative latency, with respect to population response onset. Iteratively increasing the number of cells used for reconstruction decreased the calculated error close to zero. Latency is the fastest response parameter available to the brain. Therefore, latency coding is best suited for high speed coding of moving objects. The quantitative data of this study are in good accordance with previously published behavioural response latencies.

  10. Moderate Velocity Ball Impact of a Mock High-Explosive

    SciTech Connect

    Furmanski, Jevan; Rae, Philip; Clements, Bradford E.

    2012-06-05

    Modeling of thermal and mechanical events in high-explosive materials is complicated by the composite nature of the material, which experiences viscoelastic and plastic deformations and sustains damage in the form of microcracks that can dominate its overall behavior. A mechanical event of interest is projectile interaction with the material, which leads to extreme local deformation and adiabatic heating, which can potentially lead to adverse outcomes in an energetic material. Simulations of such an event predicted large local temperature rises near the path of a spherical projectile, but these were experimentally unconfirmed and hence potentially non-physical. This work concerns the experimental verification of local temperatures both at the surface and in the wake of a spherical projectile penetrating a mock (unreactive) high-explosive at {approx}700 m/s. Fast response thermocouples were embedded radially in a mid-plane of a cylindrical target, which was bonded around the thermocouples with epoxy and recorded by an oscilloscope through a low-pass filter with a bandwidth of 500 Hz. A peak temperature rise of 70 K was measured both at the equator of the projectile and in its wake, in good agreement with the temperature predicted in the minimally distorted elements at those locations by a finite element model in ABAQUS employing the ViscoSCRAM constitutive model. Further work is needed to elucidate the extreme temperature rises in material undergoing crushing or fragmentation, which is difficult to predict with meshed finite element methods due to element distortion, and also challenging to quantify experimentally.

  11. Ignition process evolution at high supersonic velocities in channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldfeld, M. A.; Starov, A. V.; Timofeev, K. Yu.; Vinogradov, V. A.

    2009-06-01

    The results of experimental research of multi-injector combustors in the regime of the attached pipe are presented. As a source of high-enthalpy working gas (air), hot shot wind tunnel IT-302M of ITAM, the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences was used. Tests have been carried out at Mach numbers 3, 4 and 5, in a range of change of total temperature from 2000K up to 3000K and static pressure from 0.08MPa up to 0.23MPa. Injector section has been manufactured in two versions with a various relative height of wedge-shaped injectors with parallel fuel injection. Influence of conditions on the entrance of the combustion chamber on ignition and a stable combustion of hydrogen was investigated. Intensive combustion of hydrogen has been received only at Mach numbers 3 and 4. Advantage of injector section with the greater relative height of injectors is revealed. The mechanism of fuel ignition in the combustion chamber of the given configuration was investigated: two-step ignition process including “kindling” and intensive combustion over all channel volume.

  12. Airflow energy harvesting with high wind velocities for industrial applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chew, Z. J.; Tuddenham, S. B.; Zhu, M.

    2016-11-01

    An airflow energy harvester capable of harvesting energy from vortices at high speed is presented in this paper. The airflow energy harvester is implemented using a modified helical Savonius turbine and an electromagnetic generator. A power management module with maximum power point finding capability is used to manage the harvested energy and convert the low voltage magnitude from the generator to a usable level for wireless sensors. The airflow energy harvester is characterized using vortex generated by air hitting a plate in a wind tunnel. By using an aircraft environment with wind speed of 17 m/s as case study, the output power of the airflow energy harvester is measured to be 126 mW. The overall efficiency of the power management module is 45.76 to 61.2%, with maximum power point tracking efficiency of 94.21 to 99.72% for wind speed of 10 to 18 m/s, and has a quiescent current of 790 nA for the maximum power point tracking circuit.

  13. High velocity HI in the inner 5 KPC of M31

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brinks, E.

    New radio frequency position-velocity maps of HI whithin 5 kpc of the M31 galactic center are reported. The maps were generated from 21 cm line studies performed with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope directed at regions +6 arcmin, 0 arcmin, and -6 arcmin distance from the nucleus. High velocity neutral hydrogen displayed the same signature at high velocities previously observed in the visible range (Rubin and Ford, 1970), but no HI was detected within the inner 500 pc. The data indicate that rotation produces the high velocities rather than an infall to or an ejection from the nucleus. The region around the M31 nucleus is suggested to be similar to that of the Galaxy.

  14. High-energy radiation from the impact of high-velocity clouds on the galactic disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Ana Laura; Romero, Gustavo Esteban; del Valle, Maŕıa Victoria

    2017-01-01

    High-velocity clouds (HVCs) are HI clouds with velocities of more than 100 km s-1. These clouds do not partake of the differential Galactic rotation; a significant fraction of them are falling down towards the Galactic disk. The typical mass of these clouds is ˜ 104 M⊙, so in a collision with the disk energies of the order of ˜ 1051 erg can be released into the interstellar medium. Such collisions should produce strong shocks propagating through both the cloud and the disk. Under adequate conditions, these shocks can accelerate particles up to relativistic energies by Fermi mechanism. In this work, we study the hydrodynamical inter-actions and the relevant radiative processes (thermal and non-thermal) associated with HVC-disk collisions. We find that a shock propagating through a typical cloud should give rise to significant non-thermal radio emission, whereas the protons accelerated there diffuse and might emit elsewhere. A shock propagating through the disk, on the other hand, produces extended gamma-ray emission and injects protons with energies from 10 GeV to ˜1 TeV. Taking into account the injected mass rate of HI in our Galaxy by cloud bombardement, we found that ˜ 10 % of the Galactic cosmic ray power could be generated by these cloud-disk collisional events.

  15. Preliminary trial to increase gait velocity with high speed treadmill training for patients with hemiplegia.

    PubMed

    Wada, Yosuke; Kondo, Izumi; Sonoda, Shigeru; Miyasaka, Hiroyuki; Teranishi, Toshio; Nagai, Shota; Saitoh, Eiichi

    2010-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether high-speed treadmill training improved the gait velocity of patients whose maximum walking speed was assumed to have reached a plateau level. The subjects included seven patients with hemiplegia after stroke. The high-speed treadmill training was performed as the maximum gait velocity of each patient was presumed to have reached a plateau level. The patients walked 20% faster than their maximum gait velocity of the day for 5 days (phase I). Then they walked 20% slower than maximum gait velocity of the day for 5 days, and they repeated the fast treadmill walking for further 5 days (phase II). Before phase I, mean maximum gait velocity of the day was 0.84 m/sec before phase I, 1.08 m/sec after phase I, and 1.24 m/sec after phase II. These results demonstrated that training at a speed 20% faster than the maximum gait velocity of the day on the treadmill for 5 days could further increase a patient's gait velocity.

  16. Liquid mercury sound velocity measurements under high pressure and high temperature by picosecond acoustics in a diamond anvils cell.

    PubMed

    Decremps, F; Belliard, L; Couzinet, B; Vincent, S; Munsch, P; Le Marchand, G; Perrin, B

    2009-07-01

    Recent improvements to measure ultrasonic sound velocities of liquids under extreme conditions are described. Principle and feasibility of picosecond acoustics in liquids embedded in a diamond anvils cell are given. To illustrate the capability of these advances in the sound velocity measurement technique, original high pressure and high temperature results on the sound velocity of liquid mercury up to 5 GPa and 575 K are given. This high pressure technique will certainly be useful in several fundamental and applied problems in physics and many other fields such as geophysics, nonlinear acoustics, underwater sound, petrology or physical acoustics.

  17. Negative ion productions in high velocity collision between small carbon clusters and Helium atom target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    M, Chabot; K, Béroff; T, Pino; G, Féraud; N, Dothi; Padellec A, Le; G, Martinet; S, Bouneau; Y, Carpentier

    2012-11-01

    We measured absolute double capture cross section of Cn+ ions (n=1,5) colliding, at 2.3 and 2.6 a.u velocities, with an Helium target atom and the branching ratios of fragmentation of the so formed electronically excited anions Cn-*. We also measured absolute cross section for the electronic attachment on neutral Cn clusters colliding at same velocities with He atom. This is to our knowledge the first measurement of neutral-neutral charge exchange in high velocity collision.

  18. Elastic wave velocities of lunar samples at high pressures and their geophysical implications.

    PubMed

    Kanamori, H; Nur, A; Chung, D; Wones, D; Simmons, G

    1970-01-30

    Ultrasonic measurement of P and S velocities of Apollo 11 lunar samples 10020, 10057, and 10065 to 5 kilobars pressure at room temperature shows a pronounced increase of velocity (as much as twofold) for the first 2 kilobars. The travel times predicted from the velocity-depth curve of sample 10057 are consistent with the results of the Apollo 12 seismic experiments. At pressures below 200 bars, the samples are highly attenuating; for both P and S waves, the value of Q is about 10.

  19. High resolution P-wave velocity structure beneath Northeastern Tibet from multiscale seismic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, B.; Gao, X.; Chen, J.; Liu, Q.; Li, S.

    2016-12-01

    The continuing collision of the northward advancing Indian continent with the Eurasia results in the high elevations and thickened Tibetan Plateau. Numerous geologic and geophysical studies engaged in the mechanics of the Tibetan Plateau deformation and uplift. Many seismic experiments were deployed in south and central Tibet, such as INDEPTH and Hi-climb, but very few in northeastern Tibet. Between 2013 and 2015, The China Seismic Array-experiment operated 670 broadband seismic stations with an average station spacing of 35km. This seismic array located in northeastern Tibet and covered the Qilian Mountains, Qaidam Basin, and part of Songpan-Ganzi, Gobi-Alashan, Yangzi, and Ordos. A new multiscale seismic traveltime tomography technique with sparsity constrains were used to map the upper mantle P-wave velocity structure beneath northeastern Tibet. The seismic tomography algorithm employs sparsity constrains on the wavelet representation velocity model via the L1-norm regularization. This algorithm can efficiently deal with the uneven-sampled volume, and give multiscale images of the model. Our preliminary results can be summarized as follows: 1) in the upper mantle down to 200km, significate low-velocity anomalies exist beneath the northeastern Tibet, and slight high-velocity anomalies beneath the Qaidam basin; 2) under Gobi-Alashan, Yangzi, and Ordos, high-velocity anomalies appear to extend to a depth of 250km, this high-velocity may correspond to the lithosphere; 3) there exist relative high-velocity anomalies at depth of 250km-350km underneath north Tibet, which suggests lithospheric delamination; 4) the strong velocity contrast between north Tibet and Yangzi, Gabi-Alashan is visible down to 200km, which implies the north Tibet boundary.

  20. Warm spraying—a novel coating process based on high-velocity impact of solid particles

    PubMed Central

    Kuroda, Seiji; Kawakita, Jin; Watanabe, Makoto; Katanoda, Hiroshi

    2008-01-01

    In recent years, coating processes based on the impact of high-velocity solid particles such as cold spraying and aerosol deposition have been developed and attracting much industrial attention. A novel coating process called ‘warm spraying’ has been developed, in which coatings are formed by the high-velocity impact of solid powder particles heated to appropriate temperatures below the melting point of the powder material. The advantages of such process are as follows: (1) the critical velocity needed to form a coating can be significantly lowered by heating, (2) the degradation of feedstock powder such as oxidation can be significantly controlled compared with conventional thermal spraying where powder is molten, and (3) various coating structures can be realized from porous to dense ones by controlling the temperature and velocity of the particles. The principles and characteristics of this new process are discussed in light of other existing spray processes such as high-velocity oxy-fuel spraying and cold spraying. The gas dynamics of particle heating and acceleration by the spraying apparatus as well as the high-velocity impact phenomena of powder particles are discussed in detail. Several examples of depositing heat sensitive materials such as titanium, metallic glass, WC–Co cermet and polymers are described with potential industrial applications. PMID:27877996

  1. High Velocity Impact Interaction of Metal Particles with Porous Heterogeneous Materials with an Inorganic Matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glazunov, A. A.; Ishchenko, A. N.; Afanasyeva, S. A.; Belov, N. N.; Burkin, V. V.; Rogaev, K. S.; Tabachenko, A. N.; Khabibulin, M. V.; Yugov, N. T.

    2016-03-01

    A computational-experimental investigation of stress-strain state and fracture of a porous heterogeneous material with an inorganic matrix, used as a thermal barrier coating of flying vehicles, under conditions of a high-velocity impact by a spherical steel projectile imitating a meteorite particle is discussed. Ballistic tests are performed at the velocities about 2.5 km/s. Numerical modeling of the high-velocity impact is described within the framework of a porous elastoplastic model including fracture and different phase states of the materials. The calculations are performed using the Euler and Lagrange numerical techniques for the velocities up to 10 km/s in a complete-space problem statement.

  2. Heat Transfer and Hydraulic Flow Resistance for Streams of High Velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lelchuk, V. L.

    1943-01-01

    Problems of hydraulic flow resistance and heat transfer for streams with velocities comparable with acoustic have present great importance for various fields of technical science. Especially, they have great importance for the field of heat transfer in designing and constructing boilers.of the "Velox" type. In this article a description of experiments and their results as regards definition of the laws of heat transfer in differential form for high velocity air streams inside smooth tubes are given.

  3. Group velocity matching in high-order harmonic generation driven by mid-infrared lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-García, C.; Popmintchev, T.; Murnane, M. M.; Kapteyn, H. C.; Plaja, L.; Becker, A.; Jaron-Becker, A.

    2016-07-01

    We analyze the role of group-velocity matching (GVM) in the macroscopic build up of the high-harmonic signal generated in gas targets at high pressures. A definition of the walk-off length, associated with GVM, in the non-perturbative intensity regime of high-harmonic generation is given. Semiclassical predictions based on this definition are in excellent agreement with full quantum simulations. We demonstrate that group velocity matching is a relevant factor in high harmonic generation and the isolation of attosecond pulses driven by long wavelength lasers and preferentially selects contributions from the short quantum trajectories.

  4. Development of a high-velocity free-flight launcher : the Ames light-gas gun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charters, A C; Denardo, B Pat; Rossow, Vernon J

    1955-01-01

    Recent interest in long-range missiles has stimulated a search for new experimental techniques which can reproduce in the laboratory the high temperatures and Mach numbers associated with the missiles' flight. One promising possibility lies in free-flight testing of laboratory models which are flown at the full velocity of the missile. In this type of test, temperatures are approximated and aerodynamic heating of the model is representative of that experienced by the missile in high-velocity flight. A prime requirement of the free-flight test technique is a device which had the capacity for launching models at the velocities desired. In response to thie need, a gun firing light models at velocities up to 15,000 feet per second has been developed at the Ames Aeronautical Laboratory. The design of this gun, the analysis of its performance, and the results of the initial firing trials are described in this paper. The firing trials showed that the measured velocities and pressures agreed well with the predicted values. Also, the erosion of the launch tube was very small for the eleven rounds fired. The performance of the gun suggests that it will prove to be a satisfactory launcher for high-velocity free-flight tests. However, it should be mentioned that only the gross performance has been evaluated so far, and, consequently, the operation of the gun must be investigated in further detail before its performance can be reliably predicted over its full operating range.

  5. Improving estimation of microseismic focal mechanisms using a high-resolution velocity model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, T.; Chen, Y.; Lin, Y.; Huang, L.

    2015-12-01

    Injection and migration of CO2 during the geological carbon sequestration change the pore pressure and stress distribution in the reservoir. The change in stress may induce brittle failure on fractures, causing microseismic events. Focal mechanisms of induced microseismic events are useful for understanding stress evolution in the reservoir. An accurate estimation of microseismic focal mechanism depends on the accuracy of velocity models. In this work, we study the improvement on estimation of microseismic focal mechanisms using a high-resolution velocity model. We obtain the velocity model using a velocity inversion algorithm with a modified total-variation scheme rather than the commonly used Tikhonov regularization technique. We demonstrate with synthetic microseismic data that the velocity inversion method with a modified total-variation regularization scheme improves velocity inversion, and the improved velocity models enhance the accuracy of estimated focal mechanisms of microseismic events. We apply the new methodology to microseismic data acquired at a CO2-EOR (enhanced oil recovery) site at Aneth, Utah.

  6. High precision UTDR measurements by sonic velocity compensation with reference transducer.

    PubMed

    Stade, Sam; Kallioinen, Mari; Mänttäri, Mika; Tuuva, Tuure

    2014-07-02

    An ultrasonic sensor design with sonic velocity compensation is developed to improve the accuracy of distance measurement in membrane modules. High accuracy real-time distance measurements are needed in membrane fouling and compaction studies. The benefits of the sonic velocity compensation with a reference transducer are compared to the sonic velocity calculated with the measured temperature and pressure using the model by Belogol'skii, Sekoyan et al. In the experiments the temperature was changed from 25 to 60 °C at pressures of 0.1, 0.3 and 0.5 MPa. The set measurement distance was 17.8 mm. Distance measurements with sonic velocity compensation were over ten times more accurate than the ones calculated based on the model. Using the reference transducer measured sonic velocity, the standard deviations for the distance measurements varied from 0.6 to 2.0 µm, while using the calculated sonic velocity the standard deviations were 21-39 µm. In industrial liquors, not only the temperature and the pressure, which were studied in this paper, but also the properties of the filtered solution, such as solute concentration, density, viscosity, etc., may vary greatly, leading to inaccuracy in the use of the Belogol'skii, Sekoyan et al. model. Therefore, calibration of the sonic velocity with reference transducers is needed for accurate distance measurements.

  7. Intermediate-metallicity, high-velocity stars and Galactic chemical evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, S. G.; Smith, I. M.

    2003-05-01

    High signal-to-noise ratio spectra were obtained of 10 high-proper-motion stars having -1 <~[Fe/H] < 0, and a comparable number of disc stars. All but two of the high-proper-motion stars were confirmed to have [Fe/H] > -1.0, some approaching solar metallicity, but, even so, earlier measurements overestimated the metallicities and velocities of some of these stars. Models of stellar populations were used to assign membership probabilities to the Galactic components to which the high-velocity stars might belong. Many were found to be more probably thick-disc than halo objects, despite their large space motions, and two might be associated with the inner Galaxy. It may be necessary to reassess contamination of previous halo samples, such as those used to define the metallicity distribution, to account for contamination by high-velocity thick-disc stars, and to consider possible subcomponents of the halo. The change in [α/Fe] ratios at [Fe/H]~=-1.0 is often used to constrain the degree and timing of Type Ia supernova nucleosynthesis in Galactic chemical-evolution models. [Ti/Fe] values were measured for eight of the high-velocity stars. Both high- and low-[Ti/Fe] halo stars exist; likewise high- and low-[Ti/Fe] thick-disc stars exist. We conclude that the [Ti/Fe]`break' is not well defined for a given population; nor is there a simple, continuous evolutionary sequence through the break. Implications for the interpretation of the [α/Fe] break in terms of SN Ia time-scales and progenitors are discussed. The range of [Ti/Fe] found for high-velocity (low rotation) thick-disc stars contrasts with that for the low-velocity (high rotation) thick-disc sample studied by Prochaska et al.

  8. A simple approach for determining detonation velocity of high explosive at any loading density.

    PubMed

    Keshavarz, Mohammad Hossein

    2005-05-20

    A simple empirical relationship is introduced between detonation velocity at any loading density and chemical composition of high explosive as well as its gas phase heat of formation, which is calculated by group additivity rules. The present work may be applied to any explosive that contains the elements of carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen and oxygen with no difficulties. The new correlation can easily be applied for determining detonation velocity of explosives with loading densities less than 1g/cm3 as well as greater than 1g/cm3. Calculated detonation velocities by this procedure for both pure and explosive formulations show good agreement with respect to measured detonation velocity over a wide range of loading density.

  9. The kinematics of the high velocity bipolar nebulae NGC 6537 and HB 5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corradi, Romano L. M.; Schwarz, Hugo E.

    1993-03-01

    The velocity structure of the bipolar planetary nebulae (PNe) NGC 6537 and Hb 5 has been investigated by means of medium dispersion long slit spectra. We have derived kinematical parameters and the deprojected shapes of the two nebulae by applying the kinematical model introduced by Solf and Ulrich (1985). In the direction of the polar axis of the nebulae, the deprojected expansion velocity is computed to be 300 km/s for NGC 6537 and about 250 km/s for Hb 5. These are very high velocities, but not unusual in the class of bipolar nebulae. The observed shapes and the velocity fields, in particular the one of Hb 5, are nicely reproduced by the interacting winds models by Icke et al. (1989). These imply a strongly aspherical initial mass distribution, i.e. equatorial to polar density contrasts larger than five. We espouse the idea that these initial conditions are created in interacting binary systems.

  10. HIGH-RESOLUTION OBSERVATIONS AND THE PHYSICS OF HIGH-VELOCITY CLOUD A0

    SciTech Connect

    Verschuur, Gerrit L.

    2013-04-01

    The neutral hydrogen structure of high-velocity cloud A0 (at about -180 km s{sup -1}) has been mapped with a 9.'1 resolution. Gaussian decomposition of the profiles is used to separately map families of components defined by similarities in center velocities and line widths. About 70% of the H I gas is in the form of a narrow, twisted filament whose typical line widths are of the order of 24 km s{sup -1}. Many bright features with narrow line widths of the order of 6 km s{sup -1}, clouds, are located in and near the filament. A third category with properties between those of the filament and clouds appears in the data. The clouds are not always co-located with the broader line width filament emission as seen projected on the sky. Under the assumption that magnetic fields underlie the presence of the filament, a theorem is developed for its stability in terms of a toroidal magnetic field generated by the flow of gas along field lines. It is suggested that the axial magnetic field strength may be derived from the excess line width of the H I emission over and above that due to kinetic temperature by invoking the role of Alfven waves that create what is in essence a form of magnetic turbulence. At a distance of 200 pc the axial and the derived toroidal magnetic field strengths in the filament are then about 6 {mu}G while for the clouds they are about 4 {mu}G. The dependence of the derived field strength on distance is discussed.

  11. Sound velocity of high-strength polymer with negative thermal expansion coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, R.; Ueno, M.; Okuda, Y.; Burmistrov, S.; Yamanaka, A.

    2003-05-01

    Sound velocities of fiber reinforced plastics (FRPs) were measured along the fiber axis at temperatures between 360 and 77 K. We used two kinds of the high-strength crystalline polymer fibers, polyethylene (Dyneema) and polybenzobisoxazole (Zylon), which have negative thermal expansion coefficients. They also have high thermal conductivities and high resistances for flash over voltage, and are expected as new materials for coil bobbins or spacers at cryogenic temperatures. They have very large sound velocities of about 9000 (m/s) at 77 K, which are 4.5 times larger than that of the ordinary polyethylene fiber.

  12. On the Origin of High Shear Wave Velocities in the Deep Roots of Cratons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, L.; Duncan, M. S.; Garber, J. M.; Hernandez, J. A.; Maurya, S.; Zhang, H.; Faul, U.; McCammon, C. A.; Montagner, J. P.; Moresi, L. N.; Romanowicz, B. A.; Rudnick, R. L.; Stixrude, L. P.

    2016-12-01

    Some seismic models derived from tomographic studies indicate very high shear wave velocities around 150 km depth, which cannot be explained by standard cratonic peridotite compositions derived from kimberlites, even under the assumption of very cold geotherms (i.e. 28mW/m3 surface heat flux). We present the results of a multi-disciplinary study conducted at the CIDER Summer 2016 program in Santa Barbara (CA), in which we have reviewed various geophysical and petrological constraints on the nature of cratonic roots (seismic velocities, electrical conductivity, gravity, lithologies) and explored a range of possible solutions. We find that matching the high shear wave velocities requires a large proportion of eclogite that is not matched by observed eclogite proportions in kimberlite samples. The high shear velocity of diamond makes it a viable candidate to account for such high velocities, in a proportion that is compatible with the global carbon budget. Our most recent results will be presented as well as suggestions for possible mechanisms for diamond formation and emplacement.

  13. A high velocity impact experiment of micro-scale ice particles using laser-driven system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Hyeonju; Kim, Jungwook; Yoh, Jack J.

    2014-11-01

    A jet engine for high speed air breathing propulsion is subject to continuous wear as a result of impacts of micro-scale ice particles during a flight in the atmosphere. The inlet duct and compressor blades are exposed to on-coming frozen moisture particles that may result in the surface damage and significantly shorten the designed lifetime of the aircraft. Under such prolonged high-speed impact loading, the performance parameters such as flight instability and power loss of a jet engine can be significantly degraded. In this work, a laser-driven system was designed to accelerate micro-scale ice particles to the velocity up to Mach 2 using a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser beam at 100-600 mJ with 1064 nm wavelength and 9 ns pulse duration. The high speed images (Phantom v711) and double exposure shadowgraphs were used to calculate the average velocity of ice particles and their deceleration. Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector measurements were also utilized for the analysis of free surface velocity of a metal foil in order to understand the interfacial dynamics between the impacting particles and accepting metal target. The velocity of our ice particles is sufficiently fast for studying the effect of moisture particle collision on an air-breathing duct of high speed aircraft, and thus the results can provide insight into how minute space debris or micrometeorites cause damage to the orbiting spacecraft at large.

  14. Temporary Network Development Capability in High Velocity Environments: A Dynamic Capability Study of Disaster Relief Organizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Brien, William Ross

    2010-01-01

    Organizations involved in crisis relief after a natural disaster face the multifaceted challenge of significantly changing needs of their various stakeholders, limited, ambiguous and even incorrect information, and highly compressed time limitations. Yet the performance of these organization in these high velocity environments is critical for the…

  15. Temporary Network Development Capability in High Velocity Environments: A Dynamic Capability Study of Disaster Relief Organizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Brien, William Ross

    2010-01-01

    Organizations involved in crisis relief after a natural disaster face the multifaceted challenge of significantly changing needs of their various stakeholders, limited, ambiguous and even incorrect information, and highly compressed time limitations. Yet the performance of these organization in these high velocity environments is critical for the…

  16. Experimental verification of vapor deposition rate theory in high velocity burner rigs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gokoglu, Suleyman A.; Santoro, Gilbert J.

    1985-01-01

    The main objective has been the experimental verification of the corrosive vapor deposition theory in high-temperature, high-velocity environments. Towards this end a Mach 0.3 burner-rig appartus was built to measure deposition rates from salt-seeded (mostly Na salts) combustion gases on the internally cooled cylindrical collector. Deposition experiments are underway.

  17. High Resolution Interseismic Velocity Model of the San Andreas Fault From GPS and InSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, X.; Sandwell, D. T.; Smith-Konter, B. R.

    2011-12-01

    We recover the interseismic deformation along the entire San Andreas Fault System (SAFS) at a spatial resolution of 200 meters by combining InSAR and GPS observations using a dislocation model. Previous efforts to compare 17 different GPS-derived strain rate models of the SAFS shows that GPS data alone cannot uniquely resolve the rapid velocity gradients near faults, which are critical for understanding the along-strike variations in stress accumulation rate and associated earthquake hazard. To improve the near-fault velocity resolution, we integrate new GPS observations with InSAR observations, initially from ALOS (Advanced Land Observation Satellite launched by Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency) ascending data (spanning 2006.5-2010), using a remove/restore approach. More than 1100 interferograms were processed with the newly developed InSAR processing software GMTSAR. The integration uses a dislocation-based velocity model to interpolate the Line-Of-Sight (LOS) velocity at the full resolution of the InSAR data in radar coordinates. The residual between the model and InSAR LOS velocity are stacked and high-pass filtered, then added back to the model. This LOS velocity map covers almost entire San Andreas Fault System (see Figure 1) from Maacama Fault to the north to the Superstition Hills Fault to the south. The average standard deviation of the LOS velocity model ranges from 2 to 4 mm/yr. Our initial results show previously unknown details in along-strike variations in surface fault creep. Moreover, the high resolution velocity field can resolve asperities in these "creeping" sections that are important for understanding moment accumulation rates and seismic hazards. We find that much of the high resolution velocity signal is related to non-tectonic processes (e.g., ground subsidence and uplift) sometimes very close to the fault zone. The near-fault deformation signal extracted from this velocity map can provide tighter constraints on fault slip rates and

  18. Isolated Bacterial Spores at High-velocity Survive Surface Impacts in Vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austin, Daniel; Barney, Brandon

    We present experiments in which bacterial spores were found to survive being accelerated in vacuum to velocities in the range 30-120 m/s and impacted on a dense target. In these experiments, spores of Bacillus subtilis spores were charged using electrospray at atmospheric pressure, dried, and then introduced into high vacuum. Through choice of skimmers and beam tubes, different velocity ranges were achieved. An image-charge detector observed the charged spores, providing total charge and velocity. The spores then impacted a glass target within a collection vessel. After the experiment, the collection vessel contents were extracted and cultured. Several positive and negative controls were used, including the use of antibiotic-resistant spores and antibiotic-containing (rifampicin) agar for culturing. These impact velocities are of particular interest for possible transport of bacterial spores from Mars to Phobos, and may have implications for planetary protection in a Phobos sample return mission. In addition, bacteria may reach similar velocities during a spacecraft crash (e.g., within components, or from spacecraft to surface materials during impact, etc.), raising concerns about forward contamination. The velocities of interest to transport of life between planets (panspermia) are somewhat higher, but these results complement shock-based experiments and contribute to the general discussion of impact survivability of organisms.

  19. Jet Velocity Profile Effects on Spray Characteristics of Impinging Jets at High Reynolds and Weber Numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Neil S.; Kulkarni, Varun; Sojka, Paul E.

    2014-11-01

    While like-on-like doublet impinging jet atomization has been extensively studied in the literature, there is poor agreement between experimentally observed spray characteristics and theoretical predictions (Ryan et al. 1995, Anderson et al. 2006). Recent works (Bremond and Villermaux 2006, Choo and Kang 2007) have introduced a non-uniform jet velocity profile, which lead to a deviation from the standard assumptions for the sheet velocity and the sheet thickness parameter. These works have assumed a parabolic profile to serve as another limit to the traditional uniform jet velocity profile assumption. Incorporating a non-uniform jet velocity profile results in the sheet velocity and the sheet thickness parameter depending on the sheet azimuthal angle. In this work, the 1/7th power-law turbulent velocity profile is assumed to provide a closer match to the flow behavior of jets at high Reynolds and Weber numbers, which correspond to the impact wave regime. Predictions for the maximum wavelength, sheet breakup length, ligament diameter, and drop diameter are compared with experimental observations. The results demonstrate better agreement between experimentally measured values and predictions, compared to previous models. U.S. Army Research Office under the Multi-University Research Initiative Grant Number W911NF-08-1-0171.

  20. Smith's Cloud: A High Velocity HI Cloud Entering The Galactic Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lockman, Felix J.; Benjamin, R. A.; Heroux, A.; Langston, G. I.

    2007-12-01

    HI observations using the Green Bank Telescope at 21cm of the high-velocity cloud known as Smith's Cloud show that it has a large, cometary morphology pointing toward the Galactic disk, and shows clear signs of interaction with the Milky Way. From the velocity range of the interaction we can estimate the rest velocity of the ambient medium into which Smith's Cloud moves. This gives a kinematic distance to the interaction site of 12 kpc, a value which is essentially identical to other distance estimates for the cloud. The main portion of Smith's Cloud is located about 3 kpc below the Galactic plane and only 7.6 kpc from the Galactic center. Its total extent is more than 3 kpc. It is bring more than a million solar masses of gas to the star-forming regions of the inner Galaxy. From the projected differential velocity of the cloud we can estimate its trajectory: its total space velocity appears to be at least 275 km/s and it has a peculiar velocity with respect to its environment of at least 95 km/s.

  1. HIGH-VELOCITY CLOUDS IN THE GALACTIC ALL SKY SURVEY. I. CATALOG

    SciTech Connect

    Moss, V. A.; Kummerfeld, J. K.; McClure-Griffiths, N. M.; Murphy, T.; Pisano, D. J.; Curran, J. R.

    2013-11-01

    We present a catalog of high-velocity clouds (HVCs) from the Galactic All Sky Survey (GASS) of southern sky neutral hydrogen, which has 57 mK sensitivity and 1 km s{sup –1} velocity resolution and was obtained with the Parkes Telescope. Our catalog has been derived from the stray-radiation-corrected second release of GASS. We describe the data and our method of identifying HVCs and analyze the overall properties of the GASS population. We catalog a total of 1693 HVCs at declinations <0°, including 1111 positive velocity HVCs and 582 negative velocity HVCs. Our catalog also includes 295 anomalous velocity clouds (AVCs). The cloud line-widths of our HVC population have a median FWHM of ∼19 km s{sup –1}, which is lower than that found in previous surveys. The completeness of our catalog is above 95% based on comparison with the HIPASS catalog of HVCs upon which we improve by an order of magnitude in spectral resolution. We find 758 new HVCs and AVCs with no HIPASS counterpart. The GASS catalog will shed unprecedented light on the distribution and kinematic structure of southern sky HVCs, as well as delve further into the cloud populations that make up the anomalous velocity gas of the Milky Way.

  2. Critical velocities for deflagration and detonation triggered by voids in a REBO high explosive

    SciTech Connect

    Herring, Stuart Davis; Germann, Timothy C; Jensen, Niels G

    2010-01-01

    The effects of circular voids on the shock sensitivity of a two-dimensional model high explosive crystal are considered. We simulate a piston impact using molecular dynamics simulations with a Reactive Empirical Bond Order (REBO) model potential for a sub-micron, sub-ns exothermic reaction in a diatomic molecular solid. The probability of initiating chemical reactions is found to rise more suddenly with increasing piston velocity for larger voids that collapse more deterministically. A void with radius as small as 10 nm reduces the minimum initiating velocity by a factor of 4. The transition at larger velocities to detonation is studied in a micron-long sample with a single void (and its periodic images). The reaction yield during the shock traversal increases rapidly with velocity, then becomes a prompt, reliable detonation. A void of radius 2.5 nm reduces the critical velocity by 10% from the perfect crystal. A Pop plot of the time-to-detonation at higher velocities shows a characteristic pressure dependence.

  3. High-resolution CFD detects high-frequency velocity fluctuations in bifurcation, but not sidewall, aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Valen-Sendstad, Kristian; Mardal, Kent-André; Steinman, David A

    2013-01-18

    High-frequency flow fluctuations in intracranial aneurysms have previously been reported in vitro and in vivo. On the other hand, the vast majority of image-based computational fluid dynamics (CFD) studies of cerebral aneurysms report periodic, laminar flow. We have previously demonstrated that transitional flow, consistent with in vivo reports, can occur in a middle cerebral artery (MCA) bifurcation aneurysm when ultra-high-resolution direct numerical simulation methods are applied. The object of the present study was to investigate if such high-frequency flow fluctuations might be more widespread in adequately-resolved CFD models. A sample of N=12 anatomically realistic MCA aneurysms (five unruptured, seven ruptured), was digitally segmented from CT angiograms. Four were classified as sidewall aneurysms, the other eight as bifurcation aneurysms. Transient CFD simulations were carried out assuming a steady inflow velocity of 0.5m/s, corresponding to typical peak systolic conditions at the MCA. To allow for detection of clinically-reported high-frequency flow fluctuations and resulting flow structures, temporal and spatial resolutions of the CFD simulations were in the order of 0.1 ms and 0.1 mm, respectively. A transient flow response to the stationary inflow conditions was found in five of the 12 aneurysms, with energetic fluctuations up to 100 Hz, and in one case up to 900 Hz. Incidentally, all five were ruptured bifurcation aneurysms, whereas all four sidewall aneurysms, including one ruptured case, quickly reached a stable, steady state solution. Energetic, rapid fluctuations may be overlooked in CFD models of bifurcation aneurysms unless adequate temporal and spatial resolutions are used. Such fluctuations may be relevant to the mechanobiology of aneurysm rupture, and to a recently reported dichotomy between predictors of rupture likelihood for bifurcation vs. sidewall aneurysms. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. A Investigation of Gouge Initiation in High-Velocity Sliding Contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tachau, Robert David Mazur

    1991-02-01

    Surface damage has been observed on the rails of rocket sled tracks and on the barrels of high-velocity guns. The phenomenon is generally referred to as "gouging". Damage to a stationary surface (guider) is created from the oblique impact of a high-velocity object (slider) moving over its surface. The surface damage (gouge) is typically a shallow crater in the shape of a teardrop with the leading edge characterized by the wider end and a slightly raised lip. For rocket sleds, rail gouging occurs when the sled velocity is greater than 1.5 km/sec; while in guns, barrel gouging occurs when the velocity exceeds 4 km/sec. A model is developed to describe the phenomenon of gouging. An unbalanced slider randomly causes a shallow -angle, oblique impact between the slider and the guider. At sufficiently high velocity, the impact produces a thin, but very hot, layer of soft material at the contact surface. Under the action of a moving load, the soft layer lends itself to an antisymmetric deformation and a gouge is formed when this soft material is over-run by the slider. The model is simulated numerically with a hydrodynamic (CTH) code. The results of the simulations are in good agreement with the observed phenomena. Based on the simulated temperature and pressure profiles at the contact surface, design criteria for gouge mitigation are developed in this study.

  5. Analysis of human glottal velocity using hot-wire anemometry and high-speed imaging.

    PubMed

    Kataoka, Hideyuki; Arii, Shiro; Ochiai, Yoshitaka; Suzuki, Toyohiko; Hasegawa, Kensaku; Kitano, Hiroya

    2007-05-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze glottal velocity and glottal opening and closure. For this purpose, we developed a miniature, flexible, hot-wire probe that can make truly instantaneous measurements of the human larynx in vivo. A miniature hot-wire tip was inserted into a flexible transnasal endoscope. Fiberscopic examination was performed transnasally so that we could observe glottal vibration using high-speed imaging. The tip of the hot-wire probe was placed just above the glottis. The position of the probe was carefully monitored and checked with another flexible endoscope. Changes in velocity were recorded periodically. The velocity was higher in close proximity to the vocal folds. High-speed motion pictures were taken at a rate of 2000 frames per second with an auxiliary light source. Quantitative analysis of glottal velocity is required to improve our understanding of the relationship between laryngeal physiology and acoustics in humans. To solve the problem of synchronization inaccuracy, glottal velocity was captured instantaneously in the high-speed imaging system's processor memory.

  6. Determination of minority-carrier lifetime and surface recombination velocity with high spacial resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watanabe, M.; Actor, G.; Gatos, H. C.

    1977-01-01

    Quantitative analysis of the electron beam induced current in conjunction with high-resolution scanning makes it possible to evaluate the minority-carrier lifetime three dimensionally in the bulk and the surface recombination velocity two dimensionally, with a high spacial resolution. The analysis is based on the concept of the effective excitation strength of the carriers which takes into consideration all possible recombination sources. Two-dimensional mapping of the surface recombination velocity of phosphorus-diffused silicon diodes is presented as well as a three-dimensional mapping of the changes in the minority-carrier lifetime in ion-implanted silicon.

  7. Experimental verification of corrosive vapor deposition rate theory in high velocity burner rigs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gokoglu, S. A.; Santoro, G. J.

    1986-01-01

    The ability to predict deposition rates is required to facilitate modelling of high temperature corrosion by fused salt condensates in turbine engines. A corrosive salt vapor deposition theory based on multicomponent chemically frozen boundary layers (CFBL) has been successfully verified by high velocity burner rig experiments. The experiments involved internally air-impingement cooled, both rotating full and stationary segmented cylindrical collectors located in the crossflow of sodium-seeded combustion gases. Excellent agreement is found between the CFBL theory an the experimental measurements for both the absolute amounts of Na2SO4 deposition rates and the behavior of deposition rate with respect to collector temperature, mass flowrate (velocity) and Na concentration.

  8. Frictional strength of wet- and dry- talc gouge in high-velocity shear experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, X.; Reches, Z.; Elwood Madden, A. S.

    2015-12-01

    The strength of the creeping segment of the San Andres fault may be controlled by the distinct weakness and stability of talc (Moore & Rymer, 2007). We analyze talc frictional strength at high slip-velocity of 0.002 - 0.66 m/s, long slip-distances of 0.01 m to 33 m, and normal stresses up to 4.1 MPa. This analysis bridges the gap between nucleation stage of low velocity/distance, and the frictional behavior during large earthquakes. We tested wet and dry samples of pure talc gouge in a confined rotary cell, and continuously monitored the slip-velocity, stresses, dilation and temperature. We run 29 experiments of single and stepped velocities to obtain 243 values of quasi-static frictional coefficients. Dry talc gouge showed distinct slip-strengthening: friction coefficient of µ ~0.4 at short slip-distances of D < 0.1 m, and it increased systematically to µ ~0.8 at slip-distances of D = 0.1- 1 m; at D > 1 m, the frictional strength saturated at µ= 0.8 - 1 level. Wet talc gouge (16-20% water) displayed low frictional strength of µ= 0.1-0.3, in agreement with published triaxial tests. The stepped-velocity runs revealed a consistent velocity-strengthening trend. For a velocity jump from V1 to V2, we used VD = (µ2 -µ1)/ln (V2/V1), and found that on average VD = 0.06 and 0.03 for dry and wet talc, respectively, and for slip distances shorter than 1 m. Microstructural analysis of post-shearing wet talc gouge revealed extreme slip localization to a principal-slip-zone of a few microns, and significant shear compaction of 10-30%. In contrast, dry talc gouge exhibited distributed shear in a wide zone and systematic shear dilation (10-50%). We propose slip along weak interlayer talc plates and thermal-pressurization as the possible weakening mechanisms for wet talc. The development of distributed secondary fault network along with substantial grain crushing is responsible for slip-strengthening in dry condition. Fig. 1. Friction maps of talc gouge as function of slip

  9. Field-effect transistor having a superlattice channel and high carrier velocities at high applied fields

    DOEpatents

    Chaffin, R.J.; Dawson, L.R.; Fritz, I.J.; Osbourn, G.C.; Zipperian, T.E.

    1984-04-19

    In a field-effect transistor comprising a semiconductor having therein a source, a drain, a channel and a gate in operational relationship, there is provided an improvement wherein said semiconductor is a superlattice comprising alternating quantum well and barrier layers, the quantum well layers comprising a first direct gap semiconductor material which in bulk form has a certain bandgap and a curve of electron velocity versus applied electric field which has a maximum electron velocity at a certain electric field, the barrier layers comprising a second semiconductor material having a bandgap wider than that of said first semiconductor material, wherein the layer thicknesses of said quantum well and barrier layers are sufficiently thin that the alternating layers constitute a superlattice having a curve of electron velocity versus applied electric field which has a maximum electron velocity at a certain electric field, and wherein the thicknesses of said quantum well layers are selected to provide a superlattice curve of electron velocity versus applied electric field whereby, at applied electric fields higher than that at which the maximum electron velocity occurs in said first material when in bulk form, the electron velocities are higher in said superlattice than they are in said first semiconductor material in bulk form.

  10. Analysis of group-velocity dispersion of high-frequency Rayleigh waves for near-surface applications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Luo, Y.; Xia, J.; Xu, Y.; Zeng, C.

    2011-01-01

    The Multichannel Analysis of Surface Waves (MASW) method is an efficient tool to obtain the vertical shear (S)-wave velocity profile using the dispersive characteristic of Rayleigh waves. Most MASW researchers mainly apply Rayleigh-wave phase-velocity dispersion for S-wave velocity estimation with a few exceptions applying Rayleigh-wave group-velocity dispersion. Herein, we first compare sensitivities of fundamental surface-wave phase velocities with group velocities with three four-layer models including a low-velocity layer or a high-velocity layer. Then synthetic data are simulated by a finite difference method. Images of group-velocity dispersive energy of the synthetic data are generated using the Multiple Filter Analysis (MFA) method. Finally we invert a high-frequency surface-wave group-velocity dispersion curve of a real-world example. Results demonstrate that (1) the sensitivities of group velocities are higher than those of phase velocities and usable frequency ranges are wider than that of phase velocities, which is very helpful in improving inversion stability because for a stable inversion system, small changes in phase velocities do not result in a large fluctuation in inverted S-wave velocities; (2) group-velocity dispersive energy can be measured using single-trace data if Rayleigh-wave fundamental-mode energy is dominant, which suggests that the number of shots required in data acquisition can be dramatically reduced and the horizontal resolution can be greatly improved using analysis of group-velocity dispersion; and (3) the suspension logging results of the real-world example demonstrate that inversion of group velocities generated by the MFA method can successfully estimate near-surface S-wave velocities. ?? 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  11. Characterization and evaluation of silicon carbide for high-velocity impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmquist, Timothy J.; Johnson, Gordon R.

    2005-05-01

    This article presents a characterization and evaluation of silicon carbide for high-velocity impact. This includes a wide range of loading conditions that produce large strains, high strain rates, and high pressures. Experimental data from the literature are used to determine constants for the Johnson-Holmquist-Beissel (JHB) constitutive model for brittle materials. A previous article by the authors presented a characterization of silicon carbide for high-velocity impact using an earlier version of the model (JH-1). The previous work provided good agreement with a broad range of experimental data with the exception of high-velocity penetration data. The current work uses the more recently developed JHB constitutive model, a target geometry that more closely matches the experimental design, and a computational technique that allows for target prestress. These recent developments (primarily the prestress) produce computed results that agree with all the experimental data, including the high-velocity penetration data. The computed results also provide a detailed analysis of the penetration process into a prestressed target and show why it is necessary to include the target prestress. A specific result is the ability to reproduce the nonsteady penetration rate that occurs in the prestressed target.

  12. How pyroclastic flows attain high velocities- new insights from large-scale experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breard, E.; Lube, G.; Jones, J.; Valentine, G. A.

    2015-12-01

    Explosive volcanic eruptions are most deadly when highly mobile pyroclastic density currents (PDCs) sweep down mountain flanks after eruption columns or lava domes collapse. An important goal in volcanic hazard assessment is to predict the velocity of PDCs in numerical hazard models. To date, this has only been partially successful for dilute PDCs, and major uncertainties remain with regard to the dynamics of PDCs that have coupled dense underflow and dilute ash-cloud regions. Interrogating these complex multiphase processes is only practical in the laboratory, but this introduces the problem of scale where it is difficult to minimise the boundary layer effects which, in small flows, can dominate behaviour. To bridge the gap, we synthesized large-scale PDCs by gravitational collapse of 1300 kg of a natural pyroclastic mixture and examined flow front velocity fields on inclined slopes. We show that, proximally, PDCs experience rapid expulsion of gas that entrains particles and yields a fast-moving turbulent and dilute cloud that becomes the flow head and moves at 200-250% of the impact velocity. Downstream, the turbulent cloud moves ahead of the underflow. We show that the velocity-dependent friction coefficient (which represents the major dissipative form of energy) directly relates to the kinematics of the underflow front. In experimental situations where the dilute flow front velocity exceeds at all times the underflow velocity, we propose a new analytical model to quantify the asymptotic waning of the flow front velocity with distance. Using measurements of the flow head geometry and density, we show that our model successfully predicts the flow front kinematics including a long-lasting period of deceleration. Importantly, the interplay between the turbulent flow front and the presence of an underflow leads to the formation of a wedge-shaped head characterized by unexpectedly high coefficients of entrainment of ambient air.

  13. Synchronous high speed multi-point velocity profile measurement by heterodyne interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Xueqin; Xiao, Wen; Chen, Zonghui; Qin, Xiaodong; Pan, Feng

    2017-02-01

    This paper presents a synchronous multipoint velocity profile measurement system, which acquires the vibration velocities as well as images of vibrating objects by combining optical heterodyne interferometry and a high-speed CMOS-DVR camera. The high-speed CMOS-DVR camera records a sequence of images of the vibrating object. Then, by extracting and processing multiple pixels at the same time, a digital demodulation technique is implemented to simultaneously acquire the vibrating velocity of the target from the recorded sequences of images. This method is validated with an experiment. A piezoelectric ceramic plate with standard vibration characteristics is used as the vibrating target, which is driven by a standard sinusoidal signal.

  14. Measurement of a velocity field in microvessels using a high resolution PIV technique.

    PubMed

    Sugii, Yasuhiko; Nishio, Shigeru; Okamoto, Koji

    2002-10-01

    Because endothelial cells are subject to flow shear stress, it is important to determine the velocity distribution in microvessels during studies of the mechanical interactions between the blood and the endothelium. Particle image velocimetry (PIV) is a quantitative method for measuring velocity fields instantaneously in experimental fluid mechanics. The authors have developed a high-resolution PIV technique that improves the dynamic flow range, spatial resolution, and measurement accuracy. The proposed method was applied to images of the arteriole in the rat mesentery, using an intravital microscope and high-speed digital video system. Taking the mesentery motion into account, the PIV technique was improved to measure red blood cell (RBC) velocity. Velocity distributions with spatial resolutions of 0.8 3 0.8 mm were obtained even near the wall in the center plane of the arteriole. The arteriole velocity profile was blunt in the center region of the vessel cross-section and sharp in the near-wall region. Typical flow features for non-Newtonian fluid are shown.

  15. Velocity measurements of laser driven flyers backed by high impedance windows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheffield, S. A.; Rogers, J. W., Jr.; Castaneda, J. N.

    The response of free-standing foils to laser intensity levels of 1,000 to 1,000000 Gw/sq cm was characterized. The response of free-standing and backed foils at much lower intensities, i.e., in the region of 1 to 20 GW/sq cm, was characterized and these flyers are used to initiate insensitive secondary high explosives. The output of a 3.5-J Nd:glass laser with a 16 ns pulse was used to drive 1.5-mm-diameter aluminum flyers. The velocities of both free-standing flyers and flyers backed on the driven side by windows of water, fused silica, or sapphire were measured using optically recording velocity interferometer system (ORVIS). Intensities were on the order of 10 GW/sq cm and velocities as high as 5 km/s were measured for 13-micron/thick, Al flyers. Velocity and acceleration varied only slightly with the shock impedance of the window. Preliminary measurements indicate that pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) at a density of 1.4 grams/cu cm, and HNS-FP (hexanitrostilbene-fine particle) at a density of 1.6 grams/cu cm, can be promptly detonated by 66-micron m-thick, Al flyers impacting at a velocity of near 2.5 km/s.

  16. Velocity measurements of laser driven flyers backed by high impedance windows

    SciTech Connect

    Sheffield, S.A.; Rogers, J.W. Jr.; Castaneda, J.N.

    1985-01-01

    Because of possible applications to inertial confinement fusion, the response of free-standing foils to laser intensity levels of 10/sup 3/ to 10/sup 6/ GW/cm/sup 2/ has been well characterized. Our interest is in characterizing the response of free-standing and backed foils at much lower intensities, i.e., in the region of 1 to 20 GW/cm/sup 2/, and using these flyers to initiate insensitive secondary high explosives. The output of a 3.5-J Nd:glass laser with a 16 ns pulse was used to drive 1.5-mm-diameter aluminum (Al) flyers. The velocities of both free-standing flyers and flyers backed on the driven side by windows of water, fused silica, or sapphire were measured using ORVIS (Optically Recording Velocity Interferometer System). Intensities were on the order of 10 GW/cm/sup 2/ and velocities as high as 5 km/s were measured for 13-..mu..m/thick, Al flyers. Velocity and acceleration were observed to vary only slightly with the shock impedance of the window. Preliminary measurements indicate that PETN (pentaerythritol tetranitrate) at a density of 1.4 grams/cm/sup 3/, and HNS-FP (hexanitrostilbene-fine particle) at a density of 1.6 grams/cm/sup 3/, can be promptly detonated by 66-..mu..m-thick, Al flyers impacting at a velocity of near 2.5 km/s.

  17. First high resolution P wave velocity structure beneath Tenerife Island, (Canary Islands, Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Yeguas, Araceli; Ivan, Koulakov; Ibañez Jesus, M.; Valenti, Sallarès.

    2010-05-01

    3D velocity structure distribution has been imaged for first time using high resolution traveltime seismic tomography of the active volcano of Tenerife Island (Canary Islands, Spain). It is located in the Atlantic Ocean. In this island is situated the Teide stratovolcano (3718 m high) that is part of the Cañadas-Teide-Pico Viejo volcanic complex. Las Cañadas is a caldera system more than 20 kilometers wide where at least four distinct caldera processes have been identified. Evidence for many explosive eruptions in the volcanic complex has been found; the last noticeable explosive eruption (sub-plinean) occurred at Montaña Blanca around 2000 years ago. During the last 300 years, six effusive eruptions have been reported, the last of which took place at Chinyero Volcano on 18 November 1909. In January 2007, a seismic active experiment was carried out as part of the TOM-TEIDEVS project. About 6850 air gun shots were fired on the sea and recorded on a dense local seismic land network consisting of 150 independent (three component) seismic stations. The good quality of the recorded data allowed identifying P-wave arrivals up to offsets of 30-40 km obtaining more than 63000 traveltimes used in the tomographic inversion. The images have been obtained using ATOM-3D code (Koulakov, 2009). This code uses ray bending algorithms in the ray tracing for the forward modelling and in the inversion step it uses gradient methods. The velocity models show a very heterogeneous upper crust that is usual in similar volcanic environment. The tomographic images points out the no-existence of a magmatic chamber near to the surface and below Pico Teide. The ancient Las Cañadas caldera borders are clearly imaged featuring relatively high seismic velocity. Moreover, we have found a big low velocity anomaly in the northwest dorsal of the island. The last eruption took place in 1909 in this area. Furthermore, in the southeast another low velocity anomaly has been imaged. Several resolution

  18. MULTIPLE HIGH-VELOCITY SiO MASER FEATURES FROM THE HIGH-MASS PROTOSTAR W51 NORTH

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Se-Hyung; Kim, Jaeheon; Byun, Do-Young E-mail: jhkim@kasi.re.kr

    2011-02-01

    We present the detection of multiple high-velocity silicon monoxide (SiO v = 1, 2, J = 1-0) maser features in the high-mass protostar W51 North which are distributed over an exceedingly large velocity range from 105 to 230 km s{sup -1}. The SiO v = 1, J = 1-0 maser emission shows 3-5 narrow components which span a velocity range from 154 to 230 km s{sup -1} according to observational epochs. The SiO v = 2, J = 1-0 maser also shows 3-5 narrow components that do not correspond to the SiO v = 1 maser and span a velocity range from 105 to 154 km s{sup -1}. The multiple maser components show significant changes on very short timescales (<1 month) from epoch to epoch. We suggest that the high-velocity SiO masers may be emanated from massive star-forming activity of the W51 North protostar as SiO maser jets and will be a good probe of the earliest evolutionary stages of high-mass star formation via an accretion model. Further high angular resolution observations will be required for confirmation.

  19. A GRAVITATIONAL DOUBLE-SCATTERING MECHANISM FOR GENERATING HIGH-VELOCITY OBJECTS DURING HALO MERGERS

    SciTech Connect

    Samsing, Johan

    2015-02-01

    We present a dynamical model that describes how halo particles can receive a significant energy kick from the merger between their own host halo and a target halo. This could provide a possible explanation for some high-velocity objects, including extended systems like globular clusters (GCs). In the model we especially introduce a double-scattering mechanism, where a halo particle receives a significant part of its total energy kick by first undergoing a gravitational deflection by the target halo and subsequently by its original host halo. This generates an energy kick that is due to the relative velocity between the halos during the deflections. We derive analytically the total kick energy of the particle, which is composed of energy from the double-scattering mechanism and tidal fields, as a function of its position in its original host halo just before merger. In the case of a 1:10 merger, we find that the presented mechanisms can easily generate particles with a velocity approximately two times the virial velocity of the target halo. This motivates us to suggest that the high velocity of the recently discovered GC HVGC-1 can be explained by a head-on halo merger. Finally, we illustrate the orbital evolution of high-velocity particles outside the virial sphere of the target halo by solving the equation of motion in an expanding universe. We find a sweet spot around a scale factor of 0.3-0.5 for ejecting particles into large orbits, which can easily reach beyond approximately five virial radii.

  20. A Gravitational Double-scattering Mechanism for Generating High-velocity Objects during Halo Mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samsing, Johan

    2015-02-01

    We present a dynamical model that describes how halo particles can receive a significant energy kick from the merger between their own host halo and a target halo. This could provide a possible explanation for some high-velocity objects, including extended systems like globular clusters (GCs). In the model we especially introduce a double-scattering mechanism, where a halo particle receives a significant part of its total energy kick by first undergoing a gravitational deflection by the target halo and subsequently by its original host halo. This generates an energy kick that is due to the relative velocity between the halos during the deflections. We derive analytically the total kick energy of the particle, which is composed of energy from the double-scattering mechanism and tidal fields, as a function of its position in its original host halo just before merger. In the case of a 1:10 merger, we find that the presented mechanisms can easily generate particles with a velocity approximately two times the virial velocity of the target halo. This motivates us to suggest that the high velocity of the recently discovered GC HVGC-1 can be explained by a head-on halo merger. Finally, we illustrate the orbital evolution of high-velocity particles outside the virial sphere of the target halo by solving the equation of motion in an expanding universe. We find a sweet spot around a scale factor of 0.3-0.5 for ejecting particles into large orbits, which can easily reach beyond approximately five virial radii.

  1. Depot-Level Simulation and Multivariate Analysis on B-1 High Velocity Maintenance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-01

    the USAF supply chain elements, 2Lt Anson R. Park, USAF, developed a flexible stand-alone model that examines the impact of HVM on the availability...15. Park, Anson R. Simulation Analysis of High Velocity Maintenance for the B-1B. MS Thesis, AFIT-OR-MS-ENS-10-09. Department of Operational

  2. Preservation of cognitive performance with age during exertional heat stress under low and high air velocity.

    PubMed

    Wright Beatty, Heather E; Keillor, Jocelyn M; Hardcastle, Stephen G; Boulay, Pierre; Kenny, Glen P

    2015-01-01

    Older adults may be at greater risk for occupational injuries given their reduced capacity to dissipate heat, leading to greater thermal strain and potentially cognitive decrements. To examine the effects of age and increased air velocity, during exercise in humid heat, on information processing and attention. Nine young (24 ± 1 years) and 9 older (59 ± 1 years) males cycled 4 × 15 min (separated by 15 min rest) at a fixed rate of heat production (400 W) in humid heat (35°C, 60% relative humidity) under 0.5 (low) and 3.0 (high) m·s(-1) air velocity wearing coveralls. At rest, immediately following exercise (end exercise), and after the final recovery, participants performed an abbreviated paced auditory serial addition task (PASAT, 2 sec pace). PASAT numbers of correct responses at end exercise were similar for young (low = 49 ± 3; high = 51 ± 3) and older (low = 46 ± 5; high = 47 ± 4) males and across air velocity conditions, and when scored relative to age norms. Psychological sweating, or an increased sweat rate with the administration of the PASAT, was observed in both age groups in the high condition. No significant decrements in attention and speeded information processing were observed, with age or altered air velocity, following intermittent exercise in humid heat.

  3. Preservation of Cognitive Performance with Age during Exertional Heat Stress under Low and High Air Velocity

    PubMed Central

    Wright Beatty, Heather E.; Keillor, Jocelyn M.; Hardcastle, Stephen G.; Boulay, Pierre; Kenny, Glen P.

    2015-01-01

    Older adults may be at greater risk for occupational injuries given their reduced capacity to dissipate heat, leading to greater thermal strain and potentially cognitive decrements. Purpose. To examine the effects of age and increased air velocity, during exercise in humid heat, on information processing and attention. Methods. Nine young (24 ± 1 years) and 9 older (59 ± 1 years) males cycled 4 × 15 min (separated by 15 min rest) at a fixed rate of heat production (400 W) in humid heat (35°C, 60% relative humidity) under 0.5 (low) and 3.0 (high) m·s−1 air velocity wearing coveralls. At rest, immediately following exercise (end exercise), and after the final recovery, participants performed an abbreviated paced auditory serial addition task (PASAT, 2 sec pace). Results. PASAT numbers of correct responses at end exercise were similar for young (low = 49 ± 3; high = 51 ± 3) and older (low = 46 ± 5; high = 47 ± 4) males and across air velocity conditions, and when scored relative to age norms. Psychological sweating, or an increased sweat rate with the administration of the PASAT, was observed in both age groups in the high condition. Conclusion. No significant decrements in attention and speeded information processing were observed, with age or altered air velocity, following intermittent exercise in humid heat. PMID:25874223

  4. High Velocity Oxidation and Hot Corrosion Resistance of Some ODS Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowell, C. E.; Deadmore, D. L.

    1977-01-01

    Several oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloys were tested for cyclic, high velocity, oxidation, and hot corrosion resistance. These results were compared to the resistance of an advanced, NiCrAl coated superalloy. An ODS FeCrAl were identified as having sufficient oxidation and hot corrosion resistance to allow potential use in an aircraft gas turbine without coating.

  5. Ultraviolet Molecular Rayleigh Scattering Used to Measure Velocity in High-Speed Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seasholtz, Richard G.

    1997-01-01

    Molecular Rayleigh scattering offers a means to measure gas flow parameters including density, temperature, and velocity. No seeding of the flow is necessary. The Rayleigh scattered power is proportional to the gas density, the spectral width is related to the gas temperature, and the shift in the frequency of the spectral peak is proportional to one component of the fluid velocity. Velocity measurements based on Rayleigh scattering are more suitable for high-speed flow, where the bulk fluid velocity is on the order of, or larger than, the molecular thermal velocities. Use of ultraviolet wavelengths for Rayleigh scattering diagnostics is attractive for two reasons. First, the Rayleigh scattering cross section is proportional to the inverse 4th power of the wavelength. And second, the reflectivity of metallic surfaces is generally less than it is at longer wavelengths. This is of particular interest in confined flow situations, such as in small wind tunnels and aircraft engine components, where the stray laser light scattered from the windows and internal surfaces in the test facility limits the application of Rayleigh scattering diagnostics. In this work at the NASA Lewis Research Center, molecular Rayleigh scattering of the 266-nm fourth harmonic of a pulsed, injection seeded Nd:YAG (neodymium:yttriumaluminum- garnet) laser was used to measure velocity in a supersonic free air jet with a 9.3- mm exit diameter. The frequency of the Rayleigh scattered light was analyzed with a planar mirror Fabry-Perot interferometer used in a static imaging mode, with the images recorded on a cooled, high-quantum-efficiency charge-coupled discharge (CCD) camera. In addition, some unshifted light from the same laser pulse was imaged through the interferometer to generate a reference. Data were obtained with single laser pulses at velocities up to Mach 1.3. The measured velocities were in good agreement with velocities calculated from isentropic flow relations. Our conclusion from

  6. Role of the leader in the rail gun channel at high launching velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zagorskii, A. V.; Katsnel'Son, S. S.; Pravdin, S. S.; Fomichev, V. P.

    1992-08-01

    An analysis of the performance of a number of rail guns indicates that one of the factors limiting the launching velocity is the formation of a leader. In experiments, the leader is usually formed as a result of a plasma breakdown between the dielectric projectile and the channel walls. This can be prevented by various technical means. However, at high launching velocities (5 km/s and greater) a leader may form as a result of a breakdown in the ionized gas in the wake of a strong shock wave ahead of the projectile. Further research is needed to find ways of preventing the formation of a leader in the latter case.

  7. Sound Velocity Measurement of Stishovite at High Pressures up to 19 GPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, C.; Jin, Z.; Wang, Y.; Zhang, Y.; WANG, C.

    2015-12-01

    An experimental system for measurement of the elastic wave velocities of solid polycrystalline samples at high pressures has been installed at the State Key Laboratory of Geological Processes and Mineral Resources, China University of Geosciences (Wuhan). The ultrasonic system with LiNbO3 transducer can both generate and receive high frequency (MHz) signal. Combination with a Walker-type multianvil, the travel time through the polycrystalline sample at high pressures can be obtained. We carried out sound velocity measurements on polycrystalline stishovite up to 19 GPa at room temperature. And the experimental result shows an acoustic softening at high pressures. The experimental technique provides the offline experimental measurement of various materials to the high pressures corresponding to the Earth's mantle transition zone.

  8. Estimation of the surface normal velocity of high frequency ultrasound transducers.

    PubMed

    Rupitsch, Stefan J; Kindermann, Stefan; Zagar, Bernhard G

    2008-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the characterization of the true locally resolved surface normal velocity of an assumed piston-type ultrasonic transducer. Instead of involving a very complicated direct pointwise measurement of the velocity distribution, an inverse problem is solved which yields a spatially discretized weighting vector for the surface normal velocity of the transducer. The study deals with a spherically focused high frequency transducer, which is driven in pulse-echo mode. As a means of posing the inverse problem, the active transducer surface is divided into annuli of equal surface so that for each annulus the spatial impulse response can be calculated. An acrylic glass plate acts as a simple structured target. The resulting ill-posed nonlinear inverse problem is solved with an iterative regularized Gauss-Newton algorithm. The solution of the inverse problem yields an estimated weight for the surface normal velocity for each annulus. Experimental results for a thin copper wire target are compared to simulation results for both uniform and estimated surface normal velocities.

  9. Fabry-Perot images of NGC 1275 and its puzzling high-velocity system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caulet, Adeline; Woodgate, Bruce E.; Brown, Larry W.; Gull, Theodore R.; Hintzen, Paul; Lowenthal, James D.; Oliversen, Ronald J.; Ziegler, Michael M.

    1992-01-01

    The Fabry-Perot imager is used to obtain a velocity sequence of calibrated narrow-band CCD images to cover 3000 km/s velocity space between the redshifted H-alpha emission lines of NGC 1275, its extended associated system of low-velocity (LV) filaments, and the high-velocity (HV) system of knots, projected on the same line of sight in the sky. The lack of intermediate-velocity emission-line gas between the two systems leads to an upper limit of 1.5 x 10 exp -16 ergs/sq cm s sq arcsec (3 sigma) on stripped ionized gas due to the dynamical interaction between NGC 1275 and its HV companion galaxy. It also confirms previous reports that the level of continuum light arising from stellar and nonstellar sources must be very low in otherwise bright, strongly concentrated emission-line knots with unresolved diameters of 425/h pc. The H-alpha luminosities of the emission-line regions of the two systems were measured and star formation rates derived in order to investigate quantitatively the physical relation between the HV galaxy, NGC 1275, and the surrounding cooling flow filaments.

  10. Measuring our peculiar velocity on the CMB with high-multipole off-diagonal correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amendola, Luca; Catena, Riccardo; Masina, Isabella; Notari, Alessio; Quartin, Miguel; Quercellini, Claudia

    2011-07-01

    Our peculiar velocity with respect to the CMB rest frame is known to induce a large dipole in the CMB. However, the motion of an observer has also the effect of distorting the anisotropies at all scales, as shown by Challinor and Van Leeuwen (2002), due to aberration and Doppler effects. We propose to measure independently our local motion by using off-diagonal two-point correlation functions for high multipoles. We study the observability of the signal for temperature and polarization anisotropies. We point out that Planck can measure the velocity β with an error of about 30% and the direction with an error of about 20°. This method constitutes a cross-check, which can be useful to verify that our CMB dipole is due mainly to our velocity or to disentangle the velocity from other possible intrinsic sources. Although in this paper we focus on our peculiar velocity, a similar effect would result also from other intrinsic vectorial distortion of the CMB which would induce a dipolar lensing. Measuring the off-diagonal correlation terms is therefore a test for a preferred direction on the CMB sky.

  11. The Effects of Drag and Tidal Forces on the Orbits of High-Velocity Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, Alexandre; Benjamin, R. A.

    2013-06-01

    Over the past several years, orbital constraints have been obtained for several high velocity cloud complexes surrounding the Milky Way: Complex GCP (Smith Cloud), Complex A, Complex H, Complex GCN, and the Magellanic Stream. We summarize what is known about the orbits of these clouds and and discuss how well each of these complexes fits a balistic trajectory, and discuss how the length of a complex across the sky is related to the inital "fragmentation" and velocity dispersion of the clouds. We then introduce gas drag into the simulation of the orbits of these complexes. We present analytical tests of our numerical method and characterize the departure of the clouds from the ballistic trajectory as a function of drag parameters (ambient gas density and velocity and cloud column density). Using the results of these simulations we comment on the survivability and ultimate fate of HVC in the context of the different models of drag forces.

  12. Portable conduction velocity experiments using earthworms for the college and high school neuroscience teaching laboratory.

    PubMed

    Shannon, Kyle M; Gage, Gregory J; Jankovic, Aleksandra; Wilson, W Jeffrey; Marzullo, Timothy C

    2014-03-01

    The earthworm is ideal for studying action potential conduction velocity in a classroom setting, as its simple linear anatomy allows easy axon length measurements and the worm's sparse coding allows single action potentials to be easily identified. The earthworm has two giant fiber systems (lateral and medial) with different conduction velocities that can be easily measured by manipulating electrode placement and the tactile stimulus. Here, we present a portable and robust experimental setup that allows students to perform conduction velocity measurements within a 30-min to 1-h laboratory session. Our improvement over this well-known preparation is the combination of behaviorally relevant tactile stimuli (avoiding electrical stimulation) with the invention of minimal, low-cost, and portable equipment. We tested these experiments during workshops in both a high school and college classroom environment and found positive learning outcomes when we compared pre- and posttests taken by the students.

  13. Velocity analysis using high-resolution semblance based on sparse hyperbolic Radon transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Xiangbo; Wang, Shengchao; Zhang, Tianze

    2016-11-01

    Semblance measures the lateral coherency of the seismic events in a common mid-point gather, and it has been widely used for the normal-moveout-based velocity estimation. In this paper, we propose a new velocity analysis method by using high-resolution semblance based on sparse hyperbolic Radon transform (SHRT). Conventional semblance can be defined as the ratio of signal energy to total energy in the time gate. We replace the signal energy with the square of the sparse Radon panel and replace the total energy with the sparse Radon panel of the square data. Because of the sparsity-constrained inversion of SHRT, the new approach can produce higher resolution semblance spectra than the conventional semblance. We test this new semblance on synthetic and field data to demonstrate the improvements in velocity analysis.

  14. Rayleigh Scattering Diagnostic for Dynamic Measurement of Velocity Fluctuations in High Speed Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seasholtz, Richard G.; Panda, Jayanta; Elam, Kristie A.

    2001-01-01

    A flow diagnostic technique based on the molecular Rayleigh scattering of laser light is used to obtain dynamic density and velocity data in a high speed flow. The technique is based on analyzing the Rayleigh scattered light with a Fabry-Perot interferometer used in the static, imaging mode. An analysis is presented that established a lower bound for measurement uncertainty of about 20 m/sec for individual velocity measurements obtained in a 100 microsecond time interval. Software and hardware interfaces were developed to allow computer control of all aspects of the experiment and data acquisition. The signals from three photomultiplier tubes were simultaneously recorded using photon counting at a 10 kHz sampling rate and 10 second recording periods. Density and velocity data, including distribution functions and power spectra, taken in a Mach 0.8 free jet, are presented.

  15. An extremely high velocity CO outflow from NGC 7538 IRS 9

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, George F.; Hasegawa, Tatsuhiko I.

    1991-04-01

    New observations of the luminous protostellar object NGC 7538 IRS 9 are presented. Lines of CO J = 3-2 show an extremely high velocity (EHV) red wing, with outflow velocities of 110 km/s. The EHV-emitting region is compact and is centered at a position 5 arcsec east of IRS 9. The emission in lower velocity (classical HV) gas is spatially extended and bipolar. The different spatial distribution and kinematics of the HV and EHV gas imply that the outflow activity of IRS 9 has been discontinuous. The activity which produced the extended HV outflow began roughly 16,000 yr ago, while the activity which produced the EHV gas began roughly 1200 yr ago. The EHV gas has only 3 percent of the mass of the HV gas, but 1.5 times the kinetic energy.

  16. The surface shape and structure of the high magnetic and velocity shear magnetopause: CLUSTER observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budnik, E.; Fedorov, A.; Louarn, P.; Reme, H.; Dunlop, M.

    2003-04-01

    In case when 4 Cluster satellites spend relatively long time in the vicinity of the magnetopause, the relative motion of the satellites and the magnetopause current layer allows to reconstruct the shape of the magnetopause surface. The properties of ion distribution and magnetic field across the magnetopause show that high magnetic and velocity shear magnetopause is a wide layer of open field lines dragged tailward with different velocities. Rapidly moving flux tubes pass in the external layer while slowly convecting ones are located deeper in the boundary layer. We show that such a behavior can be explained in terms of spatial distribution of the entered magnetosheath plasma along reconnected field lines and successive bending of magnetospheric parts of reconnected lines. This "distributed line bending" causes the observed distribution of plasma velocity in the BL.

  17. Portable conduction velocity experiments using earthworms for the college and high school neuroscience teaching laboratory

    PubMed Central

    Shannon, Kyle M.; Gage, Gregory J.; Jankovic, Aleksandra; Wilson, W. Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    The earthworm is ideal for studying action potential conduction velocity in a classroom setting, as its simple linear anatomy allows easy axon length measurements and the worm's sparse coding allows single action potentials to be easily identified. The earthworm has two giant fiber systems (lateral and medial) with different conduction velocities that can be easily measured by manipulating electrode placement and the tactile stimulus. Here, we present a portable and robust experimental setup that allows students to perform conduction velocity measurements within a 30-min to 1-h laboratory session. Our improvement over this well-known preparation is the combination of behaviorally relevant tactile stimuli (avoiding electrical stimulation) with the invention of minimal, low-cost, and portable equipment. We tested these experiments during workshops in both a high school and college classroom environment and found positive learning outcomes when we compared pre- and posttests taken by the students. PMID:24585472

  18. A Joint Inversion for Velocity and Anisotropy Structure Beneath a Highly Extended Continental Rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eilon, Z.; Abers, G. A.; Gaherty, J. B.; Jin, G.

    2014-12-01

    We jointly invert body wave travel times for anisotropy and velocity variations within the Woodlark Rift, Papua New Guinea, one of the youngest (≤6Ma) and most highly-extended (≤190km) continental rifts known. We use data from the CDPapua passive seismic array deployed around the D'Entrecasteaux Islands; these islands lie within the maximally-thinned continental crust at the centre of the rift and host the world's youngest (5 - 7 Ma) UHP rocks. We have previously used SK(K)S splitting to identify strong anisotropy within this rift, with fast axis orientated parallel to extension, roughly N-S. Consistency of splitting direction across station, back azimuth and method of analysis indicates a simple anisotropic fabric beneath much of this region. Consequently, we simplify the anisotropic inversion by solving for perturbations to N-S and E-W shear velocities at each node. This work builds on our previous isotropic tomographic study by resolving tradeoffs between anisotropy and velocity heterogeneities. We cross-correlate shear wave arrivals separately on N-S and E-W components, using the Christoffel equations to show that the travel times of these orthogonal quasi-shear pulses distinctly record the fast and slow velocities within our model. We invert these data for velocities on an irregular mesh, using a finite frequency approach with a first fresnel zone approximation. Preliminary results identify the locus of the rift beneath the D'Entrecasteaux Islands, and demonstrate that substantial anisotropy is present beneath the region of major extension. This anisotropy is co-located with low seismic velocities that indicate almost total removal of lithosphere, consistent with gravity fitting. Therefore, we ascribe the anisotropy within the rift to LPO of highly sheared asthenospheric mantle as a result of the large magnitude of extension.

  19. Nanotribological investigations of materials, coatings and lubricants for nanotechnology applications at high sliding velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tambe, Nikhil S.

    The advent of micro/nanostructures and the subsequent miniaturization of moving components for various nanotechnology applications, such as micro/nanoelectromechanical systems (MEMS/NEMS), have ascribed paramount importance to the tribology and mechanics on the nanoscale. Most of these micro/nanodevices and components operate at very high sliding velocities (of the order of tens of mm/s to few m/s). Atomic force microscopy (AFM) studies to investigate potential materials, coatings and lubricants for these devices have been rendered inadequate due to the inherent limitations on the highest sliding velocities achievable with commercial AFMs (<250 mum/s). The development of a new AFM based technique, done as part of this research work, has allowed nanotribological investigations over a wide range of velocities (up to 10 mm/s). The impacts of this research on the design and development of nanotechnology applications are profound. Research conducted on various materials, coatings and lubricants reveals a strong velocity dependence of friction, adhesion and wear on the nanoscale. Based on the experimental evidence, theoretical formulations have been conducted for nanoscale friction behavior to design a comprehensive analytical model that explains the velocity dependence. The model takes into consideration the contributions of adhesion at the tip-sample interface, high impact velocity related deformations at the contacting asperities and atomic scale stick-slip. Dominant friction mechanisms are identified and the critical operating parameters corresponding to their transitions are defined. Wear studies are conducted at high sliding velocities for materials, coatings and lubricants to understand the primary failure mechanisms. A novel AFM based nanowear mapping technique is developed to map wear on the nanoscale and the interdependence of normal load and sliding velocity on sample surface wear is studied. This technique helps identify and classify wear mechanisms and

  20. Method and apparatus for optical Doppler tomographic imaging of fluid flow velocity in highly scattering media

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, John Stuart; Milner, Thomas Edward; Chen, Zhongping

    1999-01-01

    Optical Doppler tomography permits imaging of fluid flow velocity in highly scattering media. The tomography system combines Doppler velocimetry with high spatial resolution of partially coherent optical interferometry to measure fluid flow velocity at discrete spatial locations. Noninvasive in vivo imaging of blood flow dynamics and tissue structures with high spatial resolutions of the order of 2 to 10 microns is achieved in biological systems. The backscattered interference signals derived from the interferometer may be analyzed either through power spectrum determination to obtain the position and velocity of each particle in the fluid flow sample at each pixel, or the interference spectral density may be analyzed at each frequency in the spectrum to obtain the positions and velocities of the particles in a cross-section to which the interference spectral density corresponds. The realized resolutions of optical Doppler tomography allows noninvasive in vivo imaging of both blood microcirculation and tissue structure surrounding the vessel which has significance for biomedical research and clinical applications.

  1. High-resolution HI and CO observations of high-latitude intermediate-velocity clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Röhser, T.; Kerp, J.; Ben Bekhti, N.; Winkel, B.

    2016-08-01

    Context. Intermediate-velocity clouds (IVCs) are HI halo clouds that are likely related to a Galactic fountain process. In-falling IVCs are candidates for the re-accretion of matter onto the Milky Way. Aims: We study the evolution of IVCs at the disk-halo interface, focussing on the transition from atomic to molecular IVCs. We compare an atomic IVC to a molecular IVC and characterise their structural differences in order to investigate how molecular IVCs form high above the Galactic plane. Methods: With high-resolution HI observations of the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope and 12CO(1 → 0) and 13CO(1 → 0) observations with the IRAM 30 m telescope, we analyse the small-scale structures within the two clouds. By correlating HI and far-infrared (FIR) dust continuum emission from the Planck satellite, the distribution of molecular hydrogen (H2) is estimated. We conduct a detailed comparison of the HI, FIR, and CO data and study variations of the XCO conversion factor. Results: The atomic IVC does not disclose detectable CO emission. The atomic small-scale structure, as revealed by the high-resolution HI data, shows low peak HI column densities and low HI fluxes as compared to the molecular IVC. The molecular IVC exhibits a rich molecular structure and most of the CO emission is observed at the eastern edge of the cloud. There is observational evidence that the molecular IVC is in a transient and, thus, non-equilibrium phase. The average XCO factor is close to the canonical value of the Milky Way disk. Conclusions: We propose that the two IVCs represent different states in a gradual transition from atomic to molecular clouds. The molecular IVC appears to be more condensed allowing the formation of H2 and CO in shielded regions all over the cloud. Ram pressure may accumulate gas and thus facilitate the formation of H2. We show evidence that the atomic IVC will evolve also into a molecular IVC in a few Myr. The reduced datacubes are only available at the CDS via

  2. The frequency and distribution of high-velocity gas in the Galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, Joy S.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the frequency and distribution of high-velocity gas in the Galaxy using UV absorption line measurements from archival high-dispersion IUE spectra and to identify particularly interesting regions for future study. Approximately 500 spectra have been examined. The study began with the creation of a database of all 0 and B stars with b less than or = to 30 deg observed with IUE at high dispersion over its 18-year lifetime. The original database of 2500 unique objects was reduced to 1200 objects which had optimal exposures available. The next task was to determine the distances of these stars so the high-velocity structures could be mapped in the Galaxy. Spectroscopic distances were calculated for each star for which photometry was available. The photometry was acquired for each star using the SIMBAD database. Preference was given to the ubvy system where available; otherwise the UBV system was used.

  3. Hypersonic velocity measurement using Brillouin scattering technique. Application to water under high pressure and temperature.

    PubMed

    Decremps, Frederic; Datchi, Frederic; Polian, Alain

    2006-12-22

    This paper presents recent improvement on sound velocity measurements under extreme conditions, illustrated by the hypersonic sound velocity measurements of water up to 723 K and 9 GPa using Brillouin scattering technique. Because water at high pressure and high temperature is chemically very aggressive, these experiments have been carried out using a specific experimental set-up. The present data should be useful to better constrain the water equation of state at high density. This new development brings high-quality elastic data in a large pressure/temperature domain, which may afterwards benefit the understanding of many other fields as nonlinear acoustics, underwater sound, or physical acoustics from a more general point of view.

  4. Introducing a novel gravitation-based high-velocity compaction analysis method for pharmaceutical powders.

    PubMed

    Tanner, Timo; Antikainen, Osmo; Ehlers, Henrik; Yliruusi, Jouko

    2017-06-30

    With modern tableting machines large amounts of tablets are produced with high output. Consequently, methods to examine powder compression in a high-velocity setting are in demand. In the present study, a novel gravitation-based method was developed to examine powder compression. A steel bar is dropped on a punch to compress microcrystalline cellulose and starch samples inside the die. The distance of the bar is being read by a high-accuracy laser displacement sensor which provides a reliable distance-time plot for the bar movement. In-die height and density of the compact can be seen directly from this data, which can be examined further to obtain information on velocity, acceleration and energy distribution during compression. The energy consumed in compact formation could also be seen. Despite the high vertical compression speed, the method was proven to be cost-efficient, accurate and reproducible. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Design and test of a superconducting structure for high-velocity ions

    SciTech Connect

    Delayen, J.R.; Kennedy, W.L.; Roche, C.T.

    1992-10-01

    Following the successful development of a niobium coaxial half-wave structure we have designed, built and tested a new half-wave geometry: the spoke resonator. This geometry is better suited for high frequency resonators and for the acceleration of high velocity ions. The prototype cavity is a 2-gap structure resonating at 855 MHz, and optimized for particle velocity of 0.30 c. It is easier to manufacture than the coaxial half-wave resonator and the geometry can be straightforwardly extended to multigap designs. Rf-tests have been performed on this cavity both prior to and after high temperature annealing. An accelerating gradient of 7.2 MV/m (cw) and 7.8 MV/m (pulsed) was observed at 4.2 K. After annealing, a low power Q{sub 0} of 1.2 {times}10{sup 8} was observed with small Q degradation due to field emission at high accelerating fields.

  6. Design and test of a superconducting structure for high-velocity ions

    SciTech Connect

    Delayen, J.R.; Kennedy, W.L.; Roche, C.T.

    1992-01-01

    Following the successful development of a niobium coaxial half-wave structure we have designed, built and tested a new half-wave geometry: the spoke resonator. This geometry is better suited for high frequency resonators and for the acceleration of high velocity ions. The prototype cavity is a 2-gap structure resonating at 855 MHz, and optimized for particle velocity of 0.30 c. It is easier to manufacture than the coaxial half-wave resonator and the geometry can be straightforwardly extended to multigap designs. Rf-tests have been performed on this cavity both prior to and after high temperature annealing. An accelerating gradient of 7.2 MV/m (cw) and 7.8 MV/m (pulsed) was observed at 4.2 K. After annealing, a low power Q{sub 0} of 1.2 {times}10{sup 8} was observed with small Q degradation due to field emission at high accelerating fields.

  7. The high-velocity outflow in the proto-planetary nebula Hen 3-1475

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riera, A.; García-Lario, P.; Manchado, A.; Bobrowsky, M.; Estalella, R.

    2003-04-01

    The proto-planetary nebula Hen 3-1475 shows a remarkable highly collimated optical jet with an S-shaped string of three pairs of knots and extremely high velocities. We present here a detailed analysis of the overall morphology, kinematic structure and the excitation conditions of these knots based on deep ground-based high dispersion spectroscopy complemented with high spatial resolution spectroscopy obtained with STIS onboard HST, and WFPC2 [N II] images. The spectra obtained show double-peaked, extremely wide emission line profiles, and a decrease of the radial velocities with distance to the source in a step-like fashion. We find that the emission line ratios observed in the intermediate knots are consistent with a spectrum arising from the recombination region of a shock wave with shock velocities ranging from 100 to 150 km s-1. We propose that the ejection velocity is varying as a function of time with a quasi-periodic variability (with timescale of the order of 100 years) and the direction of ejection is also varying with a precession period of the order of 1500 years. Some slowing down with distance along the axis of the Hen 3-1475 jet may be due to the entrainment process and/or to the enviromental drag. This scenario is supported by geometric and kinematic evidence: firstly, the decrease of the radial velocities along the Hen 3-1475 jet in a step like fashion; secondly, the kinematic structure observed in the knots; thirdly, the point-symmetric morphology together with the high proper motions shown by several knots; and finally the fact that the shock velocity predicted from the observed spectra of the shocked knots is much slower than the velocities at which these knots move outwards with respect to the central source. Based on observations made during service time with the 2.5 m Isaac Newton Telescope operated on La Palma by the Isaac Newton Group of Telescopes in the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrofísica de

  8. High-Velocity Absorption Features in FUSE Spectra of Eta Carinae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonneborn, G.; Iping, R. C.; Gull, T. R.; Vieira, G.

    2003-01-01

    Numerous broad (200 to 1000 km/sec) features in the FUSE spectrum (905-1187 A) of eta Carinae are identified as absorption by a forest of high-velocity narrow lines formed in the expanding circumstellar envelope. These features were previously thought to be P-Cygni lines arising in the wind of the central star. The features span a heliocentric velocity range of -140 to -580 km/sec and are seen prominently in low-ionization ground-state transitions (e.g. N I 1134-35, Fe II 1145-42, 1133, 1127- 22, P II 1153, C I 1158) in addition to C III] 1176 A. The high-velocity components of the FUSE transitions have depths about 50% below the continuum. The identifications are consistent with the complex velocity structures seen in ground- and excited-state transitions of Mg I, Mg 11, Fe II, V II, etc observed in STIS/E230H spectra. The origin of other broad features of similar width and depth in the FUSE spectrum, but without low-velocity ISM absorption, are unidentified. However, they are suspected of being absorption of singly-ionized iron-peak elements (e.g. Fe II, V II, Cr II) out of excited levels 1,000 to 20,000 cmE-l above the ground state. The high-velocity features seen in Fe II 1145 are also present in Fe II 1608 (STIS/E140M), but are highly saturated in the latter. Since these transitions have nearly identical log (flambda) (1.998 vs. 2.080), the differences in the profiles are attributable to the different aperture sizes used (30 x 30 arcsec for FUSE, 0.2 x 0.2 arcsec for STIS/E140M). The high-velocity gas appears to be very patchy or has a small covering factor near the central star. Eta Carinae has been observed several times by FUSE over the past three years. The FUSE flux levels and spectral features in eta Car are essentially unchanged over the 2000 March to June 2002 period, establishing a baseline far-UV spectrum in advance of the predicted spectroscopic minimum in 2003.

  9. High-Velocity Absorption Features in FUSE Spectra of Eta Carinae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonneborn, G.; Iping, R. C.; Gull, T. R.; Vieira, G.

    2003-01-01

    Numerous broad (200 to 1000 km/sec) features in the FUSE spectrum (905-1187 A) of eta Carinae are identified as absorption by a forest of high-velocity narrow lines formed in the expanding circumstellar envelope. These features were previously thought to be P-Cygni lines arising in the wind of the central star. The features span a heliocentric velocity range of -140 to -580 km/sec and are seen prominently in low-ionization ground-state transitions (e.g. N I 1134-35, Fe II 1145-42, 1133, 1127- 22, P II 1153, C I 1158) in addition to C III] 1176 A. The high-velocity components of the FUSE transitions have depths about 50% below the continuum. The identifications are consistent with the complex velocity structures seen in ground- and excited-state transitions of Mg I, Mg 11, Fe II, V II, etc observed in STIS/E230H spectra. The origin of other broad features of similar width and depth in the FUSE spectrum, but without low-velocity ISM absorption, are unidentified. However, they are suspected of being absorption of singly-ionized iron-peak elements (e.g. Fe II, V II, Cr II) out of excited levels 1,000 to 20,000 cmE-l above the ground state. The high-velocity features seen in Fe II 1145 are also present in Fe II 1608 (STIS/E140M), but are highly saturated in the latter. Since these transitions have nearly identical log (flambda) (1.998 vs. 2.080), the differences in the profiles are attributable to the different aperture sizes used (30 x 30 arcsec for FUSE, 0.2 x 0.2 arcsec for STIS/E140M). The high-velocity gas appears to be very patchy or has a small covering factor near the central star. Eta Carinae has been observed several times by FUSE over the past three years. The FUSE flux levels and spectral features in eta Car are essentially unchanged over the 2000 March to June 2002 period, establishing a baseline far-UV spectrum in advance of the predicted spectroscopic minimum in 2003.

  10. Friction properties and deformation mechanisms of halite(-mica) gouges from low to high sliding velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buijze, Loes; Niemeijer, André R.; Han, Raehee; Shimamoto, Toshihiko; Spiers, Christopher J.

    2017-01-01

    The evolution of friction as a function of slip rate is important in understanding earthquake nucleation and propagation. Many laboratory experiments investigating friction of fault rocks are either conducted in the low velocity regime (10-8-10-4 ms-1) or in the high velocity regime (0.01-1 m s-1). Here, we report on the evolution of friction and corresponding operating deformation mechanisms in analog gouges deformed from low to high slip rates, bridging the gap between these low and high velocity regimes. We used halite and halite-muscovite gouges to simulate processes, governing friction, active in upper crustal quartzitic fault rocks, at conditions accessible in the laboratory. The gouges were deformed over a 7 orders of magnitude range of slip rate (10-7-1 m s-1) using a low-to-high velocity rotary shear apparatus, using a normal stress of 5 MPa and room-dry humidity. Microstructural analysis was conducted to study the deformation mechanisms. Four frictional regimes as a function of slip rate could be recognized from the mechanical data, showing a transitional regime and stable sliding (10-7-10-6 m s-1), unstable sliding and weakening (10-6-10-3 m s-1), hardening (10-2-10-1 m s-1) and strong weakening (10-1-1 m s-1). Each of the four regimes can be associated with a distinct microstructure, reflecting a transition from mainly brittle deformation accompanied by pressure solution healing to temperature activated deformation mechanisms. Additionally, the frictional response of a sliding gouge to a sudden acceleration of slip rate to seismic velocities was investigated. These showed an initial strengthening, the amount of which depended on the friction level at which the step was made, followed by strong slip weakening.

  11. High Resolution Velocity Map Imaging Photoelectron Spectroscopy of the Beryllium Oxide Anion, BeO-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dermer, Amanda Reed; Mascaritolo, Kyle; Heaven, Michael

    2016-06-01

    The photodetachment spectrum of BeO- has been studied using high resolution velocity map imaging photoelectron spectroscopy. The vibrational contours were imaged and compared with Franck-Condon simulations for the ground and excited states of the neutral. The electron affinity of BeO was measured for the first time, and anisotropies of several transitions were determined. Experimental findings are compared to high level ab initio calculations.

  12. Development of tunable high pressure CO2 laser for lidar measurements of pollutants and wind velocities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, J. S.; Guerra, M.; Javan, A.

    1980-01-01

    The problem of laser energy extraction at a tunable monochromatic frequency from an energetic high pressure CO2 pulsed laser plasma, for application to remote sensing of atmospheric pollutants by Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) and of wind velocities by Doppler Lidar, was investigated. The energy extraction principle analyzed is based on transient injection locking (TIL) at a tunable frequency. Several critical experiments for high gain power amplification by TIL are presented.

  13. High-Resolution Seismic Velocity and Attenuation Models of Eastern Tibet and Adjacent Regions (Post Print)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-04

    Basin. QLg and QPg models have been determined using a Reverse Two- station/event Method, which shows a high seismic attenuation zone along the...been determined using a Reverse Two-station/event Method, which shows a high seismic attenuation zone along the Kunlun belt. We have also observed...Like Pn and body wave results, low velocity anomalies occur across and within major strike-slip fault zones in the Qiangtang and Songpan-Ganzi

  14. Dramatic High-Speed Velocity Dependence of Quartz Friction Without Melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Toro, G.; Di Toro, G.; Goldsby, D. L.; Tullis, T. E.

    2001-12-01

    A series of large displacement, ambient pressure friction experiments on a monominerallic quartz rock has been conducted to supplement our previous experiments at high confining pressure. Ambient pressure tests are conducted at higher sliding velocities, up to 100 mm/s, than presently can be obtained at high pressure, ~3 mm/s. The 1-atm. rotary shear apparatus allows only ~40 mm of unidirectional sliding displacement; large displacements of many meters are accumulated by repeatedly reversing the sliding direction. Time-dependent finite-element heat-flow analyses were performed to estimate temperatures generated by sliding. These FEM results were verified with temperature measurements made below the slip surface. Results obtained at ambient pressure are consistent with those obtained at high pressure at 3 mm/s. Both tests reveal an extraordinary reduction in friction coefficient with increasing sliding displacement and velocity, from initial values of 0.6 to 0.8 down to a relatively steady-state value of 0.2 to 0.4. Once the friction coefficient has decreased to a relatively steady-state low level, a pause in sliding or an interval of slow sliding results in an increase in the friction coefficient to values of 0.6 to 0.8. A return to high velocity causes a decrease in friction over ~0.5 m of slip back to the quasi-steady-state level. The velocity dependence of friction revealed by these experiments is striking. On a plot of friction coefficient versus log slip velocity, friction decreases only slightly with increasing slip velocity below 1 mm/s, as for typical rate and state friction data. Between ~3 and 100 mm/s, however, the linear trend of friction versus log velocity extrapolates to zero at 300 mm/s. The observed frictional weakening cannot be caused by melting; average fault surface temperatures are < 150° C, and flash temperatures at asperity contacts are < 900° C. Weakening may be due to a lubricating layer of hydrated amorphous silica produced on the

  15. On projectile fragmentation at high-velocity perforation of a thin bumper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myagkov, N. N.; Stepanov, V. V.

    2014-09-01

    By means of 3D numerical simulations, we study the statistical properties of the fragments cloud formed during high-velocity impact of a spherical projectile on a mesh bumper. We present a quantitative description of the projectile fragmentation, and study the nature of the transition from the damage to the fragmentation of the projectile when the impact velocity varies. A distinctive feature of the present work is that the calculations are carried out by smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) method applied to the equations of mechanics of deformable solids (MDS). We describe the materials behavior by the Mie-Grüneisen equation of state and the Johnson-Cook model for the yield strength. The maximum principal stress spall model is used as the fracture model. It is shown that the simulation results of fragmentation based on the MDS equations by the SPH method are qualitatively consistent with the results obtained earlier on the basis of the molecular dynamics and discrete element models. It is found that the power-law distribution exponent does not depend on energy imparted to the projectile during the high-velocity impact. At the same time, our calculations show that the critical impact velocity, the power-law exponent and other critical exponents depend on the fracture criterion.

  16. HIGH-RESOLUTION SEISMIC VELOCITY AND ATTENUATION MODELS OF THE CAUCASUS-CASPIAN REGION

    SciTech Connect

    Mellors, R; Gok, R; Sandvol, E

    2007-07-10

    The southwest edge of Eurasia is a tectonically and structurally complex region that includes the Caspian and Black Sea basins, the Caucasus Mountains, and the high plateaus south of the Caucasus. Crustal and upper mantle velocities show great heterogeneity in this region and regional phases display variations in both amplitudes and travel time. Furthermore, due to a lack of quality data, the region has largely been unexplored in terms of the detailed lithospheric seismic structure. A unified high-resolution 3D velocity and attenuation model of the crust and upper mantle will be developed and calibrated. This model will use new data from 23 new broadband stations in the region analyzed with a comprehensive set of techniques. Velocity models of the crust and upper mantle will be developed using a joint inversion of receiver functions and surface waves. The surface wave modeling will use both event-based methods and ambient noise tomography. Regional phase (Pg, Pn, Sn, and Lg) Q model(s) will be constructed using the new data in combination with existing data sets. The results of the analysis (both attenuation and velocity modeling) will be validated using modeling of regional phases, calibration with selected events, and comparison with previous work. Preliminary analyses of receiver functions show considerable variability across the region. All results will be integrated into the KnowledgeBase.

  17. Measurement of the Radial Velocity of Vega and SAO 104807 by high resolution spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosas, F.; Ordoñez, J.; Suarez, W.; Quijano, A.

    2017-07-01

    The radial velocity is the component of the velocity with which a celestial object approaches (blueshift) or go away (redshift) of the observer. The precise measurement of the redshift allowed to Humason and Hubble discover the expansion of the Universe. In 1998 two research teams simultaneously discovered that this expansion is accelerated, for that reason the hypothesis of the dark energy has been raised to explain the existing repulsion. The present work shows the measurement of the radial velocity of Vega and SAO104807 by high resolution spectrometry. Using the instruments of the Astronomical Observatory of the University of Nariño, located in the south of Colombia, was measured the displacement that the spectral lines of both celestial objects suffer due to the Doppler effect. The results obtained were quite close to those recorded in databases such as SIMBAD, according to the used equipment. The instruments used were: Celestron CGE Pro 1400 Telescope, Shelyak LHIRES III High Resolution Spectrometer and SBIG ST-8300 CCD Camera. The characteristics of the spectrometer are: Diffraction grating: 2400 lines/mm, Spectral dispersion (H alpha): 0:012 nm/pixel, Radial velocity resolution: 5 km/s.

  18. Velocity-pressure integrated versus penalty finite element methods for high Reynolds number flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, S.-W.; Decker, Rand A.

    1989-01-01

    Velocity-pressure integrated and consistent penalty finite element computations of high Reynolds number laminar flows are presented. In both methods the pressure has been interpolated using linear shape functions for a triangular element which is contained inside the biquadratic flow element. It has been shown previously that the pressure interpolation method, when used in conjunction with the velocity-pressure integrated method, yields accurate computational results for high-Reynolds-number flows. It is shown in this paper that use of the same pressure interpolation method in the consistent penalty finite element method yields computational results which are comparable to those of the velocity-pressure integrated method for both the velocity and the pressure fields. Accuracy of the two finite element methods has been demonstrated by comparing the computational results with available experimental data and/or fine grid finite difference computational results. Advantages and disadvantages of the two finite element methods are discussed on the basis of accuracy and convergence nature. Example problems considered include a lid-driven cavity flow of Reynolds number 10000, a laminar backward-facing step flow and a laminar flow through a nest of cylinders.

  19. Velocity-pressure integrated versus penalty finite element methods for high Reynolds number flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Sang-Wook

    1988-01-01

    Velocity-pressure integrated and consistent penalty finite element computations of high Reynolds number, laminar flows are presented. In both of the methods, the pressure has been interpolated using linear shape functions for a triangular element. The triangular element is contained inside the bi-quadratic isoparametric element. It has been reported previously that the pressure interpolation method, when used in the velocity-pressure integrated method, yielded accurate computational results for high Reynolds number flows. It is shown that use of the same pressure interpolation method in the consistent penalty finite element method yielded accurate velocity and pressure fields which were comparable to those obtained using the velocity-pressure integrated method. Accuracy of the two finite element methods has been demonstrated by comparing the computational results with available experimental data and/or fine-grid finite difference computational results. Advantages and disadvantages of the two methods are discussed on the basis of accuracy and convergence nature. Example problems considered include a lid-driven cavity flow for Reynolds number of 10,000, a laminar backward-facing step flow, a laminar flow through a nest of cylinders, and a channel flow with an internal blockage. A finite element computer program (NSFLOW/P) for the 2-D, incompressible Navier-Stokes equations is also presented.

  20. Single ionization in highly charged ion-atom collisions at low to intermediate velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdallah, Mohammad Abdallah

    1998-11-01

    Single electron ejection from neutral targets (He and Ne) by the impact of low to highly charged ions (p, He+,/ Ne+,/ He2+,/ C6+,/ O8+, and Ne10+) at low to intermediate impact velocities is studied. A novel technique of electron momentum imaging is implemented. In this technique two-dimensional electron momentum distributions are produced in coincidence with recoil ions and projectile ions. In first generation experiments we studied the ejected electron momentum distributions without analyzing recoil ions momentum. This series of experiments revealed a charge-state dependence and velocity dependence that are contradictory to a dominant saddle point ionization mechanism at intermediate velocities. It showed a possibility of an agreement with a saddle centered distributions for low charge states at low collision velocities. To pursue the problem in more detail, we developed a second generation spectrometer which allowed us to fully determine the recoil ions momentum. This allowed us to determine the collision plane, energy loss (Q-value), and impact parameter for every collision that resulted in a single (target) electron ejection. This series of experiments revealed for the first time very marked structure in electron spectra that were impossible to observe in other experiments. These structures indicate the quasi-molecular nature of the collision process even at velocities comparable to the electron 'classical' orbital velocity. For the collisions of p, He+, and He2+ with He, a π-orbital shape of the electron momentum distribution is observed. This indicates the importance of the rotational coupling 2p/sigma/to2p/pi in the initial promotion of the ground state electron. This is followed by further promotions to the continuum. This agrees with the 'classical' description implied by the saddle-point ionization mechanism picture.

  1. The Relationship Between Convection Velocities in Simultaneous High-Latitude Ionospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepherd, S. G.; Murr, D. L.; Ruohoniemi, J. M.

    2007-12-01

    Depending on the dipole tilt angle of the Earth's magnetosphere, the northern and southern hemispheres can have dramatically different average conductances. Because the ionosphere provides a path through which magnetospheric field-aligned currents coupling the two regions close, it is expected that the electric field and current density would also exhibit asymmetric behavior between hemispheres that depend on the dipole tilt angle. Some magnetohydrodynamic models of the magnetosphere show that the ratio of the global hemispheric electric potential can be a factor of 2-4 for large dipole tilt angles. Statistical studies of ionospheric electric fields using ground-based radars and spacecraft also show that there is a seasonal dependence of the global ionospheric potential but that the difference is at most ~20%. Here we use merged line-of-sight velocity vectors obtained simultaneously in both hemispheres from the SuperDARN network of HF radars to investigate the relationship of the convection velocity for conditions of varying hemispheric conductance. We find a marked difference in the hemispheric relationship of the simultaneous convection velocities between the dayside and the nightside ionospheres. Using a dataset consisting of seven years of SuperDARN merged velocities centered roughly on the most recent solar maximum, we show statistically that the ratio of velocities restricted to the dayside in the Summer hemisphere to those in the dayside Winter hemisphere depends only marginally on the dipole tilt angle and is at most a factor of ~1.2 for extreme tilt angles. The ratio of merged velocities restricted to the nightside, however, show a strong dependence on dipole tilt angle and can be as high as 2 for extreme tilt angles. The results are consistent with the notion that the dayside magnetosphere-ionosphere circuit behaves as if driven by a constant voltage source, whereas the nightside acts more like a circuit with a constant current source.

  2. Chemical reactions induced by high-velocity molecular impacts: challenges for closed-source mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austin, Daniel

    2016-07-01

    Analysis of upper atmosphere composition using closed-source neutral mass spectrometers (e.g., Cassini INMS, MAVEN NGIMS) is subject to error due to chemical reactions caused by the high-velocity impacts of neutral molecules on the source surfaces. In addition to species traditionally considered "surface reactive" (e.g., O, N) it is likely that many or all impacting molecules are vibrationally excited to the point that chemical changes can occur. Dissociation, fragmentation, formation of radicals and ions, and other reactions likely obscure analysis of the native atmospheric composition, particularly of organic compounds. Existing techniques are not capable of recreating the relevant impact chemistry in the lab. We report on the development of a new capability allowing reactions of high-velocity neutrals impacting surfaces to be characterized directly. Molecules introduced into a vacuum chamber are impacted at several km/s by the surface of a high-speed rotor. These molecules subsequently impact multiple times on other surfaces within the vacuum chamber until they are thermalized, after which they are cryogenically collected and analyzed. Reaction pathways and thermodynamics for volatile compounds are then determined. We will present current results on this project, including data from low- and mid-range velocity experiments. This type of information is critical to clarify prior flight results and plan for future missions. Finally, we present a new type of inlet intended to significantly reduce fragmentation for impact velocities typical of a fly-by mission. Theoretical analysis indicates that this new inlet may reduce fragmentation by more than an order of magnitude for any encounter velocity.

  3. Proper Motion of the Extremely High Velocity SIO J = 2 --> 1 Emission in L1448

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girart, José M.; Acord, Jerry M. P.

    2001-05-01

    We report the first measurements of proper motions in a molecular outflow by using interferometric rotational line observations. We observed and mapped with the BIMA millimeter array the extremely high velocity (EHV) SiO J=2-->1 emission associated with the L1448 molecular outflow. Comparisons were made with the Plateau de Bure interferometer maps carried out 8.5 yr earlier. We obtained proper motions of up to 0.12" yr-1, which imply absolute velocities of 180 km s-1 and an outflow inclination of 21° to the plane of the sky, in agreement with previous modeling of the CO emission. These proper motions suggests that the EHV emission in L1448 has a short timescale. These results strongly suggest that with the new generation of powerful interferometric arrays, the combination of high spectral and angular resolution with high sensitivity will permit a detailed three-dimensional picture of the kinematics of molecular outflows.

  4. Measuring densities of high-velocity metallic sprays using piezoelectric sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Lloyd, C. E.; Proud, W. G.

    2007-12-12

    Recent research efforts in large-scale hydrodynamic experiments have concentrated on the possibility of using piezoelectric sensors to study the evolution of ejecta. Ejecta are small (<100 m diameter) particulates that are ejected at high velocity (>1 km s{sup -1}) from a shocked surface. This paper investigates whether Dynasen PZT piezoelectric sensors are reliable and robust enough to measure accurate time-resolved stresses and densities in high-velocity metallic sprays. The sprays are assumed to have similar characteristics to ejecta sprays, and are generated by a gas gun and in a safe and reproducible manner. A complimentary diagnostic technique, utilising high-speed photography and fast x-radiography, measures the densities of the sprays independently, allowing the accuracy of the sensors to be assessed. The Dynasen sensors have been shown to perform relatively well in spray environments. Their accuracy can be improved by taking their mechanical impedance characteristics into account.

  5. Thin Shell, High Velocity Inertial Confinement Fusion Implosions on the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, T.; Hurricane, O. A.; Callahan, D. A.; Barrios, M. A.; Casey, D. T.; Dewald, E. L.; Dittrich, T. R.; Doppner, T.; Haan, S. W.; Hinkel, D. E.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Le Pape, S.; MacPhee, A. G.; Pak, A.; Park, H. S.; Patel, P. K.; Remington, B. A.; Robey, H. F.; Salmonson, J. D.; Springer, P. T.; Tommasini, R.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bionta, R.; Bond, E.; Bradley, D. K.; Caggiano, J.; Celliers, P.; Cerjan, C. J.; Church, J. A.; Dixit, S.; Dylla-Spears, R.; Edgell, D.; Edwards, M. J.; Field, J.; Fittinghoff, D. N.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Grim, G.; Guler, N.; Hatarik, R.; Herrmann, H. W.; Hsing, W. W.; Izumi, N.; Jones, O. S.; Khan, S. F.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Knauer, J.; Kohut, T.; Kozioziemski, B.; Kritcher, A.; Kyrala, G.; Landen, O. L.; MacGowan, B. J.; Mackinnon, A. J.; Meezan, N. B.; Merrill, F. E.; Moody, J. D.; Nagel, S. R.; Nikroo, A.; Parham, T.; Ralph, J. E.; Rosen, M. D.; Rygg, J. R.; Sater, J.; Sayre, D.; Schneider, M. B.; Shaughnessy, D.; Spears, B. K.; Town, R.P. J.; Volegov, P. L.; Wan, A.; Widmann, K.; Wilde, C. H.; Yeamans, C.

    2015-04-06

    Experiments have recently been conducted at the National Ignition Facility utilizing inertial confinement fusion capsule ablators that are 175 and 165 μm in thickness, 10% and 15% thinner, respectively, than the nominal thickness capsule used throughout the high foot and most of the National Ignition Campaign. These three-shock, high-adiabat, high-foot implosions have demonstrated good performance, with higher velocity and better symmetry control at lower laser powers and energies than their nominal thickness ablator counterparts. Little to no hydrodynamic mix into the DT hot spot has been observed despite the higher velocities and reduced depth for possible instability feedthrough. Earlier results have shown good repeatability, with up to 1/2 the neutron yield coming from α-particle self-heating.

  6. Thin Shell, High Velocity Inertial Confinement Fusion Implosions on the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, T.; Hurricane, O. A.; Callahan, D. A.; Barrios, M. A.; Casey, D. T.; Dewald, E. L.; Dittrich, T. R.; Döppner, T.; Haan, S. W.; Hinkel, D. E.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Le Pape, S.; MacPhee, A. G.; Pak, A.; Park, H.-S.; Patel, P. K.; Remington, B. A.; Robey, H. F.; Salmonson, J. D.; Springer, P. T.; Tommasini, R.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bionta, R.; Bond, E.; Bradley, D. K.; Caggiano, J.; Celliers, P.; Cerjan, C. J.; Church, J. A.; Dixit, S.; Dylla-Spears, R.; Edgell, D.; Edwards, M. J.; Field, J.; Fittinghoff, D. N.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Grim, G.; Guler, N.; Hatarik, R.; Herrmann, H. W.; Hsing, W. W.; Izumi, N.; Jones, O. S.; Khan, S. F.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Knauer, J.; Kohut, T.; Kozioziemski, B.; Kritcher, A.; Kyrala, G.; Landen, O. L.; MacGowan, B. J.; Mackinnon, A. J.; Meezan, N. B.; Merrill, F. E.; Moody, J. D.; Nagel, S. R.; Nikroo, A.; Parham, T.; Ralph, J. E.; Rosen, M. D.; Rygg, J. R.; Sater, J.; Sayre, D.; Schneider, M. B.; Shaughnessy, D.; Spears, B. K.; Town, R. P. J.; Volegov, P. L.; Wan, A.; Widmann, K.; Wilde, C. H.; Yeamans, C.

    2015-04-01

    Experiments have recently been conducted at the National Ignition Facility utilizing inertial confinement fusion capsule ablators that are 175 and 165 μ m in thickness, 10% and 15% thinner, respectively, than the nominal thickness capsule used throughout the high foot and most of the National Ignition Campaign. These three-shock, high-adiabat, high-foot implosions have demonstrated good performance, with higher velocity and better symmetry control at lower laser powers and energies than their nominal thickness ablator counterparts. Little to no hydrodynamic mix into the DT hot spot has been observed despite the higher velocities and reduced depth for possible instability feedthrough. Early results have shown good repeatability, with up to 1 /2 the neutron yield coming from α -particle self-heating.

  7. Spectroscopic Observations of SN 2012fr: A Luminous, Normal Type Ia Supernova with Early High-velocity Features and a Late Velocity Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Childress, M. J.; Scalzo, R. A.; Sim, S. A.; Tucker, B. E.; Yuan, F.; Schmidt, B. P.; Cenko, S. B.; Silverman, J. M.; Contreras, C.; Hsiao, E. Y.; Phillips, M.; Morrell, N.; Jha, S. W.; McCully, C.; Filippenko, A. V.; Anderson, J. P.; Benetti, S.; Bufano, F.; de Jaeger, T.; Forster, F.; Gal-Yam, A.; Le Guillou, L.; Maguire, K.; Maund, J.; Mazzali, P. A.; Pignata, G.; Smartt, S.; Spyromilio, J.; Sullivan, M.; Taddia, F.; Valenti, S.; Bayliss, D. D. R.; Bessell, M.; Blanc, G. A.; Carson, D. J.; Clubb, K. I.; de Burgh-Day, C.; Desjardins, T. D.; Fang, J. J.; Fox, O. D.; Gates, E. L.; Ho, I.-T.; Keller, S.; Kelly, P. L.; Lidman, C.; Loaring, N. S.; Mould, J. R.; Owers, M.; Ozbilgen, S.; Pei, L.; Pickering, T.; Pracy, M. B.; Rich, J. A.; Schaefer, B. E.; Scott, N.; Stritzinger, M.; Vogt, F. P. A.; Zhou, G.

    2013-06-01

    We present 65 optical spectra of the Type Ia SN 2012fr, 33 of which were obtained before maximum light. At early times, SN 2012fr shows clear evidence of a high-velocity feature (HVF) in the Si II λ6355 line that can be cleanly decoupled from the lower velocity "photospheric" component. This Si II λ6355 HVF fades by phase -5 subsequently, the photospheric component exhibits a very narrow velocity width and remains at a nearly constant velocity of ~12,000 km s-1 until at least five weeks after maximum brightness. The Ca II infrared triplet exhibits similar evidence for both a photospheric component at v ≈ 12,000 km s-1 with narrow line width and long velocity plateau, as well as an HVF beginning at v ≈ 31,000 km s-1 two weeks before maximum. SN 2012fr resides on the border between the "shallow silicon" and "core-normal" subclasses in the Branch et al. classification scheme, and on the border between normal and high-velocity Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) in the Wang et al. system. Though it is a clear member of the "low velocity gradient" group of SNe Ia and exhibits a very slow light-curve decline, it shows key dissimilarities with the overluminous SN 1991T or SN 1999aa subclasses of SNe Ia. SN 2012fr represents a well-observed SN Ia at the luminous end of the normal SN Ia distribution and a key transitional event between nominal spectroscopic subclasses of SNe Ia.

  8. Using high-resolution global mantle circulation models to understand fast seismic velocity anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, P. J.; Davies, J.; Davies, R.

    2011-12-01

    Mantle circulation models (MCMs) incorporate plate motion history into a standard mantle convection model. They are an important tool for studying the link between plate tectonics and Earth's interior. Such models are used to predict temperature fields throughout the mantle, which can be compared to seismic tomography, a present day snapshot of Earth's mantle. Assuming a mantle primarily driven by thermal convection we relate regions of colder than average mantle to regions of faster than average seismic velocity. Traditionally, mantle circulation models have used 120 million years of plate motion history as their surface velocity boundary condition. Such models can reconcile observed large-scale fast seismic velocity anomalies in regions of major plate convergence, to depths of around 1300 km. Recent advances allow for high-resolution mantle circulation models with up to 300 million years of plate motion history. When combined with higher resolution tomographic studies we are now able to study the influence of subduction on mantle heterogeneity structure, in greater detail. In this study we present results from a suite of mantle circulation models across a wide parameter space. By comparing the predicted temperature fields to seismic tomography we gain an understanding of which parameters affect the location and magnitude of subduction related anomalies. We also quantify the effect of using mineral physics data to convert modelled temperature fields to seismic velocity. In the simplest cases, we can accurately predict the larger regional scale, mid-mantle fast seismic velocity anomalies, including remnants of the Farallon slab beneath North America and the Tethys oceans below South East Asia. However, the more realistic high-resolution studies allow us to investigate other areas of interest, including more localised aspects of Tethyan subduction associated with the closure of smaller ocean basins. We also examine the model predictions for subducted material in

  9. Quasi-static and multi-site high velocity impact response of composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deka, Lakshya

    Understanding of low and high velocity transverse impact of laminated fiber reinforced composites is of interest in military, aerospace, marine and civilian structures. Recent advances in the field of numerical simulation provide a means of predicting the performance characteristics of layered materials for impact protection. The overall objective of this work is to investigate the behavior of laminated composites which include both thermoplastic and thermoset systems subjected to quasi-static, low and high velocity impact; both from an experimental and numerical modeling view point. To analyze this problem, a series of quasi-static, low and high velocity impact tests have been performed on laminated composite plates namely E-glass/polypropylene, S2-glass/epoxy and carbon/polyphenylene sulphide. To analyze the perforation mechanism, ballistic limit and damage evolution, an explicit three-dimensional finite element code LS-DYNA is used. Selecting proper material models and contact definition is one of the major criteria for obtaining accurate numerical simulation. Material model 162 (MAT 162), a progressive failure model based on modified Hashin's criteria and continuum damage mechanics (CDM) has been assigned to predict failure of the laminate. This approach is used because during transverse impact, a composite laminate undergoes progressive damage. The laminate and the projectile are meshed using brick elements with single integration points. The impact velocity ranges from 180 to 400 m s -1. This work focuses on three main aspects; (i) To obtain static and dynamic material properties to incorporate into the finite element model and predict the ballistic limit of a composite laminate based on the information from quasi-static punch shear test; (ii) To understand penetration, material erosion, ballistic limit and delamination mechanisms for single and multi-site high velocity (or ballistic) impact of composite laminates; (iii) To investigate the different failure

  10. IX Ophiuchi: A High-Velocity Star Near a Molecular Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbig, G. H.

    2005-08-01

    The molecular cloud Barnard 59 is probably an outlier of the Upper Sco/ρ Oph complex. B59 contains several T Tauri stars (TTSs), but outside its northwestern edge are three other Hα-emission objects whose nature has been unclear: IX, KK, and V359 Oph. This paper is a discussion of all three and of a nearby Be star (HD 154851), based largely on Keck HIRES spectrograms obtained in 2004. KK Oph is a close (1.6") double. The brighter component is an HAeBe star, and the fainter is a K-type TTS. The complex BVR variations of the unresolved pair require both components to be variable. V359 Oph is a conventional TTS. Thus, these pre-main-sequence stars continue to be recognizable as such well outside the boundary of their parent cloud. IX Oph is quite different. Its absorption spectrum is about type G, with many peculiarities: all lines are narrow but abnormally weak, with structures that depend on ion and excitation level and that vary in detail from month to month. It could be a spectroscopic binary of small amplitude. Hα and Hβ are the only prominent emission lines. They are broad, with variable central reversals. However, the most unusual characteristic of IX Oph is the very high (heliocentric) radial velocity: about -310 km s-1, common to all spectrograms, and very different from the radial velocity of B59, about -7 km s-1. There is no detectable Li I λ6707 line. There is reason to believe that IX Oph is actually a background object, only aligned with B59. Several conceivable interpretations are discussed: (1) It is unlikely that it is a high-velocity ejectee from the Upper Sco or Upper Cen-Lup associations (the lack of detectable λ6707 shows that it is not the product of a very recent event, and the proper motion points in the wrong direction) or that it was born in or ejected from one of the distant high-velocity CO clouds at this longitude (l=357deg). (2) A stronger possibility is that it is simply a metal-poor high-velocity G- or K-type giant (but such stars

  11. Development for sound velocity and density measurements of liquid metal at high pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terasaki, H.; Nishida, K.; Urakawa, S.; Uesugi, K.; Takubo, Y.; Kuwabara, S.; Nakatsuka, A.; Hoshino, M.; Kono, Y.; Higo, Y.; Kondo, T.

    2012-12-01

    Sound velocity and density of liquid Fe-alloys under high pressure is quite important physical property to estimate the amount of light elements in the terrestrial core from the seismic data. Here, we have developed the system for simultaneous measurement of sound velocity and density combined with X-ray tomography technique at high pressure and temperature. High pressure experiments were performed using 80-ton uni-axial press (Urakawa et al. 2010) installed at X-ray computed micro-tomography (CT) beamline (BL20B2), SPring-8 synchrotron radiation facility. High pressure was generated using opposed-type cupped anvils. We measured the sound velocity and density of solid FeSi at room temperature and those of solid and liquid Ni-S at high temperature. Experimental pressure was obtained from the volume of h-BN. CT measurement was carried out by rotating the press from 0 to 180o with 0.2-0.3o steps. Monochromatized X-ray of 51 keV was used. Density was determined by using X-ray absorption method based on the X-ray radiograph image. The sample thickness for the X-ray path can be directly obtained from the CT data. This is a big advantage for CT measurement. Sound velocity was measured using pulse-echo overlapping ultrasonic method. P-wave signals were generated and detected by LiNbO3 transducer attached backside of the anvil. We have successfully observed both P-wave and S-wave signals up to 1.5 GPa and 1673 K. We detected change of signal intensity and shape corresponding to melting of Ni-S sample.

  12. Real-time dynamics of high-velocity micro-particle impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veysset, David; Hsieh, Alex; Kooi, Steve; Maznev, Alex A.; Tang, Shengchang; Olsen, Bradley D.; Nelson, Keith A.

    High-velocity micro-particle impact is important for many areas of science and technology, from space exploration to the development of novel drug delivery platforms. We present real-time observations of supersonic micro-particle impacts using multi-frame imaging. In an all optical laser-induced projectile impact test, a monolayer of micro-particles is placed on a transparent substrate coated with a laser absorbing polymer layer. Ablation of a laser-irradiated polymer region accelerates the micro-particles into free space with speeds up to 1.0 km/s. The particles are monitored during the impact on the target with an ultrahigh-speed multi-frame camera that can record up to 16 images with time resolution as short as 3 ns. In particular, we investigated the high-velocity impact deformation response of poly(urethane urea) (PUU) elastomers to further the fundamental understanding of the molecular influence on dynamical behaviors of PUUs. We show the dynamic-stiffening response of the PUUs and demonstrate the significance of segmental dynamics in the response. We also present movies capturing individual particle impact and penetration in gels, and discuss the observed dynamics. The results will provide an impetus for modeling high-velocity microscale impact responses and high strain rate deformation in polymers, gels, and other materials.

  13. Unrecognized ligamentous instability due to high-energy, low-velocity mechanism of injury.

    PubMed

    Dusseldorp, J R; Ow-Yang, M; Mobbs, R J

    2010-01-01

    We report a unique mechanism of injury and illustrate the difficulties of diagnosing purely ligamentous injuries to the cervical spine. To our knowledge, there have been no previous reports of this type of high-energy, low-velocity mechanism of injury. The pattern of injury is also unusual, consisting of anterolisthesis of L4 on L5 with bilateral perched facet joints, atlantoaxial instability and bilateral lower limb fractures. We present a 49-year-old man who experienced a high-energy, low-velocity crush injury that led to extreme hyperflexion of his spine. Standard trauma protocols were carried out, yet atlantoaxial instability was not diagnosed until 3 days post-operatively, when the patient went into respiratory failure due to high spinal cord compression. We fused the C1/2 vertebral bodies using Harm's technique; the patient exhibited no long-term spinal cord dysfunction. Although uncommon, if left undiagnosed or not considered, purely ligamentous injuries to the cervical spine can result in catastrophic complications. Such injuries are an important subgroup to be considered at the time of initial assessment. Furthermore, when managing the multi-trauma patient, clinicians must remember not to overlook the atlantoaxial joint, as high-energy, low-velocity injury to the cervical spine may lead to silent, life-threatening instability that may not be apparent on routine imaging. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Nonlinear free vibrations of centrifugally stiffened uniform beams at high angular velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekhoucha, F.; Rechak, S.; Duigou, L.; Cadou, J. M.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we study the bending nonlinear free vibrations of a centrifugally stiffened beam with uniform cross-section and constant angular velocity. The nonlinear intrinsic equations of motion used here are geometrically exact and specific to beams exhibiting large amplitude displacements and rotations associated with small strains. Based on the Timoshenko beam model, these equations are derived from Hamilton's principle, in which the warping is considered. All coupling terms are considered including Coriolis terms. The studied beams are isotropic with clamped-free boundary conditions. By combining the Galerkin method with the harmonic balance method, the equations of motion are converted into a quadratic function treated with a continuation method: the Asymptotic Numerical Method, where the generalized displacement vector is presented as a series expansion. While analysing the effect of the angular velocity, we determine the amplitude versus frequency variations which are plotted as backbone curves. Considering the first lagging and flapping modes, the changes in beam behaviour from hardening to softening are investigated and identified as a function of the angular velocity and the effect of shear. Particular attention is paid to high angular velocities for both Euler-Bernoulli and Timoshenko beams and the natural frequencies so obtained are compared with the results available in the literature.

  15. Experimental and analytical study of high velocity impact on Kevlar/Epoxy composite plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sikarwar, Rahul; Velmurugan, Raman; Madhu, Velmuri

    2012-12-01

    In the present study, impact behavior of Kevlar/Epoxy composite plates has been carried out experimentally by considering different thicknesses and lay-up sequences and compared with analytical results. The effect of thickness, lay-up sequence on energy absorbing capacity has been studied for high velocity impact. Four lay-up sequences and four thickness values have been considered. Initial velocities and residual velocities are measured experimentally to calculate the energy absorbing capacity of laminates. Residual velocity of projectile and energy absorbed by laminates are calculated analytically. The results obtained from analytical study are found to be in good agreement with experimental results. It is observed from the study that 0/90 lay-up sequence is most effective for impact resistance. Delamination area is maximum on the back side of the plate for all thickness values and lay-up sequences. The delamination area on the back is maximum for 0/90/45/-45 laminates compared to other lay-up sequences.

  16. Experimental and analytical study of high velocity impact on Kevlar/Epoxy composite plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sikarwar, Rahul S.; Velmurugan, Raman; Madhu, Velmuri

    2012-12-01

    In the present study, impact behavior of Kevlar/Epoxy composite plates has been carried out experimentally by considering different thicknesses and lay-up sequences and compared with analytical results. The effect of thickness, lay-up sequence on energy absorbing capacity has been studied for high velocity impact. Four lay-up sequences and four thickness values have been considered. Initial velocities and residual velocities are measured experimentally to calculate the energy absorbing capacity of laminates. Residual velocity of projectile and energy absorbed by laminates are calculated analytically. The results obtained from analytical study are found to be in good agreement with experimental results. It is observed from the study that 0/90 lay-up sequence is most effective for impact resistance. Delamination area is maximum on the back side of the plate for all thickness values and lay-up sequences. The delamination area on the back is maximum for 0/90/45/-45 laminates compared to other lay-up sequences.

  17. The Smith Cloud: A High-Velocity Cloud Colliding with the Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lockman, Felix J.; Benjamin, Robert A.; Heroux, A. J.; Langston, Glen I.

    2008-05-01

    New 21 cm H I observations made with the Green Bank Telescope show that the high-velocity cloud known as the Smith Cloud has a striking cometary appearance and many indications of interaction with the Galactic interstellar medium. The velocities of interaction give a kinematic distance of 12.4 +/- 1.3 kpc, consistent with the distance derived from other methods. The Cloud is >3 × 1 kpc in size, and its tip at (l, b) ≈ 39°, -13° is 7.6 kpc from the Galactic center and 2.9 kpc below the Galactic plane. It has >106 M⊙ in H I. Its leading section has a total space velocity near 300 km s-1, is moving toward the Galactic plane with a velocity of 73 +/- 26 km s-1, and is shedding material to the Galaxy. In the absence of drag, the Cloud will cross the plane in about 27 Myr. The Smith Cloud may be an example of the accretion of gas by the Milky Way that is needed to explain certain persistant anomalies in Galactic chemical evolution.

  18. Higher velocity, high-foot implosions on the National Ignition Facility laser

    SciTech Connect

    Callahan, D. A.; Hurricane, O. A.; Hinkel, D. E.; Döppner, T.; Ma, T.; Park, H. -S.; Barrios Garcia, M. A.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Casey, D. T.; Cerjan, C. J.; Dewald, E. L.; Dittrich, T. R.; Edwards, M. J.; Haan, S. W.; Hamza, A. V.; Kline, J. L.; Knauer, J. P.; Kritcher, A. L.; Landen, O. L.; LePape, S.; MacPhee, A. G.; Milovich, J. L.; Nikroo, A.; Pak, A. E.; Patel, P. K.; Rygg, J. R.; Ralph, J. E.; Salmonson, J. D.; Spears, B. K.; Springer, P. T.; Tommasini, R.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bionta, R. M.; Bond, E. J.; Bradley, D. K.; Caggiano, J. A.; Field, J. E.; Fittinghoff, D. N.; Frenje, J.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Grim, G. P.; Hatarik, R.; Merrill, F. E.; Nagel, S. R.; Izumi, N.; Khan, S. F.; Town, R. P. J.; Sayre, D. B.; Volegov, P.; Wilde, C. H.

    2015-05-15

    By increasing the velocity in “high foot” implosions [Dittrich et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 055002 (2014); Park et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 055001 (2014); Hurricane et al., Nature 506, 343 (2014); Hurricane et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 056314 (2014)] on the National Ignition Facility laser, we have nearly doubled the neutron yield and the hotspot pressure as compared to the implosions reported upon last year. The implosion velocity has been increased using a combination of the laser (higher power and energy), the hohlraum (depleted uranium wall material with higher opacity and lower specific heat than gold hohlraums), and the capsule (thinner capsules with less mass). We find that the neutron yield from these experiments scales systematically with a velocity-like parameter of the square root of the laser energy divided by the ablator mass. By connecting this parameter with the inferred implosion velocity (v), we find that for shots with primary yield >1e15 neutrons, the total yield ~ v⁹˙⁴. This increase is considerably faster than the expected dependence for implosions without alpha heating ( ~v⁵˙⁹) and is additional evidence that these experiments have significant alpha heating.

  19. Higher velocity, high-foot implosions on the National Ignition Facility laser

    SciTech Connect

    Callahan, D. A.; Hurricane, O. A.; Hinkel, D. E.; Döppner, T.; Ma, T.; Park, H.-S.; Barrios Garcia, M. A.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Casey, D. T.; Cerjan, C. J.; Dewald, E. L.; Dittrich, T. R.; Edwards, M. J.; Haan, S. W.; Hamza, A. V.; Kritcher, A. L.; Landen, O. L.; LePape, S.; MacPhee, A. G.; Milovich, J. L.; and others

    2015-05-15

    By increasing the velocity in “high foot” implosions [Dittrich et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 055002 (2014); Park et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 055001 (2014); Hurricane et al., Nature 506, 343 (2014); Hurricane et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 056314 (2014)] on the National Ignition Facility laser, we have nearly doubled the neutron yield and the hotspot pressure as compared to the implosions reported upon last year. The implosion velocity has been increased using a combination of the laser (higher power and energy), the hohlraum (depleted uranium wall material with higher opacity and lower specific heat than gold hohlraums), and the capsule (thinner capsules with less mass). We find that the neutron yield from these experiments scales systematically with a velocity-like parameter of the square root of the laser energy divided by the ablator mass. By connecting this parameter with the inferred implosion velocity (v), we find that for shots with primary yield >1 × 10{sup 15} neutrons, the total yield ∼ v{sup 9.4}. This increase is considerably faster than the expected dependence for implosions without alpha heating (∼v{sup 5.9}) and is additional evidence that these experiments have significant alpha heating.

  20. Higher velocity, high-foot implosions on the National Ignition Facility laser

    DOE PAGES

    Callahan, D. A.; Hurricane, O. A.; Hinkel, D. E.; ...

    2015-05-15

    By increasing the velocity in “high foot” implosions [Dittrich et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 055002 (2014); Park et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 055001 (2014); Hurricane et al., Nature 506, 343 (2014); Hurricane et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 056314 (2014)] on the National Ignition Facility laser, we have nearly doubled the neutron yield and the hotspot pressure as compared to the implosions reported upon last year. The implosion velocity has been increased using a combination of the laser (higher power and energy), the hohlraum (depleted uranium wall material with higher opacity and lower specific heat than gold hohlraums), andmore » the capsule (thinner capsules with less mass). We find that the neutron yield from these experiments scales systematically with a velocity-like parameter of the square root of the laser energy divided by the ablator mass. By connecting this parameter with the inferred implosion velocity (v), we find that for shots with primary yield >1e15 neutrons, the total yield ~ v⁹˙⁴. This increase is considerably faster than the expected dependence for implosions without alpha heating ( ~v⁵˙⁹) and is additional evidence that these experiments have significant alpha heating.« less

  1. Residual stresses in high-velocity oxy-fuel metallic coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Totemeier, T. C.; Wright, R. N.; Swank, W. D.

    2004-06-01

    X-ray based residual stress measurements were made on type 316 stainless steel and Fe3Al coatings that were high-velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) sprayed onto low-carbon and stainless steel substrates. Nominal coating thicknesses varied from 250 to 1500 µm. The effect of HVOF spray particle velocity on residual stress and deposition efficiency was assessed by preparing coatings at three different torch chamber pressures. The effect of substrate thickness on residual stress was determined by spraying coatings onto thick (6.4 mm) and thin (1.4 mm) substrates. Residual stresses were compressive for both coating materials and increased in magnitude with spray velocity. For coatings applied to thick substrates, near-surface residual stresses were essentially constant with increasing coating thickness. Differences in thermal expansion coefficient between low-carbon and stainless steels led to a 180 MPa difference in residual stress for Fe3Al coatings. Deposition efficiency for both materials is maximized at an intermediate (˜600 m/s) velocity. Considerations for X-ray measurement of residual stresses in HVOF coatings are also presented.

  2. Electrical method and apparatus for impelling the extruded ejection of high-velocity material jets

    DOEpatents

    Weingart, Richard C.

    1989-01-01

    A method and apparatus (10, 40) for producing high-velocity material jets provided. An electric current pulse generator (14, 42) is attached to an end of a coaxial two-conductor transmission line (16, 44) having an outer cylindrical conductor (18), an inner cylindrical conductor (20), and a solid plastic or ceramic insulator (21) therebetween. A coxial, thin-walled metal structure (22, 30) is conductively joined to the two conductors (18, 20) of the transmission line (16, 44). An electrical current pulse applies magnetic pressure to and possibly explosively vaporizes metal structure (22), thereby collapsing it and impelling the extruded ejection of a high-velocity material jet therefrom. The jet is comprised of the metal of the structure (22), together with the material that comprises any covering layers (32, 34) disposed on the structure. An electric current pulse generator of the explosively driven magnetic flux compression type or variety (42) may be advantageously used in the practice of this invention.

  3. The detection of high-velocity outflows from M8E-IR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, George F.; Allen, Mark; Beer, Reinhard; Dekany, Richard; Huntress, Wesley

    1988-01-01

    A high-resolution (0.059/cm) M band (4.6 micron) spectrum of the embedded young stellar object M8E-IR is presented and discussed. The spectrum shows strong absorption to large blueshifts in the rotational lines of the fundamental vibrational band, v = 1-0, of CO. The absorption is interpreted as being due to gas near to, and flowing from, the central object. The outflowing gas is warm (95-330 K) and consists of discrete velocity components with the very high velocities of 90, 130, 150, and 160 km/s. On the basis of a simple model, it is estimated that the observed outflows are less than 100 yr old.

  4. The Guitar nebula - A bow shock from a slow-spin, high-velocity neutron star

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cordes, James M.; Romani, Roger W.; Lundgren, Scott C.

    1993-01-01

    The discovery is reported of a prominent nebula produced by the motion of a high-velocity pulsar, PSR 2224 + 65, through partially neutral gas. The pulsar's transverse speed of over about 800 km/s makes it arguably the fastest known star in the Galaxy and guarantees that it will ultimately escape the Galactic potential well. A deep H-alpha image reveals a bright head and a giant limb-brightened 'body' whose variable width suggests that the ambient interstellar gas has density variations on length scales less than 0.1 pc. Thermalization of shock energy occurs at a rate of about 0.01 times the pulsar's spindown loss rate. These observations provide some insights into the likelihood of finding shocks around other pulsars and the use of nebulae to find high-velocity neutron stars either not acting as pulsars or with their radiation beamed away from the earth.

  5. High Velocity Tensile Test for Thin Plate Specimen with One Bar Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itabashi, Masaaki

    In order to design thin-walled impact-resistant structure, for example, an automotive body, dynamic behavior of thin plate is essential. So far, except for laminated composite materials, high velocity tensile test of thin plate specimen did not attract impact researchers' and engineers' attention very much. In this paper, the previous thin plate specimen assembly for the one bar method was improved. The one bar method has been utilized for cylindrical specimens of various solid materials and is known as an effective high velocity tensile testing technique. Unfortunately, the previous assembly introduced a tremendous initial peak on stress-strain curves, even for aluminum alloys. With a new specimen assembly, stress-strain curves for IF (Interstitial-atom Free) steel and 7075-T6 aluminum alloy obtained by the one bar method were almost equivalent to those obtained by the tensile version of the split Hopkinson pressure bar method.

  6. The Guitar nebula - A bow shock from a slow-spin, high-velocity neutron star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordes, James M.; Romani, Roger W.; Lundgren, Scott C.

    1993-03-01

    The discovery is reported of a prominent nebula produced by the motion of a high-velocity pulsar, PSR 2224 + 65, through partially neutral gas. The pulsar's transverse speed of over about 800 km/s makes it arguably the fastest known star in the Galaxy and guarantees that it will ultimately escape the Galactic potential well. A deep H-alpha image reveals a bright head and a giant limb-brightened 'body' whose variable width suggests that the ambient interstellar gas has density variations on length scales less than 0.1 pc. Thermalization of shock energy occurs at a rate of about 0.01 times the pulsar's spindown loss rate. These observations provide some insights into the likelihood of finding shocks around other pulsars and the use of nebulae to find high-velocity neutron stars either not acting as pulsars or with their radiation beamed away from the earth.

  7. Chronic symptoms after vestibular neuritis and the high velocity vestibulo-ocular reflex

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Mitesh; Arshad, Qadeer; Roberts, R Edward; Ahmad, Hena; Bronstein, Adolfo M.

    2015-01-01

    Hypothesis As the anterior and posterior semicircular canals are vital to the regulation of gaze stability, particularly during locomotion or vehicular travel, we tested whether the high velocity vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) of the three ipsilesional semicircular canals elicited by the modified Head Impulse Test would correlate with subjective dizziness or vertigo scores after vestibular neuritis (VN). Background Recovery following acute VN varies with around half reporting persistent symptoms long after the acute episode. However, an unanswered question is whether chronic symptoms are associated with impairment of the high velocity VOR of the anterior or posterior canals. Methods Twenty patients who had experienced an acute episode of VN at least three months earlier were included in this study. Participants were assessed with the video head impulse test (vHIT) of all six canals, bithermal caloric irrigation, the Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI) and the Vertigo Symptoms Scale short-form (VSS). Results Of these 20 patients, 12 felt that they had recovered from the initial episode whereas 8 did not and reported elevated DHI and VSS scores. However, we found no correlation between DHI or VSS scores and the ipsilesional single or combined vHIT gain, vHIT gain asymmetry or caloric paresis. The high velocity VOR was not different between patients who felt they had recovered and patients who felt they had not. Conclusions Our findings suggest that chronic symptoms of dizziness following VN are not associated with the high velocity VOR of the single or combined ipsilesional horizontal, anterior or posterior semicircular canals. PMID:26719963

  8. Symmetry control of an indirectly driven high-density-carbon implosion at high convergence and high velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Divol, L.; Pak, A.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Le Pape, S.; Meezan, N. B.; Dewald, E. L.; Ho, D. D.-M.; Khan, S. F.; Mackinnon, A. J.; Ross, J. S.; Turnbull, D. P.; Weber, C.; Celliers, P. M.; Millot, M.; Benedetti, L. R.; Field, J. E.; Izumi, N.; Kyrala, G. A.; Ma, T.; Nagel, S. R.; Rygg, J. R.; Edgell, D.; Macphee, A. G.; Goyon, C.; Hohenberger, M.; MacGowan, B. J.; Michel, P.; Strozzi, D.; Cassata, W.; Casey, D.; Fittinghoff, D. N.; Gharibyan, N.; Hatarik, R.; Sayre, D.; Volegov, P.; Yeamans, C.; Bachmann, B.; Döppner, T.; Biener, J.; Crippen, J.; Choate, C.; Huang, H.; Kong, C.; Nikroo, A.; Rice, N. G.; Stadermann, M.; Bhandarkar, S. D.; Haan, S.; Kozioziemski, B.; Hsing, W. W.; Landen, O. L.; Moody, J. D.; Town, R. P. J.; Callahan, D. A.; Hurricane, O. A.; Edwards, M. J.

    2017-05-01

    We report on the most recent and successful effort at controlling the trajectory and symmetry of a high density carbon implosion at the National Ignition Facility. We use a low gasfill (0.3 mg/cc He) bare depleted uranium hohlraum with around 1 MJ of laser energy to drive a 3-shock-ignition relevant implosion. We assess drive performance and we demonstrate symmetry control at convergence 1, 3-5, 12, and 27 to better than ±5 μm using a succession of experimental platforms. The symmetry control was maintained at a peak fuel velocity of 380 km/s. Overall, implosion symmetry measurements are consistent with the pole-equator symmetry of the X-ray drive on the capsule being better than 5% in the foot of the drive (when shocks are launched) and better than 1% during peak drive (main acceleration phase). This level of residual asymmetry should have little impact on implosion performance.

  9. Ultrafine particle generation by high-velocity impact of metal projectiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stabile, L.; Iannitti, G.; Vigo, P.; Ruggiero, A.; Russi, A.; Buonanno, G.

    2014-05-01

    Ultrafine particle generation through mechanical processes was not carefully deepened so far, even if it could be related to the human health-based researches. In particular, the evaluation of ultrafine particles produced in battlefield scenarios can be useful to quantify the exposure of soldiers to particles carrying toxic heavy metals. In the present work ultrafine particle generation during high-velocity impact of metal projectiles was deepened performing symmetrical high velocity Taylor impacts of copper cylinder tests (Rod-on-Rod tests) by means of a gas-gun facility. Particle number distributions and total concentrations were measured through one-second-time resolution instruments in a chamber where impact events at different velocities were performed. Particle number generation per impact was also evaluated. Particle concentrations in the 106 part. cm-3 range were measured corresponding to particle generations higher than 1012 particles per impact, then comparable to those typical of combustion sources. Particle number distribution showed a unimodal distribution with a 10 nm mode. Summarizing, the performed experimental campaign revealed an extremely high generation of ultrafine particles from mechanical processes.

  10. High-definition velocity-space tomography of fast-ion dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salewski, M.; Geiger, B.; Jacobsen, A. S.; Hansen, P. C.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Korsholm, S. B.; Leipold, F.; Madsen, J.; Moseev, D.; Nielsen, S. K.; Nocente, M.; Odstrčil, T.; Rasmussen, J.; Stagner, L.; Stejner, M.; Weiland, M.; the ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2016-10-01

    Velocity-space tomography of the fast-ion distribution function in a fusion plasma is usually a photon-starved tomography method due to limited optical access and signal-to-noise ratio of fast-ion D α (FIDA) spectroscopy as well as the strive for high-resolution images. In high-definition tomography, prior information makes up for this lack of data. We restrict the target velocity space through the measured absence of FIDA light, impose phase-space densities to be non-negative, and encode the known geometry of neutral beam injection (NBI) sources. We further use a numerical simulation as prior information to reconstruct where in velocity space the measurements and the simulation disagree. This alternative approach is demonstrated for four-view as well as for two-view FIDA measurements. The high-definition tomography tools allow us to study fast ions in sawtoothing plasmas and the formation of NBI peaks at full, half and one-third energy by time-resolved tomographic movies.

  11. Atomic collision experiments utilizing low-velocity, highly-charged ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, B.M.; Jones, K.W.; Meron, M.

    1982-01-01

    Intense beams of highly-stripped ions are now routinely produced at low velocities using the Brookhaven dual MP-tandens in a unique four-stage accel/decel mode. This mode of operation combines three stages of acceleration, stripping at high energy, and one stage of deceleration to near-zero velocity. To date, experiments have used 10-100 nA beams of bare and few-electron heavy ions at energies as low as 0.2 MeV/amu, and upgrades of the facility should push the lower limit below 0.1 MeV/amu. Recent experiments, such as measurements of charge transfer and x-ray production for S/sup 6-16+/ on He and Ar at 6 to 20 MeV and P(b) measurements for MO x-rays produced in Cl/sup 16 +/ + Ar collisions at 20, 10, and 5 MeV have demonstrated the usefulness of highly-stripped, low-velocity projectiles. These experiments and a few possibilities for future experiments are discussed.

  12. High-velocity frictional strength across the Tohoku-Oki megathrust determined from surface drilling torque

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ujiie, Kohtaro; Inoue, Tomoya; Ishiwata, Junya

    2016-03-01

    High-velocity frictional strength is one of the primary factors controlling earthquake faulting. The Japan Trench Fast Drilling Project drilled through the shallow plate boundary fault, where displacement was ~50 m during the 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake. To determine downhole frictional strength, we analyzed the surface drilling torque data acquired at rotation rates equivalent to seismic slip rates (0.8-1.3 m/s). The results show a clear contrast in high-velocity frictional strength across the plate boundary fault: the apparent friction coefficient of frontal prism sediments (hemipelagic mudstones) in the hanging wall is 0.1-0.3, while that of the underthrust sediments (mudstone, laminar pelagic claystone, and chert) in the footwall increases to 0.2-0.4. The apparent friction coefficient of the smectite-rich pelagic clay in the plate boundary fault is 0.08-0.19, which is consistent with that determined from high-velocity (1.1-1.3 m/s) friction experiments. This suggests that surface drilling torque is useful in obtaining downhole frictional strength.

  13. A comprehensive statistical investigation of schlieren image velocimetry (SIV) using high-velocity helium jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Sayan; Qiao, Li

    2017-03-01

    A detailed statistical assessment of seedless velocity measurement using Schlieren Image Velocimetry (SIV) was explored using open source Robust Phase Correlation (RPC) algorithm. A well-known flow field, an axisymmetric turbulent helium jet, was analyzed near and intermediate region (0≤ x/d≤ 20) for two different Reynolds numbers, Re d = 11,000 and Re d = 22,000 using schlieren with horizontal knife-edge, schlieren with vertical knife-edge and shadowgraph technique, and the resulted velocity fields from SIV techniques were compared to traditional Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) measurements. A novel, inexpensive, easy to setup two-camera SIV technique had been demonstrated to measure high-velocity turbulent jet, with jet exit velocities 304 m/s (Mach = 0.3) and 611 m/s (Mach = 0.6), respectively. Several image restoration and enhancement techniques were tested to improve signal to noise ratio (SNR) in schlieren and shadowgraph images. Processing and post-processing parameters for SIV techniques were examined in detail. A quantitative comparison between self-seeded SIV techniques and traditional PIV had been made using correlation statistics. While the resulted flow field from schlieren with horizontal knife-edge and shadowgraph showed excellent agreement with PIV measurements, schlieren with vertical knife-edge performed poorly. The performance of spatial cross-correlations at different jet locations using SIV techniques and PIV was evaluated. Turbulence quantities like turbulence intensity, mean velocity fields, Reynolds shear stress influenced spatial correlations and correlation plane SNR heavily. Several performance metrics such as primary peak ratio (PPR), peak to correlation energy (PCE), the probability distribution of signal and noise were used to compare capability and potential of different SIV techniques.

  14. The Gas Dynamics of High-Velocity Oxy-Fuel Thermal Sprays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hackett, Charles Marcou

    An experimental study of the gas dynamics of the High-Velocity Oxy-Fuel (HVOF) thermal spray process has been performed. With this process, a hot, combustion-driven, supersonic jet is used to propel particles onto a surface, thus forming metal coatings that provide wear, temperature, and corrosion resistance. The fundamental physics of the spray process were studied and several key areas of interest were identified for in-depth study. Optical diagnostic techniques, including microsecond -exposure schlieren and shadowgraph imaging, were used to visualize the hot supersonic jet produced during the spray process. Energetic turbulent mixing of the jet with the surrounding atmosphere was observed. Measurements of oxide levels in aluminum and mild steel coatings sprayed for a range of conditions indicated that the turbulent mixing influences coating oxidation. However, experiments conducted with a low-speed coaxial shroud of inert gas demonstrated that coating oxide formation can be effectively controlled during the spray process. A simple numerical model was developed to predict the behavior of a spray particle in the HVOF jet. The results of computations indicated that independent control of spray particle velocity and temperature was possible through systematic variations in combustion chamber pressure and particle injection location within the nozzle. This hypothesis was confirmed through a series of experiments in which stainless steel particle velocity and temperature were measured using trace velocimetry and two-color radiative pyrometry, respectively. Combustion chamber pressure had a strong effect on particle velocity. Injection location was used to control the residence time of a particle within the flow, thus allowing manipulation of particle temperature without a measurable effect on velocity. Thus, the results of these experiments revealed that the gas dynamics--the behavior of the compressible gas flow--of the HVOF spray process strongly influenced spray

  15. Predicting the Maximum Dynamic Strength in Bench Press: The High Precision of the Bar Velocity Approach.

    PubMed

    Loturco, Irineu; Kobal, Ronaldo; Moraes, José E; Kitamura, Katia; Cal Abad, César C; Pereira, Lucas A; Nakamura, Fábio Y

    2017-04-01

    Loturco, I, Kobal, R, Moraes, JE, Kitamura, K, Cal Abad, CC, Pereira, LA, and Nakamura, FY. Predicting the maximum dynamic strength in bench press: the high precision of the bar velocity approach. J Strength Cond Res 31(4): 1127-1131, 2017-The aim of this study was to determine the force-velocity relationship and test the possibility of determining the 1 repetition maximum (1RM) in "free weight" and Smith machine bench presses. Thirty-six male top-level athletes from 3 different sports were submitted to a standardized 1RM bench press assessment (free weight or Smith machine, in randomized order), following standard procedures encompassing lifts performed at 40-100% of 1RM. The mean propulsive velocity (MPV) was measured in all attempts. A linear regression was performed to establish the relationships between bar velocities and 1RM percentages. The actual and predicted 1RM for each exercise were compared using a paired t-test. Although the Smith machine 1RM was higher (10% difference) than the free weight 1RM, in both cases the actual and predicted values did not differ. In addition, the linear relationship between MPV and percentage of 1RM (coefficient of determination ≥95%) allow determination of training intensity based on the bar velocity. The linear relationships between the MPVs and the relative percentages of 1RM throughout the entire range of loads enable coaches to use the MPV to accurately monitor their athletes on a daily basis and accurately determine their actual 1RM without the need to perform standard maximum dynamic strength assessments.

  16. High velocity anomaly beneath the Deccan volcanic province: Evidence from seismic tomography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Iyer, H.M.; Gaur, V.K.; Rai, S.S.; Ramesh, D.S.; Rao, C.V.R.; Srinagesh, D.; Suryaprakasam, K.

    1989-01-01

    Analysis of teleseismic P-wave residuals observed at 15 seismograph stations operated in the Deccan volcanic province (DVP) in west central India points to the existence of a large, deep anomalous region in the upper mantle where the velocity is a few per cent higher than in the surrounding region. The seismic stations were operated in three deployments together with a reference station on precambrian granite at Hyderabad and another common station at Poona. The first group of stations lay along a west-northwesterly profile from Hyderabad through Poona to Bhatsa. The second group roughly formed an L-shaped profile from Poona to Hyderabad through Dharwar and Hospet. The third group of stations lay along a northwesterly profile from Hyderabad to Dhule through Aurangabad and Latur. Relative residuals computed with respect to Hyderabad at all the stations showed two basic features: a large almost linear variation from approximately +1s for teleseisms from the north to-1s for those from the southeast at the western stations, and persistance of the pattern with diminishing magnitudes towards the east. Preliminary ray-plotting and three-dimensional inversion of the P-wave residual data delineate the presence of a 600 km long approximately N-S trending anomalous region of high velocity (1-4% contrast) from a depth of about 100 km in the upper mantle encompassing almost the whole width of the DVP. Inversion of P-wave relative residuals reveal the existence of two prominent features beneath the DVP. The first is a thick high velocity zone (1-4% faster) extending from a depth of about 100 km directly beneath most of the DVP. The second feature is a prominent low velocity region which coincides with the westernmost part of the DVP. A possible explanation for the observed coherent high velocity anomaly is that it forms the root of the lithosphere which coherently translates with the continents during plate motions, an architecture characteristic of precambrian shields. The low

  17. High-velocity stimulation evokes "dense" population response in layer 2/3 vibrissal cortex.

    PubMed

    Ranjbar-Slamloo, Yadollah; Arabzadeh, Ehsan

    2017-03-01

    Supragranular layers of sensory cortex are known to exhibit sparse firing. In rodent vibrissal cortex, a small fraction of neurons in layer 2 and 3 (L2/3) respond to whisker stimulation. In this study, we combined whole cell recording and two-photon imaging in anesthetized mice and quantified the synaptic response and spiking profile of L2/3 neurons. Previous literature has shown that neurons across layers of vibrissal cortex are tuned to the velocity of whisker movement. We therefore used a broad range of stimuli that included the standard range of velocities (0-1.2 deg/ms) and extended to a "sharp" high-velocity deflection (3.8 deg/ms). Consistent with previous literature, whole cell recording revealed a sparse response to the standard range of velocities: although all recorded cells showed tuning to velocity in their postsynaptic potentials, only a small fraction produced stimulus-evoked spikes. In contrast, the sharp stimulus evoked reliable spiking in the majority of neurons. The action potential threshold of spikes evoked by the sharp stimulus was significantly lower than that of the spontaneous spikes. Juxtacellular recordings confirmed that application of sharp stimulus to single or multiple whiskers produced temporally precise spiking with minimal trial-to-trial spike count variability (Fano factors equal or close to the theoretical minimum). Two-photon imaging further confirmed that most neurons that were not responsive to the standard deflections responded to the sharp stimulus. Altogether, our results indicate that sparseness in L2/3 cortex depends on the choice of stimulus: strong single- or multiwhisker stimulation can induce the transition from sparse to "dense" population response.NEW & NOTEWORTHY In superficial layers of sensory cortex, only a small fraction of neurons fire most of the spontaneous and sensory evoked spikes. However, the functional relevance of such "sparse" activity remains unknown. We found that a "dense" population response is

  18. Velocity and pressure characteristics of a model SSME high pressure fuel turbopump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tse, D. G-N.; Sabnis, J. S.; Mcdonald, H.

    1991-01-01

    Under the present effort an experiment rig has been constructed, an instrumentation package developed and a series of mean and rms velocity and pressure measurements made in a turbopump which modelled the first stage of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) High Pressure Fuel Turbopump. The rig was designed so as to allow initial experiments with a single configuration consisting of a bell-mouth inlet, a flight impeller, a vaneless diffuser and a volute. Allowance was made for components such as inlet guide vanes, exit guide vanes, downstream pumps, etc. to be added in future experiments. This flexibility will provide a clear baseline set of experiments and allow evaluation in later experiments of the effect of adding specific components upon the pump performance properties. The rotational speed of the impeller was varied between 4260 and 7680 rpm which covered the range of scaled SSME rotation speeds when due allowance is made for the differing stagnation temperature, model to full scale. The results at the inlet obtained with rotational speeds of 4260, 6084 and 7680 rpm showed that the axial velocity at the bell-mouth inlet remained roughly constant at 2.2 of the bulk velocity at the exit of the turbopump near the center of the inlet, but it decreased rapidly with increasing radius at all three speeds. Reverse flow occurred at a radius greater than 0.9 R for all three speeds and the maximum negative velocity reduced from 1.3 of the bulk velocity at the exit of the turbopump at 4260 rpm to 0.35 at 7680 rpm, suggesting that operating at a speed closer to the design condition of 8700 rpm improved the inlet characteristics. The reverse flow caused positive prerotation at the impeller inlet which was negligibly small near the center but reached 0.7 of the impeller speed at the outer annulus. The results in the diffuser and the volute obtained at 7680 rpm show that the hub and shroud walls of the diffuser were characterized by regions of transient reverse flow with

  19. Mapping high Pn velocity beneath the Colorado Plateau constrains uplift models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beghoul, Noureddine; Barazangi, Muawia

    1989-06-01

    The massive International Seismological Centre data set of the past 20 years and the two-station method are used to determine Pn velocities in the mantle lid beneath the Colorado plateau. In this method the event is located at distances where Pn is the first arrival (2°-16°) and the path is in or very near the azimuth of the two-station pair and crosses the plateau. This technique to a large extent minimizes the hypocenter mislocation effect and possible errors due to variations in the crustal structure near the source, since only the difference in travel times at the two stations is used. However, this technique has a few underlying assumptions and possible sources of errors (such as the quality of the Pn data base and station delays caused by varying crustal structure) that require an extremely careful application of the method. A detailed study of the source of errors and a methodology of selection of the data are presented. Application of this method to the Colorado plateau using all possible two-station pairs from 53 stations located within or along the margin of the plateau yields an average high Pn velocity of 8.12±0.09 km/s. This value is considerably larger than the average value of 7.83 km/s based on available but very limited seismic refraction profiles but is remarkably similar to the average value of 8.1 km/s for the relatively stable midcontinent region. Our new Pn velocity for the Colorado plateau eliminates the paradox in the literature that emphasizes the rather close similarity between average Pn velocities beneath the Colorado plateau and the Basin and Range Province while their tectonic and magmatic Cenozoic history is dramatically different. Previous models for the structure and evolution of the plateau have used the low Pn velocity as an important constraint on density and thermal state of the lithosphere. Hence such models should be reexamined on the basis of this new uppermost mantle Pn velocity determination. There are two main models

  20. Two-step simulation of velocity and passive scalar mixing at high Schmidt number in turbulent jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rah, K. Jeff; Blanquart, Guillaume

    2016-11-01

    Simulation of passive scalar in the high Schmidt number turbulent mixing process requires higher computational cost than that of velocity fields, because the scalar is associated with smaller length scales than velocity. Thus, full simulation of both velocity and passive scalar with high Sc for a practical configuration is difficult to perform. In this work, a new approach to simulate velocity and passive scalar mixing at high Sc is suggested to reduce the computational cost. First, the velocity fields are resolved by Large Eddy Simulation (LES). Then, by extracting the velocity information from LES, the scalar inside a moving fluid blob is simulated by Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS). This two-step simulation method is applied to a turbulent jet and provides a new way to examine a scalar mixing process in a practical application with smaller computational cost. NSF, Samsung Scholarship.

  1. Ultrasound Velocity Measurements in High-Chromium Steel Under Plastic Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunev, Aleksey; Bochkareva, Anna; Barannikova, Svetlana; Zuev, Lev

    2016-04-01

    In the present study, the variation of the propagation velocity of ultrasound in the plastic deformation of corrosion-resistant high-chromium steel 40X13 with ferrite-carbide (delivery status), martensitic (quenched) and sorbitol (after high-temperature tempering) structures have beem studied/ It is found that each state shows its view of the loading curve. In the delivery state diagram loading is substantially parabolic throughout, while in the martensitic state contains only linear strain hardening step and in the sorbitol state the plastic flow curve is three-step. The velocity of ultrasonic surface waves (Rayleigh waves) was measured simultaneously with the registration of the loading curve in the investigated steel in tension. It is shown that the dependence of the velocity of ultrasound in active loading is determined by the law of plastic flow, that is, the staging of the corresponding diagram of loading. Structural state of the investigated steel is not only changing the type of the deformation curve under uniaxial tension, but also changes the nature of ultrasound speed of deformation.

  2. Prescribed Velocity Gradients for Highly Viscous SPH Fluids with Vorticity Diffusion.

    PubMed

    Peer, Andreas; Teschner, Matthias

    2016-12-06

    Working with prescribed velocity gradients is a promising approach to efficiently and robustly simulate highly viscous SPH fluids. Such approaches allow to explicitly and independently process shear rate, spin, and expansion rate. This can be used to, e.g., avoid interferences between pressure and viscosity solvers. Another interesting aspect is the possibility to explicitly process the vorticity, e.g. to preserve the vorticity. In this context, this paper proposes a novel variant of the prescribed-gradient idea that handles vorticity in a physically motivated way. In contrast to a less appropriate vorticity preservation that has been used in a previous approach, vorticity is diffused. The paper illustrates the utility of the vorticity diffusion. Therefore, comparisons of the proposed vorticity diffusion with vorticity preservation and additionally with vorticity damping are presented. The paper further discusses the relation between prescribed velocity gradients and prescribed velocity Laplacians which improves the intuition behind the prescribed-gradient method for highly viscous SPH fluids. Finally, the paper discusses the relation of the proposed method to a physically correct implicit viscosity formulation.

  3. PTF 12gzk—A rapidly declining, high-velocity type Ic radio supernova

    SciTech Connect

    Horesh, Assaf; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.; Corsi, Alessandra; Frail, Dale A.; Cenko, S. Bradley; Ben-Ami, Sagi; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Yaron, Ofer; Arcavi, Iair; Ofek, Eran O.; Kasliwal, Mansi M.

    2013-11-20

    Only a few cases of Type Ic supernovae (SNe) with high-velocity ejecta (≥0.2 c) have been discovered and studied. Here, we present our analysis of radio and X-ray observations of the Type Ic SN PTF 12gzk. The radio emission declined less than 10 days after explosion, suggesting SN ejecta expanding at high velocity (∼0.3 c). The radio data also indicate that the density of the circumstellar material (CSM) around the supernova is lower by a factor of ∼10 than the CSM around normal Type Ic SNe. PTF 12gzk may therefore be an intermediate event between a 'normal' SN Ic and a gamma-ray-burst-SN-like event. Our observations of this rapidly declining radio SN at a distance of 58 Mpc demonstrates the potential to detect many additional radio SNe, given the new capabilities of the Very Large Array (improved sensitivity and dynamic scheduling), which are currently missed, leading to a biased view of radio SNe Ic. Early optical discovery followed by rapid radio observations would provide a full description of the ejecta velocity distribution and CSM densities around stripped massive star explosions as well as strong clues about the nature of their progenitor stars.

  4. Target responses to the impact of high-velocity, non-abrasive water jets

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, S.W.; Reitter, T.; Carlson, G.; Crutchmer, J.; Garrett, D.; Kramer, P.; Do, B.

    1993-04-01

    Theoretical and experimental investigations have been performed on the effects of a non-abrasive water jet impinging on a solid surface. The theoretical analysis treats the time-dependent, twodimensional case of an axisymmetric jet impacting on a rigid or non-rigid surface at various velocities, up to 1500 m/s. The numerical results obtained include time-dependent pressure distributions and jet geometry near the surface. The maximum calculated pressures agree well with the ``water-hammer`` values when modified for high-velocity jets. Impact and machining experiments were conducted with various materials with water jet reservoir pressures up to 276 MPa (40,000 psi). Test results show that maximum mass removal rate takes place when the standoff distance is several hundred nozzle diameters from the nozzle, suggesting that at this long distance the jet has disintegrated into a series of ligaments and drops impinging on the surface. Analytical and experimental efforts are continuing on determining the dominant mechanisms for the target response to high-velocity jets.

  5. Target responses to the impact of high-velocity, non-abrasive water jets

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, S.W.; Reitter, T.; Carlson, G. ); Crutchmer, J.; Garrett, D.; Kramer, P.; Do, B. )

    1993-04-01

    Theoretical and experimental investigations have been performed on the effects of a non-abrasive water jet impinging on a solid surface. The theoretical analysis treats the time-dependent, twodimensional case of an axisymmetric jet impacting on a rigid or non-rigid surface at various velocities, up to 1500 m/s. The numerical results obtained include time-dependent pressure distributions and jet geometry near the surface. The maximum calculated pressures agree well with the water-hammer'' values when modified for high-velocity jets. Impact and machining experiments were conducted with various materials with water jet reservoir pressures up to 276 MPa (40,000 psi). Test results show that maximum mass removal rate takes place when the standoff distance is several hundred nozzle diameters from the nozzle, suggesting that at this long distance the jet has disintegrated into a series of ligaments and drops impinging on the surface. Analytical and experimental efforts are continuing on determining the dominant mechanisms for the target response to high-velocity jets.

  6. Electrical conductivity and velocity of highly ionized plasma flows - Theory and experiment.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vendell, E. W.; Park, C.; Posch, R. E.

    1972-01-01

    Use of an immersible, three-coil, magnetic-induction probe, previously tested in a low-density supersonic argon jet, to measure electrical conductivity and velocity profiles of a highly ionized high-density nitrogen jet in the continuum flow regime where effects due to probe bow shocks and boundary layers might not be negligible. Measured centerline values of electrical conductivity and velocity were compared with predictions based on a theoretical analysis previously developed to study the gas as it expanded adiabatically and inviscidly from an equilibrium sonic state to the nozzle exit. The resulting numerical exit plane values for electron density and electron temperature were then substituted into the Spitzer-Haerm conductivity formula to compute a theoretical conductivity which agreed within 40% of the measured conductivity, while the calculated and experimental velocity values differed by as much as 50%. The lack of agreement was attributed to the possible use of invalid assumptions and boundary conditions in the computer analysis or to the unknown effects of shocks on the probe data.

  7. Episodic High-velocity Outflows from V899 Mon: A Constraint On The Outflow Mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ninan, J. P.; Ojha, D. K.; Philip, N. S.

    2016-07-01

    We report the detection of large variations in the outflow wind velocity from a young eruptive star, V899 Mon, during its ongoing high accretion outburst phase. Such large variations in the outflow velocity (from -722 to -425 km s-1) have never been reported previously in this family of objects. Our continuous monitoring of this source shows that the multi-component, clumpy, and episodic high velocity outflows are stable in the timescale of a few days, and vary over the timescale of a few weeks to months. We detect significant decoupling in the instantaneous outflow strength to accretion rate. From the comparison of various possible outflow mechanisms in magnetospheric accretion of young stellar objects, we conclude magnetically driven polar winds to be the most consistent mechanism for the outflows seen in V899 Mon. The large scale fluctuations in outflow over the short period makes V899 Mon the most ideal source to constrain various magnetohydrodynamics simulations of magnetospheric accretion. Based on observations made with the Southern African Large Telescope (SALT).

  8. High-Resolution Hα Velocity Fields of Nearby Spiral Galaxies with the Southern African Large Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Carl; Williams, Ted; Spekkens, Kristine; Lee-Waddell, Karen; Kuzio de Naray, Rachel; Sellwood, Jerry

    2016-01-01

    In an effort to test ΛCDM predictions of galaxy mass distributions, we have obtained spectrophotometric observations of several nearby spiral galaxies with the Southern African Large Telescope (SALT) Fabry-Pérot (FP) interferometer as part of the RSS Imaging spectroscopy Nearby Galaxy Survey. Utilizing the SALT FP's 8 arcmin field of view and 2 arcsec angular resolution, we have derived 2D velocity fields of the Hα emission line to high spatial resolution at large radii. We have modeled these velocity fields with the DiskFit software package and found them to be in good agreement with lower-resolution velocity fields of the HI 21 cm line for the same galaxies. Here we present our Hα kinematic map of the barred spiral galaxy NGC 578. At the distance to this galaxy (22 Mpc), our kinematic data has a spatial resolution of 185 pc and extends to galactocentric radii of 13 kpc. The high spatial resolution of this data allows us to resolve the inner rising part of the rotation curves, which is compromised by beam smearing in lower-resolution observations. We are using these Hα kinematic data, combined with HI 21 cm kinematics and broadband photometric observations, to place constraints on NGC 578's mass distribution.

  9. Rebound mechanics of micrometre-scale, spherical particles in high-velocity impacts.

    PubMed

    Yildirim, Baran; Yang, Hankang; Gouldstone, Andrew; Müftü, Sinan

    2017-08-01

    The impact mechanics of micrometre-scale metal particles with flat metal surfaces is investigated for high-velocity impacts ranging from 50 m s(-1) to more than 1 km s(-1), where impact causes predominantly plastic deformation. A material model that includes high strain rate and temperature effects on the yield stress, heat generation due to plasticity, material damage due to excessive plastic strain and heat transfer is used in the numerical analysis. The coefficient of restitution e is predicted by the classical work using elastic-plastic deformation analysis with quasi-static impact mechanics to be proportional to [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] for the low and moderate impact velocities that span the ranges of 0-10 and 10-100 m s(-1), respectively. In the elastic-plastic and fully plastic deformation regimes the particle rebound is attributed to the elastic spring-back that initiates at the particle-substrate interface. At higher impact velocities (0.1-1 km s(-1)) e is shown to be proportional to approximately [Formula: see text]. In this deeply plastic deformation regime various deformation modes that depend on plastic flow of the material including the time lag between the rebound instances of the top and bottom points of particle and the lateral spreading of the particle are identified. In this deformation regime, the elastic spring-back initiates subsurface, in the substrate.

  10. Electroencephalogram, circulation, and lung function after high-velocity behind armor blunt trauma.

    PubMed

    Drobin, Dan; Gryth, Dan; Persson, Jonas K E; Rocksén, David; Arborelius, Ulf P; Olsson, Lars-Gunnar; Bursell, Jenny; Kjellström, B Thomas

    2007-08-01

    Behind armor blunt trauma (BABT) is defined as the nonpenetrating injury resulting from a ballistic impact on personal body armor. The protective vest may impede the projectile, but some of the kinetic energy is transferred to the body, causing internal injuries and occasionally death. The aim in this study was to investigate changes in electroencephalogram (EEG) and physiologic parameters after high-velocity BABT. Eight anesthetized pigs, wearing body armor (including a ceramic plate) on the right side of their thorax, were shot with a 7.62-mm assault rifle (velocity approximately 800 m/s). The shots did not penetrate the armor and these animals were compared with control animals (n = 4), shot with blank ammunition. EEG and several physiologic parameters were thereafter monitored during a 2-hour period after the shot. All animals survived during the experimental period. Five of the exposed animals showed a temporary effect on EEG. Furthermore, exposed animals displayed decreased cardiac capacity and an impaired oxygenation of the blood. Postmortem examination revealed subcutaneous hematomas and crush injuries to the right lung. The results in our animal model indicate that high-velocity BABT induce circulatory and respiratory dysfunction, and in some cases even transient cerebral functional disturbances.

  11. A High Speed Calibration Method for Laser Positioner by Constant Velocity Scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Hiroyuki

    This paper describes a high speed calibration method for laser positioner by scanning work area under constant velocity. Laser positioner consists of sinusoidal laser encoder, DC motor and the controller. The encoder has diffraction grating scale and laser optics. It generates sine and cosine outputs according to the travel distance. Qualities of the scale and the optics contribute to the fluctuation of output signal amplitude, DC offset and relative phase. First, the controller collects the output data under constant velocity of 4 samples per 1 sine wave length. The parameter can be estimated by simplified discrete Fourier transform method. Calibration data are collected every quarter sine wave length over all positioner work area. The result is stored in the table then referred by the controller in real time operation. Experiment results are also reported for HDD servo track writer application.

  12. The quest for TPa Hugoniot data: using the DEMG in high velocity pulsed power experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, Jeff H; Rousculp, Christopher L; Holtkamp, David B; Oro, David M; Griego, Jeffrey R; Atchison, Walter L; Reinovsky, Robert E

    2010-12-20

    ALT-3 is an experiment being designed in collaboration between Russian VNIIEF scientists and LANL that aims to conduct high velocity material experiments to measure shock velocities at pressures near 1 TPa. The DEMG (Disk Explosive Magnetic Generator) is used to drive >60MA currents to accelerate an aluminum liner to speeds in excess of 20 km/s. The 1-D model of the DEMG has been refined from a given current profile to a time-varying inductance. Various techniques are used to model the FOS (Foil Opening Switch) on the DEMG and a refined DEMG model is then used to drive a liner into various targets to determine the optimum design for the experiment and analyze the possible conditions and complications.

  13. Erosive wear of ductile metals by a particle-laden high velocity liquid jet

    SciTech Connect

    Ka-Keung Li, Simon; Humphrey, Joseph A. C.; Levy, Alan V.

    1981-11-30

    In this paper, a liquid-solid particle jet impingement flow apparatus is described and experimental measurements are reported for the accelerated erosion of copper, aluminum and mild steel sheet metal by coal suspensions in kerosene and Al2O3 and SiC suspensions in water. Slurry velocities of up to 130 ft s-1 (40 m s-1) and impingement angles of 15°–90° were investigated. The maximum particle concentration used was 40 wt.%. For high velocity the results of this work show two erosion maxima; these are found at impingement angles of 90° and 40°. However, in corresponding gas-solid particle investigations maximum erosion occurs at approximately 20°. In this work both particle concentration and composition were varied. Finally, a polynomial regression technique was used to calculate empirical and semitheoretical correlation constants.

  14. Cavity dimensions for high velocity penetration events: A comparison of calculational results with data

    SciTech Connect

    Kmetyk, L.N.; Yarrington, P.

    1989-05-01

    Calculations were performed with the CTH and HULL finite difference wavecodes to evaluate computational capabilities for predicting depth and diameter of target cavities produced in high velocity penetration events. The calculations simulated selected tests in a set of armor penetration experiments conducted by the US Army Ballistic Research Laboratory and reported earlier in the literature. The tests and simulations involved penetration of semi-infinite targets by long rod projectiles over a range of impact velocities from 1.3 to 4.5 km/sec. Comparisons are made between the calculated and measured dimensions of the target cavities, and the sensitivity of the predicted results to target property variations is investigated. 9 refs., 18 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. High-speed force spectroscopy unfolds titin at the velocity of molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Rico, Felix; Gonzalez, Laura; Casuso, Ignacio; Puig-Vidal, Manel; Scheuring, Simon

    2013-11-08

    The mechanical unfolding of the muscle protein titin by atomic force microscopy was a landmark in our understanding of single-biomolecule mechanics. Molecular dynamics simulations offered atomic-level descriptions of the forced unfolding. However, experiment and simulation could not be directly compared because they differed in pulling velocity by orders of magnitude. We have developed high-speed force spectroscopy to unfold titin at velocities reached by simulation (~4 millimeters per second). We found that a small β-strand pair of an immunoglobulin domain dynamically unfolds and refolds, buffering pulling forces up to ~100 piconewtons. The distance to the unfolding transition barrier is larger than previously estimated but is in better agreement with atomistic predictions. The ability to directly compare experiment and simulation is likely to be important in studies of biomechanical processes.

  16. LP 400-22, A Very Low Mass and High-Velocity White Dwarf

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawka, Adela; Vennes, Stephane; Oswalt, Terry D.; Smith, J. Allyn; Silvestri, Nicole M.

    2006-01-01

    We report the identification of LP 400-22 (WD 2234+222) as a very low mass and high-velocity white dwarf. The ultraviolet GALEX and optical photometric colors and a spectral line analysis of LP 400-22 show this star to have an effective temperature of 11,080+/-140 K and a surface gravity of log g = 6.32 +/-0.08. Therefore, this is a helium-core white dwarf with a mass of 0.17 M,. The tangential velocity of this white dwarf is 414+/-43 km/s, making it one of the fastest moving white dwarfs known. We discuss probable evolutionary scenarios for this remarkable object.

  17. Correlation between compressive strength and ultrasonic pulse velocity of high strength concrete incorporating chopped basalt fibre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafiq, Nasir; Fadhilnuruddin, Muhd; Elshekh, Ali Elheber Ahmed; Fathi, Ahmed

    2015-07-01

    Ultrasonic pulse velocity (UPV), is considered as the most important test for non-destructive techniques that are used to evaluate the mechanical characteristics of high strength concrete (HSC). The relationship between the compressive strength of HSC containing chopped basalt fibre stands (CBSF) and UPV was investigated. The concrete specimens were prepared using a different ratio of CBSF as internal strengthening materials. The compressive strength measurements were conducted at the sample ages of 3, 7, 28, 56 and 90 days; whilst, the ultrasonic pulse velocity was measured at 28 days. The result of HSC's compressive strength with the chopped basalt fibre did not show any improvement; instead, it was decreased. The UPV of the chopped basalt fibre reinforced concrete has been found to be less than that of the control mix for each addition ratio of the basalt fibre. A relationship plot is gained between the cube compressive strength for HSC and UPV with various amounts of chopped basalt fibres.

  18. Effects of light illumination on electron velocity of AlGaN/GaN heterostructures under high electric field

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Lei; Yang, Xuelin Cheng, Jianpeng; Sang, Ling; Xu, Fujun; Tang, Ning; Feng, Zhihong; Lv, Yuanjie; Wang, Xinqiang; Shen, B.; Ge, Weikun

    2014-12-15

    We have investigated the variation of electron velocity in AlGaN/GaN heterostructures depending on illuminating light intensity and wavelength. It is shown that the electron velocity at high electric field increases under above-band light illumination. This electron velocity enhancement is found to be related to the photo-generated cold holes which interact with hot electrons and thus accelerate the energy relaxation at high electric field. The results suggest an alternative way to improve the electron energy relaxation rate and hence the electron velocity in GaN based heterostructures.

  19. Growth responses of male broilers subjected to increasing air velocities at high ambient temperatures and a high dew point.

    PubMed

    Dozier, W A; Lott, B D; Branton, S L

    2005-06-01

    This study examined live performance responses of male broilers to increasing air velocity of 120 and 180 m/min reared under high cyclic temperatures (25-35-25 degrees C) with a 23 degrees C dew point from 21 to 49 d. Birds were reared in an environmental facility containing 2 wind tunnels (4 pens/tunnel) and 6 floor pens (control). At 21 d, 53 birds were placed in each pen of the wind tunnels and control group, respectively, and growth performance was determined weekly. Increasing air velocity from 120 to 180 m/min improved BW and BW gain from 29 to 35, 36 to 42, and 43 to 49 d of age leading to a cumulative advantage of 287 g in BW gain and a 10-point difference in feed conversion from 21 to 49 d of age. Subjecting birds to air velocity improved growth rate, feed consumption, and feed conversion at each weekly interval from 28 to 49 d over the control birds. These results indicate that male broilers approximating 2.0 to 3.0 kg respond to an air velocity of 180 m/min when exposed to high cyclic temperatures.

  20. Phonon Density of States and Sound Velocities of an Iron-Nickel Alloy at High Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, R. A.; Jackson, J. M.; Sturhahn, W.; Murphy, C. A.

    2012-12-01

    Seismological and cosmochemical studies suggest Earth's core is primarily composed of iron with ~5 to 10 wt% nickel and some light elements [e.g., 1]. Therefore, understanding the behavior of Fe-Ni alloys at high pressure is important for interpreting seismic data and for modeling the interior of the Earth. While many studies have investigated the properties of pure Fe at high pressure, the elastic and vibrational properties of Fe-Ni alloys at high pressure are not well known. We measured sound velocities and thermodynamic properties of 95%-enriched 57Fe alloyed with 10 wt% Ni at high-pressures in a Ne pressure medium. Measurements of high statistical quality were performed with nuclear resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (NRIXS) at 3ID-B of the Advanced Photon Source [e.g., 2 & 3]. The sample volume was determined at each compression point with in-line x-ray diffraction at 3ID-B before and after each NRIXS measurement. In this contribution, we will present derived partial phonon density of states, Debye sound velocities, and compressional and shear sound velocities for Fe0.9-Ni0.1 at high-pressures. [1] McDonough, W.F. (2004): Compositional Model for the Earth's Core. Elsevier Ltd., Oxford. [2] Murphy, C.A., J.M. Jackson, W. Sturhahn, and B. Chen (2011): Melting and thermal pressure of hcp-Fe from the phonon density of states, Phys. Earth Planet. Int., doi:10.1016/j.pepi.2011.07.001. [3] Murphy, C.A., J.M. Jackson, W. Sturhahn, and B. Chen (2011): Grüneisen parameter of hcp-Fe to 171 GPa, Geophys. Res. Lett., doi:10.1029/2011GL049531.

  1. Simulation of compact circumstellar shells around Type Ia supernovae and the resulting high-velocity features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulligan, Brian W.; Wheeler, J. Craig

    2017-01-01

    For Type Ia supernovae that are observed prior to B-band maximum (approximately 18-20 days after the explosion) Ca absorption features are observed at velocities of order 10,000 km/s faster than the typical photospheric features. These high velocity features weaken in the first couple of weeks, disappearing entirely by a week after B-band maximum. The source of this high velocity material is uncertain: it may be the result of interaction between the supernova and circumstellar material or may be the result of plumes or bullets of material ejected during the course of the explosion. We simulate interaction between a supernova and several compact circumstellar shells, located within 0.03 solar radii of the progenitor white dwarf and having masses of 0.02 solar masses or less. We use FLASH to perform hydrodynamic simulations of the system to determine the structure of the ejecta and shell components after the interaction, then use these results to generate synthetic spectra with 1 day cadence for the first 25 days after the explosion. We compare the evolution of the velocity and pseudo-equivalent width of the Ca near-infrared triplet features in the synthetic spectra to observed values, demonstrating that these models are consistent with observations. Additionally, we fit the observed spectra of SN 2011fe (Parrent 2012, Pereira 2013) prior to B-band maximum using these models and synthetic spectra and provide an estimate for Ca abundance within the circumstellar material with implications for the mechanism by which the white dwarf explodes.

  2. High-velocity gas toward the LMC resides in the Milky Way halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, P.; de Boer, K. S.; Werner, K.; Rauch, T.

    2015-12-01

    Aims: To explore the origin of high-velocity gas in the direction of the Large Magellanic Cloud, (LMC) we analyze absorption lines in the ultraviolet spectrum of a Galactic halo star that is located in front of the LMC at d = 9.2+4.1-7.2 kpc distance. Methods: We study the velocity-component structure of low and intermediate metal ions (C ii, Si ii, Si iii) in the spectrum of RX J0439.8-6809, as obtained with the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) onboard the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), and measure equivalent widths and column densities for these ions. We supplement our COS data with a Far-Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) spectrum of the nearby LMC star Sk -69 59 and with H i 21 cm data from the Leiden-Argentina-Bonn (LAB) survey. Results: Metal absorption toward RX J0439.8-6809 is unambiguously detected in three different velocity components near vLSR = 0, + 60, and + 150 km s-1. The presence of absorption proves that all three gas components are situated in front of the star, thus located in the disk and inner halo of the Milky Way. For the high-velocity cloud (HVC) at vLSR = + 150 km s-1, we derive an oxygen abundance of [O/H] =-0.63 (~0.2 solar) from the neighboring Sk -69 59 sight line, in accordance with previous abundance measurements for this HVC. From the observed kinematics we infer that the HVC hardly participates in the Galactic rotation. Conclusions: Our study shows that the HVC toward the LMC represents a Milky Way halo cloud that traces low column density gas with relatively low metallicity. We rule out scenarios in which the HVC represents material close to the LMC that stems from a LMC outflow.

  3. Wide Binaries among High-Velocity and Metal-Poor Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, C.; Herrera, M. A.; Poveda, A.

    The properties of old disk and halo binaries are of interest for the understanding of the processes of formation and early dynamical evolution of the Galaxy. The luminosity function of the components of wide binaries and multiples, their mass function, the fraction of halo or old disk stars that are members of wide binaries, and the distribution of its separations are some of the basic properties that are poorly understood, mainly because of the paucity of known wide binaries among halo and old disk stars. The present work is an attempt to ameliorate this situation. We have elaborated a list of 130 halo and old disk wide binaries by searching for common proper motion companions to the high-velocity and metal-poor stars studied by Schuster and Nissen (1988, 1993). Based on Stromgren photometry, these authors have derived distances, metallicities and ages for their stars. Since each star has a large and well determined proper motion it was possible to compare this value with that of NLTT stars of its vicinity. In this way we were able to identify 130 high-velocity and metal-poor common proper motion binary systems. Each system was carefully checked to avoid misidentifications, and when possible, distances were updated using the Hipparcos trigonometric parallaxes. We have determined the distribution of angular separations for our wide binaries. Reliable distances are available for all of our systems, so this distribution can be converted into a separation distribution in AU. We find that 12 systems have separations in excess of 10000 AU, and their existence poses interesting dynamical problems. Since many systems also have known radial velocities, space velocities for them can be determined, and galactic orbits have been computed and characterized. The secondaries of these wide binaries are interesting in themselves, since they represent a sampling of the faint end of the main sequence of old disk and halo stars.

  4. HIGH-PRECISION TIMING OF FIVE MILLISECOND PULSARS: SPACE VELOCITIES, BINARY EVOLUTION, AND EQUIVALENCE PRINCIPLES

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez, M. E.; Stairs, I. H.; Ferdman, R. D.; Lyne, A. G.; Freire, P. C. C.; Kramer, M.; Nice, D. J.; Demorest, P. B.; Ransom, S. M.; Camilo, F.; Hobbs, G.; Manchester, R. N.

    2011-12-20

    We present high-precision timing of five millisecond pulsars (MSPs) carried out for more than seven years; four pulsars are in binary systems and one is isolated. We are able to measure the pulsars' proper motions and derive an estimate for their space velocities. The measured two-dimensional velocities are in the range 70-210 km s{sup -1}, consistent with those measured for other MSPs. We also use all the available proper motion information for isolated and binary MSPs to update the known velocity distribution for these populations. As found by earlier works, we find that the velocity distribution of binary and isolated MSPs are indistinguishable with the current data. Four of the pulsars in our observing program are highly recycled with low-mass white dwarf companions and we are able to derive accurate binary parameters for these systems. For three of these binary systems, we are able to place initial constraints on the pulsar masses with best-fit values in the range 1.0-1.6 M{sub Sun }. The implications of the results presented here to our understanding of binary pulsar evolution are discussed. The updated parameters for the binary systems studied here, together with recently discovered similar systems, allowed us to update previous limits on the violation of the strong equivalence principle through the parameter |{Delta}| to 4.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} (95% confidence) and the violation of Lorentz invariance/momentum conservation through the parameter |{alpha}-hat3| to 5.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -20} (95% confidence).

  5. An all-sky study of compact, isolated high-velocity clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Heij, V.; Braun, R.; Burton, W. B.

    2002-09-01

    We combine the catalog of compact high-velocity H I clouds extracted by de Heij et al. (\\cite{deheij02}) from the Leiden/Dwingeloo Survey in the northern hemisphere with the catalog extracted by Putman et al. (\\cite{putman02a}) from the Parkes HIPASS data in the southern hemisphere, and analyze the all-sky properties of the ensemble. Compact high-velocity clouds are a subclass of the general high-velocity cloud phenomenon which are isolated in position and velocity from the extended high-velocity Complexes and Streams down to column densities below 1.5*E18 cm-2. Objects satisfying these criteria for isolation are found to have a median angular size of less than one degree. We discuss selection effects relevant to the two surveys; in particular the crucial role played by obscuration due to Galactic H I. Five principal observables are defined for the CHVC population: (1) the spatial deployment of the objects on the sky, (2) the kinematic distribution, (3) the number distribution of observed H I column densities, (4) the number distribution of angular sizes, and (5) the number distribution of H I linewidth. Two classes of models are considered to reproduce the observed properties. The agreement of models with the data is judged by extracting these same observables from simulations, in a manner consistent with the sensitivities of the observations and explicitly taking account of Galactic obscuration. We show that models in which the CHVCs are the H I counterparts of dark-matter halos evolving in the Local Group potential provide a good match to the observables. The best-fitting populations have a maximum HI mass of 107;Msun, a power-law slope of the HI mass distribution in the range -1.7 to -1.8, and a Gaussian dispersion for their spatial distributions of between 150 and 200 kpc centered on both the Milky Way and M 31. Given its greater mean distance, only a small fraction of the M 31 sub-population is predicted to have been detected in present surveys. An

  6. Investigation of high velocity separator for particle removal in coal gasification plants. Phase II report

    SciTech Connect

    Linhardt, H.D.

    1980-01-15

    This report summarizes the results of Phase II of the High Velocity Particle Separator Program performed under Contract EF-77-C-01-2709. This high velocity wedge separator has the potential to reduce equipment size and cost of high temperature and pressurized particulate removal equipment for coal derived gases. Phase II has been directed toward testing and detailed conceptual design of an element suitable for a commercial scale high temperature, high pressure particle separator (HTPS). Concurrently, Phase IA has been conducted, which utilized the ambient analog method (AAM) for aerodynamic and collection performance investigation of each HTPS configuration prior and during hot testing. This report summarizes the results of Phase IA and II. The AAM effort established correlation of theoretical analysis and experiment for HTPS pressure drop, purge flow ratio and collection efficiency potential. Task I defined the initial test conditions to be the contract design point of 1800/sup 0/F and 350 psia. The 1800/sup 0/F, 350 psia testing represents the main high temperature testing with coal-derived particulates in the 2 to 10 micron range. Phase IA and Phase II have demonstrated efficient particle collection with acceptable pressure drop. In view of these encouraging results, it is reasonable to apply the developed technology toward future hot gas particulate cleanup requirements.

  7. High velocity continuous-flow reactor for the production of solar grade silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woerner, L.

    1977-01-01

    The feasibility of a high volume, high velocity continuous reduction reactor as an economical means of producing solar grade silicon was tested. Bromosilanes and hydrogen were used as the feedstocks for the reactor along with preheated silicon particles which function both as nucleation and deposition sites. A complete reactor system was designed and fabricated. Initial preheating studies have shown the stability of tetrabromosilane to being heated as well as the ability to preheat hydrogen to the desired temperature range. Several test runs were made and some silicon was obtained from runs carried out at temperatures in excess of 1180 K.

  8. Shells, holes, worms, high-velocity gas and the z-distribution of gas in galaxies.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rand, R. J.

    The author gives an overview of the current observational understanding of vertically extended gas components in spiral galaxies and the various phenomena which come under such names as shells, holes, worms, and high-velocity gas. For the most part, the focus is on recent high-resolution interferometric studies. The author concentrates on cold gas, and briefly on warm ionized gas, in the Milky Way and a few nearby spirals. Along the way, it is seen how phenomena such as worms and shells may be related to the formation and maintenance of the vertically extended components.

  9. Density and sound velocity of Fe-S liquids at high pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Z.; Sakamaki, T.; Yu, T.; Kono, Y.; Wang, Y.; Park, C.; Shen, G.

    2011-12-01

    Liquid iron is the dominant component in the Earth's outer core and possibly the cores (or outer cores) of other terrestrial planets like Moon, Mars, and Mercury. Seismological and geochemical observations suggest that light elements such as S, C, O, Si, H, etc may be present in the liquid cores. In order to constrain the abundances of light elements and understand their effects on the structure, dynamics, and evolution of planetary cores, it is crucial to determine the equation of state for Fe-light element alloying liquids under core conditions. However, density data on liquid Fe-light element alloys at core pressures are very limited and no sound velocity or bulk modulus data are available for these liquids at high pressures. This makes it difficult to extrapolate the equation of state to core pressures. As a result, density data on solid Fe alloys are often used in the literature to compare with seismological observations by making corrections for the volume of melting. In this study, we extend the density dataset for Fe-S liquids by measuring the density of liquid iron with 19wt% sulfur and 27wt% sulfur using the X-ray absorption technique in a DIA-type multianvil apparatus up to 7 GPa and 2173 K. Ion chambers and 2D X-ray radiographic images were used to measure intensities of the incident and transmitted monochromatic X-rays, with the photon energy optimized at 40 keV. The density was then determined from the Beer-Lambert law using the mass absorption coefficients. We have also developed techniques to directly measure the ultrasonic sound velocities in these liquids up to 5 GPa and 1773 K using a Paris-Edinburgh cell. The sound velocity was determined by measuring the travel time difference between the sample echo and the buffer rod echo using a waveform generator and a digital oscilloscope and by measuring the sample thickness using X-ray radiographic images. The combination of density and sound velocity data can provide tight constraints on the equation of

  10. Wide Binaries among High-Velocity and Metal-Poor Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, C.; Herrera, M. A.; Poveda, A.

    1998-11-01

    The properties of old disk and halo binaries are of interest for the understanding of the processes of formation and early dynamical evolution of the Galaxy. The luminosity function of the components of wide binaries and multiples, their mass function, the fraction of halo or old disk stars that are members of wide binaries, and the distribution of their separations are some of the basic properties that are poorly understood, mainly because of the paucity of known wide binaries among halo and old disk stars. The present work is an attempt to ameliorate this situation. We have elaborated a list of 133 wide binaries mostly belonging to the halo or high-velocity disk, by searching for common proper motion companions to the high-velocity and metal-poor stars studied by Schuster and collaborators (1988, 1993). Based on Stromgren photometry, these authors have derived distances, metallicities and ages for their stars. Since each star has a large and well determined proper motion, it was possible to compare this value with that of NLTT stars of its vicinity. In this way we were able to identify over 100 high-velocity and metal-poor common proper motion binary systems. Each system was carefully checked to avoid misidentifications; in most of the cases, distances were improved using the Hipparcos trigonometric parallaxes. We have determined the distribution of angular separations for our wide binaries. Reliable distances are available for all of our systems, so this distribution can be converted into a separation distribution in AU. We find 11 systems that have projected semiaxes in excess of 10000 AU, or 16 systems with expected semiaxes larger than 10000 AU, their existence poses interesting dynamical problems. Since many systems also have known radial velocities, space velocities for them can be determined, and galactic orbits have been computed and characterized. The secondaries of these wide binaries are interesting by themselves, since they represent a sampling of the

  11. Astrometry of two High--Velocity Stars with the HST FGS System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacConnell, D. J.; Osborn, W.

    1995-12-01

    POS--mode observations with the HST FGS system have been obtained of the two--high--proper motion stars Ross 50 (G166--37) and Wolf 624 (G16--25) over a 25--month period. These stars are thought to have space velocities near the escape speed of the galaxy, but the velocities are not well known because of the large uncertainties in the spectroscopic/photometric distances used to derive the tangential motions. The FGS astrometry yielded positions from a single measure with a typical precision of 2 mas. This allowed proper motions and trigonometric parallaxes to be determined. R50 was observed at six epochs near parallax factor maxima and yielded a parallax of 4 +/- 0.6 mas implying a speed in the local rest frame of 498 +/- 82 k/s. Only four epochs of observations were scheduled for W624, and the decreased baseline made our parallax determination inconclusive. The parallax is less than 3.7 mas and may be as small as 2 mas which equates to the extremely large rest--frame velocity of 800 km/s. Several requirements and limitations of FGS astrometry that have been learned in the course of this study will also be presented.

  12. A high stellar velocity dispersion for a compact massive galaxy at redshift z = 2.186.

    PubMed

    van Dokkum, Pieter G; Kriek, Mariska; Franx, Marijn

    2009-08-06

    Recent studies have found that the oldest and most luminous galaxies in the early Universe are surprisingly compact, having stellar masses similar to present-day elliptical galaxies but much smaller sizes. This finding has attracted considerable attention, as it suggests that massive galaxies have grown in size by a factor of about five over the past ten billion years (10 Gyr). A key test of these results is a determination of the stellar kinematics of one of the compact galaxies: if the sizes of these objects are as extreme as has been claimed, their stars are expected to have much higher velocities than those in present-day galaxies of the same mass. Here we report a measurement of the stellar velocity dispersion of a massive compact galaxy at redshift z = 2.186, corresponding to a look-back time of 10.7 Gyr. The velocity dispersion is very high at km s(-1), consistent with the mass and compactness of the galaxy inferred from photometric data. This would indicate significant recent structural and dynamical evolution of massive galaxies over the past 10 Gyr. The uncertainty in the dispersion was determined from simulations that include the effects of noise and template mismatch. However, we cannot exclude the possibility that some subtle systematic effect may have influenced the analysis, given the low signal-to-noise ratio of our spectrum.

  13. High-resolution blood flow velocity measurements in the human finger.

    PubMed

    Klarhöfer, M; Csapo, B; Balassy, C; Szeles, J C; Moser, E

    2001-04-01

    MR phase contrast blood flow velocity measurements in the human index finger were performed with triggered, nontriggered, and cine acquisition schemes. A strong (G(max) = 200 mT/m), small bore (inner diameter 12 cm) gradient system inserted in a whole body 3 Tesla MR scanner allowed high-resolution imaging at short echo times, which decreases partial volume effects and flow artifacts. Arterial blood flow velocities ranging from 4.9-19 cm/sec were measured, while venous blood flow was significantly slower at 1.5-7.1 cm/sec. Taking into account the corresponding vessel diameters ranging from 800 microm to 1.8 mm, blood flow rates of 3.0-26 ml/min in arteries and 1.2-4.8 ml/min in veins are obtained. The results were compared to ultrasound measurements, resulting in comparable blood flow velocities in the same subjects. Magn Reson Med 45:716-719, 2001. Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. High velocity features in Type Ia supernovae via interaction with circumstellar shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulligan, Brian W.; Wheeler, J. Craig

    2015-01-01

    Observations of Type Ia supernovae (SN Ia) in the weeks before B-band maximum (Bmax) have shown the presence of Ca, Si, and Fe features with velocities of 8,000-14,000 km/s faster than that associated with the photospheric features (PSF). Suggestions for the source of the high velocity features include interaction of the ejecta with a circumstellar material. We perform hydrodynamic simulation of a supernova interacting with a shell consisting of 5×10-3 M⊙ of material and an outer radius of 0.028 R⊙ as well as a supernova in a low density circumstellar medium (LDCSM) without a shell. We present the synthetic spectra of the Ca II near-IR feature generated from both models fit to the observed features in SN 2011fe in the epoch before Bmax. The shell interaction model consistently fits the observed spectra better than the LDCSM model at all times before Bmax, and satisfies the observed velocity evolution of both the HVF and PSF.

  15. Transient flow of highly concentrated suspensions investigated using the ultrasound velocity profiler pressure difference method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouriev (Ur'ev), Boris; Windhab, Erich

    2003-11-01

    In the present work, the transient pressure driven shear flow of highly concentrated suspensions was investigated. The authors applied a novel Doppler-based ultrasound velocity profiler (Met-Flow SA)-pressure difference (UVP-PD) methodology (Ouriev B 2000 PhD Thesis Zurich ISBN: 3-905609-11-8, Ouriev B and Windhab E 2002 J. Exp. Fluids 32 204-11), for the investigation of concentrated suspensions in steady and transient flows. Model suspensions with two different solid phase concentrations and fluid matrixes were analysed in shear steady flow at different volumetric flow rates. Transient flow was initiated by abrupt flow interruption. Simultaneous recording of the pressure gradient (Windhab E 1986 Thesis VDI) and real time flow velocity profiles enables analyses of transient rheological flow properties. Both velocity and rheological information were simultaneously measured on-line and evaluated off-line. The rheological characteristics of the suspensions in transient flow are compared with those in steady flow and conclusions are drawn.

  16. [Estimates of velocity of the travelling wave in the high-range cochlea of the dolphin].

    PubMed

    Popov, V V; Supin, A Ia

    2014-07-01

    Auditory brainstem responses (ABR) to sound pulses of precisely defined spectrum band of 0.5 oct (from 11.2-16 to 90-128 kHz) were recorded in bottlenose dolphins Tursiops truncatus. At equal stimulus levels, ABR amplitude depended on the stimulus spectrum band: the higher the frequency, the higher the amplitude. ABR waveform little depended on the stimulus spectrum band, however ABR latency did depend: the higher the frequency, the shorter the latency. The latency difference between responses to the lowest-frequency (11.2-16 kHz) and the highest-frequency (90-129 kHz) stimuli was up to 0.3 ms. This latency difference was attributed to the time of the wave travelling along the basilar membrane. Therefore, the data were used to compute the travelling-wave velocity. The obtained estimates were: 38.2 oct/ms at the proximal (high-frequ- ency) end of the basilar membrane to 2.8 oct/ms at the distal (low-frequency) end. Comparison of the travelling-wave velocities in humans and dolphins shows that the travelling-wave velocity is linked to the characteristic frequency, not to the place in the cochlea.

  17. Discovery of very high velocity outflow in V Hydra - Wind from an accretion disk in a binary?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sahai, R.; Wannier, P. G.

    1988-01-01

    High-resolution observations of lines from the CO v = 1-0 vibration-rotation band at 4.6 microns, taken with the FTS/KPNO 4-m telescope, are reported for the carbon-rich red giant V Hydra, which is surrounded by an extended expanding molecular envelope resulting from extensive mass loss. The spectrum shows, in addition to the expected absorption at the outflow velocity of the envelope, absorption extending up to 120 km/s bluewards of the stellar velocity. A comparison of the spectrum observed at two epochs shows that the high-velocity absorption features change with time. It is suggested that the observed high-velocity features in V Hydra arise in a high-velocity polar outflow from an accretion disk in a binary system, as proposed in the mass-loss model for bipolar envelopes by Morris (1988).

  18. Effects of High Velocity Elastic Band versus Heavy Resistance Training on Hamstring Strength, Activation, and Sprint Running Performance

    PubMed Central

    Janusevicius, Donatas; Snieckus, Audrius; Skurvydas, Albertas; Silinskas, Viktoras; Trinkunas, Eugenijus; Cadefau, Joan Aureli; Kamandulis, Sigitas

    2017-01-01

    Hamstring muscle injuries occur during high-speed activities, which suggests that muscular strength at high velocities may be more important than maximal strength. This study examined hamstring adaptations to training for maximal strength and for strength at high velocities. Physically active men (n = 25; age, 23.0 ± 3.2 years) were randomly divided into: (1) a resistance training (RT, n = 8) group, which performed high-load, low-velocity concentric–eccentric hamstring contractions; (2) a resistance training concentric (RTC; n = 9) group, which performed high-load, low-velocity concentric-only hamstring contractions; and (3) a high-velocity elastic band training (HVT, n = 8) group, which performed low-load, high-velocity concentric–eccentric hamstring contractions. Pre- and posttraining tests included hamstring strength on a hamstring-curl apparatus, concentric knee extension–flexion at 60°/s, 240°/s, and 450°/s, eccentric knee flexion at 60°/s and 240°/s, hamstring and quadriceps coactivation, knee flexion and extension frequency in the prone position, and 30-m sprint running speed from a stationary start and with a running start. Knee flexor torque increased significantly by 21.1% ± 8.1% in the RTC group and 16.2% ± 4.2% in the RT group (p < 0.05 for both groups). Hamstring coactivation decreased significantly in both groups. In the HVT group, knee flexion and extension frequency increased by 17.8% ± 8.2%, concentric peak torque of the knee flexors at 450°/s increased by 31.0% ± 12.0%, hamstring coactivation decreased, and running performance over 30 m improved (p < 0.05 for all parameters). These findings suggest that resistance training at high velocities is superior to traditional heavy resistance training for increasing knee flexor strength at high velocities, movement frequency, and sprint running performance. These findings also indicate that traditional training approaches are effective for increasing knee flexor strength and reducing knee

  19. HIGH-RESOLUTION SEISMIC VELOCITY AND ATTENUATION MODELS OF THE CAUCASUS-CASPIAN REGION

    SciTech Connect

    Mellors, R; Gok, R; Pasyanos, M; Skobeltsyn, G; Teoman, U; Godoladze, T; Sandvol, E

    2008-07-01

    The southwest edge of Eurasia is a tectonically and structurally complex region that includes the Caspian and Black Sea basins, the Caucasus Mountains, and the high plateaus south of the Caucasus. Using data from 25 broadband stations located in the region, new estimates of crustal and upper mantle thickness, velocity structure, and attenuation are being developed. Receiver functions have been determined for all stations. Depth to Moho is estimated using slant stacking of the receiver functions, forward modeling, and inversion. Moho depths along the Caspian and in the Kura Depression are in general poorly constrained using only receiver functions due to thick sedimentary basin sediments. The best fitting models suggest a low velocity upper crust with Moho depths ranging from 30 to 40 km. Crustal thicknesses increase in the Greater Caucasus with Moho depths of 40 to 50 km. Pronounced variations with azimuth of source are observed indicating 3D structural complexity and upper crustal velocities are higher than in the Kura Depression to the south. In the Lesser Caucasus, south and west of the Kura Depression, the crust is thicker (40 to 50 km) and upper crustal velocities are higher. Work is underway to refine these models with the event based surface wave dispersion and ambient noise correlation measurements from continuous data. Regional phase (Lg and Pg) attenuation models as well as blockage maps for Pn and Sn are being developed. Two methods are used to estimate Q: the two-station method to estimate inter-station Q and the reversed, two-station, two event method. The results are then inverted to create Lg and Pg Q maps. Initial results suggest substantial variations in both Pg and Lg Q in the region. A zone of higher Pg Q extends west from the Caspian between the Lesser and Greater Caucasus and a narrow area of higher Lg Q is observed.

  20. A line source tracer test - a better method for assessing high groundwater velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magal, E.; Weisbrod, N.; Yakirevich, A.; Kurtzman, D.; Yechieli, Y.

    2009-12-01

    A line source injection is suggested as an effective method for assessing groundwater velocities and flow directions in subsurface characterized by high water fluxes. Modifying the common techniques of injecting a tracer into a well was necessary after frequently-used methods of natural and forced gradient tracer tests ended with no reliable information on the local groundwater flow. In a field experiment, tracers were injected into 8-m long line injection system constructed below the water table almost perpendicular to the assumed flow direction. The injection system was divided to four separate segments (each 2 m long) enabling the injection of four different tracers along the line source. An array of five boreholes located in an area of 10x10 m downstream was used for monitoring the tracers' transport. Two dye tracers (Uranine and Na Naphthionate) were injected in a long pulse of several hours into two of the injection pipe segments and two tracers (Rhenium oxide and Gd-DTPA) were instantaneously injected to the other two segments. The tracers were detected 0.7 to 2.3 hours after injection in four of the five observation wells, located 2.3 to 10 m from the injection system, respectively. Groundwater velocities were calculated directly from the tracers' arrival times and by fitting the observed breakthrough curves to simulations with one and two dimensions analytical solutions for conservative tracer transport. The groundwater velocity was determined to be ~100 m/d. The longitudinal dispersivity value, generated from fitting the tracer breakthrough curves, was in a range of 0.2-3m. The groundwater flow direction was derived based on the arrival of the tracers and was found to be consistent with the apparent direction of the hydraulic gradient. The hydraulic conductivity derived from the groundwater velocity was ~1200 m/d, which is in the upper range of gravel sediment.

  1. The head-tail structure of high-velocity clouds. A survey of the northern sky

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brüns, C.; Kerp, J.; Kalberla, P. M. W.; Mebold, U.

    2000-05-01

    We present new observational results on high-velocity clouds (HVCs) based on an analysis of the Leiden/Dwingeloo \\ion{HI} survey. We cataloged all HVCs with N_HI>= 1*1019 cm-2 and found 252 clouds that form a representative flux limited sample. The detailed analysis of each individual HVC in this sample revealed a significant number of HVCs (nearly 20%) having simultaneously a velocity and a column density gradient. These HVCs have a cometary appearance in the position-velocity representation and are called henceforward head-tail HVCs (HT HVCs). The head is the region with the highest column density of the HVC, while the column density of the tail is in general much lower (by a factor of 2-4). The absolute majority of the cataloged HVCs belongs to the well known HVC complexes. With exception of the very faint HVC complex L, all HVC complexes contain HT HVCs. The HT HVCs were analyzed statistically with respect to their physical parameters like position, velocity (v_LSR, v_GSR), and column density. We found a linear correlation between the fraction of HVCs having a head-tail structure and the peak column density of the HVCs. While there is no correlation between the fraction of HT HVCs and v_LSR, we found a dependence of the fraction of HT HVCs and v_GSR. There is no significant correlation between the fraction of HT HVCs and the parameters galactic longitude and latitude. The HT HVCs may be interpreted as HVCs that are currently interacting with their ambient medium. In the context of this model the tails represent material that is stripped off from the HVC core. We discuss the implications of this model for galactic and extragalactic HVCs.

  2. Wire melting and droplet atomization in a high velocity oxy-fuel jet

    SciTech Connect

    Neiser, R.A.; Brockmann, J.E.; O`Hern, T.J.

    1995-07-01

    Coatings produced by feeding a steel wire into a high-velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) torch are being intensively studied by the automotive industry as a cost-effective alternative to the more expensive cast iron sleeves currently used in aluminum engine blocks. The microstructure and properties of the sprayed coatings and the overall economics of the process depend critically on the melting and atomization occurring at the wire tip. This paper presents results characterizing several aspects of wire melting and droplet breakup in an HVOF device. Fluctuations in the incandescent emission of the plume one centimeter downstream from the wire tip were recorded using a fast photodiode. A Fourier transform of the light traces provided a measure of the stripping rate of molten material from the wire tip. Simultaneous in-flight measurement of atomized particle size and velocity distributions were made using a Phase Doppler Particle Analyzer (PDPA). The recorded size distributions approximate a log-normal distribution. Small particles traveled faster than large particles, but the difference was considerably smaller than simple aerodynamic drag arguments would suggest. A set of experiments was carried out to determine the effect that variations in torch gas flow rates have on wire melt rate, average particle size, and average particle velocity. The observed variation of particle size with spray condition is qualitatively consistent with a Weber breakup of the droplets coming off the wire. The measurements also showed that it was possible to significantly alter atomized particle size and velocity without appreciably changing the wire melt rate.

  3. High-Velocity Clouds in the Nearby Spiral Galaxy M 83

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Eric D.; Bregman, Joel N.; Wakker, Bart P.

    2009-02-01

    We present deep H I 21 cm and optical observations of the face-on spiral galaxy M 83 obtained as part of a project to search for high-velocity clouds (HVCs) in nearby galaxies. Anomalous-velocity neutral gas is detected toward M 83, with 5.6 × 107 M sun of H I contained in a disk rotating 40-50 km s-1 more slowly in projection than the bulk of the gas. We interpret this as a vertically extended thick disk of neutral material, containing 5.5% of the total H I within the central 8 kpc. Using an automated source detection algorithm to search for small-scale H I emission features, we find eight distinct, anomalous-velocity H I clouds with masses ranging from 7 × 105 to 1.5 × 107 M sun and velocities differing by up to 200 km s-1 compared to the H I disk. Large on-disk structures are coincident with the optical spiral arms, while unresolved off-disk clouds contain no diffuse optical emission down to a limit of 27 r' mag per square arcsec. The diversity of the thick H I disk and larger clouds suggests the influence of multiple formation mechanisms, with a galactic fountain responsible for the slowly rotating disk and on-disk discrete clouds, and tidal effects responsible for off-disk cloud production. The mass and kinetic energy of the H I clouds are consistent with the mass exchange rate predicted by the galactic fountain model. If the HVC population in M 83 is similar to that in our own Galaxy, then the Galactic HVCs must be distributed within a radius of less than 25 kpc.

  4. Plasma armature formation in high-pressure high-velocity hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Hawke, R.S.; Susoeff, A.R.; Asay, J.R.; Hall, C.A.; Konrad, C.H.; Hickman, R.J.; Sauve, J.L.

    1988-09-20

    The use of a two-stage light-gas gun (2SLGG) as a preaccelerator in combination with a railgun is expected to significantly reduce barrel ablation and improve overall performance. In particular, the use of a hydrogen 2SLGG provides injection velocities of 6 to 8 km/s and a pure hydrogen environment immediately behind the projectile as it enters a railgun. To continue acceleration of the projectile, a plasma armature must be formed. We explored two methods of converting a portion of the fast-moving hydrogen gas into a plasma armature capable of supporting currents exceeding 100 kA. We report on the results of these studies. This work is part of STARFIRE, the joint Sandia National Laboratories/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory project to develop a hypervelocity railgun. 11 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Plasma armature formation in high-pressure, high-velocity hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Hawke, R.S.; Susoeff, A.R.; Asay, J.R.; Hall, C.A.; Konrad, C.H.; Hickman, R.J.; Sauve, J.L.

    1988-03-01

    The use of a two-stage light-gas gun (2SLGG) as a preaccelerator in combination with a railgun is expected to significantly reduce barrel ablation and improve overall performance. In particular, the use of a hydrogen 2SLGG provides injection velocities of 6 to 8 km/s and a pure hydrogen environment immediately behind the projectile as it enters a railgun. To continue acceleration of the projectile, a plasma armature must be formed. We explored two methods of converting a portion of the fast-moving hydrogen gas into a plasma armature capable of supporting currents exceeding 100 kA. We report on the results of these studies. This work is part of STARFIRE, the joint Sandia National Laboratories/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory project to develop a hypervelocity railgun. 11 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Plasma armature formation in high-pressure, high-velocity hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Hawke, R.S.; Susoeff, A.R. ); Asay, J.R.; Hall, C.A.; Konrad, C.H. ); Hickman, R.J. ); Sauve, J.L. )

    1989-01-01

    The use of a two-stage light-gas gun (2SLGG) as a preaccelerator in combination with a railgun is expected to significantly reduce barrel ablation and improve overall performance. In particular, the use of a hydrogen 2SLGG provides injection velocities of 6 to 8 km/s and a pure hydrogen environment immediately behind the projectile as it enters a railgun. To continue acceleration of the projectile, a plasma armature must be formed. The authors explored two methods of converting a portion of the fast-moving hydrogen gas into a plasma armature capable of supporting currents exceeding 100 {kappa}A. They report on the results of these studies. This work is part of STARFIRE, the joint Sandia National Laboratories/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory project to develop a hypervelocity railgun.

  7. Nickel-silver composition shows promise as catalyst for hydrogen-oxygen fuel cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Magerl, J. A.; Murray, J. N.

    1970-01-01

    Carburized 3-1 nickel-silver preparation exhibits considerable catalytic activity, although not as high as platinum black. Cost and availability factors warrant further evaluation of nickel-silver materials.

  8. 29 CFR 1910.253 - Oxygen-fuel gas welding and cutting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... shall be brazed with silver-brazing alloy or similar high melting point (not less than 800 °F (427 °C...-brazing alloy or similar high melting point (not less than 800 °F (427 °C)) filler metal. (3) Installation.... The hood or bend shall be so constructed that it will not be obstructed by rain, snow, ice, insects...

  9. 29 CFR 1910.253 - Oxygen-fuel gas welding and cutting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... shall be brazed with silver-brazing alloy or similar high melting point (not less than 800 °F (427 °C...-brazing alloy or similar high melting point (not less than 800 °F (427 °C)) filler metal. (3) Installation.... The hood or bend shall be so constructed that it will not be obstructed by rain, snow, ice, insects...

  10. 29 CFR 1910.253 - Oxygen-fuel gas welding and cutting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... shall be brazed with silver-brazing alloy or similar high melting point (not less than 800 °F (427 °C...-brazing alloy or similar high melting point (not less than 800 °F (427 °C)) filler metal. (3) Installation.... The hood or bend shall be so constructed that it will not be obstructed by rain, snow, ice, insects...

  11. Identifying galaxy candidates in WSRT H i imaging of ultra-compact high velocity clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Elizabeth A. K.; Oosterloo, Tom A.; Cannon, John M.; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Haynes, Martha P.

    2016-12-01

    Ultra-compact high velocity clouds (UCHVCs) were identified in the Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA (ALFALFA) H i survey as potential gas-bearing dark matter halos. Here we present higher resolution neutral hydrogen (H i) observations of twelve UCHVCS with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT). The UCHVCs were selected based on a combination of size, isolation, large recessional velocity and high column density as the best candidate dark matter halos. The WSRT data were tapered to image the UCHVCs at 210'' (comparable to the Arecibo resolution) and 105'' angular resolution. In a comparison of the single-dish to interferometer data, we find that the integrated line flux recovered in the WSRT observations is generally comparable to that from the single-dish ALFALFA data. In addition, any structure seen in the ALFALFA data is reproduced in the WSRT maps at the same angular resolution. At 210'' resolution all the sources are generally compact with a smooth H i morphology, as expected from their identification as UCHVCs. At the higher angular resolution, a majority of the sources break into small clumps contained in a diffuse envelope. These UCHVCs also have no ordered velocity motion and are most likely Galactic halo clouds. We identify two UCHVCs, AGC 198606 and AGC 249525, as excellent galaxy candidates based on maintaining a smooth H i morphology at higher angular resolution and showing ordered velocity motion consistent with rotation. A third source, AGC 249565, lies between these two populations in properties and is a possible galaxy candidate. If interpreted as gas-bearing dark matter halos, the three candidate galaxies have rotation velocities of 8-15 km s-1, H i masses of 0.6-50 × 105M⊙, H i radii of 0.3-2 kpc, and dynamical masses of 2-20 × 107M⊙ for a range of plausible distances. These are the UCHVCs with the highest column density values in the ALFALFA H i data and we suggest this is the best way to identify further candidates.

  12. A novel platform to study magnetized high-velocity collisionless shocks

    SciTech Connect

    Higginson, D. P.; Korneev, Ph; Béard, J.; Chen, S. N.; d'Humières, E.; Pépin, H.; Pikuz, S.; Pollock, B.; Riquier, R.; Tikhonchuk, V.; Fuchs, J.

    2014-12-13

    An experimental platform to study the interaction of two colliding high-velocity (0.01–0.2c; 0.05–20 MeV) proton plasmas in a high strength (20 T) magnetic field is introduced. This platform aims to study the collision of magnetized plasmas accelerated via the Target-Normal-Sheath-Acceleration mechanism and initially separated by distances of a few hundred microns. The plasmas are accelerated from solid targets positioned inside a few cubic millimeter cavity located within a Helmholtz coil that provides up to 20 T magnetic fields. Various parameters of the plasmas at their interaction location are estimated. These show an interaction that is highly non-collisional, and that becomes more and more dominated by the magnetic fields as time progresses (from 5 to 60 ps). Particle-in-cell simulations are used to reproduce the initial acceleration of the plasma both via simulations including the laser interaction and via simulations that start with preheated electrons (to save dramatically on computational expense). The benchmarking of such simulations with the experiment and with each other will be used to understand the physical interaction when a magnetic field is applied. In conclusion, the experimental density profile of the interacting plasmas is shown in the case without an applied magnetic magnetic field, so to show that without an applied field that the development of high-velocity shocks, as a result of particle-to-particle collisions, is not achievable in the configuration considered.

  13. Revisit of the relationship between the elastic properties and sound velocities at high pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chenju; Xiang, Shikai; Gu, Jianbing; Kuang, Xiaoyu; Yu, Yin; Yan, Xiaozhen; Chen, Haiyan

    2014-09-01

    The second-order elastic constants and stress-strain coefficients are defined, respectively, as the second derivatives of the total energy and the first derivative of the stress with respect to strain. Since the Lagrangian and infinitesimal strain are commonly used in the two definitions above, the second-order elastic constants and stress-strain coefficients are separated into two categories, respectively. In general, any of the four physical quantities is employed to characterize the elastic properties of materials without differentiation. Nevertheless, differences may exist among them at non-zero pressures, especially high pressures. Having explored the confusing issue systemically in the present work, we find that the four quantities are indeed different from each other at high pressures and these differences depend on the initial stress applied on materials. Moreover, the various relations between the four quantities depicting elastic properties of materials and high-pressure sound velocities are also derived from the elastic wave equations. As examples, we calculated the high-pressure sound velocities of cubic tantalum and hexagonal rhenium using these nexus. The excellent agreement of our results with available experimental data suggests the general applicability of the relations.

  14. Revisit of the relationship between the elastic properties and sound velocities at high pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Chenju; Yan, Xiaozhen; Xiang, Shikai Chen, Haiyan; Gu, Jianbing; Yu, Yin; Kuang, Xiaoyu

    2014-09-14

    The second-order elastic constants and stress-strain coefficients are defined, respectively, as the second derivatives of the total energy and the first derivative of the stress with respect to strain. Since the Lagrangian and infinitesimal strain are commonly used in the two definitions above, the second-order elastic constants and stress-strain coefficients are separated into two categories, respectively. In general, any of the four physical quantities is employed to characterize the elastic properties of materials without differentiation. Nevertheless, differences may exist among them at non-zero pressures, especially high pressures. Having explored the confusing issue systemically in the present work, we find that the four quantities are indeed different from each other at high pressures and these differences depend on the initial stress applied on materials. Moreover, the various relations between the four quantities depicting elastic properties of materials and high-pressure sound velocities are also derived from the elastic wave equations. As examples, we calculated the high-pressure sound velocities of cubic tantalum and hexagonal rhenium using these nexus. The excellent agreement of our results with available experimental data suggests the general applicability of the relations.

  15. Characterization of High-Velocity Single Particle Impacts on Plasma-Sprayed Ceramic Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiilakoski, Jarkko; Lindroos, Matti; Apostol, Marian; Koivuluoto, Heli; Kuokkala, Veli-Tapani; Vuoristo, Petri

    2016-08-01

    High-velocity impact wear can have a significant effect on the lifetime of thermally sprayed coatings in multiple applications, e.g., in the process and paper industries. Plasma-sprayed oxide coatings, such as Cr2O3- and TiO2-based coatings, are often used in these industries in wear and corrosion applications. An experimental impact study was performed on thermally sprayed ceramic coatings using the High-Velocity Particle Impactor (HVPI) at oblique angles to investigate the damage, failure, and deformation of the coated structures. The impact site was characterized by profilometry, optical microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Furthermore, the connection between the microstructural details and impact behavior was studied in order to reveal the damage and failure characteristics at a more comprehensive level. Differences in the fracture behavior were found between the thermally sprayed Cr2O3 and TiO2 coatings, and a concept of critical impact energy is presented here. The superior cohesion of the TiO2 coating inhibited interlamellar cracking while the Cr2O3 coating suffered greater damage at high impact energies. The HVPI experiment has proven to be able to produce valuable information about the deformation behavior of coatings under high strain rates and could be utilized further in the development of wear-resistant coatings.

  16. DETECTION OF HIGH VELOCITY OUTFLOWS IN THE SEYFERT 1 GALAXY Mrk 590

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, A.; Mathur, S.; Krongold, Y.

    2015-01-01

    We report on the detection of ultra-fast outflows in the Seyfert 1 galaxy Mrk 590. These outflows are identified through highly blueshifted absorption lines of O VIII and Ne IX in the medium energy grating spectrum and Si XIV and Mg XII in the high energy grating spectrum on board the Chandra X-ray observatory. Our best-fit photoionization model requires two absorber components at outflow velocities of 0.176c and 0.0738c and a third tentative component at 0.0867c. The components at 0.0738c and 0.0867c have high ionization parameters and high column densities, similar to other ultra-fast outflows detected at low resolution by Tombesi et al. We also found suggestive evidence for super-solar silicon in these components. These outflows carry sufficient mass and energy to provide effective feedback proposed by theoretical models. The component at 0.176c, on the other hand, has a low ionization parameter and low column density, similar to those detected by Gupta et al. in Ark 564. These absorbers occupy a different locus on the velocity versus ionization parameter plane and have opened up a new parameter space of active galactic nucleus (AGN) outflows. The presence of ultra-fast outflows in moderate luminosity AGNs poses a challenge to models of AGN outflows.

  17. Low Sound Velocity Contributing to the High Thermoelectric Performance of Ag8SnSe6.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen; Lin, Siqi; Ge, Binghui; Yang, Jiong; Zhang, Wenqing; Pei, Yanzhong

    2016-11-01

    Conventional strategies for advancing thermoelectrics by minimizing the lattice thermal conductivity focus on phonon scattering for a short mean free path. Here, a design of slow phonon propagation as an effective approach for high-performance thermoelectrics is shown. Taking Ag8SnSe6 as an example, which shows one of the lowest sound velocities among known thermoelectric semiconductors, the lattice thermal conductivity is found to be as low as 0.2 W m(-1) K(-1) in the entire temperature range. As a result, a peak thermoelectric figure of merit zT > 1.2 and an average zT as high as ≈0.8 are achieved in Nb-doped materials, without relying on a high thermoelectric power factor. This work demonstrates not only a guiding principle of low sound velocity for minimal lattice thermal conductivity and therefore high zT, but also argyrodite compounds as promising thermoelectric materials with weak chemical bonds and heavy constituent elements.

  18. High resolution velocity structure beneath Mount Vesuvius from seismic array data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarpa, Roberto; Tronca, Fabrizio; Bianco, Francesca; Del Pezzo, Edoardo

    2002-11-01

    A high resolution P-wave image of Mt. Vesuvius edifice has been derived from simultaneous inversion of travel times and hypocentral parameters of local earthquakes, land based shots and small aperture array data. The results give details down to 300-500 m. The relocated local seismicity appears to extend down to 5 km below the central crater, distributed in a major cluster, centered at 3 km below the central crater and in a minor group, with diffuse hypocenters inside the volcanic edifice. The two clusters are separated by an anomalously high Vp region at around 1 km depth. A zone with high Vp/Vs in the upper layers is interpreted as produced by the presence of intense fluid circulation. The highest energy quakes (up to M = 3.6) are located in the deeper cluster, in a high P-wave velocity zone. Our results favor an interpretation in terms of absence of shallow magma reservoirs.

  19. Petrophysical models of high velocity lower crust on the South Atlantic rifted margins: whence the asymmetry?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trumbull, Robert B.; Franke, Dieter; Bauer, Klaus; Sobolev, Stephan V.

    2015-04-01

    Lower crustal bodies with high seismic velocity (Vp > 7km/s) underlie seaward-dipping reflector wedges on both margins of the South Atlantic, as on many other volcanic rifted margins worldwide. A comprehensive geophysical study of the South Atlantic margins by Becker et al. (Solid Earth, 5: 1011-1026, 2014) showed a strong asymmetry in the development of high-velocity lower crust (HVLC), with about 4 times larger volumes of HVLC on the African margin. That study also found interesting variations in the vertical position of HVLC relative to seaward-dipping reflectors which question a simple intrusive vs. extrusive relationship between these lower- and upper crustal features. The asymmetry of HVLC volumes on the conjugate margins is paradoxically exactly the opposite to that of surface lavas in the Paraná-Etendeka flood basalt province, which are much more voluminous on the South American margin. This contribution highlights the asymmetric features of magma distribution on the South Atlantic margins and explores their geodynamic significance. Petrophysical models of the HVLC are presented in the context of mantle melt generation, based on thickness-velocity (H-Vp) relations. These suggest that the greater volumes and average Vp values of HVLC on the African margin are due to active upwelling and high temperature, whereas passive upwelling under a thick lithospheric lid suppressed magma generation on the South American margin. The contrast in mantle upwelling rate and lithospheric thickness on the two margins predictably causes differential uplift, and this may help explain the greater accomodation space for surface lavas on the South American side although melt generation was strongest under the African margin.

  20. High-velocity OH megamasers in IRAS 20100-4156: evidence for a supermassive black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey-Smith, L.; Allison, J. R.; Green, J. A.; Bannister, K. W.; Chippendale, A.; Edwards, P. G.; Heywood, I.; Hotan, A. W.; Lenc, E.; Marvil, J.; McConnell, D.; Phillips, C. J.; Sault, R. J.; Serra, P.; Stevens, J.; Voronkov, M.; Whiting, M.

    2016-08-01

    We report the discovery of new, high-velocity narrow-line components of the OH megamaser in IRAS 20100-4156. Results from the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder (ASKAP)'s Boolardy Engineering Test Array (BETA) and the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) provide two independent measurements of the OH megamaser spectrum. We found evidence for OH megamaser clumps at -409 and -562 km s-1 (blue-shifted) from the systemic velocity of the galaxy, in addition to the lines previously known. The presence of such high velocities in the molecular emission from IRAS 20100-4156 could be explained by a ˜50 pc molecular ring enclosing a ˜3.8 billion solar mass black hole. We also discuss two alternatives, i.e. that the narrow-line masers are dynamically coupled to the wind driven by the active galactic nucleus or they are associated with two separate galactic nuclei. The comparison between the BETA and ATCA spectra provides another scientific verification of ASKAP's BETA. Our data, combined with previous measurements of the source enabled us to study the variability of the source over a 26 yr period. The flux density of the brightest OH maser components has reduced by more than a factor of 2 between 1988 and 2015, whereas a secondary narrow-line component has more than doubled in the same time. Plans for high-resolution very long baseline interferometry follow-up of this source are discussed, as are prospects for discovering new OH megamasers during the ASKAP early science programme.

  1. Pressure and velocity measurements in a three dimensional wall jet. [high lift V/STOL wing-flap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Catalano, G. D.; Morton, J. B.; Humphris, R. R.

    1979-01-01

    In three recent papers, some results of an experimental investigation of a freely expanding coflowing jet as well as a three dimensional wall jet have been presented. A flat plate as well as a curved wall surface intended to model a wing-flap combination in a high lift V/STOL configuration have been investigated. In these papers, the ratio of the jet exit plane velocity to the free stream velocity, was 5.1. This paper explores the effects of increasing the velocity ratio. The quantities measured include the width of the mixing region, the mean velocity field, turbulent intensities and time scales. In addition, wall and static pressure-velocity correlations and coherences are presented. The velocity measurements are made using a laser Doppler velocimeter with a phase-locked loop processor. The fluctuating pressures are monitored using condenser-type microphones.

  2. Application of railgun principle to high-velocity hydrogen pellet injection for magnetic fusion reactor refueling

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.; Honig, J.

    1984-09-01

    Design, construction, testing, and performance evaluation of a small-bore plasma-arc-driven electromagnetic railgun system are described. The railgun system, which is intended for injecting high-velocity hydrogen pellets into the magnetic fusion devices for the purpose of refueling, has two acceleration stages. One consists of a gas gun preaccelerator and the other a railgun booster accelerator. The plasma-arc armature is formed behind the pellet by electrically discharging the propellant gas following the pellet into the railgun from the gas gun.

  3. High-Resolution Subduction Zone Seismicity and Velocity Structure in Ibaraki, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelly, D. R.; Beroza, G. C.; Zhang, H.; Thurber, C. H.; Ide, S.

    2004-12-01

    We use double-difference tomography (tomoDD) [Zhang and Thurber, 2003] and waveform-derived cross-correlation differential arrival times to invert for the earthquake locations and P- and S-wave velocity distributions in the subduction zone under Ibaraki Prefecture of north-central Honshu, Japan. The Ibaraki region is attractive for its high rate of slab seismicity and for the presence of an intermediate-depth double seismic zone. We relocate ~8000 events occurring in this region between June 2002 and June 2004. We use a combination of ~200,000 absolute travel times, ~5 million catalog-derived differential times, and ~5 million cross-correlation differential times derived from more than 150,000 waveforms, with roughly equal numbers of P- and S-wave data. Many of the waveforms are from HiNet borehole stations that provide particularly high-quality data. We also use data from JMA, the University of Tokyo, and Tohoku University. Since it is natural to expect sharp velocity contrasts in a subduction zone, we regularize the inversion using the total variation (TV) approach implemented through iteratively reweighted least squares. Because TV is an L1-norm regularization, sharp changes in velocity are penalized no more than gradual ones, but undulations in the velocity model remain damped. We will compare the TV results with those determined by standard least-squares, L2-norm regularization. Our results show increasingly organized seismicity including narrowing by up to 50% of the upper and lower limbs of the double seismic zone as viewed in cross-section. We find a zone of interplate events extending as deep as 60 km, forming a very distinct lineation in cross-section. Focal mechanisms support the interpretation that these are low angle, subduction interface events. These earthquakes are accompanied by a zone of very high Vp/Vs ratio within the downgoing plate, just beneath the seismicity, suggesting that high pore-pressures may enable seismic slip on the subduction

  4. Acceleration to High Velocities and Heating by Impact Using Nike KrF Laser

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    Acceleration to high velocities and heating by impact using Nike KrF laser. Max Karasik,1, ∗ J. L. Weaver,1 Y. Aglitskiy,2 T. Watari ,3 Y. Arikawa,3 T...Azechi, T. Sakaiya, T. Watari , M. Karasik, H. Saito, K. Ohtani, K. Takeda, H. Hosoda, H. Shiraga, M. Nakai, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 235002 (2009...Fusion Res. 83, 831 (2007). [17] S. Y. Gus’kov, H. Azechi, N. N. Demchenko, I. Y. Doskoch, M. Murakami, V. B. Rozanov, T. Sakaiya, T. Watari , and N. V

  5. Acceleration to high velocities and heating by impact using Nike KrF laser

    SciTech Connect

    Karasik, Max; Weaver, J. L.; Velikovich, A. L.; Zalesak, S. T.; Bates, J. W.; Obenschain, S. P.; Schmitt, A. J.; Aglitskiy, Y.; Watari, T.; Arikawa, Y.; Sakaiya, T.; Murakami, M.; Azechi, H.; Oh, J.

    2010-05-15

    The Nike krypton fluoride laser [S. P. Obenschain, S. E. Bodner, D. Colombant, et al., Phys. Plasmas 3, 2098 (1996)] is used to accelerate planar plastic foils to velocities that for the first time reach 1000 km/s. Collision of the highly accelerated deuterated polystyrene foil with a stationary target produces approxGbar shock pressures and results in heating of the foil to thermonuclear temperatures. The impact conditions are diagnosed using DD fusion neutron yield, with approx10{sup 6} neutrons produced during the collision. Time-of-flight neutron detectors are used to measure the ion temperature upon impact, which reaches 2-3 keV.

  6. Acceleration to high velocities and heating by impact using Nike KrF lasera)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karasik, Max; Weaver, J. L.; Aglitskiy, Y.; Watari, T.; Arikawa, Y.; Sakaiya, T.; Oh, J.; Velikovich, A. L.; Zalesak, S. T.; Bates, J. W.; Obenschain, S. P.; Schmitt, A. J.; Murakami, M.; Azechi, H.

    2010-05-01

    The Nike krypton fluoride laser [S. P. Obenschain, S. E. Bodner, D. Colombant, et al., Phys. Plasmas 3, 2098 (1996)] is used to accelerate planar plastic foils to velocities that for the first time reach 1000 km/s. Collision of the highly accelerated deuterated polystyrene foil with a stationary target produces ˜Gbar shock pressures and results in heating of the foil to thermonuclear temperatures. The impact conditions are diagnosed using DD fusion neutron yield, with ˜106 neutrons produced during the collision. Time-of-flight neutron detectors are used to measure the ion temperature upon impact, which reaches 2-3 keV.

  7. Development of high speed fiber grating sensor solutions for measuring velocity, position, pressure and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udd, Eric; Benterou, Jerry

    2013-05-01

    A novel very high speed fiber grating sensor system has been used to support velocity, position, temperature and pressure measurements during burn, deflagration and detonation of energetic materials in Russian DDT tests. For the first time the system has been demonstrated in card gap testing and has allowed real time measurements of the position of the blast front into the card gap and monitoring of pressure at key locations in the card gap test. This paper provides an overview of this technology and examples of its application.

  8. Carbon nanotube reinforced aluminum nanocomposite via plasma and high velocity oxy-fuel spray forming.

    PubMed

    Laha, T; Liu, Y; Agarwal, A

    2007-02-01

    Free standing structures of hypereutectic aluminum-23 wt% silicon nanocomposite with multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) reinforcement have been successfully fabricated by two different thermal spraying technique viz Plasma Spray Forming (PSF) and High Velocity Oxy-Fuel (HVOF) Spray Forming. Comparative microstructural and mechanical property evaluation of the two thermally spray formed nanocomposites has been carried out. Presence of nanosized grains in the Al-Si alloy matrix and physically intact and undamaged carbon nanotubes were observed in both the nanocomposites. Excellent interfacial bonding between Al alloy matrix and MWCNT was observed. The elastic modulus and hardness of HVOF sprayed nanocomposite is found to be higher than PSF sprayed composites.

  9. Low Sound Velocity Contributing to the High Thermoelectric Performance of Ag8SnSe6

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wen; Lin, Siqi; Ge, Binghui; Yang, Jiong; Zhang, Wenqing

    2016-01-01

    Conventional strategies for advancing thermoelectrics by minimizing the lattice thermal conductivity focus on phonon scattering for a short mean free path. Here, a design of slow phonon propagation as an effective approach for high‐performance thermoelectrics is shown. Taking Ag8SnSe6 as an example, which shows one of the lowest sound velocities among known thermoelectric semiconductors, the lattice thermal conductivity is found to be as low as 0.2 W m−1 K−1 in the entire temperature range. As a result, a peak thermoelectric figure of merit zT > 1.2 and an average zT as high as ≈0.8 are achieved in Nb‐doped materials, without relying on a high thermoelectric power factor. This work demonstrates not only a guiding principle of low sound velocity for minimal lattice thermal conductivity and therefore high zT, but also argyrodite compounds as promising thermoelectric materials with weak chemical bonds and heavy constituent elements. PMID:27980995

  10. Aerosol formation from high-velocity uranium drops: Comparison of number and mass distributions. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Rader, D.J.; Benson, D.A.

    1995-05-01

    This report presents the results of an experimental study of the aerosol produced by the combustion of high-velocity molten-uranium droplets produced by the simultaneous heating and electromagnetic launch of uranium wires. These tests are intended to simulate the reduction of high-velocity fragments into aerosol in high-explosive detonations or reactor accidents involving nuclear materials. As reported earlier, the resulting aerosol consists mainly of web-like chain agglomerates. A condensation nucleus counter was used to investigate the decay of the total particle concentration due to coagulation and losses. Number size distributions based on mobility equivalent diameter obtained soon after launch with a Differential Mobility Particle Sizer showed lognormal distributions with an initial count median diameter (CMD) of 0.3 {mu}m and a geometric standard deviation, {sigma}{sub g} of about 2; the CMD was found to increase and {sigma}{sub g} decrease with time due to coagulation. Mass size distributions based on aerodynamic diameter were obtained for the first time with a Microorifice Uniform Deposit Impactor, which showed lognormal distributions with mass median aerodynamic diameters of about 0.5 {mu}m and an aerodynamic geometric standard deviation of about 2. Approximate methods for converting between number and mass distributions and between mobility and aerodynamic equivalent diameters are presented.

  11. High-velocity intermittent running: effects of beta-alanine supplementation.

    PubMed

    Smith-Ryan, Abbie E; Fukuda, David H; Stout, Jeffrey R; Kendall, Kristina L

    2012-10-01

    The use of β-alanine in sport is widespread. However, the effects across all sport activities are inconclusive. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of β-alanine supplementation on high-intensity running performance and critical velocity (CV) and anaerobic running capacity (ARC). Fifty recreationally trained men were randomly assigned, in a double-blind fashion, to a β-alanine group (BA, 2 × 800 mg tablets, 3 times daily; CarnoSyn; n = 26) or placebo group (PL, 2 × 800 mg maltodextrin tablets, 3 times daily; n = 24). A graded exercise test (GXT) was performed to establish peak velocity (PV). Three high-speed runs to exhaustion were performed at 110, 100, and 90% of PV, with 15 minutes of rest between bouts. The distances achieved were plotted over the time to exhaustion (TTE). Linear regression was used to determine the slope (CV) and y-intercept (ARC) of these relationships to assess aerobic and anaerobic performances, respectively. There were no significant treatment effects (p > 0.05) on CV or ARC for either men or women. Additionally, no TTE effects were evident for bouts at 90-110%PV lasting 1.95-5.06 minutes. There seems to be no ergogenic effect of β-alanine supplementation on CV, ARC, or high-intensity running lasting approximately 2-5 minutes in either men or women in the current study.

  12. Acceleration to High Velocities and Heating by Impact Using Nike KrF laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karasik, Max

    2009-11-01

    Shock ignition, impact ignition, as well as higher intensity conventional hot spot ignition designs reduce driver energy requirement by pushing the envelope in laser intensity and target implosion velocities. This talk will describe experiments that for the first time reach target velocities in the range of 700 -- 1000 km/s. The highly accelerated planar foils of deuterated polystyrene, some with bromine doping, are made to collide with a witness foil to produce extreme shock pressures and result in heating of matter to thermonuclear temperatures. Target acceleration and collision are diagnosed using large field of view monochromatic x-ray imaging with backlighting as well as bremsstrahlung self-emission. The impact conditions are diagnosed using DD fusion neutron yield, with over 10^6 neutrons produced during the collision. Time-of-flight neutron detectors are used to measure the ion temperature upon impact, which reaches 2 -- 3 keV. The experiments are performed on the Nike facility, reconfigured specifically for high intensity operation. The short wavelength and high illumination uniformity of Nike KrF laser uniquely enable access to this new parameter regime. Intensities of (0.4 -- 1.2) x 10^15 W/cm^2 and pulse durations of 0.4 -- 2 ns were utilized. Modeling of the target acceleration, collision, and neutron production is performed using the FAST3D radiation hydrodynamics code with a non-LTE radiation model. Work is supported by US Department of Energy.

  13. A SPITZER-MIPS SEARCH FOR DUST IN COMPACT HIGH-VELOCITY H I CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Rik J.; Mathur, Smita; Poindexter, Shawn; Elvis, Martin; Nicastro, Fabrizio

    2012-04-15

    We employ three-band Spitzer-MIPS observations to search for cold dust emission in three neutral hydrogen compact high-velocity clouds (CHVCs) in the vicinity of the Milky Way. Far-infrared emission correlated with H I column density was previously reported in HVC Complex C, indicating that this object contains dust heated by the Galactic radiation field at its distance of {approx}10 kpc. Assuming published Spitzer, IRAS, and Planck, IR-H I correlations for Complex C, our Spitzer observations are of sufficient depth to directly detect 160 {mu}m dust emission in the CHVCs if it is present at the same level as in Complex C, but no emission is detected in any of the targets. For one of the targets (CHVC289) which has well-localized H I clumps, we therefore conclude that it is fundamentally different from Complex C, with either a lower dust-to-gas ratio or a greater distance from the Galactic disk (and consequently cooler dust temperature). Firm conclusions cannot be drawn for the other two Spitzer-observed CHVCs since their small-scale H I structures are not sufficiently well known; nonetheless, no extended dust emission is apparent despite their relatively high H I column densities. The lack of dust emission in CHVC289 suggests that at least some compact high-velocity clouds objects may exhibit very low dust-to-gas ratios and/or greater Galactocentric distances than large HVC complexes.

  14. Eulerian adaptive finite-difference method for high-velocity impact and penetration problems

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, Philip T.; Deiterding, Ralf; Meiron, Daniel I.; Pullin, Dale I

    2013-01-01

    Owing to the complex processes involved, faithful prediction of high-velocity impact events demands a simulation method delivering efficient calculations based on comprehensively formulated constitutive models. Such an approach is presented herein, employing a weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) method within an adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) framework for the numerical solution of hyperbolic partial differential equations. Applied widely in computational fluid dynamics, these methods are well suited to the involved locally non-smooth finite deformations, circumventing any requirement for artificial viscosity functions for shock capturing. Application of the methods is facilitated through using a model of solid dynamics based upon hyper-elastic theory comprising kinematic evolution equations for the elastic distortion tensor. The model for finite inelastic deformations is phenomenologically equivalent to Maxwell s model of tangential stress relaxation. Closure relations tailored to the expected high-pressure states are proposed and calibrated for the materials of interest. Sharp interface resolution is achieved by employing level-set functions to track boundary motion, along with a ghost material method to capture the necessary internal boundary conditions for material interactions and stress-free surfaces. The approach is demonstrated for the simulation of high velocity impacts of steel projectiles on aluminium target plates in two and three dimensions.

  15. High-Velocity Frictional Behavior of Incoming Pelagic Sediments to the Tohoku Subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawai, M.; Hirose, T.

    2012-12-01

    The 2011 Tohoku earthquake (Mw 9.0) off the Pacific coast of Japan produced huge slip (~50 m) on the shallow part of the fault close to the toe of the megathrust (e.g., Fujiwara et al., 2011), resulting in destructive tsunamis. Although the multiple causes of such large slip at shallow depths is expected, the frictional property of sediments around the fault, especially at coseismic slip velocities, may significantly contribute to large slip along the fault. We thus investigate the frictional properties of pelagic sediments to be subducting beneath the Tohoku region at high velocities and large displacement toward understanding the rupture processes to cause large slip at the shallow portion of subduction zone. We have conducted friction experiments on incoming pelagic sediment on the Pacific plate (DSDP, Site 436, Leg56, 378 mbsf) that consider as simulated fault gouge. The site locates about 100 km northeast from the Hole C0019E drilled during the IODP Expedition 343 (J-FAST). The sediment contains mainly montmorillonite and its blackish color is quite similar to the sheared sediments in the plate boundary fault recovered during the Expedition 343. Experiments are performed at slip velocities of 2.5 x 10-4 to 1.3 m/s, normal stresses of 0.5 to 2.0 MPa and slip displacement of about 16 m under brine saturated conditions, using a rotary-shear friction apparatus. One gram of gouge was placed between rock cylinders of sandstone or gabbro of 25 mm diameter with Teflon sleeve outside to contain gouge. Both gouge sample and host rock were saturated with brine. At slip velocity of 1.3 m/s and normal stresses of 0.5 to 2.0 MPa, a typical slip weakening behavior is observed; friction coefficient of the sediment rapidly increases 0.1 - 0.3 at the onset of sliding and subsequently decreases to 0.06 - 0.15 over the displacement of > 1 m. However, peak friction and frictional work during slip-weakening (fracture energy) are markedly lower as compared to similar studies

  16. SCEC CVM-Toolkit (CVM-T) -- High Performance Meshing Tools for SCEC Community Velocity Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Small, P.; Maechling, P. J.; Ely, G. P.; Olsen, K. B.; Withers, K.; Graves, R. W.; Jordan, T. H.; Plesch, A.; Shaw, J. H.

    2010-12-01

    The SCEC Community Velocity Model Toolkit (CVM-T) enables earthquake modelers to quickly build, visualize, and validate large-scale 3D velocity meshes using SCEC CVM-H or CVM-4. CVM-T is comprised of three main components: (1) a current SCEC community velocity model for Southern California, (2) tools for extracting meshes from this model and visualizing them, and (3) an automated test framework for evaluating new releases of CVMs using SCEC’s AWP-ODC forward wave propagation software and one, or more, ground motion goodness of fit (GoF) algorithms. CVM-T is designed to help SCEC modelers build large-scale velocity meshes by extracting material properties from the most current version of Community Velocity Model H (CVM-H) and to provide a consistent interface as new CVM-H versions are developed. The CVM-T software provides a highly-scalable interface to CVM-H 6.2 (and later) voxets. Along with an improved interface to CVM-H material properties, the CVM-T software adds a geotechnical layer (GTL) to CVM-H 6.2+ based on Ely’s Vs30-derived GTL. The initial release of CVM-T also extends the coverage region for CVM-H 6.2 with a Hadley-Kanamori 1D background. Smoothing is performed within the transition boundary between the core model and the 1D background. The user interface now includes a C API that allows applications to query the model either by elevation or depth. The Extraction and Visualization Tools (EVT) include a parallelized 3D mesh generator which can quickly generate meshes (consisting of Vp, Vs, and density) from either CVM-H or CVM-4 with over 100 billion points. Python plotting scripts can be employed to plot horizontal or profile slices from existing meshes or directly from either CVM. The Automated Test Framework (ATF) is a system for quantitatively evaluating new versions of CVM-H and ensuring that the model improves against prior versions. The ATF employs the CruiseControl build and test framework to run an AWP-ODC simulation for the 2008 Chino

  17. Earthquake Energy Dissipation in Light of High-Velocity, Slip-Pulse Shear Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reches, Z.; Liao, Z.; Chang, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    We investigated the energy dissipation during earthquakes by analysis of high-velocity shear experiments conducted on room-dry, solid samples of granite, tonalite, and dolomite sheared at slip-velocity of 0.0006-1m/s, and normal stress of 1-11.5MPa. The experimental fault were loaded in one of three modes: (1) Slip-pulse of abrupt, intense acceleration followed by moderate deceleration; (2) Impact by a spinning, heavy flywheel (225 kg); and (3) Constant velocity loading. We refer to energy dissipation in terms of power-density (PD=shear stress*slip-velocity; units of MW/m^2), and Coulomb-energy-density (CED= mechanical energy/normal stress; units of m). We present two aspects: Relative energy dissipation of the above loading modes, and relative energy dissipation between impact experiments and moderate earthquakes. For the first aspect, we used: (i) the lowest friction coefficient of the dynamic weakening; (ii) the work dissipated before reaching the lowest friction; and (iii) the cumulative mechanical work during the complete run. The results show that the slip-pulse/impact modes are energy efficient relatively to the constant-velocity mode as manifested by faster, more intense weakening and 50-90% lower energy dissipation. Thus, for a finite amount of pre-seismic crustal energy, the efficiency of slip-pulse would amplify earthquake instability. For the second aspect, we compare the experimental CED of the impact experiments to the reported breakdown energy (EG) of moderate earthquakes, Mw = 5.6 to 7.2 (Chang et al., 2012). In is commonly assumed that the seismic EG is a small fraction of the total earthquake energy, and as expected in 9 out of 11 examined earthquakes, EG was 0.005 to 0.07 of the experimental CED. We thus speculate that the experimental relation of Coulomb-energy-density to total slip distance, D, CED = 0.605 × D^0.933, is a reasonable estimate of total earthquake energy, a quantity that cannot be determined from seismic data.

  18. Formation and transformation of amino acids and amino acid precursors by high-velocity impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneko, T.; Kobayashi, K.; Yamori, A.

    A wide variety of organic compounds have been found in extraterrestrial bodies such as comets and carbonaceous chondrites. It is plausible that these extraterrestrial bodies carried organic compounds such as amino acids or their precursors to the early Earth. It is claimed, however, that these extraterrestrial organics were destroyed during impacts to the Earth. We therefore examined possible transformation of amino acids and their precursors during high-velocity impacts by using a rail gun "HYPAC" in ISAS. Starting materials used in the impact experiments were (i) aqueous solution of glycine (10 mM or 1.0 M), and (ii) a mixture of ammonia, methanol and water. The target materials were sealed in stainless steel capsules, and shocked by impact with a polycarbonate projectile accelerated with "HYPAC" to the velocities of 2.5 - 7.0 km/s. A part of the products was acid-hydrolyzed. Both hydrolyzed an unhydrolyzed products were analyzed by mass spectrometry, high performance liquid chromatography and capillary electrophoresis and chromatography. When an aqueous solution containing ammonia, methanol and water was shocked by impact at the velocity of 6.4 km/s, a number of amino acids (e.g., serine and glycine) were detected after hydrolysis. The present results suggest that amino acid precursors could be formed during cometary impacts. When glycine solution was used as a starting material, about 40 % of glycine was recovered even after 6 km/s impact. Methylamine and ammonia, which are known as pyrolytic products of glycine, were detected, besides them, diketopiperazine and an unidentified product whose molecular weight was 134, were detected, while no glycine peptides were identified in them. It was shown that the impact processes resulted in the formation of amino acid condensates. Thermal stability of glycine precursor is comparable with glycine. The present results suggest that organic material could survive and/or formed during an impact process. Most of organic

  19. Multi-wavelength study of a high velocity event near a sunspot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chia-Hsien; Banerjee, D.; O'Shea, E.; Doyle, J. G.

    2006-05-01

    Context: .Jets with velocities higher than 200 km s-1 are often observed in the X-ray spectral range in the solar atmosphere, however, very few such objects are observed in the EUV range. Aims: .We report on an eruptive event observed in the south-west side of a sunspot, within active region, AR0554, in a range of spectral lines formed in the transition region and corona. Methods: .The main data were time-series observations obtained with the Coronal Diagnostic Spectrometer (CDS), in addition to images from the Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) and Extreme ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT) on board the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory. Additional high resolution images from the Transition Region and Coronal Explorer (TRACE) were also used. Results: .The event brightened a loop connecting the sunspot and a bright-point structure, triggering both a high-speed flow in the loop and a transient, low-speed ambient flow into the sunspot. The energy released is quickly conducted to the chromosphere, as deduced from the TRACE 1600 Å images and the light curve of He i 522 Å as seen by CDS. The results from our multi-wavelength study further indicates that the effect of the eruptive event may have reached temperatures higher than 2 × 106 K. Relative Doppler velocities of over 300 km s-1 were detected in the transition region line, O v 629 Å. Conclusions: .The multi-wavelength analysis indicates that the event is likely due to fast magnetic reconnection in the transition region. The velocities detected are consistent with the results obtained by the evaporation jet model.

  20. Higher Velocity High-Foot Implosions on the National Ignition Facility Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callahan, Debra

    2014-10-01

    After the end of the National Ignition Campaign on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser, we began a campaign to test capsule performance using a modified laser pulse-shape that delivers higher power early in the pulse (``high foot''). This pulse-shape trades one-dimensional performance (peak compression) for increased hydrodynamic stability. The focus of the experiments this year have been to improve performance by increasing the implosion velocity using higher laser power/energy, depleted uranium hohlraums, and thinner capsules. While the mix of ablator material into the hotspot has been low for all of these implosions, the challenge has been to keep the implosion shape under control. As the peak laser power is increased, the plasma density in the hohlraum is increased - making it more and more challenging for the inner cone beams to reach the midplane of the hohlraum and resulting in an oblate implosion. Depleted uranium hohlraums have higher albedo than Au hohlraums, which leads to additional drive and improved implosion shape. Thinner ablators increase the velocity by reducing the amount of payload; thinner ablators also put less mass into the hohlraum which results in improved inner beam propagation. These techniques have allowed us to push the capsule to higher and higher velocity. In parallel with this effort, we are exploring other hohlraums such as the rugby shaped hohlraum to allow us to push these implosions further. This talk will summarize the progress of the high foot campaign in terms of both capsule and hohlraum performance. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  1. Chemical abundances in a high-velocity RR Lyrae star near the bulge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, C. J.; Rich, R. M.; Koch, A.; Xu, S.; Kunder, A.; Ludwig, H.-G.

    2016-05-01

    Low-mass variable high-velocity stars are interesting study cases for many aspects of Galactic structure and evolution. Until recently, the only known high- or hyper-velocity stars were young stars thought to originate from the Galactic center. Wide-area surveys such as APOGEE and BRAVA have found several low-mass stars in the bulge with Galactic rest-frame velocities higher than 350 km s-1. In this study we present the first abundance analysis of a low-mass RR Lyrae star that is located close to the Galactic bulge, with a space motion of ~-400 km s-1. Using medium-resolution spectra, we derived abundances (including upper limits) of 11 elements. These allowed us to chemically tag the star and discuss its origin, although our derived abundances and metallicity, at [Fe/H] =-0.9 dex, do not point toward one unambiguous answer. Based on the chemical tagging, we cannot exclude that it originated in the bulge. However, its retrograde orbit and the derived abundances combined suggest that the star was accelerated from the outskirts of the inner (or even outer) halo during many-body interactions. Other possible origins include the bulge itself, or the star might have been stripped from a stellar cluster or the Sagittarius dwarf galaxy when it merged with the Milky Way. The data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation.

  2. High-velocity Interstellar Bullets in IRAS 05506+2414: A Very Young Protostar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sahai, Raghvendra; Claussen, Mark; Sanchez Contreras, Carmen; Morris, Mark; Sarkar, Geetanjali

    2008-01-01

    We have made a serendipitous discovery of an enigmatic outflow source, IRAS 05506+2414 (hereafter IRAS 05506), as part of a multiwavelength survey of pre-planetary nebulae (PPNs). The HST optical and near-infrared images show a bright compact central source with a jet-like extension, and a fan-like spray of high-velocity (with radial velocities up to 350 km/s) elongated knots which appear to emanate from it. These structures are possibly analogous to the near-IR bullets'' seen in the Orion Nebula. Interferometric observations at 2.6 mm show the presence of a continuum source and a high-velocity CO outflow, which is aligned with the optical jet structure. IRAS 05506 is most likely not a PPN. We find extended NH3 (1,1) emission toward IRAS 05506; these data, together with the combined presence of far-IR emission, H2O and OH masers, and CO and CS J=2-1 emission, strongly argue for a dense, dusty star-forming core associated with IRAS 05506. IRAS 05506 is probably an intermediate-mass or massive protostar, and the very short timescale (200 yr) of its outflows indicates that it is very young. If IRAS 05506 is a massive star, then the lack of radio continuum and the late G to early K spectral type we find from our optical spectra imply that in this object we are witnessing the earliest stages of its life, while its temperature is still too low to provide sufficient UV flux for ionization.

  3. High-velocity Interstellar Bullets in IRAS 05506+2414: A Very Young Protostar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sahai, Raghvendra; Claussen, Mark; Sanchez Contreras, Carmen; Morris, Mark; Sarkar, Geetanjali

    2008-01-01

    We have made a serendipitous discovery of an enigmatic outflow source, IRAS 05506+2414 (hereafter IRAS 05506), as part of a multiwavelength survey of pre-planetary nebulae (PPNs). The HST optical and near-infrared images show a bright compact central source with a jet-like extension, and a fan-like spray of high-velocity (with radial velocities up to 350 km/s) elongated knots which appear to emanate from it. These structures are possibly analogous to the near-IR bullets'' seen in the Orion Nebula. Interferometric observations at 2.6 mm show the presence of a continuum source and a high-velocity CO outflow, which is aligned with the optical jet structure. IRAS 05506 is most likely not a PPN. We find extended NH3 (1,1) emission toward IRAS 05506; these data, together with the combined presence of far-IR emission, H2O and OH masers, and CO and CS J=2-1 emission, strongly argue for a dense, dusty star-forming core associated with IRAS 05506. IRAS 05506 is probably an intermediate-mass or massive protostar, and the very short timescale (200 yr) of its outflows indicates that it is very young. If IRAS 05506 is a massive star, then the lack of radio continuum and the late G to early K spectral type we find from our optical spectra imply that in this object we are witnessing the earliest stages of its life, while its temperature is still too low to provide sufficient UV flux for ionization.

  4. Mapping High-Velocity H-alpha and Lyman-alpha Emission from Supernova 1987A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    France, Kevin; McCray, Richard; Fransson, Claes; Larsson, Josefin; Frank, Kari A.; Burrows, David N.; Challis, Peter; Kirshner, Robert P.; Chevalier, Roger A.; Garnavich, Peter; Heng, Kevin; Lawrence, Stephen S.; Lundqvist, Peter; Smith, Nathan; Sonneborn, George

    2015-01-01

    We present new Hubble Space Telescope images of high-velocity H-alpha and Lyman-alpha emission in the outer debris of SN 1987A. The H-alpha images are dominated by emission from hydrogen atoms crossing the reverse shock. For the first time we observe emission from the reverse shock surface well above and below the equatorial ring, suggesting a bipolar or conical structure perpendicular to the ring plane. Using the H-alpha imaging, we measure the mass flux of hydrogen atoms crossing the reverse shock front, in the velocity intervals (-7,500 < V(sub obs) < -2,800 km/s) and (1,000 < V(sub obs) < 7,500 km/s), ?M(sub H) = 1.2 × 10(exp -3) M/ y. We also present the first Lyman-alpha imaging of the whole remnant and new Chandra X-ray observations. Comparing the spatial distribution of the Lyman-alpha and X-ray emission, we observe that the majority of the high-velocity Lyman-alpha emission originates interior to the equatorial ring. The observed Lyman-alpha/H-alpha photon ratio, R(L-alpha/H-alpha) approx. = 17, is significantly higher than the theoretically predicted ratio of approx. = 5 for neutral atoms crossing the reverse shock front. We attribute this excess to Lyman-alpha emission produced by X-ray heating of the outer debris. The spatial orientation of the Lyman-alpha and X-ray emission suggests that X-ray heating of the outer debris is the dominant Lyman-alpha production mechanism in SN 1987A at this phase in its evolution.

  5. Wind tunnel investigation of the effect of high relative velocities on the structural integrity of birds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bresnahan, D. L.

    1972-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted in a supersonic wind tunnel to determine the effect a sudden high velocity headwind had on the physical deformation and structural breakup characteristics of birds. Several sizes of recently killed birds were dropped into the test section at free-stream Mach numbers ranging from 0.2 to 0.8 and photographed with high-speed motion-picture cameras. These conditions simulated flow conditions encountered when birds are ingested into the inlets of high speed aircraft, thereby constituting a safety hazard to the aircraft and its occupants. The investigation shows that, over the range of headwind conditions tested, the birds remained structurally intact and did not suffer any appreciable deformation or structural breakup.

  6. Survivability of bare, individual Bacillus subtilis spores to high-velocity surface impact: Implications for microbial transfer through space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barney, Brandon L.; Pratt, Sara N.; Austin, Daniel E.

    2016-06-01

    Laboratory experiments show that endospores of Bacillus subtilis survive impact against a solid surface at velocities as high as 299 ±28 m/s. During impact, spores experience and survive accelerations of at least 1010 m/s2. The spores were introduced into a vacuum chamber using an electrospray source and accelerated to a narrow velocity distribution by entrainment in a differentially pumped gas flow. Different velocity ranges were studied by modifying the gas flow parameters. The spores were electrically charged, allowing direct measurement of the velocity of each spore as it passed through an image charge detector prior to surface impact. Spores impacted a glass surface and were collected for subsequent analysis by culturing. Most spores survived impact at all measured velocities. These experiments differ fundamentally from other studies that show either shock or impact survivability of bacteria embedded within or on the surface of a projectile. Bacteria in the present experiments undergo a single interaction with a solid surface at the full impact velocity, in the absence of any other effects such as cushioning due to microbe agglomerations, deceleration due to air or vapor, or transfer of impact shock through solid or liquid media. During these full-velocity impact events, the spores experience extremely high decelerations. This study is the first reported instance of accelerations of this magnitude experienced during a bacteria impact event. These results are discussed in the context of potential transfer of viable microbes in space and other scenarios involving surface impacts at high velocities.

  7. Phase contrast ultrashort TE: A more reliable technique for measurement of high-velocity turbulent stenotic jets.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Kieran R; Myerson, Saul G; Cowan, Brett R; Young, Alistair A; Robson, Matthew D

    2009-09-01

    Accurate measurement of peak velocity is critical to the assessment of patients with stenotic valvular disease. Conventional phase contrast (PC) methods for imaging high-velocity jets in aortic stenosis are susceptible to intravoxel dephasing signal loss, which can result in unreliable measurements. The most effective method for reducing intravoxel dephasing is to shorten the echo time (TE); however, the amount that TE can be shortened in conventional sequences is limited. A new sequence incorporating velocity-dependent slice excitation and ultrashort TE (UTE) centric radial readout trajectories is proposed that reduces TE from 2.85 to 0.65 ms. In a high-velocity stenotic jet phantom, a conventional sequence had >5% flow error at a flow rate of only 400 mL/s (velocity >358 cm/s), whereas the PC-UTE showed excellent agreement (<5% error) at much higher flow rates (1080 mL/s, 965 cm/s). In vivo feasibility studies demonstrated that by measuring velocity over a shorter time the PC-UTE approach is more robust to intravoxel dephasing signal loss. It also has less inherent higher-order motion encoding. This sequence therefore demonstrates potential as a more robust method for measuring peak velocity and flow in high-velocity turbulent stenotic jets.

  8. Extreme High Velocity Components in Quadrupolar Outflow of NGC 1333 IRAS 2A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Cheng-Hung; Chen, Vivien; Lee, Chin-Fei; Hirano, Naomi; Shang, Hsien

    2013-07-01

    We have mapped a quadrupolar outflow of NGC 1333 IRAS 2A with the Submillimeter Array in CO (2-1) and SiO (5-4) at an angular resolution of 3". The quadrupolar outflow consists of an extended north-south outflow and a collimated east-west outflow. Our observations newly discovered extreme high velocity (EHV) components (≳ 20 km/s) within a north-south wide-angle cavity. These jet-like EHV components are detected near the YSO and outflow vertexes and imply a jet axis along the presumable cavity shell. On the other hand, the east-west outflow shows a bow-shock delineated by standard high velocity (≲ 20 km/s) CO emission and an off-axis EHV component in the west lobe. In the southern EHV component, two distinct kinematic features show an outflow overtaking process with an interface coincided with nearby shocked H2 emission. Considering shock dynamics of these EHV components, we witnessed an ongoing jet interaction with earlier ejected materials and surrounding envelop.

  9. High-Velocity Features in Type Ia Supernovae from a Compact Circumstellar Shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulligan, Brian W.; Wheeler, J. Craig

    2017-05-01

    High-velocity features (HVF) of Ca prior to B-band maximum light are a ubiquitous property of Type Ia supernovae (SN Ia), but the origin of this high-velocity material is unknown. It may result from ejection of material during the explosion, detonation of material on the surface prior to the supernova or interaction with a companion or material in the nearby environment. Here, we introduce the methods we use to simulate the interaction of SN Ia ejecta with a shell of material surrounding the progenitor at a distance of less than 1 R⊙. Assuming free expansion, constant ion state and excitation temperature, we generate synthetic spectra from the data showing the effect of equation of state, explosion model, and the width, initial density profile and mass of the shell on the appearance and temporal evolution of the Ca ii near-infrared triplet (CaNIR). The Ca abundance of the shell is taken to be a free parameter. We compare the evolution of the pseudo-equivalent width (pEW) of the CaNIR feature resulting from these models to observational results from Silverman et al. We find that the mass of the shell must be less than 0.012 ± 0.004 M⊙. We discuss potential ambiguities in observational methods of determining the pEW of the HVF.

  10. Treatment of open tibial fracture with bone defect caused by high velocity missiles: a case report.

    PubMed

    Golubović, Zoran; Vukajinović, Zoran; Stojiljković, Predrag; Golubović, Ivan; Visnjić, Aleksandar; Radovanović, Zoran; Najman, Stevo

    2013-01-01

    Tibia fracture caused by high velocity missiles is mostly comminuted and followed by bone defect which makes their healing process extremely difficult and prone to numerous complications. A 34-year-old male was wounded at close range by a semi-automatic gun missile. He was wounded in the distal area of the left tibia and suffered a massive defect of the bone and soft tissue. After the primary treatment of the wound, the fracture was stabilized with an external fixator type Mitkovic, with convergent orientation of the pins. The wound in the medial region of the tibia was closed with the secondary stitch, whereas the wound in the lateral area was closed with the skin transplant after Thiersch. Due to massive bone defect in the area of the rifle-missile wound six months after injury, a medical team placed a reconstructive external skeletal fixator type Mitkovic and performed corticotomy in the proximal metaphyseal area of the tibia. By the method of bone transport (distractive osteogenesis), the bone defect of the tibia was replaced. After the fracture healing seven months from the secondary surgery, the fixator was removed and the patient was referred to physical therapy. Surgical treatment of wounds, external fixation, performing necessary debridement, adequate antibiotic treatment and soft and bone tissue reconstruction are essential in achieving good results in patients with the open tibial fracture with bone defect caused by high velocity missiles. Reconstruction of bone defect can be successfully treated by reconstructive external fixator Mitkovic.

  11. Condensation of Halo, Circumgalactic, and Intergalactic Gas onto Massive High-velocity Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gritton, Jeffrey A.; Shelton, Robin L.; Galyardt, Jason E.

    2017-06-01

    High-velocity clouds (HVCs) hydrodynamically interact with their surroundings. In scenarios with small clouds, the net result is erosion of the HVC, but in scenarios with large, massive clouds, it is capture and cooling of environmental gas by the cloud. In order to examine these effects over long periods of time, we made detailed three-dimensional hydrodynamic FLASH simulations of massive HVCs (1.35 × 105 M ⊙ to 1.35 × 108 M ⊙) traveling through hot, low-density media like that in the extended Galactic halo, circumgalactic media, and intergalactic space for at least 200 Myr. By setting the metallicity of the clouds to differ from that of the ambient gas, we were able to track the transfer of material between the two media. We found that massive clouds condense substantial amounts of ambient gas, up to 100% of their initial mass in certain cases. This gas cools to temperatures below 1.0 × 104 K, but retains some high ions. The amount of condensed gas depends on the cloud mass, the ambient density, and the cloud density and temperature, but apparently not on the velocity. We discuss the ramifications for cloud survivability and for the transport of halo, circumgalactic, and intergalactic gas to the disk of the Galaxy aboard massive HVCs.

  12. High-Velocity Features in Type Ia Supernovae from a Compact Circumstellar Shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulligan, Brian W.; Wheeler, J. Craig

    2017-01-01

    High-velocity features (HVF) of Ca prior to B-band maximum light are a ubiquitous property of Type Ia supernovae (SN Ia), but the origin of this high-velocity material is unknown. It may result from ejection of material during the explosion, detonation of material on the surface prior to the supernova, or interaction with a companion or material in the nearby environment. Here we introduce the methods we use to simulate the interaction of SN Ia ejecta with a shell of material surrounding the progenitor at a distance of less than 1 R⊙. Assuming free expansion, constant ion state and excitation temperature, we generate synthetic spectra from the data showing the effect of equation of state, explosion model, and the width, initial density profile, and mass of the shell on the appearance and temporal evolution of the Ca II near-infrared triplet (CaNIR). The Ca abundance of the shell is taken to be a free parameter. We compare the evolution of the pseudo-equivalent width (pEW) of the CaNIR feature resulting from these models to observational results. We find that the mass of the shell must be less than 0.012 ± 0.004 M⊙. We discuss potential ambiguities in observational methods of determining the pEW of the HVF.

  13. Magnetized High Velocity Clouds in the Galactic Halo: A New Distance Constraint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grønnow, Asger; Tepper-García, Thor; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; McClure-Griffiths, N. M.

    2017-08-01

    High velocity gas that does not conform to Galactic rotation is observed throughout the Galaxy’s halo. One component of this gas, H i high velocity clouds (HVCs), have attracted attention since their discovery in the 1960s and remain controversial in terms of their origins, largely due to the lack of reliable distance estimates. The recent discovery of enhanced magnetic fields toward HVCs has encouraged us to explore their connection to cloud evolution, kinematics, and survival as they fall through the magnetized Galactic halo. For a reasonable model of the halo magnetic field, most infalling clouds see transverse rather than radial field lines. We find that significant compression (and thereby amplification) of the ambient magnetic field occurs in front of the cloud and in the tail of material stripped from the cloud. The compressed transverse field attenuates hydrodynamical instabilities. This delays cloud destruction, though not indefinitely. The observed {\\boldsymbol{B}} field compression is related to the cloud’s distance from the Galactic plane. As a result, the observed rotation measure provides useful distance information on a cloud’s location.

  14. Estimation of Rotational Velocity of Baseball Using High-Speed Camera Movies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Takuya; Uematsu, Yuko; Saito, Hideo

    Movies can be used to analyze a player's performance and improve his/her skills. In the case of baseball, the pitching is recorded by using a high-speed camera, and the recorded images are used to improve the pitching skills of the players. In this paper, we present a method for estimating of the rotational velocity of a baseball on the basis of movies recorded by high-speed cameras. Unlike in the previous methods, we consider the original seam pattern of the ball seen in the input movie and identify the corresponding image from a database of images by adopting the parametric eigenspace method. These database images are CG Images. The ball's posture can be determined on the basis of the rotational parameters. In the proposed method, the symmetric property of the ball is also taken into consideration, and the time continuity is used to determine the ball's posture. In the experiments, we use the proposed method to estimate the rotational velocity of a baseball on the basis of real movies and movies consisting of CG images of the baseball. The results of both the experiments prove that our method can be used to estimate the ball's rotation accurately.

  15. The 1994 Northridge, California, earthquake: Investigation of rupture velocity, risetime, and high-frequency radiation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hartzell, S.; Liu, P.; Mendoza, C.

    1996-01-01

    A hybrid global search algorithm is used to solve the nonlinear problem of calculating slip amplitude, rake, risetime, and rupture time on a finite fault. Thirty-five strong motion velocity records are inverted by this method over the frequency band from 0.1 to 1.0 Hz for the Northridge earthquake. Four regions of larger-amplitude slip are identified: one near the hypocenter at a depth of 17 km, a second west of the hypocenter at about the same depth, a third updip from the hypocenter at a depth of 10 km, and a fourth updip from the hypocenter and to the northwest. The results further show an initial fast rupture with a velocity of 2.8 to 3.0 km/s followed by a slow termination of the rupture with velocities of 2.0 to 2.5 km/s. The initial energetic rupture phase lasts for 3 s, extending out 10 km from the hypocenter. Slip near the hypocenter has a short risetime of 0.5 s, which increases to 1.5 s for the major slip areas removed from the hypocentral region. The energetic rupture phase is also shown to be the primary source of high-frequency radiation (1-15 Hz) by an inversion of acceleration envelopes. The same global search algorithm is used in the envelope inversion to calculate high-frequency radiation intensity on the fault and rupture time. The rupture timing from the low- and high-frequency inversions is similar, indicating that the high frequencies are produced primarily at the mainshock rupture front. Two major sources of high-frequency radiation are identified within the energetic rupture phase, one at the hypocenter and another deep source to the west of the hypocenter. The source at the hypocenter is associated with the initiation of rupture and the breaking of a high-stress-drop asperity and the second is associated with stopping of the rupture in a westerly direction.

  16. A dynamic study of fragmentation and energy loss during high velocity impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zee, Ralph H.

    1992-01-01

    Research conducted under this contract can be divided into two main areas: hypervelocity (in the range up to 7 km/s) and high velocity (less than 1 km/s). Work in the former was performed at NASA-MSFC using the Light Gas Gun Facility. The lower velocity studies were conducted at Auburn University using the ballistic gun. The emphasis of the project was on the hypervelocity phenomenon especially in the characterization of the debris cloud formed by the primary impact events. Special devices were made to determine the angular distributions of momentum and energy of the debris cloud as a function of impact conditions. After several iteration processes, it was decided to concentrate on the momentum effort. Prototype devices were designed, fabricated, and tested. These devices were based on the conservation of momentum. Distributions of the debris cloud formed were measured by determining the amount of momentum transferred from the debris cloud to strategically placed pendulum measurement devices. The motion of the pendula was monitored using itegrated opto-interrupters. The distribution of momentum in the debris cloud was found to be a strong function of the impact condition. Small projectiles at high velocities were observed to produce finely dispersed debris whereas large projectiles generated discrete particles in the debris. Results also show that the momentum in the forward direction was enhanced due to the impact. This phenomenon of momentum multiplication was also observed in other studies and in computer simulations. It was initially planned to determine the energy distribution using deformation energy in a rod with strain gauges. Results from preliminary studies show that this technique is acceptable but too tedious. A new technique was explored based on measuring the heating effect of the debris cloud using an IR camera. The feasibility and sensitivity was established at Auburn University. This type of energy distribution measurement method can easily be

  17. High-velocity frictional experiments on dolerite and quartzite under controlled pore pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Togo, T.; Shimamoto, T.; Ma, S.

    2013-12-01

    High-velocity friction experiments on rocks with or without gouge have been conducted mostly under dry conditions and demonstrated dramatic weakening of faults at high velocities (e.g., Di Toro et al., 2011, Nature). Recent experiments under wet conditions (e.g., Ujiie and Tsutsumi, 2010, GRL; Faulkner et al., 2011, GRL) revealed very different behaviors from those of dry faults, but those experiments were done under drained conditions. Experiments with controlled pore pressure Pp are definitely needed to determine mechanical properties of faults under fluid-rich environments such as those in subduction zones. Thus we have developed a pressure vessel that can be attached to our rotary-shear low to high-velocity friction apparatus (Marui Co Ltd., MIS-233-1-76). With a current specimen holder, friction experiments can be done on hollow-cylindrical specimens of 15 and 40 mm in inner and outer diameters, respectively, at controlled Pp to 35 MPa, at effective normal stresses of 3~9 MPa, and at slip rates of 60 mm/year to 2 m/s. An effective normal stress can be applied with a 100 kN hydraulic actuator. We report an outline of the experimental system and preliminary high-velocity experiments on Shanxi dolerite and a quartzite from China that are composed of pyroxene and plagioclase and of almost pure quartz, respectively. High-velocity friction experiments were performed on hollow-cylindrical specimens of Shanxi dolerite at effective normal stresses of 0.13~1.07 MPa and at slip rates of 1, 10, 100 and 1000 mm/sec. All experiments were conducted first with the nitrogen gas filling the pressure vessel (dry tests) and then with a controlled pore-water pressure (wet tests). In the dry tests an axial force was kept at 1 kN and the nitrogen gas pressure was increased in steps to 5 MPa to change an effective normal stress. In the wet tests the specimens were soaked in distilled water in the vessel and Pp was applied by nitrogen gas in a similar manner as in the dry tests

  18. Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph Observations of High-Velocity Interstellar Absorption-Line Profiles in the Carina Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walborn, Nolan R.; Danks, Anthony C.; Vieira, Gladys; Landsman, Wayne B.

    2002-06-01

    An atlas of ultraviolet interstellar absorption-line profiles toward four stars in the Carina Nebula is presented. The observations have been made with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph on the Hubble Space Telescope, with a resolving power of 114,000. Low-ionization, high-ionization, and excited-state lines from a wide array of chemical species are included. Extensive measurements of radial velocities, velocity dispersions, and column densities of individual components in these profiles are also given. The unprecedented capabilities of STIS reveal many more velocity components than previously known; most of the high-velocity components in previous observations with the International Ultraviolet Explorer are now resolved into multiple subcomponents, and even higher velocities are seen. The great range of line strengths available permits the detection of the low-velocity components in the weakest lines, and progressively higher velocities in stronger lines (in which the low-velocity components become completely blended). The weak and high-ionization lines trace global structure in the H II region, while the strong low-ionization lines show intricate high-velocity structure that likely originates relatively near to the O stars observed. The extreme velocities found in the low-ionization lines toward these four stars are -388 and +127 km s-1, with 23-26 resolved components in each. Some components in different stars may be related, but many are different in each line of sight. A remarkably well-defined Routly-Spitzer effect is found in this region. Temporal variations toward one star observed twice have already been reported. These measurements will be used in subsequent astrophysical analyses to further constrain the origins of the phenomena. Based on observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract

  19. Comparison of three baseball-specific 6-week training programs on throwing velocity in high school baseball players.

    PubMed

    Escamilla, Rafael F; Ionno, Michele; deMahy, M Scott; Fleisig, Glenn S; Wilk, Kevin E; Yamashiro, Kyle; Mikla, Tony; Paulos, Lonnie; Andrews, James R

    2012-07-01

    Throwing velocity is an important baseball performance variable for baseball pitchers, because greater throwing velocity results in less time for hitters to make a decision to swing. Throwing velocity is also an important baseball performance variable for position players, because greater throwing velocity results in decreased time for a runner to advance to the next base. This study compared the effects of 3 baseball-specific 6-week training programs on maximum throwing velocity. Sixty-eight high school baseball players 14-17 years of age were randomly and equally divided into 3 training groups and a nontraining control group. The 3 training groups were the Throwers Ten (TT), Keiser Pneumatic (KP), and Plyometric (PLY). Each training group trained 3 d·wk(-1) for 6 weeks, which comprised approximately 5-10 minutes for warm-up, 45 minutes of resistance training, and 5-10 for cool-down. Throwing velocity was assessed before (pretest) and just after (posttest) the 6-week training program for all the subjects. A 2-factor repeated measures analysis of variance with post hoc paired t-tests was used to assess throwing velocity differences (p < 0.05). Compared with pretest throwing velocity values, posttest throwing velocity values were significantly greater in the TT group (1.7% increase), the KP group (1.2% increase), and the PLY group (2.0% increase) but not significantly different in the control group. These results demonstrate that all 3 training programs were effective in increasing throwing velocity in high school baseball players, but the results of this study did not demonstrate that 1 resistance training program was more effective than another resistance training program in increasing throwing velocity.

  20. Leaner Lifted-Flame Combustion Enabled by the Use of an Oxygenated Fuel in an Optical CI Engine

    SciTech Connect

    Gehmlich, Ryan K.; Dumitrescu, Cosmin E.; Wang, Yefu; Mueller, Charles J.

    2016-04-05

    Leaner lifted-flame combustion (LLFC) is a mixing-controlled combustion strategy for compression-ignition engines that does not produce soot because the equivalence ratio at the lift-off length, Φ(H), is less than or equal to approximately two. In addition to preventing soot formation, LLFC can simultaneously control emissions of nitrogen oxides because it is tolerant to the use of exhaust-gas recirculation for lowering in-cylinder temperatures. LLFC can be achieved through the use of oxygenated fuels and enhanced fuel/charge-gas mixing upstream of the lift-off length. Enhanced mixing can be obtained via higher injection pressures, smaller injector orifice diameters, lower intake-manifold and coolant temperatures, and/or more retarded injection timings. This study focuses on the effects of an oxygenated fuel blend (T50) made up of 50% by volume tri-propylene glycol mono-methyl ether with a #2 ULSD emissions-certification fuel (CFA), compared against baseline testing of the CFA fuel without the oxygenate. Experimental measurements include crank-angle resolved natural luminosity (NL) and chemiluminescence (CL) imaging diagnostics. EGR is simulated by adding nitrogen and carbon dioxide to the intake charge to produce a 16% intake-oxygen mole fraction (XO2), and results are compared against cases with no charge dilution (i.e., 21% XO2). Initial experiments with a two-hole tip achieved soot-free LLFC at low loads with the T50 fuel, 240 MPa injection pressure, 50 °C intake-manifold temperature (IMT), 95 °C coolant temperature, and -5 crank-angle degree (CAD) after top-dead-center (ATDC) start of combustion (SOC) timing. The strategy was extended to more moderate loads by employing a 6-hole injector tip, where lowering the IMT to 30 °C, reducing the coolant temperature to 85 °C, and retarding the SOC timing to +5 CAD ATDC resulted in sustained LLFC at both 21% and 16% XO2 at up to 6.2 bar gross indicated mean effective pressure (gIMEP) with T50. The achievement of

  1. Leaner Lifted-Flame Combustion Enabled by the Use of an Oxygenated Fuel in an Optical CI Engine

    DOE PAGES

    Gehmlich, Ryan K.; Dumitrescu, Cosmin E.; Wang, Yefu; ...

    2016-04-05

    Leaner lifted-flame combustion (LLFC) is a mixing-controlled combustion strategy for compression-ignition engines that does not produce soot because the equivalence ratio at the lift-off length, Φ(H), is less than or equal to approximately two. In addition to preventing soot formation, LLFC can simultaneously control emissions of nitrogen oxides because it is tolerant to the use of exhaust-gas recirculation for lowering in-cylinder temperatures. LLFC can be achieved through the use of oxygenated fuels and enhanced fuel/charge-gas mixing upstream of the lift-off length. Enhanced mixing can be obtained via higher injection pressures, smaller injector orifice diameters, lower intake-manifold and coolant temperatures, and/ormore » more retarded injection timings. This study focuses on the effects of an oxygenated fuel blend (T50) made up of 50% by volume tri-propylene glycol mono-methyl ether with a #2 ULSD emissions-certification fuel (CFA), compared against baseline testing of the CFA fuel without the oxygenate. Experimental measurements include crank-angle resolved natural luminosity (NL) and chemiluminescence (CL) imaging diagnostics. EGR is simulated by adding nitrogen and carbon dioxide to the intake charge to produce a 16% intake-oxygen mole fraction (XO2), and results are compared against cases with no charge dilution (i.e., 21% XO2). Initial experiments with a two-hole tip achieved soot-free LLFC at low loads with the T50 fuel, 240 MPa injection pressure, 50 °C intake-manifold temperature (IMT), 95 °C coolant temperature, and -5 crank-angle degree (CAD) after top-dead-center (ATDC) start of combustion (SOC) timing. The strategy was extended to more moderate loads by employing a 6-hole injector tip, where lowering the IMT to 30 °C, reducing the coolant temperature to 85 °C, and retarding the SOC timing to +5 CAD ATDC resulted in sustained LLFC at both 21% and 16% XO2 at up to 6.2 bar gross indicated mean effective pressure (gIMEP) with T50. The

  2. Effects of bumper size on high velocity impact damage to Whipple shield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Y.; Guan, G. S.; Pang, B. J.; Zhang, W.

    With the increasing number of space mission the impact risk on spacecraft at hypervelocity by space debris is increasing A collision with space debris can cause damage to a spacecraft in low Earth orbit For designing spacecraft protection constructions and developing advanced debris shieldsLhypervelocity impact simulation experiments on the ground and the computer simulation of hypervelocity impact is the important means The choice of shields modle sizes is a important step both in the experiments and computer simulation Whipple shields are the basic structure configuration for protecting spacecraft from meteoroid and orbital debris and are still extensively adopted This paper explores the bumper size effects on the damage produced by high velocity impacts on Wipple shields Tests were performed using the non-powder two-stage light gas gun facilities at Hypervelocity Impact Research Center at Harbin Institute of Technology The configuration of Wipple shields consisted of various sizes 1 mm thickness bumpers and constant size 3 mm thickness rear wall with 10 cm space btween the bumper and the rear wall The bumpers used for the tests were made up of 8 12 16 and 20 cm square plate made from 2A12 Aluminum All tests were performed with 4 mm in diameter aluminum projectile at velocity ranging from 1 45 to 1 71 km s The limit velocity of projectile impacting on the Whipple shields in over 0 8 probability of penetration of rear wall in probability of no-penetration of rear wall and on critical penetration condition of rear wall was shown to

  3. A DETAILED KINEMATIC MAP OF CASSIOPEIA A'S OPTICAL MAIN SHELL AND OUTER HIGH-VELOCITY EJECTA

    SciTech Connect

    Milisavljevic, Dan; Fesen, Robert A.

    2013-08-01

    We present three-dimensional (3D) kinematic reconstructions of optically emitting material in the young Galactic supernova remnant Cassiopeia A (Cas A). These Doppler maps have the highest spectral and spatial resolutions of any previous survey of Cas A and represent the most complete catalog of its optically emitting material to date. We confirm that the bulk of Cas A's optically bright ejecta populate a torus-like geometry tilted approximately 30 Degree-Sign with respect to the plane of the sky with a -4000 to +6000 km s{sup -1} radial velocity asymmetry. Near-tangent viewing angle effects and an inhomogeneous surrounding circumstellar material/interstellar medium environment suggest that this geometry and velocity asymmetry may not be faithfully representative of the remnant's true 3D structure or the kinematic properties of the original explosion. The majority of the optical ejecta are arranged in several well-defined and nearly circular ring-like structures with diameters between approximately 30'' (0.5 pc) and 2' (2 pc). These ejecta rings appear to be a common phenomenon of young core-collapse remnants and may be associated with post-explosion input of energy from plumes of radioactive {sup 56}Ni-rich ejecta that rise, expand, and compress non-radioactive material. Our optical survey encompasses Cas A's faint outlying ejecta knots and exceptionally high-velocity NE and SW streams of S-rich debris often referred to as ''jets''. These outer knots, which exhibit a chemical make-up suggestive of an origin deep within the progenitor star, appear to be arranged in opposing and wide-angle outflows with opening half-angles of Almost-Equal-To 40 Degree-Sign.

  4. High-velocity Line Forming Regions in the Type Ia Supernova 2009ig

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marion, G. H.; Vinko, Jozsef; Wheeler, J. Craig; Foley, Ryan J.; Hsiao, Eric Y.; Brown, Peter J.; Challis, Peter; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Garnavich, Peter; Kirshner, Robert P.; Landsman, Wayne B.; Parrent, Jerod T.; Pritchard, Tyler A.; Roming, Peter W. A.; Silverman, Jeffrey M.; Wang, Xiaofeng

    2013-11-01

    We report measurements and analysis of high-velocity (HVF) (>20,000 km s-1) and photospheric absorption features in a series of spectra of the Type Ia supernova (SN) 2009ig obtained between -14 days and +13 days with respect to the time of maximum B-band luminosity (B-max). We identify lines of Si II, Si III, S II, Ca II, and Fe II that produce both HVF and photospheric-velocity (PVF) absorption features. SN 2009ig is unusual for the large number of lines with detectable HVF in the spectra, but the light-curve parameters correspond to a slightly overluminous but unexceptional SN Ia (MB = -19.46 mag and Δm 15(B) = 0.90 mag). Similarly, the Si II λ6355 velocity at the time of B-max is greater than "normal" for an SN Ia, but it is not extreme (v Si = 13,400 km s-1). The -14 days and -13 days spectra clearly resolve HVF from Si II λ6355 as separate absorptions from a detached line forming region. At these very early phases, detached HVF are prevalent in all lines. From -12 days to -6 days, HVF and PVF are detected simultaneously, and the two line forming regions maintain a constant separation of about 8000 km s-1. After -6 days all absorption features are PVF. The observations of SN 2009ig provide a complete picture of the transition from HVF to PVF. Most SNe Ia show evidence for HVF from multiple lines in spectra obtained before -10 days, and we compare the spectra of SN 2009ig to observations of other SNe. We show that each of the unusual line profiles for Si II λ6355 found in early-time spectra of SNe Ia correlate to a specific phase in a common development sequence from HVF to PVF.

  5. A Detailed Kinematic Map of Cassiopeia A's Optical Main Shell and Outer High-velocity Ejecta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milisavljevic, Dan; Fesen, Robert A.

    2013-08-01

    We present three-dimensional (3D) kinematic reconstructions of optically emitting material in the young Galactic supernova remnant Cassiopeia A (Cas A). These Doppler maps have the highest spectral and spatial resolutions of any previous survey of Cas A and represent the most complete catalog of its optically emitting material to date. We confirm that the bulk of Cas A's optically bright ejecta populate a torus-like geometry tilted approximately 30° with respect to the plane of the sky with a -4000 to +6000 km s-1 radial velocity asymmetry. Near-tangent viewing angle effects and an inhomogeneous surrounding circumstellar material/interstellar medium environment suggest that this geometry and velocity asymmetry may not be faithfully representative of the remnant's true 3D structure or the kinematic properties of the original explosion. The majority of the optical ejecta are arranged in several well-defined and nearly circular ring-like structures with diameters between approximately 30'' (0.5 pc) and 2' (2 pc). These ejecta rings appear to be a common phenomenon of young core-collapse remnants and may be associated with post-explosion input of energy from plumes of radioactive 56Ni-rich ejecta that rise, expand, and compress non-radioactive material. Our optical survey encompasses Cas A's faint outlying ejecta knots and exceptionally high-velocity NE and SW streams of S-rich debris often referred to as "jets." These outer knots, which exhibit a chemical make-up suggestive of an origin deep within the progenitor star, appear to be arranged in opposing and wide-angle outflows with opening half-angles of ≈40°.

  6. A study of two high-velocity red horizontal branch stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, C. B.; Jilinski, E. G.; Drake, N. A.; Ortega, V. G.; Roig, F.

    2013-11-01

    Context. High-velocity halo stars provide important information about the properties of the extreme Galactic halo. The study of Population II unbound and bound stars enables us better estimate the mass of the halo. Aims: We carried out a detailed spectroscopic and kinematic study of two red horizontal branch stars, CD-41°15048 and HD 214362. Methods: The atmospheric parameters, chemical abundances, and kinematical properties were determined using high-resolution optical spectroscopy and employing the local thermodynamic equilibrium model atmospheres of Kurucz and the spectral analysis code moog. Results: We found that CD-41°15048 and HD 214362 are metal-poor red horizontal branch stars. Their abundance patterns are similar to other metal-poor halo stars already investigated. Our kinematic analysis of the 3D space motions shows that HD 214362 has a highly eccentric (e = 0.95) orbit and passes at 2 kpc from the Galactic center. CD-41°15048, for an adopted distance of 1.3 kpc, has an extreme retrograde motion and travels with very high velocity relative to the Galactocentric reference frame (VGRF = 583 km s-1). Conclusions: CD-41°15048 is a bound or an unbound star, depending on the adopted Galactic potential. We also show that the red horizontal branch star BD+09°3223 is another example of a hypervelocity star. Whether it is bound or unbound to the Galaxy depends on the assumed mass and adopted Galactic potential. Possible origins of these two high-velocity stars are briefly discussed. CD-41°15048 and BD+09°3223 are further examples of evolved stars to join the restricted group of hypervelocity stars. Finally, our results seem to contradict the idea that a passage of a star very close to the Galactic center is the only possible origin of hypervelocity stars. Based on observations made with the 2.2 m telescope at the European Southern Observatory (La Silla, Chile) under the agreement between ESO and Observatório Nacional (2007-2010).Figures 3-5, 8, 10

  7. Theoretical model for high-power diamond laser optics using high-velocity liquid-metal jet impingement cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, James R.

    1993-02-01

    In 1988 I presented a paper, `Fly's Eye Modular Optic,' in the Los Angeles Symposium that described an optic for high power laser systems that provided for a modular system of hexagonal components that were independently cooled using a high velocity jet pointed normal to the back surface of the optical faceplate. In this paper we look at the use of diamond optical materials in concert with high velocity jet impingement heat transfer of various liquid metal mediums. By using this combination of techniques and materials we can push the laser damage threshold of optical components to even higher levels of absorbed flux density. The thrust of this paper is to develop a theoretical model for use on optical elements subject to very high continuous flux density lasers and to evaluate the use of commercial diamond substrates with conventional optical thin films and conventional substrates with CVD diamond films. In order to assume the very high absorbed flux densities, it is necessary to have a heat transfer technique capable of maintaining the optical component at a stable temperature and below the damage threshold of the optical materials. For the more common materials, thermal shock and subsequent failure in bi-axial shear have proven to be one of the major constituents of the optical damage. In this paper we look at the thermal shock, vis-a-vis, the melting point of some of the materials.

  8. The Draco Nebula, a Molecular Cloud Associated with a High Velocity Cloud?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mebold, U.; Kalberla, P. W. M.

    1984-01-01

    Extended and very faint bright nebulae are found in high galactic latitudes at the Palomar Observatory Sky Survey. Such a nebula, located in the constellation Draco and called Draco Nebula or Dracula, was found to be in detailed positional coincidence with a 21 cm emission line feature. Estimates of the minimum visual extinction from star counts ON and OFF Dracula and an estimated visual surface brightness indicate that Dracula fits the relation SBV = 24.2 - 2.5 log AV for dust clouds located above the galactic plane and reflecting the integrated starlight of the galactic disk. Hence Dracula is probably a reflection nebula. Indicators of molecular hydrogen in Dracula, molecules such as CO, were searched for by using a 2.5-m mm-telescope. Molecular hydrogen column densities were estimated. The dynamics of CO clumps was studied. Dracula has a close positional and possibly even astrophysical relationship to the high velocity cloud phenomenon.

  9. Draco Nebula, a molecular cloud associated with a high velocity cloud

    SciTech Connect

    Mebold, U.; Kalberla, P.W.M.

    1984-11-01

    Extended and very faint bright nebulae are found in high galactic latitudes at the Palomar Observatory Sky Survey. Such a nebula, located in the constellation Draco and called Draco Nebula or Dracula, was found to be in detailed positional coincidence with a 21 cm emission line feature. Estimates of the minimum visual extinction from star counts ON and OFF Dracula and an estimated visual surface brightness indicate that Dracula fits the relation SBV 24.2 - 2.5 log AV for dust clouds located above the galactic plane and reflecting the integrated starlight of the galactic disk. Hence Dracula is probably a reflection nebula. Indicators of molecular hydrogen in Dracula, molecules such as CO, were searched for by using a 2.5-m mm-telescope. Molecular hydrogen column densities were estimated. The dynamics of CO clumps was studied. Dracula has a close positional and possibly even astrophysical relationship to the high velocity cloud phenomenon.

  10. Asymmetric High-Velocity Ejecta in the Youngest Galactic SNR G1.9+0.3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borkowski, Kazimierz

    2014-11-01

    Chandra has revealed highly asymmetric supernova ejecta in G1.9+0.3. Iron dominates thermal emission in the radio-bright northern rim, while only intermediate-mass elements are found along the SE-NW axis. The measured X-ray expansion rates decrease radially by about 60% along this axis from 0.84% yr^{-1) to 0.52% yr^{-1}. This corresponds to undecelerated ages of 120 - 190 yr, confirming the young age of G1.9+0.3, and implying that the blast wave is much more decelerated than the reverse shock. Only the outermost ejecta with very high (>18,000 km s^{-1}) free-expansion velocities have been shocked so far. We discuss G1.9+0.3 in the framework of recent asymmetric 3D delayed-detonation Type Ia explosions from Seitenzahl et al. (2013). Their N3 model provides the best match.

  11. The Draco Nebula, a Molecular Cloud Associated with a High Velocity Cloud?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mebold, U.; Kalberla, P. W. M.

    1984-01-01

    Extended and very faint bright nebulae are found in high galactic latitudes at the Palomar Observatory Sky Survey. Such a nebula, located in the constellation Draco and called Draco Nebula or Dracula, was found to be in detailed positional coincidence with a 21 cm emission line feature. Estimates of the minimum visual extinction from star counts ON and OFF Dracula and an estimated visual surface brightness indicate that Dracula fits the relation SBV = 24.2 - 2.5 log AV for dust clouds located above the galactic plane and reflecting the integrated starlight of the galactic disk. Hence Dracula is probably a reflection nebula. Indicators of molecular hydrogen in Dracula, molecules such as CO, were searched for by using a 2.5-m mm-telescope. Molecular hydrogen column densities were estimated. The dynamics of CO clumps was studied. Dracula has a close positional and possibly even astrophysical relationship to the high velocity cloud phenomenon.

  12. High domain wall velocities via spin transfer torque using vertical current injection.

    PubMed

    Metaxas, Peter J; Sampaio, Joao; Chanthbouala, André; Matsumoto, Rie; Anane, Abdelmadjid; Fert, Albert; Zvezdin, Konstantin A; Yakushiji, Kay; Kubota, Hitoshi; Fukushima, Akio; Yuasa, Shinji; Nishimura, Kazumasa; Nagamine, Yoshinori; Maehara, Hiroki; Tsunekawa, Koji; Cros, Vincent; Grollier, Julie

    2013-01-01

    Domain walls, nanoscale transition regions separating oppositely oriented ferromagnetic domains, have significant promise for use in spintronic devices for data storage and memristive applications. The state of these devices is related to the wall position and thus rapid operation will require a controllable onset of domain wall motion and high speed wall displacement. These processes are traditionally driven by spin transfer torque due to lateral injection of spin polarized current through a ferromagnetic nanostrip. However, this geometry is often hampered by low maximum wall velocities and/or a need for prohibitively high current densities. Here, using time-resolved magnetotransport measurements, we show that vertical injection of spin currents through a magnetic tunnel junction can drive domain walls over hundreds of nanometers at ~500 m/s using current densities on the order of 6 MA/cm(2). Moreover, these measurements provide information about the stochastic and deterministic aspects of current driven domain wall mediated switching.

  13. High domain wall velocities via spin transfer torque using vertical current injection

    PubMed Central

    Metaxas, Peter J.; Sampaio, Joao; Chanthbouala, André; Matsumoto, Rie; Anane, Abdelmadjid; Fert, Albert; Zvezdin, Konstantin A.; Yakushiji, Kay; Kubota, Hitoshi; Fukushima, Akio; Yuasa, Shinji; Nishimura, Kazumasa; Nagamine, Yoshinori; Maehara, Hiroki; Tsunekawa, Koji; Cros, Vincent; Grollier, Julie

    2013-01-01

    Domain walls, nanoscale transition regions separating oppositely oriented ferromagnetic domains, have significant promise for use in spintronic devices for data storage and memristive applications. The state of these devices is related to the wall position and thus rapid operation will require a controllable onset of domain wall motion and high speed wall displacement. These processes are traditionally driven by spin transfer torque due to lateral injection of spin polarized current through a ferromagnetic nanostrip. However, this geometry is often hampered by low maximum wall velocities and/or a need for prohibitively high current densities. Here, using time-resolved magnetotransport measurements, we show that vertical injection of spin currents through a magnetic tunnel junction can drive domain walls over hundreds of nanometers at ~500 m/s using current densities on the order of 6 MA/cm2. Moreover, these measurements provide information about the stochastic and deterministic aspects of current driven domain wall mediated switching. PMID:23670402

  14. Numerical simulation for accuracy of velocity analysis in small-scale high-resolution marine multichannel seismic technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Di; Cai, Feng; Wu, Zhiqiang

    2017-06-01

    When used with large energy sparkers, marine multichannel small-scale high-resolution seismic detection technology has a high resolution, high-detection precision, a wide applicable range, and is very flexible. Positive results have been achieved in submarine geological research, particularly in the investigation of marine gas hydrates. However, the amount of traveltime difference information is reduced for the velocity analysis under conditions of a shorter spread length, thus leading to poorer focusing of the velocity spectrum energy group and a lower accuracy of the velocity analysis. It is thus currently debatable whether the velocity analysis accuracy of short-arrangement multichannel seismic detection technology is able to meet the requirements of practical application in natural gas hydrate exploration. Therefore, in this study the bottom boundary of gas hydrates (Bottom Simulating Reflector, BSR) is used to conduct numerical simulation to discuss the accuracy of the velocity analysis related to such technology. Results show that a higher dominant frequency and smaller sampling interval are not only able to improve the seismic resolution, but they also compensate for the defects of the short-arrangement, thereby improving the accuracy of the velocity analysis. In conclusion, the accuracy of the velocity analysis in this small-scale, high-resolution, multi-channel seismic detection technology meets the requirements of natural gas hydrate exploration.

  15. A novel platform to study magnetized high-velocity collisionless shocks

    DOE PAGES

    Higginson, D. P.; Korneev, Ph; Béard, J.; ...

    2014-12-13

    An experimental platform to study the interaction of two colliding high-velocity (0.01–0.2c; 0.05–20 MeV) proton plasmas in a high strength (20 T) magnetic field is introduced. This platform aims to study the collision of magnetized plasmas accelerated via the Target-Normal-Sheath-Acceleration mechanism and initially separated by distances of a few hundred microns. The plasmas are accelerated from solid targets positioned inside a few cubic millimeter cavity located within a Helmholtz coil that provides up to 20 T magnetic fields. Various parameters of the plasmas at their interaction location are estimated. These show an interaction that is highly non-collisional, and that becomesmore » more and more dominated by the magnetic fields as time progresses (from 5 to 60 ps). Particle-in-cell simulations are used to reproduce the initial acceleration of the plasma both via simulations including the laser interaction and via simulations that start with preheated electrons (to save dramatically on computational expense). The benchmarking of such simulations with the experiment and with each other will be used to understand the physical interaction when a magnetic field is applied. In conclusion, the experimental density profile of the interacting plasmas is shown in the case without an applied magnetic magnetic field, so to show that without an applied field that the development of high-velocity shocks, as a result of particle-to-particle collisions, is not achievable in the configuration considered.« less

  16. Global properties of the HI high velocity sky. A statistical investigation based on the LAB survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalberla, P. M. W.; Haud, U.

    2006-08-01

    Context.Since 1973, it has been known that some H i high velocity clouds (HVCs) have a core-envelope structure. Recent observations of compact HVCs confirm this, but more general investigations have been missing so far.Aims.We study the properties of all major HVC complexes from a sample compiled in 1991 by Wakker & van Woerden (WvW). Methods.We use the Leiden/Argentine/Bonn all sky 21-cm line survey and decompose the profiles into Gaussian components.Results.We find the WvW line widths and column densities to be underestimated by ~40%. In 1991, these line widths could not be measured directly, but had to be estimated with the help of higher resolution data. We find a well-defined multi-component structure for most of the HVC complexes. The cold HVC phase has lines with typical velocity dispersions of σ = 3 km s-1 and exists only within more extended broad line regions, typically with σ = 12 km s-1. The motions of the cores relative to the envelopes are characterized by Mach numbers M = (vcore-venvelope)/σenvelope ˜ 1.5. The center velocities of the cores within a HVC complex have typical dispersions of 20 km s-1. The well-defined two-component structure of some prominent HVC complexes in the outskirts of the Milky Way is remakable: Complex H lies approximately in the Galactic plane, and the most plausible distance estimate of R ˜ 33 kpc places it at the edge of the disk. The Magellanic Stream and the Leading Arm (complex EP) reach higher latitudes and are probably more distant, R ˜ 50 kpc. There might be some indications for an interaction between HVCs and disk gas at intermediate velocities. This is possible for complex H, M, C, WB, WD, WE, WC, R, G, GCP, and OA, but not for complex A, MS, ACVHV, EN, WA, and P. Conclusions.The line widths, determined by us, imply that estimates of HVC masses, as far as those derived from the WvW database are concerned, need to be scaled up by a factor 1.4. Correspondingly, guesses for the external pressure of a confining

  17. The Serendipitous Discovery of High-Velocity Shocks in the Galactic Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, Janet P.

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies with Spitzer have shown that the Galactic Center (GC) contains widespread (although of low abundance) lines from high-excitation gas, such as [O IV] (ionization potential IP = 55 eV), even though most of its diffuse ionized interstellar medium is low excitation, dominated by singly ionized species like Ne+ or doubly ionized species whose singly ionized IP is below the 13.6 eV needed to ionize hydrogen, like S++. Because of the O3+, the GC cannot be considered a normal H II region, which is ionized by massive O and B stars whose extreme ultraviolet spectra essentially cut off at 54 eV, owing to the high opacity of the helium and metals in their atmospheres. The consequence is that highly ionized species, like He++, O3+, etc, with IP > 54 are not seen in Milky Way H II regions, whereas such gas is commonly found in AGN with their hard radiation fields. In order to investigate the energy inputs to the Galactic Center, we have reduced all the Infrared Spectrograph data in the Spitzer archive with positions in the GC. We find that the highest excitation gas isn't uniformly distributed over the GC but is concentrated in compact clumps, unlike the low-excitation gas. Ten of these highly-excited regions have [Ne V] (IP = 97 eV) lines. Such high-energy gas cannot be excited by the OB stars that ionize H II regions, but is found only in high-velocity shocks and high-excitation planetary nebulae (PNe). The shocks could be due to outflows from massive young stellar objects or red supergiants. Analysis of the emission lines reveals that the energies of the clumped gas range from 1036 to 1037 erg/s for assumed GC distances of 8 kpc if the high-excitation regions are shocks with velocities of order several hundred km/s and similar energies if the regions are excited by the hot stars required for PNe. We will show examples of the high-excitation regions, which range from the bubble surrounding the Sgr B1-C ultra-compact H II region to several high

  18. What Happens to a High Velocity Cloud When it Hits the Milky Way's Disk: Is Dark Matter Necessary for Survival?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelton, Robin L.; Galyardt, Jason

    2015-01-01

    Dark matter halos enshroud some of the most massive high velocity clouds. Their gravitational pull confines the clouds as they pass through the intergalactic medium. Given the ability of dark matter halos to stabilize their embedded baryonic clouds against hydrodynamic interactions that would otherwise disrupt them, it has further been suggested that dark matter halos could enable high velocity clouds to survive impacts with the Milky Way's disk. The survival of high velocity clouds, such as the Smith Cloud, during a passage through the disk has been cited as evidence for the presence of dark matter. However, a second actor, the magnetic field, may also be at play. In order to characterize, measure, and disentangle their effects, we have performed magnetohydrodynamic simulations of massive high velocity clouds as they impact a galactic disk. Here, we present the rate at which material dissipates in a variety of situations that include or exclude dark matter and magnetic fields.

  19. High-Velocity Ly(Alpha) Emission from SMR 1987A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michael, Eli; McCray, Richard; Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Pun, Chu S. J.; Sonneborn, George

    1998-01-01

    The high-velocity Ly(Alpha) emission from SN 1987A observed with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) evidently comes from a reverse shock formed where the outer envelope of SN 1987A strikes ionized gas inside the inner circumstellar ring. The observations can be explained by a simple kinematic model, in which the Ly(Alpha) emission comes from hydrogen atoms with radial velocity approximately 15,000 km s(exp -1) crossing a reverse shock in the shape of a slightly prolate ellipsoid with equatorial radius 4.8 x 10(exp 17) cm or approximately 80% of the distance to the inner surface of the inner ring. N v double Lambda 1239, 1243 emission, if present, has a net luminosity approximately less than 30% times that of the Ly(Alpha) emission. Future STIS observations should enable us to predict the time of impact with the inner ring and to determine unambiguously whether or not N v emission is present. These observations will offer a unique opportunity to probe the structure of SN 1987A's circumstellar environment and the hydrodynamics and kinetics of very fast shocks.

  20. Variability of the high-velocity outflow in the quasar PDS 456

    SciTech Connect

    Reeves, J. N.; Gofford, J.; Costa, M.; Matzeu, G.; Braito, V.; Sim, S. A.; Behar, E.; Kaspi, S.; Miller, L.; O'Brien, P.; Turner, T. J.; Ward, M.

    2014-01-01

    We present a comparison of two Suzaku X-ray observations of the nearby (z = 0.184), luminous (L {sub bol} ∼ 10{sup 47} erg s{sup –1}) type I quasar, PDS 456. A new 125 ks Suzaku observation in 2011 caught the quasar during a period of low X-ray flux and with a hard X-ray spectrum, in contrast with a previous 190 ks Suzaku observation in 2007 when the quasar appeared brighter and had a steep (Γ > 2) X-ray spectrum. The 2011 X-ray spectrum contains a pronounced trough near 9 keV in the quasar rest frame, which can be modeled with blueshifted iron K-shell absorption, most likely from the He- and H-like transitions of iron. The absorption trough is observed at a similar rest-frame energy as in the earlier 2007 observation, which appears to confirm the existence of a persistent high-velocity wind in PDS 456, at an outflow velocity of 0.25-0.30c. The spectral variability between 2007 and 2011 can be accounted for by variations in a partial covering absorber, increasing in covering fraction from the brighter 2007 observation to the hard and faint 2011 observation. Overall, the low-flux 2011 observation can be explained if PDS 456 is observed at relatively low inclination angles through a Compton-thick wind, originating from the accretion disk, which significantly attenuates the X-ray flux from the quasar.

  1. H ii REGIONS WITHIN A COMPACT HIGH VELOCITY CLOUD. A NEARLY STARLESS DWARF GALAXY?

    SciTech Connect

    Bellazzini, M.; Magrini, L.; Mucciarelli, A.; Fraternali, F.; Ibata, R.; Martin, N.; Battaglia, G.; Testa, V.; Fumana, M.; Marchetti, A.; Correnti, M.

    2015-02-10

    Within the SECCO survey we identified a candidate stellar counterpart to the Ultra Compact High Velocity Cloud (UCHVC) HVC274.68+74.70-123 that was suggested by Adams et al. to be a possible mini halo within the Local Group of galaxies. The spectroscopic follow-up of the brightest sources within the candidate reveals the presence of two H ii regions whose radial velocity is compatible with a physical association with the UVHVC. The available data do not allow us to give a definite answer on the nature of the newly identified system. A few alternative hypotheses are discussed. However, the most likely possibility is that we have found a new faint dwarf galaxy residing in the Virgo cluster of galaxies, which we name SECCO 1. Independently of its actual distance, SECCO 1 displays a ratio of neutral hydrogen mass to V luminosity of M{sub H} {sub I}/L{sub V}≳20, by far the largest among local dwarfs. Hence, it appears to be a nearly starless galaxy and it may be an example of the missing links between normal dwarfs and the dark mini halos that are predicted to exist in large numbers according to the currently accepted cosmological model.

  2. Variability of the High-velocity Outflow in the Quasar PDS 456

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeves, J. N.; Braito, V.; Gofford, J.; Sim, S. A.; Behar, E.; Costa, M.; Kaspi, S.; Matzeu, G.; Miller, L.; O'Brien, P.; Turner, T. J.; Ward, M.

    2014-01-01

    We present a comparison of two Suzaku X-ray observations of the nearby (z = 0.184), luminous (L bol ~ 1047 erg s-1) type I quasar, PDS 456. A new 125 ks Suzaku observation in 2011 caught the quasar during a period of low X-ray flux and with a hard X-ray spectrum, in contrast with a previous 190 ks Suzaku observation in 2007 when the quasar appeared brighter and had a steep (Γ > 2) X-ray spectrum. The 2011 X-ray spectrum contains a pronounced trough near 9 keV in the quasar rest frame, which can be modeled with blueshifted iron K-shell absorption, most likely from the He- and H-like transitions of iron. The absorption trough is observed at a similar rest-frame energy as in the earlier 2007 observation, which appears to confirm the existence of a persistent high-velocity wind in PDS 456, at an outflow velocity of 0.25-0.30c. The spectral variability between 2007 and 2011 can be accounted for by variations in a partial covering absorber, increasing in covering fraction from the brighter 2007 observation to the hard and faint 2011 observation. Overall, the low-flux 2011 observation can be explained if PDS 456 is observed at relatively low inclination angles through a Compton-thick wind, originating from the accretion disk, which significantly attenuates the X-ray flux from the quasar.

  3. Detecting non-Maxwellian electron velocity distributions at JET by high resolution Thomson scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Beausang, K. V.; Prunty, S. L.; Scannell, R.; Beurskens, M. N.; Walsh, M. J.; Collaboration: JET EFDA Contributors

    2011-03-15

    The present work is motivated by a long standing discrepancy between the electron temperature measurements of Thomson scattering (TS) and electron cyclotron emission (ECE) diagnostics for plasmas with strong auxiliary heating observed at both JET and TFTR above 6-7 keV, where in some cases the ECE electron temperature measurements can be 15%-20% higher than the TS measurements. Recent analysis based on ECE results at JET has shown evidence of distortions to the Maxwellian electron velocity distribution and a correlation with the TS and ECE discrepancies has been suggested. In this paper, a technique to determine the presence of non-Maxwellian behavior using TS diagnostics is outlined. The difficulties and limitations of modern TS system designs to determine the electron velocity distribution are also discussed. It is demonstrated that small deviations such as those suggested by previous ECE analysis could be potentially detected, depending on the spectral layout of the TS polychromators. The spectral layout of the JET high resolution Thomson scattering system is such that it could be used to determine these deviations between 1 and 6 keV, and the results presented here indicate that no evidence of non-Maxwellian behavior is observed in this range. In this paper, a modification to the current polychromator design is proposed, allowing non-Maxwellian distortions to be detected up to at least 10 keV.

  4. Laminar burning velocities at high pressure for primary reference fuels and gasoline: Experimental and numerical investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Jerzembeck, S.; Peters, N.; Pepiot-Desjardins, P.; Pitsch, H.

    2009-02-15

    Spherical flames of n-heptane, iso-octane, PRF 87 and gasoline/air mixtures are experimentally investigated to determine laminar burning velocities and Markstein lengths under engine-relevant conditions by using the constant volume bomb method. Data are obtained for an initial temperature of 373 K, equivalence ratios varying from {phi}=0.7 to {phi}=1.2, and initial pressures from 10 to 25 bar. To track the flame front in the vessel a dark field He-Ne laser Schlieren measurement technique and digital image processing were used. The propagating speed with respect to the burned gases and the stretch rate are determined from the rate of change of the flame radius. The laminar burning velocities are obtained through a linear extrapolation to zero stretch. The experimentally determined Markstein numbers are compared to theoretical predictions. A reduced chemical kinetic mechanism for n-heptane and iso-octane was derived from the Lawrence Livermore comprehensive mechanisms. This mechanism was validated for ignition delay times and flame propagation at low and high pressures. In summary an overall good agreement with the various experimental data sets used in the validation was obtained. (author)

  5. High Antiferromagnetic Domain Wall Velocity Induced by Néel Spin-Orbit Torques.

    PubMed

    Gomonay, O; Jungwirth, T; Sinova, J

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate the possibility to drive an antiferromagnetic domain wall at high velocities by fieldlike Néel spin-orbit torques. Such torques arise from current-induced local fields that alternate their orientation on each sublattice of the antiferromagnet and whose orientation depends primarily on the current direction, giving them their fieldlike character. The domain wall velocities that can be achieved by this mechanism are 2 orders of magnitude greater than the ones in ferromagnets. This arises from the efficiency of the staggered spin-orbit fields to couple to the order parameter and from the exchange-enhanced phenomena in antiferromagnetic texture dynamics, which leads to a low domain wall effective mass and the absence of a Walker breakdown limit. In addition, because of its nature, the staggered spin-orbit field can lift the degeneracy between two 180° rotated states in a collinear antiferromagnet, and it provides a force that can move such walls and control the switching of the states.

  6. Velocity measurements in a high-Reynolds-number, momentum-conserving, axisymmetric, turbulent jet

    SciTech Connect

    Hussein, H.J.; Capp, S.P.; George, W.K.

    1994-01-01

    The turbulent flow resulting from a top-hat jet exhausting into a large room was investigated. The Reynolds number based on exit conditions was approximately 10(exp 5). Velocity moments to third order were obtained using flying and stationary hot-wire and burst-mode laser-Doppler anemometry (LDA) techniques. The entire room was fully seeded for the LDA measurements. The measurements are shown to satisfy the differential and integral momentum equations for a round jet in an infinite environment. The results differ substantially from those reported by some earlier investigators, both in the level and shape of the profiles. These differences are attributed to the smaller enclosures used in the earlier works and the recirculation within them. Also, the flying hot-wire and burst-mode LDA measurements made here differ from the stationary wire measurements, especially the higher moments and away from the flow centreline. These differences are attributed to the cross-flow and rectification errors on the latter at the high turbulence intensities present in this flow (30% minimum at centreline). The measurements are used, together with recent dissipation measurements, to compute the energy balance for the jet, and an attempt is made to estimate the pressure-velocity and pressure-strain rate correlations.

  7. Removal of interproximal dental biofilms by high-velocity water microdrops.

    PubMed

    Rmaile, A; Carugo, D; Capretto, L; Aspiras, M; De Jager, M; Ward, M; Stoodley, P

    2014-01-01

    The influence of the impact of a high-velocity water microdrop on the detachment of Streptococcus mutans UA159 biofilms from the interproximal (IP) space of teeth in a training typodont was studied experimentally and computationally. Twelve-day-old S. mutans biofilms in the IP space were exposed to a prototype AirFloss delivering 115 µL water at a maximum exit velocity of 60 m/sec in a 30-msec burst. Using confocal microscopy and image analysis, we obtained quantitative measurements of the percentage removal of biofilms from different locations in the IP space. The 3D geometry of the typodont and the IP spaces was obtained by micro-computed tomography (µ-CT) imaging. We performed computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations to calculate the wall shear stress (τw ) distribution caused by the drops on the tooth surface. A qualitative agreement and a quantitative relationship between experiments and simulations were achieved. The wall shear stress (τw ) generated by the prototype AirFloss and its spatial distribution on the teeth surface played a key role in dictating the efficacy of biofilm removal in the IP space.

  8. Estimation of Venus wind velocities from high-resolution infrared spectra. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, M. A. H.

    1978-01-01

    Zonal velocity profiles in the Venus atmosphere above the clouds were estimated from measured asymmetries of HCl and HF infrared absorption lines in high-resolution Fourier interferometer spectra of the planet. These asymmetries are caused by both pressure-induced shifts in the positions of the hydrogen-halide lines perturbed by CO2 and Doppler shifts due to atmospheric motions. Particularly in the case of the HCl 2-0 band, the effects of the two types of line shifts can be easily isolated, making it possible to estimate a profile of average Venus equatorial zonal velocity as a function of pressure in the region roughly 60 to 70 km above the surface of the planet. The mean profiles obtained show strong vertical shear in the Venus zonal winds near the cloud-top level, and both the magnitude and direction of winds at all levels in this region appear to vary greatly with longitude relative to the sub-solar point.

  9. Thermal conductivity and sound velocity of antigorite at high pressure using time-domain thermoreflectance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chien, Y. H.; Hsieh, W. P.

    2016-12-01

    We measure the thermal conductivity and compressional wave velocity of antigorite at room temperature and up to 13 GPa. Antigorite is a serpentine mineral (Mg6Si4O10(OH)8) of high-temperature form having a wavy structure and it has a wide stability field (e.g., up to 720°C at 2 GPa or 620°C at 5 GPa), which is a key material for understanding slab subduction, deep earthquake and volcanic processes in the mantle wedge where fluids from the dehydrating oceanic crust interact with the mantle. The mineral phases, chemical compositions, and crystal orientations of the antigorite were analyzed using Raman spectroscopy, energy-dispersive spectroscopy, and electron backscattered diffraction, respectively. The measurements of thermal conductivities and sound velocities of antigorite with different crystal orientations were carried out by time-domain thermoreflectance (TDTR). At P<7 GPa, thermal conductivity becomes more anisotropic with increasing pressure but becomes more isotropic in elastic property between b and c-axis. We also discuss the lattice internal rearrangement may induce over three times increase in thermal conductivity at 7 GPa ( 210 km depth) which would enhance larger heat flux along b-axis in the serpentinized slab. Thus, it gives new insights into the potential influence of thermal conductivity anisotropy on the mineral dehydration processes in the subduction zone.

  10. High Antiferromagnetic Domain Wall Velocity Induced by Néel Spin-Orbit Torques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomonay, O.; Jungwirth, T.; Sinova, J.

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate the possibility to drive an antiferromagnetic domain wall at high velocities by fieldlike Néel spin-orbit torques. Such torques arise from current-induced local fields that alternate their orientation on each sublattice of the antiferromagnet and whose orientation depends primarily on the current direction, giving them their fieldlike character. The domain wall velocities that can be achieved by this mechanism are 2 orders of magnitude greater than the ones in ferromagnets. This arises from the efficiency of the staggered spin-orbit fields to couple to the order parameter and from the exchange-enhanced phenomena in antiferromagnetic texture dynamics, which leads to a low domain wall effective mass and the absence of a Walker breakdown limit. In addition, because of its nature, the staggered spin-orbit field can lift the degeneracy between two 180° rotated states in a collinear antiferromagnet, and it provides a force that can move such walls and control the switching of the states.

  11. Removal of Interproximal Dental Biofilms by High-velocity Water Microdrops

    PubMed Central

    Rmaile, A.; Carugo, D.; Capretto, L.; Aspiras, M.; De Jager, M.; Ward, M.; Stoodley, P.

    2014-01-01

    The influence of the impact of a high-velocity water microdrop on the detachment of Streptococcus mutans UA159 biofilms from the interproximal (IP) space of teeth in a training typodont was studied experimentally and computationally. Twelve-day-old S. mutans biofilms in the IP space were exposed to a prototype AirFloss delivering 115 µL water at a maximum exit velocity of 60 m/sec in a 30-msec burst. Using confocal microscopy and image analysis, we obtained quantitative measurements of the percentage removal of biofilms from different locations in the IP space. The 3D geometry of the typodont and the IP spaces was obtained by micro-computed tomography (µ-CT) imaging. We performed computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations to calculate the wall shear stress (τw) distribution caused by the drops on the tooth surface. A qualitative agreement and a quantitative relationship between experiments and simulations were achieved. The wall shear stress (τw) generated by the prototype AirFloss and its spatial distribution on the teeth surface played a key role in dictating the efficacy of biofilm removal in the IP space. PMID:24170371

  12. VLA Observations of the Magnetic Field of the Smith High Velocity Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betti, Sarah; Hill, Alex S.; Mao, Sui Ann; McClure-Griffiths, Naomi M.; Lockman, Felix J.; Benjamin, Robert A.; Gaensler, Bryan M.

    2017-01-01

    High velocity clouds (HVCs) are hydrogen gas clouds around galaxies with velocities inconsistent with Galactic rotation. HVCs may fuel future star formation and drive galaxy evolution. The Smith Cloud is an HVC with an orbit suggesting it has made at least one passage through the disk. A measured magnetic field suggests how it survived passage through the Galactic halo. The Faraday rotation measure (RM) provides information about the strength and direction of the magnetic field. We use the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) to obtain reliable RMs towards ~950 background point sources to measure the geometry of the magnetic field of the Smith Cloud. These RMs constrain the strength of the magnetic field at the head, tail, and body of the Smith Cloud while RMs directly behind the Smith Cloud suggest there is ionized gas associated with the cloud that has not previously been detected. The confirmation of the magnetic field of the Smith Cloud along with a detailed morphology of the magnetic field structure will constrain how HVCs pass through the Galactic halo without losing their gas and survive the passage through the intergalactic and interstellar media.

  13. Sound velocity of liquid Fe-Ni-S at high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawaguchi, Saori I.; Nakajima, Yoichi; Hirose, Kei; Komabayashi, Tetsuya; Ozawa, Haruka; Tateno, Shigehiko; Kuwayama, Yasuhiro; Tsutsui, Satoshi; Baron, Alfred Q. R.

    2017-05-01

    The sound velocity of liquid Fe47Ni28S25 and Fe63Ni12S25 was measured up to 52 GPa/2480 K in externally resistance-heated and laser-heated diamond-anvil cells using high-resolution inelastic X-ray scattering. From these experimental data, we obtained the elastic parameters of liquid Fe47Ni28S25, KS0 = 96.1 ± 2.7 GPa and KS0' = 4.00 ± 0.13, where KS0 and KS0' are the adiabatic bulk modulus and its pressure derivative at 1 bar, when the density is fixed at ρ0 = 5.62 ± 0.09 g/cm3 for 1 bar and 2000 K. With these parameters, the sound velocity and density of liquid Fe47Ni28S25 were calculated to be 8.41 ± 0.17 km/s and 8.93 ± 0.19 to 9.10 ± 0.18 g/cm3, respectively, at the core mantle boundary conditions of 135 GPa and 3600-4300 K. These values are 9.4% higher and 17-18% lower than those of pure Fe, respectively. Extrapolation of measurements and comparison with seismological models suggest the presence of 5.8-7.5 wt % sulfur in the Earth's outer core if it is the only light element.

  14. Cleansing technique using high-velocity steam-air micromist jet spray.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Koichi; Ishihara, Masayuki; Murakami, Kaoru; Nakamura, Shingo; Sato, Yoko; Kuwabara, Masahiro; Fujita, Masanori; Kiyosawa, Tomoharu; Yokoe, Hidetaka

    2017-08-29

    Application of a high-velocity steam-air micromist jet spray (HVS-AMJS; micromist average diameter: 2.4 μm) for cleansing the skin is proposed. Low-pressure steam is mixed with compressed air (pH 6.5) in a nozzle, and then sprayed at a pressure of ≦0.25 MPa and a velocity of ≧0.34 m/s on the skin or surface of material located approximately 5-10 cm from the nozzle. The temperature on the sprayed surface and water flow rate could be controlled between 42 °C and 46 °C and at approximately 50 mL/min, respectively. Compared with ultrasonic cleansing with tap water and rubbing with only tap water, the HVS-AMJS successfully removed fluorescent lotion covering pieces of wood and significantly reduced both the number of coliforms and the total viable counts on pieces of wood and gauze. Furthermore, the HVS-AMJS effectively removed oily ink from the skin of hairless rats, and temporarily elevated the skin temperature and blood flow, indicating massage effects. The striking characteristics of this cleansing technique using HVS-AMJS are not only its ability to remove microbes and residue without using any chemicals or detergents but also its massage effects.

  15. Microstructure of surface zones subjected to high-velocity parting-off

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryttberg, K.; Knutson Wedel, M.; Dahlman, P.; Nyborg, L.

    2006-08-01

    A hydraulic high-velocity pressing machine with a parting-off tool was used for adiabatic cutting with impact velocities ranging from 5 to 10 m/s. In this study the associated fracture mechanisms and microstructures of three different materials (100Cr6, 100CrMn6 and C56) in the form of wire or bar were investigated. It was concluded that the parting-off is initiated through a shearing effect resulting in ductile shear fracture being responsible for the cutting. In all of the samples microcracks were found in the severely deformed region around the cut, which became larger with increasing sample diameter. Evidence of heating was not observed in the cut zone of samples having 6 mm diameter. However, for samples with a diameter of 70 mm and above, a white-etching band could be found, indicating that the temperature had increased considerably in this region. Analysis of the fracture surfaces using scanning optical microscopy showed that the fracture mode had mostly been ductile shear, with exception of the largest samples where some evidence of tensile fracture could be observed.

  16. High Velocity Precessing Jet from the Water Fountain IRAS 18286-0959 Revealed by VLBA Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yung, Bosco; Nakashima, J.; Imai, H.; Deguchi, S.; Diamond, P. J.; Kwok, S.

    2011-05-01

    We report the multi-epoch VLBA observations of 22.2GHz water maser emission associated with the "water fountain" star IRAS 18286-0959. The detected maser emission are distributed in the velocity range from -50km/s to 150km/s. The spatial distribution of over 70% of the identified maser features is found to be highly collimated along a spiral jet (namely, jet 1) extended from southeast to northwest direction, and the rest of the features appear to trace another spiral jet (jet 2) with a different orientation. The two jets form a "double-helix" pattern which lies across 200 milliarcseconds (mas). The maser features are reasonably fit by a model consisting of two precessing jets. The velocities of jet 1 and jet 2 are derived to be 138km/s and 99km/s, respectively. The precession period of jet 1 is about 56 years, and for jet 2 it is about 73 years. We propose that the appearance of two jets observed are the result of a single driving source with a significant proper motion. This research was supported by grants from the Research Grants Council of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, China, the Seed Funding Programme for Basic Research of the University of Hong Kong, Grant-in-Aid for Young Scientists from the Ministry 9 of Education, Culture, Sports, Science, and Technology, and Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research from Japan Society for Promotion Science.

  17. A high speed data acquisition and analysis system for transonic velocity, density, and total temperature fluctuations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clukey, Steven J.

    1988-01-01

    The high speed Dynamic Data Acquisition System (DDAS) is described which provides the capability for the simultaneous measurement of velocity, density, and total temperature fluctuations. The system of hardware and software is described in context of the wind tunnel environment. The DDAS replaces both a recording mechanism and a separate data processing system. The data acquisition and data reduction process has been combined within DDAS. DDAS receives input from hot wires and anemometers, amplifies and filters the signals with computer controlled modules, and converts the analog signals to digital with real-time simultaneous digitization followed by digital recording on disk or tape. Automatic acquisition (either from a computer link to an existing wind tunnel acquisition system, or from data acquisition facilities within DDAS) collects necessary calibration and environment data. The generation of hot wire sensitivities is done in DDAS, as is the application of sensitivities to the hot wire data to generate turbulence quantities. The presentation of the raw and processed data, in terms of root mean square values of velocity, density and temperature, and the processing of the spectral data is accomplished on demand in near-real-time- with DDAS. A comprehensive description of the interface to the DDAS and of the internal mechanisms will be prosented. A summary of operations relevant to the use of the DDAS will be provided.

  18. Detecting non-maxwellian electron velocity distributions at JET by high resolution Thomson scattering.

    PubMed

    Beausang, K V; Prunty, S L; Scannell, R; Beurskens, M N; Walsh, M J; de la Luna, E

    2011-03-01

    The present work is motivated by a long standing discrepancy between the electron temperature measurements of Thomson scattering (TS) and electron cyclotron emission (ECE) diagnostics for plasmas with strong auxiliary heating observed at both JET and TFTR above 6–7 keV, where in some cases the ECE electron temperature measurements can be 15%–20% higher than the TS measurements. Recent analysis based on ECE results at JET has shown evidence of distortions to the Maxwellian electron velocity distribution and a correlation with the TS and ECE discrepancies has been suggested. In this paper, a technique to determine the presence of non-Maxwellian behavior using TS diagnostics is outlined. The difficulties and limitations of modern TS system designs to determine the electron velocity distribution are also discussed. It is demonstrated that small deviations such as those suggested by previous ECE analysis could be potentially detected, depending on the spectral layout of the TS polychromators. The spectral layout of the JET high resolution Thomson scattering system is such that it could be used to determine these deviations between 1 and 6 keV, and the results presented here indicate that no evidence of non-Maxwellian behavior is observed in this range. In this paper, a modification to the current polychromator design is proposed, allowing non-Maxwellian distortions to be detected up to at least 10 keV.

  19. High-temporal velocity-encoded MRI for the assessment of left ventricular inflow propagation velocity: Comparison with color M-mode echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Calkoen, Emmeline E; Marsan, Nina Ajmone; Bax, Jeroen J; van den Boogaard, Pieter J; Roest, Arno A W; de Roos, Albert; Westenberg, Jos J M

    2015-11-01

    To develop an alternative method for Vp-assessment using high-temporal velocity-encoded magnetic resonance imaging (VE-MRI). Left ventricular (LV) inflow propagation velocity (Vp) is considered a useful parameter in the complex assessment of LV diastolic function and is measured by Color M-mode echocardiography. A total of 43 patients diagnosed with ischemic heart failure (61 ± 11 years) and 22 healthy volunteers (29 ± 13 years) underwent Color M-mode echocardiography and VE-MRI to assess the inflow velocity through the mitral valve (mean interexamination time 14 days). Temporal resolution of VE-MRI was 10.8-11.8 msec. Local LV inflow velocity was sampled along a 4-cm line starting from the tip of the mitral leaflets and for consecutive sample points the point-in-time was assessed when local velocity exceeded 30 cm/s. From the position-time relation, Vp was calculated by both the difference quotient (Vp-MRI-DQ) as well as from linear regression (Vp-MRI-LR). Good correlation was found between Vp-echo and both Vp-MRI-DQ (r = 0.83, P < 0.001) and Vp-MRI-LR (r = 0.84, P < 0.001). Vp-MRI showed a significant but small underestimation as compared to Vp measured by echocardiography (Vp-MRI-DQ: 5.5 ± 16.2 cm/s, P = 0.008; Vp-MRI-LR: 9.9 ± 15.2 cm/s, P < 0.001). Applying age-related cutoff values for Vp to identify LV impaired relaxation, kappa-agreement with echocardiography was 0.72 (P < 0.001) for Vp-MRI-DQ and 0.69 (P < 0.001) for Vp-MRI-LR. High temporal VE-MRI represents a novel approach to assess Vp, showing good correlation with Color M-mode echocardiography. In healthy subjects and patients with ischemic heart failure, this new method demonstrated good agreement with echocardiography to identify LV impaired relaxation. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Ultradiscrete optimal velocity model: a cellular-automaton model for traffic flow and linear instability of high-flux traffic.

    PubMed

    Kanai, Masahiro; Isojima, Shin; Nishinari, Katsuhiro; Tokihiro, Tetsuji

    2009-05-01

    In this paper, we propose the ultradiscrete optimal velocity model, a cellular-automaton model for traffic flow, by applying the ultradiscrete method for the optimal velocity model. The optimal velocity model, defined by a differential equation, is one of the most important models; in particular, it successfully reproduces the instability of high-flux traffic. It is often pointed out that there is a close relation between the optimal velocity model and the modified Korteweg-de Vries (mkdV) equation, a soliton equation. Meanwhile, the ultradiscrete method enables one to reduce soliton equations to cellular automata which inherit the solitonic nature, such as an infinite number of conservation laws, and soliton solutions. We find that the theory of soliton equations is available for generic differential equations and the simulation results reveal that the model obtained reproduces both absolutely unstable and convectively unstable flows as well as the optimal velocity model.