Science.gov

Sample records for high wind penetration

  1. Impact of High Wind Power Penetration on Hydroelectric Unit Operations

    SciTech Connect

    Hodge, B. M.; Lew, D.; Milligan, M.

    2011-01-01

    The Western Wind and Solar Integration Study (WWSIS) investigated the operational impacts of very high levels of variable generation penetration rates (up to 35% by energy) in the western United States. This work examines the impact of this large amount of wind penetration on hydroelectric unit operations. Changes in hydroelectric unit operating unit patterns are examined for an aggregation of all hydro generators. The cost impacts of maintaining hydro unit flexibility are assessed and compared for a number of different modes of system operation.

  2. Microgrid optimal scheduling considering impact of high penetration wind generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alanazi, Abdulaziz

    The objective of this thesis is to study the impact of high penetration wind energy in economic and reliable operation of microgrids. Wind power is variable, i.e., constantly changing, and nondispatchable, i.e., cannot be controlled by the microgrid controller. Thus an accurate forecasting of wind power is an essential task in order to study its impacts in microgrid operation. Two commonly used forecasting methods including Autoregressive Integrated Moving Average (ARIMA) and Artificial Neural Network (ANN) have been used in this thesis to improve the wind power forecasting. The forecasting error is calculated using a Mean Absolute Percentage Error (MAPE) and is improved using the ANN. The wind forecast is further used in the microgrid optimal scheduling problem. The microgrid optimal scheduling is performed by developing a viable model for security-constrained unit commitment (SCUC) based on mixed-integer linear programing (MILP) method. The proposed SCUC is solved for various wind penetration levels and the relationship between the total cost and the wind power penetration is found. In order to reduce microgrid power transfer fluctuations, an additional constraint is proposed and added to the SCUC formulation. The new constraint would control the time-based fluctuations. The impact of the constraint on microgrid SCUC results is tested and validated with numerical analysis. Finally, the applicability of proposed models is demonstrated through numerical simulations.

  3. Generation Expansion Planning with High Penetration of Wind Power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharan, Ishan; Balasubramanian, R.

    2016-08-01

    Worldwide thrust is being provided in generation of electricity from wind. Planning for the developmental needs of wind based power has to be consistent with the objective and basic framework of overall resource planning. The operational issues associated with the integration of wind power must be addressed at the planning stage. Lack of co-ordinated planning of wind turbine generators, conventional generating units and expansion of the transmission system may lead to curtailment of wind power due to transmission inadequacy or operational constraints. This paper presents a generation expansion planning model taking into account fuel transportation and power transmission constraints, while addressing the operational issues associated with the high penetration of wind power. For analyzing the operational issues, security constrained unit commitment algorithm is embedded in the integrated generation and transmission expansion planning model. The integrated generation and transmission expansion planning problem has been formulated as a mixed integer linear problem involving both binary and continuous variables in GAMS. The model has been applied to the expansion planning of a real system to illustrate the proposed approach.

  4. High Wind Penetration Impact on U.S. Wind Manufacturing Capacity and Critical Resources

    SciTech Connect

    Laxson, A.; Hand, M. M.; Blair, N.

    2006-10-01

    This study used two different models to analyze a number of alternative scenarios of annual wind power capacity expansion to better understand the impacts of high levels of wind generated electricity production on wind energy manufacturing and installation rates.

  5. Impact of High Wind Power Penetration on Hydroelectric Unit Operations: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Hodge, B. M.; Lew, D.; Milligan, M.

    2011-10-01

    This paper examines the impact of this large amount of wind penetration on hydroelectric unit operations. Changes in hydroelectric unit operating unit patterns are examined for an aggregation of all hydro generators.

  6. Impact of High Wind Power Penetration on Hydroelectric Unit Operations in the WWSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Hodge, B.-M.; Lew, D.; Milligan, M.

    2011-07-01

    This report examines the impact of this large amount of wind penetration on hydroelectric unit operations. Changes in hydroelectric unit operating patterns are examined both for an aggregation of all hydro generators and for select individual plants.

  7. Reactive power planning under high penetration of wind energy using Benders decomposition

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Xu, Yan; Wei, Yanli; Fang, Xin; Li, Fangxing; Azim, Riyasat

    2015-11-05

    This study addresses the optimal allocation of reactive power volt-ampere reactive (VAR) sources under the paradigm of high penetration of wind energy. Reactive power planning (RPP) in this particular condition involves a high level of uncertainty because of wind power characteristic. To properly model wind generation uncertainty, a multi-scenario framework optimal power flow that considers the voltage stability constraint under the worst wind scenario and transmission N 1 contingency is developed. The objective of RPP in this study is to minimise the total cost including the VAR investment cost and the expected generation cost. Therefore RPP under this condition ismore » modelled as a two-stage stochastic programming problem to optimise the VAR location and size in one stage, then to minimise the fuel cost in the other stage, and eventually, to find the global optimal RPP results iteratively. Benders decomposition is used to solve this model with an upper level problem (master problem) for VAR allocation optimisation and a lower problem (sub-problem) for generation cost minimisation. Impact of the potential reactive power support from doubly-fed induction generator (DFIG) is also analysed. Lastly, case studies on the IEEE 14-bus and 118-bus systems are provided to verify the proposed method.« less

  8. Reactive power planning under high penetration of wind energy using Benders decomposition

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Yan; Wei, Yanli; Fang, Xin; Li, Fangxing; Azim, Riyasat

    2015-11-05

    This study addresses the optimal allocation of reactive power volt-ampere reactive (VAR) sources under the paradigm of high penetration of wind energy. Reactive power planning (RPP) in this particular condition involves a high level of uncertainty because of wind power characteristic. To properly model wind generation uncertainty, a multi-scenario framework optimal power flow that considers the voltage stability constraint under the worst wind scenario and transmission N 1 contingency is developed. The objective of RPP in this study is to minimise the total cost including the VAR investment cost and the expected generation cost. Therefore RPP under this condition is modelled as a two-stage stochastic programming problem to optimise the VAR location and size in one stage, then to minimise the fuel cost in the other stage, and eventually, to find the global optimal RPP results iteratively. Benders decomposition is used to solve this model with an upper level problem (master problem) for VAR allocation optimisation and a lower problem (sub-problem) for generation cost minimisation. Impact of the potential reactive power support from doubly-fed induction generator (DFIG) is also analysed. Lastly, case studies on the IEEE 14-bus and 118-bus systems are provided to verify the proposed method.

  9. Effective Ancillary Services Market Designs on High Wind Power Penetration Systems: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Ela, E.; Kirby, B.; Navid, N.; Smith, J. C.

    2011-12-01

    This paper focuses on how the ancillary service market designs are implemented and how they may require changes on systems with greater penetrations of variable renewable energy suppliers, in particular wind power. Ancillary services markets have been developed in many of the restructured power system regions throughout the world. Ancillary services include the services that support the provision of energy to support power system reliability. The ancillary services markets are tied tightly to the design of the energy market and to the physics of the system and therefore careful consideration of power system economics and engineering must be considered in their design. This paper focuses on how the ancillary service market designs are implemented and how they may require changes on systems with greater penetrations of variable renewable energy suppliers, in particular wind power.

  10. Off-disk penetration of ancient solar wind

    SciTech Connect

    Sasaki, SHO )

    1991-05-01

    Following a suggestion by Wetherill (1981), an estimation is made of the capture of an ancient, intense solar wind by primordial dust. Because the mutual collision of planetesimals would generate additional dust grains in interplanetary space after the solar nebula's dissipation, the vertical distribution of the dust is taken into account. The solar wind penetrates the dust swarm through the less opaque off-disk portions, explaining both the trapping of a substantial quantity of solar wind species and the high abundances of solar-type noble gases in gas-rich meteorites and on Venus. The off-disk trap is efficient when the disk is opaque and its relative thickness does not diminish with increasing heliocentric distance. 34 refs.

  11. Eastern Renewable Generation Integration Study: Flexibility and High Penetrations of Wind and Solar; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect

    Bloom, Aaron; Townsend, Aaron; Palchak, David

    2015-07-29

    Balancing wind and solar in a model is relatively easy. All you need to do is assume a very large system with infinite flexibility! But what if you don't have an infinitely flexible system? What if there are thousands of generators nestled in a handful of regions that are unlikely to change their operational practices? Would you still have enough flexibility to balance hundreds of gigawatts of wind and solar at a 5 minute level? At NREL, we think we can, and our industry partners agree. This presentation was presented at the IEEE Power and Energy Society General Meeting by Aaron Bloom, highlighting results of the Eastern Renewable Generation Integration Study.

  12. Evaluation of Production Cost Savings from Consolidation of Balancing Authorities in the US Western Interconnection under High Wind and Solar Penetration

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Tony B.; Samaan, Nader A.; Jin, Chunlian

    2014-12-24

    This paper introduces a comprehensive analysis to quantify the potential savings in production cost due to consolidation of 32 US western interconnection Balancing Authorities (BAs). Three simulation scenarios are developed: current Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC) BAs structure, full copper-sheet consolidation, and full consolidation with transmission congestion considered. The study uses WECC Transmission Expansion Planning Policy Committee (TEPPC) model that was developed for the year 2020. The model assumes 8% wind and 3% solar energy penetration as percentage of total WECC demand in 2020. Sensitivity analyses are carried out to assess the impact of transmission hurdle rates between WECC BAs on potential benefits. The study shows savings that ranges from $400 Million (2.4% of total one year production cost) to $600 Million (3.2%) per year in thermal units production cost due to consolidation can be achieved. The copper sheet consolidation scenario shows an extra savings of $240 Million (1.4%) per year.

  13. System-wide emissions implications of increased wind power penetration.

    PubMed

    Valentino, Lauren; Valenzuela, Viviana; Botterud, Audun; Zhou, Zhi; Conzelmann, Guenter

    2012-04-01

    This paper discusses the environmental effects of incorporating wind energy into the electric power system. We present a detailed emissions analysis based on comprehensive modeling of power system operations with unit commitment and economic dispatch for different wind penetration levels. First, by minimizing cost, the unit commitment model decides which thermal power plants will be utilized based on a wind power forecast, and then, the economic dispatch model dictates the level of production for each unit as a function of the realized wind power generation. Finally, knowing the power production from each power plant, the emissions are calculated. The emissions model incorporates the effects of both cycling and start-ups of thermal power plants in analyzing emissions from an electric power system with increasing levels of wind power. Our results for the power system in the state of Illinois show significant emissions effects from increased cycling and particularly start-ups of thermal power plants. However, we conclude that as the wind power penetration increases, pollutant emissions decrease overall due to the replacement of fossil fuels.

  14. Improved models for increasing wind penetration, economics and operating reliability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlueter, R. A.; Park, G. L.; Sigari, G.; Costi, T.

    1984-04-01

    The need for wind power prediction in order to enable larger wind power penetrations and improve the economics and reliability of power system operation is discussed. Methods for estimating turbulence and prediction of diurnal wind power prediction are reviewed. A method is presented to predict meteorological event induced wind power variation from measurements of wind speed at reference meteorological towers that encircle all wind turbine clusters and from sites within the wind turbine clusters. The methodology uses a recursive least squares model and requires: (1) detection of even propagation direction; and (2) determination of delays between groups of measurements at reference meteorological towers and those measurements at towers in the array. Proper filtering of the data and methods for switching reference sites and delays for the transition from one frontal system to another are also discussed. The performance of the prediction methodology on data sets from both sites was quite good and indicates one or more hour ahead prediction of wind power for meteorological events is feasible.

  15. Sunshot Initiative High Penetration Solar Portal

    DOE Data Explorer

    The DOE SunShot Initiative is a collaborative national initiative to make solar energy cost-competitive with other forms of energy by the end of the decade. Reducing the installed cost of solar energy systems by about 75% will drive widespread large-scale adoption of this renewable energy and restore U.S. leadership in the global clean energy race. The High Penetration Solar Portal was created as a resource to aggregate the most relevant and timely information related to high penetration solar scenarios and integrating solar into the grid. The site is designed so that utilities, grant awardees, regulators, researchers, and other solar professionals can easily share data, case studies, lessons learned, and demonstration project findings. [from https://solarhighpen.energy.gov/about_the_high_penetration_solar_portal

  16. A single fatal penetrating chest wound from shattered wind-blown glass.

    PubMed

    Murphy, G K

    1985-12-01

    The great majority of penetrating wounds of the thorax result from firearms and bladed weapons. Penetrating wounds of the heart and of the great vessels still have a high immediate mortality. While penetrating chest wounds occasionally result from fragments of glass; most severe and fatal wounds from glass result from one's falling into or through architectural (plate) glass, sustaining wounds of abdomen or extremities, or both. A single, fatal penetrating chest wound resulting from a wind-blown fragment of glass is distinctly uncommon. The unique case of this type reported herein is that of a 12-year-old youth who was struck in his home in the left anterior chest by a single, sharp, slender fragment of glass blown from a window which shattered in a thunderstorm. This resulted in a rapidly fatal penetrating wound involving thoracic viscera. The forensic pathologist must thoroughly investigate and document such accidental deaths, modifying his/her autopsy procedure as necessary for these purposes and to avoid accidental injury at the autopsy table.

  17. Optical remote sensing of penetration into the lower thermosphere of neutral wind and composition perturbations driven by magnetospheric forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conde, M. G.; Anderson, C.; Hecht, J. H.

    2011-12-01

    Numerous observations of thermospheric neutral winds at altitudes of 240 km and higher clearly show wind structures occurring at auroral latitudes in response to magnetospheric forcing. It is also known from observations that magnetospheric forcing is not a major driver of winds down at mesopause heights and below. Because it is difficult to measure winds in the intervening "transition region" between these height regimes, very little is known about how deeply the magnetospherically driven neutral wind structures penetrate into the lower thermosphere, what factors affect this penetration, and what consequences it may have for transport of chemical species. Here we will show neutral wind maps obtained at F-region and E-region heights in the auroral zone using Fabry-Perot Doppler spectroscopy of the 630 nm and 558 nm optical emissions. Although thermospheric neutral winds are smoothed by viscosity and inertia, observed responses to magnetospheric forcing still include wind responses on time scales as short as 10 minutes or less, and on length scales shorter than 100 km horizontally and 5 km vertically. The data also show that the degree of penetration of magnetospheric forcing into the lower thermospheric wind field is highly variable from day to day. Signatures of magnetospheric forcing are sometimes seen at altitudes as low as 120 km, whereas at other times the E-region does not seem to respond at all. Possible links will be explored between this variability and the day to day differences seen in the column integrated thermospheric [O]/[N2] ratio over Alaska.

  18. Deploying High Penetration Photovoltaic Systems: A Case Study

    SciTech Connect

    Coddington, M. H.; Baca, D.; Kroposki, B. D.; Basso, T.

    2011-01-01

    Photovoltaic (PV) system capacity penetration, or simply 'penetration,' is often defined as the rated power output of the aggregate PV systems on a distribution circuit segment divided by the peak load of that circuit segment. Industry experts agree that a single value defining high penetration is not universally applicable. However, it is generally agreed that a conservative value to designate high penetration is the condition when the ratio of aggregate PV systems ratings to peak load exceeds 15%. This case study illustrates the case of a distribution feeder which is able to accommodate a traditional capacity penetration level of 47%, and perhaps more. New maximum penetration levels need to be defined and verified and enhanced definitions for penetration on a distribution circuit need to be developed. The new penetration definitions and studies will help utility engineers, system developers, and regulatory agencies better agree what levels of PV deployment can be attained without jeopardizing the reliability and power quality of a circuit.

  19. Asymmetric penetration of solar wind perturbations down to 400-km altitudes at Mars observed by Mars Global Surveyor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsunaga, K.; Seki, K.; Hara, T.; Brain, D. A.

    2012-12-01

    Since Mars has no intrinsic global magnetic field, the exchange of energy, momentum, and material with the planet takes place through interaction between the solar wind and the Martin upper atmosphere. It is thought that solar wind encountering Mars can penetrate into the point where the solar wind dynamic pressure and the plasma thermal pressure in the Martin ionosphere are almost balanced and the solar wind flow is deflected around the boundary. However, the actual interaction can be complicated, since both plasma processes and the existence of crustal magnetic fields can modify the structure of the boundary. The Kelvin-Helmholtz (K-H) instability at the Martian ionopause is one of important candidate process to cause the modification. The dDistribution of ionopause surface waves generated by the K-H instability can should exhibit a clear asymmetry between hemispheres of upward and downward solar wind motional electric fields [e.g., Terada et al., 2002]. It is also suggested that the crustal magnetic fields can locally push the MPB (magnetic pileup boundary) upward [e.g., Brain et al., 2003]. It is also reported that the boundary between the solar wind and Martian ionosphere is located at an altitude of 380 km on average in the dayside [e.g., Mitchell et al., 2001]. However, this boundary location can change significantly depending on solar wind conditions. While it is considered that the solar wind can penetrate to lower altitudes than usual when the solar wind pressure is high, the frequency of the solar wind penetration and its quantitative dependence on the solar wind conditions are not yet well understood. In this study, we focused on penetration of solar wind electromagnetic disturbances, which are a characteristic feature of the shocked solar wind (magnetosheath), down to 400-km altitude at Mars. Using Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) data, we investigated the observational frequency and characteristics of the penetration events. We used data from the MGS

  20. Sub-Hourly Impacts of High Solar Penetrations in the Western United States: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Lew, D.; Brinkman, G.; Ibanez, E.; Hummon, M.; Hodge, B. M.; Heaney, M.; King, J.

    2012-09-01

    This paper presents results of analysis on the sub-hourly impacts of high solar penetrations from the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study Phase 2. Extreme event analysis showed that most large ramps were due to sunrise and sunset events, which have a significant predictability component. Variability in general was much higher in the high-solar versus high-wind scenario. Reserve methodologies that had already been developed for wind were therefore modified to take into account the predictability component of solar variability.

  1. Final Technical Report: Distributed Controls for High Penetrations of Renewables

    SciTech Connect

    Byrne, Raymond H.; Neely, Jason C.; Rashkin, Lee J.; Trudnowski, Daniel J.; Wilson, David G.

    2015-12-01

    The goal of this effort was to apply four potential control analysis/design approaches to the design of distributed grid control systems to address the impact of latency and communications uncertainty with high penetrations of photovoltaic (PV) generation. The four techniques considered were: optimal fixed structure control; Nyquist stability criterion; vector Lyapunov analysis; and Hamiltonian design methods. A reduced order model of the Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC) developed for the Matlab Power Systems Toolbox (PST) was employed for the study, as well as representative smaller systems (e.g., a two-area, three-area, and four-area power system). Excellent results were obtained with the optimal fixed structure approach, and the methodology we developed was published in a journal article. This approach is promising because it offers a method for designing optimal control systems with the feedback signals available from Phasor Measurement Unit (PMU) data as opposed to full state feedback or the design of an observer. The Nyquist approach inherently handles time delay and incorporates performance guarantees (e.g., gain and phase margin). We developed a technique that works for moderate sized systems, but the approach does not scale well to extremely large system because of computational complexity. The vector Lyapunov approach was applied to a two area model to demonstrate the utility for modeling communications uncertainty. Application to large power systems requires a method to automatically expand/contract the state space and partition the system so that communications uncertainty can be considered. The Hamiltonian Surface Shaping and Power Flow Control (HSSPFC) design methodology was selected to investigate grid systems for energy storage requirements to support high penetration of variable or stochastic generation (such as wind and PV) and loads. This method was applied to several small system models.

  2. High Penetration Photovoltaic Case Study Report

    SciTech Connect

    Bank, J.; Mather, B.; Keller, J.; Coddington, M.

    2013-01-01

    Technical concerns with integrating higher penetrations of photovoltaic (PV) systems include grid stability, voltage regulation, power quality (voltage rise, sags, flicker, and frequency fluctuations), and protection and coordination. The current utility grid was designed to accommodate power flows from the central generation source to the transmission system and eventually to the distribution feeders. At the distribution level, the system was designed to carry power from the substation toward the load. Renewable distributed generation, particularly solar PV, provides power at the distribution level challenging this classical paradigm. As these resources become more commonplace the nature of the distribution network and its operation is changing to handle power flow in both directions. This report is focused on large PV installations in which penetration is significantly greater than 15% of maximum daytime feeder load. These case studies are intended to demonstrate success stories with integration of large PV plants at the distribution level as well as some of the solutions used by the utility to ensure safe, reliable operation of both the PV system and the distribution network.

  3. Grid-wide subdaily hydrologic alteration under massive wind power penetration in Chile.

    PubMed

    Haas, J; Olivares, M A; Palma-Behnke, R

    2015-05-01

    Hydropeaking operations can severely degrade ecosystems. As variable renewable sources (e.g. wind power) are integrated into a power grid, fluctuations in the generation-demand balance are expected to increase. In this context, compensating technologies, notably hydropower reservoir plants, could operate in a stronger peaking scheme. This issue calls for an integrated modeling of the entire power system, including not only hydropower reservoirs, but also all other plants. A novel methodology to study the link between the short-term variability of renewable energies and the subdaily hydrologic alteration, due to hydropower reservoir operations is presented. Grid operations under selected wind power portfolios are simulated using a short-term hydro-thermal coordination tool. The resulting turbined flows by relevant reservoir plants are then compared in terms of the Richard-Baker flashiness index to both the baseline and the natural flow regime. Those are then analyzed in order to: i) detect if there is a significant change in the degree of subdaily hydrologic alteration (SDHA) due to a larger wind penetration, and ii) identify which rivers are most affected. The proposed scheme is applied to Chile's Central Interconnect System (SIC) for scenarios up to 15% of wind energy penetration. Results show a major degree of SDHA under the baseline as compared to the natural regime. As wind power increases, so does the SDHA in two important rivers. This suggests a need for further ecological studies in those rivers, along with an analysis of operational constraints to limit the SDHA. PMID:25728917

  4. Grid-wide subdaily hydrologic alteration under massive wind power penetration in Chile.

    PubMed

    Haas, J; Olivares, M A; Palma-Behnke, R

    2015-05-01

    Hydropeaking operations can severely degrade ecosystems. As variable renewable sources (e.g. wind power) are integrated into a power grid, fluctuations in the generation-demand balance are expected to increase. In this context, compensating technologies, notably hydropower reservoir plants, could operate in a stronger peaking scheme. This issue calls for an integrated modeling of the entire power system, including not only hydropower reservoirs, but also all other plants. A novel methodology to study the link between the short-term variability of renewable energies and the subdaily hydrologic alteration, due to hydropower reservoir operations is presented. Grid operations under selected wind power portfolios are simulated using a short-term hydro-thermal coordination tool. The resulting turbined flows by relevant reservoir plants are then compared in terms of the Richard-Baker flashiness index to both the baseline and the natural flow regime. Those are then analyzed in order to: i) detect if there is a significant change in the degree of subdaily hydrologic alteration (SDHA) due to a larger wind penetration, and ii) identify which rivers are most affected. The proposed scheme is applied to Chile's Central Interconnect System (SIC) for scenarios up to 15% of wind energy penetration. Results show a major degree of SDHA under the baseline as compared to the natural regime. As wind power increases, so does the SDHA in two important rivers. This suggests a need for further ecological studies in those rivers, along with an analysis of operational constraints to limit the SDHA.

  5. Transmission System Performance Analysis for High-Penetration Photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect

    Achilles, S.; Schramm, S.; Bebic, J.

    2008-02-01

    This study is an assessment of the potential impact of high levels of penetration of photovoltaic (PV) generation on transmission systems. The effort used stability simulations of a transmission system with different levels of PV generation and load.

  6. Effects of Rock High Pressure Strength on Penetration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Hongfa

    2011-06-01

    Perforating of oil/gas well creates communication tunnel between reservoir and wellbore. Shaped charges are widely used as perforators in oilfield industry. The liners of the charges are mostly made of powder metal to prevent solid slug clogging the entrance hole of well casing or locking the hole in perforating gun. High speed jet from the shaped charge pierces through perforating gun, well fluid, well casing, and then penetrates into reservoir formation. Prediction of jet penetration in reservoir rock is critical in modeling of well production. An analytical penetration model developed for solid rod by Tate and Alekseevskii is applied. However, strength of formation rock at high pressure needs to be measured. Lateral stress gauge measurements in plate impact tests are conducted. Piezoelectric pressure gauges are imbedded in samples to measure the longitudinal and transverse stress. The two stresses provide Hugoniot and material compressive strength. Indiana limestone, a typical rock in perforation testing, is selected as target sample material in the plate impact tests. Since target strength effect on penetration is more significant in late stage of penetration when the strength of material becomes significant compared to the impact pressure, all the impact tests are focused on lower impact pressure up to 9 GPa. The measurements show that the strength increases with impact pressure. The results are applied in the penetration calculations. The final penetration matches testing data very well.

  7. Shielding materials for highly penetrating space radiations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiefer, Richard L.; Orwoll, Robert A.

    1995-01-01

    Interplanetary travel involves the transfer from an Earth orbit to a solar orbit. Once outside the Earth's magnetosphere, the major sources of particulate radiation are solar cosmic rays (SCR's) and galactic cosmic rays (GCR's). Intense fluxes of SCR's come from solar flares and consist primarily of protons with energies up to 1 GeV. The GCR consists of a low flux of nuclei with energies up to 10(exp 10) GeV. About 70 percent of the GCR are protons, but a small amount (0.6 percent) are nuclei with atomic numbers greater than 10. High energy charged particles (HZE) interact with matter by transferring energy to atomic electrons in a Coulomb process and by reacting with an atomic nucleus. Energy transferred in the first process increases with the square of the atomic number, so particles with high atomic numbers would be expected to lose large amounts of energy by this process. Nuclear reactions produced by (HZE) particles produce high-energy secondary particles which in turn lose energy to the material. The HZE nuclei are a major concern for radiation protection of humans during interplanetary missions because of the very high specific ionization of both primary and secondary particles. Computer codes have been developed to calculate the deposition of energy by very energetic charged particles in various materials. Calculations show that there is a significant buildup of secondary particles from nuclear fragmentation and Coulomb dissociation processes. A large portion of these particles are neutrons. Since neutrons carry no charge, they only lose energy by collision or reaction with a nucleus. Neutrons with high energies transfer large amounts of energy by inelastic collisions with nuclei. However, as the neutron energy decreases, elastic collisions become much more effective for energy loss. The lighter the nucleus, the greater the fraction of the neutron's kinetic energy that can be lost in an elastic collision. Thus, hydrogen-containing materials such as polymers

  8. Southern California Edison High Penetration Photovoltaic Project - Year 1

    SciTech Connect

    Mather, B.; Kroposki, B.; Neal, R.; Katiraei, F.; Yazdani, A.; Aguero, J. R.; Hoff, T. E.; Norris, B. L.; Parkins, A.; Seguin, R.; Schauder, C.

    2011-06-01

    This report discusses research efforts from the first year of a project analyzing the impacts of high penetration levels of photovoltaic (PV) resources interconnected onto Southern California Edison's (SCE's) distribution system. SCE will be interconnecting a total of 500 MW of commercial scale PV within their service territory by 2015. This Year 1 report describes the need for investigating high-penetration PV scenarios on the SCE distribution system; discusses the necessary PV system modeling and distribution system simulation advances; describes the available distribution circuit data for the two distribution circuits identified in the study; and discusses the additional inverter functionality that could be implemented in order to specifically mitigate some of the undesirable distribution system impacts caused by high-penetration PV installations.

  9. PENETRATION OF COAL SLAGS INTO HIGH-CHROMIA REFRACTORIES

    SciTech Connect

    Longanbach, Sara C.; Matyas, Josef; Sundaram, S. K.

    2009-10-05

    Slagging coal gasifiers are used for the production of electricity and synthetic gases, as well as chemicals. High temperatures in the reaction chamber, typically between 1250ºC and 1600ºC, high pressure, generally greater than 400 psi, and corrosive slag place severe demands on the refractory materials. Slag produced during the combustion of coal flows over the refractory surface and penetrates the porous material. Slag penetration is typically followed by spalling of a brick that significantly decreases the service life of gasifier refractories. Laboratory tests were conducted to determine the penetration depth of slags into high-chromia refractories as a function of time and temperature for various refractory-slag combinations.

  10. Photovoltaic (PV) Impact Assessment for Very High Penetration Levels

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Danling; Mather, Barry A.; Seguin, Richard; Hambrick, Joshua; Broadwater, Robert P.

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes a granular approach for investigating the impacts of very high photovoltaic (PV) generation penetration. Studies on two real-world distribution feeders connected to PV plants are presented. The studies include both steady-state and time-series power flow analyses, which include the effects of solar variability. The goal of the study is to predict the effects of increasing levels of PV generation as it reaches very high penetration levels. The loss and return of generation with and without regulation is simulated to capture short-term problems such as voltage fluctuations. Impact results from the analyses are described along with potential mitigations.

  11. Evaluation of nano- and submicron particle penetration through ten nonwoven fabrics using a wind-driven approach.

    PubMed

    Gao, Pengfei; Jaques, Peter A; Hsiao, Ta-Chih; Shepherd, Angie; Eimer, Benjamin C; Yang, Mengshi; Miller, Adam; Gupta, Bhupender; Shaffer, Ronald

    2011-01-01

    Existing face mask and respirator test methods draw particles through materials under vacuum to measure particle penetration. However, these filtration-based methods may not simulate conditions under which protective clothing operates in the workplace, where airborne particles are primarily driven by wind and other factors instead of being limited to a downstream vacuum. This study was focused on the design and characterization of a method simulating typical wind-driven conditions for evaluating the performance of materials used in the construction of protective clothing. Ten nonwoven fabrics were selected, and physical properties including fiber diameter, fabric thickness, air permeability, porosity, pore volume, and pore size were determined. Each fabric was sealed flat across the wide opening of a cone-shaped penetration cell that was then housed in a recirculation aerosol wind tunnel. The flow rate naturally driven by wind through the fabric was measured, and the sampling flow rate of the Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer used to measure the downstream particle size distribution and concentrations was then adjusted to minimize filtration effects. Particle penetration levels were measured under different face velocities by the wind-driven method and compared with a filtration-based method using the TSI 3160 automated filter tester. The experimental results show that particle penetration increased with increasing face velocity, and penetration also increased with increasing particle size up to about 300 to 500 nm. Penetrations measured by the wind-driven method were lower than those obtained with the filtration method for most of the fabrics selected, and the relative penetration performances of the fabrics were very different due to the vastly different pore structures. PMID:21154104

  12. Penetration dynamics of a magnetic field pulse into high-? superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meerovich, V.; Sinder, M.; Sokolovsky, V.; Goren, S.; Jung, G.; Shter, G. E.; Grader, G. S.

    1996-12-01

    The penetration of a magnetic field pulse into a high-0953-2048/9/12/004/img9 superconducting plate is investigated experimentally and theoretically. It follows from our experiments that the threshold of penetration increases with increasing amplitude and/or decreasing duration of the applied pulse. The penetrating field continues to grow as the applied magnetic field decreases. The peculiarities observed are explained in the framework of the extended critical state model. It appears that the deviations from Bean's classical critical state model are characterized by a parameter equal to the square of the ratio of plate thickness to skin depth. The applicability of the classical critical state model is restricted by the condition that this parameter is much less than 1. This condition is also the criterion for the applicability of pulse methods of critical current measurements.

  13. Highly Alfvenic Slow Solar Wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, D. Aaron

    2010-01-01

    It is commonly thought that fast solar wind tends to be highly Alfvenic, with strong correlations between velocity and magnetic fluctuations, but examples have been known for over 20 years in which slow wind is both Alfvenic and has many other properties more typically expected of fast solar wind. This paper will present a search for examples of such flows from more recent data, and will begin to characterize the general characteristics of them. A very preliminary search suggests that such intervals are more common in the rising phase of the solar cycle. These intervals are important for providing constraints on models of solar wind acceleration, and in particular the role waves might or might not play in that process.

  14. High Penetration, Grid Connected Photovoltaic Technology Codes and Standards: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Basso, T. S.

    2008-05-01

    This paper reports the interim status in identifying and reviewing photovoltaic (PV) codes and standards (C&S) and related electrical activities for grid-connected, high-penetration PV systems with a focus on U.S. electric utility distribution grid interconnection.

  15. Penetrating injury from high-speed motor vehicle collision.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Alan H

    2015-01-01

    We present the case history of a post motor vehicle crash victim with lower extremity fractures and decreased blood flow. Emergent Angipgraphy revealed a foreign body which was later operated and removed. The case emphasizes that High-speed motor vehicle accidents commonly lead to penetrating injury from objects within and outside of the vehicle.

  16. Security, protection, and control of power systems with large-scale wind power penetration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acharya, Naresh

    As the number of wind generation facilities in the utility system is fast increasing, many issues associated with their integration into the power system are beginning to emerge. Of the various issues, this dissertation deals with the development of new concepts and computational methods to handle the transmission issues and voltage issues caused by large-scale integration of wind turbines. This dissertation also formulates a probabilistic framework for the steady-state security assessment of wind power incorporating the forecast uncertainty and correlation. Transmission issues are mainly related to the overloading of transmission lines, when all the wind power generated cannot be delivered in full due to prior outage conditions. To deal with this problem, a method to curtail the wind turbine outputs through Energy Management System facilities in the on-line operational environment is proposed. The proposed method, which is based on linear optimization, sends the calculated control signals via the Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition system to wind farm controllers. The necessary ramping of the wind farm outputs is implemented either by the appropriate blade pitch angle control at the turbine level or by switching a certain number of turbines. The curtailment strategy is tested with an equivalent system model of MidAmerican Energy Company. The results show that the line overload in high wind areas can be alleviated by controlling the outputs of the wind farms step-by-step over an allowable period of time. A low voltage event during a system fault can cause a large number of wind turbines to trip, depending on voltages at the wind turbine terminals during the fault and the under-voltage protection setting of wind turbines. As a result, an N-1 contingency may evolve into an N-(K+1) contingency, where K is the number of wind farms tripped due to low voltage conditions. Losing a large amount of wind power following a line contingency might lead to system

  17. Topic 5: Power System Operation and Planning for Enhanced Wind Generation Penetration

    SciTech Connect

    Vittal, Vijay; Heydt, Gerald T; Ayyanar, Raja; McCalley, James D; Ajjarapu, V; Aliprantis, Dionysios

    2012-08-31

    This project dealt with the development of a range of educational resources dealing with wind energy and wind energy integration in the electric grid. These resources were developed for a variety of audiences including; a) high school student, b) undergraduate electrical engineering students, c) graduate electrical engineering students, and d) practicing engineers in industry. All the developed material is available publicly and the courses developed are being taught at the two participating universities, Arizona State University and Iowa State University.

  18. High Penetration PV: How High Can We Go?

    SciTech Connect

    2016-01-01

    Brochure highlighting NREL's partnership with SolarCity and Hawaiian Electric (HECO) to increase the penetration of solar photovoltaics on the electricity grid. To better understand the potential impact of transient overvoltages due to load rejection, NREL collaborated with SolarCity and HECO to run a series of tests measuring the magnitude and duration of load rejection overvoltage events and demonstrating the ability of advanced PV inverters to mitigate their impacts.

  19. Power oscillation suppression by robust SMES in power system with large wind power penetration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngamroo, Issarachai; Cuk Supriyadi, A. N.; Dechanupaprittha, Sanchai; Mitani, Yasunori

    2009-01-01

    The large penetration of wind farm into interconnected power systems may cause the severe problem of tie-line power oscillations. To suppress power oscillations, the superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) which is able to control active and reactive powers simultaneously, can be applied. On the other hand, several generating and loading conditions, variation of system parameters, etc., cause uncertainties in the system. The SMES controller designed without considering system uncertainties may fail to suppress power oscillations. To enhance the robustness of SMES controller against system uncertainties, this paper proposes a robust control design of SMES by taking system uncertainties into account. The inverse additive perturbation is applied to represent the unstructured system uncertainties and included in power system modeling. The configuration of active and reactive power controllers is the first-order lead-lag compensator with single input feedback. To tune the controller parameters, the optimization problem is formulated based on the enhancement of robust stability margin. The particle swarm optimization is used to solve the problem and achieve the controller parameters. Simulation studies in the six-area interconnected power system with wind farms confirm the robustness of the proposed SMES under various operating conditions.

  20. Penetrating of high-latitude-electric-field effects to low latitudes during SUNDIAL 1984

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiro, R. W.; Wolf, R. A.; Fejer, B. G.

    1988-02-01

    Electric-field-penetration events have been identified using F-region vertical-drift measurements obtained in the October 6-13, 1984 period by the Jicamarcan incoherent-backscatter radar and corresponding h-prime F measurements from ionosondes at Fortaleza, Cachoeira Paulista, and Dakar. Predictions made using the Rice Convection Model for the pattern, strength, and duration of the low-latitude electric field occurring in response to an increasing high-latitude convection agree with observations. The observed 1-2 h duration of the low-latitude response to decreased convection can be explained by the fossil-wind theory of Richmond (1983).

  1. Penetrating of high-latitude-electric-field effects to low latitudes during SUNDIAL 1984

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spiro, R. W.; Wolf, R. A.; Fejer, B. G.

    1988-01-01

    Electric-field-penetration events have been identified using F-region vertical-drift measurements obtained in the October 6-13, 1984 period by the Jicamarcan incoherent-backscatter radar and corresponding h-prime F measurements from ionosondes at Fortaleza, Cachoeira Paulista, and Dakar. Predictions made using the Rice Convection Model for the pattern, strength, and duration of the low-latitude electric field occurring in response to an increasing high-latitude convection agree with observations. The observed 1-2 h duration of the low-latitude response to decreased convection can be explained by the fossil-wind theory of Richmond (1983).

  2. Solar wind density controlling penetration electric field at the equatorial ionosphere during a saturation of cross polar cap potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Y.; Wan, W.; Zhao, B.; Hong, M.; Ridley, A.; Ren, Z.; Fraenz, M.; Dubinin, E.; He, M.

    2012-09-01

    The most important source of electrodynamic disturbances in the equatorial ionosphere during the main phase of a storm is the prompt penetration electric field (PPEF) originating from the high-latitude region. It has been known that such an electric field is correlated with the magnetospheric convection or interplanetary electric field. Here we show a unique case, in which the electric field disturbance in the equatorial ionosphere cannot be interpreted by this concept. During the superstorm on Nov. 20-21, 2003, the cross polar cap potential (CPCP) saturated at least for 8.2 h. The CPCP reconstructed by Assimilative Mapping of Ionospheric Electrodynamics (AMIE) procedure suggested that the PPEF at the equatorial ionosphere still correlated with the saturated CPCP, but the CPCP was controlled by the solar wind density instead of the interplanetary electric field. However, the predicted CPCPs by Hill-Siscoe-Ober (HSO) model and Boyle-Ridley (BR) model were not fully consistent with the AMIE result and PPEF. The PPEF also decoupled from the convection electric field in the magnetotail. Due to the decoupling, the electric field in the ring current was not able to comply with the variations of PPEF, and this resulted in a long-duration electric field penetration without shielding.

  3. Penetration of Solar Wind Driven ULF Waves into the Earth's Inner Magnetosphere: Role in Radiation Belt and Ring Current Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Ian; Murphy, Kyle; Rae, Jonathan; Ozeke, Louis; Milling, David

    2013-04-01

    Ultra-low frequency (ULF) waves in the Pc4-5 band can be excited in the magnetosphere by the solar wind. Much recent work has shown how ULF wave power is strongly correlated with solar wind speed. However, little attention has been paid the dynamics of ULF wave power penetration onto low L-shells in the inner magnetosphere. We use more than a solar cycle of ULF wave data, derived from ground-based magnetometer networks, to examine this ULF wave power penetration and its dependence on solar wind and geomagnetic activity indices. In time domain data, we show very clearly that dayside ULF wave power, spanning more than 4 orders of magnitude, follows solar wind speed variations throughout the whole solar cycle - during periods of sporadic solar maximum ICMEs, during declining phase fast solar wind streams, and at solar minimum, alike. We also show that time domain ULF wave power increases during magnetic storms activations, and significantly demonstrate that a deeper ULF wave power penetration into the inner magnetosphere occurs during larger negative excursions in Dst. We discuss potential explanations for this low-L ULF wave power penetration, including the role of plasma mass density (such as during plasmaspheric erosion), or ring current ion instabilities during near-Earth ring current penetration. Interestingly, we also show that both ULF wave power and SAMPEX MeV electron flux show a remarkable similarity in their penetration to low-L, which suggests that ULF wave power penetration may be important for understanding and explaining radiation belt dynamics. Moreover, the correlation of ULF wave power with Dst, which peaks at one day lag, suggests the ULF waves might also be important for the inward transport of ions into the ring current. Current ring current models, which exclude long period ULF wave transport, under-estimate the ring current during fast solar wind streams which is consistent with a potential role for ULF waves in ring current energisation. The

  4. Integrating High Penetrations of PV into Southern California

    SciTech Connect

    Kroposki, B.; Mather, B.; Hasper-Tuttle, J.; Neal, R.; Katiraei, F.; Yazdani, A.; Aguero, J. R.; Hoff, T. E.; Norris, B. L.; Parkins, A.; Seguin, R.; Schauder, C.

    2011-01-01

    California regulators recently approved a plan proposed by Southern California Edison (SCE) to install 500 MW of distributed photovoltaic (PV) energy in its utility service territory over the next 5 years. The installations will include 250 MW of utility-owned solar and 250 MW of independently owned solar. SCE expects that the majority of these systems will be commercial-scale rooftop PV systems connected at various points in the distribution system. Each of the SCE rooftop PV systems will typically have a rating of 1-3 MW. To understand the impact of high-penetration PV on the distribution grid, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and SCE brought together a team of experts in resource assessment, distribution modeling, and planning to help analyze the impacts of adding high penetration of PV into the distribution system. Through modeling and simulation, laboratory testing, and field demonstrations, the team will address the issues identified in the analysis by fully examining the challenges, developing solutions, and transitioning those solutions to the field for large-scale deployment. This paper gives an update on the project and discusses technical results of integrating a large number of distributed PV systems into the grid.

  5. Ballistic penetration phenomenology of high symmetry single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kingman, Pat W.; Herring, Rodney A.

    1995-02-01

    The ballistic performance of tungsten single crystal penetrators is known to be a function of crystallographic symmetry. The macroscopic deformation geometry of both single crystal and polycrystal tungsten penetrators is a continuous eversion of the rod into a hollow tube. The differences in energy partitioning leading to these variations in ballistic performance must therefore be accounted for by detailed material deformation processes governed by crystallographic orientation. Inferences about these processes have been drawn from microstructural characterization of recovered penetrators. Residual penetrators of both 011 and 111 orientations were found to have repeatedly deformed and recrystalized, but the actual operative processes led to quite different macrostructures, microstructures, and penetration depths. The 001 orientation deformed by a unique process which allowed very efficient deformation, resulting in maximum penetration depth. These single crystal experiments demonstrate the critical role of detailed deformation processes in determining the final penetration depths even when similar macroscopic material flow geometry occurs.

  6. Changes in the Economic Value of Variable Generation at High Penetration Levels: A Pilot Case Study of California

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, Andrew; Wiser, Ryan

    2012-05-18

    We estimate the long-run economic value of variable renewable generation with increasing penetration using a unique investment and dispatch model that captures long-run investment decisions while also incorporating detailed operational constraints and hourly time resolution over a full year. High time resolution and the incorporation of operational constraints are important for estimating the economic value of variable generation, as is the use of a modeling framework that accommodates new investment decisions. The model is herein applied with a case study that is loosely based on California in 2030. Increasing amounts of wind, photovoltaics (PV), and concentrating solar power (CSP) with and without thermal energy storage (TES) are added one at a time. The marginal economic value of these renewable energy sources is estimated and then decomposed into capacity value, energy value, day-ahead forecast error cost, and ancillary services. The marginal economic value, as defined here, is primarily based on the combination of avoided capital investment cost and avoided variable fuel and operations and maintenance costs from other power plants in the power system. Though the model only captures a subset of the benefits and costs of renewable energy, it nonetheless provides unique insights into how the value of that subset changes with technology and penetration level. Specifically, in this case study implementation of the model, the marginal economic value of all three solar options is found to exceed the value of a flat-block of power (as well as wind energy) by \\$20--30/MWh at low penetration levels, largely due to the high capacity value of solar at low penetration. Because the value of CSP per unit of energy is found to be high with or without thermal energy storage at low penetration, we find little apparent incremental value to thermal storage at low solar penetration in the present case study analysis. The marginal economic value of PV and CSP without thermal

  7. Potential of ultrafine grained materials as high performance penetrator materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, L. J.; Kim, H. J.; Lee, C. S.; Park, K.-T.

    2012-08-01

    The shear formability and the metal jet formability are important for the kinetic energy penetrator and the chemical energy penetrator, respectively. The shear formability of ultrafine grained (UFG) steel was examined, mainly focusing on the effects of the grain shape on the shear characteristics. For this purpose, UFG 4130 steel having the different UFG structures, the lamellar UFG and the equiaxed UFG, was prepared by equal channel angular pressing (ECAP). The lamellar UFG steel exhibited more sharper and localized shear band formation than the equiaxed UFG steel. This is because a lamellar UFG structure was unfavourable against grain rotation which is a main mechanism of the band propagation in UFG materials. Meanwhile, the metal jet formability of UFG OFHC Cu also processed by ECAP was compared to that of coarse grained (CG) one by means of dynamic tensile extrusion (DTE) tests. CG OFHC Cu exhibited the higher DTE ductility, i.e. better metal jet stability, than UFG OFHC Cu. The initial high strength and the lack of strain hardenability of UFG OFHC Cu were harmful to the metal jet formability.

  8. Environmental impacts of high penetration renewable energy scenarios for Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berrill, Peter; Arvesen, Anders; Scholz, Yvonne; Gils, Hans Christian; Hertwich, Edgar G.

    2016-01-01

    The prospect of irreversible environmental alterations and an increasingly volatile climate pressurises societies to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, thereby mitigating climate change impacts. As global electricity demand continues to grow, particularly if considering a future with increased electrification of heat and transport sectors, the imperative to decarbonise our electricity supply becomes more urgent. This letter implements outputs of a detailed power system optimisation model into a prospective life cycle analysis framework in order to present a life cycle analysis of 44 electricity scenarios for Europe in 2050, including analyses of systems based largely on low-carbon fossil energy options (natural gas, and coal with carbon capture and storage (CCS)) as well as systems with high shares of variable renewable energy (VRE) (wind and solar). VRE curtailments and impacts caused by extra energy storage and transmission capabilities necessary in systems based on VRE are taken into account. The results show that systems based largely on VRE perform much better regarding climate change and other impact categories than the investigated systems based on fossil fuels. The climate change impacts from Europe for the year 2050 in a scenario using primarily natural gas are 1400 Tg CO2-eq while in a scenario using mostly coal with CCS the impacts are 480 Tg CO2-eq. Systems based on renewables with an even mix of wind and solar capacity generate impacts of 120-140 Tg CO2-eq. Impacts arising as a result of wind and solar variability do not significantly compromise the climate benefits of utilising these energy resources. VRE systems require more infrastructure leading to much larger mineral resource depletion impacts than fossil fuel systems, and greater land occupation impacts than systems based on natural gas. Emissions and resource requirements from wind power are smaller than from solar power.

  9. Analysis of Distribution Circuits with High Penetrations of Photo-Voltaic Generation and Progressive Steps to Enable Higher Penetrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payne, Joshua Daniel

    Concern for anthropogenic climate change has instigated an increase in renewable generation capacity, including photo-voltaic (PV) power generation in distribution circuits. Distribution circuits with relatively high penetrations of PV generation (High-Pen PV) exist today, but how much more generation can distribution systems handle? This research aims to approach this question by 1) analyzing and quantifying High-Pen PV limitations on the primary circuits of distribution systems and 2) propose and analyze progressive steps to enable higher penetrations of PV on distribution circuits. Utilizing connectivity and load demand measurements provided by Pacific Gas & Electric (PG&E), time-resolved three-phase balanced feeder models of a commercial and a residential circuit featuring High-Pen PV were developed and calibrated to the point of the sub-station. Once calibrated, the circuit performance was simulated with varying PV penetrations and spatial distributions for typical seasonal high and seasonal low load demand days. Circuit scenarios with the Generation Center located downstream of the Load Center and with high impedance distribution line in-between lead to high voltage conditions. High-Pen PV interacting with the sub-station Load Drop Compensation (LDC) resulted an increased number of equipment operations and low voltage conditions on the circuit. As PV penetration increased, sub-station power factor and line loss decreased until reverse power flow became dominant. These were observed characteristics of High-Pen PV circuits. To overcome the limitations stated above, practical steps, such as line re-conductoring, and progressive control and operation changes were introduced. The progressive changes included using a Voltage Rise Siting (VRS) score for planning and LDC Current Compensation control to enable higher penetrations of PV. It was shown that limitations of High-Pen PV on the primary side of distribution circuits may be overcome via these practical and

  10. High-Penetration PV Integration Handbook for Distribution Engineers

    SciTech Connect

    Seguin, Rich; Woyak, Jeremy; Costyk, David; Hambrick, Josh; Mather, Barry

    2016-01-01

    This handbook has been developed as part of a five-year research project which began in 2010. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Southern California Edison (SCE), Quanta Technology, Satcon Technology Corporation, Electrical Distribution Design (EDD), and Clean Power Research (CPR) teamed together to analyze the impacts of high-penetration levels of photovoltaic (PV) systems interconnected onto the SCE distribution system. This project was designed specifically to leverage the experience that SCE and the project team would gain during the significant installation of 500 MW of commercial scale PV systems (1-5 MW typically) starting in 2010 and completing in 2015 within SCE’s service territory through a program approved by the California Public Utility Commission (CPUC).

  11. A numerical test of a high-penetrability approximation for the one-dimensional penetrable-square-well model.

    PubMed

    Fantoni, Riccardo; Giacometti, Achille; Malijevský, Alexandr; Santos, Andrés

    2010-07-14

    The one-dimensional penetrable-square-well fluid is studied using both analytical tools and specialized Monte Carlo simulations. The model consists of a penetrable core characterized by a finite repulsive energy combined with a short-range attractive well. This is a many-body one-dimensional problem, lacking an exact analytical solution, for which the usual van Hove theorem on the absence of phase transition does not apply. We determine a high-penetrability approximation complementing a similar low-penetrability approximation presented in previous work. This is shown to be equivalent to the usual Debye-Hückel theory for simple charged fluids for which the virial and energy routes are identical. The internal thermodynamic consistency with the compressibility route and the validity of the approximation in describing the radial distribution function is assessed by a comparison against numerical simulations. The Fisher-Widom line separating the oscillatory and monotonic large-distance behaviors of the radial distribution function is computed within the high-penetrability approximation and compared with the opposite regime, thus providing a strong indication of the location of the line in all possible regimes. The high-penetrability approximation predicts the existence of a critical point and a spinodal line, but this occurs outside the applicability domain of the theory. We investigate the possibility of a fluid-fluid transition by the Gibbs ensemble Monte Carlo techniques, not finding any evidence of such a transition. Additional analytical arguments are given to support this claim. Finally, we find a clustering transition when Ruelle's stability criterion is not fulfilled. The consequences of these findings on the three-dimensional phase diagrams are also discussed.

  12. A numerical test of a high-penetrability approximation for the one-dimensional penetrable-square-well model.

    PubMed

    Fantoni, Riccardo; Giacometti, Achille; Malijevský, Alexandr; Santos, Andrés

    2010-07-14

    The one-dimensional penetrable-square-well fluid is studied using both analytical tools and specialized Monte Carlo simulations. The model consists of a penetrable core characterized by a finite repulsive energy combined with a short-range attractive well. This is a many-body one-dimensional problem, lacking an exact analytical solution, for which the usual van Hove theorem on the absence of phase transition does not apply. We determine a high-penetrability approximation complementing a similar low-penetrability approximation presented in previous work. This is shown to be equivalent to the usual Debye-Hückel theory for simple charged fluids for which the virial and energy routes are identical. The internal thermodynamic consistency with the compressibility route and the validity of the approximation in describing the radial distribution function is assessed by a comparison against numerical simulations. The Fisher-Widom line separating the oscillatory and monotonic large-distance behaviors of the radial distribution function is computed within the high-penetrability approximation and compared with the opposite regime, thus providing a strong indication of the location of the line in all possible regimes. The high-penetrability approximation predicts the existence of a critical point and a spinodal line, but this occurs outside the applicability domain of the theory. We investigate the possibility of a fluid-fluid transition by the Gibbs ensemble Monte Carlo techniques, not finding any evidence of such a transition. Additional analytical arguments are given to support this claim. Finally, we find a clustering transition when Ruelle's stability criterion is not fulfilled. The consequences of these findings on the three-dimensional phase diagrams are also discussed. PMID:20632742

  13. Renewable Electricity Futures Study. Volume 1: Exploration of High-Penetration Renewable Electricity Futures

    SciTech Connect

    Mai, T.; Wiser, R.; Sandor, D.; Brinkman, G.; Heath, G.; Denholm, P.; Hostick, D.J.; Darghouth, N.; Schlosser, A.; Strzepek, K.

    2012-06-01

    The Renewable Electricity Futures (RE Futures) Study investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. The analysis focused on the sufficiency of the geographically diverse U.S. renewable resources to meet electricity demand over future decades, the hourly operational characteristics of the U.S. grid with high levels of variable wind and solar generation, and the potential implications of deploying high levels of renewables in the future. RE Futures focused on technical aspects of high penetration of renewable electricity; it did not focus on how to achieve such a future through policy or other measures. Given the inherent uncertainties involved with analyzing alternative long-term energy futures as well as the multiple pathways that might be taken to achieve higher levels of renewable electricity supply, RE Futures explored a range of scenarios to investigate and compare the impacts of renewable electricity penetration levels (30%-90%), future technology performance improvements, potential constraints to renewable electricity development, and future electricity demand growth assumptions. RE Futures was led by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).

  14. Renewable Electricity Futures Study. Volume 1. Exploration of High-Penetration Renewable Electricity Futures

    SciTech Connect

    Hand, M. M.; Baldwin, S.; DeMeo, E.; Reilly, J. M.; Mai, T.; Arent, D.; Porro, G.; Meshek, M.; Sandor, D.

    2012-06-15

    The Renewable Electricity Futures (RE Futures) Study investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. The analysis focused on the sufficiency of the geographically diverse U.S. renewable resources to meet electricity demand over future decades, the hourly operational characteristics of the U.S. grid with high levels of variable wind and solar generation, and the potential implications of deploying high levels of renewables in the future. RE Futures focused on technical aspects of high penetration of renewable electricity; it did not focus on how to achieve such a future through policy or other measures. Given the inherent uncertainties involved with analyzing alternative long-term energy futures as well as the multiple pathways that might be taken to achieve higher levels of renewable electricity supply, RE Futures explored a range of scenarios to investigate and compare the impacts of renewable electricity penetration levels (30%–90%), future technology performance improvements, potential constraints to renewable electricity development, and future electricity demand growth assumptions. RE Futures was led by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). Learn more at the RE Futures website. http://www.nrel.gov/analysis/re_futures/

  15. CgWind: A high-order accurate simulation tool for wind turbines and wind farms

    SciTech Connect

    Chand, K K; Henshaw, W D; Lundquist, K A; Singer, M A

    2010-02-22

    CgWind is a high-fidelity large eddy simulation (LES) tool designed to meet the modeling needs of wind turbine and wind park engineers. This tool combines several advanced computational technologies in order to model accurately the complex and dynamic nature of wind energy applications. The composite grid approach provides high-quality structured grids for the efficient implementation of high-order accurate discretizations of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. Composite grids also provide a natural mechanism for modeling bodies in relative motion and complex geometry. Advanced algorithms such as matrix-free multigrid, compact discretizations and approximate factorization will allow CgWind to perform highly resolved calculations efficiently on a wide class of computing resources. Also in development are nonlinear LES subgrid-scale models required to simulate the many interacting scales present in large wind turbine applications. This paper outlines our approach, the current status of CgWind and future development plans.

  16. Production cost and air emissions impacts of coal cycling in power systems with large-scale wind penetration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oates, David Luke; Jaramillo, Paulina

    2013-06-01

    Wind power introduces variability into electric power systems. Due to the physical characteristics of wind, most of this variability occurs at inter-hour time-scales and coal units are therefore technically capable of balancing wind. Operators of coal-fired units have raised concerns that additional cycling will be prohibitively costly. Using PJM bid-data, we observe that coal operators are likely systematically under-bidding their startup costs. We then consider the effects of a 20% wind penetration scenario in the coal-heavy PJM West area, both when coal units bid business as usual startup costs, and when they bid costs accounting for the elevated wear and tear that occurs during cycling. We conclude that while 20% wind leads to increased coal cycling and reduced coal capacity factors under business as usual startup costs, including full startup costs shifts the burden of balancing wind onto more flexible units. This shift has benefits for CO2, NOX, and SO2 emissions as well as for the profitability of coal plants, as calculated by our dispatch model.

  17. Estimating the Reduction of Generating System CO2 Emissions Resulting from Significant Wind Energy Penetration

    SciTech Connect

    Holttinen, Hannele; Kiviluoma, Juha; Pineda, Ivan; McCann, John; Clancy, Matthew; Milligan, Michael

    2014-11-13

    This paper presents ways of estimating CO2 reductions of wind power using different methodologies. The paper discusses pitfalls in methodology and proposes appropriate methods to perform the calculations. Results for CO2 emission reductions are shown from several countries. This paper is an international collaboration of IEA Wind Task 25 on wind integration.

  18. 75 FR 47301 - Cedro Hill Wind LLC; Butler Ridge Wind Energy Center, LLC; High Majestic Wind Energy Center, LLC...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-05

    ... IV LLC; Blackstone Wind Farm II LLC; Otay Acquisition Company, LLC; TX Solar I LLC; CalRENEW-1 LLC...; EG10-36-000; EG10-37-000; EG10-38-000] Cedro Hill Wind LLC; Butler Ridge Wind Energy Center, LLC; High Majestic Wind Energy Center, LLC; Wessington Wind Energy Center, LLC; Juniper Canyon Wind Power...

  19. Improved Modeling Tools Development for High Penetration Solar

    SciTech Connect

    Washom, Byron

    2014-12-11

    One of the significant objectives of the High Penetration solar research is to help the DOE understand, anticipate, and minimize grid operation impacts as more solar resources are added to the electric power system. For Task 2.2, an effective, reliable approach to predicting solar energy availability for energy generation forecasts using the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) Sky Imager technology has been demonstrated. Granular cloud and ramp forecasts for the next 5 to 20 minutes over an area of 10 square miles were developed. Sky images taken every 30 seconds are processed to determine cloud locations and cloud motion vectors yielding future cloud shadow locations respective to distributed generation or utility solar power plants in the area. The performance of the method depends on cloud characteristics. On days with more advective cloud conditions, the developed method outperforms persistence forecasts by up to 30% (based on mean absolute error). On days with dynamic conditions, the method performs worse than persistence. Sky Imagers hold promise for ramp forecasting and ramp mitigation in conjunction with inverter controls and energy storage. The pre-commercial Sky Imager solar forecasting algorithm was documented with licensing information and was a Sunshot website highlight

  20. Runs of homozygosity reveal highly penetrant recessive loci in schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Lencz, Todd; Lambert, Christophe; DeRosse, Pamela; Burdick, Katherine E.; Morgan, T. Vance; Kane, John M.; Kucherlapati, Raju; Malhotra, Anil K.

    2007-01-01

    Evolutionarily significant selective sweeps may result in long stretches of homozygous polymorphisms in individuals from outbred populations. We developed whole-genome homozygosity association (WGHA) methodology to characterize this phenomenon in healthy individuals and to use this genomic feature to identify genetic risk loci for schizophrenia (SCZ). Applying WGHA to 178 SCZ cases and 144 healthy controls genotyped at 500,000 markers, we found that runs of homozygosity (ROHs), ranging in size from 200 kb to 15 mb, were common in unrelated Caucasians. Properties of common ROHs in healthy subjects, including chromosomal location and presence of nonancestral haplotypes, converged with prior reports identifying regions under selective pressure. This interpretation was further supported by analysis of multiethnic HapMap samples genotyped with the same markers. ROHs were significantly more common in SCZ cases, and a set of nine ROHs significantly differentiated cases from controls. Four of these 9 “risk ROHs” contained or neighbored genes associated with SCZ (NOS1AP, ATF2, NSF, and PIK3C3). Several of these risk ROHs were very rare in healthy subjects, suggesting that recessive effects of relatively high penetrance may explain a proportion of the genetic liability for SCZ. Other risk ROHs feature haplotypes that are also common in healthy individuals, possibly indicating a source of balancing selection. PMID:18077426

  1. Water Impacts of High Solar PV Electricity Penetration

    SciTech Connect

    Macknick, Jordan; Cohen, Stuart

    2015-09-01

    This analysis provides a detailed national and regional description of the water-related impacts and constraints of high solar electricity penetration scenarios in the U.S. in 2030 and 2050. A modified version of the Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) model that incorporates water resource availability and costs as a constraint in each of its 134 Balancing Area (BA) regions was utilized to explore national and regional differences in water use impacts and solar deployment locations under different solar energy cost and water availability scenarios (Macknick et al. 2015). Water resource availability and cost data are from recently completed research at Sandia National Laboratories (Tidwell et al. 2013a). Scenarios analyzed include two business-as-usual solar energy cost cases, one with and one without considering available water resources, and four solar energy cost cases that meet the SunShot cost goals (i.e., $1/watt for utility-scale PV systems), with varying levels of water availability restrictions. This analysis provides insight into the role solar energy technologies have in the broader electricity sector under scenarios of water constraints.

  2. High Voltage Power Transmission for Wind Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Young il

    The high wind speeds and wide available area at sea have recently increased the interests on offshore wind farms in the U.S.A. As offshore wind farms become larger and are placed further from the shore, the power transmission to the onshore grid becomes a key feature. Power transmission of the offshore wind farm, in which good wind conditions and a larger installation area than an onshore site are available, requires the use of submarine cable systems. Therefore, an underground power cable system requires unique design and installation challenges not found in the overhead power cable environment. This paper presents analysis about the benefit and drawbacks of three different transmission solutions: HVAC, LCC/VSC HVDC in the grid connecting offshore wind farms and also analyzed the electrical characteristics of underground cables. In particular, loss of HV (High Voltage) subsea power of the transmission cables was evaluated by the Brakelmann's theory, taking into account the distributions of current and temperature.

  3. High-pressure-induced water penetration into 3-isopropylmalate dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Nagae, Takayuki; Kawamura, Takashi; Chavas, Leonard M. G.; Niwa, Ken; Hasegawa, Masashi; Kato, Chiaki; Watanabe, Nobuhisa

    2012-03-01

    Structures of 3-isopropylmalate dehydrogenase were determined at pressures ranging from 0.1 to 650 MPa. Comparison of these structures gives a detailed picture of the swelling of a cavity at the dimer interface and the generation of a new cleft on the molecular surface, which are accompanied by water penetration. Hydrostatic pressure induces structural changes in proteins, including denaturation, the mechanism of which has been attributed to water penetration into the protein interior. In this study, structures of 3-isopropylmalate dehydrogenase (IPMDH) from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 were determined at about 2 Å resolution under pressures ranging from 0.1 to 650 MPa using a diamond anvil cell (DAC). Although most of the protein cavities are monotonically compressed as the pressure increases, the volume of one particular cavity at the dimer interface increases at pressures over 340 MPa. In parallel with this volume increase, water penetration into the cavity could be observed at pressures over 410 MPa. In addition, the generation of a new cleft on the molecular surface accompanied by water penetration could also be observed at pressures over 580 MPa. These water-penetration phenomena are considered to be initial steps in the pressure-denaturation process of IPMDH.

  4. Wind Erosion and Dune Formation on High Frozen Bluffs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsh, W. M.; Marsh, B. D.

    1984-01-01

    Frost penetration increases upslope on barren, windswept bluffs in cold environments. Along the south shore of Lake Superior, near the brow of 100 m high bluffs it typically exceeds 5 m. Frost increases the shear strength of damp sand to a level comparable to that of concrete, making winter slopes highly stable despite undercutting by waves and ground-water sapping along the footslope. Sublimation of interparticle ice in the slope face increases with wind speed and lower vapor pressures. The cold and dry winter winds of Lake Superior ablate these slopes through loss of binding ice. Wind erosion rates, based on measurements of sand accumulation on the forest floor downwind of the brow, show most airborne sand falls out within several meters of the brow, forming a berm 1 to 3 m high after many years. The spatial pattern of sand deposition, however, varies considerably over distances of several hundred meters along the top bluffs in response to frost conditions and the build-up of gravel lag on the slope face, sand exposure from mass movements, and local aerodynamics of the crest slope. The formation of perched sand dunes in the Great Lakes region is clearly related to wind erosion of sand from high bluffs in winter. Broadly similar processes may operate on Mars.

  5. Wind erosion and dune formation on high frozen bluffs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsh, W. M.; Marsh, B. D.

    1984-04-01

    Frost penetration increases upslope on barren, windswept bluffs in cold environments. Along the south shore of Lake Superior, near the brow of 100 m high bluffs it typically exceeds 5 m. Frost increases the shear strength of damp sand to a level comparable to that of concrete, making winter slopes highly stable despite undercutting by waves and ground-water sapping along the footslope. Sublimation of interparticle ice in the slope face increases with wind speed and lower vapor pressures. The cold and dry winter winds of Lake Superior ablate these slopes through loss of binding ice. Wind erosion rates, based on measurements of sand accumulation on the forest floor downwind of the brow, show most airborne sand falls out within several meters of the brow, forming a berm 1 to 3 m high after many years. The spatial pattern of sand deposition, however, varies considerably over distances of several hundred meters along the top bluffs in response to frost conditions and the build-up of gravel lag on the slope face, sand exposure from mass movements, and local aerodynamics of the crest slope. The formation of perched sand dunes in the Great Lakes region is clearly related to wind erosion of sand from high bluffs in winter. Broadly similar processes may operate on Mars.

  6. A scenario for solar wind penetration of earth's magnetic tail based on ion composition data from the ISEE 1 spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lennartsson, W.

    1992-01-01

    Based on He(2+) and H(-) ion composition data from the Plasma Composition Experiment on ISEE 1, a scenario is proposed for the solar wind penetration of the earth's magnetic tail, which does not require that the solar wind plasma be magnetized. While this study does not take issue with the notion that earth's magnetic field merges with the solar wind magnetic field on a regular basis, it focuses on certain aspects of interaction between the solar wind particles and the earth's field, e.g, the fact that the geomagnetic tail always has a plasma sheet, even during times when the physical signs of magnetic merging are weak or absent. It is argued that the solar plasma enters along slots between the tail lobes and the plasma sheet, even quite close to earth, convected inward along the plasma sheet boundary layer or adjacent to it, by the electric fringe field of the ever present low-latitude magnetopause boundary layer (LLBL). The required E x B drifts are produced by closing LLBL equipotential surfaces through the plasma sheet.

  7. Results of analyses performed on soil adjacent to penetrators emplaced into sediments at McCook, Nebraska, January 1976. [simulated penetration into wind-deposited sediments on Martian plains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, M.; Bunch, T.; Davis, A.; Kyte, F.; Shade, H.; Erlichman, J.; Polkowski, G.

    1977-01-01

    During 1976 several penetrators (full and 0.58 scale) were dropped into a test site McCook, Nebraska. The McCook site was selected because it simulated penetration into wind-deposited sediments (silts and sands) on Martian plains. The physical and chemical modifications found in the sediment after the penetrators' impact are described. Laboratory analyses have shown mineralogical and elemental changes are produced in the sediment next to the penetrator. Optical microscopy studies of material next to the skin of the penetrator revealed a layer of glassy material about 75 microns thick. Elemental analysis of a 0-1-mm layer of sediment next to the penetrator revealed increased concentrations for Cr, Fe, Ni, Mo, and reduced concentrations for Mg, Al Si, P, K, and Ca. The Cr, Fe, Ni, and Mo were in fragments abraded from the penetrator. Mineralogical changes occurring in the sediment next to the penetrator included the introduction of micron-size grains of alpha iron and several hydrated iron oxide minerals. The newly formed silicate minerals include metastable phases of silica (cristobalite, lechatelierite, and opal). The glassy material was mostly opal which formed when the host minerals (mica, calcite, and clay) decomposed. In summary, contaminants introduced by the penetrator occur up to 2 mm away from the penetrator's skin. Although volatile elements do migrate and new minerals are formed during the destruction of host minerals in the sediment, no changes were observed beyond the 2-mm distance. The analyses indicate 0.58-scale penetrators do effectively simulate full-scale testing for soil modification effects.

  8. Optimizing the U.S. Electric System with a High Penetration of Renewables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corcoran, B. A.; Jacobson, M. Z.

    2013-12-01

    As renewable energy generators are increasingly being installed throughout the U.S., there is growing interest in interconnecting diverse renewable generators (primarily wind and solar) across large geographic areas through an enhanced transmission system. This reduces variability in the aggregate power output, increases system reliability, and allows for the development of the best overall group of renewable technologies and sites to meet the load. Studies are therefore needed to determine the most efficient and economical plan to achieve large area interconnections in a future electric system with a high penetration of renewables. This research quantifies the effects of aggregating electric load together with diverse renewable generation throughout the ten Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) regions in the contiguous U.S. A deterministic linear program has been built in AMPL (A Mathematical Programming Language) to solve for the least-cost organizational structure and system (generators, transmission, and storage) for a highly renewable electric grid. The analysis will 1) examine a highly renewable 2006 electric system, including various sensitivity cases and additional system components such as additional load from electric vehicles, and 2) create a 'roadmap' from the existing 2006 system to a highly renewable system in 2030, accounting for projected price and demand changes and generator retirements based on age and environmental regulations. Ideally, results from this study will offer insight for a federal renewable energy policy (such as a renewable portfolio standard) and how to best organize U.S. regions for transmission planning.

  9. High-Resolution Wind Measurements for Offshore Wind Energy Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nghiem, Son V.; Neumann, Gregory

    2011-01-01

    A mathematical transform, called the Rosette Transform, together with a new method, called the Dense Sampling Method, have been developed. The Rosette Transform is invented to apply to both the mean part and the fluctuating part of a targeted radar signature using the Dense Sampling Method to construct the data in a high-resolution grid at 1-km posting for wind measurements over water surfaces such as oceans or lakes.

  10. Wind study for high altitude platform design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strganac, T. W.

    1979-01-01

    An analysis of upper air winds was performed to define the wind environment at potential operating altitudes for high-altitude powered platform concepts. Expected wind conditions of the contiguous United States, Pacific area (Alaska to Sea of Japan), and European area (Norwegian and Mediterranean Seas) were obtained using a representative network of sites selected based upon adequate high-altitude sampling, geographic dispersion, and observed upper wind patterns. A data base of twenty plus years of rawinsonde gathered wind information was used in the analysis. Annual variations from surface to 10 mb (approximately 31 km) pressure altitude were investigated to encompass the practical operating range for the platform concepts. Parametric analysis for the United States and foreign areas was performed to provide a basis for vehicle system design tradeoffs. This analysis of wind magnitudes indicates the feasibility of annual operation at a majority of sites and more selective seasonal operation for the extreme conditions between the pressure altitudes of 100 to 25 mb based upon the assumed design speeds.

  11. Wind study for high altitude platform design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strganac, T. W.

    1979-01-01

    An analysis of upper air winds was performed to define the wind environment at potential operating altitudes for high altitude powered platform concepts. Wind conditions of the continental United States, Pacific area (Alaska to Sea of Japan), and European area (Norwegian and Mediterranean Sea) were obtained using a representative network of sites selected based upon adequate high altitude sampling, geographic dispersion, and observed upper wind patterns. A data base of twenty plus years of rawinsonde gathered wind information was used in the analysis. Annual variations from surface to 10 mb pressure altitude were investigated to encompass the practical operating range for the platform concepts. Parametric analysis for the United States and foreign areas was performed to provide a basis for vehicle system design tradeoffs. This analysis of wind magnitudes indicates the feasibility of annual operation at a majority of sites and more selective seasonal operation for the extreme conditions between the pressure altitudes of 100 to 25 mb based upon the assumed design speeds.

  12. High temperature co-axial winding transformers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Divan, Deepakraj M.; Novotny, Donald W.

    1993-01-01

    The analysis and design of co-axial winding transformers is presented. The design equations are derived and the different design approaches are discussed. One of the most important features of co-axial winding transformers is the fact that the leakage inductance is well controlled and can be made low. This is not the case in conventional winding transformers. In addition, the power density of co-axial winding transformers is higher than conventional ones. Hence, using co-axial winding transformers in a certain converter topology improves the power density of the converter. The design methodology used in meeting the proposed specifications of the co-axial winding transformer specifications are presented and discussed. The final transformer design was constructed in the lab. Co-axial winding transformers proved to be a good choice for high power density and high frequency applications. They have a more predictable performance compared with conventional transformers. In addition, the leakage inductance of the transformer can be controlled easily to suit a specific application. For space applications, one major concern is the extraction of heat from power apparatus to prevent excessive heating and hence damaging of these units. Because of the vacuum environment, the only way to extract heat is by using a cold plate. One advantage of co-axial winding transformers is that the surface area available to extract heat from is very large compared to conventional transformers. This stems from the unique structure of the co-axial transformer where the whole core surface area is exposed and can be utilized for cooling effectively. This is a crucial issue here since most of the losses are core losses.

  13. Analysis Methodology for Balancing Authority Cooperation in High Penetration of Variable Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Makarov, Yuri V.; Etingov, Pavel V.; Zhou, Ning; Ma, Jian; Samaan, Nader A.; Diao, Ruisheng; Malhara, Sunita V.; Guttromson, Ross T.; Du, Pengwei; Sastry, Chellury

    2010-02-01

    With the rapidly growing penetration level of wind and solar generation, the challenges of managing variability and the uncertainty of intermittent renewable generation become more and more significant. The problem of power variability and uncertainty gets exacerbated when each balancing authority (BA) works locally and separately to balance its own subsystem. The virtual BA concept means various forms of collaboration between individual BAs must manage power variability and uncertainty. The virtual BA will have a wide area control capability in managing its operational balancing requirements in different time frames. This coordination results in the improvement of efficiency and reliability of power system operation while facilitating the high level integration of green, intermittent energy resources. Several strategies for virtual BA implementation, such as ACE diversity interchange (ADI), wind only BA, BA consolidation, dynamic scheduling, regulation and load following sharing, extreme event impact study are discussed in this report. The objective of such strategies is to allow individual BAs within a large power grid to help each other deal with power variability. Innovative methods have been developed to simulate the balancing operation of BAs. These methods evaluate the BA operation through a number of metrics — such as capacity, ramp rate, ramp duration, energy and cycling requirements — to evaluate the performances of different virtual BA strategies. The report builds a systematic framework for evaluating BA consolidation and coordination. Results for case studies show that significant economic and reliability benefits can be gained. The merits and limitation of each virtual BA strategy are investigated. The report provides guidelines for the power industry to evaluate the coordination or consolidation method. The application of the developed strategies in cooperation with several regional BAs is in progress for several off-spring projects.

  14. Policies and Programs to Integrate High Penetrations of Variable Renewable Energy (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Cochran, J.

    2012-06-01

    The goals of this project are to highlight the diverse approaches for enabling high renewable energy penetration; synthesize lessons on effective policies and programs and present avenues for action to energy ministers and other stakeholders.

  15. Power System Planning: Emerging Practices Suitable for Evaluating the Impact of High-Penetration Photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect

    Bebic, J.

    2008-02-01

    This report explores the impact of high-penetration renewable generation on electric power system planning methodologies and outlines how these methodologies are evolving to enable effective integration of variable-output renewable generation sources.

  16. Analyzing of Balancing Authorities Cooperation Methods with High Variable Generation Penetration

    SciTech Connect

    Makarov, Yuri V.; Zhou, Ning; Etingov, Pavel V.; Samaan, Nader A.; Ma, Jian; Diao, Ruisheng; Guttromson, Ross T.

    2010-11-02

    With the rapidly growing penetration level of wind and solar generation, the challenges of managing variability and the uncertainty of intermittent renewable generation become more and more significant. The problem of power variability and uncertainty gets exacerbated when each balancing authority (BA) works locally and separately to balance its own subsystem. The virtual BA concept is based on various forms of collaboration between individual BAs to manage power variability and uncertainty. The virtual BA will have a wide area control capability in managing its operational balancing requirements in different time frames. This coordination results in the improvement of efficiency and reliability of power system operation while facilitating the high level integration of green, intermittent energy resources. Several strategies for virtual BA implementation, such as Area Control Error (ACE) diversity interchange (ADI), variable generation only BA, BA consolidation, dynamic scheduling, and regulation and load following sharing are discussed in this paper. The objective of such strategies is to allow individual BAs within a large power grid to help each other dealing with power variability. Innovative methods have been developed to simulate the balancing operation of BAs. These methods evaluate the BA operation through a number of metrics such as capacity, ramp rate, ramp duration, energy and cycling requirements to evaluate the performance of different virtual BA strategies.

  17. Estimation of friction velocity from the wind-wave spectrum at extremely high wind speeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takagaki, N.; Komori, S.; Suzuki, N.

    2016-05-01

    The equilibrium range of wind-waves at normal and extremely high wind speeds was investigated experimentally using a high-speed wind-wave tank together with field measurements at normal wind speeds. Water level fluctuations at normal and extremely high wind speeds were measured with resistance-type wave gauges, and the wind-wave spectrum and significant phase velocity were calculated. The equilibrium range constant was estimated from the wind-wave spectrum and showed the strong relationship with inverse wave age at normal and extremely high wind speeds. Using the strong relation between the equilibrium range constant and inverse wave age, a new method for estimating the wind speed at 10-m height (U 10) and friction velocity (u*) was proposed. The results suggest that U 10 and u* can be estimated from wave measurements alone at extremely high wind speeds in oceans under tropical cyclones.

  18. High Penetration of Electrical Vehicles in Microgrids: Threats and Opportunities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khederzadeh, Mojtaba; Khalili, Mohammad

    2014-10-01

    Given that the microgrid concept is the building block of future electric distribution systems and electrical vehicles (EVs) are the future of transportation market, in this paper, the impact of EVs on the performance of microgrids is investigated. Demand-side participation is used to cope with increasing demand for EV charging. The problem of coordination of EV charging and discharging (with vehicle-to-grid (V2G) functionality) and demand response is formulated as a market-clearing mechanism that accepts bids from the demand and supply sides and takes into account the constraints put forward by different parts. Therefore, a day-ahead market with detailed bids and offers within the microgrid is designed whose objective is to maximize the social welfare which is the difference between the value that consumers attach to the electrical energy they buy plus the benefit of the EV owners participating in the V2G functionality and the cost of producing/purchasing this energy. As the optimization problem is a mixed integer nonlinear programming one, it is decomposed into one master problem for energy scheduling and one subproblem for power flow computation. The two problems are solved iteratively by interfacing MATLAB with GAMS. Simulation results on a sample microgrid with different residential, commercial and industrial consumers with associated demand-side biddings and different penetration level of EVs support the proposed formulation of the problem and the applied methods.

  19. Integrating High Penetrations of PV into Southern California: Year 2 Project Update; Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Mather, B.; Neal, R.

    2012-08-01

    Southern California Edison (SCE) is well into a five-year project to install a total of 500 MW of distributed photovoltaic (PV) energy within its utility service territory. Typical installations to date are 1-3 MW peak rooftop PV systems that interconnect to medium-voltage urban distribution circuits or larger (5 MW peak) ground-mounted systems that connect to medium-voltage rural distribution circuits. Some of the PV system interconnections have resulted in distribution circuits that have a significant amount of PV generation compared to customer load, resulting in high-penetration PV integration scenarios. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and SCE have assembled a team of distribution modeling, resource assessment, and PV inverter technology experts in order to investigate a few of the high-penetration PV distribution circuits. Currently, the distribution circuits being studied include an urban circuit with a PV penetration of approximately 46% and a rural circuit with a PV penetration of approximately 60%. In both cases, power flow on the circuit reverses direction, compared to traditional circuit operation, during periods of high PV power production and low circuit loading. Research efforts during year two of the five-year project were focused on modeling the distribution system level impacts of high-penetration PV integrations, the development and installation of distribution circuit data acquisition equipment appropriate for quantifying the impacts of high-penetration PV integrations, and investigating high-penetration PV impact mitigation strategies. This paper outlines these research efforts and discusses the following activities in more detail: the development of a quasi-static time-series test feeder for evaluating high-penetration PV integration modeling tools; the advanced inverter functions being investigated for deployment in the project's field demonstration and a power hardware-in-loop test of a 500-kW PV inverter implementing a

  20. Effects of high pressure strength of rock material on penetration by shaped charge jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Hongfa

    2012-03-01

    Perforating of oil/gas well creates communication tunnel between reservoir and wellbore. Shaped charges are widely used as perforators in oilfield industry. The liners of the charges are mostly made of powder metal to prevent solid slug clogging the entrance hole of well casing or locking the hole in perforating gun. High speed jet from the shaped charge pierces through perforating gun, well fluid, well casing, and then penetrates into reservoir formation. Prediction of jet penetration in reservoir rock is critical in modeling of well production. An analytical penetration model developed for solid rod by Tate and Alekseevskii is applied in this work. For better results, strength of formation rock at high pressure needs to be measured. Lateral stress gauge measurements in plate impact tests are conducted. Piezoelectric pressure gauges are imbedded in samples to measure the longitudinal and transverse stress simultaneously. The two stresses provide Hugoniot and material compressive strength. Indiana limestone, a typical rock in perforation testing, is selected as target sample material in the plate impact tests. Since target strength effect on penetration is more important in late stage of penetration when the strength of material becomes significant compared to the impact pressure, all the impact tests are focused on lower impact pressure up to 9 GPa. The measurements show that the strength increases with impact pressure. The results are applied in the penetration calculations. The final penetration matches testing data very well.

  1. Wind induced composition effects at high latitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayr, H. G.; Harris, I.

    1981-01-01

    The temperature and compositional structure of the upper atmosphere are discussed in relation to the impacts of wind-induced diffusion processes. Seasonal variations in thermospheric temperature and composition are explained by energy and mass transport from the summer to the winter hemisphere induced by preferential heating, with the winter oxygen bulge participating in a feedback mechanism which acts to dampen wind velocities and increase temperature contrast. Changes in the eddy diffusion coefficient are considered as a complementary mechanism of producing the seasonal anomalies. The role of winds induced by high-latitude heating by particles and Joule dissipation during magnetic storms and substorms in accounting for thermospheric density increases and N2 and Ar enhancements and O and He depletions at high latitudes are discussed, and the rather weak compositional signature of E x B momentum coupling is distinguished from the effects of Joule dissipation.

  2. Highly Structured Wind in Vela X-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kreykenbohm, Ingo; Wilms, Joern; Kretschmar, Peter; Torrejon, Jose Miguel; Pottschmidt, Katja; Hanke, Manfred; Santangelo, Andrea; Ferrigno, Carlo; Staubert, Ruediger

    2008-01-01

    We present an in-depth analysis of the spectral and temporal behavior of a long almost uninterrupted INTEGRAL observation of Vela X-1 in Nov/Dec 2003. In addition to an already high activity level, Vela X-1 exhibited several very intense flares with a maximum intensity of more than 5 Crab in the 20 40 keV band. Furthermore Vela X-1 exhibited several off states where the source became undetectable with ISGRI. We interpret flares and off states as being due to the strongly structured wind of the optical companion: when Vela X-1 encounters a cavity in the wind with strongly reduced density, the flux will drop, thus potentially triggering the onset of the propeller effect which inhibits further accretion, thus giving rise to the off states. The required drop in density to trigger the propeller effect in Vela X-1 is of the same order as predicted by theoretical papers for the densities in the OB star winds. The same structured wind can give rise to the giant flares when Vela X-1 encounters a dense blob in the wind. Further temporal analysis revealed that a short lived QPO with a period of 6800 sec is present. The part of the light curve during which the QPO is present is very close to the off states and just following a high intensity state, thus showing that all these phenomena are related.

  3. High-energy trapped radiation penetrating the rings of Saturn

    SciTech Connect

    Chenette, D.L.; Cooper, J.F.; Eraker, J.H.; Pyle, K.R.; Simpson, J.A.

    1980-11-01

    Electrons and protons in the energy ranges 2--25 MeV and >67 MeV, respectively, have been discovered throughout the entire equatorial region inward from the outer edge of the A ring at L=2.3 to the periapsis of the Pioneer trajectory at Lapprox.1.3. The trapped radiation which populates Saturn's magnetosphere byond L=2.3 is totally absent in this region. The electron measurements include (1) a differential energy spectrum proportionalE/sup -0.6/, (2) an L dependence consistent with L/sup 2.8/, and (3) an intensity of approx.0.05 el/cm/sup 2/ s sr near L=2 for the energy range 7--17 MeV (a factor of 5 times the interplanetary quiettime flux in this energy range.) The proton measurements display an L dependence of L/sup 2/ with a flux level of approx.6 x 10/sup -2/ protons/cm/sup 2/ s sr above 67 MeV, just inside the edge of the A ring. The pitch angle distributions of both the electrons and protons are consistent with isotropy in the dipole magnetic field. It is argued from these results that the electrons and protons are trapped and thus penetrate the A-B-C rings. However, from the above experimental evidence it is concluded that this trapped radiation is not remnant radiation from the trapped radiation region beyond L=2.3. We find that these measurements are consistent with a model for spalsh albedo production of electrons and protons resulting from the bombardment of the atmosphere and/or rings of Saturn by cosmic ray protons with energies above the Stoermer cut-off at the magnetic latitudes of production. These secondary particles are then observed as trapped radiation propagating along the appropriate field lines crossing the ring plane. We also show that electron production may occur through ..pi../sup + -/..--> mu../sup + -/ ..-->..e/sup + -/ decay chain which yields an L dependence of L/sup 2.8/ for pions.

  4. A high resolution WRF model for wind energy forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincent, Claire Louise; Liu, Yubao

    2010-05-01

    The increasing penetration of wind energy into national electricity markets has increased the demand for accurate surface layer wind forecasts. There has recently been a focus on forecasting the wind at wind farm sites using both statistical models and numerical weather prediction (NWP) models. Recent advances in computing capacity and non-hydrostatic NWP models means that it is possible to nest mesoscale models down to Large Eddy Simulation (LES) scales over the spatial area of a typical wind farm. For example, the WRF model (Skamarock 2008) has been run at a resolution of 123 m over a wind farm site in complex terrain in Colorado (Liu et al. 2009). Although these modelling attempts indicate a great hope for applying such models for detailed wind forecasts over wind farms, one of the obvious challenges of running the model at this resolution is that while some boundary layer structures are expected to be modelled explicitly, boundary layer eddies into the inertial sub-range can only be partly captured. Therefore, the amount and nature of sub-grid-scale mixing that is required is uncertain. Analysis of Liu et al. (2009) modelling results in comparison to wind farm observations indicates that unrealistic wind speed fluctuations with a period of around 1 hour occasionally occurred during the two day modelling period. The problem was addressed by re-running the same modelling system with a) a modified diffusion constant and b) two-way nesting between the high resolution model and its parent domain. The model, which was run with horizontal grid spacing of 370 m, had dimensions of 505 grid points in the east-west direction and 490 points in the north-south direction. It received boundary conditions from a mesoscale model of resolution 1111 m. Both models had 37 levels in the vertical. The mesoscale model was run with a non-local-mixing planetary boundary layer scheme, while the 370 m model was run with no planetary boundary layer scheme. It was found that increasing the

  5. An Analytical Means of Determining Mass Loss from High Velocity Rigid Penetrators based on the Thermodynamic and Mechanical Properties of the Penetrator and Target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, Joseph C., Jr.; Jones, S. E.; Rule, William; Toness, Odin

    1999-06-01

    Sub-scale experimentation is commonly used as a cost-effective means of conducting terminal ballistics research. Analytical models of the penetration process focus on calculating the depth of penetration based on target density, target strength represented by the unconfined compressive-strength (f”c), the areal density of the penetrator (W/A), and the impact velocity.1 Forrestal, et. al. have documented the mass loss from the penetrator during the penetration process and employed improved equations of motion.2 Various researchers have investigated the upper limits of rigid body penetration and identified the onset of instabilities.3 In an effort to better understand the physical processes associated with this instability, experimental techniques have been developed to capture the details of the penetrator and target and subject them to microscopic analysis.4 These results have served as motivation to explore new forms for the physics included in the penetration equation as a means of identifying the processes associated with high velocity instability. We have included target shear and nose friction in the formulation of the fundamental load function expressions.5 When the resulting equations of motion are integrated and combined with the thermodynamics indicated by microscopic analysis, methods are identified to calculated penetrator mass loss. A comparison of results with experimental data serves as an indicator of the thermodynamic state variables associated with the quasi-steady state penetrator target interface conditions. 1 Young, C. W. , “Depth Predictions for Earth Penetrating Projectiles,” Journal of Soil Mechanics and Foundations, Division of ASCE, May 1998 pp 803-817 2. M.J. Forrestal, D.J. Frew, S.J. Hanchak, amd Brar, “ Pentration of Grout and Concrete Targets with Ogive-Nose Steel Projectiles,” Inrt. J. Impact Engng. Vol 18, pp. 465-476,1996 3. Andrew J. Piekutowski, Michael J. Forrestal, Kevin L. Poormon, and Thomas L. Warren, “Penetration

  6. Impact of High Solar Penetration in the Western Interconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Lew, D.; Miller, N.; Clark, K.; Jordan, G.; Gao, Z.

    2010-12-01

    This paper presents an overview of the variable characteristics of solar power, as well as the accompanying grid dynamic performance and operational economics for a system with significant solar generation. The paper will show results of economic operational simulations of a very high solar generation future for the western half of the United States.

  7. High-Penetration Photovoltaics Standards and Codes Workshop, Denver, Colorado, May 20, 2010: Workshop Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Coddington, M.; Kroposki, B.; Basso, T.; Lynn, K.; Herig, C.; Bower, W.

    2010-09-01

    Effectively interconnecting high-level penetration of photovoltaic (PV) systems requires careful technical attention to ensuring compatibility with electric power systems. Standards, codes, and implementation have been cited as major impediments to widespread use of PV within electric power systems. On May 20, 2010, in Denver, Colorado, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, in conjunction with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), held a workshop to examine the key technical issues and barriers associated with high PV penetration levels with an emphasis on codes and standards. This workshop included building upon results of the High Penetration of Photovoltaic (PV) Systems into the Distribution Grid workshop held in Ontario California on February 24-25, 2009, and upon the stimulating presentations of the diverse stakeholder presentations.

  8. PENETRATION AND DEFECT FORMATION IN HIGH CURRENT ARC WELDING

    SciTech Connect

    MENDEZ,P.F.; EAGAR, T.W.

    2003-01-01

    The work performed during the three previous years can be roughly divided into two main categories: (1) development of advanced modeling techniques; and (2) modeling of arc welding process. The work in the first category comprised the development of the Order of Magnitude Scaling (OMS) technique, which is complementary to numerical modeling techniques such as finite elements, but it provides approximate formulas instead of just numerical results. Borrowing concepts from OMS, another modeling technique based on empirical data was also developed. During this stage special software was also developed. The second category comprised the application of OMS to the three main subsystems of arc welding: the weld pool, the arc, and the electrode. For each of these subsystems they found scaling laws and regimes. With this knowledge, they analyzed the generation of weld pool defects during high current arc welding, proposed a mechanistic description of the process, and possible solutions.

  9. Transient Stability of the US Western Interconnection with High Wind and Solar Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, Kara; Miller, Nicholas W.; Shao, Miaolei; Pajic, Slobodan; D'Aquila, Robert

    2015-07-03

    The addition of large amounts of wind and solar generation to bulk power systems that are traditionally subject to operating constraints set by transient limitations is the subject of considerable concern in the industry. The US Western Interconnection (WI) is expected to experience substantial additional growth in both wind and solar generation. These plants will, to some extent, displace large central station thermal generation, both coal and gas-fired, which have traditionally helped maintain stability. This paper reports the results of a study that investigated the transient stability of the WI with high penetrations of wind and solar generation. The main goals of this work were to (1) create a realistic, baseline model of the WI, (2) test selected transient stability events, (3) investigate the impact of large amounts of wind and solar generation, and (4) examine means to improve performance.

  10. High resolution wind measurements for offshore wind energy development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nghiem, Son Van (Inventor); Neumann, Gregory (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A method, apparatus, system, article of manufacture, and computer readable storage medium provide the ability to measure wind. Data at a first resolution (i.e., low resolution data) is collected by a satellite scatterometer. Thin slices of the data are determined. A collocation of the data slices are determined at each grid cell center to obtain ensembles of collocated data slices. Each ensemble of collocated data slices is decomposed into a mean part and a fluctuating part. The data is reconstructed at a second resolution from the mean part and a residue of the fluctuating part. A wind measurement is determined from the data at the second resolution using a wind model function. A description of the wind measurement is output.

  11. Solar wind and high energy particle effects in the middle atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lastovicka, Jan

    1989-01-01

    The solar wind variability and high energy particle effects in the neutral middle atmosphere are not much known. These factors are important in the high latitude upper mesosphere, lower thermosphere energy budget. They influence temperature, composition (minor constituents of nitric oxide, ozone), circulation (wind system) and airflow. The vertical and latitudinal structures of such effects, mechanisms of downward penetration of energy and questions of energy abundance are largely to be solved. The most important recent finding seems to be the discovery of the role of highly relativistic electrons in the middle atmosphere at L = 3 - 8 (Baker et al., 1987). The solar wind and high energy particle flux variability appear to form a part of the chain of possible Sun-weather (climate) relationships. The importance of such studies in the nineties is emphasized by their role in big international programs STEP and IGBP - Global Change.

  12. Optimizing the U.S. Electric System with a High Penetration of Renewables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corcoran, B. A.; Jacobson, M. Z.

    2012-12-01

    As renewable energy generators are increasingly being installed throughout the U.S., there is growing interest in interconnecting diverse renewable generators (primarily wind and solar) across large geographic areas through an enhanced transmission system. This reduces variability in the aggregate power output, increases system reliability, and allows for the development of the best overall group of renewable technologies and sites to meet the load. Studies are therefore needed to determine the most efficient and economical plan to achieve large area interconnections in a future electric system with a high penetration of renewables. This research quantifies the effects of aggregating electric load and, separately, electric load together with diverse renewable generation throughout the ten Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) regions in the contiguous U.S. The effects of aggregating electric load alone -- including generator capacity capital cost savings, load energy shift operating cost savings, reserve requirement cost savings, and transmission costs -- were calculated for various groupings of FERC regions using 2006 data. Transmission costs outweighed cost savings due to aggregation in nearly all cases. East-west transmission layouts had the highest overall cost, and interconnecting ERCOT to adjacent FERC regions resulted in increased costs, both due to limited existing transmission capacity. Scenarios consisting of smaller aggregation groupings had the lowest overall cost. This analysis found no economic case for further aggregation of load alone within the U.S., except possibly in the West and Northwest. If aggregation of electric load is desired, then small, regional consolidations yield the lowest overall system cost. Next, the effects of aggregating electric load together with renewable electricity generation are being quantified through the development and use of an optimization tool in AMPL (A Mathematical Programming Language). This deterministic

  13. Penetration of Liquid Jets into a High-velocity Air Stream

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chelko, Louis J

    1950-01-01

    Data are presented showing the penetration characteristics of liquid jets directed approximately perpendicular to a high-velocity air stream for jet-nozzle-throat diameters from 0.0135 to 0.0625 inch, air stream densities from 0.0805 to 0.1365 pound per cubic foot, liquid jet velocities from 168.1 to 229.0 feet per second and a liquid jet density of approximately 62 pounds per cubic foot. The data were analyzed and a correlation was developed that permitted the determination of the penetration length of the liquid jet for any operation condition within the range of variables investigated.

  14. Cavity dimensions for high velocity penetration events: A comparison of calculational results with data

    SciTech Connect

    Kmetyk, L.N.; Yarrington, P.

    1989-05-01

    Calculations were performed with the CTH and HULL finite difference wavecodes to evaluate computational capabilities for predicting depth and diameter of target cavities produced in high velocity penetration events. The calculations simulated selected tests in a set of armor penetration experiments conducted by the US Army Ballistic Research Laboratory and reported earlier in the literature. The tests and simulations involved penetration of semi-infinite targets by long rod projectiles over a range of impact velocities from 1.3 to 4.5 km/sec. Comparisons are made between the calculated and measured dimensions of the target cavities, and the sensitivity of the predicted results to target property variations is investigated. 9 refs., 18 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Solar wind entry into the high-latitude terrestrial magnetosphere during geomagnetically quiet times.

    PubMed

    Shi, Q Q; Zong, Q-G; Fu, S Y; Dunlop, M W; Pu, Z Y; Parks, G K; Wei, Y; Li, W H; Zhang, H; Nowada, M; Wang, Y B; Sun, W J; Xiao, T; Reme, H; Carr, C; Fazakerley, A N; Lucek, E

    2013-01-01

    An understanding of the transport of solar wind plasma into and throughout the terrestrial magnetosphere is crucial to space science and space weather. For non-active periods, there is little agreement on where and how plasma entry into the magnetosphere might occur. Moreover, behaviour in the high-latitude region behind the magnetospheric cusps, for example, the lobes, is poorly understood, partly because of lack of coverage by previous space missions. Here, using Cluster multi-spacecraft data, we report an unexpected discovery of regions of solar wind entry into the Earth's high-latitude magnetosphere tailward of the cusps. From statistical observational facts and simulation analysis we suggest that these regions are most likely produced by magnetic reconnection at the high-latitude magnetopause, although other processes, such as impulsive penetration, may not be ruled out entirely. We find that the degree of entry can be significant for solar wind transport into the magnetosphere during such quiet times. PMID:23403567

  16. Solar wind entry into the high-latitude terrestrial magnetosphere during geomagnetically quiet times.

    PubMed

    Shi, Q Q; Zong, Q-G; Fu, S Y; Dunlop, M W; Pu, Z Y; Parks, G K; Wei, Y; Li, W H; Zhang, H; Nowada, M; Wang, Y B; Sun, W J; Xiao, T; Reme, H; Carr, C; Fazakerley, A N; Lucek, E

    2013-01-01

    An understanding of the transport of solar wind plasma into and throughout the terrestrial magnetosphere is crucial to space science and space weather. For non-active periods, there is little agreement on where and how plasma entry into the magnetosphere might occur. Moreover, behaviour in the high-latitude region behind the magnetospheric cusps, for example, the lobes, is poorly understood, partly because of lack of coverage by previous space missions. Here, using Cluster multi-spacecraft data, we report an unexpected discovery of regions of solar wind entry into the Earth's high-latitude magnetosphere tailward of the cusps. From statistical observational facts and simulation analysis we suggest that these regions are most likely produced by magnetic reconnection at the high-latitude magnetopause, although other processes, such as impulsive penetration, may not be ruled out entirely. We find that the degree of entry can be significant for solar wind transport into the magnetosphere during such quiet times.

  17. Renewable Electricity Futures. Operational Analysis of the Western Interconnection at Very High Renewable Penetrations

    SciTech Connect

    Brinkman, Gregory

    2015-09-01

    The Renewable Electricity Futures Study (RE Futures)--an analysis of the costs and grid impacts of integrating large amounts of renewable electricity generation into the U.S. power system--examined renewable energy resources, technical issues regarding the integration of these resources into the grid, and the costs associated with high renewable penetration scenarios. These scenarios included up to 90% of annual generation from renewable sources, although most of the analysis was focused on 80% penetration scenarios. Hourly production cost modeling was performed to understand the operational impacts of high penetrations. One of the conclusions of RE Futures was that further work was necessary to understand whether the operation of the system was possible at sub-hourly time scales and during transient events. This study aimed to address part of this by modeling the operation of the power system at sub-hourly time scales using newer methodologies and updated data sets for transmission and generation infrastructure. The goal of this work was to perform a detailed, sub-hourly analysis of very high penetration scenarios for a single interconnection (the Western Interconnection). It focused on operational impacts, and it helps verify that the operational results from the capacity expansion models are useful. The primary conclusion of this study is that sub-hourly operation of the grid is possible with renewable generation levels between 80% and 90%.

  18. Plasma Filaments in Dielectric Barrier Discharges Penetrating into High Aspect Ratio Cracks for Sterilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babaeva, Natalia Yu.; Kushner, Mark J.

    2012-10-01

    The ability of surface-hugging-plasmas, as produced in dielectric barrier discharges (DBDs), to penetrate into crevices, turn corners and navigate geometrical obstructions, is important in plasma-wound healing and sterilization. In this talk, we discuss results from a computational investigation of the plasma filaments produced in an air DBD and impinging on and penetrating into deep, high aspect ratio cracks in the bottom dielectric. The model used in this work, nonPDPSIM, is a plasma hydrodynamics model in which continuity, momentum and energy equations are solved for charged and neutral species with solution of Poisson's equation for the electric potential, concurrent with radiation transport. A Monte Carlo simulation is used to obtain ion energy distributions (IEDs) to surfaces. Cracks are 1 mm deep and 3 μm to 250 μm wide (aspect ratios of 333 to 4). We found that when impinging onto the cracked dielectric, the plasma filament conformally spreads over the surface. The conductive plasma transfers the applied potential to the opening of the crack. The width of the crack, w, then determines the penetration of the plasma. If w is large compared to the filament, the penetration is surface hugging. If w is commensurate with the filament, the plasma fills the crack. If the Debye length is about w or larger, there is not significant penetration. For the conditions investigated, penetration occurred for w > 5-6 μm. IEDs onto the surfaces of the trenches produce transient pulses of ions with energies >150 eV.

  19. Effect of Discontinuities and Penetrations on the Shielding Efficacy of High Temperature Superconducting Magnetic Shields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatwar, R.; Kvitkovic, J.; Herman, C.; Pamidi, S.

    2015-12-01

    High Temperature Superconducting (HTS) materials have been demonstrated to be suitable for applications in shielding of both DC and AC magnetic fields. Magnetic shielding is required for protecting sensitive instrumentation from external magnetic fields and for preventing the stray magnetic fields produced by high power density equipment from affecting neighbouring devices. HTS shields have high current densities at relatively high operating temperatures (40-77 K) and can be easily fabricated using commercial HTS conductor. High current densities in HTS materials allow design and fabrication of magnetic shields that are lighter and can be incorporated into the body and skin of high power density devices. HTS shields are particularly attractive for HTS devices because a single cryogenic system can be used for cooling the device and the associated shield. Typical power devices need penetrations for power and signal cabling and the penetrations create discontinuities in HTS shields. Hence it is important to assess the effect of the necessary discontinuities on the efficacy of the shields and the design modifications necessary to accommodate the penetrations.

  20. Ballistic penetration test results for Ductal and ultra-high performance concrete samples.

    SciTech Connect

    Reinhart, William Dodd; Thornhill, Tom Finley, III

    2010-03-01

    This document provides detailed test results of ballistic impact experiments performed on several types of high performance concrete. These tests were performed at the Sandia National Laboratories Shock Thermodynamic Applied Research Facility using a 50 caliber powder gun to study penetration resistance of concrete samples. This document provides test results for ballistic impact experiments performed on two types of concrete samples, (1) Ductal{reg_sign} concrete is a fiber reinforced high performance concrete patented by Lafarge Group and (2) ultra-high performance concrete (UHPC) produced in-house by DoD. These tests were performed as part of a research demonstration project overseen by USACE and ERDC, at the Sandia National Laboratories Shock Thermodynamic Applied Research (STAR) facility. Ballistic penetration tests were performed on a single stage research powder gun of 50 caliber bore using a full metal jacket M33 ball projectile with a nominal velocity of 914 m/s (3000 ft/s). Testing was observed by Beverly DiPaolo from ERDC-GSL. In all, 31 tests were performed to achieve the test objectives which were: (1) recovery of concrete test specimens for post mortem analysis and characterization at outside labs, (2) measurement of projectile impact velocity and post-penetration residual velocity from electronic and radiographic techniques and, (3) high-speed photography of the projectile prior to impact, impact and exit of the rear surface of the concrete construct, and (4) summarize the results.

  1. Verification of high-speed solar wind stream forecasts using operational solar wind models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiss, Martin A.; Temmer, Manuela; Veronig, Astrid M.; Nikolic, Ljubomir; Vennerstrom, Susanne; Schöngassner, Florian; Hofmeister, Stefan J.

    2016-07-01

    High-speed solar wind streams emanating from coronal holes are frequently impinging on the Earth's magnetosphere causing recurrent, medium-level geomagnetic storm activity. Modeling high-speed solar wind streams is thus an essential element of successful space weather forecasting. Here we evaluate high-speed stream forecasts made by the empirical solar wind forecast (ESWF) and the semiempirical Wang-Sheeley-Arge (WSA) model based on the in situ plasma measurements from the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) spacecraft for the years 2011 to 2014. While the ESWF makes use of an empirical relation between the coronal hole area observed in Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO)/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) images and solar wind properties at the near-Earth environment, the WSA model establishes a link between properties of the open magnetic field lines extending from the photosphere to the corona and the background solar wind conditions. We found that both solar wind models are capable of predicting the large-scale features of the observed solar wind speed (root-mean-square error, RMSE ≈100 km/s) but tend to either overestimate (ESWF) or underestimate (WSA) the number of high-speed solar wind streams (threat score, TS ≈ 0.37). The predicted high-speed streams show typical uncertainties in the arrival time of about 1 day and uncertainties in the speed of about 100 km/s. General advantages and disadvantages of the investigated solar wind models are diagnosed and outlined.

  2. Measuring fuel contamination using high speed gas chromatography and cone penetration techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Farrington, S.P.; Bratton, W.L.; Akard, M.L.

    1995-10-01

    Decision processes during characterization and cleanup of hazardous waste sites are greatly retarded by the turnaround time and expense incurred through the use of conventional sampling and laboratory analyses. Furthermore, conventional soil and groundwater sampling procedures present many opportunities for loss of volatile organic compounds (VOC) by exposing sample media to the atmosphere during transfers between and among sampling devices and containers. While on-site analysis by conventional gas chromatography can reduce analytical turnaround time, time-consuming sample preparation procedures are still often required, and the potential for loss of VOC is not reduced. This report describes the development of a high speed gas chromatography and cone penetration testing system which can detect and measure subsurface fuel contamination in situ during the cone penetration process.

  3. Plant Gas Exchange at High Wind Speeds 1

    PubMed Central

    Caldwell, Martyn M.

    1970-01-01

    High altitude Rhododendron ferrugineum L. and Pinus cembra L. seedlings were exposed to winds at 15 meters per second for 24-hour periods. Wind-sensitive stomata of Rhododendron seedlings immediately initiated a closing response which resulted in decreased photosynthesis and an even greater reduction in transpiration. Stomatal aperture and transpiration rates of P. cembra were only slightly reduced by high speed winds. However, photosynthesis was substantially reduced because of changes in needle display to available irradiation. PMID:16657501

  4. Using operationally synthesized multiple-Doppler winds for high resolution horizontal wind forecast verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bousquet, Olivier; Montmerle, Thibaut; Tabary, Pierre

    2008-05-01

    The potential value of operational Doppler radar networks for high resolution wind forecast verification is investigated through comparing wind outputs of the cloud resolving model AROME against newly available operational multiple-Doppler winds in northern France. Quantitative comparisons of radar and model winds for a 16-h frontal precipitation event show good agreement, with differences in wind speed (resp. direction) generally comprised between +/-2.5 m.s-1 (resp. +/-15°). Power spectra deduced from the scale decomposition of radar and model outputs also show good agreement through all scales. The method is also applied to validate the divergence structures as analyzed by AROME's 3Dvar assimilation system that considers, among a comprehensive set of observation types, the same radial velocities than those considered in the wind retrieval.

  5. High-resolution sea wind hindcasts over the Mediterranean area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menendez, M.; García-Díez, M.; Fita, L.; Fernández, J.; Méndez, F. J.; Gutiérrez, J. M.

    2014-04-01

    The goal of this study is to develop a high-resolution atmospheric hindcast over the Mediterranean area using the WRF-ARW model, focusing on offshore surface wind fields. In order to choose the most adequate model configuration, the study provides details on the calibration of the experimental saet-up through a sensitivity test considering the October-December 2001 period (the 2001 super-storm event in the West Mediterranean). A daily forecast outperforms the spectral technique of previous products and the boundary data from ERA-Interim reanalysis produces the most accurate estimates in terms of wind variability and hour-to-hour correspondence. According to the sensitivity test, two data sets of wind hindcast are produced: the SeaWind I (30-km horizontal resolution for a period of 60 years) and the SeaWind II (15-km horizontal resolution for 20 years). The validation of the resulting surface winds is undertaken considering two offshore observational datasets. On the one hand, hourly surface buoy stations are used to validate wind time series at specific locations; on the other hand, wind altimeter satellite observations are considered for spatial validation in the whole Mediterranean Sea. The results obtained from this validation process show a very good agreement with observations for the southern Europe region. Finally, SeaWind I and II are used to characterize offshore wind fields in the Mediterranean Sea. The statistical structure of sea surface wind is analyzed and the agreement with Weibull probability distribution is discussed. In addition, wind persistence and extreme wind speed (50 year return period) are characterized and relevant areas of wind power generation are described by estimating wind energy quantities.

  6. Pressure-induced penetration of guest molecules in high-silica zeolites: the case of mordenite.

    PubMed

    Arletti, R; Leardini, L; Vezzalini, G; Quartieri, S; Gigli, L; Santoro, M; Haines, J; Rouquette, J; Konczewicz, L

    2015-10-01

    A synthetic high-silica mordenite (HS-MOR) has been compressed in both non-penetrating (silicone oil, s.o.) and penetrating [methanol : ethanol : water (16 : 3 : 1) (m.e.w.), water : ethanol (3 : 1) (w.e.), and ethylene glycol (e.gl.)] pressure transmitting media (PTM). In situ high-pressure (HP) synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) experiments allowed the unit cell parameters to be followed up to 1.6, 1.8, 8.4, and 6.7 GPa in s.o., w.e., m.e.w., and e.gl., respectively. Moreover, e.gl. was also used as a PTM in in situ HP Raman and ex situ IR experiments. The structural refinement of HS-MOR compressed in e.gl. at 0.1 GPa - the lowest investigated pressure - revealed the presence of 3.5 ethylene glycol molecules per unit cell. The infrared spectrum of the recovered sample, after compression to 1 GPa, is consistent with the insertion of ethylene glycol molecules in the pores. XRPD and Raman spectroscopy experiments performed under pressure indicated the insertion of a small number of guest molecules. Ethylene glycol is partially retained inside mordenite upon pressure release. A symmetry lowering was observed in s.o. above 0.8 GPa, while above 1.6 GPa the patterns indicated a rapid loss of long range order. From ambient pressure (Pamb) to 1.6 GPa, a high cell volume contraction (ΔV = -9.5%) was determined. The patterns collected with penetrating PTM suggested the penetration of guest molecules into the porous host matrix, starting from a very low P regime. The entrapment of PTM molecules inside micropores contributes to the stiffening of the structure and, as a consequence, to the decrease of the compressibility with respect to that measured in s.o. From the structural point of view, HS-MOR reacts to compression and to the penetration of different guest species with appropriate framework deformations. Interestingly, ethylene glycol is partially retained inside mordenite upon pressure release, which is of importance for potential

  7. DSCOVR High Time Resolution Solar Wind Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szabo, Adam

    2012-01-01

    The Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR), previously known as Triana, spacecraft is expected to be launched in late 2014. It will carry a fluxgate magnetometer, Faraday Cup solar wind detector and a top-hat electron electrostatic analyzer. The Faraday Cup will provide an unprecedented 10 vectors/sec time resolution measurement of the solar wind proton and alpha reduced distribution functions. Coupled with the 40 vector/sec vector magnetometer measurements, the identification of specific wave modes in the solar wind will be possible for the first time. The science objectives and data products of the mission will be discussed.

  8. Jet engine powers large, high-temperature wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benham, T. F.; Mulliken, S. R.

    1967-01-01

    Wind tunnel for large component testing uses a jet engine with afterburner to provide high temperatures /1200 degrees to 2000 degrees F/ and controlled high velocity gas. This economical wind tunnel can accommodate parts ten feet by ten feet or larger, and is a useful technique for qualitative information.

  9. Winding Losses in High-Speed Machines using Form-Wound Windings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wanjun

    Understanding the ac loss phenomena in form-wound windings is critical for achieving high efficiency in ac machines that employ this type of winding. Accurate calculation of these losses using finite element (FE) analysis typically requires a fine mesh size in the conductors and small time steps, requiring considerable computational resources to accomplish. This research program presents the development of a closed-form 2D analytical model that is capable of calculating the ac losses in form-wound windings with promising accuracy and short computation times. This model is valuable for carrying out rapid assessments of the ac losses in machines for a wide range of operating conditions, making it practical to evaluate large numbers of candidate designs. Significant attention is devoted to exploring alternative approaches for reducing these ac losses that are influenced by many winding design factors including the conductor locations and thicknesses, number of conductors per slot, and phase arrangement. In addition, experimental tests have been carried out using three identical stators with form-wound, "pseudo" Litz and true Litz windings, all configured with the same winding function. The availability of these stators makes it possible to experimentally segregate the winding losses, explore winding losses under different operating conditions, and, finally, build confidence in the proposed model. The results of this investigation highlight the advantages of form-wound windings for low-frequency operation while also clearly demonstrating the risks that they present for unacceptably high ac losses at elevated frequencies. This work also demonstrates that careful attention to the design details of form-wound windings can lead to promising reductions of the ac winding losses under demanding operating conditions associated with high-speed operation.

  10. Wind Tunnel Tests of Wind Turbine Airfoils at High Reynolds Numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llorente, E.; Gorostidi, A.; Jacobs, M.; Timmer, W. A.; Munduate, X.; Pires, O.

    2014-06-01

    Wind tunnel tests have been performed to measure the two-dimensional aerodynamic characteristics of two different airfoil families at high Reynolds numbers (from 3 to 12 millions) in the DNW High Pressure Wind Tunnel in Gottingen (HDG), Germany. Also, tests at a Reynolds number of 3 millions have been performed in the Low-Speed Low- Turbulence Wind Tunnel of Delft University, The Netherlands. The airfoils tested belong to two wind turbine dedicated families: the TU-Delft DU family and the ACCIONA Windpower AWA family that was designed in collaboration with CENER. Reynolds number effects on airfoil performance have been obtained in the range of 3 to 12 millions. The availability of data from two different wind tunnels has brought the opportunity to cross compare the results from the two facilities.

  11. Design and Performance of Solar Decathlon 2011 High-Penetration Microgrid: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Stafford, B.; Coddington, M.; Butt, R.; Solomon, S.; Wiegand, G.; Wagner, C.; Gonzalez, B.

    2012-04-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon challenges collegiate teams to design, build, and operate solar-powered houses that are cost-effective, energy-efficient, and attractive. The Solar Decathlon 2011 was held in Washington, D.C., from September 23 to October 2, 2011 . A high-penetration microgrid was designed, installed, and operated for the Solar Decathlon 2011 to grid-connect 19 highly energy-efficient, solar-powered competition houses to a single utility connection point. The capacity penetration of this microgrid (defined as maximum PV generation divided by maximum system load over a two-week period) was 74% based on 1-minute averaged data. Temporary, ground-laid conductors and electrical distribution equipment were installed to grid-connect the Solar Decathlon village, which included the houses as well as other electrical loads used by the event organizers. While 16 of the houses were connected to the 60 Hz microgrid, three houses from Belgium, China, and New Zealand were supplied with 50 Hz power. The design of the microgrid, including the connection of the houses powered by 50 Hz and a standby diesel generator, is discussed in this paper. In addition to the utility-supplied net energy meters at each house, a microgrid monitoring system was installed to measure and record energy consumption and PV energy production at 1-second intervals at each house. Bidirectional electronic voltage regulators were installed for groups of competition houses, which held the service voltage at each house to acceptable levels. The design and successful performance of this high-penetration microgrid is presented from the house, microgrid operator, and utility perspectives.

  12. Extended-Term Dynamic Simulations with High Penetrations of Photovoltaic Generation.

    SciTech Connect

    Concepcion, Ricky James; Elliott, Ryan Thomas; Donnelly, Matt; Sanchez-Gasca, Juan

    2016-01-01

    The uncontrolled intermittent availability of renewable energy sources makes integration of such devices into today's grid a challenge. Thus, it is imperative that dynamic simulation tools used to analyze power system performance are able to support systems with high amounts of photovoltaic (PV) generation. Additionally, simulation durations expanding beyond minutes into hours must be supported. This report aims to identify the path forward for dynamic simulation tools to accom- modate these needs by characterizing the properties of power systems (with high PV penetration), analyzing how these properties affect dynamic simulation software, and offering solutions for po- tential problems. We present a study of fixed time step, explicit numerical integration schemes that may be more suitable for these goals, based on identified requirements for simulating high PV penetration systems. We also present the alternative of variable time step integration. To help determine the characteristics of systems with high PV generation, we performed small signal sta- bility studies and time domain simulations of two representative systems. Along with feedback from stakeholders and vendors, we identify the current gaps in power system modeling including fast and slow dynamics and propose a new simulation framework to improve our ability to model and simulate longer-term dynamics.

  13. High-Penetration PV Deployment in the Arizona Public Service System, Phase 1 Update: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Hambrick, J.; Narang, D.

    2012-06-01

    In an effort to better understand the impacts of high penetrations of photovoltaic generators on distribution systems, Arizona Public Service and its partners have begun work on a multi-year project to develop the tools and knowledge base needed to safely and reliably integrate high penetrations of utility- and residential-scale photovoltaics (PV). Building upon the APS Community Power Project -- Flagstaff Pilot, this project will analyze the impact of PV on a representative feeder in northeast Flagstaff. To quantify and catalog the effects of the estimated 1.3 MW of PV that will be installed on the feeder (both smaller units at homes as well as large, centrally located systems), high-speed weather and electrical data acquisition systems and digital 'smart' meters are being designed and installed to facilitate monitoring and to build and validate comprehensive, high-resolution models of the distribution system. These models will be used to analyze the impacts of the PV on distribution circuit protection systems (including anti-islanding), predict voltage regulation and phase balance issues, and develop volt/var control schemes. This paper continues from a paper presented at the 2011 IEEE PVSC conference that introduces the project and describes some of the preliminary consideration, as well as project plans and early results. This paper gives a status update of the project and presents selected results from Phase 2 of the project. It discusses baseline feeder modeling, load allocation, data acquisition, utility-scale PV integration, preliminary model validation, and plans for future phases.

  14. Microwave (EPR) measurements of the penetration depth measurements of high-Tc superconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dalal, N. S.; Rakvin, B.; Mahl, T. A.; Bhalla, A. S.; Sheng, Z. Z.

    1991-01-01

    The use is discussed of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) as a quick and easily accessible method for measuring the London penetration depth, lambda for the high T sub c superconductors. The method uses the broadening of the EPR signal, due to the emergence of the magnetic flux lattice, of a free radical adsorbed on the surface of the sample. The second moment, of the EPR signal below T sub c is fitted to the Brandt equation for a simple triangular lattice. The precision of this method compares quite favorably with those of the more standard methods such as micro sup(+)SR, neutron scattering, and magnetic susceptibility.

  15. Improving Ground Penetrating Radar Imaging in High Loss Environments by Coordinated System Development, Data Processing, Numerical Modeling, & Visualization

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, David L.

    2004-12-01

    Improving Ground Penetrating Radar Imaging in High Loss Environments by Coordinated System Development, Data Processing, Numerical Modeling, and Visualization Methods with Applications to Site Characterization EMSP Project 86992 Progress Report as of 9/2004.

  16. Optimal Operation and Management for Smart Grid Subsumed High Penetration of Renewable Energy, Electric Vehicle, and Battery Energy Storage System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shigenobu, Ryuto; Noorzad, Ahmad Samim; Muarapaz, Cirio; Yona, Atsushi; Senjyu, Tomonobu

    2016-04-01

    Distributed generators (DG) and renewable energy sources have been attracting special attention in distribution systems in all over the world. Renewable energies, such as photovoltaic (PV) and wind turbine generators are considered as green energy. However, a large amount of DG penetration causes voltage deviation beyond the statutory range and reverse power flow at interconnection points in the distribution system. If excessive voltage deviation occurs, consumer's electric devices might break and reverse power flow will also has a negative impact on the transmission system. Thus, mass interconnections of DGs has an adverse effect on both of the utility and the customer. Therefore, reactive power control method is proposed previous research by using inverters attached DGs for prevent voltage deviations. Moreover, battery energy storage system (BESS) is also proposed for resolve reverse power flow. In addition, it is possible to supply high quality power for managing DGs and BESSs. Therefore, this paper proposes a method to maintain voltage, active power, and reactive power flow at interconnection points by using cooperative controlled of PVs, house BESSs, EVs, large BESSs, and existing voltage control devices. This paper not only protect distribution system, but also attain distribution loss reduction and effectivity management of control devices. Therefore mentioned control objectives are formulated as an optimization problem that is solved by using the Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) algorithm. Modified scheduling method is proposed in order to improve convergence probability of scheduling scheme. The effectiveness of the proposed method is verified by case studies results and by using numerical simulations in MATLAB®.

  17. High Kinetic Energy Penetrator Shielding and High Wear Resistance Materials Fabricated with Boron Nitride Nanotubes (BNNTS) and BNNT Polymer Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kang, Jin Ho (Inventor); Park, Cheol (Inventor); Sauti, Godfrey (Inventor); Smith, Michael W. (Inventor); Jordan, Kevin C. (Inventor); Lowther, Sharon E. (Inventor); Bryant, Robert George (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs), boron nitride nanoparticles (BNNPs), carbon nanotubes (CNTs), graphites, or combinations, are incorporated into matrices of polymer, ceramic or metals. Fibers, yarns, and woven or nonwoven mats of BNNTs are used as toughening layers in penetration resistant materials to maximize energy absorption and/or high hardness layers to rebound or deform penetrators. They can be also used as reinforcing inclusions combining with other polymer matrices to create composite layers like typical reinforcing fibers such as Kevlar.RTM., Spectra.RTM., ceramics and metals. Enhanced wear resistance and usage time are achieved by adding boron nitride nanomaterials, increasing hardness and toughness. Such materials can be used in high temperature environments since the oxidation temperature of BNNTs exceeds 800.degree. C. in air. Boron nitride based composites are useful as strong structural materials for anti-micrometeorite layers for spacecraft and space suits, ultra strong tethers, protective gear, vehicles, helmets, shields and safety suits/helmets for industry.

  18. High Resolution Atmospheric Modeling for Wind Energy Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, M; Bulaevskaya, V; Glascoe, L; Singer, M

    2010-03-18

    The ability of the WRF atmospheric model to forecast wind speed over the Nysted wind park was investigated as a function of time. It was found that in the time period we considered (August 1-19, 2008), the model is able to predict wind speeds reasonably accurately for 48 hours ahead, but that its forecast skill deteriorates rapidly after 48 hours. In addition, a preliminary analysis was carried out to investigate the impact of vertical grid resolution on the forecast skill. Our preliminary finding is that increasing vertical grid resolution does not have a significant impact on the forecast skill of the WRF model over Nysted wind park during the period we considered. Additional simulations during this period, as well as during other time periods, will be run in order to validate the results presented here. Wind speed is a difficult parameter to forecast due the interaction of large and small length scale forcing. To accurately forecast the wind speed at a given location, the model must correctly forecast the movement and strength of synoptic systems, as well as the local influence of topography / land use on the wind speed. For example, small deviations in the forecast track or strength of a large-scale low pressure system can result in significant forecast errors for local wind speeds. The purpose of this study is to provide a preliminary baseline of a high-resolution limited area model forecast performance against observations from the Nysted wind park. Validating the numerical weather prediction model performance for past forecasts will give a reasonable measure of expected forecast skill over the Nysted wind park. Also, since the Nysted Wind Park is over water and some distance from the influence of terrain, the impact of high vertical grid spacing for wind speed forecast skill will also be investigated.

  19. Analysis of axial-induction-based wind plant control using an engineering and a high-order wind plant model

    SciTech Connect

    Annoni, Jennifer; Gebraad, Pieter M. O.; Scholbrock, Andrew K.; Fleming, Paul A.; Wingerden, Jan-Willem van

    2015-08-14

    Wind turbines are typically operated to maximize their performance without considering the impact of wake effects on nearby turbines. Wind plant control concepts aim to increase overall wind plant performance by coordinating the operation of the turbines. This paper focuses on axial-induction-based wind plant control techniques, in which the generator torque or blade pitch degrees of freedom of the wind turbines are adjusted. The paper addresses discrepancies between a high-order wind plant model and an engineering wind plant model. Changes in the engineering model are proposed to better capture the effects of axial-induction-based control shown in the high-order model.

  20. High-performance TSD bits improve penetration rate. [Thermally Stable Diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, J.H.; Maurer, W.C. ); Westcott, P.A. )

    1993-04-12

    Optimizing the number, size, and orientation of clutters on thermally stable diamond (TSD) bits increases penetration rate and extends bit life. The use of optimized TSD (also commonly referred to as thermally stable product or TSP) bits on high-power drilling motors can greatly reduce drilling time for harsh-environment wells, such as deep gas wells. The power delivered to the rock governs drilling rate, and at high speed the optimized TSD bits are capable of effectively delivering power to drill the rock. This article reviews a 3-year project to develop advanced thermally stable diamond bits that can operate at a power level 5-10 times greater than that typically delivered by conventional rotary drilling. These bits are designed to operate on advanced drilling motors that drill three to six times faster than rotary drilling. These advanced bits and motors are especially designed for use in slim-hole and horizontal drilling applications. The TSD bit design parameters which were varied during the tests were cutter size, shape, density (number of cutters), and orientation. Drilling tests in limestone, sandstone, marble, and granite blocks showed that these optimized bits drilled many of these rocks at 500-1,000 ft/hr compared to 50-100 ft/hr for conventional rotary drilling. A sensitivity model showed that doubling the rate of penetration significantly reduced the time to drill a well and reduced costs by 13 %.

  1. Development of Deep Penetration Welding Technology with High Brightness Laser under Vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katayama, Seiji; Yohei, Abe; Mizutani, Masami; Kawahito, Yousuke

    The authors have developed a new chamber for laser welding under the low vacuum conditions achieved by using rotary pumps. High-power disk laser bead-on-plate welding was performed on Type 304 stainless steel or A5052 aluminium alloy plate at the powers of 10, 16 and 26 kW at various welding speeds under low vacuum. The sound welds of more than 50 and 70 mm in penetration depth could be produced in Type 304 at the pressure of 0.1 kPa, the speed of 0.3 m/min and the power of 16 kW and 26 kW, respectively. Similar penetration was achieved in A 5052 aluminum alloy. Welding phenomena under low vacuum were also understood by observing the behavior of a keyhole inlet, a molten pool, melt flows and a plume ejected from a keyhole through high speed video cameras. Low interaction between a laser beam and a plume under low vacuum was confirmed by using probe laser beam method.

  2. Advanced Inverter Technology for High Penetration Levels of PV Generation in Distribution Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Schauder, C.

    2014-03-01

    This subcontract report was completed under the auspices of the NREL/SCE High-Penetration Photovoltaic (PV) Integration Project, which is co-funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) and the California Solar Initiative (CSI) Research, Development, Demonstration, and Deployment (RD&D) program funded by the California Public Utility Commission (CPUC) and managed by Itron. This project is focused on modeling, quantifying, and mitigating the impacts of large utility-scale PV systems (generally 1-5 MW in size) that are interconnected to the distribution system. This report discusses the concerns utilities have when interconnecting large PV systems that interconnect using PV inverters (a specific application of frequency converters). Additionally, a number of capabilities of PV inverters are described that could be implemented to mitigate the distribution system-level impacts of high-penetration PV integration. Finally, the main issues that need to be addressed to ease the interconnection of large PV systems to the distribution system are presented.

  3. Identifying Highly Penetrant Disease Causal Mutations Using Next Generation Sequencing: Guide to Whole Process

    PubMed Central

    Erzurumluoglu, A. Mesut; Shihab, Hashem A.; Baird, Denis; Richardson, Tom G.; Day, Ian N. M.; Gaunt, Tom R.

    2015-01-01

    Recent technological advances have created challenges for geneticists and a need to adapt to a wide range of new bioinformatics tools and an expanding wealth of publicly available data (e.g., mutation databases, and software). This wide range of methods and a diversity of file formats used in sequence analysis is a significant issue, with a considerable amount of time spent before anyone can even attempt to analyse the genetic basis of human disorders. Another point to consider that is although many possess “just enough” knowledge to analyse their data, they do not make full use of the tools and databases that are available and also do not fully understand how their data was created. The primary aim of this review is to document some of the key approaches and provide an analysis schema to make the analysis process more efficient and reliable in the context of discovering highly penetrant causal mutations/genes. This review will also compare the methods used to identify highly penetrant variants when data is obtained from consanguineous individuals as opposed to nonconsanguineous; and when Mendelian disorders are analysed as opposed to common-complex disorders. PMID:26106619

  4. Identifying Highly Penetrant Disease Causal Mutations Using Next Generation Sequencing: Guide to Whole Process.

    PubMed

    Erzurumluoglu, A Mesut; Rodriguez, Santiago; Shihab, Hashem A; Baird, Denis; Richardson, Tom G; Day, Ian N M; Gaunt, Tom R

    2015-01-01

    Recent technological advances have created challenges for geneticists and a need to adapt to a wide range of new bioinformatics tools and an expanding wealth of publicly available data (e.g., mutation databases, and software). This wide range of methods and a diversity of file formats used in sequence analysis is a significant issue, with a considerable amount of time spent before anyone can even attempt to analyse the genetic basis of human disorders. Another point to consider that is although many possess "just enough" knowledge to analyse their data, they do not make full use of the tools and databases that are available and also do not fully understand how their data was created. The primary aim of this review is to document some of the key approaches and provide an analysis schema to make the analysis process more efficient and reliable in the context of discovering highly penetrant causal mutations/genes. This review will also compare the methods used to identify highly penetrant variants when data is obtained from consanguineous individuals as opposed to nonconsanguineous; and when Mendelian disorders are analysed as opposed to common-complex disorders.

  5. RF penetration depth study of superconductivity in high magnetic field at low temperature and under pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Catalin

    2005-07-01

    We used a technique based on a self-resonating rf circuit powered by a Tunnel Diode, the TDO technique, to perform measurements of penetration depth with magnetic field on organic and heavy fermions superconductors. Both classes of materials have strong resemblance to the High Temperature Superconductors (HTS). However, they feature much lower critical fields Bc 2 then the HTS, making the study of magnetic properties much more facile. In general, the penetration depth in the presence of a magnetic field is determined by the appearance and the motion of vortices. However, we proved that when the magnetic field is aligned parallel to the conducting planes, due to the geometry of our set-up and the layered nature of the studied systems, the vortex dynamics is drastically reduced. In this case, we were able to measure the field dependence of London penetration depth, lambda L(B). Recent theoretical work has shown that the field dependence of lambdaL can provide information about the symmetry of the energy gap in superconductors. This is a key information in understanding the mechanism of superconductivity in HTS. The existence of strong spin fluctuations in HTS results in an energy gap Delta k, which is not uniform in k-space as predicted by the BCS theory of superconductivity. Therefore, the HTS are assumed to be non-BCS or unconventional superconductors. The question is whether the symmetry of the energy gap in organic and heavy fermions is the same as in HTS. We found that lambdaL(B) in the organic compound alpha-(ET)2NH4Hg(SCN)4 indicated a uniform energy gap, therefore a conventional or BCS superconductivity in this material. The measurements on CeCoIn5 revealed a linear field dependence of lambdaL, in good agreement with the theoretical calculation for a superconductor with nodes in energy gap, therefore non-conventional superconductivity. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  6. Environmental acceptability of high-performance alternatives for depleted uranium penetrators

    SciTech Connect

    Kerley, C.R.; Easterly, C.E.; Eckerman, K.F.

    1996-08-01

    The Army`s environmental strategy for investigating material substitution and management is to measure system environmental gains/losses in all phases of the material management life cycle from cradle to grave. This study is the first in a series of new investigations, applying material life cycle concepts, to evaluate whether there are environmental benefits from increasing the use of tungsten as an alternative to depleted uranium (DU) in Kinetic Energy Penetrators (KEPs). Current military armor penetrators use DU and tungsten as base materials. Although DU alloys have provided the highest performance of any high-density alloy deployed against enemy heavy armor, its low-level radioactivity poses a number of environmental risks. These risks include exposures to the military and civilian population from inhalation, ingestion, and injection of particles. Depleted uranium is well known to be chemically toxic (kidney toxicity), and workplace exposure levels are based on its renal toxicity. Waste materials containing DU fragments are classified as low-level radioactive waste and are regulated by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. These characteristics of DU do not preclude its use in KEPs. However, long-term management challenges associated with KEP deployment and improved public perceptions about environmental risks from military activities might be well served by a serious effort to identify, develop, and substitute alternative materials that meet performance objectives and involve fewer environmental risks. Tungsten, a leading candidate base material for KEPS, is potentially such a material because it is not radioactive. Tungsten is less well studied, however, with respect to health impacts and other environmental risks. The present study is designed to contribute to the understanding of the environmental behavior of tungsten by synthesizing available information that is relevant to its potential use as a penetrator.

  7. Highly accurate and fast optical penetration-based silkworm gender separation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamtongdee, Chakkrit; Sumriddetchkajorn, Sarun; Chanhorm, Sataporn

    2015-07-01

    Based on our research work in the last five years, this paper highlights our innovative optical sensing system that can identify and separate silkworm gender highly suitable for sericulture industry. The key idea relies on our proposed optical penetration concepts and once combined with simple image processing operations leads to high accuracy in identifying of silkworm gender. Inside the system, there are electronic and mechanical parts that assist in controlling the overall system operation, processing the optical signal, and separating the female from male silkworm pupae. With current system performance, we achieve a very highly accurate more than 95% in identifying gender of silkworm pupae with an average system operational speed of 30 silkworm pupae/minute. Three of our systems are already in operation at Thailand's Queen Sirikit Sericulture Centers.

  8. Effect of Impact and Penetration on Microstructural Evolution of High-performance Concretes

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Fei; Mattus, Catherine H; Wang, Jy-An John; Dipaolo, Beverly P

    2013-01-01

    Due to the increased concern of public safety in recent years, blast resistance of infrastructures has become an emerging research focus in the cement and concrete industry. Ultra High Performance Concrete (UHPC) with fiber reinforcement usually possesses compressive strengths greater than 200 MPa, which makes them promising candidates for blast-resistant building materials. In the current project, two UHPC materials, Ductal and ERDC-M, were subject to projectile penetration testing. The microstructural evolution due to projectile impact was examined via scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Possible phase changes were observed in the impact volume, which was likely a result of the high temperature and high pressure induced by the impact.

  9. On High-Resolution Scatterometer Winds near the Coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoffelen, Ad; Verhoef, Anton; Vogelzang, Jur; Portabella, Marcos; Figa, Julia

    2010-12-01

    The Advanced SCATterometer (ASCAT) operational processing uses spatial filtering with a Hamming window to avoid noise due to aliasing. The spatial extent of the Hamming windows prevents processing near the coast line. However, sea surface winds near the coast are very important, given that activities related to shipping and transport, off-shore resource exploitation, wind parks and tourism are most intense near the coast. Furthermore, coastal winds are also important for monitoring ecological and erosion processes. To provide ASCAT winds closer to the coast, three different products have been generated with spatial filtering over a circular box, and subjected to validation both in coastal and open ocean areas. The product made with a backscatter averaging cut-off radius Rmax = 15 km closely resembles the operational ASCAT 12.5-km product. However, the smaller spatial averaging extent of the box compared to the Hamming window, not only allows retrieving winds closer to the coast, but also captures smaller ocean wind variability and it is consequently providing greater consistency of the ASCAT backscatter triplet with the wind Geophysical Model Function (GMF), as observed by a reduced elimination of points by the Quality Control (QC). Due to the low noise observed in this product, we anticipate that in cases with high wind gradients, such as near tropical cyclones, even higher resolution winds than the ones presented here may be worthwhile retrieving.

  10. Transient Stability and Frequency Response of the US Western Interconnection Under Conditions of High Wind and Solar Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Nicholas W.; Shao, Miaolei; Pajic, Slobodan; D'Aquila, Robert; Clark, Kara

    2014-11-13

    The addition of large amounts of wind and solar generation to bulk power systems that are traditionally subject to operating constraints set by transient stability and frequency response limitations is the subject of considerable concern in the industry. The US Western Interconnection (WI) is expected to experience substantial additional growth in both wind and solar generation. These plants will, to some extent, displace large central station thermal generation, both coal and gas-fired, which have traditionally helped maintain stability. This paper reports the results of a study that investigated the transient stability and frequency response of the WI with high penetrations of wind and solar generation. The main goals of this work were to (1) create a realistic, baseline model of the WI, (2) test selected transient stability and frequency events, (3) investigate the impact of large amounts of wind and solar generation, and (4) examine means to improve performance.

  11. Transient Stability and Frequency Response of the US Western Interconnection under conditions of High Wind and Solar Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, Kara; Miller, Nicholas W.; Shao, Miaolei; Pajic, Slobodan; D'Aquila, Robert

    2015-04-15

    Adding large amounts of wind and solar generation to bulk power systems that are traditionally subject to operating constraints set by transient stability and frequency response limitations is the subject of considerable concern in the industry. The US Western Interconnection (WI) is expected to experience substantial additional growth in both wind and solar generation. These plants will, to some extent, displace large central station thermal generation, both coal and gas-fired, which have traditionally helped maintain stability. Our paper reports the results of a study that investigated the transient stability and frequency response of the WI with high penetrations of wind and solar generation. Moreover, the main goals of this work were to (1) create a realistic, baseline model of the WI, (2) test selected transient stability and frequency events, (3) investigate the impact of large amounts of wind and solar generation, and (4) examine means to improve performance.

  12. Global assessment of high-altitude wind power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archer, C. L.; Caldeira, K.

    2008-12-01

    Wind speed generally increases with altitude to the tropopause; hence, the power available in high-altitude winds is enormous, especially near the jet streams. We assess for the first time the available wind power resource worldwide at altitudes between 500 and 12,000 m. The highest wind power densities are found near 10,000 m over Japan and eastern China, the eastern coast of the United States, southern Australia, and north-eastern Africa. Below 1000 m, the best locations are the southern tip of South America, the coasts along the northern Pacific and Atlantic oceans, the central-eastern coast of Africa, and the north-eastern coast of South America. Because jet streams vary locally and seasonally, however, the high-altitude wind power resource is less steady than needed for baseload power. However, dynamically reaching the height with the highest winds, increasing the area covered with high-altitude devices, and using batteries for storage can effectively reduce intermittency. When high-altitude wind power devices are distributed uniformly throughout the entire atmosphere, numerical simulations show negligible effects on the global climate for low densities, but surface cooling, decreased precipitation, and greater sea ice cover for high densities.

  13. Solar Forecasting Challenges and Opportunities for Enabling High Penetration of Solar Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, S.

    2015-12-01

    In 2011, DOE launched the SunShot Initiative to reduce the total cost of solar energy systems by about 75% to make them cost competitive with other forms of energy (without subsidies) by 2020. This translates to a total cost of installed solar energy at 1/Watt or 0.06/kWh, incentivizing high penetration of solar on the utility grid. In the past four years, the SunShot Initiative has catalyzed revolutionary advancements in solar technologies, stimulating significant growth and accelerating deployment of solar energy systems. However, as solar deployment increases, integrating solar energy into the utility grid poses difficult challenges due to the variability in solar resource and the impact of clouds and aerosols on surface irradiance. Accurate forecasting of solar resource and its variability at high temporal and spatial resolution at least a day ahead is crucial to large scale integration of solar energy into the utility grid. However, this is limited by current errors in forecasting that are as high as 25% for clear sky forecasts of Global Horizontal Irradiance (GHI), and as large as 40-80% for cloudy conditions. Forecasting errors are even higher for the direct normal irradiance (DNI). For solar energy to be seamlessly integrated into the utility grid under the scenarios of high penetration of solar, significant improvements in surface solar irradiance modeling and observations of both Global Horizontal Irradiance (GHI) and Direct Normal Irradiance (DNI) are essential to accurately predict power outputs from photovoltaic (PV) and concentrating solar power (CSP) systems. Furthermore, forecasting improvements have to be closely tied to utility needs and operation timelines. Details about the ongoing research efforts supported through the SunShot initiative and the challenges and needs for solar forecasting improvements in regards to the SunShot Initiative will be presented at the conference.

  14. Validation of solar wind high-speed stream predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiss, Martin; Temmer, Manuela; Veronig, Astrid; Nikolic, Ljubomir; Schöngassner, Florian; Vennerstrøm, Susanne

    2016-04-01

    Solar wind high-speed streams emanating from coronal holes are frequently impinging on the Earth's magnetosphere causing recurrent, medium-level geomagnetic storm activity. As major contributors to space weather disturbances at times of low solar activity, prediction models of solar wind high-speed streams are becoming highly desirable. We present a verification analysis of two operational solar wind prediction models (empirical model, Wang-Sheeley-Arge like model) by comparing the model runs for the period 2011 to 2014 with in-situ plasma measurements from the ACE spacecraft located at 1 AU. We find that both prediction models achieve a similar accuracy but demonstrate the tendency to under-predict and over-predict events of solar wind high-speed streams, respectively. General advantages and disadvantages of both models are diagnosed and outlined.

  15. Eastern Wind Integration and Transmission Study: Executive Summary and Project Overview

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluates the future operational and integration impacts of three different 20 percent wind energy penetration scenarios and one 30 percent wind penetration scenario, including a high-level analysis of transmission to deliver the wind energy to load centers, in the study year 2024.

  16. Improving NWS wind forecasts across high mountain ridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myrick, D. T.; Rasch, W.

    2011-12-01

    The National Weather Service (NWS) creates grid-based forecasts of 10-meter sustained wind speed and direction. The first guess for such forecasts is based on downscaled numerical weather prediction guidance. The downscaling techniques employed often produce first guess fields that contain a slow speed bias across high peaks and ridges. This poster describes an effort to provide NWS forecasters with a better first guess grid for wind speed across the Sierra Nevada in the western United States. The improved first guess grids incorporate wind speed data from model levels above the surface which are often more representative of the conditions observed on exposed mountain ridges. Verification statistics and event case studies will be shown to demonstrate how the modified wind guidance has improved the accuracy and collaboration of NWS wind forecasts across the Sierra Nevada.

  17. CONDITIONED ANALYSIS OF HIGH-LATITUDE SOLAR WIND INTERMITTENCY

    SciTech Connect

    D'Amicis, R.; Consolini, G.; Bavassano, B.; Bruno, R.

    2012-08-10

    The solar wind is a turbulent medium displaying intermittency. Its intermittent features have been widely documented and studied, showing how the intermittent character is different in fast and slow wind. In this paper, a statistical conditioned analysis of the solar wind intermittency for a period of high-latitude fast solar wind is presented. In particular, the intermittent features are investigated as a function of the Alfvenic degree of fluctuations at a given scale. The results show that the main contribution to solar wind intermittency is due to non-Alfvenic structures, while Alfvenic increments are found to be characterized by a smaller level of intermittency than the previous ones. Furthermore, the lifetime statistics of Alfvenic periods are discussed in terms of a multiscale texture of randomly oriented flux tubes.

  18. Use of high-resolution ground-penetrating radar in kimberlite delineation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kruger, J.M.; Martinez, A.; Berendsen, P.

    1997-01-01

    High-resolution ground-penetrating radar (GPR) was used to image the near-surface extent of two exposed Late Cretaceous kimberlites intruded into lower Permian limestone and dolomite host rocks in northeast Kansas. Six parallel GPR profiles identify the margin of the Randolph 1 kimberlite by the up-bending and termination of limestone reflectors. Five radially-intersecting GPR profiles identify the elliptical margin of the Randolph 2 kimberlite by the termination of dolomite reflectors near or below the kimberlite's mushroom-shaped cap. These results suggest GPR may augment magnetic methods for the delineation of kimberlites or other forceful intrusions in a layered host rock where thick, conductive soil or shale is not present at the surface.

  19. Image reconstruction enables high resolution imaging at large penetration depths in fluorescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dilipkumar, Shilpa; Montalescot, Sandra; Mondal, Partha Pratim

    2013-10-01

    Imaging thick specimen at a large penetration depth is a challenge in biophysics and material science. Refractive index mismatch results in spherical aberration that is responsible for streaking artifacts, while Poissonian nature of photon emission and scattering introduces noise in the acquired three-dimensional image. To overcome these unwanted artifacts, we introduced a two-fold approach: first, point-spread function modeling with correction for spherical aberration and second, employing maximum-likelihood reconstruction technique to eliminate noise. Experimental results on fluorescent nano-beads and fluorescently coated yeast cells (encaged in Agarose gel) shows substantial minimization of artifacts. The noise is substantially suppressed, whereas the side-lobes (generated by streaking effect) drops by 48.6% as compared to raw data at a depth of 150 μm. Proposed imaging technique can be integrated to sophisticated fluorescence imaging techniques for rendering high resolution beyond 150 μm mark.

  20. NREL/SCE High Penetration PV Integration Project: FY13 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Mather, B. A.; Shah, S.; Norris, B. L.; Dise, J. H.; Yu, L.; Paradis, D.; Katiraei, F.; Seguin, R.; Costyk, D.; Woyak, J.; Jung, J.; Russell, K.; Broadwater, R.

    2014-06-01

    In 2010, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Southern California Edison (SCE), Quanta Technology, Satcon Technology Corporation, Electrical Distribution Design (EDD), and Clean Power Research (CPR) teamed to analyze the impacts of high penetration levels of photovoltaic (PV) systems interconnected onto the SCE distribution system. This project was designed specifically to benefit from the experience that SCE and the project team would gain during the installation of 500 megawatts (MW) of utility-scale PV systems (with 1-5 MW typical ratings) starting in 2010 and completing in 2015 within SCE's service territory through a program approved by the California Public Utility Commission (CPUC). This report provides the findings of the research completed under the project to date.

  1. The Wind Integration National Dataset (WIND) toolkit (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Caroline Draxl: NREL

    2014-01-01

    Regional wind integration studies require detailed wind power output data at many locations to perform simulations of how the power system will operate under high penetration scenarios. The wind datasets that serve as inputs into the study must realistically reflect the ramping characteristics, spatial and temporal correlations, and capacity factors of the simulated wind plants, as well as being time synchronized with available load profiles.As described in this presentation, the WIND Toolkit fulfills these requirements by providing a state-of-the-art national (US) wind resource, power production and forecast dataset.

  2. Mobile, high-wind, balloon-launching apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rust, W. David; Marshall, Thomas C.

    1989-01-01

    In order to place instruments for measuring meteorological and electrical parameters into thunderstorms, an inexpensive apparatus has been developed which makes it possible to inflate, transport, and launch balloons in high winds. The launching apparatus is a cylinder of bubble plastic that is made by joining the sides of the cylinder together with a velcro rip strip. A balloon is launched by pulling the rip strip rapidly. This allows the balloon to pop upward into the ambient low-level wind and carry its instrumentation aloft. Different-sized launch tubes are constructed to accommodate particular sizes of balloons. Balloons have been launched in winds of about 20 m/s.

  3. Stellar winds in supergiant High Mass X-ray Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manousakis, Antonios; Walter, Roland

    2013-06-01

    Supergiant High Mass X-ray Binary systems (sgHMXBs) consist of a massive, late type, star and a neutron star. The massive stars exhibit strong, radiatively driven, stellar winds. Wind accretion onto compact object triggers X-ray emission, which alters the stellar wind significantly. Hydrodynamic simulation has been used to study the neutron star - stellar wind interaction it two sgHMXBs: i) A heavily obscured sgHMXB (IGR J17252-3616) discovered by INTEGRAL. To account for observable quantities (i.e., absorbing column density) we have to assume a very slow wind terminal velocity of about 500 km/s and a rather massive neutron star. If confirmed in other obscured systems, this could provide a completely new stellar wind diagnostics. ii) A classical sgHMXB (Vela X-1) has been studied in depth to understand the origin of the off-states observed in this system. Among many models used to account for this observed behavior (clumpy wind, gating mechanism) we propose that self-organized criticality of the accretion stream is the likely reason for the observed behavior.

  4. The cryogenic wind tunnel for high Reynolds number testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kilgore, R. A.; Dress, D. A.

    1982-01-01

    The development of cryogenic wind tunnels is reviewed with reference to the theory and advantages of cryogenic tunnels, problems common to wind tunnels and their solution, and application of cryogenic wind tunnels to high Reynolds number testing. It is shown that cryogenic wind tunnels can achieve full-scale Reynolds number with reasonable tunnel size, dynamic pressure, and drive power; the use of such tunnels also makes it possible to separate the effects of Reynolds number, Mach number, and aeroelasticity. Application of the cryogenic tunnel concept is illustrated by three examples, namely an atmospheric low-speed cryogenic tunnel, a 0.3-meter transonic cryogenic tunnel, and the National Transonic Facility now nearing completion.

  5. Edge technique Doppler lidar wind measurements with high vertical resolution.

    PubMed

    Korb, C L; Gentry, B M; Li, S X

    1997-08-20

    We have developed a Doppler lidar system using the edge technique and have made atmospheric lidar wind measurements. Line-of-sight wind profiles with a vertical resolution of 22 m have a standard deviation of 0.40 m /s for a ten-shot average. Day and night lidar measurements of the vector wind have been made for altitudes from 200 to 2000 m. We validated the lidar measurements by comparing them with independent rawinsonde and pilot balloon measurements of wind speed and direction. Good agreement was obtained. The instrumental noise for these data is 0.11 m /s for a 500-shot average, which is in good agreement with the observed minimum value of the standard deviation for the atmospheric measurements. The average standard deviation over 30 mins varied from 1.16 to 0.25 m /s for day and night, respectively. High spatial and temporal resolution lidar profiles of line-of-sight winds clearly show wind shear and turbulent features at the 1 -2-m /s level with a high signal-to-noise ratio and demonstrate the potential of the edge-technique lidar for studying turbulent processes and atmospheric dynamics.

  6. Characteristics of rain penetration through a gravity ventilator used for natural ventilation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Taehyeung; Lee, Dong Ho; Ahn, Kwangseog; Ha, Hyunchul; Park, Heechang; Piao, Cheng Xu; Li, Xiaoyu; Seo, Jeoungyoon

    2008-01-01

    Gravity ventilators rely simply on air buoyancy to extract air and are widely used to exhaust air contaminants and heat from workplaces using minimal energy. They are designed to maximize the exhaust flow rate, but the rain penetration sometimes causes malfunctioning. In this study, the characteristics of rain penetration through a ventilator were examined as a preliminary study to develop a ventilator with the maximum exhaust capacity while minimizing rain penetration. A model ventilator was built and exposed to artificial rain and wind. The paths, intensities and amounts of penetration through the ventilator were observed and measured in qualitative and quantitative fashions. In the first phase, the pathways and intensities of rain penetration were visually observed. In the second phase, the amounts of rain penetration were quantitatively measured under the different configurations of ventilator components that were installed based on the information obtained in the first-phase experiment. The effects of wind speed, grill direction, rain drainage width, outer wall height, neck height and leaning angle of the outer wall from the vertical position were analyzed. Wind speed significantly affected rain penetration. Under the low crosswind conditions, the rain penetration intensities were under the limit of detection. Under the high crosswind conditions, grill direction and neck height were the most significant factors in reducing rain penetration. The installation of rain drainage was also important in reducing rain penetration. The experimental results suggest that, with proper configurations of its components, a gravity ventilator can be used for natural ventilation without significant rain penetration problems.

  7. Design of High Resolution Soft X-Ray Microcalorimeters Using Magnetic Penetration Thermometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Busch. Sarah; Balvin, Manuel; Bandler, Simon; Denis, Kevin; Finkbeiner, Fred; Porst, Jan-Patrick; Sadlier, Jack; Smith, Stephen; Stevenson, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    We have designed high-resolution soft x-ray microcalorimeters using magnetic penetration thermometers (MPTs) in an array of pixels covering a total of 2 square centimeters to have a resolving power of 300 at energies around 300 eV. This performance is desirable for studying the soft x-ray background from the warm hot intergalactic medium. MPT devices have small sensor heat capacity and high responsivities, which makes them excellent detector technology for attempting to attain sub-eV resolution. We are investigating the feasibility of pixels with absorbers that are 625 x 625 square micrometers, up to 1 x 1 square millimeters in area and 0.35 micrometer thick and thinner. Our tests have shown that suspended gold absorbers 0.35 micrometers thick (RRR = 6.7) are feasible to fabricate. We modeled the thermal diffusion from such thin gold over the size of a 625 x 625 square micrometer absorber, and conclude that the effect of the thermalization on the resolution of a 300 eV photon is an additional approximately 0.2 eV FWHM of broadening. We discuss the thermal effects of small absorber attachment sterns on solid substrate, as well as considerations for multiplexed readout. We will present the progress we have made towards building and testing this soft x-ray detector.

  8. Energy storage requirements of dc microgrids with high penetration renewables under droop control

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Weaver, Wayne W.; Robinett, Rush D.; Parker, Gordon G.; Wilson, David G.

    2015-01-09

    Energy storage is a important design component in microgrids with high penetration renewable sources to maintain the system because of the highly variable and sometimes stochastic nature of the sources. Storage devices can be distributed close to the sources and/or at the microgrid bus. In addition, storage requirements can be minimized with a centralized control architecture, but this creates a single point of failure. Distributed droop control enables a completely decentralized architecture but, the energy storage optimization becomes more difficult. Our paper presents an approach to droop control that enables the local and bus storage requirements to be determined. Givenmore » a priori knowledge of the design structure of a microgrid and the basic cycles of the renewable sources, we found that the droop settings of the sources are such that they minimize both the bus voltage variations and overall energy storage capacity required in the system. This approach can be used in the design phase of a microgrid with a decentralized control structure to determine appropriate droop settings as well as the sizing of energy storage devices.« less

  9. Energy storage requirements of dc microgrids with high penetration renewables under droop control

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, Wayne W.; Robinett, Rush D.; Parker, Gordon G.; Wilson, David G.

    2015-01-09

    Energy storage is a important design component in microgrids with high penetration renewable sources to maintain the system because of the highly variable and sometimes stochastic nature of the sources. Storage devices can be distributed close to the sources and/or at the microgrid bus. In addition, storage requirements can be minimized with a centralized control architecture, but this creates a single point of failure. Distributed droop control enables a completely decentralized architecture but, the energy storage optimization becomes more difficult. Our paper presents an approach to droop control that enables the local and bus storage requirements to be determined. Given a priori knowledge of the design structure of a microgrid and the basic cycles of the renewable sources, we found that the droop settings of the sources are such that they minimize both the bus voltage variations and overall energy storage capacity required in the system. This approach can be used in the design phase of a microgrid with a decentralized control structure to determine appropriate droop settings as well as the sizing of energy storage devices.

  10. Melting Penetration Simulation of Fe-U System at High Temperature Using MPS_LER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mustari, A. P. A.; Yamaji, A.; Irwanto, Dwi

    2016-08-01

    Melting penetration information of Fe-U system is necessary for simulating the molten core behavior during severe accident in nuclear power plants. For Fe-U system, the information is mainly obtained from experiment, i.e. TREAT experiment. However, there is no reported data on SS304 at temperature above 1350°C. The MPS_LER has been developed and validated to simulate melting penetration on Fe-U system. The MPS_LER modelled the eutectic phenomenon by solving the diffusion process and by applying the binary phase diagram criteria. This study simulates the melting penetration of the system at higher temperature using MPS_LER. Simulations were conducted on SS304 at 1400, 1450 and 1500°C. The simulation results show rapid increase of melting penetration rate.

  11. Ulysses Composition, Plasma and Magnetic Field Observations of High Speed Solar wind Streams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, E. J.

    1997-01-01

    During 1992-3 as the Ulysses spacecraft passed in and out of the southern high speed solar wind stream, the Solar Wind Ion Spectrometer, SWICS made continuous composition and temperature measurements of all major solar wind ions.

  12. Laboratory Measurement of Enthalpy Flux in High Winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, D.; Haus, B. K.; Donelan, M. A.; Zhang, J.

    2006-12-01

    The intensity of tropical cyclones is sensitive to the rates at which enthalpy and momentum are transferred between sea and air in the high-wind core of the storm. Present models of the wind dependence of these transfer rates, does not allow for storms of greater than marginal hurricane intensity. Recent studies have shown that there is a saturation of the bulk drag coefficient in high winds, however more information on the enthalpy flux is required. In particular the role that sea spray plays in enhancing the enthalpy transfer at very high wind speeds is not known. The coefficients for sensible and latent heat transfer (Stanton and Dalton numbers) were measured in the 15-m wind-wave facility at the University of Miami's Air-Sea Interaction Saltwater Tank (ASIST). The wind speed (referred to 10m) was explored over a range of 0 to 45 m/s, covering a full range of aerodynamic conditions from smooth to fully rough. Experiments were designed with water temperatures set between 2 and 5° C above/below the air temperature, with precision thermistors (± 0.002° C) to monitor temperature and Li-Cor infra-red absorption devices to monitor specific humidity changes at upstream and downstream ends of the wave tank during the experiment. The calorimetric use of a wind-wave tank gave precise flux estimates, and experiments were repeated at different Bowen ratios to allow the separation of the heat and moisture parts of the transfer. The effect of spray on the moisture flux was reflected in the drop in temperature along the air path from upstream to downstream and this made it possible to estimate the total spray evaporated in the air column.

  13. Analysis of Carbon Policies for Electricity Networks with High Penetration of Green Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feijoo, Felipe A.

    In recent decades, climate change has become one of the most crucial challenges for humanity. Climate change has a direct correlation with global warming, caused mainly by the green house gas emissions (GHG). The Environmental Protection Agency in the U.S. (EPA) attributes carbon dioxide to account for approximately 82% of the GHG emissions. Unfortunately, the energy sector is the main producer of carbon dioxide, with China and the U.S. as the highest emitters. Therefore, there is a strong (positive) correlation between energy production, global warming, and climate change. Stringent carbon emissions reduction targets have been established in order to reduce the impacts of GHG. Achieving these emissions reduction goals will require implementation of policies like as cap-and-trade and carbon taxes, together with transformation of the electricity grid into a smarter system with high green energy penetration. However, the consideration of policies solely in view of carbon emissions reduction may adversely impact other market outcomes such as electricity prices and consumption. In this dissertation, a two-layer mathematical-statistical framework is presented, that serves to develop carbon policies to reduce emissions level while minimizing the negative impacts on other market outcomes. The bottom layer of the two layer model comprises a bi-level optimization problem. The top layer comprises a statistical model and a Pareto analysis. Two related but different problems are studied under this methodology. The first problem looks into the design of cap-and-trade policies for deregulated electricity markets that satisfy the interest of different market constituents. Via the second problem, it is demonstrated how the framework can be used to obtain levels of carbon emissions reduction while minimizing the negative impact on electricity demand and maximizing green penetration from microgrids. In the aforementioned studies, forecasts for electricity prices and production cost

  14. A three-generation family with idiopathic facial palsy suggesting an autosomal dominant inheritance with high penetrance.

    PubMed

    Grønhøj Larsen, Christian; Gyldenløve, Mette; Jønch, Aia Elise; Charabi, Birgitte; Tümer, Zeynep

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic facial palsy (IFP), also known as Bell's palsy, is a common neurologic disorder, but recurrent and familial forms are rare. This case series presents a three-generation family with idiopathic facial palsy. The mode of inheritance of IFP has previously been suggested as autosomal dominant with low or variable penetrance, but the present family indicates an autosomal dominant trait with high or complete penetrance. Chromosome microarray studies did not reveal a pathogenic copy number variation, which could enable identification of a candidate gene.

  15. Subsurface Feature Mapping of Mars using a High Resolution Ground Penetrating Radar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, T. S.; Persaud, D. M.; Preudhomme, M. A.; Jurg, M.; Smith, M. K.; Buckley, H.; Tarnas, J.; Chalumeau, C.; Lombard-Poirot, N.; Mann, B.

    2015-12-01

    As the closest Earth-like, potentially life-sustaining planet in the solar system, Mars' future of human exploration is more a question of timing than possibility. The Martian surface remains hostile, but its subsurface geology holds promise for present or ancient astrobiology and future habitation, specifically lava tube (pyroduct) systems, whose presence has been confirmed by HiRISE imagery.The location and characterization of these systems could provide a basis for understanding the evolution of the red planet and long-term shelters for future manned missions on Mars. To detect and analyze the subsurface geology of terrestrial bodies from orbit, a novel compact (smallsat-scale) and cost-effective approach called the High-resolution Orbiter for Mapping gEology by Radar (HOMER) has been proposed. Adapting interferometry techniques with synthetic aperture radar (SAR) to a ground penetrating radar system, a small satellite constellation is able to achieve a theoretical resolution of 50m from low-Mars orbit (LMO). Alongside this initial prototype design of HOMER, proposed data processing methodology and software and a Mars mission design are presented. This project was developed as part of the 2015 NASA Ames Academy for Space Exploration.

  16. Distributed control of reactive power flow in a radial distribution circuit with high photovoltaic penetration

    SciTech Connect

    Chertkov, Michael; Turitsyn, Konstantin; Backhaus, Scott; Sule, Petr

    2009-01-01

    We show how distributed control of reactive power can serve to regulate voltage and minimize resistive losses in a distribution circuit that includes a significant level of photovoltaic (PV) generation. To demonstrate the technique, we consider a radial distribution circuit with a single branch consisting of sequentially-arranged residential-scale loads that consume both real and reactive power. In parallel, some loads also have PV generation capability. We postulate that the inverters associated with each PV system are also capable of limited reactive power generation or consumption, and we seek to find the optimal dispatch of each inverter's reactive power to both maintain the voltage within an acceptable range and minimize the resistive losses over the entire circuit. We assume the complex impedance of the distribution circuit links and the instantaneous load and PV generation at each load are known. We compare the results of the optimal dispatch with a suboptimal local scheme that does not require any communication. On our model distribution circuit, we illustrate the feasibility of high levels of PV penetration and a significant (20% or higher) reduction in losses.

  17. NREL/SCE High-Penetration PV Integration Project: Report on Field Demonstration of Advanced Inverter Functionality in Fontana, CA

    SciTech Connect

    Mather, B.

    2014-08-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory/Southern California Edison High-Penetration PV Integration Project is (1) researching the distribution system level impacts of high-penetration photovoltaic (PV) integration, (2) determining mitigation methods to reduce or eliminate those impacts, and (3) seeking to demonstrate these mitigation methods on actual high-penetration PV distribution circuits. This report describes a field demonstration completed during the fall of 2013 on the Fontana, California, study circuit, which includes a total of 4.5 MW of interconnected utility-scale rooftop PV systems. The demonstration included operating a 2-MW PV system at an off-unity power factor that had been determined during previously completed distribution system modeling and PV impact assessment analyses. Data on the distribution circuit and PV system operations were collected during the 2-week demonstration period. This demonstration reinforces the findings of previous laboratory testing that showed that utility-scale PV inverters are capable of operating at off-unity power factor to mitigate PV impacts; however, because of difficulties setting and retaining PV inverter power factor set points during the field demonstration, it was not possible to demonstrate the effectiveness of off-unity power factor operation to mitigate the voltage impacts of high-penetration PV integration. Lessons learned from this field demonstration are presented to inform future field demonstration efforts.

  18. In vitro evaluation of the cutaneous penetration of sprayable sunscreen emulsions with high concentrations of UV filters.

    PubMed

    Durand, L; Habran, N; Henschel, V; Amighi, K

    2009-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the possible penetration through human skin of organic and inorganic filters contained in sunscreen emulsions packaged in aerosol cans, using an in vitro method. Experiments were carried out on two different types of emulsion: W/Si and W/O. This study was conducted using static diffusion cells (Franz cells). The determination of organic UV filters [Methylene Bis Benzotriazolyl Tetramethylbutylphenol (MBBT); Bis-Ethylhexyloxyphenol Methoxyphenyl Triazine (BEMT); Diethylamino Hydroxybenzoyl Hexyl Benzoate (DHHB); Ethylhexyl Methoxycinnamate (EMC); and 2-Ethylhexyl Dimethyl PABA (ED-PABA)] was performed by High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC). Therefore, it was important to develop a single analytical method for the quantification of the five organic filters with the aim of facilitating the experiment. The determination of inorganic filters [titanium dioxide (TiO(2)) and zinc oxide (ZnO)] was performed using an emission spectrometric analysis method (ICP-OES). The HPLC and ICP-OES methods were validated. After a penetration test of 24 h duration, the results showed very low penetration only for two of the organic filters (maximum penetration of 1.21 microg cm(-2) h(-1) for EMC and 0.14 microg cm(-2) h(-1) for MBBT) and no penetration for the inorganic filters. Moreover, more than 50% of each sunscreen agent stayed on the surface on the skin. These results are consistent with those in the literature that presents similar experiments. This study showed that the sprayable sunscreen products developed, which contained high concentrations of UV filters, presented a low level of skin penetration.

  19. Ulysses solar wind plasma observations at high southerly latitudes.

    PubMed

    Phillips, J L; Bame, S J; Feldman, W C; Gosling, J T; Hammond, C M; McComas, D J; Goldstein, B E; Neugebauer, M; Scime, E E; Suess, S T

    1995-05-19

    Solar wind plasma observations made by the Ulysses spacecraft through -80.2 degrees solar latitude and continuing equatorward to -40.1 degrees are summarized. Recurrent high-speed streams and corotating interaction regions dominated at middle latitudes. The speed of the solar wind was typically 700 to 800 kilometers per second poleward of -35 degrees . Corotating reverse shocks persisted farther south than did forward shocks because of the tilt of the heliomagnetic streamer belt. Sporadic coronal mass ejections were seen as far south as -60.5 degrees . Proton temperature was higher and the electron strahl was broader at higher latitudes. The high-latitude wind contained compressional, pressure-balanced, and Alfvénic structures.

  20. High amplitude waves in the expanding solar wind plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, J. M.; Velli, M.; Grappin, R.

    1995-01-01

    We simulated the 1-D nonlinear time-evolution of high-amplitude Alfven, slow and fast magnetoacoustic waves in the solar wind propagating outward at different angles to the mean magnetic (spiral) field, using the expanding box model. The simulation results for Alfven waves and fast magnetoacustic waves fit the observational constraints in the solar wind best, showing decreasing trends for energies and other rms-quantities due to expansion and the appearance of inward propagating waves as minor species in the wind. Inward propagating waves are generated by reflection of Alfven waves propagating at large angles to the magnetic field or they coincide with the occurrence of compressible fluctuations. In our simulations, fast and slow magnetoacoustic waves seem to have a level in the density-fluctuations which is too high when we compare with the observations. Furthermore, the evolution of energies for slow magnetoacoustic waves differs strongly from the evolution of fluctuation energies in situ.

  1. Coronal Holes and Solar Wind High-Speed Streams: I. Forecasting the Solar Wind Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vršnak, Bojan; Temmer, Manuela; Veronig, Astrid M.

    2007-02-01

    We analyze the relationship between the coronal hole (CH) area/position and physical characteristics of the associated corotating high-speed stream (HSS) in the solar wind at 1 AU. For the analysis we utilize the data in the period DOY 25 125 of 2005, characterized by a very low coronal mass ejection (CME) activity. Distinct correlations between the daily averaged CH parameters and the solar wind characteristics are found, which allows us to forecast the solar wind velocity v, proton temperature T, proton density n, and magnetic field strength B, several days in advance in periods of low CME activity. The forecast is based on monitoring fractional areas A, covered by CHs in the meridional slices embracing the central meridian distance ranges [-40°,-20°], [-10°,10°], and [20°,40°]. On average, the peaks in the daily values of n, B, T, and v appear delayed by 1, 2, 3, and 4 days, respectively, after the area A attains its maximum in the central-meridian slice. The peak values of the solar wind parameters are correlated to the peak values of A, which provides also forecasting of the peak values of n, B, T, and v. The most accurate prediction can be obtained for the solar wind velocity, for which the average relative difference between the calculated and the observed peak values amounts to overline{\\vertδ\\vert}≈10 %. The forecast reliability is somewhat lower in the case of T, B, and n ( overline{\\vertδ\\vert}≈20 , 30, and 40%, respectively). The space weather implications are discussed, including the perspectives for advancing the real-time calculation of the Sun Earth transit times of coronal mass ejections and interplanetary shocks, by including more realistic real-time estimates of the solar wind characteristics.

  2. Ulysses solar wind plasma observations at high latitudes

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, P.; Bame, S.J.; Barraclough, B.L.

    1996-10-01

    Ulysses reached its peak northerly heliolatitude of 80.2{degrees}N on July 31, 1995, and now is moving towards aphelion at 5.41 AU which it will reach in May, 1998. We summarize measurements from the solar wind plasma experiment, SWOOPS, emphasizing northern hemispheric observations but also providing southern and equatorial results for comparison. The solar wind momentum flux during Ulysses` fast pole-to- pole transit at solar minimum was significantly higher over the poles than at near-equatorial latitudes, suggesting a non-circular cross section for the heliosphere. Furthermore, modest asymmetries in the wind speed, density, and mass flux were observed between the two hemispheres during the fast latitude scan. The solar wind was faster and less dense in the north than in the south. These asymmetries persist in the most recent high- and mid-latitude data but are less pronounced. As of July 1, 1996 the northern fast solar wind has lacked any strong stream interactions or shocks and, although a comprehensive search has not yet been made, no CMEs have yet been identified during this interval. On the other hand, Alfv{acute e}nic, compressional, and pressure balanced features are abundant at high latitudes. The most recent data, at 4 AU and 32{degrees}N, has begun to show the effects of solar rotation modulated features in the form of recurrent compressed regions.

  3. A highly tumor-targeted nanoparticle of podophyllotoxin penetrated tumor core and regressed multidrug resistant tumors

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Aniruddha; Ernsting, Mark J.; Undzys, Elijus; Li, Shyh-Dar

    2015-01-01

    Podophyllotoxin (PPT) exhibited significant activity against P-glycoprotein mediated multidrug resistant (MDR) tumor cell lines; however, due to its poor solubility and high toxicity, PPT cannot be dosed systemically, preventing its clinical use for MDR cancer. We developed a nanoparticle dosage form of PPT by covalently conjugating PPT and polyethylene glycol (PEG) with acetylated carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC-Ac) using one-pot esterification chemistry. The polymer conjugates self-assembled into nanoparticles (NPs) of variable sizes (20–120 nm) depending on the PPT-to-PEG molar ratio (2–20). The conjugate with a low PPT/PEG molar ratio of 2 yielded NPs with a mean diameter of 20 nm and released PPT at ~5%/day in serum, while conjugates with increased PPT/PEG ratios (5 and 20) produced bigger particles (30 nm and 120 nm respectively) that displayed slower drug release (~2.5%/day and ~1%/day respectively). The 20 nm particles exhibited 2- to 5-fold enhanced cell killing potency and 5- to 20-fold increased tumor delivery compared to the larger NPs. The biodistribution of the 20 nm PPT-NPs was highly selective to the tumor with 8-fold higher accumulation than all other examined tissues, while the larger PPT-NPs (30 and 100 nm) exhibited increased liver uptake. Within the tumor, >90% of the 20 nm PPT-NPs penetrated to the hypovascular core, while the larger particles were largely restricted in the hypervascular periphery. The 20 nm PPT-NPs displayed significantly improved efficacy against MDR tumors in mice compared to the larger PPT-NPs, native PPT and the standard taxane chemotherapies, with minimal toxicity. PMID:25818440

  4. Groundwater penetrating radar and high resolution seismic for locating shallow faults in unconsolidated sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Wyatt, D.E. |; Waddell, M.G.; Sexton, B.G.

    1993-12-31

    Faults in shallow, unconsolidated sediments, particularly in coastal plain settings, are very difficult to discern during subsurface exploration yet have critical impact to groundwater flow, contaminant transport and geotechnical evaluations. This paper presents a case study using cross-over geophysical technologies in an area where shallow faulting is probable and known contamination exists. A comparison is made between Wenner and dipole-dipole resistivity data, ground penetrating radar, and high resolution seismic data. Data from these methods were verified with a cone penetrometer investigation for subsurface lithology and compared to existing monitoring well data. Interpretations from these techniques are compared with actual and theoretical shallow faulting found in the literature. The results of this study suggests that (1) the CPT study, combined with the monitoring well data may suggest that discontinuities in correlatable zones may indicate that faulting is present (2) the addition of the Wenner and dipole-dipole data may further suggest that offset zones exist in the shallow subsurface but not allow specific fault planes or fault stranding to be mapped (3) the high resolution seismic data will image faults to within a few feet of the surface but does not have the resolution to identify the faulting on the scale of our models, however it will suggest locations for upward continuation of faulted zones (4) offset 100 MHz and 200 MHz CMP GPR will image zones and features that may be fault planes and strands similar to our models (5) 300 MHz GPR will image higher resolution features that may suggest the presence of deeper faults and strands, and (6) the combination of all of the tools in this study, particularly the GPR and seismic may allow for the mapping of small scale, shallow faulting in unconsolidated sediments.

  5. Microspheres for laser velocimetry in high temperature wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghorieshi, Anthony

    1993-01-01

    The introduction of non-intrusive measurement techniques in wind tunnel experimentation has been a turning point in error free data acquisition. Laser velocimetry has been progressively implemented and utilized in various wind tunnels; e.g. subsonic, transonic, and supersonic. The success of the laser velocimeter technique is based on an accurate measurement of scattered light by seeding particles introduced into the flow stream in the wind tunnel. Therefore, application of appropriate seeding particles will affect, to a large extent the acquired data. The seeding material used depends on the type of experiment being run. Among the seeding material for subsonic tunnel are kerosene, Kaolin, and polystyrene. Polystyrene is known to be the best because of being solid particles, having high index of refraction, capable of being made both spherical and monodisperse. However for high temperature wind tunnel testing seeding material must have an additional characteristic that is high melting point. Typically metal oxide powders such as Al2O3 with melting point 3660 F are used. The metal oxides are, however polydispersed, have a high density, and a tendency to form large agglomerate that does not closely follow the flow velocity. The addition of flame phase silica to metal oxide helps to break up the agglomerates, yet still results in a narrow band of polydispersed seeding. The less desirable utility of metal oxide in high temperature wind tunnels necessitates the search for a better alternative particle seeding which this paper addresses. The Laser Velocimetry (LV) characteristic of polystyrene makes it a prime candidate as a base material in achieving the high temperature particle seeding inexpensively. While polystyrene monodisperse seeding particle reported has been successful in a subsonic wind tunnel, it lacks the high melting point and thus is not practically usable in a high temperature wind tunnel. It is well known that rise in melting point of polystyrene can be

  6. High-Resolution Simulations of Gas-Solids Jet Penetration Into a High Density Riser Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Tingwen

    2011-05-01

    High-resolution simulations of a gas-solids jet in a 0.3 m diameter and 15.9 m tall circulating fluidized bed (CFB) riser were conducted with the open source software-MFIX. In the numerical simulations, both gas and solids injected through a 1.6 cm diameter radial-directed tube 4.3 m above the bottom distributor were tracked as tracers, which enable the analysis of the characteristics of a two-phase jet. Two jetting gas velocities of 16.6 and 37.2 m/s were studied with the other operating conditions fixed. Reasonable flow hydrodynamics with respect to overall pressure drop, voidage, and solids velocity distributions were predicted. Due to the different dynamic responses of gas and particles to the crossflow, a significant separation of gas and solids within the jet region was predicted for both cases. In addition, the jet characteristics based on tracer concentration and tracer mass fraction profiles at different downstream levels are discussed. Overall, the numerical predictions compare favorably to the experimental measurements made at NETL.

  7. High-Energy 2-Micrometers Doppler Lidar for Wind Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, Grady J.; Beyon, Jeffrey Y.; Barnes, Bruce W.; Petros, Mulugeta; Yu, Jirong; Amzajerdian, Farzin; Kavaya, Michael J.; Singh, Upendra N.

    2006-01-01

    High-energy 2-micrometer wavelength lasers have been incorporated in a prototype coherent Doppler lidar to test component technologies and explore applications for remote sensing of the atmosphere. Design of the lidar is presented including aspects in the laser transmitter, receiver, photodetector, and signal processing. Calibration tests and sample atmospheric data are presented on wind and aerosol profiling.

  8. Drag Corrections in High-Speed Wind Tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ludwieg, H.

    1947-01-01

    In the vicinity of a body in a wind tunnel the displacement effect of the wake, due to the finite dimensions of the stream, produces a pressure gradient which evokes a change of drag. In incompressible flow this change of drag is so small, in general, that one does not have to take it into account in wind-tunnel measurements; however, in compressible flow it beoomes considerably larger, so that a correction factor is necessary for measured values. Correction factors for a closed tunnel and an open jet with circular cross sections are calculated and compared with the drag - corrections already bown for high-speed tunnnels.

  9. High-resolution magnetic penetration depth and inhomogeneities in locally noncentrosymmetric SrPtAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landaeta, J. F.; Taylor, S. V.; Bonalde, I.; Rojas, C.; Nishikubo, Y.; Kudo, K.; Nohara, M.

    2016-02-01

    We present a magnetic-penetration-depth study on polycrystalline and granular samples of SrPtAs, a pnictide superconductor with a hexagonal structure containing PtAs layers that individually break inversion symmetry (local noncentrosymmetry). Compact samples show a clear-cut s -wave-type BCS behavior, which we consider to be the intrinsic penetration depth of SrPtAs. Granular samples display a sample-dependent second diamagnetic drop, attributed to the intergrain coupling. Our experimental results point to a nodeless isotropic superconducting energy gap in SrPtAs, which puts strong constraints on the driven mechanism for superconductivity and the order parameter symmetry of this compound.

  10. Stability analyses of the mass abrasive projectile high-speed penetrating into concrete target. Part II: Structural stability analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Hao; Chen, Xiao-Wei; Fang, Qin; He, Li-Lin

    2014-12-01

    The initial oblique and attacking angles as well as the asymmetrical nose abrasion may lead to bending or even fracture of a projectile, and the penetration efficiency decreases distinctly. The structural stability of a high-speed projectile non-normally penetrating into concrete and the parametric influences involved are analyzed with the mass abrasion taken into account. By considering the symmetrical or asymmetrical nose abrasion as well as the initial oblique and attacking angles, both the axial and the transverse drag forces acting on the projectile are derived. Based on the ideal elastic-plastic yield criterion, an approach is proposed for predicting the limit striking velocity (LSV) that is the highest velocity at which no yielding failure has occurred and the projectile can still maintain its integral structural stability. Furthermore, some particular penetration scenarios are separately discussed in detail. Based on the engineering model for the mass loss and nose-blunting of ogive-nose projectiles established in Part I of this study, the above approach is validated by several high-speed penetration tests. The analysis on parametric influences indicates that the LSV is reduced with an increase in the asymmetrical nose abrasion, the length-diameter-ratio, and the concrete strength, as well as the oblique and attacking angles. Also, the LSV raises with an increase in the initial caliber-radius-head (CRH) and the dimensionless cartridge thickness of a projectile.

  11. A laboratory study of spray generation in high winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz-Suslow, D. G.; Haus, B. K.; Mehta, S.; Laxague, N. J. M.

    2016-05-01

    Characterizing the vertical distribution of large spray particles (i.e., spume) in high wind conditions is necessary for better understanding of the development of the atmospheric boundary layer in extreme conditions. To this end a laboratory experiment was designed to observe the droplet concentration in the air above actively breaking waves. The experiments were carried out in hurricane force conditions (U 10 equivalent wind speed of 36 to 54 m/s) and using both fresh water and salt water. While small differences between fresh and salt water were observed in profiles of radius-integrated spray volume fraction, the profiles tend to converge as the wind forcing increases. This supports the assumption that the physical mechanism for spume production is not sensitive to salinity and its corresponding link to the bubble size distribution.

  12. Advancements in Wind Integration Study Data Modeling: The Wind Integration National Dataset (WIND) Toolkit; Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Draxl, C.; Hodge, B. M.; Orwig, K.; Jones, W.; Searight, K.; Getman, D.; Harrold, S.; McCaa, J.; Cline, J.; Clark, C.

    2013-10-01

    Regional wind integration studies in the United States require detailed wind power output data at many locations to perform simulations of how the power system will operate under high-penetration scenarios. The wind data sets that serve as inputs into the study must realistically reflect the ramping characteristics, spatial and temporal correlations, and capacity factors of the simulated wind plants, as well as be time synchronized with available load profiles. The Wind Integration National Dataset (WIND) Toolkit described in this paper fulfills these requirements. A wind resource dataset, wind power production time series, and simulated forecasts from a numerical weather prediction model run on a nationwide 2-km grid at 5-min resolution will be made publicly available for more than 110,000 onshore and offshore wind power production sites.

  13. Quasi-static time-series simulation using OpenDSS in IEEE distribution feeder model with high PV penetration and its impact on solar forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammed, Touseef Ahmed Faisal

    Since 2000, renewable electricity installations in the United States (excluding hydropower) have more than tripled. Renewable electricity has grown at a compounded annual average of nearly 14% per year from 2000-2010. Wind, Concentrated Solar Power (CSP) and solar Photo Voltaic (PV) are the fastest growing renewable energy sectors. In 2010 in the U.S., solar PV grew over 71% and CSP grew by 18% from the previous year. Globally renewable electricity installations have more than quadrupled from 2000-2010. Solar PV generation grew by a factor of more than 28 between 2000 and 2010. The amount of CSP and solar PV installations are increasing on the distribution grid. These PV installations transmit electrical current from the load centers to the generating stations. But the transmission and distribution grid have been designed for uni-directional flow of electrical energy from generating stations to load centers. This causes imbalances in voltage and switchgear of the electrical circuitry. With the continuous rise in PV installations, analysis of voltage profile and penetration levels remain an active area of research. Standard distributed photovoltaic (PV) generators represented in simulation studies do not reflect the exact location and variability properties such as distance between interconnection points to substations, voltage regulators, solar irradiance and other environmental factors. Quasi-Static simulations assist in peak load planning hour and day ahead as it gives a time sequence analysis to help in generation allocation. Simulation models can be daily, hourly or yearly depending on duty cycle and dynamics of the system. High penetration of PV into the power grid changes the voltage profile and power flow dynamically in the distribution circuits due to the inherent variability of PV. There are a number of modeling and simulations tools available for the study of such high penetration PV scenarios. This thesis will specifically utilize OpenDSS, a open source

  14. High-pressure-induced water penetration into 3-­isopropylmalate dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Nagae, Takayuki; Kawamura, Takashi; Chavas, Leonard M. G.; Niwa, Ken; Hasegawa, Masashi; Kato, Chiaki; Watanabe, Nobuhisa

    2012-01-01

    Hydrostatic pressure induces structural changes in proteins, including denaturation, the mechanism of which has been attributed to water penetration into the protein interior. In this study, structures of 3-isopropylmalate dehydrogenase (IPMDH) from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 were determined at about 2 Å resolution under pressures ranging from 0.1 to 650 MPa using a diamond anvil cell (DAC). Although most of the protein cavities are monotonically compressed as the pressure increases, the volume of one particular cavity at the dimer interface increases at pressures over 340 MPa. In parallel with this volume increase, water penetration into the cavity could be observed at pressures over 410 MPa. In addition, the generation of a new cleft on the molecular surface accompanied by water penetration could also be observed at pressures over 580 MPa. These water-penetration phenomena are considered to be initial steps in the pressure-denaturation process of IPMDH. PMID:22349232

  15. Western Wind and Solar Integration Study Phase 2 (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2013-09-01

    This is one-page, two-sided fact sheet presents high-level summary results of the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study Phase 2, which examined operational impacts of high penetrations of variable renewable generation in the West.

  16. Liquid Fuel Emulsion Jet-in-Crossflow Penetration and Dispersion Under High Pressure Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, Guillermo Andres

    The current work focuses on the jet-in-crossflow penetration and dispersion behavior of water-in-oil emulsions in a high pressure environment. Both fuel injection strategies of using a water-in-oil emulsion and a jet-in-crossflow have demonstrated unique benefits in improving gas turbine performance from an emissions and efficiency standpoint. A jet-in-crossflow is very practical for use in gas turbine engines, rocket propulsion, and aircraft engines since it utilizes already available crossflow air to atomize fuel. Injecting water into a combustion chamber in the form of a water-in-oil emulsion allows for pollutant emissions reduction while reducing efficiency loses that may result from using a separate water or steam injection circuit. Dispersion effects on oil droplets are expected, therefore investigating the distribution of both oil and water droplets in the crossflow is an objective in this work. Understanding the synchronization and injection behavior of the two strategies is of key interest due to their combined benefits. A water-to-oil ratio and an ambient pressure parameter are developed for emulsion jet-in-crossflow trajectories. To this end, a total of 24 emulsion jet-in-crossflow tests were performed with varying ambient pressures of 2-8 atm and momentum flux ratios of 50, 85, and 120. Sobel edge filtering was applied to each averaged image obtained from a high speed video of each test case. Averaged and filtered images were used to resolve top and bottom edges of the trajectory in addition to the overall peak intensity up to 40 mm downstream of the injection point. An optimized correlation was established and found to differ from literature based correlations obtained under atmospheric pressure conditions. Overall it was found that additional parameters were not necessary for the top edge and peak intensity correlations, but a need for a unique emulsion bottom edge and width trajectory correlation was recognized. In addition to investigating emulsion

  17. Large-scale, high-definition Ground Penetrating Radar prospection in archaeology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trinks, I.; Kucera, M.; Hinterleitner, A.; Löcker, K.; Nau, E.; Neubauer, W.; Zitz, T.

    2012-04-01

    The future demands on professional archaeological prospection will be its ability to cover large areas in a time and cost efficient manner with very high spatial resolution and accuracy. The objective of the 2010 in Vienna established Ludwig Boltzmann Institute for Archaeological Prospection and Virtual Archaeology (LBI ArchPro) in collaboration with its eight European partner organisations is the advancement of state-of-the-art archaeological sciences. The application and specific further development of remote sensing, geophysical prospection and virtual reality applications, as well as of novel integrated interpretation approaches dedicated to non-invasive spatial archaeology combining near-surface prospection methods with advanced computer science is crucial for modern archaeology. Within the institute's research programme different areas for distinct case studies in Austria, Germany, Norway, Sweden and the UK have been selected as basis for the development and testing of new concepts for efficient and universally applicable tools for spatial, non-invasive archaeology. In terms of geophysical prospection the investigation of entire archaeological landscapes for the exploration and protection of Europe's buried cultural heritage requires new measurement devices, which are fast, accurate and precise. Therefore the further development of motorized, multichannel survey systems and advanced navigation solutions is required. The use of motorized measurement devices for archaeological prospection implicates several technological and methodological challenges. Latest multichannel Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) arrays mounted in front off, or towed behind motorized survey vehicles permit large-scale GPR prospection surveys with unprecedented spatial resolution. In particular the motorized 16 channel 400 MHz MALÅ Imaging Radar Array (MIRA) used by the LBI ArchPro in combination with latest automatic data positioning and navigation solutions permits the reliable high

  18. Trans-scleral diode laser cyclophotocoagulation for refractory glaucoma after high-risk penetrating keratoplasty.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-García, Alejandro; González-González, Luis Alonso; Carlos Alvarez-Guzmán, J

    2016-06-01

    To analyze the intraocular pressure reduction, number of anti-glaucoma medications needed, and post-operative complications of trans-scleral diode laser cyclophotocoagulation (DCPC) in patients with high-risk penetrating keratoplasty (PKP) and secondary refractory glaucoma. Prospective interventional, longitudinal, non-comparative series of cases, including 16 eyes of 15 patient's post-PKP on maximal anti-glaucoma medical therapy with intraocular pressures above 22 mmHg. All patients received 18 shots, 360° peri-limbal (avoiding the long posterior ciliary nerves and arteries at 3 and 9 o'clock positions) of trans-scleral DCPC (2000 mW, time: 2.0 s/shot). There was a 55.5 % reduction (total of 14.0 mmHg) of the mean pre-operative IOP (31.5 mmHg) after the first diode laser application (p = 0.0020). Re-treatment was required in 31.2 % of eyes over a mean period of 10.7 months. In these five eyes, the mean pre-operative IOP was 40.4 mmHg, which decreased to 15.0 mmHg post-therapy, and a mean IOP reduction of 25.4 mmHg (p = 0.0218). There was a 51.0 % reduction in the mean number of medications used after the first, and a 57.1 % reduction after a second laser application. The incidence of failure (IOP ≥ 22 mmHg or need of additional medical therapy) from initial intervention to loss of follow-up was 1.3 % per person-month. DCPC effectively reduces the intraocular pressure and the number of anti-glaucoma medications with few complications in patients after high-risk PKP and secondary glaucoma. Only, one-third of the eyes needed a second intervention to control the intraocular pressure. Post-DCPC complications were limited to phthisis bulbi and endothelial dysfunction, one eye each. Please check and confirm the author names and initials are correct. Also, kindly confirm the details in the metadata are correct.

  19. Interconnection Assessment Methodology and Cost Benefit Analysis for High-Penetration PV Deployment in the Arizona Public Service System

    SciTech Connect

    Baggu, Murali; Giraldez, Julieta; Harris, Tom; Brunhart-Lupo, Nicholas; Lisell, Lars; Narang, David

    2015-06-14

    In an effort to better understand the impacts of high penetrations of photovoltaic (PV) generators on distribution systems, Arizona Public Service and its partners completed a multi-year project to develop the tools and knowledge base needed to safely and reliably integrate high penetrations of utility- and residential-scale PV. Building upon the APS Community Power Project-Flagstaff Pilot, this project investigates the impact of PV on a representative feeder in northeast Flagstaff. To quantify and catalog the effects of the estimated 1.3 MW of PV that will be installed on the feeder (both smaller units at homes and large, centrally located systems), high-speed weather and electrical data acquisition systems and digital 'smart' meters were designed and installed to facilitate monitoring and to build and validate comprehensive, high-resolution models of the distribution system. These models are being developed to analyze the impacts of PV on distribution circuit protection systems (including coordination and anti-islanding), predict voltage regulation and phase balance issues, and develop volt/VAr control schemes. This paper continues from a paper presented at the 2014 IEEE PVSC conference that described feeder model evaluation and high penetration advanced scenario analysis, specifically feeder reconfiguration. This paper presents results from Phase 5 of the project. Specifically, the paper discusses tool automation; interconnection assessment methodology and cost benefit analysis.

  20. Orbiting observatory SOHO finds source of high-speed "wind" blowing from the Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-02-01

    "The search for the source of the solar wind has been like the hunt for the source of the Nile," said Dr. Don Hassler of the Southwest Research Institute, Boulder, Colorado, lead author of the paper in Science. "For 30 years, scientists have observed high-speed solar wind coming from regions in the solar atmosphere with open magnetic field lines, called coronal holes. However, only recently, with the observations from SOHO, have we been able to measure the detailed structure of this source region". The solar wind comes in two varieties : high-speed and low-speed. The low-speed solar wind moves at "only" 1.5 million kilometres per hour, while the high-speed wind is even faster, moving at speeds as high as 3 million kilometres per hour. As it flows past Earth, the solar wind changes the shape and structure of the Earth's magnetic field. In the past, the solar wind didn't affect us directly, but as we become increasingly dependent on advanced technology, we become more susceptible to its effects. Researchers are learning that variations in the solar wind flow can cause dramatic changes in the shape of the Earth's magnetic field, which can damage satellites and disrupt communications and electrical power systems. The nature and origin of the solar wind is one of the main mysteries ESA's solar observatory SOHO was designed to solve. It has long been thought that the solar wind flows from coronal holes; what is new is the discovery that these outflows are concentrated in specific patches at the edges of the honeycomb-shaped magnetic fields. Just below the surface of the Sun there are large convection cells, and each cell has a magnetic field associated with it. "If one thinks of these cells as paving stones in a patio, then the solar wind is breaking through like grass around the edges, concentrated in the corners where the paving stones meet", said Dr. Helen Mason, University of Cambridge, England, and co-author of the paper to appear in Science. "However, at speeds

  1. High precision Wind measurements in the upper Venus atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmuelling, F.; Goldstein, J.; Kostiuk, T.; Hewagama, T.; Zipoy, D.

    2000-10-01

    We will present high accuracy measurements of line-of-sight wind velocities in the upper Venus atmosphere and models of the implied global circulation. The measurements were performed using the NASA/GSFC Infrared Heterodyne Spectrometer at the NASA IRTF. Thermospheric altitudes between 100 and 120 km were probed using 12C16O2 solar-pumped, non-thermal emission. The observed signal-to-noise allowed determination of line center frequencies to a precision of 0.1 MHz (1 m/s at 10 μ m). Absolute frequency calibration was possible to better than 0.1 MHz due to the extremely high frequency stability of the Lamb-dip stabilized heterodyne system. The quality of the data together with the instrument stability allowed measurement of line-of-sight wind velocities across the illuminated crescent to 1 m/s. Data were acquired just before and after inferior conjunction in 1990 and 1991. In combination, these two data sets allowed modeling of the global wind field. Modeled horizontal wind velocities will be presented for a sub-solar to anti-solar flow and a zonal retrograde super-rotation.

  2. Analysis of the high Reynolds number 2D tests on a wind turbine airfoil performed at two different wind tunnels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pires, O.; Munduate, X.; Ceyhan, O.; Jacobs, M.; Madsen, J.; Schepers, J. G.

    2016-09-01

    2D wind tunnel tests at high Reynolds numbers have been done within the EU FP7 AVATAR project (Advanced Aerodynamic Tools of lArge Rotors) on the DU00-W-212 airfoil and at two different test facilities: the DNW High Pressure Wind Tunnel in Gottingen (HDG) and the LM Wind Power in-house wind tunnel. Two conditions of Reynolds numbers have been performed in both tests: 3 and 6 million. The Mach number and turbulence intensity values are similar in both wind tunnels at the 3 million Reynolds number test, while they are significantly different at 6 million Reynolds number. The paper presents a comparison of the data obtained from the two wind tunnels, showing good repeatability at 3 million Reynolds number and differences at 6 million Reynolds number that are consistent with the different Mach number and turbulence intensity values.

  3. High Winds in the Jovian Mid-latitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    A high resolution image of the Jovian mid-latitudes taken by Voyager 1 on March 2, 1979, shows distinctly differing characteristics of the planet's meteorology. The well defined pale orange line running from southwest to northeast (North is at the top) marks the high speed north temperate current with wind speeds of about 120 meters per second. These high winds produce a cleaner flow pattern in the surrounding clouds. Toward the top of the picture, a weaker jet of approximately 30 meters per second is characterized by wave patterns and cloud features which have been observed to rotate in a clockwise manner at these latitudes of about 35 North. These clouds have been observed to have lifetimes of about one to two years. The picture was taken from a distance of 4 million kilometers (2.5 million miles).

  4. Low-cost solution to the grid reliability problem with 100% penetration of intermittent wind, water, and solar for all purposes.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Mark Z; Delucchi, Mark A; Cameron, Mary A; Frew, Bethany A

    2015-12-01

    This study addresses the greatest concern facing the large-scale integration of wind, water, and solar (WWS) into a power grid: the high cost of avoiding load loss caused by WWS variability and uncertainty. It uses a new grid integration model and finds low-cost, no-load-loss, nonunique solutions to this problem on electrification of all US energy sectors (electricity, transportation, heating/cooling, and industry) while accounting for wind and solar time series data from a 3D global weather model that simulates extreme events and competition among wind turbines for available kinetic energy. Solutions are obtained by prioritizing storage for heat (in soil and water); cold (in ice and water); and electricity (in phase-change materials, pumped hydro, hydropower, and hydrogen), and using demand response. No natural gas, biofuels, nuclear power, or stationary batteries are needed. The resulting 2050-2055 US electricity social cost for a full system is much less than for fossil fuels. These results hold for many conditions, suggesting that low-cost, reliable 100% WWS systems should work many places worldwide.

  5. Low-cost solution to the grid reliability problem with 100% penetration of intermittent wind, water, and solar for all purposes.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Mark Z; Delucchi, Mark A; Cameron, Mary A; Frew, Bethany A

    2015-12-01

    This study addresses the greatest concern facing the large-scale integration of wind, water, and solar (WWS) into a power grid: the high cost of avoiding load loss caused by WWS variability and uncertainty. It uses a new grid integration model and finds low-cost, no-load-loss, nonunique solutions to this problem on electrification of all US energy sectors (electricity, transportation, heating/cooling, and industry) while accounting for wind and solar time series data from a 3D global weather model that simulates extreme events and competition among wind turbines for available kinetic energy. Solutions are obtained by prioritizing storage for heat (in soil and water); cold (in ice and water); and electricity (in phase-change materials, pumped hydro, hydropower, and hydrogen), and using demand response. No natural gas, biofuels, nuclear power, or stationary batteries are needed. The resulting 2050-2055 US electricity social cost for a full system is much less than for fossil fuels. These results hold for many conditions, suggesting that low-cost, reliable 100% WWS systems should work many places worldwide. PMID:26598655

  6. Low-cost solution to the grid reliability problem with 100% penetration of intermittent wind, water, and solar for all purposes

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Mark Z.; Delucchi, Mark A.; Cameron, Mary A.; Frew, Bethany A.

    2015-01-01

    This study addresses the greatest concern facing the large-scale integration of wind, water, and solar (WWS) into a power grid: the high cost of avoiding load loss caused by WWS variability and uncertainty. It uses a new grid integration model and finds low-cost, no-load-loss, nonunique solutions to this problem on electrification of all US energy sectors (electricity, transportation, heating/cooling, and industry) while accounting for wind and solar time series data from a 3D global weather model that simulates extreme events and competition among wind turbines for available kinetic energy. Solutions are obtained by prioritizing storage for heat (in soil and water); cold (in ice and water); and electricity (in phase-change materials, pumped hydro, hydropower, and hydrogen), and using demand response. No natural gas, biofuels, nuclear power, or stationary batteries are needed. The resulting 2050–2055 US electricity social cost for a full system is much less than for fossil fuels. These results hold for many conditions, suggesting that low-cost, reliable 100% WWS systems should work many places worldwide. PMID:26598655

  7. Detection of 3D tree root systems using high resolution ground penetration radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altdorff, D.; Honds, M.; Botschek, J.; Van Der Kruk, J.

    2014-12-01

    Knowledge of root systems and its distribution are important for biomass estimation as well as for the prevention of subsurface distribution network damages. Ground penetration radar (GPR) is a promising technique that enables a non-invasive imaging of tree roots. Due to the polarisation-dependent reflection coefficients and complicated three-dimensional root structure, accurate measurements with perpendicularly polarized antennas are needed. In this study, we show GPR data from two planes and one chestnut at two locations with different soil conditions. Perpendicular 10 x 10 cm grid measurements were made with a shielded 250 MHz antenna in combination with a high precision self-tracking laser theodolite that provides geo-referenced traces with a spatial resolution of ~ 2 cm. After selecting potential root hyperbolas within the perpendicular GPR profiles, the corresponding three-dimensional coordinates were extracted and visualized in planar view to reveal any linear structure that indicates a possible tree root. The coordinates of the selected linear structures were projected back to the surface by means of the laser-theodolite to indicate the locations for groundtruthing. Additionally, we interpolated the measured data into a 3D cube where time slices confirmed the locations of linear reflection events. We validated the indicated predictions by excavation of the soil with a suction dredge. Subsequent georeferencing of the true root distribution and comparison with the selected linear events showed that the approach was able to identify the precise position of roots with a diameter between 3 and 10 cm and a depth of up to 70 cm. However, not all linear events were roots; also mouse channels were found in these depths, since they also generate GPR hyperbolas aligned in linear structures. Roots at a second location at depths of 1 to 1.20 m did not generate identifiable hyperboles, which was probably due to an increased electrical conductivity below 86 cm depth. The

  8. Penetration equations

    SciTech Connect

    Young, C.W.

    1997-10-01

    In 1967, Sandia National Laboratories published empirical equations to predict penetration into natural earth materials and concrete. Since that time there have been several small changes to the basic equations, and several more additions to the overall technique for predicting penetration into soil, rock, concrete, ice, and frozen soil. The most recent update to the equations was published in 1988, and since that time there have been changes in the equations to better match the expanding data base, especially in concrete penetration. This is a standalone report documenting the latest version of the Young/Sandia penetration equations and related analytical techniques to predict penetration into natural earth materials and concrete. 11 refs., 6 tabs.

  9. 77 FR 48138 - Topaz Solar Farms LLC; High Plains Ranch II, LLC; Bethel Wind Energy LLC; Rippey Wind Energy LLC...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-13

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [Docket Nos. EG12-63-000; EG12-64-000; EG12-65-000; EG12-66-000; EG12- 67-000; EG12-68-000; EG12-69-000] Topaz Solar Farms LLC; High Plains Ranch II, LLC; Bethel Wind Energy LLC; Rippey Wind Energy LLC; Pacific Wind,...

  10. Oxidation of depleted uranium penetrators and aerosol dispersal at high temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Elder, J.C.; Tinkle, M.C.

    1980-12-01

    Aerosols dispersed from depleted uranium penetrators exposed to air and air-CO/sub 2/ mixtures at temperatures ranging from 500 to 1000/sup 0/C for 2- or 4-h periods were characterized. These experiments indicated dispersal of low concentrations of aerosols in the respirable size range (typically <10/sup -3/% of penetrator mass at 223 cm/s (5 mph) windspeed). Oxidation was maximum at 700/sup 0/C in air and 800/sup 0/C in 50% air-50% CO/sub 2/, indicating some self-protection developed at higher temperatures. No evidence of self-sustained burning was observed, although complete oxidation can be expected in fires significantly exceeding 4 h, the longest exposure of this series. An outdoor burning experiment using 10 batches of pine wood and paper packing material as fuel caused the highest oxidation rate, probably accelerated by disruption of the oxide layer accompanying broad temperature fluctuation as each fuel batch was added.

  11. Wind resource quality affected by high levels of renewables

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Diakov, Victor

    2015-06-17

    For solar photovoltaic (PV) and wind resources, the capacity factor is an important parameter describing the quality of the resource. As the share of variable renewable resources (such as PV and wind) on the electric system is increasing, so does curtailment (and the fraction of time when it cannot be avoided). At high levels of renewable generation, curtailments effectively change the practical measure of resource quality from capacity factor to the incremental capacity factor. The latter accounts only for generation during hours of no curtailment and is directly connected with the marginal capital cost of renewable generators for a givenmore » level of renewable generation during the year. The Western U.S. wind generation is analyzed hourly for a system with 75% of annual generation from wind, and it is found that the value for the system of resources with equal capacity factors can vary by a factor of 2, which highlights the importance of using the incremental capacity factor instead. Finally, the effect is expected to be more pronounced in smaller geographic areas (or when transmission limitations imposed) and less pronounced at lower levels of renewable energy in the system with less curtailment.« less

  12. Wind resource quality affected by high levels of renewables

    SciTech Connect

    Diakov, Victor

    2015-06-17

    For solar photovoltaic (PV) and wind resources, the capacity factor is an important parameter describing the quality of the resource. As the share of variable renewable resources (such as PV and wind) on the electric system is increasing, so does curtailment (and the fraction of time when it cannot be avoided). At high levels of renewable generation, curtailments effectively change the practical measure of resource quality from capacity factor to the incremental capacity factor. The latter accounts only for generation during hours of no curtailment and is directly connected with the marginal capital cost of renewable generators for a given level of renewable generation during the year. The Western U.S. wind generation is analyzed hourly for a system with 75% of annual generation from wind, and it is found that the value for the system of resources with equal capacity factors can vary by a factor of 2, which highlights the importance of using the incremental capacity factor instead. Finally, the effect is expected to be more pronounced in smaller geographic areas (or when transmission limitations imposed) and less pronounced at lower levels of renewable energy in the system with less curtailment.

  13. WIND MEASUREMENTS WITH HIGH-ENERGY DOPPLER LIDAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, Grady J.; Kavaya, Michael J.; Barnes, Bruce W.; Beyon, Jeffrey Y.; Petros, Mulugeta; Jirong, Yu; Amzajerdian, Farzin; Slingh, Upendra N.

    2006-01-01

    Coherent lidars at 2-micron wavelengths from holmium or thulium solid-state lasers have been in use to measure wind for applications in meteorology, aircraft wake vortex tracking, and turbulence detection [1,2,3] These field-deployed lidars, however, have generally been of a pulse energy of a few millijoules, limiting their range capability or restricting operation to regions of high aerosol concentration such as the atmospheric boundary layer. Technology improvements in the form of high-energy pulsed lasers, low noise detectors, and high optical quality telescopes are being evaluated to make wind measurements to long ranges or low aerosol concentrations. This research is aimed at developing lidar technology for satellite-based observation of wind on a global scale. The VALIDAR project was initiated to demonstrate a high pulse energy coherent Doppler lidar. VALIDAR gets its name from the concept of validation lidar, in that it can serve as a calibration and validation source for future airborne and spaceborne lidar missions. VALIDAR is housed within a mobile trailer for field measurements.

  14. 11. INTERIOR VIEW OF 8FOOT HIGH SPEED WIND TUNNEL. SAME ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. INTERIOR VIEW OF 8-FOOT HIGH SPEED WIND TUNNEL. SAME CAMERA POSITION AS VA-118-B-10 LOOKING IN THE OPPOSITE DIRECTION. - NASA Langley Research Center, 8-Foot High Speed Wind Tunnel, 641 Thornell Avenue, Hampton, Hampton, VA

  15. Observation of high-resolution wind fields and offshore wind turbine wakes using TerraSAR-X imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gies, Tobias; Jacobsen, Sven; Lehner, Susanne; Pleskachevsky, Andrey

    2014-05-01

    1. Introduction Numerous large-scale offshore wind farms have been built in European waters and play an important role in providing renewable energy. Therefore, knowledge of behavior of wakes, induced by large wind turbines and their impact on wind power output is important. The spatial variation of offshore wind turbine wake is very complex, depending on wind speed, wind direction, ambient atmospheric turbulence and atmospheric stability. In this study we demonstrate the application of X-band TerraSAR-X (TS-X) data with high spatial resolution for studies on wind turbine wakes in the near and far field of the offshore wind farm Alpha Ventus, located in the North Sea. Two cases which different weather conditions and different wake pattern as observed in the TS-X image are presented. 2. Methods The space-borne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) is a unique sensor that provides two-dimensional information on the ocean surface. Due to their high resolution, daylight and weather independency and global coverage, SARs are particularly suitable for many ocean and coastal applications. SAR images reveal wind variations on small scales and thus represent a valuable means in detailed wind-field analysis. The general principle of imaging turbine wakes is that the reduced wind speed downstream of offshore wind farms modulates the sea surface roughness, which in turn changes the Normalized Radar Cross Section (NRCS, denoted by σ0) in the SAR image and makes the wake visible. In this study we present two cases at the offshore wind farm Alpha Ventus to investigate turbine-induced wakes and the retrieved sea surface wind field. Using the wind streaks, visible in the TS-X image and the shadow behind the offshore wind farm, induced by turbine wake, the sea surface wind direction is derived and subsequently the sea surface wind speed is calculated using the latest generation of wind field algorithm XMOD2. 3. Case study alpha ventus Alpha Ventus is located approximately 45 km from the

  16. SOWFA Super-Controller: A High-Fidelity Tool for Evaluating Wind Plant Control Approaches

    SciTech Connect

    Fleming, P.; Gebraad, P.; van Wingerden, J. W.; Lee, S.; Churchfield, M.; Scholbrock, A.; Michalakes, J.; Johnson, K.; Moriarty, P.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a new tool for testing wind plant controllers in the Simulator for Offshore Wind Farm Applications (SOWFA). SOWFA is a high-fidelity simulator for the interaction between wind turbine dynamics and the fluid flow in a wind plant. The new super-controller testing environment in SOWFA allows for the implementation of the majority of the wind plant control strategies proposed in the literature.

  17. Solar wind collimation of the Jupiter high velocity dust streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flandes, A.; Krueger, H.

    2006-12-01

    The dust bursts discovered by the Ulysses dust sensor when approaching Jupiter in 1992 were later confirmed as collimated streams of high velocity (~200 km/s) charged (~5V) dust grains escaping from Jupiter and dominated by the interplanetary Magnetic field (IMF). With Cassini, a similar phenomenon was observed in Saturn. It was demonstrated that the Jovian dust streams are closely related to the solar wind compressed regions, either Corotating interaction regions (CIRs) or Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) ¨Cto a minor extent-. Actually the dust streams seem ultimately to be generated by such events. This can be explained considering that dust grains are accelerated as they gain substantial energy while compressed at the forward and reverse shocks that bound or precede these solar wind regions.

  18. Mineral density and penetration strength of the subchondral bone plate of the talar dome: high correlation and specific distribution patterns.

    PubMed

    Leumann, André; Valderrabano, Victor; Hoechel, Sebastian; Göpfert, Beat; Müller-Gerbl, Magdalena

    2015-01-01

    The subchondral bone plate plays an important role in stabilizing the osteochondral joint unit and in the pathomechanism of osteochondral lesions and osteoarthritis. The objective of the present study was to measure the mineral density distribution and subchondral bone plate penetration strength of the talar dome joint facet to display and compare the specific distribution patterns. Ten cadaver specimens were used for computed tomography (CT) scans, from which densitograms were derived using CT-osteoabsorptiometry, and for mechanical indentation testing from which the penetration strength was obtained. Our results showed 2 different distribution patterns for mineral density and penetration strength. Of the 10 specimens, 6 (60%) showed bicentric maxima (anteromedially and anterolaterally), and 4 (40%) showed a monocentric maximum (either anteromedially or anterolaterally). A highly significant correlation (p < .0001) for both methods confirmed that the mineral density relied on local load characteristics. In conclusion, the biomechanical properties of the subchondral bone plate of the talar dome joint facet showed specific distribution patterns. CT-osteoabsorptiometry is a reliable method to display the mineral density distribution noninvasively. We recommend CT-osteoabsorptiometry for noninvasive analysis of the biomechanical properties of the subchondral bone plate in osteochondral joint reconstruction and the prevention and treatment of osteoarthritis and osteochondral lesions.

  19. Very high resolution measurement of the penetration depth of superconductors by a novel single-coil inductance technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauzzi, A.; Le Cochec, J.; Lamura, G.; Jönsson, B. J.; Gasparov, V. A.; Ladan, F. R.; Plaçais, B.; Probst, P. A.; Pavuna, D.; Bok, J.

    2000-05-01

    We describe a novel single-coil mutual inductance technique for measuring the magnetic penetration depth λ of superconductors at 2-4 MHz as a function of temperature in the 4-100 K range. We combine a single-coil configuration with a high-stability marginal oscillator; this enables us to measure the absolute value of λ on both bulk samples and thin films with very high resolution (δλ=10 pm) and a precision of 30 nm. As example of application, we report measurements on NbTi bulk samples and Nb films. This contactless technique is suited for probing the superconducting properties of samples over large surfaces.

  20. Images of interlayer vortices and c -axis penetration depth of high- Tc YBa2Cu3O7-y superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iguchi, Ienari; Takeda, Tomohiro; Uchiyama, Tetsuji; Sugimoto, Akira; Hatano, Takeshi

    2006-06-01

    The measurements on the magnetic image of interlayer vortices are performed for the high- Tc YBa2Cu3O7-y(110) thin film using a high sensitive scanning SQUID microscopy. Clear images of aligned giant interlayer vortices are observable. For the majority of vortices, using the London model, the c -axis penetration depth is estimated to be about 20μm at 3K . The temperature dependence of λc is obtained from the observed vortex images at different temperatures, whose behavior is in good agreement with those of the microwave cavity measurement.

  1. Cellular Model Analogy of The Magnetosphere-ionosphere Substorm Activity Driven By Solar Wind With Finite Velocity of Penetration Into Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozelov, B. V.; Kozelova, T. V.

    The cellular model as an analogy of the dynamic magnetosphere-ionosphere system related with the substorm activity is presented. Each cell in the model contains two connected parts, one of which may be associated with the magnetosphere current sheet pieces, and other part may be associated with ionosphere region at the same magnetic field line. The magnetospheric part of the model system is organised as a rectangu- lar cellular automation with local redistribution of the stored energy from the cells where the threshold value is exceeded. We suppose that the threshold value in each cell depends on external driver (solar wind parameters) which influences on the long boundaries of the rectangular array. The finite velocity is assumed for the influence penetration into the array and along boundaries. Observational studies of magneto- spheric activity suggest that the magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling plays a critical role in the physical processes leading up to substorm onset. The local reallocation of energy in the magnetosphere causes a local change of conductivity of the ionosphere in the same magnetic tube (the particles, diffused by pitch-angle, are precipitated in the loss-cone along the magnetic field, and ionize atmospheric gases). In turn, the iono- spheric conductivity influences the value of energy, which may be reallocated in the magnetic tube at the following time moment. This positive feedback has been included in the model also. The state (conductivity) of the ionospheric part of a cell is supposed to depend on the cell history (by analogy with the recombination coefficient). Dynam- ics of the model for different parameters and for driving by real Bz IMF is discussed. The model demonstrates the small-scale transients which are directly driven by Bz, and the large-scale transients which depends on the system history also. The onsets of the large scale-transients (which associate with substorms) are occurred at the differ- ent positions in the array (as

  2. Follicular penetration and targeting.

    PubMed

    Lademann, Jürgen; Otberg, Nina; Jacobi, Ute; Hoffman, Robert M; Blume-Peytavi, Ulrike

    2005-12-01

    In the past, intercellular penetration was assumed to be the most important penetration pathway of topically applied substances. First hints that follicular penetration needs to be taken into consideration were confirmed by recent investigations, presented during the workshop "Follicular Penetration and Targeting" at the 4th Intercontinental Meeting of Hair Research Societies", in Berlin 2004. Hair follicles represent an efficient reservoir for the penetration of topically applied substances with subsequent targeting of distinct cell populations, e.g., nestin-expressing follicular bulge cells. The volume of this reservoir can be determined by differential stripping technology. The follicular penetration processes are significantly influenced by the state of the follicular infundibulum; recent experimental investigations could demonstrate that it is essential to distinguish between open and closed hair follicles. Topically applied substances can only penetrate into open hair follicle. Knowledge of follicular penetration is of high clinical relevance for functional targeting of distinct follicular regions. Human hair follicles show a hair-cycle-dependent variation of the dense neuronal and vascular network. Moreover, during hair follicle cycling with initiation of anagen, newly formed vessels occur. Thus, the potential of nestin-expressing hair follicle stem cells to form neurons and blood vessels was investigated.

  3. Renewable Energy and Efficiency Modeling Analysis Partnership: An Analysis of How Different Energy Models Addressed a Common High Renewable Energy Penetration Scenario in 2025

    SciTech Connect

    Blair, N.; Jenkin, T.; Milford, J.; Short, W.; Sullivan, P.; Evans, D.; Lieberman, E.; Goldstein, G.; Wright, E.; Jayaraman, K.; Venkatech, B.; Kleiman, G.; Namovicz, C.; Smith, B.; Palmer, K.; Wiser, R.; Wood, F.

    2009-09-30

    /or different answers in response to a set of focused energy-related questions. The focus was on understanding reasons for model differences, not on policy implications, even though a policy of high renewable penetration was used for the analysis. A group process was used to identify the potential question (or questions) to be addressed through the project. In late 2006, increasing renewable energy penetration in the electricity sector was chosen from among several options as the general policy to model. From this framework, the analysts chose a renewable portfolio standard (RPS) as the way to implement the required renewable energy market penetration in the models. An RPS was chosen because it was (i) of interest and represented the group's consensus choice, and (ii) tractable and not too burdensome for the modelers. Because the modelers and analysts were largely using their own resources, it was important to consider the degree of effort required. In fact, several of the modelers who started this process had to discontinue participation because of other demands on their time. Federal and state RPS policy is an area of active political interest and debate. Recognizing this, participants used this exercise to gain insight into energy model structure and performance. The results are not intended to provide any particular insight into policy design or be used for policy advocacy, and participants are not expected to form a policy stance based on the outcomes of the modeling. The goals of this REMAP project - in terms of the main topic of renewable penetration - were to: (1) Compare models and understand why they may give different results to the same question, (2) Improve the rigor and consistency of assumptions used across models, and (3) Evaluate the ability of models to measure the impacts of high renewable-penetration scenarios.

  4. Western Wind and Solar Integration Study: Phase 2 (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Lew, D.; Brinkman, G.; Ibanez, E.; Lefton, S.; Kumar, N.; Venkataraman, S.; Jordan, G.

    2013-09-01

    This presentation summarizes the scope and results of the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study Phase 2, which examined operational impacts of high penetrations of variable renewable generation in the West.

  5. Ulysses sees differences in solar wind at high, low latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1995-06-01

    Scientists presenting results today of their data at the spring meeting of the American Geophysical Union in Baltimore, Md., said the speed of the solar wind over the southern pole is high, compared to its low velocity near the Sun's equator. The solar wind is the hot ionized gas that escapes from the solar corona and expands into interplanetary space. At the present minimum of the solar activity cycle, the angle between the Sun's rotational and magnetic equators has decreased -- in these conditions Ulysses found that the region of low-speed solar winds were confined more closely to the rotational equator than in earlier portions of the solar cycle. Now on its way to the northern solar pole, Ulysses is nearly 62 degrees north of the Sun's equator today. The second phase of the primary mission -- to explore the northern pole of the Sun -- will begin on June 19, when the spacecraft reaches 70 degrees north latitude, The spacecraft will reach a maximum northern latitude of 80,2 degrees on 31 July 1995. Ulysses' trajectory from 80 degrees south of the equator in September 1994, back down to the Sun's equator in March 1995, also brought the spacecraft within 1.3 astronomical units (121 million miles, 194 million km) of the Sun, the closest Ulysses would ever travel to the Sun since it was launched on October 6, 1990. The spacecraft picked up speed during this phase allowing the entire region to be scanned in just six months time. Scientists refer to this phase of the mapping as the "fast latitude scan", Ulysses had left the equatorial plane in early 1992 after a gravitational swingby of Jupiter, and had gradually climbed in latitude until reaching 80 degrees south in September 1994. Ulysses' observations during the fast latitude scan have shown that the solar wind being continuously emitted by the Sun is distinctly different at high and low latitudes, said Dr. Edward J. Smith, Ulysses project scientist at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, for the joint NASA

  6. High-energy flux evolution of Pulsar Wind Nebulae

    SciTech Connect

    Mattana, F.; Falanga, M.; Goetz, D.

    2008-12-24

    The very high energy {gamma}-ray spectra of Pulsar Wind Nebulae are interpreted as due to inverse Compton scattering of ultrarelativistic electrons on the ambient photons, whereas their X-ray spectra are due to synchrotron emission. We investigate the relation between the {gamma}- and X-ray emission and the pulsars' spin-down luminosity and characteristic age. We find that the {gamma}-to X-ray flux ratio of the nebulae is inversely proportional to the spin-down luminosity ({proportional_to}E{sup -1.9}) and to the characteristic age ({proportional_to}{tau}{sub c}{sup 2.2}) of the parent pulsar. We interpret these results as due to the evolution of the electron energy distribution and the nebular dynamics, supporting the idea of so-called relic pulsar wind nebulae. These empirical relations provide a new tool to classify unidentified diffuse {gamma}-ray sources and to estimate the spin-down luminosity and characteristic age for four rotation powered pulsars with no detected pulsation from the X- and {gamma}--ray properties of the associated pulsar wind nebulae.

  7. High amplitude waves in the expanding solar wind plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, J. M.; Velli, M.; Grappin, R.

    1996-07-20

    We simulated the 1 D nonlinear time-evolution of high-amplitude Alfven, slow and fast magnetoacustic waves in the solar wind propagating outward at different angles to the mean magnetic (spiral) field, using the expanding box model. The simulation results for Alfven waves and fast magnetoacustic waves fit the observational constraints in the solar wind best, showing decreasing trends for energies and other rms-quantities due to expansion and the appearance of inward propagating waves as minor species in the wind. Inward propagating waves are generated by reflection of Alfven waves propagating at large angles to the magnetic field or they coincide with the occurrence of compressible fluctuations. It is the generation of sound due to ponderomotive forces of the Alfven wave which we can detect in the latter case. For slow magnetoacustic waves we find a kind of oscillation of the character of the wave between a sound wave and an Alfven wave. This is the more, the slow magnetoacustic wave is close to a sound wave in the beginning. On the other hand, fast magnetoacustic waves are much more dissipated than the other wave-types and their general behaviour is close to the Alfven. The normalized cross-helicity {sigma}{sub c} is close to one for Alfven-waves and this quantity is decreasing slightly when density-fluctuations are generated. {sigma}{sub c} decreases significantly when the waves are close to perpendicular propagation. Then, the waves are close to quasi-static structures.

  8. Methods of integrating a high penetration photovoltaic power plant into a micro grid.

    SciTech Connect

    Stein, Joshua S.; Johnson, Lars; Nelson, Lauren; Lenox, Carl; Johnson, Robert.

    2010-06-01

    The island of Lanai is currently one of the highest penetration PV micro grids in the world, with the 1.2 MWAC La Ola Solar Farm operating on a grid with a peak net load of 4.7 MW. This facility interconnects to one of Lanai's three 12.47 kV distribution circuits. An initial interconnection requirements study (IRS) determined that several control and performance features are necessary to ensure safe and reliable operation of the island grid. These include power curtailment, power factor control, over/under voltage and frequency ride through, and power ramp rate limiting. While deemed necessary for stable grid operation, many of these features contradict the current IEEE 1547 interconnection requirements governing distributed generators. These controls have been successfully implemented, tested, and operated since January 2009. Currently, the system is producing power in a curtailed mode according to the requirements of a power purchase agreement (PPA).

  9. Grid Inertial Response-Based Probabilistic Determination of Energy Storage System Capacity Under High Solar Penetration

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yue, Meng; Wang, Xiaoyu

    2015-07-01

    It is well-known that responsive battery energy storage systems (BESSs) are an effective means to improve the grid inertial response to various disturbances including the variability of the renewable generation. One of the major issues associated with its implementation is the difficulty in determining the required BESS capacity mainly due to the large amount of inherent uncertainties that cannot be accounted for deterministically. In this study, a probabilistic approach is proposed to properly size the BESS from the perspective of the system inertial response, as an application of probabilistic risk assessment (PRA). The proposed approach enables a risk-informed decision-making processmore » regarding (1) the acceptable level of solar penetration in a given system and (2) the desired BESS capacity (and minimum cost) to achieve an acceptable grid inertial response with a certain confidence level.« less

  10. Grid Inertial Response-Based Probabilistic Determination of Energy Storage System Capacity Under High Solar Penetration

    SciTech Connect

    Yue, Meng; Wang, Xiaoyu

    2015-07-01

    It is well-known that responsive battery energy storage systems (BESSs) are an effective means to improve the grid inertial response to various disturbances including the variability of the renewable generation. One of the major issues associated with its implementation is the difficulty in determining the required BESS capacity mainly due to the large amount of inherent uncertainties that cannot be accounted for deterministically. In this study, a probabilistic approach is proposed to properly size the BESS from the perspective of the system inertial response, as an application of probabilistic risk assessment (PRA). The proposed approach enables a risk-informed decision-making process regarding (1) the acceptable level of solar penetration in a given system and (2) the desired BESS capacity (and minimum cost) to achieve an acceptable grid inertial response with a certain confidence level.

  11. Concept for a high-resolution thermometer utilizing the temperature dependence of the magnetic penetration depth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shirron, P. J.; Dipirro, M. J.

    1993-01-01

    A thermometer using the temperature dependence of the magnetic penetration depth in superconductors is described which has the potential for temperature resolution, when using a dc SQUID readout, on the order of 1 pK. One such device has been fabricated and characterized to demonstrate proof of concept. It consists of primary and secondary coils of NbTi wire wound on a copper toroidal core on which a thin layer of In (Tc = 3.4 K) has been deposited. The temperature dependence of the mutual inductance, M(T), or self-inductance, is used to detect changes in temperature. Measurements of M(T) have been made with an ac excitation of the primary for various frequencies and peak magnetic field strengths. Estimates of ultimate temperature resolution are given.

  12. Highly reliable wind-rolling triboelectric nanogenerator operating in a wide wind speed range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yong, Hyungseok; Chung, Jihoon; Choi, Dukhyun; Jung, Daewoong; Cho, Minhaeng; Lee, Sangmin

    2016-09-01

    Triboelectric nanogenerators are aspiring energy harvesting methods that generate electricity from the triboelectric effect and electrostatic induction. This study demonstrates the harvesting of wind energy by a wind-rolling triboelectric nanogenerator (WR-TENG). The WR-TENG generates electricity from wind as a lightweight dielectric sphere rotates along the vortex whistle substrate. Increasing the kinetic energy of a dielectric converted from the wind energy is a key factor in fabricating an efficient WR-TENG. Computation fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis is introduced to estimate the precise movements of wind flow and to create a vortex flow by adjusting the parameters of the vortex whistle shape to optimize the design parameters to increase the kinetic energy conversion rate. WR-TENG can be utilized as both a self-powered wind velocity sensor and a wind energy harvester. A single unit of WR-TENG produces open-circuit voltage of 11.2 V and closed-circuit current of 1.86 μA. Additionally, findings reveal that the electrical power is enhanced through multiple electrode patterns in a single device and by increasing the number of dielectric spheres inside WR-TENG. The wind-rolling TENG is a novel approach for a sustainable wind-driven TENG that is sensitive and reliable to wind flows to harvest wasted wind energy in the near future.

  13. Highly reliable wind-rolling triboelectric nanogenerator operating in a wide wind speed range

    PubMed Central

    Yong, Hyungseok; Chung, Jihoon; Choi, Dukhyun; Jung, Daewoong; Cho, Minhaeng; Lee, Sangmin

    2016-01-01

    Triboelectric nanogenerators are aspiring energy harvesting methods that generate electricity from the triboelectric effect and electrostatic induction. This study demonstrates the harvesting of wind energy by a wind-rolling triboelectric nanogenerator (WR-TENG). The WR-TENG generates electricity from wind as a lightweight dielectric sphere rotates along the vortex whistle substrate. Increasing the kinetic energy of a dielectric converted from the wind energy is a key factor in fabricating an efficient WR-TENG. Computation fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis is introduced to estimate the precise movements of wind flow and to create a vortex flow by adjusting the parameters of the vortex whistle shape to optimize the design parameters to increase the kinetic energy conversion rate. WR-TENG can be utilized as both a self-powered wind velocity sensor and a wind energy harvester. A single unit of WR-TENG produces open-circuit voltage of 11.2 V and closed-circuit current of 1.86 μA. Additionally, findings reveal that the electrical power is enhanced through multiple electrode patterns in a single device and by increasing the number of dielectric spheres inside WR-TENG. The wind-rolling TENG is a novel approach for a sustainable wind-driven TENG that is sensitive and reliable to wind flows to harvest wasted wind energy in the near future. PMID:27653976

  14. Optimization of Sizing and Placement of Energy Storage Systems on an Islanded Grid with High Penetration of Renewables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, M. M.

    This thesis seeks to find an optimized energy storage system (ESS) solution that reduces the effects of power variations and fluctuations from renewable energy sources like wind and solar. This study focuses on the effects of renewables at penetration levels larger than 20% for an isolated power grid. This optimized energy storage solution includes sizing the ESS appropriately while taking into account the economic cost of deploying the ESS. The ideal placement of the ESS on this grid seeks to reduce any impact on grid transmission congestion due to the ESS. Two configurations of the grid were modeled; the first is a simple load-frequency control model of the grid that only examines the effect of active power fluctuations from the renewables on the grid. The other model uses a one-line transmission line model of the isolated grid to model the transmission congestion in the grid. Modeling has shown that ESS systems are capable of reducing the frequency variations and reducing power fluctuations, however there is a trade off in economic cost.

  15. Incremental wind tunnel testing of high lift systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Victor, Pricop Mihai; Mircea, Boscoianu; Daniel-Eugeniu, Crunteanu

    2016-06-01

    Efficiency of trailing edge high lift systems is essential for long range future transport aircrafts evolving in the direction of laminar wings, because they have to compensate for the low performance of the leading edge devices. Modern high lift systems are subject of high performance requirements and constrained to simple actuation, combined with a reduced number of aerodynamic elements. Passive or active flow control is thus required for the performance enhancement. An experimental investigation of reduced kinematics flap combined with passive flow control took place in a low speed wind tunnel. The most important features of the experimental setup are the relatively large size, corresponding to a Reynolds number of about 2 Million, the sweep angle of 30 degrees corresponding to long range airliners with high sweep angle wings and the large number of flap settings and mechanical vortex generators. The model description, flap settings, methodology and results are presented.

  16. Airborne laser scan measurements of winter snow accumulation in high alpine catchments - hydrological implications and verification by ground penetrating radar at glacier surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helfricht, K.; Keuschnig, M.; Heilig, A.; Mayer, C.; Kuhn, M.

    2012-04-01

    The snow cover as storage of winter precipitation is a substantial source for runoff generation in high mountain catchments. Redistribution of solid precipitation, caused by wind and gravity, leads to a characteristic spatial distribution of snow accumulation which differs from simple model assumption of a homogenous snowpack increasing with altitude. Both, the distinct distribution of snow accumulation and the total amount of SWE stored in the snow cover, affect the magnitude and seasonality of melt water runoff. Complex relations exist between the spatial pattern of snow accumulation and the presence of glaciers and vice versa. For proper hydrological modeling in high mountain catchments, knowledge about snow cover distribution is an important requirement. To date, to evaluate modeling results, spatially insufficient point data on snow depths and SWE are usually available. On catchment scale, optical space-borne remote sensing techniques deliver areal extent of snow cover, but no snow depths and hence no volume of snow cover. Multi-temporal airborne laser scanning (ALS) is an active remote sensing method to obtain elevation changes extensively even in inaccessible alpine terrain. Before the start and at the end of accumulation season of winter 2010/2011, two airborne laser scan acquisitions were performed in the Ötztal Alps (Tirol, Austria). Differences of the respective digital elevation models were interpreted as snow depths and converted into SWE using a simple regression method between snow depths and snow density. Preferred snow accumulation areas were determined, e.g. wind sheltered depressions, the base of steep mountain walls and flat glacier surfaces. At catchment scale, solid precipitation is obviously redistributed from wind exposed mountain ridges to lower elevations, inducing characteristic elevations of maximum snow accumulation. Overall, catchment precipitation derived from snow accumulation is a valuable reference for precipitation approaches in

  17. Wind and water erosion on abandoned land in High Andalusia - First results of a portable combined wind and rainfall simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iserloh, T.; Fister, W.; Marzen, M.; Ries, J. B.; Schmidt, R.-G.

    2009-04-01

    On abandoned land in semi-arid environments wind and water erosion are the main driving factors causing soil degradation. Recent research has proven the existence of very complex interactions between both processes. For in situ assessment of these interactions on soil erosion rates a portable combined wind and rainfall simulator was constructed and used in a field study in Andalusia. The main objective is to get first results for comparison of erosion rates with and without the influence of wind on plot scale on abandoned land in a semi-arid environment. The simulator is 4 m long, 0.7 m high, 0.7 m wide and rectangular in shape. A bounded plot of 2.2 m² can be irrigated by four downward spraying pressure nozzles (Lechler 460.608) in the roof of the tunnel producing a rainfall intensity of about 90 mm h-1. Approximate wind speed is 8 m s-1 free stream. For sediment collection a gutter system has been combined with two wedge-shaped sediment traps and a beam with four Modified Wilson & Cook Samplers. Runoff was collected with 0.5 l plastic bottles. Test duration is 30 min with measurement intervals of 2.5 min for surface runoff. The test runs were carried out with three variations in the following order on each plot: (1) single wind test run, (2) single rainfall test run and (3) simultaneous wind and rainfall test run. Runoff results show no distinctive differences between test runs without (2) and in combination with wind (3). The sediment loss seems to be higher with wind (3). This might indicate the influence of wind on the kinetic energy and impact angle of raindrops and consequently on the detachment and provision of soil particles. It could be argued that in addition to conventional rainfall simulations the inclusion of wind could assist a better understanding of soil erosion processes in the future.

  18. Nonlinear Alfven waves in high-speed solar wind streams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abraham-Shrauner, B.; Feldman, W. C.

    1977-01-01

    A nonlinear proton distribution function that is an exact stationary solution of the nonlinear Vlasov equation and Maxwell's equations and which supports a single nonlinear transverse Alfven (ion cyclotron) wave that is circularly polarized and nondispersive is proposed for most of the observations during high-speed solar wind streams. This nonlinear distribution removes the strong Alfven wave instability, inconsistent with the persistence of the observed proton distribution functions in high-speed streams, found by the linear stability analysis. Model temperature anisotropies and drift velocities of the two spatially inhomogeneous bi-Maxwellian components are consistent with typical proton velocity distributions measured in high-speed streams at 1 AU. Two derived relations for each of the wave number and the phase velocity of the wave are obeyed within experimental uncertainties by two typical proton measurements. Our model also predicts that the alpha particle bulk flow velocity exceeds the proton particle bulk flow velocity, as is observed.

  19. Penetration of High Intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Into General Aviation Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balanis, Constantine A.; Birtcher, Craig R.; Georgakopoulos, Stavros V.; Panaretos, Anastasios H.

    2004-01-01

    The ability to design and achieve electromagnetic compatibility is becoming more challenging with the rapid development of new electronic products and technologies. The importance of electromagnetic interference (EMI) and electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) issues stems from the fact that the ambient electromagnetic environment has become very hostile; that is, it increases both in density and intensity, while the current trend in technology suggests the number of electronic devices increases in homes, businesses, factories, and transportation vehicles. Furthermore, the operating frequency of products coming into the market continuously increases. While cell phone technology has exceeded 1 GHz and Bluetooth operates at 2.4 GHz, products involving satellite communications operate near 10 GHz and automobile radar systems involve frequencies above 40 GHz. The concern about higher frequencies is that they correspond to smaller wavelengths, therefore electromagnetic waves are able to penetrate equipment enclosure through apertures or even small cracks more easily. In addition, electronic circuits have become small in size, and they are usually placed on motherboards or housed in boxes in very close proximity. Cosite interference and coupling in all electrical and electronic circuit assemblies are two essential issues that have to be examined in every design.

  20. Analysis of high Reynolds numbers effects on a wind turbine airfoil using 2D wind tunnel test data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pires, O.; Munduate, X.; Ceyhan, O.; Jacobs, M.; Snel, H.

    2016-09-01

    The aerodynamic behaviour of a wind turbine airfoil has been measured in a dedicated 2D wind tunnel test at the DNW High Pressure Wind Tunnel in Gottingen (HDG), Germany. The tests have been performed on the DU00W212 airfoil at different Reynolds numbers: 3, 6, 9, 12 and 15 million, and at low Mach numbers (below 0.1). Both clean and tripped conditions of the airfoil have been measured. An analysis of the impact of a wide Reynolds number variation over the aerodynamic characteristics of this airfoil has been performed.

  1. Airfoil stall penetration at constant pitch rate and high Reynolds number

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorber, Peter F.; Carta, Franklin O.

    1989-01-01

    The model wing consists of a set of fiberglass panels mounted on a steel spar that spans the 8 ft test section of the UTRC Large Subsonic Wind Tunnel. The first use of this system was to measure surface pressures and flow conditions for a series of constant pitch rate ramps and sinusoidal oscillations a Mach number range, a Reynolds number range, and a pitch angle range. It is concluded that an increased pitch rate causes stall events to be delayed, strengthening of the stall vortex, increase in vortex propagation, and increase in unsteady airloads. The Mach number range causes a supersonic zone near the leading edge, stall vortex to be weaker, and a reduction of unsteady airloads.

  2. Effects on electrical distribution networks of dispersed power generation at high levels of connection penetration

    SciTech Connect

    Longrigg, P

    1983-07-01

    The advent and deployment of significant levels of photovoltaic and wind energy generation in the spatially dispersed mode (i.e., residential and intermediate load centers) may have deleterious effects upon existing protective relay equipment and its time-current coordination on radial distribution circuits to which power conditioning equipment may be connected for power sell-back purposes. The problems that may arise involve harmonic injection from power conditioning inverters that can affect protective relays and cause excessive voltage and current from induced series and parallel resonances on feeders and connected passive equipment. Voltage regulation, var requirements, and consumer metering can also be affected by this type of dispersed generation. The creation of islands of supply is also possible, particularly on rural supply systems. This paper deals mainly with the effects of harmonics and short-circuit currents from wind energy conversion systems (WECS) and photovoltaic (PV) systems upon the operating characteristics of distribution networks and relays and other protective equipment designed to ensure the safety and supply integrity of electrical utility networks. Traditionally, electrical supply networks have been designed for one-way power flow-from generation to load, with a balance maintained between the two by means of automatic generation and load-frequency controls. Dispersed generation, from renewables like WECS or PV or from nonrenewable resources, can change traditional power flow. These changes must be dealt with effectively if renewable energy resources are to be integrated into the utility distribution system. This paper gives insight into these problems and proposes some solutions.

  3. The winds of high luminosity late-type bright stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stencel, Robert E.; Carpenter, K. G.

    1989-01-01

    The occurrence and characteristics of the Fe II line asymmetries were studied to determine the radial dependence of the wind velocity for each star. The dependence of the Fe II profiles on spectral type and luminosity class and thus the variation of the velocity fields with stellar type was also investigated. This allows the generality of the results reported for alpha Ori by Carpenter (1984b) to be judged. In addition, new atomic data was used along with observations of the C II (UV 0.01) multiplet to estimate N(sub e) in the stellar winds. Measures of relative Fe II fluxes can be used in a probability-of-escape model to determine the opacity and hydrogen column density versus height in the chromosphere of each star. Finally, analysis of the fluorescent Fe II lines (pumped by Ly alpha) near 2507 A will yield estimates of the intrinsic stellar Ly alpha flux that cannot be measured directly because of interstellar and circumstellar absorption. One important goal of the effort was to acquire high resolution spectra of the whole 2300 to 3200 A region of 13 luminous K and M stars as a data base that will be enormously valuable in planning observations with the Hubble Space Telescope High Resolution Spectrograph. It is also proposed to follow up the recent discovery of significant variations in the Fe II chromospheric emission line profiles from the M-giant Gamma Cru for the purpose of determining the underlying cause of the variations.

  4. DOE/NREL supported wind energy activities in Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Drouilhet, S.

    1997-12-01

    This paper describes three wind energy projects implemented in Alaska. The first, a sustainable technology energy partnerships (STEP) wind energy deployment project in Kotzebue will install 6 AOC 15/50 wind turbines and connect to the existing village diesel grid, consisting of approximately 1 MW average load. It seeks to develop solutions to the problems of arctic wind energy installations (transport, foundations, erection, operation, and maintenance), to establish a wind turbine test site, and to establish the Kotzebue Electric Association as a training and deployment center for wind/diesel technology in rural Alaska. The second project, a large village medium-penetration wind/diesel system, also in Kotzebue, will install a 1-2 MW windfarm, which will supplement the AOC turbines of the STEP project. The program will investigate the impact of medium penetration wind energy on power quality and system stability. The third project, the Alaska high-penetration wind/diesel village power pilot project in Wales will install a high penetration (80-100%) wind/diesel system in a remote Alaskan village. The system will include about 180 kW installed wind capacity, meeting an average village load of about 60 kW. This program will provide a model for high penetration wind retrofits to village diesel power systems and build the capability in Alaska to operate, maintain, and replicate wind/diesel technology. The program will also address problems of: effective use of excess wind energy; reliable diesel-off operation; and the role of energy storage.

  5. Western Wind and Solar Integration Study (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2012-09-01

    Initiated in 2007 to examine the operational impact of up to 35% penetration of wind, photovoltaic (PV), and concentrating solar power (CSP) energy on the electric power system, the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study (WWSIS) is one of the largest regional wind and solar integration studies to date. The goal is to understand the effects of variability and uncertainty of wind, PV, and CSP on the grid. In the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study Phase 1, solar penetration was limited to 5%. Utility-scale PV was not included because of limited capability to model sub-hourly, utility-scale PV output . New techniques allow the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study Phase 2 to include high penetrations of solar - not only CSP and rooftop PV but also utility-scale PV plants.

  6. A Highly Sensitive Assay Using Synthetic Blood Containing Test Microbes for Evaluation of the Penetration Resistance of Protective Clothing Material under Applied Pressure.

    PubMed

    Shimasaki, Noriko; Hara, Masayuki; Kikuno, Ritsuko; Shinohara, Katsuaki

    2016-01-01

    To prevent nosocomial infections caused by even either Ebola virus or methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), healthcare workers must wear the appropriate protective clothing which can inhibit contact transmission of these pathogens. Therefore, it is necessary to evaluate the performance of protective clothing for penetration resistance against infectious agents. In Japan, some standard methods were established to evaluate the penetration resistance of protective clothing fabric materials under applied pressure. However, these methods only roughly classified the penetration resistance of fabrics, and the detection sensitivity of the methods and the penetration amount with respect to the relationship between blood and the pathogen have not been studied in detail. Moreover, no standard method using bacteria for evaluation is known. Here, to evaluate penetration resistance of protective clothing materials under applied pressure, the detection sensitivity and the leak amount were investigated by using synthetic blood containing bacteriophage phi-X174 or S. aureus. And the volume of leaked synthetic blood and the amount of test microbe penetration were simultaneously quantified. Our results showed that the penetration detection sensitivity achieved using a test microbial culture was higher than that achieved using synthetic blood at invisible leak level pressures. This finding suggested that there is a potential risk of pathogen penetration even when visual leak of contaminated blood through the protective clothing was not observed. Moreover, at visible leak level pressures, it was found that the amount of test microbe penetration varied at least ten-fold among protective clothing materials classified into the same class of penetration resistance. Analysis of the penetration amount revealed a significant correlation between the volume of penetrated synthetic blood and the amount of test microbe penetration, indicating that the leaked volume of synthetic

  7. A survey of the three-dimensional high Reynolds number transonic wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takashima, K.; Sawada, H.; Aoki, T.

    1982-01-01

    The facilities for aerodynamic testing of airplane models at transonic speeds and high Reynolds numbers are surveyed. The need for high Reynolds number testing is reviewed, using some experimental results. Some approaches to high Reynolds number testing such as the cryogenic wind tunnel, the induction driven wind tunnel, the Ludwieg tube, the Evans clean tunnel and the hydraulic driven wind tunnel are described. The level of development of high Reynolds number testing facilities in Japan is discussed.

  8. Forest trees filter chronic wind-signals to acclimate to high winds.

    PubMed

    Bonnesoeur, Vivien; Constant, Thiéry; Moulia, Bruno; Fournier, Meriem

    2016-05-01

    Controlled experiments have shown that trees acclimate thigmomorphogenetically to wind-loads by sensing their deformation (strain). However, the strain regime in nature is exposed to a full spectrum of winds. We hypothesized that trees avoid overreacting by responding only to winds which bring information on local climate and/or wind exposure. Additionally, competition for light dependent on tree social status also likely affects thigmomorphogenesis. We monitored and manipulated quantitatively the strain regimes of 15 pairs of beech (Fagus sylvatica) trees of contrasting social status in an acclimated stand, and quantified the effects of these regimes on the radial growth over a vegetative season. Trees exposed to artificial bending, the intensity of which corresponds to the strongest wind-induced strains, enhanced their secondary growth by at least 80%. Surprisingly, this reaction was even greater - relatively - for suppressed trees than for dominant ones. Acclimated trees did not sense the different types of wind events in the same way. Daily wind speed peaks due to thermal winds were filtered out. Thigmomorphogenesis was therefore driven by intense storms. Thigmomorphogenesis is also likely to be involved in determining social status.

  9. Forest trees filter chronic wind-signals to acclimate to high winds.

    PubMed

    Bonnesoeur, Vivien; Constant, Thiéry; Moulia, Bruno; Fournier, Meriem

    2016-05-01

    Controlled experiments have shown that trees acclimate thigmomorphogenetically to wind-loads by sensing their deformation (strain). However, the strain regime in nature is exposed to a full spectrum of winds. We hypothesized that trees avoid overreacting by responding only to winds which bring information on local climate and/or wind exposure. Additionally, competition for light dependent on tree social status also likely affects thigmomorphogenesis. We monitored and manipulated quantitatively the strain regimes of 15 pairs of beech (Fagus sylvatica) trees of contrasting social status in an acclimated stand, and quantified the effects of these regimes on the radial growth over a vegetative season. Trees exposed to artificial bending, the intensity of which corresponds to the strongest wind-induced strains, enhanced their secondary growth by at least 80%. Surprisingly, this reaction was even greater - relatively - for suppressed trees than for dominant ones. Acclimated trees did not sense the different types of wind events in the same way. Daily wind speed peaks due to thermal winds were filtered out. Thigmomorphogenesis was therefore driven by intense storms. Thigmomorphogenesis is also likely to be involved in determining social status. PMID:26790391

  10. Systematic variation of magnetic-field penetration depth in high-Tc superconductors studied by muon-spin relaxation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uemura, Y. J.; Emery, V. J.; Moodenbaugh, A. R.; Suenaga, M.; Johnston, D. C.

    1988-01-01

    The muon relaxation rate (sigma) was measured in the high critical temperature superconductors YBa2Cu3O(x) for x = 6.66, 6.95, 7.0, and La1.85 SrO.15 CuO4 in transverse external magnetic fields 1 is approximately 4 kG. A simple relation is found which connects the transition temperature T(c), the magnetic field penetration depth lambda(L), the carrier concentration n(s) and the effective mass m* as T(c) varies as sigma which varies as 1/lambda(L) squared which varies as n(s)/m*. The linear dependence T(c) varies as n(s)/m* suggests a high energy scale for the coupling between superconducting carriers.

  11. Systematic variation of magnetic-field penetration depth in high-T(c) superconductors studied by muon spin relaxation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uemura, Y. J.; Emery, V. J.; Moodenbaugh, A. R.; Suenaga, M.; Johnston, D. C.; Jacobson, A. J.; Lewandowski, J. T.; Brewer, J. H.; Kiefl, R. F.; Kreitzman, S. R.

    1988-01-01

    The muon relaxation rate (sigma) was measured in the high critical temperature superconductors YBa2Cu3O(x) for x = 6.66, 6.95, 7.0, and La1.85 Sr0.15 CuO4 in transverse external magnetic fields 1 is approximately 4kG. A simple relation is found which connects the transition temperature T(c), the magnetic field penetration depth lambda(L), the carrier concentration n(s) and the effective mass m* as T(c) varies as sigma which varies as 1/lambda(L) squared which varies as n(s)/m*. The linear dependence T(c) varies as n(s)/m* suggests a high energy scale for the coupling between superconducting carriers.

  12. Novel A14841G mutation is associated with high penetrance of LHON/C4171A family.

    PubMed

    Yang, Juhua; Zhu, Yihua; Chen, Lu; Zhang, Hongxing; Tong, Yi; Huang, Dinggou; Zhang, Zhiqiang; Chen, Shi; Han, Xiaoli; Ma, Xu

    2009-09-01

    We report the clinical and genetic characterization of a Chinese LHON family carrying an ND1/C4171A mutation. This family has high penetrance of visual impairment and extremely low frequency of vision recovery, which is in marked contrast to previously reported results for Korean LHON families with the same mutation. Sequence analysis of the complete mtDNA in the partially defined East Asian haplogroup N9a1 revealed the presence of 29 other variants. A novel heteroplasmic A14841G mutation, one of the variants with a serine substituted for a highly conserved asparagine at amino acid 32 of Cytochrome b (Cytb), may play a synergistic role with the C4171A mutation, leading to significantly different clinical manifestations of LHON among these families. The study further confirmed that C4171A was a rare primary LHON mutation, and the mtDNA background could also contribute to the clinical manifestation of the LHON/C4171A mutation.

  13. Modeling the Benefits of Storage Technologies to Wind Power

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, P.; Short, W.; Blair, N.

    2008-06-01

    Rapid expansion of wind power in the electricity sector is raising questions about how wind resource variability might affect the capacity value of wind farms at high levels of penetration. Electricity storage, with the capability to shift wind energy from periods of low demand to peak times and to smooth fluctuations in output, may have a role in bolstering the value of wind power at levels of penetration envisioned by a new Department of Energy report ('20% Wind by 2030, Increasing Wind Energy's Contribution to U.S. Electricity Supply'). This paper quantifies the value storage can add to wind. The analysis was done employing the Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) model, formerly known as the Wind Deployment System (WinDS) model. ReEDS was used to estimate the cost and development path associated with 20% penetration of wind in the report. ReEDS differs from the WinDS model primarily in that the model has been modified to include the capability to build and use three storage technologies: pumped-hydroelectric storage (PHS), compressed-air energy storage (CAES), and batteries. To assess the value of these storage technologies, two pairs of scenarios were run: business-as-usual, with and without storage; 20% wind energy by 2030, with and without storage. This paper presents the results from those model runs.

  14. Compact, High Energy 2-micron Coherent Doppler Wind Lidar Development for NASA's Future 3-D Winds Measurement from Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Koch, Grady; Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Beyon, Jeffrey; Kavaya, Michael J.; Trieu, Bo; Chen, Songsheng; Bai, Yingxin; Petzar, paul; Modlin, Edward A.; Barnes, Bruce W.; Demoz, Belay B.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of 2-micron laser transmitter development at NASA Langley Research Center for coherent-detection lidar profiling of winds. The novel high-energy, 2-micron, Ho:Tm:LuLiF laser technology developed at NASA Langley was employed to study laser technology currently envisioned by NASA for future global coherent Doppler lidar winds measurement. The 250 mJ, 10 Hz laser was designed as an integral part of a compact lidar transceiver developed for future aircraft flight. Ground-based wind profiles made with this transceiver will be presented. NASA Langley is currently funded to build complete Doppler lidar systems using this transceiver for the DC-8 aircraft in autonomous operation. Recently, LaRC 2-micron coherent Doppler wind lidar system was selected to contribute to the NASA Science Mission Directorate (SMD) Earth Science Division (ESD) hurricane field experiment in 2010 titled Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP). The Doppler lidar system will measure vertical profiles of horizontal vector winds from the DC-8 aircraft using NASA Langley s existing 2-micron, pulsed, coherent detection, Doppler wind lidar system that is ready for DC-8 integration. The measurements will typically extend from the DC-8 to the earth s surface. They will be highly accurate in both wind magnitude and direction. Displays of the data will be provided in real time on the DC-8. The pulsed Doppler wind lidar of NASA Langley Research Center is much more powerful than past Doppler lidars. The operating range, accuracy, range resolution, and time resolution will be unprecedented. We expect the data to play a key role, combined with the other sensors, in improving understanding and predictive algorithms for hurricane strength and track. 1

  15. Manufactured Home Testing in Simulated and Naturally Occurring High Winds

    SciTech Connect

    W. D. Richins; T. K. Larson

    2006-08-01

    A typical double-wide manufactured home was tested in simulated and naturally occurring high winds to understand structural behavior and improve performance during severe windstorms. Seven (7) lateral load tests were conducted on a double-wide manufactured home at a remote field test site in Wyoming. An extensive instrumentation package monitored the overall behavior of the home and collected data vital to validating computational software for the manufactured housing industry. The tests were designed to approach the design load of the home without causing structural damage, thus allowing the behavior of the home to be accessed when the home was later exposed to high winds (to 80-mph). The data generally show near-linear initial system response with significant non-linear behavior as the applied loads increase. Load transfer across the marriage line is primarily compression. Racking, while present, is very small. Interface slip and shear displacement along the marriage line are nearly insignificant. Horizontal global displacements reached 0.6 inch. These tests were designed primarily to collect data necessary to calibrate a desktop analysis and design software tool, MHTool, under development at the Idaho National Laboratory specifically for manufactured housing. Currently available analysis tools are, for the most part, based on methods developed for “stick built” structures and are inappropriate for manufactured homes. The special materials utilized in manufactured homes, such as rigid adhesives used in the connection of the sheathing materials to the studs, significantly alter the behavior of manufactured homes under lateral loads. Previous full scale tests of laterally loaded manufactured homes confirm the contention that conventional analysis methods are not applicable. System behavior dominates the structural action of manufactured homes and its prediction requires a three dimensional analysis of the complete unit, including tiedowns. This project was

  16. The Effect of High-Pressure Devitrification and Densification on Ballistic-Penetration Resistance of Fused Silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grujicic, M.; Avuthu, V.; Snipes, J. S.; Ramaswami, S.; Galgalikar, R.

    2015-12-01

    Recent experimental and molecular-level computational analyses have indicated that fused silica, when subjected to pressures of several tens of GPa, can experience irreversible devitrification and densification. Such changes in the fused-silica molecular-level structure are associated with absorption and/or dissipation of the strain energy acquired by fused silica during high-pressure compression. This finding may have important practical consequences in applications for fused silica such as windshields and windows of military vehicles, portholes in ships, ground vehicles, spacecraft, etc. In the present work, our prior molecular-level computational results pertaining to the response of fused silica to high pressures (and shear stresses) are used to enrich a continuum-type constitutive model (that is, the so-called Johnson-Holmquist-2, JH2, model) for this material. Since the aforementioned devitrification and permanent densification processes modify the response of fused silica to the pressure as well as to the deviatoric part of the stress, changes had to be made in both the JH2 equation of state and the strength model. To assess the potential improvements in respect to the ballistic-penetration resistance of this material brought about by the fused-silica devitrification and permanent densification processes, a series of transient non-linear dynamics finite-element analyses of the transverse impact of a fused-silica test plate with a solid right-circular cylindrical steel projectile were conducted. The results obtained revealed that, provided the projectile incident velocity and, hence, the attendant pressure, is sufficiently high, fused silica can undergo impact-induced devitrification, which improves its ballistic-penetration resistance.

  17. Long range surface plasmon resonance with ultra-high penetration depth for self-referenced sensing and ultra-low detection limit using diverging beam approach

    SciTech Connect

    Isaacs, Sivan Abdulhalim, Ibrahim

    2015-05-11

    Using an insulator-metal-insulator structure with dielectric having refractive index (RI) larger than the analyte, long range surface plasmon (SP) resonance exhibiting ultra-high penetration depth is demonstrated for sensing applications of large bioentities at wavelengths in the visible range. Based on the diverging beam approach in Kretschmann-Raether configuration, one of the SP resonances is shown to shift in response to changes in the analyte RI while the other is fixed; thus, it can be used as a built in reference. The combination of the high sensitivity, high penetration depth and self-reference using the diverging beam approach in which a dark line is detected of the high sensitivity, high penetration depth, self-reference, and the diverging beam approach in which a dark line is detected using large number of camera pixels with a smart algorithm for sub-pixel resolution, a sensor with ultra-low detection limit is demonstrated suitable for large bioentities.

  18. Trends in 100m Wind Speed using Global High-Resolution Downscaled Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGraw, Z.

    2015-12-01

    The strength and variability of the wind energy resource are expected to be susceptible to the complex changes undergoing Earth's climate system. A variety of physical mechanisms for long-term wind speed changes has been proposed, including modified temperature gradients, shifting storm tracks and altered land use. This study is an analysis of multi-decadal wind speed trends within a high-resolution downscaled global analysis provided by our collaborators at Vestas Wind Systems A/S. We have sought to identify the regions and landscape types that most exhibit long-term changes to wind speed and identify the mechanisms responsible.

  19. Possibility of critical field enhancement due to field penetration in high-T/sub c/ sponges and thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Collings, E.W.; Markworth, A.J.; Marken, K.R. Jr.

    1989-03-01

    Magnetic susceptibility measurements of a sample of sintered high-T/sub c/ ceramic superconductor of nominal composition Y/sub 1/Ba/sub 2/Cu/sub 3/O/sub 7-y/ were conducted as function of temperature from liquid-He temperatures to T/sub c/. The fitted form of the susceptibility temperature dependence yielded a sample particle size that was only a few times larger than the field-penetration depth. The particle size was much less than the grain size and commensurate with the thickness of the optical twins. The occurence of field penetration between lamina about 0.2 to 0.7 /mu/m in half-thickness was predicted to lead to a small enhancement of the lower critical field. This prediction was compared with the results of an experiment in which the M(H) field sweep, initially +- 100 gauss, was incremented in small steps up to several kgauss. The results of the enhancement studies are also discussed in the light of Bean's early experiments on Pb sponges (in this case /lambda/ >> particle size) which exhibited spectacular enhancements of H/sub c/ in association with flux trapping at or between the Pb filaments. It is predicted that it should be possible, using presently available film-deposition techniques, to produce high-T/sub c/ films possessing several-fold enhancements of H/sub cl/ beyond the bulk value; and that as with the Pb sponges, the magnetization loops, even when taken within what passes for the Meissner state in such materials, will by hysteretic.

  20. 78 FR 29364 - Exelon Corporation, Exelon Wind 1, LLC, Exelon Wind 2, LLC, Exelon Wind 3, LLC, Exelon Wind 4...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-20

    ...-005, QF07-257-004] Exelon Corporation, Exelon Wind 1, LLC, Exelon Wind 2, LLC, Exelon Wind 3, LLC, Exelon Wind 4, LLC, Exelon Wind 5, LLC, Exelon Wind 6, LLC, Exelon Wind 7, LLC, Exelon Wind 8, LLC, Exelon Wind 9, LLC, Exelon Wind 10, LLC, Exelon Wind 11, LLC, High Plains Wind Power, LLC v. Xcel...

  1. Effect of High Air Velocities on the Distribution and Penetration of a Fuel Spray

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothrock, A M

    1931-01-01

    By means of the NACA Spray Photography Equipment high speed moving pictures were taken of the formation and development of fuel sprays from an automatic injection valve. The sprays were injected normal to and counter to air at velocities from 0 to 800 feet per second. The air was at atmosphere temperature and pressure. The results show that high air velocities are an effective means of mixing the fuel spray with the air during injection.

  2. A Study on the Wind Power Generation Fluctuation of Multiple Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamagishi, Yoshio; Ueda, Tomoyuki; Kanao, Norikazu; Komami, Shintaro

    The use of renewable energy sources such as the sun and wind is increasing steadily. High penetration of wind power may affect electric power system frequency, because the fluctuations in wind power generation are much larger than that of conventional power plants. To evaluate wind power fluctuation and its effect on the power systems, it is important to acquire actual fluctuation data of wind farm power. In this paper, the authors report the results of an analysis of wind power fluctuation and smoothing effect from data measured at existing wind power sites in the Hokuriku region. A novel index is proposed to evaluate the smoothing effect, and impacts of high wind penetration are estimated using this index. This paper also proposes a control strategy of battery storage system for stabilizing wind farm output.

  3. Automatic Detection Algorithm of the Solar Wind Dynamic Pressure Pulses with the Application to WIND High-resolution Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, P.; Feng, X. S.

    2014-12-01

    Solar wind dynamic pressure pulses (DPPs), i.e. the abrupt change in solar wind dynamic pressure, can affect the energy and momentum transfer from the solar wind to the magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling system, and as a result, cause various types of disturbances. To detect the DPPs rapidly from the solar wind plasma data, an automated DPP-hunting computer code is developed. In order to meet the research requirements, it demands not only identify and isolate the special structure, but also automatically select appropriate preceding and succeeding reference data points, for which there are very small variations in solar wind dynamic pressure, to represent the plasma status before and after the pressure change, as well as determine the DPP fine ramp structure where the solar wind transits from one relatively quiet status to another. It indicates from the high-resolution measurements that the pressure changes can occur on time scale from a few seconds to many minutes. The code can be used to hunt DPPs of arbitrary ramp length and arbitrary pressure change amplitude by adjusting the criteria. It can be applied to variable data rates. The strong DPPs that have very large pressure change are most geoeffective so as to affect the near-Earth environment intensively. Thus the code also benefits the space weather warning or forecasting when applied to the real-time spacecraft data to hunt the large DPPs. Here we present the major algorithm to identify and define the upstream, downstream and the ramp region. The effectiveness of this code is tested on WIND high-resolution measurements covering the 23th solar cycle. We will show the test results during the interval of magnetic cloud (MC) and corotating interation region (CIR). The statistical results of DPPs in 23th solar cycle are also discussed.

  4. Wind compensation by radiometer arrays in high altitude propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gimelshein, Natalia; Gimelshein, Sergey; Ketsdever, Andrew; Young, Marcus

    2012-11-01

    Numerical analysis has been conducted to assess the feasibility of using radiometer arrays mounted on a near-space vehicle, for wind disturbance compensation. The results indicate the possibility of using radiometric force for that purpose for altitudes of 80 km and smaller, and head winds up to 30 m/s.

  5. Reduced drag coefficient for high wind speeds in tropical cyclones.

    PubMed

    Powell, Mark D; Vickery, Peter J; Reinhold, Timothy A

    2003-03-20

    The transfer of momentum between the atmosphere and the ocean is described in terms of the variation of wind speed with height and a drag coefficient that increases with sea surface roughness and wind speed. But direct measurements have only been available for weak winds; momentum transfer under extreme wind conditions has therefore been extrapolated from these field measurements. Global Positioning System sondes have been used since 1997 to measure the profiles of the strong winds in the marine boundary layer associated with tropical cyclones. Here we present an analysis of these data, which show a logarithmic increase in mean wind speed with height in the lowest 200 m, maximum wind speed at 500 m and a gradual weakening up to a height of 3 km. By determining surface stress, roughness length and neutral stability drag coefficient, we find that surface momentum flux levels off as the wind speeds increase above hurricane force. This behaviour is contrary to surface flux parameterizations that are currently used in a variety of modelling applications, including hurricane risk assessment and prediction of storm motion, intensity, waves and storm surges.

  6. Analysis of High-Penetration Levels of Photovoltaics into the Distribution Grid on Oahu, Hawaii: Detailed Analysis of HECO Feeder WF1

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, E.; MacPherson, J.; Vasilic, S.; Nakafuji, D.; Aukai, T.

    2013-05-01

    Renewable generation is growing at a rapid rate due to the incentives available and the aggressive renewable portfolio standard targets implemented by state governments. Distributed generation in particular is seeing the fastest growth among renewable energy projects, and is directly related to the incentives. Hawaii has the highest electricity costs in the country due to the high percentage of oil burning steam generation, and therefore has some of the highest penetration of distributed PV in the nation. The High Penetration PV project on Oahu aims to understand the effects of high penetration PV on the distribution level, to identify penetration levels creating disturbances on the circuit, and to offer mitigating solutions based on model results. Power flow models are validated using data collected from solar resources and load monitors deployed throughout the circuit. Existing interconnection methods and standards are evaluated in these emerging high penetration scenarios. A key finding is a shift in the level of detail to be considered and moving away from steady-state peak time analysis towards dynamic and time varying simulations. Each level of normal interconnection study is evaluated and enhanced to a new level of detail, allowing full understanding of each issue.

  7. Discovery of Isonicotinamides as Highly Selective, Brain Penetrable, and Orally Active Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3 Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Luo, Guanglin; Chen, Ling; Burton, Catherine R; Xiao, Hong; Sivaprakasam, Prasanna; Krause, Carol M; Cao, Yang; Liu, Nengyin; Lippy, Jonathan; Clarke, Wendy J; Snow, Kimberly; Raybon, Joseph; Arora, Vinod; Pokross, Matt; Kish, Kevin; Lewis, Hal A; Langley, David R; Macor, John E; Dubowchik, Gene M

    2016-02-11

    GSK-3 is a serine/threonine kinase that has numerous substrates. Many of these proteins are involved in the regulation of diverse cellular functions, including metabolism, differentiation, proliferation, and apoptosis. Inhibition of GSK-3 may be useful in treating a number of diseases including Alzheimer's disease (AD), type II diabetes, mood disorders, and some cancers, but the approach poses significant challenges. Here, we present a class of isonicotinamides that are potent, highly kinase-selective GSK-3 inhibitors, the members of which demonstrated oral activity in a triple-transgenic mouse model of AD. The remarkably high kinase selectivity and straightforward synthesis of these compounds bode well for their further exploration as tool compounds and therapeutics.

  8. Discovery of Isonicotinamides as Highly Selective, Brain Penetrable, and Orally Active Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3 Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Luo, Guanglin; Chen, Ling; Burton, Catherine R; Xiao, Hong; Sivaprakasam, Prasanna; Krause, Carol M; Cao, Yang; Liu, Nengyin; Lippy, Jonathan; Clarke, Wendy J; Snow, Kimberly; Raybon, Joseph; Arora, Vinod; Pokross, Matt; Kish, Kevin; Lewis, Hal A; Langley, David R; Macor, John E; Dubowchik, Gene M

    2016-02-11

    GSK-3 is a serine/threonine kinase that has numerous substrates. Many of these proteins are involved in the regulation of diverse cellular functions, including metabolism, differentiation, proliferation, and apoptosis. Inhibition of GSK-3 may be useful in treating a number of diseases including Alzheimer's disease (AD), type II diabetes, mood disorders, and some cancers, but the approach poses significant challenges. Here, we present a class of isonicotinamides that are potent, highly kinase-selective GSK-3 inhibitors, the members of which demonstrated oral activity in a triple-transgenic mouse model of AD. The remarkably high kinase selectivity and straightforward synthesis of these compounds bode well for their further exploration as tool compounds and therapeutics. PMID:26751161

  9. Eulerian adaptive finite-difference method for high-velocity impact and penetration problems

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, Philip T.; Deiterding, Ralf; Meiron, Daniel I.; Pullin, Dale I

    2013-01-01

    Owing to the complex processes involved, faithful prediction of high-velocity impact events demands a simulation method delivering efficient calculations based on comprehensively formulated constitutive models. Such an approach is presented herein, employing a weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) method within an adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) framework for the numerical solution of hyperbolic partial differential equations. Applied widely in computational fluid dynamics, these methods are well suited to the involved locally non-smooth finite deformations, circumventing any requirement for artificial viscosity functions for shock capturing. Application of the methods is facilitated through using a model of solid dynamics based upon hyper-elastic theory comprising kinematic evolution equations for the elastic distortion tensor. The model for finite inelastic deformations is phenomenologically equivalent to Maxwell s model of tangential stress relaxation. Closure relations tailored to the expected high-pressure states are proposed and calibrated for the materials of interest. Sharp interface resolution is achieved by employing level-set functions to track boundary motion, along with a ghost material method to capture the necessary internal boundary conditions for material interactions and stress-free surfaces. The approach is demonstrated for the simulation of high velocity impacts of steel projectiles on aluminium target plates in two and three dimensions.

  10. Seismic, high wind, tornado, and probabilistic risk assessments of the High Flux Isotope Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, S.P.; Stover, R.L.; Hashimoto, P.S.; Dizon, J.O.; Oak Ridge National Lab., TN; EQE, Inc., San Francisco, CA )

    1989-01-01

    Natural phenomena analyses were performed on the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) Deterministic and probabilistic evaluations were made to determine the risks resulting from earthquakes, high winds, and tornadoes. Analytic methods in conjunction with field evaluations and an earthquake experience data base evaluation methods were used to provide more realistic results in a shorter amount of time. Plant modifications completed in preparation for HFIR restart and potential future enhancements are discussed. 5 figs.

  11. High-frequency wave normals in the solar wind

    SciTech Connect

    Herbert, F.; Smith, L.D.; Sonett, C.P.

    1984-05-01

    High-frequency (0.01--0.04 Hz) magnetic fluctuations in 506 ten-minute intervals of contemporaneous Explorer 35 and Apollo 12 measurements made in the solar wind near the morning side of the Earth's bow shock show the presence of a large population of disturbances resembling Alfven waves. Each wavefront normal n is systematically aligned (median deviation = 35/sup 0/) with , the associated ten-minute average of the magnetic field. Because of variability in the direction of from one interval to another, the coupled distribution of n is nearly isotropic in solar ecliptic coordinates, in contrast with the results of other studies of waves at much lower frequency indicating outward propagation from the sun. Presumably the high frequency waves discussed here are stirred into isotropy (in solar ecliptic coordinates) by following the low frequency fluctuations. As these waves maintain their alignement of n with despite the great variation of , a strong physical alignment constraint is inferred.

  12. High-aspect-ratio photoresist processing for fabrication of high resolution and thick micro-windings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anthony, Ricky; Laforge, Elias; Casey, Declan P.; Rohan, James F.; O'Mathuna, Cian

    2016-10-01

    DC winding losses remain a major roadblock in realizing high efficiency micro-magnetic components (inductors/transformers). This paper reports an optimized photoresist process using negative tone and acrylic based THB-151N (from JSR Micro), to achieve one of the highest aspect ratio (17:1) and resolution (~5 µm) resist patterns for fabrication of thick (~80 µm) micro-winding using UV lithography. The process was optimized to achieve photoresist widths from 5 µm to 20 µm with resist thickness of ~85 µm in a single spin step. Unlike SU-8, this resist can be readily removed and shows a near-vertical (~91°) electroplated Cu side-wall profile. Moreover, the high resolution compared to available resist processes enables a further reduction in the footprint area and can potentially increase the number of winding thereby increasing the inductance density for micro-magnetic components. Resistance measurements of electroplated copper winding of air-core micro-inductors within the standard 0402 size (0.45 mm2 footprint area) suggested a 42% decrease in resistance (273 mΩ-159 mΩ) with the increase in electroplated Cu thickness (from 50 µm to 80 µm). Reduction of the spacings (from 10 µm to 5 µm) enabled further miniaturisation of the device footprint area (from 0.60 mm2 to 0.45 mm2) without significant increase in resistance.

  13. Western Wind and Solar Integration Study Phase 3: Technical Overview

    SciTech Connect

    2015-11-01

    Technical fact sheet outlining the key findings of Phase 3 of the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study (WWSIS-3). NREL and GE find that with good system planning, sound engineering practices, and commercially available technologies, the Western grid can maintain reliability and stability during the crucial first minute after grid disturbances with high penetrations of wind and solar power.

  14. High-speed solar wind streams and polar mesosphere winter echoes at Troll, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkwood, S.; Osepian, A.; Belova, E.; Lee, Y.-S.

    2015-06-01

    A small, 54 MHz wind-profiler radar, MARA, was operated at Troll, Antarctica (72° S, 2.5° E), continuously from November 2011 to January 2014, covering two complete Antarctic winters. Despite very low power, MARA observed echoes from heights of 55-80 km (polar mesosphere winter echoes, PMWE) on 60% of all winter days (from March to October). This contrasts with previous reports from radars at high northern latitudes, where PWME have been reported only by very high power radars or during rare periods of unusually high electron density at PMWE heights, such as during solar proton events. Analysis shows that PWME at Troll were not related to solar proton events but were often closely related to the arrival of high-speed solar wind streams (HSS) at the Earth, with PWME appearing at heights as low as 56 km and persisting for up to 15 days following HSS arrival. This demonstrates that HSS effects penetrate directly to below 60 km height in the polar atmosphere. Using local observations of cosmic-noise absorption (CNA), a theoretical ionization/ion-chemistry model and a statistical model of precipitating energetic electrons associated with HSS, the electron density conditions during the HSS events are estimated. We find that PMWE detectability cannot be explained by these variations in electron density and molecular-ion chemistry alone. PWME become detectable at different thresholds depending on solar illumination and height. In darkness, PWME are detected only when the modelled electron density is above a threshold of about 1000 cm-3, and only above 75 km height, where negative ions are few. In daylight, the electron density threshold falls by at least 2 orders of magnitude and PWME are found primarily below 75 km height, even in conditions when a large proportion of negative ions is expected. There is also a strong dawn-dusk asymmetry with PWME detected very rarely during morning twilight but often during evening twilight. This behaviour cannot be explained if PMWE

  15. Wind constraints on the thermoregulation of high mountain lizards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega, Zaida; Mencía, Abraham; Pérez-Mellado, Valentín

    2016-08-01

    Thermal biology of lizards affects their overall physiological performance. Thus, it is crucial to study how abiotic constraints influence thermoregulation. We studied the effect of wind speed on thermoregulation in an endangered mountain lizard (Iberolacerta aurelioi). We compared two populations of lizards: one living in a sheltered rocky area and the other living in a mountain ridge, exposed to strong winds. The preferred temperature range of I. aurelioi, which reflects thermal physiology, was similar in both areas, and it was typical of a cold specialist. Although the thermal physiology of lizards and the structure of the habitat were similar, the higher wind speed in the exposed population was correlated with a significant decrease in the effectiveness thermoregulation, dropping from 0.83 to 0.74. Our results suggest that wind reduces body temperatures in two ways: via direct convective cooling of the animal and via convective cooling of the substrate, which causes conductive cooling of the animal. The detrimental effect of wind on thermoregulatory effectiveness is surprising, since lizards are expected to thermoregulate more effectively in more challenging habitats. However, wind speed would affect the costs and benefits of thermoregulation in more complex ways than just the cooling of animals and their habitats. For example, it may reduce the daily activity, increase desiccation, or complicate the hunting of prey. Finally, our results imply that wind should also be considered when developing conservation strategies for threatened ectotherms.

  16. Effects of High-frequency Wind Sampling on Simulated Mixed Layer Depth and Upper Ocean Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Tong; Liu, W. Timothy

    2005-01-01

    Effects of high-frequency wind sampling on a near-global ocean model are studied by forcing the model with a 12 hourly averaged wind product and its 24 hourly subsamples in separate experiments. The differences in mixed layer depth and sea surface temperature resulting from these experiments are examined, and the underlying physical processes are investigated. The 24 hourly subsampling not only reduces the high-frequency variability of the wind but also affects the annual mean wind because of aliasing. While the former effect largely impacts mid- to high-latitude oceans, the latter primarily affects tropical and coastal oceans. At mid- to high-latitude regions the subsampled wind results in a shallower mixed layer and higher sea surface temperature because of reduced vertical mixing associated with weaker high-frequency wind. In tropical and coastal regions, however, the change in upper ocean structure due to the wind subsampling is primarily caused by the difference in advection resulting from aliased annual mean wind, which varies with the subsampling time. The results of the study indicate a need for more frequent sampling of satellite wind measurement and have implications for data assimilation in terms of identifying the nature of model errors.

  17. Brushless exciters using a high temperature superconducting field winding

    SciTech Connect

    Garces, Luis Jose; Delmerico, Robert William; Jansen, Patrick Lee; Parslow, John Harold; Sanderson, Harold Copeland; Sinha, Gautam

    2008-03-18

    A brushless exciter for a synchronous generator or motor generally includes a stator and a rotor rotatably disposed within the stator. The rotor has a field winding and a voltage rectifying bridge circuit connected in parallel to the field winding. A plurality of firing circuits are connected the voltage rectifying bridge circuit. The firing circuit is configured to fire a signal at an angle of less than 90.degree. or at an angle greater than 90.degree.. The voltage rectifying bridge circuit rectifies the AC voltage to excite or de-excite the field winding.

  18. Flow-Visualization Techniques Used at High Speed by Configuration Aerodynamics Wind-Tunnel-Test Team

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamar, John E. (Editor)

    2001-01-01

    This paper summarizes a variety of optically based flow-visualization techniques used for high-speed research by the Configuration Aerodynamics Wind-Tunnel Test Team of the High-Speed Research Program during its tenure. The work of other national experts is included for completeness. Details of each technique with applications and status in various national wind tunnels are given.

  19. Tools for Enhanced Grid Operation and Optimized PV Penetration Utilizing Highly Distributed Sensor Data.

    SciTech Connect

    Reno, Matthew J.; Peppanen, Jouni; Seuss, John; Lave, Matthew Samuel; Broderick, Robert Joseph; Grijalva, Santiago

    2015-11-01

    Increasing number s of PV on distribution systems are creating more grid impacts , but it also provides more opportunities for measurement, sensing, and control of the grid in a distributed fashion. This report demonstrates three software tools for characterizing and controlling distribution feeders by utilizing large numbers of highly distributed current, voltage , and irradiance sensors. Instructions and a user manual is presented for each tool. First, the tool for distribution system secondary circuit parameter estimation is presented. This tool allows studying distribution system parameter estimation accuracy with user-selected active power, reactive power, and voltage measurements and measurement error levels. Second, the tool for multi-objective inverter control is shown. Various PV inverter control strategies can be selected to objectively compare their impact on the feeder. Third, the tool for energy storage for PV ramp rate smoothing is presented. The tool allows the user to select different storage characteristics (power and energy ratings) and control types (local vs. centralized) to study the tradeoffs between state-of-charge (SOC) management and the amount of ramp rate smoothing.

  20. Energy Loss of High Intensity Focused Proton Beams Penetrating Metal Foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuffey, C.; Qiao, B.; Kim, J.; Beg, F. N.; Wei, M. S.; Evans, M.; Fitzsimmons, P.; Stephens, R. B.; Chen, S. N.; Fuchs, J.; Nilson, P. M.; Canning, D.; Mastrosimone, D.; Foord, M. E.

    2014-10-01

    Shortpulse-laser-driven intense ion beams are appealing for applications in probing and creating high energy density plasmas. Such a beam isochorically heats and rapidly ionizes any target it enters into warm dense matter with uncertain transport and stopping properties. Here we present experimental measurements taken with the 1.25 kJ, 10 ps OMEGA EP BL shortpulse laser of the proton and carbon spectra after passing through metal foils. The laser irradiated spherically curved C targets with intensity 4×1018 W/cm2, producing proton beams with 3 MeV slope temperature and a sharp low energy cutoff at 5 MeV which has not been observed on lower energy, shorter pulse intense lasers. The beam either diverged freely or was focused to estimated 1016 p +/cm2 ps by a surrounding structure before entering the metal foils (Al or Ag and a Cu tracer layer). The proton and ion spectra were altered by the foil depending on material and whether or not the beam was focused. Transverse proton radiography probed the target with ps temporal and 10 micron spatial resolution, indicating an electrostatic field on the foil may also have affected the beam. We present complementary particle-in-cell simulations of the beam generation and transport to the foils. This work was supported by the DOE/NNSA National Laser User Facility program, Contract DE-SC0001265.

  1. Cellulosic fibers with high aspect ratio from cornhusks via controlled swelling and alkaline penetration.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhuanzhuan; Pan, Gangwei; Xu, Helan; Huang, Yiling; Yang, Yiqi

    2015-06-25

    Cellulosic fibers with high aspect ratio have been firstly obtained from cornhusks via controlled swelling in organic solvent and simultaneous tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAOH) post treatment within restricted depth. Cornhusks, with around 42% cellulose content, are a copious and inexpensive source for natural fibers. However, cornhusk fibers at 20tex obtained via small-molecule alkaline extraction were too coarse for textile applications. Continuous NaOH treatment would result in fine fibers but with length of about 0.5-1.5mm, too short for textile use. In this research, post treatment using TMAOH and under controlled swelling significantly reduced fineness of cornhusk fibers from 21.3±2.88 to 5.72±0.21tex. Fiber length was reduced from 105.47±10.03 to47.2±27.4mm. The cornhusk fibers had more oriented microstructures and cellulose content increased to 84.47%. Besides, cornhusk fibers had similar tenacity, longer elongation, and lower modulus compared to cotton and linen, which endowed them with durability and flexibility.

  2. An experimental study of a high-rise building model in tornado-like winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zifeng; Sarkar, Partha; Hu, Hui

    2011-05-01

    An experimental study was conducted to quantify the characteristics of wake vortex and flow structures around a high-rise building model as well as the resultant wind loads (both forces and moments) acting on the test model in tornado-like winds. In addition to measuring wind loads acting on the tested high-rise building model using a high-sensitivity load cell, a digital Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) system was used to conduct detailed flow field measurements to quantify the evolution of the unsteady vortex and turbulent flow structures around the test model in tornado-like winds. The measurement results revealed clearly that the evolution of the wake vortex and turbulent flow structures around the test model as well as the resultant wind loads induced by tornado-like winds were significantly different from those in conventional straight-line winds. The detailed flow field measurements were correlated with the wind load measurement data to elucidate the underlying physics to gain further insight into the flow-structure interactions between the tested high-rise building model and tornado-like vortex. The new findings derived from the present study could be used to provide more accurate prediction of wind damage potential to built environment with the ultimate goal of reducing life loss, injury casualty, and economic loss that results from tornados.

  3. High-G accelerometer for earth-penetrator weapons applications. LDRD final report

    SciTech Connect

    Davies, B.R.; Montague, S.; Bateman, V.I.; Brown, F.A.; Chanchani, R.; Christenson, T.; Murray, J.R.; Rey, D.; Ryerson, D.

    1998-03-01

    Micromachining technologies, or Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS), enable the develop of low-cost devices capable of sensing motion in a reliable and accurate manner. Sandia has developed a MEMS fabrication process for integrating both the micromechanical structures and microelectronics circuitry of surface micromachined sensors, such as silicon accelerometers, on the same chip. Integration of the micromechanical sensor elements with microelectronics provides substantial performance and reliability advantages for MEMS accelerometers. A design team at Sandia was assembled to develop a micromachined silicon accelerometer capable of surviving and measuring very high accelerations (up to 50,000 times the acceleration due to gravity). The Sandia integrated surface micromachining process was selected for fabrication of the sensor due to the extreme measurement sensitivity potential associated with integrated microelectronics. Very fine measurement sensitivity was required due to the very small accelerometer proof mass (< 200 {times} 10{sup {minus}9} gram) obtainable with this surface micromachining process. The small proof mass corresponded to small sensor deflections which required very sensitive electronics to enable accurate acceleration measurement over a range of 1,000 to 50,000 times the acceleration due to gravity. Several prototype sensors, based on a suspended plate mass configuration, were developed and the details of the design, modeling, fabrication and validation of the device will be presented in this paper. The device was analyzed using both conventional lumped parameter modeling techniques and finite element analysis tools. The device was tested and performed well over its design range (the device was tested over a range of a few thousand G to 46,000 G, where 1 G equals the acceleration due to gravity).

  4. High altitude wind resource in the Middle East

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yip, Chak Man Andrew; Gunturu, Udaya B.; Stenchikov, Georgiy L.

    2016-04-01

    This study presents a first identification of areas favorable to Airborne Wind Energy (AWE) Systems deployment in the Middle East and illustrates their diurnal and seasonal characteristics. Optimal heights of AWE system deployment are computed. The AWE literature has conventionally used a top-down approach where AWE potentials are estimated as a fraction of wind power density. This study takes the bottom-up approach where the regional AWE potentials are estimated using realistic machine specification with assumptions upon deployment conditions. The annual energy production per capita illustrates the potential of AWE systems in fulfilling electricity needs at the current level for several countries in the region. Our estimate also compares favorably to the near-surface wind power potential using identical data source from a previous study. In addition, the non-monotonicity in the vertical profile is examined for areas with potential LLJ influences, where behaviors in wind speed and direction similar to that of inertial oscillations are identified.

  5. Wind Measurements with High Energy 2 Micron Coherent Doppler Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, Bruce W.; Koch, Grady J.; Petros, Mulugeta; Beyon, Jeffrey Y.; Amzajerdian, Farzin; Yu, Ji-Rong; Kavaya, Michael J.; Singh, Upendra N.

    2004-01-01

    A coherent Doppler lidar based on an injection seeded Ho:Tm:YLF pulsed laser was developed for wind measurements. A transmitted pulse energy over 75 mJ at 5 Hz repetition rate has been demonstrated. Designs are presented on the laser, injection seeding, receiver, and signal processing subsystems. Sample data of atmospheric measurements are presented including a wind profile extending from the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) to the free troposphere.

  6. A highly penetrant form of childhood apraxia of speech due to deletion of 16p11.2.

    PubMed

    Fedorenko, Evelina; Morgan, Angela; Murray, Elizabeth; Cardinaux, Annie; Mei, Cristina; Tager-Flusberg, Helen; Fisher, Simon E; Kanwisher, Nancy

    2016-02-01

    Individuals with heterozygous 16p11.2 deletions reportedly suffer from a variety of difficulties with speech and language. Indeed, recent copy-number variant screens of children with childhood apraxia of speech (CAS), a specific and rare motor speech disorder, have identified three unrelated individuals with 16p11.2 deletions. However, the nature and prevalence of speech and language disorders in general, and CAS in particular, is unknown for individuals with 16p11.2 deletions. Here we took a genotype-first approach, conducting detailed and systematic characterization of speech abilities in a group of 11 unrelated children ascertained on the basis of 16p11.2 deletions. To obtain the most precise and replicable phenotyping, we included tasks that are highly diagnostic for CAS, and we tested children under the age of 18 years, an age group where CAS has been best characterized. Two individuals were largely nonverbal, preventing detailed speech analysis, whereas the remaining nine met the standard accepted diagnostic criteria for CAS. These results link 16p11.2 deletions to a highly penetrant form of CAS. Our findings underline the need for further precise characterization of speech and language profiles in larger groups of affected individuals, which will also enhance our understanding of how genetic pathways contribute to human communication disorders. PMID:26173965

  7. Development of a high power supercontinuum source in the 1.7 μm wavelength region for highly penetrative ultrahigh-resolution optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Kawagoe, H.; Ishida, S.; Aramaki, M.; Sakakibara, Y.; Omoda, E.; Kataura, H.; Nishizawa, N.

    2014-01-01

    We developed a high power supercontinuum source at a center wavelength of 1.7 μm to demonstrate highly penetrative ultrahigh-resolution optical coherence tomography (UHR-OCT). A single-wall carbon nanotube dispersed in polyimide film was used as a transparent saturable absorber in the cavity configuration and a high-repetition-rate ultrashort-pulse fiber laser was realized. The developed SC source had an output power of 60 mW, a bandwidth of 242 nm full-width at half maximum, and a repetition rate of 110 MHz. The average power and repetition rate were approximately twice as large as those of our previous SC source [20]. Using the developed SC source, UHR-OCT imaging was demonstrated. A sensitivity of 105 dB and an axial resolution of 3.2 μm in biological tissue were achieved. We compared the UHR-OCT images of some biological tissue samples measured with the developed SC source, the previous one, and one operating in the 1.3 μm wavelength region. We confirmed that the developed SC source had improved sensitivity and penetration depth for low-water-absorption samples. PMID:24688825

  8. Role of Concentrating Solar Power in Integrating Solar and Wind Energy: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Denholm, P.; Mehos, M.

    2015-06-03

    As wind and solar photovoltaics (PV) increase in penetration it is increasingly important to examine enabling technologies that can help integrate these resources at large scale. Concentrating solar power (CSP) when deployed with thermal energy storage (TES) can provide multiple services that can help integrate variable generation (VG) resources such as wind and PV. CSP with TES can provide firm, highly flexible capacity, reducing minimum generation constraints which limit penetration and results in curtailment. By acting as an enabling technology, CSP can complement PV and wind, substantially increasing their penetration in locations with adequate solar resource.

  9. High-Resolution X-ray Spectroscopy of Colliding Wind Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henely, David B.

    2005-02-01

    Massive stars have powerful winds which have profound effects on their surroundings and the stars' own evolution. Most such stars reside in binaries, in which the two stars' winds collide highly supersonically. The winds are shock-heated and produce copious X-rays, the study of which can be used to address poorly understood aspects of massive star winds. In this thesis, high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy is used to study in detail the structure of wind-wind collisions. We develop a model for synthesizing X-ray emission line profiles from colliding wind binaries. We then present analyses of X-ray spectra of two colliding wind systems: gamma(2) Velorum and eta Carinae, part of which includes applying the line synthesis model to these systems. The application of the model to a third system (WR 140) is also discussed. In general, the high-resolution spectra reveal that the physics in these systems is more complicated than is usually assumed. Given this, we go on to discuss how the future development of this work can be used to further the study of the physics of massive star winds and strong collisionless shocks.

  10. On the contribution of the thermospheric neutral wind to high-latitude energetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thayer, J. P.; Vickrey, J. F.

    1992-01-01

    The significance of the neutral wind dynamo as a contributor to ionospheric energetics at high latitudes is addressed by determining separately the electrical energy flux from the magnetospheric dynamo and the maximum electrical energy flux available due to the neutral wind dynamo, neglecting the natural feedback processes between the two. The neutral wind dynamo is found to contribute significantly to the flux of energy exchanged between the magnetosphere and thermosphere, particularly in the central polar cap. In the region of the magnetospheric convection reversal, the amount of available energy flux from the neutral wind dynamo can exceed that provided by the magnetospheric dynamo making the neutrals a dominant contributor to local electrodynamics.

  11. Convective transport of highly plasma protein bound drugs facilitates direct penetration into deep tissues after topical application

    PubMed Central

    Dancik, Yuri; Anissimov, Yuri G; Jepps, Owen G; Roberts, Michael S

    2012-01-01

    AIMS To relate the varying dermal, subcutaneous and muscle microdialysate concentrations found in man after topical application to the nature of the drug applied and to the underlying physiology. METHODS We developed a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model in which transport to deeper tissues was determined by tissue diffusion, blood, lymphatic and intersitial flow transport and drug properties. The model was applied to interpret published human microdialysis data, estimated in vitro dermal diffusion and protein binding affinity of drugs that have been previously applied topically in vivo and measured in deep cutaneous tissues over time. RESULTS Deeper tissue microdialysis concentrations for various drugs in vivo vary widely. Here, we show that carriage by the blood to the deeper tissues below topical application sites facilitates the transport of highly plasma protein bound drugs that penetrate the skin, leading to rapid and significant concentrations in those tissues. Hence, the fractional concentration for the highly plasma protein bound diclofenac in deeper tissues is 0.79 times that in a probe 4.5 mm below a superficial probe whereas the corresponding fractional concentration for the poorly protein bound nicotine is 0.02. Their corresponding estimated in vivo lag times for appearance of the drugs in the deeper probes were 1.1 min for diclofenac and 30 min for nicotine. CONCLUSIONS Poorly plasma protein bound drugs are mainly transported to deeper tissues after topical application by tissue diffusion whereas the transport of highly plasma protein bound drugs is additionally facilitated by convective blood, lymphatic and interstitial transport to deep tissues. PMID:21999217

  12. Wind Tunnel Studies in Aerodynamic Phenomena at High Speed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caldwell, F W; Fales, E N

    1921-01-01

    A great amount of research and experimental work has been done and fair success obtained in an effort to place airplane and propeller design upon an empirical basis. However, one can not fail to be impressed by the apparent lack of data available toward establishing flow phenomena upon a rational basis, such that they may be interpreted in terms of the laws of physics. With this end in view it was the object of the authors to design a wind tunnel differing from the usual type especially in regard to large power and speed of flow. This report describes the wind tunnel at Mccook Field and gives the results of experiments conducted in testing the efficiency of the wind tunnel.

  13. Improving Ground Penetrating Radar Imaging in High Loss Environments by Coordinated System Development, Data Processing, Numerical Modeling, & Visualization ...

    SciTech Connect

    Powers, Michael H.

    2003-06-01

    The Department of Energy has identified the location and characterization of subsurface contaminants and the characterization of the subsurface as a priority need. Many DOE facilities are in need of subsurface imaging in the vadose and saturated zones. This includes (1) the detection and characterization of metal and concrete structures, (2) the characterization of waste pits (for both contents and integrity) and (3) mapping the complex geological/hydrological framework of the vadose and saturated zones. The DOE has identified ground penetrating radar (GPR) as a method that can non-invasively map transportation pathways and vadose zone heterogeneity. An advanced GPR system and advanced subsurface modeling, processing, imaging, and inversion techniques can be directly applied to several DOE science needs in more than one focus area and at many sites. Needs for enhanced subsurface imaging have been identified at Hanford, INEEL, SRS, ORNL, LLNL, SNL, LANL, and many other sites. In fact, needs for better subsurface imaging probably exist at all DOE sites. However, GPR performance is often inadequate due to increased attenuation and dispersion when soil conductivities are high. Our objective is to extend the limits of performance of GPR by improvements to both hardware and numerical computation. The key features include (1) greater dynamic range through real time digitizing, receiver gain improvements, and high output pulser, (2) modified, fully characterized antennas with sensors to allow dynamic determination of the changing radiated waveform, (3) modified deconvolution and depth migration algorithms exploiting the new antenna output information, (4) development of automatic full waveform inversion made possible by the known radiated pulse shape.

  14. Low-Cost Superconducting Wire for Wind Generators: High Performance, Low Cost Superconducting Wires and Coils for High Power Wind Generators

    SciTech Connect

    2012-01-01

    REACT Project: The University of Houston will develop a low-cost, high-current superconducting wire that could be used in high-power wind generators. Superconducting wire currently transports 600 times more electric current than a similarly sized copper wire, but is significantly more expensive. The University of Houston’s innovation is based on engineering nanoscale defects in the superconducting film. This could quadruple the current relative to today’s superconducting wires, supporting the same amount of current using 25% of the material. This would make wind generators lighter, more powerful and more efficient. The design could result in a several-fold reduction in wire costs and enable their commercial viability of high-power wind generators for use in offshore applications.

  15. Highly ionized stellar winds in Be stars - The evidence for aspect dependence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grady, C. A.; Bjorkman, K. S.; Snow, T. P.

    1987-01-01

    The paper presents the results of an ultraviolet survey of stellar winds in 62 Be and 43 normal B stars covering spectral types B0.5-B5 and luminosity classes V-III. Excess wind absorption in Be stars over that detected in normal B stars is found in C IV and Si IV, confirming results of previous surveys. The stars showing excess wind absorption also show one or more shortward-shifted discrete absorption components, suggesting that much of the excess wind absorption is in the form of discrete absorption components. Evidence is presented that the high-velocity and highly ionized stellar wind observed in some Be stars is a function of latitude.

  16. MAVEN observations of solar wind hydrogen deposition in the atmosphere of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halekas, J. S.; Lillis, R. J.; Mitchell, D. L.; Cravens, T. E.; Mazelle, C.; Connerney, J. E. P.; Espley, J. R.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Benna, M.; Jakosky, B. M.; Luhmann, J. G.; McFadden, J. P.; Larson, D. E.; Harada, Y.; Ruhunusiri, S.

    2015-11-01

    Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN mission (MAVEN) observes a tenuous but ubiquitous flux of protons with the same energy as the solar wind in the Martian atmosphere. During high flux intervals, we observe a corresponding negative hydrogen population. The correlation between penetrating and solar wind fluxes, the constant energy, and the lack of a corresponding charged population at intermediate altitudes implicate products of hydrogen energetic neutral atoms from charge exchange between the upstream solar wind and the exosphere. These atoms, previously observed in neutral form, penetrate the magnetosphere unaffected by electromagnetic fields (retaining the solar wind velocity), and some fraction reconvert to charged form through collisions with the atmosphere. MAVEN characterizes the energy and angular distributions of both penetrating and backscattered particles, potentially providing information about the solar wind, the hydrogen corona, and collisional interactions in the atmosphere. The accretion of solar wind hydrogen may provide an important source term to the Martian atmosphere over the planet's history.

  17. On the contribution of the thermospheric neutral wind to high-latitude energetics

    SciTech Connect

    Thayer, J.P.; Vickrey, J.F. )

    1992-02-07

    Although the neutral wind's contribution to ionospheric electrodynamics is well-established at low latitudes, this electrical energy source has been largely ignored at high latitudes, owing to the assumed dominance of the magnetospheric dynamo contribution. Yet, the potential for exchange of electrical energy between the neutral wind dynamo and the magnetospheric dynamo is a direct consequence of the coupling magnetic field lines. The integral nature of this coupling precludes the direct separation of the neutral wind and solar wind contributions to the observed electrodynamics. Therefore, to gain some insight into their relative importance, the authors have performed a simple numerical experiment in which the two dynamos are individually connected to a fixed load and their energetics evaluated separately. To determine the electric energy flux supplied by the magnetosphere, they treat is a voltage generator and the ionosphere as a resistive load. The available electrical energy flux generated by the neutral wind dynamo is determined from the mechanical energy stored within an established neutral wind field. This exercise has led to a number of conclusions, including: (1) the neutral wind dynamo contributes significantly to high-latitude energetics, particularly in the central polar cap; and (2) in the region near the plasma convection reversal boundary, the amount of energy flux available from the neutral wind dynamo can exceed that provided by the magnetospheric dynamo.

  18. Novel Low Cost, High Reliability Wind Turbine Drivetrain

    SciTech Connect

    Chobot, Anthony; Das, Debarshi; Mayer, Tyler; Markey, Zach; Martinson, Tim; Reeve, Hayden; Attridge, Paul; El-Wardany, Tahany

    2012-09-13

    Clipper Windpower, in collaboration with United Technologies Research Center, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, and Hamilton Sundstrand Corporation, developed a low-cost, deflection-compliant, reliable, and serviceable chain drive speed increaser. This chain and sprocket drivetrain design offers significant breakthroughs in the areas of cost and serviceability and addresses the key challenges of current geared and direct-drive systems. The use of gearboxes has proven to be challenging; the large torques and bending loads associated with use in large multi-MW wind applications have generally limited demonstrated lifetime to 8-10 years [1]. The large cost of gearbox replacement and the required use of large, expensive cranes can result in gearbox replacement costs on the order of $1M, representing a significant impact to overall cost of energy (COE). Direct-drive machines eliminate the gearbox, thereby targeting increased reliability and reduced life-cycle cost. However, the slow rotational speeds require very large and costly generators, which also typically have an undesirable dependence on expensive rare-earth magnet materials and large structural penalties for precise air gap control. The cost of rare-earth materials has increased 20X in the last 8 years representing a key risk to ever realizing the promised cost of energy reductions from direct-drive generators. A common challenge to both geared and direct drive architectures is a limited ability to manage input shaft deflections. The proposed Clipper drivetrain is deflection-compliant, insulating later drivetrain stages and generators from off-axis loads. The system is modular, allowing for all key parts to be removed and replaced without the use of a high capacity crane. Finally, the technology modularity allows for scalability and many possible drivetrain topologies. These benefits enable reductions in drivetrain capital cost by 10.0%, levelized replacement and O&M costs by 26.7%, and overall cost of

  19. The Western Wind and Solar Integration Study Phase 2

    SciTech Connect

    Lew, D.; Brinkman, G.; Ibanez, E.; Hodge, B. M.; Hummon, M.; Florita, A.; Heaney, M.

    2013-09-01

    The electric grid is a highly complex, interconnected machine, and changing one part of the grid can have consequences elsewhere. Adding wind and solar affects the operation of the other power plants and adding high penetrations can induce cycling of fossil-fueled generators. Cycling leads to wear-and-tear costs and changes in emissions. Phase 2 of the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study (WWSIS-2) evaluated these costs and emissions and simulated grid operations for a year to investigate the detailed impact of wind and solar on the fossil-fueled fleet. This built on Phase 1, one of the largest wind and solar integration studies ever conducted, which examined operational impacts of high wind and solar penetrations in the West.

  20. The Western Wind and Solar Integration Study Phase 2

    SciTech Connect

    Lew, Debra; Brinkman, Greg; Ibanez, E.; Florita, A.; Heaney, M.; Hodge, B. -M.; Hummon, M.; Stark, G.; King, J.; Lefton, S. A.; Kumar, N.; Agan, D.; Jordan, G.; Venkataraman, S.

    2013-09-01

    The electric grid is a highly complex, interconnected machine, and changing one part of the grid can have consequences elsewhere. Adding wind and solar affects the operation of the other power plants and adding high penetrations can induce cycling of fossil-fueled generators. Cycling leads to wear-and-tear costs and changes in emissions. Phase 2 of the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study (WWSIS-2) evaluated these costs and emissions and simulated grid operations for a year to investigate the detailed impact of wind and solar on the fossil-fueled fleet. This built on Phase 1, one of the largest wind and solar integration studies ever conducted, which examined operational impacts of high wind and solar penetrations in the West(GE Energy 2010).

  1. Adaptation and penetration of resin-based root canal sealers in root canals irradiated with high-intensity lasers.

    PubMed

    Moura-Netto, Cacio; Mello-Moura, Anna Carolina Volpi; Palo, Renato Miotto; Prokopowitsch, Igor; Pameijer, Cornelis H; Marques, Marcia Martins

    2015-03-01

    This research analyzed the quality of resin-based sealer adaptation after intracanal laser irradiation. Extracted teeth (n = 168) were root canal treated and divided into four groups, according to dentin surface treatment: no laser; Nd:YAG laser (1.5 W, 100 mJ, 15 Hz); diode laser (2.5 W in CW), and Er:YAG laser (1 W, 100 mJ, 10 Hz). The teeth were divided into four subgroups according to the sealer used: AH Plus, EndoREZ, Epiphany, and EpiphanySE. For testing the sealing after root canal obturation, the penetration of silver nitrate solution was measured, whereas to evaluate the adaptation and penetration of the sealer into the dentin, environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) was used. The ESEM images were analyzed using a four-grade criteria score by three evaluators. The inter-examiner agreement was confirmed by Kappa test and the scores statistically compared by the Kruskal-Wallis' test (p < 0.05). Both adaptation and sealer penetration in root canals were not affected by the laser irradiation. Nd:YAG and diode laser decreased the tracer penetration for AH Plus, whereas EndoREZ and EpiphanySE performances were affected by Nd:YAG irradiation (p < 0.05). It can be concluded that intracanal laser irradiation can be used as an adjunct in endodontic treatment; however, the use of hydrophilic resin sealers should be avoided when root canals were irradiated with Nd:YAG laser.

  2. Adaptation and penetration of resin-based root canal sealers in root canals irradiated with high-intensity lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moura-Netto, Cacio; Mello-Moura, Anna Carolina Volpi; Palo, Renato Miotto; Prokopowitsch, Igor; Pameijer, Cornelis H.; Marques, Marcia Martins

    2015-03-01

    This research analyzed the quality of resin-based sealer adaptation after intracanal laser irradiation. Extracted teeth (n=168) were root canal treated and divided into four groups, according to dentin surface treatment: no laser; Nd:YAG laser (1.5 W, 100 mJ, 15 Hz) diode laser (2.5 W in CW), and Er:YAG laser (1 W, 100 mJ, 10 Hz). The teeth were divided into four subgroups according to the sealer used: AH Plus, EndoREZ, Epiphany, and EpiphanySE. For testing the sealing after root canal obturation, the penetration of silver nitrate solution was measured, whereas to evaluate the adaptation and penetration of the sealer into the dentin, environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) was used. The ESEM images were analyzed using a four-grade criteria score by three evaluators. The inter-examiner agreement was confirmed by Kappa test and the scores statistically compared by the Kruskal-Wallis' test (p<0.05). Both adaptation and sealer penetration in root canals were not affected by the laser irradiation. Nd:YAG and diode laser decreased the tracer penetration for AH Plus, whereas EndoREZ and EpiphanySE performances were affected by Nd:YAG irradiation (p<0.05). It can be concluded that intracanal laser irradiation can be used as an adjunct in endodontic treatment; however, the use of hydrophilic resin sealers should be avoided when root canals were irradiated with Nd:YAG laser.

  3. Cryogenic wind tunnels for high Reynolds number testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawing, P. L.; Kilgore, R. A.; Mcguire, P. D.

    1986-01-01

    A compilation of lectures presented at various Universities over a span of several years is discussed. A central theme of these lectures has been to present the research facility in terms of the service it provides to, and its potential effect on, the entire community, rather than just the research community. This theme is preserved in this paper which deals with the cryogenic transonic wind tunnels at Langley Research Center. Transonic aerodynamics is a focus both because of its crucial role in determining the success of aeronautical systems and because cryogenic wind tunnels are especially applicable to the transonics problem. The paper also provides historical perspective and technical background for cryogenic tunnels, culminating in a brief review of cryogenic wind tunnel projects around the world. An appendix is included to provide up to date information on testing techniques that have been developed for the cryogenic tunnels at Langley Research Center. In order to be as inclusive and as current as possible, the appendix is less formal than the main body of the paper. It is anticipated that this paper will be of particular value to the technical layman who is inquisitive as to the value of, and need for, cryogneic tunnels.

  4. Probing the clumpy winds of giant stars with high mass X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grinberg, Victoria; Hell, Natalie; Hirsch, Maria; Garcia, Javier; Huenemoerder, David; Leutenegger, Maurice A.; Nowak, Michael; Pottschmidt, Katja; Schulz, Norbert S.; Sundqvists, Jon O.; Townsend, Richard D.; Wilms, Joern

    2016-04-01

    Line-driven winds from early type stars are structured, with small, overdense clumps embedded in tenuous hot gas. High mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs), systems where a neutron star or a black hole accretes from the line-driven stellar wind of an O/B-type companion, are ideal for studying such winds: the wind drives the accretion onto the compact object and thus the X-ray production. The radiation from close to the compact object is quasi-pointlike and effectively X-rays the wind.We used RXTE and Chandra-HETG observations of two of the brightest HMXBs, Cyg X-1 and Vela X-1, to decipher their wind structure. In Cyg X-1, we show that the orbital variability of absorption can be only explained by a clumpy wind model and constrain the porosity of the wind as well as the onion-like structure of the clumps. In Vela X-1 we show, using the newest reference energies for low ionization Si-lines obtained with LLNL’s EBIT-I, that the ionized phase of the circumstellar medium and the cold clumps have different velocities.

  5. Characteristic Paths of Extratropical Cyclones that Cause High Wind Events in the Northeast United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Booth, J. F.; Rieder, H. E.; Lee, D.; Kushnir, Y.

    2014-12-01

    This study analyzes the association between wintertime high wind events (HWEs) in the northeast United States US and extratropical cyclones. Sustained wind maxima in the Daily Summary Data from the National Climatic Data Center's Integrated Surface Database are analyzed for 1979-2012. For each station, a Generalized Pareto Distribution (GPD) is fit to the upper tail of the daily maximum wind speed data, and probabilistic return levels at intervals of 1, 3 and 5-years are derived from the GPD fit. At each interval, wind events meeting the return level criteria are termed HWEs. The HWEs occurring on the same day are grouped into multi-station events allowing the association with extratropical cyclones, which are tracked in the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecast ERA-Interim reanalysis. Using hierarchical clustering analysis, this study finds that the HWEs are most often associated with cyclones travelling from southwest to northeast, usually originating west of the Appalachian Mountains. The results show that a storm approaching from the southwest is four times more likely to cause strong surface winds than a Nor'easter. A series of sensitivity analyses confirms the robustness of this result. Next, the relationship between the strength of the wind events and the corresponding storm minimum sea level pressure is analyzed. No robust relationship between these quantities is found for strong wind events. Nevertheless, subsequent analysis shows that a relationship between deeper storms and stronger winds emerges if the analysis is extended to the entire set of wintertime storms.

  6. Synoptic climatological analysis of the high level winds over the Carpathian Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zsilinszki, Anna; Soósné Dezsö, Zsuzsanna; Bartholy, Judit; Pongrácz, Rita

    2016-04-01

    In recent years several „unusual" weather events have been recorded in the Carpathian Basin, e.g. severe snow in March 2013. In this paper we evaluate the hypothesis assuming that these weather events are related to the high level winds, especially, to the characterictics of the polar jet-stream. For this puspose, first, we performed a general statistical analysis of the high level wind fields of the region for 18 vertical layers above the 500 hPa pressure level, including the detaled analysis of average wind speed and wind directions, trend analysis of daily wind speed values, and extreme wind speed values. In addition, we examined the relationship between the regional climatic conditions and the jet stream, for which we used NAO (North Atlantic Oscillation) and AO (Arctic Oscillation) indices for first estimations since these teleconnection pattern indices are closely related to the jet-stream. We calculated linear correlation coefficients between NAO and AO indices, and local weather conditions for 30 years (1981-2010) on annual, seasonal, and monthly time scales as well as for special cases. Our final goal is to evaluate the possible effects of climate change on the high level winds, and thereby the weather conditions in the Carpathian Basin.

  7. Molecular Profiling Reveals Diversity of Stress Signal Transduction Cascades in Highly Penetrant Alzheimer's Disease Human Skin Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Mendonsa, Graziella; Dobrowolska, Justyna; Lin, Angela; Vijairania, Pooja; Jong, Y.-J. I.; Baenziger, Nancy L.

    2009-01-01

    The serious and growing impact of the neurodegenerative disorder Alzheimer's disease (AD) as an individual and societal burden raises a number of key questions: Can a blanket test for Alzheimer's disease be devised forecasting long-term risk for acquiring this disorder? Can a unified therapy be devised to forestall the development of AD as well as improve the lot of present sufferers? Inflammatory and oxidative stresses are associated with enhanced risk for AD. Can an AD molecular signature be identified in signaling pathways for communication within and among cells during inflammatory and oxidative stress, suggesting possible biomarkers and therapeutic avenues? We postulated a unique molecular signature of dysfunctional activity profiles in AD-relevant signaling pathways in peripheral tissues, based on a gain of function in G-protein-coupled bradykinin B2 receptor (BKB2R) inflammatory stress signaling in skin fibroblasts from AD patients that results in tau protein Ser hyperphosphorylation. Such a signaling profile, routed through both phosphorylation and proteolytic cascades activated by inflammatory and oxidative stresses in highly penetrant familial monogenic forms of AD, could be informative for pathogenesis of the complex multigenic sporadic form of AD. Comparing stimulus-specific cascades of signal transduction revealed a striking diversity of molecular signaling profiles in AD human skin fibroblasts that express endogenous levels of mutant presenilins PS-1 or PS-2 or the Trisomy 21 proteome. AD fibroblasts bearing the PS-1 M146L mutation associated with highly aggressive AD displayed persistent BKB2R signaling plus decreased ERK activation by BK, correctible by gamma-secretase inhibitor Compound E. Lack of these effects in the homologous PS-2 mutant cells indicates specificity of presenilin gamma-secretase catalytic components in BK signaling biology directed toward MAPK activation. Oxidative stress revealed a JNK-dependent survival pathway in normal

  8. Seasonal and solar cycle variations in high-latitude thermospheric winds

    SciTech Connect

    Aruliah, A.L.; Rees, D. ); Steen, A. )

    1991-11-01

    Thermospheric wind measurements have been collected systematically every winter for over nine years from a high-latitude site at Kiruna, Sweden (67.8{degree}N, 20.4{degree}E). The database contains 1,242 nights of data collected with a Fabry-Perot Interferometer (FPI), perhaps the largest single-site database of thermospheric winds. This analysis shows a marked seasonal and solar cycle variation. Particularly at high solar activity, sunward winds of the evening period (16-20 UT) are more than 50% stronger at Spring than at Autumn equinox. This large asymmetry in the behavior of high-latitude thermospheric winds at spring and autumn equinox has not yet been predicted by model simulations.

  9. A Diagnostic Diagram to Understand the Marine Atmospheric Boundary Layer at High Wind Speeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kettle, Anthony

    2014-05-01

    Long time series of offshore meteorological measurements in the lower marine atmospheric boundary layer show dynamical regimes and variability that are forced partly by interaction with the underlying sea surface and partly by the passage of cloud systems overhead. At low wind speeds, the dynamics and stability structure of the surface layer depend mainly on the air-sea temperature difference and the measured wind speed at a standard height. The physical processes are mostly understood and the quantified through Monin-Obukhov (MO) similarity theory. At high wind speeds different dynamical regimes become dominant. Breaking waves contribute to the atmospheric loading of sea spray and water vapor and modify the character of air-sea interaction. Downdrafts and boundary layer rolls associated with clouds at the top of the boundary layer impact vertical heat and momentum fluxes. Data from offshore meteorological monitoring sites will typically show different behavior and the regime shifts depending on the local winds and synoptic conditions. However, the regular methods to interpret time series through spectral analysis give only a partial view of dynamics in the atmospheric boundary layer. Also, the spectral methods have limited use for boundary layer and mesoscale modellers whose geophysical diagnostics are mostly anchored in directly measurable quantities: wind speed, temperature, precipitation, pressure, and radiation. Of these, wind speed and the air-sea temperature difference are the most important factors that characterize the dynamics of the lower atmospheric boundary layer and they provide a dynamical and thermodynamic constraint to frame observed processes, especially at high wind speeds. This was recognized in the early interpretation of the Froya database of gale force coastal winds from mid-Norway (Andersen, O.J. and J. Lovseth, Gale force maritime wind. The Froya data base. Part 1: Sites and instrumentation. Review of the data base, Journal of Wind

  10. High altitude bird migration at temperate latitudes: a synoptic perspective on wind assistance.

    PubMed

    Dokter, Adriaan M; Shamoun-Baranes, Judy; Kemp, Michael U; Tijm, Sander; Holleman, Iwan

    2013-01-01

    At temperate latitudes the synoptic patterns of bird migration are strongly structured by the presence of cyclones and anticyclones, both in the horizontal and altitudinal dimensions. In certain synoptic conditions, birds may efficiently cross regions with opposing surface wind by choosing a higher flight altitude with more favourable wind. We observed migratory passerines at mid-latitudes that selected high altitude wind optima on particular nights, leading to the formation of structured migration layers at varying altitude up to 3 km. Using long-term vertical profiling of bird migration by C-band Doppler radar in the Netherlands, we find that such migration layers occur nearly exclusively during spring migration in the presence of a high-pressure system. A conceptual analytic framework providing insight into the synoptic patterns of wind assistance for migrants that includes the altitudinal dimension has so far been lacking. We present a simple model for a baroclinic atmosphere that relates vertical profiles of wind assistance to the pressure and temperature patterns occurring at temperate latitudes. We show how the magnitude and direction of the large scale horizontal temperature gradient affects the relative gain in wind assistance that migrants obtain through ascending. Temperature gradients typical for northerly high-pressure systems in spring are shown to cause high altitude wind optima in the easterly sectors of anticyclones, thereby explaining the frequent observations of high altitude migration in these synoptic conditions. Given the recurring synoptic arrangements of pressure systems across temperate continents, the opportunities for exploiting high altitude wind will differ between flyways, for example between easterly and westerly oceanic coasts. PMID:23300969

  11. High altitude bird migration at temperate latitudes: a synoptic perspective on wind assistance.

    PubMed

    Dokter, Adriaan M; Shamoun-Baranes, Judy; Kemp, Michael U; Tijm, Sander; Holleman, Iwan

    2013-01-01

    At temperate latitudes the synoptic patterns of bird migration are strongly structured by the presence of cyclones and anticyclones, both in the horizontal and altitudinal dimensions. In certain synoptic conditions, birds may efficiently cross regions with opposing surface wind by choosing a higher flight altitude with more favourable wind. We observed migratory passerines at mid-latitudes that selected high altitude wind optima on particular nights, leading to the formation of structured migration layers at varying altitude up to 3 km. Using long-term vertical profiling of bird migration by C-band Doppler radar in the Netherlands, we find that such migration layers occur nearly exclusively during spring migration in the presence of a high-pressure system. A conceptual analytic framework providing insight into the synoptic patterns of wind assistance for migrants that includes the altitudinal dimension has so far been lacking. We present a simple model for a baroclinic atmosphere that relates vertical profiles of wind assistance to the pressure and temperature patterns occurring at temperate latitudes. We show how the magnitude and direction of the large scale horizontal temperature gradient affects the relative gain in wind assistance that migrants obtain through ascending. Temperature gradients typical for northerly high-pressure systems in spring are shown to cause high altitude wind optima in the easterly sectors of anticyclones, thereby explaining the frequent observations of high altitude migration in these synoptic conditions. Given the recurring synoptic arrangements of pressure systems across temperate continents, the opportunities for exploiting high altitude wind will differ between flyways, for example between easterly and westerly oceanic coasts.

  12. High Altitude Bird Migration at Temperate Latitudes: A Synoptic Perspective on Wind Assistance

    PubMed Central

    Dokter, Adriaan M.; Shamoun-Baranes, Judy; Kemp, Michael U.; Tijm, Sander; Holleman, Iwan

    2013-01-01

    At temperate latitudes the synoptic patterns of bird migration are strongly structured by the presence of cyclones and anticyclones, both in the horizontal and altitudinal dimensions. In certain synoptic conditions, birds may efficiently cross regions with opposing surface wind by choosing a higher flight altitude with more favourable wind. We observed migratory passerines at mid-latitudes that selected high altitude wind optima on particular nights, leading to the formation of structured migration layers at varying altitude up to 3 km. Using long-term vertical profiling of bird migration by C-band Doppler radar in the Netherlands, we find that such migration layers occur nearly exclusively during spring migration in the presence of a high-pressure system. A conceptual analytic framework providing insight into the synoptic patterns of wind assistance for migrants that includes the altitudinal dimension has so far been lacking. We present a simple model for a baroclinic atmosphere that relates vertical profiles of wind assistance to the pressure and temperature patterns occurring at temperate latitudes. We show how the magnitude and direction of the large scale horizontal temperature gradient affects the relative gain in wind assistance that migrants obtain through ascending. Temperature gradients typical for northerly high-pressure systems in spring are shown to cause high altitude wind optima in the easterly sectors of anticyclones, thereby explaining the frequent observations of high altitude migration in these synoptic conditions. Given the recurring synoptic arrangements of pressure systems across temperate continents, the opportunities for exploiting high altitude wind will differ between flyways, for example between easterly and westerly oceanic coasts. PMID:23300969

  13. Interdisciplinary design study of a high-rise integrated roof wind energy system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekker, R. W. A.; Ferraro, R. M.; Suma, A. B.; Moonen, S. P. G.

    2012-10-01

    Today's market in micro-wind turbines is in constant development introducing more efficient solutions for the future. Besides the private use of tower supported turbines, opportunities to integrate wind turbines in the built environment arise. The Integrated Roof Wind Energy System (IRWES) presented in this work is a modular roof structure integrated on top of existing or new buildings. IRWES is build up by an axial array of skewed shaped funnels used for both wind inlet and outlet. This inventive use of shape and geometry leads to a converging air capturing inlet to create high wind mass flow and velocity toward a Vertical Axis Wind Turbine (VAWT) in the center-top of the roof unit for the generation of a relatively high amount of energy. The scope of this research aims to make an optimized structural design of IRWES to be placed on top of the Vertigo building in Eindhoven; analysis of the structural performance; and impact to the existing structure by means of Finite Element Modeling (FEM). Results show that the obvious impact of wind pressure to the structural design is easily supported in different configurations of fairly simple lightweight structures. In particular, the weight addition to existing buildings remains minimal.

  14. Low frequency variability of Climate-Related-Energy penetration in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raynaud, Damien; Baptiste, François; Hingray, Benoit; Creutin, Jean-Dominique

    2016-04-01

    The penetration rate of Climate Related Energy sources like solar-power, wind-power and hydro-power source measures the mismatch between the energy availability from those fatal productions and the energy demand which may be also partly dependent on the climate. The penetration rate is a key factor - with potentially large technical and economic implications, to be accounted for in public policies and private initiatives for a massive integration of renewables in the classical energy system. For a given region, it is classically estimated from high resolution time series of energy productions and energy demand derived from times series of their driving climatic variables (temperature, wind, radiation, precipitation). The penetration rate obviously highly depends on the seasonal and also high frequency time variability of these climatic variables (François et al. 2016). A less studied aspect of this penetration rate is its dependence to low frequency variability of climate, from annual to pluriannual time scales. We here explore this dependence for a set of 12 contrasted hydroclimatic regions in Europe with long time series of weather variables reconstructed for the whole 20th century. We discuss the interannual, and interdecadal variability of the penetration rate for the solar-power, wind-power and run-of-the river energy sources taken individually and for different mixes. We discuss how it can be increased / stabilized with local energy storage. Reference : François, B, Hingray, B., Raynaud, R., Borga, M. and Creutin, J.D., 2016. Increasing Climate-Related-Energy penetration by integrating run-of-the river hydropower to wind/solar mix. Renewable Energy. 87(1), pp.686-696. doi:10.1016/j.renene.2015.10.064 This work is part of the COMPLEX Project (European Collaborative Project FP7-ENV-2012 number: 308601; http://www.complex.ac.uk/).

  15. A high performance finite element model for wind farm modeling in forested areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owen, Herbert; Avila, Matias; Folch, Arnau; Cosculluela, Luis; Prieto, Luis

    2015-04-01

    Wind energy has grown significantly during the past decade and is expected to continue growing in the fight against climate change. In the search for new land where the impact of the wind turbines is small several wind farms are currently being installed in forested areas. In order to optimize the distribution of the wind turbines within the wind farm the Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes equations are solved over the domain of interest using either commercial or in house codes. The existence of a canopy alters the Atmospheric Boundary Layer wind profile close to the ground. Therefore in order to obtain a more accurate representation of the flow in forested areas modification to both the Navier Stokes and turbulence variables equations need to be introduced. Several existing canopy models have been tested in an academic problem showing that the one proposed by Sogachev et. al gives the best results. This model has been implemented in an in house CFD solver named Alya. It is a high performance unstructured finite element code that has been designed from scratch to be able to run in the world's biggest supercomputers. Its scalabililty has recently been tested up to 100000 processors in both American and European supercomputers. During the past three years the code has been tuned and tested for wind energy problems. Recent efforts have focused on the canopy model following industry needs. In this work we shall benchmark our results in a wind farm that is currently being designed by Scottish Power and Iberdrola in Scotland. This is a very interesting real case with extensive experimental data from five different masts with anemometers at several heights. It is used to benchmark both the wind profiles and the speed up obtained between different masts. Sixteen different wind directions are simulated. The numerical model provides very satisfactory results for both the masts that are affected by the canopy and those that are not influenced by it.

  16. Penetrative Convection and Zonal Flow on Jupiter

    PubMed

    Zhang; Schubert

    1996-08-16

    Measurements by the Galileo probe support the possibility that the zonal winds in Jupiter's atmosphere originate from convection that takes place in the deep hydrogen-helium interior. However, according to models based on recent opacity data and the probe's temperature measurements, there may be radiative and nonconvective layers in the outer part of the jovian interior, raising the question of how deep convection could extend to the surface. A theoretical model is presented to demonstrate that, because of predominant rotational effects and spherical geometry, thermal convection in the deep jovian interior can penetrate into any outer nonconvective layer. These penetrative convection rolls interact nonlinearly and efficiently in the model to generate and sustain a mean zonal wind with a larger amplitude than that of the nonaxisymmetric penetrative convective motions, a characteristic of the wind field observed at the cloud level on Jupiter. PMID:8688074

  17. X-ray tomography to measure size of fragments from penetration of high-velocity tungsten rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, Zach; Bless, Stephan; Tolman, John; McDonald, Jason; Levinson, Scott; Hanna, R.

    2012-03-01

    Behind-armor debris that results from tungsten rods penetrating armor steel at 2 km/s was studied by analysis of recovered fragments. Fragment recovery was by means of particle board. Individual fragments were analyzed by x-ray tomography, which provides information for fragment identification, mass, shape, and penetration down to masses of a few milligrams. The experiments were complemented by AUTODYN and EPIC calculations. Fragments were steel or tungsten generated from the channel or from the breakout through the target rear surface. Channel fragment motions were well described by Tate theory. Breakout fragments had velocities from the projectile remnant to the channel velocity, apparently depending on where in the projectile a fragment originated. The fragment size distribution was extremely broad and did not correlate well with simple uniform-fragment-size models.

  18. X-Ray Tomography to Measure Size of Fragments from Penetration of High-Velocity Tungsten Rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, Zach; Hanna, Romy; Bless, Stephan; Levinson, Scott; InstituteAdvanced Technology Collaboration; Department of Geological Sciences-UT Austin Collaboration

    2011-06-01

    Behind-armor debris that results from tungsten rods penetrating armor steel at 2 km/s was studied by analysis of recovered fragments. Fragment recovery was by means of particleboard. Individual fragments were analyzed by x-ray tomography, which provides information for fragment identification, mass, shape, and penetration down to masses of a few milligrams. The experiments were complemented by AUTODYN SPH calculations to provide the exit velocity and the strain rate at the time of particle formation. There were four types of fragments: steel or tungsten, and generated from the channel or from the breakout through the target rear surface. Channel fragment motions were well described by Tate theory. Breakout fragments had velocities from the projectile remnant to the channel velocity, apparently depending on where in the projectile a fragment originated. The fragment size distribution was extremely broad and did not correlate well with simple uniform-fragment-size models, e.g., Grady Kipp.

  19. N-acetylcysteine enhances cystic fibrosis sputum penetration and airway gene transfer by highly compacted DNA nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Suk, Jung Soo; Boylan, Nicholas J; Trehan, Kanika; Tang, Benjamin C; Schneider, Craig S; Lin, Jung-Ming G; Boyle, Michael P; Zeitlin, Pamela L; Lai, Samuel K; Cooper, Mark J; Hanes, Justin

    2011-11-01

    For effective airway gene therapy of cystic fibrosis (CF), inhaled gene carriers must first penetrate the hyperviscoelastic sputum covering the epithelium. Whether clinically studied gene carriers can penetrate CF sputum remains unknown. Here, we measured the diffusion of a clinically tested nonviral gene carrier, composed of poly-l-lysine conjugated with a 10 kDa polyethylene glycol segment (CK(30)PEG(10k)). We found that CK(30)PEG(10k)/DNA nanoparticles were trapped in CF sputum. To improve gene carrier diffusion across sputum, we tested adjuvant regimens consisting of N-acetylcysteine (NAC), recombinant human DNase (rhDNase) or NAC together with rhDNase. While rhDNase alone did not enhance gene carrier diffusion, NAC and NAC + rhDNase increased average effective diffusivities by 6-fold and 13-fold, respectively, leading to markedly greater fractions of gene carriers that may penetrate sputum layers. We further tested the adjuvant effects of NAC in the airways of mice with Pseudomonas aeruginosa lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced mucus hypersecretion. Intranasal dosing of NAC prior to CK(30)PEG(10k)/DNA nanoparticles enhanced gene expression by up to ~12-fold compared to saline control, reaching levels observed in the lungs of mice without LPS challenge. Our findings suggest that a promising synthetic nanoparticle gene carrier may transfer genes substantially more effectively to lungs of CF patients if administered following adjuvant mucolytic therapy with NAC or NAC + rhDNase. PMID:21829177

  20. N-acetylcysteine enhances cystic fibrosis sputum penetration and airway gene transfer by highly compacted DNA nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Suk, Jung Soo; Boylan, Nicholas J; Trehan, Kanika; Tang, Benjamin C; Schneider, Craig S; Lin, Jung-Ming G; Boyle, Michael P; Zeitlin, Pamela L; Lai, Samuel K; Cooper, Mark J; Hanes, Justin

    2011-11-01

    For effective airway gene therapy of cystic fibrosis (CF), inhaled gene carriers must first penetrate the hyperviscoelastic sputum covering the epithelium. Whether clinically studied gene carriers can penetrate CF sputum remains unknown. Here, we measured the diffusion of a clinically tested nonviral gene carrier, composed of poly-l-lysine conjugated with a 10 kDa polyethylene glycol segment (CK(30)PEG(10k)). We found that CK(30)PEG(10k)/DNA nanoparticles were trapped in CF sputum. To improve gene carrier diffusion across sputum, we tested adjuvant regimens consisting of N-acetylcysteine (NAC), recombinant human DNase (rhDNase) or NAC together with rhDNase. While rhDNase alone did not enhance gene carrier diffusion, NAC and NAC + rhDNase increased average effective diffusivities by 6-fold and 13-fold, respectively, leading to markedly greater fractions of gene carriers that may penetrate sputum layers. We further tested the adjuvant effects of NAC in the airways of mice with Pseudomonas aeruginosa lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced mucus hypersecretion. Intranasal dosing of NAC prior to CK(30)PEG(10k)/DNA nanoparticles enhanced gene expression by up to ~12-fold compared to saline control, reaching levels observed in the lungs of mice without LPS challenge. Our findings suggest that a promising synthetic nanoparticle gene carrier may transfer genes substantially more effectively to lungs of CF patients if administered following adjuvant mucolytic therapy with NAC or NAC + rhDNase.

  1. Remote sensing of mesospheric winds with the High-Resolution Doppler Imager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hays, Paul B.; Abreu, V. J.; Burrage, M. D.; Gell, D. A.; Grassi, H. J.; Marshall, A. R.; Morton, Y. T.; Ortland, D. A.; Skinner, W. R.; Wu, D. L.

    1992-01-01

    Observations of the winds in the upper atmosphere obtained with the High-Resolution Doppler Imager (HRDI) on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) are discussed. This instrument is a very stable high-resolution triple-etalon Fabry-Perot interferometer, which is used to observe the slight Doppler shifts of absorption and emission lines in the O2 Atmospheric bands induced by atmospheric motions. Preliminary observations indicate that the winds in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere are a mixture of migrating and non-migrating tides, and planetary-scale waves. The mean meridional winds are dominated by the 1,1 diurnal tide which is easily extracted from the daily zonal means of the satellite observations. The daily mean zonal winds are a mixture of the diurnal tide and a zonal flow which is consistent with theoretical expectations.

  2. High-R Walls for New Construction Structural Performance: Wind Pressure Testing

    SciTech Connect

    DeRenzis, A.; Kochkin, V.

    2013-01-01

    This technical report is focused primarily on laboratory testing that evaluates wind pressure performance characteristics for wall systems constructed with exterior insulating sheathing. This research and test activity will help to facilitate the ongoing use of non-structural sheathing options and provide a more in-depth understanding of how wall system layers perform in response to high wind perturbations normal to the surface.

  3. High-R Walls for New Construction Structural Performance. Wind Pressure Testing

    SciTech Connect

    DeRenzis, A.; Kochkin, V.

    2013-01-01

    This technical report is focused primarily on laboratory testing that evaluates wind pressure performance characteristics for wall systems constructed with exterior insulating sheathing. This research and test activity will help to facilitate the ongoing use of non-structural sheathing options and provide a more in-depth understanding of how wall system layers perform in response to high wind perturbations normal to the surface.

  4. A high time resolution study of the solar wind-magnetosphere energy coupling function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akasofu, S.-I.; Carbary, J. F.; Meng, C.-I.; Sullivan, J. P.; Lepping, R. P.

    1982-01-01

    A high time resolution study of the relationships between the solar wind-magnetosphere energy coupling function and the total energy dissipation rate of the magnetosphere is made using 5-min average values of solar wind data and of the geomagnetic indices AE and Dst. All the results are essentially the same as those obtained by the earlier studies which were based on the hourly average data set. Therefore, it is confirmed that the magnetosphere is primarily a driven system

  5. Wind energy.

    PubMed

    Leithead, W E

    2007-04-15

    From its rebirth in the early 1980s, the rate of development of wind energy has been dramatic. Today, other than hydropower, it is the most important of the renewable sources of power. The UK Government and the EU Commission have adopted targets for renewable energy generation of 10 and 12% of consumption, respectively. Much of this, by necessity, must be met by wind energy. The US Department of Energy has set a goal of 6% of electricity supply from wind energy by 2020. For this potential to be fully realized, several aspects, related to public acceptance, and technical issues, related to the expected increase in penetration on the electricity network and the current drive towards larger wind turbines, need to be resolved. Nevertheless, these challenges will be met and wind energy will, very likely, become increasingly important over the next two decades. An overview of the technology is presented.

  6. Wind energy.

    PubMed

    Leithead, W E

    2007-04-15

    From its rebirth in the early 1980s, the rate of development of wind energy has been dramatic. Today, other than hydropower, it is the most important of the renewable sources of power. The UK Government and the EU Commission have adopted targets for renewable energy generation of 10 and 12% of consumption, respectively. Much of this, by necessity, must be met by wind energy. The US Department of Energy has set a goal of 6% of electricity supply from wind energy by 2020. For this potential to be fully realized, several aspects, related to public acceptance, and technical issues, related to the expected increase in penetration on the electricity network and the current drive towards larger wind turbines, need to be resolved. Nevertheless, these challenges will be met and wind energy will, very likely, become increasingly important over the next two decades. An overview of the technology is presented. PMID:17272245

  7. Effects of magnetospheric lobe cell convection on dayside upper thermospheric winds at high latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, B.; Wang, W.; Wu, Q.; Knipp, D.; Kilcommons, L.; Brambles, O. J.; Liu, J.; Wiltberger, M.; Lyon, J. G.; Häggström, I.

    2016-08-01

    This paper investigates a possible physical mechanism of the observed dayside high-latitude upper thermospheric wind using numerical simulations from the coupled magnetosphere-ionosphere-thermosphere (CMIT) model. Results show that the CMIT model is capable of reproducing the unexpected afternoon equatorward winds in the upper thermosphere observed by the High altitude Interferometer WIND observation (HIWIND) balloon. Models that lack adequate coupling produce poleward winds. The modeling study suggests that ion drag driven by magnetospheric lobe cell convection is another possible mechanism for turning the climatologically expected dayside poleward winds to the observed equatorward direction. The simulation results are validated by HIWIND, European Incoherent Scatter, and Defense Meteorological Satellite Program. The results suggest a strong momentum coupling between high-latitude ionospheric plasma circulation and thermospheric neutral winds in the summer hemisphere during positive IMF Bz periods, through the formation of magnetospheric lobe cell convection driven by persistent positive IMF By. The CMIT simulation adds important insight into the role of dayside coupling during intervals of otherwise quiet geomagnetic activity

  8. Aerodynamic Characteristics of High Speed Trains under Cross Wind Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, W.; Wu, S. P.; Zhang, Y.

    2011-09-01

    Numerical simulation for the two models in cross-wind was carried out in this paper. The three-dimensional compressible Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations(RANS), combined with the standard k-ɛ turbulence model, were solved on multi-block hybrid grids by second order upwind finite volume technique. The impact of fairing on aerodynamic characteristics of the train models was analyzed. It is shown that, the flow separates on the fairing and a strong vortex is generated, the pressure on the upper middle car decreases dramatically, which leads to a large lift force. The fairing changes the basic patterns around the trains. In addition, formulas of the coefficient of aerodynamic force at small yaw angles up to 24° were expressed.

  9. A novel transdermal drug delivery system based on self-adhesive Janus nanofibrous film with high breathability and monodirectional water-penetration.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yongli; Li, Yue; Wu, Jianming; Wang, Weiguo; Dong, Anjie; Zhang, Jianhua

    2014-01-01

    Transdermal drug delivery systems (TDDS) had achieved significant success in medical practice, but still suffered from adhesion failure and skin reaction due to the occlusive properties of hydrophobic pressure sensitive adhesives (PSAs). In order to solve these problems, a novel TDDS patch based on self-adhesive Janus nanofibrous film was prepared by a multilayered electrospinning. This multifunctional patch was a bilayer structure. The subjacent layer was a hydrophobic and adhesive fibrous layer electrospun from polyacrylate PSA (HPSA), and the upper backing layer was a hydrophilic cross-linked poly (vinyl alcohol) (c-PVA) nanofibrous film. The structures of the HPSA/c-PVA composite fibrous films were characterized and their application properties, including adherence performance, water vapor permeability, water-penetration, release characteristics, and skin irritation were evaluated. The results indicated that the HPSA/c-PVA composite fibrous films could provide suitable adhesive properties for TDDS application, excellent capacity for drug loading and release, aesthetical appearance and high safety for use on the skin. Especially, due to the nanofibrous network structures and the hydrophobic-hydrophilic wettability gradient from hydrophobic HPSA layer to the hydrophilic c-PVA layer, the Janus films possessed high breathability and monodirectional water-penetration. Water could penetrate from the hydrophobic to the hydrophilic side, but could not permeate through in the opposite direction. This may provide a feasible solution to the problems caused by the water, sweat, or wound exudate on the skin, when the hydrophobic PSAs were used as matrix for TDDS and wound dressing patches.

  10. Very high penetrance and occurrence of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy in a large Han Chinese pedigree carrying the ND4 G11778A mutation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiangtian; Zhang, Hongxing; Zhao, Fuxin; Ji, Yanchun; Tong, Yi; Zhang, Juanjuan; Zhang, Yu; Yang, Li; Qian, Yaping; Lu, Fan; Qu, Jia; Guan, Min-Xin

    2010-08-01

    We report here the clinical, genetics and molecular characterization of a five-generation Han Chinese family with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON). Strikingly, this family exhibits very high penetrance and occurrence of optic neuropathy. In particular, 25 (10 males/15 females) of 30 matrilineal relatives exhibited the variable severity, ranging from profound to mild of visual impairment. This penetrance of optic neuropathy in this Chinese family is much higher than those in many families with LHON worldwide. The age-at-onset for visual impairment in matrilineal relatives in this Chinese family varied from 7 to 24years old, with the average of 15 years old. Furthermore, the ratio between affected male and female matrilineal relatives is 1:1.5 in the Chinese family. This observation is in contrast with the typical features in LHON pedigrees that there was predominance of affected males in LHON in many families from different ethnic origins. Molecular analysis of mitochondrial genome identified the known ND4 G11778A mutation and 51 variants, belonging to Asian haplogroup C4a1. The absence of other known secondary LHON-associated and functionally significant mtDNA mutations in this Chinese family suggested that mitochondrial variants may not play an important role in the phenotypic manifestation of the G11778A mutation in this Chinese family. Therefore, nuclear modifier gene(s) may be responsible for very high penetrance and occurrence of optic neuropathy in this Chinese pedigree.

  11. CONSTRAINING HIGH-SPEED WINDS IN EXOPLANET ATMOSPHERES THROUGH OBSERVATIONS OF ANOMALOUS DOPPLER SHIFTS DURING TRANSIT

    SciTech Connect

    Miller-Ricci Kempton, Eliza; Rauscher, Emily

    2012-06-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) dynamical models of hot Jupiter atmospheres predict very strong wind speeds. For tidally locked hot Jupiters, winds at high altitude in the planet's atmosphere advect heat from the day side to the cooler night side of the planet. Net wind speeds on the order of 1-10 km s{sup -1} directed towards the night side of the planet are predicted at mbar pressures, which is the approximate pressure level probed by transmission spectroscopy. These winds should result in an observed blueshift of spectral lines in transmission on the order of the wind speed. Indeed, Snellen et al. recently observed a 2 {+-} 1 km s{sup -1} blueshift of CO transmission features for HD 209458b, which has been interpreted as a detection of the day-to-night (substellar to anti-stellar) winds that have been predicted by 3D atmospheric dynamics modeling. Here, we present the results of a coupled 3D atmospheric dynamics and transmission spectrum model, which predicts the Doppler-shifted spectrum of a hot Jupiter during transit resulting from winds in the planet's atmosphere. We explore four different models for the hot Jupiter atmosphere using different prescriptions for atmospheric drag via interaction with planetary magnetic fields. We find that models with no magnetic drag produce net Doppler blueshifts in the transmission spectrum of {approx}2 km s{sup -1} and that lower Doppler shifts of {approx}1 km s{sup -1} are found for the higher drag cases, results consistent with-but not yet strongly constrained by-the Snellen et al. measurement. We additionally explore the possibility of recovering the average terminator wind speed as a function of altitude by measuring Doppler shifts of individual spectral lines and spatially resolving wind speeds across the leading and trailing terminators during ingress and egress.

  12. Cooperative Transmembrane Penetration of Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Haizhen; Ji, Qiuju; Huang, Changjin; Zhang, Sulin; Yuan, Bing; Yang, Kai; Ma, Yu-qiang

    2015-01-01

    Physical penetration of lipid bilayer membranes presents an alternative pathway for cellular delivery of nanoparticles (NPs) besides endocytosis. NPs delivered through this pathway could reach the cytoplasm, thereby opening the possibility of organelle-specific targeting. Herein we perform dissipative particle dynamics simulations to elucidate the transmembrane penetration mechanisms of multiple NPs. Our simulations demonstrate that NPs’ translocation proceeds in a cooperative manner, where the interplay of the quantity and surface chemistry of the NPs regulates the translocation efficiency. For NPs with hydrophilic surfaces, the increase of particle quantity facilitates penetration, while for NPs with partly or totally hydrophobic surfaces, the opposite highly possibly holds. Moreover, a set of interesting cooperative ways, such as aggregation, aggregation-dispersion, and aggregation-dispersion-reaggregation of the NPs, are observed during the penetration process. We find that the penetration behaviors of multiple NPs are mostly dominated by the changes of the NP-membrane force components in the membrane plane direction, in addition to that in the penetration direction, suggesting a different interaction mechanism between the multiple NPs and the membrane compared with the one-NP case. These results provide a fundamental understanding in the underlying mechanisms of cooperative penetration of NPs, and shed light on the NP-based drug and gene delivery. PMID:26013284

  13. ON THE OCCURRENCE OF THE THIRD-ORDER SCALING IN HIGH LATITUDE SOLAR WIND

    SciTech Connect

    Marino, R.; D'Amicis, R.; Bruno, R.; Sorriso-Valvo, L.; Carbone, V.; Veltri, P.

    2012-05-01

    The occurrence and nature of a nonlinear energy cascade within the intermediate scales of solar wind Alfvenic turbulence represents an important open issue. Using in situ measurements of fast, high latitude solar wind taken by the Ulysses spacecraft at solar minima, it is possible to show that a nonlinear energy cascade of imbalanced turbulence is only observed when the solar wind owns peculiar properties. These are the reduction of the local correlation between velocity and magnetic field (weak cross-helicity); the presence of large-scale velocity shears; and the steepening and extension down to low frequencies of the turbulent spectra. Our observations suggest the important role of both large-scale velocity and Alfvenicity of the field fluctuations for the validation of the Yaglom law in solar wind turbulence.

  14. A new high-density (25 electrodes/mm2) penetrating microelectrode array for recording and stimulating sub-millimeter neuroanatomical structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wark, H. A. C.; Sharma, R.; Mathews, K. S.; Fernandez, E.; Yoo, J.; Christensen, B.; Tresco, P.; Rieth, L.; Solzbacher, F.; Normann, R. A.; Tathireddy, P.

    2013-08-01

    Objective. Among the currently available neural interface devices, there has been a need for a penetrating electrode array with a high electrode-count and high electrode-density (the number of electrodes/mm2) that can be used for electrophysiological studies of sub-millimeter neuroanatomical structures. We have developed such a penetrating microelectrode array with both a high electrode-density (25 electrodes/mm2) and high electrode-count (up to 96 electrodes) for small nervous system structures, based on the existing Utah Slanted Electrode Array (USEA). Such high electrode-density arrays are expected to provide greater access to nerve fibers than the conventionally spaced USEA especially in small diameter nerves. Approach. One concern for such high density microelectrode arrays is that they may cause a nerve crush-type injury upon implantation. We evaluated this possibility during acute (<10 h) in vivo experiments with electrode arrays implanted into small diameter peripheral nerves of anesthetized rats (sciatic nerve) and cats (pudendal nerve). Main results. Successful intrafascicular implantation and viable nerve function was demonstrated via microstimulation, single-unit recordings and histological analysis. Measurements of the electrode impedances and quantified electrode dimensions demonstrated fabrication quality. The results of these experiments show that such high density neural interfaces can be implanted acutely into neural tissue without causing a complete nerve crush injury, while mediating intrafascicular access to fibers in small diameter peripheral nerves. Significance. This new penetrating microelectrode array has characteristics un-matched by other neural interface devices currently available for peripheral nervous system neurophysiological research.

  15. The donor star winds in High-Mass X-ray Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oskinova, Lida

    2014-10-01

    High-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs) are essential astrophysical laboratories. These objects represent an advanced stage in the evolution of massive binary systems, after the initially more massive star has already collapsed in a supernova explosion, but its remnant, a neutron star or black hole, remains gravitationally bound. The stellar wind from the OB-type donor is partially accreted onto its compact companion powering its relatively high X-ray luminosity. Since HMXBs accrete from the stellar wind, parameters such as the donor's mass-loss rate, the velocity of the wind, and its clumpiness are of fundamental importance.This proposal takes advantage of the unique capabilities of HST/STIS for UV spectroscopy. We focus on the most populous in the Galaxy class of those HMXBs where the stellar wind of the OB donor is directly accreted onto a neutron star. Recently, a new sub-class of HMXBs - "supergiant fast X-ray transients" - was discovered. It has been proposed that these enigmatic objects can be explained by the specific properties of their donor-star winds. The only way to validate or disprove this hypothesis is by a studying the wind diagnostics lines in the UV spectra of donor stars. The observations proposed here will, for the first time, provide the UV spectra of this important new type of accreting binaries. Our state-of-the art non-LTE expanding stellar atmospheres and 3-D stellar wind simulations allow thorough exploitation of the STIS spectra. As a result we will obtain the wind parameters for a representative sample of six Galactic HMXBs, thus heightening our knowledge thereof considerably.

  16. The Inland Penetration of Atmospheric Rivers over Western North America: A Lagrangian Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutz, J. J.; Steenburgh, W. J.; Ralph, F. M.

    2014-12-01

    Although atmospheric rivers (ARs) typically weaken following landfall, those that penetrate inland can contribute to heavy precipitation and high-impact weather within the interior of western North America. In this paper, we examine the evolution of ARs over western North America using trajectories released at 950 and 700 hPa within cool-season ARs along the Pacific coast. These trajectories are classified as coastal decaying, inland penetrating, or interior penetrating based on whether they remain within an AR upon reaching selected transects over western North America. Interior-penetrating AR trajectories most frequently make landfall along the Oregon coast, but the greatest fraction of landfalling AR trajectories that eventually penetrate into the interior is found along the Baja Peninsula. In contrast, interior-penetrating trajectories rarely traverse the southern "high" Sierra. At landfall, interior-penetrating trajectories are associated with a more amplified flow pattern, more southwesterly (vs. westerly) flow along the Pacific coast, and larger water vapor transport (qu). The larger initial qu of interior-penetrating trajectories is due primarily to larger initial water vapor (q) and wind speed (u) for those initiated at 950 and 700 hPa, respectively. Inland- and interior-penetrating AR trajectories maintain large qu over the interior due partially to increases in u that offset decreases in q, particularly in the vicinity of topographical barriers. Therefore, synoptic conditions and trajectory pathways favoring larger initial qu at the coast, limited water vapor depletion by orographic precipitation, and increases in u over the interior are keys to differentiating interior-penetrating from coastal-decaying AR trajectories.

  17. Parameterizations in high resolution isopycnal wind-driven ocean models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, T. G.; Randall, D. A.

    1994-01-01

    For the Computer Hardware Advanced Mathematics and Model Physics (CHAMMP) project, developing a new multilayer ocean model, based on the hydrodynamic FSU Indian Ocean model was proposed. The new model will include prognostic temperature and salinity and will be coded for massively parallel machines. Other specific objectives for the proposed research were to: incorporate a oceanic mixed layer on top of the isopycnal deep layers; implement positive definite scheme for advection; determine effects of islands on large scale flow; and investigate lateral boundary conditions for boundary layer currents. The mixed layer model is proposed to be of a bulk type with prognostic equations for temperature and salinity. Development of parallel code will be done in cooperation with other CHAMMP participants, mainly the ocean modelling group at LANL. The main objective is model development, while the application is to determine the influence and parameterization of narrow flows along continents and through chains of small islands on the large scale oceanic circulation. Test runs with artificial wind stress and heat flux will be used to determine model stability, performance, and optimization for the new model configuration. Tests will include western boundary currents, coastal upwelling, and equatorial dynamics. This report discusses project progress for period January 1, 1993 through December 31, 1993.

  18. Investigation of a recent extreme-high temperature event in the Tokyo metropolitan are using numerical simulations: the potential role of a 'hybrid' foehn wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takane, Yuya; Kusaka, Hiroyuki; Kondo, Hiroaki

    2015-04-01

    A record-breaking high surface air temperature in Japan of 39.8 °C occurred at 1420 Japan Standard Time (JST) 24 June 2011 in Kumagaya located 60-km northwest of central Tokyo. This extreme temperature, the third-highest ever recorded in Kumagaya, forced 70 people in the local prefecture to be rushed to hospitals due to heat stroke. The day had westerly winds in the inland area of Tokyo and localized rainfall in the windward direction over the Chubu Mountains. Thus, the extreme high temperature (EHT) may have been influenced by a traditional foehn wind. But, as in Takane and Kusaka (2011), other EHT event occurred in 2007 may have been caused by a complex mechanism involving a combination of several types of foehn winds. Determining the mechanism requires the use of extensive observations and numerical simulations. The purpose of this study is to clarify quantitatively the mechanism of the EHT event on 24 June 2011, with a particular focus on the possible contributions of several combinations of foehn wind types. The contributions to temperature increase are analysed using a heat budget analysis of the control volume, a backward trajectory analysis, a Lagrangian energy budget analysis, an Eulerian forward tracer analysis, and an analysis of diabatic heating from the surface. In 2011 EHT event, surface air temperatures exceeding 37.0 °C were recorded in and around Kumagaya, an area just north of the convergence line between westerly winds from the Chubu Mountains (complex terrains) and southwesterly sea breeze from the Pacific Ocean. To determine the mechanism of this EHT event, we applied various analyses using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model Version 3.1.1. The WRF model successfully reproduces the physical features of the wind and temperature distributions and diurnal variations. To quantitatively evaluate the mechanism underlying the temperature change in the mixed layer on high-temperature area, we analyze the heat budget of a control volume

  19. North Wind Power Company 2-kilowatt high-reliability wind system. Phase I: design and analysis executive summary

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, D J; Norton, Jr, J H

    1981-07-01

    The results of Phase I of a program to design a 2kw high reliability wind turbine for use in remote locations and harsh environments are presented. A predecessor of the proposed design was procured and tested in a wind tunnel and in the freestream to observe operational characteristics. An analytical procedure was developed for designing and modelling the proposed variable axis rotor control system (VARCS). This was then verified by extensive mobile testing of pre-prototype components. A new low speed three phase alternator with a Lundel type rotor was designed. Prototypes were fabricated and tested to refine calculation procedures and develop an effective alternator with appropriate characteristics. A solid state field switching regulator was designed and tested successfully. All necessary support elements were designed and engineered. A complete analysis of system reliability was conducted, including failure mode and effects analyses and reliability, maintenance and safety analyses. Cost estimates were made for a mature product in production rates of 1000 per year. Analysis and testing conducted throughout the first phase is included in this report. Final prototype fabrication and testing will be covered in a subsequent Phase II report.

  20. North Wind Power Company 2-kilowatt high-reliability wind system. Phase I. Design and analysis. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, D J; Norton, Jr, J H

    1981-07-01

    Results are presented of Phase I of a program to design a 2kW high reliability wind turbine for use in remote locations and harsh environments. In phase I of the program, a predecessor of the proposed design was procured and tested in a wind tunnel and in the freestream to observe operational characteristics. An analytical procedure was developed for designing and modelling the proposed variable axis rotor control system (VARCS). This was then verified by extensive mobile testing of pre-prototype components. A low speed three phase alternator with a Lundel type rotor was designed. Prototypes were fabricated and tested to refine calculation procedures and develop an effective alternator with appropriate characteristics. A solid state field switching regulator was designed and tested successfully. All necessary support elements were designed and engineered. A complete analysis of system reliability was conducted including failure mode and effects analyses and reliability, maintenance and safety analyses. Cost estimates were performed for a mature product in production rates of 1000 per year. Analysis and testing conducted throughout the first phase is included.

  1. Numerical Study of the High-Speed Leg of a Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nayani, Sudheer; Sellers, William L., III; Brynildsen, Scott E.; Everhart, Joel L.

    2015-01-01

    The paper describes the numerical study of the high-speed leg of the NASA Langley 14 by 22-foot Low Speed Wind Tunnel. The high-speed leg consists of the Settling Chamber, Contraction, Test Section, and First Diffuser. Results are shown comparing two different exit boundary conditions and two different methods of determining the surface geometry.

  2. Comparison of Drop and Wind-Tunnel Experiments on Bomb Drag at High Subsonic Speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gothert, B.

    1948-01-01

    The drag coefficients of bombs at high velocities velocity of fall was 97 percent of the speed of sound) (the highest are determined by drop tests and compared with measurements taken in the DVL high-speed closed wind tunnel and the open jet at AVA - Gottingen.

  3. Validation of winds from the high resolution Doppler imager on UARS

    SciTech Connect

    Burrage, M.D.; Skinner, W.R.; Marshall, A.R.

    1994-12-31

    The High Resolution Doppler Imager (HRDI) on the Upper Atmospheric Research Satellite (UARS) is designed to measure horizontal winds in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (50--115 km) and in the stratosphere (10--40 km), as part of a coordinated mission which is aimed at an improved understanding of global atmospheric change. Horizontal winds are obtained by observing the Doppler shifts of emission lines in the O{sub 2} Atmospheric band. The validity of the measurements depends on an accurate knowledge of the positions on the detector of the observed lines in the absence of a wind induced Doppler shift. These positions have been determined to an accuracy of better than 5 ms{sup {minus}1} from the comparison of winds measured by HRDI with those obtained by MF radars and rockets. In addition, the degrees of horizontal and vertical smoothing of the recovered wind profiles have been optimized by examining the effect both on the amplitude of the HRDI derived diurnal tidal amplitude and the variance of the wind differences with correlative data.

  4. Wind Plant Ramping Behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Ela, E.; Kemper, J.

    2009-12-01

    With the increasing wind penetrations, utilities and operators (ISOs) are quickly trying to understand the impacts on system operations and planning. This report focuses on ramping imapcts within the Xcel service region.

  5. Influence of Geomagnetic and IMF conditions on High Latitude Upper Atmospheric winds and Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhadly, M. S.; Conde, M.; Emmert, J. T.

    2015-12-01

    We analyzed the climatological behavior of upper atmospheric winds (horizontal and vertical) and temperatures above Alaska by combining line-of-sight Doppler shifts of 630 nm optical emissions recorded during the 2011 and 2012 winters using a ground based all-sky wavelength scanning Doppler Fabry-Perot interferometer (SDI) located at Poker Flat (65.12N, 147.47W). The wide field of view covered a large geographic region above Alaska. This field was divided in software into multiple zones (115 used here), allowing independent spectra to be sampled from many directions simultaneously. As a result, it is capable of recording the wind field's spatial variations over a wide geographic region with high spatial resolution, and to resolve these variations over time. Although such climatological studies have been performed previously using satellites, models, and narrow field Fabry-Perot interferometers, there are no published climatological studies of thermospheric winds and temperatures using either SDI data or any other technique with comparable geographic coverage and resolution. Wind summary dial plots were produced to depict the climatology of the horizontal winds and temperatures for different geomagnetic conditions and orientation of interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). Results show that horizontal winds and temperatures had a strong dependence on geospace activity and orientation of IMF. The latitudinal shears in horizontal winds were stronger when geomagnetic conditions were active compared to the latitudinal shears for quiet conditions. Also, shears appeared earlier over Poker Flat when geomagnetic conditions were active. The latitudinal shears showed more dependence on IMF when geomagnetic conditions were active than they did during quieter conditions. F-region temperatures were higher under active geomagnetic conditions than during quiet conditions. They were also observed to be higher in pre-magnetic midnight sector (duskside) than they were post

  6. The effects of the stellar wind and orbital motion on the jets of high-mass microquasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosch-Ramon, V.; Barkov, M. V.

    2016-05-01

    Context. High-mass microquasar jets propagate under the effect of the wind from the companion star, and the orbital motion of the binary system. The stellar wind and the orbit may be dominant factors determining the jet properties beyond the binary scales. Aims: This is an analytical study, performed to characterise the effects of the stellar wind and the orbital motion on the jet properties. Methods: Accounting for the wind thrust transferred to the jet, we derive analytical estimates to characterise the jet evolution under the impact of the stellar wind. We include the Coriolis force effect, induced by orbital motion and enhanced by the wind's presence. Large-scale evolution of the jet is sketched, accounting for wind-to-jet thrust transfer, total energy conservation, and wind-jet flow mixing. Results: If the angle of the wind-induced jet bending is larger than its half-opening angle, the following is expected: (i) a strong recollimation shock; (ii) bending against orbital motion, caused by Coriolis forces and enhanced by the wind presence; and (iii) non-ballistic helical propagation further away. Even if disrupted, the jet can re-accelerate due to ambient pressure gradients, but wind entrainment can weaken this acceleration. On large scales, the opening angle of the helical structure is determined by the wind-jet thrust relation, and the wind-loaded jet flow can be rather slow. Conclusions: The impact of stellar winds on high-mass microquasar jets can yield non-ballistic helical jet trajectories, jet partial disruption and wind mixing, shocks, and possibly non-thermal emission. Among other observational diagnostics, such as radiation variability at any band, the radio morphology on milliarcsecond scales can be informative on the wind-jet interaction.

  7. All-fiber upconversion high spectral resolution wind lidar using a Fabry-Perot interferometer.

    PubMed

    Shangguan, Mingjia; Xia, Haiyun; Wang, Chong; Qiu, Jiawei; Shentu, Guoliang; Zhang, Qiang; Dou, Xiankang; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2016-08-22

    An all-fiber, micro-pulse and eye-safe high spectral resolution wind lidar (HSRWL) at 1.5 μm is proposed and demonstrated by using a pair of upconversion single-photon detectors and a fiber Fabry-Perot scanning interferometer (FFP-SI). In order to improve the optical detection efficiency, both the transmission spectrum and the reflection spectrum of the FFP-SI are used for spectral analyses of the aerosol backscatter and the reference laser pulse. Taking advantages of high signal-to-noise ratio of the detectors and high spectral resolution of the FFP-SI, the center frequencies and the bandwidths of spectra of the aerosol backscatter are obtained simultaneously. Continuous LOS wind observations are carried out on two days at Hefei (31.843 °N, 117.265 °E), China. The horizontal detection range of 4 km is realized with temporal resolution of 1 minute. The spatial resolution is switched from 30 m to 60 m at distance of 1.8 km. In a comparison experiment, LOS wind measurements from the HSRWL show good agreement with the results from an ultrasonic wind sensor (Vaisala windcap WMT52). An empirical method is adopted to evaluate the precision of the measurements. The standard deviation of the wind speed is 0.76 m/s at 1.8 km. The standard deviation of bandwidth variation is 2.07 MHz at 1.8 km.

  8. All-fiber upconversion high spectral resolution wind lidar using a Fabry-Perot interferometer.

    PubMed

    Shangguan, Mingjia; Xia, Haiyun; Wang, Chong; Qiu, Jiawei; Shentu, Guoliang; Zhang, Qiang; Dou, Xiankang; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2016-08-22

    An all-fiber, micro-pulse and eye-safe high spectral resolution wind lidar (HSRWL) at 1.5 μm is proposed and demonstrated by using a pair of upconversion single-photon detectors and a fiber Fabry-Perot scanning interferometer (FFP-SI). In order to improve the optical detection efficiency, both the transmission spectrum and the reflection spectrum of the FFP-SI are used for spectral analyses of the aerosol backscatter and the reference laser pulse. Taking advantages of high signal-to-noise ratio of the detectors and high spectral resolution of the FFP-SI, the center frequencies and the bandwidths of spectra of the aerosol backscatter are obtained simultaneously. Continuous LOS wind observations are carried out on two days at Hefei (31.843 °N, 117.265 °E), China. The horizontal detection range of 4 km is realized with temporal resolution of 1 minute. The spatial resolution is switched from 30 m to 60 m at distance of 1.8 km. In a comparison experiment, LOS wind measurements from the HSRWL show good agreement with the results from an ultrasonic wind sensor (Vaisala windcap WMT52). An empirical method is adopted to evaluate the precision of the measurements. The standard deviation of the wind speed is 0.76 m/s at 1.8 km. The standard deviation of bandwidth variation is 2.07 MHz at 1.8 km. PMID:27557211

  9. Low-turbulence high-speed wind tunnel for the determination of cascade shock losses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slovisky, J. A.; Roberts, W. B.; Sandercock, D. M.

    1979-01-01

    A low turbulence high-speed wind tunnel, using anti-turbulence screening and a 100:1 contraction ratio, has been found suitable for high-speed smoke flow visualization. The location and strength of normal, oblique, and curved shock waves generated by transonic or supersonic wind tunnel flow over airfoils or through axial compressor cascades is determined by combined shadowgraph and smokelines visualization techniques without the interference effects caused by intrusive probes. The Reynolds number based on chord varied between 50,000 and 1,000,000. Preliminary results are compared with the relevant theory and data gathered using a total pressure probe.

  10. Development of an Apparatus for Wind Tunnel Dynamic Experiments at High-alpha

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pedreiro, Nelson

    1997-01-01

    A unique experimental apparatus that allows a wind tunnel model two degrees of freedom has been designed and built. The apparatus was developed to investigate the use of new methods to augment aircraft control in the high angle of attack regime. The model support system provides a platform in which the roll-yaw coupling at high angles of attack can be studied in a controlled environment. Active cancellation of external effects is used to provide a system in which the dynamics are dominated by the aerodynamic loads acting on the wind tunnel model.

  11. A High-Resolution Merged Wind Dataset for DYNAMO: Progress and Future Plans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, Timothy J.; Mecikalski, John; Li, Xuanli; Chronis, Themis; Castillo, Tyler; Hoover, Kacie; Brewer, Alan; Churnside, James; McCarty, Brandi; Hein, Paul; Rutledge, Steve; Dolan, Brenda; Matthews, Alyssa; Thompson, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    In order to support research on optimal data assimilation methods for the Cyclone Global Navigation Satellite System (CYGNSS), launching in 2016, work has been ongoing to produce a high-resolution merged wind dataset for the Dynamics of the Madden Julian Oscillation (DYNAMO) field campaign, which took place during late 2011/early 2012. The winds are produced by assimilating DYNAMO observations into the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) three-dimensional variational (3DVAR) system. Data sources from the DYNAMO campaign include the upper-air sounding network, radial velocities from the radar network, vector winds from the Advanced Scatterometer (ASCAT) and Oceansat-2 Scatterometer (OSCAT) satellite instruments, the NOAA High Resolution Doppler Lidar (HRDL), and several others. In order the prep them for 3DVAR, significant additional quality control work is being done for the currently available TOGA and SMART-R radar datasets, including automatically dealiasing radial velocities and correcting for intermittent TOGA antenna azimuth angle errors. The assimilated winds are being made available as model output fields from WRF on two separate grids with different horizontal resolutions - a 3-km grid focusing on the main DYNAMO quadrilateral (i.e., Gan Island, the R/V Revelle, the R/V Mirai, and Diego Garcia), and a 1-km grid focusing on the Revelle. The wind dataset is focused on three separate approximately 2-week periods during the Madden Julian Oscillation (MJO) onsets that occurred in October, November, and December 2011. Work is ongoing to convert the 10-m surface winds from these model fields to simulated CYGNSS observations using the CYGNSS End-To-End Simulator (E2ES), and these simulated satellite observations are being compared to radar observations of DYNAMO precipitation systems to document the anticipated ability of CYGNSS to provide information on the relationships between surface winds and oceanic precipitation at the mesoscale level. This research will

  12. Solar Wind Effect on Joule Heating in the High-Latitude Ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, L.; Aikio, A. T.; Nygren, T. J.

    2014-12-01

    The interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) carried by solar wind affects strongly several key parameters in the high-latitude ionosphere. In this study, the solar wind effect on those parameters especially on Joule heating is conducted statistically based on the simultaneous measurements by the EISCAT radars in Tromsø (TRO, 66.6° cgmLat, mainly within the auroral oval on the nightside), and on Svalbard (ESR, 75.4º cgmLat, mostly within the polar cap). The most important findings are as follows: (i) At TRO, the decrease in Joule heating in the afternoon-evening sector due to neutral winds reported by Aikio et al. [2012] requires southward IMF conditions and a sufficiently high solar wind electric field. The increase in the morning sector takes place for all IMF directions within a region where the upper-E neutral wind has a large equatorward component and the F-region plasma flow is directed eastward. (ii) At ESR, an afternoon hot spot of joule heating centred typically at 14-15 MLT is observed during all IMF conditions. Enhanced Pedersen conductances within the hot spot region are observed only for the IMF Bz+/By- conditions, and the corresponding convection electric field values within the hot spot are smaller than during the other IMF conditions. Hence, the hot spot represents a region of persistent magnetopsheric electromagnetic energy input. (iii) For the southward IMF conditions, the MLT-integrated Joule heating rate without neutral winds for By- is twice the value for By+ at TRO. This can plausibly be explained by the higher average solar wind electric field values for By-.

  13. Evaluation of High-Resolution Ocean Surface Vector Winds Measured by QuikSCAT Scatterometer in Coastal Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, Wenqing; Liu, W. Timothy; Stiles, Bryan W.

    2004-01-01

    The SeaWinds scatterometer onboard QuikSCAT covers approximately 90% of the global ocean under clear and cloudy condition in 24 h, and the standard data product has 25-km spatial resolution. Such spatial resolution is not sufficient to resolve small-scale processes, especially in coastal oceans. Based on range-compressed normalized backscatter and a modified wind retrieval algorithm, a coastal wind dataset at 12.5-km resolution was produced. Even with larger error, the high-resolution winds, in medium to high strength, would still be useful over coastal ocean. Using measurements from moored buoys from the National Buoy Data Center, the high-resolution QuikSCAT wind data are found to have similar accuracy as standard data in the open ocean. The accuracy of both high- and standard-resolution winds, particularly in wind directions, is found to degrade near shore. The increase in error is likely caused by the inadequacy of the geophysical model function/ambiguity removal scheme in addressing coastal conditions and light winds situations. The modified algorithm helps to bring the directional accuracy of the high-resolution winds to the accuracy of the standard-resolution winds in near-shore regions, particularly in the nadir and far zones across the satellite track.

  14. Folic Acid-Targeted and Cell Penetrating Peptide-Mediated Theranostic Nanoplatform for High-Efficiency Tri-Modal Imaging-Guided Synergistic Anticancer Phototherapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Na; Li, Tingting; Liu, Chen; Ye, Shiyi; Liang, Jiangong; Han, Heyou

    2016-05-01

    A novel nanomaterial with precisely-defined size and shape, biocompatible composition, and excellent stability, which can integrate multi modal targeted imaging and therapy into a single system for visualized therapeutics, has recently attracted significant research interest. Here, we developed a multifunctional nanoplatform based on silica-coated 4-mercaptobenzoic acid-modified gold nanorods (Au NRs) decorated with gold nanoclusters rich in the photosensitizer Ce6 (Au-Ce6 NCs). The nanoparticles also comprised folic acid and cell penetrating peptide molecules anchored on the surface, obtaining the Au@SiO2@Au-cell penetrating peptide nanocomposite. The Au-Ce6 NCs enhanced the photophysical stability, provided numerous bonding sites and offered a large surface-area and interior space to achieve a high drug loading efficiency (up to 55%). The anchored folic acid and cell penetrating peptide synergistically enhanced the efficiency of uptake of nanocomposites by HeLa cells (up to 70.7%) and improved therapeutic efficacy. The nanocomposite also has good water-solubility, excellent biocompatibility, and long-term stability against illumination and exposure to pH 3-12, thus facilitating their bioapplications in cancer theranostics. Here, the nanocomposite was established for high-resolution and noninvasive tri-modal surface-enhanced Raman spectrum/dark-field/fluorescence imaging-guided high-efficiency synergistic photodynamic/photothermal therapy of cancer. Our studies demonstrate that the multifunctional nanocomposite has the potential as a novel and sensitive contrast agent for complementary and synergistic theranostics in the clinic.

  15. Folic Acid-Targeted and Cell Penetrating Peptide-Mediated Theranostic Nanoplatform for High-Efficiency Tri-Modal Imaging-Guided Synergistic Anticancer Phototherapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Na; Li, Tingting; Liu, Chen; Ye, Shiyi; Liang, Jiangong; Han, Heyou

    2016-05-01

    A novel nanomaterial with precisely-defined size and shape, biocompatible composition, and excellent stability, which can integrate multi modal targeted imaging and therapy into a single system for visualized therapeutics, has recently attracted significant research interest. Here, we developed a multifunctional nanoplatform based on silica-coated 4-mercaptobenzoic acid-modified gold nanorods (Au NRs) decorated with gold nanoclusters rich in the photosensitizer Ce6 (Au-Ce6 NCs). The nanoparticles also comprised folic acid and cell penetrating peptide molecules anchored on the surface, obtaining the Au@SiO2@Au-cell penetrating peptide nanocomposite. The Au-Ce6 NCs enhanced the photophysical stability, provided numerous bonding sites and offered a large surface-area and interior space to achieve a high drug loading efficiency (up to 55%). The anchored folic acid and cell penetrating peptide synergistically enhanced the efficiency of uptake of nanocomposites by HeLa cells (up to 70.7%) and improved therapeutic efficacy. The nanocomposite also has good water-solubility, excellent biocompatibility, and long-term stability against illumination and exposure to pH 3-12, thus facilitating their bioapplications in cancer theranostics. Here, the nanocomposite was established for high-resolution and noninvasive tri-modal surface-enhanced Raman spectrum/dark-field/fluorescence imaging-guided high-efficiency synergistic photodynamic/photothermal therapy of cancer. Our studies demonstrate that the multifunctional nanocomposite has the potential as a novel and sensitive contrast agent for complementary and synergistic theranostics in the clinic. PMID:27305812

  16. Cement penetration after patella venting.

    PubMed

    Jones, Christopher W; Lam, Li-On; Butler, Adam; Wood, David J; Walsh, William R

    2009-01-01

    There is a high rate of patellofemoral complications following total knee arthroplasty. Optimization of the cement-bone interface by venting and suction of the tibial plateau has been shown to improve cement penetration. Our study was designed to investigate if venting the patella prior to cementing improved cement penetration. Ten paired cadaver patellae were allocated prior to resurfacing to be vented or non-vented. Bone mineral density (BMD) was measured by DEXA scanning. In vented specimens, a 1.6 mm Kirschner wire was used to breach the anterior cortex at the center. Specimens were resurfaced with standard Profix instrumentation and Versabond bone cement (Smith and Nephew PLC, UK). Cement penetration was assessed from Faxitron and sectioned images by a digital image software package (ImageJ V1.38, NIH, USA). Wilcoxon rank sum test was used to assess the difference in cement penetration between groups. The relationship between BMD and cement penetration was analyzed by Pearson correlation coefficient. There was a strong negative correlation between peak BMD and cement penetration when analyzed independent of experimental grouping (r(2)=-0.812, p=0.004). Wilcoxon rank sum testing demonstrated no significant difference (rank sum statistic W=27, p=0.579) in cement penetration between vented (10.53%+/-4.66; mean+/-std dev) and non-vented patellae (11.51%+/-6.23; mean+/-std dev). Venting the patella using a Kirschner wire does not have a significant effect on the amount of cement penetration achieved in vitro using Profix instrumentation and Versabond cement.

  17. Cement penetration after patella venting.

    PubMed

    Jones, Christopher W; Lam, Li-On; Butler, Adam; Wood, David J; Walsh, William R

    2009-01-01

    There is a high rate of patellofemoral complications following total knee arthroplasty. Optimization of the cement-bone interface by venting and suction of the tibial plateau has been shown to improve cement penetration. Our study was designed to investigate if venting the patella prior to cementing improved cement penetration. Ten paired cadaver patellae were allocated prior to resurfacing to be vented or non-vented. Bone mineral density (BMD) was measured by DEXA scanning. In vented specimens, a 1.6 mm Kirschner wire was used to breach the anterior cortex at the center. Specimens were resurfaced with standard Profix instrumentation and Versabond bone cement (Smith and Nephew PLC, UK). Cement penetration was assessed from Faxitron and sectioned images by a digital image software package (ImageJ V1.38, NIH, USA). Wilcoxon rank sum test was used to assess the difference in cement penetration between groups. The relationship between BMD and cement penetration was analyzed by Pearson correlation coefficient. There was a strong negative correlation between peak BMD and cement penetration when analyzed independent of experimental grouping (r(2)=-0.812, p=0.004). Wilcoxon rank sum testing demonstrated no significant difference (rank sum statistic W=27, p=0.579) in cement penetration between vented (10.53%+/-4.66; mean+/-std dev) and non-vented patellae (11.51%+/-6.23; mean+/-std dev). Venting the patella using a Kirschner wire does not have a significant effect on the amount of cement penetration achieved in vitro using Profix instrumentation and Versabond cement. PMID:19010682

  18. Development of the NASA High-Altitude Imaging Wind and Rain Airborne Profiler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Lihua; Heymsfield, Gerald; Carswell, James; Schaubert, Dan; McLinden, Matthew; Vega, Manuel; Perrine, Martin

    2011-01-01

    The scope of this paper is the development and recent field deployments of the High-Altitude Imaging Wind and Rain Airborne Profiler (HIWRAP), which was funded under the NASA Instrument Incubator Program (IIP) [1]. HIWRAP is a dual-frequency (Ka- and Ku-band), dual-beam (300 and 400 incidence angles), conical scanning, Doppler radar system designed for operation on the NASA high-altitude (65,000 ft) Global Hawk Unmanned Aerial System (UAS). It utilizes solid state transmitters along with a novel pulse compression scheme that results in a system with compact size, light weight, less power consumption, and low cost compared to radars currently in use for precipitation and Doppler wind measurements. By combining measurements at Ku- and Ka-band, HIWRAP is able to image winds through measuring volume backscattering from clouds and precipitation. In addition, HIWRAP is also capable of measuring surface winds in an approach similar to SeaWinds on QuikScat. To this end, HIWRAP hardware and software development has been completed. It was installed on the NASA WB57 for instrument test flights in March, 2010 and then deployed on the NASA Global Hawk for supporting the Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP) field campaign in August-September, 2010. This paper describes the scientific motivations of the development of HIWRAP as well as system hardware, aircraft integration and flight missions. Preliminary data from GRIP science flights is also presented.

  19. Unmanned air vehicle flow separation control using dielectric barrier discharge plasma at high wind speed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xin; Huang, Yong; Wang, WanBo; Wang, XunNian; Li, HuaXing

    2014-06-01

    The present paper described an experimental investigation of separation control of an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) at high wind speeds. The plasma actuator was based on Dielectric Barrier Discharge (DBD) and operated in a steady manner. The flow over a wing of UAV was performed with smoke flow visualization in the ϕ0.75 m low speed wind tunnel to reveal the flow structure over the wing so that the locations of plasma actuators could be optimized. A full model of the UAV was experimentally investigated in the ϕ3.2 m low speed wind tunnel using a six-component internal strain gauge balance. The effects of the key parameters, including the locations of the plasma actuators, the applied voltage amplitude and the operating frequency, were obtained. The whole test model was made of aluminium and acted as a cathode of the actuator. The results showed that the plasma acting on the surface of UAV could obviously suppress the boundary layer separation and reduce the model vibration at the high wind speeds. It was found that the maximum lift coefficient of the UAV was increased by 2.5% and the lift/drag ratio was increased by about 80% at the wind speed of 100 m/s. The control mechanism of the plasma actuator at the test configuration was also analyzed.

  20. Fluorescent penetrant inspection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sastri, Sankar

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this experiment is to familiarize the student with fluorescent penetrant inspection and to relate it to classification of various defects. The penetrant method of nondestructive testing is a method for finding discontinuities open to the surface in solids and essentially nonporous bodies. The method employs a penetrating liquid which is applied over the surface and enters the discontinuity or crack. After the excess of penetrant has been cleaned from the surface, the penetrant which exudes or is drawn back out of the crack indicates the presence and location of a discontinuity. The experimental procedure is described.

  1. FAA fluorescent penetrant activities

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, D.G.; Larson, B.F.

    1997-11-01

    The Federal Aviation Administration`s Airworthiness Assurance NDI Validation Center (AANC) and the Center for Aviation Systems Reliability (CASR) are currently working to develop a liquid penetrant inspection (LPI) system evaluation capability that will support the needs of the penetrant manufacturers, commercial airline industry and the FAA. The main focus of this facility is to support the evaluation of penetrant inspection materials, penetrant systems and to apply resources to support industry needs. This paper discusses efforts to create such a facility and an initial project to produce fatigue crack specimens for evaluation of Type 1 penetrant sensitivities.

  2. Singular year of high geomagnetic responses to the same solar wind input

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamauchi, Masatoshi; Olsthoorn, Bart; Nicolaou, Georgios

    2016-04-01

    Using high-resolution (5 min) solar wind data and westward auroral electrojet index (AL) index since 1981, temporal variation of the Sun-Earth coupling efficiency (AL response to the solar wind electromagnetic energy/flux input) was examined. To separate the seasonal variation, 3-month averaged statistics is used. (1) The Sun-Earth coupling efficiency for moderate solar wind input occasionally increased beyond the seasonal variation for about half a year during the declining phase of solar cycles; (2) Excluding these singular years and seasonal variation, the Sun-Earth coupling efficiency for moderate or low solar wind input continuously decreased over the past three decades; (3) These temporal variations do not correlate with F10.7 index (proxy for the Solar UV flux). The results confirm some of the previous study using 1-hour resolution data with a better accuracy, and suggest that the existence of additional controlling mechanisms either at the Sun (e.g., magnetic field or solar cycle strength) or solar wind-magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling (e.g., through the solar wind composition). On the other hand, the Sun-Earth coupling efficiency for large solar wind input is very variable and the present correlation method is not sufficient to determine the conditions for large AL activities and its temporal variation. Acknowledgement: Auroral electrojet (AE) indices and sunspot numbers (RI) are official IAGA and IAA endorsed indices that are provided by World Data Center for Geomagnetism, Kyoto University, Japan (AE) and the Royal Observatory of Belgium, Brussels (RI). Including these indices, all data in 5-minutes values are obtained from NASA-GSFC/SPDF through OMNIWeb (http://omniweb.gsfc.nasa.gov/ow.html).

  3. Atomization, drop size, and penetration for cross-stream water injection at high-altitude reentry conditions with application to the RAM C-1 and C-3 flights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gooderum, P. B.; Bushnell, D. M.

    1972-01-01

    Atomization, drop size, and penetration data are presented for cross stream water injection at conditions simulating high altitude reentry (low Weber number, high static temperature, high Knudsen number, and low static pressure). These results are applied to the RAM C-1 and C-3 flights. Two primary breakup modes are considered, vapor pressure or flashing and aerodynamic atomization. Results are given for breakup boundaries and mean drop size for each of these atomization mechanisms. Both standard and flight orifice geometries are investigated. The data were obtained in both a static environment and in conventional aerodynamic facilities at Mach numbers of 4.5 and 8. The high temperature aspects of reentry were simulated in a Mach 5.5 cyanogen-oxygen tunnel with total temperature of 4500 K.

  4. Metallic hot wire anemometer. [for high speed wind tunnel tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemos, F. R. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A hot wire anemometer is described which has a body formed of heat resistant metal such as an alloy high in nickel content which supports a probe wire disposed in a V groove in the body. The V groove contains a high temperature ceramic adhesive that partially encompasses the downstream side of the probe wire. Mechanical and electrical connection to the probe wire is achieved through conductive support rods that are constructed of the same high temperature metal, insulation between the body and the conductor rods being provided by a coating of an oxide of the same material which coating is formed in situ. The oxide coating insulates the conductor rods from the body, mechanically fixes the conductors within the body, and maintains its integrity at elevated temperatures.

  5. The NACA High-Speed Wind Tunnel and Tests of Six Propeller Sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stack, John

    1934-01-01

    This report gives a description of the high-speed wind tunnel of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics. The operation of the tunnel is also described and the method of presenting the data is given. An account of an investigation of the aerodynamic properties of six propeller sections is included.

  6. The George C. Marshall Space Flight Center High Reynolds Number Wind Tunnel Technical Handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gwin, H. S.

    1975-01-01

    The High Reynolds Number Wind Tunnel at the George C. Marshall Space Flight Center is described. The following items are presented to illustrate the operation and capabilities of the facility: facility descriptions and specifications, operational and performance characteristics, model design criteria, instrumentation and data recording equipment, data processing and presentation, and preliminary test information required.

  7. Gas transfer under high wind and its dependence on wave breaking and sea state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brumer, Sophia; Zappa, Christopher; Fairall, Christopher; Blomquist, Byron; Brooks, Ian; Yang, Mingxi

    2016-04-01

    Quantifying greenhouse gas fluxes on regional and global scales relies on parameterizations of the gas transfer velocity K. To first order, K is dictated by wind speed (U) and is typically parameterized as a non-linear functions of U. There is however a large spread in K predicted by the traditional parameterizations at high wind speed. This is because a large variety of environmental forcing and processes (Wind, Currents, Rain, Waves, Breaking, Surfactants, Fetch) actually influence K and wind speed alone cannot capture the variability of air-water gas exchange. At high wind speed especially, breaking waves become a key factor to take into account when estimating gas fluxes. The High Wind Gas exchange Study (HiWinGS) presents the unique opportunity to gain new insights on this poorly understood aspects of air-sea interaction under high winds. The HiWinGS cruise took place in the North Atlantic during October and November 2013. Wind speeds exceeded 15 m s‑1 25% of the time, including 48 hrs with U10 > 20 m s‑1. Continuous measurements of turbulent fluxes of heat, momentum, and gas (CO2, DMS, acetone and methanol) were taken from the bow of the R/V Knorr. The wave field was sampled by a wave rider buoy and breaking events were tracked in visible imagery was acquired from the port and starboard side of the flying bridge during daylight hours at 20Hz. Taking advantage of the range of physical forcing and wave conditions sampled during HiWinGS, we test existing parameterizations and explore ways of better constraining K based on whitecap coverage, sea state and breaking statistics contrasting pure windseas to swell dominated periods. We distinguish between windseas and swell based on a separation algorithm applied to directional wave spectra for mixed seas, system alignment is considered when interpreting results. The four gases sampled during HiWinGS ranged from being mostly waterside controlled to almost entirely airside controlled. While bubble-mediated transfer

  8. Gas transfer under high wind and its dependence on wave breaking and sea state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brumer, Sophia; Zappa, Christopher; Fairall, Christopher; Blomquist, Byron; Brooks, Ian; Yang, Mingxi

    2016-04-01

    Quantifying greenhouse gas fluxes on regional and global scales relies on parameterizations of the gas transfer velocity K. To first order, K is dictated by wind speed (U) and is typically parameterized as a non-linear functions of U. There is however a large spread in K predicted by the traditional parameterizations at high wind speed. This is because a large variety of environmental forcing and processes (Wind, Currents, Rain, Waves, Breaking, Surfactants, Fetch) actually influence K and wind speed alone cannot capture the variability of air-water gas exchange. At high wind speed especially, breaking waves become a key factor to take into account when estimating gas fluxes. The High Wind Gas exchange Study (HiWinGS) presents the unique opportunity to gain new insights on this poorly understood aspects of air-sea interaction under high winds. The HiWinGS cruise took place in the North Atlantic during October and November 2013. Wind speeds exceeded 15 m s-1 25% of the time, including 48 hrs with U10 > 20 m s-1. Continuous measurements of turbulent fluxes of heat, momentum, and gas (CO2, DMS, acetone and methanol) were taken from the bow of the R/V Knorr. The wave field was sampled by a wave rider buoy and breaking events were tracked in visible imagery was acquired from the port and starboard side of the flying bridge during daylight hours at 20Hz. Taking advantage of the range of physical forcing and wave conditions sampled during HiWinGS, we test existing parameterizations and explore ways of better constraining K based on whitecap coverage, sea state and breaking statistics contrasting pure windseas to swell dominated periods. We distinguish between windseas and swell based on a separation algorithm applied to directional wave spectra for mixed seas, system alignment is considered when interpreting results. The four gases sampled during HiWinGS ranged from being mostly waterside controlled to almost entirely airside controlled. While bubble-mediated transfer

  9. a New Method to Detect Regions Endangered by High Wind Speeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, P.; Ehrensperger, S.; Krauß, T.

    2016-06-01

    In this study we evaluate whether the methodology of Boosted Regression Trees (BRT) suits for accurately predicting maximum wind speeds. As predictors a broad set of parameters derived from a Digital Elevation Model (DEM) acquired within the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) is used. The derived parameters describe the surface by means of quantities (e.g. slope, aspect) and quality (landform classification). Furthermore land cover data from the CORINE dataset is added. The response variable is maximum wind speed, measurements are provided by a network of weather stations. The area of interest is Switzerland, a country which suits perfectly for this study because of its highly dynamic orography and various landforms.

  10. Solar wind suprathermal electron Stahl widths across high-speed stream structures

    SciTech Connect

    Skoug, Ruth M; Steinberg, John T; Goodrich, Katherine A; Anderson, Brett R

    2011-01-03

    Suprathermal electrons (100-1500 eV) observed in the solar wind typically show a strahl distribution, that is, a beam directed away from the Sun along the magnetic field direction. The strahl width observed at 1 AU is highly variable, ranging from 10-70 degrees. The obsenred finite width of the strahl results from the competition between beam focusing as the interplanetary magnetic field strength drops with distance from the Sun, and pitch-angle scattering as the beam interacts with the solar wind plasma in transit from the sun. Here we examine strahl width, observed with ACE SWEPAM across high-speed stream structures to investigate variations in electron scattering as a function of local plasma characteristics. We find that narrow strahls (less than 20 degrees wide), indicating reduced scattering, are observed within high-speed streams. Narrow strahls are also observed in both very low temperature solar wind, in association with ICMEs. Case studies of high-speed streams typically show the strahl narrowing at the leading edge of the stream. In some cases, the strahl narrows at the reverse shock or pressure wave, in other cases at the stream interface. The narrowing can either occur discontinuously or gradually over a period of hours. Within the high-speed wind, the strahl remains narrow for a period of hours to days, and then gradually broadens. The strahl width is roughly constant at all energies across these structures. For some fraction of high-speed streams, counterstreaming is associated with passage of the corotating interaction region. In these cases, we find the widths of the two counterstreaming beams frequently differ by more than 40 degrees. This dramatic difference in strahl width contrasts with observations in the solar wind as a whole, in which counterstreaming strahls typically differ in width by less than 20 degrees.

  11. Ramping Performance Analysis of the Kahuku Wind-Energy Battery Storage System

    SciTech Connect

    Gevorgian, V.; Corbus, D.

    2013-11-01

    High penetrations of wind power on the electrical grid can introduce technical challenges caused by resource variability. Such variability can have undesirable effects on the frequency, voltage, and transient stability of the grid. Energy storage devices can be an effective tool in reducing variability impacts on the power grid in the form of power smoothing and ramp control. Integrating anenergy storage system with a wind power plant can help smooth the variable power produced from wind. This paper explores the fast-response, megawatt-scale, wind-energy battery storage systems that were recently deployed throughout the Hawaiian islands to support wind and solar projects.

  12. When physics meets biology: low and high-velocity penetration, blunt impact, and blast injuries to the brain.

    PubMed

    Young, Leanne; Rule, Gregory T; Bocchieri, Robert T; Walilko, Timothy J; Burns, Jennie M; Ling, Geoffrey

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of traumatic brain injuries (TBI) in the US has reached epidemic proportions with well over 2 million new cases reported each year. TBI can occur in both civilians and warfighters, with head injuries occurring in both combat and non-combat situations from a variety of threats, including ballistic penetration, acceleration, blunt impact, and blast. Most generally, TBI is a condition in which physical loads exceed the capacity of brain tissues to absorb without injury. More specifically, TBI results when sufficient external force is applied to the head and is subsequently converted into stresses that must be absorbed or redirected by protective equipment. If the stresses are not sufficiently absorbed or redirected, they will lead to damage of extracranial soft tissue and the skull. Complex interactions and kinematics of the head, neck and jaw cause strains within the brain tissue, resulting in structural, anatomical damage that is characteristic of the inciting insult. This mechanical trauma then initiates a neuro-chemical cascade that leads to the functional consequences of TBI, such as cognitive impairment. To fully understand the mechanisms by which TBI occurs, it is critically important to understand the effects of the loading environments created by these threats. In the following, a review is made of the pertinent complex loading conditions and how these loads cause injury. Also discussed are injury thresholds and gaps in knowledge, both of which are needed to design improved protective systems. PMID:25999910

  13. When Physics Meets Biology: Low and High-Velocity Penetration, Blunt Impact, and Blast Injuries to the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Young, Leanne; Rule, Gregory T.; Bocchieri, Robert T.; Walilko, Timothy J.; Burns, Jennie M.; Ling, Geoffrey

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of traumatic brain injuries (TBI) in the US has reached epidemic proportions with well over 2 million new cases reported each year. TBI can occur in both civilians and warfighters, with head injuries occurring in both combat and non-combat situations from a variety of threats, including ballistic penetration, acceleration, blunt impact, and blast. Most generally, TBI is a condition in which physical loads exceed the capacity of brain tissues to absorb without injury. More specifically, TBI results when sufficient external force is applied to the head and is subsequently converted into stresses that must be absorbed or redirected by protective equipment. If the stresses are not sufficiently absorbed or redirected, they will lead to damage of extracranial soft tissue and the skull. Complex interactions and kinematics of the head, neck and jaw cause strains within the brain tissue, resulting in structural, anatomical damage that is characteristic of the inciting insult. This mechanical trauma then initiates a neuro-chemical cascade that leads to the functional consequences of TBI, such as cognitive impairment. To fully understand the mechanisms by which TBI occurs, it is critically important to understand the effects of the loading environments created by these threats. In the following, a review is made of the pertinent complex loading conditions and how these loads cause injury. Also discussed are injury thresholds and gaps in knowledge, both of which are needed to design improved protective systems. PMID:25999910

  14. Automated monitoring of subglacial hydrological processes with ground-penetrating radar (GPR) at high temporal resolution: scope and potential pitfalls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulessa, B.; Booth, A. D.; Hobbs, A.; Hubbard, A. L.

    2008-12-01

    We demonstrate that automated GPR techniques can monitor, at repeat timescales of minutes, hydrological processes beneath glaciers experiencing perennial surface melting. At Grubengletscher, Swiss Alps, melt penetrates into porous near-surface ice during the day, modifying the transmitted radar energy and thus the amplitudes of the targeted subglacial reflections. Normalising these reflections by early-time radar arrivals, integrated over a suitable time window, minimises such artefacts. In mid afternoon peak surface ablation, a diagnostic pulse in englacial reflectivity, sharp increases in subglacial reflectivity and glacier surface uplift precede the onset of transient glacier acceleration. Sliding terminates as the glacier surface lowers and the magnitude of subglacial reflectivity decreases. We infer a prominent episode of basal sliding as subglacial water pressure rises rapidly in response to englacially-routed melt delivery, jacking the glacier off its bed and modifying the observed reflectivity. Quantification of such processes is pertinent for any measurement and interpretation of basal reflection strength or bed reflection power from a GPR dataset.

  15. When physics meets biology: low and high-velocity penetration, blunt impact, and blast injuries to the brain.

    PubMed

    Young, Leanne; Rule, Gregory T; Bocchieri, Robert T; Walilko, Timothy J; Burns, Jennie M; Ling, Geoffrey

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of traumatic brain injuries (TBI) in the US has reached epidemic proportions with well over 2 million new cases reported each year. TBI can occur in both civilians and warfighters, with head injuries occurring in both combat and non-combat situations from a variety of threats, including ballistic penetration, acceleration, blunt impact, and blast. Most generally, TBI is a condition in which physical loads exceed the capacity of brain tissues to absorb without injury. More specifically, TBI results when sufficient external force is applied to the head and is subsequently converted into stresses that must be absorbed or redirected by protective equipment. If the stresses are not sufficiently absorbed or redirected, they will lead to damage of extracranial soft tissue and the skull. Complex interactions and kinematics of the head, neck and jaw cause strains within the brain tissue, resulting in structural, anatomical damage that is characteristic of the inciting insult. This mechanical trauma then initiates a neuro-chemical cascade that leads to the functional consequences of TBI, such as cognitive impairment. To fully understand the mechanisms by which TBI occurs, it is critically important to understand the effects of the loading environments created by these threats. In the following, a review is made of the pertinent complex loading conditions and how these loads cause injury. Also discussed are injury thresholds and gaps in knowledge, both of which are needed to design improved protective systems.

  16. First Observations of Simultaneous Inter-hemispheric Conjugate High-latitude Thermospheric Winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, C.; Yiu, I.; Kellerman, A. C.; Kosch, M.; Makarevitch, R.; Aruliah, A. L.; Conde, M. G.; Davies, T.; Dyson, P. L.

    2009-12-01

    We report the first observations of simultaneous high-latitude inter-hemispheric F-region neutral wind fields by combining the 630 nm optical measurements from two scanning Doppler imagers (SDI) and three Fabry-Perot interferometers (FPI) for a period exceeding 5 hours. From the southern hemisphere, a SDI at Mawson and a FPI at Davis, both in Antarctica, were geomagnetically mapped onto the northern hemisphere. These data were combined in the northern hemisphere with a SDI at Longyearbyen, Svalbard, and two FPIs near Kiruna in Sweden and Sodankyla in Finland. Geomagnetic conditions were moderate and steady although the IMF Bz did change polarity several times. There was good agreement between the conjugate 630 nm optical intensities and wind vectors. All wind field vectors were overlaid onto the northern SuperDARN ion convection contours. The agreement between neutral and ion flow was remarkably good throughout the study interval, even down to meso-scale spatial size.

  17. On the high correlation between long-term averages of solar wind speed and geomagnetic activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crooker, N. U.; Feynman, J.; Gosling, J. T.

    1977-01-01

    Six-month and yearly averages of solar-wind speed from 1962 to 1975 are shown to be highly correlated with geomagnetic activity as measured by averages of the Ap index. On the same time scale the correlation between the southward component of the interplanetary magnetic field and geomagnetic activity is poor. Previous studies with hourly averages gave opposite results. The better correlation with the southward component on an hourly time scale is explained by its large variation compared with the relatively constant solar-wind speed. However, on a yearly time scale the magnitude of the variations in both parameters are about the same. This problem can be solved by invoking an energy transfer mechanism which is proportional to the first power of the southward component and a higher power of the solar-wind speed.

  18. High-velocity tails on the velocity distribution of solar wind ions

    SciTech Connect

    Ogilvie, K.W. ); Geiss, J. ); Gloeckler, G. ); Berdichevsky, D. ); Wilken, B. )

    1993-03-01

    Recent observations of the solar wind using the SWICS instrument on the Ulysses spacecraft have shown the presence of high-velocity [open quotes]tails[close quotes] on the velocity distribution of protons. Similar features have also been observed on the velocity distributions of helium and oxygen ions. Of the order of 1% of the solar wind density is involved in these tails, which are approximately exponential in shape and persist to V = V[sub B] + 10V[sub th] or beyond, where V[sub B] is the bulk velocity and V[sub th] the thermal velocity of the solar wind. This paper contains a preliminary description of the phenomenon. It is clear that it is ultimately connected with the passage of interplanetary shocks past the spacecraft and that particle acceleration at oblique shocks is involved. 21 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Wind tunnel tests of high-lift systems for advanced transports using high-aspect-ratio supercritical wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, J. B.; Oliver, W. R.; Spacht, L. A.

    1982-01-01

    The wind tunnel testing of an advanced technology high lift system for a wide body and a narrow body transport incorporating high aspect ratio supercritical wings is described. This testing has added to the very limited low speed high Reynolds number data base for this class or aircraft. The experimental results include the effects on low speed aerodynamic characteristics of various leading and trailing edge devices, nacelles and pylons, ailerons, and spoilers, and the effects of Mach and Reynolds numbers.

  20. Techno-economic Modeling of the Integration of 20% Wind and Large-scale Energy Storage in ERCOT by 2030

    SciTech Connect

    Baldick, Ross; Webber, Michael; King, Carey; Garrison, Jared; Cohen, Stuart; Lee, Duehee

    2012-12-21

    This study's objective is to examine interrelated technical and economic avenues for the Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT) grid to incorporate up to and over 20% wind generation by 2030. Our specific interests are to look at the factors that will affect the implementation of both high level of wind power penetration (> 20% generation) and installation of large scale storage.

  1. Impact of Distribution-Connected Large-Scale Wind Turbines on Transmission System Stability during Large Disturbances: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y.; Allen, A.; Hodge, B. M.

    2014-02-01

    This work examines the dynamic impacts of distributed utility-scale wind power during contingency events on both the distribution system and the transmission system. It is the first step toward investigating high penetrations of distribution-connected wind power's impact on both distribution and transmission stability.

  2. Quantifying Solar Wind-Polar Cap Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urban, K. D.; Gerrard, A. J.; Lanzerotti, L. J.; Weatherwax, A. T.; Huang, Y.

    2015-12-01

    It is well known that the solar wind is a major driver of ultra-low frequency [ULF] power at ground locations from low to high latitudes. However, due to the scarcity of deep polar cap magnetometer sites, it is not clear when, where, or if this is true deep inside the polar cap on open field lines where interplanetary magnetic field [IMF] ULF waves could possibly be directly detected. Given recent observations of very large Joule heating estimates from DMSP data, together with the large heating reported by the CHAMP satellite, it is important to understand the degree to which ULF waves in the solar wind can directly cause such heating. Using a time series of lagged correlation sequences ("dynamic correlograms") between GSM Bz ULF power (computed via data obtained from NASA's Advanced Composition Explorer [ACE] ahead of Earth in the solar wind) and the horizontal ULF power (H^2=N^2+E^2) from ground-based magnetometers in Earth's southern polar cap, we investigate the direct penetration of ULF waves from the solar wind into the polar ionosphere during a gamut of space weather conditions at a distributed network of Automated Geophysical Observatories [AGOs] in Antarctica. To infer causation, a predicted lag correlation maximum at each time step is computed by simply dividing the associated distance of ACE from Earth by the concurrent bulk solar wind speed. This technique helps parse out direct penetration of solar wind ULF waves from other sources (e.g., via leakage from closed field line resonances due to the bulk solar wind plasma viscously interacting at dawn/dusk flanks inducing Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities [KHI] or compressional modes induced by impulses in solar wind dynamic pressure). The identified direct-penetrating ULF waves are related to the DMSP-derived Poynting fluxes by regression analysis, and conclusions are drawn for the importance of the ULF source for the measured heating.

  3. Overview: Hard Rock Penetration

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, J.C.

    1992-01-01

    The Hard Rock Penetration program is developing technology to reduce the costs of drilling and completing geothermal wells. Current projects include: lost circulation control, rock penetration mechanics, instrumentation, and industry/DOE cost shared projects of the Geothermal Drilling organization. Last year, a number of accomplishments were achieved in each of these areas. A new flow meter being developed to accurately measure drilling fluid outflow was tested extensively during Long Valley drilling. Results show that this meter is rugged, reliable, and can provide useful measurements of small differences in fluid inflow and outflow rates. By providing early indications of fluid gain or loss, improved control of blow-out and lost circulation problems during geothermal drilling can be expected. In the area of downhole tools for lost circulation control, the concept of a downhole injector for injecting a two-component, fast-setting cementitious mud was developed. DOE filed a patent application for this concept during FY 91. The design criteria for a high-temperature potassium, uranium, thorium logging tool featuring a downhole data storage computer were established, and a request for proposals was submitted to tool development companies. The fundamental theory of acoustic telemetry in drill strings was significantly advanced through field experimentation and analysis. A new understanding of energy loss mechanisms was developed.

  4. Overview: Hard Rock Penetration

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, J.C.

    1992-08-01

    The Hard Rock Penetration program is developing technology to reduce the costs of drilling and completing geothermal wells. Current projects include: lost circulation control, rock penetration mechanics, instrumentation, and industry/DOE cost shared projects of the Geothermal Drilling organization. Last year, a number of accomplishments were achieved in each of these areas. A new flow meter being developed to accurately measure drilling fluid outflow was tested extensively during Long Valley drilling. Results show that this meter is rugged, reliable, and can provide useful measurements of small differences in fluid inflow and outflow rates. By providing early indications of fluid gain or loss, improved control of blow-out and lost circulation problems during geothermal drilling can be expected. In the area of downhole tools for lost circulation control, the concept of a downhole injector for injecting a two-component, fast-setting cementitious mud was developed. DOE filed a patent application for this concept during FY 91. The design criteria for a high-temperature potassium, uranium, thorium logging tool featuring a downhole data storage computer were established, and a request for proposals was submitted to tool development companies. The fundamental theory of acoustic telemetry in drill strings was significantly advanced through field experimentation and analysis. A new understanding of energy loss mechanisms was developed.

  5. Overview - Hard Rock Penetration

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, James C.

    1992-03-24

    The Hard Rock Penetration program is developing technology to reduce the costs of drilling and completing geothermal wells. Current projects include: lost circulation control, rock penetration mechanics, instrumentation, and industry/DOE cost shared projects of the Geothermal Drilling Organization. Last year, a number of accomplishments were achieved in each of these areas. A new flow meter being developed to accurately measure drilling fluid outflow was tested extensively during Long Valley drilling. Results show that this meter is rugged, reliable, and can provide useful measurements of small differences in fluid inflow and outflow rates. By providing early indications of fluid gain or loss, improved control of blow-out and lost circulation problems during geothermal drilling can be expected. In the area of downhole tools for lost circulation control, the concept of a downhole injector for injecting a two-component, fast-setting cementitious mud was developed. DOE filed a patent application for this concept during FY 91. The design criteria for a high-temperature potassium, uranium, thorium logging tool featuring a downhole data storage computer were established, and a request for proposals was submitted to tool development companies. The fundamental theory of acoustic telemetry in drill strings was significantly advanced through field experimentation and analysis. A new understanding of energy loss mechanisms was developed.

  6. Monolithic ballasted penetrator

    DOEpatents

    Hickerson, Jr., James P.; Zanner, Frank J.; Baldwin, Michael D.; Maguire, Michael C.

    2001-01-01

    The present invention is a monolithic ballasted penetrator capable of delivering a working payload to a hardened target, such as reinforced concrete. The invention includes a ballast made from a dense heavy material insert and a monolithic case extending along an axis and consisting of a high-strength steel alloy. The case includes a nose end containing a hollow portion in which the ballast is nearly completely surrounded so that no movement of the ballast relative to the case is possible during impact with a hard target. The case is cast around the ballast, joining the two parts together. The ballast may contain concentric grooves or protrusions that improve joint strength between the case and ballast. The case further includes a second hollow portion; between the ballast and base, which has a payload fastened within this portion. The penetrator can be used to carry instrumentation to measure the geologic character of the earth, or properties of arctic ice, as they pass through it.

  7. On ultra-high energy cosmic ray acceleration at the termination shock of young pulsar winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemoine, Martin; Kotera, Kumiko; Pétri, Jérôme

    2015-07-01

    Pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe) are outstanding accelerators in Nature, in the sense that they accelerate electrons up to the radiation reaction limit. Motivated by this observation, this paper examines the possibility that young pulsar wind nebulae can accelerate ions to ultra-high energies at the termination shock of the pulsar wind. We consider here powerful PWNe, fed by pulsars born with ~ millisecond periods. Assuming that such pulsars exist, at least during a few years after the birth of the neutron star, and that they inject ions into the wind, we find that protons could be accelerated up to energies of the order of the Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuzmin cut-off, for a fiducial rotation period P ~ 1 msec and a pulsar magnetic field Bstar ~ 1013 G, implying a fiducial wind luminosity Lp ~ 1045 erg/s and a spin-down time tsd ~ 3× 107 s. The main limiting factor is set by synchrotron losses in the nebula and by the size of the termination shock; ions with Z>= 1 may therefore be accelerated to even higher energies. We derive an associated neutrino flux produced by interactions in the source region. For a proton-dominated composition, our maximum flux lies slightly below the 5-year sensitivity of IceCube-86 and above the 3-year sensitivity of the projected Askaryan Radio Array. It might thus become detectable in the next decade, depending on the exact level of contribution of these millisecond pulsar wind nebulae to the ultra-high energy cosmic ray flux.

  8. On-line air-tightness and insertion loss simultaneous detection method of high air-tightness fiber optic penetration connector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jingchuan; Yang, Xiaoning; Wang, Jing; Jiang, Junfeng

    2015-08-01

    The high air-tightness multicore fiber optic penetration connector is a core component for the optical fiber sensing and communication technologies applied in the space environment simulator under the vacuum thermal environment. High air-tightness and insertion loss are the two key indexes of the fiber optic penetration connector. The air-tightness and insertion loss on-line synchronous detection method was proposed. First, established hardware-in-the-loop testing platform by using the vacuum pumping system, the vacuum vessel, the helium mass spectrometer leak detector and optical time-domain reflectmeter, then, described the air tightness and insertion loss on-line detection principle, finally, designed a detection test scheme and air-tightness and insertion loss were tested. Experimental results indicate that the leakage rate is lower than 1.0×10-7Pa•L/S, the minimum of which is1.0×10-10Pa•L/S and the insertion loss at wave length window 1550 nm is +/-0.07db, which is less than +/-0.1db. It can lay the data basis for the design of opto-mechanical combination and later period fine processing.

  9. Design and synthesis of a novel 2-oxindole scaffold as a highly potent and brain-penetrant phosphodiesterase 10A inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Masato; Kamisaki, Haruhi; Kunitomo, Jun; Oki, Hideyuki; Kokubo, Hironori; Suzuki, Akihiro; Ikemoto, Tomomi; Nakashima, Kosuke; Kamiguchi, Naomi; Harada, Akina; Kimura, Haruhide; Taniguchi, Takahiko

    2015-11-15

    Highly potent and brain-penetrant phosphodiesterase 10A (PDE10A) inhibitors based on the 2-oxindole scaffold were designed and synthesized. (2-Oxo-1,3-oxazolidin-3-yl)phenyl derivative 1 showed the high P-glycoprotein (P-gp) efflux (efflux ratio (ER)=6.2) despite the potent PDE10A inhibitory activity (IC50=0.94 nM). We performed an optimization study to improve both the P-gp efflux ratio and PDE10A inhibitory activity by utilizing structure-based drug design (SBDD) techniques based on the X-ray crystal structure with PDE10A. Finally, 1-(cyclopropylmethyl)-4-fluoro-5-[5-methoxy-4-oxo-3-(1-phenyl-1H-pyrazol-5-yl)pyridazin-1(4H)-yl]-3,3-dimethyl-1,3-dihydro-2H-indol-2-one (19e) was identified with improved P-gp efflux (ER=1.4) and an excellent PDE10A inhibitory activity (IC50=0.080 nM). Compound 19e also exhibited satisfactory brain penetration, and suppressed PCP-induced hyperlocomotion with a minimum effective dose of 0.3mg/kg by oral administration in mice. PMID:26494583

  10. The role of microphysics in the development of mesoscale areas of high winds around occluded cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, T. P.; Knippertz, P.; Blyth, A.

    2012-04-01

    Extratropical cyclones are an integral part of the weather in north-western Europe and can be associated with heavy precipitation and strong winds. While synoptic-scale aspects of these storms are often satisfactorily forecast several days in advance, mesoscale features within these systems such as bands of heavy rain or localized wind maxima, which are often the cause of the most damaging effects, are significantly less well understood and predicted by operational forecasts. Accurate predictions of the location, timing and intensity of these features are, however, highly important for the mitigation of the adverse effects that they bring. This is one of the motivations for the UK consortium DIAMET (DIAbatic influences on Mesoscale structures in ExtraTropical storms) that is focused on improving the understanding and predictability of these potentially damaging mesoscale features embedded within larger synoptic-scale extratropical storms. The project is based around a number of field campaigns using the Facility for Airborne Atmospheric Measurements (FAAM) BAe146 research aircraft along with other remote and in-situ measurements. An overview of the project will be presented by Geraint Vaughan in this session. This study analyses the effects of microphysics on the mesoscale dynamics within extratropical storms, in particular the high wind areas around occluded fronts wrapped around the core of a matured cyclonic storm. It has been hypothesized that evaporation and melting of hydrometeors in this region can lead to downward momentum transport and thereby increase near-surface winds (sometimes referred to as sting jets). The main tool for this study is the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. High-resolution simulations are run for several cases from the DIAMET field campaigns to examine how the development of strong winds around occluded fronts is affected by the microphysics. The model results using different microphysics schemes are compared with the

  11. High-latitude ionospheric drivers and their effects on wind patterns in the thermosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liuzzo, L. R.; Ridley, A. J.; Perlongo, N. J.; Mitchell, E. J.; Conde, M.; Hampton, D. L.; Bristow, W. A.; Nicolls, M. J.

    2015-01-01

    Winds in the thermosphere are highly important for transporting mass, momentum, and energy over the globe. In the high-latitude region, observations show that ion and neutral motions are strongly coupled when the aurora is present but the coupling is less evident when there is no aurora. In this study, we investigate the ability of the Global Ionosphere-Thermosphere Model (GITM) to simulate the mesoscale wind structure over Alaska during a substorm. Thirteen distinct numerical simulations of a substorm event that occurred between 02:00 and 17:00 Universal Time on 24 November 2012 have been performed. Distinct drivers considered include the Weimer and SuperDARN potential patterns and the OVATION Prime and OVATION-SME auroral models. The effects of the boundary between the neutral wind dynamo calculation and the high-latitude imposed electric potential were also considered. Neutral wind velocities and thermospheric temperatures measured by the Scanning Doppler Imager instruments located at three locations in Alaska were compared to GITM simulation results, and electron densities within GITM were compared to data from the Poker Flat Incoherent Scatter Radar. It was found that the different drivers used between multiple simulations lead to various amounts of momentum coupling within the simulation, affecting the accuracy of the modeled neutral and ion flow patterns and the strength of electron precipitation at high latitudes. This affirms that better observations of auroral precipitation and electric fields are required to accurately understand and consistently reproduce the mesoscale neutral wind flow patterns and temperature structure in the high-latitude thermosphere.

  12. High winds induce nitrogen loss from US Pacific Northwest agricultural lands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharratt, B. S.; Graves, L.; Pressley, S. N.

    2012-12-01

    High winds common to the Pacific Northwest region of the USA have resulted in massive loss of topsoil from agricultural fields that are primarily managed in a winter wheat / summer fallow rotation. This topsoil contains nitrogen (N), an essential nutrient required for growth and development of plants. Loss of N from soils can cause degradation of air and water quality and also is an economic concern to farmers because depletion of nutrients from soils results in lower crop yield. Flux of windblown sediment moving across eroding fields was measured during high wind events between 1999 and 2006 in eastern Washington. Samplers were deployed to trap sediment that was creeping along or in saltation/suspension at various heights above fields that were in the summer fallow phase of the rotation. Windblown sediment was weighed and analyzed for N content by combustion and a thermal conductivity analyzer. Enrichment, or the ratio of N in the windblown sediment to soil of greater than one, was observed in about half of the years. For nearly all high wind events, N content of sediment transported by creep was greater than sediment transported by saltation or suspension. This study suggests that wind erosion can result in loss of N from agricultural soils.

  13. Freestanding Flag-Type Triboelectric Nanogenerator for Harvesting High-Altitude Wind Energy from Arbitrary Directions.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhenfu; Pu, Xiong; Du, Chunhua; Li, Linxuan; Jiang, Chunyan; Hu, Weiguo; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2016-02-23

    Wind energy at a high altitude is far more stable and stronger than that near the ground, but it is out of reach of the wind turbine. Herein, we develop an innovative freestanding woven triboelectric nanogenerator flag (WTENG-flag) that can harvest high-altitude wind energy from arbitrary directions. The wind-driven fluttering of the woven unit leads to the current generation by a coupled effect of contact electrification and electrostatic induction. Systematic study is conducted to optimize the structure/material parameters of the WTENG-flag to improve the power output. This 2D WTENG-flag can also be stacked in parallel connections in many layers for a linearly increased output. Finally, a self-powered high-altitude platform with temperature/humidity sensing/telecommunicating capability is demonstrated with the WTENG-flag as a power source. Due to the light weight, low cost, and easy scale-up, this WTENG-flag has great potential for applications in weather/environmental sensing/monitoring systems.

  14. Solar Wind Charge Exchange Studies Of Highly Charged Ions On Atomic Hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Draganic, I. N.; Havener, C. C.; Seely, D. G.; McCammon, D.

    2011-06-01

    Accurate studies of low-energy charge exchange (CX) are critical to understanding underlying soft X-ray radiation processes in the interaction of highly charged ions from the solar wind with the neutral atoms and molecules in the heliosphere, cometary comas, planetary atmospheres, interstellar winds, etc.. Particularly important are the CX cross sections for bare, H-like, and He-like ions of C, N, O and Ne, which are the dominant charge states for these heavier elements in the solar wind. Absolute total cross sections for single electron capture by H-like ions of C, N, O and fully-stripped O ions from atomic hydrogen have been measured in an expanded range of relative collision energies (5 eV/u-20 keV/u) and compared to previous H-oven measurements. The present measurements are performed using a merged-beams technique with intense highly charged ion beams extracted from a 14.5 GHz ECR ion source installed on a high voltage platform at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. For the collision energy range of 0.3 keV/u-3.3 keV/u, which corresponds to typical ion velocities in the solar wind, the new measurements are in good agreement with previous H-oven measurements. The experimental results are discussed in detail and compared with theoretical calculations where available.

  15. Solar Wind Charge Exchange Studies of Highly Charged Ions on Atomic Hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Draganic, Ilija N; Seely, D. G.; McCammon, D; Havener, Charles C

    2011-01-01

    Accurate studies of low energy charge exchange (CX) are critical to understanding underlying soft X ray radiation processes in the interaction of highly charged ions from the solar wind with the neutral atoms and molecules in the heliosphere, cometary comas, planetary atmospheres, interstellar winds, etc.. Particularly important are the CX cross sections for bare, H like, and He like ions of C, N, O and Ne, which are the dominant charge states for these heavier elements in the solar wind. Absolute total cross sections for single electron capture by H like ions of C, N, O and fully stripped O ions from atomic hydrogen have been measured in an expanded range of relative collision energies (5 eV u 20 keV u) and compared to previous H oven measurements. The present measurements are performed using a merged beams technique with intense highly charged ion beams extracted from a 14.5 GHz ECR ion source installed on a high voltage platform at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. For the collision energy range of 0.3 keV u 3.3 keV u, which corresponds to typical ion velocities in the solar wind, the new measurements are in good agreement with previous H oven measurements. The experimental results are discussed in detail and compared with theoretical calculations where available.

  16. Freestanding Flag-Type Triboelectric Nanogenerator for Harvesting High-Altitude Wind Energy from Arbitrary Directions.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhenfu; Pu, Xiong; Du, Chunhua; Li, Linxuan; Jiang, Chunyan; Hu, Weiguo; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2016-02-23

    Wind energy at a high altitude is far more stable and stronger than that near the ground, but it is out of reach of the wind turbine. Herein, we develop an innovative freestanding woven triboelectric nanogenerator flag (WTENG-flag) that can harvest high-altitude wind energy from arbitrary directions. The wind-driven fluttering of the woven unit leads to the current generation by a coupled effect of contact electrification and electrostatic induction. Systematic study is conducted to optimize the structure/material parameters of the WTENG-flag to improve the power output. This 2D WTENG-flag can also be stacked in parallel connections in many layers for a linearly increased output. Finally, a self-powered high-altitude platform with temperature/humidity sensing/telecommunicating capability is demonstrated with the WTENG-flag as a power source. Due to the light weight, low cost, and easy scale-up, this WTENG-flag has great potential for applications in weather/environmental sensing/monitoring systems. PMID:26738695

  17. Innovative Power-Augmentation-Guide-Vane Design of Wind-Solar Hybrid Renewable Energy Harvester for Urban High Rise Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Chong Wen; Zainon, M. Z.; Chew, Poh Sin; Kui, Soo Chun; Keong, Wee Seng; Chen, Pan Kok

    2010-06-01

    To generate greater quantities of energy from wind, the most efficient solution would be by increasing the wind speed. Also, due to the decreasing number of economic wind energy sites, there are plans to place wind turbines closer to populated areas. To site wind turbines out from rural areas, the current problems of wind turbines need to be resolved, especially visual impact, poor starting behaviour in low wind speeds, noise and danger caused by blade failure. In this paper, a patented wind-solar hybrid renewable energy harvester is introduced. It is a compact system that integrates and optimizes several green elements and can be built on the top (or between upper levels) of high rise buildings or structures. This system can be used in remote and urban areas, particularly at locations where the wind speed is lower and more turbulent. It overcomes the inferior aspect on the low wind speed by guiding and increasing the speed of the high altitude free-stream wind through fixed or yaw-able power-augmentation-guide-vane (PAGV) before entering the wind turbine (straight-bladed vertical axis wind turbine, VAWT in this project) at center portion. PAGV is a new and innovative design where its appearance or outer design can be blended into the building architecture without negative visual impact. From the studies, it is shown that the wind speed increment in the PAGV can be produced according to the Bernoulli's principle. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation is used to optimize the geometry of the PAGV and the simulation results demonstrated the technical possibility of this innovative concept. The PAGV replaces the free air-stream from wind by multiple channels of speed-increased and directional-controlled air-stream. With the PAGV, this lift-type VAWT can be self-started and its size can be reduced for a given power output. The design is also safer since the VAWT is enclosed by the PAGV. By integrating the PAGV with the VAWT (the diameter and height of PAGV are 2

  18. Parameterizations in high resolution isopycanl wind-driven ocean models

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, T.G.; Randall, D.A.

    1993-01-01

    For the CHAMMP project, we proposed to implement and test new numerical schemes, parameterizations of boundary layer flow and development and implement mixed layer physics in an existing isopycnal models. The objectives for the proposed research were; implement the Arakawa and Hsu, scheme in an existing isopycnal model of the Indian Ocean; recode the new model for a highly parallel architecture; determine effects of various parameterizations of islands; determine the correct lateral boundary condition for boundary layer currents, as for instance the Gulf Stream and other western boundary currents.; and incorporate a oceanic mixed layer on top of the isopycnal deep layers. This is, primarily a model development project, with emphasis on determining the influence and parameterization of narrow flows along continents and through chains of small islands on the large scale oceanic circulation, which is resolved by climate models. The new model is based on the multi-layer FSU Indian Ocean model. Our research strategy is to; recode a one-layer version of the Indian Ocean Model for a highly parallel computer; add thermodynamics to a rectangular domain version of the new model; implement the irregular domain from the Indian Ocean Model into the box model; change the numerical scheme for the continuity equation to the scheme proposed by; perform parameterization experiments with various coast line and island geometries. This report discusses project progress for period August 1, 1992 through December 31, 1992.

  19. The Western Wind and Solar Integration Study Phase 2 (Executive Summary)

    SciTech Connect

    Lew, Debra; Brinkman, Greg

    2013-09-01

    The electric grid is a highly complex, interconnected machine, and changing one part of the grid can have consequences elsewhere. Adding wind and solar affects the operation of the other power plants and adding high penetrations can induce cycling of fossil-fueled generators. Cycling leads to wear-and-tear costs and changes in emissions. Phase 2 of the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study (WWSIS-2) evaluated these costs and emissions and simulated grid operations for a year to investigate the detailed impact of wind and solar on the fossil-fueled fleet. This built on Phase 1, one of the largest wind and solar integration studies ever conducted, which examined operational impacts of high wind and solar penetrations in the West(GE Energy 2010).

  20. High Intra-abdominal Pressure Enhances the Penetration and Antitumor Effect of Intraperitoneal Cisplatin on Experimental Peritoneal Carcinomatosis

    PubMed Central

    Esquis, Philippe; Consolo, David; Magnin, Guy; Pointaire, Philippe; Moretto, Philippe; Ynsa, Maria Dolores; Beltramo, Jean-Luc; Drogoul, Carole; Simonet, Michel; Benoit, Laurent; Rat, Patrick; Chauffert, Bruno

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the role of increased intra-abdominal pressure (IAP) on the intratumoral accumulation and the antitumor effect of intraperitoneal cisplatin in rats with advanced peritoneal carcinomatosis. To evaluate the tolerance of IAP in pigs, as it is a large animal with a body size equivalent to humans. Summary Background Data: To investigate if an active convection, driven by a positive IAP, increases cisplatin penetration and antitumor effectiveness in a model of advanced peritoneal carcinomatosis in rats. Experimental Design: BDIX rats with macroscopic peritoneal tumors received cisplatin administered as intravenous injection (IV), conventional intraperitoneal injection (IP), or sustained intraperitoneal injection of cisplatin given in a large volume of solvent for maintaining IAP for 1 hour. Platinum tissue concentration was measured by atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS), and platinum distribution into the tumor nodules was assessed by the particular-induced x-ray emission (PIXE) method. The antitumor effect was assessed in a survival experiment. The hemodynamic, local, and systemic tolerance of IAP, with or without cisplatin, was evaluated in Large White pigs. Results: The maximum tolerated IAP was 22 mm Hg for 1 hour in nonventilated rats. IAP, in comparison with IV or conventional IP injections, resulted in the increased concentration and depth of diffusion of platinum into diaphragm and peritoneal tumor nodules. Consequently, IAP treatment induced an extended survival of rats treated at an advanced stage of carcinomatosis. In 7 50- to 70-kg ventilated pigs, a 40-mm Hg IAP was well tolerated when maintained stable for 2 hours. Renal failure occurred in pigs receiving a total dose of 200 and 400 mg of cisplatin with IAP, but a dose of 100 mg was well tolerated. Conclusions: Intraperitoneal chemotherapy with increased IAP, in comparison with conventional IP or IV chemotherapy, improved the tumor accumulation and the antitumor effect of

  1. Evaluation of the effect of media velocity on filter efficiency and most penetrating particle size of nuclear grade high-efficiency particulate air filters.

    PubMed

    Alderman, Steven L; Parsons, Michael S; Hogancamp, Kristina U; Waggoner, Charles A

    2008-11-01

    High-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters are widely used to control particulate matter emissions from processes that involve management or treatment of radioactive materials. Section FC of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers AG-1 Code on Nuclear Air and Gas Treatment currently restricts media velocity to a maximum of 2.5 cm/sec in any application where this standard is invoked. There is some desire to eliminate or increase this media velocity limit. A concern is that increasing media velocity will result in higher emissions of ultrafine particles; thus, it is unlikely that higher media velocities will be allowed without data to demonstrate the effect of media velocity on removal of ultrafine particles. In this study, the performance of nuclear grade HEPA filters, with respect to filter efficiency and most penetrating particle size, was evaluated as a function of media velocity. Deep-pleat nuclear grade HEPA filters (31 cm x 31 cm x 29 cm) were evaluated at media velocities ranging from 2.0 to 4.5 cm/sec using a potassium chloride aerosol challenge having a particle size distribution centered near the HEPA filter most penetrating particle size. Filters were challenged under two distinct mass loading rate regimes through the use of or exclusion of a 3 microm aerodynamic diameter cut point cyclone. Filter efficiency and most penetrating particle size measurements were made throughout the duration of filter testing. Filter efficiency measured at the onset of aerosol challenge was noted to decrease with increasing media velocity, with values ranging from 99.999 to 99.977%. The filter most penetrating particle size recorded at the onset of testing was noted to decrease slightly as media velocity was increased and was typically in the range of 110-130 nm. Although additional testing is needed, these findings indicate that filters operating at media velocities up to 4.5 cm/sec will meet or exceed current filter efficiency requirements. Additionally

  2. Evaluation of the effect of media velocity on filter efficiency and most penetrating particle size of nuclear grade high-efficiency particulate air filters.

    PubMed

    Alderman, Steven L; Parsons, Michael S; Hogancamp, Kristina U; Waggoner, Charles A

    2008-11-01

    High-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters are widely used to control particulate matter emissions from processes that involve management or treatment of radioactive materials. Section FC of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers AG-1 Code on Nuclear Air and Gas Treatment currently restricts media velocity to a maximum of 2.5 cm/sec in any application where this standard is invoked. There is some desire to eliminate or increase this media velocity limit. A concern is that increasing media velocity will result in higher emissions of ultrafine particles; thus, it is unlikely that higher media velocities will be allowed without data to demonstrate the effect of media velocity on removal of ultrafine particles. In this study, the performance of nuclear grade HEPA filters, with respect to filter efficiency and most penetrating particle size, was evaluated as a function of media velocity. Deep-pleat nuclear grade HEPA filters (31 cm x 31 cm x 29 cm) were evaluated at media velocities ranging from 2.0 to 4.5 cm/sec using a potassium chloride aerosol challenge having a particle size distribution centered near the HEPA filter most penetrating particle size. Filters were challenged under two distinct mass loading rate regimes through the use of or exclusion of a 3 microm aerodynamic diameter cut point cyclone. Filter efficiency and most penetrating particle size measurements were made throughout the duration of filter testing. Filter efficiency measured at the onset of aerosol challenge was noted to decrease with increasing media velocity, with values ranging from 99.999 to 99.977%. The filter most penetrating particle size recorded at the onset of testing was noted to decrease slightly as media velocity was increased and was typically in the range of 110-130 nm. Although additional testing is needed, these findings indicate that filters operating at media velocities up to 4.5 cm/sec will meet or exceed current filter efficiency requirements. Additionally

  3. A transient solar wind disturbance observed at both low and high heliographic latitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gosling, J. T.; McComas, D. J.; Phillips, J. L.; Pizzo, V. J.; Goldstein, B. E.; Lepping, R. P.; Forsyth, R. J.

    1995-01-01

    Ulysses observations have revealed a new class of forward-reverse shock pairs in the solar wind that appears to be restricted to high heliographic latitudes. Shock pairs in this new class of events are produced by over-expansion (i.e., expansion driven by a high internal pressure) of coronal mass ejections, CMEs, that have speeds comparable to that of the surrounding solar wind plasma. Here we compare low- and high-latitude observations of an event observed both near Earth by IMP 8 and at high latitudes by Ulysses. At the time of these observations Ulysses was at 3.53 AU and was situated 47.2 deg south and 11.4 deg west of Earth (in the sense of planetary motion about the Sun). A fast CME that departed from the Sun on February 20, 1994 produced both a major (forward) shock wave disturbance in the ecliptic plane at 1 AU (and a large geomagnetic storm) and a forward reverse shock pair associated with over-expansion of the CME at high heliographic latitudes. The combined measurements provide a graphic illustration of how the same fast CME can produce totally different types of disturbances at low and high latitudes. Differences in the disturbances generated by the CME at high and low latitudes are due primarily to the different speeds initially prevailing in the ambient solar wind ahead of it. These observations are consistent with the results of simple numerical simulations of the event.

  4. Pose Measurement Method and Experiments for High-Speed Rolling Targets in a Wind Tunnel

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Zhenyuan; Ma, Xin; Liu, Wei; Lu, Wenbo; Li, Xiao; Chen, Ling; Wang, Zhengqu; Cui, Xiaochun

    2014-01-01

    High-precision wind tunnel simulation tests play an important role in aircraft design and manufacture. In this study, a high-speed pose vision measurement method is proposed for high-speed and rolling targets in a supersonic wind tunnel. To obtain images with high signal-to-noise ratio and avoid impacts on the aerodynamic shape of the rolling targets, a high-speed image acquisition method based on ultrathin retro-reflection markers is presented. Since markers are small-sized and some of them may be lost when the target is rolling, a novel markers layout with which markers are distributed evenly on the surface is proposed based on a spatial coding method to achieve highly accurate pose information. Additionally, a pose acquisition is carried out according to the mentioned markers layout after removing mismatching points by Case Deletion Diagnostics. Finally, experiments on measuring the pose parameters of high-speed targets in the laboratory and in a supersonic wind tunnel are conducted to verify the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed method. Experimental results indicate that the position measurement precision is less than 0.16 mm, the pitching and yaw angle precision less than 0.132° and the roll angle precision 0.712°. PMID:25615732

  5. Analysis of Near Simultaneous Jimsphere and AMPS High Resolution Wind Profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adelfang, S. I.

    2003-01-01

    The high-resolution wind profile of the Automated Meteorological Profiling System (HRAMPS) is the proposed replacement for the Jimsphere measurement system used to support NASA Shuttle launches from the Eastern Test Range (ETR). Samples of twenty-six ETR near simultaneous Jimsphere and HRAMPS wind profiles were obtained for Shuttle program HRAMPS certification studies. Shuttle systems engineering certification is to ensure that spacecraft and launch vehicle systems performance and safety evaluations for each launch (derived from flight simulations with Jimsphere wind profile data bases) retain their validity when HRAMPS profiles are used on day-of-launch (DOL) in trajectory and loads simulations to support the commit-to-launch decision. This paper describes a statistical analysis of the near simultaneous profiles. In principle the differences between a Jimsphere profile and an HRAMPS profile should be attributed to tracking technology (radar versus GPS tracking of a Jimsphere flight element) and the method for derivation of wind vectors from the raw tracking data. In reality, it is not technically feasible to track the same Jimsphere balloon with the two systems. The aluminized Mylar surface of the standard Jimsphere flight element facilitates radar tracking, but it interferes with HRAMPS during simultaneous tracking. Suspending a radar reflector from an HRAMPS flight element (Jimsphere without aluminized coating) does not produce satisfactory Jimsphere profiles because of intermittent radar returns. Thus, differences between the Jimsphere and HRAMPS profiles are also attributed to differences in the trajectories of separate flight elements. Because of small sample size and a test period limited to one winter season, test measurements during extreme high winds aloft could not have been expected and did not occur. It is during the highest winds that the largest differences between Jimsphere and HRAMPS would occur because the distance between flight elements would be

  6. A Technique for Estimating Recurrence Intervals of Tropical Cyclone-Related High Winds in the Tropics: Results for Guam.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rupp, John A.; Lander, Mark A.

    1996-05-01

    The authors develop a technique that applies models of the radial profile of the wind in tropical cyclones to historical best-track databases of tropical cyclones, in order to estimate the wind (at 1-h intervals) experienced at any selected tropical location for any or all of the historical tropical cyclones affecting the location. When these estimated winds are condensed into a time series of the highest annual tropical cyclone-related wind, extreme value analysis can be applied in order to calculate the recurrence intervals of extreme wind speeds.The island of Guam, located at a low latitude in the western North Pacific, was selected as a site for testing the technique. Guam has historical measurements of tropical cyclone-related wind, from which an independent estimate of the recurrence intervals of extreme wind speeds was obtained. In addition, wind traces during the passage of three major typhoons that affected Guam were used to assess the ability of the technique to reproduce an accurate hourly time series of the winds experienced during the passage of these typhoons.For Guam, the recurrence intervals calculated from the time series of wind yielded by the authors' technique closely match those computed from the wind measurements. The technique also reproduces a reasonable wind trace for the three major typhoons affecting Guam. Given its successful validation when applied to Guam, we believe that this technique can be used to make useful estimates of the recurrence intervals of tropical cyclone-related high wind speeds at any coastal tropical location where in situ wind measurements may he lacking, but where an historical best-track archive of tropical cyclone track and intensity exists.

  7. Development of tunable high pressure CO2 laser for lidar measurements of pollutants and wind velocities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, J. S.; Guerra, M.; Javan, A.

    1980-01-01

    The problem of laser energy extraction at a tunable monochromatic frequency from an energetic high pressure CO2 pulsed laser plasma, for application to remote sensing of atmospheric pollutants by Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) and of wind velocities by Doppler Lidar, was investigated. The energy extraction principle analyzed is based on transient injection locking (TIL) at a tunable frequency. Several critical experiments for high gain power amplification by TIL are presented.

  8. Solar wind effect on Joule heating in the high-latitude ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, L.; Aikio, A. T.; Nygrén, T.

    2014-12-01

    The effect of solar wind on several electrodynamic parameters, measured simultaneously by the European Incoherent Scatter (EISCAT) radars in Tromsø (TRO, 66.6° cgmLat) and on Svalbard (ESR, 75.4° cgmLat), has been evaluated statistically. The main emphasis is on Joule heating rate QJ, which has been estimated by taking into account the neutral wind. In addition, a generally used proxy QE, which is the Pedersen conductance times the electric field squared, has been calculated. The most important findings are as follows. (i) The decrease in Joule heating in the afternoon-evening sector due to winds reported by Aikio et al. (2012) requires southward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) conditions and a sufficiently high solar wind electric field. The increase in the morning sector takes place for all IMF directions within a region where the upper E neutral wind has a large equatorward component and the F region plasma flow is directed eastward. (ii) At ESR, an afternoon hot spot of Joule heating centered typically at 14-15 magnetic local time (MLT) is observed during all IMF conditions. Enhanced Pedersen conductances within the hot spot region are observed only for the IMF Bz + /By- conditions, and the corresponding convection electric field values within the hot spot are smaller than during the other IMF conditions. Hence, the hot spot represents a region of persistent magnetospheric electromagnetic energy input, and the median value is about 3 mW/m2. (iii) For the southward IMF conditions, the MLT-integrated QE for By- is twice the value for By+ at TRO. This can plausibly be explained by the higher average solar wind electric field values for By-.

  9. Characteristics of satellite accelerometer measurements of thermospheric neutral winds at high latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doornbos, E.; Ridley, A. J.; Cnossen, I.; Aruliah, A. L.; Foerster, M.

    2015-12-01

    Thermospheric neutral winds play an important part in the coupled thermosphere-ionosphere system at high latitudes. Neutral wind speeds have been derived from the CHAMP and GOCE satellites, which carried precise accelerometers in low Earth orbits. Due to the need to simultaneously determine thermosphere neutral density from the accelerometer in-track measurements, only information on the wind component in the cross-track direction, perpendicular to the flight direction can be derived. However, contrary to ground-based Fabry-Perot interferometer and scanning Doppler imager observations of the thermosphere wind, these satellite-based measurements provide equally distributed coverage over both hemispheres. The sampling of seasonal and local time variations depend on the precession rate of the satellite's orbital plane, with CHAMP covering about 28 cycles of 24-hour local solar time coverage, during its 10 year mission (2000-2010), while the near sun-synchronous orbit of GOCE resulted in a much more limited local time coverage ranging from 6:20 to 8:00 (am and pm), during a science mission duration of 4 years (2009-2013). For this study, the wind data from both CHAMP and GOCE have been analysed in terms of seasonal variations and geographic and geomagnetic local solar time and latitude coordinates, in order to make statistical comparisons for both the Northern and Southern polar areas. The wind data from both satellites were studied independently and in combination, in order to investigate how the strengths and weaknesses of the instruments and orbit parameters of these missions affect investigations of interhemispheric differences. Finally, the data have been compared with results from coupled ionosphere-thermosphere models and from ground-based FPI and SDI measurements.

  10. A High-Efficiency Wind Energy Harvester for Autonomous Embedded Systems

    PubMed Central

    Brunelli, Davide

    2016-01-01

    Energy harvesting is currently a hot research topic, mainly as a consequence of the increasing attractiveness of computing and sensing solutions based on small, low-power distributed embedded systems. Harvesting may enable systems to operate in a deploy-and-forget mode, particularly when power grid is absent and the use of rechargeable batteries is unattractive due to their limited lifetime and maintenance requirements. This paper focuses on wind flow as an energy source feasible to meet the energy needs of a small autonomous embedded system. In particular the contribution is on the electrical converter and system integration. We characterize the micro-wind turbine, we define a detailed model of its behaviour, and then we focused on a highly efficient circuit to convert wind energy into electrical energy. The optimized design features an overall volume smaller than 64 cm3. The core of the harvester is a high efficiency buck-boost converter which performs an optimal power point tracking. Experimental results show that the wind generator boosts efficiency over a wide range of operating conditions. PMID:26959018

  11. A High-Efficiency Wind Energy Harvester for Autonomous Embedded Systems.

    PubMed

    Brunelli, Davide

    2016-03-04

    Energy harvesting is currently a hot research topic, mainly as a consequence of the increasing attractiveness of computing and sensing solutions based on small, low-power distributed embedded systems. Harvesting may enable systems to operate in a deploy-and-forget mode, particularly when power grid is absent and the use of rechargeable batteries is unattractive due to their limited lifetime and maintenance requirements. This paper focuses on wind flow as an energy source feasible to meet the energy needs of a small autonomous embedded system. In particular the contribution is on the electrical converter and system integration. We characterize the micro-wind turbine, we define a detailed model of its behaviour, and then we focused on a highly efficient circuit to convert wind energy into electrical energy. The optimized design features an overall volume smaller than 64 cm³. The core of the harvester is a high efficiency buck-boost converter which performs an optimal power point tracking. Experimental results show that the wind generator boosts efficiency over a wide range of operating conditions.

  12. A High-Efficiency Wind Energy Harvester for Autonomous Embedded Systems.

    PubMed

    Brunelli, Davide

    2016-01-01

    Energy harvesting is currently a hot research topic, mainly as a consequence of the increasing attractiveness of computing and sensing solutions based on small, low-power distributed embedded systems. Harvesting may enable systems to operate in a deploy-and-forget mode, particularly when power grid is absent and the use of rechargeable batteries is unattractive due to their limited lifetime and maintenance requirements. This paper focuses on wind flow as an energy source feasible to meet the energy needs of a small autonomous embedded system. In particular the contribution is on the electrical converter and system integration. We characterize the micro-wind turbine, we define a detailed model of its behaviour, and then we focused on a highly efficient circuit to convert wind energy into electrical energy. The optimized design features an overall volume smaller than 64 cm³. The core of the harvester is a high efficiency buck-boost converter which performs an optimal power point tracking. Experimental results show that the wind generator boosts efficiency over a wide range of operating conditions. PMID:26959018

  13. Kinetic and Potential Sputtering of Lunar Regolith: The Contribution of the Heavy Highly Charged (Minority) Solar Wind Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, F. W.; Barghouty, A. F.

    2012-01-01

    Solar wind sputtering of the lunar surface helps determine the composition of the lunar exosphere and contributes to surface weathering. To date, only the effects of the two dominant solar wind constituents, H+ and He+, have been considered. The heavier, less abundant solar wind constituents have much larger sputtering yields because they have greater mass (kinetic sputtering) and they are highly charged (potential sputtering) Their contribution to total sputtering can therefore be orders of magnitude larger than their relative abundances would suggest

  14. Wind tunnel interference factors for high-lift wings in closed wind tunnels. Ph.D. Thesis - Princeton Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joppa, R. G.

    1973-01-01

    A problem associated with the wind tunnel testing of very slow flying aircraft is the correction of observed pitching moments to free air conditions. The most significant effects of such corrections are to be found at moderate downwash angles typical of the landing approach. The wind tunnel walls induce interference velocities at the tail different from those induced at the wing, and these induced velocities also alter the trajectory of the trailing vortex system. The relocated vortex system induces different velocities at the tail from those experienced in free air. The effect of the relocated vortex and the walls is to cause important changes in the measured pitching moments in the wind tunnel.

  15. Measurements of the absolute value of the penetration depth in high-T{sub c} superconductors using a low-T{sub c} superconductive coating

    SciTech Connect

    Prozorov, R.; Giannetta, R. W.; Carrington, A.; Fournier, P.; Greene, R. L.; Guptasarma, P.; Hinks, D. G.; Banks, A. R.

    2000-12-18

    A method is presented to measure the absolute value of the London penetration depth, {lambda}(T=0), from the frequency shift of a resonator. The technique involves coating a high-T{sub c} superconductor with film of low-T{sub c} material of known thickness and penetration depth. The method is applied to obtain {lambda}(YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}}){approx}1460{+-}150Aa, {lambda}(Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8+{delta}}){approx}2690{+-}150Aa and {lambda}(Pr{sub 1.85}Ce{sub 0.15}CuO{sub 4-{delta}}){approx}2790{+-}150Aa. {lambda}(YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}}) from this method is very close to that obtained by several other techniques. For both Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8+{delta}} and Pr{sub 1.85}Ce{sub 0.15}CuO{sub 4-{delta}} the values exceed those obtained by other methods.

  16. IMF dependence of high-latitude thermospheric wind pattern derived from CHAMP cross-track measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Förster, M.; Rentz, S.; Köhler, W.; Liu, H.; Haaland, S. E.

    2008-06-01

    Neutral thermospheric wind pattern at high latitudes obtained from cross-track acceleration measurements of the CHAMP satellite above both North and South polar regions are statistically analyzed in their dependence on the Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF) direction in the GSM y-z plane (clock angle). We compare this dependency with magnetospheric convection pattern obtained from the Cluster EDI plasma drift measurements under the same sorting conditions. The IMF-dependency shows some similarity with the corresponding high-latitude plasma convection insofar that the larger-scale convection cells, in particular the round-shaped dusk cell for ByIMF+ (ByIMF-) conditions at the Northern (Southern) Hemisphere, leave their marks on the dominant general transpolar wind circulation from the dayside to the nightside. The direction of the transpolar circulation is generally deflected toward a duskward flow, in particular in the evening to nighttime sector. The degree of deflection correlates with the IMF clock angle. It is larger for ByIMF+ than for ByIMF- and is systematically larger (~5°) and appear less structured at the Southern Hemisphere compared with the Northern. Thermospheric cross-polar wind amplitudes are largest for BzIMF-/ByIMF- conditions at the Northern Hemisphere, but for BzIMF-/ByIMF+ conditions at the Southern because the magnetospheric convection is in favour of largest wind accelerations over the polar cap under these conditions. The overall variance of the thermospheric wind magnitude at Southern high latitudes is larger than for the Northern. This is probably due to a larger "stirring effect" at the Southern Hemisphere because of the larger distance between the geographic and geomagnetic frameworks.

  17. Chemical penetration enhancers.

    PubMed

    Newton, Stephen J

    2013-01-01

    Chemical penetration enhancers are utilized in topical preparations as a method for enhancing permeation of drugs across the skin. In particular, they are utilized for transdermal delivery of medications in an attempt to produce a systemic response, to avoid first-pass metabolism, and to decrease the gastrointestinal transit time observed with oral medications. A review of the selection of chemical penetration enhancers, their mechanism of action, the most common chemical penetration enhancers in each class, and alternatives will be discussed in detail.

  18. Field Demonstration of Using Advanced PV Inverter Functionality to Mitigate the Impacts of High-Penetration PV Grid Integration on the Distribution System

    SciTech Connect

    Mather, Barry; Gebeyehu, Araya

    2015-06-14

    This paper describes a field demonstration that was completed to show the ability of currently installed PV inverters to implement advanced PV inverter functionality and that such functionality was effective at reducing the voltage-related PV impacts of high-penetration PV integration. A distribution circuit was instrumented and then tested for a two week period using off-unity power factor operation. Specifically, an inductive power factor of -0.95 was demonstrated. The results show that the PV inverters were capable of such operation and that the use of off-unity power factor operation was highly effective at reducing the voltage-related impacts of the PV systems interconnected to the circuits used in the demonstration. The impacts of using off-unity power factor operation - resulting in additional reactive current flow on the distribution circuit - are also presented and analyzed.

  19. Relative Contributions of Heating and Momentum Forcing to High-Latitude Lower Thermospheric Winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, Y. S.; Richmond, A. D.

    2015-12-01

    At high latitudes the thermospheric dynamics are gov­erned by various heat and momentum sources. Recently several modeling studies have been attempt­ed to understand the physical process that control the high-latitude lower thermospheric dynamics. Kwak and Richmond [2007] and Kwak et al. [2007] studied the momentum forcing bal­ance that are mainly responsible for maintaining the high-latitude lower thermospheric wind system by using the National Center for Atmospheric Research Thermo­sphere Ionosphere Electrodynamics General Circulation Model (NCAR TIE-GCM). Kwak and Richmond [2014] analyzed the divergence and vorticity of the high-latitude neutral wind field in the lower thermosphere during the south­ern summertime. In this study, we extend previous works by Kwak and Rich­mond [2007, 2014] and Kwak et al. [2007], which helped to better understand the physical processes maintaining thermospheric dynamics at high latitudes, and here perform a "term analysis of the potential vorticity equation" for the high-latitude neu­tral wind field in the lower thermosphere, on the basis of numerical simulations using the NCAR TIE-GCM. These analyses can provide insight into the relative strength of the heating and the momentum forcing responsible for driving rotational winds at the high-latitude lower thermosphere. The heating is the net heat including the heat transfer by downward molecular and eddy heat conduction, the absorption of solar ultraviolet (UV) and extreme ultraviolet (EUV) ra­diation, auroral heating by particles, Joule dissipation of ionospheric currents, release of chemical energy by the atomic oxygen recombination, and radiative CO2, NO and O infrared emissions. The momentum forcing is associated with the viscous force and the frictional drag force from convecting ions.

  20. Observation of summer daytime aurora in the noctilucent cloud layer and its link to high-energy particle precipitation during high-speed solar wind streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Y.; Kwak, Y. S.; Kim, K. C.; Solheim, B.; Park, J.

    2015-12-01

    Aurora produced by precipitating low-energy electrons can be suppressed in summer daytime. However, the high-energy electrons (>30 keV) that are unsuppressed by sunlight are capable of penetrating deep into the mesosphere, where they can produce the odd hydrogen (HOx) and eventually lead to catalytic ozone (O3) loss. By elevating the D-region ionization level, they also play the important role of facilitating the production of polar mesospheric summer echoes (PMSE) as a precursor of polar mesospheric clouds (PMC). In the present study, it was discovered that high-energy electrons induce supersonic luminous phenomena, including the enhancement of O(1S) 557.7-nm emission with an intensity of up to 300 kR (horizontally integrated) and a supersonic velocity (300-1500 m s-1) as seen within a field of view that is 150-km wide, also called a supersonic burst (SB). SB-accompanied O(1S) emission enhancement is differentiated from aurora because the former occurs only in summer daytime, at a low altitude of ~80 km, and in the form of an intense localised burst. The source of the SB energy might be linked to the precipitation of high-energy electrons (>30 keV), especially as observed during high-speed solar wind streams (HSSs). In producing O(1S) emission, the secondary electron number flux of the precipitated primary electrons increases in magnitude by as much as an order of four, and a local process is required to provide the supplement. The supplementary local process may involve a supersonic velocity possibly caused by ion acceleration in a strong electric field, resulting in the inducement of electron acceleration in the field.

  1. The internal plasma state of the high speed solar wind at 1 AU

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, W. C.; Abraham-Shrauner, B.; Asbridge, J. R.; Bame, S. J.

    1976-01-01

    The character of particle velocity distributions in the high speed solar wind is described. It is found that electron distribution shapes differ from simple bi-Maxwellians in that a hot strongly beamed high energy electron component is always present, and is observed to move relative to a distinct low energy electron component along the magnetic field direction away from the sun. The velocity difference between hot and cold electron components appears, at times, to be strongly correlated with the local Alfven speed. Proton velocity distributions are also best represented by two relatively convecting unresolved components. Evidence is presented which supports the idea that the two-component proton structure observed in high speed regions is intimately related to fine scale velocity variations at 1 AU, and probably to prominent spatial and/or temporal structures present throughout that part of the corona from which the solar wind evolves.

  2. Long range wind lidars based on novel high spectral brilliance all-fibered sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombard, L.; Dolfi-Bouteyre, A.; Besson, C.; Augère, B.; Bourdon, P.; Durécu, A.; Goular, D.; Le Gouët, J.; Planchat, C.; Renard, W.; Valla, M.; Canat, G.

    2015-10-01

    New Lidar applications related to aircraft safety in the area of an airport include mapping wind velocity and monitoring turbulences within a radius longer than 8km in a short acquisition time (360° map in 1 minute). During landing and takeoff, a minimal distance separation between aircrafts is set by referring to wake turbulence categories. However, it was shown that wake vortices can dissipate quicker because of atmospheric turbulence (characterized by eddy dissipation rate - EDR) or can be transported out of the way on oncoming traffic by cross-winds. Long range scanning Lidars provide radial wind data that can be used to calculate EDR. To reach long range within a short acquisition time, coherent wind Lidars require high power (~kW), narrow linewidth (few MHz) pulsed laser sources with nearly TF limited pulse duration (~1μs). Eyesafe, all-fiber laser sources based on MOPFA (master oscillator, power fiber amplifier) architecture offer many advantages over bulk sources such as low sensitivity to vibrations, efficiency and versatility. However, narrow linewidth pulsed fiber lasers and amplifiers are usually limited by nonlinear effects such as stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) to 300W with commercial fibers. We investigated various solutions to push this limit further. For example, a source based on a new fiber composition yielded a peak power of 1120W for 650ns pulse duration with excellent beam quality. Based on these innovative solutions we built a Lidar with a record range of 16km in 0.1s averaging time. In this proceeding, we present some recent results obtained with our wind Lidars based on these high power sources with record ranges. EDR measurements using the developed algorithm based on structure function calculation are presented, as well as its validation with simulations and measurements campaign results.

  3. Clumpy wind accretion in supergiant neutron star high mass X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozzo, E.; Oskinova, L.; Feldmeier, A.; Falanga, M.

    2016-05-01

    The accretion of the stellar wind material by a compact object represents the main mechanism powering the X-ray emission in classical supergiant high mass X-ray binaries and supergiant fast X-ray transients. In this work we present the first attempt to simulate the accretion process of a fast and dense massive star wind onto a neutron star, taking into account the effects of the centrifugal and magnetic inhibition of accretion ("gating") due to the spin and magnetic field of the compact object. We made use of a radiative hydrodynamical code to model the nonstationary radiatively driven wind of an O-B supergiant star and then place a neutron star characterized by a fixed magnetic field and spin period at a certain distance from the massive companion. Our calculations follow, as a function of time (on a total timescale of several hours), the transitions of the system through all different accretion regimes that are triggered by the intrinsic variations in the density and velocity of the nonstationary wind. The X-ray luminosity released by the system is computed at each time step by taking into account the relevant physical processes occurring in the different accretion regimes. Synthetic lightcurves are derived and qualitatively compared with those observed from classical supergiant high mass X-ray binaries and supergiant fast X-ray transients. Although a number of simplifications are assumed in these calculations, we show that taking into account the effects of the centrifugal and magnetic inhibition of accretion significantly reduces the average X-ray luminosity expected for any neutron star wind-fed binary. The present model calculations suggest that long spin periods and stronger magnetic fields are favored in order to reproduce the peculiar behavior of supergiant fast X-ray transients in the X-ray domain.

  4. Penetration Analysis of Aluminum Alloy Foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Nianmei; Yang, Guitong

    Aluminum alloy foam offers a unique combination of good characteristics, for example, low density, high strength and energy absorption. During penetration, the foam materials exhibit significant nonlinear deformation. The penetration of aluminum alloy foam struck transversely by cone-nosed projectiles has been theoretically investigated. The dynamic cavity-expansion model is used to study the penetration resistance of the projectiles, which can be taken as two parts. One is due to the elasto-plastic deformation of the aluminum alloy foam materials. The other is dynamic resistance force coming from the energy of the projectiles. The penetration resistance expression is derived and applied to analyze the penetration depth of cone-nosed projectiles into the aluminum alloy foam target. The effect of initial velocity, the geometry of the projectiles on the penetration depth is investigated.

  5. Advancements in Wind Integration Study Input Data Modeling: The Wind Integration National Dataset (WIND) Toolkit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodge, B.; Orwig, K.; McCaa, J. R.; Harrold, S.; Draxl, C.; Jones, W.; Searight, K.; Getman, D.

    2013-12-01

    Regional wind integration studies in the United States, such as the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study (WWSIS), Eastern Wind Integration and Transmission Study (EWITS), and Eastern Renewable Generation Integration Study (ERGIS), perform detailed simulations of the power system to determine the impact of high wind and solar energy penetrations on power systems operations. Some of the specific aspects examined include: infrastructure requirements, impacts on grid operations and conventional generators, ancillary service requirements, as well as the benefits of geographic diversity and forecasting. These studies require geographically broad and temporally consistent wind and solar power production input datasets that realistically reflect the ramping characteristics, spatial and temporal correlations, and capacity factors of wind and solar power plant production, and are time-synchronous with load profiles. The original western and eastern wind datasets were generated independently for 2004-2006 using numerical weather prediction (NWP) models run on a ~2 km grid with 10-minute resolution. Each utilized its own site selection process to augment existing wind plants with simulated sites of high development potential. The original dataset also included day-ahead simulated forecasts. These datasets were the first of their kind and many lessons were learned from their development. For example, the modeling approach used generated periodic false ramps that later had to be removed due to unrealistic impacts on ancillary service requirements. For several years, stakeholders have been requesting an updated dataset that: 1) covers more recent years; 2) spans four or more years to better evaluate interannual variability; 3) uses improved methods to minimize false ramps and spatial seams; 4) better incorporates solar power production inputs; and 5) is more easily accessible. To address these needs, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Wind and Solar Programs have funded two

  6. BeamDyn: A High-Fidelity Wind Turbine Blade Solver in the FAST Modular Framework: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Q.; Sprague, M.; Jonkman, J.; Johnson, N.

    2015-01-01

    BeamDyn, a Legendre-spectral-finite-element implementation of geometrically exact beam theory (GEBT), was developed to meet the design challenges associated with highly flexible composite wind turbine blades. In this paper, the governing equations of GEBT are reformulated into a nonlinear state-space form to support its coupling within the modular framework of the FAST wind turbine computer-aided engineering (CAE) tool. Different time integration schemes (implicit and explicit) were implemented and examined for wind turbine analysis. Numerical examples are presented to demonstrate the capability of this new beam solver. An example analysis of a realistic wind turbine blade, the CX-100, is also presented as validation.

  7. High-energy particle transport in three-dimensional hydrodynamic models of colliding-wind binaries

    SciTech Connect

    Reitberger, K.; Kissmann, R.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Dubus, G.

    2014-02-20

    Massive stars in binary systems (such as WR 140, WR 147, or η Carinae) have long been regarded as potential sources of high-energy γ-rays. The emission is thought to arise in the region where the stellar winds collide and produce relativistic particles that subsequently might be able to emit γ-rays. Detailed numerical hydrodynamic simulations have already offered insight into the complex dynamics of the wind collision region (WCR), while independent analytical studies, albeit with simplified descriptions of the WCR, have shed light on the spectra of charged particles. In this paper, we describe a combination of these two approaches. We present a three-dimensional hydrodynamical model for colliding stellar winds and compute spectral energy distributions of relativistic particles for the resulting structure of the WCR. The hydrodynamic part of our model incorporates the line-driven acceleration of the winds, gravity, orbital motion, and the radiative cooling of the shocked plasma. In our treatment of charged particles, we consider diffusive shock acceleration in the WCR and the subsequent cooling via inverse Compton losses (including Klein-Nishina effects), bremsstrahlung, collisions, and other energy loss mechanisms.

  8. Gust wind tunnel study on ballast pick-up by high-speed trains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navarro-Medina, F.; Sanz-Andres, A.; Perez-Grande, I.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the experimental setup, procedure, and results obtained, concerning the dynamics of a body lying on a floor, attached to a hinge, and exposed to an unsteady flow, which is a model of the initiation of rotational motion of ballast stones due to the wind generated by the passing of a high-speed train. The idea is to obtain experimental data to support the theoretical model developed in Sanz-Andres and Navarro-Medina (J Wind Eng Ind Aerodyn 98, 772-783, (2010), aimed at analyzing the initial phase of the ballast train-induced-wind erosion (BATIWE) phenomenon. The experimental setup is based on an open circuit, closed test section, low-speed wind tunnel, with a new sinusoidal gust generator mechanism concept, designed and built at the IDR/UPM. The tunnel's main characteristic is the ability to generate a flow with a uniform velocity profile and sinusoidal time fluctuation of the speed. Experimental results and theoretical model predictions are in good agreement.

  9. Analytical aerodynamic model of a high alpha research vehicle wind-tunnel model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cao, Jichang; Garrett, Frederick, Jr.; Hoffman, Eric; Stalford, Harold

    1990-01-01

    A 6 DOF analytical aerodynamic model of a high alpha research vehicle is derived. The derivation is based on wind-tunnel model data valid in the altitude-Mach flight envelope centered at 15,000 ft altitude and 0.6 Mach number with Mach range between 0.3 and 0.9. The analytical models of the aerodynamics coefficients are nonlinear functions of alpha with all control variable and other states fixed. Interpolation is required between the parameterized nonlinear functions. The lift and pitching moment coefficients have unsteady flow parts due to the time range of change of angle-of-attack (alpha dot). The analytical models are plotted and compared with their corresponding wind-tunnel data. Piloted simulated maneuvers of the wind-tunnel model are used to evaluate the analytical model. The maneuvers considered are pitch-ups, 360 degree loaded and unloaded rolls, turn reversals, split S's, and level turns. The evaluation finds that (1) the analytical model is a good representation at Mach 0.6, (2) the longitudinal part is good for the Mach range 0.3 to 0.9, and (3) the lateral part is good for Mach numbers between 0.6 and 0.9. The computer simulations show that the storage requirement of the analytical model is about one tenth that of the wind-tunnel model and it runs twice as fast.

  10. High-energy Particle Transport in Three-dimensional Hydrodynamic Models of Colliding-wind Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reitberger, K.; Kissmann, R.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Dubus, G.

    2014-02-01

    Massive stars in binary systems (such as WR 140, WR 147, or η Carinae) have long been regarded as potential sources of high-energy γ-rays. The emission is thought to arise in the region where the stellar winds collide and produce relativistic particles that subsequently might be able to emit γ-rays. Detailed numerical hydrodynamic simulations have already offered insight into the complex dynamics of the wind collision region (WCR), while independent analytical studies, albeit with simplified descriptions of the WCR, have shed light on the spectra of charged particles. In this paper, we describe a combination of these two approaches. We present a three-dimensional hydrodynamical model for colliding stellar winds and compute spectral energy distributions of relativistic particles for the resulting structure of the WCR. The hydrodynamic part of our model incorporates the line-driven acceleration of the winds, gravity, orbital motion, and the radiative cooling of the shocked plasma. In our treatment of charged particles, we consider diffusive shock acceleration in the WCR and the subsequent cooling via inverse Compton losses (including Klein-Nishina effects), bremsstrahlung, collisions, and other energy loss mechanisms.

  11. Comparative Assessment of Direct Drive High Temperature Superconducting Generators in Multi-Megawatt Class Wind Turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Maples, B.; Hand, M.; Musial, W.

    2010-10-01

    This paper summarizes the work completed under the CRADA between NREL and American Superconductor (AMSC). The CRADA combined NREL and AMSC resources to benchmark high temperature superconducting direct drive (HTSDD) generator technology by integrating the technologies into a conceptual wind turbine design, and comparing the design to geared drive and permanent magnet direct drive (PMDD) wind turbine configurations. Analysis was accomplished by upgrading the NREL Wind Turbine Design Cost and Scaling Model to represent geared and PMDD turbines at machine ratings up to 10 MW and then comparing cost and mass figures of AMSC's HTSDD wind turbine designs to theoretical geared and PMDD turbine designs at 3.1, 6, and 10 MW sizes. Based on the cost and performance data supplied by AMSC, HTSDD technology has good potential to compete successfully as an alternative technology to PMDD and geared technology turbines in the multi megawatt classes. In addition, data suggests the economics of HTSDD turbines improve with increasing size, although several uncertainties remain for all machines in the 6 to 10 MW class.

  12. High-Resolution Spectroscopy of Winds Associated with T Tauri Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iguchi, Naoto; Itoh, Yoichi

    2016-02-01

    We carried out optical high-resolution spectroscopy of T Tauri stars using the Subaru Telescope. Using archived data from the Keck Telescope and the Very Large Telescope, we detected forbidden lines of [S II] at 4069 Å, in addition to those of [O I] at 5577 Å and 6300 Å, for 13 T Tauri stars. We consider that low-velocity components of these forbidden lines emanate from the wind associated with T Tauri stars. Using two flux ratios of the three lines, we simultaneously determined the hydrogen density and temperature of the winds. The winds of T Tauri stars have a hydrogen density of 2.5 × 106 cm‑3 ‑ 2.5 × 109 cm‑3 and a temperature of 10800 –18 000 K. The mass loss rates by the wind are estimated to lie in the range from 2.0 × 10‑10 M⊙ yr‑1 to 1.4 × 10‑9 M⊙ yr‑1. The mass loss rates are found to increase with increasing mass accretion rates. The ratio of the mass loss rate to the mass accretion rate is 0.001–0.1 for classical T Tauri stars and 0.1–1 for transitional disk objects.

  13. Penetrating abdominal trauma.

    PubMed

    Henneman, P L

    1989-08-01

    The management of patients with penetrating abdominal trauma is outlined in Figure 1. Patients with hemodynamic instability, evisceration, significant gastrointestinal bleeding, peritoneal signs, gunshot wounds with peritoneal violation, and type 2 and 3 shotgun wounds should undergo emergency laparotomy. The initial ED management of these patients includes airway management, monitoring of cardiac rhythm and vital signs, history, physical examination, and placement of intravenous lines. Blood should be obtained for initial hematocrit, type and cross-matching, electrolytes, and an alcohol level or drug screen as needed. Initial resuscitation should utilize crystalloid fluid replacement. If more than 2 liters of crystalloid are needed to stabilize an adult (less in a child), blood should be given. Group O Rh-negative packed red blood cells should be immediately available for a patient in impending arrest or massive hemorrhage. Type-specific blood should be available within 15 minutes. A patient with penetrating thoracic and high abdominal trauma should receive a portable chest x-ray, and a hemo- or pneumothorax should be treated with tube thoracostomy. An unstable patient with clinical signs consistent with a pneumothorax, however, should receive a tube thoracostomy prior to obtaining roentgenographic confirmation. If time permits, a nasogastric tube and Foley catheter should be placed, and the urine evaluated for blood (these procedures can be performed in the operating room). If kidney involvement is suspected because of hematuria or penetrating trauma in the area of a kidney or ureter in a patient requiring surgery, a single-shot IVP should be performed either in the ED or the operating room. An ECG is important in patients with possible cardiac involvement and in patients over the age of 40 going to the operating room. Tetanus status should be updated, and appropriate antibiotics covering bowel flora should be given. Operative management should rarely be delayed

  14. Wind selection and drift compensation optimize migratory pathways in a high-flying moth.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Jason W; Reynolds, Don R; Mouritsen, Henrik; Hill, Jane K; Riley, Joe R; Sivell, Duncan; Smith, Alan D; Woiwod, Ian P

    2008-04-01

    Numerous insect species undertake regular seasonal migrations in order to exploit temporary breeding habitats [1]. These migrations are often achieved by high-altitude windborne movement at night [2-6], facilitating rapid long-distance transport, but seemingly at the cost of frequent displacement in highly disadvantageous directions (the so-called "pied piper" phenomenon [7]). This has lead to uncertainty about the mechanisms migrant insects use to control their migratory directions [8, 9]. Here we show that, far from being at the mercy of the wind, nocturnal moths have unexpectedly complex behavioral mechanisms that guide their migratory flight paths in seasonally-favorable directions. Using entomological radar, we demonstrate that free-flying individuals of the migratory noctuid moth Autographa gamma actively select fast, high-altitude airstreams moving in a direction that is highly beneficial for their autumn migration. They also exhibit common orientation close to the downwind direction, thus maximizing the rectilinear distance traveled. Most unexpectedly, we find that when winds are not closely aligned with the moth's preferred heading (toward the SSW), they compensate for cross-wind drift, thus increasing the probability of reaching their overwintering range. We conclude that nocturnally migrating moths use a compass and an inherited preferred direction to optimize their migratory track.

  15. Low-wind/high particulate matter episodes in the Calexico/Mexicali region.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Kerry E; Jaramillo, Isabel C; Quintero-Núñez, Margarito; Wagner, David A; Collins, Kimberly; Meuzelaar, Henk L C; Lighty, JoAnn S

    2010-12-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) currently classifies Imperial County, CA, as a nonattainment area for PM10 (particulate matter [PM] < or = 10 microm in diameter), and this region suffers from high rates of chronic bronchitis and childhood asthma. Although high annual and daily average PM levels can have negative health and economic effects, recent studies have identified an association between adverse health effects and short-term PM spikes of tens of micrograms per cubic meter. This study identified PM episodes in Calexico/Mexicali that involve PM concentration spikes with concentrations up to 10 times greater than those reported to cause adverse health effects. These episodes appear to be relatively common during the winter months, are associated with wind speeds below 2 m/sec and stable boundary level heights below 500 m, and can comprise a large portion of the 24-hr PM levels. The organic composition of the PM10 samples collected during the low-wind/ high-PM episodes differed from that collected at other times. However, a preliminary source attribution identified only one significant difference between the source classes: agricultural burning accounted for 6.7% of organic-fraction PM10 for low-wind/high-PM episodes versus 0.25% at other times. This preliminary source attribution also revealed that motor vehicles were the most important relative contributor to organic PM10. PMID:21243902

  16. Wind selection and drift compensation optimize migratory pathways in a high-flying moth.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Jason W; Reynolds, Don R; Mouritsen, Henrik; Hill, Jane K; Riley, Joe R; Sivell, Duncan; Smith, Alan D; Woiwod, Ian P

    2008-04-01

    Numerous insect species undertake regular seasonal migrations in order to exploit temporary breeding habitats [1]. These migrations are often achieved by high-altitude windborne movement at night [2-6], facilitating rapid long-distance transport, but seemingly at the cost of frequent displacement in highly disadvantageous directions (the so-called "pied piper" phenomenon [7]). This has lead to uncertainty about the mechanisms migrant insects use to control their migratory directions [8, 9]. Here we show that, far from being at the mercy of the wind, nocturnal moths have unexpectedly complex behavioral mechanisms that guide their migratory flight paths in seasonally-favorable directions. Using entomological radar, we demonstrate that free-flying individuals of the migratory noctuid moth Autographa gamma actively select fast, high-altitude airstreams moving in a direction that is highly beneficial for their autumn migration. They also exhibit common orientation close to the downwind direction, thus maximizing the rectilinear distance traveled. Most unexpectedly, we find that when winds are not closely aligned with the moth's preferred heading (toward the SSW), they compensate for cross-wind drift, thus increasing the probability of reaching their overwintering range. We conclude that nocturnally migrating moths use a compass and an inherited preferred direction to optimize their migratory track. PMID:18394893

  17. Influence of solar wind variability on geomagnetic activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrett, H. B.; Dessler, A. J.; Hill, T. W.

    1974-01-01

    A statistical study of solar wind data from the Explorer 33 satellite shows that interplanetary magnetic field irregularities are enhanced in the interaction region where a fast solar wind stream overtakes a slower solar wind stream. Comparison with geomagnetic AE and ap indexes further shows that these interplanetary irregularities enhance the level of geomagnetic disturbances. Thus while substorm occurrence is highly correlated with the dawn-dusk component of the solar wind electric field, the amplitude of the substorms is an increasing function of the variance in the interplanetary field. This result can be interpreted as a capacitative effect of the magnetopause that allows a time-varying solar wind electric field to penetrate the magnetosphere more effectively than a static solar wind electric field.

  18. Experimental study of snow accretion on overhead transmission lines using a wind tunnel and a high-speed camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasui, Mitsuru; Kagami, Jun; Ando, Hitoshi; Hamada, Yutaka

    1995-05-01

    The experimental study of snow accretion on overhead power transmission lines was carried out to obtain data on accretion rates using the artificial snow accretion test equipment and a high speed camera. We evaluated the accretion rate relative to temperature and wind velocity under simulated conditions of natural snowing and strong winds.

  19. Proton-driven electromagnetic instabilities in high-speed solar wind streams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abraham-Shrauner, B.; Asbridge, J. R.; Bame, S. J.; Feldman, W. C.

    1979-01-01

    Electromagnetic instabilities of the field-aligned, right-hand circularly polarized magnetosonic wave and the left-hand circularly polarized Alfven wave driven by two drifted proton components are analyzed for model parameters determined from Imp 7 solar wind proton data measured during high-speed flow conditions. Growth rates calculated using bi-Lorentzian forms for the main and beam proton as well as core and halo electron velocity distributions do not differ significantly from those calculated using bi-Maxwellian forms. Using distribution parameters determined from 17 measured proton spectra, we show that considering the uncertainties the magnetosonic wave may be linearly stable and the Alfven wave is linearly unstable. Because proton velocity distribution function shapes are observed to persist for times long compared to the proton gyroperiod, the latter result suggests that linear stability theory fails for proton-driven ion cyclotron waves in the high-speed solar wind.

  20. Session: Hard Rock Penetration

    SciTech Connect

    Tennyson, George P. Jr.; Dunn, James C.; Drumheller, Douglas S.; Glowka, David A.; Lysne, Peter

    1992-01-01

    This session at the Geothermal Energy Program Review X: Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market consisted of five presentations: ''Hard Rock Penetration - Summary'' by George P. Tennyson, Jr.; ''Overview - Hard Rock Penetration'' by James C. Dunn; ''An Overview of Acoustic Telemetry'' by Douglas S. Drumheller; ''Lost Circulation Technology Development Status'' by David A. Glowka; ''Downhole Memory-Logging Tools'' by Peter Lysne.

  1. High-time resolution measurements of solar wind heavy ions with SOHO/CELIAS/CTOF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janitzek, N. P.; Taut, A.; Berger, L.; Bochsler, P.; Drews, C.; Klecker, B.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R. F.

    2016-03-01

    The Charge Time-Of-Flight (CTOF) mass spectrometer as part of the Charge, ELement and Isotope Analysis System (CELIAS) onboard the SOlar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) is designed to measure the kinetic properties and elemental/ionic composition of solar wind ions heavier than protons, which we refer to as heavy ions. This is achieved by the combined measurements of the energy-per-charge, the time-of-flight and the energy of incident ions. The CTOF instrument combines a remarkable time-of-flight resolution with a large effective area and a high measurement cadence. This allows to determine the Velocity Distribution Functions (VDFs) of a wide range of heavy ions with 5-minute time resolution which ensures that the complete VDF is measured under nearly identical solar wind and magnetic field conditions. For the measurement period between Day Of Year (DOY) 150 and 220 in 1996, which covers a large part of the instrument's short life time, we analyzed VDFs of solar wind iron Fe8+, Fe9+ and Fe10+ for differential streaming relative to the solar wind proton speed measured simultaneously with the CELIAS Proton Monitor (PM). We find an increasing differential streaming with increasing solar wind proton speed for all investigated ions up to ion-proton velocity differences of 30 - 50 km s-1 at proton velocities of 500 km s-1, which is contradictory to an earlier CTOF study by [7]. We believe this difference is because in this study we used raw Pulse Height Analysis (PHA) data with a significantly increased mass and mass-per-charge resolution compared to the earlier used onboard preprocessed data.

  2. AE Geomagnetic Index Predictability for High Speed Solar Wind Streams: A Wavelet Decomposition Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guarnieri, Fernando L.; Tsurutani, Bruce T.; Hajra, Rajkumar; Echer, Ezequiel; Gonzalez, Walter D.; Mannucci, Anthony J.

    2014-01-01

    High speed solar wind streams cause geomagnetic activity at Earth. In this study we have applied a wavelet interactive filtering and reconstruction technique on the solar wind magnetic field components and AE index series to allowed us to investigate the relationship between the two. The IMF Bz component was found as the most significant solar wind parameter responsible by the control of the AE activity. Assuming magnetic reconnection associated to southward directed Bz is the main mechanism transferring energy into the magnetosphere, we adjust parameters to forecast the AE index. The adjusted routine is able to forecast AE, based only on the Bz measured at the L1 Lagrangian point. This gives a prediction approximately 30-70 minutes in advance of the actual geomagnetic activity. The correlation coefficient between the observed AE data and the forecasted series reached values higher than 0.90. In some cases the forecast reproduced particularities observed in the signal very well.The high correlation values observed and the high efficacy of the forecasting can be taken as a confirmation that reconnection is the main physical mechanism responsible for the energy transfer during HILDCAAs. The study also shows that the IMF Bz component low frequencies are most important for AE prediction.

  3. Ion energy equation for the high-speed solar wind: Ulysses observations

    SciTech Connect

    Feldman, W.C.; Barraclough, B.L.; Gosling, J.T.; McComas, D.J.; Riley, P.; Goldstein, B.E.; Balogh, A.

    1998-07-01

    Ulysses data in the high-speed solar wind that cover a wide range of latitudes centered on the solar poles were studied to test whether a polytrope law can be used to close the ion energy equation. Three approaches were taken. We determined the correlation between proton temperature and density (1) in the free expansion of the high-speed solar wind between 1.5 and 4.8 AU, (2) in steepened microstreams at high latitudes, and (3) at the edges of the equatorial band of solar wind variability. Strong correlations were observed in all data subsets that are consistent with a single polytrope relation, T{sub p}=aN{sub p}{sup ({gamma}{sup {asterisk}}{minus}1)}, where our best estimate for {gamma}{sup {asterisk}} is between 1.5 and 1.7. The best fitting relation is T{sub p}=(2.0{plus_minus}0.13){times}10{sup 5} N{sub p}{sup 0.57}. {copyright} 1998 American Geophysical Union

  4. A CME-driven solar wind distrubance observed at both low and high heliographic latitudes

    SciTech Connect

    Gosling, J.T.; McComas, D.J.; Phillips, J.L.

    1995-07-01

    A solar wind disturbance produced by a fast coronal mass ejection, CME, that departed from the Sun on Feburary 20, 1994 was observed in the ecliptic plane at 1 AU by IMP 8 and at high heliographic latitudes at 3.53 AU by Ulysses. In the ecliptic the disturbance included a strong forward shock but no reverse shock, while at high latitudes the disturbance was bounded by a relatively weak forward-reverse shock pair. It is clear that the disturbance in the ecliptic plane was driven primarily by the relative speed between the CME and a slower ambient solar wind ahead, whereas at higher latitudes the disturbance was driven by expansion of the CME. The combined IMP 8 and Ulysses observations thus provide a graphic illustration of how a single fast CME can produce very different types of solar wind disturbances at low and high heliographic latitudes. Simple numerical simulations help explain observed differences at the two spacecraft. 12 refs., 3 figs.

  5. Key Topics for High-Lift Research: A Joint Wind Tunnel/Flight Test Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, David; Thomas, Flint O.; Nelson, Robert C.

    1996-01-01

    Future high-lift systems must achieve improved aerodynamic performance with simpler designs that involve fewer elements and reduced maintenance costs. To expeditiously achieve this, reliable CFD design tools are required. The development of useful CFD-based design tools for high lift systems requires increased attention to unresolved flow physics issues. The complex flow field over any multi-element airfoil may be broken down into certain generic component flows which are termed high-lift building block flows. In this report a broad spectrum of key flow field physics issues relevant to the design of improved high lift systems are considered. It is demonstrated that in-flight experiments utilizing the NASA Dryden Flight Test Fixture (which is essentially an instrumented ventral fin) carried on an F-15B support aircraft can provide a novel and cost effective method by which both Reynolds and Mach number effects associated with specific high lift building block flows can be investigated. These in-flight high lift building block flow experiments are most effective when performed in conjunction with coordinated ground based wind tunnel experiments in low speed facilities. For illustrative purposes three specific examples of in-flight high lift building block flow experiments capable of yielding a high payoff are described. The report concludes with a description of a joint wind tunnel/flight test approach to high lift aerodynamics research.

  6. Wind tunnel investigation of a high lift system with pneumatic flow control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Victor, Pricop Mihai; Mircea, Boscoianu; Daniel-Eugeniu, Crunteanu

    2016-06-01

    Next generation passenger aircrafts require more efficient high lift systems under size and mass constraints, to achieve more fuel efficiency. This can be obtained in various ways: to improve/maintain aerodynamic performance while simplifying the mechanical design of the high lift system going to a single slotted flap, to maintain complexity and improve the aerodynamics even more, etc. Laminar wings have less efficient leading edge high lift systems if any, requiring more performance from the trailing edge flap. Pulsed blowing active flow control (AFC) in the gap of single element flap is investigated for a relatively large model. A wind tunnel model, test campaign and results and conclusion are presented.

  7. Solar Wind Influence on the Oxygen Content of Ion Outflow in the High Altitude Polar Cap During Solar Minimum Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliott, Heather A.; Comfort, Richard H.; Craven, Paul D.; Chandler, Michael O.; Moore, Thomas E.

    2000-01-01

    We correlate solar wind and IMF properties with the properties of O(+) and H(+) in the polar cap in early 1996 during solar minimum conditions at altitudes between 5.5 and 8.9 Re geocentric using the Thermal Ion Dynamics Experiment (TIDE) on the POLAR satellite. Throughout the high altitude polar cap, we observe H(+) to be more abundant than O(+). H(+) is a significant fraction of both the ionosphere and the solar wind, and O(+) is not a significant species in the solar wind. O(+) is the major species in the ionosphere so the faction of O(+) present in the magnetosphere is commonly used as a measure of the ionospheric contribution to the magnetosphere. For these reasons, 0+ is of primary interest in this study. We observe O(+) to be most abundant at lower latitudes when the solar wind speed is low (and low Kp), and at higher solar wind speeds (and high Kp) O(+) is observed across most of the polar cap. We also find that O(+) density and parallel flux are well organized by solar wind dynamic pressure; they both increase with solar wind dynamic pressure. H(+) is not as highly correlated with solar wind and IMF parameters, but H(+) density and parallel flux have some negative correlation with IMF By, and some positive correlation with VswBIMF. In this solar minimum data set, H(+) is dominant so that contributions of this plasma to the plasma sheet would have a very low O(+) to H(+) ratio.

  8. The Effect of Central Nervous System Penetration Effectiveness of Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy on Neuropsychological Performance and Neuroimaging in HIV Infected Individuals.

    PubMed

    Baker, Laurie M; Paul, Robert H; Heaps-Woodruff, Jodi M; Chang, Jee Yoon; Ortega, Mario; Margolin, Zachary; Usher, Christina; Basco, Brian; Cooley, Sarah; Ances, Beau M

    2015-09-01

    The incidence of HIV-associated dementia has been greatly reduced in the era of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART); however milder forms of cognitive impairment persist. It remains uncertain whether HAART regimens with a high degree of central nervous system penetration effectiveness (CPE) exert beneficial neurological outcomes in HIV-infected (HIV+) individuals on stable treatment. Sixty-four HIV-infected adults on HAART were assigned a CPE score using a published ranking system and divided into high (≥7; n = 35) and low (<7; n = 29) CPE groups. All participants completed neuropsychological testing in addition to structural neuroimaging. Neuropsychological tests included measures known to be sensitive to HIV with values converted into standardized scores (NPZ-4) based on published normative scores. A semi-automated methodology was utilized to assess brain volumetrics within cortical (grey and white matter) and subcortical (thalamus, caudate, putamen) regions of interest. Analyses assessed NPZ-4 and brain volumetric differences between HIV+ individuals with high and low CPE scores. No significant differences in brain integrity were observed between the two groups. Long-term HAART regimens with a high degree of CPE were not associated with significantly improved neuropsychological or neuroimaging outcomes in HIV+ adults. Results suggest that alternate mechanisms may potentially contribute to better neurological outcomes in the era of HAART.

  9. In-place HEPA filter penetration test

    SciTech Connect

    Bergman, W.; Wilson, kK.; Elliott, J.; Bettencourt, B.; Slawski, J.W.

    1997-01-01

    We have demonstrated the feasibility of conducting penetration tests on high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters as installed in nuclear ventilation systems. The in-place penetration test, which is designed to yield equivalent penetration measurements as the standard DOP efficiency test, is based on measuring the aerosol penetration of the filter installation as a function of particle size using a portable laser particle counter. This in-place penetration test is compared to the current in-place leak test using light scattering photometers for single HEPA filter installations and for HEPA filter plenums using the shroud method. Test results show the in-place penetration test is more sensitive than the in-place leak test, has a similar operating procedure, but takes longer to conduct. Additional tests are required to confirm that the in-place penetration test yields identical results as the standard dioctyl phthalate (DOP) penetration test for HEPA filters with controlled leaks in the filter and gasket and duct by-pass leaks. Further development of the procedure is also required to reduce the test time before the in- place penetration test is practical.

  10. In-place HEPA filter penetration test

    SciTech Connect

    Bergman, W.; Wilson, K.; Elliott, J.

    1997-08-01

    We have demonstrated the feasibility of conducting penetration tests on high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters as installed in nuclear ventilation systems. The in-place penetration test, which is designed to yield equivalent penetration measurements as the standard DOP efficiency test, is based on measuring the aerosol penetration of the filter installation as a function of particle size using a portable laser particle counter. This in-place penetration test is compared to the current in-place leak test using light scattering photometers for single HEPA filter installations and for HEPA filter plenums using the shroud method. Test results show the in-place penetration test is more sensitive than the in-place leak test, has a similar operating procedure, but takes longer to conduct. Additional tests are required to confirm that the in-place penetration test yields identical results as the standard dioctyl phthalate (DOP) penetration test for HEPA filters with controlled leaks in the filter and gasket and duct by-pass leaks. Further development of the procedure is also required to reduce the test time before the in-place penetration test is practical. 14 refs., 14 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Integrating Wind and Solar Energy in the U.S. Bulk Power System: Lessons from Regional Integration Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Bird, L.; Lew, D.

    2012-09-01

    Two recent studies sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have examined the impacts of integrating high penetrations of wind and solar energy on the Eastern and Western electric grids. The Eastern Wind Integration and Transmission Study (EWITS), initiated in 2007, examined the impact on power system operations of reaching 20% to 30% wind energy penetration in the Eastern Interconnection. The Western Wind and Solar Integration Study (WWSIS) examined the operational implications of adding up to 35% wind and solar energy penetration to the Western Interconnect. Both studies examined the costs of integrating variable renewable energy generation into the grid and transmission and operational changes that might be necessary to address higher penetrations of wind or solar generation. This paper identifies key insights from these regional studies for integrating high penetrations of renewables in the U.S. electric grid. The studies share a number of key findings, although in some instances the results vary due to differences in grid operations and markets, the geographic location of the renewables, and the need for transmission.

  12. Highly ionized stellar winds in Be stars. II - Winds in B6-B9.5e stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grady, C. A.; Sonneborn, George; Bjorkman, K. S.; Snow, T. P.; Shore, Steven N.

    1989-01-01

    The results of a UV survey of stellar winds and circumstellar shells in 40 B6-B9.5e stars covering luminosity classes V-III are presented. A graph is presented of the region from 1520-1560 A, which includes both the Si II UV multiplet 2 transitions and the C IV resonance transition for selected Be stars in the sample. The detection of shortward-shifted discrete component absorption features in nine of the program stars suggests that the material is produced in a stellar wind, which attains velocities of at least a few hundred km/s.

  13. Ceramic and coating applications in the hostile environment of a high temperature hypersonic wind tunnel. [Langley 8-foot high temperature structures tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Puster, R. L.; Karns, J. R.; Vasquez, P.; Kelliher, W. C.

    1981-01-01

    A Mach 7, blowdown wind tunnel was used to investigate aerothermal structural phenomena on large to full scale high speed vehicle components. The high energy test medium, which provided a true temperature simulation of hypersonic flow at 24 to 40 km altitude, was generated by the combustion of methane with air at high pressures. Since the wind tunnel, as well as the models, must be protected from thermally induced damage, ceramics and coatings were used extensively. Coatings were used both to protect various wind tunnel components and to improve the quality of the test stream. Planned modifications for the wind tunnel included more extensive use of ceramics in order to minimize the number of active cooling systems and thus minimize the inherent operational unreliability and cost that accompanies such systems. Use of nonintrusive data acquisition techniques, such as infrared radiometry, allowed more widespread use of ceramics for models to be tested in high energy wind tunnels.

  14. High resolution satellite measurements of coastal wind field and sea state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehner, Susanne

    TerraSAR-X is a new high resolution right looking radar satellite that has been launched on June 15, 2007. (http://www.dlr.de/tsx). TSX carries a high frequency X-band SAR sensor that can be operated in different modes (resolutions) and polarization. Since February 2008 the data are available for general scientific use. The satellite design is based on technology and knowledge achieved from the successful Synthetic Aperture Radar missions X-SAR/SIR-C and SRTM. The sensor operates in different modes: • the "Spotlight" mode with 10 x 10 km scenes at a resolution of 1-2 meters, • the "Stripmap"mode with 30 km wide strips at a resolution between 3 and 6 meters, • the "ScanSAR" mode with 100 km wide strips at a resolution of 16 meters. These images are of particularly interest for oceanographers due to the fact that using radar the sea surface can be observed through clouds and independent of illumination by sunlight. Radar images give the intensity of the backscattered signal, over the sea surface this signal is related to the roughness of the surface and therefore to the wind speed and the sea state. A new algorithm to deduce wind speed from TerraSAR X images is derived The streaks on the sea surface of the image are used to determine the wind direction. Wind shadow behind the coast helps to resolve the 180 degree ambiguity. The intensity of the image (further depending on incidence angle) is used to derive the wind speed by a new XMOD algorithm. From the radar images ocean wave length down to 10meters, direction and significant wave height is determined. The wave length of the ocean waves approaching the shoreline and breaking is measured and compared to in Situ measurements. Thus coastal processes affecting offshore buildings can be studied in detail. Examples from the English Channel, the Strait of Gibraltar and Offshore wind farms situated in the North Sea are given.

  15. Observations of high and low Fe charge states in individual solar wind streams with coronal-hole origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heidrich-Meisner, Verena; Peleikis, Thies; Kruse, Martin; Berger, Lars; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert

    2016-09-01

    Context. The solar wind originating from coronal holes is comparatively well-understood and is characterized by lower densities and average charge states compared to the so-called slow solar wind. Except for wave perturbations, the average properties of the coronal-hole solar wind are passably constant. Aims: In this case study, we focus on observations of the Solar Wind Ion Composition Spectrometer (SWICS) on the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) of individual streams of coronal-hole solar wind that illustrate that although the O and C charge states are low in coronal-hole wind, the Fe charge distribution is more variable. In particular, we illustrate that the Fe charge states in coronal-hole solar wind are frequently as high as in slow solar wind. Methods: We selected individual coronal-hole solar wind streams based on their collisional age as well as their respective O and C charge states and analyzed their Fe charge-state distributions. Additionally, with a combination of simple ballistic back-mapping and the potential field source surface model, transitions between streams with high and low Fe charge states were mapped back to the photosphere. The relative frequency of high and low Fe charge-state streams is compared for the years 2004 and 2006. Results: We found several otherwise typical coronal-hole streams that include Fe charge states either as high as or lower than in slow solar wind. Eight such transitions in 2006 were mapped back to equatorial coronal holes that were either isolated or connected to the northern coronal-hole. Attempts to identify coronal structures associated with the transitions were so far inconclusive.

  16. Direct observation of the latitudinal extent of a high-speed stream in the solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwenn, R.; Montgomery, M. D.; Rosenbauer, H.; Miggenrieder, H.; Muehlhaeuser, K. H.; Bame, S. J.; Feldman, W. C.; Hansen, R. T.

    1978-01-01

    The latitudinal boundaries of stationary fast solar wind streams emerging from equatorward extensions of the sun's polar coronal holes are studied. Simultaneous data from the Helios 1 and Imp spacecraft at different heliographic latitudes are compared. The measured latitudinal speed gradient of 30 km/s/deg shows that large angular speed gradients occur at the leading edges of fast streams and also with respect to latitude. The data indicate that longitudinal speed gradients are steeper near 0.3 AU than at 1.0 AU. Generally, regions with large angular speed gradients are observed to separate fast streams from the surrounding slower plasma. This suggests the existence of mechanisms which diminish longitudinal speed gradients as the plasma travels toward 1.0 AU. It also seems that the distribution of solar wind speeds on a near-sun spherical surface has large mesalike high-speed regions. Comparisons of Helios 1 and Imp data with corona observations supports the hypothesis that high-speed solar wind streams emerge from coronal holes.

  17. Application of Rapid Prototyping Methods to High-Speed Wind Tunnel Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Springer, A. M.

    1998-01-01

    This study was undertaken in MSFC's 14-Inch Trisonic Wind Tunnel to determine if rapid prototyping methods could be used in the design and manufacturing of high speed wind tunnel models in direct testing applications, and if these methods would reduce model design/fabrication time and cost while providing models of high enough fidelity to provide adequate aerodynamic data, and of sufficient strength to survive the test environment. Rapid prototyping methods utilized to construct wind tunnel models in a wing-body-tail configuration were: fused deposition method using both ABS plastic and PEEK as building materials, stereolithography using the photopolymer SL-5170, selective laser sintering using glass reinforced nylon, and laminated object manufacturing using plastic reinforced with glass and 'paper'. This study revealed good agreement between the SLA model, the metal model with an FDM-ABS nose, an SLA nose, and the metal model for most operating conditions, while the FDM-ABS data diverged at higher loading conditions. Data from the initial SLS model showed poor agreement due to problems in post-processing, resulting in a different configuration. A second SLS model was tested and showed relatively good agreement. It can be concluded that rapid prototyping models show promise in preliminary aerodynamic development studies at subsonic, transonic, and supersonic speeds.

  18. Investigation of a wind tunnel model high aspect ratio wing fracture

    SciTech Connect

    Gutierrez, W.T.; Tate, R.E.; Fell, H.P.

    1994-06-01

    A preliminary design and feasibility analysis on the aerodynamic performance characteristics of an experimental flight vehicle was conducted by Sandia National Laboratories. During a routine force and moment, static wind tunnel test in a blow down facility, one section of the high aspect ratio wing fractured outboard of the critical static stress location. Initially, a combination of material and aeroelastic analyses provided insight into the problem, but eventually proved inconclusive. After returning to the wind tunnel with a near identical model, instrumented with strain gages and accelerometers, and viewed with high speed video, the definitive mode of failure was discovered. It was determined that the first torsional mode of the wing was excited over a discrete angle of attack band, over the tested Mach number range of 0.5--0.9. Major flow separation on the airfoil occurred at the same time that flutter initiated, and was repeatable with a smaller scale model (geometrically similar, but 22% scale relative to the larger model) tested in a smaller test section wind tunnel. Data acquired during the stall flutter confirmed stress levels and numbers of cycles worked consistent with low cycle fatigue.

  19. An Experimental Device for Generating High Frequency Perturbations in Supersonic Wind Tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melcher, Kevin J.; Ibrahim, Mounir B.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes the analytical study of a device that has been proposed as a mechanism for generating gust-like perturbations in supersonic wind tunnels. The device is envisioned as a means to experimentally validate dynamic models and control systems designed for high-speed inlets. The proposed gust generator is composed of two flat trapezoidal plates that modify the properties of the flow ingested by the inlet. One plate may be oscillated to generate small perturbations in the flow. The other plate is held stationary to maintain a constant angle-of-attack. Using an idealized approach, design equations and performance maps for the new device were developed from the compressible flow relations. A two-dimensional CFD code was used to confirm the correctness of these results. The idealized approach was then used to design and evaluate a new gust generator for a 3.05-meter by 3.05-meter (10-foot by 10-foot) supersonic wind tunnel.

  20. SOLAR WIND TURBULENCE FROM MHD TO SUB-ION SCALES: HIGH-RESOLUTION HYBRID SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Franci, Luca; Verdini, Andrea; Landi, Simone; Matteini, Lorenzo; Hellinger, Petr

    2015-05-10

    We present results from a high-resolution and large-scale hybrid (fluid electrons and particle-in-cell protons) two-dimensional numerical simulation of decaying turbulence. Two distinct spectral regions (separated by a smooth break at proton scales) develop with clear power-law scaling, each one occupying about a decade in wavenumbers. The simulation results simultaneously exhibit several properties of the observed solar wind fluctuations: spectral indices of the magnetic, kinetic, and residual energy spectra in the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) inertial range along with a flattening of the electric field spectrum, an increase in magnetic compressibility, and a strong coupling of the cascade with the density and the parallel component of the magnetic fluctuations at sub-proton scales. Our findings support the interpretation that in the solar wind, large-scale MHD fluctuations naturally evolve beyond proton scales into a turbulent regime that is governed by the generalized Ohm’s law.

  1. Development of a High Accuracy Angular Measurement System for Langley Research Center Hypersonic Wind Tunnel Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, Brett; Yu, Si-bok; Rhew, Ray D. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    Modern experimental and test activities demand innovative and adaptable procedures to maximize data content and quality while working within severely constrained budgetary and facility resource environments. This report describes development of a high accuracy angular measurement capability for NASA Langley Research Center hypersonic wind tunnel facilities to overcome these deficiencies. Specifically, utilization of micro-electro-mechanical sensors including accelerometers and gyros, coupled with software driven data acquisition hardware, integrated within a prototype measurement system, is considered. Development methodology addresses basic design requirements formulated from wind tunnel facility constraints and current operating procedures, as well as engineering and scientific test objectives. Description of the analytical framework governing relationships between time dependent multi-axis acceleration and angular rate sensor data and the desired three dimensional Eulerian angular state of the test model is given. Calibration procedures for identifying and estimating critical parameters in the sensor hardware is also addressed.

  2. An experimental study of high contraction ratio, subsonic wind tunnel inlets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caylor, M. J.; Batill, S. M.

    1984-01-01

    The inlet or contraction section has significant impact on the performance and operating characteristics of any subsonic wind tunnel. Previous experimental studies have been conducted to examine specific aspects of inlet performance and design. This work builds on this earlier experience by performing a comprehensive experimental analysis of a member of a family of high contraction ratio inlets used on indraft type wind tunnels. Quantitative flow field measurements were made using wall static ports, a five-hole pressure probe, and a hot wire anemometry system. Smoke flow visualization techniques were used to examine the inlet flow in a more qualitative manner and to correlate with quantitative measurements. This experimental investigation has provided insight into some of the many problems associated with inlet flows.

  3. Transport of aurorally produced N/2D/ by winds in the high latitude thermosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerard, J.-C.; Roble, R. G.

    1982-01-01

    A time-dependent, two-dimensional model is developed for describing the meridional circulation of thermospheric odd nitrogen species produced in the auroral zone. The model is based on a previous model by Roble and Gary (1979) extended to upper altitude transport of the nitrogen species. Assumptions made include the existence of a steady neutral wind flowing from low to high latitudes, and an initial background due to scattered Lyman-beta and nightglow emissions. The aurora is also assumed as steady, along with a constant ion production. Predictions made using the model are compared with observations with the Atmosphere Explorer C spacecraft and rocket sounding measurements of the 5200 A distribution near the day-side polar cusp. The model requires thermospheric winds of 100-200 m/sec, flowing from day to nightside. Convective velocities near 1000 m/sec were detected by the Explorer spacecraft, as well as a day-to-nightside flow at the cusp.

  4. Effect of recombinant adeno-associated virus mediated transforming growth factor-beta1 on corneal allograft survival after high-risk penetrating keratoplasty.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lianhong; Zhu, Xiangxiang; Tan, Jinquan; Wang, Jiong; Xing, Yiqiao

    2013-06-01

    Corneal transplantation is one of the most common and successful transplant surgeries performed around the world. However, the high-risk corneal transplantation remains a high level of corneal graft failure. Gene transfer of immunomodulatory molecules is considered as one potential strategy in preventing allograft rejection. It is worthy evaluating the effects of the immunemodulating agent on corneal allograft rejection. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effects and mechanisms of recombinant adeno-associated virus mediated transforming growth factor-beta1 (rAAV-TGF-beta1) on corneal allograft survival using a high-risk rat model after penetrating keratoplasty (PKP). The mean survival time (MST) of corneal grafts was observed and immuno-histochemical staining of TGF-beta1 and Ox-62 was performed in the study. The MST showed significant prolongation in the rAAV-TGF-beta1 group compared to the allograft group. The rejection index (RI) at day 10 revealed was significantly greater in the allograft group than that of the other two groups. Besides the increase of TGF-beta1, the expression of Ox-62 decreasing in rAAV-TGF-beta1 transplanted recipients was detected after transplantation. In short, treatment with rAAV-TGF-beta1 prolongs corneal allograft survival and inhibits the Ox-62 expression in grafts after high-risk PKP.

  5. Developing a high-resolution wind map for a complex terrain with a coupled MM5/CALMET system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yim, Steve H. L.; Fung, Jimmy C. H.; Lau, Alexis K. H.; Kot, S. C.

    2007-03-01

    This study investigates the wind energy potential in Hong Kong, a region with a complex terrain, by coupling the prognostic MM5 mesoscale model with the CALMET diagnostic model to produce high-resolution wind fields. Hourly wind fields were simulated for the entire year of 2004. The MM5 simulations were performed on a nested grid from 40.5 km down to 1.5 km horizontal resolution. The CALMET meteorological model was used in a domain that includes the entire Hong Kong region with a high horizontal resolution of 100 m. The MM5 model wind field (1.5 km horizontal resolution) output was input into the CALMET diagnostic meteorological model every hour along with an objective analysis procedure using all available observations. Verification was achieved through two steps. In the first step, the data from three meteorological surface stations that were not assimilated into the CALMET model were compared horizontally with the simulated wind fields. In the second step, the simulated wind fields were compared vertically with the vertical wind profile collected from two upper air sounding stations. The results of this study identified the locations of the highest wind energy potential in HK down to 100 m resolution.

  6. The Generation of Smooth High Speed Solar Wind from Plume-Interplume Mixing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parhi, Shyamsundar; Suess, Steven T.; Sulkanen, Martin E.

    1998-01-01

    Plumes and rays are magnetic field aligned density striations in coronal holes with different values of plasma beta. The overall plasma beta is very small in the low corona but exceeds unity beyond 15-20 solar radius. High speed solar wind reported beyond 0.3 AU is relatively smooth and uniform and known to originate from the much filamented coronal hole. Thus the obvious question is how to generate a smooth solar wind from seemingly filamentary structure. Hence one has to find a mechanism to substantiate this apparent observed (Ulysses) phenomenon. To do this we model plumes as jets (or wakes) of plasma emitted from the solar surface. The shear between a jet and its ambient is known to become unstable to the MHD Kelvin-Helmholtz ("KH") instability if the Alfven Mach number of the jet is greater than one and the uniform external magnetic field is small. Starting with a simple configuration we consider a jet of half thickness R, having uniform density and uniform internal magnetic field. The external medium has also a uniform density and uniform magnetic field. The jet is perturbed at the boundary with a linear amplitude and fixed frequency. We simulate the coronal jet using the 3D ZEUS code. The first results indicate the slab jet is unstable to the MHD KH instability at 5-10 solar radius for some angle of wave propagation. The propagating instability may smooth the filamented flow. It may also produce the entrained Alfvenic fluctuations observed by Ulysses in the high speed wind. We are at present determining the parameters which induce large growth rate. This may clarify the mystery behind the emergence of fast smooth solar wind from very filamentary structures in coronal holes. Also, using the dispersion relation already available for such a flow we obtain some general description of the instability criteria for the KH instability at a jet interface.

  7. Source tracking aerosols released from land-applied class B biosolids during high-wind events.

    PubMed

    Baertsch, Carolina; Paez-Rubio, Tania; Viau, Emily; Peccia, Jordan

    2007-07-01

    DNA-based microbial source tracking (MST) methods were developed and used to specifically and sensitively track the unintended aerosolization of land-applied, anaerobically digested sewage sludge (biosolids) during high-wind events. Culture and phylogenetic analyses of bulk biosolids provided a basis for the development of three different MST methods. They included (i) culture- and 16S rRNA gene-based identification of Clostridium bifermentans, (ii) direct PCR amplification and sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene for an uncultured bacterium of the class Chloroflexi that is commonly present in anaerobically digested biosolids, and (iii) direct PCR amplification of a 16S rRNA gene of the phylum Euryarchaeota coupled with terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism to distinguish terminal fragments that are unique to biosolid-specific microorganisms. Each method was first validated with a broad group of bulk biosolids and soil samples to confirm the target's exclusive presence in biosolids and absence in soils. Positive responses were observed in 100% of bulk biosolid samples and in less than 11% of the bulk soils tested. Next, a sampling campaign was conducted in which all three methods were applied to aerosol samples taken upwind and downwind of fields that had recently been land applied with biosolids. When average wind speeds were greater than 5 m/s, source tracking results confirmed the presence of biosolids in 56% of the downwind samples versus 3% of the upwind samples. During these high-wind events, the biosolid concentration in downwind aerosols was between 0.1 and 2 microg/m3. The application of DNA-based source tracking to aerosol samples has confirmed that wind is a possible mechanism for the aerosolization and off-site transport of land-applied biosolids. PMID:17513591

  8. Numerical Study of the High-Speed Leg of a Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nayani, Sudheer; Sellers, William L, III; Brynildsen, Scott E.; Everhart, Joel L.

    2015-01-01

    The paper describes a numerical study of the high-speed leg of the NASA Langley 14 x 22-ft Low-Speed Wind Tunnel. The high-speed leg consists of the settling chamber, contraction, test section, and first diffuser. Results are shown comparing two different sources of surface geometry, and two different unstructured grid solvers for the flow characteristics. Numerical simulations of the flow on the tunnel centerline, boundary layer profiles on the floor, and wall static pressures have been compared with experiment. Flow angularities along the test section length have also been determined.

  9. Coronal mass ejections in the solar wind at high solar latitudes: An overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gosling, Jack T.

    1994-01-01

    Ulysses provided the first direct measurements of coronal mass ejections (CME's) in the solar wind at high heliographic latitudes. An overview of new results from the plasma experiment on Ulysses and magnetic field measurements, during the spacecraft's first excursion to high solar latitudes are summarized. A striking aspect of the high-latitude CME's observed is that they all had high speeds, with the overall average speed being 730 km/sec. A new class of forward-reverse shock pairs, associated with expansion of CME's was discovered at high latitudes. Of six certain CME's observed at high latitudes, three have associated shock pairs of this nature. Combined Ulysses and Yohkoh observations suggest that the flux rope topology characteristic of some CME's results from reconnection within the legs of neighboring magnetic loops embedded within the escaping CME's.

  10. Coronal mass ejections in the solar wind at high solar latitudes: An overview

    SciTech Connect

    Gosling, J.T.

    1994-10-01

    Ulysses has provided the first direct measurements of coronal mass ejections, CMES, in the solar wind at high heliographic latitudes. This paper provides an overview of new and unexpected results from the plasma experiment on Ulysses, supplemented with magnetic field measurements, during the spacecraft`s first excursion to high solar latitudes. A striking aspect of the high-latitude CMEs observed is that they all had high speeds, with the overall average speed being 730 km s{sup {minus}1}. A new class of forward-reverse shock pairs, associated with expansion of CMES, has been discovered at high latitudes. Of six certain CMEs observed at high latitudes, three have associated shock pairs of this nature. Combined Ulysses and Yohkoh observations suggest that the flux rope topology characteristic of some CMEs results from reconnection within the legs of neighboring magnetic loops embedded within the escaping CMES.

  11. Stability analyses of the mass abrasive projectile high-speed penetrating into concrete target. Part I: Engineering model for the mass loss and nose-blunting of ogive-nosed projectiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Hao; Chen, Xiao-Wei; He, Li-Lin; Fang, Qin

    2014-12-01

    The mass loss and nose blunting of a projectile during high-speed deep penetration into concrete target may cause structural destruction and ballistic trajectory instability of the penetrator, obviously reducing the penetration efficiency of penetrator. Provided that the work of friction between projectile and target is totally transformed into the heat to melt penetrator material at its nose surface, an engineering model is established for the mass loss and nose-blunting of the ogive-nosed projectile. A dimensionless formula for the relative mass loss of projectile is obtained by introducing the dimensionless impact function I and geometry function N of the projectile. The critical value V {0/c} of the initial striking velocity is formulated, and the mass loss of projectile tends to increase weakly nonlinearly with I/ N when V 0 < V {0/c}, whilst the mass loss is proportional to the initial kinetic energy of projectile when V 0 < V {0/c}. The theoretical prediction of V {0/c} is further confirmed to be very close to the experimental value of 1.0 km/s based on 11 sets of different penetration tests. Also the validity of the proposed expressions of mass loss and nose-blunting coefficients of a projectile are verified by the tests. Therefore, a theoretical basis is for the empirical conclusions drawn in previous publications. Regarding the completely empirical determinations of the mass loss and nose-blunting coefficients given in previous papers, the present analysis reveals its physical characteristic and also guarantees its prediction accuracy. The engineering model established in the present paper forms the basis for further discussions on the structural stability and the terminal ballistic stability of ogive-nosed projectiles high-speed penetrating into concrete targets, which will respectively be elaborated in Part II and Part III of the present study.

  12. All-fiber upconversion high spectral resolution wind lidar using a Fabry-Perot interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shangguan, Mingjia; Xia, Haiyun; Wang, Chong; Qiu, Jiawei; Shentu, Guoliang; Zhang, Qiang; Dou, Xiankang; Pan, Jian-wei

    2016-08-01

    An all-fiber, micro-pulse and eye-safe high spectral resolution wind lidar (HSRWL) at 1550nm is proposed and demonstrated by using a pair of upconversion single-photon detectors and a fiber Fabry-Perot scanning interferometer (FFP-SI). In order to improve the optical detection efficiency, both the transmission spectrum and the reflection spectrum of the FFP-SI are used for spectral analyses of the aerosol backscatter and the reference laser pulse. The reference signal is tapped from the outgoing laser and served as a zero velocity indicator. The Doppler shift is retrieved from a frequency response function Q, which is defined as the ratio of difference of the transmitted signal and the reflected signal to their sum. Taking advantages of high signal-to-noise ratio of the detectors and high spectral resolution of the FFP-SI, the Q spectra of the aerosol backscatter are reconstructed along the line-of-sight (LOS) of the telescope. By applying a least squares fit procedure to the measured Q spectra, the center frequencies and the bandwidths are obtained simultaneously. And then the Doppler shifts are determined relative to the center frequency of the reference signal. To eliminate the influence of temperature fluctuations on the FFP-SI, the FFP-SI is cased in a chamber with temperature stability of 0.001 during the measurement. Continuous LOS wind observations are carried out on two days at Hefei (31.843 N, 117.265 E), China. In the meantime, LOS wind measurements from the HSRWL show good agreement with the results from an ultrasonic wind sensor (Vaisala windcap WMT52). Due to the computational expensive of the convolution operation of the Q function, an empirical method is adopted to evaluate the quality of the measurements. The standard deviation of the wind speed is 0.76 m/s at the 1.8 km. The standard deviation of the retrieved bandwidth variation is 2.07 MHz at the 1.8 km.

  13. The Western Wind and Solar Integration Study Phase 2 (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    2013-09-01

    This fact sheet is a basic overview of the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study, Phase 2. The electric grid is a highly complex, interconnected machine, and changing one part of the grid can have consequences elsewhere. Adding wind and solar affects the operation of the other power plants and adding high penetrations can induce cycling of fossil-fueled generators. Cycling leads to wear-and-tear costs and changes in emissions.

  14. Conditional deletion of p53 and Rb in the renin-expressing compartment of the pancreas leads to a highly penetrant metastatic pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Glenn, S T; Jones, C A; Sexton, S; LeVea, C M; Caraker, S M; Hajduczok, G; Gross, K W

    2014-12-11

    Efforts to model human pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PanNETs) in animals have been moderately successful, with minimal evidence for glucagonomas or metastatic spread. The renin gene, although classically associated with expression in the kidney, is also expressed in many other extrarenal tissues including the pancreas. To induce tumorigenesis within rennin-specific tissues, floxed alleles of p53 and Rb were selectively abrogated using Cre-recombinase driven by the renin promoter. The primary neoplasm generated is a highly metastatic islet cell carcinoma of the pancreas. Lineage tracing identifies descendants of renin-expressing cells as pancreatic alpha cells despite a lack of active renin expression in the mature pancreas. Both primary and metastatic tumors express high levels of glucagon; furthermore, an increased level of glucagon is found in the serum, identifying the pancreatic cancer as a functional glucagonoma. This new model is highly penetrant and exhibits robust frequency of metastases to the lymph nodes and the liver, mimicking human disease, and provides a useful platform for better understanding pancreatic endocrine differentiation and development, as well as islet cell carcinogenesis. The use of fluorescent reporters for lineage tracing of the cells contributing to disease initiation and progression provides an unique opportunity to dissect the timeline of disease, examining mechanisms of the metastatic process, as well as recovering primary and metastatic cells for identifying cooperating mutations that are necessary for progression of disease.

  15. High Resolution ground penetrating radar (GPR) measurements at the laboratory scale to model porosity and permeability in the Miami Limestone in South Florida.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mount, G. J.; Comas, X.

    2015-12-01

    Subsurface water flow within the Biscayne aquifer is controlled by the heterogeneous distribution of porosity and permeability in the karst Miami Limestone and the presence of numerous dissolution and mega-porous features. The dissolution features and other high porosity areas can create preferential flow paths and direct recharge to the aquifer, which may not be accurately conceptualized in groundwater flow models. As hydrologic conditions are undergoing restoration in the Everglades, understanding the distribution of these high porosity areas within the subsurface would create a better understanding of subsurface flow. This research utilizes ground penetrating radar to estimate the spatial variability of porosity and dielectric permittivity of the Miami Limestone at centimeter scale resolution at the laboratory scale. High frequency GPR antennas were used to measure changes in electromagnetic wave velocity through limestone samples under varying volumetric water contents. The Complex Refractive Index Model (CRIM) was then applied in order to estimate porosity and dielectric permittivity of the solid phase of the limestone. Porosity estimates ranged from 45.2-66.0% from the CRIM model and correspond well with estimates of porosity from analytical and digital image techniques. Dielectric permittivity values of the limestone solid phase ranged from 7.0 and 13.0, which are similar to values in the literature. This research demonstrates the ability of GPR to identify the cm scale spatial variability of aquifer properties that influence subsurface water flow which could have implications for groundwater flow models in the Biscayne and potentially other shallow karst aquifers.

  16. Conditional deletion of p53 and Rb in the renin-expressing compartment of the pancreas leads to a highly penetrant metastatic pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Glenn, Sean T.; Jones, Craig A.; Sexton, Sandra; LeVea, Charles M.; Caraker, Susan M.; Hajduczok, George; Gross, Kenneth W.

    2014-01-01

    Efforts to model human pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PanNET) in animals have been moderately successful, with minimal evidence for glucagonomas or metastatic spread. The renin gene while classically associated with expression in the kidney is also expressed in many other extra-renal tissues including the pancreas. To induce tumorigenesis within renin specific tissues, floxed alleles of p53 and Rb were selectively abrogated using Cre-recombinase driven by the renin promoter. The primary neoplasm generated is a highly metastatic islet cell carcinoma of the pancreas. Lineage tracing identifies descendants of renin-expressing cells as pancreatic alpha cells despite a lack of active renin expression in the mature pancreas. Both primary and metastatic tumors express high levels of glucagon, furthermore an increased level of glucagon is found in the serum identifying the pancreatic cancer as a functional glucagonoma. This new model is highly penetrant and exhibits robust frequency of metastases to lymph nodes and liver, mimicking human disease and provides a useful platform for better understanding pancreatic endocrine differentiation and development, as well as islet cell carcinogenesis. The use of fluorescent reporters for lineage tracing of the cells contributing to disease initiation and progression provides a unique opportunity to dissect the timeline of disease, examining mechanisms of the metastatic process, as well as recovering primary and metastatic cells for identifying co-operating mutations that are necessary for progression of disease. PMID:24292676

  17. The statistics of the photometric accuracy based on MASS data and the evaluation of high-altitude wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornilov, V. G.

    2011-01-01

    The effect of stellar scintillation on the accuracy of photometric measurements is analyzed. We obtain a convenient form of estimaton of this effect in the long exposure regime, when the turbulence shift produced by the wind is much larger than the aperture of the telescope. A simple method is proposed to determine index S 3 introduced by Kenyon et al. (2006), directly from the measurements with the Multi Aperture Scintillation Sensor (MASS) without information on vertical profile of the wind. The statistics S 3 resulting from our campaign of 2005-2007 at Maidanak observatory is presented. It is shown that these data can be used to estimate high-altitude winds at pressure level 70-100 mbar. Comparison with the wind speed retrieved from the NCEP/NCAR global models shows a good agreement. Some prospects for retrieval of the wind speed profile from the MASS measurements are outlined.

  18. Wind-jet interaction in high-mass X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zdziarski, Andrzej

    2016-07-01

    Jets in high-mass X-ray binaries can strongly interact with the stellar wind from the donor. The interaction leads, in particular, to formation of recollimation shocks. The shocks can then accelerate electrons in the jet and lead to enhanced emission, observable in the radio and gamma-ray bands. DooSoo, Zdziarski & Heinz (2016) have formulated a condition on the maximum jet power (as a function of the jet velocity and wind rate and velocity) at which such shocks form. This criterion can explain the large difference in the radio and gamma-ray loudness between Cyg X-1 and Cyg X-3. The orbital modulation of radio emission observed in Cyg X-1 and Cyg X-3 allows a measurement of the location of the height along the jet where the bulk of emission at a given frequency occurs. Strong absorption of X-rays in the wind of Cyg X-3 is required to account for properties of the correlation of the radio emission with soft and hard X-rays. That absorption can also account for the unusual spectral and timing X-ray properties of this source.

  19. First observations of simultaneous interhemispheric conjugate high-latitude thermospheric winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosch, M. J.; Anderson, C.; Yiu, H.-C. I.; Kellerman, A. C.; Makarevich, R. A.; Aruliah, A.; Conde, M.; Griffin, E.; Davies, T.; McWhirter, I.; Dyson, P. L.

    2010-09-01

    We report the first observations of simultaneous high-latitude interhemispheric F region neutral wind fields by combining the 630 nm optical measurements from two scanning Doppler imagers (SDIs) and three Fabry-Perot interferometers (FPIs) for a period exceeding 5 h. From the Southern Hemisphere, a SDI at Mawson and a FPI at Davis, both in Antarctica, are geomagnetically mapped onto the Northern Hemisphere. These data are combined in the Northern Hemisphere with a SDI at Longyearbyen, Svalbard, and two FPIs near Kiruna in Sweden and Sodankyla in Finland. Geomagnetic conditions were moderate (Kp = 3--3+) and steady although the interplanetary magnetic field Bz component did change polarity several times. There is good agreement between the conjugate 630 nm optical intensities and wind vectors where the two SDIs' fields of view overlap. All wind field vectors are overlaid onto the northern Super Dual Auroral Radar Network ion convection contours. Qualitatively, the agreement between neutral and ion flow is remarkably good throughout the study interval, even down to mesoscale spatial size.

  20. Quasi-periodic (~mHz) dayside auroral brightennings associated with high-speed solar wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liou, K.

    2013-12-01

    It has been reported that dayside auroral pulsations of a few mHz frequency can occur when variations of solar wind dynamic pressure at the same frequency appear. Magnetospheric compression/decompression is attributed to the auroral pulsations. Here we report another type of dayside auroral pulsations not associated with solar wind dynamic pressure changes by using global auroral images acquired from the Ultraviolet Imager (UVI) on board the Polar satellite. From one periodic (~2 - 8 mHz) auroral event that occurred on February 8, 2000, it is found that the auroral enhancements covered most of the day (~05 - 16 MLT) sector and did not show a latitudinal dependence. Based on in situ particle data from DMSP SSJ/4, the brightennings were associated mainly with enhanced particle precipitations from the central plasma sheet (i.e., diffuse aurora). There was no geomagnetic pulsation on the ground and in the dawn sector of the magnetosheath as indicated by the Geotail measurements. While the auroral pulsations occurred during high solar wind speed (> 600 km/s), they commenced when the interplanetary magnetic field turned northward, suggesting the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability being a source of the pulsations. We will present detail analysis results and discuss other possible mechanisms in the context of current theories.

  1. Exploring and Modeling High-excitation Emission in the Ejecta and the Wind of Eta Carinae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehner, Andrea

    Eta Carinae is the most massive, most luminous star in our region of the Galaxy. It is an evolved massive star and therefore provides many clues to the fate of the most massive stars. In the 1840s its unstable nature culminated in the Great Eruption when it briefly became the second brightest star in the sky and ejected more than ten solar masses, which today enshroud the surviving star as a bipolar nebula. Every 5.54 years Eta Car's photometry and spectra show dramatic changes which last for several months. Combining data from HST/STIS, Gemini-S/GMOS, and VLT/UVES from 1998 to 2010, I analyzed two spectroscopic cycles. Observations with a variety of different slit position angles made it possible to map the emission across the nebula and the complex outer ejecta of Eta Car permit to observe the star at different stellar latitudes via reflected light. The spectroscopic cycles are thought to be regulated by a hot companion star and therefore give us information to the nature and orbit of the stars hidden behind Eta Car's opaque wind. The observations, covering more than 10 years, made it also possible to observe the ongoing long-term recovery from the Great Eruption. Topics covered in this thesis include: 1) spatial and temporal behavior of the high-excitation emission lines, 2) parameters of the secondary star, 3) He II 4687 emission during the 2009 "Event," 4) changing wind structure during the 2009 "Event," 5) origin of the He I lines, and 6) major changes in the broad-line wind spectrum indicating a decrease in Eta Car's wind density.

  2. Global Simulations of the Interaction of Microquasar Jets with a Stellar Wind in High-mass X-ray Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, D.; Heinz, S.

    2015-03-01

    Jets powered by high-mass X-ray binaries must traverse the powerful wind of the companion star. We present the first global three-dimensional simulations of jet-wind interaction in high-mass X-ray binaries. We show that the wind momentum flux intercepted by the jet can lead to significant bending of the jet and that jets propagating through a spherical wind will be bent to an asymptotic angle {{\\psi }∞ }. We derive simple expressions for {{\\psi }∞ } as a function of jet power and wind thrust. For known wind parameters, measurements of {{\\psi }∞ } can be used to constrain the jet power. In the case of Cygnus X-1, the lack of jet precession as a function of orbital phase observed by the Very Long Baseline Array can be used to put a lower limit on the jet power of {{L}jet}≳ {{10}36} ergs {{s}-1}. We further discuss the case where the initial jet is inclined relative to the binary orbital axis. We also analyze the case of Cygnus X-3 and show that jet bending is likely negligible unless the jet is significantly less powerful or much wider than currently thought. Our numerical investigation is limited to isotropic stellar winds. We discuss the possible effects of wind clumping on jet-wind interaction, which are likely significant, but argue that our limits on jet power for Cygnus X-1 are likely unaffected by clumping unless the global wind mass-loss rate is orders of magnitude below the commonly assumed range for Cyg X-1.

  3. Top Sounder Ice Penetration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, D. L.; Goemmer, S. A.; Sweeney, J. H.

    2014-12-01

    Ice draft measurements are made as part of normal operations for all US Navy submarines operating in the Arctic Ocean. The submarine ice draft data are unique in providing high resolution measurements over long transects of the ice covered ocean. The data has been used to document a multidecadal drop in ice thickness, and for validating and improving numerical sea-ice models. A submarine upward-looking sonar draft measurement is made by a sonar transducer mounted in the sail or deck of the submarine. An acoustic beam is transmitted upward through the water column, reflecting off the bottom of the sea ice and returning to the transducer. Ice thickness is estimated as the difference between the ship's depth (measured by pressure) and the acoustic range to the bottom of the ice estimated from the travel time of the sonar pulse. Digital recording systems can provide the return off the water-ice interface as well as returns that have penetrated the ice. Typically, only the first return from the ice hull is analyzed. Information regarding ice flow interstitial layers provides ice age information and may possibly be derived with the entire return signal. The approach being investigated is similar to that used in measuring bottom sediment layers and will involve measuring the echo level from the first interface, solving the reflection loss from that transmission, and employing reflection loss versus impedance mismatch to ascertain ice structure information.

  4. Extending wind turbine operational conditions; a comparison of set point adaptation and LQG individual pitch control for highly turbulent wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engels, W. P.; Subhani, S.; Zafar, H.; Savenije, F.

    2014-06-01

    Extreme wind conditions can cause excessive loading on the turbine. This not only results in higher design loads, but when these conditions occur in practice, will also result in higher maintenance cost. Although there are already effective methods of dealing with gusts, other extreme conditions should also be examined. More specifically, extreme turbulence conditions (e.g. those specified by design load case 1.3 in IEC61400-1 ed. 3) require special attention as they can lead to design-driving extreme loads on blades, tower and other wind turbine components. This paper examines two methods to deal with extreme loads in a case of extreme turbulent wind. One method is derating the turbine, the other method is an individual pitch control (IPC) algorithm. Derating of the turbine can be achieved in two ways, one is changing the rated torque, the other is changing the rated rotor speed. The effect of these methods on fatigue loads and extreme loads is examined. Non-linear aero-elastic simulations using Phatas, show that reducing the rated rotor speed is far more effective at reducing the loads than reducing torque. Then, the IPC algorithm is proposed. This algorithm is a linear quadratic Gaussian (LQG) controller based on a time invariant model, defined in the fixed reference frame that includes the first tower and blade modes. Because this method takes the dynamics of the system into account more than conventional IPC control, it is expected that these loads dealt with more effectively, when they are particularly relevant. It is expected that in extreme turbulent the blade and tower dynamics are indeed more relevant. The effect of this algorithm on fatigue loads and pitch effort is examined and compared with the fatigue loads and pitch effort of reference IPC. Finally, the methods are compared in non-linear aero-elastic simulations with extreme turbulent wind.

  5. Evolution of a highly dilatant fault zone in the grabens of Canyonlands National Park, Utah/USA - integrating field work, ground penetrating radar and airborne imagery analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kettermann, M.; Grützner, C.; van Gent, H. W.; Urai, J. L.; Reicherter, K.; Mertens, J.

    2015-03-01

    The grabens of the Canyonlands National Park are a young and active system of sub-parallel, arcuate grabens, whose evolution is the result of salt movement in the subsurface and a slight regional tilt of the faulted strata. We present results of ground penetrating radar surveys in combination with field observations and analysis of high resolution airborne imagery. GPR data show intense faulting of the Quaternary sediments at the flat graben floors, implying a more complex fault structure than visible at the surface. Direct measurements of heave and throw at several locations to infer fault dips at depth, combined with observations of primary joint surfaces in the upper 100 m suggest a model of the highly dilatant fault geometry in profile. Sinkholes observed in the field as well as in airborne imagery give insights in local massive dilatancy and show where water and sediments are transported underground. Based on correlations of paleosols observed in outcrops and GPR profiles, we argue that the grabens in Canyonlands National Park are either older than previously assumed, or that sedimentation rates were much higher in the Pleistocene.

  6. Evolution of a highly dilatant fault zone in the grabens of Canyonlands National Park, Utah, USA - integrating fieldwork, ground-penetrating radar and airborne imagery analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kettermann, M.; Grützner, C.; van Gent, H. W.; Urai, J. L.; Reicherter, K.; Mertens, J.

    2015-07-01

    The grabens of Canyonlands National Park are a young and active system of sub-parallel, arcuate grabens, whose evolution is the result of salt movement in the subsurface and a slight regional tilt of the faulted strata. We present results of ground-penetrating radar (GPR) surveys in combination with field observations and analysis of high-resolution airborne imagery. GPR data show intense faulting of the Quaternary sediments at the flat graben floors, implying a more complex fault structure than visible at the surface. Direct measurements of heave and throw at several locations to infer fault dips at depth, combined with observations of primary joint surfaces in the upper 100 m, suggest a highly dilatant fault geometry. Sinkholes observed in the field as well as in airborne imagery give insights in local dilatancy and show where water and sediments are transported underground. Based on correlations of paleosols observed in outcrops and GPR profiles, we argue that either the grabens in Canyonlands National Park are older than previously assumed or that sedimentation rates were much higher in the Pleistocene.

  7. Weld penetration and defect control

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, B.A.

    1992-05-15

    Highly engineered designs increasingly require the use of improved materials and sophisticated manufacturing techniques. To obtain optimal performance from these engineered products, improved weld properties and joint reliability are a necessarily. This requirement for improved weld performance and reliability has led to the development of high-performance welding systems in which pre-programmed parameters are specified before any welding takes place. These automated systems however lack the ability to compensate for perturbations which arise during the welding process. Hence the need for systems which monitor and control the in-process status of the welding process. This report discusses work carried out on weld penetration indicators and the feasibility of using these indicators for on-line penetration control.

  8. Kansas Wind Energy Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Gruenbacher, Don

    2015-12-31

    This project addresses both fundamental and applied research problems that will help with problems defined by the DOE “20% Wind by 2030 Report”. In particular, this work focuses on increasing the capacity of small or community wind generation capabilities that would be operated in a distributed generation approach. A consortium (KWEC – Kansas Wind Energy Consortium) of researchers from Kansas State University and Wichita State University aims to dramatically increase the penetration of wind energy via distributed wind power generation. We believe distributed generation through wind power will play a critical role in the ability to reach and extend the renewable energy production targets set by the Department of Energy. KWEC aims to find technical and economic solutions to enable widespread implementation of distributed renewable energy resources that would apply to wind.

  9. Q fever infection in dairy cattle herds: increased risk with high wind speed and low precipitation.

    PubMed

    Nusinovici, S; Frössling, J; Widgren, S; Beaudeau, F; Lindberg, A

    2015-11-01

    Ruminants are considered the main reservoir for transmission of Coxiella burnetii (Cb) to humans. The implementation of effective control measures against Cb in ruminants requires knowledge about potential risk factors. The objectives of this study were (i) to describe the spatial distribution of Q fever-infected dairy cattle herds in Sweden, (ii) to quantify the respective contributions of wind and animal movements on the risk of infection, while accounting for other sources of variation, and (iii) to investigate the possible protective effect of precipitation. A total of 1537 bulk milk samples were collected and tested for presence of Cb antibodies. The prevalence of test-positive herds was higher in the south of Sweden. For herds located in areas with high wind speed, open landscape, high animal densities and high temperature, the risk of being infected reached very high values. Because these factors are difficult to control, vaccination could be an appropriate control measure in these areas. Finally, the cumulated precipitation over 1 year was identified as a protective factor.

  10. Ulysses observations of a recurrent high speed solar wind stream and the heliomagnetic streamer belt

    SciTech Connect

    Bame, S.J.; Gosling, J.T.; McComas, D.J.; Phillips, J.L. ); Goldstein, B.E.; Neugebauer, M. ); Harvey, J.W.

    1993-11-05

    Near-ecliptic solar wind observations by Ulysses on its way to the polar regions of the Sun, compared with those from IMP 8 at 1 AU, showed that high-speed streams decay and broaden with heliocentric distance from IMP 8 to Ulysses, as expected. In July 1992 while travelling south at [approximately]13[degrees]S and 5.3 AU, Ulysses encountered a recurrent high-speed stream, that may also have been observed at IMP 8. The stream has been observed a total of 14 times, once in each solar rotation through June 1993 at [approximately]34[degrees]S. The source of the high-speed stream is an equatorward extension of the south polar coronal hole. From July 1992 through June 1993, averages of solar wind peak speed increased while density decreased with heliographic latitude. Both the stream and a low-speed, high-density flow, presumably associated with the heliomagnetic (coronal) streamer belt encircling the heliomagnetic equator, crossed Ulysses with the solar rotation period until April 1993 when the spacecraft was at [approximately]29[degrees]S heliographic latitude. After this time, as the spacecraft climbed to higher latitudes, the central portion of the streamer belt with lowest speed and highest density disappeared. Therefore, at its maximum inclination, the belt was tilted at [approximately]29[degrees] to the heliographic equator at this point in the solar cycle. 11 refs., 5 figs.

  11. Wind tunnel wall interference in V/STOL and high lift testing: A selected, annotated bibliography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuttle, M. H.; Mineck, R. E.; Cole, K. L.

    1986-01-01

    This bibliography, with abstracts, consists of 260 citations of interest to persons involved in correcting aerodynamic data, from high lift or V/STOL type configurations, for the interference arising from the wind tunnel test section walls. It provides references which may be useful in correcting high lift data from wind tunnel to free air conditions. References are included which deal with the simulation of ground effect, since it could be viewed as having interference from three tunnel walls. The references could be used to design tests from the standpoint of model size and ground effect simulation, or to determine the available testing envelope with consideration of the problem of flow breakdown. The arrangement of the citations is chronological by date of publication in the case of reports or books, and by date of presentation in the case of papers. Included are some documents of historical interest in the development of high lift testing techniques and wall interference correction methods. Subject, corporate source, and author indices, by citation numbers, have been provided to assist the users. The appendix includes citations of some books and documents which may not deal directly with high lift or V/STOL wall interference, but include additional information which may be helpful.

  12. High-resolution mapping of soil moisture at the field scale using ground-penetrating radar for improving remote sensing data products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambot, Sébastien; Mahmoudzadeh, Mohammad Reza; Phuong Tran, Anh; Nottebaere, Martijn; Leonard, Aline; Defourny, Pierre; Neyt, Xavier

    2014-05-01

    Characterizing the spatiotemporal distribution of soil moisture at various scales is essential in agricultural, hydrological, meteorological, and climatological research and applications. Soil moisture determines the boundary condition between the soil and the atmosphere and governs key processes of the hydrological cycle such as infiltration, runoff, root water uptake, evaporation, as well as energy exchanges between the Earth's surface and the atmosphere. In that respect, ground-penetrating radar (GPR) is of particular interest for field-scale soil moisture mapping as soil moisture is highly correlated to its permittivity, which controls radar wave propagation in the soil. Yet, accurate determination of the electrical properties of a medium using GPR requires full-wave inverse modeling, which has remained a major challenge in applied geophysics for many years. We present a new near-field radar modeling approach for wave propagation in layered media. Radar antennas are modeled using an equivalent set of infinitesimal electric dipoles and characteristic, frequency-dependent, global reflection and transmission coefficients. These coefficients determine wave propagation between the radar reference plane, point sources, and field points. The interactions between the antenna and the soil are inherently accounted for. The fields are calculated using three-dimensional Green's functions. We validated the model using both time and frequency domain radars. The radars were mounted on a quad and controlled by a computer for real-time radar and dGPS data acquisition. Several fields were investigated and time-lapse measurements were performed on some of them to analyze temporal stability in soil moisture patterns and the repeatability of the measurements. The results were compared to ground-truths. The proposed technique is presently being applied to improve space-borne remote sensing data products for soil moisture by providing high-resolution observational information that

  13. A simple and specific high performance liquid chromatography method for the assay of a series of novel dermal penetration enhancers.

    PubMed

    Michniak, B B; Seyda, K L

    1993-02-01

    Synopsis A series of clofibric acid amides has been synthesized and previously reported by the authors as possessing enhancer activity in vitro in athymic nude mouse skin against model drugs, hydrocortisone-21-acetate and beta-methasone-17-valerate. An assay was required for each of these enhancers however, which would be specific for each compound and would also separate model drugs and their metabolite peaks. This study reports reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography assays for clofibric acid amide and seven derivatives (Ia-Ig). All enhancers showed maximum absorption at 232 nm, betamethasone (BM) and its valerate (BMV) at 238 nm, and hydrocortisone (HC) and its acetate (HCA) at 242 nm. Practical units of detection for the amides were 0.46-2.8 mug ml(-1) and peaks were sharp and well-separated from steroid peaks in three vehicles - methanol alone. Franz diffusion cell receptor phase samples (isotonic phosphate buffer), and full-thickness athymic nude mouse skin extracts in methanol. Mobile phases consisted of various proportions of acetonitrile and water, some with 2-propanol. The octyl amide for example, with mobile phase CH(3)CN: H(2)O (85:15) at 1 ml min(-1) had a retention time (t(R)) of 7.9 mins. Under the same conditions, retention times for the steroids were HC, t(R)= 3.3 mins; HCA, t(R)= 4.3 mins; BM, t(R)= 3.4 mins; BMV, t(R)= 4.6 mins. Résumé Les auteurs avaient démontré dans un article précédent le pouvoir accélérateur de pénétration dermique in vitro d'une gamme d'amides d'acide clofibrique sur la peau de souris sans poils, et sans thymus avec des médicaments types tels que l'acetate 21 d'hydrocortisone et le valerate 17 de beta-metasone. Il a cependant été requis, pour chacun de ces accélérateurs, un test spécifique pour chaque composition, permettant de séparer chaque médicament et les pics des métabolites. Cette étude décrit des tests par chromatographie liquide à haute performance en phase inverse pour l

  14. Simulating three-dimensional nonthermal high-energy photon emission in colliding-wind binaries

    SciTech Connect

    Reitberger, K.; Kissmann, R.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.

    2014-07-01

    Massive stars in binary systems have long been regarded as potential sources of high-energy γ rays. The emission is principally thought to arise in the region where the stellar winds collide and accelerate relativistic particles which subsequently emit γ rays. On the basis of a three-dimensional distribution function of high-energy particles in the wind collision region—as obtained by a numerical hydrodynamics and particle transport model—we present the computation of the three-dimensional nonthermal photon emission for a given line of sight. Anisotropic inverse Compton emission is modeled using the target radiation field of both stars. Photons from relativistic bremsstrahlung and neutral pion decay are computed on the basis of local wind plasma densities. We also consider photon-photon opacity effects due to the dense radiation fields of the stars. Results are shown for different stellar separations of a given binary system comprising of a B star and a Wolf-Rayet star. The influence of orbital orientation with respect to the line of sight is also studied by using different orbital viewing angles. For the chosen electron-proton injection ratio of 10{sup –2}, we present the ensuing photon emission in terms of two-dimensional projections maps, spectral energy distributions, and integrated photon flux values in various energy bands. Here, we find a transition from hadron-dominated to lepton-dominated high-energy emission with increasing stellar separations. In addition, we confirm findings from previous analytic modeling that the spectral energy distribution varies significantly with orbital orientation.

  15. Langevin power curve analysis for numerical wind energy converter models with new insights on high frequency power performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mücke, Tanja A.; Wächter, Matthias; Milan, Patrick; Peinke, Joachim

    2015-11-01

    Based on the Langevin equation it has been proposed to obtain power curves for wind turbines from high frequency data of wind speed measurements u(t) and power output P (t). The two parts of the Langevin approach, power curve and drift field, give a comprehensive description of the conversion dynamic over the whole operating range of the wind turbine. The method deals with high frequent data instead of 10 min means. It is therefore possible to gain a reliable power curve already from a small amount of data per wind speed. Furthermore, the method is able to visualize multiple fixed points, which is e.g. characteristic for the transition from partial to full load or in case the conversion process deviates from the standard procedures. In order to gain a deeper knowledge it is essential that the method works not only for measured data but also for numerical wind turbine models and synthetic wind fields. Here, we characterize the dynamics of a detailed numerical wind turbine model and calculate the Langevin power curve for different data samplings. We show, how to get reliable results from synthetic data and verify the applicability of the method for field measurements with ultra-sonic, cup and Lidar measurements. The independence of the fixed points on site specific turbulence effects is also confirmed with the numerical model. Furthermore, we demonstrate the potential of the Langevin approach to detect failures in the conversion process and thus show the potential of the Langevin approach for a condition monitoring system.

  16. HIGH-RESOLUTION X-RAY SPECTROSCOPY REVEALS THE SPECIAL NATURE OF WOLF-RAYET STAR WINDS

    SciTech Connect

    Oskinova, L. M.; Hamann, W.-R.; Gayley, K. G.; Huenemoerder, D. P.; Ignace, R.; Pollock, A. M. T.

    2012-03-10

    We present the first high-resolution X-ray spectrum of a putatively single Wolf-Rayet (WR) star. 400 ks observations of WR 6 by the XMM-Newton telescope resulted in a superb quality high-resolution X-ray spectrum. Spectral analysis reveals that the X-rays originate far out in the stellar wind, more than 30 stellar radii from the photosphere, and thus outside the wind acceleration zone where the line-driving instability (LDI) could create shocks. The X-ray emitting plasma reaches temperatures up to 50 MK and is embedded within the unshocked, 'cool' stellar wind as revealed by characteristic spectral signatures. We detect a fluorescent Fe line at Almost-Equal-To 6.4 keV. The presence of fluorescence is consistent with a two-component medium, where the cool wind is permeated with the hot X-ray emitting plasma. The wind must have a very porous structure to allow the observed amount of X-rays to escape. We find that neither the LDI nor any alternative binary scenario can explain the data. We suggest a scenario where X-rays are produced when the fast wind rams into slow 'sticky clumps' that resist acceleration. Our new data show that the X-rays in single WR star are generated by some special mechanism different from the one operating in the O-star winds.

  17. An Investigation of the Drag of Windshields in the 8-foot High-Speed Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Russell G; Delano, James B

    1942-01-01

    Report presents the results of tests made to determine the drag of closed-cockpit and transport-type windshields. The tests were made at speeds corresponding to a Mach number range of approximately 0.25 to 0.58 in the NACA 8-foot high-speed wind tunnel. This speed range corresponds to a test Reynolds number range of 2,510,000 to 4,830,000 based on the mean aerodynamic chord of the full-span model (17.29 in.). The shapes of the windshield proper, the hood, and the tail fairing were systematically varied to include common types and refined design.

  18. Wind-tunnel investigation of vortex flaps on a highly swept interceptor configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoonover, W. E., Jr.; Ohlson, W. E.

    1982-01-01

    A subsonic wind-tunnel investigation of the application of vortex flaps to a supersonic interceptor configuration is described. Experimental results are presented which indicate the aerodynamic effects of vortex-flap deflection, trailing-edge flap deflection, vortex flap chord and span, vertical stabilizers, and a highly cambered leading edge designed for attached flow. Data presented include longitudinal forces and moments, upper-surface pressure distributions, and oil- and smoke-flow visualization photographs. It is concluded that a full-span deployable vortex flap can provide a substantial performance improvement for this and other similar configurations.

  19. Error propagation equations for estimating the uncertainty in high-speed wind tunnel test results

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, E.L.

    1994-07-01

    Error propagation equations, based on the Taylor series model, are derived for the nondimensional ratios and coefficients most often encountered in high-speed wind tunnel testing. These include pressure ratio and coefficient, static force and moment coefficients, dynamic stability coefficients, and calibration Mach number. The error equations contain partial derivatives, denoted as sensitivity coefficients, which define the influence of free-steam Mach number, M{infinity}, on various aerodynamic ratios. To facilitate use of the error equations, sensitivity coefficients are derived and evaluated for five fundamental aerodynamic ratios which relate free-steam test conditions to a reference condition.

  20. Electron heating within interaction zones of simple high-speed solar wind streams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, W. C.; Asbridge, J. R.; Bame, S. J.; Gosling, J. T.; Lemons, D. S.

    1978-01-01

    In the present paper, electron heating within the high-speed portions of three simple stream-stream interaction zones is studied to further our understanding of the physics of heat flux regulation in interplanetary space. To this end, the thermal signals present in the compressions at the leading edges of the simple high-speed streams are analyzed, showing that the data are inconsistent with the Spitzer conductivity. Instead, a polynomial law is found to apply. Its implication concerning the mechanism of interplanetary heat conduction is discussed, and the results of applying this conductivity law to high-speed flows inside of 1 AU are studied. A self-consistent model of the radial evolution of electrons in the high-speed solar wind is proposed.

  1. High-resolution daily gridded datasets of air temperature and wind speed for Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brinckmann, S.; Krähenmann, S.; Bissolli, P.

    2015-08-01

    New high-resolution datasets for near surface daily air temperature (minimum, maximum and mean) and daily mean wind speed for Europe (the CORDEX domain) are provided for the period 2001-2010 for the purpose of regional model validation in the framework of DecReg, a sub-project of the German MiKlip project, which aims to develop decadal climate predictions. The main input data sources are hourly SYNOP observations, partly supplemented by station data from the ECA&D dataset (http://www.ecad.eu). These data are quality tested to eliminate erroneous data and various kinds of inhomogeneities. Grids in a resolution of 0.044° (5 km) are derived by spatial interpolation of these station data into the CORDEX area. For temperature interpolation a modified version of a regression kriging method developed by Krähenmann et al. (2011) is used. At first, predictor fields of altitude, continentality and zonal mean temperature are chosen for a regression applied to monthly station data. The residuals of the monthly regression and the deviations of the daily data from the monthly averages are interpolated using simple kriging in a second and third step. For wind speed a new method based on the concept used for temperature was developed, involving predictor fields of exposure, roughness length, coastal distance and ERA Interim reanalysis wind speed at 850 hPa. Interpolation uncertainty is estimated by means of the kriging variance and regression uncertainties. Furthermore, to assess the quality of the final daily grid data, cross validation is performed. Explained variance ranges from 70 to 90 % for monthly temperature and from 50 to 60 % for monthly wind speed. The resulting RMSE for the final daily grid data amounts to 1-2 °C and 1-1.5 m s-1 (depending on season and parameter) for daily temperature parameters and daily mean wind speed, respectively. The datasets presented in this article are published at http://dx.doi.org/10.5676/DWD_CDC/DECREG0110v1.

  2. 2.5 MHz Line-Width High-energy, 2 Micrometer Coherent Wind Lidar Transmitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petros, Mulugeta; Yu, Jirong; Trieu, Bo; Bai, Yingxin; Petzar, Paul; Singh, Upendra N.; Reithmaier, Karl

    2007-01-01

    2 micron solid-state lasers are the primary choice for coherent Doppler wind detection. As wind lidars, they are used for wake vortex and clear air turbulence detection providing air transport safety. In addition, 2 micron lasers are one of the candidates for CO2 detection lidars. The rich CO2 absorption line around 2 micron, combined with the long upper state life of time, has made Ho based 2 micron lasers a viable candidate for CO2 sensing DIAL instrument. The design and fabrication of a compact coherent laser radar transmitter for Troposphere wind sensing is under way. This system is hardened for ground as well as airborne applications. As a transmitter for a coherent wind lidar, this laser has stringent spectral line width and beam quality requirements. Although the absolute wavelength does not have to be fixed for wind detection, to maximize return signal, the output wavelength should avoid atmospheric CO2 and H2O absorption lines. The base line laser material is Ho:Tm:LuLF which is an isomorph of Ho:Tm:YLF. LuLF produces 20% more output power than Ho:Tm:YLF. In these materials the Tm absorption cross-section, the Ho emission cross-section, the Tm to Ho energy transfer parameters and the Ho (sup 5) I (sub 7) radiative life time are all identical. However, the improved performance of the LuLF is attributed to the lower thermal population in the (sup 5) I (sub 8) manifold. It also provides higher normal mode to Q-switch conversion than YLF at high pump energy indicating a lower up-conversion. The laser architecture is composed of a seed laser, a ring oscillator, and a double pass amplifier. The seed laser is a single longitudinal mode with a line width of 13 KHz. The 100mJ class oscillator is stretched to 3 meters to accommodate the line-width requirement without compromising the range resolution of the instrument. The amplifier is double passed to produce greater than 300mJ energy.

  3. High-resolution daily gridded data sets of air temperature and wind speed for Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brinckmann, Sven; Krähenmann, Stefan; Bissolli, Peter

    2016-10-01

    New high-resolution data sets for near-surface daily air temperature (minimum, maximum and mean) and daily mean wind speed for Europe (the CORDEX domain) are provided for the period 2001-2010 for the purpose of regional model validation in the framework of DecReg, a sub-project of the German MiKlip project, which aims to develop decadal climate predictions. The main input data sources are SYNOP observations, partly supplemented by station data from the ECA&D data set (http://www.ecad.eu). These data are quality tested to eliminate erroneous data. By spatial interpolation of these station observations, grid data in a resolution of 0.044° (≈ 5km) on a rotated grid with virtual North Pole at 39.25° N, 162° W are derived. For temperature interpolation a modified version of a regression kriging method developed by Krähenmann et al.(2011) is used. At first, predictor fields of altitude, continentality and zonal mean temperature are used for a regression applied to monthly station data. The residuals of the monthly regression and the deviations of the daily data from the monthly averages are interpolated using simple kriging in a second and third step. For wind speed a new method based on the concept used for temperature was developed, involving predictor fields of exposure, roughness length, coastal distance and ERA-Interim reanalysis wind speed at 850 hPa. Interpolation uncertainty is estimated by means of the kriging variance and regression uncertainties. Furthermore, to assess the quality of the final daily grid data, cross validation is performed. Variance explained by the regression ranges from 70 to 90 % for monthly temperature and from 50 to 60 % for monthly wind speed. The resulting RMSE for the final daily grid data amounts to 1-2 K and 1-1.5 ms-1 (depending on season and parameter) for daily temperature parameters

  4. Occurrence of high-speed solar wind streams over the Grand Modern Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mursula, Kalevi; Lukianova, Renata; Holappa, Lauri

    2015-04-01

    In the declining phase of the solar cycle, when the new-polarity fields of the solar poles are strengthened by the transport of same-signed magnetic flux from lower latitudes, the polar coronal holes expand and form non-axisymmetric extensions toward the solar equator. These extensions enhance the occurrence of high-speed solar wind streams (HSS) and related co-rotating interaction regions in the low-latitude heliosphere, and cause moderate, recurrent geomagnetic activity in the near-Earth space. Here, using a novel definition of geomagnetic activity at high (polar cap) latitudes and the longest record of magnetic observations at a polar cap station, we calculate the annually averaged solar wind speeds as proxies for the effective annual occurrence of HSS over the whole Grand Modern Maximum (GMM) from 1920s onwards. We find that a period of high annual speeds (frequent occurrence of HSS) occurs in the declining phase of each solar cycle 16-23. For most cycles the HSS activity clearly maximizes during one year, suggesting that typically only one strong activation leading to a coronal hole extension is responsible for the HSS maximum. We find that the most persistent HSS activity occurred in the declining phase of solar cycle 18. This suggests that cycle 19, which marks the sunspot maximum period of the GMM, was preceded by exceptionally strong polar fields during the previous sunspot minimum. This gives interesting support for the validity of solar dynamo theory during this dramatic period of solar magnetism.

  5. Deployable Wireless Camera Penetrators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badescu, Mircea; Jones, Jack; Sherrit, Stewart; Wu, Jiunn Jeng

    2008-01-01

    A lightweight, low-power camera dart has been designed and tested for context imaging of sampling sites and ground surveys from an aerobot or an orbiting spacecraft in a microgravity environment. The camera penetrators also can be used to image any line-of-sight surface, such as cliff walls, that is difficult to access. Tethered cameras to inspect the surfaces of planetary bodies use both power and signal transmission lines to operate. A tether adds the possibility of inadvertently anchoring the aerobot, and requires some form of station-keeping capability of the aerobot if extended examination time is required. The new camera penetrators are deployed without a tether, weigh less than 30 grams, and are disposable. They are designed to drop from any altitude with the boost in transmitting power currently demonstrated at approximately 100-m line-of-sight. The penetrators also can be deployed to monitor lander or rover operations from a distance, and can be used for surface surveys or for context information gathering from a touch-and-go sampling site. Thanks to wireless operation, the complexity of the sampling or survey mechanisms may be reduced. The penetrators may be battery powered for short-duration missions, or have solar panels for longer or intermittent duration missions. The imaging device is embedded in the penetrator, which is dropped or projected at the surface of a study site at 90 to the surface. Mirrors can be used in the design to image the ground or the horizon. Some of the camera features were tested using commercial "nanny" or "spy" camera components with the charge-coupled device (CCD) looking at a direction parallel to the ground. Figure 1 shows components of one camera that weighs less than 8 g and occupies a volume of 11 cm3. This camera could transmit a standard television signal, including sound, up to 100 m. Figure 2 shows the CAD models of a version of the penetrator. A low-volume array of such penetrator cameras could be deployed from an

  6. Akon - A Penetrator for Europa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Geraint

    2016-04-01

    Jupiter's moon Europa is one of the most intriguing objects in our Solar System. This 2000km-wide body has a geologically young solid water ice crust that is believed to cover a global ocean of liquid water. The presence of this ocean, together with a source of heating through tidal forces, make Europa a conceivable location for extraterrestrial life. The science case for exploring all aspects of this icy world is compelling. NASA has selected the Europa Mission (formerly Europa Clipper) to study Europa in detail in the 2020s through multiple flybys, and ESA's JUICE mission will perform two flybys of the body in the 2030s. The US agency has extended to the European Space Agency an invitation to provide a contribution to their mission. European scientists interested in Europa science and exploration are currently organizing themselves, in the framework of a coordinated Europa M5 Inititative to study concurrently the main options for this ESA contribution, from a simple addition of individual instruments to the NASA spacecraft, to a lander to investigate Europa's surface in situ. A high speed lander - a penetrator - is by far the most promising technology to achieve this latter option within the anticipated mass constraints, and studies of such a hard lander, many funded by ESA, are now at an advanced level. An international team to formally propose an Europa penetrator to ESA in response to the anticipated ESA M5 call is growing. The working title of this proposal is Akon (Άκων), named after the highly accurate javelin gifted to Europa by Zeus in ancient Greek mythology. We present plans for the Akon penetrator, which would impact Europa's surface at several hundred metres per second, and travel up to several metres into the moon's subsurface. To achieve this, the penetrator would be delivered to the surface by a dedicated descent module, to be destroyed on impact following release of the penetrator above the surface. It is planned that the instruments to be

  7. Penetration of yawed projectiles

    SciTech Connect

    Reaugh, J.E.

    1990-10-08

    We used computer simulations and experiment to study the penetration of tungsten-alloy projectiles into a thick, armored steel target. These projectiles, with length-to-diameter ratios of 4, strike the target with severe yaws, up to 90{degree}(side-on-impact), such as might be induced in an originally longer projectile by a multiple-spaced plate array. In this study, we focus on the terminal ballistics of these projectiles and ignore how the yaw was induced. We found that the minimum penetration depth occurs at 90{degree}yaw. This case is well approximated by the two-dimensional plane-strain penetration of a side-on cylinder. The ratio of penetration depth to diameter, P:D, for this case is larger than that for a sphere because the plane-strain geometry lacks hoop stress, which is activated in axisymmetric geometry. A more surprising result of work is that the penetration at 60{degree} yaw is only slightly deeper than that of the side-on impact. 8 refs., 15 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Dispersion modeling of particulate matter containing hexavalent chromium during high winds in southern Iraq.

    PubMed

    Zannetti, Paolo; Daly, Aaron D; Freedman, Frank R

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this paper is to describe a scientific methodology (i.e., the combination of different well-established modeling techniques) and its application to a real case scenario of contaminated dust emissions in high winds. This scenario addresses potential air pollution problems at the water treatment plant (WTP) at Qarmat-Ali, Basra, Iraq, during 2003. Workplace practices at the WTP before 2003 resulted in sodium dichromate contamination in the area. Looting at the site in early 2003 also contributed to this contamination. Individuals who were assigned to provide security at the site in 2003 have claimed adverse health effects caused by exposure to dust containing hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)]. This report presents our modeling study with respect to these claims in relation to (1) amount of Cr(VI) present in the soil, (2) wind erosion episodes, and (3) possible long-term (e.g., annual average) Cr(VI) concentrations inhaled by different people while at the site. Our modeling approach included (1) the analysis of Cr(VI) soil measurements to assess the degree of contamination in different areas of the plant at different times; (2) the use of DUSTRAN model equations to calculate the emission rate of particulate matter (PM) less than 10 µm in diameter (PM10) during high-wind episodes; (3) the use of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) AERMOD modeling system to estimate Cr(VI) concentrations at the site; and (4) the calculation of modeling results in the form of both contour lines of average Cr(VI) concentrations at the site, and specific concentration values for selected individuals, based upon their recollection of their visits to the site.

  9. Rotation and Winds of Exoplanet HD 189733 b Measured with High-dispersion Transmission Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brogi, M.; de Kok, R. J.; Albrecht, S.; Snellen, I. A. G.; Birkby, J. L.; Schwarz, H.

    2016-02-01

    Giant exoplanets orbiting very close to their parent star (hot Jupiters) are subject to tidal forces expected to synchronize their rotational and orbital periods on short timescales (tidal locking). However, spin rotation has never been measured directly for hot Jupiters. Furthermore, their atmospheres can show equatorial super-rotation via strong eastward jet streams, and/or high-altitude winds flowing from the day- to the night-side hemisphere. Planet rotation and atmospheric circulation broaden and distort the planet spectral lines to an extent that is detectable with measurements at high spectral resolution. We observed a transit of the hot Jupiter HD 189733 b around 2.3 μm and at a spectral resolution of R˜105 with CRIRES at the ESO Very Large Telescope. After correcting for the stellar absorption lines and their distortion during transit (the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect), we detect the absorption of carbon monoxide and water vapor in the planet transmission spectrum by cross-correlating with model spectra. The signal is maximized (7.6σ) for a planet rotational velocity of ({3.4}-2.1+1.3) km s-1, corresponding to a rotational period of ({1.7}-0.4+2.9) days. This is consistent with the planet orbital period of 2.2 days, and therefore with tidal locking. We find that the rotation of HD 189733 b is longer than 1 day (3σ). The data only marginally (1.5σ) prefer models with rotation versus models without rotation. We measure a small day- to night-side wind speed of (-{1.7}-1.2+1.1) km s-1. Compared to the recent detection of sodium blueshifted by (8+/- 2) km s-1, this likely implies a strong vertical wind shear between the pressures probed by near-infrared and optical transmission spectroscopy.

  10. Dispersion modeling of particulate matter containing hexavalent chromium during high winds in southern Iraq.

    PubMed

    Zannetti, Paolo; Daly, Aaron D; Freedman, Frank R

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this paper is to describe a scientific methodology (i.e., the combination of different well-established modeling techniques) and its application to a real case scenario of contaminated dust emissions in high winds. This scenario addresses potential air pollution problems at the water treatment plant (WTP) at Qarmat-Ali, Basra, Iraq, during 2003. Workplace practices at the WTP before 2003 resulted in sodium dichromate contamination in the area. Looting at the site in early 2003 also contributed to this contamination. Individuals who were assigned to provide security at the site in 2003 have claimed adverse health effects caused by exposure to dust containing hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)]. This report presents our modeling study with respect to these claims in relation to (1) amount of Cr(VI) present in the soil, (2) wind erosion episodes, and (3) possible long-term (e.g., annual average) Cr(VI) concentrations inhaled by different people while at the site. Our modeling approach included (1) the analysis of Cr(VI) soil measurements to assess the degree of contamination in different areas of the plant at different times; (2) the use of DUSTRAN model equations to calculate the emission rate of particulate matter (PM) less than 10 µm in diameter (PM10) during high-wind episodes; (3) the use of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) AERMOD modeling system to estimate Cr(VI) concentrations at the site; and (4) the calculation of modeling results in the form of both contour lines of average Cr(VI) concentrations at the site, and specific concentration values for selected individuals, based upon their recollection of their visits to the site. PMID:25947053

  11. Co-existence of whistler waves with kinetic Alfven wave turbulence for the high-beta solar wind plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Mithaiwala, Manish; Crabtree, Chris; Ganguli, Gurudas; Rudakov, Leonid

    2012-10-15

    It is shown that the dispersion relation for whistler waves is identical for a high or low beta plasma. Furthermore, in the high-beta solar wind plasma, whistler waves meet the Landau resonance with electrons for velocities less than the thermal speed, and consequently, the electric force is small compared to the mirror force. As whistlers propagate through the inhomogeneous solar wind, the perpendicular wave number increases through refraction, increasing the Landau damping rate. However, the whistlers can survive because the background kinetic Alfven wave (KAW) turbulence creates a plateau by quasilinear (QL) diffusion in the solar wind electron distribution at small velocities. It is found that for whistler energy density of only {approx}10{sup -3} that of the kinetic Alfven waves, the quasilinear diffusion rate due to whistlers is comparable to KAW. Thus, very small amplitude whistler turbulence can have a significant consequence on the evolution of the solar wind electron distribution function.

  12. A three-dimensional sharp interface Cartesian grid method for solving high speed multi-material impact, penetration and fragmentation problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapahi, A.; Sambasivan, S.; Udaykumar, H. S.

    2013-05-01

    This work presents a three-dimensional, Eulerian, sharp interface, Cartesian grid technique for simulating the response of elasto-plastic solid materials to hypervelocity impact, shocks and detonations. The mass, momentum and energy equations are solved along with evolution equations for deviatoric stress and plastic strain using a third-order finite difference scheme. Material deformation occurs with accompanying nonlinear stress wave propagation; in the Eulerian framework the boundaries of the deforming material are tracked in a sharp fashion using level-sets and the conditions on the immersed boundaries are applied by suitable modifications of a ghost fluid approach. The dilatational response of the material is modeled using the Mie-Gruneisen equation of state and the Johnson-Cook model is employed to characterize the material response due to rate-dependent plastic deformation. Details are provided on the treatment of the deviatoric stress ghost state so that physically correct boundary conditions can be applied at the material interfaces. An efficient parallel algorithm is used to handle computationally intensive three-dimensional problems. The results demonstrate the ability of the method to simulate high-speed impact, penetration and fragmentation phenomena in three dimensions.

  13. The tRNA(Gln) 4336 mitochondrial DNA variant is not a high penetrance mutation which predisposes to dementia before the age of 75 years.

    PubMed Central

    Tysoe, C; Robinson, D; Brayne, C; Dening, T; Paykel, E S; Huppert, F A; Rubinsztein, D C

    1996-01-01

    The genetic factors that predispose to Alzheimer's disease (AD) are heterogeneous. Two recent reports have suggested that a mitochondrial DNA mutation within the tRNAGln gene, located at position 4336, may be a risk factor for AD, as it was found in 10/256 (3.9%) cases with AD confirmed by necropsy. Although low prevalences of this mutation were detected in non-demented subjects in both of these studies, the controls were not carefully matched with the AD cases. We have investigated the frequency of this mutation in two community based elderly cohorts in Cambridgeshire, who have participated in longitudinal studies of cognitive function. The 4336 mitochondrial mutation was detected in 8/ 443 people examined. These people were found to be non-demented at ages 74, 81, 84, 86, 89, 90, 91, and 102 years, in contrast to the previously described cases whose onset of dementia occurred between 60 and 76 years (mean 68). Accordingly, we believe that this mitochondrial variant is not a high penetrance mutation which predisposes to dementia before the age of 76 years. Images PMID:9004131

  14. Estimating porosity and solid dielectric permittivity in the Miami Limestone using high-frequency ground penetrating radar (GPR) measurements at the laboratory scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mount, Gregory J.; Comas, Xavier

    2014-10-01

    Subsurface water flow in South Florida is largely controlled by the heterogeneous nature of the karst limestone in the Biscayne aquifer and its upper formation, the Miami Limestone. These heterogeneities are amplified by dissolution structures that induce changes in the aquifer's material and physical properties (i.e., porosity and dielectric permittivity) and create preferential flow paths. Understanding such patterns are critical for the development of realistic groundwater flow models, particularly in the Everglades, where restoration of hydrological conditions is intended. In this work, we used noninvasive ground penetrating radar (GPR) to estimate the spatial variability in porosity and the dielectric permittivity of the solid phase of the limestone at centimeter-scale resolution to evaluate the potential for field-based GPR studies. A laboratory setup that included high-frequency GPR measurements under completely unsaturated and saturated conditions was used to estimate changes in electromagnetic wave velocity through Miami Limestone samples. The Complex Refractive Index Model was used to derive estimates of porosity and dielectric permittivity of the solid phase of the limestone. Porosity estimates of the samples ranged between 45.2 and 66.0% and showed good correspondence with estimates of porosity using analytical and digital image techniques. Solid dielectric permittivity values ranged between 7.0 and 13.0. This study shows the ability of GPR to image the spatial variability of porosity and dielectric permittivity in the Miami Limestone and shows potential for expanding these results to larger scales and other karst aquifers.

  15. Towards the modelling of pedestrian wind speed using high-resolution digital surface models and statistical methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, Lars; Onomura, Shiho; Lindberg, Fredrik; Seaquist, Jonathan

    2016-04-01

    Wind is a complex phenomenon and a critical factor in assessing climatic conditions and pedestrian comfort within cities. To obtain spatial information on near-ground wind speed, 3D computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modelling is often used. This is a computationally intensive method which requires extensive computer resources and is time consuming. By using a simpler 2D method, larger areas can be processed and less time is required. This study attempts to model the relationship between near-ground wind speed and urban geometry using 2.5D raster data and variable selection methods. Such models can be implemented in a geographic information system (GIS) to assess the spatial distribution of wind speed at street level in complex urban environments at scales from neighbourhood to city. Wind speed data, 2 m above ground, is obtained from simulations by CFD modelling and used as a response variable. A number of derivatives calculated from high-resolution digital surface models (DSM) are used as potential predictors. A sequential variable selection algorithm followed by all-possible subset regression was used to select candidate models for further evaluation. The results show that the selected models explain general spatial wind speed pattern characteristics but the prediction errors are large, especially so in areas with high wind speeds. However, all selected models did explain 90 % of the wind speed variability (R 2 ≈ 0.90). Predictors adding information on width and height ratio and alignment of street canyons with respect to wind direction are suggested for improving model performance. To assess the applicability of any derived model, the results of the CFD model should be thoroughly evaluated against field measurements.

  16. 76 FR 56735 - Small Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Cape Wind's High Resolution...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-14

    ..., shallow-penetration subbottom profiler, multibeam depth sounder, and medium-penetration subbottom profiler... result from propeller cavitations, propeller singing, propulsion, flow noise from water dragging across... 1 to 1.5 m (3 to 5 ft) beneath the water's surface. Sources such as the chirp are considered...

  17. High-Temperature Motor Windings for Downhole Pumps Used in Geothermal Energy Production

    SciTech Connect

    Hooker, Matthew; Hazelton, Craig; Kano, Kimi

    2010-12-31

    The development of highly reliable downhole equipment is an essential element in enabling the widespread utilization of Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS). The downhole equipment used in these systems will be required to operate at high voltages and temperatures on the order of 200 to 250°C (and eventually to 300°C). These conditions exceed the practical operating ranges of currently available thermoplastic wire insulations, and thus limit the operating lifetime of tools such as Electric Submersible Pumps (ESPs). In this work, high-temperature insulations based on composite materials were developed and demonstrated. The products of this work were found to exhibit electrical resistivities and dielectric breakdown strengths that PEEK at temperatures above 250C. In addition, sub-scale motor windings were fabricated and tested to validate the performance of this technology

  18. Wind tunnel investigation of the effect of high relative velocities on the structural integrity of birds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bresnahan, D. L.

    1972-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted in a supersonic wind tunnel to determine the effect a sudden high velocity headwind had on the physical deformation and structural breakup characteristics of birds. Several sizes of recently killed birds were dropped into the test section at free-stream Mach numbers ranging from 0.2 to 0.8 and photographed with high-speed motion-picture cameras. These conditions simulated flow conditions encountered when birds are ingested into the inlets of high speed aircraft, thereby constituting a safety hazard to the aircraft and its occupants. The investigation shows that, over the range of headwind conditions tested, the birds remained structurally intact and did not suffer any appreciable deformation or structural breakup.

  19. Analysis of the long-term surface wind variability over complex terrain using a high spatial resolution WRF simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez, Pedro A.; González-Rouco, J. Fidel; Montávez, Juan P.; García-Bustamante, E.; Navarro, J.; Dudhia, J.

    2013-04-01

    This work uses a WRF numerical simulation from 1960 to 2005 performed at a high horizontal resolution (2 km) to analyze the surface wind variability over a complex terrain region located in northern Iberia. A shorter slice of this simulation has been used in a previous study to demonstrate the ability of the WRF model in reproducing the observed wind variability during the period 1992-2005. Learning from that validation exercise, the extended simulation is herein used to inspect the wind behavior where and when observations are not available and to determine the main synoptic mechanisms responsible for the surface wind variability. A principal component analysis was applied to the daily mean wind. Two principal modes of variation accumulate a large percentage of the wind variability (83.7%). The first mode reflects the channeling of the flow between the large mountain systems in northern Iberia modulated by the smaller topographic features of the region. The second mode further contributes to stress the differentiated wind behavior over the mountains and valleys. Both modes show significant contributions at the higher frequencies during the whole analyzed period, with different contributions at lower frequencies during the different decades. A strong relationship was found between these two modes and the zonal and meridional large scale pressure gradients over the area. This relationship is described in the context of the influence of standard circulation modes relevant in the European region like the North Atlantic Oscillation, the East Atlantic pattern, East Atlantic/Western Russia pattern, and the Scandinavian pattern.

  20. Penetration of a copper rod into a sandy target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaminskii, M. V.; Kopytov, G. F.; Mogilev, V. A.; Travov, Yu. F.; Faikov, Yu. I.

    2010-05-01

    This paper presents the results of experimental and theoretical studies of high-velocity penetration of cylindrical copper rods into sand. The hydrodynamic Alekseevskii-Tate theory is modified to determine the penetration depth and wear velocity of the material of the rod penetrating into soil target in the plastic and hydrodynamic stages of penetration. The case where the target material is significantly less strong than the rod (impactor) material is considered.