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Sample records for high yield ethanol

  1. Identification of multiple interacting alleles conferring low glycerol and high ethanol yield in Saccharomyces cerevisiae ethanolic fermentation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Genetic engineering of industrial microorganisms often suffers from undesirable side effects on essential functions. Reverse engineering is an alternative strategy to improve multifactorial traits like low glycerol/high ethanol yield in yeast fermentation. Previous rational engineering of this trait always affected essential functions like growth and stress tolerance. We have screened Saccharomyces cerevisiae biodiversity for specific alleles causing lower glycerol/higher ethanol yield, assuming higher compatibility with normal cellular functionality. Previous work identified ssk1E330N…K356N as causative allele in strain CBS6412, which displayed the lowest glycerol/ethanol ratio. Results We have now identified a unique segregant, 26B, that shows similar low glycerol/high ethanol production as the superior parent, but lacks the ssk1E330N…K356N allele. Using segregants from the backcross of 26B with the inferior parent strain, we applied pooled-segregant whole-genome sequence analysis and identified three minor quantitative trait loci (QTLs) linked to low glycerol/high ethanol production. Within these QTLs, we identified three novel alleles of known regulatory and structural genes of glycerol metabolism, smp1R110Q,P269Q, hot1P107S,H274Y and gpd1L164P as causative genes. All three genes separately caused a significant drop in the glycerol/ethanol production ratio, while gpd1L164P appeared to be epistatically suppressed by other alleles in the superior parent. The order of potency in reducing the glycerol/ethanol ratio of the three alleles was: gpd1L164P > hot1P107S,H274Y ≥ smp1R110Q,P269Q. Conclusions Our results show that natural yeast strains harbor multiple specific alleles of genes controlling essential functions, that are apparently compatible with survival in the natural environment. These newly identified alleles can be used as gene tools for engineering industrial yeast strains with multiple subtle changes, minimizing the risk of

  2. Combination of high solids loading pretreatment and ethanol fermentation of whole slurry of pretreated rice straw to obtain high ethanol titers and yields.

    PubMed

    Jung, Young Hoon; Park, Hyun Min; Kim, Dong Hyun; Park, Yong-Cheol; Seo, Jin-Ho; Kim, Kyoung Heon

    2015-12-01

    In cellulosic ethanol production using lignocellulose, an increase in biomass solids loading during the pretreatment process significantly affects the final ethanol titer and the production cost. In this study, pretreatment using rice straw at high solids loading (20% (w/v)) was evaluated, using maleic acid as a catalyst. After pretreatment at optimal conditions of 190°C, 20 min, and 0.2% or 5% (w/v) maleic acid, the highest enzymatic digestibility obtained was over 80%. Simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) of the whole slurry of pretreated rice straw in the presence of activated carbon to separate inhibitory compounds generated a high ethanol yield of 62.8%, based on the initial glucan in unpretreated rice straw. These findings suggest that high solids loading pretreatment using maleic acid and SSF of the whole slurry of pretreated rice straw can be combined to improve the process economics of ethanol production.

  3. Combination of high solids loading pretreatment and ethanol fermentation of whole slurry of pretreated rice straw to obtain high ethanol titers and yields.

    PubMed

    Jung, Young Hoon; Park, Hyun Min; Kim, Dong Hyun; Park, Yong-Cheol; Seo, Jin-Ho; Kim, Kyoung Heon

    2015-12-01

    In cellulosic ethanol production using lignocellulose, an increase in biomass solids loading during the pretreatment process significantly affects the final ethanol titer and the production cost. In this study, pretreatment using rice straw at high solids loading (20% (w/v)) was evaluated, using maleic acid as a catalyst. After pretreatment at optimal conditions of 190°C, 20 min, and 0.2% or 5% (w/v) maleic acid, the highest enzymatic digestibility obtained was over 80%. Simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) of the whole slurry of pretreated rice straw in the presence of activated carbon to separate inhibitory compounds generated a high ethanol yield of 62.8%, based on the initial glucan in unpretreated rice straw. These findings suggest that high solids loading pretreatment using maleic acid and SSF of the whole slurry of pretreated rice straw can be combined to improve the process economics of ethanol production. PMID:26461793

  4. Direct and efficient ethanol production from high-yielding rice using a Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain that express amylases.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Ryosuke; Yamakawa, Syun-Ichi; Tanaka, Tsutomu; Ogino, Chiaki; Fukuda, Hideki; Kondo, Akihiko

    2011-04-01

    Efficient ethanol producing yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae cannot produce ethanol from raw starch directly. Thus the conventional ethanol production required expensive and complex process. In this study, we developed a direct and efficient ethanol production process from high-yielding rice harvested in Japan by using amylase expressing yeast without any pretreatment or addition of enzymes or nutrients. Ethanol productivity from high-yielding brown rice (1.1g/L/h) was about 5-fold higher than that obtained from purified raw corn starch (0.2g/L/h) when nutrients were added. Using an inoculum volume equivalent to 10% of the fermentation volume without any nutrient supplementation resulted in ethanol productivity and yield reaching 1.2g/L/h and 101%, respectively, in a 24-h period. High-yielding rice was demonstrated to be a suitable feedstock for bioethanol production. In addition, our polyploid amylase-expressing yeast was sufficiently robust to produce ethanol efficiently from real biomass. This is first report of direct ethanol production on real biomass using an amylase-expressing yeast strain without any pretreatment or commercial enzyme addition.

  5. Nitrogen fertilization affects corn cellulosic biomass and ethanol yields

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Research results on the effects of N management on corn (Zea mays L.) grain production in high-yielding cropping systems are widely available, but information on its effects on cellulosic ethanol potential from corn stover and cobs is limited. Stover and cob biomass and respective ethanol yields all...

  6. Co-solvent pretreatment reduces costly enzyme requirements for high sugar and ethanol yields from lignocellulosic biomass.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thanh Yen; Cai, Charles M; Kumar, Rajeev; Wyman, Charles E

    2015-05-22

    We introduce a new pretreatment called co-solvent-enhanced lignocellulosic fractionation (CELF) to reduce enzyme costs dramatically for high sugar yields from hemicellulose and cellulose, which is essential for the low-cost conversion of biomass to fuels. CELF employs THF miscible with aqueous dilute acid to obtain up to 95 % theoretical yield of glucose, xylose, and arabinose from corn stover even if coupled with enzymatic hydrolysis at only 2 mgenzyme  gglucan (-1) . The unusually high saccharification with such low enzyme loadings can be attributed to a very high lignin removal, which is supported by compositional analysis, fractal kinetic modeling, and SEM imaging. Subsequently, nearly pure lignin product can be precipitated by the evaporation of volatile THF for recovery and recycling. Simultaneous saccharification and fermentation of CELF-pretreated solids with low enzyme loadings and Saccharomyces cerevisiae produced twice as much ethanol as that from dilute-acid-pretreated solids if both were optimized for corn stover. PMID:25677100

  7. High-yield nanosized (Si)AlPO-41 using ethanol polarity equalization and co-templating synthesis approach.

    PubMed

    Majano, Gerardo; Raltchev, Kolio; Vicente, Aurelie; Mintova, Svetlana

    2015-03-19

    Control of the crystallite dimensions of the microporous aluminophosphate AlPO-41 (AFO-type framework structure), and the Si-containing analogue SAPO-41, was attained down to the nanometer scale under stable hydrothermal conditions. The combined application of a tetraalkylammonium co-template (tetrapentylammonium hydroxide) along with an amine structure directing agent (n-dipropylamine) stabilized through the use of ethanol in the initial suspension enables a crystallization medium, which remains homogeneous throughout the entire synthesis. As a direct consequence of the optimized homogeneity of the suspension, the AFO-type microporous nanocrystals (AlPO-41 and SAPO-41) with a size in the range of 30-500 nm with yields surpassing 50% are obtained. The feasibility to obtain nanosized AlPO-41 and SAPO-41 crystals using ethanol as a polarity equalizing agent, resulting in a scalable hydrothermal synthesis from non-colloidal starting mixtures without the use of other assisting methods, is presented.

  8. High-yield nanosized (Si)AlPO-41 using ethanol polarity equalization and co-templating synthesis approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majano, Gerardo; Raltchev, Kolio; Vicente, Aurelie; Mintova, Svetlana

    2015-03-01

    Control of the crystallite dimensions of the microporous aluminophosphate AlPO-41 (AFO-type framework structure), and the Si-containing analogue SAPO-41, was attained down to the nanometer scale under stable hydrothermal conditions. The combined application of a tetraalkylammonium co-template (tetrapentylammonium hydroxide) along with an amine structure directing agent (n-dipropylamine) stabilized through the use of ethanol in the initial suspension enables a crystallization medium, which remains homogeneous throughout the entire synthesis. As a direct consequence of the optimized homogeneity of the suspension, the AFO-type microporous nanocrystals (AlPO-41 and SAPO-41) with a size in the range of 30-500 nm with yields surpassing 50% are obtained. The feasibility to obtain nanosized AlPO-41 and SAPO-41 crystals using ethanol as a polarity equalizing agent, resulting in a scalable hydrothermal synthesis from non-colloidal starting mixtures without the use of other assisting methods, is presented.Control of the crystallite dimensions of the microporous aluminophosphate AlPO-41 (AFO-type framework structure), and the Si-containing analogue SAPO-41, was attained down to the nanometer scale under stable hydrothermal conditions. The combined application of a tetraalkylammonium co-template (tetrapentylammonium hydroxide) along with an amine structure directing agent (n-dipropylamine) stabilized through the use of ethanol in the initial suspension enables a crystallization medium, which remains homogeneous throughout the entire synthesis. As a direct consequence of the optimized homogeneity of the suspension, the AFO-type microporous nanocrystals (AlPO-41 and SAPO-41) with a size in the range of 30-500 nm with yields surpassing 50% are obtained. The feasibility to obtain nanosized AlPO-41 and SAPO-41 crystals using ethanol as a polarity equalizing agent, resulting in a scalable hydrothermal synthesis from non-colloidal starting mixtures without the use of other assisting

  9. Thermoanaerobacter pentosaceus sp. nov., an anaerobic, extremely thermophilic, high ethanol-yielding bacterium isolated from household waste.

    PubMed

    Tomás, Ana Faria; Karakashev, Dimitar; Angelidaki, Irini

    2013-07-01

    An extremely thermophilic, xylanolytic, spore-forming and strictly anaerobic bacterium, strain DTU01(T), was isolated from a continuously stirred tank reactor fed with xylose and household waste. Cells stained Gram-negative and were rod-shaped (0.5-2 µm in length). Spores were terminal with a diameter of approximately 0.5 µm. Optimal growth occurred at 70 °C and pH 7, with a maximum growth rate of 0.1 h(-1). DNA G+C content was 34.2 mol%. Strain DTU01(T) could ferment arabinose, cellobiose, fructose, galactose, glucose, lactose, mannitol, mannose, melibiose, pectin, starch, sucrose, xylan, yeast extract and xylose, but not cellulose, Avicel, inositol, inulin, glycerol, rhamnose, acetate, lactate, ethanol, butanol or peptone. Ethanol was the major fermentation product and a maximum yield of 1.39 mol ethanol per mol xylose was achieved when sulfite was added to the cultivation medium. Thiosulfate, but not sulfate, nitrate or nitrite, could be used as electron acceptor. On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity, strain DTU01(T) was shown to be closely related to Thermoanaerobacter mathranii A3(T), Thermoanaerobacter italicus Ab9(T) and Thermoanaerobacter thermocopriae JT3-3(T), with 98-99 % similarity. Despite this, the physiological and phylogenetic differences (DNA G+C content, substrate utilization, electron acceptors, phylogenetic distance and isolation site) allow for the proposal of strain DTU01(T) as a representative of a novel species within the genus Thermoanaerobacter, for which the name Thermoanaerobacter pentosaceus sp. nov. is proposed, with the type strain DTU01(T) ( = DSM 25963(T) = KCTC 4529(T) = VKM B-2752(T) = CECT 8142(T)).

  10. Cell recycle batch fermentation of high-solid lignocellulose using a recombinant cellulase-displaying yeast strain for high yield ethanol production in consolidated bioprocessing.

    PubMed

    Matano, Yuki; Hasunuma, Tomohisa; Kondo, Akihiko

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this study is to develop a scheme of cell recycle batch fermentation (CRBF) of high-solid lignocellulosic materials. Two-phase separation consisting of rough removal of lignocellulosic residues by low-speed centrifugation and solid-liquid separation enabled effective collection of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells with decreased lignin and ash. Five consecutive batch fermentation of 200 g/L rice straw hydrothermally pretreated led to an average ethanol titer of 34.5 g/L. Moreover, the display of cellulases on the recombinant yeast cell surface increased ethanol titer to 42.2 g/L. After, five-cycle fermentation, only 3.3 g/L sugar was retained in the fermentation medium, because cellulase displayed on the cell surface hydrolyzed cellulose that was not hydrolyzed by commercial cellulases or free secreted cellulases. Fermentation ability of the recombinant strain was successfully kept during a five-cycle repeated batch fermentation with 86.3% of theoretical yield based on starting biomass.

  11. Protease increases fermentation rate and ethanol yield in dry-grind ethanol production.

    PubMed

    Johnston, David B; McAloon, Andrew J

    2014-02-01

    The effects of acid protease and urea addition during the fermentation step were evaluated. The fermentations were also tested with and without the addition of urea to determine if protease altered the nitrogen requirements of the yeast. Results show that the addition of the protease had a statistically significant effect on the fermentation rate and yield. Fermentation rates and yields were improved with the addition of the protease over the corresponding controls without protease. Protease addition either with or with added urea resulted in a higher final ethanol yield than without the protease addition. Urea addition levels >1200 ppm of supplemental nitrogen inhibited ethanol production. The economic effects of the protease addition were evaluated by using process engineering and economic models developed at the Eastern Regional Research Center. The decrease in overall processing costs from protease addition was as high as $0.01/L (4 ¢/gal) of denatured ethanol produced.

  12. Effect of phytase application during high gravity (HG) maize mashes preparation on the availability of starch and yield of the ethanol fermentation process.

    PubMed

    Mikulski, D; Kłosowski, G; Rolbiecka, A

    2014-10-01

    Phytic acid present in raw materials used in distilling industry can form complexes with starch and divalent cations and thus limit their biological availability. The influence of the enzymatic hydrolysis of phytate complexes on starch availability during the alcoholic fermentation process using high gravity (HG) maize mashes was analyzed. Indicators of the alcoholic fermentation as well as the fermentation activity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae D-2 strain were statistically evaluated. Phytate hydrolysis improved the course of the alcoholic fermentation of HG maize mashes. The final ethanol concentration in the media supplemented with phytase applied either before or after the starch hydrolysis increased by 1.0 and 0.6 % v/v, respectively, as compared to the control experiments. This increase was correlated with an elevated fermentation yield that was higher by 5.5 and 2.0 L EtOH/100 kg of starch, respectively. Phytate hydrolysis resulted also in a statistically significant increase in the initial concentration of fermenting sugars by 14.9 mg/mL of mash, on average, which was a consequence of a better availability of starch for enzymatic hydrolysis. The application of phytase increased the attenuation of HG media fermentation thus improving the economical aspect of the ethanol fermentation process.

  13. Estimating ethanol yield from switchgrass strains using NIRS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Quantifying actual and theoretical ethanol yields from biomass conversion processes requires expensive, complex fermentation tests and extensive laboratory analyses of the biomass sample with costs exceeding $300 per sample. Near infrared reflectance spectroscopy (NIRS) is a non-destructive technolo...

  14. Vacuum stripping of ethanol during high solids fermentation of corn.

    PubMed

    Shihadeh, Jameel K; Huang, Haibo; Rausch, Kent D; Tumbleson, Mike E; Singh, Vijay

    2014-05-01

    In corn-ethanol industry, yeast stress inducing glucose concentrations produced during liquefaction and subsequent high ethanol concentrations produced during fermentation restrict slurry solids to 32 % w/w. These limits were circumvented by combining two novel technologies: (1) granular starch hydrolyzing enzyme (GSHE) to break down starch simultaneously with fermentation and (2) vacuum stripping to remove ethanol. A vacuum stripping system was constructed and applied to fermentations at 30, 40, and 45 % solids. As solids increased from 30 to 40 %, ethanol yield decreased from 0.35 to 0.29 L/kg. Ethanol yield from 45 % solids was only 0.18 L/kg. An improvement was conducted by increasing enzyme dose from 0.25 to 0.75 g/g corn and reducing yeast inoculum by half. After improvement, ethanol yield from 40 % solids vacuum treatment increased to 0.36 L/kg, comparable to ethanol yield from 30 % solids (control).

  15. Adjustment of Trehalose Metabolism in Wine Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strains To Modify Ethanol Yields

    PubMed Central

    Rossouw, D.; Heyns, E. H.; Setati, M. E.; Bosch, S.

    2013-01-01

    The ability of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to efficiently produce high levels of ethanol through glycolysis has been the focus of much scientific and industrial activity. Despite the accumulated knowledge regarding glycolysis, the modification of flux through this pathway to modify ethanol yields has proved difficult. Here, we report on the systematic screening of 66 strains with deletion mutations of genes encoding enzymes involved in central carbohydrate metabolism for altered ethanol yields. Five of these strains showing the most prominent changes in carbon flux were selected for further investigation. The genes were representative of trehalose biosynthesis (TPS1, encoding trehalose-6-phosphate synthase), central glycolysis (TDH3, encoding glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase), the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway (ZWF1, encoding glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase), and the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle (ACO1 and ACO2, encoding aconitase isoforms 1 and 2). Two strains exhibited lower ethanol yields than the wild type (tps1Δ and tdh3Δ), while the remaining three showed higher ethanol yields. To validate these findings in an industrial yeast strain, the TPS1 gene was selected as a good candidate for genetic modification to alter flux to ethanol during alcoholic fermentation in wine. Using low-strength promoters active at different stages of fermentation, the expression of the TPS1 gene was slightly upregulated, resulting in a decrease in ethanol production and an increase in trehalose biosynthesis during fermentation. Thus, the mutant screening approach was successful in terms of identifying target genes for genetic modification in commercial yeast strains with the aim of producing lower-ethanol wines. PMID:23793638

  16. Improving carbon dioxide yields and cell efficiencies for ethanol oxidation by potential scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majidi, Pasha; Pickup, Peter G.

    2014-12-01

    An ethanol electrolysis cell with aqueous ethanol supplied to the anode and nitrogen at the cathode has been operated under potential cycling conditions in order to increase the yield of carbon dioxide and thereby increase cell efficiency relative to operation at a fixed potential. At ambient temperature, faradaic yields of CO2 as high as 26% have been achieved, while only transient CO2 production was observed at constant potential. Yields increased substantially at higher temperatures, with maximum values at Pt anodes reaching 45% at constant potential and 65% under potential cycling conditions. Use of a PtRu anode increased the cell efficiency by decreasing the anode potential, but this was offset by decreased CO2 yields. Nonetheless, cycling increased the efficiency relative to constant potential. The maximum yields at PtRu and 80 °C were 13% at constant potential and 32% under potential cycling. The increased yields under cycling conditions have been attributed to periodic oxidative stripping of adsorbed CO, which occurs at lower potentials on PtRu than on Pt. These results will be important in the optimization of operating conditions for direct ethanol fuel cells and for the electrolysis of ethanol to produce clean hydrogen.

  17. Enabling High Efficiency Ethanol Engines

    SciTech Connect

    Szybist, J.; Confer, K.

    2011-03-01

    Delphi Automotive Systems and ORNL established this CRADA to explore the potential to improve the energy efficiency of spark-ignited engines operating on ethanol-gasoline blends. By taking advantage of the fuel properties of ethanol, such as high compression ratio and high latent heat of vaporization, it is possible to increase efficiency with ethanol blends. Increasing the efficiency with ethanol-containing blends aims to remove a market barrier of reduced fuel economy with E85 fuel blends, which is currently about 30% lower than with petroleum-derived gasoline. The same or higher engine efficiency is achieved with E85, and the reduction in fuel economy is due to the lower energy density of E85. By making ethanol-blends more efficient, the fuel economy gap between gasoline and E85 can be reduced. In the partnership between Delphi and ORNL, each organization brought a unique and complementary set of skills to the project. Delphi has extensive knowledge and experience in powertrain components and subsystems as well as overcoming real-world implementation barriers. ORNL has extensive knowledge and expertise in non-traditional fuels and improving engine system efficiency for the next generation of internal combustion engines. Partnering to combine these knowledge bases was essential towards making progress to reducing the fuel economy gap between gasoline and E85. ORNL and Delphi maintained strong collaboration throughout the project. Meetings were held regularly, usually on a bi-weekly basis, with additional reports, presentations, and meetings as necessary to maintain progress. Delphi provided substantial hardware support to the project by providing components for the single-cylinder engine experiments, engineering support for hardware modifications, guidance for operational strategies on engine research, and hardware support by providing a flexible multi-cylinder engine to be used for optimizing engine efficiency with ethanol-containing fuels.

  18. Reduction of ethanol yield from switchgrass infected with rust caused by Puccinia emaculata

    DOE PAGES

    Sykes, Virginia R.; Allen, Fred L.; Mielenz, Jonathan R.; Stewart, Jr., C. Neal; Windham, Mark T.; Hamilton, Choo Y.; Rodriguez, Miguel; Yee, Kelsey L.

    2015-10-16

    Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) is an important biofuel crop candidate thought to have low disease susceptibility. As switchgrass production becomes more prevalent, monoculture and production fields in close proximity to one another may increase the spread and severity of diseases such as switchgrass rust caused by the pathogen Puccinia emaculata. The objective of this research was to examine the impact of rust on ethanol yield in switchgrass. In 2010 and 2012, naturally infected leaves from field-grown Alamo and Kanlow in Knoxville, TN (2010, 2012) and Crossville, TN (2012) were visually categorized as exhibiting low, medium, or high disease based on themore » degree of chlorosis and sporulation. P. emaculata was isolated from each disease range to confirm infection. Samples from 2010 were acid/heat pretreated and subjected to two runs of simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) with Saccharomyces cerevisiae D5A to measure ethanol yield. Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) was used to estimate ethanol yield for 2012 samples. SSF and NIRS data were analyzed separately using ANOVA. Disease level effects were significant within both models (P < 0.05) and both models explained a large amount of variation in ETOH (SSF: R2 = 0.99, NIRS: R2 = 0.99). In the SSF dataset, ethanol was reduced by 35 % in samples exhibiting medium disease symptoms and by 55 % in samples exhibiting high disease symptoms. In the NIRS dataset, estimated ethanol was reduced by 10 % in samples exhibiting medium disease symptoms and by 21 % in samples exhibiting high disease symptoms. Lastly, results indicate that switchgrass rust will likely have a negative impact on ethanol yield in switchgrass grown as a biofuel crop.« less

  19. Improved ethanol yield and reduced Minimum Ethanol Selling Price (MESP) by modifying low severity dilute acid pretreatment with deacetylation and mechanical refining: 1) Experimental

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Historically, acid pretreatment technology for the production of bio-ethanol from corn stover has required severe conditions to overcome biomass recalcitrance. However, the high usage of acid and steam at severe pretreatment conditions hinders the economic feasibility of the ethanol production from biomass. In addition, the amount of acetate and furfural produced during harsh pretreatment is in the range that strongly inhibits cell growth and impedes ethanol fermentation. The current work addresses these issues through pretreatment with lower acid concentrations and temperatures incorporated with deacetylation and mechanical refining. Results The results showed that deacetylation with 0.1 M NaOH before acid pretreatment improved the monomeric xylose yield in pretreatment by up to 20% while keeping the furfural yield under 2%. Deacetylation also improved the glucose yield by 10% and the xylose yield by 20% during low solids enzymatic hydrolysis. Mechanical refining using a PFI mill further improved sugar yields during both low- and high-solids enzymatic hydrolysis. Mechanical refining also allowed enzyme loadings to be reduced while maintaining high yields. Deacetylation and mechanical refining are shown to assist in achieving 90% cellulose yield in high-solids (20%) enzymatic hydrolysis. When fermentations were performed under pH control to evaluate the effect of deacetylation and mechanical refining on the ethanol yields, glucose and xylose utilizations over 90% and ethanol yields over 90% were achieved. Overall ethanol yields were calculated based on experimental results for the base case and modified cases. One modified case that integrated deacetylation, mechanical refining, and washing was estimated to produce 88 gallons of ethanol per ton of biomass. Conclusion The current work developed a novel bio-ethanol process that features pretreatment with lower acid concentrations and temperatures incorporated with deacetylation and mechanical refining. The

  20. High ethanol producing derivatives of Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus

    DOEpatents

    Ljungdahl, L.G.; Carriera, L.H.

    1983-05-24

    Derivatives of the newly discovered microorganism Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus which under anaerobic and thermophilic conditions continuously ferment substrates such as starch, cellobiose, glucose, xylose and other sugars to produce recoverable amounts of ethanol solving the problem of fermentations yielding low concentrations of ethanol using the parent strain of the microorganism Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus are disclosed. These new derivatives are ethanol tolerant up to 10% (v/v) ethanol during fermentation. The process includes the use of an aqueous fermentation medium, containing the substrate at a substrate concentration greater than 1% (w/v).

  1. High ethanol producing derivatives of Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus

    DOEpatents

    Ljungdahl, Lars G.; Carriera, Laura H.

    1983-01-01

    Derivatives of the newly discovered microorganism Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus which under anaerobic and thermophilic conditions continuously ferment substrates such as starch, cellobiose, glucose, xylose and other sugars to produce recoverable amounts of ethanol solving the problem of fermentations yielding low concentrations of ethanol using the parent strain of the microorganism Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus are disclosed. These new derivatives are ethanol tolerant up to 10% (v/v) ethanol during fermentation. The process includes the use of an aqueous fermentation medium, containing the substrate at a substrate concentration greater than 1% (w/v).

  2. Impact of cultivar selection and process optimization on ethanol yield from different varieties of sugarcane

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The development of ‘energycane’ varieties of sugarcane is underway, targeting the use of both sugar juice and bagasse for ethanol production. The current study evaluated a selection of such ‘energycane’ cultivars for the combined ethanol yields from juice and bagasse, by optimization of dilute acid pretreatment optimization of bagasse for sugar yields. Method A central composite design under response surface methodology was used to investigate the effects of dilute acid pretreatment parameters followed by enzymatic hydrolysis on the combined sugar yield of bagasse samples. The pressed slurry generated from optimum pretreatment conditions (maximum combined sugar yield) was used as the substrate during batch and fed-batch simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) processes at different solid loadings and enzyme dosages, aiming to reach an ethanol concentration of at least 40 g/L. Results Significant variations were observed in sugar yields (xylose, glucose and combined sugar yield) from pretreatment-hydrolysis of bagasse from different cultivars of sugarcane. Up to 33% difference in combined sugar yield between best performing varieties and industrial bagasse was observed at optimal pretreatment-hydrolysis conditions. Significant improvement in overall ethanol yield after SSF of the pretreated bagasse was also observed from the best performing varieties (84.5 to 85.6%) compared to industrial bagasse (74.5%). The ethanol concentration showed inverse correlation with lignin content and the ratio of xylose to arabinose, but it showed positive correlation with glucose yield from pretreatment-hydrolysis. The overall assessment of the cultivars showed greater improvement in the final ethanol concentration (26.9 to 33.9%) and combined ethanol yields per hectare (83 to 94%) for the best performing varieties with respect to industrial sugarcane. Conclusions These results suggest that the selection of sugarcane variety to optimize ethanol

  3. Nitrogen and tillage management affect corn cellulosic yield, composition, and ethanol potential

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Corn (Zea mays L.) stover and cobs remaining after grain harvest can serve as a feedstock for cellulosic ethanol production. Field trials were conducted at two locations in Minnesota over three years to determine how corn cellulosic yield composition and ethanol yield are influenced by tillage syste...

  4. Increase in ethanol yield via elimination of lactate production in an ethanol-tolerant mutant of Clostridium thermocellum

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, Ranjita; Prabhu, Sandeep; Lynd, Lee R; Guss, Adam M

    2014-01-01

    Large-scale production of lignocellulosic biofuel is a potential solution to sustainably meet global energy needs. One-step consolidated bioprocessing (CBP) is a potentially advantageous approach for the production of biofuels, but requires an organism capable of hydrolyzing biomass to sugars and fermenting the sugars to ethanol at commercially viable titers and yields. Clostridium thermocellum, a thermophilic anaerobe, can ferment cellulosic biomass to ethanol and organic acids, but low yield, low titer, and ethanol sensitivity remain barriers to industrial production. Here, we deleted the hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase gene in ethanol tolerant strain of C. thermocellum adhE*(EA) in order to allow use of previously developed gene deletion tools, then deleted lactate dehydrogenase (ldh) to redirect carbon flux towards ethanol. Upon deletion of ldh, the adhE*(EA) ldh strain produced 30% more ethanol than wild type on minimal medium. The adhE*(EA) ldh strain retained tolerance to 5% v/v ethanol, resulting in an ethanol tolerant platform strain of C. thermocellum for future metabolic engineering efforts.

  5. Parameter Optimization for Enhancement of Ethanol Yield by Atmospheric Pressure DBD-Treated Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Xiaoyu; Yuan, Yulian; Tang, Qian; Dou, Shaohua; Di, Lanbo; Zhang, Xiuling

    2014-01-01

    In this study, Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) was exposed to dielectric barrier discharge plasma (DBD) to improve its ethanol production capacity during fermentation. Response surface methodology (RSM) was used to optimize the discharge-associated parameters of DBD for the purpose of maximizing the ethanol yield achieved by DBD-treated S. cerevisiae. According to single factor experiments, a mathematical model was established using Box-Behnken central composite experiment design, with plasma exposure time, power supply voltage, and exposed-sample volume as impact factors and ethanol yield as the response. This was followed by response surface analysis. Optimal experimental parameters for plasma discharge-induced enhancement in ethanol yield were plasma exposure time of 1 min, power voltage of 26 V, and an exposed sample volume of 9 mL. Under these conditions, the resulting yield of ethanol was 0.48 g/g, representing an increase of 33% over control.

  6. PRODUCING HIGH CORN YIELDS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois Univ., Urbana. Coll. of Agriculture.

    RESOURCE MATERIAL ON CORN PRODUCTION FOR HIGH SCHOOL VOCATIONAL AGRICULTURE AND ADULT FARMER CLASSES WAS DESIGNED BY A STATE LEVEL GROUP OF SUBJECT MATTER SPECIALISTS, TEACHER EDUCATORS, SUPERVISORS, AND TEACHERS TO HELP SOLVE PROBLEMS THAT CONFRONT CORN PRODUCERS AT PLANTING TIME. THE SUBJECT MATTER CONCERNS PLANTING TIME, DEPTH, ROW WIDTH,…

  7. Effects of genetic variation and growing condition of prairie cordgrass on feedstock composition and ethanol yield.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun Min; Guo, Jia; Kwak, Suryang; Jin, Yong-Su; Lee, D K; Singh, Vijay

    2015-05-01

    Prairie cordgrass (Spartina pectinata L.) has the potential to be a feedstock for bioethanol. It is native to North America, and has extensive genetic diversity. Eleven natural populations of prairie cordgrass harvested in 2011 and 2012 were studied. Compositions of the samples showed significant differences within the same year, and between the two years. Two highest, one medium and two lowest glucan concentration samples from each year were selected to evaluate ethanol yield after dilute acid pretreatment and simultaneous saccharification and co-fermentation using Saccharomycescerevisiae SR8 that can ferment both glucose and xylose. Up to 88% of theoretical ethanol yields were achieved. Our research demonstrates the potential of prairie cordgrass as a dedicated energy crop with ethanol yields of 205.0-275.6 g/kg biomass and 1748-4368 L/ha, depending on feedstock composition and biomass yield. These ethanol yields are comparable with those of switchgrass, corn stover and bagasse. PMID:25723129

  8. Improving the bioconversion yield of carbohydrates and ethanol from lignocellulosic biomass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewanick, Shannon M.

    Improving the efficiency of lignocellulosic ethanol production is of the utmost importance if cellulosic bioethanol is to be competitive with fossil fuels and first generation bioethanol from starch and sucrose. Improvements in individual processes (pretreatment, saccharification, fermentation) have been ongoing, but few researchers have considered the effect that the incoming raw biomass can have on the process. It is important to understand how biomass can be altered to provide the maximum yield of hydrolysable and fermentable sugars from whatever is available. Since the moisture content is highly variable and easily altered, the effect of drying and rewetting on bioconversion was studied on switchgrass, sugarcane bagasse and hybrid poplar. For switchgrass and sugarcane bagasse, the ethanol yield after simultaneous saccharification and fermentation was improved 18-24% by increasing the moisture content by soaking prior to pretreatment. It was also found that soaking had no effect when the samples were not catalyzed with SO2 confirming that the effect of moisture content is directly related to SO2 uptake and diffusion into the biomass. In hybrid poplar, the results were similar to herbaceous biomass for chips with less than 2% absorbed SO2. However, when the SO2 uptake was increased to 3% even the air dried chips exhibited high digestibility, indicating that increased SO2 uptake can overcome the poor diffusion in dried biomass. Alongside controlling the biomass moisture content, improving knowledge and control of the processes can also increase efficiency and product yields. By monitoring reactions continuously with accurate, robust, on-line sensors, operators can detect when reactions deviate from the norm, and when they are complete. Avoiding process upsets and contamination could be the difference between an economically viable biorefinery and one that struggles to compete. Real time, continuous Raman spectroscopy was used to continuously monitor both a

  9. Estimation methods and parameter assessment for ethanol yields from total soluble solids of sweet sorghum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Estimation methods and evaluation of ethanol yield from sweet sorghum (Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench.) based on agronomic production traits and juice characteristics is important for developing parents and inbred lines of sweet sorghum that can be used by the bio-ethanol industry. The objectives of th...

  10. Temporal and spatial variation in switchgrass biomass composition and theoretical ethanol yield

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Information on temporal and spatial variation in switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) biomass composition as it affects ethanol yield (L Mg-1) at a biorefinery and ethanol production (L ha-1) at the field scale has previously not been available. Switchgrass biomass samples were collected from a region...

  11. Quantifying actual and theoretical ethanol yields for switchgrass strains using NIRS analyses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Quantifying actual and theoretical ethanol yields from biomass conversion processes such as simultanteous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) requires expensive, complex fermentation assays and extensive compositional analyses of the biomass sample. Near infrared reflectance spectroscopy (NIRS...

  12. Elimination of metabolic pathways to all traditional fermentation products increases ethanol yields in Clostridium thermocellum

    DOE PAGES

    Papanek, Beth A.; Biswas, Ranjita; Rydzak, Thomas; Guss, Adam M.

    2015-09-12

    Clostridium thermocellum has the natural ability to convert cellulose to ethanol, making it a promising candidate for consolidated bioprocessing (CBP) of cellulosic biomass to biofuels. To further improve its CBP capabilities, we study a mutant strain of C. thermocellum that was constructed (strain AG553; C. thermocellum Δhpt ΔhydG Δldh Δpfl Δpta-ack) to increase flux to ethanol by removing side product formation. Strain AG553 showed a two- to threefold increase in ethanol yield relative to the wild type on all substrates tested. On defined medium, strain AG553 exceeded 70% of theoretical ethanol yield on lower loadings of the model crystalline cellulosemore » Avicel, effectively eliminating formate, acetate, and lactate production and reducing H2 production by fivefold. On 5 g/L Avicel, strain AG553 reached an ethanol yield of 63.5% of the theoretical maximum compared with 19.9% by the wild type, and it showed similar yields on pretreated switchgrass and poplar. The elimination of organic acid production suggested that the strain might be capable of growth under higher substrate loadings in the absence of pH control. Final ethanol titer peaked at 73.4 mM in mutant AG553 on 20 g/L Avicel, at which point the pH decreased to a level that does not allow growth of C. thermocellum, likely due to CO2 accumulation. In comparison, the maximum titer of wild type C. thermocellum was 14.1 mM ethanol on 10 g/L Avicel. In conclusion, with the elimination of the metabolic pathways to all traditional fermentation products other than ethanol, AG553 is the best ethanol-yielding CBP strain to date and will serve as a platform strain for further metabolic engineering for the bioconversion of lignocellulosic biomass.« less

  13. Elimination of metabolic pathways to all traditional fermentation products increases ethanol yields in Clostridium thermocellum.

    PubMed

    Papanek, Beth; Biswas, Ranjita; Rydzak, Thomas; Guss, Adam M

    2015-11-01

    Clostridium thermocellum has the natural ability to convert cellulose to ethanol, making it a promising candidate for consolidated bioprocessing (CBP) of cellulosic biomass to biofuels. To further improve its CBP capabilities, a mutant strain of C. thermocellum was constructed (strain AG553; C. thermocellum Δhpt ΔhydG Δldh Δpfl Δpta-ack) to increase flux to ethanol by removing side product formation. Strain AG553 showed a two- to threefold increase in ethanol yield relative to the wild type on all substrates tested. On defined medium, strain AG553 exceeded 70% of theoretical ethanol yield on lower loadings of the model crystalline cellulose Avicel, effectively eliminating formate, acetate, and lactate production and reducing H2 production by fivefold. On 5 g/L Avicel, strain AG553 reached an ethanol yield of 63.5% of the theoretical maximum compared with 19.9% by the wild type, and it showed similar yields on pretreated switchgrass and poplar. The elimination of organic acid production suggested that the strain might be capable of growth under higher substrate loadings in the absence of pH control. Final ethanol titer peaked at 73.4mM in mutant AG553 on 20 g/L Avicel, at which point the pH decreased to a level that does not allow growth of C. thermocellum, likely due to CO2 accumulation. In comparison, the maximum titer of wild type C. thermocellum was 14.1mM ethanol on 10 g/L Avicel. With the elimination of the metabolic pathways to all traditional fermentation products other than ethanol, AG553 is the best ethanol-yielding CBP strain to date and will serve as a platform strain for further metabolic engineering for the bioconversion of lignocellulosic biomass.

  14. Reduction of ethanol yield from switchgrass infected with rust caused by Puccinia emaculata

    SciTech Connect

    Sykes, Virginia R.; Allen, Fred L.; Mielenz, Jonathan R.; Stewart, Jr., C. Neal; Windham, Mark T.; Hamilton, Choo Y.; Rodriguez, Miguel; Yee, Kelsey L.

    2015-10-16

    Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) is an important biofuel crop candidate thought to have low disease susceptibility. As switchgrass production becomes more prevalent, monoculture and production fields in close proximity to one another may increase the spread and severity of diseases such as switchgrass rust caused by the pathogen Puccinia emaculata. The objective of this research was to examine the impact of rust on ethanol yield in switchgrass. In 2010 and 2012, naturally infected leaves from field-grown Alamo and Kanlow in Knoxville, TN (2010, 2012) and Crossville, TN (2012) were visually categorized as exhibiting low, medium, or high disease based on the degree of chlorosis and sporulation. P. emaculata was isolated from each disease range to confirm infection. Samples from 2010 were acid/heat pretreated and subjected to two runs of simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) with Saccharomyces cerevisiae D5A to measure ethanol yield. Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) was used to estimate ethanol yield for 2012 samples. SSF and NIRS data were analyzed separately using ANOVA. Disease level effects were significant within both models (P < 0.05) and both models explained a large amount of variation in ETOH (SSF: R2 = 0.99, NIRS: R2 = 0.99). In the SSF dataset, ethanol was reduced by 35 % in samples exhibiting medium disease symptoms and by 55 % in samples exhibiting high disease symptoms. In the NIRS dataset, estimated ethanol was reduced by 10 % in samples exhibiting medium disease symptoms and by 21 % in samples exhibiting high disease symptoms. Lastly, results indicate that switchgrass rust will likely have a negative impact on ethanol yield in switchgrass grown as a biofuel crop.

  15. Effect of various factors on ethanol yields from lignocellulosic biomass by Thermoanaerobacterium AK₁₇.

    PubMed

    Almarsdottir, Arnheidur Ran; Sigurbjornsdottir, Margret Audur; Orlygsson, Johann

    2012-03-01

    The ethanol production capacity from sugars and lignocellulosic biomass hydrolysates (HL) by Thermoanaerobacterium strain AK(17) was studied in batch cultures. The strain converts various carbohydrates to, acetate, ethanol, hydrogen, and carbon dioxide. Ethanol yields on glucose and xylose were 1.5 and 1.1 mol/mol sugars, respectively. Increased initial glucose concentration inhibited glucose degradation and end product formation leveled off at 30 mM concentrations. Ethanol production from 5 g L(-1) of complex biomass HL (grass, hemp, wheat straw, newspaper, and cellulose) (Whatman paper) pretreated with acid (0.50% H(2) SO(4)), base (0.50% NaOH), and without acid/base (control) and the enzymes Celluclast and Novozyme 188 (0.1 mL g(-1) dw; 70 and 25 U g(-1) of Celluclast and Novozyme 188, respectively) was investigated. Highest ethanol yields (43.0 mM) were obtained on cellulose but lowest on hemp leafs (3.6 mM). Chemical pretreatment increased ethanol yields substantially from lignocellulosic biomass but not from cellulose. The influence of various factors (HL, enzyme, and acid/alkaline concentrations) on end-product formation from 5 g L(-1) of grass and cellulose was further studied to optimize ethanol production. Highest ethanol yields (5.5 and 8.6 mM ethanol g(-1) grass and cellulose, respectively) were obtained at very low HL concentrations (2.5 g L(-1)); with 0.25% acid/alkali (v/v) and 0.1 mL g(-1) enzyme concentrations. Inhibitory effects of furfural and hydroxymethylfurfural during glucose fermentation, revealed a total inhibition in end product formation from glucose at 4 and 6 g L(-1), respectively. PMID:22012653

  16. High Speed/ Low Effluent Process for Ethanol

    SciTech Connect

    M. Clark Dale

    2006-10-30

    n this project, BPI demonstrated a new ethanol fermentation technology, termed the High Speed/ Low Effluent (HS/LE) process on both lab and large pilot scale as it would apply to wet mill and/or dry mill corn ethanol production. The HS/LE process allows very rapid fermentations, with 18 to 22% sugar syrups converted to 9 to 11% ethanol ‘beers’ in 6 to 12 hours using either a ‘consecutive batch’ or ‘continuous cascade’ implementation. This represents a 5 to 8X increase in fermentation speeds over conventional 72 hour batch fermentations which are the norm in the fuel ethanol industry today. The ‘consecutive batch’ technology was demonstrated on a large pilot scale (4,800 L) in a dry mill corn ethanol plant near Cedar Rapids, IA (Xethanol Biofuels). The pilot demonstrated that 12 hour fermentations can be accomplished on an industrial scale in a non-sterile industrial environment. Other objectives met in this project included development of a Low Energy (LE) Distillation process which reduces the energy requirements for distillation from about 14,000 BTU/gal steam ($0.126/gal with natural gas @ $9.00 MCF) to as low as 0.40 KW/gal electrical requirements ($0.022/gal with electricity @ $0.055/KWH). BPI also worked on the development of processes that would allow application of the HS/LE fermentation process to dry mill ethanol plants. A High-Value Corn ethanol plant concept was developed to produce 1) corn germ/oil, 2) corn bran, 3) ethanol, 4) zein protein, and 5) nutritional protein, giving multiple higher value products from the incoming corn stream.

  17. Evaluation of nanoparticle-immobilized cellulase for improved ethanol yield in simultaneous saccharification and fermentation reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Lupoi, Jason; Smith, Emily

    2011-12-01

    Ethanol yields were 2.1 (P = 0.06) to 2.3 (P = 0.01) times higher in simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) reactions of microcrystalline cellulose when cellulase was physisorbed on silica nanoparticles compared to enzyme in solution. In SSF reactions, cellulose is hydrolyzed to glucose by cellulase while yeast simultaneously ferments glucose to ethanol. The 35 C temperature and the presence of ethanol in SSF reactions are not optimal conditions for cellulase. Immobilization onto solid supports can stabilize the enzyme and promote activity at non-optimum reaction conditions. Mock SSF reactions that did not contain yeast were used to measure saccharification products and identify the mechanism for the improved ethanol yield using immobilized cellulase. Cellulase adsorbed to 40 nm silica nanoparticles produced 1.6 times (P = 0.01) more glucose than cellulase in solution in 96 h at pH 4.8 and 35 C. There was no significant accumulation (<250 {mu}g) of soluble cellooligomers in either the solution or immobilized enzyme reactions. This suggests that the mechanism for the immobilized enzyme's improved glucose yield compared to solution enzyme is the increased conversion of insoluble cellulose hydrolysis products to soluble cellooligomers at 35 C and in the presence of ethanol. The results show that silica-immobilized cellulase can be used to produce increased ethanol yields in the conversion of lignocellulosic materials by SSF.

  18. Linking genome content to biofuel production yields: a meta-analysis of major catabolic pathways among select H2 and ethanol-producing bacteria

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Fermentative bacteria offer the potential to convert lignocellulosic waste-streams into biofuels such as hydrogen (H2) and ethanol. Current fermentative H2 and ethanol yields, however, are below theoretical maxima, vary greatly among organisms, and depend on the extent of metabolic pathways utilized. For fermentative H2 and/or ethanol production to become practical, biofuel yields must be increased. We performed a comparative meta-analysis of (i) reported end-product yields, and (ii) genes encoding pyruvate metabolism and end-product synthesis pathways to identify suitable biomarkers for screening a microorganism’s potential of H2 and/or ethanol production, and to identify targets for metabolic engineering to improve biofuel yields. Our interest in H2 and/or ethanol optimization restricted our meta-analysis to organisms with sequenced genomes and limited branched end-product pathways. These included members of the Firmicutes, Euryarchaeota, and Thermotogae. Results Bioinformatic analysis revealed that the absence of genes encoding acetaldehyde dehydrogenase and bifunctional acetaldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase (AdhE) in Caldicellulosiruptor, Thermococcus, Pyrococcus, and Thermotoga species coincide with high H2 yields and low ethanol production. Organisms containing genes (or activities) for both ethanol and H2 synthesis pathways (i.e. Caldanaerobacter subterraneus subsp. tengcongensis, Ethanoligenens harbinense, and Clostridium species) had relatively uniform mixed product patterns. The absence of hydrogenases in Geobacillus and Bacillus species did not confer high ethanol production, but rather high lactate production. Only Thermoanaerobacter pseudethanolicus produced relatively high ethanol and low H2 yields. This may be attributed to the presence of genes encoding proteins that promote NADH production. Lactate dehydrogenase and pyruvate:formate lyase are not conducive for ethanol and/or H2 production. While the type(s) of encoded hydrogenases appear

  19. Very high gravity ethanol and fatty acid production of Zymomonas mobilis without amino acid and vitamin.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haoyong; Cao, Shangzhi; Wang, William Tianshuo; Wang, Kaven Tianyv; Jia, Xianhui

    2016-06-01

    Very high gravity (VHG) fermentation is the mainstream technology in ethanol industry, which requires the strains be resistant to multiple stresses such as high glucose concentration, high ethanol concentration, high temperature and harsh acidic conditions. To our knowledge, it was not reported previously that any ethanol-producing microbe showed a high performance in VHG fermentations without amino acid and vitamin. Here we demonstrate the engineering of a xylose utilizing recombinant Zymomonas mobilis for VHG ethanol fermentations. The recombinant strain can produce ethanol up to 136 g/L without amino acid and vitamin with a theoretical yield of 90 %, which is significantly superior to that produced by all the reported ethanol-producing strains. The intracellular fatty acids of the bacterial were about 16 % of the bacterial dry biomass, with the ratio of ethanol:fatty acids was about 273:1 (g/g). The recombinant strain was achieved by a multivariate-modular strategy tackles with the multiple stresses which are closely linked to the ethanol productivity of Z. mobilis. The over-expression of metB/yfdZ operon enabled the growth of the recombinant Z. mobilis in a chemically defined medium without amino acid and vitamin; and the fatty acids overproduction significantly increased ethanol tolerance and ethanol production. The coupled production of ethanol with fatty acids of the Z. mobilis without amino acid and vitamin under VHG fermentation conditions may permit a significant reduction of the production cost of ethanol and microbial fatty acids.

  20. Improved ethanol yield and reduced minimum ethanol selling price (MESP) by modifying low severity dilute acid pretreatment with deacetylation and mechanical refining: 2) Techno-economic analysis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Our companion paper discussed the yield benefits achieved by integrating deacetylation, mechanical refining, and washing with low acid and low temperature pretreatment. To evaluate the impact of the modified process on the economic feasibility, a techno-economic analysis (TEA) was performed based on the experimental data presented in the companion paper. Results The cost benefits of dilute acid pretreatment technology combined with the process alternatives of deacetylation, mechanical refining, and pretreated solids washing were evaluated using cost benefit analysis within a conceptual modeling framework. Control cases were pretreated at much lower acid loadings and temperatures than used those in the NREL 2011 design case, resulting in much lower annual ethanol production. Therefore, the minimum ethanol selling prices (MESP) of the control cases were $0.41-$0.77 higher than the $2.15/gallon MESP of the design case. This increment is highly dependent on the carbohydrate content in the corn stover. However, if pretreatment was employed with either deacetylation or mechanical refining, the MESPs were reduced by $0.23-$0.30/gallon. Combing both steps could lower the MESP further by $0.44 ~ $0.54. Washing of the pretreated solids could also greatly improve the final ethanol yields. However, the large capital cost of the solid–liquid separation unit negatively influences the process economics. Finally, sensitivity analysis was performed to study the effect of the cost of the pretreatment reactor and the energy input for mechanical refining. A 50% cost reduction in the pretreatment reactor cost reduced the MESP of the entire conversion process by $0.11-$0.14/gallon, while a 10-fold increase in energy input for mechanical refining will increase the MESP by $0.07/gallon. Conclusion Deacetylation and mechanical refining process options combined with low acid, low severity pretreatments show improvements in ethanol yields and calculated MESP for cellulosic

  1. Improving conversion yield of fermentable sugars into fuel ethanol in 1st generation yeast-based production processes.

    PubMed

    Gombert, Andreas K; van Maris, Antonius J A

    2015-06-01

    Current fuel ethanol production using yeasts and starch or sucrose-based feedstocks is referred to as 1st generation (1G) ethanol production. These processes are characterized by the high contribution of sugar prices to the final production costs, by high production volumes, and by low profit margins. In this context, small improvements in the ethanol yield on sugars have a large impact on process economy. Three types of strategies used to achieve this goal are discussed: engineering free-energy conservation, engineering redox-metabolism, and decreasing sugar losses in the process. Whereas the two former strategies lead to decreased biomass and/or glycerol formation, the latter requires increased process and/or yeast robustness.

  2. Sinusoidal potential cycling operation of a direct ethanol fuel cell to improving carbon dioxide yields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majidi, Pasha; Pickup, Peter G.

    2014-12-01

    A direct ethanol fuel cell has been operated under sinusoidal (AC) potential cycling conditions in order to increase the yield of carbon dioxide and thereby increase cell efficiency relative to operation at a fixed potential. At 80 °C, faradaic yields of CO2 as high as 25% have been achieved with a PtRu anode catalyst, while the maximum CO2 production at constant potential was 13%. The increased yields under cycling conditions have been attributed to periodic oxidative stripping of adsorbed CO. These results will be important in the optimization of operating conditions for direct ethanol fuel cells, where the benefits of potential cycling are projected to increase as catalysts that produce CO2 more efficiently are implemented.

  3. Combined inactivation of the Clostridium cellulolyticum lactate and malate dehydrogenase genes substantially increases ethanol yield from cellulose and switchgrass fermentations

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yongchao; Tschaplinski, Timothy J; Engle, Nancy L; Hamilton, Choo Yieng; Rodriguez, Jr., Miguel; Liao, James C; Schadt, Christopher Warren; Guss, Adam M; Yang, Yunfeng; Graham, David E

    2012-01-01

    Background: The model bacterium Clostridium cellulolyticum efficiently hydrolyzes crystalline cellulose and hemicellulose, using cellulosomes to degrade lignocellulosic biomass. Although it imports and ferments both pentose and hexose sugars to produce a mixture of ethanol, acetate, lactate, H2 and CO2, the proportion of ethanol is low, which impedes its use in consolidated bioprocessing for biofuels. Therefore genetic engineering will likely be required to improve the ethanol yield. Random mutagenesis, plasmid transformation, and heterologous expression systems have previously been developed for C. cellulolyticum, but targeted mutagenesis has not been reported for this organism. Results: The first targeted gene inactivation system was developed for C. cellulolyticum, based on a mobile group II intron originating from the Lactococcus lactis L1.LtrB intron. This markerless mutagenesis system was used to disrupt both the paralogous L-lactate dehydrogenase (Ccel_2485; ldh) and L-malate dehydrogenase (Ccel_0137; mdh) genes, distinguishing the overlapping substrate specificities of these enzymes. Both mutations were then combined in a single strain. This double mutant produced 8.5-times more ethanol than wild-type cells growing on crystalline cellulose. Ethanol constituted 93% of the major fermentation products (by molarity), corresponding to a molar ratio of ethanol to organic acids of 15, versus 0.18 in wild-type cells. During growth on acid-pretreated switchgrass, the double mutant also produced four-times as much ethanol as wild-type cells. Detailed metabolomic analyses identified increased flux through the oxidative branch of the mutant s TCA pathway. Conclusions: The efficient intron-based gene inactivation system produced the first gene-targeted mutations in C. cellulolyticum. As a key component of the genetic toolbox for this bacterium, markerless targeted mutagenesis enables functional genomic research in C. cellulolyticum and rapid genetic engineering to

  4. Effects of Kernel Composition and Starch Structure on Ethanol Yield Produced from Dry-Grind Corn

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objectives of this study were to understand how the composition of kernels (i.e., starch, protein, and lipid contents) and the starch structure of dry-grind corn affected the enzyme hydrolysis of starch and the ethanol yield during yeast fermentation. Four lines of corn, designated, 05GEM06031, 06G...

  5. Effects of ground corn particle size on ethanol yield and thin stillage soluble solids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of ground corn particle size on ethanol yield and soluble solids in thin stillage were evaluated using a 2-L laboratory dry-grind procedure. The procedure was optimized for grinding, liquefaction, saccharification, and fermentation parameters. The optimized procedure was reproducible wi...

  6. High Yielding Microbubble Production Method

    PubMed Central

    Fiabane, Joe; Prentice, Paul; Pancholi, Ketan

    2016-01-01

    Microfluidic approaches to microbubble production are generally disadvantaged by low yield and high susceptibility to (micro)channel blockages. This paper presents an alternative method of producing microbubbles of 2.6 μm mean diameter at concentrations in excess of 30 × 106 mL−1. In this method, the nitrogen gas flowing inside the liquid jet is disintegrated into spray of microbubble when air surrounding this coflowing nitrogen gas-liquid jet passes through a 100 μm orifice at high velocity. Resulting microbubble foam has the polydispersity index of 16%. Moreover, a ratio of mean microbubble diameter to channel width ratio was found to be less than 0.025, which substantially alleviates the occurrence of blockages during production. PMID:27034935

  7. Intermittent High-Dose Ethanol Exposure Increases Ethanol Preference in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Peris, Joanna; Rhodes, Nathaniel; McCullough, Brian; Aramini, Richard; Zharikova, Alevtina

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Alcohol use disorders have both high social and economic costs and are among the leading causes of preventable death in the United States. Understanding the factors that contribute to escalation of alcohol intake is important in developing effective treatments for this problem. This study further characterizes the effects of limited intermittent exposure to high levels of alcohol on the preference for alcohol consumption over other incentives. Method: Fourteen male, Sprague-Dawley rats were trained to consume ethanol in a gelatin vehicle. They were then given free access to both ethanol gelatin and plain gelatin during daily choice periods interspersed with nonchoice periods (only plain gelatin access). After baseline ethanol preference was established, half of the rats were given eight injections of 3 g/kg ethanol during nonchoice periods (spread out over about 2 months), and the other half received saline injections. Ethanol preference was measured during subsequent choice periods. Results: Intermittent ethanol injections increased ethanol preference from 21% (SEM = 2.3%) of their total gelatin consumption during the first choice period to 46.8% (SEM = 3.4%) during the third choice period. The saline-treated rats had no significant change in ethanol preference. In addition, the ethanol-treated rats exhibited higher ethanol intake than saline-treated rats when ethanol gelatin was the only choice available. Conclusions: The results indicate that intermittent exposure to sedative doses of ethanol leads to an increased ethanol preference in rats. This suggests that occasional high-dose alcohol exposure could be an important contributor to the development of enhanced ethanol intake, which may affect the incidence of chronic alcoholism. PMID:25486406

  8. Increased expression of the yeast multidrug resistance ABC transporter Pdr18 leads to increased ethanol tolerance and ethanol production in high gravity alcoholic fermentation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The understanding of the molecular basis of yeast tolerance to ethanol may guide the design of rational strategies to increase process performance in industrial alcoholic fermentations. A set of 21 genes encoding multidrug transporters from the ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC) Superfamily and Major Facilitator Superfamily (MFS) in S. cerevisiae were scrutinized for a role in ethanol stress resistance. Results A yeast multidrug resistance ABC transporter encoded by the PDR18 gene, proposed to play a role in the incorporation of ergosterol in the yeast plasma membrane, was found to confer resistance to growth inhibitory concentrations of ethanol. PDR18 expression was seen to contribute to decreased 3 H-ethanol intracellular concentrations and decreased plasma membrane permeabilization of yeast cells challenged with inhibitory ethanol concentrations. Given the increased tolerance to ethanol of cells expressing PDR18, the final concentration of ethanol produced during high gravity alcoholic fermentation by yeast cells devoid of PDR18 was lower than the final ethanol concentration produced by the corresponding parental strain. Moreover, an engineered yeast strain in which the PDR18 promoter was replaced in the genome by the stronger PDR5 promoter, leading to increased PDR18 mRNA levels during alcoholic fermentation, was able to attain a 6 % higher ethanol concentration and a 17 % higher ethanol production yield than the parental strain. The improved fermentative performance of yeast cells over-expressing PDR18 was found to correlate with their increased ethanol tolerance and ability to restrain plasma membrane permeabilization induced throughout high gravity fermentation. Conclusions PDR18 gene over-expression increases yeast ethanol tolerance and fermentation performance leading to the production of highly inhibitory concentrations of ethanol. PDR18 overexpression in industrial yeast strains appears to be a promising approach to improve alcoholic

  9. Increasing Anaerobic Acetate Consumption and Ethanol Yields in Saccharomyces cerevisiae with NADPH-Specific Alcohol Dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Henningsen, Brooks M.; Hon, Shuen; Covalla, Sean F.; Sonu, Carolina; Argyros, D. Aaron; Barrett, Trisha F.; Wiswall, Erin; Froehlich, Allan C.

    2015-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae has recently been engineered to use acetate, a primary inhibitor in lignocellulosic hydrolysates, as a cosubstrate during anaerobic ethanolic fermentation. However, the original metabolic pathway devised to convert acetate to ethanol uses NADH-specific acetylating acetaldehyde dehydrogenase and alcohol dehydrogenase and quickly becomes constrained by limited NADH availability, even when glycerol formation is abolished. We present alcohol dehydrogenase as a novel target for anaerobic redox engineering of S. cerevisiae. Introduction of an NADPH-specific alcohol dehydrogenase (NADPH-ADH) not only reduces the NADH demand of the acetate-to-ethanol pathway but also allows the cell to effectively exchange NADPH for NADH during sugar fermentation. Unlike NADH, NADPH can be freely generated under anoxic conditions, via the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway. We show that an industrial bioethanol strain engineered with the original pathway (expressing acetylating acetaldehyde dehydrogenase from Bifidobacterium adolescentis and with deletions of glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase genes GPD1 and GPD2) consumed 1.9 g liter−1 acetate during fermentation of 114 g liter−1 glucose. Combined with a decrease in glycerol production from 4.0 to 0.1 g liter−1, this increased the ethanol yield by 4% over that for the wild type. We provide evidence that acetate consumption in this strain is indeed limited by NADH availability. By introducing an NADPH-ADH from Entamoeba histolytica and with overexpression of ACS2 and ZWF1, we increased acetate consumption to 5.3 g liter−1 and raised the ethanol yield to 7% above the wild-type level. PMID:26386051

  10. Increasing anaerobic acetate consumption and ethanol yields in Saccharomyces cerevisiae with NADPH-specific alcohol dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Henningsen, Brooks M; Hon, Shuen; Covalla, Sean F; Sonu, Carolina; Argyros, D Aaron; Barrett, Trisha F; Wiswall, Erin; Froehlich, Allan C; Zelle, Rintze M

    2015-12-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae has recently been engineered to use acetate, a primary inhibitor in lignocellulosic hydrolysates, as a cosubstrate during anaerobic ethanolic fermentation. However, the original metabolic pathway devised to convert acetate to ethanol uses NADH-specific acetylating acetaldehyde dehydrogenase and alcohol dehydrogenase and quickly becomes constrained by limited NADH availability, even when glycerol formation is abolished. We present alcohol dehydrogenase as a novel target for anaerobic redox engineering of S. cerevisiae. Introduction of an NADPH-specific alcohol dehydrogenase (NADPH-ADH) not only reduces the NADH demand of the acetate-to-ethanol pathway but also allows the cell to effectively exchange NADPH for NADH during sugar fermentation. Unlike NADH, NADPH can be freely generated under anoxic conditions, via the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway. We show that an industrial bioethanol strain engineered with the original pathway (expressing acetylating acetaldehyde dehydrogenase from Bifidobacterium adolescentis and with deletions of glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase genes GPD1 and GPD2) consumed 1.9 g liter(-1) acetate during fermentation of 114 g liter(-1) glucose. Combined with a decrease in glycerol production from 4.0 to 0.1 g liter(-1), this increased the ethanol yield by 4% over that for the wild type. We provide evidence that acetate consumption in this strain is indeed limited by NADH availability. By introducing an NADPH-ADH from Entamoeba histolytica and with overexpression of ACS2 and ZWF1, we increased acetate consumption to 5.3 g liter(-1) and raised the ethanol yield to 7% above the wild-type level.

  11. Utilization of household food waste for the production of ethanol at high dry material content

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Environmental issues and shortage of fossil fuels have turned the public interest to the utilization of renewable, environmentally friendly fuels, such as ethanol. In order to minimize the competition between fuels and food production, researchers are focusing their efforts to the utilization of wastes and by-products as raw materials for the production of ethanol. household food wastes are being produced in great quantities in European Union and their handling can be a challenge. Moreover, their disposal can cause severe environmental issues (for example emission of greenhouse gasses). On the other hand, they contain significant amounts of sugars (both soluble and insoluble) and they can be used as raw material for the production of ethanol. Results Household food wastes were utilized as raw material for the production of ethanol at high dry material consistencies. A distinct liquefaction/saccharification step has been included to the process, which rapidly reduced the viscosity of the high solid content substrate, resulting in better mixing of the fermenting microorganism. This step had a positive effect in both ethanol production and productivity, leading to a significant increase in both values, which was up to 40.81% and 4.46 fold, respectively. Remaining solids (residue) after fermentation at 45% w/v dry material (which contained also the unhydrolyzed fraction of cellulose), were subjected to a hydrothermal pretreatment in order to be utilized as raw material for a subsequent ethanol fermentation. This led to an increase of 13.16% in the ethanol production levels achieving a final ethanol yield of 107.58 g/kg dry material. Conclusions In conclusion, the ability of utilizing household food waste for the production of ethanol at elevated dry material content has been demonstrated. A separate liquefaction/saccharification process can increase both ethanol production and productivity. Finally, subsequent fermentation of the remaining solids could

  12. Methane hydrate synthesis from ice: Influence of pressurization and ethanol on optimizing formation rates and hydrate yield

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chen, Po-Chun.; Huang, Wuu-Liang; Stern, Laura A.

    2010-01-01

    Polycrystalline methane gas hydrate (MGH) was synthesized using an ice-seeding method to investigate the influence of pressurization and ethanol on the hydrate formation rate and gas yield of the resulting samples. When the reactor is pressurized with CH4 gas without external heating, methane hydrate can be formed from ice grains with yields up to 25% under otherwise static conditions. The rapid temperature rise caused by pressurization partially melts the granular ice, which reacts with methane to form hydrate rinds around the ice grains. The heat generated by the exothermic reaction of methane hydrate formation buffers the sample temperature near the melting point of ice for enough time to allow for continuous hydrate growth at high rates. Surprisingly, faster rates and higher yields of methane hydrate were found in runs with lower initial temperatures, slower rates of pressurization, higher porosity of the granular ice samples, or mixtures with sediments. The addition of ethanol also dramatically enhanced the formation of polycrystalline MGH. This study demonstrates that polycrystalline MGH with varied physical properties suitable for different laboratory tests can be manufactured by controlling synthesis procedures or parameters. Subsequent dissociation experiments using a gas collection apparatus and flowmeter confirmed high methane saturation (CH 4·2O, with n = 5.82 ± 0.03) in the MGH. Dissociation rates of the various samples synthesized at diverse conditions may be fitted to different rate laws, including zero and first order.

  13. Highly Efficient Process for Production of Biofuel from Ethanol Catalyzed by Ruthenium Pincer Complexes.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yinjun; Ben-David, Yehoshoa; Shimon, Linda J W; Milstein, David

    2016-07-27

    A highly efficient ruthenium pincer-catalyzed Guerbet-type process for the production of biofuel from ethanol has been developed. It produces the highest conversion of ethanol (73.4%, 0.02 mol% catalyst) for a Guerbet-type reaction, including significant amounts of C4 (35.8% yield), C6 (28.2% yield), and C8 (9.4% yield) alcohols. Catalyst loadings as low as 0.001 mol% can be used, leading to a record turnover number of 18 209. Mechanistic studies reveal the likely active ruthenium species and the main deactivation process. PMID:27399841

  14. The preparation and ethanol fermentation of high-concentration sugars from steam-explosion corn stover.

    PubMed

    Xie, Hui; Wang, Fengqin; Yin, Shuangyao; Ren, Tianbao; Song, Andong

    2015-05-01

    In the field of biofuel ethanol, high-concentration- reducing sugars made from cellulosic materials lay the foundation for high-concentration ethanol fermentation. In this study, corn stover was pre-treated in a process combining chemical methods and steam explosion; the cellulosic hydrolyzed sugars obtained by fed-batch saccharification were then used as the carbon source for high-concentration ethanol fermentation. Saccharomyces cerevisiae 1308, Angel yeast, and Issatchenkia orientalis were shake-cultured with Pachysolen tannophilus P-01 for fermentation. Results implied that the ethanol yields from the three types of mixed strains were 4.85 g/100 mL, 4.57 g/100 mL, and 5.02 g/100 mL (separately) at yield rates of 91.6, 89.3, and 92.2%, respectively. Therefore, it was inferred that shock-fermentation using mixed strains achieved a higher ethanol yield at a greater rate in a shorter fermentation period. This study provided a theoretical basis and technical guidance for the fermentation of industrial high-concentrated cellulosic ethanol.

  15. Ethanol production from food waste at high solids content with vacuum recovery technology.

    PubMed

    Huang, Haibo; Qureshi, Nasib; Chen, Ming-Hsu; Liu, Wei; Singh, Vijay

    2015-03-18

    Ethanol production from food wastes does not only solve environmental issues but also provides renewable biofuels. This study investigated the feasibility of producing ethanol from food wastes at high solids content (35%, w/w). A vacuum recovery system was developed and applied to remove ethanol from fermentation broth to reduce yeast ethanol inhibition. A high concentration of ethanol (144 g/L) was produced by the conventional fermentation of food waste without a vacuum recovery system. When the vacuum recovery is applied to the fermentation process, the ethanol concentration in the fermentation broth was controlled below 100 g/L, thus reducing yeast ethanol inhibition. At the end of the conventional fermentation, the residual glucose in the fermentation broth was 5.7 g/L, indicating incomplete utilization of glucose, while the vacuum fermentation allowed for complete utilization of glucose. The ethanol yield for the vacuum fermentation was found to be 358 g/kg of food waste (dry basis), higher than that for the conventional fermentation at 327 g/kg of food waste (dry basis).

  16. Increased Delay Discounting Tracks with a High Ethanol-Seeking Phenotype and Subsequent Ethanol-Seeking but not Consumption

    PubMed Central

    Beckwith, Steven Wesley; Czachowski, Cristine Lynn

    2014-01-01

    Background Increased levels of delay discounting have been associated with alcoholism and problematic levels of drinking. Attempts to assess the directionality of this relationship by studying individuals with a family history of alcoholism as well as rodent lines selectively bred for high home cage alcohol preference have yielded discordant results. One possible reason for this discordance is that increased levels of delay discounting may only track with specific processes that lead to addiction vulnerability. The current study investigated this possibility by assessing three strains of rats previously identified to exhibit heritable differences in ethanol-seeking and consumption. Methods In an adjusting amount delay discounting task, alcohol-preferring P rats who display high levels of both ethanol-seeking and consumption were compared to High Alcohol Drinking (HAD2) rats who only exhibit moderate ethanol-seeking despite high levels of consumption, and Long Evans (LE) rats who display moderate seeking and consumption. Ethanol-seeking and consumption phenotypes were subsequently confirmed in an operant self-administration task with a procedural separation between ethanol-seeking and drinking. Results P rats discounted delayed rewards to a greater extent than both HAD2s and LE who did not show differences in discounting. Moreover, the ethanol-seeking and drinking phenotypes were replicated with P rats displaying greater ethanol-seeking compared to both the HAD2s and LE, and both the HAD2s and P rats consuming more ethanol than LEs. Conclusions Only the high seeking strain, the P rats, exhibited increased levels of delay discounting. This suggests that this measure of behavioral under-control is specifically associated with alcohol-related appetitive, but not consummatory, processes since the moderate seeking/high drinking line did not show increased levels of impulsivity. This finding supports the hypothesis that delay discounting is specifically associated with

  17. A high yield neutron target

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alger, D. L.; Steinberg, R.; Weisenbach, P.

    1974-01-01

    Target, in cylinder form, rotates rapidly in front of beam. Titanium tritide film is much thicker than range of accelerated deutron. Sputtering electrode permits full use of thick film. Stream of high-velocity coolant provides efficient transfer of heat from target.

  18. Production of fuel ethanol at high temperature from sugar cane juice by a newly isolated Kluyveromyces marxianus.

    PubMed

    Limtong, Savitree; Sringiew, Chutima; Yongmanitchai, Wichien

    2007-12-01

    Kluyveromyces marxianus DMKU 3-1042, isolated by an enrichment technique in a sugar cane juice medium supplemented with 4% (w/v) ethanol at 35 degrees C, produced high concentrations of ethanol at both 40 and 45 degrees C. Ethanol production by this strain in shaking flask cultivation in sugar cane juice media at 37 degrees C was highest in a medium containing 22% total sugars, 0.05% (NH(4))(2)SO(4), 0.05% KH(2)PO(4), and 0.15% MgSO(4).7H(2)O and having a pH of 5.0; the ethanol concentration reached 8.7% (w/v), productivity 1.45 g/l/h and yield 77.5% of theoretical yield. At 40 degrees C, a maximal ethanol concentration of 6.78% (w/v), a productivity of 1.13 and a yield 60.4% of theoretical yield were obtained from the same medium, except that the pH was adjusted to 5.5. In a study on ethanol production in a 5l jar fermenter with an agitation speed of 300 rpm and an aeration rate of 0.2 vvm throughout the fermentation, K. marxianus DMKU 3-1042 yielded a final ethanol concentration of 6.43% (w/v), a productivity of 1.3g/l/h and a yield of 57.1% of theoretical yield.

  19. Operant ethanol-reinforced behavior in P, NP, HAD, and LAD rats bred for high versus low ethanol preference.

    PubMed

    Ritz, M C; Garcia, J M; Protz, D; George, F R

    1994-12-01

    These studies examined the reinforcing effects of ethanol in rats selectively bred for high versus low ethanol drinking in a two-bottle choice preference task, namely the Preferring (P), Non-Preferring (NP), High Alcohol Drinking (HAD), and Low Alcohol Drinking (LAD) rats. The results substantiate findings suggesting that genetic factors are significant in determining whether ethanol will come to serve as a reinforcer. P rats exhibited high levels of responding for ethanol compared with the water vehicle, NP and HAD rats exhibited more moderate levels of responding for ethanol, and the behavior of LAD rats suggested that ethanol served only inconsistently as a reinforcer for these rats. Overall, the results suggest the existence of distinct, biologically influenced components of ethanol drinking behavior. Preference appears to measure an inherent facilitative factor allowing animals to initiate ethanol drinking. The operant chamber paradigm appears to measure factors related to whether and to what extent ethanol will serve as a positive reinforcer following conditioned exposure to the drug. Although preferring animals generally find ethanol reinforcing there seems to be little quantitative relationship between degree of preference and whether ethanol will serve as a reinforcer. Lack of preference does not seem to be predictive of lack of reinforcement. Thus, it appears that preference for ethanol and reinforcement from ethanol are somewhat overlapping, but distinct factors that contribute to ethanol drinking. These results suggest the existence of multiple components of behavior mediated by multiple mechanisms that contribute to ethanol drinking. PMID:7695037

  20. Land usage attributed to corn ethanol production in the United States: sensitivity to technological advances in corn grain yield, ethanol conversion, and co-product utilization

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Although the system for producing yellow corn grain is well established in the US, its role among other biofeedstock alternatives to petroleum-based energy sources has to be balanced with its predominant purpose for food and feed as well as economics, land use, and environmental stewardship. We model land usage attributed to corn ethanol production in the US to evaluate the effects of anticipated technological change in corn grain production, ethanol processing, and livestock feeding through a multi-disciplinary approach. Seven scenarios are evaluated: four considering the impact of technological advances on corn grain production, two focused on improved efficiencies in ethanol processing, and one reflecting greater use of ethanol co-products (that is, distillers dried grains with solubles) in diets for dairy cattle, pigs, and poultry. For each scenario, land area attributed to corn ethanol production is estimated for three time horizons: 2011 (current), the time period at which the 15 billion gallon cap for corn ethanol as per the Renewable Fuel Standard is achieved, and 2026 (15 years out). Results Although 40.5% of corn grain was channeled to ethanol processing in 2011, only 25% of US corn acreage was attributable to ethanol when accounting for feed co-product utilization. By 2026, land area attributed to corn ethanol production is reduced to 11% to 19% depending on the corn grain yield level associated with the four corn production scenarios, considering oil replacement associated with the soybean meal substituted in livestock diets with distillers dried grains with solubles. Efficiencies in ethanol processing, although producing more ethanol per bushel of processed corn, result in less co-products and therefore less offset of corn acreage. Shifting the use of distillers dried grains with solubles in feed to dairy cattle, pigs, and poultry substantially reduces land area attributed to corn ethanol production. However, because distillers dried grains

  1. High ethanol fermentation performance of the dry dilute acid pretreated corn stover by an evolutionarily adapted Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, Abdul Sattar; Zhang, Jian; Bao, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Ethanol fermentation was investigated at the high solids content of the dry dilute sulfuric acid pretreated corn stover feedstock using an evolutionary adapted Saccharomyces cerevisiae DQ1 strain. The evolutionary adaptation was conducted by successively transferring the S. cerevisiae DQ1 cells into the inhibitors containing corn stover hydrolysate every 12h and finally a stable yeast strain was obtained after 65 days' continuous adaptation. The ethanol fermentation performance using the adapted strain was significantly improved with the high ethanol titer of 71.40 g/L and the high yield of 80.34% in the simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) at 30% solids content. No wastewater was generated from pretreatment to fermentation steps. The results were compared with the published cellulosic ethanol fermentation cases, and the obvious advantages of the present work were demonstrated not only at the high ethanol titer and yield, but also the significant reduction of wastewater generation and potential cost reduction.

  2. High ethanol fermentation performance of the dry dilute acid pretreated corn stover by an evolutionarily adapted Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, Abdul Sattar; Zhang, Jian; Bao, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Ethanol fermentation was investigated at the high solids content of the dry dilute sulfuric acid pretreated corn stover feedstock using an evolutionary adapted Saccharomyces cerevisiae DQ1 strain. The evolutionary adaptation was conducted by successively transferring the S. cerevisiae DQ1 cells into the inhibitors containing corn stover hydrolysate every 12h and finally a stable yeast strain was obtained after 65 days' continuous adaptation. The ethanol fermentation performance using the adapted strain was significantly improved with the high ethanol titer of 71.40 g/L and the high yield of 80.34% in the simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) at 30% solids content. No wastewater was generated from pretreatment to fermentation steps. The results were compared with the published cellulosic ethanol fermentation cases, and the obvious advantages of the present work were demonstrated not only at the high ethanol titer and yield, but also the significant reduction of wastewater generation and potential cost reduction. PMID:25930238

  3. Adaptation to High Ethanol Reveals Complex Evolutionary Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Das, Anupam; Espinosa-Cantú, Adriana; De Maeyer, Dries; Arslan, Ahmed; Van Pee, Michiel; van der Zande, Elisa; Meert, Wim; Yang, Yudi; Zhu, Bo; Marchal, Kathleen; DeLuna, Alexander; Van Noort, Vera; Jelier, Rob; Verstrepen, Kevin J.

    2015-01-01

    Tolerance to high levels of ethanol is an ecologically and industrially relevant phenotype of microbes, but the molecular mechanisms underlying this complex trait remain largely unknown. Here, we use long-term experimental evolution of isogenic yeast populations of different initial ploidy to study adaptation to increasing levels of ethanol. Whole-genome sequencing of more than 30 evolved populations and over 100 adapted clones isolated throughout this two-year evolution experiment revealed how a complex interplay of de novo single nucleotide mutations, copy number variation, ploidy changes, mutator phenotypes, and clonal interference led to a significant increase in ethanol tolerance. Although the specific mutations differ between different evolved lineages, application of a novel computational pipeline, PheNetic, revealed that many mutations target functional modules involved in stress response, cell cycle regulation, DNA repair and respiration. Measuring the fitness effects of selected mutations introduced in non-evolved ethanol-sensitive cells revealed several adaptive mutations that had previously not been implicated in ethanol tolerance, including mutations in PRT1, VPS70 and MEX67. Interestingly, variation in VPS70 was recently identified as a QTL for ethanol tolerance in an industrial bio-ethanol strain. Taken together, our results show how, in contrast to adaptation to some other stresses, adaptation to a continuous complex and severe stress involves interplay of different evolutionary mechanisms. In addition, our study reveals functional modules involved in ethanol resistance and identifies several mutations that could help to improve the ethanol tolerance of industrial yeasts. PMID:26545090

  4. High-pressure vapor-liquid equilibrium for R-22 + ethanol and R-22 + ethanol + water

    SciTech Connect

    Elbaccouch, M.M.; Raymond, M.B.; Elliott, J.R.

    2000-04-01

    High-pressure vapor-liquid equilibrium (VLE) data for the systems CO{sub 2} + methanol at 313.05 K, CO{sub 2} + ethanol at 323.55, 325.15, and 333.35 K, R-22 (chlorodifluoromethane) + ethanol at 343.25, 361.45, and 382.45 K, and R-22 + ethanol + water at 351.55, 362.65, and 371.85 K are obtained using a circulation-type VLE apparatus. The apparatus is tested with measurements of the CO{sub 2} + methanol and CO{sub 2} + ethanol systems. The experimental data are correlated using the Peng-Robinson and Elliott-Suresh-Donohue equations of state.

  5. Ethanol yield and volatile compound content in fermentation of agave must by Kluyveromyces marxianus UMPe-1 comparing with Saccharomyces cerevisiae baker's yeast used in tequila production.

    PubMed

    López-Alvarez, Arnoldo; Díaz-Pérez, Alma Laura; Sosa-Aguirre, Carlos; Macías-Rodríguez, Lourdes; Campos-García, Jesús

    2012-05-01

    In tequila production, fermentation is an important step. Fermentation determines the ethanol productivity and organoleptic properties of the beverage. In this study, a yeast isolated from native residual agave must was identified as Kluyveromyces marxianus UMPe-1 by 26S rRNA sequencing. This yeast was compared with the baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae Pan1. Our findings demonstrate that the UMPe-1 yeast was able to support the sugar content of agave must and glucose up to 22% (w/v) and tolerated 10% (v/v) ethanol concentration in the medium with 50% cells survival. Pilot and industrial fermentation of agave must tests showed that the K. marxianus UMPe-1 yeast produced ethanol with yields of 94% and 96% with respect to fermentable sugar content (glucose and fructose, constituting 98%). The S. cerevisiae Pan1 baker's yeast, however, which is commonly used in some tequila factories, showed 76% and 70% yield. At the industrial level, UMPe-1 yeast shows a maximum velocity of fermentable sugar consumption of 2.27g·L(-1)·h(-1) and ethanol production of 1.38g·L(-1)·h(-1), providing 58.78g ethanol·L(-1) at 72h fermentation, which corresponds to 96% yield. In addition, the major and minor volatile compounds in the tequila beverage obtained from UMPe-1 yeast were increased. Importantly, 29 volatile compounds were identified, while the beverage obtained from Pan1-yeast contained fewer compounds and in lower concentrations. The results suggest that the K. marxianus UMPe-1 is a suitable yeast for agave must fermentation, showing high ethanol productivity and increased volatile compound content comparing with a S. cerevisiae baker's yeast used in tequila production.

  6. Ethanol yield and volatile compound content in fermentation of agave must by Kluyveromyces marxianus UMPe-1 comparing with Saccharomyces cerevisiae baker's yeast used in tequila production.

    PubMed

    López-Alvarez, Arnoldo; Díaz-Pérez, Alma Laura; Sosa-Aguirre, Carlos; Macías-Rodríguez, Lourdes; Campos-García, Jesús

    2012-05-01

    In tequila production, fermentation is an important step. Fermentation determines the ethanol productivity and organoleptic properties of the beverage. In this study, a yeast isolated from native residual agave must was identified as Kluyveromyces marxianus UMPe-1 by 26S rRNA sequencing. This yeast was compared with the baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae Pan1. Our findings demonstrate that the UMPe-1 yeast was able to support the sugar content of agave must and glucose up to 22% (w/v) and tolerated 10% (v/v) ethanol concentration in the medium with 50% cells survival. Pilot and industrial fermentation of agave must tests showed that the K. marxianus UMPe-1 yeast produced ethanol with yields of 94% and 96% with respect to fermentable sugar content (glucose and fructose, constituting 98%). The S. cerevisiae Pan1 baker's yeast, however, which is commonly used in some tequila factories, showed 76% and 70% yield. At the industrial level, UMPe-1 yeast shows a maximum velocity of fermentable sugar consumption of 2.27g·L(-1)·h(-1) and ethanol production of 1.38g·L(-1)·h(-1), providing 58.78g ethanol·L(-1) at 72h fermentation, which corresponds to 96% yield. In addition, the major and minor volatile compounds in the tequila beverage obtained from UMPe-1 yeast were increased. Importantly, 29 volatile compounds were identified, while the beverage obtained from Pan1-yeast contained fewer compounds and in lower concentrations. The results suggest that the K. marxianus UMPe-1 is a suitable yeast for agave must fermentation, showing high ethanol productivity and increased volatile compound content comparing with a S. cerevisiae baker's yeast used in tequila production. PMID:22280963

  7. Characteristics of an immobilized yeast cell system using very high gravity for the fermentation of ethanol.

    PubMed

    Ji, Hairui; Yu, Jianliang; Zhang, Xu; Tan, Tianwei

    2012-09-01

    The characteristics of ethanol production by immobilized yeast cells were investigated for both repeated batch fermentation and continuous fermentation. With an initial sugar concentration of 280 g/L during the repeated batch fermentation, more than 98% of total sugar was consumed in 65 h with an average ethanol concentration and ethanol yield of 130.12 g/L and 0.477 g ethanol/g consumed sugar, respectively. The immobilized yeast cell system was reliable for at least 10 batches and for a period of 28 days without accompanying the regeneration of Saccharomyces cerevisiae inside the carriers. The multistage continuous fermentation was carried out in a five-stage column bioreactor with a total working volume of 3.75 L. The bioreactor was operated for 26 days at a dilution rate of 0.015 h(-1). The ethanol concentration of the effluent reached 130.77 g/L ethanol while an average 8.18 g/L residual sugar remained. Due to the high osmotic pressure and toxic ethanol, considerable yeast cells died without regeneration, especially in the last two stages, which led to the breakdown of the whole system of multistage continuous fermentation.

  8. Ethanol enhances de novo synthesis of high density lipoprotein cholesterol

    SciTech Connect

    Cluette, J.E.; Mulligan, J.J.; Noring, R.; Doyle, K.; Hojnacki, J.

    1984-05-01

    Male squirrel monkeys fed ethanol at variable doses were used to assess whether alcohol enhances de novo synthesis of high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol in vivo. Monkeys were divided into three groups: 1) controls fed isocaloric liquid diet; 2) low ethanol monkeys fed liquid diet with vodka substituted isocalorically for carbohydrate at 12% of calories; and 3) High Ethanol animals fed diet plus vodka at 24% of calories. High Ethanol primates had significantly higher levels of HDL nonesterified cholesterol than Control and Low Ethanol animals while serum glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase was similar for the three treatments. There were no significant differences between the groups in HDL cholesteryl ester mass or specific activity following intravenous injection of labeled mevalonolactone. By contrast, High Ethanol monkeys had significantly greater HDL nonesterified cholesterol specific activity with approximately 60% of the radioactivity distributed in the HDL/sub 3/ subfraction. This report provides the first experimental evidence that ethanol at 24% of calories induces elevations in HDL cholesterol in primates through enhanced de novo synthesis without adverse effects on liver function.

  9. High yield fabrication of fluorescent nanodiamonds

    PubMed Central

    Boudou, Jean-Paul; Curmi, Patrick; Jelezko, Fedor; Wrachtrup, Joerg; Aubert, Pascal; Sennour, Mohamed; Balasubramanian, Gopalakrischnan; Reuter, Rolf; Thorel, Alain; Gaffet, Eric

    2009-01-01

    A new fabrication method to produce homogeneously fluorescent nanodiamonds with high yields is described. The powder obtained by high energy ball milling of fluorescent high pressure, high temperature diamond microcrystals was converted in a pure concentrated aqueous colloidal dispersion of highly crystalline ultrasmall nanoparticles with a mean size less than or equal to 10 nm. The whole fabrication yield of colloidal quasi-spherical nanodiamonds was several orders of magnitude higher than those previously reported starting from microdiamonds. The results open up avenues for the industrial cost-effective production of fluorescent nanodiamonds with well-controlled properties. PMID:19451687

  10. Insights from the Fungus Fusarium oxysporum Point to High Affinity Glucose Transporters as Targets for Enhancing Ethanol Production from Lignocellulose

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Shahin S.; Nugent, Brian; Mullins, Ewen; Doohan, Fiona M.

    2013-01-01

    Ethanol is the most-widely used biofuel in the world today. Lignocellulosic plant biomass derived from agricultural residue can be converted to ethanol via microbial bioprocessing. Fungi such as Fusarium oxysporum can simultaneously saccharify straw to sugars and ferment sugars to ethanol. But there are many bottlenecks that need to be overcome to increase the efficacy of microbial production of ethanol from straw, not least enhancement of the rate of fermentation of both hexose and pentose sugars. This research tested the hypothesis that the rate of sugar uptake by F. oxysporum would enhance the ethanol yields from lignocellulosic straw and that high affinity glucose transporters can enhance ethanol yields from this substrate. We characterized a novel hexose transporter (Hxt) from this fungus. The F. oxysporum Hxt represents a novel transporter with homology to yeast glucose signaling/transporter proteins Rgt2 and Snf3, but it lacks their C-terminal domain which is necessary for glucose signalling. Its expression level decreased with increasing glucose concentration in the medium and in a glucose uptake study the Km(glucose) was 0.9 mM, which indicated that the protein is a high affinity glucose transporter. Post-translational gene silencing or over expression of the Hxt in F. oxysporum directly affected the glucose and xylose transport capacity and ethanol yielded by F. oxysporum from straw, glucose and xylose. Thus we conclude that this Hxt has the capacity to transport both C5 and C6 sugars and to enhance ethanol yields from lignocellulosic material. This study has confirmed that high affinity glucose transporters are ideal candidates for improving ethanol yields from lignocellulose because their activity and level of expression is high in low glucose concentrations, which is very common during the process of consolidated processing. PMID:23382943

  11. Insights from the fungus Fusarium oxysporum point to high affinity glucose transporters as targets for enhancing ethanol production from lignocellulose.

    PubMed

    Ali, Shahin S; Nugent, Brian; Mullins, Ewen; Doohan, Fiona M

    2013-01-01

    Ethanol is the most-widely used biofuel in the world today. Lignocellulosic plant biomass derived from agricultural residue can be converted to ethanol via microbial bioprocessing. Fungi such as Fusarium oxysporum can simultaneously saccharify straw to sugars and ferment sugars to ethanol. But there are many bottlenecks that need to be overcome to increase the efficacy of microbial production of ethanol from straw, not least enhancement of the rate of fermentation of both hexose and pentose sugars. This research tested the hypothesis that the rate of sugar uptake by F. oxysporum would enhance the ethanol yields from lignocellulosic straw and that high affinity glucose transporters can enhance ethanol yields from this substrate. We characterized a novel hexose transporter (Hxt) from this fungus. The F. oxysporum Hxt represents a novel transporter with homology to yeast glucose signaling/transporter proteins Rgt2 and Snf3, but it lacks their C-terminal domain which is necessary for glucose signalling. Its expression level decreased with increasing glucose concentration in the medium and in a glucose uptake study the Km((glucose)) was 0.9 mM, which indicated that the protein is a high affinity glucose transporter. Post-translational gene silencing or over expression of the Hxt in F. oxysporum directly affected the glucose and xylose transport capacity and ethanol yielded by F. oxysporum from straw, glucose and xylose. Thus we conclude that this Hxt has the capacity to transport both C5 and C6 sugars and to enhance ethanol yields from lignocellulosic material. This study has confirmed that high affinity glucose transporters are ideal candidates for improving ethanol yields from lignocellulose because their activity and level of expression is high in low glucose concentrations, which is very common during the process of consolidated processing.

  12. Combined process for ethanol fermentation at high-solids loading and biogas digestion from unwashed steam-exploded corn stover.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhen; Lv, Zhe; Du, Jiliang; Mo, Chunling; Yang, Xiushan; Tian, Shen

    2014-08-01

    A combined process was designed for the co-production of ethanol and methane from unwashed steam-exploded corn stover. A terminal ethanol titer of 69.8 g/kg mass weight (72.5%) was achieved when the fed-batch mode was performed at a final solids loading of 35.5% (w/w) dry matter (DM) content. The whole stillage from high-solids ethanol fermentation was directly transferred in a 3-L anaerobic digester. During 52-day single-stage digester operation, the methane productivity was 320 mL CH₄/g volatile solids (VS) with a maximum VS reduction efficiency of 55.3%. The calculated overall product yield was 197 g ethanol + 96 g methane/kg corn stover. This indicated that the combined process was able to improve overall content utilization and extract a greater yield of lignocellulosic biomass compared to ethanol fermentation alone.

  13. Elimination of metabolic pathways to all traditional fermentation products increases ethanol yields in Clostridium thermocellum

    SciTech Connect

    Papanek, Beth A.; Biswas, Ranjita; Rydzak, Thomas; Guss, Adam M.

    2015-09-12

    Clostridium thermocellum has the natural ability to convert cellulose to ethanol, making it a promising candidate for consolidated bioprocessing (CBP) of cellulosic biomass to biofuels. To further improve its CBP capabilities, we study a mutant strain of C. thermocellum that was constructed (strain AG553; C. thermocellum Δhpt ΔhydG Δldh Δpfl Δpta-ack) to increase flux to ethanol by removing side product formation. Strain AG553 showed a two- to threefold increase in ethanol yield relative to the wild type on all substrates tested. On defined medium, strain AG553 exceeded 70% of theoretical ethanol yield on lower loadings of the model crystalline cellulose Avicel, effectively eliminating formate, acetate, and lactate production and reducing H2 production by fivefold. On 5 g/L Avicel, strain AG553 reached an ethanol yield of 63.5% of the theoretical maximum compared with 19.9% by the wild type, and it showed similar yields on pretreated switchgrass and poplar. The elimination of organic acid production suggested that the strain might be capable of growth under higher substrate loadings in the absence of pH control. Final ethanol titer peaked at 73.4 mM in mutant AG553 on 20 g/L Avicel, at which point the pH decreased to a level that does not allow growth of C. thermocellum, likely due to CO2 accumulation. In comparison, the maximum titer of wild type C. thermocellum was 14.1 mM ethanol on 10 g/L Avicel. In conclusion, with the elimination of the metabolic pathways to all traditional fermentation products other than ethanol, AG553 is the best ethanol-yielding CBP strain to date and will serve as a platform strain for further metabolic engineering for the bioconversion of lignocellulosic biomass.

  14. Elimination of hydrogenase active site assembly blocks H2 production and increases ethanol yield in Clostridium thermocellum

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, Ranjita; Zheng, Tianyong; Olson, Daniel G.; Lynd, Lee R.; Guss, Adam M.

    2015-02-01

    The native ability of Clostridium thermocellum to rapidly consume cellulose and produce ethanol makes it a leading candidate for a consolidated bioprocessing (CBP) biofuel production strategy. C. thermocellum also synthesizes lactate, formate, acetate, H2, and amino acids that compete with ethanol production for carbon and electrons. Elimination of H2 production could redirect carbon flux towards ethanol production by making more electrons available for acetyl-CoA reduction to ethanol. C. thermocellum encodes four hydrogenases and rather than delete each individually, we targeted a hydrogenase maturase gene (hydG), involved in converting the three [FeFe] hydrogenase apoenzymes into holoenzymes. Further deletion of the [NiFe] hydrogenase (ech) resulted in a mutant that functionally lacks all four hydrogenases. H2 production in hydG ech was undetectable and ethanol yield increased nearly 2-fold compared to wild type. Interestingly, mutant growth improved upon the addition of acetate, which led to increased expression of genes related to sulfate metabolism, suggesting these mutants may use sulfate as a terminal electron acceptor to balance redox reactions. Genomic analysis of hydG revealed a mutation in adhE, resulting in a strain with both NADH- and NADPH-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase activities. While this same adhE mutation is found in ethanol tolerant C. thermocellum strain E50C, hydG and hydG ech are not more ethanol tolerant than wild type, illustrating the complicated interactions between redox balancing and ethanol tolerance in C. thermocellum. The dramatic increase in ethanol production here suggests that targeting protein post-translational modification is a promising new approach for inactivation of multiple enzymes simultaneously for metabolic engineering.

  15. Elimination of hydrogenase active site assembly blocks H2 production and increases ethanol yield in Clostridium thermocellum

    DOE PAGES

    Biswas, Ranjita; Zheng, Tianyong; Olson, Daniel G.; Lynd, Lee R.; Guss, Adam M.

    2015-02-01

    The native ability of Clostridium thermocellum to rapidly consume cellulose and produce ethanol makes it a leading candidate for a consolidated bioprocessing (CBP) biofuel production strategy. C. thermocellum also synthesizes lactate, formate, acetate, H2, and amino acids that compete with ethanol production for carbon and electrons. Elimination of H2 production could redirect carbon flux towards ethanol production by making more electrons available for acetyl-CoA reduction to ethanol. C. thermocellum encodes four hydrogenases and rather than delete each individually, we targeted a hydrogenase maturase gene (hydG), involved in converting the three [FeFe] hydrogenase apoenzymes into holoenzymes. Further deletion of the [NiFe]more » hydrogenase (ech) resulted in a mutant that functionally lacks all four hydrogenases. H2 production in hydG ech was undetectable and ethanol yield increased nearly 2-fold compared to wild type. Interestingly, mutant growth improved upon the addition of acetate, which led to increased expression of genes related to sulfate metabolism, suggesting these mutants may use sulfate as a terminal electron acceptor to balance redox reactions. Genomic analysis of hydG revealed a mutation in adhE, resulting in a strain with both NADH- and NADPH-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase activities. While this same adhE mutation is found in ethanol tolerant C. thermocellum strain E50C, hydG and hydG ech are not more ethanol tolerant than wild type, illustrating the complicated interactions between redox balancing and ethanol tolerance in C. thermocellum. The dramatic increase in ethanol production here suggests that targeting protein post-translational modification is a promising new approach for inactivation of multiple enzymes simultaneously for metabolic engineering.« less

  16. Direct ethanol production from cellulosic materials at high temperature using the thermotolerant yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus displaying cellulolytic enzymes.

    PubMed

    Yanase, Shuhei; Hasunuma, Tomohisa; Yamada, Ryosuke; Tanaka, Tsutomu; Ogino, Chiaki; Fukuda, Hideki; Kondo, Akihiko

    2010-09-01

    To exploit cellulosic materials for fuel ethanol production, a microorganism capable of high temperature and simultaneous saccharification-fermentation has been required. However, a major drawback is the optimum temperature for the saccharification and fermentation. Most ethanol-fermenting microbes have an optimum temperature for ethanol fermentation ranging between 28 degrees C and 37 degrees C, while the activity of cellulolytic enzymes is highest at around 50 degrees C and significantly decreases with a decrease in temperature. Therefore, in the present study, a thermotolerant yeast, Kluyveromyces marxianus, which has high growth and fermentation at elevated temperatures, was used as a producer of ethanol from cellulose. The strain was genetically engineered to display Trichoderma reesei endoglucanase and Aspergillus aculeatus beta-glucosidase on the cell surface, which successfully converts a cellulosic beta-glucan to ethanol directly at 48 degrees C with a yield of 4.24 g/l from 10 g/l within 12 h. The yield (in grams of ethanol produced per gram of beta-glucan consumed) was 0.47 g/g, which corresponds to 92.2% of the theoretical yield. This indicates that high-temperature cellulose fermentation to ethanol can be efficiently accomplished using a recombinant K. marxianus strain displaying thermostable cellulolytic enzymes on the cell surface.

  17. Reduction of ethanol yield and improvement of glycerol formation by adaptive evolution of the wine yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae under hyperosmotic conditions.

    PubMed

    Tilloy, Valentin; Ortiz-Julien, Anne; Dequin, Sylvie

    2014-04-01

    There is a strong demand from the wine industry for methodologies to reduce the alcohol content of wine without compromising wine's sensory characteristics. We assessed the potential of adaptive laboratory evolution strategies under hyperosmotic stress for generation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine yeast strains with enhanced glycerol and reduced ethanol yields. Experimental evolution on KCl resulted, after 200 generations, in strains that had higher glycerol and lower ethanol production than the ancestral strain. This major metabolic shift was accompanied by reduced fermentative capacities, suggesting a trade-off between high glycerol production and fermentation rate. Several evolved strains retaining good fermentation performance were selected. These strains produced more succinate and 2,3-butanediol than the ancestral strain and did not accumulate undesirable organoleptic compounds, such as acetate, acetaldehyde, or acetoin. They survived better under osmotic stress and glucose starvation conditions than the ancestral strain, suggesting that the forces that drove the redirection of carbon fluxes involved a combination of osmotic and salt stresses and carbon limitation. To further decrease the ethanol yield, a breeding strategy was used, generating intrastrain hybrids that produced more glycerol than the evolved strain. Pilot-scale fermentation on Syrah using evolved and hybrid strains produced wine with 0.6% (vol/vol) and 1.3% (vol/vol) less ethanol, more glycerol and 2,3-butanediol, and less acetate than the ancestral strain. This work demonstrates that the combination of adaptive evolution and breeding is a valuable alternative to rational design for remodeling the yeast metabolic network.

  18. Lignocellulosic ethanol production at high-gravity: challenges and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Koppram, Rakesh; Tomás-Pejó, Elia; Xiros, Charilaos; Olsson, Lisbeth

    2014-01-01

    In brewing and ethanol-based biofuel industries, high-gravity fermentation produces 10-15% (v/v) ethanol, resulting in improved overall productivity, reduced capital cost, and reduced energy input compared to processing at normal gravity. High-gravity technology ensures a successful implementation of cellulose to ethanol conversion as a cost-competitive process. Implementation of such technologies is possible if all process steps can be performed at high biomass concentrations. This review focuses on challenges and technological efforts in processing at high-gravity conditions and how these conditions influence the physiology and metabolism of fermenting microorganisms, the action of enzymes, and other process-related factors. Lignocellulosic materials add challenges compared to implemented processes due to high inhibitors content and the physical properties of these materials at high gravity.

  19. Yield strength of molybdenum at high pressures.

    PubMed

    Jing, Qiumin; Bi, Yan; Wu, Qiang; Jing, Fuqian; Wang, Zhigang; Xu, Jian; Jiang, Sheng

    2007-07-01

    In the diamond anvil cell technology, the pressure gradient approach is one of the three major methods in determining the yield strength for various materials at high pressures. In the present work, by in situ measuring the thickness of the sample foil, we have improved the traditional technique in this method. Based on this modification, the yield strength of molybdenum at pressures has been measured. Our main experimental conclusions are as follows: (1) The measured yield strength data for three samples with different initial thickness (100, 250, and 500 microm) are in good agreement above a peak pressure of 10 GPa. (2) The measured yield strength can be fitted into a linear formula Y=0.48(+/-0.19)+0.14(+/-0.01)P (Y and P denote the yield strength and local pressure, respectively, both of them are in gigapascals) in the local pressure range of 8-21 GPa. This result is in good agreement with both Y=0.46+0.13P determined in the pressure range of 5-24 GPa measured by the radial x-ray diffraction technique and the previous shock wave data below 10 GPa. (3) The zero-pressure yield strength of Mo is 0.5 GPa when we extrapolate our experimental data into the ambient pressure. It is close to the tensile strength of 0.7 GPa determined by Bridgman [Phys. Rev. 48, 825 (1934)] previously. The modified method described in this article therefore provides the confidence in determination of the yield strength at high pressures. PMID:17672772

  20. Integration options for high energy efficiency and improved economics in a wood-to-ethanol process

    PubMed Central

    Sassner, Per; Zacchi, Guido

    2008-01-01

    Background There is currently a steady increase in the use of wood-based fuels for heat and power production in Sweden. A major proportion of these fuels could serve as feedstock for ethanol production. In this study various options for the utilization of the solid residue formed during ethanol production from spruce, such as the production of pellets, electricity and heat for district heating, were compared in terms of overall energy efficiency and production cost. The effects of changes in the process performance, such as variations in the ethanol yield and/or the energy demand, were also studied. The process was based on SO2-catalysed steam pretreatment, which was followed by simultaneous saccharification and fermentation. A model including all the major process steps was implemented in the commercial flow-sheeting program Aspen Plus, the model input was based on data recently obtained on lab scale or in a process development unit. Results For the five base case scenarios presented in the paper the overall energy efficiency ranged from 53 to 92%, based on the lower heating values, and a minimum ethanol selling price from 3.87 to 4.73 Swedish kronor per litre (0.41–0.50 EUR/L); however, ethanol production was performed in essentially the same way in each base case scenario. (Highly realistic) improvements in the ethanol yield and reductions in the energy demand resulted in significantly lower production costs for all scenarios. Conclusion Although ethanol was shown to be the main product, i.e. yielding the major part of the income, the co-product revenue had a considerable effect on the process economics and the importance of good utilization of the entire feedstock was clearly shown. With the assumed prices of the co-products, utilization of the excess solid residue for heat and power production was highly economically favourable. The study also showed that improvements in the ethanol yield and reductions in the energy demand resulted in significant production

  1. Consolidated bioprocessing of highly concentrated Jerusalem artichoke tubers for simultaneous saccharification and ethanol fermentation.

    PubMed

    Guo, Lihao; Zhang, Jian; Hu, Fengxian; Dy Ryu, Dewey; Bao, Jie

    2013-10-01

    Consolidated bioprocessing (CBP) of Jerusalem artichoke tuber (Jat) for ethanol production is one of the most promising options for an alternate biofuel technology development. The technical barriers include the weak saccharolytic enzyme (inulinase) activity of the fermentation strain, and the well mixing of the high viscous fermentation slurry at the highly concentrated Jat loading. In this study, Saccharomyces cerevisiae DQ1 was found to produce relatively large amount of inulinase for hydrolysis of inulin in Jat, and the helical ribbon stirring bioreactor used provided well mixing performance under the high Jat loading. Even a highly concentrated Jat loading up to 35% (w/w) in the helical ribbon bioreactor for CBP was allowed. The results obtained from this study have demonstrated a feasibility of developing a CBP process technology in the helical ribbon bioreactor for ethanol production at a high yield 128.7 g/L and the theoretical yield 73.5%, respectively. This level of ethanol yield from Jat is relatively higher than others reported so far. The results of this study could provide a practical CBP process technology in the helical ribbon bioreactor for economically sustainable alternate biofuel production using highly concentrated inulin containing biomass feedstock such as Jat, at least 35%.

  2. Simultaneous saccharification and fermentation of steam exploded duckweed: Improvement of the ethanol yield by increasing yeast titre.

    PubMed

    Zhao, X; Moates, G K; Elliston, A; Wilson, D R; Coleman, M J; Waldron, K W

    2015-10-01

    This study investigated the conversion of Lemna minor biomass to bioethanol. The biomass was pre-treated by steam explosion (SE, 210°C, 10 min) and then subjected to simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) using Cellic® CTec 2 (20 U or 0.87 FPU g(-1) substrate) cellulase plus β-glucosidase (2 U g(-1) substrate) and a yeast inoculum of 10% (v/v or 8.0×10(7) cells mL(-1)). At a substrate concentration of 1% (w/v) an ethanol yield of 80% (w/w, theoretical) was achieved. However at a substrate concentration of 20% (w/v), the ethanol yield was lowered to 18.8% (w/w, theoretical). Yields were considerably improved by increasing the yeast titre in the inoculum or preconditioning the yeast on steam exploded liquor. These approaches enhanced the ethanol yield up to 70% (w/w, theoretical) at a substrate concentration of 20% (w/v) by metabolising fermentation inhibitors. PMID:26210138

  3. Simultaneous saccharification and fermentation of steam exploded duckweed: Improvement of the ethanol yield by increasing yeast titre

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, X.; Moates, G.K.; Elliston, A.; Wilson, D.R.; Coleman, M.J.; Waldron, K.W.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the conversion of Lemna minor biomass to bioethanol. The biomass was pre-treated by steam explosion (SE, 210 °C, 10 min) and then subjected to simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) using Cellic® CTec 2 (20 U or 0.87 FPU g−1 substrate) cellulase plus β-glucosidase (2 U g−1 substrate) and a yeast inoculum of 10% (v/v or 8.0 × 107 cells mL−1). At a substrate concentration of 1% (w/v) an ethanol yield of 80% (w/w, theoretical) was achieved. However at a substrate concentration of 20% (w/v), the ethanol yield was lowered to 18.8% (w/w, theoretical). Yields were considerably improved by increasing the yeast titre in the inoculum or preconditioning the yeast on steam exploded liquor. These approaches enhanced the ethanol yield up to 70% (w/w, theoretical) at a substrate concentration of 20% (w/v) by metabolising fermentation inhibitors. PMID:26210138

  4. Simultaneous saccharification and fermentation of steam exploded duckweed: Improvement of the ethanol yield by increasing yeast titre.

    PubMed

    Zhao, X; Moates, G K; Elliston, A; Wilson, D R; Coleman, M J; Waldron, K W

    2015-10-01

    This study investigated the conversion of Lemna minor biomass to bioethanol. The biomass was pre-treated by steam explosion (SE, 210°C, 10 min) and then subjected to simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) using Cellic® CTec 2 (20 U or 0.87 FPU g(-1) substrate) cellulase plus β-glucosidase (2 U g(-1) substrate) and a yeast inoculum of 10% (v/v or 8.0×10(7) cells mL(-1)). At a substrate concentration of 1% (w/v) an ethanol yield of 80% (w/w, theoretical) was achieved. However at a substrate concentration of 20% (w/v), the ethanol yield was lowered to 18.8% (w/w, theoretical). Yields were considerably improved by increasing the yeast titre in the inoculum or preconditioning the yeast on steam exploded liquor. These approaches enhanced the ethanol yield up to 70% (w/w, theoretical) at a substrate concentration of 20% (w/v) by metabolising fermentation inhibitors.

  5. 40 CFR 1065.725 - High-level ethanol-gasoline blends.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... ethanol used for blending must be either denatured ethanol meeting the specifications in 40 CFR 80.1610... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false High-level ethanol-gasoline blends... Calibration Standards § 1065.725 High-level ethanol-gasoline blends. For testing vehicles capable of...

  6. Ethanol fermentation from molasses at high temperature by thermotolerant yeast Kluyveromyces sp. IIPE453 and energy assessment for recovery.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, Diptarka; Ghosh, Prasenjit; Ghosh, Debashish; Suman, Sunil Kumar; Khan, Rashmi; Agrawal, Deepti; Adhikari, Dilip K

    2014-10-01

    High temperature ethanol fermentation from sugarcane molasses B using thermophilic Crabtree-positive yeast Kluyveromyces sp. IIPE453 was carried out in batch bioreactor system. Strain was found to have a maximum specific ethanol productivity of 0.688 g/g/h with 92 % theoretical ethanol yield. Aeration and initial sugar concentration were tuning parameters to regulate metabolic pathways of the strain for either cell mass or higher ethanol production during growth with an optimum sugar to cell ratio 33:1 requisite for fermentation. An assessment of ethanol recovery from fermentation broth via simulation study illustrated that distillation-based conventional recovery was significantly better in terms of energy efficiency and overall mass recovery in comparison to coupled solvent extraction-azeotropic distillation technique for the same.

  7. Ethanol Production from Extruded Thermoplastic Maize Meal by High Gravity Fermentation with Zymomonas mobilis.

    PubMed

    Peralta-Contreras, Mayeli; Aguilar-Zamarripa, Edna; Pérez-Carrillo, Esther; Escamilla-García, Erandi; Serna-Saldívar, Sergio Othon

    2014-01-01

    A comparative study of extruded and ground maize meals as raw materials for the production of regular (12°P) and high gravity (20°P) worts was devised. Extruded water solubility index (WSI) was higher (9.8 percentage units) and crude fat was lower (2.64 percentage units) compared to ground maize. Free-amino nitrogen compounds (FAN), pH, and glucose were evaluated in regular and high gravity worts produced from ground or extruded maize. Extrusion improved glucose content and ethanol yield. In 20°P mashes, extrusion is enhanced by 2.14% initial glucose compared with regular ground mashes. The 12°P and 20°P extruded treatments averaged 12.2% and 8.4% higher ethanol, respectively, compared to the uncooked counterpart. The 20°P worts fermented with Zymomonas mobilis produced 9.56% more ethanol than the 12°P counterpart. The results show that the combination of extrusion and fermentation of 20°P worts improved ethanol yield per kg flour until 20.93%. This pretreatment stimulates Z. mobilis fermentation efficiency. PMID:25530885

  8. Ethanol Production from Extruded Thermoplastic Maize Meal by High Gravity Fermentation with Zymomonas mobilis

    PubMed Central

    Peralta-Contreras, Mayeli; Aguilar-Zamarripa, Edna; Pérez-Carrillo, Esther; Escamilla-García, Erandi; Serna-Saldívar, Sergio Othon

    2014-01-01

    A comparative study of extruded and ground maize meals as raw materials for the production of regular (12°P) and high gravity (20°P) worts was devised. Extruded water solubility index (WSI) was higher (9.8 percentage units) and crude fat was lower (2.64 percentage units) compared to ground maize. Free-amino nitrogen compounds (FAN), pH, and glucose were evaluated in regular and high gravity worts produced from ground or extruded maize. Extrusion improved glucose content and ethanol yield. In 20°P mashes, extrusion is enhanced by 2.14% initial glucose compared with regular ground mashes. The 12°P and 20°P extruded treatments averaged 12.2% and 8.4% higher ethanol, respectively, compared to the uncooked counterpart. The 20°P worts fermented with Zymomonas mobilis produced 9.56% more ethanol than the 12°P counterpart. The results show that the combination of extrusion and fermentation of 20°P worts improved ethanol yield per kg flour until 20.93%. This pretreatment stimulates Z. mobilis fermentation efficiency. PMID:25530885

  9. Highly Selective Formation of n-Butanol from Ethanol through the Guerbet Process: A Tandem Catalytic Approach.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Sumit; Piszel, Paige E; Hayes, Cassandra E; Baker, R Tom; Jones, William D

    2015-11-18

    A highly selective (>99%) tandem catalytic system for the conversion of ethanol (up to 37%) to n-butanol, through the Guerbet process, has been developed using a bifunctional iridium catalyst coupled with bulky nickel or copper hydroxides. These sterically crowded nickel and copper hydroxides catalyze the key aldol coupling reaction of acetaldehyde to exclusively yield the C4 coupling product, crotonaldehyde. Iridium-mediated dehydrogenation of ethanol to acetaldehyde has led to the development of an ethanol-to-butanol process operated at a lower temperature. PMID:26526779

  10. Extraction of high-quality DNA from ethanol-preserved tropical plant tissues

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Proper conservation of plant samples, especially during remote field collection, is essential to assure quality of extracted DNA. Tropical plant species contain considerable amounts of secondary compounds, such as polysaccharides, phenols, and latex, which affect DNA quality during extraction. The suitability of ethanol (96% v/v) as a preservative solution prior to DNA extraction was evaluated using leaves of Jatropha curcas and other tropical species. Results Total DNA extracted from leaf samples stored in liquid nitrogen or ethanol from J. curcas and other tropical species (Theobroma cacao, Coffea arabica, Ricinus communis, Saccharum spp., and Solanum lycopersicon) was similar in quality, with high-molecular-weight DNA visualized by gel electrophoresis. DNA quality was confirmed by digestion with EcoRI or HindIII and by amplification of the ribosomal gene internal transcribed spacer region. Leaf tissue of J. curcas was analyzed by light and transmission electron microscopy before and after exposure to ethanol. Our results indicate that leaf samples can be successfully preserved in ethanol for long periods (30 days) as a viable method for fixation and conservation of DNA from leaves. The success of this technique is likely due to reduction or inactivation of secondary metabolites that could contaminate or degrade genomic DNA. Conclusions Tissue conservation in 96% ethanol represents an attractive low-cost alternative to commonly used methods for preservation of samples for DNA extraction. This technique yields DNA of equivalent quality to that obtained from fresh or frozen tissue. PMID:24761774

  11. Purification of ethanol for highly sensitive self-assembly experiments

    PubMed Central

    Barbe, Kathrin; Kind, Martin; Pfeiffer, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Summary Ethanol is the preferred solvent for the formation of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of thiolates on gold. By applying a thin film sensor system, we could demonstrate that even the best commercial qualities of ethanol contain surface-active contaminants, which can compete with the desired thiolates for surface sites. Here we present that gold nanoparticles deposited onto zeolite X can be used to remove these contaminants by chemisorption. This nanoparticle-impregnated zeolite does not only show high capacities for surface-active contaminants, such as thiols, but can be fully regenerated via a simple pyrolysis protocol. PMID:25161861

  12. A novel direct ethanol fuel cell with high power density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, L.; Zhao, T. S.; Chen, R.; Wu, Q. X.

    2011-08-01

    A new type of direct ethanol fuel cell (DEFC) that is composed of an alkaline anode and an acid cathode separated with a charger conducting membrane is developed. Theoretically it is shown that the voltage of this novel fuel cell is 2.52 V, while, experimentally it has been demonstrated that this fuel cell can yield an open-circuit voltage (OCV) of 1.60 V and a peak power density of 240 mW cm-2 at 60 °C, which represent the highest performance of DEFCs that has so far been reported in the open literature.

  13. Improved saccharification and ethanol yield from field-grown transgenic poplar deficient in cinnamoyl-CoA reductase.

    PubMed

    Van Acker, Rebecca; Leplé, Jean-Charles; Aerts, Dirk; Storme, Véronique; Goeminne, Geert; Ivens, Bart; Légée, Frédéric; Lapierre, Catherine; Piens, Kathleen; Van Montagu, Marc C E; Santoro, Nicholas; Foster, Clifton E; Ralph, John; Soetaert, Wim; Pilate, Gilles; Boerjan, Wout

    2014-01-14

    Lignin is one of the main factors determining recalcitrance to enzymatic processing of lignocellulosic biomass. Poplars (Populus tremula x Populus alba) down-regulated for cinnamoyl-CoA reductase (CCR), the enzyme catalyzing the first step in the monolignol-specific branch of the lignin biosynthetic pathway, were grown in field trials in Belgium and France under short-rotation coppice culture. Wood samples were classified according to the intensity of the red xylem coloration typically associated with CCR down-regulation. Saccharification assays under different pretreatment conditions (none, two alkaline, and one acid pretreatment) and simultaneous saccharification and fermentation assays showed that wood from the most affected transgenic trees had up to 161% increased ethanol yield. Fermentations of combined material from the complete set of 20-mo-old CCR-down-regulated trees, including bark and less efficiently down-regulated trees, still yielded ∼ 20% more ethanol on a weight basis. However, strong down-regulation of CCR also affected biomass yield. We conclude that CCR down-regulation may become a successful strategy to improve biomass processing if the variability in down-regulation and the yield penalty can be overcome.

  14. Improved saccharification and ethanol yield from field-grown transgenic poplar deficient in cinnamoyl-CoA reductase

    PubMed Central

    Van Acker, Rebecca; Leplé, Jean-Charles; Aerts, Dirk; Storme, Véronique; Goeminne, Geert; Ivens, Bart; Légée, Frédéric; Lapierre, Catherine; Piens, Kathleen; Van Montagu, Marc C. E.; Santoro, Nicholas; Foster, Clifton E.; Ralph, John; Soetaert, Wim; Pilate, Gilles; Boerjan, Wout

    2014-01-01

    Lignin is one of the main factors determining recalcitrance to enzymatic processing of lignocellulosic biomass. Poplars (Populus tremula x Populus alba) down-regulated for cinnamoyl-CoA reductase (CCR), the enzyme catalyzing the first step in the monolignol-specific branch of the lignin biosynthetic pathway, were grown in field trials in Belgium and France under short-rotation coppice culture. Wood samples were classified according to the intensity of the red xylem coloration typically associated with CCR down-regulation. Saccharification assays under different pretreatment conditions (none, two alkaline, and one acid pretreatment) and simultaneous saccharification and fermentation assays showed that wood from the most affected transgenic trees had up to 161% increased ethanol yield. Fermentations of combined material from the complete set of 20-mo-old CCR–down-regulated trees, including bark and less efficiently down-regulated trees, still yielded ∼20% more ethanol on a weight basis. However, strong down-regulation of CCR also affected biomass yield. We conclude that CCR down-regulation may become a successful strategy to improve biomass processing if the variability in down-regulation and the yield penalty can be overcome. PMID:24379366

  15. Fermentation method producing ethanol

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Daniel I. C.; Dalal, Rajen

    1986-01-01

    Ethanol is the major end product of an anaerobic, thermophilic fermentation process using a mutant strain of bacterium Clostridium thermosaccharolyticum. This organism is capable of converting hexose and pentose carbohydrates to ethanol, acetic and lactic acids. Mutants of Clostridium thermosaccharolyticum are capable of converting these substrates to ethanol in exceptionally high yield and with increased productivity. Both the mutant organism and the technique for its isolation are provided.

  16. Construction and analysis of high-ethanol-producing fusants with co-fermentation ability through protoplast fusion and double labeling technology.

    PubMed

    Ge, Jingping; Zhao, Jingwen; Zhang, Luyan; Zhang, Mengyun; Ping, Wenxiang

    2014-01-01

    Double labeling of resistance markers and report genes can be used to breed engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains that can assimilate xylose and glucose as a mixed carbon source for ethanol fermentation and increased ethanol production. In this study Saccharomyces cerevisiae W5 and Candida shehatae 20335 were used as parent strains to conduct protoplast fusion and the resulting fusants were screened by double labeling. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was used to assess the ethanol yield following the fermentation of xylose and glucose, as both single and mixed carbon sources, by the fusants. Interestingly, one fusant (ZLYRHZ7) was demonstrated to have an excellent fermentation performance, with an ethanol yield using the mixed carbon source of 0.424 g g-1, which compares with 0.240 g g-1 (W5) and 0.353 g g-1 (20335) for the parent strains. This indicates an improvement in the ethanol yield of 43.4% and 16.7%, respectively.

  17. Reduction of Ethanol Yield and Improvement of Glycerol Formation by Adaptive Evolution of the Wine Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae under Hyperosmotic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Tilloy, Valentin; Ortiz-Julien, Anne

    2014-01-01

    There is a strong demand from the wine industry for methodologies to reduce the alcohol content of wine without compromising wine's sensory characteristics. We assessed the potential of adaptive laboratory evolution strategies under hyperosmotic stress for generation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine yeast strains with enhanced glycerol and reduced ethanol yields. Experimental evolution on KCl resulted, after 200 generations, in strains that had higher glycerol and lower ethanol production than the ancestral strain. This major metabolic shift was accompanied by reduced fermentative capacities, suggesting a trade-off between high glycerol production and fermentation rate. Several evolved strains retaining good fermentation performance were selected. These strains produced more succinate and 2,3-butanediol than the ancestral strain and did not accumulate undesirable organoleptic compounds, such as acetate, acetaldehyde, or acetoin. They survived better under osmotic stress and glucose starvation conditions than the ancestral strain, suggesting that the forces that drove the redirection of carbon fluxes involved a combination of osmotic and salt stresses and carbon limitation. To further decrease the ethanol yield, a breeding strategy was used, generating intrastrain hybrids that produced more glycerol than the evolved strain. Pilot-scale fermentation on Syrah using evolved and hybrid strains produced wine with 0.6% (vol/vol) and 1.3% (vol/vol) less ethanol, more glycerol and 2,3-butanediol, and less acetate than the ancestral strain. This work demonstrates that the combination of adaptive evolution and breeding is a valuable alternative to rational design for remodeling the yeast metabolic network. PMID:24532067

  18. Impact of deficit irrigation on maize physical and chemical properties and ethanol yield

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this research was to study the effect of irrigation levels (five levels from 102 to 457 mm of water) on the physical and chemical properties and ethanol fermentation performance of maize. Twenty maize samples with two crop rotation systems, grain sorghum–maize and maize–maize, were ...

  19. Impact of deficit irrigation on sorghum physical and chemical properties and ethanol yield

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this research was to study the effect of irrigation levels (five levels from 304.8 to 76.2 mm water) on the physical and chemical properties and ethanol fermentation performance of sorghum. Ten sorghum samples grown under semi-arid climatic conditions were harvested in 2011 from the...

  20. Protease addition to increase yield and fermentation rate in dry grind ethanol production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Using a small scale laboratory procedure (100g shake flasks) for ethanol production from corn, the effects of acid protease addition during the fermentation step were evaluated. The batch fermentations were conducted in duplicate using standard conditions and with protease addition during fermentati...

  1. Selection and characterization of a newly isolated thermotolerant Pichia kudriavzevii strain for ethanol production at high temperature from cassava starch hydrolysate.

    PubMed

    Yuangsaard, Napatchanok; Yongmanitchai, Wichien; Yamada, Mumoru; Limtong, Savitree

    2013-03-01

    Pichia kudriavzevii DMKU 3-ET15 was isolated from traditional fermented pork sausage by an enrichment technique in a yeast extract peptone dextrose (YPD) broth, supplemented with 4 % (v/v) ethanol at 40 °C and selected based on its ethanol fermentation ability at 40 °C in YPD broth composed of 16 % glucose, and in a cassava starch hydrolysate medium composed of cassava starch hydrolysate adjusted to 16 % glucose. The strain produced ethanol from cassava starch hydrolysate at a high temperature up to 45 °C, but the optimal temperature for ethanol production was at 40 °C. Ethanol production by this strain using shaking flask cultivation was the highest in a medium containing cassava starch hydrolysate adjusted to 18 % glucose, 0.05 % (NH(4))(2)SO(4), 0.09 % yeast extract, 0.05 % KH(2)PO(4), and 0.05 % MgSO(4)·7H(2)O, with a pH of 5.0 at 40 °C. The highest ethanol concentration reached 7.86 % (w/v) after 24 h, with productivity of 3.28 g/l/h and yield of 85.4 % of the theoretical yield. At 42 °C, ethanol production by this strain became slightly lower, while at 45 °C only 3.82 % (w/v) of ethanol, 1.27 g/l/h productivity and 41.5 % of the theoretical yield were attained. In a study on ethanol production in a 2.5-l jar fermenter with an agitation speed of 300 rpm and an aeration rate of 0.1 vvm throughout the fermentation, P. kudriavzevii DMKU 3-ET15 yielded a final ethanol concentration of 7.35 % (w/v) after 33 h, a productivity of 2.23 g/l/h and a yield of 79.9 % of the theoretical yield.

  2. Selection and characterization of a newly isolated thermotolerant Pichia kudriavzevii strain for ethanol production at high temperature from cassava starch hydrolysate.

    PubMed

    Yuangsaard, Napatchanok; Yongmanitchai, Wichien; Yamada, Mumoru; Limtong, Savitree

    2013-03-01

    Pichia kudriavzevii DMKU 3-ET15 was isolated from traditional fermented pork sausage by an enrichment technique in a yeast extract peptone dextrose (YPD) broth, supplemented with 4 % (v/v) ethanol at 40 °C and selected based on its ethanol fermentation ability at 40 °C in YPD broth composed of 16 % glucose, and in a cassava starch hydrolysate medium composed of cassava starch hydrolysate adjusted to 16 % glucose. The strain produced ethanol from cassava starch hydrolysate at a high temperature up to 45 °C, but the optimal temperature for ethanol production was at 40 °C. Ethanol production by this strain using shaking flask cultivation was the highest in a medium containing cassava starch hydrolysate adjusted to 18 % glucose, 0.05 % (NH(4))(2)SO(4), 0.09 % yeast extract, 0.05 % KH(2)PO(4), and 0.05 % MgSO(4)·7H(2)O, with a pH of 5.0 at 40 °C. The highest ethanol concentration reached 7.86 % (w/v) after 24 h, with productivity of 3.28 g/l/h and yield of 85.4 % of the theoretical yield. At 42 °C, ethanol production by this strain became slightly lower, while at 45 °C only 3.82 % (w/v) of ethanol, 1.27 g/l/h productivity and 41.5 % of the theoretical yield were attained. In a study on ethanol production in a 2.5-l jar fermenter with an agitation speed of 300 rpm and an aeration rate of 0.1 vvm throughout the fermentation, P. kudriavzevii DMKU 3-ET15 yielded a final ethanol concentration of 7.35 % (w/v) after 33 h, a productivity of 2.23 g/l/h and a yield of 79.9 % of the theoretical yield. PMID:23132277

  3. Do new cellulolytic enzyme preparations affect the industrial strategies for high solids lignocellulosic ethanol production?

    PubMed

    Cannella, David; Jørgensen, Henning

    2014-01-01

    Production of ethanol from lignocellulosic materials has a promising market potential, but the process is still only at pilot/demonstration scale due to the technical and economical difficulties of the process. Operating the process at very high solids concentrations (above 20% dry matter-DM) has proven essential for economic feasibility at industrial scale. Historically, simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) was found to give better ethanol yields compared to separate hydrolysis and fermentation (SHF), but data in literature are typically based on operating the process at low dry matter conditions. In this work the impact of selected enzyme preparation and processing strategy (SHF, presaccharification and simultaneous saccharification and fermentation-PSSF, and SSF) on final ethanol yield and overall performance was investigated with pretreated wheat straw up to 30% DM. The experiments revealed that an SSF strategy was indeed better than SHF when applying an older generation enzyme cocktail (Celluclast-Novozym 188). In case of the newer product Cellic CTec 2, SHF resulted in 20% higher final ethanol yield compared to SSF. It was possible to close the mass balance around cellulose to around 94%, revealing that the most relevant products could be accounted for. One observation was the presence of oxidized sugar (gluconic acid) upon enzymatic hydrolysis with the latest enzyme preparation. Experiments showed gluconic acid formation by recently discovered enzymatic class of lytic polysaccharides monoxygenases (LPMO's) to be depending on the processing strategy. The lowest concentration was achieved in SSF, which could be correlated with less available oxygen due to simultaneous oxygen consumption by the yeast. Quantity of glycerol and cell mass was also depending on the selected processing strategy.

  4. The effect of a combined biological and thermo-mechanical pretreatment of wheat straw on energy yields in coupled ethanol and methane generation.

    PubMed

    Theuretzbacher, Franz; Blomqvist, Johanna; Lizasoain, Javier; Klietz, Lena; Potthast, Antje; Horn, Svein Jarle; Nilsen, Paal J; Gronauer, Andreas; Passoth, Volkmar; Bauer, Alexander

    2015-10-01

    Ethanol and biogas are energy carriers that could contribute to a future energy system independent of fossil fuels. Straw is a favorable bioenergy substrate as it does not compete with food or feed production. As straw is very resistant to microbial degradation, it requires a pretreatment to insure efficient conversion to ethanol and/or methane. This study investigates the effect of combining biological pretreatment and steam explosion on ethanol and methane yields in order to improve the coupled generation process. Results show that the temperature of the steam explosion pretreatment has a particularly strong effect on possible ethanol yields, whereas combination with the biological pretreatment showed no difference in overall energy yield. The highest overall energy output was found to be 10.86 MJ kg VS(-1) using a combined biological and steam explosion pretreatment at a temperature of 200°C.

  5. Analysis of methane potentials of steam-exploded wheat straw and estimation of energy yields of combined ethanol and methane production.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Alexander; Bösch, Peter; Friedl, Anton; Amon, Thomas

    2009-06-01

    Agrarian biomass as a renewable energy source can contribute to a considerable CO(2) reduction. The overriding goal of the European Union is to cut energy consumption related greenhouse gas emission in the EU by 20% until the year 2020. This publication aims at optimising the methane production from steam-exploded wheat straw and presents a theoretical estimation of the ethanol and methane potential of straw. For this purpose, wheat straw was pretreated by steam explosion using different time/temperature combinations. Specific methane yields were analyzed according to VDI 4630. Pretreatment of wheat straw by steam explosion significantly increased the methane yield from anaerobic digestion by up to 20% or a maximum of 331 l(N)kg(-1) VS compared to untreated wheat straw. Furthermore, the residual anaerobic digestion potential of methane after ethanol fermentation was determined by enzymatic hydrolysis of pretreated wheat straw using cellulase. Based on the resulting glucose concentration the ethanol yield and the residual sugar available for methane production were calculated. The theoretical maximum ethanol yield of wheat straw was estimated to be 0.249 kg kg(-1) dry matter. The achievable maximum ethanol yield per kg wheat straw dry matter pretreated by steam explosion and enzymatic hydrolysis was estimated to be 0.200 kg under pretreatment conditions of 200 degrees C and 10 min corresponding to 80% of the theoretical maximum. The residual methane yield from straw stillage was estimated to be 183 l(N)kg(-1) wheat straw dry matter. Based on the presented experimental data, a concept is proposed that processes wheat straw for ethanol and methane production. The concept of an energy supply system that provides more than two forms of energy is met by (1) upgrading obtained ethanol to fuel-grade quality and providing methane to CHP plants for the production of (2) electric energy and (3) utility steam that in turn can be used to operate distillation columns in the

  6. Use of high-ethanol-resistant yeast isolates from Nigerian palm wine in lager beer brewing.

    PubMed

    Agu, R C; Anyanwu, T U; Onwumelu, A H

    1993-11-01

    High-ethanol-resistant yeasts, characterized as Saccharomyces sp., were isolated from Nigerian palm wine with added sucrose for high gravity brewing. The yeast isolates that survived the highest ethanol production were used to ferment brewery wort and produced 8.2 to 8.5% (v/v) ethanol; values almost double that of the control yeast from a local brewery.

  7. High-yield synthesis of bioactive ethyl cinnamate by enzymatic esterification of cinnamic acid.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yun; Zhang, Dong-Hao; Zhang, Jiang-Yan; Chen, Na; Zhi, Gao-Ying

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, Lipozyme TLIM-catalyzed synthesis of ethyl cinnamate through esterification of cinnamic acid with ethanol was studied. In order to increase the yield of ethyl cinnamate, several media, including acetone, isooctane, DMSO and solvent-free medium, were investigated in this reaction. The reaction showed a high yield by using isooctane as reaction medium, which was found to be much higher than the yields reported previously. Furthermore, several parameters such as shaking rate, water activity, reaction temperature, substrate molar ratio and enzyme loading had important influences on this reaction. For instance, when temperature increased from 10 to 50 °C, the initial reaction rate increased by 18 times and the yield of ethyl cinnamate increased by 6.2 times. Under the optimum conditions, lipase-catalyzed synthesis of ethyl cinnamate gave a maximum yield of 99%, which was of general interest for developing industrial processes for the preparation of ethyl cinnamate.

  8. Novel technologies for enhanced production of ethanol: impact of high productivity on process economics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In these studies Saccharomyces cerevisiae NRRL Y-566 was used to produce ethanol from a concentrated glucose (250-300 gL-1) solution. When fermentation media were supplemented with CaCO3 and CaCl2, ethanol concentrations, yield, and productivities were improved significantly. In control batch fermen...

  9. Feasibility of producing ethanol from food waste.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae Hyung; Lee, Jun Cheol; Pak, Daewon

    2011-01-01

    Food waste generated in Korea is rich in carbohydrate as high as 65% of total solids. Using the food waste, the feasibility of ethanol production was investigated in a lab-scale fermentor. Pretreatment with hydrolyzing enzymes including carbohydrase, glucoamylase, cellulase and protease were tested for hydrolysis of food waste. The carbohydrase was able to hydrolyze and produce glucose with a glucose yield of 0.63 g glucose/g total solid. Enzymatic hydrolysis and ethanol fermentation by using carbohydrase and Saccharomyces cerevisiae were conducted in the batch mode. For separated hydrolysis and fermentation (SHF), ethanol concentration reached at the level corresponding to an ethanol yield of 0.43 g ethanol/g total solids. For simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF), the ethanol yield was 0.31 g ethanol/g total solids. During the continuous operation of SHF, the volumetric ethanol production rate was 1.18 g/lh with an ethanol yield of 0.3g ethanol/g total solids. For SSF process, the volumetric ethanol production rate was 0.8 g/lh with an ethanol yield of 0.2g ethanol/g total solids. PMID:21596551

  10. Ethanol production by engineered thermophiles.

    PubMed

    Olson, Daniel G; Sparling, Richard; Lynd, Lee R

    2015-06-01

    We compare a number of different strategies that have been pursued to engineer thermophilic microorganisms for increased ethanol production. Ethanol production from pyruvate can proceed via one of four pathways, which are named by the key pyruvate dissimilating enzyme: pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC), pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH), pyruvate formate lyase (PFL), and pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFOR). For each of these pathways except PFL, we see examples where ethanol production has been engineered with a yield of >90% of the theoretical maximum. In each of these cases, this engineering was achieved mainly by modulating expression of native genes. We have not found an example where a thermophilic ethanol production pathway has been transferred to a non-ethanol-producing organism to produce ethanol at high yield. A key reason for the lack of transferability of ethanol production pathways is the current lack of understanding of the enzymes involved. PMID:25745810

  11. High-throughput detection of ethanol-producing cyanobacteria in a microdroplet platform.

    PubMed

    Abalde-Cela, Sara; Gould, Anna; Liu, Xin; Kazamia, Elena; Smith, Alison G; Abell, Chris

    2015-05-01

    Ethanol production by microorganisms is an important renewable energy source. Most processes involve fermentation of sugars from plant feedstock, but there is increasing interest in direct ethanol production by photosynthetic organisms. To facilitate this, a high-throughput screening technique for the detection of ethanol is required. Here, a method for the quantitative detection of ethanol in a microdroplet-based platform is described that can be used for screening cyanobacterial strains to identify those with the highest ethanol productivity levels. The detection of ethanol by enzymatic assay was optimized both in bulk and in microdroplets. In parallel, the encapsulation of engineered ethanol-producing cyanobacteria in microdroplets and their growth dynamics in microdroplet reservoirs were demonstrated. The combination of modular microdroplet operations including droplet generation for cyanobacteria encapsulation, droplet re-injection and pico-injection, and laser-induced fluorescence, were used to create this new platform to screen genetically engineered strains of cyanobacteria with different levels of ethanol production.

  12. High Yield Synthesis of Aspect Ratio Controlled Graphenic Materials from Anthracite Coal in Supercritical Fluids.

    PubMed

    Sasikala, Suchithra Padmajan; Henry, Lucile; Yesilbag Tonga, Gulen; Huang, Kai; Das, Riddha; Giroire, Baptiste; Marre, Samuel; Rotello, Vincent M; Penicaud, Alain; Poulin, Philippe; Aymonier, Cyril

    2016-05-24

    This paper rationalizes the green and scalable synthesis of graphenic materials of different aspect ratios using anthracite coal as a single source material under different supercritical environments. Single layer, monodisperse graphene oxide quantum dots (GQDs) are obtained at high yield (55 wt %) from anthracite coal in supercritical water. The obtained GQDs are ∼3 nm in lateral size and display a high fluorescence quantum yield of 28%. They show high cell viability and are readily used for imaging cancer cells. In an analogous experiment, high aspect ratio graphenic materials with ribbon-like morphology (GRs) are synthesized from the same source material in supercritical ethanol at a yield of 6.4 wt %. A thin film of GRs with 68% transparency shows a surface resistance of 9.3 kΩ/sq. This is apparently the demonstration of anthracite coal as a source for electrically conductive graphenic materials. PMID:27135862

  13. Integrated process for high conversion and high yield protein PEGylation.

    PubMed

    Pfister, David; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2016-08-01

    Over the past decades, PEGylation has become a powerful technique to increase the in vivo circulation half-life of therapeutic proteins while maintaining their activity. The development of new therapeutic proteins is likely to require further improvement of the PEGylation methods to reach even better selectivity and yield for reduced costs. The intensification of the PEGylation process was investigated through the integration of a chromatographic step in order to increase yield and conversion for the production of mono-PEGylated protein. Lysozyme was used as a model protein to demonstrate the feasibility of such approach. In the integrated reaction/separation process, chromatography was used as fractionation technique in order to isolate and recycle the unreacted protein from the PEGylated products. This allows operating the reactor with short reaction times so as to minimize the production of multi-PEGylated proteins (i.e., conjugated to more than one polymer). That is, the reaction is stopped before the desired product (i.e., the mono-PEGylated protein) can further react, thus leading to limited conversion but high yield. The recycling of the unreacted protein was then considered to drive the protein overall conversion to completion. This approach has great potential to improve processes whose yield is limited by the further reaction of the product leading to undesirable by-products. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 1711-1718. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Evolved strains of Scheffersomyces stipitis achieving high ethanol productivity on acid- and base-pretreated biomass hydrolyzate at high solids loading

    DOE PAGES

    Slininger, Patricia J.; Shea-Andersh, Maureen A.; Thompson, Stephanie R.; Dien, Bruce S.; Kurtzman, Cletus P.; Balan, Venkatesh; da Costa Sousa, Leonardo; Uppugundla, Nirmal; Dale, Bruce E; Cotta, Michael A

    2015-04-09

    Lignocellulosic biomass is an abundant, renewable feedstock useful for the production of fuel-grade ethanol via the processing steps of pretreatment, enzyme hydrolysis, and microbial fermentation. Traditional industrial yeasts do not ferment xylose and are not able to grow, survive, or ferment in concentrated hydrolyzates that contain enough sugar to support economical ethanol recovery since they are laden with toxic byproducts generated during pretreatment. Repetitive culturing in two types of concentrated hydrolyzates was applied along with ethanol challenged xylose-fed continuous culture to force targeted evolution of the native pentose fermenting yeast Scheffersomyces (Pichia) stipitis strain NRRL Y-7124 maintained in the ARSmore » Culture Collection, Peoria, IL. Isolates collected from various enriched populations were screened and ranked based on relative xylose uptake rate and ethanol yield. Ranking on hydrolyzates with and without nutritional supplementation was used to identify those isolates with best performance across diverse conditions. Robust S. stipitis strains adapted to perform very well in enzyme hydrolyzates of high solids loading ammonia fiber expansion-pretreated corn stover (18% weight per volume solids) and dilute sulfuric acid-pretreated switchgrass (20% w/v solids) were obtained. Improved features include reduced initial lag phase preceding growth, significantly enhanced fermentation rates, improved ethanol tolerance and yield, reduced diauxic lag during glucose-xylose transition, and ability to accumulate >40 g/L ethanol in <167 h when fermenting hydrolyzate at low initial cell density of 0.5 absorbance units and pH 5 to 6.« less

  15. Ethanol yields and cell wall properties in divergently bred switchgrass genotypes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genetic modification of herbaceous plant cell walls to increase biofuels yields from harvested biomass is a primary bioenergy research goal. The focus of much of this research has been on cell wall lignin concentration. Using switchgrass genotypes developed by divergent breeding for ruminant diges...

  16. Enhancing digestibility and ethanol yield of Populus wood via expression of an engineered monolignol 4-O-methyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Yuanheng; Zhang, Kewei; Kim, Hoon; Hou, Guichuan; Zhang, Xuebin; Yang, Huijun; Feng, Huan; Miller, Lisa; Ralph, John; Liu, Chang-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Producing cellulosic biofuels and bio-based chemicals from woody biomass is impeded by the presence of lignin polymer in the plant cell wall. Manipulating the monolignol biosynthetic pathway offers a promising approach to improved processability, but often impairs plant growth and development. Here, we show that expressing an engineered 4-O-methyltransferase that chemically modifies the phenolic moiety of lignin monomeric precursors, thus preventing their incorporation into the lignin polymer, substantially alters hybrid aspens' lignin content and structure. Woody biomass derived from the transgenic aspens shows a 62% increase in the release of simple sugars and up to a 49% increase in the yield of ethanol when the woody biomass is subjected to enzymatic digestion and yeast-mediated fermentation. Moreover, the cell wall structural changes do not affect growth and biomass production of the trees. Our study provides a useful strategy for tailoring woody biomass for bio-based applications. PMID:27349324

  17. Enhancing digestibility and ethanol yield of Populus wood via expression of an engineered monolignol 4-O-methyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yuanheng; Zhang, Kewei; Kim, Hoon; Hou, Guichuan; Zhang, Xuebin; Yang, Huijun; Feng, Huan; Miller, Lisa; Ralph, John; Liu, Chang-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Producing cellulosic biofuels and bio-based chemicals from woody biomass is impeded by the presence of lignin polymer in the plant cell wall. Manipulating the monolignol biosynthetic pathway offers a promising approach to improved processability, but often impairs plant growth and development. Here, we show that expressing an engineered 4-O-methyltransferase that chemically modifies the phenolic moiety of lignin monomeric precursors, thus preventing their incorporation into the lignin polymer, substantially alters hybrid aspens' lignin content and structure. Woody biomass derived from the transgenic aspens shows a 62% increase in the release of simple sugars and up to a 49% increase in the yield of ethanol when the woody biomass is subjected to enzymatic digestion and yeast-mediated fermentation. Moreover, the cell wall structural changes do not affect growth and biomass production of the trees. Our study provides a useful strategy for tailoring woody biomass for bio-based applications. PMID:27349324

  18. Enhancing digestibility and ethanol yield of Populus wood via expression of an engineered monolignol 4-O-methyltransferase

    DOE PAGES

    Cai, Yuanheng; Zhang, Kewei; Kim, Hoon; Hou, Guichuan; Zhang, Xuebin; Yang, Huijun; Feng, Huan; Miller, Lisa; Ralph, John; Liu, Chang -Jun

    2016-06-28

    Producing cellulosic biofuels and bio-based chemicals from woody biomass is impeded by the presence of lignin polymer in the plant cell wall. Manipulating the monolignol biosynthetic pathway offers a promising approach to improved processability, but often impairs plant growth and development. Here, we show that expressing an engineered 4-O-methyltransferase that chemically modifies the phenolic moiety of lignin monomeric precursors, thus preventing their incorporation into the lignin polymer, substantially alters hybrid aspens’ lignin content and structure. Woody biomass derived from the transgenic aspens shows a 62% increase in the release of simple sugars and up to a 49% increase in themore » yield of ethanol when the woody biomass is subjected to enzymatic digestion and yeast-mediated fermentation. Furthermore, the cell wall structural changes do not affect growth and biomass production of the trees. Our study provides a useful strategy for tailoring woody biomass for bio-based applications.« less

  19. Enhanced thermotolerance and ethanol tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutated by high-energy pulse electron beam and protoplast fusion.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Min; Xiao, Yu; Zhu, Rongrong; Zhang, Qin; Wang, Shi-Long

    2012-11-01

    To increase thermotolerance and ethanol tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain YZ1, the strategies of high-energy pulse electron beam (HEPE) and three rounds of protoplast fusion were explored. The YF31 strain had the characteristics of resistant to high-temperature, high-ethanol tolerance, rapid growth and high yield. The YF31 could grow on plate cultures up to 47 °C, containing 237.5 g L(-1) of ethanol. In particular, the mutant strain YF31 generated 94.2 ± 4.8 g L(-1) ethanol from 200 g glucose L(-1) at 42 °C, which was 2.48 times the production of the wild strain YZ1. Results demonstrated that the variant phenotypes from the strains screening by HEPE irradiation could be used as parent stock for yeast regeneration and the protoplast fusion technology is sufficiently powerful in combining suitable characteristics in a single strain for ethanol fermentation.

  20. How do yeast cells become tolerant to high ethanol concentrations?

    PubMed

    Snoek, Tim; Verstrepen, Kevin J; Voordeckers, Karin

    2016-08-01

    The brewer's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae displays a much higher ethanol tolerance compared to most other organisms, and it is therefore commonly used for the industrial production of bioethanol and alcoholic beverages. However, the genetic determinants underlying this yeast's exceptional ethanol tolerance have proven difficult to elucidate. In this perspective, we discuss how different types of experiments have contributed to our understanding of the toxic effects of ethanol and the mechanisms and complex genetics underlying ethanol tolerance. In a second part, we summarize the different routes and challenges involved in obtaining superior industrial yeasts with improved ethanol tolerance. PMID:26758993

  1. Influence of fiber degradation and concentration of fermentable sugars on simultaneous saccharification and fermentation of high-solids spruce slurry to ethanol

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Saccharification and fermentation of pretreated lignocellulosic materials, such as spruce, should be performed at high solids contents in order to reduce the cost of the produced bioethanol. However, this has been shown to result in reduced ethanol yields or a complete lack of ethanol production. Previous studies have shown inconsistent results when prehydrolysis is performed at a higher temperature prior to the simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) of steam-pretreated lignocellulosic materials. In some cases, a significant increase in overall ethanol yield was reported, while in others, a slight decrease in ethanol yield was observed. In order to investigate the influence of prehydrolysis on high-solids SSF of steam-pretreated spruce slurry, in the present study, the presence of fibers and inhibitors, degree of fiber degradation and initial fermentable sugar concentration has been studied. Results SSF of whole steam-pretreated spruce slurry at a solids content of 13.7% water-insoluble solids (WIS) resulted in a very low overall ethanol yield, mostly due to poor fermentation. The yeast was, however, able to ferment the washed slurry and the liquid fraction of the pretreated slurry. Performing prehydrolysis at 48°C for 22 hours prior to SSF of the whole pretreated slurry increased the overall ethanol yield from 3.9 to 62.1%. The initial concentration of fermentable sugars in SSF could not explain the increase in ethanol yield in SSF with prehydrolysis. Although the viscosity of the material did not appear to decrease significantly during prehydrolysis, the degradation of the fibers prior to the addition of the yeast had a positive effect on ethanol yield when using whole steam-pretreated spruce slurry. Conclusions The results of the present study suggest that the increase in ethanol yield from SSF when performing prehydrolysis is a result of fiber degradation rather than a decrease in viscosity. The increased concentration of fermentable

  2. Biotransformation of ethanol to ethyl glucuronide in a rat model after a single high oral dosage.

    PubMed

    Wright, Trista H; Ferslew, Kenneth E

    2012-03-01

    Ethyl glucuronide (EtG) is a minor ethanol metabolite that confirms the absorption and metabolism of ethanol after oral or dermal exposure. Human data suggest that maximum blood EtG (BEtG) concentrations are reached between 3.5 and 5.5h after ethanol administration. This study was undertaken to determine if the Sprague-Dawley (SD) rat biotransforms ethanol to EtG after a single high oral dose of ethanol. SD rats (male, n=6) were gavaged with a single ethanol dose (4 g/kg), and urine was collected for 3 h in metabolic cages, followed by euthanization and collection of heart blood. Blood and urine were analyzed for ethanol and EtG by gas chromatography and enzyme immunoassay. Blood and urine ethanol concentrations were 195±23 and 218±19 mg/dL, whereas BEtG and urine EtG (UEtG) concentrations were 1,363±98 ng equivalents/mL and 210±0.29 mg equivalents/dL (X ± standard error of the mean [S.E.M.]). Sixty-six male SD rats were gavaged ethanol (4 g/kg) and placed in metabolic cages to determine the extent and duration of ethanol to EtG biotransformation and urinary excretion. Blood and urine were collected up to 24 h after administration for ethanol and EtG analysis. Maximum blood ethanol, urine ethanol, and UEtG were reached within 4 h, whereas maximum BEtG was reached 6 h after administration. Maximum concentrations were blood ethanol, 213±20 mg/dL; urine ethanol, 308±34 mg/dL; BEtG, 2,683±145 ng equivalents/mL; UEtG, 1.2±0.06 mg equivalents/mL (X±S.E.M.). Areas under the concentration-time curve were blood ethanol, 1,578 h*mg/dL; urine ethanol, 3,096 h*mg/dL; BEtG, 18,284 h*ng equivalents/mL; and UEtG, 850 h*mg equivalents/dL. Blood ethanol and BEtG levels were reduced to below limits of detection (LODs) within 12 and 18 h after ethanol administration. Urine ethanols were below LOD at 18 h, but UEtG was still detectable at 24h after administration. Our data prove that the SD rat biotransforms ethanol to EtG and excretes both in the urine and suggest that it

  3. Biotransformation of ethanol to ethyl glucuronide in a rat model after a single high oral dosage.

    PubMed

    Wright, Trista H; Ferslew, Kenneth E

    2012-03-01

    Ethyl glucuronide (EtG) is a minor ethanol metabolite that confirms the absorption and metabolism of ethanol after oral or dermal exposure. Human data suggest that maximum blood EtG (BEtG) concentrations are reached between 3.5 and 5.5h after ethanol administration. This study was undertaken to determine if the Sprague-Dawley (SD) rat biotransforms ethanol to EtG after a single high oral dose of ethanol. SD rats (male, n=6) were gavaged with a single ethanol dose (4 g/kg), and urine was collected for 3 h in metabolic cages, followed by euthanization and collection of heart blood. Blood and urine were analyzed for ethanol and EtG by gas chromatography and enzyme immunoassay. Blood and urine ethanol concentrations were 195±23 and 218±19 mg/dL, whereas BEtG and urine EtG (UEtG) concentrations were 1,363±98 ng equivalents/mL and 210±0.29 mg equivalents/dL (X ± standard error of the mean [S.E.M.]). Sixty-six male SD rats were gavaged ethanol (4 g/kg) and placed in metabolic cages to determine the extent and duration of ethanol to EtG biotransformation and urinary excretion. Blood and urine were collected up to 24 h after administration for ethanol and EtG analysis. Maximum blood ethanol, urine ethanol, and UEtG were reached within 4 h, whereas maximum BEtG was reached 6 h after administration. Maximum concentrations were blood ethanol, 213±20 mg/dL; urine ethanol, 308±34 mg/dL; BEtG, 2,683±145 ng equivalents/mL; UEtG, 1.2±0.06 mg equivalents/mL (X±S.E.M.). Areas under the concentration-time curve were blood ethanol, 1,578 h*mg/dL; urine ethanol, 3,096 h*mg/dL; BEtG, 18,284 h*ng equivalents/mL; and UEtG, 850 h*mg equivalents/dL. Blood ethanol and BEtG levels were reduced to below limits of detection (LODs) within 12 and 18 h after ethanol administration. Urine ethanols were below LOD at 18 h, but UEtG was still detectable at 24h after administration. Our data prove that the SD rat biotransforms ethanol to EtG and excretes both in the urine and suggest that it

  4. High-efficiency ethanol production from lignocellulosic residues pretreated with alkaline H/sub 2/O/sub 2/

    SciTech Connect

    Gould, J.M.; Freer, S.N.

    1984-06-01

    Pretreatment should be economic and should not utilize toxic reagents. In this study locally obtained residues were used - wheat straw, cornstalks, corn husks and kenaf -as substrates. The high efficiency of glucose production from alkaline H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ pretreated lignocellulosic residues made these materials excellent substrates for ethanol production by Saccharomyces cerevisiae in combined saccharification/fermentation experiments. Results showed that overall efficiency of ethanol formation was 90% for pretreated corn cobs, stalks and husks compared to 50% for untreated materials. Yields from kenaf and oak were also enhanced although below the theoretical maximum. The lignin containing supernatant does not appear to be inhibitory to Saccharomyces cerevisiae growth or ethanol production. The improvement in conversion efficiency is apparently the result of the removal of about one half of the lignin along with an apparent reduction in the degree of crystallinity within the cellulose structure itself. 16 references.

  5. Pyruvate decarboxylase and alcohol dehydrogenase overexpression in Escherichia coli resulted in high ethanol production and rewired metabolic enzyme networks.

    PubMed

    Yang, Mingfeng; Li, Xuefeng; Bu, Chunya; Wang, Hui; Shi, Guanglu; Yang, Xiushan; Hu, Yong; Wang, Xiaoqin

    2014-11-01

    Pyruvate decarboxylase and alcohol dehydrogenase are efficient enzymes for ethanol production in Zymomonas mobilis. These two enzymes were over-expressed in Escherichia coli, a promising candidate for industrial ethanol production, resulting in high ethanol production in the engineered E. coli. To investigate the intracellular changes to the enzyme overexpression for homoethanol production, 2-DE and LC-MS/MS were performed. More than 1,000 protein spots were reproducibly detected in the gel by image analysis. Compared to the wild-type, 99 protein spots showed significant changes in abundance in the recombinant E. coli, in which 46 were down-regulated and 53 were up-regulated. Most proteins related to tricarboxylic acid cycle, glycerol metabolism and other energy metabolism were up-regulated, whereas proteins involved in glycolysis and glyoxylate pathway were down-regulated, indicating the rewired metabolism in the engineered E. coli. As glycolysis is the main pathway for ethanol production, and it was inhibited significantly in engineered E. coli, further efforts should be directed at minimizing the repression of glycolysis to optimize metabolism network for higher yields of ethanol production.

  6. Effects of ethanol on body temperature of rats at high ambient pressure.

    PubMed

    Berge, O G; Garcia-Cabrera, I

    1991-05-01

    Separately, ethanol and high ambient pressure cause hypothermia in laboratory animals. However, ethanol and high pressure have mutually antagonistic effects on several biological functions and the present experiments investigate their combined action on body temperature. Rats given saline, 1.5 g/kg ethanol or 3.5 g/kg ethanol were exposed to 1 bar air at 25-26 degrees C, 1 bar helium-oxygen at 30-31 degrees C, or 48 bar helium-oxygen at 33.5-34.5 degrees C. Ambient, colonic and tail-skin temperatures were monitored for 60 min. There were no significant differences in mean ambient or tail-skin temperatures between groups belonging to the same ambient condition. Colonic temperatures under the 1 bar conditions were 1.5-2 degrees C lower in the 3.5 g/kg ethanol group than in the saline and 1.5 g/kg ethanol groups, while no significant differences were observed between the groups at 48 bar. Comparisons of the colonic temperatures at the end of the observation period, i.e., 60 min after administration of ethanol, demonstrated that their values at 48 bar were significantly lower than at 1 bar after saline, significantly higher after 3.5 g/kg ethanol and identical across conditions in the 1.5 g/kg groups. The results suggest that high ambient pressure may counteract rather than potentiate the hypothermic effect of ethanol.

  7. Highly loaded Ni-based catalysts for low temperature ethanol steam reforming.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tuo; Ma, Hongyan; Zeng, Liang; Li, Di; Tian, Hao; Xiao, Shengning; Gong, Jinlong

    2016-05-21

    This paper describes the design of high-loading Ni/Al2O3 catalysts (78 wt% Ni) for low temperature ethanol steam reforming. The catalysts were synthesized via both co-precipitation (COP) and impregnation (IMP) methods. All the catalysts were measured by N2 adsorption-desorption, XRD, H2-TPR, and H2 pulse chemisorption. The characterization results demonstrated that the preparation method and the loading significantly affected the nickel particle size, active nickel surface area and catalytic performance. Over COP catalysts, large nickel particles were presented in nickel aluminum mixed oxides. In comparison, IMP catalysts gained more "free" NiO particles with weak interaction with the aluminum oxide. Consequently, COP catalysts yielded smaller nickel particles and larger active nickel surface areas than those of IMP catalysts. High loading is beneficial for obtaining sufficient active nickel sites when nickel particles are dispersed via COP, whereas excessive nickel content is not desired for catalysts prepared by IMP. Specifically, the 78 wt% nickel loaded catalyst synthesized by COP possessed small nickel particles (∼6.0 nm) and an abundant active nickel area (35.1 m(2) gcat(-1)). Consequently, COP-78 achieved superior stability with 92% ethanol conversion and ∼35% H2 selectivity at 673 K for 30 h despite the presence of a considerable amount of coke.

  8. Highly loaded Ni-based catalysts for low temperature ethanol steam reforming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tuo; Ma, Hongyan; Zeng, Liang; Li, Di; Tian, Hao; Xiao, Shengning; Gong, Jinlong

    2016-05-01

    This paper describes the design of high-loading Ni/Al2O3 catalysts (78 wt% Ni) for low temperature ethanol steam reforming. The catalysts were synthesized via both co-precipitation (COP) and impregnation (IMP) methods. All the catalysts were measured by N2 adsorption-desorption, XRD, H2-TPR, and H2 pulse chemisorption. The characterization results demonstrated that the preparation method and the loading significantly affected the nickel particle size, active nickel surface area and catalytic performance. Over COP catalysts, large nickel particles were presented in nickel aluminum mixed oxides. In comparison, IMP catalysts gained more ``free'' NiO particles with weak interaction with the aluminum oxide. Consequently, COP catalysts yielded smaller nickel particles and larger active nickel surface areas than those of IMP catalysts. High loading is beneficial for obtaining sufficient active nickel sites when nickel particles are dispersed via COP, whereas excessive nickel content is not desired for catalysts prepared by IMP. Specifically, the 78 wt% nickel loaded catalyst synthesized by COP possessed small nickel particles (~6.0 nm) and an abundant active nickel area (35.1 m2 gcat-1). Consequently, COP-78 achieved superior stability with 92% ethanol conversion and ~35% H2 selectivity at 673 K for 30 h despite the presence of a considerable amount of coke.

  9. Highly loaded Ni-based catalysts for low temperature ethanol steam reforming.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tuo; Ma, Hongyan; Zeng, Liang; Li, Di; Tian, Hao; Xiao, Shengning; Gong, Jinlong

    2016-05-21

    This paper describes the design of high-loading Ni/Al2O3 catalysts (78 wt% Ni) for low temperature ethanol steam reforming. The catalysts were synthesized via both co-precipitation (COP) and impregnation (IMP) methods. All the catalysts were measured by N2 adsorption-desorption, XRD, H2-TPR, and H2 pulse chemisorption. The characterization results demonstrated that the preparation method and the loading significantly affected the nickel particle size, active nickel surface area and catalytic performance. Over COP catalysts, large nickel particles were presented in nickel aluminum mixed oxides. In comparison, IMP catalysts gained more "free" NiO particles with weak interaction with the aluminum oxide. Consequently, COP catalysts yielded smaller nickel particles and larger active nickel surface areas than those of IMP catalysts. High loading is beneficial for obtaining sufficient active nickel sites when nickel particles are dispersed via COP, whereas excessive nickel content is not desired for catalysts prepared by IMP. Specifically, the 78 wt% nickel loaded catalyst synthesized by COP possessed small nickel particles (∼6.0 nm) and an abundant active nickel area (35.1 m(2) gcat(-1)). Consequently, COP-78 achieved superior stability with 92% ethanol conversion and ∼35% H2 selectivity at 673 K for 30 h despite the presence of a considerable amount of coke. PMID:27122228

  10. The yield and post-yield behavior of high-density polyethylene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Semeliss, M. A.; Wong, R.; Tuttle, M. E.

    1990-01-01

    An experimental and analytical evaluation was made of the yield and post-yield behavior of high-density polyethylene, a semi-crystalline thermoplastic. Polyethylene was selected for study because it is very inexpensive and readily available in the form of thin-walled tubes. Thin-walled tubular specimens were subjected to axial loads and internal pressures, such that the specimens were subjected to a known biaxial loading. A constant octahederal shear stress rate was imposed during all tests. The measured yield and post-yield behavior was compared with predictions based on both isotropic and anisotropic models. Of particular interest was whether inelastic behavior was sensitive to the hydrostatic stress level. The major achievements and conclusions reached are discussed.

  11. Ethanol production from food waste at high solid contents with vacuum recovery technology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ethanol production from food wastes does not only solve the environmental issues but also provide renewable biofuel to partially substitute fossil fuels. This study investigated the feasibility of utilization of food wastes for producing ethanol at high solid contents (35%, w/w). Vacuum recovery sys...

  12. Saccharomyces cerevisiae KNU5377 stress response during high-temperature ethanol fermentation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Il-Sup; Kim, Young-Saeng; Kim, Hyun; Jin, Ingnyol; Yoon, Ho-Sung

    2013-03-01

    Fuel ethanol production is far more costly to produce than fossil fuels. There are a number of approaches to cost-effective fuel ethanol production from biomass. We characterized stress response of thermotolerant Saccharomyces cerevisiae KNU5377 during glucose-based batch fermentation at high temperature (40°C). S. cerevisiae KNU5377 (KNU5377) transcription factors (Hsf1, Msn2/4, and Yap1), metabolic enzymes (hexokinase, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, isocitrate dehydrogenase, and alcohol dehydrogenase), antioxidant enzymes (thioredoxin 3, thioredoxin reductase, and porin), and molecular chaperones and its cofactors (Hsp104, Hsp82, Hsp60, Hsp42, Hsp30, Hsp26, Cpr1, Sti1, and Zpr1) are upregulated during fermentation, in comparison to S. cerevisiae S288C (S288C). Expression of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase increased significantly in KNU5377 cells. In addition, cellular hydroperoxide and protein oxidation, particularly lipid peroxidation of triosephosphate isomerase, was lower in KNU5377 than in S288C. Thus, KNU5377 activates various cell rescue proteins through transcription activators, improving tolerance and increasing alcohol yield by rapidly responding to fermentation stress through redox homeostasis and proteostasis.

  13. Evolved strains of Scheffersomyces stipitis achieving high ethanol productivity on acid- and base-pretreated biomass hydrolyzate at high solids loading

    SciTech Connect

    Slininger, Patricia J.; Shea-Andersh, Maureen A.; Thompson, Stephanie R.; Dien, Bruce S.; Kurtzman, Cletus P.; Balan, Venkatesh; da Costa Sousa, Leonardo; Uppugundla, Nirmal; Dale, Bruce E; Cotta, Michael A

    2015-04-09

    Lignocellulosic biomass is an abundant, renewable feedstock useful for the production of fuel-grade ethanol via the processing steps of pretreatment, enzyme hydrolysis, and microbial fermentation. Traditional industrial yeasts do not ferment xylose and are not able to grow, survive, or ferment in concentrated hydrolyzates that contain enough sugar to support economical ethanol recovery since they are laden with toxic byproducts generated during pretreatment. Repetitive culturing in two types of concentrated hydrolyzates was applied along with ethanol challenged xylose-fed continuous culture to force targeted evolution of the native pentose fermenting yeast Scheffersomyces (Pichia) stipitis strain NRRL Y-7124 maintained in the ARS Culture Collection, Peoria, IL. Isolates collected from various enriched populations were screened and ranked based on relative xylose uptake rate and ethanol yield. Ranking on hydrolyzates with and without nutritional supplementation was used to identify those isolates with best performance across diverse conditions. Robust S. stipitis strains adapted to perform very well in enzyme hydrolyzates of high solids loading ammonia fiber expansion-pretreated corn stover (18% weight per volume solids) and dilute sulfuric acid-pretreated switchgrass (20% w/v solids) were obtained. Improved features include reduced initial lag phase preceding growth, significantly enhanced fermentation rates, improved ethanol tolerance and yield, reduced diauxic lag during glucose-xylose transition, and ability to accumulate >40 g/L ethanol in <167 h when fermenting hydrolyzate at low initial cell density of 0.5 absorbance units and pH 5 to 6.

  14. Determining yields in high solids enzymatic hydrolysis of biomass.

    PubMed

    Kristensen, Jan B; Felby, Claus; Jørgensen, Henning

    2009-05-01

    As technologies for utilizing biomass for fuel and chemical production continue to improve, enzymatic hydrolysis can be run at still higher solids concentrations. For hydrolyses that initially contain little or no free water (10-40% total solids, w/w), the saccharification of insoluble polymers into soluble sugars involves changes of volume, density, and proportion of insoluble solids. This poses a new challenge when determining the degree of hydrolysis (conversion yield). Experiments have shown that calculating the yield from the resulting sugar concentration in the supernatant of the slurry and using the assumed initial volume leads to significant overestimations of the yield. By measuring the proportion of insoluble solids in the slurry as well as the sugar concentration and specific gravity of the aqueous phase, it is possible to precisely calculate the degree of conversion. The discrepancies between the different ways of calculating yields are demonstrated along with a nonlaborious method for approximating yields in high solids hydrolysis. PMID:18836690

  15. "Jello® shots" and cocktails as ethanol vehicles: parametric studies with high- and low-saccharin-consuming rats.

    PubMed

    Dess, Nancy K; Madkins, Chardonnay D; Geary, Bree A; Chapman, Clinton D

    2013-11-21

    Naïve humans and rats voluntarily consume little ethanol at concentrations above ~6% due to its aversive flavor. Developing procedures that boost intake of ethanol or ethanol-paired flavors facilitates research on neural mechanisms of ethanol-associated behaviors and helps identify variables that modulate ethanol intake outside of the lab. The present study explored the impact on consumption of ethanol and ethanol-paired flavors of nutritionally significant parametric variations: ethanol vehicle (gelatin or solution, with or without polycose); ethanol concentration (4% or 10%); and feeding status (chow deprived or ad lib.) during flavor conditioning and flavor preference testing. Individual differences were modeled by testing rats of lines selectively bred for high (HiS) or low (LoS) saccharin intake. A previously reported preference for ethanol-paired flavors was replicated when ethanol had been drunk during conditioning. However, indifference or aversion to ethanol-paired flavors generally obtained when ethanol had been eaten in gelatin during conditioning, regardless of ethanol concentration, feeding status, or caloric value of the vehicle. Modest sex and line variations occurred. Engaging different behavioral systems when eating gelatin, rather than drinking solution, may account for these findings. Implications for parameter selection in future neurobiological research and for understanding conditions that influence ethanol intake outside of the lab are discussed.

  16. Corrigendum to "Sinusoidal potential cycling operation of a direct ethanol fuel cell to improving carbon dioxide yields" [J. Power Sources 268 (5 December 2014) 439-442

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majidi, Pasha; Pickup, Peter G.

    2016-09-01

    The authors regret that Equation (5) is incorrect and has resulted in errors in Fig. 4 and the efficiencies stated on p. 442. The corrected equation, figure and text are presented below. In addition, the title should be 'Sinusoidal potential cycling operation of a direct ethanol fuel cell to improve carbon dioxide yields', and the reversible cell potential quoted on p. 441 should be 1.14 V. The authors would like to apologise for any inconvenience caused.

  17. Place conditioning with ethanol in rats bred for high (UChB) and low (UChA) voluntary alcohol drinking.

    PubMed

    Quintanilla, María Elena; Tampier, Lutske

    2011-12-01

    The main goal of this study was to investigate the ability of an ethanol dose (1g/kg) administered intraperitoneally to induce conditioned place preference (CPP) and/or conditioned place aversion (CPA) in two lines of rats selectively bred for their high (UChB) or low (UChA) voluntary ethanol intake. It was found that five pairings with ethanol induced CPA in ethanol-naïve rats of both lines, but the magnitude of avoidance was lower in the UChB relative to the UChA rats, indicating that ethanol was less aversive to naïve rats bred for high alcohol drinking. After 2 months of high voluntary ethanol drinking (~6-7g/kg/day), in free choice between 10% ethanol and water, ethanol produced CPP in UChB rats, reflecting that ethanol had become rewarding to these rats. By contrast, the low voluntary ethanol intake (<1g/kg/day) displayed by UChA rats preexposed for 2 months in free choice did not change ethanol-induced CPA. However, preexposure of UChA rats to forced ethanol drinking (~5.7g/kg/day) and the later inhibition of ethanol-derived acetaldehyde by 4-methylpyrazole (10mg/kg intraperitoneal), an inhibitor of the enzyme alcohol dehydrogenase, not only increased their voluntary ethanol intake in free choice, but also had a facilitating effect on the development of CPP. Taken together, these results show that the expression of the reinforcing effects of ethanol required a period of voluntary ethanol intake in UChB rats, whereas in UChA rats, both prior exposure to forced ethanol drinking and reduction of high blood ethanol-derived acetaldehyde were required.

  18. High-throughput detection of ethanol-producing cyanobacteria in a microdroplet platform

    PubMed Central

    Abalde-Cela, Sara; Gould, Anna; Liu, Xin; Kazamia, Elena; Smith, Alison G.; Abell, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Ethanol production by microorganisms is an important renewable energy source. Most processes involve fermentation of sugars from plant feedstock, but there is increasing interest in direct ethanol production by photosynthetic organisms. To facilitate this, a high-throughput screening technique for the detection of ethanol is required. Here, a method for the quantitative detection of ethanol in a microdroplet-based platform is described that can be used for screening cyanobacterial strains to identify those with the highest ethanol productivity levels. The detection of ethanol by enzymatic assay was optimized both in bulk and in microdroplets. In parallel, the encapsulation of engineered ethanol-producing cyanobacteria in microdroplets and their growth dynamics in microdroplet reservoirs were demonstrated. The combination of modular microdroplet operations including droplet generation for cyanobacteria encapsulation, droplet re-injection and pico-injection, and laser-induced fluorescence, were used to create this new platform to screen genetically engineered strains of cyanobacteria with different levels of ethanol production. PMID:25878135

  19. High pressure intensification of cassava resistant starch (RS3) yields.

    PubMed

    Lertwanawatana, Proyphon; Frazier, Richard A; Niranjan, Keshavan

    2015-08-15

    Cassava starch, typically, has resistant starch type 3 (RS3) content of 2.4%. This paper shows that the RS3 yields can be substantially enhanced by debranching cassava starch using pullulanase followed by high pressure or cyclic high-pressure annealing. RS3 yield of 41.3% was obtained when annealing was carried out at 400MPa/60°C for 15 min, whereas it took nearly 8h to obtain the same yield under conventional atmospheric annealing at 60°C. The yield of RS3 could be further significantly increased by annealing under 400 MPa/60°C pressure for 15 min followed by resting at atmospheric pressure for 3h 45 min, and repeating this cycle for up to six times. Microstructural surface analysis of the product under a scanning electron microscope showed an increasingly rigid density of the crystalline structure formed, confirming higher RS3 content.

  20. Optimization of dilute sulfuric acid pretreatment to maximize combined sugar yield from sugarcane bagasse for ethanol production.

    PubMed

    Benjamin, Y; Cheng, H; Görgens, J F

    2014-01-01

    Increasing fermentable sugar yields per gram of biomass depends strongly on optimal selection of varieties and optimization of pretreatment conditions. In this study, dilute acid pretreatment of bagasse from six varieties of sugarcane was investigated in connection with enzymatic hydrolysis for maximum combined sugar yield (CSY). The CSY from the varieties were also compared with the results from industrial bagasse. The results revealed considerable differences in CSY between the varieties. Up to 22.7 % differences in CSY at the optimal conditions was observed. The combined sugar yield difference between the best performing variety and the industrial bagasse was 34.1 %. High ratio of carbohydrates to lignin and low ash content favored the release of sugar from the substrates. At mild pretreatment conditions, the differences in bioconversion efficiency between varieties were greater than at severe condition. This observation suggests that under less severe conditions the glucose recovery was largely determined by chemical composition of biomass. The results from this study support the possibility of increasing sugar yields or improving the conversion efficiency when pretreatment optimization is performed on varieties with improved properties.

  1. Construction and analysis of high-ethanol-producing fusants with co-fermentation ability through protoplast fusion and double labeling technology.

    PubMed

    Ge, Jingping; Zhao, Jingwen; Zhang, Luyan; Zhang, Mengyun; Ping, Wenxiang

    2014-01-01

    Double labeling of resistance markers and report genes can be used to breed engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains that can assimilate xylose and glucose as a mixed carbon source for ethanol fermentation and increased ethanol production. In this study Saccharomyces cerevisiae W5 and Candida shehatae 20335 were used as parent strains to conduct protoplast fusion and the resulting fusants were screened by double labeling. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was used to assess the ethanol yield following the fermentation of xylose and glucose, as both single and mixed carbon sources, by the fusants. Interestingly, one fusant (ZLYRHZ7) was demonstrated to have an excellent fermentation performance, with an ethanol yield using the mixed carbon source of 0.424 g g-1, which compares with 0.240 g g-1 (W5) and 0.353 g g-1 (20335) for the parent strains. This indicates an improvement in the ethanol yield of 43.4% and 16.7%, respectively. PMID:25268957

  2. Auxotrophic Mutations Reduce Tolerance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to Very High Levels of Ethanol Stress

    PubMed Central

    Swinnen, Steve; Goovaerts, Annelies; Schaerlaekens, Kristien; Dumortier, Françoise; Verdyck, Pieter; Souvereyns, Kris; Van Zeebroeck, Griet; Foulquié-Moreno, María R.

    2015-01-01

    Very high ethanol tolerance is a distinctive trait of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae with notable ecological and industrial importance. Although many genes have been shown to be required for moderate ethanol tolerance (i.e., 6 to 12%) in laboratory strains, little is known of the much higher ethanol tolerance (i.e., 16 to 20%) in natural and industrial strains. We have analyzed the genetic basis of very high ethanol tolerance in a Brazilian bioethanol production strain by genetic mapping with laboratory strains containing artificially inserted oligonucleotide markers. The first locus contained the ura3Δ0 mutation of the laboratory strain as the causative mutation. Analysis of other auxotrophies also revealed significant linkage for LYS2, LEU2, HIS3, and MET15. Tolerance to only very high ethanol concentrations was reduced by auxotrophies, while the effect was reversed at lower concentrations. Evaluation of other stress conditions showed that the link with auxotrophy is dependent on the type of stress and the type of auxotrophy. When the concentration of the auxotrophic nutrient is close to that limiting growth, more stress factors can inhibit growth of an auxotrophic strain. We show that very high ethanol concentrations inhibit the uptake of leucine more than that of uracil, but the 500-fold-lower uracil uptake activity may explain the strong linkage between uracil auxotrophy and ethanol sensitivity compared to leucine auxotrophy. Since very high concentrations of ethanol inhibit the uptake of auxotrophic nutrients, the active uptake of scarce nutrients may be a major limiting factor for growth under conditions of ethanol stress. PMID:26116212

  3. Ethanol Demand in United States Gasoline Production

    SciTech Connect

    Hadder, G.R.

    1998-11-24

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (OWL) Refinery Yield Model (RYM) has been used to estimate the demand for ethanol in U.S. gasoline production in year 2010. Study cases examine ethanol demand with variations in world oil price, cost of competing oxygenate, ethanol value, and gasoline specifications. For combined-regions outside California summer ethanol demand is dominated by conventional gasoline (CG) because the premised share of reformulated gasoline (RFG) production is relatively low and because CG offers greater flexibility for blending high vapor pressure components like ethanol. Vapor pressure advantages disappear for winter CG, but total ethanol used in winter RFG remains low because of the low RFG production share. In California, relatively less ethanol is used in CG because the RFG production share is very high. During the winter in California, there is a significant increase in use of ethanol in RFG, as ethanol displaces lower-vapor-pressure ethers. Estimated U.S. ethanol demand is a function of the refiner value of ethanol. For example, ethanol demand for reference conditions in year 2010 is 2 billion gallons per year (BGY) at a refiner value of $1.00 per gallon (1996 dollars), and 9 BGY at a refiner value of $0.60 per gallon. Ethanol demand could be increased with higher oil prices, or by changes in gasoline specifications for oxygen content, sulfur content, emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCS), and octane numbers.

  4. Zymomonas ethanol fermentations

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, P.L.; Goodman, A.E.; Heyes, R.E.

    1984-09-01

    Studies on various industrial raw materials indicate that a Zymomonas process has its greatest commercial potential in fermenting starch-based substrates. High yields, productivities and ethanol concentrations can be achieved. Genetic manipulation is now being used to extend the substrate range to lactose and other carbohydrates. 31 references.

  5. HIGH TEMPERATURE STRESS ON FLORAL DEVELOPMENT AND YIELD OF COTTON

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Because a number of reproductive processes must occur in highly concerted fashion during the progamic phase (from pollination to fertilization) for successful fertilization and seed production to occur, final yield in cotton is exceptionally sensitive to high temperatures during the flowering period...

  6. Yield-determining factors in high-solids enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocellulose

    PubMed Central

    Kristensen, Jan B; Felby, Claus; Jørgensen, Henning

    2009-01-01

    Background Working at high solids (substrate) concentrations is advantageous in enzymatic conversion of lignocellulosic biomass as it increases product concentrations and plant productivity while lowering energy and water input. However, for a number of lignocellulosic substrates it has been shown that at increasing substrate concentration, the corresponding yield decreases in a fashion which can not be explained by current models and knowledge of enzyme-substrate interactions. This decrease in yield is undesirable as it offsets the advantages of working at high solids levels. The cause of the 'solids effect' has so far remained unknown. Results The decreasing conversion at increasing solids concentrations was found to be a generic or intrinsic effect, describing a linear correlation from 5 to 30% initial total solids content (w/w). Insufficient mixing has previously been shown not to be involved in the effect. Hydrolysis experiments with filter paper showed that neither lignin content nor hemicellulose-derived inhibitors appear to be responsible for the decrease in yields. Product inhibition by glucose and in particular cellobiose (and ethanol in simultaneous saccharification and fermentation) at the increased concentrations at high solids loading plays a role but could not completely account for the decreasing conversion. Adsorption of cellulases was found to decrease at increasing solids concentrations. There was a strong correlation between the decreasing adsorption and conversion, indicating that the inhibition of cellulase adsorption to cellulose is causing the decrease in yield. Conclusion Inhibition of enzyme adsorption by hydrolysis products appear to be the main cause of the decreasing yields at increasing substrate concentrations in the enzymatic decomposition of cellulosic biomass. In order to facilitate high conversions at high solids concentrations, understanding of the mechanisms involved in high-solids product inhibition and adsorption inhibition

  7. Mapping Crop Yield and Sow Date Using High Resolution Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Royal, K.

    2015-12-01

    Keitasha Royal, Meha Jain, Ph.D., David Lobell, Ph.D Mapping Crop Yield and Sow Date Using High Resolution ImageryThe use of satellite imagery in agriculture is becoming increasingly more significant and valuable. Due to the emergence of new satellites, such as Skybox, these satellites provide higher resolution imagery (e.g 1m) therefore improving the ability to map smallholder agriculture. For the smallholder farm dominated area of northern India, Skybox high-resolution satellite imagery can aid in understanding how to improve farm yields. In particular, we are interested in mapping winter wheat in India, as this region produces approximately 80% of the country's wheat crop, which is important given that wheat is a staple crop that provides approximately 20% of household calories. In northeast India, the combination of increased heat stress, limited irrigation access, and the difficulty for farmers to access advanced farming technologies results in farmers only producing about 50% of their potential crop yield. The use of satellite imagery can aid in understanding wheat yields through time and help identify ways to increase crop yields in the wheat belt of India. To translate Skybox satellite data into meaningful information about wheat fields, we examine vegetation indices, such as the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), to measure the "greenness" of plants to help determine the health of the crops. We test our ability to predict crop characteristics, like sow date and yield, using vegetation indices of 59 fields for which we have field data in Bihar, India.

  8. The frequency of daily ethanol consumption influences the effect of ethanol on insulin sensitivity in rats fed a high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Feng, Li; Han, Bo; Wang, Ruxia; Li, Qiu; Bian, Dezhi; Ma, Chunyan; Song, Guangyao; Gao, Ling; Zhao, J

    2012-03-01

    The different effects of ethanol on insulin sensitivity may be due to complex reasons. Here, we focus on the various daily ethanol consumption frequencies in rats fed a high-fat (HF) diet and explore the possible mechanism mediated by adiponectin and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). A total of thirty-six male Wistar rats were fed a HF diet and were randomly divided into three groups: those that received tap water (C); those that received ethanol via a gastric tube twice per d (E1); those that received free access to ethanol for drinking (E2). The total daily ethanol dosage in groups E1 and E2 were the same (5 g/kg per d). At the end of 18 weeks, insulin sensitivity was evaluated. Adiponectin AMPK and GLUT4 levels were determined. We found that the different administration frequencies led to markedly different plasma ethanol concentrations and there were intimate relationships between plasma ethanol concentration and insulin sensitivity. Insulin resistance was markedly improved in group E1, whereas only a slight improvement was observed in group E2. Accordingly, adiponectin, phosphorylated AMPK and GLUT4 levels were significantly increased in group E1. Based on these findings, we propose that ethanol concentration might be the major influencing factor mediating the effect of ethanol on insulin sensitivity. At a total daily dosage of 5 g/kg per d, twice daily administration of ethanol was more beneficial than continuous drinking. The protective effect of ethanol might be mediated by increased adiponectin levels, which subsequently improve the activation of AMPKα and GLUT4 expression in adipose tissue.

  9. Effect of concurrent saccharin intake on ethanol consumption by high-alcohol-drinking (UChB) rats.

    PubMed

    Tampier, Lutske; Quintanilla, Maria Elena

    2009-07-01

    This study examined the effect of concurrent presentation of a highly palatable saccharin solution on ethanol consumption during the acquisition or maintenance of ethanol drinking by high-alcohol-drinking (UChB) rats. Rats were exposed to ethanol (10% v/v) and water under a home cage, two-bottle, free-choice regimen with unlimited access for 24 hours/day. After 7 days (acquisition) of ethanol exposure, a third bottle containing saccharin (0.2% w/v) was concomitantly offered for an additional seven consecutive days, and the same process was repeated after 3 months (maintenance) of ethanol exposure. We found that concurrent saccharin intake significantly reduced ethanol intake by UChB rats after 7 days of ethanol exposure indicating that preference for sweet taste tends to override the preference for ethanol. However, the concurrent saccharin presentation to rats after 3 months of stable ethanol consumption did not reduce ethanol intake, whereas their saccharin consumption reached polydipsic-like values. These results support the notion that in UChB rats, a time-dependent sensitization to the rewarding effects of ethanol is developed that may account for the increases in ethanol volition seen following chronic ethanol intake.

  10. Ethanol production and maximum cell growth are highly correlated with membrane lipid composition during fermentation as determined by lipidomic analysis of 22 Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Clark M; Lozada-Contreras, Michelle; Jiranek, Vladimir; Longo, Marjorie L; Block, David E

    2013-01-01

    Optimizing ethanol yield during fermentation is important for efficient production of fuel alcohol, as well as wine and other alcoholic beverages. However, increasing ethanol concentrations during fermentation can create problems that result in arrested or sluggish sugar-to-ethanol conversion. The fundamental cellular basis for these problem fermentations, however, is not well understood. Small-scale fermentations were performed in a synthetic grape must using 22 industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains (primarily wine strains) with various degrees of ethanol tolerance to assess the correlation between lipid composition and fermentation kinetic parameters. Lipids were extracted at several fermentation time points representing different growth phases of the yeast to quantitatively analyze phospholipids and ergosterol utilizing atmospheric pressure ionization-mass spectrometry methods. Lipid profiling of individual fermentations indicated that yeast lipid class profiles do not shift dramatically in composition over the course of fermentation. Multivariate statistical analysis of the data was performed using partial least-squares linear regression modeling to correlate lipid composition data with fermentation kinetic data. The results indicate a strong correlation (R(2) = 0.91) between the overall lipid composition and the final ethanol concentration (wt/wt), an indicator of strain ethanol tolerance. One potential component of ethanol tolerance, the maximum yeast cell concentration, was also found to be a strong function of lipid composition (R(2) = 0.97). Specifically, strains unable to complete fermentation were associated with high phosphatidylinositol levels early in fermentation. Yeast strains that achieved the highest cell densities and ethanol concentrations were positively correlated with phosphatidylcholine species similar to those known to decrease the perturbing effects of ethanol in model membrane systems.

  11. Warsaw high-preferring (WHP) and Warsaw low-preferring (WLP) lines of rats selectively bred for high and low voluntary ethanol intake: preliminary phenotypic characterization.

    PubMed

    Dyr, Wanda; Kostowski, Wojciech

    2008-05-01

    The Warsaw High Preferring (WHP) and Warsaw Low Preferring (WLP) lines were bred from Wistar foundation stock to obtain lines of rats that differ in their preference for ethanol solutions. The WHP line has met several major criteria for an animal model of alcoholism. The WHP rats voluntarily drink excessive amounts of ethanol while the WLP rats consume negligible amounts of ethanol. The WHP rats attain physiologically active blood ethanol concentrations with chronic free-choice drinking. They also develop subtle but visible signs of physical dependence (the withdrawal signs). The patterns of ethanol consumption in WHP and WLP lines are stable in time and independent of the manner of access to ethanol solutions. Notably, when exposed to the increasing ethanol concentrations WHP rats gradually increased total ethanol intake whereas the WLP rats consumed invariably very low amounts of ethanol. Furthermore, the WHP rats show an increased responsiveness to the stimulatory effects of low dose of ethanol.

  12. Neutron emission and fragment yield in high-energy fission

    SciTech Connect

    Grudzevich, O. T. Klinov, D. A.

    2013-07-15

    The KRIS special library of spectra and emission probabilities in the decays of 1500 nuclei excited up to energies between 150 and 250 MeV was developed for correctly taking into account the decay of highly excited nuclei appearing as fission fragments. The emission of neutrons, protons, and photons was taken into account. Neutron emission fromprimary fragments was found to have a substantial effect on the formation of yields of postneutron nuclei. The library was tested by comparing the calculated and measured yields of products originating from the fission of nuclei that was induced by high-energy protons. The method for calculating these yields was tested on the basis of experimental data on the thermal-neutroninduced fission of {sup 235}U nuclei.

  13. High Frequency Electrical Stimulation of Lateral Habenula Reduces Voluntary Ethanol Consumption in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing; Zuo, Wanhong; Fu, Rao; Xie, Guiqin; Kaur, Amandeep; Bekker, Alex

    2016-01-01

    Background: Development of new strategies that can effectively prevent and/or treat alcohol use disorders is of paramount importance, because the currently available treatments are inadequate. Increasing evidence indicates that the lateral habenula (LHb) plays an important role in aversion, drug abuse, and depression. In light of the success of high-frequency stimulation (HFS) of the LHb in improving helplessness behavior in rodents, we assessed the effects of LHb HFS on ethanol-drinking behavior in rats. Methods: We trained rats to drink ethanol under an intermittent access two-bottle choice procedure. We used c-Fos immunohistochemistry and electrophysiological approaches to examine LHb activity. We applied a HFS protocol that has proven effective for reducing helplessness behavior in rats via a bipolar electrode implanted into the LHb. Results: c-Fos protein expression and the frequency of both spontaneous action potential firings and spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents were higher in LHb neurons of ethanol-withdrawn rats compared to their ethanol-naïve counterparts. HFS to the LHb produced long-term reduction of intake and preference for ethanol, without altering locomotor activity. Conversely, low-frequency electrical stimulation to the LHb or HFS applied to the nearby nucleus did not affect drinking behavior. Conclusions: Our results suggest that withdrawal from chronic ethanol exposure increases glutamate release and the activity of LHb neurons, and that functional inhibition of the LHb via HFS reduces ethanol consumption. Thus, LHb HFS could be a potential new therapeutic option for alcoholics. PMID:27234303

  14. Experimental Study on Thermal Interaction of Ethanol Jets in High Temperature Fluorinert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sa, Rongyuan; Takahashi, Minoru

    As a fundamental study for the direct contact heat exchange which was employed for in-vessel heat exchange in the Pb-Bi-cooled direct contact boiling water small fast reactor (PBWFR) and for the steam generator tube rupture (SGTR) accident in lead alloy-cooled fast reactor (LFR), ethanol jet was injected into high temperature fluorinert (FC-3283) as a simulation experiment in order to investigate the jet boiling phenomena just after volatile water contacting with the high temperature continuous lead alloy liquid. Two series of tests (no-boiling and boiling) were initiated to evaluate the ethanol vapor volume which generated around the ethanol jet. From synchronized temperature measurement around ethanol jet, the overview of the boiling behavior showed that jet boiling occurred at bottom part of jet first and developed to the upper part within very narrow area around jet.

  15. Combining the effects of process design and pH for improved xylose conversion in high solid ethanol production from Arundo donax

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The impact of pH coupled to process design for the conversion of the energy crop Arundo donax to ethanol was assessed in the present study under industrially relevant solids loadings. Two main process strategies were investigated, i.e. the traditional simultaneous saccharification and co-fermentation (SSCF) and a HYBRID design, where a long high temperature enzymatic hydrolysis step was carried out prior to continued low temperature SSCF, keeping the same total reaction time. Since acetic acid was identified as the major inhibitor in the slurry, the scenarios were investigated under different fermentation pH in order to alleviate the inhibitory effect on, in particular, xylose conversion. The results show that, regardless of fermentation pH, a higher glucan conversion could be achieved with the HYBRID approach compared to SSCF. Furthermore, it was found that increasing the pH from 5.0 to 5.5 for the fermentation phase had a large positive effect on xylose consumption for both process designs, although the SSCF design was more favored. With the high sugar concentrations available at the start of fermentation during the HYBRID design, the ethanol yield was reduced in favor of cell growth and glycerol production. This finding was confirmed in shake flask fermentations where an increase in pH enhanced both glucose and xylose consumption, but also cell growth and cell yield with the overall effect being a reduced ethanol yield. In conclusion this resulted in similar overall ethanol yields at the different pH values for the HYBRID design, despite the improved xylose uptake, whereas a significant increase in overall ethanol yield was found with the SSCF design. PMID:24949274

  16. High-yield maize with large net energy yield and small global warming intensity

    PubMed Central

    Grassini, Patricio; Cassman, Kenneth G.

    2012-01-01

    Addressing concerns about future food supply and climate change requires management practices that maximize productivity per unit of arable land while reducing negative environmental impact. On-farm data were evaluated to assess energy balance and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of irrigated maize in Nebraska that received large nitrogen (N) fertilizer (183 kg of N⋅ha−1) and irrigation water inputs (272 mm or 2,720 m3 ha−1). Although energy inputs (30 GJ⋅ha−1) were larger than those reported for US maize systems in previous studies, irrigated maize in central Nebraska achieved higher grain and net energy yields (13.2 Mg⋅ha−1 and 159 GJ⋅ha−1, respectively) and lower GHG-emission intensity (231 kg of CO2e⋅Mg−1 of grain). Greater input-use efficiencies, especially for N fertilizer, were responsible for better performance of these irrigated systems, compared with much lower-yielding, mostly rainfed maize systems in previous studies. Large variation in energy inputs and GHG emissions across irrigated fields in the present study resulted from differences in applied irrigation water amount and imbalances between applied N inputs and crop N demand, indicating potential to further improve environmental performance through better management of these inputs. Observed variation in N-use efficiency, at any level of applied N inputs, suggests that an N-balance approach may be more appropriate for estimating soil N2O emissions than the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change approach based on a fixed proportion of applied N. Negative correlation between GHG-emission intensity and net energy yield supports the proposition that achieving high yields, large positive energy balance, and low GHG emissions in intensive cropping systems are not conflicting goals. PMID:22232684

  17. High-yield maize with large net energy yield and small global warming intensity.

    PubMed

    Grassini, Patricio; Cassman, Kenneth G

    2012-01-24

    Addressing concerns about future food supply and climate change requires management practices that maximize productivity per unit of arable land while reducing negative environmental impact. On-farm data were evaluated to assess energy balance and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of irrigated maize in Nebraska that received large nitrogen (N) fertilizer (183 kg of N · ha(-1)) and irrigation water inputs (272 mm or 2,720 m(3) ha(-1)). Although energy inputs (30 GJ · ha(-1)) were larger than those reported for US maize systems in previous studies, irrigated maize in central Nebraska achieved higher grain and net energy yields (13.2 Mg · ha(-1) and 159 GJ · ha(-1), respectively) and lower GHG-emission intensity (231 kg of CO(2)e · Mg(-1) of grain). Greater input-use efficiencies, especially for N fertilizer, were responsible for better performance of these irrigated systems, compared with much lower-yielding, mostly rainfed maize systems in previous studies. Large variation in energy inputs and GHG emissions across irrigated fields in the present study resulted from differences in applied irrigation water amount and imbalances between applied N inputs and crop N demand, indicating potential to further improve environmental performance through better management of these inputs. Observed variation in N-use efficiency, at any level of applied N inputs, suggests that an N-balance approach may be more appropriate for estimating soil N(2)O emissions than the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change approach based on a fixed proportion of applied N. Negative correlation between GHG-emission intensity and net energy yield supports the proposition that achieving high yields, large positive energy balance, and low GHG emissions in intensive cropping systems are not conflicting goals.

  18. Zinc-oxygen primary cell yields high energy density

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graff, C. B.

    1968-01-01

    Zinc-oxygen primary cell yields high energy density for battery used as an auxiliary power source in space vehicle systems. Maximum reliability and minimum battery weight is achieved by using a stacking configuration of 23 series-connected modules with 6 parallel-connected cells per module.

  19. Setting the Record Straight on "High-Yield" Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marzano, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    Widely credited with proposing nine "high-yield" instructional strategies, author Robert J. Marzano sets the record straight about the broader number of strategies identified by the research. He provides a list of 41 strategies and suggests more nuanced ways of using, observing, and evaluating them. (Contains 1 figure.)

  20. Executive Summary High-Yield Scenario Workshop Series Report

    SciTech Connect

    Leslie Park Ovard; Thomas H. Ulrich; David J. Muth Jr.; J. Richard Hess; Steven Thomas; Bryce Stokes

    2009-12-01

    To get a collective sense of the impact of research and development (R&D) on biomass resource availability, and to determine the feasibility that yields higher than baseline assumptions used for past assessments could be achieved to support U.S. energy independence, an alternate “High-Yield Scenario” (HYS) concept was presented to industry experts at a series of workshops held in December 2009. The workshops explored future production of corn/agricultural crop residues, herbaceous energy crops (HECs), and woody energy crops (WECs). This executive summary reports the findings of that workshop.

  1. TIO2 Based Electrorheological Fluid with High Yield Stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Rong; Wang, Xuezhao; Wen, Weijia; Lu, Kunquan

    We have fabricated several TiO2 based ER fluids with doping and without designed doping, which exhibit the high yield stress up to more than 100kPa. The titanium oxide nanoparticles were synthesized by using wet chemical method. The ER effect of those materials is dominated by the special additives, such as amide or its ramification, as well as the remained molecules or ions in the sample preparation. It is found that the yield stress is also strongly dependent on the viscosity of the oil. The prepared ER fluids possess other attractive characters, for instance the current density is low and against sedimentation.

  2. Facile synthesis of highly active PdAu nanowire networks as self-supported electrocatalyst for ethanol electrooxidation.

    PubMed

    Hong, Wei; Wang, Jin; Wang, Erkang

    2014-06-25

    In recent years, direct ethanol fuel cells (DEFCs) are attracting increasing attention owing to their wide applications. However, a significant challenge in the development of DEFC technology is the urgent need for highly active anode catalysts for the ethanol oxidation reaction. In this work, a facile and reproducible method for the high-yield synthesis of PdAu nanowire networks is demonstrated. The whole synthetic process is very simple, just mixing Na2PdCl4, HAuCl4, and KBr in an aqueous solution and using polyvinylpyrrolidone as a protective reagent while sodium borohydride as a reductant. The whole synthetic process can be simply performed at room temperature and completed in 30 min, which can greatly simplify the synthetic process and lower the preparation cost. Electrochemical catalytic measurement results prove that the as-prepared catalysts exhibit dramatically enhanced electrocatalytic activity for ethanol electrooxidation in alkaline solution. The facile synthetic process and excellent catalytic performance of the as-prepared catalysts demonstrate that they can be used as a promising catalyst for DEFCs.

  3. High concentrations of cellulosic ethanol achieved by fed batch semi simultaneous saccharification and fermentation of waste-paper

    PubMed Central

    Elliston, Adam; Collins, Samuel R.A.; Wilson, David R.; Roberts, Ian N.; Waldron, Keith W.

    2013-01-01

    A fundamental goal of second generation ethanol production is to increase the ethanol concentration to 10% (v/v) or more to optimise distillation costs. Semi simultaneous saccharification and fermentations (SSSF) were conducted at small pilot scale (5 L) utilising fed-batch additions of solid shredded copier paper substrate. Early addition of Accellerase® 1500 at 16 FPU/g substrate and 30 U/g β-glucosidase followed by substrate only batch addition allowed low final equivalent enzyme concentrations to be achieved (3.7 FPU/g substrate) whilst maintaining digestion. Batch addition resulted in a cumulative substrate concentration equivalent to 65% (w/v). This in turn resulted in the production of high concentrations of ethanol (11.6% v/v). The success of this strategy relied on the capacity of the bioreactor to perform high shear mixing as required. Further research into the timing and number of substrate additions could lead to further improvement in overall yields from the 65.5% attained. PMID:23500568

  4. High Ethanol Titers from Cellulose by Using Metabolically Engineered Thermophilic, Anaerobic Microbes ▿ † ‡

    PubMed Central

    Argyros, D. Aaron; Tripathi, Shital A.; Barrett, Trisha F.; Rogers, Stephen R.; Feinberg, Lawrence F.; Olson, Daniel G.; Foden, Justine M.; Miller, Bethany B.; Lynd, Lee R.; Hogsett, David A.; Caiazza, Nicky C.

    2011-01-01

    This work describes novel genetic tools for use in Clostridium thermocellum that allow creation of unmarked mutations while using a replicating plasmid. The strategy employed counter-selections developed from the native C. thermocellum hpt gene and the Thermoanaerobacterium saccharolyticum tdk gene and was used to delete the genes for both lactate dehydrogenase (Ldh) and phosphotransacetylase (Pta). The Δldh Δpta mutant was evolved for 2,000 h, resulting in a stable strain with 40:1 ethanol selectivity and a 4.2-fold increase in ethanol yield over the wild-type strain. Ethanol production from cellulose was investigated with an engineered coculture of organic acid-deficient engineered strains of both C. thermocellum and T. saccharolyticum. Fermentation of 92 g/liter Avicel by this coculture resulted in 38 g/liter ethanol, with acetic and lactic acids below detection limits, in 146 h. These results demonstrate that ethanol production by thermophilic, cellulolytic microbes is amenable to substantial improvement by metabolic engineering. PMID:21965408

  5. Elimination of acetate production to improve ethanol yield during continuous synthesis gas fermentation by engineered biocatalyst Clostridium sp. MTEtOH550.

    PubMed

    Berzin, Vel; Kiriukhin, Michael; Tyurin, Michael

    2012-05-01

    Acetogen strain Clostridum sp. MT653 produced acetate 273 mM (p < 0.005) and ethanol 250 mM (p < 0.005) from synthesis gas blend mixture of 64% CO and 36% H(2). Clostridum sp. MT653 was metabolically engineered to the biocatalyst strain Clostridium sp. MTEtOH550. The biocatalyst increased ethanol yield to 590 mM with no acetate production during single-stage continuous syngas fermentation due to expression of synthetic adh cloned in a multi-copy number expression vector. The acetate production was eliminated by inactivation of the pta gene in Clostridium sp. MTEtOH550. Gene introduction and gene elimination were achieved only using Syngas Biofuels Energy, Inc. electroporation generator. The electrotransformation efficiencies were 8.0 ± 0.2 × 10(6) per microgram of transforming DNA of the expression vector at cell viability ~15%. The frequency of suicidal vector integration to inactivate pta was ~10(-5) per the number of recipient cells. This is the first report on elimination of acetate production and overexpression of synthetic adh gene to engineer acetogen biocatalyst for selective biofuel ethanol production during continuous syngas fermentation.

  6. Inactivation of Bacillus subtilis spores by combining high-pressure thermal sterilization and ethanol.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhong; Jiang, Bin; Liao, Xiaojun; Yi, Jianyong; Hu, Xiaosong; Zhang, Yan

    2012-11-15

    High-pressure thermal sterilization (HPTS) is a new and promising sterilization technology of foods. Effects of combining HPTS and ethanol treatment on inactivation of Bacillus subtilis spores were investigated. An interesting phenomenon was observed. The inactivation effect of HPTS treatment on the spores was enhanced significantly with the increase in ethanol concentration from 0 to 15%. However, the inactivation effect was decreased with further increase in ethanol concentration up to 70%. In addition, the release of DPA and leakages of OD(260) and OD(280) material from the spores increased continuously with the increase in ethanol concentration. Moreover, flow cytometry analysis suggested that although the inner membrane of the spores was damaged, PI could not bind with the spore DNA immediately after HPTS treatment. In conclusion, the mechanism of this special phenomenon could be attributed to the germination of spores under HPTS treatment and effects of ethanol on the protein or water activity. HPTS caused other lethal damages to the spores besides its damage to the inner membrane. Ethanol of low concentrations could significantly enhance the sterilization effects of HPTS, which was good for keeping the qualities of foods.

  7. Ethanol production from high cellulose concentration by the basidiomycete fungus Flammulina velutipes.

    PubMed

    Maehara, Tomoko; Ichinose, Hitomi; Furukawa, Takanori; Ogasawara, Wataru; Takabatake, Koji; Kaneko, Satoshi

    2013-03-01

    Ethanol production by Flammulina velutipes from high substrate concentrations was evaluated. F. velutipes produces approximately 40-60 g l(-1) ethanol from 15% (w/v) D-glucose, D-fructose, D-mannose, sucrose, maltose, and cellobiose, with the highest conversion rate of 83% observed using cellobiose as a carbon source. We also attempted to assess direct ethanol fermentation from sugarcane bagasse cellulose (SCBC) by F. velutipes. The hydrolysis rate of 15% (w/v) SCBC with commercial cellulase was approximately 20%. In contrast, F. velutipes was able to produce a significant amount of ethanol from 15% SCBC with the production of β-glucosidase, cellobohydrolase, and cellulase, although the addition of a small amount of commercial cellulase to the culture was required for the conversion. When 9 mg g(-1) biomass of commercial cellulase was added to cultures, 0.36 g of ethanol was produced from 1 g of cellulose, corresponding to an ethanol conversion rate of 69.6%. These results indicate that F. velutipes would be useful for consolidated bioprocessing of lignocellulosic biomass to bioethanol.

  8. Formation of oligopeptides in high yield under simple programmable conditions

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Garcia, Marc; Surman, Andrew J.; Cooper, Geoffrey J.T.; Suárez-Marina, Irene; Hosni, Zied; Lee, Michael P.; Cronin, Leroy

    2015-01-01

    Many high-yielding reactions for forming peptide bonds have been developed but these are complex, requiring activated amino-acid precursors and heterogeneous supports. Herein we demonstrate the programmable one-pot dehydration–hydration condensation of amino acids forming oligopeptide chains in around 50% yield. A digital recursive reactor system was developed to investigate this process, performing these reactions with control over parameters such as temperature, number of cycles, cycle duration, initial monomer concentration and initial pH. Glycine oligopeptides up to 20 amino acids long were formed with very high monomer-to-oligomer conversion, and the majority of these products comprised three amino acid residues or more. Having established the formation of glycine homo-oligopeptides, we then demonstrated the co-condensation of glycine with eight other amino acids (Ala, Asp, Glu, His, Lys, Pro, Thr and Val), incorporating a range of side-chain functionality. PMID:26442968

  9. Ethanol and High-Value Terpene Co-Production from Lignocellulosic Biomass of Cymbopogon flexuosus and Cymbopogon martinii

    SciTech Connect

    Joyce, Blake L.; Zheljazkov, Valtcho D.; Sykes, Robert; Cantrell, Charles L.; Hamilton, Choo; Mann, David G. J.; Rodriguez, Miguel; Mielenz, Jonathan R.; Astatkie, Tess; C. Neal Stewart Jr.

    2015-10-05

    Cymbopogon flexuosus, lemongrass, and C. martinii, palmarosa, are perennial grasses grown to produce essential oils for the fragrance industry. The objectives of this study were (1) to evaluate biomass and oil yields as a function of nitrogen and sulfur fertilization, and (2) to characterize their utility for lignocellulosic ethanol compared to Panicum virgatum (switchgrass). Mean biomass yields were 12.83 Mg lemongrass ha-1 and 15.11 Mg palmarosa ha-1 during the second harvest year resulting in theoretical biofuel yields of 2541 and 2569 L ethanol ha-1 respectively compared to reported 1749–3691 L ethanol ha-1 for switchgrass. Pretreated lemongrass yielded 198 mL ethanol (g biomass) -1 and pretreated palmarosa yielded 170 mL ethanol (g biomass) -1. Additionally, lemongrass yielded 85.7 kg essential oil ha-1 and palmarosa yielded 67.0 kg ha-1 with an estimated value of USD $857 and $1005 ha-1. These data suggest that dual-use crops such as lemongrass and palmarosa may increase the economic viability of lignocellulosic biofuels.

  10. Ethanol and High-Value Terpene Co-Production from Lignocellulosic Biomass of Cymbopogon flexuosus and Cymbopogon martinii.

    PubMed

    Joyce, Blake L; Zheljazkov, Valtcho D; Sykes, Robert; Cantrell, Charles L; Hamilton, Choo; Mann, David G J; Rodriguez, Miguel; Mielenz, Jonathan R; Astatkie, Tess; Stewart, C Neal

    2015-01-01

    Cymbopogon flexuosus, lemongrass, and C. martinii, palmarosa, are perennial grasses grown to produce essential oils for the fragrance industry. The objectives of this study were (1) to evaluate biomass and oil yields as a function of nitrogen and sulfur fertilization, and (2) to characterize their utility for lignocellulosic ethanol compared to Panicum virgatum (switchgrass). Mean biomass yields were 12.83 Mg lemongrass ha-1 and 15.11 Mg palmarosa ha-1 during the second harvest year resulting in theoretical biofuel yields of 2541 and 2569 L ethanol ha-1 respectively compared to reported 1749-3691 L ethanol ha-1 for switchgrass. Pretreated lemongrass yielded 198 mL ethanol (g biomass)-1 and pretreated palmarosa yielded 170 mL ethanol (g biomass)-1. Additionally, lemongrass yielded 85.7 kg essential oil ha-1 and palmarosa yielded 67.0 kg ha-1 with an estimated value of USD $857 and $1005 ha-1. These data suggest that dual-use crops such as lemongrass and palmarosa may increase the economic viability of lignocellulosic biofuels. PMID:26437026

  11. Ethanol and High-Value Terpene Co-Production from Lignocellulosic Biomass of Cymbopogon flexuosus and Cymbopogon martinii

    PubMed Central

    Joyce, Blake L.; Zheljazkov, Valtcho D.; Sykes, Robert; Cantrell, Charles L.; Hamilton, Choo; Mann, David G. J.; Rodriguez, Miguel; Mielenz, Jonathan R.; Astatkie, Tess; Stewart, C. Neal

    2015-01-01

    Cymbopogon flexuosus, lemongrass, and C. martinii, palmarosa, are perennial grasses grown to produce essential oils for the fragrance industry. The objectives of this study were (1) to evaluate biomass and oil yields as a function of nitrogen and sulfur fertilization, and (2) to characterize their utility for lignocellulosic ethanol compared to Panicum virgatum (switchgrass). Mean biomass yields were 12.83 Mg lemongrass ha-1 and 15.11 Mg palmarosa ha-1 during the second harvest year resulting in theoretical biofuel yields of 2541 and 2569 L ethanol ha-1 respectively compared to reported 1749–3691 L ethanol ha-1 for switchgrass. Pretreated lemongrass yielded 198 mL ethanol (g biomass)-1 and pretreated palmarosa yielded 170 mL ethanol (g biomass)-1. Additionally, lemongrass yielded 85.7 kg essential oil ha-1 and palmarosa yielded 67.0 kg ha-1 with an estimated value of USD $857 and $1005 ha-1. These data suggest that dual-use crops such as lemongrass and palmarosa may increase the economic viability of lignocellulosic biofuels. PMID:26437026

  12. Ethanol and High-Value Terpene Co-Production from Lignocellulosic Biomass of Cymbopogon flexuosus and Cymbopogon martinii.

    PubMed

    Joyce, Blake L; Zheljazkov, Valtcho D; Sykes, Robert; Cantrell, Charles L; Hamilton, Choo; Mann, David G J; Rodriguez, Miguel; Mielenz, Jonathan R; Astatkie, Tess; Stewart, C Neal

    2015-01-01

    Cymbopogon flexuosus, lemongrass, and C. martinii, palmarosa, are perennial grasses grown to produce essential oils for the fragrance industry. The objectives of this study were (1) to evaluate biomass and oil yields as a function of nitrogen and sulfur fertilization, and (2) to characterize their utility for lignocellulosic ethanol compared to Panicum virgatum (switchgrass). Mean biomass yields were 12.83 Mg lemongrass ha-1 and 15.11 Mg palmarosa ha-1 during the second harvest year resulting in theoretical biofuel yields of 2541 and 2569 L ethanol ha-1 respectively compared to reported 1749-3691 L ethanol ha-1 for switchgrass. Pretreated lemongrass yielded 198 mL ethanol (g biomass)-1 and pretreated palmarosa yielded 170 mL ethanol (g biomass)-1. Additionally, lemongrass yielded 85.7 kg essential oil ha-1 and palmarosa yielded 67.0 kg ha-1 with an estimated value of USD $857 and $1005 ha-1. These data suggest that dual-use crops such as lemongrass and palmarosa may increase the economic viability of lignocellulosic biofuels.

  13. Electrochemical Partial Reforming of Ethanol into Ethyl Acetate Using Ultrathin Co3O4 Nanosheets as a Highly Selective Anode Catalyst

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Electrochemical partial reforming of organics provides an alternative strategy to produce valuable organic compounds while generating H2 under mild conditions. In this work, highly selective electrochemical reforming of ethanol into ethyl acetate is successfully achieved by using ultrathin Co3O4 nanosheets with exposed (111) facets as an anode catalyst. Those nanosheets were synthesized by a one-pot, templateless hydrothermal method with the use of ammonia. NH3 was demonstrated critical to the overall formation of ultrathin Co3O4 nanosheets. With abundant active sites on Co3O4 (111), the as-synthesized ultrathin Co3O4 nanosheets exhibited enhanced electrocatalytic activities toward water and ethanol oxidations in alkaline media. More importantly, over the Co3O4 nanosheets, the electrooxidation from ethanol to ethyl acetate was so selective that no other oxidation products were yielded. With such a high selectivity, an electrolyzer cell using Co3O4 nanosheets as the anode electrocatalyst and Ni–Mo nanopowders as the cathode electrocatalyst has been successfully built for ethanol reforming. The electrolyzer cell was readily driven by a 1.5 V battery to achieve the effective production of both H2 and ethyl acetate. After the bulk electrolysis, about 95% of ethanol was electrochemically reformed into ethyl acetate. This work opens up new opportunities in designing a material system for building unique devices to generate both hydrogen and high-value organics at room temperature by utilizing electric energy from renewable sources.

  14. Electrochemical Partial Reforming of Ethanol into Ethyl Acetate Using Ultrathin Co3O4 Nanosheets as a Highly Selective Anode Catalyst

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Electrochemical partial reforming of organics provides an alternative strategy to produce valuable organic compounds while generating H2 under mild conditions. In this work, highly selective electrochemical reforming of ethanol into ethyl acetate is successfully achieved by using ultrathin Co3O4 nanosheets with exposed (111) facets as an anode catalyst. Those nanosheets were synthesized by a one-pot, templateless hydrothermal method with the use of ammonia. NH3 was demonstrated critical to the overall formation of ultrathin Co3O4 nanosheets. With abundant active sites on Co3O4 (111), the as-synthesized ultrathin Co3O4 nanosheets exhibited enhanced electrocatalytic activities toward water and ethanol oxidations in alkaline media. More importantly, over the Co3O4 nanosheets, the electrooxidation from ethanol to ethyl acetate was so selective that no other oxidation products were yielded. With such a high selectivity, an electrolyzer cell using Co3O4 nanosheets as the anode electrocatalyst and Ni–Mo nanopowders as the cathode electrocatalyst has been successfully built for ethanol reforming. The electrolyzer cell was readily driven by a 1.5 V battery to achieve the effective production of both H2 and ethyl acetate. After the bulk electrolysis, about 95% of ethanol was electrochemically reformed into ethyl acetate. This work opens up new opportunities in designing a material system for building unique devices to generate both hydrogen and high-value organics at room temperature by utilizing electric energy from renewable sources. PMID:27610415

  15. Electrochemical Partial Reforming of Ethanol into Ethyl Acetate Using Ultrathin Co3O4 Nanosheets as a Highly Selective Anode Catalyst.

    PubMed

    Dai, Lei; Qin, Qing; Zhao, Xiaojing; Xu, Chaofa; Hu, Chengyi; Mo, Shiguang; Wang, Yu Olivia; Lin, Shuichao; Tang, Zichao; Zheng, Nanfeng

    2016-08-24

    Electrochemical partial reforming of organics provides an alternative strategy to produce valuable organic compounds while generating H2 under mild conditions. In this work, highly selective electrochemical reforming of ethanol into ethyl acetate is successfully achieved by using ultrathin Co3O4 nanosheets with exposed (111) facets as an anode catalyst. Those nanosheets were synthesized by a one-pot, templateless hydrothermal method with the use of ammonia. NH3 was demonstrated critical to the overall formation of ultrathin Co3O4 nanosheets. With abundant active sites on Co3O4 (111), the as-synthesized ultrathin Co3O4 nanosheets exhibited enhanced electrocatalytic activities toward water and ethanol oxidations in alkaline media. More importantly, over the Co3O4 nanosheets, the electrooxidation from ethanol to ethyl acetate was so selective that no other oxidation products were yielded. With such a high selectivity, an electrolyzer cell using Co3O4 nanosheets as the anode electrocatalyst and Ni-Mo nanopowders as the cathode electrocatalyst has been successfully built for ethanol reforming. The electrolyzer cell was readily driven by a 1.5 V battery to achieve the effective production of both H2 and ethyl acetate. After the bulk electrolysis, about 95% of ethanol was electrochemically reformed into ethyl acetate. This work opens up new opportunities in designing a material system for building unique devices to generate both hydrogen and high-value organics at room temperature by utilizing electric energy from renewable sources. PMID:27610415

  16. Construction of lactose-assimilating and high-ethanol-producing yeasts by protoplast fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Farahnak, F.; Seki, T.; Ryu, D.D.Y.; Ogrydziak, D.

    1986-02-01

    The availability of a yeast strain which is capable of fermenting lactose and at the same time is tolerant to high concentrations of ethanol would be useful for the production of ethanol from lactose. Kluyveromyces fragilis is capable of fermenting lactose, but it is not as tolerant as Saccharomyces cerevisiae to high concentrations of ethanol. In this study, the authors have used the protoplast fusion technique to construct hybrids between auxotrophic strains of S. cerevisiae having high ethanol tolerance and an auxotrophic strain of lactose-fermenting K. fragilis isolated by ethyl methanesulfonate mutagenesis. The fusants obtained were prototrophic and capable of assimilating lactose and producing ethanol in excess of 13% (vol/vol). The complementation frequency of fusion was about 0.7%. Formation of fusants was confirmed by the increased amount of chromosomal DNA per cell. Fusants contained 8 x 10/sup -9/ to 16 x 10/sup -8/ ..mu..g of DNA per cell as compared with about 4 x 10/sup -8/ ..mu..g of DNA per cell for the parental strains, suggesting that multiple fusions had taken place.

  17. Application of low-cost algal nitrogen source feeding in fuel ethanol production using high gravity sweet potato medium.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yu; Guo, Jin-Song; Chen, You-Peng; Zhang, Hai-Dong; Zheng, Xu-Xu; Zhang, Xian-Ming; Bai, Feng-Wu

    2012-08-31

    Protein-rich bloom algae biomass was employed as nitrogen source in fuel ethanol fermentation using high gravity sweet potato medium containing 210.0 g l(-1) glucose. In batch mode, the fermentation could not accomplish even in 120 h without any feeding of nitrogen source. While, the feeding of acid-hydrolyzed bloom algae powder (AHBAP) notably promoted fermentation process but untreated bloom algae powder (UBAP) was less effective than AHBAP. The fermentation times were reduced to 96, 72, and 72 h if 5.0, 10.0, and 20.0 g l(-1) AHBAP were added into medium, respectively, and the ethanol yields and productivities increased with increasing amount of feeding AHBAP. The continuous fermentations were performed in a three-stage reactor system. Final concentrations of ethanol up to 103.2 and 104.3 g l(-1) with 4.4 and 5.3 g l(-1) residual glucose were obtained using the previously mentioned medium feeding with 20.0 and 30.0 g l(-1) AHBAP, at dilution rate of 0.02 h(-1). Notably, only 78.5 g l(-1) ethanol and 41.6 g l(-1) residual glucose were obtained in the comparative test without any nitrogen source feeding. Amino acids analysis showed that approximately 67% of the protein in the algal biomass was hydrolyzed and released into the medium, serving as the available nitrogen nutrition for yeast growth and metabolism. Both batch and continuous fermentations showed similar fermentation parameters when 20.0 and 30.0 g l(-1) AHBAP were fed, indicating that the level of available nitrogen in the medium should be limited, and an algal nitrogen source feeding amount higher than 20.0 g l(-1) did not further improve the fermentation performance.

  18. High-Yield Magnetized Liner Fusion Explosions and Blast Mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slutz, Stephen; Vesey, Roger; Cuneo, Michael

    2011-10-01

    Cylindrical liner implosions with preheated and magnetized deuterium-tritium (DT) are predicted to reach fusion conditions on present pulsed power machines [S.A. Slutz et al Phys. Plasmas 17, 056303 (2010)]. We present simulations indicating that high yields (1-10 GJ) and gains (100-1000) may be possible at currents of about 60-70 MA if a cryogenic layer of solid DT is provided on the inside surface of the metal liner. A hot spot is formed from the central preheated magnetized low-density gas and a burn wave propagates radially into the surrounding cold dense fuel. These yields and gains are more than adequate for inertial fusion energy. However, the pulsed-power driver must be protected from the blast of these high-yield explosions. Numerical simulations are presented which show that the blast can be deflected and the fusion neutrons absorbed by a blanket that partially surrounds the liner. Thus a modest length transmission line can be used to deliver power to the liner. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  19. Laser heating challenges of high yield MagLIF targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slutz, Stephen; Sefkow, Adam; Vesey, Roger

    2014-10-01

    The MagLIF (Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion) concept is predicted by numerical simulation to produce fusion yields of about 100 kJ, when driven by 25 MA from the existing Z accelerator [S. A. Slutz et al. Phys. Plasmas 17, 056303 (2010)] and much higher yields with future accelerators delivering higher currents [Slutz and Vesey PRL 108, 025003 (2012)]. The fuel must be heated before compression to obtain significant fusion yields due to the relatively slow implosion velocities (~ 100 km/s) of magnetically driven liners. Lasers provide a convenient means to accomplish this pre-compressional heating of the fusion fuel, but there are challenges. The laser must penetrate a foil covering the laser entrance hole and deposit 20-30 kJ within the ~1 cm length of the liner in fuel at 6-12 mg/cc. Such high densities could result in beam scattering due to refraction and laser plasma interactions. Numerical simulations of the laser heating process are presented, which indicate that energies as high as 30 kJ could be deposited in the fuel by using two laser pulses of different wavelengths. Simulations of this process will be presented as well of results for a MagLIF design for a potential new machine delivering 50 MA of current. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  20. Development of high-yield influenza A virus vaccine viruses

    PubMed Central

    Ping, Jihui; Lopes, Tiago J.S.; Nidom, Chairul A.; Ghedin, Elodie; Macken, Catherine A.; Fitch, Adam; Imai, Masaki; Maher, Eileen A.; Neumann, Gabriele; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro

    2015-01-01

    Vaccination is one of the most cost-effective ways to prevent infection. Influenza vaccines propagated in cultured cells are approved for use in humans, but their yields are often suboptimal. Here, we screened A/Puerto Rico/8/34 (PR8) virus mutant libraries to develop vaccine backbones (defined here as the six viral RNA segments not encoding haemagglutinin and neuraminidase) that support high yield in cell culture. We also tested mutations in the coding and regulatory regions of the virus, and chimeric haemagglutinin and neuraminidase genes. A combination of high-yield mutations from these screens led to a PR8 backbone that improved the titres of H1N1, H3N2, H5N1 and H7N9 vaccine viruses in African green monkey kidney and Madin–Darby canine kidney cells. This PR8 backbone also improves titres in embryonated chicken eggs, a common propagation system for influenza viruses. This PR8 vaccine backbone thus represents an advance in seasonal and pandemic influenza vaccine development. PMID:26334134

  1. An alternate high yielding purification method for Clitoria ternatea lectin.

    PubMed

    Naeem, Aabgeena; Ahmad, Ejaz; Khan, Rizwan Hasan

    2007-10-01

    In our previous publication we had reported the purification and characterization of Clitoria ternatea agglutinin from its seeds on fetuin CL agarose affinity column, designated CTA [A. Naeem, S. Haque, R.H. Khan. Protein J., 2007]. Since CTA binds beta-d-galactosides, this lectin can be used as valuable tool for glycobiology studies in biomedical and cancer research. So an attempt was made for a high yielding alternative purification method employing the use of asialofetuin CL agarose column for the above-mentioned lectin, designated CTL. The fetuin affinity purified agglutinin was found similar to asialofetuin affinity purified lectin in SDS pattern, HPLC and N-terminal sequence. The content of lectin was found to be 30mg/30g dry weight of pulse. The yield was 2.8% as compared to 0.3% obtained on fetuin column. The number of tryptophan and tyrosine estimated was four and six per subunit. PMID:17590430

  2. Selection of stress-tolerant yeasts for simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) of very high gravity (VHG) potato mash to ethanol.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Takashi; Srichuwong, Sathaporn; Arakane, Mitsuhiro; Tamiya, Seiji; Yoshinaga, Masaru; Watanabe, Itsuki; Yamamoto, Mami; Ando, Akira; Tokuyasu, Ken; Nakamura, Toshihide

    2010-12-01

    Highly concentrated bioethanol production requires less volume in fermentation tanks and conserves distillery energy. We screened osmotolerant yeasts from a collection of 1699 yeast strains at our institute and found that three strains, NFRI3062, NFRI3213, and NFRI3225, were candidates for use in bioethanol production. All of these strains belonged to Saccharomyces cerevisiae. NFRI3062 produced 15.0% (w/v) of ethanol from YPD medium containing 35% glucose cultivated at 30 degrees C for 60 h, while S. cerevisiae NBRC0224, which has previously been reported suitable for ethanol production, only produced 13.0% (w/v). The thermotolerances of NFRI3213 and NFRI3225 were also superior to those of NBRC0224 and NFRI3062. We also demonstrated the simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) of very high gravity (VHG) potato mash and sweet-potato mash. NFRI3225 produced ethanol from potato mash at the fastest rate and in the highest volume (13.7% (w/v)) among the tested strains. The maximum productivity and ethanol yields were 9.1g/L/h and 92.3%, respectively. Although the potato mash was not sterilized, bacterial contamination was not observed. This may have been due to the growth inhibition of bacteria by the rapid glucose consumption and ethanol production of NFRI3225 during the VHG-SSF process.

  3. Selection of stress-tolerant yeasts for simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) of very high gravity (VHG) potato mash to ethanol.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Takashi; Srichuwong, Sathaporn; Arakane, Mitsuhiro; Tamiya, Seiji; Yoshinaga, Masaru; Watanabe, Itsuki; Yamamoto, Mami; Ando, Akira; Tokuyasu, Ken; Nakamura, Toshihide

    2010-12-01

    Highly concentrated bioethanol production requires less volume in fermentation tanks and conserves distillery energy. We screened osmotolerant yeasts from a collection of 1699 yeast strains at our institute and found that three strains, NFRI3062, NFRI3213, and NFRI3225, were candidates for use in bioethanol production. All of these strains belonged to Saccharomyces cerevisiae. NFRI3062 produced 15.0% (w/v) of ethanol from YPD medium containing 35% glucose cultivated at 30 degrees C for 60 h, while S. cerevisiae NBRC0224, which has previously been reported suitable for ethanol production, only produced 13.0% (w/v). The thermotolerances of NFRI3213 and NFRI3225 were also superior to those of NBRC0224 and NFRI3062. We also demonstrated the simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) of very high gravity (VHG) potato mash and sweet-potato mash. NFRI3225 produced ethanol from potato mash at the fastest rate and in the highest volume (13.7% (w/v)) among the tested strains. The maximum productivity and ethanol yields were 9.1g/L/h and 92.3%, respectively. Although the potato mash was not sterilized, bacterial contamination was not observed. This may have been due to the growth inhibition of bacteria by the rapid glucose consumption and ethanol production of NFRI3225 during the VHG-SSF process. PMID:20705456

  4. Tunable catalytic properties of bi-functional mixed oxides in ethanol conversion to high value compounds

    DOE PAGES

    Ramasamy, Karthikeyan K.; Gray, Michel; Job, Heather; Smith, Colin; Wang, Yong

    2016-02-03

    Here, a highly versatile ethanol conversion process to selectively generate high value compounds is presented here. By changing the reaction temperature, ethanol can be selectively converted to >C2 alcohols/oxygenates or phenolic compounds over hydrotalcite derived bi-functional MgO–Al2O3 catalyst via complex cascade mechanism. Reaction temperature plays a role in whether aldol condensation or the acetone formation is the path taken in changing the product composition. This article contains the catalytic activity comparison between the mono-functional and physical mixture counterpart to the hydrotalcite derived mixed oxides and the detailed discussion on the reaction mechanisms.

  5. Highly efficient bioethanol production by a Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain with multiple stress tolerance to high temperature, acid and ethanol.

    PubMed

    Benjaphokee, Suthee; Hasegawa, Daisuke; Yokota, Daiki; Asvarak, Thipa; Auesukaree, Choowong; Sugiyama, Minetaka; Kaneko, Yoshinobu; Boonchird, Chuenchit; Harashima, Satoshi

    2012-02-15

    Use of super strains exhibiting tolerance to high temperature, acidity and ethanol is a promising way to make ethanol production economically feasible. We describe here the breeding and performance of such a multiple-tolerant strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae generated by a spore-to-cell hybridization technique without recombinant DNA technology. A heterothallic strain showing a high-temperature (41°C) tolerant (Htg(+)) phenotype, a derivative from a strain isolated from nature, was crossed with a homothallic strain displaying high-ethanol productivity (Hep(+)), a stock culture at the Thailand Institute of Scientific and Technological Research. The resultant hybrid TJ14 displayed ability to rapidly utilize glucose, and produced ethanol (46.6g/l) from 10% glucose fermentation medium at high temperature (41°C). Not only ethanol productivity at 41°C but also acid tolerance (Acd(+)) was improved in TJ14 as compared with its parental strains, enabling TJ14 to grow in liquid medium even at pH 3. TJ14 maintained high ethanol productivity (46.0g/l) from 10% glucose when fermentation was done under multiple-stress conditions (41°C and pH 3.5). Furthermore, when TJ14 was subjected to a repeated-batch fermentation scheme, the growth and ethanol production of TJ14 were maintained at excellent levels over ten cycles of fermentation. Thus, the multiple-stress (Htg(+) Hep(+) Acd(+)) resistant strain TJ14 should be useful for cost-effective bioethanol production under high-temperature and acidic conditions.

  6. [Very high gravity ethanol fermentation with cassava flour and sugarcane juice].

    PubMed

    Shen, Naikun; Zhang, Hongyan; Wang, Qingyan; Qin, Yan; Liao, Siming; Wang, Chenghua; Huang, Ribo

    2010-09-01

    We optimized the conditions of mixed fermentation of very high gravity ethanol with cassava flour and sugarcane juice. Based on the single factor experiment, we screened the important parameters for very high gravity ethanol fermentation with cassava flour and sugarcane juice by the Plackeet-burman design. Then, we obtained the optimum values of the important parameters by the orthogonal experiments: the mixing ratio of cassava flour to sugarcane juice, 1:5; initial pH of fermentation, 4.0-4.5; the concentrations of urea and MgSO4, 0.25% and 0.04% (W/W), respectively. Finally, we used a gradient temperature control strategy with the optimized conditions, and ethanol concentration of 17.84% (V/V) and fermentation efficiency of 91.82% were achieved, correspondingly.

  7. Projecting crop yield in northern high latitude area.

    PubMed

    Matsumura, Kanichiro

    2014-01-01

    Changing climatic conditions on seasonal and longer time scales influence agricultural production. Improvement of soil and fertilizer is a strong factor in agricultural production, but agricultural production is influenced by climate conditions even in highly developed countries. It is valuable if fewer predictors make it possible to conduct future projections. Monthly temperature and precipitation, wintertime 500hPa geopotential height, and the previous year's yield are used as predictors to forecast spring wheat yield in advance. Canadian small agricultural divisions (SAD) are used for analysis. Each SAD is composed of a collection of Canadian Agricultural Regions (CAR) of similar weather and growing conditions. Spring wheat yields in each CAR are forecast from the following variables: (a) the previous year's yield, (b) earlier stages of the growing season's climate conditions and, (c) the previous year's wintertime northern hemisphere 500hPa geopotential height field. Arctic outflow events in the Okanagan Valley in Canada are associated with episodes of extremely low temperatures during wintertime. Principal component analysis (PCA) is applied for wintertime northern hemisphere 500hPa geopotential height anomalies. The spatial PCA mode1 is defined as Arctic Oscillation and it influences prevailing westerlies. The prevailing westerlies meanders and influences climatic conditions. The spatial similarity between wintertime top 5 Arctic outflow event year's composites of 500hPa geopotential height anomalies and mode 3's spatial pattern is found. Mode 3's spatial pattern looks like the Pacific/North American (PNA) pattern which describes the variation of atmospheric circulation pattern over the Pacific Ocean and North America. Climate conditions from April to June, May to July, mode 3's time coefficients, and previous year's yield are used for forecasting spring wheat yield in each SAD. Cross-validation procedure which generates eight sets of models for the eight

  8. A high-yield saponification of galactosylceramide I(3)-sulfate.

    PubMed

    Koshy, K M; Boggs, J M

    1982-12-01

    A method for the deacylation of galactosylceramide I(3)-sulphate using aqueous methanolic KOH is described. The combination of a relatively low concentration of the alkali (0.3 M) and a moderate reaction temperature (reflux point of 90% methanol) results in the formation of galactosylsphingosine I(3)-sulphate in consistently high yields (61%) with a minimum of side reactions. The product was purified by column chromatography and its identity established by thin layer chromatography, infrared spectroscopy, determination of galactose content and organic sulphate assay using established methods or their modifications.

  9. Orexin-1 and orexin-2 receptor antagonists reduce ethanol self-administration in high-drinking rodent models.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Rachel I; Becker, Howard C; Adams, Benjamin L; Jesudason, Cynthia D; Rorick-Kehn, Linda M

    2014-01-01

    To examine the role of orexin-1 and orexin-2 receptor activity on ethanol self-administration, compounds that differentially target orexin (OX) receptor subtypes were assessed in various self-administration paradigms using high-drinking rodent models. Effects of the OX1 antagonist SB334867, the OX2 antagonist LSN2424100, and the mixed OX1/2 antagonist almorexant (ACT-078573) on home cage ethanol consumption were tested in ethanol-preferring (P) rats using a 2-bottle choice procedure. In separate experiments, effects of SB334867, LSN2424100, and almorexant on operant ethanol self-administration were assessed in P rats maintained on a progressive ratio operant schedule of reinforcement. In a third series of experiments, SB334867, LSN2424100, and almorexant were administered to ethanol-preferring C57BL/6J mice to examine effects of OX receptor blockade on ethanol intake in a binge-like drinking (drinking-in-the-dark) model. In P rats with chronic home cage free-choice ethanol access, SB334867 and almorexant significantly reduced ethanol intake, but almorexant also reduced water intake, suggesting non-specific effects on consummatory behavior. In the progressive ratio operant experiments, LSN2424100 and almorexant reduced breakpoints and ethanol consumption in P rats, whereas the almorexant inactive enantiomer and SB334867 did not significantly affect the motivation to consume ethanol. As expected, vehicle-injected mice exhibited binge-like drinking patterns in the drinking-in-the-dark model. All three OX antagonists reduced both ethanol intake and resulting blood ethanol concentrations relative to vehicle-injected controls, but SB334867 and LSN2424100 also reduced sucrose consumption in a different cohort of mice, suggesting non-specific effects. Collectively, these results contribute to a growing body of evidence indicating that OX1 and OX2 receptor activity influences ethanol self-administration, although the effects may not be selective for ethanol consumption

  10. Increasing alcohol yield by selected yeast fermentation of sweet sorghum. I. Evaluation of yeast strains for ethanol production

    SciTech Connect

    de Mancilha, I.M.; Pearson, A.M.; Waller, J.; Hogaboam, G.J.

    1984-01-01

    A study was conducted for the purpose of evaluating and selecting yeast strains for their ability to produce ethanol using sweet sorghum juice as the substrate. Stalks of sweet sorghum were obtained by cutting off the tops and stripping away the leaves. Fermentation media were prepared by diluting or adding dextrose to the sorghum juice to give a sugar concentration of either 10% (w/v) or 20% (w/v). All yeast strains were first tested in 10% (w/v) total sugar medium. Those strains showing more than 90% sugar conversion efficiency were further tested in 20% (w/v) total sugar medium. Active cultures for inoculation were prepared by growing the yeast strains on the fermentation medium (10% (w/v) total sugar) for 24 h. Then the cultures were added to the fermentation media at a rate of 2%.

  11. Ethanol and High-Value Terpene Co-Production from Lignocellulosic Biomass of Cymbopogon flexuosus and Cymbopogon martinii

    DOE PAGES

    Joyce, Blake L.; Zheljazkov, Valtcho D.; Sykes, Robert; Cantrell, Charles L.; Hamilton, Choo; Mann, David G. J.; Rodriguez, Miguel; Mielenz, Jonathan R.; Astatkie, Tess; C. Neal Stewart Jr.

    2015-10-05

    Cymbopogon flexuosus, lemongrass, and C. martinii, palmarosa, are perennial grasses grown to produce essential oils for the fragrance industry. The objectives of this study were (1) to evaluate biomass and oil yields as a function of nitrogen and sulfur fertilization, and (2) to characterize their utility for lignocellulosic ethanol compared to Panicum virgatum (switchgrass). Mean biomass yields were 12.83 Mg lemongrass ha-1 and 15.11 Mg palmarosa ha-1 during the second harvest year resulting in theoretical biofuel yields of 2541 and 2569 L ethanol ha-1 respectively compared to reported 1749–3691 L ethanol ha-1 for switchgrass. Pretreated lemongrass yielded 198 mL ethanolmore » (g biomass) -1 and pretreated palmarosa yielded 170 mL ethanol (g biomass) -1. Additionally, lemongrass yielded 85.7 kg essential oil ha-1 and palmarosa yielded 67.0 kg ha-1 with an estimated value of USD $857 and $1005 ha-1. These data suggest that dual-use crops such as lemongrass and palmarosa may increase the economic viability of lignocellulosic biofuels.« less

  12. Engineering Escherichia coli for improved ethanol production from gluconate.

    PubMed

    Hildebrand, Amanda; Schlacta, Theresa; Warmack, Rebeccah; Kasuga, Takao; Fan, Zhiliang

    2013-10-10

    We report on engineering Escherichia coli to produce ethanol at high yield from gluconic acid (gluconate). Knocking out genes encoding for the competing pathways (l-lactate dehydrogenase and pyruvate formate lyase A) in E. coli KO11 eliminated lactate production, lowered the carbon flow toward acetate production, and improved the ethanol yield from 87.5% to 97.5% of the theoretical maximum, while the growth rate of the mutant strain was about 70% of the wild type. The corresponding genetic modifications led to a small improvement of ethanol yield from 101.5% to 106.0% on glucose. Deletion of the pyruvate dehydrogenase gene (pdh) alone improved the ethanol yield from 87.5% to 90.4% when gluconate was a substrate. The growth rate of the mutant strain was identical to that of the wild type. The corresponding genetic modification led to no improvements on ethanol yield on glucose.

  13. High postnatal susceptibility of hippocampal cytoskeleton in response to ethanol exposure during pregnancy and lactation.

    PubMed

    Reis, Karina Pires; Heimfarth, Luana; Pierozan, Paula; Ferreira, Fernanda; Loureiro, Samanta Oliveira; Fernandes, Carolina Gonçalves; Carvalho, Rônan Vivian; Pessoa-Pureur, Regina

    2015-11-01

    Ethanol exposure to offspring during pregnancy and lactation leads to developmental disorders, including central nervous system dysfunction. In the present work, we have studied the effect of chronic ethanol exposure during pregnancy and lactation on the phosphorylating system associated with the astrocytic and neuronal intermediate filament (IF) proteins: glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), and neurofilament (NF) subunits of low, medium, and high molecular weight (NFL, NFM, and NFH, respectively) in 9- and 21-day-old pups. Female rats were fed with 20% ethanol in their drinking water during pregnancy and lactation. The homeostasis of the IF phosphorylation was not altered in the cerebral cortex, cerebellum, or hippocampus of 9-day-old pups. However, GFAP, NFL, and NFM were hyperphosphorylated in the hippocampus of 21-day-old pups. PKA had been activated in the hippocampus, and Ser55 in the N-terminal region of NFL was hyperphosphorylated. In addition, JNK/MAPK was activated and KSP repeats in the C-terminal region of NFM were hyperphosphorylated in the hippocampus of 21-day-old pups. Decreased NFH immunocontent but an unaltered total NFH/phosphoNFH ratio suggested altered stoichiometry of NFs in the hippocampus of ethanol-exposed 21-day-old pups. In contrast to the high susceptibility of hippocampal cytoskeleton in developing rats, the homeostasis of the cytoskeleton of ethanol-fed adult females was not altered. Disruption of the cytoskeletal homeostasis in neural cells supports the view that regions of the brain are differentially vulnerable to alcohol insult during pregnancy and lactation, suggesting that modulation of JNK/MAPK and PKA signaling cascades target the hippocampal cytoskeleton in a window of vulnerability in 21-day-old pups. Our findings are relevant, since disruption of the cytoskeleton in immature hippocampus could contribute to later hippocampal damage associated with ethanol toxicity.

  14. Ethanol and xylitol production from glucose and xylose at high temperature by Kluyveromyces sp. IIPE453.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sachin; Singh, Surendra P; Mishra, Indra M; Adhikari, Dilip K

    2009-12-01

    A yeast strain Kluyveromyces sp. IIPE453 (MTCC 5314), isolated from soil samples collected from dumping sites of crushed sugarcane bagasse in Sugar Mill, showed growth and fermentation efficiency at high temperatures ranging from 45 degrees C to 50 degrees C. The yeast strain was able to use a wide range of substrates, such as glucose, xylose, mannose, galactose, arabinose, sucrose, and cellobiose, either for growth or fermentation to ethanol. The strain also showed xylitol production from xylose. In batch fermentation, the strain showed maximum ethanol concentration of 82 +/- 0.5 g l(-1) (10.4% v/v) on initial glucose concentration of 200 g l(-1), and ethanol concentration of 1.75 +/- 0.05 g l(-1) as well as xylitol concentration of 11.5 +/- 0.4 g l(-1) on initial xylose concentration of 20 g l(-1) at 50 degrees C. The strain was capable of simultaneously using glucose and xylose in a mixture of glucose concentration of 75 g l(-1) and xylose concentration of 25 g l(-1), achieving maximum ethanol concentration of 38 +/- 0.5 g l(-1) and xylitol concentration of 14.5 +/- 0.2 g l(-1) in batch fermentation. High stability of the strain was observed in a continuous fermentation by feeding the mixture of glucose concentration of 75 g l(-1) and xylose concentration of 25 g l(-1) by recycling the cells, achieving maximum ethanol concentration of 30.8 +/- 6.2 g l(-1) and xylitol concentration of 7.35 +/- 3.3 g l(-1) with ethanol productivity of 3.1 +/- 0.6 g l(-1) h(-1) and xylitol productivity of 0.75 +/- 0.35 g l(-1) h(-1), respectively.

  15. High-Yield Secretion of Multiple Client Proteins in Aspergillus

    SciTech Connect

    Segato, F.; Damasio, A. R. L.; Goncalves, T. A.; de Lucas, R. C.; Squina, F. M.; Decker, S. R.; Prade, R. A.

    2012-07-15

    Production of pure and high-yield client proteins is an important technology that addresses the need for industrial applications of enzymes as well as scientific experiments in protein chemistry and crystallization. Fungi are utilized in industrial protein production because of their ability to secrete large quantities of proteins. In this study, we engineered a high-expression-secretion vector, pEXPYR that directs proteins towards the extracellular medium in two Aspergillii host strains, examine the effect of maltose-induced over-expression and protein secretion as well as time and pH-dependent protein stability in the medium. We describe five client proteins representing a core set of hemicellulose degrading enzymes that accumulated up to 50-100 mg/L of protein. Using a recyclable genetic marker that allows serial insertion of multiple genes, simultaneous hyper-secretion of three client proteins in a single host strain was accomplished.

  16. High-Yield D-T Neutron Generator

    SciTech Connect

    Ludewigt, B.A.; Wells, R.P.; Reijonen, J.

    2006-11-15

    A high-yield D-T neutron generator has been developed for neutron interrogation in homeland security applications such as cargo screening. The generator has been designed as a sealed tube with a performance goal of producing 5 {center_dot} 10{sup 11} n/s over a long lifetime. The key generator components developed are a radio-frequency (RF) driven ion source and a beam-loaded neutron production target that can handle a beam power of 10 kW. The ion source can provide a 100 mA D{sup +}/T{sup +} beam current with a high fraction of atomic species and can be pulsed up to frequencies of several kHz for pulsed neutron generator operation. Testing in D-D operation has been started.

  17. ETHANOL, ACETIC ACID, AND WATER ADSORPTION FROM BINARY AND TERNARY LIQUID MIXTURES ON HIGH-SILICA ZEOLITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Adsorption isotherms were measured for ethanol, acetic acid, and water adsorbed on high-silica ZSM-5 zeolite powder from binary and ternary liquid mixtures at room temperature. Ethanol and water adsorption on two high-silica ZSM-5 zeolites with different aluminum contents and a h...

  18. Fast high-throughput screening of temoporfin-loaded liposomal formulations prepared by ethanol injection method.

    PubMed

    Yang, Kewei; Delaney, Joseph T; Schubert, Ulrich S; Fahr, Alfred

    2012-03-01

    A new strategy for fast, convenient high-throughput screening of liposomal formulations was developed, utilizing the automation of the so-called ethanol-injection method. This strategy was illustrated by the preparation and screening of the liposomal formulation library of a potent second-generation photosensitizer, temoporfin. Numerous liposomal formulations were efficiently prepared using a pipetting robot, followed by automated size characterization, using a dynamic light scattering plate reader. Incorporation efficiency of temoporfin and zeta potential were also detected in selected cases. To optimize the formulation, different parameters were investigated, including lipid types, lipid concentration in injected ethanol, ratio of ethanol to aqueous solution, ratio of drug to lipid, and the addition of functional phospholipid. Step-by-step small liposomes were prepared with high incorporation efficiency. At last, an optimized formulation was obtained for each lipid in the following condition: 36.4 mg·mL(-1) lipid, 13.1 mg·mL(-1) mPEG(2000)-DSPE, and 1:4 ethanol:buffer ratio. These liposomes were unilamellar spheres, with a diameter of approximately 50 nm, and were very stable for over 20 weeks. The results illustrate this approach to be promising for fast high-throughput screening of liposomal formulations.

  19. Processable high-carbon-yielding polymer for micro- and nanofabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perpall, Mark W.; Zengin, Huseyin; Perera, K. Prasanna U.; Zhou, Wensheng; Shah, Hiren; Wu, Xinyu; Creager, Stephen E.; Smith, Dennis W., Jr.; Foulger, Stephen H.; Ballato, John M.

    2003-01-01

    Bis-ortho-Diynyl Arene (BODA) monomers polymerize to network polynapthalene by the thermally-driven Bergman cyclization and subsequent radical polymerization via oligomeric intermediates that can be melt or solution processed. Further heating of the network to 1000 °C affords a high-yield glassy carbon structure that retains the approximate size and dimensions of the polymer precursor. The higher carbon-yield for BODA networks (75- 80 % by mass) is significantly greater than that of traditional phenol-formaldehyde resins and other carbon precursor polymers leading to its greater dimensional stability. Phenyl terminated BODA derived polymers were fabricated using microprocessing such as the micromolding in capillaries (MIMIC) technique, direct microtransfer molding, and molding in quartz capillary tubes. Nano-scale fabrication using closed packed silica spheres as templates was demonstrated with an hydroxy-terminated monomer which exhibits greatly enhanced compatibility for silica surfaces. After pyrolysis to glassy carbon, the silica is chemically etched leaving an inverse carbon opal photonic crystal which is electrically conductive. The wavelength of light diffracted is a function of the average refractive index of the carbon/ filler composite, which can be modified for use as sensitive detector elements.

  20. Film quantum yields of EUV& ultra-high PAG photoresists

    SciTech Connect

    Hassanein, Elsayed; Higgins, Craig; Naulleau, Patrick; Matyi, Richard; Gallatin, Greg; Denbeaux, Gregory; Antohe, Alin; Thackery, Jim; Spear, Kathleen; Szmanda, Charles; Anderson, Christopher N.; Niakoula, Dimitra; Malloy, Matthew; Khurshid, Anwar; Montgomery, Cecilia; Piscani, Emil C.; Rudack, Andrew; Byers, Jeff; Ma, Andy; Dean, Kim; Brainard, Robert

    2008-01-10

    Base titration methods are used to determine C-parameters for three industrial EUV photoresist platforms (EUV-2D, MET-2D, XP5496) and twenty academic EUV photoresist platforms. X-ray reflectometry is used to measure the density of these resists, and leads to the determination of absorbance and film quantum yields (FQY). Ultrahigh levels ofPAG show divergent mechanisms for production of photo acids beyond PAG concentrations of 0.35 moles/liter. The FQY of sulfonium PAGs level off, whereas resists prepared with iodonium PAG show FQY s that increase beyond PAG concentrations of 0.35 moles/liter, reaching record highs of 8-13 acids generatedlEUV photons absorbed.

  1. Analysis of the trade-off between high crop yield and low yield instability at the global scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Ari, Tamara; Makowski, David

    2016-10-01

    Yield dynamics of major crops species vary remarkably among continents. Worldwide distribution of cropland influences both the expected levels and the interannual variability of global yields. An expansion of cultivated land in the most productive areas could theoretically increase global production, but also increase global yield instability if the most productive regions are characterized by high interannual yield variability. In this letter, we use portfolio analysis to quantify the tradeoff between the expected values and the interannual variance of global yield. We compute optimal frontiers for four crop species i.e., maize, rice, soybean and wheat and show how the distribution of cropland among large world regions can be optimized to either increase expected global crop production or decrease its interannual variability. We also show that a preferential allocation of cropland in the most productive regions can increase global expected yield at the expense of yield stability. Theoretically, optimizing the distribution of a small fraction of total cultivated areas can help find a good compromise between low instability and high crop yields at the global scale.

  2. Use of sugarcane molasses "B" as an alternative for ethanol production with wild-type yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae ITV-01 at high sugar concentrations.

    PubMed

    Fernández-López, C L; Torrestiana-Sánchez, B; Salgado-Cervantes, M A; García, P G Mendoza; Aguilar-Uscanga, M G

    2012-05-01

    Molasses "B" is a rich co-product of the sugarcane process. It is obtained from the second step of crystallization and is richer in fermentable sugars (50-65%) than the final molasses, with a lower non-sugar solid content (18-33%); this co-product also contains good vitamin and mineral levels. The use of molasses "B" for ethanol production could be a good option for the sugarcane industry when cane sugar prices diminish in the market. In a complex medium like molasses, osmotolerance is a desirable characteristic for ethanol producing strains. The aim of this work was to evaluate the use of molasses "B" for ethanol production using Saccharomyces cerevisiae ITV-01 (a wild-type yeast isolated from sugarcane molasses) using different initial sugar concentrations (70-291 g L(-1)), two inoculum sizes and the addition of nutrients such as yeast extract, urea, and ammonium sulphate to the culture medium. The results obtained showed that the strain was able to grow at 291 g L(-1) total sugars in molasses "B" medium; the addition of nutrients to the culture medium did not produce a statistically significant difference. This yeast exhibits high osmotolerance in this medium, producing high ethanol yields (0.41 g g(-1)). The best conditions for ethanol production were 220 g L(-1) initial total sugars in molasses "B" medium, pH 5.5, using an inoculum size of 6 × 10(6) cell mL(-1); ethanol production was 85 g L(-1), productivity 3.8 g L(-1 )h(-1) with 90% preserved cell viability.

  3. Microvascular endothelium and pericytes: high yield, low passage cultures.

    PubMed

    Carson, M P; Haudenschild, C C

    1986-06-01

    Cultured microvascular endothelial cells (MEC) have become a valuable model for studies of microvascular physiology and pathology. Most current techniques involve manual removal of undesirable cell types or cloning, require one to several months, and yield high population doubling level cultures derived from a relatively small sample of the original population. We have devised a technique to more rapidly produce larger numbers of MEC. This method provided primary cultures consisting predominantly of MEC within 1 wk. The technique involves selective aspiration of gray matter from the bovine cerebral cortex followed by homogenization, sieving, enzymatic dissociation, and then dense plating (10(4) to 10(5) vessel fragments/cm2) onto gelatin- or fibronectin-coated plastic. Typical yields were 0.1 to 0.5 X 10(6) fragments/g of aspirated gray matter. The optimal culture medium for these cells was 15% equine plasma derived serum, 20% conditioned medium, 2% retinal extract, 60% fresh medium, and 500 micrograms/ml heparin. Cells attached within 24 h, well-spread colonies were present within 1 to 2 d, and cultures approached confluence within 2 to 3 d. Alkaline phosphatase staining confirmed the microvascular origin of the material plated. Morphology, Factor VIII-related antigen staining and 1,1'-dioctacecyl-3,3,3'3,-tetramethyl-indocarbocyanine perchlorate acetylated low density lipoprotein uptake suggested that MEC predominated. Cultures could be passaged and additionally purified by sequential exposure to pancreatin and trypsin-EDTA. Pancreatin selectively removed MEC colonies leaving a relatively homogeneous pericyte population. The relative ease with which such cultures can be produced should facilitate the in vitro study of brain microvascular function and may also provide insights useful for growing MEC from other vascular beds.

  4. Recycling cellulases for cellulosic ethanol production at industrial relevant conditions: potential and temperature dependency at high solid processes.

    PubMed

    Lindedam, Jane; Haven, Mai Østergaard; Chylenski, Piotr; Jørgensen, Henning; Felby, Claus

    2013-11-01

    Different versions of two commercial cellulases were tested for their recyclability of enzymatic activity at high dry matter processes (12% or 25% DM). Recyclability was assessed by measuring remaining enzyme activity in fermentation broth and the ability of enzymes to hydrolyse fresh, pretreated wheat straw. Industrial conditions were used to study the impact of hydrolysis temperature (40 or 50°C) and residence time on recyclability. Enzyme recycling at 12% DM indicated that hydrolysis at 50°C, though ideal for ethanol yield, should be kept short or carried out at lower temperature to preserve enzymatic activity. Best results for enzyme recycling at 25% DM was 59% and 41% of original enzyme load for a Celluclast:Novozyme188 mixture and a modern cellulase preparation, respectively. However, issues with stability of enzymes and their strong adsorption to residual solids still pose a challenge for applicable methods in enzyme recycling.

  5. Impact of reformulated ethanol-gasoline blends on high-emitting vehicles.

    PubMed

    Schifter, I; Díaz, L; González, Uriel

    2013-01-01

    In-use vehicles which are high emitters (HEVs) make a large contribution to the emissions inventory. It is not known, however, whether HEVs share common emissions characteristics, and particularly the effect of ethanol blends. We study this by first examining laboratory measurements of exhaust and evaporative emissions on ethanol blends containing 21%, 26% and 30% aromatics, and a reference fuel formulated with methyl-tertiary butyl ether (MTBE). Switching from MTBE to ethanol fuels on HEVs shows no effect on the total emissions of regulated pollutants, but 1,3-butadiene emissions would increased substantially while the emissions of total carbonyls would not be affected except in the case of acetaldehyde, which would increase with EtOH. The ozone-forming potential of exhaust and evaporative emissions would be less using the EtOH blends and specific reactivity will not be incremented. Lowering the vapour pressure of the gasoline and increasing the proportions of alkylate and isomerate in the composition produces an ethanol-blended fuel with lower environmental impact both in normal vehicles and HEVs. PMID:23837342

  6. Impact of reformulated ethanol-gasoline blends on high-emitting vehicles.

    PubMed

    Schifter, I; Díaz, L; González, Uriel

    2013-01-01

    In-use vehicles which are high emitters (HEVs) make a large contribution to the emissions inventory. It is not known, however, whether HEVs share common emissions characteristics, and particularly the effect of ethanol blends. We study this by first examining laboratory measurements of exhaust and evaporative emissions on ethanol blends containing 21%, 26% and 30% aromatics, and a reference fuel formulated with methyl-tertiary butyl ether (MTBE). Switching from MTBE to ethanol fuels on HEVs shows no effect on the total emissions of regulated pollutants, but 1,3-butadiene emissions would increased substantially while the emissions of total carbonyls would not be affected except in the case of acetaldehyde, which would increase with EtOH. The ozone-forming potential of exhaust and evaporative emissions would be less using the EtOH blends and specific reactivity will not be incremented. Lowering the vapour pressure of the gasoline and increasing the proportions of alkylate and isomerate in the composition produces an ethanol-blended fuel with lower environmental impact both in normal vehicles and HEVs.

  7. Metabolic engineering to improve ethanol production in Thermoanaerobacter mathranii.

    PubMed

    Yao, Shuo; Mikkelsen, Marie Just

    2010-09-01

    Thermoanaerobacter mathranii can produce ethanol from lignocellulosic biomass at high temperatures, but its biotechnological exploitation will require metabolic engineering to increase its ethanol yield. With a cofactor-dependent ethanol production pathway in T. mathranii, it may become crucial to regenerate cofactor to increase the ethanol yield. Feeding the cells with a more reduced carbon source, such as mannitol, was shown to increase ethanol yield beyond that obtained with glucose and xylose. The ldh gene coding for lactate dehydrogenase was previously deleted from T. mathranii to eliminate an NADH oxidation pathway. To further facilitate NADH regeneration used for ethanol formation, a heterologous gene gldA encoding an NAD(+)-dependent glycerol dehydrogenase was expressed in T. mathranii. One of the resulting recombinant strains, T. mathranii BG1G1 (Deltaldh, P(xyl)GldA), showed increased ethanol yield in the presence of glycerol using xylose as a substrate. With an inactivated lactate pathway and expressed glycerol dehydrogenase activity, the metabolism of the cells was shifted toward the production of ethanol over acetate, hence restoring the redox balance. It was also shown that strain BG1G1 acquired the capability to utilize glycerol as an extra carbon source in the presence of xylose, and utilization of the more reduced substrate glycerol resulted in a higher ethanol yield.

  8. Xylose fermentation to ethanol

    SciTech Connect

    McMillan, J.D.

    1993-01-01

    The past several years have seen tremendous progress in the understanding of xylose metabolism and in the identification, characterization, and development of strains with improved xylose fermentation characteristics. A survey of the numerous microorganisms capable of directly fermenting xylose to ethanol indicates that wild-type yeast and recombinant bacteria offer the best overall performance in terms of high yield, final ethanol concentration, and volumetric productivity. The best performing bacteria, yeast, and fungi can achieve yields greater than 0.4 g/g and final ethanol concentrations approaching 5%. Productivities remain low for most yeast and particularly for fungi, but volumetric productivities exceeding 1.0 g/L-h have been reported for xylose-fermenting bacteria. In terms of wild-type microorganisms, strains of the yeast Pichia stipitis show the most promise in the short term for direct high-yield fermentation of xylose without byproduct formation. Of the recombinant xylose-fermenting microorganisms developed, recombinant E. coli ATTC 11303 (pLOI297) exhibits the most favorable performance characteristics reported to date.

  9. High yield, single crystal ice via the Bridgman method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisson, Patrick; Groenzin, Henning; Barnett, Irene Li; Shultz, Mary Jane

    2016-03-01

    The surface chemistry of ice and of water is an important topic of study, especially given the role of ice and water in shaping the environment. Although snow, granular, and polycrystalline ice are often used in research, there are applications where large surface areas of a known crystallographic plane are required. For example, fundamental spectroscopy or scattering studies rely on large area samples of known crystalline orientation. In addition, due to its slower dynamics and decreased number of molecular configurations, ice can be viewed as a reduced complexity model for the complex hydrogen bonding environment found at the surface and within the bulk of liquid water. In our studies using Sum Frequency Generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy, we have shown that each crystalline face has a unique spectral signature and therefore a unique chemistry and chemical activity. A reliable, reproducible, high performance method of producing large single crystal samples is needed to support this surface chemistry research. The design, construction, and use of a computer-controlled, ice-growth machine based on the Stockbarger modified Bridgeman technique is described. The instrument reliably produces relatively large single crystals that are optically flawless (that is, no visible flaws when viewed in a crossed polarizer), and in very high yield. Success rates of 95% are typical. Such performance has not been observed in the literature.

  10. Influence of high gravity process conditions on the environmental impact of ethanol production from wheat straw.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Matty; Tillman, Anne-Marie; Cannella, David; Jørgensen, Henning

    2014-12-01

    Biofuel production processes at high gravity are currently under development. Most of these processes however use sugars or first generation feedstocks as substrate. This paper presents the results of a life cycle assessment (LCA) of the production of bio-ethanol at high gravity conditions from a second generation feedstock, namely, wheat straw. The LCA used lab results of a set of 36 process configurations in which dry matter content, enzyme preparation and loading, and process strategy were varied. The LCA results show that higher dry matter content leads to a higher environmental impact of the ethanol production, but this can be compensated by reducing the impact of enzyme production and use, and by polyethylene glycol addition at high dry matter content. The results also show that the renewable and non-renewable energy use resulting from the different process configurations ultimately determine their environmental impact. PMID:25299491

  11. Influence of high gravity process conditions on the environmental impact of ethanol production from wheat straw.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Matty; Tillman, Anne-Marie; Cannella, David; Jørgensen, Henning

    2014-12-01

    Biofuel production processes at high gravity are currently under development. Most of these processes however use sugars or first generation feedstocks as substrate. This paper presents the results of a life cycle assessment (LCA) of the production of bio-ethanol at high gravity conditions from a second generation feedstock, namely, wheat straw. The LCA used lab results of a set of 36 process configurations in which dry matter content, enzyme preparation and loading, and process strategy were varied. The LCA results show that higher dry matter content leads to a higher environmental impact of the ethanol production, but this can be compensated by reducing the impact of enzyme production and use, and by polyethylene glycol addition at high dry matter content. The results also show that the renewable and non-renewable energy use resulting from the different process configurations ultimately determine their environmental impact.

  12. Enzymatic Hydrolysis and Ethanol Fermentation of High Dry Matter Wet-Exploded Wheat Straw at Low Enzyme Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgieva, Tania I.; Hou, Xiaoru; Hilstrøm, Troels; Ahring, Birgitte K.

    Wheat straw was pretreated by wet explosion using three different oxidizing agents (H2O2, O2, and air). The effect of the pretreatment was evaluated based on glucose and xylose liberated during enzymatic hydrolysis. The results showed that pretreatment with the use of O2 as oxidizing agent was the most efficient in enhancing overall convertibility of the raw material to sugars and minimizing generation of furfural as a by-product. For scale-up of the process, high dry matter (DM) concentrations of 15-20% will be necessary. However, high DM hydrolysis and fermentation are limited by high viscosity of the material, higher inhibition of the enzymes, and fermenting microorganism. The wet-explosion pretreatment method enabled relatively high yields from both enzymatic hydrolysis and simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) to be obtained when performed on unwashed slurry with 14% DM and a low enzyme loading of 10 FPU/g cellulose in an industrial acceptable time frame of 96 h. Cellulose and hemicellulose conversion from enzymatic hydrolysis were 70 and 68%, respectively, and an overall ethanol yield from SSF was 68%.

  13. High temperature stimulates acetic acid accumulation and enhances the growth inhibition and ethanol production by Saccharomyces cerevisiae under fermenting conditions.

    PubMed

    Woo, Ji-Min; Yang, Kyung-Mi; Kim, Sae-Um; Blank, Lars M; Park, Jin-Byung

    2014-07-01

    Cellular responses of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to high temperatures of up to 42 °C during ethanol fermentation at a high glucose concentration (i.e., 100 g/L) were investigated. Increased temperature correlated with stimulated glucose uptake to produce not only the thermal protectant glycerol but also ethanol and acetic acid. Carbon flux into the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle correlated positively with cultivation temperature. These results indicate that the increased demand for energy (in the form of ATP), most likely caused by multiple stressors, including heat, acetic acid, and ethanol, was matched by both the fermentation and respiration pathways. Notably, acetic acid production was substantially stimulated compared to that of other metabolites during growth at increased temperature. The acetic acid produced in addition to ethanol seemed to subsequently result in adverse effects, leading to increased production of reactive oxygen species. This, in turn, appeared to cause the specific growth rate, and glucose uptake rate reduced leading to a decrease of the specific ethanol production rate far before glucose depletion. These results suggest that adverse effects from heat, acetic acid, ethanol, and oxidative stressors are synergistic, resulting in a decrease of the specific growth rate and ethanol production rate and, hence, are major determinants of cell stability and ethanol fermentation performance of S. cerevisiae at high temperatures. The results are discussed in the context of possible applications.

  14. Ru-assisted synthesis of Pd/Ru nanodendrites with high activity for ethanol electrooxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ke; Bin, Duan; Yang, Beibei; Wang, Caiqin; Ren, Fangfang; Du, Yukou

    2015-07-01

    Due to the specific physical and chemical properties of a highly branched noble metal, the controllable synthesis has attracted much attention. This article reports the synthesis of Pd/Ru nanodendrites by a facile method using an oil bath in the presence of polyvinyl pyrrolidone, potassium bromide and ascorbic acid. The morphology, structure, and composition of the as-prepared catalysts were characterized by means of X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. In the electrochemical measurement, the as-prepared Pd7/Ru1 bimetallic nanodendrites provide a large electrochemically active surface area and exhibit high peak current density in the forward scan toward ethanol electrooxidation, which is nearly four times higher than those of a pure Pd catalyst. The as-prepared Pd7/Ru1 catalysts also exhibit significantly enhanced cycling stability toward ethanol oxidation in alkaline medium, which are mainly ascribed to the synergetic effect between Pd and Ru. This indicates that the Pd7/Ru1 catalysts should have great potential applications in direct ethanol fuel cells.Due to the specific physical and chemical properties of a highly branched noble metal, the controllable synthesis has attracted much attention. This article reports the synthesis of Pd/Ru nanodendrites by a facile method using an oil bath in the presence of polyvinyl pyrrolidone, potassium bromide and ascorbic acid. The morphology, structure, and composition of the as-prepared catalysts were characterized by means of X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. In the electrochemical measurement, the as-prepared Pd7/Ru1 bimetallic nanodendrites provide a large electrochemically active surface area and exhibit high peak current density in the forward scan toward ethanol electrooxidation, which is nearly four times higher than those of a pure Pd catalyst. The as-prepared Pd7/Ru1 catalysts also exhibit significantly

  15. High-Yield Synthesis of Stoichiometric Boron Nitride Nanostructures

    DOE PAGES

    Nocua, José E.; Piazza, Fabrice; Weiner, Brad R.; Morell, Gerardo

    2009-01-01

    Boron nimore » tride (BN) nanostructures are structural analogues of carbon nanostructures but have completely different bonding character and structural defects. They are chemically inert, electrically insulating, and potentially important in mechanical applications that include the strengthening of light structural materials. These applications require the reliable production of bulk amounts of pure BN nanostructures in order to be able to reinforce large quantities of structural materials, hence the need for the development of high-yield synthesis methods of pure BN nanostructures. Using borazine ( B 3 N 3 H 6 ) as chemical precursor and the hot-filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD) technique, pure BN nanostructures with cross-sectional sizes ranging between 20 and 50 nm were obtained, including nanoparticles and nanofibers. Their crystalline structure was characterized by (XRD), their morphology and nanostructure was examined by (SEM) and (TEM), while their chemical composition was studied by (EDS), (FTIR), (EELS), and (XPS). Taken altogether, the results indicate that all the material obtained is stoichiometric nanostructured BN with hexagonal and rhombohedral crystalline structure.« less

  16. Stabilized Alumina/Ethanol Colloidal Dispersion for Seeding High Temperature Air Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wernet, Judith H.; Wernet, Mark P.

    1994-01-01

    Seeding air flows with particles to enable measurements of gas velocities via laser anemometry and/or particle image velocimetry techniques can be quite exasperating. The seeding requirements are compounded when high temperature environments are encountered and special care must be used in selecting a refractory seed material. The pH stabilization techniques commonly employed in ceramic processing are used to obtain stable dispersions for generating aerosols of refractory seed material. By adding submicron alumina particles to a preadjusted pH solution of ethanol, a stable dispersion is obtained which when atomized produces a high quality aerosol. Commercial grade alumina powder is used with a moderate size distribution. The technique is not limited to alumina/ethanol and is also demonstrated with an alumina/H2O system. Other ceramic powders in various polar solvents could also be used once the point of zero charge (pH(sub pzc)) of the powder in the solvent has been determined.

  17. Tailoring wet explosion process parameters for the pretreatment of cocksfoot grass for high sugar yields.

    PubMed

    Njoku, S I; Ahring, B K; Uellendahl, H

    2013-08-01

    The pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass is crucial for efficient subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis and ethanol fermentation. In this study, wet explosion (WEx) pretreatment was applied to cocksfoot grass and pretreatment conditions were tailored for maximizing the sugar yields using response surface methodology. The WEx process parameters studied were temperature (160-210 °C), retention time (5-20 min), and dilute sulfuric acid concentration (0.2-0.5 %). The pretreatment parameter set E, applying 210 °C for 5 min and 0.5 % dilute sulfuric acid, was found most suitable for achieving a high glucose release with low formation of by-products. Under these conditions, the cellulose and hemicellulose sugar recovery was 94 % and 70 %, respectively. The efficiency of the enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose under these conditions was 91 %. On the other hand, the release of pentose sugars was higher when applying less severe pretreatment conditions C (160 °C, 5 min, 0.2 % dilute sulfuric acid). Therefore, the choice of the most suitable pretreatment conditions is depending on the main target product, i.e., hexose or pentose sugars.

  18. Genetics of alcoholism: rapid development of a new high-ethanol-preferring (HEP) strain of female and male rats.

    PubMed

    Myers, R D; Robinson, D E; West, M W; Biggs, T A; McMillen, B A

    1998-11-01

    A genetically based animal model of alcoholism has been developed in a relatively short period of 3 years. The new strain is characterized by an intense preference for ethanol over water as well as unique behavioral, neurochemical and other attributes. This new strain, termed high-ethanol-preferring (HEP) rats, was derived initially from selective cross-breeding of a variant strain of female Harlan Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats with the outbred Wistar line of male ethanol-preferring (P) rats. In this study, drinking patterns of both genders were obtained over 10 days by presenting water and ethanol in concentrations ranging from 3% to 30%. To expedite the development of the new strain, only three to five female and male rats served as breeders, which were chosen from all litters on the basis of their maximum g/kg intake integrated with proportion of ethanol to total fluid values. Profiles of intake of preferred concentrations of ethanol were obtained over 24 h of unlimited access as well as during 2-h intervals of limited access to ethanol. Levels of blood ethanol were measured in both female and male HEP animals during bouts of ethanol drinking in the limited access paradigm. By the sixth generation of HEP rats, ethanol consumption of the females often exceeded that of any other rat genetically bred to drink ethanol (e.g., at a concentration of 15.7%, 10.3 g/kg per day). Seven additional characteristics are notable: 1) the HEP rats prefer ethanol in the presence of a nutritious chocolate drink or nonnutrient sweetened solution (aspartame); 2) high levels of blood ethanol are associated with their drinking; 3) females drink significantly greater g/kg amounts of ethanol than HEP males and prefer a higher percent concentration of ethanol; 4) the drinking of ethanol by the female HEP animals does not fluctuate during the estrous cycle; 5) neurochemical assays show differential profiles of 5-HT, dopamine, and their metabolites in different regions of the brain; 6) measures

  19. Ethanol and High Cholesterol Diet Causes Severe Steatohepatitis and Early Liver Fibrosis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Krishnasamy, Yasodha; Ramshesh, Venkat K.; Gooz, Monika; Schnellmann, Rick G.; Lemasters, John J.; Zhong, Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aim Because ethanol consumption is commonly associated with a high cholesterol diet, we examined whether combined consumption of ethanol and high cholesterol increases liver injury and fibrosis. Methods Male C57BL/6J mice were fed diets containing: 1) 35% of calories from corn oil (CTR), 2) CTR plus 0.5% (w/v) cholesterol (Chol), 3) CTR plus ethanol (27% of calories) (EtOH), or 4) EtOH+Chol for 3 months. Results In mice fed Chol or EtOH alone, ALT increased to ~160 U/L, moderate hepatic steatosis occurred, and leukocyte infiltration, necrosis, and apoptosis increased modestly, but no observable fibrosis developed. By contrast in mice fed EtOH+Chol, ALT increased to ~270 U/L, steatosis was more extensive and mostly macrovesicular, and expression of proinflammatory molecules (HMGB-1, TLR4, TNFα, ICAM-1) and leukocyte infiltration increased substantially. Necrosis and apoptosis also increased. Trichrome staining and second harmonic generation microscopy revealed hepatic fibrosis. Fibrosis was mostly sinusoidal and/or perivenular, but in some mice bridging fibrosis occurred. Expression of smooth muscle α-actin and TGF-β1 increased slightly by Chol, moderately by EtOH, and markedly by EtOH+Chol. TGF-β pseudoreceptor BAMBI increased slightly by Chol, remained unchanged by EtOH and decreased by EtOH+Chol. MicroRNA-33a, which enhances TGF-β fibrotic effects, and phospho-Smad2/3, the down-stream signal of TGF-β, also increased more greatly by EtOH+Chol than Chol or EtOH. Metalloproteinase-2 and -9 were decreased only by EtOH+Chol. Conclusion High dietary cholesterol and chronic ethanol consumption synergistically increase liver injury, inflammation, and profibrotic responses and suppress antifibrotic responses, leading to severe steatohepatitis and early fibrosis in mice. PMID:27676640

  20. Ethanol-Induced ADH Activity in Zebrafish: Differential Concentration-Dependent Effects on High- Versus Low-Affinity ADH Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Tran, Steven; Nowicki, Magda; Facciol, Amanda; Chatterjee, Diptendu; Gerlai, Robert

    2016-04-01

    Zebrafish express enzymes that metabolize ethanol in a manner comparable to that of mammals, including humans. We previously demonstrated that acute ethanol exposure increases alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) activity in an inverted U-shaped dose-dependent manner. It was hypothesized that the biphasic dose-response was due to the increased activity of a high-affinity ADH isoform following exposure to low concentrations of ethanol and increased activity of a low-affinity ADH isoform following exposure to higher concentrations of ethanol. To test this hypothesis, we exposed zebrafish to different concentrations of ethanol (0%, 0.25%, 0.5%, and 1.0% v/v) for 30 min and measured the total ADH activity in the zebrafish liver. However, we also repeated this enzyme activity assay using a low concentration of the substrate (ethanol) to determine the activity of high-affinity ADH isoforms. We found that total ADH activity in response to ethanol induces an inverted U-shaped dose-response similar to our previous study. Using a lower substrate level in our enzyme assay targeting high-affinity isozymes, we found a similar dose-response. However, the difference in activity between the high and low substrate assays (high substrate activity - low substrate activity), which provide an index of activity for low-affinity ADH isoforms, revealed no significant effect of ethanol exposure. Our results suggest that the inverted U-shaped dose-response for total ADH activity in response to ethanol is driven primarily by high-affinity isoforms of ADH.

  1. A quantitative metabolomics study of high sodium response in Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xinhe; Condruz, Stefan; Chen, Jingkui; Jolicoeur, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Hemicellulose hydrolysates, sugar-rich feedstocks used in biobutanol refinery, are normally obtained by adding sodium hydroxide in the hydrolyze process. However, the resulting high sodium concentration in the hydrolysate inhibits ABE (acetone-butanol-ethanol) fermentation, and thus limits the use of these low-cost feedstocks. We have thus studied the effect of high sodium on the metabolic behavior of Clostridium acetobutyricum ATCC 824, with xylose as the carbon source. At a threshold sodium concentration of 200 mM, a decrease of the maximum cell dry weight (−19.50 ± 0.85%) and of ABE yield (−35.14 ± 3.50% acetone, −33.37 ± 0.74% butanol, −22.95 ± 1.81% ethanol) were observed compared to control culture. However, solvents specific productivities were not affected by supplementing sodium. The main effects of high sodium on cell metabolism were observed in acidogenesis, during which we observed the accumulation of ATP and NADH, and the inhibition of the pentose phosphate (PPP) and the glycolytic pathways with up to 80.73 ± 1.47% and 68.84 ± 3.42% decrease of the associated metabolic intermediates, respectively. However, the NADP+-to-NADPH ratio was constant for the whole culture duration, a phenomenon explaining the robustness of solvents specific productivities. Therefore, high sodium, which inhibited biomass growth through coordinated metabolic effects, interestingly triggered cell robustness on solvents specific productivity. PMID:27321153

  2. Lichen Symbiosis: Nature's High Yielding Machines for Induced Hydrogen Production

    PubMed Central

    Papazi, Aikaterini; Kastanaki, Elizabeth; Pirintsos, Stergios; Kotzabasis, Kiriakos

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen is a promising future energy source. Although the ability of green algae to produce hydrogen has long been recognized (since 1939) and several biotechnological applications have been attempted, the greatest obstacle, being the O2-sensitivity of the hydrogenase enzyme, has not yet been overcome. In the present contribution, 75 years after the first report on algal hydrogen production, taking advantage of a natural mechanism of oxygen balance, we demonstrate high hydrogen yields by lichens. Lichens have been selected as the ideal organisms in nature for hydrogen production, since they consist of a mycobiont and a photobiont in symbiosis. It has been hypothesized that the mycobiont’s and photobiont’s consumption of oxygen (increase of COX and AOX proteins of mitochondrial respiratory pathways and PTOX protein of chrolorespiration) establishes the required anoxic conditions for the activation of the phycobiont’s hydrogenase in a closed system. Our results clearly supported the above hypothesis, showing that lichens have the ability to activate appropriate bioenergetic pathways depending on the specific incubation conditions. Under light conditions, they successfully use the PSII-dependent and the PSII-independent pathways (decrease of D1 protein and parallel increase of PSaA protein) to transfer electrons to hydrogenase, while under dark conditions, lichens use the PFOR enzyme and the dark fermentative pathway to supply electrons to hydrogenase. These advantages of lichen symbiosis in combination with their ability to survive in extreme environments (while in a dry state) constitute them as unique and valuable hydrogen producing natural factories and pave the way for future biotechnological applications. PMID:25826211

  3. Lichen symbiosis: nature's high yielding machines for induced hydrogen production.

    PubMed

    Papazi, Aikaterini; Kastanaki, Elizabeth; Pirintsos, Stergios; Kotzabasis, Kiriakos

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen is a promising future energy source. Although the ability of green algae to produce hydrogen has long been recognized (since 1939) and several biotechnological applications have been attempted, the greatest obstacle, being the O2-sensitivity of the hydrogenase enzyme, has not yet been overcome. In the present contribution, 75 years after the first report on algal hydrogen production, taking advantage of a natural mechanism of oxygen balance, we demonstrate high hydrogen yields by lichens. Lichens have been selected as the ideal organisms in nature for hydrogen production, since they consist of a mycobiont and a photobiont in symbiosis. It has been hypothesized that the mycobiont's and photobiont's consumption of oxygen (increase of COX and AOX proteins of mitochondrial respiratory pathways and PTOX protein of chrolorespiration) establishes the required anoxic conditions for the activation of the phycobiont's hydrogenase in a closed system. Our results clearly supported the above hypothesis, showing that lichens have the ability to activate appropriate bioenergetic pathways depending on the specific incubation conditions. Under light conditions, they successfully use the PSII-dependent and the PSII-independent pathways (decrease of D1 protein and parallel increase of PSaA protein) to transfer electrons to hydrogenase, while under dark conditions, lichens use the PFOR enzyme and the dark fermentative pathway to supply electrons to hydrogenase. These advantages of lichen symbiosis in combination with their ability to survive in extreme environments (while in a dry state) constitute them as unique and valuable hydrogen producing natural factories and pave the way for future biotechnological applications.

  4. Lichen symbiosis: nature's high yielding machines for induced hydrogen production.

    PubMed

    Papazi, Aikaterini; Kastanaki, Elizabeth; Pirintsos, Stergios; Kotzabasis, Kiriakos

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen is a promising future energy source. Although the ability of green algae to produce hydrogen has long been recognized (since 1939) and several biotechnological applications have been attempted, the greatest obstacle, being the O2-sensitivity of the hydrogenase enzyme, has not yet been overcome. In the present contribution, 75 years after the first report on algal hydrogen production, taking advantage of a natural mechanism of oxygen balance, we demonstrate high hydrogen yields by lichens. Lichens have been selected as the ideal organisms in nature for hydrogen production, since they consist of a mycobiont and a photobiont in symbiosis. It has been hypothesized that the mycobiont's and photobiont's consumption of oxygen (increase of COX and AOX proteins of mitochondrial respiratory pathways and PTOX protein of chrolorespiration) establishes the required anoxic conditions for the activation of the phycobiont's hydrogenase in a closed system. Our results clearly supported the above hypothesis, showing that lichens have the ability to activate appropriate bioenergetic pathways depending on the specific incubation conditions. Under light conditions, they successfully use the PSII-dependent and the PSII-independent pathways (decrease of D1 protein and parallel increase of PSaA protein) to transfer electrons to hydrogenase, while under dark conditions, lichens use the PFOR enzyme and the dark fermentative pathway to supply electrons to hydrogenase. These advantages of lichen symbiosis in combination with their ability to survive in extreme environments (while in a dry state) constitute them as unique and valuable hydrogen producing natural factories and pave the way for future biotechnological applications. PMID:25826211

  5. A highly sensitive ethanol sensor based on mesoporous ZnO–SnO2 nanofibers

    PubMed Central

    Song, Xiaofeng; Wang, Zhaojie; Liu, Yongben; Wang, Ce; Li, Lijuan

    2009-01-01

    A facile and versatile method for the large-scale synthesis of sensitive mesoporous ZnO–SnO2 (m-Z–S) nanofibers through a combination of surfactant-directed assembly and an electrospinning approach is reported. The morphology and the structure were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), x-ray diffraction (XRD), and nitrogen adsorption–desorption isotherm analysis. The results showed that the diameters of fibers ranged from 100 to 150 nm with mixed structures of wurtzite (ZnO) and rutile (SnO2), and a mesoporous structure was observed in the m-Z–S nanofibers. The sensor performance of the prepared m-Z–S nanofibers was measured for ethanol. It is found that the mesoporous fiber film obtained exhibited excellent ethanol sensing properties, such as high sensitivity, quick response and recovery, good reproducibility, and linearity in the range 3–500 ppm. PMID:19417420

  6. Anaerobic digestion of corn ethanol thin stillage in batch and by high-rate down-flow fixed film reactors.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, A; Kennedy, K J

    2012-01-01

    Thin stillage (CTS) from a dry-grind corn ethanol plant was evaluated as a carbon source for anaerobic digestion (AD) by batch and high rate semi-continuous down-flow stationary fixed film (DSFF) reactors. Biochemical methane potential (BMP) assays were carried out with CTS concentrations ranging from approximately 2,460-27,172 mg total chemical oxygen demand (TCOD) per litre, achieved by diluting CTS with clean water or a combination of clean water and treated effluent. High TCOD, SCOD and volatile solids (VS) removal efficiencies of 85 ± 2, 94 ± 0 and 82 ± 1% were achieved for CTS diluted with only clean water at an organic concentration of 21,177 mg TCOD per litre, with a methane yield of 0.30 L methane per gram TCOD(removed) at standard temperature and pressure (STP, 0 °C and 1 atmosphere). Batch studies investigating the use of treated effluent for dilution showed promising results. Continuous studies employed two mesophilic DSFF anaerobic digesters treating thin stillage, operated at hydraulic retention times (HRT) of 20, 14.3, 8.7, 6.3, 5 and 4.2 d. Successful digestion was achieved up to an organic loading rate (OLR) of approximately 7.4 g TCOD L(-1)d(-1) at a 5 d HRT with a yield of 2.05 LCH(4) L(-1)d(-1) (at STP) and TCOD and VS removal efficiencies of 89 ± 3 and 85 ± 3%, respectively.

  7. Redox potential driven aeration during very-high-gravity ethanol fermentation by using flocculating yeast

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chen-Guang; Hao, Xue-Mi; Lin, Yen-Han; Bai, Feng-Wu

    2016-01-01

    Ethanol fermentation requires oxygen to maintain high biomass and cell viability, especially under very-high-gravity (VHG) condition. In this work, fermentation redox potential (ORP) was applied to drive the aeration process at low dissolved oxygen (DO) levels, which is infeasible to be regulated by a DO sensor. The performance and characteristics of flocculating yeast grown under 300 and 260 g glucose/L conditions were subjected to various aeration strategies including: no aeration; controlled aeration at −150, −100 and −50 mV levels; and constant aeration at 0.05 and 0.2 vvm. The results showed that anaerobic fermentation produced the least ethanol and had the highest residual glucose after 72 h of fermentation. Controlled aerations, depending on the real-time oxygen demand, led to higher cell viability than the no-aeration counterpart. Constant aeration triggered a quick biomass formation, and fast glucose utilization. However, over aeration at 0.2 vvm caused a reduction of final ethanol concentration. The controlled aeration driven by ORP under VHG conditions resulted in the best fermentation performance. Moreover, the controlled aeration could enhance yeast flocculating activity, promote an increase of flocs size, and accelerate yeast separation near the end of fermentation. PMID:27161047

  8. Ru-assisted synthesis of Pd/Ru nanodendrites with high activity for ethanol electrooxidation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ke; Bin, Duan; Yang, Beibei; Wang, Caiqin; Ren, Fangfang; Du, Yukou

    2015-08-01

    Due to the specific physical and chemical properties of a highly branched noble metal, the controllable synthesis has attracted much attention. This article reports the synthesis of Pd/Ru nanodendrites by a facile method using an oil bath in the presence of polyvinyl pyrrolidone, potassium bromide and ascorbic acid. The morphology, structure, and composition of the as-prepared catalysts were characterized by means of X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. In the electrochemical measurement, the as-prepared Pd7/Ru1 bimetallic nanodendrites provide a large electrochemically active surface area and exhibit high peak current density in the forward scan toward ethanol electrooxidation, which is nearly four times higher than those of a pure Pd catalyst. The as-prepared Pd7/Ru1 catalysts also exhibit significantly enhanced cycling stability toward ethanol oxidation in alkaline medium, which are mainly ascribed to the synergetic effect between Pd and Ru. This indicates that the Pd7/Ru1 catalysts should have great potential applications in direct ethanol fuel cells.

  9. Redox potential driven aeration during very-high-gravity ethanol fermentation by using flocculating yeast.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chen-Guang; Hao, Xue-Mi; Lin, Yen-Han; Bai, Feng-Wu

    2016-05-10

    Ethanol fermentation requires oxygen to maintain high biomass and cell viability, especially under very-high-gravity (VHG) condition. In this work, fermentation redox potential (ORP) was applied to drive the aeration process at low dissolved oxygen (DO) levels, which is infeasible to be regulated by a DO sensor. The performance and characteristics of flocculating yeast grown under 300 and 260 g glucose/L conditions were subjected to various aeration strategies including: no aeration; controlled aeration at -150, -100 and -50 mV levels; and constant aeration at 0.05 and 0.2 vvm. The results showed that anaerobic fermentation produced the least ethanol and had the highest residual glucose after 72 h of fermentation. Controlled aerations, depending on the real-time oxygen demand, led to higher cell viability than the no-aeration counterpart. Constant aeration triggered a quick biomass formation, and fast glucose utilization. However, over aeration at 0.2 vvm caused a reduction of final ethanol concentration. The controlled aeration driven by ORP under VHG conditions resulted in the best fermentation performance. Moreover, the controlled aeration could enhance yeast flocculating activity, promote an increase of flocs size, and accelerate yeast separation near the end of fermentation.

  10. Redox potential driven aeration during very-high-gravity ethanol fermentation by using flocculating yeast.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chen-Guang; Hao, Xue-Mi; Lin, Yen-Han; Bai, Feng-Wu

    2016-01-01

    Ethanol fermentation requires oxygen to maintain high biomass and cell viability, especially under very-high-gravity (VHG) condition. In this work, fermentation redox potential (ORP) was applied to drive the aeration process at low dissolved oxygen (DO) levels, which is infeasible to be regulated by a DO sensor. The performance and characteristics of flocculating yeast grown under 300 and 260 g glucose/L conditions were subjected to various aeration strategies including: no aeration; controlled aeration at -150, -100 and -50 mV levels; and constant aeration at 0.05 and 0.2 vvm. The results showed that anaerobic fermentation produced the least ethanol and had the highest residual glucose after 72 h of fermentation. Controlled aerations, depending on the real-time oxygen demand, led to higher cell viability than the no-aeration counterpart. Constant aeration triggered a quick biomass formation, and fast glucose utilization. However, over aeration at 0.2 vvm caused a reduction of final ethanol concentration. The controlled aeration driven by ORP under VHG conditions resulted in the best fermentation performance. Moreover, the controlled aeration could enhance yeast flocculating activity, promote an increase of flocs size, and accelerate yeast separation near the end of fermentation. PMID:27161047

  11. Lipid-enhanced ethanol production from xylose by Pachysolen tannophilus

    SciTech Connect

    Dekker, R.F.H.

    1986-04-01

    A number of different yeasts are now recognized as being capable of fermenting the pentose sugar, D-xylose, into ethanol. The most prominent among these are Pachysolen tannophilus and several Candida species. D-Xylose is found principally in lignocellulosic materials where it occurs as the main constitutent of the hemicellulosic xylans (1,4-..beta..-D-heteroxylans). With the exception of Candida XF-217, the conversion yields of xylose into ethanol for most yeasts were generally low (less than 70% of theoretical when grown on at least 50 g/l xylose). The low ethanol yields are attributable to a number of factors: 1) fermentation was not performed under conditions that maximize ethanol formation; 2) ethanol was not the major fermentation end-product, (e.g., acetic acid xylitol, and arabinitol are also known products, 3) ethanol toxicity; 4) ethanol is assimilated when the substrate becomes limiting; 4.8 and 5) osmotic sensitivity to high substrate levels, i.e. substrate inhibition. Attempts to increase ethanol yields of yeasts by adding exogenous lipids (e.g., oleic and linoleic acids, or ergosterol or its ester, lipid mixtures, or protein-lipid mixtures) to nutrient medium have succeeded in improving ethanol yields and also in reducing fermentation times. These lipids, when added to the nutrient medium, were incorporated into the yeast's cellular membrane. The protective action of these lipids was to alleviate the inhibitory effect of ethanol which then allowed the cells to tolerate higher ethanol levels. This communication reports on improved ethanol yields arising from the fermentation of xylose by a Pachysolen tannophilus strain when grown semi-aerobically in the presence of exogenous-added lipids. 17 references.

  12. Are the yields of major cereal crops stagnating? Results from the newly developed high spatial resolution crop yield time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, D. K.; Ramankutty, N.; Foley, J. A.

    2011-12-01

    A variety of global scale studies that use crop yield time series for the last 50 years have remained constrained to using national level information due to the lack of high spatial resolution crop yield time series data. In this presentation we will unveil a new global crop yield data set for the 1961-2008 time period, at 5 min spatial resolution, and covering 174 crops. We developed this data by collecting national and sub-national harvested area and production information for individual crops. This new dataset can be used to answer questions related to global agriculture at a resolution and over a time period not previously possible. We have used this new dataset to address the question of whether the yields of the three important cereal crops -- maize, rice and wheat -- are stagnating as widely reported. Our results show that while in the older crop belts of the world yield improvements have slowed, a green revolution type of major yield increases in maize, rice and wheat are continuing in newly cultivated areas of the world.

  13. Clostridium beijerinckii mutant obtained by atmospheric pressure glow discharge producing high proportions of butanol and solvent yields.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ting; Tang, Yan; Xi, Yong-lan; He, Ai-yong; Sun, Bai-jun; Wu, Hao; Liang, Da-feng; Jiang, Min; Ouyang, Ping-kai

    2011-12-01

    With 30 g glucose/l as carbon source, Clostridium beijerinckii ART124, a mutant created by atmospheric pressure glow discharge, produced 13.7 g total solvent/l (containing 3.1 g acetone/l, 10.4 g butanol/l and 0.2 g ethanol/l) in 72 h. The mutant could also use sucrose or xylose or a mixture of glucose/xylose/arabinose with nearly equal yields.

  14. Anomalous softening of yield strength in tantalum at high pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Jing, Qiumin Wu, Qiang; Xu, Ji-an; Bi, Yan; Liu, Lei; Liu, Shenggang; Zhang, Yi; Geng, Huayun

    2015-02-07

    The pressure dependence of the yield strength of tantalum was investigated experimentally up to 101 GPa at room temperature using a diamond anvil cell. A yield strength softening is observed between 52 and 84 GPa, whereas a normal trend is observed below 52 GPa and above 84 GPa. The onset pressure of the softening is in agreement with previous results obtained by the pressure gradient method and shock wave experiments. This unusual strength softening in tantalum is not related with structural transformation, preferred orientation, or material damage. Our measurements indicate that microscopic deviatoric strain is the major reason for the observed strength softening in tantalum.

  15. Modification of Corn Starch Ethanol Refinery to Efficiently Accept Various High-Impact Cellulosic Feedstocks

    SciTech Connect

    Derr, Dan

    2013-12-30

    The goal of the Corn-to-Cellulosic Migration (CCM) pilot facility was to demonstrate the implementation of advanced technologies and methods for conversion of non-food, cellulosic feedstocks into ethanol, assess the economics of the facility and evaluate potential environmental benefits for biomass to fuels conversion. The CCM project was comprised of design, build, and operate phases for the CCM pilot facility as well as research & development, and modeling components. The CCM pilot facility was designed to process 1 tonne per day of non-food biomass and biologically convert that biomass to ethanol at a rate of 70 gallons per tonne. The plant demonstrated throughputs in excess of 1 tonne per day for an extended run of 1400 hours. Although target yields were not fully achieved, the continuous operation validated the design and operability of the plant. These designs will permit the design of larger scale operations at existing corn milling operations or for greenfield plants. EdeniQ, a partner in the project and the owner of the pilot plant, continues to operate and evaluate other feedstocks.

  16. A highly efficient chemical sensor material for ethanol: Al2O3/Graphene nanocomposites fabricated from graphene oxide.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Zaixing; Wang, Jiajun; Meng, Linghui; Huang, Yudong; Liu, Li

    2011-06-14

    Al(2)O(3)/Graphene nanocomposites are firstly produced from GO solution by a one-step, green, facile, low-cost SC CO(2) method. The as-prepared nanocomposite papers display high CL sensitivity and high selectivity to the ethanol gas, which provides a facile, green and low-cost route for the preparation of ethanol nanoscopic sensing devices with wide applications. PMID:21547307

  17. ATP metabolism in rat liver chronically treated with ethanol and high fat

    SciTech Connect

    Miyamoto, K.; French, S.W.

    1986-03-01

    Five pairs of Wistar male rats weighing about 350 g were continuously infused with a liquid diet in which 25-35% of total calories was derived from fat, plus ethanol or isocaloric dextrose through gastrostomy cannulas for 3 wks to 3.5 mos. Mean ethanol intake was 12.9 +/- 0.7 g/kg B.W. (55% of total calories). High blood alcohol levels (BAL, 342 +/- 151 mg/dl) were maintained. The liver showed severe steatosis (4+) in all the ethanol-fed rats (ER). Two had mild focal mononuclear cell infiltration, one had mild fibrosis and one had spotty necrosis. Mild steatosis (1+) was seen in 4 out of 5 pair-fed control rats (CR). Serum ALT was significantly higher in ER (129 +/- 44 U) compared with Cr (59 +/- 30 U) or rats fed chow ad lib (NR) (48 +/- 26 U). Biopsied liver tissue was used to measure the concentration of adenine nucleotides by HPLC (6 pairs). There was a significant decrease of ATP in ER (1.7 +/- 0.3 ..mu..mol/g liver) as compared to CR (2.5 +/- 0.5 ..mu..mol/g) or NR (2.8 +/- 0.2 ..mu..mol/g, n = 6). There was no significant change in the ADP or AMP content, however. The total adenylate pool of the liver was also significantly reduced in ER when compared to that of CR or NR (3.2 +/- 0.4, 4.0 +/- 0.5 and 4.3 +/- 0.2 ..mu..mol/g liver, respectively). Adeynlate energy charge (E.C.) of the ER livers (0.71 +/- 0.05) was significantly reduced compared to NR (0.77 +/- 0.02) but not with CR (0.75 +/- 0.06). The results indicate that ethanol decreases the level of ATP as well as the biological mechanism to compensate for the lowered level.

  18. Moderate ethanol administration accentuates cardiomyocyte contractile dysfunction and mitochondrial injury in high fat diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Fang; Lei, Yonghong; Wang, Qiurong; Esberg, Lucy B; Huang, Zaixing; Scott, Glenda I; Li, Xue; Ren, Jun

    2015-03-18

    Light to moderate drinking confers cardioprotection although it remains unclear with regards to the role of moderate drinking on cardiac function in obesity. This study was designed to examine the impact of moderate ethanol intake on myocardial function in high fat diet intake-induced obesity and the mechanism(s) involved with a focus on mitochondrial integrity. C57BL/6 mice were fed low or high fat diet for 16 weeks prior to ethanol challenge (1g/kg/d for 3 days). Cardiac contractile function, intracellular Ca(2+) homeostasis, myocardial histology, and mitochondrial integrity [aconitase activity and the mitochondrial proteins SOD1, UCP-2 and PPARγ coactivator 1α (PGC-1α)] were assessed 24h after the final ethanol challenge. Fat diet intake compromised cardiomyocyte contractile and intracellular Ca(2+) properties (depressed peak shortening and maximal velocities of shortening/relengthening, prolonged duration of relengthening, dampened intracellular Ca(2+) rise and clearance without affecting duration of shortening). Although moderate ethanol challenge failed to alter cardiomyocyte mechanical property under low fat diet intake, it accentuated high fat diet intake-induced changes in cardiomyocyte contractile function and intracellular Ca(2+) handling. Moderate ethanol challenge failed to affect fat diet intake-induced cardiac hypertrophy as evidenced by H&E staining. High fat diet intake reduced myocardial aconitase activity, downregulated levels of mitochondrial protein UCP-2, PGC-1α, SOD1 and interrupted intracellular Ca(2+) regulatory proteins, the effect of which was augmented by moderate ethanol challenge. Neither high fat diet intake nor moderate ethanol challenge affected protein or mRNA levels as well as phosphorylation of Akt and GSK3β in mouse hearts. Taken together, our data revealed that moderate ethanol challenge accentuated high fat diet-induced cardiac contractile and intracellular Ca(2+) anomalies as well as mitochondrial injury.

  19. Biological production of ethanol from coal

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    Previously studies have shown the importance of both medium composition and concentration and medium pH on ethanol production of Clostridium ljungdahlii in fermenting CO, CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2} in synthesis gas. Four additional batch experiments involving medium composition and concentration were carried out in modified basal medium without yeast extract at pH 4.0. These experiments indicate that basal medium with only small amounts of B-vitamins can yield significant cell growth while yielding ethanol as the major product. Product ratios as high as 11.0 g ethanol per g acetate were obtained with half strength B-vitamins. Further experiments indicates that Ca-pantothenate may be necessary for the growth of C. ljungdahlii and that growth and ethanol production can occur simultaneously.

  20. Advanced scheme for high-yield laser driven nuclear reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margarone, D.; Picciotto, A.; Velyhan, A.; Krasa, J.; Kucharik, M.; Mangione, A.; Szydlowsky, A.; Malinowska, A.; Bertuccio, G.; Shi, Y.; Crivellari, M.; Ullschmied, J.; Bellutti, P.; Korn, G.

    2015-01-01

    The use of a low contrast nanosecond laser pulse with a relatively low intensity (3  ×  1016 W cm-2) allowed the enhancing of the yield of induced nuclear reactions in advanced solid targets. In particular the ‘ultraclean’ proton-boron fusion reaction, producing energetic alpha particles without neutron generation, was chosen. A spatially well-defined layer of boron dopants in a hydrogen-enriched silicon substrate was used as a target. A combination of the specific target composition and the laser pulse temporal shape allowed the enhancing of the yield of alpha particles up to 109 per steradian. This result can be ascribed to the interaction of the long-laser pre-pulse with the target and to the optimal target geometry and composition.

  1. A high yield neutron target for cancer therapy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alger, D. L.; Steinberg, R.

    1972-01-01

    A rotating target was developed that has the potential for providing an initial yield of 10 to the 13th power neutrons per second by the T(d,n)He-4 reaction, and a useable lifetime in excess of 600 hours. This yield and lifetime are indicated for a 300 Kv and 30 mA deuteron accelerator and a 30 microns thick titanium tritide film formed of the stoichiometric compound TiT2. The potential for extended lifetime is made possible by incorporating a sputtering electrode that permits use of titanium tritide thicknesses much greater than the deuteron range. The electrode is used to remove in situ depleted titanium layers to expose fresh tritide beneath. The utilization of the rotating target as a source of fast neutrons for cancer therapy is discussed.

  2. Effects of concurrent access to multiple ethanol concentrations and repeated deprivations on alcohol intake of high-alcohol-drinking (HAD) rats.

    PubMed

    Rodd, Zachary A; Bell, Richard L; Kuc, Kelly A; Murphy, James M; Lumeng, Lawrence; McBride, William J

    2009-04-01

    High-alcohol-drinking rats, given access to 10% ethanol, expressed an alcohol deprivation effect (ADE) only after multiple deprivations. In alcohol-preferring (P) rats, concurrent access to multiple ethanol concentrations combined with repeated cycles of EtOH access and deprivation produced excessive ethanol drinking. The current study was undertaken to examine the effects of repeated alcohol deprivations with concurrent access to multiple concentrations of ethanol on ethanol intake of HAD replicate lines of rats. HAD-1 and HAD-2 rats received access to 10, 20 and 30% (v/v) ethanol for 6 weeks. Rats from each replicate line were assigned to: (1) a non-deprived group; (2) a group initially deprived of ethanol for 2 weeks; or (3) a group initially deprived for 8 weeks. Following the restoration of the ethanol solutions, cycle of 2 weeks of ethanol exposure and 2 weeks of alcohol deprivation was repeated three times for a total of four deprivations. Following the initial ethanol deprivation period, deprived groups significantly increased ethanol intakes during the initial 24-hour re-exposure period. Multiple deprivations increased ethanol intakes, shifted preference to higher ethanol concentrations and prolonged the duration of the elevated ethanol intakes for up to 5 days. In addition, repeated deprivations increased ethanol intake in the first 2-hour re-exposure period as high as 5-7 g/kg (which are equivalent to amounts consumed in 24 hours by HAD rats), and produced blood ethanol levels in excess of 150 mg%. The results indicate that HAD rats exhibit 'loss-of-control' of alcohol drinking with repeated deprivations when multiple ethanol concentrations are available.

  3. Anisotropic yielding of rocks at high temperatures and pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Kronenberg, A.K.; Russell, J.E.; Handin, J.; Gottschalk, R.R.; Shea, W.T.

    1987-12-01

    Results to date are: All of the starting materials for the three year project have been collected. Included in our collection are relatively fine-grained, fresh, oriented blocks of schist, gneiss, and micaceous quartzite with well-defined foliations and lineations as well as granite blocks oriented with respect to the principal quarrying orientations, the rift, grain, and hardway. A suite of samples has also been collected from an exposed granite stock and surrounding country rocks in order to evaluate the strengths and distribution of fabrics which may be encountered while drilling. These fabrics appear to be directly related to the forceful emplacement of the pluton. The literature on the mechanics of intrusion has been reviewed with regard to strain gradients and foliation development associated with diapiric flow. This information will be used to evaluate flow of varying fabrics on yield criteria within and surrounding magma chambers. Twenty-three successful experiments have been performed on samples of gneiss cored along six different orientations at temperatures ranging from 25{degrees} to 700{degrees}C. These experiments include extension tests, unconfined compression tests, and compression tests performed at P{sub c} = 100 MPa. Theoretical yield conditions for anisotropic materials have been reviewed and the assumptions upon which they are based probed. These yield conditions will ultimately be used to fit our data on gneiss, and the other foliated rocks under investigation. Two abstracts have been published and oral presentations made at the 1987 Fall Meeting of the American Geophysical Union, based upon our previous DOE-sponsored work on tensile fracturing of quartzite and related work on semi-brittle deformation of granitic rocks. 21 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Enhanced ethanol production by fermentation of Gelidium amansii hydrolysate using a detoxification process and yeasts acclimated to high-salt concentration.

    PubMed

    Ra, Chae Hun; Jung, Jang Hyun; Sunwoo, In Yung; Jeong, Gwi-Taek; Kim, Sung-Koo

    2015-06-01

    A total monosaccharide concentration of 59.0 g/L, representing 80.1 % conversion of 73.6 g/L total fermentable sugars from 160 g dw/L G. amansii slurry was obtained by thermal acid hydrolysis and enzymatic hydrolysis. Subsequent adsorption treatment using 5 % activated carbon with an adsorption time of 2 min was used to prevent the inhibitory effect of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) >5 g/L in the medium. Ethanol production decreased with increasing salt concentration using C. tropicalis KCTC 7212 non-acclimated or acclimated to a high concentration of salt. Salt concentration of 90 psu was the maximum concentration for cell growth and ethanol production. The levels of ethanol production by C. tropicalis non-acclimated or acclimated to 90 psu high-salt concentration were 13.8 g/L with a yield (YEtOH) of 0.23, and 26.7 g/L with YEtOH of 0.45, respectively.

  5. High yield neutron generator based on a high-current gasdynamic electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Skalyga, V.; Sidorov, A.; Izotov, I.; Golubev, S.; Razin, S.; Strelkov, A.; Tarvainen, O.; Koivisto, H.; Kalvas, T.

    2015-09-07

    In present paper, an approach for high yield compact D-D neutron generator based on a high current gasdynamic electron cyclotron resonance ion source is suggested. Results on dense pulsed deuteron beam production with current up to 500 mA and current density up to 750 mA/cm{sup 2} are demonstrated. Neutron yield from D{sub 2}O and TiD{sub 2} targets was measured in case of its bombardment by pulsed 300 mA D{sup +} beam with 45 keV energy. Neutron yield density at target surface of 10{sup 9} s{sup −1} cm{sup −2} was detected with a system of two {sup 3}He proportional counters. Estimations based on obtained experimental results show that neutron yield from a high quality TiD{sub 2} target bombarded by D{sup +} beam demonstrated in present work accelerated to 100 keV could reach 6 × 10{sup 10} s{sup −1} cm{sup −2}. It is discussed that compact neutron generator with such characteristics could be perspective for a number of applications like boron neutron capture therapy, security systems based on neutron scanning, and neutronography.

  6. High-yield microfabrication process for biomimetic artificial haircell sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Junjun; Fan, Zhifang; Chen, Jack; Zou, Jun; Liu, Chang

    2002-07-01

    We have developed artificial haircell sensors based on an improved plastic deformation magnetic assembly (PDMA) method. The PDMA method is uniquely capable of realizing 3D microstructures in an efficient, IC-compatible manner. We have improved the design of the PDMA structure to significantly increase the yield by eliminating stress concentration. The robustness of the fabricated devices is enhanced using conformal Parylene deposition. The PDMA process uses magnetic force to bend surface micromachiend cantilever beams. If the bending is significant, the beams would enter plastic deformation regime and maintains permanently bent position even after the magnetic field is removed. Previously, the PDMA process is associated with appreciable yield loss during het magnetic assembly. The failure mechanisms is believed to be stress concentration at sharp corners defined by edges of sacrificial layers. In the new design, a structure enhancement feature is added to the surface micromachiend assembly and hence eliminating any sharp features. Haircells sensors are modular sensory units widely found in the biological world. Haircells are responsible for hearing, flow sensing, and for balancing/equilibrium. We are developing artificial haircell sensors using advanced micromachining technology. The artificial haircell sensors have similar physical scale compared with biological ones.

  7. Transesterification of waste vegetable oil under pulse sonication using ethanol, methanol and ethanol-methanol mixtures.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Guerra, Edith; Gude, Veera Gnaneswar

    2014-12-01

    This study reports on the effects of direct pulse sonication and the type of alcohol (methanol and ethanol) on the transesterification reaction of waste vegetable oil without any external heating or mechanical mixing. Biodiesel yields and optimum process conditions for the transesterification reaction involving ethanol, methanol, and ethanol-methanol mixtures were evaluated. The effects of ultrasonic power densities (by varying sample volumes), power output rates (in W), and ultrasonic intensities (by varying the reactor size) were studied for transesterification reaction with ethanol, methanol and ethanol-methanol (50%-50%) mixtures. The optimum process conditions for ethanol or methanol based transesterification reaction of waste vegetable oil were determined as: 9:1 alcohol to oil ratio, 1% wt. catalyst amount, 1-2 min reaction time at a power output rate between 75 and 150 W. It was shown that the transesterification reactions using ethanol-methanol mixtures resulted in biodiesel yields as high as >99% at lower power density and ultrasound intensity when compared to ethanol or methanol based transesterification reactions.

  8. Hierarchical Pd-Sn Alloy Nanosheet Dendrites: An Economical and Highly Active Catalyst for Ethanol Electrooxidation

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Liang-Xin; Wang, An-Liang; Ou, Yan-Nan; Li, Qi; Guo, Rui; Zhao, Wen-Xia; Tong, Ye-Xiang; Li, Gao-Ren

    2013-01-01

    Hierarchical alloy nanosheet dendrites (ANSDs) are highly favorable for superior catalytic performance and efficient utilization of catalyst because of the special characteristics of alloys, nanosheets, and dendritic nanostructures. In this paper, we demonstrate for the first time a facile and efficient electrodeposition approach for the controllable synthesis of Pd-Sn ANSDs with high surface area. These synthesized Pd-Sn ANSDs exhibit high electrocatalytic activity and superior long-term cycle stability toward ethanol oxidation in alkaline media. The enhanced electrocataytic activity of Pd-Sn ANSDs may be attributed to Pd-Sn alloys, nanosheet dendrite induced promotional effect, large number of active sites on dendrite surface, large surface area, and good electrical contact with the base electrode. Because of the simple implement and high flexibility, the proposed approach can be considered as a general and powerful strategy to synthesize the alloy electrocatalysts with high surface areas and open dendritic nanostructures. PMID:23383368

  9. Photoyellowing inhibition of bleached high yield pulps using novel water-soluble UV screens.

    PubMed

    Argyropoulos, D S; Halevy, P; Peng, P

    2000-02-01

    To address the deficiencies of benzophenone UV screens for preventing brightness reversion in high yield mechanical papers, we synthesized a new series of such materials with enhanced water solubility and compatibility with the lignocellulosic substrate. A series of 2,4-dihydroxybenzophenones (DHB) were synthesized containing various Mannich bases at the C3 position of one of its rings. They possess the UV-screening ability of o-hydroxylbenzophenones, and they also contain tertiary nitrogen atoms that may function as radical scavengers. Aqueous solutions of the hydrochloride salt of 3-(dimethylaminomethylene)-2,4-dihydroxylbenzophenone (1), when applied on bleached chemithermomechanical pulp (CTMP) sheets, were significantly more efficient in preventing photoyellowing than the original DHB applied on the sheets from ethanol-water solutions. This confirmed our original hypothesis that increasing the compatibility of the UV screen with the lignocellulosic matrix would increase its efficiency in preventing photoyellowing. Compound 1, however, was found to be somewhat more effective than its hydrochloride salt toward preventing photoyellowing. This was attributed to the synergistic action of the free tertiary aminic center attached on the molecule with its UV-screening ability. To comprehend further the various parameters that influence the photoyellowing inhibition performance of these compounds and DHB with bleached CTMP pulp fibers, a series of handsheets were prepared at different pH. The interactions of the protonated compound 1 with pulp fibers were then evaluated by studying their kinetics of absorption and desorption to and from the fiber matrix. This part of our study found that the adsorption of protonated Mannich derivatives of DHB onto pulp is most likely governed by a cation-exchange mechanism involving the cationic amine group with the sulfonic and carboxylic acid groups located on the surface of the fibers. The pH the paper sheet was made from was also

  10. High Level Ethanol from Sugar Cane Molasses by a New Thermotolerant Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strain in Industrial Scale.

    PubMed

    Fadel, M; Keera, Abeer A; Mouafi, Foukia E; Kahil, Tarek

    2013-01-01

    A new local strain of S. cerevisiae F-514, for ethanol production during hot summer season, using Egyptian sugar cane molasses was applied in Egyptian distillery factory. The inouluum was propagated through 300 L, 3 m(3), and 12 m(3) fermenters charged with diluted sugar cane molasses containing 4%-5% sugars. The yeast was applied in fermentation vessels 65 m(3) working volume to study the varying concentrations of urea, DAP, orthophosphoric acid (OPA), and its combinations as well as magnesium sulfate and inoculum size. The fermenter was allowed to stay for a period of 20 hours to give time for maximum conversion of sugars into ethanol. S. cerevisiae F-514 at molasses sugar level of 18% (w/v), inoculum size of 20% (v/v) cell concentration of 3.0 × 10(8)/mL, and combinations of urea, diammonium phosphate (DAP), orthophosphoric acid (OPA), and magnesium sulfate at amounts of 20, 10, 5, and 10 kg/65 m(3) working volume fermenters, respectively, supported maximum ethanol production (9.8%, v/v), fermentation efficiency (FE) 88.1%, and remaining sugars (RS) 1.22%. The fermentation resulted 13.4 g dry yeast/L contained 34.6% crude protein and 8.2% ash. By selecting higher ethanol yielding yeast strain and optimizing, the fermentation parameters both yield and economics of the fermentation process can be improved.

  11. High Level Ethanol from Sugar Cane Molasses by a New Thermotolerant Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strain in Industrial Scale

    PubMed Central

    Fadel, M.; Keera, Abeer A.; Mouafi, Foukia E.; Kahil, Tarek

    2013-01-01

    A new local strain of S. cerevisiae F-514, for ethanol production during hot summer season, using Egyptian sugar cane molasses was applied in Egyptian distillery factory. The inouluum was propagated through 300 L, 3 m3, and 12 m3 fermenters charged with diluted sugar cane molasses containing 4%-5% sugars. The yeast was applied in fermentation vessels 65 m3 working volume to study the varying concentrations of urea, DAP, orthophosphoric acid (OPA), and its combinations as well as magnesium sulfate and inoculum size. The fermenter was allowed to stay for a period of 20 hours to give time for maximum conversion of sugars into ethanol. S. cerevisiae F-514 at molasses sugar level of 18% (w/v), inoculum size of 20% (v/v) cell concentration of 3.0 × 108/mL, and combinations of urea, diammonium phosphate (DAP), orthophosphoric acid (OPA), and magnesium sulfate at amounts of 20, 10, 5, and 10 kg/65 m3 working volume fermenters, respectively, supported maximum ethanol production (9.8%, v/v), fermentation efficiency (FE) 88.1%, and remaining sugars (RS) 1.22%. The fermentation resulted 13.4 g dry yeast/L contained 34.6% crude protein and 8.2% ash. By selecting higher ethanol yielding yeast strain and optimizing, the fermentation parameters both yield and economics of the fermentation process can be improved. PMID:24363937

  12. Using the Nova target chamber for high-yield targets

    SciTech Connect

    Pitts, J.H.

    1987-09-28

    The existing 2.2-m-radius Nova aluminum target chamber, coated and lined with boron-seeded carbon shields, is proposed for use with 1000-MJ-yield targets in the next laser facility. The laser beam and diagnostic holes in the target chamber are left open and the desired 10/sup -2/ Torr vacuum is maintained both inside and outside the target chamber; a larger target chamber room is the vacuum barrier to the atmosphere. The hole area available is three times that necessary to maintain a maximum fluence below 12 J/cm/sup 2/ on optics placed at a radius of 10 m. Maximum stress in the target chamber wall is 73 MPa, which complies with the intent of the ASME Pressure Vessel Code. However, shock waves passing through the inner carbon shield could cause it to comminute. We propose tests and analyses to ensure that the inner carbon shield survives the environment. 13 refs.

  13. Optimization of low-cost medium for very high gravity ethanol fermentations by Saccharomyces cerevisiae using statistical experimental designs.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Francisco B; Guimarães, Pedro M R; Teixeira, José A; Domingues, Lucília

    2010-10-01

    Statistical experimental designs were used to develop a medium based on corn steep liquor (CSL) and other low-cost nutrient sources for high-performance very high gravity (VHG) ethanol fermentations by Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The critical nutrients were initially selected according to a Plackett-Burman design and the optimized medium composition (44.3 g/L CSL; 2.3 g/L urea; 3.8 g/L MgSO₄·7H₂O; 0.03 g/L CuSO₄·5H₂O) for maximum ethanol production by the laboratory strain CEN.PK 113-7D was obtained by response surface methodology, based on a three-level four-factor Box-Behnken design. The optimization process resulted in significantly enhanced final ethanol titre, productivity and yeast viability in batch VHG fermentations (up to 330 g/L glucose) with CEN.PK113-7D and with industrial strain PE-2, which is used for bio-ethanol production in Brazil. Strain PE-2 was able to produce 18.6±0.5% (v/v) ethanol with a corresponding productivity of 2.4±0.1g/L/h. This study provides valuable insights into cost-effective nutritional supplementation of industrial fuel ethanol VHG fermentations.

  14. Naloxone and ethanol intoxication.

    PubMed

    Askenasi, R; Fontaine, J

    1982-01-01

    Naloxone has been said to be an antidote of acute ethanol intoxication in man. Experimental and clinical studies are however not convincing and contradictory. We have used naloxone to antagonize the effect of ethanol in mice. Results are compared to those obtained with morphine intoxication. Even at high doses (5 mg/kg) naloxone is not a good antagonist of ethanol intoxication in mice.

  15. Anistotropic yielding of rocks at high temperatures and pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Kronenberg, A.K.; Russell, J.E.; Carter, N.L.

    1990-10-14

    The anisotropic deformation of foliated and linealed rocks has been investigated, primarily to predict the mechanical response of rocks surrounding buried magma chambers to the stress fields generated by deep drilling. The principal application in this regard has been to evaluate, the scientific feasibility of extracting geothermal energy from buried magma chambers. Our approach has been to perform triaxial extension and compression tests at temperatures and pressures representative of the borehole environment on samples cored along six selected orientations and to fit the data to an orthohombric yield criterion. We have investigated Four-Mile gneiss (a strongly layered gneiss with well defined lineation), a biotite-rich schist, and Westerly granite (using a block oriented with respect to the granite's rift, grain, and hardway). Progress has been made in three areas: the experimental determination of strength anisotropies for the three starting materials, theoretical treatment and modeling of the results, and characterization of fabrics surrounding magma bodies resulting from their diaperic emplacement into shallow portions of the Earth's crust. In addition, results have been obtained for the tensile fracture of quartzite, basal slip and anisotropy of biotite single crystals, and anisotropic flow of bedded rocksalt.

  16. Separating heat stress from moisture stress: analyzing yield response to high temperature in irrigated maize

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, Elizabeth K.; Melkonian, Jeff; Riha, Susan J.; Shaw, Stephen B.

    2016-09-01

    Several recent studies have indicated that high air temperatures are limiting maize (Zea mays L.) yields in the US Corn Belt and project significant yield losses with expected increases in growing season temperatures. Further work has suggested that high air temperatures are indicative of high evaporative demand, and that decreases in maize yields which correlate to high temperatures and vapor pressure deficits (VPD) likely reflect underlying soil moisture limitations. It remains unclear whether direct high temperature impacts on yields, independent of moisture stress, can be observed under current temperature regimes. Given that projected high temperature and moisture may not co-vary the same way as they have historically, quantitative analyzes of direct temperature impacts are critical for accurate yield projections and targeted mitigation strategies under shifting temperature regimes. To evaluate yield response to above optimum temperatures independent of soil moisture stress, we analyzed climate impacts on irrigated maize yields obtained from the National Corn Growers Association (NCGA) corn yield contests for Nebraska, Kansas and Missouri. In irrigated maize, we found no evidence of a direct negative impact on yield by daytime air temperature, calculated canopy temperature, or VPD when analyzed seasonally. Solar radiation was the primary yield-limiting climate variable. Our analyses suggested that elevated night temperature impacted yield by increasing rates of phenological development. High temperatures during grain-fill significantly interacted with yields, but this effect was often beneficial and included evidence of acquired thermo-tolerance. Furthermore, genetics and management—information uniquely available in the NCGA contest data—explained more yield variability than climate, and significantly modified crop response to climate. Thermo-acclimation, improved genetics and changes to management practices have the potential to partially or completely

  17. Low concentration of ethanol favors progenitor cell differentiation and neovascularization in high-fat diet-fed mice model.

    PubMed

    Vergori, Luisa; Lauret, Emilie; Soleti, Raffaella; Martinez, Maria Carmen; Andriantsitohaina, Ramaroson

    2016-09-01

    Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) and monocytic cells from bone marrow (BM) can be recruited to the injured endothelium and contribute to its regeneration. During metabolic diseases such as obesity and diabetes, progenitor cell function is impaired. Several studies have shown that moderate alcohol consumption prevents the development and progression of atherosclerosis in a variety of animal/mouse models and increases mobilization of progenitor cells. Along with these studies, we identify ethanol at low concentration as therapeutic tool to in vitro expand progenitor cells in order to obtain an adequate number of cells for their use in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases. We evaluated the effects of ethanol on the phenotype of BM-derived cells from mice fed with high-fat diet (HFD). HFD did not induce changes in weight of mice but induced metabolic alterations. HFD feeding increased the differentiation of monocytic progenitors but not EPCs. Whereas ethanol at 0.6% is able to increase monocytic progenitor differentiation, 1% ethanol diminished it. Furthermore, ethanol at 0.6% increased the ability of progenitor cells to promote in vivo angiogenesis as well as secretome of BM-derived cells from mice fed with HFD, but not in mice fed normal diet. In conclusion, ethanol at low concentration is able to increase angiogenic abilities of progenitor cells from animals with early metabolic alterations.

  18. High stable suspension of magnetite nanoparticles in ethanol by using sono-synthesized nanomagnetite in polyol medium

    SciTech Connect

    Bastami, Tahereh Rohani; Entezari, Mohammad H.

    2013-09-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The sonochemical synthesis of magnetite nanoparticles was carried out in EG without any surfactant. • The nanoparticles with sizes ∼24 nm were composed of small building blocks with sizes ∼2 nm. • The hydrophilic magnetite nanoparticles were stable in ethanol even after 8 months. • Ultrasonic intensity showed a crucial role on the obtained high stable magnetite nanoparticles in ethanol. - Abstract: The sonochemical synthesis of magnetite nanoparticles was carried out at relatively low temperature (80 °C) in ethylene glycol (EG) as a polyol solvent. The particle size was determined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The magnetite nanoparticles with an average size of 24 nm were composed of small building blocks with an average size of 2–3 nm and the particles exhibited nearly spherical shape. The surface characterization was investigated by using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The stability of magnetite nanoparticles was studied in ethanol as a polar solvent. The nanoparticles showed an enhanced stability in ethanol which is due to the hydrophilic surface of the particles. The colloidal stability of magnetite nanoparticles in ethanol was monitored by UV–visible spectrophotometer. According to the results, the nanoparticles synthesized in 30 min of sonication with intensity of 35 W/cm{sup 2} (50%) led to a maximum stability in ethanol as a polar solvent with respect to the other applied intensities. The obtained magnetite nanoparticles were stable for more than12 months.

  19. Synergistic ablation of liver tissue and liver cancer cells with high-intensity focused ultrasound and ethanol.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Nguyen H; Murad, Hakm Y; Ratnayaka, Sithira H; Chen, Chong; Khismatullin, Damir B

    2014-08-01

    We investigated the combined effect of ethanol and high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU), first, on heating and cavitation bubble activity in tissue-mimicking phantoms and porcine liver tissues and, second, on the viability of HepG2 liver cancer cells. Phantoms or porcine tissues were injected with ethanol and then subjected to HIFU at acoustic power ranging from 1.2 to 20.5 W (HIFU levels 1-7). Cavitation events and the temperature around the focal zone were measured with a passive cavitation detector and embedded type K thermocouples, respectively. HepG2 cells were subjected to 4% ethanol solution in growth medium (v/v) just before the cells were exposed to HIFU at 2.7, 8.7 or 12.0 W for 30 s. Cell viability was measured 2, 24 and 72 h post-treatment. The results indicate that ethanol and HIFU have a synergistic effect on liver cancer ablation as manifested by greater temperature rise and lesion volume in liver tissues and reduced viability of liver cancer cells. This effect is likely caused by reduction of the cavitation threshold in the presence of ethanol and the increased rate of ethanol diffusion through the cell membrane caused by HIFU-induced streaming, sonoporation and heating.

  20. Beneficial effect of a low dose of ethanol on liver function and serum urate in rats fed a high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Osaki, Aimi; Okazaki, Yukako; Kimoto, Akiko; Izu, Hanae; Kato, Norihisa

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of the consumption of 1% or 2% (v/v) ethanol in drinking water for 12 wk on rats fed a high-fat diet. Body weight gain, food intake, and fluid intake were unaffected by ethanol intake. Adipose tissue weight, and serum glucose and lipids were unaffected. Compared to the control (no ethanol), 1% ethanol intake significantly reduced serum levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), and ammonia (p<0.05), whereas 2% ethanol intake did so to a lesser extent. Serum urate was significantly lower in both the 1% and 2% ethanol groups than that in the control group (p<0.05). The results suggest a low dose of ethanol has beneficial effects on liver function and serum urate in rats fed a high-fat diet.

  1. High-yield anthocyanin biosynthesis in engineered Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yajun; Li, Zhen; Koffas, Mattheos A G

    2008-05-01

    Anthocyanins are red, purple, or blue plant water-soluble pigments. In the past two decades, anthocyanins have received extensive studies for their anti-oxidative, anti-inflammatory, anti-cancer, anti-obesity, anti-diabetic, and cardioprotective properties. In the present study, anthocyanin biosynthetic enzymes from different plant species were characterized and employed for pathway construction leading from inexpensive precursors such as flavanones and flavan-3-ols to anthocyanins in Escherichia coli. The recombinant E. coli cells successfully achieved milligram level production of two anthocyanins, pelargonidin 3-O-glucoside (0.98 mg/L) and cyanidin 3-O-gluside (2.07 mg/L) from their respective flavanone precursors naringenin and eriodictyol. Cyanidin 3-O-glucoside was produced at even higher yields (16.1 mg/L) from its flavan-3-ol, (+)-catechin precursor. Further studies demonstrated that availability of the glucosyl donor, UDP-glucose, was the key metabolic limitation, while product instability at normal pH was also identified as a barrier for production improvement. Therefore, various optimization strategies were employed for enhancing the homogenous synthesis of UDP-glucose in the host cells while at the same time stabilizing the final anthocyanin product. Such optimizations included culture medium pH adjustment, the creation of fusion proteins and the rational manipulation of E. coli metabolic network for improving the intracellular UDP-glucose metabolic pool. As a result, production of pelargonidin 3-O-glucoside at 78.9 mg/L and cyanidin 3-O-glucoside at 70.7 mg/L was achieved from their precursor flavan-3-ols without supplementation with extracellular UDP-glucose. These results demonstrate the efficient production of the core anthocyanins for the first time and open the possibility for their commercialization for pharmaceutical and nutraceutical applications.

  2. High-risk energy plans yield low rewards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gwynne, Peter

    2009-10-01

    Scientists have complained that a new research body run by the US Department of Energy (DOE) is suffering from management problems and is rejecting funding proposals without stating why. The DOE's Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E) - created in 2007 - is designed to fund high-risk, high-payoff research and development projects in energy. However, the agency, which received its first budget in April, has so far turned down almost 95% of proposals after the first round.

  3. Sorghum to Ethanol Research

    SciTech Connect

    Dahlberg, Jeffrey A.; Wolfrum, Edward J.

    2010-09-28

    The development of a robust source of renewable transportation fuel will require a large amount of biomass feedstocks. It is generally accepted that in addition to agricultural and forestry residues, we will need crops grown specifically for subsequent conversion into fuels. There has been a lot of research on several of these so-called "dedicated bioenergy crops" including switchgrass, miscanthus, sugarcane, and poplar. It is likely that all of these crops will end up playing a role as feedstocks, depending on local environmental and market conditions. Many different types of sorghum have been grown to produce syrup, grain, and animal feed for many years. It has several features that may make it as compelling as other crops mentioned above as a renewable, sustainable biomass feedstock; however, very little work has been done to investigate sorghum as a dedicated bioenergy crop. The goal of this project was to investigate the feasibility of using sorghum biomass to produce ethanol. The work performed included a detailed examination of the agronomics and composition of a large number of sorghum varieties, laboratory experiments to convert sorghum to ethanol, and economic and life-cycle analyses of the sorghum-to-ethanol process. This work showed that sorghum has a very wide range of composition, which depended on the specific sorghum cultivar as well as the growing conditions. The results of laboratory- and pilot-scale experiments indicated that a typical high-biomass sorghum variety performed very similarly to corn stover during the multi-step process required to convert biomass feedstocks to ethanol; yields of ethanol for sorghum were very similar to the corn stover used as a control in these experiments. Based on multi-year agronomic data and theoretical ethanol production, sorghum can achieve more than 1,300 gallons of ethanol per acre given the correct genetics and environment. In summary, sorghum may be a compelling dedicated bioenergy crop that could help

  4. Sorghum to Ethanol Research

    SciTech Connect

    Jeff Dahlberg, Ph D; Ed Wolfrum, Ph D

    2010-06-30

    The development of a robust source of renewable transportation fuel will require a large amount of biomass feedstocks. It is generally accepted that in addition to agricultural and forestry residues, we will need crops grown specifically for subsequent conversion into fuels. There has been a lot of research on several of these so-called "dedicated bioenergy crops" including switchgrass, miscanthus, sugarcane, and poplar. It is likely that all of these crops will end up playing a role as feedstocks, depending on local environmental and market conditions. Many different types of sorghum have been grown to produce syrup, grain, and animal feed for many years. It has several features that may make it as compelling as other crops mentioned above as a renewable, sustainable biomass feedstock; however, very little work has been done to investigate sorghum as a dedicated bioenergy crop. The goal of this project was to investigate the feasibility of using sorghum biomass to produce ethanol. The work performed included a detailed examination of the agronomics and composition of a large number of sorghum varieties, laboratory experiments to convert sorghum to ethanol, and economic and life-cycle analyses of the sorghum-to-ethanol process. This work showed that sorghum has a very wide range of composition, which depended on the specific sorghum cultivar as well as the growing conditions. The results of laboratory- and pilot-scale experiments indicated that a typical high-biomass sorghum variety performed very similarly to corn stover during the multi-step process required to convert biomass feedstocks to ethanol; yields of ethanol for sorghum were very similar to the corn stover used as a control in these experiments. Based on multi-year agronomic data and theoretical ethanol production, sorghum can achieve more than 1,300 gallons of ethanol per acre given the correct genetics and environment. In summary, sorghum may be a compelling dedicated bioenergy crop that could help

  5. Effects of High Octane Ethanol Blends on Four Legacy Flex-Fuel Vehicles, and a Turbocharged GDI Vehicle

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, John F; West, Brian H; Huff, Shean P

    2015-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is supporting engine and vehicle research to investigate the potential of high-octane fuels to improve fuel economy. Ethanol has very high research octane number (RON) and heat of vaporization (HoV), properties that make it an excellent spark ignition engine fuel. The prospects of increasing both the ethanol content and the octane number of the gasoline pool has the potential to enable improved fuel economy in future vehicles with downsized, downsped engines. This report describes a small study to explore the potential performance benefits of high octane ethanol blends in the legacy fleet. There are over 17 million flex-fuel vehicles (FFVs) on the road today in the United States, vehicles capable of using any fuel from E0 to E85. If a future high-octane blend for dedicated vehicles is on the horizon, the nation is faced with the classic chicken-and-egg dilemma. If today’s FFVs can see a performance advantage with a high octane ethanol blend such as E25 or E30, then perhaps consumer demand for this fuel can serve as a bridge to future dedicated vehicles. Experiments were performed with four FFVs using a 10% ethanol fuel (E10) with 88 pump octane, and a market gasoline blended with ethanol to make a 30% by volume ethanol fuel (E30) with 94 pump octane. The research octane numbers were 92.4 for the E10 fuel and 100.7 for the E30 fuel. Two vehicles had gasoline direct injected (GDI) engines, and two featured port fuel injection (PFI). Significant wide open throttle (WOT) performance improvements were measured for three of the four FFVs, with one vehicle showing no change. Additionally, a conventional (non-FFV) vehicle with a small turbocharged direct-injected engine was tested with a regular grade of gasoline with no ethanol (E0) and a splash blend of this same fuel with 15% ethanol by volume (E15). RON was increased from 90.7 for the E0 to 97.8 for the E15 blend. Significant wide open throttle and thermal efficiency performance

  6. High School Student Physics Research Experience Yields Positive Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Podolak, K. R.; Walters, M. J.

    2016-01-01

    All high school students that wish to continue onto college are seeking opportunities to be competitive in the college market. They participate in extra-curricular activities which are seen to foster creativity and the skills necessary to do well in the college environment. In the case of students with an interest in physics, participating in a…

  7. High-biomass sorghum yield estimate with aerial imagery

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Abstract. To reach the goals laid out by the U.S. Government for displacing fossil fuels with biofuels, agricultural production of dedicated biomass crops is required. High-biomass sorghum is advantageous across wide regions because it requires less water per unit dry biomass and can produce very hi...

  8. Demonstration of a stabilized alumina/ethanol colloidal dispersion technique for seeding high temperature air flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wernet, Mark P.; Skoch, Gary J.; Wernet, Judith H.

    1995-01-01

    Laser anemometry enables the measurement of complex flow fields via the light scattered from small particles entrained in the flow. In the study of turbomachinery, refractory seed materials are required for seeding the flow due to the high temperatures encountered. In this work we present a pH stabilization technique commonly employed in ceramic processing to obtain stable dispersions for generating aerosols of refractory seed material. By adding submicron alumina particles to a preadjusted pH solution of ethanol, a stable dispersion is obtained which when atomized, produces a high quality aerosol. Commercial grade alumina powder is used with a moderate size distribution. Other metal oxide powders in various polar solvents could also be used once the point of zero charge (pH(pzc)) of the powder in the solvent has been determined. Laser anemometry measurements obtained using the new seeding technique are compared to measurements obtained using Polystyrene Latex (PSL) spheres as the seed material.

  9. Improvement of Ethanol Production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by High-Efficient Disruption of the ADH2 Gene Using a Novel Recombinant TALEN Vector

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Wei; Zhang, Weimin; Liu, Taomei; Tan, Guohui; Li, Haohua; Huang, Zilei

    2016-01-01

    Bioethanol is becoming increasingly important in energy supply and economic development. However, the low yield of bioethanol and the insufficiency of high-efficient genetic manipulation approaches limit its application. In this study, a novel transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN) vector containing the left and right arms of TALEN was electroporated into Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain As2.4 to sequence the alcohol dehydrogenase gene ADH2 and the hygromycin-resistant gene hyg. Western blot analysis using anti-FLAG monoclonal antibody proved the successful expression of TALE proteins in As2.4 strains. qPCR and sequencing demonstrated the accurate knockout of the 17 bp target gene with 80% efficiency. The TALEN vector and ADH2 PCR product were electroporated into ΔADH2 to complement the ADH2 gene (ADH2+ As2.4). LC–MS and GC were employed to detect ethanol yields in the native As2.4, ΔADH2 As2.4, and ADH2+ As2.4 strains. Results showed that ethanol production was improved by 52.4 ± 5.3% through the disruption of ADH2 in As2.4. The bioethanol yield of ADH2+ As2.4 was nearly the same as that of native As2.4. This study is the first to report on the disruption of a target gene in S. cerevisiae by employing Fast TALEN technology to improve bioethanol yield. This work provides a novel approach for the disruption of a target gene in S. cerevisiae with high efficiency and specificity, thereby promoting the improvement of bioethanol production in S. cerevisiae by metabolic engineering. PMID:27462304

  10. Improvement of Ethanol Production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by High-Efficient Disruption of the ADH2 Gene Using a Novel Recombinant TALEN Vector.

    PubMed

    Ye, Wei; Zhang, Weimin; Liu, Taomei; Tan, Guohui; Li, Haohua; Huang, Zilei

    2016-01-01

    Bioethanol is becoming increasingly important in energy supply and economic development. However, the low yield of bioethanol and the insufficiency of high-efficient genetic manipulation approaches limit its application. In this study, a novel transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN) vector containing the left and right arms of TALEN was electroporated into Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain As2.4 to sequence the alcohol dehydrogenase gene ADH2 and the hygromycin-resistant gene hyg. Western blot analysis using anti-FLAG monoclonal antibody proved the successful expression of TALE proteins in As2.4 strains. qPCR and sequencing demonstrated the accurate knockout of the 17 bp target gene with 80% efficiency. The TALEN vector and ADH2 PCR product were electroporated into ΔADH2 to complement the ADH2 gene (ADH2 (+) As2.4). LC-MS and GC were employed to detect ethanol yields in the native As2.4, ΔADH2 As2.4, and ADH2 (+) As2.4 strains. Results showed that ethanol production was improved by 52.4 ± 5.3% through the disruption of ADH2 in As2.4. The bioethanol yield of ADH2 (+) As2.4 was nearly the same as that of native As2.4. This study is the first to report on the disruption of a target gene in S. cerevisiae by employing Fast TALEN technology to improve bioethanol yield. This work provides a novel approach for the disruption of a target gene in S. cerevisiae with high efficiency and specificity, thereby promoting the improvement of bioethanol production in S. cerevisiae by metabolic engineering. PMID:27462304

  11. Direct ethanol production from glucose, xylose and sugarcane bagasse by the corn endophytic fungi Fusarium verticillioides and Acremonium zeae.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, Maíra N; Guimarães, Valéria M; Falkoski, Daniel L; Visser, Evan M; Siqueira, Germano A; Milagres, Adriane M F; de Rezende, Sebastião T

    2013-10-10

    Production of ethanol with two corn endophytic fungi, Fusarium verticillioides and Acremonium zeae, was studied. The yield of ethanol from glucose, xylose and a mixture of both sugars were 0.47, 0.46 and 0.50g/g ethanol/sugar for F. verticillioides and 0.37, 0.39 and 0.48g/g ethanol/sugar for A. zeae. Both fungi were able to co-ferment glucose and xylose. Ethanol production from 40g/L of pre-treated sugarcane bagasse was 4.6 and 3.9g/L for F. verticillioides and A. zeae, respectively, yielding 0.31g/g of ethanol per consumed sugar. Both fungi studied were capable of co-fermenting glucose and xylose at high yields. Moreover, they were able to produce ethanol directly from lignocellulosic biomass, demonstrating to be suitable microorganisms for consolidated bioprocessing.

  12. High-Yield Metal Materials for Photocathode RF Gun

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, X.J.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Smedley, J.; Srinivasan-Rao, T.; Woodle, M.; Palmer, D.T.; Miller, R.H.

    1997-11-01

    Significant progress has been made in both improving the quantum efficiency and understanding the physics process of photoemission of metal photocathode materials under high electric field. Metal material, copper and magnesium were installed on the photocathode RF gun, and experimentally investigated using frequency quadrupled Nd:Yag laser (266 nm). A systemic procedure was developed for preparing cathode; this involves diamond polishing, ultrasonic cleaning and high temperature vacuum bake out. Using laser cleaning and explosive electron emission cleaning, the highest quantum efficiency measured for copper and magnesium are 0.02% and 0.3%, respectively. The Schottky effect was experimental investigated, the quantum efficiency of the Cu is dominated by the Schottky effect since the work function of the copper is almost equal to the photon energy used (4.66 eV). The quantum efficiency of the magnesium is significant enhanced by the Schottky effect.

  13. High school student physics research experience yields positive results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podolak, K. R.; Walters, M. J.

    2016-03-01

    All high school students that wish to continue onto college are seeking opportunities to be competitive in the college market. They participate in extra-curricular activities which are seen to foster creativity and the skills necessary to do well in the college environment. In the case of students with an interest in physics, participating in a small scale research project while in high school gives them the hands on experience and ultimately prepares them more for the college experience. SUNY Plattsburgh’s Physics department started a five-week summer program for high school students in 2012. This program has proved not only beneficial for students while in the program, but also as they continue on in their development as scientists/engineers. Independent research, such as that offered by SUNY Plattsburgh’s five-week summer program, offers students a feel and taste of the culture of doing research, and life as a scientist. It is a short-term, risk free way to investigate whether a career in research or a particular scientific field is a good fit.

  14. Ethanol Production from Ulva fasciata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masutani, Evan M.; Yoza, Brandon A.

    The theoretical potential yield of Ulva fasciata as a biomass feedstock for fermentative ethanol was found to be about 310 L per tonne, dry weight. U. fasciata has numerous characteristics that render it a suitable mariculture energy crop. Specifically, it forms large complex structures that grow quickly, with high (14%) dry to wet weight percentages, holocellulose content for the dry mass of 51%, carbohydrate content of 5%, and relatively low (5%) lignin content. Enzymatic saccharification with a commercial cellulase (Accelerase) from Genencor was investigated: After a 12 hr digestion, 25% of the potential glucose was recovered from the cellulose fraction. The hydrolysate was supplemented with a modified YM medium and used directly for batch fermentation. A 12 hr incubation resulted in complete utilization of the glucose and production of ethanol. In this preliminary investigation, the ethanol yield corresponded to approximately 126 L per tonne (dry weight) of macroalga, or 43% of the theoretical alcohol yield with respect to only the cellulose and carbohydrate contents. Theoretical yields are higher when the hemicellulose fraction is considered. While sugar recovery needs further optimization, the data suggest that additional work is warranted.

  15. Biochemical Disincentives to Fertilizing Cellulosic Ethanol Crops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallagher, M. E.; Hockaday, W. C.; Snapp, S.; McSwiney, C.; Baldock, J.

    2010-12-01

    moderate levels (67 kg N ha-1). Increasing fertilizer application beyond the point of diminishing returns for grain (67 kg N ha-1) to double the regionally-recommended amount (202 kg N ha-1) resulted in only marginal increases (25%) in crop residue carbohydrate yield, while increasing lignin yields 41%. In the case of at least this ecosystem, high fertilization rates did not result in large carbohydrate yield increases in the crop residue, and instead produced a lower quality feedstock for cellulosic ethanol production.

  16. Clickstream data yields high-resolution maps of science

    SciTech Connect

    Bollen, Johan; Van De Sompel, Herbert; Hagberg, Aric; Bettencourt, Luis; Chute, Ryan; Rodriguez, Marko A; Balakireva, Lyudmila

    2009-01-01

    Intricate maps of science have been created from citation data to visualize the structure of scientific activity. However, most scientific publications are now accessed online. Scholarly web portals record detailed log data at a scale that exceeds the number of all existing citations combined. Such log data is recorded immediately upon publication and keeps track of the sequences of user requests (clickstreams) that are issued by a variety of users across many different domains. Given these advantagees of log datasets over citation data, we investigate whether they can produce high-resolution, more current maps of science.

  17. High-Throughput FRET Assay Yields Allosteric SERCA Activators

    PubMed Central

    Cornea, Razvan L.; Lockamy, Elizabeth L.; Gruber, Simon J.; Muretta, Joseph M.; Jin, Dongzhu; Chen, Jiqiu; Dahl, Russell; Bartfai, Tamas; Zsebo, Krisztina M.; Gillispie, Gregory D.; Thomas, David D.

    2013-01-01

    Using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), we performed a high-throughput screen (HTS) in a reconstituted membrane system, seeking compounds that reverse inhibition of sarco-/endoplasmic reticulum Ca-ATPase (SERCA) by its endogenous regulator, phospholamban (PLB). Such compounds have long been sought to correct aberrant Ca2+ regulation in heart failure. Donor-SERCA was reconstituted in phospholipid membranes with or without acceptor-PLB, and FRET was measured in a steady-state fluorescence microplate reader. A 20,000-compound library was tested in duplicate. Compounds that decreased FRET by more than three standard deviations were considered hits. From 43 primary hits (0.2%), 31 (72%) were found to be false positives upon more thorough testing. The remaining 12 hits were tested in assays of Ca-ATPase activity, and six of these activated SERCA significantly, by as much as 60%, and several also enhanced cardiomyocyte contractility. These compounds directly activated SERCA from heart and other tissues. These results validate our FRET approach and set the stage for medicinal chemistry and pre-clinical testing. We were concerned about the high rate of false positives, resulting from the low precision of steady-state fluorescence. Preliminary studies with a novel fluorescence lifetime plate reader show 20-fold higher precision. This instrument can dramatically increase the quality of future HT. PMID:22923787

  18. High-throughput FRET assay yields allosteric SERCA activators.

    PubMed

    Cornea, Razvan L; Gruber, Simon J; Lockamy, Elizabeth L; Muretta, Joseph M; Jin, Dongzhu; Chen, Jiqiu; Dahl, Russell; Bartfai, Tamas; Zsebo, Krisztina M; Gillispie, Gregory D; Thomas, David D

    2013-01-01

    Using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), we performed a high-throughput screen (HTS) in a reconstituted membrane system, seeking compounds that reverse inhibition of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca-ATPase (SERCA) by its cardiac regulator, phospholamban (PLB). Such compounds have long been sought to correct aberrant Ca(2+) regulation in heart failure. Donor-SERCA was reconstituted in phospholipid membranes with or without acceptor-PLB, and FRET was measured in a steady-state fluorescence microplate reader. A 20 000-compound library was tested in duplicate. Compounds that decreased FRET by more than three standard deviations were considered hits. From 43 hits (0.2%), 31 (72%) were found to be false-positives upon more thorough FRET testing. The remaining 12 hits were tested in assays of Ca-ATPase activity, and six of these activated SERCA significantly, by as much as 60%, and several also enhanced cardiomyocyte contractility. These compounds directly activated SERCA from heart and other tissues. These results validate our FRET approach and set the stage for medicinal chemistry and preclinical testing. We were concerned about the high rate of false-positives, resulting from the low precision of steady-state fluorescence. Preliminary studies with a novel fluorescence lifetime plate reader show 20-fold higher precision. This instrument can dramatically increase the quality of future HTS.

  19. Relative Fluid Novelty Differentially Alters the Time Course of Limited-Access Ethanol and Water Intake in Selectively Bred High Alcohol Preferring Mice

    PubMed Central

    Linsenbardt, David N.; Boehm, Stephen L.

    2015-01-01

    Background The influence of previous alcohol (ethanol) drinking experience on increasing the rate and amount of future ethanol consumption might be a genetically-regulated phenomenon critical to the development and maintenance of repeated excessive ethanol abuse. We have recently found evidence supporting this view, wherein inbred C57BL/6J (B6) mice develop progressive increases in the rate of binge-ethanol consumption over repeated Drinking-in-the-Dark (DID) ethanol access sessions (i.e. ‘front-loading’). The primary goal of the present study was to evaluate identical parameters in High Alcohol Preferring (HAP) mice to determine if similar temporal alterations in limited-access ethanol drinking develop in a population selected for high ethanol preference/intake under continuous (24hr) access conditions. Methods Using specialized volumetric drinking devices, HAP mice received 14 daily 2 hour DID ethanol or water access sessions. A subset of these mice was then given one day access to the opposite assigned fluid on day 15. Home cage locomotor activity was recorded concomitantly on each day of these studies. The possibility of behavioral/metabolic tolerance was evaluated on day 16 using experimenter administered ethanol. Results The amount of ethanol consumed within the first 15 minutes of access increased markedly over days. However, in contrast to previous observations in B6 mice, ethanol front-loading was also observed on day 15 in mice that only had previous DID experience with water. Furthermore, a decrease in the amount of water consumed within the first 15 minutes of access compared to animals given repeated water access was observed on day 15 in mice with 14 previous days of ethanol access. Conclusions These data further illustrate the complexity and importance of the temporal aspects of limited-access ethanol consumption, and suggest that previous procedural/fluid experience in HAP mice selectively alters the time course of ethanol and water consumption

  20. High level extracellular production of a recombinant alkaline catalase in E. coli BL21 under ethanol stress and its application in hydrogen peroxide removal after cotton fabrics bleaching.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhenxiao; Zheng, Hongchen; Zhao, Xingya; Li, Shufang; Xu, Jianyong; Song, Hui

    2016-08-01

    The effects of induction parameters, osmolytes and ethanol stress on the productivity of the recombinant alkaline catalase (KatA) in Escherichia coli BL21 (pET26b-KatA) were investigated. The yield of soluble KatA was significantly enhanced by 2% ethanol stress. And a certain amount of Triton X-100 supplementation could markedly improved extracellular ratio of KatA. A total soluble catalase activity of 78,762U/mL with the extracellular ratio of 92.5% was achieved by fed-batch fermentation in a 10L fermentor, which was the highest yield so far. The purified KatA showed high stability at 50°C and pH 6-10. Application of KatA for elimination of H2O2 after cotton fabrics bleaching led to less consumption of water, steam and electric power by 25%, 12% and 16.7% respectively without productivity and quality losing of cotton fabrics. Thus, the recombinant KatA is a promising candidate for industrial production and applications. PMID:27151682

  1. Production of fuel ethanol and methane from garbage by high-efficiency two-stage fermentation process.

    PubMed

    Koike, Yoji; An, Ming-Zhe; Tang, Yue-Qin; Syo, Tomohiro; Osaka, Noriko; Morimura, Shigeru; Kida, Kenji

    2009-12-01

    A two-stage fermentation process, consisting of a simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) stage and a dry methane fermentation stage, was developed to utilize garbage for the production of fuel ethanol and methane. Garbage from families, canteens and concessionaires was used for the study. Saccharification method was studied and the results indicated that the liquefaction pretreatment and the combination of cellulase and glucoamylase was effective for polysaccharide hydrolysis of family garbage with a high content of holocellulose and that SSF was suitable for ethanol fermentation of garbage. Ethanol productivity could be markedly increased from 1.7 to 7.0 g/l/h by repeated-batch SSF of family garbage. A high ethanol productivity of 17.7 g/l/h was achieved when canteen garbage was used. The stillage after distillation was treated by dry methane fermentation and the results indicated that the stillage was almost fully digested and that about 850 ml of biogas was recovered from 1 g of volatile total solid (VTS). Approximately 85% of the energy of the garbage was converted to fuels, ethanol and methane by this process.

  2. Production of fuel ethanol and methane from garbage by high-efficiency two-stage fermentation process.

    PubMed

    Koike, Yoji; An, Ming-Zhe; Tang, Yue-Qin; Syo, Tomohiro; Osaka, Noriko; Morimura, Shigeru; Kida, Kenji

    2009-12-01

    A two-stage fermentation process, consisting of a simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) stage and a dry methane fermentation stage, was developed to utilize garbage for the production of fuel ethanol and methane. Garbage from families, canteens and concessionaires was used for the study. Saccharification method was studied and the results indicated that the liquefaction pretreatment and the combination of cellulase and glucoamylase was effective for polysaccharide hydrolysis of family garbage with a high content of holocellulose and that SSF was suitable for ethanol fermentation of garbage. Ethanol productivity could be markedly increased from 1.7 to 7.0 g/l/h by repeated-batch SSF of family garbage. A high ethanol productivity of 17.7 g/l/h was achieved when canteen garbage was used. The stillage after distillation was treated by dry methane fermentation and the results indicated that the stillage was almost fully digested and that about 850 ml of biogas was recovered from 1 g of volatile total solid (VTS). Approximately 85% of the energy of the garbage was converted to fuels, ethanol and methane by this process. PMID:19914584

  3. Effects of the pretreatment method on high solids enzymatic hydrolysis and ethanol fermentation of the cellulosic fraction of sugarcane bagasse.

    PubMed

    Martins, Luiza Helena da Silva; Rabelo, Sarita Cândida; da Costa, Aline Carvalho

    2015-09-01

    This work evaluated ethanol production from sugarcane bagasse at high solids loadings in the pretreatment (20-40% w/v) and hydrolysis (10-20% w/v) stages. The best conditions for diluted sulfuric acid, AHP and Ox-B pretreatments were determined and mass balances including pretreatment, hydrolysis and fermentation were calculated. From a technical point of view, the best pretreatment was AHP, which enabled the production of glucose concentrations near 8% with high productivity (3.27 g/Lh), as well as ethanol production from 100.9 to 135.4 kg ethanol/ton raw bagasse. However, reagent consumption for acid pretreatment was much lower. Furthermore, for processes that use pentoses and hexoses separately, this pretreatment produces the most desirable pentoses liquor, with higher xylose concentration in the monomeric form.

  4. A high yield method for growing primary canine keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Watson, Adrian; Baker, Claire; Bailey, Julie; Fray, Tim; Markwell, Peter

    2004-07-01

    From a small amount of starting material, a large quantity of canine keratinocytes can be generated for experimental purposes using a refined method of explant culture to initiate the growth of basal cells with a high proliferative potential. The dividing capacity of cultures was promoted by a system selecting clonogenic cells onto an i3T3 feeder layer in combination with carefully monitoring cell morphology and passaging to select out excessive numbers of differentiated keratinocytes. Levels of contaminating dermal fibroblasts, which if left unchecked will overgrow keratinocytes, were kept to a minimum by a combination of careful explant micro-dissection to remove dermis, eliminating explants with signs of fibroblast growth as well as using cholera toxin, EGF and i3T3 feeder layers. The advantage of the method described is that it does not rely on the provision of large quantities of starting material thereby reducing the need for repeated tissue sampling, and passage numbers of five or six can be routinely achieved. This technique can therefore be useful to experimenters who require a regular and reliable source of cells for their studies. PMID:15158212

  5. Clickstream Data Yields High-Resolution Maps of Science

    PubMed Central

    Bollen, Johan; Van de Sompel, Herbert; Rodriguez, Marko A.; Balakireva, Lyudmila

    2009-01-01

    Background Intricate maps of science have been created from citation data to visualize the structure of scientific activity. However, most scientific publications are now accessed online. Scholarly web portals record detailed log data at a scale that exceeds the number of all existing citations combined. Such log data is recorded immediately upon publication and keeps track of the sequences of user requests (clickstreams) that are issued by a variety of users across many different domains. Given these advantages of log datasets over citation data, we investigate whether they can produce high-resolution, more current maps of science. Methodology Over the course of 2007 and 2008, we collected nearly 1 billion user interactions recorded by the scholarly web portals of some of the most significant publishers, aggregators and institutional consortia. The resulting reference data set covers a significant part of world-wide use of scholarly web portals in 2006, and provides a balanced coverage of the humanities, social sciences, and natural sciences. A journal clickstream model, i.e. a first-order Markov chain, was extracted from the sequences of user interactions in the logs. The clickstream model was validated by comparing it to the Getty Research Institute's Architecture and Art Thesaurus. The resulting model was visualized as a journal network that outlines the relationships between various scientific domains and clarifies the connection of the social sciences and humanities to the natural sciences. Conclusions Maps of science resulting from large-scale clickstream data provide a detailed, contemporary view of scientific activity and correct the underrepresentation of the social sciences and humanities that is commonly found in citation data. PMID:19277205

  6. Effect of air supplement on the performance of contiuous ethanol fermentation system. [Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Ryu, D.D.Y.; Kim, Y.J.; Kim, J.H.

    1984-01-01

    For the purpose of improving ethanol productivity, the effect of air supplement on the performance of continuous ethanol fermentation system was studied. The effect of oxygen supplement on yeast concentration, cell yield, cell viability, extracellular ethanol concentration, ethanol yield, maintenance coefficient, specific rates of glucose assimilation, ethanol production, and ethanol productivity have been evaluated, using a high alcohol tolerant Saccharomyces cerevisiae STV89 strain and employing a continous fermentor equipped with an accurate air metering system in the flow rate range 0-11 mL air/L/h. It was found that, when a small amount of oxygen up to about 80..mu.. mol oxygen/L/h was supplied, the ethanol productivity was significantly enhanced as compared to the productivity of the culture without any air supplement. It was also found that the oxygen supplement improved cell viability considerably as well as the ethanol tolerance level of yeast. As the air supply rate was increased, from 0 to 11 mL air/L/h while maintaining a constant dilution rate at about 0.06 h/sup -1/, the cell concentration increased from 2.3 to 8.2 g/L and the ethanol/L/h, although the specific ethanol production rate decreases slightly from 0.75 to 0.5 g ethanol/g cell/h. The ethanol yield was slightly improved also with an increase in air supply rate, from about 0.37 to 0.45 ethanol/g glucose. The maintenance coefficient increased by only a small amount with the air supplement. This kind of air supplement technique may very well prove to be of practical importance to a development of a highly productive ethanol fermentation process system especially as a combined system with a high density cell culture technique.

  7. Novel DDR Processing of Corn Stover Achieves High Monomeric Sugar Concentrations from Enzymatic Hydrolysis (230 g/L) and High Ethanol Concentration (10% v/v) During Fermentation

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xiaowen; Jennings, Ed; Shekiro, Joe; Kuhn, Erik M.; O'Brien, Marykate; Wang, Wei; Schell, Daniel J.; Himmel, Mike; Elander, Richard T.; Tucker, Melvin P.

    2015-04-03

    Distilling and purifying ethanol, butanol, and other products from second and later generation lignocellulosic biorefineries adds significant capital and operating cost for biofuels production. The energy costs associated with distillation affects plant gate and life cycle analysis costs. Lower titers in fermentation due to lower sugar concentrations from pretreatment increase both energy and production costs. In addition, higher titers decrease the volumes required for enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation vessels. Therefore, increasing biofuels titers has been a research focus in renewable biofuels production for several decades. In this work, we achieved over 200 g/L of monomeric sugars after high solids enzymatic hydrolysis using the novel deacetylation and disc refining (DDR) process on corn stover. The high sugar concentrations and low chemical inhibitor concentrations from the DDR process allowed ethanol titers as high as 82 g/L in 22 hours, which translates into approximately 10 vol% ethanol. To our knowledge, this is the first time that 10 vol% ethanol in fermentation derived from corn stover without any sugar concentration or purification steps has been reported. Techno-economic analysis shows the higher titer ethanol achieved from the DDR process could significantly reduce the minimum ethanol selling price from cellulosic biomass.

  8. Design of high-reliability low-cost amorphous silicon modules for high energy yield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansen, Kai W.; Varvar, Anthony; Twesme, Edward; Berens, Troy; Dhere, Neelkanth G.

    2008-08-01

    For PV modules to fulfill their intended purpose, they must generate sufficient economic return over their lifetime to justify their initial cost. Not only must modules be manufactured at a low cost/Wp with a high energy yield (kWh/kWp), they must also be designed to withstand the significant environmental stresses experienced throughout their 25+ year lifetime. Based on field experience, the most common factors affecting the lifetime energy yield of glass-based amorphous silicon (a-Si) modules have been identified; these include: 1) light-induced degradation; 2) moisture ingress and thin film corrosion; 3) transparent conductive oxide (TCO) delamination; and 4) glass breakage. The current approaches to mitigating the effect of these degradation mechanisms are discussed and the accelerated tests designed to simulate some of the field failures are described. In some cases, novel accelerated tests have been created to facilitate the development of improved manufacturing processes, including a unique test to screen for TCO delamination. Modules using the most reliable designs are tested in high voltage arrays at customer and internal test sites, as well as at independent laboratories. Data from tests at the Florida Solar Energy Center has shown that a-Si tandem modules can demonstrate an energy yield exceeding 1200 kWh/kWp/yr in a subtropical climate. In the same study, the test arrays demonstrated low long-term power loss over two years of data collection, after initial stabilization. The absolute power produced by the test arrays varied seasonally by approximately +/-7%, as expected.

  9. Continuous High-solids corn liquefaction and fermentation with stripping of ethanol

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Removal of ethanol from the fermentor during fermentation can increase productivity and reduce the costs for dewatering the product and coproduct. One approach is to recycle the fermentor contents through a stripping column, where a non-condensable gas removes ethanol to a condenser. Previous resear...

  10. HIGH PERMEABILITY MEMBRANES FOR THE DEHYDRATION OF LOW WATER CONTENT ETHANOL BY PERVAPORATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Energy efficient dehydration of low water content ethanol is a challenge for the sustainable production of fuel-grade ethanol. Pervaporative membrane dehydration using a recently developed hydrophilic polymer membrane formulation consisting of a cross-linked mixture of poly(allyl...

  11. Fast, high-yield synthesis of amphiphilic Ag nanoclusters and the sensing of Hg2+ in environmental samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Nan; Yang, Jie; Wu, Zhikun

    2015-05-01

    We report the high-yield (74%) synthesis of Ag30(Capt)18 (abbreviated as Ag30) in a very time-saving fashion (half an hour). The cluster composition was determined by high-resolution mass spectrometry combined with TG analysis, and the structure was probed by 1D and 2D NMR. Interestingly, the nanoclusters can dissolve in water and methanol, as well as in most organic solvents such as ethanol, acetone, acetonitrile, dichloromethane and ethyl acetate with the assistance of acetic acid. Such a good solubility in a range of various polar solvents was not reported previously in nanoclusters' research and is important for applications. An important result from this work is that Ag30 can sense a low concentration of Hg2+ in environmental samples (including lake water and soil solution), indicating that Ag30 can be a potential colorimetric probe for Hg2+. The sensing mechanism was revealed to be related to the anti-galvanic reduction process.We report the high-yield (74%) synthesis of Ag30(Capt)18 (abbreviated as Ag30) in a very time-saving fashion (half an hour). The cluster composition was determined by high-resolution mass spectrometry combined with TG analysis, and the structure was probed by 1D and 2D NMR. Interestingly, the nanoclusters can dissolve in water and methanol, as well as in most organic solvents such as ethanol, acetone, acetonitrile, dichloromethane and ethyl acetate with the assistance of acetic acid. Such a good solubility in a range of various polar solvents was not reported previously in nanoclusters' research and is important for applications. An important result from this work is that Ag30 can sense a low concentration of Hg2+ in environmental samples (including lake water and soil solution), indicating that Ag30 can be a potential colorimetric probe for Hg2+. The sensing mechanism was revealed to be related to the anti-galvanic reduction process. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr00705d

  12. High Level Ethanol from Sugar Cane Molasses by a New Thermotolerant Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strain in Industrial Scale.

    PubMed

    Fadel, M; Keera, Abeer A; Mouafi, Foukia E; Kahil, Tarek

    2013-01-01

    A new local strain of S. cerevisiae F-514, for ethanol production during hot summer season, using Egyptian sugar cane molasses was applied in Egyptian distillery factory. The inouluum was propagated through 300 L, 3 m(3), and 12 m(3) fermenters charged with diluted sugar cane molasses containing 4%-5% sugars. The yeast was applied in fermentation vessels 65 m(3) working volume to study the varying concentrations of urea, DAP, orthophosphoric acid (OPA), and its combinations as well as magnesium sulfate and inoculum size. The fermenter was allowed to stay for a period of 20 hours to give time for maximum conversion of sugars into ethanol. S. cerevisiae F-514 at molasses sugar level of 18% (w/v), inoculum size of 20% (v/v) cell concentration of 3.0 × 10(8)/mL, and combinations of urea, diammonium phosphate (DAP), orthophosphoric acid (OPA), and magnesium sulfate at amounts of 20, 10, 5, and 10 kg/65 m(3) working volume fermenters, respectively, supported maximum ethanol production (9.8%, v/v), fermentation efficiency (FE) 88.1%, and remaining sugars (RS) 1.22%. The fermentation resulted 13.4 g dry yeast/L contained 34.6% crude protein and 8.2% ash. By selecting higher ethanol yielding yeast strain and optimizing, the fermentation parameters both yield and economics of the fermentation process can be improved. PMID:24363937

  13. Thermal conductivity of methanol-ethanol mixture and silicone oil at high pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Wen-Pin

    2015-06-01

    4:1 methanol-ethanol (ME) mixture and silicone oil are common, important pressure transmitting media used in high pressure diamond anvil cell (DAC) experiments. Their thermal conductivities and elastic properties are critical for modeling heat conduction in the DAC experiments and for determining thermal conductivity of measurement samples under extreme conditions. We used time-domain thermoreflectance and picosecond interferometry combined with the DAC to study the thermal conductivities and elastic constants C11 of the ME mixture and silicone oil at room temperature and to pressures as high as ≈23 GPa. We found that pressure dependence of the thermal conductivity of ME and silicone oil are both well described by the prediction of the minimum thermal conductivity model, confirming the diffusion of thermal energy between nonpropagating molecular vibrational modes is the dominant heat transport mechanism in a liquid and amorphous polymer. Our results not only provide new insights into the physics of thermal transport in these common pressure media for high pressure thermal measurements, but will also significantly extend the feasibility of using silicone fluid medium to much higher pressure and moderately high temperature conditions with higher measurement accuracy than other pressure media.

  14. Water use and grain yield in drought-tolerant corn in the Texas High Plains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Drought is an important factor limiting corn (Zea mays L.) yields in the Texas High Plains, and adoption of drought-tolerant (DT) hybrids could be a management tool under water shortage. We conducted a 3-yr field study to investigate grain yield, evapotranspiration (ET), and water use efficiency (WU...

  15. Genome Signature of Artificial Selection for High Milk Yield in Holstein Cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Artificial selection for high milk yield in Holstein cattle during the past forty years achieved tremendous increases in milk yield but had an unintended consequence of reduced fertility. It was unknown how artificial selection changed the Holstein genome and what genome changes were associated wit...

  16. High-order harmonic generation yielding tunable extreme-ultraviolet radiation of high spectral purity.

    PubMed

    Brandi, F; Neshev, D; Ubachs, W

    2003-10-17

    Production of extreme-ultraviolet radiation by high-order harmonic generation is demonstrated to yield unprecedented spectral purity of lambda/Delta lambda=2.5 x 10(5) at wavelengths covering the entire range 40-100 nm. Tunability and sub-cm(-1) bandwidth of the harmonics are demonstrated in recordings of the He (1s4p) and Ar (3p(5)3d') resonance lines at 52.2 and 86.6 nm. Frequency shift of the harmonics due to chirp-induced phenomena are investigated and found to be small, resulting in a frequency accuracy of about 5 x 10(-7) in the domain of extreme-ultraviolet radiation.

  17. Breeding high-yielding drought-tolerant rice: genetic variations and conventional and molecular approaches

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Arvind; Dixit, Shalabh; Ram, T.; Yadaw, R. B.; Mishra, K. K.; Mandal, N. P.

    2014-01-01

    The increased occurrence and severity of drought stress have led to a high yield decline in rice in recent years in drought-affected areas. Drought research at the International Rice Research Institute (IRRI) over the past decade has concentrated on direct selection for grain yield under drought. This approach has led to the successful development and release of 17 high-yielding drought-tolerant rice varieties in South Asia, Southeast Asia, and Africa. In addition to this, 14 quantitative trait loci (QTLs) showing a large effect against high-yielding drought-susceptible popular varieties were identified using grain yield as a selection criterion. Six of these (qDTY 1.1, qDTY 2.2, qDTY 3.1, qDTY 3.2, qDTY 6.1, and qDTY 12.1) showed an effect against two or more high-yielding genetic backgrounds in both the lowland and upland ecosystem, indicating their usefulness in increasing the grain yield of rice under drought. The yield of popular rice varieties IR64 and Vandana has been successfully improved through a well-planned marker-assisted backcross breeding approach, and QTL introgression in several other popular varieties is in progress. The identification of large-effect QTLs for grain yield under drought and the higher yield increase under drought obtained through the use of these QTLs (which has not been reported in other cereals) indicate that rice, because of its continuous cultivation in two diverse ecosystems (upland, drought tolerant, and lowland, drought susceptible), has benefited from the existence of larger genetic variability than in other cereals. This can be successfully exploited using marker-assisted breeding. PMID:25205576

  18. Breeding high-yielding drought-tolerant rice: genetic variations and conventional and molecular approaches.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Arvind; Dixit, Shalabh; Ram, T; Yadaw, R B; Mishra, K K; Mandal, N P

    2014-11-01

    The increased occurrence and severity of drought stress have led to a high yield decline in rice in recent years in drought-affected areas. Drought research at the International Rice Research Institute (IRRI) over the past decade has concentrated on direct selection for grain yield under drought. This approach has led to the successful development and release of 17 high-yielding drought-tolerant rice varieties in South Asia, Southeast Asia, and Africa. In addition to this, 14 quantitative trait loci (QTLs) showing a large effect against high-yielding drought-susceptible popular varieties were identified using grain yield as a selection criterion. Six of these (qDTY 1.1 , qDTY 2.2 , qDTY 3.1 , qDTY 3.2 , qDTY 6.1 , and qDTY 12.1 ) showed an effect against two or more high-yielding genetic backgrounds in both the lowland and upland ecosystem, indicating their usefulness in increasing the grain yield of rice under drought. The yield of popular rice varieties IR64 and Vandana has been successfully improved through a well-planned marker-assisted backcross breeding approach, and QTL introgression in several other popular varieties is in progress. The identification of large-effect QTLs for grain yield under drought and the higher yield increase under drought obtained through the use of these QTLs (which has not been reported in other cereals) indicate that rice, because of its continuous cultivation in two diverse ecosystems (upland, drought tolerant, and lowland, drought susceptible), has benefited from the existence of larger genetic variability than in other cereals. This can be successfully exploited using marker-assisted breeding.

  19. Towards high water permeability in triazine-framework-based microporous membranes for dehydration of ethanol.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yu Pan; Wang, Huan; Chung, Tai Shung

    2015-01-01

    The microstructural evolution of a series of triazine framework-based microporous (TFM) membranes under different conditions has been explored in this work. The pristine TFM membrane is in situ fabricated in the course of polymer synthesis via a facile Brønsted-acid-catalyzed cyclotrimerizaiton reaction. The as-synthesized polymer exhibits a microporous network with high thermal stability. The free volume size of the TFM membranes gradually evolved from a unimodal distribution to a bimodal distribution under annealing, as analyzed by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS). The emergence of the bimodal distribution is probably ascribed to the synergetic effect of quenching and thermal cyclization reaction. In addition, the fractional free volume (FFV) of the membranes presents a concave trend with increasing annealing temperature. Vapor sorption tests reveal that the mass transport properties are closely associated with the free volume evolution, which provides an optimal condition for dehydration of biofuels. A promising separation performance with extremely high water permeability has been attained for dehydration of an 85 wt % ethanol aqueous solution at 45 °C. The study on the free volume evolution of the TFM membranes may provide useful insights about the microstructure and mass transport behavior of the microporous polymeric materials.

  20. Recombinant host cells and media for ethanol production

    DOEpatents

    Wood, Brent E; Ingram, Lonnie O; Yomano, Lorraine P; York, Sean W

    2014-02-18

    Disclosed are recombinant host cells suitable for degrading an oligosaccharide that have been optimized for growth and production of high yields of ethanol, and methods of making and using these cells. The invention further provides minimal media comprising urea-like compounds for economical production of ethanol by recombinant microorganisms. Recombinant host cells in accordance with the invention are modified by gene mutation to eliminate genes responsible for the production of unwanted products other than ethanol, thereby increasing the yield of ethanol produced from the oligosaccharides, relative to unmutated parent strains. The new and improved strains of recombinant bacteria are capable of superior ethanol productivity and yield when grown under conditions suitable for fermentation in minimal growth media containing inexpensive reagents. Systems optimized for ethanol production combine a selected optimized minimal medium with a recombinant host cell optimized for use in the selected medium. Preferred systems are suitable for efficient ethanol production by simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) using lignocellulose as an oligosaccharide source. The invention also provides novel isolated polynucleotide sequences, polypeptide sequences, vectors and antibodies.

  1. Fast, high-yield synthesis of amphiphilic Ag nanoclusters and the sensing of Hg(2+) in environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Xia, Nan; Yang, Jie; Wu, Zhikun

    2015-06-14

    We report the high-yield (74%) synthesis of Ag30(Capt)18 (abbreviated as Ag30) in a very time-saving fashion (half an hour). The cluster composition was determined by high-resolution mass spectrometry combined with TG analysis, and the structure was probed by 1D and 2D NMR. Interestingly, the nanoclusters can dissolve in water and methanol, as well as in most organic solvents such as ethanol, acetone, acetonitrile, dichloromethane and ethyl acetate with the assistance of acetic acid. Such a good solubility in a range of various polar solvents was not reported previously in nanoclusters' research and is important for applications. An important result from this work is that Ag30 can sense a low concentration of Hg(2+) in environmental samples (including lake water and soil solution), indicating that Ag30 can be a potential colorimetric probe for Hg(2+). The sensing mechanism was revealed to be related to the anti-galvanic reduction process. PMID:25891837

  2. Hydrogen Production from Ethanol Steam Reforming over Supported Cobalt Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Sean S.-Y.; Kim, Do Heui; Ha, Su Y.

    2008-05-01

    Hydrogen production was carried out via ethanol steam reforming over supported cobalt catalysts. Wet incipient impregnation method was used to support cobalt on ZrO2, CeO2 and CeZrO4 followed by pre-reduction with H2 up to 677 °C to attain supported cobalt catalysts. It was found that the non-noble metal based 10 wt % Co/CeZrO4 is an efficient catalyst to achieve ethanol conversion of 100% and hydrogen yield of 82% (4.9 mol H2/ mol ethanol) at 450 oC , which is superior to 0.5 wt % Rh/Al2O3. The pre-reduction process is required to activate supported cobalt catalysts for high H2 yield of ethanol steam reforming. In addition, support effect is found significant for cobalt during ethanol steam reforming. 10% Co/CeO2 gave high H2 selectivity while suffered low conversion due to the poor thermal stability. In contrast to CeO2, 10 wt % Co/ZrO2 achieved high conversion while suffered lower H2 yield due to the production of methane. The synergistic effect of ZrO2 and CeO2 to promote high ethanol conversion while suppress methanation was observed when CeZrO4 was used as a support for cobalt. This synergistic effect of CeZrO4 support leads to a high hydrogen yield at low temperature for 10 wt % Co/CeZrO4 catalyst. Under the high weight hourly space velocity (WHSV) of ethanol (2.5 h-1), the hydrogen yield over 10 wt % Co/CeZrO4 was found to gradually decrease to 70% of its initial value in 6 hours possibly due to the coke formation on the catalyst.

  3. Behavioral interactions between ethanol and imidazodiazepines with high affinities for benzodiazepine receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Lister, R.G.

    1988-01-01

    The intrinsic effect of two imidazodiazepines RO 15-3505 and RO 17-1812 on the behavior of mice in a holeboard test were investigated. The interactions of these two drugs with ethanol were also studied. RO 15-3505 failed to significantly alter either exploratory head-dipping or locomotor activity when administered alone but doses of 0.75 and 1.5 mg/kg reversed the reduction in the number of head-dips caused by ethanol and partially reversed ethanol's locomotor stimulant action. In contrast, RO 17-1812 increased locomotor activity when administered alone, and enhanced the reduction in exploration caused by ethanol. Neither RO 15-3505 nor RO 17-1812 altered blood alcohol concentrations suggesting a pharmacodynamic basis for these interactions. The results suggest that in the holeboard test the interactions of imidazodiazepines with ethanol are related to the nature of their interaction with benzodiazepine receptors, inverse agonists antagonising and agonists enhancing ethanol's effects on exploration.

  4. Lipid-ethanol interaction studied by NMR on bicelles.

    PubMed

    Koenig, Bernd W; Gawrisch, Klaus

    2005-04-21

    The interaction of ethanol with phospholipids was studied in bicelles at a physiologically relevant ethanol concentration of 20 mM and a lipid content of 14 wt % by high-resolution NMR. Transient association of ethanol with magnetically aligned bicelles imparts a small degree of anisotropy to the solute. This anisotropy allows detection of residual (1)H-(1)H and (1)H-(13)C dipolar couplings, which are superimposed on scalar couplings. Residual (2)H NMR quadrupole splittings of isotope-labeled ethanol were measured as well. The analysis of residual tensorial interactions yielded information on the orientation and motions of ethanol in the membrane-bound state. The fraction of phosphatidylcholine-bound ethanol was determined independently by gas chromatography and NMR. About 4% of ethanol is bound to phosphatidylcholine at a bicelle concentration of 14 wt % at 40 degrees C. Free and bound ethanol are in rapid exchange. The lifetime of ethanol association with phosphatidylcholine membranes is of the order of a few nanoseconds.

  5. Fuel ethanol production from L-arabinose: Constraints, challenges, current status and future trends

    SciTech Connect

    Saha, B.C.; Bothast, R.J.

    1995-12-01

    Interest in fermentation of L-arabinose to ethanol has increased in recent years because corn fiber contains 11% L-arabinose and is available in sufficient quantities to serve as a low cost feedstock to produce fuel ethanol. Various L-arabinose utilizing yeasts were screened for cost feedstock to produce fuel ethanol of their ability to ferment L-arabinose to ethanol. Most yeasts produced L-arabitol instead ethanol. The optimal conditions for production of L-arabitol in high yield from L-arabinose alone, in mixed sugars and in corn fiber acid hydrolyzate by certain yeasts will be described. In addition, the fermentative performance of an ethanologenic recombinant organism on L-arabinose will be discussed. Current status of microbial fermentation of L-arabinose to ethanol, problems and prospects of ethanol production from L-arabinose by yeasts and future directions of research will be reviewed.

  6. Neglecting rice milling yield and quality underestimates economic losses from high-temperature stress.

    PubMed

    Lyman, Nathaniel B; Jagadish, Krishna S V; Nalley, L Lanier; Dixon, Bruce L; Siebenmorgen, Terry

    2013-01-01

    Future increases in global surface temperature threaten those worldwide who depend on rice production for their livelihoods and food security. Past analyses of high-temperature stress on rice production have focused on paddy yield and have failed to account for the detrimental impact of high temperatures on milling quality outcomes, which ultimately determine edible (marketable) rice yield and market value. Using genotype specific rice yield and milling quality data on six common rice varieties from Arkansas, USA, combined with on-site, half-hourly and daily temperature observations, we show a nonlinear effect of high-temperature stress exposure on yield and milling quality. A 1 °C increase in average growing season temperature reduces paddy yield by 6.2%, total milled rice yield by 7.1% to 8.0%, head rice yield by 9.0% to 13.8%, and total milling revenue by 8.1% to 11.0%, across genotypes. Our results indicate that failure to account for changes in milling quality leads to understatement of the impacts of high temperatures on rice production outcomes. These dramatic losses result from reduced paddy yield and increased percentages of chalky and broken kernels, which together decrease the quantity and market value of milled rice. Recently published estimates show paddy yield reductions of up to 10% across the major rice-producing regions of South and Southeast Asia due to rising temperatures. The results of our study suggest that the often-cited 10% figure underestimates the economic implications of climate change for rice producers, thus potentially threatening future food security for global rice producers and consumers.

  7. Neglecting Rice Milling Yield and Quality Underestimates Economic Losses from High-Temperature Stress

    PubMed Central

    Lyman, Nathaniel B.; Jagadish, Krishna S. V.; Nalley, L. Lanier; Dixon, Bruce L.; Siebenmorgen, Terry

    2013-01-01

    Future increases in global surface temperature threaten those worldwide who depend on rice production for their livelihoods and food security. Past analyses of high-temperature stress on rice production have focused on paddy yield and have failed to account for the detrimental impact of high temperatures on milling quality outcomes, which ultimately determine edible (marketable) rice yield and market value. Using genotype specific rice yield and milling quality data on six common rice varieties from Arkansas, USA, combined with on-site, half-hourly and daily temperature observations, we show a nonlinear effect of high-temperature stress exposure on yield and milling quality. A 1°C increase in average growing season temperature reduces paddy yield by 6.2%, total milled rice yield by 7.1% to 8.0%, head rice yield by 9.0% to 13.8%, and total milling revenue by 8.1% to 11.0%, across genotypes. Our results indicate that failure to account for changes in milling quality leads to understatement of the impacts of high temperatures on rice production outcomes. These dramatic losses result from reduced paddy yield and increased percentages of chalky and broken kernels, which together decrease the quantity and market value of milled rice. Recently published estimates show paddy yield reductions of up to 10% across the major rice-producing regions of South and Southeast Asia due to rising temperatures. The results of our study suggest that the often-cited 10% figure underestimates the economic implications of climate change for rice producers, thus potentially threatening future food security for global rice producers and consumers. PMID:23991056

  8. Fatty acids, calcium soaps of fatty acids, and cottonseeds fed to high yielding cows.

    PubMed

    Sklan, D; Ashkenazi, R; Braun, A; Devorin, A; Tabori, K

    1992-09-01

    We examined the effects of dietary fat as cottonseed, fatty acids, or calcium soaps of fatty acids in the rations of high yielding lactating cows receiving low forage. Experiments were with isoenergetic, isonitrogenous diets containing equal amounts of forage. Inclusion of up to 510 g/d of fatty acids in the ration enhanced FCM yield. With cottonseed, increased FCM was mainly due to increased fat yield. Dietary fatty acids tended to increase milk in mid and late lactation and to decrease fat percentage. Calcium soaps of fatty acids enhanced FCM, particularly in early lactation. Feeding cottonseed and fatty acids together did not enhance yield. Effects described may be attributed in part to changes in ruminal fermentation in which cottonseed increased acetate concentrations and fatty acids decreased the ratio of acetate and butyrate to propionate and in part to enhanced efficiency of milk yield when fat was included in the ration.

  9. Ethanol Inhibits High-Affinity Immunoglobulin E Receptor (FcεRI) Signaling in Mast Cells by Suppressing the Function of FcεRI-Cholesterol Signalosome.

    PubMed

    Draberova, Lubica; Paulenda, Tomas; Halova, Ivana; Potuckova, Lucie; Bugajev, Viktor; Bambouskova, Monika; Tumova, Magda; Draber, Petr

    2015-01-01

    Ethanol has multiple effects on biochemical events in a variety of cell types, including the high-affinity immunoglobulin E receptor (FcεRI) signaling in antigen-activated mast cells. However, the underlying molecular mechanism remains unknown. To get better understanding of the effect of ethanol on FcεRI-mediated signaling we examined the effect of short-term treatment with non-toxic concentrations of ethanol on FcεRI signaling events in mouse bone marrow-derived mast cells. We found that 15 min exposure to ethanol inhibited antigen-induced degranulation, calcium mobilization, expression of proinflammatory cytokine genes (tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6, and interleukin-13), and formation of reactive oxygen species in a dose-dependent manner. Removal of cellular cholesterol with methyl-β-cyclodextrin had a similar effect and potentiated some of the inhibitory effects of ethanol. In contrast, exposure of the cells to cholesterol-saturated methyl-β-cyclodextrin abolished in part the inhibitory effect of ethanol on calcium response and production of reactive oxygen species, supporting lipid-centric theories of ethanol action on the earliest stages of mast cell signaling. Further studies showed that exposure to ethanol and/or removal of cholesterol inhibited early FcεRI activation events, including tyrosine phosphorylation of the FcεRI β and γ subunits, SYK kinases, LAT adaptor protein, phospholipase Cγ, STAT5, and AKT and internalization of aggregated FcεRI. Interestingly, ethanol alone, and particularly in combination with methyl-β-cyclodextrin, enhanced phosphorylation of negative regulatory tyrosine 507 of LYN kinase. Finally, we found that ethanol reduced passive cutaneous anaphylactic reaction in mice, suggesting that ethanol also inhibits FcεRI signaling under in vivo conditions. The combined data indicate that ethanol interferes with early antigen-induced signaling events in mast cells by suppressing the function of Fc

  10. Ultra fast elemental synthesis of high yield copper Chevrel phase with high electrochemical performance

    SciTech Connect

    Gershinsky, Gregory; Haik, Ortal; Salitra, Gregory; Grinblat, Judith; Levi, Elena; Daniel Nessim, Gilbert; Zinigrad, Ella; Aurbach, Doron

    2012-04-15

    Self-propagating High-temperature Synthesis (SHS) was applied for the first time to prepare Chevrel phases, M{sub x}Mo{sub 6}T{sub 8} (M=metal, T=S, Se). Combined electron microscopy and X-ray powder diffraction were used to clarify the chemical reactions in the Cu-Mo-S system. It was shown that the replacement of the frontal combustion by thermal explosion increased the Cu{sub 2}Mo{sub 6}S{sub 8} yield from 86 to 96%, while the synthesis remained ultra-fast: 10-20 min in a hot furnace (1000 Degree-Sign C), as compared to at least 17 h of heating for the conventional solid state technique. The synthesized material conformed to the requirements of cathode precursors for Mg batteries, and its electrochemically activity was similar to that of the conventional product. - Graphical abstarct: Schematic diagram of the combustion process. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Self-propagating high-temperature synthesis was applied for the first time for preparing Chevrel phases. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Combined electron microscopy and X-ray powder diffraction were used to clarify the chemical reactions in the Cu-Mo-S system. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The synthesized Cu{sub 2}Mo{sub 6}S{sub 8} product conforms to the requirements of cathode precursors for Mg batteries.

  11. Effect of high oleic acid soybean on seed oil, protein concentration, and yield

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soybeans with high oleic acid content are desired by oil processors because of their improved oxidative stability for broader use in food, fuel and other products. However, non-GMO high-oleic soybeans have tended to have low seed yield. The objective of this study was to test non-GMO, high-oleic s...

  12. A Selective Ultrahigh Responding High Temperature Ethanol Sensor Using TiO2 Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Arafat, M. M.; Haseeb, A. S. M. A.; Akbar, Sheikh A.

    2014-01-01

    In this research work, the sensitivity of TiO2 nanoparticles towards C2H5OH, H2 and CH4 gases was investigated. The morphology and phase content of the particles was preserved during sensing tests by prior heat treatment of the samples at temperatures as high as 750 °C and 1000 °C. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis were employed to characterize the size, morphology and phase content of the particles. For sensor fabrication, a film of TiO2 was printed on a Au interdigitated alumina substrate. The sensing temperature was varied from 450 °C to 650 °C with varying concentrations of target gases. Results show that the sensor has ultrahigh response towards ethanol (C2H5OH) compared to hydrogen (H2) and methane (CH4). The optimum sensing temperature was found to be 600 °C. The response and recovery times of the sensor are 3 min and 15 min, respectively, for 20 ppm C2H5OH at the optimum operating temperature of 600 °C. It is proposed that the catalytic action of TiO2 with C2H5OH is the reason for the ultrahigh response of the sensor. PMID:25072346

  13. A selective ultrahigh responding high temperature ethanol sensor using TiO2 nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Arafat, M M; Haseeb, A S M A; Akbar, Sheikh A

    2014-01-01

    In this research work, the sensitivity of TiO2 nanoparticles towards C2H5OH, H2 and CH4 gases was investigated. The morphology and phase content of the particles was preserved during sensing tests by prior heat treatment of the samples at temperatures as high as 750 °C and 1000 °C. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis were employed to characterize the size, morphology and phase content of the particles. For sensor fabrication, a film of TiO2 was printed on a Au interdigitated alumina substrate. The sensing temperature was varied from 450 °C to 650 °C with varying concentrations of target gases. Results show that the sensor has ultrahigh response towards ethanol (C2H5OH) compared to hydrogen (H2) and methane (CH4). The optimum sensing temperature was found to be 600 °C. The response and recovery times of the sensor are 3 min and 15 min, respectively, for 20 ppm C2H5OH at the optimum operating temperature of 600 °C. It is proposed that the catalytic action of TiO2 with C2H5OH is the reason for the ultrahigh response of the sensor.

  14. Chemical characterization of high-molar-mass fractions in a Norway spruce knotwood ethanol extract.

    PubMed

    Smeds, Annika I; Eklund, Patrik C; Willför, Stefan M

    2016-10-01

    The low-molar-mass (LMM) fraction, only, i.e., the GC-eluting compounds, which are mainly lignans, has been characterized in Norway spruce knotwood hydrophilic extracts previously. Of this fraction, many lignans and sesquilignans and all GC peaks supposedly representing dilignans remain unidentified. In this work, dilignans and the GC non-eluting compounds (the high-molar mass fractions, HMM) were characterized in a 7-hydroxymatairesinol-reduced knotwood ethanol extract of Norway spruce by using several fractionation and analytical techniques. A methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) insoluble fraction of the extract contained mainly HMM material, of which the main part was shown to consist of lignan oligomers. The oligolignans (with a molar mass up to approximately 3700 Da) seemed to be linked by 55' bonds, some of them containing one or two guaiacylglycerol ether units linked to the lignan by βO4 or β5 bonds. Several oligolignans were identified or tentatively identified. The MTBE soluble fraction, which accounted for the major part (81%) of the extract, contained mainly LMM material (lignans, sesqui- and dilignans). The part of the HMM material in the MTBE soluble fraction that was easily isolable (2%) seemed to contain polymers of fatty acids and alcohols, resin acids, and sterols. PMID:27256310

  15. Refeeding after acute food restriction: differential reduction in preference for ethanol and ethanol-paired flavors in selectively bred rats.

    PubMed

    Dess, Nancy K; Chapman, Clinton D; Cousins, Laura A; Monroe, Derek C; Nguyen, Phuong

    2013-01-17

    Rats' voluntary ethanol intake varies with dispositional factors and energy status. The joint influences of these were of interest here. We previously reported that rats selectively bred for high voluntary saccharin intake (HiS) consume more ethanol and express more robust conditioning of preference for flavors paired with voluntarily consumed ethanol than do low-saccharin consuming counterparts (LoS). Three new experiments examined the effect of refeeding after an episode of food restriction on ethanol intake and on preference for ethanol-paired flavors in HiS and LoS rats. A 48-h episode of food restriction with wheel running reduced intake of and preference for 4% ethanol (Exp. 1a) and preference for an ethanol-paired flavor (Exp. 1b) during refeeding. Food restriction alone was sufficient to reduce the flavor preference (Exp. 2). Adding fat to the refeeding diet or extending the food restriction period exacerbated the effect (Exp. 3), yielding a frank aversion to ethanol-paired flavors in LoS rats. These studies indicate that rebound from negative energy balance shifts responses to ethanol-associated cues from preference toward aversion. Analyses of bodyweight changes and caloric intake during refeeding support this conclusion and further suggest that lower metabolic efficiency may be a marker for enhanced preference mutability.

  16. Market penetration of biodiesel and ethanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szulczyk, Kenneth Ray

    This dissertation examines the influence that economic and technological factors have on the penetration of biodiesel and ethanol into the transportation fuels market. This dissertation focuses on four aspects. The first involves the influence of fossil fuel prices, because biofuels are substitutes and have to compete in price. The second involves biofuel manufacturing technology, principally the feedstock-to-biofuel conversion rates, and the biofuel manufacturing costs. The third involves prices for greenhouse gas offsets. The fourth involves the agricultural commodity markets for feedstocks, and biofuel byproducts. This dissertation uses the Forest and Agricultural Sector Optimization Model-Greenhouse Gas (FASOM-GHG) to quantitatively examine these issues and calculates equilibrium prices and quantities, given market interactions, fossil fuel prices, carbon dioxide equivalent prices, government biofuel subsidies, technological improvement, and crop yield gains. The results indicate that for the ranges studied, gasoline prices have a major impact on aggregate ethanol production but only at low prices. At higher prices, one runs into a capacity constraint that limits expansion on the capacity of ethanol production. Aggregate biodiesel production is highly responsive to gasoline prices and increases over time. (Diesel fuel price is proportional to the gasoline price). Carbon dioxide equivalent prices expand the biodiesel industry, but have no impact on ethanol aggregate production when gasoline prices are high again because of refinery capacity expansion. Improvement of crop yields shows a similar pattern, expanding ethanol production when the gasoline price is low and expanding biodiesel. Technological improvement, where biorefinery production costs decrease over time, had minimal impact on aggregate ethanol and biodiesel production. Finally, U.S. government subsidies have a large expansionary impact on aggregate biodiesel production. Finally, U.S. government

  17. High-Yield Endoglucanase Production by Trichoderma harzianum IOC-3844 Cultivated in Pretreated Sugarcane Mill Byproduct

    PubMed Central

    de Castro, Aline Machado; Ferreira, Marcela Costa; da Cruz, Juliana Cunha; Pedro, Kelly Cristina Nascimento Rodrigues; Carvalho, Daniele Fernandes; Leite, Selma Gomes Ferreira; Pereira, Nei

    2010-01-01

    The low-cost production of cellulolytic complexes presenting high action at mild conditions and well-balanced cellulase activities is one of the major bottlenecks for the economical viability of the production of cellulosic ethanol. In the present paper, the filamentous fungus Trichoderma harzianum IOC-3844 was used for the production of cellulases from a pretreated sugarcane bagasse (namely, cellulignin), by submerged fermentation. This fungal strain produced high contents of endoglucanase activity (6,358 U·L−1) after 72 hours of process, and further relevant β-glucosidase and FPase activities (742 and 445 U·L−1, resp.). The crude enzyme extract demonstrated appropriate characteristics for its application in cellulose hydrolysis, such as high thermal stability at up to 50°C, accessory xylanase activity, and absence of proteolytic activity towards azocasein. This strain showed, therefore, potential for the production of complete cellulolytic complexes aiming at the saccharification of lignocellulosic materials. PMID:21048871

  18. High-photon-yield scintillation detector with Ar/CF4 and glass gas electron multiplier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiwara, Takeshi; Mitsuya, Yuki; Yanagida, Takayuki; Saito, Takumi; Toyokawa, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Hiroyuki

    2016-10-01

    The glass made gas electron multiplier (GEM) and Ar/CF4-gas-based gaseous detector is developed as a scintillation detector and ultra high photon yield is demonstrated. The light yield of a glass GEM (G-GEM)-based gaseous detector is estimated to be 85,000 photons/keV, which is three orders of magnitude brighter than inorganic scintillators. The radioluminescence spectrum peak appeared at around 620 nm, which matches the spectral response of commonly used photosensors such as photomultiplier tubes, photodiodes, CMOSs, CCDs, and other photo-sensors. In X-ray spectroscopy, the light yield showed excellent proportionality and the device was successfully operated as a gas proportional scintillation counter. With this design, we obtained a high photon yield of the G-GEM, which has the further advantage of being much more sensitive to low-energy radiation than solid-scintillator-based detectors.

  19. Bacterial conversion of lignocellulose to ethanol

    SciTech Connect

    Ingram, L.O.

    1996-10-01

    Technologies for fuel ethanol production from lignocellulose are currently available. The challenge today is to assemble these technologies into a commercial demonstration plant. Bacteria such as Escherichia coli strain KO11 have been specifically engineered to produce ethanol at greater than 90% of theoretical yield (40 g ethanol/L in 48 h) from all sugar constituents in hemicellulose (pentoses and hexoses). Methods have been developed to produce fermentable hemicellulose syrups containing high concentrations of sugars. The effectiveness of strain KO11 has been demonstrated with hemicellulose syrups at the 150-liter scale and with laboratory sugars at the 10,000-liter scale. Additional organisms such as Klebsiella oxytoca strain P2 have been engineered for the simultaneous saccharification and fermentation of cellulose (SSF). Cellulase enzymes is one of the major costs associated with all SSF processes. The new organisms eliminate the need for added cellobiase and in some cases produce part of the endoglucanase. Strain P2 has been tested with bagasse, purified cellulose and mixed waste office paper. A simple method of enzyme recycling was tested using strain P2 with office paper as a substrate. Ethanol yields were prejected to be over 539 liters per metric ton. With onsite production, the estimated cost of cellulose for this process is 8.5 cents (U.S.) per liter.

  20. Consolidated bioprocessing (CBP) of AFEX™-pretreated corn stover for ethanol production using Clostridium phytofermentans at a high solids loading.

    PubMed

    Jin, Mingjie; Gunawan, Christa; Balan, Venkatesh; Dale, Bruce E

    2012-08-01

    Consolidated bioprocessing (CBP) using Clostridium phytofermentans (ATCC 700394) on ammonia fiber expansion (AFEX™)-treated corn stover (AFEX™-CS) at a low solids loading showed promising results [Jin et al. (2011) Biotechnol Bioeng 108(6): 1290-1297]. However, industrial relevant process requires high solids loading. Therefore, we studied high solids loading CBP performance on AFEX™-CS. The factors potentially affecting the performance including solids loading, CBP products acetate and ethanol, and degradation products resulting from pretreatment were investigated. At 4% (w/w) glucan loading, C. phytofermentans performed well on AFEX™-CS with no nutrients supplementation and reached similar sugar conversions as a fermentation with nutrients supplementation. A glucan conversion of 48.9% and a xylan conversion of 77.9% were achieved after 264 h with 7.0 g/L ethanol and 8.8 g/L acetate produced. Relatively high concentrations of acetate produced at high solids loading was found to be the major factor limiting the CBP performance. Degradation products in AFEX™-CS helped enhance ethanol production.

  1. [High titer ethanol production from an atmospheric glycerol autocatalytic organosolv pretreated wheat straw].

    PubMed

    Wang, Liang; Liu, Jianquan; Zhang, Zhe; Zhang, Feiyang; Ren, Junli; Sun, Fubao; Zhang, Zhenyu; Ding, Cancan; Lin, Qiaowen

    2015-10-01

    The expensive production of bioethanol is because it has not yet reached the 'THREE-HIGH' (High-titer, high-conversion and high-productivity) technical levels of starchy ethanol production. To cope with it, it is necessary to implement a high-gravity mash bioethanol production (HMBP), in which sugar hydrolysates are thick and fermentation-inhibitive compounds are negligible. In this work, HMBP from an atmospheric glycerol autocatalytic organosolv pretreated wheat straw was carried out with different fermentation strategies. Under an optimized condition (15% substrate concentration, 10 g/L (NH4)2SO4, 30 FPU/g dry matter, 10% (V/V) inoculum ratio), HMBP was at 31.2 g/L with a shaking simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) at 37 degrees C for 72 h, and achieved with a conversion of 73% and a productivity of 0.43 g/(L x h). Further by a semi-SFF with pre-hydrolysis time of 24 h, HMBP reached 33.7 g/L, the conversion and productivity of which was 79% and 0.47 g/(L x h), respectively. During the SSF and semi-SSF, more than 90% of the cellulose in both substrates were hydrolyzed into fermentable sugars. Finally, a fed-batch semi-SFF was developed with an initial substrate concentration of 15%, in which dried substrate (= the weight of the initial substrate) was divided into three portions and added into the conical flask once each 8 h during the first 24 h. HMBP achieved at 51.2 g/L for 72 h with a high productivity of 0.71 g/(L x h) while a low cellulose conversion of 62%. Interestingly, the fermentation inhibitive compound was mainly acetic acid, less than 3.0 g/L, and there were no other inhibitors detected, commonly furfural and hydroxymethyl furfural existing in the slurry. The data indicate that the lignocellulosic substrate subjected to the atmospheric glycerol autocatalytic organosolv pretreatment is very applicable for HMBP. The fed-batch semi-SFF is effective and desirable to realize an HMBP.

  2. [High titer ethanol production from an atmospheric glycerol autocatalytic organosolv pretreated wheat straw].

    PubMed

    Wang, Liang; Liu, Jianquan; Zhang, Zhe; Zhang, Feiyang; Ren, Junli; Sun, Fubao; Zhang, Zhenyu; Ding, Cancan; Lin, Qiaowen

    2015-10-01

    The expensive production of bioethanol is because it has not yet reached the 'THREE-HIGH' (High-titer, high-conversion and high-productivity) technical levels of starchy ethanol production. To cope with it, it is necessary to implement a high-gravity mash bioethanol production (HMBP), in which sugar hydrolysates are thick and fermentation-inhibitive compounds are negligible. In this work, HMBP from an atmospheric glycerol autocatalytic organosolv pretreated wheat straw was carried out with different fermentation strategies. Under an optimized condition (15% substrate concentration, 10 g/L (NH4)2SO4, 30 FPU/g dry matter, 10% (V/V) inoculum ratio), HMBP was at 31.2 g/L with a shaking simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) at 37 degrees C for 72 h, and achieved with a conversion of 73% and a productivity of 0.43 g/(L x h). Further by a semi-SFF with pre-hydrolysis time of 24 h, HMBP reached 33.7 g/L, the conversion and productivity of which was 79% and 0.47 g/(L x h), respectively. During the SSF and semi-SSF, more than 90% of the cellulose in both substrates were hydrolyzed into fermentable sugars. Finally, a fed-batch semi-SFF was developed with an initial substrate concentration of 15%, in which dried substrate (= the weight of the initial substrate) was divided into three portions and added into the conical flask once each 8 h during the first 24 h. HMBP achieved at 51.2 g/L for 72 h with a high productivity of 0.71 g/(L x h) while a low cellulose conversion of 62%. Interestingly, the fermentation inhibitive compound was mainly acetic acid, less than 3.0 g/L, and there were no other inhibitors detected, commonly furfural and hydroxymethyl furfural existing in the slurry. The data indicate that the lignocellulosic substrate subjected to the atmospheric glycerol autocatalytic organosolv pretreatment is very applicable for HMBP. The fed-batch semi-SFF is effective and desirable to realize an HMBP. PMID:26964336

  3. Fermentation of soybean hulls to ethanol while retaining protein value

    SciTech Connect

    Mielenz, Jonathan R; Wyman, Professor Charles E; John, Bardsley

    2009-01-01

    Soybean hulls were evaluated as a resource for production of ethanol by the simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) process, and no pretreatment of the hulls was found to be needed to realize high ethanol yields with S. cerevisiae D5A. The impact of cellulase, -glucosidase and pectinase dosages were determined at a 15% biomass loading, and ethanol concentrations of 25-30 g/L were routinely obtained, while under these conditions corn stover, wheat straw, and switchgrass produced 3-4 times lower ethanol yields. Removal of carbohydrates also concentrated the hull protein to over 25% w/w from the original roughly 10%. Analysis of the soybean hulls before and after fermentation showed similar amino acid profiles including an increase in the essential amino acids lysine and threonine in the residues. Thus, eliminating pretreatment should assure that the protein in the hulls is preserved, and conversion of the carbohydrates to ethanol with high yields produces a more concentrated and valuable co-product in addition to ethanol. The resulting upgraded feed product from soybean hulls would likely to be acceptable to monogastric as well as bovine livestock.

  4. Ethanol fermentation using novel techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.

    1984-01-01

    Potato starch, sweet potato, and Jerusalem artichoke were hydrolyzed using high pressure extrusion and/or acid and the hydrolysates were utilized as substrates for ethanol fermentation. The first extrusion at 13,000 to 40,000 psi did not completely hydrolyze the starch solution to fermentable sugar. At elevated temperatures (79-97/sup 0/C) and in the presence of HCl, the high pressure extrusion (13,000 psi) effectively hydrolyzed starch into fermentable sugars to yield 12.1, 22.4, and 30.5 dextrose equivalent (DE) in 1, 2, and 3 N HCl, respectively. Maximal reducing sugar value of 84.2 DE and 0.056% hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) was achieved after heating 8% sweet potato slurry (SPS) in 1 N HCl at 110/sup 0/C for 15 min. The degraded SPS was then fermented at 37/sup 0/C using an alcohol-tolerant strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to give 41.6 g of 200 proof ethanol from 400 g fresh Georgia Red Sweet potato tuber. A maximal reducing sugar value of 83.5 fructose equivalent and 0.004% HMF was formed from Jerusalem artichoke slurry (JAS) containing 8% total solid following heating in 0.1 N HCl at 97/sup 0/C for 10 min. The degraded JAS was then fermented at 37 C and 29.1 g 200 proof ethanol was produced from 320 g fresh tuber of Jerusalem artichoke. Continuous ethanol fermentation was successfully achieved using a bioreactor where cells were immobilized onto inorganic, channeled porous alumina beads. A maximum productivity (27.0/g ethanol/l.h) was achieved with the bioreactor at 35 C using malt yeast extract broth containing 10% glucose as the feedstock. The immobilized cell system showed good operational and storage stability, and could be stored for more than five months without loss of productivities.

  5. Facile synthesis of a platinum-lead oxide nanocomposite catalyst with high activity and durability for ethanol electrooxidation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wei-Hua; Wang, Hong-Hui; Chen, De-Hao; Zhou, Zhi-You; Sun, Shi-Gang

    2012-12-21

    Aimed at searching for highly active and stable nano-scale Pt-based catalysts that can improve significantly the energy conversion efficiency of direct ethanol fuel cells (DEFCs), a novel Pt-PbO(x) nanocomposite (Pt-PbO(x) NC) catalyst with a mean size of 3.23 nm was synthesized through a simple wet chemistry method without using a surfactant, organometallic precursors and high temperature. Electrocatalytic tests demonstrated that the as-prepared Pt-PbO(x) NC catalyst possesses a much higher catalytic activity and a longer durability than Pt nanoparticles (nm-Pt) and commercial Pt black catalysts for ethanol electrooxidation. For instance, Pt-PbO(x) NC showed an onset potential that was 30 mV and 44 mV less positive, together with a peak current density 1.7 and 2.6 times higher than those observed for nm-Pt and Pt black catalysts in the cyclic voltammogram tests. The ratio of current densities per unit Pt mass on Pt-PbO(x) NC, nm-Pt and Pt black catalysts is 27.3 : 3.4 : 1 for the long-term (2 hours) chronoamperometric experiments measured at -0.4 V (vs. SCE). In situ FTIR spectroscopic studies revealed that the activity of breaking C-C bonds of ethanol of the Pt-PbO(x) NC is as high as 5.17 times that of the nm-Pt, which illustrates a high efficiency of ethanol oxidation to CO(2) on the as-prepared Pt-PbO(x) NC catalyst.

  6. Ethanol poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002644.htm Ethanol poisoning To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Ethanol poisoning is caused by drinking too much alcohol. ...

  7. Creating high yield water soluble luminescent graphene quantum dots via exfoliating and disintegrating carbon nanotubes and graphite flakes.

    PubMed

    Lin, Liangxu; Zhang, Shaowei

    2012-10-21

    We have developed an effective method to exfoliate and disintegrate multi-walled carbon nanotubes and graphite flakes. With this technique, high yield production of luminescent graphene quantum dots with high quantum yield and low oxidization can be achieved.

  8. Sodium citrate assisted facile synthesis of AuPd alloy networks for ethanol electrooxidation with high activity and durability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Yanling; Zhu, Zhijun; Lu, Xiaolin; Zhou, H. Susan

    2016-10-01

    The direct ethanol fuel cell is an emerging energy conversion device for which palladium is considered as the one of the most effective components for anode catalyst, however, its widespread application has been still limited by the activity and durability of the anode catalyst. In this work, AuPd alloy networks (NWs) are synthesized using H2PdCl4 and HAuCl4 as precursors reduced by NaBH4 in the presence of sodium citrate (SC). The results reveal that SC plays significant role in network structure, resulting in the enhanced electrocatalytic activity of the catalyst. This self-supported AuPd NWs catalyst exhibits much higher electrochemical catalytic activity than commercial Pd/C catalyst toward ethanol electrooxidation in alkaline solution. Significantly, AuPd NWs catalyst shows extremely high durability at the beginning of the chronoamperometry test, and as high as 49% of the mass current density (1.41 A/mgPd) remains after 4000 s current-time test at -0.3 V (vs. Ag/AgCl) in N2-saturated KOH-ethanol solution. This strategy provides a facile method for the preparation of alloy networks with high electrochemical activity, and can be potentially expanded to a variety of electrochemical applications.

  9. Highly Sensitive Ethanol Sensor Based on Au-Decorated SnO2 Nanoparticles Synthesized Through Precipitation and Microwave Irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yan; Zhao, Fang-Xian; Lian, Xiao-Xue; Zou, Yun-Ling; Wang, Qiong; Zhou, Qing-Jun

    2016-06-01

    Gold (Au)-decorated SnO2 nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized through a precipitation and microwave irradiation process. The as-prepared products were characterized by x-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. The results indicated that the as-prepared products consisted of nanometer-scale tetragonal crystalline SnO2 and face-centered cubic gold metal NPs. The gas sensing measurements showed that the sensor based on Au-decorated SnO2 NPs exhibited an extremely high response (239.5) toward 500-ppm ethanol at a relatively low working temperature (220°C). In addition, the response and recovery times of this sensor to ethanol were 1 s and 31 s, respectively. The excellent gas sensing performance of the synthesized NPs in terms of high response, fast response-recovery, superior selectivity, and good stability was attributed to the small nanometer size of the particles, Schottky barrier, and Au NP catalysis. Finally, we demonstrated that our Au-decorated SnO2 NPs could be a potential candidate for use in highly sensitive and selective gas sensors for ethanol.

  10. [Process strategy for ethanol production from lignocellulose feedstock under extremely low water usage and high solids loading conditions].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian; Chu, Deqiang; Yu, Zhanchun; Zhang, Xiaoxi; Deng, Hongbo; Wang, Xiusheng; Zhu, Zhinan; Zhang, Huaiqing; Dai, Gance; Bao, Jie

    2010-07-01

    The massive water and steam are consumed in the production of cellulose ethanol, which correspondingly results in the significant increase of energy cost, waster water discharge and production cost as well. In this study, the process strategy under extremely low water usage and high solids loading of corn stover was investigated experimentally and computationally. The novel pretreatment technology with zero waste water discharge was developed; in which a unique biodetoxification method using a kerosene fungus strain Amorphotheca resinae ZN1 to degrade the lignocellulose derived inhibitors was applied. With high solids loading of pretreated corn stover, high ethanol titer was achieved in the simultaneous saccharification and fermentation process, and the scale-up principles were studied. Furthermore, the flowsheet simulation of the whole process was carried out with the Aspen plus based physical database, and the integrated process developed was tested in the biorefinery mini-plant. Finally, the core technologies were applied in the cellulose ethanol demonstration plant, which paved a way for the establishment of an energy saving and environment friendly technology of lignocellulose biotransformation with industry application potential.

  11. High vapor pressure deficit drives salt-stress-induced rice yield losses in India.

    PubMed

    Tack, Jesse; Singh, Rakesh K; Nalley, Lawton L; Viraktamath, Basavaraj C; Krishnamurthy, Saraswathipura L; Lyman, Nate; Jagadish, Krishna S V

    2015-04-01

    Flooded rice is grown across wide geographic boundaries from as far north as Manchuria and as far south as Uruguay and New South Wales, primarily because of its adaptability across diverse agronomic and climatic conditions. Salt-stress damage, a common occurrence in delta and coastal rice production zones, could be heightened by the interactions between high temperature and relative humidity (vapor pressure deficit--VPD). Using temporal and spatial observations spanning 107 seasons and 19 rice-growing locations throughout India with varying electrical conductivity (EC), including coastal saline, inland saline, and alkaline soils, we quantified the proportion of VPD inducing salinity damage in rice. While controlling for time-invariant factors such as trial locations, rice cultivars, and soil types, our regression analysis indicates that EC has a nonlinear detrimental effect on paddy rice yield. Our estimates suggest these yield reductions become larger at higher VPD. A one standard deviation (SD) increase in EC from its mean value is associated with 1.68% and 4.13% yield reductions at median and maximum observed VPD levels, respectively. Yield reductions increase roughly sixfold when the one SD increase is taken from the 75th percentile of EC. In combination, high EC and VPD generate near catastrophic crop loss as predicted yield approaches zero. If higher VPD levels driven by global warming materialize in conjunction with rising sea levels or salinity incursion in groundwater, this interaction becomes an important and necessary predictor of expected yield losses and global food security. PMID:25379616

  12. High vapor pressure deficit drives salt-stress-induced rice yield losses in India.

    PubMed

    Tack, Jesse; Singh, Rakesh K; Nalley, Lawton L; Viraktamath, Basavaraj C; Krishnamurthy, Saraswathipura L; Lyman, Nate; Jagadish, Krishna S V

    2015-04-01

    Flooded rice is grown across wide geographic boundaries from as far north as Manchuria and as far south as Uruguay and New South Wales, primarily because of its adaptability across diverse agronomic and climatic conditions. Salt-stress damage, a common occurrence in delta and coastal rice production zones, could be heightened by the interactions between high temperature and relative humidity (vapor pressure deficit--VPD). Using temporal and spatial observations spanning 107 seasons and 19 rice-growing locations throughout India with varying electrical conductivity (EC), including coastal saline, inland saline, and alkaline soils, we quantified the proportion of VPD inducing salinity damage in rice. While controlling for time-invariant factors such as trial locations, rice cultivars, and soil types, our regression analysis indicates that EC has a nonlinear detrimental effect on paddy rice yield. Our estimates suggest these yield reductions become larger at higher VPD. A one standard deviation (SD) increase in EC from its mean value is associated with 1.68% and 4.13% yield reductions at median and maximum observed VPD levels, respectively. Yield reductions increase roughly sixfold when the one SD increase is taken from the 75th percentile of EC. In combination, high EC and VPD generate near catastrophic crop loss as predicted yield approaches zero. If higher VPD levels driven by global warming materialize in conjunction with rising sea levels or salinity incursion in groundwater, this interaction becomes an important and necessary predictor of expected yield losses and global food security.

  13. The syntheiss of high yields of full-length reverse transcripts of globin mRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, E Y; Rosbash, M

    1977-01-01

    Conditions have been determined under which reverse transcriptase catalyzes the synthesis of the high yields of full length complementary deoxyribonucleic acid (cDNA). These conditions depend not only on the cencentration of deoxynucleoside triphosphates (1) but also on the concentration of reverse transcriptase. An analysis of the kinetics of cDNA synthesis and the size of cDNA synthesized as a function of time under different conditions indicates that the mechanism of action of reverse transcriptase is partially distributive. This accounts for the necessity of a high enzyme concentration to obtain high yields of full length cDNA. Additional experiments indicate that the yield of cDNA is limited by the fact that the template mRNA is rapidly inactivated. This is most likely due to the fact that the product cDNA is hydrogen bonded to the template mRNA during synthesis. Images PMID:73163

  14. Localized brain differences in Arc expression between mice showing low vs. high propensity to ethanol sensitization.

    PubMed

    Nona, Christina N; Lam, Marcus; Nobrega, José N

    2016-03-01

    Behavioral sensitization to ethanol (EtOH) manifests as a progressive and enduring increase in locomotor activity with repeated drug exposure. However, not all mice sensitize to EtOH and the neuronal mechanisms mediating vulnerability and resistance to EtOH sensitization remain unclear. We examined regional brain expression of the immediate early gene activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein (Arc) in order to identify brain areas in which neuroplastic changes may contribute to the development and expression of EtOH sensitization. Male DBA/2J mice received 5 biweekly injections of EtOH (2.2g/kg, i.p.) or saline (SAL). They were categorized as high- (HS) or low-sensitized (LS) on the basis of final locomotor activity scores. In both LS and HS mice sacrificed after the last sensitization injection, Arc expression was decreased throughout the brain in comparison to SAL animals. A similar pattern was seen in mice sacrificed after an EtOH challenge two weeks after the last sensitization injection. However in this cohort, Arc expression was significantly increased in the central amygdala (CeA) in LS mice and in SAL mice receiving EtOH for the first time. No significant increases in Arc expression were seen in brains of sensitized (HS) animals. These results indicate an acute EtOH challenge results in different patterns of Arc expression in brains of LS, HS, and SAL mice. The dramatic increases in Arc expression in the CeA in LS and SAL mice showing little or no behavioral activation suggests that neural activity in this region may serve to inhibit the stimulant effects of EtOH. The observation that HS mice do not show increases in Arc expression with an EtOH challenge suggests the possibility that increased tolerance to the Arc-inducing effects of EtOH may be a factor in behavioral sensitization.

  15. Ethanol Basics

    SciTech Connect

    2015-01-30

    Ethanol is a widely-used, domestically-produced renewable fuel made from corn and other plant materials. More than 96% of gasoline sold in the United States contains ethanol. Learn more about this alternative fuel in the Ethanol Basics Fact Sheet, produced by the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Cities program.

  16. Ethanol Production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This book chapter reviews the current process technologies for fuel ethanol production. In the US, almost all commercial fuel ethanol is produced from corn whereas cane sugar is used almost exclusively in Brazil. In Europe, two major types of feedstock considered for fuel ethanol production are be...

  17. Indole-3-ethanol Oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Percival, Frank W.; Purves, William K.; Vickery, Larry E.

    1973-01-01

    We report the further characterization of indole-3-ethanol oxidase from cucumber seedlings. The effects of various inhibitors suggest that the enzyme may be a flavoprotein with a metal ion and sulfhydryl groups required for full activity. Indole-3-acetaldehyde, a product of the reaction, inhibits the enzyme. This inhibition is overcome by O2 but not by indole-3-ethanol, indicating that the kinetic mechanism of the enzyme is a ping-pong Bi-Bi. The enzyme undergoes cooperative interactions with indoleethanol, yielding Hill coefficients as high as 2.96. Gibberellins are without effect on the enzyme, but it is inhibited by several acidic indoles possessing growth-promoting activity and by two synthetic auxins, 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid and 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetic acid. Increasing concentrations of indoleacetic acid (IAA) brought about a slight reduction in the indoleethanol concentration producing halfmaximal velocity. Increasing levels of indoleethanol decreased the concentration of IAA required for half-maximal inhibition. At low concentrations of indoleethanol, low levels of IAA activated rather than inhibited. The effect of IAA was not overcome at higher levels of indoleethanol. These results may be interpreted as showing that IAA is a noncompetitive inhibitor which binds to that conformation of the enzyme which also binds indoleethanol. The significance of these interactions for the regulation of IAA biosynthesis is discussed. PMID:16658401

  18. High temperature dilute phosphoric acid pretreatment of corn stover for furfural and ethanol production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Furfural was produced from corn stover by one stage pretreatment process using dilute H3PO4 and solid residues following furfural production were used for ethanol production by Saccharomyces cerevisiae NRRL- Y2034. A series of experiments were conducted at varied temperatures (140-200 oC) and acid ...

  19. Genome-based establishment of a high-yielding heterotic pattern for hybrid wheat breeding

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yusheng; Li, Zuo; Liu, Guozheng; Jiang, Yong; Maurer, Hans Peter; Würschum, Tobias; Mock, Hans-Peter; Matros, Andrea; Ebmeyer, Erhard; Schachschneider, Ralf; Kazman, Ebrahim; Schacht, Johannes; Gowda, Manje; Longin, C. Friedrich H.; Reif, Jochen C.

    2015-01-01

    Hybrid breeding promises to boost yield and stability. The single most important element in implementing hybrid breeding is the recognition of a high-yielding heterotic pattern. We have developed a three-step strategy for identifying heterotic patterns for hybrid breeding comprising the following elements. First, the full hybrid performance matrix is compiled using genomic prediction. Second, a high-yielding heterotic pattern is searched based on a developed simulated annealing algorithm. Third, the long-term success of the identified heterotic pattern is assessed by estimating the usefulness, selection limit, and representativeness of the heterotic pattern with respect to a defined base population. This three-step approach was successfully implemented and evaluated using a phenotypic and genomic wheat dataset comprising 1,604 hybrids and their 135 parents. Integration of metabolomic-based prediction was not as powerful as genomic prediction. We show that hybrid wheat breeding based on the identified heterotic pattern can boost grain yield through the exploitation of heterosis and enhance recurrent selection gain. Our strategy represents a key step forward in hybrid breeding and is relevant for self-pollinating crops, which are currently shifting from pure-line to high-yielding and resilient hybrid varieties. PMID:26663911

  20. Genome-based establishment of a high-yielding heterotic pattern for hybrid wheat breeding.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yusheng; Li, Zuo; Liu, Guozheng; Jiang, Yong; Maurer, Hans Peter; Würschum, Tobias; Mock, Hans-Peter; Matros, Andrea; Ebmeyer, Erhard; Schachschneider, Ralf; Kazman, Ebrahim; Schacht, Johannes; Gowda, Manje; Longin, C Friedrich H; Reif, Jochen C

    2015-12-22

    Hybrid breeding promises to boost yield and stability. The single most important element in implementing hybrid breeding is the recognition of a high-yielding heterotic pattern. We have developed a three-step strategy for identifying heterotic patterns for hybrid breeding comprising the following elements. First, the full hybrid performance matrix is compiled using genomic prediction. Second, a high-yielding heterotic pattern is searched based on a developed simulated annealing algorithm. Third, the long-term success of the identified heterotic pattern is assessed by estimating the usefulness, selection limit, and representativeness of the heterotic pattern with respect to a defined base population. This three-step approach was successfully implemented and evaluated using a phenotypic and genomic wheat dataset comprising 1,604 hybrids and their 135 parents. Integration of metabolomic-based prediction was not as powerful as genomic prediction. We show that hybrid wheat breeding based on the identified heterotic pattern can boost grain yield through the exploitation of heterosis and enhance recurrent selection gain. Our strategy represents a key step forward in hybrid breeding and is relevant for self-pollinating crops, which are currently shifting from pure-line to high-yielding and resilient hybrid varieties.

  1. Protective Effect of Gymnema sylvestre Ethanol Extract on High Fat Diet-induced Obese Diabetic Wistar Rats.

    PubMed

    Kumar, V; Bhandari, Uma; Tripathi, C D; Khanna, Geetika

    2014-07-01

    Obesity is associated with numerous co-morbidities such as cardiovascular diseases, type 2 diabetes, hypertension and others. Therefore, the present study was planned to investigate the effect of water- soluble fraction of Gymnema sylvestre ethanol extract on biochemical and molecular alterations in obese diabetic rats. Diabetes was induced by single i.v. injection of streptozotocin (45 mg/kg) via tail vein. Obesity was induced by oral feeding of high fat diet for a period of 28 days in diabetic rats. Body weight gain, food intake, water intake, hemodynamic parameters (systolic, diastolic, mean arterial blood pressures and heart rate), serum biochemical parameters (leptin, insulin, lipid levels, apolipoprotein B and glucose), cardiomyocyte apoptosis (cardiac caspase-3, Na(+)/K(+) ATPase activity and DNA fragmentation) organs and visceral fat pad weight and oxidative stress parameters were measured. Oral treatment with water soluble fraction of Gymnema sylvestre ethanol extracts (120 mg/kg/p.o.) for a period of 21 days, resulted in significant reduction in heart rate, mean arterial pressure, serum leptin, insulin, apolipoprotein B, lipids, glucose, cardiac caspase-3 levels, Na(+)/K(+) ATPase activity and DNA laddering, visceral fat pad and organ's weight and improved the antioxidant enzymes levels in the high fat diet induced obesity in diabetic rats. The results of present study reveal that water soluble fraction of Gymnema sylvestre ethanol extract could be useful intervention in the treatment of obesity and type-2 diabetes mellitus.

  2. Production of an acetone-butanol-ethanol mixture from Clostridium acetobutylicum and its conversion to high-value biofuels.

    PubMed

    Sreekumar, Sanil; Baer, Zachary C; Pazhamalai, Anbarasan; Gunbas, Gorkem; Grippo, Adam; Blanch, Harvey W; Clark, Douglas S; Toste, F Dean

    2015-03-01

    Clostridium acetobutylicum is a bacterial species that ferments sugar to a mixture of organic solvents (acetone, butanol and ethanol). This protocol delineates a methodology to combine solventogenic clostridial fermentation and chemical catalysis via extractive fermentation for the production of biofuel blendstocks. Extractive fermentation of C. acetobutylicum is operated in fed-batch mode with a concentrated feed solution (500 grams per liter glucose and 50 grams per liter yeast extract) for 60 h, producing in excess of 40 g of solvents (acetone, butanol and ethanol) between the completely immiscible extractant and aqueous phases of the bioreactor. After distillation of the extractant phase, the acetone, butanol and ethanol mixture is upgraded to long-chain ketones over a palladium-hydrotalcite (Pd-HT) catalyst. This reaction is generally carried out in batch with a high-pressure Q-tube for 20 h at 250 °C. Following this protocol enables the production of ∼0.5 g of high-value biofuel precursors from a 1.7-g portion of fermentation solvents.

  3. High Intrinsic Aerobic Capacity Protects against Ethanol-Induced Hepatic Injury and Metabolic Dysfunction: Study Using High Capacity Runner Rat Model.

    PubMed

    Szary, Nicholas; Rector, R Scott; Uptergrove, Grace M; Ridenhour, Suzanne E; Shukla, Shivendra D; Thyfault, John P; Koch, Lauren G; Britton, Steven L; Ibdah, Jamal A

    2015-01-01

    Rats artificially selected over several generations for high intrinsic endurance/aerobic capacity resulting in high capacity runners (HCR) has been developed to study the links between high aerobic fitness and protection from metabolic diseases (Wisloff et al., Science, 2005). We have previously shown that the HCR strain have elevated hepatic mitochondrial content and oxidative capacity. In this study, we tested if the elevated hepatic mitochondrial content in the HCR rat would provide "metabolic protection" from chronic ethanol-induced hepatic steatosis and injury. The Leiber-Decarli liquid diet with ethanol (7% v/v; HCR-E) and without (HCR-C) was given to HCR rats (n = 8 per group) from 14 to 20 weeks of age that were weight matched and pair-fed to assure isocaloric intake. Hepatic triglyceride (TG) content and macro- and microvesicular steatosis were significantly greater in HCR-E compared with HCR-C (p < 0.05). In addition, hepatic superoxide dismutase activity and glutathione levels were significantly (p < 0.05) reduced in the HCR-E rats. This hepatic phenotype also was associated with reduced total hepatic fatty acid oxidation (p = 0.03) and β-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase activity (p = 0.01), and reductions in microsomal triglyceride transfer protein and apoB-100 protein content (p = 0.01) in HCR-E animals. However, despite these documented hepatic alterations, ethanol ingestion failed to induce significant hepatic liver injury, including no changes in hepatic inflammation, or serum alanine amino transferase (ALTs), free fatty acids (FFAs), triglycerides (TGs), insulin, or glucose. High intrinsic aerobic fitness did not reduce ethanol-induced hepatic steatosis, but protected against ethanol-induced hepatic injury and systemic metabolic dysfunction in a high aerobic capacity rat model. PMID:26610588

  4. On the possibility of long-wavelength long-lifetime high-quantum-yield luminophores.

    PubMed

    Lakowicz, J R; Piszczek, G; Kang, J S

    2001-01-01

    We describe an approach to creating a new class of luminophores which display both long wavelength emissions exceeding 600 nm and long lifetimes. These luminophores are based on resonance energy transfer (RET) from a long lifetime donor to a short lifetime but long wavelength acceptor. We demonstrated the possibility of obtaining these desirable spectral properties using donors and acceptors noncovalently bound to DNA. The donor was a ruthenium (Ru) metal-ligand complex in which one of the diimine ligands intercalated into double-helix DNA. The acceptors were either nile blue, TOTO-3, or TO-PRO-3. Upon binding of the acceptor to donor-labeled DNA, we found that the acceptor quantum yield was remarkably enhanced so that the wavelength-integrated intensities of the donor and acceptor bound to DNA were many-fold greater than the intensity of the donor and acceptor alone when separately bound to DNA. The origin of this effect is efficient energy transfer from the donor. Under these conditions the effective overall quantum yield approaches that of the acceptor. Importantly, the increased quantum yield can be obtained while maintaining usefully long apparent acceptor lifetimes of 30 to 80 ns. The effect of an increased quantum yield from a low quantum yield donor may find use in assays to detect macromolecular binding interactions. These results suggest the synthesis of covalently linked donor-acceptor pairs with the desirable spectral properties of long wavelength emission, high quantum yield, and moderately long lifetimes for gated detection.

  5. Mass production of multi-wall carbon nanotubes by metal dusting process with high yield

    SciTech Connect

    Ghorbani, H.; Rashidi, A.M.; Rastegari, S.; Mirdamadi, S.; Alaei, M.

    2011-05-15

    Research highlights: {yields} Synthesis of carbon nanotubes over Fe-Ni nanoparticles supported alloy 304L. {yields} Production of carbon nanotubes with high yield (700-1000%) and low cost catalyst. {yields} Optimum growth condition is CO/H{sub 2} = 1/1, 100 cm{sup 3}/min, at 620 {sup o}C under long term repetitive thermal cycling. {yields} Possibility of the mass production by metal dusting process with low cost. -- Abstract: Carbon nanotube materials were synthesized over Fe-Ni nanoparticles generated during disintegration of the surface of alloy 304L under metal dusting environment. The metal dusting condition was simulated and optimized through exposing stainless steel samples during long term repetitive thermal cycling in CO/H{sub 2} = 1/1, total gas flow rate 100 cm{sup 3}/min, at 620 {sup o}C for 300 h. After reaction, surface morphology of the samples and also carbonaceous deposition which had grown on sample surfaces were examined by stereoscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Results revealed that multi-wall carbon nanotubes could be formed over nanocatalyst generated on the alloy surface by exploiting metal dusting process. By optimization of reaction parameters the yields of carbon nanotube materials obtained were 700-1000%. Also it has been shown herein that the amount of carbon nanotube materials remarkably increases when the reaction time is extended up to 300 h, indicating a possibility of the mass production by this easy method.

  6. High-resolution, regional-scale crop yield simulations for the Southwestern United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stack, D. H.; Kafatos, M.; Medvigy, D.; El-Askary, H. M.; Hatzopoulos, N.; Kim, J.; Kim, S.; Prasad, A. K.; Tremback, C.; Walko, R. L.; Asrar, G. R.

    2012-12-01

    Over the past few decades, there have been many process-based crop models developed with the goal of better understanding the impacts of climate, soils, and management decisions on crop yields. These models simulate the growth and development of crops in response to environmental drivers. Traditionally, process-based crop models have been run at the individual farm level for yield optimization and management scenario testing. Few previous studies have used these models over broader geographic regions, largely due to the lack of gridded high-resolution meteorological and soil datasets required as inputs for these data intensive process-based models. In particular, assessment of regional-scale yield variability due to climate change requires high-resolution, regional-scale, climate projections, and such projections have been unavailable until recently. The goal of this study was to create a framework for extending the Agricultural Production Systems sIMulator (APSIM) crop model for use at regional scales and analyze spatial and temporal yield changes in the Southwestern United States (CA, AZ, and NV). Using the scripting language Python, an automated pipeline was developed to link Regional Climate Model (RCM) output with the APSIM crop model, thus creating a one-way nested modeling framework. This framework was used to combine climate, soil, land use, and agricultural management datasets in order to better understand the relationship between climate variability and crop yield at the regional-scale. Three different RCMs were used to drive APSIM: OLAM, RAMS, and WRF. Preliminary results suggest that, depending on the model inputs, there is some variability between simulated RCM driven maize yields and historical yields obtained from the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA). Furthermore, these simulations showed strong non-linear correlations between yield and meteorological drivers, with critical threshold values for some of the inputs (e.g. minimum and

  7. NEW ACALA GERMPLASM LINES WITH HIGH YIELD POTENTIAL AND FIBER QUALITY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper reports the development of 18 Acala 1517 cotton germplasm lines developed in the New Mexico Cotton Breeding Program. NM W1218 is an Acala cotton line with okra leaf and 7.8% higher lint yield than Acala 1517-99. NM 970123 is an Acala cotton line with high lint percentage (44.6%) and 6.4...

  8. Comparing high density LIDAR and medium resolution GPS generated elevation data for predicting yield stability

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    High density light detection and ranging (LIDAR) imaging has been shown to be able to define yield stability areas of a field for multi-cropping. Since LIDAR imaging is expensive and not widely available, we hypothesized that medium resolution GPS elevation data which is commonly collected with var...

  9. High yield synthesis of high-silica chabazite by combining the role of zeolite precursors and tetraethylammonium: SCR of NOx.

    PubMed

    Martín, Nuria; Moliner, Manuel; Corma, Avelino

    2015-06-21

    The synthesis of chabazite with high solid yields is achieved by the rational combination of directing effects of a source of Si and Al coming from USY zeolites and the inexpensive tetraethylammonium. Moreover, Cu-CHA materials prepared by post-synthetic and "one-pot" methodologies show high activity and stability for SCR of NOx.

  10. Root-determined hypernodulation mutant of Lotus japonicus shows high-yielding characteristics.

    PubMed

    Yokota, Keisuke; Li, Yong Yi; Hisatomi, Masahiro; Wang, Yanxu; Ishikawa, Kaori; Liu, Chi-Te; Suzuki, Shino; Aonuma, Kho; Aono, Toshihiro; Nakamoto, Tomomi; Oyaizu, Hiroshi

    2009-07-01

    Here we report the phenotypic characteristics of a novel hypernodulation mutant, Ljrdh1 (root-determined hypernodulation 1) of Lotus japonicus. At 12 weeks after rhizobial inoculation, there were no differences between the growth of Ljrdh1 and, wild-type. However, Ljrdh1 showed 2 to 3 times higher nitrogen-fixing activity, and seed and pod yields, were approximately 50% higher than the wild-type. This is the first report of a legume hypernodulation mutant showing normal growth and a high-yielding characteristic under optimal cultivation conditions.

  11. High-yield reactivation of anionic tobacco peroxidase overexpressed in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Zakharova, G S; Poloznikov, A A; Chubar, T A; Gazaryan, I G; Tishkov, V I

    2015-09-01

    Anionic tobacco peroxidase (TOP) is extremely active in chemiluminescence reaction of luminol oxidation without addition of enhancers and more stable than horseradish peroxidase under antibody conjugation conditions. In addition, recombinant TOP (rTOP) produced in Escherichia coli is known to be a perfect direct electron transfer catalyst on electrodes of various origin. These features make the task of development of a high-yield reactivation protocol for rTOP practically important. Previous attempts to reactivate the enzyme from E. coli inclusion bodies were successful, but the reported reactivation yield was only 14%. In this work, we thoroughly screened the refolding conditions for dilution protocol and compared it with gel-filtration chromatography. The impressive reactivation yield in the dilution protocol (85%) was achieved for 8 μg/mL solubilized rTOP protein and the refolding medium containing 0.3 mM oxidized glutathione, 0.05 mM dithiothreitol, 5 mM CaCl2, 5% glycerol in 50 mM Tris-HCl buffer, pH 9.6, with 1 μM hemin added at the 24th hour of incubation. A practically important discovery was a 30-40% increase in the reactivation yield upon delayed addition of hemin. The reactivation yield achieved is one of the highest reported in the literature on protein refolding by dilution. The final yield of purified active non-glycosylated rTOP was ca. 60 mg per L of E. coli culture, close to the yield reported before for tomato and tobacco plants overexpressing glycosylated TOP (60 mg/kg biomass) and much higher than for the previously reported refolding protocol (2.6 mg per L of E. coli culture).

  12. Acceleration of the rate of ethanol fermentation by addition of nitrogen in high tannin grain sorghum

    SciTech Connect

    Mullins, J.T.; NeSmith, C.C.

    1987-01-01

    In this communication, the authors show that accelerated rates of ethanol production, comparable to sorghum varieties containing low levels of tannins and to corn, can occur without the removal of the tannins. The basis of the inhibition appears to be a lack of sufficient nitrogen in the mash for protein synthesis required to support an accelerated fermentative metabolism in Saccharomyces. No inhibition of the enzymes used for starch hydrolysis was found.

  13. Microbial electrolysis cells for high yield hydrogen gas production from organic matter.

    PubMed

    Logan, Bruce E; Call, Douglas; Cheng, Shaoan; Hamelers, Hubertus V M; Sleutels, Tom H J A; Jeremiasse, Adriaan W; Rozendal, René A

    2008-12-01

    The use of electrochemically active bacteria to break down organic matter, combined with the addition of a small voltage (> 0.2 V in practice) in specially designed microbial electrolysis cells (MECs), can result in a high yield of hydrogen gas. While microbial electrolysis was invented only a few years ago, rapid developments have led to hydrogen yields approaching 100%, energy yields based on electrical energy input many times greater than that possible by water electrolysis, and increased gas production rates. MECs used to make hydrogen gas are similar in design to microbial fuel cells (MFCs) that produce electricity, but there are important differences in architecture and analytical methods used to evaluate performance. We review here the materials, architectures, performance, and energy efficiencies of these MEC systems that show promise as a method for renewable and sustainable energy production, and wastewater treatment.

  14. Differential metabolite profiles during fruit development in high-yielding oil palm mesocarp.

    PubMed

    Teh, Huey Fang; Neoh, Bee Keat; Hong, May Ping Li; Low, Jaime Yoke Sum; Ng, Theresa Lee Mei; Ithnin, Nalisha; Thang, Yin Mee; Mohamed, Mohaimi; Chew, Fook Tim; Yusof, Hirzun Mohd; Kulaveerasingam, Harikrishna; Appleton, David R

    2013-01-01

    To better understand lipid biosynthesis in oil palm mesocarp, in particular the differences in gene regulation leading to and including de novo fatty acid biosynthesis, a multi-platform metabolomics technology was used to profile mesocarp metabolites during six critical stages of fruit development in comparatively high- and low-yielding oil palm populations. Significantly higher amino acid levels preceding lipid biosynthesis and nucleosides during lipid biosynthesis were observed in a higher yielding commercial palm population. Levels of metabolites involved in glycolysis revealed interesting divergence of flux towards glycerol-3-phosphate, while carbon utilization differences in the TCA cycle were proven by an increase in malic acid/citric acid ratio. Apart from insights into the regulation of enhanced lipid production in oil palm, these results provide potentially useful metabolite yield markers and genes of interest for use in breeding programmes. PMID:23593468

  15. Impact of high temperature on ethanol fermentation by Kluyveromyces marxianus immobilized on banana leaf sheath pieces.

    PubMed

    Le, Hoang Du; Thanonkeo, Pornthap; Le, Van Viet Man

    2013-10-01

    Ethanol fermentation was carried out with Kluyveromyces marxianus cells at various temperatures (30, 35, 40, and 45 °C). Fermentation performance of the immobilized yeast on banana leaf sheath pieces and the free yeast were evaluated and compared. Generally, ethanol production of the immobilized and free yeast was stable in a temperature range of 30-40 °C. Temperature of 45 °C restricted yeast growth and lengthened the fermentation. The immobilized yeast demonstrated faster sugar assimilation and higher ethanol level in the fermentation broth in comparison with the free yeast at all fermentation temperatures. Change in fatty acid level in cellular membrane was determined to clarify the response of the free and immobilized yeast to thermal stress. The free cells of K. marxianus responded to temperature increase by increasing saturated fatty acid (C16:0 and C18:0) level and by decreasing unsaturated fatty acid (C18:1 and C18:2) level in cellular membrane. For fermentation at 40 °C with immobilized cells of K. marxianus, however, the changes were not observed in both saturated fatty acid (C16:0) and unsaturated fatty acid (C18:1 and C18:2) level.

  16. High Photoluminescence Quantum Yield in Band Gap Tunable Bromide Containing Mixed Halide Perovskites.

    PubMed

    Sutter-Fella, Carolin M; Li, Yanbo; Amani, Matin; Ager, Joel W; Toma, Francesca M; Yablonovitch, Eli; Sharp, Ian D; Javey, Ali

    2016-01-13

    Hybrid organic-inorganic halide perovskite based semiconductor materials are attractive for use in a wide range of optoelectronic devices because they combine the advantages of suitable optoelectronic attributes and simultaneously low-cost solution processability. Here, we present a two-step low-pressure vapor-assisted solution process to grow high quality homogeneous CH3NH3PbI3-xBrx perovskite films over the full band gap range of 1.6-2.3 eV. Photoluminescence light-in versus light-out characterization techniques are used to provide new insights into the optoelectronic properties of Br-containing hybrid organic-inorganic perovskites as a function of optical carrier injection by employing pump-powers over a 6 orders of magnitude dynamic range. The internal luminescence quantum yield of wide band gap perovskites reaches impressive values up to 30%. This high quantum yield translates into substantial quasi-Fermi level splitting and high "luminescence or optically implied" open-circuit voltage. Most importantly, both attributes, high internal quantum yield and high optically implied open-circuit voltage, are demonstrated over the entire band gap range (1.6 eV ≤ Eg ≤ 2.3 eV). These results establish the versatility of Br-containing perovskite semiconductors for a variety of applications and especially for the use as high-quality top cell in tandem photovoltaic devices in combination with industry dominant Si bottom cells. PMID:26691065

  17. High-material yield fabrication of YBCO coated conductors by Nd:YAG-PLD system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, I.; Ichino, Y.; Yoshida, Y.; Yoshizumi, M.; Izumi, T.; Shiohara, Y.

    In order to fabricate superconducting coated conductors with lower cost, fabrication processes are required high material yield. We report an improvement of the material yield of YBCO films prepared by inside-plume Nd:YAG pulsed laser deposition method on metal substrates with an architecture of CeO2/LMO/IBAD-MgO/GZO/HastelloyTM. In this study, we shortened a distance from the target to the substrate (dT-S) in order to improve the material yield. Additionally, we have used Nd:YAG laser because initial and running costs are anticipated to be lower than those of excimer laser. As a result, by shorting the dT-S from 40 mm to 20 mm, the material yield increased on 10 mm×10 mm substrates. Additionally, by changing the O2 pressure (PO2) from 40 Pa to 400 Pa at dT-S = 20 mm, the material yield had a local maximal value of 18.6% at PO2=200 Pa. On multi-turn (MT) metal substrates, the material yield reached 56.0%. However, the critical current density (Jc) of the YBCO film which was deposited at dT-S = 20 mm and PO2=200 Pa on the 10 mm×10 mm substrate was 1.2 MA/cm2 at the edges and 0.2 MA/cm2 at the center at 77 K in self-field, although the YBCO films showed good aligned crystal textures. In order to improve this non-uniformity, we tilted the surface normal of the target 15 degree from a line connecting target and substrate. As a result, we achieved the uniformity in deposition rate. Then, we prepared YBa1.78Cu2.9Oy target to fabricate YBCO films with stoichiometric composition and obtained the uniform-high Jc.

  18. Effects of short deprivation and re-exposure intervals on the ethanol drinking behavior of selectively bred high alcohol-consuming rats.

    PubMed

    Bell, Richard L; Rodd, Zachary A; Schultz, Jonathon A; Peper, Caron L; Lumeng, Lawrence; Murphy, James M; McBride, William J

    2008-08-01

    Alcoholics generally display cycles of excessive ethanol intake, abstinence and relapse behavior. Using an animal model of relapse-like drinking, the alcohol deprivation effect (ADE), our laboratory has shown that repeated 2-week cycles of ethanol deprivation and re-exposure, following an initial 6-week access period, result in a robust ADE by alcohol-preferring (P) and high alcohol-drinking (HAD-1 and HAD-2) rats. These rat lines have been selectively bred to prefer a 10% ethanol solution over water. The present study examined whether P and HAD rats would display an ADE using much shorter ethanol deprivation and re-exposure intervals. Rats were given either continuous or periodic concurrent access to multiple concentrations (10%, 20%, and 30% [vol/vol]) of ethanol. The periodic protocol involved access to ethanol for 12 days followed by four cycles of 4 days of deprivation and 4 days of re-exposure to ethanol access. High-alcohol-drinking rats displayed a robust 24-h ADE upon first re-exposure (HAD-1: approximately 5 vs. 8g/kg/day; HAD-2: approximately 6 vs. 9g/kg/day, baseline vs. re-exposure), whereas P rats ( approximately 7 vs. 8g/kg/day) displayed a modest, nonsignificant, increase in 24-h intake. In a separate group of rats, ethanol intake and blood alcohol concentrations after the first hour of the fourth re-exposure cycle were HAD-1: 2.0g/kg and 97 mg%, HAD-2: 2.3g/kg and 73 mg%, and P: 1.2g/kg and 71 mg%; with all three lines displaying a robust first hour ADE. These findings suggest that (a) an ADE may be observed with short ethanol deprivation and re-exposure intervals in HAD rats, and (b) the genetic make-up of the P and HAD rats influences the expression of this ADE.

  19. Ethanol tolerance in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Ingram, L O

    1990-01-01

    The adverse effects of ethanol on bacterial growth, viability, and metabolism are caused primarily by ethanol-induced leakage of the plasma membrane. This increase in membrane leakage is consistent with known biophysical properties of membranes and ethanolic solutions. The primary actions of ethanol result from colligative effects of the high molar concentrations rather than from specific interactions with receptors. The ethanol tolerance of growth in different microorganisms appears to result in large part from adaptive and evolutionary changes in cell membrane composition. Different cellular activities vary in their tolerance to ethanol. Therefore, it is essential that the aspect of cellular function under study be specifically defined and that comparisons of ethanol tolerance among systems share this common definition. Growth is typically one of the most sensitive cellular activities to inhibition by ethanol, followed by survival, or loss of reproductive ability. Glycolysis is the most resistant of these three activities. Since glycolysis is an exergonic process, a cell need not be able to grow or remain viable for glycolysis to occur.

  20. Characterization of Saccharomyces strains with respect to their ability to grow and ferment in the presence of ethanol and sucrose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benitez, T.; Delcastillo, L.; Aguilera, A.; Conde, J.; Cerda-Olmedo, E.

    1982-12-01

    To optimize the conversion of carbohydrates to ethanol strains of several Saccharomyces species were examined for their ability to grow and ferment in a range of sucrose and ethanol concentrations. Isolated wine yeasts grew in the presence of 10% ethanol to the same final cell density as control cultures without ethanol. The best of these yeast strains grew in the presence of 15% ethanol and fermented in 18%. Ethanol accumulated, although at a reduced rate, after the cells stopped growing. Most yeast strains were highly fermentative in 50% sucrose. Some of them effectively utilized the carbohydrates of the culture, yielding final ethanol concentrations over 14%. Sixteen of the 35 strains were chosen for genetic analysis and breeding because of their capacity to sporulate. These strains are homothallic and their spores are viable.

  1. Accounting for all sugars produced during integrated production of ethanol from lignocellulosic biomass

    DOE PAGES

    Schell, Daniel J.; Dowe, Nancy; Chapeaux, Alexandre; Nelson, Robert S.; Jennings, Edward W.

    2016-01-19

    This study explored integrated conversion of corn stover to ethanol and highlights techniques for accurate yield calculations. Acid pretreated corn stover (PCS) produced in a pilot-scale reactor was enzymatically hydrolyzed and the resulting sugars were fermented to ethanol by the glucose–xylose fermenting bacteria, Zymomonas mobilis 8b. The calculations account for high solids operation and oligomeric sugars produced during pretreatment, enzymatic hydrolysis, and fermentation, which, if not accounted for, leads to overestimating ethanol yields. The calculations are illustrated for enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation of PCS at 17.5% and 20.0% total solids achieving 80.1% and 77.9% conversion of cellulose and xylan tomore » ethanol and ethanol titers of 63 g/L and 69 g/L, respectively. In the future, these techniques, including the TEA results, will be applied to fully integrated pilot-scale runs.« less

  2. Effect of lactose concentration on batch production of ethanol from cheese whey using Candida pseudotropicalis

    SciTech Connect

    Ghaly, A.E.; El-Taweel, A.A.

    1995-07-01

    The effect of lactose concentration on growth of Candida pseudotropicalis and ethanol production from cheese whey under batch conditions was investigated. Four initial lactose concentrations ranging from 50 to 200 g/L (5 to 20% wt/vol) were used. High concentration of lactose had an inhibitory effect on the specific growth rate, lactose utilization rate, and ethanol production rate. The maximum cell concentration was influenced by the initial substrate concentration as well as ethanol concentration. Inhibition of ethanol production was more pronounced at higher initial lactose concentrations. The maximum ethanol yield (96.6% of the theoretical yield) was achieved with the 100 g/L initial substrate concentration. The results indicated that pH control during alcohol fermentation of cheese whey is not necessary. 41 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Bio-ethanol Production from Green Onion by Yeast in Repeated Batch.

    PubMed

    Robati, Reza

    2013-09-01

    Considered to be the cleanest liquid fuel, bio-ethanol can be a reliable alternative to fossil fuels. It is produced by fermentation of sugar components of plant materials. The common onions are considered to be a favorable source of fermentation products as they have high sugar contents as well as contain various nutrients. This study focused on the effective production of ethanol from Green onion (Allium fistulosum L.) by the yeast "Saccharomyces cerevisiae" in repeated batch. The results showed that the total sugar concentration of onion juice was 68.4 g/l. The maximum rate of productivity, ethanol yield and final bio-ethanol percentage was 7 g/l/h (g ethanol per liter of onion juice per hour), 35 g/l (g ethanol per liter of onion juice) and 90 %, respectively. PMID:24426132

  4. Northern contaminant mixtures induced morphological and functional changes in human coronary artery endothelial cells under culture conditions typifying high fat/sugar diet and ethanol exposure.

    PubMed

    Florian, Maria; Yan, Jin; Ulhaq, Saad; Coughlan, Melanie; Laziyan, Mahemuti; Willmore, William; Jin, Xiaolei

    2013-11-16

    It has been reported that Northern populations are exposed to mixtures of various environmental contaminants unique to the Arctic (Northern contaminant mixtures - NCM) at a large range of concentrations, depending on their geological location, age, lifestyle and dietary habits. To determine if these contaminants may contribute to a cardiovascular health risk, especially when combined with a high fat and sugar diet and ethanol exposure, we treated human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAEC) with two mixtures of 4 organic (NCM1) or 22 organic and inorganic (NCM2) chemicals detected in Northerners' blood during 2004-2005 in the presence or absence of low-density lipoprotein (1.5mg/ml), very-low-density lipoprotein (1.0mg/ml) and glucose (10mmol/L) (LVG), and in the absence or presence of 0.1% ethanol. After 24h of exposure, cell morphology and markers of cytotoxicity and endothelial function were examined. NCM1 treatment did not affect cell viability, but increased cell size, disrupted cell membrane integrity, and decreased cell density, uptake of small peptides, release of endothelin-1 (ET-1) and plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI), while causing no changes in endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) protein expression and nitric oxide (NO) release. In contrast, NCM2 decreased cell viability, total protein yield, uptake of small peptides, eNOS protein expression, and NO release and caused membrane damage, but caused no changes in the secretion of ET-1, prostacyclin and PAI. The presence of LVG and/or alcohol did or did not influence the effects of NCM1 or NCM2 depending on the endpoint and the mixture examined. These results suggested that the effects of one or one group of contaminants may be altered by the presence of other contaminants, and that with or without the interaction of high fat and sugar diet and/or ethanol exposure, NCMs at the concentrations used caused endothelial dysfunction in vitro. It remains to be investigated if these effects of NCMs also

  5. Flow “Fine” Synthesis: High Yielding and Selective Organic Synthesis by Flow Methods

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The concept of flow “fine” synthesis, that is, high yielding and selective organic synthesis by flow methods, is described. Some examples of flow “fine” synthesis of natural products and APIs are discussed. Flow methods have several advantages over batch methods in terms of environmental compatibility, efficiency, and safety. However, synthesis by flow methods is more difficult than synthesis by batch methods. Indeed, it has been considered that synthesis by flow methods can be applicable for the production of simple gasses but that it is difficult to apply to the synthesis of complex molecules such as natural products and APIs. Therefore, organic synthesis of such complex molecules has been conducted by batch methods. On the other hand, syntheses and reactions that attain high yields and high selectivities by flow methods are increasingly reported. Flow methods are leading candidates for the next generation of manufacturing methods that can mitigate environmental concerns toward sustainable society. PMID:26337828

  6. Flow "Fine" Synthesis: High Yielding and Selective Organic Synthesis by Flow Methods.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Shū

    2016-02-18

    The concept of flow "fine" synthesis, that is, high yielding and selective organic synthesis by flow methods, is described. Some examples of flow "fine" synthesis of natural products and APIs are discussed. Flow methods have several advantages over batch methods in terms of environmental compatibility, efficiency, and safety. However, synthesis by flow methods is more difficult than synthesis by batch methods. Indeed, it has been considered that synthesis by flow methods can be applicable for the production of simple gasses but that it is difficult to apply to the synthesis of complex molecules such as natural products and APIs. Therefore, organic synthesis of such complex molecules has been conducted by batch methods. On the other hand, syntheses and reactions that attain high yields and high selectivities by flow methods are increasingly reported. Flow methods are leading candidates for the next generation of manufacturing methods that can mitigate environmental concerns toward sustainable society.

  7. Characterization of aerobic ethanol productions in a computerized auxostat

    SciTech Connect

    Fraleigh, S.P.

    1989-01-01

    For many valuable bioproducts high productivity is associated with rapid growth. However, most continuous microbial cultures become unstable when the dilution rate is fixed near the value for maximum growth rate. The auxostat culture technique employs feedback control of a nutrient or metabolite to stabilize the biomass at its maximum potential growth rate. An auxostat device is therefore ideal for study of bioprocesses involving the overproduction of primary metabolites such as ethanol. Oxidoreductive transformations involving ethanol are utilized by Saccharomyces yeasts when normal respiration cannot satisfy energy needs. When rapid growth or other stress creates oxidoreductive conditions in aerobic Saccharomyces cultures, very high specific ethanol formation rates are established and biomass yield drops to levels more typical of anaerobic fermentation. Although the physiology is favorable, the potential for large-scale aerobic ethanol processes to compete with traditional anaerobic fermentations has not previously been assessed. In this study, a fully computerized auxostat device was constructed and used to characterize the specific and volumetric aerobic ethanol productivity of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. To divert substrate away from biomass and into product formation, aerobic cultures were stressed with variations of ionic balance (via extreme K{sup +} and H{sup +} setpoints) in the auxostat device. During growth with limiting K{sup +} concentrations, the goal of very low biomass yield was attained but the rate of ethanol production was poor. However, with excess K{sup +} the volumetric productivity reached 6.1 g/I,-h, a value that is comparable to optimized, continuous anaerobic cultures.

  8. Optimization of H2SO4-catalyzed hydrothermal pretreatment of rapeseed straw for bioconversion to ethanol: focusing on pretreatment at high solids content.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xuebin; Zhang, Yimin; Angelidaki, Irini

    2009-06-01

    A central composite design of response surface method was used to optimize H(2)SO(4)-catalyzed hydrothermal pretreatment of rapeseed straw, in respect to acid concentration (0.5-2%), treatment time (5-20 min) and solid content (10-20%) at 180 degrees C. Enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation were also measured to evaluate the optimal pretreatment conditions for maximizing ethanol production. The results showed that acid concentration and treatment time were more significant than solid content for optimization of xylose release and cellulose recovery. Pretreatment with 1% sulfuric acid and 20% solid content for 10 min at 180 degrees C was found to be the most optimal condition for pretreatment of rapeseed straw for ethanol production. After pretreatment at the optimal condition and enzymatic hydrolysis, 75.12% total xylan and 63.17% total glucan were converted to xylose and glucose, respectively. Finally, 66.79% of theoretical ethanol yielded after fermentation.

  9. Ultra-broadband nonlinear saturable absorption of high-yield MoS2 nanosheets.

    PubMed

    Wei, Rongfei; Zhang, Hang; Hu, Zhongliang; Qiao, Tian; He, Xin; Guo, Qiangbing; Tian, Xiangling; Chen, Zhi; Qiu, Jianrong

    2016-07-29

    High-yield MoS2 nanosheets with strong nonlinear optical (NLO) responses in a broad near-infrared range were synthesized by a facile hydrothermal method. The observation of saturable absorption, which was excited by the light with photon energy smaller than the gap energy of MoS2, can be attributed to the enhancement of the hybridization between the Mo d-orbital and S p-orbital by the oxygen incorporation into MoS2. High-yield MoS2 nanosheets with high modulation depth and large saturable intensity generated a stable, passively Q-switched fiber laser pulse at 1.56 μm. The high output power of 1.08 mW can be attained under a very low pump power of 30.87 mW. Compared to recently reported passively Q-switched fiber lasers utilizing exfoliated MoS2 nanosheets, the efficiency of the laser for our passive Q-switching operation is larger and reaches 3.50%. This research may extend the understanding on the NLO properties of MoS2 and indicate the feasibility of the high-yield MoS2 nanosheets to passively Q-switched fiber laser effectively at low pump strengths.

  10. Ultra-broadband nonlinear saturable absorption of high-yield MoS2 nanosheets.

    PubMed

    Wei, Rongfei; Zhang, Hang; Hu, Zhongliang; Qiao, Tian; He, Xin; Guo, Qiangbing; Tian, Xiangling; Chen, Zhi; Qiu, Jianrong

    2016-07-29

    High-yield MoS2 nanosheets with strong nonlinear optical (NLO) responses in a broad near-infrared range were synthesized by a facile hydrothermal method. The observation of saturable absorption, which was excited by the light with photon energy smaller than the gap energy of MoS2, can be attributed to the enhancement of the hybridization between the Mo d-orbital and S p-orbital by the oxygen incorporation into MoS2. High-yield MoS2 nanosheets with high modulation depth and large saturable intensity generated a stable, passively Q-switched fiber laser pulse at 1.56 μm. The high output power of 1.08 mW can be attained under a very low pump power of 30.87 mW. Compared to recently reported passively Q-switched fiber lasers utilizing exfoliated MoS2 nanosheets, the efficiency of the laser for our passive Q-switching operation is larger and reaches 3.50%. This research may extend the understanding on the NLO properties of MoS2 and indicate the feasibility of the high-yield MoS2 nanosheets to passively Q-switched fiber laser effectively at low pump strengths. PMID:27319573

  11. Ultra-broadband nonlinear saturable absorption of high-yield MoS2 nanosheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Rongfei; Zhang, Hang; Hu, Zhongliang; Qiao, Tian; He, Xin; Guo, Qiangbing; Tian, Xiangling; Chen, Zhi; Qiu, Jianrong

    2016-07-01

    High-yield MoS2 nanosheets with strong nonlinear optical (NLO) responses in a broad near-infrared range were synthesized by a facile hydrothermal method. The observation of saturable absorption, which was excited by the light with photon energy smaller than the gap energy of MoS2, can be attributed to the enhancement of the hybridization between the Mo d-orbital and S p-orbital by the oxygen incorporation into MoS2. High-yield MoS2 nanosheets with high modulation depth and large saturable intensity generated a stable, passively Q-switched fiber laser pulse at 1.56 μm. The high output power of 1.08 mW can be attained under a very low pump power of 30.87 mW. Compared to recently reported passively Q-switched fiber lasers utilizing exfoliated MoS2 nanosheets, the efficiency of the laser for our passive Q-switching operation is larger and reaches 3.50%. This research may extend the understanding on the NLO properties of MoS2 and indicate the feasibility of the high-yield MoS2 nanosheets to passively Q-switched fiber laser effectively at low pump strengths.

  12. Pyrolytic and oxidative syntheses of high-yield carbons from biomass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Xiangfeng

    A pressurized chemical reactor was designed and built per ASME code, which is capable of conducting pyrolysis, activation and gasification processes with an available volume of 7.2 L. It can operate at a pressure up to 3.5 MPa and the system provides a maximum saturated steam flow rate of 2.4 kg/hr at 5.4 MPa. With this reactor, the effects of moisture content, pressure and pretreatment of feedstock on synthesizing charcoal and its yields and properties were examined. Higher moisture content favors charcoal formation and leads to uniform properties of charcoal throughout the bed. However, it demands more external energy. Increase in operation pressure also favors higher yield of charcoal with reduced cook time, but not significantly for pressure above 1 MPa. Woods sorbed with CuSOsb4 and FeSOsb4 result in higher yield and/or better quality as well as short cook time. Charcoals from woods and nutshells have yields around 40% to 65% with a gross calorific value over 30 MJ/kg. A novel process for synthesizing high-yield activated carbon from Macshells was discovered, which involves air activation. Together with equations derived from energy balance, a model describing mass transport and reaction was developed for evaluating roles of diffusion in oxygenating biomass charcoal. Carbonization step is found necessary for subsequent oxygenation and activation in obtaining high-yield activated carbon. Both modeled and experimental results show no influence of mass transport in oxygenation at a temperature below 560 K, and good agreement in temperature rise due to reaction. Results from the kinetics model and the experiments indicate first-order reaction kinetics in oxygenation with respect to oxygen partial pressure. Evaluation on the values of increase in surface area (or iodine number) per carbon loss for activated carbon obtained by this process shows more effective use of carbon compared to the conventional method. Ultimate analyses show high carbon content and low ash

  13. Efficient two-step chemo-enzymatic synthesis of all-trans-retinyl palmitate with high substrate concentration and product yield.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhi-Qiang; Zhou, Ling-Mei; Liu, Peng; Baker, Peter James; Liu, Shan-Shan; Xue, Ya-Ping; Xu, Ming; Zheng, Yu-Guo

    2015-11-01

    A new two-step chemo-enzymatic approach for highly efficient synthesis of all-trans-retinyl palmitate is constructed in this study. In the first step, retinyl acetate as starting material was fully hydrolyzed to retinol by potassium hydroxide. In the hydrolysis system, anhydrous ethanol was the best co-solvent to increase the solubility of retinyl acetate. The addition amounts of 5 M potassium hydroxide and anhydrous ethanol were 8 and 10 mL against 10 g retinyl acetate, respectively, and 100 % hydrolysis rate was obtained. In the second step, esterification was catalyzed by immobilized lipase on macroporous acrylic resin AB-8 using the extracted retinol and palmitic acid as substrates in non-aqueous system. After optimization, the parameters of esterification reaction were confirmed as follows: non-aqueous solvent was selected as n-hexane, washing times of extraction solution was four times, retinol concentration was 300 g/L, substrate molar ratio of retinol to palmitic acid was 1:1.1, the amount of immobilized enzyme was 10 g/L, and the esterification temperature was 30 °C. Under the optimal conditions, this protocol resulted in a 97.5 % yield of all-trans-retinyl palmitate in 700-L reactor. After purification, all-trans-retinyl palmitate was obtained with above 99 % of purity and 88 % of total recovery rate. This methodology provides a promising strategy for the large-scale production of all-trans-retinyl palmitate.

  14. Efficient two-step chemo-enzymatic synthesis of all-trans-retinyl palmitate with high substrate concentration and product yield.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhi-Qiang; Zhou, Ling-Mei; Liu, Peng; Baker, Peter James; Liu, Shan-Shan; Xue, Ya-Ping; Xu, Ming; Zheng, Yu-Guo

    2015-11-01

    A new two-step chemo-enzymatic approach for highly efficient synthesis of all-trans-retinyl palmitate is constructed in this study. In the first step, retinyl acetate as starting material was fully hydrolyzed to retinol by potassium hydroxide. In the hydrolysis system, anhydrous ethanol was the best co-solvent to increase the solubility of retinyl acetate. The addition amounts of 5 M potassium hydroxide and anhydrous ethanol were 8 and 10 mL against 10 g retinyl acetate, respectively, and 100 % hydrolysis rate was obtained. In the second step, esterification was catalyzed by immobilized lipase on macroporous acrylic resin AB-8 using the extracted retinol and palmitic acid as substrates in non-aqueous system. After optimization, the parameters of esterification reaction were confirmed as follows: non-aqueous solvent was selected as n-hexane, washing times of extraction solution was four times, retinol concentration was 300 g/L, substrate molar ratio of retinol to palmitic acid was 1:1.1, the amount of immobilized enzyme was 10 g/L, and the esterification temperature was 30 °C. Under the optimal conditions, this protocol resulted in a 97.5 % yield of all-trans-retinyl palmitate in 700-L reactor. After purification, all-trans-retinyl palmitate was obtained with above 99 % of purity and 88 % of total recovery rate. This methodology provides a promising strategy for the large-scale production of all-trans-retinyl palmitate. PMID:26224426

  15. Surface studies and implanted helium measurements following NOVA high-yield DT experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Stoyer, M.A.; Hudson, G.B.

    1997-02-18

    This paper presents the results of three March 6, 1996 direct-drive high-yield DT NOVA experiments and provides `proof-of-principal` results for the quantitative measurement of energetic He ions. Semiconductor quality Si wafers and an amorphous carbon wafer were exposed to NOVA high-yield implosions. Surface damage was sub-micron in general, although the surface ablation was slightly greater for the carbon wafer than for the Si wafers. Melting of a thin ({approx} 0.1{mu}) layer of Si was evident from microscopic investigation. Electron microscopy indicated melted blobs of many different metals (e.g. Al, Au, Ta, Fe alloys, Cu and even Cd) on the surfaces. The yield measured by determining the numbers of atoms of implanted {sup 4}He and {sup 3}He indicate the number of DT fusions to be 9.1({plus_minus}2.3) X 10{sup 12} and DD fusions to be 4.8({plus_minus}1.0) x 10{sup 10}, respectively. The helium DT fusion yield is slightly lower than that of the Cu activation measurement, which was 1.3({plus_minus}0.l) x 10{sup 13} DT fusions.

  16. Highly Active Iridium/Iridium Tin/Tin Oxide Heterogeneous Nanoparticles as Alternative Electrocatalysts for the Ethanol Oxidation Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Du W.; Su D.; Wang Q.; Saxner D.; Deskins N.A.; Krzanowski J.E.; Frenkel A.I.; Teng X.

    2011-08-03

    Ethanol is a promising fuel for low-temperature direct fuel cell reactions due to its low toxicity, ease of storage and transportation, high-energy density, and availability from biomass. However, the implementation of ethanol fuel cell technology has been hindered by the lack of low-cost, highly active anode catalysts. In this paper, we have studied Iridium (Ir)-based binary catalysts as low-cost alternative electrocatalysts replacing platinum (Pt)-based catalysts for the direct ethanol fuel cell (DEFC) reaction. We report the synthesis of carbon supported Ir{sub 71}Sn{sub 29} catalysts with an average diameter of 2.7 {+-} 0.6 nm through a 'surfactant-free' wet chemistry approach. The complementary characterization techniques, including aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy equipped with electron energy loss spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy, are used to identify the 'real' heterogeneous structure of Ir{sub 71}Sn{sub 29}/C particles as Ir/Ir-Sn/SnO{sub 2}, which consists of an Ir-rich core and an Ir-Sn alloy shell with SnO{sub 2} present on the surface. The Ir{sub 71}Sn{sub 29}/C heterogeneous catalyst exhibited high electrochemical activity toward the ethanol oxidation reaction compared to the commercial Pt/C (ETEK), PtRu/C (Johnson Matthey) as well as PtSn/C catalysts. Electrochemical measurements and density functional theory calculations demonstrate that the superior electro-activity is directly related to the high degree of Ir-Sn alloy formation as well as the existence of nonalloyed SnO{sub 2} on surface. Our cross-disciplinary work, from novel 'surfactant-free' synthesis of Ir-Sn catalysts, theoretical simulations, and catalytic measurements to the characterizations of 'real' heterogeneous nanostructures, will not only highlight the intriguing structure-property correlations in nanosized catalysts but also have a transformative impact on the commercialization of DEFC

  17. Fuel ethanol

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-02-01

    This report discusses the Omnibus Trade and Competitiveness Act of 1988 which requires GAO to examine fuel ethanol imports from Central America and the Caribbean and their impact on the U.S. fuel ethanol industry. Ethanol is the alcohol in beverages, such as beer, wine, and whiskey. It can also be used as a fuel by blending with gasoline. It can be made from renewable resources, such as corn, wheat, grapes, and sugarcane, through a process of fermentation. This report finds that, given current sugar and gasoline prices, it is not economically feasible for Caribbean ethanol producers to meet the current local feedstock requirement.

  18. Ethanol fermentation in an immobilized cell reactor using Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Najafpour, Ghasem; Younesi, Habibollah; Syahidah Ku Ismail, Ku

    2004-05-01

    Fermentation of sugar by Saccharomyces cerevisiae, for production of ethanol in an immobilized cell reactor (ICR) was successfully carried out to improve the performance of the fermentation process. The fermentation set-up was comprised of a column packed with beads of immobilized cells. The immobilization of S. cerevisiae was simply performed by the enriched cells cultured media harvested at exponential growth phase. The fixed cell loaded ICR was carried out at initial stage of operation and the cell was entrapped by calcium alginate. The production of ethanol was steady after 24 h of operation. The concentration of ethanol was affected by the media flow rates and residence time distribution from 2 to 7 h. In addition, batch fermentation was carried out with 50 g/l glucose concentration. Subsequently, the ethanol productions and the reactor productivities of batch fermentation and immobilized cells were compared. In batch fermentation, sugar consumption and ethanol production obtained were 99.6% and 12.5% v/v after 27 h while in the ICR, 88.2% and 16.7% v/v were obtained with 6 h retention time. Nearly 5% ethanol production was achieved with high glucose concentration (150 g/l) at 6 h retention time. A yield of 38% was obtained with 150 g/l glucose. The yield was improved approximately 27% on ICR and a 24 h fermentation time was reduced to 7 h. The cell growth rate was based on the Monod rate equation. The kinetic constants (K(s) and mu(m)) of batch fermentation were 2.3 g/l and 0.35 g/lh, respectively. The maximum yield of biomass on substrate (Y(X-S)) and the maximum yield of product on substrate (Y(P-S)) in batch fermentations were 50.8% and 31.2% respectively. Productivity of the ICR were 1.3, 2.3, and 2.8 g/lh for 25, 35, 50 g/l of glucose concentration, respectively. The productivity of ethanol in batch fermentation with 50 g/l glucose was calculated as 0.29 g/lh. Maximum production of ethanol in ICR when compared to batch reactor has shown to increase

  19. High liquid fuel yielding biofuel processes and a roadmap for the future transportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Navneet R.

    In a fossil-fuel deprived world when crude oil will be scarce and transportation need cannot be met with electricity and transportation liquid fuel must be produced, biomass derived liquid fuels can be a natural replacement. However, the carbon efficiency of the currently known biomass to liquid fuel conversion processes ranges from 35-40%, yielding 90 ethanol gallon equivalents (ege) per ton of biomass. This coupled with the fact that the efficiency at which solar energy is captured by biomass (<1%) is significantly lower than H 2 (10-27%) and electricity (20-42%), implies that sufficient land area is not available to meet the need for the entire transportation sector. To counter this dilemma, a number of processes have been proposed in this work: a hybrid hydrogen-carbon (H2CAR) process based on biomass gasification followed by the Fischer-Tropsch process such that 100% carbon efficiency is achieved yielding 330 ege/ton biomass using hydrogen derived from a carbon-free energy. The hydrogen requirement for the H2CAR process is 0.33 kg/liter of diesel. To decrease the hydrogen requirement associated with the H2CAR process, a hydrogen bio-oil (H2Bioil) process based on biomass fast-hydropyrolysis/hydrodeoxygenation is proposed which can achieve liquid fuel yield of 215 ege/ton consuming 0.11 kg hydrogen per liter of oil. Due to the lower hydrogen consumption of the H2Bioil process, synergistically integrated transition pathways are feasible where hot syngas derived from coal gasification (H2Bioil-C) or a natural gas reformer (H 2Bioil-NG) is used to supply the hydrogen and process heat for the biomass fast-hydropyrolysis/hydrodeoxygenation. Another off-shoot of the H2Bioil process is the H2Bioil-B process, where hydrogen required for the hydropyrolysis is obtained from gasification of a fraction of the biomass. H2Bioil-B achieves the highest liquid fuel yield (126-146 ege/ton of biomass) reported in the literature for any self-contained conversion of biomass to

  20. Optimization of ethanol production from microfluidized wheat straw by response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Turhan, Ozge; Isci, Asli; Mert, Behic; Sakiyan, Ozge; Donmez, Sedat

    2015-01-01

    In this study, wheat straw was pretreated with a microfluidizer to improve its enzymatic hydrolysis and ethanol yields. The pretreatment was performed at various pressures (500, 1000, and 1500 bar) and solid loadings (1, 2, and 3%). The microfluidized biomass was then subjected to hydrolysis and simultaneous saccharification and co-fermentation (SSCF) experiments at different enzyme loadings (5, 10, and 15 FPU/g dry wheat straw) using a mutant yeast. The results indicated that the microfluidization method alters the structure of biomass and leads to a reduction in lignin content. The samples pretreated at 1% solid loading contained the minimum lignin concentration and provided the maximum sugar and ethanol yields. These results signified that the microfluidization method is more effective on biomass at low solid loadings. The process conditions were optimized for higher ethanol and sugar yields using response surface methodology (RSM). The optimum pressure and solid and enzyme loadings were found as 1500 bar, 1%, and 15 FPU/g dry wheat straw, respectively. The yields obtained at this condition were 82%, 94%, and 65% for glucose, xylose, and ethanol, respectively. High sugar yields implied that microfluidization is an effective pretreatment method for cellulosic ethanol production. On the other hand, low ethanol yield may indicate that the microorganism was sensitive to inhibitory compounds present in the fermentation medium. PMID:25181638

  1. Optimization of ethanol production from microfluidized wheat straw by response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Turhan, Ozge; Isci, Asli; Mert, Behic; Sakiyan, Ozge; Donmez, Sedat

    2015-01-01

    In this study, wheat straw was pretreated with a microfluidizer to improve its enzymatic hydrolysis and ethanol yields. The pretreatment was performed at various pressures (500, 1000, and 1500 bar) and solid loadings (1, 2, and 3%). The microfluidized biomass was then subjected to hydrolysis and simultaneous saccharification and co-fermentation (SSCF) experiments at different enzyme loadings (5, 10, and 15 FPU/g dry wheat straw) using a mutant yeast. The results indicated that the microfluidization method alters the structure of biomass and leads to a reduction in lignin content. The samples pretreated at 1% solid loading contained the minimum lignin concentration and provided the maximum sugar and ethanol yields. These results signified that the microfluidization method is more effective on biomass at low solid loadings. The process conditions were optimized for higher ethanol and sugar yields using response surface methodology (RSM). The optimum pressure and solid and enzyme loadings were found as 1500 bar, 1%, and 15 FPU/g dry wheat straw, respectively. The yields obtained at this condition were 82%, 94%, and 65% for glucose, xylose, and ethanol, respectively. High sugar yields implied that microfluidization is an effective pretreatment method for cellulosic ethanol production. On the other hand, low ethanol yield may indicate that the microorganism was sensitive to inhibitory compounds present in the fermentation medium.

  2. Designing a high-yielding maize ideotype for a changing climate in Lombardy plain (northern Italy).

    PubMed

    Perego, Alessia; Sanna, Mattia; Giussani, Andrea; Chiodini, Marcello Ermido; Fumagalli, Mattia; Pilu, Salvatore Roberto; Bindi, Marco; Moriondo, Marco; Acutis, Marco

    2014-11-15

    The expected climate change will affect the maize yields in view of air temperature increase and scarce water availability. The application of biophysical models offers the chance to design a drought-resistant ideotype and to assist plant breeders and agronomists in the assessment of its suitability in future scenarios. The aim of the present work was to perform a model-based estimation of the yields of two hybrids, current vs ideotype, under future climate scenarios (2030-2060 and 2070-2100) in Lombardy (northern Italy), testing two options of irrigation (small amount at fixed dates vs optimal water supply), nitrogen (N) fertilization (300 vs 400 kg N ha(-1)), and crop cycle durations (current vs extended). For the designing of the ideotype we set several parameters of the ARMOSA process-based crop model: the root elongation rate and maximum depth, stomatal resistance, four stage-specific crop coefficients for the actual transpiration estimation, and drought tolerance factor. The work findings indicated that the current hybrid ensures good production only with high irrigation amount (245-565 mm y(-1)). With respect to the current hybrid, the ideotype will require less irrigation water (-13%, p<0.01) and it resulted in significantly higher yield under water stress condition (+15%, p<0.01) and optimal water supply (+2%, p<0.05). The elongated cycle has a positive effect on yield under any combination of options. Moreover, higher yields projected for the ideotype implicate more crop residues to be incorporated into the soil, which are positively correlated with the SOC sequestration and negatively with N leaching. The crop N uptake is expected to be adequate in view of higher rate of soil mineralization; the N fertilization rate of 400 kg N ha(-1) will involve significant increasing of grain yield, and it is expected to involve a higher rate of SOC sequestration. PMID:24913890

  3. Metabolic engineering of biomass for high energy density: oilseed-like triacylglycerol yields from plant leaves.

    PubMed

    Vanhercke, Thomas; El Tahchy, Anna; Liu, Qing; Zhou, Xue-Rong; Shrestha, Pushkar; Divi, Uday K; Ral, Jean-Philippe; Mansour, Maged P; Nichols, Peter D; James, Christopher N; Horn, Patrick J; Chapman, Kent D; Beaudoin, Frederic; Ruiz-López, Noemi; Larkin, Philip J; de Feyter, Robert C; Singh, Surinder P; Petrie, James R

    2014-02-01

    High biomass crops have recently attracted significant attention as an alternative platform for the renewable production of high energy storage lipids such as triacylglycerol (TAG). While TAG typically accumulates in seeds as storage compounds fuelling subsequent germination, levels in vegetative tissues are generally low. Here, we report the accumulation of more than 15% TAG (17.7% total lipids) by dry weight in Nicotiana tabacum (tobacco) leaves by the co-expression of three genes involved in different aspects of TAG production without severely impacting plant development. These yields far exceed the levels found in wild-type leaf tissue as well as previously reported engineered TAG yields in vegetative tissues of Arabidopsis thaliana and N. tabacum. When translated to a high biomass crop, the current levels would translate to an oil yield per hectare that exceeds those of most cultivated oilseed crops. Confocal fluorescence microscopy and mass spectrometry imaging confirmed the accumulation of TAG within leaf mesophyll cells. In addition, we explored the applicability of several existing oil-processing methods using fresh leaf tissue. Our results demonstrate the technical feasibility of a vegetative plant oil production platform and provide for a step change in the bioenergy landscape, opening new prospects for sustainable food, high energy forage, biofuel and biomaterial applications.

  4. Low LET radiolysis escape yields for reducing radicals and H2 in pressurized high temperature water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterniczuk, Marcin; Yakabuskie, Pamela A.; Wren, J. Clara; Jacob, Jasmine A.; Bartels, David M.

    2016-04-01

    Low Linear Energy Transfer (LET) radiolysis escape yields (G values) are reported for the sum (G(radH)+G(e-)aq) and for G(H2) in subcritical water up to 350 °C. The scavenger system 1-10 mM acetate/0.001 M hydroxide/0.00048 M N2O was used with simultaneous mass spectroscopic detection of H2 and N2 product. Temperature-dependent measurements were carried out with 2.5 MeV electrons from a van de Graaff accelerator, while room temperature calibration measurements were done with a 60Co gamma source. The concentrations and dose range were carefully chosen so that initial spur chemistry is not perturbed and the N2 product yield corresponds to those reducing radicals that escape recombination in pure water. In comparison with a recent review recommendation of Elliot and Bartels (AECL report 153-127160-450-001, 2009), the measured reducing radical yield is seven percent smaller at room temperature but in fairly good agreement above 150 °C. The H2 escape yield is in good agreement throughout the temperature range with several previous studies that used much larger radical scavenging rates. Previous analysis of earlier high temperature measurements of Gesc(radOH) is shown to be flawed, although the actual G values may be nearly correct. The methodology used in the present report greatly reduces the range of possible error and puts the high temperature escape yields for low-LET radiation on a much firmer quantitative foundation than was previously available.

  5. Thin scintillating tiles (with fiber readout and high light-yield) for the OPAL endcaps

    SciTech Connect

    Ball, A.H.

    1998-11-01

    Scintillating tiles with embedded wavelength-shifting fiber readout have recently been installed in the OPAL endcaps to improve trigger performance, time resolution and hermeticity for experiments at LEP II. The design is constrained to provide hermetic coverage of the available area with high single particle efficiency, uniform response and good time resolution, notwithstanding the limited space for the detector and its long readout cables, and despite the strong endcap magnetic field. A high light yield per embedded fiber is required. This paper motivates and describes the design, and demonstrates that the performance meets the required targets. A light yield of 14 photoelectrons/MIP and a time resolution of 3ns have been obtained during 1997 LEP operation. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  6. Thin scintillating tiles (with fiber readout and high light-yield) for the OPAL endcaps

    SciTech Connect

    Ball, Austin H.

    1998-11-09

    Scintillating tiles with embedded wavelength-shifting fiber readout have recently been installed in the OPAL endcaps to improve trigger performance, time resolution and hermeticity for experiments at LEP II. The design is constrained to provide hermetic coverage of the available area with high single particle efficiency, uniform response and good time resolution, notwithstanding the limited space for the detector and its long readout cables, and despite the strong endcap magnetic field. A high light yield per embedded fiber is required. This paper motivates and describes the design, and demonstrates that the performance meets the required targets. A light yield of 14 photoelectrons/MIP and a time resolution of 3ns have been obtained during 1997 LEP operation.

  7. High-yield isolation and subcellular proteomic characterization of nuclear and subnuclear structures from trypanosomes.

    PubMed

    DeGrasse, Jeffrey A; Chait, Brian T; Field, Mark C; Rout, Michael P

    2008-01-01

    The vast evolutionary distance between the Opisthokonta (animals and yeast) and the excavata (a major group of protists, including Giardia and Trypanosoma) presents a significant challenge to in silico functional genomics and ortholog identification. Subcellular proteomic identification of the constituents of highly enriched organelles can alleviate this problem by both providing localization evidence and yielding a manageably sized proteome for detailed in silico functional assignment. We describe a method for the high-yield isolation of nuclei from the kinetoplastid Trypanosoma brucei. We also describe the subsequent purification of subnuclear compartments, including the nuclear envelope and nucleolus. Finally, using several proteomic strategies, we survey the proteome of a subcellular structure or organelle, using the nuclear pore complex as an example.

  8. A simple, high-yield, apparatus for NEG coating of vacuum beamline elements

    SciTech Connect

    Ron, Guy; Oort, Ron; Lee, Daniel

    2010-12-01

    Non-Evaporable Getter (NEG) materials are extremely useful in vacuum systems for achieving Ultra High Vacuum. Recently, these materials have been used to coat the inner surfaces of vacuum components, acting as an internal, passive, vacuum pump. We have constructed a low cost apparatus, which allows coating of very small diameter vacuum tubes, used as differential pumping stages. Despite the relative ease of construction, we are routinely able to achieve high coating yields. We further describe an improvement to our system, which is able to achieve the same yield, at an even lower complexity by using an easily manufactured permanent magnet arrangement. The designs described are extendible to virtually any combination of length and diameter of the components to be coated.

  9. Bacillus subtilis endospores at high purity and recovery yields: optimization of growth conditions and purification method.

    PubMed

    Tavares, Milene B; Souza, Renata D; Luiz, Wilson B; Cavalcante, Rafael C M; Casaroli, Caroline; Martins, Eduardo G; Ferreira, Rita C C; Ferreira, Luís C S

    2013-03-01

    Bacillus subtilis endospores have applications in different fields including their use as probiotics and antigen delivery vectors. Such specialized applications frequently require highly purified spore preparations. Nonetheless, quantitative data regarding both yields and purity of B. subtilis endospores after application of different growth conditions and purification methods are scarce or poorly reported. In the present study, we conducted several quantitative and qualitative analyses of growth conditions and purification procedures aiming generation of purified B. subtilis spores. Based on two growth media and different incubations conditions, sporulation frequencies up to 74.2 % and spore concentrations up to 7 × 10(9) spores/ml were achieved. Application of a simplified spore isolation method, in which samples were incubated with lysozyme and a detergent, resulted in preparations with highly purified spores at the highest yields. The present study represents, therefore, an important contribution for those working with B. subtilis endospores for different biotechnological purposes.

  10. Fermentation to ethanol of pentose-containing spent sulphite liquor

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, S.; Wayman, M.; Parekh, S.K.

    1987-06-01

    Ethanolic fermentation of spent sulphite liquor with ordinary bakers' yeast is incomplete because this yeast cannot ferment the pentose sugars in the liquor. This results in poor alcohol yields, and a residual effluent problem. By using the yeast Candida shehatae (R) for fermentation of the spent sulphite liquor from a large Canadian alcohol-producing sulphite pulp and paper mill, pentoses as well as hexoses were fermented nearly completely, alcohol yields were raised by 33%, and sugar removal increased by 46%. Inhibitors were removed prior to fermentation by steam stripping. Major benefits were obtained by careful recycling of this yeast, which was shown to be tolerant both of high sugar concentrations and high alcohol concentrations. When sugar concentrations over 250 g/L (glucose:xylose 70:30) were fermented, ethanol became an inhibitor when its concentration reached 90 g/L. However, when the ethanol was removed by low-temperature vacuum distillation, fermentation continued and resulted in a yield of 0.50 g ethanol/g sugar consumed. Further improvement was achieved by combining enzyme saccharification of sugar oligomers with fermentation. This yeast is able to ferment both hexoses and pentoses simultaneously, efficiently, and rapidly. Present indications are that it is well suited to industrial operations wherever hexoses and pentoses are both to be fermented to ethanol, for example, in wood hydrolysates. (Refs. 6).

  11. Fluoro-Julia Olefination as a Mild, High-Yielding Route to α-Fluoro Acrylonitriles†

    PubMed Central

    del Solar, Maria; Ghosh, Arun K.; Zajc, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    Synthesis of a novel, stable reagent (1,3-benzothiazol-2-ylsulfonyl)fluoroacetonitrile from readily available ethyl α-(1,3-benzothiazol-2-ylsulfanyl)- α-fluoroacetate is reported. Aldehydes undergo condensations with (1,3-benzothiazol-2-ylsulfonyl)fluoroacetonitrile in the presence of DBU leading to α-fluoro acrylonitriles in high yields and with good Z-stereoselectivity. Lowering of reaction temperature increases the Z selectivity. PMID:18841918

  12. Novel endophytic yeast Rhodotorula mucilaginosa strain PTD3 I: production of xylitol and ethanol.

    PubMed

    Bura, Renata; Vajzovic, Azra; Doty, Sharon L

    2012-07-01

    An endophytic yeast, Rhodotorula mucilaginosa strain PTD3, that was isolated from stems of hybrid poplar was found to be capable of production of xylitol from xylose, of ethanol from glucose, galactose, and mannose, and of arabitol from arabinose. The utilization of 30 g/L of each of the five sugars during fermentation by PTD3 was studied in liquid batch cultures. Glucose-acclimated PTD3 produced enhanced yields of xylitol (67% of theoretical yield) from xylose and of ethanol (84, 86, and 94% of theoretical yield, respectively) from glucose, galactose, and mannose. Additionally, this yeast was capable of metabolizing high concentrations of mixed sugars (150 g/L), with high yields of xylitol (61% of theoretical yield) and ethanol (83% of theoretical yield). A 1:1 glucose:xylose ratio with 30 g/L of each during double sugar fermentation did not affect PTD3's ability to produce high yields of xylitol (65% of theoretical yield) and ethanol (92% of theoretical yield). Surprisingly, the highest yields of xylitol (76% of theoretical yield) and ethanol (100% of theoretical yield) were observed during fermentation of sugars present in the lignocellulosic hydrolysate obtained after steam pretreatment of a mixture of hybrid poplar and Douglas fir. PTD3 demonstrated an exceptional ability to ferment the hydrolysate, overcome hexose repression of xylose utilization with a short lag period of 10 h, and tolerate sugar degradation products. In direct comparison, PTD3 had higher xylitol yields from the mixed sugar hydrolysate compared with the widely studied and used xylitol producer Candida guilliermondii.

  13. Development of High Yield Feedstocks and Biomass Conversion Technology for Renewable Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, Andrew G.; Crow, Susan; DeBeryshe, Barbara; Ha, Richard; Jakeway, Lee; Khanal, Samir; Nakahata, Mae; Ogoshi, Richard; Shimizu, Erik; Stern, Ivette; Turano, Brian; Turn, Scott; Yanagida, John

    2015-04-09

    This project had two main goals. The first goal was to evaluate several high yielding tropical perennial grasses as feedstock for biofuel production, and to characterize the feedstock for compatible biofuel production systems. The second goal was to assess the integration of renewable energy systems for Hawaii. The project focused on high-yield grasses (napiergrass, energycane, sweet sorghum, and sugarcane). Field plots were established to evaluate the effects of elevation (30, 300 and 900 meters above sea level) and irrigation (50%, 75% and 100% of sugarcane plantation practice) on energy crop yields and input. The test plots were extensive monitored including: hydrologic studies to measure crop water use and losses through seepage and evapotranspiration; changes in soil carbon stock; greenhouse gas flux (CO2, CH4, and N2O) from the soil surface; and root morphology, biomass, and turnover. Results showed significant effects of environment on crop yields. In general, crop yields decrease as the elevation increased, being more pronounced for sweet sorghum and energycane than napiergrass. Also energy crop yields were higher with increased irrigation levels, being most pronounced with energycane and less so with sweet sorghum. Daylight length greatly affected sweet sorghum growth and yields. One of the energy crops (napiergrass) was harvested at different ages (2, 4, 6, and 8 months) to assess the changes in feedstock characteristics with age and potential to generate co-products. Although there was greater potential for co-products from younger feedstock, the increased production was not sufficient to offset the additional cost of harvesting multiple times per year. The feedstocks were also characterized to assess their compatibility with biochemical and thermochemical conversion processes. The project objectives are being continued through additional support from the Office of Naval Research, and the Biomass Research and Development

  14. Effects of fenfluramine, 8-OH-DPAT, and tryptophan-enriched diet on the high-ethanol intake by rats bred for susceptibility to stress.

    PubMed

    West, Charles H K; Boss-Williams, Katherine A; Weiss, Jay M

    2011-12-01

    The swim-test susceptible (SUS) line of rats has been bred in our laboratory for the characteristic of reduced motor activity in the swim test following exposure to an acute stressor. Testing of multiple generations of SUS rats has also revealed that they consume large amounts of ethanol voluntarily. As reported for lines of rats that show a propensity for high-ethanol intake, the SUS rats show evidence of low serotonergic function. Because serotonergic function has often been shown to be involved in the regulation of alcohol consumption, here we examined the effects of manipulations of serotonin transmission on intake of ethanol by SUS rats. Fenfluramine, a serotonin-releasing drug, was injected at various doses (0.625, 1.25, 2.5, and 5.0mg/kg) twice per day and ethanol intake was measured using a two-bottle free-choice method. The 8-OH-DPAT, a 5‑HT(1A) agonist, was injected at various doses (0.03125, 0.0625, 0.125, 0.25, 0.5, and 1.0mg/kg) before a 1-h session of exposure to ethanol (single-bottle test, water available the other 23h per day). A diet enriched with 3% tryptophan (TRP), the amino acid precursor for serotonin synthesis, was administered in a restricted feeding schedule (5h per day) with ethanol intake measured the last 4h. Fenfluramine decreased ethanol intake at all doses tested. The 8-OH-DPAT increased ethanol intake at lower doses, presumably acting at autoreceptors, which inhibit serotonergic neurons, and decreased intake at higher doses, presumably acting at postsynaptic 5-HT(1A) receptors. TRP-enriched diet also significantly decreased ethanol intake. Food and water intake were less or unaffected by these three manipulations. With all three manipulations, ethanol intake remained suppressed one or more days after the day of tests that decreased ethanol intake. These data suggest that SUS rats, like many other lines/strains of rodents that consume large amounts of alcohol, show an inverse relationship between serotonin transmission and

  15. Effects of fenfluramine, 8-OH-DPAT, and tryptophan-enriched diet on the high-ethanol intake by rats bred for susceptibility to stress.

    PubMed

    West, Charles H K; Boss-Williams, Katherine A; Weiss, Jay M

    2011-12-01

    The swim-test susceptible (SUS) line of rats has been bred in our laboratory for the characteristic of reduced motor activity in the swim test following exposure to an acute stressor. Testing of multiple generations of SUS rats has also revealed that they consume large amounts of ethanol voluntarily. As reported for lines of rats that show a propensity for high-ethanol intake, the SUS rats show evidence of low serotonergic function. Because serotonergic function has often been shown to be involved in the regulation of alcohol consumption, here we examined the effects of manipulations of serotonin transmission on intake of ethanol by SUS rats. Fenfluramine, a serotonin-releasing drug, was injected at various doses (0.625, 1.25, 2.5, and 5.0mg/kg) twice per day and ethanol intake was measured using a two-bottle free-choice method. The 8-OH-DPAT, a 5‑HT(1A) agonist, was injected at various doses (0.03125, 0.0625, 0.125, 0.25, 0.5, and 1.0mg/kg) before a 1-h session of exposure to ethanol (single-bottle test, water available the other 23h per day). A diet enriched with 3% tryptophan (TRP), the amino acid precursor for serotonin synthesis, was administered in a restricted feeding schedule (5h per day) with ethanol intake measured the last 4h. Fenfluramine decreased ethanol intake at all doses tested. The 8-OH-DPAT increased ethanol intake at lower doses, presumably acting at autoreceptors, which inhibit serotonergic neurons, and decreased intake at higher doses, presumably acting at postsynaptic 5-HT(1A) receptors. TRP-enriched diet also significantly decreased ethanol intake. Food and water intake were less or unaffected by these three manipulations. With all three manipulations, ethanol intake remained suppressed one or more days after the day of tests that decreased ethanol intake. These data suggest that SUS rats, like many other lines/strains of rodents that consume large amounts of alcohol, show an inverse relationship between serotonin transmission and

  16. Epidemiology and impact of Fasciola hepatica exposure in high-yielding dairy herds

    PubMed Central

    Howell, Alison; Baylis, Matthew; Smith, Rob; Pinchbeck, Gina; Williams, Diana

    2015-01-01

    The liver fluke Fasciola hepatica is a trematode parasite with a worldwide distribution and is the cause of important production losses in the dairy industry. The aim of this observational study was to assess the prevalence of exposure to F. hepatica in a group of high yielding dairy herds, to determine the risk factors and investigate their associations with production and fertility parameters. Bulk milk tank samples from 606 herds that supply a single retailer with liquid milk were tested with an antibody ELISA for F. hepatica. Multivariable linear regression was used to investigate the effect of farm management and environmental risk factors on F. hepatica exposure. Higher rainfall, grazing boggy pasture, presence of beef cattle on farm, access to a stream or pond and smaller herd size were associated with an increased risk of exposure. Univariable regression was used to look for associations between fluke exposure and production-related variables including milk yield, composition, somatic cell count and calving index. Although causation cannot be assumed, a significant (p < 0.001) negative association was seen between F. hepatica exposure and estimated milk yield at the herd level, representing a 15% decrease in yield for an increase in F. hepatica exposure from the 25th to the 75th percentile. This remained significant when fertility, farm management and environmental factors were controlled for. No associations were found between F. hepatica exposure and any of the other production, disease or fertility variables. PMID:26093971

  17. A novel medium devoid of ruminant peptone for high yield growth of Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Patel, Hiren; Mackintosh, David; Ayling, Roger D; Nicholas, Robin A J; Fielder, Mark D

    2008-03-18

    Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae is considered an emerging veterinary pathogen causing pneumonia in sheep and goats worldwide. Currently it has not been possible to define a growth medium that yields the maximum growth of M. ovipneumoniae within a short incubation period. Growth yields of M. ovipneumoniae in Eaton's medium are variable and not as consistently high as those seen with other Mycoplasma spp. This study investigated the ability of different M. ovipneumoniae field strains to grow in various media formulations, where PPLO broth was replaced by a vegetable protein source, and comparisons were made in terms of strain viability in Eaton's medium. Studies were also conducted to determine the optimal carbohydrate source for use in the M. ovipneumoniae medium. Generally, it was found that different strains showed good growth in all media tested, with growth yields at 24h in TSB-1 medium higher than those observed with Eaton's medium. Growth yields reached 10(8) to 10(9)cfu ml(-1) within 24h for particular field strains, with all strains achieving this growth level within 48-72h.

  18. Epidemiology and impact of Fasciola hepatica exposure in high-yielding dairy herds.

    PubMed

    Howell, Alison; Baylis, Matthew; Smith, Rob; Pinchbeck, Gina; Williams, Diana

    2015-09-01

    The liver fluke Fasciola hepatica is a trematode parasite with a worldwide distribution and is the cause of important production losses in the dairy industry. The aim of this observational study was to assess the prevalence of exposure to F. hepatica in a group of high yielding dairy herds, to determine the risk factors and investigate their associations with production and fertility parameters. Bulk milk tank samples from 606 herds that supply a single retailer with liquid milk were tested with an antibody ELISA for F. hepatica. Multivariable linear regression was used to investigate the effect of farm management and environmental risk factors on F. hepatica exposure. Higher rainfall, grazing boggy pasture, presence of beef cattle on farm, access to a stream or pond and smaller herd size were associated with an increased risk of exposure. Univariable regression was used to look for associations between fluke exposure and production-related variables including milk yield, composition, somatic cell count and calving index. Although causation cannot be assumed, a significant (p<0.001) negative association was seen between F. hepatica exposure and estimated milk yield at the herd level, representing a 15% decrease in yield for an increase in F. hepatica exposure from the 25th to the 75th percentile. This remained significant when fertility, farm management and environmental factors were controlled for. No associations were found between F. hepatica exposure and any of the other production, disease or fertility variables.

  19. Physiology, Genomics, and Pathway Engineering of an Ethanol-Tolerant Strain of Clostridium phytofermentans.

    PubMed

    Tolonen, Andrew C; Zuroff, Trevor R; Ramya, Mohandass; Boutard, Magali; Cerisy, Tristan; Curtis, Wayne R

    2015-08-15

    Novel processing strategies for hydrolysis and fermentation of lignocellulosic biomass in a single reactor offer large potential cost savings for production of biocommodities and biofuels. One critical challenge is retaining high enzyme production in the presence of elevated product titers. Toward this goal, the cellulolytic, ethanol-producing bacterium Clostridium phytofermentans was adapted to increased ethanol concentrations. The resulting ethanol-tolerant (ET) strain has nearly doubled ethanol tolerance relative to the wild-type level but also reduced ethanol yield and growth at low ethanol concentrations. The genome of the ET strain has coding changes in proteins involved in membrane biosynthesis, the Rnf complex, cation homeostasis, gene regulation, and ethanol production. In particular, purification of the mutant bifunctional acetaldehyde coenzyme A (CoA)/alcohol dehydrogenase showed that a G609D variant abolished its activities, including ethanol formation. Heterologous expression of Zymomonas mobilis pyruvate decarboxylase and alcohol dehydrogenase in the ET strain increased cellulose consumption and restored ethanol production, demonstrating how metabolic engineering can be used to overcome disadvantageous mutations incurred during adaptation to ethanol. We discuss how genetic changes in the ET strain reveal novel potential strategies for improving microbial solvent tolerance.

  20. Construction high-yield candidate influenza vaccine viruses in Vero cells by reassortment.

    PubMed

    Yu, Wei; Yang, Fan; Yang, Jinghui; Ma, Lei; Cun, Yina; Song, Shaohui; Liao, Guoyang

    2016-11-01

    Usage of influenza vaccine is the best choice measure for preventing and conclusion of influenza virus infection. Although it has been used of chicken embryo to produce influenza vaccine, following with WHO recommended vaccine strain, there were uncontrollable factors and its deficiencies, specially, during an influenza pandemic in the world. The Vero cells are used for vaccine production of a few strains including influenza virus, because of its homology with human, recommended by WHO. However, as known most of the influenza viruses strains could not culture by Vero cells. It was used two high-yield influenza viruses adapted in Vero cells as donor viruses, such as A/Yunnan/1/2005Va (H3N2) and B/Yunnan/2/2005Va (B), to construct high-yield wild influenza virus in Vero cells under antibody selection pressure. After reassortment and passages, it obtained the new Vaccine strains with A/Tianjin/15/2009Va (H1N1), A/Fujian/196/2009Va (H3N2) and B/Chongqing/1384/2010Va (B), which was not only completely keeping their original antigenic (HA and NA), but also grown well in Vero cells with high-yield. All results of gene analysis and HA, HI shown that this reassortment method could be used to find new direction to product the influenza vaccine. J. Med. Virol. 88:1914-1921, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27101353

  1. Experimental quantification of cavitation yield revisited: focus on high frequency ultrasound reactors.

    PubMed

    Kirpalani, D M; McQuinn, K J

    2006-01-01

    Acoustic cavitation plays an important role in enhancing the reaction rate of chemical processes in sonochemical systems. However, quantification of cavitation intensity in sonochemical systems is generally limited to low frequency systems. In this study, an empirical determination of cavitation yield in high frequency ultrasound systems was performed by measuring the amount of iodine liberated from the oxidation of potassium iodide (KI) solution at 1.7 and 2.4 MHz. Experiments for determining cavitation were carried out at various solute (KI) concentrations under constant temperature, obtained by direct cooling of the solution and variable temperature conditions, in the absence of external cooling. Cavitation yield measurements, reported in this work, extend previously reported results and lend credence to the two step reaction pathway in high frequency systems. Additionally, the concentration of KI and temperature affect the cavitation yield of a system such that the iodine production is proportional to both conditions. It is proposed that direct cooling of sonicated KI solution may be advantageous for optimization of cavitation intensity in high frequency sonochemical reactors.

  2. Variable sensitivity of US maize yield to high temperatures across developmental stages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, E. E.; Huybers, P. J.

    2013-12-01

    The sensitivity of maize to high temperatures has been widely demonstrated. Furthermore, field work has indicated that reproductive development stages are particularly sensitive to stress, but this relationship has not been quantified across a wide geographic region. Here, the relationship between maize yield and temperature variations is examined as a function of developmental stage. US state-level data from the National Agriculture Statistics Service provide dates for six growing stages: planting, silking, doughing, dented, mature, and harvested. Temperatures that correspond to each developmental stage are then inferred from a network of weather station observations interpolated to the county level, and a multiple linear regression technique is employed to estimate the sensitivity of county yield outcomes to variations in growing-degree days and an analogous measure of high temperatures referred to as killing-degree days. Uncertainties in the transition times between county-level growth stages are accounted for. Results indicate that the silking and dented stages are generally the most sensitive to killing degree days, with silking the most sensitive stage in the US South and dented the most sensitive in the US North. These variable patterns of sensitivity aid in interpreting which weather events are of greatest significance to maize yields and provide some insight into how shifts in planting time or changes in developmental timing would influence the risks associated with exposure to high temperatures.

  3. Isolation of Hofbauer Cells from Human Term Placentas with High Yield and Purity

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Zhonghua; Tadesse, Serkalem; Norwitz, Errol; Mor, Gil; Abrahams, Vikki M.; Guller, Seth

    2011-01-01

    Problem Placental villus macrophages (i.e. Hofbauer cells, HBCs) were identified more than 100 years ago. Alterations in their numbers and characteristics are associated with several complications of pregnancy. Although HBCs have previously been isolated and cultured, there is no consensus methodology to obtain these cells with high yield and purity for in vitro studies. Method of Study HBCs were isolated from human term placentas using protocols in which cytotrophoblasts (CTs) and fibroblasts (FIBs), other major villous cell types, were isolated in parallel. Enzymatic digestion, Percoll gradients, and immunoselection were used to isolate the three cell types. Purity was assessed by morphology, flow cytometry, and in phagocytosis assays. Results HBCs were isolated with 98–99% purity and a yield of 130–200 ×106 cells/80 to 100 g of tissue. HBCs exhibited a pleiomorphic and vacuolated appearance for at least 5 days in culture medium with and without serum. High levels of phagocytosis in HBCs, but not in CTs, or FIBs, confirmed macrophage function in HBCs. Phagocytotic activity was maintained across several days in culture. Conclusion HBCs were isolated from term placenta with high yield and purity using protocols in which CTs and FIBs were also obtained. This methodology will foster future studies which examine the role of HBCs in regulating villus function. PMID:21545365

  4. Synthesis of Luminescent Graphene Quantum Dots with High Quantum Yield and Their Toxicity Study

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Dan; Chen, Yunping; Li, Na; Li, Wen; Wang, Zhenguo; Zhu, Jingli; Zhang, Hong; Liu, Bin; Xu, Shan

    2015-01-01

    High fluorescence quantum yield graphene quantum dots (GQDs) have showed up as a new generation for bioimaging. In this work, luminescent GQDs were prepared by an ameliorative photo-Fenton reaction and a subsequent hydrothermal process using graphene oxide sheets as the precursor. The as-prepared GQDs were nanomaterials with size ranging from 2.3 to 6.4 nm and emitted intense green luminescence in water. The fluorescence quantum yield was as high as 24.6% (excited at 340 nm) and the fluorescence was strongest at pH 7. Moreover, the influences of low-concentration (12.5, 25 μg/mL) GQDs on the morphology, viability, membrane integrity, internal cellular reactive oxygen species level and mortality of HeLa cells were relatively weak, and the in vitro imaging demonstrated GQDs were mainly in the cytoplasm region. More strikingly, zebrafish embryos were co-cultured with GQDs for in vivo imaging, and the results of heart rate test showed the intake of small amounts of GQDs brought little harm to the cardiovascular of zebrafish. GQDs with high quantum yield and strong photoluminescence show good biocompatibility, thus they show good promising for cell imaging, biolabeling and other biomedical applications. PMID:26709828

  5. The variation of the yield stress of Ti alloys with strain rate at high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosen, R. S.; Paddon, S. P.; Kassner, M. E.

    1999-06-01

    This study extended investigation on the elevated-temperature yield-strength dependence of beta-phase titanium alloys on strain rate and temperature. Yield stresses were found to increase substantially with increasing strain rate at elevated temperatures due to the high strain-rate sensitivity of titanium at high temperatures. Above 1000 °C, the strain-rate sensitivities were found to increase substantially with increasing temperature and/or decreasing strain rate. The six alloys examined were TIMETAL 21S, Ti-15-3, Ti-6-4, Ti-13-11-3, Beta C, and Beta III. There was particular interest in determining the strain-rate sensitivity of these alloys through strain-rate change tests above 1000 °C. The yield stresses of all the titanium alloys at temperatures above 1093 °C were less than 1% of their ambient temperature values. Strain hardening was negligible in the alloys tested at these high temperatures. Extended tensile ductilities of 100 to 200% were observed due to the pronounced strain-rate sensitivity. The rate controlling mechanism for plasticity, based on activation energy and the strain-rate sensitivity measurements, is discussed.

  6. The variation of the yield stress of Ti alloys with strain rate at high temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, R.S.; Paddon, S.P.; Kassner, M.E.

    1999-06-01

    This study extended investigation on the elevated-temperature yield-strength dependence of beta-phase titanium alloys on strain rate and temperature. Yield stresses were found to increase substantially with increasing strain rate at elevated temperatures due to the high strain-rate sensitivity of titanium at high temperatures. Above 1000 C, the strain-rate sensitivities were found to increase substantially with increasing temperature and/or decreasing strain rate. The six alloys examined were TIMETAL 21S, Ti-15-3-, Ti-6-4, Ti-13-11-3, Beta C, and Beta III. There was particular interest in determining the strain-rate sensitivity of these alloys through strain-rate change tests above 1000 C. The yield stresses of all the titanium alloys at temperatures above 1093 C were less than 1% of their ambient temperature values. strain hardening was negligible in the alloys tested at these high temperatures. Extended tensile ductilities of 100 to 200% were observed due to the pronounced strain-rare sensitivity. The rate controlling mechanism for plasticity, based on activation energy and the strain-rate sensitivity measurements, is discussed.

  7. Xylose fermentation to ethanol. A review

    SciTech Connect

    McMillan, J D

    1993-01-01

    The past several years have seen tremendous progress in the understanding of xylose metabolism and in the identification, characterization, and development of strains with improved xylose fermentation characteristics. A survey of the numerous microorganisms capable of directly fermenting xylose to ethanol indicates that wild-type yeast and recombinant bacteria offer the best overall performance in terms of high yield, final ethanol concentration, and volumetric productivity. The best performing bacteria, yeast, and fungi can achieve yields greater than 0.4 g/g and final ethanol concentrations approaching 5%. Productivities remain low for most yeast and particularly for fungi, but volumetric productivities exceeding 1.0 g/L-h have been reported for xylose-fermenting bacteria. In terms of wild-type microorganisms, strains of the yeast Pichia stipitis show the most promise in the short term for direct high-yield fermentation of xylose without byproduct formation. Of the recombinant xylose-fermenting microorganisms developed, recombinant E. coli ATTC 11303 (pLOI297) exhibits the most favorable performance characteristics reported to date.

  8. Predawn respiration rates during flowering are highly predictive of yield response in Gossypium hirsutum when yield variability is water-induced.

    PubMed

    Snider, John L; Chastain, Daryl R; Meeks, Calvin D; Collins, Guy D; Sorensen, Ronald B; Byrd, Seth A; Perry, Calvin D

    2015-07-01

    Respiratory carbon evolution by leaves under abiotic stress is implicated as a major limitation to crop productivity; however, respiration rates of fully expanded leaves are positively associated with plant growth rates. Given the substantial sensitivity of plant growth to drought, it was hypothesized that predawn respiration rates (RPD) would be (1) more sensitive to drought than photosynthetic processes and (2) highly predictive of water-induced yield variability in Gossypium hirsutum. Two studies (at Tifton and Camilla Georgia) addressed these hypotheses. At Tifton, drought was imposed beginning at the onset of flowering (first flower) and continuing for three weeks (peak bloom) followed by a recovery period, and predawn water potential (ΨPD), RPD, net photosynthesis (AN) and maximum quantum yield of photosystem II (Fv/Fm) were measured throughout the study period. At Camilla, plants were exposed to five different irrigation regimes throughout the growing season, and average ΨPD and RPD were determined between first flower and peak bloom for all treatments. For both sites, fiber yield was assessed at crop maturity. The relationships between ΨPD, RPD and yield were assessed via non-linear regression. It was concluded for field-grown G. hirsutum that (1) RPD is exceptionally sensitive to progressive drought (more so than AN or Fv/Fm) and (2) average RPD from first flower to peak bloom is highly predictive of water-induced yield variability. PMID:26125121

  9. D-xylulose fermentation to ethanol by Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Chiang, L.C.; Gong, C.S.; Chen, L.F.; Tsao, G.T.

    1981-08-01

    Commercial bakers' yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) was used to study the conversion of D-xylulose to ethanol in the presence of D-xylose. The rate of ethanol production increased with an increase in yeast cell density. The optimal temperature for D-xylulose fermentation was 35 degrees Celcius, and the optimal pH range was 4 to 6. The fermentation of D-xylulose by yeast resulted in the production of ethanol as the major product; small amounts of xylitol and glycerol were also produced. The production of xylitol was influenced by pH as well as temperature. High pH values and low temperatures enhanced xylitol production. The rate of D-xylulose fermentation decreased when the production of ethanol yielded concentrations of 4% or more. The slow conversion rate of D-xylulose to ethanol was increased by increasing the yeast cell density. The overall production of ethanol from D-xylulose by yeast cells under optimal conditions was 90% of the theoretical yield. (Refs. 21).

  10. D-xylulose fermentation to ethanol by Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Chiang, L.C.; Gong, C.S. Chen, L.F.; Tsao, G.T.

    1981-01-01

    Commercial bakers' yeast (S. cerevisiae) was used to study the conversion of D-xylulose to ethanol in the presence of D-xylose. The rate of ethanol production increased with an increase in yeast cell density. The optimal temperature for D-xylulose fermentation was 35 degrees, and the optimal pH range was 4-6. The fermentation of D-xylulose by yeast resulted in the production of ethanol as the major product; small amounts of xylitol and glycerol were also produced. The production of xylitol was influenced by pH as well as by temperature. High pH values and low temperatures enhanced xylitol production. The rate of D-xylulose fermentation decreased when the production of ethanol yielded concentrations of greater than 4%. The slow conversion rate of C-xylulose to ethanol was increased by increasing the yeast cell density. The overall production of ethanol from D-xylulose by yeast cells under optimal conditions was 90% of the theoretical yield.

  11. Economics of fertility in high-yielding dairy cows on confined TMR systems.

    PubMed

    Cabrera, V E

    2014-05-01

    The objective of this review paper was to summarise the latest findings in dairy cattle reproductive economics with an emphasis on high yielding, confined total mixed ration systems. The economic gain increases as the reproductive efficiency improves. These increments follow the law of diminishing returns, but are still positive even at high reproductive performance. Reproductive improvement results in higher milk productivity and, therefore, higher milk income over feed cost, more calf sales and lower culling and breeding expenses. Most high-yielding herds in the United States use a combination of timed artificial insemination (TAI) and oestrous detection (OD) reproductive programme. The ratio of achievable pregnancies between OD and TAI determines the economic value difference between both and their combinations. Nonetheless, complex interactions between reproductive programme, herd relative milk yield, and type of reproductive programme are reported. For example, higher herd relative milk yield would favour programme relying more on TAI. In addition, improved reproductive efficiency produces extra replacements. The availability of additional replacements could allow more aggressive culling policies (e.g. less services for non-pregnant cows) to balance on-farm supply and demand of replacements. Balancing heifer replacement availability in an efficient reproductive programme brings additional economic benefits. New technologies such as the use of earlier chemical tests for pregnancy diagnosis could be economically effective depending on the goals and characteristics of the farm. Opportunities for individual cow reproductive management within defined reproductive programme exist. These decisions would be based on economic metrics derived from the value of a cow such as the value of a new pregnancy, the cost of a pregnancy loss, or the cost of an extra day open. PMID:24679357

  12. Economics of fertility in high-yielding dairy cows on confined TMR systems.

    PubMed

    Cabrera, V E

    2014-05-01

    The objective of this review paper was to summarise the latest findings in dairy cattle reproductive economics with an emphasis on high yielding, confined total mixed ration systems. The economic gain increases as the reproductive efficiency improves. These increments follow the law of diminishing returns, but are still positive even at high reproductive performance. Reproductive improvement results in higher milk productivity and, therefore, higher milk income over feed cost, more calf sales and lower culling and breeding expenses. Most high-yielding herds in the United States use a combination of timed artificial insemination (TAI) and oestrous detection (OD) reproductive programme. The ratio of achievable pregnancies between OD and TAI determines the economic value difference between both and their combinations. Nonetheless, complex interactions between reproductive programme, herd relative milk yield, and type of reproductive programme are reported. For example, higher herd relative milk yield would favour programme relying more on TAI. In addition, improved reproductive efficiency produces extra replacements. The availability of additional replacements could allow more aggressive culling policies (e.g. less services for non-pregnant cows) to balance on-farm supply and demand of replacements. Balancing heifer replacement availability in an efficient reproductive programme brings additional economic benefits. New technologies such as the use of earlier chemical tests for pregnancy diagnosis could be economically effective depending on the goals and characteristics of the farm. Opportunities for individual cow reproductive management within defined reproductive programme exist. These decisions would be based on economic metrics derived from the value of a cow such as the value of a new pregnancy, the cost of a pregnancy loss, or the cost of an extra day open.

  13. Flocculating Zymomonas mobilis is a promising host to be engineered for fuel ethanol production from lignocellulosic biomass.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ning; Bai, Yun; Liu, Chen-Guang; Zhao, Xin-Qing; Xu, Jian-Feng; Bai, Feng-Wu

    2014-03-01

    Whereas Saccharomyces cerevisiae uses the Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas pathway to metabolize glucose, Zymomonas mobilis uses the Entner-Doudoroff (ED) pathway. Employing the ED pathway, 50% less ATP is produced, which could lead to less biomass being accumulated during fermentation and an improved yield of ethanol. Moreover, Z. mobilis cells, which have a high specific surface area, consume glucose faster than S. cerevisiae, which could improve ethanol productivity. We performed ethanol fermentations using these two species under comparable conditions to validate these speculations. Increases of 3.5 and 3.3% in ethanol yield, and 58.1 and 77.8% in ethanol productivity, were observed in ethanol fermentations using Z. mobilis ZM4 in media containing ∼100 and 200 g/L glucose, respectively. Furthermore, ethanol fermentation bythe flocculating Z. mobilis ZM401 was explored. Although no significant difference was observed in ethanol yield and productivity, the flocculation of the bacterial species enabled biomass recovery by cost-effective sedimentation, instead of centrifugation with intensive capital investment and energy consumption. In addition, tolerance to inhibitory byproducts released during biomass pretreatment, particularly acetic acid and vanillin, was improved. These experimental results indicate that Z. mobilis, particularly its flocculating strain, is superior to S. cerevisiae as a host to be engineered for fuel ethanol production from lignocellulosic biomass.

  14. Modified salting-out method: high-yield, high-quality genomic DNA extraction from whole blood using laundry detergent.

    PubMed

    Nasiri, H; Forouzandeh, M; Rasaee, M J; Rahbarizadeh, F

    2005-01-01

    Different approaches have been used to extract DNA from whole blood. In most of these methods enzymes (such as proteinase K and RNAse A) or toxic organic solvents (such as phenol or guanidine isothiocyanate) are used. Since these enzymes are expensive, and most of the materials that are used routinely are toxic, it is desirable to apply an efficient DNA extraction procedure that does not require the use of such materials. In this study, genomic DNA was extracted by the salting-out method, but instead of using an analytical-grade enzyme and chemical detergents, as normally used for DNA isolation, a common laundry powder was used. Different concentrations of the powder were tested, and proteins were precipitated by NaCl-saturated distilled water. Finally, DNA precipitation was performed with the use of 96% ethanol. From the results, we conclude that the optimum concentration of laundry powder for the highest yield and purity of isolated DNA is 30 mg/mL. The procedure was optimized, and a final protocol is suggested. Following the same protocol, DNA was extracted from 100 blood samples, and their amounts were found to be >50 microg/mL of whole blood. The integrity of the DNA fragments was confirmed by agarose gel electrophoresis. Furthermore, the extracted DNA was used as a template for PCR reaction. The results obtained from PCR showed that the final solutions of extracted DNA did not contain any inhibitory material for the enzyme used in the PCR reaction, and indicated that the isolated DNA was of good quality. These results show that this method is simple, fast, safe, and cost-effective, and can be used in medical laboratories and research centers.

  15. Engineering of Corynebacterium glutamicum for high-yield L-valine production under oxygen deprivation conditions.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Satoshi; Suda, Masako; Uematsu, Kimio; Natsuma, Yumi; Hiraga, Kazumi; Jojima, Toru; Inui, Masayuki; Yukawa, Hideaki

    2013-02-01

    We previously demonstrated efficient L-valine production by metabolically engineered Corynebacterium glutamicum under oxygen deprivation. To achieve the high productivity, a NADH/NADPH cofactor imbalance during the synthesis of l-valine was overcome by engineering NAD-preferring mutant acetohydroxy acid isomeroreductase (AHAIR) and using NAD-specific leucine dehydrogenase from Lysinibacillus sphaericus. Lactate as a by-product was largely eliminated by disrupting the lactate dehydrogenase gene ldhA. Nonetheless, a few other by-products, particularly succinate, were still produced and acted to suppress the L-valine yield. Eliminating these by-products therefore was deemed key to improving theL-valine yield. By additionally disrupting the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase gene ppc, succinate production was effectively suppressed, but both glucose consumption and L-valine production dropped considerably due to the severely elevated intracellular NADH/NAD(+) ratio. In contrast, this perturbed intracellular redox state was more than compensated for by deletion of three genes associated with NADH-producing acetate synthesis and overexpression of five glycolytic genes, including gapA, encoding NADH-inhibited glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase. Inserting feedback-resistant mutant acetohydroxy acid synthase and NAD-preferring mutant AHAIR in the chromosome resulted in higher L-valine yield and productivity. Deleting the alanine transaminase gene avtA suppressed alanine production. The resultant strain produced 1,280 mM L-valine at a yield of 88% mol mol of glucose(-1) after 24 h under oxygen deprivation, a vastly improved yield over our previous best.

  16. Optimized fed-batch fermentation of Scheffersomyces stipitis for efficient production of ethanol from hexoses and pentoses.

    PubMed

    Unrean, Pornkamol; Nguyen, Nhung H A

    2013-03-01

    Scheffersomyces stipitis was cultivated in an optimized, controlled fed-batch fermentation for production of ethanol from glucose-xylose mixture. Effect of feed medium composition was investigated on sugar utilization and ethanol production. Studying influence of specific cell growth rate on ethanol fermentation performance showed the carbon flow towards ethanol synthesis decreased with increasing cell growth rate. The optimum specific growth rate to achieve efficient ethanol production performance from a glucose-xylose mixture existed at 0.1 h(-1). With these optimized feed medium and cell growth rate, a kinetic model has been utilized to avoid overflow metabolism as well as to ensure a balanced feeding of nutrient substrate in fed-batch system. Fed-batch culture with feeding profile designed based on the model resulted in high titer, yield, and productivity of ethanol compared with batch cultures. The maximal ethanol concentration was 40.7 g/L. The yield and productivity of ethanol production in the optimized fed-batch culture was 1.3 and 2 times higher than those in batch culture. Thus, higher efficiency ethanol production was achieved in this study through fed-batch process optimization. This strategy may contribute to an improvement of ethanol fermentation from lignocellulosic biomass by S. stipitis on the industrial scale.

  17. Continuous, farm-scale, solid-phase fermentation process for fuel ethanol and protein feed production from fodder beets

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbons, W.R.; Westby, C.A.; Dobbs, T.L.

    1984-01-01

    Fuel ethanol (95%) was produced from fodder beets in two farm-scale processes. In the first process, involving conventional submerged fermentation of the fodder beets in a mash, ethanol and a feed (PF) rich in protein, fat, and fiber were produced. Ethanol yields of 70 L/metric ton (17 gal/ton) were obtained; however, resulting beers had low ethanol concentrations )3-5% (v/v)). The high viscosity of medium and low sugar, beet mashes caused mixing problems which prevented any further increase of beet sugar in the mash. This severely limited the maximum attainable ethanol concentration during fermentation, thereby making the beer costly to distill into fuel ethanol and the process energy inefficient. In order to achieve distillably worthwhile ethanol concentrations of 8-10% (v/v), a solid phase fermentation process (continuous) was developed and tested. In preliminary trials, this system produced fermented pulp with over 8% (v/v) ethanol corresponding to an ethanol yield of 87 L/metric ton (21 gal/ton). Production costs with this novel process are $0.47/L ($1.77/gal) and the energy balance is 2.11. These preliminary cost estimates indicate that fodder beets are potentially competitive with corn as an ethanol feedstock. Additional research, however, is warranted to more precisely refine individual costs, energy balances and the actual value of the PF.

  18. Cost of abating greenhouse gas emissions with cellulosic ethanol.

    PubMed

    Dwivedi, Puneet; Wang, Weiwei; Hudiburg, Tara; Jaiswal, Deepak; Parton, William; Long, Stephen; DeLucia, Evan; Khanna, Madhu

    2015-02-17

    We develop an integrated framework to determine and compare greenhouse gas (GHG) intensities and production costs of cellulosic ethanol derived from corn stover, switchgrass, and miscanthus grown on high and low quality soils for three representative counties in the Eastern United States. This information is critical for assessing the cost-effectiveness of utilizing cellulosic ethanol for mitigating GHG emissions and designing appropriate policy incentives to support cellulosic ethanol production nationwide. We find considerable variations in the GHG intensities and production costs of ethanol across feedstocks and locations mostly due to differences in yields and soil characteristics. As compared to gasoline, the GHG savings from miscanthus-based ethanol ranged between 130% and 156% whereas that from switchgrass ranged between 97% and 135%. The corresponding range for GHG savings with corn stover was 57% to 95% and marginally below the threshold of at least 60% for biofuels classified as cellulosic biofuels under the Renewable Fuels Standard. Estimates of the costs of producing ethanol relative to gasoline imply an abatement cost of at least $48 Mg(-1) of GHG emissions (carbon dioxide equivalent) abated and can be used to infer the minimum carbon tax rate needed to induce consumption of cellulosic ethanol. PMID:25588032

  19. Cost of abating greenhouse gas emissions with cellulosic ethanol.

    PubMed

    Dwivedi, Puneet; Wang, Weiwei; Hudiburg, Tara; Jaiswal, Deepak; Parton, William; Long, Stephen; DeLucia, Evan; Khanna, Madhu

    2015-02-17

    We develop an integrated framework to determine and compare greenhouse gas (GHG) intensities and production costs of cellulosic ethanol derived from corn stover, switchgrass, and miscanthus grown on high and low quality soils for three representative counties in the Eastern United States. This information is critical for assessing the cost-effectiveness of utilizing cellulosic ethanol for mitigating GHG emissions and designing appropriate policy incentives to support cellulosic ethanol production nationwide. We find considerable variations in the GHG intensities and production costs of ethanol across feedstocks and locations mostly due to differences in yields and soil characteristics. As compared to gasoline, the GHG savings from miscanthus-based ethanol ranged between 130% and 156% whereas that from switchgrass ranged between 97% and 135%. The corresponding range for GHG savings with corn stover was 57% to 95% and marginally below the threshold of at least 60% for biofuels classified as cellulosic biofuels under the Renewable Fuels Standard. Estimates of the costs of producing ethanol relative to gasoline imply an abatement cost of at least $48 Mg(-1) of GHG emissions (carbon dioxide equivalent) abated and can be used to infer the minimum carbon tax rate needed to induce consumption of cellulosic ethanol.

  20. Method for reproducibly preparing a low-melting high-carbon yield precursor

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Wesley E.; Napier, Jr., Bradley

    1978-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a method for preparing a reproducible synthetic carbon precursor by the autoclave polymerization of indene (C.sub.9 H.sub.8) at a temperature in the range of 470.degree.-485.degree. C, and at a pressure in the range of about 1000 to about 4300 psi. Volatiles in the resulting liquid indene polymer are removed by vacuum outgassing to form a solid carbon precursor characterized by having a relatively low melting temperature, high-carbon yield, and high reproducibility which provide for the fabrication of carbon and graphite composites having strict requirements for reproducible properties.

  1. Ethanol Extract of Persimmon Tree Leaves Improves Blood Circulation and Lipid Metabolism in Rats Fed a High-Fat Diet

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Ri; Kim, Hye-Jin; Moon, Byeongseok; Jung, Un Ju; Lee, Mi-Kyung; Lee, Dong Gun; Ryoo, ZaeYoung; Park, Yong Bok

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The leaves of the persimmon tree (PL) are known to have beneficial effects on hyperglycemia, dyslipidemia, and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. We recently demonstrated that PL had antithrombotic properties in vitro. However, little is known about the antiplatelet and anticoagulant properties of PL in vivo. Omega-3 fatty acid (n-3 FA)-containing fish oil has been widely prescribed to improve blood circulation. This study compared the effects of dietary supplementation with an ethanol extract of PL or n-3 FA on blood coagulation, platelet activation, and lipid levels in vivo. Sprague–Dawley rats were fed a high-fat diet with either PL ethanol extract (0.5% w/w) or n-3 FA (2.5% w/w) for 9 weeks. Coagulation was examined by monitoring the activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) and prothrombin time. We examined plasma thromboxane B2 (TXB2), serotonin, and soluble P-selectin (sP-selectin) levels. The aPTT was significantly prolonged in the PL and n-3 FA supplement groups. PL also attenuated the TXB2 level and lowered arterial serotonin transporter mRNA expression, although it did not alter plasma serotonin or sP-selectin levels. C-reactive protein and leptin levels were significantly reduced by PL and n-3 FA supplementation. In addition, PL decreased plasma total- and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol levels, as did n-3 FA treatment. These results indicated that the PL ethanol extract may have the potential to improve circulation by inhibiting blood coagulation and platelet activation and by reducing plasma cholesterol levels. PMID:26061228

  2. Ethanol Extract of Persimmon Tree Leaves Improves Blood Circulation and Lipid Metabolism in Rats Fed a High-Fat Diet.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Ri; Kim, Hye-Jin; Moon, Byeongseok; Jung, Un Ju; Lee, Mi-Kyung; Lee, Dong Gun; Ryoo, ZaeYoung; Park, Yong Bok; Choi, Myung-Sook

    2015-07-01

    The leaves of the persimmon tree (PL) are known to have beneficial effects on hyperglycemia, dyslipidemia, and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. We recently demonstrated that PL had antithrombotic properties in vitro. However, little is known about the antiplatelet and anticoagulant properties of PL in vivo. Omega-3 fatty acid (n-3 FA)-containing fish oil has been widely prescribed to improve blood circulation. This study compared the effects of dietary supplementation with an ethanol extract of PL or n-3 FA on blood coagulation, platelet activation, and lipid levels in vivo. Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a high-fat diet with either PL ethanol extract (0.5% w/w) or n-3 FA (2.5% w/w) for 9 weeks. Coagulation was examined by monitoring the activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) and prothrombin time. We examined plasma thromboxane B2 (TXB2), serotonin, and soluble P-selectin (sP-selectin) levels. The aPTT was significantly prolonged in the PL and n-3 FA supplement groups. PL also attenuated the TXB2 level and lowered arterial serotonin transporter mRNA expression, although it did not alter plasma serotonin or sP-selectin levels. C-reactive protein and leptin levels were significantly reduced by PL and n-3 FA supplementation. In addition, PL decreased plasma total- and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol levels, as did n-3 FA treatment. These results indicated that the PL ethanol extract may have the potential to improve circulation by inhibiting blood coagulation and platelet activation and by reducing plasma cholesterol levels. PMID:26061228

  3. Ethanol Extract of Persimmon Tree Leaves Improves Blood Circulation and Lipid Metabolism in Rats Fed a High-Fat Diet.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Ri; Kim, Hye-Jin; Moon, Byeongseok; Jung, Un Ju; Lee, Mi-Kyung; Lee, Dong Gun; Ryoo, ZaeYoung; Park, Yong Bok; Choi, Myung-Sook

    2015-07-01

    The leaves of the persimmon tree (PL) are known to have beneficial effects on hyperglycemia, dyslipidemia, and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. We recently demonstrated that PL had antithrombotic properties in vitro. However, little is known about the antiplatelet and anticoagulant properties of PL in vivo. Omega-3 fatty acid (n-3 FA)-containing fish oil has been widely prescribed to improve blood circulation. This study compared the effects of dietary supplementation with an ethanol extract of PL or n-3 FA on blood coagulation, platelet activation, and lipid levels in vivo. Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a high-fat diet with either PL ethanol extract (0.5% w/w) or n-3 FA (2.5% w/w) for 9 weeks. Coagulation was examined by monitoring the activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) and prothrombin time. We examined plasma thromboxane B2 (TXB2), serotonin, and soluble P-selectin (sP-selectin) levels. The aPTT was significantly prolonged in the PL and n-3 FA supplement groups. PL also attenuated the TXB2 level and lowered arterial serotonin transporter mRNA expression, although it did not alter plasma serotonin or sP-selectin levels. C-reactive protein and leptin levels were significantly reduced by PL and n-3 FA supplementation. In addition, PL decreased plasma total- and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol levels, as did n-3 FA treatment. These results indicated that the PL ethanol extract may have the potential to improve circulation by inhibiting blood coagulation and platelet activation and by reducing plasma cholesterol levels.

  4. High-Yield Hydrogen Production from Starch and Water by a Synthetic Enzymatic Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Y.-H. Percival; Evans, Barbara R.; Mielenz, Jonathan R.; Hopkins, Robert C.; Adams, Michael W.W.

    2007-01-01

    Background The future hydrogen economy offers a compelling energy vision, but there are four main obstacles: hydrogen production, storage, and distribution, as well as fuel cells. Hydrogen production from inexpensive abundant renewable biomass can produce cheaper hydrogen, decrease reliance on fossil fuels, and achieve zero net greenhouse gas emissions, but current chemical and biological means suffer from low hydrogen yields and/or severe reaction conditions. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we demonstrate a synthetic enzymatic pathway consisting of 13 enzymes for producing hydrogen from starch and water. The stoichiometric reaction is C6H10O5 (l)+7 H2O (l)→12 H2 (g)+6 CO2 (g). The overall process is spontaneous and unidirectional because of a negative Gibbs free energy and separation of the gaseous products with the aqueous reactants. Conclusions Enzymatic hydrogen production from starch and water mediated by 13 enzymes occurred at 30°C as expected, and the hydrogen yields were much higher than the theoretical limit (4 H2/glucose) of anaerobic fermentations. Significance The unique features, such as mild reaction conditions (30°C and atmospheric pressure), high hydrogen yields, likely low production costs ($∼2/kg H2), and a high energy-density carrier starch (14.8 H2-based mass%), provide great potential for mobile applications. With technology improvements and integration with fuel cells, this technology also solves the challenges associated with hydrogen storage, distribution, and infrastructure in the hydrogen economy. PMID:17520015

  5. Enhanced electron yield from laser-driven wakefield acceleration in high-Z gas jets.

    PubMed

    Mirzaie, Mohammad; Hafz, Nasr A M; Li, Song; Liu, Feng; He, Fei; Cheng, Ya; Zhang, Jie

    2015-10-01

    An investigation of the electron beam yield (charge) form helium, nitrogen, and neon gas jet plasmas in a typical laser-plasma wakefield acceleration experiment is carried out. The charge measurement is made by imaging the electron beam intensity profile on a fluorescent screen into a charge coupled device which was cross-calibrated with an integrated current transformer. The dependence of electron beam charge on the laser and plasma conditions for the aforementioned gases are studied. We found that laser-driven wakefield acceleration in low Z-gas jet targets usually generates high-quality and well-collimated electron beams with modest yields at the level of 10-100 pC. On the other hand, filamentary electron beams which are observed from high-Z gases at higher densities reached much higher yields. Evidences for cluster formation were clearly observed in the nitrogen gas jet target, where we received the highest electron beam charge of ∼1.7 nC. Those intense electron beams will be beneficial for the applications on the generation of bright X-rays, gamma rays radiations, and energetic positrons via the bremsstrahlung or inverse-scattering processes.

  6. Enhanced electron yield from laser-driven wakefield acceleration in high-Z gas jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirzaie, Mohammad; Hafz, Nasr A. M.; Li, Song; Liu, Feng; He, Fei; Cheng, Ya; Zhang, Jie

    2015-10-01

    An investigation of the electron beam yield (charge) form helium, nitrogen, and neon gas jet plasmas in a typical laser-plasma wakefield acceleration experiment is carried out. The charge measurement is made by imaging the electron beam intensity profile on a fluorescent screen into a charge coupled device which was cross-calibrated with an integrated current transformer. The dependence of electron beam charge on the laser and plasma conditions for the aforementioned gases are studied. We found that laser-driven wakefield acceleration in low Z-gas jet targets usually generates high-quality and well-collimated electron beams with modest yields at the level of 10-100 pC. On the other hand, filamentary electron beams which are observed from high-Z gases at higher densities reached much higher yields. Evidences for cluster formation were clearly observed in the nitrogen gas jet target, where we received the highest electron beam charge of ˜1.7 nC. Those intense electron beams will be beneficial for the applications on the generation of bright X-rays, gamma rays radiations, and energetic positrons via the bremsstrahlung or inverse-scattering processes.

  7. Enhanced electron yield from laser-driven wakefield acceleration in high-Z gas jets

    SciTech Connect

    Mirzaie, Mohammad; Hafz, Nasr A. M. Li, Song; Liu, Feng; Zhang, Jie; He, Fei; Cheng, Ya

    2015-10-15

    An investigation of the electron beam yield (charge) form helium, nitrogen, and neon gas jet plasmas in a typical laser-plasma wakefield acceleration experiment is carried out. The charge measurement is made by imaging the electron beam intensity profile on a fluorescent screen into a charge coupled device which was cross-calibrated with an integrated current transformer. The dependence of electron beam charge on the laser and plasma conditions for the aforementioned gases are studied. We found that laser-driven wakefield acceleration in low Z-gas jet targets usually generates high-quality and well-collimated electron beams with modest yields at the level of 10-100 pC. On the other hand, filamentary electron beams which are observed from high-Z gases at higher densities reached much higher yields. Evidences for cluster formation were clearly observed in the nitrogen gas jet target, where we received the highest electron beam charge of ∼1.7 nC. Those intense electron beams will be beneficial for the applications on the generation of bright X-rays, gamma rays radiations, and energetic positrons via the bremsstrahlung or inverse-scattering processes.

  8. Enhanced electron yield from laser-driven wakefield acceleration in high-Z gas jets.

    PubMed

    Mirzaie, Mohammad; Hafz, Nasr A M; Li, Song; Liu, Feng; He, Fei; Cheng, Ya; Zhang, Jie

    2015-10-01

    An investigation of the electron beam yield (charge) form helium, nitrogen, and neon gas jet plasmas in a typical laser-plasma wakefield acceleration experiment is carried out. The charge measurement is made by imaging the electron beam intensity profile on a fluorescent screen into a charge coupled device which was cross-calibrated with an integrated current transformer. The dependence of electron beam charge on the laser and plasma conditions for the aforementioned gases are studied. We found that laser-driven wakefield acceleration in low Z-gas jet targets usually generates high-quality and well-collimated electron beams with modest yields at the level of 10-100 pC. On the other hand, filamentary electron beams which are observed from high-Z gases at higher densities reached much higher yields. Evidences for cluster formation were clearly observed in the nitrogen gas jet target, where we received the highest electron beam charge of ∼1.7 nC. Those intense electron beams will be beneficial for the applications on the generation of bright X-rays, gamma rays radiations, and energetic positrons via the bremsstrahlung or inverse-scattering processes. PMID:26520950

  9. Picosecond Lifetimes with High Quantum Yields from Single-Photon-Emitting Colloidal Nanostructures at Room Temperature.

    PubMed

    Bidault, Sébastien; Devilez, Alexis; Maillard, Vincent; Lermusiaux, Laurent; Guigner, Jean-Michel; Bonod, Nicolas; Wenger, Jérôme

    2016-04-26

    Minimizing the luminescence lifetime while maintaining a high emission quantum yield is paramount in optimizing the excitation cross-section, radiative decay rate, and brightness of quantum solid-state light sources, particularly at room temperature, where nonradiative processes can dominate. We demonstrate here that DNA-templated 60 and 80 nm diameter gold nanoparticle dimers, featuring one fluorescent molecule, provide single-photon emission with lifetimes that can fall below 10 ps and typical quantum yields in a 45-70% range. Since these colloidal nanostructures are obtained as a purified aqueous suspension, fluorescence spectroscopy can be performed on both fixed and freely diffusing nanostructures to quantitatively estimate the distributions of decay rate and fluorescence intensity enhancements. These data are in excellent agreement with theoretical calculations and demonstrate that millions of bright fluorescent nanostructures, with radiative lifetimes below 100 ps, can be produced in parallel. PMID:26972678

  10. High yield antibiotic producing mutants of Streptomyces erythreus induced by low energy ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Chen; Zhixin, Lin; Zuyao, Zou; Feng, Zhang; Duo, Liu; Xianghuai, Liu; Jianzhong, Tang; Weimin, Zhu; Bo, Huang

    1998-05-01

    Conidia of Streptomyces erythreus, an industrial microbe, were implanted by nitrogen ions with energy of 40-60 keV and fluence from 1 × 10 11 to 5 × 10 14 ions/cm 2. The logarithm value of survival fraction had good linear relationship with the logarithm value of fluence. Some mutants with a high yield of erythromycin were induced by ion implantation. The yield increment was correlated with the implantation fluence. Compared with the mutation results induced by ultraviolet rays, mutation effects of ion implantation were obvious having higher increasing erythromycin potency and wider mutation spectrum. The spores of Bacillus subtilis were implanted by arsenic ions with energy of 100 keV. The distribution of implanted ions was measured by Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS) and calculated in theory. The mechanism of mutation induced by ion implantation was discussed.

  11. Reductive burning of high-yield spent pulping liquors by the addition of pulverized coal

    SciTech Connect

    Sell, N.J.; Norman, J.C. )

    1992-10-01

    This paper reports on the reductive burning of high-yield spent pulping liquors which can be accomplished by the addition of pulverized coal to increase the heat content and generate the proper reducing conditions. Samples from a 78%-yield sodium bisulfite pulping process employing a hardwood furnish were mixed with 10-50% pulveriized coal and burned at 950[degrees]C under reducing conditions in a box furnace. Even in these uncontrolled combustion conditions 76. 5% of the sulfur found in the soluble portion of the smelt was converted from lignousulfonates to useful sulfide ion. For the remainder of the sulfur, analyses determined it to be 19. 5% as sulfite ion, 3. 1% as thiosulfate ion, and 0.9% as sulfate ion.

  12. Shock-Ignited High Gain/Yield Targets for the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perkins, L. J.; Lafortune, K. N.; Bedrosiian, P.; Tabak, M.; Miles, A.; Dixit, S.; Betti, R.; Anderson, K.; Zhou, C.

    2006-10-01

    Shock-ignition, a new concept for ICF ignition [C.Zhou, R.Betti Bull APS, v50, 2005], is being studied as a future option for efficiently achieving high gains in large laser facilities such as NIF. Accordingly, this offers the potential for testing: (1)High yield (up to 200MJ), reactor-relevant targets for inertial fusion energy (2)High fusion yield targets for DOE NNSA stockpile application (3)Targets with appreciable gain at low laser drive energies (gains of 10's at 150kJ) (4)Ignition of simple, non-cryo (room temperature) single shell gas targets at (unity gain). By contrast to conventional hotspot ignition, we separate the assembly and ignition phases by initially imploding a massive cryogenic shell on a low adiabat (alpha 0.7) at low velocity (less than 2e7cm/s) using a direct drive pulse of modest total energy. The assembled fuel is then separately ignited by a strong, spherically convergent shock driven by a high intensity spike at the end of the pulse and timed to reach the center as the main fuel is stagnating and starting to rebound. Like fast ignition, shock ignition can achieve high gains with low drive energy, but has the advantages of requiring only a single laser with less demanding timing and spatial focusing requirements.

  13. Ethanol-induced conditioned taste aversion in Warsaw Alcohol High-Preferring (WHP) and Warsaw Alcohol Low-Preferring (WLP) rats.

    PubMed

    Dyr, Wanda; Wyszogrodzka, Edyta; Paterak, Justyna; Siwińska-Ziółkowska, Agnieszka; Małkowska, Anna; Polak, Piotr

    2016-03-01

    The aversive action of the pharmacological properties of ethanol was studied in selectively bred Warsaw Alcohol High-Preferring (WHP) and Warsaw Alcohol Low-Preferring (WLP) rats. For this study, a conditioned-taste aversion test was used. Male WHP and WLP rats were submitted to daily 20-min sessions for 5 days, in which a saccharin solution (1.0 g/L) was available (pre-conditioning phase). Next, this drinking was paired with the injection of ethanol (0, 0.5, 1.0 g/kg), intraperitoneally [i.p.] immediately after removal of the saccharin bottle (conditioning phase). Afterward, the choice between the saccharin solution and water was extended for 18 subsequent days for 20-min daily sessions (post-conditioning phase). Both doses of ethanol did not produce an aversion to saccharin in WLP and WHP rats in the conditioning phase. However, injection of the 1.0 g/kg dose of ethanol produced an aversion in WLP rats that was detected by a decrease in saccharin intake at days 1, 3, 7, and 10 of the post-conditioning phase, with a decrease in saccharin preference for 16 days of the post-conditioning phase. Conditioned taste aversion, measured as a decrease in saccharin intake and saccharin preference, was only visible in WHP rats at day 1 and day 3 of the post-conditioning phase. This difference between WLP and WHP rats was apparent despite similar blood ethanol levels in both rat lines following injection of 0.5 and 1.0 g/kg of ethanol. These results may suggest differing levels of aversion to the post-ingestional effects of ethanol between WLP and WHP rats. These differing levels of aversion may contribute to the selected line difference in ethanol preference in WHP and WLP rats.

  14. High-rate, high-yield production of methanol by ammonia-oxidizing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Taher, Edris; Chandran, Kartik

    2013-04-01

    The overall goal of this study was to develop an appropriate biological process for achieving autotrophic conversion of methane (CH(4)) to methanol (CH3OH). In this study, we employed ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) to selectively and partially oxidize CH(4) to CH(3)OH. In fed-batch reactors using mixed nitrifying enrichment cultures from a continuous bioreactor, up to 59.89 ± 1.12 mg COD/L of CH(3)OH was produced within an incubation time of 7 h, which is approximately ten times the yield obtained previously using pure cultures of Nitrosomonas europaea. The maximum specific rate of CH(4) to CH(3)OH conversion obtained during this study was 0.82 mg CH(3)OH COD/mg AOB biomass COD-d, which is 1.5 times the highest value reported with pure cultures. Notwithstanding these positive results, CH(4) oxidation to CH(3)OH by AOB was inhibited by NH(3) (the primary substrate for the oxidative enzyme, ammonia monooxygenase, AMO) as well as the product, CH(3)OH, itself. Further, oxidation of CH(4) to CH(3)OH by AOB was also limited by reducing equivalents supply, which could be overcome by externally supplying hydroxylamine (NH(2)OH) as an electron donor. Therefore, a potential optimum design for promoting CH(4) to CH(3)OH oxidation by AOB could involve supplying NH(3) (needed to maintain AMO activity) uncoupled from the supply of NH(2)OH and CH(4). Partial oxidation of CH(4)-containing gases to CH3OH by AOB represents an attractive platform for the conversion of a gaseous mixture to an aqueous compound, which could be used as a commodity chemical. Alternately, the nitrate and CH(3) OH thus produced could be channeled to a downstream anoxic zone in a biological nitrogen removal process to effect nitrate reduction to N(2), using an internally produced organic electron donor.

  15. Fermentation of xylose to ethanol by genetically modified enteric bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Tolan, J.S.

    1987-01-01

    This thesis describes the fermentation of D-xylose by wild type and recombinant Klebsiella planticola ATCC 33531 and Erwinia chrysanthemi B374. The recombinant strains bear multi-copy plasmids containing the pdc gene inserted from Zymomonas mobilis. Expression of the gene in K. planticola markedly increased the yield of ethanol, up to 1.3 mole/mole xylose, or 25.1 g/L. Concurrently, there were significant decreases in the yields of formation acetate, lactate, and butanediol. Transconjugant Klebsiella grew almost as fast as the wild type and tolerated up to 4% ethanol. The plasmid was retained by the cells during at least one batch culture, even in the absence of selective pressure by antibiotics to maintain the plasmid. The cells produced 31.6 g/L ethanol from 79.6 g/L of a D-glucose-D-xylose-L-arabinose mixture designed to simulate hydrolyzed hemicellulose. The physiology of the wild type K. planticola is described in more detail than in the original report of its isolation. E. chrysanthemi PDC transconjugants also produced ethanol in high yield (up to 1.45 mole/mole xylose). However, transconjugant E. chrysanthemi grew only 1/4 as rapidly as the wild type and tolerated only 2% ethanol. The plasmid PZM15 apparently exhibits pleiotropic effects when inserted into K. planticola and into E. chrysanthemi.

  16. Ethanol production from steam-explosion pretreated wheat straw.

    PubMed

    Ballesteros, Ignacio; Negro, Ma José; Oliva, José Miguel; Cabañas, Araceli; Manzanares, Paloma; Ballesteros, Mercedes

    2006-01-01

    Bioconversion of cereal straw to bioethanol is becoming an attractive alternative to conventional fuel ethanol production from grains. In this work, the best operational conditions for steam-explosion pretreatment of wheat straw for ethanol production by a simultaneous saccharification and fermentation process were studied, using diluted acid [H2SO4 0.9% (w/w)] and water as preimpregnation agents. Acid- or water-impregnated biomass was steam-exploded at different temperatures (160-200 degrees C) and residence times (5, 10, and 20 min). Composition of solid and filtrate obtained after pretreatment, enzymatic digestibility and ethanol production of pretreated wheat straw at different experimental conditions was analyzed. The best pretreatment conditions to obtain high conversion yield to ethanol (approx 80% of theoretical) of cellulose-rich residue after steam-explosion were 190 degrees C and 10 min or 200 degrees C and 5 min, in acid-impregnated straw. However, 180 degrees C for 10 min in acid-impregnated biomass provided the highest ethanol yield referred to raw material (140 L/t wheat straw), and sugars recovery yield in the filtrate (300 g/kg wheat straw).

  17. Dekkera/Brettanomyces yeasts for ethanol production from renewable sources under oxygen-limited and low-pH conditions.

    PubMed

    Galafassi, Silvia; Merico, Annamaria; Pizza, Francesca; Hellborg, Linda; Molinari, Francesco; Piškur, Jure; Compagno, Concetta

    2011-08-01

    Industrial fermentation of lignocellulosic hydrolysates to ethanol requires microorganisms able to utilise a broad range of carbon sources and generate ethanol at high yield and productivity. D. bruxellensis has recently been reported to contaminate commercial ethanol processes, where it competes with Saccharomyces cerevisiae [4, 26]. In this work Brettanomyces/Dekkera yeasts were studied to explore their potential to produce ethanol from renewable sources under conditions suitable for industrial processes, such as oxygen-limited and low-pH conditions. Over 50 strains were analysed for their ability to utilise a variety of carbon sources, and some strains grew on cellobiose and pentoses. Two strains of D. bruxellensis were able to produce ethanol at high yield (0.44 g g(-1) glucose), comparable to those reported for S. cerevisiae. B. naardenensis was shown to be able to produce ethanol from xylose. To obtain ethanol from synthetic lignocellulosic hydrolysates we developed a two-step fermentation strategy: the first step under aerobic conditions for fast production of biomass from mixtures of hexoses and pentoses, followed by a second step under oxygen limitation to promote ethanol production. Under these conditions we obtained biomass and ethanol production on synthetic lignocellulosic hydrolysates, with ethanol yields ranging from 0.2 to 0.3 g g(-1) sugar. Hexoses, xylose and arabinose were consumed at the end of the process, resulting in 13 g l(-1) of ethanol, even in the presence of furfural. Our studies showed that Brettanomyces/Dekkera yeasts have clear potential for further development for industrial processes aimed at production of ethanol from renewable sources.

  18. High Yield Chemical Vapor Deposition Growth of High Quality Large-Area AB Stacked Bilayer Graphene

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lixin; Zhou, Hailong; Cheng, Rui; Yu, Woo Jong; Liu, Yuan; Chen, Yu; Shaw, Jonathan; Zhong, Xing; Huang, Yu; Duan, Xiangfeng

    2012-01-01

    Bernal stacked (AB stacked) bilayer graphene is of significant interest for functional electronic and photonic devices due to the feasibility to continuously tune its band gap with a vertical electrical field. Mechanical exfoliation can be used to produce AB stacked bilayer graphene flakes but typically with the sizes limited to a few micrometers. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) has been recently explored for the synthesis of bilayer graphene but usually with limited coverage and a mixture of AB and randomly stacked structures. Herein we report a rational approach to produce large-area high quality AB stacked bilayer graphene. We show that the self-limiting effect of graphene growth on Cu foil can be broken by using a high H2/CH4 ratio in a low pressure CVD process to enable the continued growth of bilayer graphene. A high temperature and low pressure nucleation step is found to be critical for the formation of bilayer graphene nuclei with high AB stacking ratio. A rational design of a two-step CVD process is developed for the growth of bilayer graphene with high AB stacking ratio (up to 90 %) and high coverage (up to 99 %). The electrical transport studies demonstrated that devices made of the as-grown bilayer graphene exhibit typical characteristics of AB stacked bilayer graphene with the highest carrier mobility exceeding 4,000 cm2/V·s at room temperature, comparable to that of the exfoliated bilayer graphene. PMID:22906199

  19. Ethanol and Volatile Fatty Acid Production from Lignocellulose by Clostridium cellulolyticum

    PubMed Central

    Williams, K.; Zheng, Y.; McGarvey, J.; Fan, Z.; Zhang, R.

    2013-01-01

    Clostridium cellulolyticum is capable of producing glycosyl hydrolase enzymes as well as fermentation products including ethanol and acetate. In this study, the potential of using C. cellulolyticum for ethanol and volatile fatty acid production from straw and grape pomace was examined. For rice straw, the effects of alkaline pretreatment and substrate sterilization prior to fermentation on products yields were also investigated. Effects of alkaline pretreatment and necessity for subsequent washing were tested for two types of grape pomace. For rice straw, the highest ethanol yield was 0.16 g/gVS from the straw pretreated with 10% sodium hydroxide loading at 121°C for 1 hour. Sterilization of the straw prior to fermentation was found to be not significant for ethanol production. Sterilization appeared to decrease native acetogen populations in the rice straw, resulting in lower acetic acid yields. The highest ethanol yield from grape pomace was of 0.09 g/gVS from the pretreated pomace. Pomace type (red or white) and washing were found to be not significant. Ethanol yields by C. cellulolyticum were lower than those from yeast in a simultaneous saccharification and fermentation system, but overall conversion of cellulose and hemicellulose was high, between 68 and 79%. PMID:25969767

  20. Low-potential synthesis of "clean" Au nanodendrites and their high performance toward ethanol oxidation.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jiu-Ju; Li, Ao-Qi; Lei, Zhen; Wang, Ai-Jun

    2012-05-01

    The shape control of Au nanocrystals is crucial to their catalytic applications and optical properties. Well-defined Au nanodendrites (NDs) have been prepared on a glassy carbon electrode using low-potential synthesis, assisted by ethylenediamine (EDA). The effects of applied potential, deposition time, and HAuCl(4) (or EDA) concentrations on the morphology of the Au deposits are discussed in our work. The growth mechanism can be explained by a two-staged growth of dendrites: initial branching and subsequent dendritic growth. The Au NDs exhibits superior catalytic performance toward ethanol oxidation, in comparison with the polycrystalline Au nanoparticles. The simple and facile synthetic technique can be applied to the construction of other metals with complex hierarchical structures on a large-scale.

  1. Future consequences of decreasing marginal production efficiency in the high-yielding dairy cow.

    PubMed

    Moallem, U

    2016-04-01

    The objectives were to examine the gross and marginal production efficiencies in high-yielding dairy cows and the future consequences on dairy industry profitability. Data from 2 experiments were used in across-treatments analysis (n=82 mid-lactation multiparous Israeli-Holstein dairy cows). Milk yields, body weights (BW), and dry matter intakes (DMI) were recorded daily. In both experiments, cows were fed a diet containing 16.5 to 16.6% crude protein and net energy for lactation (NEL) at 1.61 Mcal/kg of dry matter (DM). The means of milk yield, BW, DMI, NEL intake, and energy required for maintenance were calculated individually over the whole study, and used to calculate gross and marginal efficiencies. Data were analyzed in 2 ways: (1) simple correlation between variables; and (2) cows were divided into 3 subgroups, designated low, moderate, and high DMI (LDMI, MDMI, and HDMI), according to actual DMI per day: ≤ 26 kg (n=27); >26 through 28.2 kg (n=28); and >28.2 kg (n=27). The phenotypic Pearson correlations among variables were analyzed, and the GLM procedure was used to test differences between subgroups. The relationships between milk and fat-corrected milk yields and the corresponding gross efficiencies were positive, whereas BW and gross production efficiency were negatively correlated. The marginal production efficiency from DM and energy consumed decreased with increasing DMI. The difference between BW gain as predicted by the National Research Council model (2001) and the present measurements increased with increasing DMI (r=0.68). The average calculated energy balances were 1.38, 2.28, and 4.20 Mcal/d (standard error of the mean=0.64) in the LDMI, MDMI, and HDMI groups, respectively. The marginal efficiency for milk yields from DMI or energy consumed was highest in LDMI, intermediate in MDMI, and lowest in HDMI. The predicted BW gains for the whole study period were 22.9, 37.9, and 75.8 kg for the LDMI, MDMI, and HDMI groups, respectively. The

  2. Future consequences of decreasing marginal production efficiency in the high-yielding dairy cow.

    PubMed

    Moallem, U

    2016-04-01

    The objectives were to examine the gross and marginal production efficiencies in high-yielding dairy cows and the future consequences on dairy industry profitability. Data from 2 experiments were used in across-treatments analysis (n=82 mid-lactation multiparous Israeli-Holstein dairy cows). Milk yields, body weights (BW), and dry matter intakes (DMI) were recorded daily. In both experiments, cows were fed a diet containing 16.5 to 16.6% crude protein and net energy for lactation (NEL) at 1.61 Mcal/kg of dry matter (DM). The means of milk yield, BW, DMI, NEL intake, and energy required for maintenance were calculated individually over the whole study, and used to calculate gross and marginal efficiencies. Data were analyzed in 2 ways: (1) simple correlation between variables; and (2) cows were divided into 3 subgroups, designated low, moderate, and high DMI (LDMI, MDMI, and HDMI), according to actual DMI per day: ≤ 26 kg (n=27); >26 through 28.2 kg (n=28); and >28.2 kg (n=27). The phenotypic Pearson correlations among variables were analyzed, and the GLM procedure was used to test differences between subgroups. The relationships between milk and fat-corrected milk yields and the corresponding gross efficiencies were positive, whereas BW and gross production efficiency were negatively correlated. The marginal production efficiency from DM and energy consumed decreased with increasing DMI. The difference between BW gain as predicted by the National Research Council model (2001) and the present measurements increased with increasing DMI (r=0.68). The average calculated energy balances were 1.38, 2.28, and 4.20 Mcal/d (standard error of the mean=0.64) in the LDMI, MDMI, and HDMI groups, respectively. The marginal efficiency for milk yields from DMI or energy consumed was highest in LDMI, intermediate in MDMI, and lowest in HDMI. The predicted BW gains for the whole study period were 22.9, 37.9, and 75.8 kg for the LDMI, MDMI, and HDMI groups, respectively. The

  3. High throughput and high yield nanofabrication of precisely designed gold nanohole arrays for fluorescence enhanced detection of biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Wong, Ten It; Han, Shan; Wu, Lin; Wang, Yi; Deng, Jie; Tan, Christina Yuan Ling; Bai, Ping; Loke, Yee Chong; Yang, Xin Da; Tse, Man Siu; Ng, Sum Huan; Zhou, Xiaodong

    2013-06-21

    Fluorescence excitation enhancement by plasmonic nanostructures such as gold nanohole arrays has been a hot topic in biosensing and bioimaging in recent years. However, the high throughput and high yield fabrication of precisely designed metal nanostructures for optimized fluorescence excitation remains a challenge. Our work is the first report combining nanopattern nickel mould fabrication and UV imprinting for gold nanostructure mass fabrication in high yield. We report our successful gold nanohole array mass fabrication on a 4'' glass wafer, by first fabricating a high fidelity nickel mould, then using the mould for UV nanoimprinting on a polymer coated on the glass, evaporating the gold film on the glass wafer, and lifting off the polymer to obtain a gold nanohole array on the glass. Our optimized process for wafer fabrication can achieve almost 100% yield from nanoimprinting to gold lift-off, while the fabricated nickel mould has >70% defect-free area with the rest having a few scattered defects. In our work, the size and pitch of the gold nanohole array are designed to enhance the fluorescent dye Alexa 647. When the fabricated gold nanohole array is used for prostate specific antigen (PSA) detection by establishing a sandwiched fluorescence assay on the gold surface, a detection limit of 100 pg ml(-1) is achieved, while with a same thickness of gold film, only 1 ng ml(-1) is detected. PMID:23645079

  4. Traits of selected Clostridium strains for syngas fermentation to ethanol.

    PubMed

    Martin, Michael E; Richter, Hanno; Saha, Surya; Angenent, Largus T

    2016-03-01

    Syngas fermentation is an anaerobic bioprocess that could become industrially relevant as a biorefinery platform for sustainable production of fuels and chemicals. An important prerequisite for commercialization is adequate performance of the biocatalyst (i.e., sufficiently high production rate, titer, selectivity, yield, and stability of the fermentation). Here, we compared the performance of three potential candidate Clostridium strains in syngas-to-ethanol conversion: Clostridium ljungdahlii PETC, C. ljungdahlii ERI-2, and Clostridium autoethanogenum JA1-1. Experiments were conducted in a two-stage, continuously fed syngas-fermentation system that had been optimized for stable ethanol production. The two C. ljungdahlii strains performed similar to each other but different from C. autoethanogenum. When the pH value was lowered from 5.5 to 4.5 to induce solventogenesis, the cell-specific carbon monoxide and hydrogen consumption (similar rate for all strains at pH 5.5), severely decreased in JA1-1, but hardly in PETC and ERI-2. Ethanol production in strains PETC and ERI-2 remained relatively stable while the rate of acetate production decreased, resulting in a high ethanol/acetate ratio, but lower overall productivities. With JA1-1, lowering the pH severely lowered rates of both ethanol and acetate production; and as a consequence, no pronounced shift to solventogenesis was observed. The highest overall ethanol production rate of 0.301 g · L(-1)  · h(-1) was achieved with PETC at pH 4.5 with a corresponding 19 g/L (1.9% w/v) ethanol concentration and a 5.5:1 ethanol/acetate molar ratio. A comparison of the genes relevant for ethanol metabolism revealed differences between C. ljungdahlii and C. autoethanogenum that, however, did not conclusively explain the different phenotypes.

  5. High-yield oil palm expansion spares land at the expense of forests in the Peruvian Amazon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutiérrez-Vélez, Víctor H.; DeFries, Ruth; Pinedo-Vásquez, Miguel; Uriarte, María; Padoch, Christine; Baethgen, Walter; Fernandes, Katia; Lim, Yili

    2011-01-01

    High-yield agriculture potentially reduces pressure on forests by requiring less land to increase production. Using satellite and field data, we assessed the area deforested by industrial-scale high-yield oil palm expansion in the Peruvian Amazon from 2000 to 2010, finding that 72% of new plantations expanded into forested areas. In a focus area in the Ucayali region, we assessed deforestation for high- and smallholder low-yield oil palm plantations. Low-yield plantations accounted for most expansion overall (80%), but only 30% of their expansion involved forest conversion, contrasting with 75% for high-yield expansion. High-yield expansion minimized the total area required to achieve production but counter-intuitively at higher expense to forests than low-yield plantations. The results show that high-yield agriculture is an important but insufficient strategy to reduce pressure on forests. We suggest that high-yield agriculture can be effective in sparing forests only if coupled with incentives for agricultural expansion into already cleared lands.

  6. Wafer scale fabrication of carbon nanotube thin film transistors with high yield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Boyuan; Liang, Xuelei; Yan, Qiuping; Zhang, Han; Xia, Jiye; Dong, Guodong; Peng, Lianmao; Xie, Sishen

    2016-07-01

    Carbon nanotube thin film transistors (CNT-TFTs) are promising candidates for future high performance and low cost macro-electronics. However, most of the reported CNT-TFTs are fabricated in small quantities on a relatively small size substrate. The yield of large scale fabrication and the performance uniformity of devices on large size substrates should be improved before the CNT-TFTs reach real products. In this paper, 25 200 devices, with various geometries (channel width and channel length), were fabricated on 4-in. size ridged and flexible substrates. Almost 100% device yield were obtained on a rigid substrate with high out-put current (>8 μA/μm), high on/off current ratio (>105), and high mobility (>30 cm2/V.s). More importantly, uniform performance in 4-in. area was achieved, and the fabrication process can be scaled up. The results give us more confidence for the real application of the CNT-TFT technology in the near future.

  7. Ethanol production from Jerusalem artichoke tubers at high temperature by newly isolated thermotolerant inulin-utilizing yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus using consolidated bioprocessing.

    PubMed

    Charoensopharat, Kanlayani; Thanonkeo, Pornthap; Thanonkeo, Sudarat; Yamada, Mamoru

    2015-07-01

    Thermotolerant inulin-utilizing yeast strains were successfully isolated in this study. Among the isolated strains, Kluyveromyces marxianus DBKKU Y-102 was found to be the most effective strain for direct ethanol fermentation at high temperature from fresh Jerusalem artichoke (JA) tubers without inulin hydrolysis under consolidated bioprocessing (CBP). The maximum ethanol concentrations produced by this strain under the optimum culture conditions were 104.83 and 97.46 g L(-1) at 37 and 40 °C, respectively. Data from this study clearly demonstrated that the use of thermotolerant inulin-utilizing yeast K. marxianus for ethanol production from fresh JA tubers in the CBP process not only provided high levels of ethanol, but also could eliminate the addition of external enzyme for inulin hydrolysis, which might lead to the reduction of operating costs. The expression of genes involved in carbohydrate metabolism in K. marxianus DBKKU Y-102 during ethanol fermentation was investigated by real-time RT-PCR, and the results revealed that expression levels were distinctive depending on the growth phase and growth conditions. However, among the genes tested, adh4 and tdh2 were highly expressed under high temperature conditions in both exponential- and stationary-growth phases, suggesting that these genes might play a crucial role in acquiring thermotolerance ability in this organism under stress conditions.

  8. Characterization of neutron yield and x-ray spectra of a High Flux Neutron Generator (HFNG)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nnamani, Nnaemeka; HFNG Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    The High Flux Neutron Generator (HFNG) is a DD plasma-based source, with a self-loading target intended for fundamental science and engineering applications, including 40 Ar/39 Ar geochronology, neutron cross section measurements, and radiation hardness testing of electronics. Our first estimate of the neutron yield, based on the population of the 4.486 hour 115 In isomer gave a neutron yield of the order 108 n/sec; optimization is ongoing to achieve the design target of 1011 n/sec. Preliminary x-ray spectra showed prominent energy peaks which are likely due to atomic line-emission from back-streaming electrons accelerated up to 100 keV impinging on various components of the HFNG chamber. Our x-ray and neutron diagnostics will aid us as we continue to evolve the design to suppress back-streaming electrons, necessary to achieve higher plasma beam currents, and thus higher neutron flux. This talk will focus on the characterization of the neutron yield and x-ray spectra during our tests. A collimation system is being installed near one of the chamber ports for improved observation of the x-ray spectra. This work is supported by NSF Grant No. EAR-0960138, U.S. DOE LBNL Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231, U.S. DOE LLNL Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344, and the UC Office of the President Award 12-LR-238745.

  9. Sortase A as a tool for high-yield histatin cyclization.

    PubMed

    Bolscher, Jan G M; Oudhoff, Menno J; Nazmi, Kamran; Antos, John M; Guimaraes, Carla P; Spooner, Eric; Haney, Evan F; Garcia Vallejo, Juan J; Vogel, Hans J; van't Hof, Wim; Ploegh, Hidde L; Veerman, Enno C I

    2011-08-01

    Cyclic peptides are highly valued tools in biomedical research. In many cases, they show higher receptor affinity, enhanced biological activity, and improved serum stability. Technical difficulties in producing cyclic peptides, especially larger ones, in appreciable yields have precluded a prolific use in biomedical research. Here, we describe a novel and efficient cyclization method that uses the peptidyl-transferase activity of the Staphylococcus aureus enzyme sortase A to cyclize linear synthetic precursor peptides. As a model, we used histatin 1, a 38-mer salivary peptide with motogenic activity. Chemical cyclization of histatin 1 resulted in ≤ 3% yields, whereas sortase-mediated cyclization provided a yield of >90%. The sortase-cyclized peptide displayed a maximum wound closure activity at 10 nM, whereas the linear peptide displayed maximal activity at 10 μM. Circular dichroism and NMR spectroscopic analysis of the linear and cyclic peptide in solution showed no evidence for conformational changes, suggesting that structural differences due to cyclization only became manifest when these peptides were located in the binding domain of the receptor. The sortase-based cyclization technology provides a general method for easy and efficient manufacturing of large cyclic peptides.

  10. Single phase flow characteristics of FC-72 and ethanol in high aspect ratio rectangular mini- and micro-channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuan; Wang, Zhen-guo

    2016-11-01

    Single phase flow friction factor of FC-72 and ethanol in mini-and micro-channels are experimentally investigated in the present study. High aspect ratio3 rectangular channels are selected, the hydraulic diameters of which are 571 µm, 762 µm and 1454 µm, and the aspect ratios are 20, 20 and 10 respectively. Degassed ethanol and FC-72 are used as working fluids. All the friction factors acquired in the 571 µm and 762 µm channels agree with the conventional friction theory within  ±20%–±25%. In the 1454 µm channel, however, deviations from the conventional theory occur and a modified empirical correlation of friction factor as a function of Reynolds number is proposed. Early transition from laminar to transitional flow is captured. Besides, effects of liquid physical properties are discussed. Lower viscosity and higher liquid density are responsible for the higher friction factor of FC-72. The influence of liquid properties weakens as the Reynolds number increases.

  11. Cacao Cultivation under Diverse Shade Tree Cover Allows High Carbon Storage and Sequestration without Yield Losses

    PubMed Central

    Abou Rajab, Yasmin; Leuschner, Christoph; Barus, Henry; Tjoa, Aiyen; Hertel, Dietrich

    2016-01-01

    One of the main drivers of tropical forest loss is their conversion to oil palm, soy or cacao plantations with low biodiversity and greatly reduced carbon storage. Southeast Asian cacao plantations are often established under shade tree cover, but are later converted to non-shaded monocultures to avoid resource competition. We compared three co-occurring cacao cultivation systems (3 replicate stands each) with different shade intensity (non-shaded monoculture, cacao with the legume Gliricidia sepium shade trees, and cacao with several shade tree species) in Sulawesi (Indonesia) with respect to above- and belowground biomass and productivity, and cacao bean yield. Total biomass C stocks (above- and belowground) increased fivefold from the monoculture to the multi-shade tree system (from 11 to 57 Mg ha-1), total net primary production rose twofold (from 9 to 18 Mg C ha-1 yr-1). This increase was associated with a 6fold increase in aboveground biomass, but only a 3.5fold increase in root biomass, indicating a clear shift in C allocation to aboveground tree organs with increasing shade for both cacao and shade trees. Despite a canopy cover increase from 50 to 93%, cacao bean yield remained invariant across the systems (variation: 1.1–1.2 Mg C ha-1 yr-1). The monocultures had a twice as rapid leaf turnover suggesting that shading reduces the exposure of cacao to atmospheric drought, probably resulting in greater leaf longevity. Thus, contrary to general belief, cacao bean yield does not necessarily decrease under shading which seems to reduce physical stress. If planned properly, cacao plantations under a shade tree cover allow combining high yield with benefits for carbon sequestration and storage, production system stability under stress, and higher levels of animal and plant diversity. PMID:26927428

  12. Cacao Cultivation under Diverse Shade Tree Cover Allows High Carbon Storage and Sequestration without Yield Losses.

    PubMed

    Abou Rajab, Yasmin; Leuschner, Christoph; Barus, Henry; Tjoa, Aiyen; Hertel, Dietrich

    2016-01-01

    One of the main drivers of tropical forest loss is their conversion to oil palm, soy or cacao plantations with low biodiversity and greatly reduced carbon storage. Southeast Asian cacao plantations are often established under shade tree cover, but are later converted to non-shaded monocultures to avoid resource competition. We compared three co-occurring cacao cultivation systems (3 replicate stands each) with different shade intensity (non-shaded monoculture, cacao with the legume Gliricidia sepium shade trees, and cacao with several shade tree species) in Sulawesi (Indonesia) with respect to above- and belowground biomass and productivity, and cacao bean yield. Total biomass C stocks (above- and belowground) increased fivefold from the monoculture to the multi-shade tree system (from 11 to 57 Mg ha-1), total net primary production rose twofold (from 9 to 18 Mg C ha-1 yr-1). This increase was associated with a 6fold increase in aboveground biomass, but only a 3.5fold increase in root biomass, indicating a clear shift in C allocation to aboveground tree organs with increasing shade for both cacao and shade trees. Despite a canopy cover increase from 50 to 93%, cacao bean yield remained invariant across the systems (variation: 1.1-1.2 Mg C ha-1 yr-1). The monocultures had a twice as rapid leaf turnover suggesting that shading reduces the exposure of cacao to atmospheric drought, probably resulting in greater leaf longevity. Thus, contrary to general belief, cacao bean yield does not necessarily decrease under shading which seems to reduce physical stress. If planned properly, cacao plantations under a shade tree cover allow combining high yield with benefits for carbon sequestration and storage, production system stability under stress, and higher levels of animal and plant diversity.

  13. Cacao Cultivation under Diverse Shade Tree Cover Allows High Carbon Storage and Sequestration without Yield Losses.

    PubMed

    Abou Rajab, Yasmin; Leuschner, Christoph; Barus, Henry; Tjoa, Aiyen; Hertel, Dietrich

    2016-01-01

    One of the main drivers of tropical forest loss is their conversion to oil palm, soy or cacao plantations with low biodiversity and greatly reduced carbon storage. Southeast Asian cacao plantations are often established under shade tree cover, but are later converted to non-shaded monocultures to avoid resource competition. We compared three co-occurring cacao cultivation systems (3 replicate stands each) with different shade intensity (non-shaded monoculture, cacao with the legume Gliricidia sepium shade trees, and cacao with several shade tree species) in Sulawesi (Indonesia) with respect to above- and belowground biomass and productivity, and cacao bean yield. Total biomass C stocks (above- and belowground) increased fivefold from the monoculture to the multi-shade tree system (from 11 to 57 Mg ha-1), total net primary production rose twofold (from 9 to 18 Mg C ha-1 yr-1). This increase was associated with a 6fold increase in aboveground biomass, but only a 3.5fold increase in root biomass, indicating a clear shift in C allocation to aboveground tree organs with increasing shade for both cacao and shade trees. Despite a canopy cover increase from 50 to 93%, cacao bean yield remained invariant across the systems (variation: 1.1-1.2 Mg C ha-1 yr-1). The monocultures had a twice as rapid leaf turnover suggesting that shading reduces the exposure of cacao to atmospheric drought, probably resulting in greater leaf longevity. Thus, contrary to general belief, cacao bean yield does not necessarily decrease under shading which seems to reduce physical stress. If planned properly, cacao plantations under a shade tree cover allow combining high yield with benefits for carbon sequestration and storage, production system stability under stress, and higher levels of animal and plant diversity. PMID:26927428

  14. Ethanol production at elevated temperatures using encapsulation of yeast.

    PubMed

    Ylitervo, Päivi; Franzén, Carl Johan; Taherzadeh, Mohammad J

    2011-10-20

    The ability of macroencapsulated Saccharomyces cerevisiae CBS 8066 to produce ethanol at elevated temperatures was investigated in consecutive batch and continuous cultures. Prior to cultivation yeast was confined inside alginate-chitosan capsules composed of an outer semi-permeable membrane and an inner liquid core. The encapsulated yeast could successfully ferment 30 g/L glucose and produce ethanol at a high yield in five consecutive batches of 12 h duration at 42°C, while freely suspended yeast was completely inactive already in the third batch. A high ethanol production was observed also through the first 48 h at 40°C during continuous cultivation at D=0.2 h(-1) when using encapsulated cells. The ethanol production slowly decreased in the following days at 40°C. The ethanol production was also measured in a continuous cultivation in which the temperature was periodically increased to 42-45°C and lowered to 37°C again in periods of 12h. Our investigation shows that a non-thermotolerant yeast strain improved its heat tolerance upon encapsulation, and could produce ethanol at temperatures as high as 45°C for a short time. The possibility of performing fermentations at higher temperatures would greatly improve the enzymatic hydrolysis in simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) processes and thereby make the bioethanol production process more economically feasible.

  15. Unexpected high yields of carbonyl and peroxide products of aqueous isoprene ozonolysis and implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H. L.; Huang, D.; Zhang, X.; Zhao, Y.; Chen, Z. M.

    2012-03-01

    The aqueous phase reaction of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) has not been considered in most analyses of atmospheric chemical processes. However, some experimental evidence has shown that, compared to the corresponding gas phase reaction, the aqueous chemical processes of VOCs in the bulk solutions and surfaces of ambient wet particles (cloud, fog, and wet aerosols) may potentially contribute to the products and formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). In the present study, we performed a laboratory experiment of the aqueous ozonolysis of isoprene at different pHs (3-7) and temperatures (4-25 °C). We detected three important kinds of products, including carbonyl compounds, peroxide compounds, and organic acids. Our results showed that the molar yields of these products were nearly independent of the investigated pHs and temperatures. These products included (1) carbonyls: 56.7 ± 6.7% formaldehyde, 42.8 ± 2.5% methacrolein (MAC), and 57.7 ± 3.4% methyl vinyl ketone (MVK); (2) peroxides: 53.4 ± 4.1% hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and 15.1 ± 3.1% hydroxylmethyl hydroperoxide (HMHP); and (3) organic acids: undetectable (< 1% estimated by the detection limit). Based on the amounts of products formed and the isoprene consumed, the total carbon yield was estimated to be 95 ± 4%. This implied that most of the products in the reaction system were detected. Of note, the combined yields of both MAC + MVK and H2O2 + HMHP in the aqueous isoprene ozonolysis were much higher than those observed in the corresponding gas phase reaction. We suggested that these unexpected high yields of carbonyls and peroxides were related to the greater capability of condensed water, compared to water vapor, to stabilize energy-rich Criegee radicals. This aqueous ozonolysis of isoprene (and possibly other biogenic VOCs) could potentially occur on the surfaces of ambient wet particles and plants. Moreover, the high-yield carbonyl and peroxide products might provide a considerable source of

  16. High night temperatures during grain number determination reduce wheat and barley grain yield: a field study.

    PubMed

    García, Guillermo A; Dreccer, M Fernanda; Miralles, Daniel J; Serrago, Román A

    2015-11-01

    Warm nights are a widespread predicted feature of climate change. This study investigated the impact of high night temperatures during the critical period for grain yield determination in wheat and barley crops under field conditions, assessing the effects on development, growth and partitioning crop-level processes driving grain number per unit area (GN). Experiments combined: (i) two contrasting radiation and temperature environments: late sowing in 2011 and early sowing in 2013, (ii) two well-adapted crops with similar phenology: bread wheat and two-row malting barley and (iii) two temperature regimes: ambient and high night temperatures. The night temperature increase (ca. 3.9 °C in both crops and growing seasons) was achieved using purpose-built heating chambers placed on the crop at 19:000 hours and removed at 7:00 hours every day from the third detectable stem node to 10 days post-flowering. Across growing seasons and crops, the average minimum temperature during the critical period ranged from 11.2 to 17.2 °C. Wheat and barley grain yield were similarly reduced under warm nights (ca. 7% °C(-1) ), due to GN reductions (ca. 6% °C(-1) ) linked to a lower number of spikes per m(2) . An accelerated development under high night temperatures led to a shorter critical period duration, reducing solar radiation capture with negative consequences for biomass production, GN and therefore, grain yield. The information generated could be used as a starting point to design management and/or breeding strategies to improve crop adaptation facing climate change.

  17. High night temperatures during grain number determination reduce wheat and barley grain yield: a field study.

    PubMed

    García, Guillermo A; Dreccer, M Fernanda; Miralles, Daniel J; Serrago, Román A

    2015-11-01

    Warm nights are a widespread predicted feature of climate change. This study investigated the impact of high night temperatures during the critical period for grain yield determination in wheat and barley crops under field conditions, assessing the effects on development, growth and partitioning crop-level processes driving grain number per unit area (GN). Experiments combined: (i) two contrasting radiation and temperature environments: late sowing in 2011 and early sowing in 2013, (ii) two well-adapted crops with similar phenology: bread wheat and two-row malting barley and (iii) two temperature regimes: ambient and high night temperatures. The night temperature increase (ca. 3.9 °C in both crops and growing seasons) was achieved using purpose-built heating chambers placed on the crop at 19:000 hours and removed at 7:00 hours every day from the third detectable stem node to 10 days post-flowering. Across growing seasons and crops, the average minimum temperature during the critical period ranged from 11.2 to 17.2 °C. Wheat and barley grain yield were similarly reduced under warm nights (ca. 7% °C(-1) ), due to GN reductions (ca. 6% °C(-1) ) linked to a lower number of spikes per m(2) . An accelerated development under high night temperatures led to a shorter critical period duration, reducing solar radiation capture with negative consequences for biomass production, GN and therefore, grain yield. The information generated could be used as a starting point to design management and/or breeding strategies to improve crop adaptation facing climate change. PMID:26111197

  18. DMR (deacetylation and mechanical refining) processing of corn stover achieves high monomeric sugar concentrations (230 g L-1) during enzymatic hydrolysis and high ethanol concentrations (>10% v/v) during fermentation without hydrolysate purification or concentration

    DOE PAGES

    Chen, Xiaowen; Kuhn, Erik; Jennings, Edward W.; Nelson, Robert; Tao, Ling; Zhang, Min; Tucker, Melvin P.

    2016-04-01

    Distilling and purifying ethanol and other products from second generation lignocellulosic biorefineries adds significant capital and operating costs to biofuel production. The energy usage associated with distillation negatively affects plant gate costs and causes environmental and life-cycle impacts, and the lower titers in fermentation caused by lower sugar concentrations from pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis increase energy and water usage and ethanol production costs. In addition, lower ethanol titers increase the volumes required for enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation vessels increase capital expenditure (CAPEX). Therefore, increasing biofuel titers has been a research focus in renewable biofuel production for several decades. In thismore » work, we achieved approximately 230 g L-1 of monomeric sugars after high solid enzymatic hydrolysis using deacetylation and mechanical refining (DMR) processed corn stover substrates produced at the 100 kg per day scale. The high sugar concentrations and low chemical inhibitor concentrations achieved by the DMR process allowed fermentation to ethanol with titers as high as 86 g L-1, which translates into approximately 10.9% v/v ethanol. To our knowledge, this is the first time that titers greater than 10% v/v ethanol in fermentations derived from corn stover without any sugar concentration or purification steps have been reported. As a result, the potential cost savings from high sugar and ethanol titers achieved by the DMR process are also reported using TEA analysis.« less

  19. Process for producing ethanol

    SciTech Connect

    Lantero, O.J.; Fish, J.J.

    1993-07-27

    A process is described for producing ethanol from raw materials containing a high dry solid mash level having fermentable sugars or constituents which can be converted into sugars, comprising the steps of: (a) liquefaction of the raw materials in the presence of an alpha amylase to obtain liquefied mash; (b) saccharification of the liquefied mash in the presence of a glucoamylase to obtain hydrolysed starch and sugars; (c) fermentation of the hydrolysed starch and sugars by yeast to obtain ethanol; and (d) recovering the obtained ethanol, wherein an acid fungal protease is introduced to the liquefied mash during the saccharification and/or to the hydrolysed starch and sugars during the fermentation, thereby increasing the rate of production of ethanol as compared to a substantially similar process conducted without the introduction of the protease.

  20. Delta-Doping at Wafer Level for High Throughput, High Yield Fabrication of Silicon Imaging Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoenk, Michael E. (Inventor); Nikzad, Shoulch (Inventor); Jones, Todd J. (Inventor); Greer, Frank (Inventor); Carver, Alexander G. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Systems and methods for producing high quantum efficiency silicon devices. A silicon MBE has a preparation chamber that provides for cleaning silicon surfaces using an oxygen plasma to remove impurities and a gaseous (dry) NH3 + NF3 room temperature oxide removal process that leaves the silicon surface hydrogen terminated. Silicon wafers up to 8 inches in diameter have devices that can be fabricated using the cleaning procedures and MBE processing, including delta doping.

  1. A high yield technique for freeze-fracturing of small fractions of isolated cells.

    PubMed

    Falcieri, E; Mariani, A R; Del Coco, R; Facchini, A; Maraldi, N M

    1988-07-01

    A simple, high-yield technique for the freeze-fracturing of small amounts of isolated cells is described. A drop of cells fixed in suspension is deposited on a polylysine-treated coverslip, forming a monolayer through electrostatic forces. After cryoprotection, the coverslip is inverted on a gold carrier covered with Vinol and then frozen in liquid nitrogen. The monolayer will be fractured by advancing the knife under the coverslip. Large areas of cell surface can be exposed despite their low number, such as that obtainable after cell sorting by flow cytometry. PMID:3179998

  2. A High Yield Synthesis of Chalcopyrite CuInS2 Nanoparticles with Exceptional Size Control

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Chivin; Gardner, Joseph S.; Shurdha, Endrit; Margulieux, Kelsey R.; Westover, Richard D.; Lau, Lisa D.; Long, Gary; Bajracharya, Cyril; Wang, Chong M.; Thurber, Aaron P.; Punnoose, Alex; Rodriguez, Rene G.; Pak, Joshua J.

    2009-12-29

    Various I-III-VI2 semiconductor materials have been identified as promising photovoltaic materials [1, 2]. Recently, quantum dot (QD) based solar cells have attracted much attention due to their potential to replace thin film devices [3-5]. One of the major advantages of employing QDs is by simply changing the particle size they can be tuned to absorb specific wavelengths ranging from visible to infrared wavelengths [6]. Furthermore, with careful design of photovoltaic (PV) devices incorporating various sizes of nanoparticles in multiple layers, one may achieve increased solar energy absorption in one device [7, 8]. In order to facilitate QD based multilayer devices, synthetic strategies that can deliver QDs in high yields with precise size control are essential. One of the strategies to prepare QDs is to prepare nanoparticles from molecular single source precursors (SSPs), which contain all necessary elements in a single molecule. In recent years, there have been several reports on the formation of CuInS2 nanoparticles through the decomposition of SSPs using thermolysis [9-14], photolysis [18], and microwave irradiation [16]. However, many of these procedures require a combination of long reaction times (10 to 24 hours) and high reaction temperatures (often exceeding 200 °C) with very little information regarding overall yields. Microwave-assisted growth of nanoparticles is generally favorable over traditional thermolysis as microwave irradiation overcomes local intermediaries and increases the microscopic temperature of the reaction [17] thus exhibiting greater homogeneity in the overall reaction temperature. This allows for nanoparticles with diameters of a few nanometers can be prepared [18], dramatic decreases in reaction times, improved product purities, all forms of precursors can be used, and reactions exhibit high reproducibility and yields [19]. For CuInS2 QDs, the Wannier-Mott bulk exciton radius is approximately 8 nm with a bandgap of 1.45 eV and QDs

  3. Very high CO2 reduces photosynthesis, dark respiration and yield in wheat.

    PubMed

    Reuveni, J; Bugbee, B

    1997-10-01

    Although terrestrial CO2 concentrations, [CO2] are not expected to reach 1000 micromoles mol-1 for many decades, CO2 levels in closed systems such as growth chambers and glasshouses, can easily exceed this concentration. CO2 levels in life support systems in space can exceed 10000 micromoles mol-1 (1%). Here we studied the effect of six CO2 concentrations, from ambient up to 10000 micromoles mol-1, on seed yield, growth and gas exchange of two wheat cultivars (USU-Apogee and Veery-l0). Elevating [CO2] from 350 to 1000 micromoles mol-1 increased seed yield (by 33%), vegetative biomass (by 25%) and number of heads m-2 (by 34%) of wheat plants. Elevation of [CO2] from 1000 to 10000 micromoles mol-1 decreased seed yield (by 37%), harvest index (by 14%), mass per seed (by 9%) and number of seeds per head (by 29%). This very high [CO2] had a negligible, non-significant effect on vegetative biomass, number of heads m-2 and seed mass per head. A sharp decrease in seed yield, harvest index and seeds per head occurred by elevating [CO2] from 1000 to 2600 micromoles mol-1. Further elevation of [CO2] from 2600 to 10000 micromoles mol-1 caused a further but smaller decrease. The effect of CO2 on both wheat cultivars was similar for all growth parameters. Similarly there were no differences in the response to high [CO2] between wheat grown hydroponically in growth chambers under fluorescent lights and those grown in soilless media in a glasshouse under sunlight and high pressure sodium lamps. There was no correlation between high [CO2] and ethylene production by flag leaves or by wheat heads. Therefore, the reduction in seed set in wheat plants is not mediated by ethylene. The photosynthetic rate of whole wheat plants was 8% lower and dark respiration of the wheat heads 25% lower when exposed to 2600 micromoles mol-1 CO2 compared to ambient [CO2]. It is concluded that the reduction in the seed set can be mainly explained by the reduction in the dark respiration in wheat heads

  4. Carbon dots with high fluorescence quantum yield: the fluorescence originates from organic fluorophores.

    PubMed

    Shi, Lei; Yang, Jian Hai; Zeng, Hai Bo; Chen, Yong Mei; Yang, Sheng Chun; Wu, Chao; Zeng, Hao; Yoshihito, Osada; Zhang, Qiqing

    2016-08-14

    In this contribution, we have shown that the organic fluorophores, 5-oxo-3,5-dihydro-2H-thiazolo [3,2-a] pyridine-3,7-dicarboxylic acid (TPDCA) and 5-oxo-3,5-dihydro-2H-thiazolo [3,2-a] pyridine-7-carboxylic acid (TPCA), are the main ingredients and fluorescence origins of N,S-CDs via systematic analyses. It inspires us to deeply analyze and understand the fluorescence origins of carbon dots with high fluorescence quantum yields, which will expand their applications. PMID:27426926

  5. Very high CO2 reduces photosynthesis, dark respiration and yield in wheat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reuveni, J.; Bugbee, B.

    1997-01-01

    Although terrestrial CO2 concentrations, [CO2] are not expected to reach 1000 micromoles mol-1 for many decades, CO2 levels in closed systems such as growth chambers and glasshouses, can easily exceed this concentration. CO2 levels in life support systems in space can exceed 10000 micromoles mol-1 (1%). Here we studied the effect of six CO2 concentrations, from ambient up to 10000 micromoles mol-1, on seed yield, growth and gas exchange of two wheat cultivars (USU-Apogee and Veery-l0). Elevating [CO2] from 350 to 1000 micromoles mol-1 increased seed yield (by 33%), vegetative biomass (by 25%) and number of heads m-2 (by 34%) of wheat plants. Elevation of [CO2] from 1000 to 10000 micromoles mol-1 decreased seed yield (by 37%), harvest index (by 14%), mass per seed (by 9%) and number of seeds per head (by 29%). This very high [CO2] had a negligible, non-significant effect on vegetative biomass, number of heads m-2 and seed mass per head. A sharp decrease in seed yield, harvest index and seeds per head occurred by elevating [CO2] from 1000 to 2600 micromoles mol-1. Further elevation of [CO2] from 2600 to 10000 micromoles mol-1 caused a further but smaller decrease. The effect of CO2 on both wheat cultivars was similar for all growth parameters. Similarly there were no differences in the response to high [CO2] between wheat grown hydroponically in growth chambers under fluorescent lights and those grown in soilless media in a glasshouse under sunlight and high pressure sodium lamps. There was no correlation between high [CO2] and ethylene production by flag leaves or by wheat heads. Therefore, the reduction in seed set in wheat plants is not mediated by ethylene. The photosynthetic rate of whole wheat plants was 8% lower and dark respiration of the wheat heads 25% lower when exposed to 2600 micromoles mol-1 CO2 compared to ambient [CO2]. It is concluded that the reduction in the seed set can be mainly explained by the reduction in the dark respiration in wheat heads

  6. Contamination issues in a continuous ethanol production corn wet milling facility

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Low ethanol yields and poor yeast viability were investigated at a continuous ethanol production corn wet milling facility. Using starch slurries and recycle streams from a commercial ethanol facility, laboratory hydrolysates were prepared by reproducing starch liquefaction and saccharification ste...

  7. Neutron temporal diagnostic for high-yield deuterium-tritium cryogenic implosions on OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoeckl, C.; Boni, R.; Ehrne, F.; Forrest, C. J.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Katz, J.; Lonobile, D. J.; Magoon, J.; Regan, S. P.; Shoup, M. J.; Sorce, A.; Sorce, C.; Sangster, T. C.; Weiner, D.

    2016-05-01

    A next-generation neutron temporal diagnostic (NTD) capable of recording high-quality data for the highest anticipated yield cryogenic deuterium-tritium (DT) implosion experiments was recently installed at the Omega Laser Facility. A high-quality measurement of the neutron production width is required to determine the hot-spot pressure achieved in inertial confinement fusion experiments—a key metric in assessing the quality of these implosions. The design of this NTD is based on a fast-rise-time plastic scintillator, which converts the neutron kinetic energy to 350- to 450-nm-wavelength light. The light from the scintillator inside the nose-cone assembly is relayed ˜16 m to a streak camera in a well-shielded location. An ˜200× reduction in neutron background was observed during the first high-yield DT cryogenic implosions compared to the current NTD installation on OMEGA. An impulse response of ˜40 ± 10 ps was measured in a dedicated experiment using hard x-rays from a planar target irradiated with a 10-ps short pulse from the OMEGA EP laser. The measured instrument response includes contributions from the scintillator rise time, optical relay, and streak camera.

  8. A Permanent-Magnet Microwave Ion Source for a Compact High-Yield Neutron Generator

    SciTech Connect

    Waldmann, Ole; Ludewigt, Bernhard

    2010-10-11

    We present recent work on the development of a microwave ion source that will be used in a high-yield compact neutron generator for active interrogation applications. The sealed tube generator will be capable of producing high neutron yields, 5x1011 n/s for D-T and ~;;1x1010 n/s for D-D reactions, while remaining transportable. We constructed a microwave ion source (2.45 GHz) with permanent magnets to provide the magnetic field strength of 87.5 mT necessary for satisfying the electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) condition. Microwave ion sources can produce high extracted beam currents at the low gas pressures required for sealed tube operation and at lower power levels than previously used RF-driven ion sources. A 100 mA deuterium/tritium beam will be extracted through a large slit (60x6 mm2) to spread the beam power over a larger target area. This paper describes the design of the permanent-magnet microwave ion source and discusses the impact of the magnetic field design on the source performance. The required equivalent proton beam current density of 40 mA/cm2 was extracted at a moderate microwave power of 400 W with an optimized magnetic field.

  9. RNA isolation from loquat and other recalcitrant woody plants with high quality and yield.

    PubMed

    Morante-Carriel, Jaime; Sellés-Marchart, Susana; Martínez-Márquez, Ascensión; Martínez-Esteso, María José; Luque, Ignacio; Bru-Martínez, Roque

    2014-05-01

    RNA isolation is difficult in plants that contain large amounts of polysaccharides and polyphenol compounds. To date, no commercial kit has been developed for the isolation of high-quality RNA from tissues with these characteristics, especially for fruit. The common protocols for RNA isolation are tedious and usually result in poor yields when applied to recalcitrant plant tissues. Here an efficient RNA isolation protocol based on cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and two successive precipitations with 10 M lithium chloride (LiCl) was developed specifically for loquat fruits, but it was proved to work efficiently in other tissues of loquat and woody plants. The RNA isolated by this improved protocol was not only of high purity and integrity (A260/A280 ratios ranged from 1.90 to 2.04 and A260/A230 ratios were>2.0) but also of high yield (up to 720 μg on average [coefficient of variation=21%] total RNA per gram fresh tissue). The protocol was tested on loquat fruit (different stages of development, postharvest, ripening, and bruising), leaf, root, flower, stem, and bud; quince fruit and root; grapevine cells in liquid culture; and rose petals. The RNA obtained with this method is amenable to enzymatic treatments and can be efficiently applied for research on gene characterization, expression, and function.

  10. Propagation method for persistent high yield of diverse Listeria phages on permissive hosts at refrigeration temperatures.

    PubMed

    Radford, Devon R; Ahmadi, Hanie; Leon-Velarde, Carlos G; Balamurugan, Sampathkumar

    2016-10-01

    The efficient production of a high concentration of bacteriophage in large volumes has been a limiting factor in the exploration of the true potential of these organisms for biotechnology, agriculture and medicine. Traditional methods focus on generating small volumes of highly concentrated samples as the end product of extensive mechanical and osmotic processing. To function at an industrial scale mandates extensive investment in infrastructure and input materials not feasible for many smaller facilities. To address this, we developed a novel, scalable, generic method for producing significantly higher titer psychrophilic phage (P < 2.0 × 10(-6)), 2- to 4-fold faster than traditional methods. We generate renewable high yields from single source cultures by propagating phage under refrigeration conditions in which Listeria, Yersinia and their phages grow in equilibrium. Diverse Yersinia and Listeria phages tested yielded averages of 3.49 × 10(8) to 3.36 × 10(12) PFU/ml/day compared to averages of 1.28 × 10(5) to 1.30 × 10(10) PFU/ml/day by traditional methods. Host growth and death kinetics made this method ineffective for extended propagation of mesophilic phages.

  11. Propagation method for persistent high yield of diverse Listeria phages on permissive hosts at refrigeration temperatures.

    PubMed

    Radford, Devon R; Ahmadi, Hanie; Leon-Velarde, Carlos G; Balamurugan, Sampathkumar

    2016-10-01

    The efficient production of a high concentration of bacteriophage in large volumes has been a limiting factor in the exploration of the true potential of these organisms for biotechnology, agriculture and medicine. Traditional methods focus on generating small volumes of highly concentrated samples as the end product of extensive mechanical and osmotic processing. To function at an industrial scale mandates extensive investment in infrastructure and input materials not feasible for many smaller facilities. To address this, we developed a novel, scalable, generic method for producing significantly higher titer psychrophilic phage (P < 2.0 × 10(-6)), 2- to 4-fold faster than traditional methods. We generate renewable high yields from single source cultures by propagating phage under refrigeration conditions in which Listeria, Yersinia and their phages grow in equilibrium. Diverse Yersinia and Listeria phages tested yielded averages of 3.49 × 10(8) to 3.36 × 10(12) PFU/ml/day compared to averages of 1.28 × 10(5) to 1.30 × 10(10) PFU/ml/day by traditional methods. Host growth and death kinetics made this method ineffective for extended propagation of mesophilic phages. PMID:27287043

  12. Neutron temporal diagnostic for high-yield deuterium-tritium cryogenic implosions on OMEGA

    DOE PAGES

    Stoeckl, C.; Boni, R.; Ehrne, F.; Forrest, C. J.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Katz, J.; Lonobile, D. J.; Magoon, J.; Regan, S. P.; Shoup, III, M. J.; et al

    2016-05-10

    A next-generation neutron temporal diagnostic (NTD) capable of recording high-quality data for the highest anticipated yield cryogenic DT implosion experiments was recently installed at the Omega Laser Facility. A high-quality measurement of the neutron production width is required to determine the hot-spot pressure achieved in inertial confinement fusion experiments—a key metric in assessing the quality of these implosions. The design of this NTD is based on a fast-rise-time plastic scintillator, which converts the neutron kinetic energy to 350- to 450-nm-wavelength light. The light from the scintillator inside the nose-cone assembly is relayed ~16 m to a streak camera in amore » well-shielded location. An ~200× reduction in neutron background was observed during the first high-yield DT cryogenic implosions compared to the current NTD installation on OMEGA. An impulse response of ~40±10 ps was measured in a dedicated experiment using hard x rays from a planar target irradiated with a 10-ps short pulse from the OMEGA EP laser. Furthermore, the measured instrument response includes contributions from the scintillator rise time, optical relay, and streak camera.« less

  13. Creation of High-Yield Polyhydroxyalkanoates Engineered Strains by Low Energy Ion Implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Shiquan; Cheng, Ying; Zhu, Suwen; Cheng, Beijiu

    2008-12-01

    Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs), as a candidate for biodegradable plastic materials, can be synthesized by numerous microorganisms. However, as its production cost is high in comparison with those of chemically synthesized plastics, a lot of research has been focused on the efficient production of PHAs using different methods. In the present study, the mutation effects of PHAs production in strain pCB4 were investigated with implantation of low energy ions. It was found that under the implantation conditions of 7.8 × 1014 N+/cm2 at 10 keV, a high-yield PHAs strain with high genetic stability was generated from many mutants. After optimizing its fermentation conditions, the biomass, PHAs concentration and PHAs content of pCBH4 reached 2.26 g/L, 1.81 g/L, and 80.08% respectively, whereas its wild type controls were about 1.24 g/L, 0.61 g/L, and 49.20%. Moreover, the main constituent of PHAs was identified as poly-3-hydroxybutyrates (PHB) in the mutant stain and the yield of this compound was increased up to 41.33% in contrast to that of 27.78% in the wild type strain.

  14. Preliminary process engineering evaluation of ethanol production from vegetative crops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreira, A. R.; Linden, J. C.; Smith, D. H.; Villet, R. H.

    1982-12-01

    Vegetative crops show good potential as feedstock for ethanol production via cellulose hydrolysis and yeast fermentation. The low levels of lignin encountered in young plant tissues show an inverse relationship with the high cellulose digestibility during hydrolysis with cellulose enzymes. Ensiled sorghum species and brown midrib mutants of sorghum exhibit high glucose yields after enzyme hydrolysis as well. Vegetative crop materials as candidate feedstocks for ethanol manufacture should continue to be studied. The species studied so far are high value cash crops and result in relatively high costs for the final ethanol product. Unconventional crops, such as pigweed, kochia, and Russian thistle, which can use water efficiently and grow on relatively arid land under conditions not ideal for food production, should be carefully evaluated with regard to their cultivation requirements, photosynthesis rates, and cellulose digestibility. Such crops should result in more favorable process economics for alcohol production.

  15. Effective catalytic conversion of cellulose into high yields of methyl glucosides over sulfonated carbon based catalyst.

    PubMed

    Dora, Sambha; Bhaskar, Thallada; Singh, Rawel; Naik, Desavath Viswanatha; Adhikari, Dilip Kumar

    2012-09-01

    An amorphous carbon based catalyst was prepared by sulfonation of the bio-char obtained from fast pyrolysis (N(2) atm; ≈ 550°C) of biomass. The sulfonated carbon catalyst contained high acidity of 6.28 mmol/g as determined by temperature programmed desorption of ammonia of sulfonated carbon catalyst and exhibited high catalytic performance for the hydrolysis of cellulose. Amorphous carbon based catalyst containing -SO(3)H groups was successfully tested and the complete conversion of cellulose in methanol at moderate temperatures with high yields ca. ≥ 90% of α, β-methyl glucosides in short reaction times was achieved. The methyl glucosides formed in methanol are more stable for further conversion than the products formed in water. The carbon catalyst was demonstrated to be stable for five cycles with slight loss in catalytic activity. The utilization of bio-char as a sulfonated carbon catalyst provides a green and efficient process for cellulose conversion. PMID:22776237

  16. Improvement of bleached wheat straw pulp properties by using aspen high-yield pulp.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongjie; Li, Jianguo; Hu, Huiren; He, Zhibin; Ni, Yonghao

    2012-09-01

    The bleached wheat straw pulp (BWSP) accounts for about 25% of the virgin fiber supply in the Chinese Pulp and Paper Industry. As a non-wood chemical pulp, BWSP is known to have low bulk, low light scattering coefficient and poor drainage due to its high content of parenchyma cells. In this study, a high-quality aspen high-yield pulp (HYP) was used to improve the BWSP properties at the laboratory scale. The results indicate that adding 5-20% aspen HYP into unrefined or refined BWSP can minimize many of the drawbacks associated with the BWSP: improving its drainage, bulk, light scattering coefficient and opacity. The addition of a small amount (up to 20%) of aspen HYP can also significantly increase the tear index of BWSP with only a slight decrease of the tensile index.

  17. High-yield growth of carbon nanofilaments on nickel foam using nickel-tin intermetallic catalysts.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Namjo; Hwang, Kyo Sik; Yang, Seung Cheol

    2014-10-01

    The integration of nanomaterials into macroscopic structures is of importance to their practical use. We report the direct synthesis of carbon nanofilaments on Ni foam using Ni-Sn intermetallic nanoparticles. The use of SnO2 nanoparticles was highly effective for the high-yield growth of carbon nanofilaments without the occurrence of surface breakup, resulting from excessive carbon accumulation in the Ni foam. Carbon nanofilaments with a diameter of 50 nm were synthesized and contained Ni3Sn nanoparticles at the tip, indicating a tip-growth mechanism. Higher vacuum conditions led to the growth of highly crystalline carbon nanofilaments. The results obtained using different sources of hydrocarbon revealed that in contrast to C2H2, CH4 or C3H8 did not induce carbon nanofilament formation on Ni foam.

  18. Mutant selection and phenotypic and genetic characterization of ethanol-tolerant strains of Clostridium thermocellum

    SciTech Connect

    Shao, Xiongjun; Raman, Babu; Zhu, Mingjun; Mielenz, Jonathan R; Brown, Steven D; Guss, Adam M; Lynd, Lee R

    2011-01-01

    Clostridium thermocellum is a model microorganism for converting cellulosic biomass into fuels and chemicals via consolidated bioprocessing. One of the challenges for industrial application of this organism is its low ethanol tolerance, typically 1-2% (w/v) in wild-type strains. In this study, we report the development and characterization of mutant C. thermocellum strains that can grow in the presence of high ethanol concentrations. Starting from a single colony, wild-type C. thermocellum ATCC 27405 was sub-cultured and adapted for growth in up to 50 g/L ethanol using either cellobiose or crystalline cellulose as the growth substrate. Both the adapted strains retained their ability to grow on either substrate and displayed a higher growth rate and biomass yield than the wild-type strain in the absence of ethanol. With added ethanol in the media, the mutant strains displayed an inverse correlation between ethanol concentration and growth rate or biomass yield. Genome sequencing revealed six common mutations in the two ethanol-tolerant strains including an alcohol dehydrogenase gene and genes involved in arginine/pyrimidine biosynthetic pathway. The potential role of these mutations in ethanol tolerance phenotype is discussed.

  19. Mutant selection and phenotypic and genetic characterization of ethanol-tolerant strains of Clostridium thermocellum

    SciTech Connect

    Lynd, Lee R; Shao, Xiongjun; Raman, Babu; Mielenz, Jonathan R; Brown, Steven D; Guss, Adam M; Zhu, Mingjun

    2011-01-01

    Clostridium thermocellum is a model microorganism for converting cellulosic biomass into fuels and chemicals via consolidated bioprocessing. One of the challenges for industrial application of this organism is its low ethanol tolerance, typically 1 2% (w/v) in wild-type strains. In this study, we report the development and characterization of mutant C. thermocellum strains that can grow in the presence of high ethanol concentrations. Starting from a single colony, wild-type C. thermocellum ATCC 27405 was sub-cultured and adapted for growth in up to 50 g/L ethanol using either cellobiose or crystalline cellulose as the growth substrate. Both the adapted strains retained their ability to grow on either substrate and displayed a higher growth rate and biomass yield than the wild-type strain in the absence of ethanol. With added ethanol in the media, the mutant strains displayed an inverse correlation between ethanol concentration and growth rate or biomass yield. Genome sequencing revealed six common mutations in the two ethanol-tolerant strains including an alcohol dehydrogenase gene and genes involved in arginine/pyrimidine biosynthetic pathway. The potential role of these mutations in ethanol tolerance phenotype is discussed.

  20. Improved ethanol production from various carbohydrates through anaerobic thermophilic co-culture.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lei; Tschirner, Ulrike

    2011-11-01

    Saccharification is one of the most critical steps in producing lignocellulose-based bio-ethanol through consolidated bioprocessing (CBP). However, extreme pH and ethanol concentration are commonly considered as potential inhibitors for the application of Clostridium sp. in CBP. The fermentations of several saccharides derived from lignocellulosics were investigated with a co-culture consisting of Clostridium themocellum and Clostridium thermolacticum. Alkali environments proved to be more favorable for ethanol production. Fermentation inhibition was observed at high ethanol concentrations and extreme pH. However, low levels of initial ethanol addition resulted in an unexpected stimulatory impact on the final ethanol productions for all cultures under selected conditions. The co-culture was able to actively ferment glucose, xylose, cellulose and micro-crystallized cellulose (MCC). The ethanol yield observed in the co-culture was higher (up to twofold) than in mono-cultures, especially in MCC fermentation. The highest ethanol yield (as a percentage of the theoretical maximum) observed was 75% (w/w) for MCC and 90% (w/w) for xylose.

  1. Mutant selection and phenotypic and genetic characterization of ethanol-tolerant strains of Clostridium thermocellum.

    PubMed

    Shao, Xiongjun; Raman, Babu; Zhu, Mingjun; Mielenz, Jonathan R; Brown, Steven D; Guss, Adam M; Lynd, Lee R

    2011-11-01

    Clostridium thermocellum is a model microorganism for converting cellulosic biomass into fuels and chemicals via consolidated bioprocessing. One of the challenges for industrial application of this organism is its low ethanol tolerance, typically 1-2% (w/v) in wild-type strains. In this study, we report the development and characterization of mutant C. thermocellum strains that can grow in the presence of high ethanol concentrations. Starting from a single colony, wild-type C. thermocellum ATCC 27405 was sub-cultured and adapted for growth in up to 50 g/L ethanol using either cellobiose or crystalline cellulose as the growth substrate. Both the adapted strains retained their ability to grow on either substrate and displayed a higher growth rate and biomass yield than the wild-type strain in the absence of ethanol. With added ethanol in the media, the mutant strains displayed an inverse correlation between ethanol concentration and growth rate or biomass yield. Genome sequencing revealed six common mutations in the two ethanol-tolerant strains including an alcohol dehydrogenase gene and genes involved in arginine/pyrimidine biosynthetic pathway. The potential role of these mutations in ethanol tolerance phenotype is discussed. PMID:21874277

  2. Hemicellulose utilization for ethanol production

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, S.L.; Batter, T.R.; Blanch, H.W.; Wilke, C.R.

    1980-04-01

    As much as a third of the carbohydrate content of some forms of cellulosic biomass resides in the hemicellulose fraction. Pentosans are major constituents of this material, the most common sugar being D-xylose. As part of a larger program for the bioconversion of cellulose to ethanol, the fermentation of pentose sugars to ethanol is being studied. Two microorganisms have been examined. The mold Fusarium oxysporum (lini) ferments D-xylose to near theoretical yields of ethanol but grows too slowly to be currently economical. The bacterium Bacillus macerans gives somewhat lower yields of ethanol from D-xylose but grows much faster. With further stdy this organism may form the basis for an economical hemicellulose fermentation process.

  3. High Yield Sample Preconcentration Using a Highly Ion-conductive Charge-selective Polymer

    PubMed Central

    Chun, Honggu; Chung, Taek Dong; Ramsey, J. Michael

    2011-01-01

    The development and analysis of a microfluidic sample preconcentration system using a highly ion-conductive charge-selective polymer (poly-AMPS) is reported. The preconcentration is based on the phenomenon of concentration polarization which develops at the boundaries of the poly-AMPS with buffer solutions. A negatively charged polymer, poly-AMPS, positioned between two microchannels efficiently extracts cations through its large cross section, resulting in efficient anion sample preconcentration. The present work includes the development of a robust polymer that is stable over a wide range of buffers with varying chemical compositions. The sample preconcentration effect remains linear to over 3 mM (0.15 pmol) and 500 μM (15 fmol) for fluorescein and TRITC-tagged albumin solutions, respectively. The system can potentially be used for concentrating proteins on microfluidic devices with subsequent analysis for proteomic applications. PMID:20575520

  4. High process yield rates of thermoplastic nanofluidic devices using a hybrid thermal assembly technique.

    PubMed

    Uba, Franklin I; Hu, Bo; Weerakoon-Ratnayake, Kumuditha; Oliver-Calixte, Nyote; Soper, Steven A

    2015-02-21

    Over the past decade, thermoplastics have been used as alternative substrates to glass and Si for microfluidic devices because of the diverse and robust fabrication protocols available for thermoplastics that can generate high production rates of the desired structures at low cost and with high replication fidelity, the extensive array of physiochemical properties they possess, and the simple surface activation strategies that can be employed to tune their surface chemistry appropriate for the intended application. While the advantages of polymer microfluidics are currently being realized, the evolution of thermoplastic-based nanofluidic devices is fraught with challenges. One challenge is assembly of the device, which consists of sealing a cover plate to the patterned fluidic substrate. Typically, channel collapse or substrate dissolution occurs during assembly making the device inoperable resulting in low process yield rates. In this work, we report a low temperature hybrid assembly approach for the generation of functional thermoplastic nanofluidic devices with high process yield rates (>90%) and with a short total assembly time (16 min). The approach involves thermally sealing a high T(g) (glass transition temperature) substrate containing the nanofluidic structures to a cover plate possessing a lower T(g). Nanofluidic devices with critical feature sizes ranging between 25-250 nm were fabricated in a thermoplastic substrate (T(g) = 104 °C) and sealed with a cover plate (T(g) = 75 °C) at a temperature significantly below the T(g) of the substrate. Results obtained from sealing tests revealed that the integrity of the nanochannels remained intact after assembly and devices were useful for fluorescence imaging at high signal-to-noise ratios. The functionality of the assembled devices was demonstrated by studying the stretching and translocation dynamics of dsDNA in the enclosed thermoplastic nanofluidic channels.

  5. High Process Yield Rates of Thermoplastic Nanofluidic Devices using a Hybrid Thermal Assembly Technique

    PubMed Central

    Uba, Franklin I.; Hu, Bo; Weerakoon-Ratnayake, Kumuditha; Oliver-Calixte, Nyote; Soper, Steven A.

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decade, thermoplastics have been used as alternative substrates to glass and Si for microfluidic devices because of the diverse and robust fabrication protocols available for thermoplastics that can generate high production rates of the desired structures at low cost and with high replication fidelity, the extensive array of physiochemical properties they possess, and the simple surface activation strategies that can be employed to tune their surface chemistry appropriate for the intended application. While the advantages of polymer microfluidics are currently being realized, the evolution of thermoplastic-based nanofluidic devices is fraught with challenges. One challenge is assembly of the device, which consists of sealing a cover plate to the patterned fluidic substrate. Typically, channel collapse or substrate dissolution occurs during assembly making the device inoperable resulting in low process yield rates. In this work, we report a low temperature hybrid assembly approach for the generation of functional thermoplastic nanofluidic devices with high process yield rates (>90%) with a short total assembly time (16 min). The approach involves thermally sealing a high Tg (glass transition temperature) substrate containing the nanofluidic structures to a cover plate possessing a lower Tg. Nanofluidic devices with critical feature sizes ranging between 25 – 250 nm were fabricated in a thermoplastic substrate (Tg = 104°C) and sealed with a cover plate (Tg = 75°C) at a temperature significantly below the Tg of the substrate. Results obtained from sealing tests revealed that the integrity of the nanochannels remained intact after assembly and devices were useful for fluorescence imaging at high signal-to-noise ratios. The functionality of the assembled devices was demonstrated by studying the stretching and translocation dynamics of dsDNA in the enclosed thermoplastic nanofluidic channels. PMID:25511610

  6. Granular starch hydrolysis for fuel ethanol production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ping

    Granular starch hydrolyzing enzymes (GSHE) convert starch into fermentable sugars at low temperatures (≤48°C). Use of GSHE in dry grind process can eliminate high temperature requirements during cooking and liquefaction (≥90°C). In this study, GSHE was compared with two combinations of commercial alpha-amylase and glucoamylase (DG1 and DG2, respectively). All three enzyme treatments resulted in comparable ethanol concentrations (between 14.1 to 14.2% v/v at 72 hr), ethanol conversion efficiencies and ethanol and DDGS yields. Sugar profiles for the GSHE treatment were different from DG1 and DG2 treatments, especially for glucose. During simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF), the highest glucose concentration for the GSHE treatment was 7% (w/v); for DG1 and DG2 treatments, maximum glucose concentration was 19% (w/v). GSHE was used in one of the fractionation technologies (enzymatic dry grind) to improve recovery of germ and pericarp fiber prior to fermentation. The enzymatic dry grind process with GSHE was compared with the conventional dry grind process using GSHE with the same process parameters of dry solids content, pH, temperature, time, enzyme and yeast usages. Ethanol concentration (at 72 hr) of the enzymatic process was 15.5% (v/v), which was 9.2% higher than the conventional process (14.2% v/v). Distillers dried grains with solubles (DDGS) generated from the enzymatic process (9.8% db) was 66% less than conventional process (28.3% db). Three additional coproducts, germ 8.0% (db), pericarp fiber 7.7% (db) and endosperm fiber 5.2% (db) were produced. Costs and amounts of GSHE used is an important factor affecting dry grind process economics. Proteases can weaken protein matrix to aid starch release and may reduce GSHE doses. Proteases also can hydrolyze protein into free amino nitrogen (FAN), which can be used as a yeast nutrient during fermentation. Two types of proteases, exoprotease and endoprotease, were studied; protease and urea

  7. Carbon dots with high fluorescence quantum yield: the fluores