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Sample records for high-affinity camp phosphodiesterase

  1. The localization and concentration of the PDE2-encoded high-affinity cAMP phosphodiesterase is regulated by cAMP-dependent protein kinase A in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yun; Liu, Enkai; Bai, Xiaojia; Zhang, Aili

    2010-03-01

    The genome of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes two cyclic AMP (cAMP) phosphodiesterases, a low-affinity one, Pde1, and a high-affinity one, Pde2. Pde1 has been ascribed a function for downregulating agonist-induced cAMP accumulation in a protein kinase A (PKA)-governed negative feedback loop, whereas Pde2 controls the basal cAMP level in the cell. Here we show that PKA regulates the localization and protein concentration of Pde2. Pde2 is accumulated in the nucleus in wild-type cells growing on glucose, or in strains with hyperactive PKA. In contrast, in derepressed wild-type cells or cells with attenuated PKA activity, Pde2 is distributed over the nucleus and cytoplasm. We also show evidence indicating that the Pde2 protein level is positively correlated with PKA activity. The increase in the Pde2 protein level in high-PKA strains and in cells growing on glucose was due to its increased half-life. These results suggest that, like its low-affinity counterpart, the high-affinity phosphodiesterase may also play an important role in the PKA-controlled feedback inhibition of intracellular cAMP.

  2. Regulation of Adrenal Steroidogenesis by the High-affinity Phosphodiesterase 8 Family

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, L-C. L.; Beavo, J. A.

    2014-01-01

    The main function of cyclic AMP phosphodiesterases (PDEs) is to degrade cAMP, a ubiquitous second messenger. Therefore, PDEs can function as prime regulators of cAMP/PKA-dependent processes such as steroidogenesis. Until recently, the roles of the PDE8 family have been largely unexplored, presumably due to the lack of a selective inhibitor. This review focuses on recent reports about the regulatory roles of the PDE8 family in adrenal steroidogenesis, as well as the inhibitory properties and specificity of a new PDE8-selective inhibitor, PF-04957325. We also describe a method of measuring urinary corticosterone levels in vivo as a minimally invasive way of monitoring the stress level in a mouse. PMID:22903278

  3. Phosphodiesterases and subcellular compartmentalized cAMP signaling in the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Stangherlin, Alessandra; Zaccolo, Manuela

    2012-01-01

    Phosphodiesterases are key enzymes in the cAMP signaling cascade. They convert cAMP in its inactive form 5'-AMP and critically regulate the intensity and the duration of cAMP-mediated signals. Multiple isoforms exist that possess different intracellular distributions, different affinities for cAMP, and different catalytic and regulatory properties. This complex repertoire of enzymes provides a multiplicity of ways to modulate cAMP levels, to integrate more signaling pathways, and to respond to the specific needs of the cell within distinct subcellular domains. In this review we summarize key findings on phosphodiesterase compartmentalization in the cardiovascular system.

  4. Phosphodiesterase DosP increases persistence by reducing cAMP which reduces the signal indole.

    PubMed

    Kwan, Brian W; Osbourne, Devon O; Hu, Ying; Benedik, Michael J; Wood, Thomas K

    2015-03-01

    Persisters are bacteria that are highly tolerant to antibiotics due to their dormant state and are of clinical significance owing to their role in infections. Given that the population of persisters increases in biofilms and that cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP) is an intracellular signal that increases biofilm formation, we sought to determine whether c-di-GMP has a role in bacterial persistence. By examining the effect of 30 genes from Escherichia coli, including diguanylate cyclases that synthesize c-di-GMP and phosphodiesterases that breakdown c-di-GMP, we determined that DosP (direct oxygen sensing phosphodiesterase) increases persistence by over a thousand fold. Using both transcriptomic and proteomic approaches, we determined that DosP increases persistence by decreasing tryptophanase activity and thus indole. Corroborating this effect, addition of indole reduced persistence. Despite the role of DosP as a c-di-GMP phosphodiesterase, the decrease in tryptophanase activity was found to be a result of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) phosphodiesterase activity. Corroborating this result, the reduction of cAMP via CpdA, a cAMP-specific phosphodiesterase, increased persistence and reduced indole levels similarly to DosP. Therefore, phosphodiesterase DosP increases persistence by reducing the interkingdom signal indole via reduction of the global regulator cAMP.

  5. Effects of repeated treatment with phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitors on cAMP signaling, hippocampal cell proliferation, and behavior in the forced-swim test.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Lan; O'Callaghan, James P; O'Donnell, James M

    2011-08-01

    The effects of repeated treatment with the phosphodiesterase-4 (PDE4) inhibitors rolipram, piclamilast, and 4-(2-(3-(cyclopentyloxy)-4-methoxyphenyl)-2-phenylethyl)pyridine (CDP840), which differ in their interactions with high- and low-affinity binding conformers of the enzyme, were contrasted to those of acute treatment on cAMP signaling, hippocampal cell proliferation, and immobility in the forced-swim test in rats. Repeated treatment with rolipram (1 and 3 mg/kg), piclamilast (0.3 and 1 mg/kg), or CDP840 (10 and 30 mg/kg) for 16 days increased cAMP and phosphorylation of cAMP response element binding protein (pCREB) in hippocampus and prefrontal cortex. In addition, repeated treatment with the PDE4 inhibitors increased proliferation and survival of newborn cells in the hippocampus and produced antidepressant-like effects on behavior, as evidenced by decreased immobility in the forced-swim test. Acute treatment with rolipram (3 mg/kg), piclamilast (1 mg/kg), or CDP840 (30 mg/kg) induced transient increases in cAMP and pCREB in hippocampus and prefrontal cortex, but the dose and time dependence of these effects did not parallel the behavioral effects. Compared with rolipram and piclamilast, repeated treatment with CDP840 exerted lesser effects on neural and behavioral measures, probably because of its weak interaction with the high-affinity binding conformer of PDE4. This suggests the relative importance of the high-affinity binding conformer in the mediation of the long-term effects of PDE4 inhibition on cAMP/pCREB signaling, hippocampal cell proliferation, and antidepressant-like effects on behavior.

  6. Phosphodiesterases in the rat ovary: effect of cAMP in primordial follicles.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Tonny Studsgaard; Stahlhut, Martin; Andersen, Claus Yding

    2015-07-01

    Phosphodiesterases (PDEs) are important regulators of the intracellular cAMP concentration, which is a central second messenger that affects a multitude of intracellular functions. In the ovaries, cAMP exerts diverse functions, including regulation of ovulation and it has been suggested that augmented cAMP levels stimulate primordial follicle growth. The present study examined the gene expression, enzyme activity and immunolocalization of the different cAMP hydrolysing PDEs families in the rat ovary. Further, the effect of PDE4 inhibition on primordial follicle activation in cultured neonatal rat ovaries was also evaluated. We found varied expression of all eight families in the ovary with Pde7b and Pde8a having the highest expression each accounting for more than 20% of the total PDE mRNA. PDE4 accounted for 15-26% of the total PDE activity. Immunoreactive PDE11A was found in the oocytes and PDE2A in the corpora lutea. Incubating neonatal rat ovaries with PDE4 inhibitors did not increase primordial follicle activation or change the expression of the developing follicle markers Gdf9, Amh, Inha, the proliferation marker Mki67 or the primordial follicle marker Tmeff2. In addition, the cAMP analogue 8-bromo-cAMP did not increase AKT1 or FOXO3A phosphorylation associated with follicle activation or increase the expression of Kitlg known to be associated with follicle differentiation but did increase the Tmeff2, Mki67 and Inha expression in a dose-dependent manner. In conclusion, this study shows that both Pde7b and Pde8a are highly expressed in the rodent ovary and that PDE4 inhibition does not cause an increase in primordial follicle activation.

  7. The Role of Type 4 Phosphodiesterases in Generating Microdomains of cAMP: Large Scale Stochastic Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Rodrigo F.; Terrin, Anna; Di Benedetto, Giulietta; Cannon, Robert C.; Koh, Wonryull; Kim, MyungSook; Zaccolo, Manuela; Blackwell, Kim T.

    2010-01-01

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP) and its main effector Protein Kinase A (PKA) are critical for several aspects of neuronal function including synaptic plasticity. Specificity of synaptic plasticity requires that cAMP activates PKA in a highly localized manner despite the speed with which cAMP diffuses. Two mechanisms have been proposed to produce localized elevations in cAMP, known as microdomains: impeded diffusion, and high phosphodiesterase (PDE) activity. This paper investigates the mechanism of localized cAMP signaling using a computational model of the biochemical network in the HEK293 cell, which is a subset of pathways involved in PKA-dependent synaptic plasticity. This biochemical network includes cAMP production, PKA activation, and cAMP degradation by PDE activity. The model is implemented in NeuroRD: novel, computationally efficient, stochastic reaction-diffusion software, and is constrained by intracellular cAMP dynamics that were determined experimentally by real-time imaging using an Epac-based FRET sensor (H30). The model reproduces the high concentration cAMP microdomain in the submembrane region, distinct from the lower concentration of cAMP in the cytosol. Simulations further demonstrate that generation of the cAMP microdomain requires a pool of PDE4D anchored in the cytosol and also requires PKA-mediated phosphorylation of PDE4D which increases its activity. The microdomain does not require impeded diffusion of cAMP, confirming that barriers are not required for microdomains. The simulations reported here further demonstrate the utility of the new stochastic reaction-diffusion algorithm for exploring signaling pathways in spatially complex structures such as neurons. PMID:20661441

  8. New fluorescent analogs of cAMP and cGMP available as substrates for cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase.

    PubMed

    Hiratsuka, T

    1982-11-25

    The synthesis of fluorescent derivatives of cAMP and cGMP, by reaction with isatoic anhydride in aqueous solution at mild pH and temperature, yielding 2'-O-anthraniloyl derivatives of cyclic nucleotides, is here described. 2'-O-(N-Methylanthraniloyl) derivatives were also synthesized by reaction with N-methylisatoic anhydride. Upon excitation at 330-350 nm, these derivatives exhibited maximum fluorescence emission at 430-445 nm in aqueous solution with quantum yields of 0.11-0.26. Their fluorescence was sensitive to the polarity of solvent; in N,N-dimethylformamide quantum yields of 0.8-0.95. The major differences between the two fluorophores were the longer wavelength of the emission maximum of the N-methylanthraniloyl group and its greater quantum yield. The derivatives were substrates for beef heart cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase, 15-24% as effective as the natural substrate cAMP. When combined with thin layer chromatography techniques, two apparent Km values (3-4 microM and 36-76 microM) for the cAMP derivatives and one value (10-18 microM) for the cGMP derivatives were obtained. The results indicate that these 2'-hydroxyl-modified cAMP and cGMP can be useful fluorescent substrate analogs for cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase.

  9. Pharmacophore modeling and virtual screening for the discovery of new type 4 cAMP phosphodiesterase (PDE4) inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Niu, Miaomiao; Dong, Fenggong; Tang, Shi; Fida, Guissi; Qin, Jingyi; Qiu, Jiadan; Liu, Kangbo; Gao, Weidong; Gu, Yueqing

    2013-01-01

    Type 4 cAMP phosphodiesterase (PDE4) inhibitors show a broad spectrum of anti-inflammatory effects in almost all kinds of inflamed cells, by an increase in cAMP levels which is a pivotal second messenger responsible for various biological processes. These inhibitors are now considered as the potential drugs for treatment of chronic inflammatory diseases. However, some recently marketed inhibitors e.g., roflumilast, have shown adverse effects such as nausea and emesis, thus restricting its use. In order to identify novel PDE4 inhibitors with improved therapeutic indexes, a highly correlating (r = 0.963930) pharmacophore model (Hypo1) was established on the basis of known PDE4 inhibitors. Validated Hypo1 was used in database screening to identify chemical with required pharmacophoric features. These compounds are further screened by using the rule of five, ADMET and molecular docking. Finally, twelve hits which showed good results with respect to following properties such as estimated activity, calculated drug-like properties and scores were proposed as potential leads to inhibit the PDE4 activity. Therefore, this study will not only assist in the development of new potent hits for PDE4 inhibitors, but also give a better understanding of their interaction with PDE4. On a wider scope, this will be helpful for the rational design of novel potent enzyme inhibitors.

  10. Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase-mediated integration of cGMP and cAMP signaling in cells of the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Maurice, Donald H

    2005-05-01

    Numerous pharmacological and physiological agents acting via either cAMP- or cGMP-mediated impact the activities of cells of the cardiovascular system. While most define cAMP and cGMP signaling systems as separate and independent, recent advances in our understanding of cyclic nucleotide signaling, and more specifically, of the roles which cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDEs) play in these events, have altered this view. In this short chapter, I will review the data identifying expression of several PDEs in cells of the cardiovascular system. In addition, I will review the data that identify PDEs as enzymes capable of allowing integration between cAMP and cGMP signaling in cells, and propose that cAMP and cGMP signaling systems can represent parallel and interdependent signaling systems. Moreover, I will propose that cGMP-mediated effects on the activities of variants of the Phosphodiesterase 2 (PDE2), PDE3 and PDE5 families may act to coordinate linkage between cAMP and cGMP signaling in these cells.

  11. Neurotrophins elevate cAMP to reach a threshold required to overcome inhibition by MAG through extracellular signal-regulated kinase-dependent inhibition of phosphodiesterase.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ying; Nikulina, Elena; Mellado, Wilfredo; Filbin, Marie T

    2003-12-17

    Inhibitors of regeneration in myelin, such as myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG), play an important role in preventing regeneration after CNS injury. Elevation of cAMP, either with dibutyryl-cAMP (db-cAMP) or by priming with a variety of neurotrophins, overcomes inhibition by MAG and myelin. However, activation of cAMP is not generally regarded as a signaling pathway for neurotrophins. Here we show that the NGF-like neurotrophins overcome inhibition by MAG by activating tyrosine kinase receptors. We also show that activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (Erk) by BDNF is required to overcome inhibition by MAG, and that activated Erk transiently inhibits phosphodiesterase 4 (PDE4), the enzyme that hydrolyzes cAMP. Inhibition of PDE4 then allows cAMP to increase and so initiates the pathway to overcome inhibition. Furthermore, we also show that basal levels of Erk activation and basal cAMP levels contribute to the effects of db-cAMP by pushing the combined levels of cAMP above a threshold required to overcome inhibition. Together, these results not only show how NGF-like neurotrophins can elevate cAMP and overcome inhibition but also point to a novel mechanism of cross talk in neurons from the Erk to the cAMP signaling pathways.

  12. [Effect of red light on activity of cAMP phosphodiesterases in photoperiodically different cereals and vernalized winter wheat].

    PubMed

    Fedenko, E P; Koksharova, T A

    2007-01-01

    Red light illumination of seedlings of photoperiodically different cereals had a different effect on the activity of multiple cyclic adenosine monophosphate phosphodiesterases. The response of all phosphodiesterase forms was reversed in fully vernalized winter wheat Triticum aestivum L.

  13. Molecular cloning of rat homologues of the Drosophila melanogaster dunce cAMP phosphodiesterase: evidence for a family of genes.

    PubMed Central

    Swinnen, J V; Joseph, D R; Conti, M

    1989-01-01

    To study the structure and function of cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDEs) involved in mammalian gametogenesis, a rat testis cDNA library was screened at low stringency with a cDNA clone coding for the Drosophila melanogaster dunce-encoded PDE as a probe. This screening resulted in the isolation of two groups of cDNA clones, differing in their nucleotide sequences (ratPDE1 and ratPDE2). In the rat testis, RNA transcripts corresponding to both groups of clones were expressed predominantly in germ cells. Additional screenings of a Sertoli cell cDNA library with a ratPDE2 clone as a probe led to the isolation of two more groups of clones (rat-PDE3 and ratPDE4). Unlike ratPDE1 and ratPDE2, these clones hybridized to transcripts present predominantly in the Sertoli cell. In the middle of the coding region, all four groups of clones were homologous to each other. The deduced amino acid sequences of part of this region were also homologous to the D. melanogaster dunce PDE and to PDEs from bovine and yeast. These data indicate that a family of genes homologous to the D. melanogaster dunce-encoded PDE is present in the rat and that these genes are differentially expressed in somatic and germ cells of the seminiferous tubule. These findings provide a molecular basis for the observed heterogeneity of cAMP PDEs. Images PMID:2546153

  14. Intracellular membrane association of the Aplysia cAMP phosphodiesterase long and short forms via different targeting mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kun-Hyung; Jun, Yong-Woo; Park, Yongsoo; Lee, Jin-A; Suh, Byung-Chang; Lim, Chae-Seok; Lee, Yong-Seok; Kaang, Bong-Kiun; Jang, Deok-Jin

    2014-09-12

    Phosphodiesterases (PDEs) play key roles in cAMP compartmentalization, which is required for intracellular signaling processes, through specific subcellular targeting. Previously, we showed that the long and short forms of Aplysia PDE4 (ApPDE4), which are localized to the membranes of distinct subcellular organelles, play key roles in 5-hydroxytryptamine-induced synaptic facilitation in Aplysia sensory and motor synapses. However, the molecular mechanism of the isoform-specific distinct membrane targeting was not clear. In this study, we further investigated the molecular mechanism of the membrane targeting of the ApPDE4 long and short forms. We found that the membrane targeting of the long form was mediated by hydrophobic interactions, mainly via 16 amino acids at the N-terminal region, whereas the short form was targeted solely to the plasma membrane, mainly by nonspecific electrostatic interactions between their N termini and the negatively charged lipids such as the phosphatidylinositol polyphosphates PI4P and PI(4,5)P2, which are embedded in the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane. Moreover, oligomerization of the long or short form by interaction of their respective upstream conserved region domains, UCR1 and UCR2, enhanced their plasma membrane targeting. These results suggest that the long and short forms of ApPDE4 are distinctly targeted to intracellular membranes through their direct association with the membranes via hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions, respectively.

  15. IL-1 binds to high affinity receptors on human osteosarcoma cells and potentiates prostaglandin E2 stimulation of cAMP production

    SciTech Connect

    Rodan, S.B.; Wesolowski, G.; Chin, J.; Limjuco, G.A.; Schmidt, J.A.; Rodan, G.A. )

    1990-08-15

    IL-1 is a potent bone resorbing agent. Its mechanism of action is unknown, but the presence of osteoblasts was shown to be necessary for IL-1 stimulation of bone resorption by isolated osteoclasts. This study examines the presence of IL-1R and IL-1 effects in osteoblastic cells from a clonal human osteosarcoma cell line, Saos-2/B-10. We found that the binding affinity and the number of binding sites increases substantially during the postconfluent stage. Scatchard and curve-fitting analysis revealed one class of high affinity binding sites, with Kd/Ki's of 40 +/- 17 pM (mean +/- SD) for IL-1 alpha (n = 5) and 9 +/- 7 pM for IL-1 beta (n = 5) and 2916 +/- 2438 (n = 6) receptors/cell. Incubation of the cells with 125I-IL-1 alpha (100 pM) at 4 degrees C, followed by incubation at 37 degrees C up to 4 h, revealed internalization of receptor-bound IL-1 alpha. Chemical cross-linking studies showed that the IL-1R in Saos-2/B-10 cells had a molecular mass of approximately 80 kDa. To assess the biologic effect of IL-1 in Saos-2/B-10 cells, we determined PGE2 content and adenylate cyclase activity. Although IL-1 had no effect on PGE2 synthesis, both IL-1 alpha and IL-1 beta enhanced PGE2 stimulation of adenylate cyclase two- to four-fold in a dose-dependent manner. The half-maximal effect for IL-1 alpha was seen at 8 to 10 pM and for IL-1 beta at 0.6 to 1.8 pM. IL-1 did not enhance basal adenylate cyclase or stimulation by parathyroid hormone, isoproterenol, or forskolin. IL-1 enhancement of PGE2-stimulated adenylate cyclase was detected between 1 to 2 h, was maximal at 4 to 5 h, was not prevented by cycloheximide treatment, and was seen in membranes from IL-1 pretreated cells. These data show effects of IL-1 on a human osteoblast-like cell line that are mediated by high affinity receptors. These IL-1 effects could contribute to the biologic action of IL-1 on bone.

  16. 2',3'-cAMP hydrolysis by metal-dependent phosphodiesterases containing DHH, EAL, and HD domains is non-specific: Implications for PDE screening.

    PubMed

    Rao, Feng; Qi, Yaning; Murugan, Elavazhagan; Pasunooti, Swathi; Ji, Qiang

    2010-07-30

    The recent report of 2',3'-cAMP isolated from rat kidney is the first proof of its biological existence, which revived interest in this mysterious molecule. 2',3'-cAMP serves as an extracellular adenosine source, but how it is degraded remains unclear. Here, we report that 2',3'-cAMP can be hydrolyzed by six phosphodiesterases containing three different families of hydrolytic domains, generating invariably 3'-AMP but not 2'-AMP. The catalytic efficiency (k(cat)/K(m)) of each enzyme against 2',3'-cAMP correlates with that against the widely used non-specific substrate bis(p-nitrophenyl)phosphate (bis-pNPP), indicating that 2',3'-cAMP is a previously unknown non-specific substrate for PDEs. Furthermore, we show that the exclusive formation of 3'-AMP is due to the P-O2' bond having lower activation energy and is not the result of steric exclusion at enzyme active site. Our analysis provides mechanistic basis to dissect protein function when 2',3'-cAMP hydrolysis is observed.

  17. Identification and Characterization of a Novel Phosphodiesterase from the Metagenome of an Indian Coalbed

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Durgesh Narain; Gupta, Ankush; Singh, Vijay Shankar; Mishra, Rajeev; Kateriya, Suneel; Tripathi, Anil Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Phosphoesterases are involved in the degradation of organophosphorus compounds. Although phosphomonoesterases and phosphotriesterases have been studied in detail, studies on phosphodiesterases are rather limited. In our search to find novel phosphodiesterases using metagenomic approach, we cloned a gene encoding a putative phosphodiesterase (PdeM) from the metagenome of the formation water collected from an Indian coal bed. Bioinformatic analysis showed that PdeM sequence possessed the characteristic signature motifs of the class III phosphodiesterases and phylogenetic study of PdeM enabled us to identify three distinct subclasses (A, B, and C) within class III phosphodiesterases, PdeM clustering in new subclass IIIB. Bioinformatic, biochemical and biophysical characterization of PdeM further revealed some of the characteristic features of the phosphodiesterases belonging to newly described subclass IIIB. PdeM is a monomer of 29.3 kDa, which exhibits optimum activity at 25°C and pH 8.5, but low affinity for bis(pNPP) as well as pNPPP. The recombinant PdeM possessed phosphodiesterase, phosphonate-ester hydrolase and nuclease activity. It lacked phosphomonoesterase, phosphotriesterase, and RNAse activities. Overexpression of PdeM in E.coli neither affected catabolite respression nor did the recombinant protein hydrolyzed cAMP in vitro, indicating its inability to hydrolyze cAMP. Although Mn2+ was required for the activity of PdeM, but addition of metals (Mn2+ or Fe3+) did not induce oligomerization. Further increase in concentration of Mn2+ upto 3 mM, increased α-helical content as well as the phosphodiesterase activity. Structural comparison of PdeM with its homologs showed that it lacked critical residues required for dimerization, cAMP hydrolysis, and for the high affinity binding of bis(pNPP). PdeM, thus, is a novel representative of new subclass of class III phosphodiesterases. PMID:25658120

  18. Silymarin Activates c-AMP Phosphodiesterase and Stimulates Insulin Secretion in a Glucose-Dependent Manner in HIT-T15 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Ran; Mahadevan, Jana; Oseid, Elizabeth; Vallerie, Sara; Robertson, R. Paul

    2016-01-01

    Silymarin (SIL) is a flavonoid extracted from milk thistle seed that has been reported to decrease hyperglycemia in people with type 2 diabetes (T2D). However, it is not known whether SIL has direct secretory effects on β-cells. Using the β-cell line HIT-T15, SIL was shown to decrease intracellular peroxide levels and to augment glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS). However, the latter was observed using a concentration range of 25–100 µM, which was too low to affect endogenous peroxide levels. The stimulatory effect of SIL dissipated at higher concentrations (100–200 µM), and mild apoptosis was observed. The smaller concentrations of SIL also decreased cAMP phosphodiesterase activity in a Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent manner. The stimulatory effects of SIL on GSIS were inhibited by three different inhibitors of exocytosis, indicating that SIL’s mechanism of stimulating GSIS operated via closing β-cell K-ATP channels, and perhaps more distal sites of action involving calcium influx and G-proteins. We concluded that augmentation of GSIS by SIL can be observed at concentrations that also inhibit cAMP phosphodiesterase without concomitant lowering of intracellular peroxides. PMID:27973458

  19. Hydrogen sulfide-mediated stimulation of mitochondrial electron transport involves inhibition of the mitochondrial phosphodiesterase 2A, elevation of cAMP and activation of protein kinase A.

    PubMed

    Módis, Katalin; Panopoulos, Panagiotis; Coletta, Ciro; Papapetropoulos, Andreas; Szabo, Csaba

    2013-11-01

    Although hydrogen sulfide (H₂S) is generally known as a mitochondrial poison, recent studies show that lower concentrations of H₂S play a physiological role in the stimulation of mitochondrial electron transport and cellular bioenergetics. This effect involves electron donation at Complex II. Other lines of recent studies demonstrated that one of the biological actions of H₂S involves inhibition of cAMP and cGMP phosphodiesterases (PDEs). Given the emerging functional role of the mitochondrial isoform of cAMP PDE (PDE2A) in the regulation of mitochondrial function the current study investigated whether cAMP-dependent mechanisms participate in the stimulatory effect of NaHS on mitochondrial function. In isolated rat liver mitochondria, partial digestion studies localized PDE2A into the mitochondrial matrix. NaHS exerted a concentration-dependent inhibitory effect on recombinant PDE2A enzyme in vitro. Moreover, NaHS induced an elevation of cAMP levels when added to isolated mitochondria and stimulated the mitochondrial electron transport. The latter effect was inhibited by Rp-cAMP, an inhibitor of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA). The current findings suggest that the direct electron donating effect of NaHS is amplified by an intramitochondrial cAMP system, which may involve the inhibition of PDE2A and subsequent, cAMP-mediated stimulation of PKA.

  20. The role of the PDE4D cAMP phosphodiesterase in the regulation of glucagon-like peptide-1 release

    PubMed Central

    Ong, WK; Gribble, FM; Reimann, F; Lynch, MJ; Houslay, MD; Baillie, GS; Furman, BL; Pyne, NJ

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: Increases in intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) augment the release/secretion of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1). As cAMP is hydrolysed by cAMP phosphodiesterases (PDEs), we determined the role of PDEs and particularly PDE4 in regulating GLP-1 release. Experimental approach: GLP-1 release, PDE expression and activity were investigated using rats and GLUTag cells, a GLP-1-releasing cell line. The effects of rolipram, a selective PDE4 inhibitor both in vivo and in vitro and stably overexpressed catalytically inactive PDE4D5 (D556A-PDE4D5) mutant in vitro on GLP-1 release were investigated. Key results: Rolipram (1.5 mg·kg−1 i.v.) increased plasma GLP-1 concentrations approximately twofold above controls in anaesthetized rats and enhanced glucose-induced GLP-1 release in GLUTag cells (EC50∼1.2 nmol·L−1). PDE4D mRNA transcript and protein were detected in GLUTag cells using RT-PCR with gene-specific primers and Western blotting with a specific PDE4D antibody respectively. Moreover, significant PDE activity was inhibited by rolipram in GLUTag cells. A GLUTag cell clone (C1) stably overexpressing the D556A-PDE4D5 mutant, exhibited elevated intracellular cAMP levels and increased basal and glucose-induced GLP-1 release compared with vector-transfected control cells. A role for intracellular cAMP/PKA in enhancing GLP-1 release in response to overexpression of D556A-PDE4D5 mutant was demonstrated by the finding that the PKA inhibitor H89 reduced both basal and glucose-induced GLP-1 release by 37% and 39%, respectively, from C1 GLUTag cells. Conclusions and implications: PDE4D may play an important role in regulating intracellular cAMP linked to the regulation of GLP-1 release. British Journal of Pharmacology (2009) 157, 633–644; doi:10.1111/j.1476-5381.2009.00194.x; published online 9 April 2009 PMID:19371330

  1. Important role of phosphodiesterase 3B for the stimulatory action of cAMP on pancreatic beta-cell exocytosis and release of insulin.

    PubMed

    Härndahl, Linda; Jing, Xing-Jun; Ivarsson, Rosita; Degerman, Eva; Ahrén, Bo; Manganiello, Vincent C; Renström, Erik; Holst, Lena Stenson

    2002-10-04

    Cyclic AMP potentiates glucose-stimulated insulin release and mediates the stimulatory effects of hormones such as glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) on pancreatic beta-cells. By inhibition of cAMP-degrading phosphodiesterase (PDE) and, in particular, selective inhibition of PDE3 activity, stimulatory effects on insulin secretion have been observed. Molecular and functional information on beta-cell PDE3 is, however, scarce. To provide such information, we have studied the specific effects of the PDE3B isoform by adenovirus-mediated overexpression. In rat islets and rat insulinoma cells, approximate 10-fold overexpression of PDE3B was accompanied by a 6-8-fold increase in membrane-associated PDE3B activity. The cAMP concentration was significantly lowered in transduced cells (INS-1(832/13)), and insulin secretion in response to stimulation with high glucose (11.1 mm) was reduced by 40% (islets) and 50% (INS-1). Further, the ability of GLP-1 (100 nm) to augment glucose-stimulated insulin secretion was inhibited by approximately 30% (islets) and 70% (INS-1). Accordingly, when stimulating with cAMP, a substantial decrease (65%) in exocytotic capacity was demonstrated in patch-clamped single beta-cells. In untransduced insulinoma cells, application of the PDE3-selective inhibitor OPC3911 (10 microm) was shown to increase glucose-stimulated insulin release as well as cAMP-enhanced exocytosis. The findings suggest a significant role of PDE3B as an important regulator of insulin secretory processes.

  2. [Effect of vernalization and red light illumination of seedlings of bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) on the temperature profile of the cAMP phosphodiesterase activity].

    PubMed

    Fedenko, E P; Koksharova, T A; Agamalova, S R; Beliaeva, E V

    2004-01-01

    Phenotypic manifestations of Vrn (vernalization) and Ppd (photoperiodism) genes responsible for transition of bread wheat Triticum aestivum L. to generative growth (flowering) are mutually related. Since the mechanism of phytochrome-induced photoperiodism involves the enzymes of cyclic adenosine monophosphate metabolism and phosphodiesterase in particular, we tested involvement of phosphodiesterase in the process of winter wheat vernalization and formation of flowering competence in alternate wheat requiring a long day but no vernalization for the transition to flowering. We studied temperature dependence of phosphodiesterase activity in vernalized and unvernalized winter wheat on the one hand and in etiolated and red light illuminated seedlings of alternate wheat on the other hand. Short-term experiments demonstrated that vernalization and red light illumination are similar to long day by the effect on the long-day plants. Both influences induced a pronounced inversion of the temperature profile of phosphodiesterase activity in the 28-45 degrees C range. We propose that phosphodiesterase is involved in vernalization processes and can serve as a sensor of low temperature in winter wheat. Changed temperature profile is a radical control mechanism of phosphodiesterase activity in response to the influences (red light and vernalizing temperatures) responsible for competence of various bread wheat forms for generative growth.

  3. Defining the role of a FYVE domain in the localization and activity of a cAMP phosphodiesterase implicated in osmoregulation in Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Schoijet, Alejandra C.; Miranda, Kildare; Medeiros, Lia Carolina Soares; de Souza, Wanderley; Flawiá, Mirtha M.; Torres, Héctor N.; Pignataro, Omar P.; Docampo, Roberto; Alonso, Guillermo D.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Intracellular levels of cyclic nucleotide second messengers are regulated predominantly by a large superfamily of phosphodiesterases. Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease, encodes four different phosphodiesterase (PDE) families. One of these PDEs, T. cruzi phosphodiesterase C2 (TcrPDEC2) has been characterized as a FYVE-domain containing protein. Here, we report a novel role for TcrPDEC2 in osmoregulation in T. cruzi and reveal the relevance of its FYVE domain. Our data show that treatment of epimastigotes with TcrPDEC2 inhibitors improves their regulatory volume decrease, whereas cells overexpressing this enzyme are unaffected by the same inhibitors. Consistent with these results, TcrPDEC2 localizes to the contractile vacuole complex, showing strong labeling in the region corresponding to the spongiome. Furthermore, transgenic parasites overexpressing a truncated version of TcrPDEC2 without the FYVE domain show a failure in its targeting to the contractile vacuole complex and a marked decrease in phosphodiesterase activity, supporting the importance of this domain to the localization and activity of TcrPDEC2. Taking together, the results here presented are consistent with the importance of the cyclic AMP signaling pathway in regulatory volume decrease and implicate TcrPDEC2 as a specifically localized phosphodiesterase involved in osmoregulation in T. cruzi. PMID:21166893

  4. Interaction with receptor for activated C-kinase 1 (RACK1) sensitizes the phosphodiesterase PDE4D5 towards hydrolysis of cAMP and activation by protein kinase C

    PubMed Central

    Bird, Rebecca J.; Baillie, George S.; Yarwood, Stephen J.

    2010-01-01

    We have previously identified the PKC (protein kinase C)-anchoring protein RACK1 (receptor for activated C-kinase 1), as a specific binding partner for the cAMP-specific phosphodiesterase PDE4D5, suggesting a potential site for cross-talk between the PKC and cAMP signalling pathways. In the present study we found that elevation of intracellular cAMP, with the β2-adrenoceptor agonist isoproterenol (isoprenaline), led to activation of PDE4 enzymes in the particulate and soluble fractions of HEK (human embryonic kidney)-293 cells. In contrast activation of PDE4D5, with isoproterenol and the PKC activator PMA, was restricted to the particulate fraction, where it interacts with RACK1; however, RACK1 is dispensable for anchoring PDE4D5 to the particulate fraction. Kinetic studies demonstrated that RACK1 alters the conformation of particulate-associated PDE4D5 so that it more readily interacts with its substrate cAMP and with rolipram, a PDE4 inhibitor that specifically targets the active site of the enzyme. Interaction with RACK1 was also essential for PKC-dependent and ERK (extracellular-signal-regulated kinase)-independent phosphorylation (on Ser126), and activation of PDE4D5 in response to PMA and isoproterenol, both of which trigger the recruitment of PKCα to RACK1. Together these results reveal novel signalling cross-talk, whereby RACK1 mediates PKC-dependent activation of PDE4D5 in the particulate fraction of HEK-293 cells in response to elevations in intracellular cAMP. PMID:20819076

  5. Altered phosphodiesterase 3-mediated cAMP hydrolysis contributes to a hypermotile phenotype in obese JCR:LA-cp rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells: implications for diabetes-associated cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Netherton, Stuart J; Jimmo, Sandra L; Palmer, Daniel; Tilley, Douglas G; Dunkerley, Heather A; Raymond, Daniel R; Russell, James C; Absher, P Marlene; Sage, E Helene; Vernon, Robert B; Maurice, Donald H

    2002-04-01

    Cardiovascular diseases represent a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in diabetes. Of the many animal models used in the study of non-insulin-dependent (type 2) diabetes, the JCR:LA-cp rat is unique in that it develops insulin resistance in the presence of obesity and manifests both peripheral and coronary vasculopathies. In this animal model, arterial vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) from homozygous obese (cp/cp) rats, but not from age-matched healthy (+/+ or + /cp, collectively defined +/?) littermates, display an " activated" phenotype in vitro and in vivo and have an elevated level of cAMP phosphodiesterase (PDE) activity. In this report, we confirm that cp/cp rat aortic VSMCs have an elevated level of PDE3 activity and show that only particulate PDE3 (PDE3B) activity is elevated. In marked contrast to results obtained in + /? VSMCs, simultaneous activation of adenylyl cyclase and inhibition of PDE3 activity in cp/cp VSMCs synergistically increased cAMP. Although PDE3 inhibition did not potentiate the antimigratory effects of forskolin on +/? VSMCs, PDE3 inhibition did markedly potentiate the forskolin-induced inhibition of migration of cp/cp-derived VSMCs. Although PDE3 activity was elevated in cp/cp rat aortic VSMCs, levels of expression of cytosolic PDE3 (PDE3A) and PDE3B in +/? and cp/cp VSMCs, as well as activation of these enzymes following activation of the cAMP-protein kinase A signaling cascade, were not different. Our data are consistent with an increased role for PDE3 in regulating cAMP-dependent signaling in cp/cp VSMCs and identify PDE3 as a cellular activity potentially responsible for the phenotype of cp/cp VSMCs.

  6. Cardiac Cyclic Nucleotide Phosphodiesterases: Function, Regulation, and Therapeutic Prospects

    PubMed Central

    Knight, W. E.; Yan, C.

    2014-01-01

    The second messengers cAMP and cGMP exist in multiple discrete compartments and regulate a variety of biological processes in the heart. The cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases, by catalyzing the hydrolysis of cAMP and cGMP, play crucial roles in controlling the amplitude, duration, and compartmentalization of cyclic nucleotide signaling. Over 60 phosphodiesterase isoforms, grouped into 11 families, have been discovered to date. In the heart, both cAMP- and cGMP-hydrolyzing phosphodiesterases play important roles in physiology and pathology. At least 7 of the 11 phosphodiesterase family members appear to be expressed in the myocardium, and evidence supports phosphodiesterase involvement in regulation of many processes important for normal cardiac function including pacemaking and contractility, as well as many pathological processes including remodeling and myocyte apoptosis. Pharmacological inhibitors for a number of phosphodiesterase families have also been used clinically or preclinically to treat several types of cardiovascular disease. In addition, phosphodiesterase inhibitors are also being considered for treatment of many forms of disease outside the cardiovascular system, raising the possibility of cardiovascular side effects of such agents. This review will discuss the roles of phosphodiesterases in the heart, in terms of expression patterns, regulation, and involvement in physiological and pathological functions. Additionally, the cardiac effects of various phosphodiesterase inhibitors, both potentially beneficial and detrimental, will be discussed. PMID:22951903

  7. cAMP-Specific phosphodiesterase-4 enzymes in the cardiovascular system: a molecular toolbox for generating compartmentalized cAMP signaling.

    PubMed

    Houslay, Miles D; Baillie, George S; Maurice, Donald H

    2007-04-13

    Cyclic AMP regulates a vast number of distinct events in all cells. Early studies established that its hydrolysis by cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDEs) controlled both the magnitude and the duration of its influence. Recent evidence shows that PDEs also act as coincident detectors linking cyclic-nucleotide- and non-cyclic-nucleotide-based cellular signaling processes and are tethered with great selectively to defined intracellular structures, thereby integrating and spatially restricting their cellular effects in time and space. Although 11 distinct families of PDEs have been defined, and cells invariably express numerous individual PDE enzymes, a large measure of our increased appreciation of the roles of these enzymes in regulating cyclic nucleotide signaling has come from studies on the PDE4 family. Four PDE4 genes encode more than 20 isoforms. Alternative mRNA splicing and the use of different promoters allows cells the possibility of expressing numerous PDE4 enzymes, each with unique amino-terminal-targeting and/or regulatory sequences. Dominant negative and small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown strategies have proven that particular isoforms can uniquely control specific cellular functions. Thus the protein kinase A phosphorylation status of the beta(2) adrenoceptor and, thereby, its ability to switch its signaling to extracellular signal-regulated kinase activation, is uniquely regulated by PDE4D5 in cardiomyocytes. We describe how cardiomyocytes and vascular smooth muscle cells selectively vary both the expression and the catalytic activities of PDE4 isoforms to regulate their various functions and how altered regulation of these processes can influence the development, or resolution, of cardiovascular pathologies, such as heart failure, as well as various vasculopathies.

  8. Receptor-mediated stimulation of lipid signalling pathways in CHO cells elicits the rapid transient induction of the PDE1B isoform of Ca2+/calmodulin-stimulated cAMP phosphodiesterase.

    PubMed

    Spence, S; Rena, G; Sullivan, M; Erdogan, S; Houslay, M D

    1997-01-01

    Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO cells) do not exhibit any Ca2+/calmodulin-stimulated cAMP phosphodiesterase (PDE1) activity. Challenge of CHO cells with agonists for endogenous P2-purinoceptors, lysophosphatidic acid receptors and thrombin receptors caused a similar rapid transient induction of PDE1 activity in each instance. This was also evident on noradrenaline challenge of a cloned CHO cell line transfected so as to overexpress alpha 1B-adrenoceptors. This novel PDE1 activity appeared within about 15 min of exposure to ligands, rose to a maximum value within 30 min to 1 h and then rapidly decreased. In each case, the expression of novel PDE1 activity was blocked by the transcriptional inhibitor actinomycin D. Challenge with insulin of either native CHO cells or a CHO cell line transfected so as to overexpress the human insulin receptor failed to induce PDE1 activity. Reverse transcriptase-PCR analyses, using degenerate primers able to detect the PDE1C isoform, did not amplify any fragment from RNA preparations of CHO cells expressing PDE1 activity, although they did so from the human thyroid carcinoma FTC133 cell line. Reverse transcriptase-PCR analyses, using degenerate primers able to detect the PDE1A and PDE1B isoforms, successfully amplified a fragment of the predicted size from RNA preparations of both CHO cells expressing PDE1 activity and human Jurkat T-cells. Sequencing of the PCR products, generated using the PDE1A/B primers, yielded a novel sequence which, by analogy with sequences reported for bovine and murine PDE1B forms, suggests that the PDE1 species induced in CHO cells through protein kinase C activation and that expressed in Jurkat T-cells are PDE1B forms.

  9. Two Phosphodiesterase Genes, PDEL and PDEH, Regulate Development and Pathogenicity by Modulating Intracellular Cyclic AMP Levels in Magnaporthe oryzae

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Haifeng; Liu, Kaiyue; Zhang, Xing; Tang, Wei; Wang, Jiansheng; Guo, Min; Zhao, Qian; Zheng, Xiaobo; Wang, Ping; Zhang, Zhengguang

    2011-01-01

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP) signaling plays an important role in regulating multiple cellular responses, such as growth, morphogenesis, and/or pathogenicity of eukaryotic organisms such as fungi. As a second messenger, cAMP is important in the activation of downstream effector molecules. The balance of intracellular cAMP levels depends on biosynthesis by adenylyl cyclases (ACs) and hydrolysis by cAMP phosphodiesterases (PDEases). The rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae contains a high-affinity (PdeH/Pde2) and a low-affinity (PdeL/Pde1) PDEases, and a previous study showed that PdeH has a major role in asexual differentiation and pathogenicity. Here, we show that PdeL is required for asexual development and conidial morphology, and it also plays a minor role in regulating cAMP signaling. This is in contrast to PdeH whose mutation resulted in major defects in conidial morphology, cell wall integrity, and surface hydrophobicity, as well as a significant reduction in pathogenicity. Consistent with both PdeH and PdeL functioning in cAMP signaling, disruption of PDEH only partially rescued the mutant phenotype of ΔmagB and Δpka1. Further studies suggest that PdeH might function through a feedback mechanism to regulate the expression of pathogenicity factor Mpg1 during surface hydrophobicity and pathogenic development. Moreover, microarray data revealed new insights into the underlying cAMP regulatory mechanisms that may help to identify potential pathogenicity factors for the development of new disease management strategies. PMID:21386978

  10. Cyclic AMP effectors in African trypanosomes revealed by genome-scale RNA interference library screening for resistance to the phosphodiesterase inhibitor CpdA.

    PubMed

    Gould, Matthew K; Bachmaier, Sabine; Ali, Juma A M; Alsford, Sam; Tagoe, Daniel N A; Munday, Jane C; Schnaufer, Achim C; Horn, David; Boshart, Michael; de Koning, Harry P

    2013-10-01

    One of the most promising new targets for trypanocidal drugs to emerge in recent years is the cyclic AMP (cAMP) phosphodiesterase (PDE) activity encoded by TbrPDEB1 and TbrPDEB2. These genes were genetically confirmed as essential, and a high-affinity inhibitor, CpdA, displays potent antitrypanosomal activity. To identify effectors of the elevated cAMP levels resulting from CpdA action and, consequently, potential sites for adaptations giving resistance to PDE inhibitors, resistance to the drug was induced. Selection of mutagenized trypanosomes resulted in resistance to CpdA as well as cross-resistance to membrane-permeable cAMP analogues but not to currently used trypanocidal drugs. Resistance was not due to changes in cAMP levels or in PDEB genes. A second approach, a genome-wide RNA interference (RNAi) library screen, returned four genes giving resistance to CpdA upon knockdown. Validation by independent RNAi strategies confirmed resistance to CpdA and suggested a role for the identified cAMP Response Proteins (CARPs) in cAMP action. CARP1 is unique to kinetoplastid parasites and has predicted cyclic nucleotide binding-like domains, and RNAi repression resulted in >100-fold resistance. CARP2 and CARP4 are hypothetical conserved proteins associated with the eukaryotic flagellar proteome or with flagellar function, with an orthologue of CARP4 implicated in human disease. CARP3 is a hypothetical protein, unique to Trypanosoma. CARP1 to CARP4 likely represent components of a novel cAMP signaling pathway in the parasite. As cAMP metabolism is validated as a drug target in Trypanosoma brucei, cAMP effectors highly divergent from the mammalian host, such as CARP1, lend themselves to further pharmacological development.

  11. Sarcoplasmic reticulum-associated cyclic adenosine 5'-monophosphate phosphodiesterase activity in normal and failing human hearts.

    PubMed Central

    Movsesian, M A; Smith, C J; Krall, J; Bristow, M R; Manganiello, V C

    1991-01-01

    Sarcoplasmic reticulum-associated cAMP phosphodiesterase activity was examined in microsomes prepared from the left ventricular myocardium of eight heart transplant recipients with end-stage idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy and six unmatched organ donors with normal cardiac function. At cAMP concentrations less than or equal to 1.0 microM, sarcoplasmic reticulum-associated cAMP phosphodiesterase activity was functionally homogeneous. cAMP phosphodiesterase activity was inhibited competitively by cGMP (Ki = 0.031 +/- 0.008 microM) and the cilostamide derivative OPC 3911 (Ki = 0.018 +/- 0.004 microM), but was essentially insensitive to rolipram. Vmax and Km were 781.7 +/- 109.2 nmol/mg per min and 0.188 +/- 0.031 microM, respectively, in microsomes prepared from nonfailing hearts and 793.9 +/- 68.9 nmol/mg per min and 0.150 +/- 0.027 microM in microsomes prepared from failing hearts. Microsomes prepared from nonfailing and failing hearts did not differ with respect to either the ratio of cAMP phosphodiesterase activity to ATP-dependent Ca2+ accumulation activity or the sensitivity of cAMP phosphodiesterase activity to inhibition by OPC 3911. These data suggest that the diminished inotropic efficacy of phosphodiesterase inhibitors in failing human hearts does not result from changes in the level, kinetic properties, or pharmacologic sensitivity of sarcoplasmic reticulum-associated cAMP phosphodiesterase activity. PMID:1647414

  12. Selective Phosphodiesterase 4B Inhibitors: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Azam, Mohammed Afzal; Tripuraneni, Naga Srinivas

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Phosphodiesterase 4B (PDE4B) is a member of the phosphodiesterase family of proteins that plays a critical role in regulating intracellular levels of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) by controlling its rate of degradation. It has been demonstrated that this isoform is involved in the orchestra of events which includes inflammation, schizophrenia, cancers, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, contractility of the myocardium, and psoriatic arthritis. Phosphodiesterase 4B has constituted an interesting target for drug development. In recent years, a number of PDE4B inhibitors have been developed for their use as therapeutic agents. In this review, an up-to-date status of the inhibitors investigated for the inhibition of PDE4B has been given so that this rich source of structural information of presently known PDE4B inhibitors could be helpful in generating a selective and potent inhibitor of PDE4B. PMID:25853062

  13. High-affinity K+ uptake in pepper plants.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Cordero, M Angeles; Martínez, Vicente; Rubio, Francisco

    2005-06-01

    High-affinity K+ uptake is an essential process for plant nutrition under K+-limiting conditions. The results presented here demonstrate that pepper (Capsicum annuum) plants grown in the absence of NH4+ and starved of K+ show an NH4+-sensitive high-affinity K+ uptake that allows plant roots to deplete external K+ to values below 1 microM. When plants are grown in the presence of NH4+, high-affinity K+ uptake is not inhibited by NH4+. Although NH4+-grown plants deplete external K+ below 1 microM in the absence of NH4+, when 1 mM NH4+ is present they do not deplete external K+ below 10 microM. A K+ transporter of the HAK family, CaHAK1, is very likely mediating the NH4+-sensitive component of the high-affinity K+ uptake in pepper roots. CaHAK1 is strongly induced in the roots that show the NH4+-sensitive high-affinity K+ uptake and its induction is reduced in K+-starved plants grown in the presence of NH4+. The NH4+-insensitive K+ uptake may be mediated by an AKT1-like K+ channel.

  14. Archaeology Camp.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, John R.

    1984-01-01

    A summer camp for gifted youth (13-16 years old) featured two field archaeology sessions in which students participated in excavation and field trips to nearby archaeological sites along with traditional camp activities. (CL)

  15. Summer Camp.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pfisterer, Bill

    About 50 participants and 8 supervisors attended the Summer Camp. Visitors were encouraged and parents often came to see what their kids were doing. Before arriving at camp, the students learned how important balancing the supplies was when loading the boats. On the way to camp, students studied the: (1) landmarks so that they could find their way…

  16. Summer Camp.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, Maxine; And Others

    Government regulation of children's summer camps, particularly involving health and safety standards, is discussed in a series of brief interviews with camp directors and representatives of camp associations. Transcribed from the National Public Radio weekly broadcast, "Options in Education," the program includes a lengthy montage of…

  17. Cyclic 3′,5′-Adenosine Monophosphate Phosphodiesterase of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, L. D.; Monard, D.; Rickenberg, H. V.

    1973-01-01

    The cyclic 3′,5′-adenosine monophosphate (c-AMP) phosphodiesterase from Escherichia coli has been partially purified. The enzyme has an apparent molecular weight of 30,000, a Michaelis constant of 0.5 mM c-AMP, and a pH optimum of 7. The partially purified enzyme requires for activity the presence of a reducing compound and of either iron or a protein which seemingly acts as iron carrier. PMID:4355491

  18. Phosphodiesterase 7 Inhibition Preserves Dopaminergic Neurons in Cellular and Rodent Models of Parkinson Disease

    PubMed Central

    Morales-Garcia, Jose A.; Redondo, Miriam; Alonso-Gil, Sandra; Gil, Carmen; Perez, Concepción; Martinez, Ana; Santos, Angel; Perez-Castillo, Ana

    2011-01-01

    Background Phosphodiesterase 7 plays a major role in down-regulation of protein kinase A activity by hydrolyzing cAMP in many cell types. This cyclic nucleotide plays a key role in signal transduction in a wide variety of cellular responses. In the brain, cAMP has been implicated in learning, memory processes and other brain functions. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we show a novel function of phosphodiesterase 7 inhibition on nigrostriatal dopaminergic neuronal death. We found that S14, a heterocyclic small molecule inhibitor of phosphodiesterase 7, conferred significant neuronal protection against different insults both in the human dopaminergic cell line SH-SY5Y and in primary rat mesencephalic cultures. S14 treatment also reduced microglial activation, protected dopaminergic neurons and improved motor function in the lipopolysaccharide rat model of Parkinson disease. Finally, S14 neuroprotective effects were reversed by blocking the cAMP signaling pathways that operate through cAMP-dependent protein kinase A. Conclusions/Significance Our findings demonstrate that phosphodiesterase 7 inhibition can protect dopaminergic neurons against different insults, and they provide support for the therapeutic potential of phosphodiesterase 7 inhibitors in the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders, particularly Parkinson disease. PMID:21390306

  19. Challenge of human Jurkat T-cells with the adenylate cyclase activator forskolin elicits major changes in cAMP phosphodiesterase (PDE) expression by up-regulating PDE3 and inducing PDE4D1 and PDE4D2 splice variants as well as down-regulating a novel PDE4A splice variant.

    PubMed Central

    Erdogan, S; Houslay, M D

    1997-01-01

    The cAMP phosphodiesterase (PDE) 3 and PDE4 isoforms provide the major cAMP-hydrolysing PDE activities in Jurkat T-cells, with additional contributions from the PDE1 and PDE2 isoforms. Challenge of cells with the adenylate cyclase activator forskolin led to a rapid, albeit transient, increase in PDE3 activity occurring over the first 45 min, followed by a sustained increase in PDE3 activity which began after approximately 3 h and continued for at least 24 h. Only this second phase of increase in PDE3 activity was blocked by the transcriptional inhibitor actinomycin D. After approximately 3 h of exposure to forskolin, PDE4 activity had increased, via a process that could be inhibited by actinomycin D, and it remained elevated for at least a 24 h period. Such actions of forskolin were mimicked by cholera toxin and 8-bromo-cAMP. Forskolin increased intracellular cAMP concentrations in a time-dependent fashion and its action was enhanced when PDE induction was blocked with actinomycin D. Reverse transcription (RT)-PCR analysis, using generic primers designed to detect transcripts representing enzymically active products of the four PDE4 genes, identified transcripts for PDE4A and PDE4D but not for PDE4B or PDE4C in untreated Jurkat T-cells. Forskolin treatment did not induce transcripts for either PDE4B or PDE4C; however, it reduced the RT-PCR signal for PDE4A transcripts and markedly enhanced that for PDE4D transcripts. Using RT-PCR primers for PDE4 splice variants, a weak signal for PDE4D1 was evident in control cells whereas, in forskolin-treated cells, clear signals for both PDE4D1 and PDE4D2 were detected. RT-PCR analysis of the PDE4A species indicated that it was not the PDE4A isoform PDE-46 (PDE4A4B). Immunoblotting of control cells for PDE4 forms identified a single PDE4A species of approximately 118 kDa, which migrated distinctly from the PDE4A4B isoform PDE-46, with immunoprecipitation analyses showing that it provided all of the PDE4 activity in control

  20. Structural origins of high-affinity biotin binding to streptavidin.

    PubMed

    Weber, P C; Ohlendorf, D H; Wendoloski, J J; Salemme, F R

    1989-01-06

    The high affinity of the noncovalent interaction between biotin and streptavidin forms the basis for many diagnostic assays that require the formation of an irreversible and specific linkage between biological macromolecules. Comparison of the refined crystal structures of apo and a streptavidin:biotin complex shows that the high affinity results from several factors. These factors include the formation of multiple hydrogen bonds and van der Waals interactions between biotin and the protein, together with the ordering of surface polypeptide loops that bury the biotin in the protein interior. Structural alterations at the biotin binding site produce quaternary changes in the streptavidin tetramer. These changes apparently propagate through cooperative deformations in the twisted beta sheets that link tetramer subunits.

  1. Selective high affinity polydentate ligands and methods of making such

    DOEpatents

    DeNardo, Sally; DeNardo, Gerald; Balhorn, Rodney

    2010-02-16

    This invention provides novel polydentate selective high affinity ligands (SHALs) that can be used in a variety of applications in a manner analogous to the use of antibodies. SHALs typically comprise a multiplicity of ligands that each bind different region son the target molecule. The ligands are joined directly or through a linker thereby forming a polydentate moiety that typically binds the target molecule with high selectivity and avidity.

  2. Mechanisms Restricting Diffusion of Intracellular cAMP.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Shailesh R; Clancy, Colleen E; Harvey, Robert D

    2016-01-22

    Although numerous receptors stimulate cAMP production in a wide array of cells, many elicit distinct, highly localized responses, implying that the subcellular distribution of cAMP is not uniform. One often used explanation is that phosphodiesterases, which breakdown cAMP, act as functional barriers limiting diffusion. However, several studies refute the notion that this is sufficient, suggesting that phosphodiesterase-independent movement of cAMP must occur at rates slower than free diffusion. But, until now this has never been demonstrated. Using Raster Image Correlation Spectroscopy (RICS), we measured the diffusion coefficient of a fluorescently-labeled cAMP derivative (φ450-cAMP) as well as other fluorescent molecules in order to investigate the role that molecular size, cell morphology, and buffering by protein kinase A (PKA) play in restricting cAMP mobility in different cell types. Our results demonstrate that cytosolic movement of cAMP is indeed much slower than the rate of free diffusion and that interactions with PKA, especially type II PKA associated with mitochondria, play a significant role. These findings have important implications with respect to cAMP signaling in all cells.

  3. Alterations of Phosphodiesterases in Adrenocortical Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Hannah-Shmouni, Fady; Faucz, Fabio R.; Stratakis, Constantine A.

    2016-01-01

    Alterations in the cyclic (c)AMP-dependent signaling pathway have been implicated in the majority of benign adrenocortical tumors (ACTs) causing Cushing syndrome (CS). Phosphodiesterases (PDEs) are enzymes that regulate cyclic nucleotide levels, including cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP). Inactivating mutations and other functional variants in PDE11A and PDE8B, two cAMP-binding PDEs, predispose to ACTs. The involvement of these two genes in ACTs was initially revealed by a genome-wide association study in patients with micronodular bilateral adrenocortical hyperplasia. Thereafter, PDE11A or PDE8B genetic variants have been found in other ACTs, including macronodular adrenocortical hyperplasias and cortisol-producing adenomas. In addition, downregulation of PDE11A expression and inactivating variants of the gene have been found in hereditary and sporadic testicular germ cell tumors, as well as in prostatic cancer. PDEs confer an increased risk of ACT formation probably through, primarily, their action on cAMP levels, but other actions might be possible. In this report, we review what is known to date about PDE11A and PDE8B and their involvement in the predisposition to ACTs. PMID:27625633

  4. Isolation and characterization of PDE9A, a novel human cGMP-specific phosphodiesterase.

    PubMed

    Fisher, D A; Smith, J F; Pillar, J S; St Denis, S H; Cheng, J B

    1998-06-19

    We have cloned and characterized the first human isozyme in a new family of cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases, PDE9A. By sequence homology in the catalytic domain, PDE9A is almost equidistant from all eight known mammalian PDE families but is most similar to PDE8A (34% amino acid identity) and least like PDE5A (28% amino acid identity). We report the cloning of human cDNA encoding a full-length protein of 593 amino acids, including a 261-amino acid region located near the C terminus that is homologous to the approximately 270-amino acid catalytic domain of other PDEs. PDE9A is expressed in all eight tissues examined as a approximately 2. 0-kilobase mRNA, with highest levels in spleen, small intestine, and brain. The full-length PDE9A was expressed in baculovirus fused to an N-terminal 9-amino acid FLAG tag. Kinetic analysis of the baculovirus-expressed enzyme shows it to be a very high affinity cGMP-specific PDE with a Km of 170 nM for cGMP and 230 microM for cAMP. The Km for cGMP makes PDE9A one of the highest affinity PDEs known. The Vmax for cGMP (4.9 nmol/min/microg recombinant enzyme) is about twice as fast as that of PDE4 for cAMP. The enzyme is about twice as active in vitro in 1-10 mM Mn2+ than in the same concentration of Mg2+ or Ca2+. PDE9A is insensitive (up to 100 microM) to a variety of PDE inhibitors including rolipram, vinpocetine, SKF-94120, dipyridamole, and 3-isobutyl-1-methyl-xanthine but is inhibited (IC50 = 35 microM) by zaprinast, a PDE5 inhibitor. PDE9A lacks a region homologous to the allosteric cGMP-binding regulatory regions found in the cGMP-binding PDEs: PDE2, PDE5, and PDE6.

  5. In resting COS1 cells a dominant negative approach shows that specific, anchored PDE4 cAMP phosphodiesterase isoforms gate the activation, by basal cyclic AMP production, of AKAP-tethered protein kinase A type II located in the centrosomal region.

    PubMed

    McCahill, Angela; McSorley, Theresa; Huston, Elaine; Hill, Elaine V; Lynch, Martin J; Gall, Irene; Keryer, Guy; Lygren, Birgitte; Tasken, Kjetil; van Heeke, Gino; Houslay, Miles D

    2005-09-01

    We employ a novel, dominant negative approach to identify a key role for certain tethered cyclic AMP specific phosphodiesterase-4 (PDE4) isoforms in regulating cyclic AMP dependent protein kinase A (PKA) sub-populations in resting COS1 cells. A fraction of PKA is clearly active in resting COS1 cells and this activity increases when cells are treated with the selective PDE4 inhibitor, rolipram. Point mutation of a critical, conserved aspartate residue in the catalytic site of long PDE4A4, PDE4B1, PDE4C2 and PDE4D3 isoforms renders them catalytically inactive. Overexpressed in resting COS1 cells, catalytically inactive forms of PDE4C2 and PDE4D3, but not PDE4A4 and PDE4B1, are constitutively PKA phosphorylated while overexpressed active versions of all these isoforms are not. Inactive and active versions of all these isoforms are PKA phosphorylated in cells where protein kinase A is maximally activated with forskolin and IBMX. By contrast, rolipram challenge of COS1 cells selectively triggers the PKA phosphorylation of recombinant, active PDE4D3 and PDE4C2 but not recombinant, active PDE4A4 and PDE4B1. Purified, recombinant PDE4D3 and PDE4A4 show a similar dose-dependency for in vitro phosphorylation by PKA. Disruption of the tethering of PKA type-II to PKA anchor proteins (AKAPs), achieved using the peptide Ht31, prevents inactive forms of PDE4C2 and PDE4D3 being constitutively PKA phosphorylated in resting cells as does siRNA-mediated knockdown of PKA-RII, but not PKA-RI. PDE4C2 and PDE4D3 co-immunoprecipitate from COS1 cell lysates with 250 kDa and 450 kDa AKAPs that tether PKA type-II and not PKA type-I. PKA type-II co-localises with AKAP450 in the centrosomal region of COS1 cells. The perinuclear distribution of recombinant, inactive PDE4D3, but not inactive PDE4A4, overlaps with AKAP450 and PKA type-II. The distribution of PKA phosphorylated inactive PDE4D3 also overlaps with that of AKAP450 in the centrosomal region of COS1 cells. We propose that a novel role

  6. Histamine receptors on adult rat cardiomyocytes: antagonism of alpha/sub 1/-receptor stimulation of cAMP degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Buxton, I.L.O.; Bowen, S.M.

    1986-03-01

    Incubation of intact cardiomyocytes with the histamine antagonist (/sup 3/H)mepyramine results in rapid reversible binding to a single class of high affinity sites (K/sub D/ = 1.2nM; 50,000 sites/myocyte). In membranes from purified myocytes histamine competition of (/sup 3/H)mepyramine binding (K/sub D/ = 300nM) is not altered by GTP (10..mu..M). Competition of (/sup 3/H)mepyramine binding by H-receptor subtype-selective antagonists suggests the presence of a single class of H/sub 1/-receptors. Incubation of intact myocytes with histamine (luM, H/sub 1/ receptor activation) plus norepinephrine (NE 1uM, alpha/sub 1/ + beta/sub 1/ receptor activation) for 3 min leads to significantly more cAMP accumulation (36.5 pmol/10/sup 6/ myocytes) than NE alone (30 pmol/10/sup 6/ myocytes). Histamine alone does not alter basal cAMP = 10.4 pmol/10/sup 6/ myocytes, or beta/sub 1/ stimulation (isoproternol, 1uM) = 39.6 pmol/10/sup 6/ myocytes. Cyclic AMP accumulation with NE plus prazosin 10nM, (alpha/sub 1/ + beta/sub 1/ + alpha/sub 1/ blockade) is indistinguishable from NE + histamine, (alpha/sub 1/ + beta/sub 1/ + H/sub 1/) stimulation. Histamine competition for (/sup 3/H)prazosin binding suggests that histamine does not block alpha/sub 1/ receptors on the myocyte. These data suggest that H/sub 1/ receptor activation leads to antagonism of the alpha/sub 1/ receptor mediated activation of cAMP phosphodiesterase the authors have recently described.

  7. 01-ERD-111 - The Development of Synthetic High Affinity Ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, J; Balhorn, R; Cosman, M; Lightstone, F; Zeller, L

    2004-02-05

    The aim of this project was to develop Synthetic High-Affinity Ligands (SHALs), which bind with high affinity and specificity to proteins of interest for national security and cancer therapy applications. The aim of producing synthetic ligands for sensory devices as an alternative to antibody-based detection assays and therapeutic agents is to overcome the drawbacks associated with antibody-based in next-generation sensors and systems. The focus area of the project was the chemical synthesis of the SHALs. The project concentrated on two different protein targets. (a) The C fragment of tetanus and botulinum toxin, potential biowarfare agents. A SHAL for tetanus or botulinum toxin would be incorporated into a sensory device for the toxins. (b) HLA-DR10, a protein found in high abundance on the surface of Non-Hodgkins Lymphoma. A SHAL specific to a tumor marker, labeled with a radionuclide, would enable the targeted delivery of radiation therapy to metastatic disease. The technical approach used to develop a SHAL for each protein target will be described in more detail below. However, in general, the development of a SHAL requires a combination of computational modeling techniques, modern nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) and synthetic chemistry.

  8. Direct measurement of equilibrium constants for high-affinity hemoglobins.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Suman; Premer, Scott A; Hoy, Julie A; Trent, James T; Hargrove, Mark S

    2003-06-01

    The biological functions of heme proteins are linked to their rate and affinity constants for ligand binding. Kinetic experiments are commonly used to measure equilibrium constants for traditional hemoglobins comprised of pentacoordinate ligand binding sites and simple bimolecular reaction schemes. However, kinetic methods do not always yield reliable equilibrium constants with more complex hemoglobins for which reaction mechanisms are not clearly understood. Furthermore, even where reaction mechanisms are clearly understood, it is very difficult to directly measure equilibrium constants for oxygen and carbon monoxide binding to high-affinity (K(D) < 1 micro M) hemoglobins. This work presents a method for direct measurement of equilibrium constants for high-affinity hemoglobins that utilizes a competition for ligands between the "target" protein and an array of "scavenger" hemoglobins with known affinities. This method is described for oxygen and carbon monoxide binding to two hexacoordinate hemoglobins: rice nonsymbiotic hemoglobin and Synechocystis hemoglobin. Our results demonstrate that although these proteins have different mechanisms for ligand binding, their affinities for oxygen and carbon monoxide are similar. Their large affinity constants for oxygen, 285 and approximately 100 micro M(-1) respectively, indicate that they are not capable of facilitating oxygen transport.

  9. Complex high affinity interactions occur between MHCI and superantigens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapes, S. K.; Herpich, A. R.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Staphylococcal enterotoxins A and C1 (SEA or SEC1) bound to major histocompatibility-I (MHCI) molecules with high affinity (binding constants ranging from 1.1 microM to 79 nM). SEA and SEC1 directly bound MHCI molecules that had been captured by monoclonal antibodies specific for H-2Kk, H-2Dk, or both. In addition, MHCI-specific antibodies inhibited the binding of SEC1 to LM929 cells and SEA competitively inhibited SEC1 binding; indicating that the superantigens bound to MHCI on the cell surface. The affinity and number of superantigen binding sites differed depending on whether MHCI was expressed in the membrane of LM929 cells or whether it was captured. These data support the hypothesis that MHCI molecules can serve as superantigen receptors.

  10. High-affinity ammonium transporters and nitrogen sensing in mycorrhizas.

    PubMed

    Javelle, Arnaud; André, Bruno; Marini, Anne Marie; Chalot, Michel

    2003-02-01

    Most terrestrial plants live in mutualistic symbiosis with root-infecting mycorrhizal fungi. This association requires a molecular dialogue between the two partners. However, the nature of the chemical signals that induce hyphal differentiation are not well characterized and the mechanisms for signal reception are still unknown. In addition to its role in ammonium scavenging, the Mep2 protein from Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been proposed to act as an ammonium sensor that is essential for pseudohyphal differentiation in response to ammonium limitation. We propose that the high-affinity ammonium transporters from mycorrhizal fungi act in a similar manner to sense the environment and induce, via as-yet-unidentified signal transduction cascades, the switch in the mode of fungal growth observed during the formation of mycorrhiza.

  11. HIGH AFFINITY, DSRNA BINDING BY DISCONNECTED INTERACTING PROTEIN 1†

    PubMed Central

    Catanese, Daniel J.; Matthews, Kathleen S.

    2010-01-01

    Disconnected Interacting Protein 1 (DIP1) appears from sequence analysis and preliminary binding studies to be a member of the dsRNA-binding protein family. Of interest, DIP1 was shown previously to interact with and influence multiple proteins involved in transcription regulation in Drosophila melanogaster. We show here that the longest isoform of this protein, DIP1-c, exhibits a 500-fold preference for dsRNA over dsDNA of similar nucleotide sequence. Further, DIP1-c demonstrated very high affinity for a subset of dsRNA ligands, with binding in the picomolar range for VA1 RNA and miR-iab-4 precursor stem-loop, a potential physiological RNA target involved in regulating expression of its protein partner, Ultrabithorax. PMID:20643095

  12. [Hemophilia camps.

    PubMed

    Juárez-Sierra, Julieta; Del Pilar Torres-Arreola, Laura; Marín-Palomares, Teresa; Dueñas-González, María Teresa; Monteros-Rincón, Martha Patricia; Osorio-Guzmán, Maricela

    2013-01-01

    We reported the experience of hemophilia camps which was accomplished with patients from hospitals of the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social. The aim was to prepare the families and patients regarding the disease treatment, in order to promote the self sufficiency and to know the impact of the program on the course of the disease. Surveys were applied about treatment items and personal opinions were collected. The results of the national hemophilia camp were: group of 56 patients, average 14 years, 2 % women, 51 % severe hemophilia and 43 % had hemophilic brothers. Benefits: patients increased their knowledge about earlier bleeding identification and the self-infusion method; they became aware on their responsibility in self care, timely treatment and duties at home. Hemophilia camps with patients are an option for attitude change before disease complications. Social network creation and the increase in self-sufficiency are other benefits.

  13. [Interaction of adenosin-3',5'-cyclosulfate with adenosine-3'5'-cyclophosphate dependent protein kinase and phosphodiesterase].

    PubMed

    Severin, E S; Tkachuk, V A; Guliaev, N N

    1976-02-01

    Interaction of adenosine-3',5'-cyclosulphate (cAMS) cAMP analogue, having sulphur atom instead of phosphorus in a six-term cyclic system with pig brain proteinkinase and rabbit skeletal muscle phosphodiesterase is studied. The affinity of proteinkinase to cAMS was found to be in 25000 times lower than the affinity of cAMP, the affinity of cAMS to the active site of phosphodiesterase being high enough. It is suggested that in the regulatory subunit of proteinkinase positive kationic group participates in nucleotide binding by interacting with negative oxygen atom of six-term cyclophosphate system. There is no such a group in the active site of phospodiesterase, because the absence of negative charge in case of cAMS only slightly affects the constant of cAMS binding by phosphodiesterase.

  14. Organized Camping's Honorable Tradition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miranda, Wilma

    1990-01-01

    Profiles three twentieth-century outdoor camping leaders. Describes early camping programs as "experimental intentional communities" teaching personal and social empowerment. Portia Mansfield's Wyonegonic Camps emphasized cooperation and artistic freedom. Joshua Lieberman's Pioneer Youth Camp taught workers' children social…

  15. Identification, characterization and subcellular localization of TcPDE1, a novel cAMP-specific phosphodiesterase from Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed Central

    D'Angelo, Maximiliano A; Sanguineti, Santiago; Reece, Jeffrey M; Birnbaumer, Lutz; Torres, Héctor N; Flawiá, Mirtha M

    2004-01-01

    Compartmentalization of cAMP phosphodiesterases plays a key role in the regulation of cAMP signalling in mammals. In the present paper, we report the characterization and subcellular localization of TcPDE1, the first cAMP-specific phosphodiesterase to be identified from Trypanosoma cruzi. TcPDE1 is part of a small gene family and encodes a 929-amino-acid protein that can complement a heat-shock-sensitive yeast mutant deficient in phospho-diesterase genes. Recombinant TcPDE1 strongly associates with membranes and cannot be released with NaCl or sodium cholate, suggesting that it is an integral membrane protein. This enzyme is specific for cAMP and its activity is not affected by cGMP, Ca2+, calmodulin or fenotiazinic inhibitors. TcPDE1 is sensitive to the phosphodiesterase inhibitor dipyridamole but is resistant to 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine, theophylline, rolipram and zaprinast. Papaverine, erythro-9-(2-hydroxy-3-nonyl)-adenine hydrochloride, and vinpocetine are poor inhibitors of this enzyme. Confocal laser scanning of T. cruzi epimastigotes showed that TcPDE1 is associated with the plasma membrane and concentrated in the flagellum of the parasite. The association of TcPDE1 with this organelle was confirmed by subcellular fractionation and cell-disruption treatments. The localization of this enzyme is a unique feature that distinguishes it from all the trypanosomatid phosphodiesterases described so far and indicates that compartmentalization of cAMP phosphodiesterases could also be important in these parasites. PMID:14556647

  16. Camp Minden

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Camp Minden is a Superfund Site located near the City of Minden, Louisiana. In October 2012, one of the storage bunkers exploded. In October 2014, the EPA signed a Settlement Agreement and selected a method to dispose of the remaining explosives.

  17. Phosphatidylserine Reversibly Binds Cu2+ with Extremely High Affinity

    PubMed Central

    Monson, Christopher F.; Cong, Xiao; Robison, Aaron; Pace, Hudson P.; Liu, Chunming; Poyton, Matthew F.; Cremer, Paul S.

    2012-01-01

    Phosphatidylserine (PS) embedded within supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) was found to bind Cu2+ from solution with extraordinarily high affinity. In fact, the equilibrium dissociation constant was in the femtomolar range. The resulting complex formed in a 1:2 Cu2+ to PS ratio and quenches a broad spectrum of lipid-bound fluorophores in a reversible and pH-dependent fashion. At acidic pH values, the fluorophores were almost completely unquenched, while at basic pH values significant quenching (85–90%) was observed. The pH at which the transition occurred was dependent on the PS concentration and ranged from approximately pH 5 to 8. The quenching kinetics was slow at low Cu2+ concentrations and basic values pH (up to several hours), while the unquenching reaction was orders of magnitude more rapid upon lowering the pH. This was consistent with diffusion limited complex formation at basic pH, but rapid dissociation under acidic conditions. The tight binding of Cu2+ to PS may have physiological consequences under certain circumstances. PMID:22548290

  18. Cloning and functional characterization of the high-affinity K+ transporter HAK1 of pepper.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Cordero, M Angeles; Martínez, Vicente; Rubio, Francisco

    2004-10-01

    High-affinity K+ uptake in plants plays a crucial role in K+ nutrition and different systems have been postulated to contribute to the high-affinity K+ uptake. The results presented here with pepper (Capsicum annum) demonstrate that a HAK1-type transporter greatly contributes to the high-affinity K+ uptake observed in roots. Pepper plants starved of K+ for 3 d showed high-affinity K+ uptake (Km of 6 microM K+) that was very sensitive to NH and their roots expressed a high-affinity K+ transporter, CaHAK1, which clusters in group I of the KT/HAK/KUP family of transporters. When expressed in yeast ( Saccharomyces cerevisiae ), CaHAK1 mediated high-affinity K+ and Rb+ uptake with Km values of 3.3 and 1.9 microM, respectively. Rb+ uptake was competitively inhibited by micromolar concentrations of NH and Cs+, and by millimolar concentrations of Na+.

  19. High-affinity binding of fibronectin to cultured Kupffer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Cardarelli, P.M.; Blumenstock, F.A.; McKeown-Longo, P.J.; Saba, T.M.; Mazurkiewicz, J.E.; Dias, J.A. )

    1990-11-01

    Hepatic Kupffer cells are a major component of the reticuloendothelial or macrophage system. They were the first phagocytic cell type whose phagocytosis was shown to be influenced by plasma fibronectin, a dimeric opsonic glycoprotein. In the current study, the binding of soluble radioiodinated fibronectin purified from rat serum to isolated rat hepatic Kupffer cells was investigated using a cultured Kupffer cell monolayer technique. Binding was specific, since unlabeled purified fibronectin competed in a dose-dependent manner with the 125I-fibronectin for binding to the Kupffer cells. Addition of gelatin enhanced the binding of 125I-fibronectin to Kupffer cells. The phagocytosis of gelatinized-coated red cells by Kupffer cells was increased either by preopsonizing the target particles with purified fibronectin or by the addition of purified fibronectin to the culture medium. In contrast, exposure of the Kupffer cells to medium containing purified fibronectin followed by wash-removal of the fibronectin did not increase the uptake of gelatin-coated red blood cells, even though fibronectin was detected on the surface of the Kupffer cells by immunofluorescence. Trypsinized monolayers expressed decreased capacity to bind 125I-fibronectin as well as fibronectin-coated sheep erythrocytes. The binding of 125I-fibronectin-gelatin complexes was inhibited by excess unlabeled fibronectin. We calculated that specific high-affinity (Kd = 7.46 x 10(-9) M) binding sites for fibronectin exist on Kupffer cells. There are approximately 2,800-3,500 binding sites or putative fibronectin receptors per Kupffer cell. These sites appear to mediate the enhanced phagocytosis of gelatin-coated particles opsonized by fibronectin.

  20. Clinical and Molecular Genetics of the Phosphodiesterases (PDEs)

    PubMed Central

    Azevedo, Monalisa F.; Faucz, Fabio R.; Bimpaki, Eirini; Horvath, Anelia; Levy, Isaac; de Alexandre, Rodrigo B.; Ahmad, Faiyaz; Manganiello, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDEs) are enzymes that have the unique function of terminating cyclic nucleotide signaling by catalyzing the hydrolysis of cAMP and GMP. They are critical regulators of the intracellular concentrations of cAMP and cGMP as well as of their signaling pathways and downstream biological effects. PDEs have been exploited pharmacologically for more than half a century, and some of the most successful drugs worldwide today affect PDE function. Recently, mutations in PDE genes have been identified as causative of certain human genetic diseases; even more recently, functional variants of PDE genes have been suggested to play a potential role in predisposition to tumors and/or cancer, especially in cAMP-sensitive tissues. Mouse models have been developed that point to wide developmental effects of PDEs from heart function to reproduction, to tumors, and beyond. This review brings together knowledge from a variety of disciplines (biochemistry and pharmacology, oncology, endocrinology, and reproductive sciences) with emphasis on recent research on PDEs, how PDEs affect cAMP and cGMP signaling in health and disease, and what pharmacological exploitations of PDEs may be useful in modulating cyclic nucleotide signaling in a way that prevents or treats certain human diseases. PMID:24311737

  1. High Affinity Binding of Indium and Ruthenium Ions by Gastrins.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Graham S; George, Graham N; Pushie, M Jake

    2015-01-01

    The peptide hormone gastrin binds two ferric ions with high affinity, and iron binding is essential for the biological activity of non-amidated forms of the hormone. Since gastrins act as growth factors in gastrointestinal cancers, and as peptides labelled with Ga and In isotopes are increasingly used for cancer diagnosis, the ability of gastrins to bind other metal ions was investigated systematically by absorption spectroscopy. The coordination structures of the complexes were characterized by extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. Changes in the absorption of gastrin in the presence of increasing concentrations of Ga3+ were fitted by a 2 site model with dissociation constants (Kd) of 3.3 x 10-7 and 1.1 x 10-6 M. Although the absorption of gastrin did not change upon the addition of In3+ ions, the changes in absorbance on Fe3+ ion binding in the presence of indium ions were fitted by a 2 site model with Kd values for In3+ of 6.5 x 10-15 and 1.7 x 10-7 M. Similar results were obtained with Ru3+ ions, although the Kd values for Ru3+ of 2.6 x 10-13 and 1.2 x 10-5 M were slightly larger than observed for In3+. The structures determined by EXAFS all had metal:gastrin stoichiometries of 2:1 but, while the metal ions in the Fe, Ga and In complexes were bridged by a carboxylate and an oxygen with a metal-metal separation of 3.0-3.3 Å, the Ru complex clearly demonstrated a short range Ru-Ru separation, which was significantly shorter, at 2.4 Å, indicative of a metal-metal bond. We conclude that gastrin selectively binds two In3+ or Ru3+ ions, and that the affinity of the first site for In3+ or Ru3+ ions is higher than for ferric ions. Some of the metal ion-gastrin complexes may be useful for cancer diagnosis and therapy.

  2. A Computational Modeling and Simulation Approach to Investigate Mechanisms of Subcellular cAMP Compartmentation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Pei-Chi; Boras, Britton W; Jeng, Mao-Tsuen; Docken, Steffen S; Lewis, Timothy J; McCulloch, Andrew D; Harvey, Robert D; Clancy, Colleen E

    2016-07-01

    Subcellular compartmentation of the ubiquitous second messenger cAMP has been widely proposed as a mechanism to explain unique receptor-dependent functional responses. How exactly compartmentation is achieved, however, has remained a mystery for more than 40 years. In this study, we developed computational and mathematical models to represent a subcellular sarcomeric space in a cardiac myocyte with varying detail. We then used these models to predict the contributions of various mechanisms that establish subcellular cAMP microdomains. We used the models to test the hypothesis that phosphodiesterases act as functional barriers to diffusion, creating discrete cAMP signaling domains. We also used the models to predict the effect of a range of experimentally measured diffusion rates on cAMP compartmentation. Finally, we modeled the anatomical structures in a cardiac myocyte diad, to predict the effects of anatomical diffusion barriers on cAMP compartmentation. When we incorporated experimentally informed model parameters to reconstruct an in silico subcellular sarcomeric space with spatially distinct cAMP production sites linked to caveloar domains, the models predict that under realistic conditions phosphodiesterases alone were insufficient to generate significant cAMP gradients. This prediction persisted even when combined with slow cAMP diffusion. When we additionally considered the effects of anatomic barriers to diffusion that are expected in the cardiac myocyte dyadic space, cAMP compartmentation did occur, but only when diffusion was slow. Our model simulations suggest that additional mechanisms likely contribute to cAMP gradients occurring in submicroscopic domains. The difference between the physiological and pathological effects resulting from the production of cAMP may be a function of appropriate compartmentation of cAMP signaling. Therefore, understanding the contribution of factors that are responsible for coordinating the spatial and temporal

  3. A Computational Modeling and Simulation Approach to Investigate Mechanisms of Subcellular cAMP Compartmentation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Pei-Chi; Boras, Britton W.; Jeng, Mao-Tsuen; Lewis, Timothy J.; McCulloch, Andrew D.; Harvey, Robert D.; Clancy, Colleen E.

    2016-01-01

    Subcellular compartmentation of the ubiquitous second messenger cAMP has been widely proposed as a mechanism to explain unique receptor-dependent functional responses. How exactly compartmentation is achieved, however, has remained a mystery for more than 40 years. In this study, we developed computational and mathematical models to represent a subcellular sarcomeric space in a cardiac myocyte with varying detail. We then used these models to predict the contributions of various mechanisms that establish subcellular cAMP microdomains. We used the models to test the hypothesis that phosphodiesterases act as functional barriers to diffusion, creating discrete cAMP signaling domains. We also used the models to predict the effect of a range of experimentally measured diffusion rates on cAMP compartmentation. Finally, we modeled the anatomical structures in a cardiac myocyte diad, to predict the effects of anatomical diffusion barriers on cAMP compartmentation. When we incorporated experimentally informed model parameters to reconstruct an in silico subcellular sarcomeric space with spatially distinct cAMP production sites linked to caveloar domains, the models predict that under realistic conditions phosphodiesterases alone were insufficient to generate significant cAMP gradients. This prediction persisted even when combined with slow cAMP diffusion. When we additionally considered the effects of anatomic barriers to diffusion that are expected in the cardiac myocyte dyadic space, cAMP compartmentation did occur, but only when diffusion was slow. Our model simulations suggest that additional mechanisms likely contribute to cAMP gradients occurring in submicroscopic domains. The difference between the physiological and pathological effects resulting from the production of cAMP may be a function of appropriate compartmentation of cAMP signaling. Therefore, understanding the contribution of factors that are responsible for coordinating the spatial and temporal

  4. Role of phosphodiesterase-4 on ethanol elicited locomotion and narcosis.

    PubMed

    Baliño, Pablo; Ledesma, Juan Carlos; Aragon, Carlos M G

    2016-02-01

    The cAMP signaling pathway has emerged as an important modulator of the pharmacological effects of ethanol. In this respect, the cAMP-dependent protein kinase has been shown to play an important role in the modulation of several ethanol-induced behavioral actions. Cellular levels of cAMP are maintained by the activity of adenylyl cyclases and phosphodiesterases. In the present work we have focused on ascertaining the role of PDE4 in mediating the neurobehavioral effects of ethanol. For this purpose, we have used the selective PDE4 inhibitor Ro 20-1724. This compound has been proven to enhance cellular cAMP response by PDE4 blockade and can be administered systemically. Swiss mice were injected intraperitoneally (i.p.) with Ro 20-1724 (0-5 mg/kg; i.p.) at different time intervals before ethanol (0-4 g/kg; i.p.) administration. Immediately after the ethanol injection, locomotor activity, loss of righting reflex, PKA footprint and enzymatic activity were assessed. Pretreatment with Ro 20-1724 increased ethanol-induced locomotor stimulation in a dose-dependent manner. Doses that increased locomotor stimulation did not modify basal locomotion or the suppression of motor activity produced by high doses of this alcohol. Ro 20-1724 did not alter the locomotor activation produced by amphetamine or cocaine. The time of loss of righting reflex evoked by ethanol was increased after pretreatment with Ro 20-1724. This effect was selective for the narcotic effects of ethanol since Ro 20-1724 did not affect pentobarbital-induced narcotic effects. Moreover, Ro 20-1724 administration increased the PKA footprint and enzymatic activity response elicited by ethanol. These data provide further evidence of the key role of the cAMP signaling pathway in the central effects of ethanol.

  5. Activated G-protein releases cGMP from high affinity binding sites on PDE from toad rod outer segments (ROS)

    SciTech Connect

    Yuen, P.S.T.; Walseth, T.F.; Panter, S.S.; Sundby, S.R.; Graeff, R.M.; Goldberg, N.D.

    1987-05-01

    cGMP binding proteins in toad ROS were identified by direct photoaffinity labeling (PAL) with /sup 32/P-cGMP and quantified by retention of complexes on nitrocellulose filters. By PAL, high affinity sites were present on the ..cap alpha.. and ..beta.. subunits of the cGMP-specific phosphodiesterase (PDE) which have MW/sub app/ of 94 and 90 kDa. A doublet was deduced from its photolabeling properties to represent PDE/sub ..gamma../ photocrosslinked with PDE/sub ..cap alpha../ or PDE/sub ..beta../, respectively. cGMP prebound to these high affinity sites was released by light-activated G-protein or its ..cap alpha.. subunit complexed with GTP..gamma..S; this inhibition of cGMP binding to PDE did not result from decreased cGMP availability due to enhanced hydrolysis. A low affinity cGMP binding component identified by PAL is tightly associated with ROS membranes. Apparent ATP/light-dependent stimulation of cGMP binding was shown to result from light activated cGMP hydrolysis in conjunction with ATP-promoted conversion of GMP to GDP/GTP and increased GDP/GTP binding. These findings coincide with a model for light-related regulation of cGMP binding and metabolism predicted from intact and cellfree kinetic measurements: in the dark state the cGMP hydrolic rate is constrained by the availability of cGMP because of its binding to high affinity sites on PDE. Light activated G-protein releases cGMP from these sites and allows for its redistribution to lower affinity sites represented by PDE catalytic site(s) and possible cGMP-dependent membrane cation channels.

  6. High-affinity binding of (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine to muscarinic cholinergic receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Kellar, K.J.; Martino, A.M.; Hall, D.P. Jr.; Schwartz, R.D.; Taylor, R.L.

    1985-06-01

    High-affinity binding of (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine to muscarinic cholinergic sites in rat CNS and peripheral tissues was measured in the presence of cytisin, which occupies nicotinic cholinergic receptors. The muscarinic sites were characterized with regard to binding kinetics, pharmacology, anatomical distribution, and regulation by guanyl nucleotides. These binding sites have characteristics of high-affinity muscarinic cholinergic receptors with a Kd of approximately 30 nM. Most of the muscarinic agonist and antagonist drugs tested have high affinity for the (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine binding site, but pirenzepine, an antagonist which is selective for M-1 receptors, has relatively low affinity. The ratio of high-affinity (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine binding sites to total muscarinic binding sites labeled by (/sup 3/H)quinuclidinyl benzilate varies from 9 to 90% in different tissues, with the highest ratios in the pons, medulla, and heart atrium. In the presence of guanyl nucleotides, (/sup 3/H) acetylcholine binding is decreased, but the extent of decrease varies from 40 to 90% in different tissues, with the largest decreases being found in the pons, medulla, cerebellum, and heart atrium. The results indicate that (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine binds to high-affinity M-1 and M-2 muscarinic receptors, and they suggest that most M-2 sites have high affinity for acetylcholine but that only a small fraction of M-1 sites have such high affinity.

  7. Victory Junction Gang Camp

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shell, Ryan

    2007-01-01

    This article describes the Victory Junction Gang Camp, a not-for-profit, NASCAR-themed camp for children with chronic medical conditions that serves 24 different disease groups. The mission of the camp is to give children life-changing camping experiences that are exciting, fun, and empowering in a safe and medically sound environment. While doing…

  8. Astro Camp Plus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    Stennis Space Center's new Astro Camp Plus camp kicked off June 19 for teens ages 13-15. The new camp delves more deeply into the science, math and technology concepts introduced in the center's popular Astro Camp series. Campers including Jasmyne White (left) and Dana Yingst, both of Slidell, La., learn how NASA uses 'podcasting' to broadcast video, and made their own podcasts.

  9. ElaC encodes a novel binuclear zinc phosphodiesterase.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Andreas; Schilling, Oliver; Niecke, Manfred; Bettmer, Jorg; Meyer-Klaucke, Wolfram

    2002-08-09

    ElaC is a widespread gene found in eubacteria, archaebacteria, and mammals with a highly conserved sequence. Two human ElaC variants were recently associated with cancer (Tavtigian, S. V., Simard, J., Teng, D. H., Abtin, V., Baumgard, M., Beck, A., Camp, N. J., Carillo, A. R., Chen, Y., Dayananth, P., Desrochers, M., Dumont, M., Farnham, J. M., Frank, D., Frye, C., Ghaffari, S., Gupte, J. S., Hu, R., Iliev, D., Janecki, T., Kort, E. N., Laity, K. E., Leavitt, A., Leblanc, G., McArthur-Morrison, J., Pederson, A., Penn, B., Peterson, K. T., Reid, J. E., Richards, S., Schroeder, M., Smith, R., Snyder, S. C., Swedlund, B., Swensen, J., Thomas, A., Tranchant, M., Woodland, A. M., Labrie, F., Skolnick, M. H., Neuhausen, S., Rommens, J., and Cannon-Albright, L. A. (2001) Nat. Genet. 27, 172-180; Yanaihara, N., Kohno, T., Takakura, S., Takei, K., Otsuka, A., Sunaga, N., Takahashi, M., Yamazaki, M., Tashiro, H., Fukuzumi, Y., Fujimori, Y., Hagiwara, K., Tanaka, T., and Yokota, J. (2001) Genomics 72, 169-179). Analysis of the primary sequence indicates homology to an arylsulfatase and predicts a metallo-beta-lactamase fold. At present, no ElaC gene product has been investigated. We cloned the Escherichia coli ElaC gene and purified the recombinant gene product. An enzymatic analysis showed that ElaC does not encode an arylsulfatase but rather encodes a phosphodiesterase that hydrolyzes bis(p-nitrophenyl)phosphate with a k(cat) of 59 s(-1) and K' of 4 mm. Kinetic analysis of the dimeric enzyme revealed positive cooperativity for the substrate bis(p-nitrophenyl)phosphate with a Hill coefficient of 1.6, whereas hydrolysis of the substrate thymidine-5'-p-nitrophenyl phosphate followed Michaelis-Menten kinetics. Furthermore, the enzyme is capable of binding two zinc or two iron ions. However, it displays phosphodiesterase activity only in the zinc form. The metal environment characterized by zinc K-edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy was modeled with two histidine residues, one

  10. Chromosome localizations of genes for five cAMP-specific phosphodiesterases in man and mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Milatovich, A.; Francke, U. ); Bolger, G.; Michaeli, T. )

    1994-03-01

    Cyclic nucleotides are important second messengers that mediate a number of cellular responses to external signals. Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases play a role in signal transduction by regulating the cellular concentrations of these messengers. Here, the authors have applied Southern analyses of somatic cell hybrid lines and of recombinant inbred (RI) mouse strains as well as fluorescence chromosomal in situ hybridization (FISH) to chromosomally localize five cAMP-specific nucleotide phosphodiesterase genes in human and mouse. Genes DPDE1, DPDE2, DPDE3, and DPDE4 that share sequence homology with the Drosophila dunce gene were assigned to human chromosomes 19 (DPDE1 and DPDE2), ga12 (DPDE3), and 1p31 (DPDE4) and to mouse chromosomes 8, 9, 13, and 4, respectively. The high-affinity cAMP-specific phosphodiesterase gene (HCP1) was mapped to human chromosome 8q13-q22. Since these genes are potential candidates for involvement in psychiatric or behavioral disorders, knowledge of their chromosomal localizations will facilitate the discovery of their association with disease genes as they are being mapped by linkage studies.

  11. Intracellular tortuosity underlies slow cAMP diffusion in adult ventricular myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Mark; Lomas, Oliver; Jalink, Kees; Ford, Kerrie L.; Vaughan-Jones, Richard D.; Lefkimmiatis, Konstantinos; Swietach, Pawel

    2016-01-01

    Aims 3′,5′-Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) signals in the heart are often confined to concentration microdomains shaped by cAMP diffusion and enzymatic degradation. While the importance of phosphodiesterases (degradative enzymes) in sculpting cAMP microdomains is well established in cardiomyocytes, less is known about cAMP diffusivity (DcAMP) and factors affecting it. Many earlier studies have reported fast diffusivity, which argues against sharply defined microdomains. Methods and results [cAMP] dynamics in the cytoplasm of adult rat ventricular myocytes were imaged using a fourth generation genetically encoded FRET-based sensor. The [cAMP]-response to the addition and removal of isoproterenol (β-adrenoceptor agonist) quantified the rates of cAMP synthesis and degradation. To obtain a read out of DcAMP, a stable [cAMP] gradient was generated using a microfluidic device which delivered agonist to one half of the myocyte only. After accounting for phosphodiesterase activity, DcAMP was calculated to be 32 µm2/s; an order of magnitude lower than in water. Diffusivity was independent of the amount of cAMP produced. Saturating cAMP-binding sites with the analogue 6-Bnz-cAMP did not accelerate DcAMP, arguing against a role of buffering in restricting cAMP mobility. cAMP diffused at a comparable rate to chemically unrelated but similar sized molecules, arguing for a common physical cause of restricted diffusivity. Lower mitochondrial density and order in neonatal cardiac myocytes allowed for faster diffusion, demonstrating the importance of mitochondria as physical barriers to cAMP mobility. Conclusion In adult cardiac myocytes, tortuosity due to physical barriers, notably mitochondria, restricts cAMP diffusion to levels that are more compatible with microdomain signalling. PMID:27089919

  12. Distinct pools of cAMP centre on different isoforms of adenylyl cyclase in pituitary-derived GH3B6 cells.

    PubMed

    Wachten, Sebastian; Masada, Nanako; Ayling, Laura-Jo; Ciruela, Antonio; Nikolaev, Viacheslav O; Lohse, Martin J; Cooper, Dermot M F

    2010-01-01

    Microdomains have been proposed to explain specificity in the myriad of possible cellular targets of cAMP. Local differences in cAMP levels can be generated by phosphodiesterases, which control the diffusion of cAMP. Here, we address the possibility that adenylyl cyclases, the source of cAMP, can be primary architects of such microdomains. Distinctly regulated adenylyl cyclases often contribute to total cAMP levels in endogenous cellular settings, making it virtually impossible to determine the contribution of a specific isoform. To investigate cAMP dynamics with high precision at the single-isoform level, we developed a targeted version of Epac2-camps, a cAMP sensor, in which the sensor was tagged to a catalytically inactive version of the Ca(2+)-stimulable adenylyl cyclase 8 (AC8). This sensor, and less stringently targeted versions of Epac2-camps, revealed opposite regulation of cAMP synthesis in response to Ca(2+) in GH(3)B(6) pituitary cells. Ca(2+) release triggered by thyrotropin-releasing hormone stimulated the minor endogenous AC8 species. cAMP levels were decreased by inhibition of AC5 and AC6, and simultaneous activation of phosphodiesterases, in different compartments of the same cell. These findings demonstrate the existence of distinct adenylyl-cyclase-centered cAMP microdomains in live cells and open the door to their molecular micro-dissection.

  13. Phosphodiesterase Inhibition to Target the Synaptic Dysfunction in Alzheimer's Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bales, Kelly R.; Plath, Niels; Svenstrup, Niels; Menniti, Frank S.

    Alzheimer's Disease (AD) is a disease of synaptic dysfunction that ultimately proceeds to neuronal death. There is a wealth of evidence that indicates the final common mediator of this neurotoxic process is the formation and actions on synaptotoxic b-amyloid (Aβ). The premise in this review is that synaptic dysfunction may also be an initiating factor in for AD and promote synaptotoxic Aβ formation. This latter hypothesis is consistent with the fact that the most common risk factors for AD, apolipoprotein E (ApoE) allele status, age, education, and fitness, encompass suboptimal synaptic function. Thus, the synaptic dysfunction in AD may be both cause and effect, and remediating synaptic dysfunction in AD may have acute effects on the symptoms present at the initiation of therapy and also slow disease progression. The cyclic nucleotide (cAMP and cGMP) signaling systems are intimately involved in the regulation of synaptic homeostasis. The phosphodiesterases (PDEs) are a superfamily of enzymes that critically regulate spatial and temporal aspects of cyclic nucleotide signaling through metabolic inactivation of cAMP and cGMP. Thus, targeting the PDEs to promote improved synaptic function, or 'synaptic resilience', may be an effective and facile approach to new symptomatic and disease modifying therapies for AD. There continues to be a significant drug discovery effort aimed at discovering PDE inhibitors to treat a variety of neuropsychiatric disorders. Here we review the current status of those efforts as they relate to potential new therapies for AD.

  14. Compartmentation of cAMP signalling in cardiomyocytes in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Perera, R K; Nikolaev, V O

    2013-04-01

    3',5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) is a ubiquitous second messenger critically involved in the regulation of heart function. It has been shown to act in discrete subcellular signalling compartments formed by differentially localized receptors, phosphodiesterases and protein kinases. Cardiac diseases such as hypertrophy or heart failure are associated with structural and functional remodelling of these microdomains which leads to changes in cAMP compartmentation. In this review, we will discuss recent key findings which provided new insights into cAMP compartmentation in cardiomyocytes with a particular focus on its alterations in heart disease.

  15. Engineering of a red-light-activated human cAMP/cGMP-specific phosphodiesterase.

    PubMed

    Gasser, Carlos; Taiber, Sandra; Yeh, Chen-Min; Wittig, Charlotte Helene; Hegemann, Peter; Ryu, Soojin; Wunder, Frank; Möglich, Andreas

    2014-06-17

    Sensory photoreceptors elicit vital physiological adaptations in response to incident light. As light-regulated actuators, photoreceptors underpin optogenetics, which denotes the noninvasive, reversible, and spatiotemporally precise perturbation by light of living cells and organisms. Of particular versatility, naturally occurring photoactivated adenylate cyclases promote the synthesis of the second messenger cAMP under blue light. Here, we have engineered a light-activated phosphodiesterase (LAPD) with complementary light sensitivity and catalytic activity by recombining the photosensor module of Deinococcus radiodurans bacterial phytochrome with the effector module of Homo sapiens phosphodiesterase 2A. Upon red-light absorption, LAPD up-regulates hydrolysis of cAMP and cGMP by up to sixfold, whereas far-red light can be used to down-regulate activity. LAPD also mediates light-activated cAMP and cGMP hydrolysis in eukaryotic cell cultures and in zebrafish embryos; crucially, the biliverdin chromophore of LAPD is available endogenously and does not need to be provided exogenously. LAPD thus establishes a new optogenetic modality that permits light control over diverse cAMP/cGMP-mediated physiological processes. Because red light penetrates tissue more deeply than light of shorter wavelengths, LAPD appears particularly attractive for studies in living organisms.

  16. [Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase IV expression, activity and targeting in cells of cardiovascular system].

    PubMed

    Yan, Jun; Zhu, Hai-Bo

    2007-06-01

    Cyclic nucleotide second messages (cAMP and cGMP) play a central role in signal transduction and regulation of physiologic responses. The only way to inactivate them is to degrade them through the action of phosphodiesterases (PDEs). Recent advances show that PDE4, a cAMP specific phosphodiesterase, has specific functions in regulating the activities of the cardiovascular system. PDE4 is expressed in the cells of cardiovascular systems including cardiomyocytes, vascular smooth muscle cells, and vascular endothelial cells. The expression level of PDE4 is shown to be downregulated in the failure hearts, while it is upregulated in hypertrophied hearts. And PDE4 deficiency in mice is associated with a cardiac phenotype comprised of a progressive, age-related cardiomyopathy, accelerated heart failure after myocardial infarction and exercise-induced arrhythmias. Local levels of cAMP regulate the precise opening of the ryanodine receptor complex (RyR2) which releases calcium at the start of a heartbeat. Loss or inhibition of PDE4 activity increases calcium flow through RyR2, and causes leakiness and heart failure in mice. These finding may show us a new target for treating cardiovascular diseases.

  17. Cadmium inhibits the induction of high-affinity nitrate uptake in maize (Zea mays L.) roots.

    PubMed

    Rizzardo, Cecilia; Tomasi, Nicola; Monte, Rossella; Varanini, Zeno; Nocito, Fabio F; Cesco, Stefano; Pinton, Roberto

    2012-12-01

    Cadmium (Cd) detoxification involves glutathione and phytochelatins biosynthesis: the higher need of nitrogen should require increased nitrate (NO(3)(-)) uptake and metabolism. We investigated inducible high-affinity NO(3)(-) uptake across the plasma membrane (PM) in maize seedlings roots upon short exposure (10 min to 24 h) to low Cd concentrations (0, 1 or 10 μM): the activity and gene transcript abundance of high-affinity NO(3)(-) transporters, NO(3)(-) reductases and PM H(+)-ATPases were analyzed. Exposure to 1 mM NO(3)(-) led to a peak in high-affinity (0.2 mM) NO(3)(-) uptake rate (induction), which was markedly lowered in Cd-treated roots. Plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase activity was also strongly limited, while internal NO(3)(-) accumulation and NO(3)(-) reductase activity in extracts of Cd treated roots were only slightly lowered. Kinetics of high- and low-affinity NO(3)(-) uptake showed that Cd rapidly (10 min) blocked the inducible high-affinity transport system; the constitutive high-affinity transport system appeared not vulnerable to Cd and the low-affinity transport system appeared to be less affected and only after a prolonged exposure (12 h). Cd-treatment also modified transcript levels of genes encoding high-affinity NO(3)(-) transporters (ZmNTR2.1, ZmNRT2.2), PM H(+)-ATPases (ZmMHA3, ZmMHA4) and NO(3)(-) reductases (ZmNR1, ZmNADH:NR). Despite an expectable increase in NO(3)(-) demand, a negative effect of Cd on NO(3)(-) nutrition is reported. Cd effect results in alterations at the physiological and transcriptional levels of NO(3)(-) uptake from the external solution and it is particularly severe on the inducible high-affinity anion transport system. Furthermore, Cd would limit the capacity of the plant to respond to changes in NO(3) (-) availability.

  18. A Summer Camp Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pratte, Janice L.; DiNardi, Salvatore R.

    1979-01-01

    Reported are the results of a project assessing the impact of a revised Massachusetts sanitary code on 500 summer camps for children. The study compared camp compliances with the proposed regulations to the level of compliance with existing regulations. (BT)

  19. Michelle: Growing Through Camping

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ouellet, Annette M.

    1977-01-01

    A mother, whose physically handicapped 7-year-old daughter has prosthetic feet, describes how her child adjusted well first to a summer day camp and then to a week long camping program run by the Girl Scouts. (GW)

  20. Camp is a Celebration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Dakota Farmers Union, Jamestown. Dept. of Youth Activities.

    A camping workbook provides materials for use in discussion of 3 important aspects of farm living: rural power, communication, and conservation. It is intended that this material be used in class sessions held during a junior youth camp. A sample of the youth camp schedule reveals 3 forty-five minute time periods during the day designated as class…

  1. GHB receptor targets in the CNS: focus on high-affinity binding sites.

    PubMed

    Bay, Tina; Eghorn, Laura F; Klein, Anders B; Wellendorph, Petrine

    2014-01-15

    γ-Hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) is an endogenous compound in the mammalian brain with both low- and high-affinity receptor targets. GHB is used clinically in the treatment of symptoms of narcolepsy and alcoholism, but also illicitly abused as the recreational drug Fantasy. Major pharmacological effects of exogenous GHB are mediated by GABA subtype B (GABAB) receptors that bind GHB with low affinity. The existence of GHB high-affinity binding sites has been known for more than three decades, but the uncovering of their molecular identity has only recently begun. This has been prompted by the generation of molecular tools to selectively study high-affinity sites. These include both genetically modified GABAB knock-out mice and engineered selective GHB ligands. Recently, certain GABA subtype A (GABAA) receptor subtypes emerged as high-affinity GHB binding sites and potential physiological mediators of GHB effects. In this research update, a description of the various reported receptors for GHB is provided, including GABAB receptors, certain GABAA receptor subtypes and other reported GHB receptors. The main focus will thus be on the high-affinity binding targets for GHB and their potential functional roles in the mammalian brain.

  2. Mathematical modeling of the low and high affinity arabinose transport systems in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Yildirim, Necmettin

    2012-04-01

    A mathematical model was developed for the low and high affinity arabinose transport systems in E. coli. The model is a system of three ordinary differential equations and takes the dynamics of mRNAs for the araE and araFGH proteins and the internal arabinose into account. Special attention was paid to estimate the model parameters from the literature. Our analysis and simulations suggest that the high affinity transport system helps the low affinity transport system to respond to high concentration of extracellular arabinose faster, whereas the high affinity transport system responds to a small amount of extracellular arabinose. Steady state analysis of the model also predicts that there is a regime for the extracellular concentration of arabinose where the arabinose system can show bistable behavior.

  3. Creating healthy camp experiences.

    PubMed

    Walton, Edward A; Tothy, Alison S

    2011-04-01

    The American Academy of Pediatrics has created recommendations for health appraisal and preparation of young people before participation in day or resident camps and to guide health and safety practices for children at camp. These recommendations are intended for parents, primary health care providers, and camp administration and health center staff. Although camps have diverse environments, there are general guidelines that apply to all situations and specific recommendations that are appropriate under special conditions. This policy statement has been reviewed and is supported by the American Camp Association.

  4. Lesbian camp: An unearthing.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Elly-Jean

    2016-01-01

    Camp-a sensibility, a style, and a form of artistic self-expression-is an elusive concept said to be in the eye of the beholder. To refute Susan Sontag's ( 1966 ) claims that camp is apolitical and not especially homosexual, a number of recent scholarly works have been geared toward revealing camp's fundamental gayness. With the odd footnote aside, lesbian camp has been collapsed into the category of gay male camp, if not eclipsed entirely. Despite the negligible efforts made to legitimize lesbian camp, there are numerous salient cultural examples one might draw on to illustrate, typify, and substantiate a lesbian camp sensibility. I lay the ground work for this scholarly exercise by outlining various definitions and critiques of camp, and by discussing its history and application to queer theory. Then, to unveil lesbian camp, three non-mutually exclusive categories are discussed: classic, erotic, and radical. By gathering various strands of inquiry, and various textual examples (e.g., photography, artistic performances, and literary tropes), this article attempts to reach a more inclusive and nuanced understanding of lesbian camp.

  5. High Affinity Iron Permease is Required for Virulence of Rhizopus oryzae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rhizopus oryzae is the most common cause of mucormycosis. Clinical and animal model data clearly demonstrate that the presence of elevated available serum iron predisposes the host to develop mucormycosis. The high affinity iron permease gene (rFTR1) is required for R. oryzae iron transport in iro...

  6. SORPTION OF LEAD ON A HIGH AFFINITY OXIDE: MACROSCOPIC AND MICROSCOPIC STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sorption of lead (Pb) was investigated on an innovative metal oxide compound using macroscopic and microscopic techniques. The objective of this study was to elucidate the sorption mechanism of Pb on the high-affinity engineered oxide with time at pH 6 employing batch methods an...

  7. SORPTION OF LEAD ON A HIGH AFFINITY OXIDE: MACROSCOPIC AND MICROSCOPIC STUDIES (ABSTRACT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sorption of lead (Pb) was investigated on an innovative metal oxide compound using macroscopic and microscopic techniques. The objective of this study was to elucidate the sorption mechanism of Pb on the high-affinity engineered oxide with time at pH 6 employing batch methods an...

  8. Two distinct functional high affinity receptors for mouse interleukin-3 (IL-3).

    PubMed Central

    Hara, T; Miyajima, A

    1992-01-01

    The human interleukin-3 receptor (IL-3R) is composed of an IL-3 specific alpha subunit (IL-3R alpha) and a common beta subunit (beta c) that is shared by IL-3, granulocyte/macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and IL-5 receptors. In contrast to the human, the mouse has two distinct but related genes, AIC2A and AIC2B, both of which are homologous to the human beta c gene. AIC2B has proved to encode a common beta subunit between mouse GM-CSF and IL-5 receptors. AIC2A is unique to the mouse and encodes a low affinity IL-3 binding protein. Based on the observation that the AIC2A protein is a component of a high affinity IL-3R, we searched for a cDNA encoding a protein which conferred high affinity IL-3 binding when coexpressed with the AIC2A protein in COS7 cells. We obtained such a cDNA (SUT-1) encoding a mature protein of 70 kDa that has weak homology to the human IL-3R alpha. The SUT-1 protein bound IL-3 with low affinity and formed high affinity receptors not only with the AIC2A protein but also with the AIC2B protein. Both high affinity IL-3Rs expressed on a mouse T cell line, CTLL-2, showed similar IL-3 binding properties and transmitted a growth signal in response to IL-3. Thus, the mouse has two distinct functional high affinity IL-3Rs, providing a molecular explanation for the differences observed between mouse and human IL-3Rs. Images PMID:1582416

  9. Cyclic AMP, Protein Kinase A, and Phosphodiesterases: Proceedings of an International Workshop

    PubMed Central

    Stratakis, C. A.

    2014-01-01

    Cyclic nucleotides cAMP and cGMP are part of almost all major cellular signaling pathways. Phosphodiesterases (PDEs) are enzymes that regulate the intracellular levels of cAMP and cGMP. Protein kinase A or cAMP-dependent protein kinase mediates most cAMP effects in the cell. Over the last 25 years, various components of this group of molecules have been involved in human diseases, both genetic and acquired. Lately, the PDEs attract more attention. The pharmacological exploitation of the PDE’s ability to regulate cGMP and cAMP, and through them, a variety of signaling pathways, has led to a number of new drugs for diverse applications from the treatment of erectile dysfunction to heart failure, asthma, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. We present the abstracts (available online) and selected articles from the proceedings of a meeting that took place at the National Institutes of Health (NIH), Bethesda, MD, June 8–10, 2011. PMID:22951901

  10. Epac and the high affinity rolipram binding conformer of PDE4 modulate neurite outgrowth and myelination using an in vitro spinal cord injury model

    PubMed Central

    Boomkamp, S D; McGrath, M A; Houslay, M D; Barnett, S C

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose cAMP and pharmacological inhibition of PDE4, which degrades it, are promising therapeutic targets for the treatment of spinal cord injury (SCI). Using our previously described in vitro SCI model, we studied the mechanisms by which cAMP modulators promote neurite outgrowth and myelination using enantiomers of the PDE4-specific inhibitor rolipram and other modulators of downstream signalling effectors. Experimental Approach Rat mixed neural cell myelinating cultures were cut with a scalpel and treated with enantiomers of the PDE4-specific inhibitor rolipram, Epac agonists and PKA antagonists. Neurite outgrowth, density and myelination were assessed by immunocytochemistry and cytokine levels analysed by qPCR. Key Results Inhibition of the high-affinity rolipram-binding state (HARBS), rather than the low-affinity rolipram binding state (LARBS) PDE4 conformer promoted neurite outgrowth and myelination. These effects were mediated through the activation of Epac and not through PKA. Expression of the chemokine CXCL10, known to inhibit myelination, was markedly elevated in astrocytes after Rho inhibition and this was blocked by inhibition of Rho kinase or PDE4. Conclusions and Implications PDE4 inhibitors targeted at the HARBS conformer or Epac agonists may provide promising novel targets for the treatment of SCI. Our study demonstrates the differential mechanisms of action of these compounds, as well as the benefit of a combined pharmacological approach and highlighting potential promising targets for the treatment of SCI. These findings need to be confirmed in vivo. PMID:24467222

  11. Cyclic Nucleotide Phosphodiesterases: important signaling modulators and therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Faiyaz; Murata, Taku; Simizu, Kasumi; Degerman, Eva; Maurice, Donald; Manganiello, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    By catalyzing hydrolysis of cAMP and cGMP, cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases are critical regulators of their intracellular concentrations and their biological effects. Since these intracellular second messengers control many cellular homeostatic processes, dysregulation of their signals and signaling pathways initiate or modulate pathophysiological pathways related to various disease states, including erectile dysfunction, pulmonary hypertension, acute refractory cardiac failure, intermittent claudication, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and psoriasis. Alterations in expression of PDEs and PDE-gene mutations (especially mutations in PDE6, PDE8B, PDE11A and PDE4) have been implicated in various diseases and cancer pathologies. PDEs also play important role in formation and function of multi-molecular signaling/regulatory complexes called signalosomes. At specific intracellular locations, individual PDEs, together with pathway-specific signaling molecules, regulators, and effectors, are incorporated into specific signalosomes, where they facilitate and regulate compartmentalization of cyclic nucleotide signaling pathways and specific cellular functions. Currently, only a limited number of PDE inhibitors (PDE3, PDE4, PDE5 inhibitors) are used in clinical practice. Future paths to novel drug discovery include the crystal structure-based design approach, which has resulted in generation of more effective family-selective inhibitors, as well as burgeoning development of strategies to alter compartmentalized cyclic nucleotide signaling pathways by selectively targeting individual PDEs and their signalosome partners. PMID:25056711

  12. Phosphodiesterase sequence variants may predispose to prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    de Alexandre, Rodrigo Bertollo; Horvath, Anelia; Szarek, Eva; Manning, Allison D.; Leal, Leticia Ferro; Kardauke, Fabio; Epstein, Jonathan A.; Carraro, Dirce Maria; Soares, Fernando Augusto; Apanasovich, Tatiyana; Stratakis, Constantine A.; Faucz, Fabio Rueda

    2015-01-01

    We hypothesized that mutations that inactivate phosphodiesterase (PDE) activity and lead to increased cyclic AMP (cAMP) and cyclic GMP (cGMP) levels may be associated with prostate cancer (PCa). We sequenced the entire PDE coding sequences in the DNA of 16 biopsy samples from PCa patients. Novel mutations were confirmed in the somatic or germline state by Sanger sequencing. Data were then compared to the 1000 Genome Project. PDE, CREB and pCREB protein expression was also studied in all samples, in both normal and abnormal tissue, by immunofluorescence. We identified 3 previously described PDE sequence variants that were significantly higher in PCa. Four novel sequence variations, one each in the PDE4B, PDE6C, PDE7B and PDE10A genes, respectively, were also found in the PCa samples. Interestingly, PDE10A and PDE4B novel variants that were present in 19% and 6% of the patients, respectively, were found in the tumor tissue only. In patients carrying PDE defects, there was pCREB accumulation (p<0.001), and an increase of the pCREB/CREB ratio (patients 0.97± 0.03; controls 0.52± 0.03; p-value < 0.001) by immunohistochemical analysis. We conclude that PDE sequence variants may play a role in the predisposition and/or progression to PCa at the germline and/or somatic state, respectively. Larger such studies are needed to confirm these findings. PMID:25979379

  13. cGMP Signaling, Phosphodiesterases and Major Depressive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Reierson, Gillian W; Guo, Shuyu; Mastronardi, Claudio; Licinio, Julio; Wong, Ma-Li

    2011-01-01

    Deficits in neuroplasticity are hypothesized to underlie the pathophysiology of major depressive disorder (MDD): the effectiveness of antidepressants is thought to be related to the normalization of disrupted synaptic transmission and neurogenesis. The cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) signaling cascade has received considerable attention for its role in neuroplasticity and MDD. However components of a closely related pathway, the cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) have been studied with much lower intensity, even though this signaling transduction cascade is also expressed in the brain and the activity of this pathway has been implicated in learning and memory processes. Cyclic GMP acts as a second messenger; it amplifies signals received at postsynaptic receptors and activates downstream effector molecules resulting in gene expression changes and neuronal responses. Phosphodiesterase (PDE) enzymes degrade cGMP into 5’GMP and therefore they are involved in the regulation of intracellular levels of cGMP. Here we review a growing body of evidence suggesting that the cGMP signaling cascade warrants further investigation for its involvement in MDD and antidepressant action. PMID:22654729

  14. Altering cAMP levels within a central pattern generator modifies or disrupts rhythmic motor output.

    PubMed

    Clemens, Stefan; Calin-Jageman, Robert; Sakurai, Akira; Katz, Paul S

    2007-12-01

    Cyclic AMP is a second messenger that has been implicated in the neuromodulation of rhythmically active motor patterns. Here, we tested whether manipulating cAMP affects swim motor pattern generation in the mollusc, Tritonia diomedea. Inhibiting adenylyl cyclase (AC) with 9-cyclopentyladenine (9-CPA) slowed or stopped the swim motor pattern. Inhibiting phosphodiesterase with 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX) or applying dibutyryl-cAMP (dB-cAMP) disrupted the swim motor pattern, as did iontophoresing cAMP into the central pattern generator neuron C2. Additionally, during wash-in, IBMX sometimes temporarily produced extended or spontaneous swim motor patterns. Photolysis of caged cAMP in C2 after initiation of the swim motor pattern inhibited subsequent bursting. These results suggest that cAMP levels can dynamically modulate swim motor pattern generation, possibly shaping the output of the central pattern generator on a cycle-by-cycle basis.

  15. Camp Joy: Embracing Diversity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krehbiel, Amy

    2001-01-01

    Camp Joy (Ohio) offers a racially integrated program to disadvantaged inner-city foster children. To attract quality minority staff, the camp recruits through former campers, word of mouth, a leader-in-training program, job and internship fairs, and networking with nearby colleges and social agencies. Staff training and the intrinsic rewards of…

  16. Orienteering in Camping.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larson, Elston F.

    One of the recent developments in camping is "orienteering", a program using a map and compass. Orienteering can be dovetailed into an overall camping program and used to "point up" the entire program, or it can be confined to a single simple game. The arrangement depends on the situation. The minimum age of the participants should be about 9 or…

  17. Friends' Discovery Camp

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seymour, Seth

    2008-01-01

    This article features Friends' Discovery Camp, a program that allows children with and without autism spectrum disorder to learn and play together. In Friends' Discovery Camp, campers take part in sensory-rich experiences, ranging from hands-on activities and performing arts to science experiments and stories teaching social skills. Now in its 7th…

  18. Physical Fitness at Camp.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steen, Thomas B.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Describes decline in youth fitness, emphasizing role of camping programs in youth fitness education. Describes Michigan camp's fitness program, consisting of daily workouts, fitness education, and record keeping. Describes fitness consultants' role in program. Discusses program's highlights and problems, suggesting changes for future use. Shows…

  19. Camp Nursing: Student Internships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harwood, Catherine Hoe; Van Hofwegen, Lynn

    2002-01-01

    Camps can meet or supplement their health care delivery needs by using student nurses. Three models for student nurse internships, basic information about nursing education, and tips for negotiating student nurse internships are described. Sidebars present resources for camp health centers, nursing student competence characteristics, types of…

  20. Today's Child - Tomorrow's Camp.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ditter, Robert B.

    1988-01-01

    Are camps solely in the business of providing fun, or are they facilitators of crucial life skills? A social worker explores the fun versus character-building debate, concluding that though camp is not group therapy, it contributes to overall personal growth and to the social and emotional development of all children. (JMM)

  1. Marketing for Camp Trends.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biddle, Alicia

    1998-01-01

    To effectively market a camp, current trends and issues must be considered: specialty programming, the Americans With Disabilities Act, competing recreational programs, changes in the school year, programming for seniors, and accountability. Camps should have a marketing strategy that includes public relations, a marketing plan, a pricing…

  2. Building Communities through Camping.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubendall, Robert L.

    Summer camp is a type of laboratory for community living. Society's needs have changed from providing a positive summer challenge for idle youth to experimenting with the demands and rewards of working in community groups. Decentralized camping emphasizes the team decision-making approach to teach self-reliance and awareness of democratic…

  3. Camp's "Disneyland" Effect.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Renville, Gary

    1999-01-01

    Describes the positive mental, physical, and social growth impacts that the camping experience had on the author, and urges camp program evaluation to plan and implement such changes. Sidebar lists steps of effective evaluation: program goals and objectives, goals of evaluation, implementation of evaluation, data analysis, and findings and…

  4. Maximizing Camp Property.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knapp, Clifford

    1987-01-01

    Provides selected 14-item outdoor-environmental education bibliography and 20-item checklist of factors weekend/summer camp directors should consider when pondering entry into the outdoor education market. Covers issues of camp philosophy, staff, facilities additions/alterations, equipment, food service, competition, environmental impact,…

  5. Impact of Therapeutic Camping

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shniderman, Craig M.

    1974-01-01

    There has been little interest in, and only slight illumination of, the impact of therapeutic camping for emotionally disturbed children. This study seeks to validate the belief that camping is therapeutic. Subjects were 52 boys, 5 to 11 1/2 years of age. Results support the hypothesis. (Author/HMV)

  6. The fourth dimension in immunological space: how the struggle for nutrients selects high-affinity lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Wensveen, Felix M; van Gisbergen, Klaas P J M; Eldering, Eric

    2012-09-01

    Lymphocyte activation via the antigen receptor is associated with radical shifts in metabolism and changes in requirements for nutrients and cytokines. Concomitantly, drastic changes occur in the expression of pro-and anti-apoptotic proteins that alter the sensitivity of lymphocytes to limiting concentrations of key survival factors. Antigen affinity is a primary determinant for the capacity of activated lymphocytes to access these vital resources. The shift in metabolic needs and the variable access to key survival factors is used by the immune system to eliminate activated low-affinity cells and to generate an optimal high-affinity response. In this review, we focus on the control of apoptosis regulators in activated lymphocytes by nutrients, cytokines, and costimulation. We propose that the struggle among individual clones that leads to the formation of high-affinity effector cell populations is in effect an 'invisible' fourth signal required for effective immune responses.

  7. Three Recombinant Engineered Antibodies against Recombinant Tags with High Affinity and Specificity.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hongyu; Shen, Ao; Xiang, Yang K; Corey, David P

    2016-01-01

    We describe three recombinant engineered antibodies against three recombinant epitope tags, constructed with divalent binding arms to recognize divalent epitopes and so achieve high affinity and specificity. In two versions, an epitope is inserted in tandem into a protein of interest, and a homodimeric antibody is constructed by fusing a high-affinity epitope-binding domain to a human or mouse Fc domain. In a third, a heterodimeric antibody is constructed by fusing two different epitope-binding domains which target two different binding sites in GFP, to polarized Fc fragments. These antibody/epitope pairs have affinities in the low picomolar range and are useful tools for many antibody-based applications.

  8. Three Recombinant Engineered Antibodies against Recombinant Tags with High Affinity and Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hongyu; Shen, Ao; Xiang, Yang K.; Corey, David P.

    2016-01-01

    We describe three recombinant engineered antibodies against three recombinant epitope tags, constructed with divalent binding arms to recognize divalent epitopes and so achieve high affinity and specificity. In two versions, an epitope is inserted in tandem into a protein of interest, and a homodimeric antibody is constructed by fusing a high-affinity epitope-binding domain to a human or mouse Fc domain. In a third, a heterodimeric antibody is constructed by fusing two different epitope-binding domains which target two different binding sites in GFP, to polarized Fc fragments. These antibody/epitope pairs have affinities in the low picomolar range and are useful tools for many antibody-based applications. PMID:26943906

  9. Atrazine acts as an endocrine disrupter by inhibiting cAMP-specific phosphodiesterase-4

    SciTech Connect

    Kucka, Marek; Pogrmic-Majkic, Kristina; Fa, Svetlana; Stojilkovic, Stanko S.; Kovacevic, Radmila

    2012-11-15

    Atrazine, one of the most commonly used herbicides worldwide, acts as an endocrine disruptor, but the mechanism of its action has not been characterized. In this study, we show that atrazine rapidly increases cAMP levels in cultured rat pituitary and testicular Leydig cells in a concentration-dependent manner, but less effectively than 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine, a competitive non-specific inhibitor of phosphodiesterases (PDEs). In forskolin (an activator of adenylyl cyclase)- and probenecid (an inhibitor of cyclic nucleotide transporters)-treated cells, but not in 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine-treated cells, atrazine further increased cAMP levels, indicating that inhibition of PDEs accounts for accumulation of cAMP. In contrast to cAMP, atrazine did not alter cGMP levels, further indicating that it inhibits cAMP-specific PDEs. Atrazine-induced changes in cAMP levels were sufficient to stimulate prolactin release in pituitary cells and androgen production in Leydig cells, indicating that it acts as an endocrine disrupter both in cells that secrete by exocytosis of prestored hormones and in cells that secrete by de novo hormone synthesis. Rolipram abolished the stimulatory effect of atrazine on cAMP release in both cell types, suggesting that it acts as an inhibitor of PDE4s, isoforms whose mRNA transcripts dominate in pituitary and Leydig cells together with mRNA for PDE8A. In contrast, immortalized lacto-somatotrophs showed low expression of these mRNA transcripts and several fold higher cAMP levels compared to normal pituitary cells, and atrazine was unable to further increase cAMP levels. These results indicate that atrazine acts as a general endocrine disrupter by inhibiting cAMP-specific PDE4s. -- Highlights: ► Atrazine stimulates cAMP accumulation in pituitary and Leydig cells. ► Atrazine also stimulates PRL and androgens secretion. ► Stimulatory effects of atrazine were abolished in cells with IBMX-inhibited PDEs. ► Atrazine specificity toward c

  10. Selective high-affinity polydentate ligands and methods of making such

    DOEpatents

    DeNardo, Sally; DeNardo, Gerald; Balhorn, Rodney

    2013-09-17

    This invention provides polydentate selective high affinity ligands (SHALs) that can be used in a variety of applications in a manner analogous to the use of antibodies. SHALs typically comprise a multiplicity of ligands that each binds different regions on the target molecule. The ligands are joined directly or through a linker thereby forming a polydentate moiety that typically binds the target molecule with high selectivity and avidity.

  11. Quantifying high-affinity binding of hydrophobic ligands by isothermal titration calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Krainer, Georg; Broecker, Jana; Vargas, Carolyn; Fanghänel, Jörg; Keller, Sandro

    2012-12-18

    A fast and reliable quantification of the binding thermodynamics of hydrophobic high-affinity ligands employing a new calorimetric competition experiment is described. Although isothermal titration calorimetry is the method of choice for a quantitative characterization of intermolecular interactions in solution, a reliable determination of a dissociation constant (K(D)) is typically limited to the range 100 μM > K(D) > 1 nM. Interactions displaying higher or lower K(D) values can be assessed indirectly, provided that a suitable competing ligand is available whose K(D) falls within the directly accessible affinity window. This established displacement assay, however, requires the high-affinity ligand to be soluble at high concentrations in aqueous buffer and, consequently, poses serious problems in the study of protein binding involving small-molecule ligands dissolved in organic solvents--a familiar case in many drug-discovery projects relying on compound libraries. The calorimetric competition assay introduced here overcomes this limitation, thus allowing for a detailed thermodynamic description of high-affinity receptor-ligand interactions involving poorly water-soluble compounds. Based on a single titration of receptor into a dilute mixture of the two competing ligands, this competition assay provides accurate and precise values for the dissociation constants and binding enthalpies of both high- and moderate-affinity ligands. We discuss the theoretical background underlying the approach, demonstrate its practical application to metal ion chelation and high-affinity protein-inhibitor interactions, and explore its potential and limitations with the aid of simulations and statistical analyses.

  12. Amyloid-beta binds catalase with high affinity and inhibits hydrogen peroxide breakdown.

    PubMed Central

    Milton, N G

    1999-01-01

    Amyloid-beta (Abeta) specifically bound purified catalase with high affinity and inhibited catalase breakdown of H(2)O(2). The Abeta-induced catalase inhibition involved formation of the inactive catalase Compound II and was reversible. Catalase<-->Abeta interactions provide rapid functional assays for the cytotoxic domain of Abeta and suggest a mechanism for some of the observed actions of Abeta plus catalase in vitro. PMID:10567208

  13. High affinity choline uptake: an early index of cholinergic innervation in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Sorimachi, M; Kataoka, K

    1975-08-29

    The uptake of [3H]choline was investigated in nuclei-free homogenates or crude synaptosomal fractions (P2) from rat brain under various stages of development. A comparable sensitivity of uptake to treatment by hyposmotic shock suggested the involvement of synaptosomal populations in choline uptake in immature as well as in adult brains. However, significant changes in the "apparent" Km for the high affinity transport system and quantitative differences in the Na ion requirement for maximal uptake at 0.43 muM choline concentration were found during development; facts which suggested a greater contribution of the low affinity system in the more immature brains. Assuming that the uptake with high and low sensitivity to Na+ reduction reflected that via the high and low affinity system reslectively, we have attempted to obtain real Km values for the high affinity system. These Km values changed less than those measured directly, suggesting that the affinity constant for the high affinity system does not change during development. On these assumptions, the developmental changes of cholinergic synaptogenesis were examined in 5 distinct regions of the brain. It was found that the synaptogenesis begins several days earlier than the increase of choline acetyltransferase (ChAc) level in the frontal cortex, the hippocampus, the superior colliculus and the cerebellum. These regions may be included among the terminal-rich regions according to available evidence related to cholinergic systems. On the other hand, synaptogenesis accompanied the concomitant ChAc increase in the striatum, where the cholinergic interneurons are present. It is concluded that the increase of ChAc in the terminal-rich regions is delayed by the axoplasmic flow; therefore, the earlier index of cholinergic synaptogenesis in these regions is the high affinity uptake activity rather than the enzyme activity.

  14. Neurotransmitter/sodium symporter orthologue LeuT has a single high-affinity substrate site.

    PubMed

    Piscitelli, Chayne L; Krishnamurthy, Harini; Gouaux, Eric

    2010-12-23

    Neurotransmitter/sodium symporters (NSSs) couple the uptake of neurotransmitter with one or more sodium ions, removing neurotransmitter from the synaptic cleft. NSSs are essential to the function of chemical synapses, are associated with multiple neurological diseases and disorders, and are the targets of therapeutic and illicit drugs. LeuT, a prokaryotic orthologue of the NSS family, is a model transporter for understanding the relationships between molecular mechanism and atomic structure in a broad range of sodium-dependent and sodium-independent secondary transporters. At present there is a controversy over whether there are one or two high-affinity substrate binding sites in LeuT. The first-reported crystal structure of LeuT, together with subsequent functional and structural studies, provided direct evidence for a single, high-affinity, centrally located substrate-binding site, defined as the S1 site. Recent binding, flux and molecular simulation studies, however, have been interpreted in terms of a model where there are two high-affinity binding sites: the central, S1, site and a second, the S2 site, located within the extracellular vestibule. Furthermore, it was proposed that the S1 and S2 sites are allosterically coupled such that occupancy of the S2 site is required for the cytoplasmic release of substrate from the S1 site. Here we address this controversy by performing direct measurement of substrate binding to wild-type LeuT and to S2 site mutants using isothermal titration calorimetry, equilibrium dialysis and scintillation proximity assays. In addition, we perform uptake experiments to determine whether the proposed allosteric coupling between the putative S2 site and the S1 site manifests itself in the kinetics of substrate flux. We conclude that LeuT harbours a single, centrally located, high-affinity substrate-binding site and that transport is well described by a simple, single-substrate kinetic mechanism.

  15. cAMP enhances BMP2-signaling through PKA and MKP1-dependent mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Ghayor, Chafik; Ehrbar, Martin; Miguel, Blanca San; Graetz, Klaus W.; Weber, Franz E.

    2009-04-03

    Recent studies suggest that the elevation of intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and the activation of the protein kinase A regulate BMP-induced osteogenesis. However, the precise mechanisms underlying the enhancing effect of cAMP on BMP2 signaling were not completely revealed. In this study we investigated the effect of elevated cAMP level and PKA activation on the BMP2-induced osteoblastic differentiation in pluripotent C2C12 cells. Alkaline phosphatase activity and its mRNA were consistently induced by BMP2 treatment. The pretreatment of C2C12 cells with Forskolin, a cAMP generating agent, dbcAMP, an analogue of cAMP, or IBMX (3-isobutyl 1-methyl xanthine), and a nonspecific inhibitor of phosphodiesterases elicited further activation of alkaline phosphatase. Furthermore, elevated intracellular cAMP level increased BMP2-induced MKP1. On the other hand, BMP2-induced Erk phosphorylation (p44/p42) and cell proliferation were suppressed in the presence of cAMP. Thus, cAMP might enhance BMP2-induced osteoblastic differentiation by a MKP1-Erk-dependent mechanism.

  16. Reconstitution of high-affinity opioid agonist binding in brain membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Remmers, A.E.; Medzihradsky, F. )

    1991-03-15

    In synaptosomal membranes from rat brain cortex, the {mu} selective agonist ({sup 3}H)dihydromorphine in the absence of sodium, and the nonselective antagonist ({sup 3}H)naltrexone in the presence of sodium, bound to two populations of opioid receptor sites with K{sub d} values of 0.69 and 8.7 nM for dihydromorphine, and 0.34 and 5.5 nM for naltrexone. The addition of 5 {mu}M guanosine 5{prime}-({gamma}-thio)triphosphate (GTP({gamma}S)) strongly reduced high-affinity agonist but not antagonist binding. Exposure of the membranes to high pH reduced the number of GTP({gamma}-{sup 35}S) binding sites by 90% and low K{sub m}, opioid-sensitive GTPase activity by 95%. In these membranes, high-affinity agonist binding was abolished and modulation of residual binding by GTP({gamma}S) was diminished. Alkali treatment of the glioma cell membranes prior to fusion inhibited most of the low K{sub m} GTPase activity and prevented the reconstitution of agonist binding. The results show that high-affinity opioid agonist binding reflects the ligand-occupied receptor - guanine nucleotide binding protein complex.

  17. Positron-labeled dopamine agonists for probing the high affinity states of dopamine subtype 2 receptors.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Dah-Ren; Narendran, Raj; Laruelle, Marc

    2005-01-01

    It is well documented that guanidine nucleotide-coupled dopamine subtype 2 receptors (D2) are configured in high and low affinity states for the dopamine agonist in vitro. However, it is still unclear whether these functional states exist in vivo. We hypothesized that positron-labeled D2 agonist and Positron Emission Tomography can be used to probe these functional states noninvasively. Recently, we demonstrated in nonhuman primates that N-[11C]propyl-norapomorphine (NPA), a full D2 agonist, is a suitable tracer for imaging the high affinity states of D2 receptors in vivo. We also developed kinetic modeling method to derive receptor parameters, such as binding potential (BP) and specific uptake ratios (V3''). When coupled with a dopamine releasing drug, amphetamine, NPA was found to be more sensitive than antagonist tracers, such as [11C]raclopride (RAC), to endogenous dopamine concentration changes (by about 42%). This finding suggests that NPA is a superior tracer for reporting endogenous DA concentration. In addition, the difference of the BP or V3'' of NPA and RAC under control and amphetamine challenge conditions could be used to estimate the functional states of D2 receptors in vivo. On the basis of our findings and the assumptions that NPA binds only to the high affinity states and RAC binds equally to both affinity states, we proposed that about 70% of the D2 receptors are configured in the high affinity states in vivo.

  18. Isolation of Anti-Ricin Protective Antibodies Exhibiting High Affinity from Immunized Non-Human Primates

    PubMed Central

    Noy-Porat, Tal; Rosenfeld, Ronit; Ariel, Naomi; Epstein, Eyal; Alcalay, Ron; Zvi, Anat; Kronman, Chanoch; Ordentlich, Arie; Mazor, Ohad

    2016-01-01

    Ricin, derived from the castor bean plant Ricinus communis, is one of the most potent and lethal toxins known, against which there is no available antidote. To date, the use of neutralizing antibodies is the most promising post-exposure treatment for ricin intoxication. The aim of this study was to isolate high affinity anti-ricin antibodies that possess potent toxin-neutralization capabilities. Two non-human primates were immunized with either a ricin-holotoxin- or subunit-based vaccine, to ensure the elicitation of diverse high affinity antibodies. By using a comprehensive set of primers, immune scFv phage-displayed libraries were constructed and panned. A panel of 10 antibodies (five directed against the A subunit of ricin and five against the B subunit) was isolated and reformatted into a full-length chimeric IgG. All of these antibodies were found to neutralize ricin in vitro, and several conferred full protection to ricin-intoxicated mice when given six hours after exposure. Six antibodies were found to possess exceptionally high affinity toward the toxin, with KD values below pM (koff < 1 × 10−7 s−1) that were well correlated with their ability to neutralize ricin. These antibodies, alone or in combination, could be used for the development of a highly-effective therapeutic preparation for post-exposure treatment of ricin intoxication. PMID:26950154

  19. Isolation of Anti-Ricin Protective Antibodies Exhibiting High Affinity from Immunized Non-Human Primates.

    PubMed

    Noy-Porat, Tal; Rosenfeld, Ronit; Ariel, Naomi; Epstein, Eyal; Alcalay, Ron; Zvi, Anat; Kronman, Chanoch; Ordentlich, Arie; Mazor, Ohad

    2016-03-03

    Ricin, derived from the castor bean plant Ricinus communis, is one of the most potent and lethal toxins known, against which there is no available antidote. To date, the use of neutralizing antibodies is the most promising post-exposure treatment for ricin intoxication. The aim of this study was to isolate high affinity anti-ricin antibodies that possess potent toxin-neutralization capabilities. Two non-human primates were immunized with either a ricin-holotoxin- or subunit-based vaccine, to ensure the elicitation of diverse high affinity antibodies. By using a comprehensive set of primers, immune scFv phage-displayed libraries were constructed and panned. A panel of 10 antibodies (five directed against the A subunit of ricin and five against the B subunit) was isolated and reformatted into a full-length chimeric IgG. All of these antibodies were found to neutralize ricin in vitro, and several conferred full protection to ricin-intoxicated mice when given six hours after exposure. Six antibodies were found to possess exceptionally high affinity toward the toxin, with KD values below pM (k(off )< 1 × 10(-7) s(-1)) that were well correlated with their ability to neutralize ricin. These antibodies, alone or in combination, could be used for the development of a highly-effective therapeutic preparation for post-exposure treatment of ricin intoxication.

  20. Single-experiment displacement assay for quantifying high-affinity binding by isothermal titration calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Krainer, Georg; Keller, Sandro

    2015-04-01

    Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) is the gold standard for dissecting the thermodynamics of a biomolecular binding process within a single experiment. However, reliable determination of the dissociation constant (KD) from a single titration is typically limited to the range 100 μM>KD>1 nM. Interactions characterized by a lower KD can be assessed indirectly by so-called competition or displacement assays, provided that a suitable competitive ligand is available whose KD falls within the directly accessible window. However, this protocol is limited by the fact that it necessitates at least two titrations to characterize one high-affinity inhibitor, resulting in considerable consumption of both sample material and time. Here, we introduce a fast and efficient ITC displacement assay that allows for the simultaneous characterization of both a high-affinity ligand and a moderate-affinity ligand competing for the same binding site on a receptor within a single experiment. The protocol is based on a titration of the high-affinity ligand into a solution containing the moderate-affinity ligand bound to the receptor present in excess. The resulting biphasic binding isotherm enables accurate and precise determination of KD values and binding enthalpies (ΔH) of both ligands. We discuss the theoretical background underlying the approach, demonstrate its practical application to metal ion chelation, explore its potential and limitations with the aid of simulations and statistical analyses, and elaborate on potential applications to protein-inhibitor interactions.

  1. High affinity binding of (/sup 3/H)neurotensin of rat uterus

    SciTech Connect

    Pettibone, D.J.; Totaro, J.A.

    1987-11-01

    (/sup 3/H)Neurotensin (NT) was found to bind specifically and with high affinity to crude membranes prepared from rat uterus. Scatchard analysis of saturation binding studies indicated that (/sup 3/H)NT apparently binds to two sites (high affinity Kd 0.5 nM; low affinity Kd 9 nM) with the density of high affinity sites (41 fmoles/mg prot.) being about one-third that of the low affinity sites (100 fmoles/mg prot.). In competition studies, NT and various fragments inhibited (/sup 3/H)NT binding with the following potencies (approximately IC50): NT 8-13 (0.4 nM), NT 1-13 (4 nM), NT 9-13 (130 nM), NT 1-11, NT 1-8 (greater than 100 microM). Quantitatively similar results were obtained using brain tissue. These findings raise the possibility of a role for NT in uterine function.

  2. Foreign Language Camps: Camp Waskowitz. Teacher's Guide and Planning Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baudin, Phil; And Others

    This guide to running a foreign language camp is intended to cover all aspects of camp administration and program planning. The philosophy of language camps is set forth. The chairperson's responsibilities regarding staff recruitment, staff assignments, and handling finances are outlined. Sample schedules for French, Spanish, and German camps are…

  3. Is zucchini a phosphodiesterase or a ribonuclease?

    PubMed

    Nureki, Osamu

    2014-01-01

    Zucchini (Zuc), a member of the phospholipase D (PLD) superfamily, is essential for the primary PIWI-interacting RNA (piRNA) biogenesis and the suppression of transposon expression, which are crucial for the genome integrity of germline cells. However, it has been ambiguous whether Zuc acts as a phosphodiesterase to produce phosphatidic acid (PA), the lipid signaling molecule, or as a nuclease. The recent three papers describing the crystal structures and functional analyses of fly and mouse Zuc proteins have elucidated that Zuc is a PLD family single-strand ribonuclease, not a phosphodiesterase, and functions in the maturation of primary piRNAs. This review will discuss in detail how the crystal structures clearly predict the function of Zuc, which is subsequently demonstrated by biochemical analysis to conclude the previous controversial discussion on the real function of Zuc.

  4. Camp Invention Connects to Classrooms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krebs, Danute V.; Clark, Barbara D.

    2000-01-01

    This article describes Camp Invention, a national creativity day camp that integrates science, math, social studies, and the arts. The one week camp for children entering grades 2-6 attracts many academically gifted children because of its hands-on curriculum. The camp's curriculum and activities are discussed. (Contains two references.) (CR)

  5. Camping Skills. Environmental Education Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Topeka Public Schools, KS.

    This unit on camping skills is designed for special education students at the high school level. The objective of the unit is to provide students with an adequate camping knowledge and skill development to allow them to participate in camping activities. There is an emphasis on maintaining environmental quality as a part of good camping practices.…

  6. Camping in the Snow.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Constance

    1979-01-01

    Describes the experience of winter snow camping. Provides suggestions for shelter, snow kitchens, fires and stoves, cooking, latrines, sleeping warm, dehydration prevention, and clothing. Illustrated with full color photographs. (MA)

  7. Pre-Camp Checklists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camping Magazine, 1995

    1995-01-01

    Provides checklists to prepare for camp opening. Covers such areas as health histories of all campers and staff, staff credentials, condition of facilities and equipment, staff training, horse stables and equipment, and safety of swimming areas. (LP)

  8. Hitler's Death Camps.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wieser, Paul

    1995-01-01

    Presents a high school lesson on Hitler's death camps and the widespread policy of brutality and oppression against European Jews. Includes student objectives, instructional procedures, and a chart listing the value of used clothing taken from the Jews. (CFR)

  9. Rational development of high-affinity T-cell receptor-like antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Stewart-Jones, Guillaume; Wadle, Andreas; Hombach, Anja; Shenderov, Eugene; Held, Gerhard; Fischer, Eliane; Kleber, Sascha; Nuber, Natko; Stenner-Liewen, Frank; Bauer, Stefan; McMichael, Andrew; Knuth, Alexander; Abken, Hinrich; Hombach, Andreas A.; Cerundolo, Vincenzo; Jones, E. Yvonne; Renner, Christoph

    2009-01-01

    T-cell interaction with a target cell is a key event in the adaptive immune response and primarily driven by T-cell receptor (TCR) recognition of peptide-MHC (pMHC) complexes. TCR avidity for a given pMHC is determined by number of MHC molecules, availability of coreceptors, and TCR affinity for MHC or peptide, respectively, with peptide recognition being the most important factor to confer target specificity. Here we present high-resolution crystal structures of 2 Fab antibodies in complex with the immunodominant NY-ESO-1157–165 peptide analogue (SLLMWITQV) presented by HLA-A*0201 and compare them with a TCR recognizing the same pMHC. Binding to the central methionine-tryptophan peptide motif and orientation of binding were almost identical for Fabs and TCR. As the MW “peg” dominates the contacts between Fab and peptide, we estimated the contributions of individual amino acids between the Fab and peptide to provide the rational basis for a peptide-focused second-generation, high-affinity antibody library. The final Fab candidate achieved better peptide binding by 2 light-chain mutations, giving a 20-fold affinity improvement to 2–4 nM, exceeding the affinity of the TCR by 1,000-fold. The high-affinity Fab when grafted as recombinant TCR on T cells conferred specific killing of HLA-A*0201/NY-ESO-1157–165 target cells. In summary, we prove that affinity maturation of antibodies mimicking a TCR is possible and provide a strategy for engineering high-affinity antibodies that can be used in targeting specific pMHC complexes for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. PMID:19307587

  10. High affinity nanobodies against human epidermal growth factor receptor selected on cells by E. coli display

    PubMed Central

    Salema, Valencio; Mañas, Carmen; Cerdán, Lidia; Piñero-Lambea, Carlos; Marín, Elvira; Roovers, Rob C.; Van Bergen en Henegouwen, Paul M.P.; Fernández, Luis Ángel

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Most therapeutic antibodies (Abs) target cell surface proteins on tumor and immune cells. Cloning of Ab gene libraries in E. coli and their display on bacteriophages is commonly used to select novel therapeutic Abs binding target antigens, either purified or expressed on cells. However, the sticky nature of bacteriophages renders phage display selections on cells challenging. We previously reported an E. coli display system for expression of VHHs (i.e., nanobodies, Nbs) on the surface of bacteria and selection of high-affinity clones by magnetic cell sorting (MACS). Here, we demonstrate that E. coli display is also an attractive method for isolation of Nbs against cell surface antigens, such as the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), upon direct selection and screening of Ab libraries on live cells. We employ a whole cell-based strategy using a VHH library obtained by immunization with human tumor cells over-expressing EGFR (i.e., A431), and selection of bacterial clones bound to murine fibroblast NIH-3T3 cells transfected with human EGFR, after depletion of non-specific clones on untransfected cells. This strategy resulted in the isolation of high-affinity Nbs binding distinct epitopes of EGFR, including Nbs competing with the ligand, EGF, as characterized by flow cytometry of bacteria displaying the Nbs and binding assays with purified Nbs using surface plasmon resonance. Hence, our study demonstrates that E. coli display of VHH libraries and selection on cells enables efficient isolation and characterization of high-affinity Nbs against cell surface antigens. PMID:27472381

  11. Relations between high-affinity binding sites of markers for binding regions on human serum albumin.

    PubMed Central

    Kragh-Hansen, U

    1985-01-01

    Binding of warfarin, digitoxin, diazepam, salicylate and Phenol Red, individually or in different pair combinations, to defatted human serum albumin at ligand/protein molar ratios less than 1:1 was studied at pH 7.0. The binding was determined by ultrafiltration. Some of the experiments were repeated with the use of equilibrium dialysis in order to strengthen the results. Irrespective of the method used, all ligands bind to one high-affinity binding site with an association constant in the range 10(4)-10(6) M-1. High-affinity binding of the following pair of ligands took place independently: warfarin-Phenol Red, warfarin-diazepam, warfarin-digitoxin and digitoxin-diazepam. Simultaneous binding of warfarin and salicylate led to a mutual decrease in binding of one another, as did simultaneous binding of digitoxin and Phenol Red. Both effects could be accounted for by a coupling constant. The coupling constant is the factor by which the primary association constants are affected; in these examples of anti-co-operativity the factor has a value between 0 and 1. In the first example it was calculated to be 0.8 and in the latter 0.5. Finally, digitoxin and salicylate were found to compete for a common high-affinity binding site. The present findings support the proposal of four separate primary binding sites for warfarin, digitoxin (and salicylate), diazepam and Phenol Red. An attempt to correlate this partial binding model for serum albumin with other models in the literature is made. PMID:3977850

  12. High affinity nanobodies against human epidermal growth factor receptor selected on cells by E. coli display.

    PubMed

    Salema, Valencio; Mañas, Carmen; Cerdán, Lidia; Piñero-Lambea, Carlos; Marín, Elvira; Roovers, Rob C; Van Bergen En Henegouwen, Paul M P; Fernández, Luis Ángel

    2016-10-01

    Most therapeutic antibodies (Abs) target cell surface proteins on tumor and immune cells. Cloning of Ab gene libraries in E. coli and their display on bacteriophages is commonly used to select novel therapeutic Abs binding target antigens, either purified or expressed on cells. However, the sticky nature of bacteriophages renders phage display selections on cells challenging. We previously reported an E. coli display system for expression of VHHs (i.e., nanobodies, Nbs) on the surface of bacteria and selection of high-affinity clones by magnetic cell sorting (MACS). Here, we demonstrate that E. coli display is also an attractive method for isolation of Nbs against cell surface antigens, such as the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), upon direct selection and screening of Ab libraries on live cells. We employ a whole cell-based strategy using a VHH library obtained by immunization with human tumor cells over-expressing EGFR (i.e., A431), and selection of bacterial clones bound to murine fibroblast NIH-3T3 cells transfected with human EGFR, after depletion of non-specific clones on untransfected cells. This strategy resulted in the isolation of high-affinity Nbs binding distinct epitopes of EGFR, including Nbs competing with the ligand, EGF, as characterized by flow cytometry of bacteria displaying the Nbs and binding assays with purified Nbs using surface plasmon resonance. Hence, our study demonstrates that E. coli display of VHH libraries and selection on cells enables efficient isolation and characterization of high-affinity Nbs against cell surface antigens.

  13. High-affinity antibodies to the 1,4-dihydropyridine Ca2+-channel blockers

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, K.P.; Sharp, A.; Strom, M.; Kahl, S.D.

    1986-05-01

    Antibodies with high affinity and specificity for the 1,4-dihydropyridine Ca2+-channel blockers have been produced in rabbits by immunization with dihydropyridine-protein conjugates. Anti-dihydropyridine antibodies were found to specifically bind (/sup 3/H)nitrendipine, (/sup 3/H)-nimodipine, (/sup 3/H)nisoldipine, and (/sup 3/H)PN 200-110 (all 1,4-dihydropyridine Ca2+-channel blockers) with high affinity, while (/sup 3/H)verapamil, (/sup 3/H)diltiazem, and (/sup 3/H)trifluoperazine were not recognized. The average dissociation constant of the (/sup 3/H)nitrendipine-antibody complex was 0.06 (+/- 0.02) X 10(-9) M for an antiserum studied in detail and ranged from 0.01 to 0.24 X 10(-9) M for all antisera. Inhibition of (/sup 3/H)nitrendipine binding was specific for the 1,4-dihydropyridine Ca2+-channel modifiers and the concentrations required for half-maximal inhibition ranged between 0.25 and 0.90 nM. Structurally unrelated Ca2+-channel blockers, calmodulin antagonists, inactive metabolites of nitrendipine, and UV-inactivated nisoldipine did not modify (/sup 3/H)nitrendipine binding to the anti-dihydropyridine antibodies. Dihydropyridines without a bulky substituent in the 4-position of the heterocycle were able to displace (/sup 3/H)nitrendipine binding, but the concentrations required for half-maximal inhibition were greater than 800 nM. In summary, anti-dihydropyridine antibodies have been shown to have high affinity and specificity for the 1,4-dihydropyridine Ca2+-channel blockers and to exhibit dihydropyridine binding properties similar to the membrane receptor for the 1,4-dihydropyridine Ca2+-channel blockers.

  14. High-affinity benzodiazepine receptor ligands among benzodiazepines and betacarbolines with different intrinsic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Yliniemelae, A.; Gynther, J. ); Konschin, H.; Tylli, H. ); Rouvinen, J. )

    1989-01-01

    Structural and electrostatic features of diazepam, flumazenil, and methyl betacarboline-3-carboxylate (BCCM) have been investigated using the molecular superimposition method. These high-affinity benzodiazepine (BZ) receptor ligands are structurally unrelated and they have different intrinsic activity. These ligands are superimposed in such a way that common structural and electrostatic features essential for the high receptor binding affinity overlap. In addition to this binding pharmacophore, there are roughly three separate binding zones in the BZ receptor, one for each class of ligands. The intrinsic activity of BZ receptor ligands depends on the molecular structures and the way the ligand approaches the receptor.

  15. Role of phosphodiesterase and adenylate cyclase isozymes in murine colonic glucagon-like peptide 1 secreting cells

    PubMed Central

    Friedlander, Ronn S; Moss, Catherine E; Mace, Jessica; Parker, Helen E; Tolhurst, Gwen; Habib, Abdella M; Wachten, Sebastian; Cooper, Dermot M; Gribble, Fiona M; Reimann, Frank

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is secreted from enteroendocrine L-cells after food intake. Increasing GLP-1 signalling either through inhibition of the GLP-1 degrading enzyme dipeptidyl-peptidase IV or injection of GLP-1-mimetics has recently been successfully introduced for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Boosting secretion from the L-cell has so far not been exploited, due to our incomplete understanding of L-cell physiology. Elevation of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) has been shown to be a strong stimulus for GLP-1 secretion and here we investigate the activities of adenylate cyclase (AC) and phosphodiesterase (PDE) isozymes likely to shape cAMP responses in L-cells. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Expression of AC and PDE isoforms was quantified by RT-PCR. Single cell responses to stimulation or inhibition of AC and PDE isoforms were monitored with real-time cAMP probes. GLP-1 secretion was assessed by elisa. KEY RESULTS Quantitative PCR identified expression of protein kinase C- and Ca2+-activated ACs, corresponding with phorbolester and cytosolic Ca2+-stimulated cAMP elevation. Inhibition of PDE2, 3 and 4 were found to stimulate GLP-1 secretion from murine L-cells in primary culture. This corresponded with cAMP elevations monitored with a plasma membrane targeted cAMP probe. Inhibition of PDE3 but not PDE2 was further shown to prevent GLP-1 secretion in response to guanylin, a peptide secreted into the gut lumen, which had not previously been implicated in L-cell secretion. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Our results reveal several mechanisms shaping cAMP responses in GLP-1 secreting cells, with some of the molecular components specifically expressed in L-cells when compared with their epithelial neighbours, thus opening new strategies for targeting these cells therapeutically. PMID:21054345

  16. Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDEs): coincidence detectors acting to spatially and temporally integrate cyclic nucleotide and non-cyclic nucleotide signals.

    PubMed

    Maurice, Donald H; Wilson, Lindsay S; Rampersad, Sarah N; Hubert, Fabien; Truong, Tammy; Kaczmarek, Milosz; Brzezinska, Paulina; Freitag, Silja I; Umana, M Bibiana; Wudwud, Alie

    2014-04-01

    The cyclic nucleotide second messengers cAMP and cGMP each affect virtually all cellular processes. Although these hydrophilic small molecules readily diffuse throughout cells, it is remarkable that their ability to activate their multiple intracellular effectors is spatially and temporally selective. Studies have identified a critical role for compartmentation of the enzymes which hydrolyse and metabolically inactivate these second messengers, the PDEs (cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases), in this specificity. In the present article, we describe several examples from our work in which compartmentation of selected cAMP- or cGMP-hydrolysing PDEs co-ordinate selective activation of cyclic nucleotide effectors, and, as a result, selectively affect cellular functions. It is our belief that therapeutic strategies aimed at targeting PDEs within these compartments will allow greater selectivity than those directed at inhibiting these enzymes throughout the cells.

  17. Only high-affinity receptors for interleukin 2 mediate internalization of ligand

    SciTech Connect

    Weissman, A.M.; Harford, J.B.; Svetlik, P.B.; Leonard, W.L.; Depper, J.M.; Waldmann, T.A.; Greene, W.C.; Klausner, R.D.

    1986-03-01

    Interleukin 2 (IL-2) receptors are expressed on activated T cells and in select T-cell leukemias. Recently, it has been demonstrated that at least two classes of receptor for IL-2 exist with markedly different affinities for ligand. All known biological actions of IL-2 have been correlated with occupancy of high-affinity sites; the function of the low-affinity sites remains unknown. Receptor-mediated endocytosis is the primary means of internalization of cell-surface receptors and their ligands. The internalization of IL-2 bound to high- and low-affinity receptor sites was studied in a human T-cell lymphotrophic virus type 1 (HTLV-1)-infected human T-cell leukemia cell line and in a cloned murine cytotoxic T-cell line (CTLL). Internalization of IL-2 occurred only when bound to high-affinity sites. In addition, an anti-receptor antibody (anti-Tac), which binds equally well to high- and low-affinity sites, demonstrated no detectable internalization. The implications of these findings as they relate to IL-2 receptor structure and function are discussed.

  18. High-affinity L-arabinose transport operon. Gene product expression and mRNAs.

    PubMed

    Horazdovsky, B F; Hogg, R W

    1987-09-05

    Various portions of the "high-affinity" L-arabinose transport operon were cloned into the plasmid expression vector pKK223-3 and the operon-encoded protein products were identified. The results indicate that three proteins are encoded by this operon. The first is a 33,000 Mr protein that is the product of the promoter-proximal L-arabinose binding protein coding sequence, araF. A 52,000 Mr protein is encoded by sequence 3' to araF and has been assigned to the araG locus. The sequence 3' to araG encodes a 31,000 Mr protein that has been assigned to the araH locus. Both the araG and araH gene products are localized in the membrane fraction of the cell, implying a role in the membrane-associated complex of the high-affinity L-arabinose transport system. Nuclease S1 protection studies indicate that two operon message populations are present in the cell, a full-length operon transcript and a seven- to tenfold more abundant binding protein-specific message. The relative abundance of these two message populations correlates with the differential expression of the binding protein and the membrane-associated proteins of the transport system.

  19. Discovery of Compounds that Positively Modulate the High Affinity Choline Transporter

    PubMed Central

    Choudhary, Parul; Armstrong, Emma J.; Jorgensen, Csilla C.; Piotrowski, Mary; Barthmes, Maria; Torella, Rubben; Johnston, Sarah E.; Maruyama, Yuya; Janiszewski, John S.; Storer, R. Ian; Skerratt, Sarah E.; Benn, Caroline L.

    2017-01-01

    Cholinergic hypofunction is associated with decreased attention and cognitive deficits in the central nervous system in addition to compromised motor function. Consequently, stimulation of cholinergic neurotransmission is a rational therapeutic approach for the potential treatment of a variety of neurological conditions. High affinity choline uptake (HACU) into acetylcholine (ACh)-synthesizing neurons is critically mediated by the sodium- and pH-dependent high-affinity choline transporter (CHT, encoded by the SLC5A7 gene). This transporter is comparatively well-characterized but otherwise unexplored as a potential drug target. We therefore sought to identify small molecules that would enable testing of the hypothesis that positive modulation of CHT mediated transport would enhance activity-dependent cholinergic signaling. We utilized existing and novel screening techniques for their ability to reveal both positive and negative modulation of CHT using literature tools. A screening campaign was initiated with a bespoke compound library comprising both the Pfizer Chemogenomic Library (CGL) of 2,753 molecules designed specifically to help enable the elucidation of new mechanisms in phenotypic screens and 887 compounds from a virtual screening campaign to select molecules with field-based similarities to reported negative and positive allosteric modulators. We identified a number of previously unknown active and structurally distinct molecules that could be used as tools to further explore CHT biology or as a starting point for further medicinal chemistry. PMID:28289374

  20. The human organic cation transporter OCT1 mediates high affinity uptake of the anticancer drug daunorubicin

    PubMed Central

    Andreev, Emil; Brosseau, Nicolas; Carmona, Euridice; Mes-Masson, Anne-Marie; Ramotar, Dindial

    2016-01-01

    Anthracyclines such as daunorubicin are anticancer agents that are transported into cells, and exert cytotoxicity by blocking DNA metabolism. Although there is evidence for active uptake of anthracyclines into cells, the specific transporter involved in this process has not been identified. Using the high-grade serous ovarian cancer cell line TOV2223G, we show that OCT1 mediated the high affinity (Km ~ 5 μM) uptake of daunorubicin into the cells, and that micromolar amounts of choline completely abolished the drug entry. OCT1 downregulation by shRNA impaired daunorubicin uptake into the TOV2223G cells, and these cells were significantly more resistant to the drug in comparison to the control shRNA. Transfection of HEK293T cells, which accommodated the ectopic expression of OCT1, with a plasmid expressing OCT1-EYFP showed that the transporter was predominantly localized to the plasma membrane. These transfected cells exhibited an increase in the uptake of daunorubicin in comparison to control cells transfected with an empty EYFP vector. Furthermore, a variant of OCT1, OCT1-D474C-EYFP, failed to enhance daunorubicin uptake. This is the first report demonstrating that human OCT1 is involved in the high affinity transport of anthracyclines. We postulate that OCT1 defects may contribute to the resistance of cancer cells treated with anthracyclines. PMID:26861753

  1. Selecting highly affine and well-expressed TCRs for gene therapy of melanoma.

    PubMed

    Jorritsma, Annelies; Gomez-Eerland, Raquel; Dokter, Maarten; van de Kasteele, Willeke; Zoet, Yvonne M; Doxiadis, Ilias I N; Rufer, Nathalie; Romero, Pedro; Morgan, Richard A; Schumacher, Ton N M; Haanen, John B A G

    2007-11-15

    A recent phase 1 trial has demonstrated that the generation of tumor-reactive T lymphocytes by transfer of specific T-cell receptor (TCR) genes into autologous lymphocytes is feasible. However, compared with results obtained by infusion of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes, the response rate observed in this first TCR gene therapy trial is low. One strategy that is likely to enhance the success rate of TCR gene therapy is the use of tumor-reactive TCRs with a higher capacity for tumor cell recognition. We therefore sought to develop standardized procedures for the selection of well-expressed, high-affinity, and safe human TCRs. Here we show that TCR surface expression can be improved by modification of TCR alpha and beta sequences and that such improvement has a marked effect on the in vivo function of TCR gene-modified T cells. From a panel of human, melanoma-reactive TCRs we subsequently selected the TCR with the highest affinity. Furthermore, a generally applicable assay was used to assess the lack of alloreactivity of this TCR against a large series of common human leukocyte antigen alleles. The procedures described in this study should be of general value for the selection of well- and stably expressed, high-affinity, and safe human TCRs for subsequent clinical testing.

  2. Substrate-induced internalization of the high-affinity choline transporter.

    PubMed

    Okuda, Takashi; Konishi, Asami; Misawa, Hidemi; Haga, Tatsuya

    2011-10-19

    Cholinergic neurons are endowed with a high-affinity choline uptake system for efficient synthesis of acetylcholine at the presynaptic terminals. The high-affinity choline transporter CHT1 is responsible for choline uptake, the rate-limiting step in acetylcholine synthesis. However, endogenous physiological factors that affect CHT1 expression or function and consequently regulate the acetylcholine synthesis rate are essentially unknown. Here we demonstrate that extracellular substrate decreases the cell-surface expression of CHT1 in rat brain synaptosomes, primary cultures from the basal forebrain, and mammalian cell lines transfected with CHT1. Extracellular choline rapidly decreases cell-surface CHT1 expression by accelerating its internalization, a process that is mediated by a dynamin-dependent endocytosis pathway in HEK293 cells. Specific inhibitor hemicholinium-3 decreases the constitutive internalization rate and thereby increases cell-surface CHT1 expression. We also demonstrate that the constitutive internalization of CHT1 depends on extracellular pH in cultured cells. Our results collectively suggest that the internalization of CHT1 is induced by extracellular substrate, providing a novel feedback mechanism for the regulation of acetylcholine synthesis at the cholinergic presynaptic terminals.

  3. Cationic polymer brush-modified cellulose nanocrystals for high-affinity virus binding.

    PubMed

    Rosilo, Henna; McKee, Jason R; Kontturi, Eero; Koho, Tiia; Hytönen, Vesa P; Ikkala, Olli; Kostiainen, Mauri A

    2014-10-21

    Surfaces capable of high-affinity binding of biomolecules are required in several biotechnological applications, such as purification, transfection, and sensing. Therein, the rod-shaped, colloidal cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) are appealing due to their large surface area available for functionalization. In order to exploit electrostatic binding, their intrinsically anionic surfaces have to be cationized as biological supramolecules are predominantly anionic. Here we present a facile way to prepare cationic CNCs by surface-initiated atom-transfer radical polymerization of poly(N,N-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate) and subsequent quaternization of the polymer pendant amino groups. The cationic polymer brush-modified CNCs maintained excellent dispersibility and colloidal stability in water and showed a ζ-potential of +38 mV. Dynamic light scattering and electron microscopy showed that the modified CNCs electrostatically bind cowpea chlorotic mottle virus and norovirus-like particles with high affinity. Addition of only a few weight percent of the modified CNCs in water dispersions sufficed to fully bind the virus capsids to form micrometer-sized assemblies. This enabled the concentration and extraction of the virus particles from solution by low-speed centrifugation. These results show the feasibility of the modified CNCs in virus binding and concentrating, and pave the way for their use as transduction enhancers for viral delivery applications.

  4. The AVR4 elicitor protein of Cladosporium fulvum binds to fungal components with high affinity.

    PubMed

    Westerink, Nienke; Roth, Ronelle; Van den Burg, Harrold A; De Wit, Pierre J G M; Joosten, Matthieu H A J

    2002-12-01

    The interaction between tomato and the fungal pathogen Cladosporium fulvum complies with the gene-for-gene system. Strains of C. fulvum that produce race-specific elicitor AVR4 induce a hypersensitive response, leading to resistance, in tomato plants that carry the Cf-4 resistance gene. The mechanism of AVR4 perception was examined by performing binding studies with 125I-AVR4 on microsomal membranes of tomato plants. We identified an AVR4 high-affinity binding site (KD = 0.05 nM) which exhibited all the characteristics expected for ligand-receptor interactions, such as saturability, reversibility, and specificity. Surprisingly, the AVR4 high-affinity binding site appeared to originate from fungi present on infected tomato plants rather than from the tomato plants themselves. Detailed analysis showed that this fungus-derived, AVR4-specific binding site is heat- and proteinase K-resistant. Affinity crosslinking demonstrated that AVR4 specifically binds to a component of approximately 75 kDa that is of fungal origin. Our data suggest that binding of AVR4 to a fungal component or components is related to the intrinsic virulence function of AVR4 for C. fulvum.

  5. Rac recruits high-affinity integrin alphavbeta3 to lamellipodia in endothelial cell migration.

    PubMed

    Kiosses, W B; Shattil, S J; Pampori, N; Schwartz, M A

    2001-03-01

    Integrin alphavbeta3 has an important role in the proliferation, survival, invasion and migration of vascular endothelial cells. Like other integrins, alphavbeta3 can exist in different functional states with respect to ligand binding. These changes involve both affinity modulation, by which conformational changes in the integrin heterodimer govern affinity for individual extracellular matrix proteins, and avidity modulation, by which changes in lateral mobility and integrin clustering affect the binding of cells to multivalent matrices. Here we have used an engineered monoclonal antibody Fab (antigen-binding fragment) named WOW-1, which binds to activated integrins alphavbeta3 and alphavbeta5 from several species, to investigate the role of alphavbeta3 activation in endothelial cell behaviour. Because WOW-1 is monovalent, it is insensitive to changes in integrin clustering and therefore reports only changes in affinity. WOW-1 contains an RGD tract in its variable region and binds only to unoccupied, high-affinity integrins. By using WOW-1, we have identified the selective recruitment of high-affinity integrins as a mechanism by which lamellipodia promote formation of new adhesions at the leading edge in cell migration.

  6. High affinity binding of (/sup 3/H)cocaine to rat liver microsomes

    SciTech Connect

    El-Maghrabi, E.A.; Calligaro, D.O.; Eldefrawi, M.E.

    1988-01-01

    )/sup 3/H)cocaine bound reversible, with high affinity and stereospecificity to rat liver microsomes. Little binding was detected in the lysosomal, mitochondrial and nuclear fractions. The binding kinetics were slow and the kinetically calculated K/sub D/ was 2 nM. Induction of mixed function oxidases by phenobarbital did not produce significant change in (/sup 3/H)cocaine binding. On the other hand, chronic administration of cocaine reduced (/sup 3/H)cocaine binding drastically. Neither treatment affected the affinity of the liver binding protein for cocaine. Microsomes from mouse and human livers had less cocaine-binding protein and lower affinity for cocaine than those from rat liver. Binding of (/sup 3/H)cocaine to rat liver microsomes was insensitive to monovalent cations and > 10 fold less sensitive to biogenic amines than the cocaine receptor in rat striatum. However, the liver protein had higher affinity for cocaine and metabolites except for norcocaine. Amine uptake inhibitors displaced (/sup 3/H)cocaine binding to liver with a different rank order of potency than their displacement of (/sup 3/H)cocaine binding to striatum. This high affinity (/sup 3/H)cocaine binding protein in liver is not likely to be monooxygenase, but may have a role in cocaine-induced hepatotoxicity

  7. Pharmacological characterization of a high-affinity p-tyramine transporter in rat brain synaptosomes

    PubMed Central

    Berry, Mark D.; Hart, Shannon; Pryor, Anthony R.; Hunter, Samantha; Gardiner, Danielle

    2016-01-01

    p-Tyramine is an archetypal member of the endogenous family of monoamines known as trace amines, and is one of the endogenous agonists for trace amine-associated receptor (TAAR)1. While much work has focused on the function of TAAR1, very little is known about the regulation of the endogenous agonists. We have previously reported that p-tyramine readily crosses lipid bilayers and that its release from synaptosomes is non-exocytotic. Such release, however, showed characteristics of modification by one or more transporters. Here we provide the first characterization of such a transporter. Using frontal cortical and striatal synaptosomes we show that p-tyramine passage across synaptosome membranes is not modified by selective inhibition of either the dopamine, noradrenaline or 5-HT transporters. In contrast, inhibition of uptake-2 transporters significantly slowed p-tyramine re-uptake. Using inhibitors of varying selectivity, we identify Organic Cation Transporter 2 (OCT2; SLC22A2) as mediating high affinity uptake of p-tyramine at physiologically relevant concentrations. Further, we confirm the presence of OCT2 protein in synaptosomes. These results provide the first identification of a high affinity neuronal transporter for p-tyramine, and also confirm the recently described localization of OCT2 in pre-synaptic terminals. PMID:27901065

  8. Purification of high affinity benzodiazepine receptor binding site fragments from rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Klotz, K.L.

    1984-01-01

    In central nervous system benzodiazepine recognition sites occur on neuronal cell surfaces as one member of a multireceptor complex, including recognition sites for benzodiazepines, gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA), barbiturates and a chloride ionophore. During photoaffinity labelling, the benzodiazepine agonist, /sup 3/H-flunitrazepam, is irreversibly bound to central benzodiazepine high affinity recognition sites in the presence of ultraviolet light. In these studies a /sup 3/H-flunitrazepam radiolabel was used to track the isolation and purification of high affinity agonist binding site fragments from membrane-bound benzodiazepine receptor in rat brain. The authors present a method for limited proteolysis of /sup 3/H-flunitrazepam photoaffinity labeled rat brain membranes, generating photolabeled benzodiazepine receptor fragments containing the agonist binding site. Using trypsin chymotrypsin A/sub 4/, or a combination of these two proteases, they have demonstrated the extent and time course for partial digestion of benzodiazepine receptor, yielding photolabeled receptor binding site fragments. These photolabeled receptor fragments have been further purified on the basis of size, using ultrafiltration, gel permeation chromatography, and sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) as well as on the basis of hydrophobicity, using a high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) precolumn, several HPLC elution schemes, and two different HPLC column types. Using these procedures, they have purified three photolabeled benzodiazepine receptor fragments containing the agonist binding site which appear to have a molecular weight of less than 2000 daltons each.

  9. Mechanism of high affinity inhibition of the human urate transporter URAT1

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Philip K.; Ostertag, Traci M.; Miner, Jeffrey N.

    2016-01-01

    Gout is caused by elevated serum urate levels, which can be treated using inhibitors of the uric acid transporter, URAT1. We exploited affinity differences between the human and rat transporters to map inhibitor binding sites in URAT1. Human-rat transporter chimeras revealed that human URAT1 serine-35, phenylalanine-365 and isoleucine-481 are necessary and sufficient to provide up to a 100-fold increase in affinity for inhibitors. Moreover, serine-35 and phenylalanine-365 are important for high-affinity interaction with the substrate urate. A novel URAT1 binding assay provides support for direct interaction with these amino acids; thus, current clinically important URAT1 inhibitors likely bind the same site in URAT1. A structural model suggests that these three URAT1 residues are in close proximity potentially projecting within the channel. Our results indicate that amino acids from several transmembrane segments functionally cooperate to form a high-affinity URAT1 inhibitor binding site that, when occupied, prevents substrate interactions. PMID:27713539

  10. Humanization of high-affinity antibodies targeting glypican-3 in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi-Fan; Ho, Mitchell

    2016-01-01

    Glypican-3 (GPC3) is a cell-surface heparan sulfate proteoglycan highly expressed in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). We have generated a group of high-affinity mouse monoclonal antibodies targeting GPC3. Here, we report the humanization and testing of these antibodies for clinical development. We compared the affinity and cytotoxicity of recombinant immunotoxins containing mouse single-chain variable regions fused with a Pseudomonas toxin. To humanize the mouse Fvs, we grafted the combined KABAT/IMGT complementarity determining regions (CDR) into a human IgG germline framework. Interestingly, we found that the proline at position 41, a non-CDR residue in heavy chain variable regions (VH), is important for humanization of mouse antibodies. We also showed that two humanized anti-GPC3 antibodies (hYP7 and hYP9.1b) in the IgG format induced antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity and complement-dependent-cytotoxicity in GPC3-positive cancer cells. The hYP7 antibody was tested and showed inhibition of HCC xenograft tumor growth in nude mice. This study successfully humanizes and validates high affinity anti-GPC3 antibodies and sets a foundation for future development of these antibodies in various clinical formats in the treatment of liver cancer. PMID:27667400

  11. High-affinity interactions of ligands at recombinant Guinea pig 5HT7 receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilcox, R. E.; Ragan, J. E.; Pearlman, R. S.; Brusniak, M. Y.-. K.; Eglen, R. M.; Bonhaus, D. W.; Tenner, T. E., Jr.; Miller, J. D.

    2001-10-01

    The serotonin 5HT7 receptor has been implicated in numerous physiological and pathological processes from circadian rhythms [1] to depression and schizophrenia. Clonal cell lines heterologously expressing recombinant receptors offer good models for understanding drug-receptor interactions and development of quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSAR). Comparative Molecular Field Analysis (CoMFA) is an important modern QSAR procedure that relates the steric and electrostatic fields of a set of aligned compounds to affinity. Here, we utilized CoMFA to predict affinity for a number of high-affinity ligands at the recombinant guinea pig 5HT7 receptor. Using R-lisuride as the template, a final CoMFA model was derived using procedures similar to those of our recent papers [2, 3, 4] The final cross-validated model accounted for >85% of the variance in the compound affinity data, while the final non-cross validated model accounted for >99% of the variance. Model evaluation was done using cross-validation methods with groups of 5 ligands. Twenty cross-validation runs yielded an average predictive r2(q2) of 0.779 ± 0.015 (range: 0.669-0.867). Furthermore, 3D-chemical database search queries derived from the model yielded hit lists of promising agents with high structural similarity to the template. Together, these results suggest a possible basis for high-affinity drug action at 5HT7 receptors.

  12. A molecular recognizing system of serotonin in rat fetal axonal growth cones: uptake and high affinity binding.

    PubMed

    Mercado, R; Hernández, J

    1992-09-18

    Axonal growth cone particles (AGCP) isolated from prenatal and postnatal rat brain had different high-affinity 5-HT uptake characteristics. In postnatal AGCP the uptake behaves as in the adult rat brain, while in the prenatal AGCP the uptake characteristics seem to be in a transitional stage. Also in prenatal AGCP we observed specific, high-affinity 5-HT binding sites. These results support the idea of an important role for 5-HT during axogenesis.

  13. ABCD of the phosphodiesterase family: interaction and differential activity in COPD

    PubMed Central

    Halpin, David MG

    2008-01-01

    Phosphodiesterases (PDEs) are important enzymes that hydrolyze the cyclic nucleotides adenosine 3′5′-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) and guanosine 3′5′-cyclic mono-phosphate (cGMP) to their inactive 5′ monophosphates. They are highly conserved across species and as well as their role in signal termination, they also have a vital role in intracellular localization of cyclic nucleotide signaling and integration of the cyclic nucleotide pathways with other signaling pathways. Because of their pivotal role in intracellular signaling, they are now of considerable interest as therapeutic targets in a wide variety diseases, including COPD where PDE inhibitors may have bronchodilator, anti-inflammatory and pulmonary vasodilator actions. This review examines the diversity and cellular localization of the isoforms of PDE, the known and speculative relevance of this to the treatment of COPD, and the range of PDE inhibitors in development together with a discussion of their possible role in treating COPD. PMID:19281073

  14. Active site similarity between human and Plasmodium falciparum phosphodiesterases: considerations for antimalarial drug design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, Brittany L.; Thompson, Philip E.; Manallack, David T.

    2011-08-01

    The similarity between Plasmodium falciparum phosphodiesterase enzymes ( PfPDEs) and their human counterparts have been examined and human PDE9A was found to be a suitable template for the construction of homology models for each of the four PfPDE isoforms. In contrast, the architecture of the active sites of each model was most similar to human PDE1. Molecular docking was able to model cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) substrate binding in each case but a docking mode supporting cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) binding could not be found. Anticipating the potential of PfPDE inhibitors as anti-malarial drugs, a range of reported PDE inhibitors including zaprinast and sildenafil were docked into the model of PfPDEα. The results were consistent with their reported biological activities, and the potential of PDE1/9 inhibitor analogues was also supported by docking.

  15. Toward the identification of the cardiac cGMP inhibited-phosphodiesterase catalytic site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fossa, Paola; Boggia, Raffaella; Mosti, Luisa

    1998-07-01

    Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDEs) comprise a complex group of enzymes; five major PDE families or classes with distinctive properties have been identified. Among these a great deal of interest has recently been focused on the so called cGMP-inhibited low Km cAMP phosphodiesterase (cGI PDE) or PDE III. A number of positive inotropic agents, including the well-known milrinone, display a specific inhibition of PDE III as primary mechanism of action. Recent studies have been carried out to develop a pharmacophore model of the PDE III active site. We therefore performed molecular modelling and 3D-SAR studies so as to better define structural requirements for potent and selective enzymatic inhibition. The DISCO (DIStance COmparison) strategy has been applied on a set of compounds taken from literature and a milrinone analogue previously synthesized by us, all of which are characterized by a marked inotropic effect but with varying degrees of enzyme selectivity. A common pharmacophoric model was derived, validated and considered as starting point to perform a 3D-SAR study using the GRID force field and PCA (Principal Component Analysis) with the aim of rationally designing more selective inhibitors. This paper presents the results of this theoretical approach.

  16. Chronic Cognitive Dysfunction after Traumatic Brain Injury Is Improved with a Phosphodiesterase 4B Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Titus, David J.; Wilson, Nicole M.; Freund, Julie E.; Carballosa, Melissa M.; Sikah, Kevin E.; Furones, Concepcion; Dietrich, W. Dalton; Gurney, Mark E.

    2016-01-01

    Learning and memory impairments are common in traumatic brain injury (TBI) survivors. However, there are no effective treatments to improve TBI-induced learning and memory impairments. TBI results in decreased cAMP signaling and reduced cAMP-response-element binding protein (CREB) activation, a critical pathway involved in learning and memory. TBI also acutely upregulates phosphodiesterase 4B2 (PDE4B2), which terminates cAMP signaling by hydrolyzing cAMP. We hypothesized that a subtype-selective PDE4B inhibitor could reverse the learning deficits induced by TBI. To test this hypothesis, adult male Sprague-Dawley rats received sham surgery or moderate parasagittal fluid-percussion brain injury. At 3 months postsurgery, animals were administered a selective PDE4B inhibitor or vehicle before cue and contextual fear conditioning, water maze training and a spatial working memory task. Treatment with the PDE4B inhibitor significantly reversed the TBI-induced deficits in cue and contextual fear conditioning and water maze retention. To further understand the underlying mechanisms of these memory impairments, we examined hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP). TBI resulted in a significant reduction in basal synaptic transmission and impaired expression of LTP. Treatment with the PDE4B inhibitor significantly reduced the deficits in basal synaptic transmission and rescued LTP expression. The PDE4B inhibitor reduced tumor necrosis factor-α levels and increased phosphorylated CREB levels after TBI, suggesting that this drug inhibited molecular pathways in the brain known to be regulated by PDE4B. These results suggest that a subtype-selective PDE4B inhibitor is a potential therapeutic to reverse chronic learning and memory dysfunction and deficits in hippocampal synaptic plasticity following TBI. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Currently, there are an estimated 3.2–5.3 million individuals living with disabilities from traumatic brain injury (TBI) in the United States, and 8 of

  17. ERK regulation of phosphodiesterase 4 enhances dopamine-stimulated AMPA receptor membrane insertion.

    PubMed

    Song, Roy S; Massenburg, Ben; Wenderski, Wendy; Jayaraman, Vino; Thompson, Lauren; Neves, Susana R

    2013-09-17

    AMPA-type glutamate receptor (AMPAR) trafficking is essential for modulating synaptic transmission strength. Prior studies that have characterized signaling pathways underlying AMPAR trafficking have identified the cAMP/PKA-mediated phosphorylation of GluA1, an AMPAR subunit, as a key step in the membrane insertion of AMPAR. Inhibition of ERK impairs AMPAR membrane insertion, but the mechanism by which ERK exerts its effect is unknown. Dopamine, an activator of both PKA and ERK, induces AMPAR insertion, but the relationship between the two protein kinases in the process is not understood. We used a combination of computational modeling and live cell imaging to determine the relationship between ERK and PKA in AMPAR insertion. We developed a dynamical model to study the effects of phosphodiesterase 4 (PDE4), a cAMP phosphodiesterase that is phosphorylated and inhibited by ERK, on the membrane insertion of AMPAR. The model predicted that PKA could be a downstream effector of ERK in regulating AMPAR insertion. We experimentally tested the model predictions and found that dopamine-induced ERK phosphorylates and inhibits PDE4. This regulation results in increased cAMP levels and PKA-mediated phosphorylation of DARPP-32 and GluA1, leading to increased GluA1 trafficking to the membrane. These findings provide unique insight into an unanticipated network topology in which ERK uses PDE4 to regulate PKA output during dopamine signaling. The combination of dynamical models and experiments has helped us unravel the complex interactions between two protein kinase pathways in regulating a fundamental molecular process underlying synaptic plasticity.

  18. Overexpression of phosphodiesterase-4 subtypes involved in surgery-induced neuroinflammation and cognitive dysfunction in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Zhang, Xiao-Ying; Feng, Ze-Guo; Wang, Dong-Xin; Zhang, Hao; Sui, Bo; Zhang, Yong-Yi; Zhao, Wei-Xing; Fu, Qiang; Xu, Zhi-Peng; Mi, Wei-Dong

    2017-02-21

    Postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD) is characterized by cognitive impairments in patients after surgery. Hippocampal neuroinflammation induced by surgery is highly associated with POCD. Phosphodiesterase-4 (PDE4) is an enzyme that specifically hydrolyses cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), which plays an important role during neuroinflammation and the process of learning and memory. However, the role of PDE4 in the development of POCD remains unclear. Male 14-month-old C57BL/6 mice received carotid artery exposure to mimic POCD. First, we evaluated cognitive performance by a Morris water maze (MWM) and fear conditioning system (FCS) test after surgery. The expression of PDE4 subtypes, pro-inflammatory cytokines, p-CREB and PSD95 as well as cAMP levels were investigated. Then, we used rolipram, a PDE4 inhibitor, to block the effects of PDE4. The cognitive performance of the mice and the expression of PDE4 subtypes, pro-inflammatory cytokines, p-CREB and PSD95 as well as cAMP levels were examined again. Mice displayed learning and memory impairment, overexpression of PDE4B and PDE4D, elevation of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and reduction in the expression of p-CREB, PSD95 and cAMP levels after surgery. The expression of PDE4B and PDE4D in the hippocampus decreased following blocking of PDE4 by rolipram. Meanwhile, rolipram attenuated the cognitive impairment and the elevation of pro-inflammatory cytokines induced by surgery. Moreover, rolipram reversed the reduction of p-CREB and PSD95. These results indicate that PDE4 subtype overexpression may be involved in the development of surgery-induced cognitive dysfunction in mice.

  19. Phosphodiesterases reduce spontaneous sinoatrial beating but not the 'fight or flight' tachycardia elicited by agonists through Gs-protein-coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Kaumann, Alberto J

    2011-07-01

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP) steers the generation of basal heart beat in the sinoatrial node. It also induces sinoatrial tachycardia and increased cardiac force, elicited through activation of Gs-protein-coupled receptors (GsPCRs). Phosphodiesterases (PDEs) hydrolyse cAMP. In the heart mainly PDE3 and PDE4 would be expected to limit those functions, and the PDE isoenzymes do indeed reduce basal sinoatrial beating rate and blunt the positive inotropic effects of agonists, mediated by GsPCRs. By contrast, recent evidence shows that GsPCR-mediated sinoatrial tachycardia is not controlled by PDE1-5. A PDE-resistant cAMP pool in sinoatrial cells, generated through activation of GsPCRs, including β(1)- and β(2)-adrenoceptors, appears to guarantee unrestrained tachycardia during fight or flight stress.

  20. Putative M2 muscarinic receptors of rat heart have high affinity for organophosphorus anticholinesterases

    SciTech Connect

    Silveira, C.L.; Eldefrawi, A.T.; Eldefrawi, M.E. )

    1990-05-01

    The M2 subtype of muscarinic receptor is predominant in heart, and such receptors were reported to be located in muscles as well as in presynaptic cholinergic and adrenergic nerve terminals. Muscarinic receptors of rat heart were identified by the high affinity binding of the agonist (+)-(3H)cis-methyldioxolane ((3H)CD), which has been used to label a high affinity population of M2 receptors. A single population of sites was detected and (3H)CD binding was sensitive to the M2 antagonist himbacine but much less so to pirenzepine, the M1 antagonist. These cardiac receptors had different sensitivities to NiCl2 and N-ethylmaleimide from brain muscarinic receptors, that were also labeled with (3H)CD and considered to be of the M2 subtype. Up to 70% of the (3H)CD-labeled cardiac receptors had high affinities for several organophosphate (OP) anticholinesterases. (3H)CD binding was inhibited by the nerve agents soman, VX, sarin, and tabun, with K0.5 values of 0.8, 2, 20, and 50 nM, respectively. It was also inhibited by echothiophate and paraoxon with K0.5 values of 100 and 300 nM, respectively. The apparent competitive nature of inhibition of (3H)CD binding by both sarin and paraoxon suggests that the OPs bind to the acetylcholine binding site of the muscarinic receptor. Other OP insecticides had lower potencies, inhibiting less than 50% of 5 nM (3H)CD binding by 1 microM of EPN, coumaphos, dioxathion, dichlorvos, or chlorpyriphos. There was poor correlation between the potencies of the OPs in reversibly inhibiting (3H)CD binding, and their anticholinesterase activities and toxicities. Acetylcholinesterases are the primary targets for these OP compounds because of the irreversible nature of their inhibition, which results in building of acetylcholine concentrations that activate muscarinic and nicotinic receptors and desensitize them, thereby inhibiting respiration.

  1. In vivo model with targeted cAMP biosensor reveals changes in receptor-microdomain communication in cardiac disease.

    PubMed

    Sprenger, Julia U; Perera, Ruwan K; Steinbrecher, Julia H; Lehnart, Stephan E; Maier, Lars S; Hasenfuss, Gerd; Nikolaev, Viacheslav O

    2015-04-28

    3',5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) is an ubiquitous second messenger that regulates physiological functions by acting in distinct subcellular microdomains. Although several targeted cAMP biosensors are developed and used in single cells, it is unclear whether such biosensors can be successfully applied in vivo, especially in the context of disease. Here, we describe a transgenic mouse model expressing a targeted cAMP sensor and analyse microdomain-specific second messenger dynamics in the vicinity of the sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase (SERCA). We demonstrate the biocompatibility of this targeted sensor and its potential for real-time monitoring of compartmentalized cAMP signalling in adult cardiomyocytes isolated from a healthy mouse heart and from an in vivo cardiac disease model. In particular, we uncover the existence of a phosphodiesterase-dependent receptor-microdomain communication, which is affected in hypertrophy, resulting in reduced β-adrenergic receptor-cAMP signalling to SERCA.

  2. Regulatory mechanisms of cAMP levels as a multiple target for antiplatelet activity and less bleeding risk.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, Eduardo; Palomo, Iván

    2014-08-01

    Platelet activation is a critical component of atherothrombosis. The multiple pathways of platelet activation limit the effect of specific receptor/pathway inhibitors, resulting in limited clinical efficacy. Recent research has confirmed that combination therapy results in enhanced antithrombotic efficacy without increasing bleeding risk. In this way, the best-known inhibitor and turn off signaling in platelet activation is cAMP. In this article we discuss the mechanisms of regulation of intraplatelet cAMP levels, a) platelet-dependent pathway: Gi/Gs protein-coupled receptors, phosphodiesterase inhibition and activation of PPARs and b) platelet-independent pathway: inhibition of adenosine uptake by erythrocytes. With respect to the association between intraplatelet cAMP levels and bleeding risk it is possible to establish that compounds/drugs with pleitropic effect for increased intraplatelet cAMP level could have an antithrombotic activity with less risk of bleeding.

  3. Basic Camp Management: An Introduction to Camp Administration. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ball, Armand; Ball, Beverly

    From its perspective of experience in the field, this book offers practical and specific guidance for successfully managing an organized summer camp. It may also serve as a beginning orientation for potential camp directors, a quick reference for experienced directors, or a text for entry level courses in practical camp administration. This second…

  4. How Green Is Camping? Environmental Stewardship in North Carolina Camps.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warren, Roger; Bingham, Cindy

    1994-01-01

    A survey of 47 residential camps in North Carolina revealed that most camps had written environmental objectives, practiced recycling, attempted to reduce water use and energy consumption, practiced low-impact camping, included environmental issues in staff training, and provided environmental education to campers. Includes survey questions. (LP)

  5. 36 CFR 13.1222 - Camping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Camp Campground and other designated areas. (b) Camping in Brooks Camp Campground for more than a total... site in the Brooks Camp Campground while in operation as a designated fee area is prohibited....

  6. 36 CFR 13.1222 - Camping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Camp Campground and other designated areas. (b) Camping in Brooks Camp Campground for more than a total... site in the Brooks Camp Campground while in operation as a designated fee area is prohibited....

  7. 36 CFR 13.1222 - Camping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Camp Campground and other designated areas. (b) Camping in Brooks Camp Campground for more than a total... site in the Brooks Camp Campground while in operation as a designated fee area is prohibited....

  8. 36 CFR 13.1222 - Camping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Camp Campground and other designated areas. (b) Camping in Brooks Camp Campground for more than a total... site in the Brooks Camp Campground while in operation as a designated fee area is prohibited....

  9. 36 CFR 13.1222 - Camping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Camp Campground and other designated areas. (b) Camping in Brooks Camp Campground for more than a total... site in the Brooks Camp Campground while in operation as a designated fee area is prohibited....

  10. Functional transformations of bile acid transporters induced by high-affinity macromolecules

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hilal, Taslim A.; Chung, Seung Woo; Alam, Farzana; Park, Jooho; Lee, Kyung Eun; Jeon, Hyesung; Kim, Kwangmeyung; Kwon, Ick Chan; Kim, In-San; Kim, Sang Yoon; Byun, Youngro

    2014-01-01

    Apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporters (ASBT) are the intestinal transporters that form intermediate complexes with substrates and its conformational change drives the movement of substrates across the cell membrane. However, membrane-based intestinal transporters are confined to the transport of only small molecular substrates. Here, we propose a new strategy that uses high-affinity binding macromolecular substrates to functionally transform the membrane transporters so that they behave like receptors, ultimately allowing the apical-basal transport of bound macromolecules. Bile acid based macromolecular substrates were synthesized and allowed to interact with ASBT. ASBT/macromolecular substrate complexes were rapidly internalized in vesicles, localized in early endosomes, dissociated and escaped the vesicular transport while binding of cytoplasmic ileal bile acid binding proteins cause exocytosis of macromolecules and prevented entry into lysosomes. This newly found transformation process of ASBT suggests a new transport mechanism that could aid in further utilization of ASBT to mediate oral macromolecular drug delivery. PMID:24566561

  11. A linker peptide with high affinity towards silica-containing materials.

    PubMed

    Sunna, Anwar; Chi, Fei; Bergquist, Peter L

    2013-06-25

    A peptide sequence with affinity to silica-containing materials was fused to a truncated form of Streptococcus strain G148 Protein G. The resulting recombinant Linker-Protein G (LPG) was produced in Escherichia coli and purified to apparent homogeneity. It displayed high affinity towards two natural clinoptilolite zeolites. The LPG also displayed high binding affinity towards commercial-grade synthetic zeolite, silica and silica-containing materials. A commercial sample of the truncated Protein G and a basic protein, both without the linker, did not bind to natural or synthetic zeolites or silica. We conclude that the zeolite-binding affinity is mediated by the linker peptide sequence. As a consequence, these data may imply that the binding affinity is directed to the SiO2 component rather than to the atomic orientation on the zeolite crystal surface as previously assumed.

  12. Preorganized Peptide Scaffolds as Mimics of Phosphorylated Proteins Binding Sites with a High Affinity for Uranyl.

    PubMed

    Starck, Matthieu; Sisommay, Nathalie; Laporte, Fanny A; Oros, Stéphane; Lebrun, Colette; Delangle, Pascale

    2015-12-07

    Cyclic peptides with two phosphoserines and two glutamic acids were developed to mimic high-affinity binding sites for uranyl found in proteins such as osteopontin, which is believed to be a privileged target of this ion in vivo. These peptides adopt a β-sheet structure that allows the coordination of the latter amino acid side chains in the equatorial plane of the dioxo uranyl cation. Complementary spectroscopic and analytical methods revealed that these cyclic peptides are efficient uranyl chelating peptides with a large contribution from the phosphorylated residues. The conditional affinity constants were measured by following fluorescence tryptophan quenching and are larger than 10(10) at physiological pH. These compounds are therefore promising models for understanding uranyl chelation by proteins, which is relevant to this actinide ion toxicity.

  13. Protein unfolding as a switch from self-recognition to high-affinity client binding

    PubMed Central

    Groitl, Bastian; Horowitz, Scott; Makepeace, Karl A. T.; Petrotchenko, Evgeniy V.; Borchers, Christoph H.; Reichmann, Dana; Bardwell, James C. A.; Jakob, Ursula

    2016-01-01

    Stress-specific activation of the chaperone Hsp33 requires the unfolding of a central linker region. This activation mechanism suggests an intriguing functional relationship between the chaperone's own partial unfolding and its ability to bind other partially folded client proteins. However, identifying where Hsp33 binds its clients has remained a major gap in our understanding of Hsp33's working mechanism. By using site-specific Fluorine-19 nuclear magnetic resonance experiments guided by in vivo crosslinking studies, we now reveal that the partial unfolding of Hsp33's linker region facilitates client binding to an amphipathic docking surface on Hsp33. Furthermore, our results provide experimental evidence for the direct involvement of conditionally disordered regions in unfolded protein binding. The observed structural similarities between Hsp33's own metastable linker region and client proteins present a possible model for how Hsp33 uses protein unfolding as a switch from self-recognition to high-affinity client binding. PMID:26787517

  14. Glycan-based high-affinity ligands for toxins and pathogen receptors.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Ashish A; Weiss, Alison A; Iyer, Suri S

    2010-03-01

    Glycans decorate over 95% of the mammalian cell surface in the form of glycolipids and glycoproteins. Several toxins and pathogens bind to these glycans to enter the cells. Understanding the fundamentals of the complex interplay between microbial pathogens and their glycan receptors at the molecular level could lead to the development of novel therapeutics and diagnostics. Using Shiga toxin and influenza virus as examples, we describe the complex biological interface between host glycans and these infectious agents, and recent strategies to develop glycan-based high-affinity ligands. These molecules are expected to ultimately be incorporated into diagnostics and therapeutics, and can be used as probes to study important biological processes. Additionally, by focusing on the specific glycans that microbial pathogens target, we can begin to decipher the "glycocode" and how these glycans participate in normal and aberrant cellular communication.

  15. Practical strategies for the evaluation of high-affinity protein/nucleic acid interactions

    PubMed Central

    Altschuler, Sarah E.; Lewis, Karen A.; Wuttke, Deborah S.

    2014-01-01

    The quantitative evaluation of binding interactions between proteins and nucleic acids is highly sensitive to a variety of experimental conditions. Optimization of these conditions is critical for obtaining high quality, reproducible data, particularly in the context of very high affinity interactions. Here, we discuss the practical considerations involved in optimizing the apparent binding constant of an interaction as measured by two common quantitative assays, electrophoretic mobility shift assay and double-filter binding when measuring extremely tight protein/nucleic acid interactions with sub-nanomolar binding affinities. We include specific examples from two telomere end-binding protein systems, Schizo -saccharomyces pombe Pot1 and Saccharomyces cerevisiae Cdc13, to demonstrate potential experimental pitfalls and some useful strategies for optimization. PMID:25197549

  16. Neutrophil recruitment limited by high-affinity bent β2 integrin binding ligand in cis

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Zhichao; McArdle, Sara; Marki, Alex; Mikulski, Zbigniew; Gutierrez, Edgar; Engelhardt, Britta; Deutsch, Urban; Ginsberg, Mark; Groisman, Alex; Ley, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils are essential for innate immunity and inflammation and many neutrophil functions are β2 integrin-dependent. Integrins can extend (E+) and acquire a high-affinity conformation with an ‘open' headpiece (H+). The canonical switchblade model of integrin activation proposes that the E+ conformation precedes H+, and the two are believed to be structurally linked. Here we show, using high-resolution quantitative dynamic footprinting (qDF) microscopy combined with a homogenous conformation-reporter binding assay in a microfluidic device, that a substantial fraction of β2 integrins on human neutrophils acquire an unexpected E−H+ conformation. E−H+ β2 integrins bind intercellular adhesion molecules (ICAMs) in cis, which inhibits leukocyte adhesion in vitro and in vivo. This endogenous anti-inflammatory mechanism inhibits neutrophil aggregation, accumulation and inflammation. PMID:27578049

  17. Pinealectomy increases ouabain high-affinity binding sites and dissociation constant in rat cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Acuña Castroviejo, D; del Aguila, C M; Fernández, B; Gomar, M D; Castillo, J L

    1991-06-24

    The effect of the pineal gland on the ouabain high-affinity binding sites (Kd = 3.1 +/- 0.4 nM, Bmax = 246.4 +/- 18.4 fmol/mg protein) in rat cerebral cortex was studied. Pinealectomy increased Bmax (940.7 +/- 42.8 fmol/mg protein) and Kd (7.6 +/- 1.5 nM) while melatonin injection (100 micrograms/kg b.wt.) counteracted these effects, restoring kinetic parameters (Kd = 1.9 +/- 0.05 nM; Bmax = 262.2 +/- 29.6 fmol/mg prot) to control values. Melatonin activity on ouabain binding in vitro did not depend upon a direct effect on the binding sites themselves. However, in competition experiments, melatonin increased binding affinity of ouabain as shown by the decreased IC50 values.

  18. A complex water network contributes to high-affinity binding in an antibody-antigen interface.

    PubMed

    Marino, S F; Olal, D; Daumke, O

    2016-03-01

    This data article presents an analysis of structural water molecules in the high affinity interaction between a potent tumor growth inhibiting antibody (fragment), J22.9-xi, and the tumor marker antigen CD269 (B cell maturation antigen, BCMA). The 1.89 Å X-ray crystal structure shows exquisite details of the binding interface between the two molecules, which comprises relatively few, mostly hydrophobic, direct contacts but many indirect interactions over solvent waters. These are partly or wholly buried in, and therefore part of, the interface. A partial description of the structure is included in an article on the tumor inhibiting effects of the antibody: "Potent anti-tumor response by targeting B cell maturation antigen (BCMA) in a mouse model of multiple myeloma", Mol. Oncol. 9 (7) (2015) pp. 1348-58.

  19. Cationic polymer brush-modified cellulose nanocrystals for high-affinity virus binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosilo, Henna; McKee, Jason R.; Kontturi, Eero; Koho, Tiia; Hytönen, Vesa P.; Ikkala, Olli; Kostiainen, Mauri A.

    2014-09-01

    Surfaces capable of high-affinity binding of biomolecules are required in several biotechnological applications, such as purification, transfection, and sensing. Therein, the rod-shaped, colloidal cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) are appealing due to their large surface area available for functionalization. In order to exploit electrostatic binding, their intrinsically anionic surfaces have to be cationized as biological supramolecules are predominantly anionic. Here we present a facile way to prepare cationic CNCs by surface-initiated atom-transfer radical polymerization of poly(N,N-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate) and subsequent quaternization of the polymer pendant amino groups. The cationic polymer brush-modified CNCs maintained excellent dispersibility and colloidal stability in water and showed a ζ-potential of +38 mV. Dynamic light scattering and electron microscopy showed that the modified CNCs electrostatically bind cowpea chlorotic mottle virus and norovirus-like particles with high affinity. Addition of only a few weight percent of the modified CNCs in water dispersions sufficed to fully bind the virus capsids to form micrometer-sized assemblies. This enabled the concentration and extraction of the virus particles from solution by low-speed centrifugation. These results show the feasibility of the modified CNCs in virus binding and concentrating, and pave the way for their use as transduction enhancers for viral delivery applications.Surfaces capable of high-affinity binding of biomolecules are required in several biotechnological applications, such as purification, transfection, and sensing. Therein, the rod-shaped, colloidal cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) are appealing due to their large surface area available for functionalization. In order to exploit electrostatic binding, their intrinsically anionic surfaces have to be cationized as biological supramolecules are predominantly anionic. Here we present a facile way to prepare cationic CNCs by surface

  20. Experimental conditions can obscure the second high-affinity site in LeuT.

    PubMed

    Quick, Matthias; Shi, Lei; Zehnpfennig, Britta; Weinstein, Harel; Javitch, Jonathan A

    2012-01-15

    Neurotransmitter:Na(+) symporters (NSSs), the targets of antidepressants and psychostimulants, recapture neurotransmitters from the synapse in a Na(+)-dependent symport mechanism. The crystal structure of the NSS homolog LeuT from Aquifex aeolicus revealed one leucine substrate in an occluded, centrally located (S1) binding site next to two Na(+) ions. Computational studies combined with binding and flux experiments identified a second substrate (S2) site and a molecular mechanism of Na(+)-substrate symport that depends upon the allosteric interaction of substrate molecules in the two high-affinity sites. Here we show that the S2 site, which has not yet been identified by crystallographic approaches, can be blocked during preparation of detergent-solubilized LeuT, thereby obscuring its crucial role in Na(+)-coupled symport. This finding points to the need for caution in selecting experimental environments in which the properties and mechanistic features of membrane proteins can be delineated.

  1. Neurotensin decreases high affinity [3H]-ouabain binding to cerebral cortex membranes.

    PubMed

    Rosin, Carina; Ordieres, María Graciela López; Arnaiz, Georgina Rodríguez de Lores

    2011-12-10

    Previous work from this laboratory showed the ability of neurotensin to inhibit synaptosomal membrane Na(+), K(+)-ATPase activity, the effect being blocked by SR 48692, a non-peptidic antagonist for high affinity neurotensin receptor (NTS1) [López Ordieres and Rodríguez de Lores Arnaiz 2000; 2001]. To further study neurotensin interaction with Na(+), K(+)-ATPase, peptide effect on high affinity [(3)H]-ouabain binding was studied in cerebral cortex membranes. It was observed that neurotensin modified binding in a dose-dependent manner, leading to 80% decrease with 1 × 10(-4)M concentration. On the other hand, the single addition of 1 × 10(-6)M, 1 × 10(-5)M and 1 × 10(-4)M SR 48692 (Sanofi-Aventis, U.S., Inc.) decreased [(3)H]-ouabain binding (in %) to 87 ± 16; 74 ± 16 and 34 ± 17, respectively. Simultaneous addition of neurotensin and SR 48692 led to additive or synergic effects. Partial NTS2 agonist levocabastine inhibited [(3)H]-ouabain binding likewise. Saturation assays followed by Scatchard analyses showed that neurotensin increased K(d) value whereas failed to modify B(max) value, indicating a competitive type interaction of the peptide at Na(+), K(+)-ATPase ouabain site. At variance, SR 48692 decreased B(max) value whereas it did not modify K(d) value. [(3)H]-ouabain binding was also studied in cerebral cortex membranes obtained from rats injected i. p. 30 min earlier with 100 μg and 250 μg/kg SR 48692. It was observed that the 250 μg/kg SR 48692 dose led to 19% decrease in basal [(3)H]-ouabain binding. After SR 48692 treatments, addition of 1 × 10(-6)M led to additive or synergic effect. Results suggested that [(3)H]-ouabain binding inhibition by neurotensin hardly involves NTS1 receptor.

  2. Kinetics and autoradiography of high affinity uptake of serotonin by primary astrocyte cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Katz, D.M.; Kimelberg, H.K.

    1985-07-01

    Primary astrocyte cultures prepared from the cerebral cortices of neonatal rats showed significant accumulation of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; (/sup 3/H)-5-HT). At concentrations in the range of 0.01 to 0.7 microM (/sup 3/H)-5-HT, this uptake was 50 to 85% Na+ dependent and gave a Km of 0.40 +/- 0.11 microM (/sup 3/H)-5-HT and a Vmax of 6.42 +/- 0.85 (+/- SEM) pmol of (/sup 3/H)-5-HT/mg of protein/4 min for the Na+-dependent component. In the absence of Na+ the uptake was nonsaturable. Omission of the monoamine oxidase inhibitor pargyline markedly reduced the Na+-dependent component of (/sup 3/H)-5-HT uptake but had a negligible effect on the Na+-independent component. This suggest significant oxidative deamination of serotonin after it has been taken up by the high affinity system, followed by release of its metabolite. The authors estimated that this system enabled the cells to concentrate (/sup 3/H)-5-HT up to 44-fold at an external (/sup 3/H)-5-HT concentration of 10(-7) M. Inhibition of (/sup 3/H)-5-HT uptake by a number of clinically effective antidepressants was also consistent with a specific high affinity uptake mechanism for 5-HT, the order of effectiveness of inhibition being chlorimipramine greater than fluoxetine greater than imipramine = amitriptyline greater than desmethylimipramine greater than iprindole greater than mianserin. Uptake of (/sup 3/H)-5-HT was dependent on the presence of Cl- as well as Na+ in the medium, and the effect of omission of both ions was nonadditive. Varying the concentration of K+ in the media from 1 to 50 mM had a limited effect on (/sup 3/H)-5-HT uptake.

  3. Low- and high-affinity transport systems for citric acid in the yeast Candida utilis.

    PubMed Central

    Cássio, F; Leáo, C

    1991-01-01

    Citric acid-grown cells of the yeast Candida utilis induced two transport systems for citric acid, presumably a proton symport and a facilitated diffusion system for the charged and the undissociated forms of the acid, respectively. Both systems could be observed simultaneously when the transport was measured at 25 degrees C with labelled citric acid at pH 3.5 with the following kinetic parameters: for the low-affinity system, Vmax, 1.14 nmol of undissociated citric acid s-1 mg (dry weight) of cells-1, and Km, 0.59 mM undissociated acid; for the high-affinity system, Vmax, 0.38 nmol of citrate s-1 mg (dry weight) of cells-1, and Km, 0.056 mM citrate. At high pH values (above 5.0), the low-affinity system was absent or not measurable. The two transport systems exhibited different substrate specificities. Isocitric acid was a competitive inhibitor of citric acid for the high-affinity system, suggesting that these tricarboxylic acids used the same transport system, while aconitic, tricarballylic, trimesic, and hemimellitic acids were not competitive inhibitors. With respect to the low-affinity system, isocitric acid, L-lactic acid, and L-malic acid were competitive inhibitors, suggesting that all of these mono-, di-, and tricarboxylic acids used the same low-affinity transport system. The two transport systems were repressed by glucose, and as a consequence diauxic growth was observed. Both systems were inducible, and not only citric acid but also lactic acid and malic acid may induce those transport systems. The induction of both systems was not dependent on the relative concentration of the anionic form(s) and of undissociated citric acid in the culture medium.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1664712

  4. High affinity binding of [3H]-tyramine in the central nervous system.

    PubMed Central

    Vaccari, A.

    1986-01-01

    Optimum assay conditions for the association of [3H]-para-tyramine [( 3H]-pTA) with rat brain membranes were characterized, and a saturable, reversible, drug-specific, and high affinity binding mechanism for this trace amine was revealed. The binding capacity (Bmax) for [3H]-pTA in the corpus striatum was approximately 30 times higher than that in the cerebellum, with similar dissociation constants (KD). The binding process of [3H]-pTA involved the dopamine system, inasmuch as (a) highest binding capacity was associated with dopamine-rich regions; (b) dopamine and pTA equally displaced specifically bound [3H]-pTA; (c) there was a severe loss in striatal binding capacity for [3H]-pTA and, reportedly, for [3H]-dopamine, following unilateral nigrostriatal lesion; (d) acute in vivo reserpine treatment markedly decreased the density of [3H]-pTA and, reportedly, of [3H]-dopamine binding sites. In competition experiments [3H]-pTA binding sites, though displaying nanomolar affinity for dopamine, revealed micromolar affinities for the dopamine agonists apomorphine and pergolide, and for several dopamine antagonists, while having very high affinity for reserpine, a marker for the catecholamine transporter in synaptic vesicles. The binding process of [3H]-pTA was both energy-dependent (ouabain-sensitive), and ATP-Mg2+-insensitive; furthermore, the potencies of various drugs in competing for [3H]-pTA binding to rat striatal membranes correlated well (r = 0.96) with their reported potencies in inhibiting [3H]-dopamine uptake into striatal synaptosomes. It is concluded that [3H]-pTA binds at a site located on/within synaptic vesicles where it is involved in the transport mechanism of dopamine. PMID:3801770

  5. The integration of genomic and structural information in the development of high affinity plasmepsin inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Nezami, Azin; Freire, Ernesto

    2002-12-04

    The plasmepsins are key enzymes in the life cycle of the Plasmodium parasites responsible for malaria. Since plasmepsin inhibition leads to parasite death, these enzymes have been acknowledged to be important targets for the development of new antimalarial drugs. The development of effective plasmepsin inhibitors, however, is compounded by their genomic diversity which gives rise not to a unique target for drug development but to a family of closely related targets. Successful drugs will have to inhibit not one but several related enzymes with high affinity. Structure-based drug design against heterogeneous targets requires a departure from the classic 'lock-and-key' paradigm that leads to the development of conformationally constrained molecules aimed at a single target. Drug molecules designed along those principles are usually rigid and unable to adapt to target variations arising from naturally occurring genetic polymorphisms or drug-induced resistant mutations. Heterogeneous targets need adaptive drug molecules, characterised by the presence of flexible elements at specific locations that sustain a viable binding affinity against existing or expected polymorphisms. Adaptive ligands have characteristic thermodynamic signatures that distinguish them from their rigid counterparts. This realisation has led to the development of rigorous thermodynamic design guidelines that take advantage of correlations between the structure of lead compounds and the enthalpic and entropic components of the binding affinity. In this paper, we discuss the application of the thermodynamic approach to the development of high affinity (K(i) - pM) plasmepsin inhibitors. In particular, a family of allophenylnorstatine-based compounds is evaluated for their potential to inhibit a wide spectrum of plasmepsins.

  6. Selection of DNA aptamers against epidermal growth factor receptor with high affinity and specificity

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Deng-Liang; Song, Yan-Ling; Zhu, Zhi; Li, Xi-Lan; Zou, Yuan; Yang, Hai-Tao; Wang, Jiang-Jie; Yao, Pei-Sen; Pan, Ru-Jun; Yang, Chaoyong James; Kang, De-Zhi

    2014-10-31

    Highlights: • This is the first report of DNA aptamer against EGFR in vitro. • Aptamer can bind targets with high affinity and selectivity. • DNA aptamers are more stable, cheap and efficient than RNA aptamers. • Our selected DNA aptamer against EGFR has high affinity with K{sub d} 56 ± 7.3 nM. • Our selected DNA aptamer against EGFR has high selectivity. - Abstract: Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR/HER1/c-ErbB1), is overexpressed in many solid cancers, such as epidermoid carcinomas, malignant gliomas, etc. EGFR plays roles in proliferation, invasion, angiogenesis and metastasis of malignant cancer cells and is the ideal antigen for clinical applications in cancer detection, imaging and therapy. Aptamers, the output of the systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX), are DNA/RNA oligonucleotides which can bind protein and other substances with specificity. RNA aptamers are undesirable due to their instability and high cost of production. Conversely, DNA aptamers have aroused researcher’s attention because they are easily synthesized, stable, selective, have high binding affinity and are cost-effective to produce. In this study, we have successfully identified DNA aptamers with high binding affinity and selectivity to EGFR. The aptamer named TuTu22 with K{sub d} 56 ± 7.3 nM was chosen from the identified DNA aptamers for further study. Flow cytometry analysis results indicated that the TuTu22 aptamer was able to specifically recognize a variety of cancer cells expressing EGFR but did not bind to the EGFR-negative cells. With all of the aforementioned advantages, the DNA aptamers reported here against cancer biomarker EGFR will facilitate the development of novel targeted cancer detection, imaging and therapy.

  7. UCR1C is a novel activator of phosphodiesterase 4 (PDE4) long isoforms and attenuates cardiomyocyte hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Li; Burmeister, Brian T.; Johnson, Keven R.; Baillie, George S.; Karginov, Andrei V.; Skidgel, Randal A.; O’Bryan, John P.; Carnegie, Graeme K.

    2015-01-01

    Hypertrophy increases the risk of heart failure and arrhythmia. Prevention or reversal of the maladaptive hypertrophic phenotype has thus been proposed to treat heart failure. Chronic β-adrenergic receptor (β-AR) stimulation induces cardiomyocyte hypertrophy by elevating 3′, 5′-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) levels and activating downstream effectors such protein kinase A (PKA). Conversely, hydrolysis of cAMP by phosphodiesterases (PDEs) spatiotemporally restricts cAMP signaling. Here, we demonstrate that PDE4, but not PDE3, is critical in regulating cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, and may represent a potential target for preventing maladaptive hypertrophy. We identify a sequence within the upstream conserved region 1 of PDE4D, termed UCR1C, as a novel activator of PDE4 long isoforms. UCR1C activates PDE4 in complex with A-Kinase anchoring protein (AKAP)-Lbc resulting in decreased PKA signaling facilitated by AKAP-Lbc. Expression of UCR1C in cardiomyocytes inhibits hypertrophy in response to chronic β-AR stimulation. This effect is partially due to inhibition of nuclear PKA activity, which decreases phosphorylation of the transcription factor cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB). In conclusion, PDE4 activation by UCR1C attenuates cardiomyocyte hypertrophy by specifically inhibiting nuclear PKA activity. PMID:25683917

  8. [Phosphodiesterase 3 mediates cross-talk between the protein kinase- and cGMP- dependent pathways and cyclic AMP metabolism].

    PubMed

    Makuch, Edyta; Matuszyk, Janusz

    2012-07-20

    PDE3 is a dual-substrate phosphodiesterase responsible for hydrolyzing both cAMP and cGMP whilst being simultaneously inhibited by cGMP. This feature is related to presence of the 44 amino acid insert in the catalytic domain, which determines the mechanism of introduction of the cyclic nucleotide into the catalytic pocket of the enzyme. Once bound in the catalytic site cGMP results in steric hindrance for cAMP to enter the site. The regulatory domain of PDE3 consists of two hydrophobic regions: NHR1 and NHR2. Their presence defines the enzyme's intracellular localization, thus determining its participation in particular signaling cascades. Due to the properties of PDE3 this enzyme has exceptional importance for the cross-talk between cAMP-dependent signaling and other cascades. There are two different mechanisms of action of PDE3 enzymes in cell signaling pathways. In many signaling cascades assembly of a signalosome is necessary for phosphorylation and activation of the PDE3 proteins. In response to certain hormones and growth factors, PDE3 merges the metabolism of cAMP with protein kinase-dependent signaling pathways. PDE3 also controls the level of cAMP with regard to the alternating concentration of cGMP. This effect occurs in signaling cascades activated by natriuretic peptide.

  9. Regulation of cAMP Intracellular Levels in Human Platelets Stimulated by 2-Arachidonoylglycerol.

    PubMed

    Signorello, Maria Grazia; Leoncini, Giuliana

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrated that in human platelets the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) decreased dose- and time-dependently cAMP intracellular levels. No effect on cAMP decrease induced by 2-AG was observed in the presence of the adenylate cyclase inhibitor SQ22536 as well in platelets pretreated with the thromboxane A2 receptor antagonist, SQ29548 or with aspirin, inhibitor of arachidonic acid metabolism through the cyclooxygenase pathway. An almost complete recovering of cAMP level was measured in platelets pretreated with the specific inhibitor of phosphodiesterase (PDE) 3A, milrinone. In platelets pretreated with LY294002 or MK2206, inhibitors of PI3K/AKT pathway, and with U73122, inhibitor of phospholipase C pathway, only a partial prevention was shown. cAMP intracellular level depends on synthesis by adenylate cyclase and hydrolysis by PDEs. In 2-AG-stimulated platelets adenylate cyclase activity seems to be unchanged. In contrast PDEs appear to be involved. In particular PDE3A was specifically activated, as milrinone reversed cAMP reduction by 2-AG. 2-AG enhanced PDE3A activity through its phosphorylation. The PI3K/AKT pathway and PKC participate to this PDE3A phosphorylation/activation mechanism as it was greatly inhibited by platelet pretreatment with LY294002, MK2206, U73122, or the PKC specific inhibitor GF109203X. Taken together these data suggest that 2-AG potentiates its power of platelet agonist reducing cAMP intracellular level.

  10. Spatiotemporal regulation of cAMP signaling controls the human trophoblast fusion

    PubMed Central

    Gerbaud, Pascale; Taskén, Kjetil; Pidoux, Guillaume

    2015-01-01

    During human placentation, mononuclear cytotrophoblasts fuse to form multinucleated syncytia ensuring hormonal production and nutrient exchanges between the maternal and fetal circulation. Syncytial formation is essential for the maintenance of pregnancy and for fetal growth. The cAMP signaling pathway is the major route to trigger trophoblast fusion and its activation results in phosphorylation of specific intracellular target proteins, in transcription of fusogenic genes and assembly of macromolecular protein complexes constituting the fusogenic machinery at the plasma membrane. Specificity in cAMP signaling is ensured by generation of localized pools of cAMP controlled by cAMP phosphodiesterases (PDEs) and by discrete spatial and temporal activation of protein kinase A (PKA) in supramolecular signaling clusters inside the cell organized by A-kinase-anchoring proteins (AKAPs) and by organization of signal termination by protein phosphatases (PPs). Here we present original observations on the available components of the cAMP signaling pathway in the human placenta including PKA, PDE, and PP isoforms as well as AKAPs. We continue to discuss the current knowledge of the spatiotemporal regulation of cAMP signaling triggering trophoblast fusion. PMID:26441659

  11. Cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate levels and activities of adenylate cyclase and cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate phosphodiesterase in Pseudomonas and Bacteroides.

    PubMed Central

    Siegel, L S; Hylemon, P B; Phibbs, P V

    1977-01-01

    A modified Gilman assay was used to determine the concentrations of cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP) in rapidly filtered cells and in the culture filtrates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli K-12, and Bacteroides fragilis. In P. aeruginosa cultures, levels of cAMP in the filtrate increased with the culture absorbance (3.5 to 19.8 X 10(-9) M) but did not vary significantly with the carbon source used to support growth. Intracellular concentrations (0.8 to 3.2 X 10(-5) M) were substantially higher and did not vary appreciably during growth or with carbon source. Sodium cAMP (5 mM) failed to reverse the catabolite repression of inducible glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.49) synthesis caused by the addition of 10 mM succinate. Exogenous cAMP also had no discernible effect on the catabolite repression control of inducible mannitol dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.67). P. aeruginosa was found to contain both soluble cAMP phosphodiesterase (EC 3.1.4.17) and membrane-associated adenylate cyclase (EC 4.6.1.1) activity, and these were compared to the activities detected in crude extracts of E. coli. B. fragilis crude cell extracts contain neither of these enzyme activities, and little or no cAMP was detected in cells or culture filtrates of this anaerobic bacterium. PMID:187575

  12. Aip regulates cAMP signalling and GH secretion in GH3 cells.

    PubMed

    Formosa, R; Xuereb-Anastasi, A; Vassallo, J

    2013-08-01

    Mutations in the aryl hydrocarbon receptor-interacting protein (AIP) gene have been linked to predisposition to pituitary adenomas. However, the mechanism by which this occurs remains unknown. AIP interacts with a number of interesting proteins, including members of the cAMP signalling pathway that has been shown to be consistently altered in pituitary tumours. The functional role of Aip was investigated using both over-expression and knock down of Aip in GH3 cells. cAMP signalling and its downstream effectors, including GH secretion, were then investigated. cAMP signalling was analysed using cAMP assays, cAMP-response element-promoter luciferase reporter assays, real-time PCR and finally secreted GH quantification. Over-expression of wild-type (WT)-Aip reduced forskolin-induced cAMP signalling at the total cAMP level, luciferase reporter activity and target gene expression, when compared with empty vector and the non-functional R304X mutant. Additionally, GH secretion was reduced in WT-Aip over-expressing GH3 cells treated with forskolin. Knock down of endogenous Aip resulted in increased cAMP signalling but a decrease in GH secretion was also noted. Inhibition of phosphodiesterase activity using general and selective inhibitors did not completely ablate the effect of Aip on forskolin-augmented cAMP signalling. A mechanism by which Aip acts as a tumour suppressor, by maintaining a low cAMP signalling and concentration, is suggested. Mutations of Aip render the protein incapable of such activity. This effect appears not to be mediated by the AIP-PDE interaction, suggesting the involvement of other interacting partners in mediating this outcome.

  13. A Flying Summer Camp

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mercurio, Frank X.

    1975-01-01

    Describes a five-day summer camp which provided 12 children, ages 9-14, with a complete flying experience. The training consisted of ground school and one hour actual flying time, including the basics of aircraft control and a flight prepared and executed by the students. (MLH)

  14. Recycling at Camp.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cummins, William M.

    1988-01-01

    Outlines a Michigan summer camp's efforts to reduce solid waste disposal by recycling cardboard, tin, glass, aluminum, and plastic milk containers. Points out variables affecting the success of such efforts. Discusses Michigan state funding for the development of recycling programs. (SV)

  15. Saving the Camping Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, Jean S.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses developmental encroachment on isolated caves near Pittsford, Vermont. Describes cooperative effort by recreational camps and other agencies to acquire land surrounding cave entrances for conservation. Details successes and hurdles of land acquisition. Describes ongoing work by local campers to maintain and enjoy caves and property. (TES)

  16. Alaska's Logging Camp School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Millward, Robert E.

    1999-01-01

    A visit to Ketchikan, Alaska, reveals a floating, one-teacher logging-camp school that uses multiage grouping and interdisciplinary teaching. There are 10 students. The school gym and playground, bunkhouse, fuel tanks, mess hall, and students' homes bob up and down and are often moved to other sites. (MLH)

  17. Roles of phosphodiesterases in the regulation of the cardiac cyclic nucleotide cross-talk signaling network.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Claire Y; Greenstein, Joseph L; Winslow, Raimond L

    2016-02-01

    The balanced signaling between the two cyclic nucleotides (cNs) cAMP and cGMP plays a critical role in regulating cardiac contractility. Their degradation is controlled by distinctly regulated phosphodiesterase isoenzymes (PDEs), which in turn are also regulated by these cNs. As a result, PDEs facilitate communication between the β-adrenergic and Nitric Oxide (NO)/cGMP/Protein Kinase G (PKG) signaling pathways, which regulate the synthesis of cAMP and cGMP respectively. The phenomena in which the cAMP and cGMP pathways influence the dynamics of each other are collectively referred to as cN cross-talk. However, the cross-talk response and the individual roles of each PDE isoenzyme in shaping this response remain to be fully characterized. We have developed a computational model of the cN cross-talk network that mechanistically integrates the β-adrenergic and NO/cGMP/PKG pathways via regulation of PDEs by both cNs. The individual model components and the integrated network model replicate experimentally observed activation-response relationships and temporal dynamics. The model predicts that, due to compensatory interactions between PDEs, NO stimulation in the presence of sub-maximal β-adrenergic stimulation results in an increase in cytosolic cAMP accumulation and corresponding increases in PKA-I and PKA-II activation; however, the potentiation is small in magnitude compared to that of NO activation of the NO/cGMP/PKG pathway. In a reciprocal manner, β-adrenergic stimulation in the presence of sub-maximal NO stimulation results in modest cGMP elevation and corresponding increase in PKG activation. In addition, we demonstrate that PDE2 hydrolyzes increasing amounts of cAMP with increasing levels of β-adrenergic stimulation, and hydrolyzes increasing amounts of cGMP with decreasing levels of NO stimulation. Finally, we show that PDE2 compensates for inhibition of PDE5 both in terms of cGMP and cAMP dynamics, leading to cGMP elevation and increased PKG activation

  18. Identification and Localization of the Cyclic Nucleotide Phosphodiesterase 10A in Bovine Testis and Mature Spermatozoa

    PubMed Central

    Goupil, Serge; Maréchal, Loïze; El Hajj, Hassan; Tremblay, Marie-Ève; Richard, François J.

    2016-01-01

    In mammals, adenosine 3’, 5’-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) is known to play highly important roles in sperm motility and acrosomal exocytosis. It is known to act through protein phosphorylation via PRKA and through the activation of guanine nucleotide exchange factors like EPAC. Sperm intracellular cAMP levels depend on the activity of adenylyl cyclases, mostly SACY, though transmembrane-containing adenylyl cyclases are also present, and on the activity of cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDE) whose role is to degrade cAMP into 5’-AMP. The PDE superfamily is subdivided into 11 families (PDE1 to 11), which act on either cAMP or cGMP, or on both cAMP and cGMP although with different enzymatic properties. PDE10, which is more effective on cAMP than cGMP, has been known for almost 15 years and is mostly studied in the brain where it is associated with neurological disorders. Although a high level of PDE10A gene expression is observed in the testis, information on the identity of the isoforms or on the cell type that express the PDE10 protein is lacking. The objective of this study was to identify the PDE10A isoforms expressed in the testis and germ cells, and to determine the presence and localization of PDE10A in mature spermatozoa. As a sub-objective, since PDE10A transcript variants were reported strictly through analyses of bovine genomic sequence, we also wanted to determine the nucleotide and amino acid sequences by experimental evidence. Using RT-PCR, 5’- and 3’-RACE approaches we clearly show that PDE10A transcript variants X3 and X5 are expressed in bovine testis as well as in primary spermatocytes and spermatids. We also reveal using a combination of immunological techniques and proteomics analytical tools that the PDE10A isoform X4 is present in the area of the developing acrosome of spermatids and of the acrosome of mature spermatozoa. PMID:27548062

  19. Phosphodiesterase activity is a novel property of alkaline phosphatase from osseous plate.

    PubMed Central

    Rezende, A A; Pizauro, J M; Ciancaglini, P; Leone, F A

    1994-01-01

    Phosphodiesterase activity is a novel property of the still-enigmatic alkaline phosphatase from osseous plate. Bis-(p-nitrophenyl) phosphate was hydrolysed at both pH 7.5 and 9.4 with an apparent dissociation constant (K0.5) of 1.9 mM and 3.9 mM respectively. The hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl-5'-thymidine phosphate followed hyberbolic kinetics with a K0.5 of 500 microM. For p-nitrophenyl phenylphosphonate, site-site interactions [Hill coefficient (h) = 1.3] were observed in the range between 0.2 and 100 microM, and K0.5 was 32.8 mM. The hydrolysis of cyclic AMP by the enzyme followed more complex kinetics, showing site-site interactions (h = 1.7) and K0.5 = 300 microM for high-affinity sites. The low-affinity sites, representing 85% of total activity, also showed site-site interactions (h = 3.8) and a K0.5 of about 22 mM. ATP and cyclic AMP were competitive inhibitors of bis-(p-nitrophenyl) phosphatase activity of the enzyme and Ki values (25 mM and 0.6 mM for cyclic AMP and ATP respectively) very close to those of the K0.5 (22 mM and 0.7 mM for cyclic AMP and ATP respectively), determined by direct assay, indicated that a single catalytic site was responsible for the hydrolysis of both substrates. Non-denaturing PAGE of detergent-solubilized enzyme showed coincident bands on the gel for phosphomonohydrolase and phosphodiesterase activities. Additional evidence for a single catalytic site was the similar pKa values (8.5 and 9.7) found for the two ionizing groups participating in the hydrolysis of bis-(p-nitrophenyl) phosphate and p-nitrophenyl phosphate. The alkaline apparent pH optima, the requirement for bivalent metal ions and the inhibition by methylxanthines, amrinone and amiloride demonstrated that rat osseous-plate alkaline phosphatase was a type I phosphodiesterase. Considering that there is still confusion as to which is the physiological substrate for the enzyme, the present results describing a novel property for this enzyme could be of relevance in

  20. The roles of phosphodiesterase 2 in the central nervous and peripheral systems.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chong; Yu, Yingcong; Ruan, Lina; Wang, Chuang; Pan, Jianchun; Klabnik, Jonathan; Lueptow, Lindsay; Zhang, Han-Ting; O'Donnell, James M; Xu, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Phosphodiesterase 2 (PDE2) is a ubiquitous enzyme whose major role is to hydrolyze the important second messengers cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP). In the central nervous system, pharmacological inhibition of PDE2 results in boosted cAMP and/or cGMP signaling, which is responsible for series of changes in protein expression relevant to psychiatric and learning and memory disorders, such as depression, anxiety, and cognition deficits in Alzheimer's disease. In the periphery, inhibition of PDE2 exhibits beneficial effects in the diseased cardiovascular system, the respiratory system, skeletal muscles and Candida albicans-caused systemic infections. Even though blood-brain barrier penetration properties and selectivity of currently available PDE2 inhibitors have hindered them from entering clinical trials, PDE2 is still of great potential therapeutic values in different categories of diseases, and there is demand for development of new generation drugs targeting PDE2 for treatment of diseases in central nervous and peripheral systems.

  1. Modulation of Compartmentalised Cyclic Nucleotide Signalling via Local Inhibition of Phosphodiesterase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Brescia, Marcella; Zaccolo, Manuela

    2016-01-01

    Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDEs) are the only enzymes that degrade the cyclic nucleotides cAMP and cGMP, and play a key role in modulating the amplitude and duration of the signal delivered by these two key intracellular second messengers. Defects in cyclic nucleotide signalling are known to be involved in several pathologies. As a consequence, PDEs have long been recognized as potential drug targets, and they have been the focus of intense research for the development of therapeutic agents. A number of PDE inhibitors are currently available for the treatment of disease, including obstructive pulmonary disease, erectile dysfunction, and heart failure. However, the performance of these drugs is not always satisfactory, due to a lack of PDE-isoform specificity and their consequent adverse side effects. Recent advances in our understanding of compartmentalised cyclic nucleotide signalling and the role of PDEs in local regulation of cAMP and cGMP signals offers the opportunity for the development of novel strategies for therapeutic intervention that may overcome the current limitation of conventional PDE inhibitors. PMID:27706091

  2. An adenylyl cyclase with a phosphodiesterase domain in basal plants with a motile sperm system

    PubMed Central

    Kasahara, Masahiro; Suetsugu, Noriyuki; Urano, Yuki; Yamamoto, Chiaki; Ohmori, Mikiya; Takada, Yuki; Okuda, Shujiro; Nishiyama, Tomoaki; Sakayama, Hidetoshi; Kohchi, Takayuki; Takahashi, Fumio

    2016-01-01

    Adenylyl cyclase (AC), which produces the signalling molecule cAMP, has numerous important cellular functions in diverse organisms from prokaryotes to eukaryotes. Here we report the identification and characterization of an AC gene from the liverwort Marchantia polymorpha. The encoded protein has both a C-terminal AC catalytic domain similar to those of class III ACs and an N-terminal cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase (PDE) domain that degrades cyclic nucleotides, thus we designated the gene MpCAPE (COMBINED AC with PDE). Biochemical analyses of recombinant proteins showed that MpCAPE has both AC and PDE activities. In MpCAPE-promoter-GUS lines, GUS activity was specifically detected in the male sexual organ, the antheridium, suggesting MpCAPE and thus cAMP signalling may be involved in the male reproductive process. CAPE orthologues are distributed only in basal land plants and charophytes that use motile sperm as the male gamete. CAPE is a subclass of class III AC and may be important in male organ and cell development in basal plants. PMID:27982074

  3. Regulation of high affinity iron uptake in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Role of dioxygen and Fe.

    PubMed

    Hassett, R F; Romeo, A M; Kosman, D J

    1998-03-27

    High affinity iron uptake in Saccharomyces cerevisiae requires a metal reductase, a multicopper ferroxidase, and an iron permease. Fet3, the apparent ferroxidase, is proposed to facilitate iron uptake by catalyzing the oxidation of reductase-generated Fe(II) to Fe(III) by O2; in this model, Fe(III) is the substrate for the iron permease, encoded by FTR1 (Kaplan, J., and O'Halloran, T. V. (1996) Science 271, 1510-1512). We show here that dioxygen also plays an essential role in the expression of these iron uptake activities. Cells grown anaerobically exhibited no Fe(III) reductase or high affinity iron uptake activity, even if assayed for these activities under air. Northern blot analysis showed that the amount of those mRNAs encoding proteins associated with this uptake was repressed in anaerobic cultures but was rapidly induced by exposure of the culture to dioxygen. The anaerobic repression was reduced in cells expressing an iron-independent form of the trans-activator, Aft1, a protein that regulates the expression of these proteins. Thus, the effect of oxygenation on this expression appeared due at least in part to the state or distribution of iron in the cells. In support of this hypothesis, the membrane-permeant Fe(II) chelator, 2, 2'-bipyridyl, in contrast to the impermeant chelator bathophenanthroline disulfonate, caused a strong and rapid induction of these transcripts under anaerobic conditions. An increase in the steady-state levels of iron-regulated transcripts upon oxygenation or 2,2'-bipyridyl addition occurred within 5 min, indicating that a relatively small, labile intracellular pool of Fe(II) regulates the expression of these activities. The strength of the anaerobic repression was dependent on the low affinity, Fe(II)-specific iron transporter, encoded by FET4, suggesting that this Fe(II) pool was linked in part to iron brought into the cell via Fet4 protein. The data suggest a model in which dioxygen directly or indirectly modulates the Fe

  4. Loss of cAMP-specific phosphodiesterase rescues spore development in G protein mutant in dictyostelium.

    PubMed

    Schwebs, David J; Nguyen, Hoai-Nghia; Miller, Jamison A; Hadwiger, Jeffrey A

    2014-02-01

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP) is an important intracellular signaling molecule for many G protein-mediated signaling pathways but the specificity of cAMP signaling in cells with multiple signaling pathways is not well-understood. In Dictyostelium, at least two different G protein signaling pathways, mediated by the Gα2 and Gα4 subunits, are involved with cAMP accumulation, spore production, and chemotaxis and the stimulation of these pathways results in the activation of ERK2, a mitogen-activated protein kinase that can down regulate the cAMP-specific phosphodiesterase RegA. The regA gene was disrupted in gα2(−) and gα4(−) cells to determine if the absence of this phosphodiesterase rescues the development of these G protein mutants as it does for erk2(−) mutants. There gA(−) mutation had no major effects on developmental morphology but enriched the distribution of the Gα mutant cells to the prespore/prestalk border in chimeric aggregates. The loss of RegA function had no effect on Gα4- mediated folate chemotaxis. However, the regA gene disruption in gα4(−) cells, but not in gα2(−) cells, resulted in a substantial rescue and acceleration of spore production. This rescue in sporulation required cell autonomous signaling because the precocious sporulation could not be induced through intercellular signaling in chimeric aggregates. However, intercellular signals from regA(−) strains increased the expression of the prestalk gene ecmB and accelerated the vacuolization of stalk cells. Intercellular signaling from the gα4(−)regA(−) strain did not induce ecmA gene expression indicating cell-type specificity in the promotion of prestalk cell development. regA gene disruption in a Gα4(HC) (Gα4 overexpression) strain did not result in precocious sporulation or stalk cell development indicating that elevated Gα4 subunit expression can mask regA(−) associated phenotypes even when provided with wild-type intercellular signaling. These findings indicate that

  5. Immunomodulatory Effects of Lippia sidoides Extract: Induction of IL-10 Through cAMP and p38 MAPK-Dependent Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Rajgopal, Arun; Rebhun, John F.; Burns, Charlie R.; Scholten, Jeffrey D.; Balles, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Lippia sidoides is an aromatic shrub that grows wild in the northeastern region of Brazil. In local traditional medicine, the aerial portions of this species are used as anti-infectives, antiseptics, spasmolytics, sedatives, hypotensives, and anti-inflammatory agents. In this research, we evaluate the potential immunological properties of Lippia extract through in vitro analysis of its ability to modulate intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) levels and interleukin-10 (IL-10) production. These results show that Lippia extract increases intracellular cAMP through the inhibition of phosphodiesterase activity. They also demonstrate that Lippia extract increases IL-10 production in THP-1 monocytes through both an increase in intracellular cAMP and the activation of p38 MAPK. These results suggest that the Lippia-mediated inhibition of phosphodiesterase activity and the subsequent increase in intracellular cAMP may explain some of the biological activities associated with L. sidoides. In addition, the anti-inflammatory activity of L. sidoides may also be due, in part, to its ability to induce IL-10 production through the inhibition of cyclic nucleotide-dependent phosphodiesterase activity and by its activation of the p38 MAPK pathway. PMID:25599252

  6. Advances in targeting cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases

    PubMed Central

    Maurice, Donald H.; Ke, Hengming; Ahmad, Faiyaz; Wang, Yousheng; Chung, Jay; Manganiello, Vincent C.

    2014-01-01

    Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDEs) catalyse the hydrolysis of cyclic AMP and cyclic GMP, thereby regulating the intracellular concentrations of these cyclic nucleotides, their signalling pathways and, consequently, myriad biological responses in health and disease. Currently, a small number of PDE inhibitors are used clinically for treating the pathophysiological dysregulation of cyclic nucleotide signalling in several disorders, including erectile dysfunction, pulmonary hypertension, acute refractory cardiac failure, intermittent claudication and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. However, pharmaceutical interest in PDEs has been reignited by the increasing understanding of the roles of individual PDEs in regulating the subcellular compartmentalization of specific cyclic nucleotide signalling pathways, by the structure-based design of novel specific inhibitors and by the development of more sophisticated strategies to target individual PDE variants. PMID:24687066

  7. Levodopa-induced dyskinesias are associated with transient down-regulation of cAMP and cGMP in the caudate-putamen of hemiparkinsonian rats: reduced synthesis or increased catabolism?

    PubMed

    Sancesario, Giuseppe; Morrone, Luigi Antonio; D'Angelo, Vincenza; Castelli, Valentina; Ferrazzoli, Davide; Sica, Francesco; Martorana, Alessandro; Sorge, Roberto; Cavaliere, Federica; Bernardi, Giorgio; Giorgi, Mauro

    2014-12-01

    Second messenger cAMP and cGMP represent a key step in the action of dopamine that modulates directly or indirectly their synthesis. We aimed to verify whether levodopa-induced dyskinesias are associated with changes of the time course of levodopa/dopamine stimulated cAMP and cGMP levels, and/or with changes of their catabolism by phosphodiesterase activity in rats with experimental hemiparkinsonism. Microdialysis and tissue homogenates of the striatal tissues demonstrated that extracellular and intracellular cAMP/cGMP levels were lower in dyskinetic animals during the increasing phase of dyskinesias compared to eukinetic animals, but cAMP/cGMP levels increased in dyskinetic animals during the phase of decreasing and extinction of dyskinesias. Dyskinesias and the abnormal lowering of striatal cGMP and cAMP after levodopa were prevented by pretreatment with the multipotent drug amantadine, outlining the inverse relationship of cAMP/cGMP to dyskinesias. Moreover, dyskinetic animals showed higher striatal hydrolyzing cGMP-phosphodiesterase but not hydrolyzing cAMP-phosphodiesterase activity, suggesting that low cGMP but not cAMP levels could be due to increased catabolism. However, expressions of isozyme phosphodiesterase-1B and -10A highly and specifically located in the basal ganglia were not changed after levodopa in dyskinetic and eukinetic animals: accordingly, selective inhibitors of phosphodiesterase-1B and -10A were ineffective on levodopa dyskinesias. Therefore, the isozyme(s) expressing higher cGMP-phosphodiesterase activity in the striatum of dyskinetic animal should be determined. These observations suggest that dopamine-mediated processes of synthesis and/or degradation of cAMP/cGMP could be acutely impaired in levodopa dyskinesias, opening new ways to understanding physiopathology and treatment.

  8. Molecular evolutionary analysis of the high-affinity K+ transporter gene family in angiosperms.

    PubMed

    Yang, P; Hua, C; Zhou, F; Zhang, B-J; Cai, X-N; Chen, Q-Z; Wang, R-L

    2016-07-15

    The high-affinity K(+) transporter (HKT) family comprises a group of multifunctional cation transporters widely distributed in organisms ranging from Bacteria to Eukarya. In angiosperms, the HKT family consists primarily of nine types, whose evolutionary relationships are not fully understood. The available sequences from 31 plant species were used to perform a comprehensive evolutionary analysis, including an examination of selection pressure and estimating phylogenetic tree and gene duplication events. Our results show that a gene duplication in the HKT1;5/HKT1;4 cluster might have led to the divergence of the HKT1;5 and HKT1;4 subfamilies. Additionally, maximum likelihood analysis revealed that the HKT family has undergone a strong purifying selection. An analysis of the amino acids provided strong statistical evidence for a functional divergence between subfamilies 1 and 2. Our study was the first to provide evidence of this functional divergence between these two subfamilies. Analysis of co-evolution in HKT identified 25 co-evolved groups. These findings expanded our understanding of the evolutionary mechanisms driving functional diversification of HKT proteins.

  9. Alterations of cortical pyramidal neurons in mice lacking high-affinity nicotinic receptors

    PubMed Central

    Ballesteros-Yáñez, Inmaculada; Benavides-Piccione, Ruth; Bourgeois, Jean-Pierre; Changeux, Jean-Pierre; DeFelipe, Javier

    2010-01-01

    The neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are allosteric membrane proteins involved in multiple cognitive processes, including attention, learning, and memory. The most abundant form of heterooligomeric nAChRs in the brain contains the β2- and α4- subunits and binds nicotinic agonists with high affinity. In the present study, we investigated in the mouse the consequences of the deletion of one of the nAChR components: the β2-subunit (β2−/−) on the microanatomy of cortical pyramidal cells. Using an intracellular injection method, complete basal dendritic arbors of 650 layer III pyramidal neurons were sampled from seven cortical fields, including primary sensory, motor, and associational areas, in both β2−/− and WT animals. We observed that the pyramidal cell phenotype shows significant quantitative differences among different cortical areas in mutant and WT mice. In WT mice, the density of dendritic spines was rather similar in all cortical fields, except in the prelimbic/infralimbic cortex, where it was significantly higher. In the absence of the β2-subunit, the most significant reduction in the density of spines took place in this high-order associational field. Our data suggest that the β2-subunit is involved in the dendritic morphogenesis of pyramidal neurons and, in particular, in the circuits that contribute to the high-order functional connectivity of the cerebral cortex. PMID:20534523

  10. Paracetamol and cytarabine binding competition in high affinity binding sites of transporting protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sułkowska, A.; Bojko, B.; Równicka, J.; Sułkowski, W. W.

    2006-07-01

    Paracetamol (acetaminophen, AA) the most popular analgesic drug is commonly used in the treatment of pain in patients suffering from cancer. In our studies, we evaluated the competition in binding with serum albumin between paracetamol (AA) and cytarabine, antyleukemic drug (araC). The presence of one drug can alter the binding affinity of albumin towards the second one. Such interaction can result in changing of the free fraction of the one of these drugs in blood. Two spectroscopic methods were used to determine high affinity binding sites and the competition of the drugs. Basing on the change of the serum albumin fluorescence in the presence of either of the drugs the quenching ( KQ) constants for the araC-BSA and AA-BSA systems were calculated. Analysis of UV difference spectra allowed us to describe the changes in drug-protein complexes (araC-albumin and AA-albumin) induced by the presence of the second drug (AA and araC, respectively). The mechanism of competition between araC and AA has been proposed.

  11. A 45-amino acid scaffold mined from the Protein Data Bank for high affinity ligand engineering

    PubMed Central

    Kruziki, Max A.; Bhatnagar, Sumit; Woldring, Daniel R.; Duong, Vandon T.; Hackel, Benjamin J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Small protein ligands can provide superior physiological distribution versus antibodies and improved stability, production, and specific conjugation. Systematic evaluation of the Protein Data Bank identified a scaffold to push the limits of small size and robust evolution of stable, high-affinity ligands: 45-residue T7 phage gene 2 protein (Gp2) contains an α-helix opposite a β-sheet with two adjacent loops amenable to mutation. De novo ligand discovery from 108 mutants and directed evolution towards four targets yielded target-specific binders with affinities as strong as 200 ±100 pM, Tm’s from 65 ±3 °C to 80 ±1 °C, and retained activity after thermal denaturation. For cancer targeting, a Gp2 domain for epidermal growth factor receptor was evolved with 18 ±8 nM affinity, receptor-specific binding, and high thermal stability with refolding. The efficiency of evolving new binding function and the size, affinity, specificity, and stability of evolved domains render Gp2 a uniquely effective ligand scaffold. PMID:26165154

  12. Role of constraint in catalysis and high-affinity binding by proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Vanselow, Donald G

    2002-01-01

    Using a model for catalysis of a dynamic equilibrium, the role of constraint in catalysis is quantified. The intrinsic rigidity of proteins is shown to be insufficient to constrain the activated complexes of enzymes, irrespective of the mechanism. However, when minimization of the surface excess free energy of water surrounding a protein is considered, model proteins can be designed with regions of sufficient rigidity. Structures can be designed to focus surface tension or hydrophobic attraction as compressive stress. A monomeric structure has a limited ability to concentrate compressive stress and constrain activated complexes. Oligomeric or multidomain proteins, with domains surrounding a rigid core, have unlimited ability to concentrate stress, provided there are at least four domains. Under some circumstances, four is the optimum number, which could explain the frequency of tetrameric enzymes in nature. The minimum compressive stress in oligomers increases with the square of the radius. For tetramers of similar size to natural enzymes, this stress agrees reasonably well with that needed to constrain the activated complex. A similar principle applies to high affinity binding proteins. The models explain the trigonal pyramidal shape of fibroblast growth factor and provide a basis for interpretation of protein crystal structures. PMID:11964220

  13. High-affinity DNA base analogs as supramolecular, nanoscale promoters of macroscopic adhesion.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Cyrus A; Jones, Amanda R; Briggs, Ellen M; Novitsky, Eric J; Kuykendall, Darrell W; Sottos, Nancy R; Zimmerman, Steven C

    2013-05-15

    Adhesion phenomena are essential to many biological processes and to synthetic adhesives and manufactured coatings and composites. Supramolecular interactions are often implicated in various adhesion mechanisms. Recently, supramolecular building blocks, such as synthetic DNA base-pair mimics, have drawn attention in the context of molecular recognition, self-assembly, and supramolecular polymers. These reversible, hydrogen-bonding interactions have been studied extensively for their adhesive capabilities at the nano- and microscale, however, much less is known about their utility for practical adhesion in macroscopic systems. Herein, we report the preparation and evaluation of supramolecular coupling agents based on high-affinity, high-fidelity quadruple hydrogen-bonding units (e.g., DAN·DeUG, Kassoc = 10(8) M(-1) in chloroform). Macroscopic adhesion between polystyrene films and glass surfaces modified with 2,7-diamidonaphthyridine (DAN) and ureido-7-deazaguanine (DeUG) units was evaluated by mechanical testing. Structure-property relationships indicate that the designed supramolecular interaction at the nanoscale plays a key role in the observed macroscopic adhesive response. Experiments probing reversible adhesion or self-healing properties of bulk samples indicate that significant recovery of initial strength can be realized after failure but that the designed noncovalent interaction does not lead to healing during the process of adhesion loss.

  14. Enhanced Membrane Pore Formation through High-Affinity Targeted Antimicrobial Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Arnusch, Christopher J.; Pieters, Roland J.; Breukink, Eefjan

    2012-01-01

    Many cationic antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) target the unique lipid composition of the prokaryotic cell membrane. However, the micromolar activities common for these peptides are considered weak in comparison to nisin, which follows a targeted, pore-forming mode of action. Here we show that AMPs can be modified with a high-affinity targeting module, which enables membrane permeabilization at low concentration. Magainin 2 and a truncated peptide analog were conjugated to vancomycin using click chemistry, and could be directed towards specific membrane embedded receptors both in model membrane systems and whole cells. Compared with untargeted vesicles, a gain in permeabilization efficacy of two orders of magnitude was reached with large unilamellar vesicles that included lipid II, the target of vancomycin. The truncated vancomycin-peptide conjugate showed an increased activity against vancomycin resistant Enterococci, whereas the full-length conjugate was more active against a targeted eukaryotic cell model: lipid II containing erythrocytes. This study highlights that AMPs can be made more selective and more potent against biological membranes that contain structures that can be targeted. PMID:22768121

  15. Stable U(IV) complexes form at high-affinity mineral surface sites.

    PubMed

    Latta, Drew E; Mishra, Bhoopesh; Cook, Russell E; Kemner, Kenneth M; Boyanov, Maxim I

    2014-01-01

    Uranium (U) poses a significant contamination hazard to soils, sediments, and groundwater due to its extensive use for energy production. Despite advances in modeling the risks of this toxic and radioactive element, lack of information about the mechanisms controlling U transport hinders further improvements, particularly in reducing environments where U(IV) predominates. Here we establish that mineral surfaces can stabilize the majority of U as adsorbed U(IV) species following reduction of U(VI). Using X-ray absorption spectroscopy and electron imaging analysis, we find that at low surface loading, U(IV) forms inner-sphere complexes with two metal oxides, TiO2 (rutile) and Fe3O4 (magnetite) (at <1.3 U nm(-2) and <0.037 U nm(-2), respectively). The uraninite (UO2) form of U(IV) predominates only at higher surface loading. U(IV)-TiO2 complexes remain stable for at least 12 months, and U(IV)-Fe3O4 complexes remain stable for at least 4 months, under anoxic conditions. Adsorbed U(IV) results from U(VI) reduction by Fe(II) or by the reduced electron shuttle AH2QDS, suggesting that both abiotic and biotic reduction pathways can produce stable U(IV)-mineral complexes in the subsurface. The observed control of high-affinity mineral surface sites on U(IV) speciation helps explain the presence of nonuraninite U(IV) in sediments and has important implications for U transport modeling.

  16. Characterization of high affinity binding motifs for the discoidin domain receptor DDR2 in collagen.

    PubMed

    Konitsiotis, Antonios D; Raynal, Nicolas; Bihan, Dominique; Hohenester, Erhard; Farndale, Richard W; Leitinger, Birgit

    2008-03-14

    The discoidin domain receptors, DDR1 and DDR2, are receptor tyrosine kinases that are activated by native triple-helical collagen. Here we have located three specific DDR2 binding sites by screening the entire triple-helical domain of collagen II, using the Collagen II Toolkit, a set of overlapping triple-helical peptides. The peptide sequence that bound DDR2 with highest affinity interestingly contained the sequence for the high affinity binding site for von Willebrand factor in collagen III. Focusing on this sequence, we used a set of truncated and alanine-substituted peptides to characterize the sequence GVMGFO (O is hydroxyproline) as the minimal collagen sequence required for DDR2 binding. Based on a recent NMR analysis of the DDR2 collagen binding domain, we generated a model of the DDR2-collagen interaction that explains why a triple-helical conformation is required for binding. Triple-helical peptides comprising the DDR2 binding motif not only inhibited DDR2 binding to collagen II but also activated DDR2 transmembrane signaling. Thus, DDR2 activation may be effected by single triple-helices rather than fibrillar collagen.

  17. Definition of a high-affinity Gag recognition structure mediating packaging of a retroviral RNA genome

    PubMed Central

    Gherghe, Cristina; Lombo, Tania; Leonard, Christopher W.; Datta, Siddhartha A. K.; Bess, Julian W.; Gorelick, Robert J.; Rein, Alan; Weeks, Kevin M.

    2010-01-01

    All retroviral genomic RNAs contain a cis-acting packaging signal by which dimeric genomes are selectively packaged into nascent virions. However, it is not understood how Gag (the viral structural protein) interacts with these signals to package the genome with high selectivity. We probed the structure of murine leukemia virus RNA inside virus particles using SHAPE, a high-throughput RNA structure analysis technology. These experiments showed that NC (the nucleic acid binding domain derived from Gag) binds within the virus to the sequence UCUG-UR-UCUG. Recombinant Gag and NC proteins bound to this same RNA sequence in dimeric RNA in vitro; in all cases, interactions were strongest with the first U and final G in each UCUG element. The RNA structural context is critical: High-affinity binding requires base-paired regions flanking this motif, and two UCUG-UR-UCUG motifs are specifically exposed in the viral RNA dimer. Mutating the guanosine residues in these two motifs—only four nucleotides per genomic RNA—reduced packaging 100-fold, comparable to the level of nonspecific packaging. These results thus explain the selective packaging of dimeric RNA. This paradigm has implications for RNA recognition in general, illustrating how local context and RNA structure can create information-rich recognition signals from simple single-stranded sequence elements in large RNAs. PMID:20974908

  18. Affinity Crystallography: A New Approach to Extracting High-Affinity Enzyme Inhibitors from Natural Extracts.

    PubMed

    Aguda, Adeleke H; Lavallee, Vincent; Cheng, Ping; Bott, Tina M; Meimetis, Labros G; Law, Simon; Nguyen, Nham T; Williams, David E; Kaleta, Jadwiga; Villanueva, Ivan; Davies, Julian; Andersen, Raymond J; Brayer, Gary D; Brömme, Dieter

    2016-08-26

    Natural products are an important source of novel drug scaffolds. The highly variable and unpredictable timelines associated with isolating novel compounds and elucidating their structures have led to the demise of exploring natural product extract libraries in drug discovery programs. Here we introduce affinity crystallography as a new methodology that significantly shortens the time of the hit to active structure cycle in bioactive natural product discovery research. This affinity crystallography approach is illustrated by using semipure fractions of an actinomycetes culture extract to isolate and identify a cathepsin K inhibitor and to compare the outcome with the traditional assay-guided purification/structural analysis approach. The traditional approach resulted in the identification of the known inhibitor antipain (1) and its new but lower potency dehydration product 2, while the affinity crystallography approach led to the identification of a new high-affinity inhibitor named lichostatinal (3). The structure and potency of lichostatinal (3) was verified by total synthesis and kinetic characterization. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first example of isolating and characterizing a potent enzyme inhibitor from a partially purified crude natural product extract using a protein crystallographic approach.

  19. Evolved Streptavidin Mutants Reveal Key Role of Loop Residue in High-affinity Binding

    SciTech Connect

    M Magalhaes; C Melo Czekster; R Guan; V Malashkevich; S Almo; M Levy

    2011-12-31

    We have performed a detailed analysis of streptavidin variants with altered specificity towards desthiobiotin. In addition to changes in key residues which widen the ligand binding pocket and accommodate the more structurally flexible desthiobiotin, the data revealed the role of a key, non-active site mutation at the base of the flexible loop (S52G) which slows dissociation of this ligand by approximately sevenfold. Our data suggest that this mutation results in the loss of a stabilizing contact which keeps this loop open and accessible in the absence of ligand. When this mutation was introduced into the wild-type protein, destabilization of the opened loop conferred a {approx}10-fold decrease in both the on-rate and off-rate for the ligand biotin-4-fluoroscein. A similar effect was observed when this mutation was added to a monomeric form of this protein. Our results provide key insight into the role of the streptavidin flexible loop in ligand binding and maintaining high affinity interactions.

  20. Monochromatic multicomponent fluorescence sedimentation velocity for the study of high-affinity protein interactions

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Huaying; Fu, Yan; Glasser, Carla; Andrade Alba, Eric J; Mayer, Mark L; Patterson, George; Schuck, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The dynamic assembly of multi-protein complexes underlies fundamental processes in cell biology. A mechanistic understanding of assemblies requires accurate measurement of their stoichiometry, affinity and cooperativity, and frequently consideration of multiple co-existing complexes. Sedimentation velocity analytical ultracentrifugation equipped with fluorescence detection (FDS-SV) allows the characterization of protein complexes free in solution with high size resolution, at concentrations in the nanomolar and picomolar range. Here, we extend the capabilities of FDS-SV with a single excitation wavelength from single-component to multi-component detection using photoswitchable fluorescent proteins (psFPs). We exploit their characteristic quantum yield of photo-switching to imprint spatio-temporal modulations onto the sedimentation signal that reveal different psFP-tagged protein components in the mixture. This novel approach facilitates studies of heterogeneous multi-protein complexes at orders of magnitude lower concentrations and for higher-affinity systems than previously possible. Using this technique we studied high-affinity interactions between the amino-terminal domains of GluA2 and GluA3 AMPA receptors. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17812.001 PMID:27436096

  1. Lymphocyte crawling and transendothelial migration require chemokine triggering of high-affinity LFA-1 integrin.

    PubMed

    Shulman, Ziv; Shinder, Vera; Klein, Eugenia; Grabovsky, Valentin; Yeger, Orna; Geron, Erez; Montresor, Alessio; Bolomini-Vittori, Matteo; Feigelson, Sara W; Kirchhausen, Tomas; Laudanna, Carlo; Shakhar, Guy; Alon, Ronen

    2009-03-20

    Endothelial chemokines are instrumental for integrin-mediated lymphocyte adhesion and transendothelial migration (TEM). By dissecting how chemokines trigger lymphocyte integrins to support shear-resistant motility on and across cytokine-stimulated endothelial barriers, we found a critical role for high-affinity (HA) LFA-1 integrin in lymphocyte crawling on activated endothelium. Endothelial-presented chemokines triggered HA-LFA-1 and adhesive filopodia at numerous submicron dots scattered underneath crawling lymphocytes. Shear forces applied to endothelial-bound lymphocytes dramatically enhanced filopodia density underneath crawling lymphocytes. A fraction of the adhesive filopodia invaded the endothelial cells prior to and during TEM and extended large subluminal leading edge containing dots of HA-LFA-1 occupied by subluminal ICAM-1. Memory T cells generated more frequent invasive filopodia and transmigrated more rapidly than their naive counterparts. We propose that shear forces exerted on HA-LFA-1 trigger adhesive and invasive filopodia at apical endothelial surfaces and thereby promote lymphocyte crawling and probing for TEM sites.

  2. Characterization of a high affinity cocaine binding site in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Calligaro, D.; Eldefrawi, M.

    1986-03-05

    Binding of (/sup 3/H)cocaine to synaptic membranes from whole rat brain was reversible and saturable. Nonlinear regression analysis of binding isotherms indicated two binding affinities: one with k/sub d/ = 16 nM, B/sub max/ = 0.65 pmoles/mg protein and the other with K/sub d/ = 660 nM, B/sub max/ = 5.1 pmoles/mg protein. The high-affinity binding of (/sup 3/H)cocaine was sensitive to the actions of trypsin and chymotrypsin but not carboxypeptidase, and was eliminated by exposure of the membranes to 95/sup 0/C for 5 min. Specific binding at 2 nM was higher at pH 8.8 than at pH 7.0. Binding of (/sup 3/H)cocaine (15 nM) was inhibited by increasing concentrations of Na/sup +/ ions. Several cocaine analogues, neurotransmitter uptake inhibitors and local anesthetics displaced specific (/sup 3/H)cocaine binding at 2 nM with various potencies. The cocaine analogue (-)-norcocaine was the most potent (IC/sub 50/ = 10 nM), while the local anesthetic tetracaine was the least potent in inhibiting (/sup 3/H)cocaine binding. Several biogenic amine uptake inhibitors, including tricyclic antidepressants and phencyclidine, had IC/sub 50/ values below ..mu..M concentrations.

  3. Hydroxamate Production as a High Affinity Iron Acquisition Mechanism in Paracoccidioides Spp

    PubMed Central

    Silva-Bailão, Mirelle Garcia; Bailão, Elisa Flávia Luiz Cardoso; Lechner, Beatrix Elisabeth; Gauthier, Gregory M.; Lindner, Herbert; Bailão, Alexandre Melo; Haas, Hubertus; de Almeida Soares, Célia Maria

    2014-01-01

    Iron is a micronutrient required by almost all living organisms, including fungi. Although this metal is abundant, its bioavailability is low either in aerobic environments or within mammalian hosts. As a consequence, pathogenic microorganisms evolved high affinity iron acquisition mechanisms which include the production and uptake of siderophores. Here we investigated the utilization of these molecules by species of the Paracoccidioides genus, the causative agents of a systemic mycosis. It was demonstrated that iron starvation induces the expression of Paracoccidioides ortholog genes for siderophore biosynthesis and transport. Reversed-phase HPLC analysis revealed that the fungus produces and secretes coprogen B, which generates dimerumic acid as a breakdown product. Ferricrocin and ferrichrome C were detected in Paracoccidioides as the intracellular produced siderophores. Moreover, the fungus is also able to grow in presence of siderophores as the only iron sources, demonstrating that beyond producing, Paracoccidioides is also able to utilize siderophores for growth, including the xenosiderophore ferrioxamine. Exposure to exogenous ferrioxamine and dimerumic acid increased fungus survival during co-cultivation with macrophages indicating that these molecules play a role during host-pathogen interaction. Furthermore, cross-feeding experiments revealed that Paracoccidioides siderophores promotes growth of Aspergillus nidulans strain unable to produce these iron chelators. Together, these data denote that synthesis and utilization of siderophores is a mechanism used by Paracoccidioides to surpass iron limitation. As iron paucity is found within the host, siderophore production may be related to fungus pathogenicity. PMID:25157575

  4. Selection of DNA Aptamers against Glioblastoma Cells with High Affinity and Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Dezhi; Wang, Jiangjie; Zhang, Weiyun; Song, Yanling; Li, Xilan; Zou, Yuan; Zhu, Mingtao; Zhu, Zhi; Chen, Fuyong; Yang, Chaoyong James

    2012-01-01

    Background Glioblastoma is the most common and most lethal form of brain tumor in human. Unfortunately, there is still no effective therapy to this fatal disease and the median survival is generally less than one year from the time of diagnosis. Discovery of ligands that can bind specifically to this type of tumor cells will be of great significance to develop early molecular imaging, targeted delivery and guided surgery methods to battle this type of brain tumor. Methodology/Principal Findings We discovered two target-specific aptamers named GBM128 and GBM131 against cultured human glioblastoma cell line U118-MG after 30 rounds selection by a method called cell-based Systematic Evolution of Ligands by EXponential enrichment (cell-SELEX). These two aptamers have high affinity and specificity against target glioblastoma cells. They neither recognize normal astraglial cells, nor do they recognize other normal and cancer cell lines tested. Clinical tissues were also tested and the results showed that these two aptamers can bind to different clinical glioma tissues but not normal brain tissues. More importantly, binding affinity and selectivity of these two aptamers were retained in complicated biological environment. Conclusion/Significance The selected aptamers could be used to identify specific glioblastoma biomarkers. Methods of molecular imaging, targeted drug delivery, ligand guided surgery can be further developed based on these ligands for early detection, targeted therapy, and guided surgery of glioblastoma leading to effective treatment of glioblastoma. PMID:23056171

  5. Expression of high affinity folate receptor in breast cancer brain metastasis.

    PubMed

    Leone, José Pablo; Bhargava, Rohit; Theisen, Brian K; Hamilton, Ronald L; Lee, Adrian V; Brufsky, Adam M

    2015-10-06

    High affinity folate receptor (HFR) can be overexpressed in breast cancer and is associated with poor prognosis, however the expression in breast cancer brain metastases (BCBM) is unknown. The aim of this study was to analyze the rate of HFR expression in BCBM and its role in the prognosis of this high-risk cohort. We analyzed 19 brain metastasis (BM) and 13 primary tumors (PT) from a total of 25 patients. HFR status was assessed by immunohistochemistry. Median follow-up was 4.2 years (range 0.6-18.5). HFR was positive in 4/19 BM (21.1%) and in 1/13 PT (7.7%). Positive samples had low H-scores (range 1-50). 56% of patients had apocrine differentiation. OS was similar between patients with positive HFR (median OS 48 months) and negative HFR (median OS 69 months) (P = 0.25); and between patients with apocrine differentiation (median OS 63 months) and those without apocrine differentiation (median OS 69 months) (P = 0.49). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first analysis of HFR expression in BCBM. While previous studies associated the presence of HFR with worse prognosis; in our cohort HFR was positive in only 21.1% of BM with low levels of positivity. Neither HFR nor apocrine features had impact in OS.

  6. Immunological and structural characterization of a high affinity anti-fluorescein single-chain antibody.

    PubMed

    Bedzyk, W D; Weidner, K M; Denzin, L K; Johnson, L S; Hardman, K D; Pantoliano, M W; Asel, E D; Voss, E W

    1990-10-25

    Single-chain antibody of the (NH2) VL-linker-VH (COOH) design, was constructed based on prototype high affinity anti-fluorescein monoclonal antibody (mAb) 4-4-20. Purified single-chain antibody (SCA) 4-4-20/212 was studied relative to Ig mAb 4-4-20 in terms of ligand binding, kinetics, idiotypy, metatypy, and stability in denaturing agents. Ligand-binding data correlated with metatypic relatedness of the liganded site. Anti-metatypic reagents reacted preferentially with the liganded conformer of the 4-4-20 antibody active site and were unreactive with free ligand and the non-liganded (idiotypic) state. All results were consistent with the conclusion that SCA 4-4-20/212, with a 14-amino acid linker folded into a native conformational state that closely simulated the prototypical mAb. Furthermore, GndHCl unfolding and refolding studies demonstrated H and L chain variable domain intrinsic stability between SCA 4-4-20/212 and a 50 kDa antigen-binding fragment were nearly identical. This suggested CH1 and CL domain interactions may be more prevalent in V region molecular dynamics than structure.

  7. High-affinity cannabinoid binding site in brain: A possible marijuana receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Nye, J.S.

    1988-01-01

    The mechanism by which delta{sup 9} tetrahydrocannabinol (delta{sup 9}THC), the major psychoactive component of marijuana or hashish, produces its potent psychological and physiological effects is unknown. To find receptor binding sites for THC, we designed a water-soluble analog for use as a radioligand. 5{prime}-Trimethylammonium-delta{sup 8}THC (TMA) is a positively charged analog of delta-{sup 8}THC modified on the 5{prime} carbon, a portion of the molecule not important for its psychoactivity. We have studied the binding of ({sup 3}H)-5{prime}-trimethylammonium-delta-{sup 8}THC (({sup 3}H)TMA) to rat neuronal membranes. ({sup 3}H)TMA binds saturably and reversibly to brain membranes with high affinity to apparently one class of sites. Highest binding site density occurs in brain, but several peripheral organs also display specific binding. Detergent solubilizes the sites without affecting their pharmacologial properties. Molecular sieve chromatography reveals a bimodal peak of ({sup 3}H)TMA binding activity of approximately 60,000 daltons apparent molecular weight.

  8. Osmoprotectants in Halomonas elongata: high-affinity betaine transport system and choline-betaine pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Cánovas, D; Vargas, C; Csonka, L N; Ventosa, A; Nieto, J J

    1996-01-01

    The osmoregulatory pathways of the moderately halophilic bacterium Halomonas elongata DSM 3043 have been investigated. This strain grew optimally at 1.5 to 2 M NaCl in M63 glucose-defined medium. It required at least 0.5 M NaCl for growth, which is a higher concentration than that exhibited by the H. elongata type strain ATCC 33173. Externally provided betaine, choline, or choline-O-sulfate (but not proline, ectoine, or proline betaine) enhanced the growth of H. elongata on 3 M NaCl-glucose-M63 plates, demonstrating the utilization of these compounds as osmoprotectants. Moreover, betaine and choline stimulated the growth of H. elongata DSM 3043 over the entire range of salinity, although betaine was more effective than choline at salinities below and above the optimum. We found that H. elongata DSM 3043 has at least one high-affinity transport system for betaine (K(m) = 3.06 microM and Vmax = 9.96 nmol of betaine min(-1) mg of protein(-1)). Competition assays demonstrated that proline betaine and ectoine, but not proline, choline, or choline-O-sulfate, are also transported by the betaine permease. Finally, thin-layer chromatography and 13C-nuclear magnetic resonance analysis showed that exogenous choline was taken up and transformed to betaine by H. elongata, demonstrating the existence of a choline-glycine betaine pathway in this moderately halophilic bacterium. PMID:8955405

  9. Effects of lead on the kidney: Roles of high-affinity lead-binding proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, B.A. ); DuVal, G. )

    1991-02-01

    Lead-induced nephropathy produces both tubular and interstitial manifestations of cell injury, but the pathophysiology of these lesions is not completely understood. Delineation of the molecular factors underlying renal handling of lead is one of central importance in understanding the mechanisms of renal cell injury from this agent. Recent studies from this laboratory have identified several distinct high-affinity lead-binding proteins (PbBP) from rat kidney and brain that appear to play critical roles in the intracellular bioavailability of lead to several essential cellular processes in these target tissues at low dose levels. These studies have also shown that the real PbBP is selectively localized in only certain nephrons and only specific segments of the renal proximal tubule. The striking nephron and cell-type specificity of the localization reaction could result from physoiological differences in nephron functional activity or selective molecular uptake mechanisms/metabolism differences that act to define target cell populations in the kidney. In addition, other preliminary studies have shown that short-term, high-dose lead exposure produces increased excretion of this protein into the urine with concomitant decreases in renal concentrations.

  10. The molecular basis of talin2’s high affinity toward β1-integrin

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Yaxia; Li, Liqing; Zhu, Yanyan; Qi, Lei; Azizi, Latifeh; Hytönen, Vesa P.; Zhan, Chang-Guo; Huang, Cai

    2017-01-01

    Talin interacts with β-integrin tails and actin to control integrin activation, thus regulating focal adhesion dynamics and cell migration. There are two talin genes, Tln1 and Tln2, which encode talin1 and talin2, and it is generally believed that talin2 functions redundantly with talin1. However, we show here that talin2 has a higher affinity to β1-integrin tails than talin1. Mutation of talin2 S339 to leucine, which can cause Fifth Finger Camptodactyly, a human genetic disease, completely disrupted its binding to β–integrin tails. Also, substitution of talin1 C336 with Ser enhanced the affinity of talin1, whereas substitution of talin2 S339 with Cys diminished that of talin2. Further computational modeling analysis shows that talin2 S339 formed a hydrogen bond with E353, which is critical for inducing key hydrogen bonds between talin2 N326 and β1-integrin R760, and between talin2 K327 and β1-integrin D759. Mutation at any of these residues significantly diminished the interaction of talin2 with β1- integrin tails. These hydrogen bonds were not observed in talin1/β1-integrin, but did exist in talin1C336S/β1-integrin complex. These results suggest that talin2 S339 forms a hydrogen bond with E353 to mediate its high affinity to β1-integrin. PMID:28155884

  11. Comparison of three high affinity SPECT radiotracers for the dopamine D2 receptor.

    PubMed

    al-Tikriti, M S; Baldwin, R M; Zea-Ponce, Y; Sybirska, E; Zoghbi, S S; Laruelle, M; Malison, R T; Kung, H F; Kessler, R M; Charney, D S

    1994-02-01

    The regional brain distribution and pharmacological specificity of three high affinity tracers for the dopamine (DA) D2 receptor: [123I]IBF, [123I]epidepride, and [123I]2'-ISP were assessed by SPECT imaging of non-human primates. The ratios of striatal-to-occipital activities at the time of peak striatal uptake were 2.2, 6.3 and 1.7, respectively. From the peak striatal activities, washout rates were 33, 4 and 16%/h for [123I]IBF, [123I]epidepride and [123I]2'-ISP, respectively. The reversibility of the striatal uptake of all three agents was demonstrated by the rapid displacement induced by the dopamine D2 selective antipsychotic agent raclopride, which increased washout rates to 96, 58 and 43%/h. The administration of d-amphetamine, which induces release of dopamine, had no noticeable effect on [123I]epidepride but increased the washout rate of [123I]IBF. These results suggest that, among these three agents, [123I]epidepride is the superior tracer for in vivo displacement studies because of its slow washout and high target-to-background ratios. However, for tracer kinetic modeling, [123I]IBF may be the superior agent because of its early time of peak uptake and its higher target-to-background ratios than [123I]2'-ISP.

  12. New Regulatory Roles of Galectin-3 in High-Affinity IgE Receptor Signaling.

    PubMed

    Bambouskova, Monika; Polakovicova, Iva; Halova, Ivana; Goel, Gautam; Draberova, Lubica; Bugajev, Viktor; Doan, Aivi; Utekal, Pavol; Gardet, Agnes; Xavier, Ramnik J; Draber, Petr

    2016-05-01

    Aggregation of the high-affinity receptor for IgE (FcεRI) in mast cells initiates activation events that lead to degranulation and release of inflammatory mediators. To better understand the signaling pathways and genes involved in mast cell activation, we developed a high-throughput mast cell degranulation assay suitable for RNA interference experiments using lentivirus-based short hairpin RNA (shRNA) delivery. We tested 432 shRNAs specific for 144 selected genes for effects on FcεRI-mediated mast cell degranulation and identified 15 potential regulators. In further studies, we focused on galectin-3 (Gal3), identified in this study as a negative regulator of mast cell degranulation. FcεRI-activated cells with Gal3 knockdown exhibited upregulated tyrosine phosphorylation of spleen tyrosine kinase and several other signal transduction molecules and enhanced calcium response. We show that Gal3 promotes internalization of IgE-FcεRI complexes; this may be related to our finding that Gal3 is a positive regulator of FcεRI ubiquitination. Furthermore, we found that Gal3 facilitates mast cell adhesion and motility on fibronectin but negatively regulates antigen-induced chemotaxis. The combined data indicate that Gal3 is involved in both positive and negative regulation of FcεRI-mediated signaling events in mast cells.

  13. High affinity truncated DNA aptamers for the development of fluorescence based progesterone biosensors.

    PubMed

    Alhadrami, Hani A; Chinnappan, Raja; Eissa, Shimaa; Rahamn, Anas Abdel; Zourob, Mohammed

    2017-02-24

    Aptamers have shown a number of potential applications in sensing and therapeutic due to the high affinity and specificity towards their target molecules. Not all the nucleotides in the full length aptamers are involved in the binding with their targets. The non-binding domain of the aptamer may affect the binding affinity of the aptamer-target complex. Mapping the aptamer binding region could increase the affinity and the specificity. In this paper, we designed aptamer-based fluorescence sensors from a truncated progesterone (P4) aptamer. Then, fluorescein and quencher labelled aptamer complementary oligonucleotide sequences were hybridized to the truncated aptamer at different sites to form duplex structures. We used fluorescence-quencher pair displacement assay upon progesterone binding for the determination of P4. One of the truncated sequences has shown high binding affinity with 16 fold increase in the dissociation constant, Kd (2.1 nM) compared to the original aptamer. The aptasensor was highly selective for P4 against similar compounds such as 17-β estradiol, bisphenol-A and vitamin D. The sensor has been applied for the detection of P4 in spiked tap water and in urine samples showing good recovery. This new developed aptamer-based fluorescence biosensor can be applied in food, pharmaceutical, and clinical industries.

  14. Conformation-dependent high-affinity potent ricin-neutralizing monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wei-Gang; Yin, Junfei; Chau, Damon; Hu, Charles Chen; Lillico, Dustin; Yu, Justin; Negrych, Laurel M; Cherwonogrodzky, John W

    2013-01-01

    Ricin is a potential biothreat agent with no approved antidote available for ricin poisoning. The aim of this study was to develop potent antibody-based antiricin antidotes. Four strong ricin resistant hybridoma clones secreting antiricin monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were developed. All four mAbs are bound to conformational epitopes of ricin toxin B (RTB) with high affinity (KD values from 2.55 to 36.27 nM). RTB not only triggers cellular uptake of ricin, but also facilitates transport of the ricin toxin A (RTA) from the endoplasmic reticulum to the cytosol, where RTA exerts its toxic activity. The four mAbs were found to have potent ricin-neutralizing capacities and synergistic effects among them as determined by an in vitro neutralization assay. In vivo protection assay demonstrated that all four mAbs had strong efficacy against ricin challenges. D9 was found to be exceptionally effective. Intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of D9, at a dose of 5 μ g, 6 weeks before or 6 hours after an i.p. challenge with 5 × LD50 of ricin was able to protect or rescue 100% of the mice, indicating that mAb D9 is an excellent candidate to be developed as a potent antidote against ricin poisoning for both prophylactic and therapeutic purposes.

  15. Specific high-affinity binding of fatty acids to epidermal cytosolic proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Raza, H.; Chung, W.L.; Mukhtar, H. )

    1991-08-01

    Cytosol from rat, mouse, and human skin or rat epidermis was incubated with (3H)arachidonic acid, (14C)retinoic acid, (14C)oleic acid, (3H)leukotriene A4, (3H)prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) or (3H) 15-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (15-HETE), and protein-bound ligands were separated using Lipidex-1000 at 4C to assess the binding specificity. The binding of oleic acid and arachidonic acid with rat epidermal cytosol was rapid, saturable, and reversible. Binding of oleic acid was competed out with the simultaneous addition of other ligands and found to be in the following order: arachidonic acid greater than oleic acid greater than linoleic acid greater than lauric acid greater than leukotriene A4 greater than 15-HETE = PGE1 greater than PGE2 = PGF2. Scatchard analysis of the binding with arachidonic acid, oleic acid, and retinoic acid revealed high-affinity binding sites with the dissociation constant in the nM range. SDS-PAGE analysis of the oleic acid-bound epidermal cytosolic protein(s) revealed maximum binding at the 14.5 kDa region. The presence of the fatty acid-binding protein in epidermal cytosol and its binding to fatty acids and retinoic acid may be of significance both in the trafficking and the metabolism of fatty acids and retinoids across the skin.

  16. High affinity anchoring of the decoration protein pb10 onto the bacteriophage T5 capsid

    PubMed Central

    Vernhes, Emeline; Renouard, Madalena; Gilquin, Bernard; Cuniasse, Philippe; Durand, Dominique; England, Patrick; Hoos, Sylviane; Huet, Alexis; Conway, James F.; Glukhov, Anatoly; Ksenzenko, Vladimir; Jacquet, Eric; Nhiri, Naïma; Zinn-Justin, Sophie; Boulanger, Pascale

    2017-01-01

    Bacteriophage capsids constitute icosahedral shells of exceptional stability that protect the viral genome. Many capsids display on their surface decoration proteins whose structure and function remain largely unknown. The decoration protein pb10 of phage T5 binds at the centre of the 120 hexamers formed by the major capsid protein. Here we determined the 3D structure of pb10 and investigated its capsid-binding properties using NMR, SAXS, cryoEM and SPR. Pb10 consists of an α-helical capsid-binding domain and an Ig-like domain exposed to the solvent. It binds to the T5 capsid with a remarkably high affinity and its binding kinetics is characterized by a very slow dissociation rate. We propose that the conformational exchange events observed in the capsid-binding domain enable rearrangements upon binding that contribute to the quasi-irreversibility of the pb10-capsid interaction. Moreover we show that pb10 binding is a highly cooperative process, which favours immediate rebinding of newly dissociated pb10 to the 120 hexamers of the capsid protein. In extreme conditions, pb10 protects the phage from releasing its genome. We conclude that pb10 may function to reinforce the capsid thus favouring phage survival in harsh environments. PMID:28165000

  17. Consequences of inducing intrinsic disorder in a high-affinity protein-protein interaction.

    PubMed

    Papadakos, Grigorios; Sharma, Amit; Lancaster, Lorna E; Bowen, Rebecca; Kaminska, Renata; Leech, Andrew P; Walker, Daniel; Redfield, Christina; Kleanthous, Colin

    2015-04-29

    The kinetic and thermodynamic consequences of intrinsic disorder in protein-protein recognition are controversial. We address this by inducing one partner of the high-affinity colicin E3 rRNase domain-Im3 complex (K(d) ≈ 10(-12) M) to become an intrinsically disordered protein (IDP). Through a variety of biophysical measurements, we show that a single alanine mutation at Tyr507 within the hydrophobic core of the isolated colicin E3 rRNase domain causes the enzyme to become an IDP (E3 rRNase(IDP)). E3 rRNase(IDP) binds stoichiometrically to Im3 and forms a structure that is essentially identical to the wild-type complex. However, binding of E3 rRNase(IDP) to Im3 is 4 orders of magnitude weaker than that of the folded rRNase, with thermodynamic parameters reflecting the disorder-to-order transition on forming the complex. Critically, pre-steady-state kinetic analysis of the E3 rRNase(IDP)-Im3 complex demonstrates that the decrease in affinity is mostly accounted for by a drop in the electrostatically steered association rate. Our study shows that, notwithstanding the advantages intrinsic disorder brings to biological systems, this can come at severe kinetic and thermodynamic cost.

  18. Conformation-Dependent High-Affinity Potent Ricin-Neutralizing Monoclonal Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Wei-Gang; Yin, Junfei; Chau, Damon; Hu, Charles Chen; Lillico, Dustin; Yu, Justin; Negrych, Laurel M.; Cherwonogrodzky, John W.

    2013-01-01

    Ricin is a potential biothreat agent with no approved antidote available for ricin poisoning. The aim of this study was to develop potent antibody-based antiricin antidotes. Four strong ricin resistant hybridoma clones secreting antiricin monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were developed. All four mAbs are bound to conformational epitopes of ricin toxin B (RTB) with high affinity (KD values from 2.55 to 36.27 nM). RTB not only triggers cellular uptake of ricin, but also facilitates transport of the ricin toxin A (RTA) from the endoplasmic reticulum to the cytosol, where RTA exerts its toxic activity. The four mAbs were found to have potent ricin-neutralizing capacities and synergistic effects among them as determined by an in vitro neutralization assay. In vivo protection assay demonstrated that all four mAbs had strong efficacy against ricin challenges. D9 was found to be exceptionally effective. Intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of D9, at a dose of 5 μg, 6 weeks before or 6 hours after an i.p. challenge with 5 × LD50 of ricin was able to protect or rescue 100% of the mice, indicating that mAb D9 is an excellent candidate to be developed as a potent antidote against ricin poisoning for both prophylactic and therapeutic purposes. PMID:23484120

  19. The High-Affinity E. Coli Methionine ABC Transporter: Structure And Allosteric Regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Kadaba, N.S.; Kaiser, J.T.; Johnson, E.; Lee, A.; Rees, D.C.

    2009-05-18

    The crystal structure of the high-affinity Escherichia coli MetNI methionine uptake transporter, a member of the adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette (ABC) family, has been solved to 3.7 angstrom resolution. The overall architecture of MetNI reveals two copies of the adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) MetN in complex with two copies of the transmembrane domain MetI, with the transporter adopting an inward-facing conformation exhibiting widely separated nucleotide binding domains. Each MetI subunit is organized around a core of five transmembrane helices that correspond to a subset of the helices observed in the larger membrane-spanning subunits of the molybdate (ModBC) and maltose (MalFGK) ABC transporters. In addition to the conserved nucleotide binding domain of the ABC family, MetN contains a carboxyl-terminal extension with a ferredoxin-like fold previously assigned to a conserved family of regulatory ligand-binding domains. These domains separate the nucleotide binding domains and would interfere with their association required for ATP binding and hydrolysis. Methionine binds to the dimerized carboxyl-terminal domain and is shown to inhibit ATPase activity. These observations are consistent with an allosteric regulatory mechanism operating at the level of transport activity, where increased intracellular levels of the transported ligand stabilize an inward-facing, ATPase-inactive state of MetNI to inhibit further ligand translocation into the cell.

  20. Peptide array-based characterization and design of ZnO-high affinity peptides.

    PubMed

    Okochi, Mina; Sugita, Tomoya; Furusawa, Seiji; Umetsu, Mitsuo; Adschiri, Tadafumi; Honda, Hiroyuki

    2010-08-15

    Peptides with both an affinity for ZnO and the ability to generate ZnO nanoparticles have attracted attention for the self-assembly and templating of nanoscale building blocks under ambient conditions with compositional uniformity. In this study, we have analyzed the specific binding sites of the ZnO-binding peptide, EAHVMHKVAPRP, which was identified using a phage display peptide library. The peptide binding assay against ZnO nanoparticles was performed using peptides synthesized on a cellulose membrane using the spot method. Using randomized rotation of amino acids in the ZnO-binding peptide, 125 spot-synthesized peptides were assayed. The peptide binding activity against ZnO nanoparticles varied greatly. This indicates that ZnO binding does not depend on total hydrophobicity or other physical parameters of these peptides, but rather that ZnO recognizes the specific amino acid alignment of these peptides. In addition, several peptides were found to show higher binding ability compared with that of the original peptides. Identification of important binding sites in the EAHVMHKVAPRP peptide was investigated by shortened, stepwise sequence from both termini. Interestingly, two ZnO-binding sites were found as 6-mer peptides: HVMHKV and HKVAPR. The peptides identified by amino acid substitution of HKVAPR were found to show high affinity and specificity for ZnO nanoparticles.

  1. PET measurements of cAMP-mediated phosphodiesterase-4 with (R)-[11C]rolipram.

    PubMed

    Kenk, Miran; Thomas, Adam; Lortie, Mireille; Dekemp, Rob; Beanlands, Rob S; Dasilva, Jean N

    2011-01-01

    Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) is the common second messenger in signal-transduction cascades originating at a number of monoamine receptors involved in neurotransmission, cardiac function and smooth muscle contraction. Altered regulation of cAMP synthesis (at receptors, G-protein subunits or adenylyl cyclase) and breakdown by phosphodiesterase (PDE) enzymes have been implicated in a number of pathologies. The PDE4 inhibitor (R)-rolipram, and the less active (S)- enantiomer, have been labeled with carbon-11 and characterized by in vivo and in vitro experiments for use in the evaluation of altered PDE4 levels in the brain and cardiac tissues. (R)-[11C]Rolipram has been shown to bind selectively to PDE4 over other PDE isozymes, with specific binding reflecting approximately 80 and 40% of the total detected radioactivity in the rat brain and the heart, respectively. Tracer retention in PDE4-rich tissues is increased by cAMP-elevating treatments, as detected by in vivo PET studies and ex vivo biodistribution experiments. In vivo PET imaging studies display strong region-specific signal in the brain and heart, as evaluated in rats, pigs, monkeys and humans. Impaired cAMP-mediated signaling was observed in animal models of aging, obesity, anthracycline-induced cardiotoxicity and myocardial infarction using (R)-[11C]rolipram. Given the critical role of cAMP in multiple hormonal pathways, the good safety profile and well-characterized pharmacokinetics, (R)-[11C]rolipram PET imaging provides a novel tool for serial monitoring of cAMP-mediated signaling at the PDE4 level, yielding insight into pathological progression with potential for directing therapy.

  2. Evidence that cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase inhibitors suppress interleukin-2 release from murine splenocytes by interacting with a ‘low-affinity' phosphodiesterase 4 conformer

    PubMed Central

    Souness, John E; Houghton, Clare; Sardar, Nughat; Withnall, Michael T

    1997-01-01

    We have investigated the suppressive effects of rolipram, RP 73401 (piclamilast) and other structurally diverse inhibitors of cyclic AMP-specific phosphodiesterase 4 (PDE4) on interleukin (IL)-2 generation from Balb/c mouse splenocytes exposed to the superantigen, Staphylococcocal enterotoxin-A (Staph. A). The purpose was to determine whether their potencies are more closely correlated with inhibition of PDE4 from CTLL cells, against which rolipram displays weak potency (low-affinity PDE4), or displacement of [3H]-(±)-rolipram from its high-affinity binding site (HARBS) in mouse brain cytosol. RP 73401 (IC50 0.46±0.07 nM, n=4) was a very potent inhibitor of Staph. A-induced IL-2 release from Balb/c mouse splenocytes, being >1100 fold more potent than (±)-rolipram (IC50 540±67 nM, n=3). A close correlation (r=0.95) was observed between suppression of IL-2 release by PDE inhibitors and inhibition of PDE4. In contrast, little correlation (r=0.39) was observed between suppression of IL-2 release and their affinities for the high-affinity rolipram binding site (HARBS). RP 73401 only inhibited partially (30–40%) Staph. A-induced incorporation of [3H]-thymidine into splenocyte DNA. The PDE3 inhibitor, siguazodan (10 μM), had little or no effect on IL-2 release or DNA synthesis. This concentration of siguazodan did not enhance the inhibitory action of RP 73401 on IL-2 release but potentiated its effect on DNA synthesis, increasing potency and efficacy. Staph. A-induced DNA synthesis was only partially inhibited by anti-IL-2 neutralizing antibody, whereas dexamethazone (100 nM) and cyclosporine A (100 nM) completely blocked the response. RP 73401 (IC50 6.3±1.9 nM, n=4) was 140 fold more potent than rolipram (IC50 900±300 nM, n=3) in inhibiting Staph. A-induced [3H]-thymidine incorporation into splenocyte DNA. The results implicate a low-affinity form of PDE4 in the suppression of Staph. A-induced IL-2 release from murine splenocytes by PDE inhibitors

  3. Day Camp Manual: A Study of Mandatory Standards and Desirable Camping Practices for Children's Day Camps. Book V. Revised 1974.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Babcock, William

    The final book in a 5-book day camp manual is a questionnaire developed by the Ontario Camping Association to help directors of children's summer day camps check camp operations, principles, and procedures, and to help them determine how and where a camp can be improved. The questionnaire, to be completed by the director with the aid of another…

  4. Eviprostat activates cAMP signaling pathway and suppresses bladder smooth muscle cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Li, Kai; Yao, Jian; Chi, Yuan; Sawada, Norifumi; Araki, Isao; Kitamura, Masanori; Takeda, Masayuki

    2013-06-06

    Eviprostat is a popular phytotherapeutic agent for the treatment of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). At present, the signaling mechanisms underlying its therapeutic effects are still poorly understood. Given that cAMP has been reported to suppress cell hyperplasia and hypertrophy in various pathological situations, we asked whether the effect of Eviprostat could be ascribed to the activation of the cAMP signaling pathway. In the study, exposure of cAMP response element (CRE)-secreted alkaline phosphatase (SEAP) (CRE-SEAP)-reporter cells to Eviprostat elevated SEAP secretion, which was associated with an increased phosphorylation of vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) and cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB), as well as enhanced expression of CRE-regulated protein connexin43, indicating an activation of the cAMP signaling pathway. Consistent with these observations, Eviprostat-induced expression of Cx43 was abolished in the presence of adenylyl cyclase inhibitor SQ22536 or PKA inhibitor H89, whereas it was mimicked by adenylyl cyclase activator, forskolin. Further analysis demonstrated that Eviprostat significantly potentiated the effect of phosphodiesterase 3 (PDE3) inhibitor, but not that of PDE4 inhibitor, on CRE activation. Moreover, Eviprostat suppressed PDGF-induced activation of ERK and Akt and inhibited cell proliferation and hillock formation in both mesangial cells and bladder smooth muscle cells. Collectively, activation of the cAMP signaling pathway could be an important mechanism by which Eviprostat exerts its therapeutic effects for LUTS.

  5. Renal Epithelial Cyst Formation and Enlargement in vitro: Dependence on cAMP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangoo-Karim, Roberto; Uchic, Marie; Lechene, Claude; Grantham, Jared J.

    1989-08-01

    Cysts, a common abnormality of kidneys, are collections of urine-like fluid enclosed by a continuous layer of epithelial cells. Renal cysts derive from nephrons and collecting ducts and progressively enlarge as a consequence of epithelial proliferation and transepithelial fluid secretion. The initiation of cyst formation and the factors that control cyst enlargement are unknown. We used an in vitro model of renal cysts to explore the role of the cAMP signal transduction system in the formation and expansion of cysts. MDCK cells, cultured in hydrated-collagen gel, produced polarized monolayered epithelial cysts when intracellular cAMP was increased by prostaglandin E1, arginine vasopressin, cholera toxin, forskolin, or 8-bromoadenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate. All agonists were potentiated by 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine, a nucleotide phosphodiesterase inhibitor. The cell proliferation component of cyst enlargement was accelerated by cAMP agonists, as shown by the increased growth of MDCK cells in subconfluent monolayers. The fluid secretion component, reflected by the transepithelial movement of fluid across polarized monolayers of MDCK cells grown on permeable supports, was stimulated by cAMP agonists in the basolateral medium. Chloride levels were higher in the cyst fluid and the secreted fluid than in the bathing medium. We conclude that the development of MDCK cysts is dependent on cAMP. This signal transduction system may be an important modulator of epithelial cell proliferation and transepithelial fluid secretion in the kidney.

  6. High affinity group III mGluRs regulate mossy fiber input to CA3 interneurons.

    PubMed

    Cosgrove, Kathleen E; Meriney, Stephen D; Barrionuevo, Germán

    2011-12-01

    Stratum lacunosum-moleculare interneurons (L-Mi) in hippocampal area CA3 target the apical dendrite of pyramidal cells providing feedforward inhibition. Here we report that selective activation of group III metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) 4/8 with L(+)-2-amino-4-phosphnobytyric acid (L-AP4; 10 μM) decreased the probability of glutamate release from the mossy fiber (MF) terminals synapsing onto L-Mi. Consistent with this interpretation, application of L-AP4 in the presence of 3 mM strontium decreased the frequency of asynchronous MF EPSCs in L-Mi. Furthermore, the dose response curve showed that L-AP4 at 400 μM produced no further decrease in MF EPSC amplitude compared with 20 μM L-AP4, indicating the lack of mGluRs 7 at these MF terminals. We also found that one mechanism of mGluRs 4/8-mediated inhibition of release is linked to N-type voltage gated calcium channels at MF terminals. Application of the group III mGluR antagonist MSOP (100 μM) demonstrated that mGluRs 4/8 are neither tonically active nor activated by low and moderate frequencies of activity. However, trains of stimuli to the MF at 20 and 40 Hz delivered during the application of MSOP revealed a relief of inhibition of transmitter release and an increase in the overall probability of action potential firing in the postsynaptic L-Mi. Interestingly, the time to first action potential was significantly shorter in the presence of MSOP, indicating that mGluR 4/8 activation delays L-Mi firing in response to MF activity. Taken together, our data demonstrate that the timing and probability of action potentials in L-Mi evoked by MF synaptic input is regulated by the activation of presynaptic high affinity group III mGluRs.

  7. Devices and approaches for generating specific high-affinity nucleic acid aptamers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szeto, Kylan; Craighead, Harold G.

    2014-09-01

    High-affinity and highly specific antibody proteins have played a critical role in biological imaging, medical diagnostics, and therapeutics. Recently, a new class of molecules called aptamers has emerged as an alternative to antibodies. Aptamers are short nucleic acid molecules that can be generated and synthesized in vitro to bind to virtually any target in a wide range of environments. They are, in principal, less expensive and more reproducible than antibodies, and their versatility creates possibilities for new technologies. Aptamers are generated using libraries of nucleic acid molecules with random sequences that are subjected to affinity selections for binding to specific target molecules. This is commonly done through a process called Systematic Evolution of Ligands by EXponential enrichment, in which target-bound nucleic acids are isolated from the pool, amplified to high copy numbers, and then reselected against the desired target. This iterative process is continued until the highest affinity nucleic acid sequences dominate the enriched pool. Traditional selections require a dozen or more laborious cycles to isolate strongly binding aptamers, which can take months to complete and consume large quantities of reagents. However, new devices and insights from engineering and the physical sciences have contributed to a reduction in the time and effort needed to generate aptamers. As the demand for these new molecules increases, more efficient and sensitive selection technologies will be needed. These new technologies will need to use smaller samples, exploit a wider range of chemistries and techniques for manipulating binding, and integrate and automate the selection steps. Here, we review new methods and technologies that are being developed towards this goal, and we discuss their roles in accelerating the availability of novel aptamers.

  8. Molecular basis for the high-affinity binding and stabilization of firefly luciferase by PTC124

    SciTech Connect

    Auld, Douglas S.; Lovell, Scott; Thorne, Natasha; Lea, Wendy A.; Maloney, David J.; Shen, Min; Rai, Ganesha; Battaile, Kevin P.; Thomas, Craig J.; Simeonov, Anton; Hanzlik, Robert P.; Inglese, James

    2010-04-07

    Firefly luciferase (FLuc), an ATP-dependent bioluminescent reporter enzyme, is broadly used in chemical biology and drug discovery assays. PTC124 Ataluren; (3-[5-(2-fluorophenyl)-1,2,4-oxadiazol-3-yl]benzoic acid) discovered in an FLuc-based assay targeting nonsense codon suppression, is an unusually potent FLuc-inhibitor. Paradoxically, PTC124 and related analogs increase cellular FLuc activity levels by posttranslational stabilization. In this study, we show that FLuc inhibition and stabilization is the result of an inhibitory product formed during the FLuc-catalyzed reaction between its natural substrate, ATP, and PTC124. A 2.0 {angstrom} cocrystal structure revealed the inhibitor to be the acyl-AMP mixed-anhydride adduct PTC124-AMP, which was subsequently synthesized and shown to be a high-affinity multisubstrate adduct inhibitor (MAI; KD = 120 pM) of FLuc. Biochemical assays, liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry, and near-attack conformer modeling demonstrate that formation of this novel MAI is absolutely dependent upon the precise positioning and reactivity of a key meta-carboxylate of PTC124 within the FLuc active site. We also demonstrate that the inhibitory activity of PTC124-AMP is relieved by free coenzyme A, a component present at high concentrations in luciferase detection reagents used for cell-based assays. This explains why PTC124 can appear to increase, instead of inhibit, FLuc activity in cell-based reporter gene assays. To our knowledge, this is an unusual example in which the 'off-target' effect of a small molecule is mediated by an MAI mechanism.

  9. Can we accurately quantify nanoparticle associated proteins when constructing high-affinity MRI molecular imaging probes?

    PubMed

    Rimkus, Gabriella; Bremer-Streck, Sibylle; Grüttner, Cordula; Kaiser, Werner Alois; Hilger, Ingrid

    2011-01-01

    Targeted magnetic resonance contrast agents (e.g. iron oxide nanoparticles) have the potential to become highly selective imaging tools. In this context, quantification of the coupled amount of protein is essential for the design of antibody- or antibody fragment-conjugated nanoparticles. Nevertheless, the presence of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles is still an unsolved problem for this task. The aim of the present work was to clarify whether proteins can be reliably quantified directly in the presence of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles without the use of fluorescence or radioactivity. Protein quantification via Bradford was not influenced by the presence of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (0-17.2 mmol Fe l(-1) ). Instead, bicinchoninic acid based assay was, indeed, distinctly affected by the presence of nanoparticle-iron in suspension (0.1-17.2 mmol Fe l(-1) ), although the influence was linear. This observation allowed for adequate mathematical corrections with known iron content of a given nanoparticle. The applicability of our approach was demonstrated by the determination of bovine serum albumin (BSA) content coupled to dextrane-coated magnetic nanoparticles, which was found with the QuantiPro Bicinchoninic acid assay to be of 1.5 ± 0.2 µg BSA per 1 mg nanoparticle. Both Bradford and bicinchoninic acid assay protein assays allow for direct quantification of proteins in the presence of iron oxide containing magnetic nanoparticles, without the need for the introduction of radioactivity or fluorescence modules. Thus in future it should be possible to make more precise estimations about the coupled protein amount in high-affinity targeted MRI probes for the identification of specific molecules in living organisms, an aspect which is lacking in corresponding works published so far. Additionally, the present protein coupling procedures can be drastically improved by our proposed protein quantification method.

  10. Targeting Protein-Protein Interactions with Trimeric Ligands: High Affinity Inhibitors of the MAGUK Protein Family

    PubMed Central

    Nissen, Klaus B.; Haugaard-Kedström, Linda M.; Wilbek, Theis S.; Nielsen, Line S.; Åberg, Emma; Kristensen, Anders S.; Bach, Anders; Jemth, Per; Strømgaard, Kristian

    2015-01-01

    PDZ domains in general, and those of PSD-95 in particular, are emerging as promising drug targets for diseases such as ischemic stroke. We have previously shown that dimeric ligands that simultaneously target PDZ1 and PDZ2 of PSD-95 are highly potent inhibitors of PSD-95. However, PSD-95 and the related MAGUK proteins contain three consecutive PDZ domains, hence we envisioned that targeting all three PDZ domains simultaneously would lead to more potent and potentially more specific interactions with the MAGUK proteins. Here we describe the design, synthesis and characterization of a series of trimeric ligands targeting all three PDZ domains of PSD-95 and the related MAGUK proteins, PSD-93, SAP-97 and SAP-102. Using our dimeric ligands targeting the PDZ1-2 tandem as starting point, we designed novel trimeric ligands by introducing a PDZ3-binding peptide moiety via a cysteine-derivatized NPEG linker. The trimeric ligands generally displayed increased affinities compared to the dimeric ligands in fluorescence polarization binding experiments and optimized trimeric ligands showed low nanomolar inhibition towards the four MAGUK proteins, thus being the most potent inhibitors described. Kinetic experiments using stopped-flow spectrometry showed that the increase in affinity is caused by a decrease in the dissociation rate of the trimeric ligand as compared to the dimeric ligands, likely reflecting the lower probability of simultaneous dissociation of all three PDZ ligands. Thus, we have provided novel inhibitors of the MAGUK proteins with exceptionally high affinity, which can be used to further elucidate the therapeutic potential of these proteins. PMID:25658767

  11. A functionally active presynaptic high-affinity kainate receptor in the rat hippocampal CA3 subregion.

    PubMed

    Malva, J O; Ambrósio, A F; Cunha, R A; Ribeiro, J A; Carvalho, A P; Carvalho, C M

    1995-02-09

    We studied the modulation of the intracellular free calcium concentrations ([Ca2+]i) by kainate/AMPA receptor activation in synaptosomes isolated from whole rat hippocampus, or from its CA1, CA3 or dentate gyrus subregions. The receptor was activated either by 100 microM S-alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolopropionic acid (AMPA) (EC50 = 26.6 +/- 4.9 microM) or by 100 microM kainate (EC50 = 0.81 +/- 0.1 microM), but the effects of these agonists were not additive. The response to either AMPA or kainate was competitively inhibited by 10 microM 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dioxine. Higher [Ca2+]i responses to 100 microM AMPA or to 100 microM kainate were observed in the CA3 subregion (43.2 +/- 2.5 nM or 42.8 +/- 2.3 nM, respectively) than in the whole hippocampus (22.4 +/- 1.1 nM or 22.4 +/- 1.6, respectively), in the CA1 subregion (26.4 +/- 1.1 nM or 26.6 +/- 2.6 nM, respectively) or in dentate gyrus (24.6 +/- 1.4 nM or 21.5 +/- 1.0 nM, respectively). These results indicate that the CA3 subregion of the hippocampus is enriched in a presynaptic high-affinity kainate receptor which modulates the [Ca2+]i in nerve terminals.

  12. In vitro selection, characterization, and biosensing application of high-affinity cylindrospermopsin-targeting aptamers.

    PubMed

    Elshafey, Reda; Siaj, Mohamed; Zourob, Mohammed

    2014-09-16

    Contamination of freshwater with cyanotoxin cylindrospermopsin (CYN) represents a significant global concern for public health. The sensitive detection of CYN is necessary to effectively manage and control the treatment of water resources. Here we report a novel, highly sensitive label-free aptasensor for CYN analysis, using aptamers as specific receptors. We have selected the DNA aptamers from a diverse random library using the in vitro screening SELEX approach. The aptamers exhibited high affinity for CYN with Kd of nanomolar range. One aptamer exhibited conformational change upon CYN recognition (CD analysis) and was used to fabricate the label-free impedimetric aptasensor for CYN. A self-assembled monolayer from a disulfide-derivatized aptamer was formed on a gold electrode to fabricate the aptasensor. Upon CYN capturing to the aptasensor surface, a marked drop in the electron transfer resistance was obtained, which was used as the principle of detection of CYN. This resulted from the aptamer's conformational change induced by CYN recognition. The present aptasensor could detect CYN with the limit of detection as low as 100 pM and a wide linear range of 0.1 to 80 nM. When mounted on the gold surface, the aptamer exhibited a lower dissociation constant for CYN than that observed in the fluorescence assay, implying that the anchoring of the aptamer on the Au surface improved its affinity to CYN. Moreover, the aptasensor showed high specificity toward other coexistent cyanobacterial toxins of microcystin-LR and Anatoxin-a. Further biosensor designs will be generated using those aptamers for simple and sensitive CYN monitoring.

  13. Targeting protein-protein interactions with trimeric ligands: high affinity inhibitors of the MAGUK protein family.

    PubMed

    Nissen, Klaus B; Haugaard-Kedström, Linda M; Wilbek, Theis S; Nielsen, Line S; Åberg, Emma; Kristensen, Anders S; Bach, Anders; Jemth, Per; Strømgaard, Kristian

    2015-01-01

    PDZ domains in general, and those of PSD-95 in particular, are emerging as promising drug targets for diseases such as ischemic stroke. We have previously shown that dimeric ligands that simultaneously target PDZ1 and PDZ2 of PSD-95 are highly potent inhibitors of PSD-95. However, PSD-95 and the related MAGUK proteins contain three consecutive PDZ domains, hence we envisioned that targeting all three PDZ domains simultaneously would lead to more potent and potentially more specific interactions with the MAGUK proteins. Here we describe the design, synthesis and characterization of a series of trimeric ligands targeting all three PDZ domains of PSD-95 and the related MAGUK proteins, PSD-93, SAP-97 and SAP-102. Using our dimeric ligands targeting the PDZ1-2 tandem as starting point, we designed novel trimeric ligands by introducing a PDZ3-binding peptide moiety via a cysteine-derivatized NPEG linker. The trimeric ligands generally displayed increased affinities compared to the dimeric ligands in fluorescence polarization binding experiments and optimized trimeric ligands showed low nanomolar inhibition towards the four MAGUK proteins, thus being the most potent inhibitors described. Kinetic experiments using stopped-flow spectrometry showed that the increase in affinity is caused by a decrease in the dissociation rate of the trimeric ligand as compared to the dimeric ligands, likely reflecting the lower probability of simultaneous dissociation of all three PDZ ligands. Thus, we have provided novel inhibitors of the MAGUK proteins with exceptionally high affinity, which can be used to further elucidate the therapeutic potential of these proteins.

  14. Early Signs of Pathological Cognitive Aging in Mice Lacking High-Affinity Nicotinic Receptors.

    PubMed

    Konsolaki, Eleni; Tsakanikas, Panagiotis; Polissidis, Alexia V; Stamatakis, Antonios; Skaliora, Irini

    2016-01-01

    In order to address pathological cognitive decline effectively, it is critical to adopt early preventive measures in individuals considered at risk. It is therefore essential to develop approaches that identify such individuals before the onset of irreversible dementia. A deficient cholinergic system has been consistently implicated as one of the main factors associated with a heightened vulnerability to the aging process. In the present study we used mice lacking high affinity nicotinic receptors (β2-/-), which have been proposed as an animal model of accelerated/premature cognitive aging. Our aim was to identify behavioral signs that could serve as indicators or predictors of impending cognitive decline. We used test batteries in order to assess cognitive functions and additional tasks to investigate spontaneous behaviors, such as species-specific activities and exploration/locomotion in a novel environment. Our data confirm the hypothesis that β2-/- animals exhibit age-related cognitive impairments in spatial learning. In addition, they document age-related deficits in other areas, such as recognition memory, burrowing and nesting building, thereby extending the validity of this animal model for the study of pathological aging. Finally, our data reveal deficits in spontaneous behavior and habituation processes that precede the onset of cognitive decline and could therefore be useful as a non-invasive behavioral screen for identifying animals at risk. To our knowledge, this is the first study to perform an extensive behavioral assessment of an animal model of premature cognitive aging, and our results suggest that β2-nAChR dependent cognitive deterioration progressively evolves from initial subtle behavioral changes to global dementia due to the combined effect of the neuropathology and aging.

  15. High-affinity σ1 protein agonist reduces clinical and pathological signs of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Oxombre, B; Lee-Chang, C; Duhamel, A; Toussaint, M; Giroux, M; Donnier-Maréchal, M; Carato, P; Lefranc, D; Zéphir, H; Prin, L; Melnyk, P; Vermersch, P

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Selective agonists of the sigma-1 receptor (σ1 protein) are generally reported to protect against neuronal damage and modulate oligodendrocyte differentiation. Human and rodent lymphocytes possess saturable, high-affinity binding sites for compounds binding to the σ1 protein and potential immunomodulatory properties have been described for σ1 protein ligands. Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is recognized as a valuable model of the inflammatory aspects of multiple sclerosis (MS). Here, we have assessed the role of a σ1 protein agonist, containing the tetrahydroisoquinoline-hydantoin structure, in EAE. Experimental Approach EAE was induced in SJL/J female mice by active immunization with myelin proteolipid protein (PLP)139–151 peptide. The σ1 protein agonist was injected i.p. at the time of immunization (day 0). Disease severity was assessed clinically and by histopathological evaluation of the CNS. Phenotyping of B-cell subsets and regulatory T-cells were performed by flow cytometry in spleen and cervical lymph nodes. Key Results Prophylactic treatment of EAE mice with the σ1 protein agonist prevented mononuclear cell accumulation and demyelination in brain and spinal cord and increased T2 B-cells and regulatory T-cells, resulting in an overall reduction in the clinical progression of EAE. Conclusions and Implications This σ1 protein agonist, containing the tetrahydroisoquinoline-hydantoin structure, decreased the magnitude of inflammation in EAE. This effect was associated with increased proportions of B-cell subsets and regulatory T-cells with potential immunoregulatory functions. Targeting of the σ1 protein might thus provide new therapeutic opportunities in MS. PMID:25521311

  16. Insulin Regulates the Activity of the High-Affinity Choline Transporter CHT

    PubMed Central

    Fishwick, Katherine J.; Rylett, R. Jane

    2015-01-01

    Studies in humans and animal models show that neuronal insulin resistance increases the risk of developing Alzheimer’s Disease (AD), and that insulin treatment may promote memory function. Cholinergic neurons play a critical role in cognitive and attentional processing and their dysfunction early in AD pathology may promote the progression of AD pathology. Synthesis and release of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine (ACh) is closely linked to the activity of the high-affinity choline transporter protein (CHT), but the impact of insulin receptor signaling and neuronal insulin resistance on these aspects of cholinergic function are unknown. In this study, we used differentiated SH-SY5Y cells stably-expressing CHT proteins to study the effect of insulin signaling on CHT activity and function. We find that choline uptake activity measured after acute addition of 20 nM insulin is significantly lower in cells that were grown for 24 h in media containing insulin compared to cells grown in the absence of insulin. This coincides with loss of ability to increase phospho-Protein Kinase B (PKB)/Akt levels in response to acute insulin stimulation in the chronic insulin-treated cells. Inhibition of phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase (PI3-kinase) in cells significantly lowers phospho-PKB/Akt levels and decreases choline uptake activity. We show total internal reflection microscopy (TIRF) imaging of the dynamic movement of CHT proteins in live cells in response to depolarization and drug treatments. These data show that acute exposure of depolarized cells to insulin is coupled to transiently increased levels of CHT proteins at the cell surface, and that this is attenuated by chronic insulin exposure. Moreover, prolonged inhibition of PI3-kinase results in enhanced levels of CHT proteins at the cell surface by decreasing their rate of internalization. PMID:26161852

  17. Engineering of Bispecific Affinity Proteins with High Affinity for ERBB2 and Adaptable Binding to Albumin

    PubMed Central

    Nilvebrant, Johan; Åstrand, Mikael; Georgieva-Kotseva, Maria; Björnmalm, Mattias; Löfblom, John; Hober, Sophia

    2014-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor 2, ERBB2, is a well-validated target for cancer diagnostics and therapy. Recent studies suggest that the over-expression of this receptor in various cancers might also be exploited for antibody-based payload delivery, e.g. antibody drug conjugates. In such strategies, the full-length antibody format is probably not required for therapeutic effect and smaller tumor-specific affinity proteins might be an alternative. However, small proteins and peptides generally suffer from fast excretion through the kidneys, and thereby require frequent administration in order to maintain a therapeutic concentration. In an attempt aimed at combining ERBB2-targeting with antibody-like pharmacokinetic properties in a small protein format, we have engineered bispecific ERBB2-binding proteins that are based on a small albumin-binding domain. Phage display selection against ERBB2 was used for identification of a lead candidate, followed by affinity maturation using second-generation libraries. Cell surface display and flow-cytometric sorting allowed stringent selection of top candidates from pools pre-enriched by phage display. Several affinity-matured molecules were shown to bind human ERBB2 with sub-nanomolar affinity while retaining the interaction with human serum albumin. Moreover, parallel selections against ERBB2 in the presence of human serum albumin identified several amino acid substitutions that dramatically modulate the albumin affinity, which could provide a convenient means to control the pharmacokinetics. The new affinity proteins competed for ERBB2-binding with the monoclonal antibody trastuzumab and recognized the native receptor on a human cancer cell line. Hence, high affinity tumor targeting and tunable albumin binding were combined in one small adaptable protein. PMID:25089830

  18. High affinity of acid phosphatase encoded by PHO3 gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae for thiamin phosphates.

    PubMed

    Nosaka, K

    1990-02-09

    The enzymatic properties of acid phosphatase (orthophosphoric-monoester phosphohydrolase, EC 3.1.3.2) encoded by PHO3 gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which is repressed by thiamin and has thiamin-binding activity at pH 5.0, were investigated to study physiological functions. The following results led to the conclusion that thiamin-repressible acid phosphatase physiologically catalyzes the hydrolysis of thiamin phosphates in the periplasmic space of S. cerevisiae, thus participating in utilization of the thiamin moiety of the phosphates by yeast cells: (a) thiamin-repressible acid phosphatase showed Km values of 1.6 and 1.7 microM at pH 5.0 for thiamin monophosphate and thiamin pyrophosphate, respectively. These Km values were 2-3 orders of magnitude lower than those (0.61 and 1.7 mM) for p-nitrophenyl phosphate; (b) thiamin exerted remarkable competitive inhibition in the hydrolysis of thiamin monophosphate (Ki 2.2 microM at pH 5.0), whereas the activity for p-nitrophenyl phosphate was slightly affected by thiamin; (c) the inhibitory effect of inorganic phosphate, which does not repress the thiamin-repressible enzyme, on the hydrolysis of thiamin monophosphate was much smaller than that of p-nitrophenyl phosphate. Moreover, the modification of thiamin-repressible acid phosphatase of S. cerevisiae with 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)carbodiimide resulted in the complete loss of thiamin-binding activity and the Km value of the modified enzyme for thiamin monophosphate increased nearly to the value of the native enzyme for p-nitrophenyl phosphate. These results also indicate that the high affinity of the thiamin-repressible acid phosphatase for thiamin phosphates is due to the thiamin-binding properties of this enzyme.

  19. KW-3902, a selective high affinity antagonist for adenosine A1 receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Nonaka, H.; Ichimura, M.; Takeda, M.; Kanda, T.; Shimada, J.; Suzuki, F.; Kase, H.

    1996-01-01

    1. We demonstrate that 8-(noradamantan-3-yl)-1,3-dipropylxanthine (KW-3902) is a very potent and selective adenosine A1 receptor antagonist, assessed by radioligand binding and cyclic AMP response in cells. 2. In rat forebrain adenosine A1 receptors labelled with [3H]-cyclohexyladenosine (CHA), KW-3902 had a Ki value of 0.19 nM, whereas it showed a Ki value of 170 nM in rat striatal A2A receptors labelled with [3H]-2-[p-(2-carboxyethyl)-phenethylamino]-5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoad enosine (CGS21680), indicating 890 fold A1 receptor selectivity versus the A2A receptor. KW-3902 at 10 microM showed no effect on recombinant rat A3 receptors expressed on CHO cells. 3. Saturation studies with [3H]-KW-3902 revealed that it bound with high affinity (Kd = 77 pM) and limited capacity (Bmax = 470 fmol mg-1 of protein) to a single class of recognition sites. A high positive correlation was observed between the pharmacological profile of adenosine ligands inhibiting the binding of [3H]-KW-3902 and that of [3H]-CHA. 4. KW-3902 showed potent A1 antagonism against the inhibition of forskolin-induced cyclic AMP accumulation in DDT1 MF-2 cells by the A1-selective agonist, cyclopentyladenosine with a dissociation constant (KB value) of 0.34 nM. KW-3902 antagonized 5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine-elicited cyclic AMP accumulation via A2B receptors with a KB value of 52 nM. 5. KW-3902 exhibited marked species-dependent differences in the binding affinities. The highest affinity was for the rat A1 receptor (ki = 0.19 nM) and these values for guinea-pig and dog A1 receptors were 1.3 and 10 nM, respectively. PMID:8732272

  20. High affinity nanobodies against the Trypanosome brucei VSG are potent trypanolytic agents that block endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Stijlemans, Benoît; Caljon, Guy; Natesan, Senthil Kumar A; Saerens, Dirk; Conrath, Katja; Pérez-Morga, David; Skepper, Jeremy N; Nikolaou, Alexandros; Brys, Lea; Pays, Etienne; Magez, Stefan; Field, Mark C; De Baetselier, Patrick; Muyldermans, Serge

    2011-06-01

    The African trypanosome Trypanosoma brucei, which persists within the bloodstream of the mammalian host, has evolved potent mechanisms for immune evasion. Specifically, antigenic variation of the variant-specific surface glycoprotein (VSG) and a highly active endocytosis and recycling of the surface coat efficiently delay killing mediated by anti-VSG antibodies. Consequently, conventional VSG-specific intact immunoglobulins are non-trypanocidal in the absence of complement. In sharp contrast, monovalent antigen-binding fragments, including 15 kDa nanobodies (Nb) derived from camelid heavy-chain antibodies (HCAbs) recognizing variant-specific VSG epitopes, efficiently lyse trypanosomes both in vitro and in vivo. This Nb-mediated lysis is preceded by very rapid immobilisation of the parasites, massive enlargement of the flagellar pocket and major blockade of endocytosis. This is accompanied by severe metabolic perturbations reflected by reduced intracellular ATP-levels and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, culminating in cell death. Modification of anti-VSG Nbs through site-directed mutagenesis and by reconstitution into HCAbs, combined with unveiling of trypanolytic activity from intact immunoglobulins by papain proteolysis, demonstrates that the trypanolytic activity of Nbs and Fabs requires low molecular weight, monovalency and high affinity. We propose that the generation of low molecular weight VSG-specific trypanolytic nanobodies that impede endocytosis offers a new opportunity for developing novel trypanosomiasis therapeutics. In addition, these data suggest that the antigen-binding domain of an anti-microbial antibody harbours biological functionality that is latent in the intact immunoglobulin and is revealed only upon release of the antigen-binding fragment.

  1. Water channel in the binding site of a high affinity anti-methotrexate antibody.

    PubMed

    Gayda, Susan; Longenecker, Kenton L; Manoj, Sharmila; Judge, Russell A; Saldana, Sylvia C; Ruan, Qiaoqiao; Swift, Kerry M; Tetin, Sergey Y

    2014-06-17

    In the present study, we report the structure of the free and drug-bound Fab fragment of a high affinity anti-methotrexate antibody and perform a thermodynamic analysis of the binding process. The anti-methotrexate Fab fragment features a remarkably rigid tunnel-like binding site that extends into a water channel serving as a specialized route to move solvent out and into the site upon ligand binding and dissociation. This new finding in antibody structure-function relationships directly relates to the fast association (1 × 10⁷ M⁻¹ s⁻¹) and slow dissociation (4 × 10⁻⁵ s⁻¹) rates determined for mAb ADD056, resulting in a very strong binding with a K(D) ~ 3.6 pM at 20 °C. As follows from the X-ray data analysis, the methotrexate-antibody complex is stabilized by an extended network of hydrogen bonds and stacking interactions. The analysis also shows structural involvement of the CDR H3 in formation of the water channel revealing another important role of this hypervariable region. This suggests a new direction in natural affinity maturation and opens a new possibility in antibody engineering. Methotrexate is a widely used therapeutic agent for many malignant diseases and inflammatory disorders. Unfortunately, it may also interfere with central aspects of metabolism and thereby cause inevitable side effects. Therefore, methotrexate therapy requires careful monitoring of drug blood levels, which is traditionally done by immunoassays. An understanding of the structure-function properties of antibodies selected for drug monitoring substantiates the performance and robustness of such tests.

  2. High-affinity uptake of gamma-aminobutyric acid in cultured glial and neuronal cells.

    PubMed

    Balcar, V J; Mark, J; Borg, J; Mandel, P

    1979-06-01

    Both glial and neuronal cells maintained in primary culture were found to accumulate [3H]GABA by an efficient "high-affinity" uptake system (apparent Km = 9 muM, Vmax = 0.018 and 0.584 nmol/mg/min, respectively) which required sodium ions and was inhibited by 1 mM ouabain. Strychnine and parachloromercuriphenylsulfonate (pCS) (both at 1mM) also strongly inhibited uptake of [3H]GABA, but metabolic inhibitors (2,4-dinitrophenol, potassium cyanide, and malonate) were without effect. Only three structural analogs of GABA (nipecotate, beta-alanine, and 2,4-diaminobutyrate) inhibited uptake of [3H]GABA, while several other compounds with structural similarities to GABA (e.g. glycine, L-proline, and taurine) did not interact with the system. The kinetic studies indicated presence of a second uptake (Km = 92 muM, Vmax = 0.124 nmol/mg/min) in the primary cultures containing predominantly glioblasts. On the other hand, only one of the neuronal cell lines transformed by simian virus SV40 appeared to accumulate [3H]GABA against a concentration gradient. Apparent Km of this uptake was relatively high (819 muM), and it was only weakly inhibited by 1 mM ouabain and 1 mM pCS. The structural specificity also differed from that of the uptake observed in the primary cultures. Significantly, non of the nontransformed continuous cell lines of either tumoral (glioma, C6; neuroblastoma, M1; M1NN) or normal (NN;I6) origin actively accumulated [3H]GABA. It is suggested that for the neurochemical studies related to GABA and requiring homogeneous cell populations, the primary cultures offer a better experimental model than the continuous cell lines.

  3. Early Signs of Pathological Cognitive Aging in Mice Lacking High-Affinity Nicotinic Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Konsolaki, Eleni; Tsakanikas, Panagiotis; Polissidis, Alexia V.; Stamatakis, Antonios; Skaliora, Irini

    2016-01-01

    In order to address pathological cognitive decline effectively, it is critical to adopt early preventive measures in individuals considered at risk. It is therefore essential to develop approaches that identify such individuals before the onset of irreversible dementia. A deficient cholinergic system has been consistently implicated as one of the main factors associated with a heightened vulnerability to the aging process. In the present study we used mice lacking high affinity nicotinic receptors (β2-/-), which have been proposed as an animal model of accelerated/premature cognitive aging. Our aim was to identify behavioral signs that could serve as indicators or predictors of impending cognitive decline. We used test batteries in order to assess cognitive functions and additional tasks to investigate spontaneous behaviors, such as species-specific activities and exploration/locomotion in a novel environment. Our data confirm the hypothesis that β2-/- animals exhibit age-related cognitive impairments in spatial learning. In addition, they document age-related deficits in other areas, such as recognition memory, burrowing and nesting building, thereby extending the validity of this animal model for the study of pathological aging. Finally, our data reveal deficits in spontaneous behavior and habituation processes that precede the onset of cognitive decline and could therefore be useful as a non-invasive behavioral screen for identifying animals at risk. To our knowledge, this is the first study to perform an extensive behavioral assessment of an animal model of premature cognitive aging, and our results suggest that β2-nAChR dependent cognitive deterioration progressively evolves from initial subtle behavioral changes to global dementia due to the combined effect of the neuropathology and aging. PMID:27199738

  4. Synthesis and characterization of a high affinity radioiodinated probe for the alpha 2-adrenergic receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Lanier, S.M.; Hess, H.J.; Grodski, A.; Graham, R.M.; Homcy, C.J.

    1986-03-01

    The availability of radioiodinated probes has facilitated the localization and molecular characterization of cell membrane receptors for hormones and neurotransmitters. However, such probes are not available for the study of the alpha 2-adrenergic receptor. This report describes the synthesis and characterization of functionalized derivatives of the selective alpha 2-adrenergic antagonists, rauwolscine and yohimbine, which can be radiolabeled to high specific activity with 125I. Following demethylation of rauwolscine or yohimbine, the resultant carboxylic acid derivatives were reacted with 4-aminophenethylamine to yield the respective 4-aminophenethyl carboxamides, 17 alpha-hydroxy-20 alpha-yohimban-16 beta-(N-4-amino-phenethyl)carboxamide (rau-pAPC) and 17 alpha-hydroxy-20 beta-yohimban-16 alpha-(N-4-aminophenethyl)carboxamide. In competitive inhibition studies using rat renal membranes and the radioligand (3H)rauwolscine, rau-pAPC (Ki = 11 +/- 1 nM) exhibited a 14-fold greater affinity than the corresponding yohimbine derivative (Ki = 136 +/- 45 nM). The higher affinity compound, rau-pAPC, was radioiodinated by the chloramine T method, and the product, 125I-rau-pAPC (17 alpha-hydroxy-20 alpha-yohimban-16 beta-(N-4-amino-3 -(125I)iodophenethyl)carboxamide), was purified by reverse phase HPLC to high specific activity (2175 Ci/mmol) and its binding characteristics were investigated in rat kidney membranes. Specific binding of 125I-rau-pAPC was saturable and of high affinity as determined by Scatchard analysis (KD = 1.8 +/- 0.3 nM) or from kinetic studies (KD = k2/k1 = 0.056 +/- 0.013 min-1)/4.3 +/- 0.2 X 10(7) M-1 min-1 = 1.3 +/- 0.3 nM).

  5. Sugar-binding proteins from fish: selection of high affinity "lambodies" that recognize biomedically relevant glycans.

    PubMed

    Hong, Xia; Ma, Mark Z; Gildersleeve, Jeffrey C; Chowdhury, Sudipa; Barchi, Joseph J; Mariuzza, Roy A; Murphy, Michael B; Mao, Li; Pancer, Zeev

    2013-01-18

    Glycan-binding proteins are important for a wide variety of basic research and clinical applications, but proteins with high affinity and selectivity for carbohydrates are difficult to obtain. Here we describe a facile and cost-effective strategy to generate monoclonal lamprey antibodies, called lambodies, that target glycan determinants. We screened a library of yeast surface-displayed (YSD) lamprey variable lymphocyte receptors (VLR) for clones that can selectively bind various biomedically important glycotopes. These glycoconjugates included tumor-associated carbohydrate antigens (Tn and TFα), Lewis antigens (LeA and LeX), N-glycolylneuraminic acid, targets of broadly neutralizing HIV antibodies (poly-Man9 and the HIV gp120), and the glycoproteins asialo-ovine submaxillary mucin (aOSM) and asialo-human glycophorin A (aGPA). We isolated clones that bind each of these targets in a glycan-dependent manner and with very strong binding constants, for example, 6.2 nM for Man9 and 44.7 nM for gp120, determined by surface plasmon resonance (SPR). One particular lambody, VLRB.aGPA.23, was shown by glycan array analysis to be selective for the blood group H type 3 trisaccharide (BG-H3, Fucα1-2Galβ1-3GalNAcα), aGPA, and TFα (Galβ1-3GalNAcα), with affinity constants of 0.2, 1, and 8 nM, respectively. In human tissue microarrays this lambody selectively detected cancer-associated carbohydrate antigens in 14 different types of cancers. It stained 27% of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) samples in a pattern that correlated with poor patient survival. Lambodies with exquisite affinity and selectivity for glycans may find myriad uses in glycobiology and biomedical research.

  6. High affinity receptors for vasoactive intestinal peptide on a human glioma cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Nielsen, F.C.; Gammeltoft, S.; Westermark, B.; Fahrenkrug, J. )

    1990-11-01

    Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) bound with high affinity (Kd 0.13 nmol/l) to receptors on the human glioma cell line U-343 MG Cl 2:6. The receptors bound the related peptides helodermin, PHM and secretin with 10, 400 and 5000 times lower affinity, respectively. Deamidated VIP (VIP-COOH) and (des-His1)VIP bound with 10 and 100 times lower affinity. The fragment VIP(7-28) displaced 25% of the receptor-bound {sup 125}I-VIP whereas VIP(16-28) and VIP(1-22-NH2) were inactive. The binding of {sup 125}I-VIP could be completely inhibited by 10 mumol/l of the antagonists (N-Ac-Tyr1,D-Phe2)GRF(1-29)-NH2, (pCl-D-Phe6,Leu17)VIP and VIP(10-28); in contrast, the antagonist L-8-K was inactive. Affinity labeling showed that VIP bound to proteins with Mr's of 75 kDa, 66 kDa and 50 kDa, respectively. Following binding, the peptide was rapidly internalized, and at steady-state only 20% of cell-associated {sup 125}I-VIP was bound to receptors on the cell surface. The internalized {sup 125}I-VIP was completely degraded to {sup 125}I-tyrosine which was released from the cells. Degradation of internalized {sup 125}I-VIP was significantly reduced by chloroquine phenanthroline and pepstatin-A. Surface binding and internalization of {sup 125}I-VIP was increased 3 times by phenanthroline, and pepstatin-A caused a 5 times increase in surface binding. Chloroquine reduced surface-bound {sup 125}I-VIP, but caused retention of internalized {sup 125}I-VIP.

  7. Base Camp Design Simulation Training

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-07-01

    It is a treasure-trove of engineering blueprints, bill of materials ( BOMs ), and plans. This 600- man base camp, Figure 6, inputted into VBS2TM...the technical proficiencies required in the construction of base camps. There are no blue prints or bill of materials included in the training. Yet...that “base camps need DOTMLPF (doctrine, organization, training, material , leadership and education, personnel, and facilities) solutions to address

  8. cAMP and Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Valsecchi, Federica; Ramos-Espiritu, Lavoisier S.; Buck, Jochen; Levin, Lonny R.

    2013-01-01

    Phosphorylation of mitochondrial proteins has emerged as a major regulatory mechanism for metabolic adaptation. cAMP signaling and PKA phosphorylation of mitochondrial proteins have just started to be investigated, and the presence of cAMP-generating enzymes and PKA inside mitochondria is still controversial. Here, we discuss the role of cAMP in regulating mitochondrial bioenergetics through protein phosphorylation and the evidence for soluble adenylyl cyclase as the source of cAMP inside mitochondria. PMID:23636265

  9. Specific high-affinity binding of high density lipoproteins to cultured human skin fibroblasts and arterial smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Biesbroeck, R; Oram, J F; Albers, J J; Bierman, E L

    1983-03-01

    Binding of human high density lipoproteins (HDL, d = 1.063-1.21) to cultured human fibroblasts and human arterial smooth muscle cells was studied using HDL subjected to heparin-agarose affinity chromatography to remove apoprotein (apo) E and B. Saturation curves for binding of apo E-free 125I-HDL showed at least two components: low-affinity nonsaturable binding and high-affinity binding that saturated at approximately 20 micrograms HDL protein/ml. Scatchard analysis of high-affinity binding of apo E-free 125I-HDL to normal fibroblasts yielded plots that were significantly linear, indicative of a single class of binding sites. Saturation curves for binding of both 125I-HDL3 (d = 1.125-1.21) and apo E-free 125I-HDL to low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor-negative fibroblasts also showed high-affinity binding that yielded linear Scatchard plots. On a total protein basis, HDL2 (d = 1.063-1.10), HDL3 and very high density lipoproteins (VHDL, d = 1.21-1.25) competed as effectively as apo E-free HDL for binding of apo E-free 125I-HDL to normal fibroblasts. Also, HDL2, HDL3, and VHDL competed similarly for binding of 125I-HDL3 to LDL receptor-negative fibroblasts. In contrast, LDL was a weak competitor for HDL binding. These results indicate that both human fibroblasts and arterial smooth muscle cells possess specific high affinity HDL binding sites. As indicated by enhanced LDL binding and degradation and increased sterol synthesis, apo E-free HDL3 promoted cholesterol efflux from fibroblasts. These effects also saturated at HDL3 concentrations of 20 micrograms/ml, suggesting that promotion of cholesterol efflux by HDL is mediated by binding to the high-affinity cell surface sites.

  10. Biochemical characterization of high-affinity 3H-opioid binding. Further evidence for Mu1 sites

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimura, S.L.; Recht, L.D.; Pasternak, G.W.

    1984-01-01

    In saturation studies with (/sup 3/H)dihydromorphine, unlabeled D-Ala2-D-Leu5-enkephalin (1 nM) inhibited the high-affinity binding component far more potently than the lower-affinity one. Similarly, morphine (1 nM) inhibited the higher-affinity binding of /sup 3/H-D-Ala2-D-Leu5-enkephalin to a greater extent than its lower-affinity binding component, consistent with a common high-affinity binding site for opiates and enkephalins. Treatment of tissue with either trypsin (1 microgram/ml) or N-ethylmaleimide (25 microM) effectively eliminated the high-affinity binding component of a series of /sup 3/H-opiates and opioid peptides. Competition studies following both treatments were consistent with a common high-affinity binding site. Both treatments also eliminated the ability of low morphine concentrations (less than 1 nM) to inhibit /sup 3/H-D-Ala2-D-Leu5-enkephalin binding and of low D-Ala2-D-Leu5-enkephalin concentrations (less than 1 nM) to inhibit (/sup 3/H)dihydromorphine binding. Protection experiments examining N-ethylmaleimide (25 microM) inhibition of (/sup 3/H)dihydromorphine binding showed significant protection (p less than 0.002) by both unlabeled D-Ala2-D-Leu5-enkephalin and morphine (both at 1 nM). When studied together, both naloxonazine and N-ethylmaleimide inhibited (/sup 3/H)dihydromorphine binding to a similar extent. Equally important, tissue previously treated with naloxonazine was far less sensitive to N-ethylmaleimide than was untreated control tissue, consistent with the possibility that both treatments affected the same site. Together, these results support the concept of a common high-affinity binding site for opiates and opioid peptides.

  11. Newly synthesized cAMP is integrated at a membrane protein complex signalosome to ensure receptor response specificity.

    PubMed

    Guinzberg, Raquel; Díaz-Cruz, Antonio; Acosta-Trujillo, Carlos; Vilchis-Landeros, María Magdalena; Vázquez-Meza, Héctor; Lozano-Flores, Carlos; Chiquete-Felix, Natalia; Varela-Echavarría, Alfredo; Uribe-Carvajal, Salvador; Riveros-Rosas, Héctor; Piña, Enrique

    2017-01-01

    Spatiotemporal regulation of cAMP within the cell is required to achieve receptor-specific responses. The mechanism through which the cell selects a specific response to newly synthesized cAMP is not fully understood. In hepatocyte plasma membranes, we identified two functional and independent cAMP-responsive signaling protein macrocomplexes that produce, use, degrade, and regulate their own nondiffusible (sequestered) cAMP pool to achieve their specific responses. Each complex responds to the stimulation of an adenosine G protein-coupled receptor (Ado-GPCR), bound to either A2A or A2B , but not simultaneously to both. Each isoprotein involved in each signaling cascade was identified by measuring changes in cAMP levels after receptor activation, and its participation was confirmed by antibody-mediated inactivation. A2A -Ado-GPCR selective stimulation activates adenylyl cyclase 6 (AC6), which is bound to AKAP79/150, to synthesize cAMP which is used by two other AKAP79/150-tethered proteins: protein kinase A (PKA) and phosphodiesterase 3A (PDE3A). In contrast, A2B -Ado-GPCR stimulation activates D-AKAP2-attached AC5 to generate cAMP, which is channeled to two other D-AKAP2-tethered proteins: guanine-nucleotide exchange factor 2 (Epac2) and PDE3B. In both cases, prior activation of PKA or Epac2 with selective cAMP analogs prevents de novo cAMP synthesis. In addition, we show that cAMP does not diffuse between these protein macrocomplexes or 'signalosomes'. Evidence of coimmunoprecipitation and colocalization of some proteins belonging to each signalosome is presented. Each signalosome constitutes a minimal functional signaling unit with its own machinery to synthesize and regulate a sequestered cAMP pool. Thus, each signalosome is devoted to ensure the transmission of a unique and unequivocal message through the cell.

  12. The effect of phosphodiesterase inhibitors on the extinction of cocaine-induced conditioned place preference in mice.

    PubMed

    Liddie, Shervin; Anderson, Karen L; Paz, Andres; Itzhak, Yossef

    2012-10-01

    Several phosphodiesterase inhibitors (PDEis) improve cognition, suggesting that an increase in brain cAMP and cGMP facilitates learning and memory. Since extinction of drug-seeking behavior requires associative learning, consolidation and formation of new memory, the present study investigated the efficacy of three different PDEis in the extinction of cocaine-induced conditioned place preference (CPP) in B6129S mice. Mice were conditioned by escalating doses of cocaine which was resistant to extinction by free exploration. Immediately following each extinction session mice received (a) saline/vehicle, (b) rolipram (PDE4 inhibitor), (c) BAY-73-6691 (PDE9 inhibitor) or (d) papaverine (PDE10A inhibitor). Mice that received saline/vehicle during extinction training showed no reduction in CPP for >10 days. BAY-73-6691 (a) dose-dependently increased cGMP in hippocampus and amygdala, (b) significantly facilitated extinction and (c) diminished the reinstatement of cocaine CPP. Rolipram, which selectively increased brain cAMP levels, and papaverine which caused increases in both cAMP and cGMP levels, had no significant effect on the extinction of cocaine CPP. The results suggest that increase in hippocampal and amygdalar cGMP levels via blockade of PDE9 has a prominent role in the consolidation of extinction learning.

  13. AMPK antagonizes hepatic glucagon-stimulated cyclic AMP signalling via phosphorylation-induced activation of cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase 4B

    PubMed Central

    Johanns, M.; Lai, Y.-C.; Hsu, M.-F.; Jacobs, R.; Vertommen, D.; Van Sande, J.; Dumont, J. E.; Woods, A.; Carling, D.; Hue, L.; Viollet, B.; Foretz, M; Rider, M H

    2016-01-01

    Biguanides such as metformin have previously been shown to antagonize hepatic glucagon-stimulated cyclic AMP (cAMP) signalling independently of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) via direct inhibition of adenylate cyclase by AMP. Here we show that incubation of hepatocytes with the small-molecule AMPK activator 991 decreases glucagon-stimulated cAMP accumulation, cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) activity and downstream PKA target phosphorylation. Moreover, incubation of hepatocytes with 991 increases the Vmax of cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase 4B (PDE4B) without affecting intracellular adenine nucleotide concentrations. The effects of 991 to decrease glucagon-stimulated cAMP concentrations and activate PDE4B are lost in hepatocytes deleted for both catalytic subunits of AMPK. PDE4B is phosphorylated by AMPK at three sites, and by site-directed mutagenesis, Ser304 phosphorylation is important for activation. In conclusion, we provide a new mechanism by which AMPK antagonizes hepatic glucagon signalling via phosphorylation-induced PDE4B activation. PMID:26952277

  14. Phosphodiesterase 2 negatively regulates adenosine-induced transcription of the tyrosine hydroxylase gene in PC12 rat pheochromocytoma cells.

    PubMed

    Makuch, Edyta; Kuropatwa, Marianna; Kurowska, Ewa; Ciekot, Jaroslaw; Klopotowska, Dagmara; Matuszyk, Janusz

    2014-07-05

    Adenosine induces expression of the tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) gene in PC12 cells. However, it is suggested that atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) inhibits expression of this gene. Using real-time PCR and luciferase reporter assays we found that ANP significantly decreases the adenosine-induced transcription of the TH gene. Results of measurements of cyclic nucleotide concentrations indicated that ANP-induced accumulation of cGMP inhibits the adenosine-induced increase in cAMP level. Using selective phosphodiesterase 2 (PDE2) inhibitors and a synthetic cGMP analog activating PDE2, we found that PDE2 is involved in coupling the ANP-triggered signal to the cAMP metabolism. We have established that ANP-induced elevated levels of cGMP as well as cGMP analog stimulate hydrolytic activity of PDE2, leading to inhibition of adenosine-induced transcription of the TH gene. We conclude that ANP mediates negative regulation of TH gene expression via stimulation of PDE2-dependent cAMP breakdown in PC12 cells.

  15. No ordinary boot camp.

    PubMed

    Tichy, N M

    2001-04-01

    Many companies now run boot camps--comprehensive orientation programs designed to help new hires hit the ground running. They're intense and intimidating, and new employees emerge from them with strong bonds to other recruits and to the organization. But at Trilogy, organizational consultant Noel Tichy discovered one program that's a breed apart. In this article, Tichy gives us a detailed tour of Trilogy's boot camp, Trilogy University, to demonstrate why it's so different--and so effective. Like the best boot camps, it serves as an immersion in both the technical skills new recruits will need for their jobs and Trilogy's corporate culture, which emphasizes risk-taking, teamwork, humility, and a strong customer focus. But this is a new-employee orientation session that's so fundamental to the company as a whole that it's presided over by the CEO and top corporate executives for fully six months of the year. Why? In two three-month sessions, these top executives hone their own strategic thinking about the company as they decide what to teach the new recruits each session. They also find the company's next generation of new products as they judge the innovative ideas the recruits are tasked with developing--making the program Trilogy's main R&D engine. And they pull the company's rising technical stars into mentoring roles for the new recruits, helping to build the next generation of top leadership. After spending months on-site studying Trilogy University, Tichy came away highly impressed by the power of the virtuous teaching cycle the program has set in motion. Leaders of the organization are learning from recruits at the same time that the recruits are learning from the leaders. It's a model, he argues, that other companies would do well to emulate.

  16. The Camp Health Manual. An Excellent Reference Written Especially for Organized Camps. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldring, David; Middelkamp, J. Neal

    This book is a guide to the diagnosis and care of sick children in organized camping situations. This book presents health care information for the management of medical and surgical problems by the camp counselor, camp director, camp nurse, and camp physician. The chapters are: (1) Camp Standards; (2) The Infirmary; (3) Infirmary Supplies; (4)…

  17. Blending Technology with Camp Tradition: Technology Can Simplify Camp Operations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salzman, Jeff

    2000-01-01

    Discusses uses of technology appropriate for camps, which are service organizations based on building relationships. Describes relationship marketing and how it can be enhanced through use of Web sites, interactive brochures, and client databases. Outlines other technology uses at camp: automated dispensing of medications, satellite tracking of…

  18. A JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL ORIENTATION CAMP, A COORDINATED CAMPING EXPERIENCE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    NEALE, DANIEL; AND OTHERS

    A 2-WEEK SUMMER CAMPING PROGRAM WAS OFFERED TO 61 DISADVANTAGED STUDENTS ABOUT TO ENTER LINCOLN JUNIOR HIGH IN MINNEAPOLIS, MINNESOTA. THE PROGRAM'S PRIMARY PURPOSE WAS TO EASE THE STUDENT'S TRANSITION INTO JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL. THROUGH CAMPING ACTIVITIES AND SCHOOL ORIENTATION CLASSES CONDUCTED BY THE LINCOLN STAFF, CAMPERS WOULD BECOME ACQUAINTED…

  19. Camp Director Education Curriculum Guide. Camp Administration Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stein, Sue, Ed.

    Part of Project STRETCH, a special personnel preparation grant, this guide contains 13 units on the practical and philosophical areas practitioners, educators, and consumers believed should be included in a basic course for administration of an organized camp: growth and development special populations, camp director's role, philosophy and…

  20. Summer Camp as Therapeutic Context: The Camp Logan Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCammon, Susan; And Others

    These symposium papers describe various aspects of the Camp Logan, South Carolina, program, a therapeutic summer residential program for children, ages 8-14, who have significant behavior problems. The philosophy and advantages of the therapeutic camping model are discussed, e.g., structure during the summer, controlled though informal…

  1. Camp Greentop's Adventure Camp: We Ain't No Rudypoo's.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Groff, Diane; Albright, Brian; Purvis, Katie; Creamer, Justin; Pease, Alicia

    2002-01-01

    A day-by-day account describes Camp Greentop's first 5-day adventure camping trip, which was attended by five individuals with disabilities and their counselors. The first day was spent in games and initiatives designed to develop communication, teamwork, and dependability. Other days were devoted to hiking, rock climbing, and whitewater rafting.…

  2. Living with Cancer at Camp Rainbow.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Wayne; Breitenstein, Donna

    1988-01-01

    Describes the camping experience at Camp Rainbow (Arkansas), specifically designed for children with cancer and their siblings. Discusses the emotional impact of childhood cancer on patients, parents, and siblings, and suggests positive outcomes of camp participation. Includes eight references. (SV)

  3. Current use of phosphodiesterase inhibitors in urology

    PubMed Central

    Hakky, Tariq Said; Jain, Lakshay

    2015-01-01

    The causes of male erectile dysfunction (ED) are quite variable and are now commonly divided into etiologies such as ischemia, smooth muscle damage, or altered blood flow. Although varying rates of ED have been reported in literature, the number of men with ED is projected to increase worldwide by 2025 to approximately 322 million. Since the introduction of phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5) inhibitors, there has been a paradigm shift in the treatment of ED because PDE5 inhibitors address a broad spectrum of etiologies for ED. Today, the American Urological Association recommends the use of three PDE5 inhibitors (sildenafil, tadalafil, and vardenafil) as a first-line therapy for the treatment of ED. This review evaluates the pharmacological mechanism of PDE5 inhibitors along with the impact and use of sildenafil, vardenafil, tadalafil, and avanafil. By increasing intracellular cGMP levels, PDE5 inhibitors have been shown to be effective in the treatment of ED. Through their effects on other cellular signaling pathways, PDE5 inhibitors have the potential for treating other urologic conditions as well. The use of PDE5 inhibitors can also be combined to produce a synergistic effect in conditions such as male hypogonadism and benign prostatic hyperplasia in addition to ED. PMID:26328208

  4. A new therapeutic approach to erectile dysfunction: urotensin-II receptor high affinity agonist ligands.

    PubMed

    di Villa Bianca, Roberta d'Emmanuele; Mitidieri, Emma; Donnarumma, Erminia; Fusco, Ferdinando; Longo, Nicola; Rosa, Giuseppe De; Novellino, Ettore; Grieco, Paolo; Mirone, Vincenzo; Cirino, Giuseppe; Sorrentino, Raffaella

    2015-01-01

    Urotensin-II (U-II) is a cyclic peptide that acts through a G protein-coupled receptor (urotensin-II receptor [UTR]) mainly involved in cardiovascular function in humans. The urotensinergic system is also implicated in the urogenital tract. Indeed, U-II relaxes human corpus cavernosum strips and causes an increase in intracavernous pressure (ICP) in rats. In light of this, the U-II/UTR pathway can be considered a new target for the treatment of erectile dysfunction. On this hypothesis, herein we report on two new UTR high affinity-agonists, P5U (H-Asp-c[Pen-Phe-Trp-Lys-Tyr-Cys]-Val-OH) and UPG84(H-Asp-c[Pen-Phe-DTrp-Orn-(pNH 2 ) Phe-Cys]-Val-OH). The effects of P5U and UPG84 were each compared separately with U-II by monitoring the ICP in anesthetized rats. Intracavernous injection of U-II (0.03-1 nmol), P5U (0.03-1 nmol) or UPG84 (0.03-1 nmol) caused an increase in ICP. P5U, in particular, elicited a significant increase in ICP as compared to U-II. The observed effect by using P5U at a dose of 0.1 nmol per rat was comparable to the effect elicited by U-II at a dose of 0.3 nmol. Moreover, UPG84 at the lowest dose (0.03 nmol) showed an effect similar to the highest dose of U-II (1 nmol). Furthermore, UPG84 was found to be more effective than P5U. Indeed, while the lowest dose of P5U (0.03 nmol) did not affect the ICP, UPG84, at the same dose, induced a prominent penile erection in rat. These compounds did not modify the blood pressure, which indicates a good safety profile. In conclusion, UPG84 and P5U may open new perspectives for the management of erectile dysfunction.

  5. High-affinity VEGF antagonists by oligomerization of a minimal sequence VEGF-binding domain.

    PubMed

    Stefano, James E; Bird, Julie; Kyazike, Josephine; Cheng, Anthony Wai-Ming; Boudanova, Ekaterina; Dwyer, Markryan; Hou, Lihui; Qiu, Huawei; Matthews, Gloria; O'Callaghan, Michael; Pan, Clark Q

    2012-12-19

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) neutralizing antagonists including antibodies or receptor extracellular domain Fc fusions have been applied clinically to control angiogenesis in cancer, wet age-related macular degeneration, and edema. We report here the generation of high-affinity VEGF-binding domains by chemical linkage of the second domain of the VEGF receptor Flt-1 (D2) in several configurations. Recombinant D2 was expressed with a 13 a.a. C-terminal tag, including a C-terminal cysteine to enable its dimerization by disulfide bond formation or by attachment to divalent PEGs and oligomerization by coupling to multivalent PEGs. Disulfide-linked dimers produced by Cu(2+) oxidation of the free-thiol form of the protein demonstrated picomolar affinity for VEGF in solution, comparable to that of a D2-Fc fusion (sFLT01) and ~50-fold higher than monomeric D2, suggesting the 26 a.a. tag length between the two D2 domains permits simultaneous interaction of both faces of the VEGF homodimer. Extending the separation between the D2 domains by short PEG spacers from 0.35 kD to 5 kD produced a modest ~2-fold increase in affinity over the disulfide, thus defining the optimal distance between the two D2 domains for maximum affinity. By surface plasmon resonance (SPR), a larger (~5-fold) increase in affinity was observed by conjugation of the D2 monomer to the termini of 4-arm PEG, and yielding a product with a larger hydrodynamic radius than sFLT01. The higher affinity displayed by these D2 PEG tetramers than either D2 dimer or sFLT01 was largely a consequence of a slower rate of dissociation, suggesting the simultaneous binding by these tetramers to neighboring surface-bound VEGF. Finally, disulfide-linked D2 dimers showed a greater resistance to autocatalytic fragmentation than sFLT01 under elevated temperature stress, indicating such minimum-sequence constructs may be better suited for sustained-release formulations. Therefore, these constructs represent novel Fc

  6. Developing High-Affinity Protein Capture Agents and Nanotechnology-Based Platforms for In Vitro Diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohde, Rosemary Dyane

    In this thesis, I describe projects that were aimed at improving ways to capture proteins for clinical diagnostics. Nanoelectronic sensors, such as silicon nanowires (SiNWs), can provide label-free quantitative measurements of protein biomarkers in real time. One technical challenge for SiNWs is to develop chemistry that can be applied for selectively encoding the nanowire surfaces with capture agents, thus making them sensors that have selectivity for specific proteins. Furthermore, because of the nature of how the sensor works, it is desirable to achieve this spatially selective chemical functionalization without having the silicon undergo oxidation. This method is described here and provides a general platform that can incorporate organic and biological molecules on Si (111) with minimal oxidation of the silicon surface. The development of these devices is, in part, driven by early diagnosis, treatment, monitoring, and personalized medicine---all of which are increasingly requiring quantitative, rapid, and multiparameter measurements. To begin achieving this goal, a large number of protein biomarkers need to be captured and quantitatively measured to create a diagnostic panel. One of the greatest challenges towards making protein-biomarker-based in vitro diagnostics inexpensive involves developing capture agents to detect the proteins. A major thrust of this thesis is to develop multi-valent, high-affinity and high-selectivity protein capture agents using in situ click chemistry. In situ click chemistry is a tool that utilizes the protein itself to catalyze the formation of a biligand from individual azide and alkyne ligands that are co-localized. Large one-bead one-compound (OBOC) libraries of peptides are used to form the body of these ligands, also providing high chemical diversity with minimal synthetic effort. This process can be repeated to identify a triligand, tetraligand, and so forth. Moreover, the resulting multiligand protein capture agents can be

  7. High-affinity L-arabinose transport operon. Nucleotide sequence and analysis of gene products.

    PubMed

    Scripture, J B; Voelker, C; Miller, S; O'Donnell, R T; Polgar, L; Rade, J; Horazdovsky, B F; Hogg, R W

    1987-09-05

    The nucleotide sequence of the "high-affinity" L-arabinose transport operon has been determined 3' from the regulatory region and found to contain three open reading frames designated araF, araG and araH. The first gene 3' to the regulatory region, araF, encodes the 23-residue signal peptide and the 306-residue mature form of the L-arabinose binding protein (33,200 Mr). The binding protein, which has been described elsewhere, is hydrophilic, soluble and found in the periplasm of Escherichia coli. This gene is followed by an intragenic space of 72 nucleotides, which contains a region of dyad symmetry 23 nucleotides long capable of forming an 11-member stem-loop. The second gene, designated araG, contains an open reading frame capable of encoding an equally hydrophilic protein containing 504 residues (55,000 Mr). Following a 14-nucleotide spacer, which does not appear to have any secondary structure, the third open reading frame, herein designated araH, is capable of encoding a hydrophobic protein containing 329 residues (34,000 Mr) that can only be envisioned as having an integral membrane location. 3' to araH there is a T-rich region containing a 24-nucleotide area of dyad symmetry centered 55 nucleotides from the termination codon. Analysis of the derived primary sequences of the araG and araH products indicates the nature and potential features of these components. The araG protein was found to possess internal homology between its amino and carboxyl-terminal halves, suggesting a common origin. The araG gene product has been shown to be homologous to the rbsA gene product, the hisP product, the ptsB product and the malK product, all of which presumably play similar roles in their respective transport systems. Putative ATP binding sites are observed within the regions of homology. The araH gene product has been shown to be homologous to the rbsC gene product, which is the first observed homology between two purported membrane proteins.

  8. Structural characterization of a high affinity mononuclear site in the copper(II)-α-synuclein complex.

    PubMed

    Bortolus, Marco; Bisaglia, Marco; Zoleo, Alfonso; Fittipaldi, Maria; Benfatto, Maurizio; Bubacco, Luigi; Maniero, Anna Lisa

    2010-12-29

    Human α-Synuclein (aS), a 140 amino acid protein, is the main constituent of Lewy bodies, the cytoplasmatic deposits found in the brains of Parkinson's disease patients, where it is present in an aggregated, fibrillar form. Recent studies have shown that aS is a metal binding protein. Moreover, heavy metal ions, in particular divalent copper, accelerate the aggregation process of the protein. In this work, we investigated the high affinity binding mode of truncated aS (1-99) (aS99) with Cu(II), in a stoichiometric ratio, to elucidate the residues involved in the binding site and the role of copper ions in the protein oligomerization. We used Electron Paramagnetic Resonance spectroscopy on the Cu(II)-aS99 complex at pH 6.5, performing both multifrequency continuous wave experiments and pulsed experiments at X-band. The comparison of 9.5 and 95 GHz data showed that at this pH only one binding mode is present. To identify the nature of the ligands, we performed Electron Spin Echo Envelope Modulation, Hyperfine Sublevel Correlation Spectroscopy, and pulsed Davies Electron-Nuclear Double Resonance (Davies-ENDOR) experiments. We determined that the EPR parameters are typical of a type-II copper complex, in a slightly distorted square planar geometry. Combining the results from the different pulsed techniques, we obtained that the equatorial coordination is {N(Im), N(-), H(2)O, O}, where N(im) is the imino nitrogen of His50, N(-) a deprotonated amido backbone nitrogen that we attribute to His50, H(2)O an exchangeable water molecule, and O an unidentified oxygen ligand. Moreover, we propose that the free amino terminus (Met1) participates in the complex as an axial ligand. The MXAN analysis of the XAS k-edge absorption data allowed us to independently validate the structural features proposed on the basis of the magnetic parameters of the Cu(II)-aS99 complex and then to further refine the quality of the proposed structural model.

  9. Characterization of high affinity (/sup 3/H)triazolam binding in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Earle, M.; Concas, A.; Yamamura, H.I.

    1986-03-01

    The hypnotic Triazolam (TZ), a triazolo (1,4)-benzodiazepine, displays a short physiological half life and has been used for the treatment of insomnia related to anxiety states. Specific binding properties of this recently tritiated TZ were characterized. The authors major objectives were the direct measurement of the temperature dependence and the GABA effect on (/sup 3/H)TZ binding. Saturation studies showed a shift to lower affinity at 37/sup 0/C (K/sub d/ = 0.25 +/- 0.01 nM at O/sup 0/C; K/sub d/ = 1.46 +/- 0.03 nM at 37/sup 0/C) while the B/sub max/ values remained unchanged (1003 +/- 37 fmoles/mg prot. at 0/sup 0/C and 1001 +/- 43 fmoles/mg prot. at 37/sup 0/C). Inhibition studies showed that (/sup 3/H)TZ binding displayed no GABA shift at 0/sup 0/C(K/sub i/ 0.37 +/- 0.03 nM/- GABA and K/sub i/ = 0.55 +/- 0.13 nM/+GABA) but a nearly two-fold shift was apparent at 37/sup 0/C (K/sub i/ = 2.92 +/- 0.2 nM/-GABA; K/sub i/ = 1.37 +/- 0.11 mM/+GABA). These results were also confirmed by saturation studies in the presence or absence of GABA showing a shift to higher affinity in the presence of GABA only at 37/sup 0/C. In Ro 15-1788/(/sup 3/H)TZ competition experiments the presence of GABA did not affect the inhibitory potency of Ro 15-1788 on (/sup 3/H)TZ binding at both temperatures. In conclusion (/sup 3/H)TZ binding showed an extremely high affinity for benzodiazepine receptors. In contrast to reported literature, the findings suggest that TZ interacts with benzodiazepine receptors similar to other benzodiazepine agonists.

  10. Identification of a high-affinity ligand that exhibits complete aryl hydrocarbon receptor antagonism.

    PubMed

    Smith, Kayla J; Murray, Iain A; Tanos, Rachel; Tellew, John; Boitano, Anthony E; Bisson, William H; Kolluri, Siva K; Cooke, Michael P; Perdew, Gary H

    2011-07-01

    The biological functions of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) can be delineated into dioxin response element (DRE)-dependent or -independent activities. Ligands exhibiting either full or partial agonist activity, e.g., 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin and α-naphthoflavone, have been demonstrated to potentiate both DRE-dependent and -independent AHR function. In contrast, the recently identified selective AHR modulators (SAhRMs), e.g., 1-allyl-3-(3,4-dimethoxyphenyl)-7-(trifluoromethyl)-1H-indazole (SGA360), bias AHR toward DRE-independent functionality while displaying antagonism with regard to ligand-induced DRE-dependent transcription. Recent studies have expanded the physiological role of AHR to include modulation of hematopoietic progenitor expansion and immunoregulation. It remains to be established whether such physiological roles are mediated through DRE-dependent or -independent pathways. Here, we present evidence for a third class of AHR ligand, "pure" or complete antagonists with the capacity to suppress both DRE-dependent and -independent AHR functions, which may facilitate dissection of physiological AHR function with regard to DRE or non-DRE-mediated signaling. Competitive ligand binding assays together with in silico modeling identify N-(2-(1H-indol-3-yl)ethyl)-9-isopropyl-2-(5-methylpyridin-3-yl)-9H-purin-6-amine (GNF351) as a high-affinity AHR ligand. DRE-dependent reporter assays, in conjunction with quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis of AHR targets, reveal GNF351 as a potent AHR antagonist that demonstrates efficacy in the nanomolar range. Furthermore, unlike many currently used AHR antagonists, e.g., α-naphthoflavone, GNF351 is devoid of partial agonist potential. It is noteworthy that in a model of AHR-mediated DRE-independent function, i.e., suppression of cytokine-induced acute-phase gene expression, GNF351 has the capacity to antagonize agonist and SAhRM-mediated suppression of SAA1. Such data indicate that GNF351 is a

  11. Ultraviolet light induction of skin carcinoma in the mouse; influence of cAMP modifying agents.

    PubMed

    Zajdela, F; Latarjet, R

    1978-01-01

    A short review of pathogenic factors in U.V. light skin carcinogenesis in the mouse is presented. Caffeine and theophylline applied locally during U.V. irradiation caused a 50 percent reduction of skin tumour induction in Swiss mice. These two chemicals are inhibitors of DNA postreplication repair, but they also raise the intracellular level of cyclic AMP by inhibiting cAMP phosphodiesterase with, as a consequence, a possible slowing down of cellular growth. Control experiments using three different chemicals capable of raising the cAMP level in epidermal cells gave negative results. These experimental data are compatible with our original hypothesis according to which production of skin cancers by U.V. radiation is in same way related to DNA repair which helps the cell to survive but allows or favours the occurrence of errors in cellular DNA.

  12. Encountering Child Abuse at Camp.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Durall, John K.

    1997-01-01

    Defines child abuse, including the three categories: physical, sexual, and psychological. Presents characteristics and behaviors of each type of abuse, and long-term effects. Discusses how to handle abuse that occurs at camp, and the effects on the camp. Sidebars present abuse statistics, 15 activities that promote psychological wellness, and 8…

  13. Kids Camping Takes the Challenge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Vickie L.; Hohnbaum, Claudia

    2002-01-01

    A Wisconsin Girl Scout camp integrated The Healthy Kids Challenge into its program. The camp evaluated policies related to meals, snacks, physical activities, team building, and self-esteem. Staff inservice training resulted in healthier meals on the same budget and developed ownership of the program. Campers and families had opportunities to…

  14. 36 CFR 13.25 - Camping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... impacting park resources. (c) Designated campgrounds. Except at designated campgrounds, camping is... camping in designated campgrounds. Violating restrictions, terms, and conditions is prohibited....

  15. 36 CFR 13.25 - Camping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... impacting park resources. (c) Designated campgrounds. Except at designated campgrounds, camping is... camping in designated campgrounds. Violating restrictions, terms, and conditions is prohibited....

  16. 36 CFR 13.25 - Camping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... impacting park resources. (c) Designated campgrounds. Except at designated campgrounds, camping is... camping in designated campgrounds. Violating restrictions, terms, and conditions is prohibited....

  17. 36 CFR 13.25 - Camping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... impacting park resources. (c) Designated campgrounds. Except at designated campgrounds, camping is... camping in designated campgrounds. Violating restrictions, terms, and conditions is prohibited....

  18. 36 CFR 13.25 - Camping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... impacting park resources. (c) Designated campgrounds. Except at designated campgrounds, camping is... camping in designated campgrounds. Violating restrictions, terms, and conditions is prohibited....

  19. Pharmacological profile of T-1032, a novel specific phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitor, in isolated rat aorta and rabbit corpus cavernosum.

    PubMed

    Takagi, M; Mochida, H; Noto, T; Yano, K; Inoue, H; Ikeo, T; Kikkawa, K

    2001-01-05

    This study was designed to examine the pharmacological properties of T-1032 (methyl-2-(4-aminophenyl)-1,2-dihydro-1-oxo-7-(2-pyridinylmethoxy)-4-(3,4,5-trimethoxyphenyl)-3-isoquinoline carboxylate sulfate), a novel phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitor, in isolated rat aorta and rabbit corpus cavernosum. T-1032 (3x10(-11) to 3x10(-7) M) caused an endothelium-dependent relaxation in the isolated rat aorta precontracted with phenylephrine, and the relaxation was accompanied by an increase in cGMP but not cAMP levels. The T-1032-induced relaxation was attenuated by N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) (10(-3) M), a nitric oxide (NO) synthase inhibitor, or 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-alpha]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ) (10(-5) M), a guanylyl cyclase inhibitor. T-1032 (10(-9), 10(-8) M) produced a potentiation of the relaxation induced by sodium nitroprusside, but not of the relaxation induced by isoproterenol. In the isolated rabbit corpus cavernosum precontracted with phenylephrine, the electrical field stimulation-induced relaxation was attenuated by treatment with tetrodotoxin (10(-6) M) as well as L-NAME (10(-4) M). The L-NAME-inhibited relaxation was restored by treatment with L-arginine (5x10(-4) M). T-1032 (10(-9) to 10(-6) M) and sildenafil (10(-9) to 10(-6) M) produced a potentiation of the electrical field stimulation-induced relaxation as well as a decrease in basal tension in a concentration-dependent manner. It was concluded that T-1032 had potentiating effects on the NO/cGMP signaling pathway in isolated tissues, probably through specific blockade of phosphodiesterase type 5. T-1032 would be a useful compound to examine the physiologic functions of phosphodiesterase type 5 in mammalian tissues.

  20. Local BLyS production by T follicular cells mediates retention of high affinity B cells during affinity maturation

    PubMed Central

    Goenka, Radhika; Matthews, Andrew H.; Zhang, Bochao; O’Neill, Patrick J.; Scholz, Jean L.; Migone, Thi-Sau; Leonard, Warren J.; Stohl, William; Hershberg, Uri

    2014-01-01

    We have assessed the role of B lymphocyte stimulator (BLyS) and its receptors in the germinal center (GC) reaction and affinity maturation. Despite ample BLyS retention on B cells in follicular (FO) regions, the GC microenvironment lacks substantial BLyS. This reflects IL-21–mediated down-regulation of the BLyS receptor TACI (transmembrane activator and calcium modulator and cyclophilin ligand interactor) on GC B cells, thus limiting their capacity for BLyS binding and retention. Within the GC, FO helper T cells (TFH cells) provide a local source of BLyS. Whereas T cell–derived BLyS is dispensable for normal GC cellularity and somatic hypermutation, it is required for the efficient selection of high affinity GC B cell clones. These findings suggest that during affinity maturation, high affinity clones rely on TFH-derived BLyS for their persistence. PMID:24367004

  1. Exposure to an Extremely-Low-Frequency Magnetic Field Stimulates Adrenal Steroidogenesis via Inhibition of Phosphodiesterase Activity in a Mouse Adrenal Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Kitaoka, Kazuyoshi; Kawata, Shiyori; Yoshida, Tomohiro; Kadoriku, Fumiya; Kitamura, Mitsuo

    2016-01-01

    Extremely low-frequency magnetic fields (ELF-MFs) are generated by power lines and household electrical devices. In the last several decades, some evidence has shown an association between ELF-MF exposure and depression and/or anxiety in epidemiological and animal studies. The mechanism underlying ELF-MF-induced depression is considered to involve adrenal steroidogenesis, which is triggered by ELF-MF exposure. However, how ELF-MFs stimulate adrenal steroidogenesis is controversial. In the current study, we investigated the effect of ELF-MF exposure on the mouse adrenal cortex-derived Y-1 cell line and the human adrenal cortex-derived H295R cell line to clarify whether the ELF-MF stimulates adrenal steroidogenesis directly. ELF-MF exposure was found to significantly stimulate adrenal steroidogenesis (p < 0.01–0.05) and the expression of adrenal steroid synthetic enzymes (p < 0.05) in Y-1 cells, but the effect was weak in H295R cells. Y-1 cells exposed to an ELF-MF showed significant decreases in phosphodiesterase activity (p < 0.05) and intracellular Ca2+ concentration (p < 0.01) and significant increases in intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) concentration (p < 0.001–0.05) and cAMP response element-binding protein phosphorylation (p < 0.05). The increase in cAMP was not inhibited by treatment with NF449, an inhibitor of the Gs alpha subunit of G protein. Our results suggest that ELF-MF exposure stimulates adrenal steroidogenesis via an increase in intracellular cAMP caused by the inhibition of phosphodiesterase activity in Y-1 cells. The same mechanism may trigger the increase in adrenal steroid secretion in mice observed in our previous study. PMID:27100201

  2. Localization and activity of tissue bound cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase in normal and lack of changes in psoriatic human skin.

    PubMed

    Mahrle, G; Organos, C E

    1976-12-01

    This study has been undertaken to elucidate the localization and the activity of cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase (PDE) in psoriatic epidermis compared to normal. The results showed that the evaluation of cytochemical methods may be difficult because of the various factors which interfere with the reaction and the considerable amount of background staining. Additionally, only the tissue bound particulate enzyme fraction may be demonstrated by cytochemical means. Nevertheless, the method did reveal that the activity of PDE, if any, is localized on the cytoplasmic membranes of the cells, independent of their origin, and not on the cell surface. Moreover, no differences were found between normal and psoriatic skin. It seems, therefore, that the intracellular degradation of cAMP remains unaltered in psoriasis.

  3. Identification in Silico and Experimental Validation of Novel Phosphodiesterase 7 Inhibitors with Efficacy in Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis Mice

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    A neural network model has been developed to predict the inhibitory capacity of any chemical structure to be a phosphodiesterase 7 (PDE7) inhibitor, a new promising kind of drugs for the treatment of neurological disorders. The numerical definition of the structures was achieved using CODES program. Through the validation of this neural network model, a novel family of 5-imino-1,2,4-thiadiazoles (ITDZs) has been identified as inhibitors of PDE7. Experimental extensive biological studies have demonstrated the ability of ITDZs to inhibit PDE7 and to increase intracellular levels of cAMP. Among them, the derivative 15 showed a high in vitro potency with desirable pharmacokinetic profile (safe genotoxicity and blood brain barrier penetration). Administration of ITDZ 15 in an experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) mouse model results in a significant attenuation of clinical symptoms, showing the potential of ITDZs, especially compound 15, for the effective treatment of multiple sclerosis. PMID:23077723

  4. Desynchronization of Cells on the Developmental Path Triggers the Formation of Spiral Waves of cAMP during Dictyostelium Aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauzeral, Jacques; Halloy, Jose; Goldbeter, Albert

    1997-08-01

    Whereas it is relatively easy to account for the formation of concentric (target) waves of cAMP in the course of Dictyostelium discoideum aggregation after starvation, the origin of spiral waves remains obscure. We investigate a physiologically plausible mechanism for the spontaneous formation of spiral waves of cAMP in D. discoideum. The scenario relies on the developmental path associated with the continuous changes in the activity of enzymes such as adenylate cyclase and phosphodiesterase observed during the hours that follow starvation. These changes bring the cells successively from a nonexcitable state to an excitable state in which they relay suprathreshold cAMP pulses, and then to autonomous oscillations of cAMP, before the system returns to an excitable state. By analyzing a model for cAMP signaling based on receptor desensitization, we show that the desynchronization of cells on this developmental path triggers the formation of fully developed spirals of cAMP. Developmental paths that do not correspond to the sequence of dynamic transitions no relay-relay-oscillations-relay are less able or fail to give rise to the formation of spirals.

  5. Multipurpose ligand, DAKLI (Dynorphin A-analogue Kappa LIgand), with high affinity and selectivity for dynorphin (. kappa. opioid) binding sites

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, A.; Nestor, J.J. Jr.; Naidu, A.; Newman, S.R. )

    1988-10-01

    The authors describe a synthetic ligand, DALKI (Dynorphin A-analogue Kappa LIgand), related to the opioid peptide dynorphin A. A single reactive amino group at the extended carboxyl terminus permits various reporter groups to be attached, such as {sup 125}I-labeled Bolton-Hunter reagent, fluorescein isothiocyanate, or biotin. These derivatives have high affinity and selectivity for the dynorphin ({kappa} opioid) receptor. An incidental finding is that untreated guinea pig brain membranes have saturable avidin binding sites.

  6. Imaging the high-affinity state of the dopamine D2 receptor in vivo: Fact or fiction?

    PubMed Central

    Skinbjerg, Mette; Sibley, David R.; Javitch, Jonathan A.; Abi-Dargham, Anissa

    2013-01-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) has been used for more than three decades to image and quantify dopamine D2 receptors (D2R) in vivo with antagonist radioligands but in the recent years agonist radioligands have also been employed. In vitro competition studies have demonstrated that agonists bind to both a high and a low-affinity state of the D2Rs, of which the high affinity state reflects receptors that are coupled to G-proteins and the low-affinity state reflects receptors uncoupled from G-proteins. In contrast, antagonists bind with uniform affinity to the total pool of receptors. Results of these studies led to the proposal that D2Rs exist in high and low-affinity states for agonists in vivo and sparked the development and use of agonist radioligands for PET imaging with the primary purpose of measuring the proportion of receptors in the high-affinity (activating) state. Although several lines of research support the presence of high and low-affinity states of D2Rs and their detection by in vivo imaging paradigms, a growing body of controversial data has now called this into question. These include both in vivo and ex vivo studies of anesthesia effects, rodent models with increased proportions of high-affinity state D2Rs as well as the molecular evidence for stable receptor–G-protein complexes. In this commentary we review these data and discuss the evidence for the in vivo existence of D2Rs configured in high and low-affinity states and whether or not the high-affinity state of the D2R can, in fact, be imaged in vivo with agonist radioligands. PMID:21945484

  7. Characterization of Binding and Inhibitory Properties of TAK-063, a Novel Phosphodiesterase 10A Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Harada, Akina; Suzuki, Kazunori; Kamiguchi, Naomi; Miyamoto, Maki; Tohyama, Kimio; Nakashima, Kosuke; Taniguchi, Takahiko; Kimura, Haruhide

    2015-01-01

    Phosphodiesterase 10A (PDE10A) inhibition is a novel and promising approach for the treatment of central nervous system disorders such as schizophrenia and Huntington’s disease. A novel PDE10A inhibitor, TAK-063 [1-[2-fluoro-4-(1H-pyrazol-1-yl)phenyl]-5-methoxy-3-(1-phenyl-1H-pyrazol-5-yl)-pyridazin-4(1H)-one] has shown high inhibitory activity and selectivity for human recombinant PDE10A2 in vitro; the half-maximal inhibitory concentration was 0.30 nM, and selectivity over other phosphodiesterases (PDEs) was more than 15000-fold. TAK-063 at 10 µM did not show more than 50% inhibition or stimulation of 91 enzymes or receptors except for PDEs. In vitro autoradiography (ARG) studies using rat brain sections revealed that [3H]TAK-063 selectively accumulated in the caudate putamen (CPu), nucleus accumbens (NAc), globus pallidus, substantia nigra, and striatonigral projection, where PDE10A is highly expressed. This [3H]TAK-063 accumulation was almost entirely blocked by an excess amount of MP-10, a PDE10A selective inhibitor, and the accumulation was not observed in brain slices of Pde10a-knockout mice. In rat brain sections, [3H]TAK-063 bound to a single high-affinity site with mean ± SEM dissociation constants of 7.2 ± 1.2 and 2.6 ± 0.5 nM for the CPu and NAc shell, respectively. Orally administered [14C]TAK-063 selectively accumulated in PDE10A expressing brain regions in an in vivo ARG study in rats. Striatal PDE10A occupancy by TAK-063 in vivo was measured using T-773 as a tracer and a dose of 0.88 mg/kg (p.o.) was calculated to produce 50% occupancy in rats. Translational studies with TAK-063 and other PDE10A inhibitors such as those presented here will help us better understand the pharmacological profile of this class of potential central nervous system drugs. PMID:25815469

  8. High-Affinity Glucose Transport in Aspergillus nidulans Is Mediated by the Products of Two Related but Differentially Expressed Genes

    PubMed Central

    Ventura, Luisa; González, Ramón; Ramón, Daniel; MacCabe, Andrew P.

    2014-01-01

    Independent systems of high and low affinity effect glucose uptake in the filamentous fungus Aspergillus nidulans. Low-affinity uptake is known to be mediated by the product of the mstE gene. In the current work two genes, mstA and mstC, have been identified that encode high-affinity glucose transporter proteins. These proteins' primary structures share over 90% similarity, indicating that the corresponding genes share a common origin. Whilst the function of the paralogous proteins is little changed, they differ notably in their patterns of expression. The mstC gene is expressed during the early phases of germination and is subject to CreA-mediated carbon catabolite repression whereas mstA is expressed as a culture tends toward carbon starvation. In addition, various pieces of genetic evidence strongly support allelism of mstC and the previously described locus sorA. Overall, our data define MstC/SorA as a high-affinity glucose transporter expressed in germinating conidia, and MstA as a high-affinity glucose transporter that operates in vegetative hyphae under conditions of carbon limitation. PMID:24751997

  9. High affinity IgM(+) memory B cells are generated through a germinal center-dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Hara, Yasushi; Tashiro, Yasuyuki; Murakami, Akikazu; Nishimura, Miyuki; Shimizu, Takeyuki; Kubo, Masato; Burrows, Peter D; Azuma, Takachika

    2015-12-01

    During a T cell-dependent immune response, B cells undergo clonal expansion and selection and the induction of isotype switching and somatic hypermutation (SHM). Although somatically mutated IgM(+) memory B cells have been reported, it has not been established whether they are really high affinity B cells. We tracked (4-hydroxy-3-nitrophenyl) acetyl hapten-specific GC B cells from normal immunized mice based on affinity of their B cell receptor (BCR) and performed BCR sequence analysis. SHM was evident by day 7 postimmunization and increased with time, such that high affinity IgM(+) as well as IgG(+) memory B cells continued to be generated up to day 42. In contrast, class-switch recombination (CSR) was almost completed by day 7 and then the ratio of IgG1(+)/IgM(+) GC B cells remained unchanged. Together these findings suggest that IgM(+) B cells undergo SHM in the GC to generate high affinity IgM(+) memory cells and that this process continues even after CSR is accomplished.

  10. High-affinity RNA aptamers to C-reactive protein (CRP): newly developed pre-elution methods for aptamer selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orito, N.; Umekage, S.; Sato, K.; Kawauchi, S.; Tanaka, H.; Sakai, E.; Tanaka, T.; Kikuchi, Y.

    2012-03-01

    We have developed a modified SELEX (systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment) method to obtain RNA aptamers with high affinity to C-reactive protein (CRP). CRP is a clinical biomarker present in plasma, the level of which increases in response to infections and noninfectious inflammation. The CRP level is also an important prognostic indicator in patients with several syndromes. At present, CRP content in blood is measured immunochemically using antibodies. To develop a more sensitive method using RNA aptamers, we have attempted to obtain high-affinity RNA aptamers to CRP. We succeeded in obtaining an RNA aptamer with high affinity to CRP using a CRP-immobilized Sepharose column and pre-elution procedure. Pre-elution is a method that removes the weak binding portion from a selected RNA population by washing for a short time with buffer containing CRP. By surface plasmon-resonance (SPR) analysis, the affinity constant of this aptamer for CRP was calculated to be KD = 2.25×10-9 (M). The secondary structure, contact sites with CRP protein, and application of this aptamer will be described.

  11. Differences between high-affinity forskolin binding sites in dopamine-riche and other regions of rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Poat, J.A.; Cripps, H.E.; Iversen, L.L.

    1988-05-01

    Forskolin labelled with (/sup 3/H) bound to high- and low-affinity sites in the rat brain. The high-affinity site was discretely located, with highest densities in the striatum, nucleus accumbens, olfactory tubercule, substantia nigra, hippocampus, and the molecular layers of the cerebellum. This site did not correlate well with the distribution of adenylate cyclase. The high-affinity striatal binding site may be associated with a stimulatory guanine nucleotide-binding protein. Thus, the number of sites was increased by the addition of Mg/sup 2 +/ and guanylyl imidodiphosphate. Cholera toxin stereotaxically injected into rat striatum increased the number of binding sites, and no further increase was noted following the subsequent addition of guanyl nucleotide. High-affinity forskolin binding sites in non-dopamine-rich brain areas (hippocampus and cerebullum) were modulated in a qualitatively different manner by guanyl nucleotides. In these areas the number of binding sites was significantly reduced by the addition of guanyl nucleotide. These results suggest that forskolin may have a potential role in identifying different functional/structural guanine nucleotide-binding proteins.

  12. Relations between high-affinity binding sites for L-tryptophan, diazepam, salicylate and Phenol Red on human serum albumin.

    PubMed Central

    Kragh-Hansen, U

    1983-01-01

    Binding of L-tryptophan, diazepam, salicylate and Phenol Red to defatted human serum albumin was studied by ultrafiltration at pH 7.0. All ligands bind to one high-affinity binding site with association constants of the order of 10(4)-10(5)M-1. The number of secondary binding sites was found to vary from zero to five, with association constants about 10(3)M-1. Competitive binding studies with different pairs of the ligands were performed. Binding of both ligands was determined simultaneously. L-Tryptophan and diazepam were found to compete for a common high-affinity binding site on albumin. The following combinations of ligands do not bind competitively to albumin: L-tryptophan-Phenol Red, L-tryptophan-salicylate and Phenol Red-salicylate. On the other hand, high-affinity bindings of the three ligands do not take place independently but in such a way that binding of one of the ligands results in a decrease in binding of the other ligands. The decreases in binding are reciprocal and can be accounted for by introducing a coupling constant. The magnitude of the constant is dependent on the ligands being bound. In the present study, the mutual decrease in binding was more pronounced with L-tryptophan-salicylate and Phenol Red-salicylate than with L-tryptophan-Phenol Red. PMID:6847607

  13. Berberine attenuates cAMP-induced lipolysis via reducing the inhibition of phosphodiesterase in 3T3-L1 adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Libin; Wang, Xiao; Yang, Ying; Wu, Ling; Li, Fengying; Zhang, Rong; Yuan, Guoyue; Wang, Ning; Chen, Mingdao; Ning, Guang

    2011-04-01

    Berberine, a hypoglycemic agent, has been shown to decrease plasma free fatty acids (FFAs) level in insulin-resistant rats. In the present study, we explored the mechanism responsible for the antilipolytic effect of berberine in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. It was shown that berberine attenuated lipolysis induced by catecholamines, cAMP-raising agents, and a hydrolyzable cAMP analog, but not by tumor necrosis factor α and a nonhydrolyzable cAMP analog. Unlike insulin, the inhibitory effect of berberine on lipolysis in response to isoproterenol was not abrogated by wortmannin, an inhibitor of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, but additive to that of PD98059, an extracellular signal-regulated kinase kinase inhibitor. Prior exposure of adipocytes to berberine decreased the intracellular cAMP production induced by isoproterenol, forskolin, and 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX), along with hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) Ser-563 and Ser-660 dephosphorylation, but had no effect on perilipin phosphorylation. Berberine stimulated HSL Ser-565 as well as adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) phosphorylation. However, compound C, an AMPK inhibitor, did not reverse the regulatory effect of berberine on HSL Ser-563, Ser-660, and Ser-565 phosphorylation, nor the antilipolytic effect of berberine. Knockdown of AMPK using RNA interference also failed to restore berberine-suppressed lipolysis. cAMP-raising agents increased AMPK activity, which was not additive to that of berberine. Stimulation of adipocytes with berberine increased phosphodiesterase (PDE) 3B and PDE4 activity measured by hydrolysis of (3)[H]cAMP. These results suggest that berberine exerts an antilipolytic effect mainly by reducing the inhibition of PDE, leading to a decrease in cAMP and HSL phosphorylation independent of AMPK pathway.

  14. The effect of resveratrol on beta amyloid-induced memory impairment involves inhibition of phosphodiesterase-4 related signaling

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Gang; Chen, Ling; Pan, Xiaoyu; Chen, Jiechun; Wang, Liqun; Wang, Weijie; Cheng, Ruochuan; Wu, Fan; Feng, Xiaoqing; Yu, Yingcong; Zhang, Han-Ting; O'Donnell, James M.; Xu, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Resveratrol, a natural polyphenol found in red wine, has wide spectrum of pharmacological properties including antioxidative and antiaging activities. Beta amyloid peptides (Aβ) are known to involve cognitive impairment, neuroinflammatory and apoptotic processes in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Activation of cAMP and/or cGMP activities can improve memory performance and decrease the neuroinflammation and apoptosis. However, it remains unknown whether the memory enhancing effect of resveratrol on AD associated cognitive disorders is related to the inhibition of phosphodiesterase 4 (PDE4) subtypes and subsequent increases in intracellular cAMP and/or cGMP activities. This study investigated the effect of resveratrol on Aβ1-42-induced cognitive impairment and the participation of PDE4 subtypes related cAMP or cGMP signaling. Mice microinfused with Aβ1-42 into bilateral CA1 subregions displayed learning and memory impairment, as evidenced by reduced memory acquisition and retrieval in the water maze and retention in the passive avoidance tasks; it was also significant that neuroinflammatory and pro-apoptotic factors were increased in Aβ1-42-treated mice. Aβ1-42-treated mice also increased in PDE4A, 4B and 4D expression, and decreased in PKA level. However, PKA inhibitor H89, but not PKG inhibitor KT5823, prevented resveratrol's effects on these parameters. Resveratrol also reversed Aβ1-42-induced decreases in phosphorylated cAMP response-element binding protein (pCREB), brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and anti-apoptotic factor BCl-2 expression, which were reversed by H89. These findings suggest that resveratrol reversing Aβ-induced learning and memory disorder may involve the regulation of neuronal inflammation and apoptosis via PDE4 subtypes related cAMP-CREB-BDNF signaling. PMID:26980711

  15. cGMP-selective phosphodiesterase inhibitors stimulate mitochondrial biogenesis and promote recovery from acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Whitaker, Ryan M; Wills, Lauren P; Stallons, L Jay; Schnellmann, Rick G

    2013-12-01

    Recent studies demonstrate that mitochondrial dysfunction is a mediator of acute kidney injury (AKI). Consequently, restoration of mitochondrial function after AKI may be key to the recovery of renal function. Mitochondrial function can be restored through the generation of new, functional mitochondria in a process called mitochondrial biogenesis (MB). Despite its potential therapeutic significance, very few pharmacological agents have been identified to induce MB. To examine the efficacy of phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibitors (PDE3: cAMP and cGMP activity; and PDE4: cAMP activity) in stimulating MB, primary cultures of renal proximal tubular cells (RPTCs) were treated with a panel of inhibitors for 24 hours. PDE3, but not PDE4, inhibitors increased the FCCP-uncoupled oxygen consumption rate (OCR), a marker of MB. Exposure of RPTCs to the PDE3 inhibitors, cilostamide and trequinsin, for 24 hours increased peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1α, and multiple mitochondrial electron transport chain genes. Cilostamide and trequinsin also increased mRNA expression of mitochondrial genes and mitochondrial DNA copy number in mice renal cortex. Consistent with these experiments, 8-Br-cGMP increased FCCP-uncoupled OCR and mitochondrial gene expression, whereas 8-Br-cAMP had no effect. The cGMP-specific PDE5 inhibitor sildenafil also induced MB in RPTCs and in vivo in mouse renal cortex. Treatment of mice with sildenafil after folic acid-induced AKI promoted restoration of MB and renal recovery. These data provide strong evidence that specific PDE inhibitors that increase cGMP are inducers of MB in vitro and in vivo, and suggest their potential efficacy in AKI and other diseases characterized by mitochondrial dysfunction and suppressed MB.

  16. Inhibition of Uterine Contractility by Thalidomide Analogs via Phosphodiesterase-4 Inhibition and Calcium Entry Blockade.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Martínez, Eduardo; Ponce-Monter, Héctor; Soria-Jasso, Luis E; Ortiz, Mario I; Arias-Montaño, José-Antonio; Barragán-Ramírez, Guillermo; Mayén-García, Cynthia

    2016-10-07

    Uterine relaxation is crucial during preterm labor. Phosphodiesterase-4 (PDE-4) inhibitors have been proposed as tocolytics. Some thalidomide analogs are PDE-4 inhibitors. The aim of this study was to assess the uterus-relaxant properties of two thalidomide analogs, methyl 3-(4-nitrophthalimido)-3-(3,4-dimethoxyphenyl)-propanoate (4NO2PDPMe) and methyl 3-(4-aminophthalimido)-3-(3,4-dimethoxyphenyl)-propanoate (4APDPMe) and were compared to rolipram in functional studies of spontaneous phasic, K⁺-induced tonic, and Ca(2+)-induced contractions in isolated pregnant human myometrial tissues. The accumulation of cAMP was quantified in HeLa cells. The presence of PDE-4B2 and phosphorylated myosin light-chain (pMLC), in addition to the effect of thalidomide analogs on oxytocin-induced pMLC, were assessed in human uterine myometrial cells (UtSMCs). Thalidomide analogs had concentration-dependent inhibitory effects on spontaneous and tonic contractions and inhibited Ca(2+)-induced responses. Tonic contraction was equipotently inhibited by 4APDPMe and rolipram (IC50 = 125 ± 13.72 and 98.45 ± 8.86 µM, respectively). Rolipram and the thalidomide analogs inhibited spontaneous and tonic contractions equieffectively. Both analogs increased cAMP accumulation in a concentration-dependent manner (p < 0.05) and induced changes in the subcellular localization of oxytocin-induced pMLC in UtSMCs. The inhibitory effects of thalidomide analogs on the contractions of pregnant human myometrium tissue may be due to their PDE-4 inhibitory effect and novel mechanism as calcium-channel blockers.

  17. Insight into the Phosphodiesterase Mechanism from Combined QM/MM Free Energy Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Kin-Yiu; Gao, Jiali

    2011-01-01

    Summary Molecular dynamics simulations employing a combined quantum mechanical and molecular mechanical potential have been carried out to elucidate the reaction mechanism of the hydrolysis of a cyclic nucleotide cAMP substrate by phosphodiesterase 4B (PDE4B). PDE4B is a member of the PDE superfamily of enzymes that play crucial roles in cellular signal transduction. We have determined a two-dimensional potential of mean force for the coupled phosphoryl bond cleavage and proton transfer through a general acid catalysis mechanism in PDE4B. The results indicate that the ring-opening process takes place through an SN2 reaction mechanism, followed by a proton transfer to stabilize the leaving group. The computed free energy of activation for the PDE4B-catalyzed cAMP hydrolysis is about 13 kcal/mol and an overall reaction free energy is about −17 kcal/mol, both in accord with experimental results. In comparison with the uncatalyzed reaction in water, the enzyme PDE4B provides a strong stabilization of the transition state, lowering the free energy barrier by 14 kcal/mol. We found that the proton transfer from the general acid residue His234 to the O3' oxyanion of the ribosyl leaving group lags behind the nucleophilic attack, resulting in a shallow minimum on the free energy surface. A key contributing factor to transition state stabilization is the elongation of the distance between the divalent metal ions Zn2+ and Mg2+ in the active site as the reaction proceeds from the Michaelis complex to the transition state. PMID:21595828

  18. Dual specificity and novel structural folding of yeast phosphodiesterase-1 for hydrolysis of second messengers cyclic adenosine and guanosine 3',5'-Monophosphate

    DOE PAGES

    Tian, Yuanyuan; Cui, Wenjun; Huang, Manna; ...

    2014-08-05

    Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDEs) decompose second messengers cAMP and cGMP that play critical roles in many physiological processes. PDE1 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been subcloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. Recombinant yPDE1 has a KM of 110 μM and a kcat of 16.9 s⁻¹ for cAMP and a KM of 105 μM and a kcat of 11.8 s₅⁻¹ for cGMP. Thus, the specificity constant (kcat/KMcAMP)/(kcat/KMcGMP) of 1.4 indicates a dual specificity of yPDE1 for hydrolysis of both cAMP and cGMP. The crystal structures of unliganded yPDE1 and its complex with GMP at 1.31 Å resolution reveal a new structural foldingmore » that is different from those of human PDEs but is partially similar to that of some other metalloenzymes such as metallo-β-lactamase. In spite of their different structures and divalent metals, yPDE1 and human PDEs may share a common mechanism for hydrolysis of cAMP and cGMP.« less

  19. Dual Specificity and Novel Structural Folding of Yeast Phosphodiesterase-1 for Hydrolysis of Second Messengers Cyclic Adenosine and Guanosine 3′,5′-Monophosphate

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDEs) decompose second messengers cAMP and cGMP that play critical roles in many physiological processes. PDE1 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been subcloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. Recombinant yPDE1 has a KM of 110 μM and a kcat of 16.9 s–1 for cAMP and a KM of 105 μM and a kcat of 11.8 s–1 for cGMP. Thus, the specificity constant (kcat/KMcAMP)/(kcat/KMcGMP) of 1.4 indicates a dual specificity of yPDE1 for hydrolysis of both cAMP and cGMP. The crystal structures of unliganded yPDE1 and its complex with GMP at 1.31 Å resolution reveal a new structural folding that is different from those of human PDEs but is partially similar to that of some other metalloenzymes such as metallo-β-lactamase. In spite of their different structures and divalent metals, yPDE1 and human PDEs may share a common mechanism for hydrolysis of cAMP and cGMP. PMID:25050706

  20. Self-Concept Change in Camp Staff.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Karla A.; Bialeschki, M. Deborah

    The 1981 study ascertained whether the self-concept of 66 camp staff from 2 Wisconsin camps changed more than a control group of 18 college students attending summer school; if differences in self-concept were based on a particular characteristic (age, gender, staff position, years at camp); and in what ways, if any, self-concept of camp staff…

  1. DAY CAMPING FOR THE MENTALLY RETARDED.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    GINGLEND, DAVID; GOULD, KAY

    EMPHASIS IS PLACED ON MENTAL HEALTH, PHYSICAL DEVELOPMENT AND COORDINATION (BOTH MOTOR AND MUSCULAR), SOCIAL ADJUSTMENT, AND LANGUAGE AND INTELLECTUAL DEVELOPMENT. SECTIONS ARE DEVOTED TO ORGANIZATION OF A DAY CAMPING PROGRAM, SELECTING THE STAFF AND THE CAMPERS, THE DAY CAMP IN OPERATION, DAY CAMPING AS A TRAINING PERIOD, CAMP RELATIONS WITH THE…

  2. Easter Seal Guide to Special Camping Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crane, Helen B., Ed.

    Intended for organizations having or planning to establish resident resident camping programs for people with special needs, this guide supplements the American Camping Association's Standards. The philosophy, aims, and objectives of specialized camping programs are considered, and the following are discussed: administration, camp site selection,…

  3. Camp Barnabas! No Limits! No Boundaries!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teas, Cyndy; Robertson, Donna

    2007-01-01

    This article profiles Camp Barnabas, a non-denominational Christian camp for people with special needs located in southwest Missouri. For one week, campers have every opportunity possible to be a participant in the world around them, not just an observer. The camp's goal is to provide a typical camp experience--bugs, chants, cheers and incredible…

  4. Camp Courageous of Iowa Staff Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camp Courageous of Iowa, Monticello.

    Designed as a useful and practical tool for the staff at Camp Courageous of Iowa, a year-round residential camp serving all handicapped individuals, the manual outlines safety rules for camp activities, characteristics of the mentally and physically handicapped, and a general description of the camp and its objectives. Contents of the manual…

  5. Slave Labor Camps of the Third Reich.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stone, Adolf

    1983-01-01

    Describes the ground rules used by Nazi architects in choosing the sites for slave labor camps. While some, like Auschwitz, became extermination camps, others also produced armaments. One camp, Theresienstadt, became a "model" camp to show to reporters and Red Cross representatives. (CS)

  6. American Camping Association Annual Report, 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Camping Association, Martinsville, IN.

    Founded in 1910 as the Camp Directors' Association of America, the American Camping Association (ACA) is the largest organization serving the organized camping industry. Over 5,500 members come from all segments of the camp profession. This annual report for 1999 describes ACA activities in support of organizational commitments. These commitments…

  7. Standards for Day and Resident Camps: The Accreditation Programs of the American Camping Association. 1990 Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Camping Association, Martinsville, IN.

    The purpose of this manual is to educate camp directors and camp personnel regarding government-recognized standard practices and procedures followed within the camp industry. These standards also provide a basis for voluntary accreditation of camps by the American Camping Association (ACA) beyond the minimum requirements of licensing. The manual…

  8. Guide to Camp Nursing: Qualifications, Responsibilities Outlined for the Professional Camp Nurse. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Auld, Margaret E.; Ehlke, Graceann

    This guide was developed to help the nurse in any outdoor setting or organized camp program serving children and youth to: (1) understand the responsibilities of camp nursing; (2) be aware of the nurse's relationships with the camp director and other workers; (3) relate the camp health program to the overall objectives of the camping program; (4)…

  9. Basic Camp Management: An Introduction to Camp Administration. Revised 3rd Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ball, Armand; Ball, Beverly

    This book is the primary text for the Certified Camp Director Program and the Basic Camp Directors Course sponsored by the American Camping Association (Indiana). It provides an orientation for new and prospective camp directors and a quick reference for experienced camp directors. The book covers the following topics: (1) an historical overview…

  10. cGMP Binding Sites on Photoreceptor Phosphodiesterase: Role in Feedback Regulation of Visual Transduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cote, Rick H.; Deric Bownds, M.; Arshavsky, Vadim Y.

    1994-05-01

    A central step in vertebrate visual transduction is the rapid drop in cGMP levels that causes cGMP-gated ion channels in the photoreceptor cell membrane to close. It has long been a puzzle that the cGMP phosphodiesterase (PDE) whose activation causes this decrease contains not only catalytic sites for cGMP hydrolysis but also noncatalytic cGMP binding sites. Recent work has shown that occupancy of these noncatalytic sites slows the rate of PDE inactivation. We report here that PDE activation induced by activated transducin lowers the cGMP binding affinity for noncatalytic sites on PDE and accelerates the dissociation of cGMP from these sites. These sites can exist in three states: high affinity (K_d = 60 nM) for the nonactivated PDE, intermediate affinity (K_d ≈ 180 nM) when the enzyme is activated in a complex with transducin, and low affinity (K_d > 1 μM) when transducin physically removes the inhibitory subunits of PDE from the PDE catalytic subunits. Activation of PDE by transducin causes a 10-fold increase in the rate of cGMP dissociation from one of the two noncatalytic sites; physical removal of the inhibitory subunits from the PDE catalytic subunits further accelerates the cGMP dissociation rate from both sites >50-fold. Because PDE molecules lacking bound cGMP inactivate more rapidly, this suggests that a prolonged cGMP decrease may act as a negative feedback regulator to generate the faster, smaller photoresponses characteristic of light-adapted photoreceptors.

  11. Von Braun's Dream: Space Camp.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, C. C.

    1982-01-01

    Describes the "Space Camp" program for boys and girls at the Alabama Space and Rocket Center (Huntsville, Alabama), including typical activities. Includes address for obtaining information on participation in the program. (JN)

  12. Camping Out On An Asteroid

    NASA Video Gallery

    An astronaut and a geologist recently spent three days camping out as though they were on an asteroid. They were inside NASA's Space Exploration Vehicle prototype, flying it virtually in a digital ...

  13. Site-directed mutagenesis of human beta-adrenergic receptors: substitution of aspartic acid-130 by asparagine produces a receptor with high-affinity agonist binding that is uncoupled from adenylate cyclase.

    PubMed Central

    Fraser, C M; Chung, F Z; Wang, C D; Venter, J C

    1988-01-01

    By using oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis, we have produced a point mutation (guanine to adenine) at nucleotide 388 of the gene for human beta-adrenergic receptor (beta AR) that results in a substitution of asparagine for the highly conserved aspartic acid at position 130 in the putative third transmembrane domain of the human beta AR ([Asn130]beta AR). We have examined the functional significance of this mutation in B-82 cells continuously expressing the mutant [Asn130]beta AR. The mutant [Asn130]beta AR displayed normal antagonist binding but unusually high-affinity agonist binding (5- to 10-fold higher than wild-type beta AR), consistent with a single class of high-affinity binding sites. The mutant beta AR displayed guanine nucleotide-sensitive changes in agonist affinity (3- to 5-fold shift) implying an interaction between the beta AR and the stimulatory guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory protein; however, the ability of guanine nucleotides to alter agonist affinity was attenuated. Addition of saturating concentrations of isoproterenol to cell cultures expressing mutant [Asn130]-beta ARs had no effect on intracellular levels of cAMP, indicating that the mutant beta AR is unable to affect stimulation of adenylate cyclase. These results indicate that substitution of the aspartic acid with asparagine at residue 130 of the human beta AR dissociates the well-characterized guanine nucleotide effects on agonist affinity from those on activation of the stimulatory guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory protein and adenylate cyclase and suggests the existence of two distinct counterions for the amine portion of catecholamines that are associated with high- and low-affinity agonist binding states of beta AR. Images PMID:2840663

  14. Structural Basis for the Design of Selective Phosphodiesterase 4B Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Fox, David; Burgin, Alex B.; Gurney, Mark E.

    2014-01-01

    Phosphodiesterase-4B (PDE4B) regulates the pro-inflammatory Toll Receptor –Tumor Necrosis Factor α (TNFα) pathway in monocytes, macrophages and microglial cells. As such, it is an important, although under-exploited molecular target for anti-inflammatory drugs. This is due in part to the difficulty of developing selective PDE4B inhibitors as the amino acid sequence of the PDE4 active site is identical in all PDE4 subtypes (PDE4A-D). We show that highly selective PDE4B inhibitors can be designed by exploiting sequence differences outside the active site. Specifically, PDE4B selectivity can be achieved by capture of a C-terminal regulatory helix, now termed CR3 (Control Region 3), across the active site in a conformation that closes access by cAMP. PDE4B selectivity is driven by a single amino acid polymorphism in CR3 (Leu674 in PDE4B1 versus Gln594 in PDE4D). The reciprocal mutations in PDE4B and PDE4D cause a 70-80 fold shift in selectivity. Our structural studies show that CR3 is flexible and can adopt multiple orientations and multiple registries in the closed conformation. The new co-crystal structure with bound ligand provides a guide map for the design of PDE4B selective anti-inflammatory drugs. PMID:24361374

  15. Phosphodiesterase Inhibition Rescues Chronic Cognitive Deficits Induced by Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Titus, David J.; Sakurai, Atsushi; Kang, Yuan; Furones, Concepcion; Jergova, Stanislava; Santos, Rosmery; Sick, Thomas J.; Atkins, Coleen M.

    2013-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) modulates several cell signaling pathways in the hippocampus critical for memory formation. Previous studies have found that the cAMP-protein kinase A signaling pathway is downregulated after TBI and that treatment with a phosphodiesterase (PDE) 4 inhibitor rolipram rescues the decrease in cAMP. In the present study, we examined the effect of rolipram on TBI-induced cognitive impairments. At 2 weeks after moderate fluid-percussion brain injury or sham surgery, adult male Sprague Dawley rats received vehicle or rolipram (0.03 mg/kg) 30 min before water maze acquisition or cue and contextual fear conditioning. TBI animals treated with rolipram showed a significant improvement in water maze acquisition and retention of both cue and contextual fear conditioning compared with vehicle-treated TBI animals. Cue and contextual fear conditioning significantly increased phosphorylated CREB levels in the hippocampus of sham animals, but not in TBI animals. This deficit in CREB activation during learning was rescued in TBI animals treated with rolipram. Hippocampal long-term potentiation was reduced in TBI animals, and this was also rescued with rolipram treatment. These results indicate that the PDE4 inhibitor rolipram rescues cognitive impairments after TBI, and this may be mediated through increased CREB activation during learning. PMID:23516287

  16. Structures of the four subfamilies of phosphodiesterase-4 provide insight into the selectivity of their inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huanchen; Peng, Ming-Sheng; Chen, Yi; Geng, Jie; Robinson, Howard; Houslay, Miles D; Cai, Jiwen; Ke, Hengming

    2007-12-01

    PDE4 (phosphodiesterase-4)-selective inhibitors have attracted much attention as potential therapeutics for the treatment of both depression and major inflammatory diseases, but their practical application has been compromised by side effects. A possible cause for the side effects is that current PDE4-selective inhibitors similarly inhibit isoforms from all four PDE4 subfamilies. The development of PDE4 subfamily-selective inhibitors has been hampered by a lack of structural information. In the present study, we rectify this by providing the crystal structures of the catalytic domains of PDE4A, PDE4B and PDE4D in complex with the PDE4 inhibitor NVP {4-[8-(3-nitrophenyl)-[1,7]naphthyridin-6-yl]benzoic acid} as well as the unliganded PDE4C structure. NVP binds in the same conformation to the deep cAMP substrate pocket and interacts with the same residues in each instance. However, detailed structural comparison reveals significant conformational differences. Although the active sites of PDE4B and PDE4D are mostly comparable, PDE4A shows significant displacements of the residues next to the invariant glutamine residue that is critical for substrate and inhibitor binding. PDE4C appears to be more distal from other PDE4 subfamilies, with certain key residues being disordered. Our analyses provide the first structural basis for the development of PDE4 subfamily-selective inhibitors.

  17. Bovine cone photoreceptor cGMP phosphodiesterase structure deduced from a cDNA clone.

    PubMed Central

    Li, T S; Volpp, K; Applebury, M L

    1990-01-01

    A full-length cDNA clone encoding the alpha' subunit of cGMP phosphodiesterase (PDE) from bovine cone photoreceptors was selected by probing a retinal library with a DNA fragment encoding the catalytic core of the rod cGMP PDE alpha subunit. Identity of the clone was confirmed by comparing its deduced sequence with cone PDE peptide sequences determined by Charbonneau et al. [Charbonneau, H., Prusti, R. K., LeTrong, H., Sonnenburg, W. K., Mullaney, P. J., Walsh, K. A. & Beavo, J. A. (1990) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, pp. 288-292]. The cone PDE alpha' and the rod PDE alpha and beta subunits are encoded by distinct genes. cGMP PDE subunits share a common ancestry with cAMP PDEs and cyclic nucleotide-binding proteins. Sequence comparisons predict the presence of a catalytic core and possible secondary sites for noncatalytic cGMP binding. The presence of a C-terminal CAAX (Cys-aliphatic-aliphatic-Xaa) motif suggests the cone enzyme may be posttranslationally modified by proteolysis, methylation, and isoprenylation. Images PMID:2153291

  18. Structures of the Four Subfamilies of Phosphodiesterase-4 Provide Insight into the Selectivity of Their Inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, H.; Peng, M; Chen , Y; Geng, J; Robinson, H; Houslay , M; Cai, J; Ke, H

    2007-01-01

    PDE4 (phosphodiesterase-4)-selective inhibitors have attracted much attention as potential therapeutics for the treatment of both depression and major inflammatory diseases, but their practical application has been compromised by side effects. A possible cause for the side effects is that current PDE4-selective inhibitors similarly inhibit isoforms from all four PDE4 subfamilies. The development of PDE4 subfamily-selective inhibitors has been hampered by a lack of structural information. In the present study, we rectify this by providing the crystal structures of the catalytic domains of PDE4A, PDE4B and PDE4D in complex with the PDE4 inhibitor NVP 4-[8-(3-nitrophenyl)-[1,7]naphthyridin-6-yl]benzoic acid as well as the unliganded PDE4C structure. NVP binds in the same conformation to the deep cAMP substrate pocket and interacts with the same residues in each instance. However, detailed structural comparison reveals significant conformational differences. Although the active sites of PDE4B and PDE4D are mostly comparable, PDE4A shows significant displacements of the residues next to the invariant glutamine residue that is critical for substrate and inhibitor binding. PDE4C appears to be more distal from other PDE4 subfamilies, with certain key residues being disordered. Our analyses provide the first structural basis for the development of PDE4 subfamily-selective inhibitors.

  19. Phosphodiesterase inhibition rescues chronic cognitive deficits induced by traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Titus, David J; Sakurai, Atsushi; Kang, Yuan; Furones, Concepcion; Jergova, Stanislava; Santos, Rosmery; Sick, Thomas J; Atkins, Coleen M

    2013-03-20

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) modulates several cell signaling pathways in the hippocampus critical for memory formation. Previous studies have found that the cAMP-protein kinase A signaling pathway is downregulated after TBI and that treatment with a phosphodiesterase (PDE) 4 inhibitor rolipram rescues the decrease in cAMP. In the present study, we examined the effect of rolipram on TBI-induced cognitive impairments. At 2 weeks after moderate fluid-percussion brain injury or sham surgery, adult male Sprague Dawley rats received vehicle or rolipram (0.03 mg/kg) 30 min before water maze acquisition or cue and contextual fear conditioning. TBI animals treated with rolipram showed a significant improvement in water maze acquisition and retention of both cue and contextual fear conditioning compared with vehicle-treated TBI animals. Cue and contextual fear conditioning significantly increased phosphorylated CREB levels in the hippocampus of sham animals, but not in TBI animals. This deficit in CREB activation during learning was rescued in TBI animals treated with rolipram. Hippocampal long-term potentiation was reduced in TBI animals, and this was also rescued with rolipram treatment. These results indicate that the PDE4 inhibitor rolipram rescues cognitive impairments after TBI, and this may be mediated through increased CREB activation during learning.

  20. Daily rhythm in pineal phosphodiesterase (PDE) activity reflects adrenergic/3',5'-cyclic adenosine 5'-monophosphate induction of the PDE4B2 variant.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong-So; Bailey, Michael J; Ho, Anthony K; Møller, Morten; Gaildrat, Pascaline; Klein, David C

    2007-04-01

    The pineal gland is a photoneuroendocrine transducer that influences circadian and circannual dynamics of many physiological functions via the daily rhythm in melatonin production and release. Melatonin synthesis is stimulated at night by a photoneural system through which pineal adenylate cyclase is adrenergically activated, resulting in an elevation of cAMP. cAMP enhances melatonin synthesis through actions on several elements of the biosynthetic pathway. cAMP degradation also appears to increase at night due to an increase in phosphodiesterase (PDE) activity, which peaks in the middle of the night. Here, it was found that this nocturnal increase in PDE activity results from an increase in the abundance of PDE4B2 mRNA (approximately 5-fold; doubling time, approximately 2 h). The resulting level is notably higher (>6-fold) than in all other tissues examined, none of which exhibit a robust daily rhythm. The increase in PDE4B2 mRNA is followed by increases in PDE4B2 protein and PDE4 enzyme activity. Results from in vivo and in vitro studies indicate that these changes are due to activation of adrenergic receptors and a cAMP-dependent protein kinase A mechanism. Inhibition of PDE4 activity during the late phase of adrenergic stimulation enhances cAMP and melatonin levels. The evidence that PDE4B2 plays a negative feedback role in adrenergic/cAMP signaling in the pineal gland provides the first proof that cAMP control of PDE4B2 is a physiologically relevant control mechanism in cAMP signaling.

  1. Outward currents in Drosophila larval neurons: dunce lacks a maintained outward current component downregulated by cAMP.

    PubMed

    Delgado, R; Davis, R; Bono, M R; Latorre, R; Labarca, P

    1998-02-15

    Outward current modulation by cAMP was investigated in wild type (wt) and dunce (dnc) Drosophila larval neurons. dnc is deficient in a cAMP phosphodiesterase and has altered memory. Outward current modulation by cAMP was investigated by acute or chronic exposure to cAMP analogs. The analysis included a scrutiny of outward current modulation by cAMP in neurons from the mushroom bodies (mrb). In Drosophila, the mrb are the centers of olfactory acquisition and retention. Based on outward current patterns, neurons were classified into four types. Downmodulation of outward currents induced by acute application of cAMP analogs was reversible and found only in type I and type IV neurons. In the general wt neuron population, approximately half of neurons exhibited cAMP-modulated, 4-aminopyridine (4-AP)-sensitive currents. On the other hand, a significantly larger fraction of mrb neurons in wt (70%) was endowed with cAMP-modulated, 4-AP-sensitive currents. Only 30% of the dnc neurons displayed outward currents modulated by cAMP. The deficit of cAMP-modulated outward currents was most severe in neurons derived from the mrb of dnc individuals. Only 4% of the mrb neurons of dnc were cAMP-modulated. The dnc defect can be induced by chronic exposure of wt neurons to cAMP analogs. These results document for the first time a well defined electrophysiological neuron phenotype in correlation with the dnc defect. Moreover, this study demonstrates that in dnc mutants such a deficiency affects most severely neurons in brain centers of acquisition and retention.

  2. cAMP modulation during sheep in vitro oocyte maturation delays progression of meiosis without affecting oocyte parthenogenetic developmental competence.

    PubMed

    Buell, Margaret; Chitwood, James L; Ross, Pablo J

    2015-03-01

    Removal of oocytes from their natural inhibitory follicular environment results in spontaneous resumption of meiosis independent of normal signaling events that occur in vivo. Controlling the onset of meiotic resumption via maintenance of elevated oocyte cAMP levels with adenylyl cyclase (AC) activation and phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibition, and subsequent hormone stimulation with follicle FSH has been shown to dramatically improve developmental competence of bovine and murine IVM oocytes. This study evaluated the effect of cAMP modulation during IVM of sheep oocytes on meiotic progression and development to blastocyst after parthenogenetic activation. Changes in oocyte cAMP levels were quantified during the first 2h of in vitro maturation in control or cAMP-modulating medium. No significant changes in intra-oocyte cAMP were observed under control conditions, though a slight and transient drop was noticed at 15 min of maturation. Addition of the AC stimulator Forskolin and the PDE inhibitors IBMX altered the cAMP profile, resulting in 10-fold elevation of cAMP by 15 min and sustained >3-fold elevated levels from 30 to 120 min. The effect of cAMP elevation on meiotic resumption was measured by completion of germinal vesicle breakdown. Modulated oocytes were significantly delayed when compared to control media oocytes. Also, progression to MII was significantly delayed in modulated versus control oocytes at 20 and 24h, though no differences persisted to 28 h. Lastly, when control and modulated oocytes were parthenogenetically activated, no differences in blastocyst formation were observed. Thus, while cAMP modulation delayed meiotic progression, it did not improve developmental competence of sheep IVM oocytes.

  3. α4βδ GABA(A) receptors are high-affinity targets for γ-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB).

    PubMed

    Absalom, Nathan; Eghorn, Laura F; Villumsen, Inge S; Karim, Nasiara; Bay, Tina; Olsen, Jesper V; Knudsen, Gitte M; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans; Frølund, Bente; Clausen, Rasmus P; Chebib, Mary; Wellendorph, Petrine

    2012-08-14

    γ-Hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) binding to brain-specific high-affinity sites is well-established and proposed to explain both physiological and pharmacological actions. However, the mechanistic links between these lines of data are unknown. To identify molecular targets for specific GHB high-affinity binding, we undertook photolinking studies combined with proteomic analyses and identified several GABA(A) receptor subunits as possible candidates. A subsequent functional screening of various recombinant GABA(A) receptors in Xenopus laevis oocytes using the two-electrode voltage clamp technique showed GHB to be a partial agonist at αβδ- but not αβγ-receptors, proving that the δ-subunit is essential for potency and efficacy. GHB showed preference for α4 over α(1,2,6)-subunits and preferably activated α4β1δ (EC(50) = 140 nM) over α4β(2/3)δ (EC(50) = 8.41/1.03 mM). Introduction of a mutation, α4F71L, in α4β1(δ)-receptors completely abolished GHB but not GABA function, indicating nonidentical binding sites. Radioligand binding studies using the specific GHB radioligand [(3)H](E,RS)-(6,7,8,9-tetrahydro-5-hydroxy-5H-benzocyclohept-6-ylidene)acetic acid showed a 39% reduction (P = 0.0056) in the number of binding sites in α4 KO brain tissue compared with WT controls, corroborating the direct involvement of the α4-subunit in high-affinity GHB binding. Our data link specific GHB forebrain binding sites with α4-containing GABA(A) receptors and postulate a role for extrasynaptic α4δ-containing GABA(A) receptors in GHB pharmacology and physiology. This finding will aid in elucidating the molecular mechanisms behind the proposed function of GHB as a neurotransmitter and its unique therapeutic effects in narcolepsy and alcoholism.

  4. Autoradiographic imaging and quantification of the high-affinity GHB binding sites in rodent brain using (3)H-HOCPCA.

    PubMed

    Klein, A B; Bay, T; Villumsen, I S; Falk-Petersen, C B; Marek, A; Frølund, B; Clausen, R P; Hansen, H D; Knudsen, G M; Wellendorph, P

    2016-11-01

    GHB (γ-hydroxybutyric acid) is a compound endogenous to mammalian brain with high structural resemblance to GABA. GHB possesses nanomolar-micromolar affinity for a unique population of binding sites, but the exact nature of these remains elusive. In this study we utilized the highly selective GHB analogue, 3-hydroxycyclopent-1-enecarboxylic acid (HOCPCA) as a tritiated version ((3)H-HOCPCA) to radioactively label the specific GHB high-affinity binding site and gain further insight into the density, distribution and developmental profile of this protein. We show that, in low nanomolar concentrations, (3)H-HOCPCA displays excellent signal-to-noise ratios using rodent brain autoradiography, which makes it a valuable ligand for anatomical quantification of native GHB binding site levels. Our data confirmed that (3)H-HOCPCA labels only the high-affinity specific GHB binding site, found in high density in cortical and hippocampal regions. The experiments revealed markedly stronger binding at pH 6.0 (Kd 73.8 nM) compared to pH 7.4 (Kd 2312 nM), as previously reported for other GHB radioligands but similar Bmax values. Using (3)H-HOCPCA we analyzed the GHB binding protein profile during mouse brain development. Due to the high sensitivity of this radioligand, we were able to detect low levels of specific binding already at E15 in mouse brain, which increased progressively until adulthood. Collectively, we show that (3)H-HOCPCA is a highly sensitive radioligand, offering advantages over the commonly used radioligand (3)H-NCS-382, and thus a very suitable in vitro tool for qualitative and quantitative autoradiography of the GHB high-affinity site.

  5. Characterization of AMT-mediated high-affinity ammonium uptake in roots of maize (Zea mays L.).

    PubMed

    Gu, Riliang; Duan, Fengying; An, Xia; Zhang, Fusuo; von Wirén, Nicolaus; Yuan, Lixing

    2013-09-01

    High-affinity ammonium uptake in plant roots is mainly mediated by AMT1-type ammonium transporters, and their regulation varies depending on the plant species. In this study we aimed at characterizing AMT-mediated ammonium transport in maize, for which ammonium-based fertilizer is an important nitrogen (N) source. Two ammonium transporter genes, ZmAMT1;1a and ZmAMT1;3, were isolated from a maize root-specific cDNA library by functional complementation of an ammonium uptake-defective yeast mutant. Ectopic expression of both genes in an ammonium uptake-defective Arabidopsis mutant conferred high-affinity ammonium uptake capacities in roots with substrate affinities of 48 and 33 μM for ZmAMT1;1a and ZmAMT1;3, respectively. In situ hybridization revealed co-localization of both ZmAMT genes on the rhizodermis, suggesting an involvement in capturing ammonium from the rhizosphere. In N-deficient maize roots, influx increased significantly while ZmAMT expression did not. Ammonium resupply to N-deficient or nitrate-pre-cultured roots, however, rapidly enhanced both influx and ZmAMT transcript levels, revealing a substrate-inducible regulation of ammonium uptake. In conclusion, the two rhizodermis-localized transporters ZmAMT1;1a and ZmAMT1;3 are most probably the major components in the high-affinity transport system in maize roots. A particular regulatory feature is their persistent induction by ammonium rather than an up-regulation under N deficiency.

  6. Ponticulin is the major high affinity link between the plasma membrane and the cortical actin network in Dictyostelium

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Interactions between the plasma membrane and underlying actin-based cortex have been implicated in membrane organization and stability, the control of cell shape, and various motile processes. To ascertain the function of high affinity actin-membrane associations, we have disrupted by homologous recombination the gene encoding ponticulin, the major high affinity actin-membrane link in Dictyostelium discoideum amoebae. Cells lacking detectable amounts of ponticulin message and protein also are deficient in high affinity actin-membrane binding by several criteria. First, only 10-13% as much endogenous actin cosediments through sucrose and crude plasma membranes from ponticulin- minus cells, as compared with membranes from the parental strain. Second, purified plasma membranes exhibit little or no binding or nucleation of exogenous actin in vitro. Finally, only 10-30% as much endogenous actin partitions with plasma membranes from ponticulin-minus cells after these cells are mechanically unroofed with polylysine- coated coverslips. The loss of the cell's major actin-binding membrane protein appears to be surprisingly benign under laboratory conditions. Ponticulin-minus cells grow normally in axenic culture and pinocytose FITC-dextran at the same rate as do parental cells. The rate of phagocytosis of particles by ponticulin-minus cells in growth media also is unaffected. By contrast, after initiation of development, cells lacking ponticulin aggregate faster than the parental cells. Subsequent morphogenesis proceeds asynchronously, but viable spores can form. These results indicate that ponticulin is not required for cellular translocation, but apparently plays a role in cell patterning during development. PMID:8089176

  7. Insights from the fungus Fusarium oxysporum point to high affinity glucose transporters as targets for enhancing ethanol production from lignocellulose.

    PubMed

    Ali, Shahin S; Nugent, Brian; Mullins, Ewen; Doohan, Fiona M

    2013-01-01

    Ethanol is the most-widely used biofuel in the world today. Lignocellulosic plant biomass derived from agricultural residue can be converted to ethanol via microbial bioprocessing. Fungi such as Fusarium oxysporum can simultaneously saccharify straw to sugars and ferment sugars to ethanol. But there are many bottlenecks that need to be overcome to increase the efficacy of microbial production of ethanol from straw, not least enhancement of the rate of fermentation of both hexose and pentose sugars. This research tested the hypothesis that the rate of sugar uptake by F. oxysporum would enhance the ethanol yields from lignocellulosic straw and that high affinity glucose transporters can enhance ethanol yields from this substrate. We characterized a novel hexose transporter (Hxt) from this fungus. The F. oxysporum Hxt represents a novel transporter with homology to yeast glucose signaling/transporter proteins Rgt2 and Snf3, but it lacks their C-terminal domain which is necessary for glucose signalling. Its expression level decreased with increasing glucose concentration in the medium and in a glucose uptake study the Km((glucose)) was 0.9 mM, which indicated that the protein is a high affinity glucose transporter. Post-translational gene silencing or over expression of the Hxt in F. oxysporum directly affected the glucose and xylose transport capacity and ethanol yielded by F. oxysporum from straw, glucose and xylose. Thus we conclude that this Hxt has the capacity to transport both C5 and C6 sugars and to enhance ethanol yields from lignocellulosic material. This study has confirmed that high affinity glucose transporters are ideal candidates for improving ethanol yields from lignocellulose because their activity and level of expression is high in low glucose concentrations, which is very common during the process of consolidated processing.

  8. Antibody to FcεRIα Suppresses Immunoglobulin E Binding to High-Affinity Receptor I in Allergic Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Jung Yeon; Bae, Jong-Hwan; Lee, Kyung Eun; Kim, Mina; Kim, Min Hee; Kang, Hyun Jung; Park, Eun Hye; Yoo, Kyung Sook; Jeong, Se Kyoo; Kim, Kyung Won; Kim, Kyu-Earn

    2016-01-01

    Purpose High-affinity receptor I (FcεRI) on mast cells and basophils plays a key role in the immunoglobulin E (IgE)-mediated type I hypersensitivity mediated by allergen cross-linking of the specific IgE-FcεRI complex. Thus, prevention of IgE binding to FcεRI on these cells is an effective therapy for allergic disease. We have developed a strategy to disrupt IgE binding to FcεRI using an antibody targeting FcεRIα. Materials and Methods Fab fragment antibodies, which lack the Fc domain, with high affinity and specificity for FcεRIα and effective inhibitory activity against IgE-FcεRI binding were screened. IgE-induced histamine, β-hexosaminidase and Ca2+ release in basophils were determined by ELISA. A B6.Cg-Fcer1atm1Knt Tg(FCER1A)1Bhk/J mouse model of passive cutaneous anaphylaxis (PCA) was used to examine the inhibitory effect of NPB311 on allergic skin inflammation. Results NPB311 exhibited high affinity to human FcεRIα (KD=4 nM) and inhibited histamine, β-hexosaminidase and Ca2+ release in a concentration-dependent manner in hFcεRI-expressing cells. In hFcεRIα-expressing mice, dye leakage was higher in the PCA group than in controls, but decreased after NPB311 treatment. NPB311 could form a complex with FcεRIα and inhibit the release of inflammation mediators. Conclusion Our approach for producing anti-FcεRIα Fab fragment antibody NPB311 may enable clinical application to a therapeutic pathway in IgE/FcεRI-mediated diseases. PMID:27593869

  9. Constellation of HCN channels and cAMP regulating proteins in dendritic spines of the primate prefrontal cortex: potential substrate for working memory deficits in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Paspalas, Constantinos D; Wang, Min; Arnsten, Amy F T

    2013-07-01

    Schizophrenia associates with impaired prefrontal cortical (PFC) function and alterations in cyclic AMP (cAMP) signaling pathways. These include genetic insults to disrupted-in-schizophrenia (DISC1) and phosphodiesterases (PDE4s) regulating cAMP hydrolysis, and increased dopamine D1 receptor (D1R) expression that elevates cAMP. We used immunoelectron microscopy to localize DISC1, PDE4A, PDE4B, and D1R in monkey PFC and to view spatial interactions with hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels that gate network inputs when opened by cAMP. Physiological interactions between PDE4s and HCN channels were tested in recordings of PFC neurons in monkeys performing a spatial working memory task. The study reveals a constellation of cAMP-related proteins (DISC1, PDE4A, and D1R) and HCN channels next to excitatory synapses and the spine neck in thin spines of superficial PFC, where working memory microcircuits interconnect and spine loss is most evident in schizophrenia. In contrast, channels in dendrites were distant from synapses and cAMP-related proteins, and were associated with endosomal trafficking. The data suggest that a cAMP signalplex is selectively positioned in the spines to gate PFC pyramidal cell microcircuits. Single-unit recordings confirmed physiological interactions between cAMP and HCN channels, consistent with gating actions. These data may explain why PFC networks are especially vulnerable to genetic insults that dysregulate cAMP signaling.

  10. Iodination of (Tyr11)somatostatin yields a super high affinity ligand for somatostatin receptors in GH4C1 pituitary cells

    SciTech Connect

    Presky, D.H.; Schonbrunn, A.

    1988-11-01

    GH4C1 cells are a clonal strain of rat pituitary tumor cells which contain high affinity receptors for the inhibitory neuropeptide somatostatin (SRIF). In contrast to other peptides that bind to specific receptors on these cells, receptor-bound (125I-Tyr1)SRIF does not undergo rapid endocytosis. Rather, partial degradation to 125I-tyrosine occurs concomitantly with the dissociation of (125I-Tyr1)SRIF from cell surface receptors. In this study we characterize the binding, biological activity and receptor-mediated degradation of (125I-Tyr11)SRIF, a SRIF analog that is radiolabeled in the center of the molecule. The binding of trace concentrations of (125I-Tyr11)SRIF (less than 50 pM) required 6 hr to reach equilibrium at 37 degrees compared with the 60 min required for (125I-Tyr1)SRIF. Analysis of the kinetics of (125I- Tyr11)SRIF binding showed that the rate constant for association (kon = 1.7 x 10(8) M-8min-1) was similar to that for (125I-Tyr1)SRIF (0.8 x 10(8) M-1min-1). However, the two radioligands exhibited markedly different dissociation kinetics; the koff for (125I-Tyr11)SRIF was 0.002 min-1 compared with the value of 0.02 min-1 for (125I-Tyr1) SRIF. In agreement with its much slower rate of dissociation, (125I-Tyr11)SRIF bound to the SRIF receptor with higher affinity (Kd = 70 pM) than did (125I-Tyr1)SRIF (Kd = 350 pM). However, the apparent ED50 for (I-Tyr11)SRIF to inhibit cAMP accumulation (1.9 +/- 0.4 nM) was greater than the ED50 for SRIF (0.19 +/- 0.04 nM). The low potency of (I-Tyr11)SRIF probably resulted from the fact that subsaturating concentrations of this peptide did not achieve equilibrium binding during the 30-min incubation used to assay biological activity. As previously reported for (125I-Tyr1)SRIF, receptor-bound (125I-Tyr11)SRIF was not internalized and was released from the cells as a mixture of intact (125I-Tyr11)SRIF (30%) and the degradation product 125I-tyrosine (65%).

  11. Inhibition of Enterococcus faecium adherence to collagen by antibodies against high-affinity binding subdomains of Acm.

    PubMed

    Nallapareddy, Sreedhar R; Sillanpää, Jouko; Ganesh, Vannakambadi K; Höök, Magnus; Murray, Barbara E

    2007-06-01

    Strains of Enterococcus faecium express a cell wall-anchored protein, Acm, which mediates adherence to collagen. Here, we (i) identify the minimal and high-affinity binding subsegments of Acm and (ii) show that anti-Acm immunoglobulin Gs (IgGs) purified against these subsegments reduced E. faecium TX2535 strain collagen adherence up to 73 and 50%, respectively, significantly more than the total IgGs against the full-length Acm A domain (28%) (P < 0.0001). Blocking Acm adherence with functional subsegment-specific antibodies raises the possibility of their use as therapeutic or prophylactic agents.

  12. Biomagnetic separation of Salmonella Typhimurium with high affine and specific ligand peptides isolated by phage display technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steingroewer, Juliane; Bley, Thomas; Bergemann, Christian; Boschke, Elke

    2007-04-01

    Analyses of food-borne pathogens are of great importance in order to minimize the health risk for customers. Thus, very sensitive and rapid detection methods are required. Current conventional culture techniques are very time consuming. Modern immunoassays and biochemical analysis also require pre-enrichment steps resulting in a turnaround time of at least 24 h. Biomagnetic separation (BMS) is a promising more rapid method. In this study we describe the isolation of high affine and specific peptides from a phage-peptide library, which combined with BMS allows the detection of Salmonella spp. with a similar sensitivity as that of immunomagnetic separation using antibodies.

  13. Resveratrol provides neuroprotection by inhibiting phosphodiesterases and regulating the cAMP/AMPK/SIRT1 pathway after stroke in rats.

    PubMed

    Wan, Dan; Zhou, Yehan; Wang, Ke; Hou, Yongying; Hou, Ruihang; Ye, Xiufeng

    2016-03-01

    Dysfunction of energy metabolism can be a significant and fundamental pathophysiological basis for strokes. In studies of both humans and rodents, resveratrol, a natural polyphenol, has been reported to provide protection from cerebral ischemic injury by regulating expression of silent mating type information regulation 2 homolog 1 (SIRT1). However, direct evidence demonstrating that resveratrol exerts neuroprotection from cerebral ischemia injury by decreasing energy consumption is still lacking. Therefore, the aim of this study was to elucidate the mechanisms and signaling pathways through which resveratrol regulates energy metabolism in the ischemic brain, and to identify potential targets of resveratrol. ATP levels in brain tissues were detected by high performance liquid chromatography. SIRT1 and the phosphorylation of adenosine-monophosphate-activated protein kinase (P-AMPK) expressiones were evaluated by western blot. Levels of phosphodiesterase (PDEs) and cAMP were quantitated by real-time PCR and ELISA, respectively. Results showed that resveratrol significantly reduced the harmful effects of cerebral ischemic injury in vivo. Moreover, levels of ATP, p-AMPK, SIRT1, and cAMP were increased by resveratrol and PDE inhibitors. In conclusion, our findings indicate that resveratrol provides neuroprotection by inhibiting PDEs and regulating the cAMP/AMPK/SIRT1 pathway, which reduces ATP energy consumption during ischemia.

  14. The matching of electrostatic extrema: A useful method in drug design? A study of phosphodiesterase III inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apaya, Robert P.; Lucchese, Baldo; Price, Sarah L.; Vinter, J. G.

    1995-02-01

    Ligands which bind to a specific protein binding site are often expected to have a similar electrostatic environment which complements that of the binding site. One method of assessing molecular electrostatic similarity is to examine the possible overlay of the maxima and minima in the electrostatic potential outside the molecules and thereby match the regions where strong electrostatic interactions, including hydrogen bonds, with the residues of the binding site may be possible. This approach is validated with accurate calculations of the electrostatic potential, derived from a distributed multipole analysis of an ab initio charge density of the molecule, so that the effects of lone pair and π-electron density are correctly included. We have applied this method to the phosphodiesterase (PDE) III substrate adenosine-3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) and a range of nonspecific and specific PDE III inhibitors. Despite the structural variation between cAMP and the inhibitors, it is possible to match three or four extrema to produce relative orientations in which the inhibitors are sufficiently sterically and electrostatically similar to the natural substrate to account for their affinity for PDE III. This matching of extrema is more apparent using the accurate electrostatic models than it was when this approach was first applied, using semiempirical point charge models. These results reinforce the hypothesis of electrostatic similarity and give weight to the technique of extrema matching as a useful tool in drug design.

  15. Alkaline ribonuclease and phosphodiesterase activity in rat liver plasma membranes

    PubMed Central

    Prospero, Terence D.; Burge, Malcolm L. E.; Norris, Kenneth A.; Hinton, Richard H.; Reid, Eric

    1973-01-01

    The ribonuclease and phosphodiesterase activities of rat liver plasma membranes, purified from the crude nuclear fraction by centrifugation in an A-XII zonal rotor and flotation, were examined and compared. The plasma membrane is responsible for between 65 and 90% of the phosphodiesterase activity of the cell and between 25 and 30% of the particulate ribonuclease activity measured at pH8.7 in the presence of 7.5mm-MgCl2. Both enzymes were most active between pH8.5 and 8.9. Close to the pH optimum, both enzymes were more active in Tris buffer than in Bicine or glycine buffer. Both plasma-membrane phosphodiesterase and ribonuclease were strongly activated by Mg2+, there being at least a 12-fold difference between the activity in the presence of Mg2+ and of EDTA. There is, however, a difference in the response of the enzymes to Mg2+ and EDTA in that the phosphodiesterase is fully activated by 1.0mm-MgCl2 and fully inhibited by 1.0mm-EDTA, whereas the ribonuclease requires 7.5mm-MgCl2 for full activation and 5mm-EDTA for full inhibition. Density-gradient centrifugation has indicated that on solubilization in Triton X-100 most of the ribonuclease activity is released into a small fragment of the same size as that containing the phosphodiesterase activity. The relationship between the two activities is discussed in view of these results. PMID:4353377

  16. Camp Standards with Interpretations for the Accreditation of Organized Camps. Revised Edition. Basic Standards Course Participant Workbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Camping Association, Martinsville, IN.

    The American Camping Association's (ACA) Camp Standards Program assists camp administrators in providing a quality camp experience and assists the public in selecting camps that meet standards accepted by the industry and recognized by the government. ACA Camp Standards represent desirable practices basic to quality programs. Accredited camps and…

  17. Reduced expression of cytochrome oxidases largely explains cAMP inhibition of aerobic growth in Shewanella oneidensis

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Jianhua; Meng, Qiu; Fu, Huihui; Gao, Haichun

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition of bacterial growth under aerobic conditions by elevated levels of cyclic adenosine 3′,5′-monophosphate (cAMP), first revealed more than 50 years ago, was attributed to accumulation of toxic methylglyoxal (MG). Here, we report a Crp-dependent mechanism rather than MG accumulation that accounts for the phenotype in Shewanella oneidensis, an emerging research model for the bacterial physiology. We show that a similar phenotype can be obtained by removing CpdA, a cAMP phosphodiesterase that appears more effective than its Escherichia coli counterpart. Although production of heme c and cytochromes c is correlated well with cAMP levels, neither is sufficient for the retarded growth. Quantities of overall cytochromes c increased substantially in the presence of elevated cAMP, a phenomenon resembling cells respiring on non-oxygen electron acceptors. In contrast, transcription of Crp-dependent genes encoding both cytochromes bd and cbb3 oxidases is substantially repressed under the same condition. Overall, our results suggest that cAMP of elevated levels drives cells into a low-energetic status, under which aerobic respiration is inhibited. PMID:27076065

  18. Identification of a high-affinity monoclonal antibody against ochratoxin A and its application in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xian; Sun, Mengjiao; Kang, Yue; Xie, Hui; Wang, Xin; Song, Houhui; Li, Xiaoliang; Fang, Weihuan

    2015-11-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA) is one of the most commonly occurring mycotoxins produced by some species of Aspergillus and can contaminate cereal and cereal products. A high-affinity anti-OTA monoclonal antibody (mAb) was generated from a hybridoma cell line 2D8 using splenocytes from a BALB/c mouse immunized with synthesized OTA-bovine serum albumin conjugate. The mAb 2D8 is specific with high affinity (3.75 × 10(9) L/M). An indirect competitive ELISA (ic-ELISA) was then developed using this mAb for quantitative determination of OTA in corn and feed samples. Using the optimized conditions, there was good linearity between OTA concentration and competitive inhibition (y = -0.6076x + 0.2441, R(2) = 0.9923) with the working range from 2.4 to 23.6 μg/kg, IC50 at 7.6 μg/kg and lower limit of detection at 1.4 μg/kg. The recovery rates in spiked samples were 91.2-110.3%. Of the 56 corn and feed samples, this ic-ELISA and a commercial kit both found the same 13 samples positive for OTA with good linear correlation between the two methods in OTA quantification (R(2) = 0.9706). We conclude that this ic-ELISA can be used for rapid and quantitative screening of corn and feed samples for the presence of OTA.

  19. Increased Peptide Contacts Govern High Affinity Binding of a Modified TCR Whilst Maintaining a Native pMHC Docking Mode.

    PubMed

    Cole, David K; Sami, Malkit; Scott, Daniel R; Rizkallah, Pierre J; Borbulevych, Oleg Y; Todorov, Penio T; Moysey, Ruth K; Jakobsen, Bent K; Boulter, Jonathan M; Baker, Brian M; Yi Li

    2013-01-01

    Natural T cell receptors (TCRs) generally bind to their cognate pMHC molecules with weak affinity and fast kinetics, limiting their use as therapeutic agents. Using phage display, we have engineered a high affinity version of the A6 wild-type TCR (A6wt), specific for the human leukocyte antigen (HLA-A(∗)0201) complexed with human T cell lymphotropic virus type 111-19 peptide (A2-Tax). Mutations in just 4 residues in the CDR3β loop region of the A6wt TCR were selected that improved binding to A2-Tax by nearly 1000-fold. Biophysical measurements of this mutant TCR (A6c134) demonstrated that the enhanced binding was derived through favorable enthalpy and a slower off-rate. The structure of the free A6c134 TCR and the A6c134/A2-Tax complex revealed a native binding mode, similar to the A6wt/A2-Tax complex. However, concordant with the more favorable binding enthalpy, the A6c134 TCR made increased contacts with the Tax peptide compared with the A6wt/A2-Tax complex, demonstrating a peptide-focused mechanism for the enhanced affinity that directly involved the mutated residues in the A6c134 TCR CDR3β loop. This peptide-focused enhanced TCR binding may represent an important approach for developing antigen specific high affinity TCR reagents for use in T cell based therapies.

  20. In vitro toxicological evaluation of NCS-382, a high-affinity antagonist of γ-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) binding.

    PubMed

    Vogel, K R; Ainslie, G R; Roullet, J-B; McConnell, A; Gibson, K M

    2017-01-22

    γ-Hydroxybutyric acid (GHB), a minor metabolite of the inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA, can accumulate to significant concentrations in the heritable disorder of GABA degradation, succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase (SSADH) deficiency (SSADHD). Moreover, GHB may be employed in therapeutic settings (treatment of narcolepsy), as well as instances of illicit activity, including acquaintance sexual assault and the induction of euphoria. High-affinity binding sites for GHB in the brain have been identified, although the absolute identity of these receptors remains unclear. Pharmacological antagonism of GHB binding may have multiple instances of therapeutic relevance. The high affinity GHB receptor antagonist, NCS-382 (6,7,8,9-tetrahydro-5-hydroxy-5H-benzo-cyclohept-6-ylideneacetic acid) has not been piloted in humans. To address the potential clinical utility of NCS-382, we have piloted initial studies of its toxicology in HepG2 and primary hepatocyte cells. At high dose (0.5mM), NCS-382 showed no capacity for inhibition of microsomal CYPs (CYP1A2, 2B6, 2C8, 2C9, 2C19, 2D6 and 3A4) and minimal potential for activation of xenobiotic nuclear receptors. Additional cellular integrity and functional assays (viability, oxidative stress, apoptosis, ATP production) revealed little evidence for cytotoxicity, and a low degree of dysregulation of >370 genes actively engaged in the mediation of cellular toxicity. In vitro testing indicates a low probability of cellular toxicity associated with NCS-382.

  1. The Structure of the Amyloid-[beta] Peptide High-Affinity Copper II Binding Site in Alzheimer Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Streltsov, Victor A.; Titmuss, Stephen J.; Epa, V. Chandana; Barnham, Kevin J.; Masters, Colin L.; Varghese, Joseph N.

    2008-11-03

    Neurodegeneration observed in Alzheimer disease (AD) is believed to be related to the toxicity from reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced in the brain by the amyloid-{beta} (A{beta}) protein bound primarily to copper ions. The evidence for an oxidative stress role of A{beta}-Cu redox chemistry is still incomplete. Details of the copper binding site in A{beta} may be critical to the etiology of AD. Here we present the structure determined by combining x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and density functional theory analysis of A{beta} peptides complexed with Cu{sup 2+} in solution under a range of buffer conditions. Phosphate-buffered saline buffer salt (NaCl) concentration does not affect the high-affinity copper binding mode but alters the second coordination sphere. The XAS spectra for truncated and full-length A{beta}-Cu{sup 2+} peptides are similar. The novel distorted six-coordinated (3N3O) geometry around copper in the A{beta}-Cu{sup 2+} complexes include three histidines: glutamic, or/and aspartic acid, and axial water. The structure of the high-affinity Cu{sup 2+} binding site is consistent with the hypothesis that the redox activity of the metal ion bound to A{beta} can lead to the formation of dityrosine-linked dimers found in AD.

  2. Cysteine-rich secretory proteins in snake venoms form high affinity complexes with human and porcine beta-microseminoproteins.

    PubMed

    Hansson, Karin; Kjellberg, Margareta; Fernlund, Per

    2009-08-01

    BETA-microseminoprotein (MSP), a 10 kDa protein in human seminal plasma, binds human cysteine-rich secretory protein-3 (CRISP-3) with high affinity. CRISP-3 is a member of the family of CRISPs, which are widespread among animals. In this work we show that human as well as porcine MSP binds catrin, latisemin, pseudecin, and triflin, which are CRISPs present in the venoms of the snakes Crotalus atrox, Laticauda semifasciata, Pseudechis porphyriacus, and Trimeresurus flavoviridis, respectively. The CRISPs were purified from the venoms by affinity chromatography on a human MSP column and their identities were settled by gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. Their interactions with human and porcine MSPs were studied with size exclusion chromatography and surface plasmon resonance measurements. The binding affinities at 25 degrees C were between 10(-10)M and 10(-7)M for most of the interactions, with higher affinities for the interactions with porcine MSP compared to human MSP and with Elapidae CRISPs compared to Viperidae CRISPs. The high affinities of the bindings in spite of the differences in amino acid sequence between the MSPs as well as between the CRISPs indicate that the binding is tolerant to amino acid sequence variation and raise the question how universal this cross-species reaction between MSPs and CRISPs is.

  3. The shoot is important for high-affinity nitrate uptake in Egeria densa, a submerged vascular plant.

    PubMed

    Takayanagi, Shu; Takagi, Yuma; Shimizu, Akifumi; Hasegawa, Hiroshi

    2012-09-01

    To understand the mechanisms of nitrate uptake by submerged vascular plants, a cDNA for a high-affinity nitrate transporter, NRT2, was isolated from Egeria densa, a submerged monocot. The deduced EdNRT2 protein was similar to the proteins of a conserved NRT2 group in higher plants. Real-time reverse transcription-PCR analysis revealed that after feeding whole plants with 0.2 mM nitrate, the EdNRT2 transcripts were induced in both shoots and roots within 0.5 h, reached the maximum by 1-3 h and then decreased. The EdNRT2 transcript levels in shoots were comparable to those in roots. When nitrate was applied separately to shoots and roots, the EdNRT2 transcripts were induced only in nitrate-treated organs and reached the maximum levels comparable to those in organs when nitrate was applied to whole plants. (15)N-nitrate feeding experiments demonstrated that both shoots and roots are responsible for nitrate uptake and that biomass and (15)N content in shoots was even higher than that in roots. We concluded that EdNRT2 is involved in high-affinity nitrate uptake by shoots and roots of E. densa, that nitrate is taken up independently by shoots and roots and that shoots play an important role in nitrate uptake from aquatic ecosystem.

  4. Basement-membrane heparan sulphate with high affinity for antithrombin synthesized by normal and transformed mouse mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Pejler, G; David, G

    1987-01-01

    Basement-membrane proteoglycans, biosynthetically labelled with [35S]sulphate, were isolated from normal and transformed mouse mammary epithelial cells. Proteoglycans synthesized by normal cells contained mainly heparan sulphate and, in addition, small amounts of chondroitin sulphate chains, whereas transformed cells synthesized a relatively higher proportion of chondroitin sulphate. Polysaccharide chains from transformed cells were of lower average Mr and of lower anionic charge density compared with chains isolated from the untransformed counterparts, confirming results reported previously [David & Van den Berghe (1983) J. Biol. Chem. 258, 7338-7344]. A large proportion of the chains isolated from normal cells bound with high affinity to immobilized antithrombin, and the presence of 3-O-sulphated glucosamine residues, previously identified as unique markers for the antithrombin-binding region of heparin [Lindahl, Bäckström, Thunberg & Leder (1980) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 77, 6551-6555], could be demonstrated. A significantly lower proportion of the chains derived from transformed cells bound with high affinity to antithrombin, and a corresponding decrease in the amount of incorporated 3-O-sulphate was observed. PMID:2963617

  5. The structure of the amyloid-beta peptide high-affinity copper II binding site in Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Streltsov, Victor A; Titmuss, Stephen J; Epa, V Chandana; Barnham, Kevin J; Masters, Colin L; Varghese, Joseph N

    2008-10-01

    Neurodegeneration observed in Alzheimer disease (AD) is believed to be related to the toxicity from reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced in the brain by the amyloid-beta (Abeta) protein bound primarily to copper ions. The evidence for an oxidative stress role of Abeta-Cu redox chemistry is still incomplete. Details of the copper binding site in Abeta may be critical to the etiology of AD. Here we present the structure determined by combining x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and density functional theory analysis of Abeta peptides complexed with Cu(2+) in solution under a range of buffer conditions. Phosphate-buffered saline buffer salt (NaCl) concentration does not affect the high-affinity copper binding mode but alters the second coordination sphere. The XAS spectra for truncated and full-length Abeta-Cu(2+) peptides are similar. The novel distorted six-coordinated (3N3O) geometry around copper in the Abeta-Cu(2+) complexes include three histidines: glutamic, or/and aspartic acid, and axial water. The structure of the high-affinity Cu(2+) binding site is consistent with the hypothesis that the redox activity of the metal ion bound to Abeta can lead to the formation of dityrosine-linked dimers found in AD.

  6. The Structure of the Amyloid-β Peptide High-Affinity Copper II Binding Site in Alzheimer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Streltsov, Victor A.; Titmuss, Stephen J.; Epa, V. Chandana; Barnham, Kevin J.; Masters, Colin L.; Varghese, Joseph N.

    2008-01-01

    Neurodegeneration observed in Alzheimer disease (AD) is believed to be related to the toxicity from reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced in the brain by the amyloid-β (Aβ) protein bound primarily to copper ions. The evidence for an oxidative stress role of Aβ-Cu redox chemistry is still incomplete. Details of the copper binding site in Aβ may be critical to the etiology of AD. Here we present the structure determined by combining x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and density functional theory analysis of Aβ peptides complexed with Cu2+ in solution under a range of buffer conditions. Phosphate-buffered saline buffer salt (NaCl) concentration does not affect the high-affinity copper binding mode but alters the second coordination sphere. The XAS spectra for truncated and full-length Aβ-Cu2+ peptides are similar. The novel distorted six-coordinated (3N3O) geometry around copper in the Aβ-Cu2+ complexes include three histidines: glutamic, or/and aspartic acid, and axial water. The structure of the high-affinity Cu2+ binding site is consistent with the hypothesis that the redox activity of the metal ion bound to Aβ can lead to the formation of dityrosine-linked dimers found in AD. PMID:18599641

  7. Development and characterization of small bispecific albumin-binding domains with high affinity for ErbB3.

    PubMed

    Nilvebrant, Johan; Astrand, Mikael; Löfblom, John; Hober, Sophia

    2013-10-01

    Affinity proteins based on small scaffolds are currently emerging as alternatives to antibodies for therapy. Similarly to antibodies, they can be engineered to have high affinity for specific proteins. A potential problem with small proteins and peptides is their short in vivo circulation time, which might limit the therapeutic efficacy. To circumvent this issue, we have engineered bispecificity into an albumin-binding domain (ABD) derived from streptococcal Protein G. The inherent albumin binding was preserved while the opposite side of the molecule was randomized for selection of high-affinity binders. Here we present novel ABD variants with the ability to bind to the epidermal growth factor receptor 3 (ErbB3). Isolated candidates were shown to have an extraordinary thermal stability and affinity for ErbB3 in the nanomolar range. Importantly, they were also shown to retain their affinity to albumin, hence demonstrating that the intended strategy to engineer bispecific single-domain proteins against a tumor-associated receptor was successful. Moreover, competition assays revealed that the new binders could block the natural ligand Neuregulin-1 from binding to ErbB3, indicating a potential anti-proliferative effect. These new binders thus represent promising candidates for further development into ErbB3-signaling inhibitors, where the albumin interaction could result in prolonged in vivo half-life.

  8. A low K+ signal is required for functional high-affinity K+ uptake through HAK5 transporters.

    PubMed

    Rubio, Francisco; Fon, Mario; Ródenas, Reyes; Nieves-Cordones, Manuel; Alemán, Fernando; Rivero, Rosa M; Martínez, Vicente

    2014-11-01

    The high-affinity K(+) transporter HAK5 is a key system for root K(+) uptake and, under very low external K(+), the only one capable of supplying K(+) to the plant. Functional HAK5-mediated K(+) uptake should be tightly regulated for plant adaptation to different environmental conditions. Thus, it has been described that the gene encoding the transporter is transcriptionally regulated, being highly induced under K(+) limitation. Here we show that environmental conditions, such as the lack of K(+), NO(3)(-) or P, that induced a hyperpolarization of the plasma membrane of root cells, induce HAK5 transcription. However, only the deprivation of K(+) produces functional HAK5-mediated K(+) uptake in the root. These results suggest on the one hand the existence of a posttranscriptional regulation of HAK5 elicited by the low K(+) signal and on the other that HAK5 may be involved in yet-unknown functions related to NO(3)(-) and P deficiencies. These results have been obtained here with Solanum lycopersicum (cv. Micro-Tom) as well as Arabidopsis thaliana plants, suggesting that the posttranscriptional regulation of high-affinity HAK transporters take place in all plant species.

  9. Biphasic competition between opiates and enkephalins: does it indicate the existence of a common high affinity (mu-1) binding site

    SciTech Connect

    Sarne, Y.; Kenner, A.

    1987-08-03

    Displacement from brain membranes of labeled opiates by low concentrations of enkephalins and of labeled enkephalins by low concentrations of opiates has been previously explained by the existance of a common high affinity site termed mu-1. An alternative interpretation of the same results is that the trough seen in the low concentration zone of the displacement curves represents cross binding of mu and delta opioid ligands to delta and mu receptors, respectively. In three sets of experiments with brain membranes, the size of the trough is shown to be dependent on the labeled ligand used: The ratio between the size of troughs seen with (TH)D-Ala, D-Leu enkephalin and with (TH)morphine varies with experimental conditions (storage of membranes at 4C for 72h), with ratio of mu:delta receptors (e.g. in thalamus and cortex which are enriched in mu and delta sites, respectively) and with pretreatment of membranes with naloxonazine. These results cannot be explained by a common high affinity site, but rather by binding of (TH)D-Ala, D-Leu enkephalin to mu and of (TH)morphine to delta opioid receptors. 17 references, 3 figures.

  10. Structure-guided development of a high-affinity human Programmed Cell Death-1: Implications for tumor immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Lázár-Molnár, Eszter; Scandiuzzi, Lisa; Basu, Indranil; Quinn, Thomas; Sylvestre, Eliezer; Palmieri, Edith; Ramagopal, Udupi A; Nathenson, Stanley G; Guha, Chandan; Almo, Steven C

    2017-02-06

    Programmed Cell Death-1 (PD-1) is an inhibitory immune receptor, which plays critical roles in T cell co-inhibition and exhaustion upon binding to its ligands PD-L1 and PD-L2. We report the crystal structure of the human PD-1 ectodomain and the mapping of the PD-1 binding interface. Mutagenesis studies confirmed the crystallographic interface, and resulted in mutant PD-1 receptors with altered affinity and ligand-specificity. In particular, a high-affinity mutant PD-1 (HA PD-1) exhibited 45 and 30-fold increase in binding to PD-L1 and PD-L2, respectively, due to slower dissociation rates. This mutant (A132L) was used to engineer a soluble chimeric Ig fusion protein for cell-based and in vivo studies. HA PD-1 Ig showed enhanced binding to human dendritic cells, and increased T cell proliferation and cytokine production in a mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR) assay. Moreover, in an experimental model of murine Lewis lung carcinoma, HA PD-1 Ig treatment synergized with radiation therapy to decrease local and metastatic tumor burden, as well as in the establishment of immunological memory responses. Our studies highlight the value of structural considerations in guiding the design of a high-affinity chimeric PD-1 Ig fusion protein with robust immune modulatory properties, and underscore the power of combination therapies to selectively manipulate the PD-1 pathway for tumor immunotherapy.

  11. Repressible extracellular phosphodiesterases showing cyclic 2',3'- and cyclic 3',5'-nucleotide phosphodiesterase activities in Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed Central

    Hasunuma, K

    1983-01-01

    Two molecular species of repressible extracellular phosphodiesterases showing cyclic 2',3'- and cyclic 3',5'-nucleotide phosphodiesterase activities were detected in mycelial culture media of wild-type Neurospora crassa and purified. The two molecular species were found to be monomeric and polymeric forms of an enzyme constituted of identical subunits having molecular weights of 50,000. This enzyme had the same electrophoretic mobility as repressible acid phosphatase. The enzyme designated repressible cyclic phosphodiesterase showed pH optima of 3.2 to 4.0 with a cyclic 3',5'-AMP substrate and 5.0 to 5.6 with a cyclic 2',3'-AMP substrate. Repressible cyclic phosphodiesterase was activated by MnCl2 and CoCl2 with cyclic 2',3'-AMP as substrate and was slightly activated by MnCl2 with cyclic 3',5'-AMP. The enzyme hydrolyzed cyclic 3',5'- and cyclic 2',3'-nucleotides, in addition to bis-rho-nitrophenyl phosphate, but not certain 5' -and 3'-nucleotides. 3'-GMP and 3'-CMP were hydrolyzed less efficiently. Mutant strains A1 (nuc-1) and B1 (nuc-2), which cannot utilize RNA or DNA as a sole source of phosphorus, were unable to produce repressible cyclic phosphodiesterase. The wild type (74A) and a heterocaryon between strains A1 and B1 produced the enzyme and showed growth on orthophosphate-free media containing cyclic 2',3'-AMP or cyclic 3',5'-AMP, whereas both mutants showed little or no growth on these media. Images PMID:6311798

  12. Hydromania: Summer Science Camp Curriculum.

    SciTech Connect

    Moura, Joan

    1995-07-01

    In 1992, Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the US Department of Energy (DOE) began a collaborative pilot project with the Portland Parks and Recreation Community Schools Program and others to provide summer science camps to children in Grades 4--6. Camps run two weeks in duration between late June and mid-August. Sessions are five days per week, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. In addition to hands-on science and math curriculum, at least three field trips are incorporated into the educational learning experience. The purpose of the BPA/DOE summer camps is to make available opportunities for fun, motivating experiences in science to students who otherwise would have difficulty accessing them. This includes inner city, minority, rural and low income students. Public law 101-510, which Congress passed in 1990, authorizes DOE facilities to establish collaborative inner-city and rural partnership programs in science and math. A primary goal of the BPA summer hands on science camps is to bring affordable science camp experiences to students where they live. It uses everyday materials to engage students` minds and to give them a sense that they have succeeded through a fun hands-on learning environment.

  13. Management of diabetes at summer camps.

    PubMed

    Ciambra, Roberta; Locatelli, Chiara; Suprani, Tosca; Pocecco, Mauro

    2005-01-01

    We report our experience in the organization of diabetic children summer-camps since 1973. Guidelines for organization have been recently reported by the SIEDP (Società Italiana di Endocrinologia e Diabetologia Pediatrica). Our attention is focused on diabetes management at camp, organization and planning, medical staff composition and staff training, treatment of diabetes-related emergencies, written camp management plan, diabetes education and psychological issues at camp, prevention of possible risks, assessment of effectiveness of education in summer camps and research at camp.

  14. Phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors augment UT-15C-stimulated ATP release from erythrocytes of humans with pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Bowles, Elizabeth A; Moody, Gina N; Yeragunta, Yashaswini; Stephenson, Alan H; Ellsworth, Mary L; Sprague, Randy S

    2015-01-01

    Both prostacyclin analogs and phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5) inhibitors are effective treatments for pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). In addition to direct effects on vascular smooth muscle, prostacyclin analogs increase cAMP levels and ATP release from healthy human erythrocytes. We hypothesized that UT-15C, an orally available form of the prostacyclin analog, treprostinil, would stimulate ATP release from erythrocytes of humans with PAH and that this release would be augmented by PDE5 inhibitors. Erythrocytes were isolated and the effect of UT-15C on cAMP levels and ATP release were measured in the presence and absence of the PDE5 inhibitors, zaprinast or tadalafil. In addition, the ability of a soluble guanylyl cyclase inhibitor to prevent the effects of tadalafil was determined. Erythrocytes of healthy humans and humans with PAH respond to UT-15C with increases in cAMP levels and ATP release. In both groups, UT-15C-induced ATP release was potentiated by zaprinast and tadalafil. The effect of tadalafil was prevented by pre-treatment with an inhibitor of soluble guanylyl cyclase in healthy human erythrocytes. Importantly, UT-15C-induced ATP release was greater in PAH erythrocytes than in healthy human erythrocytes in both the presence and the absence of PDE5 inhibitors. The finding that prostacyclin analogs and PDE5 inhibitors work synergistically to enhance release of the potent vasodilator ATP from PAH erythrocytes provides a new rationale for the co-administration of these drugs in this disease. Moreover, these results suggest that the erythrocyte is a novel target for future drug development for the treatment of PAH.

  15. Phosphodiesterase 10A in the rat pineal gland: localization, daily and seasonal regulation of expression and influence on signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Spiwoks-Becker, Isabella; Wolloscheck, Tanja; Rickes, Oliver; Kelleher, Debra K; Rohleder, Nils; Weyer, Veronika; Spessert, Rainer

    2011-01-01

    The cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase 10A (PDE10A) is highly expressed in striatal spiny projection neurons and represents a therapeutic target for the treatment of psychotic symptoms. As reported previously [J Biol Chem 2009; 284:7606-7622], in this study PDE10A was seen to be additionally expressed in the pineal gland where the levels of PDE10A transcript display daily changes. As with the transcript, the amount of PDE10A protein was found to be under daily and seasonal regulation. The observed cyclicity in the amount of PDE10A mRNA persists under constant darkness, is blocked by constant light and is modulated by the lighting regime. It therefore appears to be driven by the master clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). Since adrenergic agonists and dibutyryl-cAMP induce PDE10A mRNA, the in vitro clock-dependent control of Pde10a appears to be mediated via a norepinephrine → β-adrenoceptor → cAMP/protein kinase A signaling pathway. With regard to the physiological role of PDE10A in the pineal gland, the specific PDE10A inhibitor papaverine was seen to enhance the adrenergic stimulation of the second messenger cAMP and cGMP. This indicates that PDE10A downregulates adrenergic cAMP and cGMP signaling by decreasing the half-life of both nucleotides. Consistent with its effect on cAMP, PDE10A inhibition also amplifies adrenergic induction of the cAMP-inducible gene arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (Aanat) which codes the rate-limiting enzyme in pineal melatonin formation. The findings of this study suggest that Pde10a expression is under circadian and seasonal regulation and plays a modulatory role in pineal signal transduction and gene expression.

  16. Role of phosphodiesterase 4 expression in the Epac1 signaling-dependent skeletal muscle hypertrophic action of clenbuterol.

    PubMed

    Ohnuki, Yoshiki; Umeki, Daisuke; Mototani, Yasumasa; Shiozawa, Kouichi; Nariyama, Megumi; Ito, Aiko; Kawamura, Naoya; Yagisawa, Yuka; Jin, Huiling; Cai, Wenqian; Suita, Kenji; Saeki, Yasutake; Fujita, Takayuki; Ishikawa, Yoshihiro; Okumura, Satoshi

    2016-05-01

    Clenbuterol (CB), a selective β2-adrenergic receptor (AR) agonist, induces muscle hypertrophy and counteracts muscle atrophy. However, it is paradoxically less effective in slow-twitch muscle than in fast-twitch muscle, though slow-twitch muscle has a greater density of β-AR We recently demonstrated that Epac1 (exchange protein activated by cyclic AMP [cAMP]1) plays a pivotal role in β2-AR-mediated masseter muscle hypertrophy through activation of the Akt and calmodulin kinase II (CaMKII)/histone deacetylase 4 (HDAC4) signaling pathways. Here, we investigated the role of Epac1 in the differential hypertrophic effect of CB using tibialis anterior muscle (TA; typical fast-twitch muscle) and soleus muscle (SOL; typical slow-twitch muscle) of wild-type (WT) and Epac1-null mice (Epac1KO). The TA mass to tibial length (TL) ratio was similar in WT and Epac1KO at baseline and was significantly increased after CB infusion in WT, but not in Epac1KO The SOL mass to TL ratio was also similar in WT and Epac1KO at baseline, but CB-induced hypertrophy was suppressed in both mice. In order to understand the mechanism involved, we measured the protein expression levels of β-AR signaling-related molecules, and found that phosphodiesterase 4 (PDE4) expression was 12-fold greater in SOL than in TA These results are consistent with the idea that increased PDE4-mediated cAMP hydrolysis occurs in SOL compared to TA, resulting in a reduced cAMP concentration that is insufficient to activate Epac1 and its downstream Akt and CaMKII/HDAC4 hypertrophic signaling pathways in SOL of WT This scenario can account for the differential effects of CB on fast- and slow-twitch muscles.

  17. High-Affinity Transport of Choline-O-Sulfate and Its Use as a Compatible Solute in Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Nau-Wagner, Gabriele; Boch, Jens; Le Good, J. Ann; Bremer, Erhard

    1999-01-01

    We report here that the naturally occurring choline ester choline-O-sulfate serves as an effective compatible solute for Bacillus subtilis, and we have identified a high-affinity ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transport system responsible for its uptake. The osmoprotective effect of this trimethylammonium compound closely matches that of the potent and widely employed osmoprotectant glycine betaine. Growth experiments with a set of B. subtilis strains carrying defined mutations in the glycine betaine uptake systems OpuA, OpuC, and OpuD and in the high-affinity choline transporter OpuB revealed that choline-O-sulfate was specifically acquired from the environment via OpuC. Competition experiments demonstrated that choline-O-sulfate functioned as an effective competitive inhibitor for OpuC-mediated glycine betaine uptake, with a Ki of approximately 4 μM. Uptake studies with [1,2-dimethyl-14C]choline-O-sulfate showed that its transport was stimulated by high osmolality, and kinetic analysis revealed that OpuC has high affinity for choline-O-sulfate, with a Km value of 4 ± 1 μM and a maximum rate of transport (Vmax) of 54 ± 3 nmol/min · mg of protein in cells grown in minimal medium with 0.4 M NaCl. Growth studies utilizing a B. subtilis mutant defective in the choline to glycine betaine synthesis pathway and natural abundance 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of whole-cell extracts from the wild-type strain demonstrated that choline-O-sulfate was accumulated in the cytoplasm and was not hydrolyzed to choline by B. subtilis. In contrast, the osmoprotective effect of acetylcholine for B. subtilis is dependent on its biotransformation into glycine betaine. Choline-O-sulfate was not used as the sole carbon, nitrogen, or sulfur source, and our findings thus characterize this choline ester as an effective compatible solute and metabolically inert stress compound for B. subtilis. OpuC mediates the efficient transport not only of glycine betaine and choline

  18. High-affinity consensus binding of target RNAs by the STAR/GSG proteins GLD-1, STAR-2 and Quaking

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background STAR/GSG proteins regulate gene expression in metazoans by binding consensus sites in the 5' or 3' UTRs of target mRNA transcripts. Owing to the high degree of homology across the STAR domain, most STAR proteins recognize similar RNA consensus sequences. Previously, the consensus for a number of well-characterized STAR proteins was defined as a hexameric sequence, referred to as the SBE, for STAR protein binding element. C. elegans GLD-1 and mouse Quaking (Qk-1) are two representative STAR proteins that bind similar consensus hexamers, which differ only in the preferred nucleotide identities at certain positions. Earlier reports also identified partial consensus elements located upstream or downstream of a canonical consensus hexamer in target RNAs, although the relative contribution of these sequences to the overall binding energy remains less well understood. Additionally, a recently identified STAR protein called STAR-2 from C. elegans is thought to bind target RNA consensus sites similar to that of GLD-1 and Qk-1. Results Here, a combination of fluorescence-polarization and gel mobility shift assays was used to demonstrate that STAR-2 binds to a similar RNA consensus as GLD-1 and Qk-1. These assays were also used to further delineate the contributions of each hexamer consensus nucleotide to high-affinity binding by GLD-1, Qk-1 and STAR-2 in a variety of RNA contexts. In addition, the effects of inserting additional full or partial consensus elements upstream or downstream of a canonical hexamer in target RNAs were also measured to better define the sequence elements and RNA architecture recognized by different STAR proteins. Conclusions The results presented here indicate that a single hexameric consensus is sufficient for high-affinity RNA binding by STAR proteins, and that upstream or downstream partial consensus elements may alter binding affinities depending on the sequence and spacing. The general requirements determined for high-affinity RNA

  19. Astro Camp is a blast!

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    An Astro Camp counselor and her campers perform a science experiment to learn what types of `fuel' will best propel their 'rockets.' Stennis Space Center's popular series of day camps have campers design, build and test model rockets based on the principles that would be used to build different types of rockets suitable for a mission to the moon or Mars. They learn details like how far they would travel, how long it would take, what supplies they would need and how to survive in that environment.

  20. Protein kinase C activation inhibits eosinophil degranulation through stimulation of intracellular cAMP production.

    PubMed

    Ezeamuzie, Charles I; Taslim, Najla

    2004-11-01

    The mechanism of inhibition of eosinophil degranulation by protein kinase C (PKC) was investigated in complement C5a (C5a)-stimulated degranulation of highly purified human eosinophils using the specific PKC activator - phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA). C5a-induced release of eosinophil peroxidase and eosinophil cationic protein was potently inhibited in a concentration-dependent manner by PMA (IC(50): 3 and 5 nM, respectively). The inhibition by PMA, but not histamine, was significantly reversed by the specific, but isoform nonselective, PKC inhibitor Ro 31-8220 (1 microM). In the presence of phosphodiesterase inhibitor rolipram (5 microM), PMA stimulated a pronounced concentration-dependent increase in intracellular cAMP, with a potency 400 times that of histamine (EC(50): 55 nM vs 22.5 microM). The inactive PMA analogue, 4alpha-PMA, had no such effect. The cAMP production by PMA, but not histamine, was significantly reversed by Ro 31-8220 (1 microM) and the selective inhibitor of the novel PKCdelta, rottlerin (1-3 microM), but not the selective inhibitor of the classical PKC isoforms, Gö 6976 (0.01-0.1 microM). Western blot analysis revealed the presence of six PKC isoforms (alpha, betaI, betaII, delta, iota and zeta) in isolated eosinophils. Chelation of internal or external calcium had no effect on PMA-induced cAMP response, but abolished that induced by histamine. There was a good correlation between increase in intracellular cAMP and inhibition of degranulation. These results show, for the first time, that in human eosinophils, PMA, via activation of PKCdelta isoform, can stimulate cAMP production, and that this may be the basis for its potent anti-degranulatory effect.

  1. Protein kinase C activation inhibits eosinophil degranulation through stimulation of intracellular cAMP production

    PubMed Central

    Ezeamuzie, Charles I; Taslim, Najla

    2004-01-01

    The mechanism of inhibition of eosinophil degranulation by protein kinase C (PKC) was investigated in complement C5a (C5a)-stimulated degranulation of highly purified human eosinophils using the specific PKC activator – phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA). C5a-induced release of eosinophil peroxidase and eosinophil cationic protein was potently inhibited in a concentration-dependent manner by PMA (IC50: 3 and 5 nM, respectively). The inhibition by PMA, but not histamine, was significantly reversed by the specific, but isoform nonselective, PKC inhibitor Ro 31-8220 (1 μM). In the presence of phosphodiesterase inhibitor rolipram (5 μM), PMA stimulated a pronounced concentration-dependent increase in intracellular cAMP, with a potency 400 times that of histamine (EC50: 55 nM vs 22.5 μM). The inactive PMA analogue, 4α-PMA, had no such effect. The cAMP production by PMA, but not histamine, was significantly reversed by Ro 31-8220 (1 μM) and the selective inhibitor of the novel PKCδ, rottlerin (1–3 μM), but not the selective inhibitor of the classical PKC isoforms, Gö 6976 (0.01–0.1 μM). Western blot analysis revealed the presence of six PKC isoforms (α, βI, βII, δ, ι and ζ) in isolated eosinophils. Chelation of internal or external calcium had no effect on PMA-induced cAMP response, but abolished that induced by histamine. There was a good correlation between increase in intracellular cAMP and inhibition of degranulation. These results show, for the first time, that in human eosinophils, PMA, via activation of PKCδ isoform, can stimulate cAMP production, and that this may be the basis for its potent anti-degranulatory effect. PMID:15504748

  2. cAMP induction by ouabain promotes endothelin-1 secretion via MAPK/ERK signaling in beating rabbit atria.

    PubMed

    Peng, Li-Qun; Li, Ping; Zhang, Qiu-Li; Hong, Lan; Liu, Li-Ping; Cui, Xun; Cui, Bai-Ri

    2016-01-01

    Adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) participates in the regulation of numerous cellular functions, including the Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase (sodium pump). Ouabain, used in the treatment of several heart diseases, is known to increase cAMP levels but its effects on the atrium are not understood. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of ouabain on the regulation of atrial cAMP production and its roles in atrial endothelin-1 (ET-1) secretion in isolated perfused beating rabbit atria. Our results showed that ouabain (3.0 µmol/L) significantly increased atrial dynamics and cAMP levels during recovery period. The ouabain-increased atrial dynamics was blocked by KB-R7943 (3.0 µmol/L), an inhibitor for reverse mode of Na(+)-Ca(2+) exchangers (NCX), but did not by L-type Ca(2+) channel blocker nifedipine (1.0 µmol/L) or protein kinase A (PKA) selective inhibitor H-89 (3.0 µmol/L). Ouabain also enhanced atrial intracellular cAMP production in response to forskolin and theophyline (100.0 µmol/L), an inhibitor of phosphodiesterase, potentiated the ouabain-induced increase in cAMP. Ouabain and 8-Bromo-cAMP (0.5 µmol/L) markedly increased atrial ET-1 secretion, which was blocked by H-89 and by PD98059 (30 µmol/L), an inhibitor of extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK) without changing ouabain-induced atrial dynamics. Our results demonstrated that ouabain increases atrial cAMP levels and promotes atrial ET-1 secretion via the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)/ERK signaling pathway. These findings may explain the development of cardiac hypertrophy in response to digitalis-like compounds.

  3. cAMP/PKA/CREB/GLT1 signaling involved in the antidepressant-like effects of phosphodiesterase 4D inhibitor (GEBR-7b) in rats

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xu; Guo, Haibiao; Sayed, Mohammad Daud SOM; Lu, Yang; Yang, Ting; Zhou, Dongsheng; Chen, Zhongming; Wang, Haitao; Wang, Chuang; Xu, Jiangping

    2016-01-01

    Objectives GEBR-7b, a potential phosphodiesterase 4D inhibitor, has been shown to have memory-enhancing effects in rodents. However, it is still unknown whether GEBR-7b also has the antidepressant-like effects in rats. Herein, we examined the potential of GEBR-7b to attenuate depression-like behaviors in the rat model of depression induced by chronic unpredictable stress (CUS). Next, we also investigated the alterations of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), protein kinase A (PKA) catalytic subunit (PKAca), cAMP response element-binding (CREB), and glutamate transporter 1 (GLT1) levels produced by GEBR-7b in the rats model of depression. Methods Effects of GEBR-7b on CUS (35 days)-induced depression-like behaviors were examined by measuring immobility time in the forced swimming test (FST). Hippocampal cAMP levels were examined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, whereas PKAca, phosphorylation of CREB (pCREB), CREB, and GLT1 in the hippocampus of rats were subjected to Western blot analysis. Results CUS exposure caused a depression-like behavior evidenced by the increased immobility time in FST. Depression-like behavior induced by CUS was accompanied by a significant increased GLT, decreased cAMP, PKAca, pCREB activities in hippocampus. However, repeated GEBR-7b administration significantly reversed CUS-induced depression-like behavior and changes of cAMP/PKA/CREB/GLT1 signaling. No alteration was observed in locomotor activity in open field test. Conclusion These findings indicate that GEBR-7b reversed the depression-like behaviors induced by CUS in rats, which is at least in part mediated by modulating cAMP, PKAca, pCREB, and GLT1 levels in the hippocampus of rats, supporting its neuroprotective potential against behavioral and biochemical dysfunctions induced by CUS. PMID:26855578

  4. Going Camping? A Basic Guide to Camping with Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1977

    Beginning with the "often overlooked areas", this guide to camping trips for secondary students presents initial planning procedures such as: site selection; number of leaders per number of students (2 leaders for each group of 10-12); parental permission forms; transportation arrangements; public school announcements; medical aid expertise and…

  5. Making Camp Environmentally Friendly: How Two Camps Did It.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westerman, Martin; Griner-Johnson, Russ

    1991-01-01

    Describes the efforts of two camps administered by the Brandeis-Bardin Institute (Brandeis, California) in implementing water and energy conservation programs, involving recycling, composting, and landfill savings. Programs were successful in eliminating excess waste and teaching campers to care more about their environments at home and at work.…

  6. Camp Counseling: A Great Resume Builder.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fass, Jack R.

    1993-01-01

    Advocates camp counseling as an excellent preparation for human services careers. Camp counseling offers (1) leisure services preparation; (2) leadership training; (3) collaborative skills; and (4) life experience. (KS)

  7. -Adrenergic receptors on rat ventricular myocytes: characteristics and linkage to cAMP metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Buxton, I.L.O.; Brunton, L.L.

    1986-08-01

    When incubated with purified cardiomyocytes from adult rat ventricle, the 1-antagonist (TH)prazosin binds to a single class of sites with high affinity. Competition for (TH)prazosin binding by the 2-selective antagonist yohimbine and the nonselective -antagonist phentolamine demonstrates that these receptors are of the 1-subtype. In addition, incubation of myocyte membranes with (TH)yohimbine results in no measurable specific binding. Agonist competition for (TH)prazosin binding to membranes prepared from purified myocytes demonstrates the presence of two components of binding: 28% of 1-receptors interact with norepinephrine with high affinity (K/sub D/ = 36 nM), whereas the majority of receptors (72%) have a low affinity for agonist (K/sub D/ = 2.2 M). After addition of 10 M GTP, norepinephrine competes for (TH)prazosin binding to a single class of sites with lower affinity (K/sub D/ = 2.2 M). Incubation of intact myocytes for 2 min with 1 M norepinephrine leads to significantly less cyclic AMP (cAMP) accumulation than stimulation with either norepinephrine plus prazosin or isoproterenol. Likewise, incubation of intact myocytes with 10 W M norepinephrine leads to significantly less activation of cAMP-dependent protein kinase than when myocytes are stimulated by both norepinephrine and the 1-adrenergic antagonist, prazosin or the US -adrenergic agonist, isoproterenol. They conclude that the cardiomyocyte 1 receptor is coupled to a guanine nucleotide-binding protein, that 1-receptors are functionally linked to decreased intracellular cAMP content, and that this change in cellular cAMP is expressed as described activation of cAMP-dependent protein kinase.

  8. Including People with Disabilities in Camp Programs: A Resource for Camp Directors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roswal, Glenn M., Ed.; Dowd, Karen J., Ed.; Bynum, Jerry W., Ed.

    Written primarily by camp administrators affiliated with the National Easter Seal Society, this publication is designed to help camp directors meet the challenges of including campers of all abilities in their camp programs. The first section provides an overview of the inclusion concept in general and at camp, and discusses legal and medical…

  9. TRK1 encodes a plasma membrane protein required for high-affinity potassium transport in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Gaber, R F; Styles, C A; Fink, G R

    1988-01-01

    We identified a 180-kilodalton plasma membrane protein in Saccharomyces cerevisiae required for high-affinity transport (uptake) of potassium. The gene that encodes this putative potassium transporter (TRK1) was cloned by its ability to relieve the potassium transport defect in trk1 cells. TRK1 encodes a protein 1,235 amino acids long that contains 12 potential membrane-spanning domains. Our results demonstrate the physical and functional independence of the yeast potassium and proton transport systems. TRK1 is nonessential in S. cerevisiae and maps to a locus unlinked to PMA1, the gene that encodes the plasma membrane ATPase. Haploid cells that contain a null allele of TRK1 (trk1 delta) rely on a low-affinity transporter for potassium uptake and, under certain conditions, exhibit energy-dependent loss of potassium, directly exposing the activity of a transporter responsible for the efflux of this ion. Images PMID:3043197

  10. Control of high affinity interactions in the talin C terminus: how talin domains coordinate protein dynamics in cell adhesions.

    PubMed

    Himmel, Mirko; Ritter, Anett; Rothemund, Sven; Pauling, Björg V; Rottner, Klemens; Gingras, Alexandre R; Ziegler, Wolfgang H

    2009-05-15

    In cell-extracellular matrix junctions (focal adhesions), the cytoskeletal protein talin is central to the connection of integrins to the actin cytoskeleton. Talin is thought to mediate this connection via its two integrin, (at least) three actin, and several vinculin binding sites. The binding sites are cryptic in the head-to-rod autoinhibited cytoplasmic form of the protein and require (stepwise) conformational activation. This activation process, however, remains poorly understood, and there are contradictory models with respect to the determinants of adhesion site localization. Here, we report turnover rates and protein-protein interactions in a range of talin rod domain constructs varying in helix bundle structure. We conclude that several bundles of the C terminus cooperate to regulate targeting and concomitantly tailor high affinity interactions of the talin rod in cell adhesions. Intrinsic control of ligand binding activities is essential for the coordination of adhesion site function of talin.

  11. Omega-conotoxin GVIA binding to a high-affinity receptor in brain: characterization, calcium sensitivity, and solubilization

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, J.A.; Snowman, A.M.; Biswas, A.; Olivera, B.M.; Snyder, S.H.

    1988-09-01

    We describe unique, high-affinity binding sites for omega(/sup 125/I)conotoxin GVIA in membranes from rat brain and rabbit sympathetic ganglia which appear to be primarily associated with N-type voltage-dependent calcium channels. The dissociation constant (KD) for the toxin in rat brain membranes is 60 pM. Physiologic extracellular concentrations of calcium inhibit toxin binding noncompetitively (IC50 = 0.2 mM). The regional distribution of the binding sites in rat brain differs markedly from that of dihydropyridine calcium antagonist receptors associated with L-type calcium channels. In detergent-solubilized brain membranes, toxin binding retains the same affinity, specificity, and ionic sensitivity as in particulate preparations.

  12. Dual regulation of the Arabidopsis high-affinity root iron uptake system by local and long-distance signals.

    PubMed

    Vert, Grégory A; Briat, Jean-François; Curie, Catherine

    2003-06-01

    Regulation of the root high-affinity iron uptake system by whole-plant signals was investigated at the molecular level in Arabidopsis, through monitoring FRO2 and IRT1 gene expression. These two genes encode the root ferric-chelate reductase and the high-affinity iron transporter, respectively, involved in the iron deficiency-induced uptake system. Recovery from iron-deficient conditions and modulation of apoplastic iron pools indicate that iron itself plays a major role in the regulation of root iron deficiency responses at the mRNA and protein levels. Split-root experiments show that the expression of IRT1 and FRO2 is controlled both by a local induction from the root iron pool and through a systemic pathway involving a shoot-borne signal, both signals being integrated to tightly control production of the root iron uptake proteins. We also show that IRT1 and FRO2 are expressed during the day and down-regulated at night and that this additional control is overruled by iron starvation, indicating that the nutritional status prevails on the diurnal regulation. Our work suggests, for the first time to our knowledge, that like in grasses, the root iron acquisition in strategy I plants may also be under diurnal regulation. On the basis of the new molecular insights provided in this study and given the strict coregulation of IRT1 and FRO2 observed, we present a model of local and long-distance regulation of the root iron uptake system in Arabidopsis.

  13. Visual and Plasmon Resonance Absorption Sensor for Adenosine Triphosphate Based on the High Affinity between Phosphate and Zr(IV)

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Wenjing; Liu, Zhongyuan; Zhang, Wei; Halawa, Mohamed Ibrahim; Xu, Guobao

    2016-01-01

    Zr(IV) can form phosphate and Zr(IV) (–PO32−–Zr4+–) complex owing to the high affinity between Zr(IV) with phosphate. Zr(IV) can induce the aggregation of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), while adenosine triphosphate(ATP) can prevent Zr(IV)-induced aggregation of AuNPs. Herein, a visual and plasmon resonance absorption (PRA)sensor for ATP have been developed using AuNPs based on the high affinity between Zr(IV)with ATP. AuNPs get aggregated in the presence of certain concentrations of Zr(IV). After the addition of ATP, ATP reacts with Zr(IV) and prevents AuNPs from aggregation, enabling the detection of ATP. Because of the fast interaction of ATP with Zr(IV), ATP can be detected with a detection limit of 0.5 μM within 2 min by the naked eye. Moreover, ATP can be detected by the PRA technique with higher sensitivity. The A520nm/A650nm values in PRA spectra increase linearly with the concentrations of ATP from 0.1 μM to 15 μM (r = 0.9945) with a detection limit of 28 nM. The proposed visual and PRA sensor exhibit good selectivity against adenosine, adenosine monophosphate, guanosine triphosphate, cytidine triphosphate and uridine triphosphate. The recoveries for the analysis of ATP in synthetic samples range from 95.3% to 102.0%. Therefore, the proposed novel sensor for ATP is promising for real-time or on-site detection of ATP. PMID:27754349

  14. Sertraline and its metabolite desmethylsertraline, but not bupropion or its three major metabolites, have high affinity for P-glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun-Sheng; Zhu, Hao-Jie; Gibson, Bryan Bradford; Markowitz, John Seth; Donovan, Jennifer Lyn; DeVane, Carl Lindsay

    2008-02-01

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter protein subfamily B1 line (ABCB1) transporter P-glycoprotein (P-gp) plays an important role in the blood-brain barrier limiting a broad spectrum of substrates from entering the central nervous system. In the present study, the transport activity of P-gp for sertraline, desmethylsertraline, bupropion, and the major metabolites of bupropion, threo-amino alcohol (TB), erythro-amino alcohol (EB), and hydroxy metabolite (HB) was studied using an ATPase assay in expressed human P-gp membranes by measuring concentrations of inorganic P(i) in expressed human P-gp membranes. Verapamil was included as a positive control. The Michaelis-Menten equation was used for characterizing the kinetic data. Sertraline and desmethylsertraline showed high affinity for P-gp. The V(max)/K(m) values of sertraline (1.6 min(-1) x 10(-3)) and desmethylsertraline (1.4 min(-1) x 10(-3)) were comparable with that of verapamil (1.7 min(-1) x 10(-3)). Bupropion and its three metabolites showed very weak affinity for P-gp, with V(max)/K(m) values lower than 0.01 min(-1) x 10(-3). The results of the present study indicate that sertraline and desmethylsertraline have high affinity for P-gp, whereas bupropion and its three major metabolites TB, EB, and HB have very weak affinity for P-gp. These findings may help to explain observed drug-drug interactions among antidepressants.

  15. Visual and Plasmon Resonance Absorption Sensor for Adenosine Triphosphate Based on the High Affinity between Phosphate and Zr(IV).

    PubMed

    Qi, Wenjing; Liu, Zhongyuan; Zhang, Wei; Halawa, Mohamed Ibrahim; Xu, Guobao

    2016-10-12

    Zr(IV) can form phosphate and Zr(IV) (-PO₃(2-)-Zr(4+)-) complex owing to the high affinity between Zr(IV) with phosphate. Zr(IV) can induce the aggregation of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), while adenosine triphosphate(ATP) can prevent Zr(IV)-induced aggregation of AuNPs. Herein, a visual and plasmon resonance absorption (PRA)sensor for ATP have been developed using AuNPs based on the high affinity between Zr(IV)with ATP. AuNPs get aggregated in the presence of certain concentrations of Zr(IV). After the addition of ATP, ATP reacts with Zr(IV) and prevents AuNPs from aggregation, enabling the detection of ATP. Because of the fast interaction of ATP with Zr(IV), ATP can be detected with a detection limit of 0.5 μM within 2 min by the naked eye. Moreover, ATP can be detected by the PRA technique with higher sensitivity. The A520nm/A650nm values in PRA spectra increase linearly with the concentrations of ATP from 0.1 μM to 15 μM (r = 0.9945) with a detection limit of 28 nM. The proposed visual and PRA sensor exhibit good selectivity against adenosine, adenosine monophosphate, guanosine triphosphate, cytidine triphosphate and uridine triphosphate. The recoveries for the analysis of ATP in synthetic samples range from 95.3% to 102.0%. Therefore, the proposed novel sensor for ATP is promising for real-time or on-site detection of ATP.

  16. Recombinant human nerve growth factor is biologically active and labels novel high-affinity binding sites in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Altar, C.A.; Burton, L.E.; Bennett, G.L.; Dugich-Djordjevic, M. )

    1991-01-01

    Iodinated recombinant human nerve growth factor (125I-rhNGF) stimulated neurite formation in PC12 cell cultures with a half-maximal potency of 35-49 pg/ml, compared with 39-52 pg/ml for rhNGF. In quantitative ligand autoradiography, the in vitro equilibrium binding of 125I-rhNGF to brain sections showed a 10-fold regional variation in density and was saturable, reversible, and specifically displaced by up to 74% with rhNGF or murine NGF (muNGF). At equilibrium, 125I-rhNGF bound to these sites with high affinity and low capacity (Bmax less than or equal to 13.2 fmol/mg of protein). Calculation of 125I-rhNGF binding affinity by kinetic methods gave average Kd values of 24 and 31 pM. Computer-generated maps revealed binding in brain regions not identified previously with 125I-muNGF, including hippocampus; dentate gyrus; amygdala; paraventricular thalamus; frontal, parietal, occipital, and cingulate cortices; nucleus accumbens; olfactory tubercle; subiculum; pineal gland; and medial geniculate nucleus. NGF binding sites were distributed in a 2-fold increasing medial-lateral gradient in the caudate-putamen and a 2-fold lateral-medial gradient in the nucleus accumbens. 125I-rhNGF binding sites were also found in most areas labeled by 125I-muNGF, including the interpedunucular nucleus, cerebellum, forebrain cholinergic nuclei, caudoventral caudate-putamen, and trigeminal nerve nucleus. 125I-rhNGF binding sites were absent from areas replete with low-affinity NGF binding sites, including circumventricular organs, myelinated fiber bundles, and choroid plexus. The present analysis provides an anatomical differentiation of high-affinity 125I-rhNGF binding sites and greatly expands the number of brain structures that may respond to endogenous NGF or exogenously administered rhNGF.

  17. High-Affinity, Small-Molecule Peptidomimetic Inhibitors of MLL1/WDR5 Protein-Protein Interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Karatas, Hacer; Townsend, Elizabeth C; Cao, Fang; Chen, Yong; Bernard, Denzil; Liu, Liu; Lei, Ming; Dou, Yali; Wang, Shaomeng

    2013-02-12

    Mixed lineage leukemia 1 (MLL1) is a histone H3 lysine 4 (H3K4) methyltransferase, and targeting the MLL1 enzymatic activity has been proposed as a novel therapeutic strategy for the treatment of acute leukemia harboring MLL1 fusion proteins. The MLL1/WDR5 protein–protein interaction is essential for MLL1 enzymatic activity. In the present study, we designed a large number of peptidomimetics to target the MLL1/WDR5 interaction based upon -CO-ARA-NH–, the minimum binding motif derived from MLL1. Our study led to the design of high-affinity peptidomimetics, which bind to WDR5 with Ki < 1 nM and function as potent antagonists of MLL1 activity in a fully reconstituted in vitro H3K4 methyltransferase assay. Determination of co-crystal structures of two potent peptidomimetics in complex with WDR5 establishes their structural basis for high-affinity binding to WDR5. Evaluation of one such peptidomimetic, MM-102, in bone marrow cells transduced with MLL1-AF9 fusion construct shows that the compound effectively decreases the expression of HoxA9 and Meis-1, two critical MLL1 target genes in MLL1 fusion protein mediated leukemogenesis. MM-102 also specifically inhibits cell growth and induces apoptosis in leukemia cells harboring MLL1 fusion proteins. Our study provides the first proof-of-concept for the design of small-molecule inhibitors of the WDR5/MLL1 protein–protein interaction as a novel therapeutic approach for acute leukemia harboring MLL1 fusion proteins.

  18. Reconstitution of high affinity. cap alpha. /sub 2/ adrenergic agonist binding by fusion with a pertussis toxin substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, M.H.; Neubig, R.R.

    1986-03-05

    High affinity ..cap alpha../sub 2/ adrenergic agonist binding is thought to occur via a coupling of the ..cap alpha../sub 2/ receptor with N/sub i/, the inhibitory guanyl nucleotide binding protein. Human platelet membranes pretreated at pH 11.5 exhibit a selective inactivation of agonist binding and N/sub i/. To further study the mechanism of agonist binding, alkali treated membranes (ATM) were mixed with membranes pretreated with 10 ..mu..M phenoxybenzamine to block ..cap alpha../sub 2/ receptors (POB-M). The combined membrane pellet was incubated in 50% polyethylene glycol (PEG) to promote membrane-membrane fusion and assayed for binding to the ..cap alpha../sub 2/ agonist (/sup 3/H)UK 14,304 (UK) and the antagonist (/sup 3/H) yohimbine. PEG treatment resulted in a 2-4 fold enhancement of UK binding whereas yohimbine binding was unchanged. No enhancement of UK binding was observed in the absence of PEG treatment. The reconstitution was dependent on the addition of POB-M. They found that a 1:1 ratio of POB-M:ATM was optimal. Reconstituted binding was inhibited by GppNHp. Fusion of rat C6 glioma cell membranes, which do not contain ..cap alpha../sub 2/ receptors, also enhanced agonist binding to ATM. Fusion of C6 membranes from cells treated with pertussis toxin did not enhance (/sup 3/H) UK binding. These data show that a pertussis toxin sensitive membrane component, possibly N/sub i/, can reconstitute high affinity ..cap alpha../sub 2/ agonist binding.

  19. AGIA Tag System Based on a High Affinity Rabbit Monoclonal Antibody against Human Dopamine Receptor D1 for Protein Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yano, Tomoya; Takeda, Hiroyuki; Uematsu, Atsushi; Yamanaka, Satoshi; Nomura, Shunsuke; Nemoto, Keiichirou; Iwasaki, Takahiro; Takahashi, Hirotaka; Sawasaki, Tatsuya

    2016-01-01

    Polypeptide tag technology is widely used for protein detection and affinity purification. It consists of two fundamental elements: a peptide sequence and a binder which specifically binds to the peptide tag. In many tag systems, antibodies have been used as binder due to their high affinity and specificity. Recently, we obtained clone Ra48, a high-affinity rabbit monoclonal antibody (mAb) against dopamine receptor D1 (DRD1). Here, we report a novel tag system composed of Ra48 antibody and its epitope sequence. Using a deletion assay, we identified EEAAGIARP in the C-terminal region of DRD1 as the minimal epitope of Ra48 mAb, and we named this sequence the “AGIA” tag, based on its central sequence. The tag sequence does not include the four amino acids, Ser, Thr, Tyr, or Lys, which are susceptible to post-translational modification. We demonstrated performance of this new tag system in biochemical and cell biology applications. SPR analysis demonstrated that the affinity of the Ra48 mAb to the AGIA tag was 4.90 × 10−9 M. AGIA tag showed remarkably high sensitivity and specificity in immunoblotting. A number of AGIA-fused proteins overexpressed in animal and plant cells were detected by anti-AGIA antibody in immunoblotting and immunostaining with low background, and were immunoprecipitated efficiently. Furthermore, a single amino acid substitution of the second Glu to Asp (AGIA/E2D) enabled competitive dissociation of AGIA/E2D-tagged protein by adding wild-type AGIA peptide. It enabled one-step purification of AGIA/E2D-tagged recombinant proteins by peptide competition under physiological conditions. The sensitivity and specificity of the AGIA system makes it suitable for use in multiple methods for protein analysis. PMID:27271343

  20. High-affinity α4β2 nicotinic receptors mediate the impairing effects of acute nicotine on contextual fear extinction.

    PubMed

    Kutlu, Munir Gunes; Holliday, Erica; Gould, Thomas J

    2016-02-01

    Previously, studies from our lab have shown that while acute nicotine administered prior to training and testing enhances contextual fear conditioning, acute nicotine injections prior to extinction sessions impair extinction of contextual fear. Although there is also strong evidence showing that the acute nicotine's enhancing effects on contextual fear conditioning require high-affinity α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), it is unknown which nAChR subtypes are involved in the acute nicotine-induced impairment of contextual fear extinction. In this study, we investigated the effects of acute nicotine administration on contextual fear extinction in knock-out (KO) mice lacking α4, β2 or α7 subtypes of nAChRs and their wild-type (WT) littermates. Both KO and WT mice were first trained and tested for contextual fear conditioning and received a daily contextual extinction session for 4 days. Subjects received intraperitoneal injections of nicotine (0.18 mg/kg) or saline 2-4 min prior to each extinction session. Our results showed that the mice that lack α4 and β2 subtypes of nAChRs showed normal contextual fear extinction but not the acute nicotine-induced impairment while the mice that lack the α7 subtype showed both normal contextual extinction and nicotine-induced impairment of contextual extinction. In addition, control experiments showed that acute nicotine-induced impairment of contextual fear extinction persisted when nicotine administration was ceased and repeated acute nicotine administrations alone did not induce freezing behavior in the absence of context-shock learning. These results clearly demonstrate that high-affinity α4β2 nAChRs are necessary for the effects of acute nicotine on contextual fear extinction.

  1. Functional assessment of the Medicago truncatula NIP/LATD protein demonstrates that it is a high-affinity nitrate transporter.

    PubMed

    Bagchi, Rammyani; Salehin, Mohammad; Adeyemo, O Sarah; Salazar, Carolina; Shulaev, Vladimir; Sherrier, D Janine; Dickstein, Rebecca

    2012-10-01

    The Medicago truncatula NIP/LATD (for Numerous Infections and Polyphenolics/Lateral root-organ Defective) gene encodes a protein found in a clade of nitrate transporters within the large NRT1(PTR) family that also encodes transporters of dipeptides and tripeptides, dicarboxylates, auxin, and abscisic acid. Of the NRT1(PTR) members known to transport nitrate, most are low-affinity transporters. Here, we show that M. truncatula nip/latd mutants are more defective in their lateral root responses to nitrate provided at low (250 μm) concentrations than at higher (5 mm) concentrations; however, nitrate uptake experiments showed no discernible differences in uptake in the mutants. Heterologous expression experiments showed that MtNIP/LATD encodes a nitrate transporter: expression in Xenopus laevis oocytes conferred upon the oocytes the ability to take up nitrate from the medium with high affinity, and expression of MtNIP/LATD in an Arabidopsis chl1(nrt1.1) mutant rescued the chlorate susceptibility phenotype. X. laevis oocytes expressing mutant Mtnip-1 and Mtlatd were unable to take up nitrate from the medium, but oocytes expressing the less severe Mtnip-3 allele were proficient in nitrate transport. M. truncatula nip/latd mutants have pleiotropic defects in nodulation and root architecture. Expression of the Arabidopsis NRT1.1 gene in mutant Mtnip-1 roots partially rescued Mtnip-1 for root architecture defects but not for nodulation defects. This suggests that the spectrum of activities inherent in AtNRT1.1 is different from that possessed by MtNIP/LATD, but it could also reflect stability differences of each protein in M. truncatula. Collectively, the data show that MtNIP/LATD is a high-affinity nitrate transporter and suggest that it could have another function.

  2. High Affinity Binders to EphA2 Isolated from Abdurin Scaffold Libraries; Characterization, Binding and Tumor Targeting

    PubMed Central

    Ullman, Christopher; Mathonet, Pascale; Oleksy, Arkadiusz; Diamandakis, Agata; Tomei, Licia; Demartis, Anna; Nardi, Chiara; Sambucini, Sonia; Missineo, Antonino; Alt, Karen; Hagemeyer, Christoph E.; Harris, Matt; Hedt, Amos; Weis, Roland; Gehlsen, Kurt R.

    2015-01-01

    Abdurins are a novel antibody-like scaffold derived from the engineering of a single isolated CH2 domain of human IgG. Previous studies established the prolonged serum half-life of Abdurins, the result of a retained FcRn binding motif. Here we present data on the construction of large, diverse, phage-display and cell-free DNA display libraries and the isolation of high affinity binders to the cancer target, membrane-bound ephrin receptor tyrosine kinase class A2 (EphA2). Antigen binding regions were created by designing combinatorial libraries into the structural loops and Abdurins were selected using phage display methods. Initial binders were reformatted into new maturation libraries and low nanomolar binders were isolated using cell-free DNA display, CIS display. Further characterization confirmed binding of the Abdurins to both human and murine EphA2 proteins and exclusively to cell lines that expressed EphA2, followed by rapid internalization. Two different EphA2 binders were labeled with 64Cu, using a bifunctional MeCOSar chelator, and administered to mice bearing tumors from transplanted human prostate cancer cells, followed by PET/CT imaging. The anti-EphA2 Abdurins localized in the tumors as early as 4 hours after injection and continued to accumulate up to 48 hours when the imaging was completed. These data demonstrate the ability to isolate high affinity binders from the engineered Abdurin scaffold, which retain a long serum half-life, and specifically target tumors in a xenograft model. PMID:26313909

  3. Photoaffinity labeling of high affinity nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP)-binding proteins in sea urchin egg.

    PubMed

    Walseth, Timothy F; Lin-Moshier, Yaping; Jain, Pooja; Ruas, Margarida; Parrington, John; Galione, Antony; Marchant, Jonathan S; Slama, James T

    2012-01-20

    Nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP) is a messenger that regulates calcium release from intracellular acidic stores. Recent studies have identified two-pore channels (TPCs) as endolysosomal channels that are regulated by NAADP; however, the nature of the NAADP receptor binding site is unknown. To further study NAADP binding sites, we have synthesized and characterized [(32)P-5-azido]nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate ([(32)P-5N(3)]NAADP) as a photoaffinity probe. Photolysis of sea urchin egg homogenates preincubated with [(32)P-5N(3)]NAADP resulted in specific labeling of 45-, 40-, and 30-kDa proteins, which was prevented by inclusion of nanomolar concentrations of unlabeled NAADP or 5N(3)-NAADP, but not by micromolar concentrations of structurally related nucleotides such as NAD, nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide, nicotinamide mononucleotide, nicotinic acid, or nicotinamide. [(32)P-5N(3)]NAADP binding was saturable and displayed high affinity (K(d) ∼10 nM) in both binding and photolabeling experiments. [(32)P-5N(3)]NAADP photolabeling was irreversible in a high K(+) buffer, a hallmark feature of NAADP binding in the egg system. The proteins photolabeled by [(32)P-5N(3)]NAADP have molecular masses smaller than the sea urchin TPCs, and antibodies to TPCs do not detect any immunoreactivity that comigrates with either the 45-kDa or the 40-kDa photolabeled proteins. Interestingly, antibodies to TPC1 and TPC3 were able to immunoprecipitate a small fraction of the 45- and 40-kDa photolabeled proteins, suggesting that these proteins associate with TPCs. These data suggest that high affinity NAADP binding sites are distinct from TPCs.

  4. Characterization of the Staphylococcal enterotoxin A: Vβ receptor interaction using human receptor fragments engineered for high affinity.

    PubMed

    Sharma, P; Postel, S; Sundberg, E J; Kranz, D M

    2013-12-01

    Staphylococcal food poisoning is a gastrointestinal disorder caused by the consumption of food containing Staphylococcal enterotoxins. Staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA) is the most common enterotoxin recovered from food poisoning outbreaks in the USA. In addition to its enteric activity, SEA also acts as a potent superantigen through stimulation of T cells, although less is known about its interactions than the superantigens SEB, SEC and toxic shock syndrome toxin-1. To understand more about SEA:receptor interactions, and to develop toxin-detection systems for use in food testing, we engineered various SEA-binding receptor mutants. The extracellular domain of the receptor, a variable region of the beta chain (Vβ22) of the T-cell receptor, was engineered for stability as a soluble protein and for high affinity, using yeast-display technology. The highest affinity mutant was shown to bind SEA with a Kd value of 4 nM. This was a 25 000-fold improvement in affinity compared with the wild-type receptor, which bound to SEA with low affinity (Kd value of 100 µM), similar to other superantigen:Vβ interactions. The SEA:Vβ interface was centered around residues within the complementarity determining region 2 loop. The engineered receptor was specific for SEA, in that it did not bind to two other closely related enterotoxins SEE or SED, providing information on the SEA residues possibly involved in the interaction. The specificity and affinity of these high-affinity Vβ proteins also provide useful agents for the design of more sensitive and specific systems for SEA detection.

  5. Two high-affinity ligand binding states of uterine estrogen receptor distinguished by modulation of hydrophobic environment

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchens, T.W.; Li, C.M.; Zamah, N.M.; Besch, P.K.

    1987-02-10

    The steroid binding function of soluble (cytosolic) estrogen receptors from calf uteri was evaluated under conditions known to modify the extent of hydrophobic interaction with receptor-associated proteins. Receptor preparations were equilibrated into 6 M urea buffers and control buffers by chromatography through small columns of Sephadex G-25 or by dialysis at 0.6 /sup 0/C. Equilibrium dissociation constants (K/sub d/) and binding capacities (n) of experimental and control receptor preparations were determined by 13-point Scatchard analyses using concentrations of 17..beta..-(/sup 3/H)estradiol from 0.05 to 10 nM. Nonspecific binding was determined at each concentration by parallel incubations with a 200-fold molar excess of the receptor-specific competitor diethylstilbestrol. The control receptor population was consistently found to be a single class of binding sites with a high affinity for estradiol which was unaffected by G-25 chromatography, by dialysis, by dilution, or by the presence of 0.4 M KCl. However, equilibration into 6 M urea induced a discrete (10-fold) reduction in receptor affinity to reveal a second, thermodynamically stable, high-affinity binding state. The presence of 0.4 M KCl did not significantly influence the discrete change in receptor affinity induced by urea. The effects of urea on both receptor affinity and binding capacity were reversible, suggesting a lack of covalent modification. These results demonstrate nonenzymatic means by which not only the binding capacity but also the affinity of receptor for estradiol can be reversibly controlled, suggesting that high concentrations of urea might be more effectively utilized during the physicochemical characterization and purification of steroid receptor proteins.

  6. Histones have high affinity for the glomerular basement membrane. Relevance for immune complex formation in lupus nephritis

    SciTech Connect

    Schmiedeke, T.M.; Stoeckl, F.W.W.; Weber, R.; Sugisaki, Y.; Batsford, S.R.; Vogt, A.

    1989-06-01

    An effort has been made to integrate insights on charge-based interactions in immune complex glomerulonephritis with nuclear antigen involvement in lupus nephritis. Attention was focussed on the histones, a group of highly cationic nuclear constituents, which could be expected to bind to fixed anionic sites present in the glomerular basement membrane (GBM). We demonstrated that all histone subfractions, prepared according to Johns, have a high affinity for GBM and the basement membrane of peritubular capillaries. Tissue uptake of /sup 125/I-labeled histones was measured by injecting 200 micrograms of each fraction into the left kidney via the aorta and measuring organ uptake after 15 min. In glomeruli isolated from the left kidneys, the following quantities of histones were found: f1, 13 micrograms; f2a (f2al + f2a2), 17 micrograms; f2b, 17 micrograms; and f3, 32 micrograms. Kinetic studies of glomerular binding showed that f1 disappeared much more rapidly than f2a. The high affinity of histones (pI between 10.5 and 11.0; mol wt 10,000-22,000) for the GBM correlates well with their ability to form aggregates (mol wt greater than 100,000) for comparison lysozyme (pI 11, mol wt 14,000), which does not aggregate spontaneously bound poorly (0.4 micrograms in isolated glomeruli). The quantity of histones and lysozyme found in the isolated glomeruli paralleled their in vitro affinity for a Heparin-Sepharose column (gradient elution studies). This gel matrix contains the sulfated, highly anionic polysaccharide heparin, which is similar to the negatively charged heparan sulfate present in the GBM. Lysozyme eluted with 0.15 M NaCl, f1 with 1 M NaCl, and f2a, f2b, and f3 could not be fully desorbed even with 2 M NaCl; 6 M guanidine-HCl was necessary.

  7. In vivo gene transfer to dopamine neurons of rat substantia nigra via the high-affinity neurotensin receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez-Maya, I.; Navarro-Quiroga, I.; Meraz-Ríos, M. A.; Aceves, J.; Martinez-Fong, D.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Recently, we synthesized a nonviral gene vector capable of transfecting cell lines taking advantage of neurotensin (NT) internalization. The vector is NT cross-linked with poly-L-lysine, to which a plasmid DNA was bound to form a complex (NT-polyplex). Nigral dopamine neurons are able to internalize NT, thus representing a target for gene transfer via NT-polyplex. This hypothesis was tested here using reporter genes encoding green fluorescent protein or chloramphenicol acetyl transferase. MATERIALS AND METHODS: NT-polyplex was injected into the substantia nigra. Double immunofluorescence labeling was used to reveal the cell type involved in the propidium iodide-labeled polyplex internalization and reporter gene expression. RESULTS: Polyplex internalization was observed within dopamine neurons but not within glial cells, and was prevented by both hypertonic sucrose solution and SR-48692, a selective nonpeptide antagonist of NT receptors. Reporter gene expression was observed in dopamine neurons from 48 hr up to 15 days after NT-polyplex injection, and was prevented by SR-48692. However, no expression was seen when the NT-polyplex was injected into the ansiform lobule of the cerebellum, which contains low- but not high-affinity NT receptors. Neither internalization nor expression was observed in cultured glial cells, despite the NT-polyplex binding to those cells that was prevented by levocabastine, a low-affinity NT receptor antagonist. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that high-affinity NT receptors mediate the uptake of NT-polyplex with the subsequent reporter gene expression in vivo. NT polyfection may be used to transfer genes of physiologic interest to nigrostriatal dopamine neurons, and to produce transgenic animal models of dopamine-related diseases. PMID:11471555

  8. High-Affinity Inhibitors of Human NAD+-Dependent 15-Hydroxyprostaglandin Dehydrogenase: Mechanisms of Inhibition and Structure-Activity Relationships

    PubMed Central

    Niesen, Frank H.; Schultz, Lena; Jadhav, Ajit; Bhatia, Chitra; Guo, Kunde; Maloney, David J.; Pilka, Ewa S.; Wang, Minghua; Oppermann, Udo; Heightman, Tom D.; Simeonov, Anton

    2010-01-01

    Background 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase (15-PGDH, EC 1.1.1.141) is the key enzyme for the inactivation of prostaglandins, regulating processes such as inflammation or proliferation. The anabolic pathways of prostaglandins, especially with respect to regulation of the cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes have been studied in detail; however, little is known about downstream events including functional interaction of prostaglandin-processing and -metabolizing enzymes. High-affinity probes for 15-PGDH will, therefore, represent important tools for further studies. Principal Findings To identify novel high-affinity inhibitors of 15-PGDH we performed a quantitative high-throughput screen (qHTS) by testing >160 thousand compounds in a concentration-response format and identified compounds that act as noncompetitive inhibitors as well as a competitive inhibitor, with nanomolar affinity. Both types of inhibitors caused strong thermal stabilization of the enzyme, with cofactor dependencies correlating with their mechanism of action. We solved the structure of human 15-PGDH and explored the binding modes of the inhibitors to the enzyme in silico. We found binding modes that are consistent with the observed mechanisms of action. Conclusions Low cross-reactivity in screens of over 320 targets, including three other human dehydrogenases/reductases, suggest selectivity of the present inhibitors for 15-PGDH. The high potencies and different mechanisms of action of these chemotypes make them a useful set of complementary chemical probes for functional studies of prostaglandin-signaling pathways. Enhanced version This article can also be viewed as an enhanced version in which the text of the article is integrated with interactive 3D representations and animated transitions. Please note that a web plugin is required to access this enhanced functionality. Instructions for the installation and use of the web plugin are available in Text S2. PMID:21072165

  9. The role of ventral striatal cAMP signaling in stress-induced behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Plattner, Florian; Hayashi, Kanehiro; Hernandez, Adan; Benavides, David R.; Tassin, Tara C.; Tan, Chunfeng; Day, Jonathan; Fina, Maggy W.; Yuen, Eunice Y.; Yan, Zhen; Goldberg, Matthew S.; Nairn, Angus C.; Greengard, Paul; Nestler, Eric J.; Taussig, Ronald; Nishi, Akinori; Houslay, Miles D.; Bibb, James A.

    2015-01-01

    The cAMP/PKA signaling cascade is a ubiquitous pathway acting downstream of multiple neuromodulators. We found that the phosphorylation of phosphodiesterase-4 (PDE4) by cyclin-dependent protein kinase 5 (Cdk5) facilitates cAMP degradation and homeostasis of cAMP/PKA signaling. In mice, loss of Cdk5 throughout the forebrain elevated cAMP levels and increased PKA activity in striatal neurons, and altered behavioral responses to acute or chronic stressors. Ventral striatum- or D1 dopamine receptor-specific conditional knockout of Cdk5, or ventral striatum infusion of a small interfering peptide that selectively targets the regulation of PDE4 by Cdk5, all produced analogical effects on stress-induced behavioral responses. Together, our results demonstrate that altering cAMP signaling in medium spiny neurons of the ventral striatum can effectively modulate stress-induced behavioral states. We propose that targeting the Cdk5 regulation of PDE4 could be a new therapeutic approach for clinical conditions associated with stress, such as depression. PMID:26192746

  10. HPRT-Deficiency Dysregulates cAMP-PKA Signaling and Phosphodiesterase 10A Expression: Mechanistic Insight and Potential Target for Lesch-Nyhan Disease?

    PubMed Central

    Guibinga, Ghiabe-Henri; Murray, Fiona; Barron, Nikki

    2013-01-01

    Lesch-Nyhan Disease (LND) is the result of mutations in the X-linked gene encoding the purine metabolic enzyme, hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HPRT). LND gives rise to severe neurological anomalies including mental retardation, dystonia, chorea, pyramidal signs and a compulsive and aggressive behavior to self injure. The neurological phenotype in LND has been shown to reflect aberrant dopaminergic signaling in the basal ganglia, however there are little data correlating the defect in purine metabolism to the neural-related abnormalities. In the present studies, we find that HPRT-deficient neuronal cell lines have reduced CREB (cAMP response element-binding protein) expression and intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP), which correlates with attenuated CREB-dependent transcriptional activity and a reduced phosphorylation of protein kinase A (PKA) substrates such as synapsin (p-syn I). Of interest, we found increased expression of phosphodiesterase 10A (PDE10A) in HPRT-deficient cell lines and that the PDE10 inhibitor papaverine and PDE10A siRNA restored cAMP/PKA signaling. Furthermore, reconstitution of HPRT expression in mutant cells partly increased cAMP signaling synapsin phosphorylation. In conclusion, our data show that HPRT-deficiency alters cAMP/PKA signaling pathway, which is in part due to the increased of PDE10A expression and activity. These findings suggest a mechanistic insight into the possible causes of LND and highlight PDE10A as a possible therapeutic target for this intractable neurological disease. PMID:23691025

  11. Extension Sustainability Camp: Design, Implementation, and Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brain, Roslynn; Upton, Sally; Tingey, Brett

    2015-01-01

    Sustainability Camps provide an opportunity for Extension educators to be in the forefront of sustainability outreach and to meet the growing demand for sustainability education. This article shares development, implementation, and evaluation of an Extension Sustainability Camp for youth, grades 4-6. Camp impact was measured via daily pre-and…

  12. The Elementary Camp Experience: An ARC Partnership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krzemien, Marta; Krotzer, Kate

    2012-01-01

    Foreign Language Elementary Summer Camp is a fantastic way to spend part of the summer. For the past ten years in Glastonbury, Connecticut, the authors have offered a variety of foreign language elementary camps that meet daily for three hours for three to four weeks during July. Currently, they offer camps for Chinese, English Language Learners…

  13. Camping for Youth with Chronic Illnesses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, Joanna L.; Keller, M. Jean

    1994-01-01

    Camp Fortnight brought 25 British children with cystic fibrosis to experience a 2-week camping program in Texas. Campers (ages 11-15) participated in wilderness experiences, a challenge course, fishing, horseback riding, creative arts, cooking, hiking, outdoor camping, and field trips. Profiles campers and their experiences. (LP)

  14. Day Camp Manual: Program. Book IV.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Babcock, William

    Book IV in a 5-book day camp manual discusses the camp program. Section I describes the organization, definition, and elements essential to successful day camp programs. Section II, which addresses the benefits and special considerations of mass programs, includes rainy day contingencies, materials to have on hand, and activity suggestions.…

  15. Evaluation of Florida's Eckerd Wilderness Camp Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Dept. of Health and Rehabilitative Services, Tallahassee.

    This report evaluates year-long wilderness camping rehabilitation program for juvenile delinquents believed "emotionally problemed." The remote camps teach through an experience curriculum encompassing daily camping style tasks, with integration of experience via three-day home visits every six weeks followed by written reports by…

  16. Language Camps: Thirteen Years of Minor Miracles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Jean

    A language camp program that began with a small group of 10- to 12-year-olds whose faculty parents wanted them to retain the German learned on sabbaticals abroad has developed into a program of annual week-long day and resident camps for 150 children, aged 9 to 14 years, learning German, French, Spanish, and Norwegian. The camp was originally…

  17. Camping & the Whirl of Insurance Cycles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milgrim, Darrow

    1988-01-01

    Suggests possible responses for summer camp operators facing insurance rate increases and other insurance industry changes. Examines areas of risk in summer camping and suggests general ways that camps can become more desirable to the insurance industry as "insurable groups." (TES)

  18. American Camping Association Annual Report, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Camping Association, Martinsville, IN.

    The American Camping Association (ACA) is a community of camp professionals dedicated to enriching the lives of children and adults through the camp experience. This annual report describes ACA activities during 2000, grouped in five areas: (1) expansion of services and other development of ACA's 24 regional sections and partnerships with other…

  19. Summer Science Camps Program (SSC).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Science Foundation, Washington, DC. Directorate for Education and Human Resources.

    The Summer Science Camps (SSC) Program supports residential and commuter enrichment projects for seventh through ninth grade minority students who are underrepresented in science, engineering, and mathematics. Eligible organizations include school districts, museums, colleges, universities, and nonprofit youth-centered and/or community-based…

  20. AVTC Hosts TechnoCamp

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miner, Brenda

    2006-01-01

    The Area Vo-Tech Center (AVTC) in Russellville, Arkansas, recently hosted its first TechnoCamp to encourage enrollment based on the aptitude and interest level of the students enrolling in the various programs. The center currently offers student enrollment in auto technology, computer engineering, cosmetology, construction technology, drafting…

  1. Sleep At Camp: A Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pravda, Myra

    1997-01-01

    Among 40 camp directors surveyed, the majority believed that campers get enough sleep, but that staff members and directors do not get enough sleep. Addresses how sleep deprivation can affect job performance and offers strategies for helping staff understand the importance of sleep to keep them alert and functioning in their job. Includes…

  2. The Emotional Benefits of Camping.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Rebecca Cowan

    1991-01-01

    Regardless of participant background, age, or ethnic origin, camp can aid in the following key components of emotional maturity: open, positive and appropriate expression of feelings; self-acceptance; a sense of self; an awareness and acceptance of others and their feelings; the ability to develop relationships; and emotional stability. (LP)

  3. Winter Wilderness Travel and Camping.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilchrest, Norman

    Knowledge and skill are needed for safe and enjoyable travel and camping in the wilderness in winter. The beauty of snow and ice, reduced human use, and higher tolerance of animals toward humans make the wilderness attractive during winter. The uniqueness of winter travel presents several challenges that are not present in other seasons. Safety is…

  4. Lyme Disease Comes to Camp.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Michael

    1989-01-01

    Describes one summer camp's plan for dealing with Lyme disease. Describes the disease and the deer tick. Recommends avoiding tick exposure through clothing, frequent examination, showers, and avoiding high grass and brushy areas, and using chemical insect repellents and chemicals to kill ticks in deer mouse nests. (DHP)

  5. Boot Camp Prisons in 1993.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacKenzie, Doris Layton

    1993-01-01

    Describes the boot-camp prison program, its goals, and its drug-treatment and drug-education activities, and its development and change. The article presents the results of a multisite study from eight states that examined the variations in the shock-incarceration concept and its effect. (GLR)

  6. Interplay of palmitoylation and phosphorylation in the trafficking and localization of phosphodiesterase 10A: implications for the treatment of schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Charych, Erik I; Jiang, Li-Xin; Lo, Frederick; Sullivan, Kelly; Brandon, Nicholas J

    2010-07-07

    Phosphodiesterase 10A (PDE10A) is a striatum-enriched, dual-specific cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase that has gained considerable attention as a potential therapeutic target for psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia. As such, a PDE10A-selective inhibitor compound, MP-10, has recently entered clinical testing. Since little is known about the cellular regulation of PDE10A, we sought to elucidate the mechanisms that govern its subcellular localization in striatal medium spiny neurons. Previous reports suggest that PDE10A is primarily membrane bound and is transported throughout medium spiny neuron axons and dendrites. Moreover, it has been shown in PC12 cells that the localization of the major splice form, PDE10A2, may be regulated by protein kinase A phosphorylation at threonine 16 (Thr-16). Using an antibody that specifically recognizes phosphorylated Thr-16 (pThr-16) of PDE10A2, we provide evidence that phosphorylation at Thr-16 is critical for the regulation of PDE10A subcellular localization in vivo. Furthermore, we demonstrate in primary mouse striatal neuron cultures that PDE10A membrane association and transport throughout dendritic processes requires palmitoylation of cysteine 11 (Cys-11) of PDE10A2, likely by the palmitoyl acyltransferases DHHC-7 and -19. Finally, we show that Thr-16 phosphorylation regulates PDE10A trafficking and localization by preventing palmitoylation of Cys-11 rather than by interfering with palmitate-lipid interactions. These data support a model whereby PDE10A trafficking and localization can be regulated in response to local fluctuations in cAMP levels. Given this, we propose that excessive striatal dopamine release, as occurs in schizophrenia, might exert differential effects on the regulation of PDE10A localization in the two striatal output pathways.

  7. Potentiation of penile tumescence by T-1032, a new potent and specific phosphodiesterase type V inhibitor, in dogs.

    PubMed

    Noto, T; Inoue, H; Ikeo, T; Kikkawa, K

    2000-09-01

    We examined the mechanism underlying the potentiation of penile tumescence by methyl 2-(4-aminophenyl)-1, 2dihydro-1-oxo-7-(2-pyridinylmethoxy)-4-(3,4, 5-trimethoxyphenyl)3-isoquinoline carboxylate sulfate (T-1032), a new potent and selective phosphodiesterase type V inhibitor. In vivo, pelvic nerve stimulation induced a penile tumescence together with increase of total nitric oxide metabolite levels within the corpus cavernosa of anesthetized dogs. Intravenous (1-100 microg/kg) and intraduodenal (3, 30, 300 microg/kg) treatment with T-1032 dose dependently potentiated the tumescence. The potency of T-1032 was equivalent to that of sildenafil. T-1032 did not influence the intracavernous pressure when the pelvic nerve stimulation was absent. The potentiation of tumescence was more pronounced by intracavernous than i.v. injection. Intracavernous N(G)-nitro-L-arginine, a nitric-oxide synthase inhibitor, but not N(G)-nitro-D-arginine diminished the effects of T-1032 on the tumescence. Furthermore, i.v. T-1032 augmented the tumescence induced by sodium nitroprusside (SNP) but not by vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP). In vitro, in isolated preparations of canine corpus cavernosum precontracted with phenylephrine, SNP (0. 01-100 microM) and VIP (0.01-1 microM) produced a dose-dependent relaxation accompanied by an increase in cGMP and cAMP levels, respectively. T-1032 augmented the relaxation induced by SNP but not by VIP. These data suggest that oral treatment with T-1032 has potential to improve erectile dysfunction through the inhibition of phosphodiesterase type V in the smooth muscles of corpus cavernosa.

  8. A putative role for the plasma membrane potential in the control of the expression of the gene encoding the tomato high-affinity potassium transporter HAK5.

    PubMed

    Nieves-Cordones, Manuel; Miller, Anthony J; Alemán, Fernando; Martínez, Vicente; Rubio, Francisco

    2008-12-01

    A chimeric CaHAK1-LeHAK5 transporter with only 15 amino acids of CaHAK1 in the N-terminus mediates high-affinity K(+) uptake in yeast cells. Kinetic and expression analyses strongly suggest that LeHAK5 mediates a significant proportion of the high-affinity K(+) uptake shown by K(+)-starved tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) plants. The development of high-affinity K(+) uptake, putatively mediated by LeHAK5, was correlated with increased LeHAK5 mRNA levels and a more negative electrical potential difference across the plasma membrane of root epidermal and cortical cells. However, this increase in high-affinity K(+) uptake was not correlated with the root K(+) content. Thus, (i) growth conditions that result in a hyperpolarized root plasma membrane potential, such as K(+) starvation or growth in the presence of NH(4) (+), but which do not decrease the K(+) content, lead to increased LeHAK5 expression; (ii) the presence of NaCl in the growth solution, which prevents the hyperpolarization induced by K(+) starvation, also prevents LeHAK5 expression. Moreover, once the gene is induced, depolarization of the plasma membrane potential then produces a decrease in the LeHAK5 mRNA. On the basis of these results, we propose that the plant membrane electrical potential plays a role in the regulation of the expression of this gene encoding a high-affinity K(+) transporter.

  9. Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase 3A1 protects the heart against ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Oikawa, Masayoshi; Wu, Meiping; Lim, Soyeon; Knight, Walter E; Miller, Clint L; Cai, Yujun; Lu, Yan; Blaxall, Burns C; Takeishi, Yasuchika; Abe, Jun-ichi; Yan, Chen

    2013-11-01

    Phosphodiesterase 3A (PDE3A) is a major regulator of cAMP in cardiomyocytes. PDE3 inhibitors are used for acute treatment of congestive heart failure, but are associated with increased incidence of arrhythmias and sudden death with long-term use. We previously reported that chronic PDE3A downregulation or inhibition induced myocyte apoptosis in vitro. However, the cardiac protective effect of PDE3A has not been demonstrated in vivo in disease models. In this study, we examined the role of PDE3A in regulating myocardial function and survival in vivo using genetically engineered transgenic mice with myocardial overexpression of the PDE3A1 isozyme (TG). TG mice have reduced cardiac function characterized by reduced heart rate and ejection fraction (52.5±7.8% vs. 83.9±4.7%) as well as compensatory expansion of left ventricular diameter (4.19±0.19mm vs. 3.10±0.18mm). However, there was no maladaptive increase of fibrosis and apoptosis in TG hearts compared to wild type (WT) hearts, and the survival rates also remained the same. The diminution of cardiac contractile function is very likely attributed to a decrease in beta-adrenergic receptor (β-AR) response in TG mice. Importantly, the myocardial infarct size (4.0±1.8% vs. 24.6±3.8%) and apoptotic cell number (1.3±1.0% vs. 5.6±1.5%) induced by ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury were significantly attenuated in TG mice. This was associated with decreased expression of inducible cAMP early repressor (ICER) and increased expression of anti-apoptotic protein BCL-2. To further verify the anti-apoptotic effects of PDE3A1, we performed in vitro apoptosis study in isolated adult TG and WT cardiomyocytes. We found that the apoptotic rates stimulated by hypoxia/reoxygenation or H2O2 were indeed significantly reduced in TG myocytes, and the differences between TG and WT myocytes were completely reversed in the presence of the PDE3 inhibitor milrinone. These together indicate that PDE3A1 negatively regulates β-AR signaling

  10. Rod outer segment structure influences the apparent kinetic parameters of cyclic GMP phosphodiesterase

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Cyclic GMP hydrolysis by the phosphodiesterase (PDE) of retinal rod outer segments (ROS) is a key amplification step in phototransduction. Definitive estimates of the turnover number, kcat, and of the Km are crucial to quantifying the amplification contributed by the PDE. Published estimates for these kinetic parameters vary widely; moreover, light-dependent changes in the Km of PDE have been reported. The experiments and analyses reported here account for most observed variations in apparent Km, and they lead to definitive estimates of the intrinsic kinetic parameters in amphibian rods. We first obtained a new and highly accurate estimate of the ratio of holo-PDE to rhodopsin in the amphibian ROS, 1:270. We then estimated the apparent kinetic parameters of light-activated PDE of suspensions of disrupted frog ROS whose structural integrity was systematically varied. In the most severely disrupted ROS preparation, we found Km = 95 microM and kcat = 4,400 cGMP.s-1. In suspensions of disc-stack fragments of greater integrity, the apparent Km increased to approximately 600 microM, though kcat remained unchanged. In contrast, the Km for cAMP was not shifted in the disc stack preparations. A theoretical analysis shows that the elevated apparent Km of suspensions of disc stacks can be explained as a consequence of diffusion with hydrolysis in the disc stack, which causes active PDEs nearer the center of the stack to be exposed to a lower concentration of cyclic GMP than PDEs at the disc stack rim. The analysis predicts our observation that the apparent Km for cGMP is elevated with no accompanying decrease in kcat. The analysis also predicts the lack of a Km shift for cAMP and the previously reported light dependence of the apparent Km for cGMP. We conclude that the intrinsic kinetic parameters of the PDE do not vary with light or structural integrity, and are those of the most severely disrupted disc stacks. PMID:7931138

  11. Kinetic and Structural Studies of Phosphodiesterase-8A and Implication on the Inhibitor Selectivity

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, H.; Yan, Z; Yang, S; Cai, J; Robinson, H; Ke, H

    2008-01-01

    Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase-8 (PDE8) is a family of cAMP-specific enzymes and plays important roles in many biological processes, including T-cell activation, testosterone production, adrenocortical hyperplasia, and thyroid function. However, no PDE8 selective inhibitors are available for trial treatment of human diseases. Here we report kinetic properties of the highly active PDE8A1 catalytic domain prepared from refolding and its crystal structures in the unliganded and 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX) bound forms at 1.9 and 2.1 Angstroms resolutions, respectively. The PDE8A1 catalytic domain has a KM of 1.8 eM, Vmax of 6.1 emol/min/mg, a kcat of 4.0 s-1 for cAMP, and a KM of 1.6 mM, Vmax of 2.5 emol/min/mg, a kcat of 1.6 s-1 for cGMP, thus indicating that the substrate specificity of PDE8 is dominated by KM. The structure of the PDE8A1 catalytic domain has similar topology as those of other PDE families but contains two extra helices around Asn685-Thr710. Since this fragment is distant from the active site of the enzyme, its impact on the catalysis is unclear. The PDE8A1 catalytic domain is insensitive to the IBMX inhibition (IC50 = 700 eM). The unfavorable interaction of IBMX in the PDE8A1-IBMX structure suggests an important role of Tyr748 in the inhibitor binding. Indeed, the mutation of Tyr748 to phenylalanine increases the PDE8A1 sensitivity to several nonselective or family selective PDE inhibitors. Thus, the structural and mutagenesis studies provide not only insight into the enzymatic properties but also guidelines for design of PDE8 selective inhibitors.

  12. cAMP-specific PDE4 phosphodiesterases and AIP in the pathogenesis of pituitary tumors.

    PubMed

    Bolger, Graeme B; Bizzi, Mariana F; Pinheiro, Sergio V; Trivellin, Giampaolo; Smoot, Lisa; Accavitti, Mary-Ann; Korbonits, Márta; Ribeiro-Oliveira, Antonio

    2016-05-01

    PDE4 cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases regulate cAMP abundance in cells and therefore regulate numerous processes, including cell growth and differentiation. The rat PDE4A5 isoform (human homolog PDE4A4) interacts with the AIP protein (also called XAP2 or ARA-9). Germline mutations in AIP occur in approximately 20% of patients with Familial Isolated Pituitary Adenoma (FIPA) and 20% of childhood-onset simplex somatotroph adenomas. We therefore examined the protein expression of PDE4A4 and the closely related isoform PDE4A8 in normal human pituitary tissue and in pituitary adenomas. PDE4A4 had low expression in normal pituitary but was significantly overexpressed in somatotroph, lactotroph, corticotroph and clinically nonfunctioning gonadotroph adenomas (P<0.0001 for all subtypes). Likewise, PDE4A8 was expressed in normal pituitary and was also significantly overexpressed in the adenoma subtypes (P<0.0001 for all). Among the different adenoma subtypes, corticotroph and lactotroph adenomas were the highest and lowest expressed for PDE4A4, respectively, whereas the opposite was observed for PDE4A8. Naturally occurring oncogenic variants in AIP were shown by a two-hybrid assay to disrupt the ability of AIP to interact with PDE4A5. A reverse two-hybrid screen identified numerous additional variants in the tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) region of AIP that also disrupted its ability to interact with PDE4A5. The expression of PDE4A4 and PDE4A8 in normal pituitary, their increased expression in adenomatous pituitary cells where AIP is meant to participate, and the disruption of the PDE4A4-AIP interaction by AIP mutants may play a role in pituitary tumorigenesis.

  13. Phosphodiesterase7 Inhibition Activates Adult Neurogenesis in Hippocampus and Subventricular Zone In Vitro and In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Morales-Garcia, Jose A; Echeverry-Alzate, Victor; Alonso-Gil, Sandra; Sanz-SanCristobal, Marina; Lopez-Moreno, Jose A; Gil, Carmen; Martinez, Ana; Santos, Angel; Perez-Castillo, Ana

    2017-02-01

    The phosphodiesterase 7 (PDE7) enzyme is one of the enzymes responsible for controlling intracellular levels of cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate in the immune and central nervous system. We have previously shown that inhibitors of this enzyme are potent neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory agents. In addition, we also demonstrated that PDE7 inhibition induces endogenous neuroregenerative processes toward a dopaminergic phenotype. Here, we show that PDE7 inhibition controls stem cell expansion in the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus (SGZ) and the subventricular zone (SVZ) in the adult rat brain. Neurospheres cultures obtained from SGZ and SVZ of adult rats treated with PDE7 inhibitors presented an increased proliferation and neuronal differentiation compared to control cultures. PDE7 inhibitors treatment of neurospheres cultures also resulted in an increase of the levels of phosphorylated cAMP response element binding protein, suggesting that their effects were indeed mediated through the activation of the cAMP/PKA signaling pathway. In addition, adult rats orally treated with S14, a specific inhibitor of PDE7, presented elevated numbers of proliferating progenitor cells, and migrating precursors in the SGZ and the SVZ. Moreover, long-term treatment with this PDE7 inhibitor shows a significant increase in newly generated neurons in the olfactory bulb and the hippocampus. Also a better performance in memory tests was observed in S14 treated rats, suggesting a functional relevance for the S14-induced increase in SGZ neurogenesis. Taken together, our results indicate for the first time that inhibition of PDE7 directly regulates proliferation, migration and differentiation of neural stem cells, improving spatial learning and memory tasks. Stem Cells 2017;35:458-472.

  14. Phosphodiesterases Regulate BAY 41-2272-Induced VASP Phosphorylation in Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Adderley, Shaquria P.; Joshi, Chintamani N.; Martin, Danielle N.; Tulis, David Anthony

    2012-01-01

    BAY 41-2272 (BAY), a stimulator of soluble guanylyl cyclase, increases cyclic nucleotides and inhibits proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). In this study, we elucidated mechanisms of action of BAY in its regulation of vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) with an emphasis on VSMC phosphodiesterases (PDEs). BAY alone increased phosphorylation of VASPSer239 and VASPSer157, respective indicators of PKG and PKA signaling. IBMX, a non-selective inhibitor of PDEs, had no effect on BAY-induced phosphorylation at VASPSer239 but inhibited phosphorylation at VASPSer157. Selective inhibitors of PDE3 or PDE4 attenuated BAY-mediated increases at VASPSer239 and VASPSer157, whereas PDE5 inhibition potentiated BAY-mediated increases only at VASPSer157. In comparison, 8Br-cGMP increased phosphorylation at VASPSer239 and VASPSer157 which were not affected by selective PDE inhibitors. In the presence of 8Br-cAMP, inhibition of either PDE4 or PDE5 decreased VASPSer239 phosphorylation and inhibition of PDE3 increased phosphorylation at VASPSer239, while inhibition of PDE3 or PDE4 increased and PDE5 inhibition had no effect on VASPSer157 phosphorylation. These findings demonstrate that BAY operates via cAMP and cGMP along with regulation by PDEs to phosphorylate VASP in VSMCs and that the mechanism of action of BAY in VSMCs is different from that of direct cyclic nucleotide analogs with respect to VASP phosphorylation and the involvement of PDEs. Given a role for VASP as a critical cytoskeletal protein, these findings provide evidence for BAY as a regulator of VSMC growth and a potential therapeutic agent against vasculoproliferative disorders. PMID:22347188

  15. The ACA Standards Organizer. A Tool for the Preparation of Camps for Visitation for American Camping Association Camp Accreditation and Site Approval.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chenery, Mary Faeth

    This comprehensive guide helps camp administrators prepare for camp accreditation and site approval visits by the American Camping Association (ACA). The introductory sections outline the purpose and administration of the standards program and provide definitions of camping terms. Standards are organized under one section for camp accreditation…

  16. beta2-adrenergic receptor signaling and desensitization elucidated by quantitative modeling of real time cAMP dynamics.

    PubMed

    Violin, Jonathan D; DiPilato, Lisa M; Yildirim, Necmettin; Elston, Timothy C; Zhang, Jin; Lefkowitz, Robert J

    2008-02-01

    G protein-coupled receptor signaling is dynamically regulated by multiple feedback mechanisms, which rapidly attenuate signals elicited by ligand stimulation, causing desensitization. The individual contributions of these mechanisms, however, are poorly understood. Here, we use an improved fluorescent biosensor for cAMP to measure second messenger dynamics stimulated by endogenous beta(2)-adrenergic receptor (beta(2)AR) in living cells. beta(2)AR stimulation with isoproterenol results in a transient pulse of cAMP, reaching a maximal concentration of approximately 10 microm and persisting for less than 5 min. We investigated the contributions of cAMP-dependent kinase, G protein-coupled receptor kinases, and beta-arrestin to the regulation of beta(2)AR signal kinetics by using small molecule inhibitors, small interfering RNAs, and mouse embryonic fibroblasts. We found that the cAMP response is restricted in duration by two distinct mechanisms in HEK-293 cells: G protein-coupled receptor kinase (GRK6)-mediated receptor phosphorylation leading to beta-arrestin mediated receptor inactivation and cAMP-dependent kinase-mediated induction of cAMP metabolism by phosphodiesterases. A mathematical model of beta(2)AR signal kinetics, fit to these data, revealed that direct receptor inactivation by cAMP-dependent kinase is insignificant but that GRK6/beta-arrestin-mediated inactivation is rapid and profound, occurring with a half-time of 70 s. This quantitative system analysis represents an important advance toward quantifying mechanisms contributing to the physiological regulation of receptor signaling.

  17. cAMP and forskolin decrease. gamma. -aminobutyric acid-gated chloride flux in rat brain synaptoneurosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Heuschneider, G.; Schwartz, R.D. )

    1989-04-01

    The effects of the cyclic nucleotide cAMP on {gamma}-aminobutyric acid-gated chloride channel function were investigated. The membrane-permeant cAMP analog N{sup 6}, O{sup 2{prime}}-dibutyryladenosine 3{prime},5{prime}-cyclic monophosphate inhibited muscimol-induced {sup 36}Cl{sup {minus}} uptake into rat cerebral cortical synaptoneurosomes in a concentration-dependent manner. The inhibition was due to a decrease in the maximal effect of muscimol, with no change in potency. Similar effects were observed with 8-(4-chlorophenylthio)adenosine 3{prime},5{prime}-cyclic monophosphate, 8-bromoadenosine 3{prime},5{prime}-cyclic monophosphate, and the phosphodiesterase inhibitor isobutylmethylxanthine. The effect of endogenous cAMP accumulation on the {gamma}-aminobutyric acid-gated Cl{sup {minus}} channel was studied with forskolin, an activator of adenylate cyclase. Under identical conditions, in the intact synaptoneurosomes, forskolin inhibited muscimol-induced {sup 36}Cl{sup {minus}} uptake and generated cAMP with similar potencies. Surprisingly, 1,9-dideoxyforskolin, which does not activate adenylate cyclase, also inhibited the muscimol response, suggesting that forskolin and its lipophilic derivatives may interact with the Cl{sup {minus}} channel directly. The data suggest that {gamma}-aminobutyric acid (GABA{sub A}) receptor function in brain can be regulated by cAMP-dependent phosphorylation.

  18. Fructose Uptake in Sinorhizobium meliloti Is Mediated by a High-Affinity ATP-Binding Cassette Transport System

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, Annie; Østerås, Magne; Mandon, Karine; Poggi, Marie-Christine; Le Rudulier, Daniel

    2001-01-01

    By transposon mutagenesis, we have isolated a mutant of Sinorhizobium meliloti which is totally unable to grow on fructose as sole carbon source as a consequence of its inability to transport this sugar. The cloning and sequencing analysis of the chromosomal DNA region flanking the TnphoA insertion revealed the presence of six open reading frames (ORFs) organized in two loci, frcRS and frcBCAK, transcribed divergently. The frcBCA genes encode the characteristic components of an ATP-binding cassette transporter (FrcB, a periplasmic substrate binding protein, FrcC, an integral membrane permease, and FrcA, an ATP-binding cytoplasmic protein), which is the unique high-affinity (Km of 6 μM) fructose uptake system in S. meliloti. The FrcK protein shows homology with some kinases, while FrcR is probably a transcriptional regulator of the repressor-ORF-kinase family. The expression of S. meliloti frcBCAK in Escherichia coli, which transports fructose only via the phosphotransferase system, resulted in the detection of a periplasmic fructose binding activity, demonstrating that FrcB is the binding protein of the Frc transporter. The analysis of substrate specificities revealed that the Frc system is also a high-affinity transporter for ribose and mannose, which are both fructose competitors for the binding to the periplasmic FrcB protein. However, the Frc mutant was still able to grow on these sugars as sole carbon source, demonstrating the presence of at least one other uptake system for mannose and ribose in S. meliloti. The expression of the frcBC genes as determined by measurements of alkaline phosphatase activity was shown to be induced by mannitol and fructose, but not by mannose, ribose, glucose, or succinate, suggesting that the Frc system is primarily targeted towards fructose. Neither Nod nor Fix phenotypes were impared in the TnphoA mutant, demonstrating that fructose uptake is not essential for nodulation and nitrogen fixation, although FrcB protein is

  19. Fructose uptake in Sinorhizobium meliloti is mediated by a high-affinity ATP-binding cassette transport system.

    PubMed

    Lambert, A; Østerås, M; Mandon, K; Poggi, M C; Le Rudulier, D

    2001-08-01

    By transposon mutagenesis, we have isolated a mutant of Sinorhizobium meliloti which is totally unable to grow on fructose as sole carbon source as a consequence of its inability to transport this sugar. The cloning and sequencing analysis of the chromosomal DNA region flanking the TnphoA insertion revealed the presence of six open reading frames (ORFs) organized in two loci, frcRS and frcBCAK, transcribed divergently. The frcBCA genes encode the characteristic components of an ATP-binding cassette transporter (FrcB, a periplasmic substrate binding protein, FrcC, an integral membrane permease, and FrcA, an ATP-binding cytoplasmic protein), which is the unique high-affinity (K(m) of 6 microM) fructose uptake system in S. meliloti. The FrcK protein shows homology with some kinases, while FrcR is probably a transcriptional regulator of the repressor-ORF-kinase family. The expression of S. meliloti frcBCAK in Escherichia coli, which transports fructose only via the phosphotransferase system, resulted in the detection of a periplasmic fructose binding activity, demonstrating that FrcB is the binding protein of the Frc transporter. The analysis of substrate specificities revealed that the Frc system is also a high-affinity transporter for ribose and mannose, which are both fructose competitors for the binding to the periplasmic FrcB protein. However, the Frc mutant was still able to grow on these sugars as sole carbon source, demonstrating the presence of at least one other uptake system for mannose and ribose in S. meliloti. The expression of the frcBC genes as determined by measurements of alkaline phosphatase activity was shown to be induced by mannitol and fructose, but not by mannose, ribose, glucose, or succinate, suggesting that the Frc system is primarily targeted towards fructose. Neither Nod nor Fix phenotypes were impared in the TnphoA mutant, demonstrating that fructose uptake is not essential for nodulation and nitrogen fixation, although FrcB protein is

  20. Identification of overlapping but differential binding sites for the high-affinity CXCR3 antagonists NBI-74330 and VUF11211.

    PubMed

    Scholten, Danny J; Roumen, Luc; Wijtmans, Maikel; Verkade-Vreeker, Marlies C A; Custers, Hans; Lai, Michael; de Hooge, Daniela; Canals, Meritxell; de Esch, Iwan J P; Smit, Martine J; de Graaf, Chris; Leurs, Rob

    2014-01-01

    CXC chemokine receptor CXCR3 and/or its main three ligands CXCL9, CXCL10, and CXCL11 are highly upregulated in a variety of diseases. As such, considerable efforts have been made to develop small-molecule receptor CXCR3 antagonists, yielding distinct chemical classes of antagonists blocking binding and/or function of CXCR3 chemokines. Although it is suggested that these compounds bind in an allosteric fashion, thus far no evidence has been provided regarding the molecular details of their interaction with CXCR3. Using site-directed mutagenesis complemented with in silico homology modeling, we report the binding modes of two high-affinity CXCR3 antagonists of distinct chemotypes: VUF11211 [(S)-5-chloro-6-(4-(1-(4-chlorobenzyl)piperidin-4-yl)-3-ethylpiperazin-1-yl)-N-ethylnicotinamide] (piperazinyl-piperidine) with a rigid elongated structure containing two basic groups and NBI-74330 [(R)-N-(1-(3-(4-ethoxyphenyl)-4-oxo-3,4-dihydropyrido[2,3-d]pyrimidin-2-yl)ethyl)-2-(4-fluoro-3-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)-N-(pyridin-3-ylmethyl)acetamide] (8-azaquinazolinone) without any basic group. Here we show that NBI-74330 is anchored in the transmembrane minor pocket lined by helices 2 (W2.60, D2.63), 3 (F3.32), and 7 (S7.39, Y7.43), whereas VUF11211 extends from the minor pocket into the major pocket of the transmembrane domains, located between residues in helices 1 (Y1.39), 2 (W2.60), 3 (F3.32), 4 (D4.60), 6 (Y6.51), and 7 (S7.39, Y7.43). Mutation of these residues did not affect CXCL11 binding significantly, confirming the allosteric nature of the interaction of these small molecules with CXCR3. Moreover, the model derived from our in silico-guided studies fits well with the already published structure-activity relationship data on these ligands. Altogether, in this study, we show overlapping, yet different binding sites for two high-affinity CXCR3 antagonists, which offer new opportunities for the structure-based design of allosteric modulators for CXCR3.

  1. Positive allosteric modulation of the GHB high-affinity binding site by the GABAA receptor modulator monastrol and the flavonoid catechin.

    PubMed

    Eghorn, Laura F; Hoestgaard-Jensen, Kirsten; Kongstad, Kenneth T; Bay, Tina; Higgins, David; Frølund, Bente; Wellendorph, Petrine

    2014-10-05

    γ-Hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) is a metabolite of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and a proposed neurotransmitter in the mammalian brain. We recently identified α4βδ GABAA receptors as possible high-affinity GHB targets. GABAA receptors are highly sensitive to allosteric modulation. Thus to investigate whether GHB high-affinity binding sites are also sensitive to allosteric modulation, we screened both known GABAA receptor ligands and a library of natural compounds in the rat cortical membrane GHB specific high-affinity [3H]NCS-382 binding assay. Two hits were identified: Monastrol, a positive allosteric modulator of GABA function at δ-containing GABAA receptors, and the naturally occurring flavonoid catechin. These compounds increased [3H]NCS-382 binding to 185-272% in high micromolar concentrations. Monastrol and (+)-catechin significantly reduced [3H]NCS-382 dissociation rates and induced conformational changes in the binding site, demonstrating a positive allosteric modulation of radioligand binding. Surprisingly, binding of [3H]GHB and the GHB high-affinity site-specific radioligands [125I]BnOPh-GHB and [3H]HOCPCA was either decreased or only weakly increased, indicating that the observed modulation was critically probe-dependent. Both monastrol and (+)-catechin were agonists at recombinant α4β3δ receptors expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes. When monastrol and GHB were co-applied no changes were seen compared to the individual responses. In summary, we have identified the compounds monastrol and catechin as the first allosteric modulators of GHB high-affinity binding sites. Despite their relatively weak affinity, these compounds may aid in further characterization of the GHB high-affinity sites that are likely to represent certain GABAA receptors.

  2. "Store-operated" cAMP signaling contributes to Ca2+-activated Cl- secretion in T84 colonic cells.

    PubMed

    Nichols, Jonathan M; Maiellaro, Isabella; Abi-Jaoude, Joanne; Curci, Silvana; Hofer, Aldebaran M

    2015-10-15

    Apical cAMP-dependent CFTR Cl(-) channels are essential for efficient vectorial movement of ions and fluid into the lumen of the colon. It is well known that Ca(2+)-mobilizing agonists also stimulate colonic anion secretion. However, CFTR is apparently not activated directly by Ca(2+), and the existence of apical Ca(2+)-dependent Cl(-) channels in the native colonic epithelium is controversial, leaving the identity of the Ca(2+)-activated component unresolved. We recently showed that decreasing free Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]) within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) lumen elicits a rise in intracellular cAMP. This process, which we termed "store-operated cAMP signaling" (SOcAMPS), requires the luminal ER Ca(2+) sensor STIM1 and does not depend on changes in cytosolic Ca(2+). Here we assessed the degree to which SOcAMPS participates in Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) transport as measured by transepithelial short-circuit current (Isc) in polarized T84 monolayers in parallel with imaging of cAMP and PKA activity using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based reporters in single cells. In Ca(2+)-free conditions, the Ca(2+)-releasing agonist carbachol and Ca(2+) ionophore increased Isc, cAMP, and PKA activity. These responses persisted in cells loaded with the Ca(2+) chelator BAPTA-AM. The effect on Isc was enhanced in the presence of the phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibitor 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX), inhibited by the CFTR inhibitor CFTRinh-172 and the PKA inhibitor H-89, and unaffected by Ba(2+) or flufenamic acid. We propose that a discrete component of the "Ca(2+)-dependent" secretory activity in the colon derives from cAMP generated through SOcAMPS. This alternative mode of cAMP production could contribute to the actions of diverse xenobiotic agents that disrupt ER Ca(2+) homeostasis, leading to diarrhea.

  3. Both protein kinase A and exchange protein activated by cAMP coordinate adhesion of human vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Netherton, Stuart J; Sutton, Jayda A; Wilson, Lindsay S; Carter, Rhonda L; Maurice, Donald H

    2007-10-12

    cAMP regulates integrin-dependent adhesions of vascular endothelial cells (VECs) to extracellular matrix proteins, their vascular endothelial cadherin-dependent intercellular adhesions, and their proliferation and migration in response to growth and chemotactic factors. Previously, we reported that cAMP-elevating agents differentially inhibited migration of human VECs isolated from large vascular structures (macro-VECs, human aortic endothelial cells [HAECs]) or small vascular structures (micro-VECs, human microvascular endothelial cells [HMVECs]) and that cAMP hydrolysis by phosphodiesterase (PDE)3 and PDE4 enzymes was important in coordinating this difference. Here we report that 2 cAMP-effector enzymes, namely protein kinase (PK)A and exchange protein activated by cAMP (EPAC), each regulate extracellular matrix protein-based adhesions of both macro- and micro-VECs. Of interest and potential therapeutic importance, we report that although specific pharmacological activation of EPAC markedly stimulated adhesion of micro-VECs to extracellular matrix proteins when PKA was inhibited, this treatment only modestly promoted adhesion of macro-VECs. Consistent with an important role for cAMP PDEs in this difference, PDE3 or PDE4 inhibitors promoted EPAC-dependent adhesions in micro-VECs when PKA was inhibited but not in macro-VECs. At a molecular level, we identify multiple, nonoverlapping, PKA- or EPAC-based signaling protein complexes in both macro- and micro-VECs and demonstrate that each of these complexes contains either PDE3B or PDE4D but not both of these PDEs. Taken together, our data support the concept that adhesion of macro- and micro-VECs is differentially regulated by cAMP and that these differences are coordinated through selective actions of cAMP at multiple nonoverlapping signaling complexes that contain PKA or EPAC and distinct PDE variants.

  4. Prostaglandin E2 inhibits NLRP3 inflammasome activation through EP4 receptor and intracellular cAMP in human macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yueqin; Martinez-Anton, Asuncion; Qi, Hai-Yan; Logun, Carolea; Alsaaty, Sara; Park, Yong Hwan; Kastner, Daniel L.; Chae, Jae Jin; Shelhamer, James H.

    2015-01-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is a potent lipid mediator involved in maintaining homeostasis but also promotion of acute inflammation or immune suppression in chronic inflammation and cancer. NLRP3 inflammasome plays an important role in host defense. Uncontrolled activation of NLRP3 inflammasome, due to mutations in the NLRP3 gene causes cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes (CAPS). Here, we showed that NLRP3 inflammasome activation is inhibited by PGE2 in human primary monocyte-derived macrophages. This effect was mediated through prostaglandin E receptor 4 (EP4) and an increase in intracellular cAMP, independently of protein kinase A (PKA) or exchange protein directly activated by cAMP (Epac). A specific agonist of EP4 mimicked, while its antagonist or EP4 knockdown reversed PGE2-mediated NLRP3 inhibition. PGE2 caused an increase in intracellular cAMP. Blockade of adenylate cyclase by its inhibitor reversed PGE2-mediated NLRP3 inhibition. Increase of intracellular cAMP by an activator of adenylate cyclase or an analog of cAMP, or a blockade of cAMP degradation by phosphodiesterase inhibitor decreased NLRP3 activation. PKA or Epac agonists did not mimic and their antagonists did not reverse PGE2-mediated NLRP3 inhibition. In addition, constitutive IL-1β secretion from LPS-primed PBMCs of CAPS patients was substantially reduced by high doses of PGE2. Moreover, blocking cytosolic phospholipase A2α by its inhibitor or siRNA or inhibiting cyclooxygenase 2, resulting in inhibition of endogenous PGE2 production, caused an increase in NLRP3 inflammasome activation. Our results suggest that PGE2 might play a role in maintaining homeostasis during the resolution phase of inflammation and might serve as an autocrine and paracrine regulator. PMID:25917098

  5. “Store-operated” cAMP signaling contributes to Ca2+-activated Cl− secretion in T84 colonic cells

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, Jonathan M.; Maiellaro, Isabella; Abi-Jaoude, Joanne; Curci, Silvana

    2015-01-01

    Apical cAMP-dependent CFTR Cl− channels are essential for efficient vectorial movement of ions and fluid into the lumen of the colon. It is well known that Ca2+-mobilizing agonists also stimulate colonic anion secretion. However, CFTR is apparently not activated directly by Ca2+, and the existence of apical Ca2+-dependent Cl− channels in the native colonic epithelium is controversial, leaving the identity of the Ca2+-activated component unresolved. We recently showed that decreasing free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]) within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) lumen elicits a rise in intracellular cAMP. This process, which we termed “store-operated cAMP signaling” (SOcAMPS), requires the luminal ER Ca2+ sensor STIM1 and does not depend on changes in cytosolic Ca2+. Here we assessed the degree to which SOcAMPS participates in Ca2+-activated Cl− transport as measured by transepithelial short-circuit current (Isc) in polarized T84 monolayers in parallel with imaging of cAMP and PKA activity using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based reporters in single cells. In Ca2+-free conditions, the Ca2+-releasing agonist carbachol and Ca2+ ionophore increased Isc, cAMP, and PKA activity. These responses persisted in cells loaded with the Ca2+ chelator BAPTA-AM. The effect on Isc was enhanced in the presence of the phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibitor 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX), inhibited by the CFTR inhibitor CFTRinh-172 and the PKA inhibitor H-89, and unaffected by Ba2+ or flufenamic acid. We propose that a discrete component of the “Ca2+-dependent” secretory activity in the colon derives from cAMP generated through SOcAMPS. This alternative mode of cAMP production could contribute to the actions of diverse xenobiotic agents that disrupt ER Ca2+ homeostasis, leading to diarrhea. PMID:26316590

  6. Mitotic activation of the DISC1-inducible cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase-4D9 (PDE4D9), through multi-site phosphorylation, influences cell cycle progression.

    PubMed

    Sheppard, Catherine L; Lee, Louisa C Y; Hill, Elaine V; Henderson, David J P; Anthony, Diana F; Houslay, Daniel M; Yalla, Krishna C; Cairns, Lynne S; Dunlop, Allan J; Baillie, George S; Huston, Elaine; Houslay, Miles D

    2014-09-01

    In Rat-1 cells, the dramatic decrease in the levels of both intracellular cyclic 3'5' adenosine monophosphate (cyclic AMP; cAMP) and in the activity of cAMP-activated protein kinase A (PKA) observed in mitosis was paralleled by a profound increase in cAMP hydrolyzing phosphodiesterase-4 (PDE4) activity. The decrease in PKA activity, which occurs during mitosis, was attributable to PDE4 activation as the PDE4 selective inhibitor, rolipram, but not the phosphodiesterase-3 (PDE3) inhibitor, cilostamide, specifically ablated this cell cycle-dependent effect. PDE4 inhibition caused Rat-1 cells to move from S phase into G2/M more rapidly, to transit through G2/M more quickly and to remain in G1 for a longer period. Inhibition of PDE3 elicited no observable effects on cell cycle dynamics. Selective immunopurification of each of the four PDE4 sub-families identified PDE4D as being selectively activated in mitosis. Subsequent analysis uncovered PDE4D9, an isoform whose expression can be regulated by Disrupted-In-Schizophrenia 1 (DISC1)/activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) complex, as the sole PDE4 species activated during mitosis in Rat-1 cells. PDE4D9 becomes activated in mitosis through dual phosphorylation at Ser585 and Ser245, involving the combined action of ERK and an unidentified 'switch' kinase that has previously been shown to be activated by H2O2. Additionally, in mitosis, PDE4D9 also becomes phosphorylated at Ser67 and Ser81, through the action of MK2 (MAPKAPK2) and AMP kinase (AMPK), respectively. The multisite phosphorylation of PDE4D9 by all four of these protein kinases leads to decreased mobility (band-shift) of PDE4D9 on SDS-PAGE. PDE4D9 is predominantly concentrated in the perinuclear region of Rat-1 cells but with a fraction distributed asymmetrically at the cell margins. Our investigations demonstrate that the diminished levels of cAMP and PKA activity that characterise mitosis are due to enhanced cAMP degradation by PDE4D9. PDE4D9, was found to

  7. Inhibitors of phosphodiesterases PDE2, PDE3, and PDE4 do not increase the sinoatrial tachycardia of noradrenaline and prostaglandin PGE₁ in mice.

    PubMed

    Galindo-Tovar, Alejandro; Vargas, María Luisa; Kaumann, Alberto J

    2016-02-01

    Phosphodiesterases PDE2, PDE3, and PDE4 are expressed in murine sinoatrial cells. PDE3 and/or PDE4 reduce heart rate but apparently do not influence the tachycardia mediated through sinoatrial β1- and β2-adrenoceptors despite the high content of sinoatrial cAMP. The function of PDE2 is, however, uncertain. Prostaglandin PGE1 elicits sinoatrial tachycardia through EP receptors, but the control by phosphodiesterases is unknown. We investigated on spontaneously beating right atria of mice the effects of the PDE2 inhibitors Bay 60-7550 and EHNA on basal beating and the tachycardia produced by noradrenaline (3 nM) and PGE1 (1 μM). Bay 60-7550 (1 μM), but not EHNA (10 μM), increased basal sinoatrial beating. EHNA also failed to produce tachycardia in the presence of the adenosine deaminase inhibitor 2'-deoxycoformycin (10 μM), remaining inconclusive whether PDE2 reduces basal sinoatrial beating. Rolipram (10 μM) and cilostamide (300 nM) caused moderate tachycardia. The tachycardia evoked by Bay 60-7550 was similar in the absence and presence of rolipram. Noradrenaline elicited stable tachycardia that was not increased by Bay 60-7550. A stable tachycardia caused by PGE1 was not increased by the inhibitors of PDE2, PDE3, and PDE4. Unlike PDE3 and PDE4 which reduce murine basal sinoatrial beating, a possible effect of PDE2 needs further research. The stable tachycardia produced by noradrenaline and PGE1, together with the lack potentiation by the inhibitors of PDE2, PDE3, and PDE4, suggests that cAMP generated at the receptor compartments is hardly hydrolyzed by these phophodiesterases. Evidence from human volunteers is consistent with this proposal.

  8. ESCRT-III-Associated Protein ALIX Mediates High-Affinity Phosphate Transporter Trafficking to Maintain Phosphate Homeostasis in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Cardona-López, Ximena; Cuyas, Laura; Marín, Elena; Irigoyen, María Luisa; Gil, Erica; Puga, María Isabel; Bligny, Richard; Nussaume, Laurent; Geldner, Niko; Paz-Ares, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Prior to the release of their cargoes into the vacuolar lumen, sorting endosomes mature into multivesicular bodies (MVBs) through the action of ENDOSOMAL COMPLEX REQUIRED FOR TRANSPORT (ESCRT) protein complexes. MVB-mediated sorting of high-affinity phosphate transporters (PHT1) to the vacuole limits their plasma membrane levels under phosphate-sufficient conditions, a process that allows plants to maintain phosphate homeostasis. Here, we describe ALIX, a cytosolic protein that associates with MVB by interacting with ESCRT-III subunit SNF7 and mediates PHT1;1 trafficking to the vacuole in Arabidopsis thaliana. We show that the partial loss-of-function mutant alix-1 displays reduced vacuolar degradation of PHT1;1. ALIX derivatives containing the alix-1 mutation showed reduced interaction with SNF7, providing a simple molecular explanation for impaired cargo trafficking in alix-1 mutants. In fact, the alix-1 mutation also hampered vacuolar sorting of the brassinosteroid receptor BRI1. We also show that alix-1 displays altered vacuole morphogenesis, implying a new role for ALIX proteins in vacuolar biogenesis, likely acting as part of ESCRT-III complexes. In line with a presumed broad target spectrum, the alix-1 mutation is pleiotropic, leading to reduced plant growth and late flowering, with stronger alix mutations being lethal, indicating that ALIX participates in diverse processes in plants essential for their life. PMID:26342016

  9. High affinity RGD-binding sites at the plasma membrane of Arabidopsis thaliana links the cell wall.

    PubMed

    Canut, H; Carrasco, A; Galaud, J P; Cassan, C; Bouyssou, H; Vita, N; Ferrara, P; Pont-Lezica, R

    1998-10-01

    The heptapeptide Tyr-Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser-Pro containing the sequence Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD--the essential structure recognised by animal cells in substrate adhesion molecules) was tested on epidermal cells of onion and cultured cells of Arabidopsis upon plasmolysis. Dramatic changes were observed on both types of cells following treatment: on onion cells, Hechtian strands linking the cell wall to the membrane were lost, while Arabidopsis cells changed from concave to convex plasmolysis. A control heptapeptide Tyr-Gly-Asp-Gly-Arg-Ser-Pro had no effect on the shape of plasmolysed cells. Protoplasts isolated from Arabidopsis cells agglutinate in the presence of ProNectinF, a genetically engineered protein of 72 kDa containing 13 RGD sequences: several protoplasts may adhere to a single molecule of ProNectinF. The addition of the RGD-heptapeptide disrupted the adhesion between the protoplasts. Purified plasma membrane from Arabidopsis cells exhibits specific binding sites for the iodinated RGD-heptapeptide. The binding is saturable, reversible, and two types of high affinity sites (Kd1 approximately 1 nM, and Kd2 approximately 40 nM) can be discerned. Competitive inhibition by several structurally related peptides and proteins noted the specific requirement for the RGD sequence. Thus, the RGD-binding activity of Arabidopsis fulfils the adhesion features of integrins, i.e. peptide specificity, subcellular location, and involvement in plasma membrane-cell wall attachments.

  10. High Affinity S-Adenosylmethionine Plasma Membrane Transporter of Leishmania Is a Member of the Folate Biopterin Transporter (FBT) Family*

    PubMed Central

    Dridi, Larbi; Ahmed Ouameur, Amin; Ouellette, Marc

    2010-01-01

    S-Adenosylmethionine (AdoMet) is an important methyl group donor that plays a central role in many essential biochemical processes. The parasite Leishmania can both synthesize and transport AdoMet. Leishmania cells resistant to the antifolate methotrexate due to a rearrangement in folate biopterin transporter (FBT) genes were cross-resistant to sinefungin, an AdoMet analogue. FBT gene rearrangements were also observed in Leishmania major cells selected for sinefungin resistance. One of the rearranged FBT genes corresponded to the main AdoMet transporter (AdoMetT1) of Leishmania as determined by gene transfection and gene inactivation experiments. AdoMetT1 was determined to be a high affinity plasma membrane transporter expressed constitutively throughout the growth phases of the parasite. Leishmania cells selected for resistance or naturally insensitive to sinefungin had lower expression of AdoMetT1. A new function in one carbon metabolism, also a pathway of interest for chemotherapeutic interventions, is described for a novel class of membrane proteins found in diverse organisms. PMID:20406813

  11. A Rigid Hinge Region Is Necessary for High-Affinity Binding of Dimannose to Cyanovirin and Associated Constructs.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhen; Bolia, Ashini; Maxwell, Jason D; Bobkov, Andrey A; Ghirlanda, Giovanna; Ozkan, S Banu; Margulis, Claudio J

    2015-11-24

    Mutations in the hinge region of cyanovirin-N (CVN) dictate its preferential oligomerization state. Constructs with the Pro51Gly mutation preferentially exist as monomers, whereas wild-type cyanovirin can form domain-swapped dimers under certain conditions. Because the hinge region is an integral part of the high-affinity binding site of CVN, we investigated whether this mutation affects the shape, flexibility, and binding affinity of domain B for dimannose. Our studies indicate that the capability of monomeric wild-type CVN to resist mechanical perturbations is enhanced when compared to that of constructs in which the hinge region is more flexible. Our computational results also show that enhanced flexibility leads to blocking of the binding site by allowing different rotational isomeric states of Asn53. Moreover, at higher temperatures, this observed flexibility leads to an interaction between Asn53 and Asn42, further hindering access to the binding site. On the basis of these results, we predicted that binding affinity for dimannose would be more favorable for cyanovirin constructs containing a wild-type hinge region, whereas affinity would be impaired in the case of mutants containing Pro51Gly. Experimental characterization by isothermal titration calorimetry of a set of cyanovirin mutants confirms this hypothesis. Those possessing the Pro51Gly mutation are consistently inferior binders.

  12. High-affinity FRβ-specific CAR T cells eradicate AML and normal myeloid lineage without HSC toxicity.

    PubMed

    Lynn, R C; Feng, Y; Schutsky, K; Poussin, M; Kalota, A; Dimitrov, D S; Powell, D J

    2016-06-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is an aggressive malignancy, and development of new treatments to prolong remissions is warranted. Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapies appear promising but on-target, off-tumor recognition of antigen in healthy tissues remains a concern. Here we isolated a high-affinity (HA) folate receptor beta (FRβ)-specific single-chain variable fragment (2.48 nm KD) for optimization of FRβ-redirected CAR T-cell therapy for AML. T cells stably expressing the HA-FRβ CAR exhibited greatly enhanced antitumor activity against FRβ(+) AML in vitro and in vivo compared with a low-affinity FRβ CAR (54.3 nm KD). Using the HA-FRβ immunoglobulin G, FRβ expression was detectable in myeloid-lineage hematopoietic cells; however, expression in CD34(+) hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) was nearly undetectable. Accordingly, HA-FRβ CAR T cells lysed mature CD14(+) monocytes, while HSC colony formation was unaffected. Because of the potential for elimination of mature myeloid lineage, mRNA CAR electroporation for transient CAR expression was evaluated. mRNA-electroporated HA-FRβ CAR T cells retained effective antitumor activity in vitro and in vivo. Together, our results highlight the importance of antibody affinity in target protein detection and CAR development and suggest that transient delivery of potent HA-FRβ CAR T cells is highly effective against AML and reduces the risk for long-term myeloid toxicity.

  13. A dualistic conformational response to substrate binding in the human serotonin transporter reveals a high affinity state for serotonin.

    PubMed

    Bjerregaard, Henriette; Severinsen, Kasper; Said, Saida; Wiborg, Ove; Sinning, Steffen

    2015-03-20

    Serotonergic neurotransmission is modulated by the membrane-embedded serotonin transporter (SERT). SERT mediates the reuptake of serotonin into the presynaptic neurons. Conformational changes in SERT occur upon binding of ions and substrate and are crucial for translocation of serotonin across the membrane. Our understanding of these conformational changes is mainly based on crystal structures of a bacterial homolog in various conformations, derived homology models of eukaryotic neurotransmitter transporters, and substituted cysteine accessibility method of SERT. However, the dynamic changes that occur in the human SERT upon binding of ions, the translocation of substrate, and the role of cholesterol in this interplay are not fully elucidated. Here we show that serotonin induces a dualistic conformational response in SERT. We exploited the substituted cysteine scanning method under conditions that were sensitized to detect a more outward-facing conformation of SERT. We found a novel high affinity outward-facing conformational state of the human SERT induced by serotonin. The ionic requirements for this new conformational response to serotonin mirror the ionic requirements for translocation. Furthermore, we found that membrane cholesterol plays a role in the dualistic conformational response in SERT induced by serotonin. Our results indicate the existence of a subpopulation of SERT responding differently to serotonin binding than hitherto believed and that membrane cholesterol plays a role in this subpopulation of SERT.

  14. Receptor regulation of the glutamate, GABA and taurine high-affinity uptake into astrocytes in primary culture.

    PubMed

    Hansson, E; Rönnbäck, L

    1991-05-10

    From experiments using dissociated primary astroglial cultures from newborn rat cerebral cortex, the stimulation of monoamine receptors (alpha, beta and 5HT) was shown to affect the high-affinity uptake kinetics of glutamate, GABA and taurine. In the presence of the alpha 1 agonist phenylephrine, there was an increased uptake (Vmax) of glutamate, while beta adrenoceptor activation slightly inhibited the glutamate uptake and stimulated the GABA and taurine uptakes. 5HT2 receptor stimulation caused a slight inhibition of the taurine uptake. The uptake rate of GABA was not affected by 5HT, alpha 1 or alpha 2 receptor agonists and the glutamate uptake was not affected by 5HT or alpha 2 receptor agonists. Nor was the taurine uptake affected by alpha 1 or alpha 2 receptor agonists. The active uptake of aspartate was unaffected by the presence of any of the monoamine receptor agonists used in this study. When the mechanisms behind these effects were studied, the GABA uptake seemed to be mediated via the G protein-adenylate cyclase complex in the receptor domain. Moreover, the K+ channels seemed to be involved. The taurine uptake, however, did not seem to be regulated by the same mechanism. It seems more probable that there is a direct interaction between the receptor and carrier of taurine at the membrane level. The mechanism underlying the receptor-regulated glutamate uptake is at present unclear, although it does not seem to involve protein kinase C.

  15. ZrFsy1, a High-Affinity Fructose/H+ Symporter from Fructophilic Yeast Zygosaccharomyces rouxii

    PubMed Central

    Leandro, Maria José; Sychrová, Hana; Prista, Catarina; Loureiro-Dias, Maria C.

    2013-01-01

    Zygosaccharomyces rouxii is a fructophilic yeast than can grow at very high sugar concentrations. We have identified an ORF encoding a putative fructose/H+ symporter in the Z. rouxii CBS 732 genome database. Heterologous expression of this ORF in a S. cerevisiae strain lacking its own hexose transporters (hxt-null) and subsequent kinetic characterization of its sugar transport activity showed it is a high-affinity low-capacity fructose/H+ symporter, with Km 0.45±0.07 mM and Vmax 0.57±0.02 mmol h−1 (gdw) −1. We named it ZrFsy1. This protein also weakly transports xylitol and sorbose, but not glucose or other hexoses. The expression of ZrFSY1 in Z. rouxii is higher when the cells are cultivated at extremely low fructose concentrations (<0.2%) and on non-fermentable carbon sources such as mannitol and xylitol, where the cells have a prolonged lag phase, longer duplication times and change their microscopic morphology. A clear phenotype was determined for the first time for the deletion of a fructose/H+ symporter in the genome where it occurs naturally. The effect of the deletion of ZrFSY1 in Z. rouxii cells is only evident when the cells are cultivated at very low fructose concentrations, when the ZrFsy1 fructose symporter is the main active fructose transporter system. PMID:23844167

  16. High-affinity interactions between peptides and heat shock protein 70 augment CD8+ T lymphocyte immune responses.

    PubMed

    Flechtner, Jessica B; Cohane, Kenya Prince; Mehta, Sunil; Slusarewicz, Paul; Leonard, Alexis Kays; Barber, Brian H; Levey, Daniel L; Andjelic, Sofija

    2006-07-15

    Exogenously delivered antigenic peptides complexed to heat shock proteins (HSPs) are able to enter the endogenous Ag-processing pathway and prime CD8+ CTL. It was determined previously that a hybrid peptide containing a MHC class I-binding epitope and HSP70-binding sequence Javelin (J0) in complex with HSP70 could induce cytotoxic T cell responses in vivo that were more robust than those induced by the minimal epitope complexed with HSP70. The present study introduces a novel, higher-affinity HSP70-binding sequence (J1) that significantly enhances binding of various antigenic peptides to HSP70. A competition binding assay revealed a dissociation constant that was 15-fold lower for the H2-K(b) OVA epitope SIINFEKL-J1 compared with SIINFEKL-J0, indicating a substantially higher affinity for HSP70. Further, modifying the orientation of the hybrid epitope and introducing a cleavable linker sequence between the Javelin and the epitope results in even greater immunogenicity, presumably by greater efficiency of epitope processing. The enhanced immunogenicity associated with Javelin J1 and the cleavable linker is consistently observed with multiple mouse and human epitopes. Thus, by creating a series of epitopes with uniform, high-affinity binding to HSP70, successful multiple epitope immunizations are possible, with equal delivery of each antigenic epitope to the immune system via HSP70. These modified epitopes have the potential for creating successful multivalent vaccines for immunotherapy of both infectious disease and cancer.

  17. Structural basis for pure antagonism of integrin αVβ3 by a high affinity form of fibronectin

    PubMed Central

    Van Agthoven, Johannes F.; Xiong, Jian-Ping; Alonso, José Luis; Rui, Xianliang; Adair, Brian D.; Goodman, Simon L.; Arnaout, M. Amin

    2014-01-01

    Integrins are important therapeutic targets. However, current RGD-based anti-integrin drugs are also partial agonists, inducing conformational changes that trigger potentially fatal immune reactions and paradoxical cell adhesion. Here we describe the first crystal structure of αVβ3 bound to a physiologic ligand: the 10th type III RGD-domain of wild-type fibronectin (wtFN10), or to a high affinity mutant (hFN10) that acts as a pure antagonist. Comparison of these structures revealed a central π - π interaction between Trp1496 in the RGD-containing loop of hFN10 and Tyr122 of the β3-subunit that blocked conformational changes triggered by wtFN10, and trapped hFN10-bound αVβ3 in an inactive conformation. Removing the Trp1496 or Tyr122 side-chains, or reorienting Trp1496 away from Tyr122, converted hFN10 into a partial agonist. The findings offer new insights on the mechanism of integrin activation and a basis for design of RGD-based pure antagonists. PMID:24658351

  18. A high affinity kidney targeting by chitobionic acid-conjugated polysorbitol gene transporter alleviates unilateral ureteral obstruction in rats.

    PubMed

    Islam, Mohammad Ariful; Kim, Sanghwa; Firdous, Jannatul; Lee, Ah-Young; Hong, Seong-Ho; Seo, Min Kyeong; Park, Tae-Eun; Yun, Cheol-Heui; Choi, Yun-Jaie; Chae, Chanhee; Cho, Chong-Su; Cho, Myung-Haing

    2016-09-01

    Aside from kidney transplantation - a procedure which is exceedingly dependent on donor-match and availability leading to excessive costs - there are currently no permanent treatments available which reverse kidney injury and failure. However, kidney-specific targeted gene therapy has outstanding potential to treat kidney-related dysfunction. Herein we report a novel kidney-specific targeted gene delivery system developed through the conjugation of chitobionic acid (CBA) to a polysorbitol gene transporter (PSGT) synthesized from sorbitol diacrylate and low molecular weight polyethylenimine (PEI) carrying hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) gene to alleviate unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO) in rats. CBA-PSGT performed exceptionally well for targeted delivery of HGF to kidney tissues compared to its non-targeted counterparts (P < 0.001) after systemic tail-vein injection and significantly reduced the UUO symptoms, returning the UUO rats to a normal health status. The kidney-targeted CBA-PSGT-delivered HGF also strikingly reduced various pathologic and molecular markers in vivo such as the level of collagens (type I and II), blood urea nitrogen (BUN), creatinine, and the expressions of ICAM-1, TIMP-1 and α-SMA which play a critical role in obstructive kidney functions. Therefore, CBA-PSGT should be further investigated because of its potential to alleviate UUO and kidney-related diseases using high affinity kidney targeting.

  19. Ectomycorrhiza-mediated repression of the high-affinity ammonium importer gene AmAMT2 in Amanita muscaria.

    PubMed

    Willmann, Anita; Weiss, Michael; Nehls, Uwe

    2007-02-01

    A main function of ectomycorrhizas, a symbiosis between certain soil fungi and fine roots of woody plants, is the exchange of plant-derived carbohydrates for fungus-derived nutrients. As it is required in large amounts, nitrogen is of special interest. A gene (AmAMT2) coding for a putative fungal ammonium importer was identified in an EST project of functional Amanita muscaria/poplar ectomycorrhizas. Heterologous expression of the entire AmAMT2 coding region in yeast revealed the corresponding protein to be a high-affinity ammonium importer. In axenically grown Amanita hyphae AmAMT2 expression was strongly repressed by nitrogen, independent of whether the offered nitrogen source was transported by AmAMT2 or not. In functional ectomycorrhizas the AmAMT2 transcript level was further decreased in both hyphal networks (sheath and Hartig net), while extraradical hyphae revealed strong gene expression. Together our data suggest that (1) AmAMT2 expression is regulated by the endogenous nitrogen content of hyphae and (2) fungal hyphae in ectomycorrhizas are well supported with nitrogen even when the extraradical mycelium is nitrogen limited. As a consequence of AmAMT2 repression in mycorrhizas, ammonium can be suggested as a potential nitrogen source delivered by fungal hyphae in symbiosis.

  20. Cloning and expression of two distinct high-affinity receptors cross-reacting with acidic and basic fibroblast growth factors.

    PubMed Central

    Dionne, C A; Crumley, G; Bellot, F; Kaplow, J M; Searfoss, G; Ruta, M; Burgess, W H; Jaye, M; Schlessinger, J

    1990-01-01

    The fibroblast growth factor (FGF) family consists of at least seven closely related polypeptide mitogens which exert their activities by binding and activation of specific cell surface receptors. Unanswered questions have been whether there are multiple FGF receptors and what factors determine binding specificity and biological response. We report the complete cDNA cloning of two human genes previously designated flg and bek. These genes encode two similar but distinct cell surface receptors comprised of an extracellular domain with three immunoglobulin-like regions, a single transmembrane domain, and a cytoplasmic portion containing a tyrosine kinase domain with a typical kinase insert. The expression of these two cDNAs in transfected NIH 3T3 cells led to the biosynthesis of proteins of 150 kd and 135 kd for flg and bek, respectively. Direct binding experiments with radiolabeled acidic FGF (aFGF) or basic FGF (bFGF), inhibition of binding with native growth factors, and Scatchard analysis of the binding data indicated that bek and flg bind either aFGF or bFGF with dissociation constants of (2-15) x 10(-11) M. The high affinity binding of two distinct growth factors to each of two different receptors represents a unique double redundancy without precedence among polypeptide growth factor-receptor interactions. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:1697263

  1. Experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE) in mice selectively bred to produce high affinity (HA) or low affinity (LA) antibody responses.

    PubMed Central

    Devey, M E; Major, P J; Bleasdale-Barr, K M; Holland, G P; Dal Canto, M C; Paterson, P Y

    1990-01-01

    Induction of experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE) in mice genetically selected to produce either high affinity (HA) or low affinity (LA) antibody responses has revealed significant differences in disease susceptibility between the two lines. HA mice were highly susceptible to EAE following subcutaneous sensitization to mouse central nervous system (CNS) tissue emulsified in Freund's complete adjuvant (FCA). Furthermore, of HA mice surviving acute EAE, up to 93% subsequently developed chronic relapsing disease (CREAE) characterized by variable demyelinating inflammatory changes within the spinal cord. In contrast, LA mice, despite having a major histocompatability complex (MHC) haplotype associated with susceptibility to EAE, were highly resistant to the disease and showed no signs of CREAE when observed for up to 100 days post-sensitization. Antibodies to myelin basic protein (MBP) were detected in both lines but rising titres of high functional affinity antibodies were only seen in HA mice. These HA and LA lines of mice provide a new approach to the study of EAE and, in particular, the role of antibody and antibody affinity in the chronic relapsing form of the disease. Images Figure 2 PMID:2335373

  2. Regulation of the high-affinity copper transporter (hCtr1) expression by cisplatin and heavy metals.

    PubMed

    Liang, Zheng Dong; Long, Yan; Chen, Helen H W; Savaraj, Niramol; Kuo, Macus Tien

    2014-01-01

    Platinum-based antitumor agents have been the mainstay in cancer chemotherapy for many human malignancies. Drug resistance is an important obstacle to achieving the maximal therapeutic efficacy of these drugs. Understanding how platinum drugs enter cells is of great importance in improving therapeutic efficacy. It has been demonstrated that human high-affinity copper transporter 1 (hCtr1) is involved in transporting cisplatin into cells to elicit cytotoxic effects, although other mechanisms may exist. In this communication, we demonstrate that cisplatin transcriptionally induces the expression of hCtr1 in time- and concentration-dependent manners. Cisplatin functions as a competitor for hCtr1-mediated copper transport, resulting in reduced cellular copper levels and leading to upregulated expression of Sp1, which is a positive regulator for hCtr1 expression. Thus, regulation of hCtr1 expression by cisplatin is an integral part of the copper homeostasis regulation system. We also demonstrate that Ag(I) and Zn(II), which are known to suppress hCtr1-mediated copper transport, can also induce hCtr1/Sp1 expression. In contrast, Cd(II), another inhibitor of copper transport, downregulates hCtr1 expression by suppressing Sp1 expression. Collectively, our results demonstrate diverse mechanisms of regulating copper metabolism by these heavy metals.

  3. A high affinity phage-displayed peptide as a recognition probe for the detection of Salmonella Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Shailaja; Kulabhusan, Prabir Kumar; Joshi, Manali; Bodas, Dhananjay; Paknikar, Kishore M

    2016-08-10

    Salmonellosis is one of the most common and widely distributed foodborne diseases. A sensitive and robust detection method of Salmonella Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) in food can critically prevent a disease outbreak. In this work, the use of phage displayed peptides was explored for the detection of S. Typhimurium. A phage-displayed random dodecapeptide library was subjected to biopanning against lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of S. Typhimurium. The peptide NFMESLPRLGMH (pep49) derived from biopanning displayed a high affinity (25.8nM) for the LPS of S. Typhimurium and low cross-reactivity with other strains of Salmonella and related Gram-negative bacteria. Molecular insights into the interaction of pep49 with the LPS of S. Typhimurium was gleaned using atomistic molecular dynamics simulations and docking. It was deduced that the specificity of pep49 with S. Typhimurium LPS originated from the interactions of pep49 with abequose that is found only in the O-antigen of S. Typhimurium. Further, pep49 was able to detect S. Typhimurium at a LOD of 10(3) CFU/mL using ELISA, and may be a potential cost efficient alternative to antibodies.

  4. Cubilin, a high affinity receptor for fibroblast growth factor 8, is required for cell survival in the developing vertebrate head.

    PubMed

    Cases, Olivier; Perea-Gomez, Aitana; Aguiar, Diego P; Nykjaer, Anders; Amsellem, Sabine; Chandellier, Jacqueline; Umbhauer, Muriel; Cereghini, Silvia; Madsen, Mette; Collignon, Jérôme; Verroust, Pierre; Riou, Jean-François; Creuzet, Sophie E; Kozyraki, Renata

    2013-06-07

    Cubilin (Cubn) is a multiligand endocytic receptor critical for the intestinal absorption of vitamin B12 and renal protein reabsorption. During mouse development, Cubn is expressed in both embryonic and extra-embryonic tissues, and Cubn gene inactivation results in early embryo lethality most likely due to the impairment of the function of extra-embryonic Cubn. Here, we focus on the developmental role of Cubn expressed in the embryonic head. We report that Cubn is a novel, interspecies-conserved Fgf receptor. Epiblast-specific inactivation of Cubn in the mouse embryo as well as Cubn silencing in the anterior head of frog or the cephalic neural crest of chick embryos show that Cubn is required during early somite stages to convey survival signals in the developing vertebrate head. Surface plasmon resonance analysis reveals that fibroblast growth factor 8 (Fgf8), a key mediator of cell survival, migration, proliferation, and patterning in the developing head, is a high affinity ligand for Cubn. Cell uptake studies show that binding to Cubn is necessary for the phosphorylation of the Fgf signaling mediators MAPK and Smad1. Although Cubn may not form stable ternary complexes with Fgf receptors (FgfRs), it acts together with and/or is necessary for optimal FgfR activity. We propose that plasma membrane binding of Fgf8, and most likely of the Fgf8 family members Fgf17 and Fgf18, to Cubn improves Fgf ligand endocytosis and availability to FgfRs, thus modulating Fgf signaling activity.

  5. Elongated fibrillar structure of a streptococcal adhesin assembled by the high-affinity association of [alpha]- and PPII-helices

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, Matthew R.; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R.; Patel, Manisha H.; Robinette, Rebekah A.; Crowley, Paula J.; Michalek, Suzanne; Brady, L. Jeannine; Deivanayagam, Champion

    2010-08-18

    Streptococcus mutans antigen I/II (AgI/II) is a cell surface-localized protein adhesin that interacts with salivary components within the salivary pellicle. AgI/II contributes to virulence and has been studied as an immunological and structural target, but a fundamental understanding of its underlying architecture has been lacking. Here we report a high-resolution (1.8 {angstrom}) crystal structure of the A{sub 3}VP{sub 1} fragment of S. mutans AgI/II that demonstrates a unique fibrillar form (155 {angstrom}) through the interaction of two noncontiguous regions in the primary sequence. The A{sub 3} repeat of the alanine-rich domain adopts an extended {alpha}-helix that intertwines with the P{sub 1} repeat polyproline type II (PPII) helix to form a highly extended stalk-like structure heretofore unseen in prokaryotic or eukaryotic protein structures. Velocity sedimentation studies indicate that full-length AgI/II that contains three A/P repeats extends over 50 nanometers in length. Isothermal titration calorimetry revealed that the high-affinity association between the A{sub 3} and P{sub 1} helices is enthalpically driven. Two distinct binding sites on AgI/II to the host receptor salivary agglutinin (SAG) were identified by surface plasmon resonance (SPR). The current crystal structure reveals that AgI/II family proteins are extended fibrillar structures with the number of alanine- and proline-rich repeats determining their length.

  6. ZK91587: a novel synthetic antimineralocorticoid displays high affinity for corticosterone (type I) receptors in the rat hippocampus

    SciTech Connect

    Sutanto, W.; de Kloet, E.R.

    1988-01-01

    In vitro cytosol binding assays have shown the properties of binding of a novel steroid, ZK91587 (15..beta.., 16..beta..b-methylene-mexrenone) in the brain of rats. Scatchard and Woolf analyses of the binding data reveal the binding of (/sup 3/H) ZK91587 to the total hippocampal coritcosteroid receptor sites with high affinity, and low capacity. When 100-fold excess RU28362 was included simultaneously with (/sup 3/H) ZK91587, the labelled steroid binds with the same affinity and capacity. Relative binding affinities (RBA) of various steroids for the Type I or Type II corticosteroid receptor in these animals are: Type I: ZK91587 = corticosterone (B) > cortisol (F); Type II: B > F >>> ZK91587. In the binding kinetic study, ZK91587 has a high association rate of binding in the rat. The steroid dissociates following a one slope pattern, indicating, the present data demonstrate that in the rat hippocampus, ZK91587 binds specifically to the Type I (corticosterone-preferring/mineralocorticoid-like receptor.

  7. The high-affinity receptor for IgG, FcγRI, of humans and non-human primates.

    PubMed

    Chenoweth, Alicia M; Trist, Halina M; Tan, Peck-Szee; Wines, Bruce D; Hogarth, P Mark

    2015-11-01

    Non-human primate (NHP) models, especially involving macaques, are considered important models of human immunity and have been essential in preclinical testing for vaccines and therapeutics. Despite this, much less characterization of macaque Fc receptors has occurred compared to humans or mice. Much of the characterization of macaque Fc receptors so far has focused on the low-affinity Fc receptors, particularly FcγRIIIa. From these studies, it is clear that there are distinct differences between the human and macaque low-affinity receptors and their interaction with human IgG. Relatively little work has been performed on the high-affinity IgG receptor, FcγRI, especially in NHPs. This review will focus on what is currently known of how FcγRI interacts with IgG, from mutation studies and recent crystallographic studies of human FcγRI, and how amino acid sequence differences in the macaque FcγRI may affect this interaction. Additionally, this review will look at the functional consequences of differences in the amino acid sequences between humans and macaques.

  8. The CBL-Interacting Protein Kinase CIPK23 Regulates HAK5-Mediated High-Affinity K+ Uptake in Arabidopsis Roots.

    PubMed

    Ragel, Paula; Ródenas, Reyes; García-Martín, Elena; Andrés, Zaida; Villalta, Irene; Nieves-Cordones, Manuel; Rivero, Rosa M; Martínez, Vicente; Pardo, Jose M; Quintero, Francisco J; Rubio, Francisco

    2015-12-01

    Plant growth and development requires efficient acquisition of essential elements. Potassium (K(+)) is an important macronutrient present in the soil solution at a wide range of concentrations. Regulation of the K(+) uptake systems in the roots is essential to secure K(+) supply. It has been shown in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) that when the external K(+) concentration is very low (<10 µm), K(+) nutrition depends exclusively on the high-affinity K(+) transporter5 (HAK5). Low-K(+)-induced transcriptional activation of the gene encoding HAK5 has been previously reported. Here, we show the posttranscriptional regulation of HAK5 transport activity by phosphorylation. Expression in a heterologous system showed that the Ca(2+) sensors calcineurin B-like (CBL1), CBL8, CBL9, and CBL10, together with CBL-interacting protein kinase23 (CIPK23), activated HAK5 in vivo. This activation produced an increase in the affinity and the Vmax of K(+) transport. In vitro experiments show that the N terminus of HAK5 is phosphorylated by CIPK23. This supports the idea that phosphorylation of HAK5 induces a conformational change that increases its affinity for K(+). Experiments of K(+) (Rb(+)) uptake and growth measurements in low-K(+) medium with Arabidopsis single mutants hak5, akt1, and cipk23, double mutants hak5 akt1, hak5 cipk23, and akt1 cipk23, and the triple mutant hak5 akt1 cipk23 confirmed the regulatory role of CIPK23 in planta.

  9. High affinity γPNA sandwich hybridization assay for rapid detection of short nucleic acid targets with single mismatch discrimination.

    PubMed

    Goldman, Johnathan M; Zhang, Li Ang; Manna, Arunava; Armitage, Bruce A; Ly, Danith H; Schneider, James W

    2013-07-08

    Hybridization analysis of short DNA and RNA targets presents many challenges for detection. The commonly employed sandwich hybridization approach cannot be implemented for these short targets due to insufficient probe-target binding strengths for unmodified DNA probes. Here, we present a method capable of rapid and stable sandwich hybridization detection for 22 nucleotide DNA and RNA targets. Stable hybridization is achieved using an n-alkylated, polyethylene glycol γ-carbon modified peptide nucleic acid (γPNA) amphiphile. The γPNA's exceptionally high affinity enables stable hybridization of a second DNA-based probe to the remaining bases of the short target. Upon hybridization of both probes, an electrophoretic mobility shift is measured via interaction of the n-alkane modification on the γPNA with capillary electrophoresis running buffer containing nonionic surfactant micelles. We find that sandwich hybridization of both probes is stable under multiple binding configurations and demonstrate single base mismatch discrimination. The binding strength of both probes is also stabilized via coaxial stacking on adjacent hybridization to targets. We conclude with a discussion on the implementation of the proposed sandwich hybridization assay as a high-throughput microRNA detection method.

  10. Development of indazolylpyrimidine derivatives as high-affine EphB4 receptor ligands and potential PET radiotracers.

    PubMed

    Ebert, Kristin; Wiemer, Jens; Caballero, Julio; Köckerling, Martin; Steinbach, Jörg; Pietzsch, Jens; Mamat, Constantin

    2015-09-01

    Due to their essential role in the pathogenesis of cancer, members of the Eph (erythropoietin-producing hepatoma cell line-A2) receptor tyrosine kinase family represent promising candidates for molecular imaging. Thus, the development and preparation of novel radiotracers for the noninvasive imaging of the EphB4 receptor via positron emission tomography (PET) is described. First in silico investigations with the indazolylpyrimidine lead compound which is known to be highly affine to EphB4 were executed to identify favorable labeling positions for an introduction of fluorine-18 to retain the affinity. Based on this, reference compounds as well as precursors were developed and labeled with carbon-11 and fluorine-18, respectively. For this purpose, a protecting group strategy essentially had to be generated to prevent unwanted methylation and to enable the introduction of fluorine-18. Further, a convenient radiolabeling strategy using [(11)C]methyl iodide was established which afforded the isotopically labeled radiotracer in 30-35% RCY (d.c.) which is identical with the original inhibitor molecule. A spiro ammonium precursor was prepared for radiolabeling with fluorine-18. Unfortunately, the labeling did not lead to the desired (18)F-radiotracer under the chosen conditions.

  11. A Soluble Form of the High Affinity IgE Receptor, Fc-Epsilon-RI, Circulates in Human Serum

    PubMed Central

    Dehlink, Eleonora; Platzer, Barbara; Baker, Alexandra H.; LaRosa, Jessica; Pardo, Michael; Dwyer, Peter; Yen, Elizabeth H.; Szépfalusi, Zsolt

    2011-01-01

    Soluble IgE receptors are potential in vivo modulators of IgE-mediated immune responses and are thus important for our basic understanding of allergic responses. We here characterize a novel soluble version of the IgE-binding alpha-chain of Fc-epsilon-RI (sFcεRI), the high affinity receptor for IgE. sFcεRI immunoprecipitates as a protein of ∼40 kDa and contains an intact IgE-binding site. In human serum, sFcεRI is found as a soluble free IgE receptor as well as a complex with IgE. Using a newly established ELISA, we show that serum sFcεRI levels correlate with serum IgE in patients with elevated IgE. We also show that serum of individuals with normal IgE levels can be found to contain high levels of sFcεRI. After IgE-antigen-mediated crosslinking of surface FcεRI, we detect sFcεRI in the exosome-depleted, soluble fraction of cell culture supernatants. We further show that sFcεRI can block binding of IgE to FcεRI expressed at the cell surface. In summary, we here describe the alpha-chain of FcεRI as a circulating soluble IgE receptor isoform in human serum. PMID:21544204

  12. Valproate is neuroprotective against malonate toxicity in rat striatum: an association with augmentation of high-affinity glutamate uptake.

    PubMed

    Morland, Cecilie; Boldingh, Karen Astrid; Iversen, Evy Grini; Hassel, Bjørnar

    2004-11-01

    The antiepileptic drug valproate (VPA) may be neuroprotective. We treated rats with VPA for 14 days (300 mg/kg twice daily) before intrastriatal injection of 1.5 micromol (1 M) of the succinate dehydrogenase inhibitor malonate. VPA-treated animals developed smaller lesions than control animals: 10 +/- 2 mm(3) versus 26 +/- 8 mm(3) (means +/- SD; P = 10(-4). Injection of NaCl that was equiosmolar with 1 M malonate caused lesions of only 1.2 +/- 0.4 mm(3) in control animals, whereas physiologic saline produced no lesion. VPA pretreatment reduced the malonate-induced extracellular accumulation of glutamate. This effect paralleled an increase in the striatal level of the glutamate transporter GLT, which augmented high-affinity glutamate uptake by 25%, as determined from the uptake of [(3)H] glutamate into striatal proteoliposomes. Malonate caused a 76% reduction in striatal adenosine triphosphate (ATP) content, but the glial, ATP-dependent formation of glutamine from radiolabeled glucose or glutamate was intact, indicating that glial ATP production supported uptake of glutamate. Striatal levels of HSP-70 and fos were reduced, and the levels of bcl-2 and phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase remained unaffected, but histone acetylation was increased by VPA treatment. The results suggest that augmentation of glutamate uptake may contribute importantly to VPA-mediated neuroprotection in striatum.

  13. Synthesis of tetravalent LacNAc-glycoclusters as high-affinity cross-linker against Erythrina cristagalli agglutinin.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Makoto; Chuma, Yasushi; Yasumoto, Yoshinori; Onoda, Takashi; Umemura, Myco; Usui, Taichi; Park, Enoch Y

    2016-01-01

    Four kinds of tetravalent double-headed glycoclusters [(LacNAc)4-DHGs] were designed with linkers of varying lengths consisting of alkanedioic carboxyamido groups (C6, C12, C18 and C24) between two bi-antennary LacNAc-glycosides. These glycoclusters served as high-affinity cross-linking ligands for the LacNAc-binding lectin Erythrina cristagalli agglutinin (ECA). The binding activity and cross-linking between each ligand and ECA were characterized by a hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), a quantitative precipitation assay and dynamic light scattering (DLS). For the precipitation assay and DLS measurement, the synthesized (LacNAc)4-DHGs were found to be capable of binding and precipitating the ECA as multivalent ligands. ITC analysis indicated the binding of (LacNAc)4-DHGs was driven by a favorable enthalpy change. Furthermore, the entropy penalty from binding (LacNAc)4-DHGs clearly decreased in a spacer length-dependent manner. The binding affinities of flexible (LacNAc)4-DHGs (C18 and C24) with long spacers were found to be more favorable than those of the clusters having short spacers (C6 and C12). These results were supported by molecular dynamics simulations with explicit water molecules for the tetravalent glycoclusters with ECA. We concluded that the subtle modification in the epitope-presenting scaffolds exerts the significant effect in the recognition efficiency involved in the LacNAc moieties by ECA.

  14. The Analysis of the Human High Affinity IgE Receptor FceRIa from Multiple Crystal Forms

    SciTech Connect

    Garman, S.C.; Sechi, S.; Kinet, J.-P.; Jardetzky, T.S.

    2010-03-05

    We have solved the structure of the human high affinity IgE receptor, Fc{var_epsilon}RI{alpha}, in six different crystal forms, showing the structure in 15 different chemical environments. This database of structures shows no change in the overall shape of the molecule, as the angle between domains 1 and 2 (D1 and D2) varies little across the ensemble. However, the receptor has local conformational variability in the C' strand of D2 and in the BC loop of D1. In every crystal form, a residue inserts between tryptophan residues 87 and 110, mimicking the position of a proline from the IgE ligand. The different crystal forms reveal a distribution of carbohydrates lining the front and back surfaces of the structure. An analysis of crystal contacts in the different forms indicates regions where the molecule interacts with other proteins, and reveals a potential new binding site distal to the IgE binding site. The results of this study point to new directions for the design of molecules to inhibit the interaction of Fc{var_epsilon}RI{alpha} with its natural ligand and thus to prevent a primary step in the allergic response.

  15. Identification of a high-affinity binding site for dinotefuran in the nerve cord of the American cockroach.

    PubMed

    Miyagi, Satoshi; Komaki, Iori; Ozoe, Yoshihisa

    2006-04-01

    The binding of the neonicotinoid insecticide dinotefuran to insect nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) was examined by a centrifugation method using the nerve cord membranes of American cockroaches and [3H]dinotefuran (78 Ci mmol-1). The Kd and Bmax values of [3H]dinotefuran binding were estimated to be 13.7 nM and 14.8 fmol 40 microg-1 protein respectively by Scatchard analysis. Epibatidine, an nAChR agonist, showed a rather lower affinity to the dinotefuran binding site (IC50=991 nM) than dinotefuran (IC50=5.02 nM). Imidacloprid and nereistoxin displayed lower potencies than dinotefuran but higher potencies than epibatidine. The potencies of five dinotefuran analogues in inhibiting the specific binding of [3H]dinotefuran to nerve cord membranes were determined. A good correlation (r2=0.970) was observed between the -log IC50 values of the tested compounds and their piperonyl butoxide-synergised insecticidal activities (-log LD50 values) against German cockroaches. The results indicate that a high-affinity binding site for dinotefuran is present in the nerve cord of the American cockroach and that the binding of ligands to the site leads to the manifestation of insecticidal activity.

  16. Identification and properties of very high affinity brain membrane-binding sites for a neurotoxic phospholipase from the taipan venom

    SciTech Connect

    Lambeau, G.; Barhanin, J.; Schweitz, H.; Qar, J.; Lazdunski, M. )

    1989-07-05

    Four new monochain phospholipases were purified from the Oxyuranus scutellatus (taipan) venom. Three of them were highly toxic when injected into mice brain. One of these neurotoxic phospholipases, OS2, was iodinated and used in binding experiments to demonstrate the presence of two families of specific binding sites in rat brain synaptic membranes. The affinities were exceptionally high, Kd1 = 1.5 +/- 0.5 pM and Kd2 = 45 +/- 10 pM, and the maximal binding capacities were Bmax 1 = 1 +/- 0.4 and Bmax 2 = 3 +/- 0.5 pmol/mg of protein. Both binding sites were sensitive to proteolysis and demonstrated to be located on proteins of Mr 85,000-88,000 and 36,000-51,000 by cross-linking and photoaffinity labeling techniques. The binding of {sup 125}I-OS2 to synaptic membranes was dependent on Ca2+ ions and enhanced by Zn2+ ions which inhibit phospholipase activity. Competition experiments have shown that, except for beta-bungarotoxin, a number of known toxic snake or bee phospholipases have very high affinities for the newly identified binding sites. A good correlation (r = 0.80) was observed between toxicity and affinity but not between phospholipase activity and affinity.

  17. Allosteric Inhibition of a Semaphorin 4D Receptor Plexin B1 by a High-Affinity Macrocyclic Peptide.

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, Yukiko; Bashiruddin, Nasir K; Kitago, Yu; Takagi, Junichi; Suga, Hiroaki

    2016-11-17

    Semaphorin axonal guidance factors are multifunctional proteins that play important roles in immune response, cancer cell proliferation, and organogenesis, making semaphorins and their signaling receptor plexins important drug targets for various diseases. However, the large and flat binding surface of the semaphorin-plexin interaction interface is difficult to target by traditional small-molecule drugs. Here, we report the discovery of a high-affinity plexin B1 (PlxnB1)-binding macrocyclic peptide, PB1m6 (KD = 3.5 nM). PB1m6 specifically inhibited the binding of physiological ligand semaphorin 4D (Sema4D) in vitro and completely suppressed Sema4D-induced cell collapse. Structural studies revealed that PB1m6 binds at a groove between the fifth and sixth blades of the sema domain in PlxnB1 distant from the Sema4D-binding site, indicating the non-competitive and allosteric nature of the inhibitory activity. The discovery of this novel allosteric site can potentially be used to target plexin family proteins for the development of drugs that modulate semaphorin and plexin signaling.

  18. G196 epitope tag system: a novel monoclonal antibody, G196, recognizes the small, soluble peptide DLVPR with high affinity

    PubMed Central

    Tatsumi, Kasumi; Sakashita, Gyosuke; Nariai, Yuko; Okazaki, Kosuke; Kato, Hiroaki; Obayashi, Eiji; Yoshida, Hisashi; Sugiyama, Kanako; Park, Sam-Yong; Sekine, Joji; Urano, Takeshi

    2017-01-01

    The recognition specificity of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) has made mAbs among the most frequently used tools in both basic science research and in clinical diagnosis and therapies. Precise determination of the epitope allows the development of epitope tag systems to be used with recombinant proteins for various purposes. Here we describe a new family of tag derived from the epitope recognized by a highly specific mAb G196. The minimal epitope was identified as the five amino acid sequence Asp-Leu-Val-Pro-Arg. Permutation analysis was used to characterize the binding requirements of mAb G196, and the variable regions of the mAb G196 were identified and structurally analyzed by X-ray crystallography. Isothermal titration calorimetry revealed the high affinity (Kd = 1.25 nM) of the mAb G196/G196-epitope peptide interaction, and G196-tag was used to detect several recombinant cytosolic and nuclear proteins in human and yeast cells. mAb G196 is valuable for developing a new peptide tagging system for cell biology and biochemistry research. PMID:28266535

  19. Shark Attack: high affinity binding proteins derived from shark vNAR domains by stepwise in vitro affinity maturation.

    PubMed

    Zielonka, Stefan; Weber, Niklas; Becker, Stefan; Doerner, Achim; Christmann, Andreas; Christmann, Christine; Uth, Christina; Fritz, Janine; Schäfer, Elena; Steinmann, Björn; Empting, Martin; Ockelmann, Pia; Lierz, Michael; Kolmar, Harald

    2014-12-10

    A novel method for stepwise in vitro affinity maturation of antigen-specific shark vNAR domains is described that exclusively relies on semi-synthetic repertoires derived from non-immunized sharks. Target-specific molecules were selected from a CDR3-randomized bamboo shark (Chiloscyllium plagiosum) vNAR library using yeast surface display as platform technology. Various antigen-binding vNAR domains were easily isolated by screening against several therapeutically relevant antigens, including the epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM), the Ephrin type-A receptor 2 (EphA2), and the human serine protease HTRA1. Affinity maturation was demonstrated for EpCAM and HTRA1 by diversifying CDR1 of target-enriched populations which allowed for the rapid selection of nanomolar binders. EpCAM-specific vNAR molecules were produced as soluble proteins and more extensively characterized via thermal shift assays and biolayer interferometry. Essentially, we demonstrate that high-affinity binders can be generated in vitro without largely compromising the desirable high thermostability of the vNAR scaffold.

  20. Surprisingly High Selectivity and High Affinity in Mercury Recognition by H-Bonded Cavity-Containing Aromatic Foldarands.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jie; Ren, Changliang; Zeng, Huaqiang

    2017-02-09

    In the absence of macrocyclic ring constraints, few synthetic systems, possessing a mostly solvent-independent well-folded conformation that is predisposed for highly selective and high affinity recognition of metal ions, have been demonstrated. We report here such a unique class of conformationally robust modularly tunable folding molecules termed foldarands that can recognize Hg(2+) ions surprisingly well over 22 other metal ions. Despite the lack of sulfur atoms and having only oxygen-donor atoms in its structure, the best foldarand molecule, i.e., tetramer 4, exhibits a selectivity factor of at least 19 in differentiating the most tightly bound Hg(2+) ion from all other metal ions, and a binding capacity that is ≥18 times that of thio-crown ethers. These two noteworthy binding characters make possible low level removal of Hg(2+) ions. With a [4]:[Hg(2+)] molar ratio of 5:1 and a single biphasic solvent extraction, the concentration of Hg(2+) ions could be reduced drastically by 98% (from 200 to 4 ppb) in pure water. 4 could also effect a highly efficient reduction in mercury content by 98% (from 500 to 10 ppb) in artificial groundwater via multiple successive extractions with an overall consumption of 4 being 9:1 in terms of [4]:[Hg(2+)] molar ratio.

  1. OB-fold domain of KREPA4 mediates high-affinity interaction with guide RNA and possesses annealing activity.

    PubMed

    Kala, Smriti; Salavati, Reza

    2010-10-01

    KREPA4, also called MP24, is an essential mitochondrial guide RNA (gRNA)-binding protein with a preference for the 3' oligo(U) tail in trypanosomes. Structural prediction and compositional analysis of KREPA4 have identified a conserved OB (oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide-binding)-fold at the C-terminal end and two low compositional complexity regions (LCRs) at its N terminus. Concurrent with these predictions, one or both of these regions in KREPA4 protein may be involved in gRNA binding. To test this possibility, deletion mutants of KREPA4 were made and the effects on the gRNA-binding affinities were measured by quantitative electrophoretic mobility shift assays. The gRNA-binding specificities of these mutants were evaluated by competition experiments using gRNAs with U-tail deletions or stem-loop modifications and uridylated nonguide RNAs or heterologous RNA. Our results identified the predicted OB-fold as the functional domain of KREPA4 that mediates a high-affinity interaction with the gRNA oligo(U) tail. An additional contribution toward RNA-binding function was localized to LCRs that further stabilize the binding through sequence-specific interactions with the guide secondary structure. In this study we also found that the predicted OB-fold has an RNA annealing activity, representing the first report of such activity for a core component of the RNA editing complex.

  2. Cyclic GMP-AMP containing mixed phosphodiester linkages is an endogenous high-affinity ligand for STING.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xu; Shi, Heping; Wu, Jiaxi; Zhang, Xuewu; Sun, Lijun; Chen, Chuo; Chen, Zhijian J

    2013-07-25

    The presence of microbial or self DNA in the cytoplasm of mammalian cells is a danger signal detected by the DNA sensor cyclic-GMP-AMP (cGAMP) synthase (cGAS), which catalyzes the production of cGAMP that in turn serves as a second messenger to activate innate immune responses. Here we show that endogenous cGAMP in mammalian cells contains two distinct phosphodiester linkages, one between 2'-OH of GMP and 5'-phosphate of AMP, and the other between 3'-OH of AMP and 5'-phosphate of GMP. This molecule, termed 2'3'-cGAMP, is unique in that it binds to the adaptor protein STING with a much greater affinity than cGAMP molecules containing other combinations of phosphodiester linkages. The crystal structure of STING bound to 2'3'-cGAMP revealed the structural basis of this high-affinity binding and a ligand-induced conformational change in STING that may underlie its activation.

  3. New high affinity monoclonal antibodies recognize non-overlapping epitopes on mesothelin for monitoring and treating mesothelioma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi-Fan; Phung, Yen; Gao, Wei; Kawa, Seiji; Hassan, Raffit; Pastan, Ira; Ho, Mitchell

    2015-05-21

    Mesothelin is an emerging cell surface target in mesothelioma and other solid tumors. Most antibody drug candidates recognize highly immunogenic Region I (296-390) on mesothelin. Here, we report a group of high-affinity non-Region I rabbit monoclonal antibodies. These antibodies do not compete for mesothelin binding with the immunotoxin SS1P that binds Region I of mesothelin. One pair of antibodies (YP218 and YP223) is suitable to detect soluble mesothelin in a sandwich ELISA with high sensitivity. The new assay can also be used to measure serum mesothelin concentration in mesothelioma patients, indicating its potential use for monitoring patients treated with current antibody therapies targeting Region I. The antibodies are highly specific and sensitive in immunostaining of mesothelioma. To explore their use in tumor therapy, we have generated the immunotoxins based on the Fv of these antibodies. One immunotoxin (YP218 Fv-PE38) exhibits potent anti-tumor cytotoxicity towards primary mesothelioma cell lines in vitro and an NCI-H226 xenograft tumor in mice. Furthermore, we have engineered a humanized YP218 Fv that retains full binding affinity for mesothelin-expressing cancer cells. In conclusion, with their unique binding properties, these antibodies may be promising candidates for monitoring and treating mesothelioma and other mesothelin-expressing cancers.

  4. Cubilin, a High Affinity Receptor for Fibroblast Growth Factor 8, Is Required for Cell Survival in the Developing Vertebrate Head*

    PubMed Central

    Cases, Olivier; Perea-Gomez, Aitana; Aguiar, Diego P.; Nykjaer, Anders; Amsellem, Sabine; Chandellier, Jacqueline; Umbhauer, Muriel; Cereghini, Silvia; Madsen, Mette; Collignon, Jérôme; Verroust, Pierre; Riou, Jean-François; Creuzet, Sophie E.; Kozyraki, Renata

    2013-01-01

    Cubilin (Cubn) is a multiligand endocytic receptor critical for the intestinal absorption of vitamin B12 and renal protein reabsorption. During mouse development, Cubn is expressed in both embryonic and extra-embryonic tissues, and Cubn gene inactivation results in early embryo lethality most likely due to the impairment of the function of extra-embryonic Cubn. Here, we focus on the developmental role of Cubn expressed in the embryonic head. We report that Cubn is a novel, interspecies-conserved Fgf receptor. Epiblast-specific inactivation of Cubn in the mouse embryo as well as Cubn silencing in the anterior head of frog or the cephalic neural crest of chick embryos show that Cubn is required during early somite stages to convey survival signals in the developing vertebrate head. Surface plasmon resonance analysis reveals that fibroblast growth factor 8 (Fgf8), a key mediator of cell survival, migration, proliferation, and patterning in the developing head, is a high affinity ligand for Cubn. Cell uptake studies show that binding to Cubn is necessary for the phosphorylation of the Fgf signaling mediators MAPK and Smad1. Although Cubn may not form stable ternary complexes with Fgf receptors (FgfRs), it acts together with and/or is necessary for optimal FgfR activity. We propose that plasma membrane binding of Fgf8, and most likely of the Fgf8 family members Fgf17 and Fgf18, to Cubn improves Fgf ligand endocytosis and availability to FgfRs, thus modulating Fgf signaling activity. PMID:23592779

  5. Temperature-sensitive high affinity (/sup 3/H)serotonin binding: characterization and effects of antidepressant treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Helmeste, D.M.; Tang, S.W.

    1984-08-13

    Characterization of temperature-sensitive (/sup 3/H)serotonin (5-HT) binding sites (1 and 4 nM Kd sites) revealed complex inhibition by neuroleptics and serotonin antagonists. There was no simple correlation with affinities for S/sub 1/ and S/sub 2/ receptors. In vivo pretreatment (48 h before) with mianserin did not alter B/sub max/ or Kd for the 1 nM Kd (/sup 3/H)5-HT site, although (/sup 3/H)ketanserin (S/sub 2/) densities were decreased by 50%. This suggested that possible S/sub 2/ components of (/sup 3/H)5-HT binding must be negligible, even though ketanserin competed with high affinity (IC/sub 50/ = 3 nM) for a portion of the 1 nM Kd (/sup 3/H)5-HT site. Low concentrations of mianserin inhibited the 1 nM Kd (/sup 3/H)5-HT site in a non-competitive manner, as shown by a decrease in B/sub max/ with no change in Kd after in vitro incubation. The complex inhibition data may therefore represent indirect interactions through another site.

  6. Genetically encoded photocrosslinkers locate the high-affinity binding site of antidepressant drugs in the human serotonin transporter

    PubMed Central

    Rannversson, Hafsteinn; Andersen, Jacob; Sørensen, Lena; Bang-Andersen, Benny; Park, Minyoung; Huber, Thomas; Sakmar, Thomas P.; Strømgaard, Kristian

    2016-01-01

    Despite the well-established role of the human serotonin transporter (hSERT) in the treatment of depression, the molecular details of antidepressant drug binding are still not fully understood. Here we utilize amber codon suppression in a membrane-bound transporter protein to encode photocrosslinking unnatural amino acids (UAAs) into 75 different positions in hSERT. UAAs are incorporated with high specificity, and functionally active transporters have similar transport properties and pharmacological profiles compared with wild-type transporters. We employ ultraviolet-induced crosslinking with p-azido-L-phenylalanine (azF) at selected positions in hSERT to map the binding site of imipramine, a prototypical tricyclic antidepressant, and vortioxetine, a novel multimodal antidepressant. We find that the two antidepressants crosslink with azF incorporated at different positions within the central substrate-binding site of hSERT, while no crosslinking is observed at the vestibular-binding site. Taken together, our data provide direct evidence for defining the high-affinity antidepressant binding site in hSERT. PMID:27089947

  7. Are high-affinity progesterone binding site(s) from porcine liver microsomes members of the sigma receptor family?

    PubMed

    Meyer, C; Schmieding, K; Falkenstein, E; Wehling, M

    1998-04-24

    Membrane progesterone binding sites have been purified recently from pig liver. Since progesterone is considered as an endogenous sigma (sigma) receptor ligand, these sites were characterized pharmacologically by ligands selective for sigma receptor and dopamine receptor binding sites, and by other drugs from distinct pharmacological classes. Binding studies using the radioligand [3H]progesterone were done in crude membrane preparations and solubilized fractions to determine half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) values, from which inhibitory constants (Ki values) were calculated. Radioligand binding was inhibited by the sigma receptor ligands haloperidol, carbetapentane citrate, 1,3-Di(2-tolyl)guanidine (DTG), R(-)-N-(3-phenyl-1-propyl)-1-phenyl-2 aminopropane HCl (R(-)-PPAAP HCl), or sigma receptor antagonists like (+)-3-(3-hydroxyphenyl)-N-propylpiperidine HCl (R(+)-PPP HCl) and cis-9-[3-(3,5-dimethyl-1-piperazinyl)propyl]-9H-carbazole dihydrochloride (rimcazole 2HCl). The hierarchy of inhibitory action was not fully compatible with either sigma receptor class I (moderate affinity of pentazocine, diphenylhydantoin (phenytoin) insensitivity) or II sites (high affinity of carbetapentane). The data thus suggest that progesterone binding sites in porcine liver membranes are related to the sigma receptor binding site superfamily, but may represent a particular species with progesterone specificity.

  8. Adenosine 3',5-cyclic monophosphate phosphodiesterase activity in granulosa cells from Booroola x Romney ewes with and without the F gene.

    PubMed

    McNatty, K P; Heath, D A; Lun, S; Hudson, N L

    1989-02-01

    Granulosa cells from ovarian follicles (greater than or equal to 1 mm diameter) in Booroola ewes which are homozygous (FF) or heterozygous (F+) for the F gene have previously been shown to produce significantly more cAMP in response to FSH or LH than those from similar sized follicles in ewes without the F gene (++). The aim of these studies was to test whether these F gene-specific differences arose because of differences in cAMP-phosphodiesterase (cAMP-PDE) activity. In the first study using 1 mumol cAMP/l as substrate, no F gene-specific effects were noted in cAMP-PDE activity in granulosa cells from small (1-2.5 mm diameter, n = 4 per genotype) or large (greater than or equal to 3 mm diameter, n = 4 per genotype) follicles from FF, F+ or ++ ewes, despite F gene-specific effects in FSH (1 microgram/ml)- and LH (0.1 microgram/ml)-induced cAMP accumulation in these same cell preparations. The overall mean levels of cAMP-PDE across all genotypes in cells from small and large follicles were 0.47 +/- 0.04 (S.E.M., n = 12) and 0.28 +/- 0.03 pmol cAMP/10(6) cells per min respectively; the mean PDE activity in cells from small follicles was significantly (P less than 0.05) higher compared with that in cells from large follicles. In a second study, granulosa cells from each genotype were pooled over all follicle sizes (greater than or equal to 1 mm diameter, one pool per genotype) and the rates of cAMP hydrolysis tested over a range of substrate concentrations (0-16 mumol/l) but no gene-specific differences with respect to the Michaelis constant and maximum velocity were noted.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Strategic approaches to drug design. II. Modelling studies on phosphodiesterase substrates and inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, A.; Warrington, B. H.; Vinter, J. G.

    1987-07-01

    Modelling studies have been carried out on the phosphodiesterase (PDE) substrates, adenosine- and guanosine-3'5'-cyclic monophosphates, and on a number of non-specific and type III-specific phosphodiesterase inhibitors. These studies have assisted the understanding of PDE substrate differentiation and the design of potent, selective PDE type III inhibitors.

  10. Sildenafil and Phosphodiesterase-5 Inhibitors to Reduce Cardiotoxicity and Enhance the Response of Breast Tumors to Doxorubicin

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-06-1-0360 TITLE: Sildenafil and phosphodiesterase-5...Feb 2007 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Sildenafil and phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors to reduce cardiotoxicity and enhance the...the differential effects of phosphodiesterase inhibitors, such as sildenafil , in terms of protecting cardiac cells and the heart from the toxicity

  11. Chemical Validation of Phosphodiesterase C as a Chemotherapeutic Target in Trypanosoma cruzi, the Etiological Agent of Chagas' Disease▿ †

    PubMed Central

    King-Keller, Sharon; Li, Minyong; Smith, Alyssa; Zheng, Shilong; Kaur, Gurpreet; Yang, Xiaochuan; Wang, Binghe; Docampo, Roberto

    2010-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi phosphodiesterase (PDE) C (TcrPDEC), a novel and rather unusual PDE in which, unlike all other class I PDEs, the catalytic domain is localized in the middle of the polypeptide chain, is able to hydrolyze cyclic GMP (cGMP), although it prefers cyclic AMP (cAMP), and has a FYVE-type domain in its N-terminal region (S. Kunz et al., FEBS J. 272:6412-6422, 2005). TcrPDEC shows homology to the mammalian PDE4 family members. PDE4 inhibitors are currently under development for the treatment of inflammatory diseases, such as asthma, chronic pulmonary diseases, and psoriasis, and for treating depression and serving as cognitive enhancers. We therefore tested a number of compounds originally synthesized as potential PDE4 inhibitors on T. cruzi amastigote growth, and we obtained several useful hits. We then conducted homology modeling of T. cruzi PDEC and identified other compounds as potential inhibitors through virtual screening. Testing of these compounds against amastigote growth and recombinant TcrPDEC activity resulted in several potent inhibitors. The most-potent inhibitors were found to increase the cellular concentration of cAMP. Preincubation of cells in the presence of one of these compounds stimulated volume recovery after hyposmotic stress, in agreement with their TcrPDEC inhibitory activity in vitro, providing chemical validation of this target. The compounds found could be useful tools in the study of osmoregulation in T. cruzi. In addition, their further optimization could result in the development of new drugs against Chagas' disease and other trypanosomiases. PMID:20625148

  12. cGMP-PDE3-cAMP signal pathway involved in the inhibitory effect of CNP on gastric motility in rat.

    PubMed

    Cai, Ying-Lan; Sun, Qian; Huang, Xu; Jiang, Jing-Zhi; Zhang, Mo-Han; Piao, Li-Hua; Jin, Zheng; Xu, Wen-Xie

    2013-01-10

    In the present study, we investigated the mechanism of C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP)-induced inhibitory effect on spontaneous contraction of gastric antral smooth muscle to clarify CNP-NPR-B/pGC-cGMP downstream signal transduction pathway using organ bath and ELISA methods in rat. CNP significantly reduced the amplitude of the spontaneous contraction and increased the contents of cGMP and cAMP in the gastric antral smooth muscle tissue. In the presence of IBMX, a non-selective phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibitor, the inhibitory effect of CNP on spontaneous contraction was significantly suppressed; however, the production of cGMP but not cAMP was still increased by CNP. EHNA, a PDE2 inhibitor, did not affect both CNP-induced inhibition of the contraction and CNP-induced increase of cGMP and cAMP generations in gastric smooth muscle tissue, while milrinone, a PDE3 inhibitor, similar to IBMX, attenuated the CNP-induced inhibitory effect on spontaneous contraction and increased the content of cGMP but not cAMP. The results suggest that cGMP-PDE3-cAMP signal pathway is also involved in the CNP-induced inhibition of gastric motility in rat.

  13. Identifying high-affinity aptamer ligands with defined cross-reactivity using high-throughput guided systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment

    PubMed Central

    Levay, Agata; Brenneman, Randall; Hoinka, Jan; Sant, David; Cardone, Marco; Trinchieri, Giorgio; Przytycka, Teresa M.; Berezhnoy, Alexey

    2015-01-01

    Oligonucleotide aptamers represent a novel platform for creating ligands with desired specificity, and they offer many potentially significant advantages over monoclonal antibodies in terms of feasibility, cost, and clinical applicability. However, the isolation of high-affinity aptamer ligands from random oligonucleotide pools has been challenging. Although high-throughput sequencing (HTS) promises to significantly facilitate systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX) analysis, the enormous datasets generated in the process pose new challenges for identifying those rare, high-affinity aptamers present in a given pool. We show that emulsion PCR preserves library diversity, preventing the loss of rare high-affinity aptamers that are difficult to amplify. We also demonstrate the importance of using reference targets to eliminate binding candidates with reduced specificity. Using a combination of bioinformatics and functional analyses, we show that the rate of amplification is more predictive than prevalence with respect to binding affinity and that the mutational landscape within a cluster of related aptamers can guide the identification of high-affinity aptamer ligands. Finally, we demonstrate the power of this selection process for identifying cross-species aptamers that can bind human receptors and cross-react with their murine orthologs. PMID:26007661

  14. Replacement of the Bryostatin A- and B-Pyran Rings With Phenyl Rings Leads to Loss of High Affinity Binding With PKC.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Mark E; Kedei, Noemi; Lewin, Nancy E; Blumberg, Peter M; Keck, Gary E

    2016-10-19

    We describe a convergent synthesis of a bryostatin analogue in which the natural A- and B-ring pyrans have been replaced by phenyl rings. The new analogue exhibited PMA like behavior in cell assays, but failed to maintain high affinity binding for PKC, despite retaining an unaltered C-ring 'binding domain'.

  15. Recognition of the high affinity binding site in rev-response element RNA by the human immunodeficiency virus type-1 rev protein.

    PubMed Central

    Iwai, S; Pritchard, C; Mann, D A; Karn, J; Gait, M J

    1992-01-01

    The Human Immunodeficiency Virus type-1 rev protein binds with high affinity to a bubble structure located within the rev-response element (RRE) RNA in stemloop II. After this initial interaction, additional rev molecules bind to the RRE RNA in an ordered assembly process which requires a functional bubble structure, since mutations in the bubble sequence that reduce rev affinity block multiple complex formation. We have used synthetic chemistry to characterize the interaction between rev protein and its high affinity binding site. A minimal synthetic duplex RNA (RBC6) carrying the bubble and 12 flanking base pairs is able to bind rev with 1 to 1 stoichiometry and with high affinity. When the bubble structure is inserted into synthetic RNA molecules carrying longer stretches of flanking double-stranded RNA, rev forms additional complexes resembling the multimers observed with the RRE RNA. The ability of rev to bind to RBC6 analogues containing functional group modifications on base and sugar moieties of nucleoside residues was also examined. The results provide strong evidence that the bubble structure contains specific configurations of non-Watson--Crick G:G and G:A base pairs and suggest that high affinity recognition of RRE RNA by rev requires hydrogen bonding to functional groups in the major groove of a distorted RNA structure. Images PMID:1282702

  16. Transmembrane segments 1, 5, 7 and 8 are required for high-affinity glucose transport by Saccharomyces cerevisiae Hxt2 transporter.

    PubMed Central

    Kasahara, Toshiko; Kasahara, Michihiro

    2003-01-01

    Hxt2 is a high-affinity facilitative glucose transporter of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and belongs to the major facilitator superfamily. Hxt1 shares approximately 70% amino acid identity with Hxt2 in its transmembrane segments (TMs) and inter-TM loops, but transports D-glucose with an affinity about one-tenth of that of Hxt2. To determine which TMs of Hxt2 are important for high-affinity glucose transport, we constructed chimaeras of Hxt2 and Hxt1 by randomly replacing each of the 12 TMs of Hxt2 with the corresponding segment of Hxt1, for a total of 4096 different transporters. Among > 20000 yeast transformants screened, 39 different clones were selected by plate assays of high-affinity glucose-transport activity and sequenced. With only two exceptions, the selected chimaeras contained Hxt2 TMs 1, 5, 7 and 8. We then constructed chimaeras corresponding to all 16 possible combinations of Hxt2 TMs 1, 5, 7 and 8. Only one chimaera, namely that containing all four Hxt2 TMs, exhibited transport activity comparable with that of Hxt2. The K (m) and V (max) values for D-glucose transport, and the substrate specificity of this chimaera were almost identical with those of Hxt2. These results indicate that TMs 1, 5, 7 and 8 are necessary for exhibiting high-affinity glucose-transport activity of Hxt2. PMID:12603199

  17. [Intracellular cAMP involvement in the synchronized activity of noradrenaline in response to evoked release of the transmitter quanta in the frog synapses].

    PubMed

    Bukharaeva, E A; Samigullin, D V; Nikol'skiĭ, E E; Vyskocil, F

    2000-04-01

    An analogue of cyclic AMP (db-cAMP) penetrating into the frog neuromuscular junction's cell, as well as the adenylyl cyclase activator forskolin, and inhibitor of nucleotide-depending phosphodiesterase isobutilmethylxantine alter the kinetics of the quanta secretion resulting in synchronizing of the process of the transmitter release. Following a db-cAMP preliminary action, no such synchronizing of the transmitter release occurred. Action of noradrenaline on the time course of the secretion seems to be realised through activation of presynaptic beta-adrenoreceptors, augmentation of the adenylyl cyclase activity, and the rise of the intracellular cAMP.

  18. Group Experience: The Essence of Camping. An Occasional Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brower, Robert; Brower, Mary

    1980-01-01

    Five propositions related to the values of the group experience in camping are argued: (1) the group experience is the essence of camping; (2) groups influence behavior and enhance mental health; (3) camps serve a variety of purposes; (4) knowledge of group dynamics can influence camp outcomes; and (5) good camps benefit society. An elaboration on…

  19. A Day in the Life of Three Special Needs Camps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winbaum, Stephen

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author talks about three special needs camps--Camp Kirk, Camp Talisman and Camp Caglewood. Camp Kirk's philosophy is to encourage their children to take risks in a structured setting, like high ropes courses, rock climbing wall, martial arts, and traditional activities like swimming, arts and craft, drama, and others. Once…

  20. Evidence that cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase inhibitors suppress TNF alpha generation from human monocytes by interacting with a 'low-affinity' phosphodiesterase 4 conformer.

    PubMed Central

    Souness, J. E.; Griffin, M.; Maslen, C.; Ebsworth, K.; Scott, L. C.; Pollock, K.; Palfreyman, M. N.; Karlsson, J. A.

    1996-01-01

    (+/-)-rolipram (IC50: 490 +/- 260 nM, n = 4) in inhibiting LPS-induced TNF alpha release from monocytes. R-(-)-rolipram (IC50: 397 +/- 178 nM, n = 3) was 5.2-fold more potent than its S-(+)- enantiomer (IC50: 2067 +/- 659 nM, n = 3). As with cyclic AMP, accumulation a closer, linear correlation existed between the potency of structurally distinct compounds in suppressing TNF alpha with PDE4 inhibition (r = 0.93, P < 0.01, n = 13) than with displacement of [3H]-rolipram binding (r = 0.65, P < 0.01, n = 13). 6. RP 73401 (IC50: 2 nM) was 180 fold more potent than rolipram (IC50: 360 nM) in suppressing LPS (10 ng ml-1)-induced TNF alpha mRNA. 7. The results demonstrate that RP 73401 is a very potent inhibitor of TNF alpha release from human monocytes suggesting that it may have therapeutic potential in the many pathological conditions associated with over-production of this pro-inflammatory cytokine. Furthermore, PDE inhibitor actions on functional responses are better correlated with inhibition of PDE4 catalytic activity than displacement of [3H]-rolipram from its high-affinity binding site, suggesting that the native PDE4 in human monocytes exists predominantly in a 'low-affinity' state. Images Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:8762090