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Sample records for high-angle twist grain

  1. Characterizing twist grain boundaries in BCC Nb by molecular simulation: Structure and shear deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zeng-Hui; Feng, Ya-Xin; Shang, Jia-Xiang

    2016-05-01

    Atomic scale modeling was used to study the structure, energy and shear behaviors of (110) twist grain boundaries (TWGBs) in body-centered cubic Nb. The relation between grain boundary energy (GBE) and the twist angle θ agrees well with the Read-Shockley equation in low-angle range. At higher angles, the GBEs show no distinct trend with the variation of the twist angle or the density of coincident lattice sites. All (110) twist boundaries can be classified into two types: low-angle grain boundaries (LAGBs) and high-angle grain boundaries (HAGBs). LAGBs contain a hexagonal dislocation network (HDN) which is composed of 1/2 [ 111 ], 1/2 [ 1 bar 1 bar 1 ] and [001] screw dislocations. HAGBs can be classified into three sub-types further: special boundaries with low Σ, boundaries in the vicinity of special boundaries with similar structures and ordinary HAGBs consisting of periodic patterns. Besides, a dependence of grain boundary shear response vs the twist angle over the entire twist angle range is obtained. Pure sliding behavior is found at all TWGBs. When θ < 12°, the flow stress of LAGBs is found to be correlated with the HDNs and decreases with the increasing twist angle. For ordinary HAGBs, the magnitude of flow stress is around 0.8-1.0 GPa and the twist angle has little effect on the anisotropy mobility. For special grain boundaries with low Σ, the boundary structures govern the GBEs and shear motion behavior significantly.

  2. Superplastic Constitutive Equation Including Percentage of High-Angle Grain Boundaries as a Microstructural Parameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, K.; Liu, F. C.; Xue, P.; Wang, D.; Xiao, B. L.; Ma, Z. Y.

    2016-01-01

    Fifteen Al-Mg-Sc samples with subgrain/grain sizes in the range of 1.8 to 4.9 μm were prepared through the processing methods of friction stir processing (FSP), equal-channel-angular pressing (ECAP), rolling, annealing, and combinations of the above. The percentages of high-angle grain boundaries (HAGBs) of these fine-grained alloys were distributed from 39 to 97 pct. The samples processed through FSP had a higher percentage of HAGBs compared to other samples. Superplasticity was achieved in all fifteen samples, but the FSP samples exhibited better superplasticity than other samples because their fine equiaxed grains, which were mostly surrounded by HAGBs, were conducive to the occurrence of grain boundary sliding (GBS) during superplastic deformation. The dominant deformation mechanism was the same for all fifteen samples, i.e., GBS controlled by grain boundary diffusion. However, the subgrains were the GBS units for the rolled or ECAP samples, which contained high percentages of unrecrystallized grains, whereas the fine grains were the GBS units for the FSP samples. Superplastic data analysis revealed that the dimensionless A in the classical constitutive equation for superplasticity of fine-grained Al alloys was not a constant, but increased with an increase in the percentage of HAGBs, demonstrating that the enhanced superplastic deformation kinetics can be ascribed to the high percentage of HAGBs. A modified superplastic constitutive equation with the percentage of HAGBs as a new microstructural parameter was established.

  3. Possible model of an antiferroelectric twist grain boundary phase

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, J. G.; Carlsson, T.; Rudquist, P.; Lagerwall, S. T.; Nobili, M.; Brunet, M.

    2007-07-15

    Using x-ray and optical methods we have probed the structural organization of an antiferroelectric twist grain boundary phase (TGBC{sub a}) lying between the regular antiferroelectric smectic-C (SmC{sub a}{sup *}) and the smectic-Q (SmQ) or isotropic phase. We find that the twist axis is everywhere perpendicular to the local smectic layer normal and that the helical superstructure is incommensurate with the smectic layer structure. The twist grain boundaries consist of a periodic lattice of alternating +1/2 and -1/2 dispirations, i.e., unit screw dislocations in combination with half unit disclinations. The molecular tilt plane is alternatingly parallel and perpendicular to the twist axis. We find that the optically measured tilt angle in the SmC{sub a}{sup *} phase is smaller than that measured by x rays, which is the opposite to what is found in the SmC{sup *} phase. This means that the core part tilts less than the end chains in the SmC{sub a}{sup *} phase, while it tilts more in the SmC{sup *} phase. On entering the TGB phase a clear decrease is measured in the tilt angle. This is explained by the elastic influence from the disclinations, which appear in this phase.

  4. Observation of a Reentrant Twist Grain Boundary Phase

    SciTech Connect

    Shankar Rao, D. S.; Krishna Prasad, S.; Raja, V. N.; Yelamaggad, C. V.; Anitha Nagamani, S.

    2001-08-20

    We report the occurrence of a reentrant twist grain boundary phase, which we designate as Re-TGB{sub A}. Microscopic observations on a nonsymmetric dimer showed the phase sequence Iso--N{sup *} --TGB{sub A} --Sm-A --Re--TGB{sub A} --TGB{sub C{sup *}}. Here N{sup *} and Sm-A stand for the chiral nematic and smectic-A phases, TGB{sub A} is the twist grain boundary phase with smectic-A blocks, and TGB{sub C{sup *}} that with smectic-C{sup *} blocks and exhibiting features of both the smectic-C{sup *} and TGB phases. The reentrance of the TGB{sub A} phase is unambiguously demonstrated using x-ray diffraction, selective reflection, and optical rotation data.

  5. Giant-block twist grain boundary smectic phases.

    PubMed

    Fernsler, J; Hough, L; Shao, R-F; Maclennan, J E; Navailles, L; Brunet, M; Madhusudana, N V; Mondain-Monval, O; Boyer, C; Zasadzinski, J; Rego, J A; Walba, D M; Clark, N A

    2005-10-01

    Study of a diverse set of chiral smectic materials, each of which has twist grain boundary (TGB) phases over a broad temperature range and exhibits grid patterns in the Grandjean textures of the TGB helix, shows that these features arise from a common structure: "giant" smectic blocks of planar layers of thickness l(b) > 200 nm terminated by GBs that are sharp, mediating large angular jumps in layer orientation between blocks (60 degrees < Delta < 90 degrees ), and lubricating the thermal contraction of the smectic layers within the blocks. This phenomenology is well described by basic theoretical models applicable in the limit that the ratio of molecular tilt penetration length-to-layer coherence length is large, and featuring GBs in which smectic ordering is weak, approaching thin, melted (nematic-like) walls. In this limit the energy cost of change of the block size is small, leading to a wide variation of block dimension, depending on preparation conditions. The models also account for the temperature dependence of the TGB helix pitch.

  6. Raman mapping investigation of chemical vapor deposition-fabricated twisted bilayer graphene with irregular grains.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuming; Meng, Lijuan; Zhao, Weiwei; Liang, Zheng; Wu, Xing; Nan, Haiyan; Wu, Zhangting; Huang, Shan; Sun, Litao; Wang, Jinlan; Ni, Zhenhua

    2014-10-21

    Bilayer graphene as a prototype of two-dimensional stacked material has recently attracted great attention. The twist angle between graphene layers adds another dimension to control its properties. In this study, we used Raman mapping to investigate the twist angle dependence of properties of twisted bilayer graphene (TBG) with irregular grains that was fabricated by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Different Raman parameters including intensity, width, and position of G and 2D peaks were used to distinguish TBG with different twist angles. The statistical results from Raman imaging on the distribution of twist angle are consistent with the results from selected area election diffraction (SAED). Finally, the Raman peak at approximately 1347 cm(-1) for TBG with a large twist angle was assigned to the D-like peak, although it has similar excitation energy dependence of frequency as the defect-induced D peak. Theoretical calculation further confirmed that vacancy-like defect is not favored in the formation energy for TBG with a large twist angle as compared to monolayer graphene or TBG with other twist angles. These results will help to advance the understanding of TBG properties, especially for CVD samples with irregular grains.

  7. On the small angle twist sub-grain boundaries in Ti3AlC2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Chao; Hu, Tao; Zhan, Xun; Wang, Xiaohui; Zhou, Yanchun

    2016-04-01

    Tilt-dominated grain boundaries have been investigated in depth in the deformation of MAX phases. In stark contrast, another important type of grain boundaries, twist grain boundaries, have long been overlooked. Here, we report on the observation of small angle twist sub-grain boundaries in a typical MAX phase Ti3AlC2 compressed at 1200 °C, which comprise hexagonal screw dislocation networks formed by basal dislocation reactions. By first-principles investigations on atomic-scale deformation and general stacking fault energy landscapes, it is unequivocally demonstrated that the twist sub-grain boundaries are most likely located between Al and Ti4f (Ti located at the 4f Wyckoff sites of P63/mmc) layers, with breaking of the weakly bonded Al–Ti4f. The twist angle increases with the increase of deformation and is estimated to be around 0.5° for a deformation of 26%. This work may shed light on sub-grain boundaries of MAX phases, and provide fundamental information for future atomic-scale simulations.

  8. On the small angle twist sub-grain boundaries in Ti3AlC2

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Chao; Hu, Tao; Zhan, Xun; Wang, Xiaohui; Zhou, Yanchun

    2016-01-01

    Tilt-dominated grain boundaries have been investigated in depth in the deformation of MAX phases. In stark contrast, another important type of grain boundaries, twist grain boundaries, have long been overlooked. Here, we report on the observation of small angle twist sub-grain boundaries in a typical MAX phase Ti3AlC2 compressed at 1200 °C, which comprise hexagonal screw dislocation networks formed by basal dislocation reactions. By first-principles investigations on atomic-scale deformation and general stacking fault energy landscapes, it is unequivocally demonstrated that the twist sub-grain boundaries are most likely located between Al and Ti4f (Ti located at the 4f Wyckoff sites of P63/mmc) layers, with breaking of the weakly bonded Al–Ti4f. The twist angle increases with the increase of deformation and is estimated to be around 0.5° for a deformation of 26%. This work may shed light on sub-grain boundaries of MAX phases, and provide fundamental information for future atomic-scale simulations. PMID:27034075

  9. Twist grain boundaries in three-dimensional lamellar Turing structures

    PubMed Central

    De Wit, A.; Borckmans, P.; Dewel, G.

    1997-01-01

    Steady spatial self-organization of three-dimensional chemical reaction-diffusion systems is discussed with the emphasis put on the possible defects that may alter the Turing patterns. It is shown that one of the stable defects of a three-dimensional lamellar Turing structure is a twist grain boundary embedding a Scherk minimal surface. PMID:11038594

  10. Filaments in the twist-grain-boundary smectic-A phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lejček, Lubor; Novotná, Vladimíra; Glogarová, Milada

    2015-09-01

    A model of filaments of the twist-grain-boundary smectic-A phase (TGBA) arising from the homeotropic smectic-A phase and nucleating on the sample surface is proposed. The model is based on the concept of finite blocks of parallel smectic layers forming a helical structure. The blocks are surrounded by dislocation loops. The model describes the filament structure near the sample surface and the observed inclination of the filament axis with respect to the easy direction of the molecular anchoring on the surface. The model is based on the observations of filament textures of the TGBA phase in a chiral liquid crystalline compound, but can be applied for forming of TGBA filaments in any compound. The compression modulus of the compound has been estimated using such parameters as anchoring energy, estimated from the field necessary to transform the structure into the homeotropic smectic-A .

  11. Filaments in the twist-grain-boundary smectic-A phase.

    PubMed

    Lejček, Lubor; Novotná, Vladimíra; Glogarová, Milada

    2015-09-01

    A model of filaments of the twist-grain-boundary smectic-A phase (TGBA) arising from the homeotropic smectic-A phase and nucleating on the sample surface is proposed. The model is based on the concept of finite blocks of parallel smectic layers forming a helical structure. The blocks are surrounded by dislocation loops. The model describes the filament structure near the sample surface and the observed inclination of the filament axis with respect to the easy direction of the molecular anchoring on the surface. The model is based on the observations of filament textures of the TGBA phase in a chiral liquid crystalline compound, but can be applied for forming of TGBA filaments in any compound. The compression modulus of the compound has been estimated using such parameters as anchoring energy, estimated from the field necessary to transform the structure into the homeotropic smectic-A.

  12. Interaction of run-in edge dislocations with twist grain boundaries in Al-a molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, S.; Naveen Kumar, N.; Samal, M. K.; Chavan, V. M.; Patel, R. J.

    2016-06-01

    Grain boundaries play an important role in outlining the mechanical properties of crystalline materials. They act as sites for absorption/nucleation of dislocations, which are the main carriers of plastic deformation. In view of this, the interactions between edge dislocations and twist grain boundaries-dislocation pileup, dislocation absorption and dislocation emission were explored by performing molecular dynamics simulations in face-centered cubic Al using embedded atom method. The ?1 1 0? twist grain boundaries with various misorientation angles were selected for this purpose. It was found that the misorientation angle of boundary and stress anomalies arising from repeated dislocation absorption at the grain boundaries are the important parameters in determining the ability of the boundary to emit dislocations. Complex network of dislocations results in later stages of deformation, which may have a significant effect on the mechanical properties of the material. The peculiarities of dislocation nucleation, their emission from twist grain boundaries and the ramifications of this study towards development of higher length scale material models are discussed.

  13. Uranium vacancy mobility at the Σ5 symmetric tilt and Σ5 twist grain boundaries in UO₂

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Uberuaga, Blas Pedro; Andersson, David A.

    2015-10-01

    Ionic transport at grain boundaries in oxides dictates a number of important phenomena, from ionic conductivity to sintering to creep. For nuclear fuels, it also influences fission gas bubble nucleation and growth. Here, using a combination of atomistic calculations and object kinetic Monte Carlo (okMC) simulations, we examine the kinetic pathways associated with uranium vacancies at two model grain boundaries in UO2. The barriers for vacancy motion were calculated using the nudged elastic band method at all uranium sites at each grain boundary and were used as the basis of the okMC simulations. For both boundaries considered – a simplemore » tilt and a simple twist boundary – the mobility of uranium vacancies is significantly higher than in the bulk. For the tilt boundary, there is clearly preferred migration along the tilt axis as opposed to in the perpendicular direction while, for the twist boundary, migration is essentially isotropic within the boundary plane. These results show that cation defect mobility in fluorite-structured materials is enhanced at certain types of grain boundaries and is dependent on the boundary structure with the tilt boundary exhibiting higher rates of migration than the twist boundary.« less

  14. Uranium vacancy mobility at the Σ5 symmetric tilt and Σ5 twist grain boundaries in UO₂

    SciTech Connect

    Uberuaga, Blas Pedro; Andersson, David A.

    2015-10-01

    Ionic transport at grain boundaries in oxides dictates a number of important phenomena, from ionic conductivity to sintering to creep. For nuclear fuels, it also influences fission gas bubble nucleation and growth. Here, using a combination of atomistic calculations and object kinetic Monte Carlo (okMC) simulations, we examine the kinetic pathways associated with uranium vacancies at two model grain boundaries in UO2. The barriers for vacancy motion were calculated using the nudged elastic band method at all uranium sites at each grain boundary and were used as the basis of the okMC simulations. For both boundaries considered – a simple tilt and a simple twist boundary – the mobility of uranium vacancies is significantly higher than in the bulk. For the tilt boundary, there is clearly preferred migration along the tilt axis as opposed to in the perpendicular direction while, for the twist boundary, migration is essentially isotropic within the boundary plane. These results show that cation defect mobility in fluorite-structured materials is enhanced at certain types of grain boundaries and is dependent on the boundary structure with the tilt boundary exhibiting higher rates of migration than the twist boundary.

  15. Ab initio local energy and local stress: application to tilt and twist grain boundaries in Cu and Al.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hao; Kohyama, Masanori; Tanaka, Shingo; Shiihara, Yoshinori

    2013-07-31

    The energy-density and stress-density schemes (Shiihara et al 2010 Phys. Rev. B 81 075441) within the projector augmented wave (PAW) method based on the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) have been applied to tilt and twist grain boundaries (GBs) and single vacancies in Cu and Al. Local energy and local stress at GBs and defects are obtained by integrating the energy and stress densities in each local region by the Bader integration using a recent algorithm (Yu et al 2011 J. Chem. Phys. 134 064111) as well as by the layer-by-layer integration so as to settle the gauge-dependent problem in the kinetic terms. Results are compared with those by the fuzzy-Voronoi integration and by the embedded atom method (EAM). The features of local energy and local stress at GBs and vacancies depend on the bonding nature of each material. Valence electrons in Al mainly located in the interatomic regions show remarkable response to structural disorder as significant valence charge redistribution or bond reconstruction, often leading to long-range variations of charges, energies and stresses, quite differently from d electrons in Cu mainly located near nuclei. All these features can be well represented by our local energy and local stress. The EAM potential for Al does not reproduce correct local energy or local stress, while the EAM potential for Cu provides satisfactory results.

  16. High angle conveyors climb to the top

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, J.J.

    1984-11-01

    Descriptions are presented of various types of high angle conveyors, including pocket belt, fin belt, sandwich belt, snake sandwich conveyor, mechanically pressed sandwich conveyor, and pneumatically pressed sandwich conveyors. 10 references.

  17. High angle conveyors climb to the top

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, J.J.

    1984-11-01

    A major objective in the design of a storage facility is to have the least handling over the shortest distances and to optimize land usage by attaining the highest tons-per-acre value. The advantages of high angle conveyors become apparent when the height of lift is compared with the surface area. High angle conveyors achieve high capacities in the least amount of space. Continental Conveyor and Equipment Co., has conducted several studies that evaluate the technical and economic feasibility of using high angle conveyors in conveyor systems. A few of the high angle conveying concepts reviewed are the bucket ladder or pocket belt, belts with partitions or fin belt, and the sandwich type belt conveyors.

  18. The development of high angle deformation boundaries and local orientations in aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, D.A.

    1996-03-01

    High angle boundaries and their local surroundings are important for all aspects of recrystallization including nucleation, growth and texture formation. They are thus important for processing of aluminum alloys. Deformation induced high angle boundaries have been observed and quantitatively characterized using transmission electron microscopy in aluminum following rolling to large reductions. The distribution of local orientations between individual dislocation boundaries and their angle/axis pairs have been measured using convergent beam Kikuchi analysis and are compared to the macroscopic texture. The sequence of near neighbor orientations shows that individual grains subdivide across their thickness into three to four different texture components separated by sharp boundaries. The local orientations surrounding high angle boundaries are much more diverse than suggested by simple models and single crystal studies. The origins for these high angle boundaries are suggested and discussed.

  19. On the relationship between grain-boundary migration and grain-boundary diffusion by molecular-dynamics simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Schoenfelder, B. |; Keblinski, P.; Wolf, D.; Phillpot, S.R.

    1998-07-01

    A molecular-dynamics method for the simulation of the intrinsic migration behavior of individual, flat grain boundaries is presented. A constant driving force for grain-boundary migration is generated by imposing an anisotropic elastic strain on a bicrystal such that the elastic-energy densities in its two halves are different. For the model case of the large-planar-unit-cell, high-angle (001) twist boundary in Cu the authors demonstrate that the drift velocity is proportional to the applied driving force, thus enabling determination of the boundary mobility. The activation energy for grain-boundary migration is found to be distinctly lower than that for grain-boundary self-diffusion. A decrease in the related activation energies with increasing temperature is shown to arise from a crossover in the underlying mechanisms, from solid-like at low temperatures to liquid-like at high-temperatures that is accompanied by an underlying grain-boundary structural transition.

  20. Light's twist

    PubMed Central

    Padgett, Miles

    2014-01-01

    That light travels in straight lines is a statement of the obvious. However, the energy and momentum flow within light beams can twist to form vortices such as eddies in a stream. These twists carry angular momentum, which can make microscopic objects spin, be used to encode extra information in communication systems, enable the design of novel imaging systems and allow new tests of quantum mechanics. PMID:25484612

  1. X-29 at High Angle of Attack with Smoke Generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This photo shows the X-29 during a 1991 research flight. Smoke generators in the nose of the aircraft were used to help researchers see the behavior of the air flowing over the aircraft. The smoke here is demonstrating forebody vortex flow. This mission was flown September 10, 1991, by NASA research pilot Rogers Smith. Two X-29 aircraft, featuring one of the most unusual designs in aviation history, flew at the Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility (now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California) from 1984 to 1992. The fighter-sized X-29 technology demonstrators explored several concepts and technologies including: the use of advanced composites in aircraft construction; variable-camber wing surfaces; a unique forward- swept wing and its thin supercritical airfoil; strakes; close-coupled canards; and a computerized fly-by-wire flight control system used to maintain control of the otherwise unstable aircraft. Research results showed that the configuration of forward-swept wings, coupled with movable canards, gave pilots excellent control response at angles of attack of up to 45 degrees. During its flight history, the X-29 aircraft flew 422 research missions and a total of 436 missions. Sixty of the research flights were part of the X-29 follow-on 'vortex control' phase. The forward-swept wing of the X-29 resulted in reverse airflow, toward the fuselage rather than away from it, as occurs on the usual aft-swept wing. Consequently, on the forward-swept wing, the ailerons remained unstalled at high angles of attack. This provided better airflow over the ailerons and prevented stalling (loss of lift) at high angles of attack. Introduction of composite materials in the 1970s opened a new field of aircraft construction. It also made possible the construction of the X-29's thin supercritical wing. State-of-the-art composites allowed aeroelastic tailoring which, in turn, allowed the wing some bending but limited twisting and eliminated structural divergence

  2. Point-defect recombination efficiency at grain boundaries in irradiated SiC

    SciTech Connect

    Moriani, Andrea; Cleri, Fabrizio

    2006-06-01

    We studied the atomic-scale mechanisms of radiation damage recovery, by molecular dynamics simulations of irradiation cascades in a {beta}-SiC model system, containing one general (001) twist grain boundary in the direction approximately perpendicular to the cascade. The (001) grain boundary has a disordered atomic structure, representative of high-angle, high-energy boundaries in cubic silicon carbide. Compared to the perfect crystal model system, we find a relevant effect of grain boundaries on the annealing of cascade defects, both in terms of localization of defects, which are preferentially concentrated around the grain boundary, and of relative defect recovery efficiency. In general, C interstitials are the prevalent type of defect over the whole range of energies explored. A slight grain boundary expansion is observed, accompanied by a broadening of the central atomic planes.

  3. Twisted baskets.

    PubMed

    Hermann, Keith; Pratumyot, Yaowalak; Polen, Shane; Hardin, Alex M; Dalkilic, Erdin; Dastan, Arif; Badjić, Jovica D

    2015-02-23

    A preparative procedure for obtaining a pair of twisted molecular baskets, each comprising a chiral framework with either right ((P)-1syn) or left ((M)-1syn) sense of twist and six ester groups at the rim has been developed and optimized. The racemic (P/M)-1syn can be obtained in three synthetic steps from accessible starting materials. The resolution of (P/M)-1syn is accomplished by its transesterification with (1R,2S,5R)-(-)-menthol in the presence of a Ti(IV) catalyst to give diastereomeric 8(P) and 8(M). It was found that dendritic-like cavitands 8(P) and 8(M), in CD2Cl2, undergo self-inclusion ((1)H NMR spectroscopy) with a menthol moiety occupying the cavity of each host. Importantly, the degree of inclusion of the menthol group was ((1)H NMR spectroscopy) found to be greater in the case of 8(P) than 8(M). Accordingly, it is suggested that different folding characteristic of 8(P) and 8(M) ought to affect the physicochemical characteristics of the hosts to permit their effective separation by column chromatography. The absolute configuration of 8(P)/8(M), encompassing right- and left-handed "cups", was determined with the exciton chirality method and also verified in silico (DFT: B3LYP/TZVP). Finally, the twisted baskets are strongly fluorescent due to three naphthalene chromophores, having a high fluorescence quantum yield within the rigid framework of 8(P)/8(M). PMID:25604262

  4. Twisted dust acoustic waves in dusty plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Shukla, P. K.

    2012-08-15

    We examine linear dust acoustic waves (DAWs) in a dusty plasma with strongly correlated dust grains, and discuss possibility of a twisted DA vortex beam carrying orbital angular momentum (OAM). For our purposes, we use the Boltzmann distributed electron and ion density perturbations, the dust continuity and generalized viscoelastic dust momentum equations, and Poisson's equation to obtain a dispersion relation for the modified DAWs. The effects of the polarization force, strong dust couplings, and dust charge fluctuations on the DAW spectrum are examined. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the DAW can propagate as a twisted vortex beam carrying OAM. A twisted DA vortex structure can trap and transport dust particles in dusty plasmas.

  5. High-angle-of-attack aerodynamics - Lessons learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chambers, J. R.

    1986-01-01

    Recently, the military and civil technical communities have undertaken numerous studies of the high angle-of-attack aerodynamic characteristics of advanced airplane and missile configurations. The method of approach and the design methodology employed have necessarily been experimental and exploratory in nature, due to the complex nature of separated flows. However, despite the relatively poor definition of many of the key aerodynamic phenomena involved for high-alpha conditions, some generic guidelines for design consideration have been identified. The present paper summarizes some of the more important lessons learned in the area of high angle-of-attack aerodynamics with examples of a number of key concepts and with particular emphasis on high-alpha stability and control characteristics of high performance aircraft. Topics covered in the discussion include the impact of design evolution, forebody flows, control of separated flows, configuration effects, aerodynamic controls, wind-tunnel flight correlation, and recent NASA research activities.

  6. The twisted top

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiffeault, Jean-Luc; Morrison, P. J.

    2001-05-01

    We describe a new type of top, the twisted top, obtained by appending a cocycle to the Lie-Poisson bracket for the charged heavy top, thus breaking its semidirect product structure. The twisted top has an integrable case that corresponds to the Lagrange (symmetric) top. We give a canonical description of the twisted top in terms of Euler angles. We also show by a numerical calculation of the largest Lyapunov exponent that the Kovalevskaya case of the twisted top is chaotic.

  7. Low aspect ratio wings at high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stallings, Robert L., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    A survey is conducted of the results of investigations into the flowfields and aerodynamic forces associated with low aspect ratio wings at high angles of attack. Attention is given to criteria for the cataloging of these flowfields, the phenomenon of vortex breakdown, with varying wing incidence and Mach number, and the effects of aspect ratio and compressibility. The planforms treated are of rectangular, clipped-delta, and strake-wing combination geometries. Extensive graphic representations of performance trends with varying parameters are furnished.

  8. Electromagnetic and microstructural properties of pure c-axis twist Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8+{delta}} bicrystal junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Tsay, Y.N.; Li, Q.; Zhu, Y.; Suenaga, M.; Gu, G.D.; Koshizuka, N.

    1998-08-01

    Bulk Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8+{delta}} (Bi2212) bicrystals containing a single high quality [001] twist grain boundary junction were prepared in order to investigate the orbital symmetry of the superconducting order parameter in highly anisotropic Bi-based high temperature superconductors. The misorientation angles of the bicrystals ranged from 0 to 180{degree}. The microstructure in the vicinity of the junction was characterized using high-resolution, nano-probe analytical microscopy. The authors found that some high angle twist junctions were able to carry a critical current density similar to their constituent single crystals. These results cannot be interpreted in terms of a pure d{sub x{sup 2}{minus}y{sup 2}}-wave order parameter for superconducting Bi2212.

  9. X-31 high angle of attack control system performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huber, Peter; Seamount, Patricia

    1994-01-01

    The design goals for the X-31 flight control system were: (1) level 1 handling qualities during post-stall maneuvering (30 to 70 degrees angle-of-attack); (2) thrust vectoring to enhance performance across the flight envelope; and (3) adequate pitch-down authority at high angle-of-attack. Additional performance goals are discussed. A description of the flight control system is presented, highlighting flight control system features in the pitch and roll axes and X-31 thrust vectoring characteristics. The high angle-of-attack envelope clearance approach will be described, including a brief explanation of analysis techniques and tools. Also, problems encountered during envelope expansion will be discussed. This presentation emphasizes control system solutions to problems encountered in envelope expansion. An essentially 'care free' envelope was cleared for the close-in-combat demonstrator phase. High angle-of-attack flying qualities maneuvers are currently being flown and evaluated. These results are compared with pilot opinions expressed during the close-in-combat program and with results obtained from the F-18 HARV for identical maneuvers. The status and preliminary results of these tests are discussed.

  10. Cable-Twisting Machine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurnett, S.

    1982-01-01

    New cable-twisting machine is smaller and faster than many production units. Is useful mainly in production of short-run special cables. Already-twisted cable can be fed along axis of machine. Faster operation than typical industrial cable-twisting machines possible by using smaller spools of wire.

  11. Twist within a somersault.

    PubMed

    Mikl, Joanne; Rye, David C

    2016-02-01

    The twisting somersault is a key skill in diving and gymnastics. The components of twist and somersault are defined with respect to anatomical axes, and combinations of multiples of half rotations of twist and somersault define specific twisting somersault skills. To achieve a twisting somersault skill twist must be continuous; otherwise oscillations in twist while somersaulting may be observed. The posture-dependent inertial properties of the athlete and the initial conditions determine if continuous or oscillating twist is observed. The paper derives equations for the amount of somersault required per half twist, or per twist oscillation, without making assumptions about the relative magnitudes of the moments of inertia. From these equations the skills achievable may be determined. The error associated with the common assumption that the medial and transverse principal moments of inertia are equal is explored. It is concluded that the error grows as the number of twists per somersault decreases, when the medial and transverse moments of inertia diverge, and when the longitudinal moment of inertia approaches either the medial or transverse moment of inertia. Inertial property data for an example athlete are used to illustrate the various rotational states that can occur.

  12. Twist within a somersault.

    PubMed

    Mikl, Joanne; Rye, David C

    2016-02-01

    The twisting somersault is a key skill in diving and gymnastics. The components of twist and somersault are defined with respect to anatomical axes, and combinations of multiples of half rotations of twist and somersault define specific twisting somersault skills. To achieve a twisting somersault skill twist must be continuous; otherwise oscillations in twist while somersaulting may be observed. The posture-dependent inertial properties of the athlete and the initial conditions determine if continuous or oscillating twist is observed. The paper derives equations for the amount of somersault required per half twist, or per twist oscillation, without making assumptions about the relative magnitudes of the moments of inertia. From these equations the skills achievable may be determined. The error associated with the common assumption that the medial and transverse principal moments of inertia are equal is explored. It is concluded that the error grows as the number of twists per somersault decreases, when the medial and transverse moments of inertia diverge, and when the longitudinal moment of inertia approaches either the medial or transverse moment of inertia. Inertial property data for an example athlete are used to illustrate the various rotational states that can occur. PMID:26583967

  13. Vortex asymmetry on conical forebodies at high angles of attack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taligoski, Jordan L.

    Vortex asymmetry on axisymmetric forebodies at high angles of attack results in side forces and yawing moments even in symmetrical flight. This can adversely affect the yaw control characteristics of a flight vehicle and limit maneuverability. The mechanisms responsible for vortex asymmetry and the nature of instabilities causing ow asymmetry are still not well understood. Few studies suggest the role of random micro-imperfections in the nose apex region as a cause of vortex asymmetry; however there is a lack of understanding about mechanisms by which these random imperfections result in a side force variation with the roll orientation. The present study involving experiments over a wide range of test conditions and high-fidelity simulations is an attempt to provide an insight to this complex phenomenon. Experiments were carried out on a 12° semi-apex angle cone at high angles of attack at low speeds. Measurements include forces and moments using a six-component strain gauge balance and Particle Image Velocimetry to obtain quantitative flow field characteristics. A high fidelity LES Navier-Stokes solver was utilized to investigate and understand vortex asymmetry phenomenon on the same configuration at a Reynolds number of 100,000 and free stream Mach number of 0.3. Flow field characteristics are assessed with the introduction of multiple random imperfections near the tip of the conical body. Results show that slender cones at high angles of attack display bistable variation of the side force and yawing moments with roll orientation. Vortex asymmetry is initiated very close to the cone tip due to the presence of micro-imperfections on the cone surface, and develop into asymmetric vortex sheet downstream along the conical body. The strength of the fully developed vortex moving away from the surface is nearly double of the vortex residing close to the surface, leading to large magnitude side forces and yawing moments.

  14. A high angle of attack inviscid shuttle orbiter computation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleb, William L.; Weilmuenster, K. James

    1992-01-01

    As a preliminary step toward predicting the leeside thermal environment for winged reentry vehicles at flight conditions, a computational solution for the flow about the Shuttle Orbiter at wind tunnel conditions was made using a point-implicit, finite volume scheme known as the Langley Aerothermodynamic Upwind Relaxation Algorithm (LAURA). The surface pressures resulting from the computational solution are compared with wind tunnel data. The results indicate that the dominant inviscid flow features are being accurately predicted on the leeside of the Shuttle Orbiter at a moderately high angle of attack.

  15. Low aspect ratio wings at high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stallings, R. L., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    A comprehensive evaluation is made of experimental data compiled to date for the flowfields and aerodynamic forces that occur at high angles of attack for low aspect ratio wings with delta, rectangular, clipped delta, and strake/wing planform geometries. Attention is given to wing leading edge-generated vortex breakdown, aspect ratio and compressibility effects, and strake vortex effects on main wing areas. Although the nonlinear effects created by a wing-body combination significantly alter wing-alone aerodynamics, the wing-alone data presented are vital to the development of prediction methodologies for large angle of attack aerodynamics.

  16. Simulation of xenon, uranium vacancy and interstitial diffusion and grain boundary segregation in UO2

    SciTech Connect

    Andersson, Anders D.; Tonks, Michael R.; Casillas, Luis; Nerikar, Pankaj; Vyas, Shyam; Uberuaga, Blas P.; Stanek, Christopher R.

    2014-10-31

    In light water reactor fuel, gaseous fission products segregate to grain boundaries, resulting in the nucleation and growth of large intergranular fission gas bubbles. Based on the mechanisms established from density functional theory (DFT) and empirical potential calculations 1, continuum models for diffusion of xenon (Xe), uranium (U) vacancies and U interstitials in UO2 have been derived for both intrinsic conditions and under irradiation. Segregation of Xe to grain boundaries is described by combining the bulk diffusion model with a model for the interaction between Xe atoms and three different grain boundaries in UO2 ( Σ5 tilt, Σ5 twist and a high angle random boundary),as derived from atomistic calculations. All models are implemented in the MARMOT phase field code, which is used to calculate effective Xe and U diffusivities as well as redistribution for a few simple microstructures.

  17. Reynolds Number Effects at High Angles of Attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, David F.; Cobleigh, Brent R.; Banks, Daniel W.; Hall, Robert M.; Wahls, Richard A.

    1998-01-01

    Lessons learned from comparisons between ground-based tests and flight measurements for the high-angle-of-attack programs on the F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV), the X-29 forward-swept wing aircraft, and the X-31 enhanced fighter maneuverability aircraft are presented. On all three vehicles, Reynolds number effects were evident on the forebodies at high angles of attack. The correlation between flight and wind tunnel forebody pressure distributions for the F-18 HARV were improved by using twin longitudinal grit strips on the forebody of the wind-tunnel model. Pressure distributions obtained on the X-29 wind-tunnel model at flight Reynolds numbers showed excellent correlation with the flight data up to alpha = 50 deg. Above (alpha = 50 deg. the pressure distributions for both flight and wind tunnel became asymmetric and showed poorer agreement, possibly because of the different surface finish of the model and aircraft. The detrimental effect of a very sharp nose apex was demonstrated on the X-31 aircraft. Grit strips on the forebody of the X-31 reduced the randomness but increased the magnitude of the asymmetry. Nose strakes were required to reduce the forebody yawing moment asymmetries and the grit strips on the flight test noseboom improved the aircraft handling qualities.

  18. Mesoscale mechanics of twisting carbon nanotube yarns.

    PubMed

    Mirzaeifar, Reza; Qin, Zhao; Buehler, Markus J

    2015-03-12

    Fabricating continuous macroscopic carbon nanotube (CNT) yarns with mechanical properties close to individual CNTs remains a major challenge. Spinning CNT fibers and ribbons for enhancing the weak interactions between the nanotubes is a simple and efficient method for fabricating high-strength and tough continuous yarns. Here we investigate the mesoscale mechanics of twisting CNT yarns using full atomistic and coarse grained molecular dynamics simulations, considering concurrent mechanisms at multiple length-scales. To investigate the mechanical response of such a complex structure without losing insights into the molecular mechanism, we applied a multiscale strategy. The full atomistic results are used for training a coarse grained model for studying larger systems consisting of several CNTs. The mesoscopic model parameters are updated as a function of the twist angle, based on the full atomistic results, in order to incorporate the atomistic scale deformation mechanisms in larger scale simulations. By bridging across two length scales, our model is capable of accurately predicting the mechanical behavior of twisted yarns while the atomistic level deformations in individual nanotubes are integrated into the model by updating the parameters. Our results focused on studying a bundle of close packed nanotubes provide novel mechanistic insights into the spinning of CNTs. Our simulations reveal how twisting a bundle of CNTs improves the shear interaction between the nanotubes up to a certain level due to increasing the interaction surface. Furthermore, twisting the bundle weakens the intertube interactions due to excessive deformation in the cross sections of individual CNTs in the bundle. PMID:25732328

  19. Mesoscale mechanics of twisting carbon nanotube yarns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirzaeifar, Reza; Qin, Zhao; Buehler, Markus J.

    2015-03-01

    Fabricating continuous macroscopic carbon nanotube (CNT) yarns with mechanical properties close to individual CNTs remains a major challenge. Spinning CNT fibers and ribbons for enhancing the weak interactions between the nanotubes is a simple and efficient method for fabricating high-strength and tough continuous yarns. Here we investigate the mesoscale mechanics of twisting CNT yarns using full atomistic and coarse grained molecular dynamics simulations, considering concurrent mechanisms at multiple length-scales. To investigate the mechanical response of such a complex structure without losing insights into the molecular mechanism, we applied a multiscale strategy. The full atomistic results are used for training a coarse grained model for studying larger systems consisting of several CNTs. The mesoscopic model parameters are updated as a function of the twist angle, based on the full atomistic results, in order to incorporate the atomistic scale deformation mechanisms in larger scale simulations. By bridging across two length scales, our model is capable of accurately predicting the mechanical behavior of twisted yarns while the atomistic level deformations in individual nanotubes are integrated into the model by updating the parameters. Our results focused on studying a bundle of close packed nanotubes provide novel mechanistic insights into the spinning of CNTs. Our simulations reveal how twisting a bundle of CNTs improves the shear interaction between the nanotubes up to a certain level due to increasing the interaction surface. Furthermore, twisting the bundle weakens the intertube interactions due to excessive deformation in the cross sections of individual CNTs in the bundle.

  20. Wire harness twisting aid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casey, E. J.; Commadore, C. C.; Ingles, M. E.

    1980-01-01

    Long wire bundles twist into uniform spiral harnesses with help of simple apparatus. Wires pass through spacers and through hand-held tool with hole for each wire. Ends are attached to low speed bench motor. As motor turns, operator moves hand tool away forming smooth twists in wires between motor and tool. Technique produces harnesses that generate less radio-frequency interference than do irregularly twisted cables.

  1. Probing grain boundary sink strength at the nanoscale: Energetics and length scales of vacancy and interstitial absorption by grain boundaries in α-Fe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tschopp, M. A.; Solanki, K. N.; Gao, F.; Sun, X.; Khaleel, M. A.; Horstemeyer, M. F.

    2012-02-01

    The energetics and length scales associated with the interaction between point defects (vacancies and self-interstitial atoms) and grain boundaries in bcc Fe was explored. Molecular statics simulations were used to generate a grain boundary structure database that contained ≈170 grain boundaries with varying tilt and twist character. Then, vacancy and self-interstitial atom formation energies were calculated at all potential grain boundary sites within 15 Å of the boundary. The present results provide detailed information about the interaction energies of vacancies and self-interstitial atoms with symmetric tilt grain boundaries in iron and the length scales involved with absorption of these point defects by grain boundaries. Both low- and high-angle grain boundaries were effective sinks for point defects, with a few low-Σ grain boundaries (e.g., the Σ3{112} twin boundary) that have properties different from the rest. The formation energies depend on both the local atomic structure and the distance from the boundary center. Additionally, the effect of grain boundary energy, disorientation angle, and Σ designation on the boundary sink strength was explored; the strongest correlation occurred between the grain boundary energy and the mean point defect formation energies. Based on point defect binding energies, interstitials have ≈80% more grain boundary sites per area and ≈300% greater site strength than vacancies. Last, the absorption length scale of point defects by grain boundaries is over a full lattice unit larger for interstitials than for vacancies (mean of 6-7 Å versus 10-11 Å for vacancies and interstitials, respectively).

  2. Wing-alone aerodynamic characteristics at high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stallings, R. L., Jr.; Lamb, M.

    1981-01-01

    An experimental investigation has been conducted to determine wing-alone supersonic aerodynamic characteristics at high angles of attack. The family of wings tested varied in aspect ratio from 0.5 to 4.0 and taper ratio from 0.0 to 1.0. The wings were tested at angles of attack ranging from 0 to 60 deg and Mach numbers from 1.6 to 4.6. The aerodynamic characteristics were obtained by integrating local pressures measured over the wing surface. Comparison of these data with the limited available data from the literature indicate the present data are free of sting interference effects through the test range of angle of attack. Presented and discussed are results showing the effects of model geometry, Mach number and angle of attack on aerodynamic characteristics consisting of normal force, pitching moment, bending moment, longitudinal center-of-pressure locations, and lateral center-of-pressure locations.

  3. Pivotable strakes for high angle of attack control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bobbitt, P. J.; Foughner, J. T., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    A series of pivotable strakes have been tested in combination with a 44-deg swept wing to determine their ability to provide pitch control at high angles of attack. The tests were carried out in the Langley 7 X 10-Foot High-Speed tunnel at nominal Mach numbers of 0.3 to 0.4. A total of five strakes with various aspects ratios and shapes were tested at negative deflection angles of 5, 10, 15, and 20 deg through an angle of attack range up to approximately 50 deg. In addition, a cranked delta wing with 70-deg sweep was tested with two different pivotable apex flaps. This paper shows lift, drag and moment data for the complete configurations as well as for the separate contributions of the strakes and fuselage nose which are mounted on a second balance. Generally, strake deflection was found to have a significant effect on moment while lift/drag changed very little.

  4. Forebody tangential blowing for control at high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kroo, I.; Rock, S.; Roberts, L.

    1991-01-01

    A feasibility study to determine if the use of tangential leading edge blowing over the forebody could produce effective and practical control of the F-18 HARV aircraft at high angles of attack was conducted. A simplified model of the F-18 configuration using a vortex-lattice model was developed to obtain a better understanding of basic aerodynamic coupling effects and the influence of forebody circulation on lifting surface behavior. The effect of tangential blowing was estimated using existing wind tunnel data on normal forebody blowing and analytical studies of tangential blowing over conical forebodies. Incorporation of forebody blowing into the flight control system was investigated by adding this additional yaw control and sideforce generating actuator into the existing F-18 HARV simulation model. A control law was synthesized using LQG design methods that would schedule blowing rates as a function of vehicle sideslip, angle of attack, and roll and yaw rates.

  5. Buffeting of NACA 0012 airfoil at high angle of attack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Tong; Dowell, Earl

    2014-11-01

    Buffeting is a fluid instability caused by flow separation or shock wave oscillations in the flow around a bluff body. Typically there is a dominant frequency of these flow oscillations called Strouhal or buffeting frequency. In prior work several researchers at Duke University have noted the analogy between the classic Von Karman Vortex Street behind a bluff body and the flow oscillations that occur for flow around a NACA 0012 airfoil at sufficiently large angle of attack. Lock-in is found for certain combinations of airfoil oscillation (pitching motion) frequencies and amplitudes when the frequency of the airfoil motion is sufficiently close to the buffeting frequency. The goal of this paper is to explore the flow around a static and an oscillating airfoil at high angle of attack by developing a method for computing buffet response. Simulation results are compared with experimental data. Conditions for the onset of buffeting and lock-in of a NACA 0012 airfoil at high angle of attack are determined. Effects of several parameters on lift coefficient and flow response frequency are studied including Reynolds number, angle of attack and blockage ratio of the airfoil size to the wind tunnel dimensions. Also more detailed flow field characteristics are determined. For a static airfoil, a universal Strouhal number scaling has been found for angles of attack from 30° to 90°, where the flow around airfoil is fully separated. For an oscillating airfoil, conditions for lock-in are discussed. Differences between the lock-in case and the unlocked case are also studied. The second affiliation: Duke University.

  6. Rotational disorder in twisted bilayer graphene.

    PubMed

    Beechem, Thomas E; Ohta, Taisuke; Diaconescu, Bogdan; Robinson, Jeremy T

    2014-02-25

    Conventional means of stacking two-dimensional (2D) crystals inevitably leads to imperfections. To examine the ramifications of these imperfections, rotational disorder and strain are quantified in twisted bilayer graphene (TBG) using a combination of Raman spectroscopic and low-energy electron diffraction imaging. The twist angle between TBG layers varies on the order of 2° within large (50-100 μm) single-crystalline grains, resulting in changes of the emergent Raman response by over an order of magnitude. Rotational disorder does not evolve continuously across the large grains but rather comes about by variations in the local twist angles between differing contiguous subgrains, ∼ 1 μm in size, that themselves exhibit virtually no twist angle variation (ΔΘ ∼ 0.1°). Owing to weak out-of-plane van der Waals bonding between azimuthally rotated graphene layers, these subgrains evolve in conjunction with the 0.3% strain variation observed both within and between the atomic layers. Importantly, the emergent Raman response is altered, but not removed, by these extrinsic perturbations. Interlayer interactions are therefore resilient to strain and rotational disorder, a fact that gives promise to the prospect of designer 2D solid heterostructures created via transfer processes.

  7. Instabilities of twisted strings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forgács, Péter; Lukács, Árpád

    2009-12-01

    A linear stability analysis of twisted flux-tubes (strings) in an SU(2) semilocal theory — an Abelian-Higgs model with two charged scalar fields with a global SU(2) symmetry — is carried out. Here the twist refers to a relative phase between the two complex scalars (with linear dependence on, say, the z coordinate), and importantly it leads to a global current flowing along the the string. Such twisted strings bifurcate with the Abrikosov-Nielsen-Olesen (ANO) solution embedded in the semilocal theory. Our numerical investigations of the small fluctuation spectrum confirm previous results that twisted strings exhibit instabilities whose amplitudes grow exponentially in time. More precisely twisted strings with a single magnetic flux quantum admit a continuous family of unstable eigenmodes with harmonic z dependence, indexed by a wavenumber kin[-km, km]. Carrying out a perturbative semi-analytic analysis of the bifurcation, it is found that the purely numerical results are very well reproduced. This way one obtains not only a good qualitative description of the twisted solutions themselves as well as of their instabilities, but also a quantitative description of the numerical results. Our semi-analytic results indicate that in close analogy to the known instability of the embedded ANO vortex a twisted string is also likely to expand in size caused by the spreading out of its magnetic flux.

  8. Twisted partially pure spinors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrera, Rafael; Tellez, Ivan

    2016-08-01

    Motivated by the relationship between orthogonal complex structures and pure spinors, we define twisted partially pure spinors in order to characterize spinorially subspaces of Euclidean space endowed with a complex structure.

  9. Twisted superconducting semilocal strings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forgács, Péter; Reuillon, Sébastien; Volkov, Mikhail S.

    2006-09-01

    A new class of twisted, current carrying, stationary, straight string solutions having finite energy per unit length is constructed numerically in an extended Abelian Higgs model with global SU(2) symmetry. The new solutions correspond to deformations of the embedded Abrikosov Nielsen Olesen (ANO) vortices by a twist—a relative coordinate dependent phase between the two Higgs fields. The twist induces a global current flowing through the string, and the deformed solutions bifurcate with the ANO vortices in the limit of vanishing current. For each value of the winding number n=1,2,… (determining the magnetic flux through the plane orthogonal to the string) there are n distinct, two-parametric families of solutions. One of the continuously varying parameters is the twist, or the corresponding current, the other one can be chosen to be the momentum of the string. For fixed values of the momentum and twist, the n distinct solutions have different energies and can be viewed as a lowest energy “fundamental” string and its n-1 “excitations” characterized by different values of their “polarization”. The latter is defined as the ratio of the angular momentum of the vortex and its momentum. In their rest frame the twisted vortices have lower energy than the embedded ANO vortices and could be of considerable importance in various physical systems (from condensed matter to cosmic strings).

  10. Multiscale simulation of xenon diffusion and grain boundary segregation in UO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, David A.; Tonks, Michael R.; Casillas, Luis; Vyas, Shyam; Nerikar, Pankaj; Uberuaga, Blas P.; Stanek, Christopher R.

    2015-07-01

    In light water reactor fuel, gaseous fission products segregate to grain boundaries, resulting in the nucleation and growth of large intergranular fission gas bubbles. The segregation rate is controlled by diffusion of fission gas atoms through the grains and interaction with the boundaries. Based on the mechanisms established from earlier density functional theory (DFT) and empirical potential calculations, diffusion models for xenon (Xe), uranium (U) vacancies and U interstitials in UO2 have been derived for both intrinsic (no irradiation) and irradiation conditions. Segregation of Xe to grain boundaries is described by combining the bulk diffusion model with a model for the interaction between Xe atoms and three different grain boundaries in UO2 (Σ 5 tilt, Σ 5 twist and a high angle random boundary), as derived from atomistic calculations. The present model does not attempt to capture nucleation or growth of fission gas bubbles at the grain boundaries. The point defect and Xe diffusion and segregation models are implemented in the MARMOT phase field code, which is used to calculate effective Xe and U diffusivities as well as to simulate Xe redistribution for a few simple microstructures.

  11. Multiscale simulation of xenon diffusion and grain boundary segregation in UO₂

    SciTech Connect

    Andersson, David A.; Tonks, Michael R.; Casillas, Luis; Vyas, Shyam; Nerikar, Pankaj; Uberuaga, Blas P.; Stanek, Christopher R.

    2015-07-01

    In light water reactor fuel, gaseous fission products segregate to grain boundaries, resulting in the nucleation and growth of large intergranular fission gas bubbles. The segregation rate is controlled by diffusion of fission gas atoms through the grains and interaction with the boundaries. Based on the mechanisms established from earlier density functional theory (DFT) and empirical potential calculations, diffusion models for xenon (Xe), uranium (U) vacancies and U interstitials in UO₂ have been derived for both intrinsic (no irradiation) and irradiation conditions. Segregation of Xe to grain boundaries is described by combining the bulk diffusion model with a model for the interaction between Xe atoms and three different grain boundaries in UO₂ (Σ5 tilt, Σ5 twist and a high angle random boundary), as derived from atomistic calculations. The present model does not attempt to capture nucleation or growth of fission gas bubbles at the grain boundaries. The point defect and Xe diffusion and segregation models are implemented in the MARMOT phase field code, which is used to calculate effective Xe and U diffusivities as well as to simulate Xe redistribution for a few simple microstructures.

  12. Multiscale simulation of xenon diffusion and grain boundary segregation in UO₂

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Andersson, David A.; Tonks, Michael R.; Casillas, Luis; Vyas, Shyam; Nerikar, Pankaj; Uberuaga, Blas P.; Stanek, Christopher R.

    2015-07-01

    In light water reactor fuel, gaseous fission products segregate to grain boundaries, resulting in the nucleation and growth of large intergranular fission gas bubbles. The segregation rate is controlled by diffusion of fission gas atoms through the grains and interaction with the boundaries. Based on the mechanisms established from earlier density functional theory (DFT) and empirical potential calculations, diffusion models for xenon (Xe), uranium (U) vacancies and U interstitials in UO₂ have been derived for both intrinsic (no irradiation) and irradiation conditions. Segregation of Xe to grain boundaries is described by combining the bulk diffusion model with a model formore » the interaction between Xe atoms and three different grain boundaries in UO₂ (Σ5 tilt, Σ5 twist and a high angle random boundary), as derived from atomistic calculations. The present model does not attempt to capture nucleation or growth of fission gas bubbles at the grain boundaries. The point defect and Xe diffusion and segregation models are implemented in the MARMOT phase field code, which is used to calculate effective Xe and U diffusivities as well as to simulate Xe redistribution for a few simple microstructures.« less

  13. Mesozoic pre-thrusting high-angle faults and stratigraphic variations, Plomosa Mountains, W. Arizona

    SciTech Connect

    Richard, S.M.; Spencer, J.E. )

    1993-04-01

    Three contrasting stratigraphic assemblages characterize fault-bounded terranes in the Southern Plomosa Mtns. (1) The Six Price sequence (SPS) consists of Proterozoic coarse-grained granitoid overlain by Paleozoic and Mesozoic strata. (2) The Apache Wash sequence consists of a basal mega-breccia and conglomerate unit overlain by sandstone in a fining-upward sequence. Paleozoic blocks in the mega-breccia include a Cambrian Muav-like lithology not present in the SPS Paleozoic section. The thickness and clast size in conglomerate associated with the mega-breccia increases the S suggesting a source in that direction. (3) The Crystal Hill sequence consists of strata correlated with the lower McCoy Mountains Formation deposited across a previously tilted unconformity between Jurassic volcanic rocks and the Proterozoic Scadden Mountain quartz monzonite. The lower McCoy Mountain Formation consists of basal quartz-arenite that grades up into fine-grained volcanic-lithic sandstones, and then into lithic-feldspathic sandstone and locally conglomerate, forming a coarsening-upward sequence. Because the Apache Wash sequence is cut by the Poorman thrust, the breccias at its base are not related to the Poorman thrust. Derivation of these creccias entirely from the SPS Paleozoic section is precluded by the presence of the Muav-lithology blocks; their source is not exposed. Thrusting in the area, correlated with deformation in the Maria Fold and Thrust Belt, was preceded by faulting to produce the megabreccias, tilting, and formation of NW-trending high-angle fault one of which forms the major lithotectonic boundary in the range.

  14. The role of atomic structure on grain boundary-defect interactions in Cu

    SciTech Connect

    Xian-Ming Bai; Louis J. Vernon; Richard G. Hoagland; Arthur F. Voter; Michael Nastasi; Blas Pedro Uberuaga

    2012-06-01

    We investigate the role that the atomic structure of grain boundaries in Cu has in the interaction with point defects produced during irradiation. We focus on three aspects of defect-boundary interaction: how defects interact with pristine boundaries, how boundaries modify defect production during collision cascades, and how defects interact with damaged boundaries. We find that there are generic features common to most boundaries, including biased absorption of interstitials over vacancies during collision cascades and strong interactions with vacancies for interstitial-loaded boundaries. However, we find that the magnitude of these behaviors depends strongly on the atomic structure of the boundary. In particular, the biased absorption is much stronger for a high angle twist boundary and smallest for a more general twist-asymmetric tilt boundary. Further, the strength of defect-boundary interactions is also sensitive to the boundary structure. We conclude that the sink strength of grain boundaries for interacting with point defects is not an intrinsic property of the boundary but rather depends on the irradiation condition through the absorbed defect content at the boundary.

  15. Twisted waveguide accelerating structure.

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Y. W.

    2000-08-15

    A hollow waveguide with a uniform cross section may be used for accelerating charged particles if the phase velocity of an accelerating mode is equal to or less than the free space speed of light. Regular straight hollow waveguides have phase velocities of propagating electromagnetic waves greater than the free-space speed of light. if the waveguide is twisted, the phase velocities of the waveguide modes become slower. The twisted waveguide structure has been modeled and computer simulated in 3-D electromagnetic solvers to show the slow-wave properties for the accelerating mode.

  16. Twisted Yangians of small rank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guay, Nicolas; Regelskis, Vidas; Wendlandt, Curtis

    2016-04-01

    We study quantized enveloping algebras called twisted Yangians associated with the symmetric pairs of types CI, BDI, and DIII (in Cartan's classification) when the rank is small. We establish isomorphisms between these twisted Yangians and the well known Olshanskii's twisted Yangians of types AI and AII, and also with the Molev-Ragoucy reflection algebras associated with symmetric pairs of type AIII. We also construct isomorphisms with twisted Yangians in Drinfeld's original presentation.

  17. A Transformation Called "Twist"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hwang, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    The transformations found in secondary mathematics curriculum are typically limited to stretches and translations (e.g., ACARA, 2010). Advanced students may find the transformation, twist, to be of further interest. As most available resources are written for professional-level readers, this article is intended to be an introduction accessible to…

  18. An Atomistic Modeling Study of Alloying Element Impurity Element, and Transmutation Products on the cohesion of A Nickel E5 {l_brace}001{r_brace} Twist Grain Boundary

    SciTech Connect

    G.A. Young Jr.; R. Najafabadi; W. Strohmayer; D.G. Baldrey; B. Hamm; J. Harris; J. Sticht; E. Wimmer

    2003-06-16

    Atomistic modeling methods were employed to investigate the effects of impurity elements on the metallurgy, irradiation embrittlement, and environmentally assisted cracking of nickel-base alloys exposed to nuclear environments. Calculations were performed via ab initio atomistic modeling methods to ensure the accuracy and reliability of the results. A Griffith-type fracture criterion was used to quantitatively assess the effect of elements or element pairs on the grain boundary cohesive strength. In order of most embrittling to most strengthening, the elements are ranked as: He, Li, S, H, C, Zr, P, Fe, Mn, Nb, Cr, and B. Helium is strongly embrittling (-2.04 eV/atom lowering of the Griffith energy), phosphorus has little effect on the grain boundary (0.1 eV/atom), and boron offers appreciable strengthening (1.03 eV/atom increase in the Griffith energy). Calculations for pairs of elements (H-Li, H-B, H-C, H-P, and H-S) show little interaction on the grain boundary cohesive energy, so that for the conditions studied, linear superposition of elemental effects is a good approximation. These calculations help explain metallurgical effects (e.g. why boron can strengthen grain boundaries), irradiation embrittlement (e.g. how boron transmutation results in grain boundary embrittlement), as well as how grain boundary impurity elements can affect environmentally assisted cracking (i.e. low temperature crack propagation and stress corrosion cracking) of nickel-base alloys.

  19. Twisted aspirin crystals.

    PubMed

    Cui, Xiaoyan; Rohl, Andrew L; Shtukenberg, Alexander; Kahr, Bart

    2013-03-01

    Banded spherulites of aspirin have been crystallized from the melt in the presence of salicylic acid either generated from aspirin decomposition or added deliberately (2.6-35.9 mol %). Scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis, and optical polarimetry show that the spherulites are composed of helicoidal crystallites twisted along the <010> growth directions. Mueller matrix imaging reveals radial oscillations in not only linear birefringence, but also circular birefringence, whose origin is explained through slight (∼1.3°) but systematic splaying of individual lamellae in the film. Strain associated with the replacement of aspirin molecules by salicylic acid molecules in the crystal structure is computed to be large enough to work as the driving force for the twisting of crystallites. PMID:23425247

  20. Adaptive continuous twisting algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, Jaime A.; Negrete, Daniel Y.; Torres-González, Victor; Fridman, Leonid

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, an adaptive continuous twisting algorithm (ACTA) is presented. For double integrator, ACTA produces a continuous control signal ensuring finite time convergence of the states to zero. Moreover, the control signal generated by ACTA compensates the Lipschitz perturbation in finite time, i.e. its value converges to the opposite value of the perturbation. ACTA also keeps its convergence properties, even in the case that the upper bound of the derivative of the perturbation exists, but it is unknown.

  1. Twisting bilayer graphene superlattices.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chun-Chieh; Lin, Yung-Chang; Liu, Zheng; Yeh, Chao-Hui; Suenaga, Kazu; Chiu, Po-Wen

    2013-03-26

    Bilayer graphene is an intriguing material in that its electronic structure can be altered by changing the stacking order or the relative twist angle, yielding a new class of low-dimensional carbon system. Twisted bilayer graphene can be obtained by (i) thermal decomposition of SiC; (ii) chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on metal catalysts; (iii) folding graphene; or (iv) stacking graphene layers one atop the other, the latter of which suffers from interlayer contamination. Existing synthesis protocols, however, usually result in graphene with polycrystalline structures. The present study investigates bilayer graphene grown by ambient pressure CVD on polycrystalline Cu. Controlling the nucleation in early stage growth allows the constituent layers to form single hexagonal crystals. New Raman active modes are shown to result from the twist, with the angle determined by transmission electron microscopy. The successful growth of single-crystal bilayer graphene provides an attractive jumping-off point for systematic studies of interlayer coupling in misoriented few-layer graphene systems with well-defined geometry.

  2. Twisting of sheet metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, C. H.; Thuillier, S.; Manach, P. Y.

    2013-12-01

    Twisting of metallic sheets is one particular mode of springback that occurs after drawing of elongated parts, i.e. with one dimension much larger than the two others. In this study, a dedicated device for drawing of elongated part with a U-shaped section has been designed on purpose, in order to obtain reproducible data. Very thin metallic sheet, of thickness 0.15 mm, has been used, so that the maximum length of the part is 100 mm. Two different orientations of the part with respect to the tools have been chosen: either aligned with the tools, or purposefully misaligned by 2°. Several samples were drawn for each configuration, leading to the conclusion that almost no twisting occurs in the first case whereas a significant one can be measured for the second one. In a second step, 2D and 3D numerical simulations within the implicit framework for drawing and springback were carried out. A mixed hardening law associated to von Mises yield criterion represents accurately the mechanical behavior of the material. This paper highlights a comparison of numerical predictions with experiments, e.g. the final shape of the part and the twisting parameter.

  3. Economic Recovery of Oil Trapped at Fan Margins Using High Angle Wells and Multiple Hydraulic Fractures

    SciTech Connect

    Mike L. Laue

    1998-05-29

    This project attempts to demonstrate the effectiveness of exploiting thin-layered, low energy deposits at the distal end of a protruding turbidite complex through use of hydraulically fractured horizontal of high-angle wells. The combination of a horizontal or high-angle well and hydraulic fracturing will allow greater pay exposure than conventional vertical wells while maintaining vertical communication between thin interbedded layers and the well bore.

  4. Development of an engineering level prediction method for high angle of attack aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reisenthel, Patrick H.; Rodman, Laura C.; Nixon, David

    1993-01-01

    The present work is concerned with predicting the unsteady flow considered to be the cause of the structural failure of twin vertical tail aircraft. An engineering tool has been produced for high angle of attack aerodynamics using the simplest physical models. The main innovation behind this work is its emphasis on the modeling of two key aspects of the dominant physics associated with high angle-of-attack airflows, namely unsteady separation and vortex breakdown.

  5. Special Grain Boundaries in Ultrafine-Grained Tungsten.

    PubMed

    Dudka, O V; Ksenofontov, V A; Sadanov, E V; Starchenko, I V; Mazilova, T I; Mikhailovskij, I M

    2016-12-01

    Field ion microscopy and computer simulation were used for the study of an atomic structure high-angle grain boundary in hard-drawn ultrafine-grained tungsten wire. These boundaries with special misorientations are beyond the scope of the coincident site lattice model. It was demonstrated that the special non-coincident grain boundaries are the plane-matching boundaries, and rigid-body displacements of adjacent nanograins are normal to the <110> misorientation axis. The vectors of rigid-body translations of grains are described by broad asymmetric statistical distribution. Mathematical modeling showed that special incommensurate boundaries with one grain oriented along the {211} plane have comparatively high cohesive energies. The grain-boundary dislocations ½<110> were revealed and studied at the line of local mismatch of {110} atomic planes of adjacent grains. PMID:27416905

  6. Special Grain Boundaries in Ultrafine-Grained Tungsten

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudka, O. V.; Ksenofontov, V. A.; Sadanov, E. V.; Starchenko, I. V.; Mazilova, T. I.; Mikhailovskij, I. M.

    2016-07-01

    Field ion microscopy and computer simulation were used for the study of an atomic structure high-angle grain boundary in hard-drawn ultrafine-grained tungsten wire. These boundaries with special misorientations are beyond the scope of the coincident site lattice model. It was demonstrated that the special non-coincident grain boundaries are the plane-matching boundaries, and rigid-body displacements of adjacent nanograins are normal to the <110> misorientation axis. The vectors of rigid-body translations of grains are described by broad asymmetric statistical distribution. Mathematical modeling showed that special incommensurate boundaries with one grain oriented along the {211} plane have comparatively high cohesive energies. The grain-boundary dislocations ½<110> were revealed and studied at the line of local mismatch of {110} atomic planes of adjacent grains.

  7. The control of twisting somersaults.

    PubMed

    Yeadon, Maurice R; Hiley, Michael J

    2014-04-11

    In the takeoff and early flight phase of a twisting somersault, joint coordination is based on feed-forward control whereas in the late stages of the flight phase configuration adjustments are made using feedback control to ensure accurate completion of the movement and appropriate landing orientation. The aim of this study was to use a computer simulation model of aerial movement to investigate the extent to which arm and hip movements can control twist and somersault rotation in the flight phase of a twisting somersault. Two mechanisms were considered for the control of twist in simulated target trampoline movements with flight times of 1.4s. In the first case a single symmetrical arm adduction correction was made using delayed feedback control based on the difference between the twist rate in a perturbed simulation and the twist rate in a target movement comprising a forward somersault with 1½ twists. Final corrections were made using symmetrical arm abduction and hip flexion to adjust the twist and somersault angles. In the second case continual asymmetrical arm adduction/abduction adjustments were used to remove the tilt from a perturbed full twisting backward somersault using delayed feedback control based on twist angle and angular velocity. The first method was able to cope with perturbations to a forward somersault with 1½ twists providing the feedback time delay was less than 200 ms. The second method was able to correct a perturbed full twisting backward somersault providing the feedback time delay was less than 125 ms. PMID:24576588

  8. Transmission Electron Microscopy Study of Strain-Induced Low- and High-Angle Boundary Development in Equal-Channel Angular-Pressed Commercially Pure Aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabibbo, M.; Blum, W.; Evangelista, E.; Kassner, M. E.; Meyers, M. A.

    2008-01-01

    The evolution of the microstructure in a commercially pure aluminum during equal channel angular pressing (ECAP) using route BC was investigated by transmission electron microscopy. Subgrains, or cells, form, which have both high ( ϕ > 15 deg) and low ( ϕ < 15 deg) misorientation. Misorientations and spacings of cell boundaries were determined from about 250 boundaries per pass of ECAP cell boundaries on the basis of Kikuchi patterns and Moiré fringes. The average cell size and misorientation saturate within the first two passes. Misorientations and spacings of high-angle boundaries decrease with the number of passes. After eight passes, the cell size is ≈1.3 μm and the fraction of high-angle boundaries is ≈0.7. The marked differences in the rate of grain structure evolution per pass are linked to differences in the ability of dislocations introduced in new passes to recombine with the existing ones. With increasing ECAP strain, the distribution of misorientations develops strong deviations from the MacKenzie distribution for statistical grain orientation. This is interpreted as a result of the tendency to form equiaxed grains in a textured grain structure.

  9. TWISTED RIBBON FUEL ELEMENT

    DOEpatents

    Breden, C.R.; Schultz, A.B.

    1961-06-01

    A reactor core formed of bundles of parallel fuel elements in the form of ribbons is patented. The fuel ribbons are twisted about their axes so as to have contact with one another at regions spaced lengthwise of the ribbons and to be out of contact with one another at locations between these spaced regions. The contact between the ribbons is sufficient to allow them to be held together in a stable bundle in a containing tube without intermediate support, while permitting enough space between the ribbon for coolant flowing.

  10. Abnormal grain growth in Ni-5at.%W

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witte, M.; Belde, M.; Barrales Mora, L.; de Boer, N.; Gilges, S.; Klöwer, J.; Gottstein, G.

    2012-12-01

    The growth of abnormally large grains in textured Ni-5at.%W substrates for high-temperature superconductors deteriorates the sharp texture of these materials and thus has to be avoided. Therefore the growth of abnormal grains is investigated and how it is influenced by the grain orientation and the annealing atmosphere. Texture measurements and grain growth simulations show that the grain orientation only matters so far that a high-angle grain boundary exists between an abnormally growing grain and the Cube-orientated matrix grains. The annealing atmosphere has a large influence on abnormal grain growth which is attributed to the differences in oxygen partial pressure.

  11. Flight test of the X-29A at high angle of attack: Flight dynamics and controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, Jeffrey E.; Clarke, Robert; Burken, John J.

    1995-01-01

    The NASA Dryden Flight Research Center has flight tested two X-29A aircraft at low and high angles of attack. The high-angle-of-attack tests evaluate the feasibility of integrated X-29A technologies. More specific objectives focus on evaluating the high-angle-of-attack flying qualities, defining multiaxis controllability limits, and determining the maximum pitch-pointing capability. A pilot-selectable gain system allows examination of tradeoffs in airplane stability and maneuverability. Basic fighter maneuvers provide qualitative evaluation. Bank angle captures permit qualitative data analysis. This paper discusses the design goals and approach for high-angle-of-attack control laws and provides results from the envelope expansion and handling qualities testing at intermediate angles of attack. Comparisons of the flight test results to the predictions are made where appropriate. The pitch rate command structure of the longitudinal control system is shown to be a valid design for high-angle-of-attack control laws. Flight test results show that wing rock amplitude was overpredicted and aileron and rudder effectiveness were underpredicted. Flight tests show the X-29A airplane to be a good aircraft up to 40 deg angle of attack.

  12. Calculus of twisted vertex operators

    PubMed Central

    Lepowsky, J.

    1985-01-01

    Starting from an arbitrary isometry of an arbitrary even lattice, twisted and shifted vertex operators are introduced. Under commutators, these operators provide realizations of twisted affine Lie algebras. This construction, generalizing a number of known ones, is based on a self-contained “calculus.” PMID:16593635

  13. Twisted Graphene Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gani, Satrio; Virgus, Yudistira; Rossi, Enrico

    2015-03-01

    Recent advances in fabrication techniques have made possible the realization of graphene nanostructures with atomic precision. Some of the nanostructures realized are completely novel. We study the electronic properties of such novel graphene nanostructures when deposited on two dimensional crystals. In particular we study the case when the two dimensional crystal is graphene, or bilayer graphene. We obtain results for the nanostructure electronic spectrum and find how the spectrum is affected by the coupling between the nanostructure and the two-dimensional substrate. In particular we study how the ``twist'' angle between the graphene nanostructure and the two-dimensional crystal affects the spectrum of the nanostructure. Work supported by ONR-N00014-13-1-0321 and ACS-PRF # 53581-DNI5.

  14. Perversions with a twist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Pedro E. S.; Trigueiros, Joao L.; Trindade, Ana C.; Simoes, Ricardo; Dias, Ricardo G.; Godinho, Maria Helena; de Abreu, Fernao Vistulo

    2016-03-01

    Perversions connecting two helices with symmetric handedness are a common occurrence in nature, for example in tendrils. These defects can be found in our day life decorating ribbon gifts or when plants use tendrils to attach to a support. Perversions arise when clamped elastic filaments coil into a helical shape but have to conserve zero overall twist. We investigate whether other types of perversions exist and if they display different properties. Here we show mathematically and experimentally that a continuous range of different perversions can exist and present different geometries. Experimentally, different perversions were generated using micro electrospun fibres. Our experimental results also confirm that these perversions behave differently upon release and adopt different final configurations. These results also demonstrate that it is possible to control on demand the formation and shape of microfilaments, in particular, of electrospun fibres by using ultraviolet light.

  15. Perversions with a twist.

    PubMed

    Silva, Pedro E S; Trigueiros, Joao L; Trindade, Ana C; Simoes, Ricardo; Dias, Ricardo G; Godinho, Maria Helena; de Abreu, Fernao Vistulo

    2016-01-01

    Perversions connecting two helices with symmetric handedness are a common occurrence in nature, for example in tendrils. These defects can be found in our day life decorating ribbon gifts or when plants use tendrils to attach to a support. Perversions arise when clamped elastic filaments coil into a helical shape but have to conserve zero overall twist. We investigate whether other types of perversions exist and if they display different properties. Here we show mathematically and experimentally that a continuous range of different perversions can exist and present different geometries. Experimentally, different perversions were generated using micro electrospun fibres. Our experimental results also confirm that these perversions behave differently upon release and adopt different final configurations. These results also demonstrate that it is possible to control on demand the formation and shape of microfilaments, in particular, of electrospun fibres by using ultraviolet light. PMID:27025549

  16. Perversions with a twist

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Pedro E. S.; Trigueiros, Joao L.; Trindade, Ana C.; Simoes, Ricardo; Dias, Ricardo G.; Godinho, Maria Helena; de Abreu, Fernao Vistulo

    2016-01-01

    Perversions connecting two helices with symmetric handedness are a common occurrence in nature, for example in tendrils. These defects can be found in our day life decorating ribbon gifts or when plants use tendrils to attach to a support. Perversions arise when clamped elastic filaments coil into a helical shape but have to conserve zero overall twist. We investigate whether other types of perversions exist and if they display different properties. Here we show mathematically and experimentally that a continuous range of different perversions can exist and present different geometries. Experimentally, different perversions were generated using micro electrospun fibres. Our experimental results also confirm that these perversions behave differently upon release and adopt different final configurations. These results also demonstrate that it is possible to control on demand the formation and shape of microfilaments, in particular, of electrospun fibres by using ultraviolet light. PMID:27025549

  17. NanoARPES of twisted bilayer graphene on SiC: absence of velocity renormalization for small angles.

    PubMed

    Razado-Colambo, I; Avila, J; Nys, J-P; Chen, C; Wallart, X; Asensio, M-C; Vignaud, D

    2016-01-01

    The structural and electronic properties of twisted bilayer graphene (TBG) on SiC(000) grown by Si flux-assisted molecular beam epitaxy were investigated using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy with nanometric spatial resolution. STM images revealed a wide distribution of twist angles between the two graphene layers. The electronic structure recorded in single TBG grains showed two closely-spaced Dirac π bands associated to the two stacked layers with respective twist angles in the range 1-3°. The renormalization of velocity predicted in previous theoretical calculations for small twist angles was not observed. PMID:27264791

  18. NanoARPES of twisted bilayer graphene on SiC: absence of velocity renormalization for small angles

    PubMed Central

    Razado-Colambo, I.; Avila, J.; Nys, J.-P.; Chen, C.; Wallart, X.; Asensio, M.-C.; Vignaud, D.

    2016-01-01

    The structural and electronic properties of twisted bilayer graphene (TBG) on SiC(000) grown by Si flux-assisted molecular beam epitaxy were investigated using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy with nanometric spatial resolution. STM images revealed a wide distribution of twist angles between the two graphene layers. The electronic structure recorded in single TBG grains showed two closely-spaced Dirac π bands associated to the two stacked layers with respective twist angles in the range 1–3°. The renormalization of velocity predicted in previous theoretical calculations for small twist angles was not observed. PMID:27264791

  19. Aerodynamic surface distension system for high angle of attack forebody vortex control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zell, Peter T. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A deployable system is introduced for assisting flight control under certain flight conditions, such as at high angles of attack, whereby two inflatable membranes are located on the forebody portion of an aircraft on opposite sides thereof. The members form control surfaces for effecting lateral control forces if one is inflated and longitudinal control forces if both are inflated.

  20. High angle of attack flying qualities criteria for longitudinal rate command systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, David J.; Citurs, Kevin D.; Davidson, John B.

    1994-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate flying qualities requirements of alternate pitch command systems for fighter aircraft at high angle of attack. Flying qualities design guidelines have already been developed for angle of attack command systems at 30, 45, and 60 degrees angle of attack, so this research fills a similar need for rate command systems. Flying qualities tasks that require post-stall maneuvering were tested during piloted simulations in the McDonnell Douglas Aerospace Manned Air Combat Simulation facility. A generic fighter aircraft model was used to test angle of attack rate and pitch rate command systems for longitudinal gross acquisition and tracking tasks at high angle of attack. A wide range of longitudinal dynamic variations were tested at 30, 45, and 60 degrees angle of attack. Pilot comments, Cooper-Harper ratings, and pilot induced oscillation ratings were taken from five pilots from NASA, USN, CAF, and McDonnell Douglas Aerospace. This data was used to form longitudinal design guidelines for rate command systems at high angle of attack. These criteria provide control law design guidance for fighter aircraft at high angle of attack, low speed flight conditions. Additional time history analyses were conducted using the longitudinal gross acquisition data to look at potential agility measures of merit and correlate agility usage to flying qualities boundaries. This paper presents an overview of this research.

  1. Oscillatory growth for twisting crystals.

    PubMed

    Ibaraki, Shunsuke; Ise, Ryuta; Ishimori, Koichiro; Oaki, Yuya; Sazaki, Gen; Yokoyama, Etsuro; Tsukamoto, Katsuo; Imai, Hiroaki

    2015-05-18

    We demonstrate the oscillatory phenomenon for the twisting growth of a triclinic crystal through in situ observation of the concentration field around the growing tip of a needle by high-resolution phase-shift interferometry.

  2. Twisted sectors from plane partitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta, Shouvik; Gaberdiel, Matthias R.; Li, Wei; Peng, Cheng

    2016-09-01

    Twisted sectors arise naturally in the bosonic higher spin CFTs at their free points, as well as in the associated symmetric orbifolds. We identify the coset representations of the twisted sector states using the description of W_{∞} representations in terms of plane partitions. We confirm these proposals by a microscopic null-vector analysis, and by matching the excitation spectrum of these representations with the orbifold prediction.

  3. Twisting Neutron Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pushin, Dmitry

    Most waves encountered in nature can be given a ``twist'', so that their phase winds around an axis parallel to the direction of wave propagation. Such waves are said to possess orbital angular momentum (OAM). For quantum particles such as photons, atoms, and electrons, this corresponds to the particle wavefunction having angular momentum of Lℏ along its propagation axis. Controlled generation and detection of OAM states of photons began in the 1990s, sparking considerable interest in applications of OAM in light and matter waves. OAM states of photons have found diverse applications such as broadband data multiplexing, massive quantum entanglement, optical trapping, microscopy, quantum state determination and teleportation, and interferometry. OAM states of electron beams have been used to rotate nanoparticles, determine the chirality of crystals and for magnetic microscopy. Here I discuss the first demonstration of OAM control of neutrons. Using neutron interferometry with a spatially incoherent input beam, we show the addition and conservation of quantum angular momenta, entanglement between quantum path and OAM degrees of freedom. Neutron-based quantum information science heretofore limited to spin, path, and energy degrees of freedom, now has access to another quantized variable, and OAM modalities of light, x-ray, and electron beams are extended to a massive, penetrating neutral particle. The methods of neutron phase imprinting demonstrated here expand the toolbox available for development of phase-sensitive techniques of neutron imaging. Financial support provided by the NSERC Create and Discovery programs, CERC and the NIST Quantum Information Program is acknowledged.

  4. Robust, nonlinear, high angle-of-attack control design for a supermaneuverable vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Richard J.

    1993-01-01

    High angle-of-attack flight control laws are developed for a supermaneuverable fighter aircraft. The methods of dynamic inversion and structured singular value synthesis are combined into an approach which addresses both the nonlinearity and robustness problems of flight at extreme operating conditions. The primary purpose of the dynamic inversion control elements is to linearize the vehicle response across the flight envelope. Structured singular value synthesis is used to design a dynamic controller which provides robust tracking to pilot commands. The resulting control system achieves desired flying qualities and guarantees a large margin of robustness to uncertainties for high angle-of-attack flight conditions. The results of linear simulation and structured singular value stability analysis are presented to demonstrate satisfaction of the design criteria. High fidelity nonlinear simulation results show that the combined dynamics inversion/structured singular value synthesis control law achieves a high level of performance in a realistic environment.

  5. Reconfigurable flight control for high angle of attack fighter aircraft, with wind tunnel study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddiqui, Bilal Ahmed

    In this work we studied Reconfigurable Flight Control Systems to achieve acceptable performance of a fighter aircraft, even in the event of wing damage to the aircraft at low speeds and high angle of attack, which is typical of many combat maneuvers. Equations of motion for the damaged aircraft were derived, which helped in building simulators. A new methodology combining experimental and numerical aerodynamic prediction was proposed and implemented. For this a wind-tunnel study of a similar configuration was carried out to study the aerodynamics at low speeds and high angle of attack. A baseline control system for undamaged aircraft was developed, and finally a reconfigurable flight control scheme was implemented to keep the aircraft flyable even after the damage.

  6. Economic Recovery of Oil Trapped at Fan Margins Using High Angle Wells and Multiple Hydraulic Fractures

    SciTech Connect

    Mike L. Laue

    1997-05-30

    The distal fan margin in the northeast portion of the Yowlumne field contains significant reserves but is not economical to develop using vertical wells. Numerous interbedded shales and deteriorating rock properties limit producibility. In addition, extreme depths (13,000 ft) present a challenging environment for hydraulic fracturing and artificial lift. Lastly, a mature waterflood increases risk because of the uncertainty with size and location of flood fronts. This project attempts to demonstrate the effectiveness of exploiting the distal fan margin of this slope-basin clastic reservoir through the use of a high-angle well completed with multiple hydraulic-fracture treatments. The combination of a high-angle (or horizontal) well and hydraulic fracturing will allow greater pay exposure than can be achieved with conventional vertical wells while maintaining vertical communication between thin interbedded layers and the wellbore. The equivalent production rate and reserves of three vertical wells are anticipated at one-half to two-thirds the cost.

  7. Highly Angle-Resolved X-Ray Photoelectron Diffraction from Solid Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamura, K.; Shiraki, S.; Ishii, H.; Owari, M.; Nihei, Y.

    We have carried out the highly angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron diffraction (XPED) measurements by using the input-lens system for restriction of the detection angle. In the input-lens system, high angular resolution and high throughput are accomplished by placing an aperture not on the image plane but on the diffraction plane of electron optics. The aperture sizes (ϕ 4 mm, ϕ 2 mm, ϕ 0.5 mm, ϕ 0.25 mm) correspond to the angular resolutions (± 0.6°, ± 0.3°, ± 0.08°, ± 0.04°) respectively. Highly angle-resolved Ge3d XPED patterns from Ge(111) obtained by the angle-resolving system contain fine structure such as Kikuchi patterns. The fine structure was reproduced by multiple scattering cluster calculations.

  8. Development of a pneumatic high-angle-of-attack flush airdata sensing (HI-FADS) system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitmore, Stephen A.

    1991-01-01

    A nonintrusive high-angle-of-attack flush airdata sensing system was installed and flight tested in the F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle. This system consists of a matrix of 25 pressure orifices arranged in concentric circles on the nose of the vehicle to determine angles of attack and sideslip, Mach number, and pressure altitude. During the course of the flight tests, it was determined that satisfactory results could be achieved using a subset of just nine ports.

  9. Pitch control margin at high angle of attack - Quantitative requirements (flight test correlation with simulation predictions)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lackey, J.; Hadfield, C.

    1992-01-01

    Recent mishaps and incidents on Class IV aircraft have shown a need for establishing quantitative longitudinal high angle of attack (AOA) pitch control margin design guidelines for future aircraft. NASA Langley Research Center has conducted a series of simulation tests to define these design guidelines. Flight test results have confirmed the simulation studies in that pilot rating of high AOA nose-down recoveries were based on the short-term response interval in the forms of pitch acceleration and rate.

  10. Economic Recovery of Oil Trapped at Fan Margins Using High Angle Wells Multiple Hydraulic Fractures

    SciTech Connect

    Mike L. Laue

    1997-10-30

    This project attempts to demonstrate the effectiveness of exploiting thin-layered, low-energy deposits at the distal margin of a prograding turbidite complex through the use of hydraulically fractured horizontal or high-angle wells. The combination of a horizontal or high-angle well and hydraulic fracturing will allow greater pay exposure than can be achieved with conventional vertical wells while maintaining vertical communication between thin interbedded layers and the wellbore. A high-angle well will be drilled in the fan-margin portion of a slope-basin clastic reservoir and will be completed with multiple hydraulic-fracture treatments. Geologic modeling, reservoir characterization, and fine-grid reservoir simulation will be used to select the well location and orientation. Design parameters for the hydraulic-fracture treatments will be determined, in part, by fracturing an existing test well. Fracture azimuth will be predicted by passive seismic monitoring of a fracture-stimulation treatment in the test well using logging tools in an offset well.

  11. High-angle-of-attack yawing moment asymmetry of the X-31 aircraft from flight test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cobleigh, Brent R.

    1994-01-01

    Significant yawing moment asymmetries were encountered during the high-angle-of-attack envelope expansion of the two X-31 aircraft. These asymmetries led to position saturations of the thrust vector vanes and trailing-edge flaps during some of the dynamic stability axis rolling maneuvers at high angles of attack. This slowed the high-angle-of-attack envelope expansion and resulted in maneuver restrictions. Several aerodynamic modifications were made to the X-31 forebody with the goal of minimizing the asymmetry. A method for determining the yawing moment asymmetry from flight data was developed and an analysis of the various configuration changes completed. The baseline aircraft were found to have significant asymmetries above 45 deg angle of attack with the largest asymmetry typically occurring around 60 deg angle of attack. Applying symmetrical boundary layer transition strips along the forebody sides increased the magnitude of the asymmetry and widened the angle-of-attack range over which the largest asymmetry acted. Installing longitudinal forebody strakes and rounding the sharp nose of the aircraft caused the yawing moment asymmetry magnitude to be reduced. The transition strips and strakes made the asymmetry characteristic of the aircraft more repeatable than the clean forebody configuration. Although no geometric differences between the aircraft were known, ship 2 consistently had larger yawing moment asymmetries than ship 1.

  12. Experimental investigation of forebody and wing leading-edge vortex interactions at high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, G. E.; Gilbert, W. P.

    1983-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to assess the vortex flow-field interactions on an advanced, twin-jet fighter aircraft configuration at high angles of attack. Flow-field surveys were conducted on a small-scale model in the Northrop 0.41 - by 0.60-meter water tunnel and, where appropriate, the qualitative observations were correlated with low-speed wind tunnel data trends obtained on a large-scale model of the advanced fighter in the NASA Langley Research Center 30- by 60-foot (9.1- by 18.3-meter) facility. Emphasis was placed on understanding the interactions of the forebody and LEX-wing vortical flows, defining the effects on rolling moment variation with sideslip, and identifying modifications to control or regulate the vortex interactions at high angles of attack. The water tunnel flow visualization results and wind tunnel data trend analysis revealed the potential for strong interactions between the forebody and LEX vortices at high angles of attack. In particular, the forebody flow development near the nose could be controlled by means of carefully-positioned radome strakes. The resultant strake-induced flow-field changes were amplified downstream by the more powerful LEX vortical motions with subsequent large effects on wing flow separation characteristics.

  13. High angle-of-attack aerodynamic characteristics of crescent and elliptic wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandam, C. P.

    1989-01-01

    Static longitudinal and lateral-directional forces and moments were measured for elliptic- and crescent-wing models at high angles-of-attack in the NASA Langley 14 by 22-Ft Subsonic Tunnel. The forces and moments were obtained for an angle-of-attack range including stall and post-stall conditions at a Reynolds number based on the average wing chord of about 1.8 million. Flow-visualization photographs using a mixture of oil and titanium-dioxide were also taken for several incidence angles. The force and moment data and the flow-visualization results indicated that the crescent wing model with its highly swept tips produced much better high angle-of-attack aerodynamic characteristics than the elliptic model. Leading-edge separation-induced vortex flow over the highly swept tips of the crescent wing is thought to produce this improved behavior at high angles-of-attack. The unique planform design could result in safer and more efficient low-speed airplanes.

  14. Linear parameter-varying control of an F-16 aircraft at high angle of attack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Bei

    To improve the aircraft capability at high angle of attack and expand the flight envelope, advanced linear parameter-varying (LPV) control methodologies are studied in this thesis with particular applications of actuator saturation control and switching control. A standard two-step LPV antiwindup control scheme and a systematic switching LPV control approach are derived, and the advantages of LPV control techniques are demonstrated through nonlinear simulations of an F-16 longitudinal autopilot control system. The aerodynamic surface saturation is one of the major issues of flight control in the high angle of attack region. The incorporated unconventional actuators such as thrust vectoring can provide additional control power, but may have a potentially significant pay-off. The proposed LPV antiwindup control scheme is advantageous from the implementation standpoint because it can be thought of as an augmented control algorithm to the existing control system. Moreover, the synthesis condition for an antiwindup compensator is formulated as a linear matrix inequality (LMI) optimization problem and can be solved efficiently. By treating the input saturation as a sector bounded nonlinearity with a tight sector bound, the synthesized antiwindup compensator can stabilize the open-loop exponentially unstable systems. The LPV antiwindup control scheme is applied to the nonlinear F-16 longitudinal model, and compared with the thrust vectoring control approach. The simulation results show that the LPV antiwindup compensator improves the flight quality, and offers advantages over thrust vectoring in a high angle of attack region. For a thrust vectoring augmented aircraft, the actuator sets may be different at low and high angles of attack. Also due to different control objectives, a single controller may not exist over a wide angle of attack region. The proposed switching LPV control approach based on multiple parameter-dependent Lyapunov functions provides a flexible design

  15. Twisted Van der Waals Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gani, Satrio; Rossi, Enrico

    Van der Waals systems formed by two-dimensional (2D) crystals and nanostructures possess electronic properties that make them extremely interesting for basic science and for possible technological applications. By tuning the relative angle (the twist angle) between the layers, or nanostructures, forming the Van der Waals systems experimentalists have been able to control the stacking configuration of such systems. We study the dependence on the twist angle of the electronic properties of two classes of Van der Waals systems: double layers formed by two, one-atom thick, layers of a metal dichalcogenide such as molybdenum disulfide (MoS2), and graphene nanoribbons on a hexagonal boron nitride substrate. We present results that show how, for both classes of systems, the electronic properties can be strongly tuned via the twist angle. Work supported by ACS-PRF-53581-DNI5 and NSF-DMR-1455233.

  16. Polarization twist in perovskite ferrielectrics.

    PubMed

    Kitanaka, Yuuki; Hirano, Kiyotaka; Ogino, Motohiro; Noguchi, Yuji; Miyayama, Masaru; Moriyoshi, Chikako; Kuroiwa, Yoshihiro

    2016-09-02

    Because the functions of polar materials are governed primarily by their polarization response to external stimuli, the majority of studies have focused on controlling polar lattice distortions. In some perovskite oxides, polar distortions coexist with nonpolar tilts and rotations of oxygen octahedra. The interplay between nonpolar and polar instabilities appears to play a crucial role, raising the question of how to design materials by exploiting their coupling. Here, we introduce the concept of 'polarization twist', which offers enhanced control over piezoelectric responses in polar materials. Our experimental and theoretical studies provide direct evidence that a ferrielectric perovskite exhibits a large piezoelectric response because of extended polar distortion, accompanied by nonpolar octahedral rotations, as if twisted polarization relaxes under electric fields. The concept underlying the polarization twist opens new possibilities for developing alternative materials in bulk and thin-film forms.

  17. Polarization twist in perovskite ferrielectrics.

    PubMed

    Kitanaka, Yuuki; Hirano, Kiyotaka; Ogino, Motohiro; Noguchi, Yuji; Miyayama, Masaru; Moriyoshi, Chikako; Kuroiwa, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-01

    Because the functions of polar materials are governed primarily by their polarization response to external stimuli, the majority of studies have focused on controlling polar lattice distortions. In some perovskite oxides, polar distortions coexist with nonpolar tilts and rotations of oxygen octahedra. The interplay between nonpolar and polar instabilities appears to play a crucial role, raising the question of how to design materials by exploiting their coupling. Here, we introduce the concept of 'polarization twist', which offers enhanced control over piezoelectric responses in polar materials. Our experimental and theoretical studies provide direct evidence that a ferrielectric perovskite exhibits a large piezoelectric response because of extended polar distortion, accompanied by nonpolar octahedral rotations, as if twisted polarization relaxes under electric fields. The concept underlying the polarization twist opens new possibilities for developing alternative materials in bulk and thin-film forms. PMID:27586824

  18. ECONOMIC RECOVERY OF OIL TRAPPED AT FAN MARGINS USING HIGH ANGLE WELLS AND MULTIPLE HYDRAULIC FRACTURES

    SciTech Connect

    Mike L. Laue

    2001-09-28

    This project attempts to demonstrate the effectiveness of exploiting thin-layered, low-energy deposits at the distal margin of a prograding turbidite complex through the use of hydraulically fractured horizontal or high-angle wells. The combination of a horizontal or high-angle well and hydraulic fracturing will allow greater pay exposure than can be achieved with conventional vertical wells while maintaining vertical communication between thin interbedded layers and the wellbore. A high-angle well will be drilled in the fan-margin portion of a slope-basin clastic reservoir and will be completed with multiple hydraulic-fracture treatments. Geologic modeling, reservoir characterization, and fine-grid reservoir simulation will be used to select the well location and orientation. Design parameters for the hydraulic-fracture treatments will be determined, in part, by fracturing an existing test well. Fracture azimuth will be predicted by passive seismic monitoring of a fracture-stimulation treatment in the test well using logging tools in an offset well. The long radius, near horizontal well was drilled during the first quarter of 1996. Well conditions resulted in the 7 in. production liner sticking approximately 900 ft off bottom. Therefore, a 5 in. production liner was necessary to case this portion of the target formation. Swept-out sand intervals and a poor cement bond behind the 5 in. liner precluded two of the three originally planned hydraulic fracture treatments. As a result, all pay intervals behind the 5 in. liner were perforated and stimulated with a non-acid reactive fluid. Following a short production period, the remaining pay intervals in the well (behind the 7 in. liner) were perforated. The well was returned to production to observe production trends and pressure behavior and assess the need to stimulate the new perforations.

  19. Quantitative high-angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy for materials science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrova, Rumyana V.

    Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) has been widely used for characterization of materials; to identify micro- and nano-structures within a sample and to analyze crystal and defect structures. High-angle annular dark field (HAADF) STEM imaging using atomic number (Z) contrast has proven capable of resolving atomic structures with better than 2 A lateral resolution. In this work, the HAADF STEM imaging mode is used in combination with multislice simulations. This combination is applied to the investigation of the temperature dependence of the intensity collected by the HAADF detector in silicon, and to convergent beam electron diffraction (CBED) to measure the degree of chemical order in intermetallic nanoparticles. The experimental and simulation results on the high-angle scattering of 300 keV electrons in crystalline silicon provide a new contribution to the understanding of the temperature dependence of the HAADF intensity. In the case of 300 keV, the average high-angle scattered intensity slightly decreases as the temperature increases from 100 K to 300 K, and this is different from the temperature dependence at 100 keV and 200 keV where HAADF intensity increases with temperature, as had been previously reported by other workers. The L10 class of hard magnetic materials has attracted continuous attention as a candidate for high-density magnetic recording media, as this phase is known to have large magnetocrystalline anisotropy, with magnetocrystalline anisotropy constant, Ku, strongly dependent on the long-range chemical order parameter, S. A new method is developed to assess the degree of chemical order in small FePt L1 0 nanoparticles by implementing a CBED diffraction technique. Unexpectedly, the degree of order of individual particles is highly variable and not a simple function of particle size or sample composition. The particle-to-particle variability observed is an important new aspect to the understanding of phase transformations in

  20. Frictional controls on high-angle reverse faulting during compressional basin inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, S. A. F.; Alder, S.; Tesei, T.; Collettini, C.

    2015-12-01

    Large normal faults are often reactivated as high-angle reverse faults during compressional basin inversion. Prevailing models to explain steep reverse slip call upon significant fluid overpressure. Though such models are consistent with some seismological data and field observations from incipient (low-displacement) reverse faults, they remain largely untested in the case of basin-scale faults. We present field and experimental data from the >200 km long Moonlight Fault Zone in New Zealand, an Oligocene basin-bounding normal fault that reactivated in the Miocene as a high-angle reverse fault (present dip angle 65°-75°). Excellent exposures of the fault zone exhumed from c. 4-8 km depth are found in creek sections along the entire strike length. Wall rocks are mainly quartz-albite-muscovite-chlorite schists with a strong foliation that is everywhere sub-parallel to the Moonlight Fault (i.e. dip angle 65°-75°). Although the overall structure of the fault zone changes significantly along strike in response to wall rock composition, the <5 metre thick fault core everywhere contains interconnected layers of foliated cataclasite rich in authigenically-grown chlorite and muscovite/illite. Microstructural evidence suggests deformation in the fault core by a combination of cataclasis, frictional slip along phyllosilicate seams and dissolution-precipitation. Single-direct and double-direct friction experiments were performed with the BRAVA apparatus (INGV, Rome) on saturated wafers (e.g. with intact foliation) of foliated cataclasite at normal stresses up to 75 MPa. The foliated cataclasites have a friction coefficient of <0.25 and negligible frictional healing. In combination with dissolution-precipitation mechanisms, a friction coefficient of <0.25 can account for slip on high-angle reverse faults if accompanied by only moderately high fluid pressures. Our results indicate that friction may be equally as important as fluid pressure during compressional basin inversion.

  1. Influence of SiC grain boundary character on fission product transport in irradiated TRISO fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lillo, T. M.; van Rooyen, I. J.

    2016-05-01

    In this study, the fission product precipitates at silicon carbide grain boundaries from an irradiated TRISO particle were identified and correlated with the associated grain boundary characteristics. Precession electron diffraction in the transmission electron microscope provided the crystallographic information needed to identify grain boundary misorientation and boundary type (i.e., low angle, random high angle or coincident site lattice (CSL)-related). The silicon carbide layer was found to be composed mainly of twin boundaries and small fractions of random high angle and low angle grain boundaries. Most fission products were found at random, high-angle grain boundaries, with small fractions at low-angle and CSL-related grain boundaries. Palladium (Pd) was found at all types of grain boundaries while Pd-uranium and Pd-silver precipitates were only associated with CSL-related and random, high-angle grain boundaries. Precipitates containing only Ag were found only at random, high-angle grain boundaries, but not at low angle or CSL-related grain boundaries.

  2. Magnus effects at high angles of attack and critical Reynolds numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seginer, A.; Ringel, M.

    1983-01-01

    The Magnus force and moment experienced by a yawed, spinning cylinder were studied experimentally in low speed and subsonic flows at high angles of attack and critical Reynolds numbers. Flow-field visualization aided in describing a flow model that divides the Magnus phenomenon into a subcritical region, where reverse Magnus loads are experienced, and a supercritical region where these loads are not encountered. The roles of the spin rate, angle of attack, and crossflow Reynolds number in determining the boundaries of the subcritical region and the variations of the Magnus loads were studied.

  3. Static Roll Characteristics of an SST at High Angle of Attack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirotake, Masashi; Kwak, Dong-Youn; Rinoie, Kenichi; Sunada, Yasuto

    Wind tunnel tests were conducted to investigate static roll characteristics of an SST model at high angles of attack. The Reynolds number based on the mean aerodynamic chord was 6.2×104. Normal force and rolling moment measurements have been done at different roll angles for the cranked arrow wing SST model. Smoke visualizations and Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) measurements were also performed. Force measurement results were compared both with flow visualization pictures and with PIV measurement results. It was shown that the vortex breakdown has strong influences on the static roll characteristics of the cranked arrow wing.

  4. Prediction of forces and moments on finned bodies at high angle of attack in transonic flow

    SciTech Connect

    Oberkampf, W. L.

    1981-04-01

    This report describes a theoretical method for the prediction of fin forces and moments on bodies at high angle of attack in subsonic and transonic flow. The body is assumed to be a circular cylinder with cruciform fins (or wings) of arbitrary planform. The body can have an arbitrary roll (or bank) angle, and each fin can have individual control deflection. The method combines a body vortex flow model and lifting surface theory to predict the normal force distribution over each fin surface. Extensive comparisons are made between theory and experiment for various planform fins. A description of the use of the computer program that implements the method is given.

  5. Side-force alleviation on slender, pointed forebodies at high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, D. M.

    1978-01-01

    A new device was proposed for alleviating high angle-of-attack side force on slender, pointed forebodies. A symmetrical pair of separation strips in the form of helical ridges are applied to the forebody to disrupt the primary lee-side vortices and thereby avoid the instability that produces vortex asymmetry. Preliminary wind tunnel tests at Mach 0.3 and Reynolds no. 5,250,000 on a variety of forebody configurations and on a wing-body combination at angles of attack up to 56 degrees, demonstrated the effectiveness of the device.

  6. Twist does a twist to the reactivity: stoichiometric and catalytic oxidations with twisted tetramethyl-IBX.

    PubMed

    Moorthy, Jarugu Narasimha; Senapati, Kalyan; Parida, Keshaba Nanda; Jhulki, Samik; Sooraj, Kunnikuruvan; Nair, Nisanth N

    2011-12-01

    The methyl groups in TetMe-IBX lower the activation energy corresponding to the rate-determining hypervalent twisting (theoretical calculations), and the steric relay between successive methyl groups twists the structure, which manifests in significant solubility in common organic solvents. Consequently, oxidations of alcohols and sulfides occur at room temperature in common organic solvents. In situ generation of the reactive TetMe-IBX from its precursor iodo-acid, i.e., 3,4,5,6-tetramethyl-2-iodobenzoic acid, in the presence of oxone as a co-oxidant facilitates the oxidation of diverse alcohols at room temperature.

  7. Laminar flow in twisted ducts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kheshgi, Haroon S.

    1993-11-01

    Fully developed flow of an incompressible Newtonian fluid through a duct in which the orientation of the cross section is twisted about an axis parallel to an imposed pressure gradient is analyzed here with the aid of the penalty/Galerkin/finite element method. When the axis of twist is located within the duct, flow approaches limits at low and high torsion, the spatial frequency τ by which the duct is twisted. For small torsion, flow is nearly rectilinear and solutions approach previous asymptotic results for an elliptical cross section. For large torsion, flow exhibits an internal layer structure: a rotating circular-cylinder core with a nearly parabolic axial velocity profile, an internal layer of thickness τ-1 along the perimeter of the largest circular cylinder that can be inscribed in the duct, and nearly quiescent flow outside of the circular cylinder. The maximum rate of swirl in the core of a square duct is found to be at moderate torsion. The primary effect of inertia is an increase in pressure with distance from the axis, due to centrifugal acceleration. When the duct is offset from the axis of twist, inertia leads to one, two, or three primary vortices without apparent bifurcation of steady states, although stability of steady flows is lost beyond detected Hopf points.

  8. "Oliver Twist": A Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cashion, Carol; Fischer, Diana

    This teacher's guide for public television's 3-part adaptation of Charles Dickens's "Oliver Twist" provides information that will help enrich students' viewing of the series, whether or not they read the novel. The guide includes a wide range of discussion and activity ideas; there is also a series Web site and a list of Web resources.…

  9. Universal teleportation with a twist

    PubMed

    Braunstein; D'Ariano; Milburn; Sacchi

    2000-04-10

    We give a transfer theorem for teleportation based on twisting the entanglement measurement. This allows one to say what local unitary operation must be performed to complete the teleportation in any situation, generalizing the scheme to include overcomplete measurements, non-Abelian groups of local unitary operations (e.g., angular momentum teleportation), and the effect of nonmaximally entangled resources.

  10. Mathematical modeling of the aerodynamics of high-angle-of-attack maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schiff, L. B.; Tobak, M.; Malcolm, G. N.

    1980-01-01

    This paper is a review of the current state of aerodynamic mathematical modeling for aircraft motions at high angles of attack. The mathematical model serves to define a set of characteristic motions from whose known aerodynamic responses the aerodynamic response to an arbitrary high angle-of-attack flight maneuver can be predicted. Means are explored of obtaining stability parameter information in terms of the characteristic motions, whether by wind-tunnel experiments, computational methods, or by parameter-identification methods applied to flight-test data. A rationale is presented for selecting and verifying the aerodynamic mathematical model at the lowest necessary level of complexity. Experimental results describing the wing-rock phenomenon are shown to be accommodated within the most recent mathematical model by admitting the existence of aerodynamic hysteresis in the steady-state variation of the rolling moment with roll angle. Interpretation of the experimental results in terms of bifurcation theory reveals the general conditions under which aerodynamic hysteresis must exist.

  11. Full-scale high angle-of-attack tests of an F/A-18

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyn, Larry A.; Lanser, Wendy R.; James, Kevin D.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of high angle-of-attack tests of a full-scale F/A-18 in the 80- by 120-Foot Wind Tunnel of the National Full-Scale Aerodynamic Complex at NASA Ames Research Center at Moffett Field, California. A production aircraft was tested over an angle-of-attack range of 18 to 50 deg and at wind speeds of up to 100 knots. These tests had three primary test objectives. Pneumatic and mechanical forebody flow control devices were tested at full-scale and shown to produce significant yawing moments for lateral control of the aircraft at high angles of attack. Mass flow requirements for the pneumatic system were found to scale with freestream density and speed rather than freestream dynamic pressure. Detailed measurements of the pressures buffeting the vertical tail were made and spatial variations in the buffeting frequency were found. The LEX fence was found to have a significant effect on the frequency distribution on the outboard surface of the vertical fin. In addition to the above measurements, an extensive set of data was acquired for the validation of computational fluid dynamics codes and for comparison with flight test and small-scale wind tunnel test results.

  12. Twist: a molecular target in cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Khan, Md Asaduzzaman; Chen, Han-chun; Zhang, Dianzheng; Fu, Junjiang

    2013-10-01

    Twist, the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor, is involved in the process of epithelial to mesenchymal transitions (EMTs), which play an essential role in cancer metastasis. Overexpression of Twist or its promoter methylation is a common scenario in metastatic carcinomas. Twist is activated by a variety of signal transduction pathways, including Akt, signal transducer and activator of transcription 3, mitogen-activated protein kinase, Ras, and Wnt signaling. Activated Twist upregulates N-cadherin and downregulates E-cadherin, which are the hallmarks of EMT. Moreover, Twist plays an important role in some physiological processes involved in metastasis, like angiogenesis, invadopodia, extravasation, and chromosomal instability. Twist also protects cancer cells from apoptotic cell death. In addition, Twist is responsible for the stemness of cancer cells and the generation of drug resistance. Recently, targeting Twist has gained significant interests in cancer therapeutics. The inactivation of Twist by small RNA technology or chemotherapeutic approach has been proved successful. Moreover, several inhibitors which are antagonistic to the upstream or downstream molecules of Twist signaling pathways have also been identified. Development of potential treatment strategies by targeting Twist has a great promise in cancer therapeutics.

  13. Endothelial TWIST1 Promotes Pathological Ocular Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jie; Liu, Chi-Hsiu; Sun, Ye; Gong, Yan; Fu, Zhongjie; Evans, Lucy P.; Tian, Katherine T.; Juan, Aimee M.; Hurst, Christian G.; Mammoto, Akiko; Chen, Jing

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Pathological neovessel formation impacts many blinding vascular eye diseases. Identification of molecular signatures distinguishing pathological neovascularization from normal quiescent vessels is critical for developing new interventions. Twist-related protein 1 (TWIST1) is a transcription factor important in tumor and pulmonary angiogenesis. This study investigated the potential role of TWIST1 in modulating pathological ocular angiogenesis in mice. Methods. Twist1 expression and localization were analyzed in a mouse model of oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR). Pathological ocular angiogenesis in Tie2-driven conditional Twist1 knockout mice were evaluated in both OIR and laser-induced choroidal neovascularization models. In addition, the effects of TWIST1 on angiogenesis and endothelial cell function were analyzed in sprouting assays of aortic rings and choroidal explants isolated from Twist1 knockout mice, and in human retinal microvascular endothelial cells treated with TWIST1 small interfering RNA (siRNA). Results. TWIST1 is highly enriched in pathological neovessels in OIR retinas. Conditional Tie2-driven depletion of Twist1 significantly suppressed pathological neovessels in OIR without impacting developmental retinal angiogenesis. In a laser-induced choroidal neovascularization model, Twist1 deficiency also resulted in significantly smaller lesions with decreased vascular leakage. In addition, loss of Twist1 significantly decreased vascular sprouting in both aortic ring and choroid explants. Knockdown of TWIST1 in endothelial cells led to dampened expression of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) and decreased endothelial cell proliferation. Conclusions. Our study suggests that TWIST1 is a novel regulator of pathologic ocular angiogenesis and may represent a new molecular target for developing potential therapeutic treatments to suppress pathological neovascularization in vascular eye diseases. PMID:25414194

  14. Polarization twist in perovskite ferrielectrics

    PubMed Central

    Kitanaka, Yuuki; Hirano, Kiyotaka; Ogino, Motohiro; Noguchi, Yuji; Miyayama, Masaru; Moriyoshi, Chikako; Kuroiwa, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-01

    Because the functions of polar materials are governed primarily by their polarization response to external stimuli, the majority of studies have focused on controlling polar lattice distortions. In some perovskite oxides, polar distortions coexist with nonpolar tilts and rotations of oxygen octahedra. The interplay between nonpolar and polar instabilities appears to play a crucial role, raising the question of how to design materials by exploiting their coupling. Here, we introduce the concept of ‘polarization twist’, which offers enhanced control over piezoelectric responses in polar materials. Our experimental and theoretical studies provide direct evidence that a ferrielectric perovskite exhibits a large piezoelectric response because of extended polar distortion, accompanied by nonpolar octahedral rotations, as if twisted polarization relaxes under electric fields. The concept underlying the polarization twist opens new possibilities for developing alternative materials in bulk and thin-film forms. PMID:27586824

  15. A review of some Reynolds number effects related to bodies at high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polhamus, E. C.

    1984-01-01

    A review of some effects of Reynolds number on selected aerodynamic characteristics of two- and three-dimensional bodies of various cross sections in relation to fuselages at high angles of attack at subsonic and transonic speeds is presented. Emphasis is placed on the Reynolds number ranges above the subcritical and angles of attack where lee side vortex flow or unsteady wake type flows predominate. Lists of references, arranged in subject categories, are presented with emphasis on those which include data over a reasonable Reynolds number range. Selected Reynolds number data representative of various aerodynamic flows around bodies are presented and analyzed and some effects of these flows on fuselage aerodynamic parameters are discussed.

  16. A study of roll attractor and wing rock of delta wings at high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niranjana, T.; Rao, D. M.; Pamadi, Bandu N.

    1993-01-01

    Wing rock is a high angle of attack dynamic phenomenon of limited cycle motion predominantly in roll. The wing rock is one of the limitations to combat effectiveness of the fighter aircraft. Roll Attractor is the steady state or equilibrium trim angle (phi(sub trim)) attained by the free-to-roll model, held at some angle of attack, and released form rest at a given initial roll (bank) angle (phi(sub O)). Multiple roll attractors are attained at different trim angles depending on initial roll angle. The test facility (Vigyan's low speed wind tunnel) and experimental work is presented here along with mathematical modelling of roll attractor phenomenon and analysis and comparison of predictions with experimental data.

  17. Simulating Effects of High Angle of Attack on Turbofan Engine Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Yuan; Claus, Russell W.; Litt, Jonathan S.; Guo, Ten-Huei

    2013-01-01

    A method of investigating the effects of high angle of attack (AOA) flight on turbofan engine performance is presented. The methodology involves combining a suite of diverse simulation tools. Three-dimensional, steady-state computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software is used to model the change in performance of a commercial aircraft-type inlet and fan geometry due to various levels of AOA. Parallel compressor theory is then applied to assimilate the CFD data with a zero-dimensional, nonlinear, dynamic turbofan engine model. The combined model shows that high AOA operation degrades fan performance and, thus, negatively impacts compressor stability margins and engine thrust. In addition, the engine response to high AOA conditions is shown to be highly dependent upon the type of control system employed.

  18. Wing-alone aerodynamic characteristics for high angles of attack of supersonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stallings, R. L., Jr.; Lamb, M.

    1981-01-01

    An experiment was conducted to determine wing-alone supersonic aerodynamic characteristics at high angles of attack. The wings tested varied in aspect ratio from 0.5 to 4.0 and in taper ratio from 0 to 1.0. The wings were tested at angles of attack ranging rom -5 deg to 60 deg and at Mach number from 1.60 to 4.60. The aerodynamic characteristics were obtained by integrating local pressures measured over the wing surfaces. Presented and discussed are results showing the effects of aspect ratio, taper ratio, Mach number, and angle of attack on force and moment coefficients and center of pressure locations. Also included are tabulations of the pressure measurements.

  19. Towards weighing individual atoms by high-angle scattering of electrons.

    PubMed

    Argentero, G; Mangler, C; Kotakoski, J; Eder, F R; Meyer, J C

    2015-04-01

    We consider theoretically the energy loss of electrons scattered to high angles when assuming that the primary beam can be limited to a single atom. We discuss the possibility of identifying the isotopes of light elements and of extracting information about phonons in this signal. The energy loss is related to the mass of the much heavier nucleus, and is spread out due to atomic vibrations. Importantly, while the width of the broadening is much larger than the energy separation of isotopes, only the shift in the peak positions must be detected if the beam is limited to a single atom. We conclude that the experimental case will be challenging but is not excluded by the physical principles as far as considered here. Moreover, the initial experiments demonstrate that the separation of gold and carbon based on a signal that is related to their mass, rather than their atomic number.

  20. Unscrambling Mixed Elements using High Angle Annular Dark Field Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Bos, Karel H. W.; De Backer, Annick; Martinez, Gerardo T.; Winckelmans, Naomi; Bals, Sara; Nellist, Peter D.; Van Aert, Sandra

    2016-06-01

    The development of new nanocrystals with outstanding physicochemical properties requires a full three-dimensional (3D) characterization at the atomic scale. For homogeneous nanocrystals, counting the number of atoms in each atomic column from high angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy images has been shown to be a successful technique to get access to this 3D information. However, technologically important nanostructures often consist of more than one chemical element. In order to extend atom counting to heterogeneous materials, a new atomic lensing model is presented. This model takes dynamical electron diffraction into account and opens up new possibilities for unraveling the 3D composition at the atomic scale. Here, the method is applied to determine the 3D structure of Au@Ag core-shell nanorods, but it is applicable to a wide range of heterogeneous complex nanostructures.

  1. Aerodynamic characteristics of two general aviation canard configurations at high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chambers, J. R.; Yip, L. P.

    1984-01-01

    The results of wind tunnel tests of two propeller driven canard general aviation aircraft models at high angles of attack are reported. Both tractor and pusher prop configurations were examined. Angles of attack of -6 to 40 deg were used with the pusher model at Re of 1,600,000, and from -30 to 90 deg and Re of 550,000 for the tractor model. The tests showed that the canard would stall long before the wing and produce a nose-down tendency, thus effectively keeping the aircraft out of the stall regime. However, a sequence of pilot actions or design factors such as the airfoils, relative geometry of the canard and wing, the propeller location and the center of gravity location could introduce a wide variance in stall characteristics from one aircraft to another.

  2. Unscrambling Mixed Elements using High Angle Annular Dark Field Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy.

    PubMed

    van den Bos, Karel H W; De Backer, Annick; Martinez, Gerardo T; Winckelmans, Naomi; Bals, Sara; Nellist, Peter D; Van Aert, Sandra

    2016-06-17

    The development of new nanocrystals with outstanding physicochemical properties requires a full three-dimensional (3D) characterization at the atomic scale. For homogeneous nanocrystals, counting the number of atoms in each atomic column from high angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy images has been shown to be a successful technique to get access to this 3D information. However, technologically important nanostructures often consist of more than one chemical element. In order to extend atom counting to heterogeneous materials, a new atomic lensing model is presented. This model takes dynamical electron diffraction into account and opens up new possibilities for unraveling the 3D composition at the atomic scale. Here, the method is applied to determine the 3D structure of Au@Ag core-shell nanorods, but it is applicable to a wide range of heterogeneous complex nanostructures.

  3. Numerical simulation of vortical flow over an elliptical-body missile at high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newsome, R. N.; Adams, M. S.

    1986-01-01

    Numerical solutions to the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations are given for the flow about an elliptical body missile (3:1 ellipse) at a Mach number of 2.5 and a unit Reynolds number of 6.56 x 10 to the 6th/m. At high angles of attack, the flow is dominated by large-scale free vortices which occur in the lee-side flow field due to crossflow boundary-layer separation. Emphasis is focused on the accurate prediction of the lee-side vortical flow. Solutions are presented for both symmetric and asymmetric (body rolled 45 deg) configurations at 10 deg and 20 deg angle of attack. The computed results are compared with experimental surface pressure coefficients and vapor-screen photographs. Excellent agreement is obtained in all cases.

  4. High-angle light scattering to determine the optical fiber core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Świrniak, Grzegorz

    2015-06-01

    The aim of the paper is to discuss the possibility of non-invasive sizing of a step-index optical fiber with the use of a beam of light of low temporal coherence. For this purpose we examine the angular profile of light scattered from the fiber at a high angle. The scattered pattern comprises chiefly two coupled, twin rainbows and depends on the fiber physical characteristics, i.e. its dimensions, shape, and refractive index profile. In order to find a causal link between the scattering pattern and the fiber morphology, a spectral analysis (Fast Fourier Transform, FFT) is performed over the scattering intensity. From the spectral data, the core diameter of a step-index optical fiber is extracted inversely.

  5. New twist on artificial muscles

    PubMed Central

    Haines, Carter S.; Li, Na; Spinks, Geoffrey M.; Aliev, Ali E.; Di, Jiangtao; Baughman, Ray H.

    2016-01-01

    Lightweight artificial muscle fibers that can match the large tensile stroke of natural muscles have been elusive. In particular, low stroke, limited cycle life, and inefficient energy conversion have combined with high cost and hysteretic performance to restrict practical use. In recent years, a new class of artificial muscles, based on highly twisted fibers, has emerged that can deliver more than 2,000 J/kg of specific work during muscle contraction, compared with just 40 J/kg for natural muscle. Thermally actuated muscles made from ordinary polymer fibers can deliver long-life, hysteresis-free tensile strokes of more than 30% and torsional actuation capable of spinning a paddle at speeds of more than 100,000 rpm. In this perspective, we explore the mechanisms and potential applications of present twisted fiber muscles and the future opportunities and challenges for developing twisted muscles having improved cycle rates, efficiencies, and functionality. We also demonstrate artificial muscle sewing threads and textiles and coiled structures that exhibit nearly unlimited actuation strokes. In addition to robotics and prosthetics, future applications include smart textiles that change breathability in response to temperature and moisture and window shutters that automatically open and close to conserve energy. PMID:27671626

  6. Twisted complex superfluids in optical lattices.

    PubMed

    Jürgensen, Ole; Sengstock, Klaus; Lühmann, Dirk-Sören

    2015-09-08

    We show that correlated pair tunneling drives a phase transition to a twisted superfluid with a complex order parameter. This unconventional superfluid phase spontaneously breaks the time-reversal symmetry and is characterized by a twisting of the complex phase angle between adjacent lattice sites. We discuss the entire phase diagram of the extended Bose-Hubbard model for a honeycomb optical lattice showing a multitude of quantum phases including twisted superfluids, pair superfluids, supersolids and twisted supersolids. Furthermore, we show that the nearest-neighbor interactions lead to a spontaneous breaking of the inversion symmetry of the lattice and give rise to dimerized density-wave insulators, where particles are delocalized on dimers. For two components, we find twisted superfluid phases with strong correlations between the species already for surprisingly small pair-tunneling amplitudes. Interestingly, this ground state shows an infinite degeneracy ranging continuously from a supersolid to a twisted superfluid.

  7. Twisted complex superfluids in optical lattices

    PubMed Central

    Jürgensen, Ole; Sengstock, Klaus; Lühmann, Dirk-Sören

    2015-01-01

    We show that correlated pair tunneling drives a phase transition to a twisted superfluid with a complex order parameter. This unconventional superfluid phase spontaneously breaks the time-reversal symmetry and is characterized by a twisting of the complex phase angle between adjacent lattice sites. We discuss the entire phase diagram of the extended Bose—Hubbard model for a honeycomb optical lattice showing a multitude of quantum phases including twisted superfluids, pair superfluids, supersolids and twisted supersolids. Furthermore, we show that the nearest-neighbor interactions lead to a spontaneous breaking of the inversion symmetry of the lattice and give rise to dimerized density-wave insulators, where particles are delocalized on dimers. For two components, we find twisted superfluid phases with strong correlations between the species already for surprisingly small pair-tunneling amplitudes. Interestingly, this ground state shows an infinite degeneracy ranging continuously from a supersolid to a twisted superfluid. PMID:26345721

  8. Twisted complex superfluids in optical lattices.

    PubMed

    Jürgensen, Ole; Sengstock, Klaus; Lühmann, Dirk-Sören

    2015-01-01

    We show that correlated pair tunneling drives a phase transition to a twisted superfluid with a complex order parameter. This unconventional superfluid phase spontaneously breaks the time-reversal symmetry and is characterized by a twisting of the complex phase angle between adjacent lattice sites. We discuss the entire phase diagram of the extended Bose-Hubbard model for a honeycomb optical lattice showing a multitude of quantum phases including twisted superfluids, pair superfluids, supersolids and twisted supersolids. Furthermore, we show that the nearest-neighbor interactions lead to a spontaneous breaking of the inversion symmetry of the lattice and give rise to dimerized density-wave insulators, where particles are delocalized on dimers. For two components, we find twisted superfluid phases with strong correlations between the species already for surprisingly small pair-tunneling amplitudes. Interestingly, this ground state shows an infinite degeneracy ranging continuously from a supersolid to a twisted superfluid. PMID:26345721

  9. The Twist Box Domain is Required for Twist1-induced Prostate Cancer Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Gajula, Rajendra P.; Chettiar, Sivarajan T.; Williams, Russell D.; Thiyagarajan, Saravanan; Kato, Yoshinori; Aziz, Khaled; Wang, Ruoqi; Gandhi, Nishant; Wild, Aaron T.; Vesuna, Farhad; Ma, Jinfang; Salih, Tarek; Cades, Jessica; Fertig, Elana; Biswal, Shyam; Burns, Timothy F.; Chung, Christine H.; Rudin, Charles M.; Herman, Joseph M.; Hales, Russell K.; Raman, Venu; An, Steven S.; Tran, Phuoc T.

    2013-01-01

    Twist1, a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor, plays a key role during development and is a master regulator of the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) that promotes cancer metastasis. Structure-function relationships of Twist1 to cancer-related phenotypes are underappreciated, so we studied the requirement of the conserved Twist box domain for metastatic phenotypes in prostate cancer (PCa). Evidence suggests that Twist1 is overexpressed in clinical specimens and correlated with aggressive/metastatic disease. Therefore, we examined a transactivation mutant, Twist1-F191G, in PCa cells using in vitro assays which mimic various stages of metastasis. Twist1 overexpression led to elevated cytoskeletal stiffness and cell traction forces at the migratory edge of cells based on biophysical single-cell measurements. Twist1 conferred additional cellular properties associated with cancer cell metastasis including increased migration, invasion, anoikis resistance, and anchorage-independent growth. The Twist box mutant was defective for these Twist1 phenotypes in vitro. Importantly, we observed a high frequency of Twist1-induced metastatic lung tumors and extra-thoracic metastases in vivo using the experimental lung metastasis assay. The Twist box was required for PCa cells to colonize metastatic lung lesions and extra-thoracic metastases. Comparative genomic profiling revealed transcriptional programs directed by the Twist box that were associated with cancer progression, such as Hoxa9. Mechanistically, Twist1 bound to the Hoxa9 promoter and positively regulated Hoxa9 expression in PCa cells. Finally, Hoxa9 was important for Twist1-induced cellular phenotypes associated with metastasis. These data suggest that the Twist box domain is required for Twist1 transcriptional programs and PCa metastasis. PMID:23982216

  10. Actuator and aerodynamic modeling for high-angle-of-attack aeroservoelasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brenner, Martin J.

    1993-01-01

    Accurate prediction of airframe/actuation coupling is required by the imposing demands of modern flight control systems. In particular, for agility enhancement at high angle of attack and low dynamic pressure, structural integration characteristics such as hinge moments, effective actuator stiffness, and airframe/control surface damping can have a significant effect on stability predictions. Actuator responses are customarily represented with low-order transfer functions matched to actuator test data, and control surface stiffness is often modeled as a linear spring. The inclusion of the physical properties of actuation and its installation on the airframe is therefore addressed in this paper using detailed actuator models which consider the physical, electrical, and mechanical elements of actuation. The aeroservoelastic analysis procedure is described in which the actuators are modeled as detailed high-order transfer functions and as approximate low-order transfer functions. The impacts of unsteady aerodynamic modeling on aeroservoelastic stability are also investigated in this paper by varying the order of approximation, or number of aerodynamic lag states, in the analysis. Test data from a thrust-vectoring configuration of an F/A-18 aircraft are compared to predictions to determine the effects on accuracy as a function of modeling complexity.

  11. Actuator and aerodynamic modeling for high-angle-of-attack aeroservoelasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brenner, Martin J.

    1993-01-01

    Accurate prediction of airframe/actuation coupling is required by the imposing demands of modern flight control systems. In particular, for agility enhancement at high angle of attack and low dynamic pressure, structural integration characteristics such as hinge moments, effective actuator stiffness, and airframe/control surface damping can have a significant effect on stability predictions. Actuator responses are customarily represented with low-order transfer functions matched to actuator test data, and control surface stiffness is often modeled as a linear spring. The inclusion of the physical properties of actuation and its installation on the airframe is therefore addressed using detailed actuator models which consider the physical, electrical, and mechanical elements of actuation. The aeroservoelastic analysis procedure is described in which the actuators are modeled as detailed high-order transfer functions and as approximate low-order transfer functions. The impacts of unsteady aerodynamic modeling on aeroservoelastic stability are also investigated by varying the order of approximation, or number of aerodynamic lag states, in the analysis. Test data from a thrust-vectoring configuration of an F/A-l8 aircraft are compared to predictions to determine the effects on accuracy as a function of modeling complexity.

  12. Influence of spatial and temporal coherences on atomic resolution high angle annular dark field imaging.

    PubMed

    Beyer, Andreas; Belz, Jürgen; Knaub, Nikolai; Jandieri, Kakhaber; Volz, Kerstin

    2016-10-01

    Aberration-corrected (scanning) transmission electron microscopy ((S)TEM) has become a widely used technique when information on the chemical composition is sought on an atomic scale. To extract the desired information, complementary simulations of the scattering process are inevitable. Often the partial spatial and temporal coherences are neglected in the simulations, although they can have a huge influence on the high resolution images. With the example of binary gallium phosphide (GaP) we elucidate the influence of the source size and shape as well as the chromatic aberration on the high angle annular dark field (HAADF) intensity. We achieve a very good quantitative agreement between the frozen phonon simulation and experiment for different sample thicknesses when a Lorentzian source distribution is assumed and the effect of the chromatic aberration is considered. Additionally the influence of amorphous layers introduced by the preparation of the TEM samples is discussed. Taking into account these parameters, the intensity in the whole unit cell of GaP, i.e. at the positions of the different atomic columns and in the region between them, is described correctly. With the knowledge of the decisive parameters, the determination of the chemical composition of more complex, multinary materials becomes feasible.

  13. A preliminary look at techniques used to obtain airdata from flight at high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moes, Timothy R.; Whitmore, Stephen A.

    1990-01-01

    Flight research at high angles of attack has posed new problems for airdata measurements. New sensors and techniques for measuring the standard airdata quantities of static pressure, dynamic pressure, angle of attack, and angle of sideslip were subsequently developed. The ongoing airdata research supporting NASA's F-18 high alpha research program is updated. Included are the techniques used and the preliminary results. The F-18 aircraft was flown with three research airdata systems: a standard airdata probe on the right wingtip, a self-aligning airdata probe on the left wingtip, and a flush airdata system on the nose cone. The primary research goal was to obtain steady-state calibrations for each airdata system up to an angle of attack of 50 deg. This goal was accomplished and preliminary accuracies of the three airdata systems were assessed and are presented. An effort to improve the fidelity of the airdata measurements during dynamic maneuvering is also discussed. This involved enhancement of the aerodynamic data with data obtained from linear accelerometers, rate gyros, and attitude gyros. Preliminary results of this technique are presented.

  14. Longitudinal-control design approach for high-angle-of-attack aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ostroff, Aaron J.; Proffitt, Melissa S.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes a control synthesis methodology that emphasizes a variable-gain output feedback technique that is applied to the longitudinal channel of a high-angle-of-attack aircraft. The aircraft is a modified F/A-18 aircraft with thrust-vectored controls. The flight regime covers a range up to a Mach number of 0.7; an altitude range from 15,000 to 35,000 ft; and an angle-of-attack (alpha) range up to 70 deg, which is deep into the poststall region. A brief overview is given of the variable-gain mathematical formulation as well as a description of the discrete control structure used for the feedback controller. This paper also presents an approximate design procedure with relationships for the optimal weights for the selected feedback control structure. These weights are selected to meet control design guidelines for high-alpha flight controls. Those guidelines that apply to the longitudinal-control design are also summarized. A unique approach is presented for the feed-forward command generator to obtain smooth transitions between load factor and alpha commands. Finally, representative linear analysis results and nonlinear batch simulation results are provided.

  15. Influence of spatial and temporal coherences on atomic resolution high angle annular dark field imaging.

    PubMed

    Beyer, Andreas; Belz, Jürgen; Knaub, Nikolai; Jandieri, Kakhaber; Volz, Kerstin

    2016-10-01

    Aberration-corrected (scanning) transmission electron microscopy ((S)TEM) has become a widely used technique when information on the chemical composition is sought on an atomic scale. To extract the desired information, complementary simulations of the scattering process are inevitable. Often the partial spatial and temporal coherences are neglected in the simulations, although they can have a huge influence on the high resolution images. With the example of binary gallium phosphide (GaP) we elucidate the influence of the source size and shape as well as the chromatic aberration on the high angle annular dark field (HAADF) intensity. We achieve a very good quantitative agreement between the frozen phonon simulation and experiment for different sample thicknesses when a Lorentzian source distribution is assumed and the effect of the chromatic aberration is considered. Additionally the influence of amorphous layers introduced by the preparation of the TEM samples is discussed. Taking into account these parameters, the intensity in the whole unit cell of GaP, i.e. at the positions of the different atomic columns and in the region between them, is described correctly. With the knowledge of the decisive parameters, the determination of the chemical composition of more complex, multinary materials becomes feasible. PMID:27391526

  16. Bifurcation analysis of nonlinear stability of aircraft at high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hui, W. H.; Tobak, M.

    1982-01-01

    The problem of stability of steady flight of an aircraft flying at high angles of attack subject to finite-amplitude disturbances in pitch is studied using bifurcation theory, taking account of the interactions between the pitching motion and the unsteady flow. The aerodynamic responses to large-amplitude slow oscillations of the aircraft are obtained from that of infinitesimal amplitude case. Increasing the angle of attack past some critical angle for which the damping vanishes, the steady flight becomes unstable and Hopf bifurcation sets in, resulting in a periodic motion. A simple criterion in terms of the aerodynamic coefficients is given for determining the stability of the bifurcating period motion. For supersonic/hypersonic flat plate airfoils the bifurcating periodic motion is found to be unstable. This implies that when the angle of attack is increased past that of neutral damping, there will be drastic changes of the motion of the aircraft from its steady flight condition at the critical angle, including, e.g. hysteresis.

  17. Flow Control and Mechanism for Slender Body at High Angle of Attack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ming, Xiao; Gu, Yunsong

    The wind tunnel experiments for high angle of attack aerodynamics were designed from the inspiration of understanding the mechanism and development of an innovative flow control technique. The side force, varying with the different rolling angle, is featured by bi-stable situation, and can be easily switched by a tiny disturbance. A miniature strake is attached to the nose tip of the model. When the strake is stationary, the direction of the side force can be controlled. When the nose tip strake, as an unsteady control means, is swung the flow pattern could be controlled. The results obtained from dynamic measurements of section side force indicate that when the strake swing at lower frequency the side force can follow the cadence of the swinging strake. With increasing frequency, the magnitude of the side force decreases. At still high frequency, the side force diminishes to zero. The side forces could be also changed proportionally. Based on the experimental factors, the mechanism of the asymmetry is discussed.

  18. Technical Evaluation Report, Part A - Vortex Flow and High Angle of Attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luckring, James M.

    2003-01-01

    A symposium entitled Vortex Flow and High Angle of Attack was held in Loen, Norway, from May 7 through May 11, 2001. The Applied Vehicle Technology (AVT) panel, under the auspices of the Research and Technology Organization (RTO), sponsored this symposium. Forty-eight papers, organized into nine sessions, addressed computational and experimental studies of vortex flows pertinent to both aircraft and maritime applications. The studies also ranged from fundamental fluids investigations to flight test results, and significant results were contributed from a broad range of countries. The principal emphasis of this symposium was on "the understanding and prediction of separation-induced vortex flows and their effects on military vehicle performance, stability, control, and structural design loads." It was further observed by the program committee that "separation- induced vortex flows are an important part of the design and off-design performance of conventional fighter aircraft and new conventional or unconventional manned or unmanned advanced vehicle designs (UAVs, manned aircraft, missiles, space planes, ground-based vehicles, and ships)." The nine sessions addressed the following topics: vortical flows on wings and bodies, experimental techniques for vortical flows, numerical simulations of vortical flows, vortex stability and breakdown, vortex flows in maritime applications, vortex interactions and control, vortex dynamics, flight testing, and vehicle design. The purpose of this paper is to provide brief reviews of these papers along with some synthesizing perspectives toward future vortex flow research opportunities. The paper includes the symposium program. (15 refs.)

  19. A Tail Buffet Loads Prediction Method for Aircraft at High Angles of Attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pototzky, Anthony S.; Moses, Robert W.

    2005-01-01

    Aircraft designers commit significant resources to the design of aircraft in meeting performance goals. Despite fulfilling traditional design requirements, many fighter aircraft have encountered buffet loads when demonstrating their high angle-of-attack maneuver capabilities. As a result, during test or initial production phases of fighter development programs, many new designs are impacted, usually in a detrimental way, by resulting in reassessing designs or limiting full mission capability. These troublesome experiences usually stem from overlooking or completely ignoring the effects of buffet during the design phase of aircraft. Perhaps additional requirements are necessary that addresses effects of buffet in achieving best aircraft performance in fulfilling mission goals. This paper describes a reliable, fairly simple, but quite general buffet loads analysis method to use in the initial design phases of fighter-aircraft development. The method is very similar to the random gust load analysis that is now commonly available in a commercial code, which this analysis capability is based, with some key modifications. The paper describes the theory and the implementation of the methodology. The method is demonstrated on a JSF prototype example problem. The demonstration also serves as a validation of the method, since, in the paper, the analysis is shown to nearly match the flight data. In addition, the paper demonstrates how the analysis method can be used to assess candidate design concepts in determining a satisfactory final aircraft configuration.

  20. Aerodynamic Loads on Tails at High Angles of Attack and Sideslip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polhamus, E. C.; Spahr, J. R.

    1957-01-01

    Results are presented for the loads and moments acting on the individual tail surfaces of a body-tail combination over a wide range of angles of attack and sideslip. The effects of forebody length and panel-panel interference on the characteristics are included. It is shown that large nonlinear variations in these loads and moments, which occur at some combinations of angle of attack and sideslip, cannot be predicted by low-angle theory. A relatively simple, but general, theoretical method for calculating these load and moment characteristics is described, and the results from this method are found to be in good agreement with experiment provided the initial positions of the forebody vortices are known. It is shown that a simple application of slender-body theory can be used to predict the side loads due to sideslip that are contributed by a vertical tail on a wide variety of wing-body-tail combinations at low angles of attack. For several configurations, changes are indicated which reduced the vertical-tail loads per unit yawing moment of each complete configuration at large angles of attack. Some results are presented on the effect of high angle of attack on the induced-flow field and tail loads due to a wing at supersonic speed.

  1. High angle of attack: Forebody flow physics and design emphasizing directional stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravi, R.

    A framework for understanding the fundamental physics of flowfields over forebody type shapes at low speed, high angle of attack conditions with special emphasis on sideslip has been established. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) has been used to study flowfieids over experimentally investigated forebodies: the Lamont tangent-ogive forebody, the F-5A forebody and the Erickson chine forebody. A modified version of a current advanced code, CFL3D, was used to solve the Euler and thin-layer Navier-Stokes equations. The Navier-Stokes equations used a form of the Baldwin-Lomax turbulence model modified to account for massive crossflow separation. Using the insight provided by the solutions obtained using CFD, together with comparison with limited available data, the aerodynamics of forebodies with positive directional stability has been revealed. An unconventional way of presenting the results is used to illustrate how a positive contribution to directional stability arises. Based on this new understanding, a parametric study was then conducted to determine which shapes promote a positive contribution to directional stability. The effect of cross-sectional shape on directional stability was found to be very significant. Broad chine-shaped cross-sections were found to promote directional stability. Also, directional stability is improved if the chine is placed closer to the top of the cross-section. Planform shapes also played an important role in determining the forebody directional stability characteristics. This initial parametric study has been used to propose some guidelines for aerodynamic design to promote positive directional stability.

  2. Twisting Graphene into Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kit, Oleg O.; Tallinen, Tuomas; Mahadevan, L.; Timonen, Jussi; Koskinen, Pekka

    2012-02-01

    Carbon nanotubes are usually described as being rolled up from graphene sheets; this process, however, have never been realized experimentally. We showed that graphene can indeed be transformed into nanotube by twisting [1]. Further, we showed that tube formation can be well-explained within classical theory of elasticity---in fact the very mechanism of tube formation can be observed by twisting a strap from one's backpack (try now!). Furthermore, we showed that nanotube chirality may not only be predicted, but can also be controlled externally. The quantum molecular dynamic simulations at T=300K were achieved thanks to the revised periodic boundary conditions (RPBC) approach [2-3]. The structures similar to simulated have been recently observed experimentally [4]. This novel rote for nanotube formation opens new opportunities in nanomaterial manipulation not restricted to carbon alone. In the presentation, I will describe tube formation, as well as outline the easy and efficient technique for distorted nanostructures simulation, the RPBC approach. [4pt] [1] O. O. Kit et al. arXiv:1108.0048[0pt] [2] P. Koskinen & O. O. Kit PRL 105, 106401 (2010)[0pt] [3] O. O. Kit, L. Pastewka, P. Koskinen PRB 84, 155431 (2011)[0pt] [4] A. Chuvilin et al. Nature Materials 10, 687 (2011)

  3. Application of Piloted Simulation to High-Angle-of-Attack Flight-Dynamics Research for Fighter Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogburn, Marilyn E.; Foster, John V.; Hoffler, Keith D.

    2005-01-01

    This paper reviews the use of piloted simulation at Langley Research Center as part of the NASA High-Angle-of-Attack Technology Program (HATP), which was created to provide concepts and methods for the design of advanced fighter aircraft. A major research activity within this program is the development of the design processes required to take advantage of the benefits of advanced control concepts for high-angle-of-attack agility. Fundamental methodologies associated with the effective use of piloted simulation for this research are described, particularly those relating to the test techniques, validation of the test results, and design guideline/criteria development.

  4. Development of high-angle-of-attack nose-down pitch control margin design guidelines for combat aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogburn, Marilyn E.; Foster, John V.

    1993-01-01

    A broad research program to identify maneuvering requirements for advanced fighters and the corresponding design criteria to aid in making critical design tradeoffs is being conducted under the NASA High-Angle-of-Attack Technology Program (HATP). As part of this activity, NASA and the U.S. Navy are conducting cooperative research to develop high-angle-of-attack control margin requirements. This paper will summarize the status of this program. Following some background information, the simulation study conducted to develop a set of preliminary guidelines for nose-down pitch control is reviewed, and the results of some very limited flight tests are described.

  5. STOUT SMEARING FOR TWISTED FERMIONS.

    SciTech Connect

    SCHOLZ,W.; JANSEN, K.; McNEILE, C.; MONTVAY, I.; RICHARDS, C.; URBACH, C.; WENGER, U.

    2007-07-30

    The effect of Stout smearing is investigated in numerical simulations with twisted mass Wilson quarks. The phase transition near zero quark mass is studied on 12{sup 3} x 24, 16{sup 3} x 32 and 24{sup 3} x 48 lattices at lattice spacings a {approx_equal} 0.1-0.125 fm. The phase structure of Wilson fermions with twisted mass ({mu}) has been investigated in [1,2]. As it is explained there, the observed first order phase transition limits the minimal pion mass which can be reached in simulations at a given lattice spacing: m{sub k}{sup min} {approx_equal} {theta}(a). The phase structure is schematically depicted in the left panel of Fig. I . The phase transition can be observed in simulations with twisted mass fermions, for instance, as a ''jump'' or even metastabilities in the average plaquette value as a function of the hopping parameter ({kappa}). One possibility to weaken the phase transition and therefore allow for lighter pion masses at a given lattice spacing is to use an improved gauge action like the DBW2, Iwasaki, or tree-level Symanzik (tlSym) improved gauge action instead of the simple Wilson gauge action. This has been successfully demonstrated in [3,4,5]. Here we report on our attempts to use a smeared gauge field in the fermion lattice Dirac operator to further reduce the strength of the phase transition. This is relevant in simulations with N{sub f} = 2 + 1 + 1 (u,d,s,c) quark flavors [6] where the first order phase transition becomes stronger compared to N{sub f} = 2 simulations. The main impact of the above mentioned improved gauge actions on the gauge fields occurring in simulations is to suppress short range fluctuations (''dislocations'') and the associated ''exceptionally small'' eigenvalues of the fermion matrix. The same effect is expected from smearing the gauge field links in the fermion action. The cumulated effect of the improved gauge action and smeared links should allow for a smaller pion mass at a given lattice spacing and volume. Our

  6. Stress effects in twisted highly birefringent fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolinski, Tomasz R.

    1994-03-01

    Hydrostatic pressure and uniaxial longitudinal strain effects in twisted highly birefringent optical fibers have been investigated from the point of the Marcuse mode-coupling theory. The problem is analyzed in terms of local normal modes of the ideal fiber and in the limit of weak twist, where large linear birefringence dominates over twist effect, and therefore twist coupling between local modes is not effective. The authors present the results of birefringence measurements in highly birefringent bow-tie fibers influenced simultaneously by hydrostatic pressure up to 100 MPa and twisting the result for highly birefringent elliptical-core fibers influenced by uniaxial longitudinal strain up to 4000 (mu) (epsilon) and twisting effect. The birefringence measurement method is based on twist-induced effects and has been successfully applied in a stress environment. The experiment was conducted with a specially designed stress generating device that makes it possible to simultaneously generate various mechanical perturbations such as hydrostatic and radial pressure, axial strain and twist, allowing study of their influence on mode propagation in optical fibers. A comparison with theoretical results as well as with pervious experimental data on stress influence on the beat length parameter in highly birefringent fibers is also provided.

  7. Twisting of glycosidic bonds by hydrolases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Patterns of scissile bond twisting have been found in crystal structures of glycoside hydrolases (GHs) that are complexed with substrates and inhibitors. To estimate the increased potential energy in the substrates that results from this twisting, we have plotted torsion angles for the scissile bond...

  8. Two-parameter twisted quantum affine algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Naihuan; Zhang, Honglian

    2016-09-01

    We establish Drinfeld realization for the two-parameter twisted quantum affine algebras using a new method. The Hopf algebra structure for Drinfeld generators is given for both untwisted and twisted two-parameter quantum affine algebras, which include the quantum affine algebras as special cases.

  9. Identification of an unsteady aerodynamic model up to high angle of attack regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Yigang

    1997-12-01

    those from references, a state-space model is developed to describe the unsteady aerodynamic characteristics up to the high angle of attack regime. A nondimensional coordinate is introduced as the state variable describing the flow separation or vortex burst. First-order differential equation is used to govern the dynamics of flow separation or vortex bursting through this state variable. To be valid for general configurations, Taylor series expansions in terms of the input variables are used in the determination of aerodynamic characteristics, resembling the current approach of the stability derivatives. However, these derivatives are longer constant. They are dependent on the state variable of flow separation or vortex burst. In this way, the changes in stability derivatives with the angle of attack are included dynamically. The performance of the model is then validated by the wind-tunnel measurements of an NACA 0015 airfoil, a 70sp° delta wing and, finally two F-18 aircraft configurations. The results obtained show that within the framework of the proposed model, it is possible to obtain good agreement with different unsteady wind tunnel data in high angle-of-attack regime.

  10. Domain Wall Motion Across Various Grain Boundaries in Ferroelectric Thin Films

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Marincel, Daniel M.; Zhang, Huairuo; Jesse, Stephen; Belianinov, Alex; Okatan, Mahmut B.; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Rainforth, W. Mark; Reaney, Ian M.; Randall, Clive A.; Trolier-McKinstry, Susan

    2015-03-21

    Domain wall movement at and near engineered 10°, 15°, and 24° tilt and 10° and 30° twist grain boundaries was measured by band excitation piezoresponse force microscopy for Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 films with Zr/Ti ratio of 45/55 and 52/48. A minimum in nonlinear response was observed at the grain boundary for the highest angle twist and tilt grain boundaries, while a maximum in nonlinear response was observed at the 10° tilt grain boundaries. Lastly, the observed nonlinear response was correlated to the domain structure imaged in cross section by transmission electron microscopy.

  11. Domain Wall Motion Across Various Grain Boundaries in Ferroelectric Thin Films

    SciTech Connect

    Marincel, Daniel M.; Zhang, Huairuo; Jesse, Stephen; Belianinov, Alex; Okatan, Mahmut B.; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Rainforth, W. Mark; Reaney, Ian M.; Randall, Clive A.; Trolier-McKinstry, Susan

    2015-03-21

    Domain wall movement at and near engineered 10°, 15°, and 24° tilt and 10° and 30° twist grain boundaries was measured by band excitation piezoresponse force microscopy for Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 films with Zr/Ti ratio of 45/55 and 52/48. A minimum in nonlinear response was observed at the grain boundary for the highest angle twist and tilt grain boundaries, while a maximum in nonlinear response was observed at the 10° tilt grain boundaries. Lastly, the observed nonlinear response was correlated to the domain structure imaged in cross section by transmission electron microscopy.

  12. Comparison of X-31 Flight and Ground-Based Yawing Moment Asymmetries at High Angles of Attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cobleigh, Brent R.; Croom, Mark A.

    2001-01-01

    Significant yawing moment asymmetries were encountered during the high-angle-of-attack envelope expansion of the two X-31 aircraft. These asymmetries caused position saturations of the thrust-vectoring vanes and trailing-edge flaps during some stability-axis rolling maneuvers at high angles of attack. The two test aircraft had different asymmetry characteristics, and ship two has asymmetries that vary as a function of Reynolds number. Several aerodynamic modifications have been made to the X-31 forebody with the goal of minimizing the asymmetry. These modifications include adding transition strips on the forebody and noseboom, using two different length strakes, and increasing nose bluntness. Ultimately, a combination of forebody strakes, nose blunting, and noseboom transition strips reduced the yawing moment asymmetry enough to fully expand the high-angle-of-attack envelope. Analysis of the X-31 flight data is reviewed and compared to wind-tunnel and water-tunnel measurements. Several lessons learned are outlined regarding high-angle-of-attack configuration design and ground testing.

  13. Folded supersymmetry with a twist

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Cohen, Timothy; Craig, Nathaniel; Lou, Hou Keong; Pinner, David

    2016-03-30

    Folded supersymmetry (f-SUSY) stabilizes the weak scale against radiative corrections from the top sector via scalar partners whose gauge quantum numbers differ from their Standard Model counterparts. This non-trivial pairing of states can be realized in extra-dimensional theories with appropriate supersymmetry-breaking boundary conditions. We present a class of calculable f-SUSY models that are parametrized by a non-trivial twist in 5D boundary conditions and can accommodate the observed Higgs mass and couplings. Although the distinctive phenomenology associated with the novel folded states should provide strong evidence for this mechanism, the most stringent constraints are currently placed by conventional supersymmetry searches. Asmore » a result, these models remain minimally fine-tuned in light of LHC8 data and provide a range of both standard and exotic signatures accessible at LHC13.« less

  14. A demonstration of passive blade twist control using extension-twist coupling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lake, Renee C.; Nixon, Mark W.; Wilbur, Matthew L.; Singleton, Jeffrey D.; Mirick, Paul H.

    1992-01-01

    The results from a study aimed at improving the dynamic and aerodynamic characteristics of composite rotor blades through the use of extension-twist coupling are presented. A set of low twist model-scale helicopter rotor blades was manufactured with a view towards demonstrating the passive blade twist control concept. Hover testing of the blades was conducted to measure the change in blade twist as a function of rotor speed. The blades were spun through the 0-800 rpm range, with a corresponding sweep of collective pitch to determine the effect on the blade elastic twist. Hover data were obtained for both a ballasted and unballasted blade configuration in atmospheric conditions, where maximum twist changes of 2.54 and 5.24 degrees were respectively observed. These results compared well with those from a finite element analysis of the blade, which yielded maximum twists of 3.01 and 5.61 degrees for the unballasted and ballasted blade configurations, respectively. The aerodynamic-induced effects on the blade elastic twist, determined by testing a ballasted blade configuration in a near-vacuum condition, were found to be minimal with a maximum twist difference of 0.17 degrees observed between the two test environments. The effect of collective pitch sweep on the elastic twist was minimal.

  15. Simulating Topological Defects in Twisted Fiber Bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruss, Isaac R.; Grason, Gregory M.

    2012-02-01

    Twisted bundles are a common motif found in naturally occurring structures of self-assembled fibers, such as collagen and fibrin. By understanding the general principles governing such organizations, new synthetic materials--from the nano to the macroscale--may also be realized. Recently, continuum elasticity theory has been applied to describe generic twisted fiber bundles. This has revealed a relation between a bundle's twist and the presence of topological defects in the cross-sectional packing of the fibers. Here we employ numerical simulations to examine this interdependence. We model a bundle's cross-section as beads confined to a plane. The interactions between beads is governed by a modified Lennard-Jones potential that accounts for the effects of twist. We observe configurations that range from perfect hexagonal packing for cases of no twist, to defect populated structures above a critical amount of twist. For small bundles of less than ˜100 beads, there exists a discrete spectrum of energy ground states corresponding to integer numbers of five-fold disclinations. For larger bundles, we hope to uncover what types of defect arrangements effectively screen the stresses caused by twist, and compare these to current predictions of the internal organization of collagen fibrils.

  16. DYNAMICS OF STRONGLY TWISTED RELATIVISTIC MAGNETOSPHERES

    SciTech Connect

    Parfrey, Kyle; Beloborodov, Andrei M.; Hui, Lam

    2013-09-10

    Magnetar magnetospheres are believed to be strongly twisted due to shearing of the stellar crust by internal magnetic stresses. We present time-dependent axisymmetric simulations showing in detail the evolution of relativistic force-free magnetospheres subjected to slow twisting through large angles. When the twist amplitude is small, the magnetosphere moves quasi-statically through a sequence of equilibria of increasing free energy. At some twist amplitude the magnetosphere becomes tearing-mode unstable to forming a resistive current sheet, initiating large-scale magnetic reconnection in which a significant fraction of the magnetic free energy can be dissipated. This ''critical'' twist angle is insensitive to the resistive length scale. Rapid shearing temporarily stabilizes the magnetosphere beyond the critical angle, allowing the magnetosphere of a rapidly differentially rotating star to store and dissipate more free energy. In addition to these effects, shearing the surface of a rotating star increases the spindown torque applied to the star. If shearing is much slower than rotation, the resulting spikes in spindown rate can occur on timescales anywhere from the long twisting timescale to the stellar spin period or shorter, depending both on the stellar shear distribution and the existing distribution of magnetospheric twists. A model in which energy is stored in the magnetosphere and released by a magnetospheric instability therefore predicts large changes in the measured spindown rate before soft gamma repeater giant flares.

  17. Emergence of Twisted Flux in Prominence Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, T. J.; Tsuneta, S.; Berger, T. E.; Lites, B. W.

    2012-05-01

    The emergence of twisted flux is a key process for supply of magnetic flux into the corona as well as solar dynamic activities such as sunspot formation and trigger of coronal mass ejections. In particular, there are numerous discussions about the role and necessity of twisted flux emergence for origin of prominences. However, the difficulty to measure vector magnetic fields has not allowed us to investigate the detailed relationship between emerging twisted flux and prominence. Hinode has changed the situation. The Spectro-Polarimeter aboard Hinode has high sensitivity to weaker magnetic fields of fine structures, and provides opportunities to detect weak horizontal magnetic fields. As a result, we have obtained signatures of twisted flux emergence associated with prominences: The observational features are "broadening and narrowing of a region dominated by horizontal magnetic field" and "rotating direction of horizontal field" on the photosphere. Moreover, the data show the interaction between the emerging twisted flux and granules, and that the flux rope has high intrinsic strength 650 G, while the flux density is as low as 100 G. Theoretical research with numerical simulation on the basis of these results is active. In addition, we investigate activities of a coronal cavity overlying a prominence on the limb, and suggest the existence of twisted flux rope to explain the activities of prominence and the coronal cavity comprehensively. Here we introduce both these observational and theoretical results, and discuss the details about emerging twisted flux.

  18. Effect of grain orientation on mechanical properties and thermomechanical response of Sn-based solder interconnects

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Hongtao; Yan, Bingbing; Yang, Ming; Ma, Xin; Li, Mingyu

    2013-11-15

    The thermomechanical response of Sn-based solder interconnects with differently oriented grains was investigated by electron backscattered diffraction technique under thermal cycling and thermal shock testing in this study. The results showed that deformation and cracking of solder interconnects have a close relationship with the unique characteristics of grain orientation and boundaries in each solder interconnect, and deformation was frequently confined within the high-angle grain boundaries. The micro Vickers hardness testing results showed that the hardness varied significantly depending on the grain orientation and structure, and deformation twins can be induced around the indents by the indentation testing. - Highlights: • Thermomechanical response shows a close relationship with the grain structure. • Deformation was frequently confined within the high-angle grain boundaries. • Different grain orientations exhibit different hardness. • Deformation twins can be induced around the indents in SAC105 solder interconnects.

  19. Search for Mechanically-Induced Grain Morphology Changes in Oxygen Free Electrolytic (OFE) Copper

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, Jennifer; /SLAC

    2006-08-18

    The deformation of the microscopic, pure metal grains (0.1 to > 1 millimeter) in the copper cells of accelerator structures decreases the power handling capabilities of the structures. The extent of deformation caused by mechanical fabrication damage is the focus of this study. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) imaging of a bonded test stack of six accelerating cells at magnifications of 30, 100, 1000 were taken before simulated mechanical damage was done. After a 2{sup o}-3{sup o} twist was manually applied to the test stack, the cells were cut apart and SEM imaged separately at the same set magnifications (30, 100, and 1000), to examine any effects of the mechanical stress. Images of the cells after the twist were compared to the images of the stack end (cell 60) before the twist. Despite immense radial damage to the end cell from the process of twisting, SEM imaging showed no change in grain morphology from images taken before the damage: copper grains retained shape and the voids at the grain boundaries stay put. Likewise, the inner cells of the test stack showed similar grain consistency to that of the end cell before the twist was applied. Hence, there is no mechanical deformation observed on grains in the aperture disk, either for radial stress or for rotational stress. Furthermore, the high malleability of copper apparently absorbed stress and strain very well without deforming the grain structure in the surface.

  20. Low-energy, Mobile Grain Boundaries in Magnesium

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiangli; Wang, Jian

    2016-01-01

    The strong basal texture that is commonly developed during the rolling of magnesium alloy and can even increase during annealing motivates atomic-level study of dislocation structures of both <0001> tilt and twist grain boundaries (GBs) in Magnesium. Both symmetrical tilt and twist GBs over the entire range of rotation angles θ between 0° and 60° are found to have an ordered atomic structure and can be described with grain boundary dislocation models. In particular, 30° tilt and twist GBs are corresponding to energy minima. The 30° tilt GB is characterized with an array of Shockley partial dislocations bp:-bp on every basal plane and the 30° twist GB is characterized with a stacking faulted structure. More interesting, molecular dynamics simulations explored that both 30° tilt and twist GBs are highly mobile associated with collective glide of Shockley partial dislocations. This could be responsible for the formation of the strong basal texture and a significant number of 30° misorientation GBs in Mg alloy during grain growth. PMID:26891595

  1. High-angle faults control the geometry and morphology of the Corinth Rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Rebecca; Nixon, Casey; Duclaux, Guillaume; Gawthorpe, Robert; McNeill, Lisa

    2016-04-01

    The Corinth Rift is one of the most actively extending basins on Earth, with modern-day GPS extension rates of up to 15 mm/yr. The structure of the onshore and offshore parts of the rift has been intensely studied, however controversy remains as to the geometry of faults at depth. The rift has long been described as experiencing low-angle (< 30°) active faulting. The presence of an active low-angle detachment has been proposed from an interpreted cloud of microseismicity dipping at 12-20° at depths of 8-11 km. In contrast, others suggest that this microseismicity marks the brittle-ductile transition or that any detachment is incipient, and that low-angle faulting is not required to explain extension across the rift. This has led to an alternative interpretation where faults remain dipping at angles of 45-60°, as observed onshore, to the brittle-ductile transition depth. Other interpretations from seismic reflection data suggest that faults may be non-planar, being high angle at shallow depths (< ~3 km) and then shallowing in dip to 25-45° at greater depths. One observation that the various fault models must be able to honour is the long-term vertical deformation pattern and geomorphology across the Corinth Rift such as: high uplift rates along the southern margin (1-2 mm/yr); offshore basement descending to depths of 3 km; and a northern margin that is generally stable or subsiding. We compute the surface uplift and subsidence for faults of different geometries to assess which deep fault geometries can best recreate the first-order vertical deformation characteristics of the Corinth Rift. Slip rates appropriate for southern margin faults have been applied to model the deformation field over timescales of 1 Ma. We use PyLith, an open-source finite-element code for quasi-static viscoelastic simulations of crustal deformation. We model the uplift and subsidence fields associated with the following fault geometries: i) planar faults with dips of 45-60° that sole

  2. Large-Vortex Capture by a Wing at Very High Angles of Attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, J. M.; Wu, J. Z.; Denny, G. A.; Lu, X. Y.

    1996-01-01

    In generating the lift on a wing, the static stall is a severe barrier. As the angle of attack, alpha, increases to the stall angle, alpha(sub stall) the flow separation point on the upper surface of the wing moves to the leading edge, so that on a two-dimensional airfoil or a large-aspect-ratio wing, the lift abruptly drops to a very low level. Therefore, the first generation of aeronautical flow type, i.e., the attached steady flow, has been limited to alpha less than alpha(sub stall). Owing to the obvious importance in applications, therefore, a great effort has been made in the past two decades to enlarge the range of usable angles of attack by various flow controls for a large-aspect-ratio wing. Basically, relevant works fall into two categories. The first category is usually refereed to as separation control, which concentrates on partially separated flow at alpha less than alpha(sub stall). Since the first experimental study of Collins and Zelenevitz, there has been ample literature showing that a partially separated flow can be turned to almost fully attached by flow controls, so that the lift is recovered and the stall is delayed (for a recent work see Seifert et al.). It has been well established that, in this category, unsteady controls are much more effective than steady ones and can be realized at a very low power-input level (Wu et al.; Seifert et al.). The second and more ambitious category of relevant efforts is the post-stall lift enhancement. Its possibility roots at the existence of a second lift peak at a very high angle of attack. In fact, As alpha further increases from alpha(sub stall), the completely separated flow develops and gradually becomes a bluff-body flow. This flow gives a normal force to the airfoil with a lift component, which reaches a peak at a maximum utilizable angle of attack, alpha(sub m) approx.= 40 deg. This second peak is of the same level as the first lift peak at alpha(sub stall). Meanwhile, the drag is also quickly

  3. Mathematical Modeling of Yarn Dynamics in a Generalized Twisting System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, R.; Tao, X. M.; Xu, B. G.

    2016-04-01

    Twisting is an important process to form a continuous yarn from short fibres and to determine the structure and properties of the resultant yarn. This paper proposes a new theoretical model of yarn dynamics in a generalized twisting system, which deals with two important phenomena simultaneously, that is, twist generation and twist propagation. Equations of yarn motion are established and the boundary value problems are numerically solved by Newton-Raphson method. The simulation results are validated by experiments and a good agreement has been demonstrated for the system with a moving rigid cylinder as the twisting element. For the first time, influences of several parameters on the twisting process have been revealed in terms of twist efficiency of the moving rigid cylinder, propagation coefficients of twist trapping and congestion. It was found that the wrap angle and yarn tension have large influence on the twisting process, and the yarn torsional rigidity varies with the twisting parameters.

  4. Mathematical Modeling of Yarn Dynamics in a Generalized Twisting System

    PubMed Central

    Yin, R.; Tao, X. M.; Xu, B. G.

    2016-01-01

    Twisting is an important process to form a continuous yarn from short fibres and to determine the structure and properties of the resultant yarn. This paper proposes a new theoretical model of yarn dynamics in a generalized twisting system, which deals with two important phenomena simultaneously, that is, twist generation and twist propagation. Equations of yarn motion are established and the boundary value problems are numerically solved by Newton-Raphson method. The simulation results are validated by experiments and a good agreement has been demonstrated for the system with a moving rigid cylinder as the twisting element. For the first time, influences of several parameters on the twisting process have been revealed in terms of twist efficiency of the moving rigid cylinder, propagation coefficients of twist trapping and congestion. It was found that the wrap angle and yarn tension have large influence on the twisting process, and the yarn torsional rigidity varies with the twisting parameters. PMID:27079187

  5. A comparison of baseline aerodynamic performance of optimally-twisted versus non-twisted HAWT blades

    SciTech Connect

    Simms, D A; Robinson, M C; Hand, M M; Fingersh, L J

    1995-01-01

    NREL has completed the initial twisted blade field tests of the ``Unsteady Aerodynamics Experiment.`` This test series continues systematic measurements of unsteady aerodynamic phenomena prevalent in stall-controlled horizontal axis wind turbines (HAWTs). The blade twist distribution optimizes power production at a single angle of attack along the span. Abrupt transitions into and out of stall are created due to rapid changes in inflow. Data from earlier experiments have been analyzed extensively to characterize the steady and unsteady response of untwisted blades. In this report, a characterization and comparison of the baseline aerodynamic performance of the twisted versus non-twisted blade sets will be presented for steady flow conditions.

  6. New twisted intermetallic compound superconductor: A concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coles, W. D.; Brown, G. V.; Laurence, J. C.

    1972-01-01

    Method for processing Nb3Sn and other intermetallic compound superconductors produces a twisted, stabilized wire or tube which can be used to wind electromagnetics, armatures, rotors, and field windings for motors and generators as well as other magnetic devices.

  7. Deformed and twisted black holes with NUTs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krtouš, Pavel; Kubizňák, David; Frolov, Valeri P.; Kolář, Ivan

    2016-06-01

    We construct a new class of vacuum black hole solutions whose geometry is deformed and twisted by the presence of NUT charges. The solutions are obtained by ‘unspinning’ the general Kerr-NUT-(A)dS spacetimes, effectively switching off some of their rotation parameters. The resulting geometry has a structure of warped space with the Kerr-like Lorentzian part warped to a Euclidean metric of a deformed and/or twisted sphere, with the deformation and twist characterized by the ‘Euclidean NUT’ parameters. In the absence of NUTs, the solution reduces to a well known Kerr-(A)dS black hole with several rotations switched off. New geometries inherit the original symmetry of the Kerr-NUT-(A)dS family, namely, they possess the full Killing tower of hidden and explicit symmetries. As expected, for vanishing NUT, twist, and deformation parameters, the symmetry is further enlarged.

  8. Means for controlling aerodynamically induced twist

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elber, W. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A control mechanism which provides active compensation for aerodynamically induced twist deformation of high aspect ratio wings consists of a torque tube, internal to each wing and rigidly attached near the tip of each wing, which is moved by an actuator located in the aircraft fuselage. As changes in the aerodynamic loads on the wings occur the torque tube is rotated to compensate for the induced wing twist.

  9. Grain boundaries

    SciTech Connect

    Balluffi, R.W.; Bristowe, P.D.

    1991-01-01

    The present document is a progress report describing the work accomplished to date during the second year of our four-year grant (February 15, 1990--February 14, 1994) to study grain boundaries. The research was focused on the following three major efforts: Study of the atomic structure of grain boundaries by means of x-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and computer modeling; study of short-circuit diffusion along grain boundaries; and development of a Thin-film Deposition/Bonding Apparatus for the manufacture of high purity bicrystals.

  10. Investigation of Model Wake Blockage Effects at High Angles of Attack in Low-Speed Wind Tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shyu, Lih-Shyng; Chuang, Shu-Hao

    To improve the fidelity of measured aerodynamic characteristics at high angle of attack for modern jet fighters, this paper examines the model wake blockage effect. The wake blockage effect in a 2.2×3.1 m low-speed wind tunnel is investigated by analyzing drag and wall pressure measurements. Circular flat plates of different sizes are used to simulate a test model at high angles of attack. The present analysis results in simple formulas for corrections of model wake blockage effect. To verify the present correction formula, the NASA TP-1803 model is force-tested in the tunnel. The corrected test data agree well with the NASA TP-1803 data.

  11. AEROX: Computer program for transonic aircraft aerodynamics to high angles of attack. Volume 1: Aerodynamic methods and program users' guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Axelson, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    The AEROX program estimates lift, induced-drag and pitching moments to high angles (typ. 60 deg) for wings and for wingbody combinations with or without an aft horizontal tail. Minimum drag coefficients are not estimated, but may be input for inclusion in the total aerodynamic parameters which are output in listed and plotted formats. The theory, users' guide, test cases, and program listing are presented.

  12. Status of the Validation of High-Angle-Of-Attack Nose-Down Pitch Control Margin Design Guidelines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogburn, Marilyn E.; Foster, John V.; Pahle, Joseph W.; Wilson, R. Joe; Lackey, James B.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents a summary of results obtained to date in an ongoing cooperative research program between NASA and the U.S. Navy to develop design criteria for high-angle-of-attack nose- down pitch control for combat aircraft. A fundamental design consideration for aircraft incorporating relaxed static stability in pitch is the level of stability which achieves a proper balance between high- speed performance considerations and low-speed requirements for maneuvering at high angles of attack. A comprehensive data base of piloted simulation results was generated for parametric variations of critical parameters affecting nose-down control capability. The results showed a strong correlation of pilot rating to the short-term pitch response for nose-down commands applied at high- angle-of-attack conditions. Using these data, candidate design guidelines and flight demonstration requirements were defined. Full- scale flight testing to validate the research methodology and proposed guidelines is in progress, some preliminary results of which are reviewed.

  13. Evaluation of importance of lateral acceleration derivatives in extraction of lateral-directional derivatives at high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, L. T.

    1974-01-01

    A theoretical investigation was conducted to determine the importance of the lateral acceleration (beta) derivatives in the extraction of lateral-directional stability derivatives for swept wing airplanes at high angles of attack. Representative values of lateral acceleration derivatives in yaw and roll (Cn beta and Cl beta) were used in a computer program to generate representative flight motions at several angles of attack and altitudes. The computer-generated motions were then subjected to a parameter identification process based on a modified Newton-Raphson method. Two identification techniques were evaluated, one which included the beta derivatives and one which neglected them. The results of the study indicate that omission of the beta derivatives from mathematical models used in the derivative-extraction techniques can produce erroneous values for the lateral-directional stability derivatives particularly at high angles of attack, where the beta derivatives are large. The largest errors occur in the dynamic derivatives, but large errors may also occur in the static derivatives for cases in which the beta derivatives have large effects on the flight motions of the airplane. In addition, the resulting identified mathematical models provide poor motion prediction as well as erroneous predictions of dynamic modal characteristics. These results strongly indicate that the effects of beta derivatives should be considered in any attempt to extract lateral-directional aerodynamic parameters at high angles of attack.

  14. Cometary grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baum, William A.; Kreidl, Tobias J.; Schleicher, David G.

    1992-01-01

    CCD observations of cometary comas in the spectral continuum are reported. Radial brightness profiles of 14 comets and isophotal maps of three are presented. For 10 of the 14, the azimuthally averaged brightness in the vicinity of the nucleus falls off faster than rho exp -1, where rho is the projected radial distance from the nucleus in the plane of the sky. Simple modeling is used to show that radiation pressure alone cannot account for the observed departures from rho exp -1; it is postulated that the grains fade, i.e., decrease in albedo or size, while they glow outward. For only three of the comets no evidence was found of any grain fading at all. Cases with the most rapid grain fading occurred at small heliocentric distances, but so did some of the cases with no fading, from which large intrinsic differences from comet to comet in the nature of the grain population are inferred.

  15. Interstellar grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snow, T. P.

    1986-01-01

    There are few aspects of interstellar grains that can be unambiguously defined. Very little can be said that is independent of models or presuppositions; hence issues are raised and questions categorized, rather than providing definitive answers. The questions are issues fall into three general areas; the general physical and chemical nature of the grains; the processes by which they are formed and destroyed; and future observational approaches.

  16. Non-Abelian vortices with a twist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forgács, Péter; Lukács, Árpád; Schaposnik, Fidel A.

    2015-06-01

    Non-Abelian flux-tube (string) solutions carrying global currents are found in the bosonic sector of four-dimensional N =2 supersymmetric gauge theories. The specific model considered here possesses U(2 ) local×SU(2 ) global symmetry, with two scalar doublets in the fundamental representation of SU(2). We construct string solutions that are stationary and translationally symmetric along the x3 direction, and they are characterized by a matrix phase between the two doublets, referred to as "twist." Consequently, twisted strings have nonzero (global) charge, momentum, and in some cases even angular momentum per unit length. The planar cross section of a twisted string corresponds to a rotationally symmetric, charged non-Abelian vortex, satisfying first-order Bogomolny-type equations and second-order Gauss constraints. Interestingly, depending on the nature of the matrix phase, some of these solutions even break cylindrical symmetry in R3. Although twisted vortices have higher energy than the untwisted ones, they are expected to be linearly stable since one can keep their charge (or twist) fixed with respect to small perturbations.

  17. Twisted electron-acoustic waves in plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aman-ur-Rehman, Ali, S.; Khan, S. A.; Shahzad, K.

    2016-08-01

    In the paraxial limit, a twisted electron-acoustic (EA) wave is studied in a collisionless unmagnetized plasma, whose constituents are the dynamical cold electrons and Boltzmannian hot electrons in the background of static positive ions. The analytical and numerical solutions of the plasma kinetic equation suggest that EA waves with finite amount of orbital angular momentum exhibit a twist in its behavior. The twisted wave particle resonance is also taken into consideration that has been appeared through the effective wave number qeff accounting for Laguerre-Gaussian mode profiles attributed to helical phase structures. Consequently, the dispersion relation and the damping rate of the EA waves are significantly modified with the twisted parameter η, and for η → ∞, the results coincide with the straight propagating plane EA waves. Numerically, new features of twisted EA waves are identified by considering various regimes of wavelength and the results might be useful for transport and trapping of plasma particles in a two-electron component plasma.

  18. Helicoids, wrinkles, and loops in twisted ribbons.

    PubMed

    Chopin, Julien; Kudrolli, Arshad

    2013-10-25

    We investigate the instabilities of a flat elastic ribbon subject to twist under tension and develop an integrated phase diagram of the observed shapes and transitions. We find that the primary buckling mode switches from being localized longitudinally along the length of the ribbon to transverse above a triple point characterized by a crossover tension that scales with ribbon elasticity and aspect ratio. Far from threshold, the longitudinally buckled ribbon evolves continuously into a self-creased helicoid with focusing of the curvature along the triangular edges. Further twist causes an anomalous transition to loops compared with rods due to the self-rigidity induced by the creases. When the ribbon is twisted under high tension, transverse wrinkles are observed due to the development of compressive stresses with higher harmonics for greater width-to-length ratios. Our results can be used to develop functional structures using a wide range of elastic materials and length scales.

  19. Wind-tunnel investigation of the forebody aerodynamics of a vortex-lift fighter configuration at high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Daniel W.

    1988-01-01

    Results of a recent low-speed wind-tunnel investigation conducted to define the forebody flow on a 16-percent scale model of the NASA High Angle-of-Attack Research Vehicle, an F-18 configuration, are presented with analysis. Measurements include force and moment data, oil-flow visualizations, and surface pressure data taken at angles of attack near and above maximum lift (36 to 52 deg) at a Reynolds number of one million (based on mean aerodynamic chord). The results presented identify the key flow-field features on the forebody including the wing-body strake.

  20. Survey of needs and capabilities for wind tunnel testing of dynamic stability of aircraft at high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orlik-Ruckemann, K. J.

    1973-01-01

    A survey was conducted relative to future requirements for dynamic stability information for such aerospace vehicles as the space shuttle and advanced high performance military aircraft. High-angle-of-attack and high-Reynolds number conditions were emphasized. A review was made of the wind-tunnel capabilities in North America for measuring dynamic stability derivatives, revealing an almost total lack of capabilities that could satisfy these requirements. Recommendations are made regarding equipment that should be constructed to remedy this situation. A description is given of some of the more advanced existing capabilities, which can be used to at least partly satisfy immediate demands.

  1. Direct imaging of Guinier-Preston zones by high-angle annular detector dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Konno, T J; Kawasaki, M; Hiraga, K

    2001-01-01

    We report atomic resolution imaging of Cu-planar precipitates in aged Al-Cu alloys, known as Guinier-Preston (GP) zones, by high-angle annular detector dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy. Single layered GP-I zones as small as 2 nm in length were resolved among densely populated GP-I zones, whereas double layered GP zones were clearly identified. The images of GP-II zones showed not only the commonly accepted structure, in which single Cu layers are separated by three Al layers, but also a variant, in which double Cu layers are separated by a single Al layer. PMID:11347711

  2. Viscous shock-layer predictions of three-dimensional nonequilibrium flows past the space shuttle at high angle of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, M. D.; Swaminathan, S.; Lewis, C. H.

    1983-01-01

    Computational solutions were obtained for chemically reacting flowfields over the entire windward surface of the Space Shuttle at high angle of attack. The recently developed computational method for the Space Shuttle is capable of treating three dimensional viscous nonequilibrium air flow as well as equilibrium air and perfect gas flows. A general nonorthogonal computational grid system is used to treat the nonaxisymmetric geometry. Boundary conditions take into account noncatalytic wall, equilibrium with noncatalytic wall condition are compared to the fully catalytic wall solutions, the equilibrium air solutions, the perfect gas solutions, and also the Shuttle flight heating and pressure data. The comparisons show good agreement and correlations in most cases.

  3. Holographically generated twisted nematic liquid crystal gratings

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Hyunhee; Wu, J.W.; Chang, Hye Jeong; Park, Byoungchoo

    2006-01-09

    A reflection holographic method is introduced to fabricate an electro-optically tunable twisted nematic (TN) liquid crystal (LC) grating, forgoing the geometrical drawing. The photoisomerization process occurring on the LC alignment layers of an LC cell in the reflection holographic configuration gives a control over the twist angle, and the grating spacing is determined by the slant angle of reflection holographic configuration. The resulting diffraction grating is in a structure of a reverse TN LC, permitting a polarization-independent diffraction efficiency. The electro-optic tunability of the diffraction efficiency is also demonstrated.

  4. Twisted bi-layer graphene: microscopic rainbows.

    PubMed

    Campos-Delgado, J; Algara-Siller, G; Santos, C N; Kaiser, U; Raskin, J-P

    2013-10-11

    Blue, pink, and yellow colorations appear from twisted bi-layer graphene (tBLG) when transferred to a SiO2 /Si substrate (SiO2 = 100 nm-thick). Raman and electron microscope studies reveal that these colorations appear for twist angles in the 9-15° range. Optical contrast simulations confirm that the observed colorations are related to the angle-dependent electronic properties of tBLG combined with the reflection that results from the layered structure tBLG/100 nm-thick SiO2 /Si. PMID:23606323

  5. Evaluation of High-Angle-of-Attack Handling Qualities for the X-31A Using Standard Evaluation Maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoliker, Patrick C.; Bosworth, John T.

    1997-01-01

    The X-31A aircraft gross-acquisition and fine-tracking handling qualities have been evaluated using standard evaluation maneuvers developed by Wright Laboratory, Wright Patterson Air Force Base. The emphasis of the testing is in the angle-of-attack range between 30 deg. and 70 deg. Longitudinal gross-acquisition handling qualities results show borderline Level l/Level 2 performance. Lateral gross-acquisition testing results in Level l/Level 2 ratings below 45 deg. angle of attack, degrading into Level 3 as angle of attack increases. The fine tracking performance in both longitudinal and lateral axes also receives Level 1 ratings near 30 deg. angle of attack, with the ratings tending towards Level 3 at angles of attack greater than 50 deg. These ratings do not match the expectations from the extensive close-in combat testing where the X-31A aircraft demonstrated fair to good handling qualities maneuvering for high angles of attack. This paper presents the results of the high-angle-of-attack handling qualities flight testing of the X-31A aircraft. Discussion of the preparation for the maneuvers, the pilot ratings, and selected pilot comments are included. Evaluation of the results is made in conjunction with existing Neal Smith, bandwidth, Smith-Geddes, and military specifications.

  6. Evaluation of High-Angle-of-Attack Handling Qualities for the X-31A Using Standard Evaluation Maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoliker, Patrick C.; Bosworth, John T.

    1996-01-01

    The X-31A aircraft gross-acquisition and fine-tracking handling qualities have been evaluated using standard evaluation maneuvers developed by Wright Laboratory, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. The emphasis of the testing is in the angle-of-attack range between 30 deg and 70 deg. Longitudinal gross-acquisition handling qualities results show borderline Level 1/Level 2 performance. Lateral gross-acquisition testing results in Level 1/Level 2 ratings below 45 deg angle of attack, degrading into Level 3 as angle of attack increases. The fine-tracking performance in both longitudinal and lateral axes also receives Level 1 ratings near 30 deg angle of attack, with the ratings tending towards Level 3 at angles of attack greater than 50 deg. These ratings do not match the expectations from the extensive close-in combat testing where the X-31A aircraft demonstrated fair to good handling qualities maneuvering for high angles of attack. This paper presents the results of the high-angle-of-attack handling qualities flight testing of the X-31A aircraft. Discussion of the preparation for the maneuvers, the pilot ratings, and selected pilot comments are included. Evaluation of the results is made in conjunction with existing Neal-Smith, bandwidth, Smith-Geddes, and military specifications.

  7. On Twisting Real Spectral Triples by Algebra Automorphisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landi, Giovanni; Martinetti, Pierre

    2016-08-01

    We systematically investigate ways to twist a real spectral triple via an algebra automorphism and in particular, we naturally define a twisted partner for any real graded spectral triple. Among other things, we investigate consequences of the twisting on the fluctuations of the metric and possible applications to the spectral approach to the Standard Model of particle physics.

  8. On Twisting Real Spectral Triples by Algebra Automorphisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landi, Giovanni; Martinetti, Pierre

    2016-11-01

    We systematically investigate ways to twist a real spectral triple via an algebra automorphism and in particular, we naturally define a twisted partner for any real graded spectral triple. Among other things, we investigate consequences of the twisting on the fluctuations of the metric and possible applications to the spectral approach to the Standard Model of particle physics.

  9. Twisted Pair Of Insulated Wires Senses Moisture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laue, Eric G.; Stephens, James B.

    1989-01-01

    Sensitivity of electronic moisture sensor to low levels of moisture increased by new electrode configuration. Moisture-sensing circuit described in "Low-Cost Humidity Sensor" (NPO-16544). New twisted pair of wires takes place of flat-plate capacitor in circuit. Configuration allows for thermal expansion and contraction of polymer while maintaining nearly constant area of contact between polymer and wires.

  10. Dual frequency twist Cassegrain tracking antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlsson, R.; Karnevi, S.

    1983-10-01

    The development and test results of a dual-frequency twist Cassegrain antenna is presented. In an already existing X-band antenna design a higher-frequency band (Ka) has been integrated without degrading the performance in the X-band. The purpose of this was to obtain a narrower beam for low-flying target application.

  11. The Physics of Somersaulting and Twisting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frohlich, Cliff

    1980-01-01

    This is a discussion of the conservation of angular momentum of the human body engaged in somersaults and twists. The principle is also applied to a cat turning over in midair. The events occur in the absence of torques. Application of the maneuvers are suggested for astronauts. (SA)

  12. Supramolecular sensing: Enzyme activity with a twist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amabilino, David B.

    2015-04-01

    A supramolecular polymer comprising stacked artificial chromophores to which zinc(II) complexes are appended is able to respond to enzymatic hydrolysis in aqueous solution. The assembly of molecules can twist reversibly and quickly in response to changes in the type of adenosine phosphate present.

  13. Self-Portraits with a Twist

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeMarco, Frederick

    2010-01-01

    This article describes an art activity on self-portraiture inspired by artist Tim Hawkinson. Hawkinson created a sculpture titled "Emoter" in which his face, moved by motors, twisted and contorted based on random signals from a TV. This art activity incorporates technology into the art room, brings the work of practicing artists alive, and is a…

  14. Twisted Ribbons: Theory, Experiment and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chopin, Julien; Davidovitch, Benjamin; Silva, Flavio A.; Toledo Filho, Romildo D.; Kudrolli, Arshad

    2014-03-01

    We investigate, experimentally and theoretically, the buckling and wrinkling instabilities of a pre-stretched ribbon upon twisting and propose strategies for the fabrication of structured yarns. Our experiment consists in a thin elastic sheet in the form of a ribbon which is initially stretched by a fixed load and then subjected to a twist by rotating the ends through a prescribed angle. We show that a wide variety of shapes and instabilities can be obtained by simply varying the applied twist and tension. The observed structures which include helicoids with and without longitudinal and transverse wrinkles, and spontaneous creases, can be organized in a phase diagram with the tension and twist angle as control parameters [J. Chopin and A. Kudrolli, PRL (2013)]. Using a far-from-threshold analysis and a slender body approximation, we provide a comprehensive understanding of the longitudinal and transverse instabilities and show that several regimes emerge depending on subtle combinations of loading and geometrical parameters. Further, we show that the wrinkling instabilities can be manipulated to fabricate structured yarns which may be used to encapsulate amorphous materials or serve as efficient reinforcements for cement-based composites. COPPETEC / CNPq - Science Without Border Program

  15. Operator constraints for twist-3 functions and Lorentz invariance properties of twist-3 observables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanazawa, Koichi; Koike, Yuji; Metz, Andreas; Pitonyak, Daniel; Schlegel, Marc

    2016-03-01

    We investigate the behavior under Lorentz transformations of perturbative coefficient functions in a collinear twist-3 formalism relevant for high-energy observables including transverse polarization of hadrons. We argue that those perturbative coefficient functions can, a priori, acquire quite different yet Lorentz-invariant forms in various frames. This somewhat surprising difference can be traced back to a general dependence of the perturbative coefficient functions on light cone vectors which are introduced by the twist-3 factorization formulas and which are frame-dependent. One can remove this spurious frame dependence by invoking so-called Lorentz invariance relations (LIRs) between twist-3 parton correlation functions. Some of those relations for twist-3 distribution functions were discussed in the literature before. In this paper we derive the corresponding LIRs for twist-3 fragmentation functions. We explicitly demonstrate that these LIRs remove the light cone vector dependence by considering transverse spin observables in the single-inclusive production of hadrons in lepton-nucleon collisions, ℓN →h X . With the LIRs in hand, we also show that twist-3 observables in general can be written solely in terms of three-parton correlation functions.

  16. Operator constraints for twist-3 functions and Lorentz invariance properties of twist-3 observables

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kanazawa, Koichi; Pitonyak, Daniel; Koike, Yuji; Metz, Andreas; Schlegel, Marc

    2016-03-14

    We investigate the behavior under Lorentz transformations of perturbative coefficient functions in a collinear twist-3 formalism relevant for high-energy observables including transverse polarization of hadrons. We argue that those perturbative coefficient functions can, a priori, acquire quite different yet Lorentz-invariant forms in various frames. This somewhat surprising difference can be traced back to a general dependence of the perturbative coefficient functions on light cone vectors which are introduced by the twist-3 factorization formulas and which are frame-dependent. One can remove this spurious frame dependence by invoking so-called Lorentz invariance relations (LIRs) between twist-3 parton correlation functions. Some of those relationsmore » for twist-3 distribution functions were discussed in the literature before. In this paper we derive the corresponding LIRs for twist-3 fragmentation functions. We explicitly demonstrate that these LIRs remove the light cone vector dependence by considering transverse spin observables in the single-inclusive production of hadrons in lepton-nucleon collisions, ℓN→hX. Furthermore, with the LIRs in hand, we also show that twist-3 observables in general can be written solely in terms of three-parton correlation functions.« less

  17. Structural Dependence of Grain Boundary Resistivity in Copper Nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Evans III, Boyd Mccutchen; Kenik, Edward A; Kim, Tae Hwan; Kulkarni, Nagraj S; Li, An-Ping; Meyer III, Harry M; Nicholson, Don M; Radhakrishnan, Bala; Zhang, Xiaoguang

    2011-01-01

    We report the direct measurement of individual grain boundary (GB) resistances and the critical role of GB structure in the increased resistivity in copper nanowires. By measuring both intra- and inter-grain resistance with a four-probe scanning tunneling microscope, large resistance jumps are revealed owing to successive scattering across high-angle random GBs, while the resistance changes at twin and other coincidence boundaries are negligibly small. The impurity distributions in the nanowires are characterized in correlating to the microstructures. The resistance of high symmetry coincidence GBs and the impurity contributions are then calculated using a first-principle method which confirms that the coincidence GBs have orders of magnitude smaller resistance than the high-angle random GBs.

  18. Interstellar grains within interstellar grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernatowicz, Thomas J.; Amari, Sachiko; Zinner, Ernst K.; Lewis, Roy S.

    1991-01-01

    Five interstellar graphite spherules extracted from the Murchison carbonaceous meteorite are studied. The isotopic and elemental compositions of individual particles are investigated with the help of an ion microprobe, and this analysis is augmented with structural studies of ultrathin sections of the grain interiors by transmission electron microscopy. As a result, the following procedure for the formation of the interstellar graphite spherule bearing TiC crystals is inferred: (1) high-temperature nucleation and rapid growth of the graphitic carbon spherule in the atmosphere of a carbon-rich star, (2) nucleation and growth of TiC crystals during continued growth of the graphitic spherule and the accretion of TiC onto the spherule, (3) quenching of the graphite growth process by depletion of C or by isolation of the spherule before other grain types could condense.

  19. Grain Boundary Specific Segregation in Nanocrystalline Fe(Cr)

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xuyang; Yu, Xiao-xiang; Kaub, Tyler; Martens, Richard L.; Thompson, Gregory B.

    2016-01-01

    A cross-correlative precession electron diffraction – atom probe tomography investigation of Cr segregation in a Fe(Cr) nanocrystalline alloy was undertaken. Solute segregation was found to be dependent on grain boundary type. The results of which were compared to a hybrid Molecular Dynamics and Monte Carlo simulation that predicted the segregation for special character, low angle, and high angle grain boundaries, as well as the angle of inclination of the grain boundary. It was found that the highest segregation concentration was for the high angle grain boundaries and is explained in terms of clustering driven by the onset of phase separation. For special character boundaries, the highest Gibbsain interfacial excess was predicted at the incoherent ∑3 followed by ∑9 and ∑11 boundaries with negligible segregation to the twin and ∑5 boundaries. In addition, the low angle grain boundaries predicted negligible segregation. All of these trends matched well with the experiment. This solute-boundary segregation dependency for the special character grain boundaries is explained in terms of excess volume and the energetic distribution of the solute in the boundary. PMID:27708360

  20. Grain Boundary Specific Segregation in Nanocrystalline Fe(Cr)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xuyang; Yu, Xiao-Xiang; Kaub, Tyler; Martens, Richard L.; Thompson, Gregory B.

    2016-10-01

    A cross-correlative precession electron diffraction – atom probe tomography investigation of Cr segregation in a Fe(Cr) nanocrystalline alloy was undertaken. Solute segregation was found to be dependent on grain boundary type. The results of which were compared to a hybrid Molecular Dynamics and Monte Carlo simulation that predicted the segregation for special character, low angle, and high angle grain boundaries, as well as the angle of inclination of the grain boundary. It was found that the highest segregation concentration was for the high angle grain boundaries and is explained in terms of clustering driven by the onset of phase separation. For special character boundaries, the highest Gibbsain interfacial excess was predicted at the incoherent ∑3 followed by ∑9 and ∑11 boundaries with negligible segregation to the twin and ∑5 boundaries. In addition, the low angle grain boundaries predicted negligible segregation. All of these trends matched well with the experiment. This solute-boundary segregation dependency for the special character grain boundaries is explained in terms of excess volume and the energetic distribution of the solute in the boundary.

  1. Development of microprocessor-based laser velocimeter and its application to measurement of jet exhausts and flows over missiles at high angles of attack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harwell, K. E.; Farmer, W. M.; Hornkohl, J. O.; Stallings, E.

    1981-03-01

    During the past three years, personnel have developed a unique three-component laser velocimeter for the in situ measurement of particle and/or gas velocities in flow fields produced behind bodies at high angles of attack and in jet exhaust plumes. This report describes the development of the laser velocimeter and its subsequent application of the measurement of the velocity distribution and vortex structure in free jets and in flows over missiles at high angles of attack.

  2. Experimental investigations on airfoils with different geometries in the domain of high angles of attack-flow separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keil, J.

    1985-01-01

    Wind tunnel tests were conducted on airfoil models in order to study the flow separation phenomena occurring for high angles of attack. Pressure distribution on wings of different geometries were measured. Results show that for three-dimensional airfoils layout and span lift play a role. Separation effects on airfoils with moderate extension are three-dimensional. The flow domains separated from the air foil must be treated three-dimensionally. The rolling-up of separated vortex layers increases with angle in intensity and induction effect and shows strong nonlinearities. Boundary layer material moves perpendicularly to the flow direction due to the pressure gradients at the airfoil; this has a stabilizing effect. The separation starts earlier with increasing pointed profiles.

  3. A study of prediction methods for the high angle-of-attack aerodynamics of straight wings and fighter aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmillan, O. J.; Mendenhall, M. R.; Perkins, S. C., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Work is described dealing with two areas which are dominated by the nonlinear effects of vortex flows. The first area concerns the stall/spin characteristics of a general aviation wing with a modified leading edge. The second area concerns the high-angle-of-attack characteristics of high performance military aircraft. For each area, the governing phenomena are described as identified with the aid of existing experimental data. Existing analytical methods are reviewed, and the most promising method for each area used to perform some preliminary calculations. Based on these results, the strengths and weaknesses of the methods are defined, and research programs recommended to improve the methods as a result of better understanding of the flow mechanisms involved.

  4. Variable-angle high-angle annular dark-field imaging: application to three-dimensional dopant atom profiling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jack Y; Hwang, Jinwoo; Isaac, Brandon J; Stemmer, Susanne

    2015-07-24

    Variable-angle high-angle annular dark-field (HAADF) imaging in scanning transmission electron microscopy is developed for precise and accurate determination of three-dimensional (3D) dopant atom configurations. Gd-doped SrTiO3 films containing Sr columns containing zero, one, or two Gd dopant atoms are imaged in HAADF mode using two different collection angles. Variable-angle HAADF significantly increases both the precision and accuracy of 3D dopant profiling. Using image simulations, it is shown that the combined information from the two detectors reduces the uncertainty in the dopant depth position measurement and can uniquely identify certain atomic configurations that are indistinguishable with a single detector setting. Additional advances and applications are discussed.

  5. High-angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy on carbon-based functional polymer systems.

    PubMed

    Sourty, Erwan; van Bavel, Svetlana; Lu, Kangbo; Guerra, Ralph; Bar, Georg; Loos, Joachim

    2009-06-01

    Two purely carbon-based functional polymer systems were investigated by bright-field conventional transmission electron microscopy (CTEM) and high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF-STEM). For a carbon black (CB) filled polymer system, HAADF-STEM provides high contrast between the CB agglomerates and the polymer matrix so that details of the interface organization easily can be revealed and assignment of the CB phase is straightforward. For a second system, the functional polymer blend representing the photoactive layer of a polymer solar cell, details of its nanoscale organization could be observed that were not accessible with CTEM. By varying the camera length in HAADF-STEM imaging, the contrast can be enhanced between crystalline and amorphous compounds due to diffraction contrast so that nanoscale interconnections between domains are identified. In general, due to its incoherent imaging characteristics HAADF-STEM allows for reliable interpretation of the data obtained.

  6. In-flight flow visualization characteristics of the NASA F-18 high alpha research vehicle at high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, David F.; Delfrate, John H.; Richwine, David M.

    1991-01-01

    Surface and off-surface flow visualization techniques were used to visualize the 3-D separated flows on the NASA F-18 high alpha research vehicle at high angles of attack. Results near the alpha = 25 to 26 deg and alpha = 45 to 49 deg are presented. Both the forebody and leading edge extension (LEX) vortex cores and breakdown locations were visualized using smoke. Forebody and LEX vortex separation lines on the surface were defined using an emitted fluid technique. A laminar separation bubble was also detected on the nose cone using the emitted fluid technique and was similar to that observed in the wind tunnel test, but not as extensive. Regions of attached, separated, and vortical flow were noted on the wing and the leading edge flap using tufts and flow cones, and compared well with limited wind tunnel results.

  7. Experimental study of the effects of Reynolds number on high angle of attack aerodynamic characteristics of forebodies during rotary motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pauley, H.; Ralston, J.; Dickes, E.

    1995-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration and the Defense Research Agency (United Kingdom) have ongoing experimental research programs in rotary-flow aerodynamics. A cooperative effort between the two agencies is currently underway to collect an extensive database for the development of high angle of attack computational methods to predict the effects of Reynolds number on the forebody flowfield at dynamic conditions, as well as to study the use of low Reynolds number data for the evaluation of high Reynolds number characteristics. Rotary balance experiments, including force and moment and surface pressure measurements, were conducted on circular and rectangular aftbodies with hemispherical and ogive noses at the Bedford and Farnborough wind tunnel facilities in the United Kingdom. The bodies were tested at 60 and 90 deg angle of attack for a wide range of Reynolds numbers in order to observe the effects of laminar, transitional, and turbulent flow separation on the forebody characteristics when rolling about the velocity vector.

  8. Variable-angle high-angle annular dark-field imaging: application to three-dimensional dopant atom profiling

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jack Y.; Hwang, Jinwoo; Isaac, Brandon J.; Stemmer, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    Variable-angle high-angle annular dark-field (HAADF) imaging in scanning transmission electron microscopy is developed for precise and accurate determination of three-dimensional (3D) dopant atom configurations. Gd-doped SrTiO3 films containing Sr columns containing zero, one, or two Gd dopant atoms are imaged in HAADF mode using two different collection angles. Variable-angle HAADF significantly increases both the precision and accuracy of 3D dopant profiling. Using image simulations, it is shown that the combined information from the two detectors reduces the uncertainty in the dopant depth position measurement and can uniquely identify certain atomic configurations that are indistinguishable with a single detector setting. Additional advances and applications are discussed. PMID:26206489

  9. Operating characteristics of an inlet model tested with a 0.5m powered fan at high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koncsek, J. L.; Shaw, R. J.

    1977-01-01

    An inlet model designed for high angle of attack capability, coupled to a .508 m tip diameter turbofan simulator, was tested in the NASA-Lewis Research Center's 9-by 15-ft low speed wind tunnel. The test variables were: tunnel velocity, 0 to 75 m/s; inlet angle of attack, 0 to 120 deg; and fan face corrected airflow per unit area, 75 to 200 kg/s sqm. The inlet flow separation boundaries, the fan face total pressure recovery and distortion characteristics, and the fan blade vibratory stresses were determined. The recovery, distortion, and stress levels showed no abrupt changes at the onset of separation, but became gradually more unfavorable as the size and intensity of the separation increased as induced by increasingly severe operating conditions. Performance characteristics for a large scale model of the inlet were estimated from these test results.

  10. Grain orientations and grain boundaries in tungsten nonotendril fuzz grown under divertor-like conditions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Parish, Chad M.; Wang, Kun; Doerner, Russel P.; Baldwin, Matthew J.

    2016-09-19

    We grew nanotendril “fuzz” on tungsten via plasma exposure and performed transmission Kikuchi diffraction (tKD) in scanning electron microscopy of isolated nanotendrils. 900 °C, 1023 He/m2sec, 4 × 1026 He/m2 exposure of tungsten produced a deep and fully developed nanotendril mat. tKD of isolated nanotendrils indicated that there was no preferred crystallographic direction oriented along the long axes of the tendrils, and the grain boundary character showed slightly preferential orientations. In conclusion, tendril growth is sufficiently non-equilibrium to prevent any preference of growth direction to manifest measurably, and that new high-angle boundaries (with new grains and grain-growth axes) nucleate randomlymore » along the tendrils during growth.« less

  11. The Strength-Grain Size Relationship in Ultrafine-Grained Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasubramanian, N.; Langdon, Terence G.

    2016-04-01

    Metals processed by severe plastic deformation (SPD) techniques, such as equal-channel angular pressing (ECAP) and high-pressure torsion (HPT), generally have submicrometer grain sizes. Consequently, they exhibit high strength as expected on the basis of the Hall-Petch (H-P) relationship. Examples of this behavior are discussed using experimental data for Ti, Al, and Ni. These materials typically have grain sizes greater than ~50 nm where softening is not expected. An increase in strength is usually accompanied by a decrease in ductility. However, both high strength and high ductility may be achieved simultaneously by imposing high strain to obtain ultrafine-grain sizes and high fractions of high-angle grain boundaries. This facilitates grain boundary sliding, and an example is presented for a cast Al-7 pct Si alloy processed by HPT. In some materials, SPD may result in a weakening even with a very fine grain size, and this is due to microstructural changes during processing. Examples are presented for an Al-7034 alloy processed by ECAP and a Zn-22 pct Al alloy processed by HPT. In some SPD-processed materials, it is possible that grain boundary segregation and other features are present leading to higher strengths than predicted by the H-P relationship.

  12. The prediction of pressure distributions on an arrow-wing configuration including the effect of camber, twist, and a wing fin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bobbitt, P. J.; Manro, M. E.; Kulfan, R. M.

    1980-01-01

    Wind tunnel tests of an arrow wing body configuration consisting of flat, twisted, and cambered twisted wings were conducted at Mach numbers from 0.40 to 2.50 to provide an experimental data base for comparison with theoretical methods. A variety of leading and trailing edge control surface deflections were included in these tests, and in addition, the cambered twisted wing was tested with an outboard vertical fin to determine its effect on wing and control surface loads. Theory experiment comparisons show that current state of the art linear and nonlinear attached flow methods were adequate at small angles of attack typical of cruise conditions. The incremental effects of outboard fin, wing twist, and wing camber are most accurately predicted by the advanced panel method PANAIR. Results of the advanced panel separated flow method, obtained with an early version of the program, show promise that accurate detailed pressure predictions may soon be possible for an aeroelasticity deformed wing at high angles of attack.

  13. Redundant or separate entities?—roles of Twist1 and Twist2 as molecular switches during gene transcription

    PubMed Central

    Franco, Hector L.; Casasnovas, José; Rodríguez-Medina, José R.; Cadilla, Carmen L.

    2011-01-01

    Twist1 and Twist2 are highly conserved members of the Twist subfamily of bHLH proteins responsible for the transcriptional regulation of the developmental programs in mesenchymal cell lineages. The regulation of such processes requires that Twist1 and Twist2 function as molecular switches to activate and repress target genes by employing several direct and indirect mechanisms. Modes of action by these proteins include direct DNA binding to conserved E-box sequences and recruitment of coactivators or repressors, sequestration of E-protein modulators, and interruption of proper activator/repressor function through protein–protein interactions. Regulatory outcomes of Twist1 and Twist2 are themselves controlled by spatial-temporal expression, phosphoregulation, dimer choice and cellular localization. Although these two proteins are highly conserved and exhibit similar functions in vitro, emerging literature have demonstrated different roles in vivo. The involvement of Twist1 and Twist2 in a broad spectrum of regulatory pathways highlights the importance of understanding their roles in normal development, homeostasis and disease. Here we focus on the mechanistic models of transcriptional regulation and summarize the similarities and differences between Twist1 and Twist2 in the context of myogenesis, osteogenesis, immune system development and cancer. PMID:20935057

  14. Twisted, multifilament Nb3Sn superconductive ribbon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coles, W. D.

    1972-01-01

    An experimental study of superconductor stabilization has resulted in the successful application of the concepts of filamentary structure and conductor twist to Nb3Sn ribbon. The Nb3Sn is formed in parallel, helical paths, which are continuous around the ribbon. Short lengths (12-18cm) of 1.27 cm wide superconductive ribbon were produced. The filamentary and twist characteristics are incorporated in the ribbon by means of an inert mask formed on the ribbon surface early in the fabrication process. Diffusion reaction of the niobium and tin is prevented at the filament boundaries. Described are the conductor methods of fabrication, and test results obtained. The technology required to adapt the processes for the production of long lengths of ribbon is available.

  15. Terahertz conductivity of twisted bilayer graphene.

    PubMed

    Zou, Xingquan; Shang, Jingzhi; Leaw, Jianing; Luo, Zhiqiang; Luo, Liyan; La-o-Vorakiat, Chan; Cheng, Liang; Cheong, S A; Su, Haibin; Zhu, Jian-Xin; Liu, Yanpeng; Loh, Kian Ping; Castro Neto, A H; Yu, Ting; Chia, Elbert E M

    2013-02-01

    Using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy, the real part of optical conductivity [σ(1)(ω)] of twisted bilayer graphene was obtained at different temperatures (10-300 K) in the frequency range 0.3-3 THz. On top of a Drude-like response, we see a strong peak in σ(1)(ω) at ~2.7 THz. We analyze the overall Drude-like response using a disorder-dependent (unitary scattering) model, then attribute the peak at 2.7 THz to an enhanced density of states at that energy, which is caused by the presence of a van Hove singularity arising from a commensurate twisting of the two graphene layers. PMID:23432306

  16. Magnetic Field Twisting by Intergranular Downdrafts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taroyan, Youra; Williams, Thomas

    2016-10-01

    The interaction of an intergranular downdraft with an embedded vertical magnetic field is examined. It is demonstrated that the downdraft may couple to small magnetic twists leading to an instability. The descending plasma exponentially amplifies the magnetic twists when it decelerates with depth due to increasing density. Most efficient amplification is found in the vicinity of the level, where the kinetic energy density of the downdraft reaches equipartition with the magnetic energy density. Continual extraction of energy from the decelerating plasma and growth in the total azimuthal energy occurs as a consequence of the wave-flow coupling along the downdraft. The presented mechanism may drive vortices and torsional motions that have been detected between granules and in simulations of magnetoconvection.

  17. TWISTING, RECONNECTING MAGNETOSPHERES AND MAGNETAR SPINDOWN

    SciTech Connect

    Parfrey, Kyle; Beloborodov, Andrei M.; Hui, Lam

    2012-07-20

    We present the first simulations of evolving, strongly twisted magnetar magnetospheres. Slow shearing of the magnetar crust is seen to lead to a series of magnetospheric expansion and reconnection events, corresponding to X-ray flares and bursts. The axisymmetric simulations include rotation of the neutron star and the magnetic wind through the light cylinder. We study how the increasing twist affects the spindown rate of the star, finding that a dramatic increase in spindown occurs. Particularly spectacular are explosive events caused by the sudden opening of large amounts of overtwisted magnetic flux, which may be associated with the observed giant flares. These events are accompanied by a short period of ultrastrong spindown, resulting in an abrupt increase in spin period, such as was observed in the giant flare of SGR 1900+14.

  18. Control load envelope shaping by live twist

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarzanin, F. J., Jr.; Mirick, P. H.

    1974-01-01

    Rotor control systems experience a rapid load growth resulting from retreating blade stall during flight conditions of high blade loading or airspeeds. An investigation was undertaken to determine the effect of changing blade torsional properties over the rotor flight envelope. The results of this study show that reducing the blade stiffness to introduce more blade live twist significantly reduces the large retreating blade control loads, while expanding the flight envelope and reducing retreating blade stall loads.

  19. Twist transition of nematic hyperbolic hedgehogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Richard; Fukuda, Jun-ichi

    2014-04-01

    Stability of an idealized hyperbolic hedgehog in a nematic liquid crystal against a twist transition is investigated by extending the methodology of Rüdinger and Stark [Liq. Cryst. 26, 753 (1999), 10.1080/026782999204840], where the hedgehog is confined between two concentric spheres. In the ideal hyperbolic-hedgehog the molecular orientation is assumed to rotate proportionally with respect to the inclination angle, θ (and in the opposite sense). However, when splay, k11, and bend, k33, moduli differ this proportionality is lost and the liquid crystal deforms relative to the ideal with bend and splay. Although slight, these deformations are shown to significantly shift the transition if k11/k33 is small. By increasing the degree of confinement the twist transition can be inhibited, a characteristic both hyperbolic and radial hedgehogs have in common. The twist transition of a hyperbolic defect that accompanies a particle is found to be well predicted by the earlier stability analysis of a thick shell.

  20. TWISTED MAGNETIC FLUX TUBES IN THE SOLAR WIND

    SciTech Connect

    Zaqarashvili, Teimuraz V.; Vörös, Zoltán; Narita, Yasuhito; Bruno, Roberto

    2014-03-01

    Magnetic flux tubes in the solar wind can be twisted as they are transported from the solar surface, where the tubes are twisted due to photospheric motions. It is suggested that the twisted magnetic tubes can be detected as the variation of total (thermal+magnetic) pressure during their passage through the observing satellite. We show that the total pressure of several observed twisted tubes resembles the theoretically expected profile. The twist of the isolated magnetic tube may explain the observed abrupt changes of magnetic field direction at tube walls. We have also found some evidence that the flux tube walls can be associated with local heating of the plasma and elevated proton and electron temperatures. For the tubes aligned with the Parker spiral, the twist angle can be estimated from the change of magnetic field direction. Stability analysis of twisted tubes shows that the critical twist angle of the tube with a homogeneous twist is 70°, but the angle can further decrease due to the motion of the tube with respect to the solar wind stream. The tubes with a stronger twist are unstable to the kink instability, therefore they probably cannot reach 1 AU.

  1. Improved structural detail in freeze-fracture replicas: high-angle shadowing of gap junctions cooled below -170 degrees C and protected by liquid nitrogen-cooled shrouds.

    PubMed

    Rash, J E; Yasumura, T

    1992-01-15

    before they were replicated, the E-face pits faithfully maintained the shape that the IMPs had before fracturing. These more detailed images revealed a new structure in the center of each E-face pit: a 2-3 nm "peg" that may represent the frozen aqueous matrix of the connexon ion channel that remained after elastic extraction of the surrounding six connexin molecules. Thus, high-angle shadowing at very low specimen temperature under virtually non-contaminating conditions has revealed a new level of detail for membrane structure in freeze-fracture replicas. PMID:1547359

  2. Numerical simulation by TVD schemes of complex shock reflections from airfoils at high angle of attack. [Total Variation Diminishing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moon, Young J.; Yee, H. C.

    1987-01-01

    The shock-capturing capability of total variation diminishing (TVD) schemes is demonstrated for a more realistic complex shock-diffraction problem for which the experimental data are available. Second-order explicit upwind and symmetric TVD schemes are used to solve the time-dependent Euler equations of gas dynamics for the interaction of a blast wave with an airfoil at high angle-of-attack. The test cases considered are a time-dependent moving curved-shock wave and a contant moving planar-shock wave impinging at an angle-of-attack 30 deg on a NACA 0018 airfoil. Good agreement is obtained between isopycnic contours computed by the TVD schemes and those from experimental interferograms. No drastic difference in flow-field structure is found between the curved- and planar-shock wave cases, except for a difference in density level near the lower surface of the airfoil. Computation for cases with higher shock Mach numbers is also possible. Numerical experiments show that the symmetric TVD scheme is less sensitive to the boundary conditions treatment than the upwind scheme.

  3. Modelling of AlAs/GaAs interfacial structures using high-angle annular dark field (HAADF) image simulations.

    PubMed

    Robb, Paul D; Finnie, Michael; Craven, Alan J

    2012-07-01

    High angle annular dark field (HAADF) image simulations were performed on a series of AlAs/GaAs interfacial models using the frozen-phonon multislice method. Three general types of models were considered-perfect, vicinal/sawtooth and diffusion. These were chosen to demonstrate how HAADF image measurements are influenced by different interfacial structures in the technologically important III-V semiconductor system. For each model, interfacial sharpness was calculated as a function of depth and compared to aberration-corrected HAADF experiments of two types of AlAs/GaAs interfaces. The results show that the sharpness measured from HAADF imaging changes in a complicated manner with thickness for complex interfacial structures. For vicinal structures, it was revealed that the type of material that the probe projects through first of all has a significant effect on the measured sharpness. An increase in the vicinal angle was also shown to generate a wider interface in the random step model. The Moison diffusion model produced an increase in the interface width with depth which closely matched the experimental results of the AlAs-on-GaAs interface. In contrast, the interface width decreased as a function of depth in the linear diffusion model. Only in the case of the perfect model was it possible to ascertain the underlying structure directly from HAADF image analysis.

  4. In-flight flow visualization results from the X-29A aircraft at high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delfrate, John H.; Saltzman, John A.

    1992-01-01

    Flow visualization techniques were used on the X-29A aircraft at high angles of attack to study the vortical flow off the forebody and the surface flow on the wing and tail. The forebody vortex system was studied because asymmetries in the vortex system were suspected of inducing uncommanded yawing moments at zero sideslip. Smoke enabled visualization of the vortex system and correlation of its orientation with flight yawing moment data. Good agreement was found between vortex system asymmetries and the occurrence of yawing moments. Surface flow on the forward-swept wing of the X-29A was studied using tufts and flow cones. As angle of attack increased, separated flow initiated at the root and spread outboard encompassing the full wing by 30 deg angle of attack. In general, the progression of the separated flow correlated well with subscale model lift data. Surface flow on the vertical tail was also studied using tufts and flow cones. As angle of attack increased, separated flow initiated at the root and spread upward. The area of separated flow on the vertical tail at angles of attack greater than 20 deg correlated well with the marked decrease in aircraft directional stability.

  5. Extraction of structural and chemical information from high angle annular dark-field image by an improved peaks finding method.

    PubMed

    Yin, Wenhao; Huang, Rong; Qi, Ruijuan; Duan, Chungang

    2016-09-01

    With the development of spherical aberration (Cs) corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), high angle annular dark filed (HAADF) imaging technique has been widely applied in the microstructure characterization of various advanced materials with atomic resolution. However, current qualitative interpretation of the HAADF image is not enough to extract all the useful information. Here a modified peaks finding method was proposed to quantify the HAADF-STEM image to extract structural and chemical information. Firstly, an automatic segmentation technique including numerical filters and watershed algorithm was used to define the sub-areas for each atomic column. Then a 2D Gaussian fitting was carried out to determine the atomic column positions precisely, which provides the geometric information at the unit-cell scale. Furthermore, a self-adaptive integration based on the column position and the covariance of statistical Gaussian distribution were performed. The integrated intensities show very high sensitivity on the mean atomic number with improved signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio. Consequently, the polarization map and strain distributions were rebuilt from a HAADF-STEM image of the rhombohedral and tetragonal BiFeO3 interface and a MnO2 monolayer in LaAlO3 /SrMnO3 /SrTiO3 heterostructure was discerned from its neighbor TiO2 layers. Microsc. Res. Tech. 79:820-826, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27324521

  6. High angle-of-attack aerodynamics of a strake-canard-wing V/STOL fighter configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durston, D. A.; Schreiner, J. A.

    1983-01-01

    High angle-of-attack aerodynamic data are analyzed for a strake-canard-wing V/STOL fighter configuration. The configuration represents a twin-engine supersonic V/STOL fighter aircraft which uses four longitudinal thrust-augmenting ejectors to provide vertical lift. The data were obtained in tests of a 9.39 percent scale model of the configuration in the NASA Ames 12-Foot Pressure Wind Tunnel, at a Mach number of 0.2. Trimmed aerodynamic characteristics, longitudinal control power, longitudinal and lateral/directional stability, and effects of alternate strake and canard configurations are analyzed. The configuration could not be trimmed (power-off) above 12 deg angle of attack because of the limited pitch control power and the high degree of longitudinal instability (28 percent) at this Mach number. Aerodynamic center location was found to be controllable by varying strake size and canard location without significantly affecting lift and drag. These configuration variations had relatively little effect on the lateral/directional stability up to 10 deg angle of attack.

  7. Low-speed wind-tunnel study of the high-angle-of-attack stability and control characteristics of a cranked-arrow-wing fighter configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grafton, S. B.

    1984-01-01

    The low-speed, high-angle-of-attack stability and control characteristics of a fighter configuration incorporating a cranked arrow wing were investigated in the Langley 30- by 60-foot tunnel as part of a NASA/General Dynamics cooperative research program to investigate the application of advanced wing designs to combat aircraft. Tests were conducted on a baseline configuration and on several modified configurations. The results show that the baseline configuration exhibited a high level of maximum lift but displayed undesirable longitudinal and lateral-directional stability characteristics at high angles of attack. Various wing modifications were made which improved the longitudinal and lateral-directional stability characteristics of the configuration at high angles of attack. However, most of the modifications were detrimental to maximum lift.

  8. Optical Möbius strips and twisted ribbon cloaks.

    PubMed

    Freund, Isaac

    2014-02-15

    Optical Möbius strips that surround points of circular polarization, C points, in a generic three-dimensional optical field are cloaked by lines of twisted ribbons attached to the C points. When cloaking occurs, the observable signed twist index that counts the number of half-twists (one or three), and also measures the handedness (right or left), of a generic Möbius strip is determined by the twisted ribbon cloaks. Although some cloaks can be detached, they can never all be removed.

  9. Modelling of Nonthermal Microwave Emission from Twisted Magnetic Loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharykin, I. N.; Kuznetsov, A. A.

    2016-05-01

    Microwave gyrosynchrotron radio emission generated by nonthermal electrons in twisted magnetic loops is modelled using the recently developed simulation tool GX Simulator. We consider isotropic and anisotropic pitch-angle distributions. The main scope of the work is to understand the impact of a twisted magnetic field topology on radio emission maps. We have found that nonthermal electrons inside twisted magnetic loops produce gyrosynchrotron radio emission with a particular polarisation distribution. The polarisation sign inversion line is inclined relatively to the axis of the loop. The radio emission source is more compact in the case of a less twisted loop, assuming an anisotropic pitch-angle distribution of nonthermal electrons.

  10. Twisted rudder for reducing fuel-oil consumption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jung-Hun; Choi, Jung-Eun; Choi, Bong-Jun; Chung, Seok-Ho

    2014-09-01

    Three twisted rudders fit for large container ships have been developed; 1) the Z-twisted rudder that is an asymmetry type taking into consideration incoming flow angles of the propeller slipstream, 2) the ZB-twisted rudder with a rudder bulb added onto the Z-twisted rudder, and 3) the ZB-F twisted rudder with a rudder fin attached to the ZB-twisted rudder. The twisted rudders have been designed computationally with the hydrodynamic characteristics in a self-propulsion condition in mind. The governing equation is the Navier-Stokes equations in an unsteady turbulent flow. The turbulence model applied is the Reynolds stress. The calculation was carried out in towing and self-propulsion conditions. The sliding mesh technique was employed to simulate the flow around the propeller. The speed performances of the ship with the twisted rudders were verified through model tests in a towing tank. The twisted versions showed greater performance driven by increased hull efficiency from less thrust deduction fraction and more effective wake fraction and decreased propeller rotating speed

  11. Whole Grains and Fiber

    MedlinePlus

    ... fiber. Some examples of refined grains are wheat flour, enriched bread and white rice. Most refined grains are enriched , which means that ... grains. Some examples of enriched grains are wheat flour, enriched bread and white rice. Eating whole grains provides important health benefits: Many ...

  12. Twisting and Writhing with George Ellery Hale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canfield, Richard C.

    2013-06-01

    Early in his productive career in astronomy, George Ellery Hale developed innovative solar instrumentation that allowed him to make narrow-band images. Among the solar phenomena he discovered were sunspot vortices, which he attributed to storms akin to cyclones in our own atmosphere. Using the concept of magnetic helicity, physicists and mathematicians describe the topology of magnetic fields, including twisting and writhing. Our contemporary understanding of Hale's vortices as a consequence of large-scale twist in sunspot magnetic fields hinges on a key property of helicity: conservation. I will describe the critical role that this property plays, when applied to twist and writhe, in a fundamental aspect of global solar magnetism: the hemispheric and solar cycle dependences of active region electric currents with respect to magnetic fields. With the advent of unbroken sequences of high-resolution magnetic images, such as those presently available from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on Solar Dynamics Observatory, the flux of magnetic helicity through the photosphere can be observed quantitatively. As magnetic flux tubes buoy up through the convection zone, buffeted and shredded by turbulence, they break up into fragments by repeated random bifurcation. We track these rising flux fragments in the photosphere, and calculate the flux of energy and magnetic helicity there. Using a quantitative model of coronal currents, we also track connections between these fragments to calculate the energy and magnetic helicity stored at topological interfaces that are in some ways analogous to the storage of stress at faults in the Earth's crust. Comparison of these values to solar flares and interplanetary coronal mass ejections implies that this is the primary storage mechanism for energy and magnetic helicity released in those phenomena, and suggests a useful tool for quantitative prediction of geomagnetic storms.

  13. Twisted geometries, twistors, and conformal transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lângvik, Miklos; Speziale, Simone

    2016-07-01

    The twisted geometries of spin network states are described by simple twistors, isomorphic to null twistors with a timelike direction singled out. The isomorphism depends on the Immirzi parameter γ and reduces to the identity for γ =∞ . Using this twistorial representation, we study the action of the conformal group SU(2,2) on the classical phase space of loop quantum gravity, described by twisted geometry. The generators of translations and conformal boosts do not preserve the geometric structure, whereas the dilatation generator does. It corresponds to a one-parameter family of embeddings of T*SL(2,C) in twistor space, and its action preserves the intrinsic geometry while changing the extrinsic one—that is the boosts among polyhedra. We discuss the implication of this action from a dynamical point of view and compare it with a discretization of the dilatation generator of the continuum phase space, given by the Lie derivative of the group character. At leading order in the continuum limit, the latter reproduces the same transformation of the extrinsic geometry, while also rescaling the areas and volumes and preserving the angles associated with the intrinsic geometry. Away from the continuum limit, its action has an interesting nonlinear structure but is in general incompatible with the closure constraint needed for the geometric interpretation. As a side result, we compute the precise relation between the extrinsic geometry used in twisted geometries and the one defined in the gauge-invariant parametrization by Dittrich and Ryan and show that the secondary simplicity constraints they posited coincide with those dynamically derived in the toy model of [Classical Quantum Gravity 32, 195015 (2015)].

  14. Band-gap engineering with a twist: Formation of intercalant superlattices in twisted graphene bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Symalla, Franz; Shallcross, Sam; Beljakov, Igor; Fink, Karin; Wenzel, Wolfgang; Meded, Velimir

    2015-05-01

    Graphene-based materials have long been considered as promising building blocks for a new generation of high-frequency (terahertz) electronic devices, but their use is complicated by the lack of an intrinsic band gap in graphene itself. Here we exploit synthetically controllable incommensuration of twisted graphene bilayers as a scaffold for intercalation of alkali metal ions with the periodicity of the bilayer supercell. Systematic exploration of the energy profiles of the ions as a function of position suggests that the alkali metal ions aggregate commensurately with the symmetry of the twisted bilayer. The intercalated alkali metal ions act as a source of a periodic perturbation on the level of the bilayer supercell, which permits opening and engineering of a band gap between graphene's π bands. The twist angle between the graphene layers determines the structure and disorder of the intercalant sublattice and, consequently, the magnitude of the band gap. Appropriate choices of the intercalant and twist angle thus permit band-gap engineering in graphene. We offer arguments that the impact of intercalation on the all important charge mobility of graphene will be rather small.

  15. Mechanical properties and radiation tolerance of ultrafine grained and nanocrystalline metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Cheng

    Austenitic stainless steels are commonly used in nuclear reactors and have been considered as potential structural materials in fusion reactors due to their excellent corrosion resistance, good creep and fatigue resistance at elevated temperatures, but their relatively low yield strength and poor radiation tolerance hinder their applications in high dose radiation environments. High angle grain boundaries have long been postulated as sinks for radiation-induced defects, such as bubbles, voids, and dislocation loops. Here we provide experimental evidence that high angle grain boundaries can effectively remove radiation-induced defects. The equal channel angular pressing (ECAP) technique was used to produce ultrafine grained Fe-Cr-Ni alloy. Mechanical properties of the alloy were studied at elevated temperature by tensile tests and in situ neutron scattering measurements. Enhanced dynamic recovery process at elevated temperature due to dislocation climb lowers the strain hardening rate and ductility of ultrafine grained Fe-Cr-Ni alloy. Thermal stability of the ultrafine grained Fe-Cr-Ni alloy was examined by ex situ annealing and in situ heating within a transmission electron microscope. Abnormal grain growth at 827 K (600°C) is attributed to deformation-induced martensite, located at the triple junctions of grains. Helium ion irradiation studies on Fe-Cr-Ni alloy show that the density of He bubbles, dislocation loops, as well as irradiation hardening are reduced by grain refinement. In addition, we provide direct evidence, via in situ Kr ion irradiation within a transmission electron microscope, that high angle grain boundaries in nanocrystalline Ni can effectively absorb irradiation-induced dislocation loops and segments. The density and size of dislocation loops in irradiated nanocrystalline Ni were merely half of those in irradiated coarse grained Ni. The results imply that irradiation tolerance in bulk metals can be effectively enhanced by microstructure

  16. Twisting and Writhing with George Ellery Hale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canfield, Richard C.

    2013-07-01

    Early in his productive career in astronomy, George Ellery Hale developed innovative instrumentation that allowed him to image the magnetically-dominated solar chromosphere. Among the solar phenomena he discovered were sunspot vortices, which he attributed to storms akin to cyclones in our own atmosphere. Much more recently, physicists discovered a quantity that is very well conserved in ideal magnetohydrodynamics: magnetic helicity. Our contemporary understanding of Hale's vortices as a consequence of large-scale twist in sunspot magnetic fields hinges on this conservation. I will review the crucial role that this property plays in the hemispheric and solar cycle dependences of Hales vortices, as well as solar flares and CMEs.

  17. Berry phase transition in twisted bilayer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rode, Johannes C.; Smirnov, Dmitri; Schmidt, Hennrik; Haug, Rolf J.

    2016-09-01

    The electronic dispersion of a graphene bilayer is highly dependent on rotational mismatch between layers and can be further manipulated by electrical gating. This allows for an unprecedented control over electronic properties and opens up the possibility of flexible band structure engineering. Here we present novel magnetotransport data in a twisted bilayer, crossing the energetic border between decoupled monolayers and coupled bilayer. In addition a transition in Berry phase between π and 2π is observed at intermediate magnetic fields. Analysis of Fermi velocities and gate induced charge carrier densities suggests an important role of strong layer asymmetry for the observed phenomena.

  18. Twist Defect in an Imprinted Cholesteric Elastomer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro-Garay, Paola; Reyes, Juan Adrian; Corella-Madueño, Adalberto

    2009-03-01

    We have found that a chiral twist defect inserted in a cholesteric elastomer gives rise to circularly polarized localized modes of both handedness. This defect enhances the resonance mode amplitude whose handedness is opposite to the cholesteric helix for high cross-linked density. Complementarily, for low cross-linked density, the circular polarization opposite to helix cholesteric of the elastomer is decoupled with the defect mode so that the resonance mode disappears . Finally, the resonance mode of the circularly polarization of the same handedness to elastomer helix is maintained either, for high or low cross-linked density.

  19. Twist defect in an imprinted cholesteric elastomer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro-Garay, P.; Reyes, J. Adrian; Corella-Madueño, A.

    2009-04-01

    We have found that a chiral twist defect inserted in a cholesteric elastomer gives rise to circularly polarized localized modes of both handedness. This defect enhances the resonant mode amplitude whose handedness is opposite to that of the cholesteric helix for high cross-linked density, whereas for low cross-linked density, the same mode is decoupled with the defect and thus the resonant mode disappears. Finally, the resonant mode of the same handedness as the elastomer helix is maintained for both high and low cross-linked density.

  20. Strategy for cloaking of twisted domains

    SciTech Connect

    Schmiele, Martin; Rockstuhl, Carsten; Lederer, Falk

    2009-05-15

    We describe a strategy to cloak twisted domains where, in contrast to the usual cloaks, the outer domain does not necessarily need to possess a direct connection to the point of inflation. The strategy consists of two steps. At first, a transformation is applied to untwist the geometry. Then, a second transformation is applied to create a point-transformed cloak with vanishing scattering cross section. As an extreme, yet analytical example, we construct a cloak having the shape of a spiral. Full-wave simulations confirm that electromagnetic waves impinging on the spiral-type cloak are bent around the structure with no discernible scattering.

  1. The bacterial cytoskeleton: more than twisted filaments.

    PubMed

    Pilhofer, Martin; Jensen, Grant J

    2013-02-01

    Far from being simple 'bags' of enzymes, bacteria are richly endowed with ultrastructures that challenge and expand standard definitions of the cytoskeleton. Here we review rods, rings, twisted pairs, tubes, sheets, spirals, moving patches, meshes and composites, and suggest defining the term 'bacterial cytoskeleton' as all cytoplasmic protein filaments and their superstructures that move or scaffold (stabilize/position/recruit) other cellular materials. The evolution of each superstructure has been driven by specific functional requirements. As a result, while homologous proteins with different functions have evolved to form surprisingly divergent superstructures, those of unrelated proteins with similar functions have converged.

  2. How the embryonic brain tube twists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zi; Guo, Qiaohang; Forsch, Nickolas; Taber, Larry

    2014-03-01

    During early development, the tubular brain of the chick embryo undergoes a combination of progressive ventral bending and rightward torsion. This deformation is one of the major organ-level symmetry-breaking events in development. Available evidence suggests that bending is caused by differential growth, but the mechanism for torsion remains poorly understood. Since the heart almost always loops in the same direction that the brain twists, researchers have speculated that heart looping affects the direction of brain torsion. However, direct evidence is virtually nonexistent, nor is the mechanical origin of such torsion understood. In our study, experimental perturbations show that the bending and torsional deformations in the brain are coupled and that the vitelline membrane applies an external load necessary for torsion to occur. In addition, the asymmetry of the looping heart gives rise to the chirality of the twisted brain. A computational model is used to interpret these findings. Our work clarifies the mechanical origins of brain torsion and the associated left-right asymmetry, reminiscent of D'Arcy Thompson's view of biological form as ``diagram of forces''.

  3. Terahertz conductivity of twisted bilayer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chia, Elbert E. M.; Zou, Xingquan; Shang, Jingzhi; Leaw, Jianing; Luo, Zhiqiang; Luo, Liyan; Cheong, Siew Ann; Su, Haibin; Zhu, Jian-Xin; Castro Neto, A. H.; Yu, Ting

    2013-03-01

    Using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy, the real part of optical conductivity [σ1 (ω) ] of twisted bilayer graphene was obtained at different temperatures (10 - 300 K) in the frequency range 0.3 - 3 THz. On top of a Drude-like response, we see a strong and narrow peak in σ1 (ω) at ~2.7 THz. We analyze the overall Drude-like response using a disorder-dependent (unitary scattering) model, then attribute the peak at 2.7 THz to an enhanced density of states at that energy, that is caused by the presence of van Hove singularities arising from a commensurate twisting of the two graphene layers. Singapore MOE AcRF Tier 2 (ARC 23/08), NRF-CRP (NRF-CRP4-2008-04), NNSA of the U.S. DOE at LANL (DE-AC52-06NA25396), LANL LDRD Program, NRF-CRP (R-144-000-295-281), DOE DE-FG02-08ER46512, ONR MURI N00014-09-1-1063.

  4. Needleless electrospinning with twisted wire spinneret

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holopainen, Jani; Penttinen, Toni; Santala, Eero; Ritala, Mikko

    2015-01-01

    A needleless electrospinning setup named ‘Needleless Twisted Wire Electrospinning’ was developed. The polymer solution is electrospun from the surface of a twisted wire set to a high voltage and collected on a cylindrical collector around the wire. Multiple Taylor cones are simultaneously self-formed on the downward flowing solution. The system is robust and simple with no moving parts aside from the syringe pump used to transport the solution to the top of the wire. The structure and process parameters of the setup and the results on the preparation of polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP), hydroxyapatite (HA) and bioglass fibers with the setup are presented. PVP fiber sheets with areas of 40 × 120 cm2 and masses up to 1.15 g were prepared. High production rates of 5.23 g h-1 and 1.40 g h-1 were achieved for PVP and HA respectively. The major limiting factor of the setup is drying of the polymer solution on the wire during the electrospinning process which will eventually force to interrupt the process for cleaning of the wire. Possible solutions to this problem and other ways to develop the setup are discussed. The presented system provides a simple way to increase the production rate and area of fiber sheet as compared with the conventional needle electrospinning.

  5. Strong CP, Flavor, and Twisted Split Fermions

    SciTech Connect

    Harnik, Roni; Perez, Gilad; Schwartz, Matthew D.; Shirman, Yuri

    2004-11-10

    We present a natural solution to the strong CP problem in the context of split fermions. By assuming CP is spontaneously broken in the bulk, a weak CKM phase is created in the standard model due to a twisting in flavor space of the bulk fermion wavefunctions. But the strong CP phase remains zero, being essentially protected by parity in the bulk and CP on the branes. As always in models of spontaneous CP breaking, radiative corrections to theta bar from the standard model are tiny, but even higher dimension operators are not that dangerous. The twisting phenomenon was recently shown to be generic, and not to interfere with the way that split fermions naturally weaves small numbers into the standard model. It follows that out approach to strong CP is compatible with flavor, and we sketch a comprehensive model. We also look at deconstructed version of this setup which provides a viable 4D model of spontaneous CP breaking which is not in the Nelson-Barr class.

  6. Needleless electrospinning with twisted wire spinneret.

    PubMed

    Holopainen, Jani; Penttinen, Toni; Santala, Eero; Ritala, Mikko

    2015-01-16

    A needleless electrospinning setup named 'Needleless Twisted Wire Electrospinning' was developed. The polymer solution is electrospun from the surface of a twisted wire set to a high voltage and collected on a cylindrical collector around the wire. Multiple Taylor cones are simultaneously self-formed on the downward flowing solution. The system is robust and simple with no moving parts aside from the syringe pump used to transport the solution to the top of the wire. The structure and process parameters of the setup and the results on the preparation of polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP), hydroxyapatite (HA) and bioglass fibers with the setup are presented. PVP fiber sheets with areas of 40 × 120 cm(2) and masses up to 1.15 g were prepared. High production rates of 5.23 g h(-1) and 1.40 g h(-1) were achieved for PVP and HA respectively. The major limiting factor of the setup is drying of the polymer solution on the wire during the electrospinning process which will eventually force to interrupt the process for cleaning of the wire. Possible solutions to this problem and other ways to develop the setup are discussed. The presented system provides a simple way to increase the production rate and area of fiber sheet as compared with the conventional needle electrospinning.

  7. Electronic structure studies of nanocrystalline diamond grain boundaries

    SciTech Connect

    Zapol, P.; Sternberg, M.; Frauenheim, T.; Gruen, D. M.; Curtiss, L. A.

    1999-11-29

    Diamond growth from hydrogen-poor plasmas results in diamond structures that are profoundly different from conventionally CVD-grown diamond. High concentration of carbon dimers in the microwave plasma results in a high rate of heterogeneous renucleation leading to formation of nanocrystalline diamond with a typical grain size of 3--10 nm. Therefore, up to 10% of carbon atoms are located in the grain boundaries. In this paper the authors report on density-functional based tight-binding molecular dynamics calculations of the structure of a {Sigma}13 twist (100) grain boundary in diamond. Beginning with a coincidence site lattice model, simulated annealing of the initial structure was performed at 1,500 K followed by relaxation toward lower temperatures. About one-half of the carbons in the grain boundary are found to be three-coordinated. Coordination numbers, bond length and bond angle distributions are analyzed and compared to those obtained in previous studies.

  8. Strain mapping in nanocrystalline grains simulated by phase field crystal model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yaolin; Wang, Jincheng; Wang, Zhijun; Li, Junjie; Tang, Sai; Liu, Feng; Zhou, Yaohe

    2015-03-01

    In recent years, the phase field crystal (PFC) model has been confirmed as a good candidate to describe grain boundary (GB) structures and their nearby atomic arrangement. To further understand the mechanical behaviours of nanocrystalline materials, strain fields near GBs need to be quantitatively characterized. Using the strain mapping technique of geometric phase approach (GPA), we have conducted strain mapping across the GBs in nanocrystalline grains simulated by the PFC model. The results demonstrate that the application of GPA in strain mapping of low and high angles GBs as well as polycrystalline grains simulated by the PFC model is very successful. The results also show that the strain field around the dislocation in a very low angle GB is quantitatively consistent with the anisotropic elastic theory of dislocations. Moreover, the difference between low angle GBs and high angle GBs is revealed by the strain analysis in terms of the strain contour shape and the structural GB width.

  9. Design optimization of a twist compliant mechanism with nonlinear stiffness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tummala, Y.; Frecker, M. I.; Wissa, A. A.; Hubbard, J. E., Jr.

    2014-10-01

    A contact-aided compliant mechanism called a twist compliant mechanism (TCM) is presented in this paper. This mechanism has nonlinear stiffness when it is twisted in both directions along its axis. The inner core of the mechanism is primarily responsible for its flexibility in one twisting direction. The contact surfaces of the cross-members and compliant sectors are primarily responsible for its high stiffness in the opposite direction. A desired twist angle in a given direction can be achieved by tailoring the stiffness of a TCM. The stiffness of a compliant twist mechanism can be tailored by varying thickness of its cross-members, thickness of the core and thickness of its sectors. A multi-objective optimization problem with three objective functions is proposed in this paper, and used to design an optimal TCM with desired twist angle. The objective functions are to minimize the mass and maximum von-Mises stress observed, while minimizing or maximizing the twist angles under specific loading conditions. The multi-objective optimization problem proposed in this paper is solved for an ornithopter flight research platform as a case study, with the goal of using the TCM to achieve passive twisting of the wing during upstroke, while keeping the wing fully extended and rigid during the downstroke. Prototype TCMs have been fabricated using 3D printing and tested. Testing results are also presented in this paper.

  10. Beyond the classical Rayleigh limit with twisted light.

    PubMed

    Tong, Zhisong; Korotkova, Olga

    2012-07-01

    It is shown that twisted stochastic light can serve as illumination that may produce images with a resolution overcoming the Rayleigh limit by an order of magnitude. This finding is illustrated for an isoplanatic axially symmetric system with low angular aperture and twisted scalar Gaussian Schell-model illumination.

  11. Analysis of twist and lean of tall towers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    A method for analytically determining the amount of twist and lean of a tall tower of equilateral triangular cross section is described. This method is also applicable to tall structures of other shapes and cross-sectional areas. A BASIC computer program that determines the angle of twist and amount of lean is provided.

  12. Landau damping of Langmuir twisted waves with kappa distributed electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Arshad, Kashif Aman-ur-Rehman; Mahmood, Shahzad

    2015-11-15

    The kinetic theory of Landau damping of Langmuir twisted modes is investigated in the presence of orbital angular momentum of the helical (twisted) electric field in plasmas with kappa distributed electrons. The perturbed distribution function and helical electric field are considered to be decomposed by Laguerre-Gaussian mode function defined in cylindrical geometry. The Vlasov-Poisson equation is obtained and solved analytically to obtain the weak damping rates of the Langmuir twisted waves in a nonthermal plasma. The strong damping effects of the Langmuir twisted waves at wavelengths approaching Debye length are also obtained by using an exact numerical method and are illustrated graphically. The damping rates of the planar Langmuir waves are found to be larger than the twisted Langmuir waves in plasmas which shows opposite behavior as depicted in Fig. 3 by J. T. Mendoça [Phys. Plasmas 19, 112113 (2012)].

  13. Acoustic Aspects of Active-Twist Rotor Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Booth, Earl R., Jr.; Wilbur, Matthew L.

    2002-01-01

    The use of an Active Twist Rotor system to provide both vibration reduction and performance enhancement has been explored in recent analytical and experimental studies. Effects of active-twist control on rotor noise, however, had not been determined. During a recent wind tunnel test of an active-twist rotor system, a set of acoustic measurements were obtained to assess the effects of active-twist control on noise produced by the rotor, especially blade-vortex interaction (BVI) noise. It was found that for rotor operating conditions where BVI noise is dominant, active-twist control provided a reduction in BVI noise level. This BVI noise reduction was almost, but not quite, as large as that obtained in a similar test using HHC. However, vibration levels were usually adversely affected at operating conditions favoring minimum BVI noise. Conversely, operating conditions favoring minimum vibration levels affected BVI noise levels, but not always adversely.

  14. Twisted Fock representations of noncommutative Kähler manifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sako, Akifumi; Umetsu, Hiroshi

    2016-09-01

    We introduce twisted Fock representations of noncommutative Kähler manifolds and give their explicit expressions. The twisted Fock representation is a representation of the Heisenberg like algebra whose states are constructed by applying creation operators to a vacuum state. "Twisted" means that creation operators are not Hermitian conjugate of annihilation operators in this representation. In deformation quantization of Kähler manifolds with separation of variables formulated by Karabegov, local complex coordinates and partial derivatives of the Kähler potential with respect to coordinates satisfy the commutation relations between the creation and annihilation operators. Based on these relations, we construct the twisted Fock representation of noncommutative Kähler manifolds and give a dictionary to translate between the twisted Fock representations and functions on noncommutative Kähler manifolds concretely.

  15. A twisted disk equation that describes warped galaxy disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barker, K.

    1994-01-01

    Warped H1 gas layers in the outer regions of spiral galaxies usually display a noticeably twisted structure. This structure is thought to arise primarily as a result of differential precession in the H1 disk as it settles toward a 'preferred orientation' in an underlying dark halo potential well that is not spherically symmetric. In an attempt to better understand the structure and evolution of these twisted, warped disk structures, we have utilized the 'twist-equation' formalism. Specifically, we have generalized the twist equation to allow the treatment of non-Keplerian disks and from it have derived the steady-state structure of twisted disks that develop from free precession in a nonspherical, logarithmic halo potential. This generalized equation can also be used to examine the time-evolutionary behavior of warped galaxy disks.

  16. The Structure of Olivine Grain Boundaries Inferred from Transient and Steady State Deformation Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faul, U.; Jackson, I.

    2015-12-01

    A consensus has not been reached regarding the structure of general, high angle grain boundaries in olivine. Published high resolution transmission electron microscope images show either abutting lattice planes of the grains on either side of the boundary, or a distinct grain boundary region, about 1 nm wide, that is more disordered than the grain interiors. However, agreement exists that grain boundary region is enriched in olivine trace elements such as Ti, Ca and Al. These analytical methods can not resolve the thickness of this region. The properties of grain boundaries can be interrogated by experimentation, but the interpretation of the experimental results is tied to microphysical models. Models for diffusion creep predict a square grain size dependence for diffusion through grain interiors, and a cubic grain size dependence for diffusion along grain boundaries. Experimental observations for polycrystalline, Fe-bearing olivine are best fit with a cubic grain size dependence, indicating diffusion along grain boundaries. Similarly, models for small strain, transient creep predict that time-dependent, recoverable deformation involves diffusion along grain boundaries. For this process the models predict a linear grain size dependence. Forced torsional oscillation experiments can be employed to investigate the transient creep behaviour over a range of frequencies, temperatures and grain sizes. The observed grain size dependence for the same materials used for conventional, large strain deformation experiments is near linear, indicating diffusionally assisted grain boundary sliding. Both transient and steady state deformation therefore implicate diffusion along grain boundaries as the rate-controlling mechanism. Diffusion and viscous sliding along grain boundaries imply that they are a separate phase with a less ordered structure, consistent with their interpretation as a (narrow) region that is distinct from grain interiors. This region likely also accommodates

  17. Microstructural Features Leading to Enhanced Resistance to Grain Boundary Creep Cracking in ALLVAC 718Plus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unocic, Kinga A.; Hayes, Robert W.; Mills, Michael J.; Daehn, Glenn S.

    2010-02-01

    This study focuses on the microstructural features that enhance the resistance of ALLVAC 718Plus to grain boundary creep cracking during testing of samples at 704 °C in both dry and moist air. Fully recrystallized structures were found to be susceptible to brittle grain boundary cracking in both environments. Detailed transmission electron microscopy (TEM) microstructural characterization reveals features that are believed to lead to resistance to grain boundary cracking in the resistant microstructures. It is suggested that dislocation substructures found within the grains of resistant structures compete with the high-angle grain boundaries for oxygen, thereby reducing the concentration of oxygen on the grain boundaries and subsequent embrittlement. In addition, electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) misorientation maps reveal that special boundaries ( i.e., Σ3 boundaries) resist cracking. This is in agreement with previous findings on the superalloy INCONEL 718. Furthermore, it is observed that cracks propagate along high-angle boundaries. This study also shows that in this case, the presence of delta phase at the grain boundaries does not by itself produce materials that are resistant to grain boundary cracking.

  18. Twist1 activity thresholds define multiple functions in limb development

    PubMed Central

    Krawchuk, Dayana; Weiner, Shoshana J.; Chen, You-Tzung; Lu, Benson; Costantini, Frank; Behringer, Richard R.; Laufer, Ed

    2010-01-01

    Summary The basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor Twist1 is essential for normal limb development. Twist1−/− embryos die at midgestation. However, studies on early limb buds found that Twist1−/− mutant limb mesenchyme has an impaired response to FGF signaling from the apical ectodermal ridge, which disrupts the feedback loop between the mesenchyme and AER, and reduces and shifts anteriorly Shh expression in the zone of polarizing activity. We have combined Twist1 null, hypomorph and conditional alleles to generate a Twist1 allelic series that survives to birth. As Twist1 activity is reduced, limb skeletal defects progress from preaxial polydactyly to girdle reduction combined with hypoplasia, aplasia or mirror symmetry of all limb segments. With reduced Twist1 activity there is striking and progressive upregulation of ectopic Shh expression in the anterior of the limb, combined with an anterior shift in the posterior Shh domain, which is expressed at normal intensity, and loss of the posterior AER. Consequently limb outgrowth is initially impaired, before an ectopic anterior Shh domain expands the AER, promoting additional growth and repatterning. Reducing the dosage of FGF targets of the Etv gene family, which are known repressors of Shh expression in the anterior limb mesenchyme, strongly enhances the anterior skeletal phenotype. Conversely this and other phenotypes are suppressed by reducing the dosage of the Twist1 antagonist Hand2. Our data support a model whereby multiple Twist1 activity thresholds contribute to early limb bud patterning, and suggest how particular combinations of skeletal defects result from differing amounts of Twist1 activity. PMID:20732316

  19. Aeromechanical Evaluation of Smart-Twisting Active Rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lim, Joon W.; Boyd, D. Douglas, Jr.; Hoffman, Frauke; van der Wall, Berend G.; Kim, Do-Hyung; Jung, Sung N.; You, Young H.; Tanabe, Yasutada; Bailly, Joelle; Lienard, Caroline; Delrieux, Yves

    2014-01-01

    An investigation of Smart-Twisting Active Rotor (STAR) was made to assess potential benefits of the current active twist rotor concept for performance improvement, vibration reduction, and noise alleviation. The STAR rotor is a 40% Mach-scaled, Bo105 rotor with an articulated flap-lag hinge at 3.5%R and no pre-cone. The 0-5 per rev active twist harmonic inputs were applied for various flight conditions including hover, descent, moderate to high speed level flights, and slowed rotor high advance ratio. For the analysis, the STAR partners used multiple codes including CAMRAD II, S4, HOST, rFlow3D, elsA, and their associated software. At the high thrust level in hover, the 0 per rev active twist with 80% amplitude increased figure of merit (FM) by 0.01-0.02 relative to the baseline. In descent, the largest BVI noise reduction was on the order of 2 to 5 dB at the 3 per rev active twist. In the high speed case (mu = 0.35), the 2 per rev actuation was found to be the most effective in achieving a power reduction as well as a vibration reduction. At the 2 per rev active twist, total power was reduced by 0.65% at the 60 deg active twist phase, and vibration was reduced by 47.6% at the 45 deg active twist phase. The use of the 2 per rev active twist appears effective for vibration reduction. In the high advance ratio case (mu = 0.70), the 0 per rev actuation appeared to have negligible impact on performance improvement. In summary, computational simulations successfully demonstrated that the current active twist concept provided a significant reduction of the maximum BVI noise in descent, a significant reduction of the vibration in the high speed case, a small improvement on rotor performance in hover, and a negligible impact on rotor performance in forward flight.

  20. Do twisted laser beams evoke nuclear hyperpolarization?

    PubMed

    Schmidt, A B; Andrews, D L; Rohrbach, A; Gohn-Kreuz, C; Shatokhin, V N; Kiselev, V G; Hennig, J; von Elverfeldt, D; Hövener, J-B

    2016-07-01

    The hyperpolarization of nuclear spins promises great advances in chemical analysis and medical diagnosis by substantially increasing the sensitivity of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Current methods to produce a hyperpolarized sample, however, are arduous, time-consuming or costly and require elaborate equipment. Recently, a much simpler approach was introduced that holds the potential, if harnessed appropriately, to revolutionize the production of hyperpolarized spins. It was reported that high levels of hyperpolarization in nuclear spins can be created by irradiation with a laser beam carrying orbital angular momentum (twisted light). Aside from these initial reports however, no further experimental verification has been presented. In addition, this effect has so far evaded a critical theoretical examination. In this contribution, we present the first independent attempt to reproduce the effect. We exposed a sample of immersion oil or a fluorocarbon liquid that was placed within a low-field NMR spectrometer to Laguerre-Gaussian and Bessel laser beams at a wavelength of 514.5nm and various topological charges. We acquired (1)H and (19)F NMR free induction decay data, either during or alternating with the irradiation that was parallel to B0. We observed an irregular increase in NMR signal in experiments where the sample was exposed to beams with higher values of the topological charge. However, at no time did the effect reach statistical significance of 95%. Given the measured sensitivity of our setup, we estimate that a possible effect did not exceed a hyperpolarization (at 5mT) of 0.14-6%, depending on the assumed hyperpolarized volume. It should be noted though, that there were some differences between our setup and the previous implementation of the experiment, which may have inhibited the full incidence of this effect. To approach a theoretical description of this effect, we considered the interaction of an electron with a plane wave, which is known to be

  1. Do twisted laser beams evoke nuclear hyperpolarization?

    PubMed

    Schmidt, A B; Andrews, D L; Rohrbach, A; Gohn-Kreuz, C; Shatokhin, V N; Kiselev, V G; Hennig, J; von Elverfeldt, D; Hövener, J-B

    2016-07-01

    The hyperpolarization of nuclear spins promises great advances in chemical analysis and medical diagnosis by substantially increasing the sensitivity of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Current methods to produce a hyperpolarized sample, however, are arduous, time-consuming or costly and require elaborate equipment. Recently, a much simpler approach was introduced that holds the potential, if harnessed appropriately, to revolutionize the production of hyperpolarized spins. It was reported that high levels of hyperpolarization in nuclear spins can be created by irradiation with a laser beam carrying orbital angular momentum (twisted light). Aside from these initial reports however, no further experimental verification has been presented. In addition, this effect has so far evaded a critical theoretical examination. In this contribution, we present the first independent attempt to reproduce the effect. We exposed a sample of immersion oil or a fluorocarbon liquid that was placed within a low-field NMR spectrometer to Laguerre-Gaussian and Bessel laser beams at a wavelength of 514.5nm and various topological charges. We acquired (1)H and (19)F NMR free induction decay data, either during or alternating with the irradiation that was parallel to B0. We observed an irregular increase in NMR signal in experiments where the sample was exposed to beams with higher values of the topological charge. However, at no time did the effect reach statistical significance of 95%. Given the measured sensitivity of our setup, we estimate that a possible effect did not exceed a hyperpolarization (at 5mT) of 0.14-6%, depending on the assumed hyperpolarized volume. It should be noted though, that there were some differences between our setup and the previous implementation of the experiment, which may have inhibited the full incidence of this effect. To approach a theoretical description of this effect, we considered the interaction of an electron with a plane wave, which is known to be

  2. Do twisted laser beams evoke nuclear hyperpolarization?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, A. B.; Andrews, D. L.; Rohrbach, A.; Gohn-Kreuz, C.; Shatokhin, V. N.; Kiselev, V. G.; Hennig, J.; von Elverfeldt, D.; Hövener, J.-B.

    2016-07-01

    The hyperpolarization of nuclear spins promises great advances in chemical analysis and medical diagnosis by substantially increasing the sensitivity of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Current methods to produce a hyperpolarized sample, however, are arduous, time-consuming or costly and require elaborate equipment. Recently, a much simpler approach was introduced that holds the potential, if harnessed appropriately, to revolutionize the production of hyperpolarized spins. It was reported that high levels of hyperpolarization in nuclear spins can be created by irradiation with a laser beam carrying orbital angular momentum (twisted light). Aside from these initial reports however, no further experimental verification has been presented. In addition, this effect has so far evaded a critical theoretical examination. In this contribution, we present the first independent attempt to reproduce the effect. We exposed a sample of immersion oil or a fluorocarbon liquid that was placed within a low-field NMR spectrometer to Laguerre-Gaussian and Bessel laser beams at a wavelength of 514.5 nm and various topological charges. We acquired 1H and 19F NMR free induction decay data, either during or alternating with the irradiation that was parallel to B0. We observed an irregular increase in NMR signal in experiments where the sample was exposed to beams with higher values of the topological charge. However, at no time did the effect reach statistical significance of 95%. Given the measured sensitivity of our setup, we estimate that a possible effect did not exceed a hyperpolarization (at 5 mT) of 0.14-6%, depending on the assumed hyperpolarized volume. It should be noted though, that there were some differences between our setup and the previous implementation of the experiment, which may have inhibited the full incidence of this effect. To approach a theoretical description of this effect, we considered the interaction of an electron with a plane wave, which is known to be

  3. Improve sensitization and corrosion resistance of an Al-Mg alloy by optimization of grain boundaries.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jianfeng; Heckman, Nathan M; Velasco, Leonardo; Hodge, Andrea M

    2016-01-01

    The sensitization and subsequent intergranular corrosion of Al-5.3 wt.% Mg alloy has been shown to be an important factor in stress corrosion cracking of Al-Mg alloys. Understanding sensitization requires the review of grain boundary character on the precipitation process which can assist in developing and designing alloys with improved corrosion resistance. This study shows that the degree of precipitation in Al-Mg alloy is dependent on grain boundary misorientation angle, adjacent grain boundary planes and grain boundary types. The results show that the misorientation angle is the most important factor influencing precipitation in grain boundaries of the Al-Mg alloy. Low angle grain boundaries (≤15°) have better immunity to precipitation and grain boundary acid attack. High angle grain boundaries (>15°) are vulnerable to grain boundary acid attack. Grain boundaries with adjacent plane orientations near to {100} have potential for immunity to precipitation and grain boundary acid attack. This work shows that low Σ (Σ ≤ 29) coincident site lattice (CSL) grain boundaries have thinner β precipitates. Modified nitric acid mass loss test and polarization test demonstrated that the global corrosion resistance of sputtered Al-Mg alloy is enhanced. This may be attributed to the increased fractions of low Σ (Σ ≤ 29) CSL grain boundaries after sputtering. PMID:27230299

  4. Improve sensitization and corrosion resistance of an Al-Mg alloy by optimization of grain boundaries

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Jianfeng; Heckman, Nathan M.; Velasco, Leonardo; Hodge, Andrea M.

    2016-01-01

    The sensitization and subsequent intergranular corrosion of Al-5.3 wt.% Mg alloy has been shown to be an important factor in stress corrosion cracking of Al-Mg alloys. Understanding sensitization requires the review of grain boundary character on the precipitation process which can assist in developing and designing alloys with improved corrosion resistance. This study shows that the degree of precipitation in Al-Mg alloy is dependent on grain boundary misorientation angle, adjacent grain boundary planes and grain boundary types. The results show that the misorientation angle is the most important factor influencing precipitation in grain boundaries of the Al-Mg alloy. Low angle grain boundaries (≤15°) have better immunity to precipitation and grain boundary acid attack. High angle grain boundaries (>15°) are vulnerable to grain boundary acid attack. Grain boundaries with adjacent plane orientations near to {100} have potential for immunity to precipitation and grain boundary acid attack. This work shows that low Σ (Σ ≤ 29) coincident site lattice (CSL) grain boundaries have thinner β precipitates. Modified nitric acid mass loss test and polarization test demonstrated that the global corrosion resistance of sputtered Al-Mg alloy is enhanced. This may be attributed to the increased fractions of low Σ (Σ ≤ 29) CSL grain boundaries after sputtering. PMID:27230299

  5. Identification and characterization of a twist ortholog in the polychaete annelid Platynereis dumerilii reveals mesodermal expression of Pdu-twist.

    PubMed

    Pfeifer, Kathrin; Schaub, Christoph; Wolfstetter, Georg; Dorresteijn, Adriaan

    2013-09-01

    The basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor twist plays a key role during mesoderm development in Bilateria. In this study, we identified a twist ortholog in the polychaete annelid Platynereis dumerilii and analyze its expression during larval development, postlarval growth up to the adult stage, and caudal regeneration after amputation of posterior segments. At late larval stages, Pdu-twist is expressed in the mesodermal anlagen and in developing muscles. During adulthood and caudal regeneration, Pdu-twist is expressed in the posterior growth zone, in mesodermal cells within the newly forming segments and budding parapodia. Our results indicate that Pdu-twist is involved in mesoderm formation during larval development, posterior growth, and caudal regeneration. PMID:23817621

  6. Twist-joints and double twist-joints in RNA structure.

    PubMed

    Boutorine, Yury I; Steinberg, Sergey V

    2012-12-01

    Analysis of available RNA crystal structures has allowed us to identify a new family of RNA arrangements that we call double twist-joints, or DTJs. Each DTJ is composed of a double helix that contains two bulges incorporated into different strands and separated from each other by 2 or 3 bp. At each bulge, the double helix is over-twisted, while the unpaired nucleotides of both bulges form a complex network of stacking and hydrogen-bonding with nucleotides of helical regions. In total, we identified 14 DTJ cases, which can be combined in three groups based on common structural characteristics. One DTJ is found in a functional center of the ribosome, another DTJ mediates binding of the pre-tRNA to the RNase P, and two more DTJs form the sensing domains in the glycine riboswitch.

  7. Grain Handling and Storage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Troy G.; Minor, John

    This text for a secondary- or postecondary-level course in grain handling and storage contains ten chapters. Chapter titles are (1) Introduction to Grain Handling and Storage, (2) Elevator Safety, (3) Grain Grading and Seed Identification, (4) Moisture Control, (5) Insect and Rodent Control, (6) Grain Inventory Control, (7) Elevator Maintenance,…

  8. Grain Grading and Handling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rendleman, Matt; Legacy, James

    This publication provides an introduction to grain grading and handling for adult students in vocational and technical education programs. Organized in five chapters, the booklet provides a brief overview of the jobs performed at a grain elevator and of the techniques used to grade grain. The first chapter introduces the grain industry and…

  9. The twisted diversion: a paralyzing complication

    PubMed Central

    Hiew, Kenneth; Glendinning, Richard; Parr, Nigel; Kumar, Manal

    2013-01-01

    Ileal conduit remains a widely used urinary diversion performed after radical cystectomy. However, complications of ileal conduits remain an important concern in urological surgery. We report a rare case of an ileal conduit stricture, which can have grim complications if unobserved during the operation. Following an initial operation of radical cystectomy and ileal conduit formation in France in 2011, an 80-year-old male travelled back to the UK after 4 months of general weakness and limb paralysis. Initial blood test shows life-threatening hyperkalemia and worsened renal function. Subsequent ultrasound KUB scan and loopogram revealed obstructive uropathy. The initial management includes intravenous antibiotics and bilateral nephrostomies were inserted to aid diversion of urine. A thorough surgical exploration revealed a twisted, fibrous mesenteric band adhered to the proximal part of the ileal conduit. Only one case report of ileal conduit stenosis was described many years after the procedure. PMID:24963928

  10. Optical Twist Induced by Plasmonic Resonance.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jun; Wang, Neng; Cui, Liyong; Li, Xiao; Lin, Zhifang; Ng, Jack

    2016-01-01

    Harvesting light for optical torque is of significant importance, owing to its ability to rotate nano- or micro-objects. Nevertheless, applying a strong optical torque remains a challenging task: angular momentum must conserve but light is limited. A simple argument shows the tendency for two objects with strong mutual scattering or light exchange to exhibit a conspicuously enhanced optical torque without large extinction or absorption cross section. The torque on each object is almost equal but opposite, which we called optical twist. The effect is quite significant for plasmonic particle cluster, but can also be observed in structures with other morphologies. Such approach exhibits an unprecedentedly large torque to light extinction or absorption ratio, enabling limited light to exert a relatively large torque without severe heating. Our work contributes to the understanding of optical torque and introduces a novel way to manipulate the internal degrees of freedom of a structured particle cluster.

  11. Optical Twist Induced by Plasmonic Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jun; Wang, Neng; Cui, Liyong; Li, Xiao; Lin, Zhifang; Ng, Jack

    2016-06-01

    Harvesting light for optical torque is of significant importance, owing to its ability to rotate nano- or micro-objects. Nevertheless, applying a strong optical torque remains a challenging task: angular momentum must conserve but light is limited. A simple argument shows the tendency for two objects with strong mutual scattering or light exchange to exhibit a conspicuously enhanced optical torque without large extinction or absorption cross section. The torque on each object is almost equal but opposite, which we called optical twist. The effect is quite significant for plasmonic particle cluster, but can also be observed in structures with other morphologies. Such approach exhibits an unprecedentedly large torque to light extinction or absorption ratio, enabling limited light to exert a relatively large torque without severe heating. Our work contributes to the understanding of optical torque and introduces a novel way to manipulate the internal degrees of freedom of a structured particle cluster.

  12. Optical Twist Induced by Plasmonic Resonance

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jun; Wang, Neng; Cui, Liyong; Li, Xiao; Lin, Zhifang; Ng, Jack

    2016-01-01

    Harvesting light for optical torque is of significant importance, owing to its ability to rotate nano- or micro-objects. Nevertheless, applying a strong optical torque remains a challenging task: angular momentum must conserve but light is limited. A simple argument shows the tendency for two objects with strong mutual scattering or light exchange to exhibit a conspicuously enhanced optical torque without large extinction or absorption cross section. The torque on each object is almost equal but opposite, which we called optical twist. The effect is quite significant for plasmonic particle cluster, but can also be observed in structures with other morphologies. Such approach exhibits an unprecedentedly large torque to light extinction or absorption ratio, enabling limited light to exert a relatively large torque without severe heating. Our work contributes to the understanding of optical torque and introduces a novel way to manipulate the internal degrees of freedom of a structured particle cluster. PMID:27291860

  13. Terahertz twisted beams generation in plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobhani, Hassan; Vaziri (Khamedi), Mohammad; Rooholamininejad, Hossien; Bahrampour, Alireza

    2016-08-01

    The resonant vortex terahertz beam generation by the cross-focusing of two twisted coaxial laser beams is investigated. For the resonant excitation of terahertz radiation, the rippled density in plasma and the ripple wave number is suitably chosen to satisfy the phase matching condition. The nonlinear current density at terahertz frequency arises due to the spatial variation of two Laguerre-Gaussian coupled field. The terahertz intensity scales as the ponderomotive force of laser beams which imparts an oscillatory velocity to the electrons and, in fact, input Laguerre-Gaussian laser beams properties such as vortex charge number and beam waist. Various laser and plasma parameters are employed to yield vortex terahertz radiation with higher efficiency. Also, it is shown that when the beating frequency approaches plasma frequency, the amplitude of THz radiation increases.

  14. Optical Twist Induced by Plasmonic Resonance.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jun; Wang, Neng; Cui, Liyong; Li, Xiao; Lin, Zhifang; Ng, Jack

    2016-01-01

    Harvesting light for optical torque is of significant importance, owing to its ability to rotate nano- or micro-objects. Nevertheless, applying a strong optical torque remains a challenging task: angular momentum must conserve but light is limited. A simple argument shows the tendency for two objects with strong mutual scattering or light exchange to exhibit a conspicuously enhanced optical torque without large extinction or absorption cross section. The torque on each object is almost equal but opposite, which we called optical twist. The effect is quite significant for plasmonic particle cluster, but can also be observed in structures with other morphologies. Such approach exhibits an unprecedentedly large torque to light extinction or absorption ratio, enabling limited light to exert a relatively large torque without severe heating. Our work contributes to the understanding of optical torque and introduces a novel way to manipulate the internal degrees of freedom of a structured particle cluster. PMID:27291860

  15. Bioinspired twisted composites based on Bouligand structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto, F.; Iervolino, O.; Scarselli, G.; Ginzburg, D.; Meo, M.

    2016-04-01

    The coupling between structural support and protection makes biological systems an important source of inspiration for the development of advanced smart composite structures. In particular, some particular material configurations can be implemented into traditional composites in order to improve their impact resistance and the out-of-plane properties, which represents one of the major weakness of commercial carbon fibres reinforced polymers (CFRP) structures. Based on this premise, a three-dimensional twisted arrangement shown in a vast multitude of biological systems (such as the armoured cuticles of Scarabei, the scales of Arapaima Gigas and the smashing club of Odontodactylus Scyllarus) has been replicated to develop an improved structural material characterised by a high level of in-plane isotropy and a higher interfacial strength generated by the smooth stiffness transition between each layer of fibrils. Indeed, due to their intrinsic layered nature, interlaminar stresses are one of the major causes of failure of traditional CFRP and are generated by the mismatch of the elastic properties between plies in a traditional laminate. Since the energy required to open a crack or a delamination between two adjacent plies is due to the difference between their orientations, the gradual angle variation obtained by mimicking the Bouligand Structures could improve energy absorption and the residual properties of carbon laminates when they are subjected to low velocity impact event. Two different bioinspired laminates were manufactured following a double helicoidal approach and a rotational one and were subjected to a complete test campaign including low velocity impact loading and compared to a traditional quasi-isotropic panel. Fractography analysis via X-Ray tomography was used to understand the mechanical behaviour of the different laminates and the residual properties were evaluated via Compression After Impact (CAI) tests. Results confirmed that the biological

  16. Simulation study of twisted crystal growth in organic thin films.

    PubMed

    Fang, Alta; Haataja, Mikko

    2015-10-01

    Many polymer and organic small-molecule thin films crystallize with microstructures that twist or curve in a regular manner as crystal growth proceeds. Here we present a phase-field model that energetically favors twisting of the three-dimensional crystalline orientation about and along particular axes, allowing morphologies such as banded spherulites, curved dendrites, and "s"- or "c"-shaped needle crystals to be simulated. When twisting about the fast-growing crystalline axis is energetically favored and spherulitic growth conditions are imposed, crystallization occurs in the form of banded spherulites composed of radially oriented twisted crystalline fibers. Due to the lack of symmetry, twisting along the normal growth direction leads to heterochiral banded spherulites with opposite twist handedness in each half of the spherulite. When twisting is instead favored about the axis perpendicular to the plane of the substrate and along the normal growth direction under diffusion-limited single-crystalline growth conditions, crystallization occurs in the form of curved dendrites with uniformly rotating branches. We show that the rate at which the branches curve affects not only the morphology but also the overall kinetics of crystallization, as the total crystallized area at a given time is maximized for a finite turning rate. PMID:26565254

  17. Aerodynamic Design Study of an Advanced Active Twist Rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sekula, Martin K.; Wilbur, Matthew L.; Yeager, William T., Jr.

    2003-01-01

    An Advanced Active Twist Rotor (AATR) is currently being developed by the U.S. Army Vehicle Technology Directorate at NASA Langley Research Center. As a part of this effort, an analytical study was conducted to determine the impact of blade geometry on active-twist performance and, based on those findings, propose a candidate aerodynamic design for the AATR. The process began by creating a baseline design which combined the dynamic design of the original Active Twist Rotor and the aerodynamic design of a high lift rotor concept. The baseline model was used to conduct a series of parametric studies to examine the effect of linear blade twist and blade tip sweep, droop, and taper on active-twist performance. Rotor power requirements and hub vibration were also examined at flight conditions ranging from hover to advance ratio = 0.40. A total of 108 candidate designs were analyzed using the second-generation version of the Comprehensive Analytical Model of Rotorcraft Aerodynamics and Dynamics (CAMRAD II) code. The study concluded that the vibration reduction capabilities of a rotor utilizing controlled, strain-induced twisting are enhanced through the incorporation of blade tip sweep, droop, and taper into the blade design, while they are degraded by increasing the nose-down linear blade twist. Based on the analysis of rotor power, hub vibration, and active-twist response, a candidate aerodynamic design for the AATR consisting of a blade with approximately 10 degrees of linear blade twist and a blade tip design with 30 degree sweep, 10 degree droop, and 2.5:1 taper ratio over the outer five percent of the blade is proposed.

  18. Geometry and crystallographic configuration of grain boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichler, Jan; Weikusat, Ilka; Kipfstuhl, Sepp; Binder, Tobias

    2015-04-01

    Ice cores provide a unique opportunity to study fundamental mechanisms which control the internal flow of ice sheets. Different kinds of deformation processes acting on the micro-scale are responsible for the viscoplastic behavior on large scale. Careful interpretation of microstructural features such as grain size, shape, lattice orientation and the occurrence of subgrain boundaries can help us to follow these processes and to improve our understanding of ice rheology. Polarized light microscopy experienced a quick development in the last decade. A new generation of automatic fabric analyzers enables to measure c-axis orientations in µm-resolution. This high amount and quality of fabric data motivates to apply digital-image-processing routines (DIP) for the recognition and quantification of microstructural patterns. Here we present a study on grain boundaries based on the acquisition of more than 700 fabric images recorded along the NEEM ice core (Greenland). Geometrical characteristics of grain boundaries are studied as well as their cross-sectional orientations in relation to the c-axis orientations of the corresponding adjacent grains. We could follow the evolution from the initial N-type and P-type low-angle boundaries (Weikusat et al., 2011) to high angle boundaries during rotation recrystallization. In agreement with some previous studies we confirm that the established three-stage-recrystallization model may be an oversimplification. According to our results, rotation recrystallization as well as grain boundary migration are actually present in all depths with varying intensities at NEEM. I. Weikusat, A. Miyamoto, S. H. Faria, S. Kipfstuhl, N. Azuma, and T. Hondoh: Subgrain boundaries in Antarctic ice quantified by X-ray Laue diffraction. J. Glaciol., 57(201):85-94, 2011. doi: 10013/epic.36402.

  19. Quantum communication through a spin ring with twisted boundary conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Bose, S.; Jin, B.-Q.; Korepin, V.E.

    2005-08-15

    We investigate quantum communication between the sites of a spin ring with twisted boundary conditions. Such boundary conditions can be achieved by a magnetic flux through the ring. We find that a nonzero twist can improve communication through finite odd-numbered rings and enable high-fidelity multiparty quantum communication through spin rings (working near perfectly for rings of five and seven spins). We show that in certain cases, the twist results in the complete blockage of quantum-information flow to a certain site of the ring. This effect can be exploited to interface and entangle a flux qubit and a spin qubit without embedding the latter in a magnetic field.

  20. Assembly and Folding of Twisted Baskets in Organic Solvents.

    PubMed

    Pratumyot, Yaowalak; Chen, Shigui; Hu, Lei; Polen, Shane M; Hadad, Christopher M; Badjić, Jovica D

    2016-09-01

    A synthetic method for obtaining enantiopure and twisted baskets of type (P)-3 is described. These chiral cavitands were found to fold quinoline gates, at the rim of their twisted platform, in acetonitrile and give molecular capsules that assemble into large unilamellar vesicles. In a less polar dichloromethane, however, cup-shaped (P)-3 packed into vesicles but with the quinoline gates in an unfolded orientation. The ability of twisted baskets to form functional nanostructured materials could be of interest for building stereoselective sensors and catalysts. PMID:27513214

  1. Twisted electrostatic ion-cyclotron waves in dusty plasmas.

    PubMed

    Shukla, P K

    2013-01-01

    We show the existence of a twisted electrostatic ion-cyclotron (ESIC) wave carrying orbital angular momentum (OAM) in a magnetized dusty plasma. For our purposes, we derive a 3D wave equation for the coupled ESIC and dust ion-acoustic (DIA) waves from the hydrodynamic equations that are composed of the continuity and momentum equations, together with Poisson's equation. The 3D wave equation reveals the formation of a braided or twisted ESIC wave structure carrying OAM. The braided or twisted ESIC wave structure can trap and transport plasma particles in magnetoplasmas, such as those in Saturn's F-ring and in the forthcoming magnetized dusty plasma experiments. PMID:23410477

  2. Twisting of nanowires induced by anisotropic surface stresses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jian-Shan; Feng, Xi-Qiao; Wang, Gang-Feng; Yu, Shou-Wen

    2008-05-01

    Many natural and synthetic quasi-one-dimensional materials are of helical or twisting shape and understanding the physical mechanisms underlying the asymmetric shape is of both theoretical and technological significances. In this letter, we pointed out that anisotropic surface stresses present as a possible reason for the formation of some micro-/nanohelices. Using Gurtin's theory of surface elasticity, we quantitatively investigated the twisting deformation of nanowires due to anisotropic surface stresses. The present model can also elucidate the formation of some other helical materials at micro- and nanoscales, e.g., twisting lamellae in polymer spherulites, spiraled bacteria, and flagella.

  3. Topological suppression of optical tunneling in a twisted annular fiber

    SciTech Connect

    Ornigotti, M.; Valle, G. Della; Gatti, D.; Longhi, S.

    2007-08-15

    A classical wave-optics analog of topological (Aharonov-Bohm) suppression of tunneling in a double-well potential on a ring threaded by a magnetic flux is proposed. The optical system consists of a uniformly twisted optical fiber with a structured annular core, in which the fiber twist mimics the role of the magnetic flux in the corresponding quantum-mechanical problem. Light waves trapped in the annular core of the fiber experience an additional topological (Aharonov-Bohm) phase, which may lead to the destruction of optical tunneling at certain values of the twist rate.

  4. Economic recovery of oil trapped at fan margins using high angle wells and multiple hydraulic fractures. Annual report, September 28, 1995--September 27, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Niemeyer, B.L.

    1997-09-01

    The digital fan margin in the northeast portion of the Yowlumne field contains significant reserves but is not economic to develop using verticle wells. Numerous interbedded shales and deteriorating rock properties limit producibility. In addition, extreme depths (13,000 ft) present a challenging environment for hydraulic fracturing and artificial lift. Lastly, a mature waterflood increases risk because of the uncertainty with size and location of flood fronts. This project attempts to demonstrate the effectiveness of exploiting the distal fan margin of this slope-basin clastic reservoir through the use of a high-angle well completed with multiple hydraulic-fracture treatments. The combination of a high-angle (or horizontal) well and hydraulic fracturing will allow greater pay exposure than can be achieved with conventional verticle wells while maintaining verticle communication between thin interbedded layers and the wellbore. The equivalent production rate and reserves of three verticle wells are anticipated at one-half to two-thirds the cost.

  5. Wind-tunnel static and free-flight investigation of high-angle-of-attack stability and control characteristics of a model of the EA-6B airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, Frank L., Jr.; Hahne, David E.

    1992-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in the Langley 30- by 60-Foot Tunnel and the Langley 12-Foot Low-Speed Tunnel to identify factors contributing to a directional divergence at high angles of attack for the EA-6B airplane. The study consisted of static wind-tunnel tests, smoke and tuft flow-visualization tests, and free-flight tests of a 1/8.5-scale model of the airplane. The results of the investigation indicate that the directional divergence of the airplane is brought about by a loss of directional stability and effective dihedral at high angles of attack. Several modifications were tested that significantly alleviate the stability problem. The results of the free-flight study show that the modified configuration exhibits good dynamic stability characteristics and could be flown at angles of attack significantly higher than those of the unmodified configuration.

  6. Large-scale wind-tunnel investigation of a close-coupled canard-delta-wing fighter model through high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoll, F.; Koenig, D. G.

    1983-01-01

    Data obtained through very high angles of attack from a large-scale, subsonic wind-tunnel test of a close-coupled canard-delta-wing fighter model are analyzed. The canard delays wing leading-edge vortex breakdown, even for angles of attack at which the canard is completely stalled. A vortex-lattice method was applied which gave good predictions of lift and pitching moment up to an angle of attack of about 20 deg, where vortex-breakdown effects on performance become significant. Pitch-control inputs generally retain full effectiveness up to the angle of attack of maximum lift, beyond which, effectiveness drops off rapidly. A high-angle-of-attack prediction method gives good estimates of lift and drag for the completely stalled aircraft. Roll asymmetry observed at zero sideslip is apparently caused by an asymmetry in the model support structure.

  7. A Computational Investigation of Random Angle Grain Boundaries for CdTe Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buurma, Christopher; Chan, Maria; Klie, Robert; Sivananthan, Sivalingam; DOE Bridge Collaboration

    2015-03-01

    Grain boundaries (GB) in poly-CdTe solar cells play an important role in species diffusion, segregation, defect formation, and carrier recombination. Many studies on GBs in CdTe focus on either entire grain-boundary networks found in complete poly-CdTe devices, those exhibiting high symmetry such as the coincident site lattice (CSL) or symmetric tilt or twist, or on very small scale Scanning-Tunneling Electron Microscopse (STEM) viewable interfaces and dislocations. The topic of this talk is a comprehensive survey of the grain boundary parameter space regardless of the degree of symmetry found and whether the STEM channeling condition is satisfied. Our survey encompasses both near-CSL or vicinal grain boundaries decorated with nearby dislocations, as well as mixed tilt and twist interfaces with all possible symmetrically inequivalent grain boundary planes. Atomistic calculations using a Stillinger-Weber potential will be presented on a large representative sample of random-angle GBs. Trends in interfacial energies and atomistic structures as a function of tilt/twist/displacement parameters will be investigated. First principles density functional theory (DFT) calculations will be performed on a subset of these GBs to reveal their electronic structures and their implications towards PV performance. DoE Sunshot program contract DOE DEEE005956. Use of the Center for Nanoscale Materials was supported by the USDoE, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  8. Multislice frozen phonon high angle annular dark-field image simulation study of Mo-V-Nb-Te-O complex oxidation catalyst "M1".

    PubMed

    Blom, Douglas A

    2012-01-01

    Multislice frozen phonon calculations were performed on a model structure of a complex oxide which has potential use as an ammoxidation catalyst. The structure has 11 cation sites in the framework, several of which exhibit mixed Mo/V substitution. In this paper the sensitivity of high-angle annular dark-field (HAADF) imaging to partial substitution of V for Mo in this structure is reported. While the relationship between the average V content in an atom column and the HAADF image intensity is not independent of thickness, it is a fairly weak function of thickness suggesting that HAADF STEM imaging in certain cases can provide a useful starting point for Rietveld refinements of mixed occupancy in complex materials. The thermal parameters of the various cations and oxygen anions in the model affect the amount of thermal diffuse scattering and therefore the intensity in the HAADF images. For complex materials where the structure has been derived via powder Rietveld refinement, the uncertainty in the thermal parameters may limit the accuracy of HAADF image simulations. With the current interest in quantitative microscopy, simulations need to accurately describe the electron scattering to the very high angles often subtended by a HAADF detector. For this system approximately 15% of the scattering occurs above 200 mrad at 200 kV. To simulate scattering to such high angles, very fine sampling of the projected potential is necessary which increases the computational cost of the simulation.

  9. Simulator study of the effectiveness of an automatic control system designed to improve the high-angle-of-attack characteristics of a fighter airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, W. P.; Nguyen, L. T.; Vangunst, R. W.

    1976-01-01

    A piloted, fixed-base simulation was conducted to study the effectiveness of some automatic control system features designed to improve the stability and control characteristics of fighter airplanes at high angles of attack. These features include an angle-of-attack limiter, a normal-acceleration limiter, an aileron-rudder interconnect, and a stability-axis yaw damper. The study was based on a current lightweight fighter prototype. The aerodynamic data used in the simulation were measured on a 0.15-scale model at low Reynolds number and low subsonic Mach number. The simulation was conducted on the Langley differential maneuvering simulator, and the evaluation involved representative combat maneuvering. Results of the investigation show the fully augmented airplane to be quite stable and maneuverable throughout the operational angle-of-attack range. The angle-of-attack/normal-acceleration limiting feature of the pitch control system is found to be a necessity to avoid angle-of-attack excursions at high angles of attack. The aileron-rudder interconnect system is shown to be very effective in making the airplane departure resistant while the stability-axis yaw damper provided improved high-angle-of-attack roll performance with a minimum of sideslip excursions.

  10. Twist effect and sensing of few mode polymer fibre Bragg gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Binbin; Luo, Yanhua; Bhowmik, Kishore; Rajan, Ginu; Ji, Minning; Wen, Jianxiang; Peng, Gang-Ding

    2016-01-01

    For the development of the twist sensor based on few mode polymer optical fibre (POF) gratings, we investigated the twist effect of few mode (FM) POF Bragg gratings with large twist, and found the twist effect on reflection is highly mode dependent-insignificant on the fundamental mode and considerable on higher order modes, which seems closely related to the symmetry of modal field. In addition, Bragg wavelengths of both the fundamental mode and higher modes red-shift with the twisting and blue-shift with the twist releasing, and they almost display the similar response trend without any mode dependence. Further analysis found that the red-shift of the Bragg wavelength should be attributed to the redistribution of the pre-strain applied upon the POF, activated by twist. Finally, based on the reflection response to the twist, one kind of twist sensing scheme with few mode POF gratings has been demonstrated, showing great potential as a twist sensor.

  11. Whittaker modules for the twisted Heisenberg-Virasoro algebra

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Dong; Wu Yuezhu; Zhu Linsheng

    2010-02-15

    We define Whittaker modules for the twisted Heisenberg-Virasoro algebra and obtain several results from the classical setting, including a classification of simple Whittaker modules by central characters.

  12. Formation of Twisted Elephant Trunks in the Rosette Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlqvist, P.; Gahm, G. F.; Kristen, H.

    New observations show that dark elephant trunks in the Rosette nebula are often built up by thin filaments. In several of the trunks the filaments seem to form a twisted pattern. This pattern is hard to reconcile with current theory. We propose a new model for the formation of twisted elephant trunks in which electromagnetic forces play an important role. The model considers the behaviour of a twisted magnetic filament in a molecular cloud, where a cluster of hot stars has been recently born. As a result of stellar winds, and radiation pressure, electromagnetic forces, and inertia forces part of the filament can develop into a double helix pointing towards the stars. The double helix represents the twisted elephant trunk. A simple analogy experiment visualizes and supports the trunk model.

  13. Packing with a twist: from Wrinkles to Scrolls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudrolli, Arshad; Chopin, Julien

    2012-02-01

    We discuss an experimental investigation of a thin elastic sheet in the form of a ribbon with clamped boundary conditions at both ends which is then subjected to a twist by rotating the ends through a prescribed angle. We find that a wrinkling instability appears even at a small twist angle which depends on the aspect ratio of the ribbon, its bending modulus and initial tension. Using x-ray tomography, we show that the pattern of this first instability has an impact on the folding at larger twist angles which can result in ordered configurations including Fermat scrolls. Still further twisting results in a highly compressive packing as in wringing a towel without application of direct radial compression. Implications for developing yarns with novel mechanical and transport properties [Lima, et al., Science 331, 51 (2011)] will be discussed.

  14. 14. DETAIL OF GUSSET WITH CURVE ANGLE IRON AND TWISTED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. DETAIL OF GUSSET WITH CURVE ANGLE IRON AND TWISTED STRIPS, FORMING SUN RAY PATTERN. LATTICE RAILING AT LOWER RIGHT. - River Road Bridge, Spanning Spring Creek in Spring Creek Township, Hallton, Elk County, PA

  15. Solar Material Twists on Sun’s Surface

    NASA Video Gallery

    Solar material twists above the sun’s surface in this close-up captured by NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory on June 7-8, 2016, showcasing the turbulence caused by combative magnetic forces on the ...

  16. 6. DETAIL OF GUSSET WITH CURVE ANGLE IRON AND TWISTED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. DETAIL OF GUSSET WITH CURVE ANGLE IRON AND TWISTED STRIPS, FORMING SUN RAY PATTERN. LATTICE RAILING AT LOWER RIGHT. - River Road Bridge, Spanning Spring Creek in Spring Creek Township, Hallton, Elk County, PA

  17. Applying twisted boundary conditions for few-body nuclear systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Körber, Christopher; Luu, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    We describe and implement twisted boundary conditions for the deuteron and triton systems within finite volumes using the nuclear lattice EFT formalism. We investigate the finite-volume dependence of these systems with different twist angles. We demonstrate how various finite-volume information can be used to improve calculations of binding energies in such a framework. Our results suggests that with appropriate twisting of boundaries, infinite-volume binding energies can be reliably extracted from calculations using modest volume sizes with cubic length L ≈8 -14 fm. Of particular importance is our derivation and numerical verification of three-body analogs of "i-periodic" twist angles that eliminate the leading-order finite-volume effects to the three-body binding energy.

  18. Charge-transfer-induced twisting of the nitro group.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Jahur A; Sarkar, Moloy; Samanta, Anunay; Ghosh, Hirendra N; Palit, Dipak K

    2007-07-19

    Excited-state relaxation dynamics of 2-amino-7-nitrofluorene (ANF) and 2-dimethylamino-7-nitrofluorene (DMANF) has been investigated in two aprotic solvents, namely acetonitrile and DMSO using femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopic technique. Following photoexcitation to the highly dipolar excited singlet (S1) state, ANF and DMANF undergo mainly two concomitant relaxation processes, namely dipolar solvation and conformational relaxation via twisting of the nitro group to an orthogonal configuration with respect to the aromatic plane. Viscosity dependence of the relaxation dynamics of the S1 states of both ANF and DMANF suggests no involvement of the twisting motion of the amino or dimethylamino group in the charge-transfer process. The twisting of the nitro group is found to be a friction affected diffusive motion, which does not associate with any further charge transfer. The results presented in this paper resolve experimentally the dynamics of the twisting motion of the nitro group for the first time. PMID:17591761

  19. Determination of Elastic Twist in Horizontal Axis Wind Turbines (HAWTs)

    SciTech Connect

    Stoddard, F.; Nelson, V.; Starcher, K.; Andrews, B.

    2006-06-01

    This report presents the results of a project at the Alternative Energy Institute (AEI) which measured and calculated the elastic twist of three representative composite horizontal-axis blades: Carter 300, Gougeon ESI 54, and UTRC 8 kW.

  20. Magneto-Acoustic Waves in Compressible Magnetically Twisted Flux Tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdélyi, Robert; Fedun, Viktor

    2010-05-01

    The oscillatory modes of a magnetically twisted compressible flux tube embedded in a compressible magnetic environment are investigated in cylindrical geometry. Solutions to the governing equations to linear wave perturbations are derived in terms of Whittaker’s functions. A general dispersion equation is obtained in terms of Kummer’s functions for the approximation of weak and uniform internal twist, which is a good initial working model for flux tubes in solar applications. The sausage, kink and fluting modes are examined by means of the derived exact dispersion equation. The solutions of this general dispersion equation are found numerically under plasma conditions representative of the solar photosphere and corona. Solutions for the phase speed of the allowed eigenmodes are obtained for a range of wavenumbers and varying magnetic twist. Our results generalise previous classical and widely applied studies of MHD waves and oscillations in magnetic loops without a magnetic twist. Potential applications to solar magneto-seismology are discussed.

  1. Active-Twist Rotor Control Applications for UAVs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilbur, Matthew L.; Wilkie, W. Keats

    2004-01-01

    The current state-of-the-art in active-twist rotor control is discussed using representative examples from analytical and experimental studies, and the application to rotary-wing UAVs is considered. Topics include vibration and noise reduction, rotor performance improvement, active blade tracking, stability augmentation, and rotor blade de-icing. A review of the current status of piezoelectric fiber composite actuator technology, the class of piezoelectric actuators implemented in active-twist rotor systems, is included.

  2. Non-geometric fluxes, quasi-Hopf twist deformations, and nonassociative quantum mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Mylonas, Dionysios Szabo, Richard J.; Schupp, Peter

    2014-12-15

    We analyse the symmetries underlying nonassociative deformations of geometry in non-geometric R-flux compactifications which arise via T-duality from closed strings with constant geometric fluxes. Starting from the non-abelian Lie algebra of translations and Bopp shifts in phase space, together with a suitable cochain twist, we construct the quasi-Hopf algebra of symmetries that deforms the algebra of functions and the exterior differential calculus in the phase space description of nonassociative R-space. In this setting, nonassociativity is characterised by the associator 3-cocycle which controls non-coassociativity of the quasi-Hopf algebra. We use abelian 2-cocycle twists to construct maps between the dynamical nonassociative star product and a family of associative star products parametrized by constant momentum surfaces in phase space. We define a suitable integration on these nonassociative spaces and find that the usual cyclicity of associative noncommutative deformations is replaced by weaker notions of 2-cyclicity and 3-cyclicity. Using this star product quantization on phase space together with 3-cyclicity, we formulate a consistent version of nonassociative quantum mechanics, in which we calculate the expectation values of area and volume operators, and find coarse-graining of the string background due to the R-flux.

  3. Non-geometric fluxes, quasi-Hopf twist deformations, and nonassociative quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mylonas, Dionysios; Schupp, Peter; Szabo, Richard J.

    2014-12-01

    We analyse the symmetries underlying nonassociative deformations of geometry in non-geometric R-flux compactifications which arise via T-duality from closed strings with constant geometric fluxes. Starting from the non-abelian Lie algebra of translations and Bopp shifts in phase space, together with a suitable cochain twist, we construct the quasi-Hopf algebra of symmetries that deforms the algebra of functions and the exterior differential calculus in the phase space description of nonassociative R-space. In this setting, nonassociativity is characterised by the associator 3-cocycle which controls non-coassociativity of the quasi-Hopf algebra. We use abelian 2-cocycle twists to construct maps between the dynamical nonassociative star product and a family of associative star products parametrized by constant momentum surfaces in phase space. We define a suitable integration on these nonassociative spaces and find that the usual cyclicity of associative noncommutative deformations is replaced by weaker notions of 2-cyclicity and 3-cyclicity. Using this star product quantization on phase space together with 3-cyclicity, we formulate a consistent version of nonassociative quantum mechanics, in which we calculate the expectation values of area and volume operators, and find coarse-graining of the string background due to the R-flux.

  4. Strain softening mechanism at meso scale during micro-compression in an ultrafine-grained pure copper

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Jie; Li, Jianwei; Shan, Debin; Guo, Bin

    2015-09-15

    Strain softening behavior has been found at meso scale using micro-compression testing in an ultrafine-grained (UFG) pure copper by comparison with the typical strain hardening in conventional coarse-grained (CG) material. Microstructural observations show that grain size remains nearly the same including the fraction of high-angle grain boundaries during micro-compression in UFG pure copper. The Kernel average misorientation(KAM) distribution measured by electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), as a statistical method, is applied to qualitatively evaluate dislocation density in the interior of the grains. It is suggested that the deformation mechanisms are dominated by grain boundary sliding and grain rotation accompanied by dislocation slip in UFG pure copper, which demonstrates that the strain softening behavior is primarily caused by dislocation annihilation during micro-compression.

  5. Grain Boundary Character Distribution of TLM Titanium Alloy During Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, X. F.; Zhao, Y. Q.; Jia, Z. Q.; Zhang, Y. S.; Li, B.

    2016-06-01

    The grain boundary character distribution of TLM titanium alloy (with a nominal chemical composition of Ti-3Zr-2Sn-3Mo-25Nb) was studied under the deformation condition with different strain rates and compression reductions. The experimental results showed that the evolution and character distribution of grain boundaries structure during deformation were both related to grain boundary coupling, sliding, migration, and the grain rotating in nature. In TLM titanium alloy, the type of grain boundaries under different deformation condition included high-angle boundaries, low-angle boundaries, and the CSL boundaries of Σ3, Σ13, Σ29, and Σ39. Under the strain rate of 1 s-1, the numbers of grain boundaries with misorientation angle of 3°, 30°, and 60° all decreased obviously with the increasing compression reduction to 4.5%, comparing to those obtained under the strain rate of 0.001 s-1. Under the strain rate of 1 s-1, the numbers of Σ29 boundaries greatly increased with the compression reductions of 3 to 4.5% comparing to those obtained under the strain rate of 0.001 s-1, and the numbers of Σ3 boundaries increased firstly and then stabilized with the compression reduction increasing from 0 to 4%, while the numbers of Σ39 boundaries decreased with the compression reduction increasing to 4.5%.

  6. Twist-induced Magnetosphere Reconfiguration for Intermittent Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Lei; Yu, Cong; Tong, Hao

    2016-08-01

    We propose that the magnetosphere reconfiguration induced by magnetic twists in the closed field line region can account for the mode switching of intermittent pulsars. We carefully investigate the properties of axisymmetric force-free pulsar magnetospheres with magnetic twists in closed field line regions around the polar caps. The magnetosphere with twisted closed lines leads to enhanced spin-down rates. The enhancement in spin-down rate depends on the size of the region with twisted closed lines. Typically, it is increased by a factor of ˜2, which is consistent with the intermittent pulsars’ spin-down behavior during the “off” and “on” states. We find that there is a threshold of maximal twist angle {{Δ }}{φ }{{thres}}˜ 1. The magnetosphere is stable only if the closed line twist angle is less than {{Δ }}{φ }{{thres}}. Beyond this value, the magnetosphere becomes unstable and gets untwisted. The spin-down rate would reduce to its off-state value. The quasi-periodicity in spin-down rate change can be explained by long-term activities in the star’s crust and the untwisting induced by MHD instability. The estimated duration of on-state is about 1 week, consistent with observations. Due to the MHD instability, there exists an upper limit for the spin-down ratio (f˜ 3) between the on-state and the off-state, if the Y-point remains at the light cylinder.

  7. TWIST1 and BMI1 in Cancer Metastasis and Chemoresistance

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Hong; Du, Peizhun; Ge, Zongyu; Jin, Yiting; Ding, Di; Liu, Xiuping; Zou, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Increasing evidences revealed that cancer cells with the characteristics of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) or cancer stem cells (CSC) have high ability of progression, invasion, metastasis and chemoresistance. TWIST1 and BMI1 are crucial transcription factors required for EMT and CSC. Both TWIST1 and BMI1 are up-regulated in various cancers and have a positive correlation with poor prognosis. Although recent results showed that the two molecules function in promoting cancer metastasis and chemoresistance respectively, the correlation of TWIST1 and BMI1 is not well understood. Methods In this review, we summarize recent advance in cancer research focus on TWIST1 and BMI1 in cancer metastasis and chemoresistance, and emphasize the possible link between EMT and CSC. Results Further investigation of TWIST1 and BMI1 cooperately promote CSC proliferation due to EMT-associated effect will help to understand the mechanism of tumor cells metastasis and chemoresistance. Conclusions TWIST1 and BMI1 in cancer cells will be effective targets for treating chemoresistant metastatic lesions. PMID:27326250

  8. Twisting E8 five-branes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keurentjes, Arjan; Sethi, Savdeep

    2002-08-01

    We consider the tensor theory on coincident E8 5-branes compactified on T3. Using string theory, we predict that there must be distinct components in the moduli space of this theory. We argue that new superconformal field theories are to be found in these sectors with, for example, global G2 and F4 symmetries. In some cases, twisted E8 5-branes can be identified with small instantons in nonsimply laced gauge groups. This allows us to determine the Higgs branch for the fixed point theory. We determine the Coulomb branch by using an M theory dual description involving partially frozen singularities. Along the way, we show that a D0-brane binds to two D4-branes, but not to an Sp-type O4-plane (despite the existence of a Higgs branch). These results are used to check various string or string dualities for which, in one case (quadruple versus NVS), we present a new argument. Finally, we describe the construction of new non-BPS branes as domain walls in various heterotic or type I string theories.

  9. Dark Matter in a twisted bottle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbey, Alexandre; Cacciapaglia, Giacomo; Deandrea, Aldo; Kubik, Bogna

    2013-01-01

    The real projective plane is a compact, non-orientable orbifold of Euler characteristic 1 without boundaries, which can be described as a twisted Klein bottle. We shortly review the motivations for choosing such a geometry among all possible two-dimensional orbifolds, while the main part of the study will be devoted to dark matter study and limits in Universal Extra Dimensional (UED) models based on this peculiar geometry. In the following we consider such a UED construction based on the direct product of the real projective plane with the standard four-dimensional Minkowski space-time and discuss its relevance as a model of a weakly interacting Dark Matter candidate. One important difference with other typical UED models is the origin of the symmetry leading to the stability of the dark matter particle. This symmetry in our case is a remnant of the six-dimensional Minkowski space-time symmetry partially broken by the compactification. Another important difference is the very small mass splitting between the particles of a given Kaluza-Klein tier, which gives a very important role to co-annihilation effects. Finally the role of higher Kaluza-Klein tiers is also important and is discussed together with a detailed numerical description of the influence of the resonances.

  10. A model bismuth oxide intergranular thin film in a ZnO twist grain boundary.

    PubMed

    Domingos, H S

    2010-04-14

    The electronic properties of a model bismuth oxide intergranular film in ZnO were investigated using density functional plane wave calculations. It was found that oxygen excess plays a fundamental role in the appearance of electrical activity. The introduction by oxygen interstitials or zinc vacancies results in depletion of the charge in deep gap states introduced by the bismuth impurities. This makes the boundary less metallic and promotes the formation of acceptor states localized to the boundary core, resulting in Schottky barrier enhancement. The results indicate that the origin of electrical activity in thin intergranular bismuth oxide films is probably not distinct from that in decorated ZnO boundaries. PMID:21389532

  11. Marketing Farm Grain Crops.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ridenour, Harlan E.

    This vocational agriculture curriculum on grain marketing contains three parts: teacher guide, student manual, and student workbook. All three are coordinated and cross-referenced. The course is designed to give students of grain marketing a thorough background in the subject and provide practical help in developing grain marketing strategies for…

  12. Grain and grain boundary characters in surface layer of untreated and plasma nitrocarburized 18Ni maraging steel with nanocrystalline structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, M. F.; Wu, Y. Q.; Liu, R. L.

    2013-05-01

    The nanocrystallized 18Ni maraging steel was plasma nitrocarburized at 460 °C for 4 h in a mixture gas of N2, H2 and C2H5OH. The surface phase compositions of the specimens were analyzed using X-ray diffractometer. The grain shape and size, and grain boundaries in the subsurface layers of the samples were characterized by electron backscattering diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. The results show that the nitrocarburized layers are composed of α-Fe, γ‧-Fe4N and FeN0.049 phases. Most α-Fe and γ‧-Fe4N grains show in columnar shape. The major and minor axes of some α-Fe grains are elongated and shortened after nitrocarburizing, respectively. In the subsurface layers of the untreated and nitrocarburized specimens, the average areas of γ‧-Fe4N and α-Fe grains both with a dimension of nanometer are 0.395 μm2 and 0.397 μm2, respectively. The γ‧-Fe4N grain boundaries are mainly high angle boundaries with a very small fraction of low angle boundaries. Coincidence site lattice boundaries in the subsurface layer of the untreated specimen are composed mainly of Σ3, Σ11 and Σ13b, and their fraction decreases after nitrocarburizing.

  13. 2D and 3D simulations of damage in 5-grain copper gas gun samples

    SciTech Connect

    Tonks, Davis L; Cerreta, Ellen K; Dennis - Koller, Darcie; Escobedo - Diaz, Juan P; Trujillo, Carl P; Luo, Shengian; Bingert, John F

    2010-12-16

    2D and 3D Hydrocode simulations were done of a gas gun damage experiment involving a 5 grain sample with a polycrystalline flyer with a velocity of about 140 m/s. The simulations were done with the Flag hydrocode and involved explicit meshing of the 5 grains with a single crystal plasticity model and a pressure based damage model. The calculated fields were compared with two cross sections from the recovered sample. The sample exhibited grain boundary cracks at high angle and tilt grain boundaries in the sample but not at a sigma 3 twin boundary. However, the calculation showed large gradients in stress and strain at only the twin boundary, contrary to expectation. This indicates that the twin boundary is quite strong to resist the predicted high gradients and that the calculation needs the addition of a grain boundary fracture mode. The 2D and 3D simulations were compared.

  14. Homozygous Nonsense Mutations in TWIST2 Cause Setleis Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Tukel, Turgut; Šošić, Dražen; Al-Gazali, Lihadh I.; Erazo, Mónica; Casasnovas, Jose; Franco, Hector L.; Richardson, James A.; Olson, Eric N.; Cadilla, Carmen L.; Desnick, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    The focal facial dermal dysplasias (FFDDs) are a group of inherited developmental disorders in which the characteristic diagnostic feature is bitemporal scar-like lesions that resemble forceps marks. To date, the genetic defects underlying these ectodermal dysplasias have not been determined. To identify the gene defect causing autosomal-recessive Setleis syndrome (type III FFDD), homozygosity mapping was performed with genomic DNAs from five affected individuals and 26 members of the consanguineous Puerto Rican (PR) family originally described by Setleis and colleagues. Microsatellites D2S1397 and D2S2968 were homozygous in all affected individuals, mapping the disease locus to 2q37.3. Haplotype analyses of additional markers in the PR family and a consanguineous Arab family further limited the disease locus to ∼3 Mb between D2S2949 and D2S2253. Of the 29 candidate genes in this region, the bHLH transcription factor, TWIST2, was initially sequenced on the basis of its known involvement in murine facial development. Homozygous TWIST2 nonsense mutations, c.324C>T and c.486C>T, were identified in the affected members of the Arab and PR families, respectively. Characterization of the expressed mutant proteins, p.Q65X and p.Q119X, by electrophoretic mobility shift assays and immunoblot analyses indicated that they were truncated and unstable. Notably, Setleis syndrome patients and Twist2 knockout mice have similar facial features, indicating the gene's conserved role in mammalian development. Although human TWIST2 and TWIST1 encode highly homologous bHLH transcription factors, the finding that TWIST2 recessive mutations cause an FFDD and dominant TWIST1 mutations cause Saethre-Chotzen craniocynostosis suggests that they function independently in skin and bone development. PMID:20691403

  15. Performance of twist-coupled blades on variable speed rotors

    SciTech Connect

    Lobitz, D.W.; Veers, P.S.; Laino, D.J.

    1999-12-07

    The load mitigation and energy capture characteristics of twist-coupled HAWT blades that are mounted on a variable speed rotor are investigated in this paper. These blades are designed to twist toward feather as they bend with pretwist set to achieve a desirable twist distribution at rated power. For this investigation, the ADAMS-WT software has been modified to include blade models with bending-twist coupling. Using twist-coupled and uncoupled models, the ADAMS software is exercised for steady wind environments to generate C{sub p} curves at a number of operating speeds to compare the efficiencies of the two models. The ADAMS software is also used to generate the response of a twist-coupled variable speed rotor to a spectrum of stochastic wind time series. This spectrum contains time series with two mean wind speeds at two turbulence levels. Power control is achieved by imposing a reactive torque on the low speed shaft proportional to the RPM squared with the coefficient specified so that the rotor operates at peak efficiency in the linear aerodynamic range, and by limiting the maximum RPM to take advantage of the stall controlled nature of the rotor. Fatigue calculations are done for the generated load histories using a range of material exponents that represent materials from welded steel to aluminum to composites, and results are compared with the damage computed for the rotor without twist-coupling. Results indicate that significant reductions in damage are achieved across the spectrum of applied wind loading without any degradation in power production.

  16. Extension-twist coupling optimization in composite rotor blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozbay, Serkan

    2005-07-01

    For optimal rotor performance in a tiltrotor aircraft the difference in the inflow and the rotor speeds between the hover and cruise flight modes suggests different blade twist and chord distributions. The blade twist rates in current tiltrotor applications are defined based upon a compromise between the figure of merit in hover and propeller efficiency in airplane mode. However, when each operation mode is considered separately the optimum blade distributions are found to be considerably different. Passive blade twist control, which uses the inherent variation in centrifugal forces on a rotor blade to achieve optimum blade twist distributions in each flight mode through the use of extension-twist coupled composite rotor blades, has been considered for performance improvement of tiltrotor aircraft over the last two decades. The challenge for this concept is to achieve the desired twisting deformations in the rotor blade without altering the aeroelastic characteristics of the vehicle. A concept referred to as the sliding mass concept is proposed in this work in order to increase the twist change with rotor speed for a closed-cell composite rotor blade cross-section to practical levels for performance improvement in a tiltrotor aircraft. The concept is based on load path changes for the centrifugal forces by utilizing non-structural masses readily available on a conventional blade, such as the leading edge balancing mass. A multilevel optimization technique based on the simulated annealing method is applied to improve the performance of the XV15 tiltrotor aircraft. A cross-sectional analysis tool, VABS together with a multibody dynamics code, DYMORE are integrated into the optimization process. The optimization results revealed significant improvements in the power requirement in hover while preserving cruise efficiency. It is also shown that about 21% of the improvement is provided through the sliding mass concept pointing to the additional flexibility the concept

  17. An unexpected twist in viral capsid maturation

    SciTech Connect

    Gertsman, Ilya; Gan, Lu; Guttman, Miklos; Lee, Kelly; Speir, Jeffrey A.; Duda, Robert L.; Hendrix, Roger W.; Komives, Elizabeth A.; Johnson, John E.

    2009-04-14

    Lambda-like double-stranded (ds) DNA bacteriophage undergo massive conformational changes in their capsid shell during the packaging of their viral genomes. Capsid shells are complex organizations of hundreds of protein subunits that assemble into intricate quaternary complexes that ultimately are able to withstand over 50 atm of pressure during genome packaging. The extensive integration between subunits in capsids requires the formation of an intermediate complex, termed a procapsid, from which individual subunits can undergo the necessary refolding and structural rearrangements needed to transition to the more stable capsid. Although various mature capsids have been characterized at atomic resolution, no such procapsid structure is available for a dsDNA virus or bacteriophage. Here we present a procapsid X-ray structure at 3.65 {angstrom} resolution, termed prohead II, of the lambda-like bacteriophage HK97, the mature capsid structure of which was previously solved to 3.44 {angstrom}. A comparison of the two largely different capsid forms has unveiled an unprecedented expansion mechanism that describes the transition. Crystallographic and hydrogen/deuterium exchange data presented here demonstrate that the subunit tertiary structures are significantly different between the two states, with twisting and bending motions occurring in both helical and -sheet regions. We also identified subunit interactions at each three-fold axis of the capsid that are maintained throughout maturation. The interactions sustain capsid integrity during subunit refolding and provide a fixed hinge from which subunits undergo rotational and translational motions during maturation. Previously published calorimetric data of a closely related bacteriophage, P22, showed that capsid maturation was an exothermic process that resulted in a release of 90 kJ mol{sup -1} of energy. We propose that the major tertiary changes presented in this study reveal a structural basis for an exothermic

  18. Economic recovery of oil trapped at fan margins using high-angle wells and multiple hydraulic fractures. [Quarterly report], January 1--March 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Niemeyer, B.L.

    1996-04-29

    This project attempts to demonstrate the effectiveness of exploiting thin, layered, low-energy, deposits at the distal margin of a prograding turbidite complex through use of fractured horizontal or high-angle wells. The combination of hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling will allow greater pay exposure than conventional vertical wells while maintaining vertical communication between thin interbedded layers and the wellbore. A high-angle well will be drilled in the fan margin portion of a slope-basin clastic reservoir and will be completed with multiple hydraulic fracture treatments. Geologic modeling, reservoir characterization, and fine-grid reservoir simulation will be used to select the well location and orientation. Design parameters for hydraulic fracture treatments will be determined by fracturing an existing test well. Fracture azimuth will be predicted, in part, by passive seismic monitoring from an offset well during fracture stimulation of the test wellbore. An existing vertical well in the Yowlumne Field, Kern Co., California was hydraulically fractured. Microseismic and pressure data collected from this work are being used to predict fracture geometry and azimuth for future treatments in the proposed high-angle well. A detailed reservoir characterization of the field demonstration site is complete. This work include interpretation of a 3-D seismic survey, analysis of all available well logs, description of three whole cores, petrographic analysis of thin sections and incorporation of pressure and production data. A partial-field fine-grid model base on the reservoir characterization has been constructed and initialized. Efforts to history match the model to actual production and pressure data are underway.

  19. Boron concentration profiling by high angle annular dark field-scanning transmission electron microscopy in homoepitaxial δ-doped diamond layers

    SciTech Connect

    Araújo, D.; Alegre, M. P.; Piñero, J. C.; Fiori, A.; Bustarret, E.; Jomard, F.

    2013-07-22

    To develop further diamond related devices, the concentration and spatial location of dopants should be controlled down to the nanometer scale. Scanning transmission electron microscopy using the high angle annular dark field mode is shown to be sensitive to boron doping in diamond epilayers. An analytical procedure is described, whereby local boron concentrations above 10{sup 20} cm{sup −3} were quantitatively derived down to nanometer resolution from the signal dependence on thickness and boron content. Experimental boron local doping profiles measured on diamond p{sup −}/p{sup ++}/p{sup −} multilayers are compared to macroscopic profiles obtained by secondary ion mass spectrometry, avoiding reported artefacts.

  20. Test data report: Low speed wind tunnel tests of a full scale, fixed geometry inlet, with engine, at high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shain, W. M.

    1976-01-01

    A full scale inlet test was to be done in the NASA-ARC 40' X 80' WT to demonstrate satisfactory inlet performance at high angles of attack. The inlet was designed to match a Hamilton-Standard 55 inch, variable pitch fan, driven by a Lycoming T55-L-11A gas generator. The test was installed in the wind tunnel on two separate occasions, but mechanical failures in the fan drive gear box early in each period terminated testing. A detailed description is included of the Model, installation, instrumentation and data reduction procedures.

  1. High angle-of-attack characteristics of three-surface fighter aircraft. [canard-wing-horizontal tail configuration for greater stability and control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Croom, M. A.; Grafton, S. B.; Nguyen, L. T.

    1982-01-01

    As part of a research program aimed at providing information on the high angle-of-attack characteristics of three-surface fighter concepts incorporating a close-coupled canard, an investigation is being conducted on two specific configurations based on the F-18 and F-15 designs. The study configurations are being subjected to a wide range of tests including wind-tunnel tests, dynamic model tests, and piloted simulation. This paper summarizes the results obtained to date in this study. High-alpha results in the areas of static stability, damping, and control characteristics are reviewed and some of the more significant aerodynamic phenomena are identified.

  2. Twist-induced defects of the P-SSP7 genome revealed by modeling the cryo-EM density.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qian; Myers, Christopher G; Pettitt, B Montgomery

    2015-04-16

    We consider the consequences of assuming that DNA inside of phages can be approximated as a strongly nonlinear persistence length polymer. Recent cryo-EM experiments find a hole in the density map of P-SSP7 phage, located in the DNA segment filling the portal channel of the phage. We use experimentally derived structural constraints with coarse-grained simulation techniques to consider contrasting model interpretations of reconstructed density in the portal channel. The coarse-grained DNA models used are designed to capture the effects of torsional strain and electrostatic environment. Our simulation results are consistent with the interpretation that the vacancy or hole in the experimental density map is due to DNA strain leading to strand separation. We further demonstrate that a moderate negative twisting strain is able to account for the strand separation. This effect of nonlinear persistence length may be important in other aspects of phage DNA packing. PMID:25793549

  3. Non-Euclidean geometry of twisted filament bundle packing

    PubMed Central

    Bruss, Isaac R.; Grason, Gregory M.

    2012-01-01

    Densely packed and twisted assemblies of filaments are crucial structural motifs in macroscopic materials (cables, ropes, and textiles) as well as synthetic and biological nanomaterials (fibrous proteins). We study the unique and nontrivial packing geometry of this universal material design from two perspectives. First, we show that the problem of twisted bundle packing can be mapped exactly onto the problem of disc packing on a curved surface, the geometry of which has a positive, spherical curvature close to the center of rotation and approaches the intrinsically flat geometry of a cylinder far from the bundle center. From this mapping, we find the packing of any twisted bundle is geometrically frustrated, as it makes the sixfold geometry of filament close packing impossible at the core of the fiber. This geometrical equivalence leads to a spectrum of close-packed fiber geometries, whose low symmetry (five-, four-, three-, and twofold) reflect non-Euclidean packing constraints at the bundle core. Second, we explore the ground-state structure of twisted filament assemblies formed under the influence of adhesive interactions by a computational model. Here, we find that the underlying non-Euclidean geometry of twisted fiber packing disrupts the regular lattice packing of filaments above a critical radius, proportional to the helical pitch. Above this critical radius, the ground-state packing includes the presence of between one and six excess fivefold disclinations in the cross-sectional order. PMID:22711799

  4. "Twisted Beam" SEE Observations of Ionospheric Heating from HAARP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briczinski, S. J.; Bernhardt, P. A.; Siefring, C. L.; Han, S.-M.; Pedersen, T. R.; Scales, W. A.

    2015-10-01

    Nonlinear interactions of high power HF radio waves in the ionosphere provide aeronomers with a unique space-based laboratory capability. The High-Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) in Gakona, Alaska is the world's largest heating facility, yielding effective radiated powers in the gigawatt range. New results are present from HAARP experiments using a "twisted beam" excitation mode. Analysis of twisted beam heating shows that the SEE results obtained are identical to more traditional patterns. One difference in the twisted beam mode is the heating region produced is in the shape of a ring as opposed to the more traditional "solid spot" region from a pencil beam. The ring heating pattern may be more conducive to the creation of stable artificial airglow layers because of the horizontal structure of the ring. The results of these runs include artificial layer creation and evolution as pertaining to the twisted beam pattern. The SEE measurements aid the interpretation of the twisted beam interactions in the ionosphere.

  5. Comments on twisted indices in 3d supersymmetric gauge theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Closset, Cyril; Kim, Heeyeon

    2016-08-01

    We study three-dimensional {N} = 2 supersymmetric gauge theories on Σ g × S 1 with a topological twist along Σ g , a genus- g Riemann surface. The twisted supersymmetric index at genus g and the correlation functions of half-BPS loop operators on S 1 can be computed exactly by supersymmetric localization. For g = 1, this gives a simple UV computation of the 3d Witten index. Twisted indices provide us with a clean derivation of the quantum algebra of supersymmetric Wilson loops, for any Yang-Mills-Chern-Simons-matter theory, in terms of the associated Bethe equations for the theory on {{R}}^2× {S}^1 . This also provides a powerful and simple tool to study 3d {N} = 2 Seiberg dualities. Finally, we study A- and B-twisted indices for {N} = 4 supersymmetric gauge theories, which turns out to be very useful for quantitative studies of three-dimensional mirror symmetry. We also briefly comment on a relation between the S 2 × S 1 twisted indices and the Hilbert series of {N} = 4 moduli spaces.

  6. Effects of twisted noncommutativity in multi-particle Hamiltonians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsova, Zhanna; Toppan, Francesco

    2013-07-01

    The non-commutativity induced by a Drinfel'd twist produces Bopp-shift-like transformations for deformed operators. In a single-particle setting the Drinfel'd twist allows to recover the non-commutativity obtained from various methods which are not based on Hopf algebras. In multi-particle sector, on the other hand, the Drinfel'd twist implies novel features. In conventional approaches to non-commutativity, deformed primitive operators are postulated to act additively. A Drinfel'd twist implies non-additive effects which are controlled by the coproduct. We stress that in our framework, the central element denoted as ħ is associated to an additive operator whose physical interpretation is that of the Particle Number operator. We illustrate all these features for a class of (abelian twist-deformed) 2D Hamiltonians. Suitable choices of the parameters lead to the Hamiltonian of the non-commutative Quantum Hall Effect, the harmonic oscillator, the quantization of the configuration space. The non-additive effects in the multi-particle sector, leading to results departing from the existing literature, are pointed out.

  7. Eshelby twist and correlation effects in diffraction from nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Leonardi, A.; Scardi, P.; Ryu, S.; Pugno, N. M.

    2015-04-28

    Molecular dynamics simulations were used to model the Eshelby dislocation inside Pd and Ir nanowires and to predict the powder diffraction pattern using the Debye scattering equation. We find that the ideal dislocation solution by Eshelby is in good agreement with the observed twist angle and deviatoric strain, even though it ignores both the splitting of the Eshelby dislocation into two partials and surface stress. Surface stress plays a significant role only for nanorods with small aspect ratio (∼1:1). We also find that Wilson's prediction on the diffraction peak broadening for the Eshelby dislocation is overestimated because it ignores the fact that the Eshelby twist relaxes the deviatoric strain. Moreover, the twist loosens the correlation along the nanorod, causing additional line profile broadening, which is read by diffraction as a decrease of coherent domain size when the total twist angle is bigger than 1.5°. Overall, our findings suggest a novel way to predict and analyze the dislocations as well as the resulting strain fields in the twisted nanocrystalline rods.

  8. Interfacial Atomic Structure of Twisted Few-Layer Graphene.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Ryo; Lugg, Nathan R; Inoue, Kazutoshi; Sawada, Hidetaka; Taniguchi, Takashi; Shibata, Naoya; Ikuhara, Yuichi

    2016-02-18

    A twist in bi- or few-layer graphene breaks the local symmetry, introducing a number of intriguing physical properties such as opening new bandgaps. Therefore, determining the twisted atomic structure is critical to understanding and controlling the functional properties of graphene. Combining low-angle annular dark-field electron microscopy with image simulations, we directly determine the atomic structure of twisted few-layer graphene in terms of a moiré superstructure which is parameterized by a single twist angle and lattice constant. This method is shown to be a powerful tool for accurately determining the atomic structure of two-dimensional materials such as graphene, even in the presence of experimental errors. Using coincidence-site-lattice and displacement-shift-complete theories, we show that the in-plane translation state between layers is not a significant structure parameter, explaining why the present method is adequate not only for bilayer graphene but also a few-layered twisted graphene.

  9. Interfacial Atomic Structure of Twisted Few-Layer Graphene

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Ryo; Lugg, Nathan R.; Inoue, Kazutoshi; Sawada, Hidetaka; Taniguchi, Takashi; Shibata, Naoya; Ikuhara, Yuichi

    2016-01-01

    A twist in bi- or few-layer graphene breaks the local symmetry, introducing a number of intriguing physical properties such as opening new bandgaps. Therefore, determining the twisted atomic structure is critical to understanding and controlling the functional properties of graphene. Combining low-angle annular dark-field electron microscopy with image simulations, we directly determine the atomic structure of twisted few-layer graphene in terms of a moiré superstructure which is parameterized by a single twist angle and lattice constant. This method is shown to be a powerful tool for accurately determining the atomic structure of two-dimensional materials such as graphene, even in the presence of experimental errors. Using coincidence-site-lattice and displacement-shift-complete theories, we show that the in-plane translation state between layers is not a significant structure parameter, explaining why the present method is adequate not only for bilayer graphene but also a few-layered twisted graphene. PMID:26888259

  10. Phase-field crystal study for the characteristics and influence factors of grain boundary segregation in binary alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yan-Li; Hu, Ting-Ting; Mu, Hong; Chen, Zheng; Zhang, Liu-Chao

    2014-07-01

    Grain boundary segregation strongly modifies grain boundary behaviors and affects the physical and mechanical properties of solid polycrystalline materials. In this paper, we study the grain boundary segregation characteristics and the variation law of grain boundary segregation with temperature, crystal misorientation angle, undercooling, lattice mismatch and the difference of interspecies bond energy and self-bond energy using the binary-alloy phase-field crystal model. The simulation results show that the solute atoms segregate into individual dislocation regions for the low-angle grain boundary while the solute atoms homogeneously segregate into the entire boundary for the high-angle grain boundary with nonzero initial concentration. The degree of segregation strongly increases when the temperature, the difference of interspecies bond energy and the self-bond energy decrease, and when misorientation and undercooling increase. Small lattice mismatches did not strongly affect segregation; however, the higher mismatch has obvious effects on segregation. Our simulation results agree well with theoretical and experimental results.

  11. Properties of grain boundaries in bulk, melt processed Y-Ba-Cu-O fabricated using bridge-shaped seeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Y.-H.; Durrell, J. H.; Dennis, A. R.; Babu, N. Hari; Mancini, C. E.; Cardwell, D. A.

    2012-04-01

    Single grain RE-Ba-Cu-O ((RE)BCO, where RE is a rare earth element or yttrium) bulk superconducting materials have significant potential for a variety of engineering applications due to their ability to trap high magnetic fields. However, it is well known that the presence of grain boundaries coupled with a high angle of misorientation (typically 5°) significantly reduces the critical current density, Jc, in all forms of high temperature superconducting materials. It is of considerable fundamental and technological interest, therefore, to investigate the grain boundary properties of bulk, film and tape (RE)BCO. We report a successful multi-seeding technique for the fabrication of fully aligned, artificial (0° misalignment) grain boundaries within large grain YBCO bulk superconductors using bridge-shaped seeds. The microstructure and critical current densities of the grain boundaries produced by this technique have been studied in detail.

  12. Flight-Determined Subsonic Longitudinal Stability and Control Derivatives of the F-18 High Angle of Attack Research Vehicle (HARV) with Thrust Vectoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iliff, Kenneth W.; Wang, Kon-Sheng Charles

    1997-01-01

    The subsonic longitudinal stability and control derivatives of the F-18 High Angle of Attack Research Vehicle (HARV) are extracted from dynamic flight data using a maximum likelihood parameter identification technique. The technique uses the linearized aircraft equations of motion in their continuous/discrete form and accounts for state and measurement noise as well as thrust-vectoring effects. State noise is used to model the uncommanded forcing function caused by unsteady aerodynamics over the aircraft, particularly at high angles of attack. Thrust vectoring was implemented using electrohydraulically-actuated nozzle postexit vanes and a specialized research flight control system. During maneuvers, a control system feature provided independent aerodynamic control surface inputs and independent thrust-vectoring vane inputs, thereby eliminating correlations between the aircraft states and controls. Substantial variations in control excitation and dynamic response were exhibited for maneuvers conducted at different angles of attack. Opposing vane interactions caused most thrust-vectoring inputs to experience some exhaust plume interference and thus reduced effectiveness. The estimated stability and control derivatives are plotted, and a discussion relates them to predicted values and maneuver quality.

  13. Evaluation of Gritting Strategies for High Angle of Attack Using Wind Tunnel and Flight Test Data for the F/A-18

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Robert M.; Erickson, Gary E.; Fox, Charles H., Jr.; Banks, Daniel W.; Fisher, David F.

    1998-01-01

    A subsonic study of high-angle-of-attack gritting strategies was undertaken with a 0.06-scale model of the F/A-18, which was assumed to be typical of airplanes with smooth-sided forebodies. This study was conducted in the Langley 7- by 10-Foot High-Speed Tunnel and was intended to more accurately simulate flight boundary layer characteristics on the model in the wind tunnel than would be possible by using classical, low-angle-of-attack gritting on the fuselage. Six-component force and moment data were taken with an internally mounted strain-gauge balance, while pressure data were acquired by using electronically scanned pressure transducers. Data were taken at zero sideslip over an angle-of-attack range from 0 deg to 40 deg and, at selected angles of attack, over sideslip angles from -10 deg to 10 deg. Free-stream Mach number was fixed at 0.30, which resulted in a Reynolds number, based on mean aerodynamic chord, of 1.4 x 10(exp 6). Pressure data measured over the forebody and leading-edge extensions are compared to similar pressure data taken by a related NASA flight research program by using a specially instrumented F/A-18, the High-Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV). Preliminary guidelines for high-angle-of-attack gritting strategies are given.

  14. Flow analysis for the nacelle of an advanced ducted propeller at high angle-of-attack and at cruise with boundary layer control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, D. P.; Boldman, D. R.; Hughes, C. E.

    1994-01-01

    An axisymmetric panel code and a three dimensional Navier-Stokes code (used as an inviscid Euler code) were verified for low speed, high angle of attack flow conditions. A three dimensional Navier-Stokes code (used as an inviscid code), and an axisymmetric Navier-Stokes code (used as both viscous and inviscid code) were also assessed for high Mach number cruise conditions. The boundary layer calculations were made by using the results from the panel code or Euler calculation. The panel method can predict the internal surface pressure distributions very well if no shock exists. However, only Euler and Navier-Stokes calculations can provide a good prediction of the surface static pressure distribution including the pressure rise across the shock. Because of the high CPU time required for a three dimensional Navier-Stokes calculation, only the axisymmetric Navier-Stokes calculation was considered at cruise conditions. The use of suction and tangential blowing boundary layer control to eliminate the flow separation on the internal surface was demonstrated for low free stream Mach number and high angle of attack cases. The calculation also shows that transition from laminar flow to turbulent flow on the external cowl surface can be delayed by using suction boundary layer control at cruise flow conditions. The results were compared with experimental data where possible.

  15. Joints at high angles to normal fault strike: an explanation using 3-D numerical models of fault-perturbed stress fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kattenhorn, Simon A.; Aydin, Atilla; Pollard, David D.

    2000-01-01

    Structural methods based on homogeneous stress states predict that joints growing in an extending crust form with strike orientations identical to normal faults. However, we document a field example where the strikes of genetically related normal faults and joints are almost mutually perpendicular. Field relationships allowed us to constrain the fracture sequence and tectonic environment for fault and joint growth. We hypothesize that fault slip can perturb the surrounding stress field in a manner that controls the orientations of induced secondary structures. Numerical models were used to examine the stress field around normal faults, taking into consideration the effects of 3-D fault shape, geometrical arrangement of overlapping faults, and a range of stress states. The calculated perturbed stress fields around model normal faults indicate that it is possible for joints to form at high angles to fault strike. Such joint growth may occur at the lateral tips of an isolated fault, but is most likely in a relay zone between overlapping faults. However, the angle between joints and faults is also influenced by the remote stress state, and is particularly sensitive to the ratio of fault-parallel to fault-perpendicular stress. As this ratio increases, joints can propagate away from faults at increasingly higher angles to fault strike. We conclude that the combined remote stress state and perturbed local stress field associated with overlapping fault geometries resulted in joint growth at high angles to normal fault strike at a field location in Arches National Park, Utah.

  16. Side forces on a tangent ogive forebody with a fineness ratio of 2.5 at high angles of attack and low speed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keener, E. R.; Valdez, J.

    1976-01-01

    A wind tunnel study to determine the subsonic aerodynamic characteristics, at high angles of attack, of a tangent ogive forebody with a fineness ratio of 2.5, is reported. Static longitudinal and lateral-directional stability data were obtained at Reynolds numbers ranging from 0.4 x 1 million to 3.7 x 1 million (based on base diameter) at a Mach number of 0.25. Angle of attack was varied from 36 deg to 88 deg at zero sideslip. It was found that at low Reynolds numbers the forebody does not have a side force att high angles of attack; however, at Reynolds numbers above about 2 x 1 million, a side force occurs in the angle of attack range from 45 deg to 80 deg. The maximum side force is as large as the maximum normal force. The maximum normal force coefficient varies between 1.0 and 2.0 over the Reynolds number range tested and occurs at angles of attack near 65 deg.

  17. Local grain orientation and strain in polycrystalline YBa2Cu3O7-δ superconductor thin films measured by Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amer, Maher S.; Maguire, John; Cai, L.; Biggers, R.; Busbee, J.; LeClair, S. R.

    2001-06-01

    We report direct measurements of local grain orientation and residual strain in polycrystalline, C-axis oriented thin YBa2Cu3O7-δ superconducting films using polarized Raman spectroscopy. Strain dependence of the Ag Raman active mode at 335 cm-1 was calibrated and used to measure local strain in the films. Our data showed that high quality films are associated with the connected path of uniform grain orientation (single crystal-like) across the film and uniform residual strain in the range of -0.3%. Nonuniform grain orientation or high angle grain boundaries and nonuniform local strains were associated with low quality films.

  18. Nonlinear twist-kink instability of a coronal loop

    SciTech Connect

    Zaidman, E.G.; Tajima, T.

    1989-03-01

    Three-dimensional magnetoinductive particle simulations are used to demonstrate that the mechanical twisting motion applied to a magnetized plasma column induces a current aligned to the external magnetic field direction, pinches the plasma and magnetic fields, and stores the energy in poloidal magnetic fields. As the twist motion continues, the field lines locally begin to wrap around the plasma more than one revolution. A strong MHD instability sets in that is a mixture of kink and ballooning modes, releasing the magnetic energy and causing destruction of coherent column structure and flows of turbulent plasma. A similar episode ensues, exhibiting relaxation oscillations. The buildup of poloidal fields and structure and its sudden release driven by the twist motion may be a model for the solar coronal loop dynamics which exhibits a slow energy buildup with some photospheric motion and a sudden energy release by flares. 16 references.

  19. Wing Twist Measurements at the National Transonic Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burner, Alpheus W.; Wahls, Richard A.; Goad, William K.

    1996-01-01

    A technique for measuring wing twist currently in use at the National Transonic Facility is described. The technique is based upon a single camera photogrammetric determination of two dimensional coordinates with a fixed (and known) third dimensional coordinate. The wing twist is found from a conformal transformation between wind-on and wind-off 2-D coordinates in the plane of rotation. The advantages and limitations of the technique as well as the rationale for selection of this particular technique are discussed. Examples are presented to illustrate run-to-run and test-to-test repeatability of the technique in air mode. Examples of wing twist in cryogenic nitrogen mode are also presented.

  20. Chiral power change upon photoisomerization in twisted nematic liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Simoncelli, Sabrina; Aramendía, Pedro F

    2015-05-01

    In this work, we use the photoisomerization of azobenzenes, a phenanthrospirooxazine, and a fulgide in a twisted nematic liquid crystalline phase to change the chiral twisting power of the system. The changes are probed by the rotatory power of linearly polarized light. Time resolved and steady state experiments are carried out. The chiral change and the photoisomerization process have similar characteristic recovery times and activation energy, thus probing that the change is induced by the modification in the chemical composition of the photochromic dopant system. The amplitude of the light twisting power change correlates with the order change in the liquid crystal (LC) but not with the modification in the absorption characteristics of the system. This indicates that the driving force of the chiral change is the microscopic order modification in the LC phase that affects the helical pitch of the phase.

  1. Superlattice structures in twisted bilayers of folded graphene.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Hennrik; Rode, Johannes C; Smirnov, Dmitri; Haug, Rolf J

    2014-01-01

    The electronic properties of bilayer graphene strongly depend on relative orientation of the two atomic lattices. Whereas Bernal-stacked graphene is most commonly studied, a rotational mismatch between layers opens up a whole new field of rich physics, especially at small interlayer twist. Here we report on magnetotransport measurements on twisted graphene bilayers, prepared by folding of single layers. These reveal a strong dependence on the twist angle, which can be estimated by means of sample geometry. At small rotation, superlattices with a wavelength in the order of 10 nm arise and are observed by friction atomic force microscopy. Magnetotransport measurements in this small-angle regime show the formation of satellite Landau fans. These are attributed to additional Dirac singularities in the band structure and discussed with respect to the wide range of interlayer coupling models.

  2. The electrohydrodynamic instability in twisted nematic liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hertrich, A.; Krekhov, A. P.; Scaldin, O. A.

    1994-02-01

    We present some experiments on electrohydrodynamic convection (EHC) in nematic liquid crystals with a planar, but twisted configuration (MBBA). The threshold voltage is shown to depend only weakly on the twist angle. A theoretical analysis of the onset behaviour agrees well with the experiments. More sensitive is a secondary transition to modulation structures, which are not easily observed in untwisted geometries. A rough estimate of the secondary instability based on the behaviour of the most rapidly growing modulation mode seems to account well for the observations. Additional theoretical investigations for materials with positive dielectric anisotropy concerning the competition between the Fréedericksz transition and EHC are included. We predict the existence of a crossover codimension-2 point, which could easily be tested by variation of the twist angle.

  3. Coupling of twist and writhe in short DNA loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medalion, Shlomi; Rappaport, Shay M.; Rabin, Yitzhak

    2010-01-01

    While bending and twist can be treated as independent degrees of freedom for linear DNA molecules, the loop closure constraint introduces a coupling between these variables in circular DNA. We performed Monte Carlo simulations of wormlike rods with both bending and twist rigidity in order to study the coupling between the writhe and twist distributions for various DNA lengths. We find that for sufficiently short DNA, the writhe distribution differs from that of a model with bending energy only. We show that the factorization approximation introduced by previous researchers coincides, within numerical accuracy, with our simulation results, and conclude that the closure constraint is fully accounted for by the White-Fuller relation. Experimental tests of our results for short DNA plasmids are proposed.

  4. The Torsional Rigidity of Twist-Storing Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moroz, J. David; Nelson, Philip

    1998-03-01

    The statistical mechanics of a torsionally constrained polymer is investigated. We consider an inextensible chain with bend rigidity A and twist rigidity C. Through the relation Lk = Tw + Wr, the bend fluctuations must respond to an applied torque. We investigate this response and find excellent agreement between the predictions of our model and the experimental results on single λ-DNA molecules due to Strick et al. [Science 271 (1996) 1835]. This analysis affords an experimental determination of the microscopic twist rigidity C. Quantitative agreement between theory and experiment is obtained using C=120 nm. The theory further predicts a thermal reduction of the twist rigidity C induced by bend fluctuations. A confirmation of this result awaits further experiments.

  5. Structure of twisted BNC nanotubes with polygonal cross-section.

    PubMed

    Blank, Vladimir; Ivanov, Leonid; Kulnitskiy, Boris; Perezhogin, Igor; Polyakov, Evgene; Semenov, Alexander

    2012-10-01

    BNC nanotubes and nanofibers have been synthesized in the high isostatic pressure apparatus in Ar at 1923 K and 1.5 MPa in the presence of yttrium aluminium garnet. Some of the nanotubes obtained were filled with Al(2)O(3). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies have shown that the nanotubes and nanofibers have a polygonal cross-section (prismatic shape), and most often they are twisted, which is due to the transversal instability of the nanotubes originating under the growth conditions, including temperature treatment. Twisting also revealed itself in the appearance of the moiré fringes during the TEM observation of some of the nanotubes and nanofibers. Analysis of these fringes has shown that the facets of these nanotubes represent the slightly misoriented hexagonal BN and/or C plates. An Al(2)O(3) filling of the nanotube makes it harder to twist when subjected to torque, which conforms to the tube deformation theory. PMID:22992799

  6. Phase delay of polarisation modes in elastically twisted spun fibres

    SciTech Connect

    Morshnev, Sergey K; Chamorovsky, Yury K; Vorob'ev, Igor' L

    2011-05-31

    The evolution of the phase delay between linearly polarised orthogonal modes in a spun fibre elastically twisted around its axis has been studied experimentally and theoretically using a model for a helical structure of the built-in linear birefringence axes. The phase delay is a sinusoidal function of elastic twist angle, with an amplitude and period dependent on fibre parameters: spin pitch and built-in linear birefringence beat length. It is shown that, at a known spin pitch, phase delay versus elastic twist angle data can be used to determine the beat length of built-in linear birefringence in the range 0.01 to 100 mm. The theoretical analysis results are supported by experimental data for conventional and microstructured spun fibres. (fibre optics)

  7. Twist Defects in Topological Systems with Anyonic Symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teo, Jeffrey; Roy, Abhishek; Chen, Xiao

    2014-03-01

    Twist defects are point-like objects that support robust non-local storage of quantum information and non-abelian unitary operations. Unlike quantum deconfined anyonic excitations, they rely on symmetry rather than a non-abelian topological order. Zero energy Majorana bound states can arise at lattice defects, such as disclinations and dislocations, in a topological crystalline superconductor. More general parafermion bound state can appear as twist defects in a topological phase with an anyonic symmetry, such as a bilayer fractional quantum Hall state and the Kitaev toric code. They are however fundamentally different from quantum anyonic excitations in a true topological phase. This is demonstrated by their unconventional exchange and braiding behavior, which is characterized by a modified spin statistics theorem and modular invariance. Gauging anyonic symmetries by treating twist defects as quantum excitations provides a connection between some non-abelian topological states and abelian ones. Simons Foundation

  8. Partially coherent twisted states in arrays of coupled phase oscillators.

    PubMed

    Omel'chenko, Oleh E; Wolfrum, Matthias; Laing, Carlo R

    2014-06-01

    We consider a one-dimensional array of phase oscillators with non-local coupling and a Lorentzian distribution of natural frequencies. The primary objects of interest are partially coherent states that are uniformly "twisted" in space. To analyze these, we take the continuum limit, perform an Ott/Antonsen reduction, integrate over the natural frequencies, and study the resulting spatio-temporal system on an unbounded domain. We show that these twisted states and their stability can be calculated explicitly. We find that stable twisted states with different wave numbers appear for increasing coupling strength in the well-known Eckhaus scenario. Simulations of finite arrays of oscillators show good agreement with results of the analysis of the infinite system.

  9. DNA induced chirality and helical twist in achiral liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garvey, Alfred; Basu, Rajratan; Kinnamon, Daniel

    A small quantity of DNA sample (Deoxyribonucleic acid -cellulose double-stranded from calf thymus DNA in lyophilized powder form) was doped in an achiral liquid crystal (LC), and the mixture was found to exhibit a weak degree of chirality. The induced chirality in the LC was probed by means of the electroclinic effect in the LC's smectic-A phase, which showed significant pretransitional behavior on approaching the smectic- A-smectic- C transition temperature from above. The same DNA was doped in an achiral nematic LC and the mixture was found to exhibit an average mechanical twist over macroscopic dimensions. The double-stranded DNA-induced chiral pitch length P was determined by measuring the radius of curvature of reverse twist disclination lines in 90o nematic twist cells. In the LC +DNA mixture, the LC's benzene rings interact with the nucleobases of the DNA through π - π stacking, which induces a molecular conformational deracemization in the LC.

  10. Adaptive dual-layer super-twisting control and observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Christopher; Shtessel, Yuri

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, a super-twisting-like structure with adaptive gains is proposed. The structure is parameterised by two scalar gains, both of which adapt, and by an additional time-varying term. The magnitudes of the adaptive terms are allowed to both increase and decrease as appropriate so that they are as small as possible, in the sense that they do not unnecessarily over-bound the uncertainty, and yet are large enough to sustain a sliding motion. In the paper, a new time varying gain is incorporated into the traditional super-twisting architecture. The proposed adaption law has a dual-layer structure which is formally analyzed using Lyapunov techniques. The additional term has the effect of simplifying the stability analysis whilst guaranteeing the second-order sliding mode properties of the traditional super-twisting scheme.

  11. "Twisted Beam" SEE Observations of Ionospheric Heating from HAARP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briczinski, S. J.; Bernhardt, P. A.; Pedersen, T. R.; Rodriguez, S.; SanAntonio, G.

    2012-12-01

    High power HF radio waves exciting the ionosphere provide aeronomers with a unique space-based laboratory capability. The High-Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) in Gakona, Alaksa is the world's largest heating facility, providing effective radiated powers in the gigawatt range. Experiments performed at HAARP have allowed researchers to study many non-linear effects of wave-plasma interactions. Stimulated Electromagnetic Emission (SEE) is of interest to the ionospheric community for its diagnostic purposes. Typical SEE experiments at HAARP have focused on characterizing the parametric decay of the electromagnetic pump wave into several different wave modes such as upper and lower hybrid, ion acoustic, ion-Bernstein and electron-Bernstein. These production modes have been extensively studied at HAARP using traditional beam heating patterns and SEE detection. New results are present from HAARP experiments using a "twisted beam" excitation mode. Unlike traditional heating beams used at HAARP or other heating facilities, the twisted beam attempts to impart orbital angular momentum (OAM) into the heating region. Analysis of twisted beam heating shows that the SEE results obtained are nearly identical to the modes without OAM. One difference in the twisted beam mode is the heating region produced is in the shape of a ring as opposed to the more traditional "solid spot" region. The ring heating pattern may be more conducive to the creation of artificial airglow layers. The results of these runs include artificial layer creation and evolution as pertaining to the twisted beam pattern. The SEE measurements aid the interpretation of the twisted beam interactions in the ionosphere.

  12. Origins of GEMS Grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messenger, S.; Walker, R. M.

    2012-01-01

    Interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) collected in the Earth s stratosphere contain high abundances of submicrometer amorphous silicates known as GEMS grains. From their birth as condensates in the outflows of oxygen-rich evolved stars, processing in interstellar space, and incorporation into disks around new stars, amorphous silicates predominate in most astrophysical environments. Amorphous silicates were a major building block of our Solar System and are prominent in infrared spectra of comets. Anhydrous interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) thought to derive from comets contain abundant amorphous silicates known as GEMS (glass with embedded metal and sulfides) grains. GEMS grains have been proposed to be isotopically and chemically homogenized interstellar amorphous silicate dust. We evaluated this hypothesis through coordinated chemical and isotopic analyses of GEMS grains in a suite of IDPs to constrain their origins. GEMS grains show order of magnitude variations in Mg, Fe, Ca, and S abundances. GEMS grains do not match the average element abundances inferred for ISM dust containing on average, too little Mg, Fe, and Ca, and too much S. GEMS grains have complementary compositions to the crystalline components in IDPs suggesting that they formed from the same reservoir. We did not observe any unequivocal microstructural or chemical evidence that GEMS grains experienced prolonged exposure to radiation. We identified four GEMS grains having O isotopic compositions that point to origins in red giant branch or asymptotic giant branch stars and supernovae. Based on their O isotopic compositions, we estimate that 1-6% of GEMS grains are surviving circumstellar grains. The remaining 94-99% of GEMS grains have O isotopic compositions that are indistinguishable from terrestrial materials and carbonaceous chondrites. These isotopically solar GEMS grains either formed in the Solar System or were completely homogenized in the interstellar medium (ISM). However, the

  13. κ-Deformed Phase Space, Hopf Algebroid and Twisting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurić; , Tajron; Kovačević, Domagoj; Meljanac, Stjepan

    2014-11-01

    Hopf algebroid structures on the Weyl algebra (phase space) are presented. We define the coproduct for the Weyl generators from Leibniz rule. The codomain of the coproduct is modified in order to obtain an algebra structure. We use the dual base to construct the target map and antipode. The notion of twist is analyzed for κ-deformed phase space in Hopf algebroid setting. It is outlined how the twist in the Hopf algebroid setting reproduces the full Hopf algebra structure of κ-Poincaré algebra. Several examples of realizations are worked out in details.

  14. Folding DNA into twisted and curved nanoscale shapes.

    PubMed

    Dietz, Hendrik; Douglas, Shawn M; Shih, William M

    2009-08-01

    We demonstrate the ability to engineer complex shapes that twist and curve at the nanoscale from DNA. Through programmable self-assembly, strands of DNA are directed to form a custom-shaped bundle of tightly cross-linked double helices, arrayed in parallel to their helical axes. Targeted insertions and deletions of base pairs cause the DNA bundles to develop twist of either handedness or to curve. The degree of curvature could be quantitatively controlled, and a radius of curvature as tight as 6 nanometers was achieved. We also combined multiple curved elements to build several different types of intricate nanostructures, such as a wireframe beach ball or square-toothed gears.

  15. Folding DNA into Twisted and Curved Nanoscale Shapes

    PubMed Central

    Dietz, Hendrik; Douglas, Shawn M.; Shih, William M.

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate the ability to engineer complex shapes that twist and curve at the nanoscale from DNA. Through programmable self-assembly, strands of DNA are directed to form a custom-shaped bundle of tightly crosslinked double helices, arrayed in parallel to their helical axes. Targeted insertions and deletions of base pairs cause the DNA bundles to develop twist of either handedness or to curve. The degree of curvature could be quantitatively controlled, and a radius of curvature as tight as 6 nanometers was achieved. We also combined multiple curved elements to build several different types of intricate nanostructures, such as a wireframe beach ball or square-toothed gears. PMID:19661424

  16. Electronic Structure and Optical Properties of Twisted Bilayer Black Phosphorus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Ting; Li, Zhenglu; Qiu, Diana Y.; Louie, Steven G.

    Using first-principles calculations, we find that the electronic structure and optical properties of bilayer black phosphorus can be modified significantly through changing the interlayer twist angle. We demonstrate the origin of these twist angle dependent effects, and connect our predicted results to experimental measurements. This work was supported by NSF Grant No. DMR15-1508412, and the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231. Computational resources have been provided by DOE at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's NERSC facility.

  17. Jones birefringence in twisted single-mode optical fibers.

    PubMed

    Tentori, Diana; Garcia-Weidner, A

    2013-12-30

    In this work we analyze the birefringence matrix developed for a twisted fiber in order to identify the basic optical effects that define its birefringence. The study was performed using differential Jones calculus. The resultant differential matrix showed three independent types of birefringence: circular, linear at 0 degrees and linear at 45 degrees (Jones birefringence). We applied this birefringence matrix to the description of the output state of polarization measured for three commercial fibers that due to its higher rigidity present stronger birefringence changes when twisted. The torsion applied to the erbium-doped fiber samples varied from 0 to 1440 degrees. PMID:24514769

  18. Electrically Induced Twist in Smectic Liquid-Crystalline Elastomers.

    PubMed

    Spillmann, Christopher M; Naciri, Jawad; Ratna, B R; Selinger, Robin L B; Selinger, Jonathan V

    2016-07-01

    As an approach for electrically controllable actuators, we prepare elastomers of chiral smectic-A liquid crystals, which have an electroclinic effect, i.e., molecular tilt induced by an applied electric field. Surprisingly, our experiments find that an electric field causes a rapid and reversible twisting of the film out of the plane, with a helical sense that depends on the sign of the field. To explain this twist, we develop a continuum elastic theory based on an asymmetry between the front and back of the film. We further present finite-element simulations, which show the dynamic shape change.

  19. Effect of Grain Boundary Character Distribution on the Adiabatic Shear Susceptibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yang; Jiang, Lihong; Luo, Shuhong; Hu, Haibo; Tang, Tiegang; Zhang, Qingming

    2016-11-01

    The adiabatic shear susceptibility of AISI321 stainless steels with different grain boundary character distributions (GBCDs) was investigated by means of split-Hopkinson pressure bar. The results indicate that the width of the adiabatic shear band of the specimen after thermomechanical processing (TMP) treatment is narrower. The comparison of the stress collapse time, the critical stress, and the adiabatic shear forming energy suggests that the TMP specimens have lower adiabatic shear susceptibility than that of the solution-treated samples under the same loading condition. GBCD and grain size affected the adiabatic shear susceptibility. The high-angle boundary network of the TMP specimens was interrupted or replaced by the special grain boundary, and smaller grain size hindered the adiabatic shearing.

  20. Nano-analysis of grain boundary and triple junction transport in nanocrystalline Ni/Cu.

    PubMed

    Reda Chellali, Mohammed; Balogh, Zoltan; Schmitz, Guido

    2013-09-01

    Nanocrystalline materials are distinguished by a high density of structural defects and grain boundaries. Due to the small grain size, a particular defect of the grain boundary topology, the so-called triple junction takes a dominant role for grain growth and atomic transport. We demonstrate by atom probe tomography that triple junctions in nanocrystalline Cu have 100-300 times higher diffusivity of Ni than standard high angle grain boundaries. Also, a previously unexpected systematic variation of the grain boundary width with temperature is detected. The impurity segregation layer at the grain boundaries grows from the 0.7 nm at 563 K to 2.5 nm at 643 K. This variation is clearly not controlled by simple bulk diffusion. Taking this effect into consideration, the activation energies for Ni diffusion in triple junctions and grain boundaries in Cu can be determined to be (83 ± 10) and (120 ± 15) kJ/mol, respectively. Thus, triple junctions are distinguished by considerably lower activation energy with respect to grain boundaries.

  1. Interstellar Dust Grain Alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, B.-G.; Lazarian, A.; Vaillancourt, John E.

    2015-08-01

    Interstellar polarization at optical-to-infrared wavelengths is known to arise from asymmetric dust grains aligned with the magnetic field. This effect provides a potentially powerful probe of magnetic field structure and strength if the details of the grain alignment can be reliably understood. Theory and observations have recently converged on a quantitative, predictive description of interstellar grain alignment based on radiative processes. The development of a general, analytical model for this radiative alignment torque (RAT) theory has allowed specific, testable predictions for realistic interstellar conditions. We outline the theoretical and observational arguments in favor of RAT alignment, as well as reasons the "classical" paramagnetic alignment mechanism is unlikely to work, except possibly for the very smallest grains. With further detailed characterization of the RAT mechanism, grain alignment and polarimetry promise to not only better constrain the interstellar magnetic field but also provide new information on the dust characteristics.

  2. Gauge Theory on Twisted kappa-Minkowski: Old Problems and Possible Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitrijević, Marija; Jonke, Larisa; Pachoł, Anna

    2014-06-01

    We review the application of twist deformation formalism and the construction of noncommutative gauge theory on κ-Minkowski space-time. We compare two different types of twists: the Abelian and the Jordanian one. In each case we provide the twisted differential calculus and consider {U}(1) gauge theory. Different methods of obtaining a gauge invariant action and related problems are thoroughly discussed.

  3. The 1s-State Analysis Applied to High-Angle, Annular Dark-Field Image Interpretation—When Can We Use It?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anstis, Geoffrey R.

    2004-02-01

    A small probe centered on an atomic column excites the bound and unbound states of the two-dimensional projected potential of the column. It has been argued that, even when several states are excited, only the 1s state is sufficiently localized to contribute a signal to the high-angle detector. This article shows that non-1s states do make a significant contribution for certain incident probe profiles. The contribution of the 1s state to the thermal diffuse scattering is calculated directly. Sub-Ångstrom probes formed by Cs-corrected lenses excite predominantly the 1s state and contributions from other states are not very large. For probes of lower resolution when non-1s states are important, the integrated electron intensity at the column provides a better estimate of image intensity.

  4. Measurement of indium concentration profiles and segregation efficiencies from high-angle annular dark field-scanning transmission electron microscopy images.

    PubMed

    Mehrtens, Thorsten; Müller, Knut; Schowalter, Marco; Hu, Dongzhi; Schaadt, Daniel M; Rosenauer, Andreas

    2013-08-01

    We investigated segregation of indium in an InxGa1-xAs/GaAs heterostructure via high-angle annular dark field-scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF-STEM), where contrast strongly depends on the nuclear charges of the scattering atoms (Z-contrast). Indium concentration maps have been deduced from HAADF-STEM images by comparing normalized measured intensities with multislice simulations in the frozen lattice approach. Segregation coefficients were derived following the segregation model of Muraki et al.. This is demonstrated for HAADF-STEM images recorded in [100] and [110] zone-axes. Determined indium concentrations and segregation coefficients are compared with results from composition analysis by lattice fringe analysis (CELFA) measurements and energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX).

  5. Quantitative composition determination at the atomic level using model-based high-angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Martinez, G T; Rosenauer, A; De Backer, A; Verbeeck, J; Van Aert, S

    2014-02-01

    High angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF STEM) images provide sample information which is sensitive to the chemical composition. The image intensities indeed scale with the mean atomic number Z. To some extent, chemically different atomic column types can therefore be visually distinguished. However, in order to quantify the atomic column composition with high accuracy and precision, model-based methods are necessary. Therefore, an empirical incoherent parametric imaging model can be used of which the unknown parameters are determined using statistical parameter estimation theory (Van Aert et al., 2009, [1]). In this paper, it will be shown how this method can be combined with frozen lattice multislice simulations in order to evolve from a relative toward an absolute quantification of the composition of single atomic columns with mixed atom types. Furthermore, the validity of the model assumptions are explored and discussed.

  6. The effect of probe inaccuracies on the quantitative model-based analysis of high angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy images.

    PubMed

    Martinez, G T; De Backer, A; Rosenauer, A; Verbeeck, J; Van Aert, S

    2014-08-01

    Quantitative structural and chemical information can be obtained from high angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF STEM) images when using statistical parameter estimation theory. In this approach, we assume an empirical parameterized imaging model for which the total scattered intensities of the atomic columns are estimated. These intensities can be related to the material structure or composition. Since the experimental probe profile is assumed to be known in the description of the imaging model, we will explore how the uncertainties in the probe profile affect the estimation of the total scattered intensities. Using multislice image simulations, we analyze this effect for Cs corrected and non-Cs corrected microscopes as a function of inaccuracies in cylindrically symmetric aberrations, such as defocus and spherical aberration of third and fifth order, and non-cylindrically symmetric aberrations, such as 2-fold and 3-fold astigmatism and coma.

  7. Coexistence of low-angle normal and high-angle strike- to oblique-slip faults during Late Miocene mineralization in eastern Elba Island (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liotta, Domenico; Brogi, Andrea; Meccheri, Marco; Dini, Andrea; Bianco, Caterina; Ruggieri, Giovanni

    2015-10-01

    In this paper we deal with the kinematic and chronological relationships among low angle normal faults and high angle strike- to oblique-slip faults in an exhumed mineralized area, where shear veins and minor associated structures filled with the same mineral assemblage has been interpreted as indicators of coeval fault activities. The study area is located in the eastern Elba Island, where a mineralized late Miocene-early Pliocene low-angle normal fault (Zuccale fault) and high-angle strike- to oblique-slip faults extensively crop out, the latter giving rise to the Capoliveri-Porto Azzurro shear zone. The field study highlighted that: (a) the damage zones of both fault sets are mineralized by syn-kinematic tourmaline, graphite, Fe-oxides and/or Fe-oxyhydroxides shear veins, thus indicating their coeval activity during the hydrothermal event (5.9-5.4 Ma); (b) the Capoliveri-Porto Azzurro shear zone is constituted by a network of fractures, whose geometry and kinematics display the evolution of a NE-trending left-lateral oblique-slip transtensional shear zone; (c) its internal architecture is defined by tourmaline and Fe-oxides and/or Fe-oxyhydroxides mineralized veins, framed in the same kinematic field characterizing the Zuccale fault evolution; for this reason, the Capoliveri-Porto Azzurro shear zone is interpreted as a transfer zone active during the low-angle fault activity; (d) the Capoliveri-Porto Azzurro shear zone played the role of a significant normal fault during the Late Pliocene-Pleistocene, therefore favouring the deepening of the Tyrrhenian Basin with respect to the uplift and exhumation of the mid-crustal rocks of the Elba Island. It is finally argued that the interaction between the low-angle normal fault and the almost vertical shear zone determined an increase of permeability, favouring the mineralizing fluid flow during the hydrothermal stage and, reasonably, the previous emplacement of the Porto Azzurro magmatic body.

  8. Side forces on forebodies at high angles of attack and Mach numbers from 0.1 to 0.7: two tangent ogives, paraboloid and cone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keener, E. R.; Chapman, G. T.; Taleghani, J.; Cohen, L.

    1977-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted in the Ames 12-Foot Wind Tunnel to determine the subsonic aerodynamic characteristics of four forebodies at high angles of attack. The forebodies tested were a tangent ogive with fineness ratio of 5, a paraboloid with fineness ratio of 3.5, a 20 deg cone, and a tangent ogive with an elliptic cross section. The investigation included the effects of nose bluntness and boundary-layer trips. The tangent-ogive forebody was also tested in the presence of a short afterbody and with the afterbody attached. Static longitudinal and lateral/directional stability data were obtained. The investigation was conducted to investigate the existence of large side forces and yawing moments at high angles of attack and zero sideslip. It was found that all of the forebodies experience steady side forces that start at angles of attack of from 20 deg to 35 deg and exist to as high as 80 deg, depending on forebody shape. The side is as large as 1.6 times the normal force and is generally repeatable with increasing and decreasing angle of attack and, also, from test to test. The side force is very sensitive to the nature of the boundary layer, as indicated by large changes with boundary trips. The maximum side force caries considerably with Reynolds number and tends to decrease with increasing Mach number. The direction of the side force is sensitive to the body geometry near the nose. The angle of attack of onset of side force is not strongly influenced by Reynolds number or Mach number but varies with forebody shape. Maximum normal force often occurs at angles of attack near 60 deg. The effect of the elliptic cross section is to reduce the angle of onset by about 10 deg compared to that of an equivalent circular forebody with the same fineness ratio. The short afterbody reduces the angle of onset by about 5 deg.

  9. Mechanical Motion of Chiral Azobenzene Crystals with Twisting upon Photoirradiation.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Takuya; Fujisawa, Juri; Shiro, Motoo; Koshima, Hideko; Asahi, Toru

    2016-06-01

    The photomechanical motion of chiral crystals of trans-azobenzene derivatives with an (S)- and (R)-phenylethylamide group was investigated and compared with a racemic crystal. Changes in the UV/Vis absorption spectra of the powdered crystals before and after UV irradiation were measured by using an optical waveguide spectrometer, showing that the lifetime of the cis-to-trans thermal back-isomerization of the chiral crystals was faster than that of the racemic crystals. Upon UV irradiation, a long plate-like chiral microcrystal bent away from the light source with a twisting motion. A square-like chiral microcrystal curled toward the light with some twisting. Reversible bending of a rod-like chiral microcrystal was repeatable over twenty-five cycles. In contrast, bending of a plate-like racemic microcrystal was small. A possible mechanism for the bending and twisting motion was discussed based on the optimized cis conformer determined by using calculations, showing that the bending motion with twisting is caused by elongation along the b axis and shrinkage along the a axis.

  10. Design studies for twist-coupled wind turbine blades.

    SciTech Connect

    Valencia, Ulyses; Locke, James

    2004-06-01

    This study presents results obtained for four hybrid designs of the Northern Power Systems (NPS) 9.2-meter prototype version of the ERS-100 wind turbine rotor blade. The ERS-100 wind turbine rotor blade was designed and developed by TPI composites. The baseline design uses e-glass unidirectional fibers in combination with {+-}45-degree and random mat layers for the skin and spar cap. This project involves developing structural finite element models of the baseline design and carbon hybrid designs with and without twist-bend coupling. All designs were evaluated for a unit load condition and two extreme wind conditions. The unit load condition was used to evaluate the static deflection, twist and twist-coupling parameter. Maximum deflections and strains were determined for the extreme wind conditions. Linear and nonlinear buckling loads were determined for a tip load condition. The results indicate that carbon fibers can be used to produce twist-coupled designs with comparable deflections, strains and buckling loads to the e-glass baseline.

  11. Photoelectric Effect for Twist-deformed Space-time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daszkiewicz, M.

    In this article, we investigate the impact of twisted space-time on the photoelectric effect, i.e., we derive the $\\theta$-deformed threshold frequency. In such a way we indicate that the space-time noncommutativity strongly enhances the photoelectric process.

  12. Higher Twist Effects in Photon-Photon Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadov, A. I.; Boztosun, I.; Soylu, A.; Dadashov, E. A.

    In this article, we investigate the contribution of the high twist Feynman diagrams to the large-pT single pseudoscalar and vector mesons inclusive production cross section in two-photon collisions and we present the general formulae for the high and leading twist differential cross sections. The pion wave function where two non-trivial Gegenbauer coefficients a2 and a4 have been extracted from the CLEO data, Braun-Filyanov pion wave function, the asymptotic and the Chernyak-Zhitnitsky wave functions are all used in the calculations. For ρ-meson we used the Ball-Braun wave function. The results of the calculations reveal that the high twist cross sections, the ratio R, the dependence transverse momentum pT and the rapidity y of meson in the ΦCLEO(x, Q2) wave function case is very close to the Φasy(x) asymptotic wave function case. It is shown that the high twist contribution to the cross section depends on the choice of the meson wave functions.

  13. Scalar field theory in {kappa}-Minkowski spacetime from twist

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyeong-Chan; Lee, Youngone; Rim, Chaiho; Yee, Jae Hyung

    2009-10-15

    Using the twist deformation of U(igl(4,R)), the linear part of the diffeomorphism, we define a scalar function and construct a free scalar field theory in four-dimensional {kappa}-Minkowski spacetime. The action in momentum space turns out to differ only in the integration measure from the commutative theory.

  14. Twisting singular solutions of Betheʼs equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nepomechie, Rafael I.; Wang, Chunguang

    2014-12-01

    The Bethe equations for the periodic XXX and XXZ spin chains admit singular solutions, for which the corresponding eigenvalues and eigenvectors are ill-defined. We use a twist regularization to derive conditions for such singular solutions to be physical, in which case they correspond to genuine eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the Hamiltonian.

  15. Would You Rather (WYR), with a Sexual Health Twist!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosen, Brittany; McNeill, Elisa Beth; Wilson, Kelly

    2014-01-01

    Would You Rather (WYR), with a Sexual Health Twist! teaching technique uses two youth games, "Would you rather…" and Twister®, to actively engage students in developing decision-making skills regarding human sexuality. Utilizing the "Would you rather" choices, the teacher provides a short scenario with two difficult choices.…

  16. The twisted structure of the human Achilles tendon.

    PubMed

    Edama, M; Kubo, M; Onishi, H; Takabayashi, T; Inai, T; Yokoyama, E; Hiroshi, W; Satoshi, N; Kageyama, I

    2015-10-01

    The Achilles tendon (AT) consists of fascicles that originate from the medial head of the gastrocnemius (MG), lateral head of the gastrocnemius (LG), and soleus muscle (Sol). These fascicles are reported to have a twisted structure. However, there is no consensus as to the degree of torsion. The purpose of this study was to investigate the twisted structure of the AT at the level of fascicles that originate from the MG, LG, and Sol, and elucidate the morphological characteristics. Gross anatomical study of 60 Japanese cadavers (111 legs) was used. The AT fascicles originated from the MG, LG, and Sol were fused while twisting among themselves. There were three classification types depending on the degree of torsion. Further fine separation of each fascicle revealed MG ran fairly parallel in all types, whereas LG and Sol, particularly of the extreme type, were inserted onto the calcaneal tuberosity with strong torsion. In addition, the sites of Sol torsion were 3-5 cm proximal to the calcaneal insertion of the AT. These findings provide promising basic data to elucidate the functional role of the twisted structure and mechanisms for the occurrence of AT injury and other conditions.

  17. Stability of coupled tearing and twisting modes in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzpatrick, R.

    1994-03-01

    A dispersion relation is derived for resistive modes of arbitrary parity in a tokamak plasma. At low mode amplitude, tearing and twisting modes which have nonideal MHD behavior at only one rational surface at a time in the plasma are decoupled via sheared rotation and diamagnetic flows. At higher amplitude, more unstable {open_quote}compound{close_quote} modes develop which have nonideal behavior simultaneously at many surfaces. Such modes possess tearing parity layers at some of the nonideal surfaces, and twisting parity layers at others, but mixed parity layers are generally disallowed. At low mode number, {open_quote}compound{close_quote} modes are likely to have tearing parity layers at all of the nonideal surfaces in a very low-{beta} plasma, but twisting parity layers become more probable as the plasma {beta} is increased. At high mode number, unstable twisting modes which exceed a critical amplitude drive conventional magnetic island chains on alternate rational surfaces, to form an interlocking structure in which the O-points and X-points of neighboring chains line up.

  18. Processing, mechanical behavior and biocompatibility of ultrafine grained zirconium fabricated by accumulative roll bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Ling

    The aim of this study is to produce large quantities of bulk zirconium with an ultrafine grained microstructure and with enhanced properties. Accumulative roll bonding (ARB), a severe plastic deformation technique based on rolling, is chosen due to its availability in industrial environment. The texture, microstructure and mechanical behavior of bulk ultrafine grained (ufg) Zr fabricated by accumulative roll bonding is investigated by electron backscatter diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and mechanical testing. A reasonably homogeneous and equiaxed ufg structure, with a large fraction of high angle boundaries (HABs, ˜70%), can be obtained in Zr after only two ARB cycles. The average grain size, counting only HABs (theta>15°), is 400 nm. (Sub)grain size is equal to 320 nm. The yield stress and ultimate tensile stress (UTS) values are nearly double those from conventionally processed Zr with only a slight loss of ductility. Optimum processing conditions include large thickness reductions per pass (˜75%), which enhance grain refinement, and a rolling temperature (T ˜ 0.3Tm) at which a sufficient number of slip modes are activated, with an absence of significant grain growth. Grain refinement takes place by geometrical thinning and grain subdivision by the formation of geometrically necessary boundaries. The formation of equiaxed grains by geometric dynamic recrystallization is facilitated by enhanced diffusion due to adabatic heating. Optical microscopy examination and shear testing suggest accepted bonding quality compared to that achieved in materials processed by diffusion bonding and that obtained in other ARB studies. Biocompatibility of ultrafine grained Zr processed by large strain rolling is studied by evaluating the behavior of human osteoblast cells. It is suggested that ultrafine grained Zr has a similar good biocompatibility as Ti6Al4V alloy and conventional Zr with a large grain size have. The improved mechanical properties together with

  19. Modelling of porphyroclasts in simple shear and the role of stress variations at grain boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Christopher J. L.; Evans, Lynn; Delle Piane, Claudio

    2009-11-01

    Grain-scale numerical experiments involving simple shear of a two-phase non-linear viscous material are described and compared with mineral fish or lozenge-shaped porphyroclasts, such as muscovite. Two types of 2D models are considered; either a single elongate grain or two parallel elongate grains, in both cases supported by a weaker polygonal grain matrix. The relative viscosities of the contrasting grain structures were systematically varied, allowing us to observe the effects of non-linear viscous rheology on the resulting microstructure and flow patterns. The results show that the finite rotation of the hard elongate grain was similar within any one experiment, but was largely influenced by viscosity contrast, the geometry of the model and the imposed shear strain. Models involving single elongate hard grains show increasing instability at their ends and less strain compatibility with the deforming matrix grains, as the viscosity contrast is increased. In the paired grain models the greatest variation in the matrix grain microstructure is seen in the region where the two hard grains are oriented at a high-angle to the direction of shear. Finally, we consider the changes in intragranular stress by comparing microstructural observations using different viscosities with the distribution of stress in space and during progressive shear. In the plane approximately parallel to the maximum principal stress direction ( σ1), a localised change of stress occurs across and along the interface between the hard and soft grains. Variations in the mean stress at these boundaries are directly attributable to changes in the minimum principal stress. We propose that with shear strains greater than γ = 2 it is the minimum principal stress that can control diffusion processes at the grain boundary rather than mean stress. In conclusion we suggest that our models have the potential for providing useful insights into why metamorphic reactions can occur at the interface between a

  20. Correlation between grain boundary misorientation and M{sub 23}C{sub 6} precipitation behaviors in a wrought Ni-based superalloy

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Bin; Jiang, Li; Hu, Rui; Li, Qi

    2013-04-15

    The correlation between the grain boundary misorientation and the precipitation behaviors of intergranular M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbides in a wrought Ni–Cr–W superalloy was investigated by using the electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) technique. It was observed that the grain boundaries with a misorientation angle less than 20°, as well as all coincidence site lattice (CSL) boundaries, are immune to precipitation of the M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbides; in contrast, the random high-angle grain boundaries with a misorientation angle of 20°–40° provide preferential precipitation sites of the M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbides at the random high-angle grain boundaries with a higher misorientation angle of 55°–60°/[2 2 3] turn to retard precipitation of M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbides owing to their nature like the Σ3 grain boundaries and retard the precipitation of M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbides. The low-angle and certain random grain boundary segments induced by twins were found to interrupt the precipitation of the M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbides along the high-angle grain boundaries. - Highlights: ► The low angle grain boundaries and CSL boundaries are immune to precipitation. ► M23C6 precipitate preferentially at random grain boundaries within 20°–40°. ► Some certain random grain boundary segments interrupt M23C6 precipitation.

  1. Folding of Pollen Grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katifori, Eleni; Alben, Silas; Cerda, Enrique; Nelson, David; Dumais, Jacques

    2008-03-01

    At dehiscence, which occurs when the anther reaches maturity and opens, pollen grains dehydrate and their volume is reduced. The pollen wall deforms to accommodate the volume loss, and the deformation pathway depends on the initial turgid pollen grain geometry and the mechanical properties of the pollen wall. We demonstrate, using both experimental and theoretical approaches, that the design of the apertures (areas on the pollen wall where the stretching and the bending modulus are reduced) is critical for controlling the folding pattern, and ensures the pollen grain viability. An excellent fit to the experiments is obtained using a discretized version of the theory of thin elastic shells.

  2. Convection in grain refining

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flemings, M. C.; Szekely, J.

    1982-01-01

    The relationship between fluid flow phenomena, nucleation, and grain refinement in solidifying metals both in the presence and in the absence of a gravitational field was investigated. The reduction of grain size in hard-to-process melts; the effects of undercooling on structure in solidification processes, including rapid solidification processing; and control of this undercooling to improve structures of solidified melts are considered. Grain refining and supercooling thermal modeling of the solidification process, and heat and fluid flow phenomena in the levitated metal droplets are described.

  3. Late Miocene termination of tectonic activity on the detachment in the Alaşehir Rift, Western Anatolia: Depositional records of the Göbekli Formation and high-angle cross-cutting faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, Fatih

    2016-04-01

    Western Anatolia is a well-known province of continental extension in the world. Most distinctive structural elements of the region are E-W trending grabens. The Alaşehir Rift/Graben is an asymmetric rift/graben trending E-W between Ahmetli and Turgutlu in its western part and continues eastwardly in a NW-SE direction to Alaşehir (Philadelphia in ancient Greek). The stratigraphy of the region consists of metamorphic rocks of the Menderes Massif (Paleozoic-lower Cenozoic) and the syn-extensional Salihli granitoid (middle Miocene) forming the basement unit and overlying sedimentary cover rocks of Neogene-Quaternary. These rocks are cut and deformed by the Karadut detachment fault and various low-angle normal faults (antithetic and synthetic faults of the Karadut detachment fault), which are also cut by various younger high-angle normal faults. It is possible to observe two continuous sequences of different time intervals in that Miocene deposits of the first rifting phase are covered by Plio-Quaternary sediments of second rifting phase with a "break-up" unconformity. In lower levels of a measured stratigraphic section (583 m) of the Göbekli formation which has lower age of late Miocene and upper age of early Pliocene, the presence of angular to sub-angular clasts of the blocks and conglomerates suggests alluvial-fun origin during an initial stage of deposition. Existence of normal-reverse graded, cross-bedding, pebble imbrications in layers of the pebbly sandstone demonstrates fluvial environment in following levels of the sequence. Existence of lenses and normal graded conglomerates in pebbly sandstones and fine grained sandstones strata evidences a low energy environment. Observed siltstone-claystone intercalations on the middle levels of the sequence indicate an environment with low dipping morphology to be formed as flat plains during this period. In the uppermost levels of the sequence, existence of the pebble imbrications inside pebbly sandstones overlying

  4. Optical angular properties of twisted-nematic liquid-crystal cells with twist angles of less than 90 degrees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, Stephen

    1996-05-01

    I analyze the optical angular properties of twisted-nematic liquid-crystal cells that operate in the normally white mode with twist angles of less than 90 degrees. It is demonstrated that, although a reduction of the twist angle produces an increase in the asymmetry of the birefringence generated by a single cell when in the active phase, the positioning of two cells such that the face-to-face rub directions are crossed gives rise to a large amount of cell compensation, giving an enhanced field of view. The effect of the polarizer arrangement is investigated, and it is shown that the configuration required in order to maximize the overall optical transmittance when in the inactive phase also maintains the asymmetry displayed by the single cell when stimulated by voltages lying below that of the saturation voltage. Although employment of this polarizer design together with a lowering of the twist angle degrades cell contrast, a fast optical shutter from the light to the dark state based on a double-cell construction possessing improved optical angular properties is introduced. Such systems find applications in automatically darkening welding filter visors for which it is critical to combine both a fast response time to the protective state together with a large viewing cone.

  5. Kansas Agents Study Grain Marketing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoeff, Robert W.

    1973-01-01

    Author is an extension specialist in feed and grain marketing for Kansas State University. He describes a tour set up to educate members of the Kansas Grain and Feed Dealers' Association in the area of grain marketing and exporting. (GB)

  6. Consistent higher-twists analysis of moments of spin structure function

    SciTech Connect

    Alexandre Deur

    2005-08-01

    Available analyses on moments of the spin structure function g{sub 1} use different methods and are barely consistent with each other. We present an analysis of {Gamma}{sub 1}{sup p} using a method consistent with the studies of {Gamma}{sub 1}{sup n} and {Gamma}{sub 1}{sup p-n} already published. One result is that the higher twist coefficients seem to alternate signs: the relatively larger twist-6 contribution is partly suppressed by the twist-4 and twist-8 contributions. The size of twist-6 can be explained by the elastic contribution to the moments.

  7. Relict grains in chondrules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rambaldi, E. R.

    1981-01-01

    Attention is given to the fact that a significant fraction of the chondrules from ordinary chondrites contain silicate grains that survived the chondrule formation process without melting. Typically, these grains consist of coarse olivine, rarely orthopyroxene, crystals located in the core of chondrules and displaying a zoning that is inconsistent with crystallization from a silicate melt. It is noted that the relict grains still preserve the imprint of processes that occurred in the solar nebula and, in some cases, may include the isotopic record of interstellar grains. Information is presented on the chondrule precursor materials and the process of chondrule formation which was acquired by a compositional and textural study of three of the most unequilibrated type 3 ordinary chondrites.

  8. Misorientation-angle-dependent electrical transport across molybdenum disulfide grain boundaries

    PubMed Central

    Ly, Thuc Hue; Perello, David J.; Zhao, Jiong; Deng, Qingming; Kim, Hyun; Han, Gang Hee; Chae, Sang Hoon; Jeong, Hye Yun; Lee, Young Hee

    2016-01-01

    Grain boundaries in monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides have unique atomic defect structures and band dispersion relations that depend on the inter-domain misorientation angle. Here, we explore misorientation angle-dependent electrical transport at grain boundaries in monolayer MoS2 by correlating the atomic defect structures of measured devices analysed with transmission electron microscopy and first-principles calculations. Transmission electron microscopy indicates that grain boundaries are primarily composed of 5–7 dislocation cores with periodicity and additional complex defects formed at high angles, obeying the classical low-angle theory for angles <22°. The inter-domain mobility is minimized for angles <9° and increases nonlinearly by two orders of magnitude before saturating at ∼16 cm2 V−1 s−1 around misorientation angle≈20°. This trend is explained via grain-boundary electrostatic barriers estimated from density functional calculations and experimental tunnelling barrier heights, which are ≈0.5 eV at low angles and ≈0.15 eV at high angles (≥20°). PMID:26813605

  9. Grain boundary character distribution in nanocrystalline metals produced by different processing routes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bober, David B.; Kumar, Mukal; Rupert, Timothy J.; Khalajhedayati, Amirhossein

    2015-12-28

    Nanocrystalline materials are defined by their fine grain size, but details of the grain boundary character distribution should also be important. Grain boundary character distributions are reported for ball-milled, sputter-deposited, and electrodeposited Ni and Ni-based alloys, all with average grain sizes of ~20 nm, to study the influence of processing route. The two deposited materials had nearly identical grain boundary character distributions, both marked by a Σ3 length percentage of 23 to 25 pct. In contrast, the ball-milled material had only 3 pct Σ3-type grain boundaries and a large fraction of low-angle boundaries (16 pct), with the remainder being predominantlymore » random high angle (73 pct). Furthermore, these grain boundary character measurements are connected to the physical events that control their respective processing routes. Consequences for material properties are also discussed with a focus on nanocrystalline corrosion. As a whole, the results presented here show that grain boundary character distribution, which has often been overlooked in nanocrystalline metals, can vary significantly and influence material properties in profound ways.« less

  10. Grain boundary character distribution in nanocrystalline metals produced by different processing routes

    SciTech Connect

    Bober, David B.; Kumar, Mukal; Rupert, Timothy J.; Khalajhedayati, Amirhossein

    2015-12-28

    Nanocrystalline materials are defined by their fine grain size, but details of the grain boundary character distribution should also be important. Grain boundary character distributions are reported for ball-milled, sputter-deposited, and electrodeposited Ni and Ni-based alloys, all with average grain sizes of ~20 nm, to study the influence of processing route. The two deposited materials had nearly identical grain boundary character distributions, both marked by a Σ3 length percentage of 23 to 25 pct. In contrast, the ball-milled material had only 3 pct Σ3-type grain boundaries and a large fraction of low-angle boundaries (16 pct), with the remainder being predominantly random high angle (73 pct). Furthermore, these grain boundary character measurements are connected to the physical events that control their respective processing routes. Consequences for material properties are also discussed with a focus on nanocrystalline corrosion. As a whole, the results presented here show that grain boundary character distribution, which has often been overlooked in nanocrystalline metals, can vary significantly and influence material properties in profound ways.

  11. Grain Boundary Character Distributions in Nanocrystalline Metals Produced by Different Processing Routes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bober, David B.; Khalajhedayati, Amirhossein; Kumar, Mukul; Rupert, Timothy J.

    2016-03-01

    Nanocrystalline materials are defined by their fine grain size, but details of the grain boundary character distribution should also be important. Grain boundary character distributions are reported for ball-milled, sputter-deposited, and electrodeposited Ni and Ni-based alloys, all with average grain sizes of ~20 nm, to study the influence of processing route. The two deposited materials had nearly identical grain boundary character distributions, both marked by a Σ3 length percentage of 23 to 25 pct. In contrast, the ball-milled material had only 3 pct Σ3-type grain boundaries and a large fraction of low-angle boundaries (16 pct), with the remainder being predominantly random high angle (73 pct). These grain boundary character measurements are connected to the physical events that control their respective processing routes. Consequences for material properties are also discussed with a focus on nanocrystalline corrosion. As a whole, the results presented here show that grain boundary character distribution, which has often been overlooked in nanocrystalline metals, can vary significantly and influence material properties in profound ways.

  12. Grains in galactic haloes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrara, A.; Barsella, B.; Ferrini, F.; Greenberg, J. M.; Aiello, S.

    1989-12-01

    The authors considered the effect of extensive forces on dust grains subjected to the light and matter distribution of the spiral galaxy NGC 3198. They have shown that the combined force on a small particle located above the plane of a galactic disk may be either attractive or repulsive depending on a variety of parameters. The authors present here the preliminary results of the study of the motion of a dust grain for NGC 3198.

  13. TWIST1 Integrates Endothelial Responses to Flow in Vascular Dysfunction and Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoud, Marwa M.; Kim, Hyejeong Rosemary; Xing, Rouyu; Hsiao, Sarah; Mammoto, Akiko; Chen, Jing; Serbanovic-Canic, Jovana; Feng, Shuang; Bowden, Neil P.; Maguire, Richard; Ariaans, Markus; Francis, Sheila E.; Weinberg, Peter D.; van der Heiden, Kim; Jones, Elizabeth A.; Chico, Timothy J.A.; Ridger, Victoria

    2016-01-01

    Rationale: Blood flow–induced shear stress controls endothelial cell (EC) physiology during atherosclerosis via transcriptional mechanisms that are incompletely understood. The mechanosensitive transcription factor TWIST is expressed during embryogenesis, but its role in EC responses to shear stress and focal atherosclerosis is unknown. Objective: To investigate whether TWIST regulates endothelial responses to shear stress during vascular dysfunction and atherosclerosis and compare TWIST function in vascular development and disease. Methods and Results: The expression and function of TWIST1 was studied in EC in both developing vasculature and during the initiation of atherosclerosis. In zebrafish, twist was expressed in early embryonic vasculature where it promoted angiogenesis by inducing EC proliferation and migration. In adult porcine and murine arteries, TWIST1 was expressed preferentially at low shear stress regions as evidenced by quantitative polymerase chain reaction and en face staining. Moreover, studies of experimental murine carotid arteries and cultured EC revealed that TWIST1 was induced by low shear stress via a GATA4-dependent transcriptional mechanism. Gene silencing in cultured EC and EC-specific genetic deletion in mice demonstrated that TWIST1 promoted atherosclerosis by inducing inflammation and enhancing EC proliferation associated with vascular leakiness. Conclusions: TWIST expression promotes developmental angiogenesis by inducing EC proliferation and migration. In addition to its role in development, TWIST is expressed preferentially at low shear stress regions of adult arteries where it promotes atherosclerosis by inducing EC proliferation and inflammation. Thus, pleiotropic functions of TWIST control vascular disease and development. PMID:27245171

  14. The Effect of Tip Geometry on Active-Twist Rotor Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilbur, Matthew L.; Sekula, Martin K.

    2005-01-01

    A parametric examination of the effect of tip geometry on active-twist rotor system response is conducted. Tip geometry parameters considered include sweep, taper, anhedral, nonlinear twist, and the associated radial initiation location for each of these variables. A detailed study of the individual effect of each parameter on active-twist response is presented, and an assessment offered of the effect of combining multiple tip shape parameters. Tip sweep is shown to have the greatest affect on active-twist response, significantly decreasing the response available. Tip taper and anhedral are shown to increase moderately the active-twist response, while nonlinear twist is shown to have a minimal effect. A candidate tip shape that provides active-twist response equivalent to or greater than a rectangular planform blade is presented.

  15. Unique CCT repeats mediate transcription of the TWIST1 gene in mesenchymal cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Ohkuma, Mizue; Funato, Noriko; Higashihori, Norihisa; Murakami, Masanori; Ohyama, Kimie; Nakamura, Masataka . E-mail: naka.gene@cmn.tmd.ac.jp

    2007-01-26

    TWIST1, a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor, plays critical roles in embryo development, cancer metastasis and mesenchymal progenitor differentiation. Little is known about transcriptional regulation of TWIST1 expression. Here we identified DNA sequences responsible for TWIST1 expression in mesenchymal lineage cell lines. Reporter assays with TWIST1 promoter mutants defined the -102 to -74 sequences that are essential for TWIST1 expression in human and mouse mesenchymal cell lines. Tandem repeats of CCT, but not putative CREB and NF-{kappa}B sites in the sequences substantially supported activity of the TWIST1 promoter. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay demonstrated that the DNA sequences with the CCT repeats formed complexes with nuclear factors, containing, at least, Sp1 and Sp3. These results suggest critical implication of the CCT repeats in association with Sp1 and Sp3 factors in sustaining expression of the TWIST1 gene in mesenchymal cells.

  16. Mutations within Helix I of Twist1 Result in Distinct Limb Defects and Variation of DNA-Binding Affinities

    PubMed Central

    Firulli, Beth A.; Redick, Bradley A.; Conway, Simon J.; Firulli, Anthony B.

    2008-01-01

    Twist1 is a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) factor that plays an important role in limb development. Haploinsufficiency of Twist1 results in polydactyly via the inability of Twist1 to antagonistically regulate the related factor Hand2. The mechanism modulating Twist1-Hand2 antagonism is via phosphoregulation of conserved threonine and serine residues in helix I of the bHLH domain. Phosphoregulation alters the dimerization affinities for both proteins. Here we show that the expression of Twist1 and Twist1 phosphoregulation mutants result in distinct limb phenotypes in mice. In addition to dimer regulation, Twist1 phosphoregulation affects the DNA-binding affinities of Twist1 in a partner dependent and cis-element dependent manner. In order to gain a better understanding of the specific Twist1 transcriptional complexes that function during limb morphogensis, we employ a series of Twist1-tethered dimers that include the known Twist1 partners, E12 and Hand2, as well as a tethered Twist1 homodimer. We show that these dimers behave in a manner similar to monomerically expressed bHLH factors and result in distinct limb phenotypes that correlate well with those observed from the limb expression of Twist1 and Twist1 phosphoregulation mutants. Taken together, this study shows that the Twist1 dimer affinity for a given partner can modulate the DNA binding affinity and that Twist1 dimer choice determines phenotypic outcome during limb development. PMID:17652084

  17. Fingering phenomena during grain-grain displacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mello, Nathália M. P.; Paiva, Humberto A.; Combe, G.; Atman, A. P. F.

    2016-05-01

    Spontaneous formation of fingered patterns during the displacement of dense granular assemblies was experimentally reported few years ago, in a radial Hele-Shaw cell. Here, by means of discrete element simulations, we have recovered the experimental findings and extended the original study to explore the control parameters space. In particular, using assemblies of grains with different geometries (monodisperse, bidisperse, or polydisperse), we measured the macroscopic stress tensor in the samples in order to confirm some conjectures proposed in analogy with Saffman-Taylor viscous fingering phenomena for immiscible fluids. Considering an axial setup which allows to control the discharge of grains and to follow the trajectory and the pressure gradient along the displacing interface, we have applied the Darcy law for laminar flow in fluids in order to measure an "effective viscosity" for each assembly combination, in an attempt to mimic variation of the viscosity ratio between the injected/displaced fluids in the Saffman-Taylor experiment. The results corroborate the analogy with the viscous fluids displacement, with the bidisperse assembly corresponding to the less viscous geometry. But, differently to fluid case, granular fingers only develop for a specific combination of displaced/injected geometries, and we have demonstrated that it is always related with the formation of a force chain network along the finger direction.

  18. Complex kinetics of DNA condensation revealed through DNA twist tracing.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Wong, Wei Juan; Lim, Ci Ji; Ju, Hai-Peng; Li, Ming; Yan, Jie; Wang, Peng-Ye

    2015-08-01

    Toroid formation is an important mechanism for DNA condensation in cells. The length change during DNA condensation was investigated in previous single-molecule experiments. However, DNA twist is key to understanding the topological kinetics of DNA condensation. In this study, DNA twist as well as DNA length was traced during the DNA condensation by the freely orbiting magnetic tweezers and the tilted magnetic tweezers combined with Brownian dynamics simulations. The experimental results disclose the complex relationship between DNA extension and backbone rotation. Brownian dynamics simulations show that the toroid formation follows a wiggling pathway which leads to the complex DNA backbone rotation as revealed in our experiments. These findings provide the complete description of multivalent cation-dependent DNA toroid formation under tension.

  19. Twisted optical metamaterials for planarized ultrathin broadband circular polarizers.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Y; Belkin, M A; Alù, A

    2012-05-29

    Optical metamaterials are usually based on planarized, complex-shaped, resonant nano-inclusions. Three-dimensional geometries may provide a wider set of functionalities, including broadband chirality to manipulate circular polarization at the nanoscale, but their fabrication becomes challenging as their dimensions get smaller. Here we introduce a new paradigm for the realization of optical metamaterials, showing that three-dimensional effects may be obtained without complicated inclusions, but instead by tailoring the relative orientation within the lattice. We apply this concept to realize planarized, broadband bianisotropic metamaterials as stacked nanorod arrays with a tailored rotational twist. Because of the coupling among closely spaced twisted plasmonic metasurfaces, metamaterials realized with conventional lithography may effectively operate as three-dimensional helical structures with broadband bianisotropic optical response. The proposed concept is also shown to relax alignment requirements common in three-dimensional metamaterial designs. The realized sample constitutes an ultrathin, broadband circular polarizer that may be directly integrated within nanophotonic systems.

  20. Evolution of interlayer coupling in twisted molybdenum disulfide bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kaihui; Zhang, Liming; Cao, Ting; Jin, Chenhao; Qiu, Diana; Zhou, Qin; Zettl, Alex; Yang, Peidong; Louie, Steve G.; Wang, Feng

    2014-09-01

    Van der Waals coupling is emerging as a powerful method to engineer physical properties of atomically thin two-dimensional materials. In coupled graphene-graphene and graphene-boron nitride layers, interesting physical phenomena ranging from Fermi velocity renormalization to Hofstadter’s butterfly pattern have been demonstrated. Atomically thin transition metal dichalcogenides, another family of two-dimensional-layered semiconductors, can show distinct coupling phenomena. Here we demonstrate the evolution of interlayer coupling with twist angles in as-grown molybdenum disulfide bilayers. We find that the indirect bandgap size varies appreciably with the stacking configuration: it shows the largest redshift for AA- and AB-stacked bilayers, and a significantly smaller but constant redshift for all other twist angles. Our observations, together with ab initio calculations, reveal that this evolution of interlayer coupling originates from the repulsive steric effects that leads to different interlayer separations between the two molybdenum disulfide layers in different stacking configurations.

  1. Sweep-twist adaptive rotor blade : final project report.

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwill, Thomas D.

    2010-02-01

    Knight & Carver was contracted by Sandia National Laboratories to develop a Sweep Twist Adaptive Rotor (STAR) blade that reduced operating loads, thereby allowing a larger, more productive rotor. The blade design used outer blade sweep to create twist coupling without angled fiber. Knight & Carver successfully designed, fabricated, tested and evaluated STAR prototype blades. Through laboratory and field tests, Knight & Carver showed the STAR blade met the engineering design criteria and economic goals for the program. A STAR prototype was successfully tested in Tehachapi during 2008 and a large data set was collected to support engineering and commercial development of the technology. This report documents the methodology used to develop the STAR blade design and reviews the approach used for laboratory and field testing. The effort demonstrated that STAR technology can provide significantly greater energy capture without higher operating loads on the turbine.

  2. Stability of short wavelength tearing and twisting modes

    SciTech Connect

    Waelbroeck, F.L.

    1998-09-22

    The stability and mutual interaction of tearing and twisting modes in a torus is governed by matrices that generalize the well-known {Delta}{prime} stability index. The diagonal elements of these matrices determine the intrinsic stability of modes that reconnect the magnetic field at a single resonant surface. The off-diagonal elements indicate the strength of the coupling between the different modes. The author shows how the elements of these matrices can be evaluated, in the limit of short wavelength, from the free energy driving radially extended ballooning modes. The author applies the results by calculating the tearing and twisting {Delta}{prime} for a model high-beta equilibrium with circular flux surfaces.

  3. Deformations of Fell bundles and twisted graph algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raeburn, Iain

    2016-11-01

    We consider Fell bundles over discrete groups, and the C*-algebra which is universal for representations of the bundle. We define deformations of Fell bundles, which are new Fell bundles with the same underlying Banach bundle but with the multiplication deformed by a two-cocycle on the group. Every graph algebra can be viewed as the C*-algebra of a Fell bundle, and there are are many cocycles of interest with which to deform them. We thus obtain many of the twisted graph algebras of Kumjian, Pask and Sims. We demonstate the utility of our approach to these twisted graph algebras by proving that the deformations associated to different cocycles can be assembled as the fibres of a C*-bundle.

  4. Nonsnaking doubly diffusive convectons and the twist instability

    SciTech Connect

    Beaume, Cédric Knobloch, Edgar; Bergeon, Alain

    2013-11-15

    Doubly diffusive convection in a three-dimensional horizontally extended domain with a square cross section in the vertical is considered. The fluid motion is driven by horizontal temperature and concentration differences in the transverse direction. When the buoyancy ratio N = −1 and the Rayleigh number is increased the conduction state loses stability to a subcritical, almost two-dimensional roll structure localized in the longitudinal direction. This structure exhibits abrupt growth in length near a particular value of the Rayleigh number but does not snake. Prior to this filling transition the structure becomes unstable to a secondary twist instability generating a pair of stationary, spatially localized zigzag states. In contrast to the primary branch these states snake as they grow in extent and eventually fill the whole domain. The origin of the twist instability and the properties of the resulting localized structures are investigated for both periodic and no-slip boundary conditions in the extended direction.

  5. Partially coherent twisted states in arrays of coupled phase oscillators

    SciTech Connect

    Omel'chenko, Oleh E.; Wolfrum, Matthias; Laing, Carlo R.

    2014-06-15

    We consider a one-dimensional array of phase oscillators with non-local coupling and a Lorentzian distribution of natural frequencies. The primary objects of interest are partially coherent states that are uniformly “twisted” in space. To analyze these, we take the continuum limit, perform an Ott/Antonsen reduction, integrate over the natural frequencies, and study the resulting spatio-temporal system on an unbounded domain. We show that these twisted states and their stability can be calculated explicitly. We find that stable twisted states with different wave numbers appear for increasing coupling strength in the well-known Eckhaus scenario. Simulations of finite arrays of oscillators show good agreement with results of the analysis of the infinite system.

  6. Twisted Single Crystals of Meta-Aromatic Polyamides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrence, D. P.; Martin, D. C.

    1996-03-01

    The morphology of single crystals of the aromatic polyamide poly(metaphenylene isophthalamide) (MPDI or Nomex) was studied by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and selected area electron diffraction (SAED). The single crystals of MPDI were slowly grown from 0.1 weight percent solution. MPDI forms elongated crystals which aggregate together to form highly regular twisted helical bundles. The repeat periods of the helices typically range from 240 nm to 1000 nm and the bundle diameters vary from 36 nm to 120 nm. The angle between the edge of the crystal and the bundle axis varies from 40 to 65 degrees. The regular twisting evidently arises from a bending moment induced by the triclinic symmetry of the MPDI unit cell and the lamellar geometry of the chain-folded single crystal.

  7. Most mutant OccR proteins that are defective in positive control hold operator DNA in a locked high-angle bend.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Ching-Sung; Chen, Chia-Sui; Winans, Stephen C

    2011-10-01

    OccR is a LysR-type transcriptional regulator of Agrobacterium tumefaciens that positively regulates the octopine catabolism operon of the Ti plasmid. Positive control of the occ genes occurs in response to octopine, a nutrient released from crown gall tumors. OccR also functions as an autorepressor in the presence or absence of octopine. OccR binds to a site between occQ and occR in the presence or absence of octopine, although octopine triggers a conformational change that shortens the DNA footprint and relaxes a DNA bend. In order to determine the roles of this conformational change in transcriptional activation, we isolated 11 OccR mutants that were defective in activation of the occQ promoter but were still capable of autorepression. The mutations in these mutants spanned most of the length of the protein. Two additional positive-control mutants were isolated using site-directed mutagenesis. Twelve mutant proteins displayed a high-angle DNA bend in the presence or absence of octopine. One mutant, the L26A mutant, showed ligand-responsive DNA binding similar to that of wild-type OccR and therefore must be impaired in a subsequent step in activation. PMID:21804007

  8. The effects of pressure sensor acoustics on airdata derived from a High-angle-of-attack Flush Airdata Sensing (HI-FADS) system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitmore, Stephen A.; Moes, Timothy R.

    1991-01-01

    The accuracy of a nonintrusive high angle-of-attack flush airdata sensing (HI-FADS) system was verified for quasi-steady flight conditions up to 55 deg angle of attack during the F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV) Program. The system is a matrix of nine pressure ports arranged in annular rings on the aircraft nose. The complete airdata set is estimated using nonlinear regression. Satisfactory frequency response was verified to the system Nyquist frequency (12.5 Hz). The effects of acoustical distortions within the individual pressure sensors of the nonintrusive pressure matrix on overall system performance are addressed. To quantify these effects, a frequency-response model describing the dynamics of acoustical distortion is developed and simple design criteria are derived. The model adjusts measured HI-FADS pressure data for the acoustical distortion and quantifies the effects of internal sensor geometries on system performance. Analysis results indicate that sensor frequency response characteristics very greatly with altitude, thus it is difficult to select satisfactory sensor geometry for all altitudes. The solution used presample filtering to eliminate resonance effects, and short pneumatic tubing sections to reduce lag effects. Without presample signal conditioning the system designer must use the pneumatic transmission line to attenuate the resonances and accept the resulting altitude variability.

  9. Preliminary results from a subsonic high angle-of-attack flush airdata sensing (HI-FADS) system: Design, calibration, and flight test evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitmore, Stephen A.; Moes, Timothy R.; Larson, Terry J.

    1990-01-01

    A nonintrusive high angle-of-attack flush airdata sensing (HI-FADS) system was installed and flight-tested on the F-18 high alpha research flight vehicle. The system is a matrix of 25 pressure orifices in concentric circles on the nose of the vehicle. The orifices determine angles of attack and sideslip, Mach number, and pressure altitude. Pressure was transmitted from the orifices to an electronically scanned pressure module by lines of pneumatic tubing. The HI-FADS system was calibrated and demonstrated using dutch roll flight maneuvers covering large Mach, angle-of-attack, and sideslip ranges. Reference airdata for system calibration were generated by a minimum variance estimation technique blending measurements from two wingtip airdata booms with inertial velocities, aircraft angular rates and attitudes, precision radar tracking, and meteorological analyses. The pressure orifice calibration was based on identifying empirical adjustments to modified Newtonian flow on a hemisphere. Calibration results are presented. Flight test results used all 25 orifices or used a subset of 9 orifices. Under moderate maneuvering conditions, the HI-FADS system gave excellent results over the entire subsonic Mach number range up to 55 deg angle of attack. The internal pneumatic frequency response of the system is accurate to beyond 10 Hz. Aerodynamic lags in the aircraft flow field caused some performance degradation during heavy maneuvering.

  10. An investigation of the effects of aft blowing on a 3.0 caliber tangent ogive body at high angles of attack. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gittner, Nathan M.

    1992-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the effects of aft blowing on the asymmetric vortex flow of a slender, axisymmetric body at high angles of attack was conducted. A 3.0 caliber tangent ogive body fitted with a cylindrical afterbody was tested in a wind tunnel under subsonic, laminar flow test conditions. Asymmetric blowing from both a single nozzle and a double nozzle configuration, positioned near the body apex, was investigated. Aft blowing was observed to alter the vortex asymmetry by moving the blowing-side vortex closer to the body surface while moving the non-blowing-side vortex further away from the body. The effect of increasing the blowing coefficient was to move the blowing-side vortex closer to the body surface at a more upstream location. The data also showed that blowing was more effective in altering the initial vortex asymmetry at the higher angles of attack than at the lower. The effects of changing the nozzle exit geometry were investigated and it was observed that blowing from a nozzle with a low, broad exit geometry was more effective in reducing the vortex asymmetry than blowing from a high, narrow exit geometry.

  11. Measurement of specimen thickness and composition in Al(x)Ga(1-x)N/GaN using high-angle annular dark field images.

    PubMed

    Rosenauer, Andreas; Gries, Katharina; Müller, Knut; Pretorius, Angelika; Schowalter, Marco; Avramescu, Adrian; Engl, Karl; Lutgen, Stephan

    2009-08-01

    In scanning transmission electron microscopy using a high-angle annular dark field detector, image intensity strongly depends on specimen thickness and composition. In this paper we show that measurement of image intensities relative to the intensity of the incoming electron beam allows direct comparison with simulated image intensities, and thus quantitative measurement of specimen thickness and composition. Simulations were carried out with the frozen lattice and absorptive potential multislice methods. The radial inhomogeneity of the detector was measured and taken into account. Using a focused ion beam (FIB) prepared specimen we first demonstrate that specimen thicknesses obtained in this way are in very good agreement with a direct measurement of the thickness of the lamella by scanning electron microscopy in the FIB. In the second step we apply this method to evaluate the composition of Al(x)Ga(1-x)N/GaN layers. We measured ratios of image intensities obtained in regions with unknown and with known Al-concentration x, respectively. We show that estimation of the specimen thickness combined with evaluation of intensity ratios allows quantitative measurement of the composition x. In high-resolution images we find that the image intensity is well described by simulation if the simulated image is convoluted with a Gaussian with a half-width at half-maximum of 0.07 nm. PMID:19497670

  12. Effects of fuselage forebody geometry on low-speed lateral-directional characteristics of twin-tail fighter model at high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carr, P. C.; Gilbert, W. P.

    1979-01-01

    Low-speed, static wind-tunnel tests were conducted to explore the effects of fighter fuselage forebody geometry on lateral-directional characteristics at high angles of attack and to provide data for general design procedures. Effects of eight different forebody configurations and several add-on devices (e.g., nose strakes, boundary-layer trip wires, and nose booms) were investigated. Tests showed that forebody design features such as fineness ratio, cross-sectional shape, and add-on devices can have a significant influence on both lateral-directional and longitudinal aerodynamic stability. Several of the forebodies produced both lateral-directional symmetry and strong favorable changes in lateral-directional stability. However, the same results also indicated that such forebody designs can produce significant reductions in longitudinal stability near maximum lift and can significantly change the influence of other configuration variables. The addition of devices to highly tailored forebody designs also can significantly degrade the stability improvements provided by the clean forebody.

  13. Enhanced oil recovery utilizing high-angle wells in the Frontier Formation, Badger Basin Field, Park County, Wyoming. Final report for the period October 1992--October 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, J.P.; Fortmann, R.G.

    1994-12-01

    Badger Basin Field, discovered in 1931, produces at stripper rates from low-permeability fractured sandstones of the Upper Cretaceous Frontier Formation. Only 15% of the estimated 25 million barrels of oil originally in-place will be produced from the twenty-two attempted vertical completions. This project will increase recoverable reserves through a better understanding of the reservoir and factors which control production. Characterization of the reservoir has been accomplished through an integrated engineering, geological and geophysical approach. Production data, drilling and completion techniques, and relative location of wells on the anticline were reviewed and related to productivity. Literature was reviewed for interpretations on preferred flow directions on anticlinal structures. A structure map of the producing Frontier reservoir was constructed. Porosity development and its relationship to fracture networks was examined petrographically. Fractures in core were described and oriented using paleomagnetic techniques. Azimuths of fractures in outcrop were compared to fracture azimuths measured in the core. A 17 square-mile 3D seismic survey was designed, acquired and processed. Interpretation is being performed on a Sun workstation using Landmark Graphics software. Time-structure and amplitude-distribution maps will be constructed on three Frontier horizons. A location for a high-angle well will be chosen. The slant/horizontal test will be drilled and completed to increase recovery of reserves. Transfer of successful technologies will be accomplished by technical publications and presentations, and access to project materials, data, and field facilities.

  14. A model based iterative reconstruction algorithm for high angle annular dark field-scanning transmission electron microscope (HAADF-STEM) tomography.

    PubMed

    Venkatakrishnan, S V; Drummy, Lawrence F; Jackson, Michael A; De Graef, Marc; Simmons, Jeff; Bouman, Charles A

    2013-11-01

    High angle annular dark field (HAADF)-scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) data is increasingly being used in the physical sciences to research materials in 3D because it reduces the effects of Bragg diffraction seen in bright field TEM data. Typically, tomographic reconstructions are performed by directly applying either filtered back projection (FBP) or the simultaneous iterative reconstruction technique (SIRT) to the data. Since HAADF-STEM tomography is a limited angle tomography modality with low signal to noise ratio, these methods can result in significant artifacts in the reconstructed volume. In this paper, we develop a model based iterative reconstruction algorithm for HAADF-STEM tomography. We combine a model for image formation in HAADF-STEM tomography along with a prior model to formulate the tomographic reconstruction as a maximum a posteriori probability (MAP) estimation problem. Our formulation also accounts for certain missing measurements by treating them as nuisance parameters in the MAP estimation framework. We adapt the iterative coordinate descent algorithm to develop an efficient method to minimize the corresponding MAP cost function. Reconstructions of simulated as well as experimental data sets show results that are superior to FBP and SIRT reconstructions, significantly suppressing artifacts and enhancing contrast. PMID:23955748

  15. Twisted bilayer blue phosphorene: A direct band gap semiconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ospina, D. A.; Duque, C. A.; Correa, J. D.; Suárez Morell, Eric

    2016-09-01

    We report that two rotated layers of blue phosphorene behave as a direct band gap semiconductor. The optical spectrum shows absorption peaks in the visible region of the spectrum and in addition the energy of these peaks can be tuned with the rotational angle. These findings makes twisted bilayer blue phosphorene a strong candidate as a solar cell or photodetection device. Our results are based on ab initio calculations of several rotated blue phosphorene layers.

  16. Stochastic theory of the Stokes parameters in randomly twisted fiber

    SciTech Connect

    Botet, Robert; Kuratsuji, Hiroshi

    2011-03-15

    We present the stochastic approach of the polarization state of an electromagnetic wave traveling through randomly twisted optical fiber. We treat the case of the weak randomness. When the geometric torsion of the fiber is distributed as a Gaussian law, we can write explicitly the Fokker-Planck equation for the Stokes parameters of the wave, and find the complete solution of the polarization-state distribution.

  17. Leading Twist Parton Distribution Amplitudes in Heavy Vector Mesons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Fei; Ding, Minghui; Chang, Lei; Liu, Yu-Xin; Roberts, Craig D.

    2016-03-01

    We employed QCD's Dyson-Schwinger equations (DSEs) for heavy quarks and obtained the leading twist parton distribution amplitudes (PDAs) in heavy vector mesons J/Ψ and ϒ. We found that all of the amplitudes are narrower than the asymptotic form, while they deviate from δ function. This indicates that the interaction between the two continent quarks are still important in the mesons consisted of charm and bottom quarks.

  18. Resonant Absorption of Axisymmetric Modes in Twisted Magnetic Flux Tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giagkiozis, I.; Goossens, M.; Verth, G.; Fedun, V.; Van Doorsselaere, T.

    2016-06-01

    It has been shown recently that magnetic twist and axisymmetric MHD modes are ubiquitous in the solar atmosphere, and therefore the study of resonant absorption for these modes has become a pressing issue because it can have important consequences for heating magnetic flux tubes in the solar atmosphere and the observed damping. In this investigation, for the first time, we calculate the damping rate for axisymmetric MHD waves in weakly twisted magnetic flux tubes. Our aim is to investigate the impact of resonant damping of these modes for solar atmospheric conditions. This analytical study is based on an idealized configuration of a straight magnetic flux tube with a weak magnetic twist inside as well as outside the tube. By implementing the conservation laws derived by Sakurai et al. and the analytic solutions for weakly twisted flux tubes obtained recently by Giagkiozis et al. we derive a dispersion relation for resonantly damped axisymmetric modes in the spectrum of the Alfvén continuum. We also obtain an insightful analytical expression for the damping rate in the long wavelength limit. Furthermore, it is shown that both the longitudinal magnetic field and the density, which are allowed to vary continuously in the inhomogeneous layer, have a significant impact on the damping time. Given the conditions in the solar atmosphere, resonantly damped axisymmetric modes are highly likely to be ubiquitous and play an important role in energy dissipation. We also suggest that, given the character of these waves, it is likely that they have already been observed in the guise of Alfvén waves.

  19. Experimental study of burnout in channels with twisted fuel rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bol'Shakov, V. V.; Bashkirtsev, S. M.; Kobzar', L. L.; Morozov, A. G.

    2007-05-01

    The results of experimental studies of pressure drop and critical heat flux in the models of fuel assemblies (FAs) with fuel rod simulators twisted relative to the longitudinal axis and a three-ray cross section are considered. The experimental data are compared to the results obtained with the use of techniques adopted for design calculations with fuel rod bundles of type-VVER reactors.

  20. About Chaotic Dynamics in the Twisted Horseshoe Map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sovrano, Elisa

    2016-06-01

    The twisted horseshoe map was developed in order to study a class of density dependent Leslie population models with two age classes. From the beginning, scientists have tried to prove that this map presents chaotic dynamics. Some demonstrations that have appeared in mathematical literature present some difficulties or delicate issues. In this paper, we give a simple and rigorous proof based on a different approach. We also highlight the possibility of getting chaotic dynamics for a broader class of maps.

  1. Asymptotic stability of vacuum twisting type II metrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natorf, Włodzimierz

    2012-02-01

    We generalize the result of Lukács et al. on asymptotic stability of the Schwarzschild metric with respect to perturbations in the Robinson-Trautman class of metrics to the case of Petrov type II twisting metrics, under the condition of asymptotic flatness at future null infinity. The Bondi energy is used as the Lyapunov functional and we prove that the "final state" of such metrics is the Kerr metric.

  2. Young's double-slit interference pattern from a twisted beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emile, Olivier; Emile, Janine

    2014-10-01

    A wide range of diffractive elements have been used to evaluate the topological charge of Laguerre-Gaussian beams. Here, we show theoretically and experimentally that this charge can be simply and readily measured from the interference pattern in Young's double-slit experiment. It can be evaluated from the twisting order of the interference. The results are confronted with previously published studies. The potentialities of the method are then compared with existing techniques.

  3. The Twisting of Thin-walled, Stiffened Circular Cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schapitz, E

    1938-01-01

    On the basis of the present investigation of the twisting of thin-walled, stiffened cylinders the following conclusions can be reached: 1) there is as yet no generally applicable formula for the buckling moment of the skin; 2) the mathematical treatment of the condition of the shell after buckling of the skin is based on the tension-field theory, wherein the strain condition is considered homogenous.

  4. Visualization of Flows in Packed Beds of Twisted Tapes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, R. C.; Braun, M. J.; Peloso, D.; Athavale, M. M.; Mullen, R. L.

    2002-01-01

    A videotape presentation of the flow field in a packed bed of 48 twisted tapes which can be simulated by very thin virtual cylinders has been assembled. The indices of refraction of the oil and the Lucite twisted tapes were closely matched, and the flow was seeded with magnesium oxide particles. Planar laser light projected the flow field in two dimensions both along and transverse to the flow axis. The flow field was three dimensional and complex to describe, yet the most prominent finding was flow threads. It appeared that axial flow spiraled along either within the confines of a virtual cylindrical boundary or within the exterior region, between the tangency points, of the virtual cylinders. Random packing and bed voids created vortices and disrupted the laminar flow but minimized the entrance effects. The flow-pressure drops in the packed bed fell below the Ergun model for porous-media flows. Single-twisted-tape results of Smithberg and Landis (1964) were used to guide the analysis. In appendix A the results of several investigators are scaled to the Ergun model. Further investigations including different geometric configurations, computational fluid dynamic (CFD) gridding, and analysis are required.

  5. Leading twist nuclear shadowing phenomena in hard processes with nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    L. Franfurt; Guzey, V.; Strikman, M.

    2012-01-08

    We present and discuss the theory and phenomenology of the leading twist theory of nuclear shadowing which is based on the combination of the generalization of Gribov-Glauber theory, QCD factorization theorems, and HERA QCD analysis of diffraction in lepton-proton deep inelastic scattering (DIS). We apply this technique for the analysis of a wide range of hard processes with nuclei-inclusive DIS on deuterons, medium-range and heavy nuclei, coherent and incoherent diffractive DIS with nuclei, and hard diffraction in proton-nucleus scattering - and make predictions for the effect of nuclear shadowing in the corresponding sea quark and gluon parton distributions. We also analyze the role of the leading twist nuclear shadowing in generalized parton distributions in nuclei and certain characteristics of final states in nuclear DIS. We discuss the limits of applicability of the leading twist approximation for small x scattering off nuclei and the onset of the black disk regime and methods of detecting it. It will be possible to check many of our predictions in the near future in the studies of the ultraperipheral collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Further checks will be possible in pA collisions at the LHC and forward hadron production at Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). As a result, detailed tests will be possible at an Electon-Ion Collider (EIC) in USA and at the Large Hadron-Electron Collider (LHeC) at CERN.

  6. Leading twist nuclear shadowing phenomena in hard processes with nuclei

    DOE PAGESBeta

    L. Franfurt; Guzey, V.; Strikman, M.

    2012-01-08

    We present and discuss the theory and phenomenology of the leading twist theory of nuclear shadowing which is based on the combination of the generalization of Gribov-Glauber theory, QCD factorization theorems, and HERA QCD analysis of diffraction in lepton-proton deep inelastic scattering (DIS). We apply this technique for the analysis of a wide range of hard processes with nuclei-inclusive DIS on deuterons, medium-range and heavy nuclei, coherent and incoherent diffractive DIS with nuclei, and hard diffraction in proton-nucleus scattering - and make predictions for the effect of nuclear shadowing in the corresponding sea quark and gluon parton distributions. We alsomore » analyze the role of the leading twist nuclear shadowing in generalized parton distributions in nuclei and certain characteristics of final states in nuclear DIS. We discuss the limits of applicability of the leading twist approximation for small x scattering off nuclei and the onset of the black disk regime and methods of detecting it. It will be possible to check many of our predictions in the near future in the studies of the ultraperipheral collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Further checks will be possible in pA collisions at the LHC and forward hadron production at Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). As a result, detailed tests will be possible at an Electon-Ion Collider (EIC) in USA and at the Large Hadron-Electron Collider (LHeC) at CERN.« less

  7. van Hove Singularity Enhanced Photochemical Reactivity of Twisted Bilayer Graphene.

    PubMed

    Liao, Lei; Wang, Huan; Peng, Han; Yin, Jianbo; Koh, Ai Leen; Chen, Yulin; Xie, Qin; Peng, Hailin; Liu, Zhongfan

    2015-08-12

    Twisted bilayer graphene (tBLG) exhibits van Hove singularities (VHSs) in the density of states that can be tuned by changing the twist angle (θ), sparking various novel physical phenomena. Much effort has been devoted to investigate the θ-dependent physical properties of tBLG. Yet, the chemical properties of tBLG with VHSs, especially the chemical reactivity, remain unexplored. Here we report the first systematic study on the chemistry of tBLG through the photochemical reaction between graphene and benzoyl peroxide. Twisted bilayer graphene exhibits θ-dependent reactivity, and remarkably enhanced reactivity is obtained when the energy of incident laser matches with the energy interval of the VHSs of tBLG. This work provides an insight on the chemistry of tBLG, and the successful enhancement of chemical reactivity derived from VHS is highly beneficial for the controllable chemical modification of tBLG as well as the development of tBLG based devices.

  8. Highly twisted double-helix carbon nanotube yarns.

    PubMed

    Shang, Yuanyuan; Li, Yibin; He, Xiaodong; Du, Shanyi; Zhang, Luhui; Shi, Enzheng; Wu, Shiting; Li, Zhen; Li, Peixu; Wei, Jinquan; Wang, Kunlin; Zhu, Hongwei; Wu, Dehai; Cao, Anyuan

    2013-02-26

    The strength and flexibility of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) allow them to be constructed into a variety of innovated architectures with fascinating properties. Here, we show that CNTs can be made into a highly twisted yarn-derived double-helix structure by a conventional twist-spinning process. The double-helix is a stable and hierarchical configuration consisting of two single-helical yarn segments, with controlled pitch and unique mechanical properties. While one of the yarn components breaks early under tension due to the highly twisted state, the second yarn produces much larger tensile strain and significantly prolongs the process until ultimate fracture. In addition, these elastic and conductive double-helix yarns show simultaneous and reversible resistance change in response to a wide range of input sources (mechanical, photo, and thermal) such as applied strains or stresses, light illumination, and environmental temperature. Our results indicate that it is possible to create higher-level, more complex architectures from CNT yarns and fabricate multifunctional nanomaterials with potential applications in many areas. PMID:23289799

  9. A robotic finger driven by twisted and coiled polymer actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Kyeong Ho; Song, Min Geun; Jung, Hosang; Park, Jungwoo; Moon, Hyungpil; Koo, Ja Choon; Nam, Jae-Do; Choi, Hyouk Ryeol

    2016-04-01

    Previous studies reported that a twisted and coiled polymer actuator (TCA) generates strong force and large stroke by heating. Nylon 6,6 is known to be the most suitable polymer material for TCA because it has high thermal expansion ratio, high softening point and high toughness which is able to sustain gigantic twisting. In order to find the optimal structure of TCA fabricated with silver-coated nylon sewing threads, an equipment for twist-insertion (structuralization), composed of single DC motor, a slider fabricated by 3D printer and a body frame, is developed. It can measure the behaviors of TCAs as well as fabricate TCAs with desired characteristics by structuralizing fibers with controlled rotation per minutes (RPM) and turns. Comparing performances of diverse structures of TCAs, the optimal structure for TCA is found. For the verification of the availability of the optimal TCA, a TCA-driven biomimetic finger is developed. Finally, we successfully demonstrate the flexion/extension of the finger by using the actuation of TCAs.

  10. Flow Visualizations in a Packed Bed of Twisted Tapes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, R. C.; Braun, M. J.

    2002-01-01

    A videotape presentation of the flow field in a packed bed of 48 twisted tapes which can be simulated by very thin virtual cylinders has been assembled. The indices of refraction of the oil and the Lucite twisted tapes were closely matched, and the flow was seeded with magnesium oxide particles. Planar laser light projected the flow field in two dimensions both along and transverse to the flow axis. The flow field was three dimensional and complex to describe, yet the most prominent finding was flow threads. It appeared that axial flow spiraled along either within the confines of a virtual cylindrical boundary or within the exterior region, between the tangency points, of the virtual cylinders. Random packing and bed voids created vortices and disrupted the laminar flow but minimized the entrance effects. The flow-pressure drops in the packed bed fell below the Ergun model for porous-media flows. Single-twisted-tape results of Smithberg and Landis (1964) were used to guide the analysis. In appendix A the results of several investigators are scaled to the Ergun model. Further investigations including different geometric configurations, computational fluid dynamic (CFD) gridding, and analysis are required.

  11. The emergence of weakly twisted magnetic fields in the sun

    SciTech Connect

    Archontis, V.; Hood, A. W.; Tsinganos, K.

    2013-11-20

    We have studied the emergence of a weakly twisted magnetic flux tube from the upper convection zone into the solar atmosphere. It is found that the rising magnetized plasma does not undergo the classical, single Ω-shaped loop emergence, but it becomes unstable in two places, forming two magnetic lobes that are anchored in small-scale bipolar structures at the photosphere, between the two main flux concentrations. The two magnetic lobes rise and expand into the corona, forming an overall undulating magnetic flux system. The dynamical interaction of the lobes results in the triggering of high-speed and hot jets and the formation of successive cool and hot loops that coexist in the emerging flux region. Although the initial emerging field is weakly twisted, a highly twisted magnetic flux rope is formed at the low atmosphere, due to shearing and reconnection. The new flux rope (hereafter post-emergence flux rope) does not erupt. It remains confined by the overlying field. Although there is no ejective eruption of the post-emergence rope, it is found that a considerable amount of axial and azimuthal flux is transferred into the solar atmosphere during the emergence of the magnetic field.

  12. Twisted Savonius turbine based marine current energy conversion system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, Md. Imtiaj

    The Ocean Network Seafloor Instrumentation (ONSFI) Project is a multidisciplinary research and development project that aims to design, fabricate and validate a proof-of-concept seafloor array of wireless marine sensors for use in monitoring seabed processes. The sensor pods, known as Seaformatics, will be powered by ocean bottom currents and will be able to communicate with each other and to the Internet through surface master units to facilitate observation of the ocean floor from the shore. This thesis explores the use of the twisted Savonius turbine as a means of converting the kinetic energy of the free flowing water into electrical energy for the pods. This will eliminate the need for battery replacement. A physical model of the turbine was constructed and tested in the Water Flume at the Marine Institute of Memorial University and in the Wind Tunnel in the Engineering Building at Memorial University. A mathematical model of the turbine was constructed in SolidWorks. This was tested in the Computational Fluid Dynamics or CFD software FLOW-3D. Experimental results were compared with CFD results and the agreement was reasonable. A twisted Savonius turbine emulator was developed to test a dc-dc boost converter. A low cost microcontroller based MPPT algorithm was developed to obtain maximum power from the turbine. Overall the thesis shows that the twisted Savonius turbine can provide the power needed by the sensor pods. It also shows that CFD is a viable way to study the performance of the Savonius type of turbine.

  13. Unwinding motion of a twisted active region filament

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, X. L.; Xue, Z. K.; Kong, D. F.; Liu, J. H.; Xu, C. L.

    2014-12-10

    To better understand the structures of active region filaments and the eruption process, we study an active region filament eruption in active region NOAA 11082 in detail on 2010 June 22. Before the filament eruption, the opposite unidirectional material flows appeared in succession along the spine of the filament. The rising of the filament triggered two B-class flares at the upper part of the filament. As the bright material was injected into the filament from the sites of the flares, the filament exhibited a rapid uplift accompanying the counterclockwise rotation of the filament body. From the expansion of the filament, we can see that the filament consisted of twisted magnetic field lines. The total twist of the filament is at least 5π obtained by using a time slice method. According to the morphology change during the filament eruption, it is found that the active region filament was a twisted flux rope and its unwinding motion was like a solar tornado. We also find that there was a continuous magnetic helicity injection before and during the filament eruption. It is confirmed that magnetic helicity can be transferred from the photosphere to the filament. Using the extrapolated potential fields, the average decay index of the background magnetic fields over the filament is 0.91. Consequently, these findings imply that the mechanism of solar filament eruption could be due to the kink instability and magnetic helicity accumulation.

  14. Report on twisted nematic and supertwisted nematic device characterization program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    In this study we measured the optical characteristics of normally white twisted nematic (NWTN) and super twisted nematic (STN ) cells. Though no dynamic computer model was available, the static observations were compared with computer simulated behavior. The measurements were taken as a function of both viewing angle and applied voltage and included in the static case not only luminance but also contrast ratio and chromaticity . We employed the computer model Twist Cell Optics, developed at Kent State in conjunction with this study, and whose optical modeling foundation, Iike the ViDEOS program, is the 4 x 4 matrix method of Berreman. In order to resolve discrepancies between the experimental and modeled data the optical parameters of the individual cell components, where not known, were determined using refractometry, profilometry, and various forms of ellipsometry. The resulting agreement between experiment and model is quite good due primarily to a better understanding of the structure and optics of dichroic sheet polarizers. A description of the model and test cells employed are given in section 2. Section 3 contains the experimental data gathered and section 4 gives examples of the fit between model and experiment. Also included with this report are a pair of papers which resulted from the research and which detail the polarizer properties and some of the cell characterization methods.

  15. Twisting of Red Blood Cells Entering a Constriction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Nancy; Ristenpart, William

    2014-11-01

    Most work on the dynamic response of red blood cells (RBCs) to hydrodynamic stress has focused on linear velocity profiles. Relatively little experimental work has examined how individual RBCs respond to pressure driven flow in more complex geometries, such as the flow at the entrance of a capillary. Here, we establish the mechanical behaviors of healthy RBCs undergoing a sudden increase in shear stress at the entrance of a narrow constriction. We pumped RBCs through a constriction in an ex vivo microfluidic device and used high speed video to visualize and track the flow behavior of more than 4,400 RBCs. We show that approximately 85% of RBCs undergo one of four distinct modes of motion: stretching, twisting, tumbling, or rolling. Intriguingly, a plurality of cells (~30%) exhibited twisting (rotation around the major axis parallel to the flow direction), a mechanical behavior that is not typically observed in linear velocity profiles. We examine the mechanical origin of twisting using, as a limiting case, the equations of motion for rigid ellipsoids, and we demonstrate that the observed rotation is qualitatively consistent with rigid body theory.

  16. Microstructure of artificial 45{sup degree} [001] tilt grain boundaries in YBCO films grown on (001) MgO

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Y.; Vuchic, B.V.; Merkle, K.L.; Buchholz, D.B.; Chang, R.P.H.

    1996-03-01

    High-angle grain boundaries in YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-x} (YBCO) show weak-link effects and behave as Josephson junctions. This kind of grain boundary junction (GBJs) has potential applications in magnetic field measurement and electronic devices. This work studies the microstructure of artificially made GBJs in YBCO films on (001) MgO and the mechanism of boundary formation, with the goal to improve GBJ quality and obtain a better understanding of the junctions` transport properties.

  17. A Nanoindentation Study on Grain-Boundary Contributions to Strengthening and Aging Degradation Mechanisms in Advanced 12Cr Ferritic Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Jang, Jae-il; Shim, Sang Hoon; Komazaki, Shin-ichi; Honda, Tetsuya

    2007-01-01

    Nanoindentation experiments and microstructural analysis were performed on advanced 12% Cr ferritic steel having extremely fine and complex martensitic microstructures, to answer unsolved questions on the contributions of grain boundaries to strengthening and aging degradation mechanisms in both as-tempered and thermally aged steels. Interesting features of the experimental results led us to suggest that among several high angle boundaries, block boundary is most effective in enhancing the macroscopic strength in as-tempered virgin sample, and that a decrease in matrix strength rather than reduction in grain-boundary strengthening effect is primarily responsible for the macroscopic softening behavior observed during thermal exposure.

  18. Role of left ventricular twist mechanics in cardiomyopathies, dance of the helices

    PubMed Central

    Kauer, Floris; Geleijnse, Marcel Leonard; van Dalen, Bastiaan Martijn

    2015-01-01

    Left ventricular twist is an essential part of left ventricular function. Nevertheless, knowledge is limited in “the cardiology community” as it comes to twist mechanics. Fortunately the development of speckle tracking echocardiography, allowing accurate, reproducible and rapid bedside assessment of left ventricular twist, has boosted the interest in this important mechanical aspect of left ventricular deformation. Although the fundamental physiological role of left ventricular twist is undisputable, the clinical relevance of assessment of left ventricular twist in cardiomyopathies still needs to be established. The fact remains; analysis of left ventricular twist mechanics has already provided substantial pathophysiological understanding on a comprehensive variety of cardiomyopathies. It has become clear that increased left ventricular twist in for example hypertrophic cardiomyopathy may be an early sign of subendocardial (microvascular) dysfunction. Furthermore, decreased left ventricular twist may be caused by left ventricular dilatation or an extensive myocardial scar. Finally, the detection of left ventricular rigid body rotation in noncompaction cardiomyopathy may provide an indispensible method to objectively confirm this difficult diagnosis. All this endorses the value of left ventricular twist in the field of cardiomyopathies and may further encourage the implementation of left ventricular twist parameters in the “diagnostic toolbox” for cardiomyopathies. PMID:26322187

  19. Effect of microfibril twisting on theoretical powder diffraction patterns of cellulose Iβ

    PubMed

    Hadden, Jodi A; French, Alfred D; Woods, Robert J

    2014-04-01

    Previous studies of calculated diffraction patterns for cellulose crystallites suggest that distortions that arise once models have been subjected to MD simulation are the result of both microfibril twisting and changes in unit cell dimensions induced by the empirical force field; to date, it has not been possible to separate the individual contributions of these effects. To provide a better understanding of how twisting manifests in diffraction data, the present study demonstrates a method for generating twisted and linear cellulose structures that can be compared without the bias of dimensional changes, allowing assessment of the impact of twisting alone. Analysis of unit cell dimensions, microfibril volume, hydrogen bond patterns, glycosidic torsion angles, and hydroxymethyl group orientations confirmed that the twisted and linear structures collected with this method were internally consistent, and theoretical powder diffraction patterns for the two were shown to be effectively indistinguishable. These results indicate that differences between calculated patterns for the crystal coordinates and twisted structures from MD simulation can result entirely from changes in unit cell dimensions, and not from microfibril twisting alone. Although powder diffraction patterns for models in the 81-chain size regime were shown to be unaffected by twisting, suggesting that a modest degree of twist is not inconsistent with experimental data, it may be that other diffraction techniques are capable of detecting this structural difference. Until such time as definitive experimental evidence comes to light, the results of this study suggest that both twisted and linear microfibrils may represent an appropriate model for cellulose Iβ. PMID:24729665

  20. Twist1 Suppresses Senescence Programs and Thereby Accelerates and Maintains Mutant Kras-Induced Lung Tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Thiyagarajan, Saravanan; Das, Sandhya T.; Zabuawala, Tahera; Chen, Joy; Cho, Yoon-Jae; Luong, Richard; Tamayo, Pablo; Salih, Tarek; Aziz, Khaled; Adam, Stacey J.; Vicent, Silvestre; Nielsen, Carsten H.; Withofs, Nadia; Sweet-Cordero, Alejandro; Gambhir, Sanjiv S.; Rudin, Charles M.; Felsher, Dean W.

    2012-01-01

    KRAS mutant lung cancers are generally refractory to chemotherapy as well targeted agents. To date, the identification of drugs to therapeutically inhibit K-RAS have been unsuccessful, suggesting that other approaches are required. We demonstrate in both a novel transgenic mutant Kras lung cancer mouse model and in human lung tumors that the inhibition of Twist1 restores a senescence program inducing the loss of a neoplastic phenotype. The Twist1 gene encodes for a transcription factor that is essential during embryogenesis. Twist1 has been suggested to play an important role during tumor progression. However, there is no in vivo evidence that Twist1 plays a role in autochthonous tumorigenesis. Through two novel transgenic mouse models, we show that Twist1 cooperates with KrasG12D to markedly accelerate lung tumorigenesis by abrogating cellular senescence programs and promoting the progression from benign adenomas to adenocarcinomas. Moreover, the suppression of Twist1 to physiological levels is sufficient to cause Kras mutant lung tumors to undergo senescence and lose their neoplastic features. Finally, we analyzed more than 500 human tumors to demonstrate that TWIST1 is frequently overexpressed in primary human lung tumors. The suppression of TWIST1 in human lung cancer cells also induced cellular senescence. Hence, TWIST1 is a critical regulator of cellular senescence programs, and the suppression of TWIST1 in human tumors may be an effective example of pro-senescence therapy. PMID:22654667

  1. Grains in galactic haloes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrara, Andrea; Barsella, Bruno; Ferrini, F.; Greenberg, J. Mayo; Aiello, Santi

    1989-01-01

    Researchers considered the effect of extensive forces on dust grains subjected to the light and matter distribution of a spiral galaxy (Greenberg et al. (1987), Ferrini et al. (1987), Barsella et al (1988). Researchers showed that the combined force on a small particle located above the plane of a galactic disk may be either attractive or repulsive depending on a variety of parameters. They found, for example, that graphite grains from 20 nm to 250 nm radius are expelled from a typical galaxy, while silicates and other forms of dielectrics, after initial expulsion, may settle in potential minimum within the halo. They discuss only the statistical behavior of the forces for 17 galaxies whose luminosity and matter distribution in the disk, bulge and halo components are reasonably well known. The preliminary results of the study of the motion of a dust grain for NGC 3198 are given.

  2. Composite circumstellar dust grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Ranjan; Vaidya, Dipak B.; Dutta, Rajeshwari

    2016-10-01

    We calculate the absorption efficiencies of composite silicate grains with inclusions of graphite and silicon carbide in the spectral range 5-25 μm. We study the variation in absorption profiles with volume fractions of inclusions. In particular we study the variation in the wavelength of peak absorption at 10 and 18 μm. We also study the variation of the absorption of porous silicate grains. We use the absorption efficiencies to calculate the infrared flux at various dust temperatures and compare with the observed infrared emission flux from the circumstellar dust around some M-type and asymptotic giant branch stars obtained from IRAS and a few stars from Spitzer satellite. We interpret the observed data in terms of the circumstellar dust grain sizes, shape, composition and dust temperature.

  3. Grain quality inspection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flood, C. A., Jr.; Singletow, D. P.; James, S. N.

    1979-01-01

    A review of grain quality indicators and measurement methods was conducted in order to assess the feasibility of using remote sensing technology to develop a continuous monitoring system for use during grain transfer operations. Most detection methods were found to be too slow or too expensive to be incorporated into the normal inspection procedure of a grain elevator on a continuous basis. Two indicators, moisture content and broken corn and foreign material, show potential for automation and are of an economic value. A microprocessor based system which utilizes commercially available electronic moisture meter was developed and tested. A method for automating BCFM measurement is described. A complete system description is presented along with performance test results.

  4. Twist1 Directly Regulates Genes That Promote Cell Proliferation and Migration in Developing Heart Valves

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mary P.; Yutzey, Katherine E.

    2011-01-01

    Twist1, a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor, is expressed in mesenchymal precursor populations during embryogenesis and in metastatic cancer cells. In the developing heart, Twist1 is highly expressed in endocardial cushion (ECC) valve mesenchymal cells and is down regulated during valve differentiation and remodeling. Previous studies demonstrated that Twist1 promotes cell proliferation, migration, and expression of primitive extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules in ECC mesenchymal cells. Furthermore, Twist1 expression is induced in human pediatric and adult diseased heart valves. However, the Twist1 downstream target genes that mediate increased cell proliferation and migration during early heart valve development remain largely unknown. Candidate gene and global gene profiling approaches were used to identify transcriptional targets of Twist1 during heart valve development. Candidate target genes were analyzed for evolutionarily conserved regions (ECRs) containing E-box consensus sequences that are potential Twist1 binding sites. ECRs containing conserved E-box sequences were identified for Twist1 responsive genes Tbx20, Cdh11, Sema3C, Rab39b, and Gadd45a. Twist1 binding to these sequences in vivo was determined by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays, and binding was detected in ECCs but not late stage remodeling valves. In addition identified Twist1 target genes are highly expressed in ECCs and have reduced expression during heart valve remodeling in vivo, which is consistent with the expression pattern of Twist1. Together these analyses identify multiple new genes involved in cell proliferation and migration that are differentially expressed in the developing heart valves, are responsive to Twist1 transcriptional function, and contain Twist1-responsive regulatory sequences. PMID:22242143

  5. Twist-1, a novel regulator of hematopoietic stem cell self-renewal and myeloid lineage development.

    PubMed

    Dong, Cheng-Ya; Liu, Xiao-Yan; Wang, Nan; Wang, Li-Na; Yang, Bin-Xia; Ren, Qian; Liang, Hao-Yue; Ma, Xiao-Tong

    2014-12-01

    Transcription factor Twist-1 plays essential roles in specification and differentiation of mesoderm-derived tissues. Growing evidences now link Twist-1 to the acquisition of stem-cell-like properties. However, the role of Twist-1 in hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) remains largely uncharacterized. We report that Twist-1 is more highly expressed in murine HSC and its expression declines with differentiation. To investigate Twist-1 gene function, retroviral-mediated overexpression or removal experiments are performed. Competitive repopulation studies demonstrate that enforced expression of Twist-1 in HSC-enriched Lin(-) c-Kit(+) Sca-1(+) (LKS) cells results in an increase in the size of the G(0) population, and in their reconstitution ability after the first and a second transplantation. Conversely, removal of Twist-1 in LKS cells impairs their ability to repopulate. In addition, increased Twist-1 expression causes a shift toward production of myeloid cells. Twist-1 transduction in LKS cells activates myeloid lineage-determining factors PU.1 and GATA-1 and downregulates lymphoid factor GATA-3 in vitro, suggesting that Twist-1-mediated myeloid skewing occurs in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs). These findings indicate that Twist-1 is not only involved in the maintenance of HSC dormancy and self-renewal capacity but also implicated in the myeloid lineage fate choice of HSPCs. Exploration of the underlying mechanisms reveals that Runx1/c-Mpl/Tie2 regulatory pathway could possibly account for the observed effects caused by Twist-1 overexpression. Our study provides the first evidence supporting a role for Twist-1 in hematopoiesis.

  6. Charging of interplanetary grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baragiola, R. A.; Johnson, R. E.; Newcomb, John L.

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this program is to quantify, by laboratory experiments, the charging of ices and other insulators subject to irradiation with electrons, ions and ultraviolet photons and to model special conditions based on the data. The system and conditions to be studied are those relevant for charging of dust in magnetospheric plasmas. The measurements are supplemented by computer simulations of charging or grains under a variety of conditions. Our work for this period involved experiments on water ice, improved models of charging of ice grains for Saturn's E-ring, and the construction of apparatus for electron impact studies and measurements of electron energy distributions.

  7. Radiative Grain Alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, B. G.

    2015-12-01

    Polarization due to aligned dust grains was discovered in the interstellar medium more than 60 years ago. A quantitative, observationally well tested theory of the phenomenon has finally emerged in the last decade, promising not only an improved understanding of interstellar magnetic fields, but new tools for studying the dust environments and grain characteristics. This Radiative Alignment Torque (RAT) theory also has many potential applications in solar system physics, including for comet dust characteristics. I will review the main aspects of the theory and the observational tests performed to date, as well as some of the new possibilities for using polarization as a tool to study dust and its environment, with RAT alignment.

  8. Grain optical properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanner, Martha

    1988-01-01

    The optical properties of small grains provide the link between the infrared observations presented in Chapter 1 and the dust composition described in Chapter 3. In this session, the optical properties were discussed from the viewpoint of modeling the emission from the dust coma and the scattering in order to draw inference about the dust size distribution and composition. The optical properties are applied to the analysis of the infrared data in several ways, and these different uses should be kept in mind when judging the validity of the methods for applying optical constants to real grains.

  9. X-Ray Laue Microdiffraction Study of 3D Grain Growth in Polycrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budai, J. D.; Yang, W.; Tischler, J. Z.; Larson, B. C.; Liu, W.; Ice, G. E.

    2004-11-01

    We describe a new technique for studying 3D grain growth in polycrystalline materials using white x-ray microdiffraction with micron spatial resolution. This scanning technique uses focussed, polychromatic x-rays at the Advanced Photon Source to measure the local crystal structure and lattice orientation. The capabilities of this method are demonstrated by 3D grain growth studies of aluminium during thermal annealing. 3D grain orientation maps were obtained from hot-rolled (200ºC) polycrystalline aluminum ( 1Fe,Si). The sample was then annealed to induce grain growth, cooled, and re-mapped to measure the thermal migration of all grain boundaries within the same volume region. Initial observations reveal significant grain growth above 360ºC, involving movement of both low- and high-angle boundaries. Systematic measurements obtained after annealing at successively higher temperatures provide a detailed description of the microstructural evolution in a bulk material. These measurements provide the 3D experimental link needed for testing theories and large-scale computer models of 3D grain growth in advanced materials. Support by DOE Division of Materials Sciences under contract with ORNL managed by UT-Battelle, LLC; UNI-CAT is supported by ORNL, UIUC-MRL, NIST, and UOP LLC; APS supported by DOE.

  10. Muscle and connective tissue progenitor populations show distinct Twist1 and Twist3 expression profiles during axolotl limb regeneration.

    PubMed

    Kragl, Martin; Roensch, Kathleen; Nüsslein, Ina; Tazaki, Akira; Taniguchi, Yuka; Tarui, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Tetsutaro; Agata, Kiyokazu; Tanaka, Elly M

    2013-01-01

    Limb regeneration involves re-establishing a limb development program from cells within adult tissues. Identifying molecular handles that provide insight into the relationship between cell differentiation status and cell lineage is an important step to study limb blastema cell formation. Here, using single cell PCR, focusing on newly isolated Twist1 sequences, we molecularly profile axolotl limb blastema cells using several progenitor cell markers. We link their molecular expression profile to their embryonic lineage via cell tracking experiments. We use in situ hybridization to determine the spatial localization and extent of overlap of different markers and cell types. Finally, we show by single cell PCR that the mature axolotl limb harbors a small but significant population of Twist1(+) cells. PMID:23103585

  11. Integral Twist Actuation of Helicopter Rotor Blades for Vibration Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shin, SangJoon; Cesnik, Carlos E. S.

    2001-01-01

    Active integral twist control for vibration reduction of helicopter rotors during forward flight is investigated. The twist deformation is obtained using embedded anisotropic piezocomposite actuators. An analytical framework is developed to examine integrally-twisted blades and their aeroelastic response during different flight conditions: frequency domain analysis for hover, and time domain analysis for forward flight. Both stem from the same three-dimensional electroelastic beam formulation with geometrical-exactness, and axe coupled with a finite-state dynamic inflow aerodynamics model. A prototype Active Twist Rotor blade was designed with this framework using Active Fiber Composites as the actuator. The ATR prototype blade was successfully tested under non-rotating conditions. Hover testing was conducted to evaluate structural integrity and dynamic response. In both conditions, a very good correlation was obtained against the analysis. Finally, a four-bladed ATR system is built and tested to demonstrate its concept in forward flight. This experiment was conducted at NASA Langley Tansonic Dynamics Tunnel and represents the first-of-a-kind Mach-scaled fully-active-twist rotor system to undergo forward flight test. In parallel, the impact upon the fixed- and rotating-system loads is estimated by the analysis. While discrepancies are found in the amplitude of the loads under actuation, the predicted trend of load variation with respect to its control phase correlates well. It was also shown, both experimentally and numerically, that the ATR blade design has the potential for hub vibratory load reduction of up to 90% using individual blade control actuation. Using the numerical framework, system identification is performed to estimate the harmonic transfer functions. The linear time-periodic system can be represented by a linear time-invariant system under the three modes of blade actuation: collective, longitudinal cyclic, and lateral cyclic. A vibration

  12. Grain boundary curvature and grain growth kinetics with particle pinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahandeh, Sina; Militzer, Matthias

    2013-08-01

    Second-phase particles are used extensively in design of polycrystalline materials to control the grain size. According to Zener's theory, a distribution of particles creates a pinning pressure on a moving grain boundary. As a result, a limiting grain size is observed, but the effect of pinning on the detail of grain growth kinetics is less known. The influence of the particles on the microstructure occurs in multiple length scales, established by particle radius and the grain size. In this article, we use a meso-scale phase-field model that simulates grain growth in the presence of a uniform pinning pressure. The curvature of the grain boundary network is measured to determine the driving pressure of grain growth in 2D and 3D systems. It was observed that the grain growth continues, even under conditions where the average driving pressure is smaller than the pinning pressure. The limiting grain size is reached when the maximum of driving pressure distribution in the structure is equal to the pinning pressure. This results in a limiting grain size, larger than the one predicted by conventional models, and further analysis shows consistency with experimental observations. A physical model is proposed for the kinetics of grain growth using parameters based on the curvature analysis of the grain boundaries. This model can describe the simulated grain growth kinetics.

  13. Dynamic Light Scattering on a Twist-Bend nematic Liquid Crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsouzi, Zeinab; Shamid, Shaikh; Borshch, Volodymyr; Challa, Pavan; Tamba, Gabriela; Mehl, Georg; Gleeson, James; Jákli, Antal; Lavrentovich, Oleg; Allender, David; Selinger, Jonathan; Sprunt, Samuel

    We present a dynamic light scattering study performed on the uniaxial and twist-bend nematic (NTB) phases of a liquid crystal dimer/monomer mixture. In the nematic phase, in addition to the usual two hydrodynamic director modes, the results reveal a single non-hydrodynamic process that is associated with fluctuations in orientational order in the plane perpendicular to the primary (uniaxial) ordering direction. On the other hand, data from the NTB phase demonstrate a pair of non-hydrodynamic modes and a single hydrodynamic mode. The non-hydrodynamic modes are strongly temperature-dependent, slowing down as the transition is approached from the NTB side. Our results may be explained by a Landau-deGennes expansion of free energy for the N to NTB transition in terms of a helical polarization field, which is nonzero in the NTB state and is coupled to the heliconical director that characterizes the NTB state. The short pitch of the structure allows a ``coarse-graining'' of the free energy that accounts for the observed fluctuation mode structure and properties at optical wavevectors. In the model, the helical axis is the effective director, and the helical planes become smectic-like layers. We estimate an effective compression constant, B = 4000 Pa, for the NTB ``layer'' structure.

  14. Edible grain legumes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Edible grain legumes including dry bean, dry pea, chickpeas, and lentils, have served as important sources of protein for human diets for thousands of years. In the US, these crops are predominately produced for export markets. The objective of this study was to examine yield gains in these crops ov...

  15. Twist expansion of differential cross-sections of forward Drell-Yan process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stebel, Tomasz; Motyka, Leszek; Sadzikowski, Mariusz

    2015-04-01

    Forward Drell-Yan process at the LHC is a sensitive tool for investigating higher twist effects in QCD. The expansion of all Drell-Yan structure functions is performed assuming GBW saturation model and the saturation scale plays the role of the hadronic scale of OPE. We show that the Lam-Tung relation is broken at twist 4. The results open the way for a forthcoming analysis of multiple scattering and higher twist effects.

  16. Quantification of Resistance of Grain Boundaries to Short-Fatigue Crack Growth in Three Dimensions in High-Strength Al Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Wei; Zhai, Tongguang

    2012-08-01

    Based on the previous three-dimensional (3-D) crystallographic model for short-fatigue crack propagation through grain boundaries, the resistance of a grain boundary to the crack growth was quantified as a Weibull-type function of the twist component of crack plane deflection across the boundary. The effective driving force for the crack at a grain boundary was quantified as the applied driving force minus the resistance. This allowed the quantification of variation in growth rate at different grain boundaries along the crack front. The model could simulate satisfactorily that the crack front at the grain boundaries with high twist angle indeed was lagged behind those with low twist angle and that the crack growth rate on the surface varied significantly. The model was also used to predict short-fatigue crack growth statistically in different textures, showing potential application to texture design of alloys. Subsequent work still needs to be done to incorporate other factors, such as the tilt angle and Schmidt factor, into the model to render a more accurate simulation.

  17. Effect of twist on transverse impact response of ballistic fiber yarns

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Song, Bo; Lu, Wei -Yang

    2015-06-15

    A Hopkinson bar was employed to conduct transverse impact testing of twisted Kevlar KM2 fiber yarns at the same impact speed. The speed of Euler transverse wave generated by the impact was measured utilizing a high speed digital camera. The study included fiber yarns twisted by different amounts. The Euler transverse wave speed was observed to increase with increasing amount of twist of the fiber yarn, within the range of this investigation. As a result, the higher transverse wave speeds in the more twisted fiber yarns indicate better ballistic performance in soft body armors for personal protection.

  18. Effect of twist and porosity on the electrical conductivity of carbon nanofiber yarns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chawla, S.; Naraghi, M.; Davoudi, A.

    2013-06-01

    This study focuses on the effect of twist and porosity on the electrical conductivity of carbon nanofiber (CNF) yarns. The process of fabrication of CNF yarns included the synthesis of aligned ribbons of polyacrylonitrile (PAN) nanofibers via electrospinning. The PAN ribbons were twisted into yarns with twist levels ranging from zero twist to high twists of 1300 turn per meter (tpm). The twist imposed on the ribbons substantially improved the interactions between nanofibers and reduced the porosity. The PAN yarns were subsequently stabilized in air, and then carbonized in nitrogen at 1100 ° C for 1 h. Compressive stresses developed between the PAN nanofibers as a result of twist promoted interfusion between neighboring nanofibers, which was accelerated by heating the yarns during stabilization to temperatures above the glass transition of PAN. The electrical conductivity of the yarns was measured with a four point probe measurement technique. Although increasing the twist promotes electrical conductivity between nanofibers by forming junctions between them, our results indicate that the electrical conductivity does not continuously increase with increasing twist, but reaches a threshold value after which it starts to decrease. The causes for this behavior were studied through experimental techniques and further explored using a yarn-equivalent electrical circuit model.

  19. Polarization properties of fiber lasers with twist-induced circular birefringence

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Ho Young; Lee, El Hang Kim, Byoung Yoon

    1997-09-01

    We have experimentally observed and theoretically analyzed the polarization properties of fiber lasers with twist-induced birefringence. Twisting a fiber induces the circular birefringence of a fiber laser cavity, and this birefringence reduces the effects of intrinsic linear birefringence on the polarization properties of fiber lasers. The frequencies of their polarization eigenmodes coincide with each other gradually as the twist rate increases, and the directions of polarization eigenmodes deviate from the birefringence axis at a much larger twist rate than the magnitude of intrinsic linear birefringence. We describe the successful experimental results for Nd and Er fiber lasers. {copyright} 1997 Optical Society of America

  20. Higher-Twist Mechanism and Inclusive Gluon Production in Pion-Proton Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadov, A. I.; Aydin, C.; Myrzakulov, R.; Uzun, O.

    2016-01-01

    We calculate the contribution of the higher-twist Feynman diagrams to the large-pT inclusive gluon production cross section in πp collisions incase of the running coupling and frozen coupling approaches within perturbative and holographic QCD. The structure of infrared renormalon singularities of the higher-twist subprocess cross section are obtained and the resummed higher-twist cross sections (Borel sum) with the ones obtained in the framework of the frozen coupling approach and leading-twist cross section are compared and analyzed.

  1. Higher-twist mechanism and inclusive gluon production in pion-proton collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadov, A. I.; Aydin, C.; Myrzakulov, R.; Uzun, O.

    2015-12-01

    We calculate the contribution of the higher-twist Feynman diagrams to the large-pT inclusive gluon production cross-section in πp collisions in case of the running coupling and frozen coupling approaches within perturbative and holographic QCD. The structure of infrared renormalon singularities of the higher-twist subprocess cross-section is obtained and the resummed higher-twist cross-sections (Borel sum) with the ones obtained in the framework of the frozen coupling approach and leading-twist cross-section are compared and analyzed.

  2. Tripartite motif containing 28 (TRIM28) promotes breast cancer metastasis by stabilizing TWIST1 protein

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Chunli; Cheng, Jingliang; Zhou, Boxv; Zhu, Li; Khan, Md. Asaduzzaman; He, Tao; Zhou, Sufang; He, Jian; Lu, Xiaoling; Chen, Hanchun; Zhang, Dianzheng; Zhao, Yongxiang; Fu, Junjiang

    2016-01-01

    TRIM28 regulates its target genes at both transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels. Here we report that a TRIM28-TWIST1-EMT axis exists in breast cancer cells and TRIM28 promotes breast cancer metastasis by stabilizing TWIST1 and subsequently enhancing EMT. We find that TRIM28 is highly expressed in both cancer cell lines and advanced breast cancer tissues, and the levels of TRIM28 and TWIST1 are positively correlated with the aggressiveness of breast carcinomas. Overexpression and depletion of TRIM28 up- and down-regulates the protein, but not the mRNA levels of TWIST1, respectively, suggesting that TRIM28 upregulates TWIST1 post-transcriptionally. Overexpression of TRIM28 in breast cancer cell line promotes cell migration and invasion. Knockdown of TRIM28 reduces the protein level of TWIST1 with concurrent upregulation of E-cadherin and downregulation of N-cadherin and consequently inhibits cell migration and invasion. Furthermore, Immunoprecipitation and GST pull-down assays demonstrated that TRIM28 interacts with TWIST1 directly and this interaction is presumed to protect TWIST1 from degradation. Our study revealed a novel mechanism in breast cancer cells that TRIM28 enhances metastasis by stabilizing TWIST1, suggesting that targeting TRIM28 could be an efficacious strategy in breast cancer treatment. PMID:27412325

  3. Dust grain charging in a wake of other grains

    SciTech Connect

    Miloch, W. J.; Block, D.

    2012-12-15

    The charging of dust grain in the wake of another grains in sonic and supersonic collisionless plasma flows is studied by numerical simulations. We consider two grains aligned with the flow, as well as dust chains and multiple grain arrangements. It is found that the dust charge depends significantly on the flow speed, distance between the grains, and the grain arrangement. For two and three grains aligned, the charges on downstream grains depend linearly on the flow velocity and intergrain distance. The simulations are carried out with DiP3D, a three dimensional particle-in-cell code with both electrons and ions represented as numerical particles [W. J. Miloch et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 103703 (2010)].

  4. Grain rotation mediated by grain boundary dislocations in nanocrystalline platinum

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lihua; Teng, Jiao; Liu, Pan; Hirata, Akihiko; Ma, En; Zhang, Ze; Chen, Mingwei; Han, Xiaodong

    2014-01-01

    Grain rotation is a well-known phenomenon during high (homologous) temperature deformation and recrystallization of polycrystalline materials. In recent years, grain rotation has also been proposed as a plasticity mechanism at low temperatures (for example, room temperature for metals), especially for nanocrystalline grains with diameter d less than ~15 nm. Here, in tensile-loaded Pt thin films under a high-resolution transmission electron microscope, we show that the plasticity mechanism transitions from cross-grain dislocation glide in larger grains (d>6 nm) to a mode of coordinated rotation of multiple grains for grains with d<6 nm. The mechanism underlying the grain rotation is dislocation climb at the grain boundary, rather than grain boundary sliding or diffusional creep. Our atomic-scale images demonstrate directly that the evolution of the misorientation angle between neighbouring grains can be quantitatively accounted for by the change of the Frank–Bilby dislocation content in the grain boundary. PMID:25030380

  5. Molecular dynamics simulations of He bubble nucleation at grain boundaries

    SciTech Connect

    Yongfeng Zhang; Paul C Millett; Michael Tonks; Liangzhe Zhang; Bulent Biner

    2012-08-01

    The nucleation behavior of He bubbles in nano-grained body-centered-cubic (BCC) Mo is simulated using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with a bicrystal model, focusing on the effect of grain boundary (GB) structure. Three types of GBs, the (100) twist S29, the ?110? symmetrical tilt (tilt angle of 10.1?), and the (112) twin boundaries, are studied as representatives of random GB, low angle GB with misfit dislocations, and special sigma boundaries. With the same amount of He, more He clusters form in nano-grained Mo with smaller average size compared to that in bulk. The effects of the GB structure originate from the excess volume in GBs. Trapping by excess volume results in reduction in mobility of He atoms, which enhances the nucleation with higher density of bubbles, and impedes the growth of He bubbles by absorption of mobile He atoms. Furthermore, the distribution of excess volume in GBs determines the distribution of He clusters. The effect of GBs becomes less pronounced with increasing vacancy concentration in the matrix.

  6. History of Presolar Grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernatowicz, Thomas J.

    2005-01-01

    Papers on the History of Presolar Grains. This has been a very productive period in which much of the laboratory work conducted in the previous year and during this funding cycle were brought to completion. In the last year we have published or submitted for peer review 4 research papers, 4 review papers, and 11 abstracts in research areas supported under this grant. Brief synopses of the results of the research papers are presented, followed by short summaries of the topics discussed in the review papers. Several areas of research are of course being actively pursued, and the appended list of abstracts gives citations to this ongoing work. In a paper submitted to the Astrophysical Journal, the results of an investigation into the physical conditions in the mass outflows of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) carbon stars that are required for the formation of micron-sized presolar graphite grains, with and without previously formed internal crystals of titanium carbide (TIC) are reported.

  7. FINE GRAIN NUCLEAR EMULSION

    DOEpatents

    Oliver, A.J.

    1962-04-24

    A method of preparing nuclear track emulsions having mean grain sizes less than 0.1 microns is described. The method comprises adding silver nitrate to potassium bromide at a rate at which there is always a constant, critical excess of silver ions. For minimum size grains, the silver ion concentration is maintained at the critical level of about pAg 2.0 to 5.0 during prectpitation, pAg being defined as the negative logarithm of the silver ion concentration. It is preferred to eliminate the excess silver at the conclusion of the precipitation steps. The emulsion is processed by methods in all other respects generally similar to the methods of the prior art. (AEC)

  8. Supramolecular Recognition of Amino Acids by Twisted Cucurbit[14]uril.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Xi, Yun-Yun; Li, Qing; Tang, Qing; Wang, Ruibing; Huang, Ying; Tao, Zhu; Xue, Sai-Feng; Lindoy, Leonard F; Wei, Gang

    2016-08-19

    Binding interactions between twisted cucurbit[14]uril (tQ[14]) and twenty standard amino acids (AAs) have been investigated by NMR spectroscopy and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) in aqueous HCl solutions and in DMSO. The results showed that tQ[14] displays clear binding affinity for AAs with a positively charged side chain or containing an aromatic ring, but weaker binding affinity for AAs with hydrophobic or polar side chains, with the binding mode depending on the type of side chain present in the AAs. PMID:27349365

  9. Twisted speckle entities inside wave-front reversal mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Okulov, A. Yu

    2009-07-15

    The previously unknown property of the optical speckle pattern reported. The interference of a speckle with the counterpropagating phase-conjugated (PC) speckle wave produces a randomly distributed ensemble of a twisted entities (ropes) surrounding optical vortex lines. These entities appear in a wide range of a randomly chosen speckle parameters inside the phase-conjugating mirrors regardless to an internal physical mechanism of the wave-front reversal. These numerically generated interference patterns are relevant to the Brillouin PC mirrors and to a four-wave mixing PC mirrors based upon laser trapped ultracold atomic cloud.

  10. Quantum Nuclear Pasta Calculations with Twisted Angular Boundary Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuetrumpf, Bastian; Nazarewicz, Witold

    2015-10-01

    Nuclear pasta, expected to be present in the inner crust of neutron stars and core collapse supernovae, can contain a wide spectrum of different exotic shapes such as nuclear rods and slabs. There are also more complicated, network-like structures, the triply periodic minimal surfaces, already known e.g. in biological systems. These shapes are studied with the Hartree-Fock method using modern Skyrme forces. Furthermore twisted angular boundary conditions are utilized to reduce finite size effects in the rectangular simulation boxes. It is shown, that this improves the accuracy of the calculations drastically and additionally more insights into the mechanism of forming minimal surfaces can be gained.

  11. Defects on semiflexible filaments: Kinks and twist kinks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Nam-Kyung; Johner, Albert

    2016-04-01

    Due to local interactions with ligands or to global constraints, semiflexible filaments can exhibit localized defects. We focus on filaments laying flat on a surface. The two lowest order singularities are addressed: discontinuities of the orientation, which are called kink, and discontinuities of the curvature. The latter are called twist kinks in flattened helical filaments where they can form spontaneously. We calculate the partition functions for a given defect fugacity and discuss some often measured quantities like the correlation of the orientation along the filament.

  12. Improvement of Wilson fermions and twisted mass lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jackson M. S.

    2005-11-01

    In order for Wilson fermions to be a competitive option to use in lattice QCD (LQCD) simulations, the large inherent discretization errors starting at O(a) (a being the lattice spacing) have to be removed. This can be accomplished through the Symanizk improvement program, where improvement terms have to be added to both the action and the operators of interest with coefficients appropriately chosen so that the rate of convergence to the continuum limit is quadratic in a. For this to be applicable to numerical simulations, improvement coefficients have to be determined non-perturbatively. A program for doing so has been pioneered by the Alpha collaboration. In this work, an extension of that program is made to improve all bilinear operators in QCD with two, three, and four flavours of non-degenerate quarks. With even numbers of quark flavours, an alternative approach is afforded by twisted mass LQCD (tmLQCD), where O(a) improvement in physical quantities can be achieved automatically at maximal twist. In this work, the features and utilities of tmLQCD are studied in detail in the framework of chiral perturbation theory (chiPT). By matching onto an effective chiral theory, the phase structure of tmLQCD and the properties of the mesons (pions) in the theory has been investigated. Pionic quantities easy to calculate in numerical simulations and useful for probing the symmetry breaking effects of tmLQCD have been calculated, and conditions under which automatic O(a) improvement holds at maximal twist has been carefully studied. The resulting twisted mass chiPT has also been extended to study the baryons in this work, which has not been done before. This allows one to probe tmLQCD with more quantities, and in particular, quantities that do not involve quark-disconnected diagrams and so are much easier to calculate in numerical simulations. A major part of this dissertation has already appeared in published form. Chapters 3 through 5 are based on Refs. [1--5].

  13. Dissipationless Damping of Compressive MHD Modes in Twisted Flux Tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giagkiozis, I.; Fedun, V.; Verth, G.; Goossens, M. L.; Van Doorsselaere, T.

    2015-12-01

    Axisymmetric modes in straight magentic flux tubes exhibit a cutoff in the long wavelength limit and no damping is predicted. However, as soon as weak magnetic twist is introduced inside as well as outside the magnetic flux tube the cutoff recedes. Furthermore, when density variations are also incomporated within the modelresonant absorption appears. In this work we explore analytically the expected damping times for waves within the Alfven continuum for different solar atmospheric conditions. Based on the results in this work we offer insight on recent observations of sausage wave damping in the chromosphere.

  14. Resonant tunneling and intrinsic bistability in twisted graphene structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez-Nieva, J. F.; Dresselhaus, M. S.; Levitov, L. S.

    2016-08-01

    We predict that vertical transport in heterostructures formed by twisted graphene layers can exhibit a unique bistability mechanism. Intrinsically bistable I -V characteristics arise from resonant tunneling and interlayer charge coupling, enabling multiple stable states in the sequential tunneling regime. We consider a simple trilayer architecture, with the outer layers acting as the source and drain and the middle layer floating. Under bias, the middle layer can be either resonant or nonresonant with the source and drain layers. The bistability is controlled by geometric device parameters easily tunable in experiments. The nanoscale architecture can enable uniquely fast switching times.

  15. Vibrations of twisted cantilever plates - A comparison of theoretical results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kielb, R. E.; Leissa, A. W.; Macbain, J. C.

    1985-01-01

    As a result of significant differences in the published results for various methods of analysis involving the use of finite element techniques, there are now some questions regarding the adequacy of these methods to predict accurately the vibratory characteristics of highly twisted cantilever plates. In an attempt to help in a resolution of the arising problems, a joint government/industry/university research effort was initiated. The primary objective of the present paper is to summarize the theoretical methods used in the study and show samples of the obtained results. The study provided 19 sets of theoretical results which are derived from beam theory, shell theory, and finite element methods.

  16. Analysis of twisting stiffness for a multifiber composite layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bert, C. W.; Chang, S.

    1974-01-01

    The twisting stiffness of a rectangular cross section consisting of a single row of solid circular cross-section fibers embedded in a matrix is analyzed. The problem is formulated as a Dirichlet torsion problem of a multielement region and solved by the boundary-point least-squares method. Numerical results for a single-fiber square cross section compare favorably with previous relaxation-method results. New numerical results for three and five-fiber composites suggest that the torsional rigidity of a multifiber composite can be approximated from the torsional rigidities of single and three-fiber models.

  17. Isotropic Monte Carlo Grain Growth

    2013-04-25

    IMCGG performs Monte Carlo simulations of normal grain growth in metals on a hexagonal grid in two dimensions with periodic boundary conditions. This may be performed with either an isotropic or a misorientation - and incliantion-dependent grain boundary energy.

  18. Prediction of Wind Tunnel Effects on the Installed F/A-18A Inlet Flow Field at High Angles-of-attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Crawford F.

    1995-01-01

    NASA Lewis is currently engaged in a research effort as a team member of the High Alpha Technology Program (HATP) within NASA. This program utilizes a specially equipped F/A-18A, the High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV), in an ambitious effort to improve the maneuverability of high performance military aircraft at low subsonic speed, high angle of attack conditions. The overall objective of the Lewis effort is to develop inlet technology that will ensure efficient airflow delivery to the engine during these maneuvers. One part of the Lewis approach utilizes computational fluid dynamics codes to predict the installed performance of inlets for these highly maneuverable aircraft. Wind tunnel tests were a major component of the Lewis program. Since the available wind tunnel was small (9 x 15 ft) as compared to the scale of the model of the F/A-18A (19.78 percent), there were questions about the capability to obtain useful inlet performance data. The blockage effects were expected to be very large. This report represents the results of an analysis to determine how the wind tunnel walls effect inlet performance at several angles of attack. The predictions for the external particle traces along the fuselage indicate the influence of the wind tunnel side wall under the model is greater at 30 deg angle of attack than at 50 deg angle of attack on the under Leading Edge Extension (LEX) vortex trajectory. The side wall above the model appears to have negligible influence on the under LEX vortex. This may be due to the LEX acting as 'shield' to the upper wall effects. As expected, the wind tunnel has a significant influence on the external forces. The lift and drag coefficients increase significantly for the wind tunnel model as compared to free stream conditions. The wind tunnel had a small effect on the inlet recovery and on inlet total pressure distortion patterns. The predicted recoveries for the wind tunnel model are within one percentage point of the model recoveries in

  19. Twist promotes angiogenesis in pancreatic cancer by targeting miR-497/VEGFA axis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, An; Huang, Chenggang; Cai, Xuehong; Xu, Jia; Yang, Dinghua

    2016-01-01

    Angiogenesis is a critical step in the growth and dissemination of malignant diseases, including pancreatic cancer. Twist has been shown to stimulate angiogenesis in the tumor site. However, whether Twist contributes to angiogenesis in pancreatic cancer remains unknown. In this paper, we found that the expression of Twist was significantly increased in human pancreatic cancer cell lines and pancreatic cancer specimens. It is also closely engaged to adverse clinical feature, diminished survival and angiogenesis in pancreatic cancer patients. The up-regulation of Twist was found to be promoting cell growth, invasion and tubule formation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) in vitro. By contrast, the silencing of Twist inhibited orthotopic xenograft tumor growth, metastasis and angiogenesis. Subsequent investigations disclosed that Twist was regulated by miR-497 directly, leading to the increased level of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor-A (VEGFA). Moreover, gain-of-function and loss-of-function studies demonstrated that miR-497 could suppress the pro-proliferative, angiogenic and metastatic ability of pancreatic cancer cells. The ectopic expression of VEGFA obviously abrogated the anti-angiogenic effect induced by Twist knockdown, whereas the silencing of VEGFA markedly rescued the pro-angiogenic effect of Twist. By analyzing the expression levels of miR-497, Twist was found inversely correlated with miR-497 in pancreatic cancer tissues, and a positive correlation was found between Twist and VEGFA levels in pancreatic cancer specimens. In conclusion, our results suggested that the Twist/miR-497/VEGFA axis is significantly correlated with metastasis and angiogenesis in pancreatic cancer. PMID:27015364

  20. High resolution mapping of Twist to DNA in Drosophila embryos: Efficient functional analysis and evolutionary conservation.

    PubMed

    Ozdemir, Anil; Fisher-Aylor, Katherine I; Pepke, Shirley; Samanta, Manoj; Dunipace, Leslie; McCue, Kenneth; Zeng, Lucy; Ogawa, Nobuo; Wold, Barbara J; Stathopoulos, Angelike

    2011-04-01

    Cis-regulatory modules (CRMs) function by binding sequence specific transcription factors, but the relationship between in vivo physical binding and the regulatory capacity of factor-bound DNA elements remains uncertain. We investigate this relationship for the well-studied Twist factor in Drosophila melanogaster embryos by analyzing genome-wide factor occupancy and testing the functional significance of Twist occupied regions and motifs within regions. Twist ChIP-seq data efficiently identified previously studied Twist-dependent CRMs and robustly predicted new CRM activity in transgenesis, with newly identified Twist-occupied regions supporting diverse spatiotemporal patterns (>74% positive, n = 31). Some, but not all, candidate CRMs require Twist for proper expression in the embryo. The Twist motifs most favored in genome ChIP data (in vivo) differed from those most favored by Systematic Evolution of Ligands by EXponential enrichment (SELEX) (in vitro). Furthermore, the majority of ChIP-seq signals could be parsimoniously explained by a CABVTG motif located within 50 bp of the ChIP summit and, of these, CACATG was most prevalent. Mutagenesis experiments demonstrated that different Twist E-box motif types are not fully interchangeable, suggesting that the ChIP-derived consensus (CABVTG) includes sites having distinct regulatory outputs. Further analysis of position, frequency of occurrence, and sequence conservation revealed significant enrichment and conservation of CABVTG E-box motifs near Twist ChIP-seq signal summits, preferential conservation of ±150 bp surrounding Twist occupied summits, and enrichment of GA- and CA-repeat sequences near Twist occupied summits. Our results show that high resolution in vivo occupancy data can be used to drive efficient discovery and dissection of global and local cis-regulatory logic.

  1. TWIST modulates prostate cancer cell-mediated bone cell activity and is upregulated by osteogenic induction.

    PubMed

    Yuen, Hiu-Fung; Kwok, Wai-Kei; Chan, Ka-Kui; Chua, Chee-Wai; Chan, Yuen-Piu; Chu, Ying-Ying; Wong, Yong-Chuan; Wang, Xianghong; Chan, Kwok-Wah

    2008-08-01

    TWIST, a helix-loop-helix transcription factor, is highly expressed in many types of human cancer. We have previously found that TWIST confers prostate cancer cells with an enhanced metastatic potential through promoting epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and a high TWIST expression in human prostate cancer is associated with an increased metastatic potential. The predilection of prostate cancer cells to metastasize to bone may be due to two interplaying mechanisms (i) by increasing the rate of bone remodeling and (ii) by undergoing osteomimicry. We further studied the role of TWIST in promoting prostate cancer to bone metastasis. TWIST expression in PC3, a metastatic prostate cancer cell line, was silenced by small interfering RNA and we found that conditioned medium from PC3 with lower TWIST expression had a lower activity on stimulating osteoclast differentiation and higher activity on stimulating osteoblast mineralization. In addition, we found that these effects were, at least partly, associated with TWIST-induced expression of dickkopf homolog 1 (DKK-1), a factor that promotes osteolytic metastasis. We also examined TWIST and RUNX2 expressions during osteogenic induction of an organ-confined prostate cancer cell, 22Rv1. We observed increased TWIST and RUNX2 expressions upon osteogenic induction and downregulation of TWIST through short hairpin RNA reduced the induction level of RUNX2. In summary, our results suggest that, in addition to EMT, TWIST may also promote prostate cancer to bone metastasis by modulating prostate cancer cell-mediated bone remodeling via regulating the expression of a secretory factor, DKK-1, and enhancing osteomimicry of prostate cancer cells, probably, via RUNX2.

  2. Study of nonlinear MHD equations governing the wave propagation in twisted coronal loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parhi, S.; DeBruyne, P.; Goossens, M.; Zhelyazkov, I.

    1995-01-01

    The solar corona, modelled by a low beta, resistive plasma slab, sustains MHD wave propagations due to shearing footpoint motions in the photosphere. By using a numerical algorithm the excitation and nonlinear development of MHD waves in twisted coronal loops are studied. The plasma responds to the footpoint motion by sausage waves if there is no twist. The twist in the magnetic field of the loop destroys initially developed sausage-like wave modes and they become kinks. The transition from sausage to kink modes is analyzed. The twist brings about mode degradation producing high harmonics and this generates more complex fine structures. This can be attributed to several local extrema in the perturbed velocity profiles. The Alfven wave produces remnants of the ideal 1/x singularity both for zero and non-zero twist and this pseudo-singularity becomes less pronounced for larger twist. The effect of nonlinearity is clearly observed by changing the amplitude of the driver by one order of magnitude. The magnetosonic waves also exhibit smoothed remnants of ideal logarithmic singularities when the frequency of the driver is correctly chosen. This pseudo-singularity for fast waves is absent when the coronal loop does not undergo any twist but becomes pronounced when twist is included. On the contrary, it is observed for slow waves even if there is no twist. Increasing the twist leads to a higher heating rate of the loop. The larger twist shifts somewhat uniformly distributed heating to layers inside the slab corresponding to peaks in the magnetic field strength.

  3. Storing Peanuts in Grain Bags

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A study was executed to determine the potential of storing farmers stock peanuts and shelled peanuts for crushing in hermetically sealed grain bags. The objectives of the study were to evaluate equipment for loading and unloading the grain bags, the capacity of the grain bags, and the changes in qu...

  4. Grain-grain interaction in stationary dusty plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Lampe, Martin; Joyce, Glenn

    2015-02-15

    We present a particle-in-cell simulation study of the steady-state interaction between two stationary dust grains in uniform stationary plasma. Both the electrostatic force and the shadowing force on the grains are calculated explicitly. The electrostatic force is always repulsive. For two grains of the same size, the electrostatic force is very nearly equal to the shielded electric field due to a single isolated grain, acting on the charge of the other grain. For two grains of unequal size, the electrostatic force on the smaller grain is smaller than the isolated-grain field, and the force on the larger grain is larger than the isolated-grain field. In all cases, the attractive shadowing force exceeds the repulsive electrostatic force when the grain separation d is greater than an equilibrium separation d{sub 0}. d{sub 0} is found to be between 6λ{sub D} and 9λ{sub D} in all cases. The binding energy is estimated to be between 19 eV and 900 eV for various cases.

  5. Two-dimensional twisted sigma models, the mirror chiral de Rham complex, and twisted generalised mirror symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Meng-Chwan

    2007-07-01

    In this paper, we study the perturbative aspects of a ``B-twisted" two-dimensional (0,2) heterotic sigma model on a holomorphic gauge bundle Script E over a complex, hermitian manifold X. We show that the model can be naturally described in terms of the mathematical theory of ``Chiral Differential Operators". In particular, the physical anomalies of the sigma model can be reinterpreted as an obstruction to a global definition of the associated sheaf of vertex superalgebras derived from the free conformal field theory describing the model locally on X. In addition, one can also obtain a novel understanding of the sigma model one-loop beta function solely in terms of holomorphic data. At the (2,2) locus, one can describe the resulting half-twisted variant of the topological B-model in terms of a mirror ``Chiral de Rham complex" (or CDR) defined by Malikov et al. in [1]. Via mirror symmetry, one can also derive various conjectural expressions relating the sheaf cohomology of the mirror CDR to that of the original CDR on pairs of Calabi-Yau mirror manifolds. An analysis of the half-twisted model on a non-Kähler group manifold with torsion also allows one to draw conclusions about the corresponding sheaves of CDR (and its mirror) that are consistent with mathematically established results by Ben-Bassat in [2] on the mirror symmetry of generalised complex manifolds. These conclusions therefore suggest an interesting relevance of the sheaf of CDR in the recent study of generalised mirror symmetry.

  6. Acute mechano-electronic responses in twisted phosphorene nanoribbons.

    PubMed

    Jang, Woosun; Kang, Kisung; Soon, Aloysius

    2016-08-01

    Many different forms of mechanical and structural deformations have been employed to alter the electronic structure of various modern two-dimensional (2D) nanomaterials. Given the recent interest in the new class of 2D nanomaterials - phosphorene, here we investigate how the rotational strain-dependent electronic properties of low-dimensional phosphorene may be exploited for technological gain. Here, using first-principles density-functional theory, we investigate the mechanical stability of twisted one-dimensional phosphorene nanoribbons (TPNR) by measuring their critical twist angle (θc) and shear modulus as a function of the applied mechanical torque. We find a strong anisotropic, chirality-dependent mechano-electronic response in the hydrogen-passivated TPNRs upon vortical deformation, resulting in a striking difference in the change in the carrier effective mass as a function of torque angle (and thus, the corresponding change in carrier mobility) between the zigzag and armchair directions in these TPNRs. The accompanied tunable band-gap energies for the hydrogen-passivated zigzag TPNRs may then be exploited for various key opto-electronic nanodevices.

  7. Resonant Tunneling and Intrinsic Bistability in Twisted Graphene Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez-Nieva, Joaquin; Dresselhaus, Mildred; Levitov, Leonid

    2015-03-01

    Bistable systems exhibit several distinct macroscopic states and can switch between them upon variation of some control parameter. Nonvolatile electronic systems that exhibit intrinsic bistability and fast switching times are desirable for low-power memory and logic. Experimental realizations of such systems, however, are scarce. We propose a novel mechanism for intrinsic bistability in van der Waals heterostructures formed by twisted graphene monolayers. Bistability in these systems originates from resonant tunneling and charge coupling between different graphene layers. These characteristics, governed by Dirac-like spectrum and Moiré periodicity of the tunneling Hamiltonian, allow multiple stable states in the sequential tunneling regime. In the bistability region, an intermediate electrically decoupled graphene layer can, for the same external bias, be either in a resonant or non-resonant state with respect to the top/bottom layer. Features of interest, such as resonant tunneling, negative differential resistance and bistability, are controlled by parameters easily accessible in experiments, namely the twist angle and interlayer conductances. We estimate the power required to retain this state, switching times, and assess volatility of such intrinsically bistable systems.

  8. Acute mechano-electronic responses in twisted phosphorene nanoribbons.

    PubMed

    Jang, Woosun; Kang, Kisung; Soon, Aloysius

    2016-08-01

    Many different forms of mechanical and structural deformations have been employed to alter the electronic structure of various modern two-dimensional (2D) nanomaterials. Given the recent interest in the new class of 2D nanomaterials - phosphorene, here we investigate how the rotational strain-dependent electronic properties of low-dimensional phosphorene may be exploited for technological gain. Here, using first-principles density-functional theory, we investigate the mechanical stability of twisted one-dimensional phosphorene nanoribbons (TPNR) by measuring their critical twist angle (θc) and shear modulus as a function of the applied mechanical torque. We find a strong anisotropic, chirality-dependent mechano-electronic response in the hydrogen-passivated TPNRs upon vortical deformation, resulting in a striking difference in the change in the carrier effective mass as a function of torque angle (and thus, the corresponding change in carrier mobility) between the zigzag and armchair directions in these TPNRs. The accompanied tunable band-gap energies for the hydrogen-passivated zigzag TPNRs may then be exploited for various key opto-electronic nanodevices. PMID:27445229

  9. Twisted and tubular silica structures by anionic surfactant fibers encapsulation.

    PubMed

    Chekini, Mahshid; Guénée, Laure; Marchionni, Valentina; Sharma, Manish; Bürgi, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    Organic molecules imprinting can be used for introducing specific properties and functionalities such as chirality to mesoporous materials. Particularly organic self-assemblies can work as a scaffold for templating inorganic materials such as silica. During recent years chiral imprinting of anionic surfactant for fabrication of twisted rod-like silica structures assisted by co-structuring directing agent were thoroughly investigated. The organic self-assemblies of anionic surfactants can also be used for introducing other shapes in rod-like silica structures. Here we report the formation of amphiphilic N-miristoyl-l-alanine self-assemblies in aqueous solution upon stirring and at presence of l-arginine. These anionic surfactant self-assemblies form fibers that grow by increasing the stirring duration. The fibers were studied using transmission electron microscopy, infra-red spectroscopy and vibrational circular dichroism. Addition of silica precursor 1,2-bis(triethoxysilyl)ethylene and co-structuring directing agent N-trimethoxysilylpropyl-N,N,N-trimethylammonium chloride at different stages of fibers' growth leads to formation of different silica structures. By controlling stirring duration, we obtained twisted tubular silica structures as a result of fibers encapsulation. We decorated these structures with gold nanoparticles by different methods and measured their optical activity.

  10. Self-consistent perturbation theory for two dimensional twisted bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirodkar, Sharmila N.; Tritsaris, Georgios A.; Kaxiras, Efthimios

    Theoretical modeling and ab-initio simulations of two dimensional heterostructures with arbitrary angles of rotation between layers involve unrealistically large and expensive calculations. To overcome this shortcoming, we develop a methodology for weakly interacting heterostructures that treats the effect of one layer on the other as perturbation, and restricts the calculations to their primitive cells. Thus, avoiding computationally expensive supercells. We start by approximating the interaction potential between the twisted bilayers to that of a hypothetical configuration (viz. ideally stacked untwisted layers), which produces band structures in reasonable agreement with full-scale ab-initio calculations for commensurate and twisted bilayers of graphene (Gr) and Gr/hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) heterostructures. We then self-consistently calculate the charge density and hence, interaction potential of the heterostructures. In this work, we test our model for bilayers of various combinations of Gr, h-BN and transition metal dichalcogenides, and discuss the advantages and shortcomings of the self-consistently calculated interaction potential. Department of Physics, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, USA.

  11. Photoreceptor twist: a solution to the false-color problem.

    PubMed Central

    Wehner, R; Bernard, G D

    1993-01-01

    In bees and many other insects the majority of photoreceptors are twisted like a corkscrew. Here we show that this structural feature of insect eyes-whose very existence was a source of dispute for several years-is necessary for reliable encoding of information about color. Light reflected from waxy plant surfaces is partially linearly polarized. Moreover, insect photoreceptor membranes are dichroic and thus sensitive to the polarized glare originating from plant surfaces. Taken together, these two phenomena create a serious false-color problem: in the bee's trichromatic color vision system, the color values of a particular part of a plant could be affected not only by the spectral but also by the polarization properties of the reflecting surface. As demonstrated by spectroscopic measurements and optical analyses, the hue of color of a given surface of a plant would change dramatically with the direction of illumination and the bee's line of sight, if the bee possessed straight and thus highly "polarization-sensitive" photoreceptors. However, this false-color problem is overcome completely in photoreceptors that are twisted by exactly the amount we have found to occur in the worker-bee's eye. PMID:11607379

  12. A Modification on ECAP Process by Incorporating Twist Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisadi, Hosein; Mohamadi, Mehdi Rezazadeh; Miyanaji, Hadi; Abdoli, Maryam

    2013-03-01

    In this study, a method that combines the equal channel angular pressing (ECAP) and twist extrusion (TE) techniques has been introduced as a severe plastic deformation process and investigated by means of the three-dimensional finite element analysis. Owing to the form of the mold which is used in this technique, it can be called the symmetrical channels angular pressing (SCAP) method. This method resembles the more common ECAP process for samples with rectangular cross sections, with the difference that, in this method, the entrance and exit channels at the intersecting corner of the mold also have a twist about their longitudinal axis (as in the TE technique). In this study, to show the characteristics of the SCAP method and to compare it with the ECAP technique, the former method has been simulated by the ABAQUS/Explicit software. Also, to validate the obtained results, the SCAP and ECAP methods were practically applied on samples made of pure commercial aluminum (AA1050). To get the strain distribution along the longitudinal and transverse directions of the samples, Vickers hardness was measured on these samples. The results obtained from these hardness measurements indicate that after one pass, the SCAP method can achieve a higher amount of hardness, compared with the ECAP technique. Moreover, the strain distributions obtained from the simulation and from the samples demonstrate that the SCAP method produces a more homogeneous distribution of strain in the workpieces.

  13. The Rise of Twisted Magnetic Tubes in a Stratified Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno-Insertis, F.; Emonet, T.

    1996-11-01

    First results from a two-dimensional numerical study of the buoyant rise of twisted magnetic flux tubes in the solar convection zone are presented. We show in detail the process by which the transverse component of the field can suppress the splitting of the rising tube into two vortex filaments. For the suppression to be effective, the pitch angle of the twisted field lines has to be above a threshold given by the condition that the magnetic equivalent of the Weber number (see § 2.2) be below 1. The shape obtained for the tube and wake is strongly reminiscent of laboratory experiments with air bubbles rising in liquids. The magnetized region outside an equipartition boundary is peeled away from the tube: two sidelobes are formed, which lag behind the tube and contain only a fraction of the initial magnetic flux. This is similar to the formation of a skirt in the fluid dynamical case. The velocities of rise predicted by the thin flux tube approximation are compared with those obtained here.

  14. Probing transmembrane mechanical coupling and cytomechanics using magnetic twisting cytometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, N.; Ingber, D. E.

    1995-01-01

    We recently developed a magnetic twisting cytometry technique that allows us to apply controlled mechanical stresses to specific cell surface receptors using ligand-coated ferromagnetic microbeads and to simultaneously measure the mechanical response in living cells. Using this technique, we have previously shown the following: (i) beta 1 integrin receptors mediate mechanical force transfer across the cell surface and to the cytoskeleton, whereas other transmembrane receptors (e.g., scavenger receptors) do not; (ii) cytoskeletal stiffness increases in direct proportion to the level of stress applied to integrins; and (iii) the slope of this linear stiffening response differs depending on the shape of the cell. We now show that different integrins (beta 1, alpha V beta 3, alpha V, alpha 5, alpha 2) and other transmembrane receptors (scavenger receptor, platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule) differ in their ability to mediate force transfer across the cell surface. In addition, the linear stiffening behavior previously observed in endothelial cells was found to be shared by other cell types. Finally, we demonstrate that dynamic changes in cell shape that occur during both cell spreading and retraction are accompanied by coordinate changes in cytoskeletal stiffness. Taken together, these results suggest that the magnetic twisting cytometry technique may be a powerful and versatile tool for studies analyzing the molecular basis of transmembrane mechanical coupling to the cytoskeleton as well as dynamic relations between changes in cytoskeletal structure and alterations in cell form and function.

  15. Reconstruction of Twist Torque in Main Parachute Risers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Day, Joshua D.

    2015-01-01

    The reconstruction of twist torque in the Main Parachute Risers of the Capsule Parachute Assembly System (CPAS) has been successfully used to validate CPAS Model Memo conservative twist torque equations. Reconstruction of basic, one degree of freedom drop tests was used to create a functional process for the evaluation of more complex, rigid body simulation. The roll, pitch, and yaw of the body, the fly-out angles of the parachutes, and the relative location of the parachutes to the body are inputs to the torque simulation. The data collected by the Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) was used to calculate the true torque. The simulation then used photogrammetric and IMU data as inputs into the Model Memo equations. The results were then compared to the true torque results to validate the Model Memo equations. The Model Memo parameters were based off of steel risers and the parameters will need to be re-evaluated for different materials. Photogrammetric data was found to be more accurate than the inertial data in accounting for the relative rotation between payload and cluster. The Model Memo equations were generally a good match and when not matching were generally conservative.

  16. Aeroelastic behavior of twist-coupled HAWT blades

    SciTech Connect

    Lobitz, D.W.; Veers, P.S.

    1998-12-31

    As the technology for horizontal axis wind turbines (HAWT) development matures, more novel techniques are required for the capture of additional amounts of energy, alleviation of loads and control of the rotor. One such technique employs the use of an adaptive blade that could sense the wind velocity or rotational speed in some fashion and accordingly modify its aerodynamic configuration to meet a desired objective. This could be achieved in either an active or passive manner, although the passive approach is much more attractive due to its simplicity and economy. As an example, a blade design might employ coupling between bending and/or extension, and twisting so that, as it bends and extends due to the action of the aerodynamic and inertial loads, it also twists modifying the aerodynamic performance in some way. These performance modifications also have associated aeroelastic effects, including effects on aeroelastic instability. To address the scope and magnitude of these effects a tool has been developed for investigating classical flutter and divergence of HAWT blades. As a starting point, an adaptive version of the uniform Combined Experiment Blade will be investigated. Flutter and divergence airspeeds will be reported as a function of the strength of the coupling and also be compared to those of generic blade counterparts.

  17. Scaling Behavior in Twisted, Helical and Undulating Lysozyme Amyloid Fibrils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezzenga, Raffaele; Lara, Cecile; Adamcik, Jozef; Usov, Ivan; Jordens, Sophia

    2012-02-01

    We combine atomic force microscopy single-molecule statistical analysis with polymer physics concepts to study the molecular conformations of lysozyme amyloid fibrils. We use different denaturation conditions to yield amyloid fibrils of different types. At 90 C and pH2, highly laminated twisted and helical ribbons are found, in which as many as 17 protofilaments pack laterally for a total width approaching 180 nm. In the case of 60 C and pH2, we find thin, wavy fibrils, in which the scaling behavior varies at multiple length scales. We use bond and pair correlation functions, end-to-end distribution and worm-like chain model to identify 3 characteristic length scales. At short length scales there is a first bending transition of the fibrils, corresponding to a bending length Lb. At slightly larger length scales (>2Lb), the fibrils become pseudoperiodic and start to undulate. Finally, at length scales larger than the persistence length Lp, the fibrils become flexible and are well described by a 2D self-avoiding random walk. We interpret these results in terms of the periodic fluctuations of the cross-section orientation of the fibrils (twisting) and the impact these have on the area moment of inertia and the corresponding propensity of the fibrils to bend.

  18. Atomic structures and energies of grain boundaries in Mg2SiO4 forsterite from atomistic modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adjaoud, Omar; Marquardt, Katharina; Jahn, Sandro

    2012-10-01

    Grain boundaries influence many physical and chemical properties of crystalline materials. Here, we perform molecular dynamics simulations to study the structure of a series of [100] symmetric tilt grain boundaries in Mg2SiO4 forsterite. The present results show that grain boundary energies depend significantly on misorientation angle. For small misorientation angles (up to 22°), grain boundary structures consist of an array of partial edge dislocations with Burgers vector 1/2[001] associated with stacking faults and their energies can be readily fit with a model which adds the Peach-Koehler equation to the Read-Shockley dislocation model for grain boundaries. The core radius of partial dislocations and the spacing between the partials derived from grain boundary energies show that the transition from low- to high-angle grain boundaries occurs for a misorientation angle between 22° and 32°. For high misorientation angles (32.1° and 60.8°), the cores of dislocations overlap and form repeated structural units. Finally, we use a low energy atomic configuration obtained by molecular dynamics for the misorientation of 12.18° as input to simulate a high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) image. The simulated image is in good agreement with an observed HRTEM image, which indicates the power of the present approach to predict realistic atomic structures of grain boundaries in complex silicates.

  19. Twisted Fimbrial Cyst (Paraovarian Cyst): A Rare Cause of Acute Abdomen

    PubMed Central

    Rathi, Monika; Najam, Rehana; Budania, Satish Kumar; Awasthi, Seema; Ahmad, Faiyaz; Kumar, Ashutosh; Dutta, Shyamoli

    2013-01-01

    We present a case of a 22-year-old female who presented with acute abdomen and amenorrhea. Emergency laprotomy was done with a clinical diagnosis of ectopic pregnancy. On laprotomy, twisted fimbrial cysts were found. Thus, although fimbrial cysts are rarely twisted, they should be considered as a cause of acute abdomen in a female of reproductive age group. PMID:24385716

  20. Twisted fimbrial cyst (paraovarian cyst): a rare cause of acute abdomen.

    PubMed

    Rathi, Monika; Najam, Rehana; Budania, Satish Kumar; Awasthi, Seema; Ahmad, Faiyaz; Kumar, Ashutosh; Dutta, Shyamoli

    2013-01-01

    We present a case of a 22-year-old female who presented with acute abdomen and amenorrhea. Emergency laprotomy was done with a clinical diagnosis of ectopic pregnancy. On laprotomy, twisted fimbrial cysts were found. Thus, although fimbrial cysts are rarely twisted, they should be considered as a cause of acute abdomen in a female of reproductive age group.